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Sample records for american alligator alligator

  1. Bioprospecting the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis host defense peptidome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barney M Bishop

    Full Text Available Cationic antimicrobial peptides and their therapeutic potential have garnered growing interest because of the proliferation of bacterial resistance. However, the discovery of new antimicrobial peptides from animals has proven challenging due to the limitations associated with conventional biochemical purification and difficulties in predicting active peptides from genomic sequences, if known. As an example, no antimicrobial peptides have been identified from the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis, although their serum is antimicrobial. We have developed a novel approach for the discovery of new antimicrobial peptides from these animals, one that capitalizes on their fundamental and conserved physico-chemical properties. This sample-agnostic process employs custom-made functionalized hydrogel microparticles to harvest cationic peptides from biological samples, followed by de novo sequencing of captured peptides, eliminating the need to isolate individual peptides. After evaluation of the peptide sequences using a combination of rational and web-based bioinformatic analyses, forty-five potential antimicrobial peptides were identified, and eight of these peptides were selected to be chemically synthesized and evaluated. The successful identification of multiple novel peptides, exhibiting antibacterial properties, from Alligator mississippiensis plasma demonstrates the potential of this innovative discovery process in identifying potential new host defense peptides.

  2. OOGENESIS AND OVARIAN HISTOLOGY OF THE AMERICAN ALLIGATOR ALLIGATOR MISSISSIPPIENSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although folliculogenesis and oogenesis have been observed in numerous reptiles, these phenomena have not been described in detail in a crocodilian. Oogenesis and histological features of the adult ovary of Alligator mississippiensis are described. Using a complex process, the ov...

  3. METALS AND METALLOIDS IN TISSUES OF AMERICAN ALLIGATORS IN THREE FLORIDA LAKES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concentrations of metals and selenium were examined in tissues of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) from three lakes in central Florida, in one of which alligators have exhibited reproductive or developmental defects. Our overall objective was to determine whether ...

  4. Umbilical scarring in hatchling American alligators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, J.J.; Sepulveda, M.S.; Buckland, J.E.; Anderson, S.R.; Gross, T.S.

    2004-01-01

    Umbilical scarring is the presence of excess scar tissue deposited between abdominal dermal layers at the site of yolk sac absorption in hatchling American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis). The presence of this dermal condition plays a key evaluatory role in the overall quality and subsequent value for various commercial leather products. Despite the prevalent nature of this condition, currently the industry has no standardized protocols for its quantification. The objectives of this study were to examine the relationship between hatchling weight and age and incidence of umbilical scarring and to develop a quantifiable and reproducible technique to measure this dermal condition in hatchling American alligators. Thirty eggs from each of nine clutches were incubated in two separate incubators at different facilities and hatchling umbilical scarring was measured at 2 and 10 days of age using digital calipers. Umbilical area was calculated by multiplying umbilical length times umbilical width. There was a significant effect of both age and clutch on umbilical area (overall decline of 64%) by 10 days post-hatch. However, only five of the nine clutches utilized expressed a noticeable decline in the size of this dermal condition (range 67-74%). We had hypothesized that larger hatchlings would have larger umbilical areas and a slower rate of improvement in this condition during the first few days post-hatch. The differences in umbilical area and percent decline with age across clutches, however, were not associated with differences in initial hatchling weights. Within clutches and time periods, hatchling weight had no significant effect on the size and/or rate of decline of this condition. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Blood and Plasma Biochemistry Reference Intervals for Wild Juvenile American Alligators ( Alligator mississippiensis ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Matthew T; Kupar, Caitlin A; Kelley, Meghan D; Finger, John W; Tuberville, Tracey D

    2016-07-01

    : American alligators ( Alligator mississippiensis ) are one of the most studied crocodilian species in the world, yet blood and plasma biochemistry information is limited for juvenile alligators in their northern range, where individuals may be exposed to extreme abiotic and biotic stressors. We collected blood samples over a 2-yr period from 37 juvenile alligators in May, June, and July to establish reference intervals for 22 blood and plasma analytes. We observed no effect of either sex or blood collection time on any analyte investigated. However, our results indicate a significant correlation between a calculated body condition index and aspartate aminotransferase and creatine kinase. Glucose, total protein, and potassium varied significantly between sampling sessions. In addition, glucose and potassium were highly correlated between the two point-of-care devices used, although they were significantly lower with the i-STAT 1 CG8+ cartridge than with the Vetscan VS2 Avian/Reptile Rotor. The reference intervals presented herein should provide baseline data for evaluating wild juvenile alligators in the northern portion of their range.

  6. In vitro drug susceptibility pattern of Mycoplasma alligatoris isolated from symptomatic American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmick, Kelly E; Brown, Daniel R; Jacobson, Elliott R; Brown, Mary B

    2002-06-01

    A recently described mycoplasma, Mycoplasma alligatoris, was isolated from dead American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) that had demonstrated clinical signs of lethargy, anorexia, bilateral ocular discharge, edema. paraparesis, and polyarthritis. The in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration for nine antibacterial agents was determined through serial dilution in broth and plate culture for M. alligatoris isolates. The inhibitory concentration obtained for doxycycline, enrofloxacin, sarafloxacin, oxytetracycline, tilmicosin, and tylosin (< 1 microg/ml) was lower than that of clindamycin (1-8 microg/ml), chloramphenicol (8-16 microg/ml), and erythromycin (32-138 microg/ml).

  7. Chronic hypoxic incubation blunts a cardiovascular reflex loop in embryonic American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eme, John; Hicks, James W; Crossley, Dane A

    2011-10-01

    Hypoxia is a naturally occurring environmental challenge for embryonic non-avian reptiles, and this study is the first to investigate the impact of chronic hypoxia on a possible chemoreflex loop in a developing non-avian reptile. We measured heart rate and blood pressure in normoxic and hypoxic-incubated (10% O(2)) American alligator embryos (Alligator mississippiensis) at 70 and 90/95% of development. We hypothesized that hypoxic incubation would blunt embryonic alligators' response to a reflex loop stimulated by phenylbiguanide (PBG), a 5-HT(3) receptor agonist that stimulates vagal pulmonary C-fiber afferents. PBG injection caused a hypotensive bradycardia in 70 and 95% of development embryos (paired t tests, P alligator, with an extended length of time between each developmental stage relative to avian species, may provide an excellent model to test the cardiorespiratory effects of prolonged exposure to changes in atmospheric gases. This extended period allows for lengthy studies at each stage without the transition to a new stage, and the natural occurrence of hypoxia and hypercapnia in crocodilian nests makes this stress ecologically and evolutionarily relevant.

  8. Hexavalent Chromium Is Cytotoxic and Genotoxic to American Alligator Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Sandra S.; Wise, Catherine; Xie, Hong; Guillette, Louis J.; Zhu, Cairong; Wise, John Pierce; Wise, John Pierce

    2015-01-01

    Metals are a common pollutant in the aquatic ecosystem. With global climate change, these levels are anticipated to rise as lower pH levels allow sediment bound metals to be released. The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is an apex predator in the aquatic ecosystem and is considered a keystone species; as such it serves as a suitable monitor for localized pollution. One metal of increasing concern is hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)). It is present in the aquatic environment and is ...

  9. Fluctuating water depths affect American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) body condition in the Everglades, Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Laura A.; Beauchamp, Jeffrey S.; Jeffery, Brian M.; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Mazzotti, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Successful restoration of wetland ecosystems requires knowledge of wetland hydrologic patterns and an understanding of how those patterns affect wetland plant and animal populations.Within the Everglades, Florida, USA restoration, an applied science strategy including conceptual ecological models linking drivers to indicators is being used to organize current scientific understanding to support restoration efforts. A key driver of the ecosystem affecting the distribution and abundance of organisms is the timing, distribution, and volume of water flows that result in water depth patterns across the landscape. American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) are one of the ecological indicators being used to assess Everglades restoration because they are a keystone species and integrate biological impacts of hydrological operations through all life stages. Alligator body condition (the relative fatness of an animal) is one of the metrics being used and targets have been set to allow us to track progress. We examined trends in alligator body condition using Fulton’s K over a 15 year period (2000–2014) at seven different wetland areas within the Everglades ecosystem, assessed patterns and trends relative to restoration targets, and related those trends to hydrologic variables. We developed a series of 17 a priori hypotheses that we tested with an information theoretic approach to identify which hydrologic factors affect alligator body condition. Alligator body condition was highest throughout the Everglades during the early 2000s and is approximately 5–10% lower now (2014). Values have varied by year, area, and hydrology. Body condition was positively correlated with range in water depth and fall water depth. Our top model was the “Current” model and included variables that describe current year hydrology (spring depth, fall depth, hydroperiod, range, interaction of range and fall depth, interaction of range and hydroperiod). Across all models, interaction

  10. Hexavalent chromium is cytotoxic and genotoxic to American alligator cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sandra S; Wise, Catherine; Xie, Hong; Guillette, Louis J; Zhu, Cairong; Wise, John Pierce; Wise, John Pierce

    2016-02-01

    Metals are a common pollutant in the aquatic ecosystem. With global climate change, these levels are anticipated to rise as lower pH levels allow sediment bound metals to be released. The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is an apex predator in the aquatic ecosystem and is considered a keystone species; as such it serves as a suitable monitor for localized pollution. One metal of increasing concern is hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)). It is present in the aquatic environment and is a known human carcinogen and reproductive toxicant. We measured the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Cr(VI) in American alligator cells derived from scute tissue. We found that particulate and soluble Cr(VI) are both cytotoxic and genotoxic to alligator cells in a concentration-dependent manner. These data suggest that alligators may be used as a model for assessing the effects of environmental Cr(VI) contamination as well as for other metals of concern. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. MORPHOLOGICAL VARIATION IN HATCHLING AMERICAN ALLIGATORS (ALLIGATOR MISSISSIPPIENSIS) FROM THREE FLORIDA LAKES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morphological variation of 508 hatchling alligators from three lakes in north central Florida (Lakes Woodruff, Apopka, and Orange) was analyzed using multivariate statistics. Morphological variation was found among clutches as well as among lakes. Principal components analysis wa...

  12. Analysis of PFAAs in American alligators part 2: Potential dietary exposure of South Carolina hunters from recreationally harvested alligator meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Jessica J; Guillette, Louis J; Lovelace, Susan; Parrott, Benjamin B; Rainwater, Thomas R; Reiner, Jessica L

    2017-11-01

    Exposure to perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs) has been linked to many harmful health effects including reproductive disorders, developmental delays, and altered liver and kidney function. Most human exposure to environmental contaminants, including PFAAs, occurs through consumption of contaminated food or drinking water. This study uses PFAA data from meat samples collected from recreationally harvested American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) in South Carolina to assess potential dietary exposure of hunters and their families to PFAAs. Consumption patterns were investigated using intercept surveys of 23 hunters at a wild game meat processor. An exposure scenario using the average consumption frequency, portion size, and median perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) concentration in alligator meat from all hunt units found the daily dietary exposure to be 2.11ng/kg body weight per day for an adult human. Dietary PFOS exposure scenarios based on location of harvest suggested the highest daily exposure occurs with alligator meat from the Middle Coastal hunt unit in South Carolina. Although no samples were found to exceed the recommended threshold for no consumption of PFOS found in Minnesota state guidelines, exposure to a mixture of PFAAs found in alligator meat and site-specific exposures based on harvest location should be considered in determining an appropriate guideline for vulnerable populations potentially exposed to PFAAs through consumption of wild alligator meat. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Urinary Phthalate Metabolites in American Alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) from Selected Florida Wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, John W; Bell, Jane Margaret; Guillette, Louis J

    2016-07-01

    Phthalates have been shown to cause endocrine disruption in laboratory animals and are associated with altered development of the reproductive system in humans. Further, human have significant exposure to phthalates. However, little is known concerning the exposure of wildlife to phthalates. We report urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations from fifty juvenile alligators from three Florida lakes and a site in the Everglades. Urinary phthalate monoester concentrations varied widely among alligators from the different sites but also among alligators from the same site. Mono-2-ethylhexy phthalate and monobutyl phthalate were found in most samples of alligator urine with maximums of 35,700 ng/mL and 193 ng/mL, respectively. Monobenzyl phthalate was found in 5 alligators with a maximum of 66.7 ng/mL. Other monoesters were found in only one or two alligator urine samples. The wide variation within and among sites, in addition to the high levels of mEHP, mBP and mBzP, is consistent with exposure arising from the intermittent spraying of herbicide formulations to control invasive aquatic plants in Florida freshwater sites. Phthalate diesters are used as adjuvants in many of these formulations.

  14. Concentrations of trace elements in American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) from Florida, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horai, Sawako; Itai, Takaaki; Noguchi, Takako; Yasuda, Yusuke; Adachi, Haruki; Hyobu, Yuika; Riyadi, Adi S; Boggs, Ashley S P; Lowers, Russell; Guillette, Louis J; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2014-08-01

    Concentrations of 28 trace elements (Li, Mg, Al, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Mo, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Cs, Tl, Hg, Pb, and Bi) in the livers of juvenile and adult American alligators inhabiting two central Florida lakes, Lake Apopka (LA), and Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge (LW) and one lagoon population located in Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge (MINWR; NASA), were determined. In juveniles from MINWR, concentrations of nine elements (Li, Fe, Ni, Sr, In, Sb, Hg, Pb and Bi) were significantly higher, whereas six elements (V, Fe, As, Sr, Hg and Bi) were elevated in adults (pLA, LW and MINWR were 1770 μg g(-1) DW, 3690 μg g(-1) DW and 5250 μg g(-1) DW, respectively. More than half of the adult specimens from LW and MINWR exhibited elevated hepatic Fe concentrations that exceed the threshold value for toxic effects in donkey, red deer and human. These results prompted us to express our concern on possible exposure and health effects in American alligators by some trace elements derived from NASA activities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Feeding alters blood flow patterns in the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findsen, Anders; Crossley, Dane A; Wang, Tobias

    2018-01-01

    The crocodilian cardiovascular design with a four-chambered heart and a left aorta that emerge from the right ventricle allows blood to be shunted away from the lungs, a right-to-left (R-L) shunt. The adaptive significance of this R-L shunt remains both poorly understood and controversial with particular debate on its putative role during digestion. Here we measure blood flow patterns in the right aorta (RAo), left aorta (LAo) and the coeliac artery (CoA) of undisturbed American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) during fasting and throughout most of the digestive period. Digestion doubled blood flow in the RAo (10.1±0.9 to 20.7±1.5mlmin -1 kg -1 ), whereas LAo increased approximately 3-fold (3.8±0.6 to 12.2±2.1mlmin -1 kg -1 ). Blood flow in the CoA increased more than four-fold during digestion (3.0±0.6 to 13.3±1.6mlmin -1 kg -1 ). The rise in blood flows was achieved by a doubling of heart rate (18.5±3.3 to 37.8±3.6mlmin -1 kg -1 ). Maximal flows measured in all arteries and heart rate occurred in the first hour of the postprandial period and continued for the next 7h. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Seasonal Variation of Total Mercury Burden in the American Alligator (Alligator Mississippiensis) at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge (MINWR), Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Frances M.; Dorsey, Jonathan E.; Long, Stephen E.; Schock, Tracey B.; Bowden, John A.; Lowers, Russell H.; Guillette, Louis J., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal variation of mercury (Hg) is not well studied in free-ranging wildlife. Atmospheric deposition patterns of Hg have been studied in detail and have been modeled for both global and specific locations with great accuracy and correlates to environment impact. However, monitoring these trends in wildlife is complicated due to local environmental parameters (e.g., rainfall, humidity, pH, bacterial composition) that can affect the transformation of atmospheric Hg to the biologically available forms. Here, we utilized an abundant and healthy population of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge (MINWR), FL, and assessed Hg burden in whole blood samples over a span of 7 years (2007 2014; n 174) in an effort to assess seasonal variation of total [Hg]. While the majority of this population is assumed healthy, 18 individuals with low body mass indices (BMI, defined in this study) were captured throughout the 7 year sampling period. These individual alligators exhibited [Hg] that were not consistent with the observed overall seasonal [Hg] variation, and were statistically different from the healthy population of alligators. The alligators with low BMI had elevated concentrations of Hg compared to their age/sex/season matched counterparts with normal BMI. Statistically significant differences were found between the winter and spring seasons for animals with normal BMI. The data in this report supports the conclusion that organismal total [Hg] do fluctuate directly with seasonal deposition rates as well as other seasonal environmental parameters, such as average rainfall and prevailing wind direction. This study highlights the unique environment of MINWR to permit annual assessment of apex predators, such as the American alligator, to determine detailed environmental impact of contaminants of concern.

  17. Biophysics of directional hearing in the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bierman, Hilary S; Thornton, Jennifer L; Jones, Heath G

    2014-01-01

    Physiological and anatomical studies have suggested that alligators have unique adaptations for spatial hearing. Sound localization cues are primarily generated by the filtering of sound waves by the head. Different vertebrate lineages have evolved external and/or internal anatomical adaptations ...... in the extinct dinosaurs....

  18. Thermoregulatory adaptations and heat energy budget analyses of the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terpin, Kenneth M. [Univ. at Buffalo, NY (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Wild alligators were acclimated to laboratory conditions and thermocouples were surgically implanted at seven locations in the body. Animals were tested at different steady state environmental conditions in a climate space simulation chamber in order to ascertain the effect of heat transfer on body temperature. Results are reported.

  19. Olfactory and solitary chemosensory cells: two different chemosensory systems in the nasal cavity of the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen Anne

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nasal cavity of all vertebrates houses multiple chemosensors, either innervated by the Ist (olfactory or the Vth (trigeminal cranial nerve. Various types of receptor cells are present, either segregated in different compartments (e.g. in rodents or mingled in one epithelium (e.g. fish. In addition, solitary chemosensory cells have been reported for several species. Alligators which seek their prey both above and under water have only one nasal compartment. Information about their olfactory epithelium is limited. Since alligators seem to detect both volatile and water-soluble odour cues, I tested whether different sensory cell types are present in the olfactory epithelium. Results Electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry were used to examine the sensory epithelium of the nasal cavity of the American alligator. Almost the entire nasal cavity is lined with olfactory (sensory epithelium. Two types of olfactory sensory neurons are present. Both types bear cilia as well as microvilli at their apical endings and express the typical markers for olfactory neurons. The density of these olfactory neurons varies along the nasal cavity. In addition, solitary chemosensory cells innervated by trigeminal nerve fibres, are intermingled with olfactory sensory neurons. Solitary chemosensory cells express components of the PLC-transduction cascade found in solitary chemosensory cells in rodents. Conclusion The nasal cavity of the American alligator contains two different chemosensory systems incorporated in the same sensory epithelium: the olfactory system proper and solitary chemosensory cells. The olfactory system contains two morphological distinct types of ciliated olfactory receptor neurons.

  20. Rapid suppression of testosterone secretion after capture in male American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Valentine A; Elsey, Ruth M; Butterstein, George; Trosclair, Phillip L

    2004-01-15

    All reptiles studied to date show an increase in circulating corticosterone following capture. This rise in corticosterone has also been shown in a number of instances to result in a decline in reproductive steroids within hours after capture. As a result of these observations it has been considered imperative to collect blood samples as soon as possible after capture to get reliable measures of reproductive hormones. It has been claimed, however, that there is no effect of capture stress on reproductive steroids in juvenile alligators held for 2 h following capture. As we generally reject blood samples that are not collected within 15 min of capture we decided to reinvestigate the effect of short-term capture (2 h) on corticosterone and testosterone in male alligators. Four groups of alligators, ranging in size from 74 to 212 cm total length were captured in a 2-week period in May, the time of year when testosterone levels are highest. Two groups were captured during the day (eight bled at capture and again at 2 h, eight bled at 2 h only) and two at night (10 bled at capture and again at 2 h, 10 bled at 2 h only). Testosterone and corticosterone in alligators bled immediately on capture and at 2 h were not significantly different in the AM and PM samples so the results were combined (Initial bleed: corticosterone, 0.95 +/- 0.09 ng/ml, n=18; testosterone, 6.06 +/- 2.09 ng/ml, n=18. Two-hour bleed: corticosterone 15.68 +/- 1.91, n=18; testosterone, 2.75 +/- 0.79, n=18). Both the increase in corticosterone and the decline in testosterone at 2 h were significant (palligators sampled only once at 2 h were not significantly different from the 2-h values in alligators sampled twice (corticosterone 15.04 +/- 1.29, n=18; testosterone, 1.85 +/- 0.62, n=18). These results clearly demonstrate that short-term capture stress results in a significant decline in testosterone in male alligators.

  1. Effects of feeding on arterial blood gases in the American alligator Alligator mississippiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busk, M; Overgaard, J; Hicks, J W; Bennett, A F; Wang, T

    2000-10-01

    Reptiles habitually ingest large meals at infrequent intervals, leading to changes in acid-base status as the net secretion of acid to the stomach causes a metabolic alkalosis (the alkaline tide). In chronically cannulated and undisturbed amphibians and reptiles, the pH changes in arterial blood are, nevertheless, reduced by a concomitant respiratory acidosis (increased P(CO2) caused by a relative hypoventilation). Alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) have been reported to exhibit exceptionally large increases in plasma [HCO3(-)] following feeding, but these studies were based on blood samples obtained by cardiac puncture, so stress and disturbance may have affected the blood gas levels. Furthermore, crocodilian haemoglobin is characterised by a unique binding of HCO3(-) that act to reduce blood oxygen-affinity, and it has been proposed that this feature safeguards oxygen offloading by counteracting pH effects on blood oxygen-affinity. Therefore, to study acid-base regulation and the interaction between the alkaline tide and oxygen transport in more detail, we describe the arterial blood gas composition of chronically cannulated and undisturbed alligators before and after voluntary feeding (meal size 7.5+/-1% of body mass). Digestion was associated with an approximately fourfold increase in metabolic rate (from 0.63+/-0.04 to 2.32+/-0.24 ml O(2) min(-1)kg(-1)) and was accompanied by a small increase in the respiratory gas exchange ratio. The arterial P(O2) of fasting alligators was 60.3+/-6.8 mmHg (1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa) and reached a maximum of 81.3+/-2.7 mmHg at 96 h following feeding; there was only a small increase in lactate levels, so the increased metabolic rate seems to be entirely aerobic. Plasma [HCO3(-)] increased from 24.4+/-1.1 to 36.9+/-1.7 mmol l(-1) (at 24 h), but since arterial P(CO2) increased from 29.0+/-1.1 to 36.8+/-1.3 mmHg, arterial pH remained virtually unaffected (changing from 7.51+/-0.01 to 7.58+/-0.01 at 24 h). The changes in plasma [HCO

  2. Biomonitoring Heavy Metal Pollution Using an Aquatic Apex Predator, the American Alligator, and Its Parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez, Marisa; Merchant, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the bioaccumulation of chemical elements within various organismal tissues has become a useful tool to survey current or chronic levels of heavy metal exposure within an environment. In this study, we compared the bioaccumulations of As, Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb, Se, and Zn between the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis, and its parasites in order to establish their use as bioindicators of heavy metal pollution. Concomitant with these results, we were interested to determine if parasites were more sensitive bioindicators of heavy metals relative to alligators. We found parasites collectively accumulated higher levels of As, Cu, Se, and Zn in comparison to their alligator hosts, whereas Fe, Cd, and Pb concentrations were higher in alligators. Interestingly, Fe levels were significantly greater in intestinal trematodes than their alligator hosts when analyzed independently from other parasitic taxa. Further analyses showed alligator intestinal trematodes concentrated As, Cu, Fe, Se, and Zn at significantly higher levels than intestinal nematodes and parasites from other organs. However, pentastomids also employed the role as a good biomagnifier of As. Interestingly, parasitic abundance decreased as levels of As increased. Stomach and intestinal nematodes were the poorest bioaccumulators of metals, yet stomach nematodes showed their ability to concentrate Pb at orders of magnitude higher in comparison to other parasites. Conclusively, we suggest that parasites, particularly intestinal trematodes, are superior biomagnifiers of As, Cu, Se, and Zn, whereas alligators are likely good biological indicators of Fe, Cd, and Pb levels within the environment. PMID:26555363

  3. Pathology, physiologic parameters, tissue contaminants, and tissue thiamine in morbid and healthy central Florida adult American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeyfield, D.C.; Ross, J.P.; Carbonneau, D.A.; Terrell, S.P.; Woodward, A.R.; Schoeb, T.R.; Perceval, H.F.; Hinterkopf, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    An investigation of adult alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) mortalities in Lake Griffin, central Florida, was conducted from 1998-2004. Alligator mortality was highest in the months of April and May and annual death count peaked in 2000. Bacterial pathogens, heavy metals, and pesticides were not linked with the mortalities. Blood chemistry did not point to any clinical diagnosis, although differences between impaired and normal animals were noted. Captured alligators with signs of neurologic impairment displayed unresponsive and uncoordinated behavior. Three of 21 impaired Lake Griffin alligators were found to have neural lesions characteristic of thiamine deficiency in the telencephalon, particularly the dorsal ventricular ridge. In some cases, lesions were found in the thalamus, and parts of the midbrain. Liver and muscle tissue concentrations of thiamine (vitamin B"1) were lowest in impaired Lake Griffin alligators when compared to unimpaired alligators or to alligators from Lake Woodruff. The consumption of thiaminase-positive gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum) is thought to have been the cause of the low tissue thiamine and resulting mortalities. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  4. Scale-Dependent Habitat Selection and Size-Based Dominance in Adult Male American Alligators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley A Strickland

    Full Text Available Habitat selection is an active behavioral process that may vary across spatial and temporal scales. Animals choose an area of primary utilization (i.e., home range then make decisions focused on resource needs within patches. Dominance may affect the spatial distribution of conspecifics and concomitant habitat selection. Size-dependent social dominance hierarchies have been documented in captive alligators, but evidence is lacking from wild populations. We studied habitat selection for adult male American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis; n = 17 on the Pearl River in central Mississippi, USA, to test whether habitat selection was scale-dependent and individual resource selectivity was a function of conspecific body size. We used K-select analysis to quantify selection at the home range scale and patches within the home range to determine selection congruency and important habitat variables. In addition, we used linear models to determine if body size was related to selection patterns and strengths. Our results indicated habitat selection of adult male alligators was a scale-dependent process. Alligators demonstrated greater overall selection for habitat variables at the patch level and less at the home range level, suggesting resources may not be limited when selecting a home range for animals in our study area. Further, diurnal habitat selection patterns may depend on thermoregulatory needs. There was no relationship between resource selection or home range size and body size, suggesting size-dependent dominance hierarchies may not have influenced alligator resource selection or space use in our sample. Though apparent habitat suitability and low alligator density did not manifest in an observed dominance hierarchy, we hypothesize that a change in either could increase intraspecific interactions, facilitating a dominance hierarchy. Due to the broad and diverse ecological roles of alligators, understanding the factors that influence their

  5. Scale-dependent habitat selection and size-based dominance in adult male American alligators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Bradley A.; Vilella, Francisco; Belant, Jerrold L.

    2016-01-01

    Habitat selection is an active behavioral process that may vary across spatial and temporal scales. Animals choose an area of primary utilization (i.e., home range) then make decisions focused on resource needs within patches. Dominance may affect the spatial distribution of conspecifics and concomitant habitat selection. Size-dependent social dominance hierarchies have been documented in captive alligators, but evidence is lacking from wild populations. We studied habitat selection for adult male American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis; n = 17) on the Pearl River in central Mississippi, USA, to test whether habitat selection was scale-dependent and individual resource selectivity was a function of conspecific body size. We used K-select analysis to quantify selection at the home range scale and patches within the home range to determine selection congruency and important habitat variables. In addition, we used linear models to determine if body size was related to selection patterns and strengths. Our results indicated habitat selection of adult male alligators was a scale-dependent process. Alligators demonstrated greater overall selection for habitat variables at the patch level and less at the home range level, suggesting resources may not be limited when selecting a home range for animals in our study area. Further, diurnal habitat selection patterns may depend on thermoregulatory needs. There was no relationship between resource selection or home range size and body size, suggesting size-dependent dominance hierarchies may not have influenced alligator resource selection or space use in our sample. Though apparent habitat suitability and low alligator density did not manifest in an observed dominance hierarchy, we hypothesize that a change in either could increase intraspecific interactions, facilitating a dominance hierarchy. Due to the broad and diverse ecological roles of alligators, understanding the factors that influence their social dominance

  6. American alligator digestion rate of blue crabs and its implications for stomach contents analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nifong, James C.; Rosenblatt, Adam E.; Johnson, Nathan A.; Barichivich, William; Silliman, Brian; Heithaus, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Stomach contents analysis (SCA) provides a snap-shot observation of a consumer's diet. Interpretation of SCA data can be complicated by many factors, including variation in gastric residence times and digestion rates among prey taxa. Although some SCA methods are reported to efficiently remove all stomach contents, the effectiveness of these techniques has rarely been tested for large irregular shaped prey with hard exoskeletons. We used a controlled feeding trial to estimate gastric residency time and decomposition rate of a large crustacean prey item, the Blue Crab (Callinectes sapidus), which is consumed by American Alligators (Alligator mississippiensis), an abundant apex predator in coastal habitats of the southeastern United States. The decomposition rate of C. sapidus in the stomachs of A. mississippiensis followed a predictable pattern, and some crab pieces remained in stomachs for at least 14 days. We also found that certain portions of C. sapidus were prone to becoming caught within the stomach or esophagus, meaning not all crab parts are consistently recovered using gastric lavage techniques. However, because the state of decomposition of crabs was predictable, it is possible to estimate time since consumption for crabs recovered from wild alligators. This information, coupled with a detailed understanding of crab distributions and alligator movement tactics could help elucidate patterns of cross-ecosystem foraging by the American Alligator in coastal habitats

  7. The influence of regional hydrology on nesting behavior and nest fate of the American alligator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugarte, Cristina A.; Bass, Oron L.; Nuttle, William; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Rice, Kenneth G.; Fujisaki, Ikuko; Whelan, Kevin R.T.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrologic conditions are critical to the nesting behavior and reproductive success of crocodilians. In South Florida, USA, growing human settlement has led to extensive surface water management and modification of historical water flows in the wetlands, which have affected regional nesting of the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis). Although both natural and anthropogenic factors are considered to determine hydrologic conditions, the aspects of hydrological patterns that affect alligator nest effort, flooding (partial and complete), and failure (no hatchling) are unclear. We deconstructed annual hydrological patterns using harmonic models that estimated hydrological matrices including mean, amplitude, timing of peak, and periodicity of surface water depth and discharge and examined their effects on alligator nesting using survey data from Shark Slough, Everglades National Park, from 1985 to 2005. Nest effort increased in years with higher mean and lesser periodicity of water depth. A greater proportion of nests were flooded and failed when peak discharge occurred earlier in the year. Also, nest flooding rates were greater in years with greater periodicity of water depth, and nest failure rate was greater when mean discharge was higher. This study guides future water management decisions to mitigate negative impacts on reproduction of alligators and provides wildlife managers with a tool for assessing and modifying annual water management plans to conserve crocodilians and other wetland species.

  8. Animal-Borne Imaging Reveals Novel Insights into the Foraging Behaviors and Diel Activity of a Large-Bodied Apex Predator, the American Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nifong, James C.; Nifong, Rachel L.; Silliman, Brian R.; Lowers, Russell H.; Guillette, Louis J.; Ferguson, Jake M.; Welsh, Matthew; Abernathy, Kyler; Marshall, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Large-bodied, top- and apex predators (e.g., crocodilians, sharks, wolves, killer whales) can exert strong top-down effects within ecological communities through their interactions with prey. Due to inherent difficulties while studying the behavior of these often dangerous predatory species, relatively little is known regarding their feeding behaviors and activity patterns, information that is essential to understanding their role in regulating food web dynamics and ecological processes. Here we use animal-borne imaging systems (Crittercam) to study the foraging behavior and activity patterns of a cryptic, large-bodied predator, the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) in two estuaries of coastal Florida, USA. Using retrieved video data we examine the variation in foraging behaviors and activity patterns due to abiotic factors. We found the frequency of prey-attacks (mean = 0.49 prey attacks/hour) as well as the probability of prey-capture success (mean = 0.52 per attack) were significantly affected by time of day. Alligators attempted to capture prey most frequently during the night. Probability of prey-capture success per attack was highest during morning hours and sequentially lower during day, night, and sunset, respectively. Position in the water column also significantly affected prey-capture success, as individuals’ experienced two-fold greater success when attacking prey while submerged. These estimates are the first for wild adult American alligators and one of the few examples for any crocodilian species worldwide. More broadly, these results reveal that our understandings of crocodilian foraging behaviors are biased due to previous studies containing limited observations of cryptic and nocturnal foraging interactions. Our results can be used to inform greater understanding regarding the top-down effects of American alligators in estuarine food webs. Additionally, our results highlight the importance and power of using animal

  9. Alligator Rivers Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    An introduction to the Alligator Rivers Region is presented. It contains general information regarding the physiography, climate, hydrology and mining of the region. The Alligator Rivers Region is within an ancient basin, the Pine Creek Geosyncline, which has an area of approximately 66000 km 2 . The Geosyncline has a history of mineral exploitation dating back to 1865, during which time 16 metals have been extracted (silver, arsenic, gold, bismuth, cadmium, cobalt, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, lead, tin, tantalum, uranium, tungsten, zinc). Uranium exploration in the Pine Creek Geosyncline was stimulated by the discovery in 1949 of secondary uranium mineralisation near Rum June, 70 km south-east of Darwin. This was followed by a decade of intense exploration activity resulting in the discoveries of economic uranium ore bodies at Rum Jungle and in the upper reaches of the South Alligator River Valley. All the known major uranium deposits of the East Alligator River uranium field have been discovered since 1969. The present known resources of the Geosyncline are approximately 360 000 tonnes of contained U 3 O 8 . 2 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  10. Evaluating the effect of sample type on American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) analyte values in a point-of-care blood analyser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Matthew T; Finger, John W; Winzeler, Megan E; Tuberville, Tracey D

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of wildlife health has been enhanced by the ability of point-of-care (POC) blood analysers to provide biochemical analyses of non-domesticated animals in the field. However, environmental limitations (e.g. temperature, atmospheric humidity and rain) and lack of reference values may inhibit researchers from using such a device with certain wildlife species. Evaluating the use of alternative sample types, such as plasma, in a POC device may afford researchers the opportunity to delay sample analysis and the ability to use banked samples. In this study, we examined fresh whole blood, fresh plasma and frozen plasma (sample type) pH, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2), bicarbonate (HCO3 (-)), total carbon dioxide (TCO2), base excess (BE), partial pressure of oxygen (PO2), oxygen saturation (sO2) and lactate concentrations in 23 juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) using an i-STAT CG4+ cartridge. Our results indicate that sample type had no effect on lactate concentration values (F 2,65 = 0.37, P = 0.963), suggesting that the i-STAT analyser can be used reliably to quantify lactate concentrations in fresh and frozen plasma samples. In contrast, the other seven blood parameters measured by the CG4+ cartridge were significantly affected by sample type. Lastly, we were able to collect blood samples from all alligators within 2 min of capture to establish preliminary reference ranges for juvenile alligators based on values obtained using fresh whole blood.

  11. Spatial and temporal variability in estuary habitat use by American alligators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisaki, Ikuko; Hart, Kristen M.; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Beauchamp, Jeffrey S.; Jeffery, Brian M.; Brandt, Laura A.

    2016-01-01

    Estuarine habitat occupied by Alligator mississippiensis, a primarily freshwater species, is spatially and temporally heterogeneous largely due to a salinity gradient that fluctuates. Using long-term night light survey data, we examined seasonal patterns in alligators’ habitat use by size classes in midstream and downstream estuary zones of Shark River, Everglades National Park, in southern Florida. We observed predominantly large-sized alligators (total length ≥ 1.75 m); observations of alligators in the small size classes (0.5 m ≤ total length freshwater wetlands. Our results indicated high adaptability of alligators to the fluctuating habitat conditions. Use of estuaries by alligators is likely driven in part by physiology and possibly by reproductive cycle, and our results supported their opportunistic use of estuary habitat and ontogenetic niche shifts.

  12. Gulf-Wide Information System, Environmental Sensitivity Index Alligator Database, Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [esi_gator_LDWF_2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for American alligator in coastal Louisiana. Vector polygons represent alligator habitats with nest density...

  13. ALTERED HISTOLOGY OF THE THYMUS AND SPLEEN IN CONTAMINANT-EXPOSED JUVENILE AMERICAN ALLIGATORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morphological difference in spleen and thymus are closely related to functional immune differences. Hormonal regulation of the immune system has been demonstrated in reptilian splenic and thymic tissue. Spleens and thymus were obtained from juvenile alligators at two reference si...

  14. Heterophil/Lymphocyte Alterations as a Measure of Stress in American Alligators in Relation to Anthropogenic Disturbance in a Louisiana Intermediate Marsh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Murray

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Numerous anthropogenic factors represent environmental threats to Gulf Coast wetland ecosystems and associated fauna. American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis have been subject to long-term management and used as ecological and physiological indicators of habitat quality in response to anthropogenic events and stochastic natural disasters. The present study monitored heterophil to lymphocyte ratios (an indicator of stress, in American alligators in a Louisiana intermediate marsh from 2009 to 2011, a time period that coincides with an oil inundation event that occurred in 2011. Sixteen alligators were observed and processed morphometrically (total length, snout-vent length and body mass. Heterophil to lymphocyte ratios were negatively correlated with size, suggesting larger American alligators were physiologically more resilient to the disturbance, more able to actively avoid these poor conditions, or are less affected by localized disturbance.

  15. Variation in Nest Temperatures of the American Alligator Found on the Kennedy Space Center Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowers, Russell; Guillette, Louis J.; Weiss, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Information on nest temperatures of the American Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) constructed in the wild is limited. Nesting temperatures during a critical thermal sensitive period determine the sex of alligators and are therefore critical in establishing the sex biases in recruitment efforts of alligators within a given community. Nest components, varying environmental conditions, and global warming could have a significant impact on nest temperatures, thus affecting future generations of a given population. One hundred and seventy four programmable thermistors were inserted into fifty eight nests from 2010 through 2015 nesting cycles. Three thermistors were placed inside each nest cavity (one on top of the eggs, one in the middle of the eggs, and one at the bottom of the clutch of the eggs) to collect temperature profiles in the incubation chamber and throughout the entire incubation period. One thermistor was also placed near or above these nests to obtain an ambient air temperature profile. Once retrieved, data from these thermistors were downloaded to examine temperature profiles throughout the incubation period as well as during the period of sexual determination. These data would help establish survival rates related to nest temperature and predict sex ratio of recruited neonates at the Kennedy Space Center. Over three million temperatures have been recorded since 2010 for the alligator thermistor study giving us insight to the recruitment efforts found here. Precipitation was the largest influence on nesting temperatures outside of daily photoperiod, with immediate changes of up to eight degrees Celsius.

  16. EFFECT OF ALLIGATOR PEPPER (ZINGIBERACEAE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Daniel Owu

    proven fertility from a pilot study were randomly paired in fifteen cages in a well ventillated room. After three days of ... Key words : Effect, Alligator pepper, Herbal remedy, Nutrition, Pregnancy. Introduction ... ad libitum. Experimental drug.

  17. Alligator Rivers analogue project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerden, P.

    1990-01-01

    Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization has extensively evaluated uranium ore bodies in the Alligator Rivers Uranium Province in Australia as analogues of radioactive waste repositories. The work was extended for a three-year program as an international project based on the Koongarra uranium deposit and sponsored by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. The technical program comprises six major sub-projects involving modelling and experimental work: modelling of radionuclide migration; hydrogeology of the Koongarra uranium deposit; uranium/thorium series disequilibria studies; groundwater and colloid studies; fission product studies; transuranic nuclide studies; an outline of the technical programs and a summary of progress in the technical sub-projects is given. This is followed by a series of technical reports which briefly describe current research tasks, and which have been separately indexed

  18. Levels of mercury in alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) collected along a transect through the Florida Everglades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbold, D.G.; Fink, L.E.; Laine, K.A.; Niemczyk, S.L.; Chandrasekhar, T.; Wankel, Scott D.; Kendall, C.

    2002-01-01

    As part of a multi-agency study of alligator health, 28 American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) were captured along a transect through the Florida Everglades in 1999. Liver and tail muscle tissues were sampled and analyzed on a wet weight basis for total mercury (THg) using cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometry. All tissues had detectable concentrations of THg that ranged from 0.6 to 17 mg/kg in liver and from 0.1 to 1.8 mg/kg in tail muscle. THg was more concentrated in liver tissue than tail muscle, but levels were highly correlated between tissues. THg concentrations in tissue differed significantly among locations, with animals from Everglades National Park (ENP) having mean concentrations of THg in liver (10.4 mg/kg) and tail muscle (1.2 mg/kg) that were two-fold higher than basin-wide averages (4.9 and 0.64 mg/kg, respectively). The reasons for higher contamination of ENP alligators were unclear and could not be explained by differences in sex, length, weight or animal age. While ??15N values were positively correlated with THg concentrations in tail muscle, spatial patterns in isotopic composition did not explain the elevated THg levels in ENP alligators. Therefore, it appears that ENP alligators were more highly exposed to mercury in their environment than individuals in other areas. Comparisons to a previous survey by Yanochko et al. [Arch Environ Contam Toxicol 32 (1997) 323] suggest that mercury levels have declined in some Everglades alligators since 1994. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Environmental protection in the Alligator Rivers Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, G.

    1989-01-01

    One of a series of articles on the work of the Office of the Supervising Scientist for the Alligator Rivers Region (OSS) and its Alligator Rivers Region Research Institute (ARRRI), this discusses the environmental protection function of the OSS and the role of the ARRRI in achieving this

  20. Post-hatching development of mitochondrial function, organ mass and metabolic rate in two ectotherms, the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis and the common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K. G. Sirsat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The ontogeny of endothermy in birds is associated with disproportionate growth of thermogenic organs and increased mitochondrial oxidative capacity. However, no similar study has been made of the development of these traits in ectotherms. For comparison, we therefore investigated the metabolism, growth and muscle mitochondrial function in hatchlings of a turtle and a crocodilian, two ectotherms that never develop endothermy. Metabolic rate did not increase substantially in either species by 30 days post-hatching. Yolk-free body mass and heart mass did not change through 30 days in alligators and heart mass was a constant proportion of body mass, even after 1 year. Yolk-free body mass and liver mass grew 36% and 27%, respectively, in turtles during the first 30 days post-hatch. The mass-specific oxidative phosphorylation capacity of mitochondria, assessed using permeabilized muscle fibers, increased by a non-significant 47% in alligator thigh and a non-significant 50% in turtle thigh over 30 days, but did not increase in the heart. This developmental trajectory of mitochondrial function is slower and shallower than that previously observed in ducks, which demonstrate a 90% increase in mass-specific oxidative phosphorylation capacity in thigh muscles over just a few days, a 60% increase in mass-specific oxidative phosphorylation capacity of the heart over a few days, and disproportionate growth of the heart and other organs. Our data thus support the hypothesis that these developmental changes in ducks represent mechanistic drivers for attaining endothermy.

  1. Post-hatching development of mitochondrial function, organ mass and metabolic rate in two ectotherms, the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) and the common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirsat, Sarah K G; Sirsat, Tushar S; Price, Edwin R; Dzialowski, Edward M

    2016-04-15

    The ontogeny of endothermy in birds is associated with disproportionate growth of thermogenic organs and increased mitochondrial oxidative capacity. However, no similar study has been made of the development of these traits in ectotherms. For comparison, we therefore investigated the metabolism, growth and muscle mitochondrial function in hatchlings of a turtle and a crocodilian, two ectotherms that never develop endothermy. Metabolic rate did not increase substantially in either species by 30 days post-hatching. Yolk-free body mass and heart mass did not change through 30 days in alligators and heart mass was a constant proportion of body mass, even after 1 year. Yolk-free body mass and liver mass grew 36% and 27%, respectively, in turtles during the first 30 days post-hatch. The mass-specific oxidative phosphorylation capacity of mitochondria, assessed using permeabilized muscle fibers, increased by a non-significant 47% in alligator thigh and a non-significant 50% in turtle thigh over 30 days, but did not increase in the heart. This developmental trajectory of mitochondrial function is slower and shallower than that previously observed in ducks, which demonstrate a 90% increase in mass-specific oxidative phosphorylation capacity in thigh muscles over just a few days, a 60% increase in mass-specific oxidative phosphorylation capacity of the heart over a few days, and disproportionate growth of the heart and other organs. Our data thus support the hypothesis that these developmental changes in ducks represent mechanistic drivers for attaining endothermy. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Effects of prolonged lung inflation or deflation on pulmonary stretch receptor discharge in the alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschand, Rachel E; Wilson, Jenna L; Burleson, Mark L; Crossley, Dane A; Hedrick, Michael S

    2014-08-15

    The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is a semi-aquatic diving reptile that has a periodic breathing pattern. Previous work identified pulmonary stretch receptors, that are rapidly and slowly adapting, as well as intrapulmonary chemoreceptors (IPC), sensitive to CO2, that modulate breathing patterns in alligators. The purpose of the present study was to quantify the effects of prolonged lung inflation and deflation (simulated dives) on pulmonary stretch receptors (PSR) and/or IPC discharge characteristics. The effects of airway pressure (0-20 cm H2O), hypercapnia (7% CO2), and hypoxia (5% O2) on dynamic and static responses of PSR were studied in juvenile alligators (mean mass=246 g) at 24°C. Alligators were initially anesthetized with isoflurane, cranially pithed, tracheotomized and artificially ventilated. Vagal afferent tonic and phasic activity was recorded with platinum hook electrodes. Receptor activity was a mixture of slowly adapting PSR (SAR) and rapidly adapting PSR (RAR) with varying thresholds and degrees of adaptation, without CO2 sensitivity. Receptor activity before, during and after 1 min periods of lung inflation and deflation was quantified to examine the effect of simulated breath-hold dives. Some PSR showed a change in dynamic response, exhibiting inhibition for several breaths after prolonged lung inflation. Following 1 min deflation, RAR, but not SAR, exhibited a significant potentiation of burst frequency relative to control. For SAR, the post-inflation receptor inhibition was blocked by CO2 and hypoxia; for RAR, the post-inflation inhibition was potentiated by CO2 and blocked by hypoxia. These results suggest that changes in PSR firing following prolonged inflation and deflation may promote post-dive ventilation in alligators. We hypothesize that PSR in alligators may be involved in recovery of breathing patterns and lung volume during pre- and post-diving behavior and apneic periods in diving reptiles. Copyright © 2014

  3. Organochlorine pesticides and thiamine in eggs of largemouth bass and American alligators and their relationship with early life-stage mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, M.S.; Wiebe, J.J.; Honeyfield, D.C.; Rauschenberger, H.R.; Hinterkopf, J.P.; Johnson, W.E.; Gross, T.S.

    2004-01-01

    Thiamine deficiency has been linked to early mortality syndrome in salmonids in the Great Lakes. This study was conducted to compare thiamine concentrations in American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) and Florida largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides floridanus) eggs from sites with high embryo mortality and high exposure to organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) (Lakes Apopka and Griffin, and Emeralda Marsh, Florida, USA) to those from sites that have historically exhibited low embryo mortality and low OCPs (Lakes Woodruff and Orange, Florida). During June-July 2000, 20 alligator clutches were collected from these sites, artificially incubated, and monitored for embryo mortality. Thiamine and OCPs were measured in one egg/clutch. During February 2002, 10 adult female bass were collected from Emeralda Marsh and Lake Woodruff and mature ovaries analyzed for thiamine and OCP concentrations. Although ovaries from the Emeralda Marsh bass contained almost 1,000-fold more OCPs compared with the reference site, Lake Woodruff, there were no differences in thiamine concentrations between sites (11,710 vs. 11,857 pmol/g). In contrast, alligator eggs from the reference site had five times the amount of thiamine compared with the contaminated sites (3,123 vs. 617 pmol/g). Similarly, clutches with > 55% hatch rates had significantly higher concentrations of thiamine compared with clutches with eggs. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2004.

