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Sample records for america genetic characterization

  1. Characterization of individuals at high risk of developing melanoma in Latin America: bases for genetic counseling in melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, Susana; Potrony, Miriam; Cuellar, Francisco; Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Carrera, Cristina; Aguilera, Paula; Nagore, Eduardo; Garcia-Casado, Zaida; Requena, Celia; Kumar, Rajiv; Landman, Gilles; Costa Soares de Sá, Bianca; Gargantini Rezze, Gisele; Facure, Luciana; de Avila, Alexandre Leon Ribeiro; Achatz, Maria Isabel; Carraro, Dirce Maria; Duprat Neto, João Pedreira; Grazziotin, Thais C; Bonamigo, Renan R; Rey, Maria Carolina W; Balestrini, Claudia; Morales, Enrique; Molgo, Montserrat; Bakos, Renato Marchiori; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia; Giugliani, Roberto; Larre Borges, Alejandra; Barquet, Virginia; Pérez, Javiera; Martínez, Miguel; Cabo, Horacio; Cohen Sabban, Emilia; Latorre, Clara; Carlos-Ortega, Blanca; Salas-Alanis, Julio C; Gonzalez, Roger; Olazaran, Zulema; Malvehy, Josep; Badenas, Celia

    2016-07-01

    CDKN2A is the main high-risk melanoma-susceptibility gene, but it has been poorly assessed in Latin America. We sought to analyze CDKN2A and MC1R in patients from Latin America with familial and sporadic multiple primary melanoma (SMP) and compare the data with those for patients from Spain to establish bases for melanoma genetic counseling in Latin America. CDKN2A and MC1R were sequenced in 186 Latin American patients from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, and Uruguay, and in 904 Spanish patients. Clinical and phenotypic data were obtained. Overall, 24 and 14% of melanoma-prone families in Latin America and Spain, respectively, had mutations in CDKN2A. Latin American families had CDKN2A mutations more frequently (P = 0.014) than Spanish ones. Of patients with SMP, 10% of those from Latin America and 8.5% of those from Spain had mutations in CDKN2A (P = 0.623). The most recurrent CDKN2A mutations were c.-34G>T and p.G101W. Latin American patients had fairer hair (P = 0.016) and skin (P < 0.001) and a higher prevalence of MC1R variants (P = 0.003) compared with Spanish patients. The inclusion criteria for genetic counseling of melanoma in Latin America may be the same criteria used in Spain, as suggested in areas with low to medium incidence, SMP with at least two melanomas, or families with at least two cases among first- or second-degree relatives.Genet Med 18 7, 727-736.

  2. Genetic characterization and phylogenetic analysis of skunk-associated rabies viruses in North America with special emphasis on the central plains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Rolan; Nadin-Davis, Susan A; Moore, Michael; Hanlon, Cathleen

    2013-06-01

    Across North America the skunk acts as a reservoir for several rabies virus variants. Some of these variants are geographically restricted in range as is the case for the California skunk variant and two distinct variants present in Mexico. In contrast the North Central and South Central skunk rabies viruses are dispersed in overlapping ranges over large areas of the Midwestern region of the United States with the former extending into southern parts of the Canadian prairies. Despite this extensive range, there has been only very limited molecular characterization of these two viral variants. This study has examined the genetic diversity of the rabies viruses associated with North American skunks, with particular emphasis on the South Central skunk variant which was found to comprise three distinct geographically restricted groups of viruses that could in some cases be further sub-divided. The phylogenetic relationships of these groups and sub-groups allowed us to infer the likely direction of spread of these variants in some instances. Patterns of amino acid replacement of North American skunk-associated rabies viruses for both the nucleoprotein and glycoprotein products are also examined. These patterns reflect the virus phylogeny but no amino acid residues associated specifically with the skunk host were identified. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The Genetic Diversity of the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Chacón-Duque, Juan Camilo; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Fuentes-Guajardo, Macarena; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2017-08-31

    The history of the Americas involved the encounter of millions of Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans. A variable admixture of these three continental groups has taken place throughout the continent, influenced by demography and a range of social factors. This variable admixture has had a major influence on the genetic makeup of populations across the continent. Here, we summarize the demographic history of the region, highlight some social factors that affected historical admixture, and review major patterns of ancestry across the Western Hemisphere based on genetic data.

  4. Genetic Cancer Risk Assessment for Breast Cancer in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarri-Guerra, Yanin; Blazer, Kathleen Reilly; Weitzel, Jeffrey Nelson

    2017-01-01

    In Latin America, breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women, and limited available data suggest that up to 15% of all breast cancer cases in the region are hereditary. Genetic cancer risk assessment and counseling is a critical component of the appropriate clinical care of patients with hereditary breast cancer and their families. Unfortunately, genetic services are underdeveloped across Latin America, and access to genetic testing and counseling is very scarce in the region. Barriers contributing to the access to genetic care are high cost and lack of insurance coverage for genetic tests, insufficient oncogenetics training or expertise, nonexistence of genetic counseling as a clinical discipline and lack of supportive healthcare policies. In this review, we highlight relevant initiatives undertaken in several Latin American countries aimed at creating genetic cancer risk assessment programs. Additionally, we present a review of the scientific literature on the current status of breast cancer genomics in Latin America, with specific emphasis on demographic indicators, access to cancer genetic care, training and strategies to improve outcomes and international collaborations. PMID:28453507

  5. Characterization of co-circulating swine influenza A viruses in North America and the identification of a novel H1 genetic clade with antigenic significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Tavis K; Campbell, Brian A; Nelson, Martha I; Lewis, Nicola S; Janas-Martindale, Alicia; Killian, Mary Lea; Vincent, Amy L

    2015-04-02

    Multiple genetically and antigenically distinct hemagglutinin genes of the H1 and H3 influenza A virus (IAV) subtypes co-circulate in North American swine. This diversity has evolved by repeated transmission of IAVs from humans to swine and subsequent antigenic drift in swine. To understand the evolutionary dynamics of these diverse HA lineages in North American swine, we undertook a phylogenetic analysis of 1576 H1 and 607 H3 HA gene segments, as well as 834 N1 and 1293 N2 NA gene segments, and 2126 M gene segments. These data revealed yearly co-circulation of H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 viruses, with three HA clades representing the majority of the HA sequences: of the H1 viruses, 42% were classified as H1δ1 and 40.6% were classified as H1γ; and of the H3 viruses 53% were classified as cluster IV-A H3N2. We detected a genetically distinct minor clade consisting of 37 H1 viruses isolated between 2003 and 2013, which we classified as H1γ-2. We estimated that this clade circulated in swine since approximately 1995, but it was not detected in swine until 2003. Though this clade only represents 1.07% of swine H1 sequences reported over the past 10 years, hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays demonstrated that representatives of this clade of viruses are antigenically distinct, and, when measured using antigenic cartography, were as many as 7 antigenic units from other H1γ viruses. Therefore vaccines against the contemporary H1γ viruses are not likely to cross-protect against γ-2 viruses. The long-term circulation of these γ-2 viruses suggests that minor populations of viruses may be underreported in the national dataset given the long branch lengths and gaps in detections. The identification of these γ-2 viruses demonstrates the need for robust surveillance to capture the full diversity IAVs in swine in the USA and the importance of antigenic drift in the diversification and emergence of new antigenic variants in swine, which complicates vaccine design. Published

  6. Genetic diversity and population structure of native maize populations in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoya, Claudia A; Dreisigacker, Susanne; Hearne, Sarah; Franco, Jorge; Mir, Celine; Prasanna, Boddupalli M; Taba, Suketoshi; Charcosset, Alain; Warburton, Marilyn L

    2017-01-01

    This study describes the genetic diversity and population structure of 194 native maize populations from 23 countries of Latin America and the Caribbean. The germplasm, representing 131 distinct landraces, was genetically characterized as population bulks using 28 SSR markers. Three main groups of maize germplasm were identified. The first, the Mexico and Southern Andes group, highlights the Pre-Columbian and modern exchange of germplasm between North and South America. The second group, Mesoamerica lowland, supports the hypothesis that two separate human migration events could have contributed to Caribbean maize germplasm. The third, the Andean group, displayed early introduction of maize into the Andes, with little mixing since then, other than a regional interchange zone active in the past. Events and activities in the pre- and post-Columbian Americas including the development and expansion of pre-Columbian cultures and the arrival of Europeans to the Americas are discussed in relation to the history of maize migration from its point of domestication in Mesoamerica to South America and the Caribbean through sea and land routes.

  7. High invasion potential ofHydrilla verticillatain the Americas predicted using ecological niche modeling combined with genetic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinning; Xu, Xuan; Tao, Qing; Yi, Panpan; Yu, Dan; Xu, Xinwei

    2017-07-01

    Ecological niche modeling is an effective tool to characterize the spatial distribution of suitable areas for species, and it is especially useful for predicting the potential distribution of invasive species. The widespread submerged plant Hydrilla verticillata (hydrilla) has an obvious phylogeographical pattern: Four genetic lineages occupy distinct regions in native range, and only one lineage invades the Americas. Here, we aimed to evaluate climatic niche conservatism of hydrilla in North America at the intraspecific level and explore its invasion potential in the Americas by comparing climatic niches in a phylogenetic context. Niche shift was found in the invasion process of hydrilla in North America, which is probably mainly attributed to high levels of somatic mutation. Dramatic changes in range expansion in the Americas were predicted in the situation of all four genetic lineages invading the Americas or future climatic changes, especially in South America; this suggests that there is a high invasion potential of hydrilla in the Americas. Our findings provide useful information for the management of hydrilla in the Americas and give an example of exploring intraspecific climatic niche to better understand species invasion.

  8. Characterization of genetic structure of Podophyllum hexandrum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterization of genetic structure of Podophyllum hexandrum populations, an endangered medicinal herb of Northwestern Himalaya, using ISSR-PCR markers and its relatedness with podophyllotoxin content.

  9. Y-chromosome diversity in Native Mexicans reveals continental transition of genetic structure in the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Karla; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Mendizabal, Isabel; Underhill, Peter A; Lopez-Valenzuela, Maria; Peñaloza-Espinosa, Rosenda; Lopez-Lopez, Marisol; Buentello-Malo, Leonor; Avelino, Heriberto; Calafell, Francesc; Comas, David

    2012-07-01

    The genetic characterization of Native Mexicans is important to understand multiethnic based features influencing the medical genetics of present Mexican populations, as well as to the reconstruct the peopling of the Americas. We describe the Y-chromosome genetic diversity of 197 Native Mexicans from 11 populations and 1,044 individuals from 44 Native American populations after combining with publicly available data. We found extensive heterogeneity among Native Mexican populations and ample segregation of Q-M242* (46%) and Q-M3 (54%) haplogroups within Mexico. The northernmost sampled populations falling outside Mesoamerica (Pima and Tarahumara) showed a clear differentiation with respect to the other populations, which is in agreement with previous results from mtDNA lineages. However, our results point toward a complex genetic makeup of Native Mexicans whose maternal and paternal lineages reveal different narratives of their population history, with sex-biased continental contributions and different admixture proportions. At a continental scale, we found that Arctic populations and the northernmost groups from North America cluster together, but we did not find a clear differentiation within Mesoamerica and the rest of the continent, which coupled with the fact that the majority of individuals from Central and South American samples are restricted to the Q-M3 branch, supports the notion that most Native Americans from Mesoamerica southwards are descendants from a single wave of migration. This observation is compatible with the idea that present day Mexico might have constituted an area of transition in the diversification of paternal lineages during the colonization of the Americas. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The State of Federal Research Funding in Genetics as Reflected by Members of the Genetics Society of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rine, Jasper; Fagen, Adam P

    2015-08-01

    Scientific progress runs on the intellect, curiosity, and passion of its practitioners fueled by the research dollars of its sponsors. The concern over research funding in biology in general and genetics in particular led us to survey the membership of the Genetics Society of America for information about the federal support of genetics at the level of individual principal investigators. The results paint a mosaic of circumstances-some good, others not so good-that describes some of our present challenges with sufficient detail to suggest useful steps that could address the challenges. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  11. Ancient and Modern Genetic Evidence Provide Important Insights About the Entrance of Humans Into the Americas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, B. M.

    2008-05-01

    Genetic data collected from contemporary and prehistoric Native America populations has been crucial to our understanding of the peopling of the Americas. In recent years there has been a flurry of productive research aimed at determining when and how humans first entered these continents, and the reconstructions of this momentous event have been made with ever increasing precision. The genetic evidence is now quickly converging on a single scenario in which the initial founders of the Americas separated from Asian populations, gained unique genetic markers during a "Beringian Standstill," and rapidly spread throughout the Americas. This initial movement into the Americas was most likely along the Pacific Coast and probably occurred around 14,000-15,000 years ago. However, discerning the precise geographic origin of this migration from Asia has proven far more difficult.

  12. Genetic characterization of Portuguese Fasciola hepatica isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Tânia Raquel Martins dos

    2012-01-01

    Dissertation presented to obtain the Master Degree in Molecular, Genetics and Biomedicine Part of the results discussed in this dissertation was presented in the following communications: R. Santos, M. Calado, J. Sampaio, C. Ferreira, A. Afonso and S. Belo. Contribution to the genetic characterization of Fasciola hepatica populations in Portugal. XXXVII Portuguese Genetic Conference, Lisbon, Portugal, May 28th-30th 2012 [poster communication] R. Santos, M. Calado, J. Sampaio, C. Ferr...

  13. Regulating human genetic research in Latin America: a race to the top or a race together?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Isasi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Balancing the therapeutic potential of genetic science with the adoption of policies that reflect social values has proven to be a formidable task for Latin American countries. This essay presents some reflections on human genetics research policy in Latin America and explores a path forward for policy development.

  14. Medical genetic services in Latin America: report of a meeting of experts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penchaszadeh Víctor B

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available During the Ninth International Congress of Human Genetics which was held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 16 to 18 August 1996, a group of experts under the coordination of the authors discussed at length the state of medical genetics in Latin America. The facts and ideas presented at the meeting, which was sponsored by the Human Genetics Program of the World Health Organization (WHO and the Maternal and Child Health Program of the Pan American Health Organization, are examined in this document under three broad headings. The first verses on the history and current status of medical genetics in selected Latin American countries. This is followed by a discussion of the general features of medical genetics in the Region and by a final section of recommendations for promoting medical genetics in Latin America.

  15. History of black walnut genetics research in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erin Victory; Keith Woeste; Olin E., Jr. Rhodes

    2004-01-01

    Eastern black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) is an economically and ecologically important hardwood species that has been used throughout the history of settlement in North America. It was a resource that helped Native Americans in their everyday life, it helped European settlers carve a living out of the wilderness, and it has helped rural farmers and...

  16. Genetic characterization of native southern African chicken ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study presents the first results on the evaluation and selection of polymorphic microsatellite markers for the genetic characterization of native chicken populations in southern Africa. Blood samples for DNA extraction were obtained from five chicken lines from South Africa (Koekoek, New Hampshire, Naked-Neck, ...

  17. Genetic characterization of mango anthracnose pathogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-28

    Jun 28, 2010 ... from different agroclimatic zones of India. The isolates were evaluated for their pathogenic variability on mango seedlings and genetic characterization using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD molecular techniques). The random primers OPA-1, 3, 5, 9, 11, 15, 16 and 18 were used and the twenty-.

  18. Genetic characterization of two traditional leafy vegetables ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic characterization of two traditional leafy vegetables (Sesamum radiatum Thonn. ex Hornem and Ceratotheca sesamoides Endl.) of Benin, using flow cytometry and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. K Adéoti, A Rival, A Dansi, S Santoni, S Brown, T Beule, A Nato, Y Henry, R Vodouhe, L Loko, ...

  19. Random amplified polymorphic DNA based genetic characterization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA based genetic characterization of four important species of Bamboo, found in Raigad district, Maharashtra State, India. ... Bambusoideae are differentiated from other members of the family by the presence of petiolate blades with parallel venation and stamens are three, four, six or more, ...

  20. Ice ages leave genetic diversity 'hotspots' in Europe but not in Eastern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumibao, Candice Y; Hoban, Sean M; McLachlan, Jason

    2017-11-01

    After the last glacial cycle, temperate European trees migrated northward, experiencing genetic bottlenecks and founder effects, which left high haplotype endemism in southern populations and clines in genetic diversity northward. These patterns are thought to be ubiquitous across temperate forests, and are therefore used to anticipate the potential genetic consequences of future warming. We compared existing and new phylogeographic data sets (chloroplast DNA) from 14 woody taxa in Eastern North America (ENA) to data sets from 21 ecologically similar European species to test for common impacts of Quaternary climate swings on genetic diversity across diverse taxa and between continents. Unlike their European counterparts, ENA taxa do not share common southern centres of haplotype endemism and they generally maintain high genetic diversity even at their northern range limits. Differences between the genetic impacts of Quaternary climate cycles across continents suggest refined lessons for managing genetic diversity in today's warming world. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  1. Invasion genetics of emerald ash borer in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicia M. Bray; Leah S. Bauer; Robert A. Haack; Therese Poland; James J. Smith

    2006-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (EAB) was first detected in Michigan and Canada in 2002. Efforts to eradicate this destructive pest by federal and state regulatory agencies continue. Knowledge of EAB genetics will be useful in understanding the invasion dynamics of the beetle and to help identify geographic localities of potential biocontrol agents.

  2. Large scale patterns of genetic variation and differentiation in sugar maple from tropical Central America to temperate North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Rodriguez, Yalma L; Platt, William J; Urbatsch, Lowell E; Foltz, David W

    2015-11-19

    Geological events in the latter Cenozoic have influenced the distribution, abundance and genetic structure of tree populations in temperate and tropical North America. The biogeographical history of temperate vegetation that spans large ranges of latitude is complex, involving multiple latitudinal shifts that might have occurred via different migration routes. We determined the regional structuring of genetic variation of sugar maple (Acer saccharum subsp. saccharum) and its only subspecies in tropical America (Acer saccharum subsp. skutchii) using nuclear and chloroplast data. The studied populations span a geographic range from Maine, USA (46°N), to El Progreso, Guatemala (15°N). We examined genetic subdivisions, explored the locations of ancestral haplotypes, analyzed genetic data to explore the presence of a single or multiple glacial refugia, and tested whether genetic lineages are temporally consistent with a Pleistocene or older divergence. Nuclear and chloroplast data indicated that populations in midwestern USA and western Mexico were highly differentiated from populations in the rest of the sites. The time of the most recent common ancestor of the western Mexico haplotype lineage was dated to the Pliocene (5.9 Ma, 95% HPD: 4.3-7.3 Ma). Splits during the Pleistocene separated the rest of the phylogroups. The most frequent and widespread haplotype occurred in half of the sites (Guatemala, eastern Mexico, southeastern USA, and Ohio). Our data also suggested that multiple Pleistocene refugia (tropics-southeastern USA, midwestern, and northeastern USA), but not western Mexico (Jalisco), contributed to post-glacial northward expansion of ranges. Current southern Mexican and Guatemalan populations have reduced population sizes, genetic bottlenecks and tend toward homozygosity, as indicated using nuclear and chloroplast markers. The divergence of western Mexican populations from the rest of the sugar maples likely resulted from orographic and volcanic barriers

  3. Population genetic structure ofBromus tectorumin the mountains of western North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnesen, Spencer; Coleman, Craig E; Meyer, Susan E

    2017-06-01

    Invasive species are often initially restricted to a narrow range and may then expand through any of multiple mechanisms including phenotypic plasticity, in situ evolution, or selection on traits preadapted for new habitats. Our study used population genetics to explore possible processes by which the highly selfing invasive annual grass Bromus tectorum has expanded into montane environments. We used 69 single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) markers to genotype ca. 20 individuals from each of 38 montane cheatgrass populations from throughout the Intermountain West and to identify characteristic SNP haplotypes and examine their distribution. Five invariant SNP haplotypes were dominant in montane cheatgrass populations, making up 59% of genotyped individuals, with each haplotype present in 12 to 21 populations. Four of these were absent or present at low frequency in low elevation populations, while the fifth was also sometimes dominant at low elevation. Sixteen haplotypes made up 78% of all genotyped individuals. These haplotypes were distributed across several haplogroups within the clade that also includes most sagebrush steppe lineages. The wide geographic distribution of several common haplotypes almost completely restricted to montane habitats suggests that dominant lineages in montane populations may possess adaptive syndromes that are preserved through reduced outcrossing rates or negative selection on outcrossed progeny. However, conclusive evidence of such local adaptation requires reciprocal seeding experiments and further characterization of adaptive traits and breeding system characteristics. Other lineages have likely risen to dominance in montane populations through selectively neutral processes. © 2017 Botanical Society of America.

  4. Genetic structure of autochthonous populations of Meso-America: Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisker, R; Ramírez, E; Babinsky, V

    1996-06-01

    We analyze the possible effect of gene flow on the genetic structure of present-day Mexicans. For this purpose we reviewed previous admixture estimates for various Indian and Mestizo groups. Several facts seem clear: (1) There are no pure Indian groups in Mexico, because all Indian groups show variable degrees of admixture, mostly with whites (range, 0.088 in the Huichol to 0.373 in the Huasteco); (2) the main ancestral contribution to the noncoastal lower middle class Mestizo populations is Indian (above 50%) so that from a genetic standpoint Indians and lower middle class Mestizos are not much different; and (3) black ancestry is quite high on the coasts, ranging from 0.127 to 0.405 on the east coast, and is present in other Mestizos, ranging in large urban centers from 0.027 in Oaxaca to 0.107 in Puebla and in smaller cities from 0.08 in Tlaxcala to 0.181 in Cuanalán.

  5. Genetic characterization of Neotropical Jabiru Storks: Insights for conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, I.F.; Haig, S.M.; Lama, S.N.D.

    2010-01-01

    Jabiru Stork (Jabiru mycteria is listed under Appendix I of CITES and considered threatened in Central America. The first population genetic analysis of Jabiru Storks was carried out using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences (520 bp) and five heterologous microsatellite loci. Samples were collected from the field (N = 49) and museum skins (N = 22) in Central (mainly Belize, Nicaragua and Costa Rica) and South America (Colombia, Venezuela, Peru and Brazil). A decline of mtDNA diversity was observed in comparisons between past (N = 20) and present (N = 40) samples collected in Central America and northern South America. Similar levels of microsatellite loci diversity were observed among contemporary samples. Lower levels of mtDNA variability were observed in samples from Central America and northern South America when compared to the Brazilian Pantanal region. Significant levels of genetic differentiation were found between contemporary locations sampled, whereas non-significant results were observed for historic samples. The non-geographic association of haplotypes observed at the cladograms and the recent divergence times estimated between locations are indicative of an evolutionary history of a large population size with limited population structure. Reconnection of populations via increased gene flow, particularly in Central America, is recommended if genetic structure and status are to be restored.

  6. Genetic distinctions between autoimmune hepatitis in Italy and North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Paolo; Czaja, Albert-J; Muratori, Luigi; Pappas, Georgios; Maccariello, Silvana; Cassani, Fabio; Granito, Alessandro; Ferrari, Rodolfo; Mantovani, Vilma; Lenzi, Marco; Bianchi, Francesco-B

    2005-03-28

    Our goals were to analyze the known genetic predispositions for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) in AIH Italian population and to compare them with North American counterparts. Human leukocyte antigens (HLA) B8, C7, DR3, DR4, DR7, DR11, DR13, DQ2 and the B8-DR3-DQ2 phenotype were determined by microlymphocytotoxicity and polymerase chain reaction in 74 Italian patients (57 with type 1 and 17 with type 2 AIH) and 149 North American patients with type 1 AIH, and in adequate controls. B8-DR3-DQ2 occurred more frequently in Italian patients with type 1 AIH than in Italian controls (30% vs 7%, P<0.0001), but less frequently than in North American counterparts (30% vs 48%, P = 0.02). DR4 occurred less frequently in Italian patients with type 1 AIH (23% vs 43%, P = 0.01) and in controls (16% vs 34%, P = 0.0003) than in North American counterparts. No differences were found in alleles' frequency between type 1 and type 2 Italian AIH patients. DR11 had a frequency lower in type 1 Italian AIH patients than controls (17% vs 35%, P = 0.01). HLA DR4 is not associated with AIH in Italy. The known HLA risk factors for AIH occur similarly in Italian patients with type 1 and type 2 AIH, and they are less frequent than in North American patients. B8-DR3-DQ2 is the predominant phenotype of type 1 AIH also in Italy, and HLA DR11 may be a regionally distinctive protective factor against type 1 AIH.

  7. Genetic Evaluation of Cardiomyopathy - a Heart Failure Society of America Practice Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershberger, Ray E; Givertz, Michael; Ho, Carolyn Y; Judge, Daniel P; Kantor, Paul; McBride, Kim L; Morales, Ana; Taylor, Matthew R G; Vatta, Matteo; Ware, Stephanie M

    2018-03-19

    This guideline describes the approach and expertise needed for the genetic evaluation of cardiomyopathy. First published in 2009 by the Heart Failure Society of America (HFSA), this guidance has now been updated in collaboration with the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG). The writing group, composed of cardiologists and genetics professionals with expertise in adult and pediatric cardiomyopathy, reflects the emergence and increased clinical activity devoted to cardiovascular genetic medicine. The genetic evaluation of cardiomyopathy is a rapidly emerging key clinical priority, as high throughput sequencing is now feasible for clinical testing, and conventional interventions can improve survival, reduce morbidity, and enhance quality of life. Moreover, specific interventions may be guided by genetic analysis. A systematic approach is recommended: always a comprehensive family history; an expert phenotypic evaluation of the proband and at-risk family members to confirm a diagnosis and guide genetic test selection and interpretation; referral to expert centers as needed; genetic testing, with pre- and post-test genetic counseling; and specific guidance as indicated for drug and device therapies. The evaluation of infants and children demands special expertise. The approach to manage secondary and incidental sequence findings as recommended by the ACMG is provided. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The evolutionary history of Plasmodium vivax as inferred from mitochondrial genomes: parasite genetic diversity in the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jesse E; Pacheco, M Andreína; Bacon, David J; Beg, Mohammad A; Machado, Ricardo Luiz; Fairhurst, Rick M; Herrera, Socrates; Kim, Jung-Yeon; Menard, Didier; Póvoa, Marinete Marins; Villegas, Leopoldo; Mulyanto; Snounou, Georges; Cui, Liwang; Zeyrek, Fadile Yildiz; Escalante, Ananias A

    2013-09-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the most prevalent human malaria parasite in the Americas. Previous studies have contrasted the genetic diversity of parasite populations in the Americas with those in Asia and Oceania, concluding that New World populations exhibit low genetic diversity consistent with a recent introduction. Here we used an expanded sample of complete mitochondrial genome sequences to investigate the diversity of P. vivax in the Americas as well as in other continental populations. We show that the diversity of P. vivax in the Americas is comparable to that in Asia and Oceania, and we identify several divergent clades circulating in South America that may have resulted from independent introductions. In particular, we show that several haplotypes sampled in Venezuela and northeastern Brazil belong to a clade that diverged from the other P. vivax lineages at least 30,000 years ago, albeit not necessarily in the Americas. We propose that, unlike in Asia where human migration increases local genetic diversity, the combined effects of the geographical structure and the low incidence of vivax malaria in the Americas has resulted in patterns of low local but high regional genetic diversity. This could explain previous views that P. vivax in the Americas has low genetic diversity because these were based on studies carried out in limited areas. Further elucidation of the complex geographical pattern of P. vivax variation will be important both for diversity assessments of genes encoding candidate vaccine antigens and in the formulation of control and surveillance measures aimed at malaria elimination.

  9. The Evolutionary History of Plasmodium vivax as Inferred from Mitochondrial Genomes: Parasite Genetic Diversity in the Americas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jesse E.; Pacheco, M. Andreína; Bacon, David J.; Beg, Mohammad A.; Machado, Ricardo Luiz; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Herrera, Socrates; Kim, Jung-Yeon; Menard, Didier; Póvoa, Marinete Marins; Villegas, Leopoldo; Mulyanto; Snounou, Georges; Cui, Liwang; Zeyrek, Fadile Yildiz; Escalante, Ananias A.

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the most prevalent human malaria parasite in the Americas. Previous studies have contrasted the genetic diversity of parasite populations in the Americas with those in Asia and Oceania, concluding that New World populations exhibit low genetic diversity consistent with a recent introduction. Here we used an expanded sample of complete mitochondrial genome sequences to investigate the diversity of P. vivax in the Americas as well as in other continental populations. We show that the diversity of P. vivax in the Americas is comparable to that in Asia and Oceania, and we identify several divergent clades circulating in South America that may have resulted from independent introductions. In particular, we show that several haplotypes sampled in Venezuela and northeastern Brazil belong to a clade that diverged from the other P. vivax lineages at least 30,000 years ago, albeit not necessarily in the Americas. We propose that, unlike in Asia where human migration increases local genetic diversity, the combined effects of the geographical structure and the low incidence of vivax malaria in the Americas has resulted in patterns of low local but high regional genetic diversity. This could explain previous views that P. vivax in the Americas has low genetic diversity because these were based on studies carried out in limited areas. Further elucidation of the complex geographical pattern of P. vivax variation will be important both for diversity assessments of genes encoding candidate vaccine antigens and in the formulation of control and surveillance measures aimed at malaria elimination. PMID:23733143

  10. Invasion genetics of the Eurasian round goby in North America: tracing sources and spread patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joshua E; Stepien, Carol A

    2009-01-01

    The Eurasian round goby Neogobius melanostomus (Apollonia melanostoma) invaded the North American Great Lakes in 1990 through ballast water, spread rapidly, and now is widely distributed and moving through adjacent tributaries. We analyse its genetic diversity and divergence patterns among 25 North American (N = 744) and 22 Eurasian (N = 414) locations using mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b gene sequences and seven nuclear microsatellite loci in order to: (i) identify the invasion's founding source(s), (ii) test for founder effects, (iii) evaluate whether the invasive range is genetically heterogeneous, and (iv) determine whether fringe and central areas differ in genetic diversity. Tests include F(ST) analogues, neighbour-joining trees, haplotype networks, Bayesian assignment, Monmonier barrier analysis, and three-dimensional factorial correspondence analysis. We recovered 13 cytochrome b haplotypes and 232 microsatellite alleles in North America and compared these to variation we previously described across Eurasia. Results show: (i) the southern Dnieper River population was the primary Eurasian donor source for the round goby's invasion of North America, likely supplemented by some alleles from the Dniester and Southern Bug rivers, (ii) the overall invasion has high genetic diversity and experienced no founder effect, (iii) there is significant genetic structuring across North America, and (iv) some expansion areas show reduced numbers of alleles, whereas others appear to reflect secondary colonization. Sampling sites in Lake Huron's Saginaw Bay and Lake Ontario significantly differ from all others, having unique alleles that apparently originated from separate introductions. Substantial genetic variation, multiple founding sources, large number of propagules, and population structure thus likely aided the goby's ecological success.

  11. Genetic differentiation within the Puccinia triticina population in South America and comparison with the North American population suggests common ancestry and intercontinental migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordoñez, M E; Germán, S E; Kolmer, J A

    2010-04-01

    Leaf rust, caused by Puccinia triticina, is the most prevalent and widespread disease of wheat in South America. The objective of this study was to determine whether genetically differentiated groups of P. triticina are currently present in South America and to compare the South American population with the previously characterized population in North America. In total, 130 isolates of P. triticina from the wheat-growing regions of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Peru, and Uruguay, mostly from the 1990s to 2008, were tested for virulence on 20 lines of wheat with single genes for leaf rust resistance and for molecular genotypes with 23 simple-sequence repeat (SSR) markers. After removal of isolates with identical virulence and SSR genotypes, 99 isolates were included for further analysis. Principal coordinate analysis plots indicated five different groups of isolates based on SSR genotypes that also differed for virulence to leaf rust resistance genes. All pairs of groups, except for one pair, were significantly differentiated for SSR genotypes according to R(ST) statistics. All but two pairs of groups were significantly differentiated for virulence phenotype according to Phi(PT) statistics. Isolates in all five groups had high values of fixation index for SSR alleles and linkage disequilibrium was high across all isolates that indicated the clonal reproduction of urediniospores. Only one of the five P. triticina groups from South America was differentiated for SSR genotypes from all of the six P. triticina groups from North America. The high degree of similarity for SSR genotype of isolates from both South America and North America suggested a common European origin of P. triticina that was introduced to both continents. The emergence of the same P. triticina virulence phenotypes with highly related SSR genotypes in the United States in 1996 and in Uruguay in 1999 indicated the likely intercontinental migration of these genotypes from Mexico to both South America and

  12. Genetic characterization of the Mascaruna goat, a Sicilian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic characterization of the Mascaruna goat, a Sicilian autochthonous population, using molecular markers. Salvatore Mastrangelo, Marco Tolone, Maria Teresa Sardina, Rosalia Di Gerlando, Baldassare Portolano ...

  13. Genetic diversity and host specificity varies across three genera of blood parasites in ducks of the Pacific Americas Flyway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Andrew B.; Smith, Matthew M.; Meixell, Brandt W.; Fleskes, Joseph P.; Ramey, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Birds of the order Anseriformes, commonly referred to as waterfowl, are frequently infected by Haemosporidia of the genera Haemoproteus, Plasmodium, and Leucocytozoon via dipteran vectors. We analyzed nucleotide sequences of the Cytochrome b (Cytb) gene from parasites of these genera detected in six species of ducks from Alaska and California, USA to characterize the genetic diversity of Haemosporidia infecting waterfowl at two ends of the Pacific Americas Flyway. In addition, parasite Cytb sequences were compared to those available on a public database to investigate specificity of genetic lineages to hosts of the order Anseriformes. Haplotype and nucleotide diversity of Haemoproteus Cytb sequences was lower than was detected for Plasmodium and Leucocytozoon parasites. Although waterfowl are presumed to be infected by only a single species of Leucocytozoon, L. simondi, diversity indices were highest for haplotypes from this genus and sequences formed five distinct clades separated by genetic distances of 4.9%–7.6%, suggesting potential cryptic speciation. All Haemoproteus andLeucocytozoon haplotypes derived from waterfowl samples formed monophyletic clades in phylogenetic analyses and were unique to the order Anseriformes with few exceptions. In contrast, waterfowl-origin Plasmodium haplotypes were identical or closely related to lineages found in other avian orders. Our results suggest a more generalist strategy for Plasmodiumparasites infecting North American waterfowl as compared to those of the generaHaemoproteus and Leucocytozoon.

  14. Antigenic characterization of H3 subtypes of avian influenza A viruses from North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Elizabeth; Long, Li-Pong; Zhao, Nan; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Baroch, John A; Nolting, Jaqueline; Senter, Lucy; Cunningham, Frederick L; Pharr, G Todd; Hanson, Larry; Slemons, Richard; DeLiberto, Thomas J.; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Besides humans, H3 subtypes of influenza A viruses (IAVs) can infect various animal hosts, including avian, swine, equine, canine, and sea mammal species. These H3 viruses are both antigenically and genetically diverse. Here, we characterized the antigenic diversity of contemporary H3 avian IAVs recovered from migratory birds in North America. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays were performed on 37 H3 isolates of avian IAVs recovered from 2007 to 2011 using generated reference chicken sera. These isolates were recovered from samples taken in the Atlantic, Mississippi, Central, and Pacific waterfowl migration flyways. Antisera to all the tested H3 isolates cross-reacted with each other and, to a lesser extent, with those to H3 canine and H3 equine IAVs. Antigenic cartography showed that the largest antigenic distance among the 37 avian IAVs is about four units, and each unit corresponds to a 2 log 2 difference in the HI titer. However, none of the tested H3 IAVs cross-reacted with ferret sera derived from contemporary swine and human IAVs. Our results showed that the H3 avian IAVs we tested lacked significant antigenic diversity, and these viruses were antigenically different from those circulating in swine and human populations. This suggests that H3 avian IAVs in North American waterfowl are antigenically relatively stable.

  15. Genetic evidence for glacial refugia of the temperate tree Eucryphia cordifolia (Cunoniaceae) in southern South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segovia, Ricardo A; Pérez, María F; Hinojosa, Luis F

    2012-01-01

    The temperate forests of southern South America were greatly affected by glaciations. Previous studies have indicated that some cold-tolerant tree species were able to survive glacial periods in small, ice-free patches within glaciated areas in the Andes and in southern Patagonia. Here we asked whether populations of the mesothermic species Eucryphia cordifolia also were able to survive glaciations in these areas or only in unglaciated coastal areas. The chloroplast intergenic spacer trnV-ndhC was sequenced for 150 individuals from 22 locations. Genetic data were analyzed (standard indexes of genetic diversity, a haplotype network, and genetic differentiation) in a geographical context. Two of the nine haplotypes detected were widespread in high frequency across the entire range of the species. The highest levels of genetic diversity were found around 40°S, decreasing sharply northward and more moderately southward. No differences in genetic diversity were found between Andean and coastal populations. Notably, seven haplotypes were found in a small area of the Coast Range known as the Cordillera Pelada (40°S). The differentiation coefficients G(ST) and N(ST) revealed that most of the genetic variation detected was due to variation within populations. The low levels of population differentiation and the high genetic diversity found in the Cordillera Pelada suggest that this area was the main refugium for E. cordifolia during glaciations. Nevertheless, given the high levels of genetic diversity found in some Andean populations, we cannot discount that some local populations also survived the glaciation in the Andes.

  16. The contributions of admixture and genetic drift to diversity among post-contact populations in the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehl, Anthony J; Long, Jeffrey C

    2018-02-01

    We present a model that partitions Nei's minimum genetic distance between admixed populations into components of admixture and genetic drift. We applied this model to 17 admixed populations in the Americas to examine how admixture and drift have contributed to the patterns of genetic diversity. We analyzed 618 short tandem repeat loci in 949 individuals from 49 population samples. Thirty-two samples serve as proxies for continental ancestors. Seventeen samples represent admixed populations: (4) African-American and (13) Latin American. We partition genetic distance, and then calculate fixation indices and principal coordinates to interpret our results. A computer simulation confirms that our method correctly estimates drift and admixture components of genetic distance when the assumptions of the model are met. The partition of genetic distance shows that both admixture and genetic drift contribute to patterns of genetic diversity. The admixture component of genetic distance provides evidence for two distinct axes of continental ancestry. However, the genetic distances show that ancestry contributes to only one axis of genetic differentiation. The genetic distances among the 13 Latin American populations in this analysis show contributions from both differences in ancestry and differences in genetic drift. By contrast, the genetic distances among the four African American populations in this analysis owe mostly to genetic drift because these groups have similar fractions of European and African ancestry. The genetic structure of admixed populations in the Americas reflects more than admixture. We show that the history of serial founder effects constrains the impact of admixture on allele frequencies to a single dimension. Genetic drift in the admixed populations imposed a new level of genetic structure onto that created by admixture. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Characterization of the genetic profile of five Danish dog breeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pertoldi, Cino; Kristensen, T. N.; Loeschcke, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Pointing Dog (ODP; n = 24), and 5) Greenland Dog (GD; n = 23). The aims of the investigation were to characterize the genetic profile of the abovementioned dog breeds by quantifying the genetic differentiation among them and the degree of genetic homogeneity within breeds. The genetic profile......This investigation presents results from a genetic characterization of 5 Danish dog breeds genotyped on the CanineHD BeadChip microarray with 170,000 SNP. The breeds investigated were 1) Danish Spitz (DS; n = 8), 2) Danish-Swedish Farm Dog (DSF; n = 18), 3) Broholmer (BR; n = 22), 4) Old Danish...... was determined by means of principal component analysis (PCA) and through a Bayesian clustering method. Both the PCA and the Bayesian clustering method revealed a clear genetic separation of the 5 breeds. The level of genetic variation within the breeds varied. The expected heterozygosity (H) as well...

  18. Acceptance of a food of animal origin obtained through genetic modification and cloning in South America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnettler, Berta; Velásquez, Carlos; Miranda, Horacio

    2015-01-01

    With the aim of comparing the acceptance of milk obtained from cloned, genetically modified (GM) and conventionally bred cows among working adults and university students, and identifying and characterizing typologies among both subsamples in terms of their preferences, a survey was applied to 40...

  19. A biogeographical population genetics perspective of the colonization of cats in Latin America and temporal genetic changes in Brazilian cat populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ruiz-García

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We used nine morphological genes to analyze cat populations from Mexico, the Dominican Republic, the Colombian, Brazilian and Peruvian Amazon, Bolivia and Brazil. Most populations were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium at the O locus. The highest allele frequencies so far detected at world level for alleles I (inhibitor and L (long hair were found at La Paz (Bolivia. The analyses revealed at least five cat gene pools in Latin America: These findings suggest that the current genetic distribution of cats in Latin America correlates with the colonization of the Americas during the XIV to XVIII centuries. Additionally, the cat populations of São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and Manaus were sampled, to compare their 1996-2003 genetic profiles with those obtained in 1983. Generally, these genetic profiles seem temporally stable, which is important for comparing cat populations sampled in different years and decades.

  20. Characterization of Genetic Variation in Icelandic Cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars-Erik; Das, Ashutosh; Momeni, Jamal

    Identification of genetic variation in cattle breeds using next-generation sequencing technology has focused on the modern production cattle breeds. We focused on one of the oldest indigenous breeds, the Icelandic cattle breed. Sequencing of two individuals enabled identification of more than 8...... million SNPs and more than one million short indels. Annotation of the genetic variants identified a substantial number of functional SNPs and variants. The number of genetic variants identified in the Icelandic cattle breed is on the same level as previously seen in other studies on Holstein cattle...

  1. Genetic Diversity and Population Genetics of Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae: Culex spp. from the Sonoran Desert of North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Pfeiler

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The population genetics and phylogenetic relationships of Culex mosquitoes inhabiting the Sonoran Desert region of North America were studied using mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite molecular markers. Phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI from mosquitoes collected over a wide geographic area, including the Baja California peninsula, and mainland localities in southern Arizona, USA and Sonora, Mexico, showed several well-supported partitions corresponding to Cx. quinquefasciatus, Cx. tarsalis, and two unidentified species, Culex sp. 1 and sp. 2. Culex quinquefasciatus was found at all localities and was the most abundant species collected. Culex tarsalis was collected only at Tucson, Arizona and Guaymas, Sonora. The two unidentified species of Culex were most abundant at Navojoa in southern Sonora. Haplotype and nucleotide diversities in the COI gene segment were substantially lower in Cx. quinquefasciatus compared with the other three species. Analysis of molecular variance revealed little structure among seven populations of Cx. quinquefasciatus, whereas significant structure was found between the two populations of Cx. tarsalis. Evidence for an historical population expansion beginning in the Pleistocene was found for Cx. tarsalis. Possible explanations for the large differences in genetic diversity between Cx. quinquefasciatus and the other species of Culex are presented.

  2. Genetic Diversity and Population Genetics of Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae: Culex spp.) from the Sonoran Desert of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiler, Edward; Flores-López, Carlos A.; Mada-Vélez, Jesús Gerardo; Escalante-Verdugo, Juan; Markow, Therese A.

    2013-01-01

    The population genetics and phylogenetic relationships of Culex mosquitoes inhabiting the Sonoran Desert region of North America were studied using mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite molecular markers. Phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) from mosquitoes collected over a wide geographic area, including the Baja California peninsula, and mainland localities in southern Arizona, USA and Sonora, Mexico, showed several well-supported partitions corresponding to Cx. quinquefasciatus, Cx. tarsalis, and two unidentified species, Culex sp. 1 and sp. 2. Culex quinquefasciatus was found at all localities and was the most abundant species collected. Culex tarsalis was collected only at Tucson, Arizona and Guaymas, Sonora. The two unidentified species of Culex were most abundant at Navojoa in southern Sonora. Haplotype and nucleotide diversities in the COI gene segment were substantially lower in Cx. quinquefasciatus compared with the other three species. Analysis of molecular variance revealed little structure among seven populations of Cx. quinquefasciatus, whereas significant structure was found between the two populations of Cx. tarsalis. Evidence for an historical population expansion beginning in the Pleistocene was found for Cx. tarsalis. Possible explanations for the large differences in genetic diversity between Cx. quinquefasciatus and the other species of Culex are presented. PMID:24302868

  3. Mapping agricultural landscapes and characterizing adaptive capacity in Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, M. B.; Imbach, P. A.; Bouroncle, C.; Donatti, C.; Leguia, E.; Martinez, M.; Medellin, C.; Saborio-Rodriguez, M.; Shamer, S.; Zamora, J.

    2013-12-01

    One of the key challenges in developing adaptation strategies for smallholder farmers in developing countries is that of a data-poor environment, where spatially-explicit information about where the most vulnerable smallholder communities are located is lacking. Developing countries tend to lack consistent and reliable maps on agricultural land use, and have limited information available on smallholder adaptive capacity. We developed a novel participatory and expert mapping process to overcome these barriers and develop detailed national-scale maps that allow for a characterization of unique agricultural landscapes based on profiles of adaptive capacity for smallholder agriculture in each area. This research focuses specifically on the Central American nations of Costa Rica, Guatemala, and Honduras, where our focus is on coffee and basic grains as the two main cropping systems. Here we present the methodology and results of a series of in-depth interviews and participatory mapping sessions with experts working within the broader agricultural sector in each country. We held individual interviews and mapping sessions with approximately thirty experts from each country, and used a detailed survey instrument for each mapping session to both spatially identify distinct agricultural landscapes, and to further characterize each area based on specific farm practices and social context. The survey also included a series of questions to help us assess the relative adaptive capacity of smallholder agriculture within each landscape. After all expert mapping sessions were completed in each country we convened an expert group to assist in both validating and refining the set of landscapes already defined. We developed a characterization of adaptive capacity by aggregating indicators into main assets-based criteria (e.g. land tenure, access to credit, access to technical assistance, sustainable farm practices) derived from further expert weighting of indicators through an online

  4. Genetic characterization of two Sudanese goat breeds (Capra hircus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-18

    May 18, 2009 ... Genetic characterization of two Sudanese goat breeds. (Capra hircus) using RAPD molecular markers. Eisa El Gaali* and Mona Satti. Commission for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, National Center for Research, Ministry of Science and. Technology, P. O. Box 2404, Khartoum, Sudan. Accepted 2 ...

  5. Genetic characterization of Nigerian indigenous pig using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The genetic structure of Nigerian indigenous pigs (NIP) and crossbred pigs were investigated using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A total of 79 NIP blood samples were collected from three different locations within South-western Nigeria namely, Igbara Odo, Ekiti State (33 samples), Ogbooro, Oyo State (30 samples), ...

  6. Genetic characterization of mango anthracnose pathogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolate specific RAPD fingerprints were obtained. Out of eight primers in RAPD, OPA-1, 3 and 18 were able to produce reproducible banding pattern. Each of these primers generated a short spectrum of amplicons, located between 661 and 2291-bp markers, indicative of genetic polymorphism. Dendogram revealed more ...

  7. Random amplified polymorphic DNA based genetic characterization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DIRECTOR

    2013-07-10

    Jul 10, 2013 ... Due to the unusually long sexual cycle and unavaila- bility of any other diagnostic tool, identification of bamboo .... To our knowledge, nothing along these lines has been done. Some approaches are use- .... (Dipterocarpaceae), in Malaysia: Implications for conservation of genetic resources and tree.

  8. Genetic characterization of Indian Spiti horses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    horses can be utilized in planning breeding strategies in the small populations of Spiti horses. The present panel of microsatellites evaluated in Spiti horses showed a very high heterozygosity and polymorphism and, therefore, this set of microsatellites may be reliably used for genetic diversity studies in other breeds of ...

  9. Chemical Mineralogy, Geochemical Characterization and Petrography of the Cambumbia Stock, Northern Andes, South America, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Lequerica, Salvador; María Jaramillo Mejía, José; Concha Perdomo, Ana Elena; Jimenez Quintero, Camilo

    2013-04-01

    The Cambumbia Stock is located on the western flank of the Central Cordillera of the northern Andes, South America. The goals of this study were to characterize the mineral chemistry, the geochemical composition and the petrography of the Cambumbia igneous body and to establish its petrogenesis. We collected 41 samples, selected 28 for thin section petrographic analysis, 14 for whole rock elementary chemical determination by ICP-MS and 4 for chemical mineralogy by LA-ICP(JEOL JXA-8200). Petrographically the samples were classified as 30 % hornblende-gabbro, 30% pyroxene-gabbros, 10% diorites, 10% olivine-gabbro, 7% gabbronorites, 7% tonalities and 3% norite, 3% wehrlite, the rock varies from medium to coarse hipidiomorfic and holocristaline texture, with local microporfiritic texture. Spot elemental chemical analysis of the some minerals in 4 samples show the range of the major elemental composition is plagioclase (labradorite), clinopyroxene (augite), horblende (magnesiohornblende), olivine (fayalite())Chemical mineralogy shows the variety of minerals in this rock, essential minerals correspond to bytownite, augite, magnesio-honblende, fallaite and titanite. We conclude base on the SiO2 Vs Total Alkalis graph that the samples correspond to the sub-alkaline series with low K content, mainly in the calc-alkaline series. By using the SiO2 vs TiO2, Th/Yb vs Ta/Yb and Zr/117-Th-Nb/16 diagrams it was determined that these rocks were generated in two geotectonic environments: one type MOR (extension) and other island arc (subduction, compression). Recently, a U/Pb age was obtained by the Universidad de Caldas in zircon in 2009 (not published data), yielded an age of 233.41 ± 3.4 Ma (Carnian - Upper Triassic). Petrographic geochemical and geochronology comparisons between the rocks of Cambumbia Stock and Diorite and Gabbro El Pueblito (located about 25 km to the north-west) and with U/Pb age 231 ± 8 may postulate a possible genetic link between them. These ages are

  10. Genetic, morphological, and spectral characterization of relictual Niobrara River hybrid aspens (Populus × smithii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deacon, Nicholas John; Grossman, Jake Joseph; Schweiger, Anna Katharina; Armour, Isabella; Cavender-Bares, Jeannine

    2017-12-01

    Aspen groves along the Niobrara River in Nebraska have long been a biogeographic curiosity due to morphological differences from nearby remnant Populus tremuloides populations. Pleistocene hybridization between P. tremuloides and P. grandidentata has been proposed, but the nearest P. grandidentata populations are currently several hundred kilometers east. We tested the hybrid-origin hypothesis using genetic data and characterized putative hybrids phenotypically. We compared nuclear microsatellite loci and chloroplast sequences of Niobrara River aspens to their putative parental species. Parental species and putative hybrids were also grown in a common garden for phenotypic comparison. On the common garden plants, we measured leaf morphological traits and leaf-level spectral reflectance profiles, from which chemical traits were derived. The genetic composition of the three unique Niobrara aspen genotypes is consistent with the hybridization hypothesis and with maternal chloroplast inheritance from P. grandidentata . Leaf margin dentition and abaxial pubescence differentiated taxa, with the hybrids showing intermediate values. Spectral profiles allowed statistical separation of taxa in short-wave infrared wavelengths, with hybrids showing intermediate values, indicating that traits associated with internal structure of leaves and water absorption may vary among taxa. However, reflectance values in the visible region did not differentiate taxa, indicating that traits related to pigments are not differentiated. Both genetic and phenotypic results support the hypothesis of a hybrid origin for these genetically unique aspens. However, low genetic diversity and ongoing ecological and climatic threats to the hybrid taxon present a challenge for conservation of these relictual boreal communities. © 2017 Botanical Society of America.

