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Sample records for americium isotopes

  1. Investigations of neutron characteristics for salt blanket models; integral fission cross section measurements of neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron characteristics of salt blanket micromodels containing eutectic mixtures of sodium, zirconium, and uranium fluorides were measured on FKBN-2M, BIGR and MAKET facilities. The effective fission cross sections of neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium isotopes were measured on the neutron spectra formed by micromodels. (author)

  2. Use of radioanalytical methods for determination of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium isotopes in radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activated charcoal is a common type of radioactive waste that contains high concentrations of fission and activation products. The management of this waste includes its characterization aiming the determination and quantification of the specific radionuclides including those known as Difficult-to-Measure Radionuclides (RDM). The analysis of the RDM's generally involves complex radiochemical analysis for purification and separation of the radionuclides, which are expensive and time-consuming. The objective of this work was to define a methodology for sequential analysis of the isotopes of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium present in a type of radioactive waste, evaluating chemical yield, analysis of time spent, amount of secondary waste generated and cost. Three methodologies were compared and validated that employ ion exchange (TI + EC), extraction chromatography (EC) and extraction with polymers (ECP). The waste chosen was the activated charcoal from the purification system of primary circuit water cooling the reactor IEA-R1. The charcoal samples were dissolved by acid digestion followed by purification and separation of isotopes with ion exchange resins, extraction and chromatographic extraction polymers. Isotopes were analyzed on an alpha spectrometer, equipped with surface barrier detectors. The chemical yields were satisfactory for the methods TI + EC and EC. ECP method was comparable with those methods only for uranium. Statistical analysis as well the analysis of time spent, amount of secondary waste generated and cost revealed that EC method is the most effective for identifying and quantifying U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm present in charcoal. (author)

  3. Preparation of americium amalgam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the method of NGR-spectroscopy with the aid of 241Am isotope chemical state of transuranium elements in the volume and on the surface of amalgams is studied. Amalgam preparation was realized in a simplified electrolytic cell. It is shown that in the process of amalgam preparation the first order of reaction as to actinide is observed; americium is distributed gradually over the volume and it is partially sorbed by the surface of glass capillary. NGR spectrum of dry residue after mercury distillation at 200 deg C points to the presence of americium-mercury intermetal compounds

  4. Isotopic and elemental composition of plutonium/americium oxides influence pulmonary and extra-pulmonary distribution after inhalation in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biodistribution of plutonium and americium has been studied in a rat model after inhalation of two PuO2 powders in lungs and extra-pulmonary organs from 3 d to 3 mo. The main difference between the two powders was the content of americium (approximately 46% and 4.5% of total alpha activity). The PuO2 with a higher proportion of americium shows an accelerated transfer of activity from lungs to blood as compared to PuO2 with the lower americium content, illustrated by increased urinary excretion and higher bone and liver actinide retention. The total alpha activity measured reflects mostly the americium biological behavior. The activity contained in epithelial lining fluid, recovered in the acellular phase of broncho-alveolar lavages, mainly contains americium, whereas plutonium remains trapped in macrophages. Epithelial lining fluid could represent a transitional pulmonary compartment prior to translocation of actinides to the blood and subsequent deposition in extra-pulmonary retention organs. In addition, differential behaviors of plutonium and americium are also observed between the PuO2 powders with a higher dissolution rate for both plutonium and americium being obtained for the PuO2 with the highest americium content. Our results indicate that the biological behavior of plutonium and americium after translocation into blood differ two-fold: (1) for the two actinides for the same PuO2 aerosol, and (2) for the same actinide from the two different aerosols. These results highlight the importance of considering the specific behavior of each contaminant after accidental pulmonary intake when assessing extra-pulmonary deposits from the level of activity excreted in urine or for therapeutic strategy decisions. (authors)

  5. Isotopic and elemental composition of plutonium/americium oxides influence pulmonary and extra-pulmonary distribution after inhalation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Meeren, A; Grémy, O

    2010-09-01

    The biodistribution of plutonium and americium has been studied in a rat model after inhalation of two PuO(2) powders in lungs and extra-pulmonary organs from 3 d to 3 mo. The main difference between the two powders was the content of americium (approximately 46% and 4.5% of total alpha activity). The PuO(2) with a higher proportion of americium shows an accelerated transfer of activity from lungs to blood as compared to PuO(2) with the lower americium content, illustrated by increased urinary excretion and higher bone and liver actinide retention. The total alpha activity measured reflects mostly the americium biological behavior. The activity contained in epithelial lining fluid, recovered in the acellular phase of broncho-alveolar lavages, mainly contains americium, whereas plutonium remains trapped in macrophages. Epithelial lining fluid could represent a transitional pulmonary compartment prior to translocation of actinides to the blood and subsequent deposition in extra-pulmonary retention organs. In addition, differential behaviors of plutonium and americium are also observed between the PuO(2) powders with a higher dissolution rate for both plutonium and americium being obtained for the PuO(2) with the highest americium content. Our results indicate that the biological behavior of plutonium and americium after translocation into blood differ two-fold: (1) for the two actinides for the same PuO(2) aerosol, and (2) for the same actinide from the two different aerosols. These results highlight the importance of considering the specific behavior of each contaminant after accidental pulmonary intake when assessing extra-pulmonary deposits from the level of activity excreted in urine or for therapeutic strategy decisions.

  6. 1976 Hanford americium accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heid, K R; Breitenstein, B D; Palmer, H E; McMurray, B J; Wald, N

    1979-01-01

    This report presents the 2.5-year medical course of a 64-year-old Hanford nuclear chemical operator who was involved in an accident in an americium recovery facility in August 1976. He was heavily externally contaminated with americium, sustained a substantial internal deposition of this isotope, and was burned with concentrated nitric acid and injured by flying debris about the face and neck. The medical care given the patient, including the decontamination efforts and clinical laboratory studies, are discussed. In-vivo measurements were used to estimate the dose rates and the accumulated doses to body organs. Urinary and fecal excreta were collected and analyzed for americium content. Interpretation of these data was complicated by the fact that the intake resulted both from inhalation and from solubilization of the americium embedded in facial tissues. A total of 1100 ..mu..Ci was excreted in urine and feces during the first 2 years following the accident. The long-term use of diethylenetriaminepentate (DTPA), used principally as the zinc salt, is discussed including the method, route of administration, and effectiveness. To date, the patient has apparently experienced no complications attributable to this extensive course of therapy, even though he has been given approximately 560 grams of DTPA. 4 figures, 1 table.

  7. Neutron capture and neutron-induced fission experiments on americium isotopes with DANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandel, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Stoyer, M. A.; Wu, C. Y.; Fowler, M. M.; Becker, J. A.; Bond, E. M.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Haslett, R. J.; Henderson, R. A.; Keksis, A. L.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Neutron capture cross section data on Am isotopes were measured using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The neutron capture cross section was determined for 241Am for neutron energies between thermal and 320 keV. Preliminary results were also obtained for 243Am for neutron energies between 10 eV and 250 keV. The results on concurrent neutron-induced fission and neutron-capture measurements on 242mAm will be presented where the fission events were actively triggered during the experiments. In these experiments, a Parallel-Plate Avalanche Counter (PPAC) detector that surrounds the target located in the center of the DANCE array was used as a fission-tagging detector to separate (n,γ) events from (n,f) events. The first direct observation of neutron capture on 242mAm in the resonance region in between 2 and 9 eV of the neutron energy was obtained.

  8. Neutron capture and neutron-induced fission experiments on americium isotopes with DANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandel, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Neutron capture cross section data on Am isotopes were measured using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The neutron capture cross section was determined for {sup 241}Am for neutron energies between thermal and 320 keV. Preliminary results were also obtained for {sup 243}Am for neutron energies between 35 eV and 200 keV. The results on concurrent neutron-induced fission and neutron-capture measurements on {sup 242m}Am will be presented, where the fission events were actively triggered during the experiments. In these experiments, the Parallel-Plate Avalanche Counter (PPAC) detector that surrounds the target located in the center of the DANCE array was used as a fission-tagging detector to separate (n,{gamma}) from (n,f) events. The first evidence of neutron capture on {sup 242m}Am in the resonance region in between 2 and 9 eV of the neutron energy was obtained.

  9. Neutron capture and neutron-induced fission experiments on americium isotopes with DANCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron capture cross section data on Am isotopes were measured using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The neutron capture cross section was determined for 241Am for neutron energies between thermal and 320 keV. Preliminary results were also obtained for 243Am for neutron energies between 35 eV and 200 keV. The results on concurrent neutron-induced fission and neutron-capture measurements on 242mAm will be presented, where the fission events were actively triggered during the experiments. In these experiments, the Parallel-Plate Avalanche Counter (PPAC) detector that surrounds the target located in the center of the DANCE array was used as a fission-tagging detector to separate (n,γ) from (n,f) events. The first evidence of neutron capture on 242mAm in the resonance region in between 2 and 9 eV of the neutron energy was obtained.

  10. Aqueous Chloride Operations Overview: Plutonium and Americium Purification/Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimball, David Bryan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Skidmore, Bradley Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-22

    Acqueous Chloride mission is to recover plutonium and americium from pyrochemical residues (undesirable form for utilization and storage) and generate plutonium oxide and americium oxide. Plutonium oxide is recycled into Pu metal production flowsheet. It is suitable for storage. Americium oxide is a valuable product, sold through the DOE-OS isotope sales program.

  11. Preparation of americium amalgam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors describe a method for the electrochemical preparation of an americium amalgam from americium dioxide and americium 241 and 243 for use in determining the physicochemical properties of the alloy. Moessbauer spectra were made using neptunium dioxide, in the neptunium 237 form, as an absorber. Results show that electrolysis produces a homogeneous amalgam that gives an unoxidized product on vacuum distillation at 200 degrees C

  12. Gamma-sources on the basis of metallic americium-241

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A batch of gamma-radiation sources has been manufactured from metallic americium-241 of isotopic purity, its activity varying from 0.08 to 0.93 GBq. The cores of the sources are high-purity americium metal condensate on a tantalum or stainless steel substrate prepared by thermal decomposition of 241Pu-241Am alloy in a high vacuum. 7 refs., 1 tab

  13. Chemistry of americium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, W.W.

    1976-01-01

    Essential features of the descriptive chemistry of americium are reviewed. Chapter titles are: discovery, atomic and nuclear properties, collateral reading, production and uses, chemistry in aqueous solution, metal, alloys, and compounds, and, recovery, separation, purification. Author and subject indexes are included. (JCB)

  14. Use of radioactive methods for determination of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium isotopes in waste radioactive; Utilizacao de metodos radioanaliticos para determinacao de isotopos de uranio, netunio, plutonio, americio e curio em rejeitos radioativos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geraldo, Bianca

    2012-07-01

    Activated charcoal is a common type of radioactive waste that contains high concentrations of fission and activation products. The management of this waste includes its characterization aiming the determination and quantification of the specific radionuclides including those known as Difficult-to-Measure Radionuclides (RDM). The analysis of the RDM's generally involves complex radiochemical analysis for purification and separation of the radionuclides, which are expensive and time-consuming. The objective of this work was to define a methodology for sequential analysis of the isotopes of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium present in a type of radioactive waste, evaluating chemical yield, analysis of time spent, amount of secondary waste generated and cost. Three methodologies were compared and validated that employ ion exchange (TI+EC), extraction chromatography (EC) and extraction with polymers (ECP). The waste chosen was the activated charcoal from the purification system of primary circuit water cooling the reactor IEA-R1. The charcoal samples were dissolved by acid digestion followed by purification and separation of isotopes with ion exchange resins, extraction and chromatographic extraction polymers. Isotopes were analyzed on an alpha spectrometer, equipped with surface barrier detectors. The chemical yields were satisfactory for the methods TI+EC and EC. ECP method was comparable with those methods only for uranium. Statistical analysis as well the analysis of time spent, amount of secondary waste generated and cost revealed that EC method is the most effective for identifying and quantifying U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm present in charcoal. (author)

  15. The Biokinetic Model of Americium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    To improve in vivo measurements for detecting internal exposure from transuranium radio nuclides, such as neptunium, plutonium, americium, the bioknetic model was studied. According to ICRP report (1993, 1995, 1997) and other research, the

  16. Americium product solidification and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The americium product from the TRUEX processing plant needs to be converted into a form suitable for ultimate disposal. An evaluation of the disposal based on safety, number of process steps, demonstrated operability of the processes, production of low-level alpha waste streams, and simplicity of maintenance with low radiation exposures to personnel during maintenance, has been made. The best process is to load the americium on a cation exchange resin followed by calcination or oxidation of the resin after loading

  17. I. Nuclear Production Reaction and Chemical Isolation Procedure for Americium-240 II. New Superheavy Element Isotopes: Plutonium-242(Calcium-48,5n)(285)114

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Paul Andrew

    2011-12-01

    Part I discusses the study of a new nuclear reaction and chemical separation procedure for the production of 240Am. Thin 242Pu, natTi, and natNi targets were coincidently activated with protons from the 88-Inch Cyclotron, producing 240Am, 48V, and 57Ni, respectively. The radioactive decay of these isotopes was monitored using high-purity Ge gamma ray detectors in the weeks following irradiation. The excitation function for the 242 Pu(p, 3n)240Am nuclear reaction was measured to be lower than theoretical predictions, but high enough to be the most viable nuclear reaction for the large-scale production of 240 Am. Details of the development of a chemical separation procedure for isolating 240Am from proton-irradiated 242Pu are discussed. The separation procedure, which includes two anion exchange columns and two extraction chromatography columns, was experimentally investi- gated using tracer-level 241Am, 239Pu, and model proton-induced fission products 95Zr, 95Nb, 125Sb, and 152Eu. The separation procedure was shown to have an Am/Pu separation factor of >2x10 7 and an Am yield of ˜70%. The separation procedure was found to purify the Am sample from >99.9% of Eu, Zr, Nb, and Sb. The procedure is well suited for the processing of ˜1 gram of proton-irradiated 242Pu to produce a neutron-induced fission target consisting of tens of nanograms of 240Am. Part II describes the use of the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron for the study of the 242Pu(48Ca,5n)285114 nuclear re- action. The new, neutron-deficient, superheavy element isotope 285114 was produced in 48Ca irradiations of 242Pu targets at a center-of-target beam energy of 256 MeV ( E* = 50 MeV). The alpha decay of 285114 was followed by the sequential alpha decay of four daughter nuclides, 281Cn, 277Ds, 273Hs, and 269 Sg. 265Rf was observed to decay by spontaneous fission. The measured alpha-decay Q-values were compared with those from a macroscopic

  18. Distribution of uranium, americium and plutonium in the biomass of freshwater macrophytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zotina, T.A.; Kalacheva, G.S.; Bolsunovsky, A.YA. [Institute of Biophysics SB RAS, Akademgorodok, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    Accumulation of uranium ({sup 238}U), americium ({sup 241}Am) and plutonium ({sup 242}Pu) and their distribution in cell compartments and biochemical components of the biomass of aquatic plants Elodea canadensis, Ceratophyllum demersum, Myrioplyllum spicatum and aquatic moss Fontinalis antipyretica have been investigated in laboratory batch experiments. Isotopes of uranium, americium and plutonium taken up from the water by Elodea canadensis apical shoots were mainly absorbed by cell walls, plasmalemma and organelles. A small portion of isotopes (about 6-13 %) could be dissolved in cytoplasm. The major portion (76-92 %) of americium was bound to cell wall cellulose-like polysaccharides of Elodea canadensis, Myriophyllum spicatum, Ceratophyllum demersum and Fontinalis antipyretica, 8-23 % of americium activity was registered in the fraction of proteins and carbohydrates, and just a small portion (< 1%) in lipid fraction. The distribution of plutonium in the biomass fraction of Elodea was similar to that of americium. Hence, americium and plutonium had the highest affinity to cellulose-like polysaccharides in Elodea biomass. Distribution of uranium in the biomass of Elodea differed essentially from that of transuranium elements: a considerable portion of uranium was recorded in the fraction of protein and carbohydrates (51 %). From our data we can assume that uranium has higher affinity to carbohydrates than proteins. (authors)

  19. Synthesis and characterization of uranium-americium mixed oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Americium isotopes represent a significant part of high-level and long-lived nuclear waste in spent fuels. Among the envisaged reprocessing scenarios, their transmutation in fast neutron reactors using uranium-americium mixed-oxide pellets (U1-xAmxO2±δ) is a promising option which would help decrease the ecological footprint of ultimate waste repository sites. In this context, this thesis is dedicated to the study of such compounds over a wide range of americium contents (7.5 at.% ≤ Am/(U+Am) ≤ 70 at.%), with an emphasis on their fabrication from single-oxide precursors and the assessment of their structural and thermodynamic stabilities, also taking self-irradiation effects into account. Results highlight the main influence of americium reduction to Am(+III), not only on the mechanisms of solid-state formation of the U1-xAmxO2±δ solid solution, but also on the stabilization of oxidized uranium cations and the formation of defects in the oxygen sublattice such as vacancies and cub-octahedral clusters. In addition, the data acquired concerning the stability of U1-xAmxO2±δ compounds (existence of a miscibility gap, vaporization behavior) were compared to calculations based on new thermodynamic modelling of the U-Am-O ternary system. Finally, α-self-irradiation-induced structural effects on U1-xAmxO2±δ compounds were analyzed using XRD, XAS and TEM, allowing the influence of americium content on the structural swelling to be studied as well as the description of the evolution of radiation-induced structural defects. (author)

  20. Recovery of americium-241 from aged plutonium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After separation and purification, both actinides were precipitated as oxalates and calcined. A large-scale process was developed using dissolution, separation, purification, precipitation, and calcination. Efforts were made to control corrosion, to avoid product contamination, to keep the volume of process and waste solutions manageable, and to denitrate solutions with formic acid. The Multipurpose Processing Facility (MPPF), designed for recovery of transplutonium isotopes, was used for the first time for the precipitation and calcination of americium. Also, for the first time,, large-scale formic acid denitration was performed in a canyon vessel at SRP

  1. Analytical performance of radiochemical method for americium determination in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an analytical method developed and adapted for separation and analysis of Plutonium (Pu) isotopes and Americium (Am) in urine samples. The proposed method will attend the demand of internal exposure monitoring program for workers involved mainly with dismantling rods and radioactive smoke detectors. In this experimental procedure four steps are involved as preparation of samples, sequential radiochemical separation, preparation of the source for electroplating and quantification by alpha spectrometry. In the first stage of radiochemical separation, plutonium is conventionally isolated employing the anion exchange technique. Americium isolation is achieved sequentially by chromatographic extraction (Tru.spec column) from the load and rinse solutions coming from the anion exchange column. The 243Am tracer is added into the sample as chemical yield monitors and to correct the results improving the precision and accuracy. The mean recovery obtained is 60%, and the detection limit for 24h urine sample is 1.0 mBq L-1 in accordance with the literature. Based in the preliminary results, the method is appropriate to be used in monitoring programme of workers with a potential risk of internal contamination. (author)

  2. Spectrochemical analysis of curium and americium samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectrochemical procedures have been developed to determine impurities in americium and curium samples. The simultaneous separation of many impurity elements from the base material (americium and curium) is carried out with extraction and extraction-chromatographic methods using di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid. It is shown that part of the elements are separated with extraction or sorption of americium and curium; the other part with the Talspeak process. Two fractions in the extraction chromatography and three fractions in the extraction separation of americium and curium, containing impurities, are analyzed separately by a.c. or d.c. arc spectrography. To increase the sensitivity of the spectrographic analysis and accelerate the burn-up of impurities from the crater of the carbon electrode bismuth fluoride and sodium chloride were used as chemically active substances. The extraction of impurities from weighed quantities of americium and curium samples of 5 to 10 mg permits the lower limit of determined impurity concentrations to be extended to 1 x 10-4 to 5 x 10-3% m/m. (author)

  3. The distribution of plutonium-239 and americium-241 in the Syrian hamster following its intravenous administration as citrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actinide distribution in various tissues and the skeleton of hamsters by liquid scintillation counting or isotope dilution. For plutonium 57% of activity was concentrated in the skeleton and more than 90% in the liver and skeleton after seven days. For americium the liver retained more than 50% of total activity and 25% was excreted in urine within seven days. (U.K.)

  4. Pyrochemical technology of plutonium and americium preparation and purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyrochemical tecnology of metallic plutonium and americium preparation and purification is considered. Investigations into plutonium dioxide reduction up to metal; plutonium electrolytic refining in molten salts; plutonium extraction from the molten salts and preparation of americium dioxide and metallic americium from its tetrafluoride are described

  5. Pretreatment of americium/curium solutions for vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification will be used to stabilize an americium/curium (Am/Cm) solution presently stored in F-Canyon for eventual transport to the heavy isotope programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Prior to vitrification, an in-tank oxalate precipitation and a series of oxalic/nitric acid washes will be used to separate these elements and lanthanide fission products from the bulk of the uranium and metal impurities present in the solution. Pretreatment development experiments were performed to understand the behavior of the lanthanides and the metal impurities during the oxalate precipitation and properties of the precipitate slurry. The results of these experiments will be used to refine the target glass composition allowing optimization of the primary processing parameters and design of the solution transfer equipment

  6. 1976 Hanford americium exposure incident: psychological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accidents involving exposure to radiation or radioactive materials may involve an unusual degree of emotional trauma. Methods that may be employed in dealing with such trauma are discussed in relation to a specific accident in which a radiation worker was injured and seriously contaminated with americium-241

  7. Analysis of americium-beryllium neutron source composition using the FRAM code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hypes, P. A. (Philip A.); Bracken, D. S. (David S.); Sampson, Thomas E.; Taylor, W. A. (Wayne A.)

    2002-01-01

    The FRAM code was originally developed to analyze high-resolution gamma spectra from plutonium items. Its capabilities have since been expanded to include analysis of uranium spectra. The flexibility of the software also enables a capable spectroscopist to use FRAM to analyze spectra in which neither plutonium nor uranium is present in significant amounts. This paper documents the use of FRAM to determine the {sup 239}Pu/{sup 241}Am, {sup 243}Am/{sup 241}Am, {sup 237}Np/{sup 241}Am, and {sup 239}Np/{sup 241}Am ratios in americium-beryllium neutron sources. The effective specific power of each neutron source was calculated from the ratios determined by FRAM in order to determine the americium mass of each of these neutron sources using calorimetric assay. We will also discuss the use of FRAM for the general case of isotopic analysis of nonplutonium, nonuranium items.

  8. Plutonium and americium in sediments of Lithuanian lakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assessment of contribution of the global and the Chernobyl NPP (Nuclear Power Plant) accident plutonium and americium to plutonium pollution in sediments of Lithuanian lakes is presented. Theoretical evaluation of activity ratios of 238Pu/239+240Pu and 241Pu/239+240Pu in the reactor of unit 4 of the Chernobyl NPP before the accident was performed by means of the ORIGEN-ARP code from the SCALE 4.4A program package. Non-uniform distribution of radionuclides in depositions on the Lithuanian territory after nuclear weapon tests and the Chernobyl NPP accident is experimentally observed by measuring the lake sediment pollution with actinides. The activity concentration of sediments polluted with plutonium ranges from 2.0 ± 0.5 Bq/kg d.w. (dry weight) in Lake Asavelis to 14 ± 2 Bq/kg d.w. in Lake Juodis. The ratio of activity concentrations of plutonium isotopes 238Pu/239+240Pu measured by α-spectrometry in the 10-cm-thick upper layer of bottom sediment varies from 0.03 in Lake Juodis to 0.3 in Lake Zuvintas. The analysis of the ratio values shows that the deposition of the Chernobyl origin plutonium is prevailing in southern and south-western regions of Lithuania. Plutonium of nuclear weapon tests origin in sediments of lakes is observed on the whole territory of Lithuania, and it is especially distinct in central Lithuania. The americium activity due to 241Pu decay after the Chernobyl NPP accident and global depositions in bottom sediments of Lithuanian lakes has been evaluated to be from 0.9 to 5.7 Bq/kg. (author)

  9. Final Radiological Assessment of External Exposure for CLEAR-Line Americium Recovery Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Adam C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Belooussova, Olga N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hetrick, Lucas Duane [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-11-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is currently planning to implement an americium recovery program. The americium, ordinarily isotopically pure 241Am, would be extracted from existing Pu materials, converted to an oxide and shipped to support fabrication of americium oxide-beryllium neutron sources. These operations would occur in the currently proposed Chloride Extraction and Actinide Recovery (CLEAR) line of glove boxes. This glove box line would be collocated with the currently-operational Experimental Chloride Extraction Line (EXCEL). The focus of this document is to provide an in-depth assessment of the currently planned radiation protection measures and to determine whether or not further design work is required to satisfy design-goal and ALARA requirements. Further, this document presents a history of americium recovery operations in the Department of Energy and high-level descriptions of the CLEAR line operations to provide a basis of comparison. Under the working assumptions adopted by this study, it was found that the evaluated design appears to mitigate doses to a level that satisfies the ALARA-in-design requirements of 10 CFR 835 as implemented by the Los Alamos National Laboratory procedure P121. The analyses indicate that extremity doses would also meet design requirements. Dose-rate calculations were performed using the radiation transport code MCNP5 and doses were estimated using a time-motion study developed in consort with the subject matter expert. A copy of this report and all supporting documentation are located on the Radiological Engineering server at Y:\\Rad Engineering\\2013 PROJECTS\\TA-55 Clear Line.

  10. Incentives for transmutation of americium in thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes possible benefits when americium is irradiated in a thermal reactor. If all plutonium is partitioned from spent fuel, americium is the main contributor to the radiotoxicity of spent fuel upto several thousands of years of storage. It is shown that americium can be transmuted to other nuclides upon irradiation in a thermal reactor, leading to a 50% reduction of the radiotoxicity of neptunium, which can be an important contributor to the dose due to leakage of nuclides after one million years of storage. The radiotoxicity of americium can be reduced considerably after irradiation for 3 to 6 years in a thermal reactor with thermal neutron flux of 1014 cm-2s-1. The strongly α and neutron emitting transmutation products can most probably not be recycled again, so a transmutation process is suggested in which americium is irradiated for 3 to 6 years and then put to final storage. It is shown that the radiotoxicity of the transmuation products after a storage time of about one hundred years can be considerably reduced compared to the radiotoxicity of the initial americium. The same holds for the α activity and heat emission of the transmutation products. Because plutonium in spent fuel contributes for about 80% to the radiotoxicity upto 105 years of storage, recycling and transmutation of plutonium has first priority. Transmutation of americium is only meaningful when the radiotoxicity of plutonium is reduced far below the radiotoxicity of americium. (orig.)

  11. Surface complexation modeling of americium sorption onto volcanic tuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, M; Kelkar, S; Meijer, A

    2014-10-01

    Results of a surface complexation model (SCM) for americium sorption on volcanic rocks (devitrified and zeolitic tuff) are presented. The model was developed using PHREEQC and based on laboratory data for americium sorption on quartz. Available data for sorption of americium on quartz as a function of pH in dilute groundwater can be modeled with two surface reactions involving an americium sulfate and an americium carbonate complex. It was assumed in applying the model to volcanic rocks from Yucca Mountain, that the surface properties of volcanic rocks can be represented by a quartz surface. Using groundwaters compositionally representative of Yucca Mountain, americium sorption distribution coefficient (Kd, L/Kg) values were calculated as function of pH. These Kd values are close to the experimentally determined Kd values for americium sorption on volcanic rocks, decreasing with increasing pH in the pH range from 7 to 9. The surface complexation constants, derived in this study, allow prediction of sorption of americium in a natural complex system, taking into account the inherent uncertainty associated with geochemical conditions that occur along transport pathways.

  12. Electrochemical oxidation of americium in nitric medium: study of reaction mechanisms; Oxydation de l'americium par voie electrochimique: etude des mecanismes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picart, S.; Chartier, D.; Donnet, L.; Adnet, J.M. [CEA Valrho, (DCC/DRRV/SPHA), 30 - Marcoule (France)

    2000-07-01

    One alternative selected by the CEA for partitioning minor actinides from aqueous solutions containing fission products is the selective extraction of oxidized americium. This is the SESAME process (Selective Extraction and Separation of Americium by Means of Electrolysis) aimed to convert americium to oxidation state (VI) and then extract it with a specific extractant of high valences. This paper presents the study of the electrochemical oxidation of americium in nitric medium which represents an important stage of the process. The reaction can be divided into two main steps: oxidation of americium (III) to americium (IV), and then of americium (IV) to americium (VI). For the first oxidation step, a ligand L is needed to stabilize the intermediate species americium (IV) which disproportionates in its free form into americium (III) and (V). Phospho-tungstate or silico-tungstate are appropriate ligands because they are stable in concentrated nitric acid and show a great affinity for metallic cations at oxidation state (IV) (Table 1 lists the stability constants of americium (IV) complexes). The presence of the lacunary poly-anion lowers the potential of the americium (IV) / americium (Ill) redox pair (see Figure 5 for the diagram of the apparent formal potential of americium versus ligand concentration). This makes it thermodynamically possible to oxidize americium (III) into americium (IV) at the anode of an electrolyzer in nitric acid. For the second oxidation step, a strong oxidant redox mediator, like silver (II), is needed to convert complexed americium at oxidation state (IV) to oxidation state (V). The AmVL complex is then hydrolyzed to yield americyle (V) aqua ion. A spectroscopic Raman study with {sup 18}O labeled species showed that the oxygen atoms of the americyle moiety came from water. This indicates that water hydrolyzes the americium (V) complex to produce americyle (V) aqua ion, AmO{sub 2}{sup +}. This cation reacts with silver (Il) to give

  13. Higher Americium Oxidation State Research Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mincher, Bruce J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Law, Jack D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Goff, George S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moyer, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burns, Jon D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lumetta, Gregg J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sinkov, Sergey I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shehee, Thomas C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hobbs, David T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-12-18

    The partitioning of hexavalent Am from dissolved nuclear fuel requires the ability to efficiently oxidize Am(III) to Am(VI) and to maintain that oxidation state for a length of time sufficient to perform the separation. Several oxidants have been, or are being developed. Chemical oxidants include Ag-catalyzed ozone, Ag-catalyzed peroxydisulfate, Cu(III) periodate, and sodium bismuthate. Hexavalent americium has also now successfully been prepared by electrolysis, using functionalized electrodes. So-called auto-reduction rates of Am(VI) are sufficiently slow to allow for separations. However, for separations based on solvent extraction or ion exchange using organic resins, the high valence state must be maintained under the reducing conditions of the organic phase contact, and a holding oxidant is probably necessary. Until now, only Cu(III) periodate and sodium bismuthate oxidation have been successfully combined with solvent extraction separations. Bismuthate oxidation provided the higher DAm, since it acts as its own holding oxidant, and a successful hot test using centrifugal contactors was performed. For the other oxidants, Ag-catalyzed peroxydisulfate will not oxidize americium in nitric acid concentrations above 0.3 M, and it is not being further investigated. Peroxydisulfate in the absence of Ag catalysis is being used to prepare Am(V) in ion exchange work, discussed below. Preliminary work with Ag-catalyzed ozone has been unsuccessful for extractions of Am(VI) from 6.5 M HNO3, and only one attempt at extraction, also from 6.5 M HNO3, using the electrolytic oxidation has been attempted. However, this high acid concentration was based on the highest Am extraction efficiency using the bismuthate oxidant; which is only sparingly soluble, and thus the oxidation yield is based on bismuthate solubility. Lower acid concentrations may be sufficient with alternative oxidants and work with Ag-ozone, Cu(III) and electrolysis is on-going. Two non

  14. Plutonium and Americium Geochemistry at Hanford: A Site Wide Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2012-08-23

    This report was produced to provide a systematic review of the state-of-knowledge of plutonium and americium geochemistry at the Hanford Site. The report integrates existing knowledge of the subsurface migration behavior of plutonium and americium at the Hanford Site with available information in the scientific literature regarding the geochemistry of plutonium and americium in systems that are environmentally relevant to the Hanford Site. As a part of the report, key research needs are identified and prioritized, with the ultimate goal of developing a science-based capability to quantitatively assess risk at sites contaminated with plutonium and americium at the Hanford Site and the impact of remediation technologies and closure strategies.

  15. Mixed chelation therapy for removal of plutonium and americium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron-binding compounds, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA), 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (HBA), and 2-(acetyloxy)benzoic acid (ABA), were tested for their ability to remove americium and plutonium from rats following intraperitioneal injection of the radionuclides as citrates (pH 5). Treatments, 2 mmol/kg, were given on days 3, 6, 10, 12 and 14 following the actinide injection. DHBA and HBA caused about a 20% decrease in liver retention of americium compared to the control value, and DHB caused a similar effect for plutonium. The above agents, co-administered with 0.5 mmol polyaminopolycarboxylic acid (PAPCA)-type chelons, did not change tissue retention of americium and plutonium from that due to the PAPCAs alone. Administration of americium and plutonium to the same rats is useful for studying removal agents since the two actinides behave independently in their biological disposition and response to removal

  16. Aqueous Chloride Operations Overview: Plutonium and Americium Purification/Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, Kyle Shelton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kimball, David Bryan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Skidmore, Bradley Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-28

    These are a set of slides intended for an information session as part of recruiting activities at Brigham Young University. It gives an overview of aqueous chloride operations, specifically on plutonium and americium purification/recovery. This presentation details the steps taken perform these processes, from plutonium size reduction, dissolution, solvent extraction, oxalate precipitation, to calcination. For Americium recovery, it details the CLEAR (chloride extraction and actinide recovery) Line, oxalate precipitation and calcination.

  17. Pyrochemical investigations into recovering plutonium from americium extraction salt residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress into developing a pyrochemical technique for separating and recovering plutonium from spent americium extraction waste salts has concentrated on selective chemical reduction with lanthanum metal and calcium metal and on the solvent extraction of americium with calcium metal. Both techniques are effective for recovering plutonium from the waste salt, although neither appears suitable as a separation technique for recycling a plutonium stream back to mainline purification processes. 17 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Electrochemical oxidation of americium in nitric medium: study of reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One alternative selected by the CEA for partitioning minor actinides from aqueous solutions containing fission products is the selective extraction of oxidized americium. This is the SESAME process (Selective Extraction and Separation of Americium by Means of Electrolysis) aimed to convert americium to oxidation state (VI) and then extract it with a specific extractant of high valences. This paper presents the study of the electrochemical oxidation of americium in nitric medium which represents an important stage of the process. The reaction can be divided into two main steps: oxidation of americium (III) to americium (IV), and then of americium (IV) to americium (VI). For the first oxidation step, a ligand L is needed to stabilize the intermediate species americium (IV) which disproportionates in its free form into americium (III) and (V). Phospho-tungstate or silico-tungstate are appropriate ligands because they are stable in concentrated nitric acid and show a great affinity for metallic cations at oxidation state (IV) (Table 1 lists the stability constants of americium (IV) complexes). The presence of the lacunary poly-anion lowers the potential of the americium (IV) / americium (Ill) redox pair (see Figure 5 for the diagram of the apparent formal potential of americium versus ligand concentration). This makes it thermodynamically possible to oxidize americium (III) into americium (IV) at the anode of an electrolyzer in nitric acid. For the second oxidation step, a strong oxidant redox mediator, like silver (II), is needed to convert complexed americium at oxidation state (IV) to oxidation state (V). The AmVL complex is then hydrolyzed to yield americyle (V) aqua ion. A spectroscopic Raman study with 18O labeled species showed that the oxygen atoms of the americyle moiety came from water. This indicates that water hydrolyzes the americium (V) complex to produce americyle (V) aqua ion, AmO2+. This cation reacts with silver (Il) to give americyle (VI) ion. Figure

  19. Applicability of insoluble tannin to treatment of waste containing americium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applicability of insoluble tannin adsorbent to the treatment of aqueous waste contaminated with americium has been investigated. Insoluble tannin is considered highly applicable because it consists of only carbon, hydrogen and oxygen and so its volume can be easily reduced by incineration. This report describes measurements of the americium distribution coefficient in low concentration nitric acid. The americium distribution coefficients were found to decrease with increasing concentration of nitric acid and sodium nitrate, and with increasing temperature. At 25 C in 2.0 x 10-3 M HNO3, the distribution coefficient was found to be 2000 ml g-1. The adsorption capacity was determined by column experiments using europium as a simulant of americium, and found to be 7 x 10-3 mmol g-1-dried tannin in 0.01 M HNO3 at 25 C, which corresponds to approximately 1.7 mg-241Am/g-adsorbent(dried). The prospect of applying the adsorbent to the treatment of aqueous waste contaminated with americium appears promising. (orig.)

  20. Salvage of plutonium-and americium-contaminated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melt-slagging techniques were evaluated as a decontamination and consolidation step for metals contaminated with oxides of plutonium and americium. Experiments were performed in which mild steel, stainless steel, and nickel metals contaminated with oxides of plutonium and americium were melted in the presence of silicate slags of various compositions. The metal products were low in contamination, with the plutonium and americium strongly fractionated to the slags. Partition coefficients (plutonium in slag/plutonium in steel) of 7*10/sup 6/ with borosilicate slag and 3*10/sup 6/ for calcium, magnesium silicate slag were measured. Decontamination of metals containing as much as 14,000 p.p.m. plutonium appears to be as efficient as that of metals with plutonium levels of 400 p.p.m. Staged extraction, that is, a remelting of processed metal with clean slag, results in further decontamination of the metal. 10 refs

  1. Standard practice for The separation of americium from plutonium by ion exchange

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This practice describes the use of an ion exchange technique to separate plutonium from solutions containing low concentrations of americium prior to measurement of the 241Am by gamma counting. 1.2 This practice covers the removal of plutonium, but not all the other radioactive isotopes that may interfere in the determination of 241Am. 1.3 This practice can be used when 241Am is to be determined in samples in which the plutonium is in the form of metal, oxide, or other solid provided that the solid is appropriately sampled and dissolved (See Test Methods C758, C759, and C1168). 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  2. Discovery of Isotopes of the Transuranium Elements with 93 <= Z <= 98

    CERN Document Server

    Fry, C

    2012-01-01

    One hundred and five isotopes of the transuranium elements neptunium, plutonium, americium, curium, berkelium and californium have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  3. 1976 Hanford americium exposure incident: overview and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salient features of the 1976 Hanford americium exposure incident are discussed. Comparisons are made with previous human and animal exposure data, and conclusions drawn relative to the injured workman, to health physics practices, and to the adequacy of current exposure limits

  4. Reduction Rates for Higher Americium Oxidation States in Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, Travis Shane [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mincher, Bruce Jay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schmitt, Nicholas C [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The stability of hexavalent americium was measured using multiple americium concentrations and nitric acid concentrations after contact with the strong oxidant sodium bismuthate. Contrary to our hypotheses Am(VI) was not reduced faster at higher americium concentrations, and the reduction was only zero-order at short time scales. Attempts to model the reduction kinetics using zero order kinetic models showed Am(VI) reduction in nitric acid is more complex than the autoreduction processes reported by others in perchloric acid. The classical zero-order reduction of Am(VI) was found here only for short times on the order of a few hours. We did show that the rate of Am(V) production was less than the rate of Am(VI) reduction, indicating that some Am(VI) undergoes two electron-reduction to Am(IV). We also monitored the Am(VI) reduction in contact with the organic diluent dodecane. A direct comparison of these results with those in the absence of the organic diluent showed the reduction rates for Am(VI) were not statistically different for both systems. Additional americium oxidations conducted in the presence of Ce(IV)/Ce(III) ions showed that Am(VI) is reduced without the typical growth of Am(V) observed in the systems sans Ce ion. This was an interesting result which suggests a potential new reduction/oxidation pathway for Am in the presence of Ce; however, these results were very preliminary, and will require additional experiments to understand the mechanism by which this occurs. Overall, these studies have shown that hexavalent americium is fundamentally stable enough in nitric acid to run a separations process. However, the complicated nature of the reduction pathways based on the system components is far from being rigorously understood.

  5. Stability of penta- and hexavalent americium in the solutions of sodium peroxydisulfate and sodium bromate at intensive internal α-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectrometric method has been used for studying the dependence of the rates of radiolytic reduction of Am(5) and (6) on the initial concentration of sodium persulfate and bromate, Am(5) and (6), acidity, and the dose rate of inner alpha-irradiation of the solutions. The high dose rates of inner alpha-irradiation of solutions (up to 3.25x1021 eV/lxmin-250Ci/l) have been attained with the aid of curium isotopes. The stability of americium (6) ions towards the action of ionizing radiation in solutions of sodium persulfate and bromate has been shown to be considerable lower than that of americium (5). The chemical difference has been shown in radiolytic behaviour between Am(5) and Am(6) ions in solutions of sodium persulfate and bromate. The equations have been derived showing the dependence of the rates of Am(6) and Am(5) reduction of different variables

  6. THE FIRST ISOLATION OF AMERICIUM IN THE FORM OF PURE COMPOUNDS - THE SPECIFIC ALPHA-ACTIVITY AND HALF-LIFE OF Am241

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, B.B.; Asprey, L.B.

    1950-07-20

    The microgram scale isolation and preparation of pure compounds of americium is described. Data are presented to show that the alpha-half-life of the isotope Am{sup 241} is 490 {+-} 14 years. The absorption spectrum of Am(III) in 1M nitric acid in the range 3500-8000 mu is given. The wave lengths of 10 of the most prominent lines in the copper spark emission spectrum of americium are given to the nearest 0.01 {angstrom}. Evidence is presented to show that the potential for the Am(III)-Am(IV) couple in acid solution is more negative than -2v and that the potential for the Am(II)-Am(III) couple is more positive than +0.9v.

  7. Neptunium and americium control for international non-proliferation regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was decided in the IAEA Board of Governors Meeting held in Sept. 1999 that Neptunium and Americium could be diverted for manufacturing nuclear weapon or explosives, so that appropriate measures should be taken for the prevention of proliferation of these materials. It is expected to take relatively long time for settling down the aligned system dealing with the above materials because the present regulatory statement was prepared on the basis of voluntary offers from the States concerned. The necessity of preventive measures is being convinced among Member States, but it would not be easy to take voluntary participation in detail because of their respective interests. It is expected that this paper could contribute to the effective response as to the international commitments as well as for protecting the domestic nuclear industry and R and D area through analysis on the IAEA's approach on Neptunium and Americium

  8. Thermophysical properties of americium-containing barium plutonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycrystalline specimens of americium-containing barium plutonate have been prepared by mixing the appropriate amounts of (Pu0.91Am0.09)O2 and BaCO3 powders followed by reacting and sintering at 1600 K under the flowing gas atmosphere of dry-air. The sintered specimens had a single phase of orthorhombic perovskite structure and were crack-free. Elastic moduli were determined from longitudinal and shear sound velocities. Debye temperature was also determined from sound velocities and lattice parameter measurements. Thermal conductivity was calculated from measured density at room temperature, literature values of heat capacity and thermal diffusivity measured by laser flash method in vacuum. Thermal conductivity of americium-containing barium plutonate was roughly independent of temperature and registered almost the same magnitude as that of BaPuO3 and BaUO3. (author)

  9. 1976 Hanford americium-exposure incident: decontamination and treatment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An injured worker, contaminated with over 6 mCi of americium-241, required special treatment and housing for 4 months. This paper is a description of the design and management of the facility in which most of the treatment and housing occurred. The problems associated with contamination control, waste handling, supplies, and radiological concerns during the two-stage transfer of the patient from a controlled situation to his normal living environment are discussed in detail

  10. Ingestion Pathway Transfer Factors for Plutonium and Americium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-07-28

    Overall transfer factors for major ingestion pathways are derived for plutonium and americium. These transfer factors relate the radionuclide concentration in a given foodstuff to deposition on the soil. Equations describing basic relationships consistent with Regulatory Guide 1.109 are followed. Updated values and coefficients from IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 364 are used when a available. Preference is given to using factors specific to the Savannah River Site.

  11. Method for removal of plutonium impurity from americium oxides and fluorides

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzPatrick, John R.; Dunn, Jerry G.; Avens, Larry R.

    1987-01-01

    Method for removal of plutonium impurity from americium oxides and fluorides. AmF.sub.4 is not further oxidized to AmF.sub.6 by the application of O.sub.2 F at room temperature, while plutonium compounds present in the americium sample are fluorinated to volatile PuF.sub.6, which can readily be separated therefrom, leaving the purified americium oxides and/or fluorides as the solid tetrafluoride.

  12. Gut uptake factors for plutonium, americium and curium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on estimates of the absorption of plutonium, americium and curium from the human gut based on measurements of uptake in other mammalian species are reviewed. It is proposed that for all adult members of the public ingesting low concentrations of plutonium in food and water, 0.05% would be an appropriate value of absorption except when the conditions of exposure are known and a lower value can be justified. For dietary intakes of americium and curium, the available data do not warrant a change from the ICRP value of 0.05%. For newborn children ingesting americium, curium and soluble forms of plutonium, a value of 1% absorption is proposed for the first 3 months of life during which the infant is maintained on a milk diet. It is proposed that a value of 0.5% should be used for the first year of life to take account of the gradual maturation of the gut. In considering the ingestion of insoluble oxides of plutonium by infants, it is proposed that absorption is taken as 0.1% for the first 3 months and 0.05% for the first year. (author)

  13. Airborne plutonium-239 and americium-241 concentrations measured from the 125-meter Hanford Meteorological Tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airborne plutonium-239 and americium-241 concentrations and fluxes were measured at six heights from 1.9 to 122 m on the Hanford meteorological tower. The data show that plutonium-239 was transported on nonrespirable and small particles at all heights. Airborne americium-241 concentrations on small particles were maximum at the 91 m height

  14. 10 CFR 31.8 - Americium-241 and radium-226 in the form of calibration or reference sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Americium-241 and radium-226 in the form of calibration or... BYPRODUCT MATERIAL § 31.8 Americium-241 and radium-226 in the form of calibration or reference sources. (a..., americium-241 or radium-226 in the form of calibration or reference sources: (1) Any person in a...

  15. Uncertainty analysis of doses from ingestion of plutonium and americium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puncher, M; Harrison, J D

    2012-02-01

    Uncertainty analyses have been performed on the biokinetic model for americium currently used by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and the model for plutonium recently derived by Leggett, considering acute intakes by ingestion by adult members of the public. The analyses calculated distributions of doses per unit intake. Those parameters having the greatest impact on prospective doses were identified by sensitivity analysis; the most important were the fraction absorbed from the alimentary tract, f(1), and rates of uptake from blood to bone surfaces. Probability distributions were selected based on the observed distribution of plutonium and americium in human subjects where possible; the distributions for f(1) reflected uncertainty on the average value of this parameter for non-specified plutonium and americium compounds ingested by adult members of the public. The calculated distributions of effective doses for ingested (239)Pu and (241)Am were well described by log-normal distributions, with doses varying by around a factor of 3 above and below the central values; the distributions contain the current ICRP Publication 67 dose coefficients for ingestion of (239)Pu and (241)Am by adult members of the public. Uncertainty on f(1) values had the greatest impact on doses, particularly effective dose. It is concluded that: (1) more precise data on f(1) values would have a greater effect in reducing uncertainties on doses from ingested (239)Pu and (241)Am, than reducing uncertainty on other model parameter values and (2) the results support the dose coefficients (Sv Bq(-1) intake) derived by ICRP for ingestion of (239)Pu and (241)Am by adult members of the public.

  16. Effect of 241-americium on bone marrow stroma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regulation of haemopoiesis occurs via complex interactions between the stroma and the haemopoietic cells. An attempt to further clarifying the mechanisms and the exact role of the stroma in the regulation was made in a study. Results revealed that the murine bone marrow stromal cells are highly radiosensitive after injection with 241-americium and can thus be considered as a target population after internal contamination. In addition, observations are made which may be important for risk estimation for the developing animal and during pregnancy. Contamination in utero and by lactation shows persistent damage up to 1 year after contamination at an average annual dose of 5 cGy. (author)

  17. Preferential decorporation of americium by pulmonary administration of DTPA dry powder after inhalation of aged PuO2 containing americium in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After inhalation of plutonium oxides containing various percentages of americium in rats, we identified an acellular transient pulmonary compartment, the epithelial lining fluid (ELF), in which a fraction of actinide oxides dissolve prior to absorption and subsequent extrapulmonary deposit. Chelation therapy is usually considered to be poorly efficient after inhalation of actinide oxides. However, in the present study, prompt pulmonary administration of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) as a dry powder led to a decrease in actinide content in ELF together with a limitation of bone and liver deposits. Because americium is more soluble than plutonium, higher amounts of americium were found in ELF, extrapulmonary tissues and urine. Our results also demonstrated that the higher efficacy of DTPA on americium compared to plutonium in ELF induced a preferential inhibition of extrapulmonary deposit and a greater urinary excretion of americium compared to plutonium. All together, our data justify the use of an early and local DTPA treatment after inhalation of plutonium oxide aerosols in which americium can be in high proportion such as in aged compounds. (authors)

  18. Determination of plutonium americium and curium in soil samples by solvent extraction with trioctylphosphine oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of Pu, Am and Cm determination in soil samples, which was developed for analyzing samples from territories subjected to radioactive contamination as a result of the Chernobyl accident is described. After preliminary treatment the samples were leached by solution of 7 mol/l HNO23+0.3 mol/l KBrO3 during heating. Pu was isolated by extraction with 0.05 mol TOPO from 7 mol/l HNO3. 144Ce and partially remaining in water phase isotopes of Zr, U and Th were isolated in an extraction-chromatographic column with TOPO and PbO2. Then Am and Cm were extracted by 0.2 mol/l TOPO from solution 1 mol/l HLact+0.07 mol/l DTPA+1 mol/l Al(NO3)3. Alpha-activity of both extracted products was determined in liquid scintillation counter. Chemical yield of plutonium counted to 85±10%, that of americium and curium -75±10%. 17 refs

  19. Kilogram-scale purification of americium by ion exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheelwright, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    Sequential anion and cation exchange processes have been used for the final purification of /sup 241/Am recovered during the reprocessing of aged plutonium metallurgical scrap. Plutonium was removed by absorption of Dowex 1, X-3.5 (30 to 50 mesh) anion exchange resin from 6.5 to 7.5 M HNO/sub 3/ feed solution. Following a water dilution to 0.75 to 1.0 M HNO/sub 3/, americium was absorbed on Dowex 50W, X-8 (50 to 100 mesh) cation exchange resion. Final purification was accomplished by elution of the absorbed band down 3 to 4 successive beds of the same resin, preloaded with Zn/sup 2 +/, with an NH/sub 4/OH buffered chelating agent. The recovery of mixed /sup 241/Am-/sup 243/Am from power reactor reprocessing waste has been demonstrated. Solvent extraction was used to recover a HNO/sub 3/ solution of mixed lanthanides and actinides from waste generated by the reprocessng of 13.5 tons of Shippingport Power Reactor blanket fuel. Sequential cation exchange band-displacement processes were then used to separate americium and curium from the lanthanides and then to separate approx. 60 g of /sup 244/Cm from 1000 g of mixed /sup 241/Am-/sup 243/Am.

  20. Development of separation techniques of americium from reprocessing solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Americium(Am) and neptunium(Np) finally transfer to the waste stream in the current PUREX reprocessing process. As an option, some methods have been developed to recover Am and Np from the waste stream to decrease long-term toxicity of the high level waste. The most stable valence state of Am is III, but TBP (tri-n-butyl phosphate) which is an extractant used in the PUREX reprocessing does not extract Am(III). Therefore, some special extractants have been developed to recover Am(III). However, they also extract rare-earth elements(REs), which necessitates the separation process for Am from REs. We have been developing a separation process which consists of valence control of Am to the VI state and its extraction with TBP. This process allows Am recovery from reprocessing solution and Am separation from REs simultaneously. Americium(III) is oxidized to Am(VI) by electrochemical oxidation and chemical oxidation using peroxodisulfate ammonium and silver nitrate. The latter was adopted here because the chemical oxidation reaction proceeds faster than the electrochemical method. Reaction mechanisms of oxidation and extraction were investigated. Based on the mechanisms, we found that extraction efficiency could be improved and waste generation could be minimized. (author)

  1. Selective leaching studies of deep-sea sediments loaded with americium, neptunium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of selective leaching experiments were undertaken to investigate the solid phase speciation and distribution of americium, neptunium and plutonium which had been experimentally loaded onto different marine sediment types. The chemical leaches employed showed rather poor selectivity but certain trends were evident. Adsorption was not by ion exchange. Americium showed a preferential affinity for carbonate and plutonium for organic matter. Neptunium appeared to have no preferential affinities. Americium was sorbed by acetic acid residues (CaCO3 removed) and by unleached carbonate-rich sediments with equal efficiency. This indicates that it is able to diversify its solid phase affinity/distribution depending upon which solid phases are available. (author)

  2. Kinetic parameters of transformation of americium and plutonium physicochemical forms in podsol soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetic parameters of transformation of americium and plutonium physicochemical forms have been estimated and the prognosis of fixing and remobilization of these nuclides in podsol soils have been made on that basis in the work. (authors)

  3. Calibration procedures for in vivo sodium iodide spectrometry of plutonium and americium in the human lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the calibration techniques and associated error analysis for the in vivo measurement by NaI spectrometry of heavy elements in the lung, specifically plutonium and americium. A very brief description of the instrumentation system is included

  4. Relativistic density functional theory modeling of plutonium and americium higher oxide molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsevskii, Andréi; Mosyagin, Nikolai S.; Titov, Anatoly V.; Kiselev, Yuri M.

    2013-07-01

    The results of electronic structure modeling of plutonium and americium higher oxide molecules (actinide oxidation states VI through VIII) by two-component relativistic density functional theory are presented. Ground-state equilibrium molecular structures, main features of charge distributions, and energetics of AnO3, AnO4, An2On (An=Pu, Am), and PuAmOn, n = 6-8, are determined. In all cases, molecular geometries of americium and mixed plutonium-americium oxides are similar to those of the corresponding plutonium compounds, though chemical bonding in americium oxides is markedly weaker. Relatively high stability of the mixed heptoxide PuAmO7 is noticed; the Pu(VIII) and especially Am(VIII) oxides are expected to be unstable.

