WorldWideScience

Sample records for american naturalist highlights

  1. Annual scientific meeting--American Headache Society Washington 2011--highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, R Allan

    2012-05-01

    The 53rd Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Headache Society was held in Washington from June 2 to 5, 2011. Important clinical and basic science information was presented at this meeting. This is a review of the highlights of that meeting dealing in many areas of headache medicine. Once again, this meeting, which is the premier scientific meeting of the American Headache Society, provided lots of new and exciting information about multiple facets of migraine headache and other disorders.

  2. Interpretive signs designed to trigger naturalist intelligence at two American zoos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Martha

    An investigation of interpretive graphics was conducted in 2005 at two mid-sized AZA-accredited zoos, Lowry Park Zoo, Tampa, Florida and Knoxville Zoo, Knoxville, Tennessee. The Lowry Park Zoo study investigated signs at a red-tailed hawk and sandhill crane exhibit. Combination signs and wordless signs were more effective helping visitors see animals, increasing holding time, and number of engagements than treatments of no signs, or signs with words only. A second study, at Knoxville Zoo, tested combination and wordless signs in a children's zoo, investigating 31 signs at a 3.5-acre exhibit. Comparisons of visitors seeing the animals/using interactive exhibit elements, holding time, and engagement activities, showed wordless signs were more effective than combination signs. Differences in gender ratio, age, group size, and other demographics were not significant. Visit motivation differed between zoos, with visitors from Lowry Park Zoo more often articulating reason for a visit as wanting to see animals. Visitors at Knoxville Zoo most often said they wanted to spend time with family and friends. Differences in potential for naturalist intelligence were probably related to local practices rather than to innate differences in naturalist intelligence. The number of communities in Florida that regulate pet ownership and provide lawn service could account for the lower number of people who have pets and plants. At both institutions, behaviors supported educational theories. The importance of signs as advanced organizers was shown where signs were removed at the bird exhibit at Lowry Park Zoo, with fewer visitors seeing the animals. Social interaction was noted at both zoos, with intra- and inter-group conversations observed. If naturalist intelligence is necessary to see animals, visitors run a continuum. Some are unable to see animals with signs and assistance from other visitors; others see animals with little difficulty. The importance of honing naturalist

  3. Revisiting Paine's 1966 Sea Star Removal Experiment, the Most-Cited Empirical Article in the American Naturalist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D; Suchanek, Thomas H

    2016-10-01

    "Food Web Complexity and Species Diversity" (Paine 1966) is the most-cited empirical article published in the American Naturalist. In short, Paine removed predatory sea stars (Pisaster ochraceus) from the rocky intertidal and watched the key prey species, mussels (Mytilus californianus), crowd out seven subordinate primary space-holding species. However, because these mussels are a foundational species, they provide three-dimensional habitat for over 300 associated species inhabiting the mussel beds; thus, removing sea stars significantly increases community-wide diversity. In any case, most ecologists cite Paine (1966) to support a statement that predators increase diversity by interfering with competition. Although detractors remained skeptical of top-down effects and keystone concepts, the paradigm that predation increases diversity spread. By 1991, "Food Web Complexity and Species Diversity" was considered a classic ecological paper, and after 50 years it continues to influence ecological theory and conservation biology.

  4. Revisiting Paine’s 1966 sea star removal experiment, the most-cited empirical article in the American Naturalist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Suchanek, Tom

    2016-01-01

    “Food Web Complexity and Species Diversity” (Paine 1966) is the most-cited empirical article published in the American Naturalist. In short, Paine removed predatory sea stars (Pisaster ochraceus) from the rocky intertidal and watched the key prey species, mussels (Mytilus californianus), crowd out seven subordinate primary space-holding species. However, because these mussels are a foundational species, they provide three-dimensional habitat for over 300 associated species inhabiting the mussel beds; thus, removing sea stars significantly increases community-wide diversity. In any case, most ecologists cite Paine (1966) to support a statement that predators increase diversity by interfering with competition. Although detractors remained skeptical of top-down effects and keystone concepts, the paradigm that predation increases diversity spread. By 1991, “Food Web Complexity and Species Diversity” was considered a classic ecological paper, and after 50 years it continues to influence ecological theory and conservation biology.

  5. Naturalistic nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Trevor

    2011-01-01

    Where nurse education aims to provide an overarching intellectual framework, this paper argues that it should be the framework of naturalism. After an exposition of the chief features of naturalism and its relationship to science and morality, the paper describes naturalistic nursing, contrasting it with some other perspectives. There follows a defence of naturalism and naturalistic nursing against several objections, including those concerning spirituality, religion, meaning, morality, and alternative sources of knowledge. The paper ends with some of the advantages of the naturalistic approach.

  6. A Naturalistic Reading of Sister Carrie

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谈月

    2016-01-01

    Sister Carrie is well known as the works in which naturalism attained maturity in America. Up until now, the relevant research on Dreiser and his Sister Carrie abroad and at home is primarily concerned with the frustration of American dream, the naturalistic thoughts and pessimism. The paper attempts to study it from naturalistic point of view and explain how environmental, hereditary factors and the idea of“survival of the fittest”influence Carrie’s fate.

  7. North-American Conference Highlights the Treatment of Trauma Utilizing Guided Imagery and Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott-Montcrieff, Suzannah; Beck, Bolette Daniels; Montgomery, Erin

    2015-01-01

    A report on the 2015 Association for Music and Imagery conference highlights papers that address clinical practice and research using Guided Imagery and Music for the treatment of trauma.......A report on the 2015 Association for Music and Imagery conference highlights papers that address clinical practice and research using Guided Imagery and Music for the treatment of trauma....

  8. Highlights from Drug Use Among American High School Students 1975-1977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Lloyd D.; And Others

    The current prevalence of drug use among American high school seniors and the trends in use since 1975 are the two major topics treated. Also reported are prevailing attitudes and beliefs among seniors concerning various types of drug use. Eleven separate classes of drugs are distinguished: marihuana (including hashish), inhalants, hallucinogens,…

  9. Naturalistic Moral Realism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Susnik

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this paper is probably the most influential version of moral realism, known as “moral realism naturalism”. After I propose what seems to be the most appropriate formulation of moral realism, I discuss whether it is possible to show that moral properties and natural properties can be identified a posteriori. In the second part I try to show that moral realists naturalists cannot refute wellknown Mackie’s “argument from querness” (or at least one version of that argument. In the end I discuss whether moral realists naturalists can ascribe the explanatory power to moral properties.

  10. A systematic review of naturalistic interventions in refugee populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wyk, Sierra; Schweitzer, Robert D

    2014-10-01

    Naturalistic interventions with refugee populations examine outcomes following mental health interventions in existing refugee service organisations. The current review aimed to examine outcomes of naturalistic interventions and quality of the naturalistic intervention literature in refugee populations with the view to highlight the strengths and limitations of naturalistic intervention studies. Database search was conducted using the search terms 'refugee', 'asylum seeker', 'treatment', 'therapy' and 'intervention. No date limitations were applied, but searches were limited to articles written in English. Seven studies were identified that assessed the outcome of naturalistic interventions on adult refugees or asylum seekers in a country of resettlement using quantitative outcome measures. Results showed significant variation in the outcomes of naturalistic intervention studies, with a trend towards showing decreased symptomatology at post-intervention. However, conclusions are limited by methodological problems of the studies reviewed, particularly poor documentation of intervention methods and lack of control in the design of naturalistic intervention studies. Further examination of outcomes following naturalistic interventions is needed with studies which focus on increasing the rigour of the outcome assessment process.

  11. Naturalistic decision making and macrocognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schraagen, J.M.; Militello, L.; Ormerod, T.; Lipshitz, R.

    2008-01-01

    This book presents the latest work in the area of naturalistic decision making (NDM) and its extension into the area of macrocognition. It contains 18 chapters relating research centered on the study of expertise in naturalistic settings, written by international experts in NDM and cognitive systems

  12. Naturalistic Elements in The Egg

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    惠菲菲

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze the naturalistic elements in The Egg, which is taken from the collection of short stories, The Triumph of the Egg. The study states the ideology and technique of naturalism and then exams how naturalistic ele-ments are revealed in the fiction. Then it comes to the conclusion that the family is defeated by the egg and the life of human be-ings is under control of complicated forces from both inside and outside.

  13. Reverend Paley's naturalist revival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Peter

    2008-03-01

    This paper analyzes the remarkable popularity of William Paley's argument from design among contemporary naturalists in biology and the philosophy of science. In philosophy of science Elliott Sober has argued that creationism should be excluded from the schools not because it is not science but because it is 'less likely' than evolution according to fairly standard confirmation theory. Creationism is said to have been a plausible scientific option as presented by Paley but no longer to be acceptable according to the same standards that once approved it. In biology C. G. Williams and Richard Dawkins have seen in Paley a proto-adaptationist. This paper shows that the historical assumptions of Sober's arguments are wrong and that the philosophical arguments themselves take alternatives to science to be alternatives in science and conflate the null hypothesis, chance, with a competing explanatory hypothesis. It is also shown that the similarity of Paley's adaptationism to that of contemporary biology is not what it is made out to be.

  14. UDRIVE : the European naturalistic driving study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eenink, R.G. Barnard, Y. Baumann, M. Augros, X. & Utesch, F.

    2014-01-01

    UDRIVE is the first large-scale European Naturalistic Driving Study on cars, trucks and powered two wheelers. The acronym stands for “European naturalistic Driving and Riding for Infrastructure & Vehicle safety and Environment”. Naturalistic driving can be defined as a study undertaken to provide in

  15. Naturalistic Elements in Sister Carrie

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘艳晖

    2007-01-01

    @@ Theodore Dreiser is considered to be a controversial writer.His first novel.Sister Carrie makes a new way of presenting re-ality.This paper discusses the naturalistic elements from the de-tailed description of the environment in that society.

  16. "No More Mr. Nice Guy": Preservice Teachers' Conflict with Classroom Management in a Predominantly African-American Urban Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Karen M.; Moule, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Using methods of naturalistic inquiry, this study examines preservice teachers' conflict with classroom management strategies used in a predominantly African-American urban elementary school. It highlights the theory/practice dilemma, focusing on the tensions between the democratic strategies taught in university classes and the more authoritarian…

  17. From bench to bedside: successful translational nanomedicine: highlights of the Third Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chiming; Liu, Nanhai; Xu, Pingyi; Heller, Mike; Tomalia, Donald A; Haynie, Donald T; Chang, Esther H; Wang, Kuan; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Lyubchenko, Yuri L; Bawa, Raj; Tian, Ryan; Hanes, Justin; Pun, Suzie; Meiners, Jens-Christian; Guo, Peixuan

    2007-12-01

    The Third Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Nanomedicine (AANM) was held at the University of California San Diego, in San Diego, California during September 7-8, 2007. The meeting was focused on successful translational nanomedicine: from bench to bedside. There were four keynote lectures and eight scientific symposiums in this meeting. The researchers and investigators reported the results and process of current nanomedicine research and approaches to clinical applications. The meeting provided exciting information for nanomedicine clinical-related researches and strategy for further development of nanomedicine research which will be benefits to clinical practice.

  18. Whole genome sequencing of an African American family highlights toll like receptor 6 variants in Kawasaki disease susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeraraghavan, Narayanan; Levy, Eric; Ribeiro dos Santos, Andre M.; Yang, Hai; Hibberd, Martin L.; Tremoulet, Adriana H.; Harismendy, Olivier; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Burns, Jane C.

    2017-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is the most common acquired pediatric heart disease. We analyzed Whole Genome Sequences (WGS) from a 6-member African American family in which KD affected two of four children. We sought rare, potentially causative genotypes by sequentially applying the following WGS filters: sequence quality scores, inheritance model (recessive homozygous and compound heterozygous), predicted deleteriousness, allele frequency, genes in KD-associated pathways or with significant associations in published KD genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and with differential expression in KD blood transcriptomes. Biologically plausible genotypes were identified in twelve variants in six genes in the two affected children. The affected siblings were compound heterozygous for the rare variants p.Leu194Pro and p.Arg247Lys in Toll-like receptor 6 (TLR6), which affect TLR6 signaling. The affected children were also homozygous for three common, linked (r2 = 1) intronic single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in TLR6 (rs56245262, rs56083757 and rs7669329), that have previously shown association with KD in cohorts of European descent. Using transcriptome data from pre-treatment whole blood of KD subjects (n = 146), expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses were performed. Subjects homozygous for the intronic risk allele (A allele of TLR6 rs56245262) had differential expression of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) as a function of genotype (p = 0.0007) and a higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate at diagnosis. TLR6 plays an important role in pathogen-associated molecular pattern recognition, and sequence variations may affect binding affinities that in turn influence KD susceptibility. This integrative genomic approach illustrates how the analysis of WGS in multiplex families with a complex genetic disease allows examination of both the common disease–common variant and common disease–rare variant hypotheses. PMID:28151979

  19. BBG Highlights

    Data.gov (United States)

    Broadcasting Board of Governors — BBG Highlights is a monthly summary of the BBG's accomplishments and news and developments affecting the Agency's work. Now, for the first time, this monthly update...

  20. Expo Highlights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG ZHIPING; SHAO DA

    2010-01-01

    @@ The 2010 World Expo opened in Shanghai on May 1.While serving as a platform to display the latest global scientific achievements and economic growth,it otters a wonderful opportunity for Chinese culture to be shared with the rest of the world as well.On this occasion,participants from 246 nations and international organizations gathered in Shanghai to create an Expo stage that goes beyond national,ethnic and religious boundaries,and to convey the Expo ideas of "understanding,communication,togetherness and cooperation" to the world.Currently,four highlights of the Expo are available to visitors.

  1. Naturalistic Inquiry in E-Learning Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Agostinho

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the author explains how and why one particular qualitative research approach, the naturalistic inquiry paradigm, was implemented in an e-learning research study that investigated the use of the World Wide Web technology in higher education. A framework is presented that situates the research study within the qualitative research literature. The author then justifies how the study was compliant with naturalistic inquiry and concludes by presenting a model for judging the quality of such research. The purpose of this article is to provide an example of how naturalistic inquiry can be implemented in e-learning research that can serve as a guide for researchers undertaking this form of qualitative inquiry. As such, the focus of the article is to illustrate how methodological issues pertaining to naturalistic inquiry were addressed and justified to represent a rigorous research approach rather than presenting the results of the research study.

  2. Primate Visual Perception: Motivated Attention in Naturalistic Scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, David W.; Sabatinelli, Dean

    2017-01-01

    Research has consistently revealed enhanced neural activation corresponding to attended cues coupled with suppression to unattended cues. This attention effect depends both on the spatial features of stimuli and internal task goals. However, a large majority of research supporting this effect involves circumscribed tasks that possess few ecologically relevant characteristics. By comparison, natural scenes have the potential to engage an evolved attention system, which may be characterized by supplemental neural processing and integration compared to mechanisms engaged during reduced experimental paradigms. Here, we describe recent animal and human studies of naturalistic scene viewing to highlight the specific impact of social and affective processes on the neural mechanisms of attention modulation.

  3. "An aristocracy of talent": the South Carolina physician-naturalists and their times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Charles S; Whitehead, A Weaver

    2014-01-01

    During the natural history movement of the 18th and early 19th centuries, Charleston as a center was rivaled in the United States only by Philadelphia, New York, and Boston. Prominent physician-naturalists included Alexander Garden (for whom the gardenia is named), John Edwards Holbrook ("father of American herpetology"), and Francis Peyre Porcher (whose Resources of Southern Fields and Forests helped Confederates compensate for drug shortages). The Charleston physician-naturalists belonged to an "aristocracy of talent" as distinguished from the "aristocracy of wealth" of lowcountry planters, who probably did more than any other group to perpetuate slavery and propel the South toward a disastrous civil war. None of the physician-naturalists actively opposed slavery or secession, a reminder that we are all prisoners of the prevailing paradigms and prejudices of our times.

  4. Naturalistic acquisition in an early language classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Anne; Vulchanova, Mila D

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether it is possible to provide naturalistic second language acquisition (SLA) of vocabulary for young learners in a classroom situation without resorting to a classical immersion approach. Participants were 60 first-grade pupils in two Norwegian elementary schools in their first year. The control group followed regular instruction as prescribed by the school curriculum, while the experimental group received increased naturalistic target language input. This entailed extensive use of English by the teacher during English classes, and also during morning meetings and for simple instructions and classroom management throughout the day. Our hypothesis was that it is possible to facilitate naturalistic acquisition through better quality target language exposure within a normal curriculum. The students' English vocabulary knowledge was measured using the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, version 4 (PPVT-IV, Dunn and Dunn, 2007a), at the beginning and the end of the first year of school. Findings are that (1) early-start second-language (L2) programs in school do not in themselves guarantee vocabulary development in the first year, (2) a focus on increased exposure to the L2 can lead to a significant increase in receptive vocabulary comprehension in the course of only 8 months, and (3) even with relatively modest input, learners in such an early-start L2 program can display vocabulary acquisition comparable in some respects to that of younger native children matched on vocabulary size. The overall conclusion is that naturalistic vocabulary acquisition is in fact possible in a classroom setting.

  5. Naturalistic acquisition in an early language classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eDahl

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated whether it is possible to provide naturalistic second language acquisition (SLA of vocabulary for young learners in a classroom situation without resorting to a classical immersion approach. Participants were 60 first-grade pupils in Norwegian two elementary schools in their first year. The control group followed regular instruction as prescribed by the school curriculum, while the experimental group received increased naturalistic target language input. This entailed extensive use of English by the teacher during English classes, and also during morning meetings and for simple instructions and classroom management throughout the day. Our hypothesis was that it is possible to facilitate naturalistic acquisition through better quality target language exposure within a normal curriculum. The students' English vocabulary knowledge was measured using the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, version 4 (PPVT-IV, Dunn & Dunn, 2007, at the beginning and the end of the first year of school. Findings are that 1 early-start second-language (L2 programs in school do not in themselves guarantee vocabulary development in the first year, 2 a focus on increased exposure to the L2 can lead to a significant increase in receptive vocabulary comprehension in the course of only eight months, and 3 even with relatively modest input, learners in such an early-start L2 program can display vocabulary acquisition comparable in some respects to that of younger native children matched on vocabulary size. The overall conclusion is that naturalistic vocabulary acquisition is in fact possible in a classroom setting.

  6. A naturalistic theory of economic organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoelhorst, J.W.; Richerson, P.J.

    2013-01-01

    We develop a theory of economic organization grounded in the naturalistic paradigm currently emerging at the intersection of biology and the behavioral and social sciences. The crux of this approach is the recognition that an understanding of the evolutionary origins of human organizational capabili

  7. The Disillusion of American Dream in Sister Carrie

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晴

    2016-01-01

    Dreiser is a generally acknowledged writer as one of American's literary naturalists. In Sister Carrie, the author skillfully used the naturalistic writing style which incisively and vividly showed the society environment at that time. The paper states the process that how the American dream in Sister Carrie disillusioned gradually.

  8. Naturalistic Cognition: A Research Paradigm for Human-Centered Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Storkerson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Naturalistic thinking and knowing, the tacit, experiential, and intuitive reasoning of everyday interaction, have long been regarded as inferior to formal reason and labeled primitive, fallible, subjective, superstitious, and in some cases ineffable. But, naturalistic thinking is more rational and definable than it appears. It is also relevant to design. Inquiry into the mechanisms of naturalistic thinking and knowledge can bring its resources into focus and enable designers to create better, human-centered designs for use in real-world settings. This article makes a case for the explicit, formal study of implicit, naturalistic thinking within the fields of design. It develops a framework for defining and studying naturalistic thinking and knowledge, for integrating them into design research and practice, and for developing a more integrated, consistent theory of knowledge in design. It will (a outline historical definitions of knowledge, attitudes toward formal and naturalistic thinking, and the difficulties presented by the co-presence of formal and naturalistic thinking in design, (b define and contrast formal and naturalistic thinking as two distinct human cognitive systems, (c demonstrate the importance of naturalistic cognition in formal thinking and real-world judgment, (d demonstrate methods for researching naturalistic thinking that can be of use in design, and (e briefly discuss the impact on design theory of admitting naturalistic thinking as valid, systematic, and knowable.

  9. Who's Afraid of the Naturalistic Fallacy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Curry

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available David Hume argued that values are the projections of natural human desires, and that moral values are the projections of desires that aim at the common good of society. Recent developments in game theory, evolutionary biology, animal behaviour and neuroscience explain why humans have such desires, and hence provide support for a Humean approach to moral psychology and moral philosophy. However, few philosophers have been willing to pursue this naturalistic approach to ethics for fear that it commits something called ‘the naturalistic fallacy’. This paper reviews several versions of the fallacy, and demonstrates that none of them present an obstacle to this updated, evolutionary version of Humean ethical naturalism.

  10. New technology and clinical applications of nanomedicine: highlights of the second annual meeting of the American Academy of Nanomedicine (Part I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chiming; Lyubchenko, Yuri L; Ghandehari, Hamid; Hanes, Justin; Stebe, Kathleen J; Mao, Hai-Quan; Haynie, Donald T; Tomalia, Donald A; Foldvari, Marianna; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy; Simeonova, Petia; Nie, Shuming; Mori, Hidezo; Gilbert, Susan P; Needham, David

    2006-12-01

    The Second Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Nanomedicine (AANM) was held at the National Academy of Science Building in Washington, DC, September 9-10, 2006. The program included two Nobel Prize Laureate Lectures, two Keynote Lectures, and 123 invited outstanding State-in-Art lectures presenting in 23 special concurrent symposia. In addition, there were 22 poster presentations in the meeting addressing different areas in nanomedicine research. All of the presenters at the meeting are outstanding investigators and researchers in the field. The Second Annual Meeting of the AANM was a great success. The meeting provides investigators from different world areas a forum and an opportunity for discussion. We believe that nanomedicine research will develop rapidly in the future. The AANM invites basic and clinical researchers from the world to join this exciting research.

  11. Rawls' theory of justice: a naturalistic evaluation(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun Chan, Ho

    2005-10-01

    This article critically evaluates John Rawls' theory of justice from a naturalistic perspective. The naturalistic approach is increasingly advocated in contemporary epistemology, philosophy of science, and philosophy of logic. Recently this approach has also become more influential in the study of ethics. Based on an experimental study on social justice conducted in Hong Kong, Beijing, and Taipei, this article argues that although Rawls' theory of justice has a naturalistic flavor, it has difficulty in standing up against the scrutiny of empirical tests if he commits himself to a fully fledged naturalistic approach.

  12. Highlights From the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists/ International Transporter Consortium Joint Workshop on Drug Transporters in Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, and Excretion: From the Bench to the Bedside - Clinical Pharmacology Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronaldson, P T; Bauer, B; El-Kattan, A F; Shen, H; Salphati, L; Louie, S W

    2016-11-01

    The American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists/International Transporter Consortium Joint Workshop on Drug Transporters in absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion was held with the objective of discussing innovative advances in transporter pharmacology. Specific topics included (i) transporters at the blood-brain barrier (BBB); (ii) emerging transport proteins; (iii) recent advances in achieving hepatoselectivity and optimizing clearance for organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) substrates; (iv) utility of animal models for transporter studies; and (v) clinical correlation of transporter polymorphisms. Here, we present state-of-the-art highlights from this workshop in these key areas of focus.

  13. Mind-wandering and alterations to default mode network connectivity when listening to naturalistic versus artificial sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould van Praag, Cassandra D.; Garfinkel, Sarah N.; Sparasci, Oliver; Mees, Alex; Philippides, Andrew O.; Ware, Mark; Ottaviani, Cristina; Critchley, Hugo D.

    2017-01-01

    Naturalistic environments have been demonstrated to promote relaxation and wellbeing. We assess opposing theoretical accounts for these effects through investigation of autonomic arousal and alterations of activation and functional connectivity within the default mode network (DMN) of the brain while participants listened to sounds from artificial and natural environments. We found no evidence for increased DMN activity in the naturalistic compared to artificial or control condition, however, seed based functional connectivity showed a shift from anterior to posterior midline functional coupling in the naturalistic condition. These changes were accompanied by an increase in peak high frequency heart rate variability, indicating an increase in parasympathetic activity in the naturalistic condition in line with the Stress Recovery Theory of nature exposure. Changes in heart rate and the peak high frequency were correlated with baseline functional connectivity within the DMN and baseline parasympathetic tone respectively, highlighting the importance of individual neural and autonomic differences in the response to nature exposure. Our findings may help explain reported health benefits of exposure to natural environments, through identification of alterations to autonomic activity and functional coupling within the DMN when listening to naturalistic sounds. PMID:28345604

  14. Intuitions in Epistemology: Towards a Naturalistic Alternative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoffer Ahlstrom

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper revisits the main methodological problems with conceptual analysis and considers two attempts to rectify them in terms of prototypes and reflective equilibria, respectively. Finding both wanting for the purposes of epistemological analysis, a naturalistic alternative is then sketched that explores the positive implications of aforementioned problems for the demarcation of the respective roles of intuitions and empirical investigation within three epistemological domains, viz., the evaluation of epistemological hypotheses, the amelioration of epistemic practices, and the construction of a theory of epistemic value.

  15. Temporal integration windows for naturalistic visual sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott L Fairhall

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that the brain possesses mechanisms to integrate incoming sensory information as it unfolds over time-periods of 2-3 seconds. The ubiquity of this mechanism across modalities, tasks, perception and production has led to the proposal that it may underlie our experience of the subjective present. A critical test of this claim is that this phenomenon should be apparent in naturalistic visual experiences. We tested this using movie-clips as a surrogate for our day-to-day experience, temporally scrambling them to require (re- integration within and beyond the hypothesized 2-3 second interval. Two independent experiments demonstrate a step-wise increase in the difficulty to follow stimuli at the hypothesized 2-3 second scrambling condition. Moreover, only this difference could not be accounted for by low-level visual properties. This provides the first evidence that this 2-3 second integration window extends to complex, naturalistic visual sequences more consistent with our experience of the subjective present.

  16. Naturalistic Cognition: A Research Paradigm for Human-Centered Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storkerson, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Naturalistic thinking and knowing, the tacit, experiential, and intuitive reasoning of everyday interaction, have long been regarded as inferior to formal reason and labeled primitive, fallible, subjective, superstitious, and in some cases ineffable. But, naturalistic thinking is more rational and definable than it appears. It is also relevant to…

  17. Speciation, Ecological Opportunity, and Latitude (American Society of Naturalists Address).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluter, Dolph

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary hypotheses to explain the greater numbers of species in the tropics than the temperate zone include greater age and area, higher temperature and metabolic rates, and greater ecological opportunity. These ideas make contrasting predictions about the relationship between speciation processes and latitude, which I elaborate and evaluate. Available data suggest that per capita speciation rates are currently highest in the temperate zone and that diversification rates (speciation minus extinction) are similar between latitudes. In contrast, clades whose oldest analyzed dates precede the Eocene thermal maximum, when the extent of the tropics was much greater than today, tend to show highest speciation and diversification rates in the tropics. These findings are consistent with age and area, which is alone among hypotheses in predicting a time trend. Higher recent speciation rates in the temperate zone than the tropics suggest an additional response to high ecological opportunity associated with low species diversity. These broad patterns are compelling but provide limited insights into underlying mechanisms, arguing that studies of speciation processes along the latitudinal gradient will be vital. Using threespine stickleback in depauperate northern lakes as an example, I show how high ecological opportunity can lead to rapid speciation. The results support a role for ecological opportunity in speciation, but its importance in the evolution of the latitudinal gradient remains uncertain. I conclude that per capita evolutionary rates are no longer higher in the tropics than the temperate zone. Nevertheless, the vast numbers of species that have already accumulated in the tropics ensure that total rate of species production remains highest there. Thus, tropical evolutionary momentum helps to perpetuate the steep latitudinal biodiversity gradient.

  18. 1999 NCCS Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Jerome (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Center for Computational Sciences (NCCS) is a high-performance scientific computing facility operated, maintained and managed by the Earth and Space Data Computing Division (ESDCD) of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Earth Sciences Directorate. The mission of the NCCS is to advance leading-edge science by providing the best people, computers, and data storage systems to NASA's Earth and space sciences programs and those of other U.S. Government agencies, universities, and private institutions. Among the many computationally demanding Earth science research efforts supported by the NCCS in Fiscal Year 1999 (FY99) are the NASA Seasonal-to-Interannual Prediction Project, the NASA Search and Rescue Mission, Earth gravitational model development efforts, the National Weather Service's North American Observing System program, Data Assimilation Office studies, a NASA-sponsored project at the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, a NASA-sponsored microgravity project conducted by researchers at the City University of New York and the University of Pennsylvania, the completion of a satellite-derived global climate data set, simulations of a new geodynamo model, and studies of Earth's torque. This document presents highlights of these research efforts and an overview of the NCCS, its facilities, and its people.

  19. Highlights of the optical highlighter fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, G H

    2011-07-01

    The development of super-resolution microscopy techniques using molecular localization, such as photoactivated localization microscopy, fluorescence photoactivated localization microscopy, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, photoactivated localization microscopy with independent running acquisition and many others, has heightened interest in molecules that will be grouped here into a category referred to as 'optical highlighter' fluorescent proteins. This review will survey many of the advances in development of fluorescent proteins for optically highlighting sub-populations of fluorescently labelled molecules.

  20. Into the field: naturalistic education and the future of conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Mark A

    2009-10-01

    Some educational psychologists and researchers have argued that there are multiple ways of being intelligent. In the early 1980s, Howard Gardner presented a theory of multiple intelligences by proposing that humans can be described not by a single kind of intelligence, or intelligence quotient score, but rather by a variety of kinds of intelligence. This idea of considering multiple views of intelligence has helped educators look at intelligence from a less rigid, more expansive perspective. I considered how the relatively new concept of naturalistic intelligence, which is the cognitive potential to process information that is exhibited by expert naturalists, might influence the design of undergraduate biology curricula. Naturalistic intelligence can be fostered in undergraduate biology students by emphasizing the need for well-rounded scientific naturalists; developing curricula that involves students in outdoor inquiry-based projects; and helping students learn how to observe both the natural world and their own learning, skills that are essential to developing expert naturalistic knowledge. Professors, graduate students, and administrators can improve the naturalistic intelligence of undergraduate biology students by giving these students opportunities to be involved in outdoor research. Time spent outdoors alone and among people with expertise in natural history, ecology, and conservation biology will have important influences on the knowledge and skills biology undergraduates learn, the careers they pursue, and the contributions they make to conserving Earth's biodiversity.

  1. Does mirtazapine interfere with naturalistic diabetes treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hoo Rim; Woo, Young Sup; Wang, Hee-Ryung; Shim, In-Hee; Jun, Tae-Youn; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2014-10-01

    Mirtazapine is known to induce weight gain and possibly leads to exacerbation of diabetic profiles. However, many cases of diabetic patients, who complained of insomnia and depression, were treated with mirtazapine in the clinical situations. Thus, this study aimed to assess any negative effects that treatment with mirtazapine may incur in diabetic patients.This study included 33 patients enrolled in naturalistic diabetes treatment that had also been diagnosed with depression and prescribed mirtazapine for at least 6 months. Another 33 diabetic patients who had not taken any psychiatric medicines were included as a control group. Body mass index, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, total cholesterol, triglyceride levels, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein were assessed at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months.The dose of mirtazapine at baseline was 24.3 ± 14.0 mg/d in the mirtazapine group, and the 2 groups did not differ in any baseline characteristics except for total cholesterol levels. Body mass index increased in both groups, and the change in the mirtazapine group (1.0 ± 0.6 kg/m) was significantly greater than that in the control group (0.3 ± 0.4 kg/m, P fasting plasma glucose, whereas both groups showed a decrease in HbA1c, low-density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol, an increase in high-density lipoprotein, and no change in triglyceride levels. None of the differences between the groups were statistically significant.In conclusion, mirtazapine increased the weight gain of diabetic patients; however, other diabetic and lipid markers generally did not worsen during the 6-month treatment period. These results suggest that, at least in the short term, mirtazapine is safe for diabetic patients in a stable state and are undergoing appropriate diabetic treatment.

  2. NSI organization and highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounds, Fred

    1991-01-01

    The agenda of the NASA Science Internet (NSI) Users Working Group is given. The NSI project organization is laid out in view graph format. Also given are NSI highlights which are divided into three areas: administration, engineering, and operations.

  3. Highlights, predictions, and changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2012-11-15

    Recent literature highlights at Retrovirology are described. Predictions are made regarding "hot" retrovirology research trends for the coming year based on recent journal access statistics. Changes in Retrovirology editor and the frequency of the Retrovirology Prize are announced.

  4. Highlights from Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01

    In these two lectures I will chose some highlights from the Tevatron experiments (CDF/D0) and the Neutrino experiments and then discuss the future direction of physics at Fermilab after the Tevatron collider era.

  5. Counting Fidgets: Teaching the Complexity of Naturalistic Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beins, Bernard C.

    This paper outlines a classroom technique that conveys to students some of the complexities of naturalistic and systematic observation. Most research methods textbooks devote only a single chapter to all of the descriptive techniques of research. This activity involves students in the observation and recording of "fidgets" during a five-minute…

  6. Naturalistic Experience and the Early Use of Symbolic Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troseth, Georgene L.; Casey, Amy M.; Lawver, Kelly A.; Walker, Joan M. T.; Cole, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Experience with a variety of symbolic artifacts has been proposed as a mechanism underlying symbolic development. In this study, the parents of 120 2-year-old children who participated in symbolic object retrieval tasks completed a questionnaire regarding their children's naturalistic experience with symbolic artifacts and activities. In separate…

  7. A Case for Naturalistic Assessment of Reading Comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, David W.

    1983-01-01

    Presents a historical overview of the introduction of the major reading comprehension assessments, showing that the predominant approaches were shaped by the prevailing educational measurement milieu and were implemented largely in response to public pressure. Argues in favor of a naturalistic reading comprehension assessment for evaluating those…

  8. Using Commercial GPS Action Cameras for Gathering Naturalistic Cycling Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhuis, Frank; Waard, de Dick

    2016-01-01

    Naturalistic cycling studies can be performed by making instrumented bicycles available to participants, or by having mobile equipment added by the participants themselves to their own bicycles. This paper describes how participants’ bicycles can be equipped with a commercially available, small and

  9. The use of navigation systems in naturalistic driving.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knapper, A. Nes, C.N. van Christoph, M.W.T. Hagenzieker, M.P. & Brookhuis, K.A.

    2015-01-01

    In this study we assessed the use of portable navigation systems in everyday driving by applying in-vehicle naturalistic driving. Experienced users of navigation systems, seven female and fourteen male, were provided with a specially equipped vehicle for approximately one month. Their trips were rec

  10. The use of navigation systems in naturalistic driving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knapper, Allert; Van Nes, Nicole; Christoph, Michiel; Hagenzieker, Marjan; Brookhuis, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In this study, we assessed the use of portable navigation systems in everyday driving by applying in-vehicle naturalistic driving. Method: Experienced users of navigation systems, 7 females and 14 males, were provided with a specially equipped vehicle for approximately 1 month. Their trip

  11. Couples' Reports of Relationship Problems in a Naturalistic Therapy Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, Marie-Michele; Wright, John; Tremblay, Nadine; McDuff, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Understanding couples' relationship problems is fundamental to couple therapy. Although research has documented common relationship problems, no study has used open-ended questions to explore problems in couples seeking therapy in naturalistic settings. The present study used a reliable coding system to explore the relationship problems reported…

  12. Methodology for Naturalistic Observation of Therapist Behavior in Group Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Leslie Bloch

    This paper presents a research method derived from the functional analysis of behavior currently common among operant behavior therapists. Naturalistic observation, the method used, encompasses behavioral-level description of events, systematic observation and recording by means of codes, assessment of inter-judge reliability, as well as targeting…

  13. Neutrino Experiments Highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, H T

    2001-01-01

    This article consists of two parts. The first section presents the highlights on the goals of neutrino physics, status of the current neutrino experiments and future directions and program. The second section describes the theme, program and research efforts for the TEXONO Collaboration among scientists from Taiwan and China.

  14. Highlights, predictions, and changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeang Kuan-Teh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent literature highlights at Retrovirology are described. Predictions are made regarding “hot” retrovirology research trends for the coming year based on recent journal access statistics. Changes in Retrovirology editor and the frequency of the Retrovirology Prize are announced.

  15. Highlights, predictions, and changes

    OpenAIRE

    Jeang Kuan-Teh

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Recent literature highlights at Retrovirology are described. Predictions are made regarding “hot” retrovirology research trends for the coming year based on recent journal access statistics. Changes in Retrovirology editor and the frequency of the Retrovirology Prize are announced.

  16. ATLAS Outreach Highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Cheatham, Susan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS outreach team is very active, promoting particle physics to a broad range of audiences including physicists, general public, policy makers, students and teachers, and media. A selection of current outreach activities and new projects will be presented. Recent highlights include the new ATLAS public website and ATLAS Open Data, the very recent public release of 1 fb-1 of ATLAS data.

  17. Constructivism: a naturalistic methodology for nursing inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, J V; King, L

    1997-12-01

    This article will explore the philosophical underpinnings of the constructivist research paradigm. Despite its increasing popularity in evaluative health research studies there is limited recognition of constructivism in popular research texts. Lincoln and Guba's original approach to constructivist methodology is outlined and a detailed framework for nursing research is offered. Fundamental issues and concerns surrounding this methodology are debated and differences between method and methodology are highlighted.

  18. FY 2016 Research Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-03-23

    This fact sheet summarizes the research highlights for the Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center (CEMAC) for Fiscal Year 2106. Topics covered include additive manufacturing for the wind industry, biomass-based chemicals substitutions, carbon fiber manufacturing facility siting, geothermal power plant turbines, hydrogen refueling stations, hydropower turbines, LEDs and lighting, light-duty automotive lithium-ion cells, magnetocaloric refrigeration, silicon carbide power electronics for variable frequency motor drives, solar photovoltaics, and wide bandgap semiconductor opportunities in power electronics.

  19. Clinical highlights from Amsterdam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouke T. Annema

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article contains highlights and a selection of the scientific advances from the Clinical Assembly that were presented at the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The most relevant topics for clinicians will be discussed, covering a wide range of areas including interventional pulmonology, rehabilitation and chronic care, thoracic imaging, diffuse and parenchymal lung diseases, and general practice and primary care. In this comprehensive review, exciting novel data will be discussed and put into perspective.

  20. Highlights from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Charlton, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Highlights of recent results from ATLAS were presented. The data collected to date, the detector and physics performance, and measurements of previously established Standard Model processes were reviewed briefly before summarising the latest ATLAS results in the Brout-Englert-Higgs sector, where big progress has been made in the year since the discovery. Finally, selected prospects for measurements including the data from the HL-LHC luminosity upgrade were presented, for both ATLAS and CMS. Many of the results mentioned are preliminary. These proceedings reflect only a brief summary of the material presented, and the status at the time of the conference is reported.

  1. Greco-Roman ethics and the naturalistic fantasy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Brooke

    2014-09-01

    To modern scholars, the naturalistic fallacy looks out of place in Greco-Roman antiquity owing to the robust associations between nature, especially human nature, and moral norms. Yet nature was understood by ancient authors not only as a norm but also as a form of necessity. The Greco-Roman philosophical schools grappled with how to reconcile the idea that human nature is given with the idea that it is a goal to be reached. This essay looks at the Stoic concept of oikeiōsis as one strategy for effecting such a reconciliation. Drawing on natural history, these Stoic sources used examples of animal behavior to illustrate a process whereby nature "entrusts" all animals, including humans, with the care of their own survival. Nature is thus both what is given to the animal and what the animal achieves in a powerful but also problematic synthesis here called the "naturalistic fantasy".

  2. Evaluating environmental education, citizen science, and stewardship through naturalist programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merenlender, Adina M; Crall, Alycia W; Drill, Sabrina; Prysby, Michelle; Ballard, Heidi

    2016-12-01

    Amateur naturalists have played an important role in the study and conservation of nature since the 17th century. Today, naturalist groups make important contributions to bridge the gap between conservation science and practice around the world. We examined data from 2 regional naturalist programs to understand participant motivations, barriers, and perspectives as well as the actions they take to advance science, stewardship, and community engagement. These programs provide certification-based natural history and conservation science training for adults that is followed by volunteer service in citizen science, education, and stewardship. Studies in California and Virginia include quantitative and qualitative evaluation data collected through pre- and postcourse surveys, interviews, and long-term tracking of volunteer hours. Motivations of participants focused on learning about the local environment and plants and animals, connecting with nature, becoming certified, and spending time with people who have similar interests. Over half the participants surveyed were over 50 years old, two-thirds were women, and a majority reported household incomes of over $50,000 (60% in California, 85% in Virginia), and citizen science. The primary barrier was lack of time due to the need to work and focus on career advancement. Survey data revealed that participants' ecological knowledge, scientific skills, and belief in their ability to address environmental issues increased after training. Documented conservation actions taken by the participants include invasive plant management, habitat restoration, and cleanups of natural areas and streams. Long-term data from Virginia on volunteer hours dedicated to environmental citizen science show an increase from 14% in 2007 to 32% in 2014. In general, participants in the naturalist programs we examined increased their content knowledge about ecosystems, had greater confidence in conserving them, and continued to engage as citizen

  3. Science Highlights from VERITAS

    CERN Document Server

    Staszak, D; Archambault, S; Archer, A; Barnacka, A; Benbow, W; Bird, R; Biteau, J; Buchovecky, M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cardenzana, J V; Cerruti, M; Chen, X; Christiansen, J L; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Connolly, M P; Coppi, P; Cui, W; Dwarkadas, V V; Eisch, J D; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Feng, Q; Alonso, M Fernandez; Finley, J P; Fleischhack, H; Flinders, A; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Gillanders, G H; Griffin, S; Griffiths, S T; Gyuk, G; Hütten, M; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Humensky, T B; Johnson, C A; Kaaret, P; Kar, P; Kertzman, M; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krause, M; Krennrich, F; Kumar, S; Lang, M J; Maier, G; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Meagher, K; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nguyen, T; Nieto, D; de Bhróithe, A O'Faoláin; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Park, N; Pelassa, V; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Popkow, A; Pueschel, E; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reynolds, P T; Richards, G T; Roache, E; Rovero, A C; Santander, M; Schlenstedt, S; Sembroski, G H; Shahinyan, K; Smith, A W; Telezhinsky, I; Tucci, J V; Tyler, J; Vassiliev, V V; Vincent, S; Wakely, S P; Weiner, O M; Weinstein, A; Wilhelm, A; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B

    2015-01-01

    The Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) is a ground-based array located at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in southern Arizona and is one of the world's most sensitive gamma-ray instruments at energies of 85 GeV to $>$30 TeV. VERITAS has a wide scientific reach that includes the study of extragalactic and Galactic objects as well as the search for astrophysical signatures of dark matter and the measurement of cosmic rays. In this paper, we will summarize the current status of the VERITAS observatory and present some of the scientific highlights from the last two years, focusing in particular on those results shown at the 2015 ICRC in The Hague, Netherlands.

  4. On the Influence of Naturalism on American Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofen

    2010-01-01

    Naturalism was first proposed and formulated by French novelist Emile Zola, and it was introduced to America by American novelist Frank Norris. It is a new and harsher realism. It is a theory in literature emphasizing scientific observation of life without idealism or avoidance of the ugly. American literature naturalists dismissed the validity of…

  5. Carrie’s dreams of American Dream

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴溪

    2013-01-01

    Theodore Dreiser is one of America’s greatest writers, and its greatest naturalist writer. Dreiser committed his literary force to opening the new ground of American naturalism. Dreiser’s life story influenced the char-acters of Sister Carrie.

  6. ESO Highlights in 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    As is now the tradition, the European Southern Observatory looks back at the exciting moments of last year. 2008 was in several aspects an exceptionally good year. Over the year, ESO's telescopes provided data for more than 700 scientific publications in refereed journals, making ESO the most productive ground-based observatory in the world. ESO PR Highlights 2008 ESO PR Photo 01a/09 The image above is a clickable map. These are only some of the press releases issued by ESO in 2008. For a full listing, please go to ESO 2008 page. Austria signed the agreement to join the other 13 ESO member states (ESO 11/08 and 20/08), while the year marked the 10th anniversary of first light for ESO's "perfect science machine", the Very Large Telescope (ESO 16/08 and 17/08). The ALMA project, for which ESO is the European partner, had a major milestone in December, as the observatory was equipped with its first antenna (ESO 49/08). Also the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope impressed this year with some very impressive and publicly visible results. Highlights came in many fields: Astronomers for instance used the Very Large Telescope (VLT) to discover and image a probable giant planet long sought around the star Beta Pictoris (ESO 42/08). This is now the eighth extrasolar planet to have been imaged since the VLT imaged the first extrasolar planet in 2004 (three of eight were imaged with VLT). The VLT also enabled three students to confirm the nature of a unique planet (ESO 45/08). This extraordinary find, which turned up during their research project, is a planet about five times as massive as Jupiter. This is the first planet discovered orbiting a fast-rotating hot star. The world's foremost planet-hunting instrument, HARPS, located at ESO's La Silla observatory, scored a new first, finding a system of three super-Earths around a star (ESO 19/08). Based on the complete HARPS sample, astronomers now think that one Sun-like star out of three harbours short orbit, low

  7. A Critical Analysis of the Environments, Reasons and Constraints for which Naturalistic Codeswitching Occurs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Fei-fei

    2013-01-01

    Naturalistic codeswitching is a normal and powerful communicative feature of formal or informal bilingual interac-tions, which present linguists with part of their most fascinating analytical challenge. People use codeswitching in various commu-nication environments such as in bilingual families or immigrant contexts for effective information exchange. The present article investigates the environments and reasons for occurrence of naturalistic codeswitching and analyzes the linguistic constraints and social constraints on naturalistic codeswitching with examples. A more thorough and authentic assessment of individuals ’linguis-tic knowledge about codeswitching, as well as individuals’codeswitching habits, must include observations of codeswitching be-havior in naturalistic environments.

  8. From ought to is physics and the naturalistic fallacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries there were many attempts to justify political and social systems on the basis of physics and astronomy. By the early twentieth century such moves increasingly also integrated the life and social sciences. The physical sciences gradually became less appealing as a sole source for sociopolitical thought. The details of this transition help explain the contemporary reluctance to capitalize on an ostensibly rich opportunity for naturalistic social reasoning: the anthropic principle in cosmology, which deals with the apparent "fine-tuning" of the universe for life.

  9. Informal schooling and problem-solving skills in second-grade science: A naturalistic investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Georgia Inez Hunt

    The influence of informal schooling on the problem solving skills of urban elementary school children is unclear. The relationship between culture and problem solving can be studied using subjective methodologies, particularly when investigating problem solving strategies that are culturally situated. Yet, little research has been conducted to investigate how informal learning of African American children are integrated as part of the problem solving used in school. This study has been designed to expand the existing literature in this area. The purpose of this study is therefore to explore how 15 African American children attending school in Southwest Philadelphia solve problems presented to them in second grade science. This was accomplished by assessing their ability to observe, classify, recall, and perceive space/time relationships. Think-aloud protocols were used for this examination. A naturalistic approach to the investigation was implemented. Individual children were selected because he or she exhibited unique and subjective characteristics associated with individual approaches to problem solving. Children responded to three tasks: interviews of their parents, an essay on community gardens, and a group diorama collaboratively designed. Content analysis was used to infer themes that were evident in the children's work and that revealed the extent to which informal schooling influenced solutions to a community garden problem. The investigations did increase the researcher's ability to understand and build upon the understanding of African American children in their indigenous community. The study also demonstrated how these same strategies can be used to involve parents in the science curriculum. Additionally, the researcher gained insight on how to bridge the gap between home, community, and school.

  10. Naturalistic Stress and Cortisol Response to Awakening: Adaptation to Seafaring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberzon, Jonathan; Abelson, James L.; King, Anthony; Liberzon, Israel

    2008-01-01

    Study of the hypothalmic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis has been critical to advancing our understanding of human adaptation to stress. The cortisol response to awakening (CRA) is a potentially useful measure for understanding group and individual differences in HPA axis regulation. In this study, the CRA was examined in the context of a naturalistic stressor – a six-week voyage of work and study aboard an oceangoing ship, including both experienced and novice sailors. Thirty-one subjects provided weekday and weekend baseline CRA data onshore prior to boarding, followed by three CRAs at sea and one shore leave CRA. Subjective measures of sleep, stress and control were also collected. Results suggest that novice sailors' cortisol response to awakening was elevated at sea relative to both a shoreside weekend and a shore leave during the voyage, but the most striking elevation was found during a workday onshore. Inexperienced students' profiles changed differently over the course of the voyage from those of professional crew. CRAs were not affected by sleep variables and were not predicted by subjective ratings. These data support the value of the cortisol response to awakening as a neuroendocrine marker of HPA regulatory responses to a naturalistic stressor, influenced by changes in work and living environment, and perhaps prior experience with the stressor. PMID:18657911

  11. Defining and screening crash surrogate events using naturalistic driving data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kun-Feng; Jovanis, Paul P

    2013-12-01

    Naturalistic driving studies provide an excellent opportunity to better understand crash causality and to supplement crash observations with a much larger number of near crash events. The goal of this research is the development of a set of diagnostic procedures to define, screen, and identify crash and near crash events that can be used in enhanced safety analyses. A way to better understand crash occurrence and identify potential countermeasures to improve safety is to learn from and use near crash events, particularly those near crashes that have a common etiology to crash outcomes. This paper demonstrates that a multi-stage modeling framework can be used to search through naturalistic driving data, extracting statistically similar crashes and near crashes. The procedure is tested using data from the VTTI 100-car study for road departure events. A total of 63 events are included in this application. While the sample size is limited in this empirical study, the authors believe the procedure is ready for testing in other applications.