  11. Ethnic -Zootechnic characterization and meat potential of Sus scrofa “creole Pig” in Latin America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Linares

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this systematic scientific review was updated bibliographic information concerning the genetic, morphological, zootechnical and meat potential of creole pigs in Central and South America. It was found a population of 73 million Creoles pigs in Latin America, most under extensive, and semi extensive production systems. Since its European origin, adaptation to different ecosystems on the continent and the introduction of new breeds has led into a wide variety of creole pigs. Adaptation and introduction of breeds have led also in a rise of genetic variability of pigs benefiting the rusticity that involves a more efficient immune system. In the same way as omnivore the creole pig had a good adaptation to different diets, getting better advantage of fibrous and fatty food than commercial breeds. On the other hand, creole pigs showed an acceptable reproductive performance, distinguished by sexual precocity and high feasibility of weaning, nevertheless its growth was slow and lactation periods were long. Regarding to the quality of meat cuts , it has not been disadvantaged, if we take into account subjective criteria as well as tenderness and the nutritional value, characteristics that give higher economic value outstripping commercial pig meat.

  12. Characterizing Race/Ethnicity and Genetic Ancestry for 100,000 Subjects in the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banda, Yambazi; Kvale, Mark N; Hoffmann, Thomas J; Hesselson, Stephanie E; Ranatunga, Dilrini; Tang, Hua; Sabatti, Chiara; Croen, Lisa A; Dispensa, Brad P; Henderson, Mary; Iribarren, Carlos; Jorgenson, Eric; Kushi, Lawrence H; Ludwig, Dana; Olberg, Diane; Quesenberry, Charles P; Rowell, Sarah; Sadler, Marianne; Sakoda, Lori C; Sciortino, Stanley; Shen, Ling; Smethurst, David; Somkin, Carol P; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K; Walter, Lawrence; Whitmer, Rachel A; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Schaefer, Catherine; Risch, Neil

    2015-08-01

    Using genome-wide genotypes, we characterized the genetic structure of 103,006 participants in the Kaiser Permanente Northern California multi-ethnic Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging Cohort and analyzed the relationship to self-reported race/ethnicity. Participants endorsed any of 23 race/ethnicity/nationality categories, which were collapsed into seven major race/ethnicity groups. By self-report the cohort is 80.8% white and 19.2% minority; 93.8% endorsed a single race/ethnicity group, while 6.2% endorsed two or more. Principal component (PC) and admixture analyses were generally consistent with prior studies. Approximately 17% of subjects had genetic ancestry from more than one continent, and 12% were genetically admixed, considering only nonadjacent geographical origins. Self-reported whites were spread on a continuum along the first two PCs, indicating extensive mixing among European nationalities. Self-identified East Asian nationalities correlated with genetic clustering, consistent with extensive endogamy. Individuals of mixed East Asian-European genetic ancestry were easily identified; we also observed a modest amount of European genetic ancestry in individuals self-identified as Filipinos. Self-reported African Americans and Latinos showed extensive European and African genetic ancestry, and Native American genetic ancestry for the latter. Among 3741 genetically identified parent-child pairs, 93% were concordant for self-reported race/ethnicity; among 2018 genetically identified full-sib pairs, 96% were concordant; the lower rate for parent-child pairs was largely due to intermarriage. The parent-child pairs revealed a trend toward increasing exogamy over time; the presence in the cohort of individuals endorsing multiple race/ethnicity categories creates interesting challenges and future opportunities for genetic epidemiologic studies. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  13. Porcine deltacoronavirus: histological lesions and genetic characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Leyi; Hayes, Jeff; Sarver, Craig; Byrum, Beverly; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    First identified in 2012 in a surveillance study in Hong Kong, porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) is a proposed member of the genus Deltacoronavirus of the family Coronaviridae. In February of 2014, PDCoV was detected in pigs with clinical diarrheal symptoms for the first time in the USA. Since then, it has been detected in more than 20 states in the USA and in other countries, including Canada, South Korea, and mainland China. So far, histological lesions in the intestines of pigs naturally infected with PDCoV under field conditions have not been reported. In this report, we describe the characteristic histological lesions in the small intestine that were associated with PDCoV infection, as evidenced by detection of viral nucleic acid by RT-PCR. In addition, we performed genomic analysis to determine the genetic relationship of all PDCoV strains from the four countries. We found that PDCoV mainly caused histological lesions in the small intestines of naturally infected piglets. Sequence analysis demonstrated that the PDCoV strains of different countries are closely related and shared high nucleotide sequence similarity; however, deletion patterns in the spike and 3' untranslated regions are different among the strains from mainland China, Hong Kong, the USA, and South Korea. Our study highlights the fact that continual surveillance is needed to trace the evolution of this virus.

  14. The characterization of goat genetic diversity : Towards a genomic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ajmone-Marsan, P.; Colli, L.; Han, J. L.; Achilli, A.; Lancioni, H.; Joost, S.; Crepaldi, P.; Pilla, F.; Stella, A.; Taberlet, P.; Boettcher, P.; Negrini, R.; Lenstra, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of genetic diversity at molecular level has been proposed as a valuable complement and sometimes proxy to phenotypic diversity of local breeds and is presently considered as one of the FAO priorities for breed characterization. By recommending a set of selected molecular markers

  15. Clinical and genetic characterization of six cases with complete ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The clinical examinations such as sex hormone test and B ultrasound were performed and the genetic characterization of patients were evaluated by karyotype analysis, polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. The six cases with 46, XY karyotype were diagnosed with CAIS and four novel AR mutations were ...

  16. Clinical and genetic characterization of six cases with complete ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    JING HE

    2017-08-31

    Aug 31, 2017 ... Keywords. androgen receptor; complete androgen insensitivity syndrome; mutation; karyotype analysis; DNA sequencing. Introduction. Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is an X-linked recessive genetic disease, which is characterized by par- tial or complete cell resistance to androgens (Galani et al.

  17. Fine-scale genetic characterization of Plasmodium falciparum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fine-scale genetic characterization of Plasmodium falciparum chromosome 7 encompassing the antigenic var and the drug-resistant pfcrt genes. RUCHI BAJAJ1, SUJATA MOHANTY2, A. P. DASH1 and APARUP DAS1, ∗. 1Evolutionary Genomics and Bioinformatics Laboratory, National Institute of Malaria Research,.

  18. Genetic characterization of different pakistani date palm varieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhtar, W.; Rashid, A.; Mahmood, T.

    2014-01-01

    Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) is the oldest cultivated fruit tree and it has a great socioeconomic and nutritional value. Breeding programs and conservation rely on genetic characterization and diversity in gene pool. Its genetic diversity has not been focused more in Pakistan yet, therefore the present study aimed at the evaluation of genetic relationship based on chloroplast ribosomal protein gene (rps14). Rps14 gene was amplified and sequenced from selected varieties. Phylogram illustrated over all genetic distance of 0.001 representing close genetic relationship of selected P. dactylifera varieties. Pairwise distance was calculated for rps14 gene and very low genetic diversity values were observed ranging 0.003-0.017. Estimates of average evolutionary divergence of overall sequence pairs and nucleotide diversity were again found very low with 0.008 and 0.007 respectively. Sequences were analyzed by MEGA6, which revealed Pathri, Dhaddy, Makhi and Khudrawi as recent varieties. On the basis of rps14 genetic makeup, it can be suggested that Pakistani date palm varieties show very high degree of similarity. (author)

  19. Differential effects of landscape-level environmental features on genetic structure in three codistributed tree species in Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelchau, Monica F; Hamrick, J L

    2012-10-01

    Landscape genetic studies use spatially explicit population genetic information to determine the physical and environmental causes of population genetic structure on regional scales. Comparative studies that identify common barriers to gene flow across multiple species within a community are important to both understand the evolutionary trajectories of populations and prioritize habitat conservation. Here, we use a comparative landscape genetic approach to ask whether gradients in temperature or precipitation seasonality structure genetic variation across three codistributed tree species in Central America, or whether a simpler (geographic distance) or more complex, species-specific environmental niche model is necessary to individually explain population genetic structure. Using descriptive statistics and causal modelling, we find that different factors best explain genetic distance in each of the three species: environmental niche distance in Bursera simaruba, geographic distance in Ficus insipida and historical barriers to gene flow or cryptic reproductive barriers for Brosimum alicastrum. This study confirms suggestions from previous studies of Central American tree species that imply that population genetic structure of trees in this region is determined by complex interactions of both historical and current barriers to gene flow. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. MS-based analytical methodologies to characterize genetically modified crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cañas, Virginia; Simó, Carolina; León, Carlos; Ibáñez, Elena; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    The development of genetically modified crops has had a great impact on the agriculture and food industries. However, the development of any genetically modified organism (GMO) requires the application of analytical procedures to confirm the equivalence of the GMO compared to its isogenic non-transgenic counterpart. Moreover, the use of GMOs in foods and agriculture faces numerous criticisms from consumers and ecological organizations that have led some countries to regulate their production, growth, and commercialization. These regulations have brought about the need of new and more powerful analytical methods to face the complexity of this topic. In this regard, MS-based technologies are increasingly used for GMOs analysis to provide very useful information on GMO composition (e.g., metabolites, proteins). This review focuses on the MS-based analytical methodologies used to characterize genetically modified crops (also called transgenic crops). First, an overview on genetically modified crops development is provided, together with the main difficulties of their analysis. Next, the different MS-based analytical approaches applied to characterize GM crops are critically discussed, and include "-omics" approaches and target-based approaches. These methodologies allow the study of intended and unintended effects that result from the genetic transformation. This information is considered to be essential to corroborate (or not) the equivalence of the GM crop with its isogenic non-transgenic counterpart. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Chemical characterization and genetic relationships among Ocimum basilicum L. cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liber, Zlatko; Carović-Stanko, Klaudija; Politeo, Olivera; Strikić, Frane; Kolak, Ivan; Milos, Mladen; Satovic, Zlatko

    2011-11-01

    Twenty-seven Ocimum basilicum cultivars were subjected to a chemical characterization of essential oil components by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and a genetic characterization using the amplified fragment-length polymorphism (AFLP) technique. Since the same 27 accessions had previously been classified into six morphotypes, these analyses allowed us to make detailed comparisons of chemistry, genetics, and morphology. The chemical composition and morphology of the studied cultivars appeared to have a strong genetic component. The AFLP analysis revealed a distinction between the green and purple morphotypes. The green morphotypes predominantly utilized the terpene biosynthetic pathway, while most purple morphotypes primarily utilized the phenylpropene biosynthetic pathway. The GC/MS analysis led to identification of 87 volatiles. Among the 27 cultivars, five chemotypes were identified. A detailed characterization of the essential oil constituents indicated the existence of both specific combinations of compounds and 'private' compounds with the potential to be used in many aspects of human life. The established relationship between a genetic profile, chemical composition, and morphology represents an important step in future breeding programs and in the cultivation of this species. Copyright © 2011 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  2. Genetic Differentiation within the Puccinia triticina Population in South America and Comparison with the North American Population Suggests Common Ancestry and Intercontinental Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf rust, caused by Puccinia triticina is the most prevalent and widespread disease of wheat in South America. The objective of this study was to determine the number of genetically differentiated groups of P. triticina that are currently present in South America, and to compare the South American ...

  3. Genetic characterisation of Toxoplasma gondii in wildlife from North America revealed widespread and high prevalence of the fourth clonal type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J.P.; Velmurugan, G.V.; Ragendran, C.; Yabsley, M.J.; Thomas, N.J.; Beckmen, K.B.; Sinnett, D.; Ruid, D.; Hart, J.; Fair, P.A.; McFee, W.E.; Shearn-Bochsler, V.; Kwok, O.C.H.; Ferreira, L.R.; Choudhary, S.; Faria, E.B.; Zhou, H.; Felix, T.A.; Su, C.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known of the genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii circulating in wildlife. In the present study wild animals, from the USA were examined for T. gondii infection. Tissues of naturally exposed animals were bioassayed in mice for isolation of viable parasites. Viable T. gondii was isolated from 31 animals including, to our knowledge for the first time, from a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), five gray wolves (Canis lupus), a woodrat (Neotoma micropus), and five Arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus). Additionally, 66 T. gondii isolates obtained previously, but not genetically characterised, were revived in mice. Toxoplasma gondii DNA isolated from these 97 samples (31+66) was characterised using 11 PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers (SAG1, 5'- and 3'-SAG2, alt.SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1 and Apico). A total of 95 isolates were successfully genotyped. In addition to clonal Types II, and III, 12 different genotypes were found. These genotype data were combined with 74 T. gondii isolates previously characterised from wildlife from North America and a composite data set of 169 isolates comprised 22 genotypes, including clonal Types II, III and 20 atypical genotypes. Phylogenetic network analysis showed limited diversity with dominance of a recently designated fourth clonal type (Type 12) in North America, followed by the Type II and III lineages. These three major lineages together accounted for 85% of strains in North America. The Type 12 lineage includes previously identified Type A and X strains from sea otters. This study revealed that the Type 12 lineage accounts for 46.7% (79/169) of isolates and is dominant in wildlife of North America. No clonal Type I strain was identified among these wildlife isolates. These results suggest that T. gondii strains in wildlife from North America have limited diversity, with the occurrence of only a few major clonal types.

  4. Beautiful Piles of Bones: An Interview with 2017 Genetics Society of America Medal Recipient David M. Kingsley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, David M

    2017-12-01

    The Genetics Society of America Medal is awarded to an individual for outstanding contributions to the field of genetics in the last 15 years. Recipients of the GSA Medal are recognized for elegant and highly meaningful contributions to modern genetics, exemplifying the ingenuity of GSA membership. The 2017 recipient is David M. Kingsley, whose work in mouse, sticklebacks, and humans has shifted paradigms about how vertebrates evolve. Kingsley first fell in love with genetics in graduate school, where he worked on receptor mediated endocytosis with Monty Krieger. In his postdoctoral training he was able to unite genetics with his first scientific love: vertebrate morphology. He joined the group of Neal Copeland and Nancy Jenkins, where he led efforts to map the classical mouse skeletal mutation short ear Convinced that experimental genetics had a unique power to reveal the inner workings of evolution, Kingsley then established the stickleback fish as an extraordinarily productive model of quantitative trait evolution in wild species. He and his colleagues revealed many important insights, including the discoveries that major morphological differences can map to key loci with large effects, that regulatory changes in essential developmental control genes have produced advantageous new traits, and that nature has selected the same genes over and over again to drive the stickleback's skeletal evolution. Recently, Kingsley's group has been using these lessons to reveal more about how our own species evolved.This is an abridged version of the interview. The full interview is available on the Genes to Genomes blog, at genestogenomes.org/kingsley/. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  5. Genetic Structuration, Demography and Evolutionary History of Mycobacterium tuberculosis LAM9 Sublineage in the Americas as Two Distinct Subpopulations Revealed by Bayesian Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Yann; Millet, Julie; Rastogi, Nalin

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains broadly present in the Americas despite intense global efforts for its control and elimination. Starting from a large dataset comprising spoligotyping (n = 21183 isolates) and 12-loci MIRU-VNTRs data (n = 4022 isolates) from a total of 31 countries of the Americas (data extracted from the SITVIT2 database), this study aimed to get an overview of lineages circulating in the Americas. A total of 17119 (80.8%) strains belonged to the Euro-American lineage 4, among which the most predominant genotypic family belonged to the Latin American and Mediterranean (LAM) lineage (n = 6386, 30.1% of strains). By combining classical phylogenetic analyses and Bayesian approaches, this study revealed for the first time a clear genetic structuration of LAM9 sublineage into two subpopulations named LAM9C1 and LAM9C2, with distinct genetic characteristics. LAM9C1 was predominant in Chile, Colombia and USA, while LAM9C2 was predominant in Brazil, Dominican Republic, Guadeloupe and French Guiana. Globally, LAM9C2 was characterized by higher allelic richness as compared to LAM9C1 isolates. Moreover, LAM9C2 sublineage appeared to expand close to twenty times more than LAM9C1 and showed older traces of expansion. Interestingly, a significant proportion of LAM9C2 isolates presented typical signature of ancestral LAM-RDRio MIRU-VNTR type (224226153321). Further studies based on Whole Genome Sequencing of LAM strains will provide the needed resolution to decipher the biogeographical structure and evolutionary history of this successful family. PMID:26517715

  6. Defining Genetic, Taxonomic, and Geographic Boundaries Among Species of the Psorophora confinnis (Diptera: Culicidae) Complex in North and South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzaro, Gregory C; Collier, Travis C; Lee, Yoosook

    2015-09-01

    The Psorophora confinnis complex is currently composed of three species--Psorophora confinnis sensu stricto (Lynch Arribalzaga) in South America, Psorophora columbiae (Dyar and Knab) in North America, and Psorophora jamaicensis (Theobald) in the Caribbean. Members of the complex are of considerable importance as vectors of arboviruses, for example, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, and are significant biting pests throughout their range. The biological and geographic boundaries of Ps. confinnis and Ps. columbiae are unclear. In fact, the name Ps. columbiae is presently designated as "provisional." In this article, we aim to clarify the taxonomy and geographic distributions of species within the Ps. confinnis complex. A population genetics approach was employed using gene and genotypic frequency data at 26 isozyme loci. The results suggest that the Ps. confinnis complex in North and South America is composed of four species. Ps. confinnis s.s. and Ps. columbiae are distinct species in South and North America, respectively. Populations in Colombia, South America, formally designated as Ps. funiculus (Dyar) and populations in the southwestern United States and western Mexico, formally designated Ps. toltecum (Dyar and Knab), are distinct species. Psorophora toltecum and Psorophora funiculus species names should be resurrected from synonymy. In addition we identified a Ps. columbiae and Ps. toltecum hybrid zone in central Texas in a region described as being one of 13 North American suture zones, being geographical areas in which closely related species occur in sympatry and frequently hybridize. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Genetic characterization of some Romanian red wine grapevine varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghetea, Ligia Gabriela; Motoc, Rozalia Magda; Niculescu, Ana-Maria; Litescu, Simona Carmen; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Popescu, Carmen Florentina

    2008-04-01

    In our study we have considered three of the most valuable Romanian red wine grapevine cultivars: Feteasca neagra, Feteasca alba and Novac. We have chosen to study grapevine because grapes and wine are an important part of a healthy diet, and because red grapes have the highest content of proanthocyanidins, that act as antioxidants (free radical scavengers) in the human body. Proanthocyanidins possess anti-mutagenic, anti-tumor, anti-viral activities and they present many other confirmed or potential benefits. Genotyping method was applied in order to asses the genetic profile at 14 microsatellite loci, for two cultivars: Feteasca neagra and Feteasca alba. In order to achieve this, the HPLC-DAD method was used. The content of anthocyans in grape skin from two cultivars - Feteasca neagra and Novac - was measured. Microsatellite markers have been certified as powerful tools for assessing genetic identities and genetic relationships between grapevine gene pools. Genetic characterization of grapevine cultivars can certify their authenticity and purity, two features that have a direct effect on the quality and value of the finished product, the wine. In our country, this is the first attempt in order to establish a genetic profile for valuable Romanian origin grapevine varieties. In some of the 14 microsatellitic loci, Feteasca neagra and Feteasca alba cultivars presented allele size variants different from the values cited in the literature, proving that these cultivars belong to a geographical distinct gene pool. The content of anthocyans in Feteasca neagra grape skin was significantly higher than in Novac.

  8. Population genetic analysis of cat populations from Mexico, Colombia, Bolivia, and the Dominican Republic: identification of different gene pools in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Garcia, Manuel; Alvarez, Diana; Shostell, Joseph M

    2005-08-01

    In this paper we identify new genetic profiles of eight Latin American cat populations. In addition, we combine data from the present study and previously published data on 70 other American and European populations to discuss (1) the points of introduction of mutant alleles for cat coat phenotypes from Europe into Latin America, (2) the heterozygosity levels at these loci in the current Latin American cat populations, (3) the level of genetic heterogeneity among Latin American cat populations, and how this compares with levels found in North American and European cat populations, and (4) how many different cat gene pools are currently present in Latin America. We also include in our purview historical records of human migrations from Europe to and within the Americas. Our analyses clearly support the view that the current genetic profiles and structuring of cat populations in Latin America can be largely explained by the historical migration patterns of humans.

  9. Variation in migratory behavior influences regional genetic diversity and structure among American Kestrel populations (Falco sparverius) in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark P; Mullins, Thomas D; Parrish, John W; Walters, Jeffrey R; Haig, Susan M

    2012-07-01

    Birds employ numerous strategies to cope with seasonal fluctuations in high-quality habitat availability. Long distance migration is a common tactic; however, partial migration is especially common among broadly distributed species. Under partial migration systems, a portion of a species migrates, whereas the remainder inhabits breeding grounds year round. In this study, we identified effects of migratory behavior variation on genetic structure and diversity of American Kestrels (Falco sparverius), a widespread partial migrant in North America. American Kestrels generally migrate; however, a resident group inhabits the southeastern United States year round. The southeastern group is designated as a separate subspecies (F. s. paulus) from the migratory group (F. s. sparverius). Using mitochondrial DNA and microsatellites from 183 and 211 individuals, respectively, we illustrate that genetic structure is stronger among nonmigratory populations, with differentiation measures ranging from 0.060 to 0.189 depending on genetic marker and analysis approach. In contrast, measures from western North American populations ranged from 0 to 0.032. These findings suggest that seasonal migratory behavior is also associated with natal and breeding dispersal tendencies. We likewise detected significantly lower genetic diversity within nonmigratory populations, reflecting the greater influence of genetic drift in small populations. We identified the signal of population expansion among nonmigratory populations, consistent with the recent establishment of higher latitude breeding locations following Pleistocene glacial retreat. Differentiation of F. s. paulus and F. s. sparverius reflected subtle differences in allele frequencies. Because migratory behavior can evolve quickly, our analyses suggest recent origins of migratory American Kestrel populations in North America.

  10. Variation in migratory behavior influences regional genetic diversity and structure among American kestrel populations (Falco sparverius) in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark P.; Mullins, Thomas D.; Parrish, John G.; Walters, Jeffrey R.; Haig, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Birds employ numerous strategies to cope with seasonal fluctuations in high-quality habitat availability. Long distance migration is a common tactic; however, partial migration is especially common among broadly distributed species. Under partial migration systems, a portion of a species migrates, whereas the remainder inhabits breeding grounds year round. In this study, we identified effects of migratory behavior variation on genetic structure and diversity of American Kestrels (Falco sparverius), a widespread partial migrant in North America. American Kestrels generally migrate; however, a resident group inhabits the southeastern United States year round. The southeastern group is designated as a separate subspecies (F. s. paulus) from the migratory group (F. s. sparverius). Using mitochondrial DNA and microsatellites from 183 and 211 individuals, respectively, we illustrate that genetic structure is stronger among nonmigratory populations, with differentiation measures ranging from 0.060 to 0.189 depending on genetic marker and analysis approach. In contrast, measures from western North American populations ranged from 0 to 0.032. These findings suggest that seasonal migratory behavior is also associated with natal and breeding dispersal tendencies. We likewise detected significantly lower genetic diversity within nonmigratory populations, reflecting the greater influence of genetic drift in small populations. We identified the signal of population expansion among nonmigratory populations, consistent with the recent establishment of higher latitude breeding locations following Pleistocene glacial retreat. Differentiation of F. s. paulus and F. s. sparverius reflected subtle differences in allele frequencies. Because migratory behavior can evolve quickly, our analyses suggest recent origins of migratory American Kestrel populations in North America.

  11. Genetic hitchhiking associated with life history divergence and colonization of North America in the European corn borer moth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopman, Erik B

    2011-05-01

    A primary goal for evolutionary biology is to reveal the genetic basis for adaptive evolution and reproductive isolation. Using Z and E pheromone strains the European corn borer (ECB) moth, I address this problem through multilocus analyses of DNA polymorphism. I find that the locus Triose phosphate isomerase (Tpi) is a statistically significant outlier in coalescent simulations of demographic histories of population divergence, including strict allopatric isolation, restricted migration, secondary contact, and population growth or decline. This result corroborates a previous QTL study that identified the Tpi chromosomal region as a repository for gene(s) contributing to divergence in life history. Patterns of nucleotide polymorphism at Tpi suggest a recent selective sweep and genetic hitchhiking associated with colonization of North America from Europe ~200 generations ago. These results indicate that gene genealogies initially diverge during speciation because of selective sweeps, but differential introgression may play a role in the maintenance of differentiation for sympatric populations.

  12. The use of genetics for the management of a recovering population: temporal assessment of migratory peregrine falcons in North America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff A Johnson

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Our ability to monitor populations or species that were once threatened or endangered and in the process of recovery is enhanced by using genetic methods to assess overall population stability and size over time. This can be accomplished most directly by obtaining genetic measures from temporally-spaced samples that reflect the overall stability of the population as given by changes in genetic diversity levels (allelic richness and heterozygosity, degree of population differentiation (F(ST and D(EST, and effective population size (N(e. The primary goal of any recovery effort is to produce a long-term self-sustaining population, and these genetic measures provide a metric by which we can gauge our progress and help make important management decisions.The peregrine falcon in North America (Falco peregrinus tundrius and anatum was delisted in 1994 and 1999, respectively, and its abundance will be monitored by the species Recovery Team every three years until 2015. Although the United States Fish and Wildlife Service makes a distinction between tundrius and anatum subspecies, our genetic results based on eleven microsatellite loci suggest limited differentiation that can be attributed to an isolation by distance relationship and warrant no delineation of these two subspecies in its northern latitudinal distribution from Alaska through Canada into Greenland. Using temporal samples collected at Padre Island, Texas during migration (seven temporal time periods between 1985-2007, no significant differences in genetic diversity or significant population differentiation in allele frequencies between time periods were observed and were indistinguishable from those obtained from tundrius/anatum breeding locations throughout their northern distribution. Estimates of harmonic mean N(e were variable and imprecise, but always greater than 500 when employing multiple temporal genetic methods.These results, including those from simulations to assess the power of

  13. The complex biogeography of the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa: genetic evidence of introductions and Subspecific introgression in Central America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Nunney

    Full Text Available The bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogen with a history of economically damaging introductions of subspecies to regions where its other subspecies are native. Genetic evidence is presented demonstrating the introduction of two new taxa into Central America and their introgression into the native subspecies, X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa. The data are from 10 genetic outliers detected by multilocus sequence typing (MLST of isolates from Costa Rica. Six (five from oleander, one from coffee defined a new sequence type (ST53 that carried alleles at six of the eight loci sequenced (five of the seven MLST loci diagnostic of the South American subspecies Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca which causes two economically damaging plant diseases, citrus variegated chlorosis and coffee leaf scorch. The two remaining loci of ST53 carried alleles from what appears to be a new South American form of X. fastidiosa. Four isolates, classified as X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa, showed a low level of introgression of non-native DNA. One grapevine isolate showed introgression of an allele from X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca while the other three (from citrus and coffee showed introgression of an allele with similar ancestry to the alleles of unknown origin in ST53. The presence of X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca in Central America is troubling given its disease potential, and establishes another route for the introduction of this economically damaging subspecies into the US or elsewhere, a threat potentially compounded by the presence of a previously unknown form of X. fastidiosa.

  14. The complex biogeography of the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa: genetic evidence of introductions and Subspecific introgression in Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunney, Leonard; Ortiz, Beatriz; Russell, Stephanie A; Ruiz Sánchez, Rebeca; Stouthamer, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogen with a history of economically damaging introductions of subspecies to regions where its other subspecies are native. Genetic evidence is presented demonstrating the introduction of two new taxa into Central America and their introgression into the native subspecies, X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa. The data are from 10 genetic outliers detected by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of isolates from Costa Rica. Six (five from oleander, one from coffee) defined a new sequence type (ST53) that carried alleles at six of the eight loci sequenced (five of the seven MLST loci) diagnostic of the South American subspecies Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca which causes two economically damaging plant diseases, citrus variegated chlorosis and coffee leaf scorch. The two remaining loci of ST53 carried alleles from what appears to be a new South American form of X. fastidiosa. Four isolates, classified as X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa, showed a low level of introgression of non-native DNA. One grapevine isolate showed introgression of an allele from X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca while the other three (from citrus and coffee) showed introgression of an allele with similar ancestry to the alleles of unknown origin in ST53. The presence of X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca in Central America is troubling given its disease potential, and establishes another route for the introduction of this economically damaging subspecies into the US or elsewhere, a threat potentially compounded by the presence of a previously unknown form of X. fastidiosa.

  15. Mitochondrial DNA-based genetic diversity of genus Lygus (Hemiptera: Miridae) in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genus Lygus is widely distributed in North American and Eurasian continents. It is the most-studied genus in the family Miridae. However, very less information on the genetic diversity of this genus is available. Studying genetic variation among Lygus pest species and thereby constructing a ...

  16. The use of genetics for the management of a recovering population: temporal assessment of migratory peregrine falcons in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeff A.; Talbot, Sandra L.; Sage, George K.; Burnham, Kurt K.; Brown, Joseph W.; Maechtle, Tom L.; Seegar, William S.; Yates, Michael A.; Anderson, Bud; Mindell, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Background:Our ability to monitor populations or species that were once threatened or endangered and in the process of recovery is enhanced by using genetic methods to assess overall population stability and size over time. This can be accomplished most directly by obtaining genetic measures from temporally-spaced samples that reflect the overall stability of the population as given by changes in genetic diversity levels (allelic richness and heterozygosity), degree of population differentiation (FST and DEST), and effective population size (Ne). The primary goal of any recovery effort is to produce a long-term self-sustaining population, and these measures provide a metric by which we can gauge our progress and help make important management decisions. Methodology/Principal Findings:The peregrine falcon in North America (Falco peregrinus tundrius and anatum) was delisted in 1994 and 1999, respectively, and its abundance will be monitored by the species Recovery Team every three years until 2015. Although the United States Fish and Wildlife Service makes a distinction between tundrius and anatum subspecies, our genetic results based on eleven microsatellite loci, including those from Brown et al. (2007), suggest no differentiation and warrant delineation of a subspecies in its northern latitudinal distribution from Alaska through Canada into Greenland. Using temporal samples collected at Padre Island, Texas during migration (seven temporal time periods between 1985-2007), no significant differences in genetic diversity or significant population differentiation in allele frequencies between time periods were observed and were indistinguishable from those obtained from tundrius/anatum breeding locations throughout their northern distribution. Estimates of harmonic mean Ne were variable and imprecise, but always greater than 500 when employing multiple temporal genetic methods. These results, including those from simulations to assess the power of each method to

  17. Modified AFLP technique for rapid genetic characterization in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranamukhaarachchi, D G; Kane, M E; Guy, C L; Li, Q B

    2000-10-01

    The standard amplified fragment-length polymorphism (AFLP) technique was modified to develop a convenient and reliable technique for rapid genetic characterization of plants. Modifications included (i) using one restriction enzyme, one adapter molecule and primer, (ii) incorporating formamide to generate more intense and uniform bands and (iii) using agarose gel electrophoresis. Sea oats (Uniola paniculata L.), pickerel-weed (Pontederia cordata L.), Bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L.) and Penstemon heterophyllus Lindl. were used to determine the ability to generate adequate resolution power with both self- and cross-pollinated plant species including cultivars, ecotypes and individuals within populations. Reproducibility of bands was higher in all the AFLP experiments compared to random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Formamide with or without bovine serum albumin improved band intensities compared to dimethyl sulfoxide and the standard reaction mixture with no organic solvents. Comparison between RAPD and modified AFLP using sea-oats population samples proved that modified AFLP exhibits (i) a low number of faint bands with increased specificity of amplified bands, (ii) a significantly higher number of polymorphic loci per primer, (iii) less primer screening time, (iv) easy scoring associated with fewer faint bands and (v) greatly enhanced reproducibility. The technique described here can be applied with a high degree of accuracy for plant genetic characterization.

  18. Newborn screening for lysosomal diseases: current status and potential interface with population medical genetics in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugliani, Roberto

    2012-09-01

    The aim of newborn screening (NBS) programs is to detect a condition in a presymptomatic baby and provide management measures which could significantly improve the natural history of the disease. NBS programs for metabolic diseases were first introduced in North America and Europe and in the 1960s for phenylketonuria, expanded a few years later to include congenital hypothyroidism, and have been growing steadily in terms of number of conditions tested for and number of countries and births covered. Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of around 50 genetic conditions in which a defect in a lysosomal function occurs. LSDs are progressive conditions, being usually asymptomatic at birth, but with clinical features becoming apparent in childhood, with severe manifestations in most instances, high morbidity and shortened life span. Although individually rare, the prevalence of LSDs is significant when the group is considered as a whole (around 1:4,000-1:9,000 live births). Several management techniques, including bone marrow transplantation, enzyme replacement therapy, substrate inhibition therapy, pharmacological chaperones and many other approaches are transforming the LSDs into treatable conditions. However, lack of awareness and lack of access to tests cause a significant delay between onset of symptoms and diagnosis. Several lines of evidence showing that the earlier introduction of therapy may provide a better outcome, are bringing support to the idea of including LSDs in NBS programs. Due to advances in technology, high-throughput multiplex methods are now available for mass screening of several LSDs. Pilot projects were already developed in many countries for some LSDs, with interesting results. Although some NBS in Latin America has been carried out since the 1970s, it has so far been incorporated as a public health program in only a few countries in the region. It will probably take many years before NBS is implemented in most Latin American countries

  19. Genetic characterization of indigenous peoples from Oaxaca, Mexico, and its relation to linguistic and geographic isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinto-Cortés, Consuelo D; Arriola, Luis A; García-Hughes, Gianella; García-López, Rodrigo; Molina, Diana P; Flores, Margarita; Palacios, Rafael; Piñero, Daniel

    2010-08-01

    We used 15 short tandem repeat (STR) loci (D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D3S1358, TH01, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D19S433, VWA, TPOX, D18S51, D5S818, and FGA) to genetically characterize 361 individuals from 11 indigenous populations (Amuzgo, Chinanteco, Chontal, Huave, Mazateco, Mixe, Mixteco, Triqui, Zapoteco del Istmo, Zapoteco del Valle, and Zoque) from Oaxaca, Mexico. We also used previously published data from other Mexican peoples (Maya, Chol, Tepehua, Otomí, and Mestizos from northern and central Mexico) to delineate genetic relations, for a total of 541 individuals. Average heterozygosity (H) was lower in most populations from Oaxaca (range 0.687 in Zoque to 0.756 in Chontal) than values observed in Mestizo populations from Mexico (0.758 and 0.793 in central and northern Mestizo, respectively) but higher than values observed in other Amerindian populations from South America; the same relation was true for the number of alleles (n(a) ). We tested (using the software Structure) whether major geographic or linguistic barriers to gene flow existed among the populations of Oaxaca and found that the populations appeared to constitute one or two genetic groups, suggesting that neither geographic location nor linguistics had an effect on the genetic structure of these culturally and linguistically highly diverse indigenous peoples. Moreover, we found a low but statistically significant between-population differentiation. In addition, the genetic structure of Oaxacan populations did not fit an isolation-by-distance model. Finally, using AMOVA and a Bayesian clustering approach, we did not detect significant geographic or linguistic barriers to gene flow within Oaxaca. These results suggest that the indigenous communities of Oaxaca, although culturally isolated, can be genetically defined as a large, nearly panmictic population in which migration could be a more important population mechanism than genetic drift. Finally, compared with outgroups in Mexico (both

  20. Population genetics of the endangered Crowned Solitary Eagle (Buteogallus coronatus) in South America

    OpenAIRE

    Canal, David; Roques, Séverine; Negro, Juan J.; Sarasola, José Hernán

    2017-01-01

    The Crowned Solitary Eagle (Buteogallus coronatus) is one of the rarest and most severely threatened birds of prey in the Neotropical region. We studied levels of neutral genetic diversity, population structure, and the demographic history of the species using 55 contemporary samples covering a large fraction of the species range, which were genotyped at 17 microsatellite loci. Our results indicated genetic homogeneity across the sampled regions, which may be explained by a high dispersal cap...

  1. Genetic diversity and phylogeography of highly zoonotic Echinococcus granulosus genotype G1 in the Americas (Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Mexico) based on 8279bp of mtDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurimäe, Teivi; Kinkar, Liina; Andresiuk, Vanessa; Haag, Karen Luisa; Ponce-Gordo, Francisco; Acosta-Jamett, Gerardo; Garate, Teresa; Gonzàlez, Luis Miguel; Saarma, Urmas

    2016-11-01

    Echinococcus granulosus is a taeniid cestode and the etiological agent of an infectious zoonotic disease known as cystic echinococcosis (CE) or hydatid disease. CE is a serious public health concern in many parts of the world, including the Americas, where it is highly endemic in many regions. Echinococcus granulosus displays high intraspecific genetic variability and is divided into multiple genotypes (G1-G8, G10) with differences in their biology and etiology. Of these, genotype G1 is responsible for the majority of human and livestock infections and has the broadest host spectrum. However, despite the high significance to the public and livestock health, the data on genetic variability and regional genetic differences of genotype G1 in America are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genetic variability and phylogeography of G1 in several countries in America by sequencing a large portion of the mitochondrial genome. We analysed 8279bp of mtDNA for 52 E. granulosus G1 samples from sheep, cattle and pigs collected in Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Mexico, covering majority of countries in the Americas where G1 has been reported. The phylogenetic network revealed 29 haplotypes and a high haplotype diversity (Hd=0.903). The absence of phylogeographic segregation between different regions in America suggests the importance of animal transportation in shaping the genetic structure of E. granulosus G1. In addition, our study revealed many highly divergent haplotypes, indicating a long and complex evolutionary history of E. granulosus G1 in the Americas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetic characterization of Measles Viruses in China, 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xuelei

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genetic characterization of wild-type measles virus was studied using nucleotide sequencing of the C-terminal region of the N protein gene and phylogenetic analysis on 59 isolates from 16 provinces of China in 2004. The results showed that all of the isolates belonged to genotype H1. 51 isolates were belonged to cluster 1 and 8 isolates were cluster 2 and Viruses from both clusters were distributed throughout China without distinct geographic pattern. The nucleotide sequence and predicted amino acid homologies of the 59 H1 strains were 96.5%–100% and 95.7%–100%, respectively. The report showed that the transmission pattern of genotype H1 viruses in China in 2004 was consistent with ongoing endemic transmission of multiple lineages of a single, endemic genotype. Multiple transmission pathways leaded to multiple lineages within endemic genotype.

  3. Genetic and antigenic characterization of Bungowannah virus, a novel pestivirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, P D; Frost, M J; King, K R; Finlaison, D S; Hornitzky, C L; Gu, X; Richter, M; Reimann, I; Dauber, M; Schirrmeier, H; Beer, M; Ridpath, J F

    2015-08-05

    Bungowannah virus, a possible new species within the genus Pestivirus, has been associated with a disease syndrome in pigs characterized by myocarditis with a high incidence of stillbirths. The current analysis of the whole-genome and antigenic properties of this virus confirms its unique identity, and further suggests that this virus is both genetically and antigenically remote from previously recognized pestiviruses. There was no evidence of reactivity with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that are generally considered to be pan-reactive with other viruses in the genus, and there was little cross reactivity with polyclonal sera. Subsequently, a set of novel mAbs has been generated which allow detection of Bungowannah virus. The combined data provide convincing evidence that Bungowannah virus is a member of the genus Pestivirus and should be officially recognized as a novel virus species. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Classification, genetic variation and pathogenicity of Lymantria dispar nucleopolyhedrovirus isolates from Asia, Europe, and North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Harrison; Melody A. Keena; Daniel L. Rowley

    2014-01-01

    Lymantria dispar multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (LdMNPV) has been formulated and applied to control outbreaks of the gypsy moth, L. dispar. To classify and determine the degree of genetic variation among isolates of L. dispar NPVs from different parts of the range of the gypsy moth, partial sequences of the

  5. Population genetic structure of Bromus tectorum in the mountains of western North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer Arnesen; Craig E. Coleman; Susan E. Meyer

    2017-01-01

    PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Invasive species are often initially restricted to a narrow range and may then expand through any of multiple mechanisms including phenotypic plasticity, in situ evolution, or selection on traits preadapted for new habitats. Our study used population genetics to explore possible processes by which the highly selfing invasive annual grass Bromus...

  6. Non invasive methods for genetic analysis applied to ecological and behavioral studies in Latino-America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana González

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Documenting the presence and abundance of the neotropical mammals is the first step for understanding their population ecology, behavior and genetic dynamics in designing conservation plans. The combination of field research with molecular genetics techniques are new tools that provide valuable biological information avoiding the disturbance in the ecosystems, trying to minimize the human impact in the process to gather biological information. The objective of this paper is to review the available non invasive sampling techniques that have been used in Neotropical mammal studies to apply to determine the presence and abundance, population structure, sex ratio, taxonomic diagnostic using mitochondrial markers, and assessing genetic variability using nuclear markers. There are a wide range of non invasive sampling techniques used to determine the species identification that inhabit an area such as searching for tracks, feces, and carcasses. Other useful equipment is the camera traps that can generate an image bank that can be valuable to assess species presence and abundance by morphology. With recent advances in molecular biology, it is now possible to use the trace amounts of DNA in feces and amplify it to analyze the species diversity in an area, and the genetic variability at intraspecific level. This is particularly helpful in cases of sympatric and cryptic species in which morphology failed to diagnose the taxonomic status of several species of brocket deer of the genus Mazama.

  7. Active fault characterization throughout the Caribbean and Central America for seismic hazard modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styron, Richard; Pagani, Marco; Garcia, Julio

    2017-04-01

    The region encompassing Central America and the Caribbean is tectonically complex, defined by the Caribbean plate's interactions with the North American, South American and Cocos plates. Though active deformation over much of the region has received at least cursory investigation the past 50 years, the area is chronically understudied and lacks a modern, synoptic characterization. Regardless, the level of risk in the region - as dramatically demonstrated by the 2010 Haiti earthquake - remains high because of high-vulnerability buildings and dense urban areas home to over 100 million people, who are concentrated near plate boundaries and other major structures. As part of a broader program to study seismic hazard worldwide, the Global Earthquake Model Foundation is currently working to quantify seismic hazard in the region. To this end, we are compiling a database of active faults throughout the region that will be integrated into similar models as recently done in South America. Our initial compilation hosts about 180 fault traces in the region. The faults show a wide range of characteristics, reflecting the diverse styles of plate boundary and plate-margin deformation observed. Regional deformation ranges from highly localized faulting along well-defined strike-slip faults to broad zones of distributed normal or thrust faulting, and from readily-observable yet slowly-slipping structures to inferred faults with geodetically-measured slip rates >10 mm/yr but essentially no geomorphic expression. Furthermore, primary structures such as the Motagua-Polochic Fault Zone (the strike-slip plate boundary between the North American and Caribbean plates in Guatemala) display strong along-strike slip rate gradients, and many other structures are undersea for most or all of their length. A thorough assessment of seismic hazard in the region will require the integration of a range of datasets and techniques and a comprehensive characterization of epistemic uncertainties driving

  8. Genetic uniformity characterizes the invasive spread of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes), a clonal aquatic plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan-Ye; Zhang, Da-Yong; Barrett, Spencer C H

    2010-05-01

    Aquatic plant invasions are often associated with long-distance dispersal of vegetative propagules and prolific clonal reproduction. These reproductive features combined with genetic bottlenecks have the potential to severely limit genetic diversity in invasive populations. To investigate this question we conducted a global scale population genetic survey using amplified fragment length polymorphism markers of the world's most successful aquatic plant invader -Eichhornia crassipes (water hyacinth). We sampled 1140 ramets from 54 populations from the native (South America) and introduced range (Asia, Africa, Europe, North America, Central America and the Caribbean). Although we detected 49 clones, introduced populations exhibited very low genetic diversity and little differentiation compared with those from the native range, and approximately 80% of introduced populations were composed of a single clone. A widespread clone ('W') detected in two Peruvian populations accounted for 70.9% of the individuals sampled and dominated in 74.5% of the introduced populations. However, samples from Bangladesh and Indonesia were composed of different genotypes, implicating multiple introductions to the introduced range. Nine of 47 introduced populations contained clonal diversity suggesting that sexual recruitment occurs in some invasive sites where environmental conditions favour seedling establishment. The global patterns of genetic diversity in E. crassipes likely result from severe genetic bottlenecks during colonization and prolific clonal propagation. The prevalence of the 'W' genotype throughout the invasive range may be explained by stochastic sampling, or possibly because of pre-adaptation of the 'W' genotype to tolerate low temperatures.

  9. Evaluation of group genetic ancestry of populations from Philadelphia and Dakar in the context of sex-biased admixture in the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefflova, Klara; Dulik, Matthew C; Pai, Athma A; Walker, Amy H; Zeigler-Johnson, Charnita M; Gueye, Serigne M; Schurr, Theodore G; Rebbeck, Timothy R

    2009-11-25

    Population history can be reflected in group genetic ancestry, where genomic variation captured by the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and non-recombining portion of the Y chromosome (NRY) can separate female- and male-specific admixture processes. Genetic ancestry may influence genetic association studies due to differences in individual admixture within recently admixed populations like African Americans. We evaluated the genetic ancestry of Senegalese as well as European Americans and African Americans from Philadelphia. Senegalese mtDNA consisted of approximately 12% U haplotypes (U6 and U5b1b haplotypes, common in North Africa) while the NRY haplotypes belonged solely to haplogroup E. In Philadelphia, we observed varying degrees of admixture. While African Americans have 9-10% mtDNAs and approximately 31% NRYs of European origin, these results are not mirrored in the mtDNA/NRY pools of European Americans: they have less than 7% mtDNAs and less than 2% NRYs from non-European sources. Additionally, there is Americas. We found that sex-biased admixture in African-derived populations is present throughout the Americas, with continual influence of European males, while Native American females contribute mainly to populations of the Caribbean and South America. The high non-European female contribution to the pool of European-derived populations is consistently characteristic of Iberian colonization. These data suggest that genomic data correlate well with historical records of colonization in the Americas.

  10. Genetic footprints of demographic expansion in North America, but not Amazonia, during the Late Quaternary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessa, Enrique P.; Cook, Joseph A.; Patton, James L.

