WorldWideScience

Sample records for americium iodides

  1. Calibration procedures for in vivo sodium iodide spectrometry of plutonium and americium in the human lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the calibration techniques and associated error analysis for the in vivo measurement by NaI spectrometry of heavy elements in the lung, specifically plutonium and americium. A very brief description of the instrumentation system is included

  2. Preparation of americium amalgam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors describe a method for the electrochemical preparation of an americium amalgam from americium dioxide and americium 241 and 243 for use in determining the physicochemical properties of the alloy. Moessbauer spectra were made using neptunium dioxide, in the neptunium 237 form, as an absorber. Results show that electrolysis produces a homogeneous amalgam that gives an unoxidized product on vacuum distillation at 200 degrees C

  3. Potassium Iodide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potassium iodide is used to protect the thyroid gland from taking in radioactive iodine that may be released during ... the thyroid gland. You should only take potassium iodide if there is a nuclear radiation emergency and ...

  4. Americium recovery from reduction residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, W.V.; Proctor, S.G.

    1973-12-25

    A process for separation and recovery of americium values from container or bomb'' reduction residues comprising dissolving the residues in a suitable acid, adjusting the hydrogen ion concentration to a desired level by adding a base, precipitating the americium as americium oxalate by adding oxalic acid, digesting the solution, separating the precipitate, and thereafter calcining the americium oxalate precipitate to form americium oxide. (Official Gazette)

  5. Preparation of americium amalgam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the method of NGR-spectroscopy with the aid of 241Am isotope chemical state of transuranium elements in the volume and on the surface of amalgams is studied. Amalgam preparation was realized in a simplified electrolytic cell. It is shown that in the process of amalgam preparation the first order of reaction as to actinide is observed; americium is distributed gradually over the volume and it is partially sorbed by the surface of glass capillary. NGR spectrum of dry residue after mercury distillation at 200 deg C points to the presence of americium-mercury intermetal compounds

  6. Chemistry of americium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, W.W.

    1976-01-01

    Essential features of the descriptive chemistry of americium are reviewed. Chapter titles are: discovery, atomic and nuclear properties, collateral reading, production and uses, chemistry in aqueous solution, metal, alloys, and compounds, and, recovery, separation, purification. Author and subject indexes are included. (JCB)

  7. Potassium Iodide (KI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Planning Information on Specific Types of Emergencies Potassium Iodide (KI) Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... I get KI (potassium iodide)? What is Potassium Iodide (KI)? KI (potassium iodide) is a salt of ...

  8. Methyl Iodide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methyl iodide (MeI, iodomethane, CH3I) was reported as a potential alternative to the stratospheric ozone-depleting fumigant methyl bromide (MeBr) in the mid-1990s (Sims et al., 1995; Ohr et al., 1996). It has since received significant research attention to determine its environmental fate and tran...

  9. Americium-241 - ED 4308

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This sheet presents the characteristics of Americium-241, its origin, and its radio-physical and biological properties. It briefly describes its use in nuclear medicine. It indicates its dosimetric parameters for external exposure, cutaneous contamination, and internal exposure due to acute contamination or to chronic contamination. It indicates and comments the various exposure control techniques: ambient dose rate measurement, surface contamination measurement, atmosphere contamination. It addresses the means of protection: premise design, protection against external exposure and against internal exposure. It describes how areas are delimited and controlled within the premises: regulatory areas, controls to be performed. It addresses the personnel classification, training and medical survey. It addresses the issue of wastes and effluents. It briefly recalls the administrative procedures related to the authorization and declaration of possession and use of sealed and unsealed sources. It indicates regulatory aspects related to the road transport of Americium-241, describes what is to be done in case of incident or accident (for the different types of contamination or exposure)

  10. The Biokinetic Model of Americium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    To improve in vivo measurements for detecting internal exposure from transuranium radio nuclides, such as neptunium, plutonium, americium, the bioknetic model was studied. According to ICRP report (1993, 1995, 1997) and other research, the

  11. Americium product solidification and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The americium product from the TRUEX processing plant needs to be converted into a form suitable for ultimate disposal. An evaluation of the disposal based on safety, number of process steps, demonstrated operability of the processes, production of low-level alpha waste streams, and simplicity of maintenance with low radiation exposures to personnel during maintenance, has been made. The best process is to load the americium on a cation exchange resin followed by calcination or oxidation of the resin after loading

  12. Science and Technology for Americium Transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Americium could be seen as the most troublesome element that is present in nuclear fuel. This thesis offers different points of view on the possibility of americium transmutation. The first point of view elaborates simulations of americium-bearing facilities, namely nuclear data, a popular computational code and modeling techniques. The second point of view is focused on practical usage of the simulations to examine upper limit of americium in a specific reactor

  13. Liquid-liquid extraction separation and sequential determination of plutonium and americium in environmental samples by alpha-spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure is described by which plutonium and americium can be determined in environmental samples. The sample is leached with nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide, and the two elements are co-precipitated with ferric hydroxide and calcium oxalate. The calcium oxalate is incinerated at 4500 and the ash is dissolved in nitric acid. Plutonium is extracted with tri-n-octylamine solution in xylene from 4M nitric acid and stripped with ammonium iodide/hydrochloric acid. Americium is extracted with thenoyltrifluoroacetone solution in xylene at pH 4 together with rare-earth elements and stripped with 1M nitric acid. Americium and the rare-earth elements thus separated are sorbed on Dowex 1 x 4 resin from 1M nitric acid in 93% methanol, the rare-earth elements are eluted with 0.1M hydrochloric acid/0.5M ammonium thiocyanate/80% methanol and the americium is finally eluted with 1.5M hydrochloric acid in 86% methanol. Plutonium and americium in each fraction are electro-deposited and determined by alpha-spectrometry. Overall average recoveries are 81% for plutonium and 59% for americium. (author)

  14. Transmutation of Americium in Fast Neutron Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Youpeng

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, the feasibility to use a medium sized sodium cooled fast reactor fully loaded with MOX fuel for efficient transmutation of americium is investigated by simulating the safety performance of a BN600-type fast reactor loaded with different fractions of americium in the fuel, using the safety parameters obtained with the SERPENT Monte Carlo code. The focus is on americium mainly due to its long-term contribution to the radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel and its deterioration on c...

  15. Production of americium isotopes in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The program of productions of americium 241 and 243 isotopes is based respectively on the retreatment of aged plutonium alloys or plutonium dioxide and on the treatment of plutonium targets irradiated either in CELESTIN reactors for Pu-Al alloys or OSIRIS reactor for plutonium 242 dioxide. All the operations, including americium final purifications, are carried out in hot cells equipped with remote manipulators. The chemical processes are based on the use of extraction chromatography with hydrophobic SiO2 impregnated with extracting agents. Plutonium targets and aged plutonium alloys are dissolved in nitric acid using conventional techniques while plutonium dioxide dissolutions are performed routine at 300 grams scale with electrogenerated silver II in 4M HNO3 at room temperature. The separation between plutonium and americium is performed by extraction of Pu(IV) either on TBP/SiO2 or TOAHNO3/SiO2 column. Americium recovery from waste streams rid of plutonium is realized by chromatographic extraction of Am(III) using mainly TBP and episodically DHDECMP as extractant. The final purification of both americium isotopes uses the selective extraction of Am(VI) on HDDiBMP/SiO2 column at 60 grams scale. Using the overall process a total amount of 1000 grams of americium 241 and 100 grams of americium 243 has been produced nowadays and the AmO2 final product indicates a purity better than 98.5%

  16. Study of americium sorption by humic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of investigation of influence of the cation content and acidity of soil solution on americium sorption by the humic acids have been shown. The most influence on the interphase distribution coefficient in the system 'humic acid - model soil solution' is caused by the presence of the iron (III), calcium ions and acidity of the solution. The increase of the sodium ions concentration in the solution makes an insignificant impact on the americium sorption. (Authors)

  17. Mercury iodide crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadoret, R.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of the Mercury Iodide Crystal Growth (MICG) experiment is the growth of near-perfect single crystals of mercury Iodide (HgI2) in a microgravity environment which will decrease the convection effects on crystal growth. Evaporation and condensation are the only transformations involved in this experiment. To accomplish these objectives, a two-zone furnace will be used in which two sensors collect the temperature data (one in each zone).

  18. Spectrochemical analysis of curium and americium samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectrochemical procedures have been developed to determine impurities in americium and curium samples. The simultaneous separation of many impurity elements from the base material (americium and curium) is carried out with extraction and extraction-chromatographic methods using di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid. It is shown that part of the elements are separated with extraction or sorption of americium and curium; the other part with the Talspeak process. Two fractions in the extraction chromatography and three fractions in the extraction separation of americium and curium, containing impurities, are analyzed separately by a.c. or d.c. arc spectrography. To increase the sensitivity of the spectrographic analysis and accelerate the burn-up of impurities from the crater of the carbon electrode bismuth fluoride and sodium chloride were used as chemically active substances. The extraction of impurities from weighed quantities of americium and curium samples of 5 to 10 mg permits the lower limit of determined impurity concentrations to be extended to 1 x 10-4 to 5 x 10-3% m/m. (author)

  19. Aqueous Chloride Operations Overview: Plutonium and Americium Purification/Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimball, David Bryan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Skidmore, Bradley Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-22

    Acqueous Chloride mission is to recover plutonium and americium from pyrochemical residues (undesirable form for utilization and storage) and generate plutonium oxide and americium oxide. Plutonium oxide is recycled into Pu metal production flowsheet. It is suitable for storage. Americium oxide is a valuable product, sold through the DOE-OS isotope sales program.

  20. Pyrochemical technology of plutonium and americium preparation and purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyrochemical tecnology of metallic plutonium and americium preparation and purification is considered. Investigations into plutonium dioxide reduction up to metal; plutonium electrolytic refining in molten salts; plutonium extraction from the molten salts and preparation of americium dioxide and metallic americium from its tetrafluoride are described

  1. Formation of americium and europium humate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binding constants of americium and europium with a humic acid were determined to study if complex formation of trivalent actinide-humates affects dissolved species of the actinides in hydrosphere. The purified humic acid was characterized by means of UV-vis, IR, and pH titration, indicating high carboxylate capacity and low aromaticity. Binding constants of americium and europium humates were determined at pH 4.6 and 6.0 by solvent extraction using 241Am or 152Eu as a tracer. The binding constants for americium-humate obtained preliminarily suggest that complexes with humic acid are not negligible in speciation of trivalent actinides in hydrosphere. The obtained binding constants were nearly identical with those determined previously by the same procedures, but with humic acids of different origin and compositions. (author)

  2. The sodium/iodide symporter and radio-iodide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) is an intrinsic membrane protein that mediates the active transport of iodide into the thyroid and other tissues. NIS plays key roles in thyroid pathophysiology as the route by which iodide reaches the gland for thyroid hormone biosynthesis and as a means for diagnostic scintigraphic imaging and for radio-iodide therapy in hyperthyroidism and thyroid cancer. The continued molecular analysis of NIS clearly holds the potential of an even greater impact on the diagnosis and radio-iodide treatment of cancer, both in thyroid and beyond

  3. Preparation of americium source for smoke detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the method developed for the preparation of 241Am source for smoke detector. Americium was electrodeposited from iso-propyl alcohol medium on silver backing. Thin layer of gold (few hundred micro gram thick) was plated on the americium source to make it safe for handling. The thickness of plated gold was such that the alpha radiations from the 241Am source could escape out of the gold layer and cause ionisation in the surrounding air. The performance of the prepared sources were checked in a smoke detector and was found to be satisfactory and comparable to the imported sources. (author). 1 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  4. Recovery of americium-241 from raffinates of plutonium purification columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recovery and purification of americium from ion exchange raffinates generated during purification of aged plutonium is described. The method consists of the following stages: (i) co-precipitation of americium with kilogramme quantities of rare earth oxalates, (ii) destruction of oxalate and removal of residual plutonium from nitric acid medium using anion exchange process, (iii) preliminary separation of americium making use of its preferential uptake on an anion exchange column from thiocyanate medium and (iv) extraction of americium and remaining rare earths into di-(2-ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid followed by preferential back washing of americium by lactic acid medium containing DTPA. (author)

  5. 1976 Hanford americium exposure incident: psychological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accidents involving exposure to radiation or radioactive materials may involve an unusual degree of emotional trauma. Methods that may be employed in dealing with such trauma are discussed in relation to a specific accident in which a radiation worker was injured and seriously contaminated with americium-241

  6. Americium separations from high salt solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Americium (III) exhibits an unexpectedly high affinity for anion-exchange material from the high-salt evaporator bottoms solutions--an effect which has not been duplicated using simple salt solutions. Similar behavior is observed for its lanthanide homologue, Nd(III), in complex evaporator bottoms surrogate solutions. There appears to be no single controlling factor--acid concentration, total nitrate concentration or solution ionic strength--which accounts for the approximately 2-fold increase in retention of the trivalent ions from complex solutions relative to simple solutions. Calculation of species activities (i.e., water, proton and nitrate) in such concentrated mixed salt solutions is difficult and of questionable accuracy, but it is likely that the answer to forcing formation of anionic nitrate complexes of americium lies in the relative activities of water and nitrate. From a practical viewpoint, the modest americium removal needs (ca. 50--75%) from nitric acid evaporator bottoms allow sufficient latitude for the use of non-optimized conditions such as running existing columns filled with older, well-used Reillex HPQ. Newer materials, such as HPQ-100 and the experimental bifunctional resins, which exhibit higher distribution coefficients, would allow for either increased Am removal or the use of smaller columns. It is also of interest that one of the experimental neutral-donor solid-support extractants, DHDECMP, exhibits a similarly high level of americium (total alpha) removal from EV bottoms and is much less sensitive to total acid content than commercially-available material

  7. Decontaminaion of metals containing plutonium and americium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melt-slagging (melt-refining) techniques were evaluated as a decontamination and consolidation step for metals contaminated with oxides of plutonium and americium. Experiments were performed in which mild steel, stainless steel, and nickel contaminated with oxides of plutonium and americium were melted in the presence of silicate slags of various compositions. The metal products were low in contamination, with the plutonium and americium strongly fractionated to the slags. Partition coefficients (plutonium in slag/plutonium in steel) of 7 x 106 were measured with boro-silicate slag and of 3 x 106 with calcium, magnesium silicate slag. Decontamination of metals containing as much as 14,000 ppM plutonium appears to be as efficient as for metals with plutonium levels of 400 ppM. Staged extraction, that is, a remelting of processed metal with clean slag, results in further decontamination of the metal. The second extraction is effective with either resistance-furnace melting or electric-arc melting. Slag adhering to the metal ingots and in defects within the ingots is in the important contributors to plutonium retained in processed metals. If these sources of plutonium are controlled, the melt-refining process can be used on a large scale to convert highly contaminated metals to homogeneous and compact forms with very low concentrations of plutonium and americium. A conceptual design of a melt-refining process to decontaminate plutonium- and americium-contaminated metals is described. The process includes single-stage refining of contaminated metals to produce a metal product which would have less than 10 nCi/g of TRU-element contamination. Two plant sizes were considered. The smaller conceptual plant processes 77 kg of metal per 8-h period and may be portable.The larger one processes 140 kg of metal per 8-h period, is stationary, and may be near te maximum size that is practical for a metal decontamination process

  8. 21 CFR 184.1265 - Cuprous iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Cuprous iodide. 184.1265 Section 184.1265 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1265 Cuprous iodide. (a) Cuprous iodide (copper (I) iodide, CuI, CAS Reg... with potassium iodide under slightly acidic conditions. (b) The ingredient must be of a purity...

  9. Status of Americium-241 recovery at Rocky Flats Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is presented in two parts: Part I, Molten Salt Extraction of Americium from Molten Plutonium Metal, and Part II, Aqueous Recovery of Americium from Extraction Salts. The Rocky Flats recovery process used for waste salts includes (1) dilute hydrochloric acid dissolution of residues; (2) cation exchange to convert from the chloride to the nitrate system and to remove gross amounts of monovalent impurities; (3) anion exchange separation of plutonium; (4) oxalate precipitation of americium; and (5) calcination of the oxalate at 6000C to yield americium oxide. The aqueous process portion describes attempts to improve the recovery of americium. The first part deals with modifications to the cation exchange step; the second describes development of a solvent extractions process that will recovery americium from residues containing aluminium as well as other common impurities. Results of laboratory work are described. 3 figures, 6 tables. (DP)

  10. Plutonium and americium in soil organic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gley soil from west Cumbria, with specific activities in its surface horizon of 5-10 kBq kg-1239,240Pu and comparable 241Am levels, has been used as a source of actinide-enriched organic fractions. Humic and fulvic acids were isolated by conventional alkali extraction and investigated by gel filtration, treatment with organic solvents and differential flocculation procedures. All these techniques are capable of resolving the organics into two or more fractions, with specific activities up to 80 kBq kg-239,240Pu. There is evidence for differentiation of plutonium and americium, with americium being concentrated, to some extent, in the lower molecular weight fractions from gel filtration. (author)

  11. Hydrogen iodide decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Dennis R.; Norman, John H.

    1983-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen iodide is decomposed to form hydrogen and iodine in the presence of water using a soluble catalyst. Decomposition is carried out at a temperature between about 350.degree. K. and about 525.degree. K. and at a corresponding pressure between about 25 and about 300 atmospheres in the presence of an aqueous solution which acts as a carrier for the homogeneous catalyst. Various halides of the platinum group metals, particularly Pd, Rh and Pt, are used, particularly the chlorides and iodides which exhibit good solubility. After separation of the H.sub.2, the stream from the decomposer is countercurrently extracted with nearly dry HI to remove I.sub.2. The wet phase contains most of the catalyst and is recycled directly to the decomposition step. The catalyst in the remaining almost dry HI-I.sub.2 phase is then extracted into a wet phase which is also recycled. The catalyst-free HI-I.sub.2 phase is finally distilled to separate the HI and I.sub.2. The HI is recycled to the reactor; the I.sub.2 is returned to a reactor operating in accordance with the Bunsen equation to create more HI.

  12. Comparison of Germanium and Sodium Iodide: In Vivo Measurement Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experience several investigators have had with lithium-drifted germanium. Ge(Li), and lithium-drifted silicon, Si (Li), counting systems for in vivo measurements is compared with conventional scintillator detector systems in similar configurations. Measurements of plutonium and americium in lungs, other organs, and wounds using coaxial and planar-drift detectors are presented. A proposed large area planar Ge(Li) lung counter system is compared to two- and four-crystal sodium iodide counters (130 cm2 by 9 mm thick) currently used for uranium and plutonium lung measurements. A large Ge(Li) detector system being employed at Battelle-Northwest Laboratory to make whole-body measurements of radionuclide deposits in humans consists of four coaxial detectors, each 40 cm3 in volume (total 160 cm3). The individual detectors are enclosed in separate cryostats but mounted in a common 30 litre liquid nitrogen dewar of the ''chicken feeder'' design. The system is compared to the standard 23 cm diameter by 10 cm thick sodium iodide scintillator in the standard chair position. (author)

  13. Incentives for transmutation of americium in thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes possible benefits when americium is irradiated in a thermal reactor. If all plutonium is partitioned from spent fuel, americium is the main contributor to the radiotoxicity of spent fuel upto several thousands of years of storage. It is shown that americium can be transmuted to other nuclides upon irradiation in a thermal reactor, leading to a 50% reduction of the radiotoxicity of neptunium, which can be an important contributor to the dose due to leakage of nuclides after one million years of storage. The radiotoxicity of americium can be reduced considerably after irradiation for 3 to 6 years in a thermal reactor with thermal neutron flux of 1014 cm-2s-1. The strongly α and neutron emitting transmutation products can most probably not be recycled again, so a transmutation process is suggested in which americium is irradiated for 3 to 6 years and then put to final storage. It is shown that the radiotoxicity of the transmuation products after a storage time of about one hundred years can be considerably reduced compared to the radiotoxicity of the initial americium. The same holds for the α activity and heat emission of the transmutation products. Because plutonium in spent fuel contributes for about 80% to the radiotoxicity upto 105 years of storage, recycling and transmutation of plutonium has first priority. Transmutation of americium is only meaningful when the radiotoxicity of plutonium is reduced far below the radiotoxicity of americium. (orig.)

  14. Americium transfer studies using hollow fiber/extractant membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Americium can be removed from low acid/high nitrate feeds using hollow fiber membrane modules. Americium can be concentrated in the stripping solution. (Maximum observed concentration was a factor of 3.1). Accurel hollow fibers are less prone to leakage problems

  15. 21 CFR 172.375 - Potassium iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium iodide. 172.375 Section 172.375 Food and... Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.375 Potassium iodide. The food additive potassium iodide may be safely used in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) Potassium iodide may be...

  16. Electronic structure of compressed americium metal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolorenč, Jindřich; Shick, Alexander; Caciuffo, R.

    Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,, 2012 - (Anderson, D.; Boot, C.; Burns, P.), s. 177-182. (Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings. 1444). ISBN 978-1-60511-421-7. ISSN 0272-9172. [2012 MRS Spring Meeting. Sacramento (CA), 09.04.2012-13.04.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/10/0330; GA AV ČR IAA100100912 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : americium * X-ray spectroscopy * LDA+DMFT Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://journals.cambridge.org/article_S1946427412009463

  17. Electrochemical reaction rates in a dye sentisised solar cell - the iodide/tri-iodide redox system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Lasse; West, Keld; Winter-Jensen, Bjørn; Jacobsen, Torben

    2006-01-01

    The electrochemical reaction rate of the redox couple iodide / tri-iodide in acetonitrile is characterised by impedance spectroscopy. Different electrode materials relevant for the function of dye-sensitised solar cells (DSSC) are investigated. Preferably, the reaction with the iodide / tri-iodide...... layer on top of the FTO glass to lower the tri-iodide reduction rate....

  18. Mercuric iodide sensor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the improvement in the performance and the manufacturing yield of mercuric iodide detectors achieved by identifying the dominant impurities, carrier traps, and processing steps limiting device performance. Theoretical studies of electron and hole transport in this material set fundamental limits on detector performance and provided a standard against which to compare experimental results. Spectroscopy techniques including low temperature photoluminescence and thermally stimulated current spectroscopy were applied to characterize the deep level traps in this material. Traps and defects that can be introduced into the detector during growth, from the contact, and during the various steps in detector fabrication were identified. Trap energy levels and their relative abundances were determined. Variations in material quality and detector performance at the micron scale were investigated to understand the distribution in electric field in large volume detectors suitable for gamma-ray spectroscopy. Surface aging and contact degradation was studied extensively by techniques including atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry. Preferred handling and processing procedures for maximizing detector performance and yield were established. The manufacturing yield of high resolution gamma-ray detectors was improved from a few percent to more than 30%

  19. Electrochemical oxidation of americium in nitric medium: study of reaction mechanisms; Oxydation de l'americium par voie electrochimique: etude des mecanismes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picart, S.; Chartier, D.; Donnet, L.; Adnet, J.M. [CEA Valrho, (DCC/DRRV/SPHA), 30 - Marcoule (France)

    2000-07-01

    One alternative selected by the CEA for partitioning minor actinides from aqueous solutions containing fission products is the selective extraction of oxidized americium. This is the SESAME process (Selective Extraction and Separation of Americium by Means of Electrolysis) aimed to convert americium to oxidation state (VI) and then extract it with a specific extractant of high valences. This paper presents the study of the electrochemical oxidation of americium in nitric medium which represents an important stage of the process. The reaction can be divided into two main steps: oxidation of americium (III) to americium (IV), and then of americium (IV) to americium (VI). For the first oxidation step, a ligand L is needed to stabilize the intermediate species americium (IV) which disproportionates in its free form into americium (III) and (V). Phospho-tungstate or silico-tungstate are appropriate ligands because they are stable in concentrated nitric acid and show a great affinity for metallic cations at oxidation state (IV) (Table 1 lists the stability constants of americium (IV) complexes). The presence of the lacunary poly-anion lowers the potential of the americium (IV) / americium (Ill) redox pair (see Figure 5 for the diagram of the apparent formal potential of americium versus ligand concentration). This makes it thermodynamically possible to oxidize americium (III) into americium (IV) at the anode of an electrolyzer in nitric acid. For the second oxidation step, a strong oxidant redox mediator, like silver (II), is needed to convert complexed americium at oxidation state (IV) to oxidation state (V). The AmVL complex is then hydrolyzed to yield americyle (V) aqua ion. A spectroscopic Raman study with {sup 18}O labeled species showed that the oxygen atoms of the americyle moiety came from water. This indicates that water hydrolyzes the americium (V) complex to produce americyle (V) aqua ion, AmO{sub 2}{sup +}. This cation reacts with silver (Il) to give

  20. Modelling of americium stripping in the EXAm process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The EXAm process aims at recovering americium alone contained in the PUREX raffinate. The americium stripping model has been revised to take into account a change of stripping aqueous phase and up-to-date experimental results conducted within DRCP to improve knowledge about complexes. This work represents a first approximation at modelling americium stripping. The modelling work has led to synthesize the knowledge on chemical phenomenology and adopt assumptions that best reflect experimental results. The modelling has been implemented in PAREX code in order to simulate this step to prepare and understand tests to be carried out in mixer settlers. (authors)

  1. Higher Americium Oxidation State Research Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mincher, Bruce J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Law, Jack D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Goff, George S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moyer, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burns, Jon D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lumetta, Gregg J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sinkov, Sergey I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shehee, Thomas C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hobbs, David T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-12-18

    The partitioning of hexavalent Am from dissolved nuclear fuel requires the ability to efficiently oxidize Am(III) to Am(VI) and to maintain that oxidation state for a length of time sufficient to perform the separation. Several oxidants have been, or are being developed. Chemical oxidants include Ag-catalyzed ozone, Ag-catalyzed peroxydisulfate, Cu(III) periodate, and sodium bismuthate. Hexavalent americium has also now successfully been prepared by electrolysis, using functionalized electrodes. So-called auto-reduction rates of Am(VI) are sufficiently slow to allow for separations. However, for separations based on solvent extraction or ion exchange using organic resins, the high valence state must be maintained under the reducing conditions of the organic phase contact, and a holding oxidant is probably necessary. Until now, only Cu(III) periodate and sodium bismuthate oxidation have been successfully combined with solvent extraction separations. Bismuthate oxidation provided the higher DAm, since it acts as its own holding oxidant, and a successful hot test using centrifugal contactors was performed. For the other oxidants, Ag-catalyzed peroxydisulfate will not oxidize americium in nitric acid concentrations above 0.3 M, and it is not being further investigated. Peroxydisulfate in the absence of Ag catalysis is being used to prepare Am(V) in ion exchange work, discussed below. Preliminary work with Ag-catalyzed ozone has been unsuccessful for extractions of Am(VI) from 6.5 M HNO3, and only one attempt at extraction, also from 6.5 M HNO3, using the electrolytic oxidation has been attempted. However, this high acid concentration was based on the highest Am extraction efficiency using the bismuthate oxidant; which is only sparingly soluble, and thus the oxidation yield is based on bismuthate solubility. Lower acid concentrations may be sufficient with alternative oxidants and work with Ag-ozone, Cu(III) and electrolysis is on-going. Two non

  2. Mixed chelation therapy for removal of plutonium and americium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron-binding compounds, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA), 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (HBA), and 2-(acetyloxy)benzoic acid (ABA), were tested for their ability to remove americium and plutonium from rats following intraperitioneal injection of the radionuclides as citrates (pH 5). Treatments, 2 mmol/kg, were given on days 3, 6, 10, 12 and 14 following the actinide injection. DHBA and HBA caused about a 20% decrease in liver retention of americium compared to the control value, and DHB caused a similar effect for plutonium. The above agents, co-administered with 0.5 mmol polyaminopolycarboxylic acid (PAPCA)-type chelons, did not change tissue retention of americium and plutonium from that due to the PAPCAs alone. Administration of americium and plutonium to the same rats is useful for studying removal agents since the two actinides behave independently in their biological disposition and response to removal

  3. Plutonium and Americium Geochemistry at Hanford: A Site Wide Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2012-08-23

    This report was produced to provide a systematic review of the state-of-knowledge of plutonium and americium geochemistry at the Hanford Site. The report integrates existing knowledge of the subsurface migration behavior of plutonium and americium at the Hanford Site with available information in the scientific literature regarding the geochemistry of plutonium and americium in systems that are environmentally relevant to the Hanford Site. As a part of the report, key research needs are identified and prioritized, with the ultimate goal of developing a science-based capability to quantitatively assess risk at sites contaminated with plutonium and americium at the Hanford Site and the impact of remediation technologies and closure strategies.

  4. Americium/Curium Disposition Life Cycle Planning Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the request of the Department of Energy Savannah River Office (DOE- SR), Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) evaluated concepts to complete disposition of Americium and Curium (Am/Cm) bearing materials currently located at the Savannah River Site (SRS)

  5. Gamma-sources on the basis of metallic americium-241

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A batch of gamma-radiation sources has been manufactured from metallic americium-241 of isotopic purity, its activity varying from 0.08 to 0.93 GBq. The cores of the sources are high-purity americium metal condensate on a tantalum or stainless steel substrate prepared by thermal decomposition of 241Pu-241Am alloy in a high vacuum. 7 refs., 1 tab

  6. Pyrochemical investigations into recovering plutonium from americium extraction salt residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress into developing a pyrochemical technique for separating and recovering plutonium from spent americium extraction waste salts has concentrated on selective chemical reduction with lanthanum metal and calcium metal and on the solvent extraction of americium with calcium metal. Both techniques are effective for recovering plutonium from the waste salt, although neither appears suitable as a separation technique for recycling a plutonium stream back to mainline purification processes. 17 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  7. 1976 Hanford americium-exposure incident: external decontamination procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An accident resulted in the deposition on an injured workman's skin surfaces, in acid-burned areas and in lacerations, of something in excess of 6 mCi americium-241. The external decontamination procedures used, the change in americium content of the skin during the course of treatment, and some of the unusual problems encountered from the extrusion of foreign material and flaking of skin and scar tissue are described

  8. 21 CFR 582.5634 - Potassium iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 582.5634 Section 582.5634 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5634 Potassium iodide. (a) Product. Potassium iodide. (b) Tolerance. 0.01 percent....

  9. Electrochemical oxidation of americium in nitric medium: study of reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One alternative selected by the CEA for partitioning minor actinides from aqueous solutions containing fission products is the selective extraction of oxidized americium. This is the SESAME process (Selective Extraction and Separation of Americium by Means of Electrolysis) aimed to convert americium to oxidation state (VI) and then extract it with a specific extractant of high valences. This paper presents the study of the electrochemical oxidation of americium in nitric medium which represents an important stage of the process. The reaction can be divided into two main steps: oxidation of americium (III) to americium (IV), and then of americium (IV) to americium (VI). For the first oxidation step, a ligand L is needed to stabilize the intermediate species americium (IV) which disproportionates in its free form into americium (III) and (V). Phospho-tungstate or silico-tungstate are appropriate ligands because they are stable in concentrated nitric acid and show a great affinity for metallic cations at oxidation state (IV) (Table 1 lists the stability constants of americium (IV) complexes). The presence of the lacunary poly-anion lowers the potential of the americium (IV) / americium (Ill) redox pair (see Figure 5 for the diagram of the apparent formal potential of americium versus ligand concentration). This makes it thermodynamically possible to oxidize americium (III) into americium (IV) at the anode of an electrolyzer in nitric acid. For the second oxidation step, a strong oxidant redox mediator, like silver (II), is needed to convert complexed americium at oxidation state (IV) to oxidation state (V). The AmVL complex is then hydrolyzed to yield americyle (V) aqua ion. A spectroscopic Raman study with 18O labeled species showed that the oxygen atoms of the americyle moiety came from water. This indicates that water hydrolyzes the americium (V) complex to produce americyle (V) aqua ion, AmO2+. This cation reacts with silver (Il) to give americyle (VI) ion. Figure

  10. Complexation of americium with humic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of the interlaboratory comparison exercise for the complexation of humic acid and colloid generation (COCO-Club activities) in the CEC project MIRAGE-II, the complexation of americium with humic acid has been studied in our laboratory. Two humic acids were used for the study: Aldrich-HA(H+) which is a reference humic acid of the COCO-Club and Bradford-HA(H+) from Lake Bradford, Florida. A wide concentration range of humic acid and different ratios of Am to humic acid have been investigated between pH 5 and 6 with the ionic strength of 0.1 M and 1.0 M. The complexation has been studied by UV-spectroscopy, Laser-induced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (LPAS) and ultrafiltration. LPAS is used for the submicromolar concentration range where the sensitivity of UV spectroscopy is not accessible. Ultrafiltration is used for low Am to humic acid ratios where both spectroscopic methods are not applicable. Varying the humic acid concentration over three orders of magnitude, only a 1:1 type of binding is observed. No significant variation of the stability constant is found in the investigated range of pH and ionic strength. However, the precipitation tendency and the loading capacity of humic acid are found to depend sensitively on pH and ionic strength. The complexation study provides a deep insight into the influence of humic acid on the migration behaviour of fission products and actinides in the geosphere. (orig.)

  11. Analysis of BWR lattices to recycle americium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out to assess the ability to eliminate meaningful quantities of americium in a primarily thermal neutron flux by 'spiking' modern BWR fuel with this minor actinide (MA). The studies carried out so far include the simulation of modern 10 x 10 BWR lattices employing the Westinghouse lattice physics code PHOENIX-4 alongside validation studies using MCNP5 models of the same lattices that were spatially depleted via the MONTEBURNS code coupling to ORIGEN. When considering the total inventory of minor actinides in Am-spiked pins, excluding isotopes of uranium and plutonium, the results indicate that a reduction of approximately 50% or more in the total mass inventory of these minor actinides is viable within the selected pins. Therefore, these preliminary results have encouraged the extension of this work to the development of improved lattice designs to help optimize the transmutation rates as well as absolute MA inventory reductions. The ultimate goal being to design batches of these advanced BWR bundles alongside multi-cycle core reload strategies. (authors)

  12. Applicability of insoluble tannin to treatment of waste containing americium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applicability of insoluble tannin adsorbent to the treatment of aqueous waste contaminated with americium has been investigated. Insoluble tannin is considered highly applicable because it consists of only carbon, hydrogen and oxygen and so its volume can be easily reduced by incineration. This report describes measurements of the americium distribution coefficient in low concentration nitric acid. The americium distribution coefficients were found to decrease with increasing concentration of nitric acid and sodium nitrate, and with increasing temperature. At 25 C in 2.0 x 10-3 M HNO3, the distribution coefficient was found to be 2000 ml g-1. The adsorption capacity was determined by column experiments using europium as a simulant of americium, and found to be 7 x 10-3 mmol g-1-dried tannin in 0.01 M HNO3 at 25 C, which corresponds to approximately 1.7 mg-241Am/g-adsorbent(dried). The prospect of applying the adsorbent to the treatment of aqueous waste contaminated with americium appears promising. (orig.)

  13. The durability of iodide sodalite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Dense iodide sodalite prepared by HIP of hydrothermally synthesised powders. • Sodalite was free from leachable secondary phases. • Leach tests indicate self-arresting congruent dissolution. - Abstract: An iodide sodalite wasteform has been prepared by Hot Isostatic Pressing of powder produced by hydrothermal synthesis. The wasteform was free of leachable secondary phases which can mask leaching mechanisms. Leaching is by congruent dissolution and leach rates decrease as Si and Al accumulate in the leachate. Differential normalised leach rates are 0.005–0.01 g m−2 d−1 during the 7–14 day period. This indicates that sodalite dissolution in natural groundwater, already saturated in these elements, will be very low

  14. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichak, Jessica; Mills, Melissa; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-09-01

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI(aq)) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species. PMID:26057987

  15. A TRUEX-based separation of americium from the lanthanides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce J. Mincher; Nicholas C. Schmitt; Mary E. Case

    2011-03-01

    Abstract: The inextractability of the actinide AnO2+ ions in the TRUEX process suggests the possibility of a separation of americium from the lanthanides using oxidation to Am(V). The only current method for the direct oxidation of americium to Am(V) in strongly acidic media is with sodium bismuthate. We prepared Am(V) over a wide range of nitric acid concentrations and investigated its solvent extraction behavior for comparison to europium. While a separation is achievable in principal, the presence of macro amounts of cerium competes for the sparingly soluble oxidant and the oxidant itself competes for CMPO complexation. These factors conspire to reduce the Eu/Am separation factor from ~40 using tracer solutions to ~5 for extractions from first cycle raffinate simulant solution. To separate pentavalent americium directly from the lanthanides using the TRUEX process, an alternative oxidizing agent will be necessary.

  16. Salvage of plutonium-and americium-contaminated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melt-slagging techniques were evaluated as a decontamination and consolidation step for metals contaminated with oxides of plutonium and americium. Experiments were performed in which mild steel, stainless steel, and nickel metals contaminated with oxides of plutonium and americium were melted in the presence of silicate slags of various compositions. The metal products were low in contamination, with the plutonium and americium strongly fractionated to the slags. Partition coefficients (plutonium in slag/plutonium in steel) of 7*10/sup 6/ with borosilicate slag and 3*10/sup 6/ for calcium, magnesium silicate slag were measured. Decontamination of metals containing as much as 14,000 p.p.m. plutonium appears to be as efficient as that of metals with plutonium levels of 400 p.p.m. Staged extraction, that is, a remelting of processed metal with clean slag, results in further decontamination of the metal. 10 refs

  17. Uptake of americium-241 by algae and bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uptake of americium by three algae, scenedesmus obliquus, selenastrum capricomutum and chlorella pyrenosdosa and a bacterium aeromonas hydrophila was studied. Live and fixed cells of each algal species and live bacterial cells were used. it is shown that algae and bacteria concentrate americium 241 to a high degree which makes them important links in the biomagnification phenomenon which may ultimately lead to a human hazard and be potentially important in recycling Am 241 in the water column and mobilization from sediments. Chemical fixation of algal cells caused increased uptake which indicated that uptake is by passive diffusion and probably due to chemical alteration of surface binding sites. (U.K.)

  18. Americium incineration by recycling in target rods using coated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper proposes a type of target rod based on the use of coated particles, for an efficient incineration of americium in nuclear reactors. The analysis takes advantage of the experience gained in the past from long duration irradiation without damage of coated particles with plutonium oxide kernels. A conservative theoretical evaluation of the gas pressure inside the coated particles at the end of irradiation allows comparing the well known conditions of the plutonium oxide particles which were successfully irradiated to high burn-up, with a preliminary design of americium oxide particles. (authors)

  19. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI(aq)) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species. - Highlights: • Iodide sorption experiments were completed with a diverse array of clay minerals. • Iodide uptake trended with CEC and swamping electrolyte identity and concentration. • Results can be explained by considering the formation of ion pairs in clay interlayers

  20. 1976 Hanford americium exposure incident: overview and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salient features of the 1976 Hanford americium exposure incident are discussed. Comparisons are made with previous human and animal exposure data, and conclusions drawn relative to the injured workman, to health physics practices, and to the adequacy of current exposure limits

  1. Americium retention by the smectite hectorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Clay minerals may play an important role in a high level nuclear waste disposal site. Smectites may be major components of backfill material used to enhance the retention properties of engineered barriers. Furthermore, they have also been detected in the alteration layer of nuclear waste glass corroded in laboratory experiments. For example, the smectite hectorite (Na0.33[Mg2.67Li0.33Si4O10(OH)2]) was identified as phase forming upon waste matrix dissolution and subsequent reprecipitation. Smectites are known to be highly reactive with respect to cations in aqueous systems. Several distinct molecular scale binding mechanisms may operate, but the most effective retention may occur by incorporation in the bulk structure, especially if a (meta)stable solid solution forms. Investigations showed the possibility to incorporate Lu(III) in a clay-like octahedral site in hectorite by coprecipitation. Furthermore, luminescence studies on hectorite synthesized in the presence of Cm(III) or Eu(III) were consistent with an incorporation in the bulk structure. However, structural data such as coordination numbers and bond lengths are still missing for the actinides. In the present study, Am(III) was coprecipitated with and adsorbed on hectorite to decipher the actual retention mechanism(s). Hectorite was synthesized in the presence of Am(III) (sample AmCopHec) from an Am-containing brucite precursor phase. Briefly, brucite was freshly precipitated in the presence of Am(III) (Am:Mg molar ratio of 1:1175) and washed. The resulting sol was aged in a tightly closed vessel in the presence of LiF and silica sol for several days at 90 C. Separately, an Am-containing brucite phase (sample AmCopBru) was prepared under identical conditions as described above, and the americium aqua ions were adsorbed on hectorite (m/V = 2 g/L, [Am(III)]tot = 105 μmol/L, 0.5 mol/L NaClO4, pH = 6.4(1), sample AmSorbHec) and used as reference samples. X

  2. Synthesis and characterization of uranium-americium mixed oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Americium isotopes represent a significant part of high-level and long-lived nuclear waste in spent fuels. Among the envisaged reprocessing scenarios, their transmutation in fast neutron reactors using uranium-americium mixed-oxide pellets (U1-xAmxO2±δ) is a promising option which would help decrease the ecological footprint of ultimate waste repository sites. In this context, this thesis is dedicated to the study of such compounds over a wide range of americium contents (7.5 at.% ≤ Am/(U+Am) ≤ 70 at.%), with an emphasis on their fabrication from single-oxide precursors and the assessment of their structural and thermodynamic stabilities, also taking self-irradiation effects into account. Results highlight the main influence of americium reduction to Am(+III), not only on the mechanisms of solid-state formation of the U1-xAmxO2±δ solid solution, but also on the stabilization of oxidized uranium cations and the formation of defects in the oxygen sublattice such as vacancies and cub-octahedral clusters. In addition, the data acquired concerning the stability of U1-xAmxO2±δ compounds (existence of a miscibility gap, vaporization behavior) were compared to calculations based on new thermodynamic modelling of the U-Am-O ternary system. Finally, α-self-irradiation-induced structural effects on U1-xAmxO2±δ compounds were analyzed using XRD, XAS and TEM, allowing the influence of americium content on the structural swelling to be studied as well as the description of the evolution of radiation-induced structural defects. (author)

  3. Reduction Rates for Higher Americium Oxidation States in Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, Travis Shane [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mincher, Bruce Jay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schmitt, Nicholas C [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The stability of hexavalent americium was measured using multiple americium concentrations and nitric acid concentrations after contact with the strong oxidant sodium bismuthate. Contrary to our hypotheses Am(VI) was not reduced faster at higher americium concentrations, and the reduction was only zero-order at short time scales. Attempts to model the reduction kinetics using zero order kinetic models showed Am(VI) reduction in nitric acid is more complex than the autoreduction processes reported by others in perchloric acid. The classical zero-order reduction of Am(VI) was found here only for short times on the order of a few hours. We did show that the rate of Am(V) production was less than the rate of Am(VI) reduction, indicating that some Am(VI) undergoes two electron-reduction to Am(IV). We also monitored the Am(VI) reduction in contact with the organic diluent dodecane. A direct comparison of these results with those in the absence of the organic diluent showed the reduction rates for Am(VI) were not statistically different for both systems. Additional americium oxidations conducted in the presence of Ce(IV)/Ce(III) ions showed that Am(VI) is reduced without the typical growth of Am(V) observed in the systems sans Ce ion. This was an interesting result which suggests a potential new reduction/oxidation pathway for Am in the presence of Ce; however, these results were very preliminary, and will require additional experiments to understand the mechanism by which this occurs. Overall, these studies have shown that hexavalent americium is fundamentally stable enough in nitric acid to run a separations process. However, the complicated nature of the reduction pathways based on the system components is far from being rigorously understood.

  4. Neutron Detection with Mercuric Iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercuric iodide is a high-density, high-Z semiconducting material useful for gamma ray detection. This makes it convertible to a thermal neutron detector by covering it with a boron rich material and detecting the 478 keV gamma rays resulting from the 10B(n, α)7Li* reaction. However, the 374 barn thermal capture cross section of natHg, makes the detector itself an attractive absorber, and this has been exploited previously. Since previous work indicates that there are no low-energy gamma rays emitted in coincidence with the 368 keV capture gamma from the dominant 199Hg(n, γ)200Hg reaction, only the 368 keV capture gamma is seen with any efficiency a relatively thin (few mm) detector. In this paper we report preliminary measurements of neutrons via capture reactions in a bare mercuric iodide crystal and a crystal covered in 10B-loaded epoxy. The covered detector is an improvement over the bare detector because the presence of both the 478 and 368 keV gamma rays removes the ambiguity associated with the observation of only one of them. Pulse height spectra, obtained with and without lead and cadmium absorbers, showed the expected gamma rays and demonstrated that they were caused by neutrons

  5. Neutron Detection with Mercuric Iodide

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Z A

    2003-01-01

    Mercuric iodide is a high-density, high-Z semiconducting material useful for gamma ray detection. This makes it convertible to a thermal neutron detector by covering it with a boron rich material and detecting the 478 keV gamma rays resulting from the sup 1 sup 0 B(n, alpha) sup 7 Li* reaction. However, the 374 barn thermal capture cross section of sup n sup a sup t Hg, makes the detector itself an attractive absorber, and this has been exploited previously. Since previous work indicates that there are no low-energy gamma rays emitted in coincidence with the 368 keV capture gamma from the dominant sup 1 sup 9 sup 9 Hg(n, gamma) sup 2 sup 0 sup 0 Hg reaction, only the 368 keV capture gamma is seen with any efficiency a relatively thin (few mm) detector. In this paper we report preliminary measurements of neutrons via capture reactions in a bare mercuric iodide crystal and a crystal covered in sup 1 sup 0 B-loaded epoxy. The covered detector is an improvement over the bare detector because the presence of both ...

  6. Rare, severe hypersensitivity reaction to potassium iodide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Sofie Korsholm; Ebbehøj, Eva; Richelsen, Bjørn

    2014-01-01

    The literature reports a large variety of adverse reactions to potassium iodide. A severe hypersensitivity reaction to potassium iodide in a 51-year-old woman with Graves' thyrotoxicosis is described. Following administration the patient developed sialadenitis, conjunctivitis, stomatitis and acne...

  7. Large area mercuric iodide photodetectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of an investigation of large area mercuric iodide (HgI2) photodetectors are reported. Different entrance contacts were studied, including semitransparent metallic films and conductive liquids. Theoretical calculations of electronic noise of these photodetectors were compared with experimental results. HgI2 photodetectors with active area up to 4 cm2 were matched with NaI(Tl) and CsI(Tl) scintillation crystals and were evaluated as gamma-radiation spectrometers. Energy resolution of 9.3% for gamma radiation of 511 keV with a CsI(Tl) scintillator and energy resolution of 9.0% for gamma radiation of 622 keV with a NaI(Tl) scintillator have been obtained

  8. Large area mercuric iodide photodetectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Dabrowski, A.J.; Markakis, J.M.; Ortale, C.; Schnepple, W.F.

    1984-02-01

    Results of an investigation of large area mercuric iodide (HgI/sub 2/) photodetectors are reported. Different entrance contacts were studied, including semitransparent metallic films and conductive liquids. Theoretical calculations of electronic noise of these photodetectors were compared with experimental results. HgI/sub 2/ photodetectors with active area up to 4 cm/sup 2/ were matched with NaI(Tl) and CsI(Tl) scintillation crystals and were evaluated as gamma-radiation spectrometers. Energy resolution of 9.3% for gamma radiation of 511 keV with a CsI(Tl) scintillator and energy resolution of 9.0% for gamma radiation of 622 keV with a NaI(Tl) scintillator have been obtained.

  9. Predissociation dynamics of lithium iodide

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, H; Stienkemeier, F; Bogomolov, A S; Baklanov, A V; Reich, D M; Skomorowski, W; Koch, C P; Mudrich, M

    2015-01-01

    The predissociation dynamics of lithium iodide (LiI) in the first excited A-state is investigated for molecules in the gas phase and embedded in helium nanodroplets, using femtosecond pump-probe photoionization spectroscopy. In the gas phase, the transient Li+ and LiI+ ion signals feature damped oscillations due to the excitation and decay of a vibrational wave packet. Based on high-level ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of LiI and simulations of the wave packet dynamics, the exponential signal decay is found to result from predissociation predominantly at the lowest avoided X-A potential curve crossing, for which we infer a coupling constant V=650(20) reciprocal cm. The lack of a pump-probe delay dependence for the case of LiI embedded in helium nanodroplets indicates fast droplet-induced relaxation of the vibrational excitation.

  10. Liquid-liquid extraction separation and determination of plutonium and americium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure is described for the determination of plutonium and americium after their initial separation on barium sulfate. The barium sulfate is dissolved in perchloric acid and the antinides and lanthanides are extracted into bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP). Americium along with other tervalent actinides and lanthanides is stripped from HDEHP with nitric acid. The lanthanides are removed on a column of HDEHP supported on Teflon powder, and the americium and other tervalent actinides are electrodeposited for their determination by α spectrometry. The plutonium is stripped with nitric acid after reduction to the tervalent state with 2,5-di-tert-butylhydroquinone and electrodeposited for α spectrometry. Decontamination factors for plutonium and americium from each other and from other α emitters are 104 to 105. Two hours are required for the liquid-liquid extraction separations of plutonium and americium from eight samples. Recoveries of americium and plutonium through the HDEHP separatons are 99% and 95%, respectively

  11. Calculational study on irradiation of americium fuel samples in the Petten High Flux Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A calculational study on the irradiation of americium samples in the Petten High Flux Reactor (HFR) has been performed. This has been done in the framework of the international EFTTRA cooperation. For several reasons the americium in the samples is supposed to be diluted with a neutron inert matrix, but the main reason is to limit the power density in the sample. The low americium nuclide density in the sample (10 weight % americium oxide) leads to a low radial dependence of the burnup. Three different calculational methods have been used to calculate the burnup in the americium sample: Two-dimensional calculations with WIMS-6, one-dimensional calculations with WIMS-6, and one-dimensional calculations with SCALE. The results of the different methods agree fairly well. It is concluded that the radiotoxicity of the americium sample can be reduced upon irradiation in our scenario. This is especially the case for the radiotoxicity between 100 and 1000 years after storage. (orig.)

  12. Neptunium and americium control for international non-proliferation regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was decided in the IAEA Board of Governors Meeting held in Sept. 1999 that Neptunium and Americium could be diverted for manufacturing nuclear weapon or explosives, so that appropriate measures should be taken for the prevention of proliferation of these materials. It is expected to take relatively long time for settling down the aligned system dealing with the above materials because the present regulatory statement was prepared on the basis of voluntary offers from the States concerned. The necessity of preventive measures is being convinced among Member States, but it would not be easy to take voluntary participation in detail because of their respective interests. It is expected that this paper could contribute to the effective response as to the international commitments as well as for protecting the domestic nuclear industry and R and D area through analysis on the IAEA's approach on Neptunium and Americium

  13. Thermophysical properties of americium-containing barium plutonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycrystalline specimens of americium-containing barium plutonate have been prepared by mixing the appropriate amounts of (Pu0.91Am0.09)O2 and BaCO3 powders followed by reacting and sintering at 1600 K under the flowing gas atmosphere of dry-air. The sintered specimens had a single phase of orthorhombic perovskite structure and were crack-free. Elastic moduli were determined from longitudinal and shear sound velocities. Debye temperature was also determined from sound velocities and lattice parameter measurements. Thermal conductivity was calculated from measured density at room temperature, literature values of heat capacity and thermal diffusivity measured by laser flash method in vacuum. Thermal conductivity of americium-containing barium plutonate was roughly independent of temperature and registered almost the same magnitude as that of BaPuO3 and BaUO3. (author)

  14. Mercuric iodide light detector and related method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Barton, Jeff B.; Dabrowski, Andrzej J.; Schnepple, Wayne F.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting light involve applying a substantially uniform electrical potential difference between first and second spaced surfaces of a body of mercuric iodide, exposing the first surface to light and measuring an electrical current passed through the body in response to the light. The mercuric iodide may be substantially monocrystalline and the potential may be applied between a substantially transparent conductive layer at the first surface and a second conductive layer at the second surface. In a preferred embodiment, the detector is coupled to a scintillator for passage of light to the mercuric iodide in response to ionizing radiation incident on the scintillator.

  15. 1976 Hanford americium-exposure incident: decontamination and treatment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An injured worker, contaminated with over 6 mCi of americium-241, required special treatment and housing for 4 months. This paper is a description of the design and management of the facility in which most of the treatment and housing occurred. The problems associated with contamination control, waste handling, supplies, and radiological concerns during the two-stage transfer of the patient from a controlled situation to his normal living environment are discussed in detail

  16. Recycling heterogeneous americium targets in a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the limiting contributors to the heat load constraint for a long term spent fuel repository is the decay of americium-241. A possible option to reduce the heat load produced by Am-241 is to eliminate it via transmutation in a light water reactor thermal neutron environment, in particular, by taking advantage of the large thermal fission cross section of Am-242 and Am-242m. In this study we employ lattice loading optimization techniques to define the loadings and arrangements of fuel pins with blended americium and uranium oxide in boiling water reactor bundles, specifically, by defining the incineration of pre-loaded americium as an objective function to maximize americium transmutation. Subsequently, the viability of these optimized lattices is tested by assembling them into bundles with Am-spiked fuel pins and by loading these bundles into realistic three-dimensional BWR core-wide simulations that model multiple reload cycles and observe standard operational constraints. These simulations are possible via our collaboration with the Westinghouse Electric Co. which facilitates the use of industrial-caliber design tools such as the PHOENIX-4/POLCA-7 sequence and the Core Master 2 GUI work environment for fuel management. The resulting analysis confirms the ability to axially uniformly eliminating roughly 90% of the pre-loaded inventory of recycled Am-241 in BWR bundles with heterogeneous target pins. This high level of incineration was achieved within three to four 18-month operational cycles, which is equivalent to a typical in-core residence time of a BWR bundle.

  17. Ingestion Pathway Transfer Factors for Plutonium and Americium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-07-28

    Overall transfer factors for major ingestion pathways are derived for plutonium and americium. These transfer factors relate the radionuclide concentration in a given foodstuff to deposition on the soil. Equations describing basic relationships consistent with Regulatory Guide 1.109 are followed. Updated values and coefficients from IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 364 are used when a available. Preference is given to using factors specific to the Savannah River Site.

  18. 21 CFR 520.763a - Dithiazanine iodide tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dithiazanine iodide tablets. 520.763a Section 520... iodide tablets. (a) Chemical name. 3-Ethyl-2- -benzothiazolium iodide. (b) Specifications. Dithiazanine iodide tablets contain 10 milligrams, 50 milligrams, 100 milligrams, or 200 milligrams of...