  12. Naturalistic rapid deceleration data: Drivers aged 75 years and older

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Chevalier

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the research manuscript “Predictors of older drivers’ involvement in rapid deceleration events”, which investigates potential predictors of older drivers’ involvement in rapid deceleration events including measures of vision, cognitive function and driving confidence (A. Chevalier et al., 2016 [1]. In naturalistic driving studies such as this, when sample size is not large enough to allow crashes to be used to investigate driver safety, rapid deceleration events may be used as a surrogate safety measure. Naturalistic driving data were collected for up to 52 weeks from 182 volunteer drivers aged 75–94 years (median 80 years, 52% male living in the suburban outskirts of Sydney. Driving data were collected using an in-vehicle monitoring device. Accelerometer data were recorded 32 times per second and Global Positioning System (GPS data each second. To measure rapid deceleration behavior, rapid deceleration events (RDEs were defined as having at least one data point at or above the deceleration threshold of 750 milli-g (7.35 m/s2. All events were constrained to a maximum 5 s duration. The dataset provided with this article contains 473 events, with a row per RDE. This article also contains information about data processing, treatment and quality control. The methods and data presented here may assist with planning and analysis of future studies into rapid deceleration behaviour using in-vehicle monitoring.

  13. Naturalistic Enactment to Elicit and Recognize Caregiver State Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Darien; Favela, Jesus; Ibarra, Catalina; Cruz, Netzahualcoyotl

    2016-09-01

    Caring for people with dementia imposes significant stress on family members and caregivers. Often, these informal caregivers have no coping strategy to deal with these behaviors. Anxiety and stress episodes are often triggered by problematic behaviors exhibited by the person who suffers from dementia. Detecting these behaviors could help them in dealing with them and reduce caregiver burden. However, work on anxiety detection using physiological signals has mostly been done under controlled conditions. In this paper we describe an experiment aimed at inducing anxiety among caregivers of people with dementia under naturalistic conditions. We report an experiment, using the naturalistic enactment technique, in which 10 subjects were asked to care for an older adult who acts as if she experiences dementia. We record physiological signals from the participants (GSR, HR, EEG) during the sessions that lasted for approximately 30 min. We explain how we obtained ground truth from self-report and observation data. We conducted two different tests using the Support Vector Machine technique. We obtained an average precision of 77.8 % and 38.1 % recall when classifying two different possible states: "Anxious" and "Not anxious". Analysis of the data provides evidence that the experiment elicits state anxiety and that it can be detected using wearable sensors. Furthermore, if episodes of problematic behaviors can also be detected, the recognition of anxiety in the caregiver can be improved, leading to the enactment of appropriate interventions to help caregivers cope with anxiety episodes.

  14. Investigating gaze of children with ASD in naturalistic settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basilio Noris

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visual behavior is known to be atypical in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD. Monitor-based eye-tracking studies have measured several of these atypicalities in individuals with Autism. While atypical behaviors are known to be accentuated during natural interactions, few studies have been made on gaze behavior in natural interactions. In this study we focused on i whether the findings done in laboratory settings are also visible in a naturalistic interaction; ii whether new atypical elements appear when studying visual behavior across the whole field of view. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Ten children with ASD and ten typically developing children participated in a dyadic interaction with an experimenter administering items from the Early Social Communication Scale (ESCS. The children wore a novel head-mounted eye-tracker, measuring gaze direction and presence of faces across the child's field of view. The analysis of gaze episodes to faces revealed that children with ASD looked significantly less and for shorter lapses of time at the experimenter. The analysis of gaze patterns across the child's field of view revealed that children with ASD looked downwards and made more extensive use of their lateral field of view when exploring the environment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The data gathered in naturalistic settings confirm findings previously obtained only in monitor-based studies. Moreover, the study allowed to observe a generalized strategy of lateral gaze in children with ASD when they were looking at the objects in their environment.

  15. HIGHLIGHTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS¥//ZhaxiPuncogprayedwhilehisassistantsplacedneedlesintotheflamingstove.Hethenappliedneedlesto30-oddacupointsonthepa...

  16. HIGHLIGHTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DEGYI

    2002-01-01

    King Gesar is a focus of study in and outside China. Accomplished scholars include:——Alexandra David-Neel (1868-1969): A noted French expert in Oriental studies, Chinese and Tibetan studies in the 20th century, she visited Tibet and surrounding areas five times for survey. Her treatises and diaries related to the Orient, especially to Tibet and related areas, were translated into many languages and published repeatedly.——Ren Neiqiang (1894-1989): A noted geologist, an expert in ethnic groups and a pioneer in Tibetan studies. From 1939 to 1944, he published his Initial Introduction to "Tibetan Three Kingdoms" and "On the Three Kingdoms" in Border Government Affairs Forum and Kangdao Month.——R.A. Stein (1911-1999): He is held as the most successful Tibetan study worker in France in the 20th century. And he was one of the few who could do research in both Tibetan and Chinese. His contribution to the study of King Gesarfinds expression in his effort to translate the epic.——Wang Yinuan (1907-1998): A

  17. Science of the Particular: An Advocacy of Naturalistic Case Study in Health Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abma, Tineke A; Stake, Robert E

    2014-08-01

    Case studies can provide us with in-depth understanding of a single demarcated entity. Cases can be corporations and clinics, but are usually people. There are several approaches to case study. Naturalistic case study constitutes the science of the particular. The aim of naturalistic case study is to understand with minimum intervention the particularity of a case in its ordinary situation from multiple perspectives. Naturalistic case study relies on a humanistic commitment to study the world from the human perspective. The purpose here is to illuminate how five key features of naturalistic case study can be used in health research. Case studies are of use in various disciplines. In this article we show that the naturalistic case study can have extraordinary value in health research, and is useful from a variety of perspectives. We do so by presenting a case report of a 92-year-old resident moving to a care center.

  18. Coding early naturalists' accounts into long-term fish community changes in the Adriatic Sea (1800-2000.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaso Fortibuoni

    Full Text Available The understanding of fish communities' changes over the past centuries has important implications for conservation policy and marine resource management. However, reconstructing these changes is difficult because information on marine communities before the second half of the 20(th century is, in most cases, anecdotal and merely qualitative. Therefore, historical qualitative records and modern quantitative data are not directly comparable, and their integration for long-term analyses is not straightforward. We developed a methodology that allows the coding of qualitative information provided by early naturalists into semi-quantitative information through an intercalibration with landing proportions. This approach allowed us to reconstruct and quantitatively analyze a 200-year-long time series of fish community structure indicators in the Northern Adriatic Sea (Mediterranean Sea. Our analysis provides evidence of long-term changes in fish community structure, including the decline of Chondrichthyes, large-sized and late-maturing species. This work highlights the importance of broadening the time-frame through which we look at marine ecosystem changes and provides a methodology to exploit, in a quantitative framework, historical qualitative sources. To the purpose, naturalists' eyewitness accounts proved to be useful for extending the analysis on fish community back in the past, well before the onset of field-based monitoring programs.

  19. 2010年美国心脏协会儿童心肺复苏指南更新的解读%Highlights of 2010 American Heart Association guidelines changes for pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱素云; 高恒淼

    2012-01-01

    2010年10月,美国心脏协会新的儿童基础和高级生命支持指南发布.新指南由众多专家历经3年,对大量心肺复苏文献复习和讨论达成一致意见后完成.与2005版儿童基础和高级生命支持指南相比,新指南对一些关键问题作了重要更新,包括基础生命支持步骤由A-B-C改为C-A-B、高质量胸外按压、除颤及自动除颤器在婴儿中的使用、复苏过程中药物的使用、先天性心脏病患儿的复苏、复苏后处理及对心源性猝死的评估.本文对其重要更新及依据作一简要介绍.%In Oct 2010,American Heart Association (AHA) released new guidelines for pediatric basic life support and pediatric advanced life support.The new AHA guidelines are based on an extensive review of thousands of resuscitation studies by experts who reached a consensus over a 3-year period.Compared with the 2005 AHA guidelines for pediatric basic and advanced life support,the new guidelines made major changes on some key issues,including the change of basic life sequence from A-B-C to C-A-B,high-quality chest compression,defibrillation and the use of automated external defibrillator in infants,medications during resuscitation,resuscitation of children with congenital heart disease,post-resuscitation management and evaluation of sudden cardiac death victims.This paper summarized the substantial changes and the reasons to change.

  20. William Keith Brooks and the naturalist's defense of Darwinism in the late-nineteenth century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Richard

    2015-06-01

    William Keith Brooks was an American zoologist at Johns Hopkins University from 1876 until his death in 1908. Over the course of his career, Brooks staunchly defended Darwinism, arguing for the centrality of natural selection in evolutionary theory at a time when alternative theories, such as neo-Lamarckism, grew prominent in American biology. In his book The Law of Heredity (1883), Brooks addressed problems raised by Darwin's theory of pangenesis. In modifying and developing Darwin's pangenesis, Brooks proposed a new theory of heredity that sought to avoid the pitfalls of Darwin's hypothesis. In so doing he strengthened Darwin's theory of natural selection by undermining arguments for the inheritance of acquired characteristics. In later attacks on neo-Lamarckism, Brooks consistently defended Darwin's theory of natural selection on logical grounds, continued to challenge the idea of the inheritance of acquired characteristics, and argued that natural selection best explained a wide range of adaptations. Finally, he critiqued Galton's statistical view of heredity and argued that Galton had resurrected an outmoded typological concept of species, one which Darwin and other naturalists had shown to be incorrect. Brooks's ideas resemble the "biological species concept" of the twentieth century, as developed by evolutionary biologist Ernst Mayr and others. The late-nineteenth century was not a period of total "eclipse" of Darwinism, as biologists and historians have hitherto seen it. Although the "Modern Synthesis" refers to the reconciliation of post-Mendelian genetics with evolution by natural selection, we might adjust our understanding of how the synthesis developed by seeing it as the culmination of a longer discussion that extends back to the late-nineteenth century.

  1. LGBT survey highlights regional divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrani, Matin

    2016-05-01

    A third of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) members of the physics community have considered quitting their workplace or university in the last year, according to a report by the American Physical Society (APS).

  2. A card game for the treatment of delusional ideas: A naturalistic pilot trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benzakin Laetitia

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background "Michael's game" is a card game which aims at familiarizing healthcare professionals and patients with cognitive behavioral therapy of psychotic symptoms. This naturalistic study tests the feasibility and the impact of the intervention in various naturalistic settings. Method Fifty five patients were recruited in seven centers. They were assessed in pre and post-test with the Peters Delusion Inventory – 21 items (PDI-21. Results Forty five patients completed the intervention significantly reducing their conviction and preoccupation scores on the PDI-21. Conclusion This pilot study supports the feasibility and effectiveness of "Michael's game" in naturalistic setting. Additional studies could validate the game in a controlled fashion.

  3. Highlighting Impact and the Impact of Highlighting: PRB Editors' Suggestions

    CERN Document Server

    Antonoyiannakis, Manolis

    2016-01-01

    Associate Editor Manolis Antonoyiannakis discusses the highlighting, as Editors' Suggestions, of a small percentage of the papers published each week. We highlight papers primarily for their importance and impact in their respective fields, or because we find them particularly interesting or elegant. It turns out that the additional layer of scrutiny involved in the selection of papers as Editors' Suggestions is associated with a significantly elevated and sustained citation impact.

  4. PsyGlass: Capitalizing on Google Glass for naturalistic data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Alexandra; Rodriguez, Kevin; Dale, Rick

    2015-09-01

    As commercial technology moves further into wearable technologies, cognitive and psychological scientists can capitalize on these devices to facilitate naturalistic research designs while still maintaining strong experimental control. One such wearable technology is Google Glass (Google, Inc.: www.google.com/glass), which can present wearers with audio and visual stimuli while tracking a host of multimodal data. In this article, we introduce PsyGlass, a framework for incorporating Google Glass into experimental work that is freely available for download and community improvement over time (www.github.com/a-paxton/PsyGlass). As a proof of concept, we use this framework to investigate dual-task pressures on naturalistic interaction. The preliminary study demonstrates how designs from classic experimental psychology may be integrated in naturalistic interactive designs with emerging technologies. We close with a series of recommendations for using PsyGlass and a discussion of how wearable technology more broadly may contribute to new or adapted naturalistic research designs.

  5. False "highlighting" with Wood's lamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Jonathan I; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2014-01-01

    Wood's lamp evaluation is used to diagnose pigmentary disorders. For example, vitiligo typically demonstrates lesional enhancement under Wood's lamp evaluation. Numerous false positive enhancing lesions can be noted in the skin. We describe a 5-year-old Hispanic boy who had painted his face with highlighter, producing enhancing lesions under Wood's lamp. Physicians who use Wood's lamp should be aware that the appearance of markers and highlighter can mimic that of true clinical illnesses.

  6. Sleep complaints in adolescent depression: one year naturalistic follow-up study

    OpenAIRE

    Anna S. Urrila; Karlsson, Linnea; Kiviruusu, Olli; Pankakoski, Maiju; Pelkonen, Mirjami; Strandholm, Thea; Marttunen, Mauri; ,

    2014-01-01

    Background Sleep complaints are highly prevalent in adolescents suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD). The aims of this study were to describe the longitudinal course of sleep complaints, and to assess the association between sleep complaints and clinical outcome in a sample of adolescents with MDD during naturalistic follow-up. Methods A sample of adolescent outpatients (n = 166; age 13–19 years, 17.5% boys) diagnosed with MDD was followed-up during one year in naturalistic settings...

  7. Bayesian-based integration of multisensory naturalistic perithreshold stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regenbogen, Christina; Johansson, Emilia; Andersson, Patrik; Olsson, Mats J; Lundström, Johan N

    2016-07-29

    Most studies exploring multisensory integration have used clearly perceivable stimuli. According to the principle of inverse effectiveness, the added neural and behavioral benefit of integrating clear stimuli is reduced in comparison to stimuli with degraded and less salient unisensory information. Traditionally, speed and accuracy measures have been analyzed separately with few studies merging these to gain an understanding of speed-accuracy trade-offs in multisensory integration. In two separate experiments, we assessed multisensory integration of naturalistic audio-visual objects consisting of individually-tailored perithreshold dynamic visual and auditory stimuli, presented within a multiple-choice task, using a Bayesian Hierarchical Drift Diffusion Model that combines response time and accuracy. For both experiments, unisensory stimuli were degraded to reach a 75% identification accuracy level for all individuals and stimuli to promote multisensory binding. In Experiment 1, we subsequently presented uni- and their respective bimodal stimuli followed by a 5-alternative-forced-choice task. In Experiment 2, we controlled for low-level integration and attentional differences. Both experiments demonstrated significant superadditive multisensory integration of bimodal perithreshold dynamic information. We present evidence that the use of degraded sensory stimuli may provide a link between previous findings of inverse effectiveness on a single neuron level and overt behavior. We further suggest that a combined measure of accuracy and reaction time may be a more valid and holistic approach of studying multisensory integration and propose the application of drift diffusion models for studying behavioral correlates as well as brain-behavior relationships of multisensory integration.

  8. Victorian naturalists in China: science and informal empire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Fa-ti

    2003-03-01

    This paper discusses the research of British naturalists in China during the period between the Opium War and the collapse of the Qing dynasty (1839-1911). China was defeated in the Opium War and forced to open treaty ports for trade with the Westerners. The foreign powers, particularly Britain, imposed upon the Qing government treaties, concession leases, favourable trade conditions, legal privileges and so on to reduce its political autonomy. In the shadow of the informal empire, not only did the British have more freedom to travel in China, first at the treaty ports and later in the interior, but they successively established diplomatic , commercial and missionary institutions in dozens of Chinese cities. The most important of them - the British Consular Service, the Chinese Maritime Customs and the Protestant missionary organizations - provided the talent and infrastructure for natural historical research and became networks for scientific information. The research into China's natural history epitomized the characteristics of British research on China in general: it engaged in collecting and circulating an ever-increasing amount of information and aimed at producing 'factual' and 'useful' knowledge about China. The paper modified current literature on scientific imperialism, which has dealt primarily with the colonial context, by examining the role of nineteenth-century British imperial science in the context of informal empire.

  9. The Networked Naturalist - Mobile devices for Citizen Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrin, D.; Graham, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    Citizen science projects engage individual volunteers or groups to observe, measure, and contribute data to scientific studies. CENS is developing mobile phone and web-based tools for formal and informal observation of ecosystems. We are collaborating with national environmental education campaigns, such as Project BudBurst, and with the National Park Service to increase participation in citizen scientist campaigns and to support park service personnel in day to day data gathering. The overarching goals of the Networked Naturalist set of projects are to enhance participatory learning experiences through citizen science campaigns and to facilitate scientific and environmental data collection. Our experience with volunteers at UCLA and at the National Park Service has demonstrated that mobile phones are an efficient, effective and engaging method for collecting environmental and location data and hold great potential for both raising public awareness of environmental issues and collecting data that is valuable for both ecosystem management and research. CENS is an NSF-funded Science and Technology Center and this project represents collaboration among ecologists, computer scientist, and statisticians. Our mobile applications are free for download on Android and iPhone App stores and the source code is made available through open source licenses.

  10. Naturalistic speeding data: Drivers aged 75 years and older

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Chevalier

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled “A longitudinal investigation of the predictors of older drivers׳ speeding behavior” (Chevalier et al., 2016 [1], wherein these speed events were used to investigate older drivers speeding behavior and the influence of cognition, vision, functional decline, and self-reported citations and crashes on speeding behavior over a year of driving. Naturalistic speeding behavior data were collected for up to 52 weeks from volunteer drivers aged 75–94 years (median 80 years, 52% male living in the suburban outskirts of Sydney. Driving data were collected using an in-vehicle monitoring device. Global Positioning System (GPS data were recorded at each second and determined driving speed through triangulation of satellite collected location data. Driving speed data were linked with mapped speed zone data based on a service-provider database. To measure speeding behavior, speed events were defined as driving 1 km/h or more, with a 3% tolerance, above a single speed limit, averaged over 30 s. The data contains a row per 124,374 speed events. This article contains information about data processing and quality control.

  11. Naturalistic speeding data: Drivers aged 75 years and older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Anna; Chevalier, Aran John; Clarke, Elizabeth; Wall, John; Coxon, Kristy; Brown, Julie; Ivers, Rebecca; Keay, Lisa

    2016-09-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "A longitudinal investigation of the predictors of older drivers׳ speeding behavior" (Chevalier et al., 2016) [1], wherein these speed events were used to investigate older drivers speeding behavior and the influence of cognition, vision, functional decline, and self-reported citations and crashes on speeding behavior over a year of driving. Naturalistic speeding behavior data were collected for up to 52 weeks from volunteer drivers aged 75-94 years (median 80 years, 52% male) living in the suburban outskirts of Sydney. Driving data were collected using an in-vehicle monitoring device. Global Positioning System (GPS) data were recorded at each second and determined driving speed through triangulation of satellite collected location data. Driving speed data were linked with mapped speed zone data based on a service-provider database. To measure speeding behavior, speed events were defined as driving 1 km/h or more, with a 3% tolerance, above a single speed limit, averaged over 30 s. The data contains a row per 124,374 speed events. This article contains information about data processing and quality control.

  12. Naturalistic study of the risky situations faced by novice riders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aupetit, Samuel; Gallier, Virginie; Riff, Jacques; Espié, Stéphane; Delgehier, Flavien

    2016-08-01

    This article sets out to identify the typical risky situations experienced by novice motorcyclists in the real world just after licensing. The procedure consists of a follow-up of six novices during their first two months of riding with their own motorbike instrumented with cameras. The novices completed logbooks on a daily basis in order to identify the risky situations they encountered, and were given face-to-face interviews to identify the context and their shortcomings during the reported events. Data show a large number of road configurations considered as risky by the riders (248 occurrences), especially during the first two weeks. The results revealed that a lack of hazard perception skills contributed to the majority of these incidents. These situations were grouped together to form clusters of typical incident scenarios on the basis of their similarities. The most frequent scenario corresponds to a lane change in dense traffic (15% of all incidents). The discussion shows how this has enhanced our understanding of novice riders' behaviour and how the findings can improve training and licensing. Lastly, the main methodological limitations of the study and some guidelines for improving future naturalistic riding studies are presented. Practitioner Summary: This article aims to identify the risky situations of novice motorcyclists in real roads. Two hundred forty-eight events were recorded and 13 incident scenarios identified. Results revealed that a lack of hazard perception contributed to the majority of these events. The most frequent scenario corresponds to a lane change in dense traffic.

  13. Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics Highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, H T K

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an overview of neutrino physics research, with highlights on the physics goals, results and interpretations of the current neutrino experiments and future directions and program. It is not meant to be a comprehensive account or detailed review article. Interested readers can pursue the details via the listed references.

  14. Testing the concurrent validity of a naturalistic upper extremity reaching task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, S Y; Hengge, C R

    2016-01-01

    Point-to-point reaching has been widely used to study upper extremity motor control. We have been developing a naturalistic reaching task that adds tool manipulation and object transport to this established paradigm. The purpose of this study was to determine the concurrent validity of a naturalistic reaching task in a sample of healthy adults. This task was compared to the criterion measure of standard point-to-point reaching. Twenty-eight adults performed unconstrained out-and-back movements in three different directions relative to constant start location along midline using their nondominant arm. In the naturalistic task, participants manipulated a tool to transport objects sequentially between physical targets anchored to the planar workspace. In the standard task, participants moved a digital cursor sequentially between virtual targets, veridical to the planar workspace. In both tasks, the primary measure of performance was trial time, which indicated the time to complete 15 reaches (five cycles of three reaches/target). Two other comparator tasks were also designed to test concurrent validity when components of the naturalistic task were added to the standard task. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients indicated minimal relationship between the naturalistic and standard tasks due to differences in progressive task difficulty. Accounting for this yielded a moderate linear relationship, indicating concurrent validity. The comparator tasks were also related to both the standard and naturalistic task. Thus, the principles of motor control and learning that have been established by the wealth of point-to-point reaching studies can still be applied to the naturalistic task to a certain extent.

  15. Naturalistic FMRI mapping reveals superior temporal sulcus as the hub for the distributed brain network for social perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahnakoski, Juha M; Glerean, Enrico; Salmi, Juha; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P; Sams, Mikko; Hari, Riitta; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    Despite the abundant data on brain networks processing static social signals, such as pictures of faces, the neural systems supporting social perception in naturalistic conditions are still poorly understood. Here we delineated brain networks subserving social perception under naturalistic conditions in 19 healthy humans who watched, during 3-T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), a set of 137 short (approximately 16 s each, total 27 min) audiovisual movie clips depicting pre-selected social signals. Two independent raters estimated how well each clip represented eight social features (faces, human bodies, biological motion, goal-oriented actions, emotion, social interaction, pain, and speech) and six filler features (places, objects, rigid motion, people not in social interaction, non-goal-oriented action, and non-human sounds) lacking social content. These ratings were used as predictors in the fMRI analysis. The posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS) responded to all social features but not to any non-social features, and the anterior STS responded to all social features except bodies and biological motion. We also found four partially segregated, extended networks for processing of specific social signals: (1) a fronto-temporal network responding to multiple social categories, (2) a fronto-parietal network preferentially activated to bodies, motion, and pain, (3) a temporo-amygdalar network responding to faces, social interaction, and speech, and (4) a fronto-insular network responding to pain, emotions, social interactions, and speech. Our results highlight the role of the pSTS in processing multiple aspects of social information, as well as the feasibility and efficiency of fMRI mapping under conditions that resemble the complexity of real life.

  16. Naturalistic fMRI mapping reveals superior temporal sulcus as the hub for the distributed brain network for social perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha Marko Lahnakoski

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the abundant data on brain networks processing static social signals, such as pictures of faces, the neural systems supporting social perception in naturalistic conditions are still poorly understood. Here we delineated brain networks subserving social perception under naturalistic conditions in 19 healthy humans who watched, during 3-tesla functional magnetic imaging (fMRI, a set of 137 short (~16 s each, total 27 min audiovisual movie clips depicting pre-selected social signals. Two independent raters estimated how well each clip represented eight social features (faces, human bodies, biological motion, goal-oriented actions, emotion, social interaction, pain, and speech and six filler features (places, objects, rigid motion, people not in social interaction, non-goal-oriented action and non-human sounds lacking social content. These ratings were used as predictors in the fMRI analysis. The posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS responded to all social features but not to any non-social features, and the anterior STS responded to all social features except bodies and biological motion. We also found four partially segregated, extended networks for processing of specific social signals: 1 a fronto-temporal network responding to multiple social categories, 2 a fronto-parietal network preferentially activated to bodies, motion and pain, 3 a temporo-amygdalar network responding to faces, social interaction and speech, and 4 a fronto-insular network responding to pain, emotions, social interactions, and speech. Our results highlight the role of the posterior STS in processing multiple aspects of social information, as well as the feasibility and efficiency of fMRI mapping under conditions that resemble the complexity of real life.

  17. "My appointment received the sanction of the Admiralty": why Charles Darwin really was the naturalist on HMS Beagle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wyhe, John

    2013-09-01

    For decades historians of science and science writers in general have maintained that Charles Darwin was not the 'naturalist' or 'official naturalist' during the 1831-1836 surveying voyage of HMS Beagle but instead Captain Robert FitzRoy's 'companion', 'gentleman companion' or 'dining companion'. That is, Darwin was primarily the captain's social companion and only secondarily and unofficially naturalist. Instead, it is usually maintained, the ship's surgeon Robert McCormick was the official naturalist because this was the default or official practice at the time. Although these views have been repeated in countless accounts of Darwin's life, this essay aims to show that they are incorrect.

  18. NCI intramural research highlighted at 2014 AACR meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    This year’s American Association for Cancer Research meeting featured plenary talks by two NCI scientists, Steven Rosenberg, M.D., and Louis Staudt, M.D., Ph.D., that highlighted the challenges in developing varied and potentially synergistic treatments f

  19. Computer vision and driver distraction: developing a behaviour-flagging protocol for naturalistic driving data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Jonny; Koppel, Sjaan; Charlton, Judith L; Rudin-Brown, Christina M

    2014-11-01

    Naturalistic driving studies (NDS) allow researchers to discreetly observe everyday, real-world driving to better understand the risk factors that contribute to hazardous situations. In particular, NDS designs provide high ecological validity in the study of driver distraction. With increasing dataset sizes, current best practice of manually reviewing videos to classify the occurrence of driving behaviours, including those that are indicative of distraction, is becoming increasingly impractical. Current statistical solutions underutilise available data and create further epistemic problems. Similarly, technical solutions such as eye-tracking often require dedicated hardware that is not readily accessible or feasible to use. A computer vision solution based on open-source software was developed and tested to improve the accuracy and speed of processing NDS video data for the purpose of quantifying the occurrence of driver distraction. Using classifier cascades, manually-reviewed video data from a previously published NDS was reanalysed and used as a benchmark of current best practice for performance comparison. Two software coding systems were developed - one based on hierarchical clustering (HC), and one based on gender differences (MF). Compared to manual video coding, HC achieved 86 percent concordance, 55 percent reduction in processing time, and classified an additional 69 percent of target behaviour not previously identified through manual review. MF achieved 67 percent concordance, a 75 percent reduction in processing time, and classified an additional 35 percent of target behaviour not identified through manual review. The findings highlight the improvements in processing speed and correctly classifying target behaviours achievable through the use of custom developed computer vision solutions. Suggestions for improved system performance and wider implementation are discussed.

  20. Energy Policy. Highlights. 2013 Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-01

    Energy Policy Highlights showcases recent developments in energy policies among all 28 IEA member countries. Each contribution underscores the changing nature of both global and domestic energy challenges, as well as the commonality of energy concerns among member countries. The policies highlighted in this publication identify an urgent need to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions as a clear policy objective. Electricity, enhancing energy efficiency and increasing the share of renewables in the energy mix in a cost effective manner are likewise areas of common focus. On the end-user side, increasing public awareness of domestic energy policies through improved transparency and engagement is an important facet of policy support among IEA member countries. The successful implementation of policies and other initiatives benefitted from efforts to inform the public.

  1. LHC Results Highlights (CLASHEP 2013)

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, O

    2015-01-01

    The good performance of the LHC provided enough data at 7 TeV and 8 TeV to allow the experiments to perform very competitive measurements and to expand the knowledge about the fundamental interaction far beyond that from previous colliders. This report summarizes the highlights of the results obtained with these data samples by the four large experiments, covering all the topics of the physics program and focusing on those exploiting the possibilities of the LHC.

  2. Optical highlighter molecules in neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sandeep Robert; Patterson, George H

    2012-02-01

    The development of advanced optical methods has played a key role in propelling progress in neurobiology. Genetically-encoded fluorescent molecules found in nature have enabled labeling of individual neurons to study their physiology and anatomy. Here we discuss the recent use of both native and synthetic optical highlighter proteins to address key problems in neurobiology, including questions relevant to synaptic function, neuroanatomy, and the organization of neural circuits.

  3. Highlights in pathogenesis of vitiligo

    OpenAIRE

    Ghada F. Mohammed; Gomaa, Amal HA; Al-Dhubaibi, Mohammed Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common pigmentary disorder. Many studies across decades and all over the world have attempted to illustrate the pathogenesis behind it; however, the pathogenesis of vitiligo remains elusive. This review article, we present the findings behind the most and updated theories behind this psychologically debilitating and disfiguring disease. The discussion begun with the role of genetic predisposition followed by neural theory first proposed in the 1950s. We highlight the autoimmune ...

  4. PHYSICS FOR HEALTH: CONFERENCE HIGHLIGHTS

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Highlights of ICTR-PHE 2016 - International Conference on Translational Research in Radio-Oncology and Physics for Health -, co organized by CERN, aims at developing new strategies to better diagnose and treat cancer, by uniting biology and physics with clinics. Through the various sessions and symposia, the scientific programme offers the delegates the opportunity to discuss, in a friendly atmosphere, the latest progress in physics breakthroughs for health applications. The third edition of this conference took place at CICG (Centre International de Conférence Genève) from 15 to 19 Feb 2016.

  5. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Workpackage 6, Driver Behaviour Monitoring through Naturalistic Driving: Deliverable 6.5: Naturalistic Driving for cross-national monitoring of SPIs and Exposure : an overview.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegman, R.W.N. & Bos, N.M.

    2015-01-01

    WP6 of DaCoTA, Driver Behaviour Monitoring through Naturalistic Driving, focuses on the usefulness and feasibility of applying the Naturalistic Driving method for monitoring within the framework of ERSO. The aim is to continuously collect comparable information about the road safety level in EU Memb

  6. Sympathetic science: Charles Darwin, Joseph Hooker, and the passions of Victorian naturalists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endersby, Jim

    2009-01-01

    This essay examines the complex tangle of emotional and scientific attachments that linked Darwin and botanist Joseph Dalton Hooker. Analyzing their roles as husbands, fathers, and novel readers demonstrates that possessing and expressing sympathy was as important for Victorian naturalists as it was for Victorian husbands. Sympathy was a scientific skill that Victorian naturalists regarded as necessary to fully understand the living world; although sympathy became increasingly gendered as feminine over the course of the century, its importance to male naturalists requires us to rethink the ways gender roles were negotiated in Victorian Britain. Botany was, for men like Darwin and Hooker, an acceptably masculine pursuit that nevertheless allowed--and even required--them to be sensitive and sympathetic.

  7. Highlights from BNL-RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Tannenbaum, M J

    2012-01-01

    Recent highlights from Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are reviewed and discussed. Topics include: Discovery of the strongly interacting Quark Gluon Plasma (sQGP) in 2005; RHIC machine operation in 2011 as well as latest achievements from the superconducting Magnet Division and the National Synchrotron Light Source II project. Highlights from QGP physics at RHIC include: comparison of new measurements of charged multiplicity in A+A collisions by ALICE at the LHC to previous RHIC measurements; Observation of the anti-alpha particle by the STAR experiment; Collective Flow, including the Triangular Flow discovery and the latest results on v3; the RHIC beam energy scan in search of the QCD critical point. The pioneering use at RHIC of hard-scattering as a probe of the sQGP will also be reviewed and the latest results presented including: jet-quenching via suppression of high pT particles and two particle correlations; new results on fragmentation functions using gamma...

  8. Highlighting inconsistencies regarding metal biosorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robalds, Artis; Naja, Ghinwa Melodie; Klavins, Maris

    2016-03-01

    Thousands of articles have been devoted to examine different types of biosorbents and their use in cleaning polluted waters. An important objective of some studies has been the identification of the biosorption mechanisms. This type of investigation is not always performed, as it can only be done if scientists are aware of all mechanisms that, at least theoretically, control the removal of the target substances. Mistakes are often made, even in highly cited review articles, where biosorption mechanisms are named and/or grouped. The aim of this article is to highlight errors and inaccuracies as well as to discuss different classification systems of the biosorption mechanisms. This article serves as a guide, as well as a platform for discussion among researchers involved in the investigation of biosorbents, in an effort to avoid reproducing errors in subsequent articles.

  9. Highlights in pathogenesis of vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Ghada F; Gomaa, Amal Ha; Al-Dhubaibi, Mohammed Saleh

    2015-03-16

    Vitiligo is a common pigmentary disorder. Many studies across decades and all over the world have attempted to illustrate the pathogenesis behind it; however, the pathogenesis of vitiligo remains elusive. This review article, we present the findings behind the most and updated theories behind this psychologically debilitating and disfiguring disease. The discussion begun with the role of genetic predisposition followed by neural theory first proposed in the 1950s. We highlight the autoimmune hypothesis, followed by the reactive oxygen species model, zinc-α2-glycoprotein deficiency hypothesis, viral theory, intrinsic theory and biochemical, molecular and cellular alterations accounting for loss of functioning melanocytes in vitiligo. Many theories were elaborated to clarify vitiligo pathogenesis. It is a multifactorial disease involving the interplay of several factors. Future research is needed to clarify the interaction of these factors for better understanding of vitiligo pathogenesis and subsequent successful treatment.

  10. Highlights of DAMA/LIBRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernabei R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The DAMA project develops and uses new/improved low background scintillation detectors to investigate the Dark Matter (DM particle component(s in the galactic halo and rare processes deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS of the I.N.F.N.. Here some highlights of DAMA/LIBRA (Large sodium Iodide Bulk for Rare processes as a unique apparatus in direct DM investigation for its full sensitive mass, target material, intrinsic radio-purity, methodological approach and all the controls performed on the experimental parameters are outlined. The DAMA/LIBRA–phase1 and the former DAMA/NaI data (cumulative exposure 1.33 ton × yr, corresponding to 14 annual cycles have reached a model-independent evidence at 9.3 σ C.L. for the presence of DM particles in the galactic halo exploiting the DM annual modulation signature with highly radio-pure NaI(Tl target. Some of the perspectives of the presently running DAMA/LIBRA–phase2 are summarised and the powerful tools offered by a model independent strategy of DM investigation are pointed out.

  11. A Naturalistic Experiment on Alcohol Availability Patterns of Consumption and the Context for Drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraushaar, Kevin; Alsop, Brent

    Reduced alcohol availability following the closure of the sole hotels in two rural towns afforded a naturalistic experiment to study the effects of alcohol availability and context for drinking on consumption. Measures of consumption derived from interviews, total dollars of liquor sales, and police drink-driving data were compared across two…

  12. Artful design: writing the proposal for research in the naturalist paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandelowski, M; Davis, D H; Harris, B G

    1989-04-01

    The preparation of the research proposal for a study that involves an emergent research design compels the investigator to negotiate the paradox of planning what should not be planned in advance. This paper is a guide to writing the proposal for research in the naturalist paradigm, and includes illustrative sections of a proposal recently funded by the National Center for Nursing Research.

  13. A Naturalistic Study of Collaborative Play Transformations of Preschoolers with Hearing Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, Ann M.; Rueda, Robert S.

    1998-01-01

    This naturalistic study examined the classroom collaborative play activities of nine preschoolers with hearing impairments and language delays, but without sign-language skills. Findings indicated the children constructed collaborative play episodes which incorporated role, action, and object transformations using a nonverbal metacommunication…

  14. The Tense-Aspect System in Pidgins and Naturalistically Learned L2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, J. Clancy

    2003-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of wider or narrower definitions of "pidginization" and "pidgin" are reviewed to determine the differences between pidgins and naturalistically learned second languages (L2s). It is argued that a wider definition is preferred because it avoids problematic counterexamples and captures generalizations that allow us…

  15. A Method for Naturalistic Observation of the Childbirth Environment: With Application to Theory Building and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Joanne; Standley, Kay

    An instrument for naturalistic observation in the childbirth environment is presented. Observable features of the parturient woman's physical state, stimulus contact she experiences, and themes of conversations with the woman are recorded using a system of categories to time-sample in cycles of 30 seconds for observing followed by 30 seconds for…

  16. A Collaborative Naturalistic Service Delivery Program for Enhancing Pragmatic Language and Participation in Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demchick, Barbara B.; Day, Karen H.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a speech-language pathology and occupational therapy service delivery program for preschoolers with developmental delays and communication and related impairments. Key features included interprofessional collaboration; parent professional partnerships; naturalistic environment; opportunities for choice and control; use of a…

  17. Pathways to Language: A Naturalistic Study of Children with Williams Syndrome and Children with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Yonata; Eilam, Ariela

    2013-01-01

    This is a naturalistic study of the development of language in Hebrew-speaking children with Williams syndrome (WS) and children with Down syndrome (DS), whose MLU extended from 1[multiplied by]0 to 4[multiplied by]4. Developmental curves over the entire span of data collection revealed minor differences between children with WS, children with DS,…

  18. The Practice of Poetry among a Group of Heroin Addicts in India: Naturalistic Peer Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhand, Amar

    2006-01-01

    As part of an ongoing ethnographic study, this paper aims to consider the practice of poetry, "sher-o-shayari", as naturalistic peer learning among a group of heroin addicts in Yamuna Bazaar, New Delhi. By examining meanings given to "sher-o-shayari" and experiences of participating in the practice, this article makes the claim…

  19. The effects of alcohol expectancies on drinking behaviour in peer groups: Observations in a naturalistic setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bot, S.M.; Engels, R.C.M.E.; Knibbe, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    AIMS: To study the functionality of alcohol expectancies in predicting drinking behaviour in existing peer groups of young adults in a 'naturalistic' setting. DESIGN AND SETTING: Young adults were invited to join an experiment with their peer group in a bar annex laboratory. During a 'break' of 50 m

  20. Eliciting Naturalistic Cortical Responses with a Sensory Prosthesis via Optimized Microstimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-12

    by electrical stimulation along the sensory neural pathways. Such stimulation, when informed by electronic sensors , could provide naturalistic... naturally occurring stimuli into biomimetic percepts via multi-channel microstimulation are lacking. More specifically, generating spatiotemporal patterns... naturally occurring touch responses as closely as possible. Main results. Here we show that such optimization produces responses in the S1 cortex of the

  1. Czy naturalistyczna etyka jest możliwa? (Is Naturalistic Ethics Possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Szutta

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper concerns the possibility of naturalistic ethics. It seems that ethics properly understood must be described as a discipline necessarily focused on evaluation of human action, analyzed in the light of its moral value. Such evaluation, in turn, presupposes an agent who is responsible for his or her actions. The possibility of so understood agent seems not to be possible without agent’s being capable of self-determination in action. According to the naturalistic thesis, however, such freedom is impossible; all human action is causally determined, with no place for ‘sui generis’ causation, and such a thesis must be interpreted as excluding the possibility of responsibility for one’s action. If so, then the concept of naturalistic ethics seems contradictory. Nonetheless, some authors (ex. H. Frankfurt and D. Dennett try to show that the concept of moral responsibility (so crucial to ethics does not necessarily entail freedom understood as ‘sui generis’ causation, and therefore it is compatible with determinism. In this paper I analyze their argumentation with the purpose to assess its conclusiveness. The conclusion I reach is that responsibility postulated by Frankfurt or Dennett is to be understood as merely epiphenomenal, as such it must be treated more like an illusion than a real property of human beings. Therefore, the thesis that naturalistic ethics is a contradictory concept seems to maintain its soundness.

  2. A Naturalistic Study of Executive Function and Mathematical Problem-Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsopoulos, Donna; Lee, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    Our goal in this research was to understand the specific challenges middle-school students face when engaging in mathematical problem-solving by using executive function (i.e., shifting, updating, and inhibiting) of working memory as a functional construct for the analysis. Using modified talk-aloud protocols, real-time naturalistic analysis of…

  3. Assessment and Evaluation of the Utah Master Naturalist Program: Implications for Targeting Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larese-Casanova, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The Utah Master Naturalist Program trains citizens who provide education, outreach, and service to promote citizen stewardship of natural resources within their communities. In 2007-2008, the Watersheds module of the program was evaluated for program success, and participant knowledge was assessed. Assessment and evaluation results indicated that…

  4. A Naturalistic Method for Assessing the Learning of Arithmatic from Computer-Aided Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hativa, Nira

    1986-01-01

    A study used the naturalistic method of inquiry in order to investigate the CAI (Computer Assisted Instruction) contribution to students' performance in arithmetic and to identify possible problems. The study was aimed at understanding the holistic environment of students' individualized drill in arithmetic with the computer. (BS)

  5. The Tense-Aspect System in Pidgins and Naturalistically Learned L2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, J. Clancy

    2003-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of wider or narrower definitions of "pidginization" and "pidgin" are reviewed to determine the differences between pidgins and naturalistically learned second languages (L2s). It is argued that a wider definition is preferred because it avoids problematic counterexamples and captures…

  6. Program Evaluations of Occupational Therapy Level II Fieldwork Environments: A Naturalistic Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Susan K.

    1989-01-01

    Three occupational therapy fieldwork environments--mental health, adult physical disabilities, and pediatrics--were evaluated with the naturalistic inquiry methodology. Students and supervisors described and compared ideal clinical education environments with actual fieldwork environments. Different priorities emerged in the three environments,…

  7. ESO PR Highlights in 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    2005 was the year of Physics. It was thus also in part the year of astronomy and this is clearly illustrated by the numerous breakthroughs that were achieved, in particular using ESO's telescopes. One of the highlights was without any doubt the confirmation of the first image of an exoplanet , around the star 2M1207 (see ESO PR 12/05). ESO's telescopes also found a Neptune-mass exoplanet around a small star ( PR 30/05) - a discovery that proves crucial in the census of other planetary systems, and imaged a tiny companion in the close vicinity of the star GQ Lupi, a very young object still surrounded by a disc, with an age between 100,000 and 2 million years ( PR 09/05). Moreover, using a new high-contrast adaptive optics camera on the VLT, the NACO Simultaneous Differential Imager, or NACO SDI, astronomers were able for the first time to image a companion 120 times fainter than its star , very near the star AB Doradus A. This companion appears to be almost twice as heavy as theory predicts it to be ( PR 02/05). ESO's telescopes proved very useful in helping to solve a 30-year old puzzle . Astronomers have for the first time observed the visible light from a short gamma-ray burst (GRB). Using the 1.5m Danish telescope at La Silla (Chile), they showed that these short, intense bursts of gamma-ray emission most likely originate from the violent collision of two merging neutron stars ( PR 26/05). Additional evidence came from witnessing another event with the VLT ( PR 32/05). Also in this field, astronomers found the farthest known gamma-ray burst with ESO's VLT, observing an object with a redshift 6.3, i.e. that is seen when the Universe was less than 900 million years old ( PR 22/05). On July 4, NASA's Deep Impact spacecraft plunged onto Comet 9P/Tempel 1 with the aim to create a crater and expose pristine material from beneath the surface. For two days before and six days after, all major ESO telescopes have been observing the comet, in a coordinated fashion and in

  8. African American Women Principals in Urban Schools: Realities, (Re)constructions, and Resolutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Collette M.; Erlandson, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Using a naturalistic inquiry approach, analysis of indepth interviews reveals portraits of three African American women administrators emerging from their visible absences, illusionary opportunities, and imaginary schools with stories of strength, identity formation, and a collective consciousness in working for and with the black community in…

  9. [Identification and description of a new epistemological category of inferential reasoning related to meta-naturalistic science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugini, P

    2010-01-01

    Modern science underwent a substantial shift of methodology passing from naturalistic science to meta-naturalistic science, the latter addressed to introduce "Technologically Modified Beings or Objects" (TMB - TMO) in nature, with the intention to utilize them for some endpoints. Classically, naturalistic science draws epistemological inferences using the traditional criteria of induction, deduction or abduction. The question arises: "What is the epistemological criterion of inference used by meta-naturalistic science?". Meditating on this question, I have identified the new epistemological category of reasoning that characterizes the meta-naturalistic science, calling it: "Adduction". Adduction can be defined as "A new epistemological category of inferential reasoning, beside induction, deduction, abduction, currently used in meta-naturalistic science, that consists in deriving inferences to what it has not been yet scientifically experimented, demonstrated and validated, simply by adducing, as a support to the inference, the motivation itself for which the scientists were exerted to produce their meta-naturalistic artifacts. In so doing, the inference is no other than an aprioristic, adubitative assertion of a thesis that gives an authorization to the scope and a certainty to the results, without knowing whether or not the promised endpoints will be fulfilled. In conclusion, adduction is a convolute (sometime, tautological and para-sylogistic) process of reasoning that makes "prospective prophecies" because of its inference to the predicted premises rather than to the demonstrated conclusions".

  10. Atmospheric Research 2014 Technical Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platnick, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Earth Sciences Division in atmospheric science research. Figure 1.1 shows the 20-year record of peer-reviewed publications and proposals among the various Laboratories. This data shows that the scientific work being conducted in the Laboratories is competitive with the work being done elsewhere in universities and other government agencies. The office of Deputy Director for Atmospheric Research will strive to maintain this record by rigorously monitoring and promoting quality while emphasizing coordination and integration among atmospheric disciplines. Also, an appropriate balance will be maintained between the scientists' responsibility for large collaborative projects and missions and their need to carry out active science research as a principal investigator. This balance allows members of the Laboratories to improve their scientific credentials, and develop leadership potentials. Interdisciplinary research is carried out in collaboration with other laboratories and research groups within the Earth Sciences Division, across the Sciences and Exploration Directorate, and with partners in universities and other government agencies. Members of the Laboratories interact with the general public to support a wide range of interests in the atmospheric sciences. Among other activities, the Laboratories raise the public's awareness of atmospheric science by presenting public lectures and demonstrations, by making scientific data available to wide audiences, by teaching, and by mentoring students and teachers. The Atmosphere Laboratories make substantial efforts to attract and recruit new scientists to the various areas of atmospheric research. We strongly encourage the establishment of partnerships with Federal and state agencies that have operational responsibilities to promote the societal application of our science products. This report describes our role in NASA's mission, provides highlights of our research scope and activities, and summarizes our scientists' major

  11. Highlights from U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Recovery Act Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuel Cell Technologies Office

    2012-05-01

    This fact sheets highlights U.S. Department of Energy fuel cell projects funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act). More than 1,000 fuel cell systems have been deployed through Recovery Act funding.

  12. ESO PR Highlights in 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Last year proved to be another exceptional year for the European organisation for ground-based astronomy. ESO should begin the New Year with two new member states: Spain (PR 05/06) and the Czech Republic (PR 52/06). ESO PR Highlights 2006 2006 was a year of renovation and revolution in the world of planets. A new Earth-like exoplanet has been discovered (PR 03/06) using a network of telescopes from all over the world (including the Danish 1.54-m one at ESO La Silla). It is not the only child of this fruitful year: thanks to the combined use of ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) and La Silla instruments, a surprising system of twin giant exoplanets was found (PR 29/06), and a trio of Neptune-like planets hosted by a nearby star were identified (PR 18/06). These results open new perspectives on the search for habitable zones and on the understanding of the mechanism of planet formation. The VISIR instrument on the VLT has been providing unique information to answer this last question, by supplying a high resolution view of a planet-forming disc (PR 36/06). There are not only new members in the planets' register: during the General Assembly of the International Astronomical Union held in Prague (Czech Republic), it was decided that Pluto is not a planet anymore but a 'dwarf planet'. Whatever its status, Pluto still has a satellite, Charon, whose radius and density have been measured more accurately by observing a rare occultation from different sites, including Cerro Paranal (PR 02/06). The scientific community dedicated 2006 to the great physicist James Clerk Maxwell (it was the 175th anniversary of the birth): without his electromagnetic theory of light, none of the astonishing discoveries of modern physics could have been achieved. Nowadays we can look at distant galaxies in great detail: the GIRAFFE spectrograph on the VLT revealed that galaxies 6 billion years ago had the same amount of dark matter relative to stars than nowadays (PR 10/06), while SINFONI gave an

  13. Facilitating pictorial comprehension with color highlighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougald, Brannan R; Wogalter, Michael S

    2014-09-01

    Pictorials can aid in communicating warning information, but viewers may not always correctly comprehend them. Two experiments focused on whether the use of relevant highlighting could benefit pictorial comprehension. A set of warning-related pictorials were manipulated according to three-color highlighting conditions: highlighting areas more relevant to correct comprehension, highlighting areas less relevant to comprehension, and no highlighting. Participants were asked to describe the purpose and meaning of each pictorial presented to them. The findings from both experiments indicate that comprehension of warning pictorials is higher for the relevant highlighting condition than the other two conditions. The highlighting of less relevant areas reduced comprehension compared to no highlighting. Use of appropriately placed highlighting could benefit the design of a complex symbol by pointing out pertinent areas to aid in determining its intended conceptual meaning.

  14. Naturalistic Tendency Reflected in the symbol -sea in Kate Chopin's The Awakening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李姝毅; 岳晨

    2014-01-01

    In The Awakening,naturalistic tendency can be gleaned from its efficient employment of natural elements as symbols."Symbols are objects,characters,figures,or colors used to represent abstract ideas or concepts."They will be successful if they enable an author to convey meaning without forcing it.In The Awakening,the indifferent sea is the powerful symbol which develop the plot and is the implication of Edna's death in the end.

  15. Encoding of naturalistic stimuli by local field potential spectra in networks of excitatory and inhibitory neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Mazzoni

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Recordings of local field potentials (LFPs reveal that the sensory cortex displays rhythmic activity and fluctuations over a wide range of frequencies and amplitudes. Yet, the role of this kind of activity in encoding sensory information remains largely unknown. To understand the rules of translation between the structure of sensory stimuli and the fluctuations of cortical responses, we simulated a sparsely connected network of excitatory and inhibitory neurons modeling a local cortical population, and we determined how the LFPs generated by the network encode information about input stimuli. We first considered simple static and periodic stimuli and then naturalistic input stimuli based on electrophysiological recordings from the thalamus of anesthetized monkeys watching natural movie scenes. We found that the simulated network produced stimulus-related LFP changes that were in striking agreement with the LFPs obtained from the primary visual cortex. Moreover, our results demonstrate that the network encoded static input spike rates into gamma-range oscillations generated by inhibitory-excitatory neural interactions and encoded slow dynamic features of the input into slow LFP fluctuations mediated by stimulus-neural interactions. The model cortical network processed dynamic stimuli with naturalistic temporal structure by using low and high response frequencies as independent communication channels, again in agreement with recent reports from visual cortex responses to naturalistic movies. One potential function of this frequency decomposition into independent information channels operated by the cortical network may be that of enhancing the capacity of the cortical column to encode our complex sensory environment.