  5. A study of plutonium and americium concentrations in seaspray on the southern Scottish coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seaspray and seawater have been collected from the southern Scottish coast and, for comparison, Cumbria in northwest England during 1989 and 1991. The occurrence of sea-to-land transfer of the actinides plutonium and americium in seaspray was observed on these coasts using muslin screens (a semi-quantitative technique most efficient for collecting large spray droplets) and high volume conventional air samplers. The actinides and fine particulate in the spray were present in relatively higher concentrations than measured in the adjacent seawater, i.e. the spray was enriched in particulate actinides. The net efficiency of the muslim screens in collecting airborne plutonium isotopes and 241Am generally appeared to be about 20%. A review of earlier published concentrations of 239+240Pu and 241Am measured in aerosol and deposition for over a year several tens of metres inland was carried out. This suggested that airborne activities are up to a factor of 5 times higher in Cumbria than southern Scotland. However, neither the new data collected in 1989 and 1991 nor this older data suggests any enhancement of seaspray actinide enrichment in southern Scotland compared to Cumbria. This finding contrasts with earlier, more limited, comparisons that have been carried out which suggested such a difference. There is clear evidence of considerable localised spatial and temporal variability in aerosol actinide enrichment over the beaches in both areas. Enrichments varies between 20 and 500 relative to the adjacent surf zone waters. However, the average enrichment in spray based on the continuous measurements made further inland is likely to be at the lower end of this range. (author)

  6. Effect of americium-241 on luminous bacteria. Role of peroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrova, M., E-mail: maka-alexandrova@rambler.r [Siberian Federal University, Svobodny 79, 660041 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Rozhko, T. [Siberian Federal University, Svobodny 79, 660041 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Vydryakova, G. [Institute of Biophysics SB RAS, Akademgorodok 50, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Kudryasheva, N. [Siberian Federal University, Svobodny 79, 660041 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Biophysics SB RAS, Akademgorodok 50, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-15

    The effect of americium-241 ({sup 241}Am), an alpha-emitting radionuclide of high specific activity, on luminous bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum was studied. Traces of {sup 241}Am in nutrient media (0.16-6.67 kBq/L) suppressed the growth of bacteria, but enhanced luminescence intensity and quantum yield at room temperature. Lower temperature (4 {sup o}C) increased the time of bacterial luminescence and revealed a stage of bioluminescence inhibition after 150 h of bioluminescence registration start. The role of conditions of exposure the bacterial cells to the {sup 241}Am is discussed. The effect of {sup 241}Am on luminous bacteria was attributed to peroxide compounds generated in water solutions as secondary products of radioactive decay. Increase of peroxide concentration in {sup 241}Am solutions was demonstrated; and the similarity of {sup 241}Am and hydrogen peroxide effects on bacterial luminescence was revealed. The study provides a scientific basis for elaboration of bioluminescence-based assay to monitor radiotoxicity of alpha-emitting radionuclides in aquatic solutions. - Highlights: {yields} Am-241 in water solutions (A = 0.16-6.7 kBq/L) suppresses bacterial growth.{yields} Am-241 (A = 0.16-6.7 kBq/L) stimulate bacterial luminescence. {yields} Peroxides, secondary radiolysis products, cause increase of bacterial luminescence.

  7. 10 CFR 32.57 - Calibration or reference sources containing americium-241 or radium-226: Requirements for license...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... or radium-226: Requirements for license to manufacture or initially transfer. 32.57 Section 32.57... americium-241 or radium-226: Requirements for license to manufacture or initially transfer. An application... containing americium-241 or radium-226, for distribution to persons generally licensed under § 31.8 of...

  8. Separation and determination of americium in low-level alkaline waste of NPP origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, B.; Djingova, R.; Nikiforova, A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a short and cost-saving procedure for the determination of 241Am in sludge sample of the alkaline low-level radioactive waste (LL LRAW) collected from Nuclear Power Plant “Kozloduy”. The determination of americium was a part of a complex analytical approach, where group actinide separation was achieved. An anion exchange was used for separation of americium from uranium, plutonium and iron. For the separation of americium extraction with diethylhexyl phosphoric acid (DEHPA) was studied. The final radioactive samples were prepared by micro co-precipitation with NdF3, counted by alpha and gamma spectrometry. The procedure takes 2 hours. The recovery yield of the procedure amounts to (95 ± 1.5)% and the detection limit is 53 mBq/kg 241Am (t=150 000 s). The analytical procedure was applied for actual liquid wastes and results were compared to standard procedure.

  9. Adsorption-desorption characteristics of plutonium and americium with sediment particles in the estuarine environment: studies using plutonium-237 and americium-241

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The particle formation of plutonium and americium, their adsorption onto fresh water sediments and the desorption from the sediments in sea water were studied in the Laboratory under simulated river-estuary conditions, using γ-emitting plutonium-237 and americium-241. The results of the experiments show that the particle formation of plutonium depends on its valence states, on pH and on the salinity of the medium. For river water at pH4, some 25%, 20% and 30% of the added 237Pu was in particulate form, larger than 0.45 μm, for Pu (III), Pu (IV) and Pu (VI), respectively, while 65%, 90% and 50% of the respective valence states was associated with particles at pH 8. In sea water the general pattern remains similar, although Pu (VI) is more soluble in sea water owing to higher ligand concentrations for carbonate and bicarbonate complexes. The pH-dependency of particle formation of Am (III) is more steep than that of plutonium and seems to be influenced by colloidal substances occurring in the experimental media. The adsorption-desorption characteristics of plutonium and americium with the sediment in river water as well as sea water reflect the characteristics of their particle formation, being dependent upon such properties as valence states, the pH and salinity of the medium. A sewage effluent added to the media has small but measurable effects on the adsorption-desorption processes of plutonium. (author)

  10. Cesium-137 and americium-241 distribution by granulometric fractions of soil at Azgir test site grounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In measurements of radionuclide specific content in surface soil layer of contaminated territories it is important to determine in what agglomerations of soil particles there is the highest radionuclide concentration. For this purpose granulometric composition of soil at Azgir test site was studied and cesium-137 and americium-241 distribution by soil fractions was researched. (author)

  11. Apparatus for fabrication of americium- beryllium neutron sources prevents capsule contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, W. C.; Van Loom, J. A.

    1967-01-01

    Modified gloved enclosure is used to fill a capsule with a mixture of americium and beryllium radioactive powders to seal weld the opening, and to test it for leaks. It contains a horizontal partition, vortex mixer, mounting press, welder, test vessel, and radiation shielding to prevent surface contamination.

  12. Evaluation of the readsorption of plutonium and americium in dynamic fractionations of environmental solid samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Roongrat; Hou, Xiaolin; Hansen, Elo Harald

    2008-01-01

    extractions. The degree of readsorption in dynamic and conventional batch extraction systems are compared and evaluated by using a double-spiking technique. A high degree of readsorption of plutonium and americium (>75%) was observed in both systems, and they also exhibited similar distribution patterns...

  13. Plutonium, americium and radiocaesium in the marine environment close to the Vandellos I nuclear power plant before decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Vandellos nuclear power plant (NPP), releasing low-level radioactive liquid waste to the Mediterranean Sea, is the first to be decommissioned in Spain, after an incident which occurred in 1989. The presence, distribution and uptake of various artificial radionuclides (radiocaesium, plutonium and americium) in the environment close to the plant were studied in seawater, bottom sediments and biota, including Posidonia oceanica, fish, crustaceans and molluscs. Seawater, sediments and Posidonia oceanica showed enhanced levels in the close vicinity of the NPP, although the effect was restricted to its near environment. Maximum concentrations in seawater were 11.6±0.5 Bq m-3 and 16.9±1.2 mBq m-3 for 137Cs and 239,240Pu, respectively. When sediment concentrations were normalized to excess 210Pb, they showed both the short-distance transport of artificial radionuclides from the Vandellos plant and the long-distance transport of 137Cs from the Asco NPP. Posidonia oceanica showed the presence of various gamma-emitters attributed to the impact of the Chernobyl accident, on which the effect of the NPP was superimposed. Seawater, sediment and Posidonia oceanica collected near the plant also showed an enhancement of the plutonium isotopic ratio above the fallout value. The uptake of these radionuclides by marine organisms was detectable but limited. Pelagic fish showed relatively higher 137Cs concentrations and only in the case of demersal fish was the plutonium isotopic ratio increased. The reported levels constitute a set of baseline values against which the impact of the decommissioning operations of the Vandellos I NPP can be studied

  14. Effect of bone-status on retention and distribution of americium-241 in bones of small rodents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forced physical exercise before and after application of americium-241 resulted in only small changes in bone-structure and behaviour of the radionuclide in bone. Feeding of a low phosphorus or low calcium diet resulted in an increased excretion of americium from bone, whereby Zn-DTPA as chelating agent removed an additional fraction of the radionuclide from bone. Low calcium diet and simultaneous continuous infusion of pharmacological doses of vitamin D-hormones didn't increase the excretion of americium more than the low calcium diet alone. (orig.)

  15. Interaction and diffusion transport of americium in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez-Guinart, Oriol; Rigol, Anna; Vidal, Miquel [Analytical Chemistry department, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1-11, 08028, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    The final disposal of High Level Radioactive Wastes (HLRW) is based on its long-term storage in underground facilities located in geological stable sites with a multi-barrier system, the so called Deep Geological Repositories (DGR), that will keep HLRW confined for >10.000 years. After this period of time, leachates rich in long-live radioisotopes might escape from DGR and start to transport towards the biosphere. There is still a lack of information concerning the interaction and transport in soils of some radionuclides present in HLRW, especially for radionuclides that present a high sorption, such as americium (Am). Having reliable information about the mobility of radionuclides in soils is crucial in order to develop risk assessment models and to take proper decisions in case of soil contamination. The aim of the present work was, by means of laboratory scale experiments, to study the interaction and, for first time, to evaluate the diffusion transport of {sup 241}Am in soils. The {sup 241}Am interaction in soils was assessed by applying sorption batch assays to 20 soil samples with contrasted edaphic properties which allowed us to quantify the solid-liquid distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) and desorption percentage. K{sub d} (Am) values ranged from 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 5} L kg{sup -1} and desorption percentages were always less than 2% which denoted a high capacity of the soil to incorporate the Am and a low reversibility of the sorption process. The influence of soil properties in {sup 241}Am interaction was studied by means of multiple linear and multivariate regressions. Although a single correlation between K{sub d} (Am) values and a soil property was not found, the main properties affecting {sup 241}Am interaction in soils were soil pH, carbonate and organic matter contents in the soil. Finally, additional batch assays at different controlled pH were done to study Am sorption as a function of the contact solution pH. A variation of the Am sorption

  16. SKIN DOSIMETRY IN CONDITIONS OF ITS CONSTANT SURFACE CONTAMINATION WITH SOLUTIONS OF PLUTONIUM-239 AND AMERICIUM-241

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Ershov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers, on the basis of experimental data, the issue of assessing dose burdens to the skin basal layer in conditions of its permanent contamination with solutions of plutonium-239 and americium-241 and subsequent decontamination.

  17. Influence of biofilms on migration of uranium, americium and europium in the environment; Einfluss von Biofilmen auf das Migrationsverhalten von Uran, Americium und Europium in der Umwelt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Nils; Zirnstein, Isabel; Arnold, Thuro

    2015-07-01

    The report on the influence of biofilms on migration of uranium, americium and europium in the environment deals with the contamination problems of uranium mines such as SDAG WISMUT in Saxonia and Thuringia. In mine waters microorganisms form a complex microbiological biocoenosis in spite of low pH values and high heavy metal concentrations including high uranium concentrations. The analyses used microbiological methods like confocal laser scanning microscopy and molecular-biological techniques. The interactions of microorganism with fluorescent radioactive heavy metal ions were performed with TRLFS (time resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy).

  18. Liquid-liquid extraction separation and sequential determination of plutonium and americium in environmental samples by alpha-spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure is described by which plutonium and americium can be determined in environmental samples. The sample is leached with nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide, and the two elements are co-precipitated with ferric hydroxide and calcium oxalate. The calcium oxalate is incinerated at 4500 and the ash is dissolved in nitric acid. Plutonium is extracted with tri-n-octylamine solution in xylene from 4M nitric acid and stripped with ammonium iodide/hydrochloric acid. Americium is extracted with thenoyltrifluoroacetone solution in xylene at pH 4 together with rare-earth elements and stripped with 1M nitric acid. Americium and the rare-earth elements thus separated are sorbed on Dowex 1 x 4 resin from 1M nitric acid in 93% methanol, the rare-earth elements are eluted with 0.1M hydrochloric acid/0.5M ammonium thiocyanate/80% methanol and the americium is finally eluted with 1.5M hydrochloric acid in 86% methanol. Plutonium and americium in each fraction are electro-deposited and determined by alpha-spectrometry. Overall average recoveries are 81% for plutonium and 59% for americium. (author)

  19. Influence of environmental factors on the gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium and americium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorption of plutonium and americium from the gastrointestinal tract was studied, using adult hamsters and rabbits. Both actinides were administered as inorganic compounds, as organic complexes with naturally occurring chelating agents, and in a biologically incorporated form in liver tissues. The absorption of the tetravalent and hexavalent forms of plutonium were compared and the effect of protracted administration at very low concentrations was investigated. In addition, plutonium uptake from contaminated sediments and grass, collected near a nuclear-fuel reprocessing plant, was measured. The results of these studies suggest that chronic exposure of man to plutonium and americium in food and water will not lead to any substantial increase in their gastrointestinal absorption above the values currently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection to define the occupational exposure of workers

  20. Electrodeposition of americium on a liquid cadmium cathode from a molten salt bath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-activity experiment involving the electrode position of americium on a liquid cadmium cathode from a LiCl-KCl eutectic with about 3 g of AmO2 was conducted in a shielded cell in the ATALANTE complex. After describing the electrolyzer and the experimental conditions, the authors discuss the preparation of the LiCl-KCl-AmCl3 solution and briefly review its electrochemical properties. It was clearly confirmed that Am(III) reduction on an inert solid cathode occurs in two steps forming Am(II) before Am(0), whereas only one reduction step was observed on liquid cadmium. The main results of this study concern americium electrode position on the liquid cadmium cathode (recovery yields, current densities, problems encountered). The solvent properties of cadmium for actinide/lanthanide separation are discussed. (authors)

  1. Experimental Insight into the Radiation Resistance of Zirconia-Based Americium Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our works shows that the americium pyrochlore 241Am2Zr2O7 undergoes a phase transition to a defect-fluorite structure along with an unusual volume contraction when subjected to internal radiation from α-emitting actinides. Disorder relaxation proceeds through the simultaneous formation of cation anti sites and oxygen Frenkel pairs. X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Am-LII and the Zr-K edges reveals that Am-O polyhedra show an increasing disorder with increasing exposure. In contrast, the Zr-O polyhedral units remain highly ordered, while rotating along edges and corners, thereby reducing the structural strain imposed by the growing disorder around americium. We believe it is this particular property of the compound that provides the remarkable resistance to radiation (≥9.4 * 1018) α-decay events g-1 or 0.80 dpa). (authors)

  2. Standard test method for quantitative determination of americium 241 in plutonium by Gamma-Ray spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1994-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the quantitative determination of americium 241 by gamma-ray spectrometry in plutonium nitrate solution samples that do not contain significant amounts of radioactive fission products or other high specific activity gamma-ray emitters. 1.2 This test method can be used to determine the americium 241 in samples of plutonium metal, oxide and other solid forms, when the solid is appropriately sampled and dissolved. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  3. Calcium and zinc DTPA administration for internal contamination with plutonium-238 and americium-241.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazzi, Ziad N; Heyl, Alexander; Ruprecht, Johann

    2012-08-01

    The accidental or intentional release of plutonium or americium can cause acute and long term adverse health effects if they enter the human body by ingestion, inhalation, or injection. These effects can be prevented by rapid removal of these radionuclides by chelators such as calcium or zinc diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (calcium or zinc DTPA). These compounds have been shown to be efficacious in enhancing the elimination of members of the actinide family particularly plutonium and americium when administered intravenously or by nebulizer. The efficacy and adverse effects profile depend on several factors that include the route of internalization of the actinide, the type, and route time of administration of the chelator, and whether the calcium or zinc salt of DTPA is used. Current and future research efforts should be directed at overcoming limitations associated with the use of these complex drugs by using innovative methods that can enhance their structural and therapeutic properties.

  4. Bidentate organophosphorus extraction of americium and plutonium from Hanford Plutonium Reclamation Facility waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, W.W.

    1974-09-01

    Applicability of bidentate organiphosphorus reagents to recovery of americium and plutonium from Hanford's Plutonium Reclamation Facility acid (approx. 2M HNO/sub 3/) waste stream (CAW solution) was studied. A solvent extraction process which employs a 30% DHDECMP (dihexyl-N, N-diethylcarbamylmethylene phosphonate)-CCl/sub 4/ extractant was devised and successfully tested in mixer-settler runs with actual CAW solution. Substitution of DHDECMP for DBBP eliminates the need to perform careful neutralization of unbuffered CAW soluton and increases overall americium recovery from the present 60 to 80% level to greater than or equal to 90%. Disadvantages to such substitution include the high cost (approx. $50/liter) of DHDECMP and the need to purify it (by acid (6M HCl) hydrolysis and alkaline washing) from small amounts of an unidentified impurity which prevents stripping of americium with dilute HNO/sub 3/. Distribution data obtained in this study confirm Siddall's earlier contention that bidentate organophosphorus regents can be used to remove actinides from concentrated high-level Purex process acid waste; a conceptual flowsheet for such an extraction process is given.

  5. Isotopic ratios and effective power determined by gamma-ray spectroscopy vs mass spectroscopy for molten salt extraction residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Impure plutonium metal is routinely processed by molten salt extraction (MSE) to reduce the amount of americium in the metal product. Throughput at various facilities where similar processes are performed has made it essential to evaluate uncertainties and possible discrepancies in the analyses of these difficult MSE materials. In an effort to evaluate the plutonium isotopic ratios and americium concentrations obtained from gamma-ray spectral data analyzed by the computer code GRPAUT, measurements were made on ten MSE salts as received and after pulverization and blending. These results were then compared to the specific powers obtained from isotopic ratios determined by mass spectrometry on these same ten samples. Americium values ranged from a few thousand parts-per-million of total plutonium to greater than 50,000 ppM. Our results indicate a small discrepancy between specific powers as determined by GRPAUT on ''as received'' vs pulverized and blended MSE salts. The specific powers obtained via GRPAUT on the pulverized salts agree somewhat better with specific powers obtained from the mass spectroscopy data. This work may indicate that a small discrepancy exists in the specific powers by using GRPAUT on heterogeneous, high americium samples. 5 refs., 6 tabs

  6. Americium(3) coordination chemistry: An unexplored diversity of structure and bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedosseev, A.M.; Grigoriev, M.S.; Budantseva, N.A. [A.N. Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation); Guillaumont, D.; Den Auwer, Ch.; Moisy, Ph. [CEA Marcoule, Nuclear Energy Division, RadioChemistry and Processes Department, 30 (France); Le Naour, C.; Simoni, E. [CNRS, University Paris-11 Orsay, IPN, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2010-06-15

    The comparison of the physicochemical behavior of the actinides with that of the lanthanides can be justified by the analogy of their electronic structure, as each of the series is made up of elements corresponding to the filling of a given (n)f atomic shell. However relatively few points of comparison are available, given the lack of available structure for trans-plutonium(III) elements and the additional difficulty of stabilizing coordination complexes of uranium(III) to plutonium(III). This contribution is a focal point of trans-plutonium(III) chemistry and, more specifically, of some americium compounds that have been recently synthesized, all related with hard acid oxygen donor ligands that may be involved in the reprocessing chain of nuclear fuel. After a brief review of the solid hydrates and aquo species for the lanthanide and actinide families, we discuss two types of ligands that have in common three carboxylic groups, namely the amino-tri-acetic acid and the citric acid anions. The additional roles of the nitrogen atom for the first one and of the hydroxy function for the second one are discussed. Accordingly, five new complexes with either americium or lanthanides elements are described: [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}][M(NTA){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)].8H{sub 2}O with M Nd, Yb and Am, and [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sub 2}K[M{sub 3}(Cit){sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}].18H{sub 2}O with Nd and Am cations. In all cases the americium complexes are isostructural with their lanthanide equivalents. (authors)

  7. Americium(3) coordination chemistry: An unexplored diversity of structure and bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The comparison of the physicochemical behavior of the actinides with that of the lanthanides can be justified by the analogy of their electronic structure, as each of the series is made up of elements corresponding to the filling of a given (n)f atomic shell. However relatively few points of comparison are available, given the lack of available structure for trans-plutonium(III) elements and the additional difficulty of stabilizing coordination complexes of uranium(III) to plutonium(III). This contribution is a focal point of trans-plutonium(III) chemistry and, more specifically, of some americium compounds that have been recently synthesized, all related with hard acid oxygen donor ligands that may be involved in the reprocessing chain of nuclear fuel. After a brief review of the solid hydrates and aquo species for the lanthanide and actinide families, we discuss two types of ligands that have in common three carboxylic groups, namely the amino-tri-acetic acid and the citric acid anions. The additional roles of the nitrogen atom for the first one and of the hydroxy function for the second one are discussed. Accordingly, five new complexes with either americium or lanthanides elements are described: [Co(NH3)6][M(NTA)2(H2O)].8H2O with M Nd, Yb and Am, and [Co(NH3)6]2K[M3(Cit)4(H2O)3].18H2O with Nd and Am cations. In all cases the americium complexes are isostructural with their lanthanide equivalents. (authors)

  8. MARIOS: Irradiation of UO{sub 2} containing 15% americium at well defined temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Agata, E., E-mail: elio.dagata@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy - P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Hania, P.R. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, P.O. Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Bejaoui, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, DEC CEA-Cadarache, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Sciolla, C.; Wyatt, T.; Hannink, M.H.C. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, P.O. Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Herlet, N.; Jankowiak, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique DTEC CEA Marcoule, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze Cedex (France); Klaassen, F.C. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, P.O. Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Bonnerot, J.-M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, DEC CEA-Cadarache, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MARIOS is designed to check the behaviour of Minor Actinide Blanket Module concept. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Main requirement of the experiment is an accurate control of the temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The swelling and the helium release will be the main output of the experiment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A complementary experiment (DIAMINO), will be performed in the next future. - Abstract: Americium is a strong contributor to the long term radiotoxicity of high activity nuclear waste. Transmutation by irradiation in nuclear reactors of long-lived nuclides like {sup 241}Am is, therefore, an option for the reduction of radiotoxicity and residual power packages as well as the repository area. The MARIOS irradiation experiment is the latest of a series of experiments on americium transmutation (e.g. EFTTRA-T4, EFTTRA-T4bis, HELIOS). MARIOS experiment is carried out in the framework of the 4-year project FAIRFUELS of the EURATOM 7th Framework Programme (FP7). During the past years of experimental work in the field of transmutation and tests of innovative nuclear fuel containing americium, the release or trapping of helium as well as swelling has shown to be the key issue for the design of such kinds of target. Therefore, the main objective of the MARIOS experiment is to study the in-pile behaviour of UO{sub 2} containing minor actinides (MAs) in order to gain knowledge on the role of the microstructure and of the temperature on the gas release and on fuel swelling. The MARIOS experiment will be conducted in the HFR (high flux reactor) in Petten (The Netherlands) and will start in the beginning of 2011. It has been planned that the experiment will last 11 cycles, corresponding to 11 months. This paper covers the description of the objective of the experiment, as well as a general description of the design of the experiment.

  9. Speciation of americium in seawater and accumulation in the marine sponge Aplysina cavernicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloubier, Melody; Michel, Hervé; Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Moisy, Philippe; Tribalat, Marie-Aude; Oberhaensli, François R; Dechraoui Bottein, Marie Yasmine; Thomas, Olivier P; Monfort, Marguerite; Moulin, Christophe; Den Auwer, Christophe

    2015-12-21

    The fate of radionuclides in the environment is a cause of great concern for modern society, seen especially in 2011 after the Fukushima accident. Among the environmental compartments, seawater covers most of the earth's surface and may be directly or indirectly impacted. The interaction between radionuclides and the marine compartment is therefore essential for better understanding the transfer mechanisms from the hydrosphere to the biosphere. This information allows for the evaluation of the impact on humans via our interaction with the biotope that has been largely undocumented up to now. In this report, we attempt to make a link between the speciation of heavy elements in natural seawater and their uptake by a model marine organism. More specifically, because the interaction of actinides with marine invertebrates has been poorly studied, the accumulation in a representative member of the Mediterranean coralligenous habitat, the sponge Aplysina cavernicola, was investigated and its uptake curve exposed to a radiotracer (241)Am was estimated using a high-purity Ge gamma spectrometer. But in order to go beyond the phenomenological accumulation rate, the speciation of americium(III) in seawater must be assessed. The speciation of (241)Am (and natural europium as its chemically stable surrogate) in seawater was determined using a combination of different techniques: Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TRLIF), Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) at the LIII edge, Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and the resulting data were compared with the speciation modeling. In seawater, the americium(III) complex (as well as the corresponding europium complex, although with conformational differences) was identified as a ternary sodium biscarbonato complex, whose formula can be tentatively written as NaAm(CO3)2·nH2O. It is therefore this chemical form of americium that is

  10. Speciation of americium in seawater and accumulation in the marine sponge Aplysina cavernicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloubier, Melody; Michel, Hervé; Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Moisy, Philippe; Tribalat, Marie-Aude; Oberhaensli, François R; Dechraoui Bottein, Marie Yasmine; Thomas, Olivier P; Monfort, Marguerite; Moulin, Christophe; Den Auwer, Christophe

    2015-12-21

    The fate of radionuclides in the environment is a cause of great concern for modern society, seen especially in 2011 after the Fukushima accident. Among the environmental compartments, seawater covers most of the earth's surface and may be directly or indirectly impacted. The interaction between radionuclides and the marine compartment is therefore essential for better understanding the transfer mechanisms from the hydrosphere to the biosphere. This information allows for the evaluation of the impact on humans via our interaction with the biotope that has been largely undocumented up to now. In this report, we attempt to make a link between the speciation of heavy elements in natural seawater and their uptake by a model marine organism. More specifically, because the interaction of actinides with marine invertebrates has been poorly studied, the accumulation in a representative member of the Mediterranean coralligenous habitat, the sponge Aplysina cavernicola, was investigated and its uptake curve exposed to a radiotracer (241)Am was estimated using a high-purity Ge gamma spectrometer. But in order to go beyond the phenomenological accumulation rate, the speciation of americium(III) in seawater must be assessed. The speciation of (241)Am (and natural europium as its chemically stable surrogate) in seawater was determined using a combination of different techniques: Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TRLIF), Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) at the LIII edge, Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and the resulting data were compared with the speciation modeling. In seawater, the americium(III) complex (as well as the corresponding europium complex, although with conformational differences) was identified as a ternary sodium biscarbonato complex, whose formula can be tentatively written as NaAm(CO3)2·nH2O. It is therefore this chemical form of americium that is

  11. Americium characterization by X-ray fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy in plutonium uranium mixed oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium uranium mixed oxide (MOX) fuels are currently used in nuclear reactors. The actinides in these fuels need to be analyzed after irradiation for assessing their behaviour with regard to their environment and the coolant. In this work the study of the atomic structure and next-neighbour environment of Am in the (Pu,U)O2 lattice in an irradiated (60 MW d kg−1) MOX sample was performed employing micro-X-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF) and micro-X-ray absorption fine structure (µ-XAFS) spectroscopy. The chemical bonds, valences and stoichiometry of Am (∼0.66 wt%) are determined from the experimental data gained for the irradiated fuel material examined in its peripheral zone (rim) of the fuel. In the irradiated sample Am builds up as Am3+ species within an [AmO8]13− coordination environment (e.g. >90%) and no (III XAFS spectra recorded for the irradiated MOX sub-sample in the rim zone for a 300 μm×300 μm beam size area investigated over six scans of 4 h. The records remain constant during multi-scan. The analysis of the XAFS signal shows that Am is found as trivalent in the UO2 matrix. This analytical work shall open the door of very challenging analysis (speciation of fission product and actinides) in irradiated nuclear fuels. - Highlights: • Americium was characterized by microX-ray absorption spectroscopy in irradiated MOX fuel. • The americium redox state as determined from XAS data of irradiated fuel material was Am(III). • In the sample, the Am3+ face an AmO813− coordination environment in the (Pu,U)O2 matrix. • The americium dioxide is reduced by the uranium dioxide matrix

  12. Fabrication of uranium–americium mixed oxide pellet from microsphere precursors: Application of CRMP process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remy, E. [Radiochemistry and Processes Department, CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Picart, S., E-mail: sebastien.picart@cea.fr [Radiochemistry and Processes Department, CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Delahaye, T. [Fuel Cycle Technology Department, CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Jobelin, I. [Radiochemistry and Processes Department, CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Lebreton, F.; Horlait, D. [Fuel Cycle Technology Department, CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Bisel, I. [Radiochemistry and Processes Department, CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Blanchart, P. [Heterogeneous Materials Research Group, Centre Européen de la Céramique, F-87068 Limoges (France); Ayral, A. [Institut Européen des Membranes, CNRS-ENSCM-UM2, CC47, University Montpellier 2, F-34095 Montpellier cedex 5 (France)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Dust free process for (U,Am)O{sub 2} transmutation target fabrication. • Synthesis of U{sub 0.9}Am{sub 0.1}O{sub 2} mixed oxide microspheres from ion exchange resin. • Fabrication of dense U{sub 0.9}Am{sub 0.1}O{sub 2} pellet with 95% TD from mixed oxide microspheres. - Abstract: Mixed uranium–americium oxides are one of the materials envisaged for Americium Bearing Blankets dedicated to transmutation in fast neutron reactors. Recently, several processes have been developed in order to validate fabrication flowchart in terms of material specifications such as density and homogeneity but also to suggest simplifications for lowering industrial costs and hazards linked to dust generation of highly contaminating and irradiating compounds. This study deals with the application of an innovative route using mixed oxide microspheres obtained from metal loaded resin bead calcination, called Calcined Resin Microsphere Pelletization (CRMP). The synthesis of mixed oxide microsphere precursor of U{sub 0.9}Am{sub 0.1}O{sub 2±δ} is described as well as its characterisation. The use of this free-flowing precursor allows the pressing and sintering of one pellet of U{sub 0.9}Am{sub 0.1}O{sub 2±δ}. The ceramic obtained was characterised and results showed that its microstructure is dense and homogeneous and its density attains 95% of the theoretical density. This study validates the scientific feasibility of the CRMP process applied to the fabrication of uranium and americium-containing materials.

  13. Influence of biofilms on migration of uranium, americium and europium in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report on the influence of biofilms on migration of uranium, americium and europium in the environment deals with the contamination problems of uranium mines such as SDAG WISMUT in Saxonia and Thuringia. In mine waters microorganisms form a complex microbiological biocoenosis in spite of low pH values and high heavy metal concentrations including high uranium concentrations. The analyses used microbiological methods like confocal laser scanning microscopy and molecular-biological techniques. The interactions of microorganism with fluorescent radioactive heavy metal ions were performed with TRLFS (time resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy).

  14. Plutonium and americium in arctic waters, the North Sea and Scottish and Irish coastal zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallstadius, L.; Aarkrog, Asker; Dahlgaard, Henning;

    1986-01-01

    Plutonium and americium have been measured in surface waters of the Greenland and Barents Seas and in the northern North Sea from 1980 through 1984. Measurements in water and biota, Fucus, Mytilus and Patella, were carried out in North-English and Scottish waters in 1982 and Fucus samples were...... plutonium from the latter to Spitsbergen waters. Fallout plutonium in Arctic waters has a residence time of the order of several years, while for Pu from Sellafield we estimate mean residence times of 11–15 months in Scottish waters and, tentatively, 1·5-3 y during transport from the North Channel (north...

  15. Comparison of acid leachate and fusion methods to determine plutonium and americium in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory performs radiochemical analyses for a wide variety of sites within the Department of Energy complex. Since the chemical history of the samples may vary drastically from site to site, the effectiveness of any analytical technique may also vary. This study compares a potassium fluoride-pyrosulfate fusion technique with an acid leachate method. Both normal and high-fired soils and vegetation samples were analyzed for both americium and plutonium. Results show both methods work well, except for plutonium in high-fired soils. Here the fusion method provides higher accuracy

  16. Purification of used scintillation liquids containing the alpha emitters americium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Sweden, alpha radioactive waste liquids with an activity over some kBq per waste container cannot be sent for final storage. Therefore, in this work, a method for a purification of alpha active scintillation cocktails was developed. Until today (March, 2013) more than 20 L of scintillation liquids have successfully been purified from americium and plutonium. The products of the process are a solid fraction that can be sent to final storage and a practically non-radioactive liquid fraction that can be sent to municipal incineration. (author)

  17. Study of the extraction and the purification of americium and trivalent actinides contained in effluents with supported liquid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The supported liquid membrane technique is studied and developed for americium recovery from uranium or plutonium matrices and decontamination of liquid radioactive wastes. First tests on uranium-nickel solutions with a flat membrane showed the easiness of the operation and the efficiency of the process. Acid-resistant (10 N), interchangeable elements with hollow fibers, are developed and also a computerized automatic device. The different tests on americium solutions demonstrate the feasibility and the reliability of the system. Influence of various parameters on transfer kinetics is investigated

  18. Human bones obtained from routine joint replacement surgery as a tool for studies of plutonium, americium and {sup 90}Sr body-burden in general public

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mietelski, Jerzy W., E-mail: jerzy.mietelski@ifj.edu.pl [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Golec, Edward B. [Traumatology and Orthopaedic Clinic, 5th Military Clinical Hospital and Polyclinic, Independent Public Healthcare Facility, Wroclawska 1-3, 30-901 Cracow (Poland); Orthopaedic Rehabilitation Department, Chair of Clinical Rehabilitation, Faculty of Motor of the Bronislaw Czech' s Academy of Physical Education, Cracow (Poland); Department of Physical Therapy Basics, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Administration College, Bielsko-Biala (Poland); Tomankiewicz, Ewa [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Golec, Joanna [Orthopaedic Rehabilitation Department, Chair of Clinical Rehabilitation, Faculty of Motor of the Bronislaw Czech' s Academy of Physical Education, Cracow (Poland); Physical Therapy Department, Institute of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Heath Science, Jagiellonian University, Medical College, Cracow (Poland); Nowak, Sebastian [Traumatology and Orthopaedic Clinic, 5th Military Clinical Hospital and Polyclinic, Independent Public Healthcare Facility, Wroclawska 1-3, 30-901 Cracow (Poland); Orthopaedic Rehabilitation Department, Chair of Clinical Rehabilitation, Faculty of Motor of the Bronislaw Czech' s Academy of Physical Education, Cracow (Poland); Szczygiel, Elzbieta [Physical Therapy Department, Institute of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Heath Science, Jagiellonian University, Medical College, Cracow (Poland); Brudecki, Kamil [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Cracow (Poland)

    2011-06-15

    The paper presents a new sampling method for studying in-body radioactive contamination by bone-seeking radionuclides such as {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239+240}Pu, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 241}Am and selected gamma-emitters, in human bones. The presented results were obtained for samples retrieved from routine surgeries, namely knee or hip joints replacements with implants, performed on individuals from Southern Poland. This allowed to collect representative sets of general public samples. The applied analytical radiochemical procedure for bone matrix is described in details. Due to low concentrations of {sup 238}Pu the ratio of Pu isotopes which might be used for Pu source identification is obtained only as upper limits other then global fallout (for example Chernobyl) origin of Pu. Calculated concentrations of radioisotopes are comparable to the existing data from post-mortem studies on human bones retrieved from autopsy or exhumations. Human bones removed during knee or hip joint surgery provide a simple and ethical way for obtaining samples for plutonium, americium and {sup 90}Sr in-body contamination studies in general public. - Highlights: > Surgery for joint replacement as novel sampling method for studying in-body radioactive contamination. > Proposed way of sampling is not causing ethic doubts. > It is a convenient way of collecting human bone samples from global population. > The applied analytical radiochemical procedure for bone matrix is described in details. > The opposite patient age correlations trends were found for 90Sr (negative) and Pu, Am (positive).

  19. Human bones obtained from routine joint replacement surgery as a tool for studies of plutonium, americium and 90Sr body-burden in general public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents a new sampling method for studying in-body radioactive contamination by bone-seeking radionuclides such as 90Sr, 239+240Pu, 238Pu, 241Am and selected gamma-emitters, in human bones. The presented results were obtained for samples retrieved from routine surgeries, namely knee or hip joints replacements with implants, performed on individuals from Southern Poland. This allowed to collect representative sets of general public samples. The applied analytical radiochemical procedure for bone matrix is described in details. Due to low concentrations of 238Pu the ratio of Pu isotopes which might be used for Pu source identification is obtained only as upper limits other then global fallout (for example Chernobyl) origin of Pu. Calculated concentrations of radioisotopes are comparable to the existing data from post-mortem studies on human bones retrieved from autopsy or exhumations. Human bones removed during knee or hip joint surgery provide a simple and ethical way for obtaining samples for plutonium, americium and 90Sr in-body contamination studies in general public. - Highlights: → Surgery for joint replacement as novel sampling method for studying in-body radioactive contamination. → Proposed way of sampling is not causing ethic doubts. → It is a convenient way of collecting human bone samples from global population. → The applied analytical radiochemical procedure for bone matrix is described in details. → The opposite patient age correlations trends were found for 90Sr (negative) and Pu, Am (positive).

  20. Contribution to the prediction of americium, plutonium and neptunium behaviour in the geosphere: chemical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An exhaustive bibliographic review on hydrolysis of americium gives the stability constants, at zero ionic strength. No evidence of Am(OH)4- formation was found by solubility studies up to pH 2 (CO3)3 characterised by its X-ray diffraction pattern is studied at a high ionic strength. All the published results on Am in carbonate media are reinterpreted using these stability constants (Am-OH-CO3 complexes are not needed). No evidence of Am(CO3)45- formation was found by spectrophotometry up to 3M. Literature results are used to determine the formal redox potentials at pH = 9.4 and to calculate the formation constants, at zero ionic strength. The formation of complexes between americium and humic materials (purified fulvic and humic acids) has been studied by a spectrophotometric technique. The results are interpreted by the formation of a 1:1 complexe. Solubility of the solid PuO2(CO3) is measured in bicarbonate media at high ionic strength, to obtain the solubility product and formation constants of the PuO2(CO3)i2-2i complexes

  1. EURADOS intercomparison on measurements and Monte Carlo modelling for the assessment of Americium in a USTUR leg phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A collaboration of the EURADOS working group on 'Internal Dosimetry' and the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) has taken place to carry out an intercomparison on measurements and Monte Carlo modelling determining americium deposited in the bone of a USTUR leg phantom. Preliminary results and conclusions of this intercomparison exercise are presented here. (authors)

  2. Anomalous aryl strengthening of americium and europium complexes during extraction by alkylenediphosphine dioxides from perchloric acid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extraction of americium and europium from perchlorate environments by solutions of three types of methylenediphosphine dioxides, namely (C6H5)P(O)(CH2)sub(n)(O)P(C6H5)2, (C6H5)2P(O)CH2(O)P(C8H17)2 and (C8H17)2P(O)(CH2)sub(n)(O)P(C8H17)2 has been studied (n is 1 or 2 ) The diluents used have been dichlorethane and chloroform. In perchlorate environments the distribuiton coefficients of americium and europium have proved to be by about 3 orders of magnitude higher than in nitric acid environments, i.e. in perchlorate media the complexes are far more stable. Separation coefficients of americium and REE in perchloric acid soutions are much higher than in nitrate environments. The average value of Am/Eu separation coeffecient at 1-5 M acidity was about 6 (with dichlorethane as diluent) or about 7 (with chloroform as diluent). The complexes essentially exist as trisolvated. Americium complexes display anomalous stability increase upon being diluted: by about 2 orders of magnitude with dichlorethane and by up to 3 orders of magnitude with chloroform used as diluent

  3. Isotope ratio analysis of individual sub-micrometer plutonium particles with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esaka, Fumitaka; Magara, Masaaki; Suzuki, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Yutaka; Lee, Chi-Gyu; Kimura, Takaumi

    2010-12-15

    Information on plutonium isotope ratios in individual particles is of great importance for nuclear safeguards, nuclear forensics and so on. Although secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is successfully utilized for the analysis of individual uranium particles, the isobaric interference of americium-241 to plutonium-241 makes difficult to obtain accurate isotope ratios in individual plutonium particles. In the present work, an analytical technique by a combination of chemical separation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is developed and applied to isotope ratio analysis of individual sub-micrometer plutonium particles. The ICP-MS results for individual plutonium particles prepared from a standard reference material (NBL SRM-947) indicate that the use of a desolvation system for sample introduction improves the precision of isotope ratios. In addition, the accuracy of the (241)Pu/(239)Pu isotope ratio is much improved, owing to the chemical separation of plutonium and americium. In conclusion, the performance of the proposed ICP-MS technique is sufficient for the analysis of individual plutonium particles. PMID:21111176

  4. Isotope ratio analysis of individual sub-micrometer plutonium particles with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esaka, Fumitaka; Magara, Masaaki; Suzuki, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Yutaka; Lee, Chi-Gyu; Kimura, Takaumi

    2010-12-15

    Information on plutonium isotope ratios in individual particles is of great importance for nuclear safeguards, nuclear forensics and so on. Although secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is successfully utilized for the analysis of individual uranium particles, the isobaric interference of americium-241 to plutonium-241 makes difficult to obtain accurate isotope ratios in individual plutonium particles. In the present work, an analytical technique by a combination of chemical separation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is developed and applied to isotope ratio analysis of individual sub-micrometer plutonium particles. The ICP-MS results for individual plutonium particles prepared from a standard reference material (NBL SRM-947) indicate that the use of a desolvation system for sample introduction improves the precision of isotope ratios. In addition, the accuracy of the (241)Pu/(239)Pu isotope ratio is much improved, owing to the chemical separation of plutonium and americium. In conclusion, the performance of the proposed ICP-MS technique is sufficient for the analysis of individual plutonium particles.

  5. Purification of scintillation cocktails containing the alpha emitters americium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One efficient way of measuring alpha emitters is by the usage of liquid scintillation counting (LSC). A liquid sample is placed in a vial containing a scintillation cocktail. The alpha particles excite electrons in the surrounding liquid, and when they are de-excited photons are emitted. The photons are detected and the activity can be quantified. LSC has a high efficiency for alpha radiation and is therefore a fast and easy way for measuring alpha emitting samples. One drawback is that it does not differentiate very well between alpha energies; measurements of for example curium and plutonium simultaneously are impossible and demand other techniques. Another drawback is the production of a liquid alpha active waste. In Sweden alpha radioactive waste liquids with an activity over some kBq per waste container cannot be sent for final storage. If, however, the activity of the liquids could be reduced by precipitation of the actinides, it would be possible to send away the liquid samples to municipal incineration. In this work a method for a purification of alpha active scintillation cocktails was developed. The method was first tried on a lab scale, and then scaled up. Until today (March, 2013) more than 20 liters of scintillation liquids have successfully been purified from americium and plutonium at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden. The four scintillation cocktails used were Emulsifier Safe®, Hionic-Fluor®, Ultima Gold AB® and Ultima Gold XR®. The scintillation cocktails could all be purified from americium with higher yield than 95%. The yield was kept when the liquids were mixed. Also plutonium could be precipitated with a yield over 95% in all cocktails except in Hionic-Fluor® (>55%). However, that liquid in particular could be purified (>95%) by mixing it with the three other cocktails. Up-scaling was performed to a batch size of 6-8 L of scintillation cocktail. In neither the americium nor the plutonium system, adverse effects of increasing the

  6. Isotopic geology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Born from the application to geology of nuclear physics techniques, the isotopic geology has revolutionized the Earth's sciences. Beyond the dating of rocks, the tracer techniques have permitted to reconstruct the Earth's dynamics, to measure the temperatures of the past (giving birth to paleoclimatology) and to understand the history of chemical elements thanks to the analysis of meteorites. Today, all domains of Earth sciences appeal more or less to the methods of isotopic geology. In this book, the author explains the principles, methods and recent advances of this science: 1 - isotopes and radioactivity; 2 - principles of isotope dating; 3 - radio-chronological methods; 4 - cosmogenic isotope chronologies; 5 - uncertainties and radio-chronological results; 6 - geochemistry of radiogenic isotopes; 7 - geochemistry of stable isotopes; 8 - isotopic geology and dynamical analysis of reservoirs. (J.S.)

  7. Isotopic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectra of isotopically mixed clusters (dimers of SF6) are calculated as well as transition frequencies. The result leads to speculations about the suitability of the laser-cluster fragmentation process for isotope separation. (Auth.)

  8. A thermodynamic study of actinide oxide targets/fuels for americium transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thermodynamic study was performed on the systems Am-O, AmOx-MgO, AmOx-MgAl2O4, Pu-Mg-O and U-Mg-O. Both experimental work (X-ray analyses, oxygen potential measurements etc.) and calculations on the phase diagrams involved were made. The reaction between americium oxide and spinel is expected to form the compound AmAlO3. Isothermal sections have been calculated for AmOx-(MgO, Al2O3), Pu-Mg-O and U-Mg-O at 2000 K using the software package ''Thermo-Calc''. Thermodynamic equilibrium data were used to predict the behaviour of actinide oxides in a reactor. The implication of the results for the technological application is discussed, with emphasis on the effects of the high oxygen potential of AmO2 as compared to the conventional fuel, i.e. UO2. (author)

  9. The uptake of plutonium-239, 240, americium-241, strontium-90 into plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the results of measurements on the uptake of plutonium, americium, strontium-90 and caesium-137 into peas, beet, oats, sweet corn, tomatoes and vegetable marrow grown in tubs containing radioactively-contaminated silts. The silts had been taken from an area of West Cumbria commonly referred to as the Ravenglass estuary. The experiments are categorised as being carried out under non-standard conditions because of the manner in which the radioactivity came to be incorporated into the growth medium. The growth medium was representative of conditions which could arise when the estuarine silt moves inland under the influence of wind and tide and mixes with the adjacent farm land. The silt had been contaminated by radioactive effluents from the nuclear fuels reprocessing plant at Sellafield and this contamination had been brought about by natural means. (Auth.)

  10. Complex formation of trivalent americium with salicylic acid at very low concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first time, the complexation of americium(III) with salicylic acid was studied at trace metal concentrations using a 2.0 m Long Path Flow Cell for UV-vis spectroscopy. The detection limit of Am(III) in aqueous solution at pH 3.0 was found to be 5 x 10-9 M. Two Am(III)-salicylate complexes were formed at pH 5.0 in 0.1 M NaClO4, indicated by a clear red shift of the absorption maximum. The absorption spectra obtained from spectrophotometric titration were analyzed by means of factor analysis and complex stabilities were calculated to be log β110 = 2.56 ± 0.08 and log β120 = 3.93 ± 0.19. (author)

  11. Transportability Class of Americium in K Basin Sludge under Ambient and Hydrothermal Processing Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmitt, Bruce E.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2006-08-01

    This report establishes the technical bases for using a ''slow uptake'' instead of a ''moderate uptake'' transportability class for americium-241 (241Am) for the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project (STP) dose consequence analysis. Slow uptake classes are used for most uranium and plutonium oxides. A moderate uptake class has been used in prior STP analyses for 241Am based on the properties of separated 241Am and its associated oxide. However, when 241Am exists as an ingrown progeny (and as a small mass fraction) within plutonium mixtures, it is appropriate to assign transportability factors of the predominant plutonium mixtures (typically slow) to the Am241. It is argued that the transportability factor for 241Am in sludge likewise should be slow because it exists as a small mass fraction as the ingrown progeny within the uranium oxide in sludge. In this report, the transportability class assignment for 241Am is underpinned with radiochemical characterization data on K Basin sludge and with studies conducted with other irradiated fuel exposed to elevated temperatures and conditions similar to the STP. Key findings and conclusions from evaluation of the characterization data and published literature are summarized here. Plutonium and 241Am make up very small fractions of the uranium within the K Basin sludge matrix. Plutonium is present at about 1 atom per 500 atoms of uranium and 241Am at about 1 atom per 19000 of uranium. Plutonium and americium are found to remain with uranium in the solid phase in all of the {approx}60 samples taken and analyzed from various sources of K Basin sludge. The uranium-specific concentrations of plutonium and americium also remain approximately constant over a uranium concentration range (in the dry sludge solids) from 0.2 to 94 wt%, a factor of {approx}460. This invariability demonstrates that 241Am does not partition from the uranium or plutonium fraction for any characterized sludge matrix. Most

  12. The construction of TRIGA-TRAP and direct high-precision Penning trap mass measurements on rare-earth elements and americium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketelaer, Jens

    2010-06-14

    The construction of TRIGA-TRAP and direct high-precision Penning trap mass measurements on rare-earth elements and americium: Nuclear masses are an important quantity to study nuclear structure since they reflect the sum of all nucleonic interactions. Many experimental possibilities exist to precisely measure masses, out of which the Penning trap is the tool to reach the highest precision. Moreover, absolute mass measurements can be performed using carbon, the atomic-mass standard, as a reference. The new double-Penning trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP has been installed and commissioned within this thesis work, which is the very first experimental setup of this kind located at a nuclear reactor. New technical developments have been carried out such as a reliable non-resonant laser ablation ion source for the production of carbon cluster ions and are still continued, like a non-destructive ion detection technique for single-ion measurements. Neutron-rich fission products will be available by the reactor that are important for nuclear astrophysics, especially the r-process. Prior to the on-line coupling to the reactor, TRIGA-TRAP already performed off-line mass measurements on stable and long-lived isotopes and will continue this program. The main focus within this thesis was on certain rare-earth nuclides in the well-established region of deformation around N {proportional_to} 90. Another field of interest are mass measurements on actinoids to test mass models and to provide direct links to the mass standard. Within this thesis, the mass of {sup 241}Am could be measured directly for the first time. (orig.)

  13. The behaviour under irradiation of molybdenum matrix for inert matrix fuel containing americium oxide (CerMet concept)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agata, E.; Knol, S.; Fedorov, A. V.; Fernandez, A.; Somers, J.; Klaassen, F.

    2015-10-01

    Americium is a strong contributor to the long term radiotoxicity of high activity nuclear waste. Transmutation by irradiation in nuclear reactors or Accelerator Driven System (ADS, subcritical reactors dedicated to transmutation) of long-lived nuclides like 241Am is therefore an option for the reduction of radiotoxicity of waste packages to be stored in a repository. In order to safely burn americium in a fast reactor or ADS, it must be incorporated in a matrix that could be metallic (CerMet target) or ceramic (CerCer target). One of the most promising matrix to incorporate Am is molybdenum. In order to address the issues (swelling, stability under irradiation, gas retention and release) of using Mo as matrix to transmute Am, two irradiation experiments have been conducted recently at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten (The Netherland) namely HELIOS and BODEX. The BODEX experiment is a separate effect test, where the molybdenum behaviour is studied without the presence of fission products using 10B to "produce" helium, the HELIOS experiment included a more representative fuel target with the presence of Am and fission product. This paper covers the results of Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) of the two irradiation experiments mentioned above where molybdenum behaviour has been deeply investigated as possible matrix to transmute americium (CerMet fuel target). The behaviour of molybdenum looks satisfying at operating temperature but at high temperature (above 1000 °C) more investigation should be performed.

  14. Consideration of the effect of lymph-node deposition upon the measurement of plutonium and americium in the lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of an inhaled radionuclide by external photon counting includes quantities which may be contained in lymph nodes, as well as quantities in the lungs. An overestimate of the lung burden can result, if a portion of the radionuclide were present in the lymph nodes. This problem is analyzed with respect to the measurement of inhaled plutonium containing plutonium-241 and americium-241, when americium-241 has been used as a tracer for the plutonium. Equations are derived which yield the amounts of americium and of plutonium in the lungs and in the lymph nodes as a function of time after exposure and for various translocation and retention parameters. Count histories (count profiles) of actual exposure cases are compared with calculated count profiles in order to gain insight into possible values of the translocation and retention parameters. Comparison is also made with calculated count profiles using values of translocation and retention parameters recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for use with the Task Group Lung Model. The magnitude of the possible overestimate (error factor) was calculated for combinations o

  15. HELIOS: the new design of the irradiation of U-free fuels for americium transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Agata, E. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Klaassen, F.; Sciolla, C. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Dept. Life Cycle and Innovations, P.O. Box 25 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Fernandez-Carretero, A. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bonnerot, J.M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, DEC/SESC/LC2I CEA-Cadarache, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2009-06-15

    Americium is one of the radioactive elements that mostly contribute to the radiotoxicity of the nuclear spent fuel. Transmutation of long-lived nuclides like Americium is an option for the reduction of the mass, the radiotoxicity and the decay heat of nuclear waste. The HELIOS irradiation experiment is the last evolution in a series of experiments on americium transmutation. The previous experiments, EFTTRA-T4 and T4bis, have shown that the release or trapping of helium is the key issue for the design of such kind of target. In fact, the production of helium, which is characteristic of {sup 241}Am transmutation, is quite significant. The experiment is carried out in the framework of the 4-year project EUROTRANS of the EURATOM 6. Framework Programme (FP6). Therefore, the main objective of the HELIOS experiment is to study the in-pile behaviour of U-free fuels such as CerCer (Pu, Am, Zr)O{sub 2} and Am{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}+MgO or CerMet (Pu, Am)O{sub 2}+Mo in order to gain knowledge on the role of the fuel microstructure and of the temperature on the gas release and on the fuel swelling. The experiment was planned to be conducted in the HFR (High Flux Reactor) in Petten (The Netherlands) starting the first quarter of 2007. Because of the innovative aspects of the fuel, the fabrication has had some delays as well as the final safety analyses of the original design showed some unexpected deviation. Besides, the HFR reactor has been unavailable since August 2008. Due to the reasons described above, the experiment has been postponed. HELIOS should start in the first quarter of 2009 and will last 300 full power days. The paper will cover the description of the new design of the irradiation experiment HELIOS. The experiment has been split in two parts (HELIOS1 and HELIOS2) which will be irradiated together. Moreover, due to the high temperature achieved in cladding and to the high amount of helium produced during transmutation the experiment previously designed for a

  16. Anomalous aryl strengthening of complexes at americium and europium extraction with alkylenediphospine dioxide from perchloric media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studied was the extraction of americium(3) and europium(3) from perchlorate solutions(0.001 M) with dioxides of alkylenediphosphines of three types: aryl Ph2P(O)CH2(O)PPh2(briefly 4P), and Ph2P(O)(CH2)2(O)PPh2, mixed Ph2P(O)CH2(O)P(C8H17)2 (or 2Ph2Oct) and alkyl (C8H17)2P(O)CH2(O)P(C8H17)2 (or 4 Oct). Trisolvates of MeS3x(ClO4)3 are predominantly formed but americium disolvates are also present upon dilution with dichloroethane. For 4Ph,2Ph2Oct and 4 Oct the concentration is, respectively, 1015, 2x1014, and 1013; for disolvates by 4 orders of magnitude lower which is, nevertheless, by 2 orders of magnitude higher than for nitric acid solutions. The separation coefficient of β Am/Eu for 4Ph attains 6-8. As in the case of nitrate solutions, an anomalous aryl strengthening of the complexes is observed: an increase in the distribution coefficients and extraction constants in the series of 4 Oct - 2Ph 2 Oct - 4Ph, in spite of the introduction of electronegative aryl substituents into the dioxide molecule, which reduce electron density on oxygen atoms and basicity of dioxides. In contrast to nitric acid solutions, observed is a nonlinear effect of a change in basicity on extraction properties upon dilution with dichloroethane (dioxide of 2Ph2 Oct does not occupy an intermediate position but is close to 4Ph). Upon dilution with chloroform the dependence is linear and anomalous effect rises due to a different nature of interactions of dioxides with chloroform. When the bridge increases up to ethylene, an anomalous strengthening of the complexes disappears. However, the distribution coefficients upon extraction with alkyl dioxide are considerably lower, which can be explained by a stronger extraction of perchloric acid

  17. Americium-based oxides: Dense pellet fabrication from co-converted oxalates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horlait, Denis; Lebreton, Florent [CEA, DEN, DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Gauthé, Aurélie [CEA, DEN, DRCP/SERA/LCAR, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Caisso, Marie [CEA, DEN, DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Arab-Chapelet, Bénédicte; Picart, Sébastien [CEA, DEN, DRCP/SERA/LCAR, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Delahaye, Thibaud, E-mail: thibaud.delahaye@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France)

    2014-01-15

    Mixed oxides are used as nuclear fuels and are notably envisaged for future fuel cycles including plutonium and minor actinide recycling. In this context, processes are being developed for the fabrication of uranium–americium mixed-oxide compounds for transmutation. The purpose of these processes is not only the compliance with fuel specifications in terms of density and homogeneity, but also the simplification of the process for its industrialization as well as lowering dust generation. In this paper, the use of a U{sub 0.85}Am{sub 0.15}O{sub 2±δ} powder synthesized by oxalate co-conversion as a precursor for dense fuel fabrications is assessed. This study notably focuses on sintering, which yielded pellets up to 96% of the theoretical density, taking advantage of the high reactivity and homogeneity of the powder. As-obtained pellets were further characterized to be compared to those obtained via processes based on the UMACS (Uranium Minor Actinide Conventional Sintering) process. This comparison highlights several advantages of co-converted powder as a precursor for simplified processes that generate little dust.

