WorldWideScience

Sample records for american naturalist highlights

  1. Interpretive signs designed to trigger naturalist intelligence at two American zoos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Martha

    An investigation of interpretive graphics was conducted in 2005 at two mid-sized AZA-accredited zoos, Lowry Park Zoo, Tampa, Florida and Knoxville Zoo, Knoxville, Tennessee. The Lowry Park Zoo study investigated signs at a red-tailed hawk and sandhill crane exhibit. Combination signs and wordless signs were more effective helping visitors see animals, increasing holding time, and number of engagements than treatments of no signs, or signs with words only. A second study, at Knoxville Zoo, tested combination and wordless signs in a children's zoo, investigating 31 signs at a 3.5-acre exhibit. Comparisons of visitors seeing the animals/using interactive exhibit elements, holding time, and engagement activities, showed wordless signs were more effective than combination signs. Differences in gender ratio, age, group size, and other demographics were not significant. Visit motivation differed between zoos, with visitors from Lowry Park Zoo more often articulating reason for a visit as wanting to see animals. Visitors at Knoxville Zoo most often said they wanted to spend time with family and friends. Differences in potential for naturalist intelligence were probably related to local practices rather than to innate differences in naturalist intelligence. The number of communities in Florida that regulate pet ownership and provide lawn service could account for the lower number of people who have pets and plants. At both institutions, behaviors supported educational theories. The importance of signs as advanced organizers was shown where signs were removed at the bird exhibit at Lowry Park Zoo, with fewer visitors seeing the animals. Social interaction was noted at both zoos, with intra- and inter-group conversations observed. If naturalist intelligence is necessary to see animals, visitors run a continuum. Some are unable to see animals with signs and assistance from other visitors; others see animals with little difficulty. The importance of honing naturalist

  2. A Naturalistic Reading of Sister Carrie

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谈月

    2016-01-01

    Sister Carrie is well known as the works in which naturalism attained maturity in America. Up until now, the relevant research on Dreiser and his Sister Carrie abroad and at home is primarily concerned with the frustration of American dream, the naturalistic thoughts and pessimism. The paper attempts to study it from naturalistic point of view and explain how environmental, hereditary factors and the idea of“survival of the fittest”influence Carrie’s fate.

  3. Asa Gray and Charles Darwin: Corresponding Naturalists

    OpenAIRE

    Browne, Janet E

    2010-01-01

    Recent work on the rise of science in the nineteenth century has encouraged historians to look again at the role of correspondence. Naturalists relied extensively on this form of contact and correspondence was a major element in generating a community of experts who agreed on what comprised valid knowledge. As a leading figure in the development of North American botany, Asa Gray found that letters with botanists and collectors all over the world greatly expanded his areas of influence. La...

  4. Highlights from the 1st ISCB Latin American Student Council Symposium 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Parra, R. Gonzalo; Simonetti, Franco L.; Hasenahuer, Marcia A; Olguin-Orellana, Gabriel J; Shanmugam, Avinash K

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the scientific content and activities of the first edition of the Latin American Symposium organized by the Student Council of the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB), held in conjunction with the Third Latin American conference from the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB-LA 2014) in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, on October 27, 2014.

  5. North-American Conference Highlights the Treatment of Trauma Utilizing Guided Imagery and Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott-Montcrieff, Suzannah; Beck, Bolette Daniels; Montgomery, Erin

    2015-01-01

    A report on the 2015 Association for Music and Imagery conference highlights papers that address clinical practice and research using Guided Imagery and Music for the treatment of trauma.......A report on the 2015 Association for Music and Imagery conference highlights papers that address clinical practice and research using Guided Imagery and Music for the treatment of trauma....

  6. Highlights from Drug Use Among American High School Students 1975-1977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Lloyd D.; And Others

    The current prevalence of drug use among American high school seniors and the trends in use since 1975 are the two major topics treated. Also reported are prevailing attitudes and beliefs among seniors concerning various types of drug use. Eleven separate classes of drugs are distinguished: marihuana (including hashish), inhalants, hallucinogens,…

  7. Naturalistic Inquiry: Paradigm and Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotto, Linda S.

    Despite the rhetoric acclaiming it as a new paradigm, educational researchers have tended to treat naturalistic inquiry as a new or alternative method employed within the dominant, rationalistic paradigm. Spokespersons for naturalistic inquiry tend to concentrate on what one does differently rather than how one perceives what one is doing…

  8. CONVENTIONAL ECONOMIC THEORY — A CRITIQUE HIGHLIGHTING FLAWS IN AMERICAN STYLE CAPITALISM

    OpenAIRE

    JOERGEN OERSTROEM MOELLER

    2011-01-01

    For 200 years, we have lived with capitalism in its American style forged easy access to raw materials. Despite entering an era of scarcities, economics is still anchored in growth and distribution theories reflecting the world of plenty. Production theory does not recognize the significance of sharing of knowledge and group behavior introduced by ICT. Consumption theory is still about buying 'more', neglecting the element of uncertainty. Competition has been eradicated and replaced by a limi...

  9. Revision of widespread red squirrels (genus: Tamiasciurus) highlights the complexity of speciation within North American forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Andrew G; Malaney, Jason L; Bell, Kayce C; Salazar-Miralles, Fernando; Chavez, Andreas S; Barber, Brian R; Cook, Joseph A

    2016-07-01

    Integration of molecular methods, ecological modeling, and statistical hypothesis testing are increasing our understanding of differentiation within species and phylogenetic relationships among species by revealing environmental connections to evolutionary processes. Within mammals, novel diversity is being discovered and characterized as more complete geographic sampling is coupled with newer multi-disciplinary approaches. North American red squirrels exemplify a forest obligate genus whose species are monitored as indicators of forest ecosystem condition, yet phylogenetic relationships reflecting evolutionary history within this genus remain tentative. Through testing of competing systematic and niche-based divergence hypotheses, we recognize three species, Tamiasciurus douglasii, T. hudsonicus, and T. fremonti. Our data provide evidence of regional differences in evolutionary dynamics and continental gradients of complexity that are important both for future management and for investigating multiple pathways that can lead to the formation of new species. PMID:27083861

  10. Texting, Textese and Literacy Abilities: A Naturalistic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, Michelle; Driver, Brent

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined texting behaviours, text message characteristics (textese) of actual sent text messages and the relationships between texting, textese and literacy abilities in a sample of 183 American undergraduates. As compared to previous naturalistic and experimental studies with English-speaking adults, both texting frequency and…

  11. Highlights of the American Nuclear Society topical meeting on the treatment and handling of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The American Nuclear Society Topical Meeting on the Treatment and Handling of Radioactive Wastes was held in Richland, Washington, from 19-22 April 1982. The object of the meeting was to provide a thorough assessment of the status of technology. The response to the meeting was excellent: 123 papers were presented. There were 505 registrations; 83 were from outside the USA, representing 13 countries. The large and diverse attendance provided a broad technological view and perspective. The following major points emerged from the conference: (1) In an extensive world-wide effort, techniques are being developed to cover all phases of radioactive waste management. (2) A broad and deep technological base has been developed. (3) Many adequate processes are ready for actual application while others are ready for demonstration of applicability. These demonstrations are important to further public acceptance of nuclear energy. (4) At the present level of maturity, systematic analyses should be performed to determine actual requirements for the treatment and handling of radioactive wastes. These analyses can be used to focus our research and development, and demonstration activities to achieve treatment and conditioning systems which are both appropriate and cost-effective. (author)

  12. RAD sequencing highlights polygenic discrimination of habitat ecotypes in the panmictic American eel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavey, Scott A; Gaudin, Jérémy; Normandeau, Eric; Dionne, Mélanie; Castonguay, Martin; Audet, Céline; Bernatchez, Louis

    2015-06-15

    The two primary ways that species respond to heterogeneous environments is through local adaptation and phenotypic plasticity. The American eel (Anguilla rostrata) presents a paradox; despite inhabiting drastically different environments [1], the species is panmictic [2, 3]. Spawning takes place only in the southern Sargasso Sea in the Atlantic Ocean [1]. Then, the planktonic larvae (leptocephali) disperse to rearing locations from Cuba to Greenland, and juveniles colonize either freshwater or brackish/saltwater habitats, where they spend 3-25 years before returning to the Sargasso Sea to spawn as a panmictic species. Depending on rearing habitat, individuals exhibit drastically different ecotypes [4-6]. In particular, individuals rearing in freshwater tend to grow slowly and mature older and are more likely to be female in comparison to individuals that rear in brackish/saltwater [4, 6]. The hypothesis that phenotypic plasticity alone can account for all of the differences was not supported by three independent controlled experiments [7-10]. Here, we present a genome-wide association study that demonstrates a polygenic basis that discriminates these habitat-specific ecotypes belonging to the same panmictic population. We found that 331 co-varying loci out of 42,424 initially considered were associated with the divergent ecotypes, allowing a reclassification of 89.6%. These 331 SNPs are associated with 101 genes that represent vascular and morphological development, calcium ion regulation, growth and transcription factors, and olfactory receptors. Our results are consistent with divergent natural selection of phenotypes and/or genotype-dependent habitat choice by individuals that results in these genetic differences between habitats, occurring every generation anew in this panmictic species. PMID:26028437

  13. Reverend Paley's naturalist revival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Peter

    2008-03-01

    This paper analyzes the remarkable popularity of William Paley's argument from design among contemporary naturalists in biology and the philosophy of science. In philosophy of science Elliott Sober has argued that creationism should be excluded from the schools not because it is not science but because it is 'less likely' than evolution according to fairly standard confirmation theory. Creationism is said to have been a plausible scientific option as presented by Paley but no longer to be acceptable according to the same standards that once approved it. In biology C. G. Williams and Richard Dawkins have seen in Paley a proto-adaptationist. This paper shows that the historical assumptions of Sober's arguments are wrong and that the philosophical arguments themselves take alternatives to science to be alternatives in science and conflate the null hypothesis, chance, with a competing explanatory hypothesis. It is also shown that the similarity of Paley's adaptationism to that of contemporary biology is not what it is made out to be. PMID:18331952

  14. “An Aristocracy of Talent”: The South Carolina Physician-Naturalists and their Times

    OpenAIRE

    Bryan, Charles S.; Whitehead, A. Weaver

    2014-01-01

    During the natural history movement of the 18th and early 19th centuries, Charleston as a center was rivaled in the United States only by Philadelphia, New York, and Boston. Prominent physician-naturalists included Alexander Garden (for whom the gardenia is named), John Edwards Holbrook (“father of American herpetology”), and Francis Peyre Porcher (whose Resources of Southern Fields and Forests helped Confederates compensate for drug shortages). The Charleston physician-naturalists belonged t...

  15. 100-Car Naturalistic Driving Study Fact Sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Box, Sherri

    2005-01-01

    The 100-Car Naturalistic Driving Study was recently completed by the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute (VTTI) and sponsored by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Virginia Tech, Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT), and Virginia Transportation Research Council (VTRC).

  16. Recent advances in nephrology: highlights from the 35th annual meeting of the American society of nephrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cases, Aleix

    2002-12-01

    The 35th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology, held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States (October 30 to November 4, 2002) presented the newest advances in basic and clinical nephrology science. Several presentations and symposia discussed the effects of various interventions and risk factors in clinical outcomes in dialysis patients. The recent evidences of pure red cell aplasia secondary to neutralizing antibodies against erythropoietin were also extensively discussed in a special symposium. Recent advances in the management of calcium phosphorus metabolism and secondary hyperparathyroidism, such as the clinical efficacy and safety of AMG-073, a new calcimimetic agent in the control of hyperparathyroidism in chronic kidney disease patients, or the use of sevelamer or lanthanum carbonate as phosphate binders, were presented. The results in animal models on improved sparing of renal function with rapamycin versus cyclosporin A represent a promising advance in renal transplantation. Finally, the recent discoveries with the newly identified disease gene PKHD1, which causes autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease, were also presented at the meeting. PMID:12582469

  17. Highlights in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia from the 2014 meeting of the American Society of Hematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molica, Stefano

    2015-06-01

    The latest Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology, held in San Francisco, included data on novel-targeted agents active in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). MABTENANCE and PROLONG study suggest that either rituximab or ofatumumab improves progression-free survival in CLL. According to final analysis of CLL-10 trial, rituximab and bendamustine may have a role in the upfront treatment of fit elderly patients. Further insight into the use of ibrutinib, a first-in-class covalent Bruton’s tyrosine kinase-inhibitor that is currently approved for patients with relapsed/refractory CLL and with del(17p), was also presented. Idelalisib, a selective inhibitor of PI3K delta, demonstrated its activity with manageable toxicity in previously untreated patients ≥65 years with CLL or small lymphocytic lymphoma. Finally, a series Phase I/II studies of BCL-2 inhibitor (i.e., venetoclax, GDC-0199) used alone or in combination provide promising results in patients with relapsed/refractory CLL. PMID:25804936

  18. "An aristocracy of talent": the South Carolina physician-naturalists and their times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Charles S; Whitehead, A Weaver

    2014-01-01

    During the natural history movement of the 18th and early 19th centuries, Charleston as a center was rivaled in the United States only by Philadelphia, New York, and Boston. Prominent physician-naturalists included Alexander Garden (for whom the gardenia is named), John Edwards Holbrook ("father of American herpetology"), and Francis Peyre Porcher (whose Resources of Southern Fields and Forests helped Confederates compensate for drug shortages). The Charleston physician-naturalists belonged to an "aristocracy of talent" as distinguished from the "aristocracy of wealth" of lowcountry planters, who probably did more than any other group to perpetuate slavery and propel the South toward a disastrous civil war. None of the physician-naturalists actively opposed slavery or secession, a reminder that we are all prisoners of the prevailing paradigms and prejudices of our times. PMID:25125748

  19. “An Aristocracy of Talent”: The South Carolina Physician-Naturalists and their Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Charles S.; Whitehead, A. Weaver

    2014-01-01

    During the natural history movement of the 18th and early 19th centuries, Charleston as a center was rivaled in the United States only by Philadelphia, New York, and Boston. Prominent physician-naturalists included Alexander Garden (for whom the gardenia is named), John Edwards Holbrook (“father of American herpetology”), and Francis Peyre Porcher (whose Resources of Southern Fields and Forests helped Confederates compensate for drug shortages). The Charleston physician-naturalists belonged to an “aristocracy of talent” as distinguished from the “aristocracy of wealth” of lowcountry planters, who probably did more than any other group to perpetuate slavery and propel the South toward a disastrous civil war. None of the physician-naturalists actively opposed slavery or secession, a reminder that we are all prisoners of the prevailing paradigms and prejudices of our times. PMID:25125748

  20. On Stephen Crane’s Naturalistic Conception and Symbolic Techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-jun

    2014-01-01

    Stephen Crane spent a very productive life in his short span of life. His challenge against convention helps him to ac-cept new ideas that were popular in his time, like naturalism, symbolism and impressionism. In particular, Crane gave the perfect union of naturalistic conception and symbolic techniques in his novels, which are valued by critics as American literary classic works with highly artistic value, and his scant legacy was a rich one to the America literature. This paper tells us that, no matter how literary scholarships interpret and misinterpret Stephen Crane’s literary works, the significance of Crane’s achievement in the development of American literature has not been and will not be ignored.

  1. Evaluating the Georgia Master Naturalist Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildreth, Lauren; Mengak, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the Georgia Master Naturalist Program using an online survey. Survey participation was voluntary, and the survey addressed areas such as satisfaction, volunteerism, and future training. The program received high scores from survey respondents. They appreciated training on native plants, environmental awareness, and ecological…

  2. Naturalistic acquisition in an early language classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnneDahl

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated whether it is possible to provide naturalistic second language acquisition (SLA of vocabulary for young learners in a classroom situation without resorting to a classical immersion approach. Participants were 60 first-grade pupils in Norwegian two elementary schools in their first year. The control group followed regular instruction as prescribed by the school curriculum, while the experimental group received increased naturalistic target language input. This entailed extensive use of English by the teacher during English classes, and also during morning meetings and for simple instructions and classroom management throughout the day. Our hypothesis was that it is possible to facilitate naturalistic acquisition through better quality target language exposure within a normal curriculum. The students' English vocabulary knowledge was measured using the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, version 4 (PPVT-IV, Dunn & Dunn, 2007, at the beginning and the end of the first year of school. Findings are that 1 early-start second-language (L2 programs in school do not in themselves guarantee vocabulary development in the first year, 2 a focus on increased exposure to the L2 can lead to a significant increase in receptive vocabulary comprehension in the course of only eight months, and 3 even with relatively modest input, learners in such an early-start L2 program can display vocabulary acquisition comparable in some respects to that of younger native children matched on vocabulary size. The overall conclusion is that naturalistic vocabulary acquisition is in fact possible in a classroom setting.

  3. Naturalistic Evaluation of Programs. Parents' Voice in Parent Education Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ştefan COJOCARU

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The study presents some practical means for carrying out a naturalistic evaluation, a process that has resulted, for instance, in the identification of the profile of the parent educator as defined by the parents attending parent education classes as part of the program “How to become better parents”, implemented by Holt Romania with the support of UNICEF Country Office. Exploring parents’ voices is an advantage in naturalistic evaluation when trying to identify some essential aspects of the program. Based on the grounded theory strategy, this study explores the participants’ subjective representations, being a useful source of information for future development of similar programs. The profile of the parent educator as defined by the parents has several significant characteristics: the educator’s ability to reduce power asymmetry and increase responsiveness, the importance of the educator’s personal traits of character, the role of social and spatial proximity, the importance of the parent educator in personalizing the relationship with institutions etc. The results highlight the ways in which parent educator’s characteristics can significantly contribute to increasing the attendance of such programs.

  4. The Disillusion of American Dream in Sister Carrie

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晴

    2016-01-01

    Dreiser is a generally acknowledged writer as one of American's literary naturalists. In Sister Carrie, the author skillfully used the naturalistic writing style which incisively and vividly showed the society environment at that time. The paper states the process that how the American dream in Sister Carrie disillusioned gradually.

  5. Naturalistic Cognition: A Research Paradigm for Human-Centered Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Storkerson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Naturalistic thinking and knowing, the tacit, experiential, and intuitive reasoning of everyday interaction, have long been regarded as inferior to formal reason and labeled primitive, fallible, subjective, superstitious, and in some cases ineffable. But, naturalistic thinking is more rational and definable than it appears. It is also relevant to design. Inquiry into the mechanisms of naturalistic thinking and knowledge can bring its resources into focus and enable designers to create better, human-centered designs for use in real-world settings. This article makes a case for the explicit, formal study of implicit, naturalistic thinking within the fields of design. It develops a framework for defining and studying naturalistic thinking and knowledge, for integrating them into design research and practice, and for developing a more integrated, consistent theory of knowledge in design. It will (a outline historical definitions of knowledge, attitudes toward formal and naturalistic thinking, and the difficulties presented by the co-presence of formal and naturalistic thinking in design, (b define and contrast formal and naturalistic thinking as two distinct human cognitive systems, (c demonstrate the importance of naturalistic cognition in formal thinking and real-world judgment, (d demonstrate methods for researching naturalistic thinking that can be of use in design, and (e briefly discuss the impact on design theory of admitting naturalistic thinking as valid, systematic, and knowable.

  6. BBG Highlights

    Data.gov (United States)

    Broadcasting Board of Governors — BBG Highlights is a monthly summary of the BBG's accomplishments and news and developments affecting the Agency's work. Now, for the first time, this monthly update...

  7. Intuitions in Epistemology: Towards a Naturalistic Alternative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlström, Kristoffer

    2009-01-01

    The present paper revisits the main methodological problems with conceptual analysis and considers two attempts to rectify them in terms of prototypes and reflective equilibria, respectively. Finding both wanting for the purposes of epistemological analysis, a naturalistic alternative is then...... sketched that explores the positive implications of aforementioned problems for the demarcation of the respective roles of intuitions and empirical investigation within three epistemological domains, viz., the evaluation of epistemological hypotheses, the amelioration of epistemic practices, and the...

  8. Naturalistic acquisition in an early language classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Anne; Vulchanova, Mila D

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether it is possible to provide naturalistic second language acquisition (SLA) of vocabulary for young learners in a classroom situation without resorting to a classical immersion approach. Participants were 60 first-grade pupils in two Norwegian elementary schools in their first year. The control group followed regular instruction as prescribed by the school curriculum, while the experimental group received increased naturalistic target language input. This entailed extensive use of English by the teacher during English classes, and also during morning meetings and for simple instructions and classroom management throughout the day. Our hypothesis was that it is possible to facilitate naturalistic acquisition through better quality target language exposure within a normal curriculum. The students' English vocabulary knowledge was measured using the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, version 4 (PPVT-IV, Dunn and Dunn, 2007a), at the beginning and the end of the first year of school. Findings are that (1) early-start second-language (L2) programs in school do not in themselves guarantee vocabulary development in the first year, (2) a focus on increased exposure to the L2 can lead to a significant increase in receptive vocabulary comprehension in the course of only 8 months, and (3) even with relatively modest input, learners in such an early-start L2 program can display vocabulary acquisition comparable in some respects to that of younger native children matched on vocabulary size. The overall conclusion is that naturalistic vocabulary acquisition is in fact possible in a classroom setting. PMID:24860518

  9. Naturalistic Cognition: A Research Paradigm for Human-Centered Design

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Storkerson

    2010-01-01

    Naturalistic thinking and knowing, the tacit, experiential, and intuitive reasoning of everyday interaction, have long been regarded as inferior to formal reason and labeled primitive, fallible, subjective, superstitious, and in some cases ineffable. But, naturalistic thinking is more rational and definable than it appears. It is also relevant to design. Inquiry into the mechanisms of naturalistic thinking and knowledge can bring its resources into focus and enable designers to create better,...

  10. Rawls' theory of justice: a naturalistic evaluation(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun Chan, Ho

    2005-10-01

    This article critically evaluates John Rawls' theory of justice from a naturalistic perspective. The naturalistic approach is increasingly advocated in contemporary epistemology, philosophy of science, and philosophy of logic. Recently this approach has also become more influential in the study of ethics. Based on an experimental study on social justice conducted in Hong Kong, Beijing, and Taipei, this article argues that although Rawls' theory of justice has a naturalistic flavor, it has difficulty in standing up against the scrutiny of empirical tests if he commits himself to a fully fledged naturalistic approach. PMID:16282139

  11. Brookhaven highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report highlights the research activities of Brookhaven National Laboratory during the period dating from October 1, 1992 through September 30, 1993. There are contributions to the report from different programs and departments within the laboratory. These include technology transfer, RHIC, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, physics, biology, national synchrotron light source, applied science, medical science, advanced technology, chemistry, reactor physics, safety and environmental protection, instrumentation, and computing and communications

  12. Expo Highlights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG ZHIPING; SHAO DA

    2010-01-01

    @@ The 2010 World Expo opened in Shanghai on May 1.While serving as a platform to display the latest global scientific achievements and economic growth,it otters a wonderful opportunity for Chinese culture to be shared with the rest of the world as well.On this occasion,participants from 246 nations and international organizations gathered in Shanghai to create an Expo stage that goes beyond national,ethnic and religious boundaries,and to convey the Expo ideas of "understanding,communication,togetherness and cooperation" to the world.Currently,four highlights of the Expo are available to visitors.

  13. Intuitions in Epistemology: Towards a Naturalistic Alternative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoffer Ahlstrom

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper revisits the main methodological problems with conceptual analysis and considers two attempts to rectify them in terms of prototypes and reflective equilibria, respectively. Finding both wanting for the purposes of epistemological analysis, a naturalistic alternative is then sketched that explores the positive implications of aforementioned problems for the demarcation of the respective roles of intuitions and empirical investigation within three epistemological domains, viz., the evaluation of epistemological hypotheses, the amelioration of epistemic practices, and the construction of a theory of epistemic value.

  14. Temporal integration windows for naturalistic visual sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott L Fairhall

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that the brain possesses mechanisms to integrate incoming sensory information as it unfolds over time-periods of 2-3 seconds. The ubiquity of this mechanism across modalities, tasks, perception and production has led to the proposal that it may underlie our experience of the subjective present. A critical test of this claim is that this phenomenon should be apparent in naturalistic visual experiences. We tested this using movie-clips as a surrogate for our day-to-day experience, temporally scrambling them to require (re- integration within and beyond the hypothesized 2-3 second interval. Two independent experiments demonstrate a step-wise increase in the difficulty to follow stimuli at the hypothesized 2-3 second scrambling condition. Moreover, only this difference could not be accounted for by low-level visual properties. This provides the first evidence that this 2-3 second integration window extends to complex, naturalistic visual sequences more consistent with our experience of the subjective present.

  15. Naturalistic Cognition: A Research Paradigm for Human-Centered Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storkerson, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Naturalistic thinking and knowing, the tacit, experiential, and intuitive reasoning of everyday interaction, have long been regarded as inferior to formal reason and labeled primitive, fallible, subjective, superstitious, and in some cases ineffable. But, naturalistic thinking is more rational and definable than it appears. It is also relevant to…

  16. Use of synchrotron tomography to image naturalistic anatomy in insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socha, John J.; De Carlo, Francesco

    2008-08-01

    Understanding the morphology of anatomical structures is a cornerstone of biology. For small animals, classical methods such as histology have provided a wealth of data, but such techniques can be problematic due to destruction of the sample. More importantly, fixation and physical slicing can cause deformation of anatomy, a critical limitation when precise three-dimensional data are required. Modern techniques such as confocal microscopy, MRI, and tabletop x-ray microCT provide effective non-invasive methods, but each of these tools each has limitations including sample size constraints, resolution limits, and difficulty visualizing soft tissue. Our research group at the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne National Laboratory) studies physiological processes in insects, focusing on the dynamics of breathing and feeding. To determine the size, shape, and relative location of internal anatomy in insects, we use synchrotron microtomography at the beamline 2-BM to image structures including tracheal tubes, muscles, and gut. Because obtaining naturalistic, undeformed anatomical information is a key component of our studies, we have developed methods to image fresh and non-fixed whole animals and tissues. Although motion artifacts remain a problem, we have successfully imaged multiple species including beetles, ants, fruit flies, and butterflies. Here we discuss advances in biological imaging and highlight key findings in insect morphology.

  17. 100-car Naturalistic Driving Study tracks drivers for a year

    OpenAIRE

    Box, Sherri

    2005-01-01

    With the primary purpose of collecting pre-crash naturalistic driving data, over 100 individuals volunteered to drive their own (or leased) vehicles with specialized instrumentation for 12 - 13 months in the Northern Virginia/metropolitan DC area. The 100-Car Naturalistic Driving Study was recently completed by the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute (VTTI) and sponsored by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Virginia Tech, Virginia Department of Transportation (VDO...

  18. Naturalist Intelligence Among the Other Multiple Intelligences [In Bulgarian

    OpenAIRE

    R. Genkov; L. Genkova

    2007-01-01

    The theory of multiple intelligences was presented by Gardner in 1983. The theory was revised later (1999) and among the other intelligences a naturalist intelligence was added. The criteria for distinguishing of the different types of intelligences are considered. While Gardner restricted the analysis of the naturalist intelligence with examples from the living nature only, the present paper considered this problem on wider background including objects and persons of the natural sciences.

  19. Naturalistic Evaluation of Programs. Parents' Voice in Parent Education Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Ştefan COJOCARU; Daniela COJOCARU

    2011-01-01

    The study presents some practical means for carrying out a naturalistic evaluation, a process that has resulted, for instance, in the identification of the profile of the parent educator as defined by the parents attending parent education classes as part of the program “How to become better parents”, implemented by Holt Romania with the support of UNICEF Country Office. Exploring parents’ voices is an advantage in naturalistic evaluation when trying to identify some essential aspects of the ...

  20. Into the field: naturalistic education and the future of conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Mark A

    2009-10-01

    Some educational psychologists and researchers have argued that there are multiple ways of being intelligent. In the early 1980s, Howard Gardner presented a theory of multiple intelligences by proposing that humans can be described not by a single kind of intelligence, or intelligence quotient score, but rather by a variety of kinds of intelligence. This idea of considering multiple views of intelligence has helped educators look at intelligence from a less rigid, more expansive perspective. I considered how the relatively new concept of naturalistic intelligence, which is the cognitive potential to process information that is exhibited by expert naturalists, might influence the design of undergraduate biology curricula. Naturalistic intelligence can be fostered in undergraduate biology students by emphasizing the need for well-rounded scientific naturalists; developing curricula that involves students in outdoor inquiry-based projects; and helping students learn how to observe both the natural world and their own learning, skills that are essential to developing expert naturalistic knowledge. Professors, graduate students, and administrators can improve the naturalistic intelligence of undergraduate biology students by giving these students opportunities to be involved in outdoor research. Time spent outdoors alone and among people with expertise in natural history, ecology, and conservation biology will have important influences on the knowledge and skills biology undergraduates learn, the careers they pursue, and the contributions they make to conserving Earth's biodiversity. PMID:19659687

  1. Highlights from the 1st Latin American meeting on metronomic chemotherapy and drug repositioning in oncology, 27–28 May, 2016, Rosario, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosé, Adriana; André, Nicolas; Rozados, Viviana R.; Mainetti, Leandro E; Márquez, Mauricio Menacho; Rico, María José; Schaiquevich, Paula; Villarroel, Milena; Gregianin, Lauro; Graupera, Jaume Mora; García, Wendy Gómez; Epelman, Sidnei; Alasino, Carlos; Alonso, Daniel; Chantada, Guillermo; Scharovsky, O Graciela

    2016-01-01

    Following previous metronomic meetings in Marseille (2011), Milano (2014), and Mumbai (2016), the first Latin American metronomic meeting was held in the School of Medical Sciences, National University of Rosario, Rosario, Argentina on 27 and 28 of May, 2016. For the first time, clinicians and researchers with experience in the field of metronomics, coming from different countries in Latin America, had the opportunity of presenting and discussing their work. The talks were organised in three main sessions related to experience in the pre-clinical, and clinical (paediatric and adult) areas. The different presentations demonstrated that the fields of metronomic chemotherapy and repurposing drugs in oncology, known as metronomics, constitute a branch of cancer therapy in permanent evolution, which have strong groups working in Latin America, both in the preclinical and the clinical settings including large, adequately designed randomised studies. It was shown that metronomics offers treatments, which, whether they are combined or not with the standard therapeutic approaches, are not only effective but also minimally toxic, with the consequent improvement of the patient’s quality of life, and inexpensive, a feature very important in low resource clinical settings. The potential use of metronomic chemotherapy was proposed as a cost/effective treatment in low-/middle-income countries, for adjuvant therapy in selected tumours. The fundamental role of the governmental agencies and non-governmental alliances, as the Metronomic Global Health Initiative, in supporting this research with public interest was underlined. PMID:27610198

  2. Does mirtazapine interfere with naturalistic diabetes treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hoo Rim; Woo, Young Sup; Wang, Hee-Ryung; Shim, In-Hee; Jun, Tae-Youn; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2014-10-01

    Mirtazapine is known to induce weight gain and possibly leads to exacerbation of diabetic profiles. However, many cases of diabetic patients, who complained of insomnia and depression, were treated with mirtazapine in the clinical situations. Thus, this study aimed to assess any negative effects that treatment with mirtazapine may incur in diabetic patients.This study included 33 patients enrolled in naturalistic diabetes treatment that had also been diagnosed with depression and prescribed mirtazapine for at least 6 months. Another 33 diabetic patients who had not taken any psychiatric medicines were included as a control group. Body mass index, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, total cholesterol, triglyceride levels, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein were assessed at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months.The dose of mirtazapine at baseline was 24.3 ± 14.0 mg/d in the mirtazapine group, and the 2 groups did not differ in any baseline characteristics except for total cholesterol levels. Body mass index increased in both groups, and the change in the mirtazapine group (1.0 ± 0.6 kg/m) was significantly greater than that in the control group (0.3 ± 0.4 kg/m, P < 0.001) at 6 months. Only the control group exhibited a decrease in fasting plasma glucose, whereas both groups showed a decrease in HbA1c, low-density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol, an increase in high-density lipoprotein, and no change in triglyceride levels. None of the differences between the groups were statistically significant.In conclusion, mirtazapine increased the weight gain of diabetic patients; however, other diabetic and lipid markers generally did not worsen during the 6-month treatment period. These results suggest that, at least in the short term, mirtazapine is safe for diabetic patients in a stable state and are undergoing appropriate diabetic treatment. PMID:24987796

  3. Virginia Master Naturalist Program Strategic Planning Report 2015-2020

    OpenAIRE

    Prysby, Michelle D.

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the findings from a strategic planning process conducted by the Virginia Master Naturalist program in 2013-2014. The process involved three steps: a comprehensive needs assessment to identify program needs, strategic planning workshops to identify initiatives for addressing those needs, and online voting to prioritize proposed initiatives. 

  4. Naturalistic Experience and the Early Use of Symbolic Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troseth, Georgene L.; Casey, Amy M.; Lawver, Kelly A.; Walker, Joan M. T.; Cole, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Experience with a variety of symbolic artifacts has been proposed as a mechanism underlying symbolic development. In this study, the parents of 120 2-year-old children who participated in symbolic object retrieval tasks completed a questionnaire regarding their children's naturalistic experience with symbolic artifacts and activities. In separate…

  5. Who gives to whom? Testing the support gap hypothesis with naturalistic observations of couple interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Wen; Repetti, Rena L

    2016-06-01

    We examined sex differences in explicitly supportive behavior exchanges between husbands and wives using naturalistic video-recordings of everyday couple interactions inside the home. Thirty dual-earner, middle class, heterosexual couples with school-age children were recorded in their homes over 4 days. Specific instances of face-to-face explicit couple support in the video-recordings were identified, and the support role assumed by each partner (recipient vs. provider), the method of support initiation (solicitations vs. offers), and the type of support (instrumental vs. emotional) in each interaction were coded. Paired samples t tests examined sex differences in husbands' and wives' supportive behavior, and bivariate correlations tested the associations among spouses' support initiation behaviors. Findings counter prior research that has largely found a "support gap" favoring husbands as support recipients. Instead, results indicate that wives received significantly more support of an instrumental nature from husbands (than husbands did from wives), a finding driven by wives' active support-soliciting behavior. Among husbands, a tendency to be the solicitor of support was positively correlated with a tendency to offer support. Within couples, rates of offers of support by 1 spouse were correlated with offers by the partner. Naturalistic observations highlight processes that may not be detected by self-reports or laboratory data, in an ecologically valid context in which social behavior reflects the natural rhythms and pulls of everyday life. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27010600

  6. Adolescent Eating Disorders: Treatment and Response in a Naturalistic Study

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson-Brenner, Heather; Boisseau, Christina L.; Satir, Dana A.

    2010-01-01

    This naturalistic study investigated the treatment and outcome of adolescents with eating disorders (EDs) in the community. Clinicians from a practice-research network provided data on ED symptoms, global functioning, comorbidity, treatment, and outcome for 120 adolescents with EDs. ED “not otherwise specified” was the most common ED diagnosed. After an average of 8 months of treatment, about one third of patients had recovered, with patients with anorexia nervosa showing the most improvement...

  7. Machine analysis of facial behaviour: Naturalistic and dynamic behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Pantic, M.

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces recent advances in the machine analysis of facial expressions. It describes the problem space, surveys the problem domain and examines the state of the art. Two recent research topics are discussed with particular attention: analysis of facial dynamics and analysis of naturalistic (spontaneously displayed) facial behaviour. Scientific and engineering challenges in the field in general, and in these specific subproblem areas in particular, are discussed and recommendati...

  8. Toward a Naturalistic Foundation of the Social Contract

    OpenAIRE

    Cordes, Christian; Schubert, Christian

    2005-01-01

    This paper delivers a step toward a naturalistic foundation of the social contract. While mainstream social contract theory is based on an original position model that is defined in an aprioristic way, we endogenize its key elements, i.e., develop them out of the individuals' moral common sense. To this end, the biological and social basis of moral intuitions and empathy are explored. In this context, a key adaptation during evolution was the one that enabled humans to understand conspecifics...

  9. On the Influence of Naturalism on American Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofen

    2010-01-01

    Naturalism was first proposed and formulated by French novelist Emile Zola, and it was introduced to America by American novelist Frank Norris. It is a new and harsher realism. It is a theory in literature emphasizing scientific observation of life without idealism or avoidance of the ugly. American literature naturalists dismissed the validity of…

  10. Getting Real: A Naturalistic Methodology for Using Smartphones to Collect Mediated Communications

    OpenAIRE

    Lin Zhong; Ahmad Rahmati; Shepard, Clayton W.; Philip Kortum; Chad C. Tossell

    2012-01-01

    This paper contributes an intentionally naturalistic methodology using smartphone logging technology to study communications in the wild. Smartphone logging can provide tremendous access to communications data from real environments. However, researchers must consider how it is employed to preserve naturalistic behaviors. Nine considerations are presented to this end. We also provide a description of a naturalistic logging approach that has been applied successfully to collecting mediated com...

  11. The study design of UDRIVE: the Naturalistic Driving Study across Europe for cars, trucks and scooters

    OpenAIRE

    Barnard, Yvonne; Utesch, Fabian; van Nes, Nicole; Eenink, Rob; Baumann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: UDRIVE is the first large-scale European Naturalistic Driving Study on cars, trucks and powered two wheelers. The acronym stands for "European naturalistic Driving and Riding for Infrastructure & Vehicle safety and Environment". The purpose of the study is to gain a better understanding of what happens on the road in everyday traffic situations. Methods: The paper describes Naturalistic Driving Studies, a method which provides insight into the actual real-world behaviour of road user...

  12. Affective State Level Recognition in Naturalistic Facial and Vocal Expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Hongying; Bianchi-Berthouze, Nadia

    2014-03-01

    Naturalistic affective expressions change at a rate much slower than the typical rate at which video or audio is recorded. This increases the probability that consecutive recorded instants of expressions represent the same affective content. In this paper, we exploit such a relationship to improve the recognition performance of continuous naturalistic affective expressions. Using datasets of naturalistic affective expressions (AVEC 2011 audio and video dataset, PAINFUL video dataset) continuously labeled over time and over different dimensions, we analyze the transitions between levels of those dimensions (e.g., transitions in pain intensity level). We use an information theory approach to show that the transitions occur very slowly and hence suggest modeling them as first-order Markov models. The dimension levels are considered to be the hidden states in the Hidden Markov Model (HMM) framework. Their discrete transition and emission matrices are trained by using the labels provided with the training set. The recognition problem is converted into a best path-finding problem to obtain the best hidden states sequence in HMMs. This is a key difference from previous use of HMMs as classifiers. Modeling of the transitions between dimension levels is integrated in a multistage approach, where the first level performs a mapping between the affective expression features and a soft decision value (e.g., an affective dimension level), and further classification stages are modeled as HMMs that refine that mapping by taking into account the temporal relationships between the output decision labels. The experimental results for each of the unimodal datasets show overall performance to be significantly above that of a standard classification system that does not take into account temporal relationships. In particular, the results on the AVEC 2011 audio dataset outperform all other systems presented at the international competition. PMID:23757552

  13. The methodological lesson of complementarity: Bohr’s naturalistic epistemology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohr’s intellectual journey began with the recognition that empirical phenomena implied the breakdown of classical mechanics in the atomic domain; this, in turn, led to his adoption of the ‘quantum postulate’ that justifies the ‘stationary states’ of his atomic model of 1913. His endeavor to develop a wider conceptual framework harmonizing both classical and quantum descriptions led to his proposal of the new methodological goals and standards of complementarity. Bohr’s claim that an empirical discovery can demand methodological revision justifies regarding his epistemological lesson as supporting a naturalistic epistemology. (paper)

  14. Naturalistic Extremes in Al Aswaany’s The Yacoubian Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein H. Zeidanin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Emile Zola and other naturalistic novelists such as Stephen Crane, Jack London, Edith Wharton, Frank Norris, John Steinbeck and Richard Wright perceive naturalism as an anti-romantic philosophy dispensing with emotions, sentiments and imagination and parodying the romantic paradigm for idealizing the past and avoiding realities. They view literature as experimental and investigational as science and the novelist as scientist who objectively and methodologically observes and tests the actions and reactions of representative fictional characters under controlled conditions.  On the contrary, the writings of the opponents of naturalism like those of A. Plantinga (2010, H. Putnam (2000, J. Kim (2008, J. Spencer (2010, R. Bush (2003, and R. Gerhardt (2010 criticize naturalistic literature for focusing on the negative side instead of the bright side of life, attaching violence and threatening behaviors to the low class people, and representing a pessimistic view of life and human progress. Our paper seeks to recapitulate the epistemological premises of naturalism and the views of its proponents and opponents who debate over the materialism, atheism and sensationism of naturalism. The paper further analyzes the predominant correlation between environment and man, fate and man and biology and man from the perspective of naturalists. The study finds out that the actions and reactions of the fictional characters of Busayna el Sayed and Zaki el Dessouki in Al Aswany’s The Yacoubian Building (2003 are not self-determined; rather, they are predetermined by the triad of environment, fate and biology. In addition, the study observes that the absence of hope pervading the characters’ lives gives rise to their pessimistic worldviews and stoic behaviors. The study’s analysis and findings are based on Al Aswany’s text because it, on one hand, epitomizes the naturalistic poetics of classism, fatalism and predeterminism in the Egyptian society. On the other

  15. The methodological lesson of complementarity: Bohr’s naturalistic epistemology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folse, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    Bohr’s intellectual journey began with the recognition that empirical phenomena implied the breakdown of classical mechanics in the atomic domain; this, in turn, led to his adoption of the ‘quantum postulate’ that justifies the ‘stationary states’ of his atomic model of 1913. His endeavor to develop a wider conceptual framework harmonizing both classical and quantum descriptions led to his proposal of the new methodological goals and standards of complementarity. Bohr’s claim that an empirical discovery can demand methodological revision justifies regarding his epistemological lesson as supporting a naturalistic epistemology.

  16. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Workpackage 6, Driver Behaviour Monitoring through Naturalistic Driving: Deliverable 6.5: Naturalistic Driving for cross-national monitoring of SPIs and Exposure : an overview.

    OpenAIRE

    Wegman, R.W.N. & Bos, N.M.

    2015-01-01

    WP6 of DaCoTA, Driver Behaviour Monitoring through Naturalistic Driving, focuses on the usefulness and feasibility of applying the Naturalistic Driving method for monitoring within the framework of ERSO. The aim is to continuously collect comparable information about the road safety level in EU Member States and its development over time. Naturalistic Driving methods are intended to gather data that represent the behaviour of the population of drivers in its basic state. Naturalistic Driving ...

  17. Some Naturalistic Comments on Frege's Philosophy of Mathematics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Feng

    2012-01-01

    This paper compares Frege's philosophy of mathematics with a naturalistic and nominalistic philosophy of mathematics developed in Ye (2010a, 2010b, 2010c, 2011), and it defends the latter against the former. The paper focuses on Frege's account of the applicability of mathematics in the sciences and his conceptual realism. It argues that the naturalistic and nominalistic approach fares better than the Fregean approach in terms of its logical accuracy and clarity in explaining the applicability of mathematics in the sciences, its ability to reveal the real issues in explaining human epistemic and semantic access to objects, its prospect for resolving internal difficulties and developing into a full-fledged theory with rich details, as well its consistency with other areas of our scientific knowledge. Trivial criticisms such as "Frege is against naturalism here and therefore he is wrong" will be avoided as the paper tries to evaluate the two approaches on a neutral ground by focusing on meta-theoretical features such as accuracy, richness of detail, prospects for resolving internal issues, and consistency with other knowledge. The arguments in this paper apply not merely to Frege's philosophy. They apply as well to all philosophies that accept a Fregean account of the applicability of mathematics or accept conceptual realism. Some of these philosophies profess to endorse naturalism.

  18. Naturalistic Enactment to Elicit and Recognize Caregiver State Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Darien; Favela, Jesus; Ibarra, Catalina; Cruz, Netzahualcoyotl

    2016-09-01

    Caring for people with dementia imposes significant stress on family members and caregivers. Often, these informal caregivers have no coping strategy to deal with these behaviors. Anxiety and stress episodes are often triggered by problematic behaviors exhibited by the person who suffers from dementia. Detecting these behaviors could help them in dealing with them and reduce caregiver burden. However, work on anxiety detection using physiological signals has mostly been done under controlled conditions. In this paper we describe an experiment aimed at inducing anxiety among caregivers of people with dementia under naturalistic conditions. We report an experiment, using the naturalistic enactment technique, in which 10 subjects were asked to care for an older adult who acts as if she experiences dementia. We record physiological signals from the participants (GSR, HR, EEG) during the sessions that lasted for approximately 30 min. We explain how we obtained ground truth from self-report and observation data. We conducted two different tests using the Support Vector Machine technique. We obtained an average precision of 77.8 % and 38.1 % recall when classifying two different possible states: "Anxious" and "Not anxious". Analysis of the data provides evidence that the experiment elicits state anxiety and that it can be detected using wearable sensors. Furthermore, if episodes of problematic behaviors can also be detected, the recognition of anxiety in the caregiver can be improved, leading to the enactment of appropriate interventions to help caregivers cope with anxiety episodes. PMID:27443338

  19. Coding early naturalists' accounts into long-term fish community changes in the Adriatic Sea (1800-2000.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaso Fortibuoni

    Full Text Available The understanding of fish communities' changes over the past centuries has important implications for conservation policy and marine resource management. However, reconstructing these changes is difficult because information on marine communities before the second half of the 20(th century is, in most cases, anecdotal and merely qualitative. Therefore, historical qualitative records and modern quantitative data are not directly comparable, and their integration for long-term analyses is not straightforward. We developed a methodology that allows the coding of qualitative information provided by early naturalists into semi-quantitative information through an intercalibration with landing proportions. This approach allowed us to reconstruct and quantitatively analyze a 200-year-long time series of fish community structure indicators in the Northern Adriatic Sea (Mediterranean Sea. Our analysis provides evidence of long-term changes in fish community structure, including the decline of Chondrichthyes, large-sized and late-maturing species. This work highlights the importance of broadening the time-frame through which we look at marine ecosystem changes and provides a methodology to exploit, in a quantitative framework, historical qualitative sources. To the purpose, naturalists' eyewitness accounts proved to be useful for extending the analysis on fish community back in the past, well before the onset of field-based monitoring programs.