  16. Identifying Core Affect in Individuals from fMRI Responses to Dynamic Naturalistic Audiovisual Stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongwan; Wang, Jing; Wedell, Douglas H; Shinkareva, Svetlana V

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that affective states elicited by viewing pictures varying in valence and arousal are identifiable from whole brain activation patterns observed with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Identification of affective states from more naturalistic stimuli has clinical relevance, but the feasibility of identifying these states on an individual trial basis from fMRI data elicited by dynamic multimodal stimuli is unclear. The goal of this study was to determine whether affective states can be similarly identified when participants view dynamic naturalistic audiovisual stimuli. Eleven participants viewed 5s audiovisual clips in a passive viewing task in the scanner. Valence and arousal for individual trials were identified both within and across participants based on distributed patterns of activity in areas selectively responsive to audiovisual naturalistic stimuli while controlling for lower level features of the stimuli. In addition, the brain regions identified by searchlight analyses to represent valence and arousal were consistent with previously identified regions associated with emotion processing. These findings extend previous results on the distributed representation of affect to multimodal dynamic stimuli.

  17. Getting Real: A Naturalistic Methodology for Using Smartphones to Collect Mediated Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad C. Tossell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper contributes an intentionally naturalistic methodology using smartphone logging technology to study communications in the wild. Smartphone logging can provide tremendous access to communications data from real environments. However, researchers must consider how it is employed to preserve naturalistic behaviors. Nine considerations are presented to this end. We also provide a description of a naturalistic logging approach that has been applied successfully to collecting mediated communications from iPhones. The methodology was designed to intentionally decrease reactivity and resulted in data that were more accurate than self-reports. Example analyses are also provided to show how data collected can be analyzed to establish empirical patterns and identify user differences. Smartphone logging technologies offer flexible capabilities to enhance access to real communications data, but methodologies employing these techniques must be designed appropriately to avoid provoking naturally occurring behaviors. Functionally, this methodology can be applied to establish empirical patterns and test specific hypotheses within the field of HCI research. Topically, this methodology can be applied to domains interested in understanding mediated communications such as mobile content and systems design, teamwork, and social networks.

  18. Identifying Core Affect in Individuals from fMRI Responses to Dynamic Naturalistic Audiovisual Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongwan; Wang, Jing; Wedell, Douglas H.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that affective states elicited by viewing pictures varying in valence and arousal are identifiable from whole brain activation patterns observed with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Identification of affective states from more naturalistic stimuli has clinical relevance, but the feasibility of identifying these states on an individual trial basis from fMRI data elicited by dynamic multimodal stimuli is unclear. The goal of this study was to determine whether affective states can be similarly identified when participants view dynamic naturalistic audiovisual stimuli. Eleven participants viewed 5s audiovisual clips in a passive viewing task in the scanner. Valence and arousal for individual trials were identified both within and across participants based on distributed patterns of activity in areas selectively responsive to audiovisual naturalistic stimuli while controlling for lower level features of the stimuli. In addition, the brain regions identified by searchlight analyses to represent valence and arousal were consistent with previously identified regions associated with emotion processing. These findings extend previous results on the distributed representation of affect to multimodal dynamic stimuli. PMID:27598534

  19. The Pavlovian craver: Neural and experiential correlates of single trial naturalistic food conditioning in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blechert, J; Testa, G; Georgii, C; Klimesch, W; Wilhelm, F H

    2016-05-01

    Present-day environments are replete with tempting foods and the current obesity pandemic speaks to humans' inability to adjust to this. Pavlovian processes may be fundamental to such hedonic overeating. However, a lack of naturalistic Pavlovian paradigms in humans makes translational research difficult and important parameters such as implicitness and acquisition speed are unknown. Here we present a novel naturalistic conditioning task: an image of a neutral object was conditioned to marzipan taste in a single trial procedure by asking the participant to eat the 'object' (made from marzipan). Relative to control objects, results demonstrate robust pre- to post-conditioning changes of both subjective ratings and early as well as late event related brain potentials, suggesting contributions of implicit (attentional) and explicit (motivational) processes. Naturalistic single-trial taste-appetitive conditioning is potent in humans and shapes attentional and motivational neural processes that might challenge self-regulation during exposure to tempting foods. Thus, appetitive conditioning processes might contribute to overweight and obesity.

  20. Eliciting naturalistic cortical responses with a sensory prosthesis via optimized microstimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, John S.; Brockmeier, Austin J.; McNiel, David B.; von Kraus, Lee M.; Príncipe, José C.; Francis, Joseph T.

    2016-10-01

    Objective. Lost sensations, such as touch, could one day be restored by electrical stimulation along the sensory neural pathways. Such stimulation, when informed by electronic sensors, could provide naturalistic cutaneous and proprioceptive feedback to the user. Perceptually, microstimulation of somatosensory brain regions produces localized, modality-specific sensations, and several spatiotemporal parameters have been studied for their discernibility. However, systematic methods for encoding a wide array of naturally occurring stimuli into biomimetic percepts via multi-channel microstimulation are lacking. More specifically, generating spatiotemporal patterns for explicitly evoking naturalistic neural activation has not yet been explored. Approach. We address this problem by first modeling the dynamical input-output relationship between multichannel microstimulation and downstream neural responses, and then optimizing the input pattern to reproduce naturally occurring touch responses as closely as possible. Main results. Here we show that such optimization produces responses in the S1 cortex of the anesthetized rat that are highly similar to natural, tactile-stimulus-evoked counterparts. Furthermore, information on both pressure and location of the touch stimulus was found to be highly preserved. Significance. Our results suggest that the currently presented stimulus optimization approach holds great promise for restoring naturalistic levels of sensation.

  1. The life and viper of Dr Patrick Russell MD FRS (1727-1805): physician and naturalist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawgood, B J

    1994-11-01

    It is nearly two hundred years since the publication in 1796 of An Account of Indian Serpents collected on the Coast of Coromandel by Patrick Russell. Within the folio is a drawing and description of the venomous snake called Katuka Rekula Poda in the local Telugu language, whose venom was shown experimentally by Dr Russell to be nearly as lethal as that of Cobra de Capello. The snake is now known as Vipera russelli or Russell's viper. Dr Russell was representative of the naturalistic tendency of British medicine in the late 18th century. He was a keen observer and skilled doctor in clinical practice, particularly in Aleppo, Syria, during an outbreak of the plague, and indefatigable in his study of plant and animal life both in Aleppo and later in the Madras Province of India. As a physician as well as Naturalist to the East India Company in the Carnatic he was concerned with the problem of snakebite. His first aim was to find a means whereby the non-specialist could distinguish between poisonous and harmless snakes and so combat the terrible notion that all bites were mortal. His writing, encompassing social and natural histories and climaxed by a study of snakes, has left a rich legacy. Dr Patrick Russell was a man of the highest integrity and ability, a physician and naturalist par excellence.

  2. International Focus: Highlighting APPA Members Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazner, Steve, Comp.

    2011-01-01

    While most APPA member institutions are located in the United States and Canada, there are also 45 of member institutions located internationally--from Australia and New Zealand to Southeast Asia to the Middle East to Europe. This article focuses on four of its international members: (1) American University of Kuwait (AUK); (2) American University…

  3. Using an Electronic Highlighter to Eliminate the Negative Effects of Pre-Existing, Inappropriate Highlighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gier, Vicki; Kreiner, David; Hudnell, Jason; Montoya, Jodi; Herring, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether using an active learning technique, electronic highlighting, can eliminate the negative effects of pre-existing, poor highlighting on reading comprehension. Participants read passages containing no highlighting, appropriate highlighting, or inappropriate highlighting. We hypothesized…

  4. Role of intraglomerular circuits in shaping temporally structured responses to naturalistic inhalation-driven sensory input to the olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Ryan M; Sherwood, William Erik; Shipley, Michael T; Borisyuk, Alla; Wachowiak, Matt

    2015-05-01

    Olfaction in mammals is a dynamic process driven by the inhalation of air through the nasal cavity. Inhalation determines the temporal structure of sensory neuron responses and shapes the neural dynamics underlying central olfactory processing. Inhalation-linked bursts of activity among olfactory bulb (OB) output neurons [mitral/tufted cells (MCs)] are temporally transformed relative to those of sensory neurons. We investigated how OB circuits shape inhalation-driven dynamics in MCs using a modeling approach that was highly constrained by experimental results. First, we constructed models of canonical OB circuits that included mono- and disynaptic feedforward excitation, recurrent inhibition and feedforward inhibition of the MC. We then used experimental data to drive inputs to the models and to tune parameters; inputs were derived from sensory neuron responses during natural odorant sampling (sniffing) in awake rats, and model output was compared with recordings of MC responses to odorants sampled with the same sniff waveforms. This approach allowed us to identify OB circuit features underlying the temporal transformation of sensory inputs into inhalation-linked patterns of MC spike output. We found that realistic input-output transformations can be achieved independently by multiple circuits, including feedforward inhibition with slow onset and decay kinetics and parallel feedforward MC excitation mediated by external tufted cells. We also found that recurrent and feedforward inhibition had differential impacts on MC firing rates and on inhalation-linked response dynamics. These results highlight the importance of investigating neural circuits in a naturalistic context and provide a framework for further explorations of signal processing by OB networks.

  5. Arab-American and Muslim-American Contributions: Resources for Secondary Social Studies Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eraqi, Monica M.

    2015-01-01

    Arab-Americans and Muslim-Americans live within the United States surrounded by misconceptions about their culture and religion, in part because of the limited inclusion of positive contributions by these groups within the social studies curriculum. This article attempts to highlight Arab-American and Muslim-American contributions within the U.S.…

  6. Comparison of the antidepressant effects of venlafaxine and dosulepin in a naturalistic setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Jens Drachmann; Jørgensen, Martin Balslev; Dam, Henrik;

    2009-01-01

    was dosulepin; after that time, venlafaxine was the first-line medication. We compared the treatment outcomes among inpatients during the respective periods. There was no significant difference in the primary outcome parameters between the two groups. A tendency in favour of dosulepin confirmed by a post......-hoc analysis suggested that the failure to achieve significant difference was related to a type 2 error. However, missing data and possible confounders related to the different treatment periods weaken the results. This naturalistic study showed a non-significant trend for poorer treatment outcomes (probably...

  7. Contrasting roles of Ih and the persistent sodium current at subthreshold voltages during naturalistic stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thor, Michael G; Morris, Gareth

    2016-11-01

    The subthreshold activity of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons is regulated by the persistent sodium current (INaP) and the h-current (Ih), carried by tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels and hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated channels, respectively. Recently, Yamada-Hanff and Bean (J Neurophysiol 114: 2376-2389, 2015) used pharmacological methods to discern the roles of Ih and INaP at subthreshold voltages during naturalistic stimuli. We discuss these findings in the context of dorsoventral heterogeneity in the hippocampus and suggest further applications of the method.

  8. A Naturalistic Interpretation of The Characters’Tragedies in Of Mice and Men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ting-ting

    2015-01-01

    In Of Mice and Men, John Steinbeck tells a tragic story about how two migrant ranch workers’dream of obtaining a piece of land of their own is ultimately broken during Great Depression. According to research, there are few people categorizing the characters’tragedies and analyzing each with naturalism. Through detailed reading of the text, efforts are made to probe into the underlying reasons for the characters’doomed tragedy and analyze their inborn weaknesses and social environment at that time from the naturalistic perspective.

  9. American Religion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田甜

    2008-01-01

    It is said that American religion,as a great part of American culture,plays an important role in American culture. It is hoped that some ideas can be obtained from this research paper,which focuses on analyzing the great impact is produced to American culture by American religion. Finally, this essay gives two useful standpoints to English learners:Understunding American religion will help understand the American history, culture and American people,and help you to communic.ate with them better. Understanding American religion will help you understand English better.

  10. Using Highlighting to Train Attentional Expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roads, Brett; Mozer, Michael C; Busey, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    Acquiring expertise in complex visual tasks is time consuming. To facilitate the efficient training of novices on where to look in these tasks, we propose an attentional highlighting paradigm. Highlighting involves dynamically modulating the saliency of a visual image to guide attention along the fixation path of a domain expert who had previously viewed the same image. In Experiment 1, we trained naive subjects via attentional highlighting on a fingerprint-matching task. Before and after training, we asked subjects to freely inspect images containing pairs of prints and determine whether the prints matched. Fixation sequences were automatically scored for the degree of expertise exhibited using a Bayesian discriminative model of novice and expert gaze behavior. Highlighted training causes gaze behavior to become more expert-like not only on the trained images but also on transfer images, indicating generalization of learning. In Experiment 2, to control for the possibility that the increase in expertise is due to mere exposure, we trained subjects via highlighting of fixation sequences from novices, not experts, and observed no transition toward expertise. In Experiment 3, to determine the specificity of the training effect, we trained subjects with expert fixation sequences from images other than the one being viewed, which preserves coarse-scale statistics of expert gaze but provides no information about fine-grain features. Observing at least a partial transition toward expertise, we obtain only weak evidence that the highlighting procedure facilitates the learning of critical local features. We discuss possible improvements to the highlighting procedure.

  11. It takes the whole brain to make a cup of coffee: the neuropsychology of naturalistic actions involving technical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Karoline; Goldenberg, Georg; Daumüller, Maike; Hermsdörfer, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    Left hemisphere dominance has been established for use of single familiar tools and tool/object pairs, but everyday action in natural environment frequently affords multi-step actions with more or less novel technical devices. One purpose of our study was to find out whether left hemisphere dominance extends to such naturalistic action. Another aim was to analyze the cognitive components contributing to success or failure. Patients with LBD and aphasia, patients with RBD, and healthy controls were examined on experimental tests assessing retrieval of functional knowledge from semantic memory, inference of function from structure, and solution of mechanical and non-mechanical multi-step problems, and were confronted with two naturalistic tasks involving technical devices: preparing coffee with a drip coffee maker and fixing a cassette recorder. Both patient groups were about equally impaired on both naturalistic actions. Analysis of the experimental tests and their correlations to naturalistic actions suggested that different cognitive deficits caused failure in both patient groups, and that in LBD patients there were also different causes for failure on both naturalistic actions. The main difficulty of RBD patients seemed to reside in the demand to keep track of multi-step actions. In aphasic LBD patients difficulties with making coffee but not the cassette recorder were correlated with aphasia and defective retrieval of functional knowledge from semantic memory, whereas the cassette recorder correlated more strongly with a test probing solution of multi-step mechanical problems. Inference of function from structure which had been shown to be important for use of single familiar tools or tool/objects pairs [Goldenberg, G., Hagmann, S. (1998). AT Tool use and mechanical problem solving in apraxia. Neuropsychologia, 36, 581-589] appeared to play only a subordinate role for naturalistic actions involving technical devices.

  12. Status and recent highlights from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Wengler, Thorsten; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    After a brief introduction the start-up of the ATLAS detector for 2016 data taking will be described, as well as its current status and performance, before discussing a selection of recent physics highlights.

  13. Naturalistic arm movements during obstacle avoidance in 3D and the identification of movement primitives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimme, Britta; Lipinski, John; Schöner, Gregor

    2012-10-01

    By studying human movement in the laboratory, a number of regularities and invariants such as planarity and the principle of isochrony have been discovered. The theoretical idea has gained traction that movement may be generated from a limited set of movement primitives that would encode these invariants. In this study, we ask if invariants and movement primitives capture naturalistic human movement. Participants moved objects to target locations while avoiding obstacles using unconstrained arm movements in three dimensions. Two experiments manipulated the spatial layout of targets, obstacles, and the locations in the transport movement where an obstacle was encountered. We found that all movement trajectories were planar, with the inclination of the movement plane reflecting the obstacle constraint. The timing of the movement was consistent with both global isochrony (same movement time for variable path lengths) and local isochrony (same movement time for two components of the obstacle avoidance movement). The identified movement primitives of transport (movement from start to target position) and lift (movement perpendicular to transport within the movement plane) varied independently with obstacle conditions. Their scaling accounted for the observed double peak structure of movement speed. Overall, the observed naturalistic movement was astoundingly regular. Its decomposition into primitives suggests simple mechanisms for movement generation.

  14. Quantifying naturalistic social gaze in fragile X syndrome using a novel eye tracking paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Scott S; Frank, Michael C; Pusiol, Guido T; Farzin, Faraz; Lightbody, Amy A; Reiss, Allan L

    2015-10-01

    A hallmark behavioral feature of fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the propensity for individuals with the syndrome to exhibit significant impairments in social gaze during interactions with others. However, previous studies employing eye tracking methodology to investigate this phenomenon have been limited to presenting static photographs or videos of social interactions rather than employing a real-life social partner. To improve upon previous studies, we used a customized eye tracking configuration to quantify the social gaze of 51 individuals with FXS and 19 controls, aged 14-28 years, while they engaged in a naturalistic face-to-face social interaction with a female experimenter. Importantly, our control group was matched to the FXS group on age, developmental functioning, and degree of autistic symptomatology. Results showed that participants with FXS spent significantly less time looking at the face and had shorter episodes (and longer inter-episodes) of social gaze than controls. Regression analyses indicated that communication ability predicted higher levels of social gaze in individuals with FXS, but not in controls. Conversely, degree of autistic symptoms predicted lower levels of social gaze in controls, but not in individuals with FXS. Taken together, these data indicate that naturalistic social gaze in FXS can be measured objectively using existing eye tracking technology during face-to-face social interactions. Given that impairments in social gaze were specific to FXS, this paradigm could be employed as an objective and ecologically valid outcome measure in ongoing Phase II/Phase III clinical trials of FXS-specific interventions.

  15. Back to basics: a naturalistic assessment of the experience and regulation of emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiy, Jane E; Cheavens, Jennifer S

    2014-10-01

    Emotion regulation research links regulatory responding to important outcomes in psychological well-being, physical health, and interpersonal relations, but several fundamental questions remain. As much of the previous research has addressed generalized regulatory habits, far less is known about the ways in which individuals respond to emotions in daily life. The literature is particularly sparse in explorations of positive emotion regulation. In the current study, we provide an assessment of naturalistic experiences and regulation of emotion, both positive and negative in valence. Using an electronic experience sampling methodology, participants reported on their use of 40 regulatory strategies in response to 14 emotions for 10 consecutive days. On average, participants used 15 different regulatory strategies in response to negative emotions over this time, most frequently relying on acceptance, behavioral activation, and rumination. Participants used a similarly large repertoire of strategies, approximately 16 total, in response to positive emotions, particularly savoring, future focus, and behavioral activation. Participants' mood ratings following strategy use, however, indicated that the most frequently used strategies were often not the most effective strategies. The results of this study provide estimates of the frequency and effectiveness of a large number of emotion regulation strategies in response to both negative and positive emotions. Such findings characterize naturalistic emotion regulation, and estimates of normative emotion regulation processes are imperative to determining the ways in which deviations (e.g., small emotion regulation repertoires, insufficient attention to regulation of positive emotions) impact emotional functioning.

  16. Student Communities and Individualism in American Cinema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnick, Bryan R.; Dawson, Heather S.; Smith, D. Spencer; Vosburg-Bluem, Bethany

    2010-01-01

    Hollywood films partially construct how Americans think about education. Recent work on the representation of schools in American cinema has highlighted the role of class difference in shaping school film genres. It has also advanced the idea that a nuanced understanding of American individualism helps to explain why the different class genres are…

  17. Independent naturalists make matchless contributions to science and resource management (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crimmins, T. M.; Crimmins, M.; Bertelsen, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    Much of the recent growth in PPSR, or public participation in scientific research, has been in 'contributory' or 'collaborative'-type PPSR projects, where non-scientists' roles primarily are data collection or some participation in other aspects of project design or execution. A less common PPSR model, referred to as 'collegial' in recent literature, is characterized by dedicated naturalists collecting rich and extensive data sets outside of an organized program and then working with professional scientists to analyze these data and disseminate findings. The three collaborators on this presentation represent an example of the collegial model; our team is comprised of an independent naturalist who has collected over 150,000 records of plant flowering phenology spanning three decades, a professional climatologist, and a professional plant ecologist. Together, we have documented fundamental plant-climate relationships and seasonal patterns in flowering in the Sonoran Desert region, as well as changes in flowering community composition and distribution associated with changing climate conditions in the form of seven peer-reviewed journal articles and several conference presentations and proceedings. These novel findings address critical gaps in our understanding of plant ecology in the Sky Islands region, and have been incorporated into the Southwest Climate Change and other regional planning documents. It is safe to say that the data resource amassed by a single very dedicated individual, which is far beyond what could be accomplished by probably nearly all researchers or resource managers, has been instrumental in documenting fundamental ecological relationships in the Sky Islands region as well as how these systems are changing in this period of rapidly changing climate. The research findings that have resulted from this partnership have the potential to also directly affect management decisions. The watershed under study, managed by the US Forest Service, has been

  18. Characterizing the Motivational Orientation of Students in Higher Education: A Naturalistic Study in Three Hong Kong Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kember, David; Hong, Celina; Ho, Amber

    2008-01-01

    Background: Consideration of motivation in higher education has often been drawn upon theories and research that were based upon school or workplace studies. Aims: This paper reports an open naturalistic study to better characterize the motivational orientation of students in higher education. Method: Open semi-structured individual interviews…

  19. Intelligent Information Retrieval: Part IV. Testing the Timing of Two Information Retrieval Devices in a Naturalistic Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Charles

    2001-01-01

    Reports the results of two studies of undergraduates that tested an uncertainty expansion information retrieval device and an uncertainty reduction device in naturalistic settings, designed to be given at different stages of Kuhlthau's information search process. Concludes that the timing of the device interventions is crucial to their potential…

  20. Quality of Childcare and Otitis Media: Relationship to Children's Language during Naturalistic Interactions at 18, 24, and 36 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon-Feagans, Lynne; Hurley, Megan M.; Yont, Kristine M.; Wamboldt, Patricia M.; Kolak, Amy

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the quality of childcare and experience with otitis media (middle ear disease) as they relate to children's early naturalistic language development. Sixty children were followed longitudinally from childcare entry in the first year of life until three years of age. Half the children…

  1. Frequency-band signatures of visual responses to naturalistic input in ferret primary visual cortex during free viewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Kristin K; Bennett, Davis V; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2015-02-19

    Neuronal firing responses in visual cortex reflect the statistics of visual input and emerge from the interaction with endogenous network dynamics. Artificial visual stimuli presented to animals in which the network dynamics were constrained by anesthetic agents or trained behavioral tasks have provided fundamental understanding of how individual neurons in primary visual cortex respond to input. In contrast, very little is known about the mesoscale network dynamics and their relationship to microscopic spiking activity in the awake animal during free viewing of naturalistic visual input. To address this gap in knowledge, we recorded local field potential (LFP) and multiunit activity (MUA) simultaneously in all layers of primary visual cortex (V1) of awake, freely viewing ferrets presented with naturalistic visual input (nature movie clips). We found that naturalistic visual stimuli modulated the entire oscillation spectrum; low frequency oscillations were mostly suppressed whereas higher frequency oscillations were enhanced. In average across all cortical layers, stimulus-induced change in delta and alpha power negatively correlated with the MUA responses, whereas sensory-evoked increases in gamma power positively correlated with MUA responses. The time-course of the band-limited power in these frequency bands provided evidence for a model in which naturalistic visual input switched V1 between two distinct, endogenously present activity states defined by the power of low (delta, alpha) and high (gamma) frequency oscillatory activity. Therefore, the two mesoscale activity states delineated in this study may define the degree of engagement of the circuit with the processing of sensory input.

  2. Self-Assessment of Japanese as a Second Language: The Role of Experiences in the Naturalistic Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Self-assessment has been used to assess second language proficiency; however, as sources of measurement errors vary, they may threaten the validity and reliability of the tools. The present paper investigated the role of experiences in using Japanese as a second language in the naturalistic acquisition context on the accuracy of the…

  3. Naturalistic driving observations of manual and visual-manual interactions with navigation systems and mobile phones while driving.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christoph, M. Nes, N. van & Knapper, A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses a naturalistic driving study on the use of mobile phones and navigation systems while driving. Manual interactions with these devices while driving can cause distraction from the driving task and reduce traffic safety. In this study 21 subjects were observed for 5 weeks. Their b

  4. Brookhaven highlights - Brookhaven National Laboratory 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This report highlights research conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the following areas: alternating gradient synchrotron; physics; biology; national synchrotron light source; department of applied science; medical; chemistry; department of advanced technology; reactor; safety and environmental protection; instrumentation; and computing and communications.

  5. Status and recent highlights from CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Van Mulders, Petra Karel Ann

    2016-01-01

    The LHC Run-2 at a center of mass energy of 13 TeV started in 2015. This proceeding highlights some of the physics results based on the collision data collected by the CMS experiment in 2015. In addition, the status and readiness of the experiment for the collisions in 2016 are discussed with concrete examples on the object reconstruction performance.

  6. Teaching Literature to Highlight Social Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnaan, Ram A.

    1989-01-01

    A second-year elective course for graduate social work students in which twentieth-century novels are used to highlight social issues is described. The relationships between art and social realities and literature's usefulness for social policy analysis are discussed. (Author/MSE)

  7. Brookhaven highlights, October 1979-September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Highlights are given for the research areas of the Brookhaven National Laboratory. These areas include high energy physics, physics and chemistry, life sciences, applied energy science (energy and environment, and nuclear energy), and support activities (including mathematics, instrumentation, reactors, and safety). (GHT)

  8. Research highlights: printing the future of microfabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Peter; Murray, Coleman; Kim, Donghyuk; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-05-07

    In this issue we highlight emerging microfabrication approaches suitable for microfluidic systems with a focus on "additive manufacturing" processes (i.e. printing). In parallel with the now-wider availability of low cost consumer-grade 3D printers (as evidenced by at least three brands of 3D printers for sale in a recent visit to an electronics store in Akihabara, Tokyo), commercial-grade 3D printers are ramping to higher and higher resolution with new capabilities, such as printing of multiple materials of different transparency, and with different mechanical and electrical properties. We highlight new work showing that 3D printing (stereolithography approaches in particular) has now risen as a viable technology to print whole microfluidic devices. Printing on 2D surfaces such as paper is an everyday experience, and has been used widely in analytical chemistry for printing conductive materials on paper strips for glucose and other electrochemical sensors. We highlight recent work using electrodes printed on paper for digital microfluidic droplet actuation. Finally, we highlight recent work in which printing of membrane-bound droplets that interconnect through bilayer membranes may open up an entirely new approach to microfluidic manufacturing of soft devices that mimic physiological systems.

  9. Palliativedrugs.com therapeutic highlights: gabapentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Twycross Robert

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the second in a series of highlights drawn from the www.palliativedrugs.com website. The website provides free access to the Palliative Care Formulary, a monthly newsletter and a bulletin board for advice to be given and received. With almost 10,000 professional members it is the largest palliative care resource of its kind.

  10. Driver crash risk factors and prevalence evaluation using naturalistic driving data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingus, Thomas A; Guo, Feng; Lee, Suzie; Antin, Jonathan F; Perez, Miguel; Buchanan-King, Mindy; Hankey, Jonathan

    2016-03-08

    The accurate evaluation of crash causal factors can provide fundamental information for effective transportation policy, vehicle design, and driver education. Naturalistic driving (ND) data collected with multiple onboard video cameras and sensors provide a unique opportunity to evaluate risk factors during the seconds leading up to a crash. This paper uses a National Academy of Sciences-sponsored ND dataset comprising 905 injurious and property damage crash events, the magnitude of which allows the first direct analysis (to our knowledge) of causal factors using crashes only. The results show that crash causation has shifted dramatically in recent years, with driver-related factors (i.e., error, impairment, fatigue, and distraction) present in almost 90% of crashes. The results also definitively show that distraction is detrimental to driver safety, with handheld electronic devices having high use rates and risk.

  11. Predictive validity of the ASAM Patient Placement Criteria for naturalistically matched vs. mismatched alcoholism patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magura, Stephen; Staines, Graham; Kosanke, Nicole; Rosenblum, Andrew; Foote, Jeffrey; DeLuca, Alexander; Bali, Priti

    2003-01-01

    This study examined the predictive validity of the ASAM Patient Placement Criteria for matching alcoholism patients to recommended levels of care. A cohort of 248 patients newly admitted to inpatient rehabilitation, intensive outpatient, or regular outpatient care was evaluated using both a computerized algorithm and a clinical evaluation protocol to determine whether they were naturalistically matched or mismatched to care. Outcomes were assessed three months after intake. One common type of undertreatment (ie, receiving regular outpatient care when intensive outpatient care was recommended) predicted poorer drinking outcomes as compared with matched treatment, independent of actual level of care received. Overtreatment did not improve outcomes. There also was a trend for better outcomes with residential vs. intensive outpatient treatment, independent of matching. Results were robust for both methods of assessment. Corroboration by more research is needed, but the ASAM Criteria show promise for reducing both detrimental undertreatment and cost-inefficient overtreatment.

  12. A naturalistic study of fat talk and its behavioral and affective consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michelle D; Crowther, Janis H; Ciesla, Jeffrey A

    2014-09-01

    Fat talk is a style of verbal expression among young women involving negative self-statements, complaints about physical appearance, and weight management. This research used ecological momentary assessment to examine the impact of naturalistic fat talk experiences on body dissatisfaction, body checking, negative affect, and disordered eating behaviors. We examined trait self-objectification as a moderator. Sixty-five female college students completed a baseline questionnaire and responded to questions when randomly prompted by palm pilot devices for five days. Results indicated fat talk is common and associated with greater body dissatisfaction, body checking, negative affect, and disordered eating behaviors. Fat talk participation was associated with greater body checking than overhearing fat talk. Greater trait self-objectification was associated with greater body dissatisfaction and body checking following fat talk. These results suggest that fat talk negatively impacts the cognitions, affect, and behavior of young women and has increased negative effects for women higher in self-objectification.

  13. Spike timing and the coding of naturalistic sounds in a central auditory area of songbirds

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, B D; Bialek, W; Doupe, A J; Wright, Brian D.; Sen, Kamal; Bialek, William; Doupe, Allison J.

    2002-01-01

    In nature, animals encounter high dimensional sensory stimuli that have complex statistical and dynamical structure. Attempts to study the neural coding of these natural signals face challenges both in the selection of the signal ensemble and in the analysis of the resulting neural responses. For zebra finches, naturalistic stimuli can be defined as sounds that they encounter in a colony of conspecific birds. We assembled an ensemble of these sounds by recording groups of 10-40 zebra finches, and then analyzed the response of single neurons in the songbird central auditory area (field L) to continuous playback of long segments from this ensemble. Following methods developed in the fly visual system, we measured the information that spike trains provide about the acoustic stimulus without any assumptions about which features of the stimulus are relevant. Preliminary results indicate that large amounts of information are carried by spike timing, with roughly half of the information accessible only at time resol...

  14. Naturalistic stimulus structure determines the integration of audiovisual looming signals in binocular rivalry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Conrad

    Full Text Available Rapid integration of biologically relevant information is crucial for the survival of an organism. Most prominently, humans should be biased to attend and respond to looming stimuli that signal approaching danger (e.g. predator and hence require rapid action. This psychophysics study used binocular rivalry to investigate the perceptual advantage of looming (relative to receding visual signals (i.e. looming bias and how this bias can be influenced by concurrent auditory looming/receding stimuli and the statistical structure of the auditory and visual signals. Subjects were dichoptically presented with looming/receding visual stimuli that were paired with looming or receding sounds. The visual signals conformed to two different statistical structures: (1 a 'simple' random-dot kinematogram showing a starfield and (2 a "naturalistic" visual Shepard stimulus. Likewise, the looming/receding sound was (1 a simple amplitude- and frequency-modulated (AM-FM tone or (2 a complex Shepard tone. Our results show that the perceptual looming bias (i.e. the increase in dominance times for looming versus receding percepts is amplified by looming sounds, yet reduced and even converted into a receding bias by receding sounds. Moreover, the influence of looming/receding sounds on the visual looming bias depends on the statistical structure of both the visual and auditory signals. It is enhanced when audiovisual signals are Shepard stimuli. In conclusion, visual perception prioritizes processing of biologically significant looming stimuli especially when paired with looming auditory signals. Critically, these audiovisual interactions are amplified for statistically complex signals that are more naturalistic and known to engage neural processing at multiple levels of the cortical hierarchy.

  15. Examination of adult and child bicyclist safety-relevant events using naturalistic bicycling methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Cara J; Peek-Asa, Corinne

    2017-02-25

    Among roadway users, bicyclists are considered vulnerable due to their high risk for injury when involved in a crash. Little is known about the circumstances leading to near crashes, crashes, and related injuries or how these vary by age and gender. The purpose of this study was to examine the rates and characteristics of safety-relevant events (crashes, near crashes, errors, and traffic violations) among adult and child bicyclists. Bicyclist trips were captured using Pedal Portal, a data acquisition and coding system which includes a GPS-enabled video camera and graphical user interface. A total of 179 safety-relevant events were manually coded from trip videos. Overall, child errors and traffic violations occurred at a rate of 1.9 per 100min of riding, compared to 6.3 for adults. However, children rode on the sidewalk 56.4% of the time, compared with 12.7% for adults. For both adults and children, the highest safety-relevant event rates occurred on paved roadways with no bicycle facilities present (Adults=8.6 and Children=7.2, per 100min of riding). Our study, the first naturalistic study to compare safety-relevant events among adults and children, indicates large variation in riding behavior and exposure between child and adult bicyclists. The majority of identified events were traffic violations and we were not able to code all risk-relevant data (e.g., subtle avoidance behaviors, failure to check for traffic, probability of collision). Future naturalistic cycling studies would benefit from enhanced instrumentation (e.g., additional camera views) and coding protocols able to fill these gaps.

  16. Octopaminergic modulation of a fly visual motion-sensitive neuron during stimulation with naturalistic optic flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana eRien

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In a variety of species locomotor activity, like walking or flying, has been demonstrated to alter visual information processing. The neuromodulator octopamine was shown to change the response characteristics of optic-flow processing neurons in the fly’s visual system in a similar way as locomotor activity. This modulation resulted in enhanced neuronal responses, in particular during sustained stimulation with high temporal frequencies, and in shorter latencies of responses to abrupt onsets of pattern motion. These state-dependent changes were interpreted to adjust neuronal tuning to the range of high velocities encountered during locomotion. Here we assess the significance of these changes for the processing of optic flow as experienced during flight. Naturalistic image sequences were reconstructed based on measurements of the head position and gaze direction of Calliphora vicina flying in an arena. We recorded the responses of the V1 neuron during presentation of these image sequences on a panoramic stimulus device (FliMax. Consistent with previous accounts, we found that spontaneous as well as stimulus-induced spike rates were increased by an octopamine agonist and decreased by an antagonist. Moreover, a small but consistent decrease in response latency upon octopaminergic activation was present, which might support fast responses to optic flow cues and limit instabilities during closed-loop optomotor regulation. However, apart from these effects the similarities between the dynamic response properties in the different pharmacologically induced states were surprisingly high, indicating that the processing of naturalistic optic flow is not fundamentally altered by octopaminergic modulation.

  17. Naturalistic cycling study: identifying risk factors for on-road commuter cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marilyn; Charlton, Judith; Oxley, Jennifer; Newstead, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    The study aim was to identify risk factors for collisions/near-collisions involving on-road commuter cyclists and drivers. A naturalistic cycling study was conducted in Melbourne, Australia, with cyclists wearing helmet-mounted video cameras. Video recordings captured cyclists' perspective of the road and traffic behaviours including head checks, reactions and manoeuvres. The 100-car naturalistic driving study analysis technique was adapted for data analysis and events were classified by severity: collision, near-collision and incident. Participants were adult cyclists and each filmed 12 hours of commuter cycling trips over a 4-week period. In total, 127 hours and 38 minutes were analysed for 13 participants, 54 events were identified: 2 collisions, 6 near-collisions and 46 incidents. Prior to events, 88.9% of cyclists travelled in a safe/legal manner. Sideswipe was the most frequent event type (40.7%). Most events occurred at an intersection/intersection-related location (70.3%). The vehicle driver was judged at fault in the majority of events (87.0%) and no post-event driver reaction was observed (83.3%). Cross tabulations revealed significant associations between event severity and: cyclist reaction, cyclist post-event manoeuvre, pre-event driver behaviour, other vehicle involved, driver reaction, visual obstruction, cyclist head check (left), event type and vehicle location (proad cyclists and to indicate early before turning/changing lanes when sharing the roadway with cyclists are discussed. Findings will contribute to the development of effective countermeasures to reduce cyclist trauma.

  18. Trends and highlights of VCI 2004

    CERN Document Server

    Fabjan, Christian Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    This report attempts to summarize the presentations given at this conference. Topics related to R&D of gaseous and solid state detectors clearly point to several trends in particle physics instrumentation. More established techniques are represented by reports on recent experiments and facilities which can be considered the highlights in this research field. The extension of these techniques to space, arctic ice and deep sea are opening new frontiers of particle physics.

  19. Highlights of LHC experiments – Part I

    CERN Document Server

    Charlton, Dave; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The superb performance of the LHC accelerator in 2016, in both live time and peak luminosity, has provided a large data sample of collisions at 13 TeV. Excellent performances of the ATLAS and LHCb detectors, together with highly performant offline and analysis systems, mean that a wealth of results are already available from 13 TeV data. Selected highlights are reported here.

  20. Selected Highlights from Precision Studies in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Hans Peter; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Recent highlights on precision measurements in proton-proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector are presented: the production cross section of jets, W and Z bosons, multi-bosons and top quark pairs, as well as single top production. Furthermore, the production of W and Z bosons and top quarks in association with jets is discussed and compared to state-of-art theory calculations. The latest measurements of the top quark mass and other properties, together with Standard Model parameters, will be reviewed.

  1. Physics highlights at ILC and CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukić, Strahinja

    2015-01-01

    In this lecture, the physics potential for the e+e- linear collider experiments ILC and CLIC is reviewed. The experimental conditions are compared to those at hadron colliders and their intrinsic value for precision experiments, complementary to the hadron colliders, is discussed. The detector concepts for ILC and CLIC are outlined in their most important aspects related to the precision physics. Highlights from the physics program and from the benchmark studies are given. It is shown that linear colliders are a promising tool, complementing the LHC in essential ways to test the Standard Model and to search for new physics.

  2. Highlights fra Tour de ledelse 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt Larsen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Co-creation, ledelse af generation Y, HRM-begrebets udvikling og mellemlederen som organisationens nye helt. Det skortede ikke på spændende aktuelle temaer og indspark, da verdens største ledelseskonference – Academy of Management – løb af stablen tidligere på måneden i Florida, USA. CBS-professo......-professor Henrik Holt Larsen var med på første række for at opsnappe nye trends og landvindinger inden for HRM og god ledelse af virksomhedens menneskelige ressourcer. Her er hans highlights fra den storstilede konference....

  3. Highlights in the Study of Exoplanet Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Burrows, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Exoplanets are now being discovered in profusion. However, to understand their character requires spectral models and data. These elements of remote sensing can yield temperatures, compositions, and even weather patterns, but only if significant improvements in both the parameter retrieval process and measurements are achieved. Despite heroic efforts to garner constraining data on exoplanet atmospheres and dynamics, reliable interpretation has oftimes lagged ambition. I summarize the most productive, and at times novel, methods employed to probe exoplanet atmospheres, highlight some of the most interesting results obtained, and suggest various broad theoretical topics in which further work could pay significant dividends.

  4. Highlights in the study of exoplanet atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Adam S

    2014-09-18

    Exoplanets are now being discovered in profusion. To understand their character, however, we require spectral models and data. These elements of remote sensing can yield temperatures, compositions and even weather patterns, but only if significant improvements in both the parameter retrieval process and measurements are made. Despite heroic efforts to garner constraining data on exoplanet atmospheres and dynamics, reliable interpretation has frequently lagged behind ambition. I summarize the most productive, and at times novel, methods used to probe exoplanet atmospheres; highlight some of the most interesting results obtained; and suggest various broad theoretical topics in which further work could pay significant dividends.

  5. Highlights from BNL and RHIC 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Tannenbaum, M J

    2015-01-01

    Highlights of news from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and results from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the period July 2013-June 2014 are presented. It was a busy year for news, most notably a U. S. Government shutdown for 16 days beginning October 1, 2013 due to the lack of an approved budget for FY2014. Even with this unusual government activity, the $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV Au+Au Run14 at RHIC was the best ever with integrated luminosity exceeding the sum of all previous runs. Additionally there was a brief He$^3$+Au run to continue the study of collective flow in small systems which was reinforced by new results presented on identified particle flow in d+Au. The other scientific highlights are also mostly concerned with ``soft (low $p_T$)'' physics complemented by the first preliminary results of reconstructed jets from hard-scattered partons in Au+Au collisions at RHIC . The measurements of transverse energy ($E_T$) spectra in p-p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions, which demonstrated last ye...

  6. Research highlights: digital assays on chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donghyuk; Wei, Qingshan; Kong, Janay Elise; Ozcan, Aydogan; Di Carlo, Dino

    2015-01-07

    The ability to break up a volume of fluid into smaller pieces that are confined or separated to prevent molecular communication/transport is a key capability intrinsic to microfluidic systems. This capability has been used to develop or implement digital versions of traditional molecular analysis assays, including digital PCR and digital immunoassays/ELISA. In these digital versions, the concentration of the target analyte is in a range such that, when sampled into smaller fluid volumes, either a single molecule or no molecule may be present. Subsequent amplification is sensitive enough to obtain a digital readout of the presence of these target molecules. Advantages of such approaches that are claimed include quantification without calibration and robustness to variations in reaction conditions or times because the digital readout is less sensitive to absolute signal intensity levels. Weaknesses of digital approaches include a lower dynamic range of concentrations over which the assay is sensitive, which depends on the total volume that can be analyzed. We highlight recent efforts to expand the dynamic range of digital assays based on exploiting reaction/diffusion phenomena. A side-by-side study that evaluates the strengths of digital assays reveals that the majority of these claims are supported, with specific caveats. Finally, we highlight approaches to apply digital assays to analyze new types of reactions, including the active transport of protons across membranes by ATPases at the single protein level - perhaps opening up new biophysical understanding and screening opportunities, similar to widely deployed single-molecule ion channel analysis.

  7. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Workpackage 6, Driver Behaviour Monitoring through Naturalistic Driving: Deliverable 6.4: Naturalistic Driving for monitoring safety performance indicators and exposure: considerations for implementation.

    OpenAIRE

    Schagen, I.N.L.G. van & Reed, S.

    2015-01-01

    DaCoTA was a Collaborative Project under the European Seventh Framework Programme that aimed to develop tools and methodologies to support road safety policy and further extend and enhance the European Road Safety Observatory (ERSO). One of the Work Packages in DaCoTA, WP6, focused on the usefulness and feasibility of applying the Naturalistic Driving method for collecting comparable information about the road safety level in EU Member States and its development over time. The current Deliver...

  8. Introducing Open Highlights: Highlighting Open Access Research from PLOS and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    PLOS Biology announces a new article type, Open Highlights, which uses a recent research article to nucleate a short synthesis of up to ten related research articles from other PLOS journals and from the wider Open Access corpus.

  9. Antipsychotic monotherapy and polypharmacy in the naturalistic treatment of schizophrenia with atypical antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Correll Christoph

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antipsychotic monotherapy is recognized as the treatment of choice for patients with schizophrenia. Simultaneous treatment with multiple antipsychotics (polypharmacy is suggested by some expert consensus guidelines as the last resort after exhausting monotherapy alternatives. This study assessed the annual rate and duration of antipsychotic monotherapy and its inverse, antipsychotic polypharmacy, among schizophrenia patients initiated on commonly used atypical antipsychotic medications. Methods Data were drawn from a large prospective naturalistic study of patients treated for schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, conducted 7/1997–9/2003. Analyses focused on patients (N = 796 who were initiated during the study on olanzapine (N = 405, quetiapine (N = 115, or risperidone (N = 276. The percentage of patients with monotherapy on the index antipsychotic over the 1-year post initiation, and the cumulative number of days on monotherapy were calculated for all patients and for each of the 3 atypical antipsychotic treatment groups. Analyses employed repeated measures generalized linear models and non-parametric bootstrap re-sampling, controlling for patient characteristics. Results During the 1-year period, only a third (35.7% of the patients were treated predominately with monotherapy (>300 days. Most patients (57.7% had at least one prolonged period of antipsychotic polypharmacy (>60 consecutive days. Patients averaged 195.5 days on monotherapy, 155.7 days on polypharmacy, and 13.9 days without antipsychotic therapy. Olanzapine-initiated patients were significantly more likely to be on monotherapy with the initiating antipsychotic during the 1-year post initiation compared to risperidone (p = .043 or quetiapine (p = .002. The number of monotherapy days was significantly greater for olanzapine than quetiapine (p Conclusion Despite guidelines recommending the use of polypharmacy only as a last resort, the use of antipsychotic

  10. Creating a driving profile for older adults using GPS devices and naturalistic driving methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babulal, Ganesh M.; Traub, Cindy M.; Webb, Mollie; Stout, Sarah H.; Addison, Aaron; Carr, David B.; Ott, Brian R.; Morris, John C.; Roe, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Road tests and driving simulators are most commonly used in research studies and clinical evaluations of older drivers. Our objective was to describe the process and associated challenges in adapting an existing, commercial, off-the-shelf (COTS), in-vehicle device for naturalistic, longitudinal research to better understand daily driving behavior in older drivers. Design: The Azuga G2 Tracking Device TM was installed in each participant’s vehicle, and we collected data over 5 months (speed, latitude/longitude) every 30-seconds when the vehicle was driven.  Setting: The Knight Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at Washington University School of Medicine. Participants: Five individuals enrolled in a larger, longitudinal study assessing preclinical Alzheimer disease and driving performance.  Participants were aged 65+ years and had normal cognition. Measurements:  Spatial components included Primary Location(s), Driving Areas, Mean Centers and Unique Destinations.  Temporal components included number of trips taken during different times of the day.  Behavioral components included number of hard braking, speeding and sudden acceleration events. Methods:  Individual 30-second observations, each comprising one breadcrumb, and trip-level data were collected and analyzed in R and ArcGIS.  Results: Primary locations were confirmed to be 100% accurate when compared to known addresses.  Based on the locations of the breadcrumbs, we were able to successfully identify frequently visited locations and general travel patterns.  Based on the reported time from the breadcrumbs, we could assess number of trips driven in daylight vs. night.  Data on additional events while driving allowed us to compute the number of adverse driving alerts over the course of the 5-month period. Conclusions: Compared to cameras and highly instrumented vehicle in other naturalistic studies, the compact COTS device was quickly installed and transmitted high volumes

  11. Highlights from the VERITAS AGN Observation Program

    CERN Document Server

    Benbow, Wystan

    2015-01-01

    The VERITAS array of four 12-m imaging atmospheric-Cherenkov telescopes began full-scale operations in 2007, and is one of the world's most sensitive detectors of astrophysical VHE (E>100 GeV) $\\gamma$-rays. Observations of active galactic nuclei (AGN) are a major focus of the VERITAS Collaboration, and more than 60 AGN, primarily blazars, are known to emit VHE photons. Approximately 3400 hours have been devoted to the VERITAS AGN observation program and roughly 160 AGN are already observed with the array, in most cases with the deepest VHE exposure to date. These observations have resulted in 34 detections, most of which are accompanied by contemporaneous, multi-wavelength observations, enabling a more detailed study of the underlying jet-powered processes. Recent highlights of the VERITAS AGN observation program, and the collaboration's long-term AGN observation strategy, are presented.

  12. Research highlights: impacts of microplastics on plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Vivian S

    2016-02-01

    Each year, millions of metric tons of the plastic produced for food packaging, personal care products, fishing gear, and other human activities end up in lakes, rivers, and the ocean. The breakdown of these primary plastics in the environment results in microplastics, small fragments of plastic typically less than 1-5 mm in size. These synthetic particles have been detected in all of the world's oceans and also in many freshwater systems, accumulating in sediment, on shorelines, suspended in surface waters, and being ingested by plankton, fish, birds, and marine mammals. While the occurrence of plastics in surface waters has been surveyed in a number of studies, the impacts of microplastics on marine organisms are still being elucidated. This highlight features three recent publications that explore the interactions of microplastics with planktonic organisms to clarify the effects of these pollutants on some of the ocean's smallest and most important inhabitants.

  13. AGILE Data Center and AGILE science highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pittori, C. [ASI Science Data Center, ESRIN, I-00044 Frascati (RM) (Italy); INAF-OAR, Via Frascati 33, I00040 Monte Porzio Catone (RM) (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    AGILE is a scientific mission of the Italian Space Agency (ASI) with INFN, INAF e CIFS participation, devoted to gamma-ray astrophysics. The satellite is in orbit since April 23rd, 2007. Gamma-ray astrophysics above 100 MeV is an exciting field of astronomical sciences that has received a strong impulse in recent years. Despite the small size and budget, AGILE produced several important scientific results, among which the unexpected discovery of strong and rapid gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula. This discovery won to the AGILE PI and the AGILE Team the prestigious Bruno Rossi Prize for 2012, an international recognition in the field of high energy astrophysics. We present here the AGILE data center main activities, and we give an overview of the AGILE scientific highlights after 5 years of operations.