    2003-01-01

    The biotic consequences of climate change have attracted considerable attention. In particular, the “refugial debate” centers on the possible retraction of habitats to limited areas that may have served as refuges for many associated species, especially during glaciations of the Quaternary. One prediction of such scenarios is that populations must have experienced substantial growth accompanying climatic amelioration and the occupation of newly expanded habitats. We used coalescence theory to examine the genetic evidence, or lack thereof, for late Pleistocene refugia of boreal North American and tropical Amazonian mammals. We found substantial and concordant evidence of demographic expansion in North American mammals, particularly at higher latitudes. In contrast, small mammals from western Amazonia appear to have experienced limited or no demographic expansion after the Late Pleistocene. Thus, demographic responses to climate change can be tracked genetically and appear to vary substantially across the latitudinal gradient of biotic diversity. PMID:12913123

  11. Characterization of Large Structural Genetic Mosaicism in Human Autosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiela, Mitchell J.; Zhou, Weiyin; Sampson, Joshua N.; Dean, Michael C.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Black, Amanda; Brinton, Louise A.; Chang, I-Shou; Chen, Chu; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kexin; Cook, Linda S.; Crous Bou, Marta; De Vivo, Immaculata; Doherty, Jennifer; Friedenreich, Christine M.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hartge, Patricia; Henderson, Brian E.; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hosgood, H. Dean; Hsiung, Chao A.; Hu, Wei; Hunter, David J.; Jessop, Lea; Kim, Hee Nam; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Klein, Robert; Kraft, Peter; Lan, Qing; Lin, Dongxin; Liu, Jianjun; Le Marchand, Loic; Liang, Xiaolin; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Lingeng; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Matsuo, Keitaro; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Park, Jae Yong; Pooler, Loreall; Prescott, Jennifer; Rastogi, Radhai; Risch, Harvey A.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Seow, Adeline; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Shen, Hongbing; Sheng, Xin; Shin, Min-Ho; Shu, Xiao-Ou; VanDen Berg, David; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Yi-Long; Xia, Lucy; Yang, Hannah P.; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Abnet, Christian C.; Albanes, Demetrius; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Amos, Christopher; Amundadottir, Laufey T.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Blot, William J.; Bock, Cathryn H.; Bracci, Paige M.; Burdett, Laurie; Buring, Julie E.; Butler, Mary A.; Carreón, Tania; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Chung, Charles C.; Cook, Michael B.; Cullen, Michael; Davis, Faith G.; Ding, Ti; Duell, Eric J.; Epstein, Caroline G.; Fan, Jin-Hu; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Freedman, Neal D.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M.; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giles, Graham G.; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Goldin, Lynn; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Greene, Mark H.; Hallmans, Goran; Harris, Curtis C.; Henriksson, Roger; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hu, Nan; Hutchinson, Amy; Jenab, Mazda; Johansen, Christoffer; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kooperberg, Charles; Krogh, Vittorio; Kurtz, Robert C.; LaCroix, Andrea; Landgren, Annelie; Landi, Maria Teresa; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M.; Malats, Nuria; McGlynn, Katherine A.; McNeill, Lorna H.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Melin, Beatrice S.; Mirabello, Lisa; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M.; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Purdue, Mark; Qiao, You-Lin; Rabe, Kari G.; Rajaraman, Preetha; Real, Francisco X.; Riboli, Elio; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M.; Savage, Sharon A.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Schwartz, Kendra L.; Sesso, Howard D.; Severi, Gianluca; Silverman, Debra T.; Spitz, Margaret R.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Stram, Daniel; Tang, Ze-Zhong; Taylor, Philip R.; Teras, Lauren R.; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Viswanathan, Kala; Wacholder, Sholom; Wang, Zhaoming; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K.; Wolpin, Brian M.; Wu, Xifeng; Wunder, Jay S.; Yu, Kai; Zanetti, Krista A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Ziegler, Regina G.; de Andrade, Mariza; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Beaty, Terri H.; Bierut, Laura J.; Desch, Karl C.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Feenstra, Bjarke; Ginsburg, David; Heit, John A.; Kang, Jae H.; Laurie, Cecilia A.; Li, Jun Z.; Lowe, William L.; Marazita, Mary L.; Melbye, Mads; Mirel, Daniel B.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Nelson, Sarah C.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Rice, Kenneth; Wiggs, Janey L.; Wise, Anastasia; Tucker, Margaret; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A.; Laurie, Cathy C.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Yeager, Meredith; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data have revealed that detectable genetic mosaicism involving large (>2 Mb) structural autosomal alterations occurs in a fraction of individuals. We present results for a set of 24,849 genotyped individuals (total GWAS set II [TGSII]) in whom 341 large autosomal abnormalities were observed in 168 (0.68%) individuals. Merging data from the new TGSII set with data from two prior reports (the Gene-Environment Association Studies and the total GWAS set I) generated a large dataset of 127,179 individuals; we then conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the patterns of detectable autosomal mosaicism (n = 1,315 events in 925 [0.73%] individuals). Restricting to events >2 Mb in size, we observed an increase in event frequency as event size decreased. The combined results underscore that the rate of detectable mosaicism increases with age (p value = 5.5 × 10−31) and is higher in men (p value = 0.002) but lower in participants of African ancestry (p value = 0.003). In a subset of 47 individuals from whom serial samples were collected up to 6 years apart, complex changes were noted over time and showed an overall increase in the proportion of mosaic cells as age increased. Our large combined sample allowed for a unique ability to characterize detectable genetic mosaicism involving large structural events and strengthens the emerging evidence of non-random erosion of the genome in the aging population. PMID:25748358

  12. Genetic variability and glacial origins of yellow perch (Perca flavescens) in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Thomas N.; Hatcher, Charles O.

    1993-01-01

    Starch–gel electrophoresis was used to analyze muscle and liver tissue for variation in 13 enzymes representing 31 presumptive loci in yellow perch (Perca flavescens) from 13 localities scattered throughout the natural geographic range of the species in North America. Ten loci were polymorphic, but only three, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-1*), glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI-1*), and phosphoglucomutase (PGM-2*), exhibited polymorphisms at relatively high frequencies across localities. Western populations were fixed for one allele at ADH-1*, eastern populations were fixed for another allele, and populations from intermediate locations in Lake Ontario and Pennsylvania had both alleles. The distributions of alleles at GPI-1* and PGM-2*were similar to that of ADH-1*, exhibiting strong differences between eastern and western populations, although the delineation was not as clear. Western populations were much less variable than eastern populations, and the distribution of alleles indicated that the two groups were derived from Mississippi and Atlantic glacial refugia. Populations near the physiographic discontinuity between the Mississippi and Atlantic drainages in western New York and Pennsylvania exhibited an admixture of typically western and eastern alleles. Such observations are consistent with the mixed faunal history of the region and limited postglacial dispersal of western and eastern populations across the boundary.

  13. Genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Pará, Brazil, reveals a higher frequency of ancestral strains than previously reported in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, Emilyn Costa; Rastogi, Nalin; Couvin, David; Lopes, Maria Luíza; Furlaneto, Ismari Perini; Gomes, Harrison Magdinier; Vasconcellos, Sidra Ezídio Gonçalves; Suffys, Philip Noel; Schneider, Maria Paula Cruz; de Sousa, Maísa Silva; Sola, Christophe; de Paula Souza E Guimarães, Ricardo José; Duarte, Rafael Silva; Batista Lima, Karla Valéria

    2017-12-01

    There is only scarce information available on genotypic diversity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) clinical isolates circulating in the Northern part of Brazil, a relatively neglected region regarding research on tuberculosis. We therefore characterized 980 MTBC clinical isolates from the state of Pará, by spoligotyping and data was compared with patterns from around the world, besides analyzing drug susceptibility, and collecting sociodemographic data. We also performed 24 loci MIRU-VNTR typing to evaluate phylogenetic inferences among the East-African-Indian (EAI) lineage strains. The Geographic Information System analyses were performed to generate a descriptive visualization of MTBC strain distribution in the region. A total of 249 different spoligopatterns primarily belonging to evolutionary recent Euro-American lineages, as well as Central-Asian, Manu and ancestral EAI lineages, were identified, in addition to strains with reportedly unknown lineage signatures. The most frequent lineages were Latin American Mediterranean, T and Haarlem. Interestingly, EAI lineage strains were found in a significantly higher proportion in comparison with previous studies from South America. Regarding EAI lineage, the absence of spacers 4-9 and 23-24 co-related to 24 loci MIRU-VNTRs may suggest a close evolutionary relationship between such strains in Pará and those prevalent in Mozambique, which might have contributed to the genetic diversity of MTBC strains in this region. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Genetic analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum biovar Pullorum based on characterization and evolution of CRISPR sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaolei; Hu, Yachen; Xu, Yaohui; Yin, Kequan; Li, Yang; Chen, Yun; Xia, Jie; Xu, Lijuan; Liu, Zijian; Geng, Shizhong; Li, Qiuchun; Jiao, Xinan; Chen, Xiang; Pan, Zhiming

    2017-05-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum biovar Pullorum (S. Pullorum) is the cause of pullorum disease, characterized by white diarrhea, which leads to high mortality in poultry. In this study, we aimed to assess the genetic diversity of 655 S. Pullorum strains from 1962 to 2015 in China, Europe, and South America. A sequence typing scheme based on clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) was used to reveal the genetic relationships among these strains in this study. Overall, a total of 20 Pullorum sequence types (PSTs) of CRISPR were identified in the 655 isolates with PST7 (74%, 486/655) and PST3 (13%, 86/655) to be the most two frequent PSTs belonging to two different lineages, which confirmed the genetic conservation of S. Pullorum strains isolated from six provinces and two direct-controlled municipalities (Beijing and Shanghai) in China. However, the identification of seven new PSTs distributed in strains isolated since 2001 implied that genetic variation continues to develop in S. Pullorum. Interestingly, the whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism typing (WGST) of 96 strains out of the 655 isolates divided them into four lineages based on SNP analysis of core genomic sequence and exhibit good correspondence with the CRISPR subtyping method. Notably, 22 out of 26 isolates from Europe and South America were distributed in five distinctive PSTs (with no Chinese strains). Additionally, CRISPR data of spacers and their arrangement exhibit subtle but distinct specificity between different strains, and the dynamic adaptive nature of CRISPR loci provides critical insights into the evolution of S. Pullorum as the bacteria are influenced by their environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Dynamic characterization of oil fields, complex stratigraphically using genetic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Santiago; Hidrobo, Eduardo A

    2004-01-01

    A novel methodology is presented in this paper for the characterization of highly heterogeneous oil fields by integration of the oil fields dynamic information to the static updated model. The objective of the oil field's characterization process is to build an oil field model, as realistic as possible, through the incorporation of all the available information. The classical approach consists in producing a model based in the oil field's static information, having as the process final stage the validation model with the dynamic information available. It is important to clarify that the term validation implies a punctual process by nature, generally intended to secure the required coherence between productive zones and petrophysical properties. The objective of the proposed methodology is to enhance the prediction capacity of the oil field's model by previously integrating, parameters inherent to the oil field's fluid dynamics by a process of dynamic data inversion through an optimization procedure based on evolutionary computation. The proposed methodology relies on the construction of the oil field's high-resolution static model, escalated by means of hybrid techniques while aiming to preserve the oil field's heterogeneity. Afterwards, using an analytic simulator as reference, the scaled model is methodically modified by means of an optimization process that uses genetic algorithms and production data as conditional information. The process's final product is a model that observes the static and dynamic conditions of the oil field with the capacity to minimize the economic impact that generates production historical adjustments to the simulation tasks. This final model features some petrophysical properties (porosity, permeability and water saturation), as modified to achieve a better adjustment of the simulated production's history versus the real one history matching. Additionally, the process involves a slight modification of relative permeability, which has

  16. Genome-Wide Analysis Provides Evidence on the Genetic Relatedness of the Emergent Xylella fastidiosa Genotype in Italy to Isolates from Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampetruzzi, Annalisa; Saponari, Maria; Loconsole, Giuliana; Boscia, Donato; Savino, Vito Nicola; Almeida, Rodrigo P P; Zicca, Stefania; Landa, Blanca B; Chacón-Diaz, Carlos; Saldarelli, Pasquale

    2017-07-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a plant-pathogenic bacterium recently introduced in Europe that is causing decline in olive trees in the South of Italy. Genetic studies have consistently shown that the bacterial genotype recovered from infected olive trees belongs to the sequence type ST53 within subspecies pauca. This genotype, ST53, has also been reported to occur in Costa Rica. The ancestry of ST53 was recently clarified, showing it contains alleles that are monophyletic with those of subsp. pauca in South America. To more robustly determine the phylogenetic placement of ST53 within X. fastidiosa, we performed a comparative analysis based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the study of the pan-genome of the 27 currently public available whole genome sequences of X. fastidiosa. The resulting maximum-parsimony and maximum likelihood trees constructed using the SNPs and the pan-genome analysis are consistent with previously described X. fastidiosa taxonomy, distinguishing the subsp. fastidiosa, multiplex, pauca, sandyi, and morus. Within the subsp. pauca, the Italian and three Costa Rican isolates, all belonging to ST53, formed a compact phylotype in a clade divergent from the South American pauca isolates, also distinct from the recently described coffee isolate CFBP8072 imported into Europe from Ecuador. These findings were also supported by the gene characterization of a conjugative plasmid shared by all the four ST53 isolates. Furthermore, isolates of the ST53 clade possess an exclusive locus encoding a putative ATP-binding protein belonging to the family of histidine kinase-like ATPase gene, which is not present in isolates from the subspecies multiplex, sandyi, and pauca, but was detected in ST21 isolates of the subspecies fastidiosa from Costa Rica. The clustering and distinctiveness of the ST53 isolates supports the hypothesis of their common origin, and the limited genetic diversity among these isolates suggests this is an emerging clade within subsp

  17. Genetic characterization of trh positive Vibrio spp. isolated from Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anette eBauer Ellingsen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH and/or TDH-related hemolysin (TRH genes are carried by most virulent Vibrio parahaemolyticus serovars. In Norway, trh+ V. parahaemolyticus constitute 4.4% and 4.5 % of the total number of V. parahaemolyticus isolated from blue mussel (Mytilus edulis and water, respectively. The trh gene is located in a region close to the gene cluster for urease production (ure. This region was characterized in V. parahaemolyticus strain TH3996 and it was found that a nickel transport operon (nik was located between the first gene (ureR and the rest of the ure cluster genes. The organization of the trh-ureR-nik-ure gene cluster in the Norwegian trh+ isolates was unknown. In this study, we explore the gene organization within the trh-ureR-nik-ure cluster for these isolates. PCR analyses revealed that the genes within the trh-ureR-nik-ure gene cluster of Norwegian trh+ isolates were organized in a similar fashion as reported previously for TH33996. Additionally, the phylogenetic relationship among these trh+ isolates was investigated using Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST. Analysis by MLST or ureR-trh sequences generated two different phylogenetic trees for the same strains analyzed, suggesting that ureR-trh genes have been acquired at different times in Norwegian V. parahaemolyticus isolates. MLST results revealed that some pathogenic and non-pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus isolates in Norway appear to be highly genetically related.

  18. Characterizing commercial oil palm expansion in Latin America: land use change and trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furumo, Paul Richard; Aide, T. Mitchell

    2017-02-01

    Commodity crop expansion has increased with the globalization of production systems and consumer demand, linking distant socio-ecological systems. Oil palm plantations are expanding in the tropics to satisfy growing oilseed and biofuel markets, and much of this expansion has caused extensive deforestation, especially in Asia. In Latin America, palm oil output has doubled since 2001, and the majority of expansion seems to be occurring on non-forested lands. We used MODIS satellite imagery (250 m resolution) to map current oil palm plantations in Latin America and determined prior land use and land cover (LULC) using high-resolution images in Google Earth. In addition, we compiled trade data to determine where Latin American palm oil flows, in order to better understand the underlying drivers of expansion in the region. Based on a sample of 342 032 ha of oil palm plantations across Latin America, we found that 79% replaced previously intervened lands (e.g. pastures, croplands, bananas), primarily cattle pastures (56%). The remaining 21% came from areas that were classified as woody vegetation (e.g. forests), most notably in the Amazon and the Petén region in northern Guatemala. Latin America is a net exporter of palm oil but the majority of palm oil exports (70%) stayed within the region, with Mexico importing about half. Growth of the oil palm sector may be driven by global factors, but environmental and economic outcomes vary between regions (i.e. Asia and Latin America), within regions (i.e. Colombia and Peru), and within single countries (i.e. Guatemala), suggesting that local conditions are influential. The present trend of oil palm expanding onto previously cleared lands, guided by roundtable certifications programs, provides an opportunity for more sustainable development of the oil palm sector in Latin America.

  19. Genetic comparison of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus isolates from North America and Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, K.H.; Higman, K.H.; Arakawa, C.K.; de Kinkelin, P.; Jorgensen, P.E.V.; Meyers, T.R.; Winton, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is the cdusative agent of a serious rhabdoviral d~sease of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus myklss in Europe The first isolation of the vlrus in North Amenca occurred In the fall of 1988 when it was recovered from adult chinook 0 tshawytscha and coho 0 klsutch salmon returning to 2 hatcher~es in the state of Washington, USA The following year, VHSV was isolated from adult coho salmon at 2 other hatcher~es in northwestern Washington In 1990 and 1991, VHSV was recovered from Pacific cod Gadus macrocephalus caught in Pnnce Willlam Sound, Alaska Genetic vanation among the 4 isolates from salmon and the 1990 ~solate from Pacific cod was determ~ned uslng T1 nbonuclease finqerprlnt~ng In addition, 4 d~verse isolates from Europe were lncluded for companson The North Amencan isolates of VHSV formed a slngle fingerprint group In which the 4 isolates from salmonids were h~ghly similar to each other and the isolate from Pacific cod was related but less s~milar The 4 European ~solates which included an isolate from Atlantic cod G morhua, formed a second fingerpnnt group The genetic d~vers~ty among the isolates within each fingerpnnt group was estimated to be less than 5 % whlle the North Amencan and European strains of the virus were judged to differ by more than 5% The results indicate that the North Amerlcan isolates of VHSV are not of European ongln and that the virus may be enzootic wlthin the manne environment.

  20. Drug resistance associated genetic polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax collected in Honduras, Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovel, Irina T; Mejía, Rosa E; Banegas, Engels; Piedade, Rita; Alger, Jackeline; Fontecha, Gustavo; Ferreira, Pedro E; Veiga, Maria I; Enamorado, Irma G; Bjorkman, Anders; Ursing, Johan

    2011-12-19

    In Honduras, chloroquine and primaquine are recommended and still appear to be effective for treatment of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax malaria. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of resistance associated genetic polymorphisms in P. falciparum and P. vivax collected in Honduras. Blood samples were collected from patients seeking medical attention at the Hospital Escuela in Tegucigalpa from 2004 to 2006 as well as three regional hospitals, two health centres and one regional laboratory during 2009. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt), multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1), dihydrofolate reductase (pfdhfr) and dihydropteroate synthase (pfdhps) genes and in P. vivax multidrug resistance 1 (pvmdr1) and dihydrofolate reductase (pvdhfr) genes were detected using PCR based methods. Thirty seven P. falciparum and 64 P. vivax samples were collected. All P. falciparum infections acquired in Honduras carried pfcrt, pfmdr1, pfdhps and pfdhfr alleles associated with chloroquine, amodiaquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine sensitivity only. One patient with parasites acquired on a Pacific Island had pfcrt 76 T and pfmdr1 86Y alleles. That patient and a patient infected in West Africa had pfdhfr 51I, 59 R and 108 N alleles. Pvmdr1 976 F was found in 7/37 and two copies of pvmdr1 were found in 1/37 samples. Pvdhfr 57 L + 58 R was observed in 2/57 samples. The results indicate that P. falciparum from Honduras remain sensitive to chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine. This suggests that chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine should be efficacious for treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria, supporting current national treatment guidelines. However, genetic polymorphisms associated with chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine tolerance were detected in local P. vivax and imported P. falciparum infections. Continuous monitoring of the prevalence of drug resistant/tolerant P

  1. Characterizing Temperature Variability and Associated Large Scale Meteorological Patterns Across South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detzer, J.; Loikith, P. C.; Mechoso, C. R.; Barkhordarian, A.; Lee, H.

    2017-12-01

    South America's climate varies considerably owing to its large geographic range and diverse topographical features. Spanning the tropics to the mid-latitudes and from high peaks to tropical rainforest, the continent experiences an array of climate and weather patterns. Due to this considerable spatial extent, assessing temperature variability at the continent scale is particularly challenging. It is well documented in the literature that temperatures have been increasing across portions of South America in recent decades, and while there have been many studies that have focused on precipitation variability and change, temperature has received less scientific attention. Therefore, a more thorough understanding of the drivers of temperature variability is critical for interpreting future change. First, k-means cluster analysis is used to identify four primary modes of temperature variability across the continent, stratified by season. Next, composites of large scale meteorological patterns (LSMPs) are calculated for months assigned to each cluster. Initial results suggest that LSMPs, defined using meteorological variables such as sea level pressure (SLP), geopotential height, and wind, are able to identify synoptic scale mechanisms important for driving temperature variability at the monthly scale. Some LSMPs indicate a relationship with known recurrent modes of climate variability. For example, composites of geopotential height suggest that the Southern Annular Mode is an important, but not necessarily dominant, component of temperature variability over southern South America. This work will be extended to assess the drivers of temperature extremes across South America.

  2. Characterization and comparability of biosimilars: A filgrastim case of study and regulatory perspectives for Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Mendoza-Macedo

    2016-11-01

    Conclusions: This approach provides support to diminish uncertainty of exhibiting different pharmacological profiles and narrows or even avoids the necessity of comparative clinical studies. Ultimately, this proposal is intended to improve the accessibility to high quality biosimilars in Latin America and other developing countries.

  3. [HumGen in Spanish: a comparative description of human genetics regulatory framework in Latin America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva Sánchez, Pablo Francisco; García-López-De Llano, Jerónimo; Zaga-Galante, Jonathan; Millet-Hassey, Fernando; Rosenthal-Peretzman, Jaime; Saruwatari, Garbiñe

    2013-01-01

    To provide a research database of normative documents in Spanish related to human genetics (HG). This is a researchable database, where normative texts are related to HG. The ELSI issues are compiled, combining documents with national, regional, and international influence. The selection of these laws is done through a process of rigorous qualitative research. The portal is aimed at the general public, but with an emphasis on decision makers who possess the capacity to formulate policies on matters related to HG. Several normative documents, issued by international and regional organizations, are included, as well as documents of local government agencies of different countries. From the laws and policies available in the database, 39% are decrees of international organizations, 12% are regional normative texts, and 49% are national laws and policies. From all the national legal texts, 48% are laws or policies that belong to Spain. Latin American countries are not adopting a futuristic perspective because they do not regulate or legislate the technology resulting from research in HG. The HumGen Portal is a tool that will help the development of regulatory frameworks in Spanish-speaking countries, which will be suitable to current scientific progress.

  4. Environmental effects on allergen levels in commercially grown non-genetically modified soybeans: assessing variation across North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severin E. Stevenson

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Soybean (Glycine max is a hugely valuable soft commodity that generates tens of billions of dollars annually. This value is due in part to the balanced composition of the seed which is roughly 1:2:2 oil, starch and protein by weight. In turn, the seeds have many uses with various derivatives appearing broadly in processed food products. As is true with many edible seeds, soybeans contain proteins that are anti-nutritional factors and allergens. Soybean, along with milk, eggs, fish, crustacean shellfish, tree nuts, peanuts and wheat, elicit a majority of food allergy reactions in the United States. Soybean seed composition can be affected by breeding, environmental conditions (e.g. temperature, moisture, insect/pathogen load, and/or soil nutrient levels. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of genotype and environment on allergen and anti-nutritional proteins in soybean. To address genetic and environmental effects, four varieties of non-GM soybeans were grown in six geographically distinct regions of North America (Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, Ontario, and Pennsylvania. Absolute quantification of proteins by mass spectrometry can be achieved with a technique called multiple reaction monitoring (MRM, during which signals from an endogenous protein are compared to those from a synthetic heavy-labeled internal standard. Using MRM, eight allergens were absolutely quantified for each variety in each environment. Statistical analyses show that for most allergens, the effects of environment far outweigh the differences between varieties brought about by breeding.

  5. Environmental effects on allergen levels in commercially grown non-genetically modified soybeans: assessing variation across north america.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Severin E; Woods, Carlotta A; Hong, Bonnie; Kong, Xiaoxiao; Thelen, Jay J; Ladics, Gregory S

    2012-01-01

    Soybean (Glycinemax) is a hugely valuable soft commodity that generates tens of billions of dollars annually. This value is due in part to the balanced composition of the seed which is roughly 1:2:2 oil, starch, and protein by weight. In turn, the seeds have many uses with various derivatives appearing broadly in processed food products. As is true with many edible seeds, soybeans contain proteins that are anti-nutritional factors and allergens. Soybean, along with milk, eggs, fish, crustacean shellfish, tree nuts, peanuts, and wheat, elicit a majority of food allergy reactions in the United States. Soybean seed composition can be affected by breeding, and environmental conditions (e.g., temperature, moisture, insect/pathogen load, and/or soil nutrient levels). The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of genotype and environment on allergen and anti-nutritional proteins in soybean. To address genetic and environmental effects, four varieties of non-GM soybeans were grown in six geographically distinct regions of North America (Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, Ontario, and Pennsylvania). Absolute quantification of proteins by mass spectrometry can be achieved with a technique called multiple reaction monitoring (MRM), during which signals from an endogenous protein are compared to those from a synthetic heavy-labeled internal standard. Using MRM, eight allergens were absolutely quantified for each variety in each environment. Statistical analyses show that for most allergens, the effects of environment far outweigh the differences between varieties brought about by breeding.

  6. Genetic Characterization and Classification of Human and Animal Sapoviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoichiro Oka

    Full Text Available Sapoviruses (SaVs are enteric caliciviruses that have been detected in multiple mammalian species, including humans, pigs, mink, dogs, sea lions, chimpanzees, and rats. They show a high level of diversity. A SaV genome commonly encodes seven nonstructural proteins (NSs, including the RNA polymerase protein NS7, and two structural proteins (VP1 and VP2. We classified human and animal SaVs into 15 genogroups (G based on available VP1 sequences, including three newly characterized genomes from this study. We sequenced the full length genomes of one new genogroup V (GV, one GVII and one GVIII porcine SaV using long range RT-PCR including newly designed forward primers located in the conserved motifs of the putative NS3, and also 5' RACE methods. We also determined the 5'- and 3'-ends of sea lion GV SaV and canine GXIII SaV. Although the complete genomic sequences of GIX-GXII, and GXV SaVs are unavailable, common features of SaV genomes include: 1 "GTG" at the 5'-end of the genome, and a short (9~14 nt 5'-untranslated region; and 2 the first five amino acids (M [A/V] S [K/R] P of the putative NS1 and the five amino acids (FEMEG surrounding the putative cleavage site between NS7 and VP1 were conserved among the chimpanzee, two of five genogroups of pig (GV and GVIII, sea lion, canine, and human SaVs. In contrast, these two amino acid motifs were clearly different in three genogroups of porcine (GIII, GVI and GVII, and bat SaVs. Our results suggest that several animal SaVs have genetic similarities to human SaVs. However, the ability of SaVs to be transmitted between humans and animals is uncertain.

  7. Molecular characterization and assessment of genetic diversity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    R Madhusudhana

    Selecting parents of diverse genetic base with contrasting phenotype is an important step in developing mapping populations for quantitative trait loci (QTL) detection and marker-assisted selection. We studied genetic diversity in 31 sorghum parents using 413 sorghum simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers.

  8. Assessment and characterization of genetic diversity in Withania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... transfer of useful genes, thus maximizing the use of such available germplasms as genetic resource materials for breeders. The present input, first of its kind in Ashwagandha, will thus assist the marker assisted crop improvement programme. Key words: Withania somnifera, genetic diversity, RAPD, AFLP, polymorphism, ...

  9. Characterization of genetic structure of alfalfa (Medicago sp.) from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-08

    Aug 8, 2011 ... The mean coefficient of differentiation (Gst) was 0.0584 indicating. 30.23% of .... India' and PCR amplification was performed in reaction cocktail similar to .... Hs, genetic diversity in population; Gst, genetic diversity between population; NPL, number` of polymorphic Loci; PPL, percentage of polymorphic loci.

  10. Population Genetic Structure of Cnesterodon decemmaculatus (Poeciliidae: A Freshwater Look at the Pampa Biome in Southern South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline M. C. Ramos-Fregonezi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Pampas is a Neotropical biome formed primarily by low altitude grasslands and encompasses the southernmost portion of Brazil, Uruguay, and part of Argentina. Despite the high level of endemism, and its significant environmental heterogeneity, Pampean species are underrepresented in phylogeographic studies, especially aquatic organisms. The Pampean hydrological system resulted from a long history of tectonism, climate, and sea level changes since the Neogene. In this study, we examined the population genetic structure of Cnesterodon decemmaculatus, a freshwater fish species that occurs throughout most of the Pampa biome. We characterized mitochondrial and autosomal genetic lineages in populations sampled from Southern Brazil and Uruguay to investigate (1 the correspondence between current drainage systems and evolutionary lineages, (2 the demographic history for each genetic lineage, and (3 the temporal depth of these lineages. Overall, we found that the major evolutionary lineages in this species are strongly related to the main Pampean drainage systems, even though stream capture events may have affected the distribution of genetic lineages among drainages. There was evidence for recent population growth in the lineages occupying drainages closest to the shore, which may indicate the effect of quaternary sea-level changes. In general, divergence time estimates among evolutionary lineages were shallow, ranging from 20,000 to 800,000 years before present, indicating a geologically recent history for this group, as previously reported in other Pampean species. A Bayesian phylogeographical reconstruction suggested that an ancestral lineage probably colonized the Uruguay River Basin, and then expanded throughout the Pampas. This evolutionary scenario may represent useful starting models for other freshwater species having a similar distribution.

  11. Genetic diversity and molecular characterization of physic nut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl

    2013-02-27

    specific genetic ... diversity studies, molecular markers have been applied to identify and to select genotypes with ..... Biologia floral e polinização artificial de pinhão-manso no norte de. Minas Gerais. Pesq. Agropec. Bras.

  12. Genetic and cytogenetic characterization of genetic sexing strains of Bactrocera dorsalis and Bactrocera cucurbitae (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharopoulou, A; Franz, G

    2013-04-01

    In the current study, we performed genetic and cytogenetic analyses of two genetic sexing strains (GSSs), one for Bactrocera dorsalis s.s. and one for melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae Coquillett, the first such strains ever constructed in these species. In both strains, the genetic sexing mechanism is based on a pupal color dimorphism (white or brown) and is the result of a reciprocal translocation between the Y chromosome and the autosome bearing the white pupae (wp) locus. Based on genetic analysis and cytological data on mitotic metaphases and larval salivary gland polytene chromosomes, we succeeded in mapping the autosome breakpoints in the two Y-autosome translocations even though the Y chromosome is not visible in polytene nuclei. We show that polytene chromosomes can be used in cytogenetic analyses toward the development of genetic control methods in these pest species. The results of the genetic analysis are in full agreement with the cytological description of the strains.

  13. Characterizing dispersal patterns in a threatened seabird with limited genetic structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, Laurie A.; Palsboll, Per J.; Beissinger, Steven R.; Harvey, James T.; Berube, Martine; Raphael, Martin G.; Nelson, S. Kim; Golightly, Richard T.; Mcfarlane-Tranquilla, Laura; Newman, Scott H.; Peery, M. Zachariah

    2009-01-01

    Genetic assignment methods provide an appealing approach for characterizing dispersal patterns on ecological time scales, but require sufficient genetic differentiation to accurately identify migrants and a large enough sample size of migrants to, for example, compare dispersal between sexes or age

  14. Normalization references for Europe and North America for application with USEtox™ characterization factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurent, Alexis; Lautier, Anne; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In life cycle impact assessment, normalization can be a very effective tool for the life cycle assessment practitioner to interpret results and put them into perspective. The paper presents normalization references for the recently developed USEtox™ model, which aims at calculating...... (CFs) calculated with the version 1.0 of the USEtox™ model and substance database; both interim and recommended CFs were used. Results and discussion: Normalization references are provided for Europe and North America for the three USEtox™ toxic impact categories; ratios between the normalization...... references for the two regions in all cases lie below a factor of 3. Causes for the observed discrepancies are found to be different inventory assumptions as well as variations in the type and intensity of actual emissions between the two regions. Additional causes are inventories that only cover a limited...

  15. Characterization of Trypanosoma rangeli Strains Isolated in Central and South America: an Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grisard Edmundo C

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma rangeli is a hemoflagelate parasite that infects domestic and sylvatic animals, as well as man, in Central and South America. T. rangeli has an overlapping distribution with T. cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, sharing several animal reservoirs and triatomine vectors. We have isolated T. rangeli strains in the State of Santa Catarina, in southern Brazil, which dramatically increased the distribution area of this parasite. This brief review summarizes several studies comparing T. rangeli strains isolated in Santa Catarina with others isolated in Colombia, Honduras and Venezuela. The different methods used include indirect immunofluorescence and western blot assays, lectin agglutination, isoenzyme electrophoresis and random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, triatomine susceptibility, in vitro cell infection assays, and mini-exon gene analysis.

  16. Induction, characterization and genetic analysis of Aspergillus flavus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Aspergillus flavus infection of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) results in the accumulation of aflatoxins in seeds, which are very harmful to humans and animals. Mutation breeding programs are an effective way of inducing resistant mutants. In this study, we induced a genetic variation by using ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) ...

  17. Clinical and genetic characterization of leukoencephalopathies in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues Brandão de Paiva, Anderson; Zhang, Wei Jia; Bugiardini, Enrico; Freua, Fernando; Tavares Lucato, Leandro; Macedo-Souza, Lucia Inês; Lakshmanan, Rahul; Kinsella, Justin A.; Merwick, Aine; Rossor, Alexander M.; Bajaj, Nin; Herron, Brian; McMonagle, Paul; Morrison, Patrick J.; Hughes, Deborah; Pittman, Alan; Laurà, Matilde; Reilly, Mary M; Warren, Jason D; Mummery, Catherine J; Schott, Jonathan M.; Adams, Matthew; Fox, Nick C.; Murphy, Elaine; Davagnanam, Indran; Kok, Fernando; Chataway, Jeremy; Houlden, Henry

    2017-01-01

    Leukodystrophies and genetic leukoencephalopathies are a rare group of disorders leading to progressive degeneration of cerebral white matter. They are associated with a spectrum of clinical phenotypes dominated by dementia, psychiatric changes, movement disorders and upper motor neuron signs. Mutations in at least 60 genes can lead to leukoencephalopathy with often overlapping clinical and radiological presentations. For these reasons, patients with genetic leukoencephalopathies often endure a long diagnostic odyssey before receiving a definitive diagnosis or may receive no diagnosis at all. In this study, we used focused and whole exome sequencing to evaluate a cohort of undiagnosed adult patients referred to a specialist leukoencephalopathy service. In total, 100 patients were evaluated using focused exome sequencing of 6100 genes. We detected pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants in 26 cases. The most frequently mutated genes were NOTCH3, EIF2B5, AARS2 and CSF1R. We then carried out whole exome sequencing on the remaining negative cases including four family trios, but could not identify any further potentially disease-causing mutations, confirming the equivalence of focused and whole exome sequencing in the diagnosis of genetic leukoencephalopathies. Here we provide an overview of the clinical and genetic features of these disorders in adults. PMID:28334938

  18. Molecular and genetic characterization of OSH6 ( Oryza sativa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic studies of dissociation (Ds) insertion mutant rice plants indicated that ectopic expression of truncated OSH6 (Oryza sativa Homeobox 6) mRNA may be responsible for the mutant phenotype of knotted leaf formation at the peduncle. Additionally, ectopic expression of truncated OSH6 mRNA in the OSH6-Ds mutant ...

  19. Genetic characterization of Perna viridis L. in peninsular Malaysia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A total of 19 polymorphic microsatellite loci were used to analyse levels of genetic variation for 10 populations of Perna viridis L. collected from all over peninsular Malaysia. The populations involved in this study included Pulau Aman in Penang, Tanjung Rhu in Kedah, Bagan Tiang in Perak, Pulau Ketam in Selangor, Muar, ...

  20. Genetic characterization of the Bardigiano horse using microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed at investigating the genetic structure of the Bardigiano horse and its relationships with the Haflinger, Maremmano and Arabian breeds using 11 microsatellite markers. A total of 94 alleles were detected across the breeds, with a mean of 8.5 alleles per locus and a mean observed heterozygosity of 0.69. Compared to the other breeds, the Bardigiano horse showed quite a high genetic variability, as indicated by the mean number of alleles (7.0 vs 6.1÷7.6 and by the observed heterozygosity (0.72 vs 0.66÷0.71. Moreover, the genotype distributions in the Bardigiano groups of different sex and age were not significantly different. The overall FST value showed that the genetic differences among breeds accounted for 7.8% (P=0.001 of the total variation, and the pairwise FST values were all significant. The assignment test allocated between 96.8 and 98.9% of the individuals to the population they were collected from, with a mean probability of assignment of about 97% for all breeds, except for the Arabian, where it approached 100%. The results have highlighted that the Bardigiano breed has a high within and between breed variability, which is considerably more than could be expected by looking at its evolution history. This justifies the need for the development of additional breeding strategies to preserve the existing genetic variability.

  1. Fine-scale genetic characterization of Plasmodium falciparum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The fact that malaria is still an uncontrolled disease is reflected by the genetic organization of the parasite genome. Efforts to curb malaria should begin with proper understanding of the mechanism by which the parasites evade human immune system and evolve resistance to different antimalarial drugs. We have initiated ...

  2. Genetic characterization of Salmonella and Shigella spp. isolates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to detect and identify the target bacteria, samples were analysed by culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques (quantitative real-time PCR). Genetic relatedness was established using Sanger sequencing of the invA gene of Salmonella spp. and ipaH of Shigella spp. Results of this study displayed the ...

  3. Molecular and genetic characterization of OSH6 (Oryza sativa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-03-07

    Mar 7, 2011 ... Genomic libraries and a host strain designed for highly efficient two-hybrid selection in yeast. Genetics, 144: 1425-1436. Katsutoshi T, Yukihiro I, Shinichiro Y, Akio M, Hirohiko H, Nori K (2009). Isolation and mapping of three rice mutants that showed ectopic expression of KNOX genes in leaves. Plant Sci.

  4. Isolation and molecular genetic characterization of a yeast strain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The yeast was identified by molecular genetics technique based on sequence analysis of the variable D1/D2 domain of the large subunit (26S) ribosomal DNA. Subsequent 26S rRNA gene sequencing showed 100% base sequence homology and it was identified as Candida viswanathii. The degradation of PAHs

  5. Genetic Characterization of Enterovirus A71 Circulating in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volle, Romain; Joffret, Marie-Line; Sadeuh-Mba, Serge Alain; Gouandjika-Vasilache, Ionela; Kebe, Ousmane; Wiley, Michael R.; Majumdar, Manasi; Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Palacios, Gustavo; Martin, Javier; Delpeyroux, Francis; Ndiaye, Kader; Bessaud, Maël

    2018-01-01

    We analyzed whole-genome sequences of 8 enterovirus A71 isolates (EV-A71). We confirm the circulation of genogroup C and the new genogroup E in West Africa. Our analysis demonstrates wide geographic circulation and describes genetic exchanges between EV-A71 and autochthonous EV-A that might contribute to the emergence of pathogenic lineages. PMID:29553325

  6. Isolation, characterization and genetic analysis of canine GATA4 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biol. 13, 2235–2246. Basson C. T., Bachinsky D. R., Lin R. C., Bachinsky D. R., Wer- emowicz S., Vaglio A. et al. 1997 Mutations in human cause limb and cardiac malformation in Holt-Oram syndrome. Nature. Genet. 15, 30–35. Brickner M. E., Hillis D. and Lange R. A. 2000 Congenital heart disease in adult I. Medicine 342, ...

  7. Applying spatial analysis of genetic and environmental data to predict connection corridors to the New World screwworm populations in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresia, Pablo; Silver, Micha; Mastrangelo, Thiago; De Azeredo-Espin, Ana Maria L; Lyra, Mariana L

    2014-10-01

    The myiasis causing New World screwworm (NWS) fly is responsible for substantial losses to livestock breeders in the Americas. Due to the negative impact of the NWS fly in animal health, expansion of successful NWS fly eradication programmes is under discussion. However, the effects of geography and environmental diversity on NWS population structure and migration patterns need to be assessed before any political decision is made to implement such a programme. We present a GIS tool to construct potential connection corridors among sampling localities based on genetic and environmental data. We integrate, through a home-made python script, a friction raster based on a Maxent niche model and the pairwise ΦST statistic. Among 38 NWS fly sampling localities from South America, we find a high population connectivity among the sampling localities from the south of the Amazon region. The region along the Atlantic Ocean was identified as the most probable migration corridor between the north (NAG) and the south (SAG) of the Amazon region. The approach highlighted previously undetected population structure within NAG showing low to medium connectivity through the Andes, correlating with current understanding of NWS fly migration in South America. Also, the approach is flexible, allowing future research to incorporate other niche simulations and genetic differentiation metrics. With this flexibility, the tool could become part of any AW-IPM by helping to target regions for control. Copyright © 2014 International Atomic Energy Agency 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic structure characterization of Chileans reflects historical immigration patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyheramendy, Susana; Martinez, Felipe I.; Manevy, Federico; Vial, Cecilia; Repetto, Gabriela M.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the ancestral components of genomes of admixed individuals helps uncovering the genetic basis of diseases and understanding the demographic history of populations. We estimate local ancestry on 313 Chileans and assess the contribution from three continental populations. The distribution of ancestry block-length suggests an average admixing time around 10 generations ago. Sex-chromosome analyses confirm imbalanced contribution of European men and Native-American women. Previously known genes under selection contain SNPs showing large difference in allele frequencies. Furthermore, we show that assessing ancestry is harder at SNPs with higher recombination rates and easier at SNPs with large difference in allele frequencies at the ancestral populations. Two observations, that African ancestry proportions systematically decrease from North to South, and that European ancestry proportions are highest in central regions, show that the genetic structure of Chileans is under the influence of a diffusion process leading to an ancestry gradient related to geography. PMID:25778948

  9. Nephelium lappaceum L. genetic diversity by morphological and molecular characterization

    OpenAIRE

    De Andrade, Renata Aparecida [UNESP; Wickert, Ester [UNESP; Martins, Antonio Baldo Geraldo [UNESP; De Andrade, Mariana Macedo Costa [UNESP; De Macedo Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes [UNESP

    2011-01-01

    The rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum) is an exotic fruit with great market potential in Brazil. However, there are few available informations about plants with potential for cultivation, because great morphologic variation is observed among plants and for consequence, little uniformity in the orchards and in the fruits. This research had for objective to evaluate the genetic diversity of a collection of rambutan plants obtained by seeds through morfo-chemical analyses of plants and fruits and by...

  10. Implementation and Characterization of Dynamic Genetic Networks in Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Niederholtmeyer, Henrike Marie

    2015-01-01

    Transcription and translation (TX-TL) can be performed in vitro, outside of cells, allowing the assembly and analysis of genetic networks. This approach to engineering biological networks in a less complex and more controllable environment could one day allow rapid prototyping of network designs before implementing them in living cells. Furthermore, the in vitro approach provides insight into how natural biological systems are built and is instructive to define the rules for engineering biolo...

  11. Characterizing genetic syndromes involved in cancer and radiogenic cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unrau, P.; Doerffer, K.

    1998-01-01

    The COG project 2806A (1995), reviewed the On-line Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database of genetic syndromes to identify those syndromes, genes, and DNA sequences implicated in some way in the cancer process, and especially in radiogenic cancer risk. The current report describes a recent update of the survey in light of two years of further progress in the Human Genome project, and is intended to supply a comprehensive list of those genetic syndromes, genes, DNA sequences and map locations that define genes likely to be involved in cancer risk. Of the 8203 syndromes in OMIM in 1997 June, 814 are associated, even if marginally, with cancer. Of the 814 syndromes so linked, 672 have been mapped to a chromosome, and 476 have been mapped to a chromosome and had a DNA sequence associated with their messenger RNA (or cDNA) sequences. In addition, 35 syndromes have sequences not associated with map locations, and the remaining 107 have neither been mapped nor sequenced. We supply the list of the various genetic syndromes sorted by chromosome location and by OMIM descriptor, together with all the associated but unmapped and unsequenced syndromes. (author)

  12. Genetic characterization of Aberdeen Angus cattle using molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Pimentel de Mello Klocker Vasconcellos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberdeen Angus beef cattle from the Brazilian herd were studied genetically using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP of the kappa-casein - HinfI (CSN3 - HinfI, beta-lactoglobulin - HaeIII (LGB - HaeIII and growth hormone AluI (GH- AluI genes, as well as four microsatellites (TEXAN15, CSFM50, BM1224 and BM7160. The RFLP genotypes were determined using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR followed by digestion with restriction endonucleases and electrophoresis in agarose gels. With the exception of the microsatellite BM7160, which was analyzed in an automatic sequencer, the PCR products were genotyped by silver staining. The allele and genotype frequencies, heterozygosities and gene diversity were estimated. The values for these parameters of variability were comparable to other cattle breeds. The genetic relationship of the Aberdeen Angus to other breeds (Caracu, Canchim, Charolais, Guzerath, Gyr, Nelore, Santa Gertrudis and Simmental was investigated using Nei's genetic distance. Cluster analysis placed the Aberdeen Angus in an isolated group in the Bos taurus breeds branch. This fact is in agreement with the geographic origin of this breed.

  13. Armadillos exhibit less genetic polymorphism in North America than in South America: nuclear and mitochondrial data confirm a founder effect in Dasypus novemcinctus (Xenarthra).

    OpenAIRE

    Huchon, Dorothée; Delsuc, Frédéric; Catzeflis, François,; Douzery, Emmanuel,

    1999-01-01

    International audience; Heterozygosity at eight nuclear enzymatic loci and mitochondrial DNA control region (D-loop) sequence polymorphism was compared between North and South American nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus: Xenarthra, Dasypodidae). All markers revealed a striking genetic homogeneity amongst Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi individuals, vs. the usual level of polymorphism for the French Guiana population. This may reflect a founder effect during colonization of North A...

  14. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Clinical Isolates from Northern Colombia, South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio A. Guerra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC are major causes of childhood diarrhea in low and middle income countries including Colombia, South America. To understand the diversity of ETEC strains in the region, clinical isolates obtained from northern Colombia children were evaluated for multiple locus sequencing typing, serotyping, classical and nonclassical virulence genes, and antibiotic susceptibility. Among 40 ETEC clinical isolates evaluated, 21 (52.5% were positive for LT gene, 13 (32.5% for ST gene, and 6 (15% for both ST and LT. The most prevalent colonization surface antigens (CS were CS21 and CFA/I identified in 21 (50% and 13 (32.5% isolates, respectively. The eatA, irp2, and fyuA were the most common nonclassical virulence genes present in more than 60% of the isolates. Ampicillin resistance (80% of the strains was the most frequent phenotype among ETEC strains followed by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance (52.5%. Based on multiple locus sequencing typing (MLST, we recognize that 6 clonal groups of ETEC clinical isolates circulate in Colombia. ETEC clinical isolates from children in northern Colombia are highly diverse, yet some isolates circulating in the community belong to well-defined clonal groups that share a unique set of virulence factors, serotypes, and MLST sequence types.

  15. Molecular Characterization of Extended-Spectrum-Cephalosporin-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae from Wild Kelp Gulls in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakopoulos, Apostolos; Olsen, Björn; Geurts, Yvon; Artursson, Karin; Berg, Charlotte; Mevius, Dik J; Bonnedahl, Jonas

    2016-11-01

    Extended-spectrum-cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae are a public health concern due to limited treatment options. Here, we report on the occurrence and the molecular characteristics of extended-spectrum-cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae recovered from wild birds (kelp gulls). Our results revealed kelp gulls as a reservoir of various extended-spectrum cephalosporinase genes associated with different genetic platforms. In addition, we report for the first time the presence of a known epidemic clone of Salmonella enterica serotype Heidelberg (JF6X01.0326/XbaI.1966) among wild birds. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Low genetic diversity contrasts with high phenotypic variability in heptaploid Spartina densiflora populations invading the Pacific Coast of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Species can respond to environmental pressures through genetic and epigenetic changes and through phenotypic plasticity, but few studies have evaluated the relationships between genetic differentiation and phenotypic plasticity of plant species along changing environmental conditions such as through...

  17. The Use of Genetics for the Management of a Recovering Population: Temporal Assessment of Migratory Peregrine Falcons in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    late for the harpy eagle ( Harpia harpyja ): high levels of genetic diversity and differentiation can fuel conservation programs. PLoS ONE 4: e7336. (doi...Genetic monitoring as a promising tool for conservation and management. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 22: 25–33. 3. Laikre L, Nilsson T, Primmer...De Barba M, Waits LP, Garton EO, Genovesi P, Randi E, et al. (2010) The power of genetic monitoring for studying demography, ecology and genetics of

  18. Genetic variation and population structure of American mink Neovison vison from PCB-contaminated and non-contaminated locales in eastern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirgin, Isaac; Maceda, Lorraine; Waldman, John; Mayack, David T

    2015-11-01

    American mink Neovison vison may be particularly vulnerable to toxicities of persistent contaminants such as PCBs because of their aquatic-based diet, position near the top of the food web, and small deme sizes. Furthermore, ranched mink are sensitive to reproductive toxicities of fish diets from PCB-polluted sites. The upper Hudson River is highly contaminated with PCBs and previous studies have shown elevated hepatic burdens of total and coplanar PCBs in mink collected near the river compared with those from more distant locales in New York and elsewhere. We hypothesized that bioaccumulation of PCBs in Hudson River mink has reduced their levels of genetic diversity or altered their genetic population structure. To address this, we conducted microsatellite DNA analysis on collections made in proximity to and from more distant locales in the Hudson River watershed, elsewhere in New York State, and at other sites in eastern North America including New Brunswick, four locales in Ontario, multiple drainages in Maine, and two ecoregions in Rhode Island. We did not find reduced genetic diversity at the individual or population levels in mink collected near (<6 km) to PCB hotspots in the Hudson River nor evidence of altered population structure. Consistent with their distribution in small localized and isolated demes, we did find significant genetic population structure among many mink collections in New York State and elsewhere. Depending on the analytical approach used, genetically distinct populations numbered between 16 when using STRUCTURE to 19-20 when using Exact G tests, F ST, or AMOVA analyses. Genetically distinct population units were found among major ecoregions and minor ecoregions in New York State, among different hydrologic subunits within the Hudson River watershed, among spatially separate locales in Ontario, and among most watersheds in Maine. However, despite this localization and potential heightened impact of stressors, genetic diversity and genetic

  19. Characterizing source-sink dynamics with genetic parentage assignments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peery, M. Zachariah; Beissinger, Steven R.; House, Roger F.; Berube, Martine; Hall, Laurie A.; Sellas, Anna; Palsboll, Per J.