  20. Intentional forgetting: note-taking as a naturalistic example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskritt, Michelle; Ma, Sierra

    2014-02-01

    In the present study, we examined whether note-taking as a memory aid may provide a naturalistic example of intentional forgetting. In the first experiment, participants played Concentration, a memory card game in which the identity and location of pairs of cards need to be remembered. Before the game started, half of the participants were allowed to study the cards, and the other half made notes that were then unexpectedly taken away. No significant differences emerged between the two groups for remembering identity information, but the study group remembered significantly more location information than did the note-taking group. In a second experiment, we examined whether note-takers would show signs of proactive interference while playing Concentration repeatedly. The results indicated that they did not. The findings suggest that participants adopted an intentional-forgetting strategy when using notes to store certain types of information. PMID:24014168

  1. A naturalistic decision making model for simulated human combatants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors describe a naturalistic behavioral model for the simulation of small unit combat. This model, Klein's recognition-primed decision making (RPD) model, is driven by situational awareness rather than a rational process of selecting from a set of action options. They argue that simulated combatants modeled with RPD will have more flexible and realistic responses to a broad range of small-scale combat scenarios. Furthermore, they note that the predictability of a simulation using an RPD framework can be easily controlled to provide multiple evaluations of a given combat scenario. Finally, they discuss computational issues for building an RPD-based behavior engine for fully automated combatants in small conflict scenarios, which are being investigated within Sandia's Next Generation Site Security project

  2. RADBRUCH’S JUS-NATURALISTIC OVERCOMING OF LEGAL POSITIVISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radivoj Stepanov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Germany legal thought gave in the twentieth century several names of world renown: Emil Lask, Hans Kelsen, Max Weber, Karl Schmidt, Niklas Luman, Arthur Kaufman, Ernst Eduard Hirsch and others. All they have left a significant mark in theory, sociology and philosophy of law. And they all had very distinctive, and - for historians of law - interesting, personal biographies and destinies. Among such distinguished legal minds there is also Gustav Radbruch (G. Radbruch, Luebeck 1878 - Heidelberg 1949, who, after severe ruptures in his private and social life after Nazis came to power, made ​​a complete turnaround in his philosophy of law with his famous legal-philosophical writing: "Five Minutes of Philosophy of Law" (1945. Radbruch meticulously questioned the rigid positivist principle that even "the most vicious and inhuman law should apply until it is in effective" and pleaded instead for jus-naturalistic principle of justice in a "supra-statutory law."

  3. [Pieter Bleeker (1819-1878) physician and passionate naturalist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heiningen, Teunis Willem

    2010-01-01

    Pieter Bleeker (1819-1878), born in a modest family, made his career as a naturalist and military physician in the Dutch East Indies (1842-1860). He maintained a lively correspondence with Auguste Duméril (Paris). Many scientific museums were eagerly looking forward to receiving parts of his splendid collections of tropical fishes. His "Atlas Ichthyologique des Indes Orientales Néerlandaises" was published between 1862 and 1877. His efforts, in the field of ichthyology and tropical medicine, rendered him two doctorates honoris causa (Leyden University--1846; Utrecht University--1849). In 1855 he was elected member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 1856 he was elected correspondent of the Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle (Paris). In January 1864 he received the knighthood of the "Légion d'honneur" of the French empire. PMID:21560380

  4. William Keith Brooks and the naturalist's defense of Darwinism in the late-nineteenth century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Richard

    2015-06-01

    William Keith Brooks was an American zoologist at Johns Hopkins University from 1876 until his death in 1908. Over the course of his career, Brooks staunchly defended Darwinism, arguing for the centrality of natural selection in evolutionary theory at a time when alternative theories, such as neo-Lamarckism, grew prominent in American biology. In his book The Law of Heredity (1883), Brooks addressed problems raised by Darwin's theory of pangenesis. In modifying and developing Darwin's pangenesis, Brooks proposed a new theory of heredity that sought to avoid the pitfalls of Darwin's hypothesis. In so doing he strengthened Darwin's theory of natural selection by undermining arguments for the inheritance of acquired characteristics. In later attacks on neo-Lamarckism, Brooks consistently defended Darwin's theory of natural selection on logical grounds, continued to challenge the idea of the inheritance of acquired characteristics, and argued that natural selection best explained a wide range of adaptations. Finally, he critiqued Galton's statistical view of heredity and argued that Galton had resurrected an outmoded typological concept of species, one which Darwin and other naturalists had shown to be incorrect. Brooks's ideas resemble the "biological species concept" of the twentieth century, as developed by evolutionary biologist Ernst Mayr and others. The late-nineteenth century was not a period of total "eclipse" of Darwinism, as biologists and historians have hitherto seen it. Although the "Modern Synthesis" refers to the reconciliation of post-Mendelian genetics with evolution by natural selection, we might adjust our understanding of how the synthesis developed by seeing it as the culmination of a longer discussion that extends back to the late-nineteenth century. PMID:26013644

  5. Environmental assessment of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles using naturalistic drive cycles and vehicle travel patterns: A Michigan case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) use grid electricity as well as on-board gasoline for motive force. These multiple energy sources make prediction of PHEV energy consumption challenging and also complicate evaluation of their environmental impacts. This paper introduces a novel PHEV energy consumption modeling approach and compares it to a second approach from the literature, each using actual trip patterns from the 2009 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS). The first approach applies distance-dependent fuel efficiency and on-road electricity consumption rates based on naturalistic or real world, driving information to determine gasoline and electricity consumption. The second uses consumption rates derived in accordance with government certification testing. Both approaches are applied in the context of a location-specific case study that focuses on the state of Michigan. The two PHEV models show agreement in electricity demand due to vehicle charging, gasoline consumption, and life cycle environmental impacts for this case study. The naturalistic drive cycle approach is explored as a means of extending location-specific driving data to supplement existing PHEV impact assessments methods. - Highlights: • Travel patterns from survey data are combined with naturalistic drive cycles. • More realistic PHEV energy modeling using these synthesized real-world drive cycles. • Methodology is demonstrated for PHEVs in Michigan but applicable for other regions. • Energy and emissions findings have major implications for PHEV standards and policy

  6. A card game for the treatment of delusional ideas: A naturalistic pilot trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benzakin Laetitia

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background "Michael's game" is a card game which aims at familiarizing healthcare professionals and patients with cognitive behavioral therapy of psychotic symptoms. This naturalistic study tests the feasibility and the impact of the intervention in various naturalistic settings. Method Fifty five patients were recruited in seven centers. They were assessed in pre and post-test with the Peters Delusion Inventory – 21 items (PDI-21. Results Forty five patients completed the intervention significantly reducing their conviction and preoccupation scores on the PDI-21. Conclusion This pilot study supports the feasibility and effectiveness of "Michael's game" in naturalistic setting. Additional studies could validate the game in a controlled fashion.

  7. Comparison of the antidepressant effects of venlafaxine and dosulepin in a naturalistic setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Jens Drachmann; Jørgensen, Martin Balslev; Dam, Henrik;

    2009-01-01

    The relative efficacy of the various classes of antidepressants has not been established. Observational studies in naturalistic settings are important in evaluating treatment outcomes with antidepressants, since controlled clinical trials include only a minority of patients present in clinical...... practice. This study sought to evaluate in a naturalistic setting the treatment outcomes of dosulepin and venlafaxine for patients with depressive episodes. At the university hospital in Copenhagen, Denmark, between 1998 and early 2001, the first-line treatment for psychiatric inpatients with depression...... because of an underpowered design) after replacing dosulepin with venlafaxine as first-line drug for depression in a naturalistic inpatient setting....

  8. Psychodramatic psychotherapy combined with pharmacotherapy in major depressive disorder: an open and naturalistic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Elisabeth Maria Sene

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVE: Recent literature has highlighted the role of psychotherapy in the treatment of major depressive disorder. Combined therapies comprising both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy have presented the best results. Although several kinds of psychotherapies have been studied in the treatment of depressive disorders, there remains a lack of data on psychodramatic psychotherapy in the treatment of major depressive disorder. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of psychodramatic psychotherapy (in a sample of major depressive disorder patients. METHOD: This is an open, naturalistic, controlled, non-randomized study. Twenty major depressive disorder patients (according to the DSM-IV criteria, under pharmacological treatment for depression, with Hamilton Depression Scale total scores between 7 and 20 (mild to moderate depression, were divided into two groups. Patients in the psychotherapeutic group took part in 4 individual and 24 structured psychodramatic group sessions, whilst subjects in the control group did not participate in this psychodramatic psychotherapy. Both groups were evaluated with the Social Adjustment Scale - Self Report and the Hamilton Depression Scale. RESULTS: Psychotherapeutic group patients showed a significant improvement according to the Social Adjustment Scale - Self Report and the Hamilton Depression Scale scores at endpoint, compared to those of the control group. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that individual and group psychodramatic psychotherapy, associated to pharmacological treatment, provides good clinical benefits in the treatment of major depressive disorder.

  9. From American Dreams to American Tragedies — Theodore Dreiser’s Ponderation on American Society and Ruination of Morality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengcheng Zhang

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Theodore Herman Albert Dreiser is one of America's greatest naturalist writers. He believed that human beings are helpless in the grip of instincts and social forces beyond their control, and he judged human society as an unequal contest between the strong and the weak. Both of his masterpieces Sister Carrie (1900 and An American Tragedy (1925, which were mostly based on his personal experience, expanded and clarified those themes. By comparing Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie and An American Tragedy, this thesis analyzes the author’s exploration of the possibilities of 20th century American life with its material profusion and spiritual doubt of the life value.

  10. A Functional Description of SELF in American Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Erin

    2013-01-01

    Past studies have identified the function of SELF as a canonical reflexive pronoun in American Sign Language (ASL). This study examines the use of SELF with fifteen hours of naturalistic ASL discourse framed by the cognitive-functionalist approach. The analysis reveals that the category of SELF is expressed in three phonological forms and exhibits…

  11. Sleep complaints in adolescent depression: one year naturalistic follow-up study

    OpenAIRE

    Urrila, Anna S; Karlsson, Linnea; Kiviruusu, Olli; Pankakoski, Maiju; Pelkonen, Mirjami; Strandholm, Thea; Marttunen, Mauri; ,

    2014-01-01

    Background Sleep complaints are highly prevalent in adolescents suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD). The aims of this study were to describe the longitudinal course of sleep complaints, and to assess the association between sleep complaints and clinical outcome in a sample of adolescents with MDD during naturalistic follow-up. Methods A sample of adolescent outpatients (n = 166; age 13–19 years, 17.5% boys) diagnosed with MDD was followed-up during one year in naturalistic settings...

  12. A card game for the treatment of delusional ideas: A naturalistic pilot trial

    OpenAIRE

    Benzakin Laetitia; Azoulay Silke; Finot Sophie; Libbrecht Joël; Favrod Jérôme; Khazaal Yasser; Oury-Delamotte Myriam; Follack Christian; Pomini Valentino

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background "Michael's game" is a card game which aims at familiarizing healthcare professionals and patients with cognitive behavioral therapy of psychotic symptoms. This naturalistic study tests the feasibility and the impact of the intervention in various naturalistic settings. Method Fifty five patients were recruited in seven centers. They were assessed in pre and post-test with the Peters Delusion Inventory – 21 items (PDI-21). Results Forty five patients completed the intervent...

  13. IGC highlights 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major thrust of the research and development (R and D) activities of the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam is oriented towards mastering fast breeder reactor (FBR) technology. Towards this end, its current R and D activities are carried out in a wide variety of disciplines. Highlights of its R and D activities during 1988 are summarised under the headings: Reactor Engineering and Design, Reactor Physics and Safety, Materials Science and Technology, Sodium Chemistry and Technology, Fuel Reprocessing and Electronics and Instrumentation. The text is illustrated with a number of figures, graphs and coloured pictures. (M.G.B.). figs., tabs

  14. Highlights from NA60

    CERN Document Server

    De Falco, A; Banicz, K; Borer, K; Castor, J; Chaurand, B; Chen, W; Cicalò, C; Colla, A; Cortese, P; Damjanovic, S; David, A; Devaux, A; Ducroux, L; Enyo, H; Fargeix, J; Ferretti, A; Floris, M; Force, P; Förster, A; Guettet, N; Guichard, A; Gulkanian, H R; Heuser, J; Keil, M; Kluberg, L; Li, Z; Lourenço, C; Lozano, J; Manso, F; Martins, P; Masoni, A; Neves, A; Ohnishi, H; Oppedisano, C; Parracho, P; Pillot, P; Poghosyan, T; Puddu, G; Radermacher, E; Ramalhete, P; Rosinsky, P; Scomparin, E; Seixas, J; Serci, S; Shahoyan, R; Sonderegger, P; Specht, H J; Tieulent, R; Usai, G; Veenhof, R; Wöhri, H

    2009-01-01

    NA60 measured dimuon production in p-A and In-In collisions at the CERN SPS. This paper presents a high statistics measurement of $\\phi$ meson production in In-In collisions at 158 AGeV. Both the transverse momentum, rapidity, decay angular distributions and the absolute yield were measured as a function of centrality. The results are compared to previous measurements in order to shed light on the long standing $\\phi$ puzzle. In addition, highlights on $\\eta$ meson production and on the dimuon excess below the J/$\\psi$ mass are presented.

  15. BARC highlights '88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of research and development activities of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Bombay during 1988 are presented in chapters entitled: Physical Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Materials and Materials Sciences, Radioisotopes, Reactors, Fuel Cycle, Radiological Safety and Protection, Electronics and Instrumentation, Engineering Services, and Life Sciences. Main thrust of the R and D activities of BARC is on nuclear power reactor technology and all stages of nuclear fuel cycle. Some activities are also in the frontier areas such as high temperature superconductivity and inertial confinement fusion. (M.G.B.). figs., tabs., coloured ills

  16. Aesthetic perception and its minimal content: a naturalistic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ArgyrisArnellos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic perception is one of the most interesting topics for philosophers and scientists who investigate how it influences our interactions with objects and states of affairs. Over the last few years, several studies have attempted to determine “how aesthetics is represented in an object,” and how a specific feature of an object could evoke the respective feelings during perception. Despite the vast number of approaches and models, we believe that these explanations do not resolve the problem concerning the conditions under which aesthetic perception occurs, and what constitutes the content of these perceptions. Adopting a naturalistic perspective, we here view aesthetic perception as a normative process that enables agents to enhance their interactions with physical and socio-cultural environments. Considering perception as an anticipatory and preparatory process of detection and evaluation of indications of potential interactions (what we call ‘interactive affordances’, we argue that the minimal content of aesthetic perception is an emotionally valued indication of interaction potentiality. Aesthetic perception allows an agent to normatively anticipate interaction potentialities, thus increasing sense making and reducing the uncertainty of interaction. This conception of aesthetic perception is compatible with contemporary evidence from neuroscience, experimental aesthetics, and interaction design. The proposed model overcomes several problems of transcendental, art-centered, and objective aesthetics as it offers an alternative to the idea of aesthetic objects that carry inherent values by explaining ‘the aesthetic’ as emergent in perception within a context of uncertain interaction.

  17. The Networked Naturalist - Mobile devices for Citizen Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrin, D.; Graham, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    Citizen science projects engage individual volunteers or groups to observe, measure, and contribute data to scientific studies. CENS is developing mobile phone and web-based tools for formal and informal observation of ecosystems. We are collaborating with national environmental education campaigns, such as Project BudBurst, and with the National Park Service to increase participation in citizen scientist campaigns and to support park service personnel in day to day data gathering. The overarching goals of the Networked Naturalist set of projects are to enhance participatory learning experiences through citizen science campaigns and to facilitate scientific and environmental data collection. Our experience with volunteers at UCLA and at the National Park Service has demonstrated that mobile phones are an efficient, effective and engaging method for collecting environmental and location data and hold great potential for both raising public awareness of environmental issues and collecting data that is valuable for both ecosystem management and research. CENS is an NSF-funded Science and Technology Center and this project represents collaboration among ecologists, computer scientist, and statisticians. Our mobile applications are free for download on Android and iPhone App stores and the source code is made available through open source licenses.

  18. Scale invariance of temporal order discrimination using complex, naturalistic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Sze Chai; Macaluso, Emiliano

    2015-07-01

    Recent demonstrations of scale invariance in cognitive domains prompted us to investigate whether a scale-free pattern might exist in retrieving the temporal order of events from episodic memory. We present four experiments using an encoding-retrieval paradigm with naturalistic stimuli (movies or video clips). Our studies show that temporal order judgement retrieval times were negatively correlated with the temporal separation between two events in the movie. This relation held, irrespective of whether temporal distances were on the order of tens of minutes (Exp 1-2) or just a few seconds (Exp 3-4). Using the SIMPLE model, we factored in the retention delays between encoding and retrieval (delays of 24 h, 15 min, 1.5-2.5 s, and 0.5 s for Exp 1-4, respectively) and computed a temporal similarity score for each trial. We found a positive relation between similarity and retrieval times; that is, the more temporally similar two events, the slower the retrieval of their temporal order. Using Bayesian analysis, we confirmed the equivalence of the RT/similarity relation across all experiments, which included a vast range of temporal distances and retention delays. These results provide evidence for scale invariance during the retrieval of temporal order of episodic memories. PMID:25909581

  19. Victorian naturalists in China: science and informal empire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Fa-ti

    2003-03-01

    This paper discusses the research of British naturalists in China during the period between the Opium War and the collapse of the Qing dynasty (1839-1911). China was defeated in the Opium War and forced to open treaty ports for trade with the Westerners. The foreign powers, particularly Britain, imposed upon the Qing government treaties, concession leases, favourable trade conditions, legal privileges and so on to reduce its political autonomy. In the shadow of the informal empire, not only did the British have more freedom to travel in China, first at the treaty ports and later in the interior, but they successively established diplomatic , commercial and missionary institutions in dozens of Chinese cities. The most important of them - the British Consular Service, the Chinese Maritime Customs and the Protestant missionary organizations - provided the talent and infrastructure for natural historical research and became networks for scientific information. The research into China's natural history epitomized the characteristics of British research on China in general: it engaged in collecting and circulating an ever-increasing amount of information and aimed at producing 'factual' and 'useful' knowledge about China. The paper modified current literature on scientific imperialism, which has dealt primarily with the colonial context, by examining the role of nineteenth-century British imperial science in the context of informal empire. PMID:12755132

  20. Safety implications of infotainment system use in naturalistic driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Miguel A

    2012-01-01

    The use of a radio while driving has long been considered a "threshold" of distraction that is socially acceptable although it may be a factor in some crashes and near crashes. This "social acceptance" has prompted the use of radio tasks, specifically radio tuning, as "references" that should not be exceeded by other secondary and tertiary tasks that make their way into the vehicle. As new functions make their way into vehicle radios (or more advanced infotainment systems), however, it is possible that radio tasks may become distracting to a level that surpasses current driver expectations. This investigation examines the naturalistic usage of several advanced infotainment systems and examines whether usage is associated first with changes in near crash occurrence and second with changes in driving behavior. Little association was found with near crashes: 5 of 46 near crash events observed in the dataset exhibited infotainment system use. Drivers involved in infotainment system use during near crashes, however, did exhibit distinct glance behaviors, generally suggesting lower levels of awareness about their driving environment. Initial analyses of a larger dataset appear to confirm these findings. PMID:22317366

  1. Naturalistic speeding data: Drivers aged 75 years and older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Anna; Chevalier, Aran John; Clarke, Elizabeth; Wall, John; Coxon, Kristy; Brown, Julie; Ivers, Rebecca; Keay, Lisa

    2016-09-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "A longitudinal investigation of the predictors of older drivers׳ speeding behavior" (Chevalier et al., 2016) [1], wherein these speed events were used to investigate older drivers speeding behavior and the influence of cognition, vision, functional decline, and self-reported citations and crashes on speeding behavior over a year of driving. Naturalistic speeding behavior data were collected for up to 52 weeks from volunteer drivers aged 75-94 years (median 80 years, 52% male) living in the suburban outskirts of Sydney. Driving data were collected using an in-vehicle monitoring device. Global Positioning System (GPS) data were recorded at each second and determined driving speed through triangulation of satellite collected location data. Driving speed data were linked with mapped speed zone data based on a service-provider database. To measure speeding behavior, speed events were defined as driving 1 km/h or more, with a 3% tolerance, above a single speed limit, averaged over 30 s. The data contains a row per 124,374 speed events. This article contains information about data processing and quality control. PMID:27294182

  2. 美国心脏病学会2005年科学年会热点荟萃%Highlights of American College of Cardiology 2005 Annual Scientific Session

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈鲁原; 周颖

    2005-01-01

    美国心脏病学会(American College ofCardiology,ACC)第54届年会于2005年3月7-11日在美国佛罗里达州的奥兰多召开,来自世界各地的3万多名代表与会.现将本次大会中有关血管性疾病、高血压和预防(Vascular Disease,Hypertensionand Prevention,VHP)的临床研究系列的若干热点内容介绍如下.

  3. Science Highlights from VERITAS

    CERN Document Server

    Staszak, D; Archambault, S; Archer, A; Barnacka, A; Benbow, W; Bird, R; Biteau, J; Buchovecky, M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cardenzana, J V; Cerruti, M; Chen, X; Christiansen, J L; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Connolly, M P; Coppi, P; Cui, W; Dwarkadas, V V; Eisch, J D; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Feng, Q; Alonso, M Fernandez; Finley, J P; Fleischhack, H; Flinders, A; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Gillanders, G H; Griffin, S; Griffiths, S T; Gyuk, G; Hütten, M; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Humensky, T B; Johnson, C A; Kaaret, P; Kar, P; Kertzman, M; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krause, M; Krennrich, F; Kumar, S; Lang, M J; Maier, G; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Meagher, K; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nguyen, T; Nieto, D; de Bhróithe, A O'Faoláin; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Park, N; Pelassa, V; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Popkow, A; Pueschel, E; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reynolds, P T; Richards, G T; Roache, E; Rovero, A C; Santander, M; Schlenstedt, S; Sembroski, G H; Shahinyan, K; Smith, A W; Telezhinsky, I; Tucci, J V; Tyler, J; Vassiliev, V V; Vincent, S; Wakely, S P; Weiner, O M; Weinstein, A; Wilhelm, A; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B

    2015-01-01

    The Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) is a ground-based array located at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in southern Arizona and is one of the world's most sensitive gamma-ray instruments at energies of 85 GeV to $>$30 TeV. VERITAS has a wide scientific reach that includes the study of extragalactic and Galactic objects as well as the search for astrophysical signatures of dark matter and the measurement of cosmic rays. In this paper, we will summarize the current status of the VERITAS observatory and present some of the scientific highlights from the last two years, focusing in particular on those results shown at the 2015 ICRC in The Hague, Netherlands.

  4. PSI scientific highlights 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This comprehensive report issued by the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) reviews research in various areas carried out by the institute in 2012. Also, the various facilities to be found at the institute are described. Research focus and highlights are discussed. These include work done using synchrotron light, neutrons and muons as well as work done in the particle physics, microtechnology and nanotechnology areas. Further areas of research include biomolecular research, radiopharmacy, radiochemistry and environmental chemistry. Other areas covered include general energy research and work done at the Competence Center for Energy and Mobility CCEM, work done on nuclear energy safety as well as systems analysis in the environmental and energy areas. The report is concluded with facts and figures on the PSI, its Advisory Board and its organisational structures

  5. PSI scientific highlights 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This comprehensive report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the major highlights of the work done at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland, in 2011. According to the institute's director, work was concerned with the design and analysis of advanced materials with new functionalities, for application in fields as diverse as communications and energy technology, transportation, construction and medicine. Of particular topical interest are research projects on materials for application in the field of energy, for example for improving batteries for future electrically powered vehicles. Another example is in the field of catalysts. Environmentally harmful compounds, such as nitrogen oxide and sulphur dioxide produced in an engine, are transformed into nontoxic gases through catalytic conversion. Work progress on the SwissFEL installation is noted, including a breakthrough for SwissFEL main Linac C-band accelerating systems. Further topics in relation to the SwissFEL system are noted. Planning of the initial set of experimental stations at the SwissFEL is discussed and close collaboration with growing number of user communities is noted. Cross-Correlation Scattering, and a theoretical framework for this method is being developed and experimentally verified, using artificial nanostructures and synchrotron radiation. Highlights of further research work are discussed, including topics such as Synchrotron light, work done on neutrons and muons, particle physics, micro and nanotechnology as well as on biomolecular research and radiopharmacy. Large research facilities are discussed as is the PSI proton therapy installation. General energy topics are looked at, as are nuclear energy and safety aspects and environmental and energy systems analysis. Various further work includes factors causing glacier retreat and aerosols. User facilities are listed, including accelerators, the SLS light source, the SINQ neutron source, the UCN ultra-cold neutron source

  6. Testing the concurrent validity of a naturalistic upper extremity reaching task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, S Y; Hengge, C R

    2016-01-01

    Point-to-point reaching has been widely used to study upper extremity motor control. We have been developing a naturalistic reaching task that adds tool manipulation and object transport to this established paradigm. The purpose of this study was to determine the concurrent validity of a naturalistic reaching task in a sample of healthy adults. This task was compared to the criterion measure of standard point-to-point reaching. Twenty-eight adults performed unconstrained out-and-back movements in three different directions relative to constant start location along midline using their nondominant arm. In the naturalistic task, participants manipulated a tool to transport objects sequentially between physical targets anchored to the planar workspace. In the standard task, participants moved a digital cursor sequentially between virtual targets, veridical to the planar workspace. In both tasks, the primary measure of performance was trial time, which indicated the time to complete 15 reaches (five cycles of three reaches/target). Two other comparator tasks were also designed to test concurrent validity when components of the naturalistic task were added to the standard task. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients indicated minimal relationship between the naturalistic and standard tasks due to differences in progressive task difficulty. Accounting for this yielded a moderate linear relationship, indicating concurrent validity. The comparator tasks were also related to both the standard and naturalistic task. Thus, the principles of motor control and learning that have been established by the wealth of point-to-point reaching studies can still be applied to the naturalistic task to a certain extent. PMID:26438508

  7. Naturalistic fMRI mapping reveals superior temporal sulcus as the hub for the distributed brain network for social perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha Marko Lahnakoski

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the abundant data on brain networks processing static social signals, such as pictures of faces, the neural systems supporting social perception in naturalistic conditions are still poorly understood. Here we delineated brain networks subserving social perception under naturalistic conditions in 19 healthy humans who watched, during 3-tesla functional magnetic imaging (fMRI, a set of 137 short (~16 s each, total 27 min audiovisual movie clips depicting pre-selected social signals. Two independent raters estimated how well each clip represented eight social features (faces, human bodies, biological motion, goal-oriented actions, emotion, social interaction, pain, and speech and six filler features (places, objects, rigid motion, people not in social interaction, non-goal-oriented action and non-human sounds lacking social content. These ratings were used as predictors in the fMRI analysis. The posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS responded to all social features but not to any non-social features, and the anterior STS responded to all social features except bodies and biological motion. We also found four partially segregated, extended networks for processing of specific social signals: 1 a fronto-temporal network responding to multiple social categories, 2 a fronto-parietal network preferentially activated to bodies, motion and pain, 3 a temporo-amygdalar network responding to faces, social interaction and speech, and 4 a fronto-insular network responding to pain, emotions, social interactions, and speech. Our results highlight the role of the posterior STS in processing multiple aspects of social information, as well as the feasibility and efficiency of fMRI mapping under conditions that resemble the complexity of real life.

  8. ESO Highlights in 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    As is now the tradition, the European Southern Observatory looks back at the exciting moments of last year. 2008 was in several aspects an exceptionally good year. Over the year, ESO's telescopes provided data for more than 700 scientific publications in refereed journals, making ESO the most productive ground-based observatory in the world. ESO PR Highlights 2008 ESO PR Photo 01a/09 The image above is a clickable map. These are only some of the press releases issued by ESO in 2008. For a full listing, please go to ESO 2008 page. Austria signed the agreement to join the other 13 ESO member states (ESO 11/08 and 20/08), while the year marked the 10th anniversary of first light for ESO's "perfect science machine", the Very Large Telescope (ESO 16/08 and 17/08). The ALMA project, for which ESO is the European partner, had a major milestone in December, as the observatory was equipped with its first antenna (ESO 49/08). Also the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope impressed this year with some very impressive and publicly visible results. Highlights came in many fields: Astronomers for instance used the Very Large Telescope (VLT) to discover and image a probable giant planet long sought around the star Beta Pictoris (ESO 42/08). This is now the eighth extrasolar planet to have been imaged since the VLT imaged the first extrasolar planet in 2004 (three of eight were imaged with VLT). The VLT also enabled three students to confirm the nature of a unique planet (ESO 45/08). This extraordinary find, which turned up during their research project, is a planet about five times as massive as Jupiter. This is the first planet discovered orbiting a fast-rotating hot star. The world's foremost planet-hunting instrument, HARPS, located at ESO's La Silla observatory, scored a new first, finding a system of three super-Earths around a star (ESO 19/08). Based on the complete HARPS sample, astronomers now think that one Sun-like star out of three harbours short orbit, low

  9. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Workpackage 6, Driver Behaviour Monitoring through Naturalistic Driving: Deliverable 6.3: Report on small scale naturalistic driving pilot.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pilgerstorfer, M. Runda, K. Brandstätter, C. Christoph, M. Hakkert, S. Ishaq, R. Toledo, T. & Gatscha, M.

    2012-01-01

    WP6 of DaCoTA, Driver Behaviour Monitoring through Naturalistic Driving, aims to develop an implementation plan for a large scale activity that uses Naturalistic Driving (ND) Observations to continuously monitor relevant road safety data within the framework of the European Road Safety Observatory.

  10. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Workpackage 6, Driver Behaviour Monitoring through Naturalistic Driving: Deliverable 6.5: Naturalistic Driving for cross-national monitoring of SPIs and Exposure : an overview.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegman, R.W.N. & Bos, N.M.

    2015-01-01

    WP6 of DaCoTA, Driver Behaviour Monitoring through Naturalistic Driving, focuses on the usefulness and feasibility of applying the Naturalistic Driving method for monitoring within the framework of ERSO. The aim is to continuously collect comparable information about the road safety level in EU Memb

  11. Laterality of hand function in naturalistically housed chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Alison W; Weghorst, Jennifer A

    2005-05-01

    Studies of laterality of hand function in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) have the potential to tell us about the origins of handedness in Homo sapiens. However, the data are confusing, with discrepancies present between studies done in the field and the laboratory: the former show wild chimpanzees to be unlateralised at the population level, while the latter show captive chimpanzees as lateralised at the population level. This study of 26 semi-free ranging chimpanzees of Chester Zoo, UK, aimed to investigate a situation between the wild and captivity and provided ethological data for 43 categories of spontaneous manual use and 14 categories of tool use. Other variables recorded were subordinate hand activity, whether the subject was arboreal or terrestrial, and the identity of the subject. Using switching focal subject sampling, 23,978 bouts of hand use and 1,090 bouts of tool use were recorded. No population-level handedness was present for manual non-tool use activities in the naturalistically housed chimpanzees of Chester Zoo in a similar way to studies of wild chimpanzees. However, about half of the individuals were lateralised to one side or the other for the foraging behaviours of pick up, eat, and pluck. Using a modified version of McGrew and Marchant's (1997) Laterality Framework, these results are comparable to some wild and captive populations for similar foraging tasks. Bimanuality was rare and thus prevented comparison with captive experimental studies that have reported population right handedness. Behaviour involving contact with water elicited stronger lateralisation. Chester chimpanzees were more likely to exhibit hand preferences for manual tasks with increasing age but there were no effects of sex or rearing history on hand specialisations in adult individuals. Lateralisation was biased in tool use, which evoked significant left hand preferences in half the individuals, with no effect of age. Results are discussed comparatively with reference to

  12. [Nature and culture in the eyes of a nineteenth-century naturalist: Wallace and the Amazon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, José Jerônimo de Alencar

    2011-01-01

    Alfred Russel Wallace traveled through the Amazon from 1848 to 1852. His perceptions of the region were informed by his systematized knowledge but also influenced by judgments of an ethical and aesthetic nature, as was common among naturalists. He saw the region's 'natives' as peaceful and friendly but likewise susceptible to the vices of civilization. Nature afforded a privileged setting both for the activities of natural history and for aesthetic pleasures. These features helped keep the naturalist in the region, where he could thus engage in his scientific activities. PMID:22012097

  13. The value of site-based observations complementary to naturalistic driving observations : a pilot study on the right turn manoeuvre.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nes, N. van Christoph, M.W.T. Hoedemaeker, M. & Horst, A.R.A. van der

    2013-01-01

    Naturalistic driving studies are increasingly applied in different shapes and sizes. The European project PROLOGUE has investigated the value and feasibility of a large-scale naturalistic driving study in Europe. Within PROLOGUE several pilot studies have been conducted in different countries. The D

  14. The value of site-based observations complematary to naturalistic driving observations : a pilot study on the right turn manoeuvre.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nes, N. van Christoph, M.W.T. Hoedemaeker, M. & Horst, A.R.A. van der

    2013-01-01

    Naturalistic driving studies are increasingly applied in different shapes and sizes. The European project PROLOGUE has investigated the value and feasibility of a large-scale naturalistic driving study in Europe. Within PROLOGUE several pilot studies have been conducted in different countries. The D

  15. Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathematical Gazette, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Reprinted are "The Teaching of Euclid" by Bertrand Russell, an article on integrals by G. H. Hardy, "An Address on Relativity" by A. S. Eddington, "The Food of the Gods" by Prof. E. H. Neville, and "Simplicity and Truthfulness in Arithmetic" by W. Hope-Jones. (CT)

  16. HIGHLIGHTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DEGYI

    2002-01-01

    King Gesar is a focus of study in and outside China. Accomplished scholars include:——Alexandra David-Neel (1868-1969): A noted French expert in Oriental studies, Chinese and Tibetan studies in the 20th century, she visited Tibet and surrounding areas five times for survey. Her treatises and diaries related to the Orient, especially to Tibet and related areas, were translated into many languages and published repeatedly.——Ren Neiqiang (1894-1989): A noted geologist, an expert in ethnic groups and a pioneer in Tibetan studies. From 1939 to 1944, he published his Initial Introduction to "Tibetan Three Kingdoms" and "On the Three Kingdoms" in Border Government Affairs Forum and Kangdao Month.——R.A. Stein (1911-1999): He is held as the most successful Tibetan study worker in France in the 20th century. And he was one of the few who could do research in both Tibetan and Chinese. His contribution to the study of King Gesarfinds expression in his effort to translate the epic.——Wang Yinuan (1907-1998): A

  17. Counting Birds at the Grassroots: Making a Census into "Citizen Science," Naturalists Share Their Findings Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, James

    2001-01-01

    The Audubon Society and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology are promoting various "citizen science" projects in which amateur naturalists make local observations of birds, butterflies, or natural phenomena and report their observations to interactive databases on the World Wide Web. Events such as the Great Backyard Bird Count motivate people to get…

  18. "Our Beloved Cherokee": A Naturalistic Study of Cherokee Preschool Language Immersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Lizette

    2007-01-01

    This article contributes to our knowledge of endangered language revitalization by offering a case study of a Cherokee Nation (CN) preschool immersion program named Tsalagi Ageyui, "Our Beloved Cherokee." A naturalistic inquiry into the micro- and macrosociocultural dimensions of reversing Cherokee language shift reveals that, of all CN language…

  19. Naturalistic Observation of Behavior: A Model System Using Mice in a Colony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Harold A., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Describes exercises designed to give students experience in using methods of naturalistic observation to quantify behavior. Students construct a coding system of the behaviors observed in a small mouse colony, gather data by instantaneous and focal animal sampling, and use the data to calculate interrater reliability and sequence analysis. (GEA)

  20. Designing Library Instruction for Undergraduates: Combining Instructional Systems Design and Naturalistic Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Delia

    1991-01-01

    The Magazine and Journal Instructional Kit (MAJIK/1) is a HyperCard program delivering basic individualized library instruction. Using a technique derived from naturalistic inquiry, the program's formative evaluation was conducted at the University of Maryland, College Park, with 28 upperclassmen as subjects. They reported little difficulty with…

  1. Czy naturalistyczna etyka jest możliwa? (Is Naturalistic Ethics Possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Szutta

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper concerns the possibility of naturalistic ethics. It seems that ethics properly understood must be described as a discipline necessarily focused on evaluation of human action, analyzed in the light of its moral value. Such evaluation, in turn, presupposes an agent who is responsible for his or her actions. The possibility of so understood agent seems not to be possible without agent’s being capable of self-determination in action. According to the naturalistic thesis, however, such freedom is impossible; all human action is causally determined, with no place for ‘sui generis’ causation, and such a thesis must be interpreted as excluding the possibility of responsibility for one’s action. If so, then the concept of naturalistic ethics seems contradictory. Nonetheless, some authors (ex. H. Frankfurt and D. Dennett try to show that the concept of moral responsibility (so crucial to ethics does not necessarily entail freedom understood as ‘sui generis’ causation, and therefore it is compatible with determinism. In this paper I analyze their argumentation with the purpose to assess its conclusiveness. The conclusion I reach is that responsibility postulated by Frankfurt or Dennett is to be understood as merely epiphenomenal, as such it must be treated more like an illusion than a real property of human beings. Therefore, the thesis that naturalistic ethics is a contradictory concept seems to maintain its soundness.

  2. Aggressive, Prosocial, and Nonsocial Behavior in Hyperactive Boys: Dose Effects of Methylphenidate in Naturalistic Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Stephen P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Evaluated impact of methylphenidate on social behavior in 25 boys with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Compared children given placebo, low, and moderate dosages of methylphenidate and 15 boys without problems in attention and behavior during naturalistic summer research program. Medication decreased noncompliance and physical and…

  3. PsyGlass: Capitalizing on Google Glass for naturalistic data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Alexandra; Rodriguez, Kevin; Dale, Rick

    2015-09-01

    As commercial technology moves further into wearable technologies, cognitive and psychological scientists can capitalize on these devices to facilitate naturalistic research designs while still maintaining strong experimental control. One such wearable technology is Google Glass (Google, Inc.: www.google.com/glass), which can present wearers with audio and visual stimuli while tracking a host of multimodal data. In this article, we introduce PsyGlass, a framework for incorporating Google Glass into experimental work that is freely available for download and community improvement over time (www.github.com/a-paxton/PsyGlass). As a proof of concept, we use this framework to investigate dual-task pressures on naturalistic interaction. The preliminary study demonstrates how designs from classic experimental psychology may be integrated in naturalistic interactive designs with emerging technologies. We close with a series of recommendations for using PsyGlass and a discussion of how wearable technology more broadly may contribute to new or adapted naturalistic research designs. PMID:25893865

  4. Fatigue analyses : from 16 months of naturalistic commercial motor vehicle driving data

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegand, Douglas M.; Hanowski, Richard J.; Olson, Rebecca L. (Rebecca Lynn); Melvin, Whitney

    2008-01-01

    Under the sponsorship of the National Surface Transportation Safety Center for Excellence, an existing naturalistic data set from the Drowsy Driver Warning System Field Operational Test (DDWS FOT) was expanded and analyzed to gain a greater understanding of the conditions which are associated with fatigue in commercial motor vehicle (CMV) driving.

  5. A Naturalistic Observation of Social Behaviours during Preschool Drop-Off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Jessica S.; Ale, Chelsea M.; Morris, Tracy L.

    2012-01-01

    The present study utilised naturalistic observation to assess the impact of parental departure during daily drop-off at preschool on children's settling into daily preschool routines. Forty-six 3-5-year-old children and their parents/caregivers were observed during morning drop-off at preschool. Longer latencies of parent/caregiver leaving were…

  6. The Effects of Prospective Naturalistic Contact on the Stigma of Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, Shannon M.; Penn, David L.

    2006-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine whether naturalistic, interpersonal contact with persons with a severe mental illness (SMI) could reduce stigma. Participants from the agency Compeer (which pairs volunteers with people with SMI) were compared to volunteers from a control agency and to nonvolunteer participants from the community on…

  7. An Analysis of Naturalistic Interventions for Increasing Spontaneous Expressive Language in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Justin D.; Lieberman-Betz, Rebecca; Gast, David L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to identify naturalistic language interventions for increasing spontaneous expressive language (defined in this review as absence of verbal prompt or other verbalization from adults or peers) in young children with autism spectrum disorder. Also, the methodological rigor and effectiveness of each study were evaluated…

  8. Function and coding in the blowfly H1 neuron during naturalistic optic flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hateren, J.H. van; Kern, R.; Schwerdtfeger, G.; Egelhaaf, M.

    2005-01-01

    Naturalistic stimuli, reconstructed from measured eye movements of flying blowflies, were replayed on a panoramic stimulus device. The directional movement-sensitive H1 neuron was recorded from blowflies watching these stimuli. The response of the H1 neuron is dominated by the response to fast sacca

  9. Pathways to Language: A Naturalistic Study of Children with Williams Syndrome and Children with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Yonata; Eilam, Ariela

    2013-01-01

    This is a naturalistic study of the development of language in Hebrew-speaking children with Williams syndrome (WS) and children with Down syndrome (DS), whose MLU extended from 1[multiplied by]0 to 4[multiplied by]4. Developmental curves over the entire span of data collection revealed minor differences between children with WS, children with DS,…

  10. Scale invariance of temporal order discrimination using complex, naturalistic events

    OpenAIRE

    Kwok, Sze Chai; Macaluso, Emiliano

    2015-01-01

    Highlights • RTs in temporal-order judgement increase with temporal similarity between events. • Such relation holds across 4 experiments with varying delays and temporal scales. • Bayesian evidence for scale-invariance in temporal-order retrieval of memory.

  11. LGBT survey highlights regional divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrani, Matin

    2016-05-01

    A third of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) members of the physics community have considered quitting their workplace or university in the last year, according to a report by the American Physical Society (APS).

  12. Highlighting Impact and the Impact of Highlighting: PRB Editors' Suggestions

    CERN Document Server

    Antonoyiannakis, Manolis

    2016-01-01

    Associate Editor Manolis Antonoyiannakis discusses the highlighting, as Editors' Suggestions, of a small percentage of the papers published each week. We highlight papers primarily for their importance and impact in their respective fields, or because we find them particularly interesting or elegant. It turns out that the additional layer of scrutiny involved in the selection of papers as Editors' Suggestions is associated with a significantly elevated and sustained citation impact.

  13. Modeling 100-car safety events : a case-based approach for analyzing naturalistic driving data : final report

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Feng; Hankey, Jonathan M.

    2009-01-01

    This study developed an integrated framework for modeling the safety outcomes of naturalistic driving studies and addressed several critical methodological issues. The results indicate a certain level of discrepancy between the model-based approaches and the crude odds ratios.

  14. Naturalistic fMRI mapping reveals superior temporal sulcus as the hub for the distributed brain network for social perception

    OpenAIRE

    Juha Marko Lahnakoski; Enrico eGlerean; Juha eSalmi; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P.; Mikko eSams; Riitta eHari; Lauri eNummenmaa

    2012-01-01

    Despite the abundant data on brain networks processing static social signals, such as pictures of faces, the neural systems supporting social perception in naturalistic conditions are still poorly understood. Here we delineated brain networks subserving social perception under naturalistic conditions in 19 healthy humans who watched, during 3-T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), a set of 137 short (approximately 16 s each, total 27 min) audiovisual movie clips depicting pre-selecte...

  15. Highlights of nuclear chemistry 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report 9 topics of the work of the Nuclear Chemistry Group in 1995 are highlighted. A list of publications and an overview of the international cooperation is given. (orig.). 19 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs., 2 app

  16. Institutions, Markets and Economic Evolution - Conceptual Basis for a Naturalist Institutionalism

    OpenAIRE

    Bateira, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    The University of ManchesterJorge Manuel de Meneses BateiraDoctor of Philosophy (PhD), 2010Institutions, Markets and Economic Evolution - Conceptual Basis for a Naturalist InstitutionalismWe might wonder, after two centuries of economic science and thousands of articles and books written by economists, if something new can still be said about ‘markets’. Today, what new contribution could still be given to a so fundamental concept in economics? This thesis builds on the main legacy of Veblen, ...

  17. Dynamics of brain activity underlying working memory for music in a naturalistic condition

    OpenAIRE

    Burunat Perez, Iballa

    2012-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is at the core of any cognitive function as it is necessary for the integration of information over time. Despite WM’s critical role in high-level cognitive functions, its implementation in the neural tissue is poorly understood. Preliminary studies on auditory WM show differences between linguistic and musical memory, leading to the speculation of specific neural networks encoding memory for music. Moreover, in neuroscience WM has not been studied in naturalistic listenin...

  18. Using Naturalistic Driving Data to Examine Age and Gender Differences on Seat Belt Use

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, S.; H. Xiong; SAYER, J; Buonarosa, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    Teens and young drivers are often reported as one driver group that has significantly lower seatbelt use rates than other age groups. Objective This study was designed to address the questions of whether and how seatbelt-use behavior of novice teen drivers is different from young adult drivers and other adult drivers when driving on real roads. Method Driving data from 148 drivers who participated in two previous naturalistic driving studies were further analyzed. The combined dataset represe...

  19. The naturalistic turn in economics: implications for the theory of finance

    OpenAIRE

    Herrmann-Pillath, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    Economics is increasingly adopting the methodological standards and procedures of the natural sciences. The paper analyzes this 'naturalistic turn' from the philosophical perspective on naturalism, and I discuss the implications for the field of finance. The theory of finance is an interesting case in point for the methodological issues, as it manifests a paradigmatic tension between the pure theory of finance and Behavioral Finance. I distinguish between three kinds of naturalism: mark I, th...

  20. Examination of drivers' cell phone use behavior at intersections by using naturalistic driving data

    OpenAIRE

    H. Xiong; Bao, S.; Kato, K.; SAYER, J

    2014-01-01

    Many driving simulator studies have shown that cell phone use while driving greatly degraded driving performance. In terms of safety analysis, many factors including drivers, vehicles, and driving situations need to be considered. Controlled or simulated studies cannot always account for the full effects of these factors, especially situational factors such as road condition, traffic density, and weather and lighting conditions. Naturalistic driving by its nature provides a natural and realis...

  1. Three year naturalistic outcome study of panic disorder patients treated with paroxetine

    OpenAIRE

    Lowengrub Katherine; Cohen Ami; Iancu Iulian; Dannon Pinhas N; Grunhaus Leon; Kotler Moshe

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background This naturalistic open label follow-up study had three objectives: 1) To observe the course of illness in Panic Disorder patients receiving long-term versus intermediate-term paroxetine treatment 2) To compare the relapse rates and side-effect profile after long-term paroxetine treatment between patients with Panic Disorder and Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia. 3) To observe paroxetine's tolerability over a 24 month period. Methods 143 patients with panic disorder (PD), wit...

  2. Towards a Naturalistic Conceptualisation of Technology Integration in Classroom Practice: the example of school mathematics

    OpenAIRE

    Ruthven, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the challenges of incorporating new technologies into classroom practice calls for the development of naturalistic perspectives that situate their adoption and use within the everyday work of teaching. In this light, recent British and French studies have developed and validated a model of secondary mathematics teachers’ ideals for classroom use of computer-based tools and resources, and identified the crucial role of craft knowledge in realising these ideals in practice. From c...

  3. Analysis and Comparison of Naturalistic Themes in Iranian and Britain Modern Children's Poems

    OpenAIRE

    Shayesteh Ebrahimi; Parvin Saljeghe

    2016-01-01

    Today, children's literature given the concept of childhood, has gained a special status in the studies of humanities. Children's poetry is one of the branches of this type of literature. Naturalistic themes have the highest frequency among the themes of children poems in two countries. The population of this research consists of collections that have been published from 1921 to 2011. Children's literature was born in England in the eighteenth century and before that the first didactic books ...

  4. Estimates of Prevalence and Risk Associated with Inattention and Distraction Based Upon In Situ Naturalistic Data

    OpenAIRE

    Dingus, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    By using in situ naturalistic driving data, estimates of prevalence and risk can be made regarding driver populations’ secondary task distractions and crash rates. Through metadata analysis, three populations of drivers (i.e., adult light vehicle, teenaged light vehicle, and adult heavy vehicle) were compared regarding frequency of secondary task behavior and the associated risk for safety-critical incidents. Relative risk estimates provide insight into the risk associated with engaging in a ...