  19. 21 CFR 520.763b - Dithiazanine iodide powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dithiazanine iodide powder. 520.763b Section 520... iodide powder. (a) Chemical name. 3-Ethyl-2- -benzothiazoliumiodide. (b) Specifications. Dithiazanine iodide powder contains 200 milligrams of dithiazanine iodide per level standard tablespoon. (c)...

  20. Gut uptake factors for plutonium, americium and curium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on estimates of the absorption of plutonium, americium and curium from the human gut based on measurements of uptake in other mammalian species are reviewed. It is proposed that for all adult members of the public ingesting low concentrations of plutonium in food and water, 0.05% would be an appropriate value of absorption except when the conditions of exposure are known and a lower value can be justified. For dietary intakes of americium and curium, the available data do not warrant a change from the ICRP value of 0.05%. For newborn children ingesting americium, curium and soluble forms of plutonium, a value of 1% absorption is proposed for the first 3 months of life during which the infant is maintained on a milk diet. It is proposed that a value of 0.5% should be used for the first year of life to take account of the gradual maturation of the gut. In considering the ingestion of insoluble oxides of plutonium by infants, it is proposed that absorption is taken as 0.1% for the first 3 months and 0.05% for the first year. (author)

  1. Reaction of bis[trialkyl(aryl)arsonium]-1,4-dihydronaphthalene iodides with mercury(2) iodide in aqueous-alcoholic solutions of potassium iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composition of mercury complex iodides, formed in the course of interaction between bis[trialkyl(aryl)arsonium]-1,4-dihydronaphthalene iodides and mercury(2) iodide in aqueous-alcoholic solution in the presence of potassium iodide excess was studied using the methods of chemical analysis, conductivity and IR spectroscopy. It was ascertained that under the conditions mentioned bisarsonium triiodomercurates are formed with the yield of 72-87%. The studies conducted confirm the potentiality of formation of mercury complex iodides of [HgI3]- composition in aqueous solutions of alkali metal iodides in the presence of some organic cations

  2. Processing. alpha. -mercuric iodide by zone refining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, A.; Morgan, S.H.; Henderson, D.O.; Biao, Y.; Zhang, K.; Silberman, E. (Fisk Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics); Nason, D.; van den Berg, L.; Ortale-Baccash, C.; Cross, E. (EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Goleta, CA (United States). Santa Barbara Operations)

    1992-01-01

    An investigation is being conducted on zone refining {alpha}-mercuric iodide. Analytical studies using differential scanning calorimetry and anion chromatography indicate that impurities are segregated mainly at the end where zone travel terminates. Early results indicate that single crystals can be readily grown from zone refined material, and the effects of the process on the performance of radiation detectors fabricated from {alpha}-mercuric iodide are being evaluated.

  3. Iodide refining of calcium-thermal zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of high zirconium of calcium - thermal zirconium KTC-HP and metallic wastes production by iodide refining is examined. The impurities behavior is studied,the refining coefficient dependence on the impurity concentration in the initial material is determined. The impurities minimum concentration in iodide zirconium are evaluated by extrapolation.It is determined that the refining efficiency decreases in the range: Ni=Mn > Cr >F>C>N>O>Fe and aluminium and silicon removal during the iodide refining of calcium thermal zirconium is problematic. By comparison of iodide metal of KTC-HP expected quality with the specifications and the iodide zirconium purity real level obtained in the adopted practice the possibility of standard metal production of KTC-HP and metal wastes is demonstrated. The principal merit of KTC - hafnium content <0,01 mass % is preserved. Alloys melting of double or triple on the base of KTC according TS 95.2185-90 with the addition of 35...50 % of iodide zirconium by the method VDP will allow to obtain the alloys KTC-110 and KTC-125 with oxygen fraction of total mass 0,06...0,10% and hafnium content, meeting the world standards

  4. Recovery of anhydrous hydrogen iodide

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Dennis R.; McCorkle, Jr., Kenneth H.; de Graaf, Johannes D.

    1982-01-01

    Relatively dry hydrogen iodide can be recovered from a mixture of HI, I.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O. After the composition of the mixture is adjusted so that the amounts of H.sub.2 O and I.sub.2 do not exceed certain maximum limits, subjection of the mixture to superatmospheric pressure in an amount equal to about the vapor pressure of HI at the temperature in question causes distinct liquid phases to appear. One of the liquid phases contains HI and not more than about 1 weight percent water. Often the adjustment in the composition will include the step of vaporization, and the distinct layers appear following the increase in pressure of the vapor mixture. Adjustment in the composition may also include the addition of an extraction agent, such as H.sub.3 PO.sub.4, and even though the adjusted composition mixture contains a significant amount of such an agent, the creation of the distinct liquid phases is not adversely affected.

  5. Electrochemical reaction rates in a dye-sensitised solar cell - the iodide/tri-iodide redox system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, L.; West, K.; Winther-Jensen, B.; Jacobsen, T.

    2006-01-01

    The electrochemical reaction rate of the redox couple iodide/tri-iodide in acetonitrile is characterised by impedance spectroscopy. Different electrode materials relevant for the function of dye-sensitised solar cells (DSSC) are investigated. Preferably, the reaction with the iodide/tri-iodide...... layer on top of the FTO glass in lowering the tri-iodide reduction rate. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  6. Kinetics of gold dissolution in iodide solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kang

    Cyanide has been used as a lixiviant for free milling gold ores for a long time. Cyanide solutions are highly toxic and their use poses long term environmental problems. Cyanidation process is efficient for oxide gold ores but it is ineffective for gold ores containing sulfides. Among the noncyanide based lixiviants, iodide has the potential of replacing cyanide due to its ability to leach gold at a wider pH range and higher rate of gold dissolution. The emerging technology of bio-oxidation is an accepted process for pretreatment of sulfide gold ores. The bio-oxidation is conducted at acidic pH which makes direct cyanidation without pH adjustment impractical. On the contrary, iodide leaching of gold from the bio-oxidized ore can be accomplished without any pH adjustment. The present study was undertaken in order to investigate the kinetics of gold dissolution in various iodide-oxidant solutions under conditions similar to those prevailing in a solution containing bio-oxidized ore. The thermodynamic study indicated that gold can be spontaneously dissolved in iodide-hydrogen peroxide, iodide-ferric ion and iodide-persulfate solutions. Dissolution of gold powder was carried out in these solutions and the results showed that the gold dissolution was dependent on solution pH, concentrations of iodide, oxidants and temperature. Gold dissolution was found to increase with decreasing pH and substantial gold dissolution could be achieved at pH ≤ 2. Increasing concentration of oxidant till an optimum oxidant/iodide molar ratio increased gold dissolution and much higher concentration of oxidant would result in a decrease in gold dissolution. With increasing iodide concentration and temperature, gold dissolution increased significantly. The activation energy data which ranged between 9.6 and 13.6 kcal/mole for various oxidants indicated that surface reaction was the rate controlling step. At higher temperatures a change in rate limiting step with passage of time was observed

  7. Airborne plutonium-239 and americium-241 concentrations measured from the 125-meter Hanford Meteorological Tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airborne plutonium-239 and americium-241 concentrations and fluxes were measured at six heights from 1.9 to 122 m on the Hanford meteorological tower. The data show that plutonium-239 was transported on nonrespirable and small particles at all heights. Airborne americium-241 concentrations on small particles were maximum at the 91 m height

  8. Experimental study on preparing gaseous methyl iodide by chlorotrimelthylsilane/sodium iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experiments were carried out to study the feasibility of substituting the extremely toxic dimethyl sulfate (DMS) with nontoxic reagents in preparing the gaseous methyl iodide to measure the scrubbing efficiency of iodine adsorber. The test results show that the reaction of chlorotrimelthylsilane/sodium iodide (or potassium iodide) as a iodating agent and phosphate methylesters is a good substitution method, the reaction conditions and productivity of methyl iodide can meet the requirements of both workshop and in-place tests of iodine adsorber, and the substitutes have little influence on the nuclear grade immersed activated carbon filled in the iodine adsorber. The substitution method can substitute the DMS method to prepare gaseous methyl iodide. (authors)

  9. Plasma etching of cesium iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thick films of cesium iodide (CsI) are often used to convert x-ray images into visible light. Spreading of the visible light within CsI, however, reduces the resolution of the resulting image. Anisotropic etching of the CsI film into an array of micropixels can improve the image resolution by confining light within each pixel. The etching process uses a high-density inductively coupled plasma to pattern CsI samples held by a heated, rf-biased chuck. Fluorine-containing gases such as CF4 are found to enhance the etch rate by an order of magnitude compared to Ar+ sputtering alone. Without inert-gas ion bombardment, however, the CF4 etch becomes self-limited within a few microns of depth due to the blanket deposition of a passivation layer. Using CF4+Ar continuously removes this layer from the lateral surfaces, but the formation of a thick passivation layer on the unbombarded sidewalls of etched features is observed by scanning electron microscopy. At a substrate temperature of 220 deg. C, the minimum ion-bombardment energy for etching is Ei∼50 eV, and the rate depends on Ei1/2 above 65 eV. In dilute mixtures of CF4 and Ar, the etch rate is proportional to the gas-phase density of atomic fluorine. Above 50% CF4, however, the rate decreases, indicating the onset of net surface polymer deposition. These observations suggest that anisotropy is obtained through the ion-enhanced inhibitor etching mechanism. Etching exhibits an Arrhenius-type behavior in which the etch rate increases from ∼40 nm/min at 40 deg. C to 380 nm/min at 330 deg. C. The temperature dependence corresponds to an activation energy of 0.13±0.01 eV. This activation energy is consistent with the electronic sputtering mechanism for alkali halides

  10. Effect of 241-americium on bone marrow stroma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regulation of haemopoiesis occurs via complex interactions between the stroma and the haemopoietic cells. An attempt to further clarifying the mechanisms and the exact role of the stroma in the regulation was made in a study. Results revealed that the murine bone marrow stromal cells are highly radiosensitive after injection with 241-americium and can thus be considered as a target population after internal contamination. In addition, observations are made which may be important for risk estimation for the developing animal and during pregnancy. Contamination in utero and by lactation shows persistent damage up to 1 year after contamination at an average annual dose of 5 cGy. (author)

  11. Recovery of americium-241 from aged plutonium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After separation and purification, both actinides were precipitated as oxalates and calcined. A large-scale process was developed using dissolution, separation, purification, precipitation, and calcination. Efforts were made to control corrosion, to avoid product contamination, to keep the volume of process and waste solutions manageable, and to denitrate solutions with formic acid. The Multipurpose Processing Facility (MPPF), designed for recovery of transplutonium isotopes, was used for the first time for the precipitation and calcination of americium. Also, for the first time,, large-scale formic acid denitration was performed in a canyon vessel at SRP

  12. Preferential decorporation of americium by pulmonary administration of DTPA dry powder after inhalation of aged PuO2 containing americium in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After inhalation of plutonium oxides containing various percentages of americium in rats, we identified an acellular transient pulmonary compartment, the epithelial lining fluid (ELF), in which a fraction of actinide oxides dissolve prior to absorption and subsequent extrapulmonary deposit. Chelation therapy is usually considered to be poorly efficient after inhalation of actinide oxides. However, in the present study, prompt pulmonary administration of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) as a dry powder led to a decrease in actinide content in ELF together with a limitation of bone and liver deposits. Because americium is more soluble than plutonium, higher amounts of americium were found in ELF, extrapulmonary tissues and urine. Our results also demonstrated that the higher efficacy of DTPA on americium compared to plutonium in ELF induced a preferential inhibition of extrapulmonary deposit and a greater urinary excretion of americium compared to plutonium. All together, our data justify the use of an early and local DTPA treatment after inhalation of plutonium oxide aerosols in which americium can be in high proportion such as in aged compounds. (authors)

  13. Luminescent properties of calcium iodide crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of preparation conditions, temperature and X radiation on luminescent properties of calcium iodide scintillating crystals is studied, the results are provided. The results obtained when studying spectral characteristics of CaI2 and CaI2:H2 crystals in case of optical and X-ray excitation in the temperature range of 90-400 K, allowance made for data obtained when studying luminescent properties of calcium iodide crystals activated by Cl-, Br-, OH- and Ca2+ impurities, permit assumption that band 236 nm observed in excitation spectra of calcium iodide crystals can stem from noncontrolled hydrogen impurity. Luminescence of the crystals with the maximum in the range of 395 nm is assigned to radiation recombination of excitons localized on H- ions

  14. Analytical performance of radiochemical method for americium determination in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an analytical method developed and adapted for separation and analysis of Plutonium (Pu) isotopes and Americium (Am) in urine samples. The proposed method will attend the demand of internal exposure monitoring program for workers involved mainly with dismantling rods and radioactive smoke detectors. In this experimental procedure four steps are involved as preparation of samples, sequential radiochemical separation, preparation of the source for electroplating and quantification by alpha spectrometry. In the first stage of radiochemical separation, plutonium is conventionally isolated employing the anion exchange technique. Americium isolation is achieved sequentially by chromatographic extraction (Tru.spec column) from the load and rinse solutions coming from the anion exchange column. The 243Am tracer is added into the sample as chemical yield monitors and to correct the results improving the precision and accuracy. The mean recovery obtained is 60%, and the detection limit for 24h urine sample is 1.0 mBq L-1 in accordance with the literature. Based in the preliminary results, the method is appropriate to be used in monitoring programme of workers with a potential risk of internal contamination. (author)

  15. Placental transfer of americium and plutonium in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actinide element release to the environment and subsequent transfer through food chains to pregnant women may present a radiation hazard to fetuses in utero. To measure americium incorporation, four groups of pregnant mice were intravenously dosed with four concentrations of 243Am citrate in late pregnancy. Concentrations of 243Am in fetuses, placentas, and maternal femur, liver, carcass and pelt were determined 48 hr after injection. Doses were chosen so that the number of atoms of 243Am in each injected dose was equal to the number of atoms of 239Pu used in an earlier study of transplacental movement. Results indicate that, atom for atom, americium is incorporated into fetal tissue in lesser amounts (10-25 times) than is plutonium when intravenously administered to pregnant mice in equal atom amounts. Tissue analyses indicated that, at low dose levels, the average fraction of the dose incorporated into the fetuses decreased as the dose to the pregnant mouse was increased. A similar pattern was noted for placentas and maternal femurs. Data indicate that one must make extrapolations from low dose data only to make reasonable and realistic estimates of the transplacental movement and fetal incorporation of environmental levels of actinide elements in man and other species. (author)

  16. Development of separation techniques of americium from reprocessing solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Americium(Am) and neptunium(Np) finally transfer to the waste stream in the current PUREX reprocessing process. As an option, some methods have been developed to recover Am and Np from the waste stream to decrease long-term toxicity of the high level waste. The most stable valence state of Am is III, but TBP (tri-n-butyl phosphate) which is an extractant used in the PUREX reprocessing does not extract Am(III). Therefore, some special extractants have been developed to recover Am(III). However, they also extract rare-earth elements(REs), which necessitates the separation process for Am from REs. We have been developing a separation process which consists of valence control of Am to the VI state and its extraction with TBP. This process allows Am recovery from reprocessing solution and Am separation from REs simultaneously. Americium(III) is oxidized to Am(VI) by electrochemical oxidation and chemical oxidation using peroxodisulfate ammonium and silver nitrate. The latter was adopted here because the chemical oxidation reaction proceeds faster than the electrochemical method. Reaction mechanisms of oxidation and extraction were investigated. Based on the mechanisms, we found that extraction efficiency could be improved and waste generation could be minimized. (author)

  17. Adsorption of radioactive iodide by natural zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two natural zeolites from Iranian deposits (clinoptilolite and natrolite) were characterized and their ability for adsorption of iodide from nuclear wastewaters was evaluated. The adsorption behavior was studied on natural and modified zeolites by γ-spectrometry using 131I as radiotracer. Adsorption isotherms and distribution coefficient (Kd) were measured. The results showed that clinoptilolite is a more promising zeolite for removal of iodide compared to natrolite. Furthermore, the adsorption was higher in silver, lead and thallium forms, whereas the lowest desorption was observed in lead modified zeolite. (author)

  18. The partitioning of iodides into steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to estimate the likely releases of radioactive iodine during steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) faults, it is necessary to know the relevant partition coefficients as a function of temperature and solution composition. It has been suggested previously that, under SGTR fault conditions, partitioning of free or ion-paired I- into the steam may be more extensive than that for molecular HI. This report uses available information on the partitioning of iodides and other salts to provide a means of estimating the partition coefficient of the iodide ion as a function of boric acid concentration and temperature. (author)

  19. Kinetic Isotope Effects in the Reduction of Methyl Iodide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil

    1999-01-01

    a-Deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIE's) have been determined for the reaction of methyl iodide with a series of reducing agents. Reagents which transfer hydride ion in an SN2 reaction show small inverse or small normal KIE's. Reagents which transfer an electron to methyl iodide to produce...... methyl radical show large normal KIE's up to 20 % per a-D. Large KIE's were found for the reaction of methyl iodide with sodium, for Pd-catalyzed reaction of methyl iodide with hydrogen, for ET at a platinum cathode, for ET from benzophenone ketyl or from sodium naphthalenide, for iron catalyzed ET from...... a Grignard reagent to methyl iodide, and for reduction of methyl iodide with tributyltin hydride or with gaseous hydrogen iodide. Very small KIE's were found for electron transfer to methyl iodide from magnesium in ether or from sodium in ammonia. The reason may be that these reactions are transport...

  20. Solubility of Plutonium (IV) Oxalate During Americium/Curium Pretreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudisill, T.S.

    1999-08-11

    Approximately 15,000 L of solution containing isotopes of americium and curium (Am/Cm) will undergo stabilization by vitrification at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Prior to vitrification, an in-tank pretreatment will be used to remove metal impurities from the solution using an oxalate precipitation process. Material balance calculations for this process, based on solubility data in pure nitric acid, predict approximately 80 percent of the plutonium in the solution will be lost to waste. Due to the uncertainty associated with the plutonium losses during processing, solubility experiments were performed to measure the recovery of plutonium during pretreatment and a subsequent precipitation process to prepare a slurry feed for a batch melter. A good estimate of the plutonium content of the glass is required for planning the shipment of the vitrified Am/Cm product to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).The plutonium solubility in the oxalate precipitation supernate during pretreatment was 10 mg/mL at 35 degrees C. In two subsequent washes with a 0.25M oxalic acid/0.5M nitric acid solution, the solubility dropped to less than 5 mg/mL. During the precipitation and washing steps, lanthanide fission products in the solution were mostly insoluble. Uranium, and alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metal impurities were soluble as expected. An elemental material balance for plutonium showed that greater than 94 percent of the plutonium was recovered in the dissolved precipitate. The recovery of the lanthanide elements was generally 94 percent or higher except for the more soluble lanthanum. The recovery of soluble metal impurities from the precipitate slurry ranged from 15 to 22 percent. Theoretically, 16 percent of the soluble oxalates should have been present in the dissolved slurry based on the dilution effects and volumes of supernate and wash solutions removed. A trace level material balance showed greater than 97 percent recovery of americium-241 (from the beta dec

  1. Solubility of Plutonium (IV) Oxalate During Americium/Curium Pretreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately 15,000 L of solution containing isotopes of americium and curium (Am/Cm) will undergo stabilization by vitrification at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Prior to vitrification, an in-tank pretreatment will be used to remove metal impurities from the solution using an oxalate precipitation process. Material balance calculations for this process, based on solubility data in pure nitric acid, predict approximately 80 percent of the plutonium in the solution will be lost to waste. Due to the uncertainty associated with the plutonium losses during processing, solubility experiments were performed to measure the recovery of plutonium during pretreatment and a subsequent precipitation process to prepare a slurry feed for a batch melter. A good estimate of the plutonium content of the glass is required for planning the shipment of the vitrified Am/Cm product to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).The plutonium solubility in the oxalate precipitation supernate during pretreatment was 10 mg/mL at 35 degrees C. In two subsequent washes with a 0.25M oxalic acid/0.5M nitric acid solution, the solubility dropped to less than 5 mg/mL. During the precipitation and washing steps, lanthanide fission products in the solution were mostly insoluble. Uranium, and alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metal impurities were soluble as expected. An elemental material balance for plutonium showed that greater than 94 percent of the plutonium was recovered in the dissolved precipitate. The recovery of the lanthanide elements was generally 94 percent or higher except for the more soluble lanthanum. The recovery of soluble metal impurities from the precipitate slurry ranged from 15 to 22 percent. Theoretically, 16 percent of the soluble oxalates should have been present in the dissolved slurry based on the dilution effects and volumes of supernate and wash solutions removed. A trace level material balance showed greater than 97 percent recovery of americium-241 (from the beta dec

  2. Americium Transmutation Feasibility When Used as Burnable Absorbers - 12392

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of plutonium in Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel in traditional Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) assemblies leads to greater americium production which is not addressed in MOX recycling. The transuranic nuclides (TRU) contribute the most to the radiotoxicity of nuclear waste and a reduction of the TRU stockpile would greatly reduce the overall radiotoxicity of what must be managed. Am-241 is a TRU of particular concern because it is the dominant contributor of total radiotoxicity for the first 1000 years in a repository. This research explored the feasibility of transmuting Am-241 by using varying amounts in MOX rods being used in place of burnable absorbers and evaluated with respect to the impact on incineration and transmutation of transuranics in MOX fuel as well as the impact on safety. This research concludes that the addition of americium to a non-uniform fuel assembly is a viable method of transmuting Am-241, holding down excess reactivity in the core while serving as a burnable poison, as well as reducing the radiotoxicity of high level waste that must be managed. The use of Am/MOX hybrid fuel assemblies to transmute americium was researched using multiple computer codes. Am-241 was shown in this study to be able to hold down excess reactivity at the beginning of cycle and shape the power distribution in the core with assemblies of varying americium content loaded in a pattern similar to the traditional use of assemblies with varying amounts of burnable absorbers. The feasibility, safety, and utility of using americium to create an Am/MOX hybrid non-uniform core were also evaluated. The core remained critical to a burnup of 22,000 MWD/MTM. The power coefficient of reactivity as well as the temperature and power defects were sufficiently negative to provide a prompt feedback mechanism in case of a transient and prevent a power excursion, thus ensuring inherent safety and protection of the core. As shown here as well as many other studies, this non

  3. Removal of americium from effluent generated during the purification of plutonium by anion exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noronha, Donald M.; Pius, Illipparambil C.; Chaudhury, Satyajeet [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Fuel Chemistry Div.

    2015-07-01

    Studies have been carried out on removal of americium from the effluent generated during anion exchange purification of plutonium. Americium 241, generated by the beta decay of Plutonium-241, is the major source of a activity in this highly acidic effluent and its removal would render the waste easily disposable. A simple and effective co-precipitation method, using thorium oxalate has been investigated for the treatment of this alpha active aqueous waste. Experiments have been carried out to identify optimum conditions to obtain high percentage co-precipitation with minimum amount of co-precipitant. Efforts were carried out to correlate the optimum conditions of co-precipitation of americium obtained in these experiments with solubility of thorium oxalate and americium oxalate calculated from solubility products of these compounds, stability constants of thorium and americium oxalate complexes taken from literature. The saturation capacity of thorium oxalate for Am(III) was also calculated by analyzing the K{sub d} value data using Langmuir adsorption equation. The strong tendency of americium to get co-precipitated and the high capacity exhibited by thorium oxalate for the uptake of americium indicate feasibility of using this method for the treatment of anion exchange effluent.

  4. Removal of americium from effluent generated during the purification of plutonium by anion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies have been carried out on removal of americium from the effluent generated during anion exchange purification of plutonium. Americium 241, generated by the beta decay of Plutonium-241, is the major source of a activity in this highly acidic effluent and its removal would render the waste easily disposable. A simple and effective co-precipitation method, using thorium oxalate has been investigated for the treatment of this alpha active aqueous waste. Experiments have been carried out to identify optimum conditions to obtain high percentage co-precipitation with minimum amount of co-precipitant. Efforts were carried out to correlate the optimum conditions of co-precipitation of americium obtained in these experiments with solubility of thorium oxalate and americium oxalate calculated from solubility products of these compounds, stability constants of thorium and americium oxalate complexes taken from literature. The saturation capacity of thorium oxalate for Am(III) was also calculated by analyzing the Kd value data using Langmuir adsorption equation. The strong tendency of americium to get co-precipitated and the high capacity exhibited by thorium oxalate for the uptake of americium indicate feasibility of using this method for the treatment of anion exchange effluent.

  5. Barium iodide and strontium iodide crystals andd scintillators implementing the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Stephen A; Cherepy, Nerine J; Hull, Giulia E; Drobshoff, Alexander D; Burger, Arnold

    2013-11-12

    In one embodiment, a material comprises a crystal comprising strontium iodide providing at least 50,000 photons per MeV. A scintillator radiation detector according to another embodiment includes a scintillator optic comprising europium-doped strontium iodide providing at least 50,000 photons per MeV. A scintillator radiation detector in yet another embodiment includes a scintillator optic comprising SrI.sub.2 and BaI.sub.2, wherein a ratio of SrI.sub.2 to BaI.sub.2 is in a range of between 0:1 A method for manufacturing a crystal suitable for use in a scintillator includes mixing strontium iodide-containing crystals with a source of Eu.sup.2+, heating the mixture above a melting point of the strontium iodide-containing crystals, and cooling the heated mixture near the seed crystal for growing a crystal. Additional materials, systems, and methods are presented.

  6. Developments in mercuric iodide gamma ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mercuric iodide (HgI2) gamma ray imaging array and camera system previously described have been characterized for spatial and energy resolution. Based on these data a new camera is being developed to more fully exploit the potential of the array. Characterization results and design criteria for the new camera will be presented. (orig.)

  7. Developments in mercuric iodide gamma ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patt, B. E.; Beyerle, A. G.; Dolin, R. C.; Ortale, C.

    1989-11-01

    A mercuric iodide (HgI2) gamma ray imaging array and camera system previously described have been characterized for spatial and energy resolution. Based on these data a new camera is being developed to more fully exploit the potential of the array. Characterization results and design criteria for the new camera will be presented.

  8. Developments in mercuric iodide gamma ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patt, B.E.; Beyerle, A.G.; Dolin, R.C.; Ortale, C.

    1987-01-01

    A mercuric iodide gamma-ray imaging array and camera system previously described has been characterized for spatial and energy resolution. Based on this data a new camera is being developed to more fully exploit the potential of the array. Characterization results and design criterion for the new camera will be presented. 2 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Developments in mercuric iodide gamma ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patt, B.E.; Beyerle, A.G.; Dolin, R.C.; Ortale, C. (EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Goleta, CA (USA). Santa Barbara Operations)

    1989-11-01

    A mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) gamma ray imaging array and camera system previously described have been characterized for spatial and energy resolution. Based on these data a new camera is being developed to more fully exploit the potential of the array. Characterization results and design criteria for the new camera will be presented. (orig.).

  10. Scintillator handbook with emphasis on cesium iodide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidd, J. L.; Dabbs, J. R.; Levine, N.

    1973-01-01

    This report provides a background of reasonable depth and reference material on scintillators in general. Particular attention is paid to the cesium iodide scintillators as used in the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO) experiments. It is intended especially for use by persons such as laboratory test personnel who need to obtain a working knowledge of these materials and their characteristics in a short time.

  11. 21 CFR 184.1634 - Potassium iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ingredient meets the specifications of the “Food Chemicals Codex,” 3d Ed. (1981), pp. 246-247, which is... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium iodide. 184.1634 Section 184.1634 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  12. Iodide-trapping defect of the thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a grossly hypothyroid 50-year-old woman, mentally retarded since birth. On the basis of her history of recurrent goitre, absence of 131I neck uptake and a low saliva/plasma 131I ratio, congenital hypothyroidism due to a defect of the iodide-trapping mechanism was diagnosed. Other family members studied did not have the defect

  13. Selective leaching studies of deep-sea sediments loaded with americium, neptunium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of selective leaching experiments were undertaken to investigate the solid phase speciation and distribution of americium, neptunium and plutonium which had been experimentally loaded onto different marine sediment types. The chemical leaches employed showed rather poor selectivity but certain trends were evident. Adsorption was not by ion exchange. Americium showed a preferential affinity for carbonate and plutonium for organic matter. Neptunium appeared to have no preferential affinities. Americium was sorbed by acetic acid residues (CaCO3 removed) and by unleached carbonate-rich sediments with equal efficiency. This indicates that it is able to diversify its solid phase affinity/distribution depending upon which solid phases are available. (author)

  14. Cu-catalyzed trifluoromethylation of aryl iodides with trifluoromethylzinc reagent prepared in situ from trifluoromethyl iodide

    OpenAIRE

    Yuzo Nakamura; Motohiro Fujiu; Tatsuya Murase; Yoshimitsu Itoh; Hiroki Serizawa; Kohsuke Aikawa; Koichi Mikami

    2013-01-01

    The trifluoromethylation of aryl iodides catalyzed by copper(I) salt with trifluoromethylzinc reagent prepared in situ from trifluoromethyl iodide and Zn dust was accomplished. The catalytic reactions proceeded under mild reaction conditions, providing the corresponding aromatic trifluoromethylated products in moderate to high yields. The advantage of this method is that additives such as metal fluoride (MF), which are indispensable to activate silyl groups for transmetallation in the corresp...

  15. Determining Of Iodide Concentration In Salt Using Iodide Ion Selective Electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are various studies about the determination of iodide or iodinate in table salt samples. Iodo metric method (5), spectrophotometric method(8), gravimetric method (2), chromatographic method (6), differential potentiometric method (3).But with ion selective electrode technicality the determination of iodide in geothermal water was only determined. So, in this work, the concentration of iodide in control table salt, iodinate table salt samples were determination, using iodide ion selective electrode . Iodide calibration graph was plotted according to the standard method, and the results of control salt samples which contain a defined concentration of iodide, and known amount of ionic strength adjustment buffer, were compatible with the assigned values. The linearity and sensitivity of method were studied, the results were 50 mg.L-1 and 0.2 mg.L-1 respectively . While, when the method applied on iodinate table salt samples which contain a amount concentration of potassium iodate (KIO3), the results were inconsistent. So, we had to convert the KIO3 to I-1 with oxidation - reduction reaction. By using convenient reduction in acidic medium . Iodate calibration graph was plotted according to the last standard method, and the results of control iodinate table salt samples were good with relative standard deviation was 3 %. (author)

  16. Solubility of americium collected on an aerosol filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetics of dissolution of undefined americium aerosol in simulated serum ultrafiltrate was studied. 241Am was present in aerosol collected at a workplace, where an intake of 241Am had occurred formerly. Dissolution experiments in four parts of an aerosol filter were carried out either in ambient air or under CO2 and pH was kept within physiological range. Two?phase kinetics was found in both cases with dissolution half?times for rapid and slow phases ranging from 0.16 to 0.23 d and from 150 to 500 d, respectively. Regardless data dispersion, found half?times justify use of class M model in intake assessment. (author)

  17. The 1976 Hanford Americium Accident: Then and Now

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbaugh, Eugene H.

    2013-10-02

    The 1976 chemical explosion of an 241Am ion exchange column at a Hanford Site waste management facility resulted in the extreme contamination of a worker with 241Am, nitric acid and debris. The worker underwent medical treatment for acid burns, as well as wound debridement, extensive personal skin decontamination and long-term DTPA chelation therapy for decorporation of americium-241. Because of the contamination levels and prolonged decontamination efforts, care was provided for the first three months at the unique Emergency Decontamination Facility with gradual transition to the patient’s home occurring over another two months. The medical treatment, management, and dosimetry of the patient have been well documented in numerous reports and journal articles. The lessons learned with regard to patient treatment and effectiveness of therapy still form the underlying philosophy of treatment for contaminated injuries. Changes in infrastructure and facilities as well as societal expectations make for interesting speculation as to how responses might differ today.

  18. Separation of americium from curium by oxidation and ion exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Jonathan D; Shehee, Thomas C; Clearfield, Abraham; Hobbs, David T

    2012-08-21

    Nuclear energy has the potential to be a clean alternative to fossil fuels, but in order for it to play a major role in the US, many questions about the back end of the fuel cycle must be addressed. One of these questions is the difficult separation of americium from curium. Here, we report the oxidation of Am in two systems, perchloric acid and nitric acid and the affect of changing the acid has on the oxidation. K(d) values were observed and a direct separation factor was calculated and was seen to be as high as 20 for four metal(IV) pillared phosphate phosphonate inorganic organic hybrid ion exchange materials. These ion exchangers are characterized by very low selectivity for cations with low charge but extremely high uptake of ions of high charge. PMID:22827724

  19. Monte Carlo modeling of spallation targets containing uranium and americium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron production and transport in spallation targets made of uranium and americium are studied with a Geant4-based code MCADS (Monte Carlo model for Accelerator Driven Systems). A good agreement of MCADS results with experimental data on neutron- and proton-induced reactions on 241Am and 243Am nuclei allows to use this model for simulations with extended Am targets. It was demonstrated that MCADS model can be used for calculating the values of critical mass for 233,235U, 237Np, 239Pu and 241Am. Several geometry options and material compositions (U, U + Am, Am, Am2O3) are considered for spallation targets to be used in Accelerator Driven Systems. All considered options operate as deep subcritical targets having neutron multiplication factor of k∼0.5. It is found that more than 4 kg of Am can be burned in one spallation target during the first year of operation

  20. Pretreatment of americium/curium solutions for vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification will be used to stabilize an americium/curium (Am/Cm) solution presently stored in F-Canyon for eventual transport to the heavy isotope programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Prior to vitrification, an in-tank oxalate precipitation and a series of oxalic/nitric acid washes will be used to separate these elements and lanthanide fission products from the bulk of the uranium and metal impurities present in the solution. Pretreatment development experiments were performed to understand the behavior of the lanthanides and the metal impurities during the oxalate precipitation and properties of the precipitate slurry. The results of these experiments will be used to refine the target glass composition allowing optimization of the primary processing parameters and design of the solution transfer equipment

  1. Plutonium and americium in sediments of Lithuanian lakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assessment of contribution of the global and the Chernobyl NPP (Nuclear Power Plant) accident plutonium and americium to plutonium pollution in sediments of Lithuanian lakes is presented. Theoretical evaluation of activity ratios of 238Pu/239+240Pu and 241Pu/239+240Pu in the reactor of unit 4 of the Chernobyl NPP before the accident was performed by means of the ORIGEN-ARP code from the SCALE 4.4A program package. Non-uniform distribution of radionuclides in depositions on the Lithuanian territory after nuclear weapon tests and the Chernobyl NPP accident is experimentally observed by measuring the lake sediment pollution with actinides. The activity concentration of sediments polluted with plutonium ranges from 2.0 ± 0.5 Bq/kg d.w. (dry weight) in Lake Asavelis to 14 ± 2 Bq/kg d.w. in Lake Juodis. The ratio of activity concentrations of plutonium isotopes 238Pu/239+240Pu measured by α-spectrometry in the 10-cm-thick upper layer of bottom sediment varies from 0.03 in Lake Juodis to 0.3 in Lake Zuvintas. The analysis of the ratio values shows that the deposition of the Chernobyl origin plutonium is prevailing in southern and south-western regions of Lithuania. Plutonium of nuclear weapon tests origin in sediments of lakes is observed on the whole territory of Lithuania, and it is especially distinct in central Lithuania. The americium activity due to 241Pu decay after the Chernobyl NPP accident and global depositions in bottom sediments of Lithuanian lakes has been evaluated to be from 0.9 to 5.7 Bq/kg. (author)

  2. Transfer of the human sodium/iodide symporter gene enhances iodide uptake in melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: Radioiodide therapy using 131I is effective for patients who have benign thyroid diseases or differentiated thyroid carcinoma. The transport of iodide across the cell membrane is mediated by the human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS). To investigate the feasibility of 131I therapy for melanoma, we established melanoma cells stably expressing hNIS gene that can be modulated and studied in vivo and in vitro. Material and Methods: We transfected hNIS gene into a mouse melanoma cell line (B16) by electroporation. Iodide accumulation was assessed under various extracellular concentrations of sodium and iodide, and iodide efflux was also evaluated. Biodistribution and tumor imaging were studied using tumor-bearing mice. Results: We established a novel cell line B16-3 stably expressing the hNIS gene from B16. 125I uptake by B16-3 cells is between 6-17-fold that of B16 cells and 8-33-fold that of cell lines transduced with the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3 only. Iodide uptake was completely inhibited by 1mmol/L perchlorate and was dependent on external sodium and iodide concentrations. The velocity of iodide efflux from B16-3 cells was almost equal to that of FRTL-5 thyroid cells (T1/2 = 4min). In the biodistribution study using B16-3-xenografted mice, high tumor uptake of 131I was shown at 1 hour after injection, and tumor-to-normal tissue ratios were also high, except in the thyroid and stomach. However, the residual iodide in tumor lessened with time, reaching less than 3% at 24 h after injection. Conclusion: The transduction of he hNIS gene per se is sufficient to induce iodide transport in melanoma cells in vivo and in vitro. With regard to therapeutic application, however, further investigation is necessary to determine a method of maintaining radioiodide in the cells long enough to produce greater therapeutic effects

  3. Kinetic parameters of transformation of americium and plutonium physicochemical forms in podsol soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetic parameters of transformation of americium and plutonium physicochemical forms have been estimated and the prognosis of fixing and remobilization of these nuclides in podsol soils have been made on that basis in the work. (authors)

  4. Relativistic density functional theory modeling of plutonium and americium higher oxide molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsevskii, Andréi; Mosyagin, Nikolai S.; Titov, Anatoly V.; Kiselev, Yuri M.

    2013-07-01

    The results of electronic structure modeling of plutonium and americium higher oxide molecules (actinide oxidation states VI through VIII) by two-component relativistic density functional theory are presented. Ground-state equilibrium molecular structures, main features of charge distributions, and energetics of AnO3, AnO4, An2On (An=Pu, Am), and PuAmOn, n = 6-8, are determined. In all cases, molecular geometries of americium and mixed plutonium-americium oxides are similar to those of the corresponding plutonium compounds, though chemical bonding in americium oxides is markedly weaker. Relatively high stability of the mixed heptoxide PuAmO7 is noticed; the Pu(VIII) and especially Am(VIII) oxides are expected to be unstable.

  5. Distribution of uranium, americium and plutonium in the biomass of freshwater macrophytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zotina, T.A.; Kalacheva, G.S.; Bolsunovsky, A.YA. [Institute of Biophysics SB RAS, Akademgorodok, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    Accumulation of uranium ({sup 238}U), americium ({sup 241}Am) and plutonium ({sup 242}Pu) and their distribution in cell compartments and biochemical components of the biomass of aquatic plants Elodea canadensis, Ceratophyllum demersum, Myrioplyllum spicatum and aquatic moss Fontinalis antipyretica have been investigated in laboratory batch experiments. Isotopes of uranium, americium and plutonium taken up from the water by Elodea canadensis apical shoots were mainly absorbed by cell walls, plasmalemma and organelles. A small portion of isotopes (about 6-13 %) could be dissolved in cytoplasm. The major portion (76-92 %) of americium was bound to cell wall cellulose-like polysaccharides of Elodea canadensis, Myriophyllum spicatum, Ceratophyllum demersum and Fontinalis antipyretica, 8-23 % of americium activity was registered in the fraction of proteins and carbohydrates, and just a small portion (< 1%) in lipid fraction. The distribution of plutonium in the biomass fraction of Elodea was similar to that of americium. Hence, americium and plutonium had the highest affinity to cellulose-like polysaccharides in Elodea biomass. Distribution of uranium in the biomass of Elodea differed essentially from that of transuranium elements: a considerable portion of uranium was recorded in the fraction of protein and carbohydrates (51 %). From our data we can assume that uranium has higher affinity to carbohydrates than proteins. (authors)

  6. Separation of curium and americium microquantities by chromatographic method with introduction of separating ions. 2. Effect of cadmium ion quantity and method of it introduction in the system on efficiency of curium and americium separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of fractionating cadmium ion and a method of it introduction in the system on efficiency of separation of curium and americium with the use of NTA solutions as an eluent is investigated. It is established that in contrast to mutual sorption of curium, americium and cadmium their selective sorption contributes more complete separation of curium and americium. It is shown that growth of quantity of introduced cadmium increased efficiency of separation. Elution rate not products effect on separation process

  7. Mercuric iodide X-ray camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patt, B. E.; del Duca, A.; Dolin, R.; Ortale, C.

    1986-02-01

    A prototype X-ray camera utilizing a 1.5- by 1.5-in., 1024-element, thin mercuric iodide detector array has been tested and evaluated. The microprocessor-based camera is portable and operates at room temperature. Events can be localized within 1-2 mm at energies below 60 keV and within 5-6 mm at energies on the order of 600 keV.

  8. Mercuric iodide x-ray camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prototype x-ray camera utilizing a 1.5- by 1.5-in., 1024-element, thin mercuric iodide detector array has been tested and evaluated. The microprocessor-based camera is portable and operates at room temperature. Events can be localized within 1 to 2 mm at energies below 60 keV and within 5 to 6 mm at energies on the order of 600 keV. 5 refs., 7 figs

  9. Mercuric iodide X-ray camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patt, B.E.; Del Duca, A.; Dolin, R.; Ortale, C.

    1986-02-01

    A prototype x-ray camera utilizing a 1.5- by 1.5-inch, 1024-element, thin mercuric iodide detector array has been tested and evaluated. The microprocessor-based camera is portable and operates at room temperature. Events can be localized within 1-2 mm at energies below 60 keV and within 5-6 mm at energies on the order of 600 keV.

  10. Mercuric iodide x-ray camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patt, B.E.; Del Duca, A.; Dolin, R.; Ortale, C.

    1985-01-01

    A prototype x-ray camera utilizing a 1.5- by 1.5-in., 1024-element, thin mercuric iodide detector array has been tested and evaluated. The microprocessor-based camera is portable and operates at room temperature. Events can be localized within 1 to 2 mm at energies below 60 keV and within 5 to 6 mm at energies on the order of 600 keV. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Mercuric iodide X-ray camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prototype x-ray camera utilizing a 1.5- by 1.5-inch, 1024-element, thin mercuric iodide detector array has been tested and evaluated. The microprocessor-based camera is portable and operates at room temperature. Events can be localized within 1-2 mm at energies below 60 keV and within 5-6 mm at energies on the order of 600 keV

  12. Composition and properties of thallium mercury iodide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, John H.; Schaupp, Christopher; Yang, Yuan; Zhang, Zhengming; Novinson, Thomas; Hoffard, Theresa

    1990-10-01

    Conflicting reports exist in the literature concerning the composition of thallium mercury iodide. Solid state synthesis with HgI 2 and TlI has been reported to give Tl 4HgI 6 while synthesis from solution has been reported to give Tl 2HgI 4. In this report we show that the "orange compound" precipitating from solution is actually a 1:1 mole ratio mixture of Tl 4HgI 6 and HgI 2. Pure Tl 4HgI 6, which is yellow, can be produced by heating the mixture at 100°C for several days to volatilize HgI 2 or more simply, by adding Tl(I) to a solution containing 2:1 KI:K 2HgI 4 to provide the additional iodide ions needed for Tl 4HgI 6. Tl 4HgI 6, unlike Ag 2HgI 4 and Cu 2HgI 4, has no sharp thermochromic changes and has no measurable ionic conductivity. This provides another example of the significant role the metal ion plans in determining structure and properties of metal mercury iodide compounds.

  13. Americium(3) solvent extraction by oxides of dialkyl(diaryl)[dialkylcarbamoylmethyl]phosphines (CMPO) from perchloric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extraction of americium(3) from perchloric acid solutions by CMPO was investigated. It is shown that americium(3) is much more effectively extracted from perchloric acid solutions, than from nitric acid ones, and increase in americium distribution coefficient depends considerably on reagent nature. As a consequence, anomalous aryl effect increases significantly in perchloric acid solutions. The value of anomalous aryl effect depends directly on stoichiometry of extracted complexes in nitric acid and perchloric acid media. Conditions for extractional concentration of americium up to the 100-fold one with small reagent consumption were suggested

  14. Effect of nitrogen and oxygen on radiolysis of iodide solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasawa, H.; Endo, M. [Hitachi Ltd., Power and Industrial System R+D Divisions, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    The effect of nitrogen and oxygen on radiolysis of iodide solution was examined. Direct decomposition of nitrogen by {gamma}-radiation produced nitric acid to decrease a water pH. This resulted in the iodine formation in the radiolysis of iodide solution. Hydrogen peroxide was produced by the radiolysis of water containing oxygen. This worked a reducing agent to suppress the formation of iodine in the radiolysis of iodide solution. In the analytical model, fourteen iodine species were considered and reaction scheme consisted in 124 reactions. The analytical model could estimate the oxidation state of iodide ions. (author) 4 figs., 4 refs.

  15. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray...

  16. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray spectrometers. Two...

  17. Extraction of Americium(III) by diglycolamides in ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work, the extraction behavior of Am(lII) in the three isomeric DGAs, TODGA, DEHDODGA and TEHDGA in two ionic liquids, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(triflouromethane sulphonyl)imide (C4mimNTf2) and 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(triflouromethanesulphonyl)imide (C4mpyNTf2) is compared. The distribution ratio of americium was determined at various acidities ranging from 1M to 8M. The distribution values were found to decrease with increase in aqueous phase acidity upto 3M. The DAm values then marginally increased with increase of acidity from 3 to 4M followed by a decrease in distribution values. The distribution ratio obtained for various DGAs followed the order TEHDGA < TODGA < DEHDODGA at aqueous phase acidities ranging from 1-4 M. When the aqueous nitric acid concentration was higher than 4M, the distribution values followed the order DEHDODGA < TEHDGA < TODGA. The anomalous behaviour of unsymmetrical diglycolamide in ionic liquid medium was investigated by IR spectroscopy. The study revealed that the unprotonated fraction of DGA (i.e. the free DGA) increased in the order TEHDGA < TODGA < DEHDODGA, which seems to be responsible for the observed anomalous extraction trend in DEHDODGA in ionic liquid medium

  18. Extraction of americium and europium by CMPO-substituted adamantylcalixarenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eight p-adamantylcalix[4]arene derivatives, bearing four CMPO-like functions [-(CH2)n-NH-C(O)-CH2-P(O)Ph2] at the wide (4a,b, n = 0, 1) or narrow (5a-c and 6a-c, n = 2-4) rims were synthesized for the first time. Studies of the extraction of americium(III) and europium(III) from 3 M HNO3 solutions to organic phases (dichloromethane, m-nitro-trifluoromethylbenzene) showed: (i) The extraction ability for all the adamantylcalixarene ligands is much better than for their monomeric analogues -N-(1-adamantyl)-, N-(1-adamantylmethyl)- and N,N-(dibutyl)carbamoylmethyldiphenylphosphine oxides 7a, 7b, 8; (ii) The extraction percentage increases strongly with increasing length of the spacer for all types of ligands 4-6, and best extraction results were found for 4b (n = 1) and 5c (n = 4); (iii) The separation coefficient DAm/DEu for the investigated compounds did not exceed 2, which is close to the narrow rim CMPO calixarenes, studied earlier; (iv) Variation of the spacer length between CMPO groups attached to the 1,3- and 2,4-positions of the calixarene platform in 6 did not lead to appreciably improved extractants, neither with respect to the extraction abilities (D) nor to the selectivities (DAm/DEu). (orig.)

  19. Effect of americium-241 on luminous bacteria. Role of peroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrova, M., E-mail: maka-alexandrova@rambler.r [Siberian Federal University, Svobodny 79, 660041 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Rozhko, T. [Siberian Federal University, Svobodny 79, 660041 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Vydryakova, G. [Institute of Biophysics SB RAS, Akademgorodok 50, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Kudryasheva, N. [Siberian Federal University, Svobodny 79, 660041 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Biophysics SB RAS, Akademgorodok 50, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-15

    The effect of americium-241 ({sup 241}Am), an alpha-emitting radionuclide of high specific activity, on luminous bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum was studied. Traces of {sup 241}Am in nutrient media (0.16-6.67 kBq/L) suppressed the growth of bacteria, but enhanced luminescence intensity and quantum yield at room temperature. Lower temperature (4 {sup o}C) increased the time of bacterial luminescence and revealed a stage of bioluminescence inhibition after 150 h of bioluminescence registration start. The role of conditions of exposure the bacterial cells to the {sup 241}Am is discussed. The effect of {sup 241}Am on luminous bacteria was attributed to peroxide compounds generated in water solutions as secondary products of radioactive decay. Increase of peroxide concentration in {sup 241}Am solutions was demonstrated; and the similarity of {sup 241}Am and hydrogen peroxide effects on bacterial luminescence was revealed. The study provides a scientific basis for elaboration of bioluminescence-based assay to monitor radiotoxicity of alpha-emitting radionuclides in aquatic solutions. - Highlights: {yields} Am-241 in water solutions (A = 0.16-6.7 kBq/L) suppresses bacterial growth.{yields} Am-241 (A = 0.16-6.7 kBq/L) stimulate bacterial luminescence. {yields} Peroxides, secondary radiolysis products, cause increase of bacterial luminescence.

  20. Tritium and iodide diffusion through opalinus clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Mont Terri Project started in 1995 under the patronage of the Swiss National Hydrological and Geological Survey (SNHGS), and has the authorization of the Republique et Canton du Jura. The underground rock laboratory is located at the northwestern part of Switzerland (Canton Jura), in and beside the reconnaissance gallery of the Mont Terri motorway tunnel, one of the several tunnels of the A16 'Transjurane' motorway. The depth of overburden above the rock laboratory is approximately 300 meters. The project is aimed to investigate the geological, hydrogeological, geochemical and rock mechanical properties of the Opalinus Clay for assessing the feasibility and safety of a repository for radioactive waste placed in this type of host rock. One of the issues under study is radionuclide migration by diffusion through clays. As a part of this investigation, an interlaboratory comparison on small-scale diffusion experiments was carried out by three research laboratories: AEA Technology (UK), SCK-CEN (Belgium) and CIEMAT (Spain). The radionuclides investigated were tritium and iodine. This paper concerns to the methodological approach and results of the experiments undertaken by CIEMAT. The effective diffusion coefficients were measured for tritiated water and iodine (as Γ), resulting larger for tritium [(1.7±0.4)x10-11 m2/s] than for iodide [(2.7±0.3)x10-12 m2/s]. The porosity available for diffusion was calculated by using the time-lag method, but some results seemed unrealistic and showed a large variability. In general, tritium exhibited higher values of porosity than iodide (17 to 26% and 12 to 17%, respectively), which were consistent with the anion exclusion affecting the distribution of iodide into the clay pores. Copyright (2001) Material Research Society

  1. Transfer of the human sodium/iodide symporter gene enhances iodide uptake in melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To obtain human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) cDNA and to study its biological property and potential use as a therapeutic radioiodide for melanoma. Methods: hNIS gene cDNA was amplified with total RNA from human thyroid tissue by RT-PCR. The hNIS cDNA was inserted into cloning vector pUCm-T and subcloned into eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3. The recombinant plasmid pcDNA3-hNIS was introduced into B16 cells using the electroporation technique. The uptake and efflux of iodide was examined in vitro. Results: The cloned hNIS cDNA sequence was identical to the published sequence. Two novel cell lines named B16-A containing hNIS and B16-B containing pcDNA3 only were established. The resultant cell line B16-A accumulated 17 and 19 times more radioiodide in vitro than B16 and B16-B did, respectively. However the efflux of iodide from B16-A was also rapid ( T1/2=10 min). Conclusions: Our preliminary data indicate that the transduction of the hNIS gene per se is sufficient to induce iodide transport in melanoma cells in vitro, but its T1/2 is short. With regard to therapeutic application, however, further investigation is necessary so as to develop a method of maintaining more radioiodide in the cells for long enough to produce greater therapeutic effects

  2. Taming the Reactivity of Glycosyl Iodides To Achieve Stereoselective Glycosidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervay-Hague, Jacquelyn

    2016-01-19

    Although glycosyl iodides have been known for more than 100 years, it was not until the 21st century that their full potential began to be harnessed for complex glycoconjugate synthesis. Mechanistic studies in the late 1990s probed glycosyl iodide formation by NMR spectroscopy and revealed important reactivity features embedded in protecting-group stereoelectronics. Differentially protected sugars having an anomeric acetate were reacted with trimethylsilyl iodide (TMSI) to generate the glycosyl iodides. In the absence of C-2 participation, generation of the glycosyl iodide proceeded by inversion of the starting anomeric acetate stereochemistry. Once formed, the glycosyl iodide readily underwent in situ anomerization, and in the presence of excess iodide, equilibrium concentrations of α- and β-iodides were established. Reactivity profiles depended upon the identity of the sugar and the protecting groups adorning it. Consistent with the modern idea of disarmed versus armed sugars, ester protecting groups diminished the reactivity of glycosyl iodides and ether protecting groups enhanced the reactivity. Thus, acetylated sugars were slower to form the iodide and anomerize than their benzylated analogues, and these disarmed glycosyl iodides could be isolated and purified, whereas armed ether-protected iodides could only be generated and reacted in situ. All other things being equal, the β-iodide was orders of magnitude more reactive than the thermodynamically more stable α-iodide, consistent with the idea of in situ anomerization introduced by Lemieux in the mid-20th century. Glycosyl iodides are far more reactive than the corresponding bromides, and with the increased reactivity comes increased stereocontrol, particularly when forming α-linked linear and branched oligosaccharides. Reactions with per-O-silylated glycosyl iodides are especially useful for the synthesis of α-linked glycoconjugates. Silyl ether protecting groups make the glycosyl iodide so reactive

  3. Production of Molecular Iodine and Tri-iodide in the Frozen Solution of Iodide: Implication for Polar Atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kitae; Yabushita, Akihiro; Okumura, Masanori; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Cuevas, Carlos A; Blaszczak-Boxe, Christopher S; Min, Dae Wi; Yoon, Ho-Il; Choi, Wonyong

    2016-02-01

    The chemistry of reactive halogens in the polar atmosphere plays important roles in ozone and mercury depletion events, oxidizing capacity, and dimethylsulfide oxidation to form cloud-condensation nuclei. Among halogen species, the sources and emission mechanisms of inorganic iodine compounds in the polar boundary layer remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the production of tri-iodide (I3(-)) via iodide oxidation, which is negligible in aqueous solution, is significantly accelerated in frozen solution, both in the presence and the absence of solar irradiation. Field experiments carried out in the Antarctic region (King George Island, 62°13'S, 58°47'W) also showed that the generation of tri-iodide via solar photo-oxidation was enhanced when iodide was added to various ice media. The emission of gaseous I2 from the irradiated frozen solution of iodide to the gas phase was detected by using cavity ring-down spectroscopy, which was observed both in the frozen state at 253 K and after thawing the ice at 298 K. The accelerated (photo-)oxidation of iodide and the subsequent formation of tri-iodide and I2 in ice appear to be related with the freeze concentration of iodide and dissolved O2 trapped in the ice crystal grain boundaries. We propose that an accelerated abiotic transformation of iodide to gaseous I2 in ice media provides a previously unrecognized formation pathway of active iodine species in the polar atmosphere. PMID:26745029

  4. Recent developments in thick mercuric iodide spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, K.; Beyerle, A.; Lopez, B.; Markakis, J.; Ortale, C.; Schnepple, W.; van den Berg, L.