    2008-01-01

    Source-sink dynamics have been suggested to characterize the population structure of many species, but the prevalence of source-sink systems in nature is uncertain because of inherent challenges in estimating migration rates among populations. Migration rates are often difficult to estimate directly

  20. Genetic diversity and molecular characterization of physic nut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... were used to characterize toxicity alleles, and none of the accessions presented patterns characteristic of non-toxic accessions. Keywords: Jatropha curcas, inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR), random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), microsatellites, toxicity. African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 12(9), pp. 907-913 ...

  1. Clinical and genetic characterization of six cases with complete ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Themutations of androgen receptor (AR) gene are the most common cause for complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS). We aimed to characterize the six cases enrolled in our hospital (the First People's Hospital of Yunnan, China) and explore the molecular mechanism of CAIS. Between 2010 and 2013, six female ...

  2. Genetic characterization of the ABO blood group in Neandertals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertranpetit Jaume

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high polymorphism rate in the human ABO blood group gene seems to be related to susceptibility to different pathogens. It has been estimated that all genetic variation underlying the human ABO alleles appeared along the human lineage, after the divergence from the chimpanzee lineage. A paleogenetic analysis of the ABO blood group gene in Neandertals allows us to directly test for the presence of the ABO alleles in these extinct humans. Results We have analysed two male Neandertals that were retrieved under controlled conditions at the El Sidron site in Asturias (Spain and that appeared to be almost free of modern human DNA contamination. We find a human specific diagnostic deletion for blood group O (O01 haplotype in both Neandertal individuals. Conclusion These results suggest that the genetic change responsible for the O blood group in humans predates the human and Neandertal divergence. A potential selective event associated with the emergence of the O allele may have therefore occurred after humans separated from their common ancestor with chimpanzees and before the human-Neandertal population divergence.

  3. Molecular Genetic Characterization of Thyroid Dyshormonogenesis in a French Bulldog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, S; Pettigrew, R W; Fyfe, J C

    2015-01-01

    A case of congenital hypothyroidism with goiter (CHG) in a juvenile French bulldog was identified and hypothesized to be caused by dyshormonogenesis of genetic etiology. To describe case management, unusual phenotypic aspects, and a CHG-causing mutation in a French bulldog. Thyroid tissue and blood from a CHG-affected French bulldog and 4 normal control dogs and buccal brush samples of 125 French bulldogs were studied. Standard clinical assessment and laboratory tests were applied. Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) iodide oxidation activity was measured in vitro, and TPO protein was assessed on Western blots. Thyroid peroxidase exons and flanking splice sites were amplified from genomic DNA and sequenced. Thyroid peroxidase cDNA was amplified from thyroid RNA and sequenced. At 9 months of age, the affected dog had signs of cretinism, but near-normal skeletal maturation. The enlarged thyroid glands exhibited noninflammatory fibrosis and aberrant follicular organization. Thyroid peroxidase activity and immunocrossreactive protein were undetectable. There was a T>C mutation of the intron 12 splice donor consensus that caused abnormally spliced mRNA, consistent with absent TPO function. The mutant allele was not observed in 125 clinically normal French bulldogs. Presumptive CHG in a French bulldog with unusual clinical presentation is described. Genetic etiology was confirmed by identifying the underlying TPO mutation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  4. Characterization of genetic diversity of native 'Ancho' chili populations of Mexico using microsatellite markers

    OpenAIRE

    Rocío Toledo-Aguilar; Higinio López-Sánchez; Amalio Santacruz-Varela; Ernestina Valadez-Moctezuma; Pedro A López; Víctor H Aguilar-Rincón; Víctor A González-Hernández; Humberto Vaquera-Huerta

    2016-01-01

    'Ancho' type chilis (Capsicum annuum L. var. annuum) are an important ingredient in the traditional cuisine of Mexico and so are in high demand. It includes six native sub-types with morphological and fruit color differences. However, the genetic diversity of the set of these sub­types has not been determined. The objective of this study was to characterize the genetic diversity of native Mexican ancho chili populations using microsatellites and to determine the relationship among these popul...

  5. Genetic characterization of the gypsy moth from China (Lepidoptera, Lymantriidae using inter simple sequence repeats markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Chen

    Full Text Available This study provides the first genetic characterization of the gypsy moth from China (Lymantriadispar, one of the most recognized pests of forests and ornamental trees in the world. We assessed genetic diversity and structure in eight geographic populations of gypsy moths from China using five polymorphic Inter simple sequence repeat markers, which produced reproducible banding patterns. We observed 102 polymorphic loci across the 176 individuals sampled. Overall genetic diversity (Nei's, H was 0.2357, while the mean genetic diversity within geographic populations was 0.1845 ± 0.0150. The observed genetic distance among the eight populations ranged from 0.0432 to 0.1034. Clustering analysis (using an unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean and multidimensional scaling, revealed strong concordance between the strength of genetic relationships among populations and their geographic proximity. Analysis of molecular variance demonstrated that 25.43% of the total variability (F ST = 0.2543, P < 0.001 was attributable to variation among geographic populations. The results of our analyses investigating the degree of polymorphism, genetic diversity (Nei's and Shannon and genetic structure, suggest that individuals from Hebei may be better able to adapt to different environments and to disperse to new habitats. This study provides crucial genetic information needed to assess the distribution and population dynamics of this important pest species of global concern.

  6. The Current Status of Germplum Database: a Tool for Characterization of Plum Genetic Resources in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Harta

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In Romania, Prunus genetic resources are kept in collections of varieties, populations and biotypes, mainly located in research and development institutes or fruit growing stations and, in the last years, by some private enterprises. Creating the experimental model for the Germplum database based on phenotypic descriptors and SSR molecular markers analysis is an important and topical objective for the efficient characterization of genetic resources and also for establishing a public-private partnership for the effective management of plum germplasm resources in Romania. The technical development of the Germplum database was completed and data will be added continuously after characterizing each new accession.

  7. A Polyphasic Approach for Phenotypic and Genetic Characterization of the Fastidious Aquatic Pathogen Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José G. Ramírez-Paredes

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis (Fno is the causative agent of piscine francisellosis, an emerging infectious disease in Asia and Latin America. In this study two outbreaks of francisellosis were diagnosed in the UK on the basis of histopathology, electron microscopy, PCR, bacterial isolation and fulfillment of Koch's postulates. Furthermore, a phenotypic fingerprint based on biochemical analyses, metabolic activity, chemotaxonomic composition, and antimicrobial assays was generated for the novel isolates, the Fno type strain Ehime-1 from Asia and other Fno from Latin America. The genetic relatedness between the novel Fno and other Francisellaceae species was investigated by sequencing and comparing the 16SrRNA gene, 8 housekeeping genes (individually and concatenated and the 16SrRNA-ITS-23SrRNA sequence. The phenotypic profiling indicated a high degree of similarity among the Fno strains as all were able to metabolize dextrin, N-acetyl-D glucosamine, D-fructose, α-D-glucose, D-mannose, methyl pyruvate, acetic acid, α-keto butyric acid, L-alaninamide, L-alanine, L-alanylglycine, L-asparagine, L-glutamic acid, L-proline, L-serine, L-threonine, inosine, uridine, glycerol, D L-α-glycerol phosphate, glucose-1-phosphate, and glucose-6-phosphate. The chemotaxonomic analyses indicated that 24:1 (20.3%, 18:1n-9 (16.9%, 24:0 (13.1% 14:0 (10.9%, 22:0 (7.8%, 16:0 (7.6%, and 18:0 (5.5% were the predominant structural fatty acids in Fno. The antimicrobial assays showed little variation between the isolates and high susceptibility to enrofloxacin, gentamicin, neomycin, streptomycin, amikacin, ciprofloxacin, gatifloxacin, nitrofurantoin, tobramycin, kanamycin, tetracycline, oxytetracycline, florfenicol, oxolinic acid, and streptomycin in all the Fno analyzed. In all the phylogenetic trees the Fno strains clustered together in independent branches confirming a high degree of homogeneity. Interestingly in five of the 11 trees i.e., mutS, putA, rpo

  8. 4.4.5S: Genetic interactions of white pines and blister rust in western North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohun B. Kinloch Jr.

    1998-01-01

    A century since its introduction to North America from Europe, white pine blister rust has come to be recognized as one of the catastrophic plant disease epidemics in history. It has yet to stabilize, continuing to spread and intensify. The nine native white pine hosts comprise major timber producers, important watershed protectors, keystone ecological species, and the...

  9. THE ORIGIN AND MAINTENANCE OF GENETIC DIVERSITY WITHIN POPULATIONS OF THE ROOT PATHOGEN ARMILLARIA MELLEA IN NORTH AMERICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armillaria mellea (Basidiomycota, Physalacriaceae) sensu stricto is a common root pathogen of fruit crops, timber trees, and ornamentals worldwide. Phylogenetic analyses of nuclear rDNA and protein-coding loci support differentiation of four geographic groups: Asia, western N. America, eastern N. Am...

  10. Insights into the ecology, genetics and distribution of Lucanus elaphus Fabricius (Coleoptera: Lucanidae), North America's giant stag beetle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael D. Ulyshen; Louis G. Zachos; John O. Stireman; Thomas N. Sheehan; Ryan C. Garrick

    2017-01-01

    1. Little is known about the biology or conservation status of Lucanus elaphus Fabricius in North America despite well-documented declines of a related species, Lucanus cervus (L.), in Europe. This study provides information critical to developing conservation plans for L. elaphus...

  11. Genetic characterization of the body attributed to the evangelist Luke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernesi, Cristiano; Di Benedetto, Giulietta; Caramelli, David; Secchieri, Erica; Simoni, Lucia; Katti, Emile; Malaspina, Patrizia; Novelletto, Andrea; Marin, Vito Terribile Wiel; Barbujani, Guido

    2001-01-01

    Historical sources indicate that the evangelist Luke was born in Syria, died in Greece, and then his body was transferred to Constantinople, and from there to Padua, Italy. To understand whether there is any biological evidence supporting a Syrian origin of the Padua body traditionally attributed to Luke, or a replacement in Greece or Turkey, the mtDNA was extracted from two teeth and its control region was cloned and typed. The sequence determined in multiple clones is an uncommon variant of a set of alleles that are common in the Mediterranean region. We also collected and typed modern samples from Syria and Greece. By comparison with these population samples, and with samples from Anatolia that were already available in the literature, we could reject the hypothesis that the body belonged to a Greek, rather than a Syrian, individual. However, the probability of an origin in the area of modern Turkey was only insignificantly lower than the probability of a Syrian origin. The genetic evidence is therefore compatible with the possibility that the body comes from Syria, but also with its replacement in Constantinople. PMID:11606723

  12. Phenotypic and genetic characterization of Piscirickettsia salmonis from Chilean and Canadian salmonids

    OpenAIRE

    Otterlei, Alexander; Brevik, Øyvind J; Jensen, Daniel; Duesund, Henrik; Sommerset, Ingunn; Frost, Petter; Mendoza, Julio; McKenzie, Peter; Nylund, Are; Apablaza, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Background The study presents the phenotypic and genetic characterization of selected P. salmonis isolates from Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout suffering from SRS (salmonid rickettsial septicemia) in Chile and in Canada. The phenotypic characterization of the P. salmonis isolates were based on growth on different agar media (including a newly developed medium), different growth temperatures, antibiotics susceptibility and biochemical tests. Results This is the first study differentiating Ch...

  13. Genetic characterization of type A enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agi Deguchi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens type A, is both a ubiquitous environmental bacterium and a major cause of human gastrointestinal disease, which usually involves strains producing C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE. The gene (cpe encoding this toxin can be carried on the chromosome or a large plasmid. Interestingly, strains carrying cpe on the chromosome and strains carrying cpe on a plasmid often exhibit different biological characteristics, such as resistance properties against heat. In this study, we investigated the genetic properties of C. perfringens by PCR-surveying 21 housekeeping genes and genes on representative plasmids and then confirmed those results by Southern blot assay (SB of five genes. Furthermore, sequencing analysis of eight housekeeping genes and multilocus sequence typing (MLST analysis were also performed. Fifty-eight C. perfringens strains were examined, including isolates from: food poisoning cases, human gastrointestinal disease cases, foods in Japan or the USA, or feces of healthy humans. In the PCR survey, eight of eleven housekeeping genes amplified positive reactions in all strains tested. However, by PCR survey and SB assay, one representative virulence gene, pfoA, was not detected in any strains carrying cpe on the chromosome. Genes involved in conjugative transfer of the cpe plasmid were also absent from almost all chromosomal cpe strains. MLST showed that, regardless of their geographic origin, date of isolation, or isolation source, chromosomal cpe isolates, i assemble into one definitive cluster ii lack pfoA and iii lack a plasmid related to the cpe plasmid. Similarly, independent of their origin, strains carrying a cpe plasmid also appear to be related, but are more variable than chromosomal cpe strains, possibly because of the instability of cpe-borne plasmid(s and/or the conjugative transfer of cpe-plasmid(s into unrelated C. perfringens strains.

  14. Production and characterization of genetically modified human IL-11 variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Emiko; Takei, Toshiaki; Ueda, Takuya; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2017-02-01

    Interleukin-11 (IL-11) has been expected as a drug on severe thrombocytopenia caused by myelo-suppressive chemotherapy. Whereas, development of IL-11 inhibitor is also expected for a treatment against IL-11 related cancer progression. Here, we will demonstrate the creation of various kinds of genetically modified hIL-11s. Modified vectors were constructed by introducing N- or O-glycosylation site on the region of hIL-11 that does not belong to the core α-helical motif based on the predicted secondary structure. N-terminal (N: between 22 to 23 aa), the first loop (M1:70 to 71 aa), the second loop (M2:114-115 aa), the third loop (M3:160-161 aa) and C-terminal (C: 200- aa) were selected for modification. A large scale production system was established and the characteristics of modified hIL-11s were evaluated. The structure was analyzed by amino acid sequence and composition analysis and CD-spectra. Glycan was assessed by monosaccharide composition analysis. Growth promoting activity and biological stability were analyzed by proliferation of T1165 cells. N-terminal modified proteins were well glycosylated and produced. Growth activity of 3NN with NASNASNAS sequence on N-terminal was about tenfold higher than wild type (WT). Structural and biological stabilities of 3NN were also better than WT and residence time in mouse blood was longer than WT. M1 variants lacked growth activity though they are well glycosylated and secondary structure is very stable. Both of 3NN and OM1 with AAATPAPG on M1 associated with hIL-11R strongly. These results indicate N-terminal and M1 variants will be expected for practical use as potent agonists or antagonists of hIL-11. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical and genetic characterization of manifesting carriers of DMD mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanzadeh, Payam; Friez, Michael J; Dunn, Diane; von Niederhausern, Andrew; Gurvich, Olga L; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Sampson, Jacinda B; Pestronk, Alan; Connolly, Anne M; Florence, Julaine M; Finkel, Richard S; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Medne, Livija; Mendell, Jerry R; Mathews, Katherine D; Wong, Brenda L; Sussman, Michael D; Zonana, Jonathan; Kovak, Karen; Gospe, Sidney M; Gappmaier, Eduard; Taylor, Laura E; Howard, Michael T; Weiss, Robert B; Flanigan, Kevin M

    2010-08-01

    Manifesting carriers of DMD gene mutations may present diagnostic challenges, particularly in the absence of a family history of dystrophinopathy. We review the clinical and genetic features in 15 manifesting carriers identified among 860 subjects within the United Dystrophinopathy Project, a large clinical dystrophinopathy cohort whose members undergo comprehensive DMD mutation analysis. We defined manifesting carriers as females with significant weakness, excluding those with only myalgias/cramps. DNA extracted from peripheral blood was used to study X-chromosome inactivation patterns. Among these manifesting carriers, age at symptom onset ranged from 2 to 47 years. Seven had no family history and eight had male relatives with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Clinical severity among the manifesting carriers varied from a DMD-like progression to a very mild Becker muscular dystrophy-like phenotype. Eight had exonic deletions or duplications and six had point mutations. One patient had two mutations (an exonic deletion and a splice site mutation), consistent with a heterozygous compound state. The X-chromosome inactivation pattern was skewed toward non-random in four out of seven informative deletions or duplications but was random in all cases with nonsense mutations. We present the results of DMD mutation analysis in this manifesting carrier cohort, including the first example of a presumably compound heterozygous DMD mutation. Our results demonstrate that improved molecular diagnostic methods facilitate the identification of DMD mutations in manifesting carriers, and confirm the heterogeneity of mutational mechanisms as well as the wide spectrum of phenotypes. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of Fungal Pathogens Associated with White Pine Needle Damage (WPND in Northeastern North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk Broders

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Eastern white pine is a crucial ecological and economic component of forests in the northern USA and eastern Canada, and is now facing an emerging problem in white pine needle damage (WPND. It is still unclear whether WPND results from one, or the combination of several fungal pathogens. Therefore, the first objective of this study was to characterize the fungi associated with WPND in the northeastern United States and document the damage being done to mature eastern white pine as a result of repeated defoliation. To date, 22 species of fungi, either cultured from diseased pine needles or formed fruiting bodies on pine needles were identified based on morphology and sequence data. Lecanosticta acicola and a putative new species of Septorioides were the species most frequently recovered from diseased needles, in addition to needle cast fungi Lophophacidium dooksii and Bifusella linearis, two obligate fungal pathogens that were frequently observed on pine needles in the northeast, but have not been known to cause excessive defoliation of eastern white pine. A second objective was to monitor yearly the health of 63 pairs of healthy and unhealthy trees in eight affected locations throughout New England. Since 2012, affected trees are increasingly and repeatedly chlorotic and defoliated every year. Trees that were initially healthy are now exhibiting symptoms. While L. acicola appears to be the primary pathogen causing WPND, several other common needle pathogens are being more frequently observed and the role of climate change may be important in the disease ecology of WPND. These defoliation events, while once a sporadic occurrence, have now become more frequent as observed in continued crown deterioration of eastern white pine in long-term monitoring plots followed during the course of this three-year study.

  17. Using Genetic Algorithm and MODFLOW to Characterize Aquifer System of Northwest Florida (Published Proceedings)

    Science.gov (United States)

    By integrating Genetic Algorithm and MODFLOW2005, an optimizing tool is developed to characterize the aquifer system of Region II, Northwest Florida. The history and the newest available observation data of the aquifer system is fitted automatically by using the numerical model c...

  18. Using Genetic Algorithm and MODFLOW to Characterize Aquifer System of Northwest Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    By integrating Genetic Algorithm and MODFLOW2005, an optimizing tool is developed to characterize the aquifer system of Region II, Northwest Florida. The history and the newest available observation data of the aquifer system is fitted automatically by using the numerical model c...

  19. Diversity of the breadfruit complex (Artocarpus, Moraceae): Genetic characterization of critical germplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis, Moraceae) is a traditional staple starch crop in Oceania and has been introduced throughout the tropics. This study uses microsatellite markers to characterize the genetic diversity of breadfruit and its wild relatives housed in the USDA National Plant Germplasm Syste...

  20. Genetic characterization of guava (psidium guajava l.) Germplasm in the United States using microsatellite markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic diversity of thirty five Psidium guajava accessions maintained at the USDA, National Plants Germplasm System, Hilo, HI, was characterized using 20 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Diversity analysis detected a total of 178 alleles ranging from four to 16. The observed mean heterozygosit...

  1. Genetic characterization of fin fish species from the Warri River at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-02

    Jul 2, 2014 ... Genetic characterization of fin fish species from the. Warri River at Ubeji, Niger Delta, Nigeria. Asagbra ..... Prochilodus lineatus, Salminus brasiliensis and Steindachneridion scripta) from Uruguay River basin. Brazilian Archives Biol. Tech. 49(4):589-598. Saad YM, Shaden-Hanafi M, Essa MA, Guerges AA ...

  2. Genetic characterization of somatic recombination in Trichoderma pseudokoningii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barcellos Fernando Gomes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Crossing experiments via hyphal anastomosis between two strains contrasting for auxotrophic markers of Trichoderma pseudokoningii were conducted to characterize the somatic recombination process in this specie. Four crossings were made and a total of 1052 colonies obtained from conidial suspensions of the heterokaryotic colonies were analyzed. Sixty-eight recombinant colonies, from four growing generations, were analyzed for the auxotrophic markers. Of the 68 colonies analyzed, 58 were stable after four generations and the remainders were unstable, reverting to one of the parentals. Most of the recombinant colonies were unstable through subculture and after four growing generations they showed the leu ino met markers (auxotrophic for leucin, inositol and metionin respectively. The unstable recombinant colonies showed irregular growing borders, sparse sporulation and frequent sector formation. The results suggest the occurrence of recombination mechanisms in the heterokaryon (somatic recombination, different from those described for the parasexual cycle or parameiosis. Therefore, we proposed the ocurrence of nuclei degradation from one parental (non prevalent parental in the heterokaryon and that the resulting chromosomal fragments may be incorporated into whole nuclei of the another parental (prevalent parental. However the parameiosis as originally described cannot be excluded.

  3. Genetic characterization of five hatchery populations of the Pacific Abalone (Haliotis discus hannai) using microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hye Suck; Lee, Jang Wook; Kim, Hyun Chul; Myeong, Jeong-In

    2011-01-01

    The Pacific abalone, Haliotis discus hannai, is a popular food in Eastern Asia. Aquacultural production of this species has increased because of recent resource declines, the growing consumption, and ongoing government-operated stock release programs. Therefore, the genetic characterization of hatchery populations is necessary to maintain the genetic diversity of this species and to develop more effective aquaculture practices. We analyzed the genetic structures of five cultured populations in Korea using six microsatellite markers. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 15 to 64, with an average of 23.5. The mean observed and expected heterozygosities were 0.797 and 0.904, respectively. The inbreeding coefficient F(IS) ranged from 0.054 to 0.184 (mean F(IS) = 0.121 ± 0.056). The genetic differentiation across all populations was low but significant (overall F(ST) = 0.009, P discus hannai fisheries and the aquaculture industry.

  4. Rogue America: Benevolent Hegemon or Occupying Tyrant?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Samuels, Richard P

    2008-01-01

    .... Based on this working definition, America?s foreign policy history does not support characterization as a rogue state, though its dominant military and some imperialist history are exploited in rogue-America rhetoric...

  5. [Genotype/phenotype correlation in autism: genetic models and phenotypic characterization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet-Brilhault, F

    2011-02-01

    Autism spectrum disorders are a class of conditions categorized by communication problems, ritualistic behaviors, and deficits in social behaviors. This class of disorders merges a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders regarding some phenotypic and probably physiopathological aspects. Genetic basis is well admitted, however, considering phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity, correspondences between genotype and phenotype have yet to be established. To better identify such correspondences, genetic models have to be identified and phenotypic markers have to be characterized. Recent insights show that a variety of genetic mechanisms may be involved in autism spectrum disorders, i.e. single gene disorders, copy number variations and polygenic mechanisms. These current genetic models are described. Regarding clinical aspects, several approaches can be used in genetic studies. Nosographical approach, especially with the concept of autism spectrum disorders, merges a large group of disorders with clinical heterogeneity and may fail to identify clear genotype/phenotype correlations. Dimensional approach referred in genetic studies to the notion of "Broad Autism Phenotype" related to a constellation of language, personality, and social-behavioral features present in relatives that mirror the symptom domains of autism, but are much milder in expression. Studies of this broad autism phenotype may provide a potentially important complementary approach for detecting the genes involved in these domains. However, control population used in those studies need to be well characterized too. Identification of endophenotypes seems to offer more promising results. Endophenotypes, which are supposed to be more proximal markers of gene action in the same biological pathway, linking genes and complex clinical symptoms, are thought to be less genetically complex than the broader disease phenotype, indexing a limited aspect of genetic risk for the disorder as a whole. However

  6. Phenotypic and genetic characterization of Piscirickettsia salmonis from Chilean and Canadian salmonids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterlei, Alexander; Brevik, Øyvind J; Jensen, Daniel; Duesund, Henrik; Sommerset, Ingunn; Frost, Petter; Mendoza, Julio; McKenzie, Peter; Nylund, Are; Apablaza, Patricia

    2016-03-15

    The study presents the phenotypic and genetic characterization of selected P. salmonis isolates from Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout suffering from SRS (salmonid rickettsial septicemia) in Chile and in Canada. The phenotypic characterization of the P. salmonis isolates were based on growth on different agar media (including a newly developed medium), different growth temperatures, antibiotics susceptibility and biochemical tests. This is the first study differentiating Chilean P. salmonis isolates into two separate genetic groups. Genotyping, based on 16S rRNA-ITS and concatenated housekeeping genes grouped the selected isolates into two clades, constituted by the Chilean strains, while the Canadian isolates form a branch in the phylogenetic tree. The latter consisted of two isolates that were different in both genetic and phenotypic characteristics. The phylogenies and the MLST do not reflect the origin of the isolates with respect to host species. The isolates included were heterogeneous in phenotypic tests. The genotyping methods developed in this study provided a tool for separation of P. salmonis isolates into distinct clades. The SRS outbreaks in Chile are caused by minimum two different genetic groups of P. salmonis. This heterogeneity should be considered in future development of vaccines against this bacterium in Chile. Two different strains of P. salmonis, in regards to genetic and phenotypic characteristics, can occur in the same contemporary outbreak of SRS.

  7. Genetic and morphological divergence among Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) populations breeding in north-central and western North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Rosenfield, Robert N.; Bielefeldt, John; Murphy, Robert K.; Stewart, Andrew C.; Stout, William C.; Driscoll, Timothy G.; Bozek, Michael A.; Sloss, Brian L.; Talbot, Sandra L.

    2012-01-01

    Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) populations breeding in the northern portion of the species' range exhibit variation in morphological traits that conforms to predictions based on differences in prey size, tree stand density, and migratory behavior. We examined genetic structure and gene flow and compared divergence at morphological traits (PST) and genetic markers (FST) to elucidate mechanisms (selection or genetic drift) that promote morphological diversification among Cooper's Hawk populations. Cooper's Hawks appear to conform to the genetic pattern of an east-west divide. Populations in British Columbia are genetically differentiated from north-central populations (Wisconsin, Minnesota, and North Dakota; pairwise microsatellite FST= 0.031-0.050; mitochondrial DNA ΦST = 0.177-0.204), which suggests that Cooper's Hawks were restricted to at least two Pleistocene glacial refugia. The strength of the Rocky Mountains—Great Plains area as a barrier to dispersal is further supported by restricted gene-flow rates between British Columbia and other sampled breeding populations. Divergence in morphological traits (PST) was also observed across study areas, but with British Columbia and North Dakota differentiated from Wisconsin and Minnesota, a pattern not predicted on the basis of FST and ΦST interpopulation estimates. Comparison of PSTand FSTestimates suggests that heterogeneous selection may be acting on Cooper's Hawks in the northern portion of their distribution, which is consistent with hypotheses that variation in prey mass and migratory behavior among populations may be influencing overall body size and wing chord. We were unable to distinguish between the effects of genetic drift and selection on tail length in the study populations.

  8. Morphological and agronomical characterization and estimates of genetic parameters of sesbania Scop. (Leguminosae accessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veasey E.A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-two accessions of seven Sesbania (Leguminosae species: S. emerus, S. rostrata, S. tetraptera, S. exasperata (annuals, S. grandiflora, S. sesban and S. virgata (perennials, used for ruminant fodder, firewood, wood products, soil improvement, and human food, were investigated, with the aim of characterizing both inter- and intraspecific genetic variability, estimating genetic parameters for the characters evaluated and appraising the forage potential of the accessions. These were planted at the Instituto de Zootecnia, Nova Odessa, SP, Brazil, in a randomized complete block design with 22 treatments and four replications. Seventeen morphological and 17 agronomic characters were evaluated. Genetic parameters coefficient of intraspecific genetic diversity (bi and coefficient of intraspecific genetic variation (CVgi were obtained for the species represented by more than one accession. Highly significant differences were observed among as well as within species for most characters, showing considerable genetic variability. S. exasperata showed intraspecific genetic variability for the largest number of morphological characters. The same was observed for S. sesban for the agronomic characters. Most of the characters gave high bi values, above 0.80, indicating the possibility of selecting superior genotypes. The CVgi values, on the other hand, which indicate the magnitude of the existing genetic variability relative to the character mean, varied according to the species and character evaluated. Differences between annual and perennial species were observed, with higher biomass yields presented by the annuals at the first cut and by the perennials after the second cut, reaching the highest yield at the third cut. The annual species had higher seed production. Accession NO 934 of S. sesban gave the highest biomass yields and regrowth vigor, showing promise as a forage legume plant.

  9. The functional gene diversity in natural populations over postglacial areas: the shaping mechanisms behind genetic composition of longnose dace (Rhinichthys cataractae) in northeastern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Philippe; Angers, Bernard

    2011-08-01

    The diversity of functional genes and the related processes are important issues for conservation biology. This is especially relevant for populations that have suffered from demographic reduction as a consequence of the processes of postglacial colonization. In this perspective, the aims of the present study are (1) to quantify the genetic diversity of functional genes and (2) to disentangle the long- and short-term effects of natural selection that shapes genetic diversity from those of drift, mutation, and allopatric fragmentation. This research was conducted using an extensive genetic polymorphism analysis of populations of longnose dace (Rhinichthys cataractae) living over an area once covered by Pleistocene glaciations. The sequence and diversity of one exon of three genes (MHC IIβ, growth hormone, and trypsin) were jointly analyzed with non-coding nuclear loci from 27 populations; these populations were sampled over four major basins of northeastern North America. The survey revealed a surprisingly low allelic richness, especially for the MHC gene, considering the number of individuals and populations sampled. The results suggest that there is a complex mixture of different evolutionary processes shaping the level of polymorphism among longnose dace. While our study underlines the importance of the short-term effects of neutral processes and the major impact of post-glacial colonization on gene diversity, locally dependent balancing selection was detected on MHC. From this perspective, our results support an understanding of the importance of drift on functional gene diversity but also highlight the transient effects of natural selection on allelic composition, even in populations that show drastic reduction of genetic diversity. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

  10. Amplified fragment length polymorphism used to investigate genetic variability of the stable fly (Diptera: Muscidae) across North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneeland, K M; Skoda, S R; Foster, J E

    2013-09-01

    The stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), is a cosmopolitan pest of livestock and humans. The pestiferous nature and painful bite cause stress to cattle and other animals. The stress and resulting avoidance behaviors manifest as reductions in weight gain or milk production in cattle; estimated annual economic loss in the United States exceeds US$2 billion. Understanding the population genetics of stable flies could provide information on their population dynamics, origins of outbreaks, and geographical patterns of insecticide resistance, resulting in a tactical advantage for developing management strategies. Previous studies, mostly on a local scale, reported a high level of gene flow between locations. Here, we report results wherein amplified fragment length polymorphism was used to determine genetic diversity of stable fly samples consisting of 11-40 individuals from 12 locations representing the United States, Canada, and Panama. The Analysis of Molecular Variance showed that the majority of genetic diversity was within groups; very little was among groups. The F(ST) and G(ST) values were low ( 1.0). The tests of neutrality suggested population expansion, and no genetic differentiation was found between locations. These results show that stable flies have a high level of gene flow on a continental scale, with limited isolation owing to distance or geographical barriers.

  11. Characterization of new microsatellite loci for population genetic studies in the Smooth Cauliflower Coral (Stylophora sp.)

    KAUST Repository

    Banguera-Hinestroza, E.

    2013-01-09

    A total of one hundred microsatellites loci were selected from the draft genome of Stylophora pistillata and evaluated in previously characterized samples of Stylophora cf pistillata from the Red Sea. 17 loci were amplified successfully and tested in 24 individuals from samples belonging to a single population from the central region of the Red Sea. The number of alleles ranged from 3 to 15 alleles per locus, while observed heterozygosity ranged from 0. 292 to 0. 95. Six of these loci showed significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) expectations, and 4/136 paired loci comparisons suggested linkage disequilibrium after Bonferroni corrections. After excluding loci with significant HWE deviation and evidence of null alleles, average genetic diversity over loci in the population studied (N = 24, Nloci = 11) was 0. 701 ± 0. 380. This indicates that these loci can be used effectively to evaluate genetic diversity and undertake population genetics studies in Stylophora sp. populations. 2013 The Author(s).

  12. Genetic characterization, species differentiation and detection of Fasciola spp. by molecular approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hai-Long

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Liver flukes belonging to the genus Fasciola are among the causes of foodborne diseases of parasitic etiology. These parasites cause significant public health problems and substantial economic losses to the livestock industry. Therefore, it is important to definitively characterize the Fasciola species. Current phenotypic techniques fail to reflect the full extent of the diversity of Fasciola spp. In this respect, the use of molecular techniques to identify and differentiate Fasciola spp. offer considerable advantages. The advent of a variety of molecular genetic techniques also provides a powerful method to elucidate many aspects of Fasciola biology, epidemiology, and genetics. However, the discriminatory power of these molecular methods varies, as does the speed and ease of performance and cost. There is a need for the development of new methods to identify the mechanisms underpinning the origin and maintenance of genetic variation within and among Fasciola populations. The increasing application of the current and new methods will yield a much improved understanding of Fasciola epidemiology and evolution as well as more effective means of parasite control. Herein, we provide an overview of the molecular techniques that are being used for the genetic characterization, detection and genotyping of Fasciola spp..

  13. Genetic characterization of naturally spawned Snake River fall-run Chinook salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, A.R.; Blankenship, H.L.; Connor, W.P.

    1999-01-01

    We sampled juvenile Snake River chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha to genetically characterize the endangered Snake River fall-run population. Juveniles from fall and spring–summer lineages coexisted in our sampling areas but were differentiated by large allozyme allele frequency differences. We sorted juveniles by multilocus genotypes into putative fall and spring lineage subsamples and determined lineage composition using maximum likelihood estimation methods. Paired sMEP-1* and PGK-2* genotypes—encoding malic enzyme (NADP+) and phosphoglycerate kinase, respectively—were very effective for sorting juveniles by lineage, and subsamples estimated to be 100% fall lineage were obtained in four annual samples. We examined genetic relationships of these fall lineage juveniles with adjacent populations from the Columbia River and from Lyons Ferry Hatchery, which was established to perpetuate the Snake River fall-run population. Our samples of naturally produced Snake River fall lineage juveniles were most closely aligned with Lyons Ferry Hatchery samples. Although fall-run strays of Columbia River hatchery origin found on spawning grounds threaten the genetic integrity of the Snake River population, juvenile samples (a) showed distinctive patterns of allelic diversity, (b) were differentiated from Columbia River populations, and (c) substantiate earlier conclusions that this population is an important genetic resource. This first characterization of naturally produced Snake River fall chinook salmon provides a baseline for monitoring and recovery planning.

  14. Characterization of Rhizobacteria from field grown Genetically Modified (GM) and non-GM maizes

    OpenAIRE

    Bumunang,Emmanuel Wihkochombom; Babalola,Olubukola Oluranti

    2014-01-01

    This study was done to examine the rhizobacteria from field grown Genetically Modified (GM) maize and its non-GM counterpart. Rhizospheric soil samples were collected at 30 days after sowing (DAS) and at post-harvest from two experimental fields in Gauteng, South Africa. Total rhizobacteria (cfu/g) in GM and non-GM soil samples was not significantly different across the different media 30 DAS and at post-harvest. Rhizobacterial isolates obtained were biochemically characterized using the anal...

  15. Phenotypic and genetic characterization of circulating tumor cells by combining immunomagnetic selection and FICTION techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, María; Prior, Celia; Warleta, Fernando; Zudaire, Isabel; Ruíz-Mora, Jesús; Catena, Raúl; Calvo, Alfonso; Gaforio, José J

    2008-07-01

    The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in breast cancer patients has been proven to have clinical relevance. Cytogenetic characterization of these cells could have crucial relevance for targeted cancer therapies. We developed a method that combines an immunomagnetic selection of CTCs from peripheral blood with the fluorescence immunophenotyping and interphase cytogenetics as a tool for investigation of neoplasm (FICTION) technique. Briefly, peripheral blood (10 ml) from healthy donors was spiked with a predetermined number of human breast cancer cells. Nucleated cells were separated by double density gradient centrifugation of blood samples. Tumor cells (TCs) were immunomagnetically isolated with an anti-cytokeratin antibody and placed onto slides for FICTION analysis. For immunophenotyping and genetic characterization of TCs, a mixture of primary monoclonal anti-pancytokeratin antibodies was used, followed by fluorescent secondary antibodies, and finally hybridized with a TOP2A/HER-2/CEP17 multicolor probe. Our results show that TCs can be efficiently isolated from peripheral blood and characterized by FICTION. Because genetic amplification of TOP2A and ErbB2 (HER-2) in breast cancer correlates with response to anthracyclines and herceptin therapies, respectively, this novel methodology could be useful for a better classification of patients according to the genetic alterations of CTCs and for the application of targeted therapies.

  16. Genetic characterization of pea (Pisum sativum) germplasm from Turkey using morphological and SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikamiş, G; Yanmaz, R; Ermiş, S; Bakir, M; Yüksel, C

    2010-03-30

    The need for the conservation of plant genetic resources has been widely accepted. Germplasm characterization and evaluation yield information for more efficient utilization of these valuable resources. The aim of the present study was to characterize the pea germplasm conserved at the Aegean Agricultural Research Institute of Turkey using morphological and simple sequence repeat (SSR)-based molecular approaches. Genetic characterization of 30 pea genotypes collected from different regions of Turkey and 10 commercial pea cultivars was performed using the criteria of the International Union for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants (UPOV) (TG 7/9 Pisum sativum), and with 10 SSR markers. We originally tested 15 SSR markers; 10 of these markers were selected on the basis of high polymorphism information content in the molecular assays. Sixty-one alleles were detected at the 10 loci. The number of alleles per SSR locus ranged from 3 (PVSBE2) to 12 (AB53), with a mean of 6.1 alleles. The most informative loci were AB53 (12 alleles), AA355 (9 alleles), AD270 (8 alleles), A9 (7 alleles), AD61 (7 alleles), and AB25 (6 alleles). The UPGMA dendrogram defined by SSR markers revealed genetic relatedness of the pea genotypes. These findings can be used to guide future breeding studies and germplasm management of these pea genotypes.

  17. High genetic diversity but low population structure in the frog Pseudopaludicola falcipes (Hensel, 1867) (Amphibia, Anura) from the Pampas of South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langone, José A; Camargo, Arley; de Sá, Rafael O

    2016-02-01

    Relative to South America's ecoregions, the temperate grasslands of the Pampas have been poorly studied from a phylogeographic perspective. Based on an intermediate biogeographic setting between subtropical forest (Atlantic Forest) and arid ecosystems (Chaco and Patagonia), Pampean species are expected to show unstable demographic histories due to the Quaternary climatic oscillations. Herein, we investigate the phylogenetic relatedness and phylogeographic history of Pseudopaludicola falcipes, a small and common frog that is widely distributed across the Pampean grasslands. First, we use molecular data to assess if P. falcipes represents a single or multiple, separately evolving cryptic lineages. Because P. falcipes is a small-size species (<20mm) with extensive coloration and morphological variation, we suspected that it might represent a complex of cryptic species. In addition, we expected strong genetic and geographic structuring within Pseudopaludicola falcipes due to its large geographic distribution, potentially short dispersal distances, and multiple riverine barriers. We found that P. falcipes is a single evolutionary lineage with poor geographic structuring. Furthermore, current populations of P. falcipes have a large effective population size, maintain ancestral polymorphisms, and have a complex network of gene flow. We conclude that the demographic history of P. falcipes, combined with its ecological attributes and the landscape features of the Pampas, favored a unique combination among anurans of small body size, large population size, high genetic variability, but high cohesiveness of populations over a wide geographic distribution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic Characterization of Green Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Accessions from Turkey with SCAR and SSR Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madakbaş, Seher Yıldız; Sarıkamış, Gölge; Başak, Hakan; Karadavut, Ufuk; Özmen, Canan Yüksel; Daşçı, Mete Gürhan; Çayan, Selin

    2016-08-01

    Characterization, conservation, and utilization of genetic resources is essential for the sustainability in agriculture. Plant genetic resources are important for breeding efforts designed for the generation of new cultivars or for the improvement of existing ones. Green bean has been cultivated extensively in Turkey giving rise to local accessions through selection over time and adaptation to various environmental conditions. The objective of the present study was to determine the genetic relationships of green bean accessions collected from Kırşehir Province of Turkey, located at the central Anatolia. Within a population of 275 green bean accessions, 50 accessions were selected on the basis of morphological observations for further evaluation with SSR and STS/SCAR markers together with 4 reference cultivars of Andean and Mesoamerican origin. SSR markers selected on the basis of high polymorphism information content revealed the genetic relatedness of selected green bean accessions. STS/SCAR markers associated with bean anthracnose, common bacterial blight, white mold, halo blight, and phaseolin protein demonstrated the inheritance of resistance traits of local accessions at the selected loci. These findings may help better utilize genetic resources and furthermore are expected to facilitate forthcoming breeding studies for the generation of novel cultivars well adapted to the region.

  19. Muscle and liver transcriptome characterization and genetic marker discovery in the farmed meagre, Argyrosomus regius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manousaki, T; Tsakogiannis, A; Lagnel, J; Kyriakis, D; Duncan, N; Estevez, A; Tsigenopoulos, C S

    2018-01-21

    Meagre (Argyrosomus regius), a teleost fish of the family Sciaenidae, is part of a group of marine fish species considered new for Mediterranean aquaculture representing the larger fish cultured in the region. Meagre aquaculture started ~25years ago in West Mediterranean, and the supply of juveniles has been dominated by few hatcheries. This fact has raised concerns on possible inbreeding, urging the need for genetic information on the species and for an assessment of the polymorphisms found in the genome. To that end we characterized the muscle and liver transcriptome of a pool of meagre individuals, from different families and phenotypic size, to obtain a backbone that can support future studies regarding physiology, immunology and genetics of the species. The assembled transcripts were assigned to a wide range of biological processes including growth, reproduction, metabolism, development, stress and behavior. Then, to infer its genetic diversity and provide a catalogue of markers for future use, we scanned the reconstructed transcripts for polymorphic genetic markers. Our search revealed a total of 42,933 high quality SNP and 20,581 STR markers. We found a relatively low rate of polymorphism in the transcriptome that may indicate that inbreeding has taken place. This study has led to a catalogue of genetic markers at the expressed part of the genome and has set the ground for understanding growth and other traits of interest in meagre. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Genetic polymorphism, molecular characterization and relatedness of Macrobrachium species (Palaemonidae) based on RAPD-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, A L; Lima, A V B; Taddei, F G; Castiglioni, L

    2010-11-30

    The prawn genus Macrobrachium belongs to the family Palaemonidae. Its species are widely distributed in lakes, reservoirs, floodplains, and rivers in tropical and subtropical regions of South America. Globally, the genus Macrobrachium includes nearly 210 known species, many of which have economic and ecological importance. We analyzed three species of this genus (M. jelskii, M. amazonicum and M. brasiliense) using RAPD-PCR to assess their genetic variability, genetic structure and the phylogenetic relationship between them and to look for molecular markers that enable separation of M. jelskii and M. amazonicum, which are closely related syntopic species. Ten different random decamer primers were used for DNA amplification, yielding 182 fragments. Three of these fragments were monomorphic and exclusive to M. amazonicum or M. jelskii and can be used as specific molecular markers to identify and separate these two species. Similarity indices and a phylogenetic tree showed that M. amazonicum and M. jelskii are closest to each other, while M. brasiliense was the most differentiated species among them; this may be attributed to the different habitat conditions to which these species have been submitted. This information will be useful for further studies on these important crustacean species.

  1. Phylogeography and Genetic Variation of Triatoma dimidiata, the Main Chagas Disease Vector in Central America, and Its Position within the Genus Triatoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargues, María Dolores; Klisiowicz, Debora R.; Gonzalez-Candelas, Fernando; Ramsey, Janine M.; Monroy, Carlota; Ponce, Carlos; Salazar-Schettino, Paz María; Panzera, Francisco; Abad-Franch, Fernando; Sousa, Octavio E.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Dujardin, Jean Pierre; Guhl, Felipe; Mas-Coma, Santiago

    2008-01-01

    Background Among Chagas disease triatomine vectors, the largest genus, Triatoma, includes species of high public health interest. Triatoma dimidiata, the main vector throughout Central America and up to Ecuador, presents extensive phenotypic, genotypic, and behavioral diversity in sylvatic, peridomestic and domestic habitats, and non-domiciliated populations acting as reinfestation sources. DNA sequence analyses, phylogenetic reconstruction methods, and genetic variation approaches are combined to investigate the haplotype profiling, genetic polymorphism, phylogeography, and evolutionary trends of T. dimidiata and its closest relatives within Triatoma. This is the largest interpopulational analysis performed on a triatomine species so far. Methodology and Findings Triatomines from Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Cuba, Colombia, Ecuador, and Brazil were used. Triatoma dimidiata populations follow different evolutionary divergences in which geographical isolation appears to have had an important influence. A southern Mexican–northern Guatemalan ancestral form gave rise to two main clades. One clade remained confined to the Yucatan peninsula and northern parts of Chiapas State, Guatemala, and Honduras, with extant descendants deserving specific status. Within the second clade, extant subspecies diversity was shaped by adaptive radiation derived from Guatemalan ancestral populations. Central American populations correspond to subspecies T. d. dimidiata. A southern spread into Panama and Colombia gave the T. d. capitata forms, and a northwestern spread rising from Guatemala into Mexico gave the T. d. maculipennis forms. Triatoma hegneri appears as a subspecific insular form. Conclusions The comparison with very numerous Triatoma species allows us to reach highly supported conclusions not only about T. dimidiata, but also on different, important Triatoma species groupings and their evolution. The very large intraspecific genetic variability found in T

  2. Phylogeography and genetic variation of Triatoma dimidiata, the main Chagas disease vector in Central America, and its position within the genus Triatoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Dolores Bargues

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Among Chagas disease triatomine vectors, the largest genus, Triatoma, includes species of high public health interest. Triatoma dimidiata, the main vector throughout Central America and up to Ecuador, presents extensive phenotypic, genotypic, and behavioral diversity in sylvatic, peridomestic and domestic habitats, and non-domiciliated populations acting as reinfestation sources. DNA sequence analyses, phylogenetic reconstruction methods, and genetic variation approaches are combined to investigate the haplotype profiling, genetic polymorphism, phylogeography, and evolutionary trends of T. dimidiata and its closest relatives within Triatoma. This is the largest interpopulational analysis performed on a triatomine species so far.Triatomines from Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Cuba, Colombia, Ecuador, and Brazil were used. Triatoma dimidiata populations follow different evolutionary divergences in which geographical isolation appears to have had an important influence. A southern Mexican-northern Guatemalan ancestral form gave rise to two main clades. One clade remained confined to the Yucatan peninsula and northern parts of Chiapas State, Guatemala, and Honduras, with extant descendants deserving specific status. Within the second clade, extant subspecies diversity was shaped by adaptive radiation derived from Guatemalan ancestral populations. Central American populations correspond to subspecies T. d. dimidiata. A southern spread into Panama and Colombia gave the T. d. capitata forms, and a northwestern spread rising from Guatemala into Mexico gave the T. d. maculipennis forms. Triatoma hegneri appears as a subspecific insular form.The comparison with very numerous Triatoma species allows us to reach highly supported conclusions not only about T. dimidiata, but also on different, important Triatoma species groupings and their evolution. The very large intraspecific genetic variability found in T. dimidiata sensu lato has never

  3. Genetic aberrations in multiple myeloma characterized by cIg-FISH: a Brazilian context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Segges

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic abnormalities are critical prognostic factors for patients diagnosed with multiple myeloma (MM. This retrospective, multicenter study aimed to contribute with the genetic and clinical characterization of MM patients in a country with continental dimensions such as Brazil. Genetic abnormalities were assessed by cIg-fluorescent in situ hybridization (cIg-FISH in a series of 152 MM patients (median age 55 years, 58.5% men. Overall, genetic abnormalities were detected in 52.7% (80/152 of patients. A 14q32 rearrangement was detected in 33.5% (n=51, including t(11;14, t(4;14 and t(14;16 in 18.4, 14.1, and 1% of cases, respectively. del(13q was identified in 42.7% (n=65 of patients, of whom 49.2% (32/65 presented a concomitant 14q32 rearrangement. del(17p had a frequency of 5.2% (n=8. del(13q was associated with high plasma cell burden (≥50%, P=0.02, and del(17p with advanced ISS stages (P=0.05 and extramedullary disease (P=0.03. t(4;14 was associated with advanced Durie-Salmon stages (P=0.008, renal insufficiency (P=0.01 and was more common in patients over 60 years old. This study reports similar frequencies of genetic abnormalities to most series worldwide, whereas the t(14;16 and del(17p, two high risk factors for newly diagnosed patients, exhibited lower frequencies. Our results expand the knowledge on the molecular features of MM in Brazil, a country where innovative therapies that could overcome a poor prognosis for some genetic abnormalities are not always available.