  14. Highlights from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Kampert, Karl-Heinz

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes some highlights from the Pierre Auger Observatory that were presented at the ICRC 2011 in Beijing. The cumulative exposure has grown by more than 60% since the previous ICRC to above 21000 km^2 sr yr. Besides giving important updates on the energy spectrum, mass composition, arrival directions, and photon- and neutrino upper limits, we present first measurements of the energy spectrum down to 3 x 10^{17} eV, first distributions of the shower maximum, X_max, together with new surface detector related observables sensitive to X_max, and we present first measurements of the p-air cross section at ~ 10^{18} eV. Serendipity observations such as of atmospheric phenomena showing time evolutions of elves extend the breadth of the astrophysics research program.

  15. Highlights from the VERITAS AGN Observation Program

    CERN Document Server

    Benbow, Wystan

    2016-01-01

    The VERITAS array of four 12-m imaging atmospheric-Cherenkov telescopes began full-scale operations in 2007, and is one of the world's most sensitive detectors of astrophysical very high energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) gamma rays. Observations of active galactic nuclei (AGN) are a major focus of the VERITAS Collaboration, and more than 60 AGN, primarily blazars, are known to emit VHE photons. Approximately 4000 hours have been devoted to the VERITAS AGN observation program, resulting in 34 detections. Most of these detections are accompanied by contemporaneous, broadband observations, enabling a more detailed study of the underlying jet-powered processes. Recent highlights of the VERITAS AGN observation program are presented.

  16. Comparison of solid highlighter materials for thermography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genest, M.; Forsyth, D.S. [National Research Council of Canada, Inst. for Aerospace Research, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: marc.genest@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca; Maldague, X. [Univ. Laval, Electrical and Computing Engienering Dept., Quebec, Quebec (Canada)

    2007-07-15

    Bare metal surfaces are difficult to inspect with flash thermography due to the high reflectivity and low emissivity of metal surfaces. Often black paint is used to prepare these surfaces for inspection. The additional time required to apply, dry, and then remove paint after inspection can be a significant barrier to using thermographic inspection techniques in these applications. This paper examines the use of solid 'highlighter' materials instead of paint to provide desirable surface characteristics and ease of use. Both positive pressure and vacuum methods were used to apply a variety of materials to metal test specimens, which were then inspected with a commercial pulsed flash thermography system. A vacuum-applied black latex material provided surface performance close to that of black paint without the extra burden of paint application and removal. (author)

  17. Physical Sciences 2007 Science & Technology Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazi, A U

    2008-04-07

    The Physical Sciences Directorate applies frontier physics and technology to grand challenges in national security. Our highly integrated and multidisciplinary research program involves collaborations throughout Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the National Nuclear Security Administration, the Department of Energy, and with academic and industrial partners. The Directorate has a budget of approximately $150 million, and a staff of approximately 350 employees. Our scientists provide expertise in condensed matter and high-pressure physics, plasma physics, high-energy-density science, fusion energy science and technology, nuclear and particle physics, accelerator physics, radiation detection, optical science, biotechnology, and astrophysics. This document highlights the outstanding research and development activities in the Physical Sciences Directorate that made news in 2007. It also summarizes the awards and recognition received by members of the Directorate in 2007.

  18. LHC INAUGURATION, LHC Fest highlights: exhibition time!

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    David Gross, one of the twenty-one Nobel Laureates who have participated in the project.Tuesday 21 October 2008 Accelerating Nobels Colliding Charm, Atomic Cuisine, The Good Anomaly, A Quark Somewhere on the White Paper, Wire Proliferation, A Tale of Two Liquids … these are just some of the titles given to artworks by Physics Nobel Laureates who agreed to make drawings of their prize-winning discoveries (more or less reluctantly) during a special photo session. Science photographer Volker Steger made portraits of Physics Nobel Laureates and before the photo sessions he asked them to make a drawing of their most important discovery. The result is "Accelerating Nobels", an exhibition that combines unusual portraits of and original drawings by twenty-one Nobel laureates in physics whose work is closely related to CERN and the LHC. This exhibition will be one of the highlights of the LHC celebrations on 21 October in the SM18 hall b...

  19. ARGO-YBJ: Status and Highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Di Sciascio, G

    2012-01-01

    The ARGO-YBJ experiment is in stable data taking since November 2007 at the YangBaJing Cosmic Ray Laboratory (Tibet, P.R. China, 4300 m a.s.l., 606 g/cm$^2$). ARGO-YBJ is facing open problems in Cosmic Ray (CR) physics in different ways. The search for CR sources is carried out by the observation of TeV gamma-ray sources both galactic and extra-galactic. The CR spectrum, composition and anisotropy are measured in a wide energy range (TeV - PeV) thus overlapping for the first time direct measurements. In this paper we summarize the current status of the experiment and describe some of the scientific highlights since 2007.

  20. Research highlights: microfluidics meets big data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Peter; Weaver, Westbrook M; Masaeli, Mahdokht; Owsley, Keegan; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-03-07

    In this issue we highlight a collection of recent work in which microfluidic parallelization and automation have been employed to address the increasing need for large amounts of quantitative data concerning cellular function--from correlating microRNA levels to protein expression, increasing the throughput and reducing the noise when studying protein dynamics in single-cells, and understanding how signal dynamics encodes information. The painstaking dissection of cellular pathways one protein at a time appears to be coming to an end, leading to more rapid discoveries which will inevitably translate to better cellular control--in producing useful gene products and treating disease at the individual cell level. From these studies it is also clear that development of large scale mutant or fusion libraries, automation of microscopy, image analysis, and data extraction will be key components as microfluidics contributes its strengths to aid systems biology moving forward.

  1. FY 1996 Congressional budget request: Budget highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    The FY 1996 budget presentation is organized by the Department`s major business lines. An accompanying chart displays the request for new budget authority. The report compares the budget request for FY 1996 with the appropriated FY 1995 funding levels displayed on a comparable basis. The FY 1996 budget represents the first year of a five year plan in which the Department will reduce its spending by $15.8 billion in budget authority and by $14.1 billion in outlays. FY 1996 is a transition year as the Department embarks on its multiyear effort to do more with less. The Budget Highlights are presented by business line; however, the fifth business line, Economic Productivity, which is described in the Policy Overview section, cuts across multiple organizational missions, funding levels and activities and is therefore included in the discussion of the other four business lines.

  2. The Effects of Learning Methods and Environmental Knowledge on Age 5-6 Naturalistic Intelligence (Experiment at AR – Ridho Nature Kindergaten Group B Tembalang Semarang)

    OpenAIRE

    Diana Mauladin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to see the impact of learning methods and environmental knowledge on the naturalistic intelligence of children aged 5-6 years. This research was carried out at Ar-Ridho Nature Kindergarten Semarang, with a total sample of 60 children. This study used an experimental method. The results of this study are as follows: (1) The naturalist intelligence groups of children who were given handson method of learning was higher than in children given storyt...

  3. Highlights of Commission 37 Science Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, Giovanni; de Grijs, Richard; Elmegreen, Bruce; Stetson, Peter; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara; Goodwin, Simon; Geisler, Douglas; Minniti, Dante

    2016-04-01

    It is widely accepted that stars do not form in isolation but result from the fragmentation of molecular clouds, which in turn leads to star cluster formation. Over time, clusters dissolve or are destroyed by interactions with molecular clouds or tidal stripping, and their members become part of the general field population. Star clusters are thus among the basic building blocks of galaxies. In turn, star cluster populations, from young associations and open clusters to old globulars, are powerful tracers of the formation, assembly, and evolutionary history of their parent galaxies. Although their importance (e.g., in mapping out the Milky Way) had been recognised for decades, major progress in this area has only become possible in recent years, both for Galactic and extragalactic cluster populations. Star clusters are the observational foundation for stellar astrophysics and evolution, provide essential tracers of galactic structure, and are unique stellar dynamical environments. Star formation, stellar structure, stellar evolution, and stellar nucleosynthesis continue to benefit and improve tremendously from the study of these systems. Additionally, fundamental quantities such as the initial mass function can be successfully derived from modelling either the Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams or the integrated velocity structures of, respectively, resolved and unresolved clusters and cluster populations. Star cluster studies thus span the fields of Galactic and extragalactic astrophysics, while heavily affecting our detailed understanding of the process of star formation in dense environments. This report highlights science results of the last decade in the major fields covered by IAU Commission 37: Star clusters and associations. Instead of focusing on the business meeting - the out-going president presentation can be found here: http://www.sc.eso.org/gcarraro/splinter2015.pdf - this legacy report contains highlights of the most important scientific achievements in

  4. Differences in Anticipatory Behaviour between Rats (Rattus norvegicus Housed in Standard versus Semi-Naturalistic Laboratory Environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Joanna Makowska

    Full Text Available Laboratory rats are usually kept in relatively small cages, but research has shown that they prefer larger and more complex environments. The physiological, neurological and health effects of standard laboratory housing are well established, but fewer studies have addressed the sustained emotional impact of a standard cage environment. One method of assessing affective states in animals is to look at the animals' anticipatory behaviour between the presentation of a cue signalling the arrival of a reward and the arrival of that reward. The primary aim of this study was to use anticipatory behaviour to assess the affective state experienced by female rats a reared and housed long-term in a standard laboratory cage versus a semi-naturalistic environment, and b before and after treatment with an antidepressant or an anxiolytic. A secondary aim was to add to the literature on anticipatory behaviour by describing and comparing the frequency and duration of individual elements of anticipatory behaviour displayed by rats reared in these two systems. In all experiments, total behavioural frequency was higher in standard-housed rats compared to rats from the semi-naturalistic condition, suggesting that standard-housed rats were more sensitive to rewards and experiencing poorer welfare than rats reared in the semi-naturalistic environment. What rats did in anticipation of the reward also differed between housing treatments, with standard-housed rats mostly rearing and rats from the semi-naturalistic condition mostly sitting facing the direction of the upcoming treat. Drug interventions had no effect on the quantity or form of anticipatory behaviour, suggesting that the poorer welfare experienced by standard-housed rats was not analogous to depression or anxiety, or alternatively that the drug interventions were ineffective. This study adds to mounting evidence that standard laboratory housing for rats compromises rat welfare, and provides further

  5. As naturalistic as it gets: subtitles in the English classroom in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulchanova, Mila; Aurstad, Lisa M G; Kvitnes, Ingrid E N; Eshuis, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of subtitles in the context of authentic material on second language comprehension and potentially, second language acquisition for Norwegian learners of English. Participants in the study were 49 17-year-old students and 65 16-year-old students, who were all native speakers of Norwegian learning English as an L2 in high school. Both age groups were divided into three Conditions, where one group watched an episode of the American animated cartoon Family Guy with Norwegian subtitles, one group with English subtitles, and one group watched the episode with no subtitles. On a comprehension questionnaire conducted immediately after watching the episode positive short-term effects of both native language (L1) and target language (L2) subtitles were found for both age groups. However, no differences in terms of the language of the subtitles were found in the older and more advanced group. Four weeks later the participants responded to a word definition task and a word recall task to investigate potential long-term effects of the subtitles. The only long-term effect was found in the word definition task and was modulated by age. We found, however, that native language subtitles impact negatively on performance on the comprehension task. The results from this study suggest that the mere presence of subtitles as an additional source of information enhances learners' comprehension of the plot and content in animated audio-visual material in their L2. The absence of differences in terms of the language of the subtitles in the more advanced group suggests that both intralanguage and interlanguage subtitles can aid target language comprehension in very advanced learners, most probably due to better consolidated vocabulary knowledge in that group. The two groups differed also on predictors of performance on the two lexical tasks. While in the less proficient younger group, vocabulary status best predicted performance on both tasks

  6. Diurnal variations in arousal: a naturalistic heart rate study in children with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imeraj, Lindita; Antrop, Inge; Roeyers, Herbert; Deschepper, Ellen; Bal, Sarah; Deboutte, Dirk

    2011-08-01

    Previous studies suggest an altered circadian regulation of arousal in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as measured by activity, circadian preference, and sleep-wake patterns. Although heart rate is an important measure to evaluate arousal profiles, to date it is unknown whether 24-h heart rate patterns differentiate between children with and without ADHD. In this study, 24-h heart rate data were collected in 30 non-medicated children with ADHD (aged 6-11) and 30 sex-, class-, and age-matched normal controls in their naturalistic home and school setting, during 5 days. Simultaneously, 24-h activity patterns were registered. Confounding effects of demographic variables (e.g., age, sex, BMI, pubertal stage) and comorbid internalizing and externalizing problems on heart rate levels were additionally assessed. Longitudinal analysis showed that heart rate levels were overall higher in the ADHD group (p children with ADHD showed higher activity levels during daytime (especially early afternoon), but not during nighttime (p children with ADHD as compared to controls, with higher heart rate levels in the ADHD group. Nighttime tachycardia in this group could not be explained by nighttime activity levels or comorbid externalizing/internalizing problems. Further research on autonomic functioning in ADHD is recommended because of the major impact of higher resting heart rate on health outcomes.

  7. A prospective naturalistic multicentre study of intravenous medications in behavioural emergencies: haloperidol versus flunitrazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, Kotaro; Nakamura, Mitsuru; Yoshida, Kenichi; Hamakawa, Hiroshi; Wakejima, Toru; Nishimura, Takao; Furuta, Ko; Kawabata, Toshitaka; Hirata, Toyoaki; Usui, Chie; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Sawa, Yutaka

    2010-06-30

    A prospective naturalistic multicentre study for deep sedation was conducted in intensive care with continuous electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring. Clinical purpose was enough sedation, which made uncooperative and disrupted patients receive brain computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or fluid therapy, with minimum drug doses. A first infusion was either haloperidol (HAL group) or flunitrazepam (FNP group). If enough sedation was not achieved, a second infusion, which was the opposite drug to the first infusion, was given. The proportion requiring a second infusion was higher in the HAL group than in the FNP group (82% vs. 36%, PFNP first group (FNP+HAL group) than the HAL first group (HAL+FNP group) (68% [S.D. 17] vs. 54% [S.D. 31], P=0.02). The mean dose of flunitrazepam in the HAL+FNP group was significantly lower than that in the FNP+HAL-group (1.3 mg vs. 3.5 mg, P=0.0003). Thus, in terms of monotherapy and speed of action, flunitrazepam has advantages over haloperidol as a first infusion for deep sedation. Regarding drug dosages, haloperidol has an advantage over flunitrazepam as a first infusion in safety.

  8. From naturalistic neuroscience to modeling radical embodiment with narrative enactive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia eTikka

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mainstream cognitive neuroscience has begun to accept the idea of embodied mind, which assumes that the human mind is fundamentally constituted by the dynamical interactions of the brain, body, and the environment. In today’s paradigm of naturalistic neurosciences, subjects are exposed to rich contexts, such as video sequences or entire films, under relatively controlled conditions, against which researchers can interpret changes in neural responses within a time window. However, from the point of view of radical embodied cognitive neuroscience, the increasing complexity alone will not suffice as the explanatory apparatus for dynamical embodiment and situatedness of the mind. We suggest that narrative enactive systems with dynamically adaptive content as stimuli,may serve better to account for the embodied mind engaged with the surrounding world. Among the ensuing challenges for neuroimaging studies is how to interpret brain data against broad temporal contexts of previous experiences that condition the unfolding experience of nowness. We propose means to tackle this issue, as well as ways to limit the exponentially growing combinatoria of narrative paths to a controllable number.

  9. From naturalistic neuroscience to modeling radical embodiment with narrative enactive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikka, Pia; Kaipainen, Mauri Ylermi

    2014-01-01

    Mainstream cognitive neuroscience has begun to accept the idea of embodied mind, which assumes that the human mind is fundamentally constituted by the dynamical interactions of the brain, body, and the environment. In today's paradigm of naturalistic neurosciences, subjects are exposed to rich contexts, such as video sequences or entire films, under relatively controlled conditions, against which researchers can interpret changes in neural responses within a time window. However, from the point of view of radical embodied cognitive neuroscience, the increasing complexity alone will not suffice as the explanatory apparatus for dynamical embodiment and situatedness of the mind. We suggest that narrative enactive systems with dynamically adaptive content as stimuli, may serve better to account for the embodied mind engaged with the surrounding world. Among the ensuing challenges for neuroimaging studies is how to interpret brain data against broad temporal contexts of previous experiences that condition the unfolding experience of nowness. We propose means to tackle this issue, as well as ways to limit the exponentially growing combinatoria of narrative paths to a controllable number.

  10. Uma abordagem naturalista da consciência humana A naturalistic approach to human consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Pereira Júnior

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abordo neste trabalho alguns dos principais problemas filosóficos concernentes a uma concepção naturalista da consciência humana, assim como algumas evidências disponíveis na neuropsicologia e neurofisiologia, sobre a relação entre atividade cerebral e experiência consciente. Inicialmente faço uma revisão sobre a definição de "consciência", seu estatuto filosófico e relação com os processos emocionais, e proponho três condições para sua atribuição a um sistema físico. Em seguida, identifico diferentes modalidades de consciência, e seus correlatos cerebrais em diferentes escalas espaciais e temporais. Finalmente, discuto possíveis mecanismos biofísicos subjacentes aos processos conscientes.This essay discusses some central philosophical problems concerning the naturalistic concept of consciousness, as well as evidence from neuropsychology and neurophysiology regarding the relation of brain activity and conscious experience. Initially I review the problem of defining "consciousness", the philosophical approach to the phenomenon and its relation to emotional processes. The next step is a proposal of three conditions for the attribution of consciousness to physical systems. In the following section, I identify different modalities of consciousness and their respective neural correlates in different spatial and temporal scales. Finally, I discuss possible biophysical mechanisms underlying conscious processing.

  11. Neuroleptic-induced movement disorders in a naturalistic schizophrenia population: diagnostic value of actometric movement patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuisku Katinka

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroleptic-induced movement disorders (NIMDs have overlapping co-morbidity. Earlier studies have described typical clinical movement patterns for individual NIMDs. This study aimed to identify specific movement patterns for each individual NIMD using actometry. Methods A naturalistic population of 99 schizophrenia inpatients using conventional antipsychotics and clozapine was evaluated. Subjects with NIMDs were categorized using the criteria for NIMD found in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders – Fourth Edition (DSM-IV. Two blinded raters evaluated the actometric-controlled rest activity data for activity periods, rhythmical activity, frequencies, and highest acceleration peaks. A simple subjective question was formulated to test patient-based evaluation of NIMD. Results The patterns of neuroleptic-induced akathisia (NIA and pseudoakathisia (PsA were identifiable in actometry with excellent inter-rater reliability. The answers to the subjective question about troubles with movements distinguished NIA patients from other patients rather well. Also actometry had rather good screening performances in distinguishing akathisia from other NIMD. Actometry was not able to reliably detect patterns of neuroleptic-induced parkinsonism and tardive dyskinesia. Conclusion The present study showed that pooled NIA and PsA patients had a different pattern in lower limb descriptive actometry than other patients in a non-selected sample. Careful questioning of patients is a useful method of diagnosing NIA in a clinical setting.

  12. Naturalistic Decision Making in Power Grid Operations: Implications for Dispatcher Training and Usability Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Podmore, Robin

    2008-11-17

    The focus of the present study is on improved training approaches to accelerate learning and improved methods for analyzing effectiveness of tools within a high-fidelity power grid simulated environment. A theory-based model has been developed to document and understand the mental processes that an expert power system operator uses when making critical decisions. The theoretical foundation for the method is based on the concepts of situation awareness, the methods of cognitive task analysis, and the naturalistic decision making (NDM) approach of Recognition Primed Decision Making. The method has been systematically explored and refined as part of a capability demonstration of a high-fidelity real-time power system simulator under normal and emergency conditions. To examine NDM processes, we analyzed transcripts of operator-to-operator conversations during the simulated scenario to reveal and assess NDM-based performance criteria. The results of the analysis indicate that the proposed framework can be used constructively to map or assess the Situation Awareness Level of the operators at each point in the scenario. We can also identify the mental models and mental simulations that the operators employ at different points in the scenario. This report documents the method, describes elements of the model, and provides appendices that document the simulation scenario and the associated mental models used by operators in the scenario.

  13. Cognitive Deficits Underlying Error Behavior on a Naturalistic Task after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Mary Hendry

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available People with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI often make errors on everyday tasks that compromise their safety and independence. Such errors potentially arise from the breakdown or failure of multiple cognitive processes. This study aimed to investigate cognitive deficits underlying error behavior on a home-based version of the Cooking Task (HBCT following TBI. Participants included 45 adults (9 females, 36 males with severe TBI aged 18-64 years (M = 37.91, SD = 13.43. Participants were administered the HBCT in their home kitchens, with audiovisual recordings taken to enable scoring of total errors and error subtypes (Omissions, Additions, Estimations, Substitutions, Commentary/Questions, Dangerous Behavior, Goal Achievement. Participants also completed a battery of neuropsychological tests, including the Trail Making Test, Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised, Digit Span, Zoo Map test, Modified Stroop Test and Hayling Sentence Completion Test. After controlling for cooking experience, greater Omissions and Estimation errors, lack of goal achievement and longer completion time were significantly associated with poorer attention, memory and executive functioning. These findings indicate that errors on naturalistic tasks arise from deficits in multiple cognitive domains. Assessment of error behavior in a real life setting provides insight into individuals’ functional abilities which can guide rehabilitation planning and lifestyle support.

  14. A preliminary investigation of the relationships between historical crash and naturalistic driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Anurag; Chand, Sai; Saxena, Neeraj; Dixit, Vinayak; Loy, James; Wolshon, Brian; Kent, Joshua D

    2017-02-16

    This paper describes a project that was undertaken using naturalistic driving data collected via Global Positioning System (GPS) devices to demonstrate a proof-of-concept for proactive safety assessments of crash-prone locations. The main hypothesis for the study is that the segments where drivers have to apply hard braking (higher jerks) more frequently might be the "unsafe" segments with more crashes over a long-term. The linear referencing methodology in ArcMap was used to link the GPS data with roadway characteristic data of US Highway 101 northbound (NB) and southbound (SB) in San Luis Obispo, California. The process used to merge GPS data with quarter-mile freeway segments for traditional crash frequency analysis is also discussed in the paper. A negative binomial regression analyses showed that proportion of high magnitude jerks while decelerating on freeway segments (from the driving data) was significantly related with the long-term crash frequency of those segments. A random parameter negative binomial model with uniformly distributed parameter for ADT and a fixed parameter for jerk provided a statistically significant estimate for quarter-mile segments. The results also indicated that roadway curvature and the presence of auxiliary lane are not significantly related with crash frequency for the highway segments under consideration. The results from this exploration are promising since the data used to derive the explanatory variable(s) can be collected using most off-the-shelf GPS devices, including many smartphones.

  15. Segregating animals in naturalistic surroundings: interaction of color distributions and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Michael; Giesel, Martin; Zaidi, Qasim

    2016-03-01

    Humans have been shown to rapidly detect animals in naturalistic scenes, but the role of color in this task is unclear. We first analyze the color information contained in a large number of images of salient and camouflaged animals in generic backgrounds. We found that color distributions of most animals and of their immediate backgrounds were oriented along other than the cardinal directions of color space. In addition, the maximum distances between animals and background distributions also tended to be along noncardinal directions, suggesting a role for higher-order cortical color mechanisms whose preferred axes are distributed widely in color space. We measured temporal thresholds for segmenting animal color distributions from background distributions in the absence of spatial cues. Combined over all observers and all images in our sample, thresholds for segmenting isoluminant projections of these distributions were lower than for segmenting the original distributions and considerably lower than for segmenting achromatic projections. Color information is thus likely to be useful in segregating animals in generic views, i.e., views not purposely chosen by the photographer to enhance the visibility of the animal. However, a comparison of thresholds with distances between distributions failed to reveal any advantage conferred by higher-order color mechanisms.

  16. Interpretation and misinterpretation of warning signage: perceptions of rockfalls in a naturalistic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucote, Helen M; Miner, Anthony; Dahlhaus, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the factors relating to non-adherence to warning signs about falling rocks from coastal cliff faces. Face-to-face interviews (n = 62) in a naturalistic setting (in the vicinity of a high-risk rockfall area) were conducted to investigate attention to and comprehension of warning signs, as well as beliefs relating to non-adherence of the signage. It was found that, while most participants could correctly identify the danger in the area and had noticed the warning signage, less than half of the participants could correctly interpret the signage. The perception of danger did not differ significantly between the participants who had, or had not, entered the high-risk zone. Differences in knowledge and beliefs between local residents and visitors to the area were identified. It was concluded that the warning signs did not provide enough detail for people to make informed decisions about safe behaviours. Comprehension of the signage may have been hampered by a lack of prior-knowledge of the particular risk, a failure to think carefully about the situation (i.e. low-effort processing), and the pictorial representation on the signs misleading the participants as to the true danger.

  17. Effectiveness of antipsychotics used in first-episode psychosis: a naturalistic cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whale, Richard; Harris, Michael; Kavanagh, Gail; Wickramasinghe, Vijitha; Jones, Christopher I.; Marwaha, Steven; Jethwa, Ketan; Ayadurai, Nirmalan; Thompson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Background One year of antipsychotic treatment from symptom remission is recommended following a first episode of psychosis (FEP). Aims To investigate the effectiveness of commonly used antipsychotic medications in FEP. Method A retrospective cohort study of naturalistic treatment of patients (N=460) accepted by FEP services across seven UK sites. Treatment initiation to all-cause discontinuation determined from case files. Results Risk of treatment discontinuation is greatest within 3 months of treatment initiation. Risperidone had longest median survival time. No significant differences were observed in time to discontinuation between commonly used antipsychotics on multivariable Cox regression analysis. Poor adherence and efficacy failure were the most common reasons for discontinuation. Conclusions Effectiveness differences appear not to be a current reason for antipsychotic choice in FEP. Adherence strategies and weighing up likely adverse effects should be the clinical focus. Declaration of interest R.W., A.T. and S.M. have received research grant, speaker honoraria and conference attendance funding from all companies marketing antipsychotics. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license. PMID:27733935

  18. Using naturalistic driving data to identify variables associated with infrequent, occasional, and consistent seat belt use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagan, Ian J; McClafferty, Julie A; Berlin, Sharon P; Hankey, Jonathan M

    2013-01-01

    Seat belt use is one of the most effective countermeasures to reduce traffic fatalities and injuries. The success of efforts to increase use is measured by road side observations and self-report questionnaires. These methods have shortcomings, with the former requiring a binary point estimate and the latter being subjective. The 100-car naturalistic driving study presented a unique opportunity to study seat belt use in that seat belt status was known for every trip each driver made during a 12-month period. Drivers were grouped into infrequent, occasional, or consistent seat belt users based on the frequency of belt use. Analyses were then completed to assess if these groups differed on several measures including personality, demographics, self-reported driving style variables as well as measures from the 100-car study instrumentation suite (average trip speed, trips per day). In addition, detailed analyses of the occasional belt user group were completed to identify factors that were predictive of occasional belt users wearing their belts. The analyses indicated that consistent seat belt users took fewer trips per day, and that increased average trip speed was associated with increased belt use among occasional belt users. The results of this project may help focus messaging efforts to convert occasional and inconsistent seat belt users to consistent users.

  19. Naturalistic Engineering for risk prevention in two slopes in southern Quito

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Argüello

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available (Received: 2013/11/01 - Accepted: 2013/12/12Naturalistic engineering is a technical-scientific modern science cobining civil, environmental and geotechnical engineerings. It studies and uses building materials, plants, organic and synthetic materials for holding slopes. San Luis de Chillogallo and El Recreo are located in the South of Quito, where two projects for erosion control, containment and environmental recovery, have been implemented. These are pilot interventions that allow applying strategies and capabilities of estimation and reduction of risks from disasters. To implement the works, the ground was shifted, the organic and inorganic matter was wiped out, and unstable parts of the slope were removed, reshaping the slope through land exclusion and relocation. Subsequently, depending on the shape of each slope, specific techniques where designed and implemented. Double Wall Crib and Latin Triangular Branching techniques were used in San Luis de Chillogallo. Live Grating and Latino Triangular Branching techniques were used in El Recreo. Plants such as: Alder, Alnus glutinosa; paper tree, Polylepis sp.; chilca, Baccharis latifolia; lechero Euphorbia lactiflua and Tilo, Tilia platyphyllos; have been used in these projects. These plants are fast growing species and they have adapted successfully on the two slopes intervened.

  20. Naturalistic Action Performance Distinguishes Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment from Healthy Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, David A; Park, Norman W; Murphy, Kelly J; Troyer, Angela K

    2015-07-01

    Individuals with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) show minor decrements in their instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). Sensitive measures of IADL performance are needed to capture the mild difficulties observed in aMCI groups. Routine naturalistic actions (NAs) are familiar IADL-type activities that require individuals to enact everyday tasks such as preparing coffee. In the current study we examined the extent to which NAs could be used to help facilitate differential diagnosis of aMCI relative to composite measures of episodic memory, semantic knowledge, and executive function. Healthy older adults (n=24) and individuals with aMCI (n=24) enacted two highly familiar NAs and completed tests of episodic memory, semantic knowledge, and executive function. Binary logistic regression was used to predict group membership (aMCI vs. control participants). The regression analyses indicated that NA performance could reliably predict group membership, over and above measures of cognitive functioning. These findings indicated that NA performance can be used to help facilitate differential diagnosis of healthy aging and aMCI and used as an outcome measure in intervention studies.

  1. Cognitive Deficits Underlying Error Behavior on a Naturalistic Task after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Kathryn; Ownsworth, Tamara; Beadle, Elizabeth; Chevignard, Mathilde P.; Fleming, Jennifer; Griffin, Janelle; Shum, David H. K.

    2016-01-01

    People with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) often make errors on everyday tasks that compromise their safety and independence. Such errors potentially arise from the breakdown or failure of multiple cognitive processes. This study aimed to investigate cognitive deficits underlying error behavior on a home-based version of the Cooking Task (HBCT) following TBI. Participants included 45 adults (9 females, 36 males) with severe TBI aged 18–64 years (M = 37.91, SD = 13.43). Participants were administered the HBCT in their home kitchens, with audiovisual recordings taken to enable scoring of total errors and error subtypes (Omissions, Additions, Estimations, Substitutions, Commentary/Questions, Dangerous Behavior, Goal Achievement). Participants also completed a battery of neuropsychological tests, including the Trail Making Test, Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised, Digit Span, Zoo Map test, Modified Stroop Test, and Hayling Sentence Completion Test. After controlling for cooking experience, greater Omissions and Estimation errors, lack of goal achievement, and longer completion time were significantly associated with poorer attention, memory, and executive functioning. These findings indicate that errors on naturalistic tasks arise from deficits in multiple cognitive domains. Assessment of error behavior in a real life setting provides insight into individuals' functional abilities which can guide rehabilitation planning and lifestyle support. PMID:27790099

  2. Highlights from past and future physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Daisy Yuhas

    2009-01-01

    A two-day symposium was held at CERN on 3 and 4 December in celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the Proton Synchrotron and the twentieth anniversary of LEP. The symposium, entitled “From the Proton Synchrotron to the Large Hadron Collider- 50 Years of Nobel Memories in High-Energy Physics”, included a series of seminars reflecting on the past fifty years in particle physics and an exhibition highlighting CERN’s research over this period.   Lyn Evans, LHC project leader, addressing the audience gathered in the Main Auditorium during the symposium that celebrated the 50 years of the PS and the 20 years of LEP.  The events were well attended on both days. Thursday’s reception, to which the Director-General invited everyone working at CERN, attracted over 1200 people. The seminars drew about 500 people to the Main Auditorium and the Council Chamber each day, with at least as many on-line attendees. The symposium speakers, including thirteen No...

  3. Highlights from BNL and RHIC 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Tannenbaum, M J

    2016-01-01

    Highlights of news from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and results from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the period July 2014-June 2015 are presented. The news this year was mostly very positive. The major event at BNL was the startup and dedication of the new NSLS II, "the World's brightest Synchrotron Light Source". The operation of RHIC was outstanding with a polarized p+p run at $\\sqrt{s}=200$ GeV with integrated luminosity that exceeded the sum of all previous p+p integrated luminosity at this $\\sqrt{s}$. For the first time at RHIC asymmetric p+Au and p+Al runs were made but the p+Al run caused damage in the PHENIX forward detectors from quenches that were inadequately shielded for this first p+A run. This was also the 10th anniversary of the 2005 announcement of the Perfect Liquid Quark Gluon Plasma at RHIC and a review is presented of the discoveries leading to this claim. A new result on net-charge fluctuations (with no particle identification) from PHENIX based on previous scans ov...

  4. Highlights from BNL-RHIC-2012

    CERN Document Server

    Tannenbaum, M J

    2013-01-01

    Recent highlights from Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are reviewed and discussed in the context of the discovery of the strongly interacting Quark Gluon Plasma (sQGP) at RHIC in 2005 as confirmed by results from the CERN-LHC Pb+Pb program. Outstanding RHIC machine operation in 2012 with 3-dimensional stochastic cooling and a new EBIS ion source enabled measurements with Cu+Au, U+U, for which multiplicity distributions are shown, as well as with polarized p-p collisions. Differences of the physics and goals of p-p versus A+A are discussed leading to a review of RHIC results on pi0 suppression in Au+Au collisions and comparison to LHC Pb+Pb results in the same range 5 30 GeV. Improved measurements of direct photon production and correlation with charged particles at RHIC are shown, including the absence of a low pT (thermal) photon enhancement in d+Au collisions. Attempts to understand the apparent equality of the energy loss of light and heavy quarks in the QGP by...

  5. LHC Highlights, from dream to reality

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    The idea of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was born in the early 1980s. Although LEP (CERN’s previous large accelerator) was still under construction at that time, scientists were already starting to think about re-using the 27-kilometre ring for an even more powerful machine. Turning this ambitious scientific plan into reality proved to be an immensely complex task. Civil engineering work, state-of-the-art technologies, a new approach to data storage and analysis: many people worked hard for many years to accomplish all this.   Here are some of the highlights: 1984. A symposium organized in Lausanne, Switzerland, is the official starting point for the LHC. LHC prototype of the two beam pipes (1992). 1989. The first embryonic collaborations begin. 1992. A meeting in Evian, France, marks the beginning of the LHC experiments. 1994. The CERN Council approves the construction of the LHC accelerator. 1995. Japan becomes an Observer of CERN and announces a financial contribution to ...

  6. Active Reading Procedures for Moderating the Effects of Poor Highlighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gier, Vicki S.; Herring, Daniel; Hudnell, Jason; Montoya, Jodi; Kreiner, David S.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated two active reading techniques intended to eliminate the negative effect on reading comprehension of preexisting, inappropriate highlighting. College students read passages in three highlighting conditions: no highlighting, appropriate highlighting, and inappropriate highlighting. In Experiment 1, 30 students read the passages while…

  7. School of Optometry at Inter American University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Henry W.

    1981-01-01

    The optometry program at the Inter American University in Puerto Rico is profiled, with highlights of admission criteria, temporary and permanent facilities, faculty, governance structure, curriculum, research opportunities, and relationship with the university as a whole. (MSE)

  8. American Chemical Society Annual Report 1985 (Education).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Presents a section of the American Chemical Society's annual reports dealing with precollege education, college/university education, continuing education, and professional training. Includes highlights of grants, project summaries, types of financial support, instructional materials, and other areas. (JN)

  9. Laboratory for Atmospheres 2008 Technical Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 Technical Highlights describes the efforts of all members of the Laboratory for Atmospheres. Their dedication to advancing Earth Science through conducting research, developing and running models, designing instruments, managing projects, running field campaigns, and numerous other activities, is highlighted in this report. The Laboratory for Atmospheres (Code 613) is part of the Earth Sciences Division (Code 610), formerly the Earth Sun Exploration Division, under the Sciences and Exploration Directorate (Code 600) based at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. In line with NASA s Exploration Initiative, the Laboratory executes a comprehensive research and technology development program dedicated to advancing knowledge and understanding of the atmospheres of Earth and other planets. The research program is aimed at understanding the influence of solar variability on the Earth s climate; predicting the weather and climate of Earth; understanding the structure, dynamics, and radiative properties of precipitation, clouds, and aerosols; understanding atmospheric chemistry, especially the role of natural and anthropogenic trace species on the ozone balance in the stratosphere and the troposphere; and advancing our understanding of physical properties of Earth s atmosphere. The research program identifies problems and requirements for atmospheric observations via satellite missions. Laboratory scientists conceive, design, develop, and implement ultraviolet, infrared, optical, radar, laser, and lidar technology for remote sensing of the atmosphere. Laboratory members conduct field measurements for satellite data calibration and validation, and carry out numerous modeling activities. These modeling activities include climate model simulations, modeling the chemistry and transport of trace species on regional-to-global scales, cloud-resolving models, and development of next-generation Earth system models. Interdisciplinary research is carried

  10. Mars geologic mapping program: Review and highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David H.

    1991-01-01

    The Mars Geologic Mapping (MGM) Program was introduced by NASA in 1987 as a new initiative in the Planetary Geology and Geophysics (PGG) Program. The overall purpose of the program is to support research on topical science problems that address specific questions. Among the objectives of the project are: (1) to produce highly detailed geologic maps that will greatly increase the knowledge of the materials and processes that have contributed to the evolutionary history of Mars; (2) to define areas of special interest for possible future investigation by planned missions (Mars Observer, Mars Sample Return); and (3) to maintain the interest of the planetary community in the development of new concepts and the re-evaluation of Martian geology as new data in usable form become available. Some interesting highlights of the geologic mapping indicate that multiple flood episodes occurred at different times during the Hesperian Period in both Kasei and Maja Valles. Studies of small channels in the Memnonia, Mangala, and Tharsis regions show that fluvial events appear to have occurred during the Amazonian Period at equatorial latitudes. Flood waters occurred during the Amazonian Period at equatorial latitudes. Flood waters from Mangala Valles may have seeped into surficial materials with the subsequent development of numerous sapping channels and debris flows; this suggests that the ancient highland terrain consists of relatively unconsolidated materials. Multiple layers were observed for the first time in the ridged plains lava flows covering large areas of Lunae Planum; some wrinkle ridges in this area are associated with grabens and collapse volcanic units at Hadriaca and Tyrrhena Paterae indicates that the units may have been emplaced by gravity-driven pyroclastic flows. Unlike the north polar layered deposits, those in the south polar region show no angular unconformities or evidence of faulting and folding. Water ice in the south polar layered deposits may be protected

  11. A highlight of recent advances in immunology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG DeXian

    2011-01-01

    To celebrate the 60th anniversary of SCIENCE CHINA,six research groups of overseas and domestic Chinese immunologists published a series of review articles (SCIENCE CHINA Life Sciences,2010,53(2):157-158),which highlighted recent advances and their contributions to immunology.Wang YaYa in Prof.Cheng GenHong's group,who discovered the function of TNF receptor-associated factor (TRAF) and other signal molecules in Toll-like receptor (TLR) mediated signaling pathway and innate immunity [1],reviewed TRAF-mediated regulation of immune and inflammatory responses [2].TRAF family consists of six mammalian members (TRAF1,TRAF2,TRAF3,TRAF4,TRAF5,and TRAF6) and participates in signal transduction of a large number of receptor families such as TNF receptor family (TNFR) and TLR-interleukin-1 receptor (TLR-IL-1R)family.Upon receptor-mediated activation,TRAFs are directly or indirectly recruited to the intracellular domains of these receptors and subsequently combine with other signaling molecules to activate the inhibitor of IκB kinase (IKK) complex,TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator (TANK)-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) and the inducible Iκ B kinase (IKK-i),ultimately leading to activation of transcription factors,such as NF-κB,interferon-regulatory factor (IRF),to induce immune or inflammatory responses.In the past few years,immunologists have demonstrated the central role of TRAFs in inflammation,innate immunity.

  12. Mars geologic mapping program: Review and highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David H.

    1991-06-01

    The Mars Geologic Mapping (MGM) Program was introduced by NASA in 1987 as a new initiative in the Planetary Geology and Geophysics (PGG) Program. The overall purpose of the program is to support research on topical science problems that address specific questions. Among the objectives of the project are: (1) to produce highly detailed geologic maps that will greatly increase the knowledge of the materials and processes that have contributed to the evolutionary history of Mars; (2) to define areas of special interest for possible future investigation by planned missions (Mars Observer, Mars Sample Return); and (3) to maintain the interest of the planetary community in the development of new concepts and the re-evaluation of Martian geology as new data in usable form become available. Some interesting highlights of the geologic mapping indicate that multiple flood episodes occurred at different times during the Hesperian Period in both Kasei and Maja Valles. Studies of small channels in the Memnonia, Mangala, and Tharsis regions show that fluvial events appear to have occurred during the Amazonian Period at equatorial latitudes. Flood waters occurred during the Amazonian Period at equatorial latitudes. Flood waters from Mangala Valles may have seeped into surficial materials with the subsequent development of numerous sapping channels and debris flows; this suggests that the ancient highland terrain consists of relatively unconsolidated materials. Multiple layers were observed for the first time in the ridged plains lava flows covering large areas of Lunae Planum; some wrinkle ridges in this area are associated with grabens and collapse volcanic units at Hadriaca and Tyrrhena Paterae indicates that the units may have been emplaced by gravity-driven pyroclastic flows. Unlike the north polar layered deposits, those in the south polar region show no angular unconformities or evidence of faulting and folding. Water ice in the south polar layered deposits may be protected

  13. Cluster recent highlights in magnetospheric physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoubet, C. Philippe; Laakso, Harri; Goldstein, Mevlyn; Masson, Arnaud

    2016-07-01

    After more than 15 years in space, the Cluster mission is continuing to deliver groundbreaking results, thanks to its ability to move the four spacecraft with respect to each other, according to the science topic to be studied. The main goal of the Cluster mission, made of four identical spacecraft carrying each 11 complementary instruments, is to study in three dimensions the key plasma processes at work in the main regions of the Earth's environment: solar wind and bow shock, magnetopause, polar cusps, magnetotail, and auroral zone. During the course of the mission, the relative distance between the four spacecraft has been varied more than 55 times from a few km up to 36000 km to address the various scientific objectives. The smallest distance achieved between two Cluster spacecraft was 3.1 km in December 2015, about 50 times smaller than planned at the beginning of the mission. The rate of change of separation distances has accelerated in the last few years with the Guest Investigator programme that allowed scientists in the community to propose special science programmes requiring a new spacecraft constellation. We will present recent science highlights obtained such as solar wind reconnection and bifurcated current sheet development, multi-altitude measurements of field aligned currents, reconnection efficiency in accelerating particles and effect of cold ions, motion of X-lines, speed and direction of tail reconnection events, flux transfer events evolution, new method to find magnetic nulls outside the Cluster tetrahedron, interplanetary shock waves very quick damping and origin of theta auroras. We will also present the distribution of data through the Cluster Science Data System (CSDS), and the Cluster Science Archive (CSA). CSA was implemented to provide, for the first time for a plasma physics mission, a permanent and public archive of all the high-resolution data from all instruments.

  14. Racism and Asian American Student Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jennifer Y.

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a theoretical analysis and ethnographic account of Asian American student leadership in higher education. Existing literature highlights Asian and Asian American leadership styles as cultural differences. I shift the analysis from culture to racism in order to work toward a more socially just conception of Asian American…

  15. Depression, Sociocultural Factors, and African American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunn, Vanessa Lynn; Craig, Carlton David

    2009-01-01

    The authors discuss depression in African American women from a sociocultural perspective, including aspects of oppression and racism that affect symptom manifestation. The authors highlight John Henryism as a coping mechanism, the history and continuing role of the African American church as a safe haven, and strategies for culturally competent…

  16. Latin American Theology and Religious Pluralism: A Latin American Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascante-Gomez, Fernando A.

    2009-01-01

    This article summarizes recent efforts by Latin-American theologians concerned with developing a pluralist theology of liberation. The author highlights some of the most significant issues and themes of this emerging theological reflection among liberation theologians. Finally, he identifies some of the challenges a pluralist theology of…

  17. Language differences in the brain network for reading in naturalistic story reading and lexical decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Yang, Jianfeng; Yang, Jie; Mencl, W Einar; Shu, Hua; Zevin, Jason David

    2015-01-01

    Differences in how writing systems represent language raise important questions about whether there could be a universal functional architecture for reading across languages. In order to study potential language differences in the neural networks that support reading skill, we collected fMRI data from readers of alphabetic (English) and morpho-syllabic (Chinese) writing systems during two reading tasks. In one, participants read short stories under conditions that approximate natural reading, and in the other, participants decided whether individual stimuli were real words or not. Prior work comparing these two writing systems has overwhelmingly used meta-linguistic tasks, generally supporting the conclusion that the reading system is organized differently for skilled readers of Chinese and English. We observed that language differences in the reading network were greatly dependent on task. In lexical decision, a pattern consistent with prior research was observed in which the Middle Frontal Gyrus (MFG) and right Fusiform Gyrus (rFFG) were more active for Chinese than for English, whereas the posterior temporal sulcus was more active for English than for Chinese. We found a very different pattern of language effects in a naturalistic reading paradigm, during which significant differences were only observed in visual regions not typically considered specific to the reading network, and the middle temporal gyrus, which is thought to be important for direct mapping of orthography to semantics. Indeed, in areas that are often discussed as supporting distinct cognitive or linguistic functions between the two languages, we observed interaction. Specifically, language differences were most pronounced in MFG and rFFG during the lexical decision task, whereas no language differences were observed in these areas during silent reading of text for comprehension.

  18. Naturalistic observation of health-relevant social processes: the electronically activated recorder methodology in psychosomatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, Matthias R; Robbins, Megan L; Deters, Fenne Große

    2012-05-01

    This article introduces a novel observational ambulatory monitoring method called the electronically activated recorder (EAR). The EAR is a digital audio recorder that runs on a handheld computer and periodically and unobtrusively records snippets of ambient sounds from participants' momentary environments. In tracking moment-to-moment ambient sounds, it yields acoustic logs of people's days as they naturally unfold. In sampling only a fraction of the time, it protects participants' privacy and makes large observational studies feasible. As a naturalistic observation method, it provides an observer's account of daily life and is optimized for the objective assessment of audible aspects of social environments, behaviors, and interactions (e.g., habitual preferences for social settings, idiosyncratic interaction styles, subtle emotional expressions). This article discusses the EAR method conceptually and methodologically, reviews prior research with it, and identifies three concrete ways in which it can enrich psychosomatic research. Specifically, it can (a) calibrate psychosocial effects on health against frequencies of real-world behavior; (b) provide ecological observational measures of health-related social processes that are independent of self-report; and (c) help with the assessment of subtle and habitual social behaviors that evade self-report but have important health implications. An important avenue for future research lies in merging traditional self-report-based ambulatory monitoring methods with observational approaches such as the EAR to allow for the simultaneous yet methodologically independent assessment of inner, experiential aspects (e.g., loneliness) and outer, observable aspects (e.g., social isolation) of real-world social processes to reveal their unique effects on health.

  19. Mood and drinking: a naturalistic diary study of alcohol, coffee and tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steptoe, A; Wardle, J

    1999-01-01

    Understanding the pattern of associations between mood and consumption of alcohol, coffee and tea may provide information about the factors governing beverage drinking. The associations between mood and the consumption of alcohol, coffee and tea during everyday life were assessed. A naturalistic study was carried out with 18 male and 31 female volunteers from two working groups (psychiatric nursing and school teaching). Participants completed daily records of drink consumption, together with ratings of anxious and positive moods for 8 weeks. Potential moderators of associations were self-reported drinking to cope, high perceived job demands and social support at work. Day-by-day associations were analysed using Spearman correlations. There were substantial individual-differences in associations between mood and daily alcohol, coffee and tea consumption. Overall, alcohol intake was associated with high positive and low anxious mood. This effect was not present among participants with high drinking to cope ratings. Coffee and tea drinking were not consistently related to mood across the entire sample. However, job demands influenced the association between coffee consumption and anxious mood in men, and those who experienced high job demands drank more coffee on days on which they felt anxious. In contrast, women but not men who enjoyed high social support at work felt more relaxed on days on which they drank more tea. These results indicate that people vary widely in the extent to which mood is related to the drinking of alcohol, coffee and tea. The strength of associations is influenced by gender, motivational factors, and by stress and coping resources.

  20. Time to discontinuation of atypical versus typical antipsychotics in the naturalistic treatment of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swartz Marvin

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an ongoing debate over whether atypical antipsychotics are more effective than typical antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia. This naturalistic study compares atypical and typical antipsychotics on time to all-cause medication discontinuation, a recognized index of medication effectiveness in the treatment of schizophrenia. Methods We used data from a large, 3-year, observational, non-randomized, multisite study of schizophrenia, conducted in the U.S. between 7/1997 and 9/2003. Patients who were initiated on oral atypical antipsychotics (clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine, or ziprasidone or oral typical antipsychotics (low, medium, or high potency were compared on time to all-cause medication discontinuation for 1 year following initiation. Treatment group comparisons were based on treatment episodes using 3 statistical approaches (Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, Cox Proportional Hazards regression model, and propensity score-adjusted bootstrap resampling methods. To further assess the robustness of the findings, sensitivity analyses were performed, including the use of (a only 1 medication episode for each patient, the one with which the patient was treated first, and (b all medication episodes, including those simultaneously initiated on more than 1 antipsychotic. Results Mean time to all-cause medication discontinuation was longer on atypical (N = 1132, 256.3 days compared to typical antipsychotics (N = 534, 197.2 days; p Conclusion In the usual care of schizophrenia patients, time to medication discontinuation for any cause appears significantly longer for atypical than typical antipsychotics regardless of the typical antipsychotic potency level. Findings were primarily driven by clozapine and olanzapine, and to a lesser extent by risperidone. Furthermore, only clozapine and olanzapine therapy showed consistently and significantly longer treatment duration compared to perphenazine, a medium

  1. A naturalistic study of commuter cyclists in the greater Stockholm area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Louise; Archer, Jeffery

    2013-09-01

    Few naturalistic studies have been carried out with commuter cyclists to discover the types of problems they encounter on a daily basis. The study presented here has been commissioned by the City of Stockholm municipality and focuses specifically on commuter cyclists in the Greater Stockholm area. The aim of the study was to describe and pinpoint accessibility and safety problems, but also to generate an accessible geographical interface that could serve as a traffic planning tool for cycle network improvement. Statistical surveys in the Stockholm area have shown a rapid growth in the number of cyclists as well as an increase in problems associated with an overburdened cycle infrastructure. Given the heightened emphasis on transport system sustainability, the City of Stockholm is faced with the challenging task of trying to maintain and encourage the upward trend in commuter cycling through a process that involves problem identification, classification, prioritisation and resolution. An innovative methodology involving the use of GPS logging devices and small video cameras was developed and supported with analysis software designed specifically for the purposes of this study. Experienced commuter cyclists were recruited to cycle 17 different major cycle routes to and from the suburbs and inner city area during morning and afternoon peak traffic hours during the main cycle season. Over 500 safety and accessibility/mobility problems were identified and recorded from the data collected from 16 commuter cyclists. The method and representation of data proved successful for strategic traffic planning work at City of Stockholm and has since provided invaluable input for and the development of a new cycle plan for Greater Stockholm. Indirectly, the results of this work have also contributed to longer term safety and environmental targets.