  5. fMRI Validation of fNIRS Measurements During a Naturalistic Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noah, J Adam; Ono, Yumie; Nomoto, Yasunori; Shimada, Sotaro; Tachibana, Atsumichi; Zhang, Xian; Bronner, Shaw; Hirsch, Joy

    2015-01-01

    We present a method to compare brain activity recorded with near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) in a dance video game task to that recorded in a reduced version of the task using fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging). Recently, it has been shown that fNIRS can accurately record functional brain activities equivalent to those concurrently recorded with functional magnetic resonance imaging for classic psychophysical tasks and simple finger tapping paradigms. However, an often quoted benefit of fNIRS is that the technique allows for studying neural mechanisms of complex, naturalistic behaviors that are not possible using the constrained environment of fMRI. Our goal was to extend the findings of previous studies that have shown high correlation between concurrently recorded fNIRS and fMRI signals to compare neural recordings obtained in fMRI procedures to those separately obtained in naturalistic fNIRS experiments. Specifically, we developed a modified version of the dance video game Dance Dance Revolution (DDR) to be compatible with both fMRI and fNIRS imaging procedures. In this methodology we explain the modifications to the software and hardware for compatibility with each technique as well as the scanning and calibration procedures used to obtain representative results. The results of the study show a task-related increase in oxyhemoglobin in both modalities and demonstrate that it is possible to replicate the findings of fMRI using fNIRS in a naturalistic task. This technique represents a methodology to compare fMRI imaging paradigms which utilize a reduced-world environment to fNIRS in closer approximation to naturalistic, full-body activities and behaviors. Further development of this technique may apply to neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, late states of dementia, or those with magnetic susceptibility which are contraindicated for fMRI scanning. PMID:26132365

  6. Processing empty categories in a second language: When naturalistic exposure fills the (intermediate) gap

    OpenAIRE

    Pliatsikas , Christos; Marinis, Theodoros

    2013-01-01

    An ongoing debate on second language (L2) processing revolves around whether or not L2 learners process syntactic information similarly to monolinguals (L1), and what factors lead to a native-like processing. According to the Shallow Structure Hypothesis (Clahsen & Felser, 2006a), L2 learners’ processing does not include abstract syntactic features, such as intermediate gaps of wh-movement, but relies more on lexical/semantic information. Other researchers have suggested that naturalistic L2 ...

  7. Getting Real: A Naturalistic Methodology for Using Smartphones to Collect Mediated Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad C. Tossell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper contributes an intentionally naturalistic methodology using smartphone logging technology to study communications in the wild. Smartphone logging can provide tremendous access to communications data from real environments. However, researchers must consider how it is employed to preserve naturalistic behaviors. Nine considerations are presented to this end. We also provide a description of a naturalistic logging approach that has been applied successfully to collecting mediated communications from iPhones. The methodology was designed to intentionally decrease reactivity and resulted in data that were more accurate than self-reports. Example analyses are also provided to show how data collected can be analyzed to establish empirical patterns and identify user differences. Smartphone logging technologies offer flexible capabilities to enhance access to real communications data, but methodologies employing these techniques must be designed appropriately to avoid provoking naturally occurring behaviors. Functionally, this methodology can be applied to establish empirical patterns and test specific hypotheses within the field of HCI research. Topically, this methodology can be applied to domains interested in understanding mediated communications such as mobile content and systems design, teamwork, and social networks.

  8. Brookhaven highlights, 1986-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The highlights of research conducted between October 1985 and September 1987 at Brookhaven National Laboratory are reviewed in this publication. Also covered are the administrative and financial status of the laboratory and a brief mention of meetings held and honors received. (FI)

  9. Energy Policy. Highlights. 2013 Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-01

    Energy Policy Highlights showcases recent developments in energy policies among all 28 IEA member countries. Each contribution underscores the changing nature of both global and domestic energy challenges, as well as the commonality of energy concerns among member countries. The policies highlighted in this publication identify an urgent need to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions as a clear policy objective. Electricity, enhancing energy efficiency and increasing the share of renewables in the energy mix in a cost effective manner are likewise areas of common focus. On the end-user side, increasing public awareness of domestic energy policies through improved transparency and engagement is an important facet of policy support among IEA member countries. The successful implementation of policies and other initiatives benefitted from efforts to inform the public.

  10. LHC Results Highlights (CLASHEP 2013)

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, O

    2015-01-01

    The good performance of the LHC provided enough data at 7 TeV and 8 TeV to allow the experiments to perform very competitive measurements and to expand the knowledge about the fundamental interaction far beyond that from previous colliders. This report summarizes the highlights of the results obtained with these data samples by the four large experiments, covering all the topics of the physics program and focusing on those exploiting the possibilities of the LHC.

  11. Highlights of nuclear chemistry 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights were: 1. Fission product release: benchmark calculations for severe nuclear accidents; 2. Thermochemical data for reactor materials and fission products; 3. thermochemical calculations on fuel of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor; 4. Formation of organic tellurides during nuclear accidents?; 5. Reaction of tellurium with Zircaloy-4; 6. Transmutation of fission products; 7. The thermal conductivity of high-burnup UO2 fuel; 8. Tritium retention in graphite. (orig./HP)

  12. Examining Church Capacity to Develop and Disseminate a Religiously Appropriate HIV Tool Kit with African American Churches

    OpenAIRE

    Berkley-Patton, Jannette; Thompson, Carole Bowe; Martinez, David Alfonso; Hawes, Starlyn Montez; Moore, Erin; Williams, Eric; Wainright, Cassandra

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly, African American churches have been called upon to assist in efforts to address HIV/AIDS in underserved communities. African Americans churches may be well-positioned to provide HIV education, screening, and support services, particularly if they are equipped with church-appropriate, easy-to-deliver HIV tools that can be implemented through the naturalistic church environment. To inform the development of a church-based HIV tool kit, we examined church capacity with African Amer...

  13. Metabolic syndrome in a cohort of affectively ill patients, a naturalistic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj; Madsen, Maiken; Breum, Leif;

    2012-01-01

    at a Mood Disorder Clinic. Methods: Patients were evaluated for the presence of metabolic syndrome (MeS) according to modified NCEP ATP III criteria. Results: Of the 143 patients eligible for participation, 100 patients participated in the study (32% male, mean age 43.6 ± 14.2); the prevalence of MeS was 26......Background: Patients with affective disorder have higher mortality not only because of their affective illness but also because of a higher risk of death from physical illness especially cardiovascular diseases. Aim: To investigate the prevalence in a naturalistic cohort of patient treated...

  14. Modelling the firing pattern of bullfrog vestibular neurons responding to naturalistic stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulin, M. G.; Hoffman, L. F.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a neural system identification method for fitting models to stimulus-response data, where the response is a spike train. The method involves using a general nonlinear optimisation procedure to fit models in the time domain. We have applied the method to model bullfrog semicircular canal afferent neuron responses during naturalistic, broad-band head rotations. These neurons respond in diverse ways, but a simple four parameter class of models elegantly accounts for the various types of responses observed. c1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. PHYSICS FOR HEALTH: CONFERENCE HIGHLIGHTS

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Highlights of ICTR-PHE 2016 - International Conference on Translational Research in Radio-Oncology and Physics for Health -, co organized by CERN, aims at developing new strategies to better diagnose and treat cancer, by uniting biology and physics with clinics. Through the various sessions and symposia, the scientific programme offers the delegates the opportunity to discuss, in a friendly atmosphere, the latest progress in physics breakthroughs for health applications. The third edition of this conference took place at CICG (Centre International de Conférence Genève) from 15 to 19 Feb 2016.

  16. Highlights from BNL-RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Tannenbaum, M J

    2012-01-01

    Recent highlights from Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are reviewed and discussed. Topics include: Discovery of the strongly interacting Quark Gluon Plasma (sQGP) in 2005; RHIC machine operation in 2011 as well as latest achievements from the superconducting Magnet Division and the National Synchrotron Light Source II project. Highlights from QGP physics at RHIC include: comparison of new measurements of charged multiplicity in A+A collisions by ALICE at the LHC to previous RHIC measurements; Observation of the anti-alpha particle by the STAR experiment; Collective Flow, including the Triangular Flow discovery and the latest results on v3; the RHIC beam energy scan in search of the QCD critical point. The pioneering use at RHIC of hard-scattering as a probe of the sQGP will also be reviewed and the latest results presented including: jet-quenching via suppression of high pT particles and two particle correlations; new results on fragmentation functions using gamma...

  17. American Religion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田甜

    2008-01-01

    It is said that American religion,as a great part of American culture,plays an important role in American culture. It is hoped that some ideas can be obtained from this research paper,which focuses on analyzing the great impact is produced to American culture by American religion. Finally, this essay gives two useful standpoints to English learners:Understunding American religion will help understand the American history, culture and American people,and help you to communic.ate with them better. Understanding American religion will help you understand English better.

  18. Attention Strongly Modulates Reliability of Neural Responses to Naturalistic Narrative Stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki, Jason J; Kelly, Simon P; Parra, Lucas C

    2016-03-01

    Attentional engagement is a major determinant of how effectively we gather information through our senses. Alongside the sheer growth in the amount and variety of information content that we are presented with through modern media, there is increased variability in the degree to which we "absorb" that information. Traditional research on attention has illuminated the basic principles of sensory selection to isolated features or locations, but it provides little insight into the neural underpinnings of our attentional engagement with modern naturalistic content. Here, we show in human subjects that the reliability of an individual's neural responses with respect to a larger group provides a highly robust index of the level of attentional engagement with a naturalistic narrative stimulus. Specifically, fast electroencephalographic evoked responses were more strongly correlated across subjects when naturally attending to auditory or audiovisual narratives than when attention was directed inward to a mental arithmetic task during stimulus presentation. This effect was strongest for audiovisual stimuli with a cohesive narrative and greatly reduced for speech stimuli lacking meaning. For compelling audiovisual narratives, the effect is remarkably strong, allowing perfect discrimination between attentional state across individuals. Control experiments rule out possible confounds related to altered eye movement trajectories or order of presentation. We conclude that reliability of evoked activity reproduced across subjects viewing the same movie is highly sensitive to the attentional state of the viewer and listener, which is aided by a cohesive narrative. PMID:26961961

  19. Studying the impact of plating on ratings of the food served in a naturalistic dining context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Charles; Velasco, Carlos; Fraemohs, Paul; Spence, Charles

    2015-07-01

    An experiment conducted in a naturalistic dining context is reported, in which the impact of different styles of plating on diners' experience of the food was assessed. A hundred and sixty three diners were separated into two groups during a luncheon event held in a large dining room. Each group of diners was served the same menu, with a variation in the visual presentation of the ingredients on the plate. The results revealed that the diners were willing to pay significantly more for the appetizer (a salad), when arranged in an artistically-inspired manner (M = £5.94 vs. £4.10). The main course was liked more, and considered more artistic, when the various elements were presented in the centre of the plate, rather than placed off to one side. The participants also reported being willing to pay significantly more for the centred than for the offset plating (M = £15.35 vs. £11.65). These results are consistent with the claim that people "eat first with their eyes", and that a diner's experience of the very same ingredients can be significantly enhanced (or diminished) simply by changing the visual layout of the food elements of the dish. Results such as these suggest that theories regarding the perception of food can potentially be confirmed (or disconfirmed) outside of the confines of the laboratory (i.e., in naturalistic dining settings). PMID:25728885

  20. Areas activated during naturalistic reading comprehension overlap topological visual, auditory, and somatotomotor maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Mariam R; Sereno, Martin I

    2016-08-01

    Cortical mapping techniques using fMRI have been instrumental in identifying the boundaries of topological (neighbor-preserving) maps in early sensory areas. The presence of topological maps beyond early sensory areas raises the possibility that they might play a significant role in other cognitive systems, and that topological mapping might help to delineate areas involved in higher cognitive processes. In this study, we combine surface-based visual, auditory, and somatomotor mapping methods with a naturalistic reading comprehension task in the same group of subjects to provide a qualitative and quantitative assessment of the cortical overlap between sensory-motor maps in all major sensory modalities, and reading processing regions. Our results suggest that cortical activation during naturalistic reading comprehension overlaps more extensively with topological sensory-motor maps than has been heretofore appreciated. Reading activation in regions adjacent to occipital lobe and inferior parietal lobe almost completely overlaps visual maps, whereas a significant portion of frontal activation for reading in dorsolateral and ventral prefrontal cortex overlaps both visual and auditory maps. Even classical language regions in superior temporal cortex are partially overlapped by topological visual and auditory maps. By contrast, the main overlap with somatomotor maps is restricted to a small region on the anterior bank of the central sulcus near the border between the face and hand representations of M-I. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2784-2810, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27061771

  1. Mapping species distributions: a comparison of skilled naturalist and lay citizen science recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wal, René; Anderson, Helen; Robinson, Annie; Sharma, Nirwan; Mellish, Chris; Roberts, Stuart; Darvill, Ben; Siddharthan, Advaith

    2015-11-01

    To assess the ability of traditional biological recording schemes and lay citizen science approaches to gather data on species distributions and changes therein, we examined bumblebee records from the UK's national repository (National Biodiversity Network) and from BeeWatch. The two recording approaches revealed similar relative abundances of bumblebee species but different geographical distributions. For the widespread common carder (Bombus pascuorum), traditional recording scheme data were patchy, both spatially and temporally, reflecting active record centre rather than species distribution. Lay citizen science records displayed more extensive geographic coverage, reflecting human population density, thus offering better opportunities to account for recording effort. For the rapidly spreading tree bumblebee (Bombus hypnorum), both recording approaches revealed similar distributions due to a dedicated mapping project which overcame the patchy nature of naturalist records. We recommend, where possible, complementing skilled naturalist recording with lay citizen science programmes to obtain a nation-wide capability, and stress the need for timely uploading of data to the national repository. PMID:26508346

  2. Effects of neurofeedback on adult patients with psychiatric disorders in a naturalistic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Eun-Jin; Koo, Bon-Hoon; Seo, Wan-Seok; Lee, Jun-Yeob; Choi, Joong-Hyeon; Song, Shin-Ho

    2015-03-01

    Few well-controlled studies have considered neurofeedback treatment in adult psychiatric patients. In this regard, the present study investigates the characteristics and effects of neurofeedback on adult psychiatric patients in a naturalistic setting. A total of 77 adult patients with psychiatric disorders participated in this study. Demographic data and neurofeedback states were retrospectively analyzed, and the effects of neurofeedback were evaluated using clinical global impression (CGI) and subjective self-rating scales. Depressive disorders were the most common psychiatric disorders (19; 24.7 %), followed by anxiety disorders (18; 23.4 %). A total of 69 patients (89.6 %) took medicine, and the average frequency of neurofeedback was 17.39 ± 16.64. Neurofeedback was applied to a total of 39 patients (50.6 %) more than 10 times, and 48 patients (62.3 %) received both β/SMR and α/θ training. The discontinuation rate was 33.8 % (26 patients). There was significant difference between pretreatment and posttreatment CGI scores (anxiety, and inattention (<.001). This is a naturalistic study in a clinical setting, and has several limitations, including the absence of a control group and a heterogenous sample. Despite these limitations, the study demonstrates the potential of neurofeedback as an effective complimentary treatment for adult patients with psychiatric disorders. PMID:25740085

  3. Highlighting inconsistencies regarding metal biosorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robalds, Artis; Naja, Ghinwa Melodie; Klavins, Maris

    2016-03-01

    Thousands of articles have been devoted to examine different types of biosorbents and their use in cleaning polluted waters. An important objective of some studies has been the identification of the biosorption mechanisms. This type of investigation is not always performed, as it can only be done if scientists are aware of all mechanisms that, at least theoretically, control the removal of the target substances. Mistakes are often made, even in highly cited review articles, where biosorption mechanisms are named and/or grouped. The aim of this article is to highlight errors and inaccuracies as well as to discuss different classification systems of the biosorption mechanisms. This article serves as a guide, as well as a platform for discussion among researchers involved in the investigation of biosorbents, in an effort to avoid reproducing errors in subsequent articles. PMID:26607871

  4. Atmospheric Research 2012 Technical Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K -M.

    2013-01-01

    This annual report, as before, is intended for a broad audience. Our readers include colleagues within NASA, scientists outside the Agency, science graduate students, and members of the general public. Inside are descriptions of atmospheric research science highlights and summaries of our education and outreach accomplishments for calendar year 2012.The report covers research activities from the Mesoscale Atmospheric Processes Laboratory, the Climate and Radiation Laboratory, the Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Laboratory, and the Wallops Field Support Office under the Office of Deputy Director for Atmospheres, Earth Sciences Division in the Sciences and Exploration Directorate of NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center. The overall mission of the office is advancing knowledge and understanding of the Earths atmosphere. Satellite missions, field campaigns, peer-reviewed publications, and successful proposals are essential to our continuing research.

  5. Highlights in pathogenesis of vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Ghada F; Gomaa, Amal Ha; Al-Dhubaibi, Mohammed Saleh

    2015-03-16

    Vitiligo is a common pigmentary disorder. Many studies across decades and all over the world have attempted to illustrate the pathogenesis behind it; however, the pathogenesis of vitiligo remains elusive. This review article, we present the findings behind the most and updated theories behind this psychologically debilitating and disfiguring disease. The discussion begun with the role of genetic predisposition followed by neural theory first proposed in the 1950s. We highlight the autoimmune hypothesis, followed by the reactive oxygen species model, zinc-α2-glycoprotein deficiency hypothesis, viral theory, intrinsic theory and biochemical, molecular and cellular alterations accounting for loss of functioning melanocytes in vitiligo. Many theories were elaborated to clarify vitiligo pathogenesis. It is a multifactorial disease involving the interplay of several factors. Future research is needed to clarify the interaction of these factors for better understanding of vitiligo pathogenesis and subsequent successful treatment. PMID:25789295

  6. Highlights from U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Recovery Act Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuel Cell Technologies Office

    2012-05-01

    This fact sheets highlights U.S. Department of Energy fuel cell projects funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act). More than 1,000 fuel cell systems have been deployed through Recovery Act funding.

  7. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Workpackage 6, Driver Behaviour Monitoring through Naturalistic Driving: Deliverable 6.2: Part B: Sampling techniques and naturalistic driving study design.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Commandeur, J.J.F.

    2015-01-01

    In this document we provide an overview of sampling and estimation methods that can be used to obtain population values of risk exposure data and safety performance indicators based on naturalistic driving study designs. More specifically, we discuss how to determine the optimal sample size required

  8. Independent naturalists make matchless contributions to science and resource management (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crimmins, T. M.; Crimmins, M.; Bertelsen, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    Much of the recent growth in PPSR, or public participation in scientific research, has been in 'contributory' or 'collaborative'-type PPSR projects, where non-scientists' roles primarily are data collection or some participation in other aspects of project design or execution. A less common PPSR model, referred to as 'collegial' in recent literature, is characterized by dedicated naturalists collecting rich and extensive data sets outside of an organized program and then working with professional scientists to analyze these data and disseminate findings. The three collaborators on this presentation represent an example of the collegial model; our team is comprised of an independent naturalist who has collected over 150,000 records of plant flowering phenology spanning three decades, a professional climatologist, and a professional plant ecologist. Together, we have documented fundamental plant-climate relationships and seasonal patterns in flowering in the Sonoran Desert region, as well as changes in flowering community composition and distribution associated with changing climate conditions in the form of seven peer-reviewed journal articles and several conference presentations and proceedings. These novel findings address critical gaps in our understanding of plant ecology in the Sky Islands region, and have been incorporated into the Southwest Climate Change and other regional planning documents. It is safe to say that the data resource amassed by a single very dedicated individual, which is far beyond what could be accomplished by probably nearly all researchers or resource managers, has been instrumental in documenting fundamental ecological relationships in the Sky Islands region as well as how these systems are changing in this period of rapidly changing climate. The research findings that have resulted from this partnership have the potential to also directly affect management decisions. The watershed under study, managed by the US Forest Service, has been

  9. ESO PR Highlights in 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    new interesting scientific results on the basis of data from ESO telescopes, including several results from the unmatched interferometer mode of the VLT, the VLTI, some of which were highlighted in ESO Press Releases. Certainly worth noting is the possible first ever bona-fide image of an exoplanet and the discovery of the lightest known exoplanet . At the beginning of the year, Paranal welcomed the first Auxiliary Telescope, while on the instrument side as well, 2004 was a good year: we saw the arrival of SINFONI on the VLT, of AMBER on the VLTI, and the installation at the NACO Adaptive Optics instrument of the " Simultaneous Differential Imager (SDI)" to detect exoplanets. And the first prototype of the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory was able to provide unprecedented results on the existence of Type-2 quasars by discovering an entire population of obscured, powerful supermassive black holes. Many of these developments are described in ESO's Press Releases, most with Press Photos, cf. the 2004 PR Index. Some of last year's ESO PR highlights may be accessed directly via the clickable image above.

  10. Are Classroom and Naturalistic Acquisition the Same? A Study of the Classroom Acquisition of German Word Rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Rod

    1989-01-01

    Reports on a study of the classroom acquisition of German word order by adult learners. Results of the study support the claim that classroom and naturalistic second language acquisition of complex grammatical features such as word order follow similar routes. (50 references) (Author/OD)

  11. Towards developing a US-EU common distracted driving taxonomy : updating a naturalistic driving data coding approach

    OpenAIRE

    Hanowski, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Naturalistic video data reduction is a process of identifying information from video and putting it into a format that can be analyzed. Developing a sufficiently detailed event coding scheme is critical to this process. This report outlines an effort to refine VTTI's existing coding scheme, to identify 'driver distraction' using a pragmatic definition of driver distraction from the literature. -- Report website.

  12. Brief Report: Excessive Alcohol Use Negatively Affects the Course of Adolescent Depression--One Year Naturalistic Follow-Up Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meririnne, Esa; Kiviruusu, Olli; Karlsson, Linnea; Pelkonen, Mirjami; Ruuttu, Titta; Tuisku, Virpi; Marttunen, Mauri

    2010-01-01

    The impact of alcohol use on the course of adolescent depression over one-year was investigated by following 197 consecutive adolescent outpatients with unipolar depression in a naturalistic treatment setting. Their baseline alcohol consumption was categorized in three groups: excessive use (defined as weekly drunkenness), regular use (monthly…

  13. Practice Makes Improvement: How Adults with Autism Out-Perform Others in a Naturalistic Visual Search Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Cleotilde; Martin, Jolie M.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Behrmann, Marlene

    2013-01-01

    People with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often exhibit superior performance in visual search compared to others. However, most studies demonstrating this advantage have employed simple, uncluttered images with fully visible targets. We compare the performance of high-functioning adults with ASD and matched controls on a naturalistic luggage…

  14. Naturalistic Effects of Five Days of Bedtime Caffeine Use on Sleep, Next-Day Cognitive Performance, and Mood

    OpenAIRE

    Keenan, Emma K; Tiplady, Brian; Priestley, Caroline M.; Rogers, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Disruptive effects of caffeine on sleep have previously been reported, although measures of next-day mood and performance have rarely been included. The present study aims to evaluate the effects of caffeine on sleep and associated next-day effects in a naturalistic field setting.

  15. Self-Assessment of Japanese as a Second Language: The Role of Experiences in the Naturalistic Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Self-assessment has been used to assess second language proficiency; however, as sources of measurement errors vary, they may threaten the validity and reliability of the tools. The present paper investigated the role of experiences in using Japanese as a second language in the naturalistic acquisition context on the accuracy of the…

  16. Naturalistic and Structured Assessments of Prosocial Behavior in Preschool Children: The Influence of Empathy and Perspective Taking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannotti, Ronald J.

    1985-01-01

    Interrelationship of different categories of prosocial behavior different assessment procedures, and role of empathy and perspective taking were examined. Prosocial behavior in preschool children was assessed using three different approaches: naturalistic observation, structured measures, and teacher ratings. Results indicated preschool children…

  17. Complex tasks force hand laterality and technological behaviour in naturalistically housed chimpanzees: inferences in hominin evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, M; Geribàs, N; Bargalló, A; Llorente, M; Riba, D

    2012-01-01

    Clear hand laterality patterns in humans are widely accepted. However, humans only elicit a significant hand laterality pattern when performing complementary role differentiation (CRD) tasks. Meanwhile, hand laterality in chimpanzees is weaker and controversial. Here we have reevaluated our results on hand laterality in chimpanzees housed in naturalistic environments at Fundació Mona (Spain) and Chimfunshi Wild Orphanage (Zambia). Our results show that the difference between hand laterality in humans and chimpanzees is not as great as once thought. Furthermore, we found a link between hand laterality and task complexity and also an even more interesting connection: CRD tasks elicited not only the hand laterality but also the use of tools. This paper aims to turn attention to the importance of this threefold connection in human evolution: the link between CRD tasks, hand laterality, and tool use, which has important evolutionary implications that may explain the development of complex behaviour in early hominins. PMID:22550466

  18. The Naturalistic Flight Deck System: An Integrated System Concept for Improved Single-Pilot Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Paul C.; Goodrich, Kenneth H.; Cox, David E.; Jackson, Bruce; Palmer, Michael T.; Pope, Alan T.; Schlecht, Robin W.; Tedjojuwono, Ken K.; Trujillo, Anna C.; Williams, Ralph A.; Kinney, J. Bryan; Barry, John S., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews current and emerging operational experiences, technologies, and human-machine interaction theories to develop an integrated flight system concept designed to increase the safety, reliability, and performance of single-pilot operations in an increasingly accommodating but stringent national airspace system. This concept, know as the Naturalistic Flight Deck (NFD), uses a form of human-centered automation known as complementary-automation (or complemation) to structure the relationship between the human operator and the aircraft as independent, collaborative agents having complimentary capabilities. The human provides commonsense knowledge, general intelligence, and creative thinking, while the machine contributes specialized intelligence and control, extreme vigilance, resistance to fatigue, and encyclopedic memory. To support the development of the NFD, an initial Concept of Operations has been created and selected normal and non-normal scenarios are presented in this document.

  19. “Aesthetic Primitives”: Fundamental Biological Elements of a Naturalistic Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Dissanayake

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetics, like other philosophical subjects, has historically made use of «top down» (mentalistic, analytic, and linguistic methods. Recent discoveries in genetics, evolutionary psychology, paleoarchaeology, and neuroscience call for a new «naturalistic» or «bottom up» perspective. Combining these fields with behavioral biology and ethnoarts studies, I offer seven premises that underlie a new understanding of evolved predispositions of the brain/mind that all artists use to attract attention, sustain interest, and create, mold, and shape emotion. I describe aesthetic «primitives» in somatic and behavioral (as well as psychosensory modalities, suggesting that these were present in early sapiens and continue to influence human art making and aesthetic response today. Keywords: Aesthetic Mind; Neuroaesthetics, evolutionary aesthetics, cognitive aesthetics, evolution of art.

  20. Operationalizing NIMH Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) in naturalistic clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Carla; Fowler, J Christopher; Salas, Ramiro; Nielsen, David; Allen, Jon; Oldham, John; Kosten, Thomas; Mathew, Sanjay; Madan, Alok; Frueh, B Christopher; Fonagy, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) introduced the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative to address two major challenges facing the field of psychiatry: (1) the lack of new effective personalized treatments for psychiatric disorders, and (2) the limitations associated with categorically defined psychiatric disorders. Although the potential of RDoC to revolutionize personalized psychiatric medicine and psychiatric nosology has been acknowledged, it is unclear how to implement RDoC in naturalistic clinical settings as part of routine outcomes research. In this article, the authors present the major RDoC principles and then show how these principles are operationalized in The Menninger Clinic's McNair Initiative for Neuroscience Discovery-Menninger & Baylor College of Medicine (MIND-MB) study. The authors discuss how RDoC-informed outcomes-based assessment in clinical settings can transform personalized clinical care through multimodal treatments. PMID:27583809

  1. Driver crash risk factors and prevalence evaluation using naturalistic driving data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingus, Thomas A; Guo, Feng; Lee, Suzie; Antin, Jonathan F; Perez, Miguel; Buchanan-King, Mindy; Hankey, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    The accurate evaluation of crash causal factors can provide fundamental information for effective transportation policy, vehicle design, and driver education. Naturalistic driving (ND) data collected with multiple onboard video cameras and sensors provide a unique opportunity to evaluate risk factors during the seconds leading up to a crash. This paper uses a National Academy of Sciences-sponsored ND dataset comprising 905 injurious and property damage crash events, the magnitude of which allows the first direct analysis (to our knowledge) of causal factors using crashes only. The results show that crash causation has shifted dramatically in recent years, with driver-related factors (i.e., error, impairment, fatigue, and distraction) present in almost 90% of crashes. The results also definitively show that distraction is detrimental to driver safety, with handheld electronic devices having high use rates and risk. PMID:26903657

  2. A naturalistic study of fat talk and its behavioral and affective consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michelle D; Crowther, Janis H; Ciesla, Jeffrey A

    2014-09-01

    Fat talk is a style of verbal expression among young women involving negative self-statements, complaints about physical appearance, and weight management. This research used ecological momentary assessment to examine the impact of naturalistic fat talk experiences on body dissatisfaction, body checking, negative affect, and disordered eating behaviors. We examined trait self-objectification as a moderator. Sixty-five female college students completed a baseline questionnaire and responded to questions when randomly prompted by palm pilot devices for five days. Results indicated fat talk is common and associated with greater body dissatisfaction, body checking, negative affect, and disordered eating behaviors. Fat talk participation was associated with greater body checking than overhearing fat talk. Greater trait self-objectification was associated with greater body dissatisfaction and body checking following fat talk. These results suggest that fat talk negatively impacts the cognitions, affect, and behavior of young women and has increased negative effects for women higher in self-objectification. PMID:24976570

  3. Lazzaro Spallanzani and fossils: from a naturalist's travel observations to the teaching of natural history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestes, Maria Elice Brzezinski; Faria, Frederico Felipe de Almeida

    2011-12-01

    This article analyzes opinions expressed by Italian naturalist Lazzaro Spallanzani on the origin and constitution of fossils on three of his travels, which punctuated three courses in mineralogy he gave in the natural history discipline at the University of Pavia. These trips to Portovenere, the island of Cerigo and the Two Sicilies enabled him to address important topics, such as the discovery of fossilized shells inside volcanic rocks, the discovery of human fossils, and the existence of fossils of species that had 'been lost', incorporating knowledge being developed at the time that drew on mineral chemistry. His concern with fossils is demonstrative of how Spallanzani, in true eighteenth century fashion, integrated studies from the three kingdoms of nature. PMID:22281956

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of the Eurotest for dementia: a naturalistic, multicenter phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Ana

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Available screening tests for dementia are of limited usefulness because they are influenced by the patient's culture and educational level. The Eurotest, an instrument based on the knowledge and handling of money, was designed to overcome these limitations. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the Eurotest in identifying dementia in customary clinical practice. Methods A cross-sectional, multi-center, naturalistic phase II study was conducted. The Eurotest was administered to consecutive patients, older than 60 years, in general neurology clinics. The patients' condition was classified as dementia or no dementia according to DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. We calculated sensitivity (Sn, specificity (Sp and area under the ROC curves (aROC with 95% confidence intervals. The influence of social and educational factors on scores was evaluated with multiple linear regression analysis, and the influence of these factors on diagnostic accuracy was evaluated with logistic regression. Results Sixteen neurologists recruited a total of 516 participants: 101 with dementia, 380 without dementia, and 35 who were excluded. Of the 481 participants who took the Eurotest, 38.7% were totally or functionally illiterate and 45.5% had received no formal education. Mean time needed to administer the test was 8.2+/-2.0 minutes. The best cut-off point was 20/21, with Sn = 0.91 (0.84–0.96, Sp = 0.82 (0.77–0.85, and aROC = 0.93 (0.91–0.95. Neither the scores on the Eurotest nor its diagnostic accuracy were influenced by social or educational factors. Conclusion This naturalistic and pragmatic study shows that the Eurotest is a rapid, simple and useful screening instrument, which is free from educational influences, and has appropriate internal and external validity.

  5. Quantifying naturalistic social gaze in fragile X syndrome using a novel eye tracking paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Scott S; Frank, Michael C; Pusiol, Guido T; Farzin, Faraz; Lightbody, Amy A; Reiss, Allan L

    2015-10-01

    A hallmark behavioral feature of fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the propensity for individuals with the syndrome to exhibit significant impairments in social gaze during interactions with others. However, previous studies employing eye tracking methodology to investigate this phenomenon have been limited to presenting static photographs or videos of social interactions rather than employing a real-life social partner. To improve upon previous studies, we used a customized eye tracking configuration to quantify the social gaze of 51 individuals with FXS and 19 controls, aged 14-28 years, while they engaged in a naturalistic face-to-face social interaction with a female experimenter. Importantly, our control group was matched to the FXS group on age, developmental functioning, and degree of autistic symptomatology. Results showed that participants with FXS spent significantly less time looking at the face and had shorter episodes (and longer inter-episodes) of social gaze than controls. Regression analyses indicated that communication ability predicted higher levels of social gaze in individuals with FXS, but not in controls. Conversely, degree of autistic symptoms predicted lower levels of social gaze in controls, but not in individuals with FXS. Taken together, these data indicate that naturalistic social gaze in FXS can be measured objectively using existing eye tracking technology during face-to-face social interactions. Given that impairments in social gaze were specific to FXS, this paradigm could be employed as an objective and ecologically valid outcome measure in ongoing Phase II/Phase III clinical trials of FXS-specific interventions. PMID:26079280

  6. A selective review of simulated driving studies: Combining naturalistic and hybrid paradigms, analysis approaches, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, V D; Pearlson, G D

    2012-01-01

    Naturalistic paradigms such as movie watching or simulated driving that mimic closely real-world complex activities are becoming more widely used in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies both because of their ability to robustly stimulate brain connectivity and the availability of analysis methods which are able to capitalize on connectivity within and among intrinsic brain networks identified both during a task and in resting fMRI data. In this paper we review over a decade of work from our group and others on the use of simulated driving paradigms to study both the healthy brain as well as the effects of acute alcohol administration on functional connectivity during such paradigms. We briefly review our initial work focused on the configuration of the driving simulator and the analysis strategies. We then describe in more detail several recent studies from our group including a hybrid study examining distracted driving and compare resulting data with those from a separate visual oddball task (Fig. 6). The analysis of these data was performed primarily using a combination of group independent component analysis (ICA) and the general linear model (GLM) and in the various studies we highlight novel findings which result from an analysis of either 1) within-network connectivity, 2) inter-network connectivity, also called functional network connectivity, or 3) the degree to which the modulation of the various intrinsic networks were associated with the alcohol administration and the task context. Despite the fact that the behavioral effects of alcohol intoxication are relatively well known, there is still much to discover on how acute alcohol exposure modulates brain function in a selective manner, associated with behavioral alterations. Through the above studies, we have learned more regarding the impact of acute alcohol intoxication on organization of the brain's intrinsic connectivity networks during performance of a complex, real-world cognitive

  7. A Cognitive Vulnerability Model of Sleep and Mood in Adolescents under Naturalistically Restricted and Extended Sleep Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Bei; Wiley, Joshua F.; Allen, Nicholas B.; Trinder, John

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: School terms and vacations represent naturally occurring periods of restricted and extended sleep opportunities. A cognitive model of the relationships among objective sleep, subjective sleep, and negative mood was tested across these periods, with sleep-specific (i.e., dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep) and global (i.e., dysfunctional attitudes) cognitive vulnerabilities as moderators. Design: Longitudinal study over the last week of a school term (Time-E), the following 2-w vacation (Time-V), and the first week of the next term (Time-S). Setting: General community. Participants: 146 adolescents, 47.3% male, mean age = 16.2 years (standard deviation ± 1 year). Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Objective sleep was measured continuously by actigraphy. Sociodemographics and cognitive vulnerabilities were assessed at Time-E; subjective sleep, negative mood (anxiety and depressive symptoms), and academic stress were measured at each time point. Controlling for academic stress and sex, subjective sleep quality mediated the relationship between objective sleep and negative mood at all time points. During extended (Time-V), but not restricted (Time-E and Time-S) sleep opportunity, this mediation was moderated by global cognitive vulnerability, with the indirect effects stronger with higher vulnerability. Further, at Time-E and Time-V, but not Time-S, greater sleep-specific and global cognitive vulnerabilities were associated with poorer subjective sleep quality and mood, respectively. Conclusions: Results highlighted the importance of subjective sleep perception in the development of sleep related mood problems, and supported the role of cognitive vulnerabilities as potential mechanisms in the relationships between objective sleep, subjective sleep, and negative mood. Adolescents with higher cognitive vulnerability are more susceptible to perceived poor sleep and sleep related mood problems. These findings have practical

  8. ESO PR Highlights in 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Last year proved to be another exceptional year for the European organisation for ground-based astronomy. ESO should begin the New Year with two new member states: Spain (PR 05/06) and the Czech Republic (PR 52/06). ESO PR Highlights 2006 2006 was a year of renovation and revolution in the world of planets. A new Earth-like exoplanet has been discovered (PR 03/06) using a network of telescopes from all over the world (including the Danish 1.54-m one at ESO La Silla). It is not the only child of this fruitful year: thanks to the combined use of ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) and La Silla instruments, a surprising system of twin giant exoplanets was found (PR 29/06), and a trio of Neptune-like planets hosted by a nearby star were identified (PR 18/06). These results open new perspectives on the search for habitable zones and on the understanding of the mechanism of planet formation. The VISIR instrument on the VLT has been providing unique information to answer this last question, by supplying a high resolution view of a planet-forming disc (PR 36/06). There are not only new members in the planets' register: during the General Assembly of the International Astronomical Union held in Prague (Czech Republic), it was decided that Pluto is not a planet anymore but a 'dwarf planet'. Whatever its status, Pluto still has a satellite, Charon, whose radius and density have been measured more accurately by observing a rare occultation from different sites, including Cerro Paranal (PR 02/06). The scientific community dedicated 2006 to the great physicist James Clerk Maxwell (it was the 175th anniversary of the birth): without his electromagnetic theory of light, none of the astonishing discoveries of modern physics could have been achieved. Nowadays we can look at distant galaxies in great detail: the GIRAFFE spectrograph on the VLT revealed that galaxies 6 billion years ago had the same amount of dark matter relative to stars than nowadays (PR 10/06), while SINFONI gave an

  9. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Workpackage 6, Driver Behaviour Monitoring through Naturalistic Driving: Deliverable 6.4: Naturalistic Driving for monitoring safety performance indicators and exposure: considerations for implementation.

    OpenAIRE

    Schagen, I.N.L.G. van & Reed, S.

    2015-01-01

    DaCoTA was a Collaborative Project under the European Seventh Framework Programme that aimed to develop tools and methodologies to support road safety policy and further extend and enhance the European Road Safety Observatory (ERSO). One of the Work Packages in DaCoTA, WP6, focused on the usefulness and feasibility of applying the Naturalistic Driving method for collecting comparable information about the road safety level in EU Member States and its development over time. The current Deliver...

  10. Antipsychotic monotherapy and polypharmacy in the naturalistic treatment of schizophrenia with atypical antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Correll Christoph

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antipsychotic monotherapy is recognized as the treatment of choice for patients with schizophrenia. Simultaneous treatment with multiple antipsychotics (polypharmacy is suggested by some expert consensus guidelines as the last resort after exhausting monotherapy alternatives. This study assessed the annual rate and duration of antipsychotic monotherapy and its inverse, antipsychotic polypharmacy, among schizophrenia patients initiated on commonly used atypical antipsychotic medications. Methods Data were drawn from a large prospective naturalistic study of patients treated for schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, conducted 7/1997–9/2003. Analyses focused on patients (N = 796 who were initiated during the study on olanzapine (N = 405, quetiapine (N = 115, or risperidone (N = 276. The percentage of patients with monotherapy on the index antipsychotic over the 1-year post initiation, and the cumulative number of days on monotherapy were calculated for all patients and for each of the 3 atypical antipsychotic treatment groups. Analyses employed repeated measures generalized linear models and non-parametric bootstrap re-sampling, controlling for patient characteristics. Results During the 1-year period, only a third (35.7% of the patients were treated predominately with monotherapy (>300 days. Most patients (57.7% had at least one prolonged period of antipsychotic polypharmacy (>60 consecutive days. Patients averaged 195.5 days on monotherapy, 155.7 days on polypharmacy, and 13.9 days without antipsychotic therapy. Olanzapine-initiated patients were significantly more likely to be on monotherapy with the initiating antipsychotic during the 1-year post initiation compared to risperidone (p = .043 or quetiapine (p = .002. The number of monotherapy days was significantly greater for olanzapine than quetiapine (p Conclusion Despite guidelines recommending the use of polypharmacy only as a last resort, the use of antipsychotic

  11. The potential benefits of naturalistic driving for road safety research : theoretical and empirical considerations and challenges for the future.

    OpenAIRE

    Schagen, I.N.L.G. van & Sagberg, F.

    2012-01-01

    Naturalistic driving (ND) is a research method that provides insight in everyday driver behaviour. Typically, in an ND study vehicles are equipped with several small cameras and sensors, which continuously and inconspicuously register vehicle manoeuvres, driver behaviour, and external conditions. This allows observation and analysis of the interrelationships between driver, vehicle, road, and other traffic in normal situations, conflict situations, and crashes. This paper introduces the conce...

  12. A Selective Review of Simulated Driving Studies: Combining Naturalistic and Hybrid Paradigms, Analysis Approaches, and Future Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Calhoun, V D; Pearlson, G.D.

    2011-01-01

    Naturalistic paradigms such as movie watching or simulated driving that mimic closely real-world complex activities are becoming more widely used in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies both because of their ability to robustly stimulate brain connectivity and the availability of analysis methods which are able to capitalize on connectivity within and among intrinsic brain networks identified both during a task and in resting fMRI data. In this paper we review over a decade of...

  13. The Gospel According to Zola: National Identity and Naturalist Utopia in Fin-de-Siècle France

    OpenAIRE

    Zupsich, Gina Katherine

    2010-01-01

    My dissertation, "The Gospel According to Zola: National Identity and Naturalist Utopia in Fin-de-Siècle France" is a sustained interdisciplinary investigation of Emile Zola's Quatre Evangiles (1899-1903). These novels are an allegory of the French Republic of the future in which the heroic Froment family cures social diseases such as depopulation, agricultural stagnation, recession, anti-Semitism, as well as class and sexual inequality. Although critics have tended to dismiss this series as...

  14. Long-term Escitalopram Treatment in Korean Patients with Panic Disorder: A Prospective, Naturalistic, Open-label, Multicenter Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Kwan-Woo; Woo, Jong-Min; Kim, Youl-Ri; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Sang-Yeol; Kim, Eui-Jung; Chung, Sang-Keun; Kang, Eun-Ho; Lee, Jae-Hon; Yu, Bum-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Objective Panic disorder is characterized by recurrent panic attacks, persistent concerns about additional attacks, and worry about the implications of the attack or significant changes in behavior related to the attacks. We examined the efficacy of 24-week naturalistic, open-label escitalopram treatment in terms of the response and remission rates and functional disability in 119 adult Korean patients with panic disorder from 6 clinical centers in South Korea. Methods Clinical severity and f...

  15. An Overview of Methods and Key Findings from the NTDS: The Naturalistic Teenage Driving Study: Methods and Selected Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Simons-Morton, Bruce G.; Klauer, C.; Guo, Feng; Lee, S; Ouimet, Marie-Claude; Albert, P.S.; Dingus, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes the findings on novice teenage driving outcomes (e.g., crashes and risky driving behaviors) from the Naturalistic Teenage Driving Study. Method Survey and driving data from a data acquisition system (global positioning system, accelerometers, cameras) were collected from 42 newly licensed teenage drivers and their parents during the first 18 months of teenage licensure; stress responsivity was also measured in teenagers. Result Overall teenage crash and near-crash (CNC) ...

  16. From Sensory to Positivist Utilitarianism and Back : The Rehabilitation of Naturalistic Conjectures in the Theory of Demand

    OpenAIRE

    Witt, Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    Demand theory grew out of the revision of utilitarianism. The original, Benthamite program – based on a naturalistic, hedonic interpretation of behavior – was replaced by an abstract, subjectivist approach, a motivational mechanics. The implications – expressed exclusively in observable quantities, prices, and incomes – were developed in demand theory. The paper discusses major steps and consequences of the revision together with more recent partial revocations and attempts at reintroducing a...

  17. Failure to Find Executive Function Deficits Following One Night's Total Sleep Deprivation in University Students Under Naturalistic Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Pace-Schott, Edward F.; Hutcherson, Cendri A.; Bemporad, Brenda; Morgan, Alexandra; Kumar, Arjun; Hobson, J. Allan; Stickgold, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Young adult male students participated in a naturalistic, group-design experiment to ascertain the effects of one night's total sleep deprivation (TSD) on performance of diverse executive function tasks presented as an extended, multitask battery. On the majority of component tasks in this battery, performance has been reported to be impaired following one night's TSD when tasks are administered in isolation. However, participants sleep deprived 35 to 39 hr showed few performance deficits amo...

  18. Differences in Anticipatory Behaviour between Rats (Rattus norvegicus) Housed in Standard versus Semi-Naturalistic Laboratory Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowska, I Joanna; Weary, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory rats are usually kept in relatively small cages, but research has shown that they prefer larger and more complex environments. The physiological, neurological and health effects of standard laboratory housing are well established, but fewer studies have addressed the sustained emotional impact of a standard cage environment. One method of assessing affective states in animals is to look at the animals' anticipatory behaviour between the presentation of a cue signalling the arrival of a reward and the arrival of that reward. The primary aim of this study was to use anticipatory behaviour to assess the affective state experienced by female rats a) reared and housed long-term in a standard laboratory cage versus a semi-naturalistic environment, and b) before and after treatment with an antidepressant or an anxiolytic. A secondary aim was to add to the literature on anticipatory behaviour by describing and comparing the frequency and duration of individual elements of anticipatory behaviour displayed by rats reared in these two systems. In all experiments, total behavioural frequency was higher in standard-housed rats compared to rats from the semi-naturalistic condition, suggesting that standard-housed rats were more sensitive to rewards and experiencing poorer welfare than rats reared in the semi-naturalistic environment. What rats did in anticipation of the reward also differed between housing treatments, with standard-housed rats mostly rearing and rats from the semi-naturalistic condition mostly sitting facing the direction of the upcoming treat. Drug interventions had no effect on the quantity or form of anticipatory behaviour, suggesting that the poorer welfare experienced by standard-housed rats was not analogous to depression or anxiety, or alternatively that the drug interventions were ineffective. This study adds to mounting evidence that standard laboratory housing for rats compromises rat welfare, and provides further scientific support for

  19. Differences in Anticipatory Behaviour between Rats (Rattus norvegicus Housed in Standard versus Semi-Naturalistic Laboratory Environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Joanna Makowska

    Full Text Available Laboratory rats are usually kept in relatively small cages, but research has shown that they prefer larger and more complex environments. The physiological, neurological and health effects of standard laboratory housing are well established, but fewer studies have addressed the sustained emotional impact of a standard cage environment. One method of assessing affective states in animals is to look at the animals' anticipatory behaviour between the presentation of a cue signalling the arrival of a reward and the arrival of that reward. The primary aim of this study was to use anticipatory behaviour to assess the affective state experienced by female rats a reared and housed long-term in a standard laboratory cage versus a semi-naturalistic environment, and b before and after treatment with an antidepressant or an anxiolytic. A secondary aim was to add to the literature on anticipatory behaviour by describing and comparing the frequency and duration of individual elements of anticipatory behaviour displayed by rats reared in these two systems. In all experiments, total behavioural frequency was higher in standard-housed rats compared to rats from the semi-naturalistic condition, suggesting that standard-housed rats were more sensitive to rewards and experiencing poorer welfare than rats reared in the semi-naturalistic environment. What rats did in anticipation of the reward also differed between housing treatments, with standard-housed rats mostly rearing and rats from the semi-naturalistic condition mostly sitting facing the direction of the upcoming treat. Drug interventions had no effect on the quantity or form of anticipatory behaviour, suggesting that the poorer welfare experienced by standard-housed rats was not analogous to depression or anxiety, or alternatively that the drug interventions were ineffective. This study adds to mounting evidence that standard laboratory housing for rats compromises rat welfare, and provides further

  20. Earth scientists as time travelers and agents of colonial conquest: Swiss naturalists in the Dutch East Indies

    OpenAIRE

    Schär, Bernhard C.