    1982-01-01

    Thick (approx. 1 cm) mercuric iodide gamma-ray detectors have been produced which show spectroscopic qualities at moderate detector biases (approx. 5 kV) comparable to those of thin spectrometers. Efficiency measurements indicate that the entire volume of the detectors is active. Spectra resolutions of less than 10% have been obtained for gamma-ray energies above 1 MeV. Short charge collection times have produced the best results. Measurement of crystal charge transport properties is discussed. A small amount of bias conditioning is necessary for best performance. Operating parameters of the detectors have been investigated.

  5. Large-area mercuric iodide photodectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markakis, J.; Ortale, C.; Schnepple, W.; Iwanczyk, J.; Dabrowski, A.

    1983-07-01

    The limits of the active area of mercuric iodide photodetectors imposed by the size of available crystals, electronic noise, and the uniformity of charge carrier collection are discussed. Theoretical calculations of the photodetector electronic noise are compared with the experimental results. Different entrance contacts were studied including semitransparent palladium films and conductive liquids. HgI2 photodetectors with active area up to 4 sq cm are matched with NaI(Tl) and CsI(Tl) scintillation crystals and are evaluated as gamma radiation spectrometers.

  6. Large-area mercuric iodide photodetectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markakis, J.; Ortale, C.; Schnepple, W.; Iwanczyk, J.; Dabrowski, A.

    1983-01-01

    This article discusses the limits of the active area of mercuric iodide photodetectors imposed by the size of available crystals, electronic noise, and the uniformity of charge carrier collection. Theoretical calculations of the photodetector electronic noise are compared with the experimental results. Different entrance contacts were studied including semitransparent palladium films and conductive liquids. HgI/sub 2/ photodetectors with active area up to 4 sq cm are matched with NaI(Tl) and CsI(Tl) scintillation crystals and are evaluated as gamma radiation spectrometers.

  7. The addition of iodine to tetramethylammonium iodide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, H.W.; Fleischer, M.

    1953-01-01

    The system tetramethylammonium iodide-iodine-toluene has been studied by the solubility method at 6 and at 25??. The compounds (CH3)4NI3, (CH3)4NI5 and (CH3)4NI11 were found to be stable phases at both temperatures. In addition, the compound (CH3)4NI10 was found at 6?? and the compound (CH3)4NI9 at 25??. The dissociation pressures of the compounds at these temperatures were calculated from the solubility data.

  8. Novel mercuric iodide polycrystalline nuclear particles counters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieber, M. [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel)]|[Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States); Zuck, A.; Braiman, M.; Nissenbaum, J. [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Polycrystalline mercuric iodide nuclear radiation detectors having areas between 0.01 to 100 cm{sup 2} and thicknesses 30 to 600 microns, have been fabricated with single, linear strip and square pixel contact. The large area detectors 10 to 600 cm{sup 2} were produced by industrial ceramic equipment while the smaller ones, about 1 cm{sup 2} area, were produced in the laboratory. The large detectors still had large leakage currents and the production process is being revised. The smaller detectors were tested and their response to lower and higher gamma energy, beta and even 100 GeV muons at CERN will be reported.

  9. Novel mercuric iodide polycrystalline nuclear particles counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycrystalline mercuric iodide nuclear radiation detectors having areas between 0.01 to 100 cm2 and thicknesses 30 to 600 microns, have been fabricated with single, linear strip and square pixel contact. The large area detectors 10 to 600 cm2 were produced by industrial ceramic equipment while the smaller ones, about 1 cm2 area, were produced in the laboratory. The large detectors still had large leakage currents and the production process is being revised. The smaller detectors were tested and their response to lower and higher gamma energy, beta and even 100 GeV muons at CERN will be reported

  10. Large-area mercuric iodide photodetectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article discusses the limits of the active area of mercuric iodide photodetectors imposed by the size of available crystals, electronic noise, and the uniformity of charge carrier collection. Theoretical calculations of the photodetector electronic noise are compared with the experimental results. Different entrance contacts were studied including semitransparent palladium films and conductive liquids. HgI2 photodetectors with active area up to 4 sq cm are matched with NaI(Tl) and CsI(Tl) scintillation crystals and are evaluated as gamma radiation spectrometers

  11. Electronic and optical properties of lead iodide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahuja, R.; Arwin, H.; Ferreira da Silva, A.;

    2002-01-01

    The electronic properties and the optical absorption of lead iodide (PbI2) have been investigated experimentally by means of optical absorption and spectroscopic ellipsometry, and theoretically by a full-potential linear muffin-tin-orbital method. PbI2 has been recognized as a very promising...... detector material with a large technological applicability. Its band-gap energy as a function of temperature has also been measured by optical absorption. The temperature dependence has been fitted by two different relations, and a discussion of these fittings is given. ©2002 American Institute of Physics....

  12. Phase 2 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soelberg, Nick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Watson, Tony [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear fission produces fission products (FPs) and activation products, including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Research, demonstrations, and some reprocessing plant experience have indicated that diatomic iodine can be captured with efficiencies high enough to meet regulatory requirements. Research on the capture of organic iodides has also been performed, but to a lesser extent. Several questions remain open regarding the capture of iodine bound in organic compounds. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has progressed according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. This report summarizes the second phase of methyl iodide adsorption work performed according to this test plan using the deep-bed iodine adsorption test system at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), performed during the second half of Fiscal Year (FY) 2014. Test results continue to show that methyl iodide adsorption using AgZ can achieve total iodine decontamination factors (DFs, ratios of uncontrolled and controlled total iodine levels) above 1,000, until breakthrough occurred. However, mass transfer zone depths are deeper for methyl iodide adsorption compared to diatomic iodine (I2) adsorption. Methyl iodide DFs for the Ag Aerogel test adsorption efficiencies were less than 1,000, and the methyl iodide mass transfer zone depth exceeded 8 inches. Additional deep-bed testing and analyses are recommended to (a) expand the data base for methyl iodide adsorption under various conditions specified in the methyl iodide test plan, and (b) provide more data for evaluating organic iodide reactions and reaction byproducts for different potential adsorption conditions.

  13. Separation and determination of americium in low-level alkaline waste of NPP origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, B.; Djingova, R.; Nikiforova, A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a short and cost-saving procedure for the determination of 241Am in sludge sample of the alkaline low-level radioactive waste (LL LRAW) collected from Nuclear Power Plant “Kozloduy”. The determination of americium was a part of a complex analytical approach, where group actinide separation was achieved. An anion exchange was used for separation of americium from uranium, plutonium and iron. For the separation of americium extraction with diethylhexyl phosphoric acid (DEHPA) was studied. The final radioactive samples were prepared by micro co-precipitation with NdF3, counted by alpha and gamma spectrometry. The procedure takes 2 hours. The recovery yield of the procedure amounts to (95 ± 1.5)% and the detection limit is 53 mBq/kg 241Am (t=150 000 s). The analytical procedure was applied for actual liquid wastes and results were compared to standard procedure.

  14. 21 CFR 520.763 - Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms. 520.763 Section 520.763 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms....

  15. Experimental research on performance of gaseous methyl iodide removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the circumstance of gaseous methyl iodide removal process in containment venting system, taking the deionized water and alkalescent sodium thiosulphate as absorber, the experimental researches on the performance of gaseous methyl iodide removal were carried out at different solution temperatures and concentrations. And the effects of two types of mechanisms, namely mass transfer and chemical reaction, on gaseous methyl iodide removal process were analyzed based on the experimental results. The research results show that at room temperature, the mass transfer mechanism plays a dominant role in gaseous methyl iodide removal process through the absorption of alkalescent sodium thiosulphate solution. Thus, the slow chemical reaction rate is the major factor that limits gaseous methyl iodide removal efficiency. With temperature increasing, the effect of chemical reaction is constantly enhanced in the methyl iodide removal process. However, the gas absorption process will get into an insensitive region when the reaction rate reaches to a certain point and the continuously enhancing chemical reaction rate will not greatly influence the removal efficiency. At that point, mass transfer performance becomes the major factor that limits gaseous methyl iodide removal process. The efficiency of gaseous methyl iodide removal can be further improved by necessary means of enhancing mass transfer process through increasing contact surface and so on. (authors)

  16. Dissolution of gaseous methyl iodide into aqueous sodium hydroxide solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absorption process of gaseous methyl iodide by water or sodium hydroxide solutions was investigated using a semi-flow type experimental apparatus by measuring the concentration of all measurable chemical species in both the gas and the liquid phase. The experimental temperature ranged from 288 to 311 K and the gaseous methyl iodide and aqueous sodium hydroxide concentrations were approximately 0.6 x 10-3 to 7 x 10-3 and 0 to 0.2 mol/dm3, respectively. It is estimated that the dissolution of methyl iodide into the sodium hydroxide solution proceeds according to the following steps. Step (1) Methyl iodide in air dissolves physically into the aqueous phase. Physical dissolution process obeys Henry's law. Step (2) Methyl iodide dissolved into the aqueous phase is decomposed by a base catalytic hydrolysis and produces methyl alcohol and iodide ion. The equilibrium constants of physical dissolution were obtained from the steady concentration in both the gas and the liquid phases in the semi-flow type experiment because the hydrolysis reaction rate of methyl iodide is very slow in comparison with the physical dissolution in this experimental conditions. The obtained value of the standard heat of solution of methyl iodide into water was 7.2 kcal/mol. Salting-out effect was observed when the concentration of sodium hydroxide in the absorbent was over 0.01 mol/dm3. (auth.)

  17. Americium 241 in vegetation of natural biocenoses and agrocenoses on Belarus territories contaminated with Chernobyl fall-out

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of beta-decay of plutonium 241 the content of americium 241 increases progressively in soils, contaminated with Chernobyl trans uranium elements. Americium 241 displayed higher (0,5 - 1,5-fold) biological mobility than isotopes of plutonium 239, 240. Activity of americium 241 in surface phyto mass of wild and cultural plants varies from 0,04 to 5,9 Bq/kg of dry weight. Americium 241 contribution to the total trans uranium elements contamination of plants made up 60 - 80% in 1996 - 1998. Investigation of trials from the areas adjacent to the 30-km zone showed that mobility of americium 241 and plutonium was 5 - 15 times as high as in the zone

  18. Iodide sensing via electrochemical etching of ultrathin gold films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iodide is an essential element for humans and animals and insufficient intake is still a major problem. Affordable and accurate methods are required to quantify iodide concentrations in biological and environmental fluids. A simple and low cost sensing device is presented which is based on iodide induced electrochemical etching of ultrathin gold films. The sensitivity of resistance measurements to film thickness changes is increased by using films with a thickness smaller than the electron mean free path. The underlying mechanism is demonstrated by simultaneous cyclic voltammetry experiments and resistance change measurements in a buffer solution. Iodide sensing is conducted in buffer solutions as well as in lake water with limits of detection in the range of 1 μM (127 μg L−1) and 2 μM (254 μg L−1), respectively. In addition, nanoholes embedded in the thin films are tested for suitability of optical iodide sensing based on localized surface plasmon resonance. (paper)

  19. Isotopic and elemental composition of plutonium/americium oxides influence pulmonary and extra-pulmonary distribution after inhalation in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biodistribution of plutonium and americium has been studied in a rat model after inhalation of two PuO2 powders in lungs and extra-pulmonary organs from 3 d to 3 mo. The main difference between the two powders was the content of americium (approximately 46% and 4.5% of total alpha activity). The PuO2 with a higher proportion of americium shows an accelerated transfer of activity from lungs to blood as compared to PuO2 with the lower americium content, illustrated by increased urinary excretion and higher bone and liver actinide retention. The total alpha activity measured reflects mostly the americium biological behavior. The activity contained in epithelial lining fluid, recovered in the acellular phase of broncho-alveolar lavages, mainly contains americium, whereas plutonium remains trapped in macrophages. Epithelial lining fluid could represent a transitional pulmonary compartment prior to translocation of actinides to the blood and subsequent deposition in extra-pulmonary retention organs. In addition, differential behaviors of plutonium and americium are also observed between the PuO2 powders with a higher dissolution rate for both plutonium and americium being obtained for the PuO2 with the highest americium content. Our results indicate that the biological behavior of plutonium and americium after translocation into blood differ two-fold: (1) for the two actinides for the same PuO2 aerosol, and (2) for the same actinide from the two different aerosols. These results highlight the importance of considering the specific behavior of each contaminant after accidental pulmonary intake when assessing extra-pulmonary deposits from the level of activity excreted in urine or for therapeutic strategy decisions. (authors)

  20. Determination of trace concentration of uranium in americium oxide samples by ICP-AES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A solvent extraction method has been developed for the determination of uranium (200-2000 ppm) in americium oxide samples. The method involves the quantitative separation of uranium from americium matrix using mixed solvent comprising 1.1M tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) +1% trialkyl phosphine oxide (TRPO) + 0.3 M tertiary butyl hydroquinone (TBHQ) in n-dodecane. Uranium from the organic is stripped into the aqueous phase with 0.8 M oxalic acid and determined by ICP-AES. The reliability of the method was ascertained by analytical recovery, which is found to be nearly 100%. (author)

  1. Conserved charged amino acid residues in the extracellular region of sodium/iodide symporter are critical for iodide transport activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ji-An

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sodium/iodide symporter (NIS mediates the active transport and accumulation of iodide from the blood into the thyroid gland. His-226 located in the extracellular region of NIS has been demonstrated to be critical for iodide transport in our previous study. The conserved charged amino acid residues in the extracellular region of NIS were therefore characterized in this study. Methods Fourteen charged residues (Arg-9, Glu-79, Arg-82, Lys-86, Asp-163, His-226, Arg-228, Asp-233, Asp-237, Arg-239, Arg-241, Asp-311, Asp-322, and Asp-331 were replaced by alanine. Iodide uptake abilities of mutants were evaluated by steady-state and kinetic analysis. The three-dimensional comparative protein structure of NIS was further modeled using sodium/glucose transporter as the reference protein. Results All the NIS mutants were expressed normally in the cells and targeted correctly to the plasma membrane. However, these mutants, except R9A, displayed severe defects on the iodide uptake. Further kinetic analysis revealed that mutations at conserved positively charged amino acid residues in the extracellular region of NIS led to decrease NIS-mediated iodide uptake activity by reducing the maximal rate of iodide transport, while mutations at conserved negatively charged residues led to decrease iodide transport by increasing dissociation between NIS mutants and iodide. Conclusions This is the first report characterizing thoroughly the functional significance of conserved charged amino acid residues in the extracellular region of NIS. Our data suggested that conserved charged amino acid residues, except Arg-9, in the extracellular region of NIS were critical for iodide transport.

  2. Carrier traps and transport in mercuric iodide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, T. E.; Bao, X. J.; James, R. B.; Cheng, A. Y.; Ortale, C.; van den Berg, L.

    1992-11-01

    Thermally stimulated current spectroscopy (TSC) was performed on a variety of mercuric iodide samples and detectors to determine the nature and origin of deep traps in this material. It is shown that the trap type and concentration is a function of the metal overlayer employed as a contact material. The energy barrier height as well as the type (electron or hole) of barrier at the metal/semiconductor interface has also been determined by internal photoemission measurements. When polarization effects are not present, as is the case in most Pd contacted samples, the barrier height can be accurately determined by this technique. A value of 1.05 eV was measured for a hole barrier at the Pd/Hgl 2 interface.

  3. Ferroelastic Fingerprints in Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite

    KAUST Repository

    Hermes, Ilka M.

    2016-02-12

    Methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) perovskite materials show an outstanding performance in photovoltaic devices. However, certain material properties, especially the possible ferroic behavior, remain unclear. We observed distinct nanoscale periodic domains in the piezoresponse of MAPbI3(Cl) grains. The structure and the orientation of these striped domains indicate ferroelasticity as their origin. By correlating vertical and lateral piezoresponse force microscopy experiments performed at different sample orientations with x-ray diffraction, the preferred domain orientation was suggested to be the a1-a2-phase. The observation of these ferroelastic fingerprints appears to strongly depend on the film texture and thus the preparation route. The formation of the ferroelastic twin domains could be induced by internal strain during the cubic-tetragonal phase transition.

  4. Adsorption-desorption characteristics of plutonium and americium with sediment particles in the estuarine environment: studies using plutonium-237 and americium-241

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The particle formation of plutonium and americium, their adsorption onto fresh water sediments and the desorption from the sediments in sea water were studied in the Laboratory under simulated river-estuary conditions, using γ-emitting plutonium-237 and americium-241. The results of the experiments show that the particle formation of plutonium depends on its valence states, on pH and on the salinity of the medium. For river water at pH4, some 25%, 20% and 30% of the added 237Pu was in particulate form, larger than 0.45 μm, for Pu (III), Pu (IV) and Pu (VI), respectively, while 65%, 90% and 50% of the respective valence states was associated with particles at pH 8. In sea water the general pattern remains similar, although Pu (VI) is more soluble in sea water owing to higher ligand concentrations for carbonate and bicarbonate complexes. The pH-dependency of particle formation of Am (III) is more steep than that of plutonium and seems to be influenced by colloidal substances occurring in the experimental media. The adsorption-desorption characteristics of plutonium and americium with the sediment in river water as well as sea water reflect the characteristics of their particle formation, being dependent upon such properties as valence states, the pH and salinity of the medium. A sewage effluent added to the media has small but measurable effects on the adsorption-desorption processes of plutonium. (author)

  5. Impact of ionic liquids on europium and americium extraction by an upper rim phosphorylated calixarene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solvent extraction of europium and americium using the calixarene 5,11,17,23-tetrakis[dipropylphosphinylmethyl] 25,26,27,28-tetrapropoxycalix[4]arene (conical conformation) in the presence of ionic liquids with different natures was studied. It was shown that upper rim phosphorylated calixarene is able to extract europium and americium from nitric acid to dichloroethane by forming a 1:1 complex without the addition of ionic liquids. The distribution coefficients of americium are higher than those of europium in this case, but the isolation degrees of both elements are insufficient for this system to be useful in extraction technologies. The addition of the ionic liquid trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium hexafluorophosphate increases the europium distribution coefficient by values ranging from twofold to more than two orders of magnitude at ionic liquid concentrations of 1 and 50 %, respectively. The values of the distribution coefficients for americium are increased by approximately 25-fold after a 50 % addition of the ionic liquid. (author)

  6. Understanding the Chemistry of Uncommon Americium Oxidation States for Application to Actinide/Lanthanide Separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh Martin; Bruce J. Mincher; Nicholas C. Schmitt

    2007-09-01

    A spectroscopic study of the stability of Am(V) and Am(VI) produced by oxidizing Am(III) with sodium bismuthate is presented, varying the initial americium concentration, temperature and length of the oxidation was seen to have profound effects on the resultant solutions.

  7. Speciation and bioavailability of plutonium and americium in the Irish Sea and other marine ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the late 1960s, the Irish Sea has become a repository for a variety of radio-elements originating mainly in discharges from the British Nuclear Fuels (BNF) plc. Sellafield reprocessing complex located on the Cumbrian coast. In particular, transuranium nuclides such as plutonium, americium and curium (the main constituents of the α-emitting discharges) have become incorporated into every marine compartment by a variety of mechanisms, many of which are not well understood. Although extensive studies have been carried out in the near-field (eastern Irish Sea, especially in the vicinity of the discharge point and collateral muddy sediments), comparatively little had been done to assess the long-term behaviour and bioavailability of plutonium and americium in the far-field, e.g., the western Irish Sea, prior to the present study. In this dissertation, the results of an extensive research programme, undertaken in order to improve and refine our understanding of the behaviour of plutonium and americium in the marine environment, are presented. Specifically, the thesis details the results of (and conclusions deduced from) a series of experiments in which the physical and chemical speciation, colloidal association, mobility and bioavailability of plutonium and americium were examined in diverse environments including the Irish Sea and the Mediterranean. (author)

  8. Evaluation of the readsorption of plutonium and americium in dynamic fractionations of environmental solid samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Roongrat; Hou, Xiaolin; Hansen, Elo Harald

    2008-01-01

    extractions. The degree of readsorption in dynamic and conventional batch extraction systems are compared and evaluated by using a double-spiking technique. A high degree of readsorption of plutonium and americium (>75%) was observed in both systems, and they also exhibited similar distribution patterns...

  9. Extraction chromatographic recovery of americium from acidic raffinate solutions using CMPO adsorbed on Chromosorb-102

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microgram amounts of americium have been separated and purified from large amounts of uranium present in effluent solutions resulting from the anion-exchange columns during the purification and recovery of plutonium by using TBP extraction followed by extraction chromatography using CMPO adsorbed on Chromosorb-102. (author). 4 refs., 1 tab

  10. Cesium-137 and americium-241 distribution by granulometric fractions of soil at Azgir test site grounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In measurements of radionuclide specific content in surface soil layer of contaminated territories it is important to determine in what agglomerations of soil particles there is the highest radionuclide concentration. For this purpose granulometric composition of soil at Azgir test site was studied and cesium-137 and americium-241 distribution by soil fractions was researched. (author)

  11. Development of analytical methods for the separation of plutonium, americium, curium and neptunium from environmental samples

    OpenAIRE

    Salminen, Susanna

    2009-01-01

    In this work, separation methods have been developed for the analysis of anthropogenic transuranium elements plutonium, americium, curium and neptunium from environmental samples contaminated by global nuclear weapons testing and the Chernobyl accident. The analytical methods utilized in this study are based on extraction chromatography. Highly varying atmospheric plutonium isotope concentrations and activity ratios were found at both Kurchatov (Kazakhstan), near the former Semipalatinsk...

  12. Determination of specific activity of americium and plutonium in selected environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was development of method for determination of americium and plutonium in environmental samples. Developed method was evaluated on soil samples and after they was applied on selected samples of fishes (smoked mackerel, herring and fillet from Alaska hake). The method for separation of americium is based on liquid separation with Aliquate-336, precipitation with oxalic acid and using of chromatographic material TRU-SpecTM.The intervals of radiochemical yields were from 13.0% to 80.9% for plutonium-236 and from 10.5% to 100% for americium-241. Determined specific activities of plutonium-239,240 were from (2.3 ± 1.4) mBq/kg to (82 ± 29) mBq/kg, the specific activities of plutonium-238 were from (14.2 ± 3.7) mBq/kg to (708 ± 86) mBq/kg. The specific activities of americium-241 were from (1.4 ± 0.9) mBq/kg to (3360 ± 210) mBq/kg. The fishes from Baltic Sea as well as from North Sea show highest specific activities then fresh-water fishes from Slovakia. Therefore the monitoring of alpha radionuclides in foods imported from territories with nuclear testing is recommended

  13. Application of hollow fiber supported liquid membrane for the separation of americium from the analytical waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Americium from analytical solid waste containing U and metallic impurities was separated using hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) technique impregnated with DHOA-TODGA from nitric acid medium. An aliquot of 5 g of the solid waste containing Am (19.95 mg) as minor actinide and of U (2,588 mg), Fe (1,360 mg), Ca (1,810 mg) and Na (3,130 mg) as major impurities was processed. The feed solution obtained after the dissolution of the residue in ∼4 M HNO3 was passed through HFSLM module. In the first stage using 1 M DHOA-dodecane was used for the separation of Am from other impurities. Though, majority of the elements were separated in this cycle, Ca was co extracted along with the americium. CMPO extraction chromatographic technique was used for further separation of americium from Ca. Significant decontamination factors were achieved in this three step separation process with respect to U, Fe, Na and Ca with ∼77 % recovery of americium. (author)

  14. Determination of α-emitters (plutonium, americium, curium ...) in feces and urine ashes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is given of the methods used to determine a number of radionuclides to be found in feces and urine, and obtain samples thin enough for counting and α-spectrometry. These methods can be applied to plutonium, americium and curium especially

  15. Photoluminescence studies of impurities and defects in mercuric iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have studied the effects of chemical etching in potassium iodide(KI) aqueous solution, vacuum exposure and bulk heating on the photoluminescence(PL) spectra of mercuric iodide(HgI2). Different contact materials deposited onto HgI2 were also investigated, such as Pd, Cu, Al, Ni, Sn, In, Ag and Ta. These processing steps and the choice of a suitable electrode material are very important in the manufacturing of high-quality mercuric iodide nuclear detectors. Comparisons are made between the front surface photoluminescence and transmission photoluminescence spectra

  16. Electro regeneration of iodide loaded resin. Contributed Paper RD-18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent resins generated in the nuclear reactor contain essentially cationic activities due to Cesium, Strontium, Cobalt, and anionic activities due to Iodide, Iodate etc with activity loading to the extent of 0.1 Cim-3 and a surface dose of the order of 5 R. It is necessary to convert the spent resin into innocuous, reusable forms. An attempt has been made to regenerate Iodide containing spent resin into OH- electrolytically by using the OH- produced at the cathode compartment of an electrolytic cell. Results show that the regeneration of the spent resin containing Iodide could be completely accomplished electrolytically more efficiently than by addition of alkali. (author)

  17. Upper Limits to Americium Concentration in Medium Size Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.P.; Wallenius, J. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), AlbaNova University Centre, S-106 91, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-06-15

    The fastest way to realize transmutation of minor actinides would be using existing reactor types, adding some proper modifications to allow for insertion of MA in the fuel. According to calculations by Fazio and co-workers, the consumption rate of TRU in a low conversion ratio fast reactor may reach 70-75 % of that of an ADS with uranium free fuel [1]. However, americium introduction brings a negative influence on several safety parameters such as {beta}{sub eff}, Doppler coefficient, coolant temperature coefficient and void worth. Therefore the upper limit of americium that can be included into the fuel needs to be carefully evaluated. In this paper, fast reactor fuels with various minor actinide fractions are loaded into a SAS4A model of the semi-commercial BN600 reactor. Unprotected loss of flow (ULOF) and transient over power (UTOP) accidents are modelled using safety parameters obtained from Monte Carlo simulations as well as from the deterministic calculations published by Fazio et al. Applying the latter parameters (obtained with VARI3D), the upper limit to MA concentration in the fuel of a medium sized SFR of BN-600 type appears at 12%, corresponding to 8% of americium. We note however that the Doppler constants displayed by Fazio et al for MA concentrations above 10% have a considerably larger magnitude than those obtained with MCNP. Applying the safety parameters obtained with Monte Carlo simulations and updated nuclear data evaluations, we find that the upper limit to the americium concentration allowing to survive a ULOF is about half of that inferred by the use of parameters from VARI-3D. Since such a difference has a major impact on the predicted americium transmutation capability of SFR, it is of high priority to analyse the reasons for the apparent discrepancies. We note here that the major contribution to the Doppler feedback comes from capture resonance in U-238 and Pu-240 residing below the sodium scattering resonance located at 3 keV, and that

  18. Expression of the human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) in xenotransplanted human thyroid carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, J.W.A.; Schröder - van der Elst, J.P.; Karperien, M.; Que, I.; Romijn, J.A.; Heide, van der D.

    2001-01-01

    The uptake of iodide in thyroid epithelial cells is mediated by the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS). The uptake of iodide is of vital importance for thyroid physiology and is a prerequisite for radioiodine therapy in thyroid cancer. Loss of iodide uptake due to diminished expression of the human NIS (

  19. The Effect on Sodium/Iodide Symporter and Pendrin in Thyroid Colloid Retention Developed by Excess Iodide Intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Yi; Lin, Chu-Hui; Yang, Li-Hua; Li, Wang-Gen; Zhang, Jin-Wei; Zheng, Wen-Wei; Wang, Xiang; Qian, Jiang; Huang, Jia-Luan; Lei, Yi-Xiong

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that excess iodide can lead to thyroid colloid retention, a classic characteristic of iodide-induced goiter. However, the mechanism has not been fully unrevealed. Iodide plays an important role in thyroid function at multiple steps of thyroid colloid synthesis and transport among which sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) and pendrin are essential. In our study, we fed female BALB/c mice with different concentrations of high-iodine water including group A (control group, 0 μg/L), group B (1500 μg/L), group C (3000 μg/L), group D (6000 μg/L), and group E (12,000 μg/L). After 7 months of feeding, we found that excess iodide could lead to different degrees of thyroid colloid retention. Besides, NIS and pendrin expression were downregulated in the highest dose group. The thyroid iodide intake function detected by urine iodine assay and thyroidal (125)I experiments showed that the urine level of iodine increased, while the iodine intake rate decreased when the concentration of iodide used in feeding water increased (all p control group). In addition, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated a reduction in the number of intracellular mitochondria of thyroid cells. Based on these findings, we concluded that the occurrence of thyroid colloid retention exacerbated by excess iodide was associated with the suppression of NIS and pendrin expression, providing an additional insight of the potential mechanism of action of excess iodide on thyroid gland. PMID:26660892

  20. Effect of bone-status on retention and distribution of americium-241 in bones of small rodents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forced physical exercise before and after application of americium-241 resulted in only small changes in bone-structure and behaviour of the radionuclide in bone. Feeding of a low phosphorus or low calcium diet resulted in an increased excretion of americium from bone, whereby Zn-DTPA as chelating agent removed an additional fraction of the radionuclide from bone. Low calcium diet and simultaneous continuous infusion of pharmacological doses of vitamin D-hormones didn't increase the excretion of americium more than the low calcium diet alone. (orig.)

  1. Preparation and evaluation of mercuric iodide for crystal growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, N.L.; Ortale, C.; Schieber, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    Large quantities, on the order of several hundred, of consistent, high quality mercuric iodide for crystal growth have not been commercially available. The hydrocarbon, anion, and cation impurity levels varied considerably, occasionally preventing crystal growth. This occurred even though the starting materials was from the same vendor and was subjected to the same purification treatment. This paper will describe an aqueous precipitation process of mercuric iodide preparation in batches of 3 kg using Hg(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ or HgCl/sub 2/and KI. Since these salts are produced in much larger quantities than mercuric iodide, more consistent quality is available. The impurity content of these batched and single crystals are compared. Some of the single crystals grown using the in-house prepared mercuric iodide have yielded a large number of spectroscopy grade nuclear radiation detectors. The influence of the major impuritites are discussed. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Cesium iodide crystals fused to vacuum tube faceplates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, H. G.

    1964-01-01

    A cesium iodide crystal is fused to the lithium fluoride faceplate of a photon scintillator image tube. The conventional silver chloride solder is then used to attach the faceplate to the metal support.

  3. Improved Stability of Mercuric Iodide Detectors for Anticoincidence Shields Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to utilize guard ring electrode structures and a new film growth technique to create improved polycrystalline mercuric iodide detectors for background...

  4. Kinetic determination of iodide by the oxidation reaction of benzidine with chloramine B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iodide catalyzed oxidation of benzidine with Chloramine B is studied for its possible application to kinetic determination of iodides. Based on the results of kinetic studies performed, optimal conditions for the catalytic reaction are revealed and a kinetic method for iodide determination is developed. The determination limit of iodide is 2x10-4 μg/ml. It was demonstrated that the proposed method can be used for the determination of iodides in water, soil, and kelp

  5. Interaction and diffusion transport of americium in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The final disposal of High Level Radioactive Wastes (HLRW) is based on its long-term storage in underground facilities located in geological stable sites with a multi-barrier system, the so called Deep Geological Repositories (DGR), that will keep HLRW confined for >10.000 years. After this period of time, leachates rich in long-live radioisotopes might escape from DGR and start to transport towards the biosphere. There is still a lack of information concerning the interaction and transport in soils of some radionuclides present in HLRW, especially for radionuclides that present a high sorption, such as americium (Am). Having reliable information about the mobility of radionuclides in soils is crucial in order to develop risk assessment models and to take proper decisions in case of soil contamination. The aim of the present work was, by means of laboratory scale experiments, to study the interaction and, for first time, to evaluate the diffusion transport of 241Am in soils. The 241Am interaction in soils was assessed by applying sorption batch assays to 20 soil samples with contrasted edaphic properties which allowed us to quantify the solid-liquid distribution coefficient (Kd) and desorption percentage. Kd (Am) values ranged from 103 to 105 L kg-1 and desorption percentages were always less than 2% which denoted a high capacity of the soil to incorporate the Am and a low reversibility of the sorption process. The influence of soil properties in 241Am interaction was studied by means of multiple linear and multivariate regressions. Although a single correlation between Kd (Am) values and a soil property was not found, the main properties affecting 241Am interaction in soils were soil pH, carbonate and organic matter contents in the soil. Finally, additional batch assays at different controlled pH were done to study Am sorption as a function of the contact solution pH. A variation of the Am sorption capacity was observed in all soils due to the dissolution of soil

  6. Interaction and diffusion transport of americium in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez-Guinart, Oriol; Rigol, Anna; Vidal, Miquel [Analytical Chemistry department, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1-11, 08028, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    The final disposal of High Level Radioactive Wastes (HLRW) is based on its long-term storage in underground facilities located in geological stable sites with a multi-barrier system, the so called Deep Geological Repositories (DGR), that will keep HLRW confined for >10.000 years. After this period of time, leachates rich in long-live radioisotopes might escape from DGR and start to transport towards the biosphere. There is still a lack of information concerning the interaction and transport in soils of some radionuclides present in HLRW, especially for radionuclides that present a high sorption, such as americium (Am). Having reliable information about the mobility of radionuclides in soils is crucial in order to develop risk assessment models and to take proper decisions in case of soil contamination. The aim of the present work was, by means of laboratory scale experiments, to study the interaction and, for first time, to evaluate the diffusion transport of {sup 241}Am in soils. The {sup 241}Am interaction in soils was assessed by applying sorption batch assays to 20 soil samples with contrasted edaphic properties which allowed us to quantify the solid-liquid distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) and desorption percentage. K{sub d} (Am) values ranged from 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 5} L kg{sup -1} and desorption percentages were always less than 2% which denoted a high capacity of the soil to incorporate the Am and a low reversibility of the sorption process. The influence of soil properties in {sup 241}Am interaction was studied by means of multiple linear and multivariate regressions. Although a single correlation between K{sub d} (Am) values and a soil property was not found, the main properties affecting {sup 241}Am interaction in soils were soil pH, carbonate and organic matter contents in the soil. Finally, additional batch assays at different controlled pH were done to study Am sorption as a function of the contact solution pH. A variation of the Am sorption

  7. Prevention of organic iodide formation in BWR`s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karjunen, T. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland); Laitinen, T.; Piippo, J.; Sirkiae, P. [VTT Manufacturing Technology (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    During an accident, many different forms of iodine may emerge. Organic iodides, such as methyl iodide and ethyl iodide, are relatively volatile, and thus their appearance leads to increased concentration of gaseous iodine. Since organic iodides are also relatively immune to most accident mitigation measures, such as sprays and filters, they can affect the accident source term significantly even when only a small portion of iodine is in organic form. Formation of organic iodides may not be limited by the amount of organic substances available. Excessive amounts of methane can be produced, for example, during oxidation of boron carbide, which is used in BWR`s as a neutron absorber material. Another important source is cable insulation. In a BWR, a large quantity of cables is placed below the pressure vessel. Thus a large quantity of pyrolyse gases will be produced, should the vessel fail. Organic iodides can be formed as a result of many different reactions, but at least in certain conditions the main reaction takes place between an organic radical produced by radiolysis and elemental iodine. A necessary requirement for prevention of organic iodide production is therefore that the pH in the containment water pools is kept high enough to eliminate formation of elemental iodine. In a typical BWR the suppression pool water is usually unbuffered. As a result, the pH may be dominated by chemicals introduced during an accident. If no system for adding basic chemicals is operable, the main factor affecting pool water pH may be hydrochloric acid released during cable degradation. Should this occur, the conditions could be very favorable for production of elemental iodine and, consequently, formation of organic iodides. Although high pH is necessary for iodine retention, it could have also adverse effects. High pH may, for example, accelerate corrosion of containment materials and alter the characteristics of the solid corrosion products. (author) 6 figs., 1 tab., 13 refs.

  8. Processing {alpha}-mercuric iodide by zone refining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, A.; Morgan, S.H.; Henderson, D.O.; Biao, Y.; Zhang, K.; Silberman, E. [Fisk Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics; Nason, D.; van den Berg, L.; Ortale-Baccash, C.; Cross, E. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Goleta, CA (United States). Santa Barbara Operations

    1992-06-01

    An investigation is being conducted on zone refining {alpha}-mercuric iodide. Analytical studies using differential scanning calorimetry and anion chromatography indicate that impurities are segregated mainly at the end where zone travel terminates. Early results indicate that single crystals can be readily grown from zone refined material, and the effects of the process on the performance of radiation detectors fabricated from {alpha}-mercuric iodide are being evaluated.

  9. A review of polytypism in lead iodide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckmann, P.A. [Department of Physics, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Lead Iodide (PbI{sub 2}) is an important inorganic solid for both basic scientific research and possible technological applications and in this brief review we discuss the structure of PbI{sub 2}. Although the basic structure is a simple I-Pb-I layered structure with a[PbI{sub 6}]{sup 4-} near-octahedron being the basic building block, there are many ways of stacking the layers which results in many polytypes. We present 20 of the 23 entries for the structure of PbI{sub 2} from the Inorganic Structural Database and order them by polytype. This represents more than 80 years of crystallographic research in the structure of this compound. We present a simple way to view the 2H, 4H, 6H, and 6R polytypes and extend the procedure to higher-order polytypes. We note a relationship, not generally appreciated, between the distortion of the near [PbI{sub 6}]{sup 4-} octahedrons and the polytype. We suggest that the significance of vacancies has only recently been appreciated. We suggest that small discrepancies in structure determination are probably due to different distributions of vacancies and that there are, in practice, very many structures for macroscopic or even mesoscopic samples of a given polytype when vacancies are considered. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Mercuric iodide photodetectors for scintillation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured the responses to 137Cs (662 keV) of both a 1-inch-diam by 2-inch-thick NaI(Tl) scintillator optically coupled to a 1-inch-diam by 800-μmthick mercuric iodide (HgI2) photodetector, and a 1-cmdiam by 1-cm-thick CaWO4 scintillator coupled to a 1.3-cm-diam by 600-μm-thick HgI2 photodetector. Best spectral resolution to 137Cs was 7.8% FWHM for the NaI(Tl)-HgI2 and 12.5% FWHM for the CaWO4-HgI2 detectors; peak-to-valley ratios were 26:1 and 16:1, respectively. HgI2 detectors operate at room temperature and their use in scintillation spectroscopy presents the ultimate miniaturization of scintillation detectors, limited mainly by the size of the scintillation crystal

  11. Mercuric iodide photodetectors for scintillation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured the responses to 137Cs (662 keV) of both a 1-inch-diam by 2-inch-thick NaI(Tl) scintillator optically coupled to a 1-inch-diam by 800-μm-thick mercuric iodide (HgI2) photodetector, and a 1-cm-diam by 1-cm-thick CaWO4 scintillator coupled to a 1.3-cm-diam by 600-μm-thick HgI2 photodetector. Best spectral resolution to 137Cs was 7.8% FWHM for the NaI(Tl)-HgI2 and 12.5% FWHM for the CaWO4-HgI2 detectors; peak-to-valley ratios were 26:1 and 16:1, respectively. HgI2 detectors operate at room temperature and their use in scintillation spectroscopy presents the ultimate miniaturization of scintillation detectors, limited mainly by the size of the scintillation crystal

  12. Mercuric iodide photodetectors for scintillation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markakis, J.; Dabrowski, A.; Iwanczyk, J.; Ortale, C.; Schnepple, W.

    1985-02-01

    We have measured the responses to /sup 137/Cs (662 keV) of both a 1-inch-diam by 2-inch-thick NaI(Tl) scintillator optically coupled to a 1-inch-diam by 800-..mu..mthick mercuric iodide (HgI/sub 2/) photodetector, and a 1-cmdiam by 1-cm-thick CaWO/sub 4/ scintillator coupled to a 1.3-cm-diam by 600-..mu..m-thick HgI/sub 2/ photodetector. Best spectral resolution to /sup 137/Cs was 7.8% FWHM for the NaI(Tl)-HgI/sub 2/ and 12.5% FWHM for the CaWO/sub 4/-HgI/sub 2/ detectors; peak-to-valley ratios were 26:1 and 16:1, respectively. HgI/sub 2/ detectors operate at room temperature and their use in scintillation spectroscopy presents the ultimate miniaturization of scintillation detectors, limited mainly by the size of the scintillation crystal.

  13. Mercuric iodide photodetectors for scintillation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markakis, J.; Ortale, C.; Schnepple, W.; Iwanczyk, J.; Dabrowski, A.

    1984-01-01

    We have measured the responses to /sup 137/Cs (662 keV) of both a 1-inch-diam by 2-inch-thick NaI(Tl) scintillator optically coupled to a 1-inch-diam by 800-..mu..m-thick mercuric iodide (HgI/sub 2/) photodetector, and a 1-cm-diam by 1-cm-thick CaWO/sub 4/ scintillator coupled to a 1.3-cm-diam by 600-..mu..m-thick HgI/sub 2/ photodetector. Best spectral resolution to /sup 137/Cs was 7.8% FWHM for the NaI(Tl)-HgI/sub 2/ and 12.5% FWHM for the CaWO/sub 4/-HgI/sub 2/ detectors; peak-to-valley ratios were 26:1 and 16:1, respectively. HgI/sub 2/ detectors operate at room temperature and their use in scintillation spectroscopy presents the ultimate miniaturization of scintillation detectors, limited mainly by the size of the scintillation crystal.

  14. SKIN DOSIMETRY IN CONDITIONS OF ITS CONSTANT SURFACE CONTAMINATION WITH SOLUTIONS OF PLUTONIUM-239 AND AMERICIUM-241

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Ershov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers, on the basis of experimental data, the issue of assessing dose burdens to the skin basal layer in conditions of its permanent contamination with solutions of plutonium-239 and americium-241 and subsequent decontamination.

  15. Posttranscriptional regulation of sodium-iodide symporter mRNA expression in the rat thyroid gland by acute iodide administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Nascimento, Caroline; Calil-Silveira, Jamile; Nunes, Maria Tereza

    2010-04-01

    Iodide is an important regulator of thyroid activity. Its excess elicits the Wolff-Chaikoff effect, characterized by an acute suppression of thyroid hormone synthesis, which has been ascribed to serum TSH reduction or TGF-beta increase and production of iodolipids in the thyroid. These alterations take hours/days to occur, contrasting with the promptness of Wolff-Chaikoff effect. We investigated whether acute iodide administration could trigger events that precede those changes, such as reduction of sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) mRNA abundance and adenylation, and if perchlorate treatment could counteract them. Rats subjected or not to methylmercaptoimidazole treatment (0.03%) received NaI (2,000 microg/0.5 ml saline) or saline intraperitoneally and were killed 30 min up to 24 h later. Another set of animals was treated with iodide and perchlorate, in equimolar doses. NIS mRNA content was evaluated by Northern blotting and real-time PCR, and NIS mRNA poly(A) tail length by rapid amplification of cDNA ends-poly(A) test (RACE-PAT). We observed that NIS mRNA abundance and poly(A) tail length were significantly reduced in all periods of iodide treatment. Perchlorate reversed these effects, indicating that iodide was the agent that triggered the modifications observed. Since the poly(A) tail length of mRNAs is directly associated with their stability and translation efficiency, we can assume that the rapid decay of NIS mRNA abundance observed was due to a reduction of its stability, a condition in which its translation could be impaired. Our data show for the first time that iodide regulates NIS mRNA expression at posttranscriptional level, providing a new mechanism by which iodide exerts its autoregulatory effect on thyroid. PMID:20107044

  16. Engineering and design properties of thallium-doped sodium iodide and selected properties of sodium-doped cesium iodide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, K.; Haehner, C.; Heslin, T.; Magida, M.; Uber, J.; Freiman, S.; Hicho, G.; Polvani, R.

    1984-01-01

    Mechanical and thermal properties, not available in the literature but necessary to structural design, using thallium doped sodium iodide and sodium doped cesium iodide were determined to be coefficient of linear thermal expansion, thermal conductivity, thermal shock resistance, heat capacity, elastic constants, ultimate strengths, creep, hardness, susceptibility to subcritical crack growth, and ingot variation of strength. These properties were measured for single and polycrystalline materials at room temperature.

  17. Iodide kinetics and experimental I-131 therapy in a xenotransplanted human sodium-iodide symporter-transfected human follicular thyroid carcinoma cell line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, J.W.A.; Elst, van der J.P.; Karperien, M.; Que, I.; Stokkel, M.; Heide, van der D.; Romijn, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Uptake of iodide is a prerequisite for radioiodide therapy in thyroid cancer. However, loss of iodide uptake is frequently observed in metastasized thyroid cancer, which may be explained by diminished expression of the human sodium-iodide symporter (hNIS). We studied whether transfection of hNIS int

  18. Metabolism of americium-241 in man: an unusual case of internal contamination of a child and his father

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The metabolism of americium-241 was studied during an 8-yr period of an adult male and his son who, at the ages of 50 and 4, respectively, were accidentally and unknowingly contaminated within their home by means of inhalation. Chelation therapy with Na3(Ca-DTPA) was more effective in enhancing the removal of americium-241 from the child than from his father

  19. Influence of biofilms on migration of uranium, americium and europium in the environment; Einfluss von Biofilmen auf das Migrationsverhalten von Uran, Americium und Europium in der Umwelt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Nils; Zirnstein, Isabel; Arnold, Thuro

    2015-07-01

    The report on the influence of biofilms on migration of uranium, americium and europium in the environment deals with the contamination problems of uranium mines such as SDAG WISMUT in Saxonia and Thuringia. In mine waters microorganisms form a complex microbiological biocoenosis in spite of low pH values and high heavy metal concentrations including high uranium concentrations. The analyses used microbiological methods like confocal laser scanning microscopy and molecular-biological techniques. The interactions of microorganism with fluorescent radioactive heavy metal ions were performed with TRLFS (time resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy).

  20. Methyl Iodide Formation Under Postulated Nuclear Reactor Accident Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of methyl iodide under conditions of postulated nuclear reactor accidents is discussed. Although thermodynamic calculations indicate the equilibrium methyl iodide concentrations would be quite low, calculations based on a simple kinetic scheme involving reaction between small hydrocarbon species and iodine indicate that concentrations higher than equilibrium can occur during the course of the reaction. Such calculations were performed over a wide range of initial species concentrations and a range of temperatures representative of some reactor accident situations. These calculations suggest that little methyl iodide would be expected within the core volume where temperatures are maximum. As the gas leaves the core volume and expands into the plenum region, it cools and the concentration of methyl iodide increases. At the intermediate temperatures which might characterize this region, the formation of methyl iodide from thermally induced reactions could reach its maximum rate. The gas continues to cool, however, and it is probable that by the time it leaves the plenum region it has cooled to the point where thermally induced reactions may be of little importance. Although the thermally induced reactions will become slower as the gas expands and cools, the radiation-induced reactions will not be slowed to the same extent. The gases leaving the core carry fission products and hence a radiation source is available to initiate reaction by a temperature-independent process. An investigation of the radiation chemical formation and decomposition of methyl iodide in the presence of steam suggests that radiation-induced methyl iodide formation will generally be rapid under the postulated accident situations. Thus, in the plenum region where thermal reactions have become slow, the radiation-induced reaction can still proceed and may well become the dominant factor. The same situation probably pertains as well to the containment region. (author)

  1. Molecular imaging using sodium iodide symporter (NIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Je Yoel [School of Dentistry, Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    Radioiodide uptake in thyroid follicular epithelial cells, mediated by a plasma membrane transporter, sodium iodide symporter (NIS), provides a first step mechanism for thyroid cancer detection by radioiodide injection and effective radioiodide treatment for patients with invasive, recurrent, and/or metastatic thyroid cancers after total thyroidectomy. NIS gene transfer to tumor cells may significantly and specifically enhance internal radioactive accumulation of tumors following radioiodide administration, and result in better tumor control. NIS gene transfers have been successfully performed in a variety of tumor animal models by either plasmid-mediated transfection or virus (adenovirus or retrovirus)-mediated gene delivery. These animal models include nude mice xenografted with human melanoma, glioma, breast cancer of prostate cancer, rats with subcutaneous thyroid tumor implantation, as well as the rat intracranial glioma model. In these animal models, non-invasive imaging of in vivo tumors by gamma camera scintigraphy after radioiodide or technetium injection has been performed successfully, suggesting that the NIS can serve as an imaging reporter gene for gene therapy trials. In addition, the tumor killing effects of I-131, ReO4-188 and At-211 after NIS gene transfer have been demonstrated in in vitro clonogenic assays and in vivo radioiodide therapy studies, suggesting that NIS gene can also serve as a therapeutic requires a more efficient and specific system of gene delivery with better retention of radioiodide in tumor. Results thus far are, however, promising, and suggest that NIS gene transfer followed by radioiodide treatment will allow non-invasive in vivo imaging to assess the outcome of gene therapy and provide a therapeutic strategy for a variety of human diseases.

  2. Molecular imaging using sodium iodide symporter (NIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioiodide uptake in thyroid follicular epithelial cells, mediated by a plasma membrane transporter, sodium iodide symporter (NIS), provides a first step mechanism for thyroid cancer detection by radioiodide injection and effective radioiodide treatment for patients with invasive, recurrent, and/or metastatic thyroid cancers after total thyroidectomy. NIS gene transfer to tumor cells may significantly and specifically enhance internal radioactive accumulation of tumors following radioiodide administration, and result in better tumor control. NIS gene transfers have been successfully performed in a variety of tumor animal models by either plasmid-mediated transfection or virus (adenovirus or retrovirus)-mediated gene delivery. These animal models include nude mice xenografted with human melanoma, glioma, breast cancer of prostate cancer, rats with subcutaneous thyroid tumor implantation, as well as the rat intracranial glioma model. In these animal models, non-invasive imaging of in vivo tumors by gamma camera scintigraphy after radioiodide or technetium injection has been performed successfully, suggesting that the NIS can serve as an imaging reporter gene for gene therapy trials. In addition, the tumor killing effects of I-131, ReO4-188 and At-211 after NIS gene transfer have been demonstrated in in vitro clonogenic assays and in vivo radioiodide therapy studies, suggesting that NIS gene can also serve as a therapeutic requires a more efficient and specific system of gene delivery with better retention of radioiodide in tumor. Results thus far are, however, promising, and suggest that NIS gene transfer followed by radioiodide treatment will allow non-invasive in vivo imaging to assess the outcome of gene therapy and provide a therapeutic strategy for a variety of human diseases

  3. Electrodeposition of americium on a liquid cadmium cathode from a molten salt bath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-activity experiment involving the electrode position of americium on a liquid cadmium cathode from a LiCl-KCl eutectic with about 3 g of AmO2 was conducted in a shielded cell in the ATALANTE complex. After describing the electrolyzer and the experimental conditions, the authors discuss the preparation of the LiCl-KCl-AmCl3 solution and briefly review its electrochemical properties. It was clearly confirmed that Am(III) reduction on an inert solid cathode occurs in two steps forming Am(II) before Am(0), whereas only one reduction step was observed on liquid cadmium. The main results of this study concern americium electrode position on the liquid cadmium cathode (recovery yields, current densities, problems encountered). The solvent properties of cadmium for actinide/lanthanide separation are discussed. (authors)

  4. Experimental Insight into the Radiation Resistance of Zirconia-Based Americium Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our works shows that the americium pyrochlore 241Am2Zr2O7 undergoes a phase transition to a defect-fluorite structure along with an unusual volume contraction when subjected to internal radiation from α-emitting actinides. Disorder relaxation proceeds through the simultaneous formation of cation anti sites and oxygen Frenkel pairs. X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Am-LII and the Zr-K edges reveals that Am-O polyhedra show an increasing disorder with increasing exposure. In contrast, the Zr-O polyhedral units remain highly ordered, while rotating along edges and corners, thereby reducing the structural strain imposed by the growing disorder around americium. We believe it is this particular property of the compound that provides the remarkable resistance to radiation (≥9.4 * 1018) α-decay events g-1 or 0.80 dpa). (authors)

  5. Influence of some organic additives on the extractive separation of americium(III) by sulfoxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solvent extraction behavior of americium(III) from aqueous nitrate media by two long-chain aliphatic sulfoxides has been examined systematically in the presence of several water-miscible organic solvents to study their possible synergistic effect on metal ion extraction. Methanol, ethanol, n- and isopropanol, n-butanol, dioxane, acetone, as well as acetonitrile, were employed as the organic component of the mixed (polar) phase. These additives affected the extraction to varying degrees. Extractability of Am increased 5 to 10-fold with increasing concentration of some of these additives, with the maximum enhancement being observed in the presence of acetone or acetonitrile. However, alcohols are generally very poor in this respect. Possible reasons for such behavior are briefly discussed. The distribution of several common contaminants was also investigated at the optimum condition for americium extraction

  6. Transmutation of americium and curium incorporated in zirconia-based host materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presented are studies involving the incorporation of americium and curium in zirconia-based materials. First explored was the pseudo ternary system AmO2-ZrO2-Y2O3. It was determined that selected Y-CSZ materials can incorporate significant quantities of americium oxide and remain cubic single-phase. The cell parameters of these fluorite-type products were established to be linear with the AmO2 content. The Cm2O3-ZrO2 system was also investigated. It was found that at 25 mol% of CmO1.5, the Cm(III) stabilized zirconia in its cubic form (a = 5.21 ±0.01 Angstrom). At higher and lower concentrations, diphasic materials were encountered. At 50 mol% of CmO1.5, a pyrochlore oxide - Cm2Zr2O7 - is formed (a = 10.63 ±0.02 Angstrom). (author)

  7. Americium and samarium determination in aqueous solutions after separation by cation-exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration of trivalent americium and samarium in aqueous samples has been determined by means of alpha-radiometry and UV-Vis photometry, respectively, after chemical separation and pre-concentration of the elements by cation-exchange using Chelex-100 resin. Method calibration was performed using americium (241Am) and samarium standard solutions and resulted in a high chemical recovery for cation-exchange. Regarding, the effect of physicochemical parameters (e.g. pH, salinity, competitive cations and colloidal species) on the separation recovery of the trivalent elements from aqueous solutions by cation-exchange has also been investigated. The investigation was performed to evaluate the applicability of cation-exchange as separation and pre-concentration method prior to the quantitative analysis of trivalent f-elements in water samples, and has shown that the method could be successfully applied to waters with relatively low dissolved solid content. (author)

  8. Analysis of americium-beryllium neutron source composition using the FRAM code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hypes, P. A. (Philip A.); Bracken, D. S. (David S.); Sampson, Thomas E.; Taylor, W. A. (Wayne A.)