  2. A Naturalistic Examination of the Temporal Patterns of Affect and Eating Disorder Behaviors in Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Jason M.; Utzinger, Linsey M.; Crosby, Ross D.; Goldschmidt, Andrea B.; Ellison, Jo; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Engel, Scott G.; Mitchell, James E.; Crow, Scott J.; Peterson, Carol B.; Le Grange, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Objective Evidence supports the presence of significant variability in the timing of affective experiences and eating disorder (ED) behaviors across ED populations. This study examined the naturalistic timing of affective states and ED behaviors in anorexia nervosa (AN). Methods Women (N = 118) with full or subthreshold DSM-IV AN completed two weeks of ecological momentary assessment (EMA) involving self-reports of affect and ED behaviors. Patterns of positive affect, negative affect, and tension/anxiety across hours of the day and days of the week were examined using linear mixed models. Variation in ED behavior occurrence (i.e., binge eating, vomiting, exercise, meal skipping, and self-weighing) across hours of the day and days of the week was examined using general estimating equations. Results Results revealed significant variation in tension/anxiety across hours of the day; there were no significant associations between time of day and negative or positive affect. All affective variables significantly varied across days of the week, with both negative affect and tension/anxiety highest in the middle of the week and lowest on the weekends. The ED behaviors all significantly varied across hours of the day, with binge eating and vomiting most common in later hours, exercise and self-weighing most common in earlier hours, and meal skipping most common at times corresponding to breakfast and lunch. ED behaviors did not significantly vary across days of the week. Conclusion The significant patterns of variation in the timing of affective experiences and ED behaviors may have utility in informing theories and interventions for AN. PMID:26282336

  3. Spatially pooled contrast responses predict neural and perceptual similarity of naturalistic image categories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris I A Groen

    Full Text Available The visual world is complex and continuously changing. Yet, our brain transforms patterns of light falling on our retina into a coherent percept within a few hundred milliseconds. Possibly, low-level neural responses already carry substantial information to facilitate rapid characterization of the visual input. Here, we computationally estimated low-level contrast responses to computer-generated naturalistic images, and tested whether spatial pooling of these responses could predict image similarity at the neural and behavioral level. Using EEG, we show that statistics derived from pooled responses explain a large amount of variance between single-image evoked potentials (ERPs in individual subjects. Dissimilarity analysis on multi-electrode ERPs demonstrated that large differences between images in pooled response statistics are predictive of more dissimilar patterns of evoked activity, whereas images with little difference in statistics give rise to highly similar evoked activity patterns. In a separate behavioral experiment, images with large differences in statistics were judged as different categories, whereas images with little differences were confused. These findings suggest that statistics derived from low-level contrast responses can be extracted in early visual processing and can be relevant for rapid judgment of visual similarity. We compared our results with two other, well- known contrast statistics: Fourier power spectra and higher-order properties of contrast distributions (skewness and kurtosis. Interestingly, whereas these statistics allow for accurate image categorization, they do not predict ERP response patterns or behavioral categorization confusions. These converging computational, neural and behavioral results suggest that statistics of pooled contrast responses contain information that corresponds with perceived visual similarity in a rapid, low-level categorization task.

  4. Functional response to cholinesterase inhibitor therapy in a naturalistic Alzheimer’s disease cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wattmo Carina

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activities of daily living (ADL are an essential part of the diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer’s disease (AD. A decline in ADL affects independent living and has a strong negative impact on caregiver burden. Functional response to cholinesterase inhibitor (ChEI treatment and factors that might influence this response in naturalistic AD patients need investigating. The aim of this study was to identify the socio-demographic and clinical factors that affect the functional response after 6 months of ChEI therapy. Methods This prospective, non-randomised, multicentre study in a routine clinical setting included 784 AD patients treated with donepezil, rivastigmine or galantamine. At baseline and after 6 months of treatment, patients were assessed using several rating scales, including the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL scale, Physical Self-Maintenance Scale (PSMS and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE. Demographic and clinical characteristics were investigated at baseline. The functional response and the relationships of potential predictors were analysed using general linear models. Results After 6 months of ChEI treatment, 49% and 74% of patients showed improvement/no change in IADL and in PSMS score, respectively. The improved/unchanged patients exhibited better cognitive status at baseline; regarding improved/unchanged PSMS, patients were younger and used fewer anti-depressants. A more positive functional response to ChEI was observed in younger individuals or among those having the interaction effect of better preserved cognition and lower ADL ability. Patients with fewer concomitant medications or those using NSAIDs/acetylsalicylic acid showed a better PSMS response. Conclusions Critical characteristics that may influence the functional response to ChEI in AD were identified. Some predictors differed from those previously shown to affect cognitive response, e.g., lower cognitive ability and older age

  5. Highlights from Johannesburg, Gauteng Province, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Although the extraction of mineral wealth has been the major influence in the history of Johannesburg and the surrounding Witwatersrand regions (with about 45% of all gold ever mined coming from there), the discovery of now-famous hominid fossils at the Sterkfontein Caves, and the convening of the world's largest-ever conference on environment and development, are setting a new stage for the future. The United Nations began the second Development and Environment Conference in Johannesburg on August 26, 2002. This meeting addresses the implementation of international goals to fight poverty and protect the global environment that were established at the first such conference held in Rio de Janeiro in 1992. The Johannesburg summit involves about forty thousand participants, and perhaps 100 world leaders. One of several official opening ceremonies for the conference was held at the Sterkfontein Caves to recognize the outstanding universal value of the paleo-anthropological fossils found there.These views from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) highlight a number of the land use, vegetation, and geological features found within Gauteng Province (including the urban center of Johannesburg and the capital city Pretoria) and parts of the North West and Free State Provinces. The image on the right displays vegetation in red hues and is a false-color view utilizing data from MISR's near-infrared, red and blue bands. Both the natural-color view (left) and the false-color version were acquired by MISR's nadir camera on June 16, 2002. The urban areas appear as gray-colored pixels in the natural-color view, and exhibit colors corresponding with the relative abundance of vegetation found in the urban parts of this arid region.The mountains trending east-west near the center of the images extend from Pretoria in the east to Rustenberg in the west. These ranges, the Magaliesberg and Witwatersberg, separate the low-lying, hotter bushveld to the north from the cooler

  6. Electric transport in the Netherlands. Highlights 2012; Elektrisch vervoer in Nederland. Highlights 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-03-15

    Businesses, social and educational institutions and governmental institutes work together to accelerate electric transport and to discover and exploit economic opportunities. In 2012, many activities were carried out and results achieved, of which the highlights are presented in this brochure [Dutch] Bedrijfsleven, maatschappelijke- en kennisinstellingen en overheden werken samen aan versnelling van elektrisch vervoer en het ontdekken en benutten van economische kansen. In 2012 werden veel activiteiten uitgevoerd en resultaten geboekt, waarvan in deze brochure verslag wordt gedaan.

  7. The Diversity among Us: Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans, Caribbean Americans, and Central and South Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Vasti

    2004-01-01

    Research on Latino college students is largely based on the experiences of Mexican Americans. In this chapter, diverse experiences of other groups in terms of immigration, educational achievement, and economic attainment are highlighted, and implications for student services are explored. (Contains 3 figures and 1 table.)

  8. [Constant Duméril (1774-1860) anatomist doctor and naturalist, about a portrait by G. Devers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Floch-Prigent, P

    2008-12-01

    André, Marie, Constant Duméril (1774-1860) served as a professor in the from 1801 to 1855. He was also chairman of herpetology and ichthyology of the in Paris. The Paris-Descartes University (department of anatomy) owns a great, framed portrait which is an oil painting by Giuseppe Devers, 1855, representing C. Duméril sat on a chair. The study of his portrait, biography and bibliography brings precisions on a noticeable scholar of the anatomical and naturalistic field in Paris in the first half of the 19th century.

  9. Towards a Moon Village : Community Workshops Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    2016-07-01

    . References: [1] http://sci.esa.int/ilewg/ and https://ildwg.wordpress.com/ [2] Foing B. Moon exploration highlights and Moon Village introduction. [3] Young Lunar Explorers Report ESTEC Moon village sessions with community and young professionals.

  10. Tales from the Jazz ASH: highlights from the 2013 American Society of Haematology meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarella, Luca

    2014-01-01

    The 55th annual ASH meeting was held in pleasant New Orleans and was the largest in its history, with 22,495 participants coming from 113 nations. A 'bench-to-bedside and back' attitude characterises haematology probably more than any other discipline in medicine and, as usual, this was reflected in the extremely wide breadth of the topics covered, including the last results from clinical trials and cutting-edge advancements in basic science. This year, the balance was arguably skewed: few truly clinical practice-changing results were presented. On the other hand, a great number of basic and translational studies significantly increased our understanding of the biology of numerous malignancies and heralded the coming of age of disruptive technologies. Namely, above all, next generation sequencing and T cell engineering-based cell therapy.

  11. American ginseng

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and inflammation of the lining of the stomach (gastritis). American ginseng is also used for low iron ... Dizziness. Pregnancy and childbirth complications. Stress. Anemia. Insomnia. Gastritis. Impotence. Fever. Hangover symptoms. Headaches. Swine flu. Aging. ...

  12. Risky riding: Naturalistic methods comparing safety behavior from conventional bicycle riders and electric bike riders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Brian Casey; Chen, Jiaoli; Cherry, Christopher R

    2015-09-01

    As electric bicycles (e-bikes) have emerged as a new transportation mode, their role in transportation systems and their impact on users have become important issues for policy makers and engineers. Little safety-related research has been conducted in North America or Europe because of their relatively small numbers. This work describes the results of a naturalistic GPS-based safety study between regular bicycle (i.e., standard bicycle) and e-bike riders in the context of a unique bikesharing system that allows comparisons between instrumented bike technologies. We focus on rider safety behavior under four situations: (1) riding in the correct direction on directional roadway segments, (2) speed on on-road and shared use paths, (3) stopping behavior at stop-controlled intersections, and (4) stopping behavior at signalized intersections. We find that, with few exceptions, riders of e-bike behave very similarly to riders of bicycles. Violation rates were very high for both vehicles. Riders of regular bicycles and e-bikes both ride wrong-way on 45% and 44% of segments, respectively. We find that average on-road speeds of e-bike riders (13.3kph) were higher than regular bicyclists (10.4kph) but shared use path (greenway) speeds of e-bike riders (11.0kph) were lower than regular bicyclists (12.6kph); both significantly different at >95% confidence. At stop control intersections, both bicycle and e-bike riders violate the stop signs at the similar rate with bicycles violating stop signs at a slightly higher rate at low speed thresholds (∼80% violations at 6kph, 40% violations at 11kph). Bicycles and e-bikes violate traffic signals at similar rates (70% violation rate). These findings suggest that, among the same population of users, e-bike riders exhibit nearly identical safety behavior as regular bike riders and should be regulated in similar ways. Users of both technologies have very high violation rates of traffic control devices and interventions should occur to

  13. Evaluating depressive symptoms in mania: a naturalistic study of patients with bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young AH

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Allan H Young,1 Jonas Eberhard1,21Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, London, UK; 2Corporate Medical Affairs, H. Lundbeck A/S, Copenhagen, DenmarkObjective: This study aimed to evaluate patients with bipolar I disorder (BD-I who have mania with depressive symptoms and who meet the new “with mixed features” specifier of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5.Method: This prospective, multinational, naturalistic study surveyed psychiatrists and their patients with BD-I from October 2013 to March 2014. Eligible patients had BD-I, had a (current manic episode, and had experienced onset of a manic episode within the previous 3 months. Psychiatrists provided patient information on depressive symptoms (DSM-5 criteria; symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and agitation; suicide attempts; and physician satisfaction with treatment response. Data were stratified according to whether patients met the criteria for the BD-I “with mixed features” specifier of DSM-5 (≥3 depressive symptoms or not, and characteristics were compared between the two subgroups. Patients also self-reported on depressive symptoms using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview module questionnaire.Results: Overall, 34% of 1,035 patients met the criteria for BD-I “with mixed features,” exhibiting ≥3 depressive symptoms during their current manic episode. This correlated with the matched patient self-reports of depressive symptoms. During their current manic episode, BD-I patients “with mixed features” had more severe symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and agitation (average composite severity score of 4.1 vs 3.4, a higher incidence of suicide attempts (38% vs 9%, and more physician dissatisfaction with treatment response (22% vs 14%, compared to patients with 0–2 depressive symptoms (all P<0.05.Conclusion: This study found that patients with BD-I “with mixed features” (ie, ≥3 depressive symptoms

  14. Quantifying the yellow signal driver behavior based on naturalistic data from digital enforcement cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Gera, H; Musicant, O; Schechtman, E; Ze'evi, T

    2016-11-01

    The yellow signal driver behavior, reflecting the dilemma zone behavior, is analyzed using naturalistic data from digital enforcement cameras. The key variable in the analysis is the entrance time after the yellow onset, and its distribution. This distribution can assist in determining two critical outcomes: the safety outcome related to red-light-running angle accidents, and the efficiency outcome. The connection to other approaches for evaluating the yellow signal driver behavior is also discussed. The dataset was obtained from 37 digital enforcement cameras at non-urban signalized intersections in Israel, over a period of nearly two years. The data contain more than 200 million vehicle entrances, of which 2.3% (∼5million vehicles) entered the intersection during the yellow phase. In all non-urban signalized intersections in Israel the green phase ends with 3s of flashing green, followed by 3s of yellow. In most non-urban signalized roads in Israel the posted speed limit is 90km/h. Our analysis focuses on crossings during the yellow phase and the first 1.5s of the red phase. The analysis method consists of two stages. In the first stage we tested whether the frequency of crossings is constant at the beginning of the yellow phase. We found that the pattern was stable (i.e., the frequencies were constant) at 18 intersections, nearly stable at 13 intersections and unstable at 6 intersections. In addition to the 6 intersections with unstable patterns, two other outlying intersections were excluded from subsequent analysis. Logistic regression models were fitted for each of the remaining 29 intersection. We examined both standard (exponential) logistic regression and four parameters logistic regression. The results show a clear advantage for the former. The estimated parameters show that the time when the frequency of crossing reduces to half ranges from1.7 to 2.3s after yellow onset. The duration of the reduction of the relative frequency from 0.9 to 0.1 ranged

  15. Carbamazepine treatment of bipolar disorder: a retrospective evaluation of naturalistic long-term outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chia-Hui

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbamazepine (CBZ has been used in the treatment of bipolar disorder, both in acute mania and maintenance therapy, since the early 1970s. Here, we report a follow-up study of CBZ-treated bipolar patients in the Taipei City Psychiatric Centre. Methods Bipolar patients diagnosed according to the DSM-IV system and treated with CBZ at the Taipei City Psychiatric Centre had their charts reviewed to evaluate the efficacy and side effects of this medication during an average follow-up period of 10 years. Results A total of 129 bipolar patients (45 males, mean age: 45.7 ± 10.9 year were included in the analysis of CBZ efficacy used alone (n = 63 or as an add-on after lithium (n = 50 or valproic acid (n = 11, or the both of them (n = 5. The mean age of disease onset was 24.6 ± 9.5 years. The mean duration of CBZ use was 10.4 ± 5.2 year. The mean dose used was 571.3 ± 212.6 mg/day with a mean plasma level of 7.8 ± 5.9 μg/mL. Mean body weight increased from 62.0 ± 13.4 kg to 66.7 ± 13.1 kg during treatment. The frequencies of admission per year before and after CBZ treatment were 0.33 ± 0.46 and 0.14 ± 0.30, respectively. The most common side effects targeted the central nervous system (24%, including dizziness, ataxia and cognitive impairment. Other common side effects were gastrointestinal disturbances (3.6%, tremor (3.6%, skin rash (2.9%, and blurred vision (2.9%. Eighty-eight patients (68.2% were taking antipsychotics concomitantly. Ninety-six patients (74.4% needed to use benzodiazepines concomitantly. Sixty-three (48.8% patients had zero episodes in a 10-year follow-up period, compared to all patients having episodes prior to treatment. Using variable analysis, we found better response to CBZ in males than in females. Conclusions CBZ is efficacious in the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder in naturalistic clinical practice, either as monotherapy

  16. Taste coding of complex naturalistic taste stimuli and traditional taste stimuli in the parabrachial pons of the awake, freely licking rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammons, Joshua D; Weiss, Michael S; Victor, Jonathan D; Di Lorenzo, Patricia M

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have shown that taste-responsive cells in the brainstem taste nuclei of rodents respond to sensory qualities other than gustation. Such data suggest that cells in the classical gustatory brainstem may be better tuned to respond to stimuli that engage multiple sensory modalities than to stimuli that are purely gustatory. Here, we test this idea by recording the electrophysiological responses to complex, naturalistic stimuli in single neurons in the parabrachial pons (PbN, the second neural relay in the central gustatory pathway) in awake, freely licking rats. Following electrode implantation and recovery, we presented both prototypical and naturalistic taste stimuli and recorded the responses in the PbN. Prototypical taste stimuli (NaCl, sucrose, citric acid, and caffeine) and naturalistic stimuli (clam juice, grape juice, lemon juice, and coffee) were matched for taste quality and intensity (concentration). Umami (monosodium glutamate + inosine monophosphate) and fat (diluted heavy cream) were also tested. PbN neurons responded to naturalistic stimuli as much or more than to prototypical taste stimuli. Furthermore, they convey more information about naturalistic stimuli than about prototypical ones. Moreover, multidimensional scaling analyses showed that across unit responses to naturalistic stimuli were more widely separated than responses to prototypical taste stimuli. Interestingly, cream evoked a robust and widespread response in PbN cells. Collectively, these data suggest that natural foods are more potent stimulators of PbN cells than purely gustatory stimuli. Probing PbN cells with pure taste stimuli may underestimate the response repertoire of these cells.

  17. The art of Indigenous Americans and American art history: a century of exhibitions

    OpenAIRE

    Berlo, Janet Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The indigenous arts of the United States have long stood in a vexed relationship with the canons of American art history. This brief essay covers only the highlights of this relationship, by considering some major exhibits and installations of Native art in American art museums (and, occasionally, in other exhibition spaces) during the past century. I make these comments as an art historian who has for more than three decades focused on Native American art, with some contributions to others a...

  18. Effects of maintenance lithium treatment on serum parathyroid hormone and calcium levels: a retrospective longitudinal naturalistic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Umberto; De Cori, David; Aguglia, Andrea; Barbaro, Francesca; Lanfranco, Fabio; Bogetto, Filippo; Maina, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this retrospective longitudinal naturalistic study was to evaluate the effects of maintenance lithium treatment on parathyroid hormone (PTH) and calcium levels. Methods A retrospective longitudinal naturalistic study design was used. Data were collected from the database of a tertiary psychiatric center covering the years 2010–2014. Included were bipolar patients who had never been exposed to lithium and had lithium started, and who had PTH, and total and ionized calcium levels available before and during lithium treatment. Paired t-tests were used to analyze changes in PTH and calcium levels. Linear regressions were performed, with mean lithium level and duration of lithium exposure as independent variables and change in PTH levels as dependent variable. Results A total 31 patients were included. The mean duration of lithium treatment was 18.6±11.4 months. PTH levels significantly increased during lithium treatment (+13.55±14.20 pg/mL); the rate of hyperparathyroidism was 12.9%. Neither total nor ionized calcium increased from baseline to follow-up; none of our patients developed hypercalcemia. Linear regressions analyses did not show an effect of duration of lithium exposure or mean lithium level on PTH levels. Conclusion Lithium-associated stimulation of parathyroid function is more common than assumed to date. Among parameters to be evaluated prior to lithium implementation, calcium and PTH should be added. PMID:26229473

  19. Encoding of naturalistic optic flow by motion sensitive neurons of nucleus rotundus in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis eEckmeier

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The retinal image changes that occur during locomotion, the optic flow, carry information about self-motion and the three-dimensional structure of the environment. Especially fast moving animals with only little binocular vision depend on these depth cues for manoeuvring. They actively control their gaze to facilitate perception of depth based on cues in the optic flow. In the visual system of birds, nucleus rotundus neurons were originally found to respond to object motion but not to background motion. However, when background and object were both moving, responses increase the more the direction and velocity of object and background motion on the retina differed. These properties may play a role in representing depth cues in the optic flow. We therefore investigated how neurons in nucleus rotundus respond to optic flow that contains depth cues. We presented simplified and naturalistic optic flow on a panoramic LED display while recording from single neurons in nucleus rotundus of anaesthetized zebra finches. Unlike most studies on motion vision in birds, our stimuli included depth information.We found extensive responses of motion selective neurons in nucleus rotundus to optic flow stimuli. Simplified stimuli revealed preferences for optic flow reflecting translational or rotational self-motion. Naturalistic optic flow stimuli elicited complex response modulations, but the presence of objects was signalled by only few neurons. The neurons that did respond to objects in the optic flow, however, show interesting properties.

  20. The other-race effect in face learning: Using naturalistic images to investigate face ethnicity effects in a learning paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, William G; Favelle, Simone K; Oxner, Matt; Chu, Ming Hon; Lam, Sze Man

    2017-05-01

    The other-race effect in face identification has been reported in many situations and by many different ethnicities, yet it remains poorly understood. One reason for this lack of clarity may be a limitation in the methodologies that have been used to test it. Experiments typically use an old-new recognition task to demonstrate the existence of the other-race effect, but such tasks are susceptible to different social and perceptual influences, particularly in terms of the extent to which all faces are equally individuated at study. In this paper we report an experiment in which we used a face learning methodology to measure the other-race effect. We obtained naturalistic photographs of Chinese and Caucasian individuals, which allowed us to test the ability of participants to generalize their learning to new ecologically valid exemplars of a face identity. We show a strong own-race advantage in face learning, such that participants required many fewer trials to learn names of own-race individuals than those of other-race individuals and were better able to identify learned own-race individuals in novel naturalistic stimuli. Since our methodology requires individuation of all faces, and generalization over large image changes, our finding of an other-race effect can be attributed to a specific deficit in the sensitivity of perceptual and memory processes to other-race faces.

  1. The use of meta-analysis or research synthesis to combine driving simulation or naturalistic study results on driver distraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caird, Jeff K; Johnston, Katherine A; Willness, Chelsea R; Asbridge, Mark

    2014-06-01

    Three important and inter-related topics are addressed in this paper. First, the importance of meta-analysis and research synthesis methods to combine studies on traffic safety, in general, and on driver distraction, in particular, is briefly reviewed. Second, naturalistic, epidemiologic, and driving simulation studies on driver distraction are used to illustrate convergent and divergent results that have accumulated thus far in this domain of research. In particular, mobile phone conversation, passenger presence, and text messaging naturalistic studies use meta-analyses and research syntheses to illustrate important patterns of results that are in need of more in-depth study. Third, a number of driver distraction study limitations such as poorly defined dependent variables, lack of methodological detail, and omission of statistical information prevent the integration of many studies into meta-analyses. In addition, the overall quality of road safety studies suffers from these same limitations and suggestions for improvement are made to guide researchers and reviewers. Practical Applications. The use of research synthesis and meta-analysis provide comprehensive estimates of the impact of distractions on driving performance, which can be used to guide public policy and future research.

  2. Simulating real world functioning in schizophrenia using a naturalistic city environment and single-trial, goal-directed navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Zawadzki

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop a virtual reality platform that would serve as a functionally meaningful measure of cognition in schizophrenia that would complement standard batteries of cognitive tests during clinical trials for cognitive treatments in schizophrenia, be amenable to human neuroimaging research, yet lend itself to neurobiological comparison with rodent analogues.Method: Thirty-three patients with schizophrenia and 33 healthy controls matched for age, sex, video gaming experience and education completed eight rapid, single-trial virtual navigation tasks within a naturalistic virtual city. Four trials tested their ability to find different targets seen during the passive viewing of a closed path that led them around different city blocks. Four subsequent trials tested their ability to return to four different starting points after viewing a path that took them several blocks away from the starting position. Results: Individuals with schizophrenia had difficulties in way-finding, measured as distance travelled to find targets previously encountered within the virtual city. They were also more likely not to notice the target during passive viewing, less likely to find novel shortcuts to targets and more likely to become lost and fail completely in finding the target. Total travel distances across all eight trials strongly correlated (negatively with neurocognitive measures and, for 49 participants who completed the Quality of Life Scale, psychosocial functioning. Conclusion: Single-trial, goal-directed navigation in a naturalistic virtual environment is a functionally meaningful measure of cognitive functioning in schizophrenia.

  3. American Dream in Early American Literatuer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屈彩娥; 李小玺

    2008-01-01

    American dream has often been closely rehted to American literature.Many say that the American literary history can be seen as the history of American dreams.In most periods in history,writers,whose dreams have been infused in a variety of characters create the American literature.While in Early American literature,American dream had been presented in a dif-ferent way.

  4. American Culture Reflected in American English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李华芳

    2013-01-01

    Language is a vehicle for culture. It is also a key component of culture. It not only reflects culture but also influences culture. As a variety of British English, American English, especially American words and expressions can reflect American culture from many aspects. This paper studies some typical traits of American culture reflected in words and expressions of American Eng-lish.

  5. American Connections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anne Ring

    2015-01-01

    The Danish artist Thomas Bang spent his early years in the USA. The works he created in this formative period were thus profoundly shaped by the contemporary movements in American art of the 1960s and 1970s when sculpture, or to be more precise, three-dimensional work became a hotbed of expansive...... experiments. This article traces how Bang made a radical move from painting to sculpture, which was characteristic of that time, and how he developed his artistic idiom by taking an active part in some of the seminal new departures in American art, in particular process art and post-minimalism. By leaping...... to the lasting impact of Bang's American period, which remains the key to understanding his works....

  6. Determinism and Gender in Galsworthy’s The Man of Property and Naguib Mahfouz’s Palace Walk A Naturalistic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulfattah Omar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article is concerned with analysing the concepts of determinism and gender in John Galsworthy’s The Man of Property and Naguib Mahfouz’s Palace Walk from a naturalistic point of view. Determinism is one of the important characteristics of literary naturalism developed by Emile Zola, an eminent French writer, in the second half of the nineteenth century. Analysis indicates that pessimistic determinism, a typical feature of literary naturalism, is represented in the two texts along with other naturalistic features such as conflict, frankness about sexual problems, and objectivity. Analysis also shows that both John Galsworthy and Naguib Mahfouz gave much space in the two novels for women and their problems. Both adopted a naturalist deterministic view of the concept of gender. They used naturalist settings and practices as vehicles for symbolic meanings to convey thematic significance. The notions of determinism and free will as well as the related concepts of fate and nature are central questions in the two texts. The two authors also extend the notion of determinism to gender problems. In the two novels, we see that women are determined to suffer and submit to male dominance and tyranny. Although it is difficult to determine whether the two authors were progressive in adopting an explicit anti-patriarch stance, it can be claimed that Galsworthy and Mahfouz were concerned with introducing the social problems of the age including women problems in an objective way. Keywords: determinism- gender- naturalism- Emile Zola- feminist naturalism

  7. Infant Engagement and Early Vocabulary Development: A Naturalistic Observation Study of Mozambican Infants from 1;1 to 2;1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, J. Douglas; Voght, Paul

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes how others engage rural and urban Mozambican infants during naturalistic observations, and how the proportion of time spent in different engagements relates to infants' language development over the second year of life. Using an extended version of Bakeman and Adamson's (1984) categorization of infant engagement, we…

  8. A Fresh Pair of Eyes: A Blind Observation Method for Evaluating Social Skills of Children with ASD in a Naturalistic Peer Situation in School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Vera; Nauta, Maaike H.; Mulder, Erik J.; Sytema, Sjoerd; de Bildt, Annelies

    2016-01-01

    The Social skills Observation Measure (SOM) is a direct observation method for social skills used in naturalistic everyday situations in school. This study describes the development of the SOM and investigates its psychometric properties in 86 children with Autism spectrum disorder, aged 9.8-13.1 years. The interrater reliability was found to be…

  9. A Fresh Pair of Eyes : A Blind Observation Method for Evaluating Social Skills of Children with ASD in a Naturalistic Peer Situation in School

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Vera; Nauta, Maaike H.; Mulder, Erik J.; Sytema, Sjoerd; de Bildt, Annelies

    2016-01-01

    The Social skills Observation Measure (SOM) is a direct observation method for social skills used in naturalistic everyday situations in school. This study describes the development of the SOM and investigates its psychometric properties in 86 children with Autism spectrum disorder, aged 9.8-13.1 ye

  10. American Houses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张梦华

    2004-01-01

    American houses usually have private kitchens,a living room and sometimes separate areas for eating and watching television,A house usually has its own mailbox,a yard with plants or perhaps a lawn,and a place to store garbage out of sight.

  11. Stereoscopic highlighting: 2D graph visualization on stereo displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alper, Basak; Höllerer, Tobias; Kuchera-Morin, JoAnn; Forbes, Angus

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we present a new technique and prototype graph visualization system, stereoscopic highlighting, to help answer accessibility and adjacency queries when interacting with a node-link diagram. Our technique utilizes stereoscopic depth to highlight regions of interest in a 2D graph by projecting these parts onto a plane closer to the viewpoint of the user. This technique aims to isolate and magnify specific portions of the graph that need to be explored in detail without resorting to other highlighting techniques like color or motion, which can then be reserved to encode other data attributes. This mechanism of stereoscopic highlighting also enables focus+context views by juxtaposing a detailed image of a region of interest with the overall graph, which is visualized at a further depth with correspondingly less detail. In order to validate our technique, we ran a controlled experiment with 16 subjects comparing static visual highlighting to stereoscopic highlighting on 2D and 3D graph layouts for a range of tasks. Our results show that while for most tasks the difference in performance between stereoscopic highlighting alone and static visual highlighting is not statistically significant, users performed better when both highlighting methods were used concurrently. In more complicated tasks, 3D layout with static visual highlighting outperformed 2D layouts with a single highlighting method. However, it did not outperform the 2D layout utilizing both highlighting techniques simultaneously. Based on these results, we conclude that stereoscopic highlighting is a promising technique that can significantly enhance graph visualizations for certain use cases.

  12. Multi-Variate EEG Analysis as a Novel Tool to Examine Brain Responses to Naturalistic Music Stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Sturm

    Full Text Available Note onsets in music are acoustic landmarks providing auditory cues that underlie the perception of more complex phenomena such as beat, rhythm, and meter. For naturalistic ongoing sounds a detailed view on the neural representation of onset structure is hard to obtain, since, typically, stimulus-related EEG signatures are derived by averaging a high number of identical stimulus presentations. Here, we propose a novel multivariate regression-based method extracting onset-related brain responses from the ongoing EEG. We analyse EEG recordings of nine subjects who passively listened to stimuli from various sound categories encompassing simple tone sequences, full-length romantic piano pieces and natural (non-music soundscapes. The regression approach reduces the 61-channel EEG to one time course optimally reflecting note onsets. The neural signatures derived by this procedure indeed resemble canonical onset-related ERPs, such as the N1-P2 complex. This EEG projection was then utilized to determine the Cortico-Acoustic Correlation (CACor, a measure of synchronization between EEG signal and stimulus. We demonstrate that a significant CACor (i can be detected in an individual listener's EEG of a single presentation of a full-length complex naturalistic music stimulus, and (ii it co-varies with the stimuli's average magnitudes of sharpness, spectral centroid, and rhythmic complexity. In particular, the subset of stimuli eliciting a strong CACor also produces strongly coordinated tension ratings obtained from an independent listener group in a separate behavioral experiment. Thus musical features that lead to a marked physiological reflection of tone onsets also contribute to perceived tension in music.

  13. Multi-Variate EEG Analysis as a Novel Tool to Examine Brain Responses to Naturalistic Music Stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Irene; Dähne, Sven; Blankertz, Benjamin; Curio, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Note onsets in music are acoustic landmarks providing auditory cues that underlie the perception of more complex phenomena such as beat, rhythm, and meter. For naturalistic ongoing sounds a detailed view on the neural representation of onset structure is hard to obtain, since, typically, stimulus-related EEG signatures are derived by averaging a high number of identical stimulus presentations. Here, we propose a novel multivariate regression-based method extracting onset-related brain responses from the ongoing EEG. We analyse EEG recordings of nine subjects who passively listened to stimuli from various sound categories encompassing simple tone sequences, full-length romantic piano pieces and natural (non-music) soundscapes. The regression approach reduces the 61-channel EEG to one time course optimally reflecting note onsets. The neural signatures derived by this procedure indeed resemble canonical onset-related ERPs, such as the N1-P2 complex. This EEG projection was then utilized to determine the Cortico-Acoustic Correlation (CACor), a measure of synchronization between EEG signal and stimulus. We demonstrate that a significant CACor (i) can be detected in an individual listener's EEG of a single presentation of a full-length complex naturalistic music stimulus, and (ii) it co-varies with the stimuli's average magnitudes of sharpness, spectral centroid, and rhythmic complexity. In particular, the subset of stimuli eliciting a strong CACor also produces strongly coordinated tension ratings obtained from an independent listener group in a separate behavioral experiment. Thus musical features that lead to a marked physiological reflection of tone onsets also contribute to perceived tension in music.

  14. Effects of maintenance lithium treatment on serum parathyroid hormone and calcium levels: a retrospective longitudinal naturalistic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert U

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Umberto Albert,1 David De Cori,1 Andrea Aguglia,1 Francesca Barbaro,1 Fabio Lanfranco,2 Filippo Bogetto,1 Giuseppe Maina3 1Anxiety and Mood Disorders Unit, Rita Levi Montalcini Department of Neuroscience, University of Turin, Torino, Italy; 2Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Torino, Italy; 3Department of Mental Health, San Luigi-Gonzaga Hospital, University of Turin, Orbassano, Italy Objective: The aim of this retrospective longitudinal naturalistic study was to evaluate the effects of maintenance lithium treatment on parathyroid hormone (PTH and calcium levels. Methods: A retrospective longitudinal naturalistic study design was used. Data were collected from the database of a tertiary psychiatric center covering the years 2010–2014. Included were bipolar patients who had never been exposed to lithium and had lithium started, and who had PTH, and total and ionized calcium levels available before and during lithium treatment. Paired t-tests were used to analyze changes in PTH and calcium levels. Linear regressions were performed, with mean lithium level and duration of lithium exposure as independent variables and change in PTH levels as dependent variable. Results: A total 31 patients were included. The mean duration of lithium treatment was 18.6±11.4 months. PTH levels significantly increased during lithium treatment (+13.55±14.20 pg/mL; the rate of hyperparathyroidism was 12.9%. Neither total nor ionized calcium increased from baseline to follow-up; none of our patients developed hypercalcemia. Linear regressions analyses did not show an effect of duration of lithium exposure or mean lithium level on PTH levels. Conclusion: Lithium-associated stimulation of parathyroid function is more common than assumed to date. Among parameters to be evaluated prior to lithium implementation, calcium and PTH should be added. Keywords: bipolar disorder, follow-up study, lithium

  15. Highlighting Hospital and Patient Concerns this Election Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Tom

    2016-03-01

    Campaign 2016 is in full swing, and the American Hospital Association is seizing the opportunity to make sure the concerns of patients and hospitals are heard. On the front burner: escalating drug prices.

  16. Brookhaven highlights, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H. (eds.)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Highlights from all the department are illustrated. The main topics are on accelerator development and applications. (LSP)

  17. Guidelines for Effective Usage of Text Highlighting Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobelt, Hendrik; Oelke, Daniela; Kwon, Bum Chul; Schreck, Tobias; Pfister, Hanspeter

    2016-01-01

    Semi-automatic text analysis involves manual inspection of text. Often, different text annotations (like part-of-speech or named entities) are indicated by using distinctive text highlighting techniques. In typesetting there exist well-known formatting conventions, such as bold typeface, italics, or background coloring, that are useful for highlighting certain parts of a given text. Also, many advanced techniques for visualization and highlighting of text exist; yet, standard typesetting is common, and the effects of standard typesetting on the perception of text are not fully understood. As such, we surveyed and tested the effectiveness of common text highlighting techniques, both individually and in combination, to discover how to maximize pop-out effects while minimizing visual interference between techniques. To validate our findings, we conducted a series of crowdsourced experiments to determine: i) a ranking of nine commonly-used text highlighting techniques; ii) the degree of visual interference between pairs of text highlighting techniques; iii) the effectiveness of techniques for visual conjunctive search. Our results show that increasing font size works best as a single highlighting technique, and that there are significant visual interferences between some pairs of highlighting techniques. We discuss the pros and cons of different combinations as a design guideline to choose text highlighting techniques for text viewers.

  18. Walking in Balance: Native American Recovery Programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Owen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews Native American ritual practices, frameworks and key concepts employed by several substance abuse treatments centres in the U.S. and Canada. It also examines the way Alcoholics Anonymous’ Twelve Step programme has been modified to attract and serve the needs of Native Americans and First Nations and its potential impact on the ritual practices. Native concepts of wellbeing are highlighted and linked to the idea of living in “balance”.

  19. OECD Highlights China's Role in Economic Development of Latin America

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Xinhua reported on October 28 that Latin America had been more resilient to the economic crisis by diversifying commercial and financial exchanges with Asian economies, with China as the main driver in the last three years, said Angel Gurria, General Secretary of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), in Asuncion, Paraguay.During the Ibero-American business forum within the Ibero- American Summit, to be opened Friday evening, Gurria made a speech on the theme "Towards a more sustainable trade and investment between Latin America and China".

  20. Refuge Accomplishment Report Highlights: Canaan National Wildlife Refuge FY2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge highlights Refuge accomplishments during the 2012 fiscal year. The report begins with a...

  1. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: FY 2008, 3rd Quarter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showalter, Mary Ann

    2008-09-16

    The EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report covers the science, staff and user recognition, and publication activities that occurred during the 1st quarter (October 2007 - December 2007) of Fiscal Year 2008.

  2. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: 1st Quarter, FY08

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showalter, Mary Ann

    2008-01-28

    The EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report covers the science, staff and user recognition, and publication activities that occurred during the 1st quarter (October 2007 - December 2007) of Fiscal Year 2008.

  3. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: 1st Quarter, Fiscal Year 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showalter, Mary Ann; Kathmann, Loel E.; Manke, Kristin L.

    2009-02-02

    The EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report covers the science, staff and user recognition, and publication activities that occurred during the 1st quarter (October 2008 - December 2008) of Fiscal Year 2009.

  4. Physical and Life Sciences 2008 Science & Technology Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correll, D L; Hazi, A U

    2009-05-06

    This document highlights the outstanding research and development activities in the Physical and Life Sciences Directorate that made news in 2008. It also summarizes the awards and recognition received by members of the Directorate in 2008.

  5. [A target-highlighting method in multispectral remote sensing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin-jun; Lin, Qi-zhong; Li, Ming-xiao; Wang, Li-ming; Tian, Qing-jiu

    2009-04-01

    In order to highlight target in multispectral remote sensing and overcome the human error caused by threshold, a new method is proposed here. Image of target similarity is firstly calculated by spectral energy level matching (SEM) algorithm and as a band added to original image; Then, band normalization is performed on the new image to reduce the effects caused by the order of magnitude in different bands; Finally, a false color image that highlights the target is made by RGB composed of the first three bands (3, 2, 1) in MNF transformation. Results from the experiment of highlighting the main rock-type tuffaceous siltstone in Hatu area, Xinjiang province, China show that (1) the new method can highlight target for the increment of target's information and weights during the process of transformation by adding a band representing target's similarity to the original image. Therefore, it overcomes the shortcomings existing in the common transformations on space information-although different objects corresponding to special information space are distinguished, targets the authors wanted can not be highlighted yet; (2) The new method can distinguish more objects than original maximum noise fraction (MNF) transformation because it unifies the tone for the same object's type by suppressing none target information using SEM method; (3) In addition to highlighting tuffaceous siltstone in the study area, the new method can be used widely in other fields such as soil, concrete, altered mineral etc.

  6. Teaching reciprocal imitation skills to young children with autism using a naturalistic behavioral approach: effects on language, pretend play, and joint attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Brooke; Schreibman, Laura

    2006-05-01

    Children with autism exhibit significant deficits in imitation skills which impede the acquisition of more complex behaviors and socialization, and are thus an important focus of early intervention programs for children with autism. This study used a multiple-baseline design across five young children with autism to assess the benefit of a naturalistic behavioral technique for teaching object imitation. Participants increased their imitation skills and generalized these skills to novel environments. In addition, participants exhibited increases in other social-communicative behaviors, including language, pretend play, and joint attention. These results provide support for the effectiveness of a naturalistic behavioral intervention for teaching imitation and offer a new and potentially important treatment option for young children who exhibit deficits in social-communicative behaviors.

  7. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Workpackage 6, Driver Behaviour Monitoring through Naturalistic Driving: Deliverable 6.2: Part A: Study design of naturalistic driving observations within ERSO - development of innovative indicators for exposure and safety performance measures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonnard, A. Brusque, C. Hugot, M. Commandeur, J.J.F. & Christoph, M.W.T.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the Task 6.2 of DaCoTA is to specify the study design of naturalistic driving study in the perspective of the European Road Safety Observatory. More precisely, the task deals with three main issues: 1) the experimental design, 2) the procedures to Risk Exposure Data (RED) and Safety

  8. Native Americans with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Read the MMWR Science Clips Native Americans with Diabetes Better diabetes care can decrease kidney failure Language: ... between 1996 and 2013. Problem Kidney failure from diabetes was highest among Native Americans. Native Americans are ...

  9. Obesity and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data > Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Obesity Obesity and African Americans African American women have the ... ss6304.pdf [PDF | 3.38MB] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY More than 80 percent of people with type ...

  10. American Holidays: Culture and Language Learning Combined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Grace Scott

    Suggestions for combining cultural exposure and language instruction through class activities geared to American holidays are outlined. General information about gathering holiday-related realia and instructional materials from local newspapers and magazines is provided, and four specific holidays are highlighted. For each holiday, sources of…

  11. Baseline Face Detection, Head Pose Estimation, and Coarse Direction Detection for Facial Data in the SHRP2 Naturalistic Driving Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paone, Jeffrey R [ORNL; Bolme, David S [ORNL; Ferrell, Regina Kay [ORNL; Aykac, Deniz [ORNL; Karnowski, Thomas Paul [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Keeping a driver focused on the road is one of the most critical steps in insuring the safe operation of a vehicle. The Strategic Highway Research Program 2 (SHRP2) has over 3,100 recorded videos of volunteer drivers during a period of 2 years. This extensive naturalistic driving study (NDS) contains over one million hours of video and associated data that could aid safety researchers in understanding where the driver s attention is focused. Manual analysis of this data is infeasible, therefore efforts are underway to develop automated feature extraction algorithms to process and characterize the data. The real-world nature, volume, and acquisition conditions are unmatched in the transportation community, but there are also challenges because the data has relatively low resolution, high compression rates, and differing illumination conditions. A smaller dataset, the head pose validation study, is available which used the same recording equipment as SHRP2 but is more easily accessible with less privacy constraints. In this work we report initial head pose accuracy using commercial and open source face pose estimation algorithms on the head pose validation data set.

  12. Subjective response to antipsychotic treatment and compliance in schizophrenia. A naturalistic study comparing olanzapine, risperidone and haloperidol (EFESO Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacristán Jose A

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to compare the effectiveness of different antipsychotic drugs in the treatment of schizophrenia it is very important to evaluate subjective response and compliance in patient cohorts treated according to routine clinical practice. Method Outpatients with schizophrenia entered this prospective, naturalistic study when they received a new prescription for an antipsychotic drug. Treatment assignment was based on purely clinical criteria, as the study did not include any experimental intervention. Patients treated with olanzapine, risperidone or haloperidol were included in the analysis. Subjective response was measured using the 10-item version of the Drug Attitude Inventory (DAI-10, and treatment compliance was measured using a physician-rated 4 point categorical scale. Results A total of 2128 patients initiated treatment (as monotherapy with olanzapine, 417 with risperidone, and 112 with haloperidol. Olanzapine-treated patients had significantly higher DAI-10 scores and significantly better treatment compliance compared to both risperidone- and haloperidol-treated patients. Risperidone-treated patients had a significantly higher DAI-10 score compared to haloperidol-treated patients. Conclusion Subjective response and compliance were superior in olanzapine-treated patients, compared to patients treated with risperidone and haloperidol, in routine clinical practice. Differences in subjective response were explained largely, but not completely, by differences in incidence of EPS.

  13. Atypical Antipsychotics in the Treatment of Depressive and Psychotic Symptoms in Patients with Chronic Schizophrenia: A Naturalistic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Innamorati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of this naturalistic study was to investigate whether treatment with clozapine and other atypical antipsychotics for at least 2 years was associated with a reduction in psychotic and depressive symptoms and an improvement in chronic schizophrenia patients’ awareness of their illness. Methods. Twenty-three adult outpatients (15 men and 8 women treated with clozapine and 23 patients (16 men and 7 women treated with other atypical antipsychotics were included in the study. Psychotic symptoms were evaluated using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS, depressive symptoms were assessed with the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS, and insight was assessed with the Scale to Assess Unawareness of Mental Disorder (SUMD. Results. The sample as a whole had a significant reduction in positive, negative, and general symptoms, whereas the reduction in depression was significant only for patients with CDSS scores of 5 and higher at the baseline. At the follow-up, patients treated with other atypical antipsychotics reported a greater reduction in depression than patients treated with clozapine, but not when limiting the analyses to those with clinically relevant depression. Conclusions. Atypical antipsychotics may be effective in reducing psychotic and depressive symptoms and in improving insight in patients with chronic schizophrenia, with no differences in the profiles of efficacy between compounds.

  14. Digital footprints: facilitating large-scale environmental psychiatric research in naturalistic settings through data from everyday technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidargaddi, N; Musiat, P; Makinen, V-P; Ermes, M; Schrader, G; Licinio, J

    2017-02-01

    Digital footprints, the automatically accumulated by-products of our technology-saturated lives, offer an exciting opportunity for psychiatric research. The commercial sector has already embraced the electronic trails of customers as an enabling tool for guiding consumer behaviour, and analogous efforts are ongoing to monitor and improve the mental health of psychiatric patients. The untargeted collection of digital footprints that may or may not be health orientated comprises a large untapped information resource for epidemiological scale research into psychiatric disorders. Real-time monitoring of mood, sleep and physical and social activity in a substantial portion of the affected population in a naturalistic setting is unprecedented in psychiatry. We propose that digital footprints can provide these measurements from real world setting unobtrusively and in a longitudinal fashion. In this perspective article, we outline the concept of digital footprints and the services and devices that create them, and present examples where digital footprints have been successfully used in research. We then critically discuss the opportunities and fundamental challenges associated digital footprints in psychiatric research, such as collecting data from different sources, analysis, ethical and research design challenges.

  15. Clergymen abiding in the fields: the making of the naturalist observer in eighteenth-century Norwegian natural history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenna, Brita

    2011-06-01

    By the mid-eighteenth century, governors of the major European states promoted the study of nature as part of natural-resource based schemes for improvement and economic self-sufficiency. Procuring beneficial knowledge about nature, however, required observers, collectors, and compilers who could produce usable and useful descriptions of nature. The ways governments promoted scientific explorations varied according to the form of government, the makeup of the civil society, the state's economic ideologies and practices, and the geographical situation. This article argues that the roots of a major natural history initiative in Denmark-Norway were firmly planted in the state-church organization. Through the clergymen and their activities, a bishop, supported by the government in Copenhagen, could gather an impressive collection of natural objects, receive observations and descriptions of natural phenomena, and produce natural historical publications that described for the first time many of the species of the north. Devout naturalists were a common species in the eighteenth century, when clergymen and missionaries involved themselves in the investigation of nature in Europe and far beyond. The specific interest here is in how natural history was supported and enforced as part of clerical practice, how specimen exchange was grafted on to pre-existing institutions of gift exchange, and how this influenced the character of the knowledge produced.

  16. The Grateful Aging Program: A Naturalistic Model of Transformation and Healing into the Second Half of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlitz, Marilyn

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Understanding and managing the process of aging is a central issue in modern society. This is a critical factor given the demographic shift toward an aging population and the negative stereotypes around aging that can limit people’s worldview on aging with gratitude and well-being. Methods: Building on three decades of qualitative and quantitative studies on positive worldview transformation at the California-based Institute of Noetic Sciences, this article applies an empirically derived naturalistic model of transformation to aging. The Grateful Aging Program is introduced as a set of transformative steps to promote well-being and to shift fear of aging into inspiration for living well. Results: Nine steps to Grateful Aging are identified: 1) answer the call to transformation, 2) cultivate curiosity, 3) formalize a Grateful Aging practice, 4) set intention for Grateful Aging, 5) pay attention to the gifts of aging, 6) build Grateful Aging habits, 7) find guidance, 8) move to acceptance, and 9) transform self and society. Educational programs are described for elderly patients and for the health care professionals who serve them. Conclusion: The Grateful Aging Program is designed to expand awareness of healthy, mindful, and meaningful aging; to promote individual and social well-being; and to facilitate a supportive atmosphere for personal enrichment and shared learning.