  4. Genetic characterization of Bactrocera fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) from Northeastern India based on DNA barcodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manger, Arpana; Behere, G T; Firake, D M; Sharma, Bhagawati; Deshmukh, N A; Firake, P D; Azad Thakur, N S; Ngachan, S V

    2017-07-31

    The Northeastern region of India, one of the mega biodiversity hot spots has enormous potential for the production of fruits and vegetables. Fruit flies of the genus Bactrocera Macquart are important pests of fruits and vegetables, and one of the limiting factors in successful production of these commodities. The relationship among some of the species is unclear due to their high molecular and morphological similarities. Moreover, due to the significant morphological resemblance between fruit fly species, reliable identification is very difficult task. We genetically characterized 10 fruit fly species of the genus Bactrocera by using standard DNA barcoding region of COI gene. The characterization and identification of eight species were straight forward. This study was unable to establish the molecular identity of Bactrocera sp. 2. Within the 547 bp region of partial COI gene, there were 157 variable sites of which 110 sites were parsimony informative, 153 were synonymous substitutions and 4 were non-synonymous substitutions. The estimate of genetic divergence among the ten species was in the range of 0-21.9% and the pairwise genetic distance of Bactrocera. (Bactrocera) dorsalis (Hendel) with B. (B.) carambolae was only 0.7%. Phylogenetic analysis formed separate clades for fruit and vegetable infesting fruit flies. B. (B.) aethriobasis Hardy, B. (B.) thailandica and B. (B.) tuberculata (Bezzi) have been reported for the first time from the Northeastern India. The information generated from this study would certainly have implications for pest management, taxonomy, quarantine and trade.

  5. Characterization of the Single Stranded DNA Binding Protein SsbB Encoded in the Gonoccocal Genetic Island

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jain, Samta; Zweig, Maria; Peeters, Eveline; Siewering, Katja; Hackett, Kathleen T.; Dillard, Joseph P.; van der Does, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Background: Most strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae carry a Gonococcal Genetic Island which encodes a type IV secretion system involved in the secretion of ssDNA. We characterize the GGI-encoded ssDNA binding protein, SsbB. Close homologs of SsbB are located within a conserved genetic cluster found in

  6. Land cover characterization and mapping of South America for the year 2010 using Landsat 30 m satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Chandra; Long, Jordan

    2014-01-01

    Detailed and accurate land cover and land cover change information is needed for South America because the continent is in constant flux, experiencing some of the highest rates of land cover change and forest loss in the world. The land cover data available for the entire continent are too coarse (250 m to 1 km) for resource managers, government and non-government organizations, and Earth scientists to develop conservation strategies, formulate resource management options, and monitor land cover dynamics. We used Landsat 30 m satellite data of 2010 and prepared the land cover database of South America using state-of-the-science remote sensing techniques. We produced regionally consistent and locally relevant land cover information by processing a large volume of data covering the entire continent. Our analysis revealed that in 2010, 50% of South America was covered by forests, 2.5% was covered by water, and 0.02% was covered by snow and ice. The percent forest area of South America varies from 9.5% in Uruguay to 96.5% in French Guiana. We used very high resolution (strategies, formulating biodiversity conservation strategies, and regular land cover monitoring and forecasting.

  7. PRELIMINARY RESEARCHES REGARDING THE GENETIC AND MORPHOMETRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF HONEYBEES (A. MELLIFERA L. FROM ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELIZA CAUIA

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The international investigations regarding the honeybees’ diversity carried out until now have revealed a certain degree of genetic pollution in different countries from Europe, because of the import of more productive honeybees’ races or of some interracial honeybees’ hybrids. This fact might have a negative impact on the success adaptability of honeybees at the ecosystem. Although, the Romanian honeybees (Apis mellifera carpathica are well adapted to the local conditions and express a good resistance to diseases, the introgression (genetic pollution of different honeybees’ races could be an imminent event. So that, starting from 2007, by a cooperation between the Institute for Beekeeping Research and Development from Bucharest and the Institute of Genetics of the University of Bucharest, we have initiated different investigations in order to obtain a more accurate state of the Romanian honeybees’ diversity. We have performed specific molecular analyses, using mtDNA (the COI-COII test extracted from 32 different honeybees samples collected from several regions from Romania. For a better and detailed characterization of the collected honeybee’s samples we have also carried out some morphometric measurements of their wings. Our data have shown that the Romanian population of honeybees is almost homogenous from the genetic and the morphometric points of views. These types of investigations represent a premiere for Romania.

  8. Full-Genome Characterization and Genetic Evolution of West African Isolates of Bagaza Virus

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    Martin Faye

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Bagaza virus is a mosquito-borne flavivirus, first isolated in 1966 in Central African Republic. It has currently been identified in mosquito pools collected in the field in West and Central Africa. Emergence in wild birds in Europe and serological evidence in encephalitis patients in India raise questions on its genetic evolution and the diversity of isolates circulating in Africa. To better understand genetic diversity and evolution of Bagaza virus, we describe the full-genome characterization of 11 West African isolates, sampled from 1988 to 2014. Parameters such as genetic distances, N-glycosylation patterns, recombination events, selective pressures, and its codon adaptation to human genes are assessed. Our study is noteworthy for the observation of N-glycosylation and recombination in Bagaza virus and provides insight into its Indian origin from the 13th century. Interestingly, evidence of Bagaza virus codon adaptation to human house-keeping genes is also observed to be higher than those of other flaviviruses well known in human infections. Genetic variations on genome of West African Bagaza virus could play an important role in generating diversity and may promote Bagaza virus adaptation to other vertebrates and become an important threat in human health.

  9. Molecular marker studies in riverine buffaloes, for characterization and diagnosis of genetic defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, B.R.

    2005-01-01

    The buffalo is probably the last livestock species to have been domesticated, with many genetic, physiological and behavioural traits not yet well understood. Molecular markers have been used for characterizing animals and breeds, diagnosing diseases and identifying anatomical and physiological anomalies. RFLP studies showed low heterozygosity, but genomic and oligonucleotide probes showed species-specific bands useful for identification of carcass or other unknown samples. Use of RAPD revealed band frequencies, band sharing frequencies, genetic distances, and genetic and identity indexes in different breeds. Bovine microsatellite primers indicate that 70.9% of bovine loci were conserved in buffalo. Allele numbers, sizes, frequencies, heterozygosity and polymorphism information content showed breed-specific patterns. Different marker types - genomic and oligonucleotide probes, RAPD and microsatellites - are useful in parent identification. Individual specific DNA fingerprinting techniques were applied with twin-born animal (XX/XY) chimerism, sex identification, anatomically defective and XO individuals. Molecular markers are a potential tool for geneticists and breeders to evaluate existing germplasm and to manipulate it to develop character-specific strains and to provide the basis for effective genetic conservation. (author)

  10. Antigenic and genetic characterization of rabies viruses isolated from domestic and wild animals of Brazil identifies the hoary fox as a rabies reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, F; Nadin-Davis, S A; Wandeler, A I; Armstrong, J; Gomes, A A B; Lima, F S; Nogueira, F R B; Ito, F H

    2005-11-01

    Fifty Brazilian rabies viruses, collected from many different animal species and several regions of the country, were characterized by partial sequencing of the central, variable region of the P gene, a locus useful for sensitive molecular epidemiological studies. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequences, which included comparison with other rabies strains recovered from throughout the Americas, identified three main groups of Brazilian viruses, arbitrarily designated BRL-1 to BRL-3. BRL-1 was found in terrestrial carnivores and clusters with other American strains of the cosmopolitan lineage. BRL-2 comprised two distinct isolates, recovered from two species of non-haematophagous bats, that had evolutionary links to insectivorous-bat-derived strains of North America. BRL-3 consisted of isolates from vampire bats and from livestock species probably infected via contact with vampire bats. The terrestrial group was further subdivided into three subtypes: BRL-1a was associated exclusively with dogs and cats, while BRL-1b and BRL-1c were found exclusively in hoary foxes. These observations strongly support the role of the Brazilian hoary fox as a rabies reservoir. Screening of representative Brazilian rabies viruses against a collection of anti-rabies monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) identified a small panel of mAbs that could be used to discriminate between all Brazilian subgroups as defined by genetic classification in this study.

  11. Global and local genetic diversity at two microsatellite loci in Plasmodium vivax parasites from Asia, Africa and South America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Mette L; Ranjitkar, Samir; Rajakaruna, Rupika S

    2014-01-01

    diversity are vital to the evaluation of drug and vaccine efficacy, tracking of P. vivax outbreaks, and assessing geographical differentiation between parasite populations. METHODS: The genetic diversity of eight P. vivax populations (n = 543) was investigated by using two microsatellites (MS), m1501 and m......3502, chosen because of their seven and eight base-pair (bp) repeat lengths, respectively. These were compared with published data of the same loci from six other P. vivax populations. RESULTS: In total, 1,440 P. vivax samples from 14 countries on three continents were compared. There was highest...... heterozygosity within Asian populations, where expected heterozygosity (He) was 0.92-0.98, and alleles with a high repeat number were more common. Pairwise FST revealed significant differentiation between most P. vivax populations, with the highest divergence found between Asian and South American populations...

  12. GLOBAL OPIOID EPIDEMIC: DOOMED TO FAIL WITHOUT GENETICALLY BASED PRECISION ADDICTION MEDICINE (PAM™): LESSONS LEARNED FROM AMERICA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Modestino, Edward J; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C; Neary, Jennifer; Siwicki, David; Hauser, Mary; Barh, Debmalya; Steinberg, Bruce; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D

    2017-01-01

    It is a reality that globally opioid deaths have soared for men and women of all social, economic status and age from heroin and fentanyl overdoses. Specifically, in the United States, deaths from narcotic overdoses have reached alarming metrics since 2010. In fact, the Fentanyl rise is driven by drug dealers who sell it as heroin or who use it to lace cocaine or to make illegal counterfeit prescription opioids. The President's Commission on the crisis has linked the death toll as equivalent to "September 11th every three weeks." In fact, The U.S. Centre for Disease Control (CDC) released data showing that opioid-related overdoses were up 15% in the first three quarters of 2016 compared to 2015. Various governmental organizations including NIDA, are actively seeking solutions. However, we argue that unless the scientific community embraces genetic addiction risk coupled with potential precision or personalized medicine to induce "dopamine homeostasis" it will fail. We now have evidence that a ten-gene and eleven single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) panel predicts Addiction Severity Index (ASI) for both alcohol and drugs of abuse (e.g., Opioids). In a large multi-addiction centre study involving seven diverse treatment programs, the genetic addiction risk score (GARS ™ ) was shown to have a predictive relationship with ASI-MV derived alcohol (≥ seven alleles), and other drugs (≥ 4 alleles) severity risk scores. In a number of neuroimaging studies, we also display that in both animal (bench) and abstinent Chinese severe heroin-dependent patients (bedside), BOLD dopamine activation across the brain reward circuitry revealed increases in resting state functional connectivity as well volume connectivity. It is also known that published nutrigenomic (coupling gene polymorphisms with altered KB220z) studies reveal improved clinical outcomes related to obesity.

  13. Land Cover Characterization and Mapping of South America for the Year 2010 Using Landsat 30 m Satellite Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Giri

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Detailed and accurate land cover and land cover change information is needed for South America because the continent is in constant flux, experiencing some of the highest rates of land cover change and forest loss in the world. The land cover data available for the entire continent are too coarse (250 m to 1 km for resource managers, government and non-government organizations, and Earth scientists to develop conservation strategies, formulate resource management options, and monitor land cover dynamics. We used Landsat 30 m satellite data of 2010 and prepared the land cover database of South America using state-of-the-science remote sensing techniques. We produced regionally consistent and locally relevant land cover information by processing a large volume of data covering the entire continent. Our analysis revealed that in 2010, 50% of South America was covered by forests, 2.5% was covered by water, and 0.02% was covered by snow and ice. The percent forest area of South America varies from 9.5% in Uruguay to 96.5% in French Guiana. We used very high resolution (<5 m satellite data to validate the land cover product. The overall accuracy of the 2010 South American 30-m land cover map is 89% with a Kappa coefficient of 79%. Accuracy of barren areas needs to improve possibly using multi-temporal Landsat data. An update of land cover and change database of South America with additional land cover classes is needed. The results from this study are useful for developing resource management strategies, formulating biodiversity conservation strategies, and regular land cover monitoring and forecasting.

  14. Genetic characterization of 12 heterologous microsatellite markers for the giant tropical tree Cariniana legalis (Lecythidaceae

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    Marcela Corbo Guidugli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Twelve microsatellite loci previously developed in the tropical tree Cariniana estrellensis were genetically characterized in Cariniana legalis. Polymorphisms were assessed in 28 C. legalis individuals found between the Pardo and Mogi-Guaçu River basins in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Of the 12 loci, 10 were polymorphic and exhibited Mendelian inheritance. The allelic richness at each locus ranged from 2-11, with an average of 7 alleles per locus, and the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.07-0.88. These loci showed a high probability of paternity exclusion. The characteristics of these heterologous microsatellite markers indicate that they are suitable tools for investigating questions concerning population genetics in C. legalis.

  15. Biosynthesis and characterization of CdS quantum dots in genetically engineered Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Congcong; Wang, Yanyan; Zhang, Jingpu; Huang, Huaiqing; Xu, Linru; Wang, Shuo; Fang, Xuexun; Fang, Jin; Mao, Chuanbin; Xu, Shukun

    2011-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) were prepared in genetically engineered Escherichia coli (E. coli) through the introduction of foreign genes encoding a CdS binding peptide. The CdS QDs were successfully separated from the bacteria through two methods, lysis and freezing–thawing of cells, and purified with an anion-exchange resin. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, luminescence spectroscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were applied to characterize the as-prepared CdS QDs. The effects of reactant concentrations, bacteria incubation times, and reaction times on QD growth were systematically investigated. Our work demonstrates that genetically engineered bacteria can be used to synthesize QDs. The biologically synthesized QDs are expected to be more biocompatible probes in bio-labeling and imaging. PMID:21458508

  16. Genetic characterization of canine influenza A virus (H3N2) in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunpapong, Napawan; Nonthabenjawan, Nutthawan; Chaiwong, Supassama; Tangwangvivat, Ratanaporn; Boonyapisitsopa, Supanat; Jairak, Waleemas; Tuanudom, Ranida; Prakairungnamthip, Duangduean; Suradhat, Sanipa; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje; Amonsin, Alongkorn

    2014-02-01

    In January 2012, several clinical cases of dogs with flu-like symptoms, including coughing, sneezing, nasal discharge, and fever, were reported in a small-animal hospital located in Bangkok, Thailand. One influenza A virus was identified and characterized as an avian-like influenza virus H3N2. The virus was named A/canine/Thailand/CU-DC5299/12. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that the canine virus belonged to an avian Eurasian lineage and was genetically related to the canine influenza viruses H3N2 from China and Korea. This canine virus displays a unique genetic signature with two amino acid insertions in the NA protein, which is similar to the canine influenza viruses from eastern China (Zhejiang and Jiangsu). This study constitutes the first report of H3N2 canine influenza virus infection in a small-animal hospital in Thailand.

  17. Genetic Characterization and Comparative Genome Analysis of Brucella melitensis Isolates from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarwar Azam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is the most frequent zoonotic disease worldwide, with over 500,000 new human infections every year. Brucella melitensis, the most virulent species in humans, primarily affects goats and the zoonotic transmission occurs by ingestion of unpasteurized milk products or through direct contact with fetal tissues. Brucellosis is endemic in India but no information is available on population structure and genetic diversity of Brucella spp. in India. We performed multilocus sequence typing of four B. melitensis strains isolated from naturally infected goats from India. For more detailed genetic characterization, we carried out whole genome sequencing and comparative genome analysis of one of the B. melitensis isolates, Bm IND1. Genome analysis identified 141 unique SNPs, 78 VNTRs, 51 Indels, and 2 putative prophage integrations in the Bm IND1 genome. Our data may help to develop improved epidemiological typing tools and efficient preventive strategies to control brucellosis.

  18. Isolation, biochemical and genetic characterizations of alcohol-producing yeasts from the flowers of Woodfordia fruticosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manwar, Jagdish; Mahadik, Kakasaheb; Paradkar, Anant; Sathiyanarayanan, Lohidasan; Vohra, Mustafa; Patil, Sanjay

    2013-12-01

    To isolate and characterize the alcohol-producing yeasts from Woodfordia fruticosa flowers, which are used for the induction and maintenance of fermentation in the making of Ayurvedic formulations. Initially twenty four yeasts strains were isolated on MGYP agar plate. Among them, four strains were selected for further studies on the basis of their alcohol generation capacity using jaggery media (50% w/v). Physiological, biochemical and genetic characterization (18S rRNA sequencing) of selected strains were carried out. Physiological, biochemical and genetic characterization (18S rRNA sequencing) confirmed the strains as Saccharomycopsis fibuligera Jm.8, S. fibuligera Jm.10, S. fibuligera Jm.16 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Jm.20. Under the controlled conditions, S. cerevisiae Jm.20 produced 69.57 g/l of alcohol, whereas remaining strains produced the alcohol in the range of 6.04-7.32 g/l. Among selected strains, strains S. fibuligera are a newer in the flowers. Kinetic study of alcohol generation revealed the strain S. cerevisiae Jm.20 can be efficiently used in making of fermented Ayurvedic formulations instead of use W. fruticosa flowers.

  19. Characterizing Race/Ethnicity and Genetic Ancestry for 100,000 Subjects in the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banda, Yambazi; Kvale, Mark N.; Hoffmann, Thomas J.; Hesselson, Stephanie E.; Ranatunga, Dilrini; Tang, Hua; Sabatti, Chiara; Croen, Lisa A.; Dispensa, Brad P.; Henderson, Mary; Iribarren, Carlos; Jorgenson, Eric; Kushi, Lawrence H.; Ludwig, Dana; Olberg, Diane; Quesenberry, Charles P.; Rowell, Sarah; Sadler, Marianne; Sakoda, Lori C.; Sciortino, Stanley; Shen, Ling; Smethurst, David; Somkin, Carol P.; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Walter, Lawrence; Whitmer, Rachel A.; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Schaefer, Catherine; Risch, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Using genome-wide genotypes, we characterized the genetic structure of 103,006 participants in the Kaiser Permanente Northern California multi-ethnic Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging Cohort and analyzed the relationship to self-reported race/ethnicity. Participants endorsed any of 23 race/ethnicity/nationality categories, which were collapsed into seven major race/ethnicity groups. By self-report the cohort is 80.8% white and 19.2% minority; 93.8% endorsed a single race/ethnicity group, while 6.2% endorsed two or more. Principal component (PC) and admixture analyses were generally consistent with prior studies. Approximately 17% of subjects had genetic ancestry from more than one continent, and 12% were genetically admixed, considering only nonadjacent geographical origins. Self-reported whites were spread on a continuum along the first two PCs, indicating extensive mixing among European nationalities. Self-identified East Asian nationalities correlated with genetic clustering, consistent with extensive endogamy. Individuals of mixed East Asian–European genetic ancestry were easily identified; we also observed a modest amount of European genetic ancestry in individuals self-identified as Filipinos. Self-reported African Americans and Latinos showed extensive European and African genetic ancestry, and Native American genetic ancestry for the latter. Among 3741 genetically identified parent–child pairs, 93% were concordant for self-reported race/ethnicity; among 2018 genetically identified full-sib pairs, 96% were concordant; the lower rate for parent–child pairs was largely due to intermarriage. The parent–child pairs revealed a trend toward increasing exogamy over time; the presence in the cohort of individuals endorsing multiple race/ethnicity categories creates interesting challenges and future opportunities for genetic epidemiologic studies. PMID:26092716

  20. Genetic characterization of Gaddi goat breed of Western Himalayas using microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurdeep Singh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In the present study, genetic characterization of Gaddi goat breed, a native to north temperate western Himalayan region of India, was carried out for the purpose of breed characterization and assessing existing intra-population genetic diversity. Materials and Methods: Totally, 75 blood samples procured at random from genetically unrelated animals of two sexes and different age groups and true to breed type were collected from different locations in the breeding tract of these goats in Himachal Pradesh, of which only 51 samples with desired quantity and quality were subjected to further processing for DNA isolation. The multi-locus genotype data were generated on 51 Gaddi goats sampled across different regions of the breeding tract in Himachal Pradesh using 15 FAO recommended goat specific microsatellite markers, which gave amplification and observed and effective number of alleles, gene frequency, observed and expected heterozygosity were estimated through PopGene software (1.3.1. Results: A total of 135 distinct alleles were observed with mean observed and effective number of alleles as 9.0000±0.82 and 6.5874±0.56 respectively across all 15 studied loci. The maximum (15 alleles were contributed by loci DRBP1 and P19/DYA and the least (5 by SRCRSP5. The mean heterozygosity was observed to be 0.8347±0.01 ranging from 0.7584 (SRCRSP5 to 0.9156 (P19-DYA across all loci. The mean observed (HO and expected (HE heterozygosities across all loci were 0.7484±0.02 and 0.8431±0.01 respectively. The polymorphism information content (PIC value ranged from 0.7148 (SRCPS5 to 0.909 (P19-DYA with mean PIC of 0.8105±0.01 in the present study. The average heterozygosity was observed to be 0.8347±0.01 ranging from 0.7584 (SRCRSP5 to 0.9156 P19 (DYA across all loci. Conclusion: Microsatellite analysis revealed high level of polymorphism across studied microsatellite markers and informativeness of the markers for genetic diversity analysis studies in

  1. Genetic and environmental characterization of Abies alba Mill. populations at its western rear edge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sancho-Knapik, D.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The genetic structure of ten Abies alba populations at the western rear edge in the Spanish Pyrenees was characterized and compared with two German populations, looking for the role of climatic factors in the fir decline. Growth, defoliation, aridity and cumulative summer water deficit summer were also characterized. Spanish populations show a lower genetic diversity and a high genetic differentiation than German ones, mainly established by an East (higher diversity-West (lower diversity gradient. The three defoliated populations are the western ones, with higher summer aridity. Contrastingly, the southern population (Guara shows climatic variables close to western sites but without defoliation and with a higher genetic diversity, indicating a possible adaptation to the sub-Mediterranean conditions. Silver fir in the Spanish Pyrenees constitutes a “stable” rear edge because of their isolation, small sized and small genetic diversity. Western Pyrenean sites subjected to dryer conditions and presenting lower genetic diversity are prone to drought-induced mortality in the context of global warming.Se ha caracterizado la estructura genética de diez poblaciones de Abies alba en la retaguardia occidental de su distribución en el Pirineo español en comparación con dos poblaciones de Alemania, buscando la influencia de factores climáticos en el decaimiento del abeto. También se caracterizó crecimiento, defoliación, aridez y déficit acumulado de agua durante el verano. Las poblaciones españolas mostraron una menor diversidad genética y una mayor diferenciación genética que las poblaciones alemanas, establecida principalmente a través de un eje Este (mayor diversidad-Oeste (menor diversidad. Las tres poblaciones con defoliación son las del suroeste, con mayor aridez estival. Por el contrario, la población más meridional (Guara muestra variables climáticas cercanas a estas poblaciones del suroeste pero sin defoliación y con mayor

  2. Development and characterization of highly polymorphic long TC repeat microsatellite markers for genetic analysis of peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macedo Selma E

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. is a crop of economic and social importance, mainly in tropical areas, and developing countries. Its molecular breeding has been hindered by a shortage of polymorphic genetic markers due to a very narrow genetic base. Microsatellites (SSRs are markers of choice in peanut because they are co-dominant, highly transferrable between species and easily applicable in the allotetraploid genome. In spite of substantial effort over the last few years by a number of research groups, the number of SSRs that are polymorphic for A. hypogaea is still limiting for routine application, creating the demand for the discovery of more markers polymorphic within cultivated germplasm. Findings A plasmid genomic library enriched for TC/AG repeats was constructed and 1401 clones sequenced. From the sequences obtained 146 primer pairs flanking mostly TC microsatellites were developed. The average number of repeat motifs amplified was 23. These 146 markers were characterized on 22 genotypes of cultivated peanut. In total 78 of the markers were polymorphic within cultivated germplasm. Most of those 78 markers were highly informative with an average of 5.4 alleles per locus being amplified. Average gene diversity index (GD was 0.6, and 66 markers showed a GD of more than 0.5. Genetic relationship analysis was performed and corroborated the current taxonomical classification of A. hypogaea subspecies and varieties. Conclusions The microsatellite markers described here are a useful resource for genetics and genomics in Arachis. In particular, the 66 markers that are highly polymorphic in cultivated peanut are a significant step towards routine genetic mapping and marker-assisted selection for the crop.

  3. Characterization of genomic island 3 and genetic variability of Chilean field strains of Brucella abortus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céspedes, Sandra; Salgado, Paulina; Valenzuela, Patricio; Vidal, Roberto; Oñate, Angel A

    2011-07-01

    One of the capabilities developed by bacteria is the ability to gain large fragments of DNA from other bacteria or to lose portions of their own genomes. Among these exchangeable fragments are the genomic islands (GIs). Nine GIs have been identified in Brucella, and genomic island 3 (GI-3) is shared by two pathogenic species, B. melitensis and B. abortus. GI-3 encodes mostly unknown proteins. One of the aims of this study was to perform pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) on field isolates of B. abortus from Chile to determine whether these isolates are clonally related. Furthermore, we focused on the characterization of GI-3, studying its organization and the genetic conservation of the GI-3 sequence using techniques such as tiling-path PCR (TP-PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism-PCR (RFLP-PCR). Our results, after PFGE was performed on 69 field isolates of B. abortus from Chile, showed that the strains were genetically homogeneous. To increase the power of genetic discrimination among these strains, we used multiple locus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis with 16 loci (MLVA-16). The results obtained by MLVA-16 showed that the strains of B. abortus were genetically heterogeneous and that most of them clustered according to their geographic origin. Of the genetic loci studied, panel 2B was the one describing the highest diversity in the analysis, as well as locus Bruce19 in panel 2A. In relation to the study of GI-3, our experimental analysis by TP-PCR identified and confirmed that GI-3 is present in all wild strains of B. abortus, demonstrating the high stability of gene cluster GI-3 in Chilean field strains.

  4. Characterization of Genomic Island 3 and Genetic Variability of Chilean Field Strains of Brucella abortus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céspedes, Sandra; Salgado, Paulina; Valenzuela, Patricio; Vidal, Roberto; Oñate, Angel A.

    2011-01-01

    One of the capabilities developed by bacteria is the ability to gain large fragments of DNA from other bacteria or to lose portions of their own genomes. Among these exchangeable fragments are the genomic islands (GIs). Nine GIs have been identified in Brucella, and genomic island 3 (GI-3) is shared by two pathogenic species, B. melitensis and B. abortus. GI-3 encodes mostly unknown proteins. One of the aims of this study was to perform pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) on field isolates of B. abortus from Chile to determine whether these isolates are clonally related. Furthermore, we focused on the characterization of GI-3, studying its organization and the genetic conservation of the GI-3 sequence using techniques such as tiling-path PCR (TP-PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism-PCR (RFLP-PCR). Our results, after PFGE was performed on 69 field isolates of B. abortus from Chile, showed that the strains were genetically homogeneous. To increase the power of genetic discrimination among these strains, we used multiple locus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis with 16 loci (MLVA-16). The results obtained by MLVA-16 showed that the strains of B. abortus were genetically heterogeneous and that most of them clustered according to their geographic origin. Of the genetic loci studied, panel 2B was the one describing the highest diversity in the analysis, as well as locus Bruce19 in panel 2A. In relation to the study of GI-3, our experimental analysis by TP-PCR identified and confirmed that GI-3 is present in all wild strains of B. abortus, demonstrating the high stability of gene cluster GI-3 in Chilean field strains. PMID:21543580

  5. Population Genetic Baseline of the First Plataspid Stink Bug Symbiosis (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Plataspidae Reported in North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler D. Eaton

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The stink bug, Megacopta cribraria, has an obligate relationship with a bacterial endosymbiont which allows it to feed on legumes. The insect is a pest of soybeans in Asia and was first reported in the Western Hemisphere in October 2009 on kudzu vine, Pueraria montana, in North Georgia, USA. By October 2010 M. cribraria had been confirmed in 80 counties in Georgia actively feeding on kudzu vine and soybean plants. Since the symbiosis may support the bug’s ecological expansions, a population genetic baseline for the symbiosis was developed from mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA and nuclear DNA (nuDNA gene sequence collected from each insect and its primary g- proteobacterium and secondary a -proteobacterium endosymbionts. A single mitochondrial DNA haplotype was found in all insects sampled in Georgia and South Carolina identified as GA1. The GAI haplotype appears to be rapidly dispersing across Georgia and into contiguous states. Primary and secondary endosymbiont gene sequences from M. cribraria in Georgia were the same as those found in recently collected Megacopta samples from Japan. The implications of these data are discussed.

  6. Preparation and characterization of morph-genetic aluminum nitride/carbon composites from filter paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wei; Xue Tao; Jin Zhihao; Qiao Guanjun

    2008-01-01

    Morph-genetic aluminum nitride/carbon composites with cablelike structure were prepared from filter paper template through the surface sol-gel process and carbothermal nitridation reaction. The resulting materials have a hierarchical structure originating from the morphology of cellulose paper. The aluminum nitride/carbon composites have the core-shell microstructure, the core is graphitic carbon, and the shell is aluminum nitride nanocoating formed by carbothermal nitridation reduction of alumina with the interfacial carbon in nitrogen atmosphere. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscope were employed to characterize the structural morphology and phase compositions of the final products

  7. Complete genetic characterization of a Brazilian dengue virus type 3 strain isolated from a fatal outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marize Pereira Miagostovich

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available We have determined the complete nucleotide and the deduced amino acid sequences of Brazilian dengue virus type 3 (DENV-3 from a dengue case with fatal outcome, which occurred during an epidemic in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 2002. This constitutes the first complete genetic characterization of a Brazilian DENV-3 strain since its introduction into the country in 2001. DENV-3 was responsible for the most severe dengue epidemic in the state, based on the highest number of reported cases and on the severity of clinical manifestations and deaths reported.

  8. Detection and genetic characterization of a novel parvovirus distantly related to human bufavirus in domestic pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargitai, Renáta; Pankovics, Péter; Kertész, Attila Mihály; Bíró, Hunor; Boros, Ákos; Phan, Tung Gia; Delwart, Eric; Reuter, Gábor

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a novel parvovirus (strain swine/Zsana3/2013/HUN, KT965075) was detected in domestic pigs and genetically characterized by viral metagenomics and PCR methods. The novel parvovirus was distantly related to the human bufaviruses and was detected in 19 (90.5 %) of the 21 and five (33.3 %) of the 15 faecal samples collected from animals with and without cases of posterior paraplegia of unknown etiology from five affected farms and one control farm in Hungary, respectively. Swine/Zsana3/2013/HUN is highly prevalent in domestic pigs and potentially represents a novel parvovirus species in the subfamily Parvovirinae.

  9. Phenotypic, genetic and molecular characterization of a maize low phytic acid mutant (lpa241)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilu, R.; Panzeri, D.; Gavazzi, G.

    2003-01-01

    90% reduction of phytic acid and about a tenfold increase in seed-free phosphate content. Although germination rate was decreased by about 30% compared to wild-type, developement of mutant plants was apparentely unaffected. The results of the genetic, biochemical and molecular characterization......Phytic acid, myo-inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate, is the major storage compound of phosphorous (P) in plants, predominantly accumulating in seeds (up to 4-5% of dry weight) and pollen. In cereals, phytic acid is deposited in embryo and aleurone grain tissues as a mixed 'phytate' salt...

  10. Prevalence of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in a Brazilian population sample at-risk for hereditary breast cancer and characterization of its genetic ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, André E.; Pereira, Rui; Andrade, Carlos E.; Felicio, Paula S.; Souza, Cristiano P.; Mendes, Deise R.P.; Volc, Sahlua; Berardinelli, Gustavo N.; Grasel, Rebeca S.; Sabato, Cristina S.; Viana, Danilo V.; Machado, José Carlos; Costa, José Luis; Mauad, Edmundo C.; Scapulatempo-Neto, Cristovam; Arun, Banu; Reis, Rui M.; Palmero, Edenir I.

    2016-01-01

    Background There are very few data about the mutational profile of families at-risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) from Latin America (LA) and especially from Brazil, the largest and most populated country in LA. Results Of the 349 probands analyzed, 21.5% were BRCA1/BRCA2 mutated, 65.3% at BRCA1 and 34.7% at BRCA2 gene. The mutation c.5266dupC (former 5382insC) was the most frequent alteration, representing 36.7% of the BRCA1 mutations and 24.0% of all mutations identified. Together with the BRCA1 c.3331_3334delCAAG mutation, these mutations constitutes about 35% of the identified mutations and more than 50% of the BRCA1 pathogenic mutations. Interestingly, six new mutations were identified. Additionally, 39 out of the 44 pathogenic mutations identified were not previously reported in the Brazilian population. Besides, 36 different variants of unknown significance (VUS) were identified. Regarding ancestry, average ancestry proportions were 70.6% European, 14.5% African, 8.0% Native American and 6.8% East Asian. Materials and methods This study characterized 349 Brazilian families at-risk for HBOC regarding their germline BRCA1/BRCA2 status and genetic ancestry. Conclusions This is the largest report of BRCA1/BRCA2 assessment in an at-risk HBOC Brazilian population. We identified 21.5% of patients harboring BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations and characterized the genetic ancestry of a sample group at-risk for hereditary breast cancer showing once again how admixed is the Brazilian population. No association was found between genetic ancestry and mutational status. The knowledge of the mutational profile in a population can contribute to the definition of more cost-effective strategies for the identification of HBOC families. PMID:27741520

  11. Preparation of Mealybugs (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) for Genetic Characterization and Morphological Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahder, B W; Bollinger, M L; Sudarshana, M R; Zalom, F G

    2015-01-01

    Mealybugs (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) are economically significant agricultural pests on many different crops. Because of their small size and lack of easily visible characters for identification, determination of their taxonomic status is difficult and requires technical competency to prepare a slide-mounted specimen. The standard mounting technique does not allow for analysis of the genome of the specimen. Conversely, preparatory techniques for genetic analysis of mealybugs cause either loss of the entire individual or physical damage that can make morphology-based identification difficult. This study describes a simple protocol that does not impact physical integrity of the specimen for fixation and microscopic examination yet enables simultaneous DNA extraction for DNA-based identification of four mealybug species. All species prepared yielded high quality slide mounts, identified as Planococcus citri Risso, Pseudococcus viburni Signoret, Rhizoecus kondonis Kuwana, or Rhizoecus californicus Ferris. DNA extracted in this manner had higher purity and yield in the final eluate than in samples extracted using standard methods. DNA extracted was successfully amplified by polymerase chain reaction using primers for the cytochrome oxidase I gene and subsequently sequenced for all specimens. This protocol is likely to be applicable to other Hemiptera taxa that are preserved by slide mounting, allowing for both the preparation of a high-quality voucher specimen for morphological identification and simultaneous analysis of DNA for the same specimen. The methods used are technically less challenging than current standard procedures. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  12. Characterization of Giant Modular PKSs Provides Insight into Genetic Mechanism for Structural Diversification of Aminopolyol Polyketides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lihan; Hashimoto, Takuya; Qin, Bin; Hashimoto, Junko; Kozone, Ikuko; Kawahara, Teppei; Okada, Masahiro; Awakawa, Takayoshi; Ito, Takuya; Asakawa, Yoshinori; Ueki, Masashi; Takahashi, Shunji; Osada, Hiroyuki; Wakimoto, Toshiyuki; Ikeda, Haruo; Shin-Ya, Kazuo; Abe, Ikuro

    2017-02-06

    Polyketides form many clinically valuable compounds. However, manipulation of their biosynthesis remains highly challenging. An understanding of gene cluster evolution provides a rationale for reprogramming of the biosynthetic machinery. Herein, we report characterization of giant modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) responsible for the production of aminopolyol polyketides. Heterologous expression of over 150 kbp polyketide gene clusters successfully afforded their products, whose stereochemistry was established by taking advantage of bioinformatic analysis. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis of highly homologous but functionally diverse domains from the giant PKSs demonstrated the evolutionary mechanism for structural diversification of polyketides. The gene clusters characterized herein, together with their evolutionary insights, are promising genetic building blocks for de novo production of unnatural polyketides. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Molecular characterization and genetic diversity of Jatropha curcas L. in Costa Rica

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    Marcela Vásquez-Mayorga

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We estimated the genetic diversity of 50 Jatropha curcas samples from the Costa Rican germplasm bank using 18 EST-SSR, one G-SSR and nrDNA-ITS markers. We also evaluated the phylogenetic relationships among samples using nuclear ribosomal ITS markers. Non-toxicity was evaluated using G-SSRs and SCARs markers. A Neighbor-Joining (NJ tree and a Maximum Likelihood (ML tree were constructed using SSR markers and ITS sequences, respectively. Heterozygosity was moderate (He = 0.346, but considerable compared to worldwide values for J. curcas. The PIC (PIC = 0.274 and inbreeding coefficient (f =  − 0.102 were both low. Clustering was not related to the geographical origin of accessions. International accessions clustered independently of collection sites, suggesting a lack of genetic structure, probably due to the wide distribution of this crop and ample gene flow. Molecular markers identified only one non-toxic accession (JCCR-24 from Mexico. This work is part of a countrywide effort to characterize the genetic diversity of the Jatropha curcas germplasm bank in Costa Rica.

  14. Genetic characterization of autochthonous grapevine cultivars from Eastern Turkey by simple sequence repeats (SSRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadiye Peral Eyduran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, two well-recognized standard grape cultivars, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, together with eight historical autochthonous grapevine cultivars from Eastern Anatolia in Turkey, were genetically characterized by using 12 pairs of simple sequence repeat (SSR primers in order to evaluate their genetic diversity and relatedness. All of the used SSR primers produced successful amplifications and revealed DNA polymorphisms, which were subsequently utilized to evaluate the genetic relatedness of the grapevine cultivars. Allele richness was implied by the identification of 69 alleles in 8 autochthonous cultivars with a mean value of 5.75 alleles per locus. The average expected heterozygosity and observed heterozygosity were found to be 0.749 and 0.739, respectively. Taking into account the generated alleles, the highest number was recorded in VVC2C3 and VVS2 loci (nine and eight alleles per locus, respectively, whereas the lowest number was recorded in VrZAG83 (three alleles per locus. Two main clusters were produced by using the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean dendrogram constructed on the basis of the SSR data. Only Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot cultivars were included in the first cluster. The second cluster involved the rest of the autochthonous cultivars. The results obtained during the study illustrated clearly that SSR markers have verified to be an effective tool for fingerprinting grapevine cultivars and carrying out grapevine biodiversity studies. The obtained data are also meaningful references for grapevine domestication.

  15. Characterization of Mangifera indica cultivars in Thailand based on macroscopic, microscopic, and genetic characters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aunyachulee Ganogpichayagrai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thai mango cultivars are classified into six groups plus one miscellaneous group according to germplasm database for mango. Characterization is important for conservation and the development of Thai mango cultivars. This study investigated macroscopic, microscopic leaf characteristics, and genetic relationship among 17 cultivars selected from six groups of mango in Thailand. Selected mango samples were obtained from three different locations in Thailand (n = 57. They were observed for their leaf and fruit macroscopic characteristics. Leaf measurement for the stomatal number, veinlet termination number, and palisade ratio was evaluated under a microscope attached with digital camera. DNA fingerprint was performed using CTAB extraction of DNA and inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR amplification. Forty-five primers were screened; then, seven primers that amplified the reproducible band patterns were selected to amplified and generate dendrogram by Unweighted Pair-Group Method with Arithmetic Average. These selected 17 Thai mango cultivars had individually macroscopic characteristics based on fruits and leaves. For microscopic characteristics, the stomatal number, veinlet termination number, and palisade ratio were slightly differentiable. For genetic identification, 78 bands of 190-2660 bps were amplified, of which 82.05% were polymorphic. The genetic relationship among these cultivars was demonstrated and categorized into two main clusters. It was shown that ISSR markers could be useful for Thai mango cultivar identification.

  16. Temporal Genetic Variance and Propagule-Driven Genetic Structure Characterize Naturalized Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss from a Patagonian Lake Impacted by Trout Farming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javiera N Benavente

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the genetic underpinnings of invasions-a theme addressed by invasion genetics as a discipline-is still scarce amid well documented ecological impacts of non-native species on ecosystems of Patagonia in South America. One of the most invasive species in Patagonia's freshwater systems and elsewhere is rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss. This species was introduced to Chile during the early twentieth century for stocking and promoting recreational fishing; during the late twentieth century was reintroduced for farming purposes and is now naturalized. We used population- and individual-based inference from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs to illuminate three objectives related to the establishment and naturalization of Rainbow Trout in Lake Llanquihue. This lake has been intensively used for trout farming during the last three decades. Our results emanate from samples collected from five inlet streams over two seasons, winter and spring. First, we found that significant intra- population (temporal genetic variance was greater than inter-population (spatial genetic variance, downplaying the importance of spatial divergence during the process of naturalization. Allele frequency differences between cohorts, consistent with variation in fish length between spring and winter collections, might explain temporal genetic differences. Second, individual-based Bayesian clustering suggested that genetic structure within Lake Llanquihue was largely driven by putative farm propagules found at one single stream during spring, but not in winter. This suggests that farm broodstock might migrate upstream to breed during spring at that particular stream. It is unclear whether interbreeding has occurred between "pure" naturalized and farm trout in this and other streams. Third, estimates of the annual number of breeders (Nb were below 73 in half of the collections, suggestive of genetically small and recently founded populations that might

  17. Temporal Genetic Variance and Propagule-Driven Genetic Structure Characterize Naturalized Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) from a Patagonian Lake Impacted by Trout Farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavente, Javiera N; Seeb, Lisa W; Seeb, James E; Arismendi, Ivan; Hernández, Cristián E; Gajardo, Gonzalo; Galleguillos, Ricardo; Cádiz, Maria I; Musleh, Selim S; Gomez-Uchida, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about the genetic underpinnings of invasions-a theme addressed by invasion genetics as a discipline-is still scarce amid well documented ecological impacts of non-native species on ecosystems of Patagonia in South America. One of the most invasive species in Patagonia's freshwater systems and elsewhere is rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). This species was introduced to Chile during the early twentieth century for stocking and promoting recreational fishing; during the late twentieth century was reintroduced for farming purposes and is now naturalized. We used population- and individual-based inference from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to illuminate three objectives related to the establishment and naturalization of Rainbow Trout in Lake Llanquihue. This lake has been intensively used for trout farming during the last three decades. Our results emanate from samples collected from five inlet streams over two seasons, winter and spring. First, we found that significant intra- population (temporal) genetic variance was greater than inter-population (spatial) genetic variance, downplaying the importance of spatial divergence during the process of naturalization. Allele frequency differences between cohorts, consistent with variation in fish length between spring and winter collections, might explain temporal genetic differences. Second, individual-based Bayesian clustering suggested that genetic structure within Lake Llanquihue was largely driven by putative farm propagules found at one single stream during spring, but not in winter. This suggests that farm broodstock might migrate upstream to breed during spring at that particular stream. It is unclear whether interbreeding has occurred between "pure" naturalized and farm trout in this and other streams. Third, estimates of the annual number of breeders (Nb) were below 73 in half of the collections, suggestive of genetically small and recently founded populations that might experience substantial

  18. Genetic characterization of canine parvovirus type 2 subtypes in Maputo, Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, J; Miranda, C; Souto, R; Silva, E; Fafetine, J; Thompson, G

    2017-05-01

    Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) comprises three antigenic subtypes (2a, 2b and 2c) that have been reported in many countries. These subtypes cause serious disease in dogs with characteristic gastroenteritis signs. Little information has been documented in Africa about the genetic characterization of CPV-2. The aim of this study was to detect and to characterize the CPV-2 subtypes circulating in dogs admitted to Veterinary Clinics from two cities of Mozambique, Maputo and Matola, in 2010. A total of 40 field fecal samples were collected and tested for CPV-2 by polymerase chain reaction assay. The partial length VP2 gene of the positive samples were sequenced and genetically analyzed. Twenty-six (65%) fecal samples were positive for CPV-2. The restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was also performed from positive samples and did not reveal the presence of CPV-2c subtype. The results of the sequencing revealed the presence of CPV-2a (n = 9) and CPV-2b (n = 17). No CPV-2 and CPV-2c were detected. Sequence analysis comparison showed nucleotide identities of 99.6-100% among our CPV-2 isolates. Amino acid analysis showed predicted amino acid changes. Phylogenetically, all of the CPV-2a strains isolated formed a cluster together with South African and Nigerian isolates. Most of Mozambican CPV-2b isolates also tended to cluster together with South African isolates; however, four were more closely related to French strain and one isolates to the American strain. The present study was the first to characterize the CPV-2 circulating in the Mozambican dog population.

  19. Southern-by-Sequencing: A Robust Screening Approach for Molecular Characterization of Genetically Modified Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina M. Zastrow-Hayes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular characterization of events is an integral part of the advancement process during genetically modified (GM crop product development. Assessment of these events is traditionally accomplished by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and Southern blot analyses. Southern blot analysis can be time-consuming and comparatively expensive and does not provide sequence-level detail. We have developed a sequence-based application, Southern-by-Sequencing (SbS, utilizing sequence capture coupled with next-generation sequencing (NGS technology to replace Southern blot analysis for event selection in a high-throughput molecular characterization environment. SbS is accomplished by hybridizing indexed and pooled whole-genome DNA libraries from GM plants to biotinylated probes designed to target the sequence of transformation plasmids used to generate events within the pool. This sequence capture process enriches the sequence data obtained for targeted regions of interest (transformation plasmid DNA. Taking advantage of the DNA adjacent to the targeted bases (referred to as next-to-target sequence that accompanies the targeted transformation plasmid sequence, the data analysis detects plasmid-to-genome and plasmid-to-plasmid junctions introduced during insertion into the plant genome. Analysis of these junction sequences provides sequence-level information as to the following: the number of insertion loci including detection of unlinked, independently segregating, small DNA fragments; copy number; rearrangements, truncations, or deletions of the intended insertion DNA; and the presence of transformation plasmid backbone sequences. This molecular evidence from SbS analysis is used to characterize and select GM plants meeting optimal molecular characterization criteria. SbS technology has proven to be a robust event screening tool for use in a high-throughput molecular characterization environment.

  20. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Likelihood of getting certain diseases Mental abilities Natural talents An abnormal trait (anomaly) that is passed down ... one of them has a genetic disorder. Information Human beings have cells with 46 chromosomes . These consist ...

  1. Characterization of the genetic profile of CYP2C19 in two South African populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drögemöller, Britt I; Wright, Galen E B; Niehaus, Dana J H; Koen, Liezl; Malan, Stefanie; Da Silva, Danielle M; Hillermann-Rebello, Renate; La Grange, Anthony M; Venter, Mauritz; Warnich, Louise

    2010-08-01

    This study was aimed at elucidating the common sequence variation present in the CYP2C19 gene within the South African Xhosa population and comparing it with the Cape Mixed Ancestry (CMA) population for possible future pharmacogenetic applications. Common sequence variation was identified through the resequencing of 15 Xhosa individuals. The detected variants were prioritized for genotyping in an additional 85 Xhosa and 75 CMA individuals, while 5 -upstream variants were analyzed using dual luciferase reporter assays. Resequencing of the Xhosa population revealed 30 variants, including the novel CYP2C19*27 and CYP2C19*28 alleles. CYP2C19*27, characterized by -1041G>A, caused a twofold decrease in luciferase activity, while CYP2C19*28 is characterized by the nonsynonymous V374I variant. In addition, the previously characterized variants, CYP2C19*2, CYP2C19*9 and CYP2C19*17, were present in both populations, while CYP2C19*3 was only observed in the CMA population. Our data demonstrate that both the Xhosa and CMA populations exhibit unique genetic profiles that could influence the outcome of drug therapy in these populations.

  2. Acceptance of a food of animal origin obtained through genetic modification and cloning in South America: a comparative study among university students and working adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta SCHNETTLER

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWith the aim of comparing the acceptance of milk obtained from cloned, genetically modified (GM and conventionally bred cows among working adults and university students, and identifying and characterizing typologies among both subsamples in terms of their preferences, a survey was applied to 400 people in southern Chile, distributed using a simple allocation among the subsamples. Using a conjoint analysis, it was found that consumers preferred milk from a conventional cow. Using a cluster analysis, in both subsamples two segments sensitive to production technology were identified. Rejection of cloning was greatest among university students, whereas a higher proportion of working adults rejected GM. The segments differed in terms of area of residence, knowledge about GM, and milk consumption habits. Contrary to what was expected, no differences were found according to education, gender or degree of satisfaction with food-related life.

  3. Genetic covariation of the marine fungal symbiont Haloguignardia irritans (Ascomycota, Pezizomycotina) with its algal hosts Cystoseira and Halidrys (Phaeophyceae, Fucales) along the west coast of North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, J B J; Goff, Lynda J

    2010-01-01

    The fungal endophyte Haloguignardia irritans induces gall formation on the brown algal genera Cystoseira and Halidrys occurring from Oregon to Baja California, Mexico. Here we examine genetic covariation and compare rDNA phylogenies to investigate the coevolutionary histories of H. irritans and its algal hosts. Despite recognition of H. irritans as a single morphological species, internal transcribed spacer rDNA sequences representative of its geographic range are characterized by sequence variation at the intraspecific to intrageneric levels. An assessment of parallel cladogenesis between endophyte and host phylogenies provides evidence for a combination of independent fungal divergence and host jumping, similar to that observed in terrestrial lichens. Our results suggest that reduced gene flow due to geographic isolation is a major contributing factor to more concerted covariation observed at one island site, rather than to differences among algal host species alone. Because geography and its effects on gene flow can create heterogeneous mosaics of coevolution for symbioses in terrestrial environments, our results support the notion that conservation efforts toward the maintenance of genetic diversity in marine environments should likewise consider geographic complexity and its effects on coevolving marine species. Copyright © 2009 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification and genetic characterization of maize cell wall variation for improved biorefinery feedstock characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauly, Markus [UC Berkeley; Hake, Sarah [USDA Albany

    2013-10-31

    The objectives of this program are to 1) characterize novel maize mutants with altered cell walls for enhanced biorefinery characteristics and 2) find quantitative trait loci (QTLs) related to biorefinery characteristics by taking advantage of the genetic diversity of maize. As a result a novel non-transgenic maize plant (cal1) has been identified, whose stover (leaves and stalk) contain more glucan in their walls leading to a higher saccharification yield, when subjected to a standard enzymatic digestion cocktail. Stacking this trait with altered lignin mutants yielded evene higher saccharification yields. Cal-1 mutants do not show a loss of kernel and or biomass yield when grown in the field . Hence, cal1 biomass provides an excellent feedstock for the biofuel industry.