  18. Study of biosorbents application on the treatment of radioactive liquid wastes with americium-241

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of nuclear energy for many different purposes has been intensified and highlighted by the benefits that it provides. Medical diagnosis and therapy, agriculture, industry and electricity generation are examples of its application. However, nuclear energy generates radioactive wastes that require suitable treatment ensuring life and environmental safety. Biosorption and bioaccumulation represent an emergent alternative for the treatment of radioactive liquid wastes, providing volume reduction and physical state change. This work aimed to study biosorbents for the treatment of radioactive liquid wastes contaminated with americium-241 in order to reduce the volume and change the physical state from liquid to solid. The biosorbents evaluated were Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilized in calcium alginate beads, inactivated and free cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, calcium alginate beads, Bacillus subtilis, Cupriavidus metallidurans and Ochrobactrum anthropi. The results were quite satisfactory, achieving 100% in some cases. The technique presented in this work may be useful and viable for implementing at the Waste Management Laboratory of IPEN - CNEN/SP in short term, since it is an easy and low cost method. (author)

  19. Mutual separation of americium(III) and europium(III) using glycolamic acid and thioglycolamic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suneesh, A.S.; Venkatesan, K.A.; Syamala, K.V.; Antony, M.P.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Fuel Chemistry Div.

    2012-07-01

    The extractants, bis(2-ethylhexyl)diglycolamicacid (HDEHDGA) and bis(2-ethylhexy)thiodiglycolamic acid (HDEHSDGA) were synthesized and characterized by {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR, mass and IR spectroscopy. The extraction behaviour of {sup (152+154})Eu(III) and {sup 241}Am(III) from nitric acid medium by a solution of HDEHDGA (or HDEHSDGA) in n-dodecane (n-DD) was studied for the mutual separation of actinides and lanthanides. The effect of various parameters such as the pH, concentrations of HDEHDGA, HDEHSDGA, sodium nitrate, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) on the separation factor (SF) of americium(III) over europium(III) and vice versa was studied, and the conditions needed for the preferential separation were optimised. The results show that HDEHDGA exhibits higher extraction for {sup (152+154)}Eu(III) and HDEHSDGA shows the superior selectivity for {sup 241}Am(III). (orig.)

  20. Development and Testing of an Americium/Lanthanide Separation Flowsheet Using Sodium Bismuthate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack Law; Bruce Mincher; Troy Garn; Mitchell Greenhalgh; Nicholas Schmitt; Veronica Rutledge

    2014-04-01

    The separation of Am from the lanthanides and curium is a key step in proposed advanced fuel cycle scenarios. The partitioning and transmutation of Am is desirable to minimize the long-term heat load of material interred in a future high-level waste repository. A separation process amenable to process scale-up remains elusive. Given only subtle chemistry differences within and between the ions of the trivalent actinide and lanthanide series this separation is challenging ; however, higher oxidation states of americium can be prepared using sodium bismuthate and separated via solvent extraction using diamylamylphosphonate (DAAP) extraction. Among the other trivalent metals only Ce is also oxidized and extracted. Due to the long-term instability of Am(VI) , the loaded organic phase is readily selectively stripped to partition the actinide to a new acidic aqueous phase. Batch extraction distribution ratio measurements were used to design a flowsheet to accomplish this separation. Additionally, crossflow filtration was investigated as a method to filter the bismuthate solids from the feed solution prior to extraction. Results of the filtration studies, flowsheet development work and flowsheet performance testing using a centrifugal contactor are detailed.

  1. Speciation and bioavailability of Americium-241 in the fresh water environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to its anthropogenic origin, the transuranic americium 241 confronts physiologists with the intriguing question, which mechanisms are involved in the incorporation or elimination of such artificial elements in biological cycles. The investigations on the speciation and bioavailability of 241Am in the freshwater environment aim to establish a relation between the behavior of 241Am in freshwater ecosystems and its availability for biota. In the limnic environment, most often characterized by a high organic load and a low conductivity, the effect of complexation of 241Am with humic acids and competition with trivalent cations such as A1 and Fe, were proven to be significant on the speciation of 241Am. Based on the registration of the 241Am uptake by a large number of freshwater organisms, the crayfish Astacus leptodactylus Eschscholtz was chosen to study the whole-body uptake of 241Am, its corresponding organ distribution and its retention in the animal. The share of external fixation and ingestion in the global uptake, and the effect of speciation on it, were studied more carefully. Other aspects in this physiological part were: the kinetics of 241Am in the hemolymph and the hepatopancreas, and its subcellular distribution in the digestive gland. Finally, by comparing the physiology of 241Am with some other metals (240Pu, 64Cu, 198Au) with analogous or contradictional properties, we tried to find out whether the behavior of 241Am in organisms can be explained from its chemical characteristics

  2. Solution speciation of plutonium and Americium at an Australian legacy radioactive waste disposal site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda-Ohno, Atsushi; Harrison, Jennifer J; Thiruvoth, Sangeeth; Wilsher, Kerry; Wong, Henri K Y; Johansen, Mathew P; Waite, T David; Payne, Timothy E

    2014-09-01

    During the 1960s, radioactive waste containing small amounts of plutonium (Pu) and americium (Am) was disposed in shallow trenches at the Little Forest Burial Ground (LFBG), located near the southern suburbs of Sydney, Australia. Because of periodic saturation and overflowing of the former disposal trenches, Pu and Am have been transferred from the buried wastes into the surrounding surface soils. The presence of readily detected amounts of Pu and Am in the trench waters provides a unique opportunity to study their aqueous speciation under environmentally relevant conditions. This study aims to comprehensively investigate the chemical speciation of Pu and Am in the trench water by combining fluoride coprecipitation, solvent extraction, particle size fractionation, and thermochemical modeling. The predominant oxidation states of dissolved Pu and Am species were found to be Pu(IV) and Am(III), and large proportions of both actinides (Pu, 97.7%; Am, 86.8%) were associated with mobile colloids in the submicron size range. On the basis of this information, possible management options are assessed. PMID:25126837

  3. Solution speciation of plutonium and Americium at an Australian legacy radioactive waste disposal site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda-Ohno, Atsushi; Harrison, Jennifer J; Thiruvoth, Sangeeth; Wilsher, Kerry; Wong, Henri K Y; Johansen, Mathew P; Waite, T David; Payne, Timothy E

    2014-09-01

    During the 1960s, radioactive waste containing small amounts of plutonium (Pu) and americium (Am) was disposed in shallow trenches at the Little Forest Burial Ground (LFBG), located near the southern suburbs of Sydney, Australia. Because of periodic saturation and overflowing of the former disposal trenches, Pu and Am have been transferred from the buried wastes into the surrounding surface soils. The presence of readily detected amounts of Pu and Am in the trench waters provides a unique opportunity to study their aqueous speciation under environmentally relevant conditions. This study aims to comprehensively investigate the chemical speciation of Pu and Am in the trench water by combining fluoride coprecipitation, solvent extraction, particle size fractionation, and thermochemical modeling. The predominant oxidation states of dissolved Pu and Am species were found to be Pu(IV) and Am(III), and large proportions of both actinides (Pu, 97.7%; Am, 86.8%) were associated with mobile colloids in the submicron size range. On the basis of this information, possible management options are assessed.

  4. Leatherback Isotopes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — SWFSC is currently working on a project identifying global marine isotopes using leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) as the indicator species. We currently...

  5. Americium-Curium Stabilization - 5'' Cylindrical Induction Melter System Design Basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witt, D.C.

    1999-11-08

    Approximately 11,000 liters (3,600) gallons of solution containing isotopes of Am and Cm are currently stored in F-Canyon Tank 17.1. These isotopes were recovered during plutonium-242 production campaigns in the mid- and late-1970s. Experimental work for the project began in 1995 by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). Details of the process are given in the various sections of this document.

  6. Americium-Curium Stabilization - 5'' Cylindrical Induction Melter System Design Basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately 11,000 liters (3,600) gallons of solution containing isotopes of Am and Cm are currently stored in F-Canyon Tank 17.1. These isotopes were recovered during plutonium-242 production campaigns in the mid- and late-1970s. Experimental work for the project began in 1995 by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). Details of the process are given in the various sections of this document

  7. Isotopic chirality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floss, H.G. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    This paper deals with compounds that are chiral-at least in part, due to isotope substitution-and their use in tracing the steric course of enzyme reaction in vitro and in vivo. There are other applications of isotopically chiral compounds (for example, in analyzing the steric course of nonenzymatic reactions and in probing the conformation of biomolecules) that are important but they will not be discussed in this context.

  8. Isotopic Paleoclimatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, R.

    Paleotemperature scales were calculated by H. C. Urey and others in the 1950s to assess past temperatures, and later work using the stable isotopes of oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon employed standards such as Peedee belemnite (PDB) and Standard Mean Ocean Water (SMOW). Subsequently, subjects as diverse as ice volume and paleotemperatures, oceanic ice and sediment cores, Pleistocene/Holocene climatic changes, and isotope chronostratigraphy extending back to the Precambrian were investigated.

  9. Biosorption of Americium-242 by saccharomyces cerevisiae: preliminary evaluation and mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an important radioisotope in nuclear industry and other fields, americium-241 is one of the most serious contamination concerns duo to its high radiation toxicity and long half-life. In this experiment, the biosorption of 241Am from solution by a fungus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae), and the effects of various experimental conditions on the biosorption and the mechanism were explored. The preliminary results showed that S. cerevisiae is a very efficient biosorbent. An average of more than 99% of the total 241Am could be removed by S. cerevisiae of 2.1g/L (dry weight) from 241Am solutions of 2.22MBq/L -555 MBq/L (Co). The adsorption equilibrium was achieved within 1 hour and the optimum pH ranged 1-3. The culture times of more than 16 hours were suitable and the efficient adsorption of 241Am by the S. cerevisiae could be noted. The biosorption of 241Am by the decomposed cell wall, protoplasm or cell membrane of S. cerevisiae was same efficient as by the intact fungus, but the some components of S. cerevisiae, such as protein and acylation group had obvious effect on adsorption. When the concentrations of coexistent Eu3+, Nd3+ were 100 times more than that of 241Am, the adsorption rates would drop to 65%. However, most of the investigated acidic ions have no significant influence on the 241Am adsorption but minute change of pH value, while the saturated EDTA can strong inhibit the biosorption of 241Am.. (authors)

  10. Transport of plutonium, americium, and curium from soils into plants by roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For assessing the dose from radionuclides in agricultural products by ingestion it is necessary to know the soil to plant transfer factors. The literature was entirely investigated, in order to judge the size of the soil to plant transfer factors. In total, 92 publications - from 1948 to 1978 -have been evaluated. As result, transfer factors from 10-9 to 10-3 have been found for Plutonium, and from 10-6 to 1 for Americium. For Curium only few data are available in literature. The considerable variation of the measured transfer factors is based on the dependence of these transfer factors from the ion exchange capacity of soils, from the amount of organic materials, from the pH-value, and from the mode of contamination. There are, in any case, contradictory data, although there has been detected a dependence of the transfer factors from these parameters. Chelating agenst increase the transfer factors to approximately 1300. As well, fertilizers have an influence on the size of the transfer factors - however, the relationships have been scarcely investigated. The distribution of actinides within the individual parts of plants has been investigated. The highest concentrations are in the roots; in the plant parts above ground the concentration of actinides decreases considerably. The most inferior transfer factors were measured for the respective seed or fruits. The soil to plant transfer factors of actinides are more dependend on the age of the plants within one growing period. At the beginning of the period, the transfer factor is considerably higher than at the end of this period. With respect to plants with a growing period of several years, correlations are unknown. (orig.)

  11. The treatment of liquid radioactive waste containing Americium by using a cation exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A research in the treatment of a liquid radioactive waste containing americium has been done. The liquid radioactive waste used in this research was standard solution of U dan Ce with the initial activity of 100 ppm. The experimental investigation is aimed at a study of the effects of the waste pH, the column dimension of IR-120 cation exchanger which is expressed as L/D, the flow rate of a liquid waste and the influence of thiocyanate as a complex agent against the efficiency of a decontamination for uranium and cerium element. The experiment was done by passing downward the feed of uranium and cerium solution into an IR-120 type of cation exchanger with the L/D of 11.37. From the experimental parameters done in this research where the influence of waste pH was varied from 3 - 8, the geometric column (L/D) 11.37, the liquid flow rate was from 2.5 - 10 ml/m and the thiocyanate concentration was between 100 ppm-500 ppm can be concluded that the optimum operational condition for the ion exchange achieved were the waste pH for uranium = 4 and the waste pH for cerium = 6, the flow rate = 2.5 ml/men. From the given maximum value of DF for uranium = 24 (DE = 95.83%) and of DF for cerium = 40 (DE = 97.5%), it can also be concluded that this investigation is to be continued in order that the greater value of DF/DE can be achieved

  12. Use of radioisotopes in the study of tetracycline analytical application. Extraction of compounds formed between tetracycline and neptunium and americium elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behavior of tetracycline as complexing agent, in solvent extraction studies of neptunium and americium, using benzyl alcohol as the organic phase, is presented. By using radioactive tracers of 239Np and 241Am the extraction percent of these elements were determined as a function of pH in the absence and in the presence of several masking agents. The influence of shaking time and the use of different types of supporting eletrolytes upon the extraction behavior was also studied. The extraction curves obtained using EDTA as masking agent show that tetracycline can be used for neptunium and americium separation. In this condition neptunium is extracted into the organic phase and americium remains in the aqueous phase. (Author)

  13. Effect of a long-term release of plutonium and americium into an estuarine and coastal sea ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the general problem of speciation of plutonium and americium in aquatic ecosystems and the implications relative to their fate in those systems. The following conclusions were reached: several oxidation states of plutonium coexist in the natural environment; the effect of environmental changes such as pH and Esub(h) values and complexes are probably the cause of these various oxidation states; a clearer definition of the 'concentration factor' should be given in view of the important role the sediments play in supplying plutonium for transfer through the food web. (author)

  14. EFFECT OF COMPOSITION OF SELECTED GROUNDWATERS FROM THE BASIN AND RANGE PROVINCE ON PLUTONIUM, NEPTUNIUM, AND AMERICIUM SPECIATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Terry F.; Cleveland, Jess M.; Nash, Kenneth L.

    1984-01-01

    The speciation of plutonium, neptunium, and americium was determined in groundwaters from four sources in the Basin and Range Province: the lower carbonate aquifer, Nevada Test Site (NTS) (Crystal Pool); alluvial fill, Frenchman Flat, NTS (well 5C); Hualapai Valley, Arizona (Red Lake south well); and Tularosa Basin, New Mexico (Rentfrow well). The results were interpreted to indicate that plutonium and, to a lesser extent, neptunium are least soluble in reducing groundwaters containing a large concentration of sulfate ion and a small concentration of strongly complexing anions. The results further emphasize the desirability of including studies such as this among the other site-selection criteria for nuclear waste repositories.

  15. Microstructure and elemental distribution of americium-containing MOX fuel under the short-term irradiation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate the effect of americium addition to MOX fuels on the irradiation behavior, the 'Am-1' program is being conducted in JAEA. The Am-1 program consists of two short-term irradiation tests of 10-minute and 24-hour irradiations and a steady-state irradiation test. The short-term irradiation tests were successfully completed and the post irradiation examinations (PIEs) are in progress. The PIEs for Am-containing MOX fuels focused on the microstructural evolution and redistribution behavior of Am at the initial stage of irradiation and the results to date are reported. (author)

  16. Development of a methodology for the determination of americium and thorium by ICP-AES and their inter-element effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the scarcity of good quality uranium resources, the growth of nuclear technology in India is dependent on the utilization of the vast thorium resources. Therefore, Advance Heavy Water Reactor is going to acquire significant role in the scenario of Indian nuclear technology, where (Th, Pu)O2 will be utilized as fuel in the outermost ring of the reactor core. This will lead to a complex matrix containing thorium as well as americium, which is formed due to β-decay of plutonium. The amount of americium is dependent on the burn up and the storage time of the Pu based fuels. In the present case, attempt was made to develop a method for the determination of americium as well as thorium by ICP-AES. Two emission lines of americium were identified and calibration curves were established for determination of americium. Though the detection limit of 283.236 nm line (5 ng mL-1) of americium was found to be better than that of 408.930 nm (11 ng mL-1), the former line is significantly interfered by large amount of thorium. Three analytical lines (i.e. 283.242, 283.730 and 401.913 nm) of thorium were identified and calibration curves were established along with their detection limits. It was observed that 283.242 and 401.913 nm line are having similar detection limits (18 and 13 ng mL-1, respectively) which are better than that of 283.730 nm (60 ng mL-1). This can be attributed to the high background of 283.273 nm channel of thorium. The spectral interference study revealed that even small amount of americium has significant contribution on 283.242 nm channel of thorium while the other two channels remain practically unaffected. Considering both these facts, spectral interference and analytical performance (detection limits and sensitivity), it was concluded that 401.913 nm line is the best analytical line out of the three lines for determination of thorium in presence of americium. (author)

  17. Effect of radiolysis on leachability of plutonium and americium from 76-101 glass. [Glass containing 2 mole % plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, K.L.; Fried, S.; Friedman, A.M.; Susak, N.; Rickert, P.; Sullivan, J.C.; Karim, D.P.; Lam, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    One aspect of the leachability of actinide-bearing glass which has not been adequately addressed is the effect of radiolysis of the system (glass-water) on the amount of actinides liberated from the glass. In the present study, we have investigated the leaching of plutonium and americium from 76-101 glass samples (containing 2 mole % plutonium) in the presence of a one megaRad/hour gamma-radiation field. The presence of the radiation field was found to increase the leaching rate of both plutonium and americium by a factor of five. Speciation studies of the plutonium in the leachate indicate that the plutonium is present predominantly in the higher oxidation states, Pu(V) and Pu(VI) and that it is significantly associated with colloidal particles. Examination of the glass surfaces with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, XPS, both before and after leaching was carried out; these studies showed lower surface concentrations of plutonium in the samples of glass leached in the radiation field. 1 figure, 3 tables.

  18. Osteosarcoma induction by plutonium-239, americium-241 and neptunium-237 : the problem of deriving risk estimates for man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spontaneous bone cancer (osteosarcoma) represents only about 0.3% of all human cancers, but is well known to be inducible in humans by internal contamination with radium-226 and radium-224. plutonium-239, americium-241 and neptunium-237 form, or will form, the principal long-lived alpha particle emitting components of high activity waste and burnt-up nuclear fuel elements. These three nuclides deposit extensively in human bone and although, fortunately, no case of a human osteosarcoma induced by any of these nuclides is known, evidence from animal studies suggests that all three are more effective than radium-226 in inducing osteosarcoma. The assumption that the ratio of the risk factors, the number of osteosarcoma expected per 10000 person/animal Gy, for radium-226 and any other bone-seeking alpha-emitter will be independent of animal species has formed the basis of all the important studies of the radiotoxicity of actinide nuclides in experimental animals. The aim of this communication is to review the risk factors which may be calculated from the various animal studies carried out over the last thirty years with plutonium-237, americium-241 and neptunium-237 and to consider the problems which may arise in extrapolating these risk factors to homo sapiens

  19. Experimental Study on Behavior of Americium in Pyrochemical Process of Nitride Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R and D on the transmutation of long-lived minor actinides (MA) by the accelerator-driven system (ADS) using nitride fuels is underway at JAEA. In regard to reprocessing technology, pyrochemical process has several advantages in case of treating spent fuel with large decay heat and fast neutron emission, and recovering highly enriched N-15. In the pyrochemical reprocessing, plutonium and MA are dissolved in LiCl-KCl eutectic melts and selectively recovered into liquid cadmium (Cd) cathode by molten salt electrorefining. The electrochemical behavior in LiCl-KCl eutectic melts and the subsequent nitride formation behavior of plutonium and MA recovered in liquid Cd cathode are investigated. In this paper, recent results on electrochemical study of americium (Am) on electrolyses of AmN in LiCl-KCl eutectic melts and nitride formation of Am recovered in the liquid Cd cathode are presented. Electrochemical behavior of Am on anodic dissolution of AmN and recovery of Am into a liquid Cd cathode by electrolyses in LiCl-KCl eutectic melts was investigated by transient electrochemical techniques. The formal standard potential of Am(III)/Am(0) obtained with the liquid Cd electrode is more positive than that calculated for the solid metal electrode. The potential shift is considered to be attributed to the lowering of the activity of Am by the formation of the intermetallic compound with Cd. Potentiostatic electrolyses of AmN in LiCl-KCl eutectic melts containing AmCl3 at 773 K were carried out. Nitrogen gas generated by the anodic dissolution of AmN was observed, and the current efficiency was obtained from the ratio of the amount of released nitrogen gas and the passed electric charge to be 20 - 28 %. Am was recovered as Am-Cd alloy in the liquid Cd cathode, in which AmCd6 type phase was identified besides Cd phase. The recovered Am was converted to AmN by the nitridation-distillation combined method, in which the Am-Cd alloy was heated in nitrogen gas stream at 973 K. These

  20. Isotope Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Caffau, E; Bonifacio, P; Ludwig, H -G; Monaco, L; Curto, G Lo; Kamp, I

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of isotopic ratios provides a privileged insight both into nucleosynthesis and into the mechanisms operating in stellar envelopes, such as gravitational settling. In this article, we give a few examples of how isotopic ratios can be determined from high-resolution, high-quality stellar spectra. We consider examples of the lightest elements, H and He, for which the isotopic shifts are very large and easily measurable, and examples of heavier elements for which the determination of isotopic ratios is more difficult. The presence of 6Li in the stellar atmospheres causes a subtle extra depression in the red wing of the 7Li 670.7 nm doublet which can only be detected in spectra of the highest quality. But even with the best spectra, the derived $^6$Li abundance can only be as good as the synthetic spectra used for their interpretation. It is now known that 3D non-LTE modelling of the lithium spectral line profiles is necessary to account properly for the intrinsic line asymmetry, which is produced ...

  1. LIBS Spectral Data for a Mixed Actinide Fuel Pellet Containing Uranium, Plutonium, Neptunium and Americium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judge, Elizabeth J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Berg, John M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Le, Loan A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lopez, Leon N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barefield, James E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-18

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to analyze a mixed actinide fuel pellet containing 75% UO{sub 2}/20% PuO{sub 2}/3% AmO{sub 2}/2% NpO{sub 2}. The preliminary data shown here is the first report of LIBS analysis of a mixed actinide fuel pellet, to the authors knowledge. The LIBS spectral data was acquired in a plutonium facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory where the sample was contained within a glove box. The initial installation of the glove box was not intended for complete ultraviolet (UV), visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) transmission, therefore the LIBS spectrum is truncated in the UV and NIR regions due to the optical transmission of the window port and filters that were installed. The optical collection of the emission from the LIBS plasma will be optimized in the future. However, the preliminary LIBS data acquired is worth reporting due to the uniqueness of the sample and spectral data. The analysis of several actinides in the presence of each other is an important feature of this analysis since traditional methods must chemically separate uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium prior to analysis. Due to the historic nature of the sample fuel pellet analyzed, the provided sample composition of 75% UO{sub 2}/20% PuO{sub 2}/3% AmO{sub 2}/2% NpO{sub 2} cannot be confirm without further analytical processing. Uranium, plutonium, and americium emission lines were abundant and easily assigned while neptunium was more difficult to identify. There may be several reasons for this observation, other than knowing the exact sample composition of the fuel pellet. First, the atomic emission wavelength resources for neptunium are limited and such techniques as hollow cathode discharge lamp have different dynamics than the plasma used in LIBS which results in different emission spectra. Secondly, due to the complex sample of four actinide elements, which all have very dense electronic energy levels, there may be reactions and

  2. Preconcentration of low levels of americium and plutonium from waste waters by synthetic water-soluble metal-binding polymers with ultrafiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preconcentration approach to assist in the measurement of low levels of americium and plutonium in waste waters has been developed based on the concept of using water-soluble metal-binding polymers in combination with ultrafiltration. The method has been optimized to give over 90% recovery and accountability from actual waste water. (author)

  3. Theoretical investigation of pressure-induced structural transitions in americium using GGA+U and hybrid density functional theory methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verma, Ashok K.; Modak, P.; Sharma, Surinder M.;

    2013-01-01

    First-principles calculations have been performed for americium (Am) metal using the generalized gradient approximation + orbital-dependent onsite Coulomb repulsion via Hubbard interaction (GGA+U) and hybrid density functional theory (HYB-DFT) methods to investigate various ground state propertie...

  4. Americium and plutonium separation by extraction chromatography for determination by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, Zakir H; Cornett, Jack R; Zhao, Xaiolei; Kieser, Liam

    2014-06-01

    A simple method was developed to separate Pu and Am using single column extraction chromatography employing N,N,N',N'-tetra-n-octyldiglycolamide (DGA) resin. Isotope dilution measurements of Am and Pu were performed using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and alpha spectrometry. For maximum adsorption Pu was stabilized in the tetra valent oxidation state in 8M HNO3 with 0.05 M NaNO2 before loading the sample onto the resin. Am(III) was adsorbed also onto the resin from concentrated HNO3, and desorbed with 0.1 M HCl while keeping the Pu adsorbed. The on-column reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) with 0.02 M TiCl3 facilitated the complete desorption of Pu. Interferences (e.g. Ca(2+), Fe(3+)) were washed off from the resin bed with excess HNO3. Using NdF3, micro-precipitates of the separated isotopes were prepared for analysis by both AMS and alpha spectrometry. The recovery was 97.7±5.3% and 95.5±4.6% for (241)Am and (242)Pu respectively in reagents without a matrix. The recoveries of the same isotopes were 99.1±6.0 and 96.8±5.3% respectively in garden soil. The robustness of the method was validated using certified reference materials (IAEA 384 and IAEA 385). The measurements agree with the certified values over a range of about 1-100 Bq kg(-1). The single column separation of Pu and Am saves reagents, separation time, and cost. PMID:24856406

  5. Concordant plutonium-241-americium-241 dating of environmental samples: results from forest fire ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, Steven J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oldham, Warren J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Murrell, Michael T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Katzman, Danny [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-07

    We have measured the Pu, {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 151}Sm isotopic systematics for a set of forest fire ash samples from various locations in the western U.S. including Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, and New Mexico. The goal of this study is to develop a concordant {sup 241}Pu (t{sub 1/2} = 14.4 y)-{sup 241}Am dating method for environmental collections. Environmental samples often contain mixtures of components including global fallout. There are a number of approaches for subtracting the global fallout component for such samples. One approach is to use {sup 242}/{sup 239}Pu as a normalizing isotope ratio in a three-isotope plot, where this ratio for the nonglobal fallout component can be estimated or assumed to be small. This study investigates a new, complementary method of normalization using the long-lived fission product, {sup 151}Sm (t{sub 1/2} = 90 y). We find that forest fire ash concentrates actinides and fission products with {approx}1E10 atoms {sup 239}Pu/g and {approx}1E8 atoms {sup 151}Sm/g, allowing us to measure these nuclides by mass spectrometric (MIC-TIMS) and radiometric (liquid scintillation counting) methods. The forest fire ash samples are characterized by a western U.S. regional isotopic signature representing varying mixtures of global fallout with a local component from atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Our results also show that {sup 151}Sm is well correlated with the Pu nuclides in the forest fire ash, suggesting that these nuclides have similar geochemical behavior in the environment. Results of this correlation indicate that the {sup 151}Sm/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio for global fallout is {approx}0.164, in agreement with an independent estimate of 0.165 based on {sup 137}Cs fission yields for atmospheric weapons tests at the NTS. {sup 241}Pu-{sup 241}Am dating of the non-global fallout component in the forest fire ash samples yield ages in the late 1950's-early 1960's, consistent with a peak

  6. Comparative XRPD and XAS study of the impact of the synthesis process on the electronic and structural environments of uranium-americium mixed oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieur, D.; Lebreton, F.; Martin, P. M.; Caisso, M.; Butzbach, R.; Somers, J.; Delahaye, T.

    2015-10-01

    Uranium-americium mixed oxides are potential compounds to reduce americium inventory in nuclear waste via a partitioning and transmutation strategy. A thorough assessment of the oxygen-to-metal ratio is paramount in such materials as it determines the important underlying electronic structure and phase relations, affecting both thermal conductivity of the material and its interaction with the cladding and coolant. In 2011, various XAS experiments on U1-xAmxO2±δ samples prepared by different synthesis methods have reported contradictory results on the charge distribution of U and Am. This work alleviates this discrepancy. The XAS results confirm that, independently of the synthesis process, the reductive sintering of U1-xAmxO2±δ leads to the formation of similar fluorite solid solution indicating the presence of Am+III and U+V in equimolar proportions.

  7. Americium and plutonium separation by extraction chromatography for determination by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazi, Zakir H. [Department of Earth Science, University of Ottawa, 140 Louis Pasteur Avenue, Ottawa K1N 6N5 (Canada); Cornett, Jack R., E-mail: jack.cornett@uottawa.ca [Department of Earth Science, University of Ottawa, 140 Louis Pasteur Avenue, Ottawa K1N 6N5 (Canada); Zhao, Xaiolei; Kieser, Liam [Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 140 Louis Pasteur Avenue, Ottawa K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Am and Pu were adsorbed and separated using a single extraction chromatography DGA column. • Pu was eluted from the column completely using on-column reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III). • ²⁴¹Am and 239,240Pu measurements by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) agree with the certified values in two SRMs. Abstract: A simple method was developed to separate Pu and Am using single column extraction chromatography employing N,N,N',N'-tetra-n-octyldiglycolamide (DGA) resin. Isotope dilution measurements of Am and Pu were performed using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and alpha spectrometry. For maximum adsorption Pu was stabilized in the tetra valent oxidation state in 8 M HNO₃ with 0.05 M NaNO₂ before loading the sample onto the resin. Am(III) was adsorbed also onto the resin from concentrated HNO₃, and desorbed with 0.1 M HCl while keeping the Pu adsorbed. The on-column reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) with 0.02 M TiCl₃ facilitated the complete desorption of Pu. Interferences (e.g. Ca²⁺, Fe³⁺) were washed off from the resin bed with excess HNO₃. Using NdF₃, micro-precipitates of the separated isotopes were prepared for analysis by both AMS and alpha spectrometry. The recovery was 97.7 ± 5.3% and 95.5 ± 4.6% for ²⁴¹Am and ²⁴²Pu respectively in reagents without a matrix. The recoveries of the same isotopes were 99.1 ± 6.0 and 96.8 ± 5.3% respectively in garden soil. The robustness of the method was validated using certified reference materials (IAEA 384 and IAEA 385). The measurements agree with the certified values over a range of about 1–100 Bq kg⁻¹. The single column separation of Pu and Am saves reagents, separation time, and cost.

  8. A Density Functional Study of Atomic Hydrogen and Oxygen Chemisorption on the Relaxed (0001) Surface of Double Hexagonal Close Packed Americium

    OpenAIRE

    Dholabhai, P. P.; Atta-Fynn, R.; A.K. Ray

    2009-01-01

    Ab initio total energy calculations within the framework of density functional theory have been performed for atomic hydrogen and oxygen chemisorption on the (0001) surface of double hexagonal packed americium using a full-potential all-electron linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbitals method. Chemisorption energies were optimized with respect to the distance of the adatom from the relaxed surface for three adsorption sites, namely top, bridge, and hollow hcp sites, the adlayer str...

  9. Experimental study of Americium-241 biokinetics in Homarus Gammarus lobster. Analysis of the accumulation and detoxication mechanisms at the sub-cellular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Americium 241 radioelement accumulation and elimination rate and mechanisms in the lobster organism have been experimentally studied; incorporation and detoxification capacities of each organ are evaluated. The existence of various biological compartments is shown; the major role of the digestive gland in accumulation of the radioelement, its distribution towards the various organs, and its resorption is comprehensively described, with an analysis at the subcellular and molecular levels. 401 p., 65 fig., 43 tab., 428 ref

  10. Sorption of americium in tuff and pure minerals using synthetic and natural groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of Am between selected solid and liquid phases has been studied using initial 241Am solutions with a molarity smaller than 1 x 10-11. The synthetic and natural groundwaters used have pH values in the 7--8 range and a total alkalinity of approximately 1 mN which is mainly due to bicarbonate. Mass spectrometric isotope dilution was utilized to determine the amount of Am in the solution phase initially and after equilibrium was attained. Using this sensitive technique, 7 x 108 atoms of 241Am were accurately measured. Our results indicate that the percent of Am lost to the walls of the container in the absence of geologic material varies from 35 to 84. The Am sorption coefficient determined is on the order of 103 ml/g for clinoptilolite, 104 ml/g for tuff consisting mainly of alkali feldspar and cristobalite, and 105 ml/g for romanechite. 12 refs

  11. A new method for the determination of plutonium and americium using high pressure microwave digestion and alpha-spectrometry or ICP-SMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium and americium are radionuclides particularly difficult to measure in environmental samples because they are a-emitters and therefore necessitate a careful separation before any measurement, either using radiometric methods or ICP-SMS. Recent developments in extraction chromatography resins such as EichromR TRU and TEVA have resolved many of the analytical problems but drawbacks such as low recovery and spectral interferences still occasionally occur. Here, we report on the use of the new EichromR DGA resin in association with TEVA resin and high pressure microwave acid leaching for the sequential determination of plutonium and americium in environmental samples. The method results in average recoveries of 83 ± 15% for plutonium and 73 ± 22% for americium (n = 60), and a less than 10% deviation from reference values of four IAEA reference materials and three samples from intercomparisons exercises. The method is also suitable for measuring 239Pu in water samples at the μBq/l level, if ICP-SMS is used for the measurement. (author)

  12. An experimental study of americium-241 biokinetics in the Lobster Homarus Gammarus. Analysis of the accumulation/storage and detoxification processes at the subcellular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental study of americium-241 kinetics has been conducted in the lobster Homarus gammmarus. The investigations were conducted at all the levels from the whole body to the subcellular and molecular levels. The animals were contaminated by a single or chronic ingestion of 241 Am labelled mussels. Assessments of accumulation, elimination and distribution of the radionuclide were established on organisms kept in the laboratory; they made it possible to demonstrate the importance of the digestive gland in the radionuclide transfer pathways. The preliminary results led to structural then ultrastructural investigations of the digestive gland in association with radioautographic studies and cellular extractions methods. Four cellular types were demonstrated, only two of them being implied in the radionuclide retention, the former being responsible for americium intake and the latter for its long-term retention. By means of biochemical techniques, subcellular accumulation was studied and the organelles implied in the nuclide retention were specified. Finally, a method of cellular nuclei dissociation was developed; it made it possible to analyse the molecular nature of americium ligands and to demonstrate the function of the protein nuclear matrix in the nuclide retention

  13. Comparative XRPD and XAS study of the impact of the synthesis process on the electronic and structural environments of uranium–americium mixed oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieur, D., E-mail: dam.prieur@gmail.com [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Lebreton, F. [CEA, DEN, DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Martin, P.M. [CEA, DEN, DEC/SESC/LLCC, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance cedex (France); Caisso, M. [CEA, DEN, DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Butzbach, R. [Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf (HZDR), Institute of Radiochemistry, P.O. Box 10119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Somers, J. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Delahaye, T. [CEA, DEN, DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France)

    2015-10-15

    Uranium–americium mixed oxides are potential compounds to reduce americium inventory in nuclear waste via a partitioning and transmutation strategy. A thorough assessment of the oxygen-to-metal ratio is paramount in such materials as it determines the important underlying electronic structure and phase relations, affecting both thermal conductivity of the material and its interaction with the cladding and coolant. In 2011, various XAS experiments on U{sub 1−x}Am{sub x}O{sub 2±δ} samples prepared by different synthesis methods have reported contradictory results on the charge distribution of U and Am. This work alleviates this discrepancy. The XAS results confirm that, independently of the synthesis process, the reductive sintering of U{sub 1−x}Am{sub x}O{sub 2±δ} leads to the formation of similar fluorite solid solution indicating the presence of Am{sup +III} and U{sup +V} in equimolar proportions. - Graphical abstract: Formation of (U{sup IV/V},Am{sup III})O{sup 2} solid solution by sol–gel and by powder metallurgy. - Highlights: • Uranium–americium mixed oxides were synthesized by sol–gel and powder metallurgy. • Fluorite solid solutions with similar local environment have been obtained. • U{sup V} and Am{sup III} are formed in equimolar proportions.

  14. Impact of environmental curium on plutonium migration and isotopic signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosaki, Hiromu; Kaplan, Daniel I; Clark, Sue B

    2014-12-01

    Plutonium (Pu), americium (Am), and curium (Cm) activities were measured in sediments from a former radioactive waste disposal basin located on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, and in subsurface aquifer sediments collected downgradient from the basin. In situ Kd values (Pu concentration ratio of sediment/groundwater) derived from this field data and previously reported groundwater concentration data compared well to laboratory Kd values reported in the literature. Pu isotopic signatures confirmed multiple sources of Pu contamination. The ratio of (240)Pu/(239)Pu was appreciably lower for sediment samples compared to the associated groundwater. This isotopic ratio difference may be explained by the following: (1) (240)Pu produced by decay of (244)Cm may exist predominantly in high oxidation states (Pu(V)O2(+) and Pu(VI)O2(2+)) compared to Pu derived from the disposed waste effluents, and (2) oxidized forms of Pu sorb less to sediments than reduced forms of Pu. Isotope-specific Kd values calculated from measured Pu activities in the sediments and groundwater indicated that (240)Pu, which is derived primarily from the decay of (244)Cm, had a value of 10 ± 2 mL g(-1), whereas (239)Pu originating from the waste effluents discharged at the site had a value of 101 ± 8 mL g(-1). One possible explanation for the isotope-specific sorption behavior is that (240)Pu likely existed in the weaker sorbing oxidation states, +5 or +6, than (239)Pu, which likely existed in the +3 or +4 oxidation states. Consequently, remediation strategies for radioactively contaminated systems must consider not only the discharged contaminants but also their decay products. In this case, mitigation of Cm as well as Pu will be required to completely address Pu migration from the source term. PMID:25350948

  15. Stable isotope studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs.

  16. Method for separating isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepson, B.E.

    1975-10-21

    Isotopes are separated by contacting a feed solution containing the isotopes with a cyclic polyether wherein a complex of one isotope is formed with the cyclic polyether, the cyclic polyether complex is extracted from the feed solution, and the isotope is thereafter separated from the cyclic polyether.

  17. Stable isotope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs

  18. Intramolecular sensitization of americium luminescence in solution: shining light on short-lived forbidden 5f transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturzbecher-Hoehne, M; Yang, P; D'Aléo, A; Abergel, R J

    2016-06-14

    The photophysical properties and solution thermodynamics of water soluble trivalent americium (Am(III)) complexes formed with multidentate chromophore-bearing ligands, 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO), Enterobactin, and 5-LIO(Me-3,2-HOPO), were investigated. The three chelators were shown to act as antenna chromophores for Am(III), generating sensitized luminescence emission from the metal upon complexation, with very short lifetimes ranging from 33 to 42 ns and low luminescence quantum yields (10(-3) to 10(-2)%), characteristic of Near Infra-Red emitters in similar systems. The specific emission peak of Am(III) assigned to the (5)D1 → (7)F1 f-f transition was exploited to characterize the high proton-independent stability of the complex formed with the most efficient sensitizer 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO), with a log β110 = 20.4 ± 0.2 value. In addition, the optical and solution thermodynamic features of these Am(III) complexes, combined with density functional theory calculations, were used to probe the influence of electronic structure on coordination properties across the f-element series and to gain insight into ligand field effects.

  19. Nano-cerium vanadate: a novel inorganic ion exchanger for removal of americium and uranium from simulated aqueous nuclear waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Chayan; Dudwadkar, Nilesh; Tripathi, Subhash Chandra; Gandhi, Pritam Maniklal; Grover, Vinita; Kaushik, Chetan Prakash; Tyagi, Avesh Kumar

    2014-09-15

    Cerium vanadate nanopowders were synthesized by a facile low temperature co-precipitation method. The product was characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy and found to consist of ∼25 nm spherical nanoparticles. The efficiency of these nanopowders for uptake of alpha-emitting radionuclides (233)U (4.82 MeV α) and (241)Am (5.49 MeV α, 60 keV γ) has been investigated. Thermodynamically and kinetically favorable uptake of these radionuclides resulted in their complete removal within 3h from aqueous acidic feed solutions. The uptake capacity was observed to increase with increase in pH as the zeta potential value decreased with the increase in pH but effect of ionic strength was insignificant. Little influence of the ions like Sr(2+), Ru(3+), Fe(3+), etc., in the uptake process indicated CeVO4 nanopowders to be amenable for practical applications. The isotherms indicated predominant uptake of the radioactive metal ions in the solid phase of the exchanger at lower feed concentrations and linear Kielland plots with positive slopes indicated favorable exchange of the metal ions with the nanopowder. Performance comparison with the other sorbents reported indicated excellent potential of nano-cerium vanadate for removing americium and uranium from large volumes of aqueous acidic solutions.

  20. Distribution of plutonium, americium, and several rare earth fission product elements between liquid cadmium and LiCl-KCl eutectic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separation factors were measured that describe the partition between molten cadmium and molten LiCl-KCl eutectic of plutonium, americium, praseodymium, neodymium, cerium, lanthanum, gadolinium, dysprosium, and yttrium. The temperature range was 753-788 K, and the range of concentrations was that allowed by the sensitivity of the chemical analysis methods. Mean separation factors were derived for Am-Pu, Nd-Am, Nd-Pu, Nd-Pr, Gd-La, Dy-La, La-Ce, La-Nd, Y-La, and Y-Nd. Where previously published data were available, agreement was good. For convenience, the following series of separation factors relative to plutonium was derived by combining the measured separation factors: Pu, 1.00 (basis); Am, 1.54; Pr, 22.0; Nd, 23.4; Ce, 26; La, 70; Gd, 77; Dy, 270; Y, 3000. These data are used in calculating the distribution of the actinide and rare earth elements in the prochemical reprocessing of spent fuel from the Integral Fast Reactor. (orig.)

  1. Evaluation of synthetic water-soluble metal-binding polymers with ultrafiltration for selective concentration of americium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Routine counting methods and ICP-MS are unable to directly measure the new US Department of Energy (DOE) regulatory level for discharge waters containing alpha-emitting radionuclides of 30 pCi/L total alpha or the 0.05 pCi/L regulatory level for Pu or Am activity required for surface waters at the Rocky Flats site by the State of Colorado. This inability indicates the need to develop rapid, reliable, and robust analytical techniques for measuring actinide metal ions, particularly americium and plutonium. Selective separation or preconcentration techniques would aid in this effort. Water-soluble metal-binding polymers in combination with ultrafiltration are shown to be an effective method for selectively removing dilute actinide ions from acidic solutions of high ionic strength. The actinide-binding properties of commercially available water-soluble polymers and several polymers which have been reported in the literature were evaluated. The functional groups incorporated in the polymers were pyrrolidone, amine, oxime, and carboxylic, phosphonic, or sulfonic acid. The polymer containing phosphonic acid groups gave the best results with high distribution coefficients and concentration factors for 241Am(III) and 238Pu(III)/(IV) at pH 4 to 6 and ionic strengths of 0.1 to 4

  2. Characteristics of plutonium and americium contamination at the former U.K. atomic weapons test ranges at Maralinga and Emu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physico-chemical studies on environmental plutonium are described, which provide data integral to an assessment of dose for the inhalation of artificial actinides by Australian Aborigines living a semi-traditional lifestyle at Maralinga and Emu, sites of U.K. atomic weapons tests between 1953 and 1963. The most significant area, from a radiological perspective, is the area contaminated by plutonium in a series of ''one point'' safety trials in which large quantities of plutonium were dispersed explosively at a location known as Taranaki. The activity distribution of plutonium and americium with particle size is quite different from the mass distribution, as a considerably higher proportion of the activity is contained in the finer (inhalable) fraction than of the mass. Except in areas which were disturbed through ploughing during a cleanup in 1967, most the activity remains in the top 1 cm of the surface. Much of the activity is in particulate form, even at distances > 20 km from the firing sites, and discrete particles have been located even at distances beyond 100 km. Data are presented which permit the assessment of annual committed doses through the inhalation pathway, for Aborigines living a semi-traditional lifestyle in the areas affected by the Taranaki firings in particular. (author)

  3. Sequential isotopic determination of plutonium, thorium, americium and uranium in the air filter and drinking water samples around the WIPP site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The simultaneous determination of actinides in air filter and water samples around the WIPP site have been demonstrated. The analytical method is based on the selective separation and purification by anion exchange and Eichrome-TEVA, TRU and DGA-resin followed by determination of actinides by alpha spectrometry. Counting sources for alpha spectrometric measurements were prepared by microcoprecipitation on neodymium fluoride (NdF3). Radiochemical yields were determined using 242Pu, 229Th, 243Am and 232U as tracers. The validation of the method is performed through the analysis of reference materials or participating in laboratory intercomparison programs. The plutonium concentrations in aerosols varied seasonally, being highest in spring and summer due to the spring-time enhanced wind-storm transportation of radioactive aerosols from the stratosphere to the troposphere. The 238Pu/239+240Pu activity ratio in the aerosol samples is typically close to that of global fallout from historic above-ground nuclear weapons testing. The results presented here indicate that the source of plutonium in the WIPP environment results mainly from global nuclear fallout and there is no evidence of increases in radiological contaminants in the region that could be attributed to releases from the WIPP. (author)

  4. Isotopic geology; Geologie isotopique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allegre, C. [Paris-7 Univ. Denis Diderot, 75 (France); Institut de physique du globe de Paris, 75 - Paris (France)

    2005-07-01

    Born from the application to geology of nuclear physics techniques, the isotopic geology has revolutionized the Earth's sciences. Beyond the dating of rocks, the tracer techniques have permitted to reconstruct the Earth's dynamics, to measure the temperatures of the past (giving birth to paleoclimatology) and to understand the history of chemical elements thanks to the analysis of meteorites. Today, all domains of Earth sciences appeal more or less to the methods of isotopic geology. In this book, the author explains the principles, methods and recent advances of this science: 1 - isotopes and radioactivity; 2 - principles of isotope dating; 3 - radio-chronological methods; 4 - cosmogenic isotope chronologies; 5 - uncertainties and radio-chronological results; 6 - geochemistry of radiogenic isotopes; 7 - geochemistry of stable isotopes; 8 - isotopic geology and dynamical analysis of reservoirs. (J.S.)

  5. The role of natural organic matter in the migration behaviour of americium in the Boom Clay - Part 1: migration experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: In demonstrating the suitability of Boom Clay as reference site for studying the disposal of radioactive waste, the role of the relatively high amount of Natural Organic Matter (NOM) present in the Boom Clay on the mobility of critical radionuclides needs to be investigated thoroughly. It is generally accepted that trivalent actinides and lanthanides form strong complexes with humic substances. Complexation of these trivalent radionuclides with NOM present in the Boom Clay may therefore have two opposite effects. If complexed by the aqueous phase NOM (the mobile NOM), the radionuclide transport will be governed by the mobility of these dissolved radionuclide- NOM species. If complexed by the solid phase NOM (the immobile NOM) the migration will be retarded. One of the aims of the EC projects TRANCOM-Clay and TRANCOM-II was to investigate the role of mobile NOM as radionuclide carrier in order to develop a conceptual model for inclusion in a performance assessment (PA) model. The migration behaviour of Americium (used as an analogue for the critical radionuclide Pu) was investigated by complexing 241Am with radiolabelled (14C-labelled) NOM before passing through undisturbed Boom Clay cores contained in columns. The use of two different radionuclides, allows the migration behaviour of both the NOM and the Am to be followed. The results of the migration experiments showed that the Am-NOM complexes dissociated when they came into contact with Boom Clay and that the bulk of Am became immobilised (either as Am complexed to immobile NOM or sorbed to the mineral phase). Only a small percentage of the complex persisted as 'stabilised' Am-OM complex which exhibited slow dissociation kinetics upon moving through the Boom Clay. When the applied radionuclide source also contains Am in the form of an inorganic solid phase (when Am is applied above the solubility limit), a continuous source of Am exists to form 'temporarily stabilised' Am

  6. Optical isotope shifts for unstable samarium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a tunable dye laser beam intersecting a thermal atomic beam, optical isotope shifts and hyperfine splittings have been measured for the four unstable samarium isotopes between 144Sm and 154Sm, covering the well known transition region from spherical to deformed shapes. (orig.)

  7. Experimental study of Americium-241 biokinetics in Homarus Gammarus lobster. Analysis of the accumulation and detoxication mechanisms at the sub-cellular level; Etude experimentale des biocinetiques de l`americium-241 chez le homard homarus gammarus. Analyse des mecanismes d`accumulation et de detoxication au niveau subcellulaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paquet, F.

    1991-12-01

    The Americium 241 radioelement accumulation and elimination rate and mechanisms in the lobster organism have been experimentally studied; incorporation and detoxification capacities of each organ are evaluated. The existence of various biological compartments is shown; the major role of the digestive gland in accumulation of the radioelement, its distribution towards the various organs, and its resorption is comprehensively described, with an analysis at the subcellular and molecular levels. 401 p., 65 fig., 43 tab., 428 ref.

  8. Nano-cerium vanadate: A novel inorganic ion exchanger for removal of americium and uranium from simulated aqueous nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Chayan; Dudwadkar, Nilesh [Fuel Reprocessing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Tripathi, Subhash Chandra, E-mail: sctri001@gmail.com [Fuel Reprocessing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Gandhi, Pritam Maniklal [Fuel Reprocessing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Grover, Vinita [Waste Management Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kaushik, Chetan Prakash [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Tyagi, Avesh Kumar, E-mail: aktyagi@barc.gov.in [Waste Management Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Template free, low temperature synthesis of CeVO{sub 4} nanopowders. • Thermodynamically and kinetically favourable uptake of Am(III) and U(VI) exhibited. • K{sub d} and ΔG° values for Am(III) and U(VI) uptake in pH 1–6 are reported. • Interdiffusion coefficients and zeta potential values in pH 1–6 are reported. • Possible application in low level aqueous nuclear waste remediation. - Abstract: Cerium vanadate nanopowders were synthesized by a facile low temperature co-precipitation method. The product was characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy and found to consist of ∼25 nm spherical nanoparticles. The efficiency of these nanopowders for uptake of alpha-emitting radionuclides {sup 233}U (4.82 MeV α) and {sup 241}Am (5.49 MeV α, 60 keV γ) has been investigated. Thermodynamically and kinetically favorable uptake of these radionuclides resulted in their complete removal within 3 h from aqueous acidic feed solutions. The uptake capacity was observed to increase with increase in pH as the zeta potential value decreased with the increase in pH but effect of ionic strength was insignificant. Little influence of the ions like Sr{sup 2+}, Ru{sup 3+}, Fe{sup 3+}, etc., in the uptake process indicated CeVO{sub 4} nanopowders to be amenable for practical applications. The isotherms indicated predominant uptake of the radioactive metal ions in the solid phase of the exchanger at lower feed concentrations and linear Kielland plots with positive slopes indicated favorable exchange of the metal ions with the nanopowder. Performance comparison with the other sorbents reported indicated excellent potential of nano-cerium vanadate for removing americium and uranium from large volumes of aqueous acidic solutions.

  9. Molten salt extraction (MSE) of americium from plutonium metal in CaCl2-KCl-PuCl3 and CaCl2-PuCl3 salt systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molten salt extraction (MSE) of americium-241 from reactor-grade plutonium has been developed using plutonium trichloride salt in stationary furnaces. Batch runs with oxidized and oxide-free metal have been conducted at temperature ranges between 750 and 945C, and plutonium trichloride concentrations from one to one hundred mole percent. Salt-to-metal ratios of 0.10, 0.15, and 0 30 were examined. The solvent salt was either eutectic 74 mole percent CaCl2 endash 26 mole percent KCl or pure CaCl2. Evidence of trivalent product americium, and effects of temperature, salt-to-metal ratio, and oxide contamination on the americium extraction efficiency are given. 24 refs, 20 figs, 13 tabs

  10. Transfer across the human gut of environmental plutonium, americium, cobalt, caesium and technetium: studies with cockles (Cerastoderma edule) from the Irish Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, G J

    1998-06-01

    Our previous studies have indicated lower values of the gut transfer factor ('f1 values') for plutonium and americium in winkles (Littorina littorea) than adopted by ICRP. The present study was undertaken primarily to investigate whether this observation extends to other species. Samples of cockles (Carastoderma edule) from Ravenglass, Cumbria were eaten by volunteers who provided 24 h samples of urine and faeces. Urine samples indicated f1 values for cockles which were higher than for winkles; for plutonium these ranged overall up to 7 x 10(-4) with an arithmetic mean in the range (2-3) x 10(-4), and for americium up to 2.6 x 10(-4) with an arithmetic mean of 1.2 x 10(-4). Limited data based on volunteers eating cockles from the Solway suggest that f1 values for americium may be greater at distance from Sellafield. The measured values compare with 5 x 10(-4) used by the ICRP for environmental forms of both elements, which would appear to provide adequate protection when calculating doses from Cumbrian cockles. Data for other nuclides were obtained by analysing faecal samples from the volunteers who ate the Ravenglass cockles. Cobalt-60 showed an f1 value in the region of 0.2, twice the value currently used by ICRP. For 137Cs, variabilities were indicated in the range 0.08 to 0.43, within the ICRP value of f1 = 1.0. Technetium-99 gave f1 values up to about 0.6, in reasonable conformity with the ICRP value of 0.5.