  17. Shared written case formulations and weight change in outpatient therapy for anorexia nervosa: a naturalistic single case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladwin, Alice M; Evangeli, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The therapeutic effects of written shared case formulations are underexplored and have not been examined in anorexia nervosa. This study explored the relationship between (a) the delivery (b) the quality of a shared written case formulation and weight in outpatient psychological therapy for anorexia nervosa. A naturalistic single case series approach was used to examine the case notes of women who had attended a specialist eating disorders service over a 2-year period. The case notes of 15 adult women who had undergone outpatient psychological therapy for anorexia nervosa with a shared written case formulation component were reviewed. The impact of the quality of the case formulation on weekly weight was examined for 14 of the clients where the case formulation was available. The nature of the relationship between the delivery of the written shared case formulation and weight was examined for all 15 clients. There was some evidence to support an association between delivery of the shared written case formulation and weight changes (both weight gain [five out of 15 clients] and weight loss [three out of 15 clients]) in individual cases. Higher case formulation quality was related to cases where weight change did not occur. The delivery of case formulations can be associated with important therapeutic change (both beneficial and potentially harmful) in anorexia nervosa. Future research into the causal mechanisms associated with sharing formulations will face the challenge of adopting strategies that allow for an in-depth exploration of complex therapy variables whilst overcoming methodological challenges.

  18. Digital footprints: facilitating large-scale environmental psychiatric research in naturalistic settings through data from everyday technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidargaddi, N; Musiat, P; Makinen, V-P; Ermes, M; Schrader, G; Licinio, J

    2017-01-01

    Digital footprints, the automatically accumulated by-products of our technology-saturated lives, offer an exciting opportunity for psychiatric research. The commercial sector has already embraced the electronic trails of customers as an enabling tool for guiding consumer behaviour, and analogous efforts are ongoing to monitor and improve the mental health of psychiatric patients. The untargeted collection of digital footprints that may or may not be health orientated comprises a large untapped information resource for epidemiological scale research into psychiatric disorders. Real-time monitoring of mood, sleep and physical and social activity in a substantial portion of the affected population in a naturalistic setting is unprecedented in psychiatry. We propose that digital footprints can provide these measurements from real world setting unobtrusively and in a longitudinal fashion. In this perspective article, we outline the concept of digital footprints and the services and devices that create them, and present examples where digital footprints have been successfully used in research. We then critically discuss the opportunities and fundamental challenges associated digital footprints in psychiatric research, such as collecting data from different sources, analysis, ethical and research design challenges. PMID:27922603

  19. Attention Modulates the Auditory Cortical Processing of Spatial and Category Cues in Naturalistic Auditory Scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renvall, Hanna; Staeren, Noël; Barz, Claudia S.; Ley, Anke; Formisano, Elia

    2016-01-01

    the auditory cortex, may explain the simultaneous increase of BOLD responses and decrease of MEG responses. These findings highlight the complimentary role of electrophysiological and hemodynamic measures in addressing brain processing of complex stimuli. PMID:27375416

  20. Disaggregating Qualitative Data from Asian American College Students in Campus Racial Climate Research and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Museus, Samuel D.; Truong, Kimberly A.

    2009-01-01

    This article highlights the utility of disaggregating qualitative research and assessment data on Asian American college students. Given the complexity of and diversity within the Asian American population, scholars have begun to underscore the importance of disaggregating data in the empirical examination of Asian Americans, but most of those…

  1. Dietary Acculturation among Filipino Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Persephone; Jurado, Leo-Felix

    2015-12-22

    Acculturation, the subsequent changes that occur in one culture after continuous first hand contact with another culture, impacts the dietary habits and health risks of individuals. This study examines the acculturation, dietary habits and anthropometric measurements in a sample of 210 first generation Filipino American immigrants in New Jersey (NJ). Acculturation was measured using the Short Acculturation Scale for Filipino Americans (ASASFA). Dietary acculturation was measured using the Dietary Acculturation Questionnaire for Filipino Americans (DAQFA) and dietary intake was determined using the Block's Brief Food Frequency Questionnaire (BFFQ). Anthropometric measurements were obtained including weight, height and waist circumference. Acculturation had a significant negative relationship with Filipino Dietary acculturation. Western dietary acculturation was significantly correlated with caloric intake (r(208) = 0.193, p acculturation, dietary intake and anthropometric measurements. The results showed that Filipino American immigrants have increased risks including increased BMI, waist circumference and increased fat intake. Over all, this research highlighted some dietary changes and their effects on dietary intake and health status.

  2. Dietary Acculturation among Filipino Americans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persephone Vargas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Acculturation, the subsequent changes that occur in one culture after continuous first hand contact with another culture, impacts the dietary habits and health risks of individuals. This study examines the acculturation, dietary habits and anthropometric measurements in a sample of 210 first generation Filipino American immigrants in New Jersey (NJ. Acculturation was measured using the Short Acculturation Scale for Filipino Americans (ASASFA. Dietary acculturation was measured using the Dietary Acculturation Questionnaire for Filipino Americans (DAQFA and dietary intake was determined using the Block’s Brief Food Frequency Questionnaire (BFFQ. Anthropometric measurements were obtained including weight, height and waist circumference. Acculturation had a significant negative relationship with Filipino Dietary acculturation. Western dietary acculturation was significantly correlated with caloric intake (r(208 = 0.193, p < 0.01, percentage fat intake (r(208 = 0.154, p < 0.05, percentage carbohydrate intake (r(208 = −0.172, p < 0.05, Body Mass Index (BMI (r(208 = 0.216, p < 0.01 and waist circumference (r(208 = 0.161, p < 0.01. There was no significant correlation between Filipino dietary acculturation, dietary intake and anthropometric measurements. The results showed that Filipino American immigrants have increased risks including increased BMI, waist circumference and increased fat intake. Over all, this research highlighted some dietary changes and their effects on dietary intake and health status.

  3. Emotion socialization and ethnicity: an examination of practices and outcomes in African American, Asian American, and Latin American families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelen, Diana; Thomassin, Kristel

    2013-06-01

    The current review paper summarizes the literature on parental emotion socialization in ethnically diverse families in the United States. Models of emotion socialization have been primarily developed using samples of European American parents and children. As such, current categorizations of "adaptive" and "maladaptive" emotion socialization practices may not be applicable to individuals from different ethnic backgrounds. The review examines current models of emotion socialization, with particular attention paid to the demographic breakdown of the studies used to develop these models. Additionally, the review highlights studies examining emotion socialization practices in African American, Asian American, and Latin American families. The review is synthesized with summarizing themes of similarities and differences across ethnic groups, and implications for culturally sensitive research and practice are discussed.

  4. Highlighting the History of Astronomy in the Asia-Pacific Region

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, Tsuko; Strom, Richard G; ICOA-6 Conference

    2011-01-01

    This book provides readers with the results of recent research from some of the world's leading historians of astronomy on aspects of Arabic, Australian, Chinese, Japanese, and North and South American astronomy and astrophysics. It contains peer-reviewed papers gathered from the International Conferences on Oriental Astronomy 6 (ICO-6) with the chosen theme of "Highlighting the History of Astronomy in the Asia-Pacific Region." Of particular note are the sections on Arabic astronomy, Asian applied astronomy and the history of Australian radio astronomy, and the chapter on Peruvian astronomy. This title is a valuable complement for those with research interests in applied historical astronomy; archaeoastronomy; calendars, manuscripts, and star charts; historical instruments and observatories, and the history of radio astronomy.

  5. Highlights from the 7th European Meeting on Molecular Diagnostics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loonen, A.J.M.; Schuurman, R.; Brule, A.J.C. van den

    2012-01-01

    This report presents the highlights of the 7th European Meeting on Molecular Diagnostics held in Scheveningen, The Hague, The Netherlands, 12-14 October 2011. The areas covered included molecular diagnostics applications in medical microbiology, virology, pathology, hemato-oncology,clinical genetics

  6. Advanced Education and Technology Business Plan, 2010-13. Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Ministry of Advanced Education and Technology envisions Alberta's prosperity through innovation and lifelong learning. Advanced Education and Technology's mission is to lead the development of a knowledge-driven future through a dynamic and integrated advanced learning and innovation system. This paper presents the highlights of the business…

  7. Advanced Education and Technology Business Plan, 2009-12. Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Advanced Education and Technology provides strategic leadership for the development of the next generation economy in Alberta through the provision of accessible, affordable and quality learning opportunities for all Albertans and support for a dynamic and integrated innovation system. This paper provides the highlights of the business plan of the…

  8. Tobacco Use. Adolescent Health Highlight. Publication #2012-33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphey, David; Barry, Megan; Vaughn, Brigitte; Terzian, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoking has steadily declined among adolescents during the last fifteen years, although use of some tobacco products, like cigars, has seen recent increases. However, large numbers of teens continue to use tobacco products. This "Adolescent Health Highlight" presents key research findings; describes prevalence and trends; illustrates…

  9. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Ákos K; Rauch, Edgar F; Lábár, János L

    2016-04-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast.

  10. The Shortcomings of Medical Education Highlighted through Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Pranav

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this report are to highlight the shortcomings in medical education. To use a student made short film as an example of how issues that cause medical student distress can be displayed. To show that the process of film-making is a useful tool in reflection. To display that film is an effective device in raising awareness. (Contains 3…

  11. Highlighting Text as a Study Strategy: Beyond Attentional Focusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Reinhard W.; And Others

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate whether the strategy of differentiating main and supporting ideas with different colored highlighter pens resulted in greater use of schema building and increased recall of information by students and whether the benefits of text marking come at the time of encoding or at the time of review. Sixty-six…

  12. Mental Health Disorders. Adolescent Health Highlight. Publication #2013-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphey, David; Barry, Megan; Vaughn, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Mental disorders are diagnosable conditions characterized by changes in thinking, mood, or behavior (or some combination of these) that can cause a person to feel stressed out and impair his or her ability to function. These disorders are common in adolescence. This "Adolescent Health Highlight" presents the warning signs of mental disorders;…

  13. Students' reflections in a portfolio pilot: Highlighting professional issues.

    OpenAIRE

    Haffling, Ann-Christin; Beckman, Anders; Pahlmblad, Annika; Edgren, Gudrun

    2010-01-01

    Background: Portfolios are highlighted as potential assessment tools for professional competence. Although students' self-reflections are considered to be central in the portfolio, the content of reflections in practice-based portfolios is seldom analysed. Aim: To investigate whether students' reflections include sufficient dimensions of professional competence, notwithstanding a standardized portfolio format, and to evaluate students' satisfaction with the portfolio. Methods: Thi...

  14. Highlights of the Conference "Celebrity Tycoon and Brand"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shang Lin'aiyi

    2007-01-01

    @@ A summit's conference with the theme "Celebrity,Tycoon and Brand" highlighted this event and impressedall the present.Figring out the way to establish,protect and develop brand was the core of this summit,which triggered hot discussions and blazed ardent communications.

  15. African-American Biography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ron

    1995-01-01

    Suggests sources of information for African American History Month for library media specialists who work with students in grades four through eight. Gale Research's "African-American Reference Library," which includes "African-America Biography,""African-American Chronology," and "African-American Almanac,"…

  16. Highlights from the First Ever Demographic Study of Solar Physics, Space Physics, and Upper Atmospheric Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldwin, M.; Morrow, C. A.; White, S. C.; Ivie, R.

    2014-12-01

    Members of the Education & Workforce Working Group and the American Institute of Physics (AIP) conducted the first ever National Demographic Survey of working professionals for the 2012 National Academy of Sciences Solar and Space Physics Decadal Survey to learn about the demographics of this sub-field of space science. The instrument contained questions for participants on: the type of workplace; basic demographic information regarding gender and minority status, educational pathways (discipline of undergrad degree, field of their PhD), how their undergraduate and graduate student researchers are funded, participation in NSF and NASA funded spaceflight missions and suborbital programs, and barriers to career advancement. Using contact data bases from AGU, the American Astronomical Society's Solar Physics Division (AAS-SPD), attendees of NOAA's Space Weather Week and proposal submissions to NSF's Atmospheric, Geospace Science Division, the AIP's Statistical Research Center cross correlated and culled these data bases resulting in 2776 unique email addresses of US based working professionals. The survey received 1305 responses (51%) and generated 125 pages of single space answers to a number of open-ended questions. This talk will summarize the highlights of this first-ever demographic survey including findings extracted from the open-ended responses regarding barriers to career advancement which showed significant gender differences.

  17. Transancestral fine-mapping of four type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci highlights potential causal regulatory mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikoshi, Momoko; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Wiltshire, Steven; Huyghe, Jeroen R.; Mahajan, Anubha; Asimit, Jennifer L.; Ferreira, Teresa; Locke, Adam E.; Robertson, Neil R.; Wang, Xu; Sim, Xueling; Fujita, Hayato; Hara, Kazuo; Young, Robin; Zhang, Weihua; Choi, Sungkyoung; Chen, Han; Kaur, Ismeet; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Fontanillas, Pierre; Thuillier, Dorothée; Yengo, Loic; Below, Jennifer E.; Tam, Claudia H.T.; Wu, Ying; Abecasis, Gonçalo; Altshuler, David; Bell, Graeme I.; Blangero, John; Burtt, Noél P.; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Florez, Jose C.; Hanis, Craig L.; Seielstad, Mark; Atzmon, Gil; Chan, Juliana C.N.; Ma, Ronald C.W.; Froguel, Philippe; Wilson, James G.; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan; Dupuis, Josee; Meigs, James B.; Cho, Yoon Shin; Park, Taesung; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Chambers, John C.; Saleheen, Danish; Kadowaki, Takashi; Tai, E. Shyong; Mohlke, Karen L.; Cox, Nancy J.; Ferrer, Jorge; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Kato, Norihiro; Teo, Yik Ying; Boehnke, Michael; McCarthy, Mark I.; Morris, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    To gain insight into potential regulatory mechanisms through which the effects of variants at four established type 2 diabetes (T2D) susceptibility loci (CDKAL1, CDKN2A-B, IGF2BP2 and KCNQ1) are mediated, we undertook transancestral fine-mapping in 22 086 cases and 42 539 controls of East Asian, European, South Asian, African American and Mexican American descent. Through high-density imputation and conditional analyses, we identified seven distinct association signals at these four loci, each with allelic effects on T2D susceptibility that were homogenous across ancestry groups. By leveraging differences in the structure of linkage disequilibrium between diverse populations, and increased sample size, we localised the variants most likely to drive each distinct association signal. We demonstrated that integration of these genetic fine-mapping data with genomic annotation can highlight potential causal regulatory elements in T2D-relevant tissues. These analyses provide insight into the mechanisms through which T2D association signals are mediated, and suggest future routes to understanding the biology of specific disease susceptibility loci. PMID:26911676

  18. Naturalistic Effects of Five Days of Bedtime Caffeine Use on Sleep, Next-Day Cognitive Performance, and Mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Emma K; Tiplady, Brian; Priestley, Caroline M; Rogers, Peter J

    2014-03-01

    Background: Disruptive effects of caffeine on sleep have previously been reported, although measures of next-day mood and performance have rarely been included. The present study aims to evaluate the effects of caffeine on sleep and associated next-day effects in a naturalistic field setting. Methods: Nineteen participants (daily caffeine intake 0-141 mg), assessed as good sleepers, took part in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, 2-week crossover study to assess the effects of bedtime caffeine use (250 mg) on sleep and next-day cognitive performance and mood, which were assessed on a mobile phone in the morning and afternoon. Sleep was assessed objectively (actiwatch) and subjectively (sleep diary). Results: Caffeine's effects on sleep were largely restricted to the first day of administration, with actigraphically measured reduced sleep efficiency, increased activity score and fragmentation index, decreased self-rated sleep quality, and an increased occurrence of participants waking early; only decreased sleep efficiency remained over the week. Effects on next-day performance and mood were evident over the whole week, although despite disrupting sleep, accuracy on a working memory task was higher after caffeine than placebo administration. Conclusions: Caffeine disrupted sleep, although when assessing next-day performance, which may have been affected by the presence of residual caffeine, performance appeared better after caffeine compared to placebo, although this was most likely due to prevention of the effects of overnight withdrawal from caffeine rather than representing a net benefit. Furthermore, partial tolerance developed to the effects of caffeine on sleep.

  19. Towards a naturalistic brain-machine interface: hybrid torque and position control allows generalization to novel dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratik Y Chhatbar

    Full Text Available Realization of reaching and grasping movements by a paralytic person or an amputee would greatly facilitate her/his activities of daily living. Towards this goal, control of a computer cursor or robotic arm using neural signals has been demonstrated in rodents, non-human primates and humans. This technology is commonly referred to as a Brain-Machine Interface (BMI and is achieved by predictions of kinematic parameters, e.g. position or velocity. However, execution of natural movements, such as swinging baseball bats of different weights at the same speed, requires advanced planning for necessary context-specific forces in addition to kinematic control. Here we show, for the first time, the control of a virtual arm with representative inertial parameters using real-time neural control of torques in non-human primates (M. radiata. We found that neural control of torques leads to ballistic, possibly more naturalistic movements than position control alone, and that adding the influence of position in a hybrid torque-position control changes the feedforward behavior of these BMI movements. In addition, this level of control was achievable utilizing the neural recordings from either contralateral or ipsilateral M1. We also observed changed behavior of hybrid torque-position control under novel external dynamic environments that was comparable to natural movements. Our results demonstrate that inclusion of torque control to drive a neuroprosthetic device gives the user a more direct handle on the movement execution, especially when dealing with novel or changing dynamic environments. We anticipate our results to be a starting point of more sophisticated algorithms for sensorimotor neuroprostheses, eliminating the need of fully automatic kinematic-to-dynamic transformations as currently used by traditional kinematic-based decoders. Thus, we propose that direct control of torques, or other force related variables, should allow for more natural

  20. Prospective and concurrent correlates of emotion perception in psychotic disorders: a naturalistic, longitudinal study of neurocognition, affective blunting and avolition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaskinn, Anja; Johnsen, Erik; Jørgensen, Hugo A; Kroken, Rune A; Løberg, Else-Marie

    2013-06-01

    This naturalistic study investigated longitudinal and cross-sectional symptomatic and neurocognitive correlates of social cognition indexed by emotion perception. Participants were 31 persons admitted to a psychiatric emergency ward due to acute psychosis. Positive and negative (i.e., affective blunting and avolition) symptoms were assessed at baseline and 12-month follow-up using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Participants completed neuropsychological assessments with alternative versions of the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status at baseline and at 12-month follow-up. Emotion perception was measured using the Face/Voice Emotion Test at 12-month follow-up. Correlational analyses (Spearman's rho) revealed strong and statistically significant associations between neurocognition and emotion perception (baseline r = 0.58, follow-up r = 0.43). Associations between positive symptoms and emotion perception were weak or non-existent (baseline r = 0.13, follow-up r  =  -0.01). Emotion perception was moderately, but not significantly, associated with affective blunting at follow-up (r = 0.33), but not at baseline (r = 0.21). The association with avolition was non-existent (baseline r  =  -0.05, follow-up r = 0.01). This study supports the notion that emotion perception has neurocognitive correlates. The cross-sectional trend level association with affective blunting suggests that the ability to perceive emotions might be related to, but dissociable from the ability to express emotions.

  1. Environmental enrichment models a naturalistic form of maternal separation and shapes the anxiety response patterns of offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, E J; Migliore, M M; Pillsbury, S L; Shaik, A N; Kentner, A C

    2015-02-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) mimics positive life experiences by providing enhanced social and physical stimulation. Placement into EE following weaning, or in later life, confers beneficial outcomes on both emotional and cognitive processes. However, anxiety-like behavior is also reported, particularly in rats exposed to enhanced housing during early development. Notably, the quality of maternal behavior affects stress regulation and emotional stability in offspring, yet the impact of environmental context on maternal care has not been thoroughly evaluated, or are the influences of EE on their offspring understood. To investigate the role of EE on these factors we analyzed the details of mother-neonate interactions, and juvenile offspring performance on several anxiety measures. Additionally, we evaluated neurochemical differences (i.e. serotonin, corticosterone, GABA, glutamate) in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus as a function of EE, Communal Nesting (CN) and Standard Care (SC). Although EE dams spent significantly less time on the nest and had lower nursing frequencies compared to SC dams, there were no differences in maternal licking/grooming. In offspring, EE increased GLUR1 level and GABA concentrations in the prefrontal cortex of both juvenile male and female rats. A similar pattern for glutamate was only observed in males. Although EE offspring spent less time on the open arms of the elevated plus maze and had faster escape latencies in a light-dark test, there were no other indications of anxiety-like behavior on these measures or when engaged in social interaction with a conspecific. In the wild, rats live in complicated and variable environments. Consequently dams must leave their nest to defend and forage, limiting their duration of direct contact. EE exposure in early development may mimic this naturalistic maternal separation, shaping parental behavior and offspring resiliency to stressors.

  2. The Goal Trumps the Means: Highlighting Goals is More Beneficial than Highlighting Means in Means-End Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Sarah A.; Woodward, Amanda L.

    2013-01-01

    Means-end actions are an early-emerging form of problem solving. These actions require initiating initial behaviors with a goal in mind. In this study, we explored the origins of 8-month-old infants' means-end action production using a cloth-pulling training paradigm. We examined whether highlighting the goal (toy) or the means (cloth) was more…

  3. Earth Science Week 2009, "Understanding Climate", Highlights and News Clippings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robeck, Edward C. [American Geological Inst., Alexandria, VA (United States)

    2010-01-05

    The American Geological Institute (AGI) proposes to expand its influential Earth Science Week Program in 2009, with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy, to disseminate DOE's key messages, information, and resources on climate education and to include new program components. These components, ranging from online resources to live events and professional networks, would significantly increase the reach and impact of AGI's already successful geoscience education and public awareness effort in the United States and abroad in 2009, when the campaign's theme will be "Understanding Climate."

  4. Size from Specular Highlights for Analyzing Droplet Size Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalba, Andrei C.; Westenberg, Michel A.; Grooten, Mart H. M.

    In mechanical engineering, heat-transfer models by dropwise condensation are under development. The condensation process is captured by taking many pictures, which show the formation of droplets, of which the size distribution and area coverage are of interest for model improvement. The current analysis method relies on manual measurements, which is time consuming. In this paper, we propose an approach to automatically extract the positions and radii of the droplets from an image. Our method relies on specular highlights that are visible on the surfaces of the droplets. We show that these highlights can be reliably extracted, and that they provide sufficient information to infer the droplet size. The results obtained by our method compare favorably with those obtained by laborious and careful manual measurements. The processing time per image is reduced by two orders of magnitude.

  5. An annual topic highlight: Alcohol and liver, 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natalia A Osna

    2011-01-01

    An annual topic highlight: Alcohol and Liver, 2011, covers the important and new aspects of pathogenesis of alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). It includes broad topics ranging from the exacerbation of ALD by infectious (viral) agents (hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus) to the influence of alcohol on liver fibrogenesis, lipid rafts, autophagy and other aspects. This issue is recommended for both basic scientists and clinicians who are involved in alcoholic liver research.

  6. Ten Highlights of the Fifth Beijing International Music Festival

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Beijing International Music Festival has been successfully held for four times and gained considerable reputation at home and abroad. On October 11, this annual art event was launched again in Beijing, but with notable changes. It is no longer a gathering of master artists playing classic works. Instead, in light of international practice, the festival begins to highlight new productions and trends and put more emphasis on diversification and localization

  7. Recent results and highlights from the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00211911; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    After a 2-year stop for the upgrade of the detector, since 2015 the ATLAS collaboration has collected data for over 20 fb$^{-1}$ at 13 TeV centre-of-mass energy of pp collisions at the LHC. In this talk a summary of recent measurements of Higgs boson properties, BSM Higgs searches and the status with the resonance at 750 GeV will be presented. Also some of most recent SM and electroweak results will be highlighted.

  8. Highlights on eclipsing binary variables from Araucaria Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karczmarek Paulina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Araucaria Project, which main goal is to provide precise determination of the cosmic distance scale, has recently made a set of discoveries involving variable stars in binary systems. Among these discoveries we highlight three: 1% precise measurement of a Cepheid's dynamical mass and its projection factor, accurate determination of both stellar and orbital parameters of eclipsing binary consisting of two Cepheid variables, and discovery of new class of variable stars, mimicking RR Lyrae pulsators.

  9. Tourette syndrome research highlights 2015 [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl A. Richards

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We present selected highlights from research that appeared during 2015 on Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. Topics include phenomenology, comorbidities, developmental course, genetics, animal models, neuroimaging, electrophysiology, pharmacology, and treatment. We briefly summarize articles whose results we believe may lead to new treatments, additional research or modifications in current models of TS.

  10. The hair color-highlighting burn: a unique burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, W

    2000-01-01

    A unique, preventable, 2.8 x 3.7-cm, full-thickness scalp burn resulted after a woman underwent a professional color-highlighting procedure at a hair salon. The burn appeared to result from scalp contact with aluminum foil that had been overheated by a hair dryer during the procedure. The wound required debridement and skin grafting and 3 subsequent serial excisions to eliminate the resulting area of burn scar alopecia. The preventive aspects of this injury are discussed.

  11. Recent results and highlights from the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Caforio, Davide; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    After a 2-year stop for the upgrade of the detector, since 2015 the ATLAS collaboration has collected data for over 20 fb-1 at 13 TeV centre-of-mass energy of pp collisions at the LHC. In this talk a summary of recent measurements of Higgs boson properties, BSM Higgs searches and the situation with the resonance at 750 GeV will be presented. Also some of most recent SM and Electroweak results will be highlighted.

  12. Spring Research Festival Highlighted on WHAG-TV | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    WHAG-TV (Hagerstown, Md.) visited Fort Detrick to highlight the 2015 Spring Research Festival (SRF), sponsored by the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR). Visit the WHAG-TV website to see the video broadcast, which aired May 6. The video was produced by WHAG Reporter Mallory Sofastaii. The video featured Linganore High School senior Rebecca Matthews, a Werner H. Kirsten student intern in the Human Retrovirus Pathogenesis Section, Vaccine Branch, NCI Center for Cancer Research; Lanessa Hill, public affairs specialist,

  13. The Frequency of "Brilliant" and "Genius" in Teaching Evaluations Predicts the Representation of Women and African Americans across Fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Storage

    Full Text Available Women and African Americans-groups targeted by negative stereotypes about their intellectual abilities-may be underrepresented in careers that prize brilliance and genius. A recent nationwide survey of academics provided initial support for this possibility. Fields whose practitioners believed that natural talent is crucial for success had fewer female and African American PhDs. The present study seeks to replicate this initial finding with a different, and arguably more naturalistic, measure of the extent to which brilliance and genius are prized within a field. Specifically, we measured field-by-field variability in the emphasis on these intellectual qualities by tallying-with the use of a recently released online tool-the frequency of the words "brilliant" and "genius" in over 14 million reviews on RateMyProfessors.com, a popular website where students can write anonymous evaluations of their instructors. This simple word count predicted both women's and African Americans' representation across the academic spectrum. That is, we found that fields in which the words "brilliant" and "genius" were used more frequently on RateMyProfessors.com also had fewer female and African American PhDs. Looking at an earlier stage in students' educational careers, we found that brilliance-focused fields also had fewer women and African Americans obtaining bachelor's degrees. These relationships held even when accounting for field-specific averages on standardized mathematics assessments, as well as several competing hypotheses concerning group differences in representation. The fact that this naturalistic measure of a field's focus on brilliance predicted the magnitude of its gender and race gaps speaks to the tight link between ability beliefs and diversity.

  14. The Frequency of "Brilliant" and "Genius" in Teaching Evaluations Predicts the Representation of Women and African Americans across Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storage, Daniel; Horne, Zachary; Cimpian, Andrei; Leslie, Sarah-Jane

    2016-01-01

    Women and African Americans-groups targeted by negative stereotypes about their intellectual abilities-may be underrepresented in careers that prize brilliance and genius. A recent nationwide survey of academics provided initial support for this possibility. Fields whose practitioners believed that natural talent is crucial for success had fewer female and African American PhDs. The present study seeks to replicate this initial finding with a different, and arguably more naturalistic, measure of the extent to which brilliance and genius are prized within a field. Specifically, we measured field-by-field variability in the emphasis on these intellectual qualities by tallying-with the use of a recently released online tool-the frequency of the words "brilliant" and "genius" in over 14 million reviews on RateMyProfessors.com, a popular website where students can write anonymous evaluations of their instructors. This simple word count predicted both women's and African Americans' representation across the academic spectrum. That is, we found that fields in which the words "brilliant" and "genius" were used more frequently on RateMyProfessors.com also had fewer female and African American PhDs. Looking at an earlier stage in students' educational careers, we found that brilliance-focused fields also had fewer women and African Americans obtaining bachelor's degrees. These relationships held even when accounting for field-specific averages on standardized mathematics assessments, as well as several competing hypotheses concerning group differences in representation. The fact that this naturalistic measure of a field's focus on brilliance predicted the magnitude of its gender and race gaps speaks to the tight link between ability beliefs and diversity.

  15. The American Chicle Youth Poll: A Landmark Study on the Attitudes of American Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper Organization, Inc., New York, NY.

    Presented are findings of a 1986 national survey of 1000 American students between the ages of 8 and 17 years. Face-to-face interviews focused on youths' perceptions of their families, their schools, and major social issues confronting them. After a preview highlighting important findings, in-depth results and commentary are offered with…

  16. Allan Brooks, naturalist and artist (1869-1946): the travails of an early twentieth century wildlife illustrator in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winearls, Joan

    2008-01-01

    British by birth Allan Cyril Brooks (1869-1946) emigrated to Canada in the 1880s, and became one of the most important North American bird illustrators during the first half of the twentieth century. Brooks was one of the leading ornithologists and wildlife collectors of the time; he corresponded extensively with other ornithologists and supplied specimens to many major North American museums. From the 1890s on he hoped to support himself by painting birds and mammals, but this was not possible in Canada at that time and he was forced to turn to American sources for illustration commissions. His work can be compared with that of his contemporary, the leading American bird painter Louis Agassiz Fuertes (1874-1927), and there are striking similarities and differences in their careers. This paper discusses the work of a talented, self-taught wildlife artist working in a North American milieu, his difficulties and successes in a newly developing field, and his quest for Canadian recognition.

  17. Early Nonresponse Determined by the Clinical Global Impressions Scale Predicts Poorer Outcomes in Youth with Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders Naturalistically Treated with Second-Generation Antipsychotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stentebjerg-Olesen, Marie; Jeppesen, Pia; Pagsberg, Anne K

    2013-01-01

    , treated naturalistically with aripiprazole, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, or ziprasidone and evaluated monthly, were divided into ER/ENR groups at week 4, using at least "minimally improved" on the CGI-I scale. Prediction using week 4 ER/ENR status for UR (CGI-I=at least "much improved......"), effectiveness and adverse effect outcomes at 8-12 weeks were assessed. Results: At 4 weeks, 45.6% of subjects were ER and 54.4% were ENR without differences regarding baseline demographic, illness, and treatment variables, except for higher age (p=0.034) and maximum risperidone dose (p=0.0043) in ENR. ER...

  18. The Impact of Driver Inattention on Near-Crash/Crash Risk: An Analysis Using the 100-Car Naturalistic Driving Study Data

    OpenAIRE

    Klauer, Sheila G.; Dingus, Thomas A.; Neale, Vicki L.; Sudweeks, Jeremy D.; Ramsey, D J

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to conduct in-depth analyses of driver inattention using the driving data collected in the 100-Car Naturalistic Driving Study. An additional database of baseline epochs was reduced from the raw data and used in conjunction with the crash and near-crash data identified as part of the original 100-Car Study to account for exposure and establish near-crash/crash risk. The analyses presented in this report are able to establish direct relationships between driving b...

  19. "自然主义谬误":从摩尔到胡塞尔%The Naturalist Fallacy: From Moore to Husserl

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜青山

    2008-01-01

    @@ 由摩尔首度使用的"自然主义谬误" (the naturalistic fallacy) 一词,已经频繁而不无误导性地与关于"是一应该"关系的休谟问题联系起来,进而与事实和价值二分的教条联系起来;实际上,人们通常就是通过事实和价值二分的教条来理解"自然主义谬误"的 (Walter,p.33).

  20. Ranking Highlights in Personal Videos by Analyzing Edited Videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Min; Farhadi, Ali; Chen, Tseng-Hung; Seitz, Steve

    2016-11-01

    We present a fully automatic system for ranking domain-specific highlights in unconstrained personal videos by analyzing online edited videos. A novel latent linear ranking model is proposed to handle noisy training data harvested online. Specifically, given a targeted domain such as "surfing," our system mines the YouTube database to find pairs of raw and their corresponding edited videos. Leveraging the assumption that an edited video is more likely to contain highlights than the trimmed parts of the raw video, we obtain pair-wise ranking constraints to train our model. The learning task is challenging due to the amount of noise and variation in the mined data. Hence, a latent loss function is incorporated to mitigate the issues caused by the noise. We efficiently learn the latent model on a large number of videos (about 870 min in total) using a novel EM-like procedure. Our latent ranking model outperforms its classification counterpart and is fairly competitive compared with a fully supervised ranking system that requires labels from Amazon Mechanical Turk. We further show that a state-of-the-art audio feature mel-frequency cepstral coefficients is inferior to a state-of-the-art visual feature. By combining both audio-visual features, we obtain the best performance in dog activity, surfing, skating, and viral video domains. Finally, we show that impressive highlights can be detected without additional human supervision for seven domains (i.e., skating, surfing, skiing, gymnastics, parkour, dog activity, and viral video) in unconstrained personal videos.

  1. Highlights of the GURI hydroelectric plant computer control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dal Monte, R.; Banakar, H.; Hoffman, R.; Lebeau, M.; Schroeder, R.

    1988-07-01

    The GURI power plant on the Caroni river in Venezuela has 20 generating units with a total capacity of 10,000 MW, the largest currently operating in the world. The GURI Computer Control System (GCS) provides for comprehensive operation management of the entire power plant and the adjacent switchyards. This article describes some highlights of the functions of the state-of-the-art system. The topics considered include the operating modes of the remote terminal units (RTUs), automatic start/stop of generating units, RTU closed-loop control, automatic generation and voltage control, unit commitment, operator training stimulator, and maintenance management.

  2. Highlights of the SM Physics at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Haijun; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    This talk shows the recent highlights of the SM physics from the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC. It includes the precision measurements of diboson, triboson, vector boson scattering, and indirect search for new physics via anomalous triple/quartic gauge boson couplings etc. Some latest results from LHC Run2 @ 13 TeV will also be presented. The talk was invited to present at the 5th KIAS Workshop on Particle Physics and Cosmology in Seoul on November 9-13, 2015.

  3. Hot subluminous stars: Highlights from the MUCHFUSS and Kepler missions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geier S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Research into hot subdwarf stars is progressing rapidly. We present recent important discoveries. First we review the knowledge about magnetic fields in hot subdwarfs and highlight the first detection of a highly-magnetic, helium-rich sdO star. We briefly summarize recent discoveries based on Kepler light curves and finally introduce the closest known sdB+WD binary discovered by the MUCHFUSS project and discuss its relevance as a progenitor of a double-detonation type Ia supernova.

  4. Highlights from PHENIX-I: initial state and early times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitch, Michael J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We will review the latest physics developments from PHENIX concentrating on cold nuclear matter effects, the initial state for heavy-ion collisions, and probes of the earliest stages of the hot-dense medium created in those collisions. Recent physics results from p + p and d + Au collisions; and from direct photons, quarkonia and low-mass vector mesons in A+A collisions will be highlighted. Insights from these measurements into the characteristics of the initial state and about the earliest times in heavy-ion collisions will be discussed.

  5. Touchstone Stars: Highlights from the Cool Stars 18 Splinter Session

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, Andrew W; Boyajian, Tabetha; Gaidos, Eric; von Braun, Kaspar; Feiden, Gregory A; Metcalfe, Travis; Swift, Jonathan J; Curtis, Jason L; Deacon, Niall R; Filippazzo, Joseph C; Gillen, Ed; Hejazi, Neda; Newton, Elisabeth R

    2014-01-01

    We present a summary of the splinter session on "touchstone stars" -- stars with directly measured parameters -- that was organized as part of the Cool Stars 18 conference. We discuss several methods to precisely determine cool star properties such as masses and radii from eclipsing binaries, and radii and effective temperatures from interferometry. We highlight recent results in identifying and measuring parameters for touchstone stars, and ongoing efforts to use touchstone stars to determine parameters for other stars. We conclude by comparing the results of touchstone stars with cool star models, noting some unusual patterns in the differences.

  6. Secretary's annual report to Congress. Volume II. Budget highlights, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    DOE budget requests for FY 1982 is summarized and then detailed. Budget highlights of the energy programs include: conservation; research, development, and applications (fossil energy, solar, electric energy and energy storage systems, magnetic fusion, nuclear fission, environment); regulation and energy information; direct energy production, and strategic petroleum reserves. Additional programs and their budget requests are given for: general science, defense activities, and departmental administration. The FY 1981 supplemental and recission request is indicated. Special budget analyses are given for Federal fossil, Federal solar, nuclear waste, conservation, and alternative fuels activities programs. The organizational table is presented. Extensive statistics are presented in the appendix. (MCW)

  7. GREAT Highlights from the SOFIA Early Science Flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinnecker, Hans; Gusten, R.; GREAT Team

    2012-01-01

    Since its first light on April 01, the German REceiver for Astronomy at TeraHertz Frequencies (GREAT) has flown more than a dozen SOFIA science flights both for US and German proposals. The spectrometer was operated routinely in its low frequency configurations, for sky frequencies between 1.25 and 1.5 THz (L1 channel) and 1.81-1.91 THz (L2 channel). During a GREAT engineering flight, the 2.5 THz OH ground-state transition was successfully observed. We will summarize the science opportunities with GREAT and present highlights from these Early Science flights.

  8. Two interesting cases highlighting an oblivious specialty of psychoneuroendocrinology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. S. Hari kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychoneuroendocrinology deals with the overlap disorders pertaining to three different specialties. Awareness about the somatic manifestations of psychiatric diseases and vice versa is a must for all the clinicians. The knowledge of this interlinked specialty is essential because of the obscure presentation of certain disorders. Our first case was treated as depressive disorder, whereas the diagnosis was hypogonadism with empty sella. Our second patient was managed as schizophrenia and the evaluation revealed bilateral basal ganglia calcification and a diagnosis of Fahr′s disease. We report these cases for their unusual presentation and to highlight the importance of this emerging specialty.

  9. Realizing a Clean Energy Future: Highlights of NREL Analysis (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-12-01

    Profound energy system transformation is underway. In Hawaiian mythology, Maui set out to lasso the sun in order to capture its energy. He succeeded. That may have been the most dramatic leap forward in clean energy systems that the world has known. Until now. Today, another profound transformation is underway. A combination of forces is taking us from a carbon-centric, inefficient energy system to one that draws from diverse energy sources - including the sun. NREL analysis is helping guide energy systems policy and investment decisions through this transformation. This brochure highlights NREL analysis accomplishments in the context of four thematic storylines.

  10. The social functional outcome of being naturalistically treated with paliperidone extended-release in patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakagawa R

    2015-06-01

    had AEs and 8.75% of patients had serious AEs. Despite the recommendation of monotherapy with PAL-ER, 65.84% of patients were given additional antipsychotics (polypharmacy. Post hoc comparisons of monotherapy versus polypharmacy revealed that the monotherapy group had better outcomes and fewer AEs than the polypharmacy treated group. The improvement in social functioning and the rate of socially functional remission did not differ between groups.Conclusion: PAL-ER treatment showed effective symptom control and improvement in social functioning. The data suggest that early response to antipsychotic treatment should be important for functional outcomes.Keywords: paliperidone, social function, schizophrenia, naturalistic study

  11. Suicidality and symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and agitation in patients experiencing manic episodes with depressive symptoms: a naturalistic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eberhard J

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Jonas Eberhard,1 Emmanuelle Weiller2 1Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; 2H. Lundbeck A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark Purpose: Patients with a bipolar I disorder (BD-I manic episode meeting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5, criteria for “with mixed features” have a high incidence of suicide attempts and of anxiety, irritability, and agitation (AIA symptoms. The aim of this analysis was to explore the relationship between suicidality and AIA symptoms in patients with BD-I experiencing mania with depressive symptoms, using data from a previous naturalistic study.Patients and methods: Psychiatrists completed an online questionnaire about their adult patients who had a current BD-I manic episode. Questions covered the DSM-5 “with mixed features” specifier, the severity of AIA symptoms, the frequency and controllability of suicidal ideation, and the number of suicide attempts.Results: Of 1,035 patients with BD-I mania who were included in the analyses, 348 (33.6% met the criteria for the DSM-5 “with mixed features” specifier (three or more depressive symptoms. These patients were further stratified according to the severity of their AIA symptoms: “mild AIA” (zero or one AIA symptom above a severity threshold; 105 patients or “severe AIA” (all three AIA symptoms above a severity threshold; 167 patients. A greater incidence of suicidal ideation was observed in the severe AIA group (71.9% than in the mild AIA group (47.6%. Twice as many patients had easily controlled suicidal ideation than difficult-to-control suicidal ideation in both subgroups. The mean number of suicide attempts was higher in the severe AIA group than in the mild AIA group, during the current episode (0.84 vs 0.34 attempts, respectively; P<0.05 and over the patient’s lifetime (1.56 vs 1.04 attempts, respectively.Conclusion: The high risk of suicide among BD-I mania patients with depressive

  12. The clinical-familial correlates and naturalistic outcome of panic-disorder-agoraphobia with and without lifetime bipolar II comorbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Cristina

    2008-11-01

    complexity of the clinical picture in this naturalistic study. That such complexity does not seem to translate into poorer response and outcome in those with comorbid soft bipolarity probably reflects the fact that we had brought BP-II under control with mood stabilizers. We discuss the implications of our findings as further evidence for the existence of a distinct anxious-bipolar diathesis.

  13. Coated Particle and Deep Burn Fuels Monthly Highlights December 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    During FY 2011 the CP & DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for November 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/323, was distributed to program participants on December 9, 2010. The final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Core Design Optimization in the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor) Pebble Bed Design (INL), (c) Radiation Damage and Properties; (2) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU (transuranic elements) Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; (3) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing (ORNL); (4) Fuel Performance and Analytical Analysis - Fuel Performance Modeling (ORNL).

  14. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FY2003 Annual Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Editors: Carol A. Phillips; Anthony R. DeMeo

    2004-08-23

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FY2003 Annual Highlights report provides a summary of the activities at the Laboratory for the fiscal year--1 October 2002 through 30 September 2003. The report includes the Laboratory's Mission and Vision Statements, a message ''From the Director,'' summaries of the research and engineering activities by project, and sections on Technology Transfer, the Graduate and Science Education Programs, Awards and Honors garnered by the Laboratory and the employees, and the Year in Pictures. There is also a listing of the Laboratory's publications for the year and a section of the abbreviations, acronyms, and symbols used throughout the report. In the PDF document, links have been created from the Table of Contents to each section. You can also return to the Table of Contents from the beginning page of each section. The PPPL Highlights for fiscal year 2003 is also available in hardcopy format. To obtain a copy e-mail Publications and Reports at: pub-reports@pppl.gov. Be sure to include your complete mailing address

  15. CO2 Emissions From Fuel Combustion. Highlights. 2013 Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-01

    In the lead-up to the UN climate negotiations in Warsaw, the latest information on the level and growth of CO2 emissions, their source and geographic distribution will be essential to lay the foundation for a global agreement. To provide input to and support for the UN process, the IEA is making available for free download the ''Highlights'' version of CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion now for sale on IEA Bookshop. This annual publication contains, for more than 140 countries and regions: estimates of CO2 emissions from 1971 to 2011; selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh; a decomposition of CO2 emissions into driving factors; and CO2emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, key sources, and other relevant information. The nineteenth session of the Conference of the Parties to the Climate Change Convention (COP-19), in conjunction with the ninth meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (CMP 9), met in Warsaw, Poland from 11 to 22 November 2013. This volume of ''Highlights'', drawn from the full-scale study, was specially designed for delegations and observers of the meeting in Warsaw.

  16. The relationship between Mexican American cultural values and resilience among Mexican American college students: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan Consoli, Melissa L; Llamas, Jasmin D

    2013-10-01

    The current study investigated the role of cultural values in the resilience of Mexican American college students. Utilizing mixed methodology, 124 self-identified Mexican American college students were asked to complete an online survey, including a demographic questionnaire, the Resilience Scale, Mexican American Cultural Values Scale, and 2 open-ended questions concerning overcoming adversity and cultural values. As hypothesized, Mexican American traditional cultural values (Familismo, Respeto, Religiosidad, and Traditional Gender Roles) predicted resilience, with Familismo accounting for the majority of the variance. Consensual qualitative research (Hill, Thompson, & Nutt Williams, 1997) was used to identify emergent domains and themes within the open-ended question responses. Traditional Mexican American Value themes included Familismo, Ethnic Identity, Religiosidad, Perseverance, and Respeto. Results highlight the important role that certain Mexican American cultural values play in providing strength for overcoming adversities.

  17. American Vitiligo Research Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... life can acquire vitiligo Welcome to The American Vitiligo Foundation 2017 AVRF Calendars Order your calendar with ... animal testing. Please Visit Our Donations Page American Vitiligo Research Foundation "We Walk By Faith, Not By ...

  18. Depression and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here Home » Depression And African Americans Depression And African Americans Not “Just the Blues” Clinical ... or spiritual communities. Commonly Asked Questions about Clinical Depression How do I get help for clinical depression? ...

  19. American Hospice Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Hospice Foundation Skip to content Home Caregiving Learning About Hospice Grief Grieving Children Grief at School Grief at ... for all who come after us. The American Hospice Foundation (AHF) closed its doors in June 2014. ...

  20. Obesity and Hispanic Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Obesity Obesity and Hispanic Americans Among Mexican American women, 77 ... ss6304.pdf [PDF | 3.38MB] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY More than 80 percent of people with type ...

  1. Obesity and Asian Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Asian American > Obesity Obesity and Asian Americans Non-Hispanic whites are 60% ... youthonline . [Accessed 05/25/2016] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY More than 80 percent of people with type ...

  2. American Society of Echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Society of Echocardiography Join Ase Member Portal Log In Membership Member Portal Log In Join ASE Renew Benefits Rates FASE – Fellow of the American Society of Echocardiography Member Referral Program FAQs Initiatives Advocacy ...

  3. American Urogynecologic Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Site » PFD Registry » Contact Us American Urogynecologic Society 1100 Wayne Avenue, Suite 670 Silver Spring, MD ... Us | Privacy Policy | HONcode Accredited © 2016 American Urogynecologic Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Asthma and Hispanic Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Asthma Asthma and Hispanic Americans In 2014, 2.1 million Hispanics reported that they currently have asthma. Puerto Rican Americans have almost twice the asthma ...

  5. Heart Disease and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Heart Disease Heart Disease and African Americans Although African American adults are ... were 30 percent more likely to die from heart disease than non-Hispanic whites. African American women are ...

  6. Stress: a naturalistic proposal

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Some of the stress related topics, especially from the conceptual framework of Lazarus and Folkman are reviewed on this work. It is sustained that this approach is dualistic and that the research made from this view is made on the basis of morphological criteria that don’t allow studying important elements of this kind of behavior. From an interbehavioral approach three functional criteria are proposed to study this phenomenon: the functional nature of situations, aptitude levels of behavior,...

  7. Stress: a naturalistic proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de Lourdes Rodríguez Campuzano

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Some of the stress related topics, especially from the conceptual framework of Lazarus and Folkman are reviewed on this work. It is sustained that this approach is dualistic and that the research made from this view is made on the basis of morphological criteria that don’t allow studying important elements of this kind of behavior. From an interbehavioral approach three functional criteria are proposed to study this phenomenon: the functional nature of situations, aptitude levels of behavior, and its three dimensions. Emphasis is made on the singular and individual nature of stress reactions. Finally it is suggested to take into account these functional criteria to develop a generic situational taxonomy to study these reactions as parts of complex behavioral patterns.

  8. A Glimpse of American Society through the American TV Drama Series"the Desperate Housewives"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jia-wei

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents an analytical study on the American society through a popular American drama series"the Desper-ate House Wives". Typical American values can be found everywhere on the show as they have been ingrained in the soul of the American people. As a nation with not very long history but great achievements, its people are the one that should be highlight-ed. Unlike China, the nation of which have formed since thousands of years ago, so has its culture, America ’s history is an immi-gration history. People started migrating from other parts of the world since the 17th century and gathered at the land of America to build up their new homes and realize their dreams. They influence each other and fuse with each other. America is one of the countries in the world that plural cultures successfully mix together.The paper focuses on the American people ’s daily life to explain to the readers the American traits and values prevailing in their society. Except the Foreword which is the general intro-duction to the paper, this paper is presented in five parts. The first part to the forth part are the emphasis of the paper which re-spectively analyze the American traits and values. A series of vivid examples are provided with a wide range of study objects, man and woman, kids to elders, in hope of making the paper understandable and persuasive. It is expected that the study can offer a general idea to the people who are interested in the American society and its people.

  9. Children's expressions of positive emotion are sustained by smiling, touching, and playing with parents and siblings: A naturalistic observational study of family life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Sunhye; Repetti, Rena L; Sperling, Jacqueline B

    2016-01-01

    Research on family socialization of positive emotion has primarily focused on the infant and toddler stages of development, and relied on observations of parent-child interactions in highly structured laboratory environments. Little is known about how children's spontaneous expressions of positive emotion are maintained in the uncontrolled settings of daily life, particularly within the family and during the school-age years. This naturalistic observational study examines 3 family behaviors-mutual display of positive emotion, touch, and joint leisure-that surround 8- to 12-year-old children's spontaneous expressions of positive emotion, and tests whether these behaviors help to sustain children's expressions. Recordings taken of 31 families in their homes and communities over 2 days were screened for moments when children spontaneously expressed positive emotion in the presence of at least 1 parent. Children were more likely to sustain their expressions of positive emotion when mothers, fathers, or siblings showed positive emotion, touched, or participated in a leisure activity. There were few differences in the ways that mothers and fathers socialized their sons' and daughters' positive emotion expressions. This study takes a unique, ecologically valid approach to assess how family members connect to children's expressions of positive emotion in middle childhood. Future observational studies should continue to explore mechanisms of family socialization of positive emotion, in laboratory and naturalistic settings. (PsycINFO Database Record

  10. Technology meets research 60 years of CERN technology : selected highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Thomas; Treille, Daniel; Wenninger, Horst

    2017-01-01

    "Big" science and advanced technology are known to cross-fertilize. This book emphasizes the interplay between particle physics and technology at CERN that has led to breakthroughs in both research and technology over the laboratory's first 60 years. The innovations, often the work of individuals or by small teams, are illustrated with highlights describing selected technologies from the domains of accelerators and detectors. The book also presents the framework and conditions prevailing at CERN that enabled spectacular advances in technology and contributed to propel the European organization into the league of leading research laboratories in the world. While the book is specifically aimed at providing information for the technically interested general public, more expert readers may also appreciate the broad variety of subjects presented. Ample references are given for those who wish to further explore a given topic.