  5. Genetic characterization of residual Triatoma infestans populations from Brazil by microsatellite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belisário, Carlota Josefovicz; Pessoa, Grasielle Caldas D'Avila; Silva, Eduardo Melos; Rosa, Aline Cristine Luiz; Ferreira, Rafaela Elias; Bedin, Cleonara; Wilhelms, Tania; de Mello, Fernanda; Coutinho, Helder Silveira; Fonseca, Eduardo Lins Oyama; Dos Santos, Roberto Fonseca; Rodrigues, Vera Lucia Cortiço Corrêa; Dias, João Carlos Pinto; Diotaiuti, Liléia

    2017-02-01

    In spite of long-term efforts to eliminate Triatoma infestans (Klug 1834) from Brazil, residual foci still persist in the states of Bahia and Rio Grande do Sul. Data on the genetic variability and structuring of these populations are however lacking. Using nine microsatellite loci, we characterized one residual T. infestans population from Bahia and four from Rio Grande do Sul, and compared them with bugs originally from an older focus in São Paulo; 224 bugs were genotyped. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 5 to 11. Observed and expected heterozygosities per locus ranged, respectively, from 0 to 0.786 and from 0 to 0.764. Significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, mainly due to heterozygote deficits, were detected in all loci and in most populations. Global indices estimated by AMOVA were: Fis was 0.37; Fst was 0.28; and Fit was 0.55; overall indices with p = 0.00 indicated substantial differentiation. Inter-population Fst ranged from 0.118 to 0.562, suggesting strong genetic structuring and little to no gene flow among populations. Intra-population Fis ranged from 0.301 to 0.307. Inbreeding was apparent in all populations except that from Bahia-which might be either linked by gene flow to nearby unsampled populations or part of a relatively large local population. The overall pattern of strong genetic structuring among pyrethroid-susceptible residual T. infestans populations suggests that their persistence is probably due to operational control failures. Detection and elimination of such residual foci is technically feasible and must become a public health priority in Brazil.

  6. Dual (oxygen and nitrogen) isotopic characterization of the museum archived nitrates from the United States of America, South Africa and Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizota, Chitoshi; Hosono, Takahiro; Matsunaga, Midori; Okumura, Azusa

    2018-06-01

    Dual (oxygen and nitrogen) isotopic composition of the museum archived nitrates from the United States of America, South Africa and Australia was studied. The analyzed specimens were collected in middle 19th to early 20th centuries, and represent world-wide acquisition of the Smithsonian Institution Natural Museum of Natural History (Washington, D. C., USA) and the Natural History Museum (London, UK). The samples consist of transparent to semi-transparent aggregates of minute nitrate, euhedral crystallites which imply precipitation from percolating fluids under ample space and dry regimes. The major nitrate chemistry is saltpetre (KNO 3 ) with minor nitratine (NaNO 3 ). A binary plot of δ 15 N vs. δ 18 O of almost all nitrates indicates a trend, reflecting microbial origin through nitrification of ammonium. The diagram excludes the contribution of meteoric origin formed by mass-independent, photochemical reaction of NO with ozone in stratosphere. Calculated paleo-ambient fluid compositions responsible for microbial nitrification imply extreme evaporative concentration of relevant fluids under dry climatic regimes in the Northern Cape Province (South Africa) and in the Northern Territory (central Australia), and even throughout the United States of America. The dual isotopic characterization provides direct evidence to the origin of the museum archived nitrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical and genetic characterization of classical forms of familial adenomatous polyposis: a Spanish population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, B; González, S; Sánchez-Tomé, E; Blanco, I; Mercadillo, F; Letón, R; Benítez, J; Robledo, M; Capellá, G; Urioste, M

    2011-04-01

    Classical familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is characterized by the appearance of >100 colorectal adenomas. We screened the APC and MUTYH genes for mutations and evaluated the genotype-phenotype correlation in 136 Spanish classical FAP families. APC/MUTYH mutations were detected in 107 families. Sixty-four distinct APC point mutations were detected in 95 families of which all were truncating mutations. A significant proportion (39.6%) had not been previously reported. Mutations were spread over the entire coding region and great rearrangements were identified in six families. Another six families exhibited biallelic MUTYH mutations. No APC or MUTYH mutations were detected in 29 families. These APC/MUTYH-negative families showed clinical differences with the APC-positive families. A poor correlation between phenotype and mutation site was observed. Our results highlight that a broad approach in the genetic study must be considered for classical FAP due to involvement of both APC and MUTYH and the heterogeneous spectrum of APC mutations observed in this Spanish population. The scarcely consistent genotype-phenotype correlation does not allow making specific recommendations regarding screening and management. Differences observed in APC/MUTYH-negative families may reflect a genetic basis other than mutations in APC and MUTYH genes for FAP predisposition. © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology.

  8. Identification and genetic characterization of Clostridium botulinum serotype A strains from commercially pasteurized carrot juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Kristin M; Nowaczyk, Louis; Raphael, Brian H; Skinner, Guy E; Rukma Reddy, N

    2014-12-01

    Clostridium botulinum is an important foodborne pathogen capable of forming heat resistant endospores and producing deadly botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs). In 2006, C. botulinum was responsible for an international outbreak of botulism attributed to the consumption of commercially pasteurized carrot juice. The purpose of this study was to isolate and characterize strains of C. botulinum from the adulterated product. Carrot juice bottles retrieved from the manufacturing facility were analyzed for the presence of BoNT and BoNT-producing isolates using DIG-ELISA. Toxigenic isolates from the carrot juice were analyzed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and DNA microarray analysis to determine their genetic relatedness to the original outbreak strains CDC51348 and CDC51303. PFGE revealed that isolates CJ4-1 and CJ10-1 shared an identical pulsotype with strain CDC51303, whereas isolate CJ5-1 displayed a unique restriction banding pattern. DNA microarray analysis identified several phage related genes unique to strain CJ5-1, and Southern hybridization analysis of XhoI digested and nondigested DNA showed their chromosomal location, while a homolog to pCLI_A009 of plasmid pCLI of C. botulinum serotype Langeland F, was located on a small plasmid. The acquisition or loss of bacteriophages and other mobile genetic elements among C. botulinum strains has epidemiological and evolutionary implications. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Genetic characterization, molecular epidemiology, and phylogenetic relationships of insect-specific viruses in the taxon Negevirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Marcio R T; Contreras-Gutierrez, María Angélica; Guzman, Hilda; Martins, Livia C; Barbirato, Mayla Feitoza; Savit, Chelsea; Balta, Victoria; Uribe, Sandra; Vivero, Rafael; Suaza, Juan David; Oliveira, Hamilton; Nunes Neto, Joaquin P; Carvalho, Valeria L; da Silva, Sandro Patroca; Cardoso, Jedson F; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Santo; da Silva Lemos, Poliana; Wood, Thomas G; Widen, Steven G; Vasconcelos, Pedro F C; Fish, Durland; Vasilakis, Nikos; Tesh, Robert B

    2017-04-01

    The recently described taxon Negevirus is comprised of a diverse group of insect-specific viruses isolated from mosquitoes and phlebotomine sandflies. In this study, a comprehensive genetic characterization, molecular, epidemiological and evolutionary analyses were conducted on nearly full-length sequences of 91 new negevirus isolates obtained in Brazil, Colombia, Peru, Panama, USA and Nepal. We demonstrated that these arthropod restricted viruses are clustered in two major phylogenetic groups with origins related to three plant virus genera (Cilevirus, Higrevirus and Blunevirus). Molecular analyses demonstrated that specific host correlations are not present with most negeviruses; instead, high genetic variability, wide host-range, and cross-species transmission were noted. The data presented here also revealed the existence of five novel insect-specific viruses falling into two arthropod-restrictive virus taxa, previously proposed as distinct genera, designated Nelorpivirus and Sandewavirus. Our results provide a better understanding of the molecular epidemiology, evolution, taxonomy and stability of this group of insect-restricted viruses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. First genetic characterization of Fasciola hepatica in Argentina by nuclear and mitochondrial gene markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Silvana; Malandrini, Jorge Bruno; Pantano, María Laura; Soria, Claudia Cecilia; Rodrigues-Silva, Rosângela; Machado-Silva, José Roberto; Velásquez, Jorge Néstor; Kamenetzky, Laura

    2017-10-15

    Fasciola hepatica is a trematode showing genetic variation among isolates from different regions of the world. The objective of this work was to characterize for the first time F. hepatica isolates circulating in different regions of Argentina. Twenty-two adult flukes were collected from naturally infected bovine livers in different areas from Argentina and used for DNA extraction. We carried out PCR amplification and sequence analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1), mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunits 4 and 5 (nad4 and nad5) and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (cox1) genes as genetic markers. Phylogenies were reconstructed using maximum parsimony algorithm. A total of 6 haplotypes were found for cox1, 4 haplotypes for nad4 and 3 haplotypes for nad5. The sequenced ITS1 fragment was identical in all samples. The analyzed cox1 gene fragment is the most variable marker and is recommended for future analyses. No geographic association was found in the Argentinean samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetic Characterization of Influenza A (H1N1) Pandemic 2009 Virus Isolates from Mumbai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohil, Devanshi; Kothari, Sweta; Shinde, Pramod; Meharunkar, Rhuta; Warke, Rajas; Chowdhary, Abhay; Deshmukh, Ranjana

    2017-08-01

    Pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus was first detected in India in May 2009 which subsequently became endemic in many parts of the country. Influenza A viruses have the ability to evade the immune response through its ability of antigenic variations. The study aims to characterize influenza A (H1N1) pdm 09 viruses circulating in Mumbai during the pandemic and post-pandemic period. Nasopharyngeal swabs positive for influenza A (H1N1) pdm 09 viruses were inoculated on Madin-Darby canine kidney cell line for virus isolation. Molecular and phylogenetic analysis of influenza A (H1N1) pdm 09 isolates was conducted to understand the evolution and genetic diversity of the strains. Nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the HA gene of Mumbai isolates when compared to A/California/07/2009-vaccine strain revealed 14 specific amino acid differences located at the antigenic sites. Amino acid variations in HA and NA gene resulted in changes in the N-linked glycosylation motif which may lead to immune evasion. Phylogenetic analysis of the isolates revealed their evolutionary position with vaccine strain A/California/07/2009 but had undergone changes gradually. The findings in the present study confirm genetic variability of influenza viruses and highlight the importance of continuous surveillance during influenza outbreaks.

  12. Genetic characterization of complete open reading frame of glycoprotein C gene of bovine herpesvirus 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Majumder

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To characterize one of the major glycoprotein genes viz., glycoprotein C (gC; UL44, unique long region 44 of bovineherpesvirus 1(BoHV1 of Indian origin at genetic and phylogenetic level.Materials and Methods: A bovine herpesvirus 1 isolate viz., (BoHV1/IBR 216 II/ 1976/ India maintained at Division ofVirology, IVRI, Mukteswar was used for the current study. The DNA was extracted using commercial kit and the completeORF of gC gene was amplified, cloned, and sequenced by conventional Sanger sequencing method. The sequence wasgenetically and phylogenetically analysed using various bioinformatic tools. The sequence was submitted in the Genbankwith accession number Kc756965.Results: The complete ORF of gC gene was amplified and sequenced. It showed 100% sequence homology with referencecooper strain of BoHV1 and divergence varied from 0% to 2.7% with other isolates of BoHV1. The isolate under study haddivergence of 9.2%, 13%, 26.6%, and 9.2% with BoHV5 (Bovine herpesvirus 5, CvHV1 (Cervid herpesvirus 1, CpHV1(Caprine herpesvirus 1, and BuHV1 (Bubaline herpesvirus 1, respectively.Conclusion: This is the first genetic characterization of complete open reading frame (ORF of glycoprotein C gene (UL44 ofIndian isolate of BoHV1. The gC gene of BoHV1 is highly conserved among all BoHV1 isolates and it can be used as a targetfor designing diagnostic primers for the specific detection of BoHV1.

  13. Characterization of Movement Disorder Phenomenology in Genetically Proven, Familial Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasca-Salas, Carmen; Masellis, Mario; Khoo, Edwin; Shah, Binit B; Fisman, David; Lang, Anthony E; Kleiner-Fisman, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in granulin (PGRN) and tau (MAPT), and hexanucleotide repeat expansions near the C9orf72 genes are the most prevalent genetic causes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Although behavior, language and movement presentations are common, the relationship between genetic subgroup and movement disorder phenomenology is unclear. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature characterizing the spectrum and prevalence of movement disorders in genetic frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Electronic databases were searched using terms related to frontotemporal lobar degeneration and movement disorders. Articles were included when cases had a proven genetic cause. Study-specific prevalence estimates for clinical features were transformed using Freeman-Tukey arcsine transformation, allowing for pooled estimates of prevalence to be generated using random-effects models. The mean age at onset was earlier in those with MAPT mutations compared to PGRN (pphenomenology in genetic frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Standardized prospective collection of clinical information in conjunction with genetic characterization will be crucial for accurate clinico-genetic correlation.

  14. Characterization of cross-tissue genetic-epigenetic effects and their patterns in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dongdong; Chen, Jiayu; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora; Bustillo, Juan R; Du, Yuhui; Calhoun, Vince D; Liu, Jingyu

    2018-02-26

    One of the major challenges in current psychiatric epigenetic studies is the tissue specificity of epigenetic changes since access to brain samples is limited. Peripheral tissues have been studied as surrogates but the knowledge of cross-tissue genetic-epigenetic characteristics remains largely unknown. In this work, we conducted a comprehensive investigation of genetic influence on DNA methylation across brain and peripheral tissues with the aim to characterize cross-tissue genetic-epigenetic effects and their roles in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. Genome-wide methylation quantitative trait loci (meQTLs) from brain prefrontal cortex, whole blood, and saliva were identified separately and compared. Focusing on cis-acting effects, we tested the enrichment of cross-tissue meQTLs among cross-tissue expression QTLs and genetic risk loci of various diseases, including major psychiatric disorders. CpGs targeted by cross-tissue meQTLs were also tested for genomic distribution and functional enrichment as well as their contribution to methylation correlation across tissues. Finally, a consensus co-methylation network analysis on the cross-tissue meQTL targeted CpGs was performed on data of the three tissues collected from schizophrenia patients and controls. We found a significant overlap of cis meQTLs (45-73 %) and targeted CpG sites (31-68 %) among tissues. The majority of cross-tissue meQTLs showed consistent signs of cis-acting effects across tissues. They were significantly enriched in genetic risk loci of various diseases, especially schizophrenia, and also enriched in cross-tissue expression QTLs. Compared to CpG sites not targeted by any meQTLs, cross-tissue targeted CpGs were more distributed in CpG island shores and enhancer regions, and more likely had strong correlation with methylation levels across tissues. The targeted CpGs were also annotated to genes enriched in multiple psychiatric disorders and neurodevelopment-related pathways. Finally

  15. Genetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubitschek, H.E.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: genetic effects of high LET radiations; genetic regulation, alteration, and repair; chromosome replication and the division cycle of Escherichia coli; effects of radioisotope decay in the DNA of microorganisms; initiation and termination of DNA replication in Bacillus subtilis; mutagenesis in mouse myeloma cells; lethal and mutagenic effects of near-uv radiation; effect of 8-methoxypsoralen on photodynamic lethality and mutagenicity in Escherichia coli; DNA repair of the lethal effects of far-uv; and near uv irradiation of bacterial cells

  16. New massive parallel sequencing approach improves the genetic characterization of congenital myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Jorge; Gonçalves, Ana; Taipa, Ricardo; Melo-Pires, Manuel; Oliveira, Márcia E; Costa, José Luís; Machado, José Carlos; Medeiros, Elmira; Coelho, Teresa; Santos, Manuela; Santos, Rosário; Sousa, Mário

    2016-06-01

    Congenital myopathies (CMs) are a heterogeneous group of muscle diseases characterized by hypotonia, delayed motor skills and muscle weakness with onset during the first years of life. The diagnostic workup of CM is highly dependent on the interpretation of the muscle histology, where typical pathognomonic findings are suggestive of a CM but are not necessarily gene specific. Over 20 loci have been linked to these myopathies, including three exceptionally large genes (TTN, NEB and RYR1), which are a challenge for molecular diagnosis. We developed a new approach using massive parallel sequencing (MPS) technology to simultaneously analyze 20 genes linked to CMs. Assay design was based on the Ion AmpliSeq strategy and sequencing runs were performed on an Ion PGM system. A total of 12 patients were analyzed in this study. Among the 2534 variants detected, 14 pathogenic mutations were successfully identified in the DNM2, NEB, RYR1, SEPN1 and TTN genes. Most of these had not been documented and/or fully characterized, hereby contributing to expand the CM mutational spectrum. The utility of this approach was demonstrated by the identification of mutations in 70% of the patients included in this study, which is relevant for CMs especially considering its wide phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity.

  17. Genetic and Genomic Characterization of 462 Melanoma Patient-Derived Xenografts, Tumor Biopsies, and Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Garman

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Tumor-sequencing studies have revealed the widespread genetic diversity of melanoma. Sequencing of 108 genes previously implicated in melanomagenesis was performed on 462 patient-derived xenografts (PDXs, cell lines, and tumors to identify mutational and copy number aberrations. Samples came from 371 unique individuals: 263 were naive to treatment, and 108 were previously treated with targeted therapy (34, immunotherapy (54, or both (20. Models of all previously reported major melanoma subtypes (BRAF, NRAS, NF1, KIT, and WT/WT/WT were identified. Multiple minor melanoma subtypes were also recapitulated, including melanomas with multiple activating mutations in the MAPK-signaling pathway and chromatin-remodeling gene mutations. These well-characterized melanoma PDXs and cell lines can be used not only as reagents for a large array of biological studies but also as pre-clinical models to facilitate drug development. : Garman et al. have characterized melanoma PDXs and cell lines described in Krepler et al. (see the related paper in this issue of Cell Reports, identifying major and minor subtypes, some of which were previously not well defined, targeted and immunotherapy resistance, and tumor heterogeneity, creating a set of reagents for future drug discovery and biological studies. Keywords: melanoma, patient-derived xenografts, massively parallel sequencing, cell lines

  18. Molecular detection, epidemiology, and genetic characterization of novel European field isolates of equine infectious anemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelli, Katia; Capomaccio, Stefano; Cook, Frank R; Felicetti, Michela; Marenzoni, Maria Luisa; Coppola, Giacomo; Verini-Supplizi, Andrea; Coletti, Mauro; Passamonti, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    The application of molecular diagnostic techniques along with nucleotide sequence determination to permit contemporary phylogenetic analysis of European field isolates of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) has not been widely reported. As a result, of extensive testing instigated following the 2006 outbreak of equine infectious anemia in Italy, 24 farms with a history of exposure to this disease were included in this study. New PCR-based methods were developed, which, especially in the case of DNA preparations from peripheral blood cells, showed excellent correlation with OIE-approved agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) tests for identifying EIAV-infected animals. In contrast, the OIE-recommended oligonucleotide primers for EIAV failed to react with any of the Italian isolates. Similar results were also obtained with samples from four Romanian farms. In addition, for the first time complete characterization of gag genes from five Italian isolates and one Romanian isolate has been achieved, along with acquisition of extensive sequence information (86% of the total gag gene) from four additional EIAV isolates (one Italian and three Romanian). Furthermore, in another 23 cases we accomplished partial characterization of gag gene sequences in the region encoding the viral matrix protein. Analysis of this information suggested that most Italian isolates were geographically restricted, somewhat reminiscent of the "clades" described for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Collectively this represents the most comprehensive genetic study of European EIAV isolates conducted to date.

  19. First genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii infection in Arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Xuan; Cong, Wei; Ma, Jian-Gang; Lou, Zhi-Long; Zhao, Quan; Meng, Qing-Feng; Qian, Ai-Dong; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii can infect virtually all warm-blooded animals including foxes. However, little is known of the molecular epidemiology and genotypes of T. gondii infecting foxes in China. Therefore, the present study characterized T. gondii genotypes in foxes in China for the first time. During November 2014 to October 2015, brain tissue samples collected from 264 Arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus) in Jilin, Heilongjiang and Shandong provinces were used to detect the T. gondii B1 gene by a semi-nested PCR, and the positive samples were genotyped at 10 nuclear loci (i.e., SAG1, alternative SAG2, 5'-and 3'-SAG2, SAG3, L358, BTUB, c22-8, GRA6, c29-2, PK1) and an apicoplast locus (Apico) by multi-locus PCR-RFLP technology. Twenty-one (7.96%) samples from 264 foxes were positive for T. gondii B1 gene. T. gondii infection in male and female foxes was 7.14% and 8.70%, respectively. The highest infection rate (11.86%) was detected in foxes from Shandong, followed by foxes from Jilin (6.49%) and Heilongjiang (2.90%). Two genotypes (ToxoDB#9 and ToxoDB#10) were identified. This is the first genetic characterization of T. gondii from foxes in China, which provides basic data for the surveillance and control of T. gondii infection in foxes, other animals and humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Isolation and genetic characterization of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 from cattle in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuan-Mao; Shi, Hong-Fei; Gao, Yu-Ran; Xin, Jiu-Qing; Liu, Ni-Hong; Xiang, Wen-Hua; Ren, Xian-Gang; Feng, Jun-Ke; Zhao, Li-Ping; Xue, Fei

    2011-05-05

    Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3) is one of the most important of the known viral respiratory pathogens of both young and adult cattle. However BPIV3 has not been detected or isolated in China prior to this study. In 2008, four BPIV3 strains were isolated with MDBK cells from cattle in China and characterized by RT-PCR, nucleotide sequence analysis, transmission electron microscope observation, hemadsorption and hemagglutination tests. Nucleotide phylogenetic analysis of partial hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) gene for four isolates and the complete genome for the SD0835 isolate implicated that the four Chinese BPIV3 strains were distinct from the previously reported genotype A (BPIV3a) and genotype B (BPIV3b) and might be a potentially new genotype, which was tentatively classified as genotype C (BPIV3c). This is the first study to report the isolation and genetic characterization of BPIV3 from cattle in China. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Genetic characterization of the Wyeomyia group of orthobunyaviruses and their phylogenetic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhary, Rashmi; Street, Craig; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia; Nunes, Marcio R T; Tee, Kok Keng; Hutchison, Stephen K; Vasconcelos, Pedro F C; Tesh, Robert B; Lipkin, W Ian; Briese, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    Phylogenetic analyses can give new insights into the evolutionary history of viruses, especially of viruses with segmented genomes. However, sequence information for many viral families or genera is still limited and phylogenies based on single or short genome fragments can be misleading. We report the first genetic analysis of all three genome segments of Wyeomyia group viruses Wyeomyia, Taiassui, Macaua, Sororoca, Anhembi and Cachoeira Porteira (BeAr328208) in the genus Orthobunyavirus of the family Bunyaviridae. In addition, Tucunduba and Iaco viruses were identified as members of the Wyeomyia group. Features of Wyeomyia group members that distinguish them from other viruses in the Bunyamwera serogroup and from other orthobunyaviruses, including truncated NSs sequences that may not counteract the host's interferon response, were characterized. Our findings also suggest genome reassortment within the Wyeomyia group, identifying Macaua and Tucunduba viruses as M-segment reassortants that, in the case of Tucunduba virus, may have altered pathogenicity, stressing the need for whole-genome sequence information to facilitate characterization of orthobunyaviruses and their phylogenetic relationships.

  2. Characterization and noninvasive diagnosis of bladder cancer with serum surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and genetic algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaoxin; Li, Linfang; Zeng, Qiuyao; Zhang, Yanjiao; Guo, Zhouyi; Liu, Zhiming; Jin, Mei; Su, Chengkang; Lin, Lin; Xu, Junfa; Liu, Songhao

    2015-05-01

    This study aims to characterize and classify serum surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) spectra between bladder cancer patients and normal volunteers by genetic algorithms (GAs) combined with linear discriminate analysis (LDA). Two group serum SERS spectra excited with nanoparticles are collected from healthy volunteers (n = 36) and bladder cancer patients (n = 55). Six diagnostic Raman bands in the regions of 481-486, 682-687, 1018-1034, 1313-1323, 1450-1459 and 1582-1587 cm-1 related to proteins, nucleic acids and lipids are picked out with the GAs and LDA. By the diagnostic models built with the identified six Raman bands, the improved diagnostic sensitivity of 90.9% and specificity of 100% were acquired for classifying bladder cancer patients from normal serum SERS spectra. The results are superior to the sensitivity of 74.6% and specificity of 97.2% obtained with principal component analysis by the same serum SERS spectra dataset. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves further confirmed the efficiency of diagnostic algorithm based on GA-LDA technique. This exploratory work demonstrates that the serum SERS associated with GA-LDA technique has enormous potential to characterize and non-invasively detect bladder cancer through peripheral blood.

  3. Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; McGue, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The sequenced genomes of individuals aged ≥80 years, who were highly educated, self-referred volunteers and with no self-reported chronic diseases were compared to young controls. In these data, healthy ageing is a distinct phenotype from exceptional longevity and genetic factors that protect...

  4. Characterization of Isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae from Diseased Farmed and Wild Marine Fish from the U.S. Gulf Coast, Latin America, and Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Esteban; Wang, Rui; Wiles, Judy; Baumgartner, Wes; Green, Christopher; Plumb, John; Hawke, John

    2015-06-01

    We examined Lancefield serogroup B Streptococcus isolates recovered from diseased, cultured hybrid Striped Bass (Striped Bass Morone saxatilis × White Bass M. chrysops) and wild and cultured Gulf Killifish Fundulus grandis from coastal waters of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico (Gulf coast) and compared those isolates to strains from tilapias Oreochromis spp. reared in Mississippi, Thailand, Ecuador, and Honduras and to the original Gulf coast strain identified by Plumb et al. ( 1974 ). The isolates were subjected to phylogenetic, biochemical, and antibiotic susceptibility analyses. Genetic analysis was performed using partial sequence comparison of (1) the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene; (2) the sipA gene, which encodes a surface immunogenic protein; (3) the cspA gene, which encodes a cell surface-associated protein; and (4) the secY gene, which encodes components of a general protein secretion pathway. Phylogenies inferred from sipA, secY, and cspA gene sequence comparisons were more discriminating than that inferred from the 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison. The U.S. Gulf coast strains showed a high degree of similarity to strains from South America and Central America and belonged to a unique group that can be distinguished from other group B streptococci. In agreement with the molecular findings, biochemical and antimicrobial resistance analyses demonstrated that the isolates recovered from the U.S. Gulf coast and Latin America were more similar to each other than to isolates from Thailand. Three laboratory challenge methods for inducing streptococcosis in Gulf Killifish were evaluated-intraperitoneal (IP) injection, immersion (IMM), and immersion plus abrasion (IMMA)-using serial dilutions of S. agalactiae isolate LADL 97-151, a representative U.S. Gulf coast strain. The dose that was lethal to 50% of test fish by 14 d postchallenge was approximately 2 CFU/fish via IP injection. In contrast, the fish that were challenged via IMM or IMMA presented cumulative mortality

  5. Tectonic evolution of the continental crust of South America and its importance in the characterization of uraniferous provinces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordani, U.G.

    1981-01-01

    The tectonic evolution of the South American Continent and its relationship with uranium mineralization is discussed. During the Phanerozoic at least three phases are identified as related to the Andean chain, namely, in the lower Palaeozoic, in the upper Palaeozoic and in the Meso-Cenozoic. Recent systematic age dating of the Precambrian indicates the period of 450-700 million years (m.y.) (Brazilian Cycle) as one of the most important tectonic events in South America. Another age-dating cluster corresponds to the 1700-2100 m.y. interval (Transamazonic Cycle). An even older event within the Archean is identified with datings older than 2600 m.y. in Venezuela (Estado Bolivar), Surinam and Brazil (Bahia, Santa Catarina, Goias). All the Brazilian uranium deposits related to the Brazilian platform, such as Amorinopolis, are located on the eastern border of the platform where the Brazilian tectonic cycle is dominant. The uranium source rocks are of alkaline granitic nature. Other deposits (Itataia, Campos Belos) are associated with polycyclic rocks belonging to the basement of the Brazilian Cycle but were affected by the 450-700 m.y. tectonic event; these amphibolitic facies rocks show alkaline metamorphism and magmatization processes which indicate large geochemical mobility during which important uranium mobilization has taken place. Finally, the Pocos de Caldas deposit is excellent evidence of the important relationship of tectonic reactivations and uranium enrichments within the Brazilian platform. (author)

  6. RNA viral metagenome of whiteflies leads to the discovery and characterization of a whitefly-transmitted carlavirus in North America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karyna Rosario

    Full Text Available Whiteflies from the Bemisia tabaci species complex have the ability to transmit a large number of plant viruses and are some of the most detrimental pests in agriculture. Although whiteflies are known to transmit both DNA and RNA viruses, most of the diversity has been recorded for the former, specifically for the Begomovirus genus. This study investigated the total diversity of DNA and RNA viruses found in whiteflies collected from a single site in Florida to evaluate if there are additional, previously undetected viral types within the B. tabaci vector. Metagenomic analysis of viral DNA extracted from the whiteflies only resulted in the detection of begomoviruses. In contrast, whiteflies contained sequences similar to RNA viruses from divergent groups, with a diversity that extends beyond currently described viruses. The metagenomic analysis of whiteflies also led to the first report of a whitefly-transmitted RNA virus similar to Cowpea mild mottle virus (CpMMV Florida (genus Carlavirus in North America. Further investigation resulted in the detection of CpMMV Florida in native and cultivated plants growing near the original field site of whitefly collection and determination of its experimental host range. Analysis of complete CpMMV Florida genomes recovered from whiteflies and plants suggests that the current classification criteria for carlaviruses need to be reevaluated. Overall, metagenomic analysis supports that DNA plant viruses carried by B. tabaci are dominated by begomoviruses, whereas significantly less is known about RNA viruses present in this damaging insect vector.

  7. Characterizing genetic diversity of contemporary pacific chickens using mitochondrial DNA analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Needham Dancause

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA hypervariable region (HVR sequences of prehistoric Polynesian chicken samples reflect dispersal of two haplogroups--D and E--by the settlers of the Pacific. The distribution of these chicken haplogroups has been used as an indicator of human movement. Recent analyses suggested similarities between prehistoric Pacific and South American chicken samples, perhaps reflecting prehistoric Polynesian introduction of the chicken into South America. These analyses have been heavily debated. The current distribution of the D and E lineages among contemporary chicken populations in the Western Pacific is unclear, but might ultimately help to inform debates about the movements of humans that carried them. OBJECTIVES: We sought to characterize contemporary mtDNA diversity among chickens in two of the earliest settled archipelagos of Remote Oceania, the Marianas and Vanuatu. METHODS: We generated HVR sequences for 43 chickens from four islands in Vanuatu, and for 5 chickens from Guam in the Marianas. RESULTS: Forty samples from Vanuatu and three from Guam were assigned to haplogroup D, supporting this as a Pacific chicken haplogroup that persists in the Western Pacific. Two haplogroup E lineages were observed in Guam and two in Vanuatu. Of the E lineages in Vanuatu, one was identical to prehistoric Vanuatu and Polynesian samples and the other differed by one polymorphism. Contrary to our expectations, we observed few globally distributed domesticate lineages not associated with Pacific chicken dispersal. This might suggest less European introgression of chickens into Vanuatu than expected. If so, the E lineages might represent lineages maintained from ancient Pacific chicken introductions. The Vanuatu sample might thus provide an opportunity to distinguish between maintained ancestral Pacific chicken lineages and replacement by global domesticates through genomic analyses, which could resolve questions of contemporary

  8. Genetic Characterization of Rubella Virus Strains Detected in Spain, 1998-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Torres, Alex O; Mosquera, María M; De Ory, Fernando; González-Praetorius, Alejandro; Echevarría, Juan E

    2016-01-01

    The National Plan for the Elimination of Rubella was implemented in Spain in 2008 using the logistics of the National Plan for the Elimination of Measles that have been employed since year 2000. Molecular characterization of rubella virus (RUBV) is important for disease surveillance and for monitoring elimination of the disease throughout the world. We describe the first complete series of data regarding the circulation of RUBV genotypes in Spain. The 739-nucleotide fragment designated by the WHO for RUBV genotyping was sequenced in 88 selected cases collected from 1998 to 2014. Five genotypes were identified: 1E, 2B, 1J, 1I, and 1a. Genotype 1E was predominant between 1998 and 2003 but was replaced by genotype 2B, which was detected in sporadic cases in 2004, 2006, 2008, 2012, 2013 and 2014. There was an outbreak of genotype 2B in Algeciras (Andalusia) in 2008. Genotype 1J caused an outbreak in Madrid in 2004/2005 and sporadic cases in 2005 and 2007. Genotype 1I was found to have infected an immune-suppressed patient with neurological symptoms in 2008. Finally, vaccine strain RA 27/3 was detected in three sporadic cases, two of them immune-suppressed and without a recent history of vaccination. This suggests that during these years there were a series of imported sporadic cases and outbreaks, confirming the findings of epidemiological data analysis. The importation sources were generally consistent with our geographic and cultural ties, mainly with Europe (genotypes 1E, 2B, 1I) and Latin America (1J).

  9. Full genetic characterization and epidemiology of a novel amdoparvovirus in striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuti, Marta; Doyle, Hillary E; P Britton, Ann; Lang, Andrew S

    2017-05-10

    Amdoparvovirus is a newly defined parvoviral genus that contains four species (Carnivore amdoparvovirus 1-4), including the well-known Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV). Amdoparvoviruses cause an immune-associated and often lethal wasting syndrome in Mustelidae and Caninae hosts. In this study, we molecularly investigated amdoparvoviruses detected in 44 striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) found dead in and around Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Some of the animals exhibited pathological changes compatible with amdoparvovirus-associated disease. The nearly complete genomic sequence was obtained for seven different strains and our analyses show how this virus, which we named skunk amdoparvovirus (SKAV), should be classified as a separate species within the genus (proposed Carnivore amdoparvovirus 5). We detected co-infections, recombinant genomes, at least three separate viral lineages, and preliminary evidence for geographic segregation of lineages. Furthermore, we proved that similar viruses, only partially characterized in previous studies and labeled as AMDV, circulate in skunks from other distant areas of North America (Ontario and California) and found evidence for spillover events in mink (Neovison vison). Although SKAVs are capable of causing disease in infected animals, a high proportion of sub-clinical infections has been observed, suggesting these animals might act as asymptomatic carriers and pose a threat to wild and captive carnivores. Finally, we highlight the need for more specific diagnostic tests and further molecular investigations to clarify the epidemiology and host- and geographical distributions of amdoparvoviruses in terrestrial carnivores, especially because the whole spectrum of viral diversity in this group is likely still unknown.

  10. Application of whole genome shotgun sequencing for detection and characterization of genetically modified organisms and derived products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst-Jensen, Arne; Spilsberg, Bjørn; Arulandhu, Alfred J; Kok, Esther; Shi, Jianxin; Zel, Jana

    2016-07-01

    The emergence of high-throughput, massive or next-generation sequencing technologies has created a completely new foundation for molecular analyses. Various selective enrichment processes are commonly applied to facilitate detection of predefined (known) targets. Such approaches, however, inevitably introduce a bias and are prone to miss unknown targets. Here we review the application of high-throughput sequencing technologies and the preparation of fit-for-purpose whole genome shotgun sequencing libraries for the detection and characterization of genetically modified and derived products. The potential impact of these new sequencing technologies for the characterization, breeding selection, risk assessment, and traceability of genetically modified organisms and genetically modified products is yet to be fully acknowledged. The published literature is reviewed, and the prospects for future developments and use of the new sequencing technologies for these purposes are discussed.

  11. Quantification and characterization of β-lactam resistance genes in 15 sewage treatment plants from East Asia and North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying; Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Liang, Da-Wei; Zhang, Ming; Gao, Da-Wen; Zhu, He-Guang; Huang, Qing-Guo; Fang, Herbert H P

    2012-09-01

    The emerging antibiotic resistance genes in the aquatic environment have aroused public concern. As β-lactam is the most widely used group of antibiotics, β-lactam resistance genes were selected to investigate their distribution and diversity in the activated sludge from 15 geographically different sewage treatment plants (STPs) of China, Singapore, USA, and Canada. Specific PCR and quantitative real-time PCR (q-PCR) were used to investigate the occurrence and abundance of nine β-lactam resistance genes. Five genes (OXA-1, OXA-2, OXA-10, ampC, and TEM-1) were detected in most of the sludge collected, while three genes (mecA, CTX-M-1, and SME) were not found in any sludge sample. The total abundances of the six detected β-lactam resistance genes in the 15 STPs varied from 5.34 × 10(1) copies/ng DNA (ampC) to 5.49 × 10(4) copies/ng DNA (OXA-1). Overall, OXA-1 had the highest total concentration, followed by IMP and OXA-10. Noticeably, the abundances of TEM-1 in Chinese STPs were generally higher than those in the STPs of other countries, while the abundances of OXA-2 and IMP in the STPs of North America were much greater than those of East Asia. A total of 78 clones carrying β-lactam resistance genes were randomly selected from six clone libraries for phylogenetic diversity analysis; the similarity of these cloned genes to known β-lactam resistance genes with sequence identities ranged from 96% to 100%. Furthermore, OXA-1, ampC, and IMP were found to be more diverse than the other β-lactam resistance genes.

  12. Characterizing nuclear and mitochondrial DNA in spent embryo culture media: genetic contamination identified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Elizabeth R; McGillivray, Brent C; Wicker, Sophie M; Peek, John C; Shelling, Andrew N; Stone, Peter; Chamley, Larry W; Cree, Lynsey M

    2017-01-01

    To characterize nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in spent culture media from normally developing blastocysts to determine whether it could be used for noninvasive genetic assessment. Prospective embryo cohort study. Academic center and private in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinic. Seventy patients undergoing intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and 227 blastocysts. Culture media assessment, artificial blastocoele fluid collapse and DNA analysis using digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR), long-range PCR, quantitative PCR (qPCR), and DNA fingerprinting. Presence of nuclear and mtDNA in three different commercial culture media from Vitrolife and Irvine Scientific, spent embryo media assessment at the cleavage and blastocyst stages of development, and analysis of the internal media controls for each patient that had been exposed to identical conditions as embryo media but did not come into contact with embryos. Higher levels of nuclear and mtDNA were observed in the culture media that had been exposed to embryos compared with the internal media controls. Nuclear DNA (∼4 copies) and mtDNA (∼600 copies) could be detected in spent media, and the levels increased at the blastocyst stage. No increase in DNA was detected after artificial blastocoele fluid collapse. Mixed sex chromosome DNA was detected. This originated from contamination in the culture media and from maternal (cumulus) cells. Due to the limited amount of template, the presence of embryonic nuclear DNA could not be confirmed by DNA fingerprinting analysis. Currently DNA from culture media cannot be used for genetic assessment because embryo-associated structures release DNA into the culture medium and the DNA is of mixed origin. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Sequencing and characterization of striped venus transcriptome expand resources for clam fishery genetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Coppe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The striped venus Chamelea gallina clam fishery is among the oldest and the largest in the Mediterranean Sea, particularly in the inshore waters of northern Adriatic Sea. The high fishing pressure has lead to a strong stock abundance decline, enhanced by several irregular mortality events. The nearly complete lack of molecular characterization limits the available genetic resources for C. gallina. We achieved the first transcriptome of this species with the aim of identifying an informative set of expressed genes, potential markers to assess genetic structure of natural populations and molecular resources for pathogenic contamination detection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The 454-pyrosequencing of a normalized cDNA library of a pool C. gallina adult individuals yielded 298,494 raw reads. Different steps of reads assembly and filtering produced 36,422 contigs of high quality, one half of which (18,196 were annotated by similarity. A total of 111 microsatellites and 20,377 putative SNPs were identified. A panel of 13 polymorphic transcript-linked microsatellites was developed and their variability assessed in 12 individuals. Remarkably, a scan to search for contamination sequences of infectious origin indicated the presence of several Vibrionales species reported to be among the most frequent clam pathogen's species. Results reported in this study were included in a dedicated database available at http://compgen.bio.unipd.it/chameleabase. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study represents the first attempt to sequence and de novo annotate the transcriptome of the clam C. gallina. The availability of this transcriptome opens new perspectives in the study of biochemical and physiological role of gene products and their responses to large and small-scale environmental stress in C. gallina, with high throughput experiments such as custom microarray or targeted re-sequencing. Molecular markers, such as the already optimized EST

  14. Identification and characterization of genetic variation in the folylpolyglutamate synthase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leil, Tarek A; Endo, Chiaki; Adjei, Araba A; Dy, Grace K; Salavaggione, Oreste E; Reid, Joel R; Ames, Matthew M; Adjei, Alex A

    2007-09-15

    Folylpolyglutamate synthase (FPGS) catalyzes the polyglutamation of folic acid, methotrexate, and pemetrexed to produce highly active metabolites. To characterize genetic variation in the FPGS gene, FPGS, have resequenced the gene in four different ethnic populations. Thirty-four single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified including five nonsynonymous coding single nucleotide polymorphisms that altered the FPGS protein sequence: F13L and V22I polymorphisms in the mitochondrial isoform of FPGS, and R466/424C, A489/447V, and S499/457F polymorphisms, which exist in both the mitochondrial and cytosolic isoforms. When expressed in AuxB1 cells, the A447V cytosolic variant was functionally similar to the wild-type cytosolic (WT Cyt) allozyme, whereas the R424C and S457F cytosolic variants were reduced by approximately 2-fold in protein expression compared with WT Cyt (P glutamate was reduced by 12.3-fold (R424C, P < 0.01) and 6.2-fold (S457F, P < 0.01), whereas the intrinsic clearance of methotrexate was reduced by 4.2-fold (R424C, P < 0.05) and 5.4-fold (S457F, P < 0.05) in these two cytosolic variants when compared with the WT Cyt isoform. Additionally, the in vitro enzyme velocity at saturating pemetrexed concentrations was reduced by 1.6-fold (R424C, P < 0.05) and 2.6-fold (S457F, P < 0.01) compared with WT Cyt. AuxB1 cells harboring these same cytosolic variant allozymes displayed significant increases in the EC(50) for folic acid and in the IC(50) values for both methotrexate and pemetrexed relative to the WT Cyt form of FPGS. These observations suggest that genetic variations in FPGS may alter the efficacy of antifolate therapy in cancer patients.

  15. Characterization of genetic sequence variation of 58 STR loci in four major population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novroski, Nicole M M; King, Jonathan L; Churchill, Jennifer D; Seah, Lay Hong; Budowle, Bruce

    2016-11-01

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) can identify sequence variation within short tandem repeat (STR) alleles as well as their nominal allele lengths that traditionally have been obtained by capillary electrophoresis. Using the MiSeq FGx Forensic Genomics System (Illumina), STRait Razor, and in-house excel workbooks, genetic variation was characterized within STR repeat and flanking regions of 27 autosomal, 7 X-chromosome and 24 Y-chromosome STR markers in 777 unrelated individuals from four population groups. Seven hundred and forty six autosomal, 227 X-chromosome, and 324 Y-chromosome STR alleles were identified by sequence compared with 357 autosomal, 107 X-chromosome, and 189 Y-chromosome STR alleles that were identified by length. Within the observed sequence variation, 227 autosomal, 156 X-chromosome, and 112 Y-chromosome novel alleles were identified and described. One hundred and seventy six autosomal, 123 X-chromosome, and 93 Y-chromosome sequence variants resided within STR repeat regions, and 86 autosomal, 39 X-chromosome, and 20 Y-chromosome variants were located in STR flanking regions. Three markers, D18S51, DXS10135, and DYS385a-b had 1, 4, and 1 alleles, respectively, which contained both a novel repeat region variant and a flanking sequence variant in the same nucleotide sequence. There were 50 markers that demonstrated a relative increase in diversity with the variant sequence alleles compared with those of traditional nominal length alleles. These population data illustrate the genetic variation that exists in the commonly used STR markers in the selected population samples and provide allele frequencies for statistical calculations related to STR profiling with MPS data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization and Genetic Variation of Vibrio cholerae Isolated from Clinical and Environmental Sources in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriphap, Achiraya; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Kaas, Rolf S; Theethakaew, Chonchanok; Aarestrup, Frank M; Sutheinkul, Orasa; Hendriksen, Rene S

    2017-01-01

    Cholera is still an important public health problem in several countries, including Thailand. In this study, a collection of clinical and environmental V. cholerae serogroup O1, O139, and non-O1/non-O139 strains originating from Thailand (1983 to 2013) was characterized to determine phenotypic and genotypic traits and to investigate the genetic relatedness. Using a combination of conventional methods and whole genome sequencing (WGS), 78 V. cholerae strains were identified. WGS was used to determine the serogroup, biotype, virulence, mobile genetic elements, and antimicrobial resistance genes using online bioinformatics tools. In addition, phenotypic antimicrobial resistance was determined by the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) test. The 78 V. cholerae strains belonged to the following serogroups O1: (n = 44), O139 (n = 16) and non-O1/non-O139 (n = 18). Interestingly, we found that the typical El Tor O1 strains were the major cause of clinical cholera during 1983-2000 with two Classical O1 strains detected in 2000. In 2004-2010, the El Tor variant strains revealed genotypes of the Classical biotype possessing either only ctxB or both ctxB and rstR while they harbored tcpA of the El Tor biotype. Thirty O1 and eleven O139 clinical strains carried CTXϕ (Cholera toxin) and tcpA as well four different pathogenic islands (PAIs). Beside non-O1/non-O139, the O1 environmental strains also presented chxA and Type Three Secretion System (TTSS). The in silico MultiLocus Sequence Typing (MLST) discriminated the O1 and O139 clinical strains from other serogroups and environmental strains. ST69 was dominant in the clinical strains belonging to the 7th pandemic clone. Non-O1/non-O139 and environmental strains showed various novel STs indicating genetic variation. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains were observed and conferred resistance to ampicillin, azithromycin, nalidixic acid, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, and trimethoprim and harboured variants of the SXT elements

  17. Building America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brad Oberg

    2010-12-31

    IBACOS researched the constructability and viability issues of using high performance windows as one component of a larger approach to building houses that achieve the Building America 70% energy savings target.

  18. Global Characterization of Genetic Variation by Using High-Throughput Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhan, Bujie

    into genetic variation in bovine and swine genomes and relevant methodologies; valuable resources such as novel genome sequences of pathogens, genome annotations and genetic variations were produced for research communities regard to animal health and welfare in animal breeding industriy...

  19. Functional, genetic and chemical characterization of biosurfactants produced by plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas putida 267.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijt, Marco; Tran, Ha; Raaijmakers, Jos M

    2009-08-01

    Plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas putida strain 267, originally isolated from the rhizosphere of black pepper, produces biosurfactants that cause lysis of zoospores of the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora capsici. The biosurfactants were characterized, the biosynthesis gene(s) partially identified, and their role in control of Phytophthora damping-off of cucumber evaluated. The biosurfactants were shown to lyse zoospores of Phy. capsici and inhibit growth of the fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Rhizoctonia solani. In vitro assays further showed that the biosurfactants of strain 267 are essential in swarming motility and biofilm formation. In spite of the zoosporicidal activity, the biosurfactants did not play a significant role in control of Phytophthora damping-off of cucumber, since both wild type strain 267 and its biosurfactant-deficient mutant were equally effective, and addition of the biosurfactants did not provide control. Genetic characterization revealed that surfactant biosynthesis in strain 267 is governed by homologues of PsoA and PsoB, two nonribosomal peptide synthetases involved in production of the cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) putisolvin I and II. The structural relatedness of the biosurfactants of strain 267 to putisolvins I and II was supported by LC-MS and MS-MS analyses. The biosurfactants produced by Ps. putida 267 were identified as putisolvin-like CLPs; they are essential in swarming motility and biofilm formation, and have zoosporicidal and antifungal activities. Strain 267 provides excellent biocontrol activity against Phytophthora damping-off of cucumber, but the lipopeptide surfactants are not involved in disease suppression. Pseudomonas putida 267 suppresses Phy. capsici damping-off of cucumber and provides a potential supplementary strategy to control this economically important oomycete pathogen. The putisolvin-like biosurfactants exhibit zoosporicidal and antifungal activities, yet they do not contribute to biocontrol of Phy

  20. Molecular characterization and genetic diversity of insecticidal crystal protein genes in native Bacillus thuringiensis isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadeva Swamy, H M; Asokan, R; Mahmood, Riaz; Nagesha, S N

    2013-04-01

    The Western Ghats of Karnataka natural ecosystem are among the most diverse and is one of the eight hottest hotspots of biological diversity in the world, that runs along the western part of India through four states including Karnataka. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) strains were isolated from soils of Western Ghats of Karnataka and characterized by molecular and analytical methods as a result of which 28 new Bt-like isolates were identified. Bt strains were isolated from soil samples using sodium acetate selection method. The morphology of crystals was studied using light and phase contrast microscopy. Isolates were further characterized for insecticidal cry gene by PCR, composition of toxins in bacterial crystals by SDS-PAGE cloning, sequencing and evaluation of toxicity was done. As a result 28 new Bt-like isolates were identified. Majority of the isolates showed the presence of a 55 kDa protein bands on SDS-PAGE while the rest showed 130, 73, 34, and 25 kDa bands. PCR analysis revealed predominance of Coleopteran-active cry genes in these isolates. The variations in the nucleotide sequences, crystal morphology, and mass of crystal protein(s) purified from the Bt isolates revealed genetic and molecular diversity. Three strains containing Coleopteran-active cry genes showed higher activity against larvae Myllocerus undecimpustulatus undatus Marshall (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) than B. thuringiensis subsp. Morrisoni. Results indicated that Bt isolates could be utilized for bioinsecticide production, aiming to reduce the use of chemical insecticide which could be useful to use in integrated pest management to control agriculturally important pests for sustainable crop production.