    2002-01-01

    The FRAM code was originally developed to analyze high-resolution gamma spectra from plutonium items. Its capabilities have since been expanded to include analysis of uranium spectra. The flexibility of the software also enables a capable spectroscopist to use FRAM to analyze spectra in which neither plutonium nor uranium is present in significant amounts. This paper documents the use of FRAM to determine the {sup 239}Pu/{sup 241}Am, {sup 243}Am/{sup 241}Am, {sup 237}Np/{sup 241}Am, and {sup 239}Np/{sup 241}Am ratios in americium-beryllium neutron sources. The effective specific power of each neutron source was calculated from the ratios determined by FRAM in order to determine the americium mass of each of these neutron sources using calorimetric assay. We will also discuss the use of FRAM for the general case of isotopic analysis of nonplutonium, nonuranium items.

  9. Influence of environmental factors on the gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium and americium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorption of plutonium and americium from the gastrointestinal tract was studied, using adult hamsters and rabbits. Both actinides were administered as inorganic compounds, as organic complexes with naturally occurring chelating agents, and in a biologically incorporated form in liver tissues. The absorption of the tetravalent and hexavalent forms of plutonium were compared and the effect of protracted administration at very low concentrations was investigated. In addition, plutonium uptake from contaminated sediments and grass, collected near a nuclear-fuel reprocessing plant, was measured. The results of these studies suggest that chronic exposure of man to plutonium and americium in food and water will not lead to any substantial increase in their gastrointestinal absorption above the values currently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection to define the occupational exposure of workers

  10. Contemporary state of plutonium and americium in the soils of Palesse state radiation-ecological reserve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: At present, the most important alpha-emitting radionuclides of Chernobyl origin are Pu 238, Pu 239, Pu 240 and Am 241. They are classified as the most dangerous group of radionuclides in view of the long half-lives and high radiotoxicity. The main part of alpha-emitted radionuclides is located within the Palesse State Radiation-Ecological Reserve. One of the most important factors determining the radioecological situation in the contaminated ecosystems is the physicochemical forms of radionuclides in a soil medium. Radionuclide species determine the radionuclide entrance into the soil solutions, their redistribution in soil profiles and the 'soil - plant' and the 'soil - surface, ground or underground water' systems as well as spreading beyond the contaminated area. The present work is devoted to investigation of state and migration ability of plutonium and americium in soils of the Palesse state radiation-ecological reserve after more than 20 years from the Chernobyl accident. The objects of investigation were mineral and organic soils sampled in 2008 with the step of 5 cm to the depth of 25-30 cm. The forms of plutonium and americium distinguishing by association with the different components of soil and by potential for migration in the soil medium were studied using the method of sequential selective extraction according to the modified Tessier scheme. Activities of Pu 238, Pu 239, Pu 240 and Am 241 in the samples were determined by the method of radiochemical analysis with alpha-spectrometer radionuclide identification. The dominant part of plutonium and americium in the soils is in immobile forms. Nowadays, radionuclide portions in water soluble and reversibly bound forms do not exceed 9.4 % of radionuclide content in the soil. In mineral soil samples, the radionuclide portions in these fractions exceed the corresponding portions in organic ones. In both mineral and organic soils, the portions of mobile americium are higher than plutonium. The

  11. Standard test method for quantitative determination of americium 241 in plutonium by Gamma-Ray spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1994-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the quantitative determination of americium 241 by gamma-ray spectrometry in plutonium nitrate solution samples that do not contain significant amounts of radioactive fission products or other high specific activity gamma-ray emitters. 1.2 This test method can be used to determine the americium 241 in samples of plutonium metal, oxide and other solid forms, when the solid is appropriately sampled and dissolved. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  12. Fabrication of neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium metals for fuel research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The techniques for the fabrication of actinide metals; neptunium, americium and curium called as minor actinides, and plutonium, are surveied in a viewpoint of the preparation of starting materials for fuel property measurements. In this report, the processes of the conversion to metals, purification et al. are reviewed. The concept related to the apparatus design is also proposed and the considerable subjects are discussed. (author)

  13. Final Radiological Assessment of External Exposure for CLEAR-Line Americium Recovery Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Adam C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Belooussova, Olga N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hetrick, Lucas Duane [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-11-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is currently planning to implement an americium recovery program. The americium, ordinarily isotopically pure 241Am, would be extracted from existing Pu materials, converted to an oxide and shipped to support fabrication of americium oxide-beryllium neutron sources. These operations would occur in the currently proposed Chloride Extraction and Actinide Recovery (CLEAR) line of glove boxes. This glove box line would be collocated with the currently-operational Experimental Chloride Extraction Line (EXCEL). The focus of this document is to provide an in-depth assessment of the currently planned radiation protection measures and to determine whether or not further design work is required to satisfy design-goal and ALARA requirements. Further, this document presents a history of americium recovery operations in the Department of Energy and high-level descriptions of the CLEAR line operations to provide a basis of comparison. Under the working assumptions adopted by this study, it was found that the evaluated design appears to mitigate doses to a level that satisfies the ALARA-in-design requirements of 10 CFR 835 as implemented by the Los Alamos National Laboratory procedure P121. The analyses indicate that extremity doses would also meet design requirements. Dose-rate calculations were performed using the radiation transport code MCNP5 and doses were estimated using a time-motion study developed in consort with the subject matter expert. A copy of this report and all supporting documentation are located on the Radiological Engineering server at Y:\\Rad Engineering\\2013 PROJECTS\\TA-55 Clear Line.

  14. Fabrication of uranium–americium mixed oxide pellet from microsphere precursors: Application of CRMP process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Dust free process for (U,Am)O2 transmutation target fabrication. • Synthesis of U0.9Am0.1O2 mixed oxide microspheres from ion exchange resin. • Fabrication of dense U0.9Am0.1O2 pellet with 95% TD from mixed oxide microspheres. - Abstract: Mixed uranium–americium oxides are one of the materials envisaged for Americium Bearing Blankets dedicated to transmutation in fast neutron reactors. Recently, several processes have been developed in order to validate fabrication flowchart in terms of material specifications such as density and homogeneity but also to suggest simplifications for lowering industrial costs and hazards linked to dust generation of highly contaminating and irradiating compounds. This study deals with the application of an innovative route using mixed oxide microspheres obtained from metal loaded resin bead calcination, called Calcined Resin Microsphere Pelletization (CRMP). The synthesis of mixed oxide microsphere precursor of U0.9Am0.1O2±δ is described as well as its characterisation. The use of this free-flowing precursor allows the pressing and sintering of one pellet of U0.9Am0.1O2±δ. The ceramic obtained was characterised and results showed that its microstructure is dense and homogeneous and its density attains 95% of the theoretical density. This study validates the scientific feasibility of the CRMP process applied to the fabrication of uranium and americium-containing materials

  15. Influence of dissolved organic substances in groundwater on sorption behavior of americium and neptunium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwaters typically contain dissolved organic carbon consisting largely of high molecular weight compounds of humic and fulvic acids. To evaluate whether these dissolved organic substances can enhance the tranport of radionuclides through the groundwater system, experiments were conducted to examine the sorption of americium and neptunium onto crushed basalt in the presence of dissolved humic- and fulvic-acid organic carbon introduced into synthetic groundwater. The partitioning experiments with synthetic groundwater show that increasing the concentration of either humic or fulvic acid in the water has a significant inhibiting effect on sorption of both americium and neptunium. At 220C, adsorption of these radionuclides, as measured by distribution ratios (the ratio of nuclide sorbed onto the solid to nuclide in solution at the end of the experiment), decreased by 25% to 50% by addition of as little as 1 mg/L dissolved organic carbon and by one to two orders of magnitude by addition of 100 to 200 mg/L dissolved organic carbon. Distribution ratios measured in solutions reacted at 900C similarly decreased with the addition of dissolved organic carbon but generally ranged from one to two orders of magnitude higher than those determined in the 220C experiment. These results suggest that organic carbon dissolved in deep groundwaters may significantly enhance the mobility of radionuclides of americium and neptunium. 23 references, 5 figures, 11 tables

  16. Bidentate organophosphorus extraction of americium and plutonium from Hanford Plutonium Reclamation Facility waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, W.W.

    1974-09-01

    Applicability of bidentate organiphosphorus reagents to recovery of americium and plutonium from Hanford's Plutonium Reclamation Facility acid (approx. 2M HNO/sub 3/) waste stream (CAW solution) was studied. A solvent extraction process which employs a 30% DHDECMP (dihexyl-N, N-diethylcarbamylmethylene phosphonate)-CCl/sub 4/ extractant was devised and successfully tested in mixer-settler runs with actual CAW solution. Substitution of DHDECMP for DBBP eliminates the need to perform careful neutralization of unbuffered CAW soluton and increases overall americium recovery from the present 60 to 80% level to greater than or equal to 90%. Disadvantages to such substitution include the high cost (approx. $50/liter) of DHDECMP and the need to purify it (by acid (6M HCl) hydrolysis and alkaline washing) from small amounts of an unidentified impurity which prevents stripping of americium with dilute HNO/sub 3/. Distribution data obtained in this study confirm Siddall's earlier contention that bidentate organophosphorus regents can be used to remove actinides from concentrated high-level Purex process acid waste; a conceptual flowsheet for such an extraction process is given.

  17. Selective recovery of americium alone from PUREX or COEXTM raffinate by the EXAm process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Americium is the main contributor to the long-term radiotoxicity and to the heat generation of glasses used for the HLW conditioning. To decrease both impact on the ultimate waste and to avoid the difficult recycling of curium, the CEA has developed the EXAm process for the the separation and the recovery of the sole americium directly from PUREX or COEXTM raffinates. The principle of the EXAm process is to extract americium and light lanthanides from high nitric acid media, leaving curium and heavy lanthanides in the raffinate. A water-soluble amide molecule, TEDGA, is added in aqueous phase to increase Am/Cm and Am/heavy lanthanides selectivity, because of the preferential complexation of curium and heavy lanthanides by this diglycolamide. Many experimental data have been acquired mainly at the extraction-scrubbing step (Am/Cm separation) and were used for the development of a phenomenological model implemented in the PAREX process simulation code. The scientific feasibility demonstration of the EXAm process was then performed on a genuine PUREX raffinate in Atalante CBP hot cell in 2010. (author)

  18. Uptake and effects of americium-241 on a brackish-water amphipod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper reports the results of experimental work undertaken using the brackish-water amphipod Gammarus duebeni duebeni and the transuranium nuclide americium-241. Data on the accumulation of this actinide showed that the larger fraction of the total body burden is associated with the exoskeleton. It was found that the body burden remained constant in the range pH 8.0-6.5 even though the water concentration changed markedly. It would thus appear that the concept of a concentration factor should be re-examined and it is proposed that a factor should be defined in terms of environmental and chemical parameters which represent the bioavailable fraction of the actinide. The effect of americium on survival and moulting was studied at two activity concentrations; the dose rates and absorbed doses under the experimental conditions employed have been estimated. The differences in survival rates between the control and irradiated groups were statistically analyzed and the significant difference at the higher concentration is believed to be due to a synergism between physiological stress and radiotoxicity of americium rather than the chemical toxicity of the element. (orig.)

  19. About the reaction between uranium-americium mixed oxides and sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recycling and fission of the highly toxic minor actinides neptunium and americium is only possible in a liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor, for nuclear physical reasons. The present work is part of a research program dealing with the fuel-coolant interaction. Fuel pellets with equal parts of americium and uranium and varying oxygen-metal ratio were investigated. A behaviour comparable to that of uranium-plutonium mixed oxides was suggested as a first approach. The reaction of sodium with (U0.5Am0.5)O2-x results in a complete desintegration of the sintered pellet whereas (U, Pu)O2-x pellets show a small increase in volume. A first explanation of the strong reaction of uranium-americium mixed oxides compared to (U, Pu)O2-x or (U, Np)O2-x could be provided by the less negative oxygen potential of the former. Ternary and polynary oxides which are possible products of the fuel-coolant reaction were prepared and characterised by X-ray diffraction. Their oxygen potentials were measured using a solid state e.m.f. cell. Neither Na2AmO3 nor Na3AmO4 can coexist with sodium metal. The measured ΔGO2 values of the Am(IV) and Am (V)-compounds are much higher than those of the sodium uranates(VI) or sodium neptunates(VI). Only Na2O seems to be likely as product of the fuel-coolant interactions. It could be determined in reacted samples by X-ray diffraction. The relatively high oxygen potentials of (U0.5Am0.5)O2-x that are responsible for the reaction could be explained by a binding model which is based on an americium valency state of + 3 and U5+. The existence of both valency states could be proved by XPS measurements. Due to the similar behaviour of neptunium and uranium the problems that are expected for the recycling of Np are much smaller than for americium

  20. Phase 1 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nick Soelberg; Tony Watson

    2014-08-01

    Nuclear fission results in the production of fission products (FPs) and activation products including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Research, demonstrations, and some reprocessing plant experience have indicated that diatomic iodine can be captured with efficiencies high enough to meet regulatory requirements. Research on the capture of organic iodides has also been performed, but to a lesser extent [Jubin 2012b]. Several questions remain open regarding the capture of iodine bound in organic compounds. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has progressed according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. This report summarizes the first phase of methyl iodide adsorption work performed according to this test plan using the deep-bed iodine adsorption test system at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), performed during Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 and early FY-2014. Testing has been performed to address questions posed in the test plan, and followed the testing outline in the test plan. Tests established detection limits, developed procedures for sample analysis with minimal analytical interferences, and confirmed earlier results that show that the methyl iodide reacts when in contact with the AgZ sorbent, and not significantly in the gas flow upstream of the sorbent. The reaction(s) enable separation of the iodine from the organic moiety, so that the iodine can chemisorb onto the sorbent. The organic moiety can form other compounds, some of which are organic compounds that are detected and can be tentatively identified using GC-FID and GCMS. Test results also show that other gas constituents (NOx and/or H2O) can affect the methyl iodide reactions. With NOx and H2O present in the gas stream, the majority of uncaptured iodine exiting iodine-laden sorbent beds is in the form of I2 or HI, species that

  1. Introduction of extrinsic defects into mercuric iodide during processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low temperature (4.2 K) photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) measurements were performed on mercuric iodide (HgI2) crystals which were intentionally doped with copper or silver during KI etching. PL spectra obtained after these doping experiments show specific Cu and Ag features similar to those previously observed after deposition of Cu or Ag contacts on mercuric iodide crystals. The in-diffusion of Cu or Ag into bulk HgI2 has also been confirmed a few days after doping. This diffusion introduces new recombination centers in the material. This work suggests that the processing steps used to fabricate mercuric iodide nuclear detectors can lead to the introduction of new defects which are detrimental to detector performance

  2. Introduction of extrinsic defects into mercuric iodide during processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, C.-Y.; Bao, X. J.; Schlesinger, T. E.; James, R. B.; Cheng, A. Y.; Ortale, C.; van den Berg, L.

    1993-05-01

    Low-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) measurements were performed on mercuric iodide (HgI2) crystals which were intentionally doped with copper or silver during KI etching. PL spectra obtained after these doping experiments show specific Cu and Ag features similar to those previously observed after deposition of Cu or Ag contacts on mercuric iodide crystals. The in-diffusion of Cu or Ag into bulk HgI2 has also been confirmed a few days after doping. This diffusion introduces new recombination centers in the material. This work suggests that the processing steps used to fabricate mercuric iodide nuclear detectors can lead to the introduction of new defects which are detrimental to detector performance.

  3. Modified purification of mercuric iodide for crystal growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, N.L.; Ortale, C.; Schieber, M.M.; van den Berg, L.

    1988-01-01

    The standard procedure used in our laboratory to purify commercially available mercuric iodide consists of a sequence of steps: (1) repeated sublimation under continous evacuation, followed by (2) melting and recrystallization, and (3) a sublimation process in a closed tube. This paper describes a modification of the standard purification sequence by adding recrystallization of the mercuric iodide in hydrochloric acid. Leaching cation impurities out of mercuric iodide powder with hydrochloric acid has been practiced before by Zaletin, (V.M. Zaletin, I.H. Nozhiua, I.N. Fomin, V.T. Shystov, and N.V. Protasov, Atomic Energy 48, 169 (1980)). Our objective for the hydrochloric acid treatment was to remove nitrates and hydrocarbons which were interfering with the vapor transport during crystal growth. Results of the procedure are presented in terms of total carbon and selected ion content of the treated and untreated material. 13 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Introduction of extrinsic defects into mercuric iodide during processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, C.; Bao, X.J.; Schlesinger, T.E. (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)); James, R.B. (Advanced Materials Research Division, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)); Cheng, A.Y.; Ortale, C.; van den Berg, L. (EG G Energy Measurements, Incorporated, Goleta, California 93116 (United States))

    1993-05-01

    Low temperature (4.2 K) photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) measurements were performed on mercuric iodide (HgI[sub 2]) crystals which were intentionally doped with copper or silver during KI etching. PL spectra obtained after these doping experiments show specific Cu and Ag features similar to those previously observed after deposition of Cu or Ag contacts on mercuric iodide crystals. The in-diffusion of Cu or Ag into bulk HgI[sub 2] has also been confirmed a few days after doping. This diffusion introduces new recombination centers in the material. This work suggests that the processing steps used to fabricate mercuric iodide nuclear detectors can lead to the introduction of new defects which are detrimental to detector performance.

  5. Removal efficiency of organic iodide by silver-exchanged zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The removal efficiency of radioactive organic iodide generated under accident conditions at nuclear power plants or nuclear fuel cycle processes by silver-exchanged zeolite(AgX) was experimentally evaluated. First of all, adsorption capacities of various adsorbents such as activated carbon, zeocarbon and zeolite 13X as a function of process temperature were analyzed. Optimal operating condition for the removal of methyl iodide using AgX was suggested, based on silver-exchanged amounts and adsorption temperature. The effective removal efficiency of methyl iodide by AgX was obtained at conditions that the process temperature is in the range of 150 .deg. C to 200 .deg. C and the silver exchanged amount is about 10 wt%

  6. Adsorption of Gaseous Methyl Iodide by Active Carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impregnation of active carbons is known to be a useful means of improving the ability of these carbons to retain methyl iodide which might be formed during the accidental release of fission products from a reactor. Some basic work was done on both impregnated and unimpregnated materials, which involved: (a) the texture: (b) the reaction of Mel with the impregnants; (c) the adsorption of Mel on the carbons under dry and wet conditions at different temperatures. It was found that the carbons are highly microporous. A large part of this porosity disappears on impregnation with organic amine; These impregnants react chemically with the methyl iodide, which is thereby fixed on the carbon. For carbon which is impregnated with KI, a rapid exchange reaction takes place between the methyl iodide and KI under both dry and wet conditions. Consequently most of the iodine activity can be removed from the gas. (author)

  7. Standard free energy of formation of iron iodide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandkar, A.; Tare, V. B.; Wagner, J. B., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An experiment is reported where silver iodide is used to determine the standard free energy of formation of iron iodide. By using silver iodide as a solid electrolyte, a galvanic cell, Ag/AgI/Fe-FeI2, is formulated. The standard free energy of formation of AgI is known, and hence it is possible to estimate the standard free energy of formation of FeI2 by measuring the open-circuit emf of the above cell as a function of temperature. The free standard energy of formation of FeI2 determined by this method is -38784 + 24.165T cal/mol. It is estimated that the maximum error associated with this method is plus or minus 2500 cal/mol.

  8. A novel peculiar mutation in the sodium/iodide symporter gene in spanish siblings with iodide transport defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosugi, Shinji; Okamoto, Hiroomi; Tamada, Aiko; Sanchez-Franco, F

    2002-08-01

    Previously, we reported two Spanish siblings with congenital hypothyroidism due to total failure of iodide transport. These were the only cases reported to date who received long-term iodide treatment over 10 yr. We examined the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) gene of these patients. A large deletion was observed by long and accurate PCR using primers derived from introns 2 and 7 of the NIS gene. PCR-direct sequencing revealed a deletion of 6192 bases spanning from exon 3 to intron 7 and an inverted insertion of a 431-base fragment spanning from exon 5 to intron 5 of the NIS gene. The patients were homozygous for the mutation, and their mother was heterozygous. In the mutant, deletion of exons 3-7 was suggested by analysis using programs to predict exon/intron organization, resulting in an in-frame 182-amino acid deletion from Met(142) in the fourth transmembrane domain to Gln(323) in the fourth exoplasmic loop. The mutant showed no iodide uptake activity when transfected into COS-7 cells, confirming that the mutation was the direct cause of the iodide transport defect in these patients. Further, the mutant NIS protein was synthesized, but not properly expressed, on the cell surface, but was mostly accumulated in the cytoplasm, suggesting impaired targeting to the plasma membrane. PMID:12161518

  9. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartsough, Neal; Iwanczyk, Jan

    2009-01-01

    A film-growth process was developed for polycrystalline mercuric iodide that creates cost-effective, large-area detectors for high-energy charged-particle detection. A material, called a barrier film, is introduced onto the substrate before the normal mercuric iodide film growth process. The barrier film improves the quality of the normal film grown and enhances the adhesion between the film and the substrate. The films grown using this improved technique were found to have adequate signal-to-noise properties so that individual high-energy charged -particle interactions could be distinguished from noise, and thus, could be used to provide an anticoincidence veto function as desired.

  10. Depolymerization of Lignin in Wood with Molecular Hydrogen Iodide

    OpenAIRE

    Shevchenko, Sergey M.

    2000-01-01

    Depolymerization of lignin in wood with hydrogen iodide in a non-polar solvent is a selective, high-yield reaction that releases a diiodide of potential synthetic value into the solution. Finely milled wood (Douglas-fir, spruce, aspen, and sugarcane), was suspended in CDCl3 and treated with dry hydrogen iodide in a NMR tube. The yields and composition of the chloroform-soluble monomeric lignin depolymerization products, 1,3-diiodo-1-(4-hydroxyaryl)propanes, originated from guaiacyl (G), syrin...

  11. 40 CFR 415.510 - Applicability; description of the potassium iodide production subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... potassium iodide production subcategory. 415.510 Section 415.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Potassium Iodide Production Subcategory § 415.510 Applicability; description of the potassium iodide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  12. 21 CFR 520.763c - Dithiazanine iodide and piperazine citrate suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dithiazanine iodide and piperazine citrate... § 520.763c Dithiazanine iodide and piperazine citrate suspension. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of the drug contains 69 milligrams of dithiazanine iodide and 83 milligrams of piperazine base...

  13. Degradation of Methyl Iodide in Soil: Effects of Environmental Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methyl iodide (MeI) is a promising alternative to the phased-out fumigant methyl bromide, and its environmental fate following soil fumigation is of great concern. Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of various environmental factors on the degradation rate of MeI in soil. The chem...

  14. Enthalpies of potassium iodide dissolution in isopropanol aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At 298.15 K in air-tight microcalorimeter with isothermal shell enthalpies of potassium iodide dissolution in water and in water-isopropyl alcohol mixtures (5,10,20,30,50 and 70 mol.%) are measured. Dissolution enthalpies during infinite dilution in the above-mentioned mixed solvents are determined

  15. Iodide volatility under condition relevant to PWR steam generator faults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of iodine volatility during steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) is hampered by three factors: (i) lack of suitable plant data under fault conditions, (ii) lack of experimental data (mainly due to the difficulty of performing experiments under the conditions required) and (iii) uncertainty in theoretical methods to extrapolate experimental data to the required conditions. This report summarises methods of estimating the volatility of hydrogen iodide and iodide salts at the required conditions of temperature and pressure. A thermodynamic method has been used to estimate HI volatility and the density correlation method for iodide salt volatility. It is assumed throughout that it is more conservative to predict higher volatility. Consideration is given to two explanations of experiments carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on the influence of boric acid concentration and pH on the volatility of radioiodine ostensibly under SGTR conditions: (i) the results have been interpreted in terms of reactions involving volatility of iodide salt/ion-pairs and complexation by boric acid in the gas phase and (ii) the possibility is explored that the observed results are due to the influence of oxidation leading to the formation of much more volatile iodine species. (author)

  16. FY-2015 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Test Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soelberg, Nicholas Ray [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Watson, Tony Leroy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Nuclear fission produces fission and activation products, including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has continued in Fiscal Year 2015 according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. Updates to the deep-bed test system have also been performed to enable the inclusion of evaporated HNO3 and increased NO2 concentrations in future tests. This report summarizes the result of those activities. Test results showed that iodine adsorption from gaseous methyl iodide using reduced silver zeolite (AgZ) resulted in initial iodine decontamination factors (DFs, ratios of uncontrolled and controlled total iodine levels) under 1,000 for the conditions of the long-duration test performed this year (45 ppm CH3I, 1,000 ppm each NO and NO2, very low H2O levels [3 ppm] in balance air). The mass transfer zone depth exceeded the cumulative 5-inch depth of 4 bed segments, which is deeper than the 2-4 inch depth estimated for the mass transfer zone for adsorbing I2 using AgZ in prior deep-bed tests. The maximum iodine adsorption capacity for the AgZ under the conditions of this test was 6.2% (6.2 g adsorbed I per 100 g sorbent). The maximum Ag utilization was 51%. Additional deep-bed testing and analyses are recommended to (a) expand the data base for methyl iodide adsorption and (b) provide more data for evaluating organic iodide reactions and reaction byproducts for different potential adsorption conditions.

  17. FY-2015 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Test Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fission produces fission and activation products, including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has continued in Fiscal Year 2015 according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. Updates to the deep-bed test system have also been performed to enable the inclusion of evaporated HNO3 and increased NO2 concentrations in future tests. This report summarizes the result of those activities. Test results showed that iodine adsorption from gaseous methyl iodide using reduced silver zeolite (AgZ) resulted in initial iodine decontamination factors (DFs, ratios of uncontrolled and controlled total iodine levels) under 1,000 for the conditions of the long-duration test performed this year (45 ppm CH3I, 1,000 ppm each NO and NO2, very low H2O levels [3 ppm] in balance air). The mass transfer zone depth exceeded the cumulative 5-inch depth of 4 bed segments, which is deeper than the 2-4 inch depth estimated for the mass transfer zone for adsorbing I2 using AgZ in prior deep-bed tests. The maximum iodine adsorption capacity for the AgZ under the conditions of this test was 6.2% (6.2 g adsorbed I per 100 g sorbent). The maximum Ag utilization was 51%. Additional deep-bed testing and analyses are recommended to (a) expand the data base for methyl iodide adsorption and (b) provide more data for evaluating organic iodide reactions and reaction byproducts for different potential adsorption conditions.

  18. Americium(3) coordination chemistry: An unexplored diversity of structure and bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedosseev, A.M.; Grigoriev, M.S.; Budantseva, N.A. [A.N. Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation); Guillaumont, D.; Den Auwer, Ch.; Moisy, Ph. [CEA Marcoule, Nuclear Energy Division, RadioChemistry and Processes Department, 30 (France); Le Naour, C.; Simoni, E. [CNRS, University Paris-11 Orsay, IPN, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2010-06-15

    The comparison of the physicochemical behavior of the actinides with that of the lanthanides can be justified by the analogy of their electronic structure, as each of the series is made up of elements corresponding to the filling of a given (n)f atomic shell. However relatively few points of comparison are available, given the lack of available structure for trans-plutonium(III) elements and the additional difficulty of stabilizing coordination complexes of uranium(III) to plutonium(III). This contribution is a focal point of trans-plutonium(III) chemistry and, more specifically, of some americium compounds that have been recently synthesized, all related with hard acid oxygen donor ligands that may be involved in the reprocessing chain of nuclear fuel. After a brief review of the solid hydrates and aquo species for the lanthanide and actinide families, we discuss two types of ligands that have in common three carboxylic groups, namely the amino-tri-acetic acid and the citric acid anions. The additional roles of the nitrogen atom for the first one and of the hydroxy function for the second one are discussed. Accordingly, five new complexes with either americium or lanthanides elements are described: [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}][M(NTA){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)].8H{sub 2}O with M Nd, Yb and Am, and [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sub 2}K[M{sub 3}(Cit){sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}].18H{sub 2}O with Nd and Am cations. In all cases the americium complexes are isostructural with their lanthanide equivalents. (authors)

  19. Americium(3) coordination chemistry: An unexplored diversity of structure and bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The comparison of the physicochemical behavior of the actinides with that of the lanthanides can be justified by the analogy of their electronic structure, as each of the series is made up of elements corresponding to the filling of a given (n)f atomic shell. However relatively few points of comparison are available, given the lack of available structure for trans-plutonium(III) elements and the additional difficulty of stabilizing coordination complexes of uranium(III) to plutonium(III). This contribution is a focal point of trans-plutonium(III) chemistry and, more specifically, of some americium compounds that have been recently synthesized, all related with hard acid oxygen donor ligands that may be involved in the reprocessing chain of nuclear fuel. After a brief review of the solid hydrates and aquo species for the lanthanide and actinide families, we discuss two types of ligands that have in common three carboxylic groups, namely the amino-tri-acetic acid and the citric acid anions. The additional roles of the nitrogen atom for the first one and of the hydroxy function for the second one are discussed. Accordingly, five new complexes with either americium or lanthanides elements are described: [Co(NH3)6][M(NTA)2(H2O)].8H2O with M Nd, Yb and Am, and [Co(NH3)6]2K[M3(Cit)4(H2O)3].18H2O with Nd and Am cations. In all cases the americium complexes are isostructural with their lanthanide equivalents. (authors)

  20. Speciation of americium in seawater and accumulation in the marine sponge Aplysina cavernicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloubier, Melody; Michel, Hervé; Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Moisy, Philippe; Tribalat, Marie-Aude; Oberhaensli, François R; Dechraoui Bottein, Marie Yasmine; Thomas, Olivier P; Monfort, Marguerite; Moulin, Christophe; Den Auwer, Christophe

    2015-12-21

    The fate of radionuclides in the environment is a cause of great concern for modern society, seen especially in 2011 after the Fukushima accident. Among the environmental compartments, seawater covers most of the earth's surface and may be directly or indirectly impacted. The interaction between radionuclides and the marine compartment is therefore essential for better understanding the transfer mechanisms from the hydrosphere to the biosphere. This information allows for the evaluation of the impact on humans via our interaction with the biotope that has been largely undocumented up to now. In this report, we attempt to make a link between the speciation of heavy elements in natural seawater and their uptake by a model marine organism. More specifically, because the interaction of actinides with marine invertebrates has been poorly studied, the accumulation in a representative member of the Mediterranean coralligenous habitat, the sponge Aplysina cavernicola, was investigated and its uptake curve exposed to a radiotracer (241)Am was estimated using a high-purity Ge gamma spectrometer. But in order to go beyond the phenomenological accumulation rate, the speciation of americium(III) in seawater must be assessed. The speciation of (241)Am (and natural europium as its chemically stable surrogate) in seawater was determined using a combination of different techniques: Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TRLIF), Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) at the LIII edge, Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and the resulting data were compared with the speciation modeling. In seawater, the americium(III) complex (as well as the corresponding europium complex, although with conformational differences) was identified as a ternary sodium biscarbonato complex, whose formula can be tentatively written as NaAm(CO3)2·nH2O. It is therefore this chemical form of americium that is

  1. Fabrication of uranium–americium mixed oxide pellet from microsphere precursors: Application of CRMP process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remy, E. [Radiochemistry and Processes Department, CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Picart, S., E-mail: sebastien.picart@cea.fr [Radiochemistry and Processes Department, CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Delahaye, T. [Fuel Cycle Technology Department, CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Jobelin, I. [Radiochemistry and Processes Department, CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Lebreton, F.; Horlait, D. [Fuel Cycle Technology Department, CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Bisel, I. [Radiochemistry and Processes Department, CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Blanchart, P. [Heterogeneous Materials Research Group, Centre Européen de la Céramique, F-87068 Limoges (France); Ayral, A. [Institut Européen des Membranes, CNRS-ENSCM-UM2, CC47, University Montpellier 2, F-34095 Montpellier cedex 5 (France)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Dust free process for (U,Am)O{sub 2} transmutation target fabrication. • Synthesis of U{sub 0.9}Am{sub 0.1}O{sub 2} mixed oxide microspheres from ion exchange resin. • Fabrication of dense U{sub 0.9}Am{sub 0.1}O{sub 2} pellet with 95% TD from mixed oxide microspheres. - Abstract: Mixed uranium–americium oxides are one of the materials envisaged for Americium Bearing Blankets dedicated to transmutation in fast neutron reactors. Recently, several processes have been developed in order to validate fabrication flowchart in terms of material specifications such as density and homogeneity but also to suggest simplifications for lowering industrial costs and hazards linked to dust generation of highly contaminating and irradiating compounds. This study deals with the application of an innovative route using mixed oxide microspheres obtained from metal loaded resin bead calcination, called Calcined Resin Microsphere Pelletization (CRMP). The synthesis of mixed oxide microsphere precursor of U{sub 0.9}Am{sub 0.1}O{sub 2±δ} is described as well as its characterisation. The use of this free-flowing precursor allows the pressing and sintering of one pellet of U{sub 0.9}Am{sub 0.1}O{sub 2±δ}. The ceramic obtained was characterised and results showed that its microstructure is dense and homogeneous and its density attains 95% of the theoretical density. This study validates the scientific feasibility of the CRMP process applied to the fabrication of uranium and americium-containing materials.

  2. Americium characterization by X-ray fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy in plutonium uranium mixed oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium uranium mixed oxide (MOX) fuels are currently used in nuclear reactors. The actinides in these fuels need to be analyzed after irradiation for assessing their behaviour with regard to their environment and the coolant. In this work the study of the atomic structure and next-neighbour environment of Am in the (Pu,U)O2 lattice in an irradiated (60 MW d kg−1) MOX sample was performed employing micro-X-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF) and micro-X-ray absorption fine structure (µ-XAFS) spectroscopy. The chemical bonds, valences and stoichiometry of Am (∼0.66 wt%) are determined from the experimental data gained for the irradiated fuel material examined in its peripheral zone (rim) of the fuel. In the irradiated sample Am builds up as Am3+ species within an [AmO8]13− coordination environment (e.g. >90%) and no (III XAFS spectra recorded for the irradiated MOX sub-sample in the rim zone for a 300 μm×300 μm beam size area investigated over six scans of 4 h. The records remain constant during multi-scan. The analysis of the XAFS signal shows that Am is found as trivalent in the UO2 matrix. This analytical work shall open the door of very challenging analysis (speciation of fission product and actinides) in irradiated nuclear fuels. - Highlights: • Americium was characterized by microX-ray absorption spectroscopy in irradiated MOX fuel. • The americium redox state as determined from XAS data of irradiated fuel material was Am(III). • In the sample, the Am3+ face an AmO813− coordination environment in the (Pu,U)O2 matrix. • The americium dioxide is reduced by the uranium dioxide matrix

  3. Recovery of Americium-241 from lightning rod by the method of chemical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About 95% of the lightning rods installed in the Peruvian territory have set in their structures, pose small amounts of radioactive sources such as Americium-241 (241Am), fewer and Radium 226 (226Ra) these are alpha emitters and have a half life of 432 years and 1600 years respectively. In this paper describes the recovery of radioactive sources of 241Am radioactive lightning rods using the conventional chemical treatment method using agents and acids to break down the slides. The 241Am recovered was as excitation source and alpha particle generator for analysing samples by X Ray Fluorescence, for fixing the stainless steel 241Am technique was used electrodeposition. (author)

  4. Report of scouting study on precipitation of strontium, plutonium, and americium from Hanford complexant concentrate waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A laboratory scouting test was conducted of precipitation methods for reducing the solubility of radionuclides in complexant concentrate (CC) waste solution. The results show that addition of strontium nitrate solution is effective in reducing the liquid phase activity of 90Sr (Strontium) in CC waste from tank 107-AN by 94% when the total strontium concentration is adjusted to 0.1 M. Addition of ferric nitrate solution effective in reducing the 241Am (Americium) activity in CC waste by 96% under the conditions described in the report. Ferric nitrate was also marginally effective in reducing the solubility of 239/240Pu (Plutonium) in CC waste

  5. Plutonium and americium in arctic waters, the North Sea and Scottish and Irish coastal zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallstadius, L.; Aarkrog, Asker; Dahlgaard, Henning;

    1986-01-01

    Plutonium and americium have been measured in surface waters of the Greenland and Barents Seas and in the northern North Sea from 1980 through 1984. Measurements in water and biota, Fucus, Mytilus and Patella, were carried out in North-English and Scottish waters in 1982 and Fucus samples were...... plutonium from the latter to Spitsbergen waters. Fallout plutonium in Arctic waters has a residence time of the order of several years, while for Pu from Sellafield we estimate mean residence times of 11–15 months in Scottish waters and, tentatively, 1·5-3 y during transport from the North Channel (north...

  6. Americium and curium heterogeneous transmutation in moderated S/ A in the framework of CNE scenarios studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the transmutation of Americium and Curium in a heterogeneous mode in the framework of the 1991 French Law concerning waste management. Two scenarios with moderated targets are presented: a 100% frit reactor (EFR) scenario multi-recycling Pu+Np with targets of Am+Cm placed in core and a mixed PWR (UOX fuel) and fast reactor (50% of EFR) multi-recycling Pu+Np and containing targets in core and in the blanket region. The design of the target is based on classical fast fuel S/A technology (pins, spacer wires,...) and should reach the goal of 90% fission rate. (authors)

  7. Laboratory investigation of the role of desorption kinetics on americium transport associated with bentonite colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Timothy Mark; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Ware, Stuart Douglas; Reimus, Paul William

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the parameters that control colloid-mediated transport of radionuclides is important for the safe disposal of used nuclear fuel. We report an experimental and reactive transport modeling examination of americium transport in a groundwater-bentonite-fracture fill material system. A series of batch sorption and column transport experiments were conducted to determine the role of desorption kinetics from bentonite colloids in the transport of americium through fracture materials. We used fracture fill material from a shear zone in altered granodiorite collected from the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland and colloidal suspensions generated from FEBEX bentonite, a potential repository backfill material. The colloidal suspension (100 mg L(-1)) was prepared in synthetic groundwater that matched the natural water chemistry at GTS and was spiked with 5.5 × 10(-10) M (241)Am. Batch characterizations indicated that 97% of the americium in the stock suspension was adsorbed to the colloids. Breakthrough experiments conducted by injecting the americium colloidal suspension through three identical columns in series, each with mean residence times of 6 h, show that more than 95% of the bentonite colloids were transported through each of the columns, with modeled colloid filtration rates (k(f)) of 0.01-0.02 h(-1). Am recoveries in each column were 55-60%, and Am desorption rate constants from the colloids, determined from 1-D transport modeling, were 0.96, 0.98, and 0.91 h(-1) in the three columns, respectively. The consistency in Am recoveries and desorption rate constants in each column indicates that the Am was not associated with binding sites of widely-varying strengths on the colloids, as one binding site with fast kinetics represented the system accurately for all three sequential columns. Our data suggest that colloid-mediated transport of Am in a bentonite-fracture fill material system is unlikely to result in transport over long distance scales because

  8. Purification of used scintillation liquids containing the alpha emitters americium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Sweden, alpha radioactive waste liquids with an activity over some kBq per waste container cannot be sent for final storage. Therefore, in this work, a method for a purification of alpha active scintillation cocktails was developed. Until today (March, 2013) more than 20 L of scintillation liquids have successfully been purified from americium and plutonium. The products of the process are a solid fraction that can be sent to final storage and a practically non-radioactive liquid fraction that can be sent to municipal incineration. (author)

  9. Comparison of acid leachate and fusion methods to determine plutonium and americium in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory performs radiochemical analyses for a wide variety of sites within the Department of Energy complex. Since the chemical history of the samples may vary drastically from site to site, the effectiveness of any analytical technique may also vary. This study compares a potassium fluoride-pyrosulfate fusion technique with an acid leachate method. Both normal and high-fired soils and vegetation samples were analyzed for both americium and plutonium. Results show both methods work well, except for plutonium in high-fired soils. Here the fusion method provides higher accuracy

  10. Plutonium and americium in arctic waters, the North Sea and Scottish and Irish coastal zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallstadius, L.; Aarkrog, Asker; Dahlgaard, Henning; Holm, E.; Boelskifte, S.; Duniec, S.; Persson, B.

    1986-01-01

    Plutonium and americium have been measured in surface waters of the Greenland and Barents Seas and in the northern North Sea from 1980 through 1984. Measurements in water and biota, Fucus, Mytilus and Patella, were carried out in North-English and Scottish waters in 1982 and Fucus samples were...... plutonium from the latter to Spitsbergen waters. Fallout plutonium in Arctic waters has a residence time of the order of several years, while for Pu from Sellafield we estimate mean residence times of 11–15 months in Scottish waters and, tentatively, 1·5-3 y during transport from the North Channel (north of...

  11. Influence of biofilms on migration of uranium, americium and europium in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report on the influence of biofilms on migration of uranium, americium and europium in the environment deals with the contamination problems of uranium mines such as SDAG WISMUT in Saxonia and Thuringia. In mine waters microorganisms form a complex microbiological biocoenosis in spite of low pH values and high heavy metal concentrations including high uranium concentrations. The analyses used microbiological methods like confocal laser scanning microscopy and molecular-biological techniques. The interactions of microorganism with fluorescent radioactive heavy metal ions were performed with TRLFS (time resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy).

  12. Numerical simulation for concentration profiles of americium and lanthanides in the CMPO-TBP solvent extraction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A numerical simulation code is developed to predict the extraction behavior of americium and lanthanides in the TRUEX (TRansUranium EXtraction)process. This code gives the concentration profiles of the components at steady state. The stage efficiency is included in this code as a parameter in order to simulate the extraction behavior of the components accurately. Concentration profiles of americium and typical lanthanides in some counter current experiments are calculated by means of the present code. The calculated concentration profiles are compared with the experimental results. The efficiency value for the mixer-settlers, which gives good agreement between the calculated and the experimental profiles, is evaluated. (author)

  13. Numerical simulation for concentration profiles of americium and lanthanides in the CMPO-TBP solvent extraction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A numerical simulation code for the TRUEX (TRansUranium EXtraction) process is developed to predict the extraction behavior of americium and lanthanides. This code gives the concentrations of the components at the steady state of the TRUEX process. The stage efficiency is applied to this code in order to simulate the extraction behavior of the components accurately. Concentration profiles of americium and typical lanthanides in some counter current experiments are calculated by means of the present code. The calculated profiles are compared with the experimental ones. The efficiency value for the mixer-settlers, which gives the best agreement between the two profiles, is investigated

  14. Study of the extraction and the purification of americium and trivalent actinides contained in effluents with supported liquid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The supported liquid membrane technique is studied and developed for americium recovery from uranium or plutonium matrices and decontamination of liquid radioactive wastes. First tests on uranium-nickel solutions with a flat membrane showed the easiness of the operation and the efficiency of the process. Acid-resistant (10 N), interchangeable elements with hollow fibers, are developed and also a computerized automatic device. The different tests on americium solutions demonstrate the feasibility and the reliability of the system. Influence of various parameters on transfer kinetics is investigated

  15. Experimental and in situ investigations on americium, curium and plutonium behaviour in marine benthic species: transfer from water or sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tranfer of transuranic elements -americium, curium and plutonium- from the sediments containing them to some marine benthic species (endofauna and epifauna) was studied with a twofold approach - laboratory and in-situ investigation. The experimental investigations, divided into three parts, made it possible to specify concentration factors (F.C.), transfer factors (F.T.) and to understand the process involved for 5 benthic species. The result were refined by an in-situ study that brought new data on the marine distribution of the transuranic elements released by the La Hague plant. Finally, the localization of americium and plutonium in the tissues and cells of these species was determined by autoradiography

  16. Formation of organic iodides from containment paint ingredients caused by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of volatile alkyl iodides other than methyl iodide during a serious nuclear reactor accident may have radiological significance. The hypothesis that radioactive alkyl iodides, other than methyl iodide, could form from paint solvents under the conditions of a serious nuclear accident in light water reactors (under boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurised water reactor (PWR) conditions) was tested using stable elemental iodine, a gamma irradiator and gas chromatography equipment. It was found that methyl and isopropyl iodides were formed from the texanol ester, which is used in many modern water-based paints. Methyl, ethyl, propyl and butyl iodides were formed from a hydrocarbon solvent (white spirit) commonly used in paint products used in the past. These results suggest that further work on the formation and behaviour of the higher alkyl iodides (containing more than one carbon atom) under the conditions of a serious nuclear accident is justified. (author)

  17. A novel mutation in the sodium/iodide symporter gene in the largest family with iodide transport defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosugi, S; Bhayana, S; Dean, H J

    1999-09-01

    We previously reported nine children with an autosomally recessive form of congenital hypothyroidism due to an iodide transport defect in a large Hutterite family with extensive consanguinity living in central Canada. Since the original report, we have diagnosed congenital hypothyroidism by newborn TSH screening in 9 additional children from the family. We performed direct sequencing of the PCR products of each NIS (sodium/iodide symporter) gene exon with flanking introns amplified from genomic DNA extracted from peripheral blood cells of the patients. We identified a novel NIS gene mutation, G395R (Gly395-->Arg; GGA-->AGA), in 10 patients examined in the present study. All of the parents tested were heterozygous for the mutation, suggesting that the patients were homozygous. The mutation was located in the 10th transmembrane helix. Expression experiments by transfection of the mutant NIS complimentary DNA into COS-7 cells showed no perchlorate-sensitive iodide uptake, confirming that the mutation is the direct cause of the iodide transport defect in these patients. A patient who showed an intermediate saliva/serum technetium ratio (14.0; normal, > or = 20) and was considered to have a partial or less severe defect in the previous report (IX-24) did not have a NIS gene mutation. It is now possible to use gene diagnostics of this unique NIS mutation to identify patients with congenital hypothyroidism due to an iodide transport defect in this family and to determine the carrier state of potential parents for genetic counseling and arranging rapid and early diagnosis of their infants. PMID:10487695

  18. Vitrification of F-area americium/curium: feasibility study and preliminary process recommendation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work was performed to identify a process to vitrify the contents of F- canyon Tank 17.1. Tank 17.1 contains the majority of americium (Am) and curium (Cm) contained in the DOE Complex. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has made a formal request for this material as fuel for production of Cf252 and other transplutonium actinides. The Am and Cm (and associated lanthanide fission products) are currently in nitric acid solution. Transportation of the intensely radioactive Am/Cm in liquid form is not considered possible. As a result, the material will either be solidified and shipped to ORNL or discarded to the Tank Farm. Nuclear Materials Processing Technology (NMPT), therefore, requested Defense Waste Processing Technology (DWPT) to determine if the Tank 17.1 material could be vitrified, and if it was vitrified could the americium and curium be successfully recovered. Research was performed to determine if the Tank 17.1 contents could indeed be mixed with glass formers and vitrified. Additional studies identified critical process parameters such as heat loading, melter requirements, off-gas evolution, etc. Discussions with NMPT personnel were initiated to determine existing facilities where this work could be accomplished safely. A process has been identified which will convert the Am/Cm material into approximately 300kg of glass

  19. Transfer of radiocaesium, plutonium and americium to sheep after ingestion of contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dual isotope method has been used to study the transfer of 137Cs, 239/240Pu and 241Am to sheep following ingestion of contaminated soil. Two soils were used; an alluvial gley contaminated by Sellafield discharges, and an organic soil, artificially contaminated in a lysimeter. Values of the true absorption coefficient of radiocaesium of 0.19 +/- 0.03 and 0.03 +/- 0.01 respectively were obtained for these soils. This implies an availability factor for soil-associated radiocaesium of up to about 20 pc compared to radiocaesium ingested in soluble form. The absorption of plutonium and americium was not significantly different for the two soils tested. Absorption of both plutonium and americium was in the range 10-5 - 10-4, with mean values of 7 x 10-5 and 4 x 10-5 obtained respectively. These values imply availability factors of around 10 pc, compared to the value of 5 x 10-4 recommended by ICRP for plutonium ingested in a comparatively available form. These results are compared with estimates of availability made using an in-vitro approach

  20. Transfer of radiocaesium, plutonium and americium to sheep after ingestion of contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, A.I.; Weekes, T.E.C. [Newcastle upon Tyne Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Biological and Nutritional Sciences; Rimmer, D.L. [Newcastle upon Tyne Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Agricultural and Environmental Science; Green, N.; Wilkins, B.T. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    A dual isotope method has been used to study the transfer of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 239/240}Pu and {sup 241}Am to sheep following ingestion of contaminated soil. Two soils were used; an alluvial gley contaminated by Sellafield discharges, and an organic soil, artificially contaminated in a lysimeter. Values of the true absorption coefficient of radiocaesium of 0.19 +/- 0.03 and 0.03 +/- 0.01 respectively were obtained for these soils. This implies an availability factor for soil-associated radiocaesium of up to about 20 pc compared to radiocaesium ingested in soluble form. The absorption of plutonium and americium was not significantly different for the two soils tested. Absorption of both plutonium and americium was in the range 10{sup -5} - 10{sup -4}, with mean values of 7 x 10{sup -5} and 4 x 10{sup -5} obtained respectively. These values imply availability factors of around 10 pc, compared to the value of 5 x 10{sup -4} recommended by ICRP for plutonium ingested in a comparatively available form. These results are compared with estimates of availability made using an in-vitro approach

  1. Americium and europium extraction from carbonate solutions by 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoylpyrazolone -5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivalent TPEs and REEs are extractable from carbonate solutions by 1-pheny-3-methyl-4-benzoylpyrazolone-5 (PMBP). The effect of concentration of KHCO3 and K2CO3, extractant, metal, and other factors on the extent of extraction of the elements has been clarified. The kinetics of extraction of the elements from carbonate solutions has been studied. It has been shown that in the KHCO3 concentration range 0.2-2.0 M americium and europium are extracted by PMBP solutions in different diluents with distribution coefficients lying within n x 102-n x 103. From K2CO3 solutions the elements are extracted better by PMBP solutions in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). It has been shown that metal concentration in the range 1x10-5. 5x10-3 g-ion x liter-1 does not affect extraction (log E = 3). Extracts based on PMBP with a metal content higher than 5x10-3g-ion x liter-1 were obtained by absolute concentrating method and were used for the study of 13C NMR spectra. The composition of thecompounds extracted by PMBP from carbonate solutions was determined by 13C NMR spectroscopy and extraction. The conditions of europium and americium reextraction from extracts based on PMBP by complexones, their mixtures with alkalis and other substances were studied. The scopes for using the system PMBP-carbonate solutions to separate and concentrate TPEs and REEs has been examined

  2. Evaluation of americium-241 toxicity influence on the microbial growth of organic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Since the licenses for using radioactive sources in radioactive lightning rods were lifted by the Brazilian national nuclear authority, in 1989, the radioactive devices have been replaced by Franklin type and collected as radioactive waste. However, only 20 percent of the estimated total number of installed rods was delivered to Brazilian Nuclear Commission. This situation causes concern, due to, first, the possibility of the rods being disposed as domestic waste, and second, the americium, the most commonly employed radionuclide, is classified as a high-toxicity element. In the present study, Am-241 migration experiments were performed by a lysimeter system, in order to evaluate the risk of contamination caused by radioactive lightning rods disposed as a common solid waste. Besides the risk evaluation, it is important to know the mechanism of the Am-241 release or retention in waste as well as its influence in the waste decomposition processes. Many factors are involved, but microorganisms present in the waste play an important role in its degradation, which control the physical and chemical processes. The objective of this work was to evaluate the Am-241 influence on the microbial population by counting number of cells in lysimeters leachate. Preliminary results suggest that americium may influence significantly the bacteria growth in organic waste, evidenced by culture under aerobiosis and an-aerobiosis and the antimicrobial resistance test. (authors)

  3. Contribution to the prediction of americium, plutonium and neptunium behaviour in the geosphere: chemical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An exhaustive bibliographic review on hydrolysis of americium gives the stability constants, at zero ionic strength. No evidence of Am(OH)4- formation was found by solubility studies up to pH 2 (CO3)3 characterised by its X-ray diffraction pattern is studied at a high ionic strength. All the published results on Am in carbonate media are reinterpreted using these stability constants (Am-OH-CO3 complexes are not needed). No evidence of Am(CO3)45- formation was found by spectrophotometry up to 3M. Literature results are used to determine the formal redox potentials at pH = 9.4 and to calculate the formation constants, at zero ionic strength. The formation of complexes between americium and humic materials (purified fulvic and humic acids) has been studied by a spectrophotometric technique. The results are interpreted by the formation of a 1:1 complexe. Solubility of the solid PuO2(CO3) is measured in bicarbonate media at high ionic strength, to obtain the solubility product and formation constants of the PuO2(CO3)i2-2i complexes

  4. Mercuric iodide (HgI2) growth for nuclear detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepple, W.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to grow more-perfect mercuric iodide crystals in a low-gravity environment by taking advantage of diffusion-controlled growth conditions and by avoiding the problem of strain dislocations produced by the crystal's weight. This crystal has considerable practical importance as a sensitive gamma-ray detector and energy spectrometer that can operate at ambient temperature, as compared to presently available detectors that must be cooled to near liquid nitrogen temperatures. However, the performance of mercuric iodide crystals only rarely approaches the expected performance, presumably because some of the free electrical charges produced within the crystal are not collected at the electrodes, but instead remain trapped or immobilized at crystal defects. An efficient high atomic number semiconductor detector capable of operating at room temperature utilizing single HgI2 crystals offers a greater potential than existing detector technology.