  4. Age- and gender-related accumulation of perfluoroalkyl substances in captive Chinese alligators (Alligator sinensis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jianshe; Zhang, Yating; Zhang, Fang; Yeung, Leo W.Y.; Taniyasu, Sachi; Yamazaki, Eriko; Wang, Renping; Lam, Paul K.S.; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Dai, Jiayin

    2013-01-01

    Fourteen perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) were measured in serum of the highly endangered captive Chinese alligators, whole body homogenates of six kinds of fish (alligator prey species), and pond water (alligator habitat) in the Anhui Research Center for Chinese Alligator Reproduction. Six PFASs, including PFOS and five perfluorinated carboxylates, were detected in all alligator samples. The most dominant PFAS was PFUnDA, with a mean value of 31.4 ng/mL. Significant positive correlations were observed among the six PFASs, suggesting that they shared similar sources of contamination. Significantly higher PFOS and PFUnDA levels were observed in males, but the other four PFCAs did not differ between genders. An age related PFAS bioaccumulation analysis showed a significant negative correlation of the concentrations for five PFCAs to age, which means that higher concentrations were found in younger animals. Bioaccumulation factors (BAF) in fish for PFASs ranged from 21 to 28,000, with lower BAF for PFOA than that for longer carbon chain PFCAs, including PFUnDA, PFDA, and PFNA. Highlights: •The most dominant PFAS was PFUnDA, followed by PFOS and PFDA in all alligator samples. •Significantly higher PFOS and PFUnDA levels were observed in males. •The concentrations of the five PFCAs showed significant negative correlation to age. -- Age- and gender-related accumulation of perfluoroalkyl substances in captive Chinese alligators

  5. An indoor air quality study of an alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) holding facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, S C; Holder, H W; Martin, J M; Brasel, T L; Andriychuk, L A; Wu, C; Straus, D C; Aguilar, R

    2006-06-01

    An environmental microbiologic investigation was conducted in an alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) holding facility in a zoo in the southeastern U.S. The facility had housed five alligators between March 1999 and February 2005. In the exhibit, one alligator died and all experienced poor health. It was hypothesized that environmental microbial contamination was associated with these issues. Samples were collected for fungal identification and quantification, microcystin analysis, and airborne mycotoxins. Analyses of air and water were conducted and an examination of the heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning system (HVAC) for design, maintenance, and operating issues was made. Two control sites, a facility for false gharials (Tomistoma schlegelii) and an off-site alligator breeding facility, were also tested. Morbidity and mortality records were examined for all sites. Results showed that, compared to the control sites, the test alligator facility and its HVAC system were extensively contaminated with a range of fungi. Nearly all sampled surfaces featured fungal growth. There were also significantly higher counts of Penicillium/Aspergillus-like and Chrysosporium-like spores in the air (P conditioned and mold-contaminated air being introduced to the facility. Morbidity records revealed solitary pulmonary disorders over time in three alligators, with one dying as a result. The other two alligators suffered from general malaise and a range of nonspecific symptoms. The control facilities had no morbidity or mortality issues. In conclusion, although no causal links could be demonstrated because of the nature of the morbidity data, environmental mold contamination appeared to be associated with the history of morbidity and mortality in the alligator exhibit.

  6. Effect of alligator pepper (Zingiberaceae Aframomum melegueta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fifteen male rats and fifteen female rats of proven fertility from a pilot study were randomly paired in fifteen cages in a well ventillated room. After three days of mating, the males were withdrawn from ... risk to women in their first trimester of pregnancy. Key words : Effect, Alligator pepper, Herbal remedy, Nutrition, Pregnancy ...

  7. Estimating trends in alligator populations from nightlight survey data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisaki, Ikuko; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Dorazio, Robert M.; Rice, Kenneth G.; Cherkiss, Michael; Jeffery, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Nightlight surveys are commonly used to evaluate status and trends of crocodilian populations, but imperfect detection caused by survey- and location-specific factors makes it difficult to draw population inferences accurately from uncorrected data. We used a two-stage hierarchical model comprising population abundance and detection probability to examine recent abundance trends of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) in subareas of Everglades wetlands in Florida using nightlight survey data. During 2001–2008, there were declining trends in abundance of small and/or medium sized animals in a majority of subareas, whereas abundance of large sized animals had either demonstrated an increased or unclear trend. For small and large sized class animals, estimated detection probability declined as water depth increased. Detection probability of small animals was much lower than for larger size classes. The declining trend of smaller alligators may reflect a natural population response to the fluctuating environment of Everglades wetlands under modified hydrology. It may have negative implications for the future of alligator populations in this region, particularly if habitat conditions do not favor recruitment of offspring in the near term. Our study provides a foundation to improve inferences made from nightlight surveys of other crocodilian populations.

  8. Alligators and crocodiles as indicators for restoration of Everglades ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotti, Frank J.; Best, G. Ronnie; Brandt, Laura A.; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Jeffery, Brian M.; Rice, Kenneth G.

    2009-01-01

    Alligators and crocodiles integrate biological impacts of hydrological operations, affecting them at all life stages through three key aspects of Everglades ecology: (1) food webs, (2) diversity and productivity, and (3) freshwater flow. Responses of crocodilians are directly related to suitability of environmental conditions and hydrologic change. Correlations between biological responses and environmental conditions contribute to an understanding of species' status and trends over time. Positive or negative trends of crocodilian populations relative to hydrologic changes permit assessment of positive or negative trends in restoration. The crocodilian indicator uses monitoring parameters (performance measures) that have been shown to be both effective and efficient in tracking trends. The alligator component uses relative density (reported as an encounter rate), body condition, and occupancy rates of alligator holes; the crocodile component uses juvenile growth and hatchling survival. We hypothesize that these parameters are correlated with hydrologic conditions including depth, duration, timing, spatial extent and water quality. Salinity is a critical parameter in estuarine habitats. Assessments of parameters defined for crocodilian performance measures support these hypotheses. Alligators and crocodiles are the charismatic megafauna of the Everglades. They are both keystone and flagship species to which the public can relate. In addition, the parameters used to track trends are easy to understand. They provide answers to the following questions: How has the number of alligators or crocodiles changed? Are the animals fatter or thinner than they should be? Are the animals in the places (in terms of habitat and geography) where they should be? As surely as there is no other Everglades, no other single species defines the Everglades as does the American alligator. The Everglades is the only place in the world where both alligators and crocodiles exist. Crocodilians

  9. Organochlorine pesticides and thiamine in eggs of largemouth bass and American alligators and their relationship with early life-stage mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda, Maria S; Wiebe, Jon J; Honeyfield, Dale C; Rauschenberger, Heath R; Hinterkopf, Joy P; Johnson, William E; Gross, Timothy S

    2004-10-01

    Thiamine deficiency has been linked to early mortality syndrome in salmonids in the Great Lakes. This study was conducted to compare thiamine concentrations in American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) and Florida largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides floridanus) eggs from sites with high embryo mortality and high exposure to organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) (Lakes Apopka and Griffin, and Emeralda Marsh, Florida, USA) to those from sites that have historically exhibited low embryo mortality and low OCPs (Lakes Woodruff and Orange, Florida). During June-July 2000, 20 alligator clutches were collected from these sites, artificially incubated, and monitored for embryo mortality. Thiamine and OCPs were measured in one egg/clutch. During February 2002, 10 adult female bass were collected from Emeralda Marsh and Lake Woodruff and mature ovaries analyzed for thiamine and OCP concentrations. Although ovaries from the Emeralda Marsh bass contained almost 1,000-fold more OCPs compared with the reference site, Lake Woodruff, there were no differences in thiamine concentrations between sites (11,710 vs. 11,857 pmol/g). In contrast, alligator eggs from the reference site had five times the amount of thiamine compared with the contaminated sites (3,123 vs. 617 pmol/g). Similarly, clutches with >55% hatch rates had significantly higher concentrations of thiamine compared with clutches with reproductive failure and recruitment of largemouth bass. The cause(s) of this thiamine deficiency are unknown but might be related to differences in the nutritional value of prey items across the sites studied and/or to the presence of high concentration of contaminants in eggs.

  10. AHR and CYP1A expression link historical contamination events to modern day developmental effects in the American alligator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Matthew D; Galligan, Thomas M; Rainwater, Thomas R; Moore, Brandon C; Wilkinson, Philip M; Guillette, Louis J; Parrott, Benjamin B

    2017-11-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that initiates a transcriptional pathway responsible for the expression of CYP1A subfamily members, key to the metabolism of xenobiotic compounds. Toxic planar halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, including dioxin and PCBs, are capable of activating the AHR, and while dioxin and PCB inputs into the environment have been dramatically curbed following strict regulatory efforts in the United States, they persist in the environment and exposures remain relevant today. Little is known regarding the effects that long-term chronic exposures to dioxin or dioxin-like compounds might have on the development and subsequent health of offspring from exposed individuals, nor is much known regarding AHR expression in reptilians. Here, we characterize AHR and CYP1A gene expression in embryonic and juvenile specimen of a long-lived, apex predator, the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), and investigate variation in gene expression profiles in offspring collected from sites conveying differential exposures to environmental contaminants. Both age- and tissue-dependent patterning of AHR isoform expression are detected. We characterize two downstream transcriptional targets of the AHR, CYP1A1 and CYP1A2, and describe conserved elements of their genomic architecture. When comparisons across different sites are made, hepatic expression of CYP1A2, a direct target of the AHR, appears elevated in embryos from a site associated with a dioxin point source and previously characterized PCB contamination. Elevated CYP1A2 expression is not persistent, as site-specific variation was absent in juveniles originating from field-collected eggs but reared under lab conditions. Our results illustrate the patterning of AHR gene expression in a long-lived environmental model species, and indicate a potential contemporary influence of historical contamination. This research presents a novel opportunity to link

  11. Biological activity of alligator, avian, and mammalian insulin in juvenile alligators: plasma glucose and amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, V A; Elsey, R M; Coulson, R A

    1993-02-01

    The biological activity of alligator, turkey, and bovine insulin on plasma glucose and plasma amino acids was tested in fasted juvenile alligators. Preliminary experiments showed that the stress associated with taking the initial blood sample resulted in a hyperglycemic response lasting more than 24 hr. Despite repeated bleedings no additional hyperglycemic events occurred, and blood glucose declined slowly over the next 7 days. Under these conditions the smallest dose of insulin eliciting a hypoglycemic response was 40 micrograms/kg body wt. A dose of 400 micrograms/kg body wt of either alligator or bovine insulin caused a pronounced hypoglycemia by 12 hr postinjection. Maximum decline in plasma glucose occurred at 24 to 36 hr with a slow return to control levels by 120 hr. There were no significant differences in the hypoglycemic responses to any of the three insulins tested. The decline in plasma amino acids was much more rapid than the decline in plasma glucose in response to insulin. Even at the 40 micrograms/kg body wt dose a significant difference from saline-injected control was seen at 2 hr postinjection. Maximum decline in plasma amino acids occurred at 8 to 12 hr with a return to baseline by 36 hr. These results show that the relatively conservative changes in the sequence of alligator insulin (three amino acid substitutions in the B-chain compared with that of chicken) have little effect on biological activity and that alligator insulin receptors do not appear to discriminate among the three insulins.

  12. Comparison of metabolic substrates in alligators and several birds of prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweazea, Karen L; McMurtry, John P; Elsey, Ruth M; Redig, Patrick; Braun, Eldon J

    2014-08-01

    On average, avian blood glucose concentrations are 1.5-2 times those of mammals of similar mass and high concentrations of insulin are required to lower blood glucose. Whereas considerable data exist for granivorous species, few data are available for plasma metabolic substrate and glucoregulatory hormone concentrations for carnivorous birds and alligators. Birds and mammals with carnivorous diets have higher metabolic rates than animals consuming diets with less protein whereas alligators have low metabolic rates. Therefore, the present study was designed to compare substrate and glucoregulatory hormone concentrations in several birds of prey and a phylogenetically close relative of birds, the alligator. The hypothesis was that the combination of carnivorous diets and high metabolic rates favored the evolution of greater protein and fatty acid utilization leading to insulin resistance and high plasma glucose concentrations in carnivorous birds. In contrast, it was hypothesized that alligators would have low substrate utilization attributable to a low metabolic rate. Fasting plasma substrate and glucoregulatory hormone concentrations were compared for bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), great horned owls (Bubo virginianus), red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), and American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis). Avian species had high circulating β-hydroxybutyrate (10-21 mg/dl) compared to alligators (2.81 ± 0.16 mg/dl). In mammals high concentrations of this byproduct of fatty acid utilization are correlated with insulin resistance. Fasting glucose and insulin concentrations were positively correlated in eagles whereas no relationship was found between these variables for owls, hawks or alligators. Additionally, β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were low in alligators. Similar to carnivorous mammals, ingestion of a high protein diet may have favored the utilization of fatty acids and protein for energy thereby promoting the development of insulin

  13. Use of alligator hole abundance and occupancy rate as indicators for restoration of a human-altered wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisaki, Ikuko; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Hart, Kristen M.; Rice, Kenneth G.; Ogurcak, Danielle; Rochford, Michael; Jeffery, Brian M.; Brandt, Laura A.; Cherkiss, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Use of indicator species as a measure of ecosystem conditions is an established science application in environmental management. Because of its role in shaping wetland systems, the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is one of the ecological indicators for wetland restoration in south Florida, USA. We conducted landscape-level aerial surveys of alligator holes in two different habitats in a wetland where anthropogenic modification of surface hydrology has altered the natural system. Alligator holes were scarcer in an area where modified hydrology caused draining and frequent dry-downs compared to another area that maintains a functional wetland system. Lower abundance of alligator holes indicates lack of alligator activities, lower overall species diversity, and lack of dry-season aquatic refugia for other organisms. The occupancy rate of alligator holes was lower than the current restoration target for the Everglades, and was variable by size class with large size-class alligators predominantly occupying alligator holes. This may indicate unequal size-class distribution, different habitat selection by size classes, or possibly a lack of recruitment. Our study provides pre-restoration baseline information about one indicator species for the Everglades. Success of the restoration can be assessed via effective synthesis of information derived by collective research efforts on the entire suite of selected ecological indicators.

  14. The Federal Government and the Alligator Rivers Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BURTON, A.

    1989-01-01

    The administrative framework put in place by the Commonwealth and Northern Territory governments to monitor mining activities in the Alligator Rivers Region is presented. The key institutional element is the Coordinating Committee for the Alligator Rivers Region chaired and serviced by the Supervising Scientist and established through legislation

  15. Effect of aqueous extract of alligator pepper ( Aframomum malegueta )

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... concentration 7days post intervention; and a significant decrease in Cl− concentration 14 days post-intervention. Our findings suggest that intraperitoneally injected aqueous extract of alligator pepper induces reversible changes in serum electrolytes. Key words: Alligator pepper, Electrolytes, Homeostasis, Renal function ...

  16. Intra-population variation in activity ranges, diel patterns, movement rates, and habitat use of American alligators in a subtropical estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Adam E.; Heithaus, Michael R.; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Cherkiss, Michael; Jeffery, Brian M.

    2013-12-01

    Movement and habitat use patterns are fundamental components of the behaviors of mobile animals and help determine the scale and types of interactions they have with their environments. These behaviors are especially important to quantify for top predators because they can have strong effects on lower trophic levels as well as the wider ecosystem. Many studies of top predator movement and habitat use focus on general population level trends, which may overlook important intra-population variation in behaviors that now appear to be common. In an effort to better understand the prevalence of intra-population variation in top predator movement behaviors and the potential effects of such variation on ecosystem dynamics, we examined the movement and habitat use patterns of a population of adult American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) in a subtropical estuary for nearly four years. We found that alligators exhibited divergent behaviors with respect to activity ranges, movement rates, and habitat use, and that individualized behaviors were stable over multiple years. We also found that the variations across the three behavioral metrics were correlated such that consistent behavioral types emerged, specifically more exploratory individuals and more sedentary individuals. Our study demonstrates that top predator populations can be characterized by high degrees of intra-population variation in terms of movement and habitat use behaviors that could lead to individuals filling different ecological roles in the same ecosystem. By extension, one-size-fits-all ecosystem and species-specific conservation and management strategies that do not account for potential intra-population variation in top predator behaviors may not produce the desired outcomes in all cases.

  17. Molecular and functional characterization of BAFF from the Yangtze alligator (Alligator sinensis, Alligatoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia-Xin; Song, Ren; Sang, Ming; Sun, Si-Qing; Ma, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Shuang-Quan

    2015-10-01

    B-cell activating factor (BAFF) from the TNF family is critical for B-cell survival and maturation. In this study, we identified a Yangtze alligator (Alligator sinensis, Alligatoridae) BAFF cDNA, designated as asBAFF, using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The open reading frame of this cDNA encodes a 287-amino acid protein containing a predicted transmembrane domain and a furin protease cleavage site, similar to mammalian and avian BAFF. The amino acid identity between biologically soluble asBAFF (assBAFF) and csBAFF, hsBAFF, and msBAFF is 94, 76, and 71%, respectively. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis showed that the asBAFF gene is strongly expressed in the spleen. Since BAFF is always expressed as inclusion bodies in bacteria, it is difficult to purify. To enhance the soluble expression of assBAFF in Escherichia coli, we fused the extracellular region of the asBAFF gene to a small ubiquitin-related modifier gene (SUMO). Purified assBAFF was able to promote the survival of splenic lymphocytes and co-stimulate the proliferation of mouse B cells with anti-mouse IgM. These findings suggest that asBAFF plays an important role in the survival and proliferation of Yangtze alligator B cells, and because it is evolutionarily highly conserved, functional cross-reactivity exists between mammalian and Yangtze alligator BAFF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Stress-induced suppression of testosterone secretion in male alligators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, V A; Elsey, R M

    1986-08-01

    In order to test the effect of acute stress on gonadal hormone secretion in reptiles, six mature male alligators were captured, and a blood sample was taken within 5 min of capture. Additional blood samples were taken at timed intervals for up to 41 hr, and plasma testosterone and corticosterone were measured by radioimmunoassay. Plasma testosterone declined to 50% of the initial value by 4 hr and dropped to less than 10% of initial by 24 hr. Plasma corticosterone increased during the first 12 hr, declined at 24 hr, and rose again at 40 hr. Blood samples from male alligators collected in North and South Carolina, south Florida, and in south Louisiana in two consecutive breeding seasons were also assayed for testosterone and corticosterone. In these populations there were significant differences in mean plasma testosterone and corticosterone levels. Elevated corticosterone levels were consistently seen in alligators caught in traps and from which a blood sample was taken several hours later. Plasma testosterone, although consistently lower in trapped alligators, did not show a negative correlation with plasma corticosterone. Farm-reared alligators bled once, released, and bled again at 24 hr also showed a highly significant suppression of testosterone secretion. These results demonstrate that stress has a rapid and dramatic effect on testicular steroid secretion in both farm-reared and wild alligators.

  19. Causes of environmental change in the Alligator Rivers region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skidmore, J.

    1990-01-01

    Covering some 28,000 square kilometres of the Northern Territory, the Alligator Rivers Region (ARR) includes the catchments of the East, South and West Alligator Rivers, and many small abandoned uranium mines. To introduce the problems of human impact on the ARR, the toxicologically significant aspects of the local environment were first examined, then the possible effects on it of mining and other human activities. It was found that the most deleterious impact on the region is not caused by mining but by human settlement, introduction of animals (notably the buffalo) and plants, the use of fire and tourism

  20. Development of the Alligator Rivers uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bath, L.J.; Farthing, J.W.; Warner, R.K.

    1980-01-01

    The Alligator Rivers Uranium Province in the Northern Territory of Australia has proven uranium deposits at Jabiluka, Ranger, Koongarra and Nabarlek which contain more than 80% of the country's low-cost reasonably assured uranium resources estimated to be 290,000 t U. Following the Government's decision in 1977 to proceed with the further development of Australia's uranium resources, the region is destined to become a major producer of U 3 O 8 for export. At the time of the decision provision was made for strict controls to protect the environment, the granting of Aboriginal land rights and the creation of a major national park. The paper describes the progress made to achieve these objectives. The open-cut mining methods to be used at Ranger, Koongarra and Nabarlek are described, as well as the underground mining operations proposed for Jabiluka. Each of the treatment plants will use the conventional acid leach, solvent extraction purification process for uranium recovery. The characteristics of the treatment operations are outlined. The water-management schemes, tailings disposal methods and procedures for environment protection are also discussed. The proposed initial production capacities of the operations are: Jabiluka 2540 (expanding to 7630 in the fifth year of production); Ranger 2540 (expanding to 5080 when commercially practicable); Koongarra 850; and Nabarlek 920 t U/a. Both Nabarlek and Ranger have been granted Government development approval and construction is proceeding at each site with the expectation that normal commercial production will commence towards the end of 1980 and 1981, respectively. Planning for the Jabiluka and Koongarra projects has reached an advanced stage; each are undergoing environmental procedures and will have to reach agreement with the Aboriginals on environmental and other matters before site work can commence. (author)

  1. Alligator Rivers Regions Research Institute research report 1983-84

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The Institute undertakes and coordinates research required to ensure the protection of the environment in the Alligator Rivers Region from any consequences resulting from the mining and processing of uranium ore. Research projects outlined are in aquatic biology, terrestrial ecology, analytical chemistry, environmental radioactivity and geomorphology

  2. Blow Flies Visiting Decaying Alligators: Is Succession Synchronous or Asynchronous?

    OpenAIRE

    Nelder, Mark P.; McCreadie, John W.; Major, Clinton S.

    2009-01-01

    Succession patterns of adult blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) on decaying alligators were investigated in Mobile (Ala, USA) during August 2002. The most abundant blow fly species visiting the carcasses were Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart), Cochliomyia macellaria (Fabricus), Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricus), Phormia regina (Meigen), and Lucilia coeruleiviridis (Macquart). Lucilia coeruleiviridis was collected more often during the early stages of decomposition, followed by Chrysomya spp., C...

  3. Effect of aqueous extract of alligator pepper (Zingiberaceae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty female and ten male Sprague-Dawley rats of proven fertility from a pilot study were randomly mated in groups of two females and one male. Three days later, female rats in the ... weight gain reduction. Key words: Gestational weight gain, Aqueous Extract, Intra-peritoneal injection, Alligator Pepper, Nutrition.

  4. Effects of long-term corticosterone implants on growth and immune function in juvenile alligators, Alligator mississippiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morici, L A; Elsey, R M; Lance, V A

    1997-10-01

    Sixty juvenile alligators were implanted subcutaneously with slow release pellets of corticosterone or placebo. Alligators were divided into five different groups such that each group received a different dose. A blood sample was taken prior to and 4 days after the implants were in place to measure hormone levels. Additional blood samples were collected at 1 month and 3 months. At 4 days corticosterone levels ranged from 3,400 ng/ml in the group treated with the high dose to 40 ng/ml in the group implanted with the low dose. The extremely high dose caused 40% mortality within 4 weeks. It was evident that the pellets did not release the hormone for the expected 90 days. Circulating levels of corticosterone were back to baseline levels by 3 months. Hormone levels achieved at 4 days were a reliable predictor of subsequent growth. Rate of growth was negatively correlated with plasma corticosterone at 4 days (r2 = 0.711) and at 1 month (r2 = 0.544) posttreatment. Differential white blood cell counts performed after 1 month of treatment showed a clear effect of the implant. Alligators treated with corticosterone had decreased percentages of lymphocytes, eosinophils, and basophils and had a higher heterophil/lymphocyte (H/L) ratio than the placebo group. Furthermore, histological examination of the spleen revealed a significant depletion of lymphoid cells in alligators treated with the highest dose of hormone. The results from this study demonstrate that exogenous corticosterone can mimic the effects of prolonged stress in juvenile alligators.

  5. Blow Flies Visiting Decaying Alligators: Is Succession Synchronous or Asynchronous?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark P. Nelder

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Succession patterns of adult blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae on decaying alligators were investigated in Mobile (Ala, USA during August 2002. The most abundant blow fly species visiting the carcasses were Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart, Cochliomyia macellaria (Fabricus, Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricus, Phormia regina (Meigen, and Lucilia coeruleiviridis (Macquart. Lucilia coeruleiviridis was collected more often during the early stages of decomposition, followed by Chrysomya spp., Cochliomyia macellaria, and Phormia regina in the later stages. Lucilia coeruleiviridis was the only synchronous blow fly on the three carcasses; other blow fly species exhibited only site-specific synchrony. Using dichotomous correlations and analyses of variance, we demonstrated that blow fly-community succession was asynchronous among three alligators; however, Monte Carlo simulations indicate that there was some degree of synchrony between the carcasses.

  6. Percutaneous antegrade ureteric stent removal using a rigid alligator forceps.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Given, M F

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous antegrade ureteric stent removal using a rigid alligator forceps. Twenty patients were included in our study. Indications for ureteric stent insertion included stone disease (n = 7), malignancy (n = 8) and transplant anastomotic strictures (n = 5). Stent retrieval was carried out for proximal stent placement\\/migration in seven patients and encrustation in the remaining 13. Twenty-two stents were successfully retrieved in 20 patients. There was one technical failure (5%). There were no major complications. We had four minor complications, which included nephrostomy site pain (n = 2), periprocedural sepsis (n = 1) and a small urinoma (n = 1). All patients settled with conservative management. Percutaneous radiologically guided antegrade ureteric stent removal with an alligator forceps is safe and effective, particularly when initial surgical removal has failed.

  7. Dietary pathways through lizards of the Alligator Rivers Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, C.D.; Morton, S.R.; Braithwaite, R.W.; Wombey, J.C.

    1984-07-01

    A broad survey of the diets of 46 species of terrestrial and arboreal lizards from the families Gekkonidae, Pygopodidae, Agamidae and Scincidae was carried out in the Alligator Rivers Region, and the diets of three of the species were examined in detail by monthly sampling near the Ranger uranium mine. The study shows that, in the event of contamination of the waterbodies, only two species of lizards face any risk of contamination through their food

  8. Water Hyacinths and Alligator Weeds for Final Filtration of Sewage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolverton, B. C.; Mcdonald, R. C.; Gordon, J.

    1976-01-01

    The potential of water hyacinths (Eichhornia crassipes) (Mart.) Solms and alligator weeds (Alternanthera philoxerides) (Mart.) Griesb. as secondary and tertiary filtration systems for domestic sewage was demonstrated. These two vascular aquatic plants reduced the suspended solids, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, total phosphorus, BOD sub 5, and total organic carbon levels in domestic sewage from 60 percent to 98 percent within a two week period. These plants grown in domestic sewage were also free of toxic levels of trace heavy metals.

  9. PLASMA STEROID CONCENTRATIONS IN RELATION TO SIZE AND AGE IN JUVENILE ALLIGATORS FROM TWO FLORIDA LAKES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies have reported a number of physiological differences among juvenile alligators from two well-studied populations (Lake Apopka and Lake Woodruff) in north central Florida. These studies obtained alligators of similar size from each lake under the assumption that th...

  10. Alligator Rivers Analogue Project. Final Report - Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duerden, P [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Lever, D A [AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom); Sverjensky, D A [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Townley, L R [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Wembley, WA (Australia). Div. of Water Resources

    1992-07-01

    This summary report, which highlights the work and findings of the Alligator Rivers Analogue Project (ARAP) is one of a series of 16 volumes, listed below. Detailed descriptions and results are provided in Volumes 2 to 16. Full acknowledgment to individual contributions is provided in the individual reports, and in Appendix I of this report. The findings from the technical studies are discussed in the context of assessments of the long-term performance of geological repositories for radioactive wastes, which are being undertaken in many countries. They are also considered in an integrated 'Scenario Development' approach, aimed to understand the formation of the ore deposit. Despite their inherent uncertainties, the findings provide a basis for assessing the way in which radionuclides will migrate in environments with a variety of geologic settings and over a range of different geologic timescales. Thus, section 2 of this report discusses the concept of using uranium deposits as natural analogues and refers to a number of such studies, including those at the Koongarra deposit in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory of Australia. Section 3 reviews early scientific work in the Alligator Rivers Region and summarises the results of the analogue studies undertaken between 1981 and 1987 that were funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) and the UK Department of the Environment (UKDoE). Section 4 describes the objectives of ARAP and the manner in which the study was conducted and provides a general outline of the project and a summary of the findings. A general description of the Koongarra ore deposit, the focus of ARAP, is provided in Section 5, with Sections 6-13 providing summaries of the work carried out to characterise the site in detail and provide data for modelling. Sections 14-18 discuss how this data was used in modelling and how the results may be applied for performance assessment studies. Finally, Section 19 considers the

  11. Alligator Rivers Analogue Project. Final Report - Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerden, P.; Lever, D.A.; Sverjensky, D.A.; Townley, L.R.

    1992-01-01

    This summary report, which highlights the work and findings of the Alligator Rivers Analogue Project (ARAP) is one of a series of 16 volumes, listed below. Detailed descriptions and results are provided in Volumes 2 to 16. Full acknowledgment to individual contributions is provided in the individual reports, and in Appendix I of this report. The findings from the technical studies are discussed in the context of assessments of the long-term performance of geological repositories for radioactive wastes, which are being undertaken in many countries. They are also considered in an integrated 'Scenario Development' approach, aimed to understand the formation of the ore deposit. Despite their inherent uncertainties, the findings provide a basis for assessing the way in which radionuclides will migrate in environments with a variety of geologic settings and over a range of different geologic timescales. Thus, section 2 of this report discusses the concept of using uranium deposits as natural analogues and refers to a number of such studies, including those at the Koongarra deposit in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory of Australia. Section 3 reviews early scientific work in the Alligator Rivers Region and summarises the results of the analogue studies undertaken between 1981 and 1987 that were funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) and the UK Department of the Environment (UKDoE). Section 4 describes the objectives of ARAP and the manner in which the study was conducted and provides a general outline of the project and a summary of the findings. A general description of the Koongarra ore deposit, the focus of ARAP, is provided in Section 5, with Sections 6-13 providing summaries of the work carried out to characterise the site in detail and provide data for modelling. Sections 14-18 discuss how this data was used in modelling and how the results may be applied for performance assessment studies. Finally, Section 19 considers the

  12. Plants of the Alligator Rivers Region, Northern Territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowie, I.D.; Finlayson, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Published and unpublished lists of plants of the Alligator Rivers Region have been combined into a single, up-to-date check-list. The list has been designed to replace fragmented, regional listings with a single document suitable for use by both professional and amateur botanists. The list is ordered in the taxonomic sequence adopted for the Flora of Australia and includes 1346 species from 165 families. These are 1275 native and 71 alien species listed. Separate lists of rare species are given and discussed

  13. Plants of the Alligator Rivers Region, Northern Territory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowie, I D; Finlayson, C M

    1986-01-01

    Published and unpublished lists of plants of the Alligator Rivers Region have been combined into a single, up-to-date check-list. The list has been designed to replace fragmented, regional listings with a single document suitable for use by both professional and amateur botanists. The list is ordered in the taxonomic sequence adopted for the Flora of Australia and includes 1346 species from 165 families. These are 1275 native and 71 alien species listed. Separate lists of rare species are given and discussed.

  14. Using the American alligator and a repeated-measures design to place constraints on in vivo shoulder joint range of motion in dinosaurs and other fossil archosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Joel D; Hutson, Kelda N

    2013-01-15

    Using the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs (crocodylians and birds), recent work has reported that elbow joint range of motion (ROM) studies of fossil dinosaur forearms may be providing conservative underestimates of fully fleshed in vivo ROM. As humeral ROM occupies a more central role in forelimb movements, the placement of quantitative constraints on shoulder joint ROM could improve fossil reconstructions. Here, we investigated whether soft tissues affect the more mobile shoulder joint in the same manner in which they affect elbow joint ROM in an extant archosaur. This test involved separately and repeatedly measuring humeral ROM in Alligator mississippiensis as soft tissues were dissected away in stages to bare bone. Our data show that the ROMs of humeral flexion and extension, as well as abduction and adduction, both show a statistically significant increase as flesh is removed, but then decrease when the bones must be physically articulated and moved until they separate from one another and/or visible joint surfaces. A similar ROM pattern is inferred for humeral pronation and supination. All final skeletonized ROMs were less than initial fully fleshed ROMs. These results are consistent with previously reported elbow joint ROM patterns from the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs. Thus, studies that avoid separation of complementary articular surfaces may be providing fossil shoulder joint ROMs that underestimate in vivo ROM in dinosaurs, as well as other fossil archosaurs.

  15. Environment Protection (Alligator Rivers Region) Act 1978, No.28

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The main object of this Act is to provide for the appointment of a Supervising Scientist responsible for supervising protection of the environment in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory from the effects of uranium mining operations. His functions include advising the competent Minister on the effects of uranium mining operations on the environment and on standards, practices and procedures for its protection and restoration. The Act also sets up a Co-ordinating Committee responsible for programmes for research into the environmental effects of such mining operations and also keeping under review standards, practices and procedures for environmental protection in relation thereto. Finally the Act provides for the establishment of a Research Institute managed by the Supervising Scientist, to promote and assist in research as well as to collect information on the environmental effects of uranium mining operations. (NEA) [fr

  16. Remediating the South Alligator Valley uranium mining legacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawcett, M.; Waggitt, P.

    2010-01-01

    In late 1950s and early 1960s 13 uranium mines operated in the South Alligator Valley of Australia's Northern Territory. Once sales contracts had been filled the mines were abandoned and no remediation took place. In the 1980s the valley was designated as part of Stage 3 of the adjacent World Heritage-listed, Kakadu National Park. Proposals for remediation were only seriously put forward when the land was returned to the traditional Aboriginal owners, the Gunlom Land Trust, in 1996. Although they leased the land back so it would remain a part of Kakadu National Park the traditional Aboriginal owners required remediation to be complete by 2015. This paper tells the story of the development and implementation of the remediation process from the start of planning in 1998 to completion in 2009; and finally it describes the development of stakeholder relationships and the initial plans for long term stewardship. (author)

  17. Biochemical composition of the alligator pipefish, Syngnathoides biaculeatus (Bloch, 1785)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaye, Sushant Vilas; Pawar, Ashwini Pandurang; Rivonker, Chandrasheker Umanath; Sreepada, Rayadurga Anantha; Ansari, Zakir Ali; Ram, Anirudh

    2017-11-01

    Considering the economic importance in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and lack of baseline information, we evaluated the proximate composition, fatty acid and amino acid profiles, trace element content and C:N ratio in the alligator pipefish, Syngnathoides biaculeatus. Amongst proximate principals, a crude protein formed the major biochemical component ((58.9±2.2)% dry weight). Mean percent concentrations (dry weight) of other components such as a total lipid (TL), ash and nitrogen-free extract measured were, (1.8±0.2)%, (19.2±2.2)% and (20.1±0.45)%, respectively. The fatty acid profile revealed the presence of 27 saturated fatty acids (SFA) with 13 straight-chained and 14 branched-chained, 28 unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) with 14 monounsaturated and 14 polyunsaturated and nine other minor fatty acids. Mean percent contributions of total SFAs and UFAs to TL were found to be (55.41±0.24)% and (44.05±0.25)%, respectively. Altogether, 16 different amino acids with an equal number of essential (EAA) and non-essential (NAA) ones were identified. Percent contributions by EAA and NAA to the total amino acid content were 38.11% and 61.89%, respectively. Trace metal concentrations in S. biaculeatus were generally low and their distribution followed the order, Mg>Fe>Zn>Mn>Cu>Cr>Ni>Hg>Co. The C:N ratio was (4.37±0.04)%. The profile of major biochemical constituents in alligator pipefish, S. biaculeatus revealed its potential use in TCM as well as a nutritional diet for human consumption. The results of the study would also form the basis for formulation and optimization of diets for the culture of S. biaculeatus.

  18. Nitrate induces a type 1 diabetic profile in alligator hatchlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Thea M; Hamlin, Heather J; Freymiller, Haley; Green, Stephen; Thurman, Jenna; Guillette, Louis J

    2018-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease that affects 1 in 300 children by age 18. T1D is caused by inflammation-induced loss of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells, leading to high blood glucose and a host of downstream complications. Although multiple genes are associated with T1D risk, only 5% of genetically susceptible individuals actually develop clinical disease. Moreover, a growing number of T1D cases occur in geographic clusters and among children with low risk genotypes. These observations suggest that environmental factors contribute to T1D etiology. One potential factor, supported primarily by epidemiological studies, is the presence of nitrate and nitrite in drinking water. To test this hypothesis, female hatchling alligators were exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of nitrate in their tank water (reference, 10mg/L, or 100mg/L NO 3 -N) from hatch through 5 weeks or 5 months of age. At each time point, endpoints related to T1D were investigated: plasma levels of glucose, triglycerides, testosterone, estradiol, and thyroxine; pancreas, fat body, and thyroid weights; weight gain or loss; presence of immune cells in the pancreas; and pancreatic beta cell number, assessed by antibody staining of nkx6.1 protein. Internal dosing of nitrate was confirmed by measuring plasma and urine nitrate levels and whole blood methemoglobin. Cluster analysis indicated that high nitrate exposure (most animals exposed to 100mg/L NO3-N and one alligator exposed to 10mg/L NO3-N) induced a profile of endpoints consistent with early T1D that could be detected after 5 weeks and was more strongly present after 5 months. Our study supports epidemiological data correlating elevated nitrate with T1D onset in humans, and highlights nitrate as a possible environmental contributor to the etiology of T1D, possibly through its role as a nitric oxide precursor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. alpha-Crystallin A sequences of Alligator mississippiensis and the lizard Tupinambis teguixin: molecular evolution and reptilian phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, W W; Zweers, A; Versteeg, M; Dessauer, H C; Goodman, M

    1985-11-01

    The amino acid sequences of the eye lens protein alpha-crystallin A from many mammalian and avian species, two frog species, and a dogfish have provided detailed information about the molecular evolution of this protein and allowed some useful inferences about phylogenetic relationships among these species. We now have isolated and sequenced the alpha-crystallins of the American alligator and the common tegu lizard. The reptilian alpha A chains appear to have evolved as slowly as those of other vertebrates, i.e., at two to three amino acid replacements per 100 residues in 100 Myr. The lack of charged replacements and the general types and distribution of replacements also are similar to those in other vertebrate alpha A chains. Maximum-parsimony analyses of the total data set of 67 vertebrate alpha A sequences support the monophyletic origin of alligator, tegu, and birds and favor the grouping of crocodilians and birds as surviving sister groups in the subclass Archosauria.

  20. Coronary blood flow in the anesthetized American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, Bjarke; Elfwing, Magnus; Elsey, Ruth M.; Wang, Tobias; Crossley, Dane A.

    2016-01-01

    Coronary circulation of the heart evolved early within ectothermic vertebrates and became of vital importance to cardiac performance in some teleost fish, mammals and birds. In contrast, the role and function of the coronary circulation in ectothermic reptiles remains largely unknown. Here, we

  1. The effects of hurricane Rita and subsequent drought on alligators in southwest Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Valentine A; Elsey, Ruth M; Butterstein, George; Trosclair, Phillip L; Merchant, Mark

    2010-02-01

    Hurricane Rita struck the coast of southwest Louisiana in September 2005. The storm generated an enormous tidal surge of approximately four meters in height that inundated many thousands of acres of the coastal marsh with full strength seawater. The initial surge resulted in the deaths of a number of alligators and severely stressed those who survived. In addition, a prolonged drought (the lowest rainfall in 111 years of recorded weather data) following the hurricane resulted in highly saline conditions that persisted in the marsh for several months. We had the opportunity to collect 11 blood samples from alligators located on Holly Beach less than a month after the hurricane, but were unable to collect samples from alligators on Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge until February 2006. Conditions at Rockefeller Refuge did not permit systematic sampling, but a total of 201 samples were collected on the refuge up through August 2006. The blood samples were analyzed for sodium, potassium, chloride, osmolality, and corticosterone. Blood samples from alligators sampled on Holly Beach in October 2005, showed a marked elevation in plasma osmolality, sodium, chloride, potassium, corticosterone, and an elevated heterophil/lymphocyte ratio. Blood samples from alligators on Rockefeller Refuge showed increasing levels of corticosterone as the drought persisted and elevated osmolality and electrolytes. After substantial rainfall in July and August, these indices of osmotic stress returned to within normal limits. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Water hyacinths and alligator weeds for removal of silver, cobalt, and strontium from polluted waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolverton, B. C.; Mcdonald, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Water hyacinths and alligator weeds demonstrated the ability to rapidly remove heavy metals from an aqueous system by root absorption and concentration. Water hyacinths demonstrated the ability to remove 0.439 mg of silver, 0.568 mg of cobalt, and 0.544 mg of strontium in an ionized form per gram of dry plant material in a 24-hour period. Alligator weeds removed a maximum of 0.439 mg of silver, 0.130 mg of cobalt, and 0.161 mg of strontium per gram of dry plant material per day.

  3. Environment Protection (Alligator Rivers Region) Amendment Act 1987 - No 17 of 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This Act amends the Environment Protection (Alligator Rivers Region) Act 1978. The amendments mainly concern definition of general mining operations and specification of the functions of the Supervisory Scientist and the Research Institute in relation to general mining in an environment conservation zone (parts of the Alligator Rivers Region). The 1978 Act provided for the appointment of a Supervising Scientist responsible for supervising protection of the environment against the effects of uranium mining in the Region, and for the creation of a Research Institute under his management. (NEA) [fr

  4. Carbon dioxide transport in alligator blood and its erythrocyte permeability to anions and water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, F B; Wang, T; Jones, D R

    1998-01-01

    Deoxygenation of alligator red blood cells (RBCs) caused binding of two HCO3- equivalents per hemoglobin (Hb) tetramer at physiological pH. At lowered pH, some HCO3- binding also occurred to oxygenated Hb. The erythrocytic total CO2 content was large, and Hb-bound HCO3-, free HCO3-, and carbamate...

  5. Differential protein expression in alligator leukocytes in response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Mark; Kinney, Clint; Sanders, Paige

    2009-12-01

    Blood was collected from three juvenile alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) before, and again 24h after, injection with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The leukocytes were collected from both samples, and the proteins were extracted. Each group of proteins was labeled with a different fluorescent dye and the differences in protein expression were analyzed by two dimensional differential in-gel expressions (2D-DIGE). The proteins which appeared to be increased or decreased by treatment with LPS were selected and analyzed by MALDI-TOF to determine mass and LC-MS/MS to acquire the partial protein sequences. The peptide sequences were compared to the NCBI protein sequence database to determine homology with other sequences from other species. Several proteins of interest appeared to be increased upon LPS stimulation. Proteins with homology to human transgelin-2, fish glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, amphibian α-enolase, alligator lactate dehydrogenase, fish ubiquitin-activating enzyme, and fungal β-tubulin were also increased after LPS injection. Proteins with homology to fish vimentin 4, murine heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A3, and avian calreticulin were found to be decreased in response to LPS. In addition, five proteins, four of which were up-regulated (827, 560, 512, and 650%) and one that exhibited repressed expression (307%), did not show homology to any protein in the database, and thus may represent newly discovered proteins. We are using this biochemical approach to isolate and characterize alligator proteins with potential relevant immune function.

  6. A limnological survey of the Alligator Rivers Region. 1. Diatoms (Bacillariophyceae) of the region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, D.P.

    1983-08-01

    This study was undertaken as part of a study of the algae of the Alligator Rivers Region in general, and of the Magela Creek in particular, to support an investigation into the possible use of native algae as an indicator of any changes in water quality which might occur as a result of uranium mining and milling in the Region

  7. The oldest record of Alligator sinensis from the Late Pliocene of Western Japan, and its biogeographic implication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Masaya; Takahashi, Keiichi; Kobayashi, Yoshitsugu

    2016-07-01

    The late Cenozoic fossil record of alligators in East Asia is crucial in understanding the origin and past distribution of Asian alligators that are now represented by a single species, Alligator sinensis. This study reports a partial skeleton of A. sinensis from the Late Pliocene (approximately 3.0 Ma) of western Japan. This Japanese A. sinensis is large in size (>200 cm total length), comparable to the maximum size of extant individuals. It demonstrates the oldest record of A. sinensis and wider distribution of this species in the past. Tectonic and geographic history of East Asia suggests that alligators presumably dispersed into Japan before 25 Ma or after 10 Ma, yet finally were wiped out from Japan due to the semi-isolated condition of the Japanese island arc and the deteriorated climate during the Plio-Pleistocene.

  8. A new distributional record of alligator pipefish, Syngnathoides biaculeatus (Bloch, 1785) along Goa, central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sanaye, S.V.; Rivonker, C.U.; Ansari, Z.A; Sreepada, R.A

    Present study is based on a single male specimen of alligator pipefish, Syngnathoides biaculeatus (Bloch, 1785) collected from the bay-estuarine system of, Goa (central west coast of India) which is the new distributional record for this species. A...

  9. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Hydrogeological modelling. Final Report - Volume 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townley, L.R.; Trefry, M.G.; Barr, A.D.; Braumiller, S.

    1992-01-01

    This volume describes hydrogeological modelling carried out as part of the Alligator Rivers Analogue Project. Hydrogeology has played a key integrating role in the Project, largely because water movement is believed to have controlled the evolution of the Koongarra uranium Orebody and therefore affects field observations of all types at all scales. Aquifer testing described uses the concept of transmissivity in its interpretation of aquifer response to pumping. The concept of an aquifer, a layer transmitting significant quantities of water in a mainly horizontal direction, seems hard to accept in an environment as heterogeneous as that at Koongarra. But modelling of aquifers both in one dimension and two dimensionally in plan has contributed significantly to our understanding of the site. A one-dimensional model with three layers (often described as a quasi two dimensional model) was applied to flow between the Fault and Koongarra Creek. Being a transient model, this model was able to show that reverse flows can indeed occur back towards the Fault, but only if there is distributed recharge over the orebody as well as a mechanism for the Fault, or a region near the Fault, to remove water from the simulated cross-section. The model also showed clearly that the response of the three-layered system, consisting of a highly weathered zone, a fractured transmissive zone and a less conductive lower schist zone, is governed mainly by the transmissivity and storage coefficient of the middle layer. The storage coefficient of the higher layer has little effect. A two-dimensional model in plan used a description of anisotropy to show that reverse flows can also occur even without a conducting Fault. Modelling of a three-dimensional region using discrete fractures showed that it is certainly possible to simulate systems like that observed at Koongarra, but that large amounts of data are probably needed to obtain realistic descriptions of the fracture networks. Inverse modelling

  10. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Hydrogeological modelling. Final Report - Volume 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townley, L R; Trefry, M G; Barr, A D [CSIRO Div of Water Resources, PO Wembley, WA (Australia); Braumiller, S [Univ of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept of Hydrology and Water Resources; Kawanishi, M [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Abiko-Shi, Chiba-Ken (Japan); and others

    1993-12-31

    This volume describes hydrogeological modelling carried out as part of the Alligator Rivers Analogue Project. Hydrogeology has played a key integrating role in the Project, largely because water movement is believed to have controlled the evolution of the Koongarra uranium Orebody and therefore affects field observations of all types at all scales. Aquifer testing described uses the concept of transmissivity in its interpretation of aquifer response to pumping. The concept of an aquifer, a layer transmitting significant quantities of water in a mainly horizontal direction, seems hard to accept in an environment as heterogeneous as that at Koongarra. But modelling of aquifers both in one dimension and two dimensionally in plan has contributed significantly to our understanding of the site. A one-dimensional model with three layers (often described as a quasi two dimensional model) was applied to flow between the Fault and Koongarra Creek. Being a transient model, this model was able to show that reverse flows can indeed occur back towards the Fault, but only if there is distributed recharge over the orebody as well as a mechanism for the Fault, or a region near the Fault, to remove water from the simulated cross-section. The model also showed clearly that the response of the three-layered system, consisting of a highly weathered zone, a fractured transmissive zone and a less conductive lower schist zone, is governed mainly by the transmissivity and storage coefficient of the middle layer. The storage coefficient of the higher layer has little effect. A two-dimensional model in plan used a description of anisotropy to show that reverse flows can also occur even without a conducting Fault. Modelling of a three-dimensional region using discrete fractures showed that it is certainly possible to simulate systems like that observed at Koongarra, but that large amounts of data are probably needed to obtain realistic descriptions of the fracture networks. Inverse modelling

  11. Hydrodynamic analysis, performance assessment, and actuator design of a flexible tail propulsor in an artificial alligator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philen, Michael; Neu, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    The overall objective of this research is to develop analysis tools for determining actuator requirements and assessing viable actuator technology for design of a flexible tail propulsor in an artificial alligator. A simple hydrodynamic model that includes both reactive and resistive forces along the tail is proposed and the calculated mean thrust agrees well with conventional estimates of drag. Using the hydrodynamic model forces as an input, studies are performed for an alligator ranging in size from 1 cm to 2 m at swimming speeds of 0.3–1.8 body lengths per second containing five antagonistic pairs of actuators distributed along the length of the tail. Several smart materials are considered for the actuation system, and preliminary analysis results indicate that the acrylic electroactive polymer and the flexible matrix composite actuators are potential artificial muscle technologies for the system

  12. Plasma catecholamines and plasma corticosterone following restraint stress in juvenile alligators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, V A; Elsey, R M

    1999-05-01

    Ten juvenile alligators, mean body mass 793 g, hatched from artificially incubated eggs and raised under controlled conditions, were held out of water with their jaws held closed for 48 hr. An initial blood sample was taken and further samples collected at 1, 2, 4, 8, 24, and 48 hr. Epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine were measured in plasma aliquots of 1.5 ml using high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Corticosterone was measured by radioimmunoassay. Plasma glucose was measured using the Trinder method and plasma calcium, cholesterol, and triglycerides were measured in an autoanalyzer. Epinephrine was about 4 ng/ml at the initial bleed, but declined steadily to blood cells showed changes indicating immune system suppression. By the end of the treatment the hetorophil/lymphocyte ratio increased to 4.7. These results suggest that handling alligators, taking multiple blood samples, and keeping them restrained for more than 8 hr is a severe stress to the animals.

  13. Ecological studies on the freshwater fishes of the Alligator Rivers Region, Northern Territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, K.A.; Allen, S.A.; Pollard, D.A.; Cook, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The tropical climate of the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory has a distinctive Wet-Dry cycle resulting in seasonal flows in the creeks and rivers of its catchments. The present study, begun during August 1978, aimed at developing an ecological monitoring system that would detect changes in freshwater fish communities brought about by recent uranium mining and processing in the lowlands of the region

  14. Estimating spawning times of Alligator Gar (Atractosteus spatula) in Lake Texoma, Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Richard A.; Long, James M.