    2015-01-01

    This case study on two Swiss naturalists illustrates some of the ways scientific exploration of planet earth was connected to imperial conquest in the Dutch East Indies at around 1900. Looking for answers for zoogeographical problems on the island of Celebes the Swiss benefited from and enabled Dutch colonial invasion of the island. The case illustrates that the Dutch empire was a site of scientific competition among a transnational community of scholars. Finally, the case illustrates how sci...

  1. Using an Electronic Highlighter to Eliminate the Negative Effects of Pre-Existing, Inappropriate Highlighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gier, Vicki; Kreiner, David; Hudnell, Jason; Montoya, Jodi; Herring, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether using an active learning technique, electronic highlighting, can eliminate the negative effects of pre-existing, poor highlighting on reading comprehension. Participants read passages containing no highlighting, appropriate highlighting, or inappropriate highlighting. We hypothesized…

  2. From naturalistic neuroscience to modeling radical embodiment with narrative enactive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikka, Pia; Kaipainen, Mauri Ylermi

    2014-01-01

    Mainstream cognitive neuroscience has begun to accept the idea of embodied mind, which assumes that the human mind is fundamentally constituted by the dynamical interactions of the brain, body, and the environment. In today's paradigm of naturalistic neurosciences, subjects are exposed to rich contexts, such as video sequences or entire films, under relatively controlled conditions, against which researchers can interpret changes in neural responses within a time window. However, from the point of view of radical embodied cognitive neuroscience, the increasing complexity alone will not suffice as the explanatory apparatus for dynamical embodiment and situatedness of the mind. We suggest that narrative enactive systems with dynamically adaptive content as stimuli, may serve better to account for the embodied mind engaged with the surrounding world. Among the ensuing challenges for neuroimaging studies is how to interpret brain data against broad temporal contexts of previous experiences that condition the unfolding experience of nowness. We propose means to tackle this issue, as well as ways to limit the exponentially growing combinatoria of narrative paths to a controllable number. PMID:25339890

  3. Unsupervised Decoding of Long-Term, Naturalistic Human Neural Recordings with Automated Video and Audio Annotations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nancy X. R.; Olson, Jared D.; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.; Rao, Rajesh P. N.; Brunton, Bingni W.

    2016-01-01

    Fully automated decoding of human activities and intentions from direct neural recordings is a tantalizing challenge in brain-computer interfacing. Implementing Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs) outside carefully controlled experiments in laboratory settings requires adaptive and scalable strategies with minimal supervision. Here we describe an unsupervised approach to decoding neural states from naturalistic human brain recordings. We analyzed continuous, long-term electrocorticography (ECoG) data recorded over many days from the brain of subjects in a hospital room, with simultaneous audio and video recordings. We discovered coherent clusters in high-dimensional ECoG recordings using hierarchical clustering and automatically annotated them using speech and movement labels extracted from audio and video. To our knowledge, this represents the first time techniques from computer vision and speech processing have been used for natural ECoG decoding. Interpretable behaviors were decoded from ECoG data, including moving, speaking and resting; the results were assessed by comparison with manual annotation. Discovered clusters were projected back onto the brain revealing features consistent with known functional areas, opening the door to automated functional brain mapping in natural settings. PMID:27148018

  4. Neuroleptic-induced movement disorders in a naturalistic schizophrenia population: diagnostic value of actometric movement patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuisku Katinka

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroleptic-induced movement disorders (NIMDs have overlapping co-morbidity. Earlier studies have described typical clinical movement patterns for individual NIMDs. This study aimed to identify specific movement patterns for each individual NIMD using actometry. Methods A naturalistic population of 99 schizophrenia inpatients using conventional antipsychotics and clozapine was evaluated. Subjects with NIMDs were categorized using the criteria for NIMD found in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders – Fourth Edition (DSM-IV. Two blinded raters evaluated the actometric-controlled rest activity data for activity periods, rhythmical activity, frequencies, and highest acceleration peaks. A simple subjective question was formulated to test patient-based evaluation of NIMD. Results The patterns of neuroleptic-induced akathisia (NIA and pseudoakathisia (PsA were identifiable in actometry with excellent inter-rater reliability. The answers to the subjective question about troubles with movements distinguished NIA patients from other patients rather well. Also actometry had rather good screening performances in distinguishing akathisia from other NIMD. Actometry was not able to reliably detect patterns of neuroleptic-induced parkinsonism and tardive dyskinesia. Conclusion The present study showed that pooled NIA and PsA patients had a different pattern in lower limb descriptive actometry than other patients in a non-selected sample. Careful questioning of patients is a useful method of diagnosing NIA in a clinical setting.

  5. Immediate memory for "when, where and what": Short-delay retrieval using dynamic naturalistic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Sze Chai; Macaluso, Emiliano

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the neural correlates supporting three kinds of memory judgments after very short delays using naturalistic material. In two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments, subjects watched short movie clips, and after a short retention (1.5-2.5 s), made mnemonic judgments about specific aspects of the clips. In Experiment 1, subjects were presented with two scenes and required to either choose the scene that happened earlier in the clip ("scene-chronology"), or with a correct spatial arrangement ("scene-layout"), or that had been shown ("scene-recognition"). To segregate activity specific to seen versus unseen stimuli, in Experiment 2 only one probe image was presented (either target or foil). Across the two experiments, we replicated three patterns underlying the three specific forms of memory judgment. The precuneus was activated during temporal-order retrieval, the superior parietal cortex was activated bilaterally for spatial-related configuration judgments, whereas the medial frontal cortex during scene recognition. Conjunction analyses with a previous study that used analogous retrieval tasks, but a much longer delay (>1 day), demonstrated that this dissociation pattern is independent of retention delay. We conclude that analogous brain regions mediate task-specific retrieval across vastly different delays, consistent with the proposal of scale-invariance in episodic memory retrieval. PMID:25773646

  6. Unsupervised Decoding of Long-Term, Naturalistic Human Neural Recordings with Automated Video and Audio Annotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nancy X R; Olson, Jared D; Ojemann, Jeffrey G; Rao, Rajesh P N; Brunton, Bingni W

    2016-01-01

    Fully automated decoding of human activities and intentions from direct neural recordings is a tantalizing challenge in brain-computer interfacing. Implementing Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs) outside carefully controlled experiments in laboratory settings requires adaptive and scalable strategies with minimal supervision. Here we describe an unsupervised approach to decoding neural states from naturalistic human brain recordings. We analyzed continuous, long-term electrocorticography (ECoG) data recorded over many days from the brain of subjects in a hospital room, with simultaneous audio and video recordings. We discovered coherent clusters in high-dimensional ECoG recordings using hierarchical clustering and automatically annotated them using speech and movement labels extracted from audio and video. To our knowledge, this represents the first time techniques from computer vision and speech processing have been used for natural ECoG decoding. Interpretable behaviors were decoded from ECoG data, including moving, speaking and resting; the results were assessed by comparison with manual annotation. Discovered clusters were projected back onto the brain revealing features consistent with known functional areas, opening the door to automated functional brain mapping in natural settings. PMID:27148018

  7. Naturalistic Decision Making in Power Grid Operations: Implications for Dispatcher Training and Usability Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Podmore, Robin

    2008-11-17

    The focus of the present study is on improved training approaches to accelerate learning and improved methods for analyzing effectiveness of tools within a high-fidelity power grid simulated environment. A theory-based model has been developed to document and understand the mental processes that an expert power system operator uses when making critical decisions. The theoretical foundation for the method is based on the concepts of situation awareness, the methods of cognitive task analysis, and the naturalistic decision making (NDM) approach of Recognition Primed Decision Making. The method has been systematically explored and refined as part of a capability demonstration of a high-fidelity real-time power system simulator under normal and emergency conditions. To examine NDM processes, we analyzed transcripts of operator-to-operator conversations during the simulated scenario to reveal and assess NDM-based performance criteria. The results of the analysis indicate that the proposed framework can be used constructively to map or assess the Situation Awareness Level of the operators at each point in the scenario. We can also identify the mental models and mental simulations that the operators employ at different points in the scenario. This report documents the method, describes elements of the model, and provides appendices that document the simulation scenario and the associated mental models used by operators in the scenario.

  8. The effect of a naturalistic stressor on frontal EEG asymmetry, stress, and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Richard S; Weekes, Nicole Y; Wang, Tracy H

    2007-07-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of a naturalistic stressor, examination stress, on frontal EEG asymmetry, psychological stress, hormonal stress, and negative health. Forty-nine subjects were tested during periods of low and high examination stress. During the high examination stress period, subjects reported higher levels of stress on the Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory and Cohen's Perceived Stress Scale. However, no change in cortisol was detected across the two sessions. Furthermore, a shift from relatively greater left frontal activity during the low examination session to relatively greater right frontal activity during the high examination session was also found. Moreover, the increasing right frontal activity asymmetry associated with the high exam session compared to the low exam session correlated with increasing reports of negative health. No evidence was found for the prediction that cortisol mediated either the relationship between examination stressor and right frontal asymmetry or between right frontal asymmetry and negative health. In conclusion, while the findings from this study are compelling, the mechanism mediating increases in psychological stress, relatively greater right frontal activity, and increases in negative health from naturally occurring stressors is in need of further investigation. PMID:17512106

  9. Uma abordagem naturalista da consciência humana A naturalistic approach to human consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Pereira Júnior

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abordo neste trabalho alguns dos principais problemas filosóficos concernentes a uma concepção naturalista da consciência humana, assim como algumas evidências disponíveis na neuropsicologia e neurofisiologia, sobre a relação entre atividade cerebral e experiência consciente. Inicialmente faço uma revisão sobre a definição de "consciência", seu estatuto filosófico e relação com os processos emocionais, e proponho três condições para sua atribuição a um sistema físico. Em seguida, identifico diferentes modalidades de consciência, e seus correlatos cerebrais em diferentes escalas espaciais e temporais. Finalmente, discuto possíveis mecanismos biofísicos subjacentes aos processos conscientes.This essay discusses some central philosophical problems concerning the naturalistic concept of consciousness, as well as evidence from neuropsychology and neurophysiology regarding the relation of brain activity and conscious experience. Initially I review the problem of defining "consciousness", the philosophical approach to the phenomenon and its relation to emotional processes. The next step is a proposal of three conditions for the attribution of consciousness to physical systems. In the following section, I identify different modalities of consciousness and their respective neural correlates in different spatial and temporal scales. Finally, I discuss possible biophysical mechanisms underlying conscious processing.

  10. From naturalistic neuroscience to modeling radical embodiment with narrative enactive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia eTikka

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mainstream cognitive neuroscience has begun to accept the idea of embodied mind, which assumes that the human mind is fundamentally constituted by the dynamical interactions of the brain, body, and the environment. In today’s paradigm of naturalistic neurosciences, subjects are exposed to rich contexts, such as video sequences or entire films, under relatively controlled conditions, against which researchers can interpret changes in neural responses within a time window. However, from the point of view of radical embodied cognitive neuroscience, the increasing complexity alone will not suffice as the explanatory apparatus for dynamical embodiment and situatedness of the mind. We suggest that narrative enactive systems with dynamically adaptive content as stimuli,may serve better to account for the embodied mind engaged with the surrounding world. Among the ensuing challenges for neuroimaging studies is how to interpret brain data against broad temporal contexts of previous experiences that condition the unfolding experience of nowness. We propose means to tackle this issue, as well as ways to limit the exponentially growing combinatoria of narrative paths to a controllable number.

  11. Neuronal encoding of object and distance information: A model simulation study on naturalistic optic flow processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick eHennig

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We developed a model of the input circuitry of the FD1 cell, an identified motion-sensitive interneuron in the blowfly’s visual system. The model circuit successfully reproduces the FD1 cell’s most conspicuous property: Its larger responses to objects than to spatially extended patterns. The model circuit also mimics the time-dependent responses of FD1 to dynamically complex naturalistic stimuli, shaped by the blowfly’s saccadic flight and gaze strategy: The FD1 responses are enhanced when, as a consequence of self-motion, a nearby object crosses the receptive field during intersaccadic intervals. Moreover, the model predicts that these object-induced responses are superimposed by pronounced pattern-dependent fluctuations during movements on virtual test flights in a three-dimensional environment with systematic modifications of the environmental patterns. Hence, the FD1 cell is predicted to detect not unambiguously objects defined by the spatial layout of the environment, but to be also sensitive to objects distinguished by textural features. These ambiguous detection abilities suggest an encoding of information about objects - irrespective of the features by which the objects are defined - by a population of cells, with the FD1 cell presumably playing a prominent role in such an ensemble.

  12. Moving Perspectives on Patient Competence: A Naturalistic Case Study in Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruissen, A M; Abma, T A; Van Balkom, A J L M; Meynen, G; Widdershoven, G A M

    2016-03-01

    Patient competence, defined as the ability to reason, appreciate, understand, and express a choice is rarely discussed in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and coercive measures are seldom used. Nevertheless, a psychiatrist of psychologist may doubt whether OCD patients who refuse treatment understand their disease and the consequences of not being treated, which could result in tension between respecting the patient's autonomy and beneficence. The purpose of this article is to develop a notion of competence that is grounded in clinical practice and corresponds with the experiences of patients with obsessions and/or compulsions. We present a naturalistic case study giving both the patient's and the therapist's perspective based on in-depth interviews and a narrative analysis. The case study shows that competence is not merely an assessment by a therapist, but also a co-constructed reality shaped by the experiences and stories of patient and therapist. The patient, a medical student, initially told her story in a restitution narrative, focusing on cognitive rationality. Reconstructing the history of her disease, her story changed into a quest narrative where there was room for emotions, values and moral learning. This fitted well with the therapist's approach, who used motivational interventions with a view to appealing to the patient's responsibility to deal with her condition. We conclude that in practice both the patient and therapist used a quest narrative, approaching competence as the potential for practical reasoning to incorporate values and emotions. PMID:24902524

  13. Naturalistic Engineering for risk prevention in two slopes in southern Quito

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Argüello

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available (Received: 2013/11/01 - Accepted: 2013/12/12Naturalistic engineering is a technical-scientific modern science cobining civil, environmental and geotechnical engineerings. It studies and uses building materials, plants, organic and synthetic materials for holding slopes. San Luis de Chillogallo and El Recreo are located in the South of Quito, where two projects for erosion control, containment and environmental recovery, have been implemented. These are pilot interventions that allow applying strategies and capabilities of estimation and reduction of risks from disasters. To implement the works, the ground was shifted, the organic and inorganic matter was wiped out, and unstable parts of the slope were removed, reshaping the slope through land exclusion and relocation. Subsequently, depending on the shape of each slope, specific techniques where designed and implemented. Double Wall Crib and Latin Triangular Branching techniques were used in San Luis de Chillogallo. Live Grating and Latino Triangular Branching techniques were used in El Recreo. Plants such as: Alder, Alnus glutinosa; paper tree, Polylepis sp.; chilca, Baccharis latifolia; lechero Euphorbia lactiflua and Tilo, Tilia platyphyllos; have been used in these projects. These plants are fast growing species and they have adapted successfully on the two slopes intervened.

  14. Highlights of the Sustainability Report 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)

    2013-01-01

    This Sustainability Report covers sustainability progress and performance in the 2012 fiscal year for the Inter-American Development Bank. It includes a special focus on water and the need for climate adaptation.

  15. As naturalistic as it gets: subtitles in the English classroom in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulchanova, Mila; Aurstad, Lisa M G; Kvitnes, Ingrid E N; Eshuis, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of subtitles in the context of authentic material on second language comprehension and potentially, second language acquisition for Norwegian learners of English. Participants in the study were 49 17-year-old students and 65 16-year-old students, who were all native speakers of Norwegian learning English as an L2 in high school. Both age groups were divided into three Conditions, where one group watched an episode of the American animated cartoon Family Guy with Norwegian subtitles, one group with English subtitles, and one group watched the episode with no subtitles. On a comprehension questionnaire conducted immediately after watching the episode positive short-term effects of both native language (L1) and target language (L2) subtitles were found for both age groups. However, no differences in terms of the language of the subtitles were found in the older and more advanced group. Four weeks later the participants responded to a word definition task and a word recall task to investigate potential long-term effects of the subtitles. The only long-term effect was found in the word definition task and was modulated by age. We found, however, that native language subtitles impact negatively on performance on the comprehension task. The results from this study suggest that the mere presence of subtitles as an additional source of information enhances learners' comprehension of the plot and content in animated audio-visual material in their L2. The absence of differences in terms of the language of the subtitles in the more advanced group suggests that both intralanguage and interlanguage subtitles can aid target language comprehension in very advanced learners, most probably due to better consolidated vocabulary knowledge in that group. The two groups differed also on predictors of performance on the two lexical tasks. While in the less proficient younger group, vocabulary status best predicted performance on both tasks

  16. Photon science 2012. Highlights and annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synchrotron-radiation research at DESY is reviewed. The following topics are dealt with: Research highlights, research platforms and outstations, light sources, new technologies and developments. (HSI)

  17. Time to discontinuation of atypical versus typical antipsychotics in the naturalistic treatment of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swartz Marvin

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an ongoing debate over whether atypical antipsychotics are more effective than typical antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia. This naturalistic study compares atypical and typical antipsychotics on time to all-cause medication discontinuation, a recognized index of medication effectiveness in the treatment of schizophrenia. Methods We used data from a large, 3-year, observational, non-randomized, multisite study of schizophrenia, conducted in the U.S. between 7/1997 and 9/2003. Patients who were initiated on oral atypical antipsychotics (clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine, or ziprasidone or oral typical antipsychotics (low, medium, or high potency were compared on time to all-cause medication discontinuation for 1 year following initiation. Treatment group comparisons were based on treatment episodes using 3 statistical approaches (Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, Cox Proportional Hazards regression model, and propensity score-adjusted bootstrap resampling methods. To further assess the robustness of the findings, sensitivity analyses were performed, including the use of (a only 1 medication episode for each patient, the one with which the patient was treated first, and (b all medication episodes, including those simultaneously initiated on more than 1 antipsychotic. Results Mean time to all-cause medication discontinuation was longer on atypical (N = 1132, 256.3 days compared to typical antipsychotics (N = 534, 197.2 days; p Conclusion In the usual care of schizophrenia patients, time to medication discontinuation for any cause appears significantly longer for atypical than typical antipsychotics regardless of the typical antipsychotic potency level. Findings were primarily driven by clozapine and olanzapine, and to a lesser extent by risperidone. Furthermore, only clozapine and olanzapine therapy showed consistently and significantly longer treatment duration compared to perphenazine, a medium

  18. Therapeutic interventions in the treatment of eating disorders: A naturalistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colli, Antonello; Gentile, Daniela; Tanzilli, Annalisa; Speranza, Anna Maria; Lingiardi, Vittorio

    2016-06-01

    This study used naturalistic data from psychodynamic (PD) and cognitive-behavioral (CB) clinicians in the community to offer a portrait of treatments for eating disorder (ED) patients as provided in everyday clinical practice. The research aims were (1) to examine the therapeutic interventions reported by PD and CB clinicians working with ED patients; and (2) to assess the impact of different variables (such as patient personality styles, ED symptomatology, and therapists' theoretical orientation and experience) on the technique use reported by clinicians. A national sample of PD and CB clinicians (N = 105) completed the Shedler-Westen Assessment Procedure-200 (SWAP-200; Westen & Shedler, 1999a, 1999b) to assess personality disorders of a female patient with EDs in their care, as well as the Comparative Psychotherapy Process Scale-Bulimia Nervosa (CPPS-BN; Thompson-Brenner & Westen, 2005) to describe the characteristic interventions used in their treatments. Results showed that PD clinicians tended to use primarily PD interventions, while CB clinicians employed CB techniques supplementing them with a wider range of PD strategies. However, clinicians from both theoretical orientations used adjunctive treatment techniques for EDs at a similar level. In addition, use of PD interventions was strongly associated with the personality styles of ED patients regardless of therapists' orientation, primarily being used more often when patients exhibited dysregulated and impulsive styles. Conversely, use of CB interventions was primarily related to a clinicians' CB orientation, patients with more explicit symptoms of anorexia nervosa, and negatively related to clinicians' years of experience. The clinical implications of these findings were discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27267501

  19. Spatially pooled contrast responses predict neural and perceptual similarity of naturalistic image categories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris I A Groen

    Full Text Available The visual world is complex and continuously changing. Yet, our brain transforms patterns of light falling on our retina into a coherent percept within a few hundred milliseconds. Possibly, low-level neural responses already carry substantial information to facilitate rapid characterization of the visual input. Here, we computationally estimated low-level contrast responses to computer-generated naturalistic images, and tested whether spatial pooling of these responses could predict image similarity at the neural and behavioral level. Using EEG, we show that statistics derived from pooled responses explain a large amount of variance between single-image evoked potentials (ERPs in individual subjects. Dissimilarity analysis on multi-electrode ERPs demonstrated that large differences between images in pooled response statistics are predictive of more dissimilar patterns of evoked activity, whereas images with little difference in statistics give rise to highly similar evoked activity patterns. In a separate behavioral experiment, images with large differences in statistics were judged as different categories, whereas images with little differences were confused. These findings suggest that statistics derived from low-level contrast responses can be extracted in early visual processing and can be relevant for rapid judgment of visual similarity. We compared our results with two other, well- known contrast statistics: Fourier power spectra and higher-order properties of contrast distributions (skewness and kurtosis. Interestingly, whereas these statistics allow for accurate image categorization, they do not predict ERP response patterns or behavioral categorization confusions. These converging computational, neural and behavioral results suggest that statistics of pooled contrast responses contain information that corresponds with perceived visual similarity in a rapid, low-level categorization task.

  20. Pericyazine in the treatment of cannabis dependence in general practice: a naturalistic pilot trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morley KC

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Kirsten C Morley,1 Paul S Haber,1,2 Madeleine L Morgan,3 Fares Samara3,41Discipline of Addiction Medicine, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Drug Health Services, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW, Australia; 3Drug and Alcohol Services, North Coast Area Health Service, Kempsey and Port Macquarie, NSW, Australia; 4Durri Aboriginal Medical Service, Kempsey, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Cannabis is one of the most widely used illicit drugs worldwide. However, while the rates of cannabis dependence and treatment increase, there remains no medications approved for this use. Due to its sedative effects and low abuse liability, the typical antipsychotic pericyazine has been utilized in some parts of Australia for the treatment of cannabis dependence. We aimed to provide documentation of preliminary outcomes and acceptability of pericyazine treatment in a small sample. A naturalistic case series study was conducted in which 21 patients were enrolled for a 4-week course of pericyazine (up to 8 × 2.5 mg tablets daily and weekly medical review. Levels of cannabis use were reported and side effects with electrocardiography and blood tests were monitored. Measures of dependence severity, depression, anxiety, and insomnia were taken at baseline and follow-up utilizing validated psychometric tools. Significant reductions in cannabis use, depression, anxiety, and insomnia severity occurred across time. Pericyazine appeared to be well tolerated and easily administered in the community clinics. The results provide some preliminary evidence that low-dose short-term pericyazine may be an acceptable mode of treatment in this population. Given the open-label nature of the design, we cannot conclude that pharmacotherapy was uniquely responsible for the treatment effect. Nonetheless, low-dose pericyazine may be a potentially effective approach to the treatment of cannabis dependence, and further evaluation via a randomized placebo

  1. The objectivity of the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) in naturalistic clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Eric; Willfors, Charlotte; Berggren, Steve; Choque-Olsson, Nora; Coco, Christina; Elmund, Anna; Moretti, Åsa Hedfors; Holm, Anette; Jifält, Ida; Kosieradzki, Renata; Linder, Jenny; Nordin, Viviann; Olafsdottir, Karin; Poltrago, Lina; Bölte, Sven

    2016-07-01

    The Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) is a first-choice diagnostic tool in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Excellent interpersonal objectivity (interrater reliability) has been demonstrated for the ADOS under optimal conditions, i.e., within groups of highly trained "research reliable" examiners in research setting. We investigated the spontaneous interrater reliability among clinically trained ADOS users across multiple sites in clinical routine. Forty videotaped administrations of the ADOS modules 1-4 were rated by five different raters each from a pool of in total 15 raters affiliated to 13 different clinical sites. G(q,k) coefficients (analogous to intraclass correlations), kappas (ĸ) and percent agreement (PA) were calculated. The median interrater reliability for items across the four modules was G(q,k) = .74-.83, with the single ADOS items ranging from .23 to .94. G(q,k) for total scores was .85-.92. For diagnostic classification (ASD/non-spectrum), PA was 64-82 % and Fleiss' ĸ .19-.55. Objectivity was lower for pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified and non-spectrum diagnoses as compared to autism. Interrater reliabilities of the ADOS items and domain totals among clinical users across multiple sites were in the same range as previously reported for research reliable users, while the one for diagnostic classification was lower. Differences in sample characteristics, rater skills and statistics compared with previous studies are discussed. Findings endorse the objectivity of the ADOS in naturalistic clinical settings, but also pinpoint its limitations and the need and value of adequate and continuous rater training. PMID:26584575

  2. American ginseng

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Some research suggests that taking a specific American ginseng extract called CVT-E002 (Cold-FX, Afexa Life Sciences, ... AD-fX, Afexa Life Sciences, Canada) containing American ginseng extract in combination with ginkgo leaf extract might help ...

  3. Depression, Sociocultural Factors, and African American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunn, Vanessa Lynn; Craig, Carlton David

    2009-01-01

    The authors discuss depression in African American women from a sociocultural perspective, including aspects of oppression and racism that affect symptom manifestation. The authors highlight John Henryism as a coping mechanism, the history and continuing role of the African American church as a safe haven, and strategies for culturally competent…

  4. Racism and Asian American Student Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jennifer Y.

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a theoretical analysis and ethnographic account of Asian American student leadership in higher education. Existing literature highlights Asian and Asian American leadership styles as cultural differences. I shift the analysis from culture to racism in order to work toward a more socially just conception of Asian American…

  5. Latin American Theology and Religious Pluralism: A Latin American Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascante-Gomez, Fernando A.

    2009-01-01

    This article summarizes recent efforts by Latin-American theologians concerned with developing a pluralist theology of liberation. The author highlights some of the most significant issues and themes of this emerging theological reflection among liberation theologians. Finally, he identifies some of the challenges a pluralist theology of…

  6. Three year naturalistic outcome study of panic disorder patients treated with paroxetine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lowengrub Katherine

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This naturalistic open label follow-up study had three objectives: 1 To observe the course of illness in Panic Disorder patients receiving long-term versus intermediate-term paroxetine treatment 2 To compare the relapse rates and side-effect profile after long-term paroxetine treatment between patients with Panic Disorder and Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia. 3 To observe paroxetine's tolerability over a 24 month period. Methods 143 patients with panic disorder (PD, with or without agoraphobia, successfully finished a short-term (ie 12 week trial of paroxetine treatment. All patients then continued to receive paroxetine maintenance therapy for a total of 12 months. At the end of this period, 72 of the patients chose to discontinue paroxetine pharmacotherapy and agreed to be monitored throughout a one year discontinuation follow-up phase. The remaining 71 patients continued on paroxetine for an additional 12 months and then were monitored, as in the first group, for another year while medication-free. The primary limitation of our study is that the subgroups of patients receiving 12 versus 24 months of maintenance paroxetine therapy were selected according to individual patient preference and therefore were not assigned in a randomized manner. Results Only 21 of 143 patients (14% relapsed during the one year medication discontinuation follow-up phase. There were no significant differences in relapse rates between the patients who received intermediate-term (up to 12 months paroxetine and those who chose the long-term course (24 month paroxetine treatment. 43 patients (30.1% reported sexual dysfunction. The patients exhibited an average weight gain of 5.06 kg. All patients who eventually relapsed demonstrated significantly greater weight increase (7.3 kg during the treatment phase. Conclusions The extension of paroxetine maintenance treatment from 12 to 24 months did not seem to further decrease the risk of relapse after

  7. Evaluating depressive symptoms in mania: a naturalistic study of patients with bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young AH

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Allan H Young,1 Jonas Eberhard1,21Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, London, UK; 2Corporate Medical Affairs, H. Lundbeck A/S, Copenhagen, DenmarkObjective: This study aimed to evaluate patients with bipolar I disorder (BD-I who have mania with depressive symptoms and who meet the new “with mixed features” specifier of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5.Method: This prospective, multinational, naturalistic study surveyed psychiatrists and their patients with BD-I from October 2013 to March 2014. Eligible patients had BD-I, had a (current manic episode, and had experienced onset of a manic episode within the previous 3 months. Psychiatrists provided patient information on depressive symptoms (DSM-5 criteria; symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and agitation; suicide attempts; and physician satisfaction with treatment response. Data were stratified according to whether patients met the criteria for the BD-I “with mixed features” specifier of DSM-5 (≥3 depressive symptoms or not, and characteristics were compared between the two subgroups. Patients also self-reported on depressive symptoms using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview module questionnaire.Results: Overall, 34% of 1,035 patients met the criteria for BD-I “with mixed features,” exhibiting ≥3 depressive symptoms during their current manic episode. This correlated with the matched patient self-reports of depressive symptoms. During their current manic episode, BD-I patients “with mixed features” had more severe symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and agitation (average composite severity score of 4.1 vs 3.4, a higher incidence of suicide attempts (38% vs 9%, and more physician dissatisfaction with treatment response (22% vs 14%, compared to patients with 0–2 depressive symptoms (all P<0.05.Conclusion: This study found that patients with BD-I “with mixed features” (ie, ≥3 depressive symptoms

  8. Carbamazepine treatment of bipolar disorder: a retrospective evaluation of naturalistic long-term outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chia-Hui

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbamazepine (CBZ has been used in the treatment of bipolar disorder, both in acute mania and maintenance therapy, since the early 1970s. Here, we report a follow-up study of CBZ-treated bipolar patients in the Taipei City Psychiatric Centre. Methods Bipolar patients diagnosed according to the DSM-IV system and treated with CBZ at the Taipei City Psychiatric Centre had their charts reviewed to evaluate the efficacy and side effects of this medication during an average follow-up period of 10 years. Results A total of 129 bipolar patients (45 males, mean age: 45.7 ± 10.9 year were included in the analysis of CBZ efficacy used alone (n = 63 or as an add-on after lithium (n = 50 or valproic acid (n = 11, or the both of them (n = 5. The mean age of disease onset was 24.6 ± 9.5 years. The mean duration of CBZ use was 10.4 ± 5.2 year. The mean dose used was 571.3 ± 212.6 mg/day with a mean plasma level of 7.8 ± 5.9 μg/mL. Mean body weight increased from 62.0 ± 13.4 kg to 66.7 ± 13.1 kg during treatment. The frequencies of admission per year before and after CBZ treatment were 0.33 ± 0.46 and 0.14 ± 0.30, respectively. The most common side effects targeted the central nervous system (24%, including dizziness, ataxia and cognitive impairment. Other common side effects were gastrointestinal disturbances (3.6%, tremor (3.6%, skin rash (2.9%, and blurred vision (2.9%. Eighty-eight patients (68.2% were taking antipsychotics concomitantly. Ninety-six patients (74.4% needed to use benzodiazepines concomitantly. Sixty-three (48.8% patients had zero episodes in a 10-year follow-up period, compared to all patients having episodes prior to treatment. Using variable analysis, we found better response to CBZ in males than in females. Conclusions CBZ is efficacious in the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder in naturalistic clinical practice, either as monotherapy

  9. Taste coding of complex naturalistic taste stimuli and traditional taste stimuli in the parabrachial pons of the awake, freely licking rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammons, Joshua D; Weiss, Michael S; Victor, Jonathan D; Di Lorenzo, Patricia M

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have shown that taste-responsive cells in the brainstem taste nuclei of rodents respond to sensory qualities other than gustation. Such data suggest that cells in the classical gustatory brainstem may be better tuned to respond to stimuli that engage multiple sensory modalities than to stimuli that are purely gustatory. Here, we test this idea by recording the electrophysiological responses to complex, naturalistic stimuli in single neurons in the parabrachial pons (PbN, the second neural relay in the central gustatory pathway) in awake, freely licking rats. Following electrode implantation and recovery, we presented both prototypical and naturalistic taste stimuli and recorded the responses in the PbN. Prototypical taste stimuli (NaCl, sucrose, citric acid, and caffeine) and naturalistic stimuli (clam juice, grape juice, lemon juice, and coffee) were matched for taste quality and intensity (concentration). Umami (monosodium glutamate + inosine monophosphate) and fat (diluted heavy cream) were also tested. PbN neurons responded to naturalistic stimuli as much or more than to prototypical taste stimuli. Furthermore, they convey more information about naturalistic stimuli than about prototypical ones. Moreover, multidimensional scaling analyses showed that across unit responses to naturalistic stimuli were more widely separated than responses to prototypical taste stimuli. Interestingly, cream evoked a robust and widespread response in PbN cells. Collectively, these data suggest that natural foods are more potent stimulators of PbN cells than purely gustatory stimuli. Probing PbN cells with pure taste stimuli may underestimate the response repertoire of these cells. PMID:27121585

  10. Ethical Challenges in a Complex World: Highlights of the 2005 ACA Code of Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocet, Michael M.

    2006-01-01

    Being an effective counselor includes having knowledge of and the ability to integrate a code of ethics into one's professional practice. This article addresses some of the highlights of the changes in the 2005 ACA [American Counseling Association] Code of Ethics such as end-of-life issues, boundaries and relationships, and multicultural and…

  11. Encoding of naturalistic optic flow by motion sensitive neurons of nucleus rotundus in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Eckmeier

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The retinal image changes that occur during locomotion, the optic flow, carry information about self-motion and the three-dimensional structure of the environment. Especially fast moving animals with only little binocular vision depend on these depth cues for manoeuvring. They actively control their gaze to facilitate perception of depth based on cues in the optic flow. In the visual system of birds, nucleus rotundus neurons were originally found to respond to object motion but not to background motion. However, when background and object were both moving, responses increase the more the direction and velocity of object and background motion on the retina differed. These properties may play a role in representing depth cues in the optic flow. We therefore investigated how neurons in nucleus rotundus respond to optic flow that contains depth cues. We presented simplified and naturalistic optic flow on a panoramic LED display while recording from single neurons in nucleus rotundus of anaesthetized zebra finches. Unlike most studies on motion vision in birds, our stimuli included depth information. We found extensive responses of motion selective neurons in nucleus rotundus to optic flow stimuli. Simplified stimuli revealed preferences for optic flow reflecting translational or rotational self-motion. Naturalistic optic flow stimuli elicited complex response modulations, but the presence of objects was signalled by only few neurons. The neurons that did respond to objects in the optic flow, however, show interesting properties.

  12. Simulating real world functioning in schizophrenia using a naturalistic city environment and single-trial, goal-directed navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Zawadzki

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop a virtual reality platform that would serve as a functionally meaningful measure of cognition in schizophrenia that would complement standard batteries of cognitive tests during clinical trials for cognitive treatments in schizophrenia, be amenable to human neuroimaging research, yet lend itself to neurobiological comparison with rodent analogues.Method: Thirty-three patients with schizophrenia and 33 healthy controls matched for age, sex, video gaming experience and education completed eight rapid, single-trial virtual navigation tasks within a naturalistic virtual city. Four trials tested their ability to find different targets seen during the passive viewing of a closed path that led them around different city blocks. Four subsequent trials tested their ability to return to four different starting points after viewing a path that took them several blocks away from the starting position. Results: Individuals with schizophrenia had difficulties in way-finding, measured as distance travelled to find targets previously encountered within the virtual city. They were also more likely not to notice the target during passive viewing, less likely to find novel shortcuts to targets and more likely to become lost and fail completely in finding the target. Total travel distances across all eight trials strongly correlated (negatively with neurocognitive measures and, for 49 participants who completed the Quality of Life Scale, psychosocial functioning. Conclusion: Single-trial, goal-directed navigation in a naturalistic virtual environment is a functionally meaningful measure of cognitive functioning in schizophrenia.

  13. Efficient population coding of naturalistic whisker motion in the ventro-posterior medial thalamus based on precise spike timing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Bale

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The rodent whisker-associated thalamic nucleus (VPM contains a somatotopic map where whisker representation is divided into distinct neuronal sub-populations, called 'barreloids'. Each barreloid projects to its associated cortical barrel column and so forms a gateway for incoming sensory stimuli to the barrel cortex. We aimed to determine how the population of neurons within one barreloid encodes naturalistic whisker motion. In rats, we recorded the extracellular activity of up to 9 single neurons within a single barreloid, by implanting silicon probes parallel to the longitudinal axis of the barreloids. We found that play-back of texture-induced whisker motion evoked sparse responses, timed with millisecond precision. At the population level, there was synchronous activity: however, different subsets of neurons were synchronously active at different times. Mutual information between population responses and whisker motion increased near linearly with population size. When normalised to factor out firing rate differences, we found that texture was encoded with greater informational-efficiency than white noise. These results indicate that, within each VPM barreloid, there is a rich and efficient population code for naturalistic whisker motion based on precisely timed, population spike patterns.

  14. "Brothers Gonna Work It Out:" Understanding the Pedagogic Performance of African American Male Teachers Working with African American Male Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Anthony L.

    2009-01-01

    Drawing from ethnographic data, this paper explores how African American male teachers working with African American male students performed their pedagogy. This paper highlights how teachers' understanding of African American males social and educational needs shaped their pedagogical performance. Interestingly however, teachers' performance was…

  15. Brookhaven highlights, October 1979-September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Highlights are given for the research areas of the Brookhaven National Laboratory. These areas include high energy physics, physics and chemistry, life sciences, applied energy science (energy and environment, and nuclear energy), and support activities (including mathematics, instrumentation, reactors, and safety). (GHT)

  16. Brookhaven highlights, October 1979-September 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights are given for the research areas of the Brookhaven National Laboratory. These areas include high energy physics, physics and chemistry, life sciences, applied energy science (energy and environment, and nuclear energy), and support activities (including mathematics, instrumentation, reactors, and safety)

  17. Palliativedrugs.com therapeutic highlights: gabapentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Twycross Robert

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the second in a series of highlights drawn from the www.palliativedrugs.com website. The website provides free access to the Palliative Care Formulary, a monthly newsletter and a bulletin board for advice to be given and received. With almost 10,000 professional members it is the largest palliative care resource of its kind.

  18. Status and recent highlights from CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Van Mulders, Petra Karel Ann

    2016-01-01

    The LHC Run-2 at a center of mass energy of 13 TeV started in 2015. This proceeding highlights some of the physics results based on the collision data collected by the CMS experiment in 2015. In addition, the status and readiness of the experiment for the collisions in 2016 are discussed with concrete examples on the object reconstruction performance.

  19. Brookhaven highlights - Brookhaven National Laboratory 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This report highlights research conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the following areas: alternating gradient synchrotron; physics; biology; national synchrotron light source; department of applied science; medical; chemistry; department of advanced technology; reactor; safety and environmental protection; instrumentation; and computing and communications.

  20. The Nation's Report Card: Mathematics Highlights, 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education Statistics (ED), Washington, DC.

    This issue of The Nation's Report Card highlights mathematics in 2003. It includes sections on Average Scale Scores, Students Reaching NAEP Achievement Levels, Percentile Results, 2003 Assessment Design, State Results, Subgroup Results, Sample Mathematics Questions, Technical Notes, Additional Data Tables, and NAEP on the Web. (AMT)

  1. American Dream in Early American Literatuer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屈彩娥; 李小玺

    2008-01-01

    American dream has often been closely rehted to American literature.Many say that the American literary history can be seen as the history of American dreams.In most periods in history,writers,whose dreams have been infused in a variety of characters create the American literature.While in Early American literature,American dream had been presented in a dif-ferent way.

  2. As naturalistic as it gets: subtitles in the English classroom in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Vulchanova, Mila; Aurstad, Lisa M. G.; Kvitnes, Ingrid E. N.; Eshuis, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of subtitles in the context of authentic material on second language comprehension and potentially, second language acquisition for Norwegian learners of English. Participants in the study were 49 17-year-old students and 65 16-year-old students, who were all native speakers of Norwegian learning English as an L2 in high school. Both age groups were divided into three Conditions, where one group watched an episode of the American animated cartoon Fa...

  3. MISCONCEPTIONS OF DEPRESSION IN AFRICAN AMERICANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohaib eSohail

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Major depression is a very common disabling disorder. Although the relationship between race and depression is complex, depression affects all races, all ethnic and geographic locations as well as all age groups. The prevalence of depression in African Americans is controversial, due to the paucity of research. The deficit in the knowledge and skills in treating depression in African Americans have not been adequately addressed so far. Inadequate and insufficient data on African Americans contributes to the problems of under diagnoses, misdiagnosis and under treatment of depression. This article will highlight the existing problem of depression in Afro American with a focus on diagnostic and treatment issues.

  4. American Culture Reflected in American English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李华芳

    2013-01-01

    Language is a vehicle for culture. It is also a key component of culture. It not only reflects culture but also influences culture. As a variety of British English, American English, especially American words and expressions can reflect American culture from many aspects. This paper studies some typical traits of American culture reflected in words and expressions of American Eng-lish.

  5. Linear Discriminant Analysis Achieves High Classification Accuracy for the BOLD fMRI Response to Naturalistic Movie Stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelkow, Hendrik; de Zwart, Jacco A; Duyn, Jeff H

    2016-01-01

    Naturalistic stimuli like movies evoke complex perceptual processes, which are of great interest in the study of human cognition by functional MRI (fMRI). However, conventional fMRI analysis based on statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and the general linear model (GLM) is hampered by a lack of accurate parametric models of the BOLD response to complex stimuli. In this situation, statistical machine-learning methods, a.k.a. multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA), have received growing attention for their ability to generate stimulus response models in a data-driven fashion. However, machine-learning methods typically require large amounts of training data as well as computational resources. In the past, this has largely limited their application to fMRI experiments involving small sets of stimulus categories and small regions of interest in the brain. By contrast, the present study compares several classification algorithms known as Nearest Neighbor (NN), Gaussian Naïve Bayes (GNB), and (regularized) Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) in terms of their classification accuracy in discriminating the global fMRI response patterns evoked by a large number of naturalistic visual stimuli presented as a movie. Results show that LDA regularized by principal component analysis (PCA) achieved high classification accuracies, above 90% on average for single fMRI volumes acquired 2 s apart during a 300 s movie (chance level 0.7% = 2 s/300 s). The largest source of classification errors were autocorrelations in the BOLD signal compounded by the similarity of consecutive stimuli. All classifiers performed best when given input features from a large region of interest comprising around 25% of the voxels that responded significantly to the visual stimulus. Consistent with this, the most informative principal components represented widespread distributions of co-activated brain regions that were similar between subjects and may represent functional networks. In light of these

  6. Invisible Asian Americans: The Intersection of Sexuality, Race, and Education among Gay Asian Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo, Anthony C.; Soodjinda, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Most research on Asian American education has centered on addressing and deconstructing the model minority stereotype. While recent studies have highlighted the socioeconomic and cultural heterogeneity among Asian American students, few have examined how sexual identity and masculinity mitigate their academic experiences. In this article, we draw…

  7. Safety-critical event risk associated with cell phone tasks as measured in naturalistic driving studies: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Sarah M; Hicks, Anne; Caird, Jeff K

    2016-02-01

    A systematic review and meta-analysis of naturalistic driving studies involving estimates of safety-critical event risk associated with handheld device use while driving is described. Fifty-seven studies identified from targeted databases, journals and websites were reviewed in depth, and six were ultimately included. These six studies, published between 2006 and 2014, encompass seven sets of naturalistic driver data and describe original research that utilized naturalistic methods to assess the effects of distracting behaviors. Four studies involved non-commercial drivers of light vehicles and two studies involved commercial drivers of trucks and buses. Odds ratios quantifying safety-critical event (SCE) risk associated with talking, dialing, locating or answering, and texting or browsing were extracted. Stratified meta-analysis of pooled odds ratios was used to estimate SCE risk by distraction type; meta-regression was used to test for sources of heterogeneity. The results indicate that tasks that require drivers to take their eyes off the road, such as dialing, locating a phone and texting, increase SCE risk to a greater extent than tasks that do not require eyes off the road such as talking. Although talking on a handheld device did not increase SCE risk, further research is required to determine whether it indirectly influences SCE risk (e.g., by encouraging other cell phone activities). In addition, a number of study biases and quality issues of naturalistic driving studies are discussed. PMID:26724505

  8. Infant Engagement and Early Vocabulary Development: A Naturalistic Observation Study of Mozambican Infants from 1;1 to 2;1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, J. Douglas; Voght, Paul

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes how others engage rural and urban Mozambican infants during naturalistic observations, and how the proportion of time spent in different engagements relates to infants' language development over the second year of life. Using an extended version of Bakeman and Adamson's (1984) categorization of infant engagement, we…

  9. Recent Highlights from the ISOLDE Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, K.

    2015-11-01

    The ISOLDE facility is CERN's longest running experiment. In its 45 years of operation it has become the world's most comprehensive radioactive-isotope factory. Now capable of delivering more than 1000 isotopes from 70 chemical elements, ISOLDE supports a wide and diverse physics programme. This short article summarizes some of the recent highlights from this programme in the areas of nuclear physics, medicine and biology.

  10. Project Aloha:indexing, highlighting and annotation

    OpenAIRE

    Fallahkhair, Sanaz; Kennedy, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Lifelong learning requires many skills that are often not taught or are poorly taught. Such skills include speed reading, critical analysis, creative thinking, active reading and even a “little” skill like annotation. There are many ways that readers annotate. A short classification of some ways that reader may annotate includes underlining, using coloured highlighters, interlinear notes, marginal notes, and disassociated notes. This paper presents an investigation into the use of a tool for ...

  11. Trends and highlights of VCI 2004

    CERN Document Server

    Fabjan, Christian Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    This report attempts to summarize the presentations given at this conference. Topics related to R&D of gaseous and solid state detectors clearly point to several trends in particle physics instrumentation. More established techniques are represented by reports on recent experiments and facilities which can be considered the highlights in this research field. The extension of these techniques to space, arctic ice and deep sea are opening new frontiers of particle physics.