  5. Development of the semiconductor detector of lead iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lead iodide (PbI2) crystal is one of the most promising semiconductor detectors to be operated at room temperature. It is a semiconductor with a wide band gap energy and high atomic numbers. The preparation of a detector crystal consists of the purification of starting material, in quartz ampoules, by zone refining technique and growth of crystals by Bridgman method. The ability to obtain high purity crystals containing a relatively low number of defects and the physical-chemistry characterization are necessary pre-requisites for the production of good quality radiation detectors. This work reports the lead iodide monocrystal purification and growth methods to obtain those crystals with appropriate characteristics for their application as radiation detectors. (author)

  6. Behaviour of organic iodides under pwr accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory experiments were performed to study the behaviour of radioactive methyl iodide under PWR loss-of-coolant conditions. The pressure relief equipment consisted of an autoclave for simulating the primary circuit and of an expansion vessel for simulating the conditions after a rupture in the reactor coolant system. After pressure relief, the composition of the CH3sup(127/131)I-containing steam-air mixture within the expansion vessel was analysed at 80 0C over a period of 42 days. On the basis of the values measured and of data taken from the literature, both qualitative and quantitative assessments have been made as to the behaviour of radioactive methyl iodide in the event of loss-of-coolant accidents. (author)

  7. (1,2-Dicarba-closo-dodecaboranyltrimethylmethanaminium iodide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Dae Lee

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [1-(CH33NCH2-1,2-C2B10H11]+·I− or C6H22B10N+·I−, was obtained by the reaction of (1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaboranyldimethylmethanamine with methyl iodide. The asymmetric unit contains two iodide anions and two (o-carboranyltetramethylammonium cations. The bond lengths and angles in the carborane cage are within normal ranges, but the N—Cmethylene—Ccage angle is very large [120.2 (2°] because of repulsion between the carborane and tetramethylammonium units. In the crystal, ions are linked through C—H...I hydrogen bonds.

  8. Enhanced iodide sequestration by 3-biphenyl-5,6-dihydroimidazo 2,1-b thiazole in sodium/iodide sym-porter (NIS)-expressing cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of the sodium/iodide sym-porter (NIS) to take up iodide has long provided the basis for cyto-reductive gene therapy and cancer treatment with radio-iodide. One of the major limitations of this approach is that radio-iodide retention in NIS-expressing cells is not sufficient for their destruction. We identified and characterized a small organic molecule capable of increasing iodide retention in HEK293 cells permanently transfected with human NIS cDNA (hNIS-HEK293) and in the rat thyroid-derived cell line FRTL-5. In the presence of 3-biphenyl-4'-yl-5,6-dihydroimidazo[2,1-b)thiazole (ISA1), the transmembrane iodide concentration gradient was increased up to 4.5-fold. Our experiments indicate that the imidazo-thiazole derivative acts either by inhibiting anion efflux mechanisms, or by promoting the relocation of iodide into subcellular compartments. This new compound is not only an attractive chemical tool to investigate the mechanisms of iodide flux at the cellular level, but also opens promising perspectives in the treatment of cancer after NIS gene transfer. (authors)

  9. Recovery of thallium-activated sodium iodide detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for recovery and treatment of sodium iodide thallium activated detectors, NaI(Tl), is described. Special techniques of polishing and mounting in a dry environment (relative humidity less than 10%) are applied. The resolution was determined and compared with that obtained with a new detector and the results showed that a typical 3' phi x 3' recovered detector had a performance very similar to that of a new one. (Author)

  10. Nuclear detonation, thyroid cancer and potassium iodide prophylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2011-01-01

    The recent nuclear disaster at Japan has raised global concerns about effects of radioactive leakage in the environment, associated hazards, and how they can be prevented. In this article, we have tried to explain about the guidelines laid down by World Health Organization for a potassium iodide prophylaxis following a nuclear disaster, and its mechanism of action in preventing thyroid cancer. Data was collected mainly from the studies carried out during the Chernobyl disaster of Russia in 19...

  11. Lead iodide perovskite light-emitting field-effect transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, Xin Yu; Cortecchia, Daniele; Yin, Jun; Bruno, Annalisa; Soci, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of solution-processable hybrid organic–inorganic perovskites in photovoltaic and light-emitting applications, determination of their intrinsic charge transport parameters has been elusive due to the variability of film preparation and history-dependent device performance. Here we show that screening effects associated to ionic transport can be effectively eliminated by lowering the operating temperature of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) field-eff...

  12. Radiative efficiency of lead iodide based perovskite solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kristofer Tvingstedt; Olga Malinkiewicz; Andreas Baumann; Carsten Deibel; Snaith, Henry J.; Vladimir Dyakonov; Bolink, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    The maximum efficiency of any solar cell can be evaluated in terms of its corresponding ability to emit light. We herein determine the important figure of merit of radiative efficiency for Methylammonium Lead Iodide perovskite solar cells and, to put in context, relate it to an organic photovoltaic (OPV) model device. We evaluate the reciprocity relation between electroluminescence and photovoltaic quantum efficiency and conclude that the emission from the perovskite devices is dominated by a...

  13. Ionic transport in hybrid lead iodide perovskite solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Eames, Christopher; Frost, Jarvist Moore; Piers R. F. Barnes; O'Regan, Brian C.; Walsh, Aron; Islam, M. Saiful

    2015-01-01

    Solar cells based on organic–inorganic halide perovskites have recently shown rapidly rising power conversion efficiencies, but exhibit unusual behaviour such as current–voltage hysteresis and a low-frequency giant dielectric response. Ionic transport has been suggested to be an important factor contributing to these effects; however, the chemical origin of this transport and the mobile species are unclear. Here, the activation energies for ionic migration in methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH...

  14. Structural insight into iodide uptake by AFm phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimoz, Laure; Wieland, Erich; Taviot-Guého, Christine; Dähn, Rainer; Vespa, Marika; Churakov, Sergey V

    2012-04-01

    The ability of cement phases carrying positively charged surfaces to retard the mobility of (129)I, present as iodide (I(-)) in groundwater, was investigated in the context of safe disposal of radioactive waste. (125)I sorption experiments on ettringite, hydrotalcite, chloride-, carbonate- and sulfate-containing AFm phases indicated that calcium-monosulfate (AFm-SO(4)) is the only phase that takes up trace levels of iodide. The structures of AFm phases prepared by coprecipitating iodide with other anions were investigated in order to understand this preferential uptake mechanism. X-ray diffraction (XRD) investigations showed a segregation of monoiodide (AFm-I(2)) and Friedel's salt (AFm-Cl(2)) for I-Cl mixtures, whereas interstratifications of AFm-I(2) and hemicarboaluminate (AFm-OH-(CO(3))(0.5)) were observed for the I-CO(3) systems. In contrast, XRD measurements indicated the formation of a solid solution between AFm-I(2) and AFm-SO(4) for the I-SO(4) mixtures. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy showed a modification of the coordination environment of iodine in I-CO(3) and in I-SO(4) samples compared to pure AFm-I(2). This is assumed to be due to the introduction of stacking faults in I-CO(3) samples on one hand and due to the presence of sulfate and associated space-filling water molecules as close neighbors in I-SO(4) samples on the other hand. The formation of a solid solution between AFm-I(2) and AFm-SO(4), with a short-range mixing of iodide and sulfate, implies that AFm-SO(4) bears the potential to retard (129)I. PMID:22376086

  15. Growth of mercuric iodide single crystals from dimethylsulfoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlston, Richard C.

    1976-07-13

    Dimethylsulfoxide is used as a solvent for the growth of red mercuric iodide (HgI.sub.2) crystals for use in radiation detectors. The hygroscopic property of the solvent allows controlled amounts of water to enter into the solvent phase and diminish the large solubility of HgI.sub.2 so that the precipitating solid collects as well-defined euhedral crystals which grow into a volume of several cc.

  16. New applications for the zinc iodide-osmium tetroxide technique.

    OpenAIRE

    Dağdeviren, A; ALP, H.; Ors, U

    1994-01-01

    The zinc iodide-osmium tetroxide (ZIO) fixation/staining method was applied for neurocytological studies and also to examine several other tissue samples including epidermal Langerhans cells, blood and bone marrow cells and lymphoid tissue. Although precise specificity cannot be attributed to the staining reaction, interesting staining patterns for different cell types were observed by using one of the ZIO staining solutions. The significance of ZIO positivity is briefly discussed.

  17. Transport of Iodide Ion in Compacted Bentonite Containing Ag2O - 12111

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations of the transport of iodide through compacted bentonite containing Ag2O as additive and that without additive were made. Compacted bentonite samples with densities of 1.41 g/cm3 and 1.60 g/cm3 were used in the experiment. The amount of Ag2O added to the compacted bentonite was in the range of 0.0064 ∼ 0.0468 wt/wt%. Two diffusion solutions were used: one in which iodide ion was dissolved in demineralized water (pure iodide solution), and one in which iodide ion was dissolved in 0.1 M NaCl solution (0.1 M NaCl-iodide solution). Experimental results confirmed that iodide ion was transported by the diffusion process in the compacted bentonite containing Ag2O as well as in the compacted bentonite without Ag2O. The time-lag of diffusion of iodide ion in the compacted bentonite containing Ag2O is larger than that in the compacted bentonite without Ag2O. The increase of the time-lag of diffusion was observed in pure iodide ion solution as well as in 0.1 M NaCl-iodide solution. The apparent diffusion coefficient of iodide ion in the compacted bentonite containing Ag2O was smaller than in the compacted bentonite without Ag2O. The effective diffusion coefficient decreased as the amount of Ag2O in the compacted bentonite increased. (authors)

  18. The sodium iodide symporter: its implications for imaging and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) is an intrinsic plasma membrane glycoprotein that mediates the active transport of iodide in the thyroid gland and a number of extrathyroidal tissues, in particular lactating mammary gland. In addition to its key function in thyroid physiology, NIS-mediated iodide accumulation allows diagnostic thyroid scintigraphy as well as therapeutic radioiodine application in benign and malignant thyroid disease. NIS therefore represents one of the oldest targets for molecular imaging and therapy. Based on the effective administration of radioiodine that has been used for over 60 years in the management of follicular cell-derived thyroid cancer, cloning and characterization of the NIS gene has paved the way for the development of a novel cytoreductive gene therapy strategy based on targeted NIS expression in thyroidal and nonthyroidal cancer cells followed by therapeutic application of 131I or alternative radionuclides, including 188Re and 211At. In addition, the possibility of direct and non-invasive imaging of functional NIS expression by 123I- and 99mTc-scintigraphy or 124I-PET-imaging allows the application of NIS as a novel reporter gene. In conclusion, the dual role of NIS as diagnostic and therapeutic gene and the detection of extra-thyroidal endogenous NIS expression in breast cancer open promising perspectives in nuclear medicine and molecular oncology for diagnostic and therapeutic application of NIS outside the thyroid gland. (orig.)

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of iodide uptake inhibitors in thyroid gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work was intended to discover small organic molecules acting as iodide uptake inhibitors in thyroid cells. These compounds can indeed be derivatized into biochemical probes for further characterization of proteins involved in iodide transport mechanisms. On the long term, these inhibitors also appear as attractive drug candidates for treatment of thyroid pathologies or radioprotection against iodine isotopes. A similar strategy was adopted for both of the two inhibitor families. First, we synthesized a chemical library of around 100 analogues; we measured their IC50 against iodide uptake in FRTL-5 cells to get structure-activity relationships. Absolute configuration of stereo-genic centers was also investigated, and a preferential stereochemistry was found to be responsible for activity. From this basis, around twenty 'second-generation' analogues were synthesized by combining fragments contributing to biological activity. Biological evaluation indicated that nine were very potent inhibitors, with IC50 ≤ 6 nM and satisfying physicochemical properties required for drug candidates. Finally, one photoactivatable biotinylated probe was developed in each family and used for photoaffinity labeling. Several specifically labeled proteins are still under identification and constitute new potential therapeutic targets. (author)

  20. Growth and luminescence properties of undoped strontium iodide crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Undoped strontium iodide crystal with high optical quality was grown using the Bridgman method. •Metal impurities distribution throughout crystal boule was determined and discussed. •Reliable optical transmission spectrum of undoped strontium iodide crystal was obtained. •Luminescence properties for broad emission band at room temperature were studied. •The room temperature broad emission band was proposed to have an origin of self-trapped exciton. -- Abstract: High optical quality undoped strontium iodide crystal grown by using the Bridgman method was characterized. Crystal growth process was described and growth technical parameters were discussed. Impurity analysis of raw materials and as-grown crystal boule indicates that it is feasible to pre-purify the raw material by zone refining or recrystallization. Luminescence properties were studied by photoluminescence, radioluminescence, fluorescence decay time, and scintillation time response. As-grown crystal shows good optical transmittance with wavelength concerned and is transparent for its large Stoke shift, 540 nm peaked broad emission, which has a fluorescence decay time 494 ns at 300 K. The broad emission range from 350 nm to 800 nm was tentatively speculated to be intrinsic and have an origin of self-trapped exciton

  1. EURADOS intercomparison on measurements and Monte Carlo modelling for the assessment of Americium in a USTUR leg phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A collaboration of the EURADOS working group on 'Internal Dosimetry' and the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) has taken place to carry out an intercomparison on measurements and Monte Carlo modelling determining americium deposited in the bone of a USTUR leg phantom. Preliminary results and conclusions of this intercomparison exercise are presented here. (authors)

  2. An economic analysis of a light and heavy water moderated reactor synergy: burning americium using recycled uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An economic analysis is presented for a proposed synergistic system between 2 nuclear utilities, one operating light water reactors (LWR) and another running a fleet of heavy water moderated reactors (HWR). Americium is partitioned from LWR spent nuclear fuel (SNF) to be transmuted in HWRs, with a consequent averted disposal cost to the LWR operator. In return, reprocessed uranium (RU) is supplied to the HWRs in sufficient quantities to support their operation both as power generators and americium burners. Two simplifying assumptions have been made. First, the economic value of RU is a linear function of the cost of fresh natural uranium (NU), and secondly, plutonium recycling for a third utility running a mixed oxide (MOX) fuelled reactor fleet has been already taking place, so that the extra cost of americium recycling is manageable. We conclude that, in order for this scenario to be economically attractive to the LWR operator, the averted disposal cost due to partitioning americium from LWR spent fuel must exceed 214 dollars per kg, comparable to estimates of the permanent disposal cost of the high level waste (HLW) from reprocessing spent LWR fuel. (authors)

  3. Effects of Hanford high-level waste components on sorption of cobalt, strontium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium on Hanford sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, C H; Barney, G S

    1983-03-01

    To judge the feasibility of continued storage of high-level waste solutions in existing tanks, effects of chemical waste components on the sorption of hazardous radioelements were determined. Experiments identified the effects of 12 Hanford high-level waste-solution components on the sorption of cobalt, strontium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium on 3 Hanford 200 Area sediments. The degree of sorption of strontium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium on two Hanford sediments was then quantified in terms of the concentrations of the influential waste components. Preliminary information on the influence of the waste components on radioelement solubility was gathered. Of the 12 Hanford waste-solution components studied, the most influential on radioelement sorption were NaOH, NaAlO/sub 2/, HEDTA, and EDTA. The chelating complexants, HEDTA and EDTA, generally decreased sorption by complexation of the radioelement metal ions. The components NaOH and NaAlO/sub 2/ decreased neptunium and plutonium sorption and increased cobalt sorption. Americium sorption was increased by NaOH. The three Hanford sediments' radioelement sorption behaviors were similar, implying that their sorption reactions were also similar. Sorption prediction equations were generated for strontium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium sorption reactions on two Hanford sediments. The equations yielded values of the distribution coefficient, K/sub d/, as quadratic functions of waste-component concentrations and showed that postulated radioelement migration rates through Hanford sediment could change by factors of 13 to 40 by changes in Hanford waste composition.

  4. Effects of Hanford high-level waste components on sorption of cobalt, strontium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium on Hanford sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To judge the feasibility of continued storage of high-level waste solutions in existing tanks, effects of chemical waste components on the sorption of hazardous radioelements were determined. Experiments identified the effects of 12 Hanford high-level waste-solution components on the sorption of cobalt, strontium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium on 3 Hanford 200 Area sediments. The degree of sorption of strontium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium on two Hanford sediments was then quantified in terms of the concentrations of the influential waste components. Preliminary information on the influence of the waste components on radioelement solubility was gathered. Of the 12 Hanford waste-solution components studied, the most influential on radioelement sorption were NaOH, NaAlO2, HEDTA, and EDTA. The chelating complexants, HEDTA and EDTA, generally decreased sorption by complexation of the radioelement metal ions. The components NaOH and NaAlO2 decreased neptunium and plutonium sorption and increased cobalt sorption. Americium sorption was increased by NaOH. The three Hanford sediments' radioelement sorption behaviors were similar, implying that their sorption reactions were also similar. Sorption prediction equations were generated for strontium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium sorption reactions on two Hanford sediments. The equations yielded values of the distribution coefficient, K/sub d/, as quadratic functions of waste-component concentrations and showed that postulated radioelement migration rates through Hanford sediment could change by factors of 13 to 40 by changes in Hanford waste composition

  5. Anomalous aryl strengthening of americium and europium complexes during extraction by alkylenediphosphine dioxides from perchloric acid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extraction of americium and europium from perchlorate environments by solutions of three types of methylenediphosphine dioxides, namely (C6H5)P(O)(CH2)sub(n)(O)P(C6H5)2, (C6H5)2P(O)CH2(O)P(C8H17)2 and (C8H17)2P(O)(CH2)sub(n)(O)P(C8H17)2 has been studied (n is 1 or 2 ) The diluents used have been dichlorethane and chloroform. In perchlorate environments the distribuiton coefficients of americium and europium have proved to be by about 3 orders of magnitude higher than in nitric acid environments, i.e. in perchlorate media the complexes are far more stable. Separation coefficients of americium and REE in perchloric acid soutions are much higher than in nitrate environments. The average value of Am/Eu separation coeffecient at 1-5 M acidity was about 6 (with dichlorethane as diluent) or about 7 (with chloroform as diluent). The complexes essentially exist as trisolvated. Americium complexes display anomalous stability increase upon being diluted: by about 2 orders of magnitude with dichlorethane and by up to 3 orders of magnitude with chloroform used as diluent

  6. Investigations of neutron characteristics for salt blanket models; integral fission cross section measurements of neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron characteristics of salt blanket micromodels containing eutectic mixtures of sodium, zirconium, and uranium fluorides were measured on FKBN-2M, BIGR and MAKET facilities. The effective fission cross sections of neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium isotopes were measured on the neutron spectra formed by micromodels. (author)

  7. The distribution of plutonium-239 and americium-241 in the Syrian hamster following its intravenous administration as citrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actinide distribution in various tissues and the skeleton of hamsters by liquid scintillation counting or isotope dilution. For plutonium 57% of activity was concentrated in the skeleton and more than 90% in the liver and skeleton after seven days. For americium the liver retained more than 50% of total activity and 25% was excreted in urine within seven days. (U.K.)

  8. Electrochemistry of silver iodide the capacity of the double layer at the silver iodide-water interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyklema, J.; Overbeek, J.Th.G.

    1961-01-01

    A method is described for obtaining differential double layer capacities on silver iodide. Especially the influence of the nature and concentration of indifferent electrolytes was investigated, viz., the nitrates of Li·, K·, Rb·, NH4·, H·, Tl·, Mg··, Ba··, Co··, Cd··, Pb··, La···, Th····, the fluori

  9. Application of ion-exchange chromatography to eliminate the curium from americium by his determination by the method of liquid scintillation spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to eliminate curium in determining of americium by the method of liquid scintillation spectrometry. The paper introduces a method that has been done to eliminate curium from americium by determining of americium with liquid scintillation spectrometry method. In the research we used ion-exchange chromatography and ion-exchange sorbents DOWEX. We also observed the effect of geometry organization of column on the separation course. Resources for alpha spectrometry were prepared by micro-precipitation with neodymium chloride. High radiochemical yields were achieved, but separation did not take place according to a pre-separation scheme. (authors)

  10. Purification of scintillation cocktails containing the alpha emitters americium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One efficient way of measuring alpha emitters is by the usage of liquid scintillation counting (LSC). A liquid sample is placed in a vial containing a scintillation cocktail. The alpha particles excite electrons in the surrounding liquid, and when they are de-excited photons are emitted. The photons are detected and the activity can be quantified. LSC has a high efficiency for alpha radiation and is therefore a fast and easy way for measuring alpha emitting samples. One drawback is that it does not differentiate very well between alpha energies; measurements of for example curium and plutonium simultaneously are impossible and demand other techniques. Another drawback is the production of a liquid alpha active waste. In Sweden alpha radioactive waste liquids with an activity over some kBq per waste container cannot be sent for final storage. If, however, the activity of the liquids could be reduced by precipitation of the actinides, it would be possible to send away the liquid samples to municipal incineration. In this work a method for a purification of alpha active scintillation cocktails was developed. The method was first tried on a lab scale, and then scaled up. Until today (March, 2013) more than 20 liters of scintillation liquids have successfully been purified from americium and plutonium at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden. The four scintillation cocktails used were Emulsifier Safe®, Hionic-Fluor®, Ultima Gold AB® and Ultima Gold XR®. The scintillation cocktails could all be purified from americium with higher yield than 95%. The yield was kept when the liquids were mixed. Also plutonium could be precipitated with a yield over 95% in all cocktails except in Hionic-Fluor® (>55%). However, that liquid in particular could be purified (>95%) by mixing it with the three other cocktails. Up-scaling was performed to a batch size of 6-8 L of scintillation cocktail. In neither the americium nor the plutonium system, adverse effects of increasing the

  11. Abiotic formation of methyl iodide on synthetic birnessite: A mechanistic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allard, Sébastien, E-mail: s.allard@curtin.edu.au; Gallard, Hervé

    2013-10-01

    Methyl iodide is a well-known volatile halogenated organic compound that contributes to the iodine content in the troposphere, potentially resulting in damage to the ozone layer. Most methyl iodide sources derive from biological activity in oceans and soils with very few abiotic mechanisms proposed in the literature. In this study we report that synthetic manganese oxide (birnessite δ-MnO{sub 2}) can catalyze the formation of methyl iodide in the presence of natural organic matter (NOM) and iodide. Methyl iodide formation was only observed at acidic pH (4–5) where iodide is oxidized to iodine and NOM is adsorbed on δ-MnO{sub 2}. The effect of δ-MnO{sub 2}, iodide and NOM concentrations, nature of NOM and ionic strength was investigated. High concentrations of methyl iodide were formed in experiments conducted with the model compound pyruvate. The Lewis acid property of δ-MnO{sub 2} leads to a polarization of the iodine molecule, and catalyzes the reaction with natural organic matter. As manganese oxides are strong oxidants and are ubiquitous in the environment, this mechanism could significantly contribute to the global atmospheric input of iodine. Highlights: • Methyl iodide is formed when iodide, natural organic matter and MnO{sub 2} are in contact. • Iodide is oxidized to iodine by MnO{sub 2} which reacts with NOM already adsorbed on MnO{sub 2}. • High formation of methyl iodide was observed with pyruvate. • This abiotic mechanism could contribute to the input of iodine in the atmosphere. • This abiotic mechanism could impact the ozone layer in the troposphere.

  12. Abiotic formation of methyl iodide on synthetic birnessite: A mechanistic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methyl iodide is a well-known volatile halogenated organic compound that contributes to the iodine content in the troposphere, potentially resulting in damage to the ozone layer. Most methyl iodide sources derive from biological activity in oceans and soils with very few abiotic mechanisms proposed in the literature. In this study we report that synthetic manganese oxide (birnessite δ-MnO2) can catalyze the formation of methyl iodide in the presence of natural organic matter (NOM) and iodide. Methyl iodide formation was only observed at acidic pH (4–5) where iodide is oxidized to iodine and NOM is adsorbed on δ-MnO2. The effect of δ-MnO2, iodide and NOM concentrations, nature of NOM and ionic strength was investigated. High concentrations of methyl iodide were formed in experiments conducted with the model compound pyruvate. The Lewis acid property of δ-MnO2 leads to a polarization of the iodine molecule, and catalyzes the reaction with natural organic matter. As manganese oxides are strong oxidants and are ubiquitous in the environment, this mechanism could significantly contribute to the global atmospheric input of iodine. Highlights: • Methyl iodide is formed when iodide, natural organic matter and MnO2 are in contact. • Iodide is oxidized to iodine by MnO2 which reacts with NOM already adsorbed on MnO2. • High formation of methyl iodide was observed with pyruvate. • This abiotic mechanism could contribute to the input of iodine in the atmosphere. • This abiotic mechanism could impact the ozone layer in the troposphere

  13. Discovery of aryl-tri-fluoroborates as potent sodium/iodide sym-porter (NIS) inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure-based design of sodium/iodide sym-porter (NIS) inhibitors identified new active compounds. The organo-tri-fluoroborate shown was found to inhibit iodide uptake with an IC50 value of 0.4 μM on rat-derived thyroid cells. The biological activity is rationalized by the presence of the BF3- ion as a minimal binding motif for substrate recognition at the iodide binding site. (authors)

  14. Imitators of plutonium and americium in a mixed uranium- plutonium nitride fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, S. N.; Shornikov, D. P.; Tarasov, B. A.; Baranov, V. G.; Burlakova, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Uranium nitride and mix uranium nitride (U-Pu)N is most popular nuclear fuel for Russian Fast Breeder Reactor. The works in hot cells associated with the radiation exposure of personnel and methodological difficulties. To know the main physical-chemical properties of uranium-plutonium nitride it necessary research to hot cells. In this paper, based on an assessment of physicochemical and thermodynamic properties of selected simulators Pu and Am. Analogues of Pu is are Ce and Y, and analogues Am - Dy. The technique of obtaining a model nitride fuel based on lanthanides nitrides and UN. Hydrogenation-dehydrogenation- nitration method of derived powders nitrides uranium, cerium, yttrium and dysprosium, held their mixing, pressing and sintering, the samples obtained model nitride fuel with plutonium and americium imitation. According to the results of structural studies have shown that all the samples are solid solution nitrides rare earth (REE) elements in UN.

  15. Recovery of plutonium and americium from chloride salt wastes by solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium and americium can be recovered from aqueous waste solutions containing a mixture of HCl and chloride salt wastes by the coupling of two solvent extraction systems: tributyl phosphate (TBP) in tetrachloroethylene (TCE) and octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) in TCE. In the flowsheet developed, the salt wastes are dissolved in HCl, the Pu(III) is oxidized to the IV state with NaClO2 and recovered in the TBP-TCE cycle, and the Am is then removed from the resultant raffinate by the CMPO-TCE cycle. The consequences of the feed solution composition and extraction behavior of these species on the process flowsheet design, the Pu-product purity, and the decontamination of the aqueous raffinate from transuranic elements are discussed. 16 refs., 6 figs

  16. Recovery of plutonium and americium from chloride salt wastes by solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium and americium can be recovered from aqueous waste solutions containing a mixture of HCl and chloride salt wastes by the coupling of two solvent extraction systems: tributyl phosphate (TBP) in tetrachloroethylene (TCE) and octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) in TCE. In the flowsheet developed, the salt wastes are dissolved in HCl, the Pu(III) is oxidized to the IV state with NaClO2 and recovered in the TBP-TCE cycle, and the Am is then removed from the resultant raffinate by the CMPO-TCE cycle. The consequences of the feed solution composition and extraction behavior of these species on the process flowsheet design, the Pu-product purity, and the decontamination of the aqueous raffinate from transuranic elements are discussed

  17. The uptake of plutonium-239, 240, americium-241, strontium-90 into plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the results of measurements on the uptake of plutonium, americium, strontium-90 and caesium-137 into peas, beet, oats, sweet corn, tomatoes and vegetable marrow grown in tubs containing radioactively-contaminated silts. The silts had been taken from an area of West Cumbria commonly referred to as the Ravenglass estuary. The experiments are categorised as being carried out under non-standard conditions because of the manner in which the radioactivity came to be incorporated into the growth medium. The growth medium was representative of conditions which could arise when the estuarine silt moves inland under the influence of wind and tide and mixes with the adjacent farm land. The silt had been contaminated by radioactive effluents from the nuclear fuels reprocessing plant at Sellafield and this contamination had been brought about by natural means. (Auth.)

  18. Mutual separation of americium(III) and europium(III) using glycolamic acid and thioglycolamic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extractants, bis(2-ethylhexyl)diglycolamicacid (HDEHDGA) and bis(2-ethylhexy)thiodiglycolamic acid (HDEHSDGA) were synthesized and characterized by 1H and 13C NMR, mass and IR spectroscopy. The extraction behaviour of (152+154)Eu(III) and 241Am(III) from nitric acid medium by a solution of HDEHDGA (or HDEHSDGA) in n-dodecane (n-DD) was studied for the mutual separation of actinides and lanthanides. The effect of various parameters such as the pH, concentrations of HDEHDGA, HDEHSDGA, sodium nitrate, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) on the separation factor (SF) of americium(III) over europium(III) and vice versa was studied, and the conditions needed for the preferential separation were optimised. The results show that HDEHDGA exhibits higher extraction for (152+154)Eu(III) and HDEHSDGA shows the superior selectivity for 241Am(III). (orig.)

  19. Laboratory investigation of the role of desorption kinetics on americium transport associated with bentonite colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the parameters that control colloid-mediated transport of radionuclides is important for the safe disposal of used nuclear fuel. We report an experimental and reactive transport modeling examination of americium transport in a groundwater–bentonite–fracture fill material system. A series of batch sorption and column transport experiments were conducted to determine the role of desorption kinetics from bentonite colloids in the transport of americium through fracture materials. We used fracture fill material from a shear zone in altered granodiorite collected from the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland and colloidal suspensions generated from FEBEX bentonite, a potential repository backfill material. The colloidal suspension (100 mg L−1) was prepared in synthetic groundwater that matched the natural water chemistry at GTS and was spiked with 5.5 × 10−10 M 241Am. Batch characterizations indicated that 97% of the americium in the stock suspension was adsorbed to the colloids. Breakthrough experiments conducted by injecting the americium colloidal suspension through three identical columns in series, each with mean residence times of 6 h, show that more than 95% of the bentonite colloids were transported through each of the columns, with modeled colloid filtration rates (kf) of 0.01–0.02 h−1. Am recoveries in each column were 55–60%, and Am desorption rate constants from the colloids, determined from 1-D transport modeling, were 0.96, 0.98, and 0.91 h−1 in the three columns, respectively. The consistency in Am recoveries and desorption rate constants in each column indicates that the Am was not associated with binding sites of widely-varying strengths on the colloids, as one binding site with fast kinetics represented the system accurately for all three sequential columns. Our data suggest that colloid-mediated transport of Am in a bentonite-fracture fill material system is unlikely to result in transport over long distance

  20. Comparative study of plutonium and americium bioaccumulation from two marine sediments contaminated in the natural environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium and americium sediment-animal transfer was studied under controlled laboratory conditions by exposure of the benthic polychaete Nereis diversicolor (O. F. Mueller) to marine sediments contaminated by a nuclear bomb accident (near Thule, Greenland) and nuclear weapons testing (Enewetak Atoll). In both sediment regimes, the bioavailability of plutonium and 241Am was low, with specific activity in the tissues 241Am occurred and 241Am uptake from the Thule sediment was enhanced compared to that from lagoon sediments of Enewetak Atoll. Autoradiography studies indicated the presence of hot particles of plutonium in the sediments. The results highlight the importance of purging animals of their gut contents in order to obtain accurate estimates of transuranic transfer from ingested sediments into tissue. It is further suggested that enhanced transuranic uptake by some benthic species could arise from ingestion of highly activity particles and organic-rich detritus present in the sediments. (author)

  1. A thermodynamic study of actinide oxide targets/fuels for americium transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thermodynamic study was performed on the systems Am-O, AmOx-MgO, AmOx-MgAl2O4, Pu-Mg-O and U-Mg-O. Both experimental work (X-ray analyses, oxygen potential measurements etc.) and calculations on the phase diagrams involved were made. The reaction between americium oxide and spinel is expected to form the compound AmAlO3. Isothermal sections have been calculated for AmOx-(MgO, Al2O3), Pu-Mg-O and U-Mg-O at 2000 K using the software package ''Thermo-Calc''. Thermodynamic equilibrium data were used to predict the behaviour of actinide oxides in a reactor. The implication of the results for the technological application is discussed, with emphasis on the effects of the high oxygen potential of AmO2 as compared to the conventional fuel, i.e. UO2. (author)

  2. EURADOS action for determination of americium in skull measures in vivo and Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the Group of WG7 internal dosimetry of the EURADOS Organization (European Radiation Dosimetry group, e.V.) which It coordinates CIEMAT, international action for the vivo measurement of americium has been conducted in three mannequins type skull with detectors of Germanium by gamma spectrometry and simulation by Monte Carlo methods. Such action has been raised as two separate exercises, with the participation of institutions in Europe, America and Asia. Other actions similar precede this vivo intercomparison of measurement and modeling Monte Carlo1. The preliminary results and associated findings are presented in this work. The laboratory of the body radioactivity (CRC) of service counter of dosimetry staff internal (DPI) of the CIEMAT, it has been one of the participants in vivo measures exercise. On the other hand part, the Group of numerical dosimetry of CIEMAT is participant of the Monte Carlo2 simulation exercise. (Author)

  3. Ab initio modelling of the behaviour of helium in americium and plutonium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By means of an ab initio plane wave pseudo potential method, plutonium dioxide and americium dioxide are modelled, and the behaviour of helium in both these materials is studied. We first show that a pseudo potential approach in the Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA) can satisfactorily describe the cohesive properties of PuO2 and AmO2. We then calculate the formation energies of point defects (vacancies and interstitials), as well as the incorporation and solution energies of helium in PuO2 and AmO2. The results are discussed according to the incorporation site of the gas atom in the lattice and to the stoichiometry of PuO2±x and AmO2±x. (authors)

  4. Removal of plutonium and americium from hydrochloric acid waste stream using extraction chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extraction chromatography is under development as a method to lower actinide activity levels in hydrochloric acid (HCl) effluent streams. Successful application of this technique would allow recycle of the largest portion of HCl, while lowering the quantity and improving the form of solid waste generated. The extraction of plutonium and americium from HCl solutions was examined for several commercial and similar laboratory-produced resins coated with n-octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyphosphine oxide (CMPO) and either tributyl phosphate (TBP), or diamyl amylphosphonate (DAAP). Distribution coefficients for Pu and Am were measured by contact studies in hydrochloric acid solutions over the range of 0.1 - 10.0 N HCl, whole varying REDOX conditions, actinide loading levels, and contact time intervals. Significant differences in the actinide distribution coefficients, and in the kinetics of actinide removal were observed as a function of resin formulation. The usefulness of these resins for actinide removal from HCl effluent streams is discussed

  5. Complex formation of trivalent americium with salicylic acid at very low concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first time, the complexation of americium(III) with salicylic acid was studied at trace metal concentrations using a 2.0 m Long Path Flow Cell for UV-vis spectroscopy. The detection limit of Am(III) in aqueous solution at pH 3.0 was found to be 5 x 10-9 M. Two Am(III)-salicylate complexes were formed at pH 5.0 in 0.1 M NaClO4, indicated by a clear red shift of the absorption maximum. The absorption spectra obtained from spectrophotometric titration were analyzed by means of factor analysis and complex stabilities were calculated to be log β110 = 2.56 ± 0.08 and log β120 = 3.93 ± 0.19. (author)

  6. Standard practice for The separation of americium from plutonium by ion exchange

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This practice describes the use of an ion exchange technique to separate plutonium from solutions containing low concentrations of americium prior to measurement of the 241Am by gamma counting. 1.2 This practice covers the removal of plutonium, but not all the other radioactive isotopes that may interfere in the determination of 241Am. 1.3 This practice can be used when 241Am is to be determined in samples in which the plutonium is in the form of metal, oxide, or other solid provided that the solid is appropriately sampled and dissolved (See Test Methods C758, C759, and C1168). 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  7. Transportability Class of Americium in K Basin Sludge under Ambient and Hydrothermal Processing Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmitt, Bruce E.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2006-08-01

    This report establishes the technical bases for using a ''slow uptake'' instead of a ''moderate uptake'' transportability class for americium-241 (241Am) for the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project (STP) dose consequence analysis. Slow uptake classes are used for most uranium and plutonium oxides. A moderate uptake class has been used in prior STP analyses for 241Am based on the properties of separated 241Am and its associated oxide. However, when 241Am exists as an ingrown progeny (and as a small mass fraction) within plutonium mixtures, it is appropriate to assign transportability factors of the predominant plutonium mixtures (typically slow) to the Am241. It is argued that the transportability factor for 241Am in sludge likewise should be slow because it exists as a small mass fraction as the ingrown progeny within the uranium oxide in sludge. In this report, the transportability class assignment for 241Am is underpinned with radiochemical characterization data on K Basin sludge and with studies conducted with other irradiated fuel exposed to elevated temperatures and conditions similar to the STP. Key findings and conclusions from evaluation of the characterization data and published literature are summarized here. Plutonium and 241Am make up very small fractions of the uranium within the K Basin sludge matrix. Plutonium is present at about 1 atom per 500 atoms of uranium and 241Am at about 1 atom per 19000 of uranium. Plutonium and americium are found to remain with uranium in the solid phase in all of the {approx}60 samples taken and analyzed from various sources of K Basin sludge. The uranium-specific concentrations of plutonium and americium also remain approximately constant over a uranium concentration range (in the dry sludge solids) from 0.2 to 94 wt%, a factor of {approx}460. This invariability demonstrates that 241Am does not partition from the uranium or plutonium fraction for any characterized sludge matrix. Most

  8. Plutonium and americium concentrations and vertical profiles in some Italian mosses used as bioindicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have examined the uptake of actinide elements Am and Pu by different species of lichen and moss collected in two locations (Urbino, Central Italy; Alps region, North-east Italy). Plutonium and americium were separated and determined by extraction chromatography, electrodeposition and alpha-spectrometry. This paper summarizes our results with a special emphasis on the vertical profiles of these actinides in two different species of mosses. Several 1-2 cm depth sections were obtained and dated by 210Pb method. A typical peak for 239,240Pu and 241Am was found in the very old moss species ('Sphagnum Compactum') at a depth corresponding to the period 1960-1970 which was the period characterized by the maximum nuclear weapon tests. In a younger moss species ('Neckeria Crispa') no peak was observed and the regression curves showed that Am is more mobile than 239,240Pu and 238Pu. (author)

  9. Uptake of Iodide From Water in Atlantic Halibut Larvae (Hippoglossus Hippoglossus L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moren, Mari; Sloth, Jens Jørgen; Hamre, Kristin

    2008-01-01

    The natural diet of marine fish larvae, copepods, contain 60-350 mg I kg(-1), while live feed used in commercial hatcheries have iodine concentrations in the range of 1 mg kg(-1). Seawater is also considered to be an important source of iodine for marine fish. The question asked in this study is...... relative low levels of iodide (0-22 nM) and except for samples from one site; the levels of iodide and iodate were in agreement with previously published data. The uptake of iodide from seawater was measured by incubating Atlantic halibut larvae in water with a constant level of radioactive iodide (I-125...

  10. Expression of sodium-iodide symporter in thyroid gland tumors: immunohistochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondarenko O.O.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the key moments of radioiodine therapy, and also radioisotope diagnostics of cancers of a thyroid gland is ability of their cells to accumulate iodide. This ability is provided with activity of the specific transporter – sodium-iodide symporter. Our research has shown disorders of sodium-iodide symporter immunoexpression in all tumors of thyroid gland: from overexpression and absence of plasma membrane expression in differentiated carcinomas, up to weak or actually absent in low differentiated cancers and Hurtle-cells tumors. Thus, there is a prospect of application of the sodium-iodide symporter, as the prognostic marker of thyroid cancers.

  11. Experimental studies on removal of airborne fission products methyl iodide by sprays in containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For reducing the amount of fission products leaked to environment under accident conditions of PWR, the experimental studies on the removal of airborne fission products methyl iodide by sprays in containment was carried out on the basis of the theoretical work in a simulation facility. Inactive methyl iodide was used for the experiment so the experiment facility was simplified. A gas chromatography was employed to measure the aerosol concentration of methyl iodide. A series of experiments on the removal of methyl iodide by sprays under different temperatures and various chemical additives has been made. The experimental results are useful for rationally selecting parameters of containment spray system of PWR

  12. Polarized spectral complexes of optical functions of monovalent mercury iodide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, V. V.; Sobolev, V. Val.; Anisimov, D. V.

    2015-12-01

    Spectral complexes of optical functions of monovalent mercury iodide Hg2I2 were determined for E ⊥ c and E || c polarizations in the range from 2 to 5.5 eV at 4.2 K. The permittivity and characteristic electron energy loss spectra were expanded in simple components with the determination of their main parameters, including the energy of the maximum and the oscillator strength. The calculations were performed based on known reflectance spectra. Computer programs based on Kramers-Kronig relations and the improved parameter-free method of Argand diagrams were used.

  13. Measuring Cell Death by Propidium Iodide Uptake and Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Lisa C; Scott, Adrian P; Marfell, Brooke J; Boughaba, Jeanne A; Chojnowski, Grace; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-01-01

    Propidium iodide (PI) is a small fluorescent molecule that binds to DNA but cannot passively traverse into cells that possess an intact plasma membrane. PI uptake versus exclusion can be used to discriminate dead cells, in which plasma membranes become permeable regardless of the mechanism of death, from live cells with intact membranes. PI is excited by wavelengths between 400 and 600 nm and emits light between 600 and 700 nm, and is therefore compatible with lasers and photodetectors commonly available in flow cytometers. This protocol for PI staining can be used to quantitate cell death in most modern research facilities and universities. PMID:27371595

  14. Mechanochromic and thermochromic luminescence of a copper iodide cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perruchas, Sandrine; Le Goff, Xavier F; Maron, Sébastien; Maurin, Isabelle; Guillen, François; Garcia, Alain; Gacoin, Thierry; Boilot, Jean-Pierre

    2010-08-18

    The mechanochromic and thermochromic luminescence properties of a molecular copper(I) iodide cluster formulated [Cu(4)I(4)(PPh(2)(CH(2)CH=CH(2)))(4)] are reported. Upon mechanical grinding in a mortar, its solid-state emission properties are drastically modified as well as its thermochromic behavior. This reversible phenomenon has been attributed to distortions in the crystal packing leading to modifications of the intermolecular interactions and thus of the [Cu(4)I(4)] cluster core geometry. Notably, modification of the Cu-Cu interactions seems to be involved in this phenomenon directly affecting the emissive properties of the cluster. PMID:20698644

  15. Electronic properties and Compton profiles of silver iodide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alpa Dashora; Ambica Marwal; K R Soni; B L Ahuja

    2010-06-01

    We have carried out an extensive study of electronic properties of silver iodide in - and -phases. The theoretical Compton profiles, energy bands, density of states and anisotropies in momentum densities are computed using density functional theories. We have also employed full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave method to derive the energy bands and the density of states. To compare our theoretical data, isotropic Compton profile measurement on -AgI using 137Cs Compton spectrometer at an intermediate resolution of 0.38 a.u. has been undertaken. The theoretical anisotropies are also interpreted on the basis of energy bands.

  16. Rutherford backscattering and Auger spectroscopy of mercuric iodide detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felter, T.E.; Stulen, R.H. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (USA)); Schnepple, W.F.; Ortale, C.; Van den Berg, L. (EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Goleta, CA (USA). Santa Barbara Operations)

    1989-11-01

    Palladium contacts on mercuric iodide have been studied using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. Results on actual detector contacts show some intermixing of both mercury and iodine with the palladium. To investigate the role of processing variables as a possible cause of this effect we have fabricated model contacts at low temperatures (T {approx equal} 100 K) and analyzed in situ. The results demonstrated that significant interdiffusion occurs at temperatures as low as 225 K. We conclude that excessive heating during contact deposition could prove to be detrimental to device performance and that the use of cooled substrates during processing should be explored. (orig.).

  17. Low-temperature photoluminescence studies of mercuric-iodide photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, R. B.; Bao, X. J.; Schlesinger, T. E.; Markakis, J. M.; Cheng, A. Y.; Ortale, C.

    1989-09-01

    Mercuric-iodide (HgI2 ) photodetectors with sputtered indium-tin-oxide (ITO) entrance electrodes were studied using low-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy. The photoluminescence spectrum obtained on each photodetector was found to differ for points beneath the ITO contact and points adjacent to it, indicating that the contact fabrication process introduces new carrier traps and radiative recombination centers within the ITO-HgI2 interfacial region. In particular, a new broad band was observed in the spectra taken from points beneath the ITO electrode. Photocurrent-versus-position measurements showed that the intensity of this broad band was enhanced in regions having relatively poor photoresponse.

  18. Rutherford backscattering and Auger spectroscopy of mercuric iodide detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felter, T. E.; Stulen, R. H.; Schnepple, W. F.; Ortale, C.; van den Berg, L.

    1989-11-01

    Palladium contacts on mercuric iodide have been studied using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. Results on actual detector contacts show some intermixing of both mercury and iodine with the palladium. To investigate the role of processing variables as a possible cause of this effect we have fabricated model contacts at low temperatures (T ≈ 100 K) and analyzed in situ. The results demonstrated that significant interdiffusion occurs at temperatures as low as 225 K. We conclude that excessive heating during contact deposition could prove to be detrimental to device performance and that the use of cooled substrates during processing should be explored.

  19. Low-temperature photoluminescence studies of mercuric-iodide photodetectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, R.B. (Theoretical Division, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94551-0969 (US)); Bao, X.J. (Theoretical Division, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94551-0969 (US)); Schlesinger, T.E. (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213); Markakis, J.M. (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213); Cheng, A.Y. (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213); Ortale, C. (EG G Energy Measurements, Inc., Goleta, California 93116)

    1989-09-15

    Mercuric-iodide (HgI{sub 2} ) photodetectors with sputtered indium-tin-oxide (ITO) entrance electrodes were studied using low-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy. The photoluminescence spectrum obtained on each photodetector was found to differ for points beneath the ITO contact and points adjacent to it, indicating that the contact fabrication process introduces new carrier traps and radiative recombination centers within the ITO-HgI{sub 2} interfacial region. In particular, a new broad band was observed in the spectra taken from points beneath the ITO electrode. Photocurrent-versus-position measurements showed that the intensity of this broad band was enhanced in regions having relatively poor photoresponse.

  20. Low-temperature photoluminescence studies of mercuric-iodide photodetectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercuric-iodide (HgI2 ) photodetectors with sputtered indium-tin-oxide (ITO) entrance electrodes were studied using low-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy. The photoluminescence spectrum obtained on each photodetector was found to differ for points beneath the ITO contact and points adjacent to it, indicating that the contact fabrication process introduces new carrier traps and radiative recombination centers within the ITO-HgI2 interfacial region. In particular, a new broad band was observed in the spectra taken from points beneath the ITO electrode. Photocurrent-versus-position measurements showed that the intensity of this broad band was enhanced in regions having relatively poor photoresponse

  1. Rutherford backscattering and Auger spectroscopy of mercuric iodide detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palladium contacts on mercuric iodide have been studied using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. Results on actual detector contacts show some intermixing of both mercury and iodine with the palladium. To investigate the role of processing variables as a possible cause of this effect we have fabricated model contacts at low temperatures (T ≅ 100 K) and analyzed in situ. The results demonstrated that significant interdiffusion occurs at temperatures as low as 225 K. We conclude that excessive heating during contact deposition could prove to be detrimental to device performance and that the use of cooled substrates during processing should be explored. (orig.)

  2. Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, Benjamin J.; Marlowe, Daniel L.; Choi, Joshua J., E-mail: jjc6z@virginia.edu, E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu, E-mail: scudiero@wsu.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Sun, Keye; Gupta, Mool C., E-mail: jjc6z@virginia.edu, E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu, E-mail: scudiero@wsu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Saidi, Wissam A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261 (United States); Scudiero, Louis, E-mail: jjc6z@virginia.edu, E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu, E-mail: scudiero@wsu.edu [Chemistry Department and Materials Science and Engineering Program, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide are investigated using a combination of ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy. Our results show that the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum shift down in energy by 110 meV and 77 meV as temperature increases from 28 °C to 85 °C. Density functional theory calculations using slab structures show that the decreased orbital splitting due to thermal expansion is a major contribution to the experimentally observed shift in energy levels. Our results have implications for solar cell performance under operating conditions with continued sunlight exposure and increased temperature.

  3. Persistent photovoltage in methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Baumann, A.; Tvingstedt, K.; Heiber, M. C.; Väth, S.; C. Momblona; H. J. Bolink; Dyakonov, V.

    2014-01-01

    We herein perform open circuit voltage decay (OCVD) measurements on methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) perovskite solar cells to increase the understanding of the charge carrier recombination dynamics in this emerging technology. Optically pulsed OCVD measurements are conducted on CH3NH3PbI3 solar cells and compared to results from another type of thin-film photovoltaics, namely, the two reference polymer–fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cell devices based on P3HT:PC60BM and PTB7:PC70...

  4. Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide are investigated using a combination of ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy. Our results show that the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum shift down in energy by 110 meV and 77 meV as temperature increases from 28 °C to 85 °C. Density functional theory calculations using slab structures show that the decreased orbital splitting due to thermal expansion is a major contribution to the experimentally observed shift in energy levels. Our results have implications for solar cell performance under operating conditions with continued sunlight exposure and increased temperature

  5. Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Benjamin J.; Marlowe, Daniel L.; Sun, Keye; Saidi, Wissam A.; Scudiero, Louis; Gupta, Mool C.; Choi, Joshua J.

    2015-06-01

    Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide are investigated using a combination of ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy. Our results show that the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum shift down in energy by 110 meV and 77 meV as temperature increases from 28 °C to 85 °C. Density functional theory calculations using slab structures show that the decreased orbital splitting due to thermal expansion is a major contribution to the experimentally observed shift in energy levels. Our results have implications for solar cell performance under operating conditions with continued sunlight exposure and increased temperature.

  6. An electrochemical oxidation process of Am (III) into Am (VI) used to separate the americium of spent fuels reprocessing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this invention is to oxidize by an electrochemical process Am (III) to Am (VI). This process can be used to separate the americium of spent fuels reprocessing solutions. The method consists to add to the aqueous nitric solution containing Am (III) an heteropolyanion able to complex the americium (as for instance the potassium tungstophosphate) and the Ag (II) ion. The Ag (II) ion oxidizes the Am (III) and is reduced into an Ag (I) ion. It is then regenerated by the electrolysis of the solution. After the oxidation of Am (III) into Am (VI), this last ion can be extracted by an adapted organic solvent. With this electrochemical method a yield of 100% Am (VI) is obtained in half a hour. (O.M.). 5 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Separation of oxidized americium from lanthanides by use of pillared metal(IV) phosphate-phosphonate hybrid materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Closing the nuclear fuel cycle in the US poses many challenges, one of which is found in the waste streams, which contain both trivalent lanthanides and actinides. The separation of americium from the raffinate will dramatically reduce the long-term radiotoxicity of the waste. The sorption of americium in both the tri- and pentavalent oxidation states was observed for four M(IV) phosphate-phosphonate ion exchange materials in nitric acid at pH 2. High selectivity was observed for reduced Am(III) with Kd values ca. 6 x 105 mL/g, while the Kd values for Am(V) were much lower. A new method of synthesizing and stabilizing AmO2+ to yield a lifetime of at least 24 h in acidic media using a combination of sodium persulfate and calcium hypochlorite will be described.

  8. Effects of impurities on the size and form of crystals of thorium and americium oxalates and oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of impurity salts and certain surfactants on the shape and size of thorium and americium oxalate crystals, as well as crystals of their dioxides, prepared at thermolysis of oxalate precipitates, has been investigated. It is shown that during thorium oxalate deposition from solutions, containing 0.8 mol/l thorium and 2 mol/l nitric acid at 96 deg C in the presence of ammonium salts or surfactants larger and monodisperse crystals are grown than in the absence of the above-mentioned substances. Addition of ammonium nitrate in the amount of 0.6 mol/l to solution containing 7.6x10-3 mol/l of americium dioxide particles coincides with the shape of oxalate crystals but their size is reduced by (20-25)% as compared with the initial ones

  9. Combined radiochemical procedure for determination of plutonium, americium and strontium-90 in the soil samples from SNTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of combined radiochemical procedure for the determination of plutonium, americium and 90Sr (via measurement of 90Y) in the soil samples from SNTS (Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site) are presented. The processes of co-precipitation of these nuclides with calcium fluoride in the strong acid solutions have been investigated. The conditions for simultaneous separation of americium and yttrium using extraction chromatography have been studied. It follows from analyses of real soil samples that the procedure developed provides the chemical recovery of plutonium and yttrium in the range of 50-95 % and 60-95 %, respectively. The execution of the procedure requires 3.5 working days including a sample decomposition study. (author)

  10. Nuclear detonation, thyroid cancer and potassium iodide prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2011-04-01

    The recent nuclear disaster at Japan has raised global concerns about effects of radioactive leakage in the environment, associated hazards, and how they can be prevented. In this article, we have tried to explain about the guidelines laid down by World Health Organization for a potassium iodide prophylaxis following a nuclear disaster, and its mechanism of action in preventing thyroid cancer. Data was collected mainly from the studies carried out during the Chernobyl disaster of Russia in 1986 and the hazardous effects especially on the thyroid gland were studied. It was seen that radioactive iodine leakage from the nuclear plants mainly affected the thyroid gland, and especially children were at a higher risk at developing the cancers. Potassium Iodide prophylaxis can be administered in order to prevent an increase in the incidence of thyroid cancers in the population of an area affected by a nuclear disaster. However, one has to be cautious while giving it, as using it without indication has its own risks. PMID:21731865

  11. Nuclear detonation, thyroid cancer and potassium iodide prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent nuclear disaster at Japan has raised global concerns about effects of radioactive leakage in the environment, associated hazards, and how they can be prevented. In this article, we have tried to explain about the guidelines laid down by World Health Organization for a potassium iodide prophylaxis following a nuclear disaster, and its mechanism of action in preventing thyroid cancer. Data was collected mainly from the studies carried out during the Chernobyl disaster of Russia in 1986 and the hazardous effects especially on the thyroid gland were studied. It was seen that radioactive iodine leakage from the nuclear plants mainly affected the thyroid gland, and especially children were at a higher risk at developing the cancers. Potassium Iodide prophylaxis can be administered in order to prevent an increase in the incidence of thyroid cancers in the population of an area affected by a nuclear disaster. However, one has to be cautious while giving it, as using it without indication has its own risks.