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, juvenile Alligator Gar were sampled in the reservoir-river interface of the Red River arm of Lake Texoma. The Red River, which flows 860 km along Oklahoma’s border with Texas, is the primary in-flow source of Lake Texoma, and is impounded by Denison Dam. Minifyke nets were deployed using an adaptive random cluster sampling design, which has been used to effectively sample rare species. Lapilli otoliths (one of the three pair of ear stones found within the inner ear of fish) were removed from juvenile Alligator Gar collected in July of 2013. Daily ages were estimated by counting the number of rings present, and spawn dates were back-calculated from date of capture and subtracting 8 days (3 days from spawn to hatch and 5 days from hatch to swimup when the first ring forms). Alligator Gar daily age estimation ranged from 50 to 63 days old since swim-up. Spawn dates corresponded to rising pool elevations of Lake Texoma and water pulses of tributaries.

  15. Alligator rivers analogue project. Final report; volume 1; summary of findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerden, P.; Lever, D.A.; Sverjensky, D.A.; Townley, L.R.

    1992-01-01

    The Koongarra uranium ore deposit is located in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory of Australia. Many of the processes that have controlled the development of this natural system are relevant to the performance assessment of radioactive waste repositories. An agreement was reached in 1987 by a number of agencies concerned with radioactive waste disposal to set up the International Alligator Rivers Analogue Project (ARAP) to study relevant aspects of the hydrological and geochemical evolution of the site. The Project ran for five years. The aims of the study were: to contribute to the production of reliable and realistic models for radionuclide migration within geological environments relevant to the assessment of the safety of radioactive waste repositories; to develop methods of validation of models using a combination of laboratory and field data associated with the Koongarra uranium deposit; and to encourage maximum interaction between modellers and experimentalists in achieving these objectives. It was anticipated that the substantial databases generated in the field and laboratory studies would then be used to develop and test geochemical and radionuclide transport models. The findings from the technical studies are discussed in the context of assessments of the long-term performance of geological repositories for radioactive wastes, which are being undertaken in many countries. They are also considered in an integrated 'Scenario Development' approach, aimed to understand the formation of the ore deposit. Despite their inherent uncertainties, the findings provide a basis for assessing the way in which radionuclides will migrate in environments with a variety of geologic settings and over a range of different geologic timescales. This summary report, which highlights the work and findings of the Alligator Rivers Analogue Project is one of a series of 16 volumes

  16. The alligator woman's tale: remembering Nicaragua's "first self-declared lesbian".

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rivera, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Carmen Aguirre (1931-1971) was a young woman who lived as a self-made man in the 1960s under the brutal, yet populist, right-wing Somoza dictatorship in Nicaragua. Carmen was known as Carmelo or la Caimana (the alligator woman). This article sheds light not only on la Caimana's life, but on how he is remembered today in Nicaragua. It addresses dynamics of Nicaragua's sexual past, present, and future, as well as theoretical questions dealing with identity, sex, and politics.

  17. Supervising Scientist for the Alligator Rivers Region Annual Report 1996-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    One of the most significant developments during the year was the submission by Energy Resources of Australia Ltd of its Environmental Impact Statement for Jabiluka. The proposal is significantly different in technical detail from the Ranger and Nabarlek mines owing to the proposal to mine underground. Evaluation of the Environmental Performance of the uranium mines of the Alligator Rivers Region continued, with twice-yearly Environmental Performance Reviews (EPR) of Ranger and Nabarlek, and results reported to the Alligator Rivers Region Advisory Committee (ARRAC). Ongoing technical consultations took place through meetings of the Ranger Minesite Technical Committee. Issues relating to water disposal were addressed through the Ranger Water Management Working Group. Submissions were made regarding the Jabiluka Environmental Impact Assessment process and technical advice was provided to the Environmental Assessment Branch of Environment Australia during the assessment. The organisation's research program has reflected strategic directions set last year by the Alligator Rivers Region Technical Committee (ARRTC) concerning environmental impacts of mining. Key projects assess radiation exposure by members of the public as a result of uranium mining, the effectiveness of artificial wetlands in the treatment of mine waters, and the development of methods to assess the effectiveness of options for rehabilitation. Development of the research program into wetlands protection and management continued, including establishment of a coordinated monitoring program to measure and assess coastal change as a benchmark for monitoring effects of climate change in the Alligator Rivers Region (a key part of a national network). Other research activities included water quality research for the National River Health Program and revision of the National Water Quality Management Strategy, Water Quality Guidelines for Fresh and Marine Waters and conclusion of research projects in the Mount

  18. The first fossil skull of Alligator sinensis from the Pleistocene, Taiwan, with a paleogeographic implication of the species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsi-yin, Shan; Yen-nien, Cheng; Xiao-chun, Wu

    2013-06-01

    A nearly complete fossil skull of Alligatoridae from the Pleistocene, Penghu Channel, east of Taiwan, is reported. It can be referred to the most latest clade of Alligatorinae, which includes Alligator sinensis, Alligator mississippiensis and Alligator mefferdi, on the basis of the following features: the splenial is excluded from the mandibular symphysis; the anterior tip of the splenial passes dorsal to the Meckelian groove; and the mandible is gently curved between the fourth alveoli and the mid dentary. It differs from A. mississippiensis and A. mefferdi mainly in the following characters: the breadth between the supratemporal fenestrae is approximately equal to the interorbital width, the snout is about half the length of the skull; and the anterior part of the snout is subtriangular in dorsal view. These features suggest that the Penghu alligator is most probably referable to A. sinensis. This is the only fossil skull of A. sinensis known. The discovery of the skull in Penghu Channel not only provides the first solid fossil evidence to indicate that the geological distribution of A. sinensis extended farther southeast than the historical/archeological range of the species but also adds new information on the biodiversity of the Penghu fauna.

  19. Potential impact of Dare County landfills on Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.; Augspurger, T.

    2005-01-01

    Runoff of leachate from East Lake and Dare County Construction and Demolition Debris landfills has the potential to impact wildlife resources at Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, Dare and Hyde Counties, North Carolina. Sediment quality of samples collected in August 2000 at 14 locations down-gradient from the landfills was assessed by measuring metal and organic contaminants in the sediments, chronic toxicity of solid-phase sediment (28-d static-renewal exposures; survival and growth as test endpoints) and acute toxicity of sediment porewater (96-h static exposures) to Hyalella azteca (Crustacea: Amphipoda). In addition, contaminant bioaccumulation from 4 sediments was determined using 28-d exposures of Lumbriculus variegatus (freshwater oligochaete). Although survival was not impaired, length of H. azteca was significantly reduced in sediments from 5 locations. Pore water from 4 locations was acutely toxic to H. azteca. Metals and a few polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were bioaccumulated by L. variegatus from the sediments. Several metals and PAHs exceeded sediment quality guidelines, and metals in porewater from several sites exceeded water quality criteria for the protection of aquatic wildlife. Runoff of leachate from the landfills has reduced sediment quality and has the potential to adversely affect wildlife resources at Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge.

  20. EFFECT OF ACUTE STRESS ON PLASMA CONCENTRATIONS OF SEX AND STRESS HORMONES IN JUVENILE ALLIGATORS LIVING IN CONTROL AND CONTAMINATED LAKES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental contaminants can act as stressors, inducing elevated circulating concentrations of stress hormones such as corticosterone and cortisol. Development in contaminated eggs has been reported to modify circulating sex steroid hormone concentrations in alligators (Alligat...

  1. Alligator Rivers Region Research Institute: annual research summary 1989-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The Alligator Rivers Region Research Institute (ARRRI) research activities are associated with an assessment of environmental effect of mining in the region. While emphasis on baseline research is now much reduced, some projects are still necessary because of significant changes in the Magela Creek system, because new areas of proposed mining have been identified (e.g. Coronation Hill) and because the emphasis now being placed on rehabilitation research requires a sound knowledge of the Region's flora. The ARRRI rehabilitation research program has concentrated on the Ranger mine site, principally because it is at a critical planning stage where detailed research information is required. With regard to the development of techniques, research at the Institute has led to the development of specific analytical methods or protocols that can be used in assessing environmental impact. 39 tabs., 42 figs

  2. Problems of communicating radiation doses to aboriginal members of the public in the Alligator Rivers Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, D.

    1985-01-01

    Since the early 1970s, Aboriginal people of the Alligator Rivers Region have had to come to grips with the effects of uranium mining at Nabarlek and Ranger. One element in their cost-benefit approach to mine operations has been the expectation that bush foods in the region will not be contaminated by the mining operations. Recent studies on radionuclide concentrations in freshwater mussels (Velesunio angasi) in the region have shown this species, and perhaps others, to be efficient accumulators of radium. Information concerning natural radium accumulation in mussels and accompanying health risk estimates have been conveyed to Aboriginal people of the area and such information transfer has not been without its problems. Application of the ALARA principle to environmental management of the effluent pathways needs to consider Aboriginal expectations

  3. Diets and abundances of aquatic and semi-aquatic reptiles in the Alligator Rivers Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shine, R.

    1986-01-01

    The mining and milling of uranium in the Alligator River Region in the Northern Territory has raised the possibility that heavy metals and radionuclides might escape into the aquatic system and be accumulated by the reptilian fauna. Aquatic and semi-aquatic reptiles are regularly eaten by Aboriginal people of the region, and data on diets and reproduction of these species, as well as on their dispersion and abundance, are essential before the possibility that reptiles might act as pathways for these contaminants to Aboriginals can be assessed. The objectives of this study were to provide quantitative data on the diets of filesnakes, sand goannas and water goannas, to provide information on seasonal changes in their abundance and distribution within the Magela Creek system; and to describe their reproductive cycles

  4. A stream sediment orientation programme for Uranium in the Alligator River Province, Northern Territory, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gingrich, J.E.; Foy, M.F.

    1977-01-01

    Sediments samples were collected from streams draining the Koongarra uranium deposit and the small uranium mines in the South Alligator Valley. Determinations for U, Cu and Pb on various size fractions taken from each of these samples indicated that the best results were obtained for U from the minus 200-mesh fraction, but the train from the Koongarra ore deposit was very short. Cu and Pb were not found to be very useful as indicator elements for U. Alpha-track films were used to determine the Rn content of each sample and the ratio of alpha-track film reading to U content was found to define anomalous drainage areas around the mineralization in the Koongarra area. The areas so defined were of sufficient magnitude to be defined in a reconnaissance stream sediment programme

  5. Spermiogenesis in the imbricate alligator lizard, Barisia imbricata (Reptilia, Squamata, Anguidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribbins, Kevin M; Rheubert, Justin L; Touzinsky, Katherine; Hanover, Jessica; Matchett, Caroline L; Granados-González, Gisela; Hernández-Gallegos, Oswaldo

    2013-06-01

    Although the events of spermiogenesis are commonly studied in amniotes, the amount of research available for Squamata is lacking. Many studies have described the morphological characteristics of mature spermatozoa in squamates, but few detail the ultrastructural changes that occur during spermiogenesis. This study's purpose is to gain a better understanding of the subcellular events of spermatid development within the Imbricate Alligator Lizard, Barisia imbricata. The morphological data presented here represent the first complete ultrastructural study of spermiogenesis within the family Anguidae. Samples of testes from four specimens collected on the northwest side of the Nevado de Toluca, México, were prepared using standard techniques for transmission electron microscopy. Many of the ultrastructural changes occurring during spermiogenesis within B. imbricata are similar to that of other squamates (i.e., early acrosome formation, chromatin condensation, flagella formation, annulus present, and a prominent manchette). However, there are a few unique characteristics within B. imbricata spermatids that to date have not been described during spermiogenesis in other squamates. For example, penetration of the acrosomal granule into the subacrosomal space to form the basal plate of the perforatorium during round spermatid development, the clover-shaped morphology of the developing nuclear fossa of the flagellum, and the bulbous shape to the perforatorium are all unique to the Imbricate Alligator Lizard. These anatomical character differences may be valuable nontraditional data that along with more traditional matrices (such as DNA sequences and gross morphological data) may help elucidate phylogenetic relationships, which are historically considered controversial within Squamata. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Geomorphological assessment of sites and impoundments for the long term containment of uranium mill tailings in the Alligator Rivers Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    East, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a program of current and future research into those geomorphological processes likely to affect the long term containment of uranium mill tailings in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory. Research is directed at three main areas: identification of geomorphic hazards at proposed impoundment sites; determination of erosion rates on impoundment slopes; and prediction of patterns of fluvial dispersal of released tailings. Each necessitates consideration of present and future geomorphic processes

  7. The influence of floodplain geomorphology and hydrologic connectivity on alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula) habitat along the embanked floodplain of the Lower Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Most, Merel; Hudson, Paul F.

    2018-02-01

    The floodplain geomorphology of large lowland rivers is intricately related to aquatic ecosystems dependent upon flood pulse dynamics. The alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula) is native to the Lower Mississippi River and dependent upon floodplain backwater areas for spawning. In this study we utilize a geospatial approach to develop a habitat suitability index for alligator gar that explicitly considers hydrologic connectivity and the floodplain geomorphology along a frequently inundated segment of the Lower Mississippi River. The data sets include Landsat imagery, a high-resolution LiDAR digital elevation model (DEM), National Hydrography Dataset (NHD), and hydrologic and geomorphic data. A habitat suitability index is created based on the extent and frequency of inundation, water depth, temperature, and vegetation. A comparison between the remote sensing approach and the NHD revealed substantial differences in the area and location of water bodies available for alligator gar spawning. The final habitat suitability index indicates that a modest proportion (19%) of the overall embanked floodplain is available for alligator gar spawning. Opportunities exist for management efforts to utilize engineered and natural geomorphic features to facilitate hydrologic connectivity at flow levels below flood stage that would expand the habitat of alligator gar across the floodplain. The study results have direct implications regarding environmental restoration of the Lower Mississippi, an iconic example of an embanked meandering river floodplain.

  8. The orientation and navigation of juvenile alligators: evidence of magnetic sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodda, Gordon H.

    1984-01-01

    Displaced juvenile alligators, Alligator mississipiensis, were released on land in a 9 m diameter dodecagonal arena to test their ability to orient in the absence of terrestrial landmarks. Navigational ability seemed to improve with age. When displaced along a fairly direct route yearlings (age 7–14 months) compensated for their displacement, moving in the direction from the arena to their home sites. When displaced by a circuitous route, yearlings failed to compensate for their displacement, exhibiting instead simple compass orientation in a direction that would have returned them to water had they been released on land near the site where they were captured. The older juveniles were oriented in a homeward direction under all displacement and test conditions. The latter animals may have been using geomagnetic map information to select their homeward directions as the errors in their homeward bearings correlated with small deviations in the geomagnetic field's dip angle at the time of the test (1980r s=−0.6047,P=0.0131, all testsr s= −0.4652,P=0.0084). This effect appeared to depend on a very short-term assessment of geomagnetic conditions, as values measured 20 min before or 30 min after the tests began did not correlate with the directions the animals moved. The older juveniles appeared to use magnetically quiet hours on the night of their capture as the baseline from which to measure the geomagnetic deviations that occurred at the time of the arena test. The magnitude of the magnetic effect in the older animals suggests that the geomagnetic information may have been used to perform a ‘map’ step, as small fluctuations in dip angle correlated with much larger deviations in homeward bearings. In addition, the compass-oriented yearlings and the seemingly route-based behavior of the homeward-oriented yearlings did not appear to be influenced by geomagnetic conditions. These findings have many parallels in results obtained from bird orientation studies

  9. Ecological studies on the freshwater fishes of the Alligator Rivers region, Northern Territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, K.A.; Allen, S.A.; Pollard, D.A.; Cook, M.G.

    1990-01-01

    The tropical climate of the Alligator Rivers Region (ARR) has a distinctive wet-dry cycle , resulting in seasonal flows in the creeks and rivers of its catchments. The present study, begun in August 1978, was aimed at developing an ecological monitoring system that would detect any changes to the freshwater fish communities brought about by recent uranium mining and processing in the lowlands of the ARR. The focus of the synecological studies, was a description of spatial and temporal patterns in the community structure of the fish fauna. Interpretation of these patterns was made possible by the collection of detailed environmental data from the study sites. It was found that of the ARR seasonal changes in environmental conditions were so marked that they often obscured the effects of environmental gradients along a watercourse and differing environmental conditions characteristics of different types of waterbody. Hence it may not be entirely satisfactory to define environmental zones in these catchments based on overall environmental conditions through the whole seasonal cycle, because changes in any one such zone between seasons result in very marked changes in the fish communities of habitats in that zone. 34 refs., 22 tabs., 45 figs., 3 maps

  10. The International intraval project. Phase 1 case 8: The Alligator rivers natural analogue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerden, P.

    1992-01-01

    INTRAVAL is an international coordinated research program for predicting the potential radionuclide migration in the geosphere with the use of mathematical models. Such models are used to help assess the long-term safety of radioactive waste disposal systems. The objective of the Alligator Rivers Analogue Project (ARAP) is to identify and study long-term processes that have been significant in the development of the uranium dispersion zone at the Koongarra uranium ore deposit in the Northern Territory of Australia. This report includes a description of the site geology and gives an outline of the experimental programs, which are aimed to study the hydrogeology and geochemistry of the system, and the distribution of uranium and its daughter radionuclides in the rock strata. The extensive databases that have resulted from these studies have been used to develop and test hydrological, geochemical and transport models. A good basis has been established for modelling the transport of radionuclides in the porous, weathered zone of the Koongarra uranium deposit and its surroundings. A number of preliminary transport, hydrology and geochemical modelling reports are given, with the Koongarra databases also being used to test a Performance Assessment model. The possible application of scenario development procedures to the Koongarra site is discussed. 106 refs., 67 figs., 28 tabs

  11. A database of radionuclide activity and metal concentrations for the Alligator Rivers Region uranium province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, Che; Bollhöfer, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a database of radionuclide activity and metal concentrations for the Alligator Rivers Region (ARR) uranium province in the Australian wet-dry tropics. The database contains 5060 sample records and 57,473 concentration values. The data are for animal, plant, soil, sediment and water samples collected by the Environmental Research Institute of the Supervising Scientist (ERISS) as part of its statutory role to undertake research and monitoring into the impacts of uranium mining on the environment of the ARR. Concentration values are provided in the database for 11 radionuclides ( 227 Ac, 40 K, 210 Pb, 210 Po, 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 228 Th, 230 Th, 232 Th, 234 U, 238 U) and 26 metals (Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, S, Sb, Se, Sr, Th, U, V, Zn). Potential uses of the database are discussed. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Environmental surveillance monitoring in the Alligator Rivers Region. Report for the six months period ending 30 September 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report outlines the activities of the Northern Territory Supervising Authorities in meeting their responsibilities for environmental management and surveillance, occupational safety, relating to uranium mining and environment protection in the Alligator Rivers Region. Environmental monitoring was carried out at the Nabarlek Mine, which site has now been rehabilitated and revegetated, and at Ranger, the only mine currently operating in the region. Other uranium projects such as Jabiluka and Koongarra have been delayed due to the former Commonwealth Government's 'three mines policy'. 4 tabs., 10 figs

  13. Direct comparison of the electronic coupling efficiency of sulfur and selenium alligator clips for molecules adsorbed onto gold electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrone, L.; Palacin, S.; Bourgoin, J.P.

    2003-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy experiments have been performed to compare the electronic coupling provided by S and by Se used as alligator clips for bisthiol- and biselenol-terthiophene molecules adsorbed onto gold. The molecules were inserted in a dodecanethiol (DT) self-assembled monolayer. Their apparent height above the dodecanethiol matrix was used as a measure of the electronic coupling strength corresponding to S and Se, respectively. We show that the insertion behaviors of the two molecules are qualitatively the same, and that Se provides systematically a better coupling link than S, whatever the tunneling conditions

  14. Up-regulation of the alligator CYP3A77 gene by toxaphene and dexamethasone and its short term effect on plasma testosterone concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunderson, M.P.; Kohno, S.; Blumberg, B.; Iguchi, T.; Guillette, L.J.

    2006-01-01

    In this study we describe an alligator hepatic CYP3A gene, CYP3A77, which is inducible by dexamethasone and toxaphene. CYP3A plays a broad role in biotransforming both exogenous compounds and endogenous hormones such as testosterone and estradiol. Alligators collected from sites in Florida that are contaminated with organochlorine compounds exhibit differences in sex steroid concentrations. Many organochlorine compounds induce CYP3A expression in other vertebrates; hence, CYP3A induction by organochlorine contaminants could increase biotransformation and clearance of sex steroids by CYP3A and provide a plausible mechanism for the lowering of endogenous sex steroid concentrations in alligator plasma. We used real time PCR to examine whether known and suspected CYP3A inducers (dexamethasone, metyrapone, rifampicin, and toxaphene) up-regulate steady state levels of hepatic CYP3A77 transcript to determine if induction patterns in female juvenile alligators are similar to those reported in other vertebrates and whether toxaphene, an organochlorine compound found in high concentrations in Lake Apopka alligators, induces this gene. Estrogen receptor α (ERα), estrogen receptor β (ERβ), androgen receptor (AR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), progesterone receptor (PR), and steroid-xenobiotic receptor (SXR) transcripts were also measured to determine whether any of these nuclear receptors are also regulated by these compounds in alligators. Dexamethasone (4.2-fold) and toxaphene (3.5-fold) significantly induced CYP3A77 gene transcript, whereas rifampicin (2.8-fold) and metyrapone (2.1-fold) up-regulated ERβ after 24 h. None of the compounds significantly up-regulated AR, ERα, GR, PR, or SXR over this time period. Plasma testosterone (T) did not change significantly after 24 h in alligators from any of the treatment groups. Dexamethasone treated animals exhibited a strong relationship between the 24 h plasma T concentrations and CYP3A77 (R 2 = 0.9, positive) and SXR (R 2

  15. Ontogeny of the Alligator Cartilago Transiliens and Its Significance for Sauropsid Jaw Muscle Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Henry P.; Holliday, Casey M.

    2011-01-01

    The cartilago transiliens is a fibrocartilaginous structure within the jaw muscles of crocodylians. The cartilago transiliens slides between the pterygoid buttress and coronoid region of the lower jaw and connects two muscles historically identified as m. pseudotemporalis superficialis and m. intramandibularis. However, the position of cartilago transiliens, and its anatomical similarities to tendon organs suggest the structure may be a sesamoid linking a single muscle. Incompressible sesamoids often form inside tendons that wrap around bone. However, such structures rarely ossify in reptiles and have thus far received scant attention. We tested the hypothesis that the cartilago transiliens is a sesamoid developed within in one muscle by investigating its structure in an ontogenetic series of Alligator mississippiensis using dissection, 3D imaging, and polarizing and standard light microscopy. In all animals studied, the cartilago transiliens receives collagen fibers and tendon insertions from its two main muscular attachments. However, whereas collagen fibers were continuous within the cartilaginous nodule of younger animals, such continuity decreased in older animals, where the fibrocartilaginous core grew to displace the fibrous region. Whereas several neighboring muscles attached to the fibrous capsule in older individuals, only two muscles had significant contributions to the structure in young animals. Our results indicate that the cartilago transiliens is likely a sesamoid formed within a single muscle (i.e., m. pseudotemporalis superficialis) as it wraps around the pterygoid buttress. This tendon organ is ubiquitous among fossil crocodyliforms indicating it is a relatively ancient, conserved structure associated with the development of the large pterygoid flanges in this clade. Finally, these findings indicate that similar tendon organs exist among potentially homologous muscle groups in birds and turtles, thus impacting inferences of jaw muscle homology

  16. Evaluating potential effects of widening US 64 on the black bear population of Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, Dare County, North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    This report summarizes research conducted along US Highway 64 (US 64) and US Highway 264 (US 264) in Alligator : River National Wildlife Refuge (ARNWR), Dare County, NC regarding the proposed expansion of US 64. The study site : included the areas ad...

  17. INTRAVAL phase 2, test case 8. Alligator Rivers Natural Analogue - Modelling of uranium transport in the weathered zone at Koongarra (Australia). Progress report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Weerd H; Hassanizadeh SM; Richardson-van der Poel MA; LBG

    1993-01-01

    A study of uranium transport in the Koongarra site of Alligator Rivers Uranium deposit (Australia) is carried out. The analysis of the solid phase uranium concentration measured at various depths provides a useful picture of the dispersion process. Results of this analysis seem to support the

  18. Case history of the discovery of the Jabiluka uranium deposits, East Alligator River region, Northern Territory of Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowntree, J.C.; Mosher, D.V.

    1976-01-01

    Pancontinental Mining Limited acquired exploration rights over an area in the East Alligator River Region, Northern Territory, Australia, in 1970. Subsequently, Getty Oil Development Company Limited acquired a substantial minority interest in the property. The Jabiluka deposits were discovered during the course of exploration and are currently the largest of the four major uranium deposits in the East Alligator River Region. This region at present contains 24% of the western world's reasonably assured resources of uranium. The exploration techniques employed during primary and secondary exploration on the property between 1971 and 1975 and during the delineation of the Jabiluka deposits are discussed in detail. The case history illustrates the exploration philosophy which was successfully employed on the Jabiluka property. The philosophy encompasses the following points: The need for an assessment on the limits of airborne radiometric surveys; the necessity for detection and evaluation of point source anomalies; the necessity for exploration along extensions of favourable lithologies; and the desirability of modification of exploration techniques on different types of anomalies. Some aspects of this philosophy may be useful in exploration for similar stratabound uranium deposits in other areas. (author)

  19. Flexible Measurement of Bioluminescent Reporters Using an Automated Longitudinal Luciferase Imaging Gas- and Temperature-optimized Recorder (ALLIGATOR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Priya; Hoyle, Nathaniel P; O'Neill, John S

    2017-12-13

    Luciferase-based reporters of cellular gene expression are in widespread use for both longitudinal and end-point assays of biological activity. In circadian rhythms research, for example, clock gene fusions with firefly luciferase give rise to robust rhythms in cellular bioluminescence that persist over many days. Technical limitations associated with photomultiplier tubes (PMT) or conventional microscopy-based methods for bioluminescence quantification have typically demanded that cells and tissues be maintained under quite non-physiological conditions during recording, with a trade-off between sensitivity and throughput. Here, we report a refinement of prior methods that allows long-term bioluminescence imaging with high sensitivity and throughput which supports a broad range of culture conditions, including variable gas and humidity control, and that accepts many different tissue culture plates and dishes. This automated longitudinal luciferase imaging gas- and temperature-optimized recorder (ALLIGATOR) also allows the observation of spatial variations in luciferase expression across a cell monolayer or tissue, which cannot readily be observed by traditional methods. We highlight how the ALLIGATOR provides vastly increased flexibility for the detection of luciferase activity when compared with existing methods.

  20. A Comprehensive Analysis of the Phylogeny, Genomic Organization and Expression of Immunoglobulin Light Chain Genes in Alligator sinensis, an Endangered Reptile Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Zhang, Chenglin; Wu, Xiaobing; Han, Haitang; Zhao, Yaofeng; Ren, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Crocodilians are evolutionarily distinct reptiles that are distantly related to lizards and are thought to be the closest relatives of birds. Compared with birds and mammals, few studies have investigated the Ig light chain of crocodilians. Here, employing an Alligator sinensis genomic bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library and available genome data, we characterized the genomic organization of the Alligator sinensis IgL gene loci. The Alligator sinensis has two IgL isotypes, λ and κ, the same as Anolis carolinensis. The Igλ locus contains 6 Cλ genes, each preceded by a Jλ gene, and 86 potentially functional Vλ genes upstream of (Jλ-Cλ)n. The Igκ locus contains a single Cκ gene, 6 Jκs and 62 functional Vκs. All VL genes are classified into a total of 31 families: 19 Vλ families and 12 Vκ families. Based on an analysis of the chromosomal location of the light chain genes among mammals, birds, lizards and frogs, the data further confirm that there are two IgL isotypes in the Alligator sinensis: Igλ and Igκ. By analyzing the cloned Igλ/κ cDNA, we identified a biased usage pattern of V families in the expressed Vλ and Vκ. An analysis of the junctions of the recombined VJ revealed the presence of N and P nucleotides in both expressed λ and κ sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the V genes revealed V families shared by mammals, birds, reptiles and Xenopus, suggesting that these conserved V families are orthologous and have been retained during the evolution of IgL. Our data suggest that the Alligator sinensis IgL gene repertoire is highly diverse and complex and provide insight into immunoglobulin gene evolution in vertebrates. PMID:26901135

  1. A Comprehensive Analysis of the Phylogeny, Genomic Organization and Expression of Immunoglobulin Light Chain Genes in Alligator sinensis, an Endangered Reptile Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xifeng Wang

    Full Text Available Crocodilians are evolutionarily distinct reptiles that are distantly related to lizards and are thought to be the closest relatives of birds. Compared with birds and mammals, few studies have investigated the Ig light chain of crocodilians. Here, employing an Alligator sinensis genomic bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library and available genome data, we characterized the genomic organization of the Alligator sinensis IgL gene loci. The Alligator sinensis has two IgL isotypes, λ and κ, the same as Anolis carolinensis. The Igλ locus contains 6 Cλ genes, each preceded by a Jλ gene, and 86 potentially functional Vλ genes upstream of (Jλ-Cλn. The Igκ locus contains a single Cκ gene, 6 Jκs and 62 functional Vκs. All VL genes are classified into a total of 31 families: 19 Vλ families and 12 Vκ families. Based on an analysis of the chromosomal location of the light chain genes among mammals, birds, lizards and frogs, the data further confirm that there are two IgL isotypes in the Alligator sinensis: Igλ and Igκ. By analyzing the cloned Igλ/κ cDNA, we identified a biased usage pattern of V families in the expressed Vλ and Vκ. An analysis of the junctions of the recombined VJ revealed the presence of N and P nucleotides in both expressed λ and κ sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the V genes revealed V families shared by mammals, birds, reptiles and Xenopus, suggesting that these conserved V families are orthologous and have been retained during the evolution of IgL. Our data suggest that the Alligator sinensis IgL gene repertoire is highly diverse and complex and provide insight into immunoglobulin gene evolution in vertebrates.

  2. Completion of the South Alligator Valley remediation, Northern Territory, Australia - -16198

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waggitt, Peter; Fawcett, Mike

    2009-01-01

    13 uranium mines operated in the South Alligator Valley of Australia's Northern Territory between 1953 and 1963. At the end of operations the mines, and associated infrastructure, were simply abandoned. As this activity preceded environmental legislation by about 15 years there was neither any obligation, nor attempt, at remediation. In the 1980's it was decided that the whole area should become an extension of the adjacent World Heritage, Kakadu National Park. As a result the Commonwealth Government made an inventory of the abandoned mines and associated facilities in 1986. This established the size and scope of the liability and formed the framework for a possible future remediation project. The initial program for the reduction of physical and radiological hazards at each of the identified sites was formulated in 1989 and the works took place from 1990 to 1992. But even at this time, as throughout much of the valley's history, little attention was being paid to the long term aspirations of traditional land owners. The traditional Aboriginal owners, the Gunlom Land Trust, were granted freehold Native Title to the area in 1996. They immediately leased the land back to the Commonwealth Government so it would remain a part of Kakadu National Park, but under joint management. One condition of the lease required that all evidence of former mining activity be remediated by 2015. The consultation, and subsequent planning processes, for a final remediation program began in 1997. A plan was agreed in 2003 and, after funding was granted in 2005, works implementation commenced in 2007. An earlier paper described the planning and consultation stages, experience involving the cleaning up of remnant uranium mill tailings and other mining residues; and the successful implementation of the initial remediation works. This paper deals with the final planning and design processes to complete the remediation programme, which is due to occur in 2009. The issues of final containment

  3. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Hydrogeological field studies. Final Report - Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, S N [Univ of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona (United States). Dept of Hydrology and Water Resources; Marley, R D [D.B. Stephens and Associates Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Norris, J R [Hydro Geo Chem Inc., Tucson, Arizona (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The hydrogeology of the Koongarra site was interpreted primarily from long-term hydrographs, water-level maps, water injection tests, aquifer pumping tests, logs of boreholes, and chemical analyses of groundwater samples. Data have been collected over a 21-year period starting with test-drilling in 1970. The first intensive period of hydrogeologic investigations was from 1978 through 1981 and was related to anticipated exploitation of uranium ore at Koongarra. The second period was from 1986 through 1991 and was related to the international Alligator Rivers Analogue Project under the direction of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation. The conclusion which can be drawn from the chemical data is that water moving out of the No. 1 ore deposit is diluted rapidly with recharge from the surface as it migrates down the hydraulic gradient. Most of the groundwater outside of the ore deposit does not originate from the ore deposit, and flow models which assume unmodified stream tubes extending out of the ore deposit in a downgradient direction do not reflect the true system. Water in the ore deposit itself, must come from slow upward seepage through the fault zone. Owing to the fact that this water must be at least hundreds of years old, observed fluctuations of water levels in the deposit must reflect pressure head variations induced by seasonal recharge to the overlying surficial materials. Water level fluctuations do not signify a yearly displacement of water deep in the system. Water in the deeper part of the ore must be almost static compared to obvious rapid groundwater circulation in the area around PH88. Small changes in pH, temperature and specific electrical conductivity during aquifer tests indicate a complex hydraulic system which has a variable response to pumping as a function of time. Low concentration in tritium and Carbon-14 together with high concentrations of dissolved helium in the groundwaters all suggested strongly that semi static

  4. Alligators and Crocodiles Have High Paracellular Absorption of Nutrients, But Differ in Digestive Morphology and Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Christopher R; McWhorter, Todd J; Gienger, C M; Starck, J Matthias; Medley, Peter; Manolis, S Charlie; Webb, Grahame J W; Christian, Keith A

    2015-12-01

    Much of what is known about crocodilian nutrition and growth has come from animals propagated in captivity, but captive animals from the families Crocodilidae and Alligatoridae respond differently to similar diets. Since there are few comparative studies of crocodilian digestive physiology to help explain these differences, we investigated young Alligator mississippiensis and Crocodylus porosus in terms of (1) gross and microscopic morphology of the intestine, (2) activity of the membrane-bound digestive enzymes aminopeptidase-N, maltase, and sucrase, and (3) nutrient absorption by carrier-mediated and paracellular pathways. We also measured gut morphology of animals over a larger range of body sizes. The two species showed different allometry of length and mass of the gut, with A. mississippiensis having a steeper increase in intestinal mass with body size, and C. porosus having a steeper increase in intestinal length with body size. Both species showed similar patterns of magnification of the intestinal surface area, with decreasing magnification from the proximal to distal ends of the intestine. Although A. mississippiensis had significantly greater surface-area magnification overall, a compensating significant difference in gut length between species meant that total surface area of the intestine was not significantly different from that of C. porosus. The species differed in enzyme activities, with A. mississippiensis having significantly greater ability to digest carbohydrates relative to protein than did C. porosus. These differences in enzyme activity may help explain the differences in performance between the crocodilian families when on artificial diets. Both A. mississippiensis and C. porosus showed high absorption of 3-O methyl d-glucose (absorbed via both carrier-mediated and paracellular transport), as expected. Both species also showed surprisingly high levels of l-glucose-uptake (absorbed paracellularly), with fractional absorptions as high as those

  5. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Hydrogeological field studies. Final Report - Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, S.N. [Univ of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona (United States). Dept of Hydrology and Water Resources; Marley, R.D. [D.B. Stephens and Associates Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Norris, J.R. [Hydro Geo Chem Inc., Tucson, Arizona (United States)

    1992-12-31

    The hydrogeology of the Koongarra site was interpreted primarily from long-term hydrographs, water-level maps, water injection tests, aquifer pumping tests, logs of boreholes, and chemical analyses of groundwater samples. Data have been collected over a 21-year period starting with test-drilling in 1970. The first intensive period of hydrogeologic investigations was from 1978 through 1981 and was related to anticipated exploitation of uranium ore at Koongarra. The second period was from 1986 through 1991 and was related to the international Alligator Rivers Analogue Project under the direction of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation. The conclusion which can be drawn from the chemical data is that water moving out of the No. 1 ore deposit is diluted rapidly with recharge from the surface as it migrates down the hydraulic gradient. Most of the groundwater outside of the ore deposit does not originate from the ore deposit, and flow models which assume unmodified stream tubes extending out of the ore deposit in a downgradient direction do not reflect the true system. Water in the ore deposit itself, must come from slow upward seepage through the fault zone. Owing to the fact that this water must be at least hundreds of years old, observed fluctuations of water levels in the deposit must reflect pressure head variations induced by seasonal recharge to the overlying surficial materials. Water level fluctuations do not signify a yearly displacement of water deep in the system. Water in the deeper part of the ore must be almost static compared to obvious rapid groundwater circulation in the area around PH88. Small changes in pH, temperature and specific electrical conductivity during aquifer tests indicate a complex hydraulic system which has a variable response to pumping as a function of time. Low concentration in tritium and Carbon-14 together with high concentrations of dissolved helium in the groundwaters all suggested strongly that semi static

  6. Effect of aqueous extracts of alligator pear seed (Persea americana mill) on blood glucose and histopathology of pancreas in alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edem, Do; Ekanem, Is; Ebong, Pe

    2009-07-01

    Effects of aqueous extract of alligator pear seed on normal and alloxan-induced diabetic rats were investigated in 6 groups of rats (5 rats per group). Test groups were made diabetic with intra-peritoneal injection of alloxan and treated with 300 mg and 600 mg/kg body weight of alligator pear seed extract. Two non-diabetic groups were also administered with 300 mg and 600 mg/kg body weight extract. The levels of blood glucose were examined in all 6 experimental groups. In diabetic rats, blood glucose levels were significantly reduced (pblood glucose levels were significantly reduced (palligator pear seed may contribute significantly to the reduction of blood glucose levels and can be useful in the treatment of diabetes.

  7. As-CATH1-6, novel cathelicidins with potent antimicrobial and immunomodulatory properties from Alligator sinensis, play pivotal roles in host antimicrobial immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Cai, Shasha; Qiao, Xue; Wu, Mali; Guo, Zhilai; Wang, Renping; Kuang, Yi-Qun; Yu, Haining; Wang, Yipeng

    2017-08-10

    Crocodilians are regarded as possessing a powerful immune system. However, the composition and action of the crocodilian immune system have remained unclear until now. Cathelicidins, the principal family of host defense peptides, play pivotal roles in vertebrate immune defense against microbial invasions. However, cathelicidins from crocodilians have not been extensively studied to date. In the present study, six novel cathelicidins (As-CATH1-6) were identified and characterized from the endangered Chinese alligator ( Alligator sinensis ). As-CATH1-6 exhibit no sequence similarity with any of the known cathelicidins. Structure analysis indicated that As-CATH1-3 adopt a random coil secondary conformation, whereas As-CATH4-6 were predicted to mainly adopt an amphipathic α-helix conformation. Among them, As-CATH4-6 exhibited potent, broad-spectrum and rapid antimicrobial activity by inducing the disruption of cell membrane integrity. They also exhibited strong ability to prevent the formation of bacterial biofilms and eradicate preformed biofilms. Furthermore, As-CATH4-6 exhibited potent anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of nitric oxide (NO) and pro-inflammatory cytokines in mouse peritoneal macrophages. They directly neutralized LPS toxicity and therefore inhibited the binding of LPS to the TLR4 receptor and the subsequent activation of inflammatory response pathways. In a peritonitis mice model, As-CATH2-6 provided effective protection against bacterial infection through enhanced immune cell recruitment. In the host Chinese alligator, As-CATH1-6 are mainly expressed in immune organs and epithelial tissues. Bacterial infection significantly enhances their expression, which implies an important role in host anti-infective response. Taken together, the diversity and multiple functions of As-CATH1-6 partially reveal the powerful immune system of the Chinese alligator. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland

  8. New insight into the anatomy of the hyolingual apparatus of Alligator mississippiensis and implications for reconstructing feeding in extinct archosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiheng; Clarke, Julia A

    2015-07-01

    Anatomical studies of the cranium of crocodilians motivated by an interest in its function in feeding largely focused on bite force, the jaw apparatus and associated muscles innervated by the trigeminal nerve. However, the ossified and cartilaginous elements of the hyoid and the associated hyolingual muscles, innervated by the facial, hypoglossal and glossopharyngeal nerves, received much less attention. Crocodilians are known to retain what are ancestrally the 'Rhythmic Hyobranchial Behaviors' such as buccal oscillation, but show diminished freedom and movement for the hyobranchial apparatus and the tongue in food transport and manipulation. Feeding among crocodilians, generally on larger prey items than other reptilian outgroups, involves passive transport of the food within the mouth. The tongue in extant crocodilians is firmly attached to the buccal floor and shows little movement during feeding. Here, we present a detailed anatomical description of the myology of the hyolingual apparatus of Alligator mississippiensis, utilizing contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography and dissection. We construct the first three-dimensional (3D) description of hyolingual myology in Alligator mississippiensis and discuss the detailed implications of these data for our understanding of hyolingual muscle homology across Reptilia. These anatomical data and an evaluation of the fossil record of hyoid structures also shed light on the evolution of feeding in Reptilia. Simplification of the hyoid occurs early in the evolution of archosaurs. A hyoid with only one pair of ceratobranchials and a weakly ossified or cartilaginous midline basihyal is ancestral to Archosauriformes. The comparison with non-archosaurian reptilian outgroup demonstrates that loss of the second set of ceratobranchials as well as reduced ossification in basihyal occurred prior to the origin of crown-clade archosaurs, crocodilians and birds. Early modification in feeding ecology appears to characterize the

  9. Land application of waste waters in the Alligator Rivers region, Northern Territory - environmental constraints on design and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kearns, A.

    1986-01-01

    The existing uranium mines in the Alligator River Region presently operate under a no release water management regime for water stored within the designated restricted release zones (RRZ). This water is of variable quality ranging from rainwater influenced by runoff from the mill sites and ore stockpiles to mill process water stored within the trailings repositories. There is a pressing need to reduce the volume of stored RRZ water at Nabarlek as a prerequisite to decommissioning. There is also a requirement at Ranger to rapidly reduce the volume of stored water in the mine pit at the end of the season to allow the mining of ore. Land application of RRZ water by spray irrigation has been investigated at both sites because it offers the benefits of applying chemical constituents in the wastewater within a clearly defined irrigation area. the environmental planning for the design of a land application system involves calculations of the chemical load in the wastewater and evaluation of the assimilative capacity of the soil-plant system. The monsoon climate, lateritic soil and fluctuating water table creates a unique set of environmental constraints and conditions in which to design and operate a successful land application system for the treatment of stored water at minesites within ecologically sensitive areas

  10. The Alligator rivers natural analogue - Modelling of uranium and thorium migration in the weathered zone at Koongarra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skagius, K.; Lindgren, M.; Boghammar, A.; Brandberg, F.; Pers, K.; Widen, H.

    1993-08-01

    The Koongarra Uranium Deposit in the Alligator Rivers Region in the Northern Territory of Australia is a natural analogue being investigated with the aim to contribute to the understanding of the scientific basis for the long term prediction of radionuclide migration within geological environments relevant to radioactive waste repositories. The dispersion of uranium and decay products in the weathered zone has been modelled with a simple advection-dispersion-reversible sorption model and with a model extended to also consider α-recoil and transfer of radionuclides between different mineral phases of the rock. The modelling work was carried out in several iterations, each including a review of available laboratory and field data, selection of the system to be modelled and suitable model, and a comparison of modelling results with field observations. Uranium concentrations in bulk rock calculated with the simple advection-dispersion- reversible sorption model were in fair agreement with observed data using parameter values within ranges recommended based on independent interpretations. The advection-dispersion-reversible sorption model is a large simplification of the system among other things because the partitioning of radionuclides between water and solid phase is described with a sorption equilibrium term only. Although the results from this study not are enough to validate simple performance assessment models in a strict sense, it has been shown that even simple models are able to describe the present day distribution of uranium in the weathered zone at Koongarra. 23 refs, 61 figs

  11. Mining in the Alligator Rivers Region, northern Australia: Assessing potential and actual effects on ecosystem and human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dam, R.A. van; Humphrey, C.L.; Martin, P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of issues related to surface water contamination arising from uranium mining activities in the Alligator Rivers Region (ARR) of northern Australia, and a program of research and monitoring that must assess the potential and actual effects on ecosystem and human health. The program of assessing effects on aquatic ecosystems involves a four-tiered approach including the derivation of local water quality guideline trigger values, direct toxicity assessment of mine waters prior to their release, creekside or in situ monitoring for early warning of adverse effects during mine water release, and longer-term monitoring of macroinvertebrate and fish communities. Bioaccumulation in aquatic biota is also assessed, and is an issue of importance not only to ecosystem health, but also to the health of local Aboriginal people. The aquatic animals they consume represent potential sources of radiological dose, and as a result, a major component of the program to assess potential effects on human health is the prediction of doses to Aboriginal people living downstream of mining activities. Acknowledging the assumptions and uncertainties, the calculation of concentration factors for local aquatic (and other) food sources allows the prediction of potential radiological exposure to people following hypothetical mine water releases. The approaches described form the basis of best-practice protocols that are relevant at both regional and national levels

  12. Population variables and life-history characteristics of the alligator pipefish Syngnathoides biaculeatus, in Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, A P W; Martin-Smith, K M; Baine, M S P

    2009-03-01

    Population structure and life-history variables of the widely distributed alligator pipefish Syngnathoides biaculeatus were characterized in Bootless Bay, Papua New Guinea over the course of 11 months. There was little evidence of seasonality with four focal populations showing no significant change in abundance. Similarly, the sex ratio remained 1:1 for all but 1 month. Reproductive males carrying eggs (148-278 mm in total length, L(T)) were found in all months. Brood size was significantly, positively related to male L(T) for newly laid broods only. Maximum observed brood size was 351 and mean +/-s.d. brood size was 238 +/- 57 for newly laid broods. Juveniles and males showed no change in mean L(T) over the year while slightly smaller females were captured in November 2006 and September 2007. Males were significantly longer than females so von Bertalanffy growth coefficients were estimated separately for each sex: males L(infinity)= 285 mm, K = 0.82 year(-1) and females L(infinity)= 261 mm, K = 1.10 year(-1). These estimates suggest that this species grows rapidly and has a short-life span. In the context of growing concern about overexploitation of syngnathids, a rapid growth rate combined with year round reproductive activity suggests that the tropical S. biaculeatus may be relatively resilient with regard to fishing pressure.

  13. Geomorphological assessment of sites and impoundments for the long term containment of uranium mill tailings in the Alligator Rivers Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    East, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    Current and future research into the geomorphological processes likely to affect the long term containment of uranium mill tailings in the Alligator Rivers Region is directed at three main areas: identification of geomorphic hazards at proposed impoundment sites; determination of erosion rates on impoundment slopes; and prediction of patterns of fluvial dispersal of released tailings. Each necessitates consideration of present and future geomorphic processes. Process rates during the next few thousand years might be predictable by extrapolation of contemporary and past (i.e. Holocene) climates, sea-levels and depositional environments, evidence for which is preserved in the sedimentary record. In current projects, the Late Quarternary stratigraphy of Magela Creek are examined to provide data for modelling of present and future sedimentological processes. Site stability evaluation entails recognition of present and future geomorphic hazards at impoundment sites, and includes fluvial and hillslope erosion, extreme flood events and mass movements. The life of a tailings impoundment is further determined by the intensity of erosional processes acting upon its slopes and their cover materials. A knowledge of present and future erosion rates will allow the optimisation of slope characteristics and materials in the impoundment design

  14. The Alligator rivers natural analogue - Modelling of uranium and thorium migration in the weathered zone at Koongarra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skagius, K; Lindgren, M; Boghammar, A; Brandberg, F; Pers, K; Widen, H [Kemakta, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1993-08-01

    The Koongarra Uranium Deposit in the Alligator Rivers Region in the Northern Territory of Australia is a natural analogue being investigated with the aim to contribute to the understanding of the scientific basis for the long term prediction of radionuclide migration within geological environments relevant to radioactive waste repositories. The dispersion of uranium and decay products in the weathered zone has been modelled with a simple advection-dispersion-reversible sorption model and with a model extended to also consider {alpha}-recoil and transfer of radionuclides between different mineral phases of the rock. The modelling work was carried out in several iterations, each including a review of available laboratory and field data, selection of the system to be modelled and suitable model, and a comparison of modelling results with field observations. Uranium concentrations in bulk rock calculated with the simple advection-dispersion- reversible sorption model were in fair agreement with observed data using parameter values within ranges recommended based on independent interpretations. The advection-dispersion-reversible sorption model is a large simplification of the system among other things because the partitioning of radionuclides between water and solid phase is described with a sorption equilibrium term only. Although the results from this study not are enough to validate simple performance assessment models in a strict sense, it has been shown that even simple models are able to describe the present day distribution of uranium in the weathered zone at Koongarra. 23 refs, 61 figs.