  11. Transfer across the human gut of environmental plutonium, americium, cobalt, caesium and technetium: studies with cockles (Cerastoderma edule) from the Irish Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, G.J. [CEFAS Laboratory, Lowestoft, Suffolk NR33 0HT (United Kingdom)

    1998-06-01

    Our previous studies have indicated lower values of the gut transfer factor ('f{sub L} values') for plutonium and americium in winkles (Littorina littorea) than adopted by ICRP. The present study was undertaken primarily to investigate whether this observation extends to other species. Samples of cockles (Cerastoderma edule) from Ravenglass, Cumbria were eaten by volunteers who provided 24 samples of urine and faeces. Urine samples indicated f{sub L} values for cockles which were higher than for winkles; for plutonium these ranged overall up to 7x10{sup -4} with an arithmetic mean in the range (2-3)x10{sup -4}, and for americium up to 2.6x10{sup -4} with an arithmetic mean of 1.2x10{sup -4}. Limited data based on volunteers eating cockles from the Solway suggest that f{sub L} values for americium may be greater at distance from Sellafield. The measured values compare with 5x10{sup -4} used by the ICRP for environmental forms of both elements, which would appear to provide adequate protection when calculating doses from Cumbrian cockles. Data for other nuclides were obtained by analysing faecal samples from the volunteers who ate the Ravenglass cockles. Cobalt-60 showed an f{sub L} value in the region of 0.2, twice the value currently used by ICRP. For {sup 137}Cs, variabilities were indicated in the range 0.08 to 0.43, within the ICRP value of f{sub L}=1.0. Technetium-99 gave f{sub L} values up to about 0.6, in reasonable conformity with the ICRP value of 0.5. (author)

  12. Statistical clumped isotope signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röckmann, T; Popa, M E; Krol, M C; Hofmann, M E G

    2016-01-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a molecule, which is the conventional reference. When multiple indistinguishable atoms of the same element are present in a molecule, this reference is calculated from the bulk (≈average) isotopic composition of the involved atoms. We show here that this referencing convention leads to apparent negative clumped isotope anomalies (anti-clumping) when the indistinguishable atoms originate from isotopically different populations. Such statistical clumped isotope anomalies must occur in any system where two or more indistinguishable atoms of the same element, but with different isotopic composition, combine in a molecule. The size of the anti-clumping signal is closely related to the difference of the initial isotope ratios of the indistinguishable atoms that have combined. Therefore, a measured statistical clumped isotope anomaly, relative to an expected (e.g. thermodynamical) clumped isotope composition, may allow assessment of the heterogeneity of the isotopic pools of atoms that are the substrate for formation of molecules. PMID:27535168

  13. Determination by gamma-ray spectrometry of the plutonium and americium content of the Pu/Am separation scraps. Application to molten salts; Determination par spectrometrie gamma de la teneur en plutonium et en americium de produits issus de separation Pu/Am. Application aux bains de sels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godot, A. [CEA Valduc, Dept. de Traitement des Materiaux Nucleaires, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France); Perot, B. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. de Technologie Nucleaire, Service de Modelisation des Transferts et Mesures Nucleaires, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2005-07-01

    Within the framework of plutonium recycling operations in CEA Valduc (France), americium is extracted from molten plutonium metal into a molten salt during an electrolysis process. The scraps (spent salt, cathode, and crucible) contain extracted americium and a part of plutonium. Nuclear material management requires a very accurate determination of the plutonium content. Gamma-ray spectroscopy is performed on Molten Salt Extraction (MSE) scraps located inside the glove box, in order to assess the plutonium and americium contents. The measurement accuracy is influenced by the device geometry, nuclear instrumentation, screens located between the sample and the detector, counting statistics and matrix attenuation, self-absorption within the spent salt being very important. The purpose of this study is to validate the 'infinite energy extrapolation' method employed to correct for self-attenuation, and to detect any potential bias. We present a numerical study performed with the MCNP computer code to identify the most influential parameters and some suggestions to improve the measurement accuracy. A final uncertainty of approximately 40% is achieved on the plutonium mass. (authors)

  14. An experimental study of americium-241 biokinetics in the Lobster Homarus Gammarus. Analysis of the accumulation/storage and detoxification processes at the subcellular level; Etude experimentale des biocinetiques de l`americium-241 chez le homard homarus gammarus. Analyse des mecanismes d`accumulation et de detoxication au niveau subcellulaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paquet, F.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental study of americium-241 kinetics has been conducted in the lobster Homarus gammmarus. The investigations were conducted at all the levels from the whole body to the subcellular and molecular levels. The animals were contaminated by a single or chronic ingestion of {sup 241} Am labelled mussels. Assessments of accumulation, elimination and distribution of the radionuclide were established on organisms kept in the laboratory; they made it possible to demonstrate the importance of the digestive gland in the radionuclide transfer pathways. The preliminary results led to structural then ultrastructural investigations of the digestive gland in association with radioautographic studies and cellular extractions methods. Four cellular types were demonstrated, only two of them being implied in the radionuclide retention, the former being responsible for americium intake and the latter for its long-term retention. By means of biochemical techniques, subcellular accumulation was studied and the organelles implied in the nuclide retention were specified. Finally, a method of cellular nuclei dissociation was developed; it made it possible to analyse the molecular nature of americium ligands and to demonstrate the function of the protein nuclear matrix in the nuclide retention.

  15. Dissertation on the computer-based exploitation of a coincidence multi parametric recording. Application to the study of the disintegration scheme of Americium 241

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having presented the meaning of disintegration scheme (alpha and gamma emissions, internal conversion, mean lifetime), the author highlights the benefits of the use of multi-parametric chain for the recording of correlated parameters, and of the use of a computer for the analysis of bi-parametric information based on contour lines. Using the example of Americium 241, the author shows how these information are obtained (alpha and gamma spectrometry, time measurement), how they are chosen, coded, analysed and stored, and then processed by contour lines

  16. Isotopes in heterogeneous catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hargreaves, Justin SJ

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to review the current, state-of-the-art application of isotopic methods to the field of heterogeneous catalysis. Isotopic studies are arguably the ultimate technique in in situ methods for heterogeneous catalysis. In this review volume, chapters have been contributed by experts in the field and the coverage includes both the application of specific isotopes - Deuterium, Tritium, Carbon-14, Sulfur-35 and Oxygen-18 - as well as isotopic techniques - determination of surface mobility, steady state transient isotope kinetic analysis, and positron emission profiling.

  17. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, Eugene E.

    2001-12-21

    Semiconductor bulk crystals and multilayer structures with controlled isotopic composition have attracted much scientific and technical interest in the past few years. Isotopic composition affects a large number of physical properties, including phonon energies and lifetimes, bandgaps, the thermal conductivity and expansion coefficient and spin-related effects. Isotope superlattices are ideal media for self-diffusion studies. In combination with neutron transmutation doping, isotope control offers a novel approach to metal-insulator transition studies. Spintronics, quantum computing and nanoparticle science are emerging fields using isotope control.

  18. Direct isotope ratio analysis of individual uranium-plutonium mixed particles with various U/Pu ratios by thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Esaka, Fumitaka; Miyamoto, Yutaka; Magara, Masaaki

    2015-02-01

    Uranium and plutonium isotope ratios in individual uranium-plutonium (U-Pu) mixed particles with various U/Pu atomic ratios were analyzed without prior chemical separation by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Prior to measurement, micron-sized particles with U/Pu ratios of 1, 5, 10, 18, and 70 were produced from uranium and plutonium certified reference materials. In the TIMS analysis, the peaks of americium, plutonium, and uranium ion signals were successfully separated by continuously increasing the evaporation filament current. Consequently, the uranium and plutonium isotope ratios, except the (238)Pu/(239)Pu ratio, were successfully determined for the particles at all U/Pu ratios. This indicates that TIMS direct analysis allows for the measurement of individual U-Pu mixed particles without prior chemical separation.

  19. MCNPX Monte Carlo burnup simulations of the isotope correlation experiments in the NPP Obrigheim

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Yan, E-mail: ycao@anl.go [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Gohar, Yousry [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Broeders, Cornelis H.M. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    This paper describes the simulation work of the Isotope Correlation Experiment (ICE) using the MCNPX Monte Carlo computer code package. The Monte Carlo simulation results are compared with the ICE-Experimental measurements for burnup up to 30 GWD/t. The comparison shows the good capabilities of the MCNPX computer code package for predicting the depletion of the uranium fuel and the buildup of the plutonium isotopes in a PWR thermal reactor. The Monte Carlo simulation results show also good agreements with the experimental data for calculating several long-lived and stable fission products. However, for the americium and curium actinides, it is difficult to judge the predication capabilities for these actinides due to the large uncertainties in the ICE-Experimental data. In the MCNPX numerical simulations, a pin cell model is utilized to simulate the fuel lattice of the nuclear power reactor. Temperature dependent libraries based on JEFF3.1 nuclear data files are utilized for the calculations. In addition, temperature dependent libraries based ENDF/B-VII nuclear data files are utilized and the obtained results are very close to the JEFF3.1 results, except for {approx}10% differences in the prediction of the minor actinide isotopes buildup.

  20. Highly enriched isotope samples of uranium and transuranium elements for scientific investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesnovskii, Stanislav P.; Polynov, Vladimir N.; Danilin, Lev. D.

    1992-02-01

    The paper describes the production of highly enriched isotopes of uranium, plutonium, americium and curium by electromagnetic separation for scientific and applied researches in physics, chemistry, geology, medicine, biology and other fields. Using the equipment described, the isotopes are produced in quantities sufficient to set up nuclear physical experiments, to produce nuclear reference materials and standard sources for calibration of radiometrical and mass spectrometrical equipment, in radionuclide metrology, etc. For the following isotopes the indicated degrees of isotopic enrichment were achieved: 233U - 99.97%; 235U - 99.97%; 236U - 98.0%; 238U - 99.997%; 238Pu - 99.6%; 239Pu - 99.9977%; 240Pu - 99.9-100%; 241Pu - 96.998%; 242Pu - 97.8-99.96%; 244Pu - 96.7%; 241Am - 99.6%; 242Am - 73.6%; 243Am - 99.2-99.94%; 243Cm - 99.99%; 245Cm - 99.998%; 246Cm - 99.8%; 247Cm - 90%; 248Cm - 97%. Methods for preparing layers of highly enriched isotopes on various substances are presented: - electrochemical deposition of transuranic elements from aqueous-organic and organic media and vacuum spraying: - the method of foil and coating formation via compounds in the vapour phase; - the method of fabrication of layers of transuranic elements on superthin (1-2 μm) metal substrates with additional isolating polymer-metal coatings (0.2-0.4 μm), that substantially decrease material transfer from the active layer and increase safety of product handling.

  1. Isotope separation principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedict, Manson

    1963-03-15

    Isotope separation theory of ideal cascades is discussed. It is shown how the most important characteristics of an isotope separation process can be worked out from the compositions and flow rates of the feed and product streams. These characteristics include plant size, dependence of product rate on product purity, minimum power consumption, costs of isotope separation, minimum time for reaching steady production, and effect of third component on process performance and product costs. The concepts of value functions, separative power, and separative work are used to derive the characteristics, and the analogy between isotope separation theory and thermodynamics is emphasized. (D.L.C.)

  2. The isotope breathe test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The foundations of the breath diagnostic test, based on application of the carbon compounds, labeled with the stable (13C) or radioactive isotope are presented. The methodology for conducting the breath isotope test and the apparatuses, making it possible to determine under clinical conditions the isotope composition of the carbon, contained in the expired air, depending on the introduced tracer type, is briefly described. The safety of the method and prospects of its application are discussed. The examples of the breath isotope test practical application are presented

  3. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  4. Discovery of the Arsenic Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, A; Heim, M; Schuh, A; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-nine arsenic isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  5. Discovery of the Scandium Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Meierfrankenfeld, D

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-three scandium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  6. Discovery of the Tungsten Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    A. Fritsch; Ginepro, J. Q.; Heim, M.; Schuh, A.; SHORE, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-five tungsten isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  7. Discovery of the Vanadium Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    SHORE, A.; A. Fritsch; Heim, M.; Schuh, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-four vanadium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  8. Discovery of the Barium Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    SHORE, A.; A. Fritsch; Ginepro, J. Q.; Heim, M.; Schuh, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-eight barium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  9. Discovery of the Silver Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Schuh, A.; A. Fritsch; Ginepro, J. Q.; Heim, M.; SHORE, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-eight silver isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  10. Discovery of the Cadmium Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Amos, S.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-seven cadmium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  11. Discovery of the Krypton Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Heim, M.; A. Fritsch; Schuh, A.; SHORE, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-two krypton isotopes have been observed so far; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  12. Discovery of the Iron Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Schuh, A.; A. Fritsch; Heim, M.; SHORE, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-eight iron isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  13. Discovery of the Gold Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Schuh, A.; A. Fritsch; Ginepro, J. Q.; Heim, M.; SHORE, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-six gold isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  14. Discovery of the Cobalt Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Szymanski, T; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-six cobalt isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  15. Inhaled americium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project includes experiments to determine the effects of Zn-DTPA therapy on the retention, translocation and biological effects of inhaled 241AmO2. Beagle dogs that received inhalation exposure to 241AmO2 developed leukopenia, clincial chemistry changes associated with hepatocellular damage, and were euthanized due to respiratory insufficiency caused by radiation pneumonitis 120 to 131 days after pulmonary deposition of 22 to 65 μCi 241Am. Another group of dogs that received inhalation exposure to 241AmO2 and were treated daily with Zn-DTPA had initial pulmonary deposition of 19 to 26 μCi 241Am. These dogs did not develop respiratory insufficiency, and hematologic and clinical chemistry changes were less severe than in the non-DTPA-treated dogs

  16. Stable isotopes labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The catalogue on stable isotopes labelled compounds offers deuterium, nitrogen-15, and multiply labelled compounds. It includes: (1) conditions of sale and delivery, (2) the application of stable isotopes, (3) technical information, (4) product specifications, and (5) the complete delivery programme

  17. Detecting isotopic ratio outliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An alternative method is proposed for improving isotopic ratio estimates. This method mathematically models pulse-count data and uses iterative reweighted Poisson regression to estimate model parameters to calculate the isotopic ratios. This computer-oriented approach provides theoretically better methods than conventional techniques to establish error limits and to identify outliers. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Principles of stable isotope distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Criss, Robert E

    1999-01-01

    1. Abundance and Measurement of Stable Isotopes 1.1. Discovery of Isotopes 1.2. Nuclide Types, Abundances, and Atomic Weights 1.3. Properties and Fractionation of Isotopic Molecules 1.4. Material Balance Relationships 1.5. Mass Spectrometers 1.6. Notation and Standards 1.7. Summary 1.8. Problems References 2. Isotopic Exchange and Equilibrium Fractionation 2.1. Isotopic Exchange Reactions 2.2. Basic Equations 2.3. Molecular Models 2.4. Theory of Isotopic Fractionation 2.5. Temperature Dependence of Isotopic Fractionation Factors 2.6. Rule of the Mean 2.7. Isotopic Thermometers

  19. Isotopes in Greenland Precipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Anne-Katrine

    Greenland ice cores offer a unique opportunity to investigate the climate system behaviour. The objective of this PhD project is to investigate isotope modelling of present- day conditions and conduct model-data comparison using Greenland ice cores. Thus this thesis investigates how the integration...... of model and data can be used to improve the understanding of climate changes. This is done through analysis of isotope modelling, observations and ice core measurements. This dissertation comprises three projects: (1) Modelling the isotopic response to changes in Arctic sea surface conditions, (2......) Constructing a new Greenland database of observations and present-day ice core measurements, and (3) Performance test of isotope-enabled CAM5 for Greenland. The recent decades of rapid Arctic sea ice decline are used as a basis for an observational-based model experiment using the isotope-enabled CAM model 3...

  20. Recovery of Americium-241 from lightning rod by the method of chemical treatment; Recuperacion del Americio-241 provenientes de los pararrayos por el metodo de tratamiento quimico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, W.H., E-mail: wcruz@ipen.gob.pe [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (GRRA/IPEN), Lima (Peru). Division de Gestion de Residuos Radiactivos

    2013-07-01

    About 95% of the lightning rods installed in the Peruvian territory have set in their structures, pose small amounts of radioactive sources such as Americium-241 ({sup 241}Am), fewer and Radium 226 ({sup 226}Ra) these are alpha emitters and have a half life of 432 years and 1600 years respectively. In this paper describes the recovery of radioactive sources of {sup 241}Am radioactive lightning rods using the conventional chemical treatment method using agents and acids to break down the slides. The {sup 241}Am recovered was as excitation source and alpha particle generator for analysing samples by X Ray Fluorescence, for fixing the stainless steel {sup 241}Am technique was used electrodeposition. (author)

  1. Partitioning studies in China and the separation of americium and fission product rare earths with dialkyl phosphinic acid and its thio-substituted derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on the TRPO extractions process for recovering actinides from highly active waste (HAW) and its application to the pretreatment of Chinese HAW are described. The removal of Sr by di-cyclohexyl 18 crown 6 and the removal of Cs by spherical titanium ferrous hexa-cyanate from acidic waste are also described. Results of the extraction of trivalent americium and fission product rare earths (FPREs) by dialkyl-phosphinic, dialkyl-mono-thio-phosphinic and dialkyl-di-thio-phosphinic acids are reported. Dialkyl-thio-phosphinic acid (commercial product Cyanex 301, alkyl =2, 4, 4-methyl-pentyl) shows very high selectivity towards Am. Using 1M Cyanex 301 -kerosene as extractant, 99.9 % Am can be separated from 0.5M(Pr+Nd)(NO3)3 solution with 3-4 extraction stages and 3-4 scrubbing stages. (authors)

  2. Theoretical and experimental study of the bio-geochemical behaviour of americium 241 in simplified rhizosphere conditions. Application to a calcareous agricultural soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Americium 241, is one of the most radio-toxic contaminant produced during the nuclear fuel cycle. It can be found in all environmental compartments, in particular the soils. The main goals of this study are to identify, quantify and model the effect of the main factors controlling the mobility of 241Am in the rhizosphere and the agricultural soils. The physico-chemical parameters of the soil and of the soil solution, the potential role of microorganisms on the sorption-desorption processes, and the speciation of americium in solution have been more particularly studied. 241Am remobilization has been studied at the laboratory using leaching experiments performed in controlled conditions on reworked calcareous soils artificially contaminated with 241Am. The soil samples have been washed out in different hydrodynamic conditions by solutions with various compositions. The eluted solution has been analyzed (pH, conductivity, ionic composition, Fetot, organic acids, 241Am) and its bacterial biomass content too. The overall results indicate that 241Am remobilization is contrasted and strongly linked with the condition under study (pH, ionic strength, glucose and/or citrate concentration). Therefore, a solution in equilibrium with the soil or containing small exudate concentrations (10-4 M) re-mobilizes only a very small part of the americium fixed on the solid phase. The desorption of 241Am corresponds to a solid/liquid coefficient of partition (Kd) of about 105 L.kg-1. A significant addition of glucose induces an important dissolution of soil carbonates by the indirect action of microorganisms, but does not significantly favor the 241Am remobilization. On the other hand, the presence of strong citrate concentrations (≥ 10-2 M) allows 300 to 10000 time greater re-mobilizations by the complexing of 241Am released after the dissolution of the carrying phases. Finally, the colloidal transport of 241Am has been systematically observed in a limited but significant extend and

  3. Safe handling of kilogram amounts of fuel-grade plutonium and of gram amounts of plutonium-238, americium-241 and curium-244

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past 10 years about 600 glove-boxes have been installed at the Institute for Transuranium Elements at Karlsruhe. About 80% of these glove-boxes have been designed and equipped for handling 100-g to 1-kg amounts of 239Pu containing 8-12% 240Pu (low-exposure plutonium). A small proportion of the glove-boxes is equipped with additional shielding in the form of lead sheet or lead glass for work with recycled plutonium. In these glove-boxes gram-amounts of 241Am have also been handled for preparation of Al-Am targets using tongs and additional shielding inside the glove-boxes themselves. Water- and lead-shielded glove-boxes equipped with telemanipulators have been installed for routine work with gram-amounts of 241Am, 243Am and 244Cm. A prediction of the expected radiation dose for the personnel is difficult and only valid for a preparation procedure with well-defined preparation steps, owing to the fact that gamma dose-rates depend strongly upon proximity and source seize. Gamma radiation dose measurements during non-routine work for 241Am target preparation showed that handling of gram amounts leads to a rather high irradiation dose for the personnel, despite lead or steel glove-box shielding and shielding within the glove-boxes. A direct glove-hand to americium contact must be avoided. For all glove-handling of materials with gamma radiation an irradiation control of the forearms of the personnel by, for example, thermoluminescence dosimeters is necessary. Routine handling of americium and curium should be executed with master-slave equipment behind neutron and gamma shielding. (author)

  4. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, Eugene E.

    2006-06-19

    The following article is an edited transcript based on the Turnbull Lecture given by Eugene E. Haller at the 2005 Materials Research Society Fall Meeting in Boston on November 29, 2005. The David Turnbull Lectureship is awarded to recognize the career of a scientist who has made outstanding contributions to understanding materials phenomena and properties through research, writing, and lecturing, as exemplified by the life work of David Turnbull. Haller was named the 2005 David Turnbull Lecturer for his 'pioneering achievements and leadership in establishing the field of isotopically engineered semiconductors; for outstanding contributions to materials growth, doping and diffusion; and for excellence in lecturing, writing, and fostering international collaborations'. The scientific interest, increased availability, and technological promise of highly enriched isotopes have led to a sharp rise in the number of experimental and theoretical studies with isotopically controlled semiconductor crystals. This article reviews results obtained with isotopically controlled semiconductor bulk and thin-film heterostructures. Isotopic composition affects several properties such as phonon energies, band structure, and lattice constant in subtle, but, for their physical understanding, significant ways. Large isotope-related effects are observed for thermal conductivity in local vibrational modes of impurities and after neutron transmutation doping. Spectacularly sharp photoluminescence lines have been observed in ultrapure, isotopically enriched silicon crystals. Isotope multilayer structures are especially well suited for simultaneous self- and dopant-diffusion studies. The absence of any chemical, mechanical, or electrical driving forces makes possible the study of an ideal random-walk problem. Isotopically controlled semiconductors may find applications in quantum computing, nanoscience, and spintronics.

  5. Determination of Am and Cm in spent nuclear fuels by isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry after separation by high-performance liquid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elemental and isotopic determination of americium and curium in spent nuclear fuels is necessary to validate neutronic calculation codes and for nuclear waste disposal purposes. Prior to mass spectrometric analysis, it is mandatory to perform separations in order to eliminate isobaric interferences between U, Pu, Am and Cm. In the spent fuels samples analyzed, a separation of U and Pu has been first realized with an anion-exchange resin. Then a rapid Am/Cm separation has been developed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with an on-line detection using the Am and Cm α-emission. The influence of the different parameters on the chromatographic separation are described and discussed. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and thermal-ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) have been used to measure the isotopic composition of U, Am and Cm and to determine the 241Am/238U and 244Cm/238U ratios with the double spike isotope dilution method. The measurement procedures and the accuracy and precision of the results obtained with a quadrupole ICP-MS on different spent fuels samples are discussed and compared with those obtained by TIMS, used as a reference technique. (orig.)

  6. Oxygen isotopes and lakes

    OpenAIRE

    Leng, Melanie; Dean, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Isotopes are variations of a particular chemical element. It is all to do with the number of neutrons. Oxygen has two main isotopes: 18O which has 10 neutrons and 8 protons; and 16O which has 8 neutrons and 8 protons. Although these variants have a different number of neutrons (and therefore a different atomic mass), the number of protons remains the same, and they are still classed as the same element. Isotopes are analysed in terms of ratios such as 18O/16O which is shortened to δ18O (δ...

  7. Chromium isotope variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary

    fractionate during oxidative weathering of the continents. High river water δ53Cr values (+1.6‰) indicate that dissolved Cr has been back-reduced either in the weathering profile or during river transport. The main conclusion from this study is that δ53Cr value for continental runoff is not uniform....... The positive excursion does not correlated with other redox proxies (carbon and sulphur stable isotopes profiles from the Lower Ordovician), suggesting that Cr isotopes behave non-conservatively and are more sensitive to changes in local redox conditions. These results demonstrate that Cr isotope composition...

  8. Isotope Production Facility (IPF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced radioactive isotopes for medicine and research since the mid 1970s, when targets were first irradiated using the 800...

  9. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree [Strasbourg Univ. (France). LHyGeS/EOST; Heuser, Alexander [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Steinmann-Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Palaeontologie; Wombacher, Frank [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Dietzel, Martin [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften; Tipper, Edward [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Schiller, Martin [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Natural History Museum of Denmark

    2016-08-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  10. Perchlorate isotope forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhlke, J.K.; Sturchio, N.C.; Gu, B.; Horita, J.; Brown, G.M.; Jackson, W.A.; Batista, J.; Hatzinger, P.B.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate has been detected recently in a variety of soils, waters, plants, and food products at levels that may be detrimental to human health. These discoveries have generated considerable interest in perchlorate source identification. In this study, comprehensive stable isotope analyses ( 37Cl/35Cl and 18O/17O/ 16O) of perchlorate from known synthetic and natural sources reveal systematic differences in isotopic characteristics that are related to the formation mechanisms. In addition, isotopic analyses of perchlorate extracted from groundwater and surface water demonstrate the feasibility of identifying perchlorate sources in contaminated environments on the basis of this technique. Both natural and synthetic sources of perchlorate have been identified in water samples from some perchlorate occurrences in the United States by the isotopic method. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  11. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, E.E.

    2004-11-15

    A review of recent research involving isotopically controlled semiconductors is presented. Studies with isotopically enriched semiconductor structures experienced a dramatic expansion at the end of the Cold War when significant quantities of enriched isotopes of elements forming semiconductors became available for worldwide collaborations. Isotopes of an element differ in nuclear mass, may have different nuclear spins and undergo different nuclear reactions. Among the latter, the capture of thermal neutrons which can lead to neutron transmutation doping, can be considered the most important one for semiconductors. Experimental and theoretical research exploiting the differences in all the properties has been conducted and will be illustrated with selected examples. Manuel Cardona, the longtime editor-in-chief of Solid State Communications has been and continues to be one of the major contributors to this field of solid state physics and it is a great pleasure to dedicate this review to him.

  12. Isotopes in everyday life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotopes represent a tool which can do certain jobs better, easier, quicker, more simply and cheaper than competitive methods. Some measurements could not be done at all without the use of isotopes as there are no alternative methods available. A short review of these tools of science in their different fields is given: food and agriculture, human health applications, industry, hydrology, geology, geochemistry, geophysics and dating, environment, basic scientific research

  13. Methods of isotopic geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorokhov, I. M.; Levchenkov, O. A.

    Papers are presented on such topics as the age of the chemical elements; the age of meteorites, the moon, and the earth; isotopic ages of the most ancient terrestrial formations; and the Archean evolution of Enderby Land in the Antarctic as evidenced by isotopic dating. Consideration is also given to a uranium-lead geochronology technique for investigating Precambrian ore deposits, a Pb-Pb technique of zircon dating, and the potentials and limitations of Sm-Nd geochronology.

  14. Isotope toolbox turns 10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenander, Fredrik; Riisager, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    REX-ISOLDE, one of CERN’s most compact accelerators, has just celebrated its 10th anniversary. The machine’s versatility provides radioactive ion beams across the range of nuclear isotopes.......REX-ISOLDE, one of CERN’s most compact accelerators, has just celebrated its 10th anniversary. The machine’s versatility provides radioactive ion beams across the range of nuclear isotopes....

  15. Isotopes in environmental research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive and stable isotopes have long been considered a very efficient tool for studying physical and biological aspects of how the global ecosystem functions. Their applications in environmental research are numerous, embracing research at all levels. This article looks at only a few of the approaches to environmental problems that involve the use of isotopes. Special attention is given to studies of the Amazon Basin. Environmental isotopes are very efficient tools in water cycle studies. Tritium, a radioactive tracer, is especially useful in studying dynamics of water movement in different compartments of the hydrosphere, both on the local and global scales. Heavy stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen (deuterium and oxygen-18) provide information about steady-state characteristics of the water cycle. Isotope methods, some relatively new, have a major role in site-specific studies. Some indicative examples include: Studying turnover of organic matter. Changes in the carbon-13/carbon-12 isotopic ratio of organic matter were used to determine the respective contributions of organic carbon derived from forest and pasture. Studying biological nitrogen fixation. One of the ways nitrogen levels in soil can be maintained for productivity is by biological nitrogen fixation. Studying nitrogen availability and losses. The experimental use of nitrogen-15 is invaluable for defining losses of soil nitrogen to the atmosphere and to groundwater. Studies can similarly be done with stable and radioactive sulphur isotopes. This article indicates some potential uses of isotopes in environmental research. While the major problem of global climate change has not been specifically addressed here, the clearing of the Amazon forest, one focus of the IAEA's environmental programme, may have serious consequences for the global climate. These include substantial reduction of the amount of latent heat transported to the regions outside the tropics and acceleration of the greenhouse

  16. Oxygen Isotopes in Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, R. N.

    2003-12-01

    Oxygen isotope abundance variations in meteorites are very useful in elucidating chemical and physical processes that occurred during the formation of the solar system (Clayton, 1993). On Earth, the mean abundances of the three stable isotopes are 16O: 99.76%, 17O: 0.039%, and 18O: 0.202%. It is conventional to express variations in abundances of the isotopes in terms of isotopic ratios, relative to an arbitrary standard, called SMOW (for standard mean ocean water), as follows:The isotopic composition of any sample can then be represented by one point on a "three-isotope plot," a graph of δ17O versus δ18O. It will be seen that such plots are invaluable in interpreting meteoritic data. Figure 1 shows schematically the effect of various processes on an initial composition at the center of the diagram. Almost all terrestrial materials lie along a "fractionation" trend; most meteoritic materials lie near a line of "16O addition" (or subtraction). (4K)Figure 1. Schematic representation of various isotopic processes shown on an oxygen three-isotope plot. Almost all terrestrial materials plot along a line of "fractionation"; most primitive meteoritic materials plot near a line of "16O addition." The three isotopes of oxygen are produced by nucleosynthesis in stars, but by different nuclear processes in different stellar environments. The principal isotope, 16O, is a primary isotope (capable of being produced from hydrogen and helium alone), formed in massive stars (>10 solar masses), and ejected by supernova explosions. The two rare isotopes are secondary nuclei (produced in stars from nuclei formed in an earlier generation of stars), with 17O coming primarily from low- and intermediate-mass stars (radiation in the wavelength range 90-100 nm. The reaction proceeds by a predissociation mechanism, in which the excited electronic state lives long enough to have well-defined vibrational and rotational energy levels. As a consequence, the three isotopic species - C16O, C17O

  17. The isotopic distribution conundrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkenborg, Dirk; Mertens, Inge; Lemière, Filip; Witters, Erwin; Burzykowski, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Although access to high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS), especially in the field of biomolecular MS, is becoming readily available due to recent advances in MS technology, the accompanied information on isotopic distribution in high-resolution spectra is not used at its full potential, mainly because of lack of knowledge and/or awareness. In this review, we give an insight into the practical problems related to calculating the isotopic distribution for large biomolecules, and present an overview of methods for the calculation of the isotopic distribution. We discuss the key events that triggered the development of various algorithms and explain the rationale of how and why the various isotopic-distribution calculations were performed. The review is focused around the developmental stages as briefly outlined below, starting with the first observation of an isotopic distribution. The observations of Beynon in the field of organic MS that chlorine appeared in a mass spectrum as two variants with odds 3:1 lie at the basis of the first wave of algorithms for the calculation of the isotopic distribution, based on the atomic composition of a molecule. From here on, we explain why more complex biomolecules such as peptides exhibit a highly complex isotope pattern when assayed by MS, and we discuss how combinatorial difficulties complicate the calculation of the isotopic distribution on computers. For this purpose, we highlight three methods, which were introduced in the 1980s. These are the stepwise procedure introduced by Kubinyi, the polynomial expansion from Brownawell and Fillippo, and the multinomial expansion from Yergey. The next development was instigated by Rockwood, who suggested to decompose the isotopic distribution in terms of their nucleon count instead of the exact mass. In this respect, we could claim that the term "aggregated" isotopic distribution is more appropriate. Due to the simplification of the isotopic distribution to its aggregated counterpart

  18. Actinide Oxidation State and O/M Ratio in Hypostoichiometric Uranium-Plutonium-Americium U0.750Pu0.246Am0.004O2-x Mixed Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauchy, Romain; Belin, Renaud C; Robisson, Anne-Charlotte; Lebreton, Florent; Aufore, Laurence; Scheinost, Andreas C; Martin, Philippe M

    2016-03-01

    Innovative americium-bearing uranium-plutonium mixed oxides U1-yPuyO2-x are envisioned as nuclear fuel for sodium-cooled fast neutron reactors (SFRs). The oxygen-to-metal (O/M) ratio, directly related to the oxidation state of cations, affects many of the fuel properties. Thus, a thorough knowledge of its variation with the sintering conditions is essential. The aim of this work is to follow the oxidation state of uranium, plutonium, and americium, and so the O/M ratio, in U0.750Pu0.246Am0.004O2-x samples sintered for 4 h at 2023 K in various Ar + 5% H2 + z vpm H2O (z = ∼15, ∼90, and ∼200) gas mixtures. The O/M ratios were determined by gravimetry, XAS, and XRD and evidenced a partial oxidation of the samples at room temperature. Finally, by comparing XANES and EXAFS results to that of a previous study, we demonstrate that the presence of uranium does not influence the interactions between americium and plutonium and that the differences in the O/M ratio between the investigated conditions is controlled by the reduction of plutonium. We also discuss the role of the homogeneity of cation distribution, as determined by EPMA, on the mechanisms involved in the reduction process. PMID:26907589

  19. Transportation of medical isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Draft Technical Information Document (HNF-1855) is being prepared to evaluate proposed interim tritium and medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This assessment examines the potential health and safety impacts of transportation operations associated with the production of medical isotopes. Incident-free and accidental impacts are assessed using bounding source terms for the shipment of nonradiological target materials to the Hanford Site, the shipment of irradiated targets from the FFTF to the 325 Building, and the shipment of medical isotope products from the 325 Building to medical distributors. The health and safety consequences to workers and the public from the incident-free transportation of targets and isotope products would be within acceptable levels. For transportation accidents, risks to works and the public also would be within acceptable levels. This assessment is based on best information available at this time. As the medical isotope program matures, this analysis will be revised, if necessary, to support development of a final revision to the Technical Information Document

  20. Separation of sulfur isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Robert; Jepson, Bernhart E.; Schwind, Roger A.

    1976-06-22

    Sulfur isotopes are continuously separated and enriched using a closed loop reflux system wherein sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) is reacted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or the like to form sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO.sub.3). Heavier sulfur isotopes are preferentially attracted to the NaHSO.sub.3, and subsequently reacted with sulfuric acid (H.sub.2 SO.sub.4) forming sodium hydrogen sulfate (NaHSO.sub.4) and SO.sub.2 gas which contains increased concentrations of the heavier sulfur isotopes. This heavy isotope enriched SO.sub.2 gas is subsequently separated and the NaHSO.sub.4 is reacted with NaOH to form sodium sulfate (Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4) which is subsequently decomposed in an electrodialysis unit to form the NaOH and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 components which are used in the aforesaid reactions thereby effecting sulfur isotope separation and enrichment without objectionable loss of feed materials.

  1. Stable isotopes. Applications and production; Les isotopes stables. Applications - production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, S.; Louvet, P.; Soulie, E. [eds.

    1994-12-31

    This conference presents 46 communications concerning stable isotope production, utilization and application, grouped in 6 sessions and posters. The various themes are: biological applications (pharmacology, medical diagnosis, metabolism and protein studies, toxicity and response studies, labelled compounds), analysis procedures (NMR analysis for macromolecules, tracer studies), nuclear applications (utilization of stable isotopes in nuclear reactors), biological, physical and chemical applications (mass transfer, mobility, crystallography, isotopic exchange), stable isotope production (ion chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, cryogenic distillation).

  2. Lithium isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Published methods for 6Li-7Li lithium isotope separation have been reviewed. Future demand for 6Li, whose main use will be as a tritium breeder in blankets surrounding the core of DT fusion power reactors, is likely to exceed 5 Mg/a in the next century. The applicability of the various available methods to such a large scale production rate has been assessed. Research on improving the effectiveness of current lithium isotope separation processes has been carried out worldwide in several major areas during the past decade; these include two-phase chemical exchange systems, ion exchange resin chromatography, highly isotope-selective techniques like laser photoactivation and radiofrequency spectroscopy. Chemical exchange systems appear to offer good potential in the near term for 6Li enrichment

  3. Climate and isotopic tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applications of natural radioactivity and isotopic measurements in the sciences concerning Earth and its atmosphere, are numerous: carbon 14 dating with the Tandetron apparatus at the Cea, measurement of oxygen 18 in coral or sediment limestone for the determination of ocean temperature and salinity, carbon 14 dating of corals for the determination of sea level variations, deuterium content in polar ice-cap leads to temperature variations determination; isotopic measurements also enable the determination of present climate features such as global warming, oceanic general circulation

  4. Zinc isotope anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Zn isotope composition in refractory-element-rich inclusions of the Allende meteorite are determined. Typical inclusions contain normal Zn. A unique inclusion of the Allende meteorite shows an excess for Zn-66 of 16.7 + or - 3.7 eu (1 eu = 0.01 percent) and a deficit for Zn-70 of 21 + or - 13 eu. These results indicate the preservation of exotic components even for volatile elements in this inclusion. The observed excess Zn-66 correlates with excesses for the neutron-rich isotopes of Ca-48, Ti-50, Cr-54, and Fe-58 in the same inclusion. 32 refs

  5. Isotopes in condensed matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plekhanov, Vladimir G. [Computer Science College, Tallinn (Estonia). Mathematics and Physics Dept.

    2013-07-01

    This book provides a concise introduction to the newly created sub-discipline of solid state physics isotopetronics. The role of isotopes in materials and their properties are describe in this book. The problem of the enigma of the atomic mass in microphysics is briefly discussed. The range of the applications of isotopes is wide: from biochemical process in living organisms to modern technical applications in quantum information. Isotopetronics promises to improve nanoelectronic and optoelectronic devices. With numerous illustrations this book is useful to researchers, engineers and graduate students.

  6. Isotopes in Condensed Matter

    CERN Document Server

    G Plekhanov, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a concise introduction to the newly created sub-discipline of solid state physics isotopetronics. The role of isotopes in materials and their properties are describe  in this book. The problem of the enigma of the atomic mass in microphysics is briefly discussed.  The range of the applications of isotopes is wide: from biochemical process in living organisms to modern technical applications in quantum information. Isotopetronics promises to improve nanoelectronic and optoelectronic devices. With numerous illustrations this book is useful to researchers, engineers and graduate students.

  7. Environmental isotope survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work was initiated on the 1st of September 1971 with the objective of finding out how best to use environmental isotopes in the interpretation of the hydrology, particularly subsurface hydrology, of Cyprus through a sparse reconnaissance sampling of all the major aquifers and springs covering the whole island. The distribution of sampling was such that the survey in itself could assist in clarifying particular hydrogeologic problems, provide a better understanding of the water systems of the island, establish a general environmental isotope - framework of the hydrologic regimen of Cyprus as well as to provide the basis for specific, more detailed, studies to be undertaken subsequently

  8. The recycling of the actinides neptunium, americium and curium in a fast power reactor to reduce the long term activity in a final store

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The starting point for the considerations and calculations given in this dissertation is the inevitable production of radioactive materials in the use of nuclear energy, which creates a considerable potential danger in a final store for a very long period. As one possibility of alleviating this problem, a concept for recycling the waste actinides neptunium, americium and curium was proposed. The waste actinides are separated in the reprocessing of burnt-up fuel elements and reach a further irradiation circuit. There they pass through the stages 'manufacture of irradiation elements', 'use in a fast power reactor' and reprocessing of irradiation elements' several times. In each irradiation and subsequent storage, about 17% of the waste actinides are removed by fission or by conversion into nuclides which can be reused as fuel, so that during the life of 40 years of the fast recycling reacor, the waste actinides can be reduced in mass by one half. In order to determine this mass reduction effect, a model calculation was developed, which includes the representation of the neutron physics and thermal properties of the reactor core and the storage and reprocessing of the irradiation elements. (orig./RB)

  9. The estimation of reactions of hematopoietic systems of organisms to the effect, caused by americium and plutonium, of nuclear industry workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasteva, G. N.; Ivanova, T. A.; Gordeeva, A. A.; Suvorova, L. A.; Molokanov, A. A.; Badine, I.

    2004-07-01

    Object of research are the workers having in an organism radioactive substance (Am-241 and Pu-239). The purpose of work was the estimation of reaction hemopoietic systems of an organism on influence of americium and plutonium at workers of the nuclear industry. At the surveyed contingent of persons the determined effects caused by total influence Am-241 and Pu-239 are ascertained; chronic radiation disease with development, besides diffusive a pneumoscleoris and a chronic toxic-chemical radiating bronchitis, reactions of system of blood, jet hepatopathy which frequency accrued with increase doses loadings and essentially did not depend on age. In peripheral blood on the foreground jet changes act: hyperglobulia, the tendency to neutrophilus leukocytosis, monocytosis, increase ESR, decrease (reduction ?/G of factor reflecting weight and processing of defeat bronchus and pulmonary of system. Stable downstroke in number thrombocytes and reticulocytes in peripheral blood, their direct dependence on a doze of an irradiation, reflect hypoplastic a background hemogenesis, caused by long influence incorporatedin a bone and a bone brain of radioactive substances. At cytologic research punctate a bone brain jet changes which are expressed in increase of functional activity erythro-and myelopoiesiscome to light and provide compensatory reaction of peripheral blood. At histologic research of a bone brain and a bone fabric attributes of development atrophic process which is expressed in reduction of volume parenchyma a bone brain (a fatty atrophy) and dysplasia to a bone fabric are observed.

  10. Discoveries of isotopes by fission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Thoennessen

    2015-09-01

    Of the about 3000 isotopes presently known, about 20% have been discovered in fission. The history of fission as it relates to the discovery of isotopes as well as the various reaction mechanisms leading to isotope discoveries involving fission are presented.

  11. GEOCHRONOMETRY ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>20040631 Chen Jiangfeng (School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui) ; Xie Zhi Relationships Between Rb-Sr, Ar - Ar Geochronometers and Oxygen Isotopic Equilibrium of Intrusions from Eastern Anhui Province, China (Geological Journal of China Universities, ISSN 1006 - 7493, CN 32 -

  12. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>20070454 Bao Zengkuan (Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049, China); Yuan Wanming Apatite (U-Th)/He Dating and Its Application (Acta Petrologica et Mineralogica, ISSN1000-6524, CN11-1966/P, 24(2), 2005, p.126-132, 2 illus., 25 refs.) Key words: isotopic geochronology

  13. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>20090432 Zhou Shuqing (School of Energy Resources, China University of Geosciences Beijing 100083, China); Huang Haiping Stable Isotopic Records vs. Important Events in Life Evolution and the Concurrent Environment (Geological Review, ISSN0371-5736, CN11-1952, 54(2), 2008, p.225-231, 3 illus., 1 table, 77 refs.)

  14. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>20141014Wang Hairan(State Key Laboratory of Continental Dynamics,Department of Geology,Northwest University,Xi’an710069,China);Zhao Hongge Theory and Application of Zircon U-Pb Isotope Dating Technique(Geology and Resources,ISSN1671-1947,CN21-1458/P,22(3),2013,p.229

  15. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>20072750 Huang Sijing(State Key Laboratory of Oil/Gas Reservoir Geology and Exploitation,Chengdu University of Technology,Chengdu 610059,China);Pei Changrong Age Calibration for the Boundary between Lower and Middle Triassic by Strontium Isotope Stratigraphy in Eastern Sichuan Province

  16. Isotope hydrology experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the concentrations of H2 and O18 in the examined ground waters in the Lower Muschelkalk of the SW flank of the Asse mine it can be inferred that the flow field of the ground water with the isotopic composition of the recent precipitations has an effect down to a depth of only 611 to 744 m. (DG)

  17. Isotope hydrograph separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, P. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum, Centre of Environmental Research Leipzig-Halle, Leipzig (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    Storm-runoff thus reflects the complex hydraulic behaviour of drainage basins and water-links of such systems. Water of different origin may participate in the events and in this lecture, the application of isotope techniques to separate storm hydrographs into different components will be presented.

  18. Forensic Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Ehleringer, James R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Shea, Patrick; Tipple, Brett J.; West, Jason B.

    2016-06-01

    Stable isotopes are being used for forensic science studies, with applications to both natural and manufactured products. In this review we discuss how scientific evidence can be used in the legal context and where the scientific progress of hypothesis revisions can be in tension with the legal expectations of widely used methods for measurements. Although this review is written in the context of US law, many of the considerations of scientific reproducibility and acceptance of relevant scientific data span other legal systems that might apply different legal principles and therefore reach different conclusions. Stable isotopes are used in legal situations for comparing samples for authenticity or evidentiary considerations, in understanding trade patterns of illegal materials, and in understanding the origins of unknown decedents. Isotope evidence is particularly useful when considered in the broad framework of physiochemical processes and in recognizing regional to global patterns found in many materials, including foods and food products, drugs, and humans. Stable isotopes considered in the larger spatial context add an important dimension to forensic science.

  19. Assessment of americium and curium transmutation in magnesia based targets in different spectral zones of an experimental accelerator driven system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeck, W.; Malambu, E.; Sobolev, V. P.; Aït Abderrahim, H.

    2006-06-01

    The potential to incinerate minor actinides (MA) in a sub-critical accelerator-driven system (ADS) is a subject of study in several countries where nuclear power plants are present. The performance of the MYRRHA experimental ADS, as to the transmutation of Am and Cm in the inert matrix fuel (IMF) samples consisting of 40 vol.% (Cm0.1Am0.5Pu0.4)O1.88 fuel and 60 vol.% MgO matrix with a density of 6.077 g cm-3 in three various spectrum regions, were analysed at the belgian nuclear research centre SCK · CEN. The irradiation period of 810 effective full power days (EFPD) followed by a storage period of 2 years was considered. The ALEPH code system currently under development at SCK · CEN was used to carry out this study. The total amount of MA is shown to decrease in all three considered cases. For Am, the decrease is the largest in the reflector (89% decrease) but at the cost of a net Cm production (92% increase). In the two other positions (inside the core region), 20-30% of Am has disappeared but with a lower production of Cm (between 7% and 11%). In the reflector, a significant build-up of long-lived 245Cm, 246Cm, 247Cm and 248Cm was also observed while the production of these isotopes is 10-1000 times smaller in the core. The reduction of the Pu content is also the highest in the reflector position (41%). In the other positions the incinerated amount of Pu is much smaller: 1-5%.

  20. A neutron booster for spallation sources--application to accelerator driven systems and isotope production

    CERN Document Server

    Galy, J; Van Dam, H; Valko, J

    2002-01-01

    One can design a critical system with fissile material in the form of a thin layer on the inner surface of a cylindrical neutron moderator such as graphite or beryllium. Recently, we have investigated the properties of critical and near critical systems based on the use of thin actinide layers of uranium, plutonium and americium. The thickness of the required fissile layer depends on the type of fissile material, its concentration in the layer and on the geometrical arrangement, but is typically in the mu m-mm range. The resulting total mass of fissile material can be as low as 100 g. Thin fissile layers have a variety of applications in nuclear technology--for example in the design neutron amplifiers for medical applications and 'fast' islands in thermal reactors for waste incineration. In the present paper, we investigate the properties of a neutron booster unit for spallation sources and isotope production. In those applications a layer of fissile material surrounds the spallation source. Such a module cou...

  1. Iron isotope biosignatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, B. L.; Johnson, C. M.; Cox, L.; Sun, H.; Nealson, K. H.; Aguilar, C.

    1999-01-01

    The (56)Fe/(54)Fe of Fe-bearing phases precipitated in sedimentary environments varies by 2.5 per mil (delta(56)Fe values of +0.9 to -1. 6 per mil). In contrast, the (56)Fe/(54)Fe of Fe-bearing phases in igneous rocks from Earth and the moon does not vary measurably (delta(56)Fe = 0.0 +/- 0.3 per mil). Experiments with dissimilatory Fe-reducing bacteria of the genus Shewanella algae grown on a ferrihydrite substrate indicate that the delta(56)Fe of ferrous Fe in solution is isotopically lighter than the ferrihydrite substrate by 1.3 per mil. Therefore, the range in delta(56)Fe values of sedimentary rocks may reflect biogenic fractionation, and the isotopic composition of Fe may be used to trace the distribution of microorganisms in modern and ancient Earth.

  2. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>20132601 Cui Yurong(Tianjin Institute of Geology and Mineral Resources,China Geological Survey,Tianjin 300170,China);Zhou Hongying In Situ LA-MC-ICP-MS U-Pb Isotopic Dating of Monazite(Acta Geoscientica Sinica,ISSN0375-5444,CN11-1856/P,33(6),2012,p.865-876,6illus.,4tables,41refs.)Key words:monazite,U-Pb dating

  3. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    <正>20050934 Chen Zhihong (Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, Beijing 100037, China); Lu Songnian Age of the Fushui Intermediate-Mafic Intrusive Complex in the Qinling Orogen, New Zircon U - Pb and Whole -Rock Sm and Nd Isotope Chronological Evidence (Geological Bulletin of China, ISSN 1671-2552, CN11-4648/P, 23(4), 2004, p. 322-328, 3 illus. , 3 tables, 10 refs. )

  4. GEOCHRONOMETRY &ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>20131727 Huang Xiaowen(State Key Laboratory of Ore Deposit Geochemistry,Institute of Geochemistry,Chinese Academy of Sciences,Guiyang 550002,China);Qi Liang Preliminary Study on Sample-Preparation for Re-Os Isotopic Dating of Pyrite(Geochimica,ISSN0379-1726,CN44-1398/P,41(4),2012,p.380-386,3illus.,2tables,25refs)Key words:pyrite,Re-Os dating

  5. Isotopes and agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The agriculture is defined as the art of desturbing the ecosystems in economical terms with the minimum of irreversible damage. Man survival in the biosphere will depend on its ability of using four technologies - mechanization, fertilizers, irrigation and pest disease control. The isotopes are usefull to establish means of producing more food and to preserve it; and clains of unbearable damages to the ecosystems caused by fertilizers and pesticides are not true, are presented. (author)

  6. The isotope correlation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ESARDA working group on Isotopic Correlation Techniques, ICT and Reprocessing Input Analysis performed an Isotope Correlation Experiment, ICE with the aim to check the feasibility of the new technique. Ten input batches of the reprocessing of the KWO fuel at the WAK plant were analysed by 4 laboratories. All information to compare ICT with the gravimetric and volumetric methods was available. ICT combined with simplified reactor physics calculation was included. The main objectives of the statistical data evaluation were detection of outliers, the estimation of random errors and of systematic errors of the measurements performed by the 4 laboratories. Different methods for outlier detection, analysis of variances, Grubbs' analysis for the constant-bias model and Jaech's non-constant-bias model were applied. Some of the results of the statistical analysis may seem inconsistent which is due to the following reasons. For the statistical evaluations isotope abundance data (weight percent) as well as nuclear concentration data (atoms/initial metal atoms) were subjected to different outlier criteria before being used for further statistical evaluations. None of the four data evaluation groups performed a complete statistical data analysis which would render possible a comparison of the different methods applied since no commonly agreed statistical evaluation procedure existed. The results prove that ICT is as accurate as conventional techniques which have to rely on costly mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis. The potential of outlier detection by ICT on the basis of the results from a single laboratory is as good as outlier detection by costly interlaboratory comparison. The application of fission product or Cm-244 correlations would be more timely than remeasurements at safeguards laboratories

  7. ISOTOPE METHODS IN HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BULLOCK,R.M.; BENDER,B.R.

    2000-12-01

    The use of isotope labels has had a fundamentally important role in the determination of mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Mechanistic data is valuable since it can assist in the design and rational improvement of homogeneous catalysts. There are several ways to use isotopes in mechanistic chemistry. Isotopes can be introduced into controlled experiments and followed where they go or don't go; in this way, Libby, Calvin, Taube and others used isotopes to elucidate mechanistic pathways for very different, yet important chemistries. Another important isotope method is the study of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and equilibrium isotope effect (EIEs). Here the mere observation of where a label winds up is no longer enough - what matters is how much slower (or faster) a labeled molecule reacts than the unlabeled material. The most careti studies essentially involve the measurement of isotope fractionation between a reference ground state and the transition state. Thus kinetic isotope effects provide unique data unavailable from other methods, since information about the transition state of a reaction is obtained. Because getting an experimental glimpse of transition states is really tantamount to understanding catalysis, kinetic isotope effects are very powerful.

  8. Electrochemically controlled iron isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jay R.; Young, Edward D.; Kavner, Abby

    2010-02-01

    Variations in the stable isotope abundances of transition metals have been observed in the geologic record and trying to understand and reconstruct the physical/environmental conditions that produced these signatures is an area of active research. It is clear that changes in oxidation state lead to large fractionations of the stable isotopes of many transition metals such as iron, suggesting that transition metal stable isotope signatures could be used as a paleo-redox proxy. However, the factors contributing to these observed stable isotope variations are poorly understood. Here we investigate how the kinetics of iron redox electrochemistry generates isotope fractionation. Through a combination of electrodeposition experiments and modeling of electrochemical processes including mass-transport, we show that electron transfer reactions are the cause of a large isotope separation, while mass transport-limited supply of reactant to the electrode attenuates the observed isotopic fractionation. Furthermore, the stable isotope composition of electroplated transition metals can be tuned in the laboratory by controlling parameters such as solution chemistry, reaction overpotential, and solution convection. These methods are potentially useful for generating isotopically-marked metal surfaces for tracking and forensic purposes. In addition, our studies will help interpret stable isotope data in terms of identifying underlying electron transfer processes in laboratory and natural samples.

  9. Nuclear physics and stable isotopes; Physique nucleaire et isotopes stables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goutte, D. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee

    1994-12-31

    The aim of this paper is to show that fundamental research in nuclear physics requires utilization of stable isotopes; stable isotopes are essential as target material since a large quantity of nucleus have to be studied in order to appreciate all the complexity of the nuclear structure, but also as a tool, such as beams, for the same purpose. Examples are given with samarium, tin and germanium isotopes. 7 figs.