  12. Research highlights: manipulating cells inside and out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Andy K; Dhar, Manjima; Pushkarsky, Ivan; Di Carlo, Dino

    2015-06-21

    We highlight recent work manipulating cells: from whole cells, to intracellular content, and even subcellular gradients in proteins. In the first manuscript, using interdigitated electrode arrays at a controlled tilt angle to a microchannel allows for an array of acoustic nodes that apply force and isolate larger circulating tumor cells from remaining cells in RBC-lysed blood. Moving to the subcellular scale, recent work shows the ability to use rapid bubble generation induced by a pulsed laser to transfect hundreds of thousands of cells in parallel, especially with larger cargo, such as live bacteria. Manipulating at an even finer level, our third highlighted paper applies magnetic nanoparticle-based techniques to the localization of proteins within the cytoplasm in gradient configurations. A recurring theme in the literature is how interfacing at the cellular scale is a key feature enabled by micro & nanotechnology. This feature can be exploited to achieve new capabilities for cell biologists which opens up new fundamental cell biology questions. This matching of scales and the unique advantages are well demonstrated in the articles highlighted. PMID:25996249

  13. American Houses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张梦华

    2004-01-01

    American houses usually have private kitchens,a living room and sometimes separate areas for eating and watching television,A house usually has its own mailbox,a yard with plants or perhaps a lawn,and a place to store garbage out of sight.

  14. Failure to find executive function deficits following one night's total sleep deprivation in university students under naturalistic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace-Schott, Edward F; Hutcherson, Cendri A; Bemporad, Brenda; Morgan, Alexandra; Kumar, Arjun; Hobson, J Allan; Stickgold, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Young adult male students participated in a naturalistic, group-design experiment to ascertain the effects of one night's total sleep deprivation (TSD) on performance of diverse executive function tasks presented as an extended, multitask battery. On the majority of component tasks in this battery, performance has been reported to be impaired following one night's TSD when tasks are administered in isolation. However, participants sleep deprived 35 to 39 hr showed few performance deficits among tests in this battery when compared with non-sleep-deprived controls. Sleep-deprived participants showed only poorer recognition memory and overconfidence in incorrect temporal judgments. Behavioral and physiological adaptation to chronically sleep-restricting lifestyles may confer resistance to the cognitive effects of sleep deprivation in high-functioning young adults. PMID:19568965

  15. A naturalistic study of the directional interpretation process of discrete emotions during high-stakes table tennis matches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinent, Guillaume; Ferrand, Claude

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the directional interpretation process of discrete emotions experienced by table tennis players during competitive matches by adopting a naturalistic qualitative video-assisted approach. Thirty self-confrontation interviews were conducted with 11 national table tennis players (2 or 3 matches per participants). Nine discrete emotions were identified through the inductive analyses of the participants' transcriptions: anger, anxiety, discouragement, disappointment, disgust, joy, serenity, relief, and hope. Inductive analyses revealed the emergence of 4 categories and 13 themes among the 9 discrete emotions: positive direction (increased concentration, increased motivation, increased confidence, positive sensations, and adaptive behaviors), negative direction (decreased concentration, decreased motivation, too confident, decreased confidence, negative sensations, and maladaptive behaviors), neutral direction (take more risk and take less risk), and no perceived influence on own performance. Results are discussed in terms of current research on directional interpretation and emotions in sport. PMID:19798996

  16. The full moon as a synchronizer of circa-monthly biological rhythms: Chronobiologic perspectives based on multidisciplinary naturalistic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinberg, Alain; Smolensky, Michael H; Touitou, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    Biological rhythmicity is presumed to be an advantageous genetic adaptation of fitness and survival value resulting from evolution of life forms in an environment that varies predictably-in-time during the 24 h, month, and year. The 24 h light/dark cycle is the prime synchronizer of circadian periodicities, and its modulation over the course of the year, in terms of daytime photoperiod length, is a prime synchronizer of circannual periodicities. Circadian and circannual rhythms have been the major research focus of most scientists. Circa-monthly rhythms triggered or synchronized by the 29.5 day lunar cycle of nighttime light intensity, or specifically the light of the full moon, although explored in waterborne and certain other species, have received far less study, perhaps because of associations with ancient mythology and/or an attitude naturalistic studies are of lesser merit than ones that entail molecular mechanisms. In this editorial, we cite our recent discovery through multidisciplinary naturalistic investigation of a highly integrated circadian, circa-monthly, and circannual time structure, synchronized by the natural ambient nyctohemeral, lunar, and annual light cycles, of the Peruvian apple cactus (C. peruvianus) flowering and reproductive processes that occur in close temporal coordination with like rhythms of the honey bee as its pollinator. This finding led us to explore the preservation of this integrated biological time structure, synchronized and/or triggered by environmental light cues and cycles, in the reproduction of other species, including Homo sapiens, and how the artificial light environment of today in which humans reside may be negatively affecting human reproduction efficiency. PMID:27019304

  17. American Headache Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us American Migraine Foundation Login THE AMERICAN Headache Society is a professional society of health care providers dedicated to the study ... MIGRAINE MOMENT” FILM CONTEST WINNERS The American Headache Society and American Migraine Foundation, the AHS’s charitable division, ...

  18. Cancer and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Population Profiles > Black/African American > Cancer Cancer and African Americans African Americans have the highest mortality rate ... 65MB] At a glance – Top Cancer Sites for African Americans (2008-2012) Cancer Incidence Rates per 100, ...

  19. American Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Info » Voice, Speech, and Language American Sign Language On this page: What is American Sign Language? ... signs "I love you." What is American Sign Language? American Sign Language (ASL) is a complete, complex ...

  20. STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-05-01

    This video, Part 1 of 4, shows the activities of the STS-109 crew (Scott Altman, Commander; Duane Carey, Pilot; John Grunsfeld, Payload Commander; Nancy Currie, James Newman, Richard Linnehan, Michael Massimino, Mission Specialists) during flight days 1 through 3. The activities from other flight days can be seen on 'STS 109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 2 of 4 (internal ID 2002137664), 'STS 109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 3 of 4 (internal ID 2002139471), and 'STS-109 Mission Highlights Resource Tape' Part 4 of 4 (internal ID 2002137577). The main activity recorded during flight day 1 is the liftoff of Columbia. Attention is given to suit-up, boarding, and pre-flight procedures. The pre-launch crew meal has no sound. The crew members often wave to the camera before liftoff. The jettisoning of the solid rocket boosters is shown, and the External Tank is seen as it falls to Earth, moving over African dunes in the background. There are liftoff replays, including one from inside the cockpit. The opening of the payload bay doors is seen from the rear of the shuttle's cockpit. The footage from flight day 2 shows the Flight Support System for bearthing the HST (Hubble Space Telescope). Crew preparations for the bearthing are shown. Flight day 3 shows the tracking of and approach to the HST by Columbia, including orbital maneuvers, the capture of the HST, and its lowering onto the Flight Support System. Many views of the HST are shown, including one which reveals an ocean and cloud background as the HST retracts a solar array.

  1. Fermi GBM: Highlights from the First Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2009-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma ray Burst Monitor is an all-sky instrument sensitive to photons from about 8 keV to 40 MeV. I will summarize highlights from the first year, including triggered observations of gamma ray bursts, soft gamma ray repeaters, and terrestrial gamma flashes, and observations in the continuous data of X-ray binaries and accreting X-ray pulsars. GBM provides complementary observations to Swift/BAT, observing many of the same sources, but over a wider energy range.

  2. Physics highlights at ILC and CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukić, Strahinja

    2015-01-01

    In this lecture, the physics potential for the e+e- linear collider experiments ILC and CLIC is reviewed. The experimental conditions are compared to those at hadron colliders and their intrinsic value for precision experiments, complementary to the hadron colliders, is discussed. The detector concepts for ILC and CLIC are outlined in their most important aspects related to the precision physics. Highlights from the physics program and from the benchmark studies are given. It is shown that linear colliders are a promising tool, complementing the LHC in essential ways to test the Standard Model and to search for new physics.

  3. Highlights of the SSC Site Development Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes highlights of the Site Development Plan for the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory. The Plan, sometimes called a Master Plan, was prepared by the architectural and engineering firm for the Laboratory: Parsons Brinckerhoff/Morrison Knudsen (PB/MK) working in association with CRSS. Their task was to interpret the SSC project needs in the context of the Ellis County, Texas site. The team effort was under the direction of Lewis May from CRSS, guided by Robert Sims from the SSC Laboratory. Conceptual drawings are presented in this report

  4. Selected Highlights from Precision Studies in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Hans Peter; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Recent highlights on precision measurements in proton-proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector are presented: the production cross section of jets, W and Z bosons, multi-bosons and top quark pairs, as well as single top production. Furthermore, the production of W and Z bosons and top quarks in association with jets is discussed and compared to state-of-art theory calculations. The latest measurements of the top quark mass and other properties, together with Standard Model parameters, will be reviewed.

  5. Psychodramatic psychotherapy combined with pharmacotherapy in major depressive disorder: an open and naturalistic study

    OpenAIRE

    Costa Elisabeth Maria Sene; Antonio Rosilda; Soares Márcia Britto de Macedo; Moreno Ricardo Alberto

    2006-01-01

    OBJETIVE: Recent literature has highlighted the role of psychotherapy in the treatment of major depressive disorder. Combined therapies comprising both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy have presented the best results. Although several kinds of psychotherapies have been studied in the treatment of depressive disorders, there remains a lack of data on psychodramatic psychotherapy in the treatment of major depressive disorder. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of psychodram...

  6. Highlights from BNL and RHIC 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Tannenbaum, M J

    2015-01-01

    Highlights of news from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and results from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the period July 2013-June 2014 are presented. It was a busy year for news, most notably a U. S. Government shutdown for 16 days beginning October 1, 2013 due to the lack of an approved budget for FY2014. Even with this unusual government activity, the $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV Au+Au Run14 at RHIC was the best ever with integrated luminosity exceeding the sum of all previous runs. Additionally there was a brief He$^3$+Au run to continue the study of collective flow in small systems which was reinforced by new results presented on identified particle flow in d+Au. The other scientific highlights are also mostly concerned with ``soft (low $p_T$)'' physics complemented by the first preliminary results of reconstructed jets from hard-scattered partons in Au+Au collisions at RHIC . The measurements of transverse energy ($E_T$) spectra in p-p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions, which demonstrated last ye...

  7. FY 1996 Congressional budget request: Budget highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    The FY 1996 budget presentation is organized by the Department`s major business lines. An accompanying chart displays the request for new budget authority. The report compares the budget request for FY 1996 with the appropriated FY 1995 funding levels displayed on a comparable basis. The FY 1996 budget represents the first year of a five year plan in which the Department will reduce its spending by $15.8 billion in budget authority and by $14.1 billion in outlays. FY 1996 is a transition year as the Department embarks on its multiyear effort to do more with less. The Budget Highlights are presented by business line; however, the fifth business line, Economic Productivity, which is described in the Policy Overview section, cuts across multiple organizational missions, funding levels and activities and is therefore included in the discussion of the other four business lines.

  8. Research highlights: impacts of microplastics on plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Vivian S

    2016-02-01

    Each year, millions of metric tons of the plastic produced for food packaging, personal care products, fishing gear, and other human activities end up in lakes, rivers, and the ocean. The breakdown of these primary plastics in the environment results in microplastics, small fragments of plastic typically less than 1-5 mm in size. These synthetic particles have been detected in all of the world's oceans and also in many freshwater systems, accumulating in sediment, on shorelines, suspended in surface waters, and being ingested by plankton, fish, birds, and marine mammals. While the occurrence of plastics in surface waters has been surveyed in a number of studies, the impacts of microplastics on marine organisms are still being elucidated. This highlight features three recent publications that explore the interactions of microplastics with planktonic organisms to clarify the effects of these pollutants on some of the ocean's smallest and most important inhabitants. PMID:26829584

  9. STS-114 Flight Day 5 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Highlights of Day 5 of the STS-114 Return to Flight mission (Commander Eileen Collins, Pilot James Kelly, Mission Specialists Soichi Noguchi, Stephen Robinson, Andrew Thomas, Wendy Lawrence, and Charles Camarda) include video coverage of an extravehiclular activity (EVA) by Noguchi and Robinson. The other crew members of Discovery are seen on the flight deck and mid-deck helping the astronauts to suit-up. The objectives of the EVA are to test repair techniques on sample tiles in the shuttle's payload bay, to repair electrical equipment for a gyroscope on the International Space Station (ISS), and to install a replacement GPS antenna on the ISS. Noguchi and Robinson use a caulk gun and a putty knife to repair the sample tiles. The video contains several Earth views, including one of Baja California.

  10. Brookhaven highlights, October 1978-September 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These highlights present an overview of the major research and development achievements at Brookhaven National Laboratory from October 1978 to September 1979. Specific areas covered include: accelerator and high energy physics programs; high energy physics research; the AGS and improvements to the AGS; neutral beam development; heavy ion fusion; superconducting power cables; ISABELLE storage rings; the BNL Tandem accelerator; heavy ion experiments at the Tandem; the High Flux Beam Reactor; medium energy physics; nuclear theory; atomic and applied physics; solid state physics; neutron scattering studies; x-ray scattering studies; solid state theory; defects and disorder in solids; surface physics; the National Synchrotron Light Source ; Chemistry Department; Biology Department; Medical Department; energy sciences; environmental sciences; energy technology programs; National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems; advanced reactor systems; nuclear safety; National Nuclear Data Center; nuclear materials safeguards; Applied Mathematics Department; and support activities

  11. Pulsars, PTAs, and PALFA: Highlights and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Paul A.

    2015-08-01

    The detection of gravitational waves with nanohertz frequencies from SMBHs in merging galaxies, either a single source or a background, is greatly aided by increasing the sensitivity of pulsar timing arrays (PTAs). Increasing the number of millisecond pulsars in PTAs is one of the best ways to enhance their sensitivity. Therefore searches for new millisecond pulsars are absolutely essential to the detection of gravitational waves from merging galaxies. I will review the status of current pulsar search efforts and how they have contributed to PTAs. I will then present some of the recent highlights of the PALFA survey. Using the PALFA survey as a case study, I will outline the current challenges faced by pulsar searches, including RFI and a large number of false positives, and potential solutions to those issues.

  12. Physical Sciences 2007 Science & Technology Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazi, A U

    2008-04-07

    The Physical Sciences Directorate applies frontier physics and technology to grand challenges in national security. Our highly integrated and multidisciplinary research program involves collaborations throughout Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the National Nuclear Security Administration, the Department of Energy, and with academic and industrial partners. The Directorate has a budget of approximately $150 million, and a staff of approximately 350 employees. Our scientists provide expertise in condensed matter and high-pressure physics, plasma physics, high-energy-density science, fusion energy science and technology, nuclear and particle physics, accelerator physics, radiation detection, optical science, biotechnology, and astrophysics. This document highlights the outstanding research and development activities in the Physical Sciences Directorate that made news in 2007. It also summarizes the awards and recognition received by members of the Directorate in 2007.

  13. Physical Sciences 2007 Science and Technology Highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Physical Sciences Directorate applies frontier physics and technology to grand challenges in national security. Our highly integrated and multidisciplinary research program involves collaborations throughout Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the National Nuclear Security Administration, the Department of Energy, and with academic and industrial partners. The Directorate has a budget of approximately $150 million, and a staff of approximately 350 employees. Our scientists provide expertise in condensed matter and high-pressure physics, plasma physics, high-energy-density science, fusion energy science and technology, nuclear and particle physics, accelerator physics, radiation detection, optical science, biotechnology, and astrophysics. This document highlights the outstanding research and development activities in the Physical Sciences Directorate that made news in 2007. It also summarizes the awards and recognition received by members of the Directorate in 2007

  14. ATOMLLL: atoms with shading and highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ATOMS program, written at Bell Telephone Laboratory, is capable of determining the visible portions of a scene consisting of interpenetrating spheres and cylinders, put together to represent space-filling or ball-and-stick molecular models. The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory version contains enhancements to add shading and highlights, and to render the spheres on film as ellipses, so they will appear round when projected in various wide-screen formats. The visible parts of each sphere or cylinder are shaded by a minicomputer controlling the film recorder, thus releasing the main computer from transferring the millions of intensity values for each frame. The minicomputer is microprogrammed with an efficient algorithm for the intensities, which uses the color look-up tables in the film recorder to store the reflectance as a function of angle of incidence. 8 references

  15. LHC INAUGURATION, LHC Fest highlights: exhibition time!

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    David Gross, one of the twenty-one Nobel Laureates who have participated in the project.Tuesday 21 October 2008 Accelerating Nobels Colliding Charm, Atomic Cuisine, The Good Anomaly, A Quark Somewhere on the White Paper, Wire Proliferation, A Tale of Two Liquids … these are just some of the titles given to artworks by Physics Nobel Laureates who agreed to make drawings of their prize-winning discoveries (more or less reluctantly) during a special photo session. Science photographer Volker Steger made portraits of Physics Nobel Laureates and before the photo sessions he asked them to make a drawing of their most important discovery. The result is "Accelerating Nobels", an exhibition that combines unusual portraits of and original drawings by twenty-one Nobel laureates in physics whose work is closely related to CERN and the LHC. This exhibition will be one of the highlights of the LHC celebrations on 21 October in the SM18 hall b...

  16. Highlights of Commission 37 Science Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, Giovanni; de Grijs, Richard; Elmegreen, Bruce; Stetson, Peter; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara; Goodwin, Simon; Geisler, Douglas; Minniti, Dante

    2016-04-01

    It is widely accepted that stars do not form in isolation but result from the fragmentation of molecular clouds, which in turn leads to star cluster formation. Over time, clusters dissolve or are destroyed by interactions with molecular clouds or tidal stripping, and their members become part of the general field population. Star clusters are thus among the basic building blocks of galaxies. In turn, star cluster populations, from young associations and open clusters to old globulars, are powerful tracers of the formation, assembly, and evolutionary history of their parent galaxies. Although their importance (e.g., in mapping out the Milky Way) had been recognised for decades, major progress in this area has only become possible in recent years, both for Galactic and extragalactic cluster populations. Star clusters are the observational foundation for stellar astrophysics and evolution, provide essential tracers of galactic structure, and are unique stellar dynamical environments. Star formation, stellar structure, stellar evolution, and stellar nucleosynthesis continue to benefit and improve tremendously from the study of these systems. Additionally, fundamental quantities such as the initial mass function can be successfully derived from modelling either the Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams or the integrated velocity structures of, respectively, resolved and unresolved clusters and cluster populations. Star cluster studies thus span the fields of Galactic and extragalactic astrophysics, while heavily affecting our detailed understanding of the process of star formation in dense environments. This report highlights science results of the last decade in the major fields covered by IAU Commission 37: Star clusters and associations. Instead of focusing on the business meeting - the out-going president presentation can be found here: http://www.sc.eso.org/gcarraro/splinter2015.pdf - this legacy report contains highlights of the most important scientific achievements in

  17. Psychocultural Correlates of Mental Health Service Utilization Among African American and European American Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Miwa; Hipwell, Alison E; Stepp, Stephanie D; Keenan, Kate

    2015-11-01

    Structural equation modeling was used to examine the effects of cultural factors (ethnic identity, perceived discrimination), family relations, and child problem type on mental health service utilization in a community sample of 1,480 adolescent girls (860 African American, 620 European American) between ages 15 and 17 years enrolled in the Pittsburgh Girls Study. Results revealed ethnic identity, caregiver attachment, and conduct disorder were related to service use among African American girls. Among European American girls, correlate patterns differed by clinical need. Findings highlight the need for research on health disparities to examine racially specific influences on service utilization. PMID:25380787

  18. Walking in Balance: Native American Recovery Programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Owen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews Native American ritual practices, frameworks and key concepts employed by several substance abuse treatments centres in the U.S. and Canada. It also examines the way Alcoholics Anonymous’ Twelve Step programme has been modified to attract and serve the needs of Native Americans and First Nations and its potential impact on the ritual practices. Native concepts of wellbeing are highlighted and linked to the idea of living in “balance”.

  19. WFC3: In-Flight Performance Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, Randy A.

    2010-01-01

    Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), a powerful new imager for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), was successfully installed in the telescope in May 2009 during the first dramatic spacewalk of space shuttle flight STS-125, also known as HST Servicing Mission 4. This new camera offers unique observing capabilities in two channels spanning a broad wavelength range from the near ultraviolet to the near infrared (200-1000nm in the UV/Visible [UVIS] channel; 850-1700nm in the IR channel). After an initial outgassing period, WFC3 was cooled to its observing configuration in June. In the following months, a highly successful Servicing Mission Observatory Verification (SMOV4) program was executed, which has confirmed the exciting scientific potential of the instrument. Detailed performance results from the SMOV 4 program are presented in a number of papers in this session. In this paper, we highlight some top-level performance assessments (throughput, limiting magnitudes, survey speeds) for WFC3, which is now actively engaged in the execution of forefront astronomical observing programs.

  20. STS-114 Flight Day 3 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Video coverage of Day 3 includes highlights of STS-114 during the approach and docking of Discovery with the International Space Station (ISS). The Return to Flight continues with space shuttle crew members (Commander Eileen Collins, Pilot James Kelly, Mission Specialists Soichi Noguchi, Stephen Robinson, Andrew Thomas, Wendy Lawrence, and Charles Camarda) seen in onboard activities on the fore and aft portions of the flight deck during the orbiter's approach. Camarda sends a greeting to his family, and Collins maneuvers Discovery as the ISS appears steadily closer in sequential still video from the centerline camera of the Orbiter Docking System. The approach includes video of Discovery from the ISS during the orbiter's Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver, giving the ISS a clear view of the thermal protection systems underneath the orbiter. Discovery docks with the Destiny Laboratory of the ISS, and the shuttle crew greets the Expedition 11 crew (Commander Sergei Krikalev and NASA ISS Science Officer and Flight Engineer John Phillips) of the ISS onboard the station. Finally, the Space Station Remote Manipulator System hands the Orbiter Boom Sensor System to its counterpart, the Shuttle Remote Manipulator System.

  1. Highlights from BNL-RHIC-2012

    CERN Document Server

    Tannenbaum, M J

    2013-01-01

    Recent highlights from Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are reviewed and discussed in the context of the discovery of the strongly interacting Quark Gluon Plasma (sQGP) at RHIC in 2005 as confirmed by results from the CERN-LHC Pb+Pb program. Outstanding RHIC machine operation in 2012 with 3-dimensional stochastic cooling and a new EBIS ion source enabled measurements with Cu+Au, U+U, for which multiplicity distributions are shown, as well as with polarized p-p collisions. Differences of the physics and goals of p-p versus A+A are discussed leading to a review of RHIC results on pi0 suppression in Au+Au collisions and comparison to LHC Pb+Pb results in the same range 5 30 GeV. Improved measurements of direct photon production and correlation with charged particles at RHIC are shown, including the absence of a low pT (thermal) photon enhancement in d+Au collisions. Attempts to understand the apparent equality of the energy loss of light and heavy quarks in the QGP by...

  2. Highlights on the IAEA project QUATRO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The success of radiotherapy in term of prob- ability of local control of the tumor and the limiting factor in treatments in term of probability of complications are strictly depending on the accuracy and precision of the pa- tient treatment. An overall Quality Assurance programme (QAP) has been recognized as an essential tool to assure that the goals of radiotherapy are achieved. As part of a comprehensive approach to QAP an independent external audit is considered a very effective method of checking that the quality of activities in an Institution permits to achieve the required objectives. Since many years the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has audited Member States for radiotherapy dosimetry, for educating and training radio- therapy professionals and for reviewing the radiotherapy process. Recently a new approach has been developed and named ''Quality Assurance Team for Radiation Oncology (QUATRO)''. The principal aim of QUATRO is to review all the radiotherapy process, including organization, infra- structure, clinical and medical physics aspects of the radio- therapy services. It also includes a review of the hospital's professional competence with a view to quality improve- ment. The aim of this paper is to introduce and to highlight the QUATRO methodology describing its effectiveness on improving either the quality of the radiotherapy treatments and in general the management of the patient.

  3. Engineering sciences research highlights. Fiscal year 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Laboratory's overall mission is sixfold. We are charged with developing nuclear warheads for defense, technology for arms control, and new concepts for defense against nuclear attack; with supporting programs for both nonnuclear defense and energy research and development; and with advancing our knowledge of science and technology so that we can respond to other national needs. Major programs in support of this mission involve nuclear weapons, energy, environmental science, and basic research. Specific areas of investigation include the design, development, and testing of nuclear weapons; nuclear safeguards and security; inertial and magnetic fusion and nuclear, solar, fossil, and geothermal energy; and basic research in physics, chemistry, mathematics, engineering, and the computer and life sciences. With the staff and facilities maintained for these and other programs, the Laboratory can respond to specific national needs in virtually all areas of the physical and life sciences. Within the Laboratory's organization, most technical research activities are carried out in three directorates: Engineering Sciences; Physics and Mathematics; and Chemistry, Earth and Life Sciences. The activities highlighted here are examples of unclassified work carried out in the seven divisions that made up the Engineering Sciences Directorate at the end of fiscal year 1983. Brief descriptions of these divisions' goals and capabilities and summaries of selected projects illustrate the diversity of talent, expertise, and facilities maintained within the Engineering Sciences Directorate

  4. LHC Highlights, from dream to reality

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    The idea of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was born in the early 1980s. Although LEP (CERN’s previous large accelerator) was still under construction at that time, scientists were already starting to think about re-using the 27-kilometre ring for an even more powerful machine. Turning this ambitious scientific plan into reality proved to be an immensely complex task. Civil engineering work, state-of-the-art technologies, a new approach to data storage and analysis: many people worked hard for many years to accomplish all this.   Here are some of the highlights: 1984. A symposium organized in Lausanne, Switzerland, is the official starting point for the LHC. LHC prototype of the two beam pipes (1992). 1989. The first embryonic collaborations begin. 1992. A meeting in Evian, France, marks the beginning of the LHC experiments. 1994. The CERN Council approves the construction of the LHC accelerator. 1995. Japan becomes an Observer of CERN and announces a financial contribution to ...

  5. Highlights from past and future physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Daisy Yuhas

    2009-01-01

    A two-day symposium was held at CERN on 3 and 4 December in celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the Proton Synchrotron and the twentieth anniversary of LEP. The symposium, entitled “From the Proton Synchrotron to the Large Hadron Collider- 50 Years of Nobel Memories in High-Energy Physics”, included a series of seminars reflecting on the past fifty years in particle physics and an exhibition highlighting CERN’s research over this period.   Lyn Evans, LHC project leader, addressing the audience gathered in the Main Auditorium during the symposium that celebrated the 50 years of the PS and the 20 years of LEP.  The events were well attended on both days. Thursday’s reception, to which the Director-General invited everyone working at CERN, attracted over 1200 people. The seminars drew about 500 people to the Main Auditorium and the Council Chamber each day, with at least as many on-line attendees. The symposium speakers, including thirteen No...

  6. Highlights from BNL and RHIC 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Tannenbaum, M J

    2016-01-01

    Highlights of news from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and results from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the period July 2014-June 2015 are presented. The news this year was mostly very positive. The major event at BNL was the startup and dedication of the new NSLS II, "the World's brightest Synchrotron Light Source". The operation of RHIC was outstanding with a polarized p+p run at $\\sqrt{s}=200$ GeV with integrated luminosity that exceeded the sum of all previous p+p integrated luminosity at this $\\sqrt{s}$. For the first time at RHIC asymmetric p+Au and p+Al runs were made but the p+Al run caused damage in the PHENIX forward detectors from quenches that were inadequately shielded for this first p+A run. This was also the 10th anniversary of the 2005 announcement of the Perfect Liquid Quark Gluon Plasma at RHIC and a review is presented of the discoveries leading to this claim. A new result on net-charge fluctuations (with no particle identification) from PHENIX based on previous scans ov...

  7. A Non-Interventional Naturalistic Study of the Prescription Patterns of Antipsychotics in Patients with Schizophrenia from the Spanish Province of Tarragona

    OpenAIRE

    Gaviria, Ana M.; Franco, José G; Aguado, Víctor; Rico, Guillem; Labad, Javier; de Pablo, Joan; Vilella, Elisabet

    2015-01-01

    Background The analysis of prescribing patterns in entire catchment areas contributes to global mapping of the use of antipsychotics and may improve treatment outcomes. Objective To determine the pattern of long-term antipsychotic prescription in outpatients with schizophrenia in the province of Tarragona (Catalonia-Spain). Methods A naturalistic, observational, retrospective, non-interventional study based on the analysis of registries of computerized medical records from an anonymized datab...

  8. Decision making by patients: An application of naturalistic decision making theory to cervical screening and chronic renal failure, Working Paper 2006/5

    OpenAIRE

    Marion Haas

    2006-01-01

    Over their lifetime, individuals typically make many decisions about health and health care. Theoretical approaches to decision making have been dominated by a rational, analytic approach which assumes that problems are relatively fixed and well-defined and which have foreseeable and measurable endpoints. Naturalistic decision making (NDM) approaches attempt to mimic ?real world? situations where problems vary, may be defined differently by individuals with diverse perspectives and where endp...

  9. A highlight of recent advances in immunology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG DeXian

    2011-01-01

    To celebrate the 60th anniversary of SCIENCE CHINA,six research groups of overseas and domestic Chinese immunologists published a series of review articles (SCIENCE CHINA Life Sciences,2010,53(2):157-158),which highlighted recent advances and their contributions to immunology.Wang YaYa in Prof.Cheng GenHong's group,who discovered the function of TNF receptor-associated factor (TRAF) and other signal molecules in Toll-like receptor (TLR) mediated signaling pathway and innate immunity [1],reviewed TRAF-mediated regulation of immune and inflammatory responses [2].TRAF family consists of six mammalian members (TRAF1,TRAF2,TRAF3,TRAF4,TRAF5,and TRAF6) and participates in signal transduction of a large number of receptor families such as TNF receptor family (TNFR) and TLR-interleukin-1 receptor (TLR-IL-1R)family.Upon receptor-mediated activation,TRAFs are directly or indirectly recruited to the intracellular domains of these receptors and subsequently combine with other signaling molecules to activate the inhibitor of IκB kinase (IKK) complex,TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator (TANK)-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) and the inducible Iκ B kinase (IKK-i),ultimately leading to activation of transcription factors,such as NF-κB,interferon-regulatory factor (IRF),to induce immune or inflammatory responses.In the past few years,immunologists have demonstrated the central role of TRAFs in inflammation,innate immunity.

  10. Cluster recent highlights in magnetospheric physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoubet, C. Philippe; Laakso, Harri; Goldstein, Mevlyn; Masson, Arnaud

    2016-07-01

    After more than 15 years in space, the Cluster mission is continuing to deliver groundbreaking results, thanks to its ability to move the four spacecraft with respect to each other, according to the science topic to be studied. The main goal of the Cluster mission, made of four identical spacecraft carrying each 11 complementary instruments, is to study in three dimensions the key plasma processes at work in the main regions of the Earth's environment: solar wind and bow shock, magnetopause, polar cusps, magnetotail, and auroral zone. During the course of the mission, the relative distance between the four spacecraft has been varied more than 55 times from a few km up to 36000 km to address the various scientific objectives. The smallest distance achieved between two Cluster spacecraft was 3.1 km in December 2015, about 50 times smaller than planned at the beginning of the mission. The rate of change of separation distances has accelerated in the last few years with the Guest Investigator programme that allowed scientists in the community to propose special science programmes requiring a new spacecraft constellation. We will present recent science highlights obtained such as solar wind reconnection and bifurcated current sheet development, multi-altitude measurements of field aligned currents, reconnection efficiency in accelerating particles and effect of cold ions, motion of X-lines, speed and direction of tail reconnection events, flux transfer events evolution, new method to find magnetic nulls outside the Cluster tetrahedron, interplanetary shock waves very quick damping and origin of theta auroras. We will also present the distribution of data through the Cluster Science Data System (CSDS), and the Cluster Science Archive (CSA). CSA was implemented to provide, for the first time for a plasma physics mission, a permanent and public archive of all the high-resolution data from all instruments.

  11. Effectiveness and Predictors of Continuation of Paliperidone Palmitate Long-Acting Injection Treatment: A 12-Month Naturalistic Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whale, Richard; Pereira, Marco; Cuthbert, Sharon; Fialho, Renata

    2015-10-01

    Antipsychotic long-acting injectable (LAI) medication has an important place as a treatment option in schizophrenia with evolving evidence to support clinical benefit over oral medication. Paliperidone palmitate is recently licensed as an LAI. We studied a naturalistic cohort of all identifiable patients who initiated paliperidone LAI in a specific United Kingdom region (Sussex) from first availability up to January 2013 (n = 179). Favorably, 60% of the cohort continued paliperidone LAI beyond 12 months from initiation. Schizophrenia diagnosis was significantly associated with 12-month continuation on univariate analysis (65% continuation rate at 12 months in this diagnostic subgroup). No baseline variables were identified as independently associated with 12-month continuation. However, fewer inpatient days after initiation (odds ratio [OR], 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.003-1.011; P = 0.002), dose adjustment up or down (OR, 3.46; 95% CI, 1.26-9.51; P = 0.016), and a higher maintenance dose (OR, 8.31; 95% CI, 1.84-37.51; P = 0.006) during treatment course were all independently associated with continuation on multivariate analysis. Our findings support the importance of a collaborative approach with the LAI recipient in treatment decision making to enhance treatment effectiveness. PMID:26267419

  12. Baseline Face Detection, Head Pose Estimation, and Coarse Direction Detection for Facial Data in the SHRP2 Naturalistic Driving Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paone, Jeffrey R [ORNL; Bolme, David S [ORNL; Ferrell, Regina Kay [ORNL; Aykac, Deniz [ORNL; Karnowski, Thomas Paul [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Keeping a driver focused on the road is one of the most critical steps in insuring the safe operation of a vehicle. The Strategic Highway Research Program 2 (SHRP2) has over 3,100 recorded videos of volunteer drivers during a period of 2 years. This extensive naturalistic driving study (NDS) contains over one million hours of video and associated data that could aid safety researchers in understanding where the driver s attention is focused. Manual analysis of this data is infeasible, therefore efforts are underway to develop automated feature extraction algorithms to process and characterize the data. The real-world nature, volume, and acquisition conditions are unmatched in the transportation community, but there are also challenges because the data has relatively low resolution, high compression rates, and differing illumination conditions. A smaller dataset, the head pose validation study, is available which used the same recording equipment as SHRP2 but is more easily accessible with less privacy constraints. In this work we report initial head pose accuracy using commercial and open source face pose estimation algorithms on the head pose validation data set.

  13. Obesity and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data > Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Obesity Obesity and African Americans African American women have the ... ss6304.pdf [PDF | 3.38MB] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY More than 80 percent of people with type ...

  14. Highlights from Johannesburg, Gauteng Province, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Although the extraction of mineral wealth has been the major influence in the history of Johannesburg and the surrounding Witwatersrand regions (with about 45% of all gold ever mined coming from there), the discovery of now-famous hominid fossils at the Sterkfontein Caves, and the convening of the world's largest-ever conference on environment and development, are setting a new stage for the future. The United Nations began the second Development and Environment Conference in Johannesburg on August 26, 2002. This meeting addresses the implementation of international goals to fight poverty and protect the global environment that were established at the first such conference held in Rio de Janeiro in 1992. The Johannesburg summit involves about forty thousand participants, and perhaps 100 world leaders. One of several official opening ceremonies for the conference was held at the Sterkfontein Caves to recognize the outstanding universal value of the paleo-anthropological fossils found there.These views from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) highlight a number of the land use, vegetation, and geological features found within Gauteng Province (including the urban center of Johannesburg and the capital city Pretoria) and parts of the North West and Free State Provinces. The image on the right displays vegetation in red hues and is a false-color view utilizing data from MISR's near-infrared, red and blue bands. Both the natural-color view (left) and the false-color version were acquired by MISR's nadir camera on June 16, 2002. The urban areas appear as gray-colored pixels in the natural-color view, and exhibit colors corresponding with the relative abundance of vegetation found in the urban parts of this arid region.The mountains trending east-west near the center of the images extend from Pretoria in the east to Rustenberg in the west. These ranges, the Magaliesberg and Witwatersberg, separate the low-lying, hotter bushveld to the north from the cooler

  15. Electric transport in the Netherlands. Highlights 2012; Elektrisch vervoer in Nederland. Highlights 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-03-15

    Businesses, social and educational institutions and governmental institutes work together to accelerate electric transport and to discover and exploit economic opportunities. In 2012, many activities were carried out and results achieved, of which the highlights are presented in this brochure [Dutch] Bedrijfsleven, maatschappelijke- en kennisinstellingen en overheden werken samen aan versnelling van elektrisch vervoer en het ontdekken en benutten van economische kansen. In 2012 werden veel activiteiten uitgevoerd en resultaten geboekt, waarvan in deze brochure verslag wordt gedaan.

  16. Historiography, American Theatre, and the First Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Linda Walsh

    American theatre history should include a study of Native American performances, since these performances are rich with "American" symbolic materials such as imagery, symbols, and heraldic visions of animals and landscapes. Indian cultures understood the importance of performance for both the visionary and the community at large. Even the pow-wow…

  17. New Social Learning from Two Spirit Native Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, J. B., Jr.; Sheppard, Maia

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors highlight connections between research on Two Spirit Native Americans and standard social studies curriculum. Two Spirit is a Pan-Indian term describing Native Americans who believe they embody both masculine and feminine characteristics/traits in one physical body. Findings from this research expand the field's…

  18. African Americans Who Teach German Language and Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikes, Robert Jr.

    2001-01-01

    A large number of black scholars have pursued advanced degrees in the German language, history, and culture. Describes the history of African American interest in the German language and culture, highlighting various black scholars who have studied German over the years. Presents data on African Americans in German graduate programs and examines…

  19. Towards a Moon Village : Community Workshops Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    2016-07-01

    . References: [1] http://sci.esa.int/ilewg/ and https://ildwg.wordpress.com/ [2] Foing B. Moon exploration highlights and Moon Village introduction. [3] Young Lunar Explorers Report ESTEC Moon village sessions with community and young professionals.

  20. Naturalistic field study of the restart break in US commercial motor vehicle drivers: Truck driving, sleep, and fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Amy R; Mollicone, Daniel J; Kan, Kevin; Bartels, Rachel; Satterfield, Brieann C; Riedy, Samantha M; Unice, Aaron; Van Dongen, Hans P A

    2016-08-01

    Commercial motor vehicle (CMV) drivers in the US may start a new duty cycle after taking a 34-h restart break. A restart break provides an opportunity for sleep recuperation to help prevent the build-up of fatigue across duty cycles. However, the effectiveness of a restart break may depend on its timing, and on how many nighttime opportunities for sleep it contains. For daytime drivers, a 34-h restart break automatically includes two nighttime periods. For nighttime drivers, who are arguably at increased risk of fatigue, a 34-h restart break contains only one nighttime period. To what extent this is relevant for fatigue depends in part on whether nighttime drivers revert back to a nighttime-oriented sleep schedule during the restart break. We conducted a naturalistic field study with 106 CMV drivers working their normal schedules and performing their normal duties. These drivers were studied during two duty cycles and during the intervening restart break. They provided a total of 1260days of data and drove a total of 414,937 miles during the study. Their duty logs were used to identify the periods when they were on duty and when they were driving and to determine their duty cycles and restart breaks. Sleep/wake patterns were measured continuously by means of wrist actigraphy. Fatigue was assessed three times per day by means of a brief psychomotor vigilance test (PVT-B) and a subjective sleepiness scale. Data from a truck-based lane tracking and data acquisition system were used to compute lane deviation (variability in lateral lane position). Statistical analyses focused on 24-h patterns of duty, driving, sleep, PVT-B performance, subjective sleepiness, and lane deviation. Duty cycles preceded by a restart break containing only one nighttime period (defined as 01:00-05:00) were compared with duty cycles preceded by a restart break containing more than one nighttime period. During duty cycles preceded by a restart break with only one nighttime period, drivers

  1. Towards a naturalistic brain-machine interface: hybrid torque and position control allows generalization to novel dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhatbar, Pratik Y; Francis, Joseph T

    2013-01-01

    Realization of reaching and grasping movements by a paralytic person or an amputee would greatly facilitate her/his activities of daily living. Towards this goal, control of a computer cursor or robotic arm using neural signals has been demonstrated in rodents, non-human primates and humans. This technology is commonly referred to as a Brain-Machine Interface (BMI) and is achieved by predictions of kinematic parameters, e.g. position or velocity. However, execution of natural movements, such as swinging baseball bats of different weights at the same speed, requires advanced planning for necessary context-specific forces in addition to kinematic control. Here we show, for the first time, the control of a virtual arm with representative inertial parameters using real-time neural control of torques in non-human primates (M. radiata). We found that neural control of torques leads to ballistic, possibly more naturalistic movements than position control alone, and that adding the influence of position in a hybrid torque-position control changes the feedforward behavior of these BMI movements. In addition, this level of control was achievable utilizing the neural recordings from either contralateral or ipsilateral M1. We also observed changed behavior of hybrid torque-position control under novel external dynamic environments that was comparable to natural movements. Our results demonstrate that inclusion of torque control to drive a neuroprosthetic device gives the user a more direct handle on the movement execution, especially when dealing with novel or changing dynamic environments. We anticipate our results to be a starting point of more sophisticated algorithms for sensorimotor neuroprostheses, eliminating the need of fully automatic kinematic-to-dynamic transformations as currently used by traditional kinematic-based decoders. Thus, we propose that direct control of torques, or other force related variables, should allow for more natural neuroprosthetic movements by

  2. Prophylactic efficacy of lithium, valproic acid, and carbamazepine in the maintenance phase of bipolar disorder: a naturalistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peselow, Eric D; Clevenger, Steven; IsHak, Waguih W

    2016-07-01

    Mood stabilizers are used clinically for the management of bipolar disorder. Prophylactic therapy with mood stabilizers is the primary treatment for preventing depressive and manic relapses in bipolar patients once they are stabilized. In this study, we examined the relative efficacy of the three most commonly used mood-stabilizing agents: lithium (Li), valproic acid (VPA), and carbamazepine (CBZ), in preventing relapse episodes. A total of 225 patients with bipolar disorder were included in the present analysis. Patients taking Li, VPA, or CBZ were followed up for up to 124 months, until suffering a manic, mixed, or depressive episode (relapse), or until the end of the study/study termination (no relapse), whichever came first. The median unadjusted survival time was 36 months for patients taking VPA, 42 months for patients taking CBZ, and 81 months for patients taking Li. These results indicate that patients stayed longer on Li, suggesting that it might have been better tolerated than either CBZ or VPA. χ-Analysis showed that patients taking Li were significantly less likely to experience relapse during the observational period than patients taking either VPA or CBZ (P<0.05). A Cox regression model showed that the hazard of experiencing relapse was significantly predicted by the total number of depressive (P=0.007) and manic symptoms (P=0.02) assessed before the observation period. In addition, after controlling for symptom covariates, the hazard of experiencing relapse was 1.66 times (95% confidence interval 1.03-2.67) or 66% higher for patients taking VPA compared with patients taking Li (P=0.037). Although the hazard of experiencing relapse was higher for patients taking CBZ compared with those taking Li, the risk was not elevated by a significant amount. Notwithstanding the limitations of the naturalistic design of this study, the differences in relapse prevention and survival time observed in these medications show Li fairing relatively better in

  3. Towards a naturalistic brain-machine interface: hybrid torque and position control allows generalization to novel dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratik Y Chhatbar

    Full Text Available Realization of reaching and grasping movements by a paralytic person or an amputee would greatly facilitate her/his activities of daily living. Towards this goal, control of a computer cursor or robotic arm using neural signals has been demonstrated in rodents, non-human primates and humans. This technology is commonly referred to as a Brain-Machine Interface (BMI and is achieved by predictions of kinematic parameters, e.g. position or velocity. However, execution of natural movements, such as swinging baseball bats of different weights at the same speed, requires advanced planning for necessary context-specific forces in addition to kinematic control. Here we show, for the first time, the control of a virtual arm with representative inertial parameters using real-time neural control of torques in non-human primates (M. radiata. We found that neural control of torques leads to ballistic, possibly more naturalistic movements than position control alone, and that adding the influence of position in a hybrid torque-position control changes the feedforward behavior of these BMI movements. In addition, this level of control was achievable utilizing the neural recordings from either contralateral or ipsilateral M1. We also observed changed behavior of hybrid torque-position control under novel external dynamic environments that was comparable to natural movements. Our results demonstrate that inclusion of torque control to drive a neuroprosthetic device gives the user a more direct handle on the movement execution, especially when dealing with novel or changing dynamic environments. We anticipate our results to be a starting point of more sophisticated algorithms for sensorimotor neuroprostheses, eliminating the need of fully automatic kinematic-to-dynamic transformations as currently used by traditional kinematic-based decoders. Thus, we propose that direct control of torques, or other force related variables, should allow for more natural

  4. Using naturalistic driving data to explore the association between traffic safety-related events and crash risk at driver level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kun-Feng; Aguero-Valverde, Jonathan; Jovanis, Paul P

    2014-11-01

    There has been considerable research conducted over the last 40 years using traffic safety-related events to support road safety analyses. Dating back to traffic conflict studies from the 1960s these observational studies of driver behavior have been criticized due to: poor quality data; lack of available and useful exposure measures linked to the observations; the incomparability of self-reported safety-related events; and, the difficulty in assessing culpability for safety-related events. This study seeks to explore the relationships between driver characteristics and traffic safety-related events, and between traffic safety-related events and crash involvement while mitigating some of those limitations. The Virginia Tech Transportation Institute 100-Car Naturalistic Driving Study dataset, in which the participants' vehicles were instrumented with various cameras and sensors during the study period, was used for this study. The study data set includes 90 drivers observed for 12-13 months driving. This study focuses on single vehicle run-off-road safety-related events only, including 14 crashes and 182 safety-related events (30 near crashes, and 152 crash-relevant incidents). Among the findings are: (1) drivers under age 25 are significantly more likely to be involved in safety-related events and crashes; and (2) significantly positive correlations exist between crashes, near crashes, and crash-relevant incidents. Although there is still much to learn about the factors affecting the positive correlation between safety-related events and crashes, a Bayesian multivariate Poisson log-normal model is shown to be useful to quantify the associations between safety-related events and crash risk while controlling for driver characteristics. PMID:25086439

  5. Environmental enrichment models a naturalistic form of maternal separation and shapes the anxiety response patterns of offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, E J; Migliore, M M; Pillsbury, S L; Shaik, A N; Kentner, A C

    2015-02-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) mimics positive life experiences by providing enhanced social and physical stimulation. Placement into EE following weaning, or in later life, confers beneficial outcomes on both emotional and cognitive processes. However, anxiety-like behavior is also reported, particularly in rats exposed to enhanced housing during early development. Notably, the quality of maternal behavior affects stress regulation and emotional stability in offspring, yet the impact of environmental context on maternal care has not been thoroughly evaluated, or are the influences of EE on their offspring understood. To investigate the role of EE on these factors we analyzed the details of mother-neonate interactions, and juvenile offspring performance on several anxiety measures. Additionally, we evaluated neurochemical differences (i.e. serotonin, corticosterone, GABA, glutamate) in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus as a function of EE, Communal Nesting (CN) and Standard Care (SC). Although EE dams spent significantly less time on the nest and had lower nursing frequencies compared to SC dams, there were no differences in maternal licking/grooming. In offspring, EE increased GLUR1 level and GABA concentrations in the prefrontal cortex of both juvenile male and female rats. A similar pattern for glutamate was only observed in males. Although EE offspring spent less time on the open arms of the elevated plus maze and had faster escape latencies in a light-dark test, there were no other indications of anxiety-like behavior on these measures or when engaged in social interaction with a conspecific. In the wild, rats live in complicated and variable environments. Consequently dams must leave their nest to defend and forage, limiting their duration of direct contact. EE exposure in early development may mimic this naturalistic maternal separation, shaping parental behavior and offspring resiliency to stressors. PMID:25437120

  6. Naturalistic Effects of Five Days of Bedtime Caffeine Use on Sleep, Next-Day Cognitive Performance, and Mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Emma K; Tiplady, Brian; Priestley, Caroline M; Rogers, Peter J

    2014-03-01

    Background: Disruptive effects of caffeine on sleep have previously been reported, although measures of next-day mood and performance have rarely been included. The present study aims to evaluate the effects of caffeine on sleep and associated next-day effects in a naturalistic field setting. Methods: Nineteen participants (daily caffeine intake 0-141 mg), assessed as good sleepers, took part in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, 2-week crossover study to assess the effects of bedtime caffeine use (250 mg) on sleep and next-day cognitive performance and mood, which were assessed on a mobile phone in the morning and afternoon. Sleep was assessed objectively (actiwatch) and subjectively (sleep diary). Results: Caffeine's effects on sleep were largely restricted to the first day of administration, with actigraphically measured reduced sleep efficiency, increased activity score and fragmentation index, decreased self-rated sleep quality, and an increased occurrence of participants waking early; only decreased sleep efficiency remained over the week. Effects on next-day performance and mood were evident over the whole week, although despite disrupting sleep, accuracy on a working memory task was higher after caffeine than placebo administration. Conclusions: Caffeine disrupted sleep, although when assessing next-day performance, which may have been affected by the presence of residual caffeine, performance appeared better after caffeine compared to placebo, although this was most likely due to prevention of the effects of overnight withdrawal from caffeine rather than representing a net benefit. Furthermore, partial tolerance developed to the effects of caffeine on sleep. PMID:24868491

  7. Asian American-Pacific American Relations: The Asian American Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sucheng

    This paper examines the migration and settlement history of Asians into the United States and the interaction of the major Asian immigrants with each other and with American society. An important thesis is that, because the differences between Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders are much greater than the similarities between them, they should no…

  8. The Impact of Driver Inattention on Near-Crash/Crash Risk: An Analysis Using the 100-Car Naturalistic Driving Study Data

    OpenAIRE

    Klauer, Sheila G; Dingus, Thomas A.; Neale, Vicki L.; Sudweeks, Jeremy D.; Ramsey, D J

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to conduct in-depth analyses of driver inattention using the driving data collected in the 100-Car Naturalistic Driving Study. An additional database of baseline epochs was reduced from the raw data and used in conjunction with the crash and near-crash data identified as part of the original 100-Car Study to account for exposure and establish near-crash/crash risk. The analyses presented in this report are able to establish direct relationships between driving b...