  12. Progress in tumor therapy with human sodium iodide symporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) is an intrinsic plasma membrane protein that mediates active iodide transport into the thyroid gland and several extrathyroidal tissues, in particular the lactation mammary gland. Because of the cloning characterization of NIS, its key role in thyroid pathology and physiology could be investigated. The progress would be significant if the mechanisms of NIS expression in lactating mammary gland and breast cancer are elucidated, in which more than 80% of cases express endogenous NIS. In the future, two approaches could extend the use of radioiodide treatment to thyroid cancer and nonthyroidal cancer. One is by using the main mechanisms involving tumorous transformation to treat the tumor, based on the reinducing NIS expression in thyroid and cancer. The other is based on the application of NIS as a novel cytoreductive gene therapy strategy. NIS offers the unique advantage that it can be used both as a reporter and as a therapeutic gene, so that it is possible to image, monitor, and treat the tumor with radioiodide, just as in differentiated thyroid cancer. (authors)

  13. Polymorphic copper iodide clusters: insights into the mechanochromic luminescence properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Quentin; Le Goff, Xavier F; Maron, Sébastien; Fargues, Alexandre; Garcia, Alain; Martineau, Charlotte; Taulelle, Francis; Kahlal, Samia; Gacoin, Thierry; Boilot, Jean-Pierre; Perruchas, Sandrine

    2014-08-13

    An in-depth study of mechanochromic and thermochromic luminescent copper iodide clusters exhibiting structural polymorphism is reported and gives new insights into the origin of the mechanochromic luminescence properties. The two different crystalline polymorphs exhibit distinct luminescence properties with one being green emissive and the other one being yellow emissive. Upon mechanical grinding, only one of the polymorphs exhibits great modification of its emission from green to yellow. Interestingly, the photophysical properties of the resulting partially amorphous crushed compound are closed to those of the other yellow polymorph. Comparative structural and optical analyses of the different phases including a solution of clusters permit us to establish a correlation between the Cu-Cu bond distances and the luminescence properties. In addition, the local structure of the [Cu4I4P4] cluster cores has been probed by (31)P and (65)Cu solid-state NMR analysis, which readily indicates that the grinding process modifies the phosphorus and copper atoms environments. The mechanochromic phenomenon is thus explained by the disruption of the crystal packing within intermolecular interactions inducing shortening of the Cu-Cu bond distances in the [Cu4I4] cluster core and eventually modification of the emissive state. These results definitely establish the role of cuprophilic interactions in the mechanochromism of copper iodide clusters. More generally, this study constitutes a step further into the understanding of the mechanism involved in the mechanochromic luminescent properties of metal-based compounds. PMID:25076411

  14. Interruption with the Migration of Iodide by GR(CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to understand the influence of green rust on the migration of iodide. GR(CT) would be major corrosion product of iron near the seawater or saline layer in underground. The GR(CT) may play an important role in the retardation of the iodide migration in a deep geological environment due to it's anionic exchange reaction. In underground radioactive waste repository, the corrosion of iron canisters would be proceed as follows; Fe(II) and/or Fe(III) dissolved from iron containers → Fe(II)(OH)2 and/or Fe(III)(OH)3 → Green rust → Lepidocrocite or Magnetite → Goetite etc. Generally, the green rust has known to exist in environments close to the Fe(Π)/Fe(ΠΙ) transition zone or between the oxidized layer and reduced layer in the underground. As anion exchanger and strong reducer, the green rusts can affect the migration of anions, reactions involving green rusts were poorly studied in relation to the safety assessment of radioactive waste repository

  15. Nonradiometric and radiometric testing of radioiodine sorbents using methyl iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nonradiometric test of adsorbents and adsorbers with normal methyl iodide (CH3127I) is desirable. Use of methyl radioiodide (CH3131I) requires special precautions and facilities and results in bed contamination. However, first it must be established to what extent the removal of CH3127I by adsorbents is indicative of the removal of CH3131I. An experimental apparatus was built and used to simultaneously measure the penetrations of CH3I molecules and the radioisotope in CH3131I through charcoal absorbent beds. Gas chromatography with electron capture detection was used to measure CH3I. Radioiodine was measured using charcoal traps within NaI scintillation well crystals. Real time (5-min interval) radioiodine measurement provided immediate penetration results directly comparable to the real time penetrations of methyl iodide. These penetrations were compared for typical charcoal adsorbents with these impregnants: (a) 5% KI3, (b) 5% KI3 + 2% TEDA, (c) 5% TEDA, and (d) metal salts (Whetlerite). Differences between CH3I and CH3131I penetrations observed for the two iodized charcoals were attributed to isotope exchange reactions. Equivalent penetrations were observed for non-iodized adsorbents and for iodized ones at initial time. First order rates were confirmed for reactions with TEDA and for isotope exchange. This was one more confirmation of the lack of a challenge concentration effect on efficiencies at low test bed loadings. In addition to other removal mechanisms, reversible physical adsorption was observed with all charcoals

  16. Dose-Response Analysis of Developmental Iodide Deficiency: Reductions in Thyroid Hormones and Impaired Hippocampal Synaptic Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iodide is an essential nutrient for thyroid hormone synthesis and severe iodide deficiency (ID) during early development is associated with neurological impairments. Several environmental contaminants can perturb the thyroid axis and this perturbation may be more acute under cond...

  17. Colorimetric sensing of iodide based on triazole-acetamide functionalized gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have modified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with triazole acetamide to obtain a material for the sensitive and selective colorimetric determination of iodide. The functionalized AuNPs were prepared by a reductive single chemical step using a Cu(I)-catalyzed click reaction. The presence of iodide ions induces the aggregation of these AuNPs and results in a color change from wine-red to purple. The iodide-induced aggregation can be detected visually with bare eyes, but also by photometry. The detection limit is as low as 15 nM. The method displays excellent selectivity for iodide over other anions due to the selective interaction with the amido groups of the triazole. The method was applied to the determination of iodide in spiked lake waters. (author)

  18. Advances of radioiodine therapy of tumor induced by sodium iodide symporter gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a kind of membrane protein that mainly mediates iodide transport into thyroid follicular cells, sodium iodide symporter (NIS) plays a key role in radioiodine therapy of both thyroid and other cancers. Studies show that decreased NIS expression level or intracellular localization in thyroid carcinomas lead to low iodine uptake. So NIS gene therapy is a new method to overcome this problem. To be therapeutically effective, radioiodine has to be remained in the tumor cells for sufficient long time; this is still a problem which reduces therapeutic effect. It should increase iodide retention and decrease iodide efflux in tumor cells to optimize therapeutic scheme. This article reviews the studies on advances of radioiodine therapy of tumor induced by sodium iodide symporter gene. (authors)

  19. Recovery and separation for the trace amounts of iodide in PWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An separation and recovery technique for iodide in spent pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuels has been established using a SIMFUEL simulated for spent PWR fuel. The spent PWR fuels were dissolved with mixture of nitric and hydrochloric acids(80; 20 mol%) which can oxidize iodide to iodate through dissolution process. Iodide in uranium matrix and co-exist fission products was separated and recovered by organic extraction of iodine with carbon tetrachloride and by back extraction of iodide with 0.1 M NaHSO3. Recovered iodide was measured using an ion chromatograph/shielding system available for analysis of radioactive materials. In practice, a spent PWR fuel whose burnup rate was 42,261 MWd/MtU was analyzed and then the relation between the burnup and the quantity of the fission products was compared to the calculated by burnup code, Origen 2

  20. Ultrasensitive iodide detection based on the resonance light scattering of histidine-stabilized gold nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a novel resonance light scattering (RLS) assay for the sensitive and selective determination of iodide. It is based on the use of histidine-stabilized gold nanoclusters (His-AuNCs) which undergo fusion and aggregation in the presence of iodide. The resulting enhancement in the intensity of RLS is proportional to the concentration of iodide in the 0.01 to 8.0 μM range, and the detection limit is as low as 1.8 nM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. This “turn-on” method is highly selective for iodide and not interfered by other ions commonly present. It was applied to the determination of iodide in (spiked) real water samples. (author)

  1. Iodine K-edge EXAFS analysis of iodide ion-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the structure of inclusion complexes of α-, β-, γ-cyclodextrin with mono-iodide ion in aqueous solution by means of iodine K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy. The analysis is based on the assumption that two kinds of iodide ions exist in KI-cyclodextrin aqueous solution i.e. hydrated mono-iodide ions and one-one mono-iodide-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes. In KI-α-cyclodextrin system, iodine K-edge EXAFS analyse show that the average coordination number of the oxygen atoms in water molecules in the first hydration shell decreases as the fraction of included ions increases. This result suggests that dehydration process accompanies the formation of the inclusion complex. This is not found in the case of β-cyclodextrin, indicating that in this case the iodide ions are included together with the whole first hydration shell.

  2. Evaluation of optimal silver amount for the removal of methyl iodide on silver-impregnated adsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adsorption characteristics of methyl iodide generated from the simulated off-gas stream on various adsorbents such as silver-impregnated zeolite (AgX), zeocarbon and activated carbon were investigated. An extensive evaluation was made on the optimal silver impregnation amount for the removal of methyl iodide at temperatures up to 300 deg. C. The degree of adsorption efficiency of methyl iodide on silver-impregnated adsorbent is strongly dependent on impregnation amount and process temperature. A quantitative comparison of adsorption efficiencies on three adsorbents in a fixed bed was investigated. The influence of temperature, methyl iodide concentration and silver impregnation amount on the adsorption efficiency is closely related to the pore characteristics of adsorbents. It shows that the effective impregnation ratio was about 10wt%, based on the degree of silver utilization for the removal of methyl iodide. The practical applicability of silver-impregnated zeolite for the removal of radioiodine generated from the DUPIC process was consequently proposed. (author)

  3. Synthesis of a Stable Primary-Alkyl-Substituted Selenenyl Iodide and Its Hydrolytic Conversion to the Corresponding Selenenic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Shohei Sase; Ryo Kakimoto; Ryutaro Kimura; Kei Goto

    2015-01-01

    A primary-alkyl-substituted selenenyl iodide was successfully synthesized through oxidative iodination of a selenol with N-iodosuccinimide by taking advantage of a cavity-shaped steric protection group. The selenenyl iodide exhibited high thermal stability and remained unchanged upon heating at 100 °C for 3 h in [D8]toluene. The selenenyl iodide was reduced to the corresponding selenol by treatment with dithiothreitol. Hydrolysis of the selenenyl iodide under alkaline conditions afforded the ...

  4. Extraction of americium(III) from nitric acid medium by CMPO-TBP extractants in ionic liquid diluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extraction of americium(III) from nitric acid medium by a solution of tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) and n-octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) in room temperature ionic liquid, l-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (bmimNTf2), was studied and the results were compared with that obtained with CMPO-TBP in n-doddecane (n-DD). The distribution ratio of 241Am(III) in TBP-CMPO/bmimNTf2 was measured as a function of various parameters such as concentrations of nitric acid, CMPO, bmimNO3, NaNO3 and TBP and temperature. Remarkably large distribution ratios were observed for the extraction of americium(III) when bmimNTf2 acted as diluent and the extraction was insignificant in the absence of CMPO. The stoichiometry of metal-solvate in organic phase was determined by the slope analysis of extraction data and it indicated the formation of 1:3 (Am: CMPO) complex in organic phase. Viscosity of TBP-CMPO/bmimNTf2 at various temperatures and enthalpy change accompanied by the extraction of americium(III) were determined and reported in this paper. (orig.)

  5. The behaviour under irradiation of molybdenum matrix for inert matrix fuel containing americium oxide (CerMet concept)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agata, E.; Knol, S.; Fedorov, A. V.; Fernandez, A.; Somers, J.; Klaassen, F.

    2015-10-01

    Americium is a strong contributor to the long term radiotoxicity of high activity nuclear waste. Transmutation by irradiation in nuclear reactors or Accelerator Driven System (ADS, subcritical reactors dedicated to transmutation) of long-lived nuclides like 241Am is therefore an option for the reduction of radiotoxicity of waste packages to be stored in a repository. In order to safely burn americium in a fast reactor or ADS, it must be incorporated in a matrix that could be metallic (CerMet target) or ceramic (CerCer target). One of the most promising matrix to incorporate Am is molybdenum. In order to address the issues (swelling, stability under irradiation, gas retention and release) of using Mo as matrix to transmute Am, two irradiation experiments have been conducted recently at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten (The Netherland) namely HELIOS and BODEX. The BODEX experiment is a separate effect test, where the molybdenum behaviour is studied without the presence of fission products using 10B to "produce" helium, the HELIOS experiment included a more representative fuel target with the presence of Am and fission product. This paper covers the results of Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) of the two irradiation experiments mentioned above where molybdenum behaviour has been deeply investigated as possible matrix to transmute americium (CerMet fuel target). The behaviour of molybdenum looks satisfying at operating temperature but at high temperature (above 1000 °C) more investigation should be performed.

  6. Consideration of the effect of lymph-node deposition upon the measurement of plutonium and americium in the lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of an inhaled radionuclide by external photon counting includes quantities which may be contained in lymph nodes, as well as quantities in the lungs. An overestimate of the lung burden can result, if a portion of the radionuclide were present in the lymph nodes. This problem is analyzed with respect to the measurement of inhaled plutonium containing plutonium-241 and americium-241, when americium-241 has been used as a tracer for the plutonium. Equations are derived which yield the amounts of americium and of plutonium in the lungs and in the lymph nodes as a function of time after exposure and for various translocation and retention parameters. Count histories (count profiles) of actual exposure cases are compared with calculated count profiles in order to gain insight into possible values of the translocation and retention parameters. Comparison is also made with calculated count profiles using values of translocation and retention parameters recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for use with the Task Group Lung Model. The magnitude of the possible overestimate (error factor) was calculated for combinations o

  7. HELIOS: the new design of the irradiation of U-free fuels for americium transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Agata, E. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Klaassen, F.; Sciolla, C. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Dept. Life Cycle and Innovations, P.O. Box 25 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Fernandez-Carretero, A. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bonnerot, J.M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, DEC/SESC/LC2I CEA-Cadarache, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2009-06-15

    Americium is one of the radioactive elements that mostly contribute to the radiotoxicity of the nuclear spent fuel. Transmutation of long-lived nuclides like Americium is an option for the reduction of the mass, the radiotoxicity and the decay heat of nuclear waste. The HELIOS irradiation experiment is the last evolution in a series of experiments on americium transmutation. The previous experiments, EFTTRA-T4 and T4bis, have shown that the release or trapping of helium is the key issue for the design of such kind of target. In fact, the production of helium, which is characteristic of {sup 241}Am transmutation, is quite significant. The experiment is carried out in the framework of the 4-year project EUROTRANS of the EURATOM 6. Framework Programme (FP6). Therefore, the main objective of the HELIOS experiment is to study the in-pile behaviour of U-free fuels such as CerCer (Pu, Am, Zr)O{sub 2} and Am{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}+MgO or CerMet (Pu, Am)O{sub 2}+Mo in order to gain knowledge on the role of the fuel microstructure and of the temperature on the gas release and on the fuel swelling. The experiment was planned to be conducted in the HFR (High Flux Reactor) in Petten (The Netherlands) starting the first quarter of 2007. Because of the innovative aspects of the fuel, the fabrication has had some delays as well as the final safety analyses of the original design showed some unexpected deviation. Besides, the HFR reactor has been unavailable since August 2008. Due to the reasons described above, the experiment has been postponed. HELIOS should start in the first quarter of 2009 and will last 300 full power days. The paper will cover the description of the new design of the irradiation experiment HELIOS. The experiment has been split in two parts (HELIOS1 and HELIOS2) which will be irradiated together. Moreover, due to the high temperature achieved in cladding and to the high amount of helium produced during transmutation the experiment previously designed for a

  8. 10 CFR 35.392 - Training for the oral administration of sodium iodide I-131 requiring a written directive in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training for the oral administration of sodium iodide I... sodium iodide I-131 requiring a written directive in quantities less than or equal to 1.22 gigabecquerels... oral administration of sodium iodide I-131 requiring a written directive in quantities less than...

  9. 10 CFR 35.394 - Training for the oral administration of sodium iodide I-131 requiring a written directive in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training for the oral administration of sodium iodide I... Byproduct Material-Written Directive Required § 35.394 Training for the oral administration of sodium iodide... of sodium iodide I-131 requiring a written directive in quantities greater than 1.22...

  10. 76 FR 16770 - Petition To Suspend and Cancel All Registrations for the Soil Fumigant Iodomethane (Methyl Iodide...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ... AGENCY Petition To Suspend and Cancel All Registrations for the Soil Fumigant Iodomethane (Methyl Iodide... iodide) be suspended and cancelled. The Agency is posting this petition for public comment. Following the... Earthjustice requesting that all uses of iodomethane (methyl iodide) be suspended and cancelled. The Agency...

  11. Uptake of americium-241 by plants from contaminated Chernobyl exclusive zone test site soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Americium-241 was found to accumulate in soils and biological objects of the environment. Its concentration has increased many times after the Chernobyl disaster and can be expected to increase about 40 times in the future. This research concentrated on the contaminated exclusive Chernobyl zone polluted by trace radionuclides, their behavior and accumulation by various plant species. Special attention is devoted to the bioavailability of 241Am to the plants Galium rivale, G. tinctorium, G. aparine, G. intermedium, Berteroa incana, Artemisia absinthium, A. vulgaris, Centaurea borysthenica, C. arenaria, Cirsium arvense, Succissa pratensis, Solidago virgaurea, Linaria vulgaris, Lepidium ruderale, Stenactis annua, Veronica maxima, Verbascum lychnitis, Euphorbia cyparissias, Genista tinctoria, Erigeron canadensis, Oenothera biennis, Betula pendula and Quercus robur, which were collected from the Chernobyl, Kopachi, and Yanov districts. The plant samples of Oenothera biennis, Betula pendula and Quercus robur were collected from the Yanov district, where the soil contamination by 241Am and 137Cs was at the level of 660 and 27 MBq/m2, respectively. Gamma spectroscopy and radiochemical methods were used to estimate the activity concentration of 137Cs, 90Sr, 238Pu, 239+240Pu, 241Am. The radionuclides were measured in the dry green mass of the plant samples and in the dry soils. The contamination of the Oenothera biennis, Betula pendula and Quercus robur samples by 137Cs was (5.8±1,5)x106, (7.4±1.1)x105, and (2.6±0.2)x106 Bq/kg dry mass, respectively, and contamination by 241Am was 47±5, 45±3 and 3.2±0.2 Bq/kg, respectively. The soil-to-plant transfer ratio for 137Cs ranged lay within the interval of 0.2 to 0.03 Bq/kg : Bq/m2, the the transfer ratio for 241Am did not exceed 7x10-5 Bq/kg : Bq/m2. The coefficient of the relative contents of the 241Am/239+240Pu radionuclides in the various plant samples varied from 3.2 to 8.3, while for soil from the Yanov district this

  12. Anomalous aryl strengthening of complexes at americium and europium extraction with alkylenediphospine dioxide from perchloric media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studied was the extraction of americium(3) and europium(3) from perchlorate solutions(0.001 M) with dioxides of alkylenediphosphines of three types: aryl Ph2P(O)CH2(O)PPh2(briefly 4P), and Ph2P(O)(CH2)2(O)PPh2, mixed Ph2P(O)CH2(O)P(C8H17)2 (or 2Ph2Oct) and alkyl (C8H17)2P(O)CH2(O)P(C8H17)2 (or 4 Oct). Trisolvates of MeS3x(ClO4)3 are predominantly formed but americium disolvates are also present upon dilution with dichloroethane. For 4Ph,2Ph2Oct and 4 Oct the concentration is, respectively, 1015, 2x1014, and 1013; for disolvates by 4 orders of magnitude lower which is, nevertheless, by 2 orders of magnitude higher than for nitric acid solutions. The separation coefficient of β Am/Eu for 4Ph attains 6-8. As in the case of nitrate solutions, an anomalous aryl strengthening of the complexes is observed: an increase in the distribution coefficients and extraction constants in the series of 4 Oct - 2Ph 2 Oct - 4Ph, in spite of the introduction of electronegative aryl substituents into the dioxide molecule, which reduce electron density on oxygen atoms and basicity of dioxides. In contrast to nitric acid solutions, observed is a nonlinear effect of a change in basicity on extraction properties upon dilution with dichloroethane (dioxide of 2Ph2 Oct does not occupy an intermediate position but is close to 4Ph). Upon dilution with chloroform the dependence is linear and anomalous effect rises due to a different nature of interactions of dioxides with chloroform. When the bridge increases up to ethylene, an anomalous strengthening of the complexes disappears. However, the distribution coefficients upon extraction with alkyl dioxide are considerably lower, which can be explained by a stronger extraction of perchloric acid

  13. Strawberry growers wavered over methyl iodide, feared public backlash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Guthman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Methyl iodide, once promoted as a suitable alternative to methyl bromide for soil fumigation in strawberry systems, was withdrawn from the market in 2012 after a contentious regulatory battle that revolved around its high toxicity. At the time of its withdrawal, Arysta LifeScience, the maker of the chemical, claimed that it was no longer economically viable. In this study, I investigated what made the chemical nonviable, with a specific focus on growers' nonadoption of it. Interviews with strawberry growers in the four top California strawberry-growing counties revealed that growers' decisions not to use it were primarily related to public disapproval, although the continued availability of methyl bromide and other fumigants played a contributing role by making adoption less urgent. The study results suggest that policies in place during the methyl bromide phaseout did not strongly encourage the development and extension of less toxic alternatives, which undermined the strawberry industry's position.

  14. Betaine potassium iodide dihydrate: a new compound of betaine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betaine potassium iodide dihydrate, [(CH3)3N+CH2COO-]2.KI.2H2O, BKI for short, is a new compound of the aminoacid betaine with a triclinic symmetry and the space group P1-bar at room temperature. The study of dielectric properties provided evidence for the existence of a structural phase transition occurring around 100 K. The spontaneous electric polarization is zero in both phases. A study of dielectric dispersion disclosed two relaxational modes with different relevance in the high and in the low temperature phases. The main features observed in BKI are consistently described by the Landau theory, by assuming a quadratic coupling between the primary order parameter and the electric polarization. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  15. Incorporation of defects during processing of mercuric iodide detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, X. J.; Schlesinger, T. E.; James, R. B.; Stulen, R. H.; Ortale, C.; Cheng, A. Y.

    1990-07-01

    The effects of chemical etching in KI solution, heating, and vacuum exposures of HgI2 were individually studied by low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Each of these processing steps is important in the manufacturing of mercuric iodide detectors and may be responsible for the incorporation of carrier traps both in the near-surface region and in the bulk. The results of etching experiments showed that the near-surface region has a different defect structure than the bulk, which appears to result from iodine deficiency. Bulk heating at 100 °C also modifies the defect structure of the crystal. Vacuum exposure has an effect similar to chemical etching, but it does not cause significant degradation of the stoichiometry for recently KI-etched specimens. These studies suggest that some features in the PL spectra of HgI2 are associated with stoichiometry of the specimens.

  16. Electronic characterization of mercuric iodide gamma ray spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past four years the yield of high resolution mercuric iodide (HgI2) gamma ray spectrometers produced at EG ampersand G/EM has increased dramatically. Data is presented which demonstrates a strong correlation between starting material and spectrometer performance. Improved spectrometer yields are attributed to the method of HgI2 synthesis and to material purification procedures. Data is presented which shows that spectrometer performance is correlated with hole mobility-lifetime products. In addition, the measurement of Schottky barrier heights on HgI2 spectrometers has been performed using I-V curves and the photoelectric method. Barrier heights near 1.1 eV have been obtained using various contacts and contact deposition methods. These data suggest the pinning of the Fermi level at midgap at the HgI2 surface, probably due to surface states formed prior to contact deposition

  17. Incorporation of defects during processing of mercuric iodide detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, X.J.; Schlesinger, T.E. (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (USA)); James, R.B.; Stulen, R.H. (Theoretical Division, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94450 (USA)); Ortale, C.; Cheng, A.Y. (EG G Energy Measurements, Inc., Goleta, California 93116 (USA))

    1990-07-01

    The effects of chemical etching in KI solution, heating, and vacuum exposures of HgI{sub 2} were individually studied by low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Each of these processing steps is important in the manufacturing of mercuric iodide detectors and may be responsible for the incorporation of carrier traps both in the near-surface region and in the bulk. The results of etching experiments showed that the near-surface region has a different defect structure than the bulk, which appears to result from iodine deficiency. Bulk heating at 100 {degree}C also modifies the defect structure of the crystal. Vacuum exposure has an effect similar to chemical etching, but it does not cause significant degradation of the stoichiometry for recently KI-etched specimens. These studies suggest that some features in the PL spectra of HgI{sub 2} are associated with stoichiometry of the specimens.

  18. Modified purification of mercuric iodide for crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, N. L.; Ortale, C.; Schieber, M. M.; Van Den Berg, L.

    1988-06-01

    The standard procedure used in our laboratory to purify commercially available mercuric iodide (HgI 2) consists of a sequence of steps: (1) repeated sublimation under continuous evacuation, followed by (2) melting and recrystallization, and (3) a sublimation process in a closed tube. This paper describes a modification of the standard purification sequence by adding recrystallization of the HgI 2 in hydrochloric acid. Leaching cation impurities out of HgI 2 powder with hydrochloric acid has been practised before by Zaletin et al. Our objective for the hydrochloric acid treatment was to remove nitrates and hydrocarbons which were interfering with the vapor transport during crystal growth. Results of the procedure are presented in terms of total carbon and selected ion content of the treated and untreated material.

  19. Investigation of copper electrodes for mercuric iodide detector applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, X.J.; Schlesinger, T.E. (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (USA)); James, R.B.; Stulen, R.H. (Advanced Materials Division, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (USA)); Ortale, C.; van den Berg, L. (EG G Energy Measurements, Inc., Goleta, CA (USA))

    1990-06-15

    Copper diffusion in mercuric iodide was studied by low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. A broad radiative emission band at a wavelength of about 6720 A in the PL spectra was found to be related to Cu incorporation in the crystal. PL spectra obtained from surface doping experiments indicate that Cu is a rapid diffuser in HgI{sub 2} bulk material. Auger electron spectroscopy performed as a function of depth from the crystal surface confirms the rapid bulk diffusion process of Cu in HgI{sub 2}. Fabrication of HgI{sub 2} nuclear detectors with Cu electrodes indicates that Cu is not acceptable as an electrode material, which is consistent with the fact that it diffuses easily into the bulk crystal and introduces new radiative recombination centers.

  20. Investigation of copper electrodes for mercuric iodide detector applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, X. J.; Schlesinger, T. E.; James, R. B.; Stulen, R. H.; Ortale, C.; van den Berg, L.

    1990-06-01

    Copper diffusion in mercuric iodide was studied by low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. A broad radiative emission band at a wavelength of about 6720 Å in the PL spectra was found to be related to Cu incorporation in the crystal. PL spectra obtained from surface doping experiments indicate that Cu is a rapid diffuser in HgI2 bulk material. Auger electron spectroscopy performed as a function of depth from the crystal surface confirms the rapid bulk diffusion process of Cu in HgI2. Fabrication of HgI2 nuclear detectors with Cu electrodes indicates that Cu is not acceptable as an electrode material, which is consistent with the fact that it diffuses easily into the bulk crystal and introduces new radiative recombination centers.

  1. Photon recycling in lead iodide perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos-Outón, Luis M.; Szumilo, Monika; Lamboll, Robin; Richter, Johannes M.; Crespo-Quesada, Micaela; Abdi-Jalebi, Mojtaba; Beeson, Harry J.; Vrućinić, Milan; Alsari, Mejd; Snaith, Henry J.; Ehrler, Bruno; Friend, Richard H.; Deschler, Felix

    2016-03-01

    Lead-halide perovskites have emerged as high-performance photovoltaic materials. We mapped the propagation of photogenerated luminescence and charges from a local photoexcitation spot in thin films of lead tri-iodide perovskites. We observed light emission at distances of ≥50 micrometers and found that the peak of the internal photon spectrum red-shifts from 765 to ≥800 nanometers. We used a lateral-contact solar cell with selective electron- and hole-collecting contacts and observed that charge extraction for photoexcitation >50 micrometers away from the contacts arose from repeated recycling between photons and electron-hole pairs. Thus, energy transport is not limited by diffusive charge transport but can occur over long distances through multiple absorption-diffusion-emission events. This process creates high excitation densities within the perovskite layer and allows high open-circuit voltages.

  2. Development of mercuric iodide detectors for XAS and XRD measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prototype element for an energy dispersive detector (EDD) array was constructed using a Mercuric Iodide detector. Both detector and front end FET could be thermoelectrically cooled. Tested at SSRL, the detector had 250 eV electronic noise and 315 eV resolution at 5.9 keV. K line fluorescence spectra were collected for selected elements between Cl (2622 eV) and Zn (8638 eV). Count rate capability to 60,000 cps was demonstrated. Several detector parameters were measured, including energy linearity, resolution vs. shaping time, and detector dead time. An EXAFS (extended x-ray absorption fine structure) spectrum was recorded and compared to simultaneously collected transmission data

  3. Polarographic determination of indium and thallium iodides in phosphor tablets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of polarographic determination of indium and thallium iodides in phosphor tablets without preliminary separation of elements was developed. Mercury-dropping electrode was used as an indicator, and saturated calomel electrode was used as an auxiliary electrode. A recording of reduction currents was performed in the potential interval from -0.25 up to 1.15 V at potential sweep speed of 200 mV/min. Optimum conditions of sample acidic decomposition and polarography were presented. A solution of ethylene diamine (0.5 M), of ammonia (0.25 M) and of potassium chloride (0.05 M) served as a background electrolyte. The suggested technique allows one to determine component contents in tablets with a satisfactory accuracy. A period of one tablet analysis constitutes 1.5 h

  4. Investigation of sodium iodide hydration and dehydration in moist atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of different factors on NaI hydration and dehydration kinetics under nonequilibrium conditions is studied. NaIx2H2O solid or homogeneous solution is established to be formed at sodium iodide interaction with water vapour depending on air humidity. At low humidity water absorption is not observed. Effect of water vapour pressure, the NaI particle size, the air flux rate over a salt on the absorption rate is studied. The latter points to process rate limitation by diffusion in a gaseous phase. The NaI solution decomposition at light with iodine formation is marked. The character of NaIx2H2O dehydration depends on water vapour removing from the over-salt space. Total water removing before and after crystal hydrate thermal degradation when aqueous solution evaporation occurs, is possible. At 143 deg C the water vapour pressure over solution equals the atmospheric one

  5. Mercuric iodide crystals obtained by solvent evaporation using ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millimeter-sized mercuric iodide crystals were fabricated by the solvent evaporation technique using pure ethanol as a solvent. Three different conditions for solution evaporation were tested: (i) in the dark at room temperature; (ii) in the presence of light at room temperature and (iii) in an oven at 40 deg. C. Morphology, structure, optical and electrical properties were investigated using several techniques. Crystals fabricated in the dark show better properties and stability than others, possibly because the larger the energy of the system, the larger the number of induced growth defects. The crystals fabricated in the dark have adequate structure for higher resistivity and activation energy close to half the optical band-gap, as desired. With proper encapsulation these crystals might be good candidates for the development of ionizing radiation sensors.

  6. Americium and plutonium in water, biota, and sediment from the central Oregon coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium-239, 240 and americium-241 were measured in the mussel Mytilus californianus from the region of Coos Bay, OR. The flesh of this species has a plutonium concentration of about 90 fCi/kg, and an Am-241/Pu-239, 240 ratio that is high relative to mixed fallout, ranging between two and three. Transuranic concentrations in sediment, unfiltered water, and filterable particulates were also measured; none of these materials has an Am/Pu ratio as greatly elevated as the mussels, and there is no apparent difference in the Am/Pu ratio of terrestrial runoff and coastal water. Sediment core profiles do not allow accumulation rates or depositional histories to be identified, but it does not appear that material characterized by a high Am/Pu ratio has ever been introduced to this estuary. Other bivalves (Tresus capax and Macoma nasuta) and a polychaete (Abarenicola sp.) do not have an elevated Am/Pu ratio, although the absolute activity of plutonium in the infaunal bivalves is roughly four times that in the mussels

  7. Americium-based oxides: Dense pellet fabrication from co-converted oxalates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horlait, Denis; Lebreton, Florent [CEA, DEN, DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Gauthé, Aurélie [CEA, DEN, DRCP/SERA/LCAR, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Caisso, Marie [CEA, DEN, DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Arab-Chapelet, Bénédicte; Picart, Sébastien [CEA, DEN, DRCP/SERA/LCAR, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Delahaye, Thibaud, E-mail: thibaud.delahaye@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France)

    2014-01-15

    Mixed oxides are used as nuclear fuels and are notably envisaged for future fuel cycles including plutonium and minor actinide recycling. In this context, processes are being developed for the fabrication of uranium–americium mixed-oxide compounds for transmutation. The purpose of these processes is not only the compliance with fuel specifications in terms of density and homogeneity, but also the simplification of the process for its industrialization as well as lowering dust generation. In this paper, the use of a U{sub 0.85}Am{sub 0.15}O{sub 2±δ} powder synthesized by oxalate co-conversion as a precursor for dense fuel fabrications is assessed. This study notably focuses on sintering, which yielded pellets up to 96% of the theoretical density, taking advantage of the high reactivity and homogeneity of the powder. As-obtained pellets were further characterized to be compared to those obtained via processes based on the UMACS (Uranium Minor Actinide Conventional Sintering) process. This comparison highlights several advantages of co-converted powder as a precursor for simplified processes that generate little dust.

  8. Influence of organic additives on the colour reaction between trivalent americium and arsenazo III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The colour reaction of Am(III) with arsenazo III in several hydroorganic media has been examined systematically on the addition of certain polar water-miscible organic solvents in the course of a search for improved and simple spectrophotometric methods for the estimation of americium. Addition of these substances resulted in the stabilization of colour and brought about a drastic enhancement in the absorbance values. The organic additives studied include acetone, acetonitrile, dimethylformamide, dioxane and ethanol. Among the many solvents tested, alcohol and dioxane proved to be the most effective, the highest sensitivity is obtained by using a 60% dioxane-ethanol (1:1) mixture. The apparent molar absorptivity based on Am content is 184616+-9931 mol-1 cm-1 at 655 nm which is about 3 times higher than that attained for the reaction in aqueous medium (65178+-1243). Moreover, this is the highest value reported as yet for its determination. Beer's law is obeyed both in mixed and aqueous media. The effects of some experimental variables on colour development have also been studied to optimize the conditions for the assay of Am. (author)

  9. Speciation and bioavailability of Americium-241 in the fresh water environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to its anthropogenic origin, the transuranic americium 241 confronts physiologists with the intriguing question, which mechanisms are involved in the incorporation or elimination of such artificial elements in biological cycles. The investigations on the speciation and bioavailability of 241Am in the freshwater environment aim to establish a relation between the behavior of 241Am in freshwater ecosystems and its availability for biota. In the limnic environment, most often characterized by a high organic load and a low conductivity, the effect of complexation of 241Am with humic acids and competition with trivalent cations such as A1 and Fe, were proven to be significant on the speciation of 241Am. Based on the registration of the 241Am uptake by a large number of freshwater organisms, the crayfish Astacus leptodactylus Eschscholtz was chosen to study the whole-body uptake of 241Am, its corresponding organ distribution and its retention in the animal. The share of external fixation and ingestion in the global uptake, and the effect of speciation on it, were studied more carefully. Other aspects in this physiological part were: the kinetics of 241Am in the hemolymph and the hepatopancreas, and its subcellular distribution in the digestive gland. Finally, by comparing the physiology of 241Am with some other metals (240Pu, 64Cu, 198Au) with analogous or contradictional properties, we tried to find out whether the behavior of 241Am in organisms can be explained from its chemical characteristics

  10. Development and Testing of an Americium/Lanthanide Separation Flowsheet Using Sodium Bismuthate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack Law; Bruce Mincher; Troy Garn; Mitchell Greenhalgh; Nicholas Schmitt; Veronica Rutledge

    2014-04-01

    The separation of Am from the lanthanides and curium is a key step in proposed advanced fuel cycle scenarios. The partitioning and transmutation of Am is desirable to minimize the long-term heat load of material interred in a future high-level waste repository. A separation process amenable to process scale-up remains elusive. Given only subtle chemistry differences within and between the ions of the trivalent actinide and lanthanide series this separation is challenging ; however, higher oxidation states of americium can be prepared using sodium bismuthate and separated via solvent extraction using diamylamylphosphonate (DAAP) extraction. Among the other trivalent metals only Ce is also oxidized and extracted. Due to the long-term instability of Am(VI) , the loaded organic phase is readily selectively stripped to partition the actinide to a new acidic aqueous phase. Batch extraction distribution ratio measurements were used to design a flowsheet to accomplish this separation. Additionally, crossflow filtration was investigated as a method to filter the bismuthate solids from the feed solution prior to extraction. Results of the filtration studies, flowsheet development work and flowsheet performance testing using a centrifugal contactor are detailed.

  11. Determination of plutonium americium and curium in soil samples by solvent extraction with trioctylphosphine oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of Pu, Am and Cm determination in soil samples, which was developed for analyzing samples from territories subjected to radioactive contamination as a result of the Chernobyl accident is described. After preliminary treatment the samples were leached by solution of 7 mol/l HNO23+0.3 mol/l KBrO3 during heating. Pu was isolated by extraction with 0.05 mol TOPO from 7 mol/l HNO3. 144Ce and partially remaining in water phase isotopes of Zr, U and Th were isolated in an extraction-chromatographic column with TOPO and PbO2. Then Am and Cm were extracted by 0.2 mol/l TOPO from solution 1 mol/l HLact+0.07 mol/l DTPA+1 mol/l Al(NO3)3. Alpha-activity of both extracted products was determined in liquid scintillation counter. Chemical yield of plutonium counted to 85±10%, that of americium and curium -75±10%. 17 refs

  12. Assessment of radiation doses from residential smoke detectors that contain americium-241

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    External dose equivalents and internal dose commitments were estimated for individuals and populations from annual distribution, use, and disposal of 10 million ionization chamber smoke detectors that contain 110 kBq (3 μCi) americium-241 each. Under exposure scenarios developed for normal distribution, use, and disposal using the best available information, annual external dose equivalents to average individuals were estimated to range from 4 fSv (0.4 prem) to 20 nSv (2 μrem) for total body and from 7 fSv to 40 nSv for bone. Internal dose commitments to individuals under post disposal scenarios were estimated to range from 0.006 to 80 μSv (0.0006 to 8 mrem) to total body and from 0.06 to 800 μSv to bone. The total collective dose (the sum of external dose equivalents and 50-year internal dose commitments) for all individuals involved with distribution, use, or disposal of 10 million smoke detectors was estimated

  13. NMR Evidence for the 8.5 K Phase Transition in Americium Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Yo; Nishi, Tsuyoshi; Kambe, Shinsaku; Nakada, Masami; Itoh, Akinori; Homma, Yoshiya; Sakai, Hironori; Chudo, Hiroyuki

    2010-05-01

    We report here the first NMR study of americium dioxide (AmO2). More than 30 years ago, a phase transition was suggested to occur in this compound at 8.5 K based on magnetic susceptibility data, while no evidence had been obtained from microscopic measurements. We have prepared a powder sample of 243AmO2 containing 90 at. % 17O and have performed 17O NMR at temperatures ranging from 1.5 to 200 K. After a sudden drop of the 17O NMR signal intensity below 8.5 K, at 1.5 K we have observed an extremely broad spectrum covering a range of ˜14 kOe in applied field. These data provide the first microscopic evidence for a phase transition as a bulk property in this system. In addition, the 17O NMR spectrum has been found to split into two peaks in the paramagnetic state, an effect which has not been reported for actinide dioxides studied up to now. We suggest that the splitting is induced by self-radiation damage from the alpha decay of 243Am.

  14. Study of biosorbents application on the treatment of radioactive liquid wastes with americium-241

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of nuclear energy for many different purposes has been intensified and highlighted by the benefits that it provides. Medical diagnosis and therapy, agriculture, industry and electricity generation are examples of its application. However, nuclear energy generates radioactive wastes that require suitable treatment ensuring life and environmental safety. Biosorption and bioaccumulation represent an emergent alternative for the treatment of radioactive liquid wastes, providing volume reduction and physical state change. This work aimed to study biosorbents for the treatment of radioactive liquid wastes contaminated with americium-241 in order to reduce the volume and change the physical state from liquid to solid. The biosorbents evaluated were Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilized in calcium alginate beads, inactivated and free cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, calcium alginate beads, Bacillus subtilis, Cupriavidus metallidurans and Ochrobactrum anthropi. The results were quite satisfactory, achieving 100% in some cases. The technique presented in this work may be useful and viable for implementing at the Waste Management Laboratory of IPEN - CNEN/SP in short term, since it is an easy and low cost method. (author)

  15. In Vitro Dissolution Tests of Plutonium and Americium Containing Contamination Originating From ZPPR Fuel Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William F. Bauer; Brian K. Schuetz; Gary M. Huestis; Thomas B. Lints; Brian K. Harris; R. Duane Ball; Gracy Elias

    2012-09-01

    Assessing the extent of internal dose is of concern whenever workers are exposed to airborne radionuclides or other contaminants. Internal dose determinations depend upon a reasonable estimate of the expected biological half-life of the contaminants in the respiratory tract. One issue with refractory elements is determining the dissolution rate of the element. Actinides such as plutonium (Pu) and Americium (Am) tend to be very refractory and can have biological half-lives of tens of years. In the event of an exposure, the dissolution rates of the radionuclides of interest needs to be assessed in order to assign the proper internal dose estimates. During the November 2011 incident at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) involving a ZPPR fuel plate, air filters in a constant air monitor (CAM) and a giraffe filter apparatus captured airborne particulate matter. These filters were used in dissolution rate experiments to determine the apparent dissolution half-life of Pu and Am in simulated biological fluids. This report describes these experiments and the results. The dissolution rates were found to follow a three term exponential decay equation. Differences were noted depending upon the nature of the biological fluid simulant. Overall, greater than 95% of the Pu and 93% of the Am were in a very slow dissolving component with dissolution half-lives of over 10 years.

  16. Solution speciation of plutonium and Americium at an Australian legacy radioactive waste disposal site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda-Ohno, Atsushi; Harrison, Jennifer J; Thiruvoth, Sangeeth; Wilsher, Kerry; Wong, Henri K Y; Johansen, Mathew P; Waite, T David; Payne, Timothy E

    2014-09-01

    During the 1960s, radioactive waste containing small amounts of plutonium (Pu) and americium (Am) was disposed in shallow trenches at the Little Forest Burial Ground (LFBG), located near the southern suburbs of Sydney, Australia. Because of periodic saturation and overflowing of the former disposal trenches, Pu and Am have been transferred from the buried wastes into the surrounding surface soils. The presence of readily detected amounts of Pu and Am in the trench waters provides a unique opportunity to study their aqueous speciation under environmentally relevant conditions. This study aims to comprehensively investigate the chemical speciation of Pu and Am in the trench water by combining fluoride coprecipitation, solvent extraction, particle size fractionation, and thermochemical modeling. The predominant oxidation states of dissolved Pu and Am species were found to be Pu(IV) and Am(III), and large proportions of both actinides (Pu, 97.7%; Am, 86.8%) were associated with mobile colloids in the submicron size range. On the basis of this information, possible management options are assessed. PMID:25126837

  17. Comparative study of plutonium and americium bioaccumulation from two marine sediments contaminated in the natural environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, T.F.; Smith, J.D. (Melbourne Univ., Parkville (Australia). Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry); Fowler, S.W.; LaRosa, J.; Holm, E. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Monaco-Ville (Monaco). Lab. of Marine Radioactivity); Aarkrog, A.; Dahlgaard, H. (Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark))

    1991-01-01

    Plutonium and americium sediment-animal transfer was studied under controlled laboratory conditions by exposure of the benthic polychaete Nereis diversicolor (O. F. Mueller) to marine sediments contaminated by a nuclear bomb accident (near Thule, Greenland) and nuclear weapons testing (Enewetak Atoll). In both sediment regimes, the bioavailability of plutonium and {sup 241}Am was low, with specific activity in the tissues <1% (dry wt) than in the sediments. Over the first three months, a slight preference in transfer of plutonium over {sup 241}Am occurred and {sup 241}Am uptake from the Thule sediment was enhanced compared to that from lagoon sediments of Enewetak Atoll. Autoradiography studies indicated the presence of hot particles of plutonium in the sediments. The results highlight the importance of purging animals of their gut contents in order to obtain accurate estimates of transuranic transfer from ingested sediments into tissue. It is further suggested that enhanced transuranic uptake by some benthic species could arise from ingestion of highly activity particles and organic-rich detritus present in the sediments. (author).

  18. Rapid sonochemical preparation of shape-selective lead iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: SEM morphologies of various PbI2 products obtained with the iodine concentration of 6.7 g/L and irradiation time of 1 minute at the reaction temperatures of 35 °C (a), 25 °C (b), and 15 °C (c). Highlights: ► PbI2 with various morphologies were rapidly formed at room temperature. ► We could well control the morphologies of PbI2 by changing reaction conditions. ► The PbI2 films could better resist rolling in a liquid media. -- Abstract: Lead iodide (PbI2) films/crystals with various nano/micro morphologies (e.g., Nanoflake, block and microrod) were rapidly synthesized by taking advantage of a simple sonochemical method. The PbI2 crystals with uniform nanoflake structures could be fabricated directly on lead foils with the irradiation time as short as 36 s via interfacial reaction between lead foils and elemental iodine in ethanol at ambient temperature. It was found experimentally that the morphologies of the resulting thin films/crystals could be well controlled by the adjustment of several parameters including irradiation time, reaction solvents, iodine concentration, ultrasonic power, and reaction temperature. Most importantly, the resultant PbI2 films are stable enough to resist rolling under the drastic ultrasound irradiation in a liquid media. This method is believed to be the fastest way for in situ fabrication of morphology-controlled semiconductor films on various metal substrates for subsequent applications related to the other metal iodide or metal sulfide semiconductor films.

  19. Ambient synthesis and optoelectronic properties of copper iodide semiconductor nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: A simple chemical route to prepare crystalline γ-phase copper iodide semiconductor. Highlights: ► A new facile technique is developed to synthesize CuI semiconductor nanoparticles. ► As prepared material is highly crystalline γ-phase and visible fluorescent. ► It exhibits good electrical conductivity ∼10−4 (Ω cm)−1. ► Strong quantum confinement is observed, 22 nm size shows band gap shift of 1.7 eV. ► The γ-phase is thermodynamically more stable. -- Abstract: Electrically conducting copper iodide (CuI) nanoparticles have been synthesized at room temperature via a simple single step chemical route, using ethyl alcohol as a solvent. The resulting material was characterized by X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, optical absorption, photoluminescence, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy to assess the quality of these semiconductor nanoparticles. Thin film was deposited on copper substrate that was used to investigate temperature dependent electrical conductivity. These investigations confirm that the material is semiconductor having a negative temperature coefficient of resistivity. Thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction studies reveal that it is of low temperature γ phase. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements confirm the stoichiometry of as prepared material. The shift in optical absorption edge towards lower wavelength region (Eg ∼ 4.77 eV) as compared to its bulk absorption indicates that a decrease in particle size has a significant effect. Photoluminescence peak observed at 2.90 eV is unique to its material property. These optoelectronic properties of CuI will be helpful in the development of future electronic devices

  20. Evaluation of quaternary ammonium halides for removal of methyl iodide from flowing air streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quaternary ammonium halides of several tertiary amines were used as impregnants on activated carbon and were tested for methyl iodide penetration in accordance with test Method A, ASTM D3803, 1979, ''Standard Test Methods for Radio-iodine Testing of Nuclear Grade Gas Phase Adsorbents''. The results suggest that the primary removal mechanism for methyl iodide-131 is isotopic exchange with the quaternary ammonium halide. For example, a 5 wt% impregnation of each of the tetramethyl, tetraethyl, tetrapropyl and tetrabutyl ammonium iodides on activated carbon yielded percent penetrations of 0.47, 0.53, 0.78, and 0.08 respectively when tested according to Method A of ASTM D3803. A sample impregnated with 5% tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide gave a methyl iodide penetration of 64.87%, thus supporting the isotopic exchange mechanism for removal. It has been a generally held belief that the success of tertiary amines as impregnants for radioiodine removal is a result of their ability to complex with the methyl iodide. The results of the work indicates that the superiority of the tertiary amines similar to triethylene diamine and quinuclidine, when compared to their straight chain analogs, is a result of their ease in reacting with methyl iodide-127 to form the quaternary ammonium iodide followed by isotopic exchange

  1. In Vivo Evaluation of Transdermal Iodide Microemulsion for Treating Iodine Deficiency Using Sprague Dawley Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alayoubi, Alaadin; Sullivan, Ryan D; Lou, Hao; Patel, Hemlata; Mandrell, Timothy; Helms, Richard; Almoazen, Hassan

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the transdermal efficiency of iodide microemulsion in treating iodine deficiency using rats as an animal model. Animals were fed either iodine-deficient diet (20 μg/kg iodide) or control diet (200 μg/kg iodide) over a 17-month period. At month 14, iodide microemulsion was applied topically in iodine-deficient group and physiological evaluations of thyroid gland functions were characterized by monitoring the thyroid hormones (T3, T4), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), iodide ion excretion in urine, and the overall rat body weights in both groups. Moreover, morphological evaluations of thyroid gland before and after treatment were performed by ultrasound imaging and through histological assessment. Prior to microemulsion treatment, the levels of T3, T4, and TSH in iodine-deficient group were statistically significant as compared to that in the control group. The levels of T3 and T4 increased while TSH level decreased significantly in iodine-deficient group within the first 4 weeks of treatment. After treatment, iodide concentration in urine increased significantly. There was no statistical difference in weight between the two groups. Ultrasound imaging and histological evaluations showed evidence of hyperplasia in iodine-deficient group. Topical iodide microemulsion has shown a promising potential as a novel delivery system to treat iodine deficiency. PMID:26288943

  2. An Investigation of Diffusion of Iodide Ion in Compacted Bentonite Containing Ag2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the compacted bentonite containing Ag2O, the transport of iodide ion was investigated by Through-diffusion method. It is confirmed that Iodide ion is transported by diffusion process in the compacted bentonite containing Ag2O as well as in the compacted bentonite without Ag2O. However, the lag-time of iodide ion in the compacted bentonite containing Ag2O is larger than that in the compacted bentonite without Ag2O. The increase of the lag-time was observed in pure iodide ion solution and also in 0.1M NaCl-iodide ion solution. The apparent diffusion coefficient of iodide ion in the compacted bentonite containing Ag2O has lower value than that in the compacted bentonite without Ag2O. The effect of Ag2O on the effective diffusion coefficient was not clearly investigated in the compacted bentonite containing Ag2O while the values of effective diffusion coefficient of iodide ion in the compacted bentonite without Ag2O obtained in this study were similar to those in the compacted bentonite reported in the literature

  3. Spectrophotometric determination of trace quantities of iodide after separation from large quantities of bromide, chloride, or sulfate by solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iodide solutions were reacted with 2,4,6-triphenylpyrylium bisulfate to yield the triphenylpyrylium iodide which was extracted with chloroform and spectrophotometrically determined. The interference from perchlorate, bromide, chloride, and sulfate ions on the iodide determination was evaluated. An analytical procedure for the determination of iodide present as the iodate was developed using sodium sulfite to reduce the iodate to iodide. The use of this method for the determination of KI in commercial iodized salt gave results comparable to those obtained by the AOAC iodometric method. (U.S.)

  4. Effects of Excess Fluoride and Iodide on Thyroid Function and Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yaqiu; Guo, Xiujuan; Sun, Qiuyan; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping

    2016-04-01

    Exposure to high levels of iodide in Cangzhou, Shandong Province, China has been associated with increased incidence of thyroid disease; however, whether fluoride can affect the thyroid remains controversial. To investigate the effects of excess fluoride, we evaluated thyroid gland structure and function in rats exposed to fluoride and iodide, either alone or in combination. Five-week-old Wistar rats (n = 160 total) were randomly divided into eight groups: three groups that were given excess fluoride (15, 30, or 60 ppm F); one group given excess iodide (1200 μg/L I); three groups given excess iodide plus fluoride (1200 μg/L I plus 15, 30, or 60 ppm F); and one control group. The serum concentrations of the thyroid hormones TT3 and TT4 on day 150 were significantly reduced for certain fluoride groups; however, no significant differences were observed in concentrations for the pituitary hormone TSH among any groups. Hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed that iodide causes an increase in the areas of the colloid lumens and a decrease in the diameters of epithelial cells and nuclei; however, fluoride causes an increase in nuclear diameters. The damage to follicular epithelial cells upon fluoride or iodide treatment was easily observed by transmission electron microscopy, but the effects were most dramatic upon treatment with both fluoride and iodide. These results suggest that iodide causes the most damage but that fluoride can promote specific changes in the function and morphology of the thyroid, either alone or in combination with iodide. PMID:26319807

  5. Permeability of iodide in multilamellar liposomes modeled by two compartments and a reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schullery, S E

    1977-07-14

    A previously published rate law for the diffusion of iodide from multilamellar egg phosphatidylcholine liposomes (Schullery, S.E. (1975) Chem. Phys. Lipids 14, 49-58) is fitted to the relatively simple mathematical model of two compartments in series with a reservoir. All of the inner liposome compartments are assumed to behave as effectively one compartment in series with the liposome's outermost compartment. Based on this model, reasonable values are calculated for the fraction of the total solution trapped by liposomes which is in the outermost liposome compartment, 17%, and the permeability coefficient of iodide against isotonic, mixed iodide-chloride solution, 2-10(-9) cm/s. PMID:884087

  6. Thyroglobulin in smoking mothers and their newborns at delivery suggests autoregulation of placental iodide transport overcoming thiocyanate inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stine L; Backman Nøhr, Susanne; Wu, Chun S; Olsen, Jørn; Pedersen, Klaus M; Laurberg, Peter

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Placental transport of iodide is required for fetal thyroid hormone production. The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) mediates active iodide transport into the thyroid and the lactating mammary gland and is also present in placenta. NIS is competitively inhibited by thiocyanate from...... maternal smoking, but compensatory autoregulation of iodide transport differs between organs. The extent of autoregulation of placental iodide transport remains to be clarified. OBJECTIVE: To compare the impact of maternal smoking on thyroglobulin (Tg) levels in maternal serum at delivery and in cord serum......: Maternal smoking increased the degree of iodine deficiency in parallel in the mother and the fetus, as reflected by increased Tg levels. However, placental iodide transport seemed unaffected despite high thiocyanate levels, suggesting that thiocyanate-insensitive iodide transporters alternative to NIS are...