  10. Nickel isotopes and methanogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubeck, A.; Ivarsson, M.

    2013-12-01

    Methanogens require Ni for their growth and as a consequence the microbial fractionation of Ni isotopes can be used as a biomarker for activity of methanogenic communities1. Anaerobic laboratory experiments was performed using methanogens to investigate methanogenic growth in a modified nutrient media2 with olivine Fo91 (5g/l) added as an additional mineral nutrient source and as the only H2 provider. One of the investigated methanogens showed an increased growth in the experiments with added olivine. There were also a close relationship between the mobilized Ni and the growth of the methanogen. Ni is an element that previously has been neglected in the study of fossilized microorganisms and their interaction with mineral substrates and, thus, there are no records or published data of Ni in association with microfossils. However, we have detected enrichments of Ni in fossilized microorganisms and ichno-fossils, respectively, from three separate locations. Ni is not present in the host rock in any of the samples. Thus, Ni is present in association with fossilized microorganisms from environments and more extensive analysis is required to understand the magnitude, uptake, preservation and fractionation of Ni in microfossils. In order to analyze Ni isotope fractionation from microbe-mineral interaction, we plan to use a high-resolution Laser-Ablation Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (LMS)3. In situ profile ablation will provide detailed and localized data on fractionation patterns between microfossils and their host rock. Also, this technique will allow us to identify the change in Ni isotopic fractionation in rock samples caused by abiotic and biogenic processes in a faster and easier way and with less risk for contamination compared to the wet chemistry analyses of Ni isotopes. 1. Cameron, V., Vance, D., Archer, C. & House, C. H. A biomarker based on the stable isotopes of nickel. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 106, 10944-10948 (2009). 2. Schn

  11. 6,6 '-bis (5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-5,6,7,8-tetra-hydro-benzo 1,2,4 triazine-3-yl) 2,2 ' bipyridine, an effective extracting agent for the separation of americium(III) and curium(III) from the lanthanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extraction of americium(III), curium(III), and the lanthanides(III) from nitric acid by 6,6'- bis (5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-5,6,7,8-tetra-hydro-benzo[1,2,4]triazine-3-yl)-[2,2'] bipyridine (CyMe4-BTBP) has been studied. Since the extraction kinetics were slow, N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-di-octyl-2-(2-hexyl-oxy-ethyl)malonamide (DMDOHEMA) was added as a phase transfer reagent. With a mixture of 0.01 M CyMe4-BTBP + 0.25 M DMDOHEMA in n -octanol, extraction equilibrium was reached within 5 min of mixing. At a nitric acid concentration of 1 M, an americium(III) distribution ratio of approx. 10 was achieved. Americium(III)/lanthanide(III) separation factors between 50 (dysprosium) and 1500 (lanthanum) were obtained. Whereas americium(III) and curium(III) were extracted as di-solvates, the stoichiometries of the lanthanide(III) complexes were not identified unambiguously, owing to the presence of DMDOHEMA. In the absence of DMDOHEMA, both americium(III) and europium(III) were extracted as di-solvates. Back-extraction with 0.1 M nitric acid was thermodynamically possible but rather slow. Using a buffered glycolate solution of pH=4, an americium(III) distribution ratio of 0.01 was obtained within 5 min of mixing. There was no evidence of degradation of the extractant, for example, the extraction performance of CyMe4-BTBP during hydrolysis with 1 M nitric acid did not change over a two month contact. (authors)

  12. Isotope effects in lattice dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The large number of available stable isotopes and well developed isotope separation technology have enabled growing crystals of C, LiH, ZnO, CuCl, CuBr, Cu2O, CdS, α-Sn, Ge, Si, etc. with a controlled isotope composition. Experimental and theoretical studies provide evidence that the isotope effect has an influence on the thermal, elastic, and vibrational properties of crystals. In this paper it is shown that in Ge and C crystals isotope effect causes only weak phonon scattering whereas in LiH the scattering potential changes are so strong that they lead to experimentally observable phonon localization. It is emphasized that a systematic description of isotope effects requires that anharmonicity be taken into account. (reviews of topical problems)

  13. Therapeutic use of radioactive isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Caroline Duc

    2013-01-01

    In December, researchers from ISOLDE-CERN, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) published the results of an in vivo study which successfully proved the effectiveness of four terbium isotopes for diagnosing and treating cancerous tumours.   Four terbium isotopes suitable for clinical purposes. “ISOLDE is the only installation capable of supplying terbium isotopes of such purity and intensity in the case of three out of the four types used in this study,” explains Karl Johnson, a physicist at ISOLDE.  “Producing over a thousand different isotopes, our equipment offers the widest choice of isotopes in the world!” Initially intended for fundamental physics research, ISOLDE has diversified its activities over time to invest in various projects in the materials science, biochemistry and nuclear medicine fields. The proof-of-concept study has confirmed that the four terbium isotopes 149Tb, 152Tb, 155Tb produ...

  14. Isotope thermometery in nuclear multifragmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, B. K.; Samaddar, S. K.; Sil, Tapas; J. N.

    1998-01-01

    A systematic study of the effect of fragment$-$fragment interaction, quantum statistics, $\\gamma$-feeding and collective flow is made in the extraction of the nuclear temperature from the double ratio of the isotopic yields in the statistical model of one-step (Prompt) multifragmentation. Temperature is also extracted from the isotope yield ratios generated in the sequential binary-decay model. Comparison of the thermodynamic temperature with the extracted temperatures for different isotope r...

  15. Tank waste isotope contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the results of a calculation to determine the relative contribution of selected isotopes to the inhalation and ingestion doses for a postulated release of Hanford tank waste. The fraction of the dose due to 90Sr, 90Y, 137Cs and the alpha emitters for single shell solids and liquids, double shell solids and liquids, aging waste solids and liquids and all solids and liquids. An effective dose conversion factor was also calculated for the alpha emitters for each composite of the tank waste

  16. Cold regions isotope applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrigo, L.D.; Divine, T.E.

    1976-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) started the Cold Regions Isotope Applications Program in FY-1975 to identify special conditions in the Arctic and similar geographic areas (Cold Regions) where radioisotope power, heater, or sterilization systems would be desirable and economically viable. Significant progress was made in the first year of this program and all objectives for this initial 12-month period were achieved. The major conclusions and recommendations resulting for this effort are described below. The areas of interest covered include: radiosterilization of sewage; heating of septic tanks; and radioisotope thermoelectric generators as power sources for meteorological instruments and navigational aids. (TFD)

  17. ISOTOPE FRACTIONATION PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clewett, G.H.; Lee, DeW.A.

    1958-05-20

    A new method is described for isotopic enrichment of uranium. It has been found that when an aqueous acidic solution of ionic tetravalent uraniunn is contacted with chelate complexed tetravalent uranium, the U/sup 238/ preferentially concentrates in the complexed phase while U/sup 235/ concentrates in the ionic phase. The effect is enhanced when the chelate compound is water insoluble and is dissolved in a water-immiscible organic solvent. Cupferron is one of a number of sultable complexing agents, and chloroform is a suitable organic solvent.

  18. Isotope separation with improved selective ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Method and apparatus for isotope separation by selective ionization of a desired isotope in an environment of plural isotopes without corresponding ionization of the other isotopes in the environment. The selective ionization is achieved through a three step excitation of atoms of the desired isotope in response to laser radiations applied to the environment. The transition for each step is selected to be less than one half the ionization potential for the isotopes to avoid two step nonselective ionization

  19. Isotope techniques for hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the body of the Panel's report specific conclusions and recommendations are presented in the context of each subject. The general consensus of the Panel is as follows: by the study of this report, the 1961 Panel report, the Proceedings of the March 1963 Tokyo Symposium and other reports of research and technological advances, isotope-technique applications to hydrologic problems have provided some useful avenues for understanding the nature of the hydrologic cycle and in the solution of specific engineering problems. Some techniques are developed thoroughly enough for fairly routine application as tools for use in the solution of practical problems, but further research and development is needed on other concepts to determined whether or not they can be beneficially applied to either research or engineering problems. A concerted effort is required on the part of both hydrologists and isotope specialists working as teams to assure that proper synthesis of scientific advances in the respective fields and translation of these advances into practical technology is achieved

  20. Si Isotopes of Brownleeite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, Scott R.; Ito, M.; Keller, L. P.; Clemett, S. J.; Jones, J. H.; Tatsuoka, H.; Zolensky, M. E.; Tatsuoka, H.

    2010-01-01

    Brownleeite is a manganese silicide, ideally stoichiometric MnSi, not previously observed in nature until its discovery within an interplanetary dust particle (IDP) that likely originated from a comet [1]. Three discrete brownleeite grains in the IDP L2055 I3 (4 microns in size, hereafter IDP I3) were identified with maximum dimensions of 100, 250 and 600 nm and fully analyzed using scanning-transmission electron microscopy (STEM) [1]. One of the grains (100 nm in size) was poikilitically enclosed by low-Fe, Mn-enriched (LIME) olivine. LIME olivine is epitaxial to the brownleeite with the brownleeite (200) parallel to the olivine c* [1]. LIME olivine is an enigmatic phase first reported from chondritic porous IDPs and some unequilibrated ordinary chondrites [ 2], that is commonly observed in chondritic-porous IDPs. Recently, LIME olivine has been also found in comet Wild-2 (Stardust) samples [3], indicating that LIME olivine is a common mineral component of comets. LIME olivine has been proposed to form as a high temperature condensate in the protosolar nebula [2]. Brownleeite grains also likely formed as high-temperature condensates either in the early Solar System or in the outflow of an evolved star or supernova explosion [1]. The isotopic composition of the brownleeite grains may strongly constrain their ultimate source. To test this hypothesis, we performed isotopic analyses of the brownleeite and the associated LIME olivine, using the NASA/JSC NanoSIMS 50L ion microprobe.

  1. Impact of the cation distribution homogeneity on the americium oxidation state in the U0.54Pu0.45Am0.01O2-x mixed oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauchy, Romain; Robisson, Anne-Charlotte; Martin, Philippe M.; Belin, Renaud C.; Aufore, Laurence; Scheinost, Andreas C.; Hodaj, Fiqiri

    2015-01-01

    The impact of the cation distribution homogeneity of the U0.54Pu0.45Am0.01O2-x mixed oxide on the americium oxidation state was studied by coupling X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron probe micro analysis (EPMA) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Oxygen-hypostoichiometric Am-bearing uranium-plutonium mixed oxide pellets were fabricated by two different co-milling based processes in order to obtain different cation distribution homogeneities. The americium was generated from β- decay of 241Pu. The XRD analysis of the obtained compounds did not reveal any structural difference between the samples. EPMA, however, revealed a high homogeneity in the cation distribution for one sample, and substantial heterogeneity of the U-Pu (so Am) distribution for the other. The difference in cation distribution was linked to a difference in Am chemistry as investigated by XAS, with Am being present at mixed +III/+IV oxidation state in the heterogeneous compound, whereas only Am(IV) was observed in the homogeneous compound. Previously reported discrepancies on Am oxidation states can hence be explained by cation distribution homogeneity effects.

  2. Laser isotope separation of gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic studies on laser isotope separation of gadolinium were performed. Spectroscopic data were obtained such as isotope shifts and hyperfine structures using an atomic beam. Enrichment of 157Gd up to 80% was observed by three-step photoionization experiment using linearly polarized dye lasers. Design of an separation system was discussed by the help of computer calculation of excitation dynamics. (author)

  3. Exotic structure of carbon isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ground state properties of C isotopes, deformation and electromagnetic moments, as well as electric dipole transition strength are investigated. We first study the ground state properties of C isotopes using a deformed Hartree-Fock (HF) + BCS model with Skyrme interactions. Isotope dependence of the deformation properties is investigated. Shallow deformation minima are found in several neutron-rich C isotopes. It is also shown that the deformation minima appear in both the oblate and the prolate sides in 17C and 19C having almost the same binding energies. Next, we carry out shell model calculations to study electromagnetic moments and electric dipole transitions of C isotopes. We point out the clear configuration dependence of the quadrupole and magnetic moments in the odd C isotopes, which will be useful to find out the deformation and spin-parties of the ground states of these nuclei. Electric dipole states of C isotopes are studied focusing on the interplay between low energy Pigmy strength and giant dipole resonances. Low peak energies, two-peak structure and large widths of the giant resonances show deformation effects. Calculated transition strength below dipole giant resonance in heavier C isotopes than 15C is found to exhaust 12∼15% of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule value and 50∼ 80% of the cluster sum rule value. (author)

  4. Boron isotopes in geothermal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron is a highly mobile element and during water-rock reactions, boron is leached out of rocks with no apparent fractionation. In geothermal systems where the water recharging the systems are meteoric in origin, the B isotope ratio of the geothermal fluid reflects the B isotope ratio of the rocks. Seawater has a distinctive B isotope ratio and where seawater recharges the geothermal system, the B isotope ratio of the geothermal system reflects the mixing of rock derived B and seawater derived B. Any deviations of the actual B isotope ratio of a mixture reflects subtle differences in the water-rock ratios in the cold downwelling limb of the hydrothermal system. This paper will present data from a variety of different geothermal systems, including New Zealand; Iceland; Yellowston, USA; Ibusuki, Japan to show the range in B isotope ratios in active geothermal systems. Some of these systems show well defined mixing trends between seawater and the host rocks, whilst others show the boron isotope ratios of the host rock only. In geothermal systems containing high amounts of CO2 boron isotope ratios from a volatile B source can also be inferred. (auth)

  5. Calcium isotopes in wine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmden, C. E.

    2011-12-01

    The δ 44/40Ca values of bottled wine vary between -0.76% to -1.55% on the seawater scale and correlate weakly with inverse Ca concentration and Mg/Ca ratio, such that the lowest δ 44/40Ca values have the highest Ca concentrations and lowest Mg/Ca ratios. The correlation is notable in the sense that the measured wines include both whites and reds sampled from different wine growing regions of the world, and cover a wide range of quality. Trends among the data yield clues regarding the cause of the observed isotopic fractionation. White wines, and wines generally perceived to be of lower quality, have lower δ 44/40Ca values compared to red wines and wines of generally perceived higher quality. Quality was assessed qualitatively through sensory evaluation, price, and scores assigned by critics. The relationship between δ 44/40Ca and wine quality was most apparent when comparing wines of one varietal from one producer from the same growing region. In the vineyard, wine quality is related to factors such as the tonnage of the crop and the ripeness of the grapes at the time of harvesting, the thickness of the skins for reds, the age of the vines, as well as the place where the grapes were grown (terroir). Quality is also influenced by winemaking practices such as fermentation temperature, duration of skin contact, and barrel ageing. Accordingly, the relationship between δ 44/40Ca and wine quality may originate during grape ripening in the vineyard or during winemaking in the cellar. We tested the grape ripening hypothesis using Merlot grapes sampled from a vineyard in the Okanagan, British Columbia, using sugar content (degrees Brix) as an indicator of ripeness. The grapes were separated into pulp, skin, and pip fractions and were analyzed separately. Thus far, there is no clear evidence for a systematic change in δ 44/40Ca values associated with progressive ripening of grapes in the vineyard. On the day of harvesting, the δ 44/40Ca value of juice squeezed from

  6. Fabrication of targets for transmutation of americium : synthesis of inertial matrix by sol-gel method. Procedure study on the infiltration of a radioactive solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    addition a new and unexpected phase formed by the reaction of americium with spinel during the high temperature synthesis process has been identified. This new phase could provide a unique menas to stabilise Am in one particular oxidation state. (Author)

  7. Sorption and diffusion of cobalt, nickel, strontium, iodine, cesium and americium in natural fissure surfaces and drill core cups studied by autoradiography, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the studies on sorption and diffusion of Cs, Sr, Co, Ni, Am and I in common rocks in Finnish bedrock carried out in laboratory experiments. Samples used in these studies were sections of drill cores containing filled and unfilled natural fracture surfaces and drill cores with a diamond drilled longitudinal cavity in the middle of the sample (drill core cups). Samples originated from the two nuclear power plant sites in Finland: tonalite and mica gneiss from Olkiluoto in Eurajoki and rapakivi granite from Haestholmen in Loviisa. The water used in the experiments was synthetic groundwater spiked at a time with one of the radionuclides: Cs-134, Sr-90, Co-60, Ni-63, Am-241 and I-125. Contact times from one week to one year were used to evaluate time dependence of diffusion. An autoradiographic method was used for determination of the penetration depths and diffusion pathways of elements. For determination of diffusion coefficients a quantitative computerized autoradiographic method was used to get the concentration profiles of the radionuclides in the drill cores. Sorption on natural fracture surfaces was more effective than on freshly drilled core samples. Filling materials on natural fracture surfaces, except calcite, increased sorption. The distribution coefficients for drill core cups were about the same as those for unfilled natural fracture surfaces after a contact time of one week and the sorption tendency of radionuclides was: Ka(Cs) > Ka(Co) > Ka(Am) > Ka(Ni) > Ka(Sr) > Ka(I). Radionuclides were observed to penetrate into fissures of the rock matrix and high-capacity minerals. Strontium was found as far as 35 mm in a filled natural fracture surface sample of rapakivi granite after a contact time of one year. The corresponding values were 3.0 mm for cesium, 2.1 mm for cobalt and 2.6 mm for nickel. For americium no diffusion could be observed (a-values for strontium was 6.6 x 10-16-1.1 x 10-13 m2/s, for cesium 4.7 x 10-16-7.2 x 10-15 m2/s

  8. Separation by sequential chromatography of americium, plutonium and neptunium elements: application to the study of trans-uranian elements migration in a European lacustrine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear tests carried out in the atmosphere in the Sixties, the accidents and in particular that to the power station of Chernobyl in 1986, were at the origin of the dispersion of a significant quantity of transuranic elements and fission products. The study of a lake system, such that of the Blelham Tarn in Great Britain, presented in this memory, can bring interesting answers to the problems of management of the environment. The determination of the radionuclides in sediment cores made it possible not only to establish the history of the depositions and consequently the origin of the radionuclides, but also to evaluate the various transfers which took place according to the parameters of the site and the properties of the elements. The studied transuranic elements are plutonium 238, 239-240, americium 241 and neptunium 237. Alpha emitting radionuclides, their determination requires complex radiochemical separations. A method was worked out to successively separate the three radioelements by using a same chromatographic column. Cesium 137 is the studied fission product, its determination is done by direct Gamma spectrometry. Lead 210, natural radionuclide, whose atmospheric flow can be supposed constant. makes it possible to obtain a chronology of the various events. The detailed vertical study of sediment cores showed that the accumulation mode of the studied elements is the same one and that the methods of dating converge. The cesium, more mobile than transuranic elements in the atmosphere, was detected in the 1963 and 1986 fallout whereas an activity out of transuranic elements appears only for the 1963 fallout. The activity of the 1963 cesium fallout is of the same order of magnitude as that of 1986. The calculation of the diffusion coefficients of the elements in the sediments shows an increased migration of cesium compared to transuranic elements. An inventory on the whole of the lake made it possible to note that the atmospheric fallout constitute the

  9. Container for hydrogen isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, David E.

    1977-01-01

    A container for the storage, shipping and dispensing of hydrogen isotopes such as hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, or mixtures of the same which has compactness, which is safe against fracture or accident, and which is reusable. The container consists of an outer housing with suitable inlet and outlet openings and electrical feed elements, the housing containing an activated sorber material in the form, for example, of titanium sponge or an activated zirconium aluminate cartridge. The gas to be stored is introduced into the chamber under conditions of heat and vacuum and will be retained in the sorber material. Subsequently, it may be released by heating the unit to drive off the stored gas at desired rates.

  10. Isotope Effects in ESR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Herrmann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to present the relationship between ESR spectroscopy and isotope effects three levels are considered: (i ESR spectroscopy is described on a general level up to the models for interpretation of the experimental spectra, which go beyond the usually used time and mass independent spin-Hamilton operator, (ii the main characteristics of the generalized isotope effects are worked out, and finally (iii the basic, mainly quantum mechanical effects are used to describe the coupling of electron spins with the degrees of freedom, which are accessible under the selected conditions, of the respective paramagnetic object under investigation. The ESR parameters and the respective models are formalized so far, that they include the time and mass depending influences and reflect the specific isotope effects. Relations will be established between the effects in ESR spectra to spin relaxation, to spin exchange, to the magnetic isotope effect, to the Jahn-Teller effects, as well as to the influence of zero-point vibrations. Examples will be presented which demonstrate the influence of isotopes as well as the kind of accessible information. It will be differentiated with respect to isotope effects in paramagnetic centres itself and in the respective matrices up to the technique of ESR imaging. It is shown that the use of isotope effects is indispensable in ESR spectroscopy.

  11. Microbes: Agents of Isotopic Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Microbes drive many of the important oxidation and reduction reactions on Earth; digest almost all forms of organic matter; and can serve as both primary and secondary producers. Because of their versatile biochemistry and physiology, they impart unique isotopic signatures to organic and inorganic materials, which have proven to be key measurements for understanding elemental cycling now and throughout Earth's history. Understanding microbial isotope fractionations in laboratory experiments has been important for interpreting isotopic patterns measured in natural settings. In fact, the pairing of simple experiment with natural observation has been the pathway for interpreting the fingerprint of microbial processes in ancient sediments and rocks. Examples of how key experiments have explained stable isotope fractionations by microbes and advanced the field of microbial ecology will be presented. Learning the isotopic signatures of Earth's microbes is a valuable exercise for predicting what isotopic signatures could be displayed by possible extant or extinct extraterrestrial life. Given the potential for discovery on Mars, Enceladus, and other solar system bodies, new methods and techniques for pinpointing what is unique about microbial isotope signatures is particularly relevant.

  12. Carbon isotope geochemistry and geobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmarais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon isotope fractionation values were used to understand the history of the biosphere. For example, plankton analyses confirmed that marine extinctions at the end of the Cretaceous period were indeed severe (see Hsu's article in Sundquist and Broeker, 1984). Variations in the isotopic compositions of carbonates and evaporitic sulfates during the Paleozoic reflect the relative abundances of euxinic (anoxic) marine environments and organic deposits from terrestrial flora. The carbon isotopic composition of Precambrian sediments suggest that the enzyme ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase has existed for perhaps 3.5 billion years.

  13. Isotope-edited infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, Ginka S; Kubelka, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Isotope-edited infrared (IR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying structural and dynamical properties of peptides and proteins with site-specific resolution. Labeling of selected amide carbonyls with (13)C results in detectable sidebands of amide I' vibrations, which provide information about local conformation and/or solvent exposure without structural perturbation to the protein. Incorporation of isotopically labeled amino acids at specific positions is achieved by the chemical synthesis of the studied proteins. We describe the basic procedures for synthesis of (13)C isotopically edited protein samples, experimental IR spectroscopic measurements, and analysis of the site-specific structural changes from the thermal unfolding IR data.

  14. Compelling Research Opportunities using Isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-04-23

    Isotopes are vital to the science and technology base of the US economy. Isotopes, both stable and radioactive, are essential tools in the growing science, technology, engineering, and health enterprises of the 21st century. The scientific discoveries and associated advances made as a result of the availability of isotopes today span widely from medicine to biology, physics, chemistry, and a broad range of applications in environmental and material sciences. Isotope issues have become crucial aspects of homeland security. Isotopes are utilized in new resource development, in energy from bio-fuels, petrochemical and nuclear fuels, in drug discovery, health care therapies and diagnostics, in nutrition, in agriculture, and in many other areas. The development and production of isotope products unavailable or difficult to get commercially have been most recently the responsibility of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy program. The President's FY09 Budget request proposed the transfer of the Isotope Production program to the Department of Energy's Office of Science in Nuclear Physics and to rename it the National Isotope Production and Application program (NIPA). The transfer has now taken place with the signing of the 2009 appropriations bill. In preparation for this, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) was requested to establish a standing subcommittee, the NSAC Isotope Subcommittee (NSACI), to advise the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics. The request came in the form of two charges: one, on setting research priorities in the short term for the most compelling opportunities from the vast array of disciplines that develop and use isotopes and two, on making a long term strategic plan for the NIPA program. This is the final report to address charge 1. NSACI membership is comprised of experts from the diverse research communities, industry, production, and homeland security. NSACI discussed research opportunities divided into three areas: (1

  15. Apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heung, Leung K; Sessions, Henry T; Xiao, Xin

    2013-06-25

    The apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes is provided using dual columns, each column having an opposite hydrogen isotopic effect such that when a hydrogen isotope mixture feedstock is cycled between the two respective columns, two different hydrogen isotopes are separated from the feedstock.

  16. Determination of plutonium isotopes in urine samples from radiation workers using 236Pu tracer, anion exchange resin and alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioassay technique is used for the estimation of actinides present in the body based on their excretion rate through body fluids. For occupational radiation workers urine assay is the preferred method for monitoring of chronic internal exposure. Determination of low concentrations of actinides such as plutonium, americium and uranium at low level of mBq in urine by alpha spectrometry requires pre-concentration of large volumes of urine. This paper deals with standardization of analytical method for the determination of Pu-isotopes in urine samples using anion exchange resin and 236Pu tracer for radiochemical recovery. The method involves oxidation of urine followed by co-precipitation of plutonium along with calcium phosphate. Separation of Pu was carried out by Amberlite, IRA-400, anion exchange resin. Pu-fraction was electrodeposited and activity estimated using tracer recovery by alpha spectrometer. Twenty routine urine samples of radiation workers were analyzed and consistent radiochemical tracer recovery was obtained in the range 74-96% with a mean and standard deviation of 85 and 6% respectively. (author)

  17. Americium behaviour in plastic vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legarda, F.; Herranz, M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear y Mecanica de Fluidos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Idoeta, R., E-mail: raquel.idoeta@ehu.e [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear y Mecanica de Fluidos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Abelairas, A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear y Mecanica de Fluidos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    The adsorption of {sup 241}Am dissolved in water in different plastic storage vessels was determined. Three different plastics were investigated with natural and distilled waters and the retention of {sup 241}Am by these plastics was studied. The same was done by varying vessel agitation time, vessel agitation speed, surface/volume ratio of water in the vessels and water pH. Adsorptions were measured to be between 0% and 70%. The adsorption of {sup 241}Am is minimized with no water agitation, with PET or PVC plastics, and by water acidification.

  18. Special isotope production and separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operations and production of transuranium elements (Cf, Es) at the Transuranium Processing Plant (TRU) are reported. Isotopic separations of Pu, Tl, Zn, Te, and Pb are reported. Separator R and D were conducted for Xe, Ti, Hg, and Tl

  19. Nuclear deformation of lutetium isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Ekström, C

    1974-01-01

    For odd-A lutetium isotopes the ground-state equilibrium deformations ( epsilon , epsilon /sub 4/) and the Nilsson model Z=71 single proton levels in an ( epsilon , epsilon /sub 4/)-representation are considered.

  20. Alignments in the nobelium isotopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Shi-Zie; XU Fu-Rong; YUAN Cen-Xi; QI Chong

    2009-01-01

    Total-Routhian-Surface calculations have been performed to investigate the deformation and align-ment properties of the No isotopes. It is found that normal deformed and superdeformed states in these nuclei can coexist at low excitation energies. In neutron-deficient No isotopes, the superdeformed shapes can even become the ground states. Moreover, we plotted the kinematic moments of inertia of the No isotopes, which follow very nicely available experimental data. It is noted that, as the rotational frequency increases, align-ments develop at hω=0.2-0.3 MeV. Our calculations show that the occupation of the vj orbital plays an important role in the alignments of the No isotopes.

  1. Atlas of isotope hydrology - Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although there are abundant water resources in Africa - about 17 large rivers and 160 lakes greater than 27 km2 - most of these resources are located in the humid and sub-humid regions around the equator. The surface runoff in Africa, on average, is much lower than average precipitation as a result of high evaporation and evapotranspiration, resulting in endemic drought in parts of the continent. Consequently, groundwater is a very important resource for Africa, providing nearly two-thirds of drinking water on the continent, and an even greater proportion in northern Africa. Despite the importance of groundwater for many societies, there is a lack of corresponding public concern about its protection, perhaps because the extent and availability of groundwater are not easily measured. The impact of increasing degrees of temporal and spatial climatic variability on water resources is also an important consideration, and groundwater to some extent provides an opportunity to mitigate the impacts of climate change. Applications of isotopes in hydrology are based on the general concept of 'tracing', in which naturally occurring or environmental isotopes (either radioactive or stable) are used to study hydrological processes on large temporal and spatial scales through their natural distribution in a hydrological system. Thus, environmental isotope methodologies are unique in regional studies of water resources to obtain integrated characteristics of groundwater systems. The most frequently used environmental isotopes include those of the water molecule, hydrogen (2H or D, also called deuterium, and 3H, also called tritium) and oxygen (18O), as well as of carbon (13C and 14C, also called radiocarbon or carbon-14) occurring in water as constituents of dissolved inorganic and organic carbon compounds. 2H, 13C and 18O are stable isotopes of the respective elements, whereas 3H and 14C are radioactive isotopes. Among the most important areas where isotopes are useful in

  2. Non-linear Isotope Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Johan Albrecht

    The isotopic fractionation associated with photodissociation of N2O, OCS and CO2, at different altitudes in Earth’s atmosphere, is investigated theoretically using constructed quantum mechanical models of the dissociation processes (i.e. potential energy surfaces and relevant coupling elements...... or moderate, and overall sulfur fractionation in the stratosphere is very weak which does not exclude OCS from being an acceptable background the Stratospheric Sulfate Aerosol layer. (iii) CO2 photolysis in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere is highly fractionating in both isotopes, enriching...... the remaining CO2 and depleting the produced CO in heavy isotopes. But photolysis of CO2 is too slow to produce significant fractionation in the remaining CO2. In contrast, the produced CO is highly fractionated and possesses a significant non mass dependent perturbation and a clumped isotope signal. Given...

  3. Isotope-based quantum information

    CERN Document Server

    G Plekhanov, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    The present book provides to the main ideas and techniques of the rapid progressing field of quantum information and quantum computation using isotope - mixed materials. It starts with an introduction to the isotope physics and then describes of the isotope - based quantum information and quantum computation. The ability to manipulate and control electron and/or nucleus spin in semiconductor devices provides a new route to expand the capabilities of inorganic semiconductor-based electronics and to design innovative devices with potential application in quantum computing. One of the major challenges towards these objectives is to develop semiconductor-based systems and architectures in which the spatial distribution of spins and their properties can be controlled. For instance, to eliminate electron spin decoherence resulting from hyperfine interaction due to nuclear spin background, isotopically controlled devices are needed (i.e., nuclear spin-depleted). In other emerging concepts, the control of the spatial...

  4. Isotopic Changes During Digestion: Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuross, N.

    2013-12-01

    Nutrient and hydrological inputs traverse a complicated route of pH, enzymatic and cellular processes in digestion in higher animals. The end products of digestion are the starting products for biosynthesis that are often used to interpret past life-ways. Using an artificial gut system, the isotopic changes (dD, d18O, d13C and d15N) of protein are documented. Three separate protein sources are subjected to the conditions, chemical and enzymatic, found in the stomach and upper small intestine with only a small shift in the oxygen isotopic composition of the proteins observed. Middle to lower small intestine parameters produced both greater isotopic effects and significantly lower molecular weight products. The role of the gastric enterocyte and the likely involvement of the internal milieu of this cell in the isotopic composition of amino acids that are transported to the liver are reported.

  5. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heumann, Klaus G.

    1992-09-01

    In the past isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) has usually been applied using the formation of positive thermal ions of metals. Especially in calibrating other analytical methods and for the certification of standard reference materials this type of IDMS became a routine method. Today, the progress in this field lies in the determination of ultra trace amounts of elements, e.g. of heavy metals in Antarctic ice and in aerosols in remote areas down to the sub-pg g-1 and sub-pg m-3 levels respectively, in the analysis of uranium and thorium at concentrations of a few pg g-1 in sputter targets for the production of micro- electronic devices or in the determination of sub-picogram amounts of230Th in corals for geochemical age determinations and of226Ra in rock samples. During the last few years negative thermal ionization IDMS has become a frequently used method. The determination of very small amounts of selenium and technetium as well as of other transition metals such as vanadium, chromium, molybdenum and tungsten are important examples in this field. Also the measurement of silicon in connection with a re-determination of Avogadro's number and osmium analyses for geological age determinations by the Re/Os method are of special interest. Inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry is increasingly being used for multi-element analyses by the isotope dilution technique. Determinations of heavy metals in samples of marine origin are representative examples for this type of multi-element analysis by IDMS. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry systems have also been successfully applied after chelation of metals (for example Pt determination in clinical samples) or for the determination of volatile element species in the environment, e.g. dimethyl sulfide. However, IDMS--specially at low concentration levels in the environment--seems likely to be one of the most powerful analytical methods for speciation in the future. This has been shown, up to now, for species of

  6. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry in oceanic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) is an important and well established method in many scientific fields as analytical chemistry (isotope dilution MS), physical chemistry, nuclear sciences and technology, environmental, agricultural, geological isotope dating, archaeometric, cosmic, bioavailability and nutrition studies, food authentication and adulteration control, elucidation of chemical reaction mechanism, isotope effect studies on chemical reactions and isotope enrichment/separation processes. This paper is aimed to provide a brief summary of IRMS contribution to sea and oceanic studies

  7. Methodology for the Inventory and Assessment of Americium Contamination Level in 1987 in an Area of Palomares Contaminated with Plutonium Weapon Grade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a methodology applied for the assessment of the ''241 Am coming from the decay of ''241 Pu isotope content in a contaminated area of Palomares, where the clean-up work done in 1966, given the negligible agricultural importance of such area at the time and its geographical characteristics, was not of the same magnitude as for the rest of the region. (Author) 4 refs

  8. Isotope-Identifying neutron reflectometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitenko, Yu. V., E-mail: nikiten@nf.jinr.ru; Petrenko, A. V.; Gundorin, N. A.; Gledenov, Yu. M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Aksenov, V. L. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    The possibilities of an isotope-indentifying study of layered structures in different regimes of a neutron wave field are considered. The detection of specularly reflected neutrons and secondary radiation (caused by neutron capture) in the form of charged particles, γ quanta, and nuclear fission fragments, as well as neutrons spin-flipped in a noncollinear magnetic field and on nuclei of elements with spin, makes it possible to implement isotope-indentifying neutron reflectometry.

  9. New berkelium isotope: 242Bk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new isotope of berkelium, 242Bk, was produced with a cross section of approx. 10 μb in reactions of boron on uranium and nitrogen on thorium. It decays by electron capture with a half-life of 7 +- 1.3 minutes. The branching ratio for this isotope for alpha decay is less than 1% and that for spontaneous fission is less than 0.03%. 2 figures, 2 tables

  10. Neutron skin in Osmium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we have made an attempt to calculate neutron skin thickness in rare earth even-even osmium isotopes. The selected isotopes ranges from 2-p to 2-n drip line. Neutron skin is an important feature of neutron rich nuclei. The ground state proton and neutron rms radii have been calculated using HFB approximation. A comparison of calculated radii have been done by using two different Skyrme parameterizations and two different basis

  11. Pharmaceuticals labelled with stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relatively new field of pharmaceuticals labelled with stable isotopes is reviewed. Scientific, juridical, and ethical questions are discussed concerning the application of these pharmaceuticals in human medicine. 13C, 15N, and 2H are the stable isotopes mainly utilized in metabolic function tests. Methodical contributions are given to the application of 2H, 13C, and 15N pharmaceuticals showing new aspects and different states of development in the field under discussion. (author)

  12. Isotopic study of Karst water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of the isotopic composition of water formed part of an extended investigation of the water drainage system in the Slovenian Karst. These studies were planned to complement geological and speleological investigations which are already being performed in this area, with the knowledge of the mechanism of changes in the isotopic composition of water in the natural environment on some smaller locations, Planina cave near Postojna where the vertical percolation of meteoric water through the karstified carbonate ceiling was studied and the water catchment areas of some small rivers, Ljubljanica, Rizana and Idrijca. Mass spectrometric investigations of the isotopic composition of some elements (18O, D, 13C and T) in water and in dissolved carbonates, as well as the isotopic composition of 18O and 13C in cave carbonates were performed. The results allow to conclude that the waters in karst aquifers in spite of producing the homogenisation to a great extent, qualitative determination of the retention time and of the prevailing sources for some springs and surface and underground water flows is nevertheless possible. The isotopic composition of 18O in water and of 18O and 13C in dissolved carbonates depends on climatic conditions and on denudation processes. The investigation of cave carbonates revealed that they have different isotopic compositions of 18O and 13C because of different locations and also different ages

  13. Insects, isotopes and radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA activity on coordinating the IAEA member-state efforts in the field of pest control is considered. A complex program of agricultural pest control (IPM), applied in many parts of the world is developed. The program provides for the use of natural means of control and cases of critical pest numbers-the use of insecticides. When controlling certain types of insects it is advisable to apply the 'large area control' methods which provide for the insect destruction in places of their concentration prior to migration. Methods of pest control over large areas also include radiation sexual sterilization method (SSM), application of insect phoromons (sexual attractants) to prevent mating, other types of chemical attractants, traps, mass cultivation and reproduction of parasite plants and animals, destroying insects, as well as improvement of host-plant resistance. A great attention is paid to isotope and radiation application in pest control (labelling, sexual sterilization using ionising radiation, radiation application in genetic engineering, mutant plant cultivation)

  14. Hydrogen isotope technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen pumping speeds on panels of molecular sieve types 5A and Na-Y were compared for a variety of sieve (and chevron) temperatures between 10 and 30 K. Although pumping speeds declined with time, probably because of the slow diffusion of hydrogen from the surface of the sieve crystals into the internal regions, the different sieve materials and operating conditions could be compared using time-averaged pump speeds. The (average) pumping speeds declined with increasing temperature. Under some conditions, the Na-Y sieve performed much better than the 5A sieve. Studies of the effect of small concentrations (approx. 4%) of hydrogen on helium pumping indicate that compound cryopumps in fusion reactors will not have to provide complete screening of hydrogen from helium panels. The concentrations of hydrogen did not lower effective helium pumping speeds or shorten the helium operating period between instabilities. Studies of tritium recovery from blankets of liquid lithium focused on design and construction of a flowing-lithium test system and on ultimate removal of tritium from yttrium sorbents. At 5050C, tritium release from yttrium behaves as a diffusion-controlled process, but the release rates are very low. Apparently, higher temperatures will be required for effective sorbent regeneration. An innovative technique for separating hydrogen isotopes by using bipolar electrolysis with permeable electrodes was analyzed to determine its potential usefulness in multistage separation

  15. Paleoproxies: Heavy Stable Isotope Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagler, T. F.; Hippler, D.; Siebert, C.; Kramers, J. D.

    2002-12-01

    Recent advances in isotope ratio mass spectrometry, namely multiple collector ICP-MS and refined TIMS techniques, will significantly enhance the ability to measure heavy stable isotope fractionation, which will lead to the development of a wide array of process-identifying (bio)-geochemical tools. Thus far research in this area is not easily assessable to scientists outside the isotope field. This is due to the fact that analyzing heavy stable isotopes does not provide routine numbers which are per se true (the preciser the truer) but is still a highly experimental field. On the other hand resolving earth science problems requires specialists familiar with the environment being studied. So what is in there for paleoceanographers? In a first order approach, relating isotope variations to physical processes is straightforward. A prominent example are oxygen isotope variations with temperature. The total geological signal is of course far more complicated. At low temperatures, heavy stable isotopes variations have been reported for e.g. Ca, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn, Mo and Tl. Fractionation mechanisms and physical parameters responsible for the observed variations are not yet resolved for most elements. Significant equilibrium isotope fractionation is expected from redox reactions of transition metals. However a difference in coordination number between two coexisting speciations of an element in the same oxidation state can also cause fractionation. Protonation of dissolved Mo is one case currently discussed. For paleoceanography studies, a principal distinction between transition metals essential for life (V to Zn plus Mo) or not will be helpful. In case of the former group, distinction between biogenic and abiogenic isotope fractionation will remain an important issue. For example, abiotic Fe redox reactions result in isotope fractionations indistinguishable in direction and magnitude from microbial effects. Only a combination of different stable isotope systems bears the

  16. EURADOS action for determination of americium in skull measures in vivo and Monte Carlo simulation; Accion EURADOS para la determinacion de americio en craneo mediante medidas in-vivo y simulacion Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Ponte, M. A.; Navarro Amaro, J. F.; Perez Lopez, B.; Navarro Bravo, T.; Nogueira, P.; Vrba, T.

    2013-07-01

    From the Group of WG7 internal dosimetry of the EURADOS Organization (European Radiation Dosimetry group, e.V.) which It coordinates CIEMAT, international action for the vivo measurement of americium has been conducted in three mannequins type skull with detectors of Germanium by gamma spectrometry and simulation by Monte Carlo methods. Such action has been raised as two separate exercises, with the participation of institutions in Europe, America and Asia. Other actions similar precede this vivo intercomparison of measurement and modeling Monte Carlo1. The preliminary results and associated findings are presented in this work. The laboratory of the body radioactivity (CRC) of service counter of dosimetry staff internal (DPI) of the CIEMAT, it has been one of the participants in vivo measures exercise. On the other hand part, the Group of numerical dosimetry of CIEMAT is participant of the Monte Carlo2 simulation exercise. (Author)

  17. Critical and shielding parametric studies with the Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI to identify the key points to take into account during the transportation of blanket assemblies with high ratio of americium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of French research program on Generation IV sodium cooled fast reactor, one possible option consists in burning minor actinides in this kind of Advanced Sodium Technological Reactor. Two types of transmutation mode are studied in the world : the homogeneous mode of transmutation where actinides are scattered with very low enrichment ratio in fissile assemblies and the heterogeneous mode where fissile core is surrounded by blanket assemblies filled with minor actinides with ratio of incorporated actinides up to 20%. Depending on which element is considered to be burnt and on its content, these minor actinides contents imply constraints on assemblies' transportation between Nuclear Power Plants and fuel cycle facilities. In this study, we present some academic studies in order to identify some key constraints linked to the residual power and neutron/gamma load of such kind of blanket assemblies. To simplify the approach, we considered a modeling of a 'model cask' dedicated to the transportation of a unique irradiated blanket assembly loaded with 20% of Americium and basically inspired from an existent cask designed initially for the damaged fissile Superphenix assembly transport. Thermal calculations performed with EDF-SYRTHES code have shown that due to thermal limitations on cladding temperature, the decay time to be considered before transportation is 20 years. This study is based on explicit 3D representations of the cask and the contained blanket assembly with the Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI/JEFF3.1.1 library and concludes that after such a decay time, the transportation of a unique Americium radial blanket is feasible only if the design of our model cask is modified in order to comply with the dose limitation criterion. (author)

  18. Photodisintegration of Lithium Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtz, Ward Andrew

    We have performed a measurement of the photodisintegration of the lithium isotopes, 6Li and 7Li, using a monochromatic, polarised photon beam and a segmented neutron detector array which covers approximately ¼ of 4pi srad. Using time-of-flight and scintillator light-output spectra we separate the data into individual reaction channels. This work is motivated by the need to compare with recent theoretical predictions and to provide data for future theoretical work. For the photodisintegration of 6Li we took data at 12 photon energies between 8 and 35 MeV. We describe the data using a model consisting of two-body reaction channels and obtain angular distributions and absolute cross sections for many of these reaction channels. We compare our results with a recent Lorentz integral transform calculation (Bacca et al. Phys. Rev. C 69, 057001 (2004)). Our results are in reasonable agreement with the calculation, in contradiction with previous experimental results. For the photodisintegration of 7Li, we took data at 9 photon energies between 10 and 35 MeV. We obtain cross sections for the reaction channel 7Li + gamma → n + 6 Li(g.s.) at all photon energies with angular distributions at all but the highest energy. We obtain angular distributions and total cross sections for reaction channels involving excited states of the daughter nucleus, 6Li, at select energies. We hope that these measurements will provide incentive for new theoretical calculations. We observe neutrons that can only be described by the reaction channel 7Li + gamma → n + 6Li(10.0) which necessitates an excited state of 6Li with excitation energy Ex = 10.0 +/- 0.5 MeV that is not in the standard tables of excited states. ii

  19. Opportunities for isotope discoveries at FRIB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, T.; Hausmann, M.; Sherrill, B. M.; Tarasov, O. B.

    2016-06-01

    Expected production yields of the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) were calculated for a wide range of rare isotopes using the code LISE++ and planned performance parameters (Tarasov and Bazin, 2008; Bollen et al., 2011 [2]). A comparison between isotope discoveries of the last decade and expected particle yields indicates the range of isotopes that can likely be detected at FRIB. This paper will highlight recent isotope discoveries at NSCL's Coupled Cyclotron Facility and deduce how far the limits could be pushed with the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams.

  20. Exotic Structure of Carbon Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, T; Hagino, K; Suzuki, Toshio; Sagawa, Hiroyuki; Hagino, Kouichi

    2002-01-01

    We studied firstly the ground state properties of C-isotopes using a deformed Hartree-Fock (HF)+ BCS model with Skyrme interactions. Shallow deformation minima are found in several neutron$-$rich C-isotopes. It is shown also that the deformation minima appear in both the oblate and the prolate sides in $^{17}$C and $^{19}$C having almost the same binding energies. Secondly, we carried out shell model calculations to study electromagnetic moments and electric dipole transitions of the C-isotopes. We point out the clear configuration dependence of the quadrupole and magnetic moments in the odd C-isotopes, which will be useful to find out the deformations and the spin-parities of the ground states of these nuclei. We studied electric dipole states of C-isotopes focusing on the interplay between low energy Pigmy strength and giant dipole resonances. Reasonable agreement is obtained with available experimental data for the photoreaction cross sections both in the low energy region below $\\hbar \\omega $=14 MeV and ...

  1. Handbook of environmental isotope geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baskaran, Mark (ed.) [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States). Dept. Geology

    2011-07-01

    Applications of radioactive and stable isotopes have revolutionized our understanding of the Earth and near-earth surface processes. The utility of the isotopes are ever-increasing and our sole focus is to bring out the applications of these isotopes as tracers and chronometers to a wider audience so that they can be used as powerful tools to solve environmental problems. New developments in this field remain mostly in peer-reviewed journal articles and hence our goal is to synthesize these findings for easy reference for students, faculty, regulators in governmental and non-governmental agencies, and environmental companies. While this volume maintains its rigor in terms of its depth of knowledge and quantitative information, it contains the breadth needed for wide variety problems and applications in the environmental sciences. This volume presents all of the newer and older applications of isotopes pertaining to the environmental problems in one place that is readily accessible to readers. This book not only has the depth and rigor that is needed for academia, but it has the breadth and case studies to illustrate the utility of the isotopes in a wide variety of environments (atmosphere, oceans, lakes, rivers and streams, terrestrial environments, and sub-surface environments) and serves a large audience, from students and researchers, regulators in federal, state and local governments, and environmental companies. (orig.)

  2. Nickel isotopes in stellar matter

    CERN Document Server

    Nabi, Jameel-Un

    2014-01-01

    Isotopes of nickel play a key role during the silicon burning phase up to the presupernova phase of massive stars. Electron capture rates on these nickel isotopes are also important during the phase of core contraction. I present here the microscopic calculation of ground and excited states Gamow-Teller (GT) strength distributions for key nickel isotopes. The calculation is performed within the frame-work of pn-QRPA model. A judicious choice of model parameters, specially of the Gamow-Teller strength parameters and the deformation parameter, resulted in a much improved calculation of GT strength functions. The excited state GT distributions are much different from the corresponding ground-state distributions resulting in a failure of the Brink's hypothesis. The electron capture and positron decay rates on nickel isotopes are also calculated within the framework of pn-QRPA model relevant to the presupernova evolution of massive stars. The electron capture rates on odd-A isotopes of nickel are shown to have dom...

  3. Isotopes a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Ellam, Rob

    2016-01-01

    An isotope is a variant form of a chemical element, containing a different number of neutrons in its nucleus. Most elements exist as several isotopes. Many are stable while others are radioactive, and some may only exist fleetingly before decaying into other elements. In this Very Short Introduction, Rob Ellam explains how isotopes have proved enormously important across all the sciences and in archaeology. Radioactive isotopes may be familiar from their use in nuclear weapons, nuclear power, and in medicine, as well as in carbon dating. They have been central to establishing the age of the Earth and the origins of the solar system. Combining previous and new research, Ellam provides an overview of the nature of stable and radioactive isotopes, and considers their wide range of modern applications. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subjec...

  4. Oak Ridge National Laboratory's isotope enrichment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Isotope Enrichment Program (IEP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is responsible for the production and distribution of ∼225 enriched stable isotopes from 50 multi-isotopic elements. In addition, ORNL distributes enriched actinide isotopes and provides extensive physical- and chemical-form processing of enriched isotopes to meet customer requirements. For more than 50 yr, ORNL has been a major provider of enriched isotopes and isotope-related services to research, medical, and industrial institutions throughout the world. Consolidation of the Isotope Distribution Office (IDO), the Isotope Research Materials Laboratory (IRML), and the stable isotope inventories in the Isotope Enrichment Facility (IEF) have improved operational efficiencies and customer services. Recent changes in the IEP have included adopting policies for long-term contracts, which offer program stability and pricing advantages for the customer, and prorated service charges, which greatly improve pricing to the small research users. The former U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Loan Program has been converted to a lease program, which makes large-quantity or very expensive isotopes available for nondestructive research at a nominal cost. Current efforts are being pursued to improve and expand the isotope separation capabilities as well as the extensive chemical- and physical-form processing that now exists. The IEF's quality management system is ISO 9002 registered and accredited in the United States, Canada, and Europe

  5. Lithium isotopic separation: preliminary studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to get the separation of natural isotopes of lithium by electrolytic amalgamation, an electrolytic cell with a confined mercury cathode was used to obtain data for the design of a separation stage. The initial work was followed by the design of a moving mercury cathode electrolytic cell and three experiments with six batches stages were performed for the determination of the elementary separation factor. The value obtained, 1.053, was ill agreement: with the specialized literature. It was verified in all experiments that the lithium - 6 isotope concentrated in the amalgam phase and that the lithium - 7 isotope concentrated in the aqueous phase. A stainless-steel cathode for the decomposition of the lithium amalgam and the selective desamalgamation were also studied. In view of the results obtained, a five stages continuous scheme was proposed. (author)

  6. Photonuclear reactions on titanium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyshev, S. S. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Dzhilavyan, L. Z. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Ishkhanov, B. S.; Kapitonov, I. M. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, A. A., E-mail: kuznets@depni.sinp.msu.ru; Orlin, V. N.; Stopani, K. A. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    The photodisintegration of titanium isotopes in the giant-dipole-resonance energy region is studied by the photon-activation method. Bremsstrahlung photons whose spectrum has the endpoint energy of 55 MeV is used. The yields and integrated cross sections are determined for photoproton reactions on the titanium isotopes {sup 47,48,49,50}Ti. The respective experimental results are compared with their counterparts calculated on the basis of the TALYS code and a combined photonucleon-reaction model. The TALYS code disregards the isospin structure of the giant dipole resonance and is therefore unable to describe the yield of photoproton reactions on the heavy titanium isotopes {sup 49,50}Ti.

  7. Isotope specific arbitrary material sorter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barty, Christopher P.J.

    2015-12-08

    A laser-based mono-energetic gamma-ray source is used to provide a rapid and unique, isotope specific method for sorting materials. The objects to be sorted are passed on a conveyor in front of a MEGa-ray beam which has been tuned to the nuclear resonance fluorescence transition of the desired material. As the material containing the desired isotope traverses the beam, a reduction in the transmitted MEGa-ray beam occurs. Alternately, the laser-based mono-energetic gamma-ray source is used to provide non-destructive and non-intrusive, quantitative determination of the absolute amount of a specific isotope contained within pipe as part of a moving fluid or quasi-fluid material stream.

  8. Plasma oscillation and isotope effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconducting isotropic crystal is presented by two subsystems in terms of anharmonic oscillation model. The superconducting energy gap below the phase transition temperature is deduced by the free electron plasma energy. The anisotropic nature of the materials is appeared by the superconducting gaps in x, y, z directions. The phase transition temperature-square plasma energy relation is established. The observed facts for high temperature superconductors are consistent with the plasma theory. The isotope phase transition temperature shift is connected with the plasma energy. The fixing temperature divided by the phase transition temperature is the function of the molecular mass divided by effective mass density. The phase transition temperature depends on the interaction parameter. The equations for mercury and MgB2 isotopes are given. The interaction parameters reduce with the phase transition temperature rise. The isotope distinctions in the superconducting lines are explained. The phonon mechanism is concluded to be special case of the plasma mechanism

  9. Plasma oscillation and isotope effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netesova, Nadezhda P. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Physics Faculty, LTPS Department, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: npn@mig.phys.msu.ru

    2007-09-01

    Superconducting isotropic crystal is presented by two subsystems in terms of anharmonic oscillation model. The superconducting energy gap below the phase transition temperature is deduced by the free electron plasma energy. The anisotropic nature of the materials is appeared by the superconducting gaps in x, y, z directions. The phase transition temperature-square plasma energy relation is established. The observed facts for high temperature superconductors are consistent with the plasma theory. The isotope phase transition temperature shift is connected with the plasma energy. The fixing temperature divided by the phase transition temperature is the function of the molecular mass divided by effective mass density. The phase transition temperature depends on the interaction parameter. The equations for mercury and MgB{sub 2} isotopes are given. The interaction parameters reduce with the phase transition temperature rise. The isotope distinctions in the superconducting lines are explained. The phonon mechanism is concluded to be special case of the plasma mechanism.

  10. Natural fractionation of uranium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topic of this thesis was the investigation of U (n(238U) / n(235U)) isotope variations in nature with a focus on samples (1) that represent the continental crust and its weathering products (i.e. granites, shales and river water) (2) that represent products of hydrothermal alteration on mid-ocean ridges (i.e. altered basalts, carbonate veins and hydrothermal water) and (3) from restricted euxinic basins (i.e. from the water column and respective sediments). The overall goal was to explore the environmental conditions and unravel the mechanisms that fractionate the two most abundant U isotopes, n(238U) and n(235U), on Earth.

  11. Electron scattering off palladium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low-lying states of the even Pd isotopes are characterized by vibrator-like properties. In this thesis the results of an electron scattering experiment on the Pd isotopes, designed to study the description of such nuclei in the Anharmonic Vibrator Model (AVM) and the Interacting Boson Approximation (IBA), are presented and discussed. Data have been taken at the high-resolution electron scattering facility of NIKHEF-K and covered a momentum-transfer range of 0.4 to 2.5 fm-1. (Auth.)

  12. Developmentand Application of Accelerator Isotopes in China

    OpenAIRE

    YANG Yuan-you; LI Fei-ze; LIAO Jia-li; Liu, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Compared with the isotopes generated by nuclear reactor, the isotopes prepared by accelerator always show high specific activity and short half-life period. And most of such isotopes always were neutron-deficient nuclides, giving β+ or single energy γ ray. As one of the most important methods preparing radionuclides, the preparation of isotopes by accelerator has attracted more and more attention from the beginning of 21th century. The development of the preparation and application of the acc...