  9. The clinical-familial correlates and naturalistic outcome of panic-disorder-agoraphobia with and without lifetime bipolar II comorbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Cristina

    2008-11-01

    complexity of the clinical picture in this naturalistic study. That such complexity does not seem to translate into poorer response and outcome in those with comorbid soft bipolarity probably reflects the fact that we had brought BP-II under control with mood stabilizers. We discuss the implications of our findings as further evidence for the existence of a distinct anxious-bipolar diathesis.

  10. Children's books and the nature of science: A multisite naturalistic case study of three elementary teachers in the rural southeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricker, Patricia Lynn

    This naturalistic case study describes the efforts of three elementary teachers in a rural southeastern school to use children's books in support of inquiry-based science and specifically addresses issues related to the nature of science. Data were collected through 26 classroom and meeting observations, 16 semi-structured and informal interviews, 35 documents and 76 children's books used by the teachers. Three themes were identified related to the nature of science and the selection and use of children's books in the teachers' second, fourth, and fifth grade classrooms. (1) Science was portrayed as a human endeavor that connects to the lives of people and that involves fascination, passion, and interest; imagination and creativity; values; and diverse views. The collection of books was analyzed to look specifically at race, culture, and gender issues. While women, people of color, and different cultures were represented in the book collection, they were not represented well when considering the collection as a whole. (2) Books and the teachers' use of them supported firsthand investigation of the natural world and the idea that empirical evidence underlies scientific understanding. This theme involved observation and journaling, identification of questions to investigate and procedures to use, reasonable interpretations of results, and inferential thinking. (3) Books helped teach about the durable body of scientific knowledge we have discovered over time. They were used to broaden background knowledge and as references after firsthand investigations. The complexity of science education is revealed in these cases. The teachers were able to artfully balance multiple aspects of the nature of science in their book selection and presentation. Particularly promising aspects include their work to use fiction and poetry to promote connections between imagination, creativity and science and their innovative use of books to help students interpret data and infer. Important

  11. The social functional outcome of being naturalistically treated with paliperidone extended-release in patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakagawa R

    2015-06-01

    had AEs and 8.75% of patients had serious AEs. Despite the recommendation of monotherapy with PAL-ER, 65.84% of patients were given additional antipsychotics (polypharmacy. Post hoc comparisons of monotherapy versus polypharmacy revealed that the monotherapy group had better outcomes and fewer AEs than the polypharmacy treated group. The improvement in social functioning and the rate of socially functional remission did not differ between groups.Conclusion: PAL-ER treatment showed effective symptom control and improvement in social functioning. The data suggest that early response to antipsychotic treatment should be important for functional outcomes.Keywords: paliperidone, social function, schizophrenia, naturalistic study

  12. Highlighting Hospital and Patient Concerns this Election Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Tom

    2016-03-01

    Campaign 2016 is in full swing, and the American Hospital Association is seizing the opportunity to make sure the concerns of patients and hospitals are heard. On the front burner: escalating drug prices. PMID:27180391

  13. Stress: a naturalistic proposal

    OpenAIRE

    María De Lourdes Rodríguez Campuzano

    2013-01-01

    Some of the stress related topics, especially from the conceptual framework of Lazarus and Folkman are reviewed on this work. It is sustained that this approach is dualistic and that the research made from this view is made on the basis of morphological criteria that don’t allow studying important elements of this kind of behavior. From an interbehavioral approach three functional criteria are proposed to study this phenomenon: the functional nature of situations, aptitude levels of behavior,...

  14. Naturalistic outcome of treatment of psychosis by traditional healers in Jinja and Iganga districts, Eastern Uganda – a 3- and 6 months follow up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbo Catherine

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To determine the naturalistic outcome of treatment of psychosis by traditional healers in Jinja and Iganga districts of Eastern Uganda. Method A cohort of patients with psychosis receiving treatment from traditional healers’ shrines were recruited between January and March 2008 and followed up at three and six months. The Mini International Neuropsychiatry Interview (MINI Plus was used for making specific diagnosis at the point of contact. For specific symptoms, Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS, Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS and Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS were used to measure severity of schizophrenia, mania and psychotic depression, respectively. The Clinical Global Impression (CGI and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF were used for objective assessments. The Compass Mental Health Index measured well being. Mean scores of the scales were computed using one way ANOVA for independent samples. Associations between outcome and categorical variables were examined at bivariate and multivariate levels. Results All the symptom scales had a percentage reduction of more than 20% at three and six months follow up. The differences between the mean scores of the scales at baseline and 3 months, baseline and 6 months, and 3 and 6 months were all significant (P Conclusion This study suggests that there may be some positive effects for patients with psychosis who combine both biomedical services and traditional healing. Further research in the area of naturalistic outcome of traditional healing is necessary.

  15. American Society of Echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Society of Echocardiography Join Ase Member Portal Log In Membership Member Portal Log In Join ASE Renew Benefits Rates FASE – Fellow of the American Society of Echocardiography Member Referral Program FAQs Initiatives Advocacy ...

  16. American Urogynecologic Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Site » PFD Registry » Contact Us American Urogynecologic Society 1100 Wayne Avenue, Suite 670 Silver Spring, MD ... Us | Privacy Policy | HONcode Accredited © 2016 American Urogynecologic Society. All rights reserved.

  17. North American Spine Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Coverage Recommendations SpineLine Renew Membership NORTH AMERICAN SPINE SOCIETY BURR RIDGE, IL 7075 Veterans Blvd. Burr Ridge, ... NASS Contact Us © Copyright 2016 North American Spine Society | Terms Of Use | Privacy Statement

  18. American Epilepsy Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Doctor | Donate main search Search American Epilepsy Society CLINICAL RESOURCES FAQs GUIDELINES IOM EPILEPSY MEDICAL MARIJUANA ... RENEW VOLUNTEER FAES: FELLOW OF THE AMERICAN EPILEPSY SOCIETY MAILING LIST PURCHASE FOR PATIENTS EPILEPSY BENEFIT INTERNATIONAL ...

  19. American Society of Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Trials in Transplantation September 13, 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and its Transplantation & Immunology Research Network ... Learn More Donate Donate Donate to the American Society of Transplantation Advertisement member spotlight View all Joanna ...

  20. American Cancer Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Involved Find Local ACS How the American Cancer Society Fights Childhood Cancer Advances in treatment have improved ... long lasting consequences. Learn how the American Cancer Society is working to save more lives from cancer ...

  1. African Americans and Glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Involved News About Us Donate In This Section African Americans and Glaucoma email Send this article to ... glaucoma is the leading cause of blindness in African Americans. Half of those with glaucoma don't ...

  2. American Vitiligo Research Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... testing. Please Visit Our Donations Page American Vitiligo Research Foundation "We Walk By Faith, Not By Sight" PO ... by Using GoodSearch Copyright 2005 - 2014 American Vitiligo Research Foundation Inc. Disclaimer: Information provided on this website is ...

  3. Obesity and Hispanic Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Obesity Obesity and Hispanic Americans Among Mexican American women, 77 ... ss6304.pdf [PDF | 3.38MB] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY More than 80 percent of people with type ...

  4. Obesity and Asian Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Asian American > Obesity Obesity and Asian Americans Non-Hispanic whites are 60% ... youthonline . [Accessed 05/25/2016] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY More than 80 percent of people with type ...

  5. Culture and Personality Among European American and Asian American Men

    OpenAIRE

    Eap, Sopagna; DeGarmo, David S.; Kawakami, Ayaka; Hara, Shelley N.; Hall, Gordon C.N.; Teten, Andra L.

    2008-01-01

    Personality differences between Asian American (N = 320) and European American men (N = 242) and also among Asian American ethnic groups (Korean, Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, and mixed Asian) are examined on the Big Five personality dimension. Personality structures for Asian Americans and European Americans closely replicate established norms. However, congruence is greater for European American and highly acculturated Asian American men than for low acculturated Asian American men. Similar ...

  6. Diabetes in African Americans

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, M.

    2005-01-01

    African Americans have a high risk for type 2 diabetes. Genetic traits, the prevalence of obesity, and insulin resistance all contribute to the risk of diabetes in the African American community. African Americans have a high rate of diabetic complications, because of poor glycaemic control and racial disparities in health care in the USA. African Americans with diabetes may have an atypical presentation that simulates type 1 diabetes, but then their subsequent clinical course is typical of t...

  7. Brookhaven highlights, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H. (eds.)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Highlights from all the department are illustrated. The main topics are on accelerator development and applications. (LSP)

  8. African American Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    African American Suicide Fact Sheet Based on 2012 Data (2014) Overview • In 2012, 2,357 African Americans completed suicide in the U.S. Of these, ... 46 per 100,000. • The suicide rate for African Americans ages 10-19 was 2.98 per ...

  9. American Indian Recipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnoe, Katherine J.; Skjervold, Christian, Ed.

    Presenting some 60 to 70 Native American recipes, this document includes a brief introduction and a suggested reading list (15 citations related to American Indian foods). The introduction identifies five regional Native American cuisines as follows: in the Southwest, peppers and beans were made into chili, soups, guacamole, and barbecue sauces by…

  10. Heart Disease and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Heart Disease Heart Disease and African Americans Although African American adults are ... were 30 percent more likely to die from heart disease than non-Hispanic whites. African American women are ...

  11. Infant Mortality and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... African American > Infant Heath & Mortality Infant Mortality and African Americans African Americans have 2.2 times the infant mortality rate ... birthweight as compared to non-Hispanic white infants. African Americans had almost twice the sudden infant death syndrome ...

  12. Highlights from the scientific and educational abstracts presented at the ASER 2015 annual scientific meeting and postgraduate course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Lee A; Herr, Keith D

    2016-06-01

    The American Society of Emergency Radiology (ASER) 2015 Annual Scientific Meeting and Postgraduate Course offered dedicated learning sessions, oral presentations, and digital exhibits on a broad spectrum of topics in emergency radiology, including traumatic and non-traumatic emergencies, quality, communication, education, technological innovations, and the evolving identity of the emergency radiology subspecialty. This article highlights the scientific and educational abstracts presented at the meeting. PMID:26884403

  13. A Glimpse of American Society through the American TV Drama Series"the Desperate Housewives"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jia-wei

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents an analytical study on the American society through a popular American drama series"the Desper-ate House Wives". Typical American values can be found everywhere on the show as they have been ingrained in the soul of the American people. As a nation with not very long history but great achievements, its people are the one that should be highlight-ed. Unlike China, the nation of which have formed since thousands of years ago, so has its culture, America ’s history is an immi-gration history. People started migrating from other parts of the world since the 17th century and gathered at the land of America to build up their new homes and realize their dreams. They influence each other and fuse with each other. America is one of the countries in the world that plural cultures successfully mix together.The paper focuses on the American people ’s daily life to explain to the readers the American traits and values prevailing in their society. Except the Foreword which is the general intro-duction to the paper, this paper is presented in five parts. The first part to the forth part are the emphasis of the paper which re-spectively analyze the American traits and values. A series of vivid examples are provided with a wide range of study objects, man and woman, kids to elders, in hope of making the paper understandable and persuasive. It is expected that the study can offer a general idea to the people who are interested in the American society and its people.

  14. OECD Highlights China's Role in Economic Development of Latin America

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Xinhua reported on October 28 that Latin America had been more resilient to the economic crisis by diversifying commercial and financial exchanges with Asian economies, with China as the main driver in the last three years, said Angel Gurria, General Secretary of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), in Asuncion, Paraguay.During the Ibero-American business forum within the Ibero- American Summit, to be opened Friday evening, Gurria made a speech on the theme "Towards a more sustainable trade and investment between Latin America and China".

  15. Areas of interest of potential users for naturalistic observation studies. PROmoting real Life Observations for Gaining Understanding of road user behaviour in Europe PROLOGUE, Deliverable D1.2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schagen, I.N.L.G. van Craen, S. de Nes, N. van & Eenink, R.

    2010-01-01

    Identification of the interests of potential users is crucial for setting up a useful and broadly supported large-scale naturalistic driving (ND) study. This report describes the results of a survey amongst 72 road transport professionals in Europe from different organisation types that aimed at ide

  16. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: 1st Quarter, Fiscal Year 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showalter, Mary Ann; Kathmann, Loel E.; Manke, Kristin L.

    2009-02-02

    The EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report covers the science, staff and user recognition, and publication activities that occurred during the 1st quarter (October 2008 - December 2008) of Fiscal Year 2009.

  17. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: FY 2008, 3rd Quarter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showalter, Mary Ann

    2008-09-16

    The EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report covers the science, staff and user recognition, and publication activities that occurred during the 1st quarter (October 2007 - December 2007) of Fiscal Year 2008.

  18. Physical and Life Sciences 2008 Science & Technology Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correll, D L; Hazi, A U

    2009-05-06

    This document highlights the outstanding research and development activities in the Physical and Life Sciences Directorate that made news in 2008. It also summarizes the awards and recognition received by members of the Directorate in 2008.

  19. EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: 1st Quarter, FY08

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showalter, Mary Ann

    2008-01-28

    The EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report covers the science, staff and user recognition, and publication activities that occurred during the 1st quarter (October 2007 - December 2007) of Fiscal Year 2008.

  20. Close relationships between Asian American and European American college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C; Edwards, K; Young, B; Greenberger, E

    2001-02-01

    The authors examined attitudes and behaviors regarding close relationships between European and Asian Americans, with a particular emphasis on 5 major subgroups of Asian Americans (Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, and Filipino Americans). Participants were 218 Asian American college students and 171 European American college students attending a culturally diverse university. The European Americans did not differentiate among the various subgroups of Asian Americans. Their attitudes regarding close relationships were less positive toward Asian Americans than toward Mexican and African Americans, a finding contrary to the prediction of social exchange theory (H. Tajfel, 1975). In contrast to the European Americans' view of homogeneity among Asian Americans, the 5 major subgroups of Asian Americans expressed a distinctive hierarchy of social preference among themselves. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for future research on interethnic relations involving Asian Americans. PMID:11294169

  1. American Studies in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Gülriz Buken

    2006-01-01

    In the discipline of American Studies in Turkey, the major contribution emanates, on the one hand, from the American Culture and Literature Departments instituted in various Universities in Turkey and, on the other, from the American Studies Association of Turkey. Up till now, unfortunately, no Research and Performance Institute or Center for the Study of America has yet been established to secure the necessary contacts with other similar institutions in Europe and in the United States, to fa...

  2. American College Health Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dollars at Work Recognizing Donors Find us on social media! Home Contact Us Marketplace Cart Copyright © 2016 American College Health Association | Privacy and Usage Policies | Spokesperson and ...

  3. Des esclaves et des bêtes : fables de la sauvagerie en Amérique dans Letters from an American Farmer, de St John de Crèvecoeur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnès Derail-Imbert

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The historical naturalist discourse, which serves as an epistemological framework to the narrator of Crèvecœur’s Letters from an American Farmer, draws upon the observation of local animals in order to praise a society of freedom, in which the American farmer’s autonomy depends on the harmonious relationship with his natural environment. This idealized vision is shattered by the horror of slavery which prompts the narrator to conclude that civilization is only a state of nature where man is “an animal of prey” ready to enslave others. In the sequel to this philosophical essay, the narrator resumes his naturalist account with the description of local reptiles, whose murderous behavior hardly fails to evoke slavery, as if servitude and the violence it entails were merely a law of nature. While animal brutality invalidates the myth of a society of sympathy, it nevertheless frees the discourse from its subordination to such utopia, and allows the text to engage with the native figures of American savagery.Le discours naturaliste, qui sert de cadre intellectuel au narrateur de Letters from an American Farmer de Crèvecœur, s’appuie sur l’observation des animaux autochtones pour faire l’éloge d’une société de liberté, où la relation harmonieuse avec le milieu naturel garantit l’affranchissement du cultivateur américain. Cette vision idéalisante est compromise par l’horreur de l’esclavage qui conduit le narrateur à conclure que la civilisation n’est qu’un état de nature où l’homme est une bête de proie qui s’emploie à asservir ses semblables. Après cet essai philosophique, le récit naturaliste reprend avec un exposé sur les reptiles, dont les mœurs violentes ne sont pas sans évoquer l’esclavage, comme si la servitude et son cortège de violences étaient une loi naturelle. Si la brutalité des bêtes invalide le mythe d’une société de sympathie, elle libère néanmoins l’écriture de l

  4. Occupationally Acquired American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Edileuza Felinto de Brito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report two occupationally acquired cases of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL: one accidental laboratory autoinoculation by contaminated needlestick while handling an ACL lesion sample, and one acquired during field studies on bird biology. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays of patient lesions were positive for Leishmania, subgenus Viannia. One isolate was obtained by culture (from patient 2 biopsy samples and characterized as Leishmania (Viannia naiffi through an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA with species-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs and by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE. Patients were successfully treated with N-methyl-glucamine. These two cases highlight the potential risks of laboratory and field work and the need to comply with strict biosafety procedures in daily routines. The swab collection method, coupled with PCR detection, has greatly improved ACL laboratory diagnosis.

  5. Culturally sensitive instructional practices for African-American learners with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, M E

    1992-01-01

    This article discusses the cultural and educational needs of African-American learners with disabilities. Six theoretical assumptions establish some basic suppositions about culturally and linguistically diverse learners and effective instructional practices. A review of the literature describes African-American cultural practices, interests, and cognitive styles; highlights the attitudes, perceptions, and instructional practices of effective teachers of African-American students; and includes patterns of teacher-student and peer-group interactions that promote high academic achievement among African-American learners. Recommendations include organizing teaching, learning, and performance in ways that are compatible with the social structure of African-American students with disabilities. PMID:1425853

  6. Highlighting the History of Astronomy in the Asia-Pacific Region

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, Tsuko; Strom, Richard G; ICOA-6 Conference

    2011-01-01

    This book provides readers with the results of recent research from some of the world's leading historians of astronomy on aspects of Arabic, Australian, Chinese, Japanese, and North and South American astronomy and astrophysics. It contains peer-reviewed papers gathered from the International Conferences on Oriental Astronomy 6 (ICO-6) with the chosen theme of "Highlighting the History of Astronomy in the Asia-Pacific Region." Of particular note are the sections on Arabic astronomy, Asian applied astronomy and the history of Australian radio astronomy, and the chapter on Peruvian astronomy. This title is a valuable complement for those with research interests in applied historical astronomy; archaeoastronomy; calendars, manuscripts, and star charts; historical instruments and observatories, and the history of radio astronomy.

  7. Highlights from the First Ever Demographic Study of Solar Physics, Space Physics, and Upper Atmospheric Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldwin, M.; Morrow, C. A.; White, S. C.; Ivie, R.

    2014-12-01

    Members of the Education & Workforce Working Group and the American Institute of Physics (AIP) conducted the first ever National Demographic Survey of working professionals for the 2012 National Academy of Sciences Solar and Space Physics Decadal Survey to learn about the demographics of this sub-field of space science. The instrument contained questions for participants on: the type of workplace; basic demographic information regarding gender and minority status, educational pathways (discipline of undergrad degree, field of their PhD), how their undergraduate and graduate student researchers are funded, participation in NSF and NASA funded spaceflight missions and suborbital programs, and barriers to career advancement. Using contact data bases from AGU, the American Astronomical Society's Solar Physics Division (AAS-SPD), attendees of NOAA's Space Weather Week and proposal submissions to NSF's Atmospheric, Geospace Science Division, the AIP's Statistical Research Center cross correlated and culled these data bases resulting in 2776 unique email addresses of US based working professionals. The survey received 1305 responses (51%) and generated 125 pages of single space answers to a number of open-ended questions. This talk will summarize the highlights of this first-ever demographic survey including findings extracted from the open-ended responses regarding barriers to career advancement which showed significant gender differences.

  8. American Culture Through Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Clair Michael; Pulliam, William E.

    1976-01-01

    In honor of the Bicentennial, current instructional materials concerned with American lifestyles--past and present--American music, art, education, customs and traditions, and language are reviewed. The reviews are presented in a narrative format and value judgments are made where appropriate. Address and price information are found in a list at…

  9. Asian American Cultural Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libretti, Tim

    1997-01-01

    Explores the encounter of Marxism and Asian American literary theory and imagines an Asian American Marxism. To do so requires theorizing race, class, and gender not as substantive categories of antagonisms but as complementary and coordinated elements of a totality of social relations structuring racial patriarchal capitalism. (SLD)

  10. Highlight summarization in golf videos using audio signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoung-Gook; Kim, Jin Young

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic summarization of highlights in golf videos based on audio information alone without video information. The proposed highlight summarization system is carried out based on semantic audio segmentation and detection on action units from audio signals. Studio speech, field speech, music, and applause are segmented by means of sound classification. Swing is detected by the methods of impulse onset detection. Sounds like swing and applause form a complete action unit, while studio speech and music parts are used to anchor the program structure. With the advantage of highly precise detection of applause, highlights are extracted effectively. Our experimental results obtain high classification precision on 18 golf games. It proves that the proposed system is very effective and computationally efficient to apply the technology to embedded consumer electronic devices.

  11. African-Americans and Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Plus on Google Plus African-Americans and Alzheimer's alz.org | IHaveAlz Introduction 10 Warning Signs Brain ... African-Americans are at a higher risk for Alzheimer's disease. Many Americans dismiss the warning signs of ...

  12. American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the world's largest organization dedicated to comprehensive cosmetic dentistry. Join Now Real Patient. Real Result. Dentistry by ... 9540 Contact Us © 2015 American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD) © 2015 American ...

  13. HHS Report on Social and Economic Conditions of Native Americans for 2007-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This report to Congress provides data specific to awards made from the Department of Health and Human Services to Native Americans and provides highlights of Native...

  14. American Indian Influence on the American Pharmacopeia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Virgil J.

    The first U.S. Pharmacopeia, issued in 1820, listed 296 substances of animal, mineral, or vegetable origin in its primary and secondary lists. Of these 130, nearly all of vegetable origin, represented drugs used by American Indians. The number grew at each decennial revision during the 19th century, though some drugs were listed only for a decade.…

  15. The Shortcomings of Medical Education Highlighted through Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Pranav

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this report are to highlight the shortcomings in medical education. To use a student made short film as an example of how issues that cause medical student distress can be displayed. To show that the process of film-making is a useful tool in reflection. To display that film is an effective device in raising awareness. (Contains 3…

  16. Highlights of the Conference "Celebrity Tycoon and Brand"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shang Lin'aiyi

    2007-01-01

    @@ A summit's conference with the theme "Celebrity,Tycoon and Brand" highlighted this event and impressedall the present.Figring out the way to establish,protect and develop brand was the core of this summit,which triggered hot discussions and blazed ardent communications.

  17. Highlights of 10-Year Remote Sensing Industry Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, Ron

    2002-01-01

    A background and highlights of a 10 year remote sensing industry analysis are provided.Included are the following:Training, educational analysis, staff levels, and end-users analysis, market drivers, market segments,application areas, spatial resolution needs, use of image types.

  18. Tobacco Use. Adolescent Health Highlight. Publication #2012-33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphey, David; Barry, Megan; Vaughn, Brigitte; Terzian, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoking has steadily declined among adolescents during the last fifteen years, although use of some tobacco products, like cigars, has seen recent increases. However, large numbers of teens continue to use tobacco products. This "Adolescent Health Highlight" presents key research findings; describes prevalence and trends; illustrates…

  19. Mental Health Disorders. Adolescent Health Highlight. Publication #2013-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphey, David; Barry, Megan; Vaughn, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Mental disorders are diagnosable conditions characterized by changes in thinking, mood, or behavior (or some combination of these) that can cause a person to feel stressed out and impair his or her ability to function. These disorders are common in adolescence. This "Adolescent Health Highlight" presents the warning signs of mental disorders;…

  20. Advanced Education and Technology Business Plan, 2009-12. Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Advanced Education and Technology provides strategic leadership for the development of the next generation economy in Alberta through the provision of accessible, affordable and quality learning opportunities for all Albertans and support for a dynamic and integrated innovation system. This paper provides the highlights of the business plan of the…

  1. Advanced Education and Technology Business Plan, 2010-13. Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Ministry of Advanced Education and Technology envisions Alberta's prosperity through innovation and lifelong learning. Advanced Education and Technology's mission is to lead the development of a knowledge-driven future through a dynamic and integrated advanced learning and innovation system. This paper presents the highlights of the business…

  2. Highlights of the 8th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veterinary immunologists have expanded understanding of the immune systems for our companion animals and developed new vaccines and therapeutics. This manuscript summarizes the highlights of the 8th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium (8 th IVIS) held August 15th-19th, 2007, in Ouro Preto,...

  3. Differences in cancer incidence, mortality, and survival between African Americans and whites.

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, B.; Figgs, L.W.; Zahm, S H

    1995-01-01

    This report highlights selected evidence of different cancer patterns among African Americans and whites and considers potential risk factors associated with these cancers. During the years 1987 to 1991, African Americans experienced higher incidence and mortality rates than whites for multiple myeloma and for cancers of the oropharynx, colorectum, lung and bronchus, cervix, and prostate. African Americans had lower incidence and mortality for cancer of the urinary bladder. The incidence of b...

  4. Superstar or Scholar? African American Male Youths' Perceptions of Opportunity in a Time of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conchas, Gilberto Q.; Lin, Alex R.; Oseguera, Leticia; Drake, Sean J.

    2015-01-01

    Through a Multiple Marginality Framework, this exploratory case study highlights how African American male youth in an urban high school setting perceive the opportunity structure during the historic election of the first African American President. Youth optimism generated by Obama's election gives students a sense of hope despite the persistent…

  5. Institutional Barriers to Participation in Adult Education among African Americans within Religious Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Paulette; Rowland, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Examined institutional deterrents to participation in adult education among African American Christian church members. Focus group interview data highlighted six categories of deterrents: lack of relevance, programmatic, communication, individual/personal, instructional techniques, and interpersonal. Results suggest that African American Christian…

  6. Von Steuben and the German Contribution to the American Revolution: A Selective Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krewson, Margrit B.

    This Library of Congress selected bibliography highlights the efforts of Baron Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben, other German and German-American military leaders, and the Hessian auxiliary military forces in assisting the American colonies during the Revolutionary War. The booklet is divided into five parts. Part 1 provides historical information…

  7. Picture Books and Native Americans: An Interview with Naomi Caldwell-Wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCann, Donnarae; Richard, Olga

    1993-01-01

    Discusses and reviews children's picture books that feature Native Americans through an interview with Naomi Caldwell-Wood, president of the American Indian Library Association. Highlights include ecology-centered stories; nonfiction, historically based books; illustrations; authenticity; retellings of legends and folktales; small press…

  8. College and Career Readiness for Gifted African American Girls: A Call to School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Renae D.; Hines, Erik M.

    2014-01-01

    Current literature on college and career readiness highlights the role of educators in promoting the success of all students. However, few studies have focused on the specific needs of gifted African American girls. This article discusses the school experiences and career development of gifted African American girls and it provides a culturally…

  9. New Social Learning from Two Spirit Native American/span>s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, J. B., Jr.; Sheppard, Maia

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors highlight connections between research on Two Spirit Native Americans and standard social studies curriculum. Two Spirit is a Pan-Indian term describing Native Americans who believe they embody both masculine and feminine characteristics/traits in one physical body. Findings from this research expand the field's…

  10. Homogamy and Intermarriage of Japanese and Japanese Americans with Whites Surrounding World War II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Hiromi; Berg, Justin

    2010-01-01

    Although some sociologists have suggested that Japanese Americans quickly assimilated into mainstream America, scholars of Japanese America have highlighted the heightened exclusion that the group experienced. This study tracked historical shifts in the exclusion level of Japanese and Japanese Americans in the United States surrounding World War…

  11. Trends in Themes of African American Family Research 1939-1989: A Synopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Lenwood G.

    1990-01-01

    Themes in research on African-American families between 1939 and 1989 are discussed, and the following recently developed themes are highlighted: (1) stress, (2) aging, (3) adoption, (4) prison, (5) polygamy, and (6) violence. Much more research is needed to provide better understanding of the African-American family. (SLD)

  12. Earth Science Week 2009, "Understanding Climate", Highlights and News Clippings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robeck, Edward C. [American Geological Institute; Coulson, Doug [PS International

    2010-01-05

    The American Geological Institute (AGI) proposes to expand its influential Earth Science Week Program in 2009, with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy, to disseminate DOE's key messages, information, and resources on climate education and to include new program components. These components, ranging from online resources to live events and professional networks, would significantly increase the reach and impact of AGI's already successful geoscience education and public awareness effort in the United States and abroad in 2009, when the campaign's theme will be "Understanding Climate."

  13. American Studies in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinando Fasce

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In the early 1990s, introducing the Journal of American History’s internationalization project, Maurizio Vaudagna urged his Italian colleagues and all “non-English-speaking American historians in Europe […] to abandon the melancholic but somewhat comfortable situation of being marginal in both worlds.” More than a decade later, now that studying American history has been enormously complicated by the seismic changes connected with the end of the Cold War, the tragedy of 9/11, and the attendan...

  14. CHARACTERISTICS OF AMERICAN ENGLISH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦娟; 黄舜

    2007-01-01

    The large scale colonization of America by British settlers took place in the seventeenth century.During the process,the immigrants brought English to America.They desert great influence to the development of American English.After the civil war,American got political independence,and then there arose a tendency to develop an American brand of English.Famous persons like Thomas Jeffe,Benjamin,Franklin,and Noah Webster began to consider that the country should have a language of its own.

  15. LOLITA - THE AMERICAN NIGHTMARE

    OpenAIRE

    GRISELDA (ABAZAJ) DANGLLI

    2012-01-01

    This article deals with the analysis of Lolita seen through the lenses of the American society and norms of today. We will see that many observations of the American way of behaving and social norms still hold true even nowadays years after this novel was written. Nabokov, on the other hand, never accepted the fact that this novel probed into the very depths of American life and that his intentions were purely aesthetic. Nevertheless, the phenomenon of pedophilia, obvious in the book, is a po...

  16. American Studies in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Luca

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available American Studies at the University of BucharestThe idea of teaching American Studies and founding a program in American Studies was first voiced in the long meetings of faculty and students held at the University of Bucharest soon after the collapse of the communist regime. The proposal was one of many that reflected the spirit of reform and hope for radical changes at the outset of Romania’s transition to democracy. The absence of institutional structures other than English departments and t...

  17. The effects of social skills instruction and parental involvement on the aggressive behaviors of African American males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, M B; Cartledge, G

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of social skills instruction on identified acts of aggression. Five elementary-aged African American male students attending general education classes in an urban public school setting were taught social skills using modeling, role playing, corrective feedback, and differential reinforcement of alternative or incompatible behaviors. Parent training and parent notes were used for the maintenance and transfer of newly learned social skills. A multiple baseline design across students, combined with a withdrawal feature, was employed to assess the effectiveness of the social skills instruction. Data were collected in the classroom and cafeteria to assess generalization of the training to naturalistic settings. Results indicate the social skills instructional package to be functionally related to a decrease in aggressive behaviors with four of the five students and maintained by parental involvement. PMID:7726817

  18. Prospective, naturalistic study of open-label OROS methylphenidate treatment in Chinese school-aged children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Yi; GONG Mei-en; YIN Qing-yun; MAI Jian-ning; JING Jin; LUO Xiang-yang; MA Hong-wei; LI Hai-bo; XIE Ling; LI Yan; Kuang Gui-fang; WANG Yu-feng; YI Ming-ji; WANG Feng; ZHU Xiao-hua; YAO Yah-bin; QIN Jiong; WANG Li-wen; ZOU Li-ping; JIN Xing-ming; XU Tong; WANG Yi; QI Yuan-li

    2011-01-01

    Background Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common mental disorders during childhood,characterized by the core symptoms of hyperactivity,impulsivity and inattention and puts great burden on children themselves,their families and the society.Osmotic release oral system methylphenidate (OROS-MPH) is a once-daily controlled-release formulation developed to overcome some of the limitations associated with immediate-release methylphenidate (IR-MPH).It has been marketed in China since 2005 but still lacks data from large-sample clinical trials on efficacy and safety profiles.The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of OROS-MPH in children aged 6 to 16 years with ADHD under naturalistic clinical setting.Methods This 6-week,multi-center,prospective,open-label study enrolled 1447 ADHD children to once-daily OROS-MPH (18 mg,36 mg or 54 mg) treatment.The effectiveness measures were parent-rated Inattention and Overactivity With Aggression (IOWA) Conners I/O and O/D subscales,physician-rated CGI-I and parent-rated global efficacy assessment scale.Blood pressure,pulse rate measurement,adverse events (AEs) and concomitant medications and treatment review were conducted by the investigator and were served as safety measures.Results A total of 1447 children with ADHD (mean age (9.52±2.36) years) were enrolled in this trial.Totally 96.8%children received an OROS-MPH modal dose of 18 mg,3.1% with 36 mg and 0.1% with 54 mg at the endpoint of study.The parent IOWA Conners I/O score at the end of week 2 showed statistically significant (P <0.001) improvement with OROS-MPH (mean:6.95±2.71) versus the score at baseline (10.45±2.72).The change in the parent IOWA Conners O/D subscale,CGI-I and parent-rated global efficacy assessment scale also supported the superior efficacy for OROS-MPH treatment.Fewer than half of 1447 patients (511 (35.3%)) reported AEs,and the majority of the events reported were mild (68.2

  19. Ondansetron reduces naturalistic drinking in non-treatment seeking alcohol dependent individuals with the LL 5′-HTTLPR genotype: a laboratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, George A.; Zywiak, William H.; Swift, Robert M.; McGeary, John E.; Clifford, James S.; Shoaff, Jessica R.; Vuittonet, Cynthia; Fricchione, Samuel; Brickley, Michael; Beaucage, Kayla; Haass-Koffler, Carolina L.; Leggio, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Background One hypothesis suggests that the differential response to ondansetron and serotonin specific re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may be due to a functional polymorphism of the 5′-HTTLPR promoter region in SLC6A4, the gene that codes for the serotonin transporter (5-HTT). The LL 5′-HTTLPR genotype is postulated to be specifically sensitive to the effects of ondansetron with SS/SL 5′-HTTLPR genotypes sensitive to SSRIs. This study tests this hypothesis by matching non-treatment seeking alcohol dependent (AD) individuals with LL genotype to ondansetron and SS/SL genotypes to the SSRI sertraline, and mis-matching them assessing naturalistic and bar-laboratory alcohol drinking. Methods Seventy-seven AD individuals were randomized to one of two counterbalanced arms to receive sertraline 200mg/day or ondansetron 0.5 mg/day for three weeks followed by an alcohol self-administration experiment (ASAE), then received placebo for three weeks followed by a second ASAE. Individuals then received the alternate drug for three weeks followed by a third ASAE. Drinks per drinking day (DDD with drinks in SDUs) for 7 days prior to each ASAE and milliliters consumed during each ASAE were the primary outcomes. Results Fifty-five participants completed the study. The genotype x order interaction was significant [F(1,47) = 8.42, p = .006] for DDD. Three ANCOVAs were conducted for DDD during the week before each ASAE. Ondansetron compared to sertraline resulted in a significant reduction in DDD during the week before the first [F(1,47) = 7.64, p = .008] but not the third ASAE. There was no difference in milliliters consumed during each ASAE. Conclusion This study modestly supports the hypothesis that ondansetron may reduce DDD in AD individuals with the LL genotype as measured naturalistically. By contrast there was no support that ondansetron reduces drinking during the ASAEs or that sertraline reduces alcohol use in individuals who have SS/SL genotypes. We provide limited

  20. Living on a Cotton Farm: Mexican American Life in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Mary S.

    This packet of six lesson plans highlights Mexican-American life on a Texas cotton farm in the early 20th century. Each lesson provides a lesson overview; states educational objectives; cites materials needed; details the procedure for classroom implementation; offers a closure activity; and suggests an extension activity. The packet is divided…

  1. Culturally Responsive Collegiate Mathematics Education: Implications for African American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jett, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author utilizes the culturally congruent work of Gay (2010) and Ladson-Billings (2009) to highlight culturally responsive teaching as a viable option for African American students in higher education mathematics spaces. He offers translations of Gay and Ladson-Billings' work to Africana mathematics and argues that these…

  2. 2010 Annual Report of the American Psychological Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the 2010 annual report of the American Psychological Association (APA). It provides the highlights of the association's and individual directorate's activities to APA members. APA continued its efforts to advance psychological practice and ensure the public's access to high-quality psychological services, apply psychological…

  3. Creativity of Chinese and American Cultures: A Synthetic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Weihua; Kaufman, James C.

    2013-01-01

    The article integrates the seven papers of the two special issues with a special focus on discussing the differences in people's beliefs about creativity between the Chinese and American cultures: How it is conceived, evaluated, and nurtured. It uses three metaphors to capture major differences in these aspects, and highlights areas with profound…

  4. OSART mission highlights related to on-the-job training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the highlights, related to the topic of on-the-job training (OJT), for Agency OSART missions conducted since 1990 (a total of 27 missions). Recommendations and suggestions for improvements related to on-the-job training and qualification programmes are discussed, as well as Good Practices and Good Performances. For Good Practices and Good Performances, the plant is identified to aid in follow-up by meeting participants. For recommendations and suggestions, the number of plants that had recommendations/findings in this area are identified by a number in parentheses after the item. The paper takes a broad approach toward highlights that are related to OJT. For example, there have been a number of OSART recommendations and suggestions concerning responsibilities, authorities and interfaces for NPP activities. These recommendations and suggestions relate not only to responsibilities and interfaces for on-the-job training and qualification programmes, but also to other areas as well

  5. Hunting Activity Among Naturalistically Housed Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) at the Fundació Mona (Girona, Spain). Predation, Occasional Consumption and Strategies in Rehabilitated Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Olga Feliu; Marina Mosquera; Mei Ventura; David Riba; Miquel Llorente

    2012-01-01

    Simple Summary: Hunting is well documented in wild chimpanzees, but has rarely been documented in captive chimpanzees. At Fundació Mona Primate Rescue we have obtained evidence of five episodes of hunting in rehabilitated chimpanzees who had no previous experience of these types of behaviors. This demonstrated that they were able to perform this species-typical behavior in a naturalistic environment without learning it in the wild. Abstract: Predatory behavior in wild chimpanzees and other pr...

  6. American Society of Neuroradiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to announce Mary Beth Hepp, MBA, as the society’s next executive director, replacing James B. Gantenberg, FACHE ... Contact Search form Search 2005-2015 Copyright American Society of Neuroradiology OM Base Theme 2016 | V7.x- ...

  7. American Society of Hematology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main Navigation Account Navigation Main Content American Society of Hematology ASH Store ASH Job Center ASH Apps Share Your Idea Donate My Account Search Show Main Menu + About Awards Membership ASH ...

  8. American Music Therapy Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login Quick Links Facts About Music Therapy Qualifications ... with AMTA Sponsor AMTA Events Social Networking Support Music Therapy When you shop at AmazonSmile, Amazon will ...

  9. American Therapeutic Recreation Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Remember Me I forgot my password American Therapeutic Recreation Association Promoting Health & Wellness Services Annual Conference 2016 ... and leave your opinion Join thousands of Therapeutic Recreation specialists today Join Now Renew your membership today ...

  10. American Samoa Longline Logbook

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data system contains the logbook data of vessels unloading in American Samoa. In 1992, the logbooks of three longline trips conducting an experiment to test...

  11. American Sleep Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Public Health Professionals Join ASA Press Room American Sleep Association Share What is Sleep ? Insight into the ... Forums Contact Us Login Join ASA – for FREE Sleep Blog ASA Charitable Work – Sleeping Children Around the ...

  12. American Telemedicine Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ATA On Twitter Tweets by @AmericanTelemed ATA On Facebook Physicians and Clinicians Increase your reach as a ... the global deployment of telemedicine. ATA provides proven marketing opportunities, connecting buyers and sellers. Upcoming Trade Shows ...

  13. Native American Tribal Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Eric L.

    1999-01-01

    Lists Web sites maintained by 38 different Native American nations that deal with topics ranging from tribal history, news, arts and crafts, tourism, entertainment, and commerce. Represented nations include Apache, Blackfeet, Creek, Iroquois, Mohegan, and Sioux. (CMK)

  14. Native Americans and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Her children's father is an African-American. This means her children have inherited genes from the three ... name and that's what makes me think a little bit more about people and their feet, especially ...

  15. American Tinnitus Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Tinnitus Association Donate Become A Member Member Login Find A Provider Search form Search Menu Close Understanding The Facts Managing Your Tinnitus Research Toward A Cure About Us Initiatives News & ...

  16. Contemporary American Physics Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Alan J.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the works by six contemporary American novelists that illustrate the current state of "physics fiction." The discussed examples of physics fiction ranged from the fluent and frequent inclusion of the casual, to the elaborate systems of physics metaphors. (GA)

  17. American Samoa Cannery Offloading

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — From 1995 through 2010, the two canneries in American Samoa provided Cannery Offloading Reports to the Department of Marine and Wildlife Resources (DMWR) office. In...

  18. American Heart Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American Heart area Search by State SELECT YOUR LANGUAGE Español (Spanish) 简体中文 (Traditional Chinese) 繁体中文 (Simplified Chinese) Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese) Healthy Living Conditions Caregiver ...

  19. Native Americans and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Do you want another pickle? Child: I got a big pickle! Announcer: The 48-year-old from ... Announcer: She had an American Indian mother and a Hispanic father. Her children's father is an African- ...

  20. American College of Rheumatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lists Supporters About Us Leadership Careers at ACR Social Media Newsroom Annual Reports & Financial Statements Policies & Guidelines Connect Join Donate © 2016 American College of Rheumatology. All rights reserved. Website Policies Sitemap ...

  1. An annual topic highlight: Alcohol and liver, 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natalia A Osna

    2011-01-01

    An annual topic highlight: Alcohol and Liver, 2011, covers the important and new aspects of pathogenesis of alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). It includes broad topics ranging from the exacerbation of ALD by infectious (viral) agents (hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus) to the influence of alcohol on liver fibrogenesis, lipid rafts, autophagy and other aspects. This issue is recommended for both basic scientists and clinicians who are involved in alcoholic liver research.

  2. Highlights on eclipsing binary variables from Araucaria Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karczmarek Paulina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Araucaria Project, which main goal is to provide precise determination of the cosmic distance scale, has recently made a set of discoveries involving variable stars in binary systems. Among these discoveries we highlight three: 1% precise measurement of a Cepheid's dynamical mass and its projection factor, accurate determination of both stellar and orbital parameters of eclipsing binary consisting of two Cepheid variables, and discovery of new class of variable stars, mimicking RR Lyrae pulsators.

  3. Ten Highlights of the Fifth Beijing International Music Festival

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Beijing International Music Festival has been successfully held for four times and gained considerable reputation at home and abroad. On October 11, this annual art event was launched again in Beijing, but with notable changes. It is no longer a gathering of master artists playing classic works. Instead, in light of international practice, the festival begins to highlight new productions and trends and put more emphasis on diversification and localization

  4. Hot subluminous Stars: Highlights from the MUCHFUSS and Kepler missions

    CERN Document Server

    Heber, Ulrich; Gaensicke, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Research into hot subdwarf stars is progressing rapidly. We present recent important discoveries. First we review the knowledge about magnetic fields in hot subdwarfs and highlight the first detection of a highly-magnetic, helium-rich sdO star. We briefly summarize recent discoveries based on Kepler light curves and finally introduce the closest known sdB+WD binary discovered by the MUCHFUSS project and discuss its relevance as progenitor of a double-detonation type Ia supernova.

  5. Highlights from the 7th European Meeting on Molecular Diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    Loonen, A. J. M.; Schuurman, R.; Brule, A J C van den

    2012-01-01

    This report presents the highlights of the 7th European Meeting on Molecular Diagnostics held in Scheveningen, The Hague, The Netherlands, 12-14 October 2011. The areas covered included molecular diagnostics applications in medical microbiology, virology, pathology, hemato-oncology,clinical genetics and forensics. Novel real-time amplification approaches, novel diagnostic applications and new technologies, such as next-generation sequencing, PCR lectrospray-ionization TOF mass spectrometry an...

  6. Nuclear fuel waste management - biosphere program highlights - 1978 to 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biosphere program in support of the development of the disposal concept for Canadian nuclear fuel waste since 1978 is scheduled for close-out. AECL's Environmental Science Branch (ESB) was mainly responsible for work in this program. In order to preserve as much information as possible, this report highlights many of the key achievements of the program, particularly those related to the development of the BIOTRAC biosphere model and its supporting research. This model was used for the assessment and review of the disposal concept in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report also treats highlights related to alternative models, external scientific/technical reviews, EIS feedback, and the international BIOMOVS model validation program. Furthermore, it highlights basic aspects of future modelling and research needs in relation to siting a disposal facility. In this, feedback from the various reviews and the EIS is taken into account. Appendices of the report include listings of key ESB staff involved in the program, all the scientific/technical reports and papers produced under the program, contracts let to outside agencies, and issues raised by various participants or intervenors during the EIS review. Although the report is concerned with close-out of the biosphere program, it also provides valuable information for a continuing program concerned with siting a disposal facility. One of the conclusions of the report is that such a program is essential for successfully siting such a facility. (author)

  7. American Studies in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éva Federmayer

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The beginning of American Studies as an academic discipline at Hungarian colleges and universities is basically coterminous with the watershed years of 1989-1990 when the country made a radical shift from state socialism toward parliamentary democracy and a free economy. This political and economic about-face, which came hand in hand with the undermining of foundationalist certainties and the generation of new anxieties coincided, more or less, with the radical transformation that American St...