  15. Analysis of nutritional and odor components in muscle of Siam alligator (Crocodylus siamensis) .%暹罗鳄肌肉营养及腥味成分分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阙婷婷; 谢妍; 郑家闻; 胡庆兰; 胡亚芹; 罗自生

    2013-01-01

      利用顶空固相微萃取与气质联用技术对暹罗鳄肌肉脱腥前后的挥发性成分及其变化进行测定,并利用常规肌肉营养测试方法对鳄肉营养成分进行分析.结果表明:在暹罗鳄肌肉中共检测出72种挥发性成分,其中,正己醛为鳄肉腥味的主要成分,与其他成分一起构成鳄肉的特有腥味;在鳄鱼肌肉中水分占76.8%,蛋白质占19.8%,脂肪占2.0%,灰分占1.0%;肌肉中含有16种氨基酸,占肌肉干质量的70.44%,其中必需氨基酸7种,且必需氨基酸的构成比例基本符合联合国粮食与农业组织标准,必需氨基酸指数为60.63%;鳄肉中还富含多种不饱和脂肪酸,二十碳五烯酸( eicosapentaenoic acid , EPA)和二十二碳六烯酸( docosahexaenoic acid , DHA)含量丰富,分别为1.44%和2.96%,且矿物质和微量元素含量丰富,尤其以钙含量最多.表明暹罗鳄肉是一种低脂肪、高蛋白、富含多种不饱和脂肪酸以及矿物质的高品质肉类.%Summary Crocodile is covered in treasure . Its leather has a high reputation in the world , and its armour contains a lot of bone collagen , protein , calcium , phosphorus and so on , and its gallbladder contains more than 20 kinds of bile acids and bilichols , which has a great medicine value . Its blood with antibacterial and antitumor activity is getting the attention of researchers both at home and abroad . There has been growing interest in commercial marketing of the crocodiles meat for human consumption in China , Thailand , America and Australia , which are all artificially breeding Siam alligator , Estuarine crocodile and Nile crocodile etc . Siam alligator is also called Siam freshwater crocodile , Singapore small crocodile , and is commonly known as Thai crocodile . It is getting more and more attention in China . With the increased amount of breeding , the deep processing for the meat of Siam alligator will be the focus of future

  16. A crucial role of paralogous β-defensin genes in the Chinese alligator innate immune system revealed by the first determination of a Crocodilia defensin cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ke-Yi; Wang, Xin; Wan, Qiu-Hong; Fang, Sheng-Guo

    2018-04-01

    The β-defensin, one of the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), is a significant component of the innate immune with a broad range of antimicrobial activities. Differing from the widely-studied mammals and birds, limited information about β-defensins has been reported in reptiles, especially in crocodilians. As a same ancient species as dinosaurs and the most endangered species of 23 crocodilians, the survival of Chinese alligator (Alligator sinensis) means a powerful immune system and possible involvement of AMPs in its immune resistance. In this study, we identified 20 novel Alligator sinensisβ-defensin genes (AsBDs) from a 390 kb region using bioinformatic and experimental approaches, and successfully distinguished six orthologous AsBDs to birds and nine paralogous AsBDs undergoing gene duplication events. The amino acid alignment shows that the AsBD paralogs, like α-defensins, encode a significantly longer pro-piece comparing with the orthologs. The calculation of non-synonymous (d N ) and synonymous (d S ) substitutions in the mature peptide reveals that the AsBD paralogs experience a significantly higher selective pressure (d N /d S ) than the orthologs, but a similar evolutionary force to α-defensins. The gene expression result indicates that the AsBD paralogs have a significantly higher expression level than the orthologos in gastrointestinal tract where the host is vulnerable to enteric pathogenic bacteria, as observed in α-defensins. These three pieces of evidence demonstrate that the AsBD paralogs do play an important role in maintaining long-term survival of this endangered reptile. Thus, this survey of AsBDs on the genomic structure, evolutionary characteristics, and expression pattern provides a genetic and immunological foundation for further investigating their antimicrobial function and alternative antibiotics potentiality. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterization of mineral coatings associated with a Pleistocene-Holocene rock art style: The Northern Running Figures of the East Alligator River region, western Arnhem Land, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Penelope L; Troitzsch, Ulrike; Jones, Tristen

    2017-02-01

    This data article contains mineralogic and chemical data from mineral coatings associated with rock art from the East Alligator River region. The coatings were collected adjacent to a rock art style known as the "Northern Running Figures" for the purposes of radiocarbon dating (doi:10.1016/j.jasrep.2016.11.016; (T. Jones, V. Levchenko, P.L. King, U. Troitzsch, D. Wesley, 2017) [1]). This contribution includes raw and processed powder X-ray Diffraction data, Scanning Electron Microscopy energy dispersive spectroscopy data, and Fourier Transform infrared spectral data.

  18. Thermoregulation and temperature relations of alligators and other large ectotherms inhabiting thermally stressed habitats. Annual progress report, 1 July 1976--30 September 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spotila, J.R.

    1977-06-01

    Progress is reported on studies of the biophysical and thermal relationships between large ectotherms and their aquatic environment. Data are reported from laboratory and field studies on alligators, turtles, and fish. Mathematical models of the effect of body size and physical characteristics on temperature regulation of ectotherms and of thermal stress in aquatic organisms were developed. Results are included of field studies on the physiological and behavioral adjustments of turtles in response to changes in water temperature produced by thermal effluents in PAR Pond at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

  19. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci for alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula) and their variability in two other species (Lepisosteus oculatus and L. osseus) of Lepisosteidae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, G.R.; Sloss, Brian L.; Kreiser, B.R.; Feldheim, K.A.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the isolation of 17 polymorphic microsatellite loci from alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula), a large-bodied species that has experienced population declines across much of its range. These loci possessed 2-19 alleles and observed heterozygosities of 0-0.974. All loci conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations, and none exhibited linkage disequilibrium. Nine and eight of these loci were found to be polymorphic in the related species Lepisosteus oculatus and L. osseus, respectively. These microsatellite loci should prove useful in conservation efforts of A. spatula through the study of population structure and hatchery broodstock management. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Thermoregulation and temperature relations of alligators and other large ectotherms inhabiting thermally stressed habitats. Annual progress report, July 1, 1975--June 30, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spotila, J.R.

    1976-03-01

    The effects of radiation and convection on the equilibrium body temperatures of alligators have been determined. Gaping has been shown to be an effective thermoregulatory device for retarding heat gain in the heads of these animals. Initial time dependent experiments have been completed and ketamine hydrochloride has been shown to be an effective anesthetic for alligators. Evaporative water loss rates have been measured as a function of size, temperature and wind speed for the turtle Chrysemys scripta. Convection coefficients have been determined and climate spaces are being formulated. Field studies are under way at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Convection coefficients for largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides change as a function of temperature and water speed. Steady state heat energy budgets have been computed for this fish. The effects of arsenic and temperature on the temperature tolerance of larval muskellunge, Esox masquinongy, have been determined. The thermal tolerances of several species of minnows have also been measured. The role of the skin in the control of evaporation from amphibians and reptiles has been assessed. During the past year one article has been published, two are in press, one is in review, and eight are in preparation. Five masters theses will be completed by July 1976.

  1. Six-monthly report on surveillance of environmental monitoring in Alligator Rivers Region for the period 1 April-30 September 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This report outlines the activities of Northern Territory Government authorities (Department of Mines and Energy (DME), Conservation Commission and Department of Health and Community Services (DHCS) in meeting their responsibilities for surveillance of environmental monitoring in the Alligator Rivers Region for the period 1 April to 30 September 1988. The responsibility for DME activities derives principally from the Mining Act, the Mines Safety Control Act, the Control of Waters Act and the Uranium Mining (Environment Control) Act, referred to in this report as the UMEC Act. The Land Conservation Unit (LCU) of the Conservation Commission and the Occupational and Environmental Health Branch of DHCS, furnish technical advice to the Alligator Rivers Region Unit of DME, which then collates the data for Authorizations, approvals and compliance reports. The responsibilities of the Conservation Commission derive from the Soil Conservation and Land Utilization Act. DHCS activities derive from, in addition to the relevant Mines Acts, the Silicosis and Tuberculosis (Mine Workers and Prospectors) Act, Radiation (Safety Control) Act and the Public Health Act

  2. Thermoregulation and temperature relations of alligators and other large ectotherms inhabiting thermally stressed habitats. Annual progress report, July 1, 1975--June 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spotila, J.R.

    1976-03-01

    The effects of radiation and convection on the equilibrium body temperatures of alligators have been determined. Gaping has been shown to be an effective thermoregulatory device for retarding heat gain in the heads of these animals. Initial time dependent experiments have been completed and ketamine hydrochloride has been shown to be an effective anesthetic for alligators. Evaporative water loss rates have been measured as a function of size, temperature and wind speed for the turtle Chrysemys scripta. Convection coefficients have been determined and climate spaces are being formulated. Field studies are under way at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Convection coefficients for largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides change as a function of temperature and water speed. Steady state heat energy budgets have been computed for this fish. The effects of arsenic and temperature on the temperature tolerance of larval muskellunge, Esox masquinongy, have been determined. The thermal tolerances of several species of minnows have also been measured. The role of the skin in the control of evaporation from amphibians and reptiles has been assessed. During the past year one article has been published, two are in press, one is in review, and eight are in preparation. Five masters theses will be completed by July 1976

  3. Cytogenetic effect of Alternanthera philoxeroides (alligator weed) on Agasicles hygrophila (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in its native range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant polyploidy potentially affects plant-insect interactions; however, its effect on insect fitness remains largely unexplored. Alternanthera philoxeroides is a South American amphibious Amaranthaceae, which invades aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Different morphotypes and cytotypes were identif...

  4. The Closest Alligator to the Boat: Mexico’s Drug-Fueled Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    outside stimulus. This plays into why cartels are able to so freely recruit new members into their ranks. Machismo , a learned response and a real...part of Hispanic culture, is one of the overriding forces driving the Latin American male psyche. Machismo , directly translated from Spanish...closest English word to machismo is macho which seems to be an out of vogue word in 2010 America. In America, it is acceptable to be in touch with

  5. ANÁLISE MICROBIOLÓGICA DA CARNE DE JACARÉ DO PANTANAL (Caiman crocodilus yacare MICROBIAL ANALYSIS CHARACTERISTICS OF THE ALLIGATOR'S MEAT (Caiman crocodilus yacare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Leite HOFFMANN

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi realizar o levantamento das características microbiológicas da carne do jacaré, através da detecção e/ou enumeração dos microrganismos mais comumente encontrados na carne. Pela inexistência de padrões na legislação brasileira para a carne de jacaré, os resultados foram comparados com os padrões microbiológicos existentes para carne bovina e pescado. Encontrou-se a presença de S. aureus e de Salmonella sp, resultados estes considerados insatisfatórios, o que nos permitiu, classificar o produto como impróprio para o consumo. O trabalho sugere também, procedimentos para evitar e/ou minimizar a presença desses microrganismos indesejáveis na carne.This work subjects to collect data of the microbial characteristics of the alligator meat, and also to identify the microrganisms that can be found in it. The current Brazilian legislation does not have any specific regulations for the alligator meat, then the results were compaired to the microbial standards for the fresh beef and fish. The results has showed the presence of the S. aureus and Salmonella sp. These results let us to classify the product submited to the test, as unsatisfactory and, therefore, inadequate to the human consumption. The present study also suggests some procedures to avoid or minimize the presence of these microrganisms.

  6. In vivo locomotor strain in the hindlimb bones of alligator mississippiensis and iguana iguana: implications for the evolution of limb bone safety factor and non-sprawling limb posture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blob; Biewener

    1999-05-01

    Limb postures of terrestrial tetrapods span a continuum from sprawling to fully upright; however, most experimental investigations of locomotor mechanics have focused on mammals and ground-dwelling birds that employ parasagittal limb kinematics, leaving much of the diversity of tetrapod locomotor mechanics unexplored. This study reports measurements of in vivo locomotor strain from the limb bones of lizard (Iguana iguana) and crocodilian (Alligator mississippiensis) species, animals from previously unsampled phylogenetic lineages with non-parasagittal limb posture and kinematics. Principal strain orientations and shear strain magnitudes indicate that the limb bones of these species experience considerable torsion during locomotion. This contrasts with patterns commonly observed in mammals, but matches predictions from kinematic observations of axial rotation in lizard and crocodilian limbs. Comparisons of locomotor load magnitudes with the mechanical properties of limb bones in Alligator and Iguana indicate that limb bone safety factors in bending for these species range from 5.5 to 10.8, as much as twice as high as safety factors previously calculated for mammals and birds. Limb bone safety factors in shear (3.9-5.4) for Alligator and Iguana are also moderately higher than safety factors to yield in bending for birds and mammals. Finally, correlations between limb posture and strain magnitudes in Alligator show that at some recording locations limb bone strains can increase during upright locomotion, in contrast to expectations based on size-correlated changes in posture among mammals that limb bone strains should decrease with the use of an upright posture. These data suggest that, in some lineages, strain magnitudes may not have been maintained at constant levels through the evolution of a non-sprawling posture unless the postural change was accompanied by a shift to parasagittal kinematics or by an evolutionary decrease in body size.

  7. Hear You Later Alligator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jeppe Veirum; Knoche, Hendrik

    2017-01-01

    of an actuated guitar to a metronome at 60bpm and 120bpm. The long DAF matched a subdivision of the overall tempo. We compared their performance using two different input devices with feedback before or on activation. While 250ms DAF hardly affected musically trained participants, non-musically trained...

  8. Radionuclide migration around uranium ore bodies in the Alligator Rivers region of the Northern Territory, Australia - analogue of radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airey, P.L.; Roman, D.; Golian, C.; Short, S.; Nightingale, T.; Lowson, R.T.; Davey, B.G.; Gray, D.

    1984-01-01

    Appropriate geochemical analogues may be used to reduce the uncertainties in predicting the long-term transport of actinides, radium and fission products from laboratory adsorption and hydrological data. In this study the migration of uranium series nuclides within, and down-gradient of ore bodies in the Alligator Rivers uranium province of the Northern Territory of Australia is described. A mathematical framework was developed to permit calculation of the rate of leaching or deposition of uranium and radium between defined zones of the ore bodies, and the rate of loss of the nuclides due to groundwater transport and surface erosion. A detailed study was made of the distribution of uranium, thorium and radium isotopes within various minerals comprising the weathered ore assemblage. Uranium and thorium concentrate principally in the iron minerals and radium in the clay-quartz phases. Substantial disequilibria are observed, which are attributed to a combination of α-recoil and chemical effects. Evidence of the relative lability of iron phases is presented. The transport of uranium series nuclides in groundwater intersecting the deposits was investigated. Down-gradient of the Ranger One deposit, the maximum retardation factor of uranium is 250. The role of colloids in groundwater transport is being studied. Uranium is transported principally in solution. There appears to be an equilibrium between solute and articulate uranium

  9. Thermoregulation and temperature relations of alligators and other large ectotherms inhabiting thermally stressed habitats. Progress report, 1 October 1974--30 September 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spotila, J.R.

    1977-06-01

    Significant progress has been made in determining the mechanisms by which large ectotherms adjust to thermal stress in their natural environment. The effect of mouth gaping on head temperatures and the role of radiation, conduction and convection on body temperatures of alligators have been determined. The utility of energy budget modeling as a method for studying the thermoregulatory mechanisms of animals has been demonstrated. Steady state and time dependent models of body temperature have been tested. Convection coefficients and evaporative water loss rates have been measured for the turtle, Chysemys scripta. Climate space diagrams have been formulated and are being tested. Behavioral thermoregulation of turtles has been studied in PAR pond on the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, S.C. Steady state energy budget equations have been computed for largemouth bass. Experimental heat transfer coefficients indicate that most heat transfer is through the body wall and not via the gills. A time dependent model is being tested. It predicts the body temperature of a fish in a heterothermal environment. Theoretical calculations have been made of the effects of body size, color, and metabolism on the temperature regulation of ectotherms

  10. Sedimentation of the basal Kombolgie Formation (Upper Precambrian-Carpentarian) Northern Territory, Australia: possible significance in the genesis of the underlying Alligator Rivers unconformity-type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojakangas, R.W.

    1979-10-01

    The 1400 to 1500 My old Kombolgie Formation of the MacArthur Basin of the Northern Territory overlies or has overlain unconformity-type uranium deposits including Jabiluka, Ranger, Koongarra, Nabarlek and the small deposits of the South Alligator River Valley. A brief study of the basal portion of the formation showed it to consist entirely of mature conglomerates and quartzose sandstones. Analysis of the bedding types (planar cross beds, trough cross beds and parallel beds) and other sedimentary structures (mainly ripple marks and parting lineation) fit a braided alluvial plain model. A paleocurrent study utilizing about 400 measurements from nine localities located along the westward-facing 250 kilometer-long erosional escarpment of the Arnhem Land Plateau showed the dominant paleocurrent trend to be from west and northwest towards the east and southeast, with local divergence. The data and interpretation presented are relevant to the supergene model of uranium deposition at the unconformity, for they add to the suggestion that additional uranium deposits similar to Jabiluka Two may underlie the Kombolgie Formation eastward from the present escarpment

  11. Estudo do aproveitamento das vísceras do jacaré do pantanal (Caiman crocodilus yacare em farinha de carne Study of the utilization of the pantanal alligator's viscera for meat flour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Fernando Romanelli

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve por objetivo a produção de farinha de carne a partir das vísceras do jacaré do pantanal (Caiman crocodilus yacare e o estudo das propriedades físico-químicas, bioquímicas e bacteriológicas da farinha elaborada. Essas características que servem de parâmetro de controle de qualidade, são normalmente exigidas na comercialização de farinhas de carne elaboradas a partir de vísceras e outros materiais de descarte para animais de consumo doméstico. Os resultados obtidos do pH, acidez solúvel, composição percentual dos componentes, dos minerais Ca e P, digestibilidade em pepsina, aspecto microbiológico (presença de "salmonela" e estabilidade avaliada pelo nº de TBARS da farinha mostram ser viável o uso das vísceras do jacaré do pantanal como fonte alternativa de nutrientes para incorporação nas formulações de ração animal .The present paper shidied study the production of the meat flour from the pantanal alligator's viscera as well as the physic-chemical, biochemical and microbiological proprieties of the obtained flour. These proprieties can be parameters of quality control and are normally demanded in the trade of meat flour made from viscera and other discharge animals for domestic use.The results obtained from pH, soluble acidity, components percentual composition, Ca and P minerals, digestibility in pepsin, the microbiological aspect (salmonella determination, and the stability to the meat flour according to the evaluation of the number of TBARS, demonstrate the use of the viscera of the pantanal alligator are feasible as alternate source of nutrients for the incorporation in the formulating of animal feed.

  12. Animal-Borne Imaging Reveals Novel Insights into the Foraging Behaviors and Diel Activity of a Large-Bodied Apex Predator, the American Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis)

    OpenAIRE

    Nifong, James C.; Nifong, Rachel L.; Silliman, Brian R.; Lowers, Russell H.; Guillette, Louis J.; Ferguson, Jake M.; Welsh, Matthew; Abernathy, Kyler; Marshall, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Large-bodied, top- and apex predators (e.g., crocodilians, sharks, wolves, killer whales) can exert strong top-down effects within ecological communities through their interactions with prey. Due to inherent difficulties while studying the behavior of these often dangerous predatory species, relatively little is known regarding their feeding behaviors and activity patterns, information that is essential to understanding their role in regulating food web dynamics and ecological processes. Here...

  13. Evaluating the effect of sample type on American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) analyte values in a point-of-care blood analyser

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, Matthew T.; Finger, John W.; Winzeler, Megan E.; Tuberville, Tracey D.

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of wildlife health has been enhanced by the ability of point-of-care (POC) blood analysers to provide biochemical analyses of non-domesticated animals in the field. However, environmental limitations (e.g. temperature, atmospheric humidity and rain) and lack of reference values may inhibit researchers from using such a device with certain wildlife species. Evaluating the use of alternative sample types, such as plasma, in a POC device may afford researchers the opportunity to d...

  14. Clay vein and its implication for uranium exploration activity in the northern part of the Alligator Rivers Uranium Field, northern Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasao, Eiji

    2003-01-01

    Clay veins have been found by uranium exploration drilling around the Black Rock uranium prospect in the northern part of the alligator Rivers Uranium Field (ARUF), northern Australia. The mineralogical and chemical features are described to clarify relations with uranium mineralization, because it is not accompanied by uranium mineralization. X-ray diffraction and chemical analysis for major elements indicate that the clay vein consists mainly of chlorite (clinochlore to ferroan clinochlore) and lesser mica clay mineral (t-1M dominant). The clay vein is compared with the clay alteration zone around the uranium deposits in ARUF in terms of mode of occurrence, mineral and chemical compositions. Mineral composition of the clay vein is only in accordance with that of the inner alteration halo of the clay alteration zone. It is, however, different from mineral composition of the outer alteration halo in terms of lack of Fe chlorite in the clay vein. Chemical composition of the clay vein is similar to that of the clay alteration zone, except for lack in the vein of high iron content which is observed in some samples of the alteration zone. As a whole, the feature of the clay vein corresponds to the inner alteration zone around the uranium deposit in ARUF. The mode of occurrence of the clay vein is very different from that of the clay alteration zone. Mode of occurrence, and mineral and chemical compositions of the clay vein resemble a chlorite vein in the Lower to Middle Proterozoic sandstone above the Jabiluka deposit, one of major uranium deposit in the ARUF. Because of the similarity between the clay and the chlorite veins, the clay vein is regarded as marginal facies of an alteration zone. The fluid that formed the clay vein is estimated to have been oxidized, because of the existence of hematite and ubiquitous Mg chlorite. This nature is in accordance with the mineralizing fluid that formed the inner alteration zone in the Nabarlek deposit. In conclusion, the vein

  15. The alligator rivers analogue project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerden, P.

    1991-01-01

    The Koongarra uranium ore deposit in the Northern Territory of Australia is being studied to evaluate the processes and mechanisms involved in the hydrological/geochemical alteration of the primary uranium and model the formation of the secondary uranium mineralisation and the dispersion fan. A wide range of research is undertaken in the field and at laboratories in Australia, Japan, Sweden, the UK and the USA. The experimental and modelling tasks consider the original weathering of the region, the alteration of the host rock and primary uranium, groundwater flow and migration pathways, rock/groundwater interactions, such as adsorption desorption, nuclide transport and the relative distribution of the uranium/thorium radionuclides in the multi-phase system, and the continued development of the dispersion fan. The study of the in-situ production and mobility of long lived fission products eg Tc-99 and I-129 and transuranic nuclides such as Pu-239 is also possible. The methods used in collecting data for a repository are similar to those applied at Koongarra, hence, an analysis of the many different approaches taken may help evaluate and decrease the uncertainties of with field and laboratory measurements. (J.P.N.)

  16. MORFOLOGICAL AND HISTOCHEMICAL OBSERVATIONS ON THE SALIVARY GLANDS OF THE ALLIGATOR Caiman latirostris OBSERVAÇÕES MORFOLÓGICAS E HISTOQUÍMICAS SOBRE AS GLÂNDULAS SALIVARES DO JACARÉ Caiman latirostris (Crocodilia Reptilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilson Herbert de Faria

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Using histological and histochemical methods for glicoconjugates, the present work on the salivary glands of the alligator Caiman latirostris (Crocodilia Reptilia, was developed. On the bases of the results obtained, the authors believe that those glands are not well developed, appearing as unicellular structures goblet-like cells, in the stratified squamous epithelium of the oral cavity. Scattered glands alveolus without excretory tubules which extend directly with the epitelium were also present. By means of histochemical methods for glicoconjugates, it was possible to detect the glicoprotein and the sialic acid in the glandular formation of these animals.

    Empregando-se métodos histológicos e histoquímicos para glicoconjugados, desenvolveu-se um trabalho sobre glândulas salivares do jacaré Caiman latirostris. Com base nos resultados obtidos, constatou-se que estas glândulas são pouco desenvolvidas, aparecendo como estruturas unicelulares, semelhantes às células caliciformes, incluídas no epitélio estratificado pavimentoso da cavidade oral. Observou-se, ainda, a presença de esparsos alvéolos glandulares desprovidos de ductos excretores que continuam diretamente com o epitélio. Por meio de métodos histoquímicos para glicoconjugados, foi possível a detecção de glicoproteína e de ácido siálico nas formações glandulares desses animais.

  17. Acompanhamento das alterações post-mortem (Glicólise no músculo do jacaré do pantanal (Caiman crocodilus yacare Post-mortem alterations (Glycolysis of pantanal alligator's (Caiman crocodilus yacare muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastião Roberto Taboga

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Realizaram-se avaliações químicas, histológicas e medidas de pH ao longo do tempo da degradação do glicogênio no músculo longissumus dorsi do jacaré. A metabolização do glicogênio muscular durou em torno de 50 horas, situando-se o pH muscular inicial entre 6,6 e 6,7 e estabilizando-se, depois de 36 a 48 horas, em torno de 5,5-5,6. Oitenta a 85% do glicogênio inicial foi metabolizado nas primeiras 20-25 horas pós-abate. Histologicamente o teste do PAS revelou, ao longo do tempo de armazenamento refrigerado, um decréscimo dos grânulos de glicogênio.This paper presents a study of glycogen degradation in longissimus dorsi muscle of pantanal alligator. Glycogen concentration and muscle pH measurements were assessed. Glycolysis took about 50 hours to complete. Initial muscle pH value were in the limits of 6.6 and 6.7 and after 36 hours they dropped to 5.5-5.6. On the first 20-25 hours postmortem 80-85% of inicial glycogen was metabolized. Through histologycal PAS test it was observed during cold storage a decrease on the number of glycogen granules. On the first 20-25 hours postmortem 80-85% of inicial glycogen was metabolized.

  18. 50 CFR 23.70 - How can I trade internationally in American alligator and other crocodilian skins, parts, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) TAKING, POSSESSION..., and other parts) and small cut skin pieces. (c) Export approval of State and tribal programs for... must have a tag attached to each flank. (3) Skins with broken, cut, or missing tags may not be exported...

  19. Produção de betacianina em erva-de-jacaré cultivada in vitro com diferentes concentrações de sulfato de cobre Betacyanin production in alligator weed, grown in vitro, with different concentrations of copper sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janieli Cristina Perotti

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A manipulação da concentração dos microelementos no meio de cultura representa uma boa estratégia para aumentar a produção de metabólitos secundários em cultura de tecidos. Este trabalho teve por objetivo demonstrar a influência do sulfato de cobre na produção de betacianina e na multiplicação de plantas de Alternanthera philoxeroides (erva-de-jacaré cultivadas in vitro. Segmentos nodais, obtidos de plantas pré-estabelecidas e após três subcultivos, foram inoculados em meio MS, com diferentes concentrações de CuSO4 (0; 25; 75; 125; 175; 200µM. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi inteiramente casualizado, com seis concentrações de CuSO4 e cinco repetições representadas por um frasco contendo quatro explantes. Os resultados foram submetidos à análise de variância, à regressão polinomial e a análises de correlação entre as variáveis morfológicas e a produção de betacianina. Concentrações acima de 75µM diminuíram a altura das plantas, o número de brotos e gemas e o crescimento radicular, enquanto que, na concentração de 125µM, houve a maior produção de massa fresca. A produção de betacianina aumentou 60% em relação ao controle com 175µM de CuSO4. Ocorreu crescimento das plantas em todas as concentrações de CuSO4 testadas, com exceção de 200µM, sendo esta considerada tóxica.The manipulation of concentration of trace elements in the culture medium represents a good strategy to increase the production of secondary metabolites in tissue culture. This study aimed to demonstrate the influence of copper sulphate in the production of betacyanin and the multiplication of plants of Alternanthera philoxeroides (alligator weed cultured in vitro. Nodal segments, obtained from plants pre-stablished and after three subcultures, were inoculated in basic MS with different concentrations of CuSO4 (0, 25, 75, 125, 175, 200µM. The results were subjected to analysis of variance, polynomial regression and

  20. Abortifacient properties of alligator pepper ( Aframomum melegueta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abortifacient drugs are not generally available in the country which has ... To investigate possible abortifacient effect of Aframomum melegueta seeds, three groups ... abortion the dose if worked out in humans could be utilized in fertility clinics, ...

  1. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geochemical Data Bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, D.G.; Read, D.

    1992-01-01

    The Koongarra uranium deposit in the Northern Territory of Australia is being studied to evaluate the processes involved in the geochemical alteration of the ore body and the formation of the uranium dispersion fan. A broad range of research is being undertaken into the geochemistry and hydrology of the site with the aim of understanding the transport of radionuclides through the system. During the project a range of geochemical and hydrogeochemical models have been developed to account for measured data from the site and with which to predict site evolution. The majority of these models are based on the premise of thermodynamic chemical equilibrium and employ fundamental thermodynamic data to characterise the chemistry of the system. From the differences which exist between the thermodynamic data bases (Appendices I and II) it is possible to gain a view of the level of uncertainty associated with thermodynamic data in each set of calculations. This report gives a brief introduction to the geochemical processes underlying the models, and details the equations used to quantify the more common of these processes (e.g. aqueous speciation and mineral solubility). A description is given of the computer codes (EQ3/6, PHREEQE, MINTEQ) most commonly used during the project for geochemical modelling. Their key features are highlighted and comparisons made. It is concluded that the degree of uncertainty in geochemical modelling studies arising as a result of using one code rather than another is relatively insignificant when compared to that related to differences in the underlying data bases. 73 refs., 3 figs

  2. Avaliação físico química da carne de jacaré-do-pantanal (Caiman yacare Daudin 1802 de idades diferentes Physichist chymistry evaluation of swampland alligator meat (Caiman yacare Daudin 1802 of different ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Vicente Neto

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar a composição química e física da carne de jacaré-do-pantanal (Caiman yacare Daudin 1802, de idades diferentes, foram coletadas amostras de dois cortes de 10 jacarés-do-pantanal, sendo: 05 animais 14 meses e 05 animais com 26 meses, criados em cativeiro. Os cortes utilizados foram filé da cauda e filé do dorso. Foram determinados na composição química: umidade, proteína, extrato etéreo e cinzas; e na composição física: perda de peso por cozimento (PPC e força de cisalhamento (FC. Houve interação (PWith the objective of evaluating the chemical and physical composition of swampland alligator meat (Caiman yacare Daudin 1802, of different ages, samples of two courts of 10 swampland alligator were collected, being: 05 animals 14 months and 05 animals with 26 months, servants in captivity. The used courts were of tail and neck. They were certain in the chemical composition: moisture, protein, ethereal extract and ashes; and in the physical composition: weight loss for cooking (WLC and break force (BF. There was interaction (P<0.05 for moisture and for break force (BF. The animals with 14 months presented average of higher moisture (76.75% in the tail that the animals with 26 months (74.48%. The averages of ethereal extract varied of: 0.40% to 0.54% among the courts for the animals of 14 months and of 0.51% to 0.84% for the animals of 26 months. The found protein values were: 23.57% in the tail and 24.37% in the neck in the animals of 14 months; and of 24.26% in the tail and 23.74% in the neck for the animals of 26 months. The medium value of WLC, in the animals with 14 months was larger (40.02%, that in the animals of 26 months (33.82%. The animals abated with age of 14 months presented softer meat and values of ethereal extract smaller the animals abated with 26 months, demonstrating for these parameters a better physical and chemical quality.

  3. Caracterização do processo de rigor mortis do músculo Ilio-ischiocaudalis de jacaré-do-pantanal (Caiman crocodilus yacare e maciez da carne Characterization of rigor mortis process of muscle Ilio-ischiocaudalis of pantanal alligator (Caiman crocodilus yacare and meat tenderness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Paulino Vieira

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho utilizou seis carcaças de jacaré-do-pantanal (Caiman crocodilus yacare com o objetivo de caracterizar o processo de rigor mortis do músculo Ílio-ischiocaudalis durante o resfriamento industrial e avaliar a maciez dessa carne. Os jacarés foram escolhidos aleatoriamente e abatidos na Cooperativa de Criadores do Jacaré do Pantanal (COOCRIJAPAN, Cáceres, Mato Grosso. Após a sangria, aferiu-se as variações das temperaturas da câmara de resfriamento, das carcaças e o pH. Foram colhidas amostras para determinação do comprimento de sarcômero, da força de cisalhamento e perdas por cozimento em diferentes intervalos de tempo (0,5, 3, 5, 7, 10, 12, 15, 24 e 36h. A temperatura da câmara de resfriamento variou de 2,6°C (0,5h a 0,9°C (36h e a temperatura média das carcaças variou de 21,0°C a 4,2°C, respectivamente. O pH médio inicial do músculo foi de 6,7 e o final 5,6 e a contração máxima do sarcômero do músculo Ilio-ischiocaudalis ocorreu na 15ª hora após a sangria (1,5µm. Essa carne apresentou força de cisalhamento menor que 6,0kg.This paper studied six pantanal alligators (Caiman crocodilus yacare carcass with goal of rigor mortis process characterization of Ilio-ischiocaudalis muscle during industrial cooling and meat tenderness. The alligators were randomly assembled and slaughtered at Cooperativa de Criadores do Jacaré do Pantanal (COOCRIJAPAN - Cáceres- Mato Grosso After exsanguination, were mensured temperature of chilling room and carcasses, pH and samples were collected for determination the sarcomere length, shear force and cooking loss at different times (0.5, 3, 5, 7, 10, 12, 15, 24 and 36 hours. The temperature of chilling room varied from 2.6°C (0.5h to 0.9°C (36h and the mean carcass temperature from 21.0°C to 4.2°C, respectively. The mean initial pH of the muscle was 6.7 and the final was 5.6. The smallest sarcomere size ocurred at 15 hours after exsanguination (1.5µm. This meat presents

  4. Biting the Hands that Feed "the Alligators": A Case Study in Morbid Obesity Extremes, End-of-Life Care, and Prohibitions on Harming and Accelerating the End of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowski, Michael J

    2018-03-01

    Obesity, recognized as a disease in the U.S. and at times as a terminal illness due to associated medical complications, is an American epidemic according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ("CDC"), American Heart Association ("AHA"), and other authorities. More than one third of Americans (39.8% of adults and 18.5% of children) are medically obese. This article focuses on cases of "extreme morbid obesity" ("EMO")-situations in which death is imminent without aggressive medical interventions, and bariatric surgery is the only treatment option with a realistic possibility of success. Bariatric surgeries themselves are very high risk for EMO patients. Individuals in this state have impeded mobility and are partially, if not entirely, bedridden, highly vulnerable, and dependent upon caregivers who often are enablers feeding their food addictions. The article draws from existing Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services ("CMS") and Social Security Administration ("SSA") policies and procedures for severe obesity treatment and disability benefits. The discussion also encompasses myriad areas in which the law imposes a duty to report on professionals to protect vulnerable individuals from harm from others, and constraints and prohibitions on accelerating the end of life. The article proposes, among other law and policy measures, to introduce an obligation on medical professionals to investigate and report instances of enablement when food addiction has put the lives of individuals at risk of imminent death. The objectives of the proposals are to give providers more leverage to prevent food addiction enablers from impeding treatment and to enable EMO patients to comply with treatment protocols, to save lives and, ironically, to empower enablers to stand firm against the demands of individuals whose lives have been consumed by their food addictions.

  5. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Radionuclide transport. Final Report - Volume 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golian, C.; Lever, D.A.; Baker, A.J.; Connell, L.D.; Bennett, D.G.; Read, D.; Lindgreen, M.; Pers, K.; Skagius, K.; Murakami, T.; Ohnuki, T.

    1992-01-01

    The Koongarra orebody and its associated dispersion fan are examined as a geological analogue for the transport of radionuclides from waste repositories. The aim is to build a consistent picture of the transport that has been taking place in the orebody and the important processes controlling the retardation of uranium series isotopes and to test models of radionuclide transport. A particularly distinctive feature of the Koongarra system is the strong seasonal dependence of the groundwater flow. However, the Koongarra system is similar to a radioactive waste disposal system in that mobilization of uranium is taking place as a result of the infiltration of groundwaters that are in gross chemical disequilibrium with the mineralogy of the primary ore body. There are considerable differences between the Koongarra uranium orebody and a radioactive waste repository, particularly a deep waste repository. The Koongarra system is shallow, affected by seasonal hydrogeological changes as well as climatic variations on a longer timescale and transport is taking place in a zone of active weathering. Some of these features make the Koongarra system harder to characterise than a deep repository. However, there are nevertheless many analogies between the processes occurring at Koongarra and those occurring around a deep or shallow waste repository. The difficulties encountered because of the heterogeneity of the Koongarra weathered zone mirror those to be addressed in assessing radionuclide transport in repository systems. The 234 U/ 238 U activity ratios in rock samples from the dispersion fan decrease in the direction of groundwater transport, whereas in many other systems it has been reported that 234 U is preferentially mobile relative to 238 U (Osmond and Cowart, 1982; Osmond et al., 1983). As most uranium resides in the rock rather than in the groundwater, the net recoil flux of uranium daughter radionuclides is usually from the rock to the groundwater, thus leading to ( 234 U/ 238 U) r less than one. Other models explain the observations by invoking the presence of a phase in which 234 Th is irreversibly fixed

  6. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geophysics, petrophysics and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emerson, D.W.; Mills, K.J.; Hallett, M.S.; Cao, L.Q.; Miyakawa, K.

    1992-01-01

    The geophysical and geological field work at Koongarra (including borehole core logging) showed that the site itself is a folded, faulted, variably fractured Precambrian psammitic and pelitic schist sequence with a quasi-horizontal weathered zone superimposed on the steeply dipping rock fabric. The site is flanked by a high resistivity younger sandstone unit to the northwest and by a magnetic amphibolite/ferricrete sequence to the far southeast. The data interpretations elicited the essential structural and broad lithological elements. Gravity, magnetic and electrical laboratory and field studies confirmed a broad folded fractured sequence of dipping layered host rocks weathered in their upper parts and trending in a southwest-northeast direction. Qualitatively interpreted anomalies indicated the trend of the main groundwater movement to the south where dolomites are thought to act as a sink. These drainage features have SP, resistivity and radiometric expression. The roles of the Kombolgie Sandstone as a source of water and the Koongarra Fault as a barrier or otherwise were not established owing to the lack of sufficient samples for testing and also on account of the difficulty of geophysical access over the site's rugged escarpment. 40 refs., 13 tabs., 69 figs

  7. Alligator Rivers analogue project. Final Report. Volume 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains a description of the distribution of minerals and elements at Koongarra, including the distribution of radionuclides. The Koongarra orebody is situated 225 km east of Darwin in the Northern Territory of Australia. The zone of primary uranium mineralisation has been intersected by weathering conditions, and this has resulted in the formation of a secondary ore zone and dispersion fan in the weathered zone. The uranium distribution over the site was investigated to determine the extent and direction of uranium migration from the primary uranium mineralisation. The depth patterns of uranium concentration were also investigated to elucidate depths. The distribution of elements, rock and minerals, and how they may affect uranium mobility, or indicate interactions between uranium and solid phases, were considered. Multi-elemental analyses were carried out on many samples to provide basic concentration data about various geochemically significant elements, and to elucidate how the elements interact with one another, the solid substrate and the groundwater. This included the analysis of bulk rock samples, visually distinct sub-samples, different particle sizes and chemically defined phases. Similarly, mineralogical data supplied information on the substrate reacting with the groundwater. Extensive studies were undertaken to elucidate the form of uranium in the weathered zones. These involved optical and electron microscopy studies and auto-radiography. Spatial trends of uranium series disequilibria in bulk rock, secondary uranium minerals and different chemically defined phases were analysed. These give information about uranium deposition and leaching, the evolution of the dispersion fan, the roles and relative importance of different mineralogical phases and processes involved in the retardation of radionuclides. 157 refs., 31 tabs., 87 figs.

  8. 75 FR 34365 - Safety Zone, Alligator River, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... Guard and local law enforcement vessels will also provide actual notice to mariners. Under 5 U.S.C. 553... Gunite Construction Company of Cambridge, MD to perform bridge maintenance on the U.S. Highway 64 Swing... section 213(a) of the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-121), we...

  9. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Radionuclide transport. Final Report - Volume 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golian, C [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Lever, D A; Baker, A J; Connell, L D [AEA Decommissioning and Radwaste, Harwell (United Kingdom); Bennett, D G; Read, D [WS Atkins Science and Technology Epsom Surrey (United Kingdom); Lindgreen, M; Pers, K; Skagius, K [Kemakta Consultants co., Stockholm (Sweden); Murakami, T; Ohnuki, T [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, IBARAKI (Japan)

    1993-12-31

    The Koongarra orebody and its associated dispersion fan are examined as a geological analogue for the transport of radionuclides from waste repositories. The aim is to build a consistent picture of the transport that has been taking place in the orebody and the important processes controlling the retardation of uranium series isotopes and to test models of radionuclide transport. A particularly distinctive feature of the Koongarra system is the strong seasonal dependence of the groundwater flow. However, the Koongarra system is similar to a radioactive waste disposal system in that mobilization of uranium is taking place as a result of the infiltration of groundwaters that are in gross chemical disequilibrium with the mineralogy of the primary ore body. There are considerable differences between the Koongarra uranium orebody and a radioactive waste repository, particularly a deep waste repository. The Koongarra system is shallow, affected by seasonal hydrogeological changes as well as climatic variations on a longer timescale and transport is taking place in a zone of active weathering. Some of these features make the Koongarra system harder to characterise than a deep repository. However, there are nevertheless many analogies between the processes occurring at Koongarra and those occurring around a deep or shallow waste repository. The difficulties encountered because of the heterogeneity of the Koongarra weathered zone mirror those to be addressed in assessing radionuclide transport in repository systems. The {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios in rock samples from the dispersion fan decrease in the direction of groundwater transport, whereas in many other systems it has been reported that {sup 234}U is preferentially mobile relative to {sup 238}U (Osmond and Cowart, 1982; Osmond et al., 1983). As most uranium resides in the rock rather than in the groundwater, the net recoil flux of uranium daughter radionuclides is usually from the rock to the groundwater, thus leading to ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U){sub r} less than one. Other models explain the observations by invoking the presence of a phase in which {sup 234}Th is irreversibly fixed

  10. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Uranium sorption. Final Report - Volume 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waite, T.D.; Payne, T.E.; Davis, J.A.; Sekine, K.

    1992-01-01

    In this volume, the results of studies of uranium sorption (adsorption and desorption) to both single, well-defined mineral phases, and to selected natural (Koongarra) substrates are reported. The single phases included the amorphous iron oxide ferrihydrite, crystalline silica and two naturally occurring kaolinites, KGa-1 and Nichika. The surface properties of these materials were rigorously defined, and adsorption studies were conducted over a range of solution pH, ionic strength, carbonate content, adsorbent and adsorbate concentrations, and in the presence of uranium complexants and (potentially) competing adsorbates (such as phosphate and fluoride). The results of these studies were modelled using the 'surface complexation' approach, with a diffuse layer description of the electrical double layer. The impacts of mineral phase transformations (specifically the aging of amorphous ferrihydrite to more crystalline forms) on the uptake and desorption of uranium are also reported. The amount of data obtained in this study, with a number of experimental parameters being varied over a wide range, has enabled more confidence to be placed in the modelling results. The derived model for ferrihydrite adequately accounts for the effect on U sorption of a number of parameters, most notably pH, pCO 2 and total U present. Few (if any) of the models previously proposed are adequate in this respect. While the modelling of the data for the natural substrates is not as advanced, the U sorption data on the natural substrates show similar features to the U sorption on the model substrates. This suggests that the insights obtained in the modelling of the data for ferrihydrite will be valuable in deriving a model for the more complex natural substrates

  11. effect of aqueous extract of alligator pepper (zingiberaceae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Daniel Owu

    However, weight gain in most pregnant women is not within this range, perhaps due to the difficulty of ..... research work on whether the rats would actually eat rat chow ... the morphology, genetic or reproductive capability of the off-springs of.

  12. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Uranium sorption. Final Report - Volume 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waite, T D; Payne, T E [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Davis, J A [United States Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sekine, K [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1993-12-31

    In this volume, the results of studies of uranium sorption (adsorption and desorption) to both single, well-defined mineral phases, and to selected natural (Koongarra) substrates are reported. The single phases included the amorphous iron oxide ferrihydrite, crystalline silica and two naturally occurring kaolinites, KGa-1 and Nichika. The surface properties of these materials were rigorously defined, and adsorption studies were conducted over a range of solution pH, ionic strength, carbonate content, adsorbent and adsorbate concentrations, and in the presence of uranium complexants and (potentially) competing adsorbates (such as phosphate and fluoride). The results of these studies were modelled using the `surface complexation` approach, with a diffuse layer description of the electrical double layer. The impacts of mineral phase transformations (specifically the aging of amorphous ferrihydrite to more crystalline forms) on the uptake and desorption of uranium are also reported. The amount of data obtained in this study, with a number of experimental parameters being varied over a wide range, has enabled more confidence to be placed in the modelling results. The derived model for ferrihydrite adequately accounts for the effect on U sorption of a number of parameters, most notably pH, pCO{sub 2} and total U present. Few (if any) of the models previously proposed are adequate in this respect. While the modelling of the data for the natural substrates is not as advanced, the U sorption data on the natural substrates show similar features to the U sorption on the model substrates. This suggests that the insights obtained in the modelling of the data for ferrihydrite will be valuable in deriving a model for the more complex natural substrates 87 refs., 27 tabs., 56 figs.

  13. Alligator Rivers analogue project. Final Report. Volume 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains a description of the distribution of minerals and elements at Koongarra, including the distribution of radionuclides. The Koongarra orebody is situated 225 km east of Darwin in the Northern Territory of Australia. The zone of primary uranium mineralisation has been intersected by weathering conditions, and this has resulted in the formation of a secondary ore zone and dispersion fan in the weathered zone. The uranium distribution over the site was investigated to determine the extent and direction of uranium migration from the primary uranium mineralisation. The depth patterns of uranium concentration were also investigated to elucidate depths. The distribution of elements, rock and minerals, and how they may affect uranium mobility, or indicate interactions between uranium and solid phases, were considered. Multi-elemental analyses were carried out on many samples to provide basic concentration data about various geochemically significant elements, and to elucidate how the elements interact with one another, the solid substrate and the groundwater. This included the analysis of bulk rock samples, visually distinct sub-samples, different particle sizes and chemically defined phases. Similarly, mineralogical data supplied information on the substrate reacting with the groundwater. Extensive studies were undertaken to elucidate the form of uranium in the weathered zones. These involved optical and electron microscopy studies and auto-radiography. Spatial trends of uranium series disequilibria in bulk rock, secondary uranium minerals and different chemically defined phases were analysed. These give information about uranium deposition and leaching, the evolution of the dispersion fan, the roles and relative importance of different mineralogical phases and processes involved in the retardation of radionuclides. 157 refs., 31 tabs., 87 figs

  14. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Radionuclide transport. Final Report - Volume 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golian, C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Lever, D.A.; Baker, A.J.; Connell, L.D. [AEA Decommissioning and Radwaste, Harwell (United Kingdom); Bennett, D.G.; Read, D. [WS Atkins Science and Technology Epsom Surrey (United Kingdom); Lindgreen, M.; Pers, K.; Skagius, K. [Kemakta Consultants co., Stockholm (Sweden); Murakami, T.; Ohnuki, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, IBARAKI (Japan)

    1992-12-31

    The Koongarra orebody and its associated dispersion fan are examined as a geological analogue for the transport of radionuclides from waste repositories. The aim is to build a consistent picture of the transport that has been taking place in the orebody and the important processes controlling the retardation of uranium series isotopes and to test models of radionuclide transport. A particularly distinctive feature of the Koongarra system is the strong seasonal dependence of the groundwater flow. However, the Koongarra system is similar to a radioactive waste disposal system in that mobilization of uranium is taking place as a result of the infiltration of groundwaters that are in gross chemical disequilibrium with the mineralogy of the primary ore body. There are considerable differences between the Koongarra uranium orebody and a radioactive waste repository, particularly a deep waste repository. The Koongarra system is shallow, affected by seasonal hydrogeological changes as well as climatic variations on a longer timescale and transport is taking place in a zone of active weathering. Some of these features make the Koongarra system harder to characterise than a deep repository. However, there are nevertheless many analogies between the processes occurring at Koongarra and those occurring around a deep or shallow waste repository. The difficulties encountered because of the heterogeneity of the Koongarra weathered zone mirror those to be addressed in assessing radionuclide transport in repository systems. The {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios in rock samples from the dispersion fan decrease in the direction of groundwater transport, whereas in many other systems it has been reported that {sup 234}U is preferentially mobile relative to {sup 238}U (Osmond and Cowart, 1982; Osmond et al., 1983). As most uranium resides in the rock rather than in the groundwater, the net recoil flux of uranium daughter radionuclides is usually from the rock to the groundwater, thus leading to ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U){sub r} less than one. Other models explain the observations by invoking the presence of a phase in which {sup 234}Th is irreversibly fixed

  15. Alligator Rivers analogue project. Final Report. Volume 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains a description of the distribution of minerals and elements at Koongarra, including the distribution of radionuclides. The Koongarra orebody is situated 225 km east of Darwin in the Northern Territory of Australia. The zone of primary uranium mineralisation has been intersected by weathering conditions, and this has resulted in the formation of a secondary ore zone and dispersion fan in the weathered zone. The uranium distribution over the site was investigated to determine the extent and direction of uranium migration from the primary uranium mineralisation. The depth patterns of uranium concentration were also investigated to elucidate depths. The distribution of elements, rock and minerals, and how they may affect uranium mobility, or indicate interactions between uranium and solid phases, were considered. Multi-elemental analyses were carried out on many samples to provide basic concentration data about various geochemically significant elements, and to elucidate how the elements interact with one another, the solid substrate and the groundwater. This included the analysis of bulk rock samples, visually distinct sub-samples, different particle sizes and chemically defined phases. Similarly, mineralogical data supplied information on the substrate reacting with the groundwater. Extensive studies were undertaken to elucidate the form of uranium in the weathered zones. These involved optical and electron microscopy studies and auto-radiography. Spatial trends of uranium series disequilibria in bulk rock, secondary uranium minerals and different chemically defined phases were analysed. These give information about uranium deposition and leaching, the evolution of the dispersion fan, the roles and relative importance of different mineralogical phases and processes involved in the retardation of radionuclides. 157 refs., 31 tabs., 87 figs.