  1. Novel tetra-nucleotide microsatellite DNA markers for assessing the evolutionary genetics and demographics of Northern Snakehead (Channa argus) invading North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Timothy L.; Johnson, Robin L.

    2011-01-01

    We document the isolation and characterization of 19 tetra-nucleotide microsatellite DNA markers in northern snakehead (Channa argus) fish that recently colonized Meadow Lake, New York City, New York. These markers displayed moderate levels of allelic diversity (averaging 6.8 alleles/locus) and heterozygosity (averaging 74.2%). Demographic analyses suggested that the Meadow Lake collection has not achieved mutation-drift equilibrium. These results were consistent with instances of deviations from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium and the presence of some linkage disequilibrium. A comparison of individual pair-wise distances suggested the presence of multiple differentiated groups of related individuals. Results of all analyses are consistent with a pattern of multiple, recent introductions. The microsatellite markers developed for C. argus yielded sufficient genetic diversity to potentially: (1) delineate kinship; (2) elucidate fine-scale population structure; (3) define management (eradication) units; (4) estimate dispersal rates; (5) estimate population sizes; and (6) provide unique demographic perspectives of control or eradication effectiveness.

  2. Genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii isolates from Portugal, Austria and Israel reveals higher genetic variability within the type II lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, S K; Ajzenberg, D; Rivera-Sanchez, A; Su, C; Dubey, J P

    2015-06-01

    This study compared genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii isolates from Portugal, Austria and Israel. For this, we genotyped 90 T. gondii isolates (16 from Portugal, 67 from Austria and 7 from Israel) using 10 nested PCR-restriction length polymorphism (RFLP) genetic markers and 15 microsatellite (MS) markers. By PCR-RFLP typing, 7 isolates from Portugal chickens were identified as type II (ToxoDB #1 or #3), 4 were type III (ToxoDB #2) and the remaining 4 isolates have unique genotype pattern were designated as ToxoDB #254. One mouse virulent isolate from a bovine fetus (Bos taurus) in Portugal was type I (ToxoDB #10) at all loci and designated as TgCowPr1. All 67 isolates from Austria and 7 from Israel were type II (ToxoDB #1 or #3). By MS typing, many additional genetic variations were revealed among the type II and type III isolates. Phylogenetic analysis showed that isolates from the same geographical locations tend to cluster together, and there is little overlapping of genotypes among different locations. This study demonstrated that the MS markers can provide higher discriminatory power to reveal association of genotypes with geographical locations. Future studies of the type II strains in Europe by these MS markers will be useful to reveal transmission patterns of the parasite.

  3. Characterization of Rhizobacteria from field grown Genetically Modified (GM and non-GM maizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Wihkochombom Bumunang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was done to examine the rhizobacteria from field grown Genetically Modified (GM maize and its non-GM counterpart. Rhizospheric soil samples were collected at 30 days after sowing (DAS and at post-harvest from two experimental fields in Gauteng, South Africa. Total rhizobacteria (cfu/g in GM and non-GM soil samples was not significantly different across the different media 30 DAS and at post-harvest. Rhizobacterial isolates obtained were biochemically characterized using the analytical profile index. Species of Pseudomonas, Aeromonas, Sphingomonas, Burkholderia, Stenotrophomonas, Achromobacter, Ewingella and Bacillus were screened in vitro for plant growth promoting traits such as, ammonia production, catalase activity, indole acetic acid production, phosphate solubilisation, hydrogen cyanide production and antifungal activity. All the 32 rhizobacterial strains tested in this study were positive for catalase activity, ammonia production and IAA production; 90.6% were positive for phosphate solubilisation, 34.3% for indicate antifungal activity but none for hydrogen cyanide production. These findings contributed to the quest for potential biofertilizers and biocontrol agents for sustainable agriculture.

  4. Genetic-molecular characterization of backcross generations for sexual conversion in papaya (Carica papaya L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, H C C; Pereira, M G; Pereira, T N S; Barros, G B A; Ferreguetti, G A

    2014-12-04

    The low number of improved cultivars limits the expansion of the papaya crop, particularly because of the time required for the development of new varieties using classical procedures. Molecular techniques associated with conventional procedures accelerate this process and allow targeted improvements. Thus, we used microsatellite markers to perform genetic-molecular characterization of papaya genotypes obtained from 3 backcross generations to monitor the inbreeding level and parental genome proportion in the evaluated genotypes. Based on the analysis of 20 microsatellite loci, 77 genotypes were evaluated, 25 of each generation of the backcross program as well as the parental genotypes. The markers analyzed were identified in 11 of the 12 linkage groups established for papaya, ranging from 1 to 4 per linkage group. The average values for the inbreeding coefficient were 0.88 (BC1S4), 0.47 (BC2S3), and 0.63 (BC3S2). Genomic analysis revealed average values of the recurrent parent genome of 82.7% in BC3S2, 64.4% in BC1S4, and 63.9% in BC2S3. Neither the inbreeding level nor the genomic proportions completely followed the expected average values. This demonstrates the significance of molecular analysis when examining different genotype values, given the importance of such information for selection processes in breeding programs.

  5. Detection and genetic characterization of Pasteurella multocida from alpaca (Vicugna pacos) pneumonia cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rímac, Rocío; Luna, Luis; Hurtado, Raquel; Rosadio, Raúl; Maturrano, Lenin

    2017-08-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a common constituent of upper respiratory tract microbiota but is frequently isolated of alpaca lung tissues from pulmonary infections. Despite its importance, very little is known about this bacteria at molecular level. In order to characterize P. multocida isolates, 24 isolates recovered from 46 mortal acute cases in young alpacas with suspected pneumonia were analyzed, using biochemical and molecular tests for capsule and LPS typing, virulence factors detection, and ERIC-PCR genetic diversity analysis. All the P. multocida isolates belonged to the capsular type A, LPS genotype L6 (related to serotypes 10, 11, 12, and 15), and possessed virulence factors gene toxA and tbpA. ERIC-PCR analysis revealed two electrophoretic profiles, and the majority of isolates (23/24) shared the same fingerprint, indicating strong evidence that there was a common source of infection for all the affect animals. This study revealed the detection of P. multocida type A, LPS genotype L6, and toxA+ and tbpA+ from dead young alpacas with pneumonia in Peru.

  6. Genetic characterization of blaNDM-harboring plasmids in carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli from Myanmar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yo Sugawara

    Full Text Available The bacterial enzyme New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase hydrolyzes almost all β-lactam antibiotics, including carbapenems, which are drugs of last resort for severe bacterial infections. The spread of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae that carry the New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase gene, blaNDM, poses a serious threat to public health. In this study, we genetically characterized eight carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from a tertiary care hospital in Yangon, Myanmar. The eight isolates belonged to five multilocus-sequence types and harbored multiple antimicrobial-resistance genes, resulting in resistance against nearly all of the antimicrobial agents tested, except colistin and fosfomycin. Nine plasmids harboring blaNDM genes were identified from these isolates. Multiple blaNDM genes were found in the distinct Inc-replicon types of the following plasmids: an IncA/C2 plasmid harboring blaNDM-1 (n = 1, IncX3 plasmids harboring blaNDM-4 (n = 2 or blaNDM-7 (n = 1, IncFII plasmids harboring blaNDM-4 (n = 1 or blaNDM-5 (n = 3, and a multireplicon F plasmid harboring blaNDM-5 (n = 1. Comparative analysis highlighted the diversity of the blaNDM-harboring plasmids and their distinct characteristics, which depended on plasmid replicon types. The results indicate circulation of phylogenetically distinct strains of carbapenem-resistant E. coli with various plasmids harboring blaNDM genes in the hospital.

  7. Genetic characterization of blaNDM-harboring plasmids in carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli from Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Yo; Akeda, Yukihiro; Sakamoto, Noriko; Takeuchi, Dan; Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Hagiya, Hideharu; Yamamoto, Norihisa; Nishi, Isao; Yoshida, Hisao; Okada, Kazuhisa; Zin, Khwar Nyo; Aye, Mya Mya; Tomono, Kazunori; Hamada, Shigeyuki

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial enzyme New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase hydrolyzes almost all β-lactam antibiotics, including carbapenems, which are drugs of last resort for severe bacterial infections. The spread of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae that carry the New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase gene, blaNDM, poses a serious threat to public health. In this study, we genetically characterized eight carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from a tertiary care hospital in Yangon, Myanmar. The eight isolates belonged to five multilocus-sequence types and harbored multiple antimicrobial-resistance genes, resulting in resistance against nearly all of the antimicrobial agents tested, except colistin and fosfomycin. Nine plasmids harboring blaNDM genes were identified from these isolates. Multiple blaNDM genes were found in the distinct Inc-replicon types of the following plasmids: an IncA/C2 plasmid harboring blaNDM-1 (n = 1), IncX3 plasmids harboring blaNDM-4 (n = 2) or blaNDM-7 (n = 1), IncFII plasmids harboring blaNDM-4 (n = 1) or blaNDM-5 (n = 3), and a multireplicon F plasmid harboring blaNDM-5 (n = 1). Comparative analysis highlighted the diversity of the blaNDM-harboring plasmids and their distinct characteristics, which depended on plasmid replicon types. The results indicate circulation of phylogenetically distinct strains of carbapenem-resistant E. coli with various plasmids harboring blaNDM genes in the hospital.

  8. Detection and Genetic Characterization of Lineage IV Peste Des Petits Ruminant Virus in Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, R A; Orynbayev, M B; Sultankulova, K T; Strochkov, V M; Omarova, Z D; Shalgynbayev, E K; Rametov, N M; Sansyzbay, A R; Parida, S

    2015-10-01

    Peste des petits ruminant (PPR) is endemic in many Asian countries with expansion of the range in recent years including across China during 2013-2014 (OIE, 2014). Till the end of 2014, no cases of PPR virus (PPRV) were officially reported to the Office Internationale des Epizooties (OIE) from Kazakhstan. This study describes for the first time clinicopathological, epidemiological and genetic characterization of PPRV in 3 farm level outbreaks reported for the first time in Zhambyl region (oblast), southern Kazakhstan. Phylogenetic analysis based on partial N gene sequence data confirms the lineage IV PPRV circulation, similar to the virus that recently circulated in China. The isolated viruses are 99.5-99.7% identical to the PPRV isolated in 2014 from Heilongjiang Province in China and therefore providing evidence of transboundary spread of PPRV. There is a risk of further maintenance of virus in young stock despite vaccination of adult sheep and goats, along livestock trade and pastoral routes, threatening both small livestock and endangered susceptible wildlife populations throughout Kazakhstan. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Genetic characterization of Amazonian bovine papillomavirus reveals the existence of four new putative types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Flavio R C; Daudt, Cíntia; Streck, André F; Weber, Matheus N; Filho, Ronaldo V Leite; Driemeier, David; Canal, Cláudio W

    2015-08-01

    Papillomaviruses are small and complex viruses that belong to the Papillomaviridae family, which comprises 39 genera. The bovine papillomavirus (BPV) causes an infectious disease that is characterized by chronic and proliferative benign tumors that affect cattle worldwide. Different genotypes of BPVs can cause distinct skin and mucosal lesions and the immunity they raise has low cross-protection. This report aimed to genotype BPVs in cattle from Northern Brazil based on nucleotide partial sequences of the L1 ORF. Skin wart samples from 39 bovines clinically and histopathologically diagnosed as cutaneous papillomatosis from Acre and Rondônia States were analyzed. The results revealed four already reported BPV types (BPVs 1, 2, 11, and 13), nine putative new BPV subtypes and four putative new BPV types as well as two putative new BPV types that were already reported. To our knowledge, this is the first record of BPVs from the Brazilian Amazon region that identified new possible BPV types and subtypes circulating in this population. These findings point to the great genetic diversity of BPVs that are present in this region and highlight the importance of this knowledge before further studies about vaccination are attempted.

  10. Genetic characterization of five powdery mildew disease resistance loci in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, L; Somerville, S C

    1996-03-01

    This paper reports on six Arabidopsis accessions that show resistance to a wild isolate of the powdery mildew pathogen, Erysiphe cichoracearum. Resistance at 7 days post-inoculation in these accessions was characterized by limited fungal growth and sporadic development of chlorotic or necrotic lesions at inoculation sites. Three accessions, Wa-1, Kas-1 and SI-0, were highly resistant, while the other accessions permitted some fungal growth and conidiation. Papilla formation was a frequent host response; however, cell death appeared to be neither a rapid nor a common response to infection. To determine the genetic basis of resistance, segregation analyses of progeny from crosses between each of the resistant accessions and Columbia (gl1), which is susceptible to the powdery mildew pathogen, were performed. For all accessions except Sl-0, resistance was conferred by a single locus. Sl-0 was unique in that two unlinked loci controlled the disease reaction phenotype. In accessions Wa-1, Kas-1, Stw-0 and Su-0, powdery mildew resistance was encoded by a semi-dominant allele. However, susceptibility was dominant to resistance in accessions Te-0 and Sl-0. Mapping studies revealed that powdery mildew resistances in Kas-1, Wa-1, Te-0, Su-0 and Stw-0 were controlled by five independent loci. This study suggests that the Arabidopsis powdery mildew disease will be a suitable model system in which to investigate powdery mildew diseases.

  11. Molecular prevalence and genetic characterization of piroplasms in dogs from Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rjeibi, Mohamed R; Amairia, Safa; Rouatbi, Mariem; Ben Salem, Fatma; Mabrouk, Moez; Gharbi, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the prevalence of piroplasms in dogs was assessed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to identify Babesia and Theileria species in 200 dogs from Northern and Central Tunisia between spring and autumn 2014. The overall molecular prevalence for piroplasms was 14·5% ± 0·05 (29/200); PCR detected 2 species, namely Babesia vogeli and Theileria annulata with an overall prevalence of 12·5 ± 0·04 and 2% ± 0·02, respectively. No differences in the molecular prevalences of B. vogeli were revealed for age and sex (P > 0·05). The molecular prevalence of B. vogeli was significantly higher in central Tunisia (26·5% ± 0·01) compared with the North (9·6% ± 0·04) (P 0·05). Comparison of the partial sequences of 18S rRNA and Tams 1 genes confirmed the presence of 2 novel B. vogeli and T. annulata genotypes. This is the first molecular detection of T. annulata and genetic characterization of dogs' piroplasms in Tunisia. Further studies are needed to better assess the epidemiological feature of piroplasms infection in North Africa.

  12. Genetic characterization of hybridization between native and invasive bittersweet vines (Celastrus spp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaya, David N.; Leicht-Young, Stacey A.; Pavlovic, Noel B.; Feldheim, Kevin A.; Ashley, Mary V.

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization associated with species introductions can accelerate the decline of native species. The main objective of this study was to determine if the decline of a North American liana (American bittersweet, Celastrus scandens) in the eastern portion of its range is related to hybridization with an introduced congener (oriental bittersweet, C. orbiculatus). We used newly characterized microsatellite loci, a maternally-inherited chloroplast DNA marker, and field observation to survey individuals across the USA to determine the prevalence of hybrids, their importance in the invasion of C. orbiculatus, and the predominant direction of hybridization. We found that only 8.4 % of non-native genotypes were hybrids (20 of 239), and these hybrids were geographically widespread. Hybrids showed reduced seed set (decline of >98 %) and small, likely inviable pollen. Genetic analysis of a maternally inherited chloroplast marker showed that all 20 identified hybrids came from C. scandens seed parents. The strong asymmetry in pollen flow that favors fecundity in introduced males has the potential to greatly accelerate the decline of native species by wasting limited female reproductive effort.

  13. Characterizing ligand-gated ion channel receptors with genetically encoded Ca2++ sensors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G Yamauchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a cell based system and experimental approach to characterize agonist and antagonist selectivity for ligand-gated ion channels (LGIC by developing sensor cells stably expressing a Ca(2+ permeable LGIC and a genetically encoded Förster (or fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET-based calcium sensor. In particular, we describe separate lines with human α7 and human α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, mouse 5-HT(3A serotonin receptors and a chimera of human α7/mouse 5-HT(3A receptors. Complete concentration-response curves for agonists and Schild plots of antagonists were generated from these sensors and the results validate known pharmacology of the receptors tested. Concentration-response relations can be generated from either the initial rate or maximal amplitudes of FRET-signal. Although assaying at a medium throughput level, this pharmacological fluorescence detection technique employs a clonal line for stability and has versatility for screening laboratory generated congeners as agonists or antagonists on multiple subtypes of ligand-gated ion channels. The clonal sensor lines are also compatible with in vivo usage to measure indirectly receptor activation by endogenous neurotransmitters.

  14. Genetic characterization of a VanG-type vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium clinical isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Mohamed; Guérin, François; Lesec, Léonie; Isnard, Christophe; Fines-Guyon, Marguerite; Cattoir, Vincent; Giard, Jean-Christophe

    2018-01-16

    To characterize, phenotypically and genotypically, the first Enterococcus faecium clinical isolate harbouring a vanG operon. The antibiotic resistance profile of E. faecium 16-346 was determined and its whole genome sequenced using PacBio technology. Attempts to transfer vancomycin resistance by filter mating were performed and the inducibility of expression of the vanG operon was studied by reverse-transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) in the presence or absence of subinhibitory concentrations of vancomycin. E. faecium 16-346 was resistant to rifampicin (MIC >4 mg/L), erythromycin (MIC >4 mg/L), tetracycline (MIC >16 mg/L) and vancomycin (MIC 8 mg/L), but susceptible to teicoplanin (MIC 0.5 mg/L). The strain harboured the vanG operon in its chromosome, integrated in a 45.5 kb putative mobile genetic element, similar to that of Enterococcus faecalis BM4518. We were unable to transfer vancomycin resistance from E. faecium 16-346 to E. faecium BM4107 and E. faecalis JH2-2. Lastly, transcription of the vanG gene was inducible by vancomycin. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report of a VanG-type vancomycin-resistant strain of E. faecium. Despite the alarm pulled because of the therapeutic problems caused by VRE, our work shows that new resistant loci can still be found in E. faecium.

  15. Molecular characterization and genetic susceptibility of sapovirus in children with diarrhea in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matussek, Andreas; Dienus, Olaf; Djeneba, Ouermi; Simpore, Jacques; Nitiema, Leon; Nordgren, Johan

    2015-06-01

    Sapoviruses (SaVs) are a common cause of gastroenteritis in children. In sub-Saharan Africa, there is a scarcity of information regarding SaV as an etiological agent of diarrhea. Here, we investigated the prevalence, molecular characterization and clinico-epidemiological features of SaV infections in children less than 5years of age with diarrhea in Burkina Faso. We further investigated the role of type 1 histo blood group antigens as susceptibility factors. In total, 309 fecal and 208 saliva samples from diarrheal children in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, were collected between May 2009 and March 2010. SaV was detected using real-time PCR, and genogrouped/genotyped by PCR or sequencing. Saliva samples were ABO, Lewis and secretor phenotyped using in house ELISA assays. We found a high prevalence (18%) and large genetic diversity with all 4 human genogroups, and 9 genotypes/genoclusters circulating during the study period. The SaV infections were generally associated with milder symptoms, and neither ABH, Lewis or secretor phenotypes affected susceptibility to SaV infections. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. [Genetic characterization of Vibrio parahaemolyticus O3: K6 serovariant isolated in Shenzhen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Changyan; Yu, Muhua; Huang, Ruimin; Luo, Jinyan; Duan, Yongxiang

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the O3: K6 serovariant of Vibrio parahaemolyticus on virulence gene and molecular typing, and analyze the genetic relationship between O3: K6 and O3: K6 serovariants. PFGE was performed on 115 strains of V.parahaemolyticus which were collected from the anal swab of cases of foodbrone diseases in Shenzhen during 2006-2012. According to isolation times and locations, 7 strains of O3: K6 were selected as control strains. Tdh gene, trh gene, orf8 gene were detected, GS-PCR, multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) were used to chracterize 7 strains of O3: K6 and O3: K6 serovariants. PFGE indicated that 58.3% (67/115) of V. parahaemolyticus strains shared a high similarity of band pattern (similarity > 80%) , which comprised of O3: K6 (44/67), O1: KUT(4/67), and O3: K6 serovariants(19/67). Among the O3: K6 serovariants, O1: K25 accounted for 7% (5/67), O4: K68 accounted for 10% (7 /67), O11: K36 accounted for 10% (7 /67). They all carried both tdh and trh gene, and 53% (10/19) was GS-PCR positive and carried orf8 gene, 26% (5/19) was both GS-PCR and orf8 gene negative, 21% (4/19) was GS-PCR negative, orf8 gene positive, 89% (17/19) was assigned to ST-3, 11% (2/19) was assigned to ST-305. Seven strains of O3: K6 was GS-PCR positive, carried orf8 gene, assigned to ST-3. ST-305 and ST-3 had differences in 2 housekeeping genes, which was dtdS gene and pntA gene. In the 305th base of dtdS gene, ST-305(147 allele profile) was T, while ST-3(4 allele profile) was C. In the 33th base of pntA gene, ST-305(93 allele profile) was T, while ST-3(29 allele profile ) was C. O4: K68,O1: K25 and O11: K36 were highly similar in virulencec gene carriage, MLST type of O3: K6, and aslo shared a close genetic relationship with O3: K6, thus were considered as O3: K6 serovirants.

  17. Genetic characterization of the inducible SOS-like system of Bacillus subtilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, P.E.; Yasbin, R.E.

    1984-12-01

    The SOS-like system of Bacillus subtilis consists of several coordinately induced phenomena which are expressed after cellular insult such as DNA damage of inhibition of DNA replication. Mutagenesis of the bacterial chromosomes and the development of maintenance of competence also appear to be involved in the SOS-like response in this bacterium. The genetic characterization of the SOS-like system has involved an analysis of (i) the effects of various DNA repair mutations on the expression of inducible phenomena and (ii) the tsi-23 mutation, which renders host strains thermally inducible for each of the SOS-like functions. Bacterial filamentation was unaffected by any of the DNA repair mutations studied. In contrast, the induction of prophage after thermal or UV pretreatment was abolished in strains carrying the recE4, recA1, recB2, or recG13 mutation. The Weigle reactivation of UV-damaged bacteriophage was also inhibited by the recE4, recA1, recB2, or recG13 mutation, whereas levels of Weigle reactivation were lower in strains which carried the uvrA42, polA5, or rec-961 mutation than in the DNA repair-proficient strain. Strains which carried the recE4 mutation were incapable of chromosomal DNA-mediated transformation, and the frequency of this event was decreased in strains carrying recA1, recB2, or tsi-23 mutation. Plasmid DNA transformation efficiency was decreased only in strains carrying the tsi-23 mutation in addition to the recE4, recA1, or recB2 mutation. The results indicate that the SOS-like system of B. subtilis is regulated at different levels by two or more gene products. In this report, the current data regarding the genetic regulation of inducible phenomena are summarized, and a model is proposed to explain the mechanism of SOS-like induction in B. subtillis. 50 references, 3 figures, 6 tables.

  18. Genetic characterization of Hawaiian isolates of Plasmodium relictum reveals mixed-genotype infections

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    Atkinson Carter T

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relatively recent introduction of a highly efficient mosquito vector and an avian pathogen (Plasmodium relictum to an isolated island ecosystem with naïve, highly susceptible avian hosts provides a unique opportunity to investigate evolution of virulence in a natural system. Mixed infections can significantly contribute to the uncertainty in host-pathogen dynamics with direct impacts on virulence. Toward further understanding of how host-parasite and parasite-parasite relationships may impact virulence, this study characterizes within-host diversity of malaria parasite populations based on genetic analysis of the trap (thrombospondin-related anonymous protein gene in isolates originating from Hawaii, Maui and Kauai Islands. Methods A total of 397 clones were produced by nested PCR amplification and cloning of a 1664 bp fragment of the trap gene from two malarial isolates, K1 (Kauai and KV115 (Hawaii that have been used for experimental studies, and from additional isolates from wild birds on Kauai, Maui and Hawaii Islands. Diversity of clones was evaluated initially by RFLP-based screening, followed by complete sequencing of 33 selected clones. Results RFLP analysis of trap revealed a minimum of 28 distinct RFLP haplotypes among the 397 clones from 18 birds. Multiple trap haplotypes were detected in every bird evaluated, with an average of 5.9 haplotypes per bird. Overall diversity did not differ between the experimental isolates, however, a greater number of unique haplotypes were detected in K1 than in KV115. We detected high levels of clonal diversity with clear delineation between isolates K1 and KV115 in a haplotype network. The patterns of within-host haplotype clustering are consistent with the possibility of a clonal genetic structure and rapid within-host mutation after infection. Conclusion Avian malaria (P. relictum and Avipoxvirus are the significant infectious diseases currently affecting the native Hawaiian

  19. Genetic characterization of Hawaiian isolates of Plasmodium relictum reveals mixed-genotype infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvi, S.I.; Farias, M.E.M.; Atkinson, C.T.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The relatively recent introduction of a highly efficient mosquito vector and an avian pathogen (Plasmodium relictum) to an isolated island ecosystem with nai??ve, highly susceptible avian hosts provides a unique opportunity to investigate evolution of virulence in a natural system. Mixed infections can significantly contribute to the uncertainty in host-pathogen dynamics with direct impacts on virulence. Toward further understanding of how host-parasite and parasite-parasite relationships may impact virulence, this study characterizes within-host diversity of malaria parasite populations based on genetic analysis of the trap (thrombospondin-related anonymous protein) gene in isolates originating from Hawaii, Maui and Kauai Islands. Methods: A total of 397 clones were produced by nested PCR amplification and cloning of a 1664 bp fragment of the trap gene from two malarial isolates, K1 (Kauai) and KV115 (Hawaii) that have been used for experimental studies, and from additional isolates from wild birds on Kauai, Maui and Hawaii Islands. Diversity of clones was evaluated initially by RFLP-based screening, followed by complete sequencing of 33 selected clones. Results: RFLP analysis of trap revealed a minimum of 28 distinct RFLP haplotypes among the 397 clones from 18 birds. Multiple trap haplotypes were detected in every bird evaluated, with an average of 5.9 haplotypes per bird. Overall diversity did not differ between the experimental isolates, however, a greater number of unique haplotypes were detected in K1 than in KV115. We detected high levels of clonal diversity with clear delineation between isolates K1 and KV115 in a haplotype network. The patterns of within-host haplotype clustering are consistent with the possibility of a clonal genetic structure and rapid within-host mutation after infection. Conclusion: Avian malaria (P. relictum) and Avipoxvirus are the significant infectious diseases currently affecting the native Hawaiian avifauna. This

  20. POPULATION FREQUENCIES OF THE TRIALLELIC 5HTTLPR IN SIX ETHNICIALLY DIVERSE SAMPLES FROM NORTH AMERICA, SOUTHEAST ASIA, AND AFRICA

    OpenAIRE

    Haberstick, Brett C.; Smolen, Andrew; Williams, Redford B.; Bishop, George D.; Foshee, Vangie A.; Thornberry, Terence P; Conger, Rand; Siegler, Ilene C.; Zhang, Xiaodong; Boardman, Jason D; Frajzyngier, Zygmunt; Stallings, Michael C.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Halpern, Carolyn T.; Harris, Kathleen Mullan

    2015-01-01

    Genetic differences between populations are a potentially an important contributor to health disparities around the globe. As differences in gene frequencies influence study design, it is important to have a thorough understanding of the natural variation of the genetic variant(s) of interest. Along these lines, we characterized the variation of the 5HTTLPR and rs25531 polymorphisms in six samples from North America, Southeast Asia, and Africa (Cameroon) that differ in their racial and ethnic...

  1. A longitudinal cline characterizes the genetic structure of human populations in the Tibetan plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Benjamin M.; Basnyat, Buddha; Neupane, Maniraj; Beall, Cynthia M.; Childs, Geoff; Craig, Sienna R.; Novembre, John; Di Rienzo, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Indigenous populations of the Tibetan plateau have attracted much attention for their good performance at extreme high altitude. Most genetic studies of Tibetan adaptations have used genetic variation data at the genome scale, while genetic inferences about their demography and population structure are largely based on uniparental markers. To provide genome-wide information on population structure, we analyzed new and published data of 338 individuals from indigenous populations across the plateau in conjunction with worldwide genetic variation data. We found a clear signal of genetic stratification across the east-west axis within Tibetan samples. Samples from more eastern locations tend to have higher genetic affinity with lowland East Asians, which can be explained by more gene flow from lowland East Asia onto the plateau. Our findings corroborate a previous report of admixture signals in Tibetans, which were based on a subset of the samples analyzed here, but add evidence for isolation by distance in a broader geospatial context. PMID:28448508

  2. Microphysical characterization of long-range transported biomass burning particles from North America at three EARLINET stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Amezcua, Pablo; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; José Granados-Muñoz, María; Benavent-Oltra, José Antonio; Böckmann, Christine; Samaras, Stefanos; Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Janicka, Łucja; Baars, Holger; Bohlmann, Stephanie; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas

    2017-05-01

    Strong events of long-range transported biomass burning aerosol were detected during July 2013 at three EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network) stations, namely Granada (Spain), Leipzig (Germany) and Warsaw (Poland). Satellite observations from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) instruments, as well as modeling tools such as HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) and NAAPS (Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System), have been used to estimate the sources and transport paths of those North American forest fire smoke particles. A multiwavelength Raman lidar technique was applied to obtain vertically resolved particle optical properties, and further inversion of those properties with a regularization algorithm allowed for retrieving microphysical information on the studied particles. The results highlight the presence of smoke layers of 1-2 km thickness, located at about 5 km a.s.l. altitude over Granada and Leipzig and around 2.5 km a.s.l. at Warsaw. These layers were intense, as they accounted for more than 30 % of the total AOD (aerosol optical depth) in all cases, and presented optical and microphysical features typical for different aging degrees: color ratio of lidar ratios (LR532 / LR355) around 2, α-related ångström exponents of less than 1, effective radii of 0.3 µm and large values of single scattering albedos (SSA), nearly spectrally independent. The intensive microphysical properties were compared with columnar retrievals form co-located AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) stations. The intensity of the layers was also characterized in terms of particle volume concentration, and then an experimental relationship between this magnitude and the particle extinction coefficient was established.

  3. Genetic characterization of psp encoding the DING protein in Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25

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    Zhang Xue-Xian

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DING proteins constitute a conserved and broadly distributed set of proteins found in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals (including humans. Characterization of DING proteins from animal and plant tissues indicated ligand-binding ability suggesting a role for DING proteins in cell signaling and biomineralization. Surprisingly, the genes encoding DING proteins in eukaryotes have not been identified in the eukaryotic genome or EST databases. Recent discovery of a DING homologue (named Psp here in the genome of Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 provided a unique opportunity to investigate the physiological roles of DING proteins. P. fluorescens SBW25 is a model bacterium that can efficiently colonize plant surfaces and enhance plant health. In this report we genetically characterize Psp with a focus on conditions under which psp is expressed and the protein exported. Results Psp is closely related to the periplasmic Pi binding component of the ABC-type phosphate transporter system (Pst. psp is flanked by a gene cluster predicted to function as a type II protein secretion system (Hxc. Deletion analysis combined with chromosomally integrated 'lacZ fusions showed that both psp and pstC are induced by Pi limitation and that pstC is required for competitive growth of the bacterium in Pi limited medium. hxcR is not regulated by Pi limitation. Psp was detected (using anti-DING serum in the supernatant of wild-type culture but was greatly reduced in the supernatant of an isogenic strain carrying an hxcR mutation (ΔhxcR. A promoter fusion between hxcR and a promoterless copy of a gene ('dapB essential for growth in the plant environment showed that expression of hxcR is elevated during colonization of sugar beet seedlings. A similar analysis of psp showed that it is not induced in the plant environment. Conclusion Psp gene is expressed under conditions of Pi limitation. It is an exoprotein secreted mainly via the Hxc type II secretion

  4. Genetic characterization of psp encoding the DING protein in Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Xian; Scott, Ken; Meffin, Rebecca; Rainey, Paul B

    2007-12-18

    DING proteins constitute a conserved and broadly distributed set of proteins found in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals (including humans). Characterization of DING proteins from animal and plant tissues indicated ligand-binding ability suggesting a role for DING proteins in cell signaling and biomineralization. Surprisingly, the genes encoding DING proteins in eukaryotes have not been identified in the eukaryotic genome or EST databases. Recent discovery of a DING homologue (named Psp here) in the genome of Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 provided a unique opportunity to investigate the physiological roles of DING proteins. P. fluorescens SBW25 is a model bacterium that can efficiently colonize plant surfaces and enhance plant health. In this report we genetically characterize Psp with a focus on conditions under which psp is expressed and the protein exported. Psp is closely related to the periplasmic Pi binding component of the ABC-type phosphate transporter system (Pst). psp is flanked by a gene cluster predicted to function as a type II protein secretion system (Hxc). Deletion analysis combined with chromosomally integrated 'lacZ fusions showed that both psp and pstC are induced by Pi limitation and that pstC is required for competitive growth of the bacterium in Pi limited medium. hxcR is not regulated by Pi limitation. Psp was detected (using anti-DING serum) in the supernatant of wild-type culture but was greatly reduced in the supernatant of an isogenic strain carrying an hxcR mutation (DeltahxcR). A promoter fusion between hxcR and a promoterless copy of a gene ('dapB) essential for growth in the plant environment showed that expression of hxcR is elevated during colonization of sugar beet seedlings. A similar analysis of psp showed that it is not induced in the plant environment. Psp gene is expressed under conditions of Pi limitation. It is an exoprotein secreted mainly via the Hxc type II secretion system, whose expression is elevated on plant surfaces

  5. Borrelia persica infection in dogs and cats: clinical manifestations, clinicopathological findings and genetic characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baneth, Gad; Nachum-Biala, Yaarit; Halperin, Tamar; Hershko, Yizhak; Kleinerman, Gabriela; Anug, Yigal; Abdeen, Ziad; Lavy, Eran; Aroch, Itamar; Straubinger, Reinhard K

    2016-05-10

    Relapsing fever (RF) is an acute infectious disease caused by arthropod-borne spirochetes of the genus Borrelia. The disease is characterized by recurrent episodes of fever that concur with spirochetemia. The RF borrelioses include louse-borne RF caused by Borrelia recurrentis and tick-borne endemic RF transmitted by argasid soft ticks and caused by several Borrelia spp. such as B. crocidurae, B. coriaceae, B. duttoni, B. hermsii, B. hispanica and B. persica. Human infection with B. persica is transmitted by the soft tick Ornithodoros tholozani and has been reported from Iran, Israel, Egypt, India, and Central Asia. During 2003-2015, five cats and five dogs from northern, central and southern Israel were presented for veterinary care and detected with borrelia spirochetemia by blood smear microscopy. The causative infective agent in these animals was identified and characterized by PCR from blood and sequencing of parts of the flagellin (flab), 16S rRNA and glycerophosphodiester phosphodiestrase (GlpQ) genes. All animals were infected with B. persica genetically identical to the causative agent of human RF. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that DNA sequences from these pet carnivores clustered together with B. persica genotypes I and II from humans and O. tholozani ticks and distinctly from other RF Borrelia spp. The main clinical findings in cats included lethargy, anorexia, anemia in 5/5 cats and thrombocytopenia in 4/5. All dogs were lethargic and anorectic, 4/5 were febrile and anemic and 3/5 were thrombocytopenic. Three dogs were co-infected with Babesia spp. The animals were all treated with antibiotics and the survival rate of both dogs and cats was 80 %. The cat and dog that succumbed to disease died one day after the initiation of antibiotic treatment, while survival in the others was followed by the rapid disappearance of spirochetemia. This is the first report of disease due to B. persica infection in cats and the first case series in dogs. Infection was

  6. Genetic characterization of fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli associated with bovine mastitis in India

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    Sangeetha Balakrishnan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken to characterize the mutation in gyrA (DNA gyrase and parC (topoisomerase IV genes responsible for fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli isolates associated with the bovine mastitis. Materials and Methods: A total of 92 milk samples from bovine mastitis cases were sampled in and around Puducherry (Southern India. Among these samples, 30 isolates were bacteriologically characterized as E. coli. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC of fluoroquinolones of these 30 E. coli isolates were evaluated by resazurin microtiter assay. Then, the quinolone resistance determining region (QRDR (gyrA and parC genes of these E. coli isolates was genetically analyzed for determining the chromosomal mutation causing fluoroquinolone resistance. Results: E. coli isolates showed a resistance rate of 63.33%, 23.33% and 30.03% to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin, respectively. Mutations were found at 83rd and 87th amino acid position of gyrA gene, and at 80th and 108th amino acid position of parC gene in our study isolates. Among these five isolates, one had a single mutation at 83 amino acid position of gyrA with reduced susceptibility (0.5 μg/ml to ciprofloxacin. Then, in remaining four isolates, three isolates showed triple mutation (at gyrA: S83gL and D87gN; at parC: S80gI and the fifth isolate showed an additional mutation at codon 108 of parC (A108gT with the increased ciprofloxacin MIC of 16-128 μg/ml. The most common mutation noticed were at S83gL and D87gN of gyrA and S80gI of ParC. Conclusion: The study confirms the presence of mutation/s responsible for fluoroquinolone resistance in QRDR of gyrA and parC genes of E. coli isolates of animal origin, and there is increased rate of fluoroquinolone resistance with high-level of MIC. The mutations observed in this study were similar to that of human isolates.

  7. Isolation and characterization of renal erythropoietin-producing cells from genetically produced anemia mice.

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    Xiaoqing Pan

    Full Text Available Understanding the nature of renal erythropoietin-producing cells (REPs remains a central challenge for elucidating the mechanisms involved in hypoxia and/or anemia-induced erythropoietin (Epo production in adult mammals. Previous studies have shown that REPs are renal peritubular cells, but further details are lacking. Here, we describe an approach to isolate and characterize REPs. We bred mice bearing an Epo gene allele to which green fluorescent protein (GFP reporter cDNA was knocked-in (Epo(GFP with mice bearing an Epo gene allele lacking the 3' enhancer (Epo(Δ3'E. Mice harboring the mutant Epo(GFP/Δ3'E gene exhibited anemia (average Hematocrit 18% at 4 to 6 days after birth, and this perinatal anemia enabled us to identify and purify REPs based on GFP expression from the kidney. Light and confocal microscopy revealed that GFP immunostaining was confined to fibroblastic cells that reside in the peritubular interstitial space, confirming our previous observation in Epo-GFP transgenic reporter assays. Flow cytometry analyses revealed that the GFP fraction constitutes approximately 0.2% of the whole kidney cells and 63% of GFP-positive cells co-express CD73 (a marker for cortical fibroblasts and Epo-expressing cells in the kidney. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses confirmed that Epo expression was increased by approximately 100-fold in the purified population of REPs compared with that of the unsorted cells or CD73-positive fraction. Gene expression analyses showed enrichment of Hif2α and Hif3α mRNA in the purified population of REPs. The genetic approach described here provides a means to isolate a pure population of REPs, allowing the analysis of gene expression of a defined population of cells essential for Epo production in the kidney. This has provided evidence that positive regulation by HIF2α and negative regulation by HIF3α might be necessary for correct renal Epo induction.

  8. Genome characterization and population genetic structure of the zoonotic pathogen, Streptococcus canis

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    Richards Vincent P

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus canis is an important opportunistic pathogen of dogs and cats that can also infect a wide range of additional mammals including cows where it can cause mastitis. It is also an emerging human pathogen. Results Here we provide characterization of the first genome sequence for this species, strain FSL S3-227 (milk isolate from a cow with an intra-mammary infection. A diverse array of putative virulence factors was encoded by the S. canis FSL S3-227 genome. Approximately 75% of these gene sequences were homologous to known Streptococcal virulence factors involved in invasion, evasion, and colonization. Present in the genome are multiple potentially mobile genetic elements (MGEs [plasmid, phage, integrative conjugative element (ICE] and comparison to other species provided convincing evidence for lateral gene transfer (LGT between S. canis and two additional bovine mastitis causing pathogens (Streptococcus agalactiae, and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae, with this transfer possibly contributing to host adaptation. Population structure among isolates obtained from Europe and USA [bovine = 56, canine = 26, and feline = 1] was explored. Ribotyping of all isolates and multi locus sequence typing (MLST of a subset of the isolates (n = 45 detected significant differentiation between bovine and canine isolates (Fisher exact test: P = 0.0000 [ribotypes], P = 0.0030 [sequence types], suggesting possible host adaptation of some genotypes. Concurrently, the ancestral clonal complex (54% of isolates occurred in many tissue types, all hosts, and all geographic locations suggesting the possibility of a wide and diverse niche. Conclusion This study provides evidence highlighting the importance of LGT in the evolution of the bacteria S. canis, specifically, its possible role in host adaptation and acquisition of virulence factors. Furthermore, recent LGT detected between S. canis and human

  9. Genome characterization and population genetic structure of the zoonotic pathogen, Streptococcus canis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Vincent P; Zadoks, Ruth N; Pavinski Bitar, Paulina D; Lefébure, Tristan; Lang, Ping; Werner, Brenda; Tikofsky, Linda; Moroni, Paolo; Stanhope, Michael J

    2012-12-18

    Streptococcus canis is an important opportunistic pathogen of dogs and cats that can also infect a wide range of additional mammals including cows where it can cause mastitis. It is also an emerging human pathogen. Here we provide characterization of the first genome sequence for this species, strain FSL S3-227 (milk isolate from a cow with an intra-mammary infection). A diverse array of putative virulence factors was encoded by the S. canis FSL S3-227 genome. Approximately 75% of these gene sequences were homologous to known Streptococcal virulence factors involved in invasion, evasion, and colonization. Present in the genome are multiple potentially mobile genetic elements (MGEs) [plasmid, phage, integrative conjugative element (ICE)] and comparison to other species provided convincing evidence for lateral gene transfer (LGT) between S. canis and two additional bovine mastitis causing pathogens (Streptococcus agalactiae, and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae), with this transfer possibly contributing to host adaptation. Population structure among isolates obtained from Europe and USA [bovine = 56, canine = 26, and feline = 1] was explored. Ribotyping of all isolates and multi locus sequence typing (MLST) of a subset of the isolates (n = 45) detected significant differentiation between bovine and canine isolates (Fisher exact test: P = 0.0000 [ribotypes], P = 0.0030 [sequence types]), suggesting possible host adaptation of some genotypes. Concurrently, the ancestral clonal complex (54% of isolates) occurred in many tissue types, all hosts, and all geographic locations suggesting the possibility of a wide and diverse niche. This study provides evidence highlighting the importance of LGT in the evolution of the bacteria S. canis, specifically, its possible role in host adaptation and acquisition of virulence factors. Furthermore, recent LGT detected between S. canis and human bacteria (Streptococcus urinalis) is cause for concern

  10. Genetic relatedness and molecular characterization of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolated in central Ohio, USA

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    Tadesse Daniel

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last decade, nosocomial infections due to Acinetobacter baumannii have been described with an increasing trend towards multidrug resistance, mostly in intensive care units. The aim of the present study was to determine the clonal relatedness of clinical isolates and to elucidate the genetic basis of imipenem resistance. Methods A. baumannii isolates (n = 83 originated from two hospital settings in central Ohio were used in this study. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis genotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility testing for clinically relevant antimicrobials were performed. Resistance determinants were characterized by using different phenotypic (accumulation assay for efflux and genotypic (PCR, DNA sequencing, plasmid analysis and electroporation approaches. Results The isolates were predominantly multidrug resistant (>79.5% and comprised of thirteen unique pulsotypes, with genotype VII circulating in both hospitals. The presence of blaOXA-23 in 13% (11/83 and ISAba1 linked blaOXA-66 in 79.5% (66/83 of clinical isolates was associated with high level imipenem resistance. In this set of OXA producing isolates, multidrug resistance was bestowed by blaADC-25, class 1 integron-borne aminoglycoside modifying enzymes, presence of sense mutations in gyrA/parC and involvement of active efflux (with evidence for the presence of adeB efflux gene. Conclusion This study underscores the major role of carbapenem-hydrolyzing class D β-lactamases, and in particular the acquired OXA-23, in the dissemination of imipenem-resistant A. baumannii. The co-occurrence of additional resistance determinant could also be a significant threat.

  11. Genetic Characterization of Brain Metastases in the Era of Targeted Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine H. Han

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the current era of molecularly targeted therapies and precision medicine, choice of cancer treatment has been increasingly tailored according to the molecular or genomic characterization of the cancer the individual has. Previously, the clinical observation of inadequate control of brain metastases was widely attributed to a lack of central nervous system (CNS penetration of the anticancer drugs. However, more recent data have suggested that there are genetic explanations for such observations. Genomic analyses of brain metastases and matching primary tumor and other extracranial metastases have revealed that brain metastases can harbor potentially actionable driver mutations that are unique to them. Identification of genomic alterations specific to brain metastases and targeted therapies against these mutations represent an important research area to potentially improve survival outcomes for patients who develop brain metastases. Novel approaches in genomic testing such as that using cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF facilitate advancing our understanding of the genomics of brain metastases, which is critical for precision medicine. CSF-derived ctDNA sequencing may be particularly useful in patients who are unfit for surgical resection or have multiple brain metastases, which can harbor mutations that are distinct from their primary tumors. Compared to the traditional chemotherapeutics, novel targeted agents appear to be more effective in controlling the CNS disease with better safety profiles. Several brain metastases-dedicated trials of various targeted therapies are currently underway to address the role of these agents in the treatment of CNS disease. This review focuses on recent advances in genomic profiling of brain metastases and current knowledge of targeted therapies in the management of brain metastases from cancers of the breast, lung, colorectum, kidneys, and ovaries as well as melanoma.

  12. Seroprevalence and genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii in three species of pet birds in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Wei; Meng, Qing-Feng; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Huang, Si-Yang; Qian, Ai-Dong; Su, Chunlei; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2014-04-01

    Toxoplasmosis, caused by the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, is one of the most common zoonosis worldwide, affecting a wide range of warm-blooded mammals and birds worldwide. However, no information on T. gondii infection in pet birds in China is available. Therefore, this study was performed to determine the prevalence of T. gondii infection in pet birds in Gansu province, China. A total of 687 blood samples were collected from pet birds (Carduelis spinus, Alauda gulgula, Cocothraustes migratorlus) in three representative administrative regions in Gansu province, northwest China between August 2011 and September 2012 T. gondii antibodies were determined using the modified agglutination test (MAT). Genomic DNA was extracted from the brain tissues of seropositive pet birds and T. gondii B1 gene was amplified using a semi-nested PCR.DNA samples giving positive B1 amplification were then genetically characterized using multi-locus PCR-RFLP. The overall T. gondii seroprevalence was 11.21% (77/687). C. spinus had the highest T. gondii seroprevalence (11.65%), followed by A. arvensis (11.39%) and C. migratorlus (5.26%), these differences were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Of 77 DNA samples, 8 were positive for the T. gondii B1 gene, four showed complete genotyping results. Only one genotype (the Type II variant: ToxoDB genotype #3) was identified. The results of the present survey indicated the presence of T. gondii infection in pet birds in Gansu province, China. These data provide base-line information for the execution of control strategies against T. gondii infection in pet birds. To our knowledge, this is the first report documenting the occurrence of T. gondii prevalence and genotype in pet birds in China.