  13. Brief review on the development of isotope hydrology in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪集旸; 孙占学

    2001-01-01

    The development of isotope hydrology in China is briefly reviewed. It includes oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of precipitation, application of isotope hydrological methodologies in solving water resources problems, isotope hydrological studies on brines and salt lake waters, as well as isotope hydrological investigations of thermal waters. The review focuses on isotope hydrology in China during the last two decades.

  14. Dry phase reactor for generating medical isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, Thomas Rockwell; Heltemes, Thad Alexander

    2016-05-03

    An apparatus for generating medical isotopes provides for the irradiation of dry-phase, granular uranium compounds which are then dissolved in a solvent for separation of the medical isotope from the irradiated compound. Once the medical isotope is removed, the dissolved compound may be reconstituted in dry granular form for repeated irradiation.

  15. Substitution of stable isotopes in Chlorella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaumenhaft, E.; Katz, J. J.; Uphaus, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    Replacement of biologically important isotopes in the alga Chlorella by corresponding heavier stable isotopes produces increasingly greater deviations from the normal cell size and changes the quality and distribution of certain cellular components. The usefulness of isotopically altered organisms increases interest in the study of such permuted organisms.

  16. Stable isotopes and biomarkers in microbial ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschker, H.T.S.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    The use of biomarkers in combination with stable isotope analysis is a new approach in microbial ecology and a number of papers on a variety of subjects have appeared. We will first discuss the techniques for analysing stable isotopes in biomarkers, primarily gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ra

  17. Discovery of the Isotopes with Z <= 10

    OpenAIRE

    Thoennessen, M

    2010-01-01

    A total of 126 isotopes with Z $\\le$ 10 have been identified to date. The discovery of these isotopes which includes the observation of unbound nuclei, is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  18. Isotope separation by laser technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Wolfgang

    2002-03-01

    Isotope separation processes operate on very small differences, given either by the Quotient of masses with the same number of electrons or by their mass difference. When separating isotopes of light elements in mass quantities, thermodynamic processes accounting for the quotient, either in diffusion, chemical reactivity or distillation are used. For heavy elements those quotients are very small. Therefore they need a large number of separation steps. Large plants with high energy consumption result from that. As uranium isotope separation is the most important industrial field, alternatives, taking account for the mass difference, as e.g. gas centrifuges, have been developed. They use only a fraction of the energy input, but need a very large number of machines, as the individual throughput is small. Since it was discovered, that molecules of high symmetry like Uranium-Hexafluoride as a deep-cooled gas stream can be ionized by multiple photon excitation, this process was studied in detail and in competition to the selective ionization of metal vapors, as already demonstrated with uranium. The paper reports about the principles of the laser excitation for both processes, the different laboratory scale and prototypical plants built, the difficulties with materials, as far as the metal vapor laser separation is concerned, and the difficulties experienced in the similarity in molecular spectra. An overview of the relative economic merits of the different processes and the auspices in a saturated market for uranium isotope separation, together with other potential markets for molecular laser separation, is contained in the conclusions.

  19. My academic life with isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present article outlines investigations and experience made by the author in carrying out a variety of studies on isotopes since 1939. First, he was interested in transuranic elements and his studies on artificial radioactive isotopes covered the detection of plutonium at Nagasaki, chemical separation of plutomium from atmosphere at Tokyo, spectral analysis of alpha rays from plutomium, application of 113mIn to emission spectral analysis as a tracer, chemical enrichment of 76As hot atom, and non-destructive analysis of the chemical state of 119Sn produced through EC disintegration in solid material. His studies on natural radioactivity include measurement of the radium content in rock and mineral samples collected in the Korean Peninsula, investigation on the formation process of minerals found around hot springs and determination of the age of rock and mineral samples. He started investigations on isotope enrichment around 1965. Studies in this field cover the application of cataphoretic processes to separation of 23Na and 22Na, enrichment of 7Li and other alkali metals, enrichment of 6Li by isotope exchange, derivation of an empirical equation (Saito-Kanno Equation) for mass effect in couter-current cataphoresis of molten halides, etc. (Nogami, K.)

  20. Isotope hydrology: Investigating groundwater contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater quality has worsened in many regions, with sometimes serious consequences. Decontaminating groundwater is an extremely slow process, and sometimes impossible, because of the generally long residence time of the water in most geological formations. Major causes of contamination are poor groundwater management (often dictated by immediate social needs) and the lack of regulations and control over the use and disposal of contaminants. These types of problems have prompted an increasing demand for investigations directed at gaining insight into the behaviour of contaminants in the hydrological cycle. Major objectives are to prevent pollution and degradation of groundwater resources, or, if contamination already has occurred, to identify its origin so that remedies can be proposed. Environmental isotopes have proved to be a powerful tool for groundwater pollution studies. The IAEA has had a co-ordinated research programme since 1987 on the application of nuclear techniques to determine the transport of contaminants in groundwater. An isotope hydrology project is being launched within the framework of the IAEA's regional co-operative programme in Latin America (known as ARCAL). Main objectives are the application of environmental isotopes to problems of groundwater assessment and contamination in Latin America. In 1989, another co-ordinated research programme is planned under which isotopic and other tracers will be used for the validation of mathematical models in groundwater transport studies

  1. Generalized Isoscaling of Isotopic Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Shomin, R; Bjarki, O; Gelbke, C K; Kunde, G J; Lemmon, R C; Lynch, W G; Magestro, D; Popescu, R; Van der Molen, A; Verde, G; Westfall, G D; Xi Hong Fei; Friedman, W A; Imme, G; Maddalena, V; Nociforo, C; Raciti, G; Riccobene, G; Romano, F; Saija, A; Sfienti, C; Fritz, S; Gross, C; Odeh, T; Schwarz, C; Nadasen, A; Sisan, D R; Rao, K A G

    2002-01-01

    Generalized isoscaling relationships are proposed that may permit one to relate the isotopic distributions of systems that may not be at the same temperature. The proposed relationships are applied to multifragmentation excitation functions for central Kr+Nb and Ar+Sc collisions.

  2. A NICHE FOR ISOTOPIC ECOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifty years ago, GE Hutchinson defined the ecological niche as a hypervolume in n-dimensional space with environmental variables as axes. Ecologists have recently developed renewed interest in the concept, and technological advances now allow us to use stable isotope analyses to ...

  3. Bayesian stable isotope mixing models

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this paper we review recent advances in Stable Isotope Mixing Models (SIMMs) and place them into an over-arching Bayesian statistical framework which allows for several useful extensions. SIMMs are used to quantify the proportional contributions of various sources to a mixtur...

  4. Charge radii of radium isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wansbeek, L. W.; Schlesser, S.; Sahoo, B. K.; Dieperink, A. E. L.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Timmermans, R. G. E.

    2012-01-01

    We present a combined analysis of the available isotope-shift data from the optical spectra of Ra atoms and Ra+ ions. Atomic structure calculations of the field-shift and specific mass-shift constants of the low-lying levels in Ra+ are used. The nuclear radial differences delta for the radium

  5. Isotopic Fractionation in Interstellar Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Isotopically fractionated material is found in many solar system objects, including meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar material that was incorporated into the solar sys tem without undergoing significant processing. In this poster, we sho w the results of several models of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon f ractionation in proto-stellar cores.

  6. Calcium isotope analysis by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulyga, Sergei F

    2010-01-01

    The variations in the isotopic composition of calcium caused by fractionation in heterogeneous systems and by nuclear reactions can provide insight into numerous biological, geological, and cosmic processes, and therefore isotopic analysis finds a wide spectrum of applications in cosmo- and geochemistry, paleoclimatic, nutritional, and biomedical studies. The measurement of calcium isotopic abundances in natural samples has challenged the analysts for more than three decades. Practically all Ca isotopes suffer from significant isobaric interferences, whereas low-abundant isotopes can be particularly affected by neighboring major isotopes. The extent of natural variations of stable isotopes appears to be relatively limited, and highly precise techniques are required to resolve isotopic effects. Isotope fractionation during sample preparation and measurements and instrumental mass bias can significantly exceed small isotope abundance variations in samples, which have to be investigated. Not surprisingly, a TIMS procedure developed by Russell et al. (Russell et al., 1978. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 42: 1075-1090) for Ca isotope measurements was considered as revolutionary for isotopic measurements in general, and that approach is used nowadays (with small modifications) for practically all isotopic systems and with different mass spectrometric techniques. Nevertheless, despite several decades of calcium research and corresponding development of mass spectrometers, the available precision and accuracy is still not always sufficient to achieve the challenging goals. The present article discusses figures of merits of presently used analytical methods and instrumentation, and attempts to critically assess their limitations. In Sections 2 and 3, mass spectrometric methods applied to precise stable isotope analysis and to the determination of (41)Ca are described. Section 4 contains a short summary of selected applications, and includes tracer experiments and the potential use

  7. Modelling stable water isotopes: Status and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner M.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Modelling of stable water isotopes H2 18O and HDO within various parts of the Earth’s hydrological cycle has clearly improved our understanding of the interplay between climatic variations and related isotope fractionation processes. In this article key principles and major research results of stable water isotope modelling studies are described. Emphasis is put on research work using explicit isotope diagnostics within general circulation models as this highly complex model setup bears many resemblances with studies using simpler isotope modelling approaches.

  8. Heavy atom isotope effects on enzymatic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paneth, Piotr

    1994-05-01

    The theory of isotope effects, which has proved to be extremely useful in providing geometrical details of transition states in a variety of chemical reactions, has recently found an application in studies of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. These reactions are multistep in nature with few steps being partially rate-limiting, thus interpretation of these isotope effects is more complex. The theoretical framework of heavy-atom isotope effects on enzymatic reactions is critically analyzed on the basis of recent results of: carbon kinetic isotope effects on carbonic anhydrase and catalytic antibodies; multiple carbon, deuterium isotope effects on reactions catalyzed by formate decarboxylase; oxygen isotope effects on binding processes in reactions catalyzed by pyruvate kinase; and equilibrium oxygen isotope effect on binding an inhibitor to lactate dehydrogenase. The advantages and disadvantages of reaction complexity in learning details of formal and molecular mechanisms are discussed in the examples of reactions catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, orotidine decarboxylase and glutamine synthetase.

  9. Measuring SNM Isotopic Distributions using FRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geist, William H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-02

    The first group of slides provides background information on the isotopic composition of plutonium. It is shown that 240Pu is the critical isotope in neutron coincidence/multiplicity counting. Next, response function analysis to determine isotopic composition is discussed. The isotopic composition can be determined by measuring the net peak counts from each isotope and then taking the ratio of the counts for each isotope relative to the total counts for the element. Then FRAM (Fixed energy Response function Analysis with Multiple efficiencies) is explained. FRAM can control data acquisition, automatically analyze newly acquired data, analyze previously acquired data, provide information on the quality of the analysis, and facilitate analysis in unusual situations (non-standard energy calibrations, gamma rays from non-SNM isotopes, poor spectra (within limits)).

  10. Developing a Clinically Useful Calcium Isotope Biomarker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniello, Stephen J.; Anbar, Ariel D.; Gordon, Gwyneth W.; Skulan, Joseph L.; Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.; Monge, Jorge; Fonseca, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Naturally-occurring Ca is mixture of six isotopes Ca-40, Ca-42, Ca-43, Ca-44, Ca-46, Ca-48). Biological reaction rates and equilibrium constants depend slightly, but measurably, on atomic mass, causing the relative abundances of Ca isotopes to vary between different tissues. During bone formation, light isotopes of Ca are preferentially incorporated into bone, leaving soft tissue depleted in light isotopes. In contrast, bone resorption exhibits no isotopic preference, and thus transfers the light isotope signature of bone back to soft tissue. This balance makes the Ca isotope composition of soft tissue (e.g. serum, urine) a highly sensitive, quantitative tracer for whole-body bone mineral balance (BMB).

  11. Zinc isotopic compositions of breast cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larner, Fiona; Woodley, Laura N; Shousha, Sami; Moyes, Ashley; Humphreys-Williams, Emma; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Halliday, Alex N; Rehkämper, Mark; Coombes, R Charles

    2015-01-01

    An early diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer is essential to improve outcome. High precision isotopic analysis, originating in Earth sciences, can detect very small shifts in metal pathways. For the first time, the natural intrinsic Zn isotopic compositions of various tissues in breast cancer patients and controls were determined. Breast cancer tumours were found to have a significantly lighter Zn isotopic composition than the blood, serum and healthy breast tissue in both groups. The Zn isotopic lightness in tumours suggests that sulphur rich metallothionein dominates the isotopic selectivity of a breast tissue cell, rather than Zn-specific proteins. This reveals a possible mechanism of Zn delivery to Zn-sequestering vesicles by metallothionein, and is supported by a similar signature observed in the copper isotopic compositions of one breast cancer patient. This change in intrinsic isotopic compositions due to cancer has the potential to provide a novel early biomarker for breast cancer.

  12. Isotope hydrology of catchment basins: lithogenic and cosmogenic isotopic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimz, G. J., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water. Many solutes in natural waters are derived from the interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system - these are termed `lithogenic` solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both within and outside of the catchment - i.e., in addition to being derived from catchment rock and soil, they are solutes that are also transported into the catchment. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing `cosmogenic` nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing `thermonuclear` nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, principally {sup 238}U (producing `in-situ` lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading `cosmogenic nuclides`, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage here, although always indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute concentrations in catchment waters, and how the isotopic compositions of the solutes can be used in integrative ways to identify these processes, thereby revealing the physical history of the water within a catchment system. The concept of a `system` is important in catchment hydrology. A catchment is the smallest landscape unit that can both participate in all of the aspects of the hydrologic cycle and

  13. Laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry of carbon isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bol' shakov, Alexander A. [Applied Spectra, Inc., Fremont, CA (United States); Jain, Jinesh [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Russo, Richard E. [Applied Spectra, Inc., Fremont, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); McIntyre, Dustin [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Mao, Xianglei [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Quantitative determination of carbon isotopes using Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS) is described. Optical emission of diatomic molecules CN and C2 is used in these measurements. Two quantification approaches are presented:empirical calibration of spectra using a set of reference standards and numerical fitting of a simulated spectrum to the experimental one. Formation mechanisms of C2 and CN in laser ablation plasma are briefly reviewed to provide insights for implementation of LAMIS measurements. A simulated spectrum of the 12C2 Swan system was synthesized using four constituents within 473.5–476.5 nm. Simulation included three branches of 12C2 (1-0), branches R(0-0) and R(1-1), and branch P(9-8) of 12C2. Spectral positions of the tail lines in R(0-0) and R(1-1) were experimentally measured, since they were not accurately known before. The Swan band (1-0) of the isotopologue 13C12C was also simulated. Fitting to the experimental spectrumyielded the ratio 13C/12C = 1.08% in a good agreement with measurements by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. LAMIS promises to be useful in coal, oil and shale exploration, carbon sequestration monitoring, and agronomy studies

  14. Laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry of carbon isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bol‧shakov, Alexander A.; Mao, Xianglei; Jain, Jinesh; McIntyre, Dustin L.; Russo, Richard E.

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative determination of carbon isotopes using Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS) is described. Optical emission of diatomic molecules CN and C2 is used in these measurements. Two quantification approaches are presented: empirical calibration of spectra using a set of reference standards and numerical fitting of a simulated spectrum to the experimental one. Formation mechanisms of C2 and CN in laser ablation plasma are briefly reviewed to provide insights for implementation of LAMIS measurements. A simulated spectrum of the 12C2 Swan system was synthesized using four constituents within 473.5-476.5 nm. Simulation included three branches of 12C2 (1-0), branches R(0-0) and R(1-1), and branch P(9-8) of 12C2. Spectral positions of the tail lines in R(0-0) and R(1-1) were experimentally measured, since they were not accurately known before. The Swan band (1-0) of the isotopologue 13C12C was also simulated. Fitting to the experimental spectrum yielded the ratio 13C/12C = 1.08% in a good agreement with measurements by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. LAMIS promises to be useful in coal, oil and shale exploration, carbon sequestration monitoring, and agronomy studies.

  15. Determination of uranium isotopes in urine samples from radiation workers using 232U tracer, anion-exchange resin and alpha-spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioassay technique is used for the estimation of actinides present in the body based on the excretion rate of body fluids. For occupational radiation workers urine assay is the preferred method for monitoring of chronic internal exposure. Determination of low concentrations of actinides such as plutonium, americium and uranium at low level of mBq in urine by alpha-spectrometry requires pre-concentration of large volumes of urine. This paper deals with standardization of analytical method for the determination of U-isotopes in urine samples using anion-exchange resin and 232U tracer for radiochemical recovery. The method involves oxidation of urine followed by co-precipitation of uranium along with calcium phosphate. Separation of U was carried out by Amberlite, IRA-400, anion-exchange resin. U-fraction was electrodeposited and activity estimated using tracer recovery by alpha-spectrometer. Eight routine urine samples of radiation workers were analyzed and consistent radiochemical tracer recovery was obtained in the range of 51% to 67% with a mean and standard deviation of 60% and 5.4%, respectively. (author)

  16. Unconventional isotope effects in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The value of the isotope coefficient could be greatly affected by a number of factors not related to the lattice dynamics. Among them are magnetic scattering, the presence of a normal film (proximity effect), and nonadiabaticity (dynamic Jahn-Teller effect). The results are in good agreement with existing experimental data for oxygen isotope substitution (O16→O18) in the YBa2Cu3O7-δ, Y1-xPrxBa2Cu3O7-δ, YBa2(Cu1-xZnx)3O7-δ compounds. In addition, we make several predictions related to conventional as well as to high-Tc materials. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  17. Natural fractionation of uranium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noordmann, Janine

    2015-01-24

    The topic of this thesis was the investigation of U (n({sup 238}U) / n({sup 235}U)) isotope variations in nature with a focus on samples (1) that represent the continental crust and its weathering products (i.e. granites, shales and river water) (2) that represent products of hydrothermal alteration on mid-ocean ridges (i.e. altered basalts, carbonate veins and hydrothermal water) and (3) from restricted euxinic basins (i.e. from the water column and respective sediments). The overall goal was to explore the environmental conditions and unravel the mechanisms that fractionate the two most abundant U isotopes, n({sup 238}U) and n({sup 235}U), on Earth.

  18. Interstellar Isotopes: Prospects with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley Steven B.

    2010-01-01

    Cold molecular clouds are natural environments for the enrichment of interstellar molecules in the heavy isotopes of H, C, N and O. Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets, that may trace interstellar matter that was incorporated into the Solar Nebula without undergoing significant processing. Models of the fractionation chemistry of H, C, N and O in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cores where substantial freeze-out of molecules on to dust has occurred, make several predictions that can be tested in the near future by molecular line observations. The range of fractionation ratios expected in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and the capabilities of ALMA for testing these models (e.g. in observing doubly-substituted isotopologues) will be outlined.

  19. Radiogenic age and isotopic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is one of an annual collection of reports presenting data from the Geochronology Section of the Continental Geoscience Division of the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC). The main purpose of this collection is to make geochronological and other radiogenic isotope data produced by the section available promptly to the geological community. Reports make full presentation of the data, relate these to field settings and make comparatively short interpretations. Other geochronological and isotope data produced in the laboratory but published in outside journals or separate GSC publications are summarized at the end of this report. Report 5 contains 24 papers from most regions of Canada, but particularly from British Columbia. The Geochronology Laboratory has, over the years, provided substantial U-Pb dating for the Cordilleran Division of the Geological Survey of Canada in Vancouver, and the results of a number of these studies are presented this year. A compilation of K-Ar ages is given. (figs., tabs., refs.)

  20. Radiogenic age and isotopic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is one of an annual collection of reports presenting data from the Geochronology Section of the Continental Geoscience Division of the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC). The main purpose of this collection is to make geochronological and other radiogenic isotope data produced by the section available promptly to the geological community. Reports make full presentation of the data, relate these to field settings and make comparatively short interpretations. Other geochronological and isotope data produced in the laboratory but published in outside journals or separate GSC publications are summarized at the end of this report. Reports in this issue give U-Pb zircon ages for rocks in Newfoundland, Yukon Territory, Manitoba, Ontario, and the Northwest Territories; present a compilation of K-Ar ages; and discuss Precambrian activity in New Brunswick, the geochronology of rock from the Northwest Territories, and reconnaissance Nd studies of rocks from the Northwest Territories. (figs., tabs., refs.)

  1. Apparatus for detecting iodine isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An apparatus for detecting iodine isotopes in the exhaust gas of a nuclear installation includes a duct for a partial exhaust gas stream, which duct includes an absorption chamber which is disposed in a radiation shielding structure and through which the exhaust gas flows and which has associated therewith means for admitting absorption material and for removing it therefrom. Radiation detectors are supported in the radiation shielding structure at opposite sides of the absorption chamber for monitoring radiation of iodine isotopes collected therein, the cavity in the shielding structure in which the absorption chamber is disposed being larger than the absorption chamber and the absorption chamber being supported so as to be movable in the cavity relative to said detectors to permit calibrating the apparatus. (orig./HP)

  2. Bayesian Stable Isotope Mixing Models

    OpenAIRE

    Parnell, Andrew C.; Phillips, Donald L.; Bearhop, Stuart; Semmens, Brice X.; Ward, Eric J.; Moore, Jonathan W.; Andrew L Jackson; Inger, Richard

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we review recent advances in Stable Isotope Mixing Models (SIMMs) and place them into an over-arching Bayesian statistical framework which allows for several useful extensions. SIMMs are used to quantify the proportional contributions of various sources to a mixture. The most widely used application is quantifying the diet of organisms based on the food sources they have been observed to consume. At the centre of the multivariate statistical model we propose is a compositional m...

  3. Radiogenic age and isotopic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is one of an annual collection of reports presenting data from the Geochronology Section of the Continental Geoscience Division of the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC). The main purpose of this collection is to make geochronological and other radiogenic isotope data produced by the section available promptly to the geological community. Reports make full presentation of the data, relate these to field settings and make comparatively short interpretations. Other geochronological and isotope data produced in the laboratory but published in outside journals or separate GSC publications are summarized at the end of this report. Reports in this issue cover methods for Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic analyses; 40Ar-39Ar ages for the New Quebec Crater and for basaltic rocks; U-Pb ages for a differentiated mafic sill in the Ogilvie Mountains, plutonic rocks in the Contwoyto-Nose Lakes are, zircons from the Anton Complex, the Clinton-Colden gabbro-anorthosite intrusion, the Himag plutonic suite, the Campbell granite, the Central Gneiss Belt, Silurian granites, a metarhyolite, plagiogranite and gabbro, and the Wage shear zone; Rb-Sr ages for granitic rocks; K-Ar and Rb-Sr geochronology of granites; a compilation of K-Ar ages; ages of archean and proterozoic mylonites and pre-Misi granitoid domes; and reconnaissance geochronology of Baffin Island

  4. Quadrupole Deformation of Barium Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Sugita, M; Furuno, K

    1998-01-01

    The B(E2:0_1^+ -> 2_1^+) values of the Ba isotopes (Z=56) exhibit a sharp increase in deformation as the neutron numbers approach the mid-shell value of N=66. This behavior is anomalous because the 2_1^+ level energies are very similar to those of the neighboring isotopes. By means of the axially-symmetric deformed Woods-Saxon (WS) hamiltonian plus the BCS method, we investigated the systematics of B(E2) of the Ba isotopes. We showed that 15% of the B(E2) values at N=66 was due to the level crossing, occurring at the deformation with beta being nearly 0.3, between the proton orbits originating from the orbits Omega=1/2^-(h11/2) and 9/2^+(g9/2) at zero deformation. The latter of these two was an intruder orbit originating from below the energy gap at Z=50, rising higher in energy with the deformation and intruding the Z=50-82 shell. These two orbits have the largest magnitude of the quadrupole moment with a different sign among the orbits near and below the Fermi surface. Occupancy and non-occupancy of these o...

  5. Cluster radioactivity from Osmium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spontaneous emission of fragments heavier than alpha particle and lighter than the lightest fission fragment from a nucleus is called cluster radioactivity. It is a cold nuclear phenomenon predicted based on Quantum Mechanical Fragmentation Theory (QMFT). Cluster radioactivity is studied using Unified Fission Model (UFM). Present study is conducted using proton rich osmium isotopes with mass ranging from 162-190. The interacting potential chosen is the Effective Liquid Drop Model (ELDM). The total potential in one dimensional case is the sum of Coulomb, surface and centrifugal potential. Here centrifugal part is not considered. Barrier penetrability (P) is calculated using one dimensional WKB approximation. The decay constant is obtained as λ = νoP where νo is the assault frequency. From the calculated values we have found that osmium isotopes in the mass range between 162-168 is highly unstable against alpha decay. Mass range of osmium isotopes found favourable to 8Be decay are 162-170, to 12C decay are 162-172, to 16O decay are 162-172, to 20Ne decay are 163-169, and to 24Mg decay are 162-171

  6. Uncertainty induced by chest wall thickness assessment methods on lung activity estimation for plutonium and americium: a large population-based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo lung counting aims at assessing the retained activity in the lungs. The calibration factor relating the measured counts to the worker’s specific retained lung activity can be obtained by several means and strongly depends on the chest wall thickness. Here we compare, for 374 male nuclear workers, the activity assessed with a reference protocol, where the material equivalent chest wall thickness is known from ultrasound measurements, with two other protocols. The counting system is an array of four germanium detectors. It is found that non site-specific equations for the assessment of the chest wall thickness induce large biases in the assessment of activity. For plutonium isotopes or 241Am the proportion of workers for whom the retained activity is within ± 10% of the reference one is smaller than 10%. The use of site-specific equations raises this proportion to 20% and 58% for plutonium and 241Am, respectively. Finally, for the studied population, when site-specific equations are used for the chest wall thickness, the standard uncertainties for the lung activity are 42% and 12.5%, for plutonium and 241Am, respectively. Due to the relatively large size of the studied population, these values are a relatively robust estimate of the uncertainties due to the assessment of the chest wall thickness for the current practice at this site. (paper)

  7. Pb isotopes during mingling and melting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waight, Tod Earle; Lesher, Charles E.

    2010-01-01

    Pb isotopic data are presented for hybrid rocks formed by mingling between mantle-derived tholeiitic magma of the Eocene Miki Fjord macrodike (East Greenland) and melt derived from the adjacent Precambrian basement. Bulk mixing and AFC processes between end-members readily identified in the field...... fail to model the Pb isotope systematics. Selective contamination during diffusional exchange, which can explain the complex Sr and Nd isotope compositions of the hybrid rocks (Blichert-Toft et al., 1992), cannot fully account for the variability of the Pb isotopic data using the identified crustal end......-members. The crustal anatectic end-member, although similar in Sr and Nd isotope composition, has a markedly different Pb isotopic composition than its source gneiss. The differences are consistent with preferential incorporation of radiogenic Pb from accessory phases such as metamict zircon or loosely-bound Pb from...

  8. The use of magnetic isotope effect for the separation of uranium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of the magnetic isotope effect on the reaction of radical pairs containing radical-ion UO22+, is investigated. This can be further used in the new method of uranium isotope separation in chemical reaction

  9. Zinc isotope effects in complex formation with a crown ether

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope effects for zinc upon complex formation with dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 were investigated. The single stage separation factor for unit mass difference (α = 1.013) was great compared with that of calcium isotopes. One of the isotopes, 67Zn, showed a larger isotope effect than the other isotopes of even mass number. 7 refs., 1 fig

  10. Zinc isotopic compositions of breast cancer tissue.

    OpenAIRE

    Larner, F; Woodley, LN; Shousha, S; Moyes, A; Humphreys-Williams, E; Strekopytov, S; Halliday, AN; Rehkämper, M; Coombes, RC

    2015-01-01

    An early diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer is essential to improve outcome. High precision isotopic analysis, originating in Earth sciences, can detect very small shifts in metal pathways. For the first time, the natural intrinsic Zn isotopic compositions of various tissues in breast cancer patients and controls were determined. Breast cancer tumours were found to have a significantly lighter Zn isotopic composition than the blood, serum and healthy breast tissue in both groups. The Zn i...

  11. Measuring In Vivo Ureagenesis With Stable Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Yudkoff, Marc; Mew, Nicholas Ah; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Horyn, Oksana; Nissim, Ilana; Nissim, Itzhak; Payan, Irma; Tuchman, Mendel

    2010-01-01

    Stable isotopes have been an invaluable adjunct to biomedical research for more than 70 years. Indeed, the isotopic approach has revolutionized our understanding of metabolism, revealing it to be an intensely dynamic process characterized by an unending cycle of synthesis and degradation. Isotopic studies have taught us that the urea cycle is intrinsic to such dynamism, since it affords a capacious mechanism by which to eliminate waste nitrogen when rates of protein degradation (or dietary pr...

  12. Production of radioactive isotopes from stable isotopes, for nuclear medicine; A partir d`isotopes stables, production d`isotopes radioactifs pour la medecine nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourdoiseau, M. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Office des Rayonnements Ionisants

    1994-12-31

    Around 15 radioactive isotopes only are used for nuclear medicine diagnosis (kinetics or preferential fixation in the body); characteristics of these {gamma} and {beta}-minus emitters are presented: period, energy, production mode (isotopic filiation, fission product separation, cyclotron, reactor); details are given on applications, production mode, properties and consumption of various isotopes: Technetium 99m, Thallium 201, Iodine 123, Indium 111, Gallium 67, Rhenium 186, Erbium 169, Yttrium 90, Iron 59, Chromium 51, Krypton 81m. 1 tab.

  13. Studies on sulphur isotope variations in nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The variations of sulphur isotopes in natural compounds (and of oxygen isotopes in sulphates) provide a powerful method of investigation in various fields of earth sciences such as hydrology, geochemistry, geothermal exploration, volcanology, oceanography, sedimentology, ore formation, environmental sciences and others, although probably the method is not equally mature in all these fields, because of the inherent complexity and, sometimes, insufficient basic data. To review the current situation, and to identify trends of research and application of sulphur isotopes, the International Atomic Energy Agency held an Advisory Group Meeting on the Hydrology and Geochemistry of Sulphur Isotopes, which took place in Vienna at the IAEA Headquarters from 17 to 20 June 1985. Most of the papers presented at the meeting are included in this publication under the following titles: Isotopic composition of dissolved oceanic sulphate; Sulphur isotopes in the water of Lake Neusiedl, Austria; Relationships between the sulphur and oxygen isotope composition of dissolved sulphate; Sulphur and sulphate-oxygen isotopes in New Zealand geothermal systems and volcanic discharges; Isotopic composition and origin of sulphur compounds in groundwaters and brines in the Po Valley (northern Italy); Two case studies on the origin of aqueous sulphate in deep crystalline rocks; Sulphur and oxygen isotopic compositions of groundwater - and sabkha - sulphate in the Middle East; Radiolytic oxidation of sulphides and geochemical behaviour of sulphur isotopes in uranium deposits; On bias in 34S/32S data obtained using SO2 gas in mass spectrometry; Sulphur isotope analyses of trace sulphide and sulphate in various materials using Kiba reagent. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Medical isotopes and emerging nuclear medicine technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation discusses medical isotopes and the emerging nuclear medicine technologies as well as the impact of Chalk River reactor shutdown on patient management and diseases. It outlines the chain of supply of isotopes across the globe and isotope shortage impact. It recommends the following mitigating strategies: modifications of scanning techniques, adjustment of patient scheduling, optimization of Tc-99m generator use, patient prioritization, alternate procedures and PET scanning.

  15. Multiple linear regression for isotopic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Alonso, J. I.

    2012-04-01

    There are two typical applications of isotopic measurements: the detection of natural variations in isotopic systems and the detection man-made variations using enriched isotopes as indicators. For both type of measurements accurate and precise isotope ratio measurements are required. For the so-called non-traditional stable isotopes, multicollector ICP-MS instruments are usually applied. In many cases, chemical separation procedures are required before accurate isotope measurements can be performed. The off-line separation of Rb and Sr or Nd and Sm is the classical procedure employed to eliminate isobaric interferences before multicollector ICP-MS measurement of Sr and Nd isotope ratios. Also, this procedure allows matrix separation for precise and accurate Sr and Nd isotope ratios to be obtained. In our laboratory we have evaluated the separation of Rb-Sr and Nd-Sm isobars by liquid chromatography and on-line multicollector ICP-MS detection. The combination of this chromatographic procedure with multiple linear regression of the raw chromatographic data resulted in Sr and Nd isotope ratios with precisions and accuracies typical of off-line sample preparation procedures. On the other hand, methods for the labelling of individual organisms (such as a given plant, fish or animal) are required for population studies. We have developed a dual isotope labelling procedure which can be unique for a given individual, can be inherited in living organisms and it is stable. The detection of the isotopic signature is based also on multiple linear regression. The labelling of fish and its detection in otoliths by Laser Ablation ICP-MS will be discussed using trout and salmon as examples. As a conclusion, isotope measurement procedures based on multiple linear regression can be a viable alternative in multicollector ICP-MS measurements.

  16. New approaches to the Moon's isotopic crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Melosh, H. J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent comparisons of the isotopic compositions of the Earth and the Moon show that, unlike nearly every other body known in the Solar System, our satellite's isotopic ratios are nearly identical to the Earth's for nearly every isotopic system. The Moon's chemical make-up, however, differs from the Earth's in its low volatile content and perhaps in the elevated abundance of oxidized iron. This surprising situation is not readily explained by current impact models of the Moon's origin and offe...

  17. Quantitative microbial ecology through stable isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungate, Bruce A; Mau, Rebecca L; Schwartz, Egbert; Caporaso, J Gregory; Dijkstra, Paul; van Gestel, Natasja; Koch, Benjamin J; Liu, Cindy M; McHugh, Theresa A; Marks, Jane C; Morrissey, Ember M; Price, Lance B

    2015-11-01

    Bacteria grow and transform elements at different rates, and as yet, quantifying this variation in the environment is difficult. Determining isotope enrichment with fine taxonomic resolution after exposure to isotope tracers could help, but there are few suitable techniques. We propose a modification to stable isotope probing (SIP) that enables the isotopic composition of DNA from individual bacterial taxa after exposure to isotope tracers to be determined. In our modification, after isopycnic centrifugation, DNA is collected in multiple density fractions, and each fraction is sequenced separately. Taxon-specific density curves are produced for labeled and nonlabeled treatments, from which the shift in density for each individual taxon in response to isotope labeling is calculated. Expressing each taxon's density shift relative to that taxon's density measured without isotope enrichment accounts for the influence of nucleic acid composition on density and isolates the influence of isotope tracer assimilation. The shift in density translates quantitatively to isotopic enrichment. Because this revision to SIP allows quantitative measurements of isotope enrichment, we propose to call it quantitative stable isotope probing (qSIP). We demonstrated qSIP using soil incubations, in which soil bacteria exhibited strong taxonomic variations in (18)O and (13)C composition after exposure to [(18)O]water or [(13)C]glucose. The addition of glucose increased the assimilation of (18)O into DNA from [(18)O]water. However, the increase in (18)O assimilation was greater than expected based on utilization of glucose-derived carbon alone, because the addition of glucose indirectly stimulated bacteria to utilize other substrates for growth. This example illustrates the benefit of a quantitative approach to stable isotope probing.

  18. High resolution measurements of isotope shifts and hyperfine structure in stable and radioactive lead isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present new measurements of isotopic shifts and hyperfine structure in the lead resonance line for a total of 15 isotopes. The experimental accuracy is of order 4 MHz. Using independent measurements of the nuclear parameter lambda for the stable isotopes we have derived lambda for all measured isotopes. The derived lambda values are compared with various theoretical predictions for the lead nuclei. We also give values for the nuclear magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments deduced from our measurements. (orig.)

  19. Copper isotope fractionation by desert shrubs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarrete, Jesica U., E-mail: jnavarrete2@miners.utep.edu [University of Texas at El Paso, Department of Geological Sciences, 500 W. University Ave, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Viveros, Marian; Ellzey, Joanne T. [University of Texas at El Paso, Department of Biological Sciences, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Borrok, David M. [University of Texas at El Paso, Department of Geological Sciences, 500 W. University Ave, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Copper has two naturally occurring stable isotopes of masses 63 and 65 which can undergo mass dependent fractionation during various biotic and abiotic chemical reactions. These interactions and their resulting Cu isotope fractionations can be used to determine the mechanisms involved in the cycling of Cu in natural systems. In this study, Cu isotope changes were investigated at the organismal level in the metal-accumulating desert plant, Prosopis pubescens. Initial results suggest that the lighter Cu isotope was preferentially incorporated into the leaves of the plant, which may suggest that Cu was actively transported via intracellular proteins. The roots and stems show a smaller degree of Cu isotope fractionation and the direction and magnitude of the fractionations was dependent upon the levels of Cu exposure. Based on this and previous work with bacteria and yeast, a trend is emerging that suggests the lighter Cu isotope is preferentially incorporated into biological components, while the heavier Cu isotope tends to become enriched in aqueous solutions. In bacteria, plants and animals, intracellular Cu concentrations are strictly regulated via dozens of enzymes that can bind, transport, and store Cu. Many of these enzymes reduce Cu(II) to Cu(I). These initial results seem to fit into a broader picture of Cu isotope cycling in natural systems where oxidation/reduction reactions are fundamental in controlling the distributions of Cu isotopes.

  20. Stable isotope analysis in the ivory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishibashi, H.; Koike, H. [Graduate School of Social and Cultural Studies, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Takeuchi, Takayuki [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst

    2001-01-01

    Stable isotope ratio in an ivory collagen reflects the isotope ratio of the plants they are eaten by the elephant. From the stable isotope ratios of carbon ({delta} {sup 13}C) and nitrogen ({delta} {sup 15}N) in a ivory collagen the habitat of the elephant can be estimated. The 118 pieces of the ivory were analyzed for detecting the isotope ratios, which are kept in the Kruger National Park, South Africa. The result shows the grouping of the ivory related to the area in which elephant were captured. (H. Katsuta)

  1. Sulfur and selenium isotope separation by distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulfur and selenium isotopes are used for labeled compounds and as precursors for radioisotope production; however, both limited availability and high costs are problems. A new method is needed for large-scale separation of these isotopes. Experimental distillation columns were used to measure isotopic separations for sulfur and selenium compounds. The maximum total isotope separation of 32S vs. 34S were 1.127 for H2S, 1.048 for COS, 0.838 for SF4, and 1.058 for CH3SH. Relative volatilities of 32S vs. 34S are 1.0006 for COS and 0.9976 for SF4. There is a reverse isotope effect for carbon in COS. No isotopic separation was observed for dimethyl selenide. The lower mass selenium isotopes in H2Se are more volatile. Distillation is a promising method for separating sulfur isotopes on a production scale. Existing distillation technology produced separated isotopes with an effect similar to that found for sulfur in SF4. 8 refs., 2 tabs

  2. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. Additionally, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium. PMID:25902522

  3. Chromium isotope uptake in carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra

    composition of contemporaneous seawater. Marine carbonates are ubiquitous throughout Earth’s rock record rendering them a particularly interesting archive for constraining past changes in ocean chemistry. This thesis includes an investigation of the fractionation behavior of Cr isotopesduring coprecipitation.......The redox changes of past surface environments can be explored using the Cr isotope composition of ancient marine carbonates, where a marginal offset compared to contemporaneous seawater δ53Cr is expected and the degree of contamination and later diagenetic alteration can be evaluated. Improved...

  4. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paisner, J. A.

    1988-07-01

    Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique applicable to many elements. A major present application to the enrichement of uranium for lightwater power reactor fuel has been under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory since 1973. In June 1985, the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet future U.S. needs for the internationally competitive production of uranium separative work. Major features of the AVLIS process will be discussed with consideration of the process figures of merit.

  5. Discovery of Isotopes of Elements with Z $\\ge$ 100

    OpenAIRE

    Thoennessen, M

    2012-01-01

    Currently, 163 isotopes of elements with Z $\\ge$ 100 have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  6. Exploring the isotopic niche: isotopic variance, physiological incorporation, and the temporal dynamics of foraging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Douglas Yeakel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Consumer foraging behaviors are dynamic, changing in response to prey availability, seasonality, competition, and even the consumer's physiological state. The isotopic composition of a consumer is a product of these factors as well as the isotopic `landscape' of its prey, i.e. the isotopic mixing space. Stable isotope mixing models are used to back-calculate the most likely proportional contribution of a set of prey to a consumer's diet based on their respective isotopic distributions, however they are disconnected from ecological process. Here we build a mechanistic framework that links the ecological and physiological processes of an individual consumer to the isotopic distribution that describes its diet, and ultimately to the isotopic composition of its own tissues, defined as its `isotopic niche’. By coupling these processes, we systematically investigate under what conditions the isotopic niche of a consumer changes as a function of both the geometric properties of its mixing space and foraging strategies that may be static or dynamic over time. Results of our derivations reveal general insight into the conditions impacting isotopic niche width as a function of consumer specialization on prey, as well as the consumer's ability to transition between diets over time. We show analytically that moderate specialization on isotopically unique prey can serve to maximize a consumer's isotopic niche width, while temporally dynamic diets will tend to result in peak isotopic variance during dietary transitions. We demonstrate the relevance of our theoretical findings by examining a marine system composed of nine invertebrate species commonly consumed by sea otters. In general, our analytical framework highlights the complex interplay of mixing space geometry and consumer dietary behavior in driving expansion and contraction of the isotopic niche. Because this approach is established on ecological mechanism, it is well-suited for enhancing the

  7. Stable isotope utilization methodology; Methodologie de l`emploi des isotopes stables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, E. [Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers (CNAM), 75 - Paris (France)

    1994-12-31

    The various applications of stable isotope utilization are reviewed, as a function of their specific properties: poly-isotopic abundance modification is used for tracer applications; the accurate measurement of the stable isotope abundance may be applied to isotopic dilution for ultra-trace measurement, physical constant determination, fluid volume and concentration measurement; isotopic effects, such as reaction equilibrium differences are used for separation and identification of molecule active centers (pharmacology, paleoclimatology, hydrogeological studies) while reaction rate differences (competitive and non competitive methods) are used for the study of reaction mechanisms, such as enzymatic reactions. Analysis techniques (mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, optical methods) are reviewed. 2 figs., 18 refs.

  8. Lithium and magnesium isotopes fractionation by zone melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimov, D. V.; Egorov, N. B.; Dyachenko, A. N.; Pustovalova, M. P.; Podoinikov, I. R.

    2016-06-01

    The process of changing isotopic composition of the lithium and magnesium salts was studied by using the process of zone melting. It was founded in the paper that the process of separation of the lithium isotopes is more effective than for magnesium isotopes when the conditions of process were the same. The coefficients of isotopes separation were calculated and have the next value: α = 1.006 for 26Mg isotope and α = 1.0022 for 6Li isotope.

  9. ISOTOPES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    1 A New Therapeutic Agent for Radiation Synovectomy: Preparation of 166Ho-EDTMP-HA Bai Hongsheng Jin Xiaohai Du Jin Wang Fan Chen Daming Fan Hongqiang Cheng Zhen In order to treat the patient with inflammatory synovial disease, HA particle is labeled with 166Ho by EDTMP under the condition of pH6.0-8.0 and vibration time 15 min, its labeling efficiency is more than 98%, the size of particle is mainly in the range of 2-5 μm. The absorbed capacity is 5 mg Ho per 1g HA. Study on stability of 166Ho-EDTMP-HA in vitro shows that loss of 166Ho is less than 2% for166Ho-EDTMP-HA incubated 72 h in the 0.9% saline and 1% BSA solution at 37 ℃ .Biodistribution in vivo and extra articular leakage are investigated following injection of 166Ho-EDTMP-HA into knee of normal rabbits. The experimental results show that the extra leakage of 166Ho-EDTMP-HA is 0.32% at 48 h post-injection, most of 166Ho radioactivity leaked from the knee joint is excreted in the urine. 99% of 166Ho radioactivity is retained in the knee joint of rabbits. Thereby 166Ho-EDTMP-HA, as a new therapeutical agent of radiation synovectomy, had a value of further clinical study.

  10. Isotope separation with use of macrocyclic polyesters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Review of experimental data on isotope separation with use of macrocyclic compounds-crown ethers and cryptands is given. The table of isotope separation factors of hydrogen, lithium, sodium, potassium, calcium, strontium, barium, zinc, cerium and uranium is presented. Refs. 43, tab. 1

  11. Contrasting styles of oxygen isotope exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Valley, J. W.; Eiler, J. M.; Kohn, M.J.; Spicuzza, M.J; Baumgartner, L. P.; Elsenheimer, D.; Graham, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    Exchange of oxygen isotopes encrypts a sensitive record of the thermal evolution and fluid-exchange history of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Deciphering this record requires measurement of isotope ratios at an appropriate scale together with understanding of the processes involved: diffusion, recrystallization, new mineral growth, and fluid flow.

  12. Isotope hydrology 1970. Proceedings of a symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings contain the papers from the Symposium on Isotope Hydrology held 9-13 March 1970 in Vienna, Austria. The topics of the sessions were as follows: Thermal water studies, groundwater dating, hydrology of arid and semi-arid areas, field studies with environmental isotopes, precipitation-surface-groundwater relationships, pollution, artificial tracers and sediment transport

  13. Advanced Mass Spectrometers for Hydrogen Isotope Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chastagner, P.

    2001-08-01

    This report is a summary of the results of a joint Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) - Savannah River Plant (SRP) ''Hydrogen Isotope Mass Spectrometer Evaluation Program''. The program was undertaken to evaluate two prototype hydrogen isotope mass spectrometers and obtain sufficient data to permit SRP personnel to specify the mass spectrometers to replace obsolete instruments.

  14. Safeguards implications of laser isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to describe and emphasise the safeguards and relevant features of atomic vapour laser isotope separation (AVLIS) and molecular laser isotope separation (MLIS), and to consider the issues that must be addressed before a safeguards approach at a commercial AVLIS or MLIS facility can be implemented. (Author)

  15. Xenon Isotope Releases from Buried Transuranic Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresel, P. E.; Waichler, S. R.; Kennedy, B. M.; Hayes, J. C.; McIntyre, J. I.; Giles, J. R.; Sondrup, A. J.

    2004-12-01

    Xenon is an inert rare gas produced as a fission product in nuclear reactors and through spontaneous fission of some transuranic isotopes. Thus, xenon will be released from buried transuranic waste. Two complementary methods are used to measure xenon isotopes: radiometric analysis for short-lived radioxenon isotopes and mass spectrometry for detection of stable xenon isotopes. Initial measurements near disposal facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site show radioxenon and stable xenon isotopic signatures that are indicative of transuranic waste. Radioxenon analysis has greater sensitivity due to the lower background concentrations and indicates spontaneous fission due to the short half life of the isotopes. Stable isotope ratios may be used to distinguish irradiated fuel sources from pure spontaneous fission sources and are not as dependent on rapid release from the waste form. The release rate is dependent on the type of waste and container integrity and is the greatest unknown in application of this technique. Numerical multi-phase transport modeling of burial grounds at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory indicates that, under generalized conditions, the radioxenon isotopes will diffuse away from the waste and be found in the soil cap and adjacent to the burial ground at levels many orders of magnitude above the detection limit.

  16. The isotopic dipole moment of HDO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assafrao, Denise; Mohallem, Jose R [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, CP 702, 30123-970, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2007-03-14

    An adiabatic variational approximation is used to study the monodeuterated water molecule, HDO, accounting for the isotopic effect. The isotopic dipole moment, pointing from D to H, is then calculated for the first time, yielding (1.5 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup -3} Debye, being helpful in the interpretation of experiments. (fast track communication)

  17. Isotope hydrology. Raigon aquifer hydrochemistry - Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is the Raigon Acuifer investigation by isotopic techniques as well as the dynamic behavior in the water resources. These techniques are based on the natural water isotope deuterium, oxygen-18, tritium and carbon-14 measurement. The hydrochemistry is used like a complementary tool

  18. Applications of stable isotopes in clinical pharmacology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, Reinout C A; Stellaard, Frans; Woerdenbag, Herman J; Frijlink, Henderik W; Kosterink, Jos G W

    2011-01-01

    This review aims to present an overview of the application of stable isotope technology in clinical pharmacology. Three main categories of stable isotope technology can be distinguished in clinical pharmacology. Firstly, it is applied in the assessment of drug pharmacology to determine the pharmacok

  19. An ionic cyclotron resonance isotopic separation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotopes are separated using ion cyclotron resonance. The process takes place under vacuum in a vertical cylindrical vessel, with means for creating a plasma containing ions of the isotope to be separated. An electrical field is generated, perpendicular to a vertical magnetic field and oscillating at a frequency near to the cyclotron frequency of the isotope in question. Mixtures enriched and depleted in the isotopes in question are collected separately in the upper part of the vessel. The plasma generator includes a container for the element for treatment made of electro-conducting material which does not melt at operating temperature, open at the top. During operation part of the container is held at a high enough temperature to provoke evaporation or sublimation of the element being treated, while its upper part stays cooler. An ionizer is situated above the container. Isotopes of metals such as zinc, cadmium, tin, calcium and particularly gadolinium can be separated. 1 fig

  20. Second international conference on isotopes. Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Second International Conference on Isotopes (2ICI) was hosted by the Australian Nuclear Association in Sydney, NSW, Australia. The Theme of the Second Conference: Isotopes for Industry, Health and a Better Environment recognizes that isotopes have been used in these fields successfully for many years and offer prospects for increasing use in the future. The worldwide interest in the use of research reactors and accelerators and in applications of stable and radioactive isotopes, isotopic techniques and radiation in industry, agriculture, medicine, environmental studies and research in general, was considered. Other radiation issues including radiation protection and safety were also addressed. International and national overviews and subject reviews invited from leading experts were included to introduce the program of technical sessions. The invited papers were supported by contributions accepted from participants for oral and poster presentation. A Technical Exhibition was held in association with the Conference. This volume contains the full text or extended abstracts of papers number 61- to number 114

  1. Second international conference on isotopes. Conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, C.J. [ed.

    1997-10-01

    The Second International Conference on Isotopes (2ICI) was hosted by the Australian Nuclear Association in Sydney, NSW, Australia. The Theme of the Second Conference: Isotopes for Industry, Health and a Better Environment recognizes that isotopes have been used in these fields successfully for many years and offer prospects for increasing use in the future. The worldwide interest in the use of research reactors and accelerators and in applications of stable and radioactive isotopes, isotopic techniques and radiation in industry, agriculture, medicine, environmental studies and research in general, was considered. Other radiation issues including radiation protection and safety were also addressed. International and national overviews and subject reviews invited from leading experts were included to introduce the program of technical sessions. The invited papers were supported by contributions accepted from participants for oral and poster presentation. A Technical Exhibition was held in association with the Conference. This volume contains the full text or extended abstracts of papers number 61- to number 114

  2. Solubility and speciation studies of waste radionuclides pertinent to geologic disposal at Yucca Mountain: Results on neptunium, plutonium and americium in J-13 groundwater; Letter report (R707): Reporting period, October 1, 1985--September 30, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitsche, H.; Standifer, E.M.; Lee, S.C.; Gatti, R.C.; Tucker, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    We have studied the solubilities of neptunium, plutonium, and americium in J-13 groundwater from Yucca Mountain (Nevada) at three temperatures and hydrogen ion concentrations. They are 25{degree}, 60{degree}C, and 90{degree}C and pH 5.9, 7.0, and 8.5. The results for 25{degree}C are from a study which we did during FY 1984. We included these previous results in the tables to give more information on the solubility temperature dependence; they were, however, done at only one pH (7.0). The solubilities were studied from oversaturation. The nuclides were added at the beginning of each experiment as NpO{sub 2}{sup +}, Pu{sup 4+}, and Am{sup 3+}. The neptunium solubility decreased with increasing temperature and with increasing pH. The soluble neptunium did not change oxidation state at steady state. The pentavalent neptunium was increasingly complexed by carbonate with increasing pH. All solids were crystalline and contained carbonate, except the solid formed at 90{degree}C and pH 5.9. We identified this solid as crystalline Np{sub 2}P{sub 5}. The 25{degree}C, pH 7 solid was Na{sub 3}NpO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} {center_dot} nH{sub 2}O. Plutonium concentrations decreased with increasing temperature and showed no trend with pH. Pu(V) and Pu(VI) were the dominant oxidation states in the supernatant solution; as the amount of Pu(V) increased with pH, Pu(VI) decreed. The steady-state solids were mostly amorphous, although some contained a crystalline component. They contained Pu(IV) polymer and unknown carbonates.

  3. Nickel isotopes as a new geochemical tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, L.; Williams, H. M.; Siebert, C.; Halliday, A.

    2010-12-01

    Research into "non-traditional" stable isotope systems has been of great interest over the past decade. The stable isotope system of nickel (Ni) has not been studied as intensively as other transition metals (e.g. Fe, Cr, Cu, Zn, and Mo), even though it is a ubiquitous element in geological environments and is a bioessential trace metal, e.g. for production of methane by methanogens. We have developed a novel chemical separation procedure to isolate Ni from most geological matrices. Because of its chemical behavior during ion-exchange chromatography complete separation of Ni is very complex. We therefore make use of a Ni double spike that allows us to optimize the chemical separation and correct instrumental mass bias during mass spectrometry analysis. This technique allows high precision Ni isotope measurements resulting in long term external reproducibility of USGS rock standard BHVO-2 of 0.09‰ (2s.d.) on δ60/58Ni with typical measurement errors as low as 0.04‰ (2s.d.). We have measured the isotope composition of Ni in a variety of terrestrial samples demonstrating significant isotope variation. In magmatic rocks Ni isotopes appear to be largely homogeneous, with only small variations (no more than 0.2‰) between different rock types, from ultramafic to felsic. There is no evidence of significant isotopic fractionation during melting and differentiation of the silicate Earth. In contrast we find significant systematic isotope variations (up to 1.5‰) between magmatic rocks and FeMn crusts, shales and sulphides. Our data clearly demonstrate mass-dependent fractionation of Ni isotopes in the marine and terrestrial environment by inorganic processes, in addition to the biological fractionations already reported by others, highlighting the potential of Ni isotopes as a powerful new tracer for Earth Surface processes.

  4. Manus Water Isotope Investigation Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conroy, Jessica L [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Cobb, Kim M [Georgia Institute of Technology; Noone, David [University of Colorado, Boulder

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this field campaign was to investigate climatic controls on the stable isotopic composition of water vapor, precipitation, and seawater in the western tropical Pacific. Simultaneous measurements of the stable isotopic composition of vapor and precipitation from April 28 to May 8, 2013, at the Manus Tropical Western Pacific Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site, provided several key insights into the nature of the climate signal archived in precipitation and vapor isotope ratios. We observed a large shift from lower to higher isotopic values in vapor and precipitation because of the passage of a mesoscale convective system west of the site and a transition from a regional stormy period into a more quiescent period. During the quiescent period, the stable isotopic composition of vapor and precipitation indicated the predominance of oceanic evaporation in determining the isotopic composition of boundary-layer vapor and local precipitation. There was not a consistent relationship between intra-event precipitation amount at the site and the stable isotopic composition of precipitation, thus challenging simplified assumptions about the isotopic “amount effect” in the tropics on the time scale of individual storms. However, some storms did show an amount effect, and deuterium excess values in precipitation had a significant relationship with several meteorological variables, including precipitation, temperature, relative humidity, and cloud base height across all measured storms. The direction of these relationships points to condensation controls on precipitation deuterium excess values on intra-event time scales. The relationship between simultaneous measurements of vapor and precipitation isotope ratios during precipitation events indicates the ratio of precipitation-to-vapor isotope ratios can diagnose precipitation originating from a vapor source unique from boundary-layer vapor and rain re-evaporation.