  7. Use of radioisotopes in the study of tetracycline analytical application. Extraction of compounds formed between tetracycline and neptunium and americium elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behavior of tetracycline as complexing agent, in solvent extraction studies of neptunium and americium, using benzyl alcohol as the organic phase, is presented. By using radioactive tracers of 239Np and 241Am the extraction percent of these elements were determined as a function of pH in the absence and in the presence of several masking agents. The influence of shaking time and the use of different types of supporting eletrolytes upon the extraction behavior was also studied. The extraction curves obtained using EDTA as masking agent show that tetracycline can be used for neptunium and americium separation. In this condition neptunium is extracted into the organic phase and americium remains in the aqueous phase. (Author)

  8. Sorption of plutonium and americium on repository, backfill and geological materials relevant to the JNFL low-level radioactive waste repository at Rokkasho-Mura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An integrated program of batch sorption experiments and mathematical modeling has been carried out to study the sorption of plutonium and americium on a series of repository, backfill and geological materials relevant to the JNFL low-level radioactive waste repository at Rokkasho-Mura. The sorption of plutonium and americium on samples of concrete, mortar, sand/bentonite, tuff, sandstone and cover soil has been investigated. In addition, specimens of bitumen, cation and anion exchange resins, and polyester were chemically degraded. The resulting degradation product solutions, alongside solutions of humic and isosaccharinic acids were used to study the effects on plutonium sorption onto concrete, sand/bentonite and sandstone. The sorption behavior of plutonium and americium has been modeled using the geochemical speciation program HARPHRQ in conjunction with the HATCHES database

  9. Removal efficiency of radioactive methyl iodide on TEDA-impregnated activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activated carbons were prepared by different series of carbon dioxide and steam activation from walnut shells for their optimal use as radioactive methyl iodide adsorbents in Nuclear Plants. The knowledge of the most favourable textural characteristics of the activated carbons was possible by the previous study of the commercial activated carbon currently used for this purpose. In order to increase their methyl iodide affinity, the effect of triethylenediamine impregnation was studied at 5 and 10 wt.%. The results obtained indicated that in both cases the adsorption efficiency is markedly improved by the addition of impregnant, which allows the adsorbate uptake to occur not only by physical adsorption, via non-specific interactions (as in non-impregnated carbons) but also by the specific interaction of triethylenediamine with radioactive methyl iodide. Methyl iodide retention efficiencies up to 98.1% were achieved. (author)

  10. Removal efficiency of radioactive methyl iodide on TEDA-impregnated activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, C.M.; Gonzalez, J.F.; Roman, S. [Extremadura Univ., Badajoz (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Aplicada

    2011-02-15

    Activated carbons were prepared by different series of carbon dioxide and steam activation from walnut shells for their optimal use as radioactive methyl iodide adsorbents in Nuclear Plants. The knowledge of the most favourable textural characteristics of the activated carbons was possible by the previous study of the commercial activated carbon currently used for this purpose. In order to increase their methyl iodide affinity, the effect of triethylenediamine impregnation was studied at 5 and 10 wt.%. The results obtained indicated that in both cases the adsorption efficiency is markedly improved by the addition of impregnant, which allows the adsorbate uptake to occur not only by physical adsorption, via non-specific interactions (as in non-impregnated carbons) but also by the specific interaction of triethylenediamine with radioactive methyl iodide. Methyl iodide retention efficiencies up to 98.1% were achieved. (author)

  11. Biosorption of Americium-242 by saccharomyces cerevisiae: preliminary evaluation and mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an important radioisotope in nuclear industry and other fields, americium-241 is one of the most serious contamination concerns duo to its high radiation toxicity and long half-life. In this experiment, the biosorption of 241Am from solution by a fungus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae), and the effects of various experimental conditions on the biosorption and the mechanism were explored. The preliminary results showed that S. cerevisiae is a very efficient biosorbent. An average of more than 99% of the total 241Am could be removed by S. cerevisiae of 2.1g/L (dry weight) from 241Am solutions of 2.22MBq/L -555 MBq/L (Co). The adsorption equilibrium was achieved within 1 hour and the optimum pH ranged 1-3. The culture times of more than 16 hours were suitable and the efficient adsorption of 241Am by the S. cerevisiae could be noted. The biosorption of 241Am by the decomposed cell wall, protoplasm or cell membrane of S. cerevisiae was same efficient as by the intact fungus, but the some components of S. cerevisiae, such as protein and acylation group had obvious effect on adsorption. When the concentrations of coexistent Eu3+, Nd3+ were 100 times more than that of 241Am, the adsorption rates would drop to 65%. However, most of the investigated acidic ions have no significant influence on the 241Am adsorption but minute change of pH value, while the saturated EDTA can strong inhibit the biosorption of 241Am.. (authors)

  12. Characterization of uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium in HLW supernate for LLW certification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1S Manual requires that High Level Waste (HLW) implement a waste certification program prior to sending waste packages to the E-Area vaults. To support the waste certification plan, the HLW supernate inventory of uranium, plutonium, neptunium and americium have been characterized. This characterization is based on the chemical, isotopic and radiological properties of these elements in HLW supernate. This report uses process knowledge, solubility data, isotopic inventory data and sample data to determine if any isotopes of the aforementioned elements will exceed the minimum reportable quantity (MRQ) for waste packages contaminated with HLW supernate. If the MRQ can be exceeded for a particular nuclide, then a method for estimating the waste package content is provided. Waste packages contaminated from HLW supernate do not contain sufficient U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242 or Am-241 to warrant separate reporting on the shipping manifest. Calculations show that, on average, more than 100 gallons of supernate is required to exceed the PAC (package acceptance criteria) for each of these nuclides. Thus it is highly unlikely that the PAC would be exceeded for these nuclides and unlikely that the MRQ would be exceeded. These nuclides should be manifested as zero for waste packages contaminated with HLW supernate. The only actinide isotopes that may exceed the MRQ are Np-237 and Pu-238. The recommended method to calculate the amount of these two isotopes in waste packages contaminated with HLW supernate is to ratio them to the measured Cs-137 activity

  13. Some elements for a revision of the americium reference biokinetic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interpretation of individual activity measurement after a contamination by 241Am or its parent nuclide 241Pu is based on the reference americium (Am) biokinetic model published by the International Commission on Radiological Protection in 1993 [International Commission on Radiological Protection. Age-dependent doses to members of the public from intake of radionuclides: Part 2 Ingestion dose coefficients. ICRP Publication 67. Ann. ICRP 23(3/4) (1993)]. The authors analysed the new data about Am biokinetics reported afterwards to propose an update of the current model. The most interesting results, from the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries post-mortem measurement database [Filipy, R. E. and Russel, J. J. The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries as sources for actinide dosimetry and bio-effects. Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 105(1-4), 185-187 (2003)] and the long-term follow-up of cases of inhalation intake [Malatova, I., Foltanova, S., Beckova, V., Filgas, R., Pospisilova, H. and Hoelgye, Z. Assessment of occupational doses from internal contamination with 241Am. Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 105(1-4), 325-328 (2003)], seemed to show that the current model underestimates the retention in the massive soft tissues and overestimates the retention in the skeleton and the late urinary excretion. However, a critical review of the data demonstrated that all were not equally reliable and suggested that only a slight revision of the model, possibly involving a change in the balance of activity between massive soft tissues, cortical and trabecular bone surfaces, may be required. (authors)

  14. The treatment of liquid radioactive waste containing Americium by using a cation exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A research in the treatment of a liquid radioactive waste containing americium has been done. The liquid radioactive waste used in this research was standard solution of U dan Ce with the initial activity of 100 ppm. The experimental investigation is aimed at a study of the effects of the waste pH, the column dimension of IR-120 cation exchanger which is expressed as L/D, the flow rate of a liquid waste and the influence of thiocyanate as a complex agent against the efficiency of a decontamination for uranium and cerium element. The experiment was done by passing downward the feed of uranium and cerium solution into an IR-120 type of cation exchanger with the L/D of 11.37. From the experimental parameters done in this research where the influence of waste pH was varied from 3 - 8, the geometric column (L/D) 11.37, the liquid flow rate was from 2.5 - 10 ml/m and the thiocyanate concentration was between 100 ppm-500 ppm can be concluded that the optimum operational condition for the ion exchange achieved were the waste pH for uranium = 4 and the waste pH for cerium = 6, the flow rate = 2.5 ml/men. From the given maximum value of DF for uranium = 24 (DE = 95.83%) and of DF for cerium = 40 (DE = 97.5%), it can also be concluded that this investigation is to be continued in order that the greater value of DF/DE can be achieved

  15. A study of plutonium and americium concentrations in seaspray on the southern Scottish coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seaspray and seawater have been collected from the southern Scottish coast and, for comparison, Cumbria in northwest England during 1989 and 1991. The occurrence of sea-to-land transfer of the actinides plutonium and americium in seaspray was observed on these coasts using muslin screens (a semi-quantitative technique most efficient for collecting large spray droplets) and high volume conventional air samplers. The actinides and fine particulate in the spray were present in relatively higher concentrations than measured in the adjacent seawater, i.e. the spray was enriched in particulate actinides. The net efficiency of the muslim screens in collecting airborne plutonium isotopes and 241Am generally appeared to be about 20%. A review of earlier published concentrations of 239+240Pu and 241Am measured in aerosol and deposition for over a year several tens of metres inland was carried out. This suggested that airborne activities are up to a factor of 5 times higher in Cumbria than southern Scotland. However, neither the new data collected in 1989 and 1991 nor this older data suggests any enhancement of seaspray actinide enrichment in southern Scotland compared to Cumbria. This finding contrasts with earlier, more limited, comparisons that have been carried out which suggested such a difference. There is clear evidence of considerable localised spatial and temporal variability in aerosol actinide enrichment over the beaches in both areas. Enrichments varies between 20 and 500 relative to the adjacent surf zone waters. However, the average enrichment in spray based on the continuous measurements made further inland is likely to be at the lower end of this range. (author)

  16. Reduction of. systematic error of In-vivo measurement of americium 241 activity in the skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excretion analysis and in vivo measuring methods are used for estimation of internal contamination by 241Am. In vivo measurements of the lung are suitable in short time after time of intake when the way of the intake is inhalation. In vivo measurements of the activity in the liver or in the skeleton could be performed at a later time. Detection of radionuclide activity in the liver is quite difficult because it is necessary to distinguish liver activity from the activity of surrounding tissues i.e. lung and skeleton. The skull or knees are the most suitable., for activity assessment in the skeleton. The skull is the most appropriate for measurements because it represents about 15% of total skeleton mass and contributions to measured activity of surrounding tissues are small. Americium activity in the skull could be measured with different instrumentation and in various geometries. Setting of two semiconductors detectors placed 3 cm over temporal region of the skull is used in NRPI. Calibration of the system was done by several head phantoms, in this process was observed that detection efficiencies depend on size of the phantoms. The aim of the paper is to express character of the efficiency as function of the size of skull in order to obtain more accurate value of the activity and decrees its uncertainty. Simulations of head by simplified geometric shapes, i.e. spheres and rotary ellipsoids, is in coherence with phantoms of big size (UCIN, BPAM-0001), but for small phantoms occurred quite serious discrepancy. Activity of real cases determined by calibration with phantom BPAM-0001 (reference phantom) is reduced from 9 to 44 %, when eq. 2 is used and relative uncertainty is reduced from 32% to maximum 12%. (authors)

  17. Transport of plutonium, americium, and curium from soils into plants by roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For assessing the dose from radionuclides in agricultural products by ingestion it is necessary to know the soil to plant transfer factors. The literature was entirely investigated, in order to judge the size of the soil to plant transfer factors. In total, 92 publications - from 1948 to 1978 -have been evaluated. As result, transfer factors from 10-9 to 10-3 have been found for Plutonium, and from 10-6 to 1 for Americium. For Curium only few data are available in literature. The considerable variation of the measured transfer factors is based on the dependence of these transfer factors from the ion exchange capacity of soils, from the amount of organic materials, from the pH-value, and from the mode of contamination. There are, in any case, contradictory data, although there has been detected a dependence of the transfer factors from these parameters. Chelating agenst increase the transfer factors to approximately 1300. As well, fertilizers have an influence on the size of the transfer factors - however, the relationships have been scarcely investigated. The distribution of actinides within the individual parts of plants has been investigated. The highest concentrations are in the roots; in the plant parts above ground the concentration of actinides decreases considerably. The most inferior transfer factors were measured for the respective seed or fruits. The soil to plant transfer factors of actinides are more dependend on the age of the plants within one growing period. At the beginning of the period, the transfer factor is considerably higher than at the end of this period. With respect to plants with a growing period of several years, correlations are unknown. (orig.)

  18. Production of 131-I iodide capsules in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that 131I iodide capsules are better suited to be taken by the patient than the corresponding solution. Therefore most Pharmacopeias have monographs for 131I in both pharmaceutical forms: solution or capsules, for diagnosis but principally for therapeutic purposes. In Argentina this radiopharmaceutical has been made commercially available in November 2007. At this time Bacon Laboratories SAIC started its production, authorized by the Health and Nuclear Regulatory Authorities. 131I, in the pharmaceutical form of capsules, have evident advantages in radioprotection for the patients and the personnel involved in its administration. The intake of a 131I provokes frequently that the external part of the mouth (principally if there is a beard and/or a moustache) undergoes an external contamination. This problem is enhanced if the patient has some motor difficulties to take the glass with the solution. In this case he will need assistance from the medical or technical staff, who will receive a much greater radiation dose than in normal cases. In the capsule of 131I iodide, the solution is adsorbed on a sodium phosphate matrix. The capsule is in a plastic tube contained in an appropriate lead shielding. To take the capsule, the patient inclines the open lead shielding containing the capsule in the direction of the mouth. Once the capsule is in the mouth it is swallowed with a little portion of water. After its intake, the radiopharmaceutical is absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract. If a patient is unable to carry out the intake, the assistance by medical or technical staff is easy with practically no radiation harm, since the 131I is shielded by an adequate lead thickness. It is evident that the hands and external face of the patient are also protected since no possibility of contamination exists. The aim of this work is to present the production procedure, the packaging of the capsules and the decrease of the dose received by the involved personnel

  19. Recovery of iodide ions from geothermal water with silica with grafted alkylammonium groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of a number of factors (time of contact and mass ratio of phases, acidity and temperature of the medium, concentrations of macro components of geothermal water) on the sorption recovery of iodide ions with 3-(octadecyldimethylammonium)propylsilica and 3-(trimethylammonium)propylsilica from aqueous solutions was studied. Sorption isotherms were discussed. The possibility of using 3-(octadecyldimethylammonium)-propylsilica for recovery of iodide ions from highly mineralized geothermal water was analyzed

  20. Activity coefficients of ferrocenium iodide in aqueous-organic salt solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Values of electrode potentials were obtained by the method of potentiometric titration at 298.2 K, the standard values of emf and unified activity coefficients of ferrocenium iodide in water-acetone and water-ethanol solvents of different salt composition being calculated. It is shown that interaction of ferrocenium (Fc+) with iodide can occur with formation of two forms of complexes, i.e. [Fc+I-] and [Fc+I2]-

  1. Regioselective conversion of primary alcohols into iodides in unprotected methyl furanosides and pyranosides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaanderup, Philip Robert; Poulsen, Carina Storm; Hyldtoft, Lene; Jørgensen, Malene R.; Madsen, Robert

    Two methods are described for the regioselective displacement of the primary hydroxy group in methyl glycosides with iodide. The first method is a modification of a literature procedure employing triphenylphosphine and iodine, where purification has been carried out on a reverse phase column in...... and substitution with iodide can be carried out in a one-pot process. Protection of the iodoglycosides is also described either by benzylation with benzyl trichloroacetimidate or silylation with triethylsilyl chloride....

  2. Optimization of mercuric iodide platelets growth by the polymer controlled vapor transport method

    OpenAIRE

    Fornaro L.; Mussio L.; Köncke M.; Luchini L.; Saucedo E.; Rivoir A.; Quagliata E.

    1999-01-01

    Mercuric iodide crystals in their platelet habit were grown by the polymer controlled vapor transport method. Mercuric iodide 99% in purity was sublimated at temperatures about 122 - 126 °C and vacuum conditions (10-5 mmHg), after selecting an appropriate polymer. Temperature profiles and experimental heat transfer models were determined for two growth furnaces using different insulator configurations for the cold extreme (air, ceramic wool, grilon, copper and ceramic wool). Growth conditions...

  3. Extending the C-V method of establishing MIS detector quality to mercuric iodide radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been observed that mercuric iodide capacitance measurements provide good indication about the quality of the crystal and its suitability as a room temperature radiation detector. Such capacitance / voltage measurements show a peak at low frequency. The sharpness of the peak is proportional to the quality of the crystal, and the peak is very similar to metal insulator semiconductor (MIS) capacitance curves. The paper proposes a model for the mercuric iodide capacitance. (author)

  4. Inert matrices, uranium-free plutonium fuels and americium targets. Synthesis of CAPRA, SPIN and EFTTRA studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A first selection of inert-matrix materials, actinide support alone (Pu and Am based), and compound materials, U free plutonium burning fuels and heterogeneous americium targets are discussed. Basic properties, fabrication, and reprocessing studies, European in-pile and out-of-pile tests, performed recently in the framework of CAPRA, SPIN and EFTTRA programs, are reviewed here. Taking into account these studies and on the bases of the different requirements to be met in each of the fuels and targets, a number of materials have been selected as 'promising candidates'. Trends for further research on these materials are established. (author)

  5. Final Report on the Demonstration of Disposal of Americium and Curium Legacy Material Through the High Level Waste System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides the results of experimental demonstrations related to processing of a legacy solution containing americium and curium through the High Level Waste (HLW) system. The testing included eight experiments covering the baseline, mitigation, and enhanced nitrate processing studies. In general, each experiment studied the mixtures generated over a period of time to emulate the lifecycle of actual sludge in the High Level Waste system. While the data in previous reports remain valid, this report supercedes all the previous reports and provides a collective overview of the work

  6. Effect of a long-term release of plutonium and americium into an estuarine and coastal sea ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the general problem of speciation of plutonium and americium in aquatic ecosystems and the implications relative to their fate in those systems. The following conclusions were reached: several oxidation states of plutonium coexist in the natural environment; the effect of environmental changes such as pH and Esub(h) values and complexes are probably the cause of these various oxidation states; a clearer definition of the 'concentration factor' should be given in view of the important role the sediments play in supplying plutonium for transfer through the food web. (author)

  7. Microstructure and elemental distribution of americium-containing MOX fuel under the short-term irradiation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate the effect of americium addition to MOX fuels on the irradiation behavior, the 'Am-1' program is being conducted in JAEA. The Am-1 program consists of two short-term irradiation tests of 10-minute and 24-hour irradiations and a steady-state irradiation test. The short-term irradiation tests were successfully completed and the post irradiation examinations (PIEs) are in progress. The PIEs for Am-containing MOX fuels focused on the microstructural evolution and redistribution behavior of Am at the initial stage of irradiation and the results to date are reported. (author)

  8. The effect of elemental and hydrocarbon impurities on mercuric iodide gamma ray detector performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Eilene S.; Buffleben, George; Soria, Ed; James, Ralph; Schieber, Michael; Natarajan, Raj; Gerrish, Vern

    Mercuric iodide is a room temperature semiconductor material that is used for gamma ray and x-ray radiation detection. Mercuric iodide is synthesized from mercuric chloride and potassium iodide and is then purified by a series of melts and sublimation steps and by zone refining. The mercuric iodide is grown into crystals and platelets and then fabricated into detectors. Elemental contamination may be a determining factor in the performance of these detectors. These contaminates may be present in the starting material or may be introduced during, or be unaffected by, the purification, growth or fabrication steps. Methods have been developed for the analysis of trace levels of elemental contamination. Inductively Coupled Plasma/Mass Spectroscopy (ICP/MS), Inductively Coupled Plasma/Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP/OES) and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy (GC/MS) are used to determine sub ppm levels of many trace elemental impurities. Trace levels of many elemental impurities in the raw mercuric iodide are significantly reduced during the purification and zone refining processes. Though the levels of impurities are reduced, poor performing mercuric iodide detectors have contamination levels remaining or reintroduced which are higher for Ag, Al, Ca, Cu, Mg, Mn, Na, Pb and Zn than detectors with good gamma ray response. This paper will discuss the analytical methodology, the effects of purification on impurity levels, and the correlation between detector performance and impurity levels.

  9. Critical Evaluation of Acetylthiocholine Iodide and Acetylthiocholine Chloride as Substrates for Amperometric Biosensors Based on Acetylcholinesterase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel-Lucian Radu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous amperometric biosensors have been developed for the fast analysis of neurotoxic insecticides based on inhibition of cholinesterase (AChE. The analytical signal is quantified by the oxidation of the thiocholine that is produced enzymatically by the hydrolysis of the acetylthiocholine pseudosubstrate. The pseudosubstrate is a cation and it is associated with chloride or iodide as corresponding anion to form a salt. The iodide salt is cheaper, but it is electrochemically active and consequently more difficult to use in electrochemical analytical devices. We investigate the possibility of using acetylthiocholine iodide as pseudosubstrate for amperometric detection. Our investigation demonstrates that operational conditions for any amperometric biosensor that use acetylthiocholine iodide must be thoroughly optimized to avoid false analytical signals or a reduced sensitivity. The working overpotential determined for different screen-printed electrodes was: carbon-nanotubes (360 mV, platinum (560 mV, gold (370 mV, based on a catalytic effect of iodide or cobalt phthalocyanine (110 mV, but with a significant reduced sensitivity in the presence of iodide anions.

  10. Mechanistic aspects of ingested chlorine dioxide on thyroid function: impact of oxidants on iodide metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toxicological studies dealing with recent findings of health effects of drinking water disinfectants are reviewed. Experiments with monkeys and rodents indicate that the biological activity of ingested disinfectants is expressed via their chemical interaction with the mucosal epithelia, secretory products, and nutritional contents of the alimentary tract. Evidence exists that a principal partner of this redox interaction is the iodide of nutritional origin that is ubiquitous in the gastrointestinal tract. Thus the observation that subchronic exposure to chlorine dioxide (ClO2) in drinking water decreases serum thyroxine levels in mammalian species can be best explained with changes produced in the chemical form of the bioavailable iodide. Ongoing and previously reported mechanistic studies indicate that oxidizing agents such as chlorine-based disinfectants oxidize the basal iodide content of the gastrointestinal tract. The resulting reactive iodine species readily attaches to organic matter by covalent bonding. Evidence suggests that the extent to which such iodinated organics are formed is proportional to the magnitude of the electromotive force and stoichiometry of the redox couple between iodide and the disinfectant. Because the extent of thyroid uptake of the bioavailable iodide does not decrease during ClO2 ingestion, it seems that ClO2 does not cause iodide deficiency of sufficient magnitude to account for the decease in hormonogenesis. Absorption of one or more of iodinated molecules, e.g., nutrient, hormones, or cellular constituents of the alimentary tract having thyromimetic or thyroid inhibitory properties, is a better hypothesis for the effects seen

  11. Novel Si-tripodand functionalized ionic liquids as iodide sources for dye-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel ionic liquids with iodide anions and functionalized with silicon tripodand centers have been synthesized and tested as iodide sources for dye sensitized solar cells, 1-methyl-3-(3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl)imidazolium iodide 3a, 1-methyl-3-(3-(tris(2-methoxyethoxy)silyl)propyl)imidazolium iodide 3b, and 1-methyl-3-(3-(tris(2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethoxy)silyl)propyl)imidazolium iodide 3c. The compounds have been proved to be thermally and electrochemically stable, as evidenced by thermogravimetry and linear sweep voltammetry on platinum. Specific conductivities at 25 °C of pure ionic liquids are of the order of 10−4 S cm−1 and show little dependence on the length of oxaethylene chains. Conductivities rise to nearly 10−2 S cm−1 for the electrolytes prepared on their bases as a result of viscosity decrease. Model dye-sensitized solar cells show appreciable conversion efficiencies, reaching a maximum value of 5.08% for the electrolyte with 3b as iodide source. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements revealed high resistance associated with electron recombination on the interface of TiO2/dye/electrolyte and important contribution of electrolyte diffusion

  12. The effect of elemental and hydrocarbon impurities on mercuric iodide gamma ray detector performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercuric iodide is a room temperature semiconductor material that is used for gamma ray and x-ray radiation detection. Mercuric iodide is synthesized from mercuric chloride and potassium iodide and is then purified by a series of melts and sublimation steps and by zone refining. The mercuric iodide is grown into crystals and platelets and then fabricated into detectors. Elemental contamination may be a determining factor in the performance of these detectors. These contaminates may be present in the starting material or may be introduced during, or be unaffected by, the purification, growth or fabrication steps. Methods have been developed for the analysis of trace levels of elemental contamination. Inductively coupled plasma/mass spectroscopy (ICP/MS), inductively coupled plasma/optical emission spectroscopy (ICP/OES) and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) are used to determine sub ppm levels of many trace elemental impurities. Trace levels of many elemental impurities in the raw mercuric iodide are significantly reduced during the purification and zone refining processes. Though the levels of impurities are reduced, poor performing mercuric iodide detectors have contamination levels remaining or reintroduced which are higher for Ag, Al, Ca, Cu, Mg, Mn, Na, Pb and Zn than detectors with good gamma ray response. This paper discusses the analytical methodology, the effects of purification on impurity levels, and the correlation between detector performance and impurity levels. (orig.)

  13. Modelling iodide – iodate speciation in atmospheric aerosol: Contributions of inorganic and organic iodine chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pechtl

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The speciation of iodine in atmospheric aerosol is currently poorly understood. Models predict negligible iodide concentrations but accumulation of iodate in aerosol, both of which is not confirmed by recent measurements. We present an updated aqueous phase iodine chemistry scheme for use in atmospheric chemistry models and discuss sensitivity studies with the marine boundary layer model MISTRA. These studies show that iodate can be reduced in acidic aerosol by inorganic reactions, i.e., iodate does not necessarily accumulate in particles. Furthermore, the transformation of particulate iodide to volatile iodine species likely has been overestimated in previous model studies due to negligence of collision-induced upper limits for the reaction rates. However, inorganic reaction cycles still do not seem to be sufficient to reproduce the observed range of iodide – iodate speciation in atmospheric aerosol. Therefore, we also investigate the effects of the recently suggested reaction of HOI with dissolved organic matter to produce iodide. If this reaction is fast enough to compete with the inorganic mechanism, it would not only directly lead to enhanced iodide concentrations but, indirectly via speed-up of the inorganic iodate reduction cycles, also to a decrease in iodate concentrations. Hence, according to our model studies, organic iodine chemistry, combined with inorganic reaction cycles, is able to reproduce observations. The presented chemistry cycles are highly dependent on pH and thus offer an explanation for the large observed variability of the iodide – iodate speciation in atmospheric aerosol.

  14. Experimental study of retinoic acid on improving iodide uptake in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Hong-Liang; WU Jing-Chuan; DU Xue-Liang; LI Jia-Ning; WU Zhen; ZOU Ren-Jian

    2005-01-01

    The study aims to investigate the effect of retinoic acid on the iodide uptake of MCF-7 cells and its mechanism. The iodide uptake and expression of hNIS(human sodium/iodide symporter)mRNA in the breast cancer MCF-7 cells were compared individually before and after the intervention of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) with the iodide uptake assay and RT-PCR. The following results are obtained: (1) when treated with all-trans retinoic acid in the concentration of 1.0 μmol/L, the capacity of iodide uptake of MCF-7 cells reached about 1.5 times of the basal state; (2) 12 h after the intervention of 1.0 μmol/L ATRA, the hNISmRNA expression of the MCF-7 cells reached maximum. The study shows that all-trans retinoic acid has the effect to improve the iodide uptake of the MCF-7 cells and this effect may result from its up-regulation of the hNISmRNA expression.

  15. Development of a methodology for the determination of americium and thorium by ICP-AES and their inter-element effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the scarcity of good quality uranium resources, the growth of nuclear technology in India is dependent on the utilization of the vast thorium resources. Therefore, Advance Heavy Water Reactor is going to acquire significant role in the scenario of Indian nuclear technology, where (Th, Pu)O2 will be utilized as fuel in the outermost ring of the reactor core. This will lead to a complex matrix containing thorium as well as americium, which is formed due to β-decay of plutonium. The amount of americium is dependent on the burn up and the storage time of the Pu based fuels. In the present case, attempt was made to develop a method for the determination of americium as well as thorium by ICP-AES. Two emission lines of americium were identified and calibration curves were established for determination of americium. Though the detection limit of 283.236 nm line (5 ng mL-1) of americium was found to be better than that of 408.930 nm (11 ng mL-1), the former line is significantly interfered by large amount of thorium. Three analytical lines (i.e. 283.242, 283.730 and 401.913 nm) of thorium were identified and calibration curves were established along with their detection limits. It was observed that 283.242 and 401.913 nm line are having similar detection limits (18 and 13 ng mL-1, respectively) which are better than that of 283.730 nm (60 ng mL-1). This can be attributed to the high background of 283.273 nm channel of thorium. The spectral interference study revealed that even small amount of americium has significant contribution on 283.242 nm channel of thorium while the other two channels remain practically unaffected. Considering both these facts, spectral interference and analytical performance (detection limits and sensitivity), it was concluded that 401.913 nm line is the best analytical line out of the three lines for determination of thorium in presence of americium. (author)

  16. Polarization Effects in Methylammonium Lead Iodide Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labram, John; Fabini, Douglas; Perry, Erin; Lehner, Anna; Wang, Hengbin; Glaudell, Anne; Wu, Guang; Evans, Hayden; Buck, David; Cotta, Robert; Echegoyen, Luis; Wudl, Fred; Seshadri, Ram; Chabinyc, Michael

    The immense success of group IV and III-V semiconductors has resulted in disruptive new photovoltaic (PV) cell technologies emerging extremely infrequently. For this reason, the recent progress in Methylammonium Lead Iodide (MAPbI3) solar cells can be viewed as a highly significant historic event. Despite the staggering recent progress made in reported power conversion efficiency (PCE), debate remains intense on the nature of the various instabilities synonymous with these devices. Using various electronic device measurements, we here present a body of experimental evidence consistent with the existence of a mobile ionic species within the MAPbI3 perovskite. Temperature-dependent transistor measurements reveal operating FET devices only below approximately 210K. This is attributed to ionic screening of the (otherwise charge-neutral) semiconductor-dielectric interface. Temperature-dependent pulsed-gate and impedance spectroscopy experiments also reveal behavior consistent with this interpretation. MAPbI3 PV cells were found to possess a PCE which decreases significantly below 210K. Combined, these set of measurements provide an interesting and consistent description of the internal processes at play within the MAPbI3 perovskite structure.

  17. Thermopower and activation energy of silver iodide based superionic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver iodide based glasses, 60Agl-20Ag sub 2 O-20B sub 2O sub 3, 6 Agl-20Ag sub 2 O-20 MoO sub 3 and 60Agl-20Ag sub 2O-20WO sub 3, all in the mol % ratio, were prepared by rapidly quenching the melts of the chemicals in a stainless steel container; kept in a liquid nitrogen bath. The glassy nature of the as-quenched materials was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The electrical conductivity of the glasses was measured at various temperatures ranging from 30 to 70 degree C using an impedance bridge operating in the frequency range between 40 Hz to 100 kHz. The plot of In σT versus 1000/T for each glassy material obeys Arrhenius law and the activation energy obtained is between 0.2 to 0.3 eV. Thermopower measurement was also carried out in the same temperature range as the conductivity measurement to obtain the heat of transport

  18. Chloride, bromide and iodide scintillators with europium doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravleva, Mariya; Yang, Kan

    2014-08-26

    A halide scintillator material is disclosed where the halide may comprise chloride, bromide or iodide. The material is single-crystalline and has a composition of the general formula ABX.sub.3 where A is an alkali, B is an alkali earth and X is a halide which general composition was investigated. In particular, crystals of the formula ACa.sub.1-yEu.sub.yI.sub.3 where A=K, Rb and Cs were formed as well as crystals of the formula CsA.sub.1-yEu.sub.yX.sub.3 (where A=Ca, Sr, Ba, or a combination thereof and X=Cl, Br or I or a combination thereof) with divalent Europium doping where 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, and more particularly Eu doping has been studied at one to ten mol %. The disclosed scintillator materials are suitable for making scintillation detectors used in applications such as medical imaging and homeland security.

  19. Preparation and evaluation of mercuric iodide for crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, N. L.; Ortale, C.; Schieber, M. M.; van den Berg, L.

    1989-11-01

    Large quantities (on the order of several hundred kilograms) of consistent, high-quality mercuric iodide (HgI2) for crystal growth have not been commercially available. The hydrocarbon, anion and cation impurity levels varied considerably, occasionally preventing crystal growth. This occurred even though the starting material was from the same vendor and was subjected to the same purification treatment. This paper will describe an aqueous precipitation process of HgI2 preparation in batches of 3 kg using Hg(NO3)2, or HgCl2 and KI. Since these salts are produced in much larger quantities than HgI2, more consistent quality is available. The impurity content of these batches and single crystals grown from them have been evaluated. These results and those from several commercially available starting materials and their grown single crystals are compared. Some of the single crystals grown using the in-house prepared HgI2 have yielded a large number of spectroscopy-grade nuclear detectors. The influence of the major impurities will be discussed.

  20. Correlation between mercuric iodide detector performance and crystalline perfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray, neutron and gamma ray diffraction rocking curves; X-ray topography; microhardness; and optical microscopic measurements have been performed directly on several mercuric iodide (HgI2) nuclear radiation detectors fabricated from single crystals grown from the vapor phase. Two types of detectors were measured: Spectrometer types (grades A and B), which had resolutions of 5-10% for the 662 keV photopeak of 137Cs, or radiation counters (grades C and D), where the spectral resolution ranged from 11% to no resolution. A good correlation has been found between the detector grade and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of both the X- and gamma ray rocking curves (i.e., the higher the detector grade (A or B), the narrower the FWHM of the diffraction peak). X-ray topography also correlated with well both the FWHM of the diffraction X-ray rocking curve and the detector grade. The uniformity of the microhardness of the HgI2 detectors was found to be proportional to the nuclear performance of the detector. The better spectrometer-grade detectors were softer and much more uniform in microhardness than the most inferior detectors. The better detectors were also found to have much smoother surfaces than the poorer detectors, as observed by optical microscopy studies. (orig.)

  1. Correlation between mercuric iodide detector performance and crystalline perfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieber, M.; Ortale, C.; van den Berg, L.; Schnepple, W.; Keller, L.; Wagner, C. N. J.; Yelon, W.; Ross, F.; Georgeson, G.; Milstein, F.

    1989-11-01

    X-ray, neutron and gamma ray diffraction rocking curves; X-ray topography; microhardness; and optical microscopic measurements have been performed directly on several mercuric iodide (Hgl2) nuclear radiation detectors fabricated from single crystals grown from the vapor phase. Two types of detectors were measured: spectrometer types (grades A and B), which had resolutions of 5-10% for the 662 keV photopeak of 137Cs, or radiation counters (grades C and D), where the spectral resolution ranged from 11% to no resolution. A good correlation has been found between the detector grade and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of both the X- and gamma ray rocking curves (i.e., the higher the detector grade (A or B), the narrower the FWHM of the diffraction peak). X-ray topography also correlated with well both the FWHM of the diffraction X-ray rocking curve and the detector grade. The uniformity of the microhardness of the HgI2 detectors was found to be proportional to the nuclear performance of the detector. The better spectrometer-grade detectors were softer and much more uniform in microhardness than the most inferior detectors. The better detectors were also found to have much smoother surfaces than the poorer detectors, as observed by optical microscopy studies.

  2. Correlation between mercuric iodide detector performance and crystalline perfection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieber, M.; Ortale, C.; Van den Berg, L.; Schnepple, W. (EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Goleta, CA (USA). Santa Barbara Operations); Keller, L.; Wagner, C.N.J. (California Univ., Los Angeles (USA). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Yelon, W.; Ross, F. (Missouri Univ., Columbia (USA). Research Reactor Facility); Georgeson, G.; Milstein, F. (California Univ., Santa Barbara (USA). Dept. of Mechanical and Environmental Engineering)

    1989-11-01

    X-ray, neutron and gamma ray diffraction rocking curves; X-ray topography; microhardness; and optical microscopic measurements have been performed directly on several mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) nuclear radiation detectors fabricated from single crystals grown from the vapor phase. Two types of detectors were measured: Spectrometer types (grades A and B), which had resolutions of 5-10% for the 662 keV photopeak of {sup 137}Cs, or radiation counters (grades C and D), where the spectral resolution ranged from 11% to no resolution. A good correlation has been found between the detector grade and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of both the X- and gamma ray rocking curves (i.e., the higher the detector grade (A or B), the narrower the FWHM of the diffraction peak). X-ray topography also correlated with well both the FWHM of the diffraction X-ray rocking curve and the detector grade. The uniformity of the microhardness of the HgI{sub 2} detectors was found to be proportional to the nuclear performance of the detector. The better spectrometer-grade detectors were softer and much more uniform in microhardness than the most inferior detectors. The better detectors were also found to have much smoother surfaces than the poorer detectors, as observed by optical microscopy studies. (orig.).

  3. Lead iodide perovskite light-emitting field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Xin Yu; Cortecchia, Daniele; Yin, Jun; Bruno, Annalisa; Soci, Cesare

    2015-06-01

    Despite the widespread use of solution-processable hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites in photovoltaic and light-emitting applications, determination of their intrinsic charge transport parameters has been elusive due to the variability of film preparation and history-dependent device performance. Here we show that screening effects associated to ionic transport can be effectively eliminated by lowering the operating temperature of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) field-effect transistors. Field-effect carrier mobility is found to increase by almost two orders of magnitude below 200 K, consistent with phonon scattering-limited transport. Under balanced ambipolar carrier injection, gate-dependent electroluminescence is also observed from the transistor channel, with spectra revealing the tetragonal to orthorhombic phase transition. This demonstration of CH3NH3PbI3 light-emitting field-effect transistors provides intrinsic transport parameters to guide materials and solar cell optimization, and will drive the development of new electro-optic device concepts, such as gated light-emitting diodes and lasers operating at room temperature.

  4. Digermylene Oxide Stabilized Group 11 Metal Iodide Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Dhirendra; Siwatch, Rahul Kumar; Sinhababu, Soumen; Karwasara, Surendar; Singh, Dharmendra; Rajaraman, Gopalan; Nagendran, Selvarajan

    2015-12-01

    Use of a substituted digermylene oxide as a ligand has been demonstrated through the isolation of a series of group 11 metal(I) iodide complexes. Accordingly, the reactions of digermylene oxide [{(i-Bu)2ATIGe}2O] (ATI = aminotroponiminate) (1) with CuI under different conditions afforded [({(i-Bu)2ATIGe}2O)2(Cu4I4)] (2) with a Cu4I4 octahedral core, [({(i-Bu)2ATIGe}2O)2(Cu3I3)] (3) with a Cu3I3 core, and [{(i-Bu)2ATIGe}2O(Cu2I2)(C5H5N)2] (4) with a butterfly-type Cu2I2 core. The reactions of compound 1 with AgI and AuI produced [({(i-Bu)2ATIGe}2O)2(Ag4I4)] (5) with a Ag4I4 octahedral core and [{(i-Bu)2ATIGe}2O(Au2I2)] (6) with a Au2I2 core, respectively. The presence of metallophilic interactions in these compounds is shown through the single-crystal X-ray diffraction and atom-in-molecule (AIM) studies. Preliminary photophysical studies on compound 6 are also carried out. PMID:26558406

  5. Persistent photovoltage in methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Baumann

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We herein perform open circuit voltage decay (OCVD measurements on methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cells to increase the understanding of the charge carrier recombination dynamics in this emerging technology. Optically pulsed OCVD measurements are conducted on CH3NH3PbI3 solar cells and compared to results from another type of thin-film photovoltaics, namely, the two reference polymer–fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cell devices based on P3HT:PC60BM and PTB7:PC70BM blends. We observe two very different time domains of the voltage transient in the perovskite solar cell with a first drop on a short time scale that is similar to the decay in the studied organic solar cells. However, 65%–70% of the maximum photovoltage persists on much longer timescales in the perovskite solar cell than in the organic devices. In addition, we find that the recombination dynamics in all time regimes are dependent on the starting illumination intensity, which is also not observed in the organic devices. We then discuss the potential origins of these unique behaviors.

  6. Effect of radiolysis on leachability of plutonium and americium from 76-101 glass. [Glass containing 2 mole % plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, K.L.; Fried, S.; Friedman, A.M.; Susak, N.; Rickert, P.; Sullivan, J.C.; Karim, D.P.; Lam, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    One aspect of the leachability of actinide-bearing glass which has not been adequately addressed is the effect of radiolysis of the system (glass-water) on the amount of actinides liberated from the glass. In the present study, we have investigated the leaching of plutonium and americium from 76-101 glass samples (containing 2 mole % plutonium) in the presence of a one megaRad/hour gamma-radiation field. The presence of the radiation field was found to increase the leaching rate of both plutonium and americium by a factor of five. Speciation studies of the plutonium in the leachate indicate that the plutonium is present predominantly in the higher oxidation states, Pu(V) and Pu(VI) and that it is significantly associated with colloidal particles. Examination of the glass surfaces with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, XPS, both before and after leaching was carried out; these studies showed lower surface concentrations of plutonium in the samples of glass leached in the radiation field. 1 figure, 3 tables.

  7. Osteosarcoma induction by plutonium-239, americium-241 and neptunium-237 : the problem of deriving risk estimates for man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spontaneous bone cancer (osteosarcoma) represents only about 0.3% of all human cancers, but is well known to be inducible in humans by internal contamination with radium-226 and radium-224. plutonium-239, americium-241 and neptunium-237 form, or will form, the principal long-lived alpha particle emitting components of high activity waste and burnt-up nuclear fuel elements. These three nuclides deposit extensively in human bone and although, fortunately, no case of a human osteosarcoma induced by any of these nuclides is known, evidence from animal studies suggests that all three are more effective than radium-226 in inducing osteosarcoma. The assumption that the ratio of the risk factors, the number of osteosarcoma expected per 10000 person/animal Gy, for radium-226 and any other bone-seeking alpha-emitter will be independent of animal species has formed the basis of all the important studies of the radiotoxicity of actinide nuclides in experimental animals. The aim of this communication is to review the risk factors which may be calculated from the various animal studies carried out over the last thirty years with plutonium-237, americium-241 and neptunium-237 and to consider the problems which may arise in extrapolating these risk factors to homo sapiens

  8. Plutonium and americium in Arctic waters, the North Sea and Scottish and Irish coastal zones (in Fucus, Mytilus and Patella)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium and americium have been measured in surface waters of the Greenland and Barents Seas and in the northern North Sea from 1980 through 1984. Measurements in water and biota, Fucus, Mytilus and Patella, were carried out in North-English and Scottish waters in 1982 and Fucus samples were collected from the Irish coast in 1983. Fallout is found to dominate as a source of 239+240Pu north of latitude 650N, while for 238Pu a substantial fraction originates from European nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. The 238Pu/239+240Pu isotope ratio provides clear evidence of the transport of effluent plutonium from the latter to Spitsbergen waters. Fallout plutonium in Arctic waters has a residence time of the order of several years, while for Pu from Sellafield we estimate mean residence times of 11-15 months in Scottish waters and, tentatively, 1.5-3 y during transport from the North Channel (north of the Irish Sea) to Spitsbergen. 241Am found in Arctic waters probably originates from the decay of fallout 241Pu and, like Pu, tentatively has a residence time of the order of several years. Americium from Sellafield has an estimated mean residence time of 4-6 months in Scottish waters. (author)

  9. A glucose bio-battery prototype based on a GDH/poly(methylene blue) bioanode and a graphite cathode with an iodide/tri-iodide redox couple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jen-Yuan; Nien, Po-Chin; Chen, Chien-Hsiao; Chen, Lin-Chi; Ho, Kuo-Chuan

    2012-07-01

    A glucose bio-battery prototype independent of oxygen is proposed based on a glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) bioanode and a graphite cathode with an iodide/tri-iodide redox couple. At the bioanode, a NADH electrocatalyst, poly(methylene blue) (PMB), which can be easily grown on the electrode (screen-printed carbon paste electrode, SPCE) by electrodeposition, is harnessed and engineered. We find that carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are capable of significantly increasing the deposition amount of PMB and thus enhancing the PMB's electrocatalysis of NADH oxidation and the glucose bio-battery's performance. The choice of the iodide/tri-iodide redox couple eliminates the dependence of oxygen for this bio-battery, thus enabling the bio-battery with a constant current-output feature similar to that of the solar cells. The present glucose bio-battery prototype can attain a maximum power density of 2.4 μW/cm(2) at 25 °C. PMID:22541949

  10. Experimental Study on Behavior of Americium in Pyrochemical Process of Nitride Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R and D on the transmutation of long-lived minor actinides (MA) by the accelerator-driven system (ADS) using nitride fuels is underway at JAEA. In regard to reprocessing technology, pyrochemical process has several advantages in case of treating spent fuel with large decay heat and fast neutron emission, and recovering highly enriched N-15. In the pyrochemical reprocessing, plutonium and MA are dissolved in LiCl-KCl eutectic melts and selectively recovered into liquid cadmium (Cd) cathode by molten salt electrorefining. The electrochemical behavior in LiCl-KCl eutectic melts and the subsequent nitride formation behavior of plutonium and MA recovered in liquid Cd cathode are investigated. In this paper, recent results on electrochemical study of americium (Am) on electrolyses of AmN in LiCl-KCl eutectic melts and nitride formation of Am recovered in the liquid Cd cathode are presented. Electrochemical behavior of Am on anodic dissolution of AmN and recovery of Am into a liquid Cd cathode by electrolyses in LiCl-KCl eutectic melts was investigated by transient electrochemical techniques. The formal standard potential of Am(III)/Am(0) obtained with the liquid Cd electrode is more positive than that calculated for the solid metal electrode. The potential shift is considered to be attributed to the lowering of the activity of Am by the formation of the intermetallic compound with Cd. Potentiostatic electrolyses of AmN in LiCl-KCl eutectic melts containing AmCl3 at 773 K were carried out. Nitrogen gas generated by the anodic dissolution of AmN was observed, and the current efficiency was obtained from the ratio of the amount of released nitrogen gas and the passed electric charge to be 20 - 28 %. Am was recovered as Am-Cd alloy in the liquid Cd cathode, in which AmCd6 type phase was identified besides Cd phase. The recovered Am was converted to AmN by the nitridation-distillation combined method, in which the Am-Cd alloy was heated in nitrogen gas stream at 973 K. These

  11. Selective sorption of iodide onto organo-MnO2 film and its electrochemical desorption and detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • HDPy/MnO2 film can selectively sorb iodide with expansion of interlayer spaces. • The sorbed iodide ions are oxidized anodically and expelled as I2 molecules. • The iodide concentration can be determined by anodic current during desorption. - Abstract: This paper reports an electrochemically grown film consisting of layered MnO2 intercalated with hexadecylpyridinium cations (HDPy+), which can selectively sorb and detect iodide anions in aqueous solution amperometrically. Sorption of iodide by the HDPy/MnO2 film did not occur via ion exchange, but through hydrophobic interactions between the interlayer organic phase of the film and iodide ions in solution. The sorption rate increased with the deposited amount of MnO2. During the sorption process, the interlayer spaces expanded, and new diffraction peaks appeared that were attributed to the incorporated species. Anodic polarization of the iodide-sorbed HDPy/MnO2 film led to electron transfer from the incorporated iodide to the underlying substrate through the MnO2 sheets. The oxidized iodide was expelled from the film as molecular I2, while the expanded interlayer spaces were restored to their original state. Thus, the MnO2 layers and the incorporated HDPy can synergistically sorb/desorb iodide anions, resulting in a unique “self-cleaning” function that can operate electrochemically. This property allowed amperometric detection of iodide at a concentration as low as 0.0186 μM, which was below the detection limits reported for previous iodide sensors

  12. Selective sorption of iodide onto organo-MnO{sub 2} film and its electrochemical desorption and detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Masaharu, E-mail: nkymm@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp; Sato, Ayu; Nakagawa, Kimiko

    2015-06-02

    Highlights: • HDPy/MnO{sub 2} film can selectively sorb iodide with expansion of interlayer spaces. • The sorbed iodide ions are oxidized anodically and expelled as I{sub 2} molecules. • The iodide concentration can be determined by anodic current during desorption. - Abstract: This paper reports an electrochemically grown film consisting of layered MnO{sub 2} intercalated with hexadecylpyridinium cations (HDPy{sup +}), which can selectively sorb and detect iodide anions in aqueous solution amperometrically. Sorption of iodide by the HDPy/MnO{sub 2} film did not occur via ion exchange, but through hydrophobic interactions between the interlayer organic phase of the film and iodide ions in solution. The sorption rate increased with the deposited amount of MnO{sub 2}. During the sorption process, the interlayer spaces expanded, and new diffraction peaks appeared that were attributed to the incorporated species. Anodic polarization of the iodide-sorbed HDPy/MnO{sub 2} film led to electron transfer from the incorporated iodide to the underlying substrate through the MnO{sub 2} sheets. The oxidized iodide was expelled from the film as molecular I{sub 2}, while the expanded interlayer spaces were restored to their original state. Thus, the MnO{sub 2} layers and the incorporated HDPy can synergistically sorb/desorb iodide anions, resulting in a unique “self-cleaning” function that can operate electrochemically. This property allowed amperometric detection of iodide at a concentration as low as 0.0186 μM, which was below the detection limits reported for previous iodide sensors.

  13. Characterization of strontium iodide scintillators with silicon photomultipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Lee J.; Phlips, Bernard

    2016-06-01

    This work characterizes a commercially available europium-doped strontium iodide detector recently developed by Radiation Monitoring Devices (RMD). The detector has been chosen for a space-based mission scheduled to launch in early 2017. The primary goal of this work was to characterize the detector's response over the expected operational range of -10 °C to 30 °C as well as the expected operational voltage range of +26.5-+28.5 V and identify background interferences that may develop due to neutron activation produced by cosmic-ray interactions. The 8 mm×8 mm×20 mm detectors use KETEK silicon photomultipliers (SiPM), with an active area of 6 mmx6 mm (KETEK PM6660). Our results show substantial integral nonlinearity due to the SiPM ranging from 0% to 25% at room temperature over the energy range of 80-2614 keV. The nonlinearity, a function of temperature and overvoltage, leads to an underestimate of the full width at half max (FWHM), which is 2.6% uncorrected at 662 keV and 3.8% corrected at 662 keV. The temperature dependence of the detector results in a noise threshold that increases substantially above 30 °C due to the SiPM dark rate. In an effort to simulate the harsh environment of space, neutron activation of the detector was also explored. Gamma-ray lines at 127 keV and 164 keV were observed in the detector along with Kα x-rays associated with europium. Beta decay from europium- and iodine-activation products were also observed within the detector.

  14. THERAPY OF GRAVES’ DISEASE WITH SODIUM IODIDE-131

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wayan Hartadi Noor

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Graves’ disease is the most common form of thyrotoxicosis, with a peak incidence in the 20-40 year of age group. Females are involved about five times more commonly than male. The easiest sign to recognize patients with Graves’ disease is the present of Graves’ ophthalmopathy. The diagnosis of Graves’ disease may sometimes base only on a physical examination and a medical history. Diffuse thyroid enlargement and sign of thyrotoxicosis, mainly ophthalmopathy and to lesser extent dermopathy, usually adequate for diagnosis. TSH test combined with FT4 test is usually the first laboratory test performs in these patients. The patients suffered Graves’ disease can be treated with antithyroid drug therapy or undergo subtotal Thyroidectomy. Another therapy is by using sodium iodide-131, where this therapy has advantages including easy administration, effectiveness, low expense, and absence of pain. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  15. Rutherford Backsattering and Auger spectroscopy of mercuric iodide detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrical properties of metallic contacts on solid state x-ray detectors can play an important role in determining the overall response and sensitivity of these devices. Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) and Auger electron spectroscopies have been utilized to characterize thin palladium contacts on mercuric iodide (HgI2) detectors. The RBS measurements were performed at room temperature with the metal contact preventing evaporate loss of the HgI2 and reducing contamination to the vacuum chamber. Computer simulations of the RBS results indicate that the interface region of a sample with a palladium contact had approximately the ideal stoichiometry but that the palladium film thickness (350 /angstrom/) was less than expected from the deposition conditions. Auger sputter profiling which removes the metal contact ''cap'' was performed with a rapid transfer system equipped with liquid nitrogen cooling to avoid evaporative loss of the sample and reduce vacuum system contamination. This technique indicated significant penetration of Hg and I into the Pd contact for a variety of samples. In many cases, the penetration extended all the way to the surface. For a 600 /angstrom/ contact, approximately two thirds or 400 /angstrom/ of the contact is part of a ''reaction zone'' in which there is strong intermixing of the palladium, mercury, and iodine. In one case, where copper was tried as an electrode, the ''reaction zone'' extended all the way to the surface, and the device failed as a detector. The relationship of the contact stoichiometry to the deposition process and device performance will be discussed. 5 refs., 4 figs

  16. Rutherford Backsattering and Auger spectroscopy of mercuric iodide detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felter, T. E.; Stulen, R. H.; Schnepple, W. F.; Ortale, C.; van den Berg, L.