  16. Fullerene as alligator clips for electrical conduction through ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-04-20

    Apr 20, 2017 ... [9] and its graphical user interface Virtual Nanolab. [10] based on ab-initio ... and molecule is of paramount importance for the trans- port of electron through .... [9] Atomistic Toolkit Manual, Quantumwise Inc. [10] D Kienle, K H ...

  17. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geomorphology and paleoclimatic history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyrwoll, K.H.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this volume is to discuss the likely influence of geomorphological and palaeoclimatic controls on the development of the secondary dispersion fan at Koongarra. For the Koongarra area the Phanerozoic was a time of tectonic stability and predominantly subaerial denudation. The structural geology of the region facilitated the erosion of the Kombolgie Formation, setting in train the development of Koongarra Valley. With the removal of the Kombolgie cover the surface of the Cahill Formation could then be eroded. The geochemical controls on the development of the secondary dispersion fan require the orebody to be located in an oxidising weathering environment. Under the present weathering regimes it seems that this implies that the orebody is located at a depth of less than 30 m. From estimates of the present regional denudation rates of the area and wider geomorphological considerations, it is concluded that the top of the orebody would have reached such a depth at some time in the last 1-6 million years. The climates of the Late Quaternary provide some guide to Pleistocene climatic events. The most intense aridity coincided with times of global glacial maxima. There is also evidence that in the Late Cenozoic there were times of elevated rates of chemical weathering. However, the timing, nature and duration of such events is unclear. 171 refs., 4 tabs., 35 refs

  18. Final Environmental Impact Statement Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-01

    including increased blood pressure and higher levels of available glucose and corticosteroids in the bloodstream. Continued disturbances and prolonged...treefrogs. Besides the common American alligator , reptiles observed include the Florida box turtle, the gopher tortoise, the Florida softshell, the...star Remirea maritima - E Reptiles and Amphibians Gopher frog Rana capito C SSC American alligator Alligator mississippiensis T(S/A) SSC Eastern Indigo

  19. Reptilian prey of the sonora mud turtle (Kinosternon sonoriense) with comments on saurophagy and ophiophagy in North American Turtles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovich, J.; Drost, C.; Monatesti, A.J.; Casper, D.; Wood, D.A.; Girard, M.

    2010-01-01

    We detected evidence of predation by the Sonora mud turtle (Kinosternon sonoriense) on the Arizona alligator lizard (Elgaria kingii nobilis) and the ground snake (Sonora semiannulata) at Montezuma Well, Yavapai County, Arizona. Lizards have not been reported in the diet of K. sonoriense, and saurophagy is rare in turtles of the United States, having been reported previously in only two other species:, the false map turtle (Graptemys pseudogeographica) and the eastern box turtle (Terrapene carolina). While the diet of K. sonoriense includes snakes, ours is the first record of S. semiannulata as food of this turtle. Ophiophagy also is rare in turtles of the United States with records for only five other species of turtles. Given the opportunistic diets of many North American turtles, including K. sonoriense, the scarcity of published records of saurophagy and ophiophagy likely represents a shortage of observations, not rarity of occurrence.

  20. Final Environmental Assessment for Long-Term Vegetation Control for Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-14

    domingensis Florida Black Bear Ursus americanus floridanus Phragmites Phragmites australis American Alligator Alligator mississippiensis White Cedar...Cont’d) Tulip Poplar Liriodendron tulipifera Indigo Snake Drymarchon corais Sweet Bay Magnolia Magnolia virginiana American Beaver Castor canadensis Red...Bay Persea borbonia Parula Warbler Parula americana Wetland and Riparian Ecological Association (Saltwater) Black Needle Rush Juncus roemerianus

  1. Biology and early development of eight fish species from the Alligator Rivers Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivantsoff, W.; Crowley, L.E.L.M.; Howe, E.; Semple, G.

    1988-01-01

    The following fish were studied: Melanotaenia nigrans, Melanotaenia splendida australis, Melanotaenia splendida inornata, Pseudomugil gertrudae, Pseudomugil tenellus, Craterocephalus nov. sp., Craterocephalus stercusmuscarum stercusmuscarum, and Ambassis macleavi. Coloration, other specific attributes, sexual dichromatism and dimorphism were recorded whenever possible so that the sexes could be easily recognised. Mating and other behaviour patterns were noted to facilitate recognition of breeding pairs. Spawning patterns and occurrence of cannibalism were recorded, as was the effect of the presence of more than one breeding pair in a tank. Egg numbers at each spawning were recorded and the main breeding season for each of the species was determined. No single stimulus to spawning could be determined. Spawning appeared to be sporadic but continuous throughout the year, with a peak during late spring/early summer. Detailed records of embryonic development were kept for all species except Ambassis macleayi. Time of development to hatching, at constant temperature, was recorded. Larval development of rainbow-fishes was recorded in detail and times to particular developmental stages noted and compared. For other species, the times to particular developmental stages were recorded and representative larval stages described and drawn. General recommendations are made in regard to the requirements to breed and maintain fish, the numbers that can be produced for further study and the constraints that may be present when working with selected fish. 46 refs., 18 figs., 16 tabs

  2. Fish communities in sandy pool of Magela Creek, Alligator Rivers Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodland, D.J.; Ward, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    Physico-chemical conditions, changes in fish communities and characteristics of species populations of eight permanent sandy pools along Magela Creek during the 1981 Dry season are described. Causes of mortality in each species, especially Craterocephalus marianae, were investigated. It is emphasised that in using baseline data to assess the impact of mining and animal communities, it may sometimes be difficult to differentiate natural mortality from mortality resulting from pollution. The aim of this study was to distinguish the most important environmental factors responsible for fish mortality. The study indicates that the mortality was low (<50% of the original population) in most pools. In populations that did suffer high mortality, anoxic conditions may have been an important cause. 67 refs., 36 tabs., 21 figs., ills

  3. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geochemistry of 239Pu, 129I, 99Tc and 36Cl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabryka-Martin, J.T.; Curtis, D.B.

    1992-01-01

    One objective of this research programme has been to evaluate the applicability of uranium orebodies as natural analogues for testing radionuclide release-rate models used in performance assessment activities. The investigated nuclides included three of the most persistent radioactive constituents of high-level wastes from nuclear fission power reactors: plutonium-239, iodine-129, and technetium-99. The feasibility of uranium minerals as analogues for the behavior of these nuclear reaction products (NRP) in spent fuel relies upon a capability to characterise NRP concentrations in the source minerals. Measured abundances of natural 239 Pu, 99 Tc and 129 I in uranium ores are compared to calculated abundances in order to evaluate the degree to retention of these radionuclides by the ore. This modelling study also shows the extent to which various NRP are correlated, such that one provides a constraint on the production rates of others. Under most conditions, 36 Cl, another long-lived neutron-capture product found in uranium ores, is shown to be an ideal in-situ monitor of the 235 U fission rate, which is the dominant source term for 129 I and possibly a significant one for 99 Tc. Similarly, 239 Pu/U ratios can be used to establish limits on the 238 U neutron-induced fission rate; the ratios measured in this study suggest that 238 U induced fission comprises 129 I and 99 Tc. 79 refs., 21 tabs., 18 figs

  4. High Resolution Electron Microbeam Examination and 3D Reconstruction of Alligator Gar Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-27

    Ca/P ratio (atomic %) of 1.55. Well- crystallized geologic apatite has little Na or Mg and a Ca/P of 1.66. Ganoine HAp contains some amount of CO3 ...nanoparticle nature of the ganoine, however, presumably adds strength to the ganoine as compared to a single crystal of HAp. The curved top surface of the...From this method, individual HAp crystals were separated from the bulk (both ganoine and bone) in order to confirm the size and shape of the HAp

  5. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geochemical modelling of secondary uranium ore formation. Final Report - Volume 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sverjensky, D.; Bennett, D.G.; Read, D.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to establish how the uranyl phosphate zone at the Koongarra site was formed. The overall approach taken in the present study employed theoretical chemical mass transfer calculations and models that permit investigation and reconstruction of the kinds of waters that could produce the uranyl phosphate zone. These calculations have used the geological and mineralogical data for the Koongarra weathered zone (Volumes 2, 8, and 9 of this series), to constrain the initial compositions and reactions undergone by groundwater during the formation of the uranyl phosphate zone. In carrying out these calculations the present-day analyses of Koongarra waters are used only as a guide to the possible initial composition of the fluids associated with the formation of the phosphate zone. Aqueous speciation, saturation state and chemical mass transfer calculations were carried out using the computer programs EQ3NR and EQ6 (Wolery, 1983; Wolery et al., 1984) and a thermodynamic database generated at The Johns Hopkins University over the last eight years which is tabulated in the Appendix 1 to Volume 12 of this series. Despite uncertainties in the thermodynamic characterisation of species, all the above calculations suggest that the uranyl phosphate zone at Koongarra has not formed from present-day groundwaters (Volume 12 of this series). The present-day groundwaters in the weathered zone (eg. at 13 m depth) appear to be undersaturated with respect to saleeite. Furthermore, as present-day groundwaters descend below the water table they rapidly lose their atmospheric oxygen imprint, as is typical of most groundwaters, and become even more reducing in character. Under these circumstances, the groundwaters become more undersaturated with respect to saleeite than the shallow groundwaters. Because much of the phosphate zone is currently below the water table, under saturated zone conditions, it is suggested in the present study that the uranyl phosphate zone must have formed in the geologic past under unsaturated zone conditions

  6. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geochemical modelling of secondary uranium ore formation. Final Report - Volume 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sverjensky, D [The John Hopkins Univ, Dept of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Baltimore (United States); Bennett, D G; Read, D [W.S. Atkins Science and Technology, Epsom Surrey, (United Kingdom)

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of the present study was to establish how the uranyl phosphate zone at the Koongarra site was formed. The overall approach taken in the present study employed theoretical chemical mass transfer calculations and models that permit investigation and reconstruction of the kinds of waters that could produce the uranyl phosphate zone. These calculations have used the geological and mineralogical data for the Koongarra weathered zone (Volumes 2, 8, and 9 of this series), to constrain the initial compositions and reactions undergone by groundwater during the formation of the uranyl phosphate zone. In carrying out these calculations the present-day analyses of Koongarra waters are used only as a guide to the possible initial composition of the fluids associated with the formation of the phosphate zone. Aqueous speciation, saturation state and chemical mass transfer calculations were carried out using the computer programs EQ3NR and EQ6 (Wolery, 1983; Wolery et al., 1984) and a thermodynamic database generated at The Johns Hopkins University over the last eight years which is tabulated in the Appendix 1 to Volume 12 of this series. Despite uncertainties in the thermodynamic characterisation of species, all the above calculations suggest that the uranyl phosphate zone at Koongarra has not formed from present-day groundwaters (Volume 12 of this series). The present-day groundwaters in the weathered zone (eg. at 13 m depth) appear to be undersaturated with respect to saleeite. Furthermore, as present-day groundwaters descend below the water table they rapidly lose their atmospheric oxygen imprint, as is typical of most groundwaters, and become even more reducing in character. Under these circumstances, the groundwaters become more undersaturated with respect to saleeite than the shallow groundwaters. Because much of the phosphate zone is currently below the water table, under saturated zone conditions, it is suggested in the present study that the uranyl phosphate zone must have formed in the geologic past under unsaturated zone conditions

  7. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geochemical modelling of secondary uranium ore formation. Final Report - Volume 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sverjensky, D. [The John Hopkins Univ, Dept of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Baltimore (United States); Bennett, D.G.; Read, D. [W.S. Atkins Science and Technology, Epsom Surrey, (United Kingdom)

    1992-12-31

    The purpose of the present study was to establish how the uranyl phosphate zone at the Koongarra site was formed. The overall approach taken in the present study employed theoretical chemical mass transfer calculations and models that permit investigation and reconstruction of the kinds of waters that could produce the uranyl phosphate zone. These calculations have used the geological and mineralogical data for the Koongarra weathered zone (Volumes 2, 8, and 9 of this series), to constrain the initial compositions and reactions undergone by groundwater during the formation of the uranyl phosphate zone. In carrying out these calculations the present-day analyses of Koongarra waters are used only as a guide to the possible initial composition of the fluids associated with the formation of the phosphate zone. Aqueous speciation, saturation state and chemical mass transfer calculations were carried out using the computer programs EQ3NR and EQ6 (Wolery, 1983; Wolery et al., 1984) and a thermodynamic database generated at The Johns Hopkins University over the last eight years which is tabulated in the Appendix 1 to Volume 12 of this series. Despite uncertainties in the thermodynamic characterisation of species, all the above calculations suggest that the uranyl phosphate zone at Koongarra has not formed from present-day groundwaters (Volume 12 of this series). The present-day groundwaters in the weathered zone (eg. at 13 m depth) appear to be undersaturated with respect to saleeite. Furthermore, as present-day groundwaters descend below the water table they rapidly lose their atmospheric oxygen imprint, as is typical of most groundwaters, and become even more reducing in character. Under these circumstances, the groundwaters become more undersaturated with respect to saleeite than the shallow groundwaters. Because much of the phosphate zone is currently below the water table, under saturated zone conditions, it is suggested in the present study that the uranyl phosphate zone must have formed in the geologic past under unsaturated zone conditions

  8. Radium concentration factors in passionfruit (Passiflora foetida) from the Alligator Rivers Region, Northern Territory, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medley, Peter; Bollhöfer, Andreas; Parry, David; Martin, Paul

    2013-01-01

    In this study, uptake of Ra from soil into the edible fruit of the wild passionfruit species Passiflora foetida was investigated, using selective extraction from the soil samples. A wide range of environmental exposure conditions were represented by the locations that were sampled, including both natural soils, and soils influenced by past and present uranium mining activities. The bioavailable 226 Ra fraction in soils was found to be a better predictor of 226 Ra fruit activity concentrations than the total soil activity concentration, or any of the other fractions studied. Concentration Factors (CFs) derived using the bioavailable fraction varied by only a factor of 7 between different locations, whereas CFs derived using other fractions and total soil varied by up to two orders of magnitude. CFs were highest for those soils containing the lowest concentrations of Mg, Ca and Ba, and approached a saturation value at higher soil concentrations. This finding suggests that group II elements influence radium uptake, most likely the result of increased pressure on the plant to take up essential nutrient group II elements from soil with the lower concentrations, with Ra being taken up as an analogue element. It is also possible that at higher concentrations of bioavailable Ca and Mg in the soil, these ions will outcompete Ra for adsorption sites in the soil and/or on the root surfaces. The study also shows that 228 Ra can potentially be a significant contributor to ingestion doses and should also be considered when assessing committed effective doses from the ingestion of fruits. -- Highlights: • Fruit and soil samples were taken from wild growing native passionfruit plants. • The sampling locations were on natural and U mining impacted sites. • Sequential extraction of the soil was undertaken. • Radium-226, radium-228 and other key elements were measured. • Concentration factors show the lowest variability in the bioavailable fraction

  9. 78 FR 57480 - Safety Zone; 2013 Annual Islamorada Swim for Alligator Lighthouse, Atlantic Ocean; Islamorada, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    ... under section 4(a) of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) (5 U.S.C. 553(b)). This provision... Security Management Directive 023-01 and Commandant Instruction M16475.lD, which guide the Coast Guard in...

  10. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Weathering and its effects on uranium redistribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, H.; Ohnuki, T.; Yanase, N.; Sato, T.; Kimura, H.; Sekine, K.; Nagano, T.; Klessa, D.A.; Conoley, C.; Nakashima, S.; Ewing, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    In the vicinity of the uranium ore deposit at Koongarra, quartz-chlorite schist, the ore host rock, has been subjected to weathering. Although quartz is resistant to weathering, chlorite has been altered to clays and iron minerals. The chlorite weathering and the uranium association with the weathered minerals are the main topics of this study. In order to clarify the weathering of chlorite and its effects on the redistribution of uranium, the processes, mechanisms, and kinetics of the chlorite weathering, and the uranium concentrations in minerals were examined by various methods: X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, transmission electron microscopy, autoradiography, visible spectroscopy, alpha and gamma spectrometry. The observed results were compared to those calculated, based on two different models developed for the present study. Water-rock interactions have resulted in the weathering of chlorite and precipitation and sorption of uranyl from the groundwaters with the weathering products. It is concluded that the chlorite weathering affects the uranium retardation factor, and thus uranium redistribution at Koongarra. 55 refs., 20 tabs., 120 figs

  11. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geochemical modelling of present-day groundwaters. Final Report - Volume 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sverjensky, D A [The John Hopkins Univ, Dept of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Baltimore (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The main purpose of this report is to summarize geochemical modeling studies of the present-day Koongarra groundwaters. Information on the present-day geochemistry and geochemical processes at Koongarra forms a basis for a present-day analogue for nuclear waste migration. The present-day analogue is built on studies of the mineralogy and petrology of the Koongarra deposit, and chemical analyses of present-day groundwaters from the deposit. The overall approach taken in the present study has been to carry out a series of aqueous speciation and state of saturation calculations, including chemical mass transfer calculations, to address the possible control over the chemistry of the present-day for the groundwaters at Koongarra. The most important implication of the present study for the migration of radionuclides is the strong role played by the water-rock interactions, both above and below the water table, influencing the overall chemical evolution of the groundwaters. Thus, the results show that the chemical evolution of waters is strongly controlled by the initial availability of CO{sub 2} and the mineral assemblage encountered, which together determine the major element evolution of the waters by controlling the pH. The relative rates of evolution of the pH and the oxidation state of the groundwaters are also critical to the mobility of uranium. The shallow Koongarra waters are sufficiently oxidising that they can dissolve and transport uranium even under acidic conditions. Under the more reducing condition of the deep groundwaters, is the pH level that permits uranium transport as carbonate complexes. However, if the oxidation state decreases to much lower levels, it would be expected that uranium become immobile. All the speciation and state of saturation calculations carried out in the present study are available from the author, on request 22 refs., 7 tabs., 18 figs.

  12. Uranium mineralization in the Rum Jungle-Alligator Rivers Province, Northern Territory, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodson, R.G.; Needham, R.S.; Wilkes, P.G.; Page, R.W.; Smart, P.G.; Watchman, A.L.

    1974-01-01

    Renewed interest in uranium exploration in northern Australia in the late 1960s led to the discovery of one of the most important uranium fields in the world. To obtain an understanding of the geological setting of the uranium deposits, and to provide guidelines for future exploration, the Bureau of Mineral Resources (BMR) undertook an investigation which included semi-detailed mapping, aided by geophysical surveys, isotopic dating, and stratigraphic drilling. From the results so far obtained and from the important data made available by mining companies engaged in exploration in the region, a pattern of uranium mineralization can be recognized, particularly in relation to the Lower Proterozoic sedimentation of the region. (author)

  13. Environmental impact of the Ranger uranium mine, Alligator Rivers Region, Northern Territory, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, A.; Needham, S.

    2002-01-01

    Stringent environmental controls have been applied to the Ranger mine, in the Northern Territory of Australia, because of its location in an area of outstanding natural and cultural values. The adjacent Kakadu National Park contains a wild and extensive biodiversity, striking landscapes, ancient Aboriginal rock art and a living Aboriginal culture. A special regime of biological, radiological and chemical monitoring has been applied to protect the environment and detect even very low intensity impacts. The results from this regime demonstrate to the government and general public that the high conservation values of the national park around the mine are being properly protected. This paper describes the techniques used to measure environmental impact at Ranger, and summarizes the results of over 20 years of monitoring. The overwhelming conclusion is that a very high standard of environmental protection has been achieved. (author)

  14. Global warming increases the interspecific competitiveness of the invasive plant alligator weed, Alternanthera philoxeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Ismail, Mohannad; Ding, Jianqing

    2017-01-01

    Global warming could accelerate the spread of invasive species to higher latitudes and intensify their effects on native species. Here, we report results of two years of field surveys along a latitudinal gradient (21°N to 31°N) in southern China, to determine the species structure of the invasive plant Alternanthera philoxeroides community. We also performed a replacement series experiment (mono and mixed) to evaluate the effects of elevated temperature on the competitiveness of A. philoxeroides with the native co-occurring species Digitaria sanguinalis. In the field survey, we found that the dominance of A. philoxeroides increased with increasing of latitude gradient while cover of D. sanguinalis decreased. In monospecific plantings, artificial warming reduced the length of D. sanguinalis roots. In mixed plantings, warming reduced both A. philoxeroides abundance and D. sanguinalis stem length when A. philoxeroides was more prevalent in the planting. Warming also significantly reduced D. sanguinalis biomass, but increased that of A. philoxeroides. In addition, elevated temperatures significantly reduced the relative yield (RY) of D. sanguinalis, particularly when A. philoxeroides was planted in higher proportion in the plot. These results suggest that the invasiveness of A. philoxeroides increased with increasing latitude, and that warming may increase the effectiveness of its interspecific competition with D. sanguinalis. Hence, under global warming conditions, the harm to native species from A. philoxeroides would increase at higher latitudes. Our findings are critical for predicting the invasiveness of alien species under climate change. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Uranium mine rehabilitation: the story of the South Alligator Valley intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waggitt, Peter W.

    2004-01-01

    The rehabilitation of radioactively contaminated sites is an activity generally regarded with suspicion by the community. This is certainly the case for Australian Aboriginal traditional landowners. This paper describes the historical background to, and the successful development and implementation of, a consultation and planning process to rehabilitate former uranium mining and milling facilities on Aboriginal lands of the World Heritage-listed Kakadu National Park in northern Australia. The process of developing an appropriate community communication and consultation process to allay concerns about radioactivity is a cornerstone of the rehabilitation program. The initial stages of the program's implementation are also described. This program is also the first example of a radiological intervention under modern environmental and radiation protection legislation in the region. It was necessary to develop radiological standards for use in the program as none had been promulgated under existing relevant legislation

  16. Biology and early development of eight fish species from the Alligator Rivers Region. Technical memorandum 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivantsoff, W; Crowley, L E.L.M.; Howe, E; Semple, G

    1988-01-01

    The following fish were studied: Melanotaenia nigrans, Melanotaenia splendida australis, Melanotaenia splendida inornata, Pseudomugil gertrudae, Pseudomugil tenellus, Craterocephalus nov. sp., Craterocephalus stercusmuscarum stercusmuscarum, and Ambassis macleavi. Coloration, other specific attributes, sexual dichromatism and dimorphism were recorded whenever possible so that the sexes could be easily recognised. Mating and other behaviour patterns were noted to facilitate recognition of breeding pairs. Spawning patterns and occurrence of cannibalism were recorded, as was the effect of the presence of more than one breeding pair in a tank. Egg numbers at each spawning were recorded and the main breeding season for each of the species was determined. No single stimulus to spawning could be determined. Spawning appeared to be sporadic but continuous throughout the year, with a peak during late spring/early summer. Detailed records of embryonic development were kept for all species except Ambassis macleayi. Time of development to hatching, at constant temperature, was recorded. Larval development of rainbow-fishes was recorded in detail and times to particular developmental stages noted and compared. For other species, the times to particular developmental stages were recorded and representative larval stages described and drawn. General recommendations are made in regard to the requirements to breed and maintain fish, the numbers that can be produced for further study and the constraints that may be present when working with selected fish. 46 refs., 18 figs., 16 tabs.

  17. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geochemical modelling of present-day groundwaters. Final Report - Volume 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sverjensky, D. A. [The John Hopkins Univ, Dept of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Baltimore (United States)

    1992-12-31

    The main purpose of this report is to summarize geochemical modeling studies of the present-day Koongarra groundwaters. Information on the present-day geochemistry and geochemical processes at Koongarra forms a basis for a present-day analogue for nuclear waste migration. The present-day analogue is built on studies of the mineralogy and petrology of the Koongarra deposit, and chemical analyses of present-day groundwaters from the deposit. The overall approach taken in the present study has been to carry out a series of aqueous speciation and state of saturation calculations, including chemical mass transfer calculations, to address the possible control over the chemistry of the present-day for the groundwaters at Koongarra. The most important implication of the present study for the migration of radionuclides is the strong role played by the water-rock interactions, both above and below the water table, influencing the overall chemical evolution of the groundwaters. Thus, the results show that the chemical evolution of waters is strongly controlled by the initial availability of CO{sub 2} and the mineral assemblage encountered, which together determine the major element evolution of the waters by controlling the pH. The relative rates of evolution of the pH and the oxidation state of the groundwaters are also critical to the mobility of uranium. The shallow Koongarra waters are sufficiently oxidising that they can dissolve and transport uranium even under acidic conditions. Under the more reducing condition of the deep groundwaters, is the pH level that permits uranium transport as carbonate complexes. However, if the oxidation state decreases to much lower levels, it would be expected that uranium become immobile. All the speciation and state of saturation calculations carried out in the present study are available from the author, on request 22 refs., 7 tabs., 18 figs.

  18. Test Area C-80 Complex Final Range Environmental Assessment, Revision 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-14

    to intense noise might contribute to the development and aggravation of stress -related conditions such as high blood pressure, coronary disease...produced by test and training missions and their associated expendables. Noise may directly inconvenience and/or stress humans and some wildlife...Sherman’s fox squirrel Sciuris niger shermani Phragmites Phragmites australis American alligator Alligator mississippiensis White cedar Chamaecyparis

  19. Developmental effects of Arochlor 1242 in American kestrels and associated hormone concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, J.B.; Henry, P.F.P.; Rattner, B.A.

    1996-01-01

    Recently, diverse field and experimental studies have been brought together to suggest that abnormal sexual and reproductive development in wildlife might be caused by the endocrine-like activity of pollutants acting on embryos. For example, hormonal and gonadal anomalies in juvenile alligators from Florida are associated with exposure to DDT and dicofol, experimental work on laboratory rodents has identified estrogenic and androgenic properties of several pollutants, including polychlorinated biphenyls, and injection of gull eggs with metabolites of DDT produces intersex gonads in the male hatchlings. Very little evidence is available for birds that demonstrates a deficit in reproductive capability by this mechanism. Our breeding and egg-injection studies are investigating the potential of Aroclor 1242 and hydroxylated PCB congener 30, both with known estrogenic activity, to alter the course of embryonic development of reproductive structures and to affect later reproductive function in American kestrels. Findings from young birds whose parents were exposed indicated that gonadal morphology appeared consistent with the genetic sex of exposed birds; testes of exposed birds showed no difference in size or symmetry when compared to controls. Histological preparations showed very little intersexuality of male testes; females had ovaries that were indistinguishable from controls. Female hatchlings tended to show increased androgen and decreased estrogen in their serum with greater dose of Aroclor; females hatchlings that resulted from injected eggs showed an opposite trend. Analyses in progress include LHRH and catecholamine concentrations in the brain.

  20. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Application of scenario development method in evaluation of the Koongarra Analogue. Final Report - Volume 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skagius, K. [Kemakta Consultants co., Stockholm (Sweden); Wingefors, S. [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1992-12-31

    The study of natural analogues has been established as one of the most important methods for validation of concepts and models applied for the assessment of long-term performance of repositories for nuclear waste. The objectives of such studies range from detailed investigations of processes and features on a small scale to attempts of explaining the evolution of whole sites. For studies of specific processes it may well be as important to consider the larger scale settings as boundary conditions. This appreciation of context and an integrated view may be as important for evaluation of most natural analogues as for performance assessments. This is more evident the more the evaluation depends on a knowledge about the evolution of the natural analogue. The attempted formulation of scenarios of the Koongarra Analogue has been based on the external conditions and external features. A rapid weathering of the host rock, i.e. the chlorite schist, is assumed to have started around the onset of the Pleistocene Ice Age (ca 1.6 Ma BP). The eventual oxidation and mobilization of the uranium ore could then have occurred under unsaturated or saturated conditions. This leads to the following major scenarios: (1) Uranyl Phosphates formed under unsaturated conditions, with a periodical evolution of the dispersion fan in conjunction with alternating dry (glacial) and wet (interglacial) periods during the Pleistocene Ice Age; (2) Uranyl Phosphates formed under unsaturated conditions as a single event, taking place either early or late during the Pleistocene Ice Age; (3)Uranyl Phosphates formed under saturated conditions, in conjunction with periods of higher and lower flow due to the climatic cycling. Although the original objectives may not have been fully achieved, this work is believed to contribute to a better understanding of the Koongarra Analogue as well as to give a basis for further scenario work

  1. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Application of scenario development method in evaluation of the Koongarra Analogue. Final Report - Volume 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skagius, K.; Wingefors, S.

    1992-01-01

    The study of natural analogues has been established as one of the most important methods for validation of concepts and models applied for the assessment of long-term performance of repositories for nuclear waste. The objectives of such studies range from detailed investigations of processes and features on a small scale to attempts of explaining the evolution of whole sites. For studies of specific processes it may well be as important to consider the larger scale settings as boundary conditions. This appreciation of context and an integrated view may be as important for evaluation of most natural analogues as for performance assessments. This is more evident the more the evaluation depends on a knowledge about the evolution of the natural analogue. The attempted formulation of scenarios of the Koongarra Analogue has been based on the external conditions and external features. A rapid weathering of the host rock, i.e. the chlorite schist, is assumed to have started around the onset of the Pleistocene Ice Age (ca 1.6 Ma BP). The eventual oxidation and mobilization of the uranium ore could then have occurred under unsaturated or saturated conditions. This leads to the following major scenarios: (1) Uranyl Phosphates formed under unsaturated conditions, with a periodical evolution of the dispersion fan in conjunction with alternating dry (glacial) and wet (interglacial) periods during the Pleistocene Ice Age; (2) Uranyl Phosphates formed under unsaturated conditions as a single event, taking place either early or late during the Pleistocene Ice Age; (3)Uranyl Phosphates formed under saturated conditions, in conjunction with periods of higher and lower flow due to the climatic cycling. Although the original objectives may not have been fully achieved, this work is believed to contribute to a better understanding of the Koongarra Analogue as well as to give a basis for further scenario work

  2. Total phenolic content and in-vitro antioxidant activities from methanolic extract of alligator pipefish, Syngnathoides biaculeatus (Bloch, 1785)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sanaye, S.V.; Pise, N.M.; Pawar, A.P.; Parab, P.P.; Sreepada, R.A.; Pawar, H.B.; Murugan, A.

    -vitro antioxidant activities in terms of reducing power (RP), metal chelating activity (MCA), 2,2 diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), inhibition of lipid peroxidation (LPX) and hydroxyl radical...

  3. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Application of scenario development method in evaluation of the Koongarra Analogue. Final Report - Volume 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skagius, K [Kemakta Consultants co., Stockholm (Sweden); Wingefors, S [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1993-12-31

    The study of natural analogues has been established as one of the most important methods for validation of concepts and models applied for the assessment of long-term performance of repositories for nuclear waste. The objectives of such studies range from detailed investigations of processes and features on a small scale to attempts of explaining the evolution of whole sites. For studies of specific processes it may well be as important to consider the larger scale settings as boundary conditions. This appreciation of context and an integrated view may be as important for evaluation of most natural analogues as for performance assessments. This is more evident the more the evaluation depends on a knowledge about the evolution of the natural analogue. The attempted formulation of scenarios of the Koongarra Analogue has been based on the external conditions and external features. A rapid weathering of the host rock, i.e. the chlorite schist, is assumed to have started around the onset of the Pleistocene Ice Age (ca 1.6 Ma BP). The eventual oxidation and mobilization of the uranium ore could then have occurred under unsaturated or saturated conditions. This leads to the following major scenarios: (1) Uranyl Phosphates formed under unsaturated conditions, with a periodical evolution of the dispersion fan in conjunction with alternating dry (glacial) and wet (interglacial) periods during the Pleistocene Ice Age; (2) Uranyl Phosphates formed under unsaturated conditions as a single event, taking place either early or late during the Pleistocene Ice Age; (3)Uranyl Phosphates formed under saturated conditions, in conjunction with periods of higher and lower flow due to the climatic cycling. Although the original objectives may not have been fully achieved, this work is believed to contribute to a better understanding of the Koongarra Analogue as well as to give a basis for further scenario work

  4. Continuous bottom temperature measurements in strategic areas of the Florida Reef Tract at Alligator Reef, 2005 - 2007 (NODC Accession 0019351)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this project is to document bottom seawater temperature in strategic areas of the Florida Reef Tract on a continuing basis and make that information...

  5. Continuous bottom temperature measurements in strategic areas of the Florida Reef Tract at Alligator Reef, 2005 - 2007 (NODC Accession 0019351)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This ongoing project began in 1988. A total of 38 subsurface recording thermographs have been deployed in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS)and at...

  6. Continuous bottom temperature measurements in strategic areas of the Florida Reef Tract at Alligator Reef, 1990- 2005 (NODC Accession 0002753)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This ongoing project began in 1988. A total of 38 subsurface recording thermographs have been deployed in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS)and at...

  7. Geochemistry, mineralization, structure, and permeability of a normal-fault zone, Casino mine, Alligator Ridge district, north central Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, K. Jill; Evans, James P.

    2003-05-01

    We examine the geochemical signature and structure of the Keno fault zone to test its impact on the flow of ore-mineralizing fluids, and use the mined exposures to evaluate structures and processes associated with normal fault development. The fault is a moderately dipping normal-fault zone in siltstone and silty limestone with 55-100 m of dip-slip displacement in north-central Nevada. Across-strike exposures up to 180 m long, 65 m of down-dip exposure and 350 m of along-strike exposure allow us to determine how faults, fractures, and fluids interact within mixed-lithology carbonate-dominated sedimentary rocks. The fault changes character along strike from a single clay-rich slip plane 10-20 mm thick at the northern exposure to numerous hydrocarbon-bearing, calcite-filled, nearly vertical slip planes in a zone 15 m wide at the southern exposure. The hanging wall and footwall are intensely fractured but fracture densities do not vary markedly with distance from the fault. Fault slip varies from pure dip-slip to nearly pure strike-slip, which suggests that either slip orientations may vary on faults in single slip events, or stress variations over the history of the fault caused slip vector variations. Whole-rock major, minor, and trace element analyses indicate that Au, Sb, and As are in general associated with the fault zone, suggesting that Au- and silica-bearing fluids migrated along the fault to replace carbonate in the footwall and adjacent hanging wall rocks. Subsequent fault slip was associated with barite and calcite and hydrocarbon-bearing fluids deposited at the southern end of the fault. No correlation exists at the meter or tens of meter scale between mineralization patterns and fracture density. We suggest that the fault was a combined conduit-barrier system in which the fault provides a critical connection between the fluid sources and fractures that formed before and during faulting. During the waning stages of deposit formation, the fault behaved as a localized conduit to hydrocarbon-bearing calcite veins. The results of this study show that fault-zone character may change dramatically over short, deposit- or reservoir-scale distances. The presence of damage zones may not be well correlated at the fine scale with geochemically defined regions of the fault, even though a gross spatial correlation may exist.

  8. Attack for aquatic animals (shark and alligator): Report of two fatal cases in the Bocas del Toro province (Panama)

    OpenAIRE

    Mendieta, C.; Duarte, A.

    2009-01-01

    Los ataques por animales acuáticos, y especialmente los producidos por tiburón y cocodrilo, son muy poco frecuentes. Se han descrito ataques por tiburón en países como Australia, Sudáfrica, Brasil, Bahamas, México y Puerto Rico, algunos con resultado fatal en los últimos cinco años. En Panamá, los casos descritos de ataques por escualo son escasos, siendo el último descrito con resultado no fatal en julio de 2008 en una playa de la localidad de San Carlos mientras que el último caso fatal se ...

  9. Uranium mineralization at Anomaly 2J, South Alligator Valley, Northern Territory, and its significance concerning regional structure and stratigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foy, N.F.; Miezitis, Y.

    1977-01-01

    A weak airborne anomaly was examined in the field and the presence of uranium confirmed. Rotary-percussion drilling showed the presence of uranium but a subsequent programme of diamond and rotary-percussion drilling indicated that the concentration of uranium was uneconomic. Within the tuffs and volcanics of the prospect the uranium existed as uranyl phosphates within the oxidized zone. Geological mapping and the diamond drill core showed that the Stag Creek Volcanics are part of the Lower Proterozoic Masson Formation, probably with member status, rather than the expression of an Archaean basement ridge. This change in the interpretation of the fundamental structure of the Pine Creek Geosyncline has led to a re-examination of the stratigraphy and to suggestions which differ from the current concept. (author)

  10. Analogue studies in the alligator rivers region. In-situ measurement of uranium series nuclides with SHRIMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagano, Tetsushi; Yanase, Nobuyuki; Ohnuki, Toshihiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Sato, Tsutomu; Isobe, Hiroshi; Williams, I.S.; Zaw, M.; Payne, T.E.; Airey, P.L.

    1999-03-01

    The SHRIMP analyses have been conducted for rock samples from the Koongarra secondary ore deposit to obtain activity ratios of {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U and isotopic ratios of {sup 207}Pb/{sup 206}Pb and {sup 204}Pb/{sup 206}Pb. Target minerals for the analyses were iron minerals and kaolinite, which are the main weathering products in this area. The activity ratios of {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U were obtained based on counts at masses of uranium metal. The {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios based on counts of uranium oxides were not appropriate, because count rates of {sup 234}U{sup 16}O were interfered by those of {sup 238}U{sup 12}C molecule. The activity ratios of {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U were approximately unity for crystalline iron nodules. This fact suggested that the mean residence time of uranium within the iron nodules was at least 1 million years. On the other hand, slightly higher values than unity were obtained for kaolinite. Lead isotopes were investigated and a positive relationship was recognized between {sup 207}Pb/{sup 206}Pb and {sup 204}Pb/{sup 206}Pb isotope ratios. (author)

  11. Tupinambis merianae as nest predators of crocodilians and turtles in Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotti, Frank J.; McEachern, Michelle A.; Rochford, Michael; Reed, Robert; Ketterlin Eckles, Jennifer; Vinci, Joy; Edwards, Jake; Wasilewki, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Tupinambis merianae, is a large, omnivorous tegu lizard native to South America. Two populations of tegus are established in the state of Florida, USA, but impacts to native species are poorly documented. During summer 2013, we placed automated cameras overlooking one American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) nest, which also contained a clutch of Florida red-bellied cooter (Pseudemys nelsoni) eggs, and one American crocodile (Crocodylus acutus) nest at a site in southeastern Florida where tegus are established. We documented tegu activity and predation on alligator and turtle eggs at the alligator nest, and tegu activity at the crocodile nest. Our finding that one of the first two crocodilian nests to be monitored was depredated by tegus suggests that tegus should be further evaluated as a threat to nesting reptiles in Florida.

  12. Final Environmental Assessment for Jacksonville Aviation Authority Launch Site Operator License at Cecil Field, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    lungs and reacts with hemoglobin to reduce the oxygen carrying capacity of the blood . At low concentrations, CO has been shown to aggravate the...caretta T T American Alligator Alligator mississippiensis Not Listed SSC Florida Pine Snake Pituophis melanoleucus mugitus Not Listed SSC Gopher...cause stress on the local school system or the existing City of Jacksonville infrastructure. However, it is unlikely that 50 new employees would

  13. Crocodylus acutus (American Crocodile). Long distance juvenile movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Rafael; Beauchamp, Jeffrey S.; Mazzotti, Frank; Cherkiss, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Crocodylus acutus (American Crocodile) is the most widely distributed New World crocodilian species with its range extending from Peru in the south to the southern tip of peninsular Florida in the north. Crocodylus acutus occupies primarily coastal brackish water habitat, however it also occurs in freshwater to hypersaline habitats (Thorbjarnarson 2010. In Crocodiles. Status Survey and Conservation Action Plan. [Third Edition], American Crocodile Crocodylus acutus, pp. 46–53 S.C. Manolis and C. Stevenson. Crocodile Specialist Group, Darwin). There is limited literature on long distance movements of juvenile crocodilians worldwide and no literature on juvenile crocodiles in Florida. However, adult C. acutus in Florida have been documented to make seasonal movements of 5–15 km from preferred foraging habitat to nesting beaches (Mazzotti 1983. The Ecology of Crocodylus acutus in Florida. PhD Dissertation. The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania. 161pp), and one adult was documented making a 35 km trip from her nest site to preferred foraging habitat (Cherkiss et. al. 2006. Herpetol. Rev. 38:72–73). Rodda (1984. Herpetologica 40:444–451) reported on juvenile C. acutus movement in Gatun Lake, Panama, and found that juveniles stayed within 1 km of their nest site for the first month. Movements of juvenile Crocodylus porosus (Saltwater Crocodile) in a river system in Northern Australia showed a maximum movement of 38.9 km from a known nest site, with the majority of the crocodiles staying within 15.6 km downstream to 6.8 km upstream (Webb and Messel 1978. Aust. Wildlife Res. 5:263–283). Juvenile movement of Crocodylus niloticus (Nile Crocodile) in Lake Ngezi, Zimbabwe showed crocodiles restricted their movements from 1.0 km up to 4.5 km through the wet and dry seasons (Hutton 1989. Am. Zool. 29:1033–1049). Long distance movements of alligators were recorded for sizes ranging from 28 cm to 361 cm in a coastal refuge in Louisiana, where

  14. Presence of Breeding Birds Improves Body Condition for a Crocodilian Nest Protector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nell, Lucas A; Frederick, Peter C; Mazzotti, Frank J; Vliet, Kent A; Brandt, Laura A

    2016-01-01

    Ecological associations where one species enhances habitat for another nearby species (facilitations) shape fundamental community dynamics and can promote niche expansion, thereby influencing how and where species persist and coexist. For the many breeding birds facing high nest-predation pressure, enemy-free space can be gained by nesting near more formidable animals for physical protection. While the benefits to protected species seem well documented, very few studies have explored whether and how protector species are affected by nest protection associations. Long-legged wading birds (Pelecaniformes and Ciconiiformes) actively choose nesting sites above resident American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis), apparently to take advantage of the protection from mammalian nest predators that alligator presence offers. Previous research has shown that wading bird nesting colonies could provide substantial food for alligators in the form of dropped chicks. We compared alligator body condition in similar habitat with and without wading bird nesting colonies present. Alligator morphometric body condition indices were significantly higher in colony than in non-colony locations, an effect that was statistically independent of a range of environmental variables. Since colonially nesting birds and crocodilians co-occur in many tropical and subtropical wetlands, our results highlight a potentially widespread keystone process between two ecologically important species-groups. These findings suggest the interaction is highly beneficial for both groups of actors, and illustrate how selective pressures may have acted to form and reinforce a strongly positive ecological interaction.

  15. Presence of Breeding Birds Improves Body Condition for a Crocodilian Nest Protector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nell, Lucas A.; Frederick, Peter C.; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Vliet, Kent A.; Brandt, Laura A.

    2016-01-01

    Ecological associations where one species enhances habitat for another nearby species (facilitations) shape fundamental community dynamics and can promote niche expansion, thereby influencing how and where species persist and coexist. For the many breeding birds facing high nest-predation pressure, enemy-free space can be gained by nesting near more formidable animals for physical protection. While the benefits to protected species seem well documented, very few studies have explored whether and how protector species are affected by nest protection associations. Long-legged wading birds (Pelecaniformes and Ciconiiformes) actively choose nesting sites above resident American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis), apparently to take advantage of the protection from mammalian nest predators that alligator presence offers. Previous research has shown that wading bird nesting colonies could provide substantial food for alligators in the form of dropped chicks. We compared alligator body condition in similar habitat with and without wading bird nesting colonies present. Alligator morphometric body condition indices were significantly higher in colony than in non-colony locations, an effect that was statistically independent of a range of environmental variables. Since colonially nesting birds and crocodilians co-occur in many tropical and subtropical wetlands, our results highlight a potentially widespread keystone process between two ecologically important species-groups. These findings suggest the interaction is highly beneficial for both groups of actors, and illustrate how selective pressures may have acted to form and reinforce a strongly positive ecological interaction. PMID:26934602

  16. Extremely high major histocompatibility complex class IIb gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tial for the genetic management of the captive alligator; thus much research on this ..... protected; at the same time, we must strengthen the education about alligator ... Province, Zoology Practical Skills Training Center in Fuyang. Teachers ...

  17. Factors affecting individual foraging specialization and temporal diet stability across the range of a large "generalist" apex predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Adam E; Nifong, James C; Heithaus, Michael R; Mazzotti, Frank J; Cherkiss, Michael S; Jeffery, Brian M; Elsey, Ruth M; Decker, Rachel A; Silliman, Brian R; Guillette, Louis J; Lowers, Russell H; Larson, Justin C

    2015-05-01

    Individual niche specialization (INS) is increasingly recognized as an important component of ecological and evolutionary dynamics. However, most studies that have investigated INS have focused on the effects of niche width and inter- and intraspecific competition on INS in small-bodied species for short time periods, with less attention paid to INS in large-bodied reptilian predators and the effects of available prey types on INS. We investigated the prevalence, causes, and consequences of INS in foraging behaviors across different populations of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis), the dominant aquatic apex predator across the southeast US, using stomach contents and stable isotopes. Gut contents revealed that, over the short term, although alligator populations occupied wide ranges of the INS spectrum, general patterns were apparent. Alligator populations inhabiting lakes exhibited lower INS than coastal populations, likely driven by variation in habitat type and available prey types. Stable isotopes revealed that over longer time spans alligators exhibited remarkably consistent use of variable mixtures of carbon pools (e.g., marine and freshwater food webs). We conclude that INS in large-bodied reptilian predator populations is likely affected by variation in available prey types and habitat heterogeneity, and that INS should be incorporated into management strategies to efficiently meet intended goals. Also, ecological models, which typically do not consider behavioral variability, should include INS to increase model realism and applicability.

  18. Factors affecting individual foraging specialization and temporal diet stability across the range of a large “generalist” apex predator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Adam E.; Nifong, James C.; Heithaus, Michael R.; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Jeffery, Brian M.; Elsey, Ruth M.; Decker, Rachel A.; Silliman, Brian R.; Guillette, Louis J.; Lowers, Russell H.; Larson, Justin C.

    2015-01-01

    Individual niche specialization (INS) is increasingly recognized as an important component of ecological and evolutionary dynamics. However, most studies that have investigated INS have focused on the effects of niche width and inter- and intraspecific competition on INS in small-bodied species for short time periods, with less attention paid to INS in large-bodied reptilian predators and the effects of available prey types on INS. We investigated the prevalence, causes, and consequences of INS in foraging behaviors across different populations of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis), the dominant aquatic apex predator across the southeast US, using stomach contents and stable isotopes. Gut contents revealed that, over the short term, although alligator populations occupied wide ranges of the INS spectrum, general patterns were apparent. Alligator populations inhabiting lakes exhibited lower INS than coastal populations, likely driven by variation in habitat type and available prey types. Stable isotopes revealed that over longer time spans alligators exhibited remarkably consistent use of variable mixtures of carbon pools (e.g., marine and freshwater food webs). We conclude that INS in large-bodied reptilian predator populations is likely affected by variation in available prey types and habitat heterogeneity, and that INS should be incorporated into management strategies to efficiently meet intended goals. Also, ecological models, which typically do not consider behavioral variability, should include INS to increase model realism and applicability.

  19. The synthesis of pi-electron molecular rods with a thiophene or thieno[3,2-b]thiophene core unit and sulfur alligator clips

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seidler, A.; Svoboda, J.; Dekoj, Václav; Vacek Chocholoušová, Jana; Vacek, Jaroslav; Stará, Irena G.; Starý, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 22 (2013), s. 2795-2798 ISSN 0040-4039 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400550919 Grant - others:Rada Programu interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR(CZ) M200550914 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : molecular wires * thiophene OPE rods * thiophene OPV rods * UV spectra * HOMO-LUMO gaps Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.391, year: 2013

  20. Influence of group II metals on Radium-226 concentration ratios in the native green plum (Buchanania obovata) from the Alligator Rivers Region, Northern Territory, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medley, Peter; Bollhöfer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    In this study, uptake of Ra from soil, and the influence of group II metals on Ra uptake, into the stones and edible flesh of the fruit of the wild green plum, Buchanania obovata, was investigated. Selective extraction of the exchangeable fraction of the soil samples was undertaken but was not shown to more reliably predict Ra uptake than total soil Ra activity concentration. Comparison of the group II metal to Ca ratios (i.e. Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca, Ra/Ca) in the flesh with exchangeable Ca shows that Ca outcompetes group II metals for root uptake and that the uptake pathway discriminated against group II metals relative to ionic radius, with uptake of Ca > Sr > Ba >> Ra. Flesh and stone analysis showed that movement of group II metals to these components of the plant, after root uptake, was strongly related. This supports the hypothesis that Sr, Ba and Ra are being taken up as analogue elements, and follow the same uptake and translocation pathways, with Ca. Comparison with previously reported data from a native passion fruit supports the use of total soil CRs on natural, undisturbed sites. As exchangeable CRs for Ra reach a saturation value it may be possible to make more precise predictions using selective extraction techniques for contaminated or disturbed sites. - Highlights: • We studied uptake of Ra-226 from soil into Buchanania obovata. • The influence of group II metals (Sr, Ba and Ca) on Ra uptake was investigated. • The exchangeable Ra fraction of the soil was not a more reliable predictor of Ra uptake than total soil Ra. • Ca outcompetes group II metals Sr, Ba and Ra for root uptake. • Uptake discriminated against group II metals relative to ionic radius, with uptake of Ca > Sr > Ba >> Ra.