  5. Isotopic Measurement of Uranium by Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growing application of atomic energy creates a wider need for precise and accurate knowledge of the isotopic composition of uranium. This information is particularly of great importance in the accountability and transfer of enriched uranium for reactor and research applications involving millions of dollars worth of fissionable materials. Reliable isotopic measurements are also necessary to ensure compliance of fuel element compositions with the reactor design specifications and to permit calculation of process and fuel burn-up losses. Mass spectrometry methods, which far surpass the capabilities of other methods, Were developed for very precise isotopic determinations. These methods, ''Single Standard'' and ''Double Standard'', involve the comparison of measurements of an unknown sample to similar measurements on known standards. Use of the ''Double Standard'' method eliminates the effects of instrument bias, thus permitting isotopic determinations with precisions (95% limit of error) of the order of ± 0.02% of the values. Accuracies are limited only by the knowledge of the standard values used, which are referenced to the series of uranium isotopic standards available from the US National Bureau of Standards. The mass spectrometers are also useful for the absolute determination of isotopic composition of uranium, especially in forms other than UF6. Thermal ionization techniques using high-resolution (approximately 12-in. radius) spectrometers permit the absolute isotopic characterization of the minor isotopes (i.e. those less than 10 wt.%) with an accuracy and precision of about 0.5% of the values per analysis. These analyses are particularly useful in calibrating highly enriched and highly depleted uranium for subsequent use as blending materials in an isotopic standards programme. Both relative and absolute isotopic measurement methods are described as well as their application in the accountability and operational analytical programmes. These applications

  6. Lead Isotopes in Highway Runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, M.; Lau, S.; Green, P. G.; Stenstrom, M. K.

    2011-12-01

    Lead (Pb) isotopes have been used extensively to study the provenance of lead pollution on air, water, and sediments. In this study, we measured Pb isotopes and Pb aqueous concentration in highway runoff in three west Los Angeles sites. Those three sites, part of a long-term study sponsored by the California Department of Transportation, represent small catchment areas, and host heavy traffic. In addition, there were no inputs of sand or salt to the highway because the sites are almost completely impervious and also due to the lack of snow to be controlled. Highway runoff from the three sites was collected for 7 storms during the 2004-2005 Winter. Grab samples were collected every 15 minutes during the first hour, and hourly afterwards. A total of 202 samples were collected and filtered into five size fractions (100μm). Aqueous concentration of Pb range from 0.08μg/L to 46.95μg/L (7.98±10.89μg/L) and it is not correlated with any of the lead isotope ratios. The 208Pb/206Pb ratio ranges from 1.983 to 2.075 (2.024±0.026) and there is no statistical difference for the mean value of the 208Pb/206Pb ratio for the four particulate size fractions (0.45-8μm, 8-20μm, 20-100μm, >100μm). However, the 208Pb/206Pb ratio of nearby soils yield 2.060±0.021 and it is statistically different from the ratios obtained for the highway runoff. This hints that the lead present in highway runoff does not come from local soils. The 207Pb/206Pb ratio ranges from 0.804 to 0.847 (0.827±0.011) and there is no statistical difference for the mean value of the 207Pb/206Pb ratio for the four particulate size fractions (0.45-8μm, 8-20μm, 20-100μm, >100μm). Surprisingly, there is also no statistical difference with the 207Pb/206Pb ratio of nearby soils (0.833±0.009).

  7. A Canadian isotope success story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides some historical background on the commercial production of radioisotopes in Canada, and the evolution of the present vendor, MDS Nordion. The chief isotopes are molybdenum 99, iodine 131, and cobalt 60. Cobalt 60 for medical sterilization and irradiation is considered to be a significant growing market. Food irradiation is believed to be a big marketing opportunity, although attempts to popularize it have so far met with limited success. Candu reactors supply the bulk of the world's 60Co supply. Eighty percent of the world's 99Mo supply for medical imaging comes from Canada, and is at present produced in NRU Reactor, which is to be replaced by two Maple reactors coming into production in 1999 and 2000

  8. Isotope investigation of Lake Malawi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A vertical tritium and stable isotope profile shows that in the meromictic Lake Malawi water mixes slowly but at a significantly higher rate than in Lake Tanganyika, which has similar morphological characteristics. The tritium balance indicates that half or more of the tritium stored in the lake derives from molecular exchange with the atmospheric moisture. The tritium profile enables the vertical mixing rate in the lake to be computed. For this, a three-box model is used corresponding to epilimnion, metalimnion and hypolimnion. The computation indicates that on the average about 25% of the water is exchanged every year between the epilimnion and the metalimnion and about 20% between the metalimnion and the hypolimnion. (author)

  9. Isotope-committee reports 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this compilation the use of radioactive substances in therapies and in vivo examinations during 1999 is presented. For each examination the nuclide, chemical form, way of administration, number of hospitals, total number of examinations, mean activity used, interval of mean activity for the different hospitals and maximum activity is presented. Some examinations may be found at several different places. This is due to diverse routines of reporting and the confused use of old and new classifications. A certain caution is recommended when interpreting the data. Of the compilation it becomes known that during 1999 approximately 109,000 examinations and 2900 therapies were performed. The isotope committees at two hospitals have not presented their statistics

  10. Apparatus for storing hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved method and apparatus for storing isotopes of hydrogen (especially tritium) are provided. The hydrogen gas(es) is (are) stored as hydrides of material (for example uranium) within boreholes in a block of copper. The mass of the block is critically important to the operation, as is the selection of copper, because no cooling pipes are used. Because no cooling pipes are used, there can be no failure due to cooling pipes. And because copper is used instead of stainless steel, a significantly higher temperature can be reached before the eutectic formation of uranium with copper occurs, (the eutectic of uranium with the iron in stainless steel forming at a significantly lower temperature)

  11. Laser system for isotope separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirayama, Shimpey; Mikatsura, Takefumi; Ueda, Hiroaki; Konagai, Chikara

    1990-06-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is regarded as the most promising method to obtain srightly enriched economical nuclear fuel for a nuclear power plant. However, achieving a high power laser seems to be the bottle neck in its industrialization. In 1985, after successful development of high power lasers, the U.S. announced that AVLIS would be used for future methods of uranium enrichment. In Japan , Laser Atomic Separation Enrichment Research Associates of Japan (LASER-J), a joint Japanese utility companies research organization, was founded in April, 1987, to push a development program for laser uranium enrichment. Based on research results obtained from Japanese National Labs, and Universities , Laser-J is now constructing an AVLIS experimental facility at Tokai-mura. It is planned to have a 1-ton swu capacity per year in 1991. Previous to the experimental facility construction , Toshiba proceeded with the preliminary testing of an isotope separation system, under contract with Laser-J. Since the copper vapor laser (CVL) and the dye laser (DL) form a good combination , which can obtain high power tunable visible lights ,it is suitable to resonate uranium atoms. The laser system was built and was successfully operated in Toshiba for two years. The system consist of three copper vapor lasers , three dye lasers and appropriate o Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is regarded as the most promising method to obtain srightly enriched economical nuclear fuel for a nuclear power plant. However, achieving a high power laser seems to be the bottle neck in its industrialization. In 1985, after successful development of high power lasers, the U.S. announced that AVLIS would be used for future methods of uranium enrichment. In Japan , Laser Atomic Separation Enrichment Research Associates of Japan (LASER-J) , a joint Japanese utility companies research organization , was founded in April, 1987, to push a development program for laser uranium enrichment

  12. Isotopic signatures by bulk analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a series of measurement techniques for identification of nuclear signatures by analyzing bulk samples. Two specific applications for isotopic fingerprinting to identify the origin of anthropogenic radioactivity in bulk samples are presented. The first example is the analyses of environmental samples collected in the US Arctic to determine the impact of dumping of radionuclides in this polar region. Analyses of sediment and biota samples indicate that for the areas sampled the anthropogenic radionuclide content of sediments was predominantly the result of the deposition of global fallout. The anthropogenic radionuclide concentrations in fish, birds and mammals were very low. It can be surmised that marine food chains are presently not significantly affected. The second example is isotopic fingerprinting of water and sediment samples from the Rocky Flats Facility (RFP). The largest source of anthropogenic radioactivity presently affecting surface-waters at RFP is the sediments that are currently residing in the holding ponds. One gram of sediment from a holding pond contains approximately 50 times more plutonium than 1 liter of water from the pond. Essentially 100% of the uranium in Ponds A-1 and A-2 originated as depleted uranium. The largest source of radioactivity in the terminal Ponds A-4, B-5 and C-2 was naturally occurring uranium and its decay product radium. The uranium concentrations in the waters collected from the terminal ponds contained 0.05% or less of the interim standard calculated derived concentration guide for uranium in waters available to the public. All of the radioactivity observed in soil, sediment and water samples collected at RFP was naturally occurring, the result of processes at RFP or the result of global fallout. No extraneous anthropogenic alpha, beta or gamma activities were detected. The plutonium concentrations in Pond C-2 appear to vary seasonally

  13. Compound specific isotope analysis of organophosphorus pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Langping; Yao, Jun; Trebse, Polonca; Zhang, Ning; Richnow, Hans H

    2014-09-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) has been established as a tool to study the environmental fate of a wide range of contaminants. In this study, CSIA was developed to analyse the stable carbon isotope signatures of the widely used organophosphorus pesticides: dichlorvos, omethoate and dimethoate. The linearity of the GC-C-IRMS system was tested for target pesticides and led to an acceptable isotope composition within the uncertainty of the instrument. In order to assess the accuracy of the developed method, the effect of the evaporation procedure on measured carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) values was studied and showed that concentration by evaporation of solvents had no significant isotope effect. The CSIA was then applied to investigate isotope fractionation of the hydrolysis and photolysis of selected pesticides. The carbon isotope fractionation of tested pesticides was quantified by the Rayleigh model, which revealed a bulk enrichment factor (ε) of -0.2±0.1‰ for hydrolysis of dichlorvos, -1.0±0.1‰ and -3.7±1.1‰ for hydrolysis and photolysis of dimethoate respectively. This study is a first step towards the application of CSIA to trace the transport and degradation of organophosphorus pesticides in the environment.

  14. Carbon isotope separation by absorptive distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of separating carbon isotopes by absorptive distillation has been studied for CO absorption by cryogenic solvents. Phase equilibrium, isotopic separation, and mass transfer data were taken between 77.4 and 114.3 K for the following solvents: propane, propylene, 1:1 propane-propylene, 1-butene, isobutane and nitrogen. Carbon monoxide solubility followed Henry's Law, with a maximum experimental solubility of 6.5 mole percent. Isotopic separation between CO in the gas and liquid phases using hydrocarbon solvents was several times that for pure CO vapor-liquid equilibrium. The maximum observed isotopic separation factor was 1.029 at 77.4 K with the propane-propylene solvent mixture. Mass transfer measurements yielded calculated HETP's of 2 to 5 cm for a possible separation system. An attempt has been made to correlate isotopic separation data using Hildebrand's theory of solutions. The differential absorption of isotopic CO species is expressed as a difference in solubility of the isotopic CO molecules. Data for propane, propylene, and 1-butene show approximately the same behavior at varying temperatures

  15. Isotope effects in the gadolinium amalgam system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadolinium is a good neutron absorbent used in uranium oxide nuclear fuel for LWR. The157 Gd has a very large cross section for neutron absorption, namely 254000 barn. One of the isotope separation method for gadolinium is the isotopic exchange in the Gd3+ - GdHg system. In this work, the separation elemental factors for this isotopic exchange reaction, determined experimentally, are presented. Gadolinium amalgam was prepared by electrolysis of aqueous solution of gadolinium acetate with lithium citrate as complexing agent ([Li+]/[Gd3+] = 12), in a glass electrolyzer with a Hg cathode and a Pt anode. The gadolinium amalgam was treated with HCl 1-2N and the extracted Gd3+ was precipitated as oxalate and converted in Gd2O3. Gadolinium in acetic solution was precipitated as oxalate and converted in Gd2O3. The isotopic ratios 154 Gd/160 Gd, 155 Gd/160 Gd, 156 Gd/160 Gd, 157 Gd/160 Gd and 158 Gd/160 Gd were determined in Gd2O3 samples by a mass spectrometer MAT 261 equipped with thermoionization ion source. After the isotopic exchange, GdHg enriches with the light Gd isotopes and the solution (Gd3+) enriches with 160 Gd. The dependence of separation elemental factor on mass difference between gadolinium isotopes is presented. (authors)

  16. Carbon isotope separation by absorptive distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of separating carbon isotopes by absorptive distillation has been studied for CO absorption by cryogenic solvents. Phase equilibrium, isotopic separation, and mass transfer data were taken between 77.4 and 114.3 K for the following solvents: propane, propylene, 1:1 propane-propylene, 1-butene, isobutane and nitrogen. Carbon monoxide solubility followed Henry's Law, with a maximum experimental solubility of 6.5 mole per cent. Isotopic separation between CO in the gas and liquid phases using hydrocarbon solvents was several times that for pure CO vapor-liquid equilibrium. The maximum observed isotopic separation factor was 1.029 at 77.4 K with the propane-propylene solvent mixture. Mass transfer measurements yielded calculated HTU's of 2 to 5 cm for a possible separation system. An attempt has been made to correlate isotopic separation data using Hildebrand's theory of solutions. The differential absorption of isotopic CO species is expressed as a difference in solubility of the isotopic CO molecules. Data for propane, propylene, and 1-butene show approximately the same behavior at varying temperatures

  17. The isotope effect: Prediction, discussion, and discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Kragh, Helge

    2011-01-01

    The precise position of a spectral line emitted by an atomic system depends on the mass of the atomic nucleus and is therefore different for isotopes belonging to the same element. The possible presence of an isotope effect followed from Bohr's atomic theory of 1913, but it took several years before it was confirmed experimentally. Its early history involves the childhood not only of the quantum atom, but also of the concept of isotopy. Bohr's prediction of the isotope effect was apparently at odds with early attempts to distinguish between isotopes by means of their optical spectra. However, in 1920 the effect was discovered in HCl molecules, which gave rise to a fruitful development in molecular spectroscopy. The first detection of an atomic isotope effect was no less important, as it was by this means that the heavy hydrogen isotope deuterium was discovered in 1932. The early development of isotope spectroscopy illustrates the complex relationship between theory and experiment, and is also instructive with...

  18. Stable isotope composition of Earth's large lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasechko, S.; Gibson, J. J.; YI, Y.; Birks, S. J.; Sharp, Z. D.

    2011-12-01

    Lakes cover about three percent of Earth's continental area. Large lakes can significantly influence lake shore and regional climates by increasing specific humidity during evaporation and by moderating air temperatures. Stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen can be used to quantify lake evaporation, providing a supplementary and often cost-advantageous alternative to conventional hydrologic approaches that require over lake monitoring. Further, stable isotopes in lake sediments are an established tool in paleolimnology; however, interpreting changes to a lake's past isotope composition requires a comprehensive understanding of contemporary controls. Here, δ18O and δ2H values of water in modern lakes exceeding roughly five hundred square kilometres are compiled (n > 35). Voluminous and seasonally mixed lakes - such as the North American Great Lakes - have the most homogenous stable isotope compositions, while perennially-stratified and shallow lakes show greater variability. A rudimentary stable isotope mass balance is used to assess evaporation fluxes from large lakes on Earth. The approach taken simultaneously constrains evaporation outputs for both oxygen and hydrogen stable isotopes by accounting for lake effects on the overlying atmosphere. Model development highlights important considerations such as isotopic stratification (Tanganyika), disequilibrium isotopic mass balances (Baikal), and non-steady hydrologic balances. Further, the isotope composition of Earth's continental surface water reservoir is calculated. This value - weighted to volume - is δ18O = -7.5±1.7 per mille relative to standard mean ocean water. The compiled data may be a useful tracer of continental evaporate in global atmospheric water cycle studies and could be coupled to climate models capable of incorporating oxygen-18 and deuterium tracers to improve or validate calculations of lake effects on regional water cycling.

  19. Stable Vanadium Isotope Fractionation at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prytulak, J.; Parkinson, I. J.; Savage, P. S.; Nielsen, S. G.; Halliday, A. N.

    2011-12-01

    Vanadium is a redox sensitive transition metal existing in multiple valence states at terrestrial conditions. Stable vanadium isotopes (reported as δ51V in % relative to an Alfa Aesar standard [1]) are a potentially powerful tracer of oxidation-reduction processes. However, the determination of δ51V is analytically challenging, primarily due to the extreme abundance ratio between the only two stable isotopes (51V/50V ~ 400) and, also, significant isobaric interferences of 50Ti and 50Cr on the minor 50V isotope. We have developed the first method able to determine δ51V to a precision (2 s.d. ~ 0.15%, [1,2]) that enables application of this isotope system to geological processes. To usefully investigate high temperature processes using vanadium isotopes, knowledge of the isotope composition and range of values present in the ambient mantle is required. Here we discuss the first δ51V measured in igneous materials encompassing peridotites, MORB, and primitive mantle-derived melts such as picrites. This first dataset provides a preliminary reconnaissance of the magnitude of natural fractionation. We find little isotope fractionation in suites of peridotites and MORB (vanadium isotope fractionation that may be expected at high temperatures. The presence of significant isotope variation outside of analytical precision in these materials bodes well for the use of δ51V to address a variety of broad scale questions in high temperature planetary processes. [1] Nielsen, S.G., Prytulak, J., Halliday, A.N. 2011. Geost. Geoanal. Res., in press. [2] Prytulak, J., Nielsen, S.G., Halliday, A.N. 2011. Geost. Geoanal. Res., in press. [3] Parkinson and Pearce, 1998. Journal of Petrology, 39, 1577-1618. [4] Lee et al., 2005. Journal of Petrology, 46, 2313-2336. [5] Cottrell and Kelley, 2011. Earth and Planetary Sciences Letters, 305, 270-282.

  20. Elementary excitations in isotope-mixed crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last five decades, the isotope effect has been one of the major research in solids. Most of the physical properties of a solid depend to a greater or lesser degree on its isotopic composition. Scientific interest, technological promise and increased availability of highly enriched isotopes have led to a sharp rise in the number of experimental and theoretical studies with isotopically controlled semiconductor and insulator crystals. A great number of stable isotopes and well-developed methods of their separation has made it possible to date to grow crystals of C, LiH, ZnO, ZnSe, CuCl, GaN, GaAs, CdS, Cu2O, Si, Ge and α-Sn with a controllable isotopic composition. The use of such objects allows the investigation of not only the isotope effects in lattice dynamics (vibrational, elastic and thermal properties) but also the influence of such effects on the electronic states via electron-phonon coupling (the renormalization of the band-to-band transition energy Eg, the exciton binding energy EB and the size of the longitudinal-transverse splitting ΔLT). The thermal conductivity enhancement in the isotopically enriched materials amounts (C; Ge; Si) to almost 10% at room temperature and is close to a factor of six at the thermal conductivity maximum around 20K (Si-case). The change in the lattice constant is Δa/a∼10-3-10-4, while the change δcik in the elastic constants amounts to several percent. The nonlinear dependence of the free exciton luminescence (especially Cx1312C1-x, LiHxD1-x) intensity on the excitation density allows to consider these crystals as potential solid-state lasers in the UV part of the spectrum. Isotopic information storage may consist in assigning the information 'zero' or 'one' to mono-isotopic microislands (or even to single atoms) within a bulk crystalline (or thin film) structure. Isotope information storage and isotope quantum computers are briefly discussed

  1. Beneficial uses and production of isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    Isotopes, radioactive and stable, are used worldwide in various applications related to medical diagnosis or care, industry and scientific research. More than fifty countries have isotope production or separation facilities operated for domestic supply, and sometimes for international markets. This publication provides up-to-date information on the current status of, and trends in, isotope uses and production. It also presents key issues, conclusions and recommendations, which will be of interest to policy makers in governmental bodies, scientists and industrial actors in the field.

  2. Environmental geochemistry of calcium isotopes: Applications of a new stable isotope approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhanmin; LIU Congqiang; HAN Guilin; WANG Zhongliang; XUE Zichen; SONG Zhaoliang; YANG Cheng

    2006-01-01

    This paper summarizes isotope fractionation mechanism, analytical method and applications in environmental geochemistry of calcium isotopes. Calcium isotopic composition can be used to constrain material sources and study geological and environmental processes as the isotopic composition of calcium (δ 44Ca) and fractionation processes depend on geochemical circumstances in nature. Recently, thanks to current advances in analytical technology of calcium isotopes, calcium isotopes are broadly used in biological and geochemical studies, such as the mechanism of plants imbibing nutrients through their roots, calcium transport in the environmental ecosystem, calcium cycle in oceans and paleo-oceans and paleo-climate. The elementary data show that δ44Ca values vary from -2.88‰ to 0.92‰ in natural samples.

  3. Isotope effects on desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into stainless steel by glow discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuyama, M.; Kondo, M.; Noda, N. [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Gofuku, Toyama (Japan); Tanaka, M.; Nishimura, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki-shi, Gifu (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    In a fusion device the control of fuel particles implies to know the desorption rate of hydrogen isotopes by the plasma-facing materials. In this paper desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into type 316L stainless steel by glow discharge have been studied by experiment and numerical calculation. The temperature of a maximum desorption rate depends on glow discharge time and heating rate. Desorption spectra observed under various experimental conditions have been successfully reproduced by numerical simulations that are based on a diffusion-limited process. It is suggested, therefore, that desorption rate of a hydrogen isotope implanted into the stainless steel is limited by a diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms in bulk. Furthermore, small isotope effects were observed for the diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms. (authors)

  4. Zinc isotope discrimination effect in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) has recently been used for isotope ratio analysis. The isotope discrimination effect in the mass spectrometer is a primary factor contributing to loss of precision and accuracy in isotope ratio analysis. The discrimination effect of zinc isotopes was investigated by comparing the results obtained using a quadrupole type ICPMS with those obtained using a thermal ionization mass spectrometer

  5. Isotope effects of hafnium in solvent extraction using crown ethers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Toshiyuki; Moriyama, Hirotake [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan); Hirata, Takafumi [Laboratory for Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Nishizawa, Kazushige [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    Hafnium isotopes were fractionated in a liquid-liquid extraction system by using seven types of crown ethers, tributyl phosphate, or {omicron}-diethoxybenzene. The largest isotope effect was observed in the isotope pair of {sup 177}Hf-{sup 179}Hf with dibenzo-24-crown-8; the isotope enrichment factor was observed to be 0.0129{+-}0.0032. (author)

  6. Short course on St-02 applications of isotope dilutions and isotopic measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, P.

    1998-01-05

    This short course includes information on these topics and subtopics: (I) Nuclear Properties: (A) Historic roots; (B) Nomenclature; (C) Nuclear Stability and abundance; (D) Uses of isotopic techniques; (II) Instrumentation: (A) Sources; (B) Mass resolving elements; (C) Detectors; (III) Making Isotopic Measurements by ICP-MS: (A) Deadtime Correction; (B) Mass Discrimination; (C) Signal /Noise considerations; (IV) Applications and examples: (A) Isotope dilution; (B) Double Spike; (C) Biological Application; (D) Environmental Application; (E) Geological.

  7. Isotope pattern deconvolution as rising tool for isotope tracer studies in environmental research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irrgeher, Johanna; Zitek, Andreas; Prohaska, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    During the last decade stable isotope tracers have emerged as versatile tool in ecological research. Besides 'intrinsic' isotope tracers caused by the natural variation of isotopes, the intentional introduction of 'extrinsic' enriched stable isotope tracers into biological systems has gained significant interest. Hereby the induced change in the natural isotopic composition of an element allows amongst others for studying the fate and fluxes of metals, trace elements and species in organisms or provides an intrinsic marker or tag of particular biological samples. Due to the shoreless potential of this methodology, the number of publications dealing with applications of isotope (double) spikes as tracers to address research questions in 'real world systems' is constantly increasing. However, some isotope systems like the natural Sr isotopic system, although potentially very powerful for this type of application, are still rarely used, mainly because their adequate measurement/determination poses major analytical challenges; as e.g. Sr is available in significant amounts in natural samples. In addition, biological systems underlie complex processes such as metabolism, adsorption/desorption or oxidation/reduction. As a consequence, classic evaluation approaches such as the isotope dilution mass spectrometry equation are often not applicable because of the unknown amount of tracer finally present in the sample. Isotope pattern deconvolution (IPD), based on multiple linear regression, serves as simplified alternative data processing strategy to double spike isotope dilution calculations. The outstanding advantage of this mathematical tool lies in the possibility of deconvolving the isotope pattern in a spiked sample without knowing the quantities of enriched isotope tracer being incorporated into the natural sample matrix as well as the degree of impurities and species-interconversion (e.g. from sample preparation). Here, the potential of IPD for environmental tracer

  8. Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry: Parameter influence on boron isotope measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS) was recently reported for optical isotopic analysis of condensed samples in ambient air and at ambient pressure. LAMIS utilizes molecular emissions which exhibit larger isotopic spectral shits than in atomic transitions. For boron monoxide 10BO and 11BO, the isotopic shifts extend from 114 cm-1 (0.74 nm) to 145-238 cm-1 (5-8 nm) at the B2Σ+ (v = 0) → X2Σ+ (v = 2) and A2Πi (v = 0) → X2Σ+ (v = 3) transitions, respectively. These molecular isotopic shifts are over two orders of magnitude larger than the maximum isotopic shift of approximately 0.6 cm-1 in atomic boron. This paper describes how boron isotope abundance can be quantitatively determined using LAMIS and how atomic, ionic, and molecular optical emission develops in a plasma emanating from laser ablation of solid samples with various boron isotopic composition. We demonstrate that requirements for spectral resolution of the measurement system can be significantly relaxed when the isotopic abundance ratio is determined using chemometric analysis of spectra. Sensitivity can be improved by using a second slightly delayed laser pulse arriving into an expanding plume created by the first ablation pulse.

  9. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, N.; Leu, A.; Munoz, E.; Olsen, J.; Kwong, E.; Des Marais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4 percent depleted in C-13 relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3 percent enriched in C-13. The acetate C-13 enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6 percent depleted in C-13, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7 percent, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7 percent, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle.

  10. University hosts premier rare-isotope facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bollen, G

    2002-01-01

    Since it was founded in the 1980s, Michigan State University's National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory has evolved to become the US's premier rare-isotope facility. Cyclotrons, a superconducting magnetic spectrograph, detectors and a He gas cell are discussed.

  11. Quantification of isotopic turnover in agricultural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, A.; Auerswald, K.; Schnyder, H.

    2012-04-01

    The isotopic turnover, which is a proxy for the metabolic rate, is gaining scientific importance. It is quantified for an increasing range of organisms, from microorganisms over plants to animals including agricultural livestock. Additionally, the isotopic turnover is analyzed on different scales, from organs to organisms to ecosystems and even to the biosphere. In particular, the quantification of the isotopic turnover of specific tissues within the same organism, e.g. organs like liver and muscle and products like milk and faeces, has brought new insights to improve understanding of nutrient cycles and fluxes, respectively. Thus, the knowledge of isotopic turnover is important in many areas, including physiology, e.g. milk synthesis, ecology, e.g. soil retention time of water, and medical science, e.g. cancer diagnosis. So far, the isotopic turnover is quantified by applying time, cost and expertise intensive tracer experiments. Usually, this comprises two isotopic equilibration periods. A first equilibration period with a constant isotopic input signal is followed by a second equilibration period with a distinct constant isotopic input signal. This yields a smooth signal change from the first to the second signal in the object under consideration. This approach reveals at least three major problems. (i) The input signals must be controlled isotopically, which is almost impossible in many realistic cases like free ranging animals. (ii) Both equilibration periods may be very long, especially when the turnover rate of the object under consideration is very slow, which aggravates the first problem. (iii) The detection of small or slow pools is improved by large isotopic signal changes, but large isotopic changes also involve a considerable change in the input material; e.g. animal studies are usually carried out as diet-switch experiments, where the diet is switched between C3 and C4 plants, since C3 and C4 plants differ strongly in their isotopic signal. The

  12. Robust optical carbon dioxide isotope analyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Isotopic analysis of carbon dioxide is an important tool for characterization of the exchange and transformation of carbon between the biosphere and the atmosphere....

  13. The anomalous quadrupole collectivity in Te isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Chong

    2016-01-01

    We present systematic calculations on the spectroscopy and transition properties of even-even Te isotopes by using the large-scale configuration interaction shell model approach with a realistic interaction. These nuclei are of particular interest since their yrast spectra show a vibrational-like equally-spaced pattern but the few known E2 transitions show anomalous rotational-like behavior, which cannot be reproduced by collective models. Our calculations reproduce well the equally-spaced spectra of those isotopes as well as the constant behavior of the $B(E2)$ values in $^{114}$Te. The calculated $B(E2)$ values for neutron-deficient and heavier Te isotopes show contrasting different behaviors along the yrast line. The $B(E2)$ of light isotopes can exhibit a nearly constant bevavior upto high spins. We show that this is related to the enhanced neutron-proton correlation when approaching $N=50$.

  14. Separation of Isotopes via Dynamical Delocalization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Farhan Saif

    2008-01-01

    Based on the dynamical de-localization phenomenon we show that different isotopes of a material can be separated.We explain that the suggested scheme can be realized in the laboratory using presently available experimental facilities.

  15. Preparation of Metallic Isotope 26Mg

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WuXiaolei; ZhangFuming; GanZaiguo; GuoJunsheng; QinZhi

    2003-01-01

    Some special isotope material is usually used in nuclear experiments. It can be served as ion beam or target. When new superheavy nuclide 265Bh (Z=107) is synthesized, a reaction of 243Am target with 26Mg ion beamis selected to produce new isotope 265Bh. The preparation and production of this rare and extremely expensive isotope 26 Mg used for ion beam substance will be a key problem in synthesizing experiment of 265Bh. Theavailable chemical form of isotope 26Mg in commercial product usually is oxide or other compound, which are not required in our experiment. They need to be transformed to metal form as a proper working substance in ion source.

  16. Use of fluorescent screens for isotope radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, S. K.

    1979-01-01

    Radiographic examination can be performed on items beyond the limitation of conventional isotope radiography without a great loss of resolution. With proper film and screen selection and scatter radiation control, fluorescent screens can be a valuable additional tool for radiography.

  17. The Palladium Isotopic Composition in Iron Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. H.; Papanastassiou, D. A.

    2005-01-01

    Ru, Mo and Pd are very useful indicators for the identification of nucleosynthetic components. We have developed techniques for Pd isotopes, in an effort to check the extent of isotopic effects in this mass region and for a Pt-group element which is less refractory than Ru. Stable Pd isotopes are produced by the process only (102Pd), the s-process only (104Pd), the process only (Pd-110) and by both the r- and s-processes (Pd-105, Pd-106, Pd-108). Kelly and Wasserburg reported a hint of a shift in 102Pd (approx. 25(epsilon)u; 1(epsilon)u (triple bonds) 0.01%) in Santa Clara. Earlier searches for Mo and Ru isotopic anomalies were either positive or negative.

  18. Medium Effects in Reactions with Rare Isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss medium effects in knockout reactions with rare isotopes of weakly-bound nuclei at intermediate energies. We show that the poorly known corrections may lead to sizable modifications of knockout cross sections and momentum dsitributions.

  19. Water isotope systematics: Improving our palaeoclimate interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. D.; Dee, S.; Anderson, L.; Baker, A.; Bowen, G.; Noone, D. C.

    2016-01-01

    The stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen, measured in a variety of archives, are widely used proxies in Quaternary Science. Understanding the processes that control δ18O change have long been a focus of research (e.g. Shackleton and Opdyke, 1973; Talbot, 1990; Leng, 2006). Both the dynamics of water isotope cycling and the appropriate interpretation of geological water-isotope proxy time series remain subjects of active research and debate. It is clear that achieving a complete understanding of the isotope systematics for any given archive type, and ideally each individual archive, is vital if these palaeo-data are to be used to their full potential, including comparison with climate model experiments of the past. Combining information from modern monitoring and process studies, climate models, and proxy data is crucial for improving our statistical constraints on reconstructions of past climate variability.

  20. Mercury Isotopes in Earth and Environmental Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Joel D.; Sherman, Laura S.; Johnson, Marcus W.

    2014-05-01

    Virtually all biotic, dark abiotic, and photochemical transformations of mercury (Hg) produce Hg isotope fractionation, which can be either mass dependent (MDF) or mass independent (MIF). The largest range in MDF is observed among geological materials and rainfall impacted by anthropogenic sources. The largest positive MIF of Hg isotopes (odd-mass excess) is caused by photochemical degradation of methylmercury in water. This signature is retained through the food web and measured in all freshwater and marine fish. The largest negative MIF of Hg isotopes (odd-mass deficit) is caused by photochemical reduction of inorganic Hg and has been observed in Arctic snow and plant foliage. Ratios of MDF to MIF and ratios of 199Hg MIF to 201Hg MIF are often diagnostic of biogeochemical reaction pathways. More than a decade of research demonstrates that Hg isotopes can be used to trace sources, biogeochemical cycling, and reactions involving Hg in the environment.

  1. Origin of isotopic spin and strangeness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An explanation of the origin of isotopic spin is given by applying the theory and calculations in the author's previous papers. An explanation of the origin of strangeness and broken SU3 is given as well

  2. Isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was evaluated for the determination of trace amounts of uranium and thorium in silicate rocks. Compared with conventional isotope dilution methods using thermal ionization mass spectrometers, the major benefit is a large increase in sample through-put without a significant decrease in precision and accuracy. This results from direct liquid sampling at atmospheric pressure and from the capability of measuring isotope ratios on raw solutions, without chemical separation of the analytes from the matrix elements. Isotope dilution ICP-MS alleviates the need for matrix-matched standards. Further, it is insensitive to possible causes of intensity drift (e.g., clogging of the plasma/mass spectrometer interface and defocusing of the ion beam) and to chemical effects (e.g. oxide formulation). Results obtained on some international rock standards are in good agreement with recommended values. (author). 26 refs.; 1 fig., tabs

  3. Stable isotope production with laser techniques; Production d`isotopes stables a l`aide des techniques laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, A. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. des Procedes d`Enrichissement

    1994-12-31

    Laser properties may be used for stable isotope production either by selective photoionization of an atom particular isotope, either by selective photodissociation of a molecule. Principles of both processes are reviewed and examples of calcium 43 isotope separation through photoionization and of carbon and oxygen isotope separation by photodissociation are presented. 4 figs., 1 tab., 11 refs.

  4. Isotopic fractionation of zinc in tektites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynier, Frederic; Beck, Pierre; Jourdan, Fred; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Reimold, Uwe; Koeberl, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Tektites are terrestrial natural glasses produced during a hypervelocity impact of an extraterrestrial projectile onto the Earth's surface. The similarity between the chemical and isotopic compositions of tektites and terrestrial upper continental crust implies that the tektites formed by fusion of such target rock. Tektites are among the driest rocks on Earth. Although volatilization at high temperature may have caused this extreme dryness, the exact mechanism of the water loss and the behavior of other volatile species during tektite formation are still debated. Volatilization can fractionate isotopes, therefore, comparing the isotope composition of volatile elements in tektites with that of their source rocks may help to understand the physical conditions during tektite formation. For this study, we have measured the Zn isotopic composition of 20 tektites from four different strewn fields. Almost all samples are enriched in heavy isotopes of Zn compared to the upper continental crust. On average, the different groups of tektites are isotopically distinct (listed from the isotopically lightest to the heaviest): Muong-Nong type indochinites ( δ66/64Zn = 0.61 ± 0.30‰); North American bediasites ( δ66/64Zn = 1.61 ± 0.49‰); Ivory Coast tektites ( δ66/64Zn = 1.66 ± 0.18‰); the Australasian tektites (others than the Muong Nong-type indochinites) ( δ66/64Zn = 1.84 ± 0.42‰); and Central European moldavites ( δ66/64Zn = 2.04 ± 0.19‰). These results are contrasted with a narrow range of δ66/64Zn = 0-0.7‰ for a diverse spectrum of upper continental crust materials. The elemental abundance of Zn is negatively correlated with δ66/64Zn, which may reflect that isotopic fractionation occurred by evaporation during the heating event upon tektite formation. Simple Rayleigh distillation predicts isotopic fractionations much larger than what is actually observed, therefore, such a model cannot account for the observed Zn isotope fractionation in tektites. We

  5. Isotopes in the Arctic atmospheric water cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Bonne, Jean-Louis; Werner, Martin; Meyer, Hanno; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Rabe, Benjamin; Behrens, Melanie; Schönicke, Lutz; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    The ISO-ARC project aims at documenting the Arctic atmospheric hydrological cycle, by assessing the imprint of the marine boundary conditions (e.g. temperature variations, circulation changes, or meltwater input) to the isotopic composition of the atmospheric water cycle (H218O and HDO) with a focus on North Atlantic and Arctic oceans. For this purpose, two continuous monitoring water vapour stable isotopes cavity ring-down spectrometers have been installed in July 2015: on-boar...

  6. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan; Chauvel, Catherine

    2016-06-28

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ(26)Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from -0.25 to -0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (-0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ(26)Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid-mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration. PMID:27303032

  7. Stable carbon isotope analysis of heavy oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fixari, B.; Le Perchec, P.; Bigois, M.; Casabianca, H.; Jame, P. [CNRS, Vernaison (France). Lab. des Materiaux Organiques

    1994-03-01

    Stable carbon isotope analysis of various heavy oils and some thermo-catalytically converted products was performed with a thermal analyser coupled with an isotopic ratio mass spectrometer. The temperature-programmed oxidative pyroanalysis technique subdivides the classical {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio, affording new insights into the structural composition of heavy oils such as the contribution of naphthenoaromatics, and appears to be of interest for following their thermal refining. 24 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Environmental isotope observations on Sishen ground waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental isotope measurements have been conducted on the outputs of some of the main dewatering points in both north and south mining areas as well as on numerous other observation points in the Sishen compartment. The effect of the dykes bounding the compartment could be observed from the behaviour of the isotopic composition of ground waters in the conduit zone. Measurements were done on radiocarbon, tritium oxygen-18 and carbon-13

  9. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ26Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from −0.25 to −0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (−0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ26Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid−mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration. PMID:27303032

  10. Mixed Population Screening for Sulfur Isotopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Bin; ZHAO Lei; ZHAN Zhaoyang; HE Zhijun

    2004-01-01

    Quantitative research of the origin of sulfur isotopes is a difficult problem that has puzzled geochemists all along. In the study of the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River and the Dongpo orefield in Hunan Province,the authors successfully applied the mathematical model of mixed population screening to quantitatively resolving the problem on the origin of sulfur isotopes, which is significant in finding out the source of mineralizing matter and metallogenic mechanisms.

  11. IUPAC Periodic Table of the Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, N.E.; Coplen, T.B.; Böhlke, J.K.; Wieser, M.E.; Singleton, G.; Walczyk, T.; Yoneda, S.; Mahaffy, P.G.; Tarbox, L.V.

    2011-01-01

    For almost 150 years, the Periodic Table of the Elements has served as a guide to the world of elements by highlighting similarities and differences in atomic structure and chemical properties. To introduce students, teachers, and society to the existence and importance of isotopes of the chemical elements, an IUPAC Periodic Table of the Isotopes (IPTI) has been prepared and can be found as a supplement to this issue.

  12. Amalgam-chromatographic separation of magnesium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separation of magnesium isotopes within Mg(Hg)-MgI2 system (in dimethylformamide) is conducted under amalgam-chromatographic conditions. Separation maximal degree, that is (1.09), for 24 Mg and 26 Mg and separation coefficient (α = 1.0089±0.006) are determined. Light isotopes are found to concentrate in the amalgam. Technique of thermal conversion of flows within amalgam-dimethylformamide system is suggested on the basis of reversible reaction of Ca-Mg element exchange

  13. Uses of Radioactive Isotopes in Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report contains a list of some of the most important problems in industry that have been approached so far by the use of radioactive isotopes. The list has been compiled trough the experience gained by the authors in revising for several years the most important scientific journal and other sources of information on this subject. The classification of industries has been done in an arbitrary way, choosing those isotope uses that have reached a higher degree of development. (Author)

  14. On the hyperfine anomaly in Eu isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, J. R.

    2009-01-01

    A new method for determining the hyperfine anomaly, without knowing the nuclear magnetic moment, is used for the first time on a series of unstable isotopes. The relative large number of experimental data in Eu makes it possible to determine the hyperfine anomaly for a number of unstable isotopes. Calculations of the Bohr-Weisskopf effect and hence the hyperfine anomaly has been performed using the particle-rotor formalism. The result from the calculations and experiments is compared with oth...

  15. Hydrogen isotope effect on the Dimits shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.

    2016-10-01

    The hydrogen isotope effect on the Dimits shift in drift wave turbulence (Dimits et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 969) is discussed using the theory of zonal flows, in which the nonlinear damping rate of zonal flows is taken into account. The up-shift of the critical linear growth rate of the drift waves, above which drift wave fluctuations develop, is investigated. The dependence on the mass number of the hydrogen isotope is discussed.

  16. Surfaces that become isotopic after Dehn filling

    CERN Document Server

    Bachman, David; Sedgwick, Eric

    2010-01-01

    We show that after generic filling along a torus boundary component of a 3-manifold, no two closed, 2-sided, essential surfaces become isotopic, and no closed, 2-sided, essential surface becomes inessential. That is, the set of essential surfaces (considered up to isotopy) survives unchanged in all suitably generic Dehn fillings. Furthermore, for all but finitely many non-generic fillings, we show that two essential surfaces can only become isotopic in a constrained way.

  17. Isotope shortage triggers delays for patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Paula

    2009-07-01

    An unplanned shutdown of a nuclear reactor in Canada is disrupting the supply of medical isotopes across North America and forcing some hospitals to cancel or postpone patients' tests. The closure of the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor in Chalk River, Ontario, has also embarrassed Canadian officials, including a senior government minister who was forced to apologize after calling the isotope shortage a "sexy" career challenge.

  18. Thermal Properties of Isotopically Engineered Graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Shanshan; Wu, Qingzhi; Mishra, Columbia; Kang, Junyong; Zhang, Hengji; Cho, Kyeongjae; Cai, Weiwei; Balandin, Alexander A.; Ruoff, Rodney S.

    2011-01-01

    In addition to its exotic electronic properties graphene exhibits unusually high intrinsic thermal conductivity. The physics of phonons - the main heat carriers in graphene - was shown to be substantially different in two-dimensional (2D) crystals, such as graphene, than in three-dimensional (3D) graphite. Here, we report our experimental study of the isotope effects on the thermal properties of graphene. Isotopically modified graphene containing various percentages of 13C were synthesized by...

  19. Trophic experiments to estimate isotope discrimination factors

    OpenAIRE

    Caut, Stéphane; Angulo, Elena; Courchamp, Franck; Figuerola, Jordi

    2010-01-01

    : 1. In Caut, Angulo & Courchamp (2008a) rats were fed with experimental diets of distinct isotopic values (_13C and _15N) in order to infer the discrimination factors. We showed negative relationships between discrimination factors and diet isotopic values. In Caut, Angulo & Courchamp (2009), our aim was to generalise these relationships to other taxonomic groups with a view to providing ecologists with a general and flexible method to obtain discrimination factors for diet reconstruction st...

  20. Study of neutron-deficient Sn isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of neutron deficient nuclei by heavy ion reactions is investigated. The experimental technique is presented, and the results obtained concerning Sn et In isotopes reported: first excited states of 106Sn, high spin states in 107Sn and 107In; Yrast levels of 106Sn, 107Sn, 108Sn; study of neutron deficient Sn and In isotopes formed by the desintegration of the compound nucleus 112Xe. All these results are discussed

  1. Isotope techniques in water resources development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings contain the papers of 41 oral and the extended synopses of 40 poster presentations at the seventh symposium on the use of isotope techniques in water resources development. The topics of the sessions were as follows: Thermal water studies, groundwater dating, hydrology of arid and semi-arid areas, field studies with environmental isotopes, precipitation-surface-groundwater relationships, pollution, artificial tracers and sediment transport. Refs, figs, tabs

  2. Dye laser chain for laser isotope separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doizi, Denis; Jaraudias, Jean; Pochon, E.; Salvetat, G.

    1993-05-01

    Uranium enrichment by laser isotope separation uses a three step operation which requires four visible wavelengths to boost an individual U235 isotope from a low lying atomic energy level to an autoionizing state. The visible wavelengths are delivered by dye lasers pumped by copper vapor lasers (CVL). In this particular talk, a single dye chain consisting of a master oscillator and amplifier stages will be described and some of its performance given.

  3. Isotopic dependence of GCR fluence behind shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we consider the effects of the isotopic composition of the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR), nuclear fragmentation cross sections, and isotopic-grid on the solution to transport models used for shielding studies. Satellite measurements are used to describe the isotopic composition of the GCR. For the nuclear interaction data-base and transport solution, we use the quantum multiple scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) and high-charge and energy (HZETRN) transport code, respectively. The QMSFRG model is shown to accurately describe existing fragmentation data including proper description of the odd-even effects as function of the iso-spin dependence on the projectile nucleus. The principle finding of this study is that large errors (±100%) will occur in the mass-fluence spectra when comparing transport models that use a complete isotopic-grid (∼170 ions) to ones that use a reduced isotopic-grid, for example the 59 ion-grid used in the HZETRN code in the past; however, less significant errors (<+/-20%) occur in the elemental-fluence spectra. Because a complete isotopic-grid is readily handled on small computer workstations and is needed for several applications studying GCR propagation and scattering, it is recommended that they be used for future GCR studies

  4. Isotopic dependence of GCR fluence behind shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cucinotta, Francis A. [NASA, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77058 (United States)]. E-mail: Francis.A.Cucinotta@nasa.gov; Wilson, John W. [NASA, Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23664 (United States); Saganti, Premkumar [Prairie View A and M, Prairie View, TX 94720 (United States); Hu, Xiaodong [NASA, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Kim, Myung-Hee Y. [NASA, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Cleghorn, Timothy [NASA, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Zeitlin, Cary [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Tripathi, Ram K. [NASA, Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23664 (United States)

    2006-10-15

    In this paper we consider the effects of the isotopic composition of the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR), nuclear fragmentation cross sections, and isotopic-grid on the solution to transport models used for shielding studies. Satellite measurements are used to describe the isotopic composition of the GCR. For the nuclear interaction data-base and transport solution, we use the quantum multiple scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) and high-charge and energy (HZETRN) transport code, respectively. The QMSFRG model is shown to accurately describe existing fragmentation data including proper description of the odd-even effects as function of the iso-spin dependence on the projectile nucleus. The principle finding of this study is that large errors ({+-}100%) will occur in the mass-fluence spectra when comparing transport models that use a complete isotopic-grid ({approx}170 ions) to ones that use a reduced isotopic-grid, for example the 59 ion-grid used in the HZETRN code in the past; however, less significant errors (<+/-20%) occur in the elemental-fluence spectra. Because a complete isotopic-grid is readily handled on small computer workstations and is needed for several applications studying GCR propagation and scattering, it is recommended that they be used for future GCR studies.

  5. Isotopic Dependence of GCR Fluence behind Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Saganti, Premkumar; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cleghorn, Timothy; Zeitlin, Cary; Tripathi, Ram K.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we consider the effects of the isotopic composition of the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR), nuclear fragmentation cross-sections, and isotopic-grid on the solution to transport models used for shielding studies. Satellite measurements are used to describe the isotopic composition of the GCR. For the nuclear interaction data-base and transport solution, we use the quantum multiple-scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) and high-charge and energy (HZETRN) transport code, respectively. The QMSFRG model is shown to accurately describe existing fragmentation data including proper description of the odd-even effects as function of the iso-spin dependence on the projectile nucleus. The principle finding of this study is that large errors (+/-100%) will occur in the mass-fluence spectra when comparing transport models that use a complete isotopic-grid (approx.170 ions) to ones that use a reduced isotopic-grid, for example the 59 ion-grid used in the HZETRN code in the past, however less significant errors (<+/-20%) occur in the elemental-fluence spectra. Because a complete isotopic-grid is readily handled on small computer workstations and is needed for several applications studying GCR propagation and scattering, it is recommended that they be used for future GCR studies.

  6. Iron isotopic fractionation during continental weathering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fantle, Matthew S.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2003-10-01

    The biological activity on continents and the oxygen content of the atmosphere determine the chemical pathways through which Fe is processed at the Earth's surface. Experiments have shown that the relevant chemical pathways fractionate Fe isotopes. Measurements of soils, streams, and deep-sea clay indicate that the {sup 56}Fe/{sup 54}Fe ratio ({delta}{sup 56}Fe relative to igneous rocks) varies from +1{per_thousand} for weathering residues like soils and clays, to -3{per_thousand} for dissolved Fe in streams. These measurements confirm that weathering processes produce substantial fractionation of Fe isotopes in the modern oxidizing Earth surface environment. The results imply that biologically-mediated processes, which preferentially mobilize light Fe isotopes, are critical to Fe chemistry in weathering environments, and that the {delta}{sup 56}Fe of marine dissolved Fe should be variable and negative. Diagenetic reduction of Fe in marine sediments may also be a significant component of the global Fe isotope cycle. Iron isotopes provide a tracer for the influence of biological activity and oxygen in weathering processes through Earth history. Iron isotopic fractionation during weathering may have been smaller or absent in an oxygen-poor environment such as that of the early Precambrian Earth.

  7. Metabolic studies in man using stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this project, stable isotope compounds and stable isotope pharmaceuticals were used (with emphasis on the application of 15N) to study several aspects of nitrogen metabolism in man. Of the many methods available, the 15N stable isotope tracer technique holds a special position because the methodology for application and nitrogen isotope analysis is proven and reliable. Valid routine methods using 15N analysis by emission spectrometry have been demonstrated. Several methods for the preparation of biological material were developed during our participation in the Coordinated Research Programme. In these studies, direct procedures (i.e. use of diluted urine as a samples without chemical preparation) or rapid isolation methods were favoured. Within the scope of the Analytical Quality Control Service (AQCS) enriched stable isotope reference materials for medical and biological studies were prepared and are now available through the International Atomic Energy Agency. The materials are of special importance as the increasing application of stable isotopes as tracers in medical, biological and agricultural studies has focused interest on reliable measurements of biological material of different origin. 24 refs

  8. Manual on mathematical models in isotope hydrogeology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methodologies based on the use of naturally occurring isotopes are, at present, an integral part of studies being undertaken for water resources assessment and management. Quantitative evaluations based on the temporal and/or spatial distribution of different isotopic species in hydrological systems require conceptual mathematical formulations. Different types of model can be employed depending on the nature of the hydrological system under investigation, the amount and type of data available, and the required accuracy of the parameter to be estimated. This manual provides an overview of the basic concepts of existing modelling approaches, procedures for their application to different hydrological systems, their limitations and data requirements. Guidance in their practical applications, illustrative case studies and information on existing PC software are also included. While the subject matter of isotope transport modelling and improved quantitative evaluations through natural isotopes in water sciences is still at the development stage, this manual summarizes the methodologies available at present, to assist the practitioner in the proper use within the framework of ongoing isotope hydrological field studies. In view of the widespread use of isotope methods in groundwater hydrology, the methodologies covered in the manual are directed towards hydrogeological applications, although most of the conceptual formulations presented would generally be valid. Refs, figs, tabs

  9. Laser Spectroscopy of Neutron Rich Bismuth Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %IS344 :\\\\ \\\\ The aim of the experiment is to measure the optical isotope shifts and hyperfine structures of bismuth isotopes across the N=126 shell closure in order to extract the change in mean square charge radii ($\\delta\\langle r^{2}\\rangle$) and static moments. These include the first isotones of lead to be measured directly above the shell closure and will provide new information on the systematics of the kink ($\\delta\\langle r^{2}\\rangle)$ seen in the lead isotopic chain. After two very successful runs the programme has been extended to include the neutron deficient isotopes below $^{201}$Bi to study the systematics across the $i_{13/2}$ neutron sub-shell closure at N=118.\\\\ \\\\ During the initial 2 runs (9 shifts) the isotope shifts and hyperfine structures of three new isotopes, $ ^{210,212,213}$Bi and the 9$^{-}$ isomer of $^{210}$Bi have been measured. The accuracy of the previous measurements of $^{205,206,208}$Bi have been greatly improved. The samples of $ ^{208,210,210^{m}}$Bi were prepared by c...

  10. The discovery of isotopes a complete compilation

    CERN Document Server

    Thoennessen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the exciting discovery of every isotope observed on earth to date, which currently numbers some 3000. For each isotope a short essay highlights the authors of the first publication for the isotope, the laboratory and year where and when the isotope was discovered, as well as details about the production and detection methods used. In controversial cases previously claims are also discussed. At the end a comprehensive table lists all isotopes sorted by elements and a complete list of references. Preliminary versions of these paragraphs have been published over the last few years as separate articles in the journal "Atomic Data and Nuclear Data Tables". The work re-evaluates all assignments judging them with a uniform set of criteria. In addition, the author includes over 100 new isotopes which have been discovered since the articles published. This book is a source of information for researchers as well as enthusiastic laymen alike. From the prepublication review: “The explanations focus ...

  11. Identification of isotopically primitive interplanetary dust particles: A NanoSIMS isotopic imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floss, C; Stadermann, F J; Bradley, J P; Dai, Z R; Bajt, S; Graham, G; Lea, A S

    2005-09-02

    We have carried out a comprehensive survey of the isotopic compositions (H, B, C, N, O, S) of a suite of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), including both cluster and individual particles. Isotopic imaging with the NanoSIMS shows the presence of numerous discrete hotspots that are strongly enriched in {sup 15}N, including the largest {sup 15}N enrichments ({approx}1300 {per_thousand}) observed in IDPs to date. A number of the IDPs also contain larger regions with more modest enrichments in {sup 15}N, leading to average bulk N isotopic compositions that are {sup 15}N-enriched in these IDPs. Although C isotopic compositions are normal in most of the IDPs, two {sup 15}N-rich N-hotspots have correlated {sup 13}C anomalies. CN{sup -}/C{sup -} ratios suggest that most of the {sup 15}N-rich hotspots are associated with relatively N-poor carbonaceous matter, although specific carriers have not been determined. H isotopic distributions are similar to those of N: D anomalies are present both as distinct very D-rich hotspots and as larger regions with more modest enrichments. Nevertheless, H and N isotopic anomalies are not directly correlated, consistent with results from previous studies. Oxygen isotopic imaging shows the presence of abundant presolar silicate grains in the IDPs. The O isotopic compositions of the grains are similar to those found in presolar oxide and silicate grains from primitive meteorites. Most of the silicate grains in the IDPs have isotopic ratios consistent with meteoritic Group 1 oxide grains, indicating origins in oxygen-rich red giant and asymptotic giant branch stars, but several presolar silicates exhibit the {sup 17}O and {sup 18}O enrichments of Group 4 oxide grains, whose origin is less well understood. Based on their N isotopic compositions, the IDPs studied here can be divided into two groups. One group is characterized as being ''isotopically primitive'' and consists of those IDPs that have anomalous bulk N isotopic

  12. Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffee, M.; Elmore, D.; Granger, D.; Muzikar, P.