  13. Genome characterization and population genetic structure of the zoonotic pathogen, Streptococcus canis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Streptococcus canis is an important opportunistic pathogen of dogs and cats that can also infect a wide range of additional mammals including cows where it can cause mastitis. It is also an emerging human pathogen. Results Here we provide characterization of the first genome sequence for this species, strain FSL S3-227 (milk isolate from a cow with an intra-mammary infection). A diverse array of putative virulence factors was encoded by the S. canis FSL S3-227 genome. Approximately 75% of these gene sequences were homologous to known Streptococcal virulence factors involved in invasion, evasion, and colonization. Present in the genome are multiple potentially mobile genetic elements (MGEs) [plasmid, phage, integrative conjugative element (ICE)] and comparison to other species provided convincing evidence for lateral gene transfer (LGT) between S. canis and two additional bovine mastitis causing pathogens (Streptococcus agalactiae, and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae), with this transfer possibly contributing to host adaptation. Population structure among isolates obtained from Europe and USA [bovine = 56, canine = 26, and feline = 1] was explored. Ribotyping of all isolates and multi locus sequence typing (MLST) of a subset of the isolates (n = 45) detected significant differentiation between bovine and canine isolates (Fisher exact test: P = 0.0000 [ribotypes], P = 0.0030 [sequence types]), suggesting possible host adaptation of some genotypes. Concurrently, the ancestral clonal complex (54% of isolates) occurred in many tissue types, all hosts, and all geographic locations suggesting the possibility of a wide and diverse niche. Conclusion This study provides evidence highlighting the importance of LGT in the evolution of the bacteria S. canis, specifically, its possible role in host adaptation and acquisition of virulence factors. Furthermore, recent LGT detected between S. canis and human bacteria (Streptococcus

  14. Molecular Detection and Genetic Characterization of Toxoplasma gondii in Farmed Minks (Neovison vison in Northern China by PCR-RFLP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Bin Zheng

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is a worldwide prevalent parasite, affecting a wide range of mammals and human beings. Little information is available about the distribution of genetic diversity of T. gondii infection in minks (Neovison vison. This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence and genetic characterization of T. gondii isolates from minks in China. A total of 418 minks brain tissue samples were collected from Jilin and Hebei provinces, northern China. Genomic DNA were extracted and assayed for T. gondii infection by semi-nested PCR of B1 gene. The positive DNA samples were typed at 10 genetic markers (SAG1, SAG2 (5'+3' SAG2, alter.SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, and Apico using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP technology. 36 (8.6% of 418 DNA samples were overall positive for T. gondii. Among them, 5 samples were genotyped at all loci, and 1 sample was genotyped for 9 loci. In total, five samples belong to ToxoDB PCR-RFLP genotype#9, one belong to ToxoDB genotye#3. To our knowledge, this is the first report of genetic characterization of T. gondii in minks in China. Meanwhile, these results revealed a distribution of T. gondii infection in minks in China. These data provided base-line information for controlling T. gondii infection in minks.

  15. Molecular Detection and Genetic Characterization of Toxoplasma gondii in Farmed Minks (Neovison vison) in Northern China by PCR-RFLP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wen-Bin; Zhang, Xiao-Xuan; Ma, Jian-Gang; Li, Fa-Cai; Zhao, Quan; Huang, Si-Yang; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a worldwide prevalent parasite, affecting a wide range of mammals and human beings. Little information is available about the distribution of genetic diversity of T. gondii infection in minks (Neovison vison). This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence and genetic characterization of T. gondii isolates from minks in China. A total of 418 minks brain tissue samples were collected from Jilin and Hebei provinces, northern China. Genomic DNA were extracted and assayed for T. gondii infection by semi-nested PCR of B1 gene. The positive DNA samples were typed at 10 genetic markers (SAG1, SAG2 (5'+3' SAG2, alter.SAG2), SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, and Apico) using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technology. 36 (8.6%) of 418 DNA samples were overall positive for T. gondii. Among them, 5 samples were genotyped at all loci, and 1 sample was genotyped for 9 loci. In total, five samples belong to ToxoDB PCR-RFLP genotype#9, one belong to ToxoDB genotye#3. To our knowledge, this is the first report of genetic characterization of T. gondii in minks in China. Meanwhile, these results revealed a distribution of T. gondii infection in minks in China. These data provided base-line information for controlling T. gondii infection in minks.

  16. Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, P. Sarita, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This serial issue features 6 members of the Indiana University System faculty who have focused their research on Latin America, past and present. The first article, "A Literature of Their Own," highlights Darlene Sadlier's research on Brazilian women's fiction and poetry that has led to an interest in the interplay of Brazilian and…

  17. Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Gerald Michael

    1986-01-01

    Notes the problematical elements of diversity within Latin America, establishes priorities for the social studies curriculum, and reviews what should be taught about its geography, resources, people, religion, customs, economics, politics, history, and international relationships. Lists Latin American Studies programs and published instructional…

  18. Illiterate America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozol, Jonathan

    Intended for those involved in American social service and educational communities, this book addresses the widespread problem of illiteracy in the United States and the social consequences of this problem. Following an introduction, the chapters in the first section of the book discuss the growing crisis of illiterate America, specifically, the…

  19. Textbook America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Walter

    1980-01-01

    Focuses on how political attitudes have been influenced by American history textbooks at various times throughout history. Excerpts from traditional and revisionist textbooks are presented, with emphasis on "America Revised" by Frances FitzGerald. Journal available from Harper's Magazine Co., 2 Park Ave., New York, NY 10016. (DB)

  20. Characterization of microsatellites for population genetic analyses of the fungus-growing termite Odontotermes formosanus (Isoptera: Termitidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husseneder, Claudia; Garner, Susan P; Huang, Qiuying; Booth, Warren; Vargo, Edward L

    2013-10-01

    The fungus-growing subterranean termite Odontotermes formosanus Shiraki (Isoptera: Termitidae) is a destructive pest in Southeast Asia. To facilitate studies on the biology, ecology, and control of O. formosanus, we isolated and characterized nine novel microsatellite loci from a mixed partial genomic library of O. formosanus and the sympatric Macrotermes barneyi Light enriched for di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeats. We screened these loci in three populations of O. formosanus from China. All loci were polymorphic. Three loci showed heterozygote deficit possibly because of the presence of null alleles. The remaining six loci with 4-15 alleles per locus and an average observed heterozygosity of 0.15-0.60 across populations were used for population genetic analysis. Populations from different provinces (Guangdong, Jiangxi, and Hubei) were genetically differentiated, but the genetic distance between populations was surprisingly small (FST: 0.03-0.08) and the gene flow was considerable (Nem: 3-8), despite the geographical distance being >300 km. Genetic diversity within populations was low (allelic richness: 5.1-6.3) compared with other subterranean dwelling termites, but consistent with the diversity in species of the family Termitidae. Microsatellite markers developed for O. formosanus will allow further studies to examine the phylogeography, population genetic and colony breeding structure, dispersal ranges, and size of foraging territories in this and closely related species, as well as aid in assessing treatment success.

  1. Characterization of soybean storage and allergen protein affected by environmental and genetic factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowledge of the impact of genetic variability and diverse environments on the protein composition of crop seed is of value for the comparative safety assessments in the development of genetically engineered (GMO) crops. The objective of this study was to determine the role of genotype (G), environ...

  2. Physical and genetic characterization of the IncI plasmid R144-drd3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartskeerl, R.A.; Guchte, M. v.d.; Zuidweg, E.M.; Hoekstra, W.P.M.

    1984-01-01

    A physical and genetic map of the IncI plasmid R144-drd3 was obtained by determining restriction endonuclease sites and by physical and genetic analysis of cloned fragments, of TnI insertion mutants and of deletion mutants.

  3. Characterization of nine microsatellite loci for Dicrocoelium dendriticum, an emerging liver fluke of ungulates in North America, and their use to detect clonemates and random mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Paridon, Bradley J; Goater, Cameron P; Gilleard, John S; Criscione, Charles D

    2016-05-01

    This study characterizes polymorphic microsatellite loci from adults of the liver fluke Dicrocoelium dendriticum sampled from a population of sympatric beef cattle and wapiti in a region of emergence in southern Alberta, Canada. We also scrutinized the markers to validate their use in studying the population genetics of this complex life cycle parasite. Among the nine loci described, four deviated significantly from Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) due to technical artefacts. The remaining five loci were in HWE. These five provided sufficient resolution to identify clonemates produced from the obligate asexual reproduction phase of the life cycle in snails and to assess the impact of non-random transmission of clonemates on measures of FIS, FST and genotypic disequilibrium. Excluding clonemates, we show that the sub-population of worms was in HWE, that average FIS within hosts was 0.003 (p=0.4922) and that there was no population genetic structure among hosts FST=0.001 (p=0.3243). These markers will be useful for studies of Dicrocoelium dendriticum ecology, transmission, and evolution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetic diversity characterization of cassava cultivars (Manihot esculenta Crantz.: I RAPD markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colombo Carlos

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available RAPD markers were used to investigate the genetic diversity of 31 Brazilian cassava clones. The results were compared with the genetic diversity revealed by botanical descriptors. Both sets of variates revealed identical relationships among the cultivars. Multivariate analysis of genetic similarities placed genotypes destinated for consumption "in nature" in one group, and cultivars useful for flour production in another. Brazil?s abundance of landraces presents a broad dispersion and is consequently an important resource of genetic variability. The botanical descriptors were not able to differentiate thirteen pairs of cultivars compared two-by-two, while only one was not differentiated by RAPD markers. These results showed the power of RAPD markers over botanical descriptors in studying genetic diversity, identifying duplicates, as well as validating, or improving a core collection. The latter is particularly important in this vegetatively propagated crop.

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of New World screwworm fly, Cochliomyia hominivorax, suggests genetic isolation of some Caribbean island populations following colonization from South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonagh, L; García, R; Stevens, J R

    2009-06-01

    Larval infestations of the New World screwworm (NWS) fly, Cochliomyia hominivorax, cause considerable economic losses through the direct mortality and reduced production of livestock. Since the 1950s, NWS populations in North and Central America have been the target of virtually continuous eradication attempts by sterile insect technique (SIT). Nevertheless, in some areas, such as Jamaica, SIT-based control programmes have failed. Reasons for the failure of SIT-based programmes in some locations are unknown, but it is hypothesized that failure may be related to the mating incompatibility between sterile and wild flies or to the existence of sexually incompatible cryptic species. Accordingly, the current research investigates intraspecific phylogenetic relationships and associated biogeographic patterns between NWS populations from the Caribbean and South America, which represent those populations involved in, or earmarked for, forthcoming SIT programmes. Uniquely, this study also includes analyses of two North American samples, collected in Texas in 1933 and 1953 prior to initiation of the SIT-based eradication programme. The study utilizes three nucleotide datasets: elongation factor-1alpha (nuclear); cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (mitochondrial), and 12S rRNA (mitochondrial). Phylogenetic analysis of these data, representing populations from across the Caribbean, South America and Texas, indicates sub-structuring of fly populations on several of the larger Caribbean islands, suggesting a period of isolation and/or founder effects following colonization from South America; significantly, our findings do not support a North American origin for Cuban flies. The importance of these findings in the light of proposed SIT programmes in the region is discussed.

  6. Genetic characterization of highly pathogenic avian influenza A H5N8 viruses isolated from wild birds in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandeil, Ahmed; Kayed, Ahmed; Moatasim, Yassmin; Webby, Richard J; McKenzie, Pamela P; Kayali, Ghazi; Ali, Mohamed A

    2017-07-01

    A newly emerged H5N8 influenza virus was isolated from green-winged teal in Egypt during December 2016. In this study, we provide a detailed characterization of full genomes of Egyptian H5N8 viruses and some virological features. Genetic analysis demonstrated that the Egyptian H5N8 viruses are highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the genome of the Egyptian H5N8 viruses was related to recently characterized reassortant H5N8 viruses of clade 2.3.4.4 isolated from different Eurasian countries. Multiple peculiar mutations were characterized in the Egyptian H5N8 viruses, which probably permits transmission and virulence of these viruses in mammals. The Egyptian H5N8 viruses preferentially bound to avian-like receptors rather than human-like receptors. Also, the Egyptian H5N8 viruses were fully sensitive to amantadine and neuraminidase inhibitors. Chicken sera raised against commercial inactivated avian influenza-H5 vaccines showed no or very low reactivity with the currently characterized H5N8 viruses in agreement with the genetic dissimilarity. Surveillance of avian influenza in waterfowl provides early warning of specific threats to poultry and human health and hence should be continued.

  7. Development of molecular tools for characterization and genetic diversity analysis in Tunisian fig (Ficus carica) cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatti, Khaled; Baraket, Ghada; Ben Abdelkrim, Ahmed; Saddoud, Olfa; Mars, Messaoud; Trifi, Mokhtar; Salhi Hannachi, Amel

    2010-10-01

    Fig, Ficus carica L., is a useful genetic resource for commercial cultivation. In this study, RAPD (60), ISSR (48), RAMPO (63), and SSR (34) markers were compared to detect polymorphism and to establish genetic relationships among Tunisian fig tree cultivars. The statistical procedures conducted on the combined data show considerable genetic diversity, and the tested markers discriminated all fig genotypes studied. The identification key established on the basis of SSR permitted the unambiguous discrimination of cultivars and confirmed the reliability of SSR for fingerprinting fig genotypes. The study findings are discussed in relation to the establishment of a national reference collection that will aid in the conservation of Tunisian fig resources.

  8. Genetic and Molecular Characterization of Drosophila Brakeless: A Novel Modifier of Merlin Phenotypes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LaJeunesse, Dennis

    2004-01-01

    .... Using genetic epistasis, we show that Merlin functions upstream of both scribbler and Cyclin E - demonstrating that Merlin is a dominant second site repressor of loss of function phenotypes for Cyclin E...

  9. Genetic characterization of the Neotropical catfish Pimelodus maculatus (Pimelodidae, Siluriformes) in the Upper Uruguay River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribolli, Josiane; de Melo, Cláudio Manoel Rodrigues; Zaniboni-Filho, Evoy

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater fish present unique challenges when one attempts to understand the factors that determine the structure of their populations. Habitat fragmentation is a leading cause of population decline that threatens ecosystems worldwide. In this study, we investigated the conservation status of genetic variability in the Neotropical catfish (Pimelodus maculatus). Specifically, we examined the structure and genetic diversity of this species in a region of the Upper Uruguay River fragmented by natural barriers and dams. There was no genetic structure among the four sites analyzed, indicating the existence of only one population group. A combination of environmental management and genetic monitoring should be used to minimize the impact of impoundment on panmitic populations of migratory fish species. PMID:23271936

  10. Phenotypic characterization and genetic diversity of Flavobacterium columnare isolated from red tilapia, Oreochromis sp. in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavobacterium columnare is the etiologic agent of columnaris disease and severely affects various freshwater aquaculture fish species worldwide. The objectives of this study were to determine the phenotypic characteristics and genetic variability among F. columnare isolates isolated from red tilapi...

  11. Genetic Characterization of chayote, Sechium edule (Jacq) Swartz, in Costa Rica by using isozyme markers

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelnour-Esquivel, Ana; Rocha, Oscar

    2007-01-01

    We established protocols for the analysis of genetic diversity in chayote (Sechium edule) by using isozyme markers, thereby determining the level of genetic diversity present in 42 accessions of chayote from Costa Rica. We obtained clear and reproducible zymograms for eight enzyme staining systems: PGM, 6-PGD, PGI, IDH, MDH, SOD, SKD, and EST, and were able to score 14 putative loci. Eight of the 14 loci examined were polymorphic. We found 35 distinct multilocus genotypes among these accessio...

  12. Genetic characterization of an elite coffee germplasm assessed by gSSR and EST-SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missio, R F; Caixeta, E T; Zambolim, E M; Pena, G F; Zambolim, L; Dias, L A S; Sakiyama, N S

    2011-10-06

    Coffee is one of the main agrifood commodities traded worldwide. In 2009, coffee accounted for 6.1% of the value of Brazilian agricultural production, generating a revenue of US$6 billion. Despite the importance of coffee production in Brazil, it is supported by a narrow genetic base, with few accessions. Molecular differentiation and diversity of a coffee breeding program were assessed with gSSR and EST-SSR markers. The study comprised 24 coffee accessions according to their genetic origin: arabica accessions (six traditional genotypes of C. arabica), resistant arabica (six leaf rust-resistant C. arabica genotypes with introgression of Híbrido de Timor), robusta (five C. canephora genotypes), Híbrido de Timor (three C. arabica x C. canephora), triploids (three C. arabica x C. racemosa), and racemosa (one C. racemosa). Allele and polymorphism analysis, AMOVA, the Student t-test, Jaccard's dissimilarity coefficient, cluster analysis, correlation of genetic distances, and discriminant analysis, were performed. EST-SSR markers gave 25 exclusive alleles per genetic group, while gSSR showed 47, which will be useful for differentiating accessions and for fingerprinting varieties. The gSSR markers detected a higher percentage of polymorphism among (35% higher on average) and within (42.9% higher on average) the genetic groups, compared to EST-SSR markers. The highest percentage of polymorphism within the genetic groups was found with gSSR markers for robusta (89.2%) and for resistant arabica (39.5%). It was possible to differentiate all genotypes including the arabica-related accessions. Nevertheless, combined use of gSSR and EST-SSR markers is recommended for coffee molecular characterization, because EST-SSRs can provide complementary information.

  13. PEER NGA-East Overview: Development of a Ground Motion Characterization Model (Ground Motion Prediction Equations) for Central and Eastern North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulet, C. A.; Abrahamson, N. A.; Al Atik, L.; Atkinson, G. M.; Bozorgnia, Y.; Graves, R. W.; Kuehn, N. M.; Youngs, R. R.

    2017-12-01

    The Next Generation Attenuation project for Central and Eastern North America (CENA), NGA-East, is a major multi-disciplinary project coordinated by the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER). The project was co-sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). NGA-East involved a large number of participating researchers from various organizations in academia, industry and government and was carried-out as a combination of 1) a scientific research project and 2) a model-building component following the NRC Seismic Senior Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 3 process. The science part of the project led to several data products and technical reports while the SSHAC component aggregated the various results into a ground motion characterization (GMC) model. The GMC model consists in a set of ground motion models (GMMs) for median and standard deviation of ground motions and their associated weights, combined into logic-trees for use in probabilistic seismic hazard analyses (PSHA). NGA-East addressed many technical challenges, most of them related to the relatively small number of earthquake recordings available for CENA. To resolve this shortcoming, the project relied on ground motion simulations to supplement the available data. Other important scientific issues were addressed through research projects on topics such as the regionalization of seismic source, path and attenuation of motions, the treatment of variability and uncertainties and on the evaluation of site effects. Seven working groups were formed to cover the complexity and breadth of topics in the NGA-East project, each focused on a specific technical area. This presentation provides an overview of the NGA-East research project and its key products.

  14. Development, characterization and use of genomic SSR markers for assessment of genetic diversity in some Saudi date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L. cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulieman A. Al-Faifi

    2016-05-01

    Conclusions: The developed microsatellite markers are additional values to date palm characterization tools that can be used by researchers in population genetics, cultivar identification as well as genetic resource exploration and management. The tested cultivars exhibited a significant amount of genetic diversity and could be suitable for successful breeding program. Genomic sequences generated from this study are available at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI, Sequence Read Archive (Accession numbers. LIBGSS_039019.

  15. Characterization of the single stranded DNA binding protein SsbB encoded in the Gonoccocal Genetic Island.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samta Jain

    Full Text Available Most strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae carry a Gonococcal Genetic Island which encodes a type IV secretion system involved in the secretion of ssDNA. We characterize the GGI-encoded ssDNA binding protein, SsbB. Close homologs of SsbB are located within a conserved genetic cluster found in genetic islands of different proteobacteria. This cluster encodes DNA-processing enzymes such as the ParA and ParB partitioning proteins, the TopB topoisomerase, and four conserved hypothetical proteins. The SsbB homologs found in these clusters form a family separated from other ssDNA binding proteins.In contrast to most other SSBs, SsbB did not complement the Escherichia coli ssb deletion mutant. Purified SsbB forms a stable tetramer. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and fluorescence titration assays, as well as atomic force microscopy demonstrate that SsbB binds ssDNA specifically with high affinity. SsbB binds single-stranded DNA with minimal binding frames for one or two SsbB tetramers of 15 and 70 nucleotides. The binding mode was independent of increasing Mg(2+ or NaCl concentrations. No role of SsbB in ssDNA secretion or DNA uptake could be identified, but SsbB strongly stimulated Topoisomerase I activity.We propose that these novel SsbBs play an unknown role in the maintenance of genetic islands.

  16. New Genetic Insights into Pearl Millet Diversity As Revealed by Characterization of Early- and Late-Flowering Landraces from Senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oumar Diack

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum (L. R. Br. is a staple food and a drought-tolerant cereal well adapted to Sub-Saharan Africa agro-ecosystems. An important diversity of pearl millet landraces has been widely conserved by farmers and therefore could help copping with climate changes and contribute to future food security. Hence, characterizing its genetic diversity and population structure can contribute to better assist breeding programs for a sustainable agricultural productivity enhancement. Toward this goal, a comprehensive panel of 404 accessions were used that correspond to 12 improved varieties, 306 early flowering and 86 late-flowering cultivated landraces from Senegal. Twelve highly polymorphic SSR markers were used to study diversity and population structure. Two genes, PgMADS11 and PgPHYC, were genotyped to assess their association to flowering phenotypic difference in landraces. Results indicate a large diversity and untapped potential of Senegalese pearl millet germplasm as well as a genetic differentiation between early- and late-flowering landraces. Further, a fine-scale genetic difference of PgPHYC and PgMADS11 (SNP and indel, respectively and co-variation of their alleles with flowering time were found among landraces. These findings highlight new genetic insights of pearl millet useful to define heterotic populations for breeding, genomic association panel, or crosses for trait-specific mapping.

  17. Characterization of the genetic variation present in CYP3A4 in three South African populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drögemöller, Britt; Plummer, Marieth; Korkie, Lundi; Agenbag, Gloudi; Dunaiski, Anke; Niehaus, Dana; Koen, Liezl; Gebhardt, Stefan; Schneider, Nicol; Olckers, Antonel; Wright, Galen; Warnich, Louise

    2013-01-01

    The CYP3A4 enzyme is the most abundant human cytochrome P450 (CYP) and is regarded as the most important enzyme involved in drug metabolism. Inter-individual and inter-population variability in gene expression and enzyme activity are thought to be influenced, in part, by genetic variation. Although Southern African individuals have been shown to exhibit the highest levels of genetic diversity, they have been under-represented in pharmacogenetic research to date. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify genetic variation within CYP3A4 in three South African population groups comprising of 29 Khoisan, 65 Xhosa and 65 Mixed Ancestry (MA) individuals. To identify known and novel CYP3A4 variants, 15 individuals were randomly selected from each of the population groups for bi-directional Sanger sequencing of ~600 bp of the 5′-upstream region and all thirteen exons including flanking intronic regions. Genetic variants detected were genotyped in the rest of the cohort. In total, 24 SNPs were detected, including CYP3A4*12, CYP3A4*15, and the reportedly functional CYP3A4*1B promoter polymorphism, as well as two novel non-synonymous variants. These putatively functional variants, p.R162W and p.Q200H, were present in two of the three populations and all three populations, respectively, and in silico analysis predicted that the former would damage the protein product. Furthermore, the three populations were shown to exhibit distinct genetic profiles. These results confirm that South African populations show unique patterns of variation in the genes encoding xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. This research suggests that population-specific genetic profiles for CYP3A4 and other drug metabolizing genes would be essential to make full use of pharmacogenetics in Southern Africa. Further investigation is needed to determine if the identified genetic variants influence CYP3A4 metabolism phenotype in these populations. PMID:23423246

  18. Morphological Characterization and Assessment of Genetic Variability, Character Association, and Divergence in Soybean Mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Malek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity is important for crop improvement. An experiment was conducted during 2011 to study genetic variability, character association, and genetic diversity among 27 soybean mutants and four mother genotypes. Analysis of variance revealed significant differences among the mutants and mothers for nine morphological traits. Eighteen mutants performed superiorly to their mothers in respect to seed yield and some morphological traits including yield attributes. Narrow differences between phenotypic and genotypic coefficients of variation (PCV and GCV for most of the characters revealed less environmental influence on their expression. High values of heritability and genetic advance with high GCV for branch number, plant height, pod number, and seed weight can be considered as favorable attributes for soybean improvement through phenotypic selection and high expected genetic gain can be achieved. Pod and seed number and maturity period appeared to be the first order traits for higher yield and priority should be given in selection due to their strong associations and high magnitudes of direct effects on yield. Cluster analysis grouped 31 genotypes into five groups at the coefficient value of 235. The mutants/genotypes from cluster I and cluster II could be used for hybridization program with the mutants of clusters IV and V in order to develop high yielding mutant-derived soybean varieties for further improvement.

  19. Characterization of genetic intratumor heterogeneity in colorectal cancer and matching patient-derived spheroid cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Árnadóttir, Sigrid S; Jeppesen, Maria; Lamy, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    Patient-derived in vitro cultures of colorectal cancer (CRC) may help guide treatment strategies prior to patient treatment. However, most previous studies have been performed on a single biopsy per tumor. The purpose of this study was to analyze multiple spatially distinct biopsies from CRCs...... and spheroids contained private mutations. Therefore, multiple cultures from spatially distinct sites of the tumor increase the insight into the genetic profile of the entire tumor. Molecular subtypes were called from RNA sequencing data. When based on transcripts from both cancer and noncancerous cells......, the subtypes were largely independent of sampling site. In contrast, subtyping based on cancer cell transcripts alone was dependent on sample site and genetic ITH. In conclusion, all examined CRC tumors showed genetic ITH. Spheroid cultures partly reflected this ITH, and having multiple cultures from distinct...

  20. Biochemical, radiological, and genetic characterization of congenital hypothyroidism in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeb, Asma; Elkadry, Ihab; Attia, Salima; Al Suwaidi, Hana; Obaid, Laila; Schoenmakers, Nadia A

    2016-07-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is caused by thyroid gland (TG) dysgenesis or inadequate thyroid hormone biosynthesis in a structurally normal gland. Different etiologies are known to be associated with various clinical, biochemical and imaging markers and a subset of cases have an underlying genetic basis. Despite the presence of neonatal screening programs in the UAE, there is a lack of data on the disease etiology in the area. We aim to study the etiology of CH in our center and examine its relationship with the clinical, biochemical, genetic and radiological features. Patients with CH who were followed in our center between 2011 and 2014 are enrolled in the study. Data collected included gender, gestational age, history of CH in a first-degree relative, initial thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroxine (T4) levels, imaging findings, associated disease/malformation and treatment details. Selected patients with associated systemic disease or familial CH underwent genetic testing. Sixty-five patients were enrolled. Ten patients underwent genetic study: seven patients with associated congenital disease/malformation, one with a sibling and two with cousins with CH. Forty-nine subjects had technetium99 and/or ultrasound scans. Dyshormonogenesis was diagnosed in two-thirds of the patients. Three patients of 10 tested had likely causative genetic mutations; two homozygous thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and one heterozygous thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) missense mutations. Dyshormonogenesis is the commonest etiology in CH in the studied group. It is expected that genetic mutations are more prevalent in our region due to the nature of the CH etiology and the rate of high consanguinity rate.

  1. Characterization of unknown genetic modifications using high throughput sequencing and computational subtraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butenko Melinka A

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When generating a genetically modified organism (GMO, the primary goal is to give a target organism one or several novel traits by using biotechnology techniques. A GMO will differ from its parental strain in that its pool of transcripts will be altered. Currently, there are no methods that are reliably able to determine if an organism has been genetically altered if the nature of the modification is unknown. Results We show that the concept of computational subtraction can be used to identify transgenic cDNA sequences from genetically modified plants. Our datasets include 454-type sequences from a transgenic line of Arabidopsis thaliana and published EST datasets from commercially relevant species (rice and papaya. Conclusion We believe that computational subtraction represents a powerful new strategy for determining if an organism has been genetically modified as well as to define the nature of the modification. Fewer assumptions have to be made compared to methods currently in use and this is an advantage particularly when working with unknown GMOs.

  2. Characterizing the Pyrenophora teres f. maculata – barley interaction using pathogen genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrenophora teres f. maculata is the cause of the foliar disease spot form net blotch (SFNB) on barley. To evaluate pathogen genetics underlying the P. teres f. maculata- barley interaction, we developed a 105-progeny population by crossing two globally diverse isolates, one from North Dakota, USA a...

  3. Characterization of Population Genetic Structure of red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Shaokui; Li, Yanhe; Shi, Linlin; Zhang, Long; Li, Qingbin; Chen, Jing

    2018-04-03

    The red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) is one of the most economically important farmed aquatic species in China. However, it is also a famous invasive species in the world. This invasive species was dispersed most via human activities including intentional or unintentional carry in China. Thus, P. clarkii naturally distributed in China provides us a desirable mode to investigate the genetic structure of an invasive species dispersed mainly by human-mediated factors. To reveal the impact of human-mediated dispersal on genetic structure of P. clarkii in China, a total of 22,043 genome-wide SNPs were obtained from approximately 7.4 billion raw reads using 2b-RAD technique in this study. An evident pattern of population genetic structure and the asymmetrical migrational rates between different regions were observed with 22 populations based on these SNPs. This study provide a better understanding of the population genetic structure and demographic history of P. clarkii populations in China, inferring that anthropogenic factors (aquaculture or by accident) and ecological factors (e.g., complicated topography and climatic environment), as well as its special biological traits could account for the current population structure pattern and dispersal history of P. clarkii.

  4. Genetic characterization of Golden mahseer (Tor putitora) populations using mitochondrial DNA markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sati, Jyoti; Kumar, Rohit; Sahoo, Prabhati Kumari; Patiyal, Rabindar S; Ali, Shahnawaz; Barat, Ashoktaru

    2015-02-01

    Golden Mahseer (Tor putitora) is an economically important fish of India and Southeast Asia. The present study examined the genetic variations between seven geographically isolated populations of T. putitora using Cyt b (Cytochrome b) and ATPase6/8 gene sequences of mitochondrial DNA. Analysis of 133 sequences of Cyt b (1141 bp) and 130 sequences of ATPase6/8 gene (842 bp) revealed 47 and 44 haplotypes, respectively. The estimated haplotype and nucleotide diversity was high in River Jia Bhoreli (Bhalukpong) population (h = 1.00000, π = 0.007121 for Cyt b and h = 0.90441 π = 0.004867 for ATPase6/8). Results of AMOVA indicated that majority of the genetic variations in both genes were due to variation among populations (60.79% for Cyt b and 51.41% for ATPase6/8 gene). The pairwise F(ST) comparison and neighbor-joining tree revealed high genetic divergence of River Jia Bhoreli population from other populations. The understanding of genetic variations of T. putitora populations will play a key role in conservation and management of this endangered fish species.

  5. Characterizing Genetic Susceptibility to Breast Cancer in Women of African Ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ye; Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Huo, Dezheng; Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward A; Haddad, Stephen A; Ambrosone, Christine B; John, Esther M; Bernstein, Leslie; Zheng, Wei; Hu, Jennifer J; Ziegler, Regina G; Nyante, Sarah; Bandera, Elisa V; Ingles, Sue A; Press, Michael F; Deming, Sandra L; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Zheng, Yonglan; Yao, Song; Han, Yoo-Jeong; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Adebamowo, Clement; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Falusi, Adeyinka G; Hennis, Anselm; Nemesure, Barbara; Ambs, Stefan; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Signorello, Lisa; Nathanson, Katherine L; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E; Bensen, Jeannette T; Chanock, Stephen J; Marchand, Loic Le; Olshan, Andrew F; Kolonel, Laurence N; Conti, David V; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Stram, Daniel O; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Palmer, Julie R; Haiman, Christopher A

    2017-07-01

    Background: Genome-wide association studies have identified approximately 100 common genetic variants associated with breast cancer risk, the majority of which were discovered in women of European ancestry. Because of different patterns of linkage disequilibrium, many of these genetic markers may not represent signals in populations of African ancestry. Methods: We tested 74 breast cancer risk variants and conducted fine-mapping of these susceptibility regions in 6,522 breast cancer cases and 7,643 controls of African ancestry from three genetic consortia (AABC, AMBER, and ROOT). Results: Fifty-four of the 74 variants (73%) were found to have ORs that were directionally consistent with those previously reported, of which 12 were nominally statistically significant ( P women of African ancestry. Impact: The risk alleles identified represent genetic markers for modeling and stratifying breast cancer risk in women of African ancestry. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(7); 1016-26. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Microsatellite genetic characterization of the humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) breeding ground off Brazil (breeding stock A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cypriano-Souza, Ana Lúcia; Fernández, Gabriela P; Lima-Rosa, Carlos André V; Engel, Márcia H; Bonatto, Sandro L

    2010-01-01

    The Southwestern Atlantic Ocean humpback whales wintering ground (breeding stock A) are distributed along the Brazilian coast (5-23 degrees S), and their main mating and calving ground is in the Abrolhos Bank. We investigated genetic diversity, population structure, and relatedness of individuals sampled from the entire Southwest Atlantic humpback whale population. A total of 275 individuals sampled from 2 subregions (Abrolhos Bank, n = 229 and Praia do Forte, n = 46) were screened for 9 microsatellite loci. This population showed a high level of allelic diversity (A = 12.1) and a high mean observed heterozygosity (H(O) = 0.733). No signal of significant genetic bottleneck was detected in accordance with the mitochondrial DNA data. We find no evidence of temporal (between years) genetic structure as well as no genetic differentiation between whales from the 2 subregions of the Brazilian breeding ground. We observed that the proportion of males and females in this population was approximately 1:1, which differs from the male-biased sex ratio observed in other breeding grounds. The data obtained through this study provided no evidence of kinship associations within social groups. Finally, a female sampled off South Georgia Islands showed a putative parent-offspring relationship with a female off Abrolhos Bank, supporting the migratory link between these 2 areas.

  7. Genetic characterization of fin fish species from the Warri River at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study to evaluate the genetic similarities and differences among 11 specimens of cichlids and four specimens of mudcatfishes obtained from Warri River was carried out through DNA fingerprinting analysis using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR amplification with seven decamer primers and dendrograms ...

  8. Characterization of North American Armillaria species: Genetic relationships determined by ribosomal DNA sequences and AFLP markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. -S. Kim; N. B. Klopfenstein; J. W. Hanna; G. I. McDonald

    2006-01-01

    Phylogenetic and genetic relationships among 10 North American Armillaria species were analysed using sequence data from ribosomal DNA (rDNA), including intergenic spacer (IGS-1), internal transcribed spacers with associated 5.8S (ITS + 5.8S), and nuclear large subunit rDNA (nLSU), and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Based on rDNA sequence data,...

  9. Characterization of unknown genetic modifications using high throughput sequencing and computational subtraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tengs, Torstein; Zhang, Haibo; Holst-Jensen, Arne; Bohlin, Jon; Butenko, Melinka A; Kristoffersen, Anja Bråthen; Sorteberg, Hilde-Gunn Opsahl; Berdal, Knut G

    2009-01-01

    Background When generating a genetically modified organism (GMO), the primary goal is to give a target organism one or several novel traits by using biotechnology techniques. A GMO will differ from its parental strain in that its pool of transcripts will be altered. Currently, there are no methods that are reliably able to determine if an organism has been genetically altered if the nature of the modification is unknown. Results We show that the concept of computational subtraction can be used to identify transgenic cDNA sequences from genetically modified plants. Our datasets include 454-type sequences from a transgenic line of Arabidopsis thaliana and published EST datasets from commercially relevant species (rice and papaya). Conclusion We believe that computational subtraction represents a powerful new strategy for determining if an organism has been genetically modified as well as to define the nature of the modification. Fewer assumptions have to be made compared to methods currently in use and this is an advantage particularly when working with unknown GMOs. PMID:19814792

  10. Genetic characterization of egg weight, egg production and age at first egg in quails

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marubayashi Hidalgo, A.; Martins, E.N.; Santos, A.L.; Quadros, T.C.O.; Ton, A.P.S.; Teixeira, R.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research was to estimate genetic parameters for the traits egg weight, egg production in 189 days and age at first egg in three laying quails and one meat line of quails. Data was analyzed by Bayesian procedures using Gibbs sampling. The heritability estimates for egg weight,

  11. Genetic characterization of stem rust resistance in a global spring wheat germplasm collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem rust is considered one of the most damaging diseases of wheat. The recent emergence of the stem rust Ug99 race group poses a serious threat to world wheat production. Utilization of genetic resistance in cultivar development is the optimal way to control stem rust. Here we report association ma...

  12. Genetic characterization of Western European noble crayfish populations (Astacus astacus) for advanced conservation management strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrimpf, A.; Piscione, M.; Cammaerts, R.; Collas, M.; Herman, D.; Jung, A.; Ottburg, F.; Roessink, I.; Rollin, X.; Schulz, R.; Theissinger, K.

    2017-01-01

    One central goal of conservation biology is to conserve the genetic diversity of species in order to protect their adaptive potential. The main objective of this study was to identify management units (MUs) for the threatened noble crayfish (Astacus astacus) in Western Europe by utilizing

  13. Isolation and genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii from the gray wolf Canis lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known of the genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii circulating in wildlife. In the present study feral gray wolf (Canis lupus) from Minnesota were examined for T. gondii infection. Antibodies to T. gondii were detected in 130 (52.4%) of 248 wolves tested by the modified agglutination test...

  14. Genetic characterization of Neospora caninum from aborted bovine foetuses in Aguascalientes, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Esparza, Leticia; Regidor-Cerrillo, Javier; García-Ramos, Daniel; Álvarez-García, Gema; Benavides, Julio; Ortega-Mora, Luis Miguel; Cruz-Vázquez, Carlos

    2016-09-15

    The cyst-forming protozoan parasite Neospora caninum is one of the main causes of bovine abortion worldwide and is of great economic importance in the cattle industry. Recent studies have revealed extensive genetic variation among N. caninum isolates based on multilocus microsatellite genotyping. Currently, the most extensive study reported is based on the N. caninum genotyping of 96 samples from four countries on two continents (Spain, Argentina, Germany and Scotland) that demonstrate different clusters of multilocus genotypes (MLGs) implicated in cattle abortions as well as the population sub-structuring of N. caninum, which is partially associated with the geographical origin. The aim of this study was to genotype N. caninum from aborted bovine foetuses that originated from Mexico within the region of Aguascalientes and to investigate their genetic diversity. Parasite DNA was detected in 27 out of the 63 analysed foetuses recovered from 10 different herds. Complete or nearly complete profiles based on 9 microsatellite markers were obtained from 11 samples. Diverse N. caninum MLGs were implicated in the occurrence of abortion in each herd. All of the Mexican MLGs differed from the MLGs previously determined for the Argentinean, Spanish, German and Scottish N. caninum populations. The Mexican MLGs failed to cluster by eBURST analyses. The MLG relationships using PCoA showed a close genetic relationship between the Spanish population and a portion of the Mexican population, but a more distant genetic relationship with the Argentinean genotypes. These results demonstrate the genetic diversity of N. caninum in the studied areas that differed from other populations of N. caninum around the world. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Phenotypic and genetic characterization of a novel phenotype in pigs characterized by juvenile hairlessness and age dependent emphysema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Camilla S.; Jørgensen, Claus B.; Bay, Lene

    2008-01-01

    Background: A pig phenotype characterized by juvenile hairlessness, thin skin and age dependent lung emphysema has been discovered in a Danish pig herd. The trait shows autosomal co-dominant inheritance with all three genotypes distinguishable. Since the phenotype shows resemblance to the integrin...... of musculi arrectores pili, and at puberty or later localized areas of emphysema are seen in the lungs. Comparative mapping predicted that the porcine ITGB6 and ITGAV orthologs map to SSC15. In an experimentall family (n=113), showing segregation of the trait, the candidate region was confirmed by linkage...... splicing of the ITGB6 pre-mRNA was detected. For both ITGB6 and ITGAV quantitative PCR revealed no significant difference in the expression levels in normal and affected animals. In a western blot, ITGB6 was detected in lung protein samples of all three genotypes. This result was supported by flow...

  16. Characterization of Carambola (Averrhoa carambola L. Plant Collection of Cibinong Plant Germplasm Garden Based on Phenotypic and Genetic Characters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dody Priadi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia as a rich biodiversity country has many superior fruit plant germplasms such as sweet star fruit or carambola (Averrhoa carambola L.. Some varieties of carambola which collected at the Germplasm Garden of Research Center for Biotechnology-LIPI have been used for parent trees of fruit plant production. Therefore, they have to be characterized both phenotypically and genetically. The objective of the study was to analyze the relationship between eight varieties of carambola i.e. Malaysia, Penang, Rawasari, Bangkok, Sembiring, Dewabaru, Demak and Dewimurni at the germplasm garden based on phenotypic and genetic characters. Phenotypic characters were observed directly in the field, whereas genetic characters were observed with RAPD markers using 10 primers. Phylogenetic analysis was done using NT-SYS software showed that there were three clusters of carambola varieties. Meanwhile, Malaysia and Penang varieties have closed relationships (96% compared with the other varieties. The result of the study would be dedicated to updating and completing the existing fruit plant collection database of Plants Germplasm Garden. 

  17. Genetic diversity of pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan (l.) Millsp.) based on molecular characterization using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoiriyah, N.; Yuniastuti, E.; Purnomo, D.

    2018-03-01

    Pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.) is an annual leguminous crop (perennial) which has advantages over other local leguminous crops as drought resistant, hold collapsed and strong pods. The research on drought resistance plant is very important to adapt to climate change adverse impact to support food security. The potential of pigeon pie has not been supported by accurate data. To explore the potential of pigeon pea, it is necessary to record the important properties by characterization, one of which is molecular. Increasing genetic diversity can be done through mutation which widely used gamma ray for the induction. The purpose of this study was to identify the genetic diversity of pigeon pea of black, white and brown seeds type resulted by gamma-ray irradiation with a wavelength of 100, 200 and 300 grays by using RAPD method. The experiment resulted 14 bands, 12 of them are polymorphic bands and 2 of them are monomorphic with size varied from 300 bp to 1.3 kbp. The dendrogram showed from 30 accessions are divided into two main clusters, B shows clear genetical divergence from other clusters and some others split randomly. The range of similarity coefficient is from 0.43 to 1.00

  18. Genetic characterization of avian influenza subtype H4N6 and H4N9 from live bird market, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitikoon Pravina

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A one year active surveillance program for influenza A viruses among avian species in a live-bird market (LBM in Bangkok, Thailand was conducted in 2009. Out of 970 samples collected, influenza A virus subtypes H4N6 (n = 2 and H4N9 (n = 1 were isolated from healthy Muscovy ducks. All three viruses were characterized by whole genome sequencing with subsequent phylogenetic analysis and genetic comparison. Phylogenetic analysis of all eight viral genes showed that the viruses clustered in the Eurasian lineage of influenza A viruses. Genetic analysis showed that H4N6 and H4N9 viruses display low pathogenic avian influenza characteristics. The HA cleavage site and receptor binding sites were conserved and resembled to LPAI viruses. This study is the first to report isolation of H4N6 and H4N9 viruses from birds in LBM in Thailand and shows the genetic diversity of the viruses circulating in the LBM. In addition, co-infection of H4N6 and H4N9 in the same Muscovy duck was observed.

  19. Characterizing the physical and genetic structure of the lodgepole pine × jack pine hybrid zone: mosaic structure and differential introgression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullingham, Catherine I; James, Patrick M A; Cooke, Janice E K; Coltman, David W

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the physical and genetic structure of hybrid zones can illuminate factors affecting their formation and stability. In north-central Alberta, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud. var. latifolia) and jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb) form a complex and poorly defined hybrid zone. Better knowledge of this zone is relevant, given the recent host expansion of mountain pine beetle into jack pine. We characterized the zone by genotyping 1998 lodgepole, jack pine, and hybrids from British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario, and Minnesota at 11 microsatellites. Using Bayesian algorithms, we calculated genetic ancestry and used this to model the relationship between species occurrence and environment. In addition, we analyzed the ancestry of hybrids to calculate the genetic contribution of lodgepole and jack pine. Finally, we measured the amount of gene flow between the pure species. We found the distribution of the pine classes is explained by environmental variables, and these distributions differ from classic distribution maps. Hybrid ancestry was biased toward lodgepole pine; however, gene flow between the two species was equal. The results of this study suggest that the hybrid zone is complex and influenced by environmental constraints. As a result of this analysis, range limits should be redefined.

  20. Towards sustainable fishery management for skates in South America: The genetic population structure of Zearaja chilensis and Dipturus trachyderma (Chondrichthyes, Rajiformes) in the south-east Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Caro, Carolina; Bustamante, Carlos; Bennett, Michael B; Ovenden, Jennifer R

    2017-01-01

    The longnose skates (Zearaja chilensis and Dipturus trachyderma) are the main component of the elasmobranch fisheries in the south-east Pacific Ocean. Both species are considered to be a single stock by the fishery management in Chile however, little is known about the level of demographic connectivity within the fishery. In this study, we used a genetic variation (560 bp of the control region of the mitochondrial genome and ten microsatellite loci) to explore population connectivity at five locations along the Chilean coast. Analysis of Z. chilensis populations revealed significant genetic structure among off-shore locations (San Antonio, Valdivia), two locations in the Chiloé Interior Sea (Puerto Montt and Aysén) and Punta Arenas in southern Chile. For example, mtDNA haplotype diversity was similar across off-shore locations and Punta Arenas (h = 0.46-0.50), it was significantly different to those in the Chiloé Interior Sea (h = 0.08). These results raise concerns about the long-term survival of the species within the interior sea, as population resilience will rely almost exclusively on self-recruitment. In contrast, little evidence of genetic structure was found for D. trachyderma. Our results provide evidence for three management units for Z. chilensis, and we recommend that separate management arrangements are required for each of these units. However, there is no evidence to discriminate the extant population of Dipturus trachyderma as separate management units. The lack of genetic population subdivision for D. trachyderma appears to correspond with their higher dispersal ability and more offshore habitat preference.

  1. Functional, genetic and chemical characterization of biosurfactants produced by plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas putida 267

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijt, M.; Tran, H.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: Plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas putida strain 267, originally isolated from the rhizosphere of black pepper, produces biosurfactants that cause lysis of zoospores of the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora capsici. The biosurfactants were characterized, the biosynthesis gene(s) partially

  2. Characterization of MHC class II B polymorphism in bottlenecked New Zealand saddlebacks reveals low levels of genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Jolene T; Robertson, Bruce C; Grueber, Catherine E; Stanton, Jo-Ann L; Jamieson, Ian G

    2013-08-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is integral to the vertebrate adaptive immune system. Characterizing diversity at functional MHC genes is invaluable for elucidating patterns of adaptive variation in wild populations, and is particularly interesting in species of conservation concern, which may suffer from reduced genetic diversity and compromised disease resilience. Here, we use next generation sequencing to investigate MHC class II B (MHCIIB) diversity in two sister taxa of New Zealand birds: South Island saddleback (SIS), Philesturnus carunculatus, and North Island saddleback (NIS), Philesturnus rufusater. These two species represent a passerine family outside the more extensively studied Passerida infraorder, and both have experienced historic bottlenecks. We examined exon 2 sequence data from populations that represent the majority of genetic diversity remaining in each species. A high level of locus co-amplification was detected, with from 1 to 4 and 3 to 12 putative alleles per individual for South and North Island birds, respectively. We found strong evidence for historic balancing selection in peptide-binding regions of putative alleles, and we identified a cluster combining non-classical loci and pseudogene sequences from both species, although no sequences were shared between the species. Fewer total alleles and fewer alleles per bird in SIS may be a consequence of their more severe bottleneck history; however, overall nucleotide diversity was similar between the species. Our characterization of MHCIIB diversity in two closely related species of New Zealand saddlebacks provides an important step in understanding the mechanisms shaping MHC diversity in wild, bottlenecked populations.

  3. First report of Metastrongylus pudendotectus by the genetic characterization of mitochondria genome of cox1 in pigs from Tibet, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Luo, Houqiang; Zhang, Hui; Lan, Yanfang; Han, Zhaoqing; Shahzad, Muhammad; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Qiu, Gang; Huang, Shucheng; Jiang, Wenteng; Li, Jiakui

    2016-06-15

    Lungworms, a world wild distributed parasites cause serious respiratory diseases to the pigs. A high infection rate of Metastrongylus lungworms has been found in Tibetan pigs being slaughtered in different slaughter houses of Tibet autonomous region. The main aim of our study was to detect and confirm the lungworm parasite by the genetic characterization of mitochondrial cox1genome isolated from the lungs of Tibetan pig. The adult lungworms were collected from the lungs of slaughtered pigs and identification was done through morphological examinations. Total genomic DNA of the extracted worms was performed and a fragment (∼450bp) of the cox1 of mitochondrial (mt) gene was amplified. Amplicons were cloned into PGEM(®)-T Easy vector and the positive clones were sequenced from a commercial company. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis were performed by software of DNAMAN and MEGA respectively. The results revealed that the lungworms infecting the Tibetan pigs were Metastrongylus pudendotectus (M. pudendotectus). To our knowledge, this is the first report for the isolation and identification for the genetic characterization of mitochondria (mt) genome of cox1 of M. pudendotectus derived from Tibetan pigs in Tibet, China. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetic Characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi DTUs in Wild Triatoma infestans from Bolivia: Predominance of TcI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenière, Simone Frédérique; Aliaga, Claudia; Waleckx, Etienne; Buitrago, Rosio; Salas, Renata; Barnabé, Christian; Tibayrenc, Michel; Noireau, François

    2012-01-01

    Background The current persistence of Triatoma infestans (one of the main vectors of Chagas disease) in some domestic areas could be related to re-colonization by wild populations which are increasingly reported. However, the infection rate and the genetic characterization of the Trypanosoma cruzi strains infecting these populations are very limited. Methodology/Principal Findings Of 333 wild Triatoma infestans specimens collected from north to south of a Chagas disease endemic area in Bolivia, we characterized 234 stocks of Trypanosoma cruzi using mini-exon multiplex PCR (MMPCR) and sequencing the glucose phosphate isomerase (Gpi) gene. Of the six genetic lineages (“discrete typing units”; DTU) (TcI-VI) presently recognized in T. cruzi, TcI (99.1%) was overdominant on TcIII (0.9%) in wild Andean T. infestans, which presented a 71.7% infection rate as evaluated by microscopy. In