    1987-01-01

    The electrical properties of metallic contacts on solid state x-ray detectors can play an important role in determining the overall response and sensitivity of these devices. Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) and Auger electron spectroscopies have been utilized to characterize thin palladium contacts on mercuric iodide (HgI/sub 2/) detectors. The RBS measurements were performed at room temperature with the metal contact preventing evaporate loss of the HgI/sub 2/ and reducing contamination to the vacuum chamber. Computer simulations of the RBS results indicate that the interface region of a sample with a palladium contact had approximately the ideal stoichiometry but that the palladium film thickness (350 /angstrom/) was less than expected from the deposition conditions. Auger sputter profiling which removes the metal contact ''cap'' was performed with a rapid transfer system equipped with liquid nitrogen cooling to avoid evaporative loss of the sample and reduce vacuum system contamination. This technique indicated significant penetration of Hg and I into the Pd contact for a variety of samples. In many cases, the penetration extended all the way to the surface. For a 600 /angstrom/ contact, approximately two thirds or 400 /angstrom/ of the contact is part of a ''reaction zone'' in which there is strong intermixing of the palladium, mercury, and iodine. In one case, where copper was tried as an electrode, the ''reaction zone'' extended all the way to the surface, and the device failed as a detector. The relationship of the contact stoichiometry to the deposition process and device performance will be discussed. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Structure and scintillation of Eu2+-activated calcium bromide iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the structure and scintillation properties of Eu2+-activated calcium bromide iodide. CaBr0.7I1.3 was the only composition that could be synthesized in the CaBr2–CaI2 system. The compound has an effective atomic number of 47 and crystallizes in a trigonal crystal system with the R-3 space group and a density of 3.93 g/cc. The structure is layered and contains Ca in an octahedral environment with the Br/I anions jointly occupying a single site. Eu2+-activated samples show an intense narrow emission, characteristic of the 5d–4f transition of Eu2+, when excited with UV or X-rays. The sample with 0.5% Eu shows a light output of 63,000 ph/MeV at 662 keV with 96% of the light emitted with a monoexponential decay time of 1332 ns. An energy resolution of 10.4% full width at half maximum (FWHM) has been achieved for 662 keV gamma rays at room temperature. - Highlights: • CaBr0.7I1.3 is the only composition that formed in the CaBr2–CaI2 system. • Crystallizes in a trigonal crystal system with the R-3 space group. • Eu2+-activation yields scintillator with bright blue emission centered at 465 nm. • Light output is 63,000 ph/MeV with 10.4% energy resolution at 662 keV. • Monoexponential decay time of 1332 ns

  18. Endothelium modulates anion channel-dependent aortic contractions to iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, F S; Barna, T J

    2000-05-01

    Anion currents contribute to vascular smooth muscle (VSM) membrane potential. The substitution of extracellular chloride (Cl) with iodide (I) or bromide (Br) initially inhibited and then potentiated isometric contractile responses of rat aortic rings to norepinephrine. Anion substitution alone produced a small relaxation, which occurred despite a lack of active tone and minimal subsequent contraction of endothelium-intact rings (4.2 +/- 1.2% of the response to 90 mM KCl). Endothelium-denuded rings underwent a similar initial relaxation but then contracted vigorously (I > Br). Responses to 130 mM I (93.7 +/- 1.9% of 90 mM KCl) were inhibited by nifedipine (10(-6) M), niflumic acid (10(-5) M), tamoxifen (10(-5) M), DIDS (10(-4) M), and HCO(-)(3)-free buffer (HEPES 10 mM) but not by bumetanide (10(-5) M). Intact rings treated with N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine (10(-4) M) responded weakly to I (15.5 +/- 2.1% of 90 mM KCl), whereas hemoglobin (10(-5) M), indomethacin (10(-6) M), 17-octadecynoic acid (10(-5) M), and 1H-[1,2, 4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (10(-6) M) all failed to augment the response of intact rings to I. We hypothesize that VSM takes up I primarily via an anion exchanger. Subsequent I efflux through anion channels having a selectivity of I > Br > Cl produces depolarization. In endothelium-denuded or agonist-stimulated vessels, this current is sufficient to activate voltage-dependent calcium channels and cause contraction. Neither nitric oxide nor prostaglandins are the primary endothelial modulator of these anion channels. If they are regulated by an endothelium-dependent hyperpolarizing factor it is not a cytochrome P-450 metabolite. PMID:10775130

  19. Retinoic acid induces sodium/iodide symporter gene expression and radioiodide uptake in the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Kogai, Takahiko; Schultz, James J.; Johnson, Laura S.; Huang, Min; Brent, Gregory A.

    2000-01-01

    The sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) stimulates iodide uptake in normal lactating breast, but is not known to be active in nonlactating breast or breast cancer. We studied NIS gene regulation and iodide uptake in MCF-7 cells, an estrogen receptor (ER)-positive human breast cancer cell line. All-trans retinoic acid (tRA) treatment stimulated iodide uptake in a time- and dose-dependent fashion up to ≈9.4-fold above baseline. Stimulation with selective retinoid compounds indicated that the inductio...

  20. Preconcentration of low levels of americium and plutonium from waste waters by synthetic water-soluble metal-binding polymers with ultrafiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preconcentration approach to assist in the measurement of low levels of americium and plutonium in waste waters has been developed based on the concept of using water-soluble metal-binding polymers in combination with ultrafiltration. The method has been optimized to give over 90% recovery and accountability from actual waste water. (author)

  1. Processes of adsorption/desorption of iodides and cadmium cations onto/from Ag(111

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR D. JOVIĆ

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the adsorption/desorption processes of iodides and cadmium cations in the presence of iodides onto/from Ag(111 were investigated. It was shown that both processes were complex, characterized by several peaks on the cyclic voltammograms (CVs. By PeakFit analysis of the recorded CVs and subsequent fitting of the obtained peaks by the Frumkin adsorption isotherm, the interaction parameter (f and the Gibbs energy of adsorption (DGads for each adsorbed phase were determined. In the case of iodide adsorption, four peaks were characterized by negative values of f, indicating attractive lateral interaction between the adsorbed anions, while two of them possessed value of f < –4, indicating phase transition processes. The adsorption/desorption processes of cadmium cations (underpotential deposition – UPD of cadmium in the presence of iodide anions was characterized by two main peaks, each of them being composed of two or three peaks with negative values of f. By the analysis of charge vs. potential dependences obtained either from the CVs or current transients on potentiostatic pulses, it was concluded that adsorbed iodides did not undergo desorption during the process of Cd UPD, but became replaced by Cd ad-atoms and remained adsorbed on top of a Cd layer and/or in between Cd the ad-atoms.

  2. Evaluation of the reversibility of iodide uptake by argillaceous rocks by the radial diffusion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory radial in- and out-diffusion experiments were performed to investigate the reversibility of the iodide (I-) uptake by argillaceous rocks from the Tournemire site (France). At first, the suitability of the method was demonstrated by means of deuterium depleted water (DDW) diffusion experiments. The values for the DDW effective diffusion coefficient (1.7 to 2.7 x 10-11 m2 s-1) are indeed very close to those obtained from previous through-diffusion experiments carried out on Tournemire samples with tritiated water. The diffusion of chloride and bromide led to the determination of halide-accessible porosities, which are necessary to calculate the retardation factor (R) and the distribution ratio (RD). The calculated values for the halide-accessible porosity (2 to 5%) clearly indicated the effect of anionic exclusion and are consistent with previous data. On the contrary, the in-diffusion experiments performed with iodide clearly showed its uptake by argillite, with rock capacity factor values ranging from 14% to 25%. The corresponding values of RD (0.035 to 0.08 L kg-1) are one order of magnitude lower than those previously derived from batch methods. At last, the experiments of iodide out-diffusion revealed that only iodide located in the halide-accessible porosity diffused out of the rock samples, suggesting that the uptake of iodide by argillite would not be reversible or that the kinetics of desorption would be low (> 70 days). (orig.)

  3. Functional activity of human sodium/iodide symporter in tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: The sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) actively transports iodide into thyrocytes. Thus, NIS represents a key protein for diagnosis and radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer. Additionally, in the future the NIS gene may be used for cancer gene therapy of non-thyroid-derived malignancies. In this study we evaluated the functionality of NIS with respect to iodide uptake in a panel of tumor cell lines and compared this to gene transfer efficiency. Methods: A human NIS-containing expression vector and reporter-gene vectors encoding and beta;-Galactosidase- or EGFP were used for transient transfection of 13 tumor cell lines. Following transfection measurements of NIS-mediated radioiodide uptake using Na125I and of transfection efficiency were performed. The latter included β;-Galactosidase activity measurements using a commercial kit and observation by fluorescence microscopy for EGFP expression. Results: In contrast to respective parental cells, most NIS-transfected cell lines displayed high, perchlorate-sensitive radioiodide uptake. Differences in radioiodide uptake between cell lines apparently corresponded to transfection efficiencies, as judged from reporter-gene assays. Conclusion: With respect to iodide uptake we provide evidence that NIS is functional in different cellular context. As iodide uptake capacity appears to be well correlated to gene transfer efficiency, cell type-specific actions on NIS (e. g. post-translational modification such as glycosylation) are not inhibitory to NIS function. Our data support the promising role of NIS in cancer gene therapy strategies. (orig.)

  4. Estradiol decreases iodide uptake by rat thyroid follicular FRTL-5 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furlanetto T.W.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Estradiol has well-known indirect effects on the thyroid. A direct effect of estradiol on thyroid follicular cells, increasing cell growth and reducing the expression of the sodium-iodide symporter gene, has been recently reported. The aim of the present investigation was to study the effect of estradiol on iodide uptake by thyroid follicular cells, using FRTL-5 cells as a model. Estradiol decreased basal iodide uptake by FRTL-5 cells from control levels of 2.490 ± 0.370 to 2.085 ± 0.364 pmol I-/µg DNA at 1 ng/ml (P<0.02, to 1.970 ± 0.302 pmol I-/µg DNA at 10 ng/ml (P<0.003, and to 2.038 ± 0.389 pmol I-/µg DNA at 100 ng/ml (P<0.02. In addition, 4 ng/ml estradiol decreased iodide uptake induced by 0.02 mIU/ml thyrotropin from 8.678 ± 0.408 to 7.312 ± 0.506 pmol I-/µg DNA (P<0.02. A decrease in iodide uptake by thyroid cells caused by estradiol has not been described previously and may have a role in goiter pathogenesis.

  5. An investigation of sodium iodide solubility in sodium-stainless steel systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium iodide and major constituents of stainless steel in sodium are determined by using the steel capsules to obtain a better understanding on contribution of the constituents to the apparent iodide solubility in sodium. The capsule loaded with 20 g sodium and 0.1 - 0.3 g powder of sodium iodide is heated at its upper part in a furnace and cooled at its bottom on brass plates to establish a large temperature gradient along the capsule tube. After a given period of equilibration, the iodide and constituents are fixed in solidified sodium by quick quenching of the capsules. Sodium samples are taken from the sectioned capsule tube and submitted to sodium dissolution by vaporized water for determination of the iodine and to vacuum distillation for determination of the metal elements. Iron and nickel concentrations are observed to be lower in the samples at higher iodine concentrations. Chromium and manganese concentrations are seen to be insensitive to the iodine concentrations. The observations can be interpreted by a model that sodium oxide combines with metal iodide in sodium to form a complex compound and with consideration that the compound will fall and deposit onto the bottom of the capsule by thermal diffusion. (author)

  6. Alpha-lipoic acid induces sodium iodide symporter expression in TPC-1 thyroid cancer cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Patients with metastatic thyroid cancers that do not uptake iodine need effective therapeutic option. Differentiation-inducing agents have been tried to restore functional expression of sodium iodide symporter (NIS) without success. Our objective was to assess the effect of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA), known as potential antioxidant, on expression of sodium iodide symporter in thyroid cancer cells. Methods: Human thyroid cancer-derived cell lines, TPC-1, were treated with ALA, and changes in NIS mRNA and protein expression were measured. ALA's effect on NIS gene promoter was evaluated, and functional NIS expression was assessed by iodide uptake assay. Results: Treatment with ALA increased NIS mRNA expression up to ten folds of control dose-dependently after 24 h of exposure. ALA increased NIS promoter activity, and increased iodide uptake by 1.6 fold. ALA induced expression of NIS protein, but had no significant effect on the plasma membrane trafficking. ALA increased phosphorylation of CREB and nuclear translocation of pCREB, and co-treatment of ALA and trichostatin A increased iodide uptake by three folds in TPC-1 cells. Conclusions: ALA is a potential agent to increase NIS transcription in TPC-1. It could be used as an adjunctive agent to increase efficacy of radioiodine therapy if combined with a strategy to increase NIS protein trafficking to cell membrane.

  7. Functional activity of human sodium/iodide symporter in tumor cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrich, T.; Knapp, W.H.; Poetter, E. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover (Germany)

    2003-02-01

    Aim: The sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) actively transports iodide into thyrocytes. Thus, NIS represents a key protein for diagnosis and radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer. Additionally, in the future the NIS gene may be used for cancer gene therapy of non-thyroid-derived malignancies. In this study we evaluated the functionality of NIS with respect to iodide uptake in a panel of tumor cell lines and compared this to gene transfer efficiency. Methods: A human NIS-containing expression vector and reporter-gene vectors encoding β-Galactosidase- or EGFP were used for transient transfection of 13 tumor cell lines. Following transfection measurements of NIS-mediated radioiodide uptake using Na{sup 125}I and of transfection efficiency were performed. The latter included β-Galactosidase activity measurements using a commercial kit and observation by fluorescence microscopy for EGFP expression. Results: In contrast to respective parental cells, most NIS-transfected cell lines displayed high, perchlorate-sensitive radioiodide uptake. Differences in radioiodide uptake between cell lines apparently corresponded to transfection efficiencies, as judged from reporter-gene assays. Conclusion: With respect to iodide uptake we provide evidence that NIS is functional in different cellular context. As iodide uptake capacity appears to be well correlated to gene transfer efficiency, cell type-specific actions on NIS (e. g. post-translational modification such as glycosylation) are not inhibitory to NIS function. Our data support the promising role of NIS in cancer gene therapy strategies. (orig.)

  8. Trapping radiodine, in the form of methyl iodide, on nuclear carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nacapricha, D. [Mahidol Univ., Bangkok (Thailand); Taylor, C. [John Moores Univ., Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    Studies have been performed on potassium-iodide-impregnated charcoals of the type used in the nuclear industry for trapping radioiodine released during nuclear fission. The effects of various parameters on the trapping efficiency of methyl iodide have been investigated. A variation in particle size within a bulk charcoal caused poor precision in K value measurements because of differences in surface area, pore volume, and bed density, leading to differences in the deposition of the impregnant. Precision is improved by sieving the charcoal to a narrower size because smaller particles have a higher porosity. This finding is supported by surface area and pore measurements. Two methods of impregnation are compared by measuring K values and the deposition of potassium iodide. Charcoal impregnated by rotary evaporation exhibits both higher K values and higher potassium iodide contents than sprayed charcoal. Two designs of spraying drum are compared: a drum with helical vanes allows more efficient deposition and more uniform distribution of impregnant than a drum with axial vanes. A decrease in the K value with increasing humidity correlates with the available surface area. A similar correlation exists between water content and available pore volume. Aging of potassium-iodide-impregnated charcoal, caused by the formation of oxygen complexes on the surface, is associated with significant falls in K value. K values of charcoals also can be restored to at least their original values by heat treatment in the absence of air. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Chemical behaviour of trivalent and pentavalent americium in saline NaCl-solutions. Studies of transferability of laboratory data to natural conditions. Interim report. Reported period: 1.2.1993-31.12.1993; Chemisches Verhalten von drei- und fuenfwertigem Americium in Salinen NaCl-Loesungen. Untersuchung der Uebertragbarkeit von Labordaten auf natuerliche Verhaeltnisse. Zwischenbericht. Berichtszeitraum 1.2.1993-31.12.1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Runde, W.; Kim, J.I.

    1994-09-15

    In order to clarify the chemical behaviour of Americium in saline aqueous systems relevant for final storage this study deals with the chemical reactions of trivalent and pentavalent Americium in NaCl-solutions under the influence of radiolysis from its own alpha radiation. The focus of the study was on investigating the geologically relevant reactions, such as hydrolysis or carbonate- and chloride complexing in solid-liquid equilibriums. Comprehensive measurements on solubility and spectroscopic studies in NaCl-solutions were carried out in a CO{sub 2}-free atmosphere and 10{sup -2} atm CO{sub 2} partial pressure. Identification and characterisation of the AM (III) and AM(V) solid phases were supplemented by structural research with the chemically analogue EU (III) and Np(V) compounds. The alpha-radiation induced radiolysis in saline NaCl solutions and the redox behaviour of Americium which was influenced thereby were spectroscopically quantified. (orig.) [Deutsch] Zur Klaerung des chemischen Verhaltens von Americium in endlagerrelevanten salinen aquatischen Systemen befasst sich die vorliegende Arbeit mit den chemischen Reaktionen des drei- und fuenfwertigen Americiums in NaCl-Loesungen unter dem Einfluss der Radiolyse durch die eigene {alpha}-Strahlung. Der Schwerpunkt dieser Arbeit lag auf der Untersuchung der geologisch relevanten Reaktionen, wie Hydrolyse sowie Carbonat- und Chloridkomplexierung in fest-fluessig Gleichgewichtssystemen. Hierzu wurden umfassende Loeslichkeitsmessungen und spektroskopische Untersuchungen in NaCl-Loesungen, sowohl unter CO{sub 2}-freier Atmosphaere als auch unter 10{sup -2} atm CO{sub 2}-Partialdruck, durchgefuehrt. Die Identifizierung und Charakterisierung der Am(III)- und Am(V)-Festphasen wurde ergaenzt durch strukturelle Untersuchungen mit den chemisch analogen Eu(III)- und Np(V)-Verbindungen. Die von der {alpha}-Strahlung induzierte Radiolyse in salinen NaCl-Loesungen und das dadurch beeinflusste Redoxverhalten von Americium

  10. X-ray imaging performance of structured cesium iodide scintillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Ristic, Goran; Rowlands, J A

    2004-09-01

    Columnar structured cesium iodide (CsI) scintillators doped with Thallium (Tl) have been used extensively for indirect x-ray imaging detectors. The purpose of this paper is to develop a methodology for systematic investigation of the inherent imaging performance of CsI as a function of thickness and design type. The results will facilitate the optimization of CsI layer design for different x-ray imaging applications, and allow validation of physical models developed for the light channeling process in columnar CsI layers. CsI samples of different types and thicknesses were obtained from the same manufacturer. They were optimized either for light output (HL) or image resolution (HR), and the thickness ranged between 150 and 600 microns. During experimental measurements, the CsI samples were placed in direct contact with a high resolution CMOS optical sensor with a pixel pitch of 48 microns. The modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of the detector with different CsI configurations were measured experimentally. The aperture function of the CMOS sensor was determined separately in order to estimate the MTF of CsI alone. We also measured the pulse height distribution of the light output from both the HL and HR CsI at different x-ray energies, from which the x-ray quantum efficiency, Swank factor and x-ray conversion gain were determined. Our results showed that the MTF at 5 cycles/mm for the HR type was 50% higher than for the HL. However, the HR layer produces approximately 36% less light output. The Swank factor below K-edge was 0.91 and 0.93 for the HR and HL types, respectively, thus their DQE(0) were essentially identical. The presampling MTF decreased as a function of thickness L. The universal MTF, i.e., MTF plotted as a function of the product of spatial frequency f and CsI thickness L, increased as a function of L. This indicates that the light channeling process in CsI improved the MTF of

  11. Bromide and iodide removal from waters under dynamic conditions by Ag-doped aerogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Polo, M; Rivera-Utrilla, J; von Gunten, U

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the efficiency of Ag-doped aerogels in the removal of bromide and iodide from water. To test the applicability of these aerogels in water treatment, adsorption of bromide and iodide was studied under dynamic conditions using waters from Lake Zurich and a mineral water. The results obtained by using these waters showed a high breakthrough volume (V(0.02)=0.4 L) of the columns, while the height of the mass transfer zone (H(MTZ)=6.8 cm) was low, regardless of the anion under study. Bromide- and iodide-saturated columns were regenerated with NH4OH. No change in the column characteristics was observed after two regeneration treatments, regardless of the type of water considered. PMID:17109877

  12. Doping in mercuric iodide crystals and its influence on electronic properties and material structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doping of mercuric iodide single crystals with SbI3 was studied. Three major aspects of the influence of doping were investigated: the α to β solid phase transition, the crystal structure and the semiconducting properties. A controlled doping method and a new growth technique from the melt were developed. A quantitative correlation between the antimony concentration and the charge carrier transport properties as well as the nuclear detector characteristics of HgI2 were established for the first time. In the present work the influence of various impurities (Sb, Cu, Ag, Bi) on the solid state phase transformation of mercuric iodide has been investigated. In the second part of the work a new growth method for mercuric iodide single crystals containing a controlled amount of SbI3, has been developed. In the last part of this work the influence of the presence of impurities in the crystal on the charge carrier transport properties has been investigated. (author)

  13. Study on methyl iodide prepared without acute toxicant and its trial application in iodine adsorber test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper studied a method of substitution, which substituted the non-toxic chlorotrimethylsilane (Me3SiCl) /sodium iodide (NaI) for the acutely toxic dimethyl sulphate (DMS) as a dealkylating agent for the first time to react with phosphate methylesters in preparing the gaseous radioactive methyl iodide. Comparative tests were carried out between substitution method and DMS method to measure respective cleaning efficiencies of iodine absorber both in lab and in the ventilation system of nuclear power plant. The impact of the substitutes on the organic material components of methyl iodide generator was also evaluated. The results showed that the substitution method was comparable to the former DMS method, and the substitutes was also compatible with the generator. Therefore, the substitution method can be preliminary judged applicable to both workshop and in-place tests of iodine adsorber in nuclear power plants. (authors)

  14. Quantification of propidium iodide delivery with millisecond electric pulses: A model study

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Miao

    2014-01-01

    A model study of propidium iodide delivery with millisecond electric pulses is presented; this work is a companion of the experimental efforts by Sadik et al. [1]. Both membrane permeabilization and delivery are examined with respect to six extra-cellular conductivities. The transmembrane potential of the permeabilized regions exhibits a consistent value, which corresponds to a bifurcation point in the pore-radius-potential relation. Both the pore area density and membrane conductance increase with an increasing extra-cellular conductivity. On the other hand, the inverse correlation between propidium iodide delivery and extra-cellular conductivity as observed in the experiments is quantitatively captured by the model. This agreement confirms that this behavior is primarily mediated by electrophoretic transport during the pulse. The results suggest that electrophoresis is important even for the delivery of small molecules such as propidium iodide. The direct comparison between model prediction and experimental...

  15. Optimization of mercuric iodide platelets growth by the polymer controlled vapor transport method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fornaro L.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Mercuric iodide crystals in their platelet habit were grown by the polymer controlled vapor transport method. Mercuric iodide 99% in purity was sublimated at temperatures about 122 - 126 °C and vacuum conditions (10-5 mmHg, after selecting an appropriate polymer. Temperature profiles and experimental heat transfer models were determined for two growth furnaces using different insulator configurations for the cold extreme (air, ceramic wool, grilon, copper and ceramic wool. Growth conditions for few and separate nucleation points and large crystals were determined. Representative samples were characterized by optical microscopy and by measuring the current density and apparent resistivity of the material. Future optimization and comparisons with others mercuric iodide crystal growth methods are included.

  16. Iodide retention by cinnabar (HgS) and chalcocite (Cu{sub 2}S)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, H.L.; Balsley, S.D.; Brady, P.V.

    1995-07-01

    Sorption of iodide (I{sup {minus}}) on cinnabar (HgS) and chalcocite (Cu{sub 2}S) was examined as a function of pH at 25{degrees}C in a series of batch experiments. Calculated distribution ratios (K{sub d}) far exceed those reported for other minerals; maximal K{sub d}`s of 1375 cc/g (Cu{sub 2}S) and 3080 c/g (HgS) were observed between pH 4-5, but wre substantial at all pH`s measured (4 < pH < 10). Iodide sorption apparently occurs by the formation of an insoluble surface solid solution with exposed Hg and Cu sites. Surface solid solution formation is favored at low pH due to the lessened electrostatic repulsion of the iodide ion by the sulfide surfaces.

  17. Multicompartmental model for iodide, thyroxine, and triiodothyronine metabolism in normal and spontaneously hyperthyroid cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive multicompartmental kinetic model was developed to account for the distribution and metabolism of simultaneously injected radioactive iodide (iodide*), T3 (T3*), and T4 (T4*) in six normal and seven spontaneously hyperthyroid cats. Data from plasma samples (analyzed by HPLC), urine, feces, and thyroid accumulation were incorporated into the model. The submodels for iodide*, T3*, and T4* all included both a fast and a slow exchange compartment connecting with the plasma compartment. The best-fit iodide* model also included a delay compartment, presumed to be pooling of gastrosalivary secretions. This delay was 62% longer in the hyperthyroid cats than in the euthyroid cats. Unexpectedly, all of the exchange parameters for both T4 and T3 were significantly slowed in hyperthyroidism, possibly because the hyperthyroid cats were older. None of the plasma equivalent volumes of the exchange compartments of iodide*, T3*, or T4* was significantly different in the hyperthyroid cats, although the plasma equivalent volume of the fast T4 exchange compartments were reduced. Secretion of recycled T4* from the thyroid into the plasma T4* compartment was essential to model fit, but its quantity could not be uniquely identified in the absence of multiple thyroid data points. Thyroid secretion of T3* was not detectable. Comparing the fast and slow compartments, there was a shift of T4* deiodination into the fast exchange compartment in hyperthyroidism. Total body mean residence times (MRTs) of iodide* and T3* were not affected by hyperthyroidism, but mean T4* MRT was decreased 23%. Total fractional T4 to T3 conversion was unchanged in hyperthyroidism, although the amount of T3 produced by this route was increased nearly 5-fold because of higher concentrations of donor stable T4

  18. Influence of an alkoxy group on bis-triazinyl-pyridines for selective extraction of americium(III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extraction of americium(III), curium(III), and lanthanides(III) from nitric acid by 2,6-bis-(5,6-dimethyl-[1,2,4]-triazin-3-yl)-pyridine and 2,6-bis-(5,6-dimethyl-[1,2,4]-triazin- 3-yl)-4-methoxy-pyridine was studied. The physico-chemical properties of these ligands, such as the protonation and complexation constants, were also determined to describe the influence of different substituent groups. The selectivity of substituted-BTP was confirmed both in complexation and in solvent extraction experiments. The presence of an alkoxy-group in position 4 of the pyridine decreases the BTP selectivity. Influence of a long alkyl chain on protonation and complexation constants was also studied with 2,6-bis-(5,6-dimethyl-[1,2,4]- triazin-3-yl)-4-dodecyloxy-pyridine. (authors)

  19. Solvent extraction of europium and americium into phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone by using synergistic mixture of hydrogen dicarbollylcobaltate and 'classical' CMPO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extraction of microamounts of europium and americium by a phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone (FS 13) solution of hydrogen dicarbollylcobaltate (H+B-) in the presence of octyl-phenyl-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide ('classical' CMPO, L) has been investigated. The equilibrium data have been explained assuming that the complexes HL+, HL2+, ML23+, ML33+ and ML43+ (M3+ Eu3+, Am3+) are extracted into the organic phase. The values of extraction and stability constants of the cationic complex species in FS 13 saturated with water have been determined. It was found that the stability constants of the corresponding complexes EuLn3+ and AmLn3+, where n 2, 3, 4 and L is 'classical' CMPO, in water-saturated FS 13 are comparable. (author)

  20. Recovery, purification and concentration of plutonium and americium from the aqueous wastes discharged in the reprocessing process studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For recovering and purifying plutonium and americium from the aqueous wastes occurring in the process studies on reprocessing, a standard procedure has been established for use in the laboratory works, through the preliminary tests of the precipitation as hydroxides and the anion exchange in nitrate media. The procedure was proven in the treatment of actual wastes, of which the results were contributed to determine the process conditions in the plutonium purification and product concentration of the JAERI Reprocessing Test Plant. The preliminary tests also include washing of U and Am recovery from the anion-exchanger in nitrate media, direct ion-exchange recovery of Pu from the TBP phase and elution of Am from the cation-exchanger. (auth.)

  1. Plutonium and americium in fish, shellfish and seaweed in the Irish environment and their contribution to dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium and americium activity concentrations in fish and shellfish landed in Ireland in the period 1988 to 1997 are presented. Activity concentrations in fish are low and often below detection limits, while those in mussels and oysters sampled on the northeast coast show no significant signs of decline. The estimated doses to hypothetical typical and heavy seafood consumers remain below 1 μSv yr-1 (committed effective dose).Plutonium activity concentrations measured in Fucus vesiculosus around the Irish coastline have not fallen appreciably in the ten year period between 1986 and 1996. Furthermore, the mean 238Pu/239,240Pu ratio of 0.17±0.05 in Fucus vesiculosus from the west coast of Ireland demonstrates the increasing significance of Sellafield-derived plutonium in those waters. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  2. The bone volume effect on the dosimetry of plutonium-239 and americium-241 in the skeleton of man and baboon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were undertaken using bone removed from young adult baboons, which had been contaminated with plutonium-239 at various times prior to sacrifice, and human bone from adult male (USTR Case 246), who had received an internal deposition of americium-241 as a result of a glove-box explosion 11 years prior to his death. The baboon bone was supplied by the CEA, France, and the human bone by the United States Transuranium registry. The bone samples, examined by qualitative and quantitative autoradiography with CR 39 detectors, demonstrated the rapid redistribution of bone surface-seeking radionuclides in younger primates due to growth and the slower, bone turnover driven redistribution in the adult human bone. In both species, primary and secondary surface deposits of radionuclide remained conspicious despite bone activity; true volumization of radionuclide was seldom seen. The dosimetric implications of these findings are discussed. (author) 21 refs.; 6 figs.; 4 tabs

  3. Tris(1,2-dimethoxyethane-κ2O,O′iodidocalcium iodide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siou-Wei Ou

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In the title complex, [CaI(C4H10O23]I, the CaII atom is seven-coordinated by six O atoms from three 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME ligands and one iodide anion in a distorted pentagonal–bipyramidal geometry. The I atom and one of the O atoms from a DME ligand lie in the axial positions while the other O atoms lie in the basal plane. The other iodide anion is outside the complex cation.

  4. Thyroid hormones and iodide in the near-term pregnant rat.

    OpenAIRE

    Versloot, P.M.

    1998-01-01

    Thyroid hormones, thyroxine (T4) and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3), are produced by the thyroid gland. To synthesize thyroid hormones the thyroid needs iodide. The uptake of iodide as well as the production and secretion of T4 and T3 by the thyroid gland is regulated by thyrotropin (TSH), which is produced by the pituitary. However, most of the biologically active form, T3, is produced from T4 via monodeiodination in peripheral tissues.This reaction is catalyzed by the deiodinases, type I (ID-...

  5. Iodide uptake in human anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells after transfer of the human thyroid peroxidase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human thyroperoxidase (hTPO) is critical for the accumulation of iodide in thyroid tissues. Poorly differentiated and anaplastic thyroid tumours which lack thyroid-specific gene expression fail to accumulate iodide and, therefore, do not respond to iodine-131 therapy. We consequently investigated whether transfer of the hTPO gene is sufficient to restore the iodide-trapping capacity in undifferentiated thyroid and non-thyroid tumour cells. The human anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell lines C643 and SW1736, the rat Morris hepatoma cell line MH3924A and the rat papillary thyroid carcinoma cell line L2 were used as in vitro model systems. Employing a bicistronic retroviral vector based on the myeloproliferative sarcoma virus for the transfer of the hTPO and the neomycin resistance gene, the C643 cells and SW1736 cells were transfected while the L2 cells and MH3924A cells were infected with retroviral particles. Seven recombinant C643 and seven SW1736 cell lines as well as four recombinant L2 and four MH3924A cell lines were established by neomycin selection. They were studied for hTPO expression using an antibody-based luminescence kit, followed by determination of the enzyme activity in the guaiacol assay and of the iodide uptake capacity in the presence of Na125I. Genetically modified cell lines expressed up to 1,800 times more hTPO as compared to wild type tumour cells. The level of hTPO expression varied significantly between individual neomycin-resistant cell lines, suggesting that the recombinant retroviral DNA was integrated at different sites of the cellular genome. The accumulation of iodide, however, was not significantly enhanced in individual recombinant cell lines, irrespective of low or high hTPO expression. Moreover, there was no correlation between hTPO expression and enzyme activity in individual cell lines. The transduction of the hTPO gene per se is not sufficient to restore iodide trapping in non-iodide-concentrating tumour cells. Future studies

  6. Study of semitransparent palladium contacts on mercuric iodide by photoluminescence spectroscopy and thermally stimulated current measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, X. J.; Schlesinger, T. E.; James, R. B.; Gentry, G. L.; Cheng, A. Y.; Ortale, C.

    1991-04-01

    Semitransparent palladium contacts on mercuric iodide were studied by low temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy and thermally stimulated conductivity. These contacts were deposited either by thermal evaporation or by plasma sputtering. Changes due to palladium deposition were found in the photoluminescence spectra and were attributed to modifications in the stoichiometry within the palladium/mercuric iodide interfacial region. Thermally stimulated conductivity measurements revealed two dominant traps with activation energies of 0.010 and 0.54 eV. The importance of these traps in the application of nuclear detection is discussed.

  7. Study of semitransparent palladium contacts on mercuric iodide by photoluminescence spectroscopy and thermally stimulated current measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, X.J.; Schlesinger, T.E. (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (US)); James, R.B.; Gentry, G.L. (Advanced Materials Research Division, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94550 (US)); Cheng, A.Y.; Ortale, C. (EG G Energy Measurements, Inc., Goleta, California 93116 (US))

    1991-04-15

    Semitransparent palladium contacts on mercuric iodide were studied by low temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy and thermally stimulated conductivity. These contacts were deposited either by thermal evaporation or by plasma sputtering. Changes due to palladium deposition were found in the photoluminescence spectra and were attributed to modifications in the stoichiometry within the palladium/mercuric iodide interfacial region. Thermally stimulated conductivity measurements revealed two dominant traps with activation energies of 0.010 and 0.54 eV. The importance of these traps in the application of nuclear detection is discussed.

  8. Photoemission and optical constant measurements of a Cesium Iodide thin film photocathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of cesium iodide as a reflective photocathode is presented. The absolute quantum efficiency of a 500 nm thick film of cesium iodide has been measured in the wavelength range 150 nm–200 nm. The optical absorbance has been analyzed in the wavelength range 190 nm–900 nm and the optical band gap energy has been calculated. The dispersion properties were determined from the refractive index using an envelope plot of the transmittance data. The morphological and elemental film composition have been investigated by atomic force microscopy and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy techniques

  9. Hydrogen atom position in hydrated iodide anion from x-ray absorption near edge structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen atom position in the hydrated iodide anion complex is determined from X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) of an aqueous iodide solution at both the K- and L-edges. The spectra are compared with the theoretical ones calculated by using the FEFF method for several model geometries having hydrogen atoms at different positions. Satisfactory agreements are obtained from models with an almost linear alignment of iodine-hydrogen-oxygen atoms, indicating the capability of the XANES analysis when it is combined with the multiple scattering calculations as a method to detect the positions of hydrogen atoms in the first coordination sphere. (author)

  10. Quick analytical method for the determination of iodide and iodate ions in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytical quick-test method was developed to determine iodide and iodate ions in aqueous solutions using solid phase extraction cartridges for sample preparation. Work was focussed on finding simple, but efficient conditions for quantitative separation of iodate and iodide. Iodine amounts were then determined by standard methods. Ion-exchange absorbers in cartridge form were used. Selectivity and yield of the species separation were studied at pH value of 5-10 and various solution compositions using 131I radioactive tracer. The electrolytes used were diluted alkaline, nitrate and boric acid-borate solutions. Application to nuclear reactor cooling water analysis or environmental investigations and monitoring is proposed. (author)

  11. Nitrosyl iodide, INO: A combined ab initio and high-resolution spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailleux, S.; Duflot, D.; Aiba, S.; Nakahama, S.; Ozeki, H.

    2016-04-01

    In the nitrosyl halides series (XNO, where X = F, Cl, Br, I), INO is the only chemical species whose rotational spectrum has not been reported. Nitrosyl iodide, together with the nitryl (INO2), nitrite (IONO) and nitrate (IONO2) iodides, is believed to impact tropospheric ozone levels. Guided by our quantum chemical calculations, we report the detection of INO in the gas phase by high-resolution spectroscopy for the first time. INO was generated by mixing continuously I2 and NO. The measurement and least-squares analysis of 173 a-type rotational transitions resulted in the accurate determination of molecular parameters.

  12. Studying the iodine leaching from the compositions based on epoxide resin and lead iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When studying iodine leaching, the possibility to use solid compositions, produced by incorporation of dry powdered lead iodide and its aqueous suspension into epoxide resin for long-term immobilization of iodine-129 under conditions of monitored storage, is evaluated. Analysis of the results obtained has shown that leaching rate in the first 4 days has the maximum value and constitutes (4.2 - 2700.0) x 10-6 cm/day. Then the process of leaching is determined by diffusion mechanism. For samples, prepared by wet lead iodide incorporation the rate of leaching is higher than that of the corresponding samples prepared by dry compound incorporation

  13. Studying Equilibrium in the Chemical Reaction between Ferric and Iodide Ions in Solution Using a Simple and Inexpensive Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaychuk, Pavel Anatolyevich; Kuvaeva, Alyona Olegovna

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory experiment on the study of the chemical equilibrium based on the reaction between ferric and iodide ions in solution with the formation of ferrous ions, free iodine, and triiodide ions is developed. The total concentration of iodide and triiodide ions in the reaction mixture during the reaction is determined by the argentometric…

  14. Synthesis of a Stable Primary-Alkyl-Substituted Selenenyl Iodide and Its Hydrolytic Conversion to the Corresponding Selenenic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sase, Shohei; Kakimoto, Ryo; Kimura, Ryutaro; Goto, Kei

    2015-01-01

    A primary-alkyl-substituted selenenyl iodide was successfully synthesized through oxidative iodination of a selenol with N-iodosuccinimide by taking advantage of a cavity-shaped steric protection group. The selenenyl iodide exhibited high thermal stability and remained unchanged upon heating at 100 °C for 3 h in [D₈]toluene. The selenenyl iodide was reduced to the corresponding selenol by treatment with dithiothreitol. Hydrolysis of the selenenyl iodide under alkaline conditions afforded the corresponding selenenic acid almost quantitatively, corroborating the chemical validity of the recent proposal that hydrolysis of a selenenyl iodide to a selenenic acid is potentially involved in the catalytic mechanism of an iodothyronine deiodinase. PMID:26633336

  15. Synthesis of a Stable Primary-Alkyl-Substituted Selenenyl Iodide and Its Hydrolytic Conversion to the Corresponding Selenenic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohei Sase

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A primary-alkyl-substituted selenenyl iodide was successfully synthesized through oxidative iodination of a selenol with N-iodosuccinimide by taking advantage of a cavity-shaped steric protection group. The selenenyl iodide exhibited high thermal stability and remained unchanged upon heating at 100 °C for 3 h in [D8]toluene. The selenenyl iodide was reduced to the corresponding selenol by treatment with dithiothreitol. Hydrolysis of the selenenyl iodide under alkaline conditions afforded the corresponding selenenic acid almost quantitatively, corroborating the chemical validity of the recent proposal that hydrolysis of a selenenyl iodide to a selenenic acid is potentially involved in the catalytic mechanism of an iodothyronine deiodinase.

  16. Analysis of iodide and iodate in Lake Mead, Nevada using a headspace derivatization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, James W; Steinberg, Spencer M

    2010-02-01

    We report here a derivatization headspace method for the analysis of inorganic iodine in water. Samples from Lake Mead, the Las Vegas Wash, and from Las Vegas tap water were examined. Lake Mead and the Las Vegas Wash contained a mixture of both iodide and iodate. The average concentration of total inorganic iodine (TII) for Lake Mead was approximately 90 nM with an iodide-to-iodate ratio of approximately 1. The TII concentration (approximately 160 nM) and the ratio of iodide to iodate were higher for the Las Vegas Wash (approximately 2). The TII concentration for tap water was close to that of Lake Mead (approximately 90 nM); however, tap water contained no detectable iodide as a result of ozonation and chlorine treatment which converts all of the iodide to iodate. PMID:19184627

  17. The sodium iodide symporter: its implications for imaging and therapy; Der Natrium-Iodid-Symporter (NIS): Bedeutung fuer die Bildgebung und therapeutische Optionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitzweg, C. [Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum Grosshadern, Muenchen (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) is an intrinsic plasma membrane glycoprotein that mediates the active transport of iodide in the thyroid gland and a number of extrathyroidal tissues, in particular lactating mammary gland. In addition to its key function in thyroid physiology, NIS-mediated iodide accumulation allows diagnostic thyroid scintigraphy as well as therapeutic radioiodine application in benign and malignant thyroid disease. NIS therefore represents one of the oldest targets for molecular imaging and therapy. Based on the effective administration of radioiodine that has been used for over 60 years in the management of follicular cell-derived thyroid cancer, cloning and characterization of the NIS gene has paved the way for the development of a novel cytoreductive gene therapy strategy based on targeted NIS expression in thyroidal and nonthyroidal cancer cells followed by therapeutic application of {sup 131}I or alternative radionuclides, including {sup 188}Re and {sup 211}At. In addition, the possibility of direct and non-invasive imaging of functional NIS expression by {sup 123}I- and {sup 99m}Tc-scintigraphy or {sup 124}I-PET-imaging allows the application of NIS as a novel reporter gene. In conclusion, the dual role of NIS as diagnostic and therapeutic gene and the detection of extra-thyroidal endogenous NIS expression in breast cancer open promising perspectives in nuclear medicine and molecular oncology for diagnostic and therapeutic application of NIS outside the thyroid gland. (orig.)

  18. Relaxation of the Silver/Silver Iodide Electrode in Aqueous Solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peverelli, K.J.

    1979-01-01

    The aim of this study is to detect and characterize relaxation processes on silver/silver iodide electrodes in aqueous electrolyte solution. The information obtained is to be used for an estimation of the consequences of similar processes on colloidal AgI particles during encounter.In chapter 1 a ge

  19. Effect of hot-pressing conditions on the properties of iodide sodalite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higher hot-pressing temperatures and pressures increase density and reduce porosity and leachability of the iodide sodalite products. The effect of temperature is more significant than pressure with a significantly superior waste form being produced at 10600C compared to 8200C. Products prepared at 10600C and 5000 to 7000 psi pressure have apparent densities of 2.60 g/cm3 (99.5% of theoretical), porosities -6 g/cm2/d. Iodine concentration in the products is 15 to 20 wt %. These tests further substantiate the viability of using hot-pressed iodide sodalites as long-term waste forms for isolating long-lived 129I from the environment. The products produced at high temperatures are extremely hard, mechanically stable, capable of incorporating large amounts of iodine in a small volume, and have excellent leaching characteristics. In this study, sodalite formed at high temperatures containing 20 wt % iodine, had cumulative fraction leach values of approx. 2.6 x 10-6 cm for 96 h, and incremental leach rates of approx. 3.2 x 10-7 cm/d. Even though initial results look promising, work should continue in the following areas: (1) long-term leaching of products; (2) determine optimum conditions and effect of process variables on hydrothermal reaction; (3) characterize structural, crystal, and mechanical properties of iodide sodalite product; and (4) develop better methods of measuring iodide losses during the process

  20. Solution enthalpy of potassium iodide in furfural and its mixtures with dimethylsulfoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solution enthalpy of potassium iodide in furfural-dimethylsulfoxide mixtures at 298.15 K and furfural concentration 17.3-100% are determined experimentally. K+ and I- ion solvate shell composition, which in the general case doesn't correspond to the mixed solvent composition, is calculated

  1. The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and potential regulators in normal, benign and malignant human breast tissue.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, James

    2011-01-01

    The presence, relevance and regulation of the Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS) in human mammary tissue remains poorly understood. This study aimed to quantify relative expression of NIS and putative regulators in human breast tissue, with relationships observed further investigated in vitro.

  2. Investigations related to the chemical behaviour of methyl iodide at severe PWR-accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decomposition velocity of methyl iodide in aqueous solutions of boric acid has been measured at temperatures up to 423 K and at chemical conditions which are expected to exist in the sumpwater pool during a severe reactor accident. The decomposition was due only to hydrolysis which increased by the expected amount at high temperature. No influence of the cooling water additives was observed. Treatment of the available kinetic data indicated that the influence of polluting material expectedly present in the sump is likely to be negligible too. A possible exception may be the enhancement of the decomposition rate by particulate and dissolved silver. The resistance of methyl iodide to gas phase decomposition by steam and oxygen at 423 K was investigated and only slow decomposition in the order of 10-7/s observed which is explained by reaction with steel surfaces. Neither gas phase oxidation nor hydrolysis occur at this temperature. The resistance to oxidation is of kinetic nature. Gas phase hydrolysis is not possible due to thermodynamics. This was confirmed by the observed gas phase formation of methyl iodide from hydrogen iodide and methanol at 423 K. The kinetics of this reaction are best explained by two parallel reactions, one of second order with a kinetic constant of 1.25 x 10-5/kPa s, and one of third order under action of steam with a constant of 2 x 10-6/kPa2 s. (orig./HP)

  3. Monochloramine determination using NN diethyl-p-phenylene-diamine. Influence of iodide traces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When determining ''D.P.D.'' free oxidizers, the monochloramine interfers in particular for iodide levels analogous to those likely to be found in sea water. This is not so for iodate. The zero time extrapolation of the change in colour curve is one method that enables the method to be made more selective

  4. Photodissociation of sodium iodide and resonant ionization of sodium atom produced

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUO Bing-hai; Z.T.Salim; A.H.Bakery

    2004-01-01

    Resonant ionization spectroscopy (RIS) and resonant ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS) are employed to detect the photodissociation product of sodium iodide molecules in a molecular beam in an intense laser field in the absence of the buffer gases. Time of flight mass spectra is recorded. In particular, the appearances of multiphoton ionization are discussed.

  5. Reductive degradation of perfluoroalkyl compounds with aquated electrons generated from iodide photolysis at 254 nm

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hyunwoong; vecitis, Chad D.; Cheng, Jie; Dalleska, Nathan F; Mader, Brian T.; Hoffmann, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    The perfluoroalkyl compounds (PFCs), perfluoroalkyl sulfonates (PFXS) and perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFXA) are environmentally persistent and recalcitrant towards most conventional water treatment technologies. Here, we complete an in depth examination of the UV-254 nm production of aquated electrons during iodide photolysis for the reductive defluorination of six aquated perfluoroalkyl compounds (PFCs) of various headgroup and perfluorocarbon tail length. Cyclic voltammograms (CV) show tha...

  6. Leaching of iodide (I(-)) and iodate (IO3(-)) anions from synthetic layered double hydroxide materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiss, Frederick L; Ayoko, Godwin A; Frost, Ray L

    2016-09-15

    Several studies have previously demonstrated that layered double hydroxides (LDHs) show considerable potential for the adsorption of radioiodine from aqueous solution; however, few studies have demonstrated that these materials are able to store radioactive (131)I for an acceptable period. The leaching of iodide (I(-)) and iodate (IO3(-)) form Mg/Al LDHs has been carried out. Contact time appeared to be a more significant variable for the leaching of iodate (IO3(-)) compared to that of iodide (I(-)). Experimental results are fitted to the pseudo second order model, suggesting that diffusion is likely to be the rate-limiting step. The presence of carbonate in the leaching solution appeared to significantly increase the leaching of iodide (I(-)) as did the presence of chloride to a lesser extent. The maximum amount of iodate (IO3(-)) leached using ultrapure water as the leaching solution was 21% of the iodate (IO3(-)) originally present. The corresponding result for iodide (I(-)) was even lower at 3%. PMID:27309951

  7. Electron stimulated reactions of methyl iodide coadsorbed with amorphous solid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron stimulated reactions of methyl iodide (MeI) adsorbed on and suspended within amorphous solid water (ice) were studied using a combination of postirradiation temperature programmed desorption and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy. For MeI adsorbed on top of amorphous solid water (ice), electron beam irradiation is responsible for both structural and chemical transformations within the overlayer. Electron stimulated reactions of MeI result principally in the formation of methyl radicals and solvated iodide anions. The cross section for electron stimulated decomposition of MeI is comparable to the gas phase value and is only weakly dependent upon the local environment. For both adsorbed MeI and suspended MeI, reactions of methyl radicals within MeI clusters lead to the formation of ethane, ethyl iodide, and diiodomethane. In contrast, reactions between the products of methyl iodide and water dissociation are responsible for the formation of methanol and carbon dioxide. Methane, formed as a result of reactions between methyl radicals and either parent MeI molecules or hydrogen atoms, is also observed. The product distribution is found to depend on the film's initial chemical composition as well as the electron fluence. Results from this study highlight the similarities in the carbon-containing products formed when monohalomethanes coadsorbed with amorphous solid water are irradiated by either electrons or photons

  8. LIQUID-CRYSTALLINE AND THERMOCHROMIC BEHAVIOR OF 4-SUBSTITUTED 1-METHYLPYRIDINIUM IODIDE SURFACTANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NUSSELDER, JJH; ENGBERTS, JBFN; VANDOREN, HA

    1993-01-01

    The mesogenic behaviour of a series of thirty-one 1-alkyl-4-(or 2-)alkyl-pyridinium salts and of a homologous series of four 1-methyl-4-n-alkoxycarbonylpyridinium iodides is described. The occurrence and stability range of the thermotropic phases depend dramatically on the structure of the surfactan

  9. Phase partitioning, retention kinetics, and leaching of fumigant methyl iodide in agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although it is not currently being sold in the USA, the recent US registration of the fumigant methyl iodide has led to an increased interest in its environmental fate and transport. Although some work has now considered its volatile emissions from soil, there remains a lack of experimental data reg...

  10. Mitigating 1,3-dichloropropene, chloropicrin, and methyl iodide emissions from fumigated soil with reactive film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Implicated as a stratospheric ozone-depleting compound, methyl bromide (MeBr) is being phased out despite being considered to be the most effective soil fumigant. Its alternatives, i.e., 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D, which includes cis- and trans- isomers), chloropicrin (CP) and methyl iodide (MeI), h...

  11. Expedient Method for Samarium(II) Iodide Preparation Utilizing a Flow Approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Voltrová, Svatava; Šrogl, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 3 (2013), s. 394-396. ISSN 0936-5214 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12013 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : flow * samarium * iodide * reduction Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.463, year: 2013

  12. Surface treatments of silver rods with enhanced iodide adsorption for I-125 brachytherapy seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study described an effective method to load 125I on silver rods for the preparation of a brachytherapy source. We tested various ligands on the silver rod surface to screen the one with the highest adsorption and specific radioactivity. In addition, we investigated the effect of surface etching to increase the adsorption capability followed by the extended surface area. We also found that the use of an oxidant during iodide adsorption can increase the loading significantly. The maximum activity of 137.90 MBq/rod (3.7269 mCi/rod) was achieved on the etched silver rods with phosphate ligand and hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant. In addition, this is 4.5-fold higher than that of the conventional chloride treatment method. - Highlights: • Surface treatment of silver rods with several ligands was investigated to find optimum ligand for production of I-125 seeds. • Activity of adsorbed iodide was increased up to 499% on HNO3-etched rods compared to H2O-washed rods. • When H2O2 was used as an oxidant for surface-modification, the amount of adsorbed iodide was increased up to 589%. • Activity of adsorbed iodide exhibited the highest value (137.90 MBq/rod) on rods etched and treated with PO43− and H2O2

  13. The Reaction between Iron(II) Iodide and Potassium Dichromate(VI) in Acidified Aqueous Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This "Science note" teaching lesson explores the possible reaction between the ions in a reaction mixture consisting of iron(II) iodide and potassium dichromate(VI) in acidified aqueous solution. The electrode potentials will be used to deduce any spontaneous reactions under standard thermodynamic conditions (298 K, 1 bar (approximately…

  14. Diffusion coefficient determination of sodium iodide vapor in rare gases with use of ionization sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diffusion coefficients of sodium iodide vapor in the rare gases, argon, krypton and xenon, are determined by a method combining the analysis of measured diffusing mass with continuous monitoring of the sodium iodide vapor concentration in a flowing stream of sodium iodide-rare gas mixture. The flowing sodium iodide vapor is ionized upon its passage over a heated filament, and the generated ions are collected by a negatively-charged arched plate saddling the filament. The resulting ion current, measured by digital current meter, is integrated in time to obtain cumulative values from outset of run. The curve of the integrated values plotted against time approaches linearity with progress of run. The asymptote of the curve intersects the time axis at a point whose position serves to determine the diffusion coefficient, by applying an equation derived from the formula given by Carslaw and Jaeger. The coefficients thus determined for the three rare gases in runs at temperatures between 660degC and 710degC have proved to agree well with the values estimated using the semi-empirical correlation presented by Wilke and Lee. (author)

  15. Kinetics and Mechanism of Iodide Oxidation by Iron(III): A Clock Reaction Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Jurica; Tomisic, Vladislav; Vrkljan, Petar B. A.

    2008-01-01

    A simple method for studying the kinetics of a chemical reaction is described and the significance of reaction orders in deducing reaction mechanisms is demonstrated. In this student laboratory experiment, oxidation of iodide by iron(III) ions in an acidic medium is transformed into a clock reaction. By means of the initial rates method, it is…

  16. Heat and Radiation Effects on Iodide Sorption by Surfactant Modified Bentonite (SMB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive waste repository is designed using multiple barriers to prevent the release of radionuclides to environments. Bentonite has been used as engineering barrier in many countries. Although the bentonite is an effective sorbent for cationic radionuclides, it is not good for anions such as 129-I and 99-Tc because of negative surface charges over the pH. Radioactive iodine exists usually as anions such as iodate (IO3-) and iodide (I-) as stable iodine species in groundwater environments. Therefore, the iodine is one of the most difficult elements for its transport through engineering barrier (i. e., bentonite) to be controlled by sorption processes in the geological repository. We modified the bentonite using a cationic surfactant to enhance iodine sorption capability. The goal of this study is addressed to evaluate the effects of sorption of high heat and radiation on iodide sorption to surfactant modified bentonite (SMB) which can be used as engineering barrier in the repository. The iodide sorption on the SMBs was significantly affected by temperature conditions rather than radiation. As temperature increases, the iodide sorption decreases. Considering the similar sorption abilities between 100 and 200% SMBs, the 100% SMB is economical sorbent to apply for engineering barrier in a geological repository

  17. Theoretical calculations of primary particle condensation for cadmium and caesium iodide vapours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report considers a model of aerosol nucleation from the vapour phase which has been developed by Buckle. The applicability of the model has been tested by considering the condensation of caesium iodide and cadmium vapours under a wide variety of pre-mixed flow conditions of interest to PWR severe accident studies. (U.K.)

  18. Electrical properties of silver iodide nanoparticles system embedded into opal porous matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opal-based composite with silver iodide nanoparticles (AgI/opal) has been prepared by host-guest technology. Temperature and frequency dependences of electrical conductivity and those of dielectric permittivity of AgI/opal samples were measured. Size effects in this opal-based nanocomposite have been discussed

  19. Solvation thermodynamics of ammonium iodide ions in 2-propanol and its mixtures with water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrometric method using chains without transfer has been applied to determine total thermodynamic characteristics of ammonium iodide ions salvation in 2-propanol and its mixtures with water at 278.15-308.15 K.Regularities of their changes with temperature and composition of a mixed solvent are considered

  20. Reversible stimulus-responsive Cu(I) iodide pyridine coordination polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amo-Ochoa, P; Hassanein, K; Gómez-García, C J; Benmansour, S; Perles, J; Castillo, O; Martínez, J I; Ocón, P; Zamora, F

    2015-10-01

    We present a structurally flexible copper-iodide-pyridine-based coordination polymer showing drastic variations in its electrical conductivity driven by temperature and sorption of acetic acid molecules. The dramatic effect on the electrical conductivity enables the fabrication of a simple and robust device for gas detection. X-ray diffraction studies and DFT calculations allow the rationalisation of these observations. PMID:26264525