    2002-12-01

    The Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab) is a dedicated research and service facility for accelerator mass spectrometry. AMS is an ultra-sensitive analytical technique used to measure low levels of long-lived cosmic-ray-produced and anthropogenic radionuclides, and rare trace elements. We measure 10Be (T1/2 = 1.5 My), 26Al (.702 My), 36Cl (.301 My), and 129I (16 My), in geologic samples. Applications include dating the cosmic-ray-exposure time of rocks on Earth's surface, determining rock and sediment burial ages, measuring the erosion rates of rocks and soils, and tracing and dating ground water. We perform sample preparation and separation chemistries for these radio-nuclides for our internal research activities and for those external researchers not possessing this capability. Our chemical preparation laboratories also serve as training sites for members of the geoscience community developing these techniques at their institutions. Research at Purdue involves collaborators among members of the Purdue Departments of Physics, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Chemistry, Agronomy, and Anthropology. We also collaborate and serve numerous scientists from other institutions. We are currently in the process of modernizing the facility with the goals of higher precision for routinely measured radio-nuclides, increased sample throughput, and the development of new measurement capabilities for the geoscience community.

  13. Rare stable isotopes in meteorites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) using accelerators has been applied with success to cosmic ray exposure ages and terrestrial residence times of meteorites by measuring cosmogenic nuclides of Be, Cl, and I. It is proposed to complement this work with experiments on rare stable isotopes, in the hope of setting constraints on the processes of solar nebula/meteoritic formation. The relevant species can be classified as: a) daughter products of extinct nuclides (halflife less than or equal to 2 x 108 y) -chronology of the early solar system; b) products of high temperature astrophysical processes - different components incorporated into the solar nebula; and c) products of relatively low temperature processes, stellar winds and cosmic ray reactions - early solar system radiation history. The use of micron-scale primary ion beams will allow detailed sampling of phases within meteorites. Strategies of charge-state selection, molecular disintegration and detection should bring a new set of targets within analytical range. The developing accelerator field is compared to existing (keV energy) ion microprobes

  14. Isotope analytics for the evaluation of the feeding influence on the isotope ratio in beef samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information about the origin of food and associated production systems has a high significance for food control. An extremely promising approach to obtain such information is the determination of isotope ratios of different elements. In this study the correlation of the isotope ratios C-13/C-12, N-15/N-14, Mg-25/Mg-24, and Sr-87/Sr-86 in bovine samples (milk and urine) and the corresponding isotope ratios in feed was investigated. It was shown that in the bovine samples all four isotope ratios correlate with the isotope composition of the feed. The isotope ratios of strontium and magnesium have the advantage that they directly reflect the isotope ratios of the ingested feed since there is no isotope fractionation in the bovine organism which is in contrast to the case of carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios. From the present feeding study it is evident, that a feed change leads to a significant change in the delta C-13 values in milk and urine within 10 days already. For the deltaN-15 values the feed change was only visible in the bovine urine after 49 days. Investigations of cows from two different regions (Berlin/Germany and Goestling/Austria) kept at different feeding regimes revealed no differences in the N-15/N-14 and Mg-26/Mg-24 isotope ratios. The strongest correlation between the isotope ratio of the bovine samples and the kind of ingested feed was observed for the carbon isotope ratio. With this ratio even smallest differences in the feed composition were traceable in the bovine samples. Since different regions usually coincide with different feeding regimes, carbon isotope ratios can be used to distinguish bovine samples from different regions if the delta C-13 values of the ingested feed are different. Furthermore, the determination of strontium isotope ratios revealed significant differences between bovine and feed samples of Berlin and Goestling due to the different geologic realities. Hence the carbon and strontium isotope ratios allow the best

  15. Isotopic evolution of Mauna Loa volcano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurz, M.D.; Kammer, D.P. (Chemistry Dept., Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA (USA))

    1991-04-01

    In an effort to understand the temporal helium isotopic variations in Mauna Loa volcano, we have measured helium, strontium and lead isotopes in a suite of Mauna Loa lavas that span most of the subaerial eruptive history of the volcano. The lavas range in age from historical flows to Ninole basalt which are thought to be several hundred thousand years old. Most of the samples younger than 30 ka in age (Kau Basalt) are radiocarbon-dated flows, while the samples older than 30 ka are stratigraphically controlled (Kahuku and Ninole Basalt). The data reveal a striking change in the geochemistry of the lavas approximately 10 ka before present. The lavas older than 10 ka are characterized by high {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ({approx equal} 16-20 times atmospheric), higher {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb ({approx equal} 18.2), and lower {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr({approx equal} 0.70365) ratios than the younger Kau samples (having He, Pb and Sr ratios of approximately 8.5 x atmospheric, 18.1 and 0.70390, respectively). The historical lavas are distinct in having intermediate Sr and Pb isotopic compositions with {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios similar to the other young Kau basalt ({approx equal} 8.5 x atmospheric). The isotopic variations are on a shorter time scale (100 to 10,000 years) than has previously been observed for Hawaiian volcanoes, and demonstrate the importance of geochronology and stratigraphy to geochemical studies. The data show consistency between all three isotope systems, which suggests that the variations are not related to magma chamber degassing processes, and that helium is not decoupled from the other isotopes. However, the complex temporal evolution suggests that three distinct mantle sources are required to explain the isotopic data. Most of the Mauna Loa isotopic variations could be explained by mixing between a plume type source, similar to Loihi, and an asthenospheric source with helium isotopic composition close to MORB and elevated Sr isotopic values. (orig./WL).

  16. Isotopic yield in cold binary fission of even-even $^{244-258}$Cf isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Santhosh, K P; Krishnan, Sreejith

    2016-01-01

    The cold binary fission of even-even 244-258Cf isotopes has been studied by taking the interacting barrier as the sum of Coulomb and proximity potential. The favorable fragment combinations are obtained from the cold valley plot (plot of driving potential vs. mass number of fragments) and by calculating the yield for charge minimized fragments. It is found that highest yield for 244,246,248Cf isotopes are for the fragments with isotope of Pb (Z=82) as one fragment, whereas for 250Cf and 252Cf isotopes the highest yield is for the fragments with isotope of Hg (Z=80) as one fragment. In the case of 254,256,258Cf isotopes the highest yield is for the fragments with Sn (Z=50) as one fragment. Thus, the fragment combinations with maximum yield reveal the role of doubly magic and near doubly magic nuclei in binary fission. It is found that asymmetric splitting is favoured for Cf isotopes with mass number A 252. In the case of Cf isotope with A=252, there is an equal probability for asymmetric and symmetric splitti...

  17. Calcium isotopic composition of mantle peridotites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F.; Kang, J.; Zhang, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Ca isotopes are useful to decipher mantle evolution and the genetic relationship between the Earth and chondrites. It has been observed that Ca isotopes can be fractionated at high temperature [1-2]. However, Ca isotopic composition of the mantle peridotites and fractionation mechanism are still poorly constrained. Here, we report Ca isotope composition of 12 co-existing pyroxene pairs in 10 lherzolites, 1 harzburgite, and 1 wehrlite xenoliths collected from Hainan Island (South Eastern China). Ca isotope data were measured on a Triton-TIMS using the double spike method at the Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, CAS. The long-term external error is 0.12‰ (2SD) based on repeated analyses of NIST SRM 915a and geostandards. δ44Ca of clinopyroxenes except that from the wehrlite ranges from 0.85‰ to 1.14‰, while opx yields a wide range from 0.98‰ up to 2.16‰. Co-existing pyroxene pairs show large ∆44Caopx-cpx (defined as δ44Caopx-δ44Cacpx) ranging from 0 to 1.23‰, reflecting equilibrium fractionation controlled by variable Ca contents in the opx. Notably, clinopyroxene of wehrlite shows extremely high δ44Ca (3.22‰). δ44Ca of the bulk lherzolites and harzburgites range from 0.86‰ to 1.14‰. This can be explained by extracting melts with slightly light Ca isotopic compositions. Finally, the high δ44Ca of the wehrlite (3.22‰) may reflect metasomatism by melt which has preferentially lost light Ca isotopes due to chemical diffusion during upwelling through the melt channel. [1] Amini et al (2009) GGR 33; [2] Huang et al (2010) EPSL 292.

  18. Isotope distribution program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory with emphasis on medical isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Isotope Distribution Program (IDP) is a group of individual activities with separate and diverse DOE sponsors which share the common mission of the production and distribution of isotope products and the performance of isotope-related services. Its basic mission is to provide isotope products and associated services to the user community by utilizing government-owned facilities that are excess to the primary mission of the DOE. The IDP is in its 41st year of operation. Initially, the program provided research quantities of radioactive materials, and through the 1950's it was the major supplier of radioisotopes for both research and commercial application. Distribution of enriched stable isotopes began in 1954. This paper discusses the use of radioisotopes in medicine and the role that ORNL plays in this field

  19. Isotope hydrology evolution in Haiti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water resources in Haiti need a more rational management. In fact, the availability of water in Haiti can be described as follows: the country receives as annual precipitation about 40 billion m3 of water. However, 70% of this water is lost by evapotranspiration and of the remaining fraction, considered as a renewable resource, about 20% drains through rivers and discharges into the sea. The remaining 10 % infiltrates into local aquifers. In Haiti water is not always available in the place where it is needed, depending on the precipitation regime, geography, geology, vegetation, etc. In fact, most difficulties lie in the regulation, protection and mobilization of the available resources. Since each economic sector in Haiti has specific needs, water resources management becomes a very important issue to provide access to water of sufficient quality and quantity to the population. This point is also relevant for adequate preservation of natural ecosystems and other uses. In Haiti there are many areas which contain aquifers: Plaine de l'Arbre, Cayes, Leogane, Gonaives and Plaine du Cul-de-Sac. The last one is heavily exploited due to its geographical location. In fact, since 1980, many studies, using isotope hydrology tools, have been carried out on this aquifer. Almost all studies conducted in the Plaine du Cul-de-Sac showed the same conclusion: the aquifer system is overexploited. Some recommendations have been made, but the anarchical exploitation of this aquifer still continues. Many years after these studies were conducted, the situation has not changed. In 2001, a project dealing with the integrated management of Plaine du Cul-de-Sac aquifer was initiated with the cooperation of the IAEA. Despite the difficulties, it is considered that this is the best way to solve this water resources problem. (author)

  20. Stable isotopes in Lithuanian bioarcheological material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipityte, Raminta; Jankauskas, Rimantas; Remeikis, Vidmantas

    2015-04-01

    Investigation of bioarcheological material of ancient human populations allows us to understand the subsistence behavior associated with various adaptations to the environment. Feeding habits are essential to the survival and growth of ancient populations. Stable isotope analysis is accepted tool in paleodiet (Schutkowski et al, 1999) and paleoenvironmental (Zernitskaya et al, 2014) studies. However, stable isotopes can be useful not only in investigating human feeding habits but also in describing social and cultural structure of the past populations (Le Huray and Schutkowski, 2005). Only few stable isotope investigations have been performed before in Lithuanian region suggesting a quite uniform diet between males and females and protein intake from freshwater fish and animal protein. Previously, stable isotope analysis has only been used to study a Stone Age population however, more recently studies have been conducted on Iron Age and Late medieval samples (Jacobs et al, 2009). Anyway, there was a need for more precise examination. Stable isotope analysis were performed on human bone collagen and apatite samples in this study. Data represented various ages (from 5-7th cent. to 18th cent.). Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis on medieval populations indicated that individuals in studied sites in Lithuania were almost exclusively consuming C3 plants, C3 fed terrestrial animals, and some freshwater resources. Current investigation demonstrated social differences between elites and country people and is promising in paleodietary and daily life reconstruction. Acknowledgement I thank prof. dr. G. Grupe, Director of the Anthropological and Palaeoanatomical State Collection in Munich for providing the opportunity to work in her laboratory. The part of this work was funded by DAAD. Antanaitis-Jacobs, Indre, et al. "Diet in early Lithuanian prehistory and the new stable isotope evidence." Archaeologia Baltica 12 (2009): 12-30. Le Huray, Jonathan D., and Holger

  1. Chemical stability of levoglucosan: An isotopic perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, X. F.; Gensch, I.; Kammer, B.; Khan, A.; Kleist, E.; Laumer, W.; Schlag, P.; Schmitt, S. H.; Wildt, J.; Zhao, R.; Mungall, E. L.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2016-05-01

    The chemical stability of levoglucosan was studied by exploring its isotopic fractionation during the oxidation by hydroxyl radicals. Aqueous solutions as well as mixed (NH4)2SO4-levoglucosan particles were exposed to OH. In both cases, samples experiencing different extents of processing were isotopically analyzed by Thermal Desorption-Gas Chromatography-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (TD-GC-IRMS). From the dependence of levoglucosan δ13C and concentration on the reaction extent, the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of the OH oxidation reactions was determined to be 1.00187±0.00027 and 1.00229±0.00018, respectively. Both show good agreement within the uncertainty range. For the heterogeneous oxidation of particulate levoglucosan by gas-phase OH, a reaction rate constant of (2.67±0.03)·10-12 cm3 molecule-1S-1 was derived. The laboratory kinetic data, together with isotopic source and ambient observations, give information on the extent of aerosol chemical processing in the atmosphere.

  2. Stable isotope enrichment using a plasma centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Mahadevan; Bures, Brian; Madden, Robert

    2012-10-01

    A primary goal of the Department of Energy's Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications Program (Isotope Program) within the Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) is to produce isotopes that are in short supply in the U.S. and of which there exists no or insufficient domestic commercial production capability. A vacuum arc plasma centrifuge is a rigid rotor column of metal plasma in which centrifugal forces re-distribute ions radially according to their mass/charge ratio. Early work demonstrated rotation at 2 million rpm and separation of various stable isotopes. The spinning plasma column had a Gaussian flux profile, peaked on the rigid rotor axis. This work adopts a more efficient approach, with the plasma created as a hollow column, wherein the flux is concentrated at larger radii where the centrifugal action is highest. By tailoring the vacuum arc discharge geometry, the rotation rate can also be increased to ˜10 million rpm. Data from Cu, Al and other metal plasmas will be presented and discussed in light of enriched stable isotopes needed for research and medicine.

  3. Detecting environmental change using stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changing land use is one of the primary causes of increased sedimentation and nturient levels in aquqatic systems, resulting in contamiantion and reduction of biodiversity. Detecting and quantifying these inputs is the first step of remediation, to enable targeted reduction of transport processes into waterways from human impacted land surfaces. More recently, stable isotope analyses are being used as a detection and quantification tool in aquatic environments. Carbon and nitrogen isotopes of sediments, algae and invertebrates from aquatic systems can be used as proxies to record both short and long term enviornmental cahgne. Excess nutrients derived from urbanization, industry, forestry, farming and agriculture increase the bio-availability of nitrogen to aquatic organisms, changing their natural 15N isotopic signatures. Allochthonous (terrestrial) input from soil destabilization and human activity in surrounding catchments changes the 13C isotope ratios and increases the C:N ratio of sediments. Heavy metal and other organic pollutants can also be used to indicate urbanization and industrial contamination. The comined use of carbon and nitrogen isotopes, C:N ratios and heavy metals are powerful environmental monitoring tools which are useful indicators of source and transport pathways of terrestrial derive dmaterial and anthropogenic pollutants into streams, rivers and estuaries. (author). 56 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Carbon isotopes in mollusk shell carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnaughey, Ted A.; Gillikin, David Paul

    2008-10-01

    Mollusk shells contain many isotopic clues about calcification physiology and environmental conditions at the time of shell formation. In this review, we use both published and unpublished data to discuss carbon isotopes in both bivalve and gastropod shell carbonates. Land snails construct their shells mainly from respired CO2, and shell δ13C reflects the local mix of C3 and C4 plants consumed. Shell δ13C is typically >10‰ heavier than diet, probably because respiratory gas exchange discards CO2, and retains the isotopically heavier HCO3 -. Respired CO2 contributes less to the shells of aquatic mollusks, because CO2/O2 ratios are usually higher in water than in air, leading to more replacement of respired CO2 by environmental CO2. Fluid exchange with the environment also brings additional dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) into the calcification site. Shell δ13C is typically a few ‰ lower than ambient DIC, and often decreases with age. Shell δ13C retains clues about processes such as ecosystem metabolism and estuarine mixing. Ca2+ ATPase-based models of calcification physiology developed for corals and algae likely apply to mollusks, too, but lower pH and carbonic anhydrase at the calcification site probably suppress kinetic isotope effects. Carbon isotopes in biogenic carbonates are clearly complex, but cautious interpretation can provide a wealth of information, especially after vital effects are better understood.

  5. Second international conference on isotopes. Conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, C.J. [ed.

    1997-10-01

    The Second International Conference on Isotopes (2ICI) was hosted by the Australian Nuclear Association in Sydney, NSW, Australia. The Theme of the Second Conference: Isotopes for Industry, Health and a Better Environment recognizes that isotopes have been used in these fields successfully for many years and offer prospects for increasing use in the future. The worldwide interest in the use of research reactors and accelerators and in applications of stable and radioactive isotopes, isotopic techniques and radiation in industry, agriculture, medicine, environmental studies and research in general, was considered. Other radiation issues including radiation protection and safety were also addressed. International and national overviews and subject reviews invited from leading experts were included to introduce the program of technical sessions. The invited papers were supported by contributions accepted from participants for oral and poster presentation. A Technical Exhibition was held in association with the Conference. This volume contains the foreword, technical program, the author index and of the papers (1-60) presented at the conference.

  6. Development of helium isotopic database in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We constructed “Helium Isotopic Database in Japan”, which includes isotope ratios of noble gases and chemical compositions of gas samples collected from hot springs and drinking water wells. The helium isotopes are excellent natural tracers for indicating the presence of mantle derived volatiles, because they are chemically inert and thus conserved in crustal rock-water systems. It is common knowledge that mantle degassing does not occur homogeneously over the Earth's surface. The 3He/4He ratios higher than the typical crustal values are interpreted to indicate that transfer of mantle volatiles into the crust by processes or mechanisms such as magmatic intrusion, faulting. In particular the spatial variation of helium isotope ratios could provide a valuable information to identify volcanic regions and tectonically active areas. The database was compiled geochemical data of hot spring gas etc. from 108 published papers. As a result of the data compiling, the database has 1728 helium isotopic data. A CD-ROM is attached as an appendix. (author)

  7. Detecting environmental change using stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changing land use is one of the primary causes of increased sedimentation and nutrient levels in aquatic systems, resulting in contamination and reduction of biodiversity. Detecting and quantifying these inputs is the first step of remediation, to enable targeted reduction of transport processes into waterways from human impacted land surfaces. More recently, stable isotope analyses are being used as a detection and quantification tool in aquatic environments. Carbon and nitrogen isotopes of sediments, algae and invertebrates from aquatic systems can be used as proxies to record both short and long term environmental change. Excess nutrients derived from urbanization, industry, forestry, farming and agriculture increase the bio-availability of nitrogen to aquatic organisms, changing their natural 15N isotopic signatures. Allochthonous (terrestrial) input from soil destabilization and human activity in surrounding catchments changes the 13C isotope ratios and increases the C:N ratio of sediments. Heavy metal and other organic pollutants can also be used to indicate urbanization and industrial contamination. The combined use of carbon and nitrogen isotopes, C:N ratios and heavy metals are powerful environmental monitoring tools which are useful indicators of source and transport pathways of terrestrial derived material and anthropogenic pollutants into streams, rivers and estuaries. (author).

  8. Molybdenum isotope systematics in subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Stephan; Wille, Martin; Voegelin, Andrea; Schoenberg, Ronny

    2016-08-01

    This study presents Mo isotope data for arc lavas from different subduction zones that range between δ 98 / 95 Mo = - 0.72 and + 0.07 ‰. Heaviest isotope values are observed for the most slab fluid dominated samples. Isotopically lighter signatures are related to increasing relevance of terrigenous sediment subduction and sediment melt components. Our observation complements previous conclusions that an isotopically heavy Mo fluid flux likely mirrors selective incorporation of isotopically light Mo in secondary minerals within the subducting slab. Analogue to this interpretation, low δ 98 / 95 Mo flux that coincides with terrigenous sediment subduction and sediment melting cannot be simply related to a recycled input signature. Instead, breakdown of the controlling secondary minerals during sediment melting may release the light component and lead to decreasing δ 98 / 95 Mo influx into subarc mantle sources. The natural range between slab dehydration and hydrous sediment melting may thus cause a large spread of δ 98 / 95 Mo in global subduction zone magmas.

  9. Hydrochemical and isotope study of Lake Titicaca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical and isotopic compositions of Lake Titicaca and its inflow waters (precipitation, tributaries, groundwater) were determined with the aim of establishing the lake chemical and isotope balance. The three main regions of the lake, i.e. the Lago Mayor, the eastern and the western basins of Lago Menor, connected in cascade, show significant chemical and isotopic differences. Chloride and sodium balance indicates that an average of about 92% of the inflow water evaporates, and the remaining 8 % is lost through Rio Desaguadero and infiltration. The balance of each basin is also obtained, including the inter-basin fluxes. The stable isotope balance in not possible because no data are available on the mean atmospheric vapour isotopic composition. However, this was tentatively computed using the fluxes obtained from chemistry. The vapour δ-values are slightly more negative than those of rainfall. Tritium, noble gases and chloro-fluoro-carbons in vertical profiles show that the lake is vertically well mixed and there is no water segregation at depth. (author)

  10. CERN to start producing medical isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    A promising project that was hailed at the ICTR-PHE 2012 medical conference (see Bulletin issues 10-11/2012 and 12-13/2012) has seen the light of day at CERN. The project, known by the name of MEDICIS, will make it possible to produce a large variety of radioactive isotopes for medical research.   This image of a brain, superimposed on a drawing by Leonardo da Vinci, was taken by a PET scanner after injecting a molecule containing a positron-emitting isotope. CERN-MEDICIS will produce new isotopes for imaging which will be able to show up cancerous tissues and destroy them by emitting local radiation as the isotopes decay. In the United States, a new radium-based drug which targets bone metastases is about to go on the market. Radium, which can be brought to bear at the cell level, is a potent weapon in the fight against certain types of cancer, and is opening the way to a new form of medicine. This is the direction that CERN has decided to follow through the CERN-MEDICIS* (Medical Isotopes...

  11. Second international conference on isotopes. Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Second International Conference on Isotopes (2ICI) was hosted by the Australian Nuclear Association in Sydney, NSW, Australia. The Theme of the Second Conference: Isotopes for Industry, Health and a Better Environment recognizes that isotopes have been used in these fields successfully for many years and offer prospects for increasing use in the future. The worldwide interest in the use of research reactors and accelerators and in applications of stable and radioactive isotopes, isotopic techniques and radiation in industry, agriculture, medicine, environmental studies and research in general, was considered. Other radiation issues including radiation protection and safety were also addressed. International and national overviews and subject reviews invited from leading experts were included to introduce the program of technical sessions. The invited papers were supported by contributions accepted from participants for oral and poster presentation. A Technical Exhibition was held in association with the Conference. This volume contains the foreword, technical program, the author index and of the papers (1-60) presented at the conference

  12. Isotope effect of potassium in an aqueous/amalgam system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotope fractionation of potassium in an aqueous (KOH)/amalgam system has been studied. Two types of isotope effects with opposite isotope enrichment directions were observed in the electrolysis of potassium from the aqueous into the amalgam phase under constant electrolytic potentials. It was found that the first isotope effect causing the light isotope enriched in the amalgam is related to the kinetic process of the mass transfer through the aqueous/amalgam interface, while the second one leading to the enrichment of the heavy isotope in the amalgam phase is produced by the isotope-exchange equilibrium. The temperature dependence of the equilibrium isotope effect was also investigated using single-stage and multi-stage techniques. It was observed that the equilibrium isotope effect increases as the temperature increases in the range of 293-371 K. An empirical equation was used to fit the variations of the isotope effects with temperature for potassium together with the other alkaline and alkaline earth metals studied in the same system. The origin of the equilibrium isotope fractionation in the electron-exchange system was discussed. Furthermore, the mass dependence of the separation coefficients of the alkaline and alkaline earth metals observed in aqueous/amalgam and ion-exchange systems were compared. At 293 K the equilibrium isotope separation coefficient for the 39K/41K isotopes in the amalgam system was determined as (5.6 ± 0.6).10-3. (author)

  13. Oxygen isotopes in nitrite: Analysis, calibration, and equilibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciotti, K.L.; Böhlke, J.K.; McIlvin, M.R.; Mroczkowski, S.J.; Hannon, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Nitrite is a central intermediate in the nitrogen cycle and can persist in significant concentrations in ocean waters, sediment pore waters, and terrestrial groundwaters. To fully interpret the effect of microbial processes on nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-), and nitrous oxide (N2O) cycling in these systems, the nitrite pool must be accessible to isotopic analysis. Furthermore, because nitrite interferes with most methods of nitrate isotopic analysis, accurate isotopic analysis of nitrite is essential for correct measurement of nitrate isotopes in a sample that contains nitrite. In this study, nitrite salts with varying oxygen isotopic compositions were prepared and calibrated and then used to test the denitrifier method for nitrite oxygen isotopic analysis. The oxygen isotopic fractionation during nitrite reduction to N2O by Pseudomonas aureofaciens was lower than for nitrate conversion to N2O, while oxygen isotopic exchange between nitrite and water during the reaction was similar. These results enable the extension of the denitrifier method to oxygen isotopic analysis of nitrite (in the absence of nitrate) and correction of nitrate isotopes for the presence of nitrite in "mixed" samples. We tested storage conditions for seawater and freshwater samples that contain nitrite and provide recommendations for accurate oxygen isotopic analysis of nitrite by any method. Finally, we report preliminary results on the equilibrium isotope effect between nitrite and water, which can play an important role in determining the oxygen isotopic value of nitrite where equilibration with water is significant. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  14. Stable isotopes for heavy element production

    CERN Document Server

    Lommel, B; Hofmann, S; Kindler, B; Klemm, J; Steiner, J; Tinschert, K

    2003-01-01

    The synthesis of heavy elements and the search for new superheavy elements is one of the exciting fields in modern nuclear physics and chemistry. Heavy elements are produced by heavy-ion fusion reactions. Necessary prerequisites are intense heavy-ion beams from pure isotopic material and thin isotopically enriched targets. At GSI the elements from 107 to 112 were produced using targets of Pb and Bi and beams of the most neutron rich isotopes of Cr, Fe, Ni, and Zn. Experimental set-up consisting of target wheel, velocity filter SHIP (Separator for Heavy Ion Reaction Products), and detector system is presented. Status of the ion source techniques for delivering intense and stable beams for this kind of experiment is shortly described. The manufacturing and properties of various source - target combinations used for the synthesis of the elements by now are discussed in detail as well as the possibilities for extending the experiments into the region of superheavy elements.

  15. Isotopes in the Arctic atmospheric water cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonne, Jean-Louis; Werner, Martin; Meyer, Hanno; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Rabe, Benjamin; Behrens, Melanie; Schönicke, Lutz; Steen Larsen, Hans Christian; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie

    2016-04-01

    The ISO-ARC project aims at documenting the Arctic atmospheric hydrological cycle, by assessing the imprint of the marine boundary conditions (e.g. temperature variations, circulation changes, or meltwater input) to the isotopic composition of the atmospheric water cycle (H218O and HDO) with a focus on North Atlantic and Arctic oceans. For this purpose, two continuous monitoring water vapour stable isotopes cavity ring-down spectrometers have been installed in July 2015: on-board the Polarstern research vessel and in the Siberian Lena delta Samoylov research station (N 72° 22', E 126° 29'). The Polarstern measurements cover the summer 2015 Arctic campaign from July to mid-October, including six weeks in the Fram Strait region in July- August, followed by a campaign reaching the North Pole and a transect from the Norwegian Sea to the North Sea. These vapour observations are completed by water isotopic measurements in samples from the surface ocean water for Polarstern and from precipitation in Samoylov and Tiksi (120 km south-east of the station). A custom-made designed automatic calibration system has been implemented in a comparable manner for both vapour instruments, based on the injection of different liquid water standards, which are completely vaporised in dry air at high temperature. Subsequent humidity level can be adjusted from 2000 to at least 30000 ppm. For a better resilience, an independent calibration system has been added on the Samoylov instrument, allowing measurements of one standard at humidity levels ranging from 2000 to 15000 ppm: dry air is introduced in a tank containing a large amount of liquid water standard, undergoing evaporation under a controlled environment. The measurement protocol includes an automatic calibration every 25 hours. First instrument characterisation experiments depict a significant isotope-humidity effect at low humidity, dependant on the isotopic composition of the standard. For ambient air, our first isotope

  16. Strontium isotope stratigraphy of the Pelotas Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerfass, Geise de Santana dos Anjos, E-mail: geise.zerfass@petrobras.com.br [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS/CENPES/PDGEO/BPA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas e Desenvolvimento Leopoldo Americo Miguez de Mello; Chemale Junior, Farid, E-mail: fchemale@unb.br [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil). Instituto de Geociencias; Moura, Candido Augusto Veloso, E-mail: candido@ufpa.br [Universidade Federal do Para (UFPA), Belem, PA (Brazil). Centro de Geociencias. Dept. de Geoquimica e Petrologia; Costa, Karen Badaraco, E-mail: karen.costa@usp.br [Instituto Oceanografico, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Kawashita, Koji, E-mail: koji@usp.br [Unversidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas Geocronologicas

    2014-07-01

    Strontium isotope data were obtained from foraminifera shells of the Pelotas Basin Tertiary deposits to facilitate the refinement of the chronostratigraphic framework of this section. This represents the first approach to the acquisition of numerical ages for these strata. Strontium isotope stratigraphy allowed the identification of eight depositional hiatuses in the Eocene-Pliocene section, here classified as disconformities and a condensed section. The reconnaissance of depositional gaps based on confident age assignments represents an important advance considering the remarkably low chronostratigraphic resolution in the Cenozoic section of the Pelotas Basin. The recognition of hiatuses that match hiatuses is based on biostratigraphic data, as well as on global events. Furthermore, a substantial increase in the sedimentation rate of the upper Miocene section was identified. Paleotemperature and productivity trends were identified based on oxygen and carbon isotope data from the Oligocene-Miocene section, which are coherent with worldwide events, indicating the environmental conditions during sedimentation. (author)

  17. Isotopic studies in soil and plant nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most important peaceful applications of isotopes is in research for the enhancement of our understanding for increased crop production and better management of resources with higher economic efficiency and environmental safety. Nuclear techniques helped in generating useful information on such aspects as use-efficiency of fertilizer nutrients, quantifying their losses from soil and their biological transformations. Such information was, hitherto, obtained indirectly by conventional methods. Radio and stable isotopes have also been successfully employed for getting information in such diverse fields as soil erosion, turnover of soil organic matter, pesticide retention in soil ground water recharge etc. The property of 137Cs adhering tightly to certain exchange surface in soil and its chemically inert nature has made it a useful tool for soil erosion studies. In this paper, applications of isotopes in the research and other such studies as degradation, movement and retention of pesticides, movement of nitrate in soil, biological and ammoniacal nitrogen fixation in soil is discussed

  18. Carbon isotope geochemistry in the Yalujiang estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴莹; 张经

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of particulate organic carbon (POC) along the lower reaches is similar between the dry season and the flood season in the Yalujiang Estuary, North China. However, the values of particulate organic carbon of the upperstream in the dry season are one magnitude lower than the concentrations in the flood season. Stable carbon isotope ratios have been used to study the sources of particulate organic carbon in the Yalujiang Estuary. The isotopic composition of POC shows a range from -23.1‰ to -29.4‰ with a little seasonal variation. The isotopic evidence indicates that the POC in the Yalujiang Estuary is predominantly of terrestrial origin rather than a result of in situ plankton. The study of the ratio of POC: Chla shows that the turbidity maximum plays an important role in POC cycle in the Yalujiang Estuary. Organic detritus and soil erosion are the main contributions to POC in the turbidity maximum, especially in the flood season.

  19. Stable isotope dilution assays in mycotoxin analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rychlik, Michael; Asam, Stefan [Universitaet Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Lebensmittelchemie der Technischen, Garching (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    The principle and applications of stable isotope dilution assays (SIDAs) in mycotoxin analysis are critically reviewed. The general section includes historical aspects of SIDAs, the prerequisites and limitations of the use of stable isotopically labelled internal standards, and possible calibration procedures. In the application section actual SIDAs for the analysis of trichothecenes, zearalenone, fumonisins, patulin, and ochratoxin A are presented. The syntheses and availability of labelled mycotoxins for use as internal standards is reviewed and specific advances in food analysis and toxicology are demonstrated. The review indicates that LC-MS applications, in particular, require the use of stable isotopically labelled standards to compensate for losses during clean-up and for discrimination due to ion suppression. As the commercial availability of these compounds continues to increase, SIDAs can be expected to find expanding use in mycotoxin analysis. (orig.)

  20. Assessing wine quality using isotopic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The analytical methods used to determine the isotope ratios of deuterium, carbon-13 and oxygen-18 in wines have gained official recognition from the Office International de la Vigne et du Vin (OIV) and National Organisation of Vine and Wine. The amount of stable isotopes in water and carbon dioxide from plant organic materials and their distribution in sugar and ethanol molecules are influenced by geo-climatic conditions of the region, grape varieties and the year of harvest. For wine characterization, to prove the botanical and geographical origin of the raw material, the isotopic analysis by continuous flow mass spectrometry CF-IRMS has made a significant contribution. This paper emphasize the results of a study concerning the assessing of water adulterated wines and non-grape alcohol and sugar additions at different concentration levels, using CF-IRMS analytical technique. (authors)

  1. Probing the densities of the Sn isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Amos, K; Dobaczewski, J

    2004-01-01

    Proton and neutron densities have been obtained for the even-even isotopes of Sn from $^{100}$Sn to $^{176}$Sn using a Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov model with a Skyrme interaction. The matter densities so defined have been used with realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions in a folding model to specify optical potentials for the elastic scattering of protons with energies in the range 40 to 200 MeV. Those potentials have been used to make predictions of the differential cross sections and spin observables for proton scattering. As the target mass increases, the emergence of the neutron skin in the Sn isotopes is revealed by marked effects in the differential cross section. Comparisons with available data show how similar scattering data for the neutron-rich isotopes may provide constraints for the model structures.

  2. Iron isotope systematics of the Skaergaard intrusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lesher, Charles; Lundstrom, C.C.; Barfod, Gry;

    crystallization on non-traditional stable isotope systems, particularly iron. FeTi oxide minerals (titanomagnetite and ilmenite) appear after ~60% of the magma had solidified. This was a significant event affecting the liquid line of descent and potentially accompanied by iron isotope fractionation. Here we...... report the results of a broad study of the iron isotope compositions of gabbros within the layered and upper border series of the Skaergaard intrusion, pegmatite and granophyre associated with these gabbroic rocks, and the sandwich horizon thought to represent the product of extreme differentiation and....../or liquid immiscibility. Forty-eight whole rock samples from well-constrained stratigraphic levels in the intrusion were crushed, powdered and dissolved, followed by iron separation by ion chromatography. Purified solutions were analyzed by MC- ICPMS in high-resolution mode using the sample-std bracket...

  3. Isotope analysis in the transmission electron microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Susi, Toma; Argentero, Giacomo; Leuthner, Gregor T; Pennycook, Timothy J; Mangler, Clemens; Meyer, Jannik C; Kotakoski, Jani

    2016-01-01

    The {\\AA}ngstr\\"om-sized probe of the scanning transmission electron microscope can visualize and collect spectra from single atoms. This can unambiguously resolve the chemical structure of materials, but not their isotopic composition. Here we differentiate between two isotopes of the same element by quantifying how likely the energetic imaging electrons are to eject atoms. First, we measure the displacement probability in graphene grown from either $^{12}$C or $^{13}$C and describe the process using a quantum mechanical model of lattice vibrations coupled with density functional theory simulations. We then test our spatial resolution in a mixed sample by ejecting individual atoms from nanoscale areas spanning an interface region that is far from atomically sharp, mapping the isotope concentration with a precision better than 20%. Although we use a scanning instrument, our method should be applicable to any atomic resolution transmission electron microscope and to other low-dimensional materials.

  4. Strontium isotope stratigraphy of the Pelotas Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strontium isotope data were obtained from foraminifera shells of the Pelotas Basin Tertiary deposits to facilitate the refinement of the chronostratigraphic framework of this section. This represents the first approach to the acquisition of numerical ages for these strata. Strontium isotope stratigraphy allowed the identification of eight depositional hiatuses in the Eocene-Pliocene section, here classified as disconformities and a condensed section. The reconnaissance of depositional gaps based on confident age assignments represents an important advance considering the remarkably low chronostratigraphic resolution in the Cenozoic section of the Pelotas Basin. The recognition of hiatuses that match hiatuses is based on biostratigraphic data, as well as on global events. Furthermore, a substantial increase in the sedimentation rate of the upper Miocene section was identified. Paleotemperature and productivity trends were identified based on oxygen and carbon isotope data from the Oligocene-Miocene section, which are coherent with worldwide events, indicating the environmental conditions during sedimentation. (author)

  5. Laser Spectroscopy of neutron deficient Sn isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study the ground state properties of neutron-deficient tin isotopes towards the doubly-magic nucleus $^{100}$Sn. Nuclear spins, changes in the rms charge radii and electromagnetic moments of $^{101-121}$Sn will be measured by laser spectroscopy using the CRIS experimental beam line. These ground-state properties will help to clarify the evolution of nuclear structure properties approaching the $\\textit{N = Z =}$ 50 shell closures. The tin isotopic chain is currently the frontier for the application of state-of-the-art ab-initio calculations. Our knowledge of the nuclear structure of the Sn isotopes will set a benchmark for the advances of many-body methods, and will provide an important test for modern descriptions of the nuclear force.

  6. Isotopic analysis of bullet lead samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of using the isotopic composition of lead for the identification of bullet lead is investigated. Lead from several spent bullets were converted to lead sulphide and analysed for the isotopic abundances using an MS-7 mass spectrometer. The abundances are measured relative to that for Pb204 was too small to permit differentiation, while the range of variation of Pb206 and Pb207 and the better precision in their analyses permitted differentiating samples from one another. The correlation among the samples examined has been pointed out. The method is complementary to characterisation of bullet leads by the trace element composition. The possibility of using isotopically enriched lead for tagging bullet lead is pointed out. (author)

  7. Determination of zinc stable isotopes in biological materials using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described for using isotope dilution to determine both the amount of natural zinc and enriched isotopes of zinc in biological samples. Isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry offers a way to quantify not only the natural zinc found in a sample but also the enriched isotope tracers of zinc. Accurate values for the enriched isotopes and natural zinc are obtained by adjusting the mass count rate data for measurable instrumental biases. Analytical interferences from the matrix are avoided by extracting the zinc from the sample matrix using diethylammonium diethyldithiocarbamate. The extraction technique separates the zinc from elements which form interfering molecular ions at the same nominal masses as the zinc isotopes. Accuracy of the method is verified using standard reference materials. The detection limit is 0.06 μg Zn per sample. Precision of the abundance ratios range from 0.3-0.8%. R.S.D. for natural zinc concentrations is about 200-600 μg g-1. The accuracy and precision of the measurements make it possible to follow enriched isotopic tracers of zinc in biological samples in metabolic tracer studies. (author). 19 refs.; 1 fig., 4 tabs

  8. Zinc isotope fractionation during magmatic differentiation and the isotopic composition of the bulk Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Heng; Savage, Paul S.; Teng, Fang-Zehn; Helz, Rosalind T.; Moynier, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    he zinc stable isotope system has been successfully applied to many and varied fields in geochemistry, but to date it is still not completely clear how this isotope system is affected by igneous processes. In order to evaluate the potential application of Zn isotopes as a proxy for planetary differentiation and volatile history, it is important to constrain the magnitude of Zn isotopic fractionation induced by magmatic differentiation. In this study we present high-precision Zn isotope analyses of two sets of chemically diverse, cogenetic samples from Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii, and Hekla volcano, Iceland, which both show clear evidence of having undergone variable and significant degrees of magmatic differentiation. The Kilauea Iki samples display small but resolvable variations in Zn isotope composition (0.26‰66Zn66Zn defined as the per mille deviation of a sample's 66Zn/64Zn compositional ratio from the JMC-Lyon standard), with the most differentiated lithologies exhibiting more positive δ66Zn values. This fractionation is likely a result of the crystallization of olivine and/or Fe–Ti oxides, which can both host Zn in their crystal structures. Samples from Hekla have a similar range of isotopic variation (0.22‰66Zn66Zn=0.28±0.05‰ (2s.d.).

  9. Predicting the isotopic ratio of western European Precipitation using an isotope trajectory model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Spatial and seasonal variations of isotopic ratios in precipitation across Western Europe are well documented. Locations of moisture uptake, transport pathways, condensation temperatures, and surface temperatures at source region and precipitation location all influence the water isotope cycle. Isotope cycle modelling has been included in Global Circulation Models (GCMs) in order to model all of the controlling factors. However, the relative importance of each of these processes remains unclear due to the difficulties in decoupling these processes in GCMs. A combination of a Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model and an extended Rayleigh distillation theory model allows the effects of different atmospheric processes on isotopic fractionation to be investigated. This method has previously been used to model precipitation in Antarctica and Greenland with excellent results. However, there are added complications involved when modelling rainfall rather than snowfall, such as isotopic re-equilibration between falling raindrops and the surrounding water vapour. Lower latitude locations also experience more evaporation and re-evaporation along the path of a moist air parcel, increasing opportunities for fractionation. These models have been used to predict the hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of rainfall in the U.K and Ireland. The model results have been compared with measured isotopic data from daily rainfall samples in order to test how the modelled processes interact. A case study is presented which incorporates observed data collected throughout November 2005 at stations in Norwich, Birmingham and Dublin, together with the corresponding temporal model predictions at these localities. (author)

  10. The proliferation potential of neptunium and americium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, J. S.; Shin, J. S.; Kim, J. S.; Kwack, E. H.; Kim, B. K

    2000-05-01

    It is recognized that some trans-uranic elements other than plutonium, in particular Np and Am, if will be available in sufficient quantities, could be used for nuclear explosive devices. The spent fuel has been accumulating in number of nuclear power plant and operation of large scale commercial reprocessing plants. However, these materials are not covered by the definition of special fissionable material in the Agency Statute. At the time when the Statute was adopted, the availability of meaningful quantities of separated Np and Am was remote and they were not included in the definition of special fissionable material. Then, IAEA Board decided a measure for control of Np and Am on September 1999. This report contains the control method and the characteristic of Np and Am for using domestic nuclear industries, and it can be useful for understanding how to report and account of Np and Am. (author)

  11. Delocalization and new phase in Americium: theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soderlind, P

    1999-04-23

    Density-functional electronic structure calculations have been used to investigate the high pressure behavior of Am. At about 80 kbar (8 GPa) calculations reveal a monoclinic phase similar to the ground state structure of plutonium ({alpha}-Pu). The experimentally suggested {alpha}-U structure is found to be substantially higher in energy. The phase transition from fcc to the low symmetry structure is shown to originate from a drastic change in the nature of the electronic structure induced by the elevated pressure. A calculated volume collapse of about 25% is associated with the transition. For the low density phase, an orbital polarization correction to the local spin density (LSD) theory was applied. Gradient terms of the electron density were included in the calculation of the exchange/correlation energy and potential, according to the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The results are consistent with a Mott transition; the 5f electrons are delocalized and bonding on the high density side of the transition and chemically inert and non-bonding (localized) on the other. Theory compares rather well with recent experimental data which implies that electron correlation effects are reasonably modeled in our orbital polarization scheme.

  12. Evaluation of neutron data for americium-241

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslov, V.M.; Sukhovitskij, E.Sh.; Porodzinskij, Yu.V.; Klepatskij, A.B.; Morogovskij, G.B. [Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Inst., Minsk-Sosny (Belarus)

    1997-03-01

    The evaluation of neutron data for {sup 241}Am is made in the energy region from 10{sup -5} eV up to 20 MeV. The results of the evaluation are compiled in the ENDF/B-VI format. This work is performed under the Project Agreement CIS-03-95 with the International Science and Technology Center (Moscow). The Financing Party for the Project is Japan. The evaluation was requested by Y. Kikuchi (JAERI). (author). 60 refs.

  13. Stable Isotope Group 1981 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geothermal studies were reported on the Tauhara, Wairakei, Orakeikorako and Mokai areas. We assisted the two N.Z. geothermal consultant companies with isotope analyses and the Geothermal Institute with lectures on stable isotope aspects of the diploma course. Sample collections were made at Ngawha and Wairakei. Oxygen isotope studies of central North Island volcanics have shown a negative correlation of delta 18O with SiO2 content of dacites and rhyolites; contamination of subcrustal rhyolite differentiates by greywacke appears the best explanation. A series of four papers on 'Environmental Isotopes in New Zealand Hydrology' was published during the year. Parts 1 and 2 described the principles and measurement techniques and Parts 3 and 4 described isotope studies of the Pupu Springs, Takaka and the groundwater resources of the Waimea Plains respectively. Carbon isotopes have proved useful in elucidating the food sources of freshwater insects in forest streams on the West Coast and brachiopods from Fiordland. Potassium-argon dating studies were completed on volcanics of the Auckland Islands, North Canterbury and East Otago, basement granites and meta-sediments of Marie Byrd Land, West Antarctica and slates in Western Tasmania. Rubidium-strontium computer programs were developed to control the solid-source mass spectrometer, chemical methods for preparation of strontium and rubidium samples were substantially improved and the first analyses of USGS rock standards were completed. Fission-track dating on minerals from granites from Buller and Westland have shown ages of 100-150Ma on the West Coast decreasing to about 5Ma at the Alpine Fault, reflecting recent uplift there

  14. Hitting the moving target: modelling ontogenetic shifts with stable isotopes reveals the importance of isotopic turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, Eric; Trudel, Marc; El-Sabaawi, Rana; Tucker, Strahan; Dower, John F; Beacham, Terry D; Edwards, Andrew M; Mazumder, Asit

    2016-05-01

    Ontogenetic niche shifts are widely prevalent in nature and are important in shaping the structure and dynamics of ecosystems. Stable isotope analysis is a powerful tool to assess these shifts, with δ(15) N providing a measure of trophic level and δ(13) C a measure of energy source. Previous applications of stable isotopes to study ontogenetic niche shifts have not considered the appreciable time lag between diet and consumer tissue associated with isotopic turnover. These time lags introduce significant complexity into field studies of ontogenetic niche shifts. Juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) migrate from freshwater to marine ecosystems and shift their diet from feeding primarily on invertebrates to feeding primarily on fish. This dual ontogenetic habitat and diet shift, in addition to the long time lag associated with isotopic turnover, suggests that there is potential for a disconnect between the prey sources that juvenile salmon are consuming, and the inferred prey sources from stable isotopes. We developed a model that considered ontogenetic niche shifts and time lags associated with isotopic turnover, and compared this 'ontogeny' model to one that considered only isotopic turnover. We used a Bayesian framework to explicitly account for parameter uncertainty. Data showed overwhelming support for the ontogeny model relative to the isotopic turnover model. Estimated variables from best model fits indicate that the ontogeny model predicts a much greater reliance on fish prey than does the stomach content data. Overall, we found that this method of quantifying ontogenetic niche shifts effectively accounted for both isotopic turnover and ontogenetic diet shifts; a finding that could be widely applicable to a variety of systems.

  15. Hitting the moving target: modelling ontogenetic shifts with stable isotopes reveals the importance of isotopic turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, Eric; Trudel, Marc; El-Sabaawi, Rana; Tucker, Strahan; Dower, John F; Beacham, Terry D; Edwards, Andrew M; Mazumder, Asit

    2016-05-01

    Ontogenetic niche shifts are widely prevalent in nature and are important in shaping the structure and dynamics of ecosystems. Stable isotope analysis is a powerful tool to assess these shifts, with δ(15) N providing a measure of trophic level and δ(13) C a measure of energy source. Previous applications of stable isotopes to study ontogenetic niche shifts have not considered the appreciable time lag between diet and consumer tissue associated with isotopic turnover. These time lags introduce significant complexity into field studies of ontogenetic niche shifts. Juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) migrate from freshwater to marine ecosystems and shift their diet from feeding primarily on invertebrates to feeding primarily on fish. This dual ontogenetic habitat and diet shift, in addition to the long time lag associated with isotopic turnover, suggests that there is potential for a disconnect between the prey sources that juvenile salmon are consuming, and the inferred prey sources from stable isotopes. We developed a model that considered ontogenetic niche shifts and time lags associated with isotopic turnover, and compared this 'ontogeny' model to one that considered only isotopic turnover. We used a Bayesian framework to explicitly account for parameter uncertainty. Data showed overwhelming support for the ontogeny model relative to the isotopic turnover model. Estimated variables from best model fits indicate that the ontogeny model predicts a much greater reliance on fish prey than does the stomach content data. Overall, we found that this method of quantifying ontogenetic niche shifts effectively accounted for both isotopic turnover and ontogenetic diet shifts; a finding that could be widely applicable to a variety of systems. PMID:26880007

  16. Precision Mass Measurement of Argon Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    Lunney, D

    2002-01-01

    % IS388\\\\ \\\\ A precision mass measurement of the neutron-deficient isotopes $^{32,33,34}$Ar is proposed. Mass values of these isotopes are of importance for: a) a stringent test of the Isobaric-Multiplet- Mass-Equation, b) a verification of the correctness of calculated charge-dependent corrections as used in super-allowed $\\beta$- decay studies aiming at a test of the CVC hypothesis, and c) the determination of the kinematics in electron-neutrino correlation experiments searching for scalar currents in weak interaction. The measurements will be carried out with the ISOLTRAP Penning trap mass spectrometer.

  17. Isotope separation and advanced manufacturing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, J.; Kan, T.

    This is the fourth issue of a semiannual report for the Isotope Separation and Advanced Materials Manufacturing (ISAM) Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Primary objectives include: (1) the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (UAVLIS) process, which is being developed and prepared for deployment as an advanced uranium enrichment capability; (2) Advanced manufacturing technologies, which include industrial laser and E-beam material processing and new manufacturing technologies for uranium, plutonium, and other strategically important materials in support of DOE and other national applications. This report features progress in the ISAM Program from October 1993 through March 1994.

  18. Landfill pollution control with isotope techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater and surface water contamination by sanitary landfills is being monitored since 1989 in Italy by using isotope techniques combined with chemical analyses. The results obtained are considered mostly satisfactory for identifying sources of contaminants and predicting their behaviour. We present in this work the results of chemical and isotopic measurements performed on rainwater, surface water and groundwater samples, with the aim of investigating the fate of contaminants released from some landfills located near Ancona, Central Italy. The isotope determinations included δ18O, δ2H and tritium (3H). The first objective of these investigations is establishing the background values of the main environmental parameters related to contamination, and obtaining indication about source and residence time (age) of groundwater in the landfill proximity. In particular, the methods used for detecting groundwater and/or surface waters contamination derived from the landfill, are based on the occurrence of tritium activity anomalies and chemical concentration changes. In order to estimate the regional background of environmental tritium in shallow groundwater, we measured the tritium content of monthly rainwater samples collected in stations on the Apennines in proximity of Ancona. The tritium concentration ranged from 3 to 6 TU in winter months (October to April), and reached the maximum values (up to 14 TU) in summer months. The investigations of groundwater and surface water contamination were undertaken on landfills dismissed from 1986 to 1998. The isotopic and chemical monitoring was started one year ago and was carried out on leachates, surface waters and groundwater (the last sampled in several downstream wells). The tritium concentration in leachates can be very high, due to a still active tritium release from the landfill. Tritium values in wells outside of the landfill area, lower than in leachate but higher than the regional background of environmental

  19. The isotope effect in gadolinium amalgam system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadolinium is a neutron absorbing material and has been used as a burnable poison contained in the U fuel pellets for LWRs. Among the 7 isotopes of gadolinium, 157 Gd has a special large neutron absorption cross section of 254 000 barn (10 -24 cm2). In this paper gadolinium isotope separation factor for isotopic exchange between Gd 3+ (in solution) and gadolinium amalgam (GdHg) is determined. By electrolysis of aqueous solutions containing gadolinium acetate and lithium citrate, as complexing agent, using the ratio (Li +/Gd3+) = 12, gadolinium amalgam was prepared using a glass electrolyser with Hg as cathode and platinum as anode. The gadolinium amalgam was stirred with HCl solution 1-2N and Gd 3+ is precipitated as oxalate at weak acid pH and then converted to Gd2O3. The remained gadolinium in acetate solution (after electrolysis) was also precipitated as oxalate and converted to Gd2O3. On Gd2O3 samples the isotopic ratios 156 Gd/160 Gd were determined by mass spectrometry, using MAT 261 equipped with a thermal ionisation ion source. Between Gd3+ and Gadolinium amalgam there is an isotopic exchange, the heavy isotope 160 Gd was found to be enriched in Gd3+ while the lighter isotope, 156 Gd, was enriched in GdHg.. The single stage separation factor α (156 Gd/160 Gd) was determined in different experimental conditions: contact time between Gd3+ and GdHg, the yield of GdHg formation, current density. The range of the measured values of α was 1.0013 - 1.00456, average value being 1.0023 at 26 deg. C. The yield of GdHg formation has increased from 37-75.5% for the electrolyser of 40 mm i.d. (S = 12.56 cm2), to 89.6%, for electrolyser of 53 mm i.d. (S = 22 cm2).. After 30 minutes of contact (in electrolysis conditions) between Gd3+ and GdHg there is not an important passage of Gd between the two phases, in these conditions the isotopic exchange of Gd is studied. (authors)

  20. Isotopic abundance in atom trap trace analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zheng-Tian; Hu, Shiu-Ming; Jiang, Wei; Mueller, Peter

    2014-03-18

    A method and system for detecting ratios and amounts of isotopes of noble gases. The method and system is constructed to be able to measure noble gas isotopes in water and ice, which helps reveal the geological age of the samples and understand their movements. The method and system uses a combination of a cooled discharge source, a beam collimator, a beam slower and magneto-optic trap with a laser to apply resonance frequency energy to the noble gas to be quenched and detected.