  1. Managing the Ranger uranium mine in the Alligator Rivers Region -there is much more to this business enterprise than just production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggate, J.

    1984-01-01

    Environmental protection is very closely and continuously regulated at the Ranger uranium mine. Since the commencement of operations at Ranger the company has operated within these regulations and demonstrated clearly that yellowcake can be produced efficiently, economically and safely. The company also recognises that in order to ensure continuity of production, it will have to continue to operate within these strictly supervised regulations

  2. Phenotypic differentiation is associated with gender plasticity and its responsive delay to environmental changes in Alternanthera philoxeroides--phenotypic differentiation in alligator weed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    Full Text Available Phenotypic plasticity is common in many taxa, and it may increase an organism's fitness in heterogeneous environments. However, in some cases, the frequency of environmental changes can be faster than the ability of the individual to produce new adaptive phenotypes. The importance of such a time delay in terms of individual fitness and species adaptability has not been well studied. Here, we studied gender plasticity of Alternanthera philoxeroides to address this issue through a reciprocal transplant experiment. We observed that the genders of A. philoxeroides were plastic and reversible between monoclinous and pistillody depending on habitats, the offspring maintained the maternal genders in the first year but changed from year 2 to 5, and there was a cubic relationship between the rate of population gender changes and environmental variations. This relationship indicates that the species must overcome a threshold of environmental variations to switch its developmental path ways between the two genders. This threshold and the maternal gender stability cause a significant delay of gender changes in new environments. At the same time, they result in and maintain the two distinct habitat dependent gender phenotypes. We also observed that there was a significant and adaptive life-history differentiation between monoclinous and pistillody individuals and the gender phenotypes were developmentally linked with the life-history traits. Therefore, the gender phenotypes are adaptive. Low seed production, seed germination failure and matching phenotypes to habitats by gender plasticity indicate that the adaptive phenotypic diversity in A. philoxeroides may not be the result of ecological selection, but of gender plasticity. The delay of the adaptive gender phenotype realization in changing environments can maintain the differentiation between gender systems and their associated life-history traits, which may be an important component in evolution of novel traits and taxonomic diversity.

  3. Coronation Hill U-Au mine, South Alligator Valley, Northern Territory: an epigenetic sandstone-type deposit hosted by debris-flow conglomerate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Needham, R.S.; Stuart-Smith, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    The host rock at the Coronation Hill U-Au mine is a debris flow conglomerate, developed in a high-energy fluvial environment during deposition of the Coronation Sandstone of the El Sherana Group. Mineralisation took place by movement of low-temperature fluids from the U-enriched volcanics into the conduit sandstone and eventually into the reduced debris flow conglomerate and carbonaceous shale

  4. Effects of Methanol Seed Extract of Aframomum melegueta (Alligator Pepper on Wistar Rats with 2,4-Dinitrophenylhydrazine-induced Hemolytic Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damilola A. Omoboyowa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of parasitic infections such as malaria, which leads to decrease in hematological indices, the major cause of anemia, constitutes a serious health challenge in many developing countries such as Nigeria. This study investigated the effect of methanol seed extract of Aframomum melegueta on selected hematological indices of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH-induced anemic rats model. The toxicity study and qualitative phytochemical screening of the extract were carried out using standard procedure. Twenty Wistar rats were grouped into five of four rats each (n = 4. Group I: Normal control; Group II: Negative control; Group III: administered 20 ml/kg b.w. of Astifer (Standard drug; Group IV and V were administered 200 and 400 mg/kg b.w. of the extract, respectively. The animals of Groups II to V were induced with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (20 mg/kg b.w. once daily for seven consecutive days; their blood samples were collected by ocular puncture into heparinized capillary tubes for hematological analysis and animals with packed cell volume (PCV ≥ 30% reduction were considered anemic for the study. The result of the qualitative phytochemical analysis showed that the methanol extract tested positive to alkaloids, carbohydrate, saponins, flavonoids, steroids, terpenoids, and anthraquinones. Acute toxicity and lethality studies on methanol extract showed an oral LD50 equal or less than 5000 mg/kg b.w. in mice. The rats administered 20 ml/kg b.w. of Astifer showed significant (P 0.05 decrease in hemoglobin count, RBC, platelet, neutrophils and lymphocyte count compared with the normal control animals. The rats administered 400 mg/kg b.w. of A. melegueta showed significant (P 0.05 lower PCV, RBC, WBC count, and lymphocyte count compared with anemic rats administered with 0.3 ml of normal saline. It can be concluded that Aframomum melegueta seed has beneficial immunological and hematological properties in Wistar rats and possessed erythropoietic potentials at minimal dose that support its use for treating anemia.

  5. Continuous bottom temperature measurements in strategic areas of the Florida Reef Tract at Alligator Reef, 2007-2010 (NODC Accession 0093017)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this project is to document bottom seawater temperature in strategic areas of the Florida Reef Tract on a continuing basis and make that information...

  6. Large reptiles and cold temperatures: Do extreme cold spells set distributional limits for tropical reptiles in Florida?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotti, Frank J.; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Parry, Mark; Beauchamp, Jeff; Rochford, Mike; Smith, Brian J.; Hart, Kristen M.; Brandt, Laura A.

    2016-01-01

    Distributional limits of many tropical species in Florida are ultimately determined by tolerance to low temperature. An unprecedented cold spell during 2–11 January 2010, in South Florida provided an opportunity to compare the responses of tropical American crocodiles with warm-temperate American alligators and to compare the responses of nonnative Burmese pythons with native warm-temperate snakes exposed to prolonged cold temperatures. After the January 2010 cold spell, a record number of American crocodiles (n = 151) and Burmese pythons (n = 36) were found dead. In contrast, no American alligators and no native snakes were found dead. American alligators and American crocodiles behaved differently during the cold spell. American alligators stopped basking and retreated to warmer water. American crocodiles apparently continued to bask during extreme cold temperatures resulting in lethal body temperatures. The mortality of Burmese pythons compared to the absence of mortality for native snakes suggests that the current population of Burmese pythons in the Everglades is less tolerant of cold temperatures than native snakes. Burmese pythons introduced from other parts of their native range may be more tolerant of cold temperatures. We documented the direct effects of cold temperatures on crocodiles and pythons; however, evidence of long-term effects of cold temperature on their populations within their established ranges remains lacking. Mortality of crocodiles and pythons outside of their current established range may be more important in setting distributional limits.

  7. Multidisciplinary study of radionuclides and heavy-metal concentrations in wildlife on phosphate-mined and reclaimed lands. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pritchard, P.C.H.; Bloodwell, J.M.

    1986-11-01

    The phosphate-rich mineral deposits of central Florida tend to exhibit background radiation levels that are elevated due to the uranium and its decay products found in association with the ore. The report documents radioactivity levels in two groups of animals that had heretofore not been examined by other investigators -- aquatic reptiles (American alligators, softshell turtles, and Florida cooter turtles) and terrestrial mammals (armadillos), based on the criterion that these species have significant proportions of their mass comprised of bony tissue likely to show elevated concentrations of radium. The alligator bones contained only low concentrations of radium, and there were no significant differences between alligators collected from mined, mineralized-unmined, or unmineralized land. Whether the levels of radium in the bones of the turtles represents a hazard to the health of these long-lived animals or to humans who may consume their flesh is unclear

  8. A repeated-measures analysis of the effects of soft tissues on wrist range of motion in the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs: Implications for the functional origins of an automatic wrist folding mechanism in Crocodilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Joel David; Hutson, Kelda Nadine

    2014-07-01

    A recent study hypothesized that avian-like wrist folding in quadrupedal dinosaurs could have aided their distinctive style of locomotion with semi-pronated and therefore medially facing palms. However, soft tissues that automatically guide avian wrist folding rarely fossilize, and automatic wrist folding of unknown function in extant crocodilians has not been used to test this hypothesis. Therefore, an investigation of the relative contributions of soft tissues to wrist range of motion (ROM) in the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs, and the quadrupedal function of crocodilian wrist folding, could inform these questions. Here, we repeatedly measured wrist ROM in degrees through fully fleshed, skinned, minus muscles/tendons, minus ligaments, and skeletonized stages in the American alligator Alligator mississippiensis and the ostrich Struthio camelus. The effects of dissection treatment and observer were statistically significant for alligator wrist folding and ostrich wrist flexion, but not ostrich wrist folding. Final skeletonized wrist folding ROM was higher than (ostrich) or equivalent to (alligator) initial fully fleshed ROM, while final ROM was lower than initial ROM for ostrich wrist flexion. These findings suggest that, unlike the hinge/ball and socket-type elbow and shoulder joints in these archosaurs, ROM within gliding/planar diarthrotic joints is more restricted to the extent of articular surfaces. The alligator data indicate that the crocodilian wrist mechanism functions to automatically lock their semi-pronated palms into a rigid column, which supports the hypothesis that this palmar orientation necessitated soft tissue stiffening mechanisms in certain dinosaurs, although ROM-restricted articulations argue against the presence of an extensive automatic mechanism. Anat Rec, 297:1228-1249, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Implementing Herpetofaunal Inventory and Monitoring Efforts on Corps of Engineers Project Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    neonatal American alligators. Journal of Herpetology 31:318-321. Bailey, L. L., T. R. Simons, and K. H. Pollock. 2004. Estimating site occupancy and...Ecology of the turtle Pseudemys concinna in the New River, West Virginia. Journal of Herpetology 25:72-78. Burnham, K. P., D. R. Anderson, and J. L...and crocodilians, 6th edition. Lawrence, KA: The Center for North American Herpetology . Conant, R., and J. T. Collins. 1998. Reptiles and amphibians

  10. Characterization of Mediators of Cardiac And Renal Development in Response to Increased Prenatal Testosterone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    understanding of the long days and late nights, of my frustrations and stressed out rants, and above all her constant support and belief that this was the...whether the American alligator becomes a male or a female. While the environment does not determine the sex of human embryos, there is a large and...can potentially have negative consequences on fetal 4 development, such as hypoxia, maternal nutrition, hyperthermia, reduced placental blood flow

  11. Technique for the collection of clear urine from the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan G. Myburgh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Urine samples can be a very useful diagnostic tool for the evaluation of animal health. In this article, a simple technique to collect urine from the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus was described, based on a similar unpublished technique developed for the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis using a canine urinary catheter. With this technique, it was possible to collect relatively clean urine samples from Nile crocodiles of different sizes using canine urinary catheters or small diameter stomach tubes. Based on the gross anatomical features of the cloaca of the Nile crocodile, it was confirmed that urine accumulates in a chamber consisting of the urodeum and coprodeum. Faecal material is stored temporarily in the very short rectum, which is separated from the urinary chamber by the rectocoprodeal sphincter.

  12. Record length, mass, and clutch size in the nonindigenous Burmese Python, Python bivittatus Kuhl 1820 (Squamata: Pythonidae), in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysko, Kenneth L.; Hart, Kristen M.; Smith, Brian J.; Selby, Thomas H.; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Coutu, Nicholas T.; Reichart, Rebecca M.; Nuñez, Leroy P.; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Snow, Ray W.

    2012-01-01

    The Burmese Python, Python bivittatus Kuhl 1820 (Squamata: Pythonidae), is indigenous to northern India,east to southern China, and south to Vietnam and a few islands in Indonesia (Barker and Barker 2008, Reed and Rodda 2009). This species has been introduced since at least 1979 in southern Florida, USA, where it likely began reproducing and became established during the 1980s (Meshaka et al. 2000, Snowet al. 2007b,Kraus 2009, Krysko et al. 2011, Willson et al. 2011). Python bivittatus has been documented in Florida consuming a variety of mammals and birds, and the American Alligator(Alligator mississippiensis) (Snowet al. 2007a, 2007b; Harvey et al. 2008; Rochford et al. 2010b; Holbrook and Chesnes 2011), many of which are protected species. Herein, we provide details on two of the largest known wild P. bivittatus in Florida to date, including current records on length,mass,clutch size, and diet.

  13. African Journal of Biotechnology - Vol 7, No 17 (2008)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assesment of the water quality and prevalence of water borne diseases in Amassoma, Niger Delta, Nigeria · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT ... Eggshell membranes as a noninvasive sampling for molecular studies of Chinese alligators (Alligator sinensis) · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL ...

  14. Revised stratigraphic nomenclature and correlation of early proterozoic rocks of the Darwin - Katherine region, Northern Territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Needham, R.S.; Stuart-Smith, P.G.

    1984-01-01

    New stratigraphic names and correlations are given for parts of the Early Proterozoic Pine Creek Geosyncline metasedimentary sequence and overlying felsic volcanics of the Darwin-Katherine region. They have significant implications for the stratigraphic distribution of uranium mineralisation in the Rum Jungle, Alligator Rivers and South Alligator Valley uranium fields

  15. Binding of tryptophan and iron by reptilion plasnna proteins

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    transport functions. Albumin of the alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) and other reptiles binds, amongst other ions, tryptophan (McMenamy & Watson 1968) and transferrin binds iron (Barber & Sheeler 1963). Multiple transferrins are present in the plasma of many reptiles. (Dessauer et af 1962) and the albumin region of the.

  16. Feeding mechanics in spinosaurid theropods and extant crocodilians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R Cuff

    Full Text Available A number of extant and extinct archosaurs evolved an elongate, narrow rostrum. This longirostrine condition has been associated with a diet comprising a higher proportion of fish and smaller prey items compared to taxa with broader, more robust snouts. The evolution of longirostrine morphology and a bulbous anterior rosette of premaxillary teeth also occurs in the spinosaurid theropod dinosaurs, leading to suggestions that at least some members of this clade also had a diet comprising a notable proportion of fish or other small vertebrates. Here we compare the rostral biomechanics of the spinosaurs Baryonyx walkeri and Spinosaurus c.f. S. aegyptiacus to three extant crocodilians: two longistrine taxa, the African slender-snouted crocodile Mecistops cataphractus and the Indian gharial Gavialis gangeticus; and the American alligator Alligator mississippiensis. Using computed tomography (CT data, the second moments of area and moments of inertia at successive transverse slices along the rostrum were calculated for each of the species. Size-independent results tested the biomechanical benefits of material distribution within the rostra. The two spinosaur rostra were both digitally reconstructed from CT data and compared against all three crocodilians. Results show that African slender-snouted crocodile skulls are more resistant to bending than an equivalent sized gharial. The alligator has the highest resistances to bending and torsion of the crocodiles for its size and greater than that of the spinosaurs. The spinosaur rostra possess similar resistance to bending and torsion despite their different morphologies. When size is accounted for, B. walkeri performs mechanically differently from the gharial, contradicting previous studies whereas Spinosaurus does not. Biomechanical data support known feeding ecology for both African slender-snouted crocodile and alligator, and suggest that the spinosaurs were not obligate piscivores with diet being

  17. Pulmonary anatomy in the Nile crocodile and the evolution of unidirectional airflow in Archosauria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma R. Schachner

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The lungs of birds have long been known to move air in only one direction during both inspiration and expiration through most of the tubular gas-exchanging bronchi (parabronchi. Recently a similar pattern of airflow has been observed in American alligators, a sister taxon to birds. The pattern of flow appears to be due to the arrangement of the primary and secondary bronchi, which, via their branching angles, generate inspiratory and expiratory aerodynamic valves. Both the anatomical similarity of the avian and alligator lung and the similarity in the patterns of airflow raise the possibility that these features are plesiomorphic for Archosauria and therefore did not evolve in response to selection for flapping flight or an endothermic metabolism, as has been generally assumed. To further test the hypothesis that unidirectional airflow is ancestral for Archosauria, we measured airflow in the lungs of the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus. As in birds and alligators, air flows cranially to caudally in the cervical ventral bronchus, and caudally to cranially in the dorsobronchi in the lungs of Nile crocodiles. We also visualized the gross anatomy of the primary, secondary and tertiary pulmonary bronchi of C. niloticus using computed tomography (CT and microCT. The cervical ventral bronchus, cranial dorsobronchi and cranial medial bronchi display similar characteristics to their proposed homologues in the alligator, while there is considerable variation in the tertiary and caudal group bronchi. Our data indicate that the aspects of the crocodilian bronchial tree that maintain the aerodynamic valves and thus generate unidirectional airflow, are ancestral for Archosauria.

  18. Personnel and Vehicle Data Collection at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) and its Distribution for Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    28 Magnetometer Applied Physics Model 1540-digital 3-axis fluxgate 5 Amplifiers Alligator Technologies USBPGF-S1 programmable instrumentation...Acoustic, Seismic, magnetic, footstep, vehicle, magnetometer , geophone, unattended ground sensor (UGS) 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION

  19. Identification and phylogenetic analysis of a bacterium isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-04

    Jul 4, 2008 ... 2Anhui Research Center for Reproduction of Chinese alligator, Xuancheng, 242000, ... Before releasing, health screening protocols on individuals are very necessary. ... can be used in systems classification study of different.

  20. International Journal of Community Research http://www.arpjournals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-31

    Jul 31, 2016 ... This study was done to find out if aqueous extract of alligator pepper can prevent the development of fetal ... in preventing the development of fetal macrosomia in .... Adipose Tissue in human subjects (Sugita et al.,. 2013).

  1. Effect of Combined Intake of Garcinia Kola and Ascorbic Acid on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proximate and nutritional composition of kola nut, garcinia kola and alligator pepper. African Journal ... primarily carried bound to albumin in the blood and only a minor amount is ... increased oxida ve stress. With regular intake, the ascorbic ...

  2. Alternanthera philoxeroides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-03-16

    Mar 16, 2015 ... netic classification of alligator weed, all unigene sequences were analysed against the COG ... least genes were found in the 'extracellular structures'. Table 3. Summary of ... Ether lipid metabolism. 177. Plant hormone signal ...

  3. African Journal of Biotechnology - Vol 8, No 2 (2009)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enhanced production of glucose oxidase from UVmutant of Aspergillus niger · EMAIL ... bitter cola (Garcinia cola) and alligator pepper (Afromomum melegueta) ... Comparison of blood indices in healthy and fungal infected Caspian salmon ...

  4. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-01-31

    Jan 31, 2015 ... EFFECT OF AQUEOUS EXTRACT OF ALLIGATOR PEPPER (AFRAMOMUM ... Blood samples from the experimental animals in group B, C, D and E were ... glucose in alloxan induced diabetic rats faster than the conventional ...

  5. Description of electrophoretic loci and tissue specific gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1994-02-09

    Feb 9, 1994 ... alligators (Dessauer & Densmore 1983), lizards of the Xan- tusiidae (Bezy ..... expressed in red blood cells, and Esa-5 in brain (Harris &. Hopkinson ... catalyses the conversion of glucose to gluconic acid (Harris &. Hopkinson ...

  6. Transmyocardial Laser Revascularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... idea for TMLR by studying the hearts of alligators and snakes, where blood to feed the heart ... They also have a lower risk of heart attack. Tags: coronary artery bypass , coronary artery disease (CAD) , ...

  7. Best Practices for Construction and Repair of Bridge Approaches and Departures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) has experienced frequent distresses in bridge approach/departure asphalt pavements in its highway system. Commonly observed distresses include alligator cracking and rutting, which reduce roadway smoothness...

  8. Australian uranium - the environmental issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saddler, H.

    1980-01-01

    The principal theme of this paper is the changing pattern of issues which have dominated the environmental debate over uranium mining in Australia. These issues include the safeguards policy, a domestic energy policy, nuclear waste, economic development, particular environmental problems of the Alligator Rivers region and the social impact of uranium mining on the Aborigines. The special administrative arrangements which the Government has established for environmental protection in the Alligator Rivers region are outlined

  9. Southern marl prairies conceptual ecological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S.M.; Loftus, W.F.; Gaiser, E.E.; Huffman, A.E.

    2005-01-01

    About 190,000 ha of higher-elevation marl prairies flank either side of Shark River Slough in the southern Everglades. Water levels typically drop below the ground surface each year in this landscape. Consequently, peat soil accretion is inhibited, and substrates consist either of calcitic marl produced by algal periphyton mats or exposed limestone bedrock. The southern marl prairies support complex mosaics of wet prairie, sawgrass sawgrass (Cladium jamaicense), tree islands, and tropical hammock communities and a high diversity of plant species. However, relatively short hydroperiods and annual dry downs provide stressful conditions for aquatic fauna, affecting survival in the dry season when surface water is absent. Here, we present a conceptual ecological model developed for this landscape through scientific concensus, use of empirical data, and modeling. The two major societal drivers affecting the southern marl prairies are water management practices and agricultural and urban development. These drivers lead to five groups of ecosystem stressors: loss of spatial extent and connectivity, shortened hydroperiod and increased drought severity, extended hydroperiod and drying pattern reversals, introduction and spread of non-native trees, and introduction and spread of non-native fishes. Major ecological attributes include periphyton mats, plant species diversity and community mosaic, Cape Sable seaside sparrow (Ammodramus maritimus mirabilis), marsh fishes and associated aquatic fauna prey base, American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), and wading bird early dry season foraging. Water management and development are hypothesized to have a negative effect on the ecological attributes of the southern marl prairies in the following ways. Periphyton mats have decreased in cover in areas where hydroperiod has been significantly reduced and changed in community composition due to inverse responses to increased nutrient availability. Plant species diversity and

  10. Towards an understanding of the evolution of the chorioallantoic placenta: steroid biosynthesis and steroid hormone signaling in the chorioallantoic membrane of an oviparous reptile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruze, Lori; Kohno, Satomi; McCoy, Michael W; Guillette, Louis J

    2012-09-01

    Amniotes, mammals, reptiles, and birds form common extraembryonic membranes during development to perform essential functions, such as protection, nutrient transfer, gas exchange, and waste removal. Together with the maternal uterus, extraembryonic membranes of viviparous (live-bearing) amniotes develop as an endocrine placenta that synthesizes and responds to steroid hormones critical for development. The ability of these membranes to synthesize and respond to steroid hormone signaling has traditionally been considered an innovation of placental amniotes. However, our laboratory recently demonstrated that this ability extends to the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of an oviparous (egg-laying) amniote, the domestic chicken, and we hypothesized that steroidogenic extraembryonic membranes could be an evolutionarily conserved characteristic of all amniotes because of similarities in basic structure, function, and shared evolutionary ancestry. In this study, we examined steroid hormone synthesis and signaling in the CAM of another oviparous amniote, the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis). We quantified mRNA expression of a steroidogenic factor involved in the regulation of steroidogenesis (NR5A1), the key steroidogenic enzymes involved in the synthesis of progestins (HSD3B1), androgens (CYP17A1), and estrogens (CYP19A1), and the receptors involved in the signaling of progestins (PR), androgens (AR), estrogens (ESR1 and ESR2), and glucocorticoids (GR). Furthermore, we performed protein immunolocalization for PR and ESR1. Collectively, our findings indicate that the alligator CAM has the capability to regulate, synthesize, and respond to steroid hormone signaling, thus, supporting our hypothesis that the extraembryonic membranes of Amniota share a unifying characteristic, that is, the ability to synthesize and respond to steroid hormones.

  11. American Women and American Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmaj, Betty E.

    The American Studies Association (ASA) is an interprofessional group, representing a cross-section of persons from American literature, American history, the social sciences, philosophy, archeology, Black Studies, Urban Studies, American Studies, and others. This document by the ASA Commission on the Status of Women includes: (1) a report of the…

  12. Haitian Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catanese, Anthony V.

    1998-01-01

    Uses 1990 U.S. Census data to show the changing demographic profile of Haitian Americans. Haitian Americans are likely to live along the Atlantic seaboard and to have relatively low, although not the lowest, incomes. However, the demographic mosaic of Haitian Americans is diverse, showing the effects of Haitian national and ethnic history. (SLD)

  13. Three crocodilian genomes reveal ancestral patterns of evolution among archosaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Richard E; Braun, Edward L; Armstrong, Joel; Earl, Dent; Nguyen, Ngan; Hickey, Glenn; Vandewege, Michael W; St John, John A; Capella-Gutiérrez, Salvador; Castoe, Todd A; Kern, Colin; Fujita, Matthew K; Opazo, Juan C; Jurka, Jerzy; Kojima, Kenji K; Caballero, Juan; Hubley, Robert M; Smit, Arian F; Platt, Roy N; Lavoie, Christine A; Ramakodi, Meganathan P; Finger, John W; Suh, Alexander; Isberg, Sally R; Miles, Lee; Chong, Amanda Y; Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Gongora, Jaime; Moran, Christopher; Iriarte, Andrés; McCormack, John; Burgess, Shane C; Edwards, Scott V; Lyons, Eric; Williams, Christina; Breen, Matthew; Howard, Jason T; Gresham, Cathy R; Peterson, Daniel G; Schmitz, Jürgen; Pollock, David D; Haussler, David; Triplett, Eric W; Zhang, Guojie; Irie, Naoki; Jarvis, Erich D; Brochu, Christopher A; Schmidt, Carl J; McCarthy, Fiona M; Faircloth, Brant C; Hoffmann, Federico G; Glenn, Travis C; Gabaldón, Toni; Paten, Benedict; Ray, David A

    2015-01-01

    To provide context for the diversifications of archosaurs, the group that includes crocodilians, dinosaurs and birds, we generated draft genomes of three crocodilians, Alligator mississippiensis (the American alligator), Crocodylus porosus (the saltwater crocodile), and Gavialis gangeticus (the Indian gharial). We observed an exceptionally slow rate of genome evolution within crocodilians at all levels, including nucleotide substitutions, indels, transposable element content and movement, gene family evolution, and chromosomal synteny. When placed within the context of related taxa including birds and turtles, this suggests that the common ancestor of all of these taxa also exhibited slow genome evolution and that the relatively rapid evolution of bird genomes represents an autapomorphy within that clade. The data also provided the opportunity to analyze heterozygosity in crocodilians, which indicates a likely reduction in population size for all three taxa through the Pleistocene. Finally, these new data combined with newly published bird genomes allowed us to reconstruct the partial genome of the common ancestor of archosaurs providing a tool to investigate the genetic starting material of crocodilians, birds, and dinosaurs. PMID:25504731

  14. American Illuminations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nye, David

    Illuminated fêtes and civic celebrations began in Renaissance Italy and spread through the courts of Europe. Their fireworks, torches, lamps, and special effects glorified the monarch, marked the birth of a prince, or celebrated military victory. Nineteenth-century Americans rejected such monarch...

  15. Comparative histology of some craniofacial sutures and skull-base synchondroses in non-avian dinosaurs and their extant phylogenetic bracket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailleul, Alida M; Horner, John R

    2016-08-01

    Sutures and synchondroses, the fibrous and cartilaginous articulations found in the skulls of vertebrates, have been studied for many biological applications at the morphological scale. However, little is known about these articulations at the microscopic scale in non-mammalian vertebrates, including extant archosaurs (birds and crocodilians). The major goals of this paper were to: (i) document the microstructure of some sutures and synchondroses through ontogeny in archosaurs; (ii) compare these microstructures with previously published sutural histology (i.e. that of mammals); and (iii) document how these articulations with different morphological degrees of closure (open or obliterated) appear histologically. This was performed with histological analyses of skulls of emus, American alligators, a fossil crocodilian and ornithischian dinosaurs (hadrosaurids, pachycephalosaurids and ceratopsids). Emus and mammals possess a sutural periosteum until sutural fusion, but it disappears rapidly during ontogeny in American alligators. This study identified seven types of sutural mineralized tissues in extant and extinct archosaurs and grouped them into four categories: periosteal tissues; acellular tissues; fibrous tissues; and intratendinous tissues. Due to the presence of a periosteum in their sutures, emus and mammals possess periosteal tissues at their sutural borders. The mineralized sutural tissues of crocodilians and ornithischian dinosaurs are more variable and can also develop via a form of necrosis for acellular tissues and metaplasia for fibrous and intratendinous tissues. It was hypothesized that non-avian dinosaurs, like the American alligator, lacked a sutural periosteum and that their primary mode of ossification involved the direct mineralization of craniofacial sutures (instead of intramembranous ossification found in mammals and birds). However, we keep in mind that a bird-like sutural microstructure might have arisen within non-avian saurichians. While

  16. American Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. O. Pechatnov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The "Founding fathers" of American Studies at MGIMO are considered to be A.V. Efimov and L.I. Clove. Alexey Efimov - Corresponding Member of the USSR Academy of Sciences since 1938, Head of the Department of Modern and Contemporary History and Dean of the Historical School at the Moscow State University - one of the first professors of the Faculty of International Relations MGIMO. Efimov distinguished himself by a broad vision and scope of scientific interests. Back in 1934 he published a monograph "On the history of capitalism in the United States," which initiated a series of research culminating in the fundamental work "The United States. The path of capitalist development (pre-imperialist era". Alexey was not only a great scientist but also a great teacher, whose lectures was popular throughout Moscow. His lecture courses, given at the end of the 1940s at MGIMO, became the basis for the first post-war history textbooks USA - "Essays on the history of the United States." At least as colorful a figure was Professor Leo Izrailevich Zubok - a man of unusual destiny. As a teenager he emigrated to the United States with his parents, where he soon joined the American revolutionary movement in the 1920s and was forced to leave the country. He came to MGIMO being already an experienced scientists. His research interests were very wide: from the study of American foreign policy expansion to the history of the labor movement in the United States. Zubok's fundamental works still have not lost its scientific significance. He has successfully combined scientific work with teaching. Tutorials that are based on his lectures were very popular not only among students of MGIMO.

  17. Profile: Asian Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Asian American Profile: Asian Americans Asian American Profile (Map of the US with the top 10 states displaying the largest Asian American population according to the Census Bureau) CA - ...

  18. Immunizations and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data > Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Immunizations Immunizations and African Americans African American adults are less ... 19 to 35 months had comparable rates of immunization. African American women are as likely to have ...

  19. Operation of south Texas Project, Units 1 and 2, Docket Nos. 50-498 and 50-499, Houston Lighting and Power Company et. al., Matagorda County, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    The draft version of the environmental impact statement, EPA No. 860106D, deals with licensing a startup of Units 1 and 2 of the South Texas Project, both pressurized water reactors. The plant will permanently eliminate over 3000 acres of farmland and affect another 6000 acres of neighboring farmland. It will discharge cooling water into the Colorado River. Mitigation plans call for 1700 acres of bottom land to become a wildlife preserve and for no use of herbicides in grazing areas. Positive impacts will be increased employment for the area with a corresponding increase in revenues. Negative impacts may be changes in marsh productivity and species composition. There may be a loss of habitat for the American alligator. Risks associated with the accidental release of radiation are rated as very low. The Federal Water Pollution Control Act of 1972 and Nuclear Regulatory Commission Licensing provide legal mandates

  20. Thinking with Crocodiles: An Iconic Animal at the Intersection of Early-Modern Religion and Natural Philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreich, Spencer J

    2015-01-01

    This paper seeks to explore how culturally and religiously significant animals could shape discourses in which they were deployed, taking the crocodile as its case study. Beginning with the textual and visual traditions linking the crocodile with Africa and the Middle East, I read sixteenth- and seventeenth-century travel narratives categorizing American reptiles as "crocodiles" rather than "alligators," as attempts to mitigate the disruptive strangeness of the Americas. The second section draws on Ann Blair's study of "Mosaic Philosophy" to examine scholarly debates over the taxonomic identity of the biblical Leviathan. I argue that the language and analytical tools of natural philosophy progressively permeated religious discourse. Finally, a survey of more than 25 extant examples of the premodern practice of displaying crocodiles in churches, as well as other crocodilian elements in Christian iconography, provides an explanation for the ubiquity of crocodiles in Wunderkammern, as natural philosophy appropriated ecclesial visual vocabularies.

  1. Reptiles and Amphibians as Potential Reservoir Hosts of Chikungunya Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco-Lauth, Angela M; Hartwig, Airn E; Bowen, Richard A

    2018-03-01

    Chikungunya virus is an emerging arbovirus of significant human-health concern. Little is known about its sylvatic cycle, including whether ectothermic vertebrates are permissive to infection. In this study, individuals from ten species of reptiles and amphibians were inoculated with chikungunya virus and samples of blood were tested to characterize viremia and seroconversion. Viremia was not detected in cane toads, house geckos, or American alligators, but most of the green iguanas, red-eared sliders, ball and Burmese pythons, leopard frogs, Texas toads, and garter snakes developed viremia. Peak virus titers in serum of up to 4.5, 4.7, and 5.1 log 10 plaque-forming units per milliliter were observed for garter snakes, ball pythons, and Texas toads, respectively. These results add to those of other studies that have suggested a possible role for ectothermic vertebrates in the ecology of arbovirus maintenance and transmission in nature.

  2. AMERICAN EXCEPTIONALISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana-Andreea Pirnuta

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In an interconnected world where foreign relations matter not only for resources or military alliances but also for cultural relationships, it is highly important to have a better understanding of the power relations among nations. The information carries certain meanings that have important outcomes thus defining the power of a given nation. Foreign policy is the channel through which global politics is exercised. International politics is a hierarchy of power being determined by important cultural, economic as well as geographical aspects. The reasons and strategies that are used in order to reach the outcomes in global politics represent the focus of the present paper. The United States has been the leader in international politics since the early 20th century due to its vast resources and wealth as well as its cultural output. America’s interest in preserving a democratic and free world has its foundation in the beliefs and values it stands for the aim of this paper is to question whether or not there is a concrete premise for the idea of American exceptionalism.

  3. Obesity and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data > Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Obesity Obesity and African Americans African American women have the ... youthonline . [Accessed 08/18/2017] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY People who are overweight are more likely to ...

  4. Native Americans with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Read the MMWR Science Clips Native Americans with Diabetes Better diabetes care can decrease kidney failure Language: ... between 1996 and 2013. Problem Kidney failure from diabetes was highest among Native Americans. Native Americans are ...

  5. Obesity and Hispanic Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Obesity Obesity and Hispanic Americans Among Mexican American women, 77 percent are overweight ... inhqrdr/data/query At a Glace – Risk Factors: Obesity is a risk ... Americans Heart Disease – See Heart Disease and Hispanic Americans ...

  6. Deer-Auto Collisions in Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Believe it or not, when it comes to our worst enemy in the animal kingdom, sharks, alligators, snakes and other commonly feared animals need not apply. In fact, none of the "terrifying" animals portrayed as " killers" in our culture are responsible f...

  7. Uranium mining and indigenous social impact issues - Kakadu Region, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellings, P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports on indigenous social impact issues in the Kakadu/Alligators Rivers region of Australia. It briefly outlines the social history of the region, reflects on local, national and international attention being given to the impact of regional development on local indigenous (bininj) people, notes how social impact issues are being addressed and suggests some lessons learnt. (author)

  8. Getting Crafty with the NGSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofel-Grehl, Colby; Litts, Breanne; Searle, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, electricity and circuits are taught using alligator clips, lightbulbs, batteries, and wires. Although these circuits engage students in building, they don't always provide opportunities for students to deeply explore energy, electricity, polarity, and circuitry. Multimedia Circuits is a curricular unit made up of three projects that…

  9. Uranium and the park : or how to research and assess the environmental impact of a uranium mine on an adjacent park that features on the world heritage list

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    The activities of the Office of the Supervising Scientist, established to protect the Alligator Rivers Region in the Northern Territory of Australia from the potential effects of uranium mining operations, are described. Research which accounts for 75 per cent of the Office's biology, plant ecology, environmental chemistry, environmental radioactivity and man, environmental modelling and geomorphology

  10. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 60 ... Vol 1, No 2 (2012), Assessment of the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in ... Vol 5, No 3 (2016), Effect of aqueous extract of alligator pepper ... antigen sero-positivity and Hepatitis C virus among voluntary blood ...

  11. Do bark beetle sprays prevent Phloeosinus species from attacking cypress and juniper?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris Hayes; Tom DeGomez; Karen Clancy; Joel McMillin; John Anhold

    2008-01-01

    (Please note, this is an abstract only) Phloeosinus-caused mortality of Arizona cypress, (Cupressus arizonica), oneseed juniper, (Juniperus monosperma) and alligator juniper, (J. deppeana) has been observed at high levels in Arizona during the past 3 years. Currently, there are limited preventative measures to protect high-value cypress and juniper trees against...

  12. Australia and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    A brief justification of the Australian Government's decision to mine and export Australian Uranium is presented along with a description of the Alligator River Region in the Northern Territory where the major mines are to be located. Aboriginal interests and welfare in the region, the proposed Kakadu National Park and the economic benefits resulting from uranium development are also briefly covered. (J.R.)

  13. Science: What Reptiles Are and Aren't

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Gerry S.

    1978-01-01

    Many children have an enormous fascination for reptiles of all kinds--snakes, turtles, tortoises, crocodiles, alligators and lizards. Whatever the reason for their interest, you can channel the enthusiasm of reptile fans and build the interest of curious students with a few simple activities, e.g., getting acquainted with reptile characteristics…

  14. Pramana – Journal of Physics | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The conductance of a single molecule transport junction comprising anthracene molecular junction (AMJ) with fullerene as alligator clips was investigated using a b − i n i t i o density functional theory (DFT) in the Landauer–Imry regime of coherent tunnelling transport. In our previous research, we have already calculatedthe ...

  15. Modeling Uranium Transport in Koongarra, Australia: The Effect of a Moving Weathering Zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijnse, A.; Weerd, van de H.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.

    2001-01-01

    Natural analogues are an important source of long-term data and may be viewed as naturally occurring experiments that often include processes, phenomena, and scenarios that are important to nuclear waste disposal safety assessment studies. The Koongarra uranium deposit in the Alligator Rivers region

  16. Mining and energy in the Northern Territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Included in this book is a section on each of the major minerals of present or future importance to the Northern Territory. Brief details of the uranium mining projects at Nabarlek, Ranger, Koongarra and Jabiluka in the Alligator Rivers regions are given. Subjects such as environmental protection, Aboriginal land rights and the geology of the area are also considered

  17. The regulation of uranium mining in the Northern Territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedd, M.

    1989-01-01

    The regulatory framework developed for uranium mining operations in the Northern Territory is reviewed. The respective roles of the Commonwealth Government, State Government and other regulatory authority are described. Whilst complex, expensive and cumbersome the regulatory process has so far ensured input from diverse interest groups and it allowed for environmental protection control in the Alligator River Region

  18. Sand Dredging Operations in Lafourche Parish, Near Leeville, Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    hunting was permitted during 1979. However, there are no permits to kill alligators issued for areas below the 10 parts per thousand isohaline line...Northern House Wern Thryothorus ludovicianus Carolina Wren IMimus polyglottos Northern Mockingbird Dumetella carolinensis Cray Catbird Toxostoma rufum

  19. Uranium Mining (Environment Control) Act 1979 No 46 of 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this Act is to control the mining of uranium in the Alligator Rivers Region with a view to lessening any damage which may be caused to the environment. The Act provides for the control of mining of certain substances, for an authorization system for construction and use of facilities, equipment and processes as well as for environmental protection requirements. (NEA) [fr

  20. The geomorphology of the wet and dry tropics and problems associated with the storage of uranium tailings in Northern Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, R.F.; Pickup, G.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the principal landforms of the Alligator Rivers Region Uranium Province of Northern Australia, reviews work on landforms and processes in this wet and dry tropical environment, and discusses the kinds of geomorphological hazards which might be encountered in disposing of uranium tailings at the Nabarlek, Ranger, Koongarra and Jabiluka Uranium Project Sites

  1. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    determined and the 1:1 sex ratio is maintained. In many species of reptiles, environmental factors such as temperature play an important role in determining the sex ratio (Head et al. 1987). For example, in alligators, crocodiles and turtles, during the early stages of embryogenesis, temperature has a determining effect on the ...

  2. Environment Protection (Northern Territory Supreme Court) Act 1978, No.30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This Act relates to the enforcement by the Supreme Court of the Northern Territory of certain provisions for protecting the environment in the Alligator Rivers Region; it provides that the Supreme Court has jurisdiction to make orders concerning enforcement of provisions relating to the environmental effects in the Region of uranium mining operations. (NEA) [fr

  3. STYLET PENETRATION BEHAVIOURS OF FOUR Cicadulina ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Feeding from phloem cells, overall probing and probe mean (the average time per probe) were higher ... Key Words: Cicadulina spp., electrical penetration graph, MSV, Zea mays .... wire and alligator clip clamped to the stem of the .... á All measures are in minutes except for frequency of probing; - Main effect not significant.

  4. Pace's Maxims for Homegrown Library Projects. Coming Full Circle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Andrew K.

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses six maxims by which to run library automation. The following maxims are discussed: (1) Solve only known problems; (2) Avoid changing data to fix display problems; (3) Aut viam inveniam aut faciam; (4) If you cannot make it yourself, buy something; (5) Kill the alligator closest to the boat; and (6) Just because yours is…

  5. Molecular evolution and expression of archosaurian β-keratins: diversification and expansion of archosaurian β-keratins and the origin of feather β-keratins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwold, Matthew J; Sawyer, Roger H

    2013-09-01

    The archosauria consist of two living groups, crocodilians, and birds. Here we compare the structure, expression, and phylogeny of the beta (β)-keratins in two crocodilian genomes and two avian genomes to gain a better understanding of the evolutionary origin of the feather β-keratins. Unlike squamates such as the green anole with 40 β-keratins in its genome, the chicken and zebra finch genomes have over 100 β-keratin genes in their genomes, while the American alligator has 20 β-keratin genes, and the saltwater crocodile has 21 β-keratin genes. The crocodilian β-keratins are similar to those of birds and these structural proteins have a central filament domain and N- and C-termini, which contribute to the matrix material between the twisted β-sheets, which form the 2-3 nm filament. Overall the expression of alligator β-keratin genes in the integument increases during development. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrates that a crocodilian β-keratin clade forms a monophyletic group with the avian scale and feather β-keratins, suggesting that avian scale and feather β-keratins along with a subset of crocodilian β-keratins evolved from a common ancestral gene/s. Overall, our analyses support the view that the epidermal appendages of basal archosaurs used a diverse array of β-keratins, which evolved into crocodilian and avian specific clades. In birds, the scale and feather subfamilies appear to have evolved independently in the avian lineage from a subset of archosaurian claw β-keratins. The expansion of the avian specific feather β-keratin genes accompanied the diversification of birds and the evolution of feathers. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Obesity and Asian Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Asian American > Obesity Obesity and Asian Americans Non-Hispanic whites are 60% ... youthonline . [Accessed 08/18/2017] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY People who are overweight are more likely to ...

  7. American Society of Echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Society of Echocardiography Join Ase Renew Member Portal Log In Membership Member Portal Log In Join ASE Renew Benefits Rates FASE – Fellow of the American Society of Echocardiography Member Referral Program FAQs Initiatives Advocacy Awards, Grants, ...

  8. Asthma and Hispanic Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Asthma Asthma and Hispanic Americans In 2015, 2.2 million Hispanics reported that they currently have asthma. Puerto Rican Americans have almost twice the asthma ...

  9. Unlearning American Patriotism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Richard W.

    2007-01-01

    Immoral excesses of American foreign policy are so severe and so deep-rooted that American patriotism is now a moral burden. This love, which pulls toward amnesia, wishful thinking and inattention to urgent foreign interests, should be replaced by commitment to a global social movement that seeks to hem in the American empire. Teachers can advance…

  10. Heart Disease and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Heart Disease Heart Disease and African Americans Although African American adults are ... were 30 percent more likely to die from heart disease than non-Hispanic whites. African American women are ...

  11. The American Dream

    OpenAIRE

    Önnerth, Lars; Neubert, Mikkel; Omerbasic, Dejan; Heyman, Minch; Kimberly, Marie; Nielsen, Lyngbo; Mynte, Anne; Hørlyck Kaastrup, Markus

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the phenomenon that is the American Dream and its effect on the working and upper class citizens in American society. To give context to the American dream and its origin, we have made use of professor Jim Cullen’s book “The American Dream: A Short Story of an Idea that Shaped a Nation” from 2003. We have identified what we decided to call the “the traditional dream” and “the modern dream”, both representing different outlooks on lives and ethical standards. We have done t...

  12. Help-Seeking Experiences and Attitudes among African American, Asian American, and European American College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Akihiko; Anderson, Page L.; Twohig, Michael P.; Feinstein, Amanda B.; Chou, Ying-Yi; Wendell, Johanna W.; Stormo, Analia R.

    2009-01-01

    The study examined African American, Asian American, and European American college students' previous direct and indirect experiences of seeking professional psychological services and related attitudes. Survey data were collected from 254 European American, 182 African American and 82 Asian American college students. Results revealed that fewer…

  13. Close relationships between asian american and european american college students

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, C; Edwards, K; Young, B; Greenberger, E

    2001-01-01

    The authors examined attitudes and behaviors regarding close relationships between European and Asian Americans, with a particular emphasis on 5 major subgroups of Asian Americans (Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, and Filipino Americans). Participants were 218 Asian American college students and 171 European American college students attending a culturally diverse university. The European Americans did not differentiate among the various subgroups of Asian Americans. Their attitudes reg...

  14. American Thyroid Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... More October 20, 2017 0 American Thyroid Association: Charles H. Emerson, MD, Will Lead New Board of Directors By ATA | 2017 ... Featured , News Releases | No Comments American Thyroid Association: Charles H. Emerson, MD, Will Lead New Board of Directors October 19,… Read ...

  15. The Quiet American Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legters, Lyman H.

    1984-01-01

    What is wrong in the American parochialism about foreign languages is the assumption that language acquisition is a cosmetic gain, without any immediate or forseeable practical use. Languages will only be learned effectively when Americans learn that they can be used in getting tasks accomplished. (MSE)

  16. American Studies in Transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nye, David

    Papers first given at a conference the previous year in Fåborg, Denmark, with a dual focus on 20th century America and new methods in American Studies.......Papers first given at a conference the previous year in Fåborg, Denmark, with a dual focus on 20th century America and new methods in American Studies....

  17. Asian American Cultural Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libretti, Tim

    1997-01-01

    Explores the encounter of Marxism and Asian American literary theory and imagines an Asian American Marxism. To do so requires theorizing race, class, and gender not as substantive categories of antagonisms but as complementary and coordinated elements of a totality of social relations structuring racial patriarchal capitalism. (SLD)

  18. The Mexican American.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Helen

    The purpose of this paper, prepared for the U. S. Commission on Civil Rights, is to indicate the types and ranges of problems facing the Mexican American community and to suggest ways in which these problems are peculiar to Mexican Americans. Specific examples are cited to illustrate major problems and personal experiences. Topics covered in the…

  19. African American Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    African American Suicide Fact Sheet Based on 2012 Data (2014) Overview • In 2012, 2,357 African Americans completed suicide in the U.S. Of these, 1,908 (80. ... rate of 9.23 per 100,000). The suicide rate for females was 1.99 per 100, ...

  20. Teaching American Indian Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchell, Dick

    1991-01-01

    Reviews "Native American Architecture," by Nabokov and Easton, an encyclopedic work that examines technology, climate, social structure, economics, religion, and history in relation to house design and the "meaning" of space among tribes of nine regions. Describes this book's use in a college course on Native American architecture. (SV)

  1. Close relationships between Asian American and European American college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C; Edwards, K; Young, B; Greenberger, E

    2001-02-01

    The authors examined attitudes and behaviors regarding close relationships between European and Asian Americans, with a particular emphasis on 5 major subgroups of Asian Americans (Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, and Filipino Americans). Participants were 218 Asian American college students and 171 European American college students attending a culturally diverse university. The European Americans did not differentiate among the various subgroups of Asian Americans. Their attitudes regarding close relationships were less positive toward Asian Americans than toward Mexican and African Americans, a finding contrary to the prediction of social exchange theory (H. Tajfel, 1975). In contrast to the European Americans' view of homogeneity among Asian Americans, the 5 major subgroups of Asian Americans expressed a distinctive hierarchy of social preference among themselves. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for future research on interethnic relations involving Asian Americans.

  2. Adapting American Policymaking to Overcome American Exceptionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-13

    discomfort at President Bush’s rallying good against evil speeches and the words of the NSS. The President’s us versus them foreign policies...of global leadership, and of concern for the well being of the global community. Classically, American exceptionalism refers to the uniquely free ...longer that force for good, but a force for its own good. Exceptionalism once meant a nation free from tyrannical rule and offering of bountiful

  3. Lolita - the American nightmare

    OpenAIRE

    GRISELDA (ABAZAJ) DANGLLI

    2012-01-01

    This article deals with the analysis of Lolita seen through the lenses of the American society and norms of today. We will see that many observations of the American way of behaving and social norms still hold true even nowadays years after this novel was written. Nabokov, on the other hand, never accepted the fact that this novel probed into the very depths of American life and that his intentions were purely aesthetic. Nevertheless, the phenomenon of pedophilia, obvious in the book, is a po...