  11. CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion 2011: Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    How much CO2 are countries emitting? Where is it coming from? In the lead-up to the UN climate negotiations in Durban, the latest information on the level and growth of CO2 emissions, their source and geographic distribution will be essential to lay the foundation for a global agreement. To provide input to and support for the UN process the IEA is making available for free download the 'Highlights' version of CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion. This annual publication contains: - estimates of CO2 emissions by country from 1971 to 2009; - selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh; - CO2 emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information. These estimates have been calculated using the IEA energy databases and the default methods and emission factors from the Revised 1996 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories.

  12. CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion - 2012 Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    How much CO2 are countries emitting? Where is it coming from? In the lead-up to the UN climate negotiations in Doha, the latest information on the level and growth of CO2 emissions, their source and geographic distribution will be essential to lay the foundation for a global agreement. To provide input to and support for the UN process the IEA is making available for free download the 'Highlights' version of CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion. This annual publication contains: estimates of CO2 emissions by country from 1971 to 2010; selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh; and CO2 emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information.

  13. Replication data collection highlights value in diversity of replication attempts

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSoto, K. Andrew; Schweinsberg, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Researchers agree that replicability and reproducibility are key aspects of science. A collection of Data Descriptors published in Scientific Data presents data obtained in the process of attempting to replicate previously published research. These new replication data describe published and unpublished projects. The different papers in this collection highlight the many ways that scientific replications can be conducted, and they reveal the benefits and challenges of crucial replication research. The organizers of this collection encourage scientists to reuse the data contained in the collection for their own work, and also believe that these replication examples can serve as educational resources for students, early-career researchers, and experienced scientists alike who are interested in learning more about the process of replication. PMID:28291224

  14. Antibacterial agents: patent highlights January to June 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Oludotun A

    2004-08-01

    This review presents highlights of 32 patents, published between January and June 2004, detailing different classes of antibacterial agents. Disclosures on novel oxazolidinone derivatives with antibacterial activity continue to dominate patent publications in recent years. Novel oxazolidinone derivatives active against linezolid-resistant cocci are reviewed. Patents on beta-lactam antibiotics focused mainly on developing new processes and formulations to improve cost, purity and pharmacokinetic parameters of existing clinical agents. Disclosures on novel potential dual-acting macrolide-quinolone hybrids designed to overcome erythromycin resistance, and new macrolide derivatives with antimycobacterial activity are described. Also presented are novel antibacterial agents, including peptide deformylase and cell-wall inhibitors, and those with undefined mechanisms of action as potential lead compounds, as well as quinolone and quinoline derivatives.

  15. Women in evolution - highlighting the changing face of evolutionary biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellenreuther, Maren; Otto, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The face of science has changed. Women now feature alongside men at the forefront of many fields, and this is particularly true in evolutionary biology. This special issue celebrates the outstanding achievements and contributions of women in evolutionary biology, by highlighting a sample of their research and accomplishments. In addition to original research contributions, this collection of articles contains personal reflections to provide perspective and advice on succeeding as a woman in science. By showcasing the diversity and research excellence of women and drawing on their experiences, we wish to enhance the visibility of female scientists and provide inspiration as well as role models. These are exciting times for evolutionary biology, and the field is richer and stronger for the diversity of voices contributing to the field.

  16. FY 1995 research highlights: PNL accomplishments in OER programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducts fundamental and applied research in support of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) core missions in science and technology, environmental quality, energy resources, and national security. Much of this research is funded by the program offices of DOE`s Office of Energy Research (DOE-ER), primarily the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) and the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), and by PNL`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. This document is a collection of research highlights that describe PNL`s accomplishments in DOE-ER funded programs during Fiscal Year 1995. Included are accomplishments in research funded by OHER`s Analytical Technologies, Environmental Research, Health Effects, General Life Sciences, and Carbon Dioxide Research programs; BES`s Materials Science, Chemical Sciences, Engineering and Geoscience, and Applied Mathematical Sciences programs; and PNL`s LDRD Program. Summaries are given for 70 projects.

  17. Wildlife studies on the Hanford Site: 1993 Highlights report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, L.L. [ed.

    1994-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project was initiated by DOE to track the status of wildlife populations to determine whether Hanford operations affected them. The project continues to conduct a census of wildlife populations that are highly visible, economically or aesthetically important, and rare or otherwise considered sensitive. Examples of long-term data collected and maintained through the Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project include annual goose nesting surveys conducted on islands in the Hanford Reach, wintering bald eagle surveys, and fall Chinook salmon redd (nest) surveys. The report highlights activities related to salmon and mollusks on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River; describes efforts to map vegetation on the Site and efforts to survey species of concern; provides descriptions of shrub-steppe bird surveys, including bald eagles, Canada geese, and hawks; outlines efforts to monitor mule deer and elk populations on the Site; and describes development of a biological database management system.

  18. ISOLDE highlights and the HIE-ISOLDE project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borge María José G.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ISOLDE facility has as objective the production, study and research of nuclei far from stability. Exotic nuclei of most chemical elements are available for the study of nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics, fundamental symmetries and atomic physics, and for applications in condensed-matter and life sciences. The most recent highlights are presented. The on-going upgrade, the HIE-ISOLDE project, is discussed. HIE-ISOLDE aims to improve the ISOLDE capabilities in a wide front, from an energy increase of the post-accelerated beam to improvements in beam quality and beam purity. The first phase of HIE-ISOLDE will start for physics in the autumn of 2015 with an upgrade of energy for all post-accelerated ISOLDE beams up to 5.5 MeV/u. The proposed day-one experiments are summarized.

  19. Big data for ecologists: Highlighting the ORNL DAAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, Alison G [ORNL; Cook, Robert B [ORNL; Devarakonda, Ranjeet [ORNL; Eby, Pete I [ORNL; Thornton, Michele M [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; SanthanaVannan, Suresh K [ORNL; Virdi, Makhan L [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Ecologists are increasingly confronted by questions that can be addressed only by integrating data from numerous sources, often across large geographic areas and broad time periods. The supply of ecological big data is increasing at a rapid pace as researchers are publishing their data sets and large, public science and data infrastructures (such as NEON, DataONE, LTER, & NCEAS) are producing and curating extensive volumes of complex data and metadata. While supply of, and demand for, ecological data is on the rise, many ecologists now face a new challenge in locating and synthesizing the data relevant for their particular question. Here we highlight selected popular big data products applicable to ecological research available from the NASA Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  20. LHC highlights from ATLAS - FRAPWS2016 conference - Claudio Luci

    CERN Document Server

    Luci, Claudio; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    I am going to give a talk about highlight from ATLAS. The conference is FRAP2016, it is a conference of astrophysics. My talk is the third one oon the first day, after a general talk and one about dark matter search at colliders (given by someone does not working in atlas or cms). There is not a talk given by a colleague from cms, so mine is the only one about lhc. I have prepared my slides thinking about a "general" public and not for a specialized audience like the one we use to give talks. I have 30 minutes, maybe I have too many slides but I can easily keep the ones about dark matter if I am going to run late.

  1. History highlights and future trends of infrared sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, Carlo

    2010-10-01

    Infrared (IR) technologies (materials, devices and systems) represent an area of excellence in science and technology and, even if they have been generally confined to a selected scientific community, they have achieved technological and scientific highlights constituting 'innovation drivers' for neighbouring disciplines, especially in the sensors field. The development of IR sensors, initially linked to astronomical observations, since World War II and for many years has been fostered essentially by defence applications, particularly thermo-vision and, later on, smart vision and detection, for surveillance and warning. Only in the last few decades, the impact of silicon technology has changed the development of IR detectors dramatically, with the advent of integrated signal read-outs and the opening of civilian markets (EO communications, biomedical, environmental, transport and energy applications). The history of infrared sensors contains examples of real breakthroughs, particularly true in the case of focal plane arrays that first appeared in the late 1970s, when the superiority of bi-dimensional arrays for most applications pushed the development of technologies providing the highest number of pixels. An impressive impulse was given to the development of FPA arrays by integration with charge coupled devices (CCD), with strong competition from different technologies (high-efficiency photon sensors, Schottky diodes, multi-quantum wells and, later on, room temperature microbolometers/cantilevers). This breakthrough allowed the development of high performance IR systems of small size, light weight and low cost - and therefore suitable for civil applications - thanks to the elimination of the mechanical scanning system and the progressive reduction of cooling requirements (up to the advent of microbolometers, capable of working at room temperature). In particular, the elimination of cryogenic cooling allowed the development and commercialisation of IR Smart Sensors

  2. Highlights lecture EANM 2015: the search for nuclear medicine's superheroes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Andreas; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2016-09-01

    contributions focused on cardiac inflammation, cardiac sarcoidosis, and specific imaging of large vessel vasculitis. The physics and instrumentation track included many highlights such as novel, high resolution scanners. The most noteworthy news and developments of this meeting were summarized in the highlights lecture. Only 55 scientific contributions were mentioned, and hence they represent only a brief summary, which is outlined in this article. For a more detailed view, all presentations can be accessed by the online version of the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (Volume 42, Supplement 1).

  3. Highlighting landslides and other geomorphological features using sediment connectivity maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossi, Giulia; Crema, Stefano; Cavalli, Marco; Marcato, Gianluca; Pasuto, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Landslide identification is usually made through interpreting geomorphological features in the field or with remote sensing imagery. In recent years, airborne laser scanning (LiDAR) has enhanced the potentiality of geomorphological investigations by providing a detailed and diffuse representation of the land surface. The development of algorithms for geomorphological analysis based on LiDAR derived high-resolution Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) is increasing. Among them, the sediment connectivity index (IC) has been used to quantify sediment dynamics in alpine catchments. In this work, maps of the sediment connectivity index are used for detecting geomorphological features and processes not exclusively related to water-laden processes or debris flows. The test area is located in the upper Passer Valley in South Tyrol (Italy). Here a 4 km2 Deep-seated Gravitational Slope Deformation (DGSD) with several secondary phenomena has been studied for years. The connectivity index was applied to a well-known study area in order to evaluate its effectiveness as an interpretative layer to assist geomorphological analysis. Results were cross checked with evidence previously identified by means of in situ investigations, photointerpretation and monitoring data. IC was applied to a 2.5 m LiDAR derived DTM using two different scenarios in order to test their effectiveness: i) IC derived on the hydrologically correct DTM; ii) IC derived on the original DTM. In the resulting maps a cluster of low-connectivity areas appears as the deformation of the DGSD induce a convexity in the central part of the phenomenon. The double crests, product of the sagging of the landslide, are extremely evident since in those areas the flow directions diverge from the general drainage pattern, which is directed towards the valley river. In the crown area a rock-slab that shows clear evidence of incumbent detachment is clearly highlighted since the maps emphasize the presence of traction trenches and

  4. Highlights of Selected Consultative Studies of CASAD in 2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Focusing on issues critical to national economy, people's livelihood and sustainable development, such as energy, resources and the environment, in 2010, the Academic Divisions of CAS (CASAD) completed a number of consultative studies on a variety of topics, ranging from land reclamation, exploiting the Heishanxia Reach of the Yellow River, developing a national energy base for large-scale hybrid PV-hydro power generation in Qinghai, to the development of a largescale integrated energy base in Xinjiang, and industrial energy saving in China.In line with China's pressing needs for developing strategically-important emerging industries, and at the request of the General Office of the State Council, CASAD carried out a questionnaire survey and convened many seminars of CAS Members to work out an Investigation Report on Developing Strategic Emerging Industries in China, providing important scientific evidence to the State Council and related government departments.In all, ten consultative reports were presented to the State Council and 12 CAS Member Suggestions were submitted to the State Council and related government departments, which attracted close attention from policymakers.The followings are highlights of some of the consultation reports.

  5. Highlights on Hevea brasiliensis (pro)hevein proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Karine; Peruch, Frédéric; Lecomte, Sophie

    2016-08-01

    Hevein, from Hevea brasiliensis (rubber tree), was identified in 1960. It is the most abundant soluble protein (22%) found in latex. Hevein is formed from a larger protein called prohevein. The 187 amino-acid prohevein is cleaved into two fragments: the N-terminal 43 amino-acid hevein, a lectin bearing a chitin-binding motif with antifungal properties, and a C-terminal domain (C-ter), which possesses amyloid properties. Hevein-like proteins are also widely represented in the plant kingdom and belong to a larger family related to stress and pathogenic responses. During the last 55 years, these proteins have attracted the interest of numerous specialists from the fields of plant physiology, genetics, molecular and structural biology, and physico-chemistry to allergology. This review highlights various aspects of hevein, prohevein, and C-ter from the point of view of these various fields, and examines their potential roles in latex as well as their beneficial and negative biological effects (e.g. wound sealing and resistance to pathogens which is mediated by agglutination, antimicrobial activity, and/or allergenicity). It covers results and observations from 1960 up to the most recent research.

  6. Highlighting entanglement of cultures via ranking of multilingual Wikipedia articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Young-Ho; Shepelyansky, Dima L

    2013-01-01

    How different cultures evaluate a person? Is an important person in one culture is also important in the other culture? We address these questions via ranking of multilingual Wikipedia articles. With three ranking algorithms based on network structure of Wikipedia, we assign ranking to all articles in 9 multilingual editions of Wikipedia and investigate general ranking structure of PageRank, CheiRank and 2DRank. In particular, we focus on articles related to persons, identify top 30 persons for each rank among different editions and analyze distinctions of their distributions over activity fields such as politics, art, science, religion, sport for each edition. We find that local heroes are dominant but also global heroes exist and create an effective network representing entanglement of cultures. The Google matrix analysis of network of cultures shows signs of the Zipf law distribution. This approach allows to examine diversity and shared characteristics of knowledge organization between cultures. The developed computational, data driven approach highlights cultural interconnections in a new perspective. Dated: June 26, 2013.

  7. Engineering and Science Highlights of the KAT-7 Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Foley, A R; Armstrong, R P; Barta, A; Bauermeister, E F; Bester, H; Blose, S; Booth, R S; Botha, D H; Buchner, S J; Carignan, C; Cheetham, T; Cloete, K; Coreejes, G; Crida, R C; Cross, S D; Curtolo, F; Dikgale, A; de Villiers, M S; Toit, L J du; Esterhuyse, S W P; Fanaroff, B; Fender, R P; Fijalkowski, M; Fourie, D; Frank, B; George, D; Gibbs, P; Goedhart, S; Grobbelaar, J; Gumede, S C; Herselman, P; Hess, K M; Hoek, N; Horrell, J; Jonas, J L; Jordaan, J D B; Julie, R; Kapp, F; Kotzé, P; Kusel, T; Langman, A; Lehmensiek, R; Liebenberg, D; Liebenberg, I J V; Loots, A; Lord, R T; Lucero, D M; Ludick, J; Macfarlane, P; Madlavana, M; Magnus, L; Magozore, C; Malan, J A; Manley, J R; Marais, L; Marais, N; Marais, S J; Maree, M; Martens, A; Mokone, O; Moss, V; Mthembu, S; New, W; Nicholson, G D; van Niekerk, P C; Oozeer, N; Passmoor, S S; Peens-Hough, A; Pińska, A B; Prozesky, P; Rajan, S; Ratcliffe, S; Renil, R; Richter, L L; Rosekrans, D; Rust, A; Schröder, A C; Schwardt, L C; Seranyane, S; Serylak, M; Shepherd, D S; Siebrits, R; Sofeya, L; Spann, R; Springbok, R; Swart, P S; Thondikulam, Venkatasubramani L; Theron, I P; Tiplady, A; Toruvanda, O; Tshongweni, S; Heever, L van den; van der Merwe, C; van Rooyen, R; Wakhaba, S; Walker, A L; Welz, M; Williams, L; Wolleben, M; Woudt, P A; Young, N J; Zwart, J T L

    2016-01-01

    The construction of the KAT-7 array in the Karoo region of the Northern Cape in South Africa was intended primarily as an engineering prototype for technologies and techniques applicable to the MeerKAT telescope. This paper looks at the main engineering and scien- tific highlights from this effort, and discusses their applicability to both MeerKAT and other next-generation radio telescopes. In particular we found that the composite dish surface works well, but it becomes complicated to fabricate for a dish lacking circular symmetry; the Stir- ling cycle cryogenic system with ion pump to achieve vacuum works but demands much higher maintenance than an equivalent Gifford-McMahon cycle system; the ROACH (Recon- figurable Open Architecture Computing Hardware)-based correlator with SPEAD (Stream- ing Protocol for Exchanging Astronomical Data) protocol data transfer works very well and KATCP (Karoo Array Telescope Control Protocol) control protocol has proven very flexible and convenient. KAT-7 has also been used f...

  8. Recent highlights from the PHENIX heavy ion program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, J. C.

    2015-05-01

    It is accepted that a QGP can be formed in relativistic collisions of heavy nuclei (A+A). Recently long-range correlations have been observed in p+A collisions at the LHC in high multiplicity events. PHENIX has carried out a series of studies of d+Au collisions at 200 GeV to see if such correlations persist at lower energies compared to those at the LHC. Results of a study of long-range correlations and flow are presented for d+Au collisions. Data from Au+Au collisions collected during the beam energy scan (BES) was used to determine both quark and nucleon number scaling. The HBT method was used to determine radii of the fireball at kinetic freezeout. Implications for the nuclear EOS are discussed. Also results of a search for "dark photons" are presented. Recent PHENIX highlights on heavy flavor, electromagnetic probes, spin and plans for PHENIX upgrades were presented in other talks at this conference.

  9. New bunya-like viruses: Highlighting their relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterres, Alexandro; de Oliveira, Renata Carvalho; Fernandes, Jorlan; de Lemos, Elba Regina Sampaio; Schrago, Carlos Guerra

    2017-04-01

    The standard virus classification scheme for arenaviruses and bunyaviruses shifted dramatically when several groups reported the detection and isolation of divergent groups of viruses in a variety of insect collections. Although these viral families can differ in terms of morphology, structure and genetics, recent findings indicate these viruses may have a shared evolutionary origin. To determine the phylogenetic relations among these families, we inferred phylogenetic trees using three methods. The Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian trees were rooted as suggested by the (molecular clock-rooted) BEAST tree. Our results highlight a noteworthy relation among these viral supergroups of different genome organizations. Our study suggests that the best scenario is the existence of at least three monophyletic supergroups, all of them well supported. The recent data indicate that these viruses are evolutionarily and genetically interconnected. While these supergroups appear to be closely related in our phylogenetic analysis, other viruses should be investigated in future research. In sum, our results also provide insights into the classification scheme, thereby providing a new perspective about the fundamental questions of family origins, diversity and genome evolution.

  10. The infrared astronomical satellite AKARI: overview, highlights of the mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hiroshi; Matsuhara, Hideo

    2008-07-01

    The AKARI, Japanese infrared astronomical satellite, is a 68.5 cm cooled telescope with two focal-plane instruments providing continuous sky scan at six wavelength bands in mid- and far-infrared. The instruments also have capabilities of imaging and spectroscopy in the wavelength range 2-180 μm in the pointing observations occasionally inserted into the continuous survey. AKARI was launched on 21st Feb. 2006, and has performed the all-sky survey as well as 5380 pointing observations until the liquid helium exhaustion on 26th Aug. 2007. The all sky survey covers more than 90 percent of the entire sky with higher spatial resolutions and sensitivities than the IRAS. First version of the infrared source catalogue will be released in 2009. Here we report the overview of the mission, highlights on the scientific results as well as the performance of the focal-plane instruments. We also present the observation plan with the near infrared camera during the post-helium mission phase started in June 2008.

  11. AGILE DATA CENTER AT ASDC AND AGILE HIGHLIGHTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlotta Pittori

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We present an overview of the main AGILE Data Center activities and the AGILE scientific highlights during the first 5 years of operations. AGILE is an ASI space mission in joint collaboration with INAF, INFN and CIFS, dedicated to the observation of the gamma-ray Universe. The AGILE satellite was launched on April 23rd, 2007, and is devoted to gamma-ray astrophysics in the 30MeV ÷ 50 GeV energy range, with simultaneous X-ray imaging capability in the 18 ÷ 60 keV band. Despite the small size and budget, AGILE has produced several important scientific results, including the unexpected discovery of strong and rapid gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula over daily timescales. This discovery won AGILE PI and the AGILE Team the prestigious Bruno Rossi Prize for 2012, an international award in the field of high energy astrophysics. Thanks to its sky monitoring capability and fast ground segment alert system, AGILE is substantially improving our knowledge of the gamma-ray sky, also making a crucial contribution to the study of the terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs detected in the Earth atmosphere. The AGILE Data Center, part of the ASI Science Data Center (ASDC located in Frascati, Italy, is in charge of all the science oriented activities related to the analysis, archiving and distribution of AGILE data.

  12. Pre-accidental situations highlighted by RECUPERARE method and data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matahri, N. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2006-07-01

    RECUPERARE method has been developed for operating feedback analysis and built on the French Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) principles. It is used to study the causes of human errors or technical failures occurred in French PWRs and the recovery process of events. Based on an event classification (6 categories) model according to the nature of the link between failure and recovery, the identified and recorded data are: the causes of the defects (technical, human, organizational) and the context in which they appear; the factors of the recovery performance (depending on technical and organizational aspects); a chronological analysis, designed to collect delays between failures and their detection/recovery for each event. About 3600 events reported in French PWRs (1997-2003) had been reviewed through this model. Initially, the weight of factors and the most important factors, which influenced the detection and recovery delay, are defined. For this purpose, the regression Partial Least Square (PLS) is used. Then, to link RECUPERARE results with pre-accidental data, conditional probabilities of events linked between them by a cause and effect relationship are calculated. For this, the Bayesian method with the Bayesian network is built with the PLS obtained results and applied. This constitutes a first approach to take into account in HRA the human and organizational factors highlighted by operating feedback. (author)

  13. Recent highlights from the PHENIX heavy ion program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is accepted that a QGP can be formed in relativistic collisions of heavy nuclei (A+A. Recently long-range correlations have been observed in p+A collisions at the LHC in high multiplicity events. PHENIX has carried out a series of studies of d+Au collisions at 200 GeV to see if such correlations persist at lower energies compared to those at the LHC. Results of a study of long-range correlations and flow are presented for d+Au collisions. Data from Au+Au collisions collected during the beam energy scan (BES was used to determine both quark and nucleon number scaling. The HBT method was used to determine radii of the fireball at kinetic freezeout. Implications for the nuclear EOS are discussed. Also results of a search for “dark photons” are presented. Recent PHENIX highlights on heavy flavor, electromagnetic probes, spin and plans for PHENIX upgrades were presented in other talks at this conference.

  14. Improved "optical highlighter" probes derived from discosoma red fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lisbeth C; Marchant, Jonathan S

    2005-02-01

    The tetrameric red fluorescent protein, DsRed, undergoes a rapid red to green color change evoked by short wavelength (lambda highlighter" probe for tracking live cells, organelles, and fusion proteins. This color change results from selective bleaching of the "mature" red-emitting species of DsRed and an enhancement of emission from the "immature" green species, likely caused by dequenching of fluorescence resonance energy transfer occurring within the protein tetramer. Here, we have examined the role of residues known to influence the rate and completeness of chromophore maturation on the cellular and biophysical properties of DsRed mutants. Surprisingly, a single amino acid mutation (N42Q) with increased basal green emission yet rapid chromophore maturation displayed a multiphoton-evoked color change that was brighter, more consistent, more vivid, and easier to evoke than DsRed, despite the larger proportion of green chromophores. Rapidly maturing mutants with more complete chromophore maturation, exhibited little color change and increased resistance to multiphoton bleaching. We describe improved optical and cell biological properties for two DsRed-derived variants which we showcase in photolabeling studies, and discuss these data in terms of implications for fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based probes.

  15. Wildlife studies on the Hanford site: 1994 Highlights report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, L.L. [ed.

    1995-04-01

    The purposes of the project are to monitor and report trends in wildlife populations; conduct surveys to identify, record, and map populations of threatened, endangered, and sensitive plant and animal species; and cooperate with Washington State and federal and private agencies to help ensure the protection afforded by law to native species and their habitats. Census data and results of surveys and special study topics are shared freely among cooperating agencies. Special studies are also conducted as needed to provide additional information that may be required to assess, protect, or manage wildlife resources at Hanford. This report describes highlights of wildlife studies on the Site in 1994. Redd counts of fall chinook salmon in the Hanford Reach suggest that harvest restrictions directed at protecting Snake River salmon may have helped Columbia River stocks as well. The 1994 count (5619) was nearly double that of 1993 and about 63% of the 1989 high of approximately 9000. A habitat map showing major vegetation and land use cover types for the Hanford Site was completed in 1993. During 1994, stochastic simulation was used to estimate shrub characteristics (height, density, and canopy cover) across the previously mapped Hanford landscape. The information provided will be available for use in determining habitat quality for sensitive wildlife species. Mapping Site locations of plant species of concern continued during 1994. Additional sensitive plant species data from surveys conducted by TNC were archived. The 10 nesting pairs of ferruginous hawks that used the Hanford Site in 1993 represented approximately 25% of the Washington State population.

  16. Highlights from the La Silla QUEST Variability Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppi, Paolo S.; La Silla QUEST Survey Team

    2017-01-01

    The recently completely QUEST supernova survey ran for 6 years on the ESO 1m Schmidt telescope in La Silla Chile using a large CCD array to replace the photographic plate of the Schmidt. The survey covered ~1000 degres twice per night, for a total survey coverage area of ~20,000 square degrees from declination ~ -40 to +20. The survey magnitude limit is V~21. The average number of visits on a given patch of sky was ~150, although over a thousand squares more than 1000 visits. Although the survey cadence was driven by supernova science, it turns out to be provide good logarithmic coverage on a broad range of timescales, from ~hours to ~year, Much more time domain science can thus be done than a simple supernova search. Here we present highlights from La Silla QUEST non-supernova science, especially for AGN and RR Lyrae stars. Lessons learned from the La Silla QUEST survey should prove useful in preparing for LSST.

  17. Highlights and Discoveries from the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Tananbaum, H; Tucker, W; Wilkes, B; Edmonds, P

    2014-01-01

    Within 40 years of the detection of the first extrasolar X-ray source in 1962,NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has achieved an increase in sensitivity of 10 orders of magnitude, comparable to the gain in going from naked-eye observations to the most powerful optical telescopes over the past 400 years. Chandra is unique in its capabilities for producing sub-arcsecond X-ray images with 100-200 eV energy resolution for energies in the range 0.08highlights that illustrate how observations using Chandra, sometimes alone, but often in conjunction with other telescopes, have deepened, and in some instances revolutionized, our understanding ...

  18. Highlights and discoveries from the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tananbaum, H.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Tucker, W.; Wilkes, B.; Edmonds, P.

    2014-06-01

    Within 40 years of the detection of the first extra-solar x-ray source in 1962, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has achieved an increase in sensitivity of 10 orders of magnitude, comparable to the gain in going from naked-eye observations to the most powerful optical telescopes over the past 400 years. Chandra is unique in its capabilities for producing sub-arcsecond x-ray images with 100-200 eV energy resolution for energies in the range 0.08 cosmic phenomena. The extended Chandra mission provides a long observing baseline with stable and well-calibrated instruments, enabling temporal studies over timescales from milliseconds to years. In this report we present a selection of highlights that illustrate how observations using Chandra, sometimes alone, but often in conjunction with other telescopes, have deepened, and in some instances revolutionized, our understanding of topics as diverse as protoplanetary nebulae; massive stars; supernova explosions; pulsar wind nebulae; the superfluid interior of neutron stars; accretion flows around black holes; the growth of supermassive black holes and their role in the regulation of star formation and growth of galaxies; impacts of collisions, mergers, and feedback on growth and evolution of groups and clusters of galaxies; and properties of dark matter and dark energy.

  19. National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center project accomplishments: highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl, Sally

    2011-01-01

    The National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center (NCCWSC) has invested more than $20M since 2008 to put cutting-edge climate science research in the hands of resource managers across the Nation. With NCCWSC support, more than 25 cooperative research initiatives led by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) researchers and technical staff are advancing our understanding of habitats and species to provide guidance to managers in the face of a changing climate. Projects focus on quantifying and predicting interactions between climate, habitats, species, and other natural resources such as water. Spatial scales of the projects range from the continent of North America, to a regional scale such as the Pacific Northwest United States, to a landscape scale such as the Florida Everglades. Time scales range from the outset of the 20th century to the end of the 21st century. Projects often lead to workshops, presentations, publications and the creation of new websites, computer models, and data visualization tools. Partnership-building is also a key focus of the NCCWSC-supported projects. New and on-going cooperative partnerships have been forged and strengthened with resource managers and scientists at Federal, tribal, state, local, academic, and non-governmental organizations. USGS scientists work closely with resource managers to produce timely and relevant results that can assist managers and policy makers in current resource management decisions. This fact sheet highlights accomplishments of five NCCWSC projects.

  20. Engineering and science highlights of the KAT-7 radio telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, A. R.; Alberts, T.; Armstrong, R. P.; Barta, A.; Bauermeister, E. F.; Bester, H.; Blose, S.; Booth, R. S.; Botha, D. H.; Buchner, S. J.; Carignan, C.; Cheetham, T.; Cloete, K.; Coreejes, G.; Crida, R. C.; Cross, S. D.; Curtolo, F.; Dikgale, A.; de Villiers, M. S.; du Toit, L. J.; Esterhuyse, S. W. P.; Fanaroff, B.; Fender, R. P.; Fijalkowski, M.; Fourie, D.; Frank, B.; George, D.; Gibbs, P.; Goedhart, S.; Grobbelaar, J.; Gumede, S. C.; Herselman, P.; Hess, K. M.; Hoek, N.; Horrell, J.; Jonas, J. L.; Jordaan, J. D. B.; Julie, R.; Kapp, F.; Kotzé, P.; Kusel, T.; Langman, A.; Lehmensiek, R.; Liebenberg, D.; Liebenberg, I. J. V.; Loots, A.; Lord, R. T.; Lucero, D. M.; Ludick, J.; Macfarlane, P.; Madlavana, M.; Magnus, L.; Magozore, C.; Malan, J. A.; Manley, J. R.; Marais, L.; Marais, N.; Marais, S. J.; Maree, M.; Martens, A.; Mokone, O.; Moss, V.; Mthembu, S.; New, W.; Nicholson, G. D.; van Niekerk, P. C.; Oozeer, N.; Passmoor, S. S.; Peens-Hough, A.; Pińska, A. B.; Prozesky, P.; Rajan, S.; Ratcliffe, S.; Renil, R.; Richter, L. L.; Rosekrans, D.; Rust, A.; Schröder, A. C.; Schwardt, L. C.; Seranyane, S.; Serylak, M.; Shepherd, D. S.; Siebrits, R.; Sofeya, L.; Spann, R.; Springbok, R.; Swart, P. S.; Thondikulam, Venkatasubramani L.; Theron, I. P.; Tiplady, A.; Toruvanda, O.; Tshongweni, S.; van den Heever, L.; van der Merwe, C.; van Rooyen, R.; Wakhaba, S.; Walker, A. L.; Welz, M.; Williams, L.; Wolleben, M.; Woudt, P. A.; Young, N. J.; Zwart, J. T. L.

    2016-08-01

    The construction of the seven-dish Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7) array in the Karoo region of the Northern Cape in South Africa was intended primarily as an engineering prototype for technologies and techniques applicable to the MeerKAT telescope. This paper looks at the main engineering and scientific highlights from this effort, and discusses their applicability to both MeerKAT and other next-generation radio telescopes. In particular, we found that the composite dish surface works well, but it becomes complicated to fabricate for a dish lacking circular symmetry; the Stirling cycle cryogenic system with ion pump to achieve vacuum works but demands much higher maintenance than an equivalent Gifford-McMahon cycle system; the ROACH (Reconfigurable Open Architecture Computing Hardware)-based correlator with SPEAD (Streaming Protocol for Exchanging Astronomical Data) protocol data transfer works very well and KATCP (Karoo Array Telescope Control Protocol) control protocol has proven very flexible and convenient. KAT-7 has also been used for scientific observations where it has a niche in mapping low surface-brightness continuum sources, some extended H I haloes and OH masers in star-forming regions. It can also be used to monitor continuum source variability, observe pulsars, and make Very Long Baseline Interferometry observations.

  1. 文学的社会性--以美国自然主义文学为例%Society of literature--Take the United States naturalistic literature as an example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牟瑛; 陈明辉

    2013-01-01

      长期以来,人们对于文学一直存在着误解,认为文学就是风花雪月。其实,文学是人学,是生活的一面镜子,表现的内容涉及最为基本的社会价值关系。文学作为一种特定的语言符号,是特定时代的文化载体,是人类文明符号的象征。文学可以体现一定的社会变迁,它以一种艺术方式承载着人类文化的生存状态和人类价值,不同时期文学特点可以体现不同时代文化和社会特征。因此,文学作品是我们社会的必然产物,任何一种文学流派的产生都有一定的社会背景和思想基础,随着社会物质生活和精神生活的发展而不断变化,同时又能动的反映时代的变迁。本文以美国的自然主义文学为例,阐释了文学与社会的政治、经济、文化的发展之间密不可分的关系。%For a long time, there has been a misunderstanding to the literature, thinks literature that is romantic themes.In fact, the literature is a human study, is a mirror of life, the content relates to the social basic value relation.Literature as a kind of special language symbols, is the carrier of culture specific era, is a symbol of human civilization.Literature can reflect social changes, it bears the human cultural survival state and human value to an art form, the literary characteristics of different periods can reflect the different cultural and social characteristics.Therefore, literary works is the inevitable product of our society, any kind of literature has social background and ideological basis, changing with the development of social material life and spiritual life, change and motile reflection time. Take the American naturalist literature as an example, the close relationship between the development of literature and social politics, economy, cultural interpretation.

  2. Algerian abortion controversy highlights rape of war victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelala, C

    1998-05-09

    This brief article highlights the change in Islamic practices to allow abortion for women raped during war situations in Algeria. The Islamic Supreme Council on April 12, 1998, issued an edict (fatwa) that allowed abortions for women attacked by Islamic extremists. This changes the prior prohibition of abortion, except in cases where the mother's life is in danger. The day after the edict, the newspapers Le Matin and La Tribune denied the existence of the edict, because the President's council did not request the change in Islamic law. The newspaper Al Khabar published the April 12, 1998, news of the edict and drew attention to the fate of over 1000 women and young girls raped during attacks. An estimated 70,000 people have been reported killed since 1992. The war was precipitated when the army nullified national elections that would have given the Islamic party political power. The Algerian Family Solidarity Ministry reports that as many as 1600 women, mostly aged 13-20 years, have been abducted and raped since 1994, by bands from the Armed Islamic Group. Figures are considered underestimates. Many women were able to escape from captors, but many of these women were pregnant. The stigma is so strong that many of these women will not be accepted home by their own families. In addition to those women who survived being raped, an estimated 2000 raped women were killed by their captors. The abductions have declined, but are still ongoing, especially around Algiers and near the Moroccan and Tunisian borders. The terrorists consider the act a "temporary marriage." Amnesty International and others have criticized the recent UN Human Rights Commission for not taking action in Algeria.

  3. Dissection of protein interactomics highlights microRNA synergy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenliang Zhu

    Full Text Available Despite a large amount of microRNAs (miRNAs have been validated to play crucial roles in human biology and disease, there is little systematic insight into the nature and scale of the potential synergistic interactions executed by miRNAs themselves. Here we established an integrated parameter synergy score to determine miRNA synergy, by combining the two mechanisms for miRNA-miRNA interactions, miRNA-mediated gene co-regulation and functional association between target gene products, into one single parameter. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis indicated that synergy score accurately identified the gene ontology-defined miRNA synergy (AUC = 0.9415, p<0.001. Only a very small portion of the random miRNA-miRNA combinations generated potent synergy, implying poor expectancy of widespread synergy. However, targeting more key genes made two miRNAs more likely to act synergistically. Compared to other miRNAs, miR-21 was a highly exceptional case due to frequent appearance in the top synergistic miRNA pairs. This result highlighted its essential role in coordinating or strengthening physiological and pathological functions of other miRNAs. The synergistic effect of miR-21 and miR-1 were functionally validated for their significant influences on myocardial apoptosis, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. The novel approach established in this study enables easy and effective identification of condition-restricted potent miRNA synergy simply by concentrating the available protein interactomics and miRNA-target interaction data into a single parameter synergy score. Our results may be important for understanding synergistic gene regulation by miRNAs and may have significant implications for miRNA combination therapy of cardiovascular disease.

  4. Highlights from Hitomi observations of non-Perseus targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Bamba, Aya; Ishida, Manabu; Katsuda, Satoru; Hughes, John Patrick; Madejski, Greg; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Hitomi Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Before the tragic loss of the spacecraft due to attitude control problems, Hitomi observed three supernova remnants (SNR), N132D, G21.5-0.9, and the Crab Nebula, with the main purpose of initial in-orbit calibration. Here we present some scientific highlights of these observations.N132D is a middle-aged, core-collapse SNR in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). It was observed after the Perseus cluster. Even though the exposure was very short, the SXS clearly resolves the fine structure of He-like S K-shell emission. We detect a significant redshift that is consistent with the line-of-sight velocity of the LMC. Fe K emission is redshifted even more significantly, with a corresponding velocity of ~2000 km/s. This suggests a non-uniform velocity distribution of the Fe ejecta, probably due to an asymmetric supernova explosion.G21.5-0.9 is a young plerionic composite-type SNR. Powered by the 62 ms rotation-powered pulsar J1833-1034, the SNR is dominated by non-thermal emission from the pulsar wind nebula, with extended limb-brightening and knots of X-ray emission. The Hitomi SXS, SXI, and HXI observations provide a high-statistics wide-band spectrum from a single satellite. We are currently searching for 1) emission or absorption line features, 2) a spectral break in the continuum, and 3) the pulse period. The status of the analysis and results will be presented.The Crab was observed after all the instruments aboard Hitomi were turned on. We successfully obtain the pulse profile with all of the instruments. The X-ray polarization is being studied with the HXI and SGD. We also search for emission/absorption lines with the SXS, but no features have so far been significantly detected. We discuss the results in light of constraining the nature of the Crab's progenitor explosion.

  5. Structure-activity relationship of nerve-highlighting fluorophores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Summer L Gibbs

    Full Text Available Nerve damage is a major morbidity associated with numerous surgical interventions. Yet, nerve visualization continues to challenge even the most experienced surgeons. A nerve-specific fluorescent contrast agent, especially one with near-infrared (NIR absorption and emission, would be of immediate benefit to patients and surgeons. Currently, there are only three classes of small molecule organic fluorophores that penetrate the blood nerve barrier and bind to nerve tissue when administered systemically. Of these three classes, the distyrylbenzenes (DSBs are particularly attractive for further study. Although not presently in the NIR range, DSB fluorophores highlight all nerve tissue in mice, rats, and pigs after intravenous administration. The purpose of the current study was to define the pharmacophore responsible for nerve-specific uptake and retention, which would enable future molecules to be optimized for NIR optical properties. Structural analogs of the DSB class of small molecules were synthesized using combinatorial solid phase synthesis and commercially available building blocks, which yielded more than 200 unique DSB fluorophores. The nerve-specific properties of all DSB analogs were quantified using an ex vivo nerve-specific fluorescence assay on pig and human sciatic nerve. Results were used to perform quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR modeling and to define the nerve-specific pharmacophore. All DSB analogs with positive ex vivo fluorescence were tested for in vivo nerve specificity in mice to assess the effect of biodistribution and clearance on nerve fluorescence signal. Two new DSB fluorophores with the highest nerve to muscle ratio were tested in pigs to confirm scalability.

  6. Highlights and Conclusions of the Unidata OGC Interoperability Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenico, B.; Davis, E.; Rew, R.; Caron, J.; Nativi, S.; Yang, W.; Falke, S.; Woolf, A.; Tandy, J.

    2007-12-01

    At the OGC (Open Geospatial Consortium) Technical Committee meetings, Unidata hosted a special Interoperability Day workshop to address the use of web services via standard interfaces for accessing a broad range of environmental data. These interfaces include: WCS (Web Coverage Service), WFS (Web Feature Service, SOS (Sensor Observation Service, CS-W/ebRIM (Catalog Service for the Web / electronic business Registry Information Model) for providing access to data currently served via THREDDS (THematic Real-time Environmental Distributed Data Services), OPeNDAP (Open source Project for a Network Data Access Protocol), netCDF-CF (network Common Data Form - Climate and Forecast conventions) and IDD/LDM (Internet Data Distribution / Local Data Manager) technologies. The primary data served includes weather, climate and ocean data from the community sometimes referred to as Fluid Earth Sciences (FES). An international set of representatives from industry, government, and academia, spanning many geosciences disciplines participated actively in the workshop and are committed to continued collaboration. The overall objective for the day was to come up with practical and concrete ideas for how to deliver various classes of FES data via web services through the standard interfaces. The primary focus was on gridded datasets (e.g., forecast model output) and station/observation/point datasets (e.g. the observational data collected at weather stations, ocean buoys, river gaging stations. As time allowed, other categories (profile/trajectory, swath, radial, unstructured grids) were addressed. The main objective was to come up with a realistic plan for dealing with gridded and station/observation/point datasets. Then the remaining categories can be addressed incrementally. This presentation summarizes the highlights of the Interoperability Day and the resulting plans for future implementation and testing.

  7. Close relationships between Asian American and European American college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C; Edwards, K; Young, B; Greenberger, E

    2001-02-01

    The authors examined attitudes and behaviors regarding close relationships between European and Asian Americans, with a particular emphasis on 5 major subgroups of Asian Americans (Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, and Filipino Americans). Participants were 218 Asian American college students and 171 European American college students attending a culturally diverse university. The European Americans did not differentiate among the various subgroups of Asian Americans. Their attitudes regarding close relationships were less positive toward Asian Americans than toward Mexican and African Americans, a finding contrary to the prediction of social exchange theory (H. Tajfel, 1975). In contrast to the European Americans' view of homogeneity among Asian Americans, the 5 major subgroups of Asian Americans expressed a distinctive hierarchy of social preference among themselves. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for future research on interethnic relations involving Asian Americans.

  8. Towards a large-scale European Naturalistic Driving study : final report of PROLOGUE. PROmoting real Life Observations for Gaining Understanding of road user behaviour in Europe PROLOGUE, Deliverable D4.2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schagen, I.N.L.G. van Welsh, R. Backer-Grøndahl, A. Hoedemaeker, M. Lotan, T. Morris, A. Sagberg, F. & Winkelbauer, M.

    2011-01-01

    This report is the final report of the PROLOGUE project. It provides a concise overview of the main findings of the project in its aim to assess the usefulness and feasibility of a large-scale European Naturalistic Driving (ND) study. Successively, the report discusses the most important information

  9. HHS Report on Social and Economic Conditions of Native Americans for 2007-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This report to Congress provides data specific to awards made from the Department of Health and Human Services to Native Americans and provides highlights of Native...

  10. Occupationally Acquired American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Edileuza Felinto de Brito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report two occupationally acquired cases of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL: one accidental laboratory autoinoculation by contaminated needlestick while handling an ACL lesion sample, and one acquired during field studies on bird biology. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays of patient lesions were positive for Leishmania, subgenus Viannia. One isolate was obtained by culture (from patient 2 biopsy samples and characterized as Leishmania (Viannia naiffi through an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA with species-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs and by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE. Patients were successfully treated with N-methyl-glucamine. These two cases highlight the potential risks of laboratory and field work and the need to comply with strict biosafety procedures in daily routines. The swab collection method, coupled with PCR detection, has greatly improved ACL laboratory diagnosis.

  11. The Plate Boundary Observatory: Data Management Progress and Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, G.; Blackman, B.; Eakins, J.; Hodgkinson, K.; Matykiewicz, J.; Boler, F.; Beldyk, M.; Henderson, B.; Hoyt, B.; Lee, E.; Persson, E.; Smith, J.; Torrez, D.; Wright, J.; Jackson, M.; Meertens, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), part of the NSF-funded EarthScope project, is designed to study the three- dimensional strain field resulting from deformation across the active boundary zone between the Pacific and North American plates in the western United States. To meet these goals, UNAVCO will install 880 continuous GPS stations, 103 borehole strainmeter stations, 28 tiltmeters, and five laser strainmeters by October 2008, as well as manage data for 209 previously existing continuous GPS stations and one laser strainmeter through the PBO Nucleus project and 11 GPS stations installed by the USArray segment of EarthScope. As of 1 September 2007, UNAVCO had completed 680 PBO GPS stations and had upgraded 89% of the planned PBO Nucleus stations. Most of these stations return data to the UNAVCO Boulder Network Operations Center (NOC) on a daily basis, with about 40 stations returning data on an hourly basis. Overall, the combined PBO and Nucleus network has now provided almost 350 GB of raw standard rate data, which are routinely processed by the PBO GPS Analysis Centers, at Central Washington University and the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, and the PBO GPS Analysis Center Coordinator at MIT. These groups create a range of GPS products, including station position time series, GPS velocity vectors, and related information. As of September 2007, these centers processed data on a daily basis from about 920 stations; typical position uncertainties are under 1.5 mm horizontally and 4 mm vertically. All PBO GPS data products are archived at and available from the UNAVCO Facility, with a second archive at the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC). All these products may be accessed via the PBO web page at http://pboweb.unavco.org/gps_data. As part of PBO, UNAVCO will also install and operate the largest borehole seismic and strainmeter networks in North America, as well as tiltmeters and laser strainmeters. As of September 2007, 41 PBO borehole stations

  12. A Fresh Pair of Eyes: A Blind Observation Method for Evaluating Social Skills of Children with ASD in a Naturalistic Peer Situation in School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Vera; Nauta, Maaike H; Mulder, Erik J; Sytema, Sjoerd; de Bildt, Annelies

    2016-09-01

    The Social skills Observation Measure (SOM) is a direct observation method for social skills used in naturalistic everyday situations in school. This study describes the development of the SOM and investigates its psychometric properties in 86 children with Autism spectrum disorder, aged 9.8-13.1 years. The interrater reliability was found to be good to excellent. The convergent validity was low in relation to parent and teacher reports of social skills, and also to parent interview on adaptive social functioning. Therefore this direct observation seems to provide additional information on the frequency and quality of social behaviors in daily life situations. As such it contributes to parent and teacher information as a blind measurement to evaluate Social Skills Training.

  13. Von Steuben and the German Contribution to the American Revolution: A Selective Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krewson, Margrit B.

    This Library of Congress selected bibliography highlights the efforts of Baron Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben, other German and German-American military leaders, and the Hessian auxiliary military forces in assisting the American colonies during the Revolutionary War. The booklet is divided into five parts. Part 1 provides historical information…

  14. Discourses about Gender among Hmong American Policymakers: Conflicting Views about Gender, Culture, and Hmong Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Bic; Leet-Otley, Jill

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we draw on research with Hmong American community members to contribute to a more complex understanding of Hmong culture. Specifically, in a critical discourse analysis of interviews with 3 influential Hmong American politicians, we highlight the divergent perspectives on early marriage, Hmong gender norms, and the struggles of…

  15. Worldviews of Urban Iroquois Faculty: A Case Study of a Native American Resource Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollowell, Mary Nix; Jeffries, Rhonda Baynes

    2004-01-01

    This article highlights the Native American Magnet School, also known as P.S. #19, in Buffalo, NY, a unique public school for kindergarten through eighth-grade students. The school?s Native American population constitutes one-third of the entire student body and comes from the six Iroquois tribes: Oneida, Seneca, Mohawk, Cayuga, Onondaga, and…

  16. Trends in Themes of African American Family Research 1939-1989: A Synopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Lenwood G.

    1990-01-01

    Themes in research on African-American families between 1939 and 1989 are discussed, and the following recently developed themes are highlighted: (1) stress, (2) aging, (3) adoption, (4) prison, (5) polygamy, and (6) violence. Much more research is needed to provide better understanding of the African-American family. (SLD)

  17. Homogamy and Intermarriage of Japanese and Japanese Americans with Whites Surrounding World War II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Hiromi; Berg, Justin

    2010-01-01

    Although some sociologists have suggested that Japanese Americans quickly assimilated into mainstream America, scholars of Japanese America have highlighted the heightened exclusion that the group experienced. This study tracked historical shifts in the exclusion level of Japanese and Japanese Americans in the United States surrounding World War…

  18. Ambivalent Urban, Immigrant Identities: The Incompleteness of Lao American Student Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Bic

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author elucidates the identity work of Lao American urban, immigrant students, highlighting ambivalent identities that do not fit into notions of bicultural or binary identities. It examines the various discourses and practices that inform and shape the experiences and identities of urban, Lao American high school students. It…

  19. Cross-cultural Differences in Preferred Forms of Address: Implications for Work with African American Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Wanda Lott Collins; Moore, Sharon E.

    2004-01-01

    Using an individual’s last name indicates respect and contributes to positive interaction with African American clients and adults of African descent. This paper discusses the importance of using social titles as a proper form of address during, and sometimes after, the initial professional relationship. Two case vignettes will highlight potential difficulties that non-African American practitioners may experience when using first names with African Americans within the profess...