  8. American Pet Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    海焰

    2007-01-01

    In America you can find dogs,cats, horses,monkeys, snakes and even pigs in almost every family.They are their pets.Americans love pets and look on them as a part of the family.Sometimes pet owners dress their pets in fashionable clothes.They even buy toys for their pets.Americans love their pets as their children, sometimes even better.

  9. American Studies in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Jopi Nyman

    2005-01-01

    Since its establishment in 1996, the Finnish American Studies Association has sought to promote the field of American Studies in Finland by organizing conferences, events and by increasing networking amongst its scattered membership (ca. 35) working at various universities and other higher education institutions. The current President of the Association is Dr Jopi Nyman (University of Joensuu) and its Secretary is Dr Ari Helo (University of Helsinki). While currently only the University of He...

  10. The effects of HIV disease and older age on laboratory-based, naturalistic, and self-perceived symptoms of prospective memory: does retrieval cue type and delay interval matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, G; Loft, S; Sheppard, D P; Woods, S P

    2016-11-01

    There is a rising prevalence of older HIV+ adults who are at risk of deficits in higher order neurocognitive functions and associated problems in everyday functioning. The current study applied multiprocess theory to examine the effects of HIV and aging on measures of laboratory-based, naturalistic, and self-perceived symptoms of prospective memory (PM). Participants included 125 Younger (48 with HIV, age = 32 ± 4.6 years) and 189 Older (112 with HIV, age = 56 ± 4.9 years) adults. Controlling for global neurocognitive functioning, mood, and other demographics, older age and HIV had independent effects on long-delay time-based PM in the laboratory, whereas on a naturalistic PM task older HIV- adults performed better than older HIV+ adults and younger persons. In line with the naturalistic findings, older age, but not HIV, was associated with a relative sparing of self-perceived PM failures in daily life across longer delay self-cued intervals. Findings suggest that, even in relatively younger aging cohorts, the effects of HIV and older age on PM can vary across PM delay intervals by the strategic demands of the retrieval cue type, are expressed differently in the laboratory and in daily life, and are independent of other higher order neurocognitive functions (e.g., retrospective memory). PMID:27002287

  11. Contemporary American Chinese Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu Huafei

    2008-01-01

    The rise of modern American scholarship on China was largely attributed to the establishment of the American Joint Committee on Contemporary China (JCCC) in 1959 which sponsored all kinds of activities to promote Chinese studies, ranging from institutional support and financial resources to training courses. Since then, American study of China has entered into a period of sustainability that features academic and group-oriented research. It has become a mainstream discipline in American social science studies.1 There are some distinctive differences between early sinology and modern Chinese Studies: the latter is much more concentrated on the study of issues, comparative historical studies, and contemporary Chinese society. American Chinese studies stresses empirical research, textual data, and the application of theory to practice.Shanghai. He was a Fulbright visiting professor at State University of New York at Geneseo from 2006-2007. This treatise is one of a series of studies for China's National Research Foundation of Philosophy and Social Science (05BGJ012), "American Chinese Studies."

  12. Visualization of cortical, subcortical and deep brain neural circuit dynamics during naturalistic mammalian behavior with head-mounted microscopes and chronically implanted lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resendez, Shanna L; Jennings, Josh H; Ung, Randall L; Namboodiri, Vijay Mohan K; Zhou, Zhe Charles; Otis, James M; Nomura, Hiroshi; McHenry, Jenna A; Kosyk, Oksana; Stuber, Garret D

    2016-03-01

    Genetically encoded calcium indicators for visualizing dynamic cellular activity have greatly expanded our understanding of the brain. However, owing to the light-scattering properties of the brain, as well as the size and rigidity of traditional imaging technology, in vivo calcium imaging has been limited to superficial brain structures during head-fixed behavioral tasks. These limitations can now be circumvented by using miniature, integrated microscopes in conjunction with an implantable microendoscopic lens to guide light into and out of the brain, thus permitting optical access to deep brain (or superficial) neural ensembles during naturalistic behaviors. Here we describe steps to conduct such imaging studies using mice. However, we anticipate that the protocol can be easily adapted for use in other small vertebrates. Successful completion of this protocol will permit cellular imaging of neuronal activity and the generation of data sets with sufficient statistical power to correlate neural activity with stimulus presentation, physiological state and other aspects of complex behavioral tasks. This protocol takes 6-11 weeks to complete. PMID:26914316

  13. Naturalistic Factors inJude the Obscure%《无名的裘德》的自然主义解读

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘珠凤

    2015-01-01

    Naturalism Literature began in France in late 19th Century, which was introduced into England in 1990s, but it wasn’t widely accepted. While Thomas Hardy published his novelJude the Obscure in 1895, it also suffered abuse from the public. It’s not difficult to find naturalistic factors inJude the Obscure by reading the novel closely. The essay proposes that naturalism reality is one of the main reasons for the suffering as well as the immortality.%自然主义文学于十九世纪后半叶兴起于法国,九十年代传入英国,但在英国并未形成气候。哈代1895年出版的《无名的裘德》与自然主义在英国的命运相似。细读小说文本,不难发现哈代的《无名的裘德》具有丰厚的自然主义因素。自然主义的“真实”是小说当时遭非议的原因之一,但也将使小说代代流传成为“不朽”。

  14. From precocious fame to mature obscurity: David Walker (1837-1917) MD, LRCSI, surgeon and naturalist to the Fox Arctic Expedition of 1857-59.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froggatt, Peter; Walker, Brian M

    2012-11-01

    The Belfast-born David Walker was the 19-year-old surgeon and naturalist on the epic Fox Arctic Expedition (1857-59) that established the fate of Sir John Franklin's unsuccessful (1845) search for the North-West Passage. On return the crew were fêted as heroes and decorated, and shared in a £5000 government bounty: Walker was also received by the Queen and (in Ireland) by the Lord Lieutenant, was honoured by the principal British and Irish natural history societies and his portrait was exhibited in the National Portrait Gallery, London. This paper describes his adventurous life, including the Fox Expedition, which from 1862 was spent abroad and included time in the Cariboo gold fields, service in the United States Army, practice in a notorious Californian frontier town and, in later life, the comparative quiet of general and occupational medical practice in Portland, Oregon. Once a household name, his death went unrecorded in the British and Irish medical and lay press. PMID:23143316

  15. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program: Progress and Highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program was begun in 1997 to support the enabling materials needs of the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT). The technical agenda for the program grew out of the technology roadmap for the OHVT and includes efforts in materials for: fuel systems, exhaust aftertreatment, valve train, air handling, structural components, electrochemical propulsion, natural gas storage, and thermal management. A five-year program plan was written in early 2000, following a stakeholders workshop. The technical issues and planned and ongoing projects are discussed. Brief summaries of several technical highlights are given

  16. Recent Tsunami Highlights Need for Awareness of Tsunami Duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Annabel; Dengler, Lori A.; Uslu, Burak; Barberopoulou, Aggeliki; Yim, Solomon C.; Bergen, Kristian J.

    2006-12-01

    On Wednesday, 15 November 2006, Crescent City Harbor, in Del Norte County, Calif., was hit by surges resulting from the tsunami generated by the Mw=8.3 Kuril Islands earthquake. The strong currents caused an estimated US $700,000 to $1 million in losses to the small boat basin at Citizen's Dock, destroying or damaging three floating docks and causing minor damage to several boats (Figure 1). The event highlighted a persistent problem for tsunami hazard mitigation: Most people are still unaware that the first tsunami waves rarely are the largest and that the potential for damaging waves may last for many hours.

  17. Realizing a Clean Energy Future: Highlights of NREL Analysis (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-12-01

    Profound energy system transformation is underway. In Hawaiian mythology, Maui set out to lasso the sun in order to capture its energy. He succeeded. That may have been the most dramatic leap forward in clean energy systems that the world has known. Until now. Today, another profound transformation is underway. A combination of forces is taking us from a carbon-centric, inefficient energy system to one that draws from diverse energy sources - including the sun. NREL analysis is helping guide energy systems policy and investment decisions through this transformation. This brochure highlights NREL analysis accomplishments in the context of four thematic storylines.

  18. Hot subluminous stars: Highlights from the MUCHFUSS and Kepler missions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geier S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Research into hot subdwarf stars is progressing rapidly. We present recent important discoveries. First we review the knowledge about magnetic fields in hot subdwarfs and highlight the first detection of a highly-magnetic, helium-rich sdO star. We briefly summarize recent discoveries based on Kepler light curves and finally introduce the closest known sdB+WD binary discovered by the MUCHFUSS project and discuss its relevance as a progenitor of a double-detonation type Ia supernova.

  19. Highlights from PHENIX-I: initial state and early times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitch, Michael J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We will review the latest physics developments from PHENIX concentrating on cold nuclear matter effects, the initial state for heavy-ion collisions, and probes of the earliest stages of the hot-dense medium created in those collisions. Recent physics results from p + p and d + Au collisions; and from direct photons, quarkonia and low-mass vector mesons in A+A collisions will be highlighted. Insights from these measurements into the characteristics of the initial state and about the earliest times in heavy-ion collisions will be discussed.

  20. Status, performance and scientific highlights from the MAGIC telescope system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doert, Marlene [Technische Universitaet Dortmund (Germany); Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany); Collaboration: MAGIC-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The MAGIC telescopes are a system of two 17 m Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes, which are located at 2200 m above sea level at the Roque de Los Muchachos Observatory on the Canary Island of La Palma. In this presentation, we report on recent scientific highlights gained from MAGIC observations in the galactic and the extragalactic regime. We also present the current status and performance of the MAGIC system after major hardware upgrades in the years 2011 to 2014 and give an overview of future plans.

  1. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program: Progress and Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Ray Johnson; Sidney Diamond

    2000-06-19

    The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program was begun in 1997 to support the enabling materials needs of the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT). The technical agenda for the program grew out of the technology roadmap for the OHVT and includes efforts in materials for: fuel systems, exhaust aftertreatment, valve train, air handling, structural components, electrochemical propulsion, natural gas storage, and thermal management. A five-year program plan was written in early 2000, following a stakeholders workshop. The technical issues and planned and ongoing projects are discussed. Brief summaries of several technical highlights are given.

  2. Status, performance and scientific highlights from the MAGIC telescope system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MAGIC telescopes are a system of two 17 m Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes, which are located at 2200 m above sea level at the Roque de Los Muchachos Observatory on the Canary Island of La Palma. In this presentation, we report on recent scientific highlights gained from MAGIC observations in the galactic and the extragalactic regime. We also present the current status and performance of the MAGIC system after major hardware upgrades in the years 2011 to 2014 and give an overview of future plans.

  3. Spring Research Festival Highlighted on WHAG-TV | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    WHAG-TV (Hagerstown, Md.) visited Fort Detrick to highlight the 2015 Spring Research Festival (SRF), sponsored by the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR). Visit the WHAG-TV website to see the video broadcast, which aired May 6. The video was produced by WHAG Reporter Mallory Sofastaii. The video featured Linganore High School senior Rebecca Matthews, a Werner H. Kirsten student intern in the Human Retrovirus Pathogenesis Section, Vaccine Branch, NCI Center for Cancer Research; Lanessa Hill, public affairs specialist, 

  4. Zika Virus in an American Recreational Traveler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Dyan J; Acosta, Rebecca Wolfe; Acosta, Alberto M

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 48-year-old American traveler who presented to our clinic with diffuse rash, malaise, fatigue, fever, arthralgia, low back pain, and bilateral exudative conjunctivitis. The patient had an extensive vaccination and travel history: most notable for prior receipt of yellow fever vaccine; extensive travel or residence in areas endemic for dengue, chikungunya, and West Nile virus; and recent travel to French Polynesia. Clinical and laboratory findings were consistent with Zika virus (ZIKV) infection. Our report highlights the need to include ZIKV in the differential diagnosis, especially in febrile patients with a rash returning from endemic areas. PMID:25996909

  5. Noninvasive brain stimulation by radioelectric asymmetric conveyor in the treatment of agoraphobia: open-label, naturalistic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannu P

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Piero Mannu, Salvatore Rinaldi, Vania Fontani, Alessandro Castagna, Matteo Lotti MargottiDepartment of Neuro Psycho Physio Pathology, Rinaldi Fontani Institute, Florence, ItalyBackground: Agoraphobia is considered to be the most serious complication of panic disorder. It involves progressive development of debilitating anxiety symptoms related to being in situations where one would be extremely embarrassed and could not be rescued in the case of a panic attack. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of noninvasive brain stimulation using a radioelectric asymmetric conveyor (REAC for agoraphobia.Patients and methods: Twenty-three patients (3 males and 20 females suffering from agoraphobia and without a history of panic disorder were evaluated by a psychiatrist using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision, and the Agoraphobia Scale (AS. The patients were subjected to two 18-session cycles of noninvasive brain stimulation with the REAC, according to an established therapeutic protocol called neuro-psycho-physical optimization.Results: Analyzing the anxiety and avoidance parameters of the AS after the first and second cycles of REAC treatment revealed variation in levels of response to treatment, including weak (AS item 7, moderate (AS items 10 and 13, and good responses (AS items 1–6, 8, 9, 11, 12, and 14–20.Conclusion: These results highlight the potential of the REAC to treat complex clinical situations such as agoraphobia, which is typically resistant to pharmacologic treatments. Furthermore, these data show the advantages of REAC treatment, even compared with modern cognitive behavioral therapy, including a relatively rapid and “stable” clinical response (just over 6 months and economic cost.Keywords: anxiety, avoidance, fear, REAC

  6. CO2 Emissions From Fuel Combustion. Highlights. 2013 Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-01

    In the lead-up to the UN climate negotiations in Warsaw, the latest information on the level and growth of CO2 emissions, their source and geographic distribution will be essential to lay the foundation for a global agreement. To provide input to and support for the UN process, the IEA is making available for free download the ''Highlights'' version of CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion now for sale on IEA Bookshop. This annual publication contains, for more than 140 countries and regions: estimates of CO2 emissions from 1971 to 2011; selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh; a decomposition of CO2 emissions into driving factors; and CO2emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, key sources, and other relevant information. The nineteenth session of the Conference of the Parties to the Climate Change Convention (COP-19), in conjunction with the ninth meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (CMP 9), met in Warsaw, Poland from 11 to 22 November 2013. This volume of ''Highlights'', drawn from the full-scale study, was specially designed for delegations and observers of the meeting in Warsaw.

  7. STS-108 Mission Highlights Resource Tape. Part 2 of 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This video is a continuation of 'STS-108 Mission Highlights Resource Tape: Part 1 of 3' (Internal ID 2002049331). Flight day four footage continues with a video tour of the International Space Station (ISS). During flight day five, an exterior view of the Multipurpose Logistics Module (MPLM) is seen, followed by the crew unloading the supplies and equipment from the MPLM. Commander Dominic Gorie and Mission Specialist Linda Godwin are seen making preparations for the Extravehicular Activity (EVA) scheduled for the following day. Footage of an exterior view of the ISS is also shown. Flight day six footage includes Godwin and Mission Specialist Daniel Tani suiting up for their EVA and the installation of thermal blankets around the solar array wings of the ISS. Expedition 3 Commander Frank Culbertson is seen working in the ISS laboratory during flight day seven. Views are shown of Saudi Arabia and the Red Sea, the western coast of Australia, Cuba and Florida, and Switzerland and Northern Italy. During flight day eight, the crew is seen stowing objects in the MPLM for return to earth. The video concludes with footage of the treadmill used by the astronauts for physical exercise. Flight days nine through twelve are included in 'STS-108 Mission Highlights Resource Tape: Part 3 of 3' (Internal ID 2002049329).

  8. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FY2003 Annual Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Editors: Carol A. Phillips; Anthony R. DeMeo

    2004-08-23

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FY2003 Annual Highlights report provides a summary of the activities at the Laboratory for the fiscal year--1 October 2002 through 30 September 2003. The report includes the Laboratory's Mission and Vision Statements, a message ''From the Director,'' summaries of the research and engineering activities by project, and sections on Technology Transfer, the Graduate and Science Education Programs, Awards and Honors garnered by the Laboratory and the employees, and the Year in Pictures. There is also a listing of the Laboratory's publications for the year and a section of the abbreviations, acronyms, and symbols used throughout the report. In the PDF document, links have been created from the Table of Contents to each section. You can also return to the Table of Contents from the beginning page of each section. The PPPL Highlights for fiscal year 2003 is also available in hardcopy format. To obtain a copy e-mail Publications and Reports at: pub-reports@pppl.gov. Be sure to include your complete mailing address

  9. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for FY2003. Annual Highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FY2003 Annual Highlights report provides a summary of the activities at the Laboratory for the fiscal year--1 October 2002 through 30 September 2003. The report includes the Laboratory's Mission and Vision Statements, a message ''From the Director,'' summaries of the research and engineering activities by project, and sections on Technology Transfer, the Graduate and Science Education Programs, Awards and Honors garnered by the Laboratory and the employees, and the Year in Pictures. There is also a listing of the Laboratory's publications for the year and a section of the abbreviations, acronyms, and symbols used throughout the report. In the PDF document, links have been created from the Table of Contents to each section. You can also return to the Table of Contents from the beginning page of each section. The PPPL Highlights for fiscal year 2003 is also available in hardcopy format. To obtain a copy e-mail Publications and Reports at: pub-reports at pppl.gov. Be sure to include your complete mailing address

  10. SOFIA: first science highlights and future science potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinnecker, H.

    2013-06-01

    SOFIA, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, is a joint project between NASA and the German Aerospace Agency (DLR) to develop and operate a 2.5 m airborne telescope in a highly modified Boeing 747SP aircraft that can fly as high as 45 000 feet (13.7 km). This is above 99.8 % of the precipitable water vapor which blocks much of the mid- and far-infrared radiation from reaching ground-based telescopes. In this review, we briefly discuss the characteristics of the Observatory and present a number of early science highlights obtained with the FORCAST camera in 5-40 micron spectral region and with the GREAT heterodyne spectrometer in the 130-240 micron spectral region. The FORCAST images in Orion show the discovery of a new high-mass protostar (IRc4), while GREAT observations at 1 km s-1 velocity resolution detected velocity-resolved, redshifted ammonia spectra at 1.81 THz in absorption against several strong far-infrared dust continuum sources, clear evidence of substantial protostellar infall onto massive (non-ionizing) protostars. These powerful new data allow us to determine how massive stars form in our Galaxy. Another highlight is the stunning image taken by FORCAST that reveals the transient circumnuclear 1.5 pc radius (dust) ring around our Galactic center, heated by hundreds of massive stars in the young nuclear star cluster. The GREAT heterodyne spectrometer also observed the circumnuclear ring in highly excited CO rotational lines, indicative of emission from warm dense molecular gas with broad velocity structure, perhaps due to local shock heating. GREAT also made superb mapping observations of the [C II] fine structure cooling line at 158 microns, for example in M17-SW molecular cloud-star cluster interface, observations which disprove the simple canonical photodissociation models. The much better baseline stability of the GREAT receivers (compared to Herschel HIFI) allows efficient on-the-fly mapping of extended [C II] emission in our

  11. Pan American physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early in January, a unique meeting of Latin American physicists took place at Cocoyoc in Mexico. Apart from a strong summer school programme, the last time so many Latin American institutions got together was more than ten years ago. The meeting had about 50 attendees with strong representations from the US, Brazil and Mexico. The meeting was designed with two objectives — to review the substance, current status and future expectations of high energy particle physics, and to survey the state of physics research and education in Latin America and explore the possibilities of increased collaboration with the US, consistent with the idea of a host US Laboratory

  12. Division of Stress and Wildlife Ecology FY-1985 highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major objective of the Division is to examine the influences of natural and man-made stressors on plant and animal populations and communities, primarily in southeastern ecosystems. Special attention is given to understanding the ecology and life history of wildlife populations, particularly those native to the SRP. The research programs are ultimately designed to assess the responses of populations and communities to various perturbations, but emphasis is placed on basic ecological studies that establish the solid foundation of information necessary to conduct applied research. Specific studies have looked at the availability and utilization of habitat types by various species. Biomass and reproduction studies on different vertebrate species have yielded comparative information on variation between populations in different geographic regions. Research on the endangered species that occur on the SRP has provided background data necessary to allow SREL scientists to recommend control and mitigation measures for the American alligator and wood stork. Investigations of waterfowl utilization patterns in reactor-affected and unaffected aquatic habitats on the SRP have yielded valuable information on the effects of reactor operations on these game species. Electrophoretic and morphological measurements have been made on a number of the local vertebrate species in addressing problems in genetics and population dynamics. Special emphasis has been placed on the actual or potential effects of reactor operations on fish, including larval fish in riverine swamp systems, and on several game and non-game species of reptiles and mammals

  13. CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion 2011: Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    How much CO2 are countries emitting? Where is it coming from? In the lead-up to the UN climate negotiations in Durban, the latest information on the level and growth of CO2 emissions, their source and geographic distribution will be essential to lay the foundation for a global agreement. To provide input to and support for the UN process the IEA is making available for free download the 'Highlights' version of CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion. This annual publication contains: - estimates of CO2 emissions by country from 1971 to 2009; - selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh; - CO2 emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information. These estimates have been calculated using the IEA energy databases and the default methods and emission factors from the Revised 1996 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories.

  14. FY 1995 research highlights: PNL accomplishments in OER programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducts fundamental and applied research in support of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) core missions in science and technology, environmental quality, energy resources, and national security. Much of this research is funded by the program offices of DOE`s Office of Energy Research (DOE-ER), primarily the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) and the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), and by PNL`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. This document is a collection of research highlights that describe PNL`s accomplishments in DOE-ER funded programs during Fiscal Year 1995. Included are accomplishments in research funded by OHER`s Analytical Technologies, Environmental Research, Health Effects, General Life Sciences, and Carbon Dioxide Research programs; BES`s Materials Science, Chemical Sciences, Engineering and Geoscience, and Applied Mathematical Sciences programs; and PNL`s LDRD Program. Summaries are given for 70 projects.

  15. Women in evolution - highlighting the changing face of evolutionary biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellenreuther, Maren; Otto, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The face of science has changed. Women now feature alongside men at the forefront of many fields, and this is particularly true in evolutionary biology. This special issue celebrates the outstanding achievements and contributions of women in evolutionary biology, by highlighting a sample of their research and accomplishments. In addition to original research contributions, this collection of articles contains personal reflections to provide perspective and advice on succeeding as a woman in science. By showcasing the diversity and research excellence of women and drawing on their experiences, we wish to enhance the visibility of female scientists and provide inspiration as well as role models. These are exciting times for evolutionary biology, and the field is richer and stronger for the diversity of voices contributing to the field. PMID:27087836

  16. Wildlife studies on the Hanford Site: 1993 Highlights report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, L.L. [ed.

    1994-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project was initiated by DOE to track the status of wildlife populations to determine whether Hanford operations affected them. The project continues to conduct a census of wildlife populations that are highly visible, economically or aesthetically important, and rare or otherwise considered sensitive. Examples of long-term data collected and maintained through the Wildlife Resources Monitoring Project include annual goose nesting surveys conducted on islands in the Hanford Reach, wintering bald eagle surveys, and fall Chinook salmon redd (nest) surveys. The report highlights activities related to salmon and mollusks on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River; describes efforts to map vegetation on the Site and efforts to survey species of concern; provides descriptions of shrub-steppe bird surveys, including bald eagles, Canada geese, and hawks; outlines efforts to monitor mule deer and elk populations on the Site; and describes development of a biological database management system.

  17. CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion - 2012 Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    How much CO2 are countries emitting? Where is it coming from? In the lead-up to the UN climate negotiations in Doha, the latest information on the level and growth of CO2 emissions, their source and geographic distribution will be essential to lay the foundation for a global agreement. To provide input to and support for the UN process the IEA is making available for free download the 'Highlights' version of CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion. This annual publication contains: estimates of CO2 emissions by country from 1971 to 2010; selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh; and CO2 emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information.

  18. Some highlights of research and development at AECL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development programs of AECL have as their goal the strengthening of the knowledge and ability necessary to achieve national objectives in the field of nuclear energy. These objectives include a nuclear reactor system appropriate to Canada's industrial capabilities, now realized, and the extension of that system, through scientific and technological development, to serve the nation's needs for the forseeable future. The Company's programs are carefully integrated and focused to use the available funding to maximum advantage. The research facilities on which the program depends are among the best in the world, and support a full spectrum of research from fundamental nuclear physics to full-scale power reactor component irradiation and testing. In this report it has only been possible to high-light some important facets of the programs in each of the principal areas currently employing our energies. (auth)

  19. LHC highlights from ATLAS - FRAPWS2016 conference - Claudio Luci

    CERN Document Server

    Luci, Claudio; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    I am going to give a talk about highlight from ATLAS. The conference is FRAP2016, it is a conference of astrophysics. My talk is the third one oon the first day, after a general talk and one about dark matter search at colliders (given by someone does not working in atlas or cms). There is not a talk given by a colleague from cms, so mine is the only one about lhc. I have prepared my slides thinking about a "general" public and not for a specialized audience like the one we use to give talks. I have 30 minutes, maybe I have too many slides but I can easily keep the ones about dark matter if I am going to run late.

  20. Mobile learning and high-lighting language education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Jane

    Mobile learning and high-profiling language education. The number of students learning a second or foreign language and participating in instruction in languages other than English has been in decline for some time. There seems to be such a general tendency across nations albeit for a variety...... of reasons idiosyncratic to the particular national conditions. This paper gives an account of a diversified national project designed to infuse foreign language learning classes in upper secondary schools in Denmark with renewed enthusiasm through systematically experimenting with the new media by taking...... advantage of the social side in their application. The aim has been to make language classes attractive and relevant and to highlight the attractiveness and fun in learning through web 2.0 and mobile units. The overall project was supported by the Danish ministry of education as well as the individual...

  1. Big data for ecologists: Highlighting the ORNL DAAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, Alison G [ORNL; Cook, Robert B [ORNL; Devarakonda, Ranjeet [ORNL; Eby, Pete I [ORNL; Thornton, Michele M [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; SanthanaVannan, Suresh K [ORNL; Virdi, Makhan L [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Ecologists are increasingly confronted by questions that can be addressed only by integrating data from numerous sources, often across large geographic areas and broad time periods. The supply of ecological big data is increasing at a rapid pace as researchers are publishing their data sets and large, public science and data infrastructures (such as NEON, DataONE, LTER, & NCEAS) are producing and curating extensive volumes of complex data and metadata. While supply of, and demand for, ecological data is on the rise, many ecologists now face a new challenge in locating and synthesizing the data relevant for their particular question. Here we highlight selected popular big data products applicable to ecological research available from the NASA Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  2. Berardinelli-Seip syndrome: highlight of treatment challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraria, Nélia; Pedrosa, Cristina; Amaral, Daniela; Lopes, Lurdes

    2013-01-01

    Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy (BSCL) syndrome is a rare autosomal-recessive disease characterised by lipoatrophy and associated with deregulations of glycidic and lipid metabolism. We report three BSCL cases with its typical clinical picture and complications. Clinically, they all show marked atrophy of adipose tissue, acromegaly, acanthosis nigricans and tall stature. Two cases present attention deficit hyperactivity and developmental learning disorders; another patient has hypertrophic myocardiopathy and polycystic ovary syndrome. In all the cases AGPAT2 was the identified mutation. All the cases present hypertriglyceridemia. One case has developed hyperinsulinism controlled with metformin and another case already has type 2 diabetes with a difficult clinical control. There is no curative treatment and the current treatment options are based only on symptomatic control of the complications. Recently, published studies showed that leptin-replacement therapy appears a promising tool in the metabolic correction of BSCL complications, highlighting the importance of further investigations in BSCL treatment. PMID:23362058

  3. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Resistance Phenotypes and Phenotypic Highlighting Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    BĂLĂŞOIU, MARIA; BĂLĂŞOIU, A.T.; MĂNESCU, RODICA; AVRAMESCU, CARMEN; IONETE, OANA

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa genus bacteria are well known for their increased drug resistance (phenotypic ang genotypic resistance). The most important resistance mechanisms are: enzyme production, reduction of pore expression, reduction of the external membrane proteins expression, efflux systems, topoisomerase mutations. These mechanisms often accumulate and lead to multidrug ressitance strains emergence. The most frequent acquired resistance mechanisms are betalactamase-type enzyme production (ESBLs, AmpC, carbapenemases), which determine variable phenotypes of betalactamines resistance, phenotypes which are associated with aminoglycosides and quinolones resistance. The nonenzymatic drug resistance mechanisms are caused by efflux systems, pore reduction and penicillin-binding proteins (PBP) modification, which are often associated to other resistance mechanisms. Phenotypic methods used for testing these mechanisms are based on highlighting these phenotypes using Kirby Bauer antibiogram, clinical breakpoints, and “cut off” values recommended by EUCAST 2013 standard, version 3.1. PMID:25729587

  4. Implication of Integrative Treatment Strategies for Real-Life Geriatric Patients with Multiple, Chronic Illnesses: A 60-Month Follow-Up of a Naturalistic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gjumrakch Aliev

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegeneration [Stroke and Alzheimer disease (AD] is fastly becoming one of the leading causes of age-associated disability, dementia, and death. In addition, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC and the National Center for Health Statistics recently reported that AD has surpassed diabetes as a leading cause of death and is now considered the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States. Unfortunately, currently no effective treatments are available against this devastating disease. In the past we have shown the preservation and improvement of cognitive tasks in depressed and demented patients after 24 and 36 months of combined pharmacological and non- pharmacological treatment. Here we present the results of our ongoing, naturalistic study, in the same outpatient setting, at the 60 month follow up. The study group consisted of 156 medically ill, physically-disabled patients with mild to moderate dementia and depression. Patients were treated with antidepressants, cholinesterase inhibitors, and NMDA antagonists, along with their regular medication regimen. Non-pharmacological intervention was centered on a home-based program of physical and cognitive exercises as well as with vitamins and supplements (multivitamins, vitamin E, L-methylfolate, alpha-lipoic acid, acetyl-l-carnitine, omega-3, and coenzyme Q-10 and diet modification. Cognitive assessments were performed yearly. After 60 months of treatment, performance of all tasks remained at or above baseline. The MMSE, Cognistat–Attention, Cognistat–Judgment, and RFFT - Total Unique Designs demonstrated significant improvement. Our results, for the first time, demonstrate arrest in cognitive decline in demented/depressed patients with multiple medical co-morbidities for 60 months. Future investigations addressing the application of a combined, integrative treatment models in clinical practices are warranted.

  5. Long-term efficacy and safety of treatment with stimulants and atomoxetine in adult ADHD: a review of controlled and naturalistic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksen, Mats; Halmøy, Anne; Faraone, Stephen V; Haavik, Jan

    2013-06-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common disorder of childhood that often persists into adulthood. Although stimulant medications are recommended as the first-line treatment for ADHD because of their documented short-term effects in children and adults, less is known about their effects on long-term outcome in adults. Here we review the long-term efficacy and safety of the stimulant drugs methylphenidate and amphetamine, as well as the related compound atomoxetine. We performed a systematic review to identify direct and indirect effects of stimulant therapy on long-term outcome in adults. Five randomized controlled trials (RCTs), and 10 open-label extension studies of initial short-term RCTs, with total follow-up of at least 24weeks, were identified. All these RCTs found that medication was significantly more efficacious than placebo in treating ADHD in adults, and the extension studies showed that this favorable effect of medication was maintained during the open-label follow-up period. However, since the maximum duration of these pharmacological trials was 4years, we also reviewed 18 defined naturalistic longitudinal and cross-sectional studies, to provide more information about longer term functional outcomes, side effects and complications. These observational studies also showed positive correlations between early recognition of the disorder, stimulant treatment during childhood and favorable long-term outcome in adult ADHD patients. In conclusion, stimulant therapy of ADHD has long-term beneficial effects and is well tolerated. However, more longitudinal studies of long duration should be performed. In addition, the ethical issues involved in performing double blind RCTs of many years duration should be further explored. PMID:22917983

  6. Higher pretreatment 5-HT1A receptor binding potential in bipolar disorder depression is associated with treatment remission: a naturalistic treatment pilot PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Martin J; Hesselgrave, Natalie; Ciarleglio, Adam; Ogden, R Todd; Sullivan, Gregory M; Mann, J John; Parsey, Ramin V

    2013-11-01

    Bipolar disorder is a major cause of disability and a high risk for suicide. The pathophysiology of the disorder remains largely unknown. Medication choice for bipolar depression patients involves trial and error. Our group reported previously that brain serotonin 1A (5-HT(1A)) receptor binding measured by positron emission tomography (PET) is higher in bipolar depression. We now investigated whether pretreatment 5-HT(1A) levels correlates with antidepressant medication outcome. Forty-one medication-free DSM-IV diagnosed, bipolar patients in a major depressive episode had brain PET scans performed using [(11)C]WAY-100635 and a metabolite corrected arterial input function. The patients then received naturalistic psychopharmacologic treatment as outpatients and a follow up Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) after 3 months of treatment. Patients with 24 item HDRS scores less than 10 were considered to have remitted. A linear mixed effects model was used to compare BP(F) (binding potential, proportional to the total number of available receptors) in 13 brain regions of interest between remitters and nonremitters. Thirty-four patients completed 3 months of treatment and ratings; 9 had remitted. Remitters and nonremitters did not differ in age, sex, or recent medication history with serotonergic medications. Remitters had higher [(11)C]WAY-100635 BP(F) across all brain regions compared with nonremitters (P = 0.02). Higher pretreatment brain 5-HT(1A) receptor binding was associated with remission after 3 months of pharmacological treatment in bipolar depression. Prospective treatment studies are warranted to determine whether this test predicts outcome of specific types of treatment. PMID:23720414

  7. American Indian Perspectives of Euro-American Counseling Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokken, Jayne M.; Twohey, Denise

    2004-01-01

    Thirteen American Indians participated in 17 counseling interviews with Euro-American counselors. The study analyzed interviews of American Indian participants using Interpersonal Process Recall (IPR). Counselor trustworthiness, which was increased by counselor empathy, genuineness, concern, self-disclosure, and slow pace of problem…

  8. Patient satisfaction and ethnic identity among American Indian older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garroutte, Eva Marie; Kunovich, Robert M; Jacobsen, Clemma; Goldberg, Jack

    2004-12-01

    Work in the field of culturally competent medical care draws on studies showing that minority Americans often report lower satisfaction with care than White Americans and recommends that providers should adapt care to patients' cultural needs. However, empirical evidence in support of cultural competence models is limited by reliance upon measurements of racial rather than ethnic identity and also by a near-total neglect of American Indians. This project explored the relationship between ethnic identity and satisfaction using survey data collected from 115 chronically ill American Indian patients >or=50 years at a Cherokee Nation clinic. Satisfaction scores were high overall and comparable to those found in the general population. Nevertheless, analysis using hierarchical linear modeling showed that patients' self-rated American Indian ethnic identity was significantly associated with satisfaction. Specifically, patients who rated themselves high on the measure of American Indian ethnic identity reported reduced scores on satisfaction with health care providers' social skill and attentiveness, as compared to those who rated themselves lower. Significant associations remained after controlling for patients' sex, age, education, marital status, self-reported health, wait time, and number of previous visits. There were no significant associations between patients' American Indian ethnic identity and satisfaction with provider's technical skill and shared decision-making. Likewise, there were no significant associations between satisfaction and a separate measure of White American ethnic identity, although a suggestive trend was observed for satisfaction with provider's social skill. Our findings demonstrate the importance of including measures of ethnic identity in studies of medical satisfaction in racial minority populations. They support the importance of adapting care to patient's cultural needs, and they highlight the particular significance of interpersonal

  9. American Society of Nephrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... co/8cdJ2oSFjH – @ASNKidney on Twitter ASN News Feed Society Events Interact With ASN rss Facebook Twitter YouTube ... Podcast ASN Communities Share ASN User Login © American Society of Nephrology top Text Size + - Translate Sitemap Terms ...

  10. Native Americans: Subject Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanni, Mimmo; Etter, Patricia A.

    This annotated subject guide lists reference material that deals with Native Americans and is available in the Arizona State University Libraries. Entries were published 1933-98, but mostly in the 1980s-90s. The guide is not comprehensive, but rather a selective list of resources useful for researching a topic in a variety of fields. The guide…

  11. American Macular Degeneration Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Macular Degeneration The Eye as a Camera Anatomy of a Normal Human Eye ADA and Your Legal Protection AMD Treatment ... Amsler Grid Ten Questions to Ask Your Doctor Anatomy of a Normal Human Eye Disclaimer Privacy Policy Americans with Disabilities Act ...

  12. American Indian Authors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momaday, Natachee Scott

    Twenty-six selections by 15 contemporary American Indian authors are given in this book. The selections--legends, ceremonial chants and prayers, poems, and stories--are accompanied by topics for discussion. Some of the selections deal with the supernatural, and some tell an actual story about the author. Pictures and short biographies of each…

  13. American Overseas Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Robert J., Ed.; Duke, Charles R., Ed.

    A compilation of articles examines the similarities and differences of educational administration in schools for American students overseas. The "Introductions and Orientations" section includes: "The Association for the Advancement of International Education" (Lewis A. Grell); "The Office of Overseas Schools of the United States Department of…

  14. Unionism and American Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, Joel

    Organized labor in the United States has been divided in the types of economic solutions it has sought for the working class and in the type of support it has given education. In terms of education, rightwing unionism has tended to accept the basic structure of American education and the general ideology of equality of opportunity. Leftwing…

  15. Gifted Asian American Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, Margie K.

    1997-01-01

    Presents an analysis of personal, socialization, and structural factors affecting the lifespan achievement of 15 Asian American women identified as gifted. Their families' intense focus on educational achievement and hard work are described, and the need for better preparation to overcome obstacles in the workplace is discussed. (Author/CR)

  16. American College of Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    American College of Radiology JOIN ACR Login About Us Media Center Contact Us Follow us Shopping Cart (0) ACR Catalog Donate My ACR ... Education Center eLearning Exams & Assessments MOC Marketplace AIRP™ Radiology Leadership Institute ® Quality & Safety Accreditation Appropriateness Criteria® Practice ...

  17. BYD's American Dream

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING WENLEI

    2010-01-01

    @@ Chinese automaker BYD Co.Ltd.repeated its goal of selling electric vehicles in the United States during its third appearance at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit this year.But unlike previous years,BYD gained ground in its efforts to promote electric cars.

  18. Hispanic American Heritage, Intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Mike

    This resource book features the cultural heritage of Hispanics living within the United States and includes ideas, materials, and activities to be used with students in the intermediate grades and middle school. This book explores the definition of the term "Hispanic Americans" and suggests a multilayered population with a variety of cultural…

  19. American Holidays and Festivals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯凌

    2002-01-01

    One of the interesting things to learn about a country is to know different kinds of holidays and festivals its people celebrate(庆祝) and to tell why they celebrate them. Although there are some similarities(相似) between American and Chinese holidays and festivals, there are quite a few differences.

  20. Asian-American Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, William T.; Yu, Elena S. H.

    Although Asian Americans enjoy the image of a "successful minority," they also have endured hardships and prejudices. This report traces the history of the Japanese and Chinese experience in the United States. Some similarities are discernible in the immigration patterns of the two ethnic populations. The first wave of immigrants provided cheap…

  1. Pan American Health Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Google Tag Pan American Health Organization | Organización Panamericana de la Salud Skip to content English Español Menu Home Health Topics Programs Media Center Publications Data Countries and Centers About PAHO question  Trachoma is the ...

  2. Profile: Asian Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Program Grants Other Grants Planning and Evaluation Grantee Best Practices Asian American Asthma Cancer Chronic Liver Disease Diabetes ... Phone: 240-453-2882 Office of Minority Health Resource Center Toll Free: 1-800-444-6472 / Fax: 301-251-2160 Email: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Stay Connected ... FOIA | Accessibility | Site Map | Contact Us | Viewers & Players

  3. Immunizations and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Program Grants Other Grants Planning and Evaluation Grantee Best Practices Black/African American Asthma Cancer Chronic Liver Disease ... 13 to 17 years who ever received the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, 2014 - Males # doses ... 240-453-2882 Office of Minority Health Resource Center Toll Free: 1-800-444-6472 / Fax: ...

  4. Festival of American Folklife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Theodore P.

    1976-01-01

    The "Festival of American Folklife in 1976 was the largest cultural event of its kind ever held". Describes the Festival programs representing the diverse cultural groups who displayed their traditions and skills at the Mall between the Lincoln and Washington monuments during the summer of 1976. (Author/RK)

  5. American Dream / Anu Raat

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Raat, Anu

    2010-01-01

    Uuritakse sõnapaari "American dream" tähendust, kuidas ja millal see unelmalugu tekkis, miks see on ameerikalik nähtus, samuti 1950-ndate moeloomingut, eriti Christian Diori oma Euroopas ja Ameerikas, selle põhjusi ja mõjusid seoses massilise tarbimisega

  6. Delusion of American Dream

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘云芳

    2014-01-01

    Martin Eden by Jack London and The Great Gatsby by F.Scott Fitzergald are both stories describing the delusion of American dream. They share much in common for they are discussing the same themes actually. By analyzing the two protagonists’life experience and deaths respectively,we try to explore the profound meaning hidden under the surface.

  7. American Society for Dermatologic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ASDS: Log In Forgot your password? ASDS — American Society for Dermatologic Surgery Expertise for the life of ... with new skin cancer screening recommendation The American Society for Dermatologic Surgery (ASDS) is expressing its disappointment ...

  8. American Society of Human Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Awards August 9, 2016 Media Advisory: American Society of Human Genetics 2016 Annual Meeting July 26, ... McKusick Leadership Award June 30, 2016 The American Society of Human Genetics, Incorporated 9650 Rockville Pike • Bethesda, ...

  9. American Society of Hand Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ago Follow Us Who we are The American Society of Hand Therapists (ASHT) is a professional organization ... a chartered accredited association management company. © 2016 American Society of Hand Therapists. All Rights Reserved. Advertisement

  10. American Society of Plastic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctor who is a member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS®), you can rest assured ... ASPS The Plastic Surgery Foundation Copyright © 2016 American Society of Plastic Surgeons | Privacy Policy | Sitemap | Terms and ...

  11. Native Americans' Interest in Horticulture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Mary Hockenberry

    1999-01-01

    Focus groups arranged by local Native American Master Gardeners on two Minnesota reservations determined community interest in extension-horticulture programs. Topics of interest included food preservation and historical Native-American uses of plants. (SK)

  12. Asian American Women: A Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Judy, Comp.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Listed in this bibliography are materials available on Asian American women at the Asian Community Library (Oakland Public Library) and the Asian American Studies Library (University of California, Berkeley). (Author/EB)

  13. Childhood obesity: highlights of AMA Expert Committee recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Goutham

    2008-07-01

    Childhood obesity is an increasingly serious problem; 13.9 percent of children two to five years of age, 18.8 percent of children six to 11 years of age, and 17.4 percent of adolescents 12 to 19 years of age in America are obese. Practical strategies that primary care physicians can use to tackle the problem are scarce. The American Medical Association recently convened an expert panel to address this need. Evidence about how best to manage and prevent obesity was reviewed and incorporated into a series of reports. The Expert Committee on the Assessment, Prevention, and Treatment of Child and Adolescent Overweight and Obesity recommends addressing the issue of weight with all children at least once a year. Family physicians are urged to assess key dietary habits (e.g., consumption of sweetened beverages), physical activity habits, readiness to change lifestyle habits, and family history of obesity and obesity-related illnesses. Laboratory testing recommendations depend on the degree of obesity and associated illnesses. For children with a body mass index between the 85th and 94th percentiles but who have no obesity-related illnesses, a fasting lipid profile should be done. Those with the same body mass index and obesity-related illnesses should also have tests for alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, and fasting blood glucose levels. Measurement of blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels should be added in children with a body mass index above the 95th percentile. A four-stage approach to treatment of childhood obesity is recommended. Many of these recommendations can be carried out by family physicians for treatment and prevention. These include advising families to limit consumption of sweetened beverages and fast food, limit screen time, engage in physical activity for at least 60 minutes per day, and encourage family meals on most, and preferably all, days of the week. PMID:18649611

  14. Ignoring taboos: Maria Lenk, Latin American inspirationalist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votre, S; Mourão, L

    2001-01-01

    Maria Lenk is widely recognized as an exceptional athlete who participated in women's sport from around 1930 until 1950. In 1932, at the age of seventeen, she was the first woman to be included in a Latin American delegation to the Olympic Games. As a swimmer, she still sets world records at the age of eighty-six. This super-champion's sporting achievements and her persistent dedication to the advancement of sport still impress and surprise todays professional swimmers and researchers. Contextualised in the male-dominated society of Brazil during the first half of the twentieth century, this chapter traces the achievement, and rise to international fame, of Maria Lenk. It examines the factors that enabled her to emerge not only as an important figure in sport but also as an icon of female emancipation in Brazilian and Latin American society. The focus is on Lenk's influence on the issues which affected the development of women's sport in Latin America. It also highlights the significance of Lenk's contribution to the changing place of women in Brazilian and South American society. PMID:18604909

  15. Highlights lecture EANM 2015: the search for nuclear medicine's superheroes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Andreas; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2016-09-01

    contributions focused on cardiac inflammation, cardiac sarcoidosis, and specific imaging of large vessel vasculitis. The physics and instrumentation track included many highlights such as novel, high resolution scanners. The most noteworthy news and developments of this meeting were summarized in the highlights lecture. Only 55 scientific contributions were mentioned, and hence they represent only a brief summary, which is outlined in this article. For a more detailed view, all presentations can be accessed by the online version of the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (Volume 42, Supplement 1). PMID:27229941

  16. History highlights and future trends of infrared sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, Carlo

    2010-10-01

    Infrared (IR) technologies (materials, devices and systems) represent an area of excellence in science and technology and, even if they have been generally confined to a selected scientific community, they have achieved technological and scientific highlights constituting 'innovation drivers' for neighbouring disciplines, especially in the sensors field. The development of IR sensors, initially linked to astronomical observations, since World War II and for many years has been fostered essentially by defence applications, particularly thermo-vision and, later on, smart vision and detection, for surveillance and warning. Only in the last few decades, the impact of silicon technology has changed the development of IR detectors dramatically, with the advent of integrated signal read-outs and the opening of civilian markets (EO communications, biomedical, environmental, transport and energy applications). The history of infrared sensors contains examples of real breakthroughs, particularly true in the case of focal plane arrays that first appeared in the late 1970s, when the superiority of bi-dimensional arrays for most applications pushed the development of technologies providing the highest number of pixels. An impressive impulse was given to the development of FPA arrays by integration with charge coupled devices (CCD), with strong competition from different technologies (high-efficiency photon sensors, Schottky diodes, multi-quantum wells and, later on, room temperature microbolometers/cantilevers). This breakthrough allowed the development of high performance IR systems of small size, light weight and low cost - and therefore suitable for civil applications - thanks to the elimination of the mechanical scanning system and the progressive reduction of cooling requirements (up to the advent of microbolometers, capable of working at room temperature). In particular, the elimination of cryogenic cooling allowed the development and commercialisation of IR Smart Sensors

  17. American Head and Neck Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Head & Neck Society Head and Neck Cancer Research & Education American Head & Neck Society | AHNS Head and Neck Cancer Research & Education About AHNS ... and Announcements Copyright ©2016 · American Head and Neck Society · Privacy and Return Policy Managed by BSC Management, ...