  4. American Studies in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Luca

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available American Studies at the University of BucharestThe idea of teaching American Studies and founding a program in American Studies was first voiced in the long meetings of faculty and students held at the University of Bucharest soon after the collapse of the communist regime. The proposal was one of many that reflected the spirit of reform and hope for radical changes at the outset of Romania’s transition to democracy. The absence of institutional structures other than English departments and t...

  5. Osteoporosis and Asian American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Asian American Women Osteoporosis and Asian American Women Asian American women are at high risk for ... medications. Are There Any Special Issues for Asian Women Regarding Bone Health? Recent studies indicate a number ...

  6. Mental Health and Asian Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data > Minority Population Profiles > Asian American > Mental Health Mental Health and Asian Americans Suicide was the 9th leading ... Americans is half that of the White population. MENTAL HEALTH STATUS Serious psychological distress among adults 18 years ...

  7. African-Americans and Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Plus on Google Plus African-Americans and Alzheimer's alz.org | IHaveAlz Introduction 10 Warning Signs Brain ... African-Americans are at a higher risk for Alzheimer's disease. Many Americans dismiss the warning signs of ...

  8. On American Individualism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李谷雨

    2016-01-01

    Among those American symbols like multiculturalism, hi-tech and its powerful status in the world, an important representative one is its individualism. This paper will briefly discuss it based on daily matters.

  9. American Pediatric Surgical Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Pediatric Surgical Association Search for: Login Resources + For Members For Professionals For Training Program Directors For Media For ... Surgical Outcomes Surveys & Results Publications Continuing Education + ExPERT Pediatric Surgery NaT Annual Meeting CME MOC Requirements Residents / ...

  10. American Epilepsy Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the AES Annual Meeting. More info here . Epilepsy Currents American Epilepsy Society Journal Impact Factor More ... P450 enzyme overexpression during spontaneous recurrent seizures More Epilepsy Professional News AES Status Epilepticus guideline for treatment ...

  11. American Academy of Optometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Award Recipients Nov 07, 2017 View all news Optometry and Vision Science Journal Optometry and Vision Science is the official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. AAO members receive a complimentary online subscription. Learn ...

  12. The American dream

    OpenAIRE

    Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2015-01-01

    The American dream : literar. Spiegelungen. - In: Weltmacht USA / hrsg. von Josef Becker ... - München : Vögel, 1976. - S. 31-48. - (Schriften der Philosophischen Fachbereiche der Universität Augsburg ; 10)

  13. Latin American Newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Mary A.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews the historical development of the press in Latin America from the sixteenth century to the present. Discusses the various pressures that Latin American newspapers are subject to, including political censorship, economic restrictions, and cultural conflicts. (AEA)

  14. African Americans and Glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us Donate In This Section African Americans and Glaucoma email Send this article to a friend by ... and eventually, in developing more effective treatments. Does glaucoma treatment differ? Although treatment varies for all individuals, ...

  15. American Geriatrics Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Learn More Social Media Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Instagram Social Media Bar Right Menu Annual Meeting Donate to our Foundation Contact Us American Geriatrics Society 40 Fulton St., 18th Floor New York, NY ...

  16. American Samoa Longline Logbook

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data system contains the logbook data of vessels unloading in American Samoa. In 1992, the logbooks of three longline trips conducting an experiment to test the...

  17. American Lyme Disease Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Infectious Diseases, 35: 451-464, 2002) What is Lyme Disease? Lyme disease (LD) is an infection caused by ... mission with your own tax-deductible contribution. American Lyme Disease Foundation, Inc. PO Box 466 Lyme, CT 06371 ...

  18. American Nephrology Nurses' Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Join/Renew Jobs Contact Corporate Shop American Nephrology Nurses Association About ANNA Association About ANNA Strategic Plan ... CExpress Events National Events Chapter / Local Events Nephrology Nurses Week ANNA Education Modules CKD Modules Education Services ...

  19. American Vitiligo Research Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Place Vitiligo Voices Contact Welcome to The American Vitiligo Foundation Home Page Top Isabella T., California An ... 20.00 USD 20 for - 35.00 USD Vitiligo Doesn't Scare Me by Kim Kirkland Kim ...

  20. American Samoa Cannery Offloading

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — From 1995 through 2010, the two canneries in American Samoa provided Cannery Offloading Reports to the Department of Marine and Wildlife Resources (DMWR) office. In...

  1. American Academy of Audiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Certification Meetings & Events Employee Resources Research Academia Practice Management Reimbursement Coding Compliance Resources and Tools Publications & News News Audiology Today Journal of the American Academy of Audiology Books Brochures Multimedia Guidelines and Standards ...

  2. American Music Therapy Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login Quick Links Facts About Music Therapy Qualifications ... with AMTA Sponsor AMTA Events Social Networking Support Music Therapy When you shop at AmazonSmile, Amazon will ...

  3. The Roots of Disillusioned American Dream in Typical American

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    古冬华

    2016-01-01

    Typical American is one of Gish Jen’s notable novels catching attention of the American literary circle. The motif of disillusioned American dream can be seen clearly through the experiences of three main characters. From perspectives of the consumer culture and cultural conflicts, this paper analyzes the roots of the disillusioned American dream in the novel.

  4. Native American medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, K

    1998-11-01

    This article summarizes common principles, practices, and ethics of Native American healing, the traditional medicine of North America. Native American healing, spirituality, culture, and, in modern times, political, social, and economic concerns are closely intertwined. Intuition and spiritual awareness are a healer's most essential diagnostic tools. Therapeutic methods include prayer, music, ritual purification, herbalism, massage, ceremony, and personal innovations of individual healers. A community of friends, family, and helpers often participate in the healing intervention and help to alleviate the alienation caused by disease. A healthy patient has a healthy relationship with his or her community and, ultimately, with the greater community of nature known as "All Relations." The goal of Native American healing is to find wholeness, balance, harmony, beauty, and meaning. "Healing," making whole, is as important as curing disease; at times they are identical.

  5. Native American nurse leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Lee A

    2004-07-01

    To identify which characteristics, wisdom, and skills are essential in becoming an effective Native American nurse leader. This will lead to the development of a curriculum suitable for Native American nurses. A qualitative, descriptive design was used for this study. Focus groups were conducted in Polson, Montana. A total of 67 Native and non-Native nurses participated. Sixty-seven percent of them were members of Indian tribes. Data were content analyzed using Spradley's ethnographic methodology. Three domains of analysis emerged: point of reference for the leader (individual, family, community), what a leader is (self-actualized, wise, experienced, political, bicultural, recognized, quiet presence, humble, spiritual, and visionary), and what a leader does (mentors, role models, communicates, listens, demonstrates values, mobilizes, and inspires). Native nurse leaders lead differently. Thus, a leadership curriculum suitable for Native nurses may lead to increased work productivity and therefore improved patient care for Native Americans.

  6. North American refining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osten, James; Haltmaier, Susan

    2000-01-01

    This article examines the current status of the North American refining industry, and considers the North American economy and the growth in demand in the petroleum industry, petroleum product demand and quality, crude oil upgrading to meet product standards, and changes in crude oil feedstocks such as the use of heavier crudes and bitumens. Refining expansion, the declining profits in refining, and changes due to environmental standards are discussed. The Gross Domestic Product and oil demand for the USA, Canada, Mexico, and Venezuela for the years 1995-2020 are tabulated

  7. American Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... combined with facial expressions and postures of the body. It is the primary language of many North Americans who are deaf and ... their eyebrows, widening their eyes, and tilting their bodies forward. Just as with other languages, specific ways of expressing ideas in ASL vary ...

  8. American Housing Survey (AHS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Employment and Payroll Survey of Business Owners Work from Home Our statistics highlight trends in household statistics from multiple surveys. Data Tools & Apps Main American FactFinder Census Business Builder My Classification Codes (i.e., NAICS) Economic Census Economic Indicators Economic Studies Industry Statistics

  9. Chagas Disease (American trypanosomiasis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sheets/detail/chagas-disease-(american-trypanosomiasis)","@context":"http://schema.org","@type":"Article"}; العربية 中文 français русский español ... capacities, focusing on: strengthening world epidemiological surveillance and information systems; preventing transmission by blood transfusion and organ ...

  10. The American Oyster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Nancy E.

    The Maryland Marine Science Education Project has produced a series of mini-units in marine science education for the junior high/middle school classroom. This unit focuses on the American oyster. Although the unit specifically treats the Chesapeake Bay, it may be adapted for use with similar estuarine systems. In addition, the unit may be…

  11. American Indian Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    One Feather, Gerald

    With the emergence of reservation based community colleges (th Navajo Community College and the Dakota Community Colleges), the American Indian people, as decision makers in these institutions, are providing Indians with the technical skills and cultural knowledge necessary for self-determination. Confronted with limited numbers of accredited…

  12. Gifted European American Woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, Margie K.; Perkins, Carol O.

    2000-01-01

    This article describes factors affecting the achievement of 15 highly accomplished European American women in the fields of business, higher education, and law and government. Findings indicate participants tended to attribute their success to external factors while simultaneously employing proactive strategies to overcome potential barriers.…

  13. Depression and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have insurance or can’t afford treatment, your community may have publicly-funded mental health centers or programs that charge you according to ... how he found healing in an African American community. Other Resources ... Institute of Mental Health Phone Number: 301-443-4513 Toll Free Number: ...

  14. American Dream / Anu Raat

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Raat, Anu

    2010-01-01

    Uuritakse sõnapaari "American dream" tähendust, kuidas ja millal see unelmalugu tekkis, miks see on ameerikalik nähtus, samuti 1950-ndate moeloomingut, eriti Christian Diori oma Euroopas ja Ameerikas, selle põhjusi ja mõjusid seoses massilise tarbimisega

  15. American Holidays and Festivals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯凌

    2002-01-01

    One of the interesting things to learn about a country is to know different kinds of holidays and festivals its people celebrate(庆祝) and to tell why they celebrate them. Although there are some similarities(相似) between American and Chinese holidays and festivals, there are quite a few differences.

  16. Americans with Disabilities Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaesberg, Mary Ann; Murray, Kenneth T.

    1994-01-01

    Presents a 35-item checklist of practical activities for school district compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The checklist is based on ADA statutes, other civil rights legislation and litigation, as well as pertinent regulations and the legislative history of the act contained in the Congressional Record. (MLF)

  17. The Native American Holocaust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Russell

    1989-01-01

    Describes the American Indian "Holocaust," decimation of Indian populations following European discovery of the Americas. European and African diseases, warfare with Europeans, and genocide reduced native populations from 75 million to only a few million. Discusses population statistics and demographic effects of epidemics, continuing infection,…

  18. Grant Wood: "American Gothic."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Diane M.

    1988-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan which exposes students in grades 10-12 to the visual symbols and historical references contained in Grant Wood's "American Gothic." Includes background information on the artist and the painting, instructional strategies, a studio activity, and evaluation criteria. (GEA)

  19. Hispanic American Volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Josue; Safrit, R. Dale

    2001-01-01

    Hispanic Americans in Cleveland, Ohio were interviewed about volunteerism. Six themes were identified: (1) influence of family and friends; (2) importance of volunteering to benefit youth; (3) importance of church and religious beliefs; (4) volunteering as a requirement; (5) connections between volunteerism and the community; and (6) personal…

  20. Civic Innovation & American Democracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirianni, Carmen; Friedland, Lewis

    1997-01-01

    Argues that American democracy is at a critical stage of development, with declining trust in government, citizens feeling displaced by a professional political class, derailed public interest, and policy that limits citizen deliberation and responsibility. Some instances of civic innovation, community organization, civic journalism, and efforts…

  1. American Porphyria Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nicole Castelano Gregary Edwards Megan Parrish ~ How the dog I didn't want became the dog I'd always dreamed of Darnisha Davenport Liz ... or through the site for commercial or public purposes. The American Porphyria Foundation (APF) Tax Forms 990 ...

  2. Asian Americans and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    The communities that constitute the racialized category of Asian Americans consist of approximately 20 million people in the United States, or about 5% of the total population. About 20% or 4 million are of primary or secondary school age, and over 1.1 million are in higher education. Both in popular and academic discourse, "Asian…

  3. American Lung Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... see if you should get screened. Learn more EDUCATION ADVOCACY RESEARCH Our vision is a world free of lung disease The American Lung Association is ... by lung disease. Help us continue to deliver education, advocacy and research to those who need it. $250 $100 $50 Your best gift Donate now Learn More ... nonprofit software

  4. Native American Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabokov, Peter; Easton, Robert

    This book presents building traditions of the major Indian tribes in nine regions of the North American continent, from the huge, plankhouse villages of the Northwest Coast, to the moundbuilder towns and temples of the Southeast, to the Navajo hogans and adobe pueblos of the Southwest. Indian buildings are a central element of Indian culture, the…

  5. The American University of Beirut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Rasmus Gjedssø

    2016-01-01

    with American society through its board of trustees. American civil society has been a major financial partner since the missionary days to modern day foundation philanthropy. American business has supported the university and recruited its graduates. American government has supported the university financially...... and politically. The chapter compares the transnational relations of the AUB, the other classical American overseas universities with missionary roots in the Middle East (AUC and LAU), the more than 20 American higher education institutions founded in China around 1900 (which did not survive the Korean War...

  6. Discipline behaviors of Chinese American and European American mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulei, Elaine; Zevenbergen, Andrea A; Jacobs, Sue C

    2006-09-01

    In any society, parenting beliefs are a reflection of that society's cultural values and traditions (J. U. Ogbu, 1981). Verbosity, a parenting behavior considered dysfunctional in European American culture, may not be problematic in Chinese culture. The authors recruited 31 Chinese American and 30 European American mothers and used questionnaires to measure parenting behaviors and child behavior problems. The Chinese American mothers also completed a questionnaire assessing their acculturation level. The Chinese American mothers had higher levels of verbosity than did the European American mothers; however, there were no differences between the groups in child behavior problems. The results also revealed higher levels of laxness in the Chinese American mothers compared to the European American mothers. Acculturation level did not predict verbosity or laxness levels. Results suggest that the effectiveness of a parenting style should be defined relative to cultural context.

  7. Total recovery of nitrogen and phosphorus from three wetland plants by fast pyrolysis technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wu-Jun; Zeng, Fan-Xin; Jiang, Hong; Yu, Han-Qing

    2011-02-01

    Fast pyrolysis of three wetland plants (Alligator weed, Oenanthe javanica and Typha angustifolia) in a vertical drop fixed bed reactor was investigated in this study. The experiments were carried out at different pyrolysis temperatures, and the maximum bio-oil yields achieved were 42.3%, 40.2% and 43.6% for Alligator weed, Oenanthe javanica and Typha angustifolia, respectively. The elemental composition of the bio-oil and char were analyzed, and the results show that a low temperature was appropriate for the nitrogen and phosphorus enrichment in char. GC-MS analysis shows that nitrogenous compounds, phenols and oxygenates were the main categories in the bio-oil. A series of leaching tests were carried out to examine the recovery of the nitrogen and phosphorus in the char, and the results indicate that significant fractions of nitrogen and phosphorus could be recovered by leaching process. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Protection of the Environment near the Ranger uranium mine. Supervising Scientist report 139

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, A.; Needham, S.

    1999-01-01

    The Alligator Rivers Region, comprising an area of approximately 28 000 km 2 , is broadly defined by the catchments of the East, South and West Alligator Rivers. It is of outstanding heritage value for its unusual combination of largely uninhabited areas with attractive wild scenery, is highly biodiverse, and has a very large concentration of Aboriginal rock art of world significance. Its national and international importance is recognised by the inclusion of Kakadu National Park on the Register of the National Estate and its inscription on the World Heritage List. The flood plain areas within Kakadu are recognised as one of Australia's Wetlands of International Importance listed under the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance

  9. Effect of high hydrostatic pressure on the color and texture parameters of refrigerated Caiman (Caiman crocodilus yacare) tail meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto, A C V C S; Lima, B R C C; Cruz, A G; Lázaro, C A; Freitas, D G C; Faria, Jose A F; Torrezan, R; Freitas, M Q; Silva, T P J

    2012-07-01

    The effect of applying high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on the instrumental parameters of color and texture and sensory characteristics of alligator meat were evaluated. Samples of alligator tail meat were sliced, vacuum-packed, pressurized and distributed into four groups: control, treated with 200 MPa/10 min, 300 MPa/10 min and 400 MPa/10 min, then stored at 4°C±1°C for 45 days. Instrumental color, texture profile and a sensory profiling using quantitative descriptive analysis were carried out on the 1st, 15th, 30th and 45th days of storage. HHP was shown to affect the color and texture of the product, and the sensory descriptors (pmeat, especially low pressures (200 MPa) which can have positive effects on the quality of the product. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Waste management and environmental controls in the Australian uranium mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.G.; Morison, I.W.

    1982-01-01

    The development of the waste management and related environmental controls applied to uranium mining and processing in Australia is described. Major uranium deposits occur in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory, a world heritage tropical wetland area with deep significance to Aboriginal people. The formulation of environmental controls took into consideration the unique features of the region in addition to experiences from earlier uranium mining operations. A description is given of the operations at Rum Jungle, the pollutants released and their effects on the environment. Commonwealth and State responsibilities for waste management and environmental control and the establishment of Codes of Practice are noted and proposed water management and tailings management programs at the four Alligator Rivers sites are described

  11. Minimal volume regulation after shrinkage of red blood cells from five species of reptiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Karina; Berenbrink, Michael; Koldkjær, Pia

    2008-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) from most vertebrates restore volume upon hypertonic shrinkage and the mechanisms underlying this regulatory volume increase (RVI) have been studied extensively in these cells. Despite the phylogenetically interesting position of reptiles, very little is known about their red...... cell function. The present study demonstrates that oxygenated RBCs in all major groups of reptiles exhibit no or a very reduced RVI upon ~ 25% calculated hyperosmotic shrinkage. Thus, RBCs from the snakes Crotalus durissus and Python regius, the turtle Trachemys scripta and the alligator Alligator...... was not characterized. It seems, therefore, that the RVI response based on NHE activation was lost among the early sauropsids that gave rise to modern reptiles and birds, while it was retained in mammals. An RVI response has then reappeared in birds, but based on activation of the NKCC. Alternatively, the absence...

  12. Nabarlek rehabilitation: the supervising scientist's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapantis, A.

    2001-01-01

    Nabarlek is an important milestone in the history of uranium mining in Australia representing the first of the modern day uranium mines to have gone full cycle from inception to reinstatement under a strict regime of government supervision and compliance. Consequently, there are pressures to get it right and at the same time redress the poor public image of uranium mine site rehabilitation that arose from mining activities at Rum Jungle and the South Alligator Valley in the 1960s. As stated by the Chair of the Nabarlek Minesite Technical Committee (8 September 1999), Nabarlek provides: (An) opportunity to demonstrate to the world the successful rehabilitation of a uranium mine under world's best practice methods. Also, the lessons learnt from the rehabilitation of Nabarlek will undoubtedly feed into processes elsewhere, particularly in the Alligator Rivers Region (ARR)

  13. An American Paradox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamieson, D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the paradox that while Americans generally identify themselves as environmentalists, they show little willingness to voluntarily restrain their behavior or to support specific fiscal policies that would result in increased levels of environmental protection. I explore the role of values in the explanation of this paradox, and discuss some of the difficulties involved in studying values and their role in human behavior

  14. Asian American Adolescent Identity

    OpenAIRE

    Ohm, Julie Juhye

    1999-01-01

    The formation of ego identity in Asian American late adolescents attending Virginia Tech was examined within the frameworks of Erikson's psychosocial theory and Berry, Trimble, and Olmedo's model of acculturation. Ego identity was measured using the Achieved sub-scale of the Revised Version of the Extended Objective Measure of Ego Identity Status, an instrument based on the theoretical constructs of Erikson. Ethnic identity was measured using the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure and America...

  15. Improving American Innovation,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    Why has Jap~m succeeded: western technology and the Japanese ethos. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1982. (NC 462 MO634 Norman , Colin...productivity growth. Review of Economics and Statistics 64:627-34, N~ovember 1982. Smith, G. W. and W. N. Smallwood . Preparing for breakthroughs: the rewards of...recommendations. Edited by Charles E. Larsen and WI. Novis Smith. Washington: American Chemical Society, 1980. Kobert, Norman . Agressivn management style

  16. American Studies in Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Antsyferova, Olga

    2006-01-01

    Interest in the USA, both general and specifically academic, has always existed in Russia, with its own ups and downs. But American studies as an academic discipline started gaining its popularity probably after WWII when there sporadically started to emerge the ever-increasing number of academic books, articles and dissertations in literary and historical research on the USA, the main centers of which were founded at the Academic Research Institute of the USA and Canada, headed by academicia...

  17. Rediscovering Interwar American Theorists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    background, influences , and influence . It illuminates Robinson’s efforts to account for factors associated with an American citizen -army and the... influences , and assessing their influence on doctrine and leaders of the Second World War. Additionally, this paper contains recommendations to improve the...addresses this gap by analyzing the theories of Brigadier General William K. Naylor and Colonel Oliver P. Robinson, examining their influences , and

  18. A Native American Theatre Ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kent R.

    1973-01-01

    The ceremonial rituals American Indians have practiced for centuries are uncontestable testimony to how strongly they respond to theatre. These rituals, a pure and functional form of dramatic art, are practiced today by a Native American theater group. (FF)

  19. Mental Health and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Mental Health Mental Health and African Americans Poverty level affects mental health ... compared to 120% of non-Hispanic whites. 1 MENTAL HEALTH STATUS Serious psychological distress among adults 18 years ...

  20. Asian American Health - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Asian American Health URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Asian American Health - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features ...

  1. Agriculture and Food: Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Plan as Input to the National Infrastructure Protection Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    sliced egg sand- wich (closed-faced), frozen fish dinner, rabbit stew, shrimp-flavored instant noodles , venison jerky, buffalo burgers, alligator...meat or 2% or more poultry (e.g., chicken noodle ) Other products Cheese, onion, mushroom pizza; spaghetti sauces (less than 3% red meat), spaghetti...sauce with mushrooms and 2% meat, pork and beans, sliced egg sandwich (closed-faced), frozen fish dinner, rabbit stew, shrimp-flavored instant

  2. Let's do comprehension 5-6

    CERN Document Server

    Brodie, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Let's Do Comprehension is a brand new series of six titles in the popular 'Let's Do' range. Each book contains a rich variety of stimulating reading passages, accompanied by questions of varying difficulty. Designed to be used at home, each book includes tips and clues from Alice the Alligator as well as extra challenges in Brodie's Brain Boosters. There is a clear answer section for reference by parents and children, together with bright, colourful reward stickers.

  3. Snakes in the wrong places: Gordon Rodda’s career in invasive species research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jim

    2012-01-01

    When USGS research zoologist Gordon G. Rodda was a graduate student at Cornell University studying behavioral biology of alligators —or later, completing a post-doc at the Smithsonian Institute studying the social behavior of green iguanas in Venezuela or following that, as a statistics and sociobiology instructor at the University of Tennessee—he did not foresee that his professional future was in snakes. Lots of snakes, and in places they don’t belong.

  4. Contingency planning and risk analysis for water and tailings management at Ranger Uranium Mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNally, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes some of the more likely risks and contingency procedures associated with the extremely variable monsoonal climate of the Alligator Rivers region in the Northern Territory in relation to the Ranger Uranium Mine. The tailings management system is basically a large storage impoundment and a reticulation system that delivers tailings sludge and recycles supernatant water. It is a closed circuit within the water management system and is dealt with as an integral part of that system

  5. U.S. Marine Corps Operations in Iraq, 2003-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Alligators , Buffaloes, and Bushmasters:The History of the Development of the LVT Through World War II. Major Alfred Dunlop Bailey, USMC (Ret...efforts the 82d ABD paid for in blood , and complicate our campaign plan which we have not yet been given the opportuni­ ty to implement...Operation Saber (Hissam) covered the rest of July for RCT-2, an umbrella operation stressing counterinsurgency actions by each battalion in their

  6. Analysis of the Landing Ship Tank (LST) and its Influence on Amphibious Warfare During World War Two

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    should be conducted. He stressed that the rapid deployment of troops from ship to shore was essential. In February 1924, the Navy and Marine Corps...Figure 12). This allowed for a more rapid loading 96Alfred Dunlop Bailey, “ Alligators , Buffaloes, and Bushmasters: The History of the Development of the...of the wounded, they were adequate for 110A. K. Demetriades, M. C. Gavalas, and J. Ryan, “D-Day On Board A Tank Landing Ship: Meat, Cheese and Blood

  7. USAFSAM Review and Analysis of Radiofrequency Radiation Bioeffects Literature. Fifth Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    albumin and phosphorus only at levels that caused significant increases in body temperature (>50 mW/sq cm). Blood glucose levels were not altered...against the sinus venosus of the heart. Two small alligator clips, one on the right side of the neck and the other on the left thigh, served as EKG... blood vessels of the foot. The values of rectal and PO/AH temperature at corresponding power densities differed little from each other except perhaps

  8. Let's do comprehension 8-9

    CERN Document Server

    Brodie, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Let's Do Comprehension is a brand new series of six titles in the popular 'Let's Do' range. Each book contains a rich variety of stimulating reading passages, accompanied by questions of varying difficulty. Designed to be used at home, each book includes tips and clues from Alice the Alligator as well as extra challenges in Brodie's Brain Boosters. There is a clear answer section for reference by parents and children, together with bright, colourful reward stickers.

  9. Dredging Operations Technical Support Program. Aquaculture in Dredged Material Containment Areas, Proceedings Held at Galveston, Texas on September 1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-01

    the world’s growing need for animal protein . c. Aquaculture can provide additional stability and diversification for U. S. agriculture and agribusiness...are as follows: 33 _’k .2- .2. .. -7 First there is the Texas Historical Society. Friends, we have had dinosaurs , bears, alligators, and Indians...farm-raised catfish should find a place in the diets of more and more people. The product is high in protein , low in cholesterol, and available year

  10. A phenomenological calculus of Wiener description space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, I W; Louie, A H

    2007-10-01

    The phenomenological calculus is a categorical example of Robert Rosen's modeling relation. This paper is an alligation of the phenomenological calculus and generalized harmonic analysis, another categorical example. Our epistemological exploration continues into the realm of Wiener description space, in which constitutive parameters are extended from vectors to vector-valued functions of a real variable. Inherent in the phenomenology are fundamental representations of time and nearness to equilibrium.

  11. Sensory nerve conduction in the caudal nerves of rats with diabetes Condução nervosa sensorial no nervo caudal de ratos com diabetes experimental

    OpenAIRE

    Celina Cordeiro de Carvalho; Juliana Netto Maia; Otávio Gomes Lins; Sílvia Regina Arruda de Moraes

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate sensory nerve conduction of the caudal nerve in normal and diabetic rats. METHODS: Diabetes was induced in twenty 8-weeks old Wistar male rats. Twenty normal rats served as controls. Caudal nerve conduction studies were made before diabetes induction and the end of each week for six consecutive weeks. The caudal nerve was stimulated distally and nerve potentials were recorded proximally on the animal's tail using common "alligator" clips as surface electrodes. RESULTS:...

  12. Avaliação da qualidade microbiológica e nutritiva de carnes exóticas

    OpenAIRE

    Sfaciotte, Ricardo Antonio Pilegi; Universidade Estadual de Maringá; Vignoto, Vanessa Karla Capoia; Universidade Estadual de Maringá; Cardozo, Rejane Machado; Universidade Estadual de Maringá; Munhoz, Patrícia Marques; Universidade Estadual de Maringá; Pinto, Adriana Aparecida; Universidade Estadual de Maringá; Wosiacki, Sheila Rezler; Universidade Estadual de Maringá; Ferraro, Gisela Cristiane; Universidade Estadual de Maringá; Barbosa, Maria José Baptista; Universidade Estadual de Maringá

    2015-01-01

    Vacuum-packed and frozen of ostrich (Struthio camelus), alligator (Caiman latirostris) and wild boar (Sus scrofa) meat samples were obtained in an authorized commercial store in Maringá/Paraná. Of each kind meat were analyzed 6 samples, where were studied counts of mesophilic aerobic bacteria, aerobic bacteria psichrophilic, coliforms, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus spp., and protein and fat analysis. The results of aerobic mesophilic bacteria ranged between <1.0 a 3.6 log CFU/g, bein...

  13. Harlequin Ichthyosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashemzadeh Ahmad

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available It is an autosomal recessive, and occasionally autosomal dominant mutant extremely rare disorder with only 100 reported case in literature. This fatal disorder occur in both sexes and all races. In most circumstances the newborn die soon after birth Also it is known as harlequin fetus, alligator baby or keratosis diffusa fatalis."nBecause of its rarity, we report 2 cases of this disorder, here.

  14. Status of natural analogue studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, Keiichi

    1994-03-01

    This report is based on the materials for the meeting at the Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan held on September 1993. Details are as follows: Alteration of glass as the study of alteration of natural minerals; alteration of uranium minerals, migration of uranium and thorium series radionuclides, alteration of chlorite, fixation of uranium alteration of minerals and migration of uranium as the study of alligator rivers analogue project held at Koongarra uranium deposit, Australia. (author)

  15. Effects of life-history requirements on the distribution of a threatened reptile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Denise M; Ligon, Day B; Patton, Jason C; Papeş, Monica

    2017-04-01

    Survival and reproduction are the two primary life-history traits essential for species' persistence; however, the environmental conditions that support each of these traits may not be the same. Despite this, reproductive requirements are seldom considered when estimating species' potential distributions. We sought to examine potentially limiting environmental factors influencing the distribution of an oviparous reptile of conservation concern with respect to the species' survival and reproduction and to assess the implications of the species' predicted climatic constraints on current conservation practices. We used ecological niche modeling to predict the probability of environmental suitability for the alligator snapping turtle (Macrochelys temminckii). We built an annual climate model to examine survival and a nesting climate model to examine reproduction. We combined incubation temperature requirements, products of modeled soil temperature data, and our estimated distributions to determine whether embryonic development constrained the northern distribution of the species. Low annual precipitation constrained the western distribution of alligator snapping turtles, whereas the northern distribution was constrained by thermal requirements during embryonic development. Only a portion of the geographic range predicted to have a high probability of suitability for alligator snapping turtle survival was estimated to be capable of supporting successful embryonic development. Historic occurrence records suggest adult alligator snapping turtles can survive in regions with colder climes than those associated with consistent and successful production of offspring. Estimated egg-incubation requirements indicated that current reintroductions at the northern edge of the species' range are within reproductively viable environmental conditions. Our results highlight the importance of considering survival and reproduction when estimating species' ecological niches, implicating

  16. PATH ANALYSIS WITH LOGISTIC REGRESSION MODELS : EFFECT ANALYSIS OF FULLY RECURSIVE CAUSAL SYSTEMS OF CATEGORICAL VARIABLES

    OpenAIRE

    Nobuoki, Eshima; Minoru, Tabata; Geng, Zhi; Department of Medical Information Analysis, Faculty of Medicine, Oita Medical University; Department of Applied Mathematics, Faculty of Engineering, Kobe University; Department of Probability and Statistics, Peking University

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses path analysis of categorical variables with logistic regression models. The total, direct and indirect effects in fully recursive causal systems are considered by using model parameters. These effects can be explained in terms of log odds ratios, uncertainty differences, and an inner product of explanatory variables and a response variable. A study on food choice of alligators as a numerical exampleis reanalysed to illustrate the present approach.

  17. Cartilaginous epiphyses in extant archosaurs and their implications for reconstructing limb function in dinosaurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey M Holliday

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Extinct archosaurs, including many non-avian dinosaurs, exhibit relatively simply shaped condylar regions in their appendicular bones, suggesting potentially large amounts of unpreserved epiphyseal (articular cartilage. This "lost anatomy" is often underappreciated such that the ends of bones are typically considered to be the joint surfaces, potentially having a major impact on functional interpretation. Extant alligators and birds were used to establish an objective basis for inferences about cartilaginous articular structures in such extinct archosaur clades as non-avian dinosaurs. Limb elements of alligators, ostriches, and other birds were dissected, disarticulated, and defleshed. Lengths and condylar shapes of elements with intact epiphyses were measured. Limbs were subsequently completely skeletonized and the measurements repeated. Removal of cartilaginous condylar regions resulted in statistically significant changes in element length and condylar breadth. Moreover, there was marked loss of those cartilaginous structures responsible for joint architecture and congruence. Compared to alligators, birds showed less dramatic, but still significant changes. Condylar morphologies of dinosaur limb bones suggest that most non-coelurosaurian clades possessed large cartilaginous epiphyses that relied on the maintenance of vascular channels that are otherwise eliminated early in ontogeny in smaller-bodied tetrapods. A sensitivity analysis using cartilage correction factors (CCFs obtained from extant taxa indicates that whereas the presence of cartilaginous epiphyses only moderately increases estimates of dinosaur height and speed, it has important implications for our ability to infer joint morphology, posture, and the complicated functional movements in the limbs of many extinct archosaurs. Evidence suggests that the sizes of sauropod epiphyseal cartilages surpassed those of alligators, which account for at least 10% of hindlimb length. These data

  18. Cartilaginous epiphyses in extant archosaurs and their implications for reconstructing limb function in dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Casey M; Ridgely, Ryan C; Sedlmayr, Jayc C; Witmer, Lawrence M

    2010-09-30

    Extinct archosaurs, including many non-avian dinosaurs, exhibit relatively simply shaped condylar regions in their appendicular bones, suggesting potentially large amounts of unpreserved epiphyseal (articular) cartilage. This "lost anatomy" is often underappreciated such that the ends of bones are typically considered to be the joint surfaces, potentially having a major impact on functional interpretation. Extant alligators and birds were used to establish an objective basis for inferences about cartilaginous articular structures in such extinct archosaur clades as non-avian dinosaurs. Limb elements of alligators, ostriches, and other birds were dissected, disarticulated, and defleshed. Lengths and condylar shapes of elements with intact epiphyses were measured. Limbs were subsequently completely skeletonized and the measurements repeated. Removal of cartilaginous condylar regions resulted in statistically significant changes in element length and condylar breadth. Moreover, there was marked loss of those cartilaginous structures responsible for joint architecture and congruence. Compared to alligators, birds showed less dramatic, but still significant changes. Condylar morphologies of dinosaur limb bones suggest that most non-coelurosaurian clades possessed large cartilaginous epiphyses that relied on the maintenance of vascular channels that are otherwise eliminated early in ontogeny in smaller-bodied tetrapods. A sensitivity analysis using cartilage correction factors (CCFs) obtained from extant taxa indicates that whereas the presence of cartilaginous epiphyses only moderately increases estimates of dinosaur height and speed, it has important implications for our ability to infer joint morphology, posture, and the complicated functional movements in the limbs of many extinct archosaurs. Evidence suggests that the sizes of sauropod epiphyseal cartilages surpassed those of alligators, which account for at least 10% of hindlimb length. These data suggest that

  19. NEA international co-operative projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This text is consecrated at the international co-operative projects of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in the field of reactor safety (Halden reactor project, Loft project, studies on the damaged Three Mile Island unit-2 reactor, inspection of reactor steel components, incident reporting system) and in the field of radioactive waste management (Stripa project, geochemical data bases, Alligator river project, seabed disposal of high-level radioactive waste, decommissioning of nuclear facilities)

  20. Surveys of tidal river systems in the northern territory of Australia and their crocodile populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorlicek, G.C.; Messel, H.; Green, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides an update on the population dynamics of Crocodylus porous in the tidal waterways of Van Diemen Gulf and the Southern Gulf of Carpentaria, Australia, during 1984 and 1985. Contents: Prologue; Dedication; Introduction; Status of Crocodylus porous. July 1984, in the tidal waterways of the Alligator Region and in the Adelaide River System of Northern Australia: recovery underway; Resurvey of Crocodylus porous populations in the tidal waterways of the southern Gulf of Carpentaria, September - October 1985; Local knowledge - Northern Australia style.

  1. American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AACD AACD 2018: A Masterpiece of Comprehensive Cosmetic Dentistry Education 34th Annual Scientific Session | April 18-21 ... 222.9540 Contact Us © 2017American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD) © 2017American Academy ...

  2. American Food and World Hunger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarra, Fred R.; Long, Cathryn J., Eds.

    1983-01-01

    Describes activities to help students in grades 7-9 learn about American food production and distribution. Students learn about the American diet over the centuries; the production of American Corn; the meaning of the term hunger; and the need for protein. (CS)

  3. Discrimination against Muslim American Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroian, Karen J.

    2012-01-01

    Although there is ample evidence of discrimination toward Muslim Americans in general, there is limited information specific to Muslim American adolescents. The few existing studies specific to this age group suggest that Muslim American adolescents encounter much discrimination from teachers, school administrators, and classmates. This…

  4. Facts about American Indian Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Indian College Fund, 2010

    2010-01-01

    As a result of living in remote rural areas, American Indians living on reservations have limited access to higher education. One-third of American Indians live on reservations, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. According to the most recent U.S. government statistics, the overall poverty rate for American Indians/Alaska Natives, including…

  5. Native American Ceremonial Athletic Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, Wilma J.

    This is a report on the relationship of North American Indian athletic games to ceremonies. Data for this investigation were researched from 48 "Annual Reports of the Bureau of American Ethnology, Smithsonian Institution" published from 1881 to 1933, and the 84 volumes of the "American Anthropologist" published from 1888 to 1974. Observational…

  6. History of Asian American psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Frederick T L; Okazaki, Sumie

    2009-10-01

    An overview of the history of Asian American psychology is provided by reviewing the context for the development of the field as well as the early founding of the Asian American Psychological Association (AAPA). The presidents of AAPA as well as key events and conferences are noted. The involvement of AAPA leaders in national mental health policies and activities are reviewed. The substantive areas of Asian American psychology and the education and training of Asian American psychologists are also discussed. The article ends with some comments about the future of Asian American psychology. Copyright 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  7. Clonal integration supports the expansion from terrestrial to aquatic environments of the amphibious stoloniferous herb Alternanthera philoxeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N; Yu, F-H; Li, P-X; He, W-M; Liu, J; Yu, G-L; Song, Y-B; Dong, M

    2009-05-01

    Effects of clonal integration on land plants have been extensively studied, but little is known about the role in amphibious plants that expand from terrestrial to aquatic conditions. We simulated expansion from terrestrial to aquatic habitats in the amphibious stoloniferous alien invasive alligator weed (Alternanthera philoxeroides) by growing basal ramets of clonal fragments in soils connected (allowing integration) or disconnected (preventing integration) to the apical ramets of the same fragments submerged in water to a depth of 0, 5, 10 or 15 cm. Clonal integration significantly increased growth and clonal reproduction of the apical ramets, but decreased both of these characteristics in basal ramets. Consequently, integration did not affect the performance of whole clonal fragments. We propose that alligator weed possesses a double-edged mechanism during population expansion: apical ramets in aquatic habitats can increase growth through connected basal parts in terrestrial habitats; however, once stolon connections with apical ramets are lost by external disturbance, the basal ramets in terrestrial habitats increase stolon and ramet production for rapid spreading. This may contribute greatly to the invasiveness of alligator weed and also make it very adaptable to habitats with heavy disturbance and/or highly heterogeneous resource supply.

  8. A comparative study of piscine defense: The scales of Arapaima gigas, Latimeria chalumnae and Atractosteus spatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Vincent R; Quan, Haocheng; Yang, Wen; Ritchie, Robert O; Meyers, Marc A

    2017-09-01

    We compare the characteristics of the armored scales of three large fish, namely the Arapaima gigas (arapaima), Latimeria chalumnae (coelacanth), and Atractosteus spatula (alligator gar), with specific focus on their unique structure-mechanical property relationships and their specialized ability to provide protection from predatory pressures, with the ultimate goal of providing bio-inspiration for manmade materials. The arapaima has flexible and overlapping cycloid scales which consist of a tough Bouligand-type arrangement of collagen layers in the base and a hard external mineralized surface, protecting it from piranha, a predator with extremely sharp teeth. The coelacanth has overlapping elasmoid scales that consist of adjacent Bouligand-type pairs, forming a double-twisted Bouligand-type structure. The collagenous layers are connected by collagen fibril struts which significantly contribute to the energy dissipation, so that the scales have the capability to defend from predators such as sharks. The alligator gar has inflexible articulating ganoid scales made of a hard and highly mineralized enamel-like outer surface and a tough dentine-like bony base, which resist powerful bite forces of self-predation and attack by alligators. The structural differences between the three scales correspond with the attack of their predators, and show refined mechanisms which may be imitated and incorporated into superior bioinspired and biomimetic designs that are specialized to resist specific modes of predation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The american dental dream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The American Dental Dream-the cultural desire for straight, white teeth-is difficult, if not impossible, for poor and working-class people to achieve. Using ethnographic fiction, autoethnography, poetry, and qualitative interviewing, I brush away the taken-for-granted assumptions about teeth. I explore the personal, relational, and structural consequences of this cultural desire, and show how social class writes itself on our bodies. I write these culture-centered teeth tales to show how one might cope with their teeth.

  10. Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Population Profiles > American Indian/Alaska Native > Asthma Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives In 2015, 240, ... Native American adults reported that they currently have asthma. American Indian/Alaska Native children are 60% more ...

  11. A check-list of the pentastomid parasites of crocodilians and freshwater chelonians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Junker

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on published records and own data a summary is given of the geographical distribution of the currently known species of pentastomid parasites infecting crocodiles and alligators, as well as freshwater chelonians. A brief generic diagnosis is provided for each genus. Fourteen out of the currently 23 living crocodilian species have been recorded as being host to one or more pentastomes. Out of the 32 pentastome species six are considered species inquirendae. Presently, six genera of crocodilian pentastomes, Agema, Alofia, Leiperia, Sebekia, Selfia and Subtriquetra are recognized. African crocodiles harbour eight pentastome species, six of which have been recorded from the Nile crocodile, Crocodylus niloticus. Three species belong to the genus Sebekia, Alofia being represented by two and Leiperia by only one species. Two species, Alofia parva and Agema silvaepalustris, occur in the dwarf crocodile, Osteolaemus tetraspis, and the slender-snouted crocodile, Crocodylus cataphractus, exclusively, but a single Sebekia species is shared with the Nile crocodile. The genus Agema is endemic to the African region. Infective stages of the pentastome Sub triquetra rileyi, thought to utilize Nile crocodiles as final hosts, have been recovered only from fishes. The largest number of pentastome species is found in the Australasian region. Of these, the Indo-Pacific croc odile, Crocodylus porosus, harbours seven, representing the genera Alofia, Sebekia, Lei peria and Selfia. Selfia is exclusive to the latter host. The genus Subtriquetra has been reported from "Indian crocodiles", a term possibly referring to either Crocodylus palustris, Crocodylus porosus or Gavialis gangeticus. Ten species of pentastomes parasitizing the crocodilian genera Alligator, Caiman, Crocodylus and Melanosuchus have been recorded from the Neotropical region including the southern states of the North American continent. The two most wide-spread pentastome genera, Alofia and Sebekia

  12. Check-list of the pentastomid parasites crocodilians and freshwater chelonians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, K; Boomker, J

    2006-03-01

    Based on published records and own data a summary is given of the geographical distribution of the currently known species of pentastomid parasites infecting crocodiles and alligators, as well as freshwater chelonians. A brief generic diagnosis is provided for each genus. Fourteen out of the currently 23 living crocodilian species have been recorded as being host to one or more pentastomes. Out of the 32 pentastome species six are considered species inquirendae. Presently, six genera of crocodilian pentastomes, Agema, Alofia, Leiperia, Sebekia, Selfia and Subtriquetra are recognized. African crocodiles harbour eight pentastome species, six of which have been recorded from the Nile crocodile, Crocodylus niloticus. Three species belong to the genus Sebekia, Alofia being represented by two and Leiperia by only one species. Two species, Alofia parva and Agema silvae-palustris, occur in the dwarf crocodile, Osteolaemus tetraspis, and the slender-snouted crocodile, Crocodylus cataphractus, exclusively, but a single Sebekia species is shared with the Nile crocodile. The genus Agema is endemic to the African region. Infective stages of the pentastome Subtriquetra rileyi, thought to utilize Nile crocodiles as final hosts, have been recovered only from fishes. The largest number of pentastome species is found in the Australasian region. Of these, the Indo-Pacific crocodile, Crocodylus porosus, harbours seven, representing the genera Alofia, Sebekia, Leiperia and Selfia. Selfia is exclusive to the latter host. The genus Subtriquetra has been reported from "Indian crocodiles", a term possibly referring to either Crocodylus palustris, Crocodylus porosus or Gavialis gangeticus. Ten species of pentastomes parasitizing the crocodilian genera Alligator, Caiman, Crocodylus and Melanosuchus have been recorded from the Neotropical region including the southern states of the North American continent. The two most wide-spread pentastome genera, Alofia and Sebekia, have been recorded

  13. Vascular patterns in the heads of crocodilians: blood vessels and sites of thermal exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, William Ruger; Sedlmayr, Jayc C; Witmer, Lawrence M

    2016-12-01

    Extant crocodilians are a highly apomorphic archosaur clade that is ectothermic, yet often achieve large body sizes that can be subject to higher heat loads. Therefore, the anatomical and physiological roles that blood vessels play in crocodilian thermoregulation need further investigation to better understand how crocodilians establish and maintain cephalic temperatures and regulate neurosensory tissue temperatures during basking and normal activities. The cephalic vascular anatomy of extant crocodilians, particularly American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) was investigated using a differential-contrast, dual-vascular injection technique and high resolution X-ray micro-computed tomography (μCT). Blood vessels were digitally isolated to create representations of vascular pathways. The specimens were then dissected to confirm CT results. Sites of thermal exchange, consisting of the oral, nasal, and orbital regions, were given special attention due to their role in evaporative cooling and cephalic thermoregulation in other diapsids. Blood vessels to and from sites of thermal exchange were studied to detect conserved vascular patterns and to assess their ability to deliver cooled blood to neurosensory tissues. Within the orbital region, both the arteries and veins demonstrated consistent branching patterns, with the supraorbital, infraorbital, and ophthalmotemporal vessels supplying and draining the orbit. The venous drainage of the orbital region showed connections to the dural sinuses via the orbital veins and cavernous sinus. The palatal region demonstrated a vast plexus that comprised both arteries and veins. The most direct route of venous drainage of the palatal plexus was through the palatomaxillary veins, essentially bypassing neurosensory tissues. Anastomotic connections with the nasal region, however, may provide an alternative route for palatal venous blood to reach neurosensory tissues. The nasal region in crocodilians is probably the most

  14. Paul Graham, American Night

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Bernard

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Le photographe britannique Paul Graham (1956- ne jouit pas encore en France de la notoriété de son compatriote Martin Parr et on ne peut, par conséquent, que se féliciter de voir l’une de ses plus puissantes séries — American Night — représentée à la Galerie Les Filles du Calvaire.Connu, avec Parr, pour avoir profondément influencé la photo documentaire anglaise en la faisant passer à la couleur avec virulence, Graham a été révélé il y a une vingtaine d’années par une série d’images prises à...

  15. American Nations, Latin States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Nelson Ahumada

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The nation, as artifact of modernity, assumes particularities in America such as the colonization and genocide of original peoples which still weighs as a never ending comeback. Nevertheless, capital, with its overwhelming force, destroyed peoples, cultures, traditions and landscapes. Latin America faces the challenge of uniting beyond the necessities of capital, and beyond two languages, spanish and portuguese. All of which has full validity at present with the blocks UNASUR and ALBA. Ethnocentricity is postulated as the exclusive condition of all possible humanity and, as programme, racism without races; Latin American miscegenation, as the potential for unity and the strength of emancipation as a project. Our intellectuals, who constructed a unique and superlative literature, are the lighthouses in the development of a nationalism without races. Anthropology in debate with psychoanalysis can become a compass in rethinking our America.

  16. "American Gothic" Revised: Positive Perceptions from a Young American Farmer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joehl, Regan R.

    2008-01-01

    Grant Wood's "American Gothic," intended to represent the Depression Era, Midwestern farmer, has been regarded by many as the stereotypical representation of a true American farmer for decades. While this painting does represent farmers in the early part of the 20th century, the author feels obliged to say that it is time to drop this…

  17. Teaching about American Federal Democracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechter, Stephen L., Ed.

    Ten essays discuss federal democracy, the form of government of the United States. The first essay discusses the origins of American federalism. The second examines why we have a federal system, the functions federalism serves, and the consequences of federalism for the American political system. Federalism in the Constitution and constitutional…

  18. American uranium: Relic or reality?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    This article is a review of the American Uranium industry. Historical aspects are presented as the industry's history is outlined from the mid-1950's to the present day. Present capabilities are noted, as are a current comparison of American production costs vs. world costs. Future trends are analyzed

  19. Native American Foods and Cookery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Tom; Potter, Eloise F.

    Native Americans had a well-developed agriculture long before the arrival of the Europeans. Three staples--corn, beans, and squash--were supplemented with other gathered plants or cultivated crops such as white potatoes, sweet potatoes, pumpkins, and peanuts. Native Americans had no cows, pigs, or domesticated chickens; they depended almost…

  20. A Slice of American Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirker, Sara Schmickle

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an art project for second-grade students based on American Regionalist Grant Wood's most famous painting, "American Gothic," which was modeled by his sister, Nan, and his dentist. This well-loved painting depicting a hard-working farmer and his daughter standing in front of their farmhouse is the project's…

  1. Family Values in American Drama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joanne

    When an educator was invited by a Chinese university to teach a seminar in American drama, she used "family drama" as the organizing theme of her course because she was (and is) convinced that from Eugene O'Neill on, American playwrights have been obsessed with family disintegration and the failure of family harmony. This paper is an…

  2. American Samoa: Energy Action Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ness, J. Erik [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Haase, Scott [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Conrad, Misty [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This document outlines actions being taken to reduce American Samoa's petroleum consumption. It describes the four near-term strategies selected by the American Samoa Renewable Energy Committee during action-planning workshops conducted in May 2016, and describes the steps that will need to be taken to implement those strategies.