  20. Des esclaves et des bêtes : fables de la sauvagerie en Amérique dans Letters from an American Farmer, de St John de Crèvecoeur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnès Derail-Imbert

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The historical naturalist discourse, which serves as an epistemological framework to the narrator of Crèvecœur’s Letters from an American Farmer, draws upon the observation of local animals in order to praise a society of freedom, in which the American farmer’s autonomy depends on the harmonious relationship with his natural environment. This idealized vision is shattered by the horror of slavery which prompts the narrator to conclude that civilization is only a state of nature where man is “an animal of prey” ready to enslave others. In the sequel to this philosophical essay, the narrator resumes his naturalist account with the description of local reptiles, whose murderous behavior hardly fails to evoke slavery, as if servitude and the violence it entails were merely a law of nature. While animal brutality invalidates the myth of a society of sympathy, it nevertheless frees the discourse from its subordination to such utopia, and allows the text to engage with the native figures of American savagery.Le discours naturaliste, qui sert de cadre intellectuel au narrateur de Letters from an American Farmer de Crèvecœur, s’appuie sur l’observation des animaux autochtones pour faire l’éloge d’une société de liberté, où la relation harmonieuse avec le milieu naturel garantit l’affranchissement du cultivateur américain. Cette vision idéalisante est compromise par l’horreur de l’esclavage qui conduit le narrateur à conclure que la civilisation n’est qu’un état de nature où l’homme est une bête de proie qui s’emploie à asservir ses semblables. Après cet essai philosophique, le récit naturaliste reprend avec un exposé sur les reptiles, dont les mœurs violentes ne sont pas sans évoquer l’esclavage, comme si la servitude et son cortège de violences étaient une loi naturelle. Si la brutalité des bêtes invalide le mythe d’une société de sympathie, elle libère néanmoins l’écriture de l

  1. American Studies in Transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nye, David

    Papers first given at a conference the previous year in Fåborg, Denmark, with a dual focus on 20th century America and new methods in American Studies.......Papers first given at a conference the previous year in Fåborg, Denmark, with a dual focus on 20th century America and new methods in American Studies....

  2. Writing American Indian History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noley, Grayson B.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to critique the manner in which history about American Indians has been written and propose a rationale for the rethinking of what we know about this subject. In particular, histories of education as regards the participation of American Indians is a subject that has been given scant attention over the years and when…

  3. African American Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    African American Suicide Fact Sheet Based on 2012 Data (2014) Overview • In 2012, 2,357 African Americans completed suicide in the U.S. Of these, 1,908 (80. ... rate of 9.23 per 100,000). The suicide rate for females was 1.99 per 100, ...

  4. Teaching American Indian Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchell, Dick

    1991-01-01

    Reviews "Native American Architecture," by Nabokov and Easton, an encyclopedic work that examines technology, climate, social structure, economics, religion, and history in relation to house design and the "meaning" of space among tribes of nine regions. Describes this book's use in a college course on Native American architecture. (SV)

  5. The Japanese American Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukei, Budd

    This book presents a view of the Japanese American experience from the time of their immigration to this country in the 1800s to their acculturation into American society in the 1970s. Topics dealt with include the prejudice and mistrust experienced by the Japanese immigrants in this country, particularly their evacuation and internment in…

  6. Highlighting and Its Relation to Distributed Study and Students' Metacognitive Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Carole L.; Storm, Benjamin C.; Kornell, Nate; Bjork, Elizabeth Ligon

    2015-01-01

    Use of highlighting is a prevalent study strategy among students, but evidence regarding its benefit for learning is mixed. We examined highlighting in relation to distributed study and students' attitudes about highlighting as a study strategy. Participants read a text passage twice while highlighting or not, with their readings either…

  7. African-Americans and Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Plus on Google Plus African-Americans and Alzheimer's alz.org | IHaveAlz Introduction 10 Warning Signs Brain ... African-Americans are at a higher risk for Alzheimer's disease. Many Americans dismiss the warning signs of ...

  8. 2010 Annual Report of the American Psychological Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the 2010 annual report of the American Psychological Association (APA). It provides the highlights of the association's and individual directorate's activities to APA members. APA continued its efforts to advance psychological practice and ensure the public's access to high-quality psychological services, apply psychological…

  9. Culturally Responsive Collegiate Mathematics Education: Implications for African American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jett, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author utilizes the culturally congruent work of Gay (2010) and Ladson-Billings (2009) to highlight culturally responsive teaching as a viable option for African American students in higher education mathematics spaces. He offers translations of Gay and Ladson-Billings' work to Africana mathematics and argues that these…

  10. Inclusive Masculinities of University Soccer Players in the American Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Male teamsport athletes have traditionally been described as some of the most homophobic and femphobic men in North American culture. However, in this ethnographic research of an education-based soccer team at a small Catholic university in a rural part of Middle America, I use inclusive masculinity theory to highlight that a softer version of…

  11. Creativity of Chinese and American Cultures: A Synthetic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Weihua; Kaufman, James C.

    2013-01-01

    The article integrates the seven papers of the two special issues with a special focus on discussing the differences in people's beliefs about creativity between the Chinese and American cultures: How it is conceived, evaluated, and nurtured. It uses three metaphors to capture major differences in these aspects, and highlights areas with profound…

  12. CHARACTERISTICS OF AMERICAN ENGLISH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦娟; 黄舜

    2007-01-01

    The large scale colonization of America by British settlers took place in the seventeenth century.During the process,the immigrants brought English to America.They desert great influence to the development of American English.After the civil war,American got political independence,and then there arose a tendency to develop an American brand of English.Famous persons like Thomas Jeffe,Benjamin,Franklin,and Noah Webster began to consider that the country should have a language of its own.

  13. American Studies in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Luca

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available American Studies at the University of BucharestThe idea of teaching American Studies and founding a program in American Studies was first voiced in the long meetings of faculty and students held at the University of Bucharest soon after the collapse of the communist regime. The proposal was one of many that reflected the spirit of reform and hope for radical changes at the outset of Romania’s transition to democracy. The absence of institutional structures other than English departments and t...

  14. The Roots of Disillusioned American Dream in Typical American

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    古冬华

    2016-01-01

    Typical American is one of Gish Jen’s notable novels catching attention of the American literary circle. The motif of disillusioned American dream can be seen clearly through the experiences of three main characters. From perspectives of the consumer culture and cultural conflicts, this paper analyzes the roots of the disillusioned American dream in the novel.

  15. The impact of pathological narcissism on psychotherapy utilization, initial symptom severity, and early-treatment symptom change: a naturalistic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, William D; Levy, Kenneth N; Cain, Nicole M; Ansell, Emily B; Pincus, Aaron L

    2013-01-01

    The impact of pathological narcissism on psychotherapy has seldom been investigated empirically, despite extensive clinical theory proposing that highly narcissistic individuals should be reluctant to engage in treatment and derive smaller benefits from therapy. In this study, we investigate the relationship between scores on the Pathological Narcissism Inventory (PNI; Pincus et al., 2009), which assesses both narcissistic grandiosity and narcissistic vulnerability, and clinical variables in a sample of outpatients (N=60) at a community mental health center. Results indicated that grandiosity, but not vulnerability, was negatively related to the use of adjunctive services and positively predicted client-initiated termination of psychotherapy. In addition, grandiosity and vulnerability were related to initial levels of different symptoms in multilevel models using a subsample (n=41) but not generally related to the linear rate of symptom change in early psychotherapy. The results highlight the clinical utility of assessing pathological narcissism in a real-world psychotherapeutic context.

  16. Trajectories of Mexican American and mainstream cultural values among Mexican American adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, George P; Basilio, Camille D; Cham, Heining; Gonzales, Nancy A; Liu, Yu; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J

    2014-12-01

    Mexican Americans are one of the largest and fastest growing ethnic groups in the United States, yet we have limited knowledge regarding changes (i.e., developmental trajectories) in cultural orientation based upon their exposure to the Mexican American and mainstream cultures. We examined the parallel trajectories of Mexican American and mainstream cultural values in a sample of 749 Mexican American adolescents (49 % female) across assessments during the fifth grade (approximately 11 years of age), the seventh grade (approximately 13 years of age) and the tenth grade (approximately 16 years of age). We expected that these values would change over this developmental period and this longitudinal approach is more appropriate than the often used median split classification to identify distinct types of acculturation. We found four distinct acculturation trajectory groups: two trajectory groups that were increasing slightly with age in the endorsement of mainstream cultural values, one of which was relatively stable in Mexican American cultural values while the other was declining in their endorsement of these values; and two trajectory groups that were declining substantially with age in their endorsement of mainstream cultural values, one of which was also declining in Mexican American cultural values and the other which was stable in these values. These four trajectory groups differed in expected ways on a number of theoretically related cultural variables, but were not highly consistent with the median split classifications. The findings highlight the need to utilize longitudinal data to examine the developmental changes of Mexican American individual's adaptation to the ethnic and mainstream culture in order to understand more fully the processes of acculturation and enculturation.

  17. Americanization of Non-American Storiesin Disney Films

    OpenAIRE

    Beta Setiawati

    2016-01-01

    The study is intended to know the Disney’s animation films characteristics which are adapted from non American stories that contain Americanization in order to be American popular culture products. This qualitative and library research is carried out within the field of American Studies. Disney’s animated films which are regarded as artifacts in order to identify American society and culture is used as her primary data. She then compares those Disney films with the original stories to discove...

  18. American Nephrology Nurses' Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help Join/Renew Jobs Contact Corporate Shop American Nephrology Nurses' Association About ANNA Association About ANNA Strategic ... Activities CExpress Events National Events Chapter / Local Events Nephrology Nurses Week ANNA Education Modules CKD Modules Education ...

  19. American Academy of Audiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tools Publications Audiology Today Journal of the American Academy of Audiology Books Brochures Multimedia Guidelines and Standards ... INVEST IN YOUR FUTURE Registration and housing for Academy members is OPEN NOW. SUBMIT YOUR POSTER IDEA ...

  20. American Behcet's Disease Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Behcet's Awareness Day Behcet's Disease Awareness Share your story and educate others about Behcet's: www.rareconnect.org/en/community/behcet-s-syndrome Upcoming Events American Behcet's Disease Association PO BOX 80576 Rochester, MI ...

  1. American Migraine Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... YouTube Follow us on Pinterest Follow us on Instagram DONATE TODAY About Migraine Patient Registry Corporate Roundtable ... YouTube Follow us on Pinterest Follow us on Instagram DONATE TODAY Freedom From Pain The American Migraine ...

  2. American Lung Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Latest News American Lung Association Pledges to Fight Trump Administration Assault on Clean Air and Climate Protections March 28, 2017 In response to President Trump's announcement on climate change, Harold P. Wimmer, National ...

  3. American Association of Orthodontists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... step for patients wishing to resolve issues of crowding, misalignment and the burden of feeling self-conscious ... The American Association of Orthodontists does not provide funding for orthodontic treatment. There are several programs that ...

  4. American Sleep Apnea Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Sleep Apnea Association Learn About the CPAP Assistance Program About ASAA News about ASAA Who we are Leadership Team Supporting the ASAA Financials Learn Healthy sleep Sleep apnea Other sleep disorders Personal stories Treat Test Yourself ...

  5. American Society of Nephrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stay safe! – @ASNKidney on Twitter ASN News Feed Society Events Interact With ASN rss Facebook Twitter YouTube ... Podcast ASN Communities Share ASN User Login © American Society of Nephrology top Text Size + - Translate Sitemap Terms ...

  6. American Geriatrics Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Travel Award for Research Symposium on Pharmacotherapy and Older Adults with CVD November 10th, 2016 Need Help Understanding MACRA? Check Out this Free Toolkit ... © 2016 The American Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy . Copyright & Permissions . Disclaimer .

  7. General American: An Ambiguity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Riper, William R.

    1973-01-01

    Disputes use of the term General American'' because of the excessive breadth of its scope and its indefiniteness; article is part of Lexicography and Dialect Geography, Festgabe for Hans Kurath''. (DD)

  8. American Samoa Longline Logbook

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data system contains the logbook data of vessels unloading in American Samoa. In 1992, the logbooks of three longline trips conducting an experiment to test the...

  9. Pan American Health Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Google Tag Pan American Health Organization | Organización Panamericana de la Salud Skip to content English Español Menu Home Health Topics Programs Media Center Publications Data Countries and Centers About PAHO question  ...

  10. American Sleep Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sleep Disorders Book Join ASA Press Room American Sleep Association Improving public health by increasing awareness about ... Members Username or Email Password Remember Me Register Sleep Blog Changing Bad Sleep Habits Asthma and Sleep ...

  11. African Americans and Glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us Donate In This Section African Americans and Glaucoma email Send this article to a friend by ... and eventually, in developing more effective treatments. Does glaucoma treatment differ? Although treatment varies for all individuals, ...

  12. On American Individualism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李谷雨

    2016-01-01

    Among those American symbols like multiculturalism, hi-tech and its powerful status in the world, an important representative one is its individualism. This paper will briefly discuss it based on daily matters.

  13. The Formation of American Hegemonism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘琦灵

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, American culture permeates in our life. It seems that all the things in the world are in relation to the United States. This thesis discusses hegemonism in America from three aspects: the definition of hegemony, the origin of American hegemony and the interaction between American values. The purpose of this thesis is to get a comprehensive understanding of American hegemonism,

  14. American Pet Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    海焰

    2007-01-01

    In America you can find dogs,cats, horses,monkeys, snakes and even pigs in almost every family.They are their pets.Americans love pets and look on them as a part of the family.Sometimes pet owners dress their pets in fashionable clothes.They even buy toys for their pets.Americans love their pets as their children, sometimes even better.

  15. American Outlaws in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    An aspect of the diffusion of American popular culture is examined in this research drawing upon national survey data. Measuring Australians¡¯ knowledge of American and Australian outlaws, we found that Jesse James and Billy the Kid are better known in Australia than any of the local outlaws, or bushrangers, with the exception of Ned Kelly. While a relatively large proportion of Australians identified Ned Kelly, Ben Hall, Jesse James and Billy the Kid as outlaws, few identified other Australi...

  16. Ondansetron reduces naturalistic drinking in non-treatment seeking alcohol dependent individuals with the LL 5′-HTTLPR genotype: a laboratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, George A.; Zywiak, William H.; Swift, Robert M.; McGeary, John E.; Clifford, James S.; Shoaff, Jessica R.; Vuittonet, Cynthia; Fricchione, Samuel; Brickley, Michael; Beaucage, Kayla; Haass-Koffler, Carolina L.; Leggio, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Background One hypothesis suggests that the differential response to ondansetron and serotonin specific re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may be due to a functional polymorphism of the 5′-HTTLPR promoter region in SLC6A4, the gene that codes for the serotonin transporter (5-HTT). The LL 5′-HTTLPR genotype is postulated to be specifically sensitive to the effects of ondansetron with SS/SL 5′-HTTLPR genotypes sensitive to SSRIs. This study tests this hypothesis by matching non-treatment seeking alcohol dependent (AD) individuals with LL genotype to ondansetron and SS/SL genotypes to the SSRI sertraline, and mis-matching them assessing naturalistic and bar-laboratory alcohol drinking. Methods Seventy-seven AD individuals were randomized to one of two counterbalanced arms to receive sertraline 200mg/day or ondansetron 0.5 mg/day for three weeks followed by an alcohol self-administration experiment (ASAE), then received placebo for three weeks followed by a second ASAE. Individuals then received the alternate drug for three weeks followed by a third ASAE. Drinks per drinking day (DDD with drinks in SDUs) for 7 days prior to each ASAE and milliliters consumed during each ASAE were the primary outcomes. Results Fifty-five participants completed the study. The genotype x order interaction was significant [F(1,47) = 8.42, p = .006] for DDD. Three ANCOVAs were conducted for DDD during the week before each ASAE. Ondansetron compared to sertraline resulted in a significant reduction in DDD during the week before the first [F(1,47) = 7.64, p = .008] but not the third ASAE. There was no difference in milliliters consumed during each ASAE. Conclusion This study modestly supports the hypothesis that ondansetron may reduce DDD in AD individuals with the LL genotype as measured naturalistically. By contrast there was no support that ondansetron reduces drinking during the ASAEs or that sertraline reduces alcohol use in individuals who have SS/SL genotypes. We provide limited

  17. The longer-term cognitive effects of adjunctive antiepileptic treatment with lacosamide in comparison with lamotrigine and topiramate in a naturalistic outpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmstaedter, Christoph; Witt, Juri-Alexander

    2013-02-01

    In this retrospective controlled study, the impact of adjunctive lacosamide (LCM) on cognition in patients with epilepsy was evaluated and compared with that of topiramate (TPM) and lamotrigine (LTG) in a naturalistic outpatient setting. Cognition was investigated by means of objective assessment of executive functions (EpiTrack®) and verbal memory and by subjective ratings of self-perceived side effects (cognition, mood, and vegetative). Quality of life was assessed using the QOLIE-10 questionnaire. Patients underwent assessment at baseline and after a median follow-up interval of 32 weeks. Forty-four patients were treated with LCM, 11 with LTG, and 15 with TPM. Treatment arms differed with regard to the age at onset of epilepsy (LTG>TPM) and to seizure control from baseline to follow-up, which was best in patients whose seizures were treated with LTG (55% vs. 16% in patients whose seizures were treated with LCM and 13% in patients whose seizures were treated with TPM). Groups did not differ in the type of epilepsy, daily drug load or drug load change, nor in baseline seizure frequency. Repeated measures statistics controlling for epilepsy onset and seizure outcome showed deteriorated executive functions with TPM (F=7.5, p=0.001). On an individual level (reliable change indices), 53% of the patients whose seizures were treated with TPM showed losses in this domain (LCM 14%, LTG 27%) and none of the patients showed improvement (LCM 23%, LTG 27%; χ(2)=11.8, p=0.019). No differences in memory, quality of life, or mood were noted among patients in the three treatment arms. Subjective cognitive complaints increased in 5 of the 9 patients whose seizures were treated with TPM (LCM 1/9, LTG 0/9; χ(2)=11.9, p=0.025). The findings of this study demonstrate for the first time that the cognitive side effect profile of LCM is comparable to that of LTG and superior to that of TPM. This is indicated by both subjective and objective measures. Given the naturalistic setting and

  18. Prospective, naturalistic study of open-label OROS methylphenidate treatment in Chinese school-aged children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Yi; GONG Mei-en; YIN Qing-yun; MAI Jian-ning; JING Jin; LUO Xiang-yang; MA Hong-wei; LI Hai-bo; XIE Ling; LI Yan; Kuang Gui-fang; WANG Yu-feng; YI Ming-ji; WANG Feng; ZHU Xiao-hua; YAO Yah-bin; QIN Jiong; WANG Li-wen; ZOU Li-ping; JIN Xing-ming; XU Tong; WANG Yi; QI Yuan-li

    2011-01-01

    Background Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common mental disorders during childhood,characterized by the core symptoms of hyperactivity,impulsivity and inattention and puts great burden on children themselves,their families and the society.Osmotic release oral system methylphenidate (OROS-MPH) is a once-daily controlled-release formulation developed to overcome some of the limitations associated with immediate-release methylphenidate (IR-MPH).It has been marketed in China since 2005 but still lacks data from large-sample clinical trials on efficacy and safety profiles.The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of OROS-MPH in children aged 6 to 16 years with ADHD under naturalistic clinical setting.Methods This 6-week,multi-center,prospective,open-label study enrolled 1447 ADHD children to once-daily OROS-MPH (18 mg,36 mg or 54 mg) treatment.The effectiveness measures were parent-rated Inattention and Overactivity With Aggression (IOWA) Conners I/O and O/D subscales,physician-rated CGI-I and parent-rated global efficacy assessment scale.Blood pressure,pulse rate measurement,adverse events (AEs) and concomitant medications and treatment review were conducted by the investigator and were served as safety measures.Results A total of 1447 children with ADHD (mean age (9.52±2.36) years) were enrolled in this trial.Totally 96.8%children received an OROS-MPH modal dose of 18 mg,3.1% with 36 mg and 0.1% with 54 mg at the endpoint of study.The parent IOWA Conners I/O score at the end of week 2 showed statistically significant (P <0.001) improvement with OROS-MPH (mean:6.95±2.71) versus the score at baseline (10.45±2.72).The change in the parent IOWA Conners O/D subscale,CGI-I and parent-rated global efficacy assessment scale also supported the superior efficacy for OROS-MPH treatment.Fewer than half of 1447 patients (511 (35.3%)) reported AEs,and the majority of the events reported were mild (68.2

  19. Creating a driving profile for older adults using GPS devices and naturalistic driving methodology [version 2; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh M. Babulal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objectives: Road tests and driving simulators are most commonly used in research studies and clinical evaluations of older drivers. Our objective was to describe the process and associated challenges in adapting an existing, commercial, off-the-shelf (COTS, in-vehicle device for naturalistic, longitudinal research to better understand daily driving behavior in older drivers. Design: The Azuga G2 Tracking DeviceTM was installed in each participant’s vehicle, and we collected data over 5 months (speed, latitude/longitude every 30-seconds when the vehicle was driven.  Setting: The Knight Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at Washington University School of Medicine. Participants: Five individuals enrolled in a larger, longitudinal study assessing preclinical Alzheimer disease and driving performance.  Participants were aged 65+ years and had normal cognition. Measurements:  Spatial components included Primary Location(s, Driving Areas, Mean Centers and Unique Destinations.  Temporal components included number of trips taken during different times of the day.  Behavioral components included number of hard braking, speeding and sudden acceleration events. Methods:  Individual 30-second observations, each comprising one breadcrumb, and trip-level data were collected and analyzed in R and ArcGIS.  Results: Primary locations were confirmed to be 100% accurate when compared to known addresses.  Based on the locations of the breadcrumbs, we were able to successfully identify frequently visited locations and general travel patterns.  Based on the reported time from the breadcrumbs, we could assess number of trips driven in daylight vs. night.  Data on additional events while driving allowed us to compute the number of adverse driving alerts over the course of the 5-month period. Conclusions: Compared to cameras and highly instrumented vehicle in other naturalistic studies, the compact COTS device was quickly installed and

  20. Contemporary American Chinese Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu Huafei

    2008-01-01

    The rise of modern American scholarship on China was largely attributed to the establishment of the American Joint Committee on Contemporary China (JCCC) in 1959 which sponsored all kinds of activities to promote Chinese studies, ranging from institutional support and financial resources to training courses. Since then, American study of China has entered into a period of sustainability that features academic and group-oriented research. It has become a mainstream discipline in American social science studies.1 There are some distinctive differences between early sinology and modern Chinese Studies: the latter is much more concentrated on the study of issues, comparative historical studies, and contemporary Chinese society. American Chinese studies stresses empirical research, textual data, and the application of theory to practice.Shanghai. He was a Fulbright visiting professor at State University of New York at Geneseo from 2006-2007. This treatise is one of a series of studies for China's National Research Foundation of Philosophy and Social Science (05BGJ012), "American Chinese Studies."

  1. Evaluating Membrane Processes for Air Conditioning; Highlights in Research and Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-06-01

    This NREL Highlight discusses a recent state-of-the-art review of membrane processes for air conditioning that identifies future research opportunities. This highlight is being developed for the June 2015 S&T Alliance Board meeting.

  2. 裴斯泰洛齐与卢梭自然主义教育思想之比较%A Comparative Study of Pestalozzi’s and Rousseau’s Thoughts on Naturalistic Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯晓

    2011-01-01

    The paper comparatively studies the dissimilarities and connections of Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi,two representative naturalistic educators,in the aspects of connotations,targets,contents and teacher-student relationship of naturalistic education.Pestalozzi’s naturalistic education thought can be seen as the development and inheritance of Rousseau’s.Rousseau and Pestalozzi both emphasize the role of education in children’s development of adaptability to nature,and put forward the similar educational principles and methods.The comparison of the naturalistic education thought of Rousseau and Pestalozzi will be of great significance to promote education research,children’s healthy growth and harmonious development.%卢梭和裴斯泰洛齐是西方教育发展史上极具代表性的自然主义教育家。通过比较发现,两者在自然主义教育的内涵、培养目标、教育内容和师生关系上存在不同,但也存在一定的联系:裴斯泰洛齐自然主义教育思想是对卢梭自然教育思想的继承和发展;在适应自然的教育原则指导下,两者都十分重视教育在儿童发展过程中的作用,并提出相似的教育原则及方法。比较两者自然主义教育思想的异同,对提高教育研究水平及促进儿童健康成长、和谐发展具有良好的借鉴意义。

  3. Highlights 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-02-15

    This document summarizes a year of activities for the ESRF (European synchrotron radiation facilities), this facility serves 31 beamlines that represent 34 end stations that can be run independently. This document is organized into 9 parts. Part 1: 'high resolution and resonance scattering' deals with surface science and magnetism at high pressure, in particular results are presented for samarium and europium chalcogenides. A cross-section of a variety of applications are presented, they range from glass physics to the understanding of thermoelectric materials. Part 2: 'materials sciences' deals with material behaviour under extreme conditions (metallic sulfur above 100 GPa,...) general applications of X-ray diffraction : stress and strain studies, assessment of excess free volume in metallic glasses, or grain nucleation and growth kinetics during solidification. Part 3: 'soft condensed matter'. Part 4: 'structural biology'. Part 5: 'surface and interface science' (at ESRF surfaces and interfaces are studied at about 50% of all beamlines). A study shows the existence of ordered SiGe domains in the interior of the small Ge islands in Si, whereas bulk SiGe alloy is disordered. Other studies shed light on the surprisingly different magnetic behaviour of ultra-thin cobalt and nickel films on a platinum surface. Part 6 : 'X-ray absorption and magnetic scattering'. Many of the studies push the limits of methods using high pressure, high magnetic fields, high and low temperature with absorption and scattering techniques. There are also examples of measurements on the femtosecond time scale using the core-hole clock method and on femto-meter length scale in magnetostriction measurements. Part 7: 'X-ray imaging and optics'. Part 8: 'the X-ray source'. Part 9: 'facts and figures'. (A.C.)

  4. MAGIC highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Coto, Rubén

    2016-07-01

    The present generation of Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) has greatly improved our knowledge on the Very High Energy (VHE) side of our Universe. The MAGIC IACTs operate since 2004 with one telescope and since 2009 as a two telescope stereoscopic system. I will outline a few of our latest and most relevant results: the discovery of pulsed emission from the Crab pulsar at VHE, recently found to extend up to 400 GeV and along the "bridge" of the light curve, the measurement of the Crab nebula spectrum over three decades of energy, the discovery of VHE γ-ray emission from the PWN 3C 58, the very rapid emission of IC 310, in addition to dark matter studies. The results that will be described here and the planned deep observations in the next years will pave the path for the future generation of IACTs.

  5. Product highlights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    This machine is used to weave high-quality/ace, jacquard apparel fabric, and jacquard ornamental fabric, etc. The features of this machine are presented in the following aspects: the combination of multi bar and jacquard technology form textured base fabric; the fall plate and selvage bar forms embossed pattern; laying-in selvage bar forms the pattern of plain fabric, all those strengthening the effect of the lace pattern.

  6. Brookhaven highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L. (eds.)

    1992-01-01

    This publication provides a broad overview of the research programs and efforts being conducted, built, designed, and planned at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work covers a broad range of scientific disciplines. Major facilities include the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), with its newly completed booster, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and the RHIC, which is under construction. Departments within the laboratory include the AGS department, accelerator development, physics, chemistry, biology, NSLS, medical, nuclear energy, and interdepartmental research efforts. Research ranges from the pure sciences, in nuclear physics and high energy physics as one example, to environmental work in applied science to study climatic effects, from efforts in biology which are a component of the human genome project to the study, production, and characterization of new materials. The paper provides an overview of the laboratory operations during 1992, including staffing, research, honors, funding, and general laboratory plans for the future.

  7. MAGIC highlights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Coto Rubén

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present generation of Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs has greatly improved our knowledge on the Very High Energy (VHE side of our Universe. The MAGIC IACTs operate since 2004 with one telescope and since 2009 as a two telescope stereoscopic system. I will outline a few of our latest and most relevant results: the discovery of pulsed emission from the Crab pulsar at VHE, recently found to extend up to 400 GeV and along the “bridge” of the light curve, the measurement of the Crab nebula spectrum over three decades of energy, the discovery of VHE γ-ray emission from the PWN 3C 58, the very rapid emission of IC 310, in addition to dark matter studies. The results that will be described here and the planned deep observations in the next years will pave the path for the future generation of IACTs.

  8. OPERA HIGHLIGHTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Strauss

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The OPERA experiment is a long baseline neutrino oscillation  experiment aimed at observing the νμ → ντ neutrino oscillation in the CERN neutrino to Gran Sasso beamline in the appearance mode by detecting the τ-decay. Here I will summarize the results from the run years 2008–10 with an update on observed rare decay topologies and the results of the neutrino velocity measurements.

  9. AGARD Highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    m) IT ala (1) a freccia ES sensacion (r) artificial ES indicador (m) tipo A NE pillvleugel FR I sensation MI artificielle FR indicateur (m) type A...visualizzatore (m) tipo A TU W tipi kanat fT sensirie Nf errificiale NE A-scharmt iro) NE kunstmastig I stuurkracht) gevroel In) PO dcran Wm tipo A 10596

  10. STAR Highlights

    OpenAIRE

    Masui, Hiroshi; collaboration, for the STAR

    2011-01-01

    We report selected results from STAR collaboration at RHIC, focusing on jet-hadron and jet-like correlations, quarkonium suppression and collectivity, di-electron spectrum in both p+p and Au+Au, and higher moments of net-protons as well as azimuthal anisotropy from RHIC Beam Energy Scan program.

  11. Sexual assault services coverage on Native American land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juraska, Ashley; Wood, Lindsey; Giroux, Jennifer; Wood, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Native American women experience higher rates of sexual assault than other women in the United States, yet there is limited information on the accessibility of forensic services for Native American victims of sexual violence. This study used geographic information systems technology to map known sexual assault examiner (SAE) and sexual assault response team (SART) programs in the United States (n = 873) in proximity to 650 census-designated Native American lands. Analysis was repeated for 29 Indian Health Service and tribal-operated facilities that self-identified that they provide sexual assault examinations. Network analysis showed that 30.7% of Native American land is within a 60-minute driving distance of a facility offering SAE or SART services. Indian Health Service and tribal-operated facilities increased accessibility to SAE services on 35 Native American lands. This study shows gaps in coverage for more than two thirds of Native American lands, including 381 lands with no coverage, highlighting the need for expanded SAE and SART services near or on Native American land.

  12. Geriatric rehabilitation for patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a naturalistic prospective cohort study on feasibility and course of health status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam van Isselt, Eléonore F; Spruit, Monica; Groenewegen-Sipkema, Karin H; Chavannes, Niels H; Achterberg, Wilco P

    2014-05-01

    In view of the worldwide aging population, disease-specific geriatric rehabilitation (GR) programs are needed. Therefore, we developed and implemented a postacute GR program for patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (the GR-COPD program). The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of the GR-COPD program and to present clinical data on patient characteristics and course of functional capacity and health status. This is a naturalistic prospective cohort study of patients with advanced COPD. A total of 61 patients entered the GR-COPD program and were eligible to participate in this study. All patients suffered from advanced COPD, and comorbidities were frequent. On admission, functional capacity and health status were severely limited but showed significant and clinically relevant improvement during the GR-COPD program. Patients with advanced COPD admitted to hospital for an acute exacerbation suffer from severely impaired functional capacity and poor health status. Development and implementation of a postacute GR program for these patients are feasible and likely to offer substantial improvements. Further research is essential and should focus on designing a controlled intervention trial to investigate the efficacy of the program.

  13. Mental health service use by patients with dysthymic disorder: treatment use and dropout in a 7 1/2-year naturalistic follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Brian R; Klein, Daniel N

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about long-term treatment use among patients with dysthymia. This paper describes patterns of treatment use by 85 outpatients with dysthymic disorder and a comparison group of 36 outpatients with nonchronic (episodic) major depression in a naturalistic follow-up. Patients with dysthymia had higher rates of treatment use across 7 1/2 years compared with patients with episodic major depression. Baseline variables that predicted which patients with dysthymia dropped out of treatment before recovering from dysthymic disorder included age, ethnicity, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Revised Third Edition Axis II pathology as obtained from informant reports, higher self-reported autonomy, and receiving psychotherapy alone as compared to receiving a combination of psychotherapy and medication. Dysthymic disorder places a significant burden on the mental health services system, yet many outpatients with dysthymia may be receiving inadequate treatment. Younger patients, ethnic minority patients, and patients with personality disorders may be at increased risk of dropping out from treatment for depression. Combination treatments may increase treatment retention.

  14. A priori expectancy bias and its relation to shock experience and anxiety: a naturalistic study in patients with an automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, P; Wiedemann, G; Dengler, W; Kühlkamp, V

    2001-09-01

    Patients with an automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator (AICD) may offer an unique naturalistic opportunity to study whether expectancy biases develop because of precipitating aversive or traumatic experiences and/or because of elevated anxiety. An expectancy bias and its associations with AICD discharge and anxiety was examined in 24 AICD patients with a thought experiment. While patients without AICD discharge exhibited no expectancy bias, patients with discharge experiences were found to expect that stimuli depicting medical emergency situations will be followed by an aversive consequence. The magnitude of their expectancy bias was positively correlated with their anxiety level. In the group with AICD discharge, patients with low anxiety levels exhibited no bias, while patients with high anxiety levels exhibited a rather strong bias. It seems that the experience of an aversive or traumatic event, here an AICD discharge, is a necessary (but not sufficient) precipitating event for the development of an expectancy bias. If such an event happens, trait anxiety level presumably determines if and how strong the expectancy bias will be.

  15. No influence of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) polymorphisms on treatment response in a naturalistic sample of patients with major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musil, Richard; Zill, Peter; Seemüller, Florian; Bondy, Brigitta; Obermeier, Michael; Spellmann, Ilja; Bender, Wolfram; Adli, Mazda; Heuser, Isabella; Zeiler, Joachim; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Maier, Wolfgang; Rietschel, Marcella; Rujescu, Dan; Schennach, Rebecca; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Riedel, Michael

    2013-08-01

    The role of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD) remains to be elucidated. Recent post hoc analyses indicated a potential association of three polymorphisms in the BDNF gene with worse treatment outcome in patients with the subtype of melancholic depression. We aimed at replicating these findings in a German naturalistic multicenter follow-up. Three polymorphisms in the BDNF gene (rs7103411, rs6265 (Val66Met) and rs7124442) were genotyped in 324 patients with MDD and 470 healthy controls. We applied univariate tests and logistic regression models stratifying for depression subtype and gender. The three polymorphisms were not associated with MDD as diagnosis. Further, no associations were found in univariate tests. With logistic regression, we only found a tendency towards an association of the rs6265 (Val66Met) polymorphism with overall response to treatment (response rates: GG (val/val) < GA (val/met) < AA (met/met); p = 0.0129) and some gender differences for the rs6265 (Val66Met) and rs7103411 polymorphisms. Treatment outcome stratified for subtypes of depression did not differ significantly between the investigated polymorphisms or using haplotype analyses. However, results showed a tendency towards significance. At this stage, we cannot support an influence of these three polymorphisms. Further studies in larger patient samples to increase sample sizes of subgroups are warranted.

  16. Noninvasive brain stimulation by radioelectric asymmetric conveyor in the treatment of agoraphobia: open-label, naturalistic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannu P

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Piero Mannu, Salvatore Rinaldi, Vania Fontani, Alessandro Castagna, Matteo Lotti MargottiDepartment of Neuro Psycho Physio Pathology, Rinaldi Fontani Institute, Florence, ItalyBackground: Agoraphobia is considered to be the most serious complication of panic disorder. It involves progressive development of debilitating anxiety symptoms related to being in situations where one would be extremely embarrassed and could not be rescued in the case of a panic attack. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of noninvasive brain stimulation using a radioelectric asymmetric conveyor (REAC for agoraphobia.Patients and methods: Twenty-three patients (3 males and 20 females suffering from agoraphobia and without a history of panic disorder were evaluated by a psychiatrist using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision, and the Agoraphobia Scale (AS. The patients were subjected to two 18-session cycles of noninvasive brain stimulation with the REAC, according to an established therapeutic protocol called neuro-psycho-physical optimization.Results: Analyzing the anxiety and avoidance parameters of the AS after the first and second cycles of REAC treatment revealed variation in levels of response to treatment, including weak (AS item 7, moderate (AS items 10 and 13, and good responses (AS items 1–6, 8, 9, 11, 12, and 14–20.Conclusion: These results highlight the potential of the REAC to treat complex clinical situations such as agoraphobia, which is typically resistant to pharmacologic treatments. Furthermore, these data show the advantages of REAC treatment, even compared with modern cognitive behavioral therapy, including a relatively rapid and “stable” clinical response (just over 6 months and economic cost.Keywords: anxiety, avoidance, fear, REAC

  17. Latin American guidelines on hypertension. Latin American Expert Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Ramiro A; Ayala, Miryam; Baglivo, Hugo; Velazquez, Carlos; Burlando, Guillermo; Kohlmann, Oswaldo; Jimenez, Jorge; Jaramillo, Patricio López; Brandao, Ayrton; Valdes, Gloria; Alcocer, Luis; Bendersky, Mario; Ramirez, Agustín José; Zanchetti, Alberto

    2009-05-01

    Hypertension is a highly prevalent cardiovascular risk factor in the world and particularly overwhelming in low and middle-income countries. Recent reports from the WHO and the World Bank highlight the importance of chronic diseases such as hypertension as an obstacle to the achievement of good health status. It must be added that for most low and middle-income countries, deficient strategies of primary healthcare are the major obstacles for blood pressure control. Furthermore, the epidemiology of hypertension and related diseases, healthcare resources and priorities, the socioeconomic status of the population vary considerably in different countries and in different regions of individual countries. Considering the low rates of blood pressure control achieved in Latin America and the benefits that can be expected from an improved control, it was decided to invite specialists from different Latin American countries to analyze the regional situation and to provide a consensus document on detection, evaluation and treatment of hypertension that may prove to be cost-utility adequate. The recommendations here included are the result of preparatory documents by invited experts and a subsequent very active debate by different discussion panels, held during a 2-day sessions in Asuncion, Paraguay, in May 2008. Finally, in order to improve clinical practice, the publication of the guidelines should be followed by implementation of effective interventions capable of overcoming barriers (cognitive, behavioral and affective) preventing attitude changes in both physicians and patients.

  18. Scale-dependent factors affecting North American river otter distribution in the midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffress, Mackenzie R.; Paukert, C.P.; Whittier, Joanna B.; Sandercock, B.K.; Gipson, P.S.

    2011-01-01

    The North American river otter (Lontra canadensis) is recovering from near extirpation throughout much of its range. Although reintroductions, trapping regulations and habitat improvements have led to the reestablishment of river otters in the Midwest, little is known about how their distribution is influenced by local- and landscape-scale habitat. We conducted river otter sign surveys from Jan. to Apr. in 2008 and 2009 in eastern Kansas to assess how local- and landscape-scale habitat factors affect river otter occupancy. We surveyed three to nine 400-m stretches of stream and reservoir shorelines for 110 sites and measured local-scale variables (e.g., stream order, land cover types) within a 100 m buffer of the survey site and landscape-scale variables (e.g., road density, land cover types) for Hydrological Unit Code 14 watersheds. We then used occupancy models that account for the probability of detection to estimate occupancy as a function of these covariates using Program PRESENCE. The best-fitting model indicated river otter occupancy increased with the proportion of woodland cover and decreased with the proportion of cropland and grassland cover at the local scale. Occupancy also increased with decreased shoreline diversity, waterbody density and stream density at the landscape scale. Occupancy was not affected by land cover or human disturbance at the landscape scale. Understanding the factors and scale important to river otter occurrence will be useful in identifying areas for management and continued restoration. ?? 2011, American Midland Naturalist.

  19. Patient satisfaction and ethnic identity among American Indian older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garroutte, Eva Marie; Kunovich, Robert M; Jacobsen, Clemma; Goldberg, Jack

    2004-12-01

    Work in the field of culturally competent medical care draws on studies showing that minority Americans often report lower satisfaction with care than White Americans and recommends that providers should adapt care to patients' cultural needs. However, empirical evidence in support of cultural competence models is limited by reliance upon measurements of racial rather than ethnic identity and also by a near-total neglect of American Indians. This project explored the relationship between ethnic identity and satisfaction using survey data collected from 115 chronically ill American Indian patients >or=50 years at a Cherokee Nation clinic. Satisfaction scores were high overall and comparable to those found in the general population. Nevertheless, analysis using hierarchical linear modeling showed that patients' self-rated American Indian ethnic identity was significantly associated with satisfaction. Specifically, patients who rated themselves high on the measure of American Indian ethnic identity reported reduced scores on satisfaction with health care providers' social skill and attentiveness, as compared to those who rated themselves lower. Significant associations remained after controlling for patients' sex, age, education, marital status, self-reported health, wait time, and number of previous visits. There were no significant associations between patients' American Indian ethnic identity and satisfaction with provider's technical skill and shared decision-making. Likewise, there were no significant associations between satisfaction and a separate measure of White American ethnic identity, although a suggestive trend was observed for satisfaction with provider's social skill. Our findings demonstrate the importance of including measures of ethnic identity in studies of medical satisfaction in racial minority populations. They support the importance of adapting care to patient's cultural needs, and they highlight the particular significance of interpersonal

  20. "A Fly in the Ointment": African American Male Preservice Teachers' Experiences with Stereotype Threat in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Sonya V.; Rodriguez, Louie F.

    2015-01-01

    This study draws from a larger phenomenological study on African American academic persistence and career aspirations in education. This article highlights three African American males' experiences with concentrated forms of stereotype threat in teacher education. Their voices revealed dimensions of how power and privilege operate in teacher…

  1. The American Armies: 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    terrorism and crime that accompany it. The dynamic of the U.S. relationship with Latin American countries has also changed. This is most evident in...have already found it.... The inter-American order was not built by hatred and terror . It has been paved by the endless and effective work of men of...Peru’s armed forces." They also discuss the collapsed talks between former President Bush and Mr. Fujimori over attempts to get coca farmers to grow other

  2. MODERN AMERICAN ENGLISH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    With China’s open door policy advocating that Chinese people study abroad, primarily in English-speaking countries, a text tailored to preparing these students is needed. Modern American English, (MAE) composed jointly by Chinese and American linguists, attempts to fill the void. The book’s introduction states a twofold purpose: to help Chinese students learn situational English and to introduce Western culture and society. By assessing MAE’s strength’s and weaknesses it is my intention to provide the publisher with some feedback that may be of some help for forthcoming revisions.

  3. CHROMOSOMES OF AMERICAN MARSUPIALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BIGGERS, J D; FRITZ, H I; HARE, W C; MCFEELY, R A

    1965-06-18

    Studies of the chromosomes of four American marsupials demonstrated that Caluromys derbianus and Marmosa mexicana have a diploid number of 14 chromosomes, and that Philander opossum and Didelphis marsupialis have a diploid number of 22. The karyotypes of C. derbianus and M. mexicana are similar, whereas those of P. opossum and D. marsupialis are dissimilar. If the 14-chromosome karyotype represents a reduction from a primitive number of 22, these observations suggest that the change has occurred independently in the American and Australasian forms.

  4. American Society of Hematology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... locations A complimentary CME summit on the diagnosis, classification, and care of MDS. 2017 Highlights of ASH ® ... of Theranos, a medical and technological innovations laboratory company founded by Elizabeth Holmes. View all Hematologist articles ...

  5. Psychodramatic psychotherapy combined with pharmacotherapy in major depressive disorder: an open and naturalistic study Psicoterapia psicodramática combinada ao tratamento medicamentoso no transtorno depressivo maior: um estudo aberto e naturalístico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Maria Sene Costa

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVE: Recent literature has highlighted the role of psychotherapy in the treatment of major depressive disorder. Combined therapies comprising both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy have presented the best results. Although several kinds of psychotherapies have been studied in the treatment of depressive disorders, there remains a lack of data on psychodramatic psychotherapy in the treatment of major depressive disorder. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of psychodramatic psychotherapy (in a sample of major depressive disorder patients. METHOD: This is an open, naturalistic, controlled, non-randomized study. Twenty major depressive disorder patients (according to the DSM-IV criteria, under pharmacological treatment for depression, with Hamilton Depression Scale total scores between 7 and 20 (mild to moderate depression, were divided into two groups. Patients in the psychotherapeutic group took part in 4 individual and 24 structured psychodramatic group sessions, whilst subjects in the control group did not participate in this psychodramatic psychotherapy. Both groups were evaluated with the Social Adjustment Scale - Self Report and the Hamilton Depression Scale. RESULTS: Psychotherapeutic group patients showed a significant improvement according to the Social Adjustment Scale - Self Report and the Hamilton Depression Scale scores at endpoint, compared to those of the control group. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that individual and group psychodramatic psychotherapy, associated to pharmacological treatment, provides good clinical benefits in the treatment of major depressive disorder.OBJETIVO: A literatura recente destaca o papel das psicoterapias no tratamento do transtorno depressivo maior. A combinação de psicoterapia e farmacoterapia apresenta os melhores resultados. Vários tipos de psicoterapias têm sido estudados no tratamento dos transtornos depressivos; no entanto, existem poucos dados sobre a psicoterapia

  6. American Academy of Sleep Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the field of sleep medicine. Join the American Academy of Sleep Medicine to further your career and ... MD Sept. 21 - As president of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, I am keenly aware of ...

  7. Native Americans' Interest in Horticulture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Mary Hockenberry

    1999-01-01

    Focus groups arranged by local Native American Master Gardeners on two Minnesota reservations determined community interest in extension-horticulture programs. Topics of interest included food preservation and historical Native-American uses of plants. (SK)

  8. Job satisfaction of Asian Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, C N; Hinson, S

    2000-04-01

    Since Asian Americans have demographic and labor force characteristics more similar to Euro-Americans than African Americans, one might predict that their job satisfaction would be more like the former than the latter. And, because Asian Americans originating from different countries are heterogeneous in language, culture, and recency of immigration, one might predict that they may report obtaining different amounts of satisfaction from their jobs. However, data from 21 nationally representative opinion surveys from 1972 through 1996 suggest the opposite. Asian Americans (n = 199) reported job satisfaction more like African Americans (n = 1,231) than Euro-Americans (n = 10,709), and Asian Americans from China (n = 53), Japan (n = 44), India (n = 55), and the Philippines (n = 47) reported similar job satisfaction. These differences persisted when age, education, occupation, and personal income were held constant.

  9. Mental Health and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Mental Health Mental Health and African Americans Poverty level affects mental health ... compared to 120% of non-Hispanic whites. 1 MENTAL HEALTH STATUS Serious psychological distress among adults 18 years ...

  10. Post-9/11: Making Islam an American Religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article explores several key events in the last 12 years that led to periods of heightened suspicion about Islam and Muslims in the United States. It provides a brief overview of the rise of anti-Muslim and anti-Islam sentiment known as “Islamophobia”, and it investigates claims that American Muslims cannot be trusted to be loyal to the United States because of their religion. This research examines American Muslim perspectives on national security discourse regarding terrorism and radicalization, both domestic and foreign, after 9/11. The article argues that it is important to highlight developments, both progressive and conservative, in Muslim communities in the United States over the last 12 years that belie suspicions of widespread anti-American sentiment among Muslims or questions about the loyalty of American Muslims. The article concludes with a discussion of important shifts from a Muslim identity politics that disassociated from American identity and ‘American exceptionalism’ to a position of integration and cultural assimilation.

  11. American Academy of Ophthalmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Follow The Academy Professionals: Education Guidelines News Multimedia Public & Patients: Contact Us About the Academy Jobs at the Academy Financial Relationships with Industry Medical Disclaimer Privacy Policy Terms of Service For Advertisers For Media Ophthalmology Job Center © American Academy of ...

  12. Delusion of American Dream

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘云芳

    2014-01-01

    Martin Eden by Jack London and The Great Gatsby by F.Scott Fitzergald are both stories describing the delusion of American dream. They share much in common for they are discussing the same themes actually. By analyzing the two protagonists’life experience and deaths respectively,we try to explore the profound meaning hidden under the surface.

  13. Arab American Voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Loretta

    Through speeches, newspaper accounts, poems, memoirs, interviews, and other materials by and about Arab Americans, this collection explores issues central to what it means to be of Arab descent in the United States today. Each of the entries is accompanied by an introduction, biographical and historical information, a glossary for the selection,…

  14. Cultural Vignette: Mexican Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Mary Ellen; And Others

    Developed as part of a multicultural research project in the San Diego Community College District, this booklet presents the findings of a 10-member research team about various elements of Mexican-American culture. The areas covered are: (1) historical background on the Mexican heritage of the United States from pre-colonial times to the present…

  15. Saga of American Sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, John A.; Smith, Ronald A.

    This history of sports and athletic activities in America covers a time span from the close of the sixteenth century to the present time. It is divided into three major sections. The first, "Colonial and Early American Sport," narrates the early moral and ethical attitudes of the Puritans and follows the changes in attitudes and introduction of…

  16. American Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... combined with facial expressions and postures of the body. It is the primary language of many North Americans who are deaf and ... their eyebrows, widening their eyes, and tilting their bodies forward. Just as with other languages, specific ways of expressing ideas in ASL vary ...

  17. American Dream / Anu Raat

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Raat, Anu

    2010-01-01

    Uuritakse sõnapaari "American dream" tähendust, kuidas ja millal see unelmalugu tekkis, miks see on ameerikalik nähtus, samuti 1950-ndate moeloomingut, eriti Christian Diori oma Euroopas ja Ameerikas, selle põhjusi ja mõjusid seoses massilise tarbimisega

  18. American Board of Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Suite 860 Philadelphia, PA 19103 215.568.4000 Facebook Twitter Site Map © 2003-2017 American Board of Surgery, Inc. All rights reserved. Training & Certification Toggle navigation arrow Becoming Certified Dates & Fees Taking a Computer Exam International Training & Visas For Residency & Fellowship Programs ...

  19. American Society of Neuroradiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ASNR American Society of Neuroradiology Forgot username or password ? .: International Day Of Radiology :. Tues, Nov 8 is International Day of Radiology. ... you celebrate, #neurorad? #IDoR2016 Once again, the European Society of Radiology has created a wonderful ... Tues, Nov ...

  20. Cultural Vignette: Vietnamese Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Mary Ellen; And Others

    This booklet, developed as part of a multicultural research project conducted in the San Diego Community College District, presents the findings of a nine-member research team on various aspects of the history and culture of Vietnamese Americans. The areas covered are: (1) the Vietnamese as immigrant, which includes a discussion of the trauma and…