  18. Discrimination against Muslim American Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroian, Karen J.

    2012-01-01

    Although there is ample evidence of discrimination toward Muslim Americans in general, there is limited information specific to Muslim American adolescents. The few existing studies specific to this age group suggest that Muslim American adolescents encounter much discrimination from teachers, school administrators, and classmates. This…

  19. Who Stole Native American Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Lynn, Elizabeth

    1997-01-01

    Native American Studies has failed to develop into an academic discipline because of the continued influence of postcolonial theories, attempts to discredit Native American scholars, politically determined research agendas, and the ideology of the "New Historicism." Native American Studies must seek autonomy from other opportunistic epistemologies…

  20. Demythologizing the Mexican American Father

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracho, Olivia N.; Spodek, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    This review presents recent studies on Mexican American fathers in the United Sates to provide researchers with an understanding of contemporary fatherhood of Mexican American individuals. It describes the myths that create methodological and conceptual problems in conducting research studies to characterize Mexican American fathers. It also…

  1. Profile: American Indian/Alaska Native

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Population Profiles > American Indian/Alaska Native Profile: American Indian/Alaska Native Spotlight ACA Infographic for American Indians/ ... Program Circle of Life multimedia youth education program American Indian/Alaska Native Profile Great Plains Area Alaska Area ...

  2. Chronic Liver Disease and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and African Americans Among African Americans, chronic liver disease is a ... white women. At a glance – Cancer Rates for African Americans (2008-2012) Cancer Incidence Rates per 100,000 – ...

  3. Pre-accidental situations highlighted by RECUPERARE method and data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matahri, N. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2006-07-01

    RECUPERARE method has been developed for operating feedback analysis and built on the French Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) principles. It is used to study the causes of human errors or technical failures occurred in French PWRs and the recovery process of events. Based on an event classification (6 categories) model according to the nature of the link between failure and recovery, the identified and recorded data are: the causes of the defects (technical, human, organizational) and the context in which they appear; the factors of the recovery performance (depending on technical and organizational aspects); a chronological analysis, designed to collect delays between failures and their detection/recovery for each event. About 3600 events reported in French PWRs (1997-2003) had been reviewed through this model. Initially, the weight of factors and the most important factors, which influenced the detection and recovery delay, are defined. For this purpose, the regression Partial Least Square (PLS) is used. Then, to link RECUPERARE results with pre-accidental data, conditional probabilities of events linked between them by a cause and effect relationship are calculated. For this, the Bayesian method with the Bayesian network is built with the PLS obtained results and applied. This constitutes a first approach to take into account in HRA the human and organizational factors highlighted by operating feedback. (author)

  4. STS-103 Flight Day 5 Highlights and Crew Activities Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Highlights of the fifth day of the STS-103 mission on board the space shuttle Discovery are shown in this videotape. The mission was led by Commander Curtis L. Brown, with Pilot Scott J Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, Jean-Francois Clervoy, John M. Grunsfeld, Michael Foale, and Claude Nicollier. The main purpose of the mission was to service the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The primary objective of the mission was to replace all six of the gyroscopes that make up the three Rate Sensor Units. In addition the Astronauts installed a new computer. During the 5th day Michael Foale and Claude Nicollier performed the servicing of the HST in an 8 hour 10 minute Extravehicular Activity (EVA). The servicing included the removal of the old computer and the installation of a new, faster computer with more memory. They also installed a new outer thermal layer to protect the computer. After this was finished the astronauts replaced one of the Fine Guidance Sensors (FGS), an optical sensor which allows NASA to point the telescope in the desired direction. The video includes actual live views of the HST in the shuttle's service bay, and footage of the repair and servicing EVA.

  5. The dark secrets of gaseous nebulae -- highlights from deep spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xiaowei

    2010-01-01

    In this contribution, I will briefly review the development of the theory of photoionized gaseous nebulae, highlighting some of the key events. I will then present some recent developments of deep spectroscopy of planetary nebulae (PNe) and H II regions, concentrating on observations of faint heavy element optical recombination lines (ORLs). I will show that there is strong evidence that nebulae contain another previously unknown component of cold (about 1,000 K), high-metallicity plasma, probably in the form of H-deficient inclusions embedded in the warm (about 10,000 K) diffuse nebula of "normal (i.e. near solar) composition". This cold gas emits essentially all the observed fluxes of heavy element ORLs, but is too cool to excite any significant optical or ultraviolet collisionally excited lines (CELs) and thus invisible via the latter. The existence of H-deficient gas in PNe and probably also in H II regions, not predicted by the current stellar evolution theory, provides a natural solution to the long-sta...

  6. Research highlights: microfluidic-enabled single-cell epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Manjima; Khojah, Reem; Tay, Andy; Di Carlo, Dino

    2015-11-01

    Individual cells are the fundamental unit of life with diverse functions from metabolism to motility. In multicellular organisms, a single genome can give rise to tremendous variability across tissues at the single-cell level due to epigenetic differences in the genes that are expressed. Signals from the local environment or a history of signals can drive these variations, and tissues have many cell types that play separate roles. This epigenetic heterogeneity is of biological importance in normal functions such as tissue morphogenesis and can contribute to development or resistance of cancer, or other disease states. Therefore, an improved understanding of variations at the single cell level are fundamental to understanding biology and developing new approaches to combating disease. Traditional approaches to characterize epigenetic modifications of chromatin or the transcriptome of cells have often focused on blended responses of many cells in a tissue; however, such bulk measures lose spatial and temporal differences that occur from cell to cell, and cannot uncover novel or rare populations of cells. Here we highlight a flurry of recent activity to identify the mRNA profiles from thousands of single-cells as well as chromatin accessibility and histone marks on single to few hundreds of cells. Microfluidics and microfabrication have played a central role in the range of new techniques, and will likely continue to impact their further development towards routine single-cell epigenetic analysis. PMID:26405849

  7. Wildlife studies on the Hanford site: 1994 Highlights report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, L.L. [ed.

    1995-04-01

    The purposes of the project are to monitor and report trends in wildlife populations; conduct surveys to identify, record, and map populations of threatened, endangered, and sensitive plant and animal species; and cooperate with Washington State and federal and private agencies to help ensure the protection afforded by law to native species and their habitats. Census data and results of surveys and special study topics are shared freely among cooperating agencies. Special studies are also conducted as needed to provide additional information that may be required to assess, protect, or manage wildlife resources at Hanford. This report describes highlights of wildlife studies on the Site in 1994. Redd counts of fall chinook salmon in the Hanford Reach suggest that harvest restrictions directed at protecting Snake River salmon may have helped Columbia River stocks as well. The 1994 count (5619) was nearly double that of 1993 and about 63% of the 1989 high of approximately 9000. A habitat map showing major vegetation and land use cover types for the Hanford Site was completed in 1993. During 1994, stochastic simulation was used to estimate shrub characteristics (height, density, and canopy cover) across the previously mapped Hanford landscape. The information provided will be available for use in determining habitat quality for sensitive wildlife species. Mapping Site locations of plant species of concern continued during 1994. Additional sensitive plant species data from surveys conducted by TNC were archived. The 10 nesting pairs of ferruginous hawks that used the Hanford Site in 1993 represented approximately 25% of the Washington State population.

  8. Highlights from the Whipple 10-m Blazar Monitoring Program

    CERN Document Server

    Pichel, Ana

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 25 blazars are know to emit VHE (E>100 GeV) gamma rays. Understanding these powerful objects requires long-term, intense, monitoring observations since they exhibit strong, rapid and irregular variability across the entire electromagnetic spectrum. The Whipple 10-m Gamma-ray Telescope, the world's fourth most sensitive VHE telescope, is used primarily to perform such monitoring in the VHE band. The 10-m monitoring program focuses in particular on Mrk 421, Mrk 501, H 1426+428, 1ES 1959+650 and 1ES 2344+514, with observations performed every moonless night that each source is visible. Upon detection of a flare, alerts are sent to VERITAS and the astronomical community to trigger ToO observations, as was the case for one of the brightest-ever VHE flares of Mrk 421 in 2008. In addition to flaring alerts, the 10-m program is used to create long-term light curves, with unprecedented VHE sampling, that can be combined with other multi-frequency observations to better understand blazars. Highlights from...

  9. Highlighting entanglement of cultures via ranking of multilingual Wikipedia articles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Ho Eom

    Full Text Available How different cultures evaluate a person? Is an important person in one culture is also important in the other culture? We address these questions via ranking of multilingual Wikipedia articles. With three ranking algorithms based on network structure of Wikipedia, we assign ranking to all articles in 9 multilingual editions of Wikipedia and investigate general ranking structure of PageRank, CheiRank and 2DRank. In particular, we focus on articles related to persons, identify top 30 persons for each rank among different editions and analyze distinctions of their distributions over activity fields such as politics, art, science, religion, sport for each edition. We find that local heroes are dominant but also global heroes exist and create an effective network representing entanglement of cultures. The Google matrix analysis of network of cultures shows signs of the Zipf law distribution. This approach allows to examine diversity and shared characteristics of knowledge organization between cultures. The developed computational, data driven approach highlights cultural interconnections in a new perspective. Dated: June 26, 2013.

  10. Engineering and Science Highlights of the KAT-7 Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, A. R.; Alberts, T.; Armstrong, R. P.; Barta, A.; Bauermeister, E. F.; Bester, H.; Blose, S.; Booth, R. S.; Botha, D. H.; Buchner, S. J.; Carignan, C.; Cheetham, T.; Cloete, K.; Coreejes, G.; Crida, R. C.; Cross, S. D.; Curtolo, F.; Dikgale, A.; de Villiers, M. S.; du Toit, L. J.; Esterhuyse, S. W. P.; Fanaroff, B.; Fender, R. P.; Fijalkowski, M.; Fourie, D.; Frank, B.; George, D.; Gibbs, P.; Goedhart, S.; Grobbelaar, J.; Gumede, S. C.; Herselman, P.; Hess, K. M.; Hoek, N.; Horrell, J.; Jonas, J. L.; Jordaan, J. D. B.; Julie, R.; Kapp, F.; Kotzé, P.; Kusel, T.; Langman, A.; Lehmensiek, R.; Liebenberg, D.; Liebenberg, I. J. V.; Loots, A.; Lord, R. T.; Lucero, D. M.; Ludick, J.; Macfarlane, P.; Madlavana, M.; Magnus, L.; Magozore, C.; Malan, J. A.; Manley, J. R.; Marais, L.; Marais, N.; Marais, S. J.; Maree, M.; Martens, A.; Mokone, O.; Moss, V.; Mthembu, S.; New, W.; Nicholson, G. D.; van Niekerk, P. C.; Oozeer, N.; Passmoor, S. S.; Peens-Hough, A.; Pińska, A. B.; Prozesky, P.; Rajan, S.; Ratcliffe, S.; Renil, R.; Richter, L. L.; Rosekrans, D.; Rust, A.; Schröder, A. C.; Schwardt, L. C.; Seranyane, S.; Serylak, M.; Shepherd, D. S.; Siebrits, R.; Sofeya, L.; Spann, R.; Springbok, R.; Swart, P. S.; Thondikulam, Venkatasubramani L.; Theron, I. P.; Tiplady, A.; Toruvanda, O.; Tshongweni, S.; van den Heever, L.; van der Merwe, C.; van Rooyen, R.; Wakhaba, S.; Walker, A. L.; Welz, M.; Williams, L.; Wolleben, M.; Woudt, P. A.; Young, N. J.; Zwart, J. T. L.

    2016-05-01

    The construction of the KAT-7 array in the Karoo region of the Northern Cape in South Africa was intended primarily as an engineering prototype for technologies and techniques applicable to the MeerKAT telescope. This paper looks at the main engineering and scientific highlights from this effort, and discusses their applicability to both MeerKAT and other next-generation radio telescopes. In particular we found that the composite dish surface works well, but it becomes complicated to fabricate for a dish lacking circular symmetry; the Stirling cycle cryogenic system with ion pump to achieve vacuum works but demands much higher maintenance than an equivalent Gifford-McMahon cycle system; the ROACH (Reconfigurable Open Architecture Computing Hardware)-based correlator with SPEAD (Streaming Protocol for Exchanging Astronomical Data) protocol data transfer works very well and KATCP (Karoo Array Telescope Control Protocol) control protocol has proven very flexible and convenient. KAT-7 has also been used for scientific observations where it has a niche in mapping low surface-brightness continuum sources, some extended HI halos and OH masers in star-forming regions. It can also be used to monitor continuum source variability, observe pulsars, and make VLBI observations.

  11. Highlights on Hevea brasiliensis (pro)hevein proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Karine; Peruch, Frédéric; Lecomte, Sophie

    2016-08-01

    Hevein, from Hevea brasiliensis (rubber tree), was identified in 1960. It is the most abundant soluble protein (22%) found in latex. Hevein is formed from a larger protein called prohevein. The 187 amino-acid prohevein is cleaved into two fragments: the N-terminal 43 amino-acid hevein, a lectin bearing a chitin-binding motif with antifungal properties, and a C-terminal domain (C-ter), which possesses amyloid properties. Hevein-like proteins are also widely represented in the plant kingdom and belong to a larger family related to stress and pathogenic responses. During the last 55 years, these proteins have attracted the interest of numerous specialists from the fields of plant physiology, genetics, molecular and structural biology, and physico-chemistry to allergology. This review highlights various aspects of hevein, prohevein, and C-ter from the point of view of these various fields, and examines their potential roles in latex as well as their beneficial and negative biological effects (e.g. wound sealing and resistance to pathogens which is mediated by agglutination, antimicrobial activity, and/or allergenicity). It covers results and observations from 1960 up to the most recent research. PMID:27317253

  12. Wildlife studies on the Hanford site: 1994 Highlights report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purposes of the project are to monitor and report trends in wildlife populations; conduct surveys to identify, record, and map populations of threatened, endangered, and sensitive plant and animal species; and cooperate with Washington State and federal and private agencies to help ensure the protection afforded by law to native species and their habitats. Census data and results of surveys and special study topics are shared freely among cooperating agencies. Special studies are also conducted as needed to provide additional information that may be required to assess, protect, or manage wildlife resources at Hanford. This report describes highlights of wildlife studies on the Site in 1994. Redd counts of fall chinook salmon in the Hanford Reach suggest that harvest restrictions directed at protecting Snake River salmon may have helped Columbia River stocks as well. The 1994 count (5619) was nearly double that of 1993 and about 63% of the 1989 high of approximately 9000. A habitat map showing major vegetation and land use cover types for the Hanford Site was completed in 1993. During 1994, stochastic simulation was used to estimate shrub characteristics (height, density, and canopy cover) across the previously mapped Hanford landscape. The information provided will be available for use in determining habitat quality for sensitive wildlife species. Mapping Site locations of plant species of concern continued during 1994. Additional sensitive plant species data from surveys conducted by TNC were archived. The 10 nesting pairs of ferruginous hawks that used the Hanford Site in 1993 represented approximately 25% of the Washington State population

  13. Alberta Energy and Utilities Board, regulatory highlights for 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This new publication informs readers about what the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) did in the past year, including important regulatory issues, trends and initiatives. The EUB is an agency of the provincial government, established to regulate Alberta's energy resource and utility sectors. It is part of the Alberta Ministry of Energy. The four main functions of the Board are regulatory initiatives, license applications, enforcement and information. This publication summarized the EUB's position regarding flaring (both solution gas flaring and well test flaring), and Board activities in the areas of animal health concerns, the gas over bitumen controversy, the deregulation of the electric industry and what it means to the EUB, improvements in data quality as a result of improved industry compliance in reporting, and a variety of issues related to the oil sands and the negotiated settlement process. Also, the Board has been proactive in the area of oilfield waste management guidelines, proliferation policies for gas processing facilities, sulphur recovery guidelines, and the expansion of the orphan well program to include facilities and pipelines. As a measure of the success of the EUB, a recent survey of 19 randomly selected focus groups praised EUB for its impartiality, fair and equitable enforcement and independence. It was also praised for its technically competent and experienced staff, its access to quality information and the clarity of its mandate, regulatory requirements and processes. The Board's efforts in the area of timely stakeholder consultation was highlighted. tabs., figs

  14. Thailand Insurance Regulation: Highlights & Time to Go Ahead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivalap Sukpaiboonwat

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents Thailand’s insurance regulatory highlights and compares with 15 Asian countries. The comparison focuses on government regulators, minimum capital requirements, solvency regulation, policyholder protection fund and foreign ownership restrictions. Because of different complexity in insurance business and economic culture in each countries, the policymakers appoint insurance regulator who works under various departments, different from country to country, such as The Ministry of Finance (Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Myanmar, the Philippines, Vietnam, and Thailand, a Central Bank (Malaysia, and Singapore, and some other Government Agencies (China, Japan, Taiwan, South Korea, and Hong Kong. For licensed insurers, the highest minimum paid-up capital is USD52 million in Taiwan, and the lowest paid-up capital is USD1 million in Hong Kong due to Hong Kong liberalizing insurance market requiring no restriction in investment. Risk Based Capital has been evolving rapidly across Asian countries particularly in Japan, Indonesia, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia, South Korea, The Philippines and Thailand. The protection funds for policyholders in the event of insurer insolvency were already established in most countries except Cambodia and Laos, who require deposit protection fund with local government. Regarding foreign ownership regulation, there are no restrictions in Hong Kong, Japan, South Korea, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, the Philippines, Singapore, and Vietnam; whilst other countries, namely China, Taiwan, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, and Thailand, gradually release the market access restrictions. In assessing insurance regulation, this is helpful for understanding the current insurance legislation and future development for Thailand insurance regulation.

  15. Can chimpanzee biology highlight human origin and evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffman, Itai; Nevo, Eviatar

    2010-07-01

    The closest living relatives of humans are their chimpanzee/bonobo (Pan) sister species, members of the same subfamily "Homininae". This classification is supported by over 50 years of research in the fields of chimpanzee cultural diversity, language competency, genomics, anatomy, high cognition, psychology, society, self-consciousness and relation to others, tool use/production, as well as Homo level emotions, symbolic competency, memory recollection, complex multifaceted problem-solving capabilities, and interspecies communication. Language competence and symbolism can be continuously bridged from chimpanzee to man. Emotions, intercommunity aggression, body language, gestures, facial expressions, and vocalization of intonations seem to parallel between the sister taxa Homo and Pan. The shared suite of traits between Pan and Homo genus demonstrated in this article integrates old and new information on human-chimpanzee evolution, bilateral informational and cross-cultural exchange, promoting the urgent need for Pan cultures in the wild to be protected, as they are part of the cultural heritage of mankind. Also, we suggest that bonobos, Pan paniscus, based on shared traits with Australopithecus, need to be included in Australopithecine's subgenus, and may even represent living-fossil Australopithecines. Unfolding bonobo and chimpanzee biology highlights our common genetic and cultural evolutionary origins. PMID:23908781

  16. Can Chimpanzee Biology Highlight Human Origin and Evolution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itai Roffman

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The closest living relatives of humans are their chimpanzee/bonobo (Pan sister species, members of the same subfamily “Homininae”. This classification is supported by over 50 years of research in the fields of chimpanzee cultural diversity, language competency, genomics, anatomy, high cognition, psychology, society, self-consciousness and relation to others, tool use/production, as well as Homo level emotions, symbolic competency, memory recollection, complex multifaceted problem-solving capabilities, and interspecies communication. Language competence and symbolism can be continuously bridged from chimpanzee to man. Emotions, intercommunity aggression, body language, gestures, facial expressions, and vocalization of intonations seem to parallel between the sister taxa Homo and Pan. The shared suite of traits between Pan and Homo genus demonstrated in this article integrates old and new information on human–chimpanzee evolution, bilateral informational and cross-cultural exchange, promoting the urgent need for Pan cultures in the wild to be protected, as they are part of the cultural heritage of mankind. Also, we suggest that bonobos, Pan paniscus, based on shared traits with Australopithecus, need to be included in Australopithecine’s subgenus, and may even represent living-fossil Australopithecines. Unfolding bonobo and chimpanzee biology highlights our common genetic and cultural evolutionary origins.

  17. Recent highlights from the PHENIX heavy ion program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is accepted that a QGP can be formed in relativistic collisions of heavy nuclei (A+A. Recently long-range correlations have been observed in p+A collisions at the LHC in high multiplicity events. PHENIX has carried out a series of studies of d+Au collisions at 200 GeV to see if such correlations persist at lower energies compared to those at the LHC. Results of a study of long-range correlations and flow are presented for d+Au collisions. Data from Au+Au collisions collected during the beam energy scan (BES was used to determine both quark and nucleon number scaling. The HBT method was used to determine radii of the fireball at kinetic freezeout. Implications for the nuclear EOS are discussed. Also results of a search for “dark photons” are presented. Recent PHENIX highlights on heavy flavor, electromagnetic probes, spin and plans for PHENIX upgrades were presented in other talks at this conference.

  18. Highlights from the Survey of Canadian Buddhist Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Negru

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available There are currently 483 Buddhist organizations operating in Canada in 2012. This article presents highlights from data gathered in the first-ever survey of community development in these organizations, with some preliminary observations. The survey was created by John Negru, publisher of Canada's largest online database of Canadian Buddhist organizations, www.canadianbuddhism.info in association with the Department for the Study of Religion at the University of Toronto, in 2011. The survey contained twenty-six multi-part questions in two sections. The first section comprised directory information associated with specific organizations. The second section comprised sociological questions, the answers to which were supplied on condition of anonymity. Of 483 potential responses, 102 were received (21.1%. While not exhaustive, these responses are broadly spread over different locations, traditions, and institutional frameworks. Their distribution mirrors the geographical and lineage distribution of the full set. As such, they present a relatively accurate snapshot of current community development across Buddhist communities in Canada. 

  19. Advances and highlights in mechanisms of allergic disease in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzyniak, Paulina; Akdis, Cezmi A; Finkelman, Fred D; Rothenberg, Marc E

    2016-06-01

    This review highlights some of the advances in mechanisms of allergic disease, particularly anaphylaxis, including food allergy, drug hypersensitivity, atopic dermatitis (AD), allergic conjunctivitis, and airway diseases. During the last year, a mechanistic advance in food allergy was achieved by focusing on mechanisms of allergen sensitization. Novel biomarkers and treatment for mastocytosis were presented in several studies. Novel therapeutic approaches in the treatment of atopic dermatitis and psoriasis showed that promising supplementation of the infant's diet in the first year of life with immunoactive prebiotics might have a preventive role against early development of AD and that therapeutic approaches to treat AD in children might be best directed to the correction of a TH2/TH1 imbalance. Several studies were published emphasizing the role of the epithelial barrier in patients with allergic diseases. An impaired skin barrier as a cause for sensitization to food allergens in children and its relationship to filaggrin mutations has been an important development. Numerous studies presented new approaches for improvement of epithelial barrier function and novel biologicals used in the treatment of inflammatory skin and eosinophilic diseases. In addition, novel transcription factors and signaling molecules that can develop as new possible therapeutic targets have been reported. PMID:27090934

  20. Can Chimpanzee Biology Highlight Human Origin and Evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffman, Itai; Nevo, Eviatar

    2010-01-01

    The closest living relatives of humans are their chimpanzee/bonobo (Pan) sister species, members of the same subfamily “Homininae”. This classification is supported by over 50 years of research in the fields of chimpanzee cultural diversity, language competency, genomics, anatomy, high cognition, psychology, society, self-consciousness and relation to others, tool use/production, as well as Homo level emotions, symbolic competency, memory recollection, complex multifaceted problem-solving capabilities, and interspecies communication. Language competence and symbolism can be continuously bridged from chimpanzee to man. Emotions, intercommunity aggression, body language, gestures, facial expressions, and vocalization of intonations seem to parallel between the sister taxa Homo and Pan. The shared suite of traits between Pan and Homo genus demonstrated in this article integrates old and new information on human–chimpanzee evolution, bilateral informational and cross-cultural exchange, promoting the urgent need for Pan cultures in the wild to be protected, as they are part of the cultural heritage of mankind. Also, we suggest that bonobos, Pan paniscus, based on shared traits with Australopithecus, need to be included in Australopithecine’s subgenus, and may even represent living-fossil Australopithecines. Unfolding bonobo and chimpanzee biology highlights our common genetic and cultural evolutionary origins. PMID:23908781

  1. Engineering and science highlights of the KAT-7 radio telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, A. R.; Alberts, T.; Armstrong, R. P.; Barta, A.; Bauermeister, E. F.; Bester, H.; Blose, S.; Booth, R. S.; Botha, D. H.; Buchner, S. J.; Carignan, C.; Cheetham, T.; Cloete, K.; Coreejes, G.; Crida, R. C.; Cross, S. D.; Curtolo, F.; Dikgale, A.; de Villiers, M. S.; du Toit, L. J.; Esterhuyse, S. W. P.; Fanaroff, B.; Fender, R. P.; Fijalkowski, M.; Fourie, D.; Frank, B.; George, D.; Gibbs, P.; Goedhart, S.; Grobbelaar, J.; Gumede, S. C.; Herselman, P.; Hess, K. M.; Hoek, N.; Horrell, J.; Jonas, J. L.; Jordaan, J. D. B.; Julie, R.; Kapp, F.; Kotzé, P.; Kusel, T.; Langman, A.; Lehmensiek, R.; Liebenberg, D.; Liebenberg, I. J. V.; Loots, A.; Lord, R. T.; Lucero, D. M.; Ludick, J.; Macfarlane, P.; Madlavana, M.; Magnus, L.; Magozore, C.; Malan, J. A.; Manley, J. R.; Marais, L.; Marais, N.; Marais, S. J.; Maree, M.; Martens, A.; Mokone, O.; Moss, V.; Mthembu, S.; New, W.; Nicholson, G. D.; van Niekerk, P. C.; Oozeer, N.; Passmoor, S. S.; Peens-Hough, A.; Pińska, A. B.; Prozesky, P.; Rajan, S.; Ratcliffe, S.; Renil, R.; Richter, L. L.; Rosekrans, D.; Rust, A.; Schröder, A. C.; Schwardt, L. C.; Seranyane, S.; Serylak, M.; Shepherd, D. S.; Siebrits, R.; Sofeya, L.; Spann, R.; Springbok, R.; Swart, P. S.; Thondikulam, Venkatasubramani L.; Theron, I. P.; Tiplady, A.; Toruvanda, O.; Tshongweni, S.; van den Heever, L.; van der Merwe, C.; van Rooyen, R.; Wakhaba, S.; Walker, A. L.; Welz, M.; Williams, L.; Wolleben, M.; Woudt, P. A.; Young, N. J.; Zwart, J. T. L.

    2016-08-01

    The construction of the seven-dish Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7) array in the Karoo region of the Northern Cape in South Africa was intended primarily as an engineering prototype for technologies and techniques applicable to the MeerKAT telescope. This paper looks at the main engineering and scientific highlights from this effort, and discusses their applicability to both MeerKAT and other next-generation radio telescopes. In particular, we found that the composite dish surface works well, but it becomes complicated to fabricate for a dish lacking circular symmetry; the Stirling cycle cryogenic system with ion pump to achieve vacuum works but demands much higher maintenance than an equivalent Gifford-McMahon cycle system; the ROACH (Reconfigurable Open Architecture Computing Hardware)-based correlator with SPEAD (Streaming Protocol for Exchanging Astronomical Data) protocol data transfer works very well and KATCP (Karoo Array Telescope Control Protocol) control protocol has proven very flexible and convenient. KAT-7 has also been used for scientific observations where it has a niche in mapping low surface-brightness continuum sources, some extended H I haloes and OH masers in star-forming regions. It can also be used to monitor continuum source variability, observe pulsars, and make Very Long Baseline Interferometry observations.

  2. Engineering and Science Highlights of the KAT-7 Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Foley, A R; Armstrong, R P; Barta, A; Bauermeister, E F; Bester, H; Blose, S; Booth, R S; Botha, D H; Buchner, S J; Carignan, C; Cheetham, T; Cloete, K; Coreejes, G; Crida, R C; Cross, S D; Curtolo, F; Dikgale, A; de Villiers, M S; Toit, L J du; Esterhuyse, S W P; Fanaroff, B; Fender, R P; Fijalkowski, M; Fourie, D; Frank, B; George, D; Gibbs, P; Goedhart, S; Grobbelaar, J; Gumede, S C; Herselman, P; Hess, K M; Hoek, N; Horrell, J; Jonas, J L; Jordaan, J D B; Julie, R; Kapp, F; Kotzé, P; Kusel, T; Langman, A; Lehmensiek, R; Liebenberg, D; Liebenberg, I J V; Loots, A; Lord, R T; Lucero, D M; Ludick, J; Macfarlane, P; Madlavana, M; Magnus, L; Magozore, C; Malan, J A; Manley, J R; Marais, L; Marais, N; Marais, S J; Maree, M; Martens, A; Mokone, O; Moss, V; Mthembu, S; New, W; Nicholson, G D; van Niekerk, P C; Oozeer, N; Passmoor, S S; Peens-Hough, A; Pińska, A B; Prozesky, P; Rajan, S; Ratcliffe, S; Renil, R; Richter, L L; Rosekrans, D; Rust, A; Schröder, A C; Schwardt, L C; Seranyane, S; Serylak, M; Shepherd, D S; Siebrits, R; Sofeya, L; Spann, R; Springbok, R; Swart, P S; Thondikulam, Venkatasubramani L; Theron, I P; Tiplady, A; Toruvanda, O; Tshongweni, S; Heever, L van den; van der Merwe, C; van Rooyen, R; Wakhaba, S; Walker, A L; Welz, M; Williams, L; Wolleben, M; Woudt, P A; Young, N J; Zwart, J T L

    2016-01-01

    The construction of the KAT-7 array in the Karoo region of the Northern Cape in South Africa was intended primarily as an engineering prototype for technologies and techniques applicable to the MeerKAT telescope. This paper looks at the main engineering and scien- tific highlights from this effort, and discusses their applicability to both MeerKAT and other next-generation radio telescopes. In particular we found that the composite dish surface works well, but it becomes complicated to fabricate for a dish lacking circular symmetry; the Stir- ling cycle cryogenic system with ion pump to achieve vacuum works but demands much higher maintenance than an equivalent Gifford-McMahon cycle system; the ROACH (Recon- figurable Open Architecture Computing Hardware)-based correlator with SPEAD (Stream- ing Protocol for Exchanging Astronomical Data) protocol data transfer works very well and KATCP (Karoo Array Telescope Control Protocol) control protocol has proven very flexible and convenient. KAT-7 has also been used f...

  3. Pre-accidental situations highlighted by RECUPERARE method and data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RECUPERARE method has been developed for operating feedback analysis and built on the French Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) principles. It is used to study the causes of human errors or technical failures occurred in French PWRs and the recovery process of events. Based on an event classification (6 categories) model according to the nature of the link between failure and recovery, the identified and recorded data are: the causes of the defects (technical, human, organizational) and the context in which they appear; the factors of the recovery performance (depending on technical and organizational aspects); a chronological analysis, designed to collect delays between failures and their detection/recovery for each event. About 3600 events reported in French PWRs (1997-2003) had been reviewed through this model. Initially, the weight of factors and the most important factors, which influenced the detection and recovery delay, are defined. For this purpose, the regression Partial Least Square (PLS) is used. Then, to link RECUPERARE results with pre-accidental data, conditional probabilities of events linked between them by a cause and effect relationship are calculated. For this, the Bayesian method with the Bayesian network is built with the PLS obtained results and applied. This constitutes a first approach to take into account in HRA the human and organizational factors highlighted by operating feedback. (author)

  4. Highlights and Discoveries from the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Tananbaum, H; Tucker, W; Wilkes, B; Edmonds, P

    2014-01-01

    Within 40 years of the detection of the first extrasolar X-ray source in 1962,NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has achieved an increase in sensitivity of 10 orders of magnitude, comparable to the gain in going from naked-eye observations to the most powerful optical telescopes over the past 400 years. Chandra is unique in its capabilities for producing sub-arcsecond X-ray images with 100-200 eV energy resolution for energies in the range 0.08highlights that illustrate how observations using Chandra, sometimes alone, but often in conjunction with other telescopes, have deepened, and in some instances revolutionized, our understanding ...

  5. "A Fly in the Ointment": African American Male Preservice Teachers' Experiences with Stereotype Threat in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Sonya V.; Rodriguez, Louie F.

    2015-01-01

    This study draws from a larger phenomenological study on African American academic persistence and career aspirations in education. This article highlights three African American males' experiences with concentrated forms of stereotype threat in teacher education. Their voices revealed dimensions of how power and privilege operate in teacher…

  6. Paul Erdmann Isert (1755-1789, médecin naturaliste sur la côte de Guinée : une source pour une histoire des paysages Paul Erdmann Isert (1755-1789, a doctor and naturalist on the Guinea coast and a source for the history of landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Juhé-Beaulaton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Paul Erdmann Isert était un médecin et homme de science du xviiie siècle. Auteur d’un récit de voyage considéré comme une source majeure pour l’histoire des populations de la côte de Guinée, son apport aux sciences naturelles est resté méconnu. Il est pourtant un pionnier de l’exploration botanique de cette région d’Afrique et il a contribué à la connaissance de la flore de l’Afrique de l’Ouest par ses envois d’échantillons d’herbier conservés dans plusieurs villes d’Europe. Son récit, comportant de nombreuses descriptions des paysages observés et des références à des espèces végétales identifiées selon la nomenclature de Linné, se révèle être une source fondamentale pour restituer les paysages de cette époque. Après avoir retracé le cheminement scientifique de ce naturaliste bien représentatif de son temps, nous verrons comment les données qu’il nous a transmises concernant la flore peuvent être analysées en vue de reconstituer l’histoire des paysages de la région visitée.Isert was a doctor and a scientist of the 18th century. Although he wrote a travel report considered as a major source for the history of the populations on the Guinea coast, his contribution to the natural science remained unrecognized. He is nevertheless a pioneer of the botanical exploration in this region of Africa and he contributed to the knowledge of the West Africa flora by sending herbarium samples, which are kept in several European cities. His report contains numerous descriptions of the landscapes and references to botanical species identified according to the Linnaean classification system and represents a fundamental source to restore the landscapes of this period. In this article we shall recall the life and scientific progress of this naturalist who is representative of his time and then see how the data, which he passed on to us concerning the flora, can be analysed to reconstitute the history of the

  7. Post-9/11: Making Islam an American Religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article explores several key events in the last 12 years that led to periods of heightened suspicion about Islam and Muslims in the United States. It provides a brief overview of the rise of anti-Muslim and anti-Islam sentiment known as “Islamophobia”, and it investigates claims that American Muslims cannot be trusted to be loyal to the United States because of their religion. This research examines American Muslim perspectives on national security discourse regarding terrorism and radicalization, both domestic and foreign, after 9/11. The article argues that it is important to highlight developments, both progressive and conservative, in Muslim communities in the United States over the last 12 years that belie suspicions of widespread anti-American sentiment among Muslims or questions about the loyalty of American Muslims. The article concludes with a discussion of important shifts from a Muslim identity politics that disassociated from American identity and ‘American exceptionalism’ to a position of integration and cultural assimilation.

  8. How Children's Books Distort the Asian American Image. Criteria for Analyzing Books on Asian Americans. Survey of Childrens' Books: Chinese American, Japanese American, Korean American, Vietnamese American, General

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Eleven Asian American book reviewers were asked by the Council on Interracial Books for Children to find, read, and analyze all childrens books on Asian American themes currently in print or in use in schools and libraries. The major conclusion was that, with one or perhaps two exceptions, the 66 books reviewed are racist, sexist, and elitist.…

  9. Perceptions of African American and European American Teachers on the Education of African American Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Ellen; Banks, Joy; Young, Kathryn; Jackson, Francesina R.

    2007-01-01

    The authors interviewed 27 teachers (16 African American and 11 European American) on instructional factors contributing to overidentification of behavior problems in African American boys. Interviews focused on teachers' perspectives of effective teachers, teacher-student relationships, and communication styles. Analysis of the interviews showed…

  10. Savoirs naturalistes et stratégies de collecte de Geloina erosa, Geloina expansa et Polymesoda bengalensis dans la mangrove de l’île de Siberut (Indonésie)

    OpenAIRE

    Burgos, Ariadna

    2016-01-01

    Les femmes de la baie de Katurai (Île de Siberut, Indonésie) partent tous les jours dans la mangrove à la recherche de crabes, de poissons et de coquillages. Depuis leur enfance, elles ont une relation étroite avec cet écosystème et ont consolidé par leur expérience et la transmission de savoirs, un corpus de connaissances naturalistes qui leur permet d’évaluer leur milieu, d’identifier des changements et d’optimiser leur travail. Par une approche ethnoécologique, cet article s’intéresse plus...

  11. Call for oil independence - highlights the need for energy efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baangens, Lotta [Foereningen Sveriges Energiraadgivare (Sweden)

    2007-07-01

    In December 2005, the Swedish Government appointed a commission to draw up a programme to reduce Sweden's dependence on oil. The main reason for this was the climate change. Other reasons were the effect of oil prices on Sweden's growth and employment and the fact that oil still plays a major role for peace and security throughout the world. Members of the commission, besides the prime minister, were experts from industry, agriculture, forestry, science and experts on energy efficiency and district heating. The aim of the commission was to propose a number of measures to end the oil dependence by the year of 2020 and also to reduce the use of oil products. Although there is a great potential for Swedish raw materials (bio fuels) as alternatives to oil it was soon obvious that oil independence could not be reached without a great contribution from energy efficiency. Energy efficiency was proposed as the first of five strategies of the Commission. The Commission proposed measures for energy efficiency both on policy level and on concrete actions. Interest in the Commission's work is and has been enormous, both in Sweden and abroad. Many people took part in the hearings which were the start of the Commission's work. In Sweden the Commission has for sure increased the interest in energy related issues and also very much highlighted the need for energy efficiency.The paper will present the results of the Commissions work with a specific focus on measures on energy efficiency. Now Sweden has a new government, with a new prime minister, so the Commission does no longer exist. The new government will start a new Commission which hopefully will continue the work started by the Commission on Oil independence.

  12. Cassini Science Highlights: Surprises in the Saturn System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, Linda J.

    2012-10-01

    Cassini’s exploration of the Saturn system has generated a treasure trove of scientific data on Saturn, Titan, Enceladus, and other diverse icy satellites, the rings, and magnetosphere. After eight years of close study of this exceptionally complex and dynamic environment, Cassini is still unveiling new scientific discoveries that continue to amaze us. Standout recent highlights include aftereffects from Saturn’s huge storm, a possible subsurface ocean on Titan, close flybys of icy satellites, migrating ring “propellers”, and unexpected variations in Saturn kilometric radiation periodicities. Current observations show seasonal changes including the formation of a polar vortex at Titan’s south pole. To date, Cassini has observed Saturn from just after northern winter solstice through northern spring equinox and now is observing the Saturn system in the previously unobserved period leading up to northern summer solstice. In the remaining five years of the on-going Solstice Mission, Cassini will continue to study seasonally and temporally dependent processes. Given the long Saturnian year ( 30 years) the longevity of Cassini is essential for elucidating seasonal change in the Saturn system. The grand finale of the mission occurs in 2017, when a series of inclined orbits brings Cassini between the innermost D ring and the upper regions of Saturn’s atmosphere. This geometry will offer unique opportunities for new discoveries and ground-breaking science, including Saturn interior structure science from otherwise unobtainable gravity and magnetic field measurements and unprecedented determination of the ring mass, currently uncertain by an order of magnitude. This Proximal orbit phase is similar to Juno’s mission at Jupiter. Comparing Jupiter and Saturn is the first step toward the next great leap in solar system origins research. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA

  13. STS-107 Mission Highlights Resource, Part 4 of 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    This video, Part 4 of 4, shows the activities of the STS-107 crew during flight days 13 through 15 of the Columbia orbiter's final flight. The crew consists of Commander Rick Husband, Pilot William McCool, Payload Commander Michael Anderson, Mission Specialists David Brown, Kalpana Chawla, and Laurel Clark, and Payload Specialist Ilan Ramon. The highlight of flight day 13 is Kalpana Chawla conversing with Mission Control Center in Houston during troubleshooting of the Combustion Module in a recovery procedure to get the MIST fire suppression experiment back online. Chawla is shown replacing an atomizer head. At Mission Control Center a vase of flowers commemorating the astronauts who died on board Space Shuttle Challenger's final flight is shown and explained. The footage of flight day 14 consists of a tour of Columbia's flight deck, middeck, and Spacehab research module. Rick Husband narrates the tour, which features Kalpana Chawla, Laurel Clark, and himself. The astronauts demonstrate hygene, a dining tray, the orbiter's toilet, and a space iron, which is a rack for strapping down shirts. The Earth limb is shown with the Spacehab module in the foreground. Clark exercises on a bicycle for a respiration experiment, and demonstrates how a compact disk player gyrates in microgravity. On flight day 15, the combustion module is running again, and footage is shown of the Water Mist Fire-Suppression Experiment (Mist) in operation. Laurel Clark narrates a segment of the video in which Ilan Ramon exercises on a bicycle, Rick Husband, Kalpana Chawla, and Ramon demonstrate spinning and push-ups in the Spacehab module, and Clark demonstrates eating from a couple of food packets. The video ends with a shot of the Earth limb reflected on the radiator on the inside of Columbia's open payload bay door with the Earth in the background.

  14. Highlights on searches for supersymmetry and exotic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this review, we present highlight results of the first three years of the LHC running on searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM). The excellent performance of the LHC machine and detectors has provided a large, high-quality dataset, mainly proton-proton interactions at a centre of mass energy of 7 TeV (collected in 2010 and 2011) and 8 TeV (collected in 2012). This allowed the experiments to test the Standard Model (SM) at the highest available energy and to search for new phenomena in a considerably enlarged phase space compared to previous colliders. The present review is organised as follows. Section 2 gives motivations to search for new physics beyond the SM, and a brief description of the main classes of BSM theory candidates is reported in Section 3. Section 4 summarises the characteristics of the 3-year LHC dataset, called in the following the Run 1 dataset. Precise tests of the SM are reported in Section 5. The following next sections are the core of the review and present a selection of results from the ATLAS and CMS experiments on BSM searches, gathered in four parts: the search for new physics in the scalar sector in Section 6, the search for supersymmetric particles in Section 7, the search for dark matter candidates in Section 8, and a non-exhaustive list of other exotics BSM (heavy resonances, excited fermions, leptoquarks and vector-like quarks) searches in Section 9. Future plans of the LHC running are reported in Section 10

  15. Highlights of IAEA activities in the field of radiation application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In IAEA's major programme of Nuclear Applications, the activities performed are divided into four areas: food and agriculture, industry and earth science, human health, and physical and chemical sciences. These activities involve co-operation with FAO, WHO, UNIDO and UNEP, and have close link with the technical assistance programme. About 60% of the technical assistance projects are implemented in the field of nuclear applications. The purpose of the nuclear application programme is to develop technologies useful for environmental protection and sustainable development, to support R and D programmes of developing countries, to develop new applications of nuclear techniques. Major activities in food and agriculture are the application of radiation and isotopes, controling insects, preserving food, soil fertility and crop production, and improving animal production and the use of radiation with biotechnology for plant mutation breeding aiming at environmentally friendly and sustainable food production. In the human health programme emphasis is given to nuclear medicine, cancer therapy and nutrition. Today, only 35% of all developing countries have radiotherapy facilities. Activities, therefore, focus on strengthening clinical radiotherapy in such countries. In the field of industry and earth science, flue gas cleaning by electron beams, pollution monitoring using nuclear analytical techniques, nucleonic control systems for industries, and water resource exploration are major projects assisting developing countries. As of 1994 the IAEA will launch 12 new and promising Model Projects for developing Member States which will be of benefit to their economies and raising of their standard of living. In this paper the highlights of the above mentioned IAEA activities are presented. (author)

  16. BRITICE-CHRONO: The project and highlights so far

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabel, D.; Clark, C.; Chiverrell, R. C.; O'Cofaigh, C.; Scourse, J. D.; Hindmarsh, R. C. A.

    2015-12-01

    BRITICE-CHRONO is a five-year Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) funded consortium of more than 40 researchers comprising glaciologists, marine and terrestrial Quaternary scientists and ice sheet-modellers, with the specific aim to systematically collect and date material to constrain the timing and rates of change of the marine-influenced sectors of the collapsing British Irish Ice Sheet (http://britice-chrono.org/). At the halfway point of the project we have completed two 40-day research cruises circumnavigating the British Isles and Ireland, and over 300 person-days of terrestrial fieldwork, yieldeding around 15 tonnes of samples for dating by optically stimulated luminescence-, surface exposure-, and radiocarbon methods. By March 2016 we expect to have generated about 850 new dates from landforms associated with the deglaciation of the last British and Irish ice-sheet. The success of the project will in part depend on the team being able to provide ice-sheet modellers with robust chronological markers against which the ice-sheet models can be tested. The decision-making process in deciding robustness of ages derived from multiple samples and different Quaternary geochronological methods will be discussed. Some geochronological highlights thus far are that deglaciation of the northwest sector of the ice-sheet was in progress at 28ka, well before the global LGM, and the northern tip of mainland Scotland was ice free by 25ka. At the same time the Irish Sea ice stream in the south appears to have been advancing towards its maximum extend. Although deglaciation in the south commences much later, both the main southern and northern ice streams appear to have persisted for at least 10ka with final retreat onto the mainland occurring at approximately the same time (16ka).

  17. Quilting: An American Craft

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Phyllis

    2006-01-01

    A quilt can warm a bed, decorate a wall, comfort a child in her crib or a soldier at war. A quilt also can tell a story, commemorate an event, honor the dead, unite a community, and reflect a culture. This article is an introduction to the American craft of quilting. The article describes what quilting is and the different types of quilts. It also…

  18. Modeling American Marriage Patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Bloom, David E.; Neil G. Bennett

    1990-01-01

    This paper investigates the application of the three-parameter, Coale-McNeil marriage model and some related hyper-parameterized specifications to data on the first marriage patterns of American women. Because the model is parametric, it can be used to estimate the parameters of the marriage process, free of censoring bias, for cohorts that have yet to complete their first marriage experience. Empirical evidence from three surveys is reported on the ability of the model to replicate and proje...

  19. Asian American Adolescent Identity

    OpenAIRE

    Ohm, Julie Juhye

    1999-01-01

    The formation of ego identity in Asian American late adolescents attending Virginia Tech was examined within the frameworks of Erikson's psychosocial theory and Berry, Trimble, and Olmedo's model of acculturation. Ego identity was measured using the Achieved sub-scale of the Revised Version of the Extended Objective Measure of Ego Identity Status, an instrument based on the theoretical constructs of Erikson. Ethnic identity was measured using the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure and Ameri...

  20. American and British English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁波

    2004-01-01

    @@ The difficulty for the nonnative learner of English is there is no standard English form. He is confronted(面对) with two English dialects (方言) to learn: British English and American English (leaving aside Australian,Indian, South African English ete.) And despite the many cross-cultural influences, it seems that the vocabularies, spellings and pronunciations of these two dialects are diverging year by year.