  3. The oxymoron of American pastoralism

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. Sayre

    2013-01-01

    Pastoralism has been variously defined in American literary studies. In European literature the pastoral persisted as a distinct genre and self-conscious literary tradition from Theocritus and Virgil through the eighteenth century. Major eighteenth and nineteenth-century American authors alluded to this tradition, but they could not really lay claim to it, for as this...

  4. Additional Resources on Asian Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Corinne Maekawa; Lee, Sunny; Liang, Christopher T. H.; Alvarez, Alvin N.; McEwen, Marylu K.

    2002-01-01

    The authors identify Asian American associations and organizations, academic journals, periodicals, and media resources. Selected annotated resources on Asian American activism and politics, counseling and psychology, educational issues, gender and sexual orientation, history, policy reports, and racial and ethnic identity are also included.…

  5. Elder Abuse among African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauriac, Jesse J.; Scruggs, Natoschia

    2006-01-01

    Perceptions of extreme, moderate, and mild forms of elder abuse among African-American women (n=25) and men (n=10) were examined. African-American respondents emphasized physical abuse when giving examples of extremely abusive behavior. Along with physical abuse, verbal abuse was the most frequently identified form of abuse, and was significantly…

  6. African American Health PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the May 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. The life expectancy of African Americans has improved, but it's still an average of four years less than whites. Learn what can be done so all Americans can have the opportunity to pursue a healthy lifestyle.

  7. On American Cultural Exportation Strategy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李德俊

    2015-01-01

    American government has been attaching great importance to the role that cultural values plays in international relationships and Culture Exportation has gradually become one of the important parts of American diplomatic strategy. This strategy,which is propelled by a variety of impetuses and conducted by different approaches,is mainly aimed to serve the overall national interests of the United States.

  8. On American Cultural Exportation Strategy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李德俊

    2015-01-01

    American government has been attaching great importance to the role that cultural values plays in international relationships and Culture Exportation has gradually become one of the important parts of American diplomatic strategy.This strategy,which is propelled by a variety of impetuses and conducted by different approaches,is mainly aimed to serve the overall national interests of the United States.

  9. Reconsidering Asian American Student Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Corinne M.; Maramba, Dina C.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter addresses the applicability of student development theories in light of empirical research on Asian American college students through a twofold approach: (a) revisiting the relevance of Kodama, McEwen, Liang, and Lee's (2001, 2002) theoretical work on Asian American student development; and (b) using Jones' and Stewart's (2016)…

  10. Native American youth and justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.Sc. Laurence A. French

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Youth and delinquency issues have long been problematic among Native Americans groups both on- and off-reservation. This phenomenon is further complicated by the cultural diversity among American Indians and Alaska Natives scattered across the United States. In address these issues, the paper begins with a historical overview of Native American youth. This history presents the long tradition of federal policies that, how well intended, have resulted in discriminatory practices with the most damages attacks being those directed toward the destruction of viable cultural attributes – the same attributes that make Native Americans unique within United States society. Following the historical material, the authors contrast the pervasive Native American aboriginal ethos of harmony with that of Protestant Ethic that dominates the ethos of the larger United States society. In addition to providing general information on Native American crime and delinquency, the paper also provides a case study of Native American justice within the Navajo Nation, the largest tribe, in both size and population, in the United States. The paper concludes with a discussion of issues specific to Native American youth and efforts to address these problems.

  11. Arab American Women Negotiating Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango, Oraib

    2012-01-01

    Compared to the literature available on other ethnic groups in the United States, there is very little information about school experiences of Arab Americans (Nieto, 2003). This study examines the ways that Arab American women reported positioning themselves when faced with difficult situations related to stereotypical images of Arabs and Arab…

  12. American Canine Hepatozoonosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, S. A.; Panciera, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    American canine hepatozoonosis (ACH) is a tick-borne disease that is spreading in the southeastern and south-central United States. Characterized by marked leukocytosis and periosteal bone proliferation, ACH is very debilitating and often fatal. Dogs acquire infection by ingesting nymphal or adult Gulf Coast ticks (Amblyomma maculatum) that, in a previous life stage, ingested the parasite in a blood meal taken from some vertebrate intermediate host. ACH is caused by the apicomplexan Hepatozoon americanum and has been differentiated from Old World canine hepatozoonosis caused by H. canis. Unlike H. canis, which is transmitted by the ubiquitous brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus), H. americanum is essentially an accidental parasite of dogs, for which Gulf Coast ticks are not favored hosts. The geographic portrait of the disease parallels the known distribution of the Gulf Coast tick, which has expanded in recent years. Thus, the endemic cycle of H. americanum involves A. maculatum as definitive host and some vertebrate intermediate host(s) yet to be identified. Although coyotes (Canis latrans) are known to be infected, it is not known how important this host is in maintaining the endemic cycle. This review covers the biology of the parasite and of the tick that transmits it and contrasts ACH with classical canine hepatozoonosis. Clinical aspects of the disease are discussed, including diagnosis and treatment, and puzzling epidemiologic issues are examined. Brief consideration is given to the potential for ACH to be used as a model for study of angiogenesis and of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy. PMID:14557294

  13. North American Regional Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-11-15

    North America is an energy community fortunate to be endowed with a rich and varied resource base. It consumes about a third of the world's energy and produces about one quarter of world energy supply. North America depends on a mix of complementary energy sources that should remain competitive but not in conflict. The current supply mix varies between Canada, the United States and Mexico, but fossil fuels are dominant across the region, leaving the three member countries vulnerable to a myriad of risks associated with traditional supply sources. Energy trade between all three countries is also a major contributor to the region's economy. Thus, the impetus for collaboration across the region has grown out of the common goals of energy security and economic prosperity. The goal of the WEC regional group was to discuss avenues for advancing North American cooperation and coordination on a range of energy issues. An additional objective was to develop policy recommendations that will facilitate effective development and use of the region's energy resources. Results and recommendtaions are summarized from three forums that focused on the pertinent issues of energy trade, energy efficiency and energy diversification. The inaugural forum (Energy Trade) was held in Washington, D.C. in the fall of 2005. The following summer, the second forum (Energy Efficiency) took place in Mexico City. The third forum (Energy Diversification) was hosted in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

  14. North American Regional Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-11-15

    North America is an energy community fortunate to be endowed with a rich and varied resource base. It consumes about a third of the world's energy and produces about one quarter of world energy supply. North America depends on a mix of complementary energy sources that should remain competitive but not in conflict. The current supply mix varies between Canada, the United States and Mexico, but fossil fuels are dominant across the region, leaving the three member countries vulnerable to a myriad of risks associated with traditional supply sources. Energy trade between all three countries is also a major contributor to the region's economy. Thus, the impetus for collaboration across the region has grown out of the common goals of energy security and economic prosperity. The goal of the WEC regional group was to discuss avenues for advancing North American cooperation and coordination on a range of energy issues. An additional objective was to develop policy recommendations that will facilitate effective development and use of the region's energy resources. Results and recommendtaions are summarized from three forums that focused on the pertinent issues of energy trade, energy efficiency and energy diversification. The inaugural forum (Energy Trade) was held in Washington, D.C. in the fall of 2005. The following summer, the second forum (Energy Efficiency) took place in Mexico City. The third forum (Energy Diversification) was hosted in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

  15. North American Foreign Fighters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Noonan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available While the phenomenon of so-called “foreign fighters” is in no way new the past thirty-plus years has shown a marked increase in the numbers of individuals traveling abroad to fight in civil conflicts in the Muslim world. The crisis in Syria (2011-present has created a massive influx of such individuals going to fight. Of particular concern in western capitals has been the numbers of individuals from those countries that have gone to fight in that conflict which has since crossed the border into neighboring Iraq with the establishment of the socalled “Islamic State” and threatens to broaden the conflict into a larger regional sectarian conflagration. While the numbers of such participants from Western Europe have been greater than those who have gone from the United States and Canada there are legitimate concerns in both Washington, DC, and Ottawa about American and Canadian citizens who have gone—or attempted to go—to fight there and in other locales such as the Maghreb and Somalia. The analysis here will provide some background on the foreign fighter phenomenon, discuss the foreign fighter flow model, explore the issue from both Canadian and US perspectives to include providing details of some original research categorizing the characteristics of a small sample of US and Canadian fighters and those who attempted to go and fight, discuss how both governments have attempted to deal with the issue, and offer some policy prescription for dealing with this issue that is of importance to both international security writ large and domestic security in the US and Canada.

  16. Division of Stress and Wildlife Ecology FY-1985 highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The major objective of the Division is to examine the influences of natural and man-made stressors on plant and animal populations and communities, primarily in southeastern ecosystems. Special attention is given to understanding the ecology and life history of wildlife populations, particularly those native to the SRP. The research programs are ultimately designed to assess the responses of populations and communities to various perturbations, but emphasis is placed on basic ecological studies that establish the solid foundation of information necessary to conduct applied research. Specific studies have looked at the availability and utilization of habitat types by various species. Biomass and reproduction studies on different vertebrate species have yielded comparative information on variation between populations in different geographic regions. Research on the endangered species that occur on the SRP has provided background data necessary to allow SREL scientists to recommend control and mitigation measures for the American alligator and wood stork. Investigations of waterfowl utilization patterns in reactor-affected and unaffected aquatic habitats on the SRP have yielded valuable information on the effects of reactor operations on these game species. Electrophoretic and morphological measurements have been made on a number of the local vertebrate species in addressing problems in genetics and population dynamics. Special emphasis has been placed on the actual or potential effects of reactor operations on fish, including larval fish in riverine swamp systems, and on several game and non-game species of reptiles and mammals

  17. Evaluation of the Steel Creek ecosystem in relation to the propsed restart of the L-reactor: interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    The ecological assessment of the Steel Creek ecosystempresents information concerning the fall and winter utilization of Steel Creek habitats. An understanding of the wintering behavior of these species is necessary to assess the impact of thermal effluents on these species. Waterfowl use of the Steel Creek habitats was extensive during winter 1981-1982. The habitat was used for both foraging and roosting. Mallards and wood ducks were the most important local game species. Observations of the thermal deltas indicated substantial migratory waterfowl use of areas near Four Mile Creek, while no ducks were observed in the vicinity of Pen Branch. Studies of the American alligator through the winter of 1981-1982 indicated that this species remains active through the winter. It has also been established that the Florida mud turtle, occurs in Steel Creek. Fish collections through the fall of 1981 and winter of 1981-1982 yielded 49 species. Considerable differences in overall fish species diversity and changes in fish species composition were observed. Substantial variations in radiocesium concentrations exist among species although all species were exposed to the same concentrations of radiocesium in water. Substantially less radiocesium remains in the system than was anticipated. Substantial differences occur in different stream segments as well as the vertical distribution of the isotope through the soil profile. The studies to date document that animal use of the Steel Creek cosystems is substantial

  18. Crocodilians and other reptiles: bioindicators of pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manolis, S C; Webb, G J; Britton, A R [Wildlife Management International, NT (Australia)

    2002-03-01

    The detrimental effects of environmental contamination and pollution (e.g. heavy metals, organochlorines, radionuclides) on wildlife are generally not well known or understood. Research is providing baseline information for various groups of animals, usually because of their sensitivity to changes in their environment (e.g. fish, amphibians), but also where there is a potential conservation threat (e.g. marine mammals). Little research has been directed at reptiles, which may be good bioindicators of their environment. Crocodilians in particular, because of their position in the food chain, aquatic habits and longevity (generally >50 years; Webb and Manolis 1989) may reflect changes in an area over longer periods (Burger et al., 2000). Radioactive contaminants are not generally encountered in crocodilian populations. Radiocesium levels in American alligators living near a reservoir receiving radionuclide-contaminated water from a nuclear reactor were quantified by Brisbin (1989); levels were lower than in various prey items (e.g. fish, waterbirds). This paper provides a brief overview on environmental contamination and reptiles, with particular reference to crocodilians.

  19. Crocodilians and other reptiles: bioindicators of pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manolis, S.C.; Webb, G.J.; Britton, A.R.

    2002-01-01

    The detrimental effects of environmental contamination and pollution (e.g. heavy metals, organochlorines, radionuclides) on wildlife are generally not well known or understood. Research is providing baseline information for various groups of animals, usually because of their sensitivity to changes in their environment (e.g. fish, amphibians), but also where there is a potential conservation threat (e.g. marine mammals). Little research has been directed at reptiles, which may be good bioindicators of their environment. Crocodilians in particular, because of their position in the food chain, aquatic habits and longevity (generally >50 years; Webb and Manolis 1989) may reflect changes in an area over longer periods (Burger et al., 2000). Radioactive contaminants are not generally encountered in crocodilian populations. Radiocesium levels in American alligators living near a reservoir receiving radionuclide-contaminated water from a nuclear reactor were quantified by Brisbin (1989); levels were lower than in various prey items (e.g. fish, waterbirds). This paper provides a brief overview on environmental contamination and reptiles, with particular reference to crocodilians

  20. A gene expression signature of confinement in peripheral blood of red wolves (Canis rufus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennerly, Erin; Ballmann, Anne; Martin, Stanton; Wolfinger, Russ; Gregory, Simon; Stoskopf, Michael; Gibson, Greg

    2008-06-01

    The stresses that animals experience as a result of modification of their ecological circumstances induce physiological changes that leave a signature in profiles of gene expression. We illustrate this concept in a comparison of free range and confined North American red wolves (Canis rufus). Transcription profiling of peripheral blood samples from 13 red wolf individuals in the Alligator River region of North Carolina revealed a strong signal of differentiation. Four hundred eighty-two out of 2980 transcripts detected on Illumina HumanRef8 oligonucleotide bead arrays were found to differentiate free range and confined wolves at a false discovery rate of 12.8% and P stress responses in confined animals. Consequently, characterization of differential transcript abundance in an accessible tissue such as peripheral blood identifies biomarkers that could be useful in animal management practices and for evaluating the impact of habitat changes on population health, particularly as attention turns to the impact of climate change on physiology and in turn species distributions.

  1. Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN)—A decade of serving hydrologic information to scientists and resource managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Eduardo; Conrads, Paul; Swain, Eric; Beerens, James M.

    2017-10-30

    IntroductionThe Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN) provides scientists and resource managers with regional maps of daily water levels and depths in the freshwater part of the Greater Everglades landscape. The EDEN domain includes all or parts of five Water Conservation Areas, Big Cypress National Preserve, Pennsuco Wetlands, and Everglades National Park. Daily water-level maps are interpolated from water-level data at monitoring gages, and depth is estimated by using a digital elevation model of the land surface. Online datasets provide time series of daily water levels at gages and rainfall and evapotranspiration data (https://sofia.usgs.gov/eden/). These datasets are used by scientists and resource managers to guide large-scale field operations, describe hydrologic changes, and support biological and ecological assessments that measure ecosystem response to the implementation of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan. EDEN water-level data have been used in a variety of biological and ecological studies including (1) the health of American alligators as a function of water depth, (2) the variability of post-fire landscape dynamics in relation to water depth, (3) the habitat quality for wading birds with dynamic habitat selection, and (4) an evaluation of the habitat of the Cape Sable seaside sparrow.

  2. Energy geopolitics, an American perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, Simon

    2008-01-01

    Even if geopolitics can be said not to exist for Americans who, like for example in the field of energy, believe that any problem can find a solution with the help of money and of the American ingenuity, and who are in fact only interested in a lower energy price, the author comments how energy issues are addressed by the candidates to the President election of 2008. The author notices that American people may have to realise, at least for a while, that their country is accused to bear a large share of responsibilities in environmental problems

  3. North American oil demand outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.B.

    1995-01-01

    An understanding of the relationship of economic growth and potential petroleum product demand is needed to forecast the potential for North American oil demand growth as well as knowledge of world supply and price. The bullish expectations for economic growth in the US and Canada auger well for North American refiners and marketeers. The growth in world economic output forecast, however, means a larger oil demand and an increase in OPEC's pricing power. Such price increases could depress North American oil demand growth. (author)

  4. American Samoa Energy Action Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haase, Scott [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Esterly, Sean [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Herdrich, David [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bodell, Tim [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Visser, Charles [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Describes the five near-term strategies selected by the American Samoa Renewable Energy Committee (ASREC) during action planning workshops conducted in May 2013, and outlines the actions being taken to implement those strategies. Each option is tied to a priority identified in the earlier draft American Samoa Strategic Energy Plan as being an essential component of reducing American Samoa'spetroleum energy consumption. The actions described for each strategy provide a roadmap to facilitate the implementation of each strategy. This document is intended to evolve along with the advancement of the projects, and will be updated to reflect progress.

  5. Americanization of Non-American Storiesin Disney Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beta Setiawati

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study is intended to know the Disney’s animation films characteristics which are adapted from non American stories that contain Americanization in order to be American popular culture products. This qualitative and library research is carried out within the field of American Studies. Disney’s animated films which are regarded as artifacts in order to identify American society and culture is used as her primary data. She then compares those Disney films with the original stories to discover the changes in making those stories become American popular products. She furthermore uses the sources such as books, magazines, journals, articles, and also internet data for her secondary data. The result of this study shows that most of folk narratives which were used in Disney films were adapted from other countries’ stories. However, Disney intentionally adapts foreign countries’ stories in its animated films by using Disney formula to blow up the sale of its products. Since Disney is one of the most powerful media conglomerates in the world, it works endlessly to set out world entertainment. Disney formula in its animated films which has dominated those adapted films are only intended to obtain as much profit as possible without paying attention to the values in children entertainment.

  6. Usage Notes in the Oxford American Dictionary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, R. Thomas

    1981-01-01

    Compares the "Oxford American Dictionary" with the "American Heritage Dictionary." Examines the dictionaries' differences in philosophies of language, introductory essays, and usage notes. Concludes that the "Oxford American Dictionary" is too conservative, paternalistic, and dogmatic for the 1980s. (DMM)

  7. American Association Of State Climatologists

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records documenting the business, membership, and meetings of the American Association of State Climatologists, from 1976-92. Material donated in 2008 by the estate...

  8. Performing Transnational Arab American Womanhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koegeler-Abdi, Martina

    2016-01-01

    The first Miss Lebanon-America, Rosemary Hakim, landed at Beirut Airport in July 1955 to start a public diplomacy tour. As an American beauty queen from Detroit visiting Lebanon, her parents' homeland, she was greeted enthusiastically by the local press and closely monitored by US government...... a transnational sense of Arab Americanness to negotiate her own gender and ethnic identity. This is significant because we currently lack a broader historical understanding of Arab American women’s public agency, particularly during the mid-twentieth century. Hakim’s memoir requires us to rethink the history...... of Arab American women’s strategies of self-representation in ways that acknowledge but are not confined within the terms of conventional orientalist discourses....

  9. Central American and Caribbean Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather and soil temperature observations from foreign countries, taken by foreign and American observers. Includes NOAA forms collected and archived at NCDC, and...

  10. American Institute for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Phytochemicals in your food Red and processed meat Sugar and cancer risk Alcohol and cancer risk Physical Activity Are ... Updates: Diabetes Rates are High and Rising, That Links with Cancer Apples and Oranges, What Americans are Eating and ...

  11. Charting Transnational Native American Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsinya Huang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction to the Special Forum entitled "Charting Transnational Native American Studies: Aesthetics, Politics, Identity," edited by Hsinya Huang, Philip J. Deloria, Laura M. Furlan, and John Gamber

  12. American Head and Neck Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... research and insights. Comments This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged. This iframe ... and Announcements Copyright ©2016 · American Head and Neck Society · Privacy and Return Policy Managed by BSC Management, ...

  13. American Association of Tissue Banks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Committees Accreditation American Board of Tissue Banking Bylaws / Ethics Communications Donor Family Services Ad Hoc Committee Education Finance ... Bureau Accredited Bank Search Bookstore Bulletins Global Topics Communications & Media Job Center News Releases Patients and Community Useful ...

  14. Taxation and the American Indian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, David

    1973-01-01

    The article explores American Indian tribal rights to tax exemptions and self-imposed taxation; general recommendations on possible tribal tax alternatives; and evaluation of the probable economic effect of taxation. (FF)

  15. Geothermal energy for American Samoa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-01

    The geothermal commercialization potential in American Samoa was investigated. With geothermal energy harnessed in American Samoa, a myriad of possibilities would arise. Existing residential and business consumers would benefit from reduced electricity costs. The tuna canneries, demanding about 76% of the island's process heat requirements, may be able to use process heat from a geothermal source. Potential new industries include health spas, aquaculture, wood products, large domestic and transhipment refrigerated warehouses, electric cars, ocean nodule processing, and a hydrogen economy. There are no territorial statutory laws of American Samoa claiming or reserving any special rights (including mineral rights) to the territorial government, or other interests adverse to a land owner, for subsurface content of real property. Technically, an investigation has revealed that American Samoa does possess a geological environment conducive to geothermal energy development. Further studies and test holes are warranted.

  16. Pricing American and Asian Options

    OpenAIRE

    Pat Muldowney

    2015-01-01

    An analytic method for pricing American call options is provided; followed by an empirical method for pricing Asian call options. The methodology is the pricing theory presented in "A Modern Theory of Random Variation", by Patrick Muldowney, 2012.

  17. American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Position Statements Publications Bookstore American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry Legislative & Regulatory Agenda AAGP eNews (Members Only) Tools ... Funding Training Resources and Curricula For Clinicians >> Geriatric Psychiatry Identifier Webinar: Billing and Coding Consumer Material Clinical ...

  18. American Association for Clinical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find the answer to your question IN CLINICAL CHEMISTRY Hs-cTnI as a Gatekeeper for Further Cardiac ... Online Harmonization.net Commission on Accreditation in Clinical Chemistry American Board of Clinical Chemistry Clinical Chemistry Trainee ...

  19. American acceptance of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, W.

    1980-01-01

    The characteristic adventurous spirit that built American technology will eventually lead to American acceptance of nuclear power unless an overpowering loss of nerve causes us to reject both nuclear technology and world leadership. The acceptance of new technology by society has always been accompanied by activist opposition to industralization. To resolve the debate between environmental and exploitive extremists, we must accept with humility the basic premise that human accomplishment is a finite part of nature

  20. African American Health PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-05-02

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the May 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. The life expectancy of African Americans has improved, but it’s still an average of four years less than whites. Learn what can be done so all Americans can have the opportunity to pursue a healthy lifestyle.  Created: 5/2/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 5/2/2017.

  1. Examining Factors Influencing Asian American and Latino American Students' College Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang-Yeung, Leilani Weichun

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation examines the gap in college enrollment between Asian Americans and Latino Americans regarding the effects of family and school factors, classifying them into the six ethnic/generational status groups (Asian American first generation, Asian American second generation, Asian American third generation and plus, Latino American first…

  2. Transfusion medicine on American television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, J K

    2014-02-01

    Television is a beloved American pastime and a frequent American export. As such, American television shapes how the global public views the world. This study examines how the portrayal of blood transfusion and blood donation on American television may influence how domestic and international audiences perceive the field of transfusion medicine. American television programming of the last quarter-century was reviewed to identify programmes featuring topics related to blood banking/transfusion medicine. The included television episodes were identified through various sources. Twenty-seven television episodes airing between 1991 and 2013 were identified as featuring blood bank/transfusion medicine topics. Although some accurate representations of the field were identified, most television programmes portrayed blood banking/transfusion medicine inaccurately. The way in which blood banking/transfusion medicine is portrayed on American television may assist clinicians in understanding their patient's concerns about blood safety and guide blood collection organisations in improving donor recruitment. © 2013 The Author. Transfusion Medicine © 2013 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  3. Celebrating National American Indian Heritage Month

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mann, Diane

    2004-01-01

    November has been designated National American Indian Heritage Month to honor American Indians and Alaska Natives by increasing awareness of their culture, history, and, especially, their tremendous...

  4. Native American Women: Living with Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, Rebecca

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the role of Native American women in the spiritual and cultural life of American Indians. Native American spirituality is deeply connected to the land through daily use, ritual, and respect for sacred space. Often Native American women act as conduits and keepers of this knowledge. (MJP)

  5. Successfully Educating Our African-American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncree-Moffett, Kareem

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this empirical study was to explore the lived experiences of African American retired female teachers who have prior experience with educating urban African American students in public schools. Also explored are the experiences of active African American female teachers of urban African American students and comparisons are…

  6. Sociolinguistics features of humor in american linguoculture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article we study the characteristics of the language of representation and perception of American humour, its linguistic and cultural features in humorous texts of American comics from the American linguistic culture. The material for research is the humorous texts and fragments of the performances of American ...

  7. The Native American Experience. American Historical Images on File.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardwell, Lelia, Ed.

    This photo-documentation reference body presents more than 275 images chronicling the experiences of the American Indian from their prehistoric migrations to the present. The volume includes information and images illustrating the life ways of various tribes. The images are accompanied by historical information providing cultural context. The book…

  8. Disillusionment of the American Dream——On An American Tragedy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    管秀丽

    2008-01-01

    Theodore Dreiser is now regarded as one of the pre-eminent American realistic novelists of the first half of the twentieth century.an anatomist of the American Dream.In his great work An American Tragedy,Dreis- er exposes and criticizes mercilessly the corruption and black side of American society.The disillusionment of the American Dream is an important theme of the fiction.This paper illustrates "An American Tragedy" is the re- flection of disillusionment of the American Dream in the perspectives of the tragedy of a mortal,the tragedy of American society,and the tragedy of the American Dream.

  9. 75 FR 70300 - USEC, Inc.; American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility; American Centrifuge Plant; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    ... Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility; American Centrifuge Plant; Notice of Receipt of a License Transfer... SNM-2011, for the American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility and the American Centrifuge Plant... USEC Inc., (the Licensee), for its American Centrifuge Lead Cascade Facility (LCF) and American...

  10. Marketing to Older American Consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Barbara; Stephens, Nancy

    1986-01-01

    Examined older adults as a potential market for American businesses. Data indicate that in terms of size and income, senior citizens comprise a substantial buying group. Their buying styles, product and service needs, and shopping behavior vary from younger adults and within the older adult population. Strategies for successful marketing are…

  11. American Indians in Graduate Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, Clara Sue

    1989-01-01

    The number of American Indians enrolled in institutions of higher education is very small. Enrollment figures for fall 1984 show Indians made up .68% of the total enrollment in institutions of higher education in the country, but only 15% of them were in universities. Their largest representation was in two-year institutions, where 54% of Indian…

  12. The Evil that Americans Did

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, John David

    2007-01-01

    Slavery's unequivocal evil lies at the heart of debates over apologizing for America's "peculiar institution" and awarding reparations. In The Problem of Evil: Slavery, Freedom, and the Ambiguities of American Reform, a provocative collection of original essays, the editors Steven Mintz and John Stauffer, along with 23 contributors,…

  13. Communication; A Scientific American Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientific American, Inc., New York, NY.

    With present advances in communication technology, profound and qualitative changes in our civilization are taking place--in business and politics, in education, in entertainment, interpersonal relations, and the organization of society itself. In honor of the significance of such developments, an entire issue of "Scientific American" magazine…

  14. The American Inventors Protection Act

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, Arvid O.I.; Kleimeier, Stefanie; Mimiroglu, Nagihan; Pennings, Joost M.E.

    2018-01-01

    We examine the impact of innovation disclosure through patenting on firms' cost of debt, focusing on the American Inventors Protection Act (AIPA) as an exogenous shock in innovation disclosure regulation. Post-AIPA, firms have an incentive to apply for patents only if commercial success is likely.

  15. Foundation Networks and American Hegemony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inderjeet Parmar

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The major American foundations constructed and sustained the rich texture of cooperative social, intellectual and political relations between key actors and institutions supportive of specific modes of thought that promoted US hegemony. Foundations also fostered and developed the attractive power-knowledge networks that not only radiated intellectual influence but also attracted some of the most creative minds. Finally, liberal internationalist foundations fostered globalism even when the American state was ‘isolationist’, and when US influence abroad unwelcome. Their significance in American hegemony building lay in their sustained, long-term cooperative relationship with the American state through which they helped build national, international and global institutions and networks. The latter process evidences the most significant impact of US foundations – the building of the domestic and international infrastructure for liberal internationalism which has transformed into a kind of “social neoliberalism”. Theoretical conclusions follow from these claims: the sustained and deep cooperation between the state and foundations suggests that we must revise our views of “how power works” in the United States and therefore influences its foreign relations. Therefore, the article shows that elite networks, consisting of state officials and private citizens are powerful means by which foreign policy shifts may be prepared, elite and mass opinion primed and mobilised, new consensus built, ‘old’ forces marginalised, and US hegemony constructed.

  16. Polish Americans. Second, Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopata, Helen Znaniecka

    This book examines Polonia, the Polish ethnic community in America created by three giant waves of immigration between 1880 and 1990. The complicated history of this ethnic group is reflected in the lives of increasing numbers of Polish Americans, including recent immigrants brought by political and economic changes, as they achieve middle class…

  17. Textbooks and the American Indian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costo, Rupert, Ed.

    An independent Indian publishing house has been formed to provide classroom instructional materials which deal accurately with the history, culture, and role of the American Indian. This book is a preliminary statement in that publishing program. General criteria, valid for instructional materials from elementary through high school, are applied…

  18. Filipino Americans: Transformation and Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Maria P. P., Ed.

    Throughout the United States, many Filipino Americans, especially students, are beginning to want to know more about their cultural heritage and future. Overall, there has been very little written to transmit knowledge about Filipino history, ideas, and values, even though Filipinos make up the largest Asian ethnic group in the United States.…

  19. Latin American Folk Art Prints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navah, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Latin American customs and colors play an important role as second graders are introduced to multicultural experiences through food, music, dance, art, and craft. In this article, the author describes a printing project inspired by Guatemalan weavings and amate bark paintings. (Contains 2 online resources.)

  20. AMERICAN INDIANS AND EDUCATIONAL LABORATORIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BASS, WILLARD P.; BURGER, HENRY G.

    MANY OF THE DIVERSE EDUCATIONAL PROBLEMS OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED FOR YEARS, BUT HAVE BEEN PERMITTED TO LAY DORMANT. SOCIO-ECONOMIC DISADVANTAGEMENT IS EXHIBITED IN AREAS OF INCOME, UNEMPLOYMENT, SCHOOL DROPOUT RATE, EXPECTED LIFE SPAN, INFANT MORTALITY RATE, BIRTH RATE, AND HEALTH HISTORY. COMMUNICATION PROBLEMS BLOCK THE…

  1. Dimensions of Native American Stereotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Jeffery R.; Rouse, Linda P.

    1987-01-01

    Reports responses of 226 University of Texas undergraduates concerning their stereotypical perceptions of American Indians. Examines cultural stereotypes, personal stereotypes, perceived degree of Indian homogeneity, attitudes toward assimilation, and victim blaming. Suggests an emergent Indian stereotype based on cultural relativism prevailing…

  2. The American Way of Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    Military Experience: History and Learning,” The Journal of Interdisciplinary History, Vol. 1, No. 2 (Winter, 1971), 208. 19 Jerome S. Bruner , Jacqueline... Bruner , Jerome S., Goodnow, Jacqueline J, and Austin, George A. A Study of Thinking. New York: Wiley, 1956. Bruscino, Thomas A, “Our American

  3. American Elements in Czech Parody

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hemelíková, Blanka

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 1 (2015), s. 102-113 ISSN 0022-3840 Institutional support: RVO:68378068 Keywords : Czech interwar literature * parody * Brdečka, Jiří * Kuděj, Zdeněk Matěj * americanism Subject RIV: AJ - Letters, Mass-media, Audiovision Impact factor: 0.070, year: 2015

  4. American options under stochastic volatility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chockalingam, A.; Muthuraman, K.

    2011-01-01

    The problem of pricing an American option written on an underlying asset with constant price volatility has been studied extensively in literature. Real-world data, however, demonstrate that volatility is not constant, and stochastic volatility models are used to account for dynamic volatility

  5. Ideas That Shaped American Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Franklin

    1981-01-01

    Briefly discusses 10 books, or series of books, that represent major turning points in American education in the last 75 years. The authors include William H. McGuffey, Abraham Flexner, Lewis M. Terman, John Dewey, George S. Counts, Jerome S. Bruner, James S. Coleman, Michael B. Katz, and B. F. Skinner. (IRT)

  6. Sexism in modern American society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibraeva B. M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available the authors of the article consider that modern life is still full of various stereotypes. One of the most controversial questions in this article is the issue of discrimination against women in contemporary American society, and it is hard to believe, because this country claims to be a main guarantor of the human rights and freedoms.

  7. Dietary Acculturation among Filipino Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Persephone; Jurado, Leo-Felix

    2015-12-22

    Acculturation, the subsequent changes that occur in one culture after continuous first hand contact with another culture, impacts the dietary habits and health risks of individuals. This study examines the acculturation, dietary habits and anthropometric measurements in a sample of 210 first generation Filipino American immigrants in New Jersey (NJ). Acculturation was measured using the Short Acculturation Scale for Filipino Americans (ASASFA). Dietary acculturation was measured using the Dietary Acculturation Questionnaire for Filipino Americans (DAQFA) and dietary intake was determined using the Block's Brief Food Frequency Questionnaire (BFFQ). Anthropometric measurements were obtained including weight, height and waist circumference. Acculturation had a significant negative relationship with Filipino Dietary acculturation. Western dietary acculturation was significantly correlated with caloric intake (r(208) = 0.193, p Filipino dietary acculturation, dietary intake and anthropometric measurements. The results showed that Filipino American immigrants have increased risks including increased BMI, waist circumference and increased fat intake. Over all, this research highlighted some dietary changes and their effects on dietary intake and health status.

  8. Dietary Acculturation among Filipino Americans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persephone Vargas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Acculturation, the subsequent changes that occur in one culture after continuous first hand contact with another culture, impacts the dietary habits and health risks of individuals. This study examines the acculturation, dietary habits and anthropometric measurements in a sample of 210 first generation Filipino American immigrants in New Jersey (NJ. Acculturation was measured using the Short Acculturation Scale for Filipino Americans (ASASFA. Dietary acculturation was measured using the Dietary Acculturation Questionnaire for Filipino Americans (DAQFA and dietary intake was determined using the Block’s Brief Food Frequency Questionnaire (BFFQ. Anthropometric measurements were obtained including weight, height and waist circumference. Acculturation had a significant negative relationship with Filipino Dietary acculturation. Western dietary acculturation was significantly correlated with caloric intake (r(208 = 0.193, p < 0.01, percentage fat intake (r(208 = 0.154, p < 0.05, percentage carbohydrate intake (r(208 = −0.172, p < 0.05, Body Mass Index (BMI (r(208 = 0.216, p < 0.01 and waist circumference (r(208 = 0.161, p < 0.01. There was no significant correlation between Filipino dietary acculturation, dietary intake and anthropometric measurements. The results showed that Filipino American immigrants have increased risks including increased BMI, waist circumference and increased fat intake. Over all, this research highlighted some dietary changes and their effects on dietary intake and health status.

  9. Proverbs in Mexican American Tradition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Shirley L.

    1982-01-01

    Examines proverb use among 304 Mexican Americans (aged 16-85) of Los Angeles (California), assembling information on how or where particular proverbs were learned, with whom or what kind of individual their use is associated, the occasions on which they are used, and general attitudes toward the use of proverbs. (LC)

  10. American Akicita: Indigenous American warriors and military service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, J Douglas

    2017-08-01

    Indigenous Americans (i.e., Native/American Indians, AK natives, Pacific Islanders) have consistently volunteered for military service at greater rates than any other ethnic group, including the majority culture, since the early days of the country. This article is an introduction to the special section which includes a number of outstanding papers that provide an innovative and compelling effort to overcome the challenges of casualties from war and render effective and culturally informed care. These manuscripts describe culturally appropriate considerations of suicide (O'Keefe), family involvement and access to care (Whealin), and telehealth for treatment of rural Native veterans (Goss). Challenging and complex treatment needs call for equally mindful and competent approaches. These authors and providers present compelling examples of addressing these needs in working with our Wounded Warriors. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Asian American Education: Identities, Racial Issues, and Languages. Research on the Education of Asian Pacific Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Xue Lan, Ed.; Endo, Russell, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Asian American Education--Asian American Identities, Racial Issues, and Languages presents groundbreaking research that critically challenges the invisibility, stereotyping, and common misunderstandings of Asian Americans by disrupting "customary" discourse and disputing "familiar" knowledge. The chapters in this anthology…

  12. 75 FR 49484 - Office of Postsecondary Education; Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Postsecondary Education; Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions (AANAPISI), Native American-Serving Nontribal Institutions (NASNTI), Hispanic Serving Institutions-STEM and Articulation (HSI-STEM), and Predominantly Black Institutions (PBI...

  13. American Indian Education Opportunities Program. Supplement 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molin, Paulette F.

    1997-01-01

    Activities of the American Indian Educational Opportunities Program (AIEOP) at Hampton University for this reporting period included the establishment of a student chapter of the American Indian Science & Engineering Society (AISES), a move to new office space, hosting events on campus for visiting students from the American Indian Education Program of Oxon Hill, Maryland and Onondaga Community College in Syracuse, New York, collaboration with the Multicultural Leadership Team at NASA Langley Research Center for a Native American elder to serve as a speaker, participation in Native American conferences and other events, and continuing efforts to recruit and retain American Indian students.

  14. Polydactyly in the American Indian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingle, G J; Niswander, J D

    1975-01-01

    Polydactyly has an incidence in the American Indian twice that of Caucasians. A minimum estimate of this incidence is 2.40 per 1,000 live births. Preaxial type 1 has an incidence three to four times that reported for Caucasians or Negroes. The overall sex ratio in Indians is distorted with more males affected than females. The preaxial type 1 anomaly has a strong predilection for the hands and always is unilateral in contrast to postaxial type B where more than one-half are bilateral. The evidence to date, consisting of varying incidences of specific types of polydactyly among American whites, Negroes, and Indians in varying enviroments, suggests different gene-frequencies for polydactyly in each population. The incidence in Indians with 50% Caucasian admixture suggests that the factors controlling polydactyly are in large part genetically determined. Family studies and twin studies reported elsewhere offer no clear-cut genetic model which explains the highly variable gene frequencies.

  15. Cognitive Skill, Skill Demands of Jobs, and Earnings among Young European American, African American, and Mexican American Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, George; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Analyses of National Longitudinal Survey data indicate that cognitive skill level affects access to high-skill occupations and earnings. Lower cognitive skill levels for African Americans and U.S.-born Mexican Americans explain a substantial proportion of income differences between these groups and European Americans but not the gender gap in pay…

  16. Parental Attachment, Self-Esteem, and Antisocial Behaviors among African American, European American, and Mexican American Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbona, Consuelo; Power, Thomas G.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the relation of mother and father attachment to self-esteem and self-reported involvement in antisocial behaviors among African American, European American, and Mexican American high school students. Findings indicated that adolescents from the 3 ethnic/racial groups did not differ greatly in their reported attachment. (Contains 70…

  17. Perpetual American options within CTRWs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Miquel

    2008-06-01

    Continuous-time random walks are a well suited tool for the description of market behaviour at the smallest scale: the tick-to-tick evolution. We will apply this kind of market model to the valuation of perpetual American options: derivatives with no maturity that can be exercised at any time. Our approach leads to option prices that fulfill financial formulas when canonical assumptions on the dynamics governing the process are made, but it is still suitable for more exotic market conditions.

  18. Perpetual American options within CTRW's

    OpenAIRE

    Montero, Miquel

    2007-01-01

    Continuous-time random walks are a well suited tool for the description of market behaviour at the smallest scale: the tick-to-tick evolution. We will apply this kind of market model to the valuation of perpetual American options: derivatives with no maturity that can be exercised at any time. Our approach leads to option prices that fulfil financial formulas when canonical assumptions on the dynamics governing the process are made, but it is still suitable for more exotic market conditions.

  19. Destabilizing the American Racial Order

    OpenAIRE

    Hochschild, Jennifer L.; Weaver, Vesla; Burch, Traci

    2011-01-01

    Are racial disparities in the United States just as deep-rooted as they were before the 2008 presidential election, largely eliminated, or persistent but on the decline? One can easily find all of these pronouncements; rather than trying to adjudicate among them, this essay seeks to identify what is changing in the American racial order, what persists or is becoming even more entrenched, and what is likely to affect the balance between change and continuity. The authors focus on young America...

  20. The incunabula of American optometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Michael J

    2012-04-01

    Only a very few American opticians (optometrists) wrote textbooks or manuals before the end of the 19th century. The important hand-book by William Bohne has already been excellently covered by David Goss but three others appear to have been largely unnoticed. These are manuals by Walter Alden, August Morck and J W Queen & Co.: pioneer works that can be regarded as the incunabula or cradle of printing of optometric publishing in the United States.

  1. American Psychological Association annual report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Presents the 2009 American Psychological Association annual report. It highlights a very important year for APA and psychology by summarizing activities within each directorate. It describes strides made toward the goal of infusing psychology into the health care marketplace and of bringing psychology-and the unique skills of psychologists-to the attention of the public. This report aims to give insight into the contributions psychologists make to our communities and our country. 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  2. Understanding American Identity: An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    this leads to is, how can we begin this transformation ? D. HOW TO GET THERE: PATRIOTIC BUILDING BLOCKS 1. Civic Education Many have argued that civic... transformation of the U.S. public education system and writes, “High schools brought young people together into an adolescent world that helped to obscure...Revamped civic education and national service programs can serve to form those cross-cutting ties. 14. SUBJECT TERMS American identity, national identity

  3. Marks in Latin-American radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Almeida, S. de.

    1987-01-01

    An historical retrospective of Latin-American radiology is shortly presented. Several radiologic societies as well as personalities, scientists and doctors are reported emphasizing their contribuition to radiologic Latin-American culture. (M.A.C.) [pt

  4. American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... New Research AADSM Highlights Members More news... Dental Sleep Medicine: An area of dental practice that focuses on ... SomnoMed Silver Sponsors Copyright © American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine, All Rights Reserved. American Academy of Dental Sleep ...

  5. Early Education for Asian American Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, Margie K.

    1980-01-01

    A review of early education for Asian American children (Japanese, Chinese, Filipinos, Vietnamese, Koreans, Hawaiians, and Samoans) focuses on the 1975 Asian American Education Project, a study of the learning characteristics of preschool age children and its educational implications. (CM)

  6. African Americans and High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANSWERS by heart Lifestyle + Risk Reduction High Blood Pressure What About African Americans and High Blood Pressure? African Americans in the U.S. have a higher prevalence of high blood pressure (HBP) than ...

  7. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders among Native Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A MERICANS Native American cultures, which encompass American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian tribes, are rich with history, tradition, spirituality, and art. There are 562 Federally recognized tribes across the ...

  8. American Board of Obesity Medicine (ABOM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not trained in how to manage it. The American Board of Obesity Medicine certifies physicians looking to bridge this gap. ... an ABOM diplomate. APPLY NOW OUR MISSION The American Board of Obesity Medicine (ABOM) serves the public and the field ...

  9. American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... My Account Find Members Benefits American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy 112 South Alfred Street Alexandria, ... Fax: (703) 838-9805 © 2002 - American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | ...

  10. THE DEPICTION OF HOMOSEXUALITY IN AMERICAN MOVIES

    OpenAIRE

    Rudy Rudy

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the depiction of homosexuality in American films. It is intended to identify the images of gays depicted in American films as well as the characteristics of American gay movies. It incorporates library research by applying an analytical descriptive approach in analyzing the data. The symbol and reflective theory is used to analyze 18 American movies and 14 gay films from other countries in the early 2000s. It shows that gay films can attract audiences by describing gays ...

  11. The Depiction Of Homosexuality In American Movies

    OpenAIRE

    Rudy, Rudy

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the depiction of homosexuality in American films. It is intended to identify the images of gays depicted in American films as well as the characteristics of American gay movies. It incorporates library research by applying an analytical descriptive approach in analyzing the data. The symbol and reflective theory is used to analyze 18 American movies and 14 gay films from other countries in the early 2000s. It shows that gay films can attract audiences by describing gays ...

  12. Understanding the Strengths of African American Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlejohn-Blake, Sheila M.; Darling, Carol Anderson

    1993-01-01

    Focuses on strengths of African-American families and how they function, relevant conceptual approaches, and trends and issues in studying African-American families that can facilitate understanding. A shift from studying dysfunctional families to more positive aspects can help African-American families meet societal challenges. (SLD)

  13. The Black Man in American Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Framingham Public Schools, MA.

    GRADE OR AGES: Junior high school. SUBJECT MATTER: The black man in American society. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: There are four major parts each with an overview. The four parts concern a) the African heritage of the black man, b) the American exploitation of the black man, c) the black man's contribution to American society, d) the…

  14. Engaging African Americans in Smoking Cessation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallen, Jacqueline; Randolph, Suzanne; Carter-Pokras, Olivia; Feldman, Robert; Kanamori-Nishimura, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    Background: African Americans are disproportionately exposed to and targeted by prosmoking advertisements, particularly menthol cigarette ads. Though African Americans begin smoking later than whites, they are less likely to quit smoking than whites. Purpose: This study was designed to explore African American smoking cessation attitudes,…

  15. Nostalgia and Educational History: An American Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousmaniere, Kate

    2017-01-01

    This essay examines the way in which nostalgia informs the 1953 painting of a school setting by the popular American artist Norman Rockwell. "The Girl with Black Eye", the cover image of the American popular magazine "The Saturday Evening Post" on 23 May 1953, draws on traditional American iconography of the disciplining of…

  16. American Psychology "Is" Becoming More International

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Gregory D.; Nichols, Austin Lee; Schember, Tatiana Orozco

    2009-01-01

    Comments on an article by J. J. Arnett regarding the assertion that American psychology focuses too narrowly on Americans while neglecting the other 95% of the world's population. The authors argue that while Arnett's assessment was poignant, and his call for a more inclusive, international, and cross-cultural representation in American psychology…

  17. Student Communities and Individualism in American Cinema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnick, Bryan R.; Dawson, Heather S.; Smith, D. Spencer; Vosburg-Bluem, Bethany

    2010-01-01

    Hollywood films partially construct how Americans think about education. Recent work on the representation of schools in American cinema has highlighted the role of class difference in shaping school film genres. It has also advanced the idea that a nuanced understanding of American individualism helps to explain why the different class genres are…

  18. Asian American Giving to US Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoda, Kozue

    2010-01-01

    Asian Americans have had significant impacts on and within mainstream US society, and their great efforts and gifts in the name of charitable causes are no exception. This study aims to examine perceptions within American university development offices about Asian American giving to US higher education. The article begins with a literature review…

  19. American Jazz Cathedra Enters into Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    <正> On the evening of 25 June, 2003, an American Music Cathedra was held in the In ternational Friendship Hall of Beijing Jintai Art Museum. And its theme is "a form of American Art-Jazz". The Economic Department, Press Department of American Embassy and Beijing Jueshi Culture Development Co.Ltd. sponsored the activity.

  20. Ethnic differences in inter- and intra-situational blood pressure variation: Comparisons among African-American, Hispanic-American, Asian-American, and European-American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Gary D; Bovbjerg, Dana H; Hill, Leah A

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the daily inter- and intra-situational ambulatory blood pressure (BP) variation by ethnicity in women. The African-American (N = 82; Age = 39.7 + 8.9), Hispanic-American (N = 25; age = 37.5 + 9.4), Asian-American (N = 22; Age = 35.2 + 8.6), and European-American (N = 122; Age = 37.2+ 9.4) women in this study all worked in similar positions at two major medical centers in NYC. Each wore an ambulatory monitor during the course of one mid-week workday. Proportional BP changes from work or home to sleep, intra-situational BP variation (standard deviation [SD]) and mean situational BP levels were compared among the groups using ANOVA models. African-American and Asian-American women had significantly smaller proportional work-sleep systolic changes than either European- (P women, but the Asian-American women's changes tended to be smallest. The variability (SD) of diastolic BP at work was significantly greater among African- and Hispanic-American women compared to Asian- and European-American women (all P women had greater sleep variability than European-American women (P Asian-American women had the highest level of sleep diastolic pressure (all comparisons P Asian-American women have an attenuated proportional BP decline from waking environments to sleep compared to European-American and Hispanic-American women. Asian-American nocturnal BP may be elevated relative to all other groups. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 28:932-935, 2016. © 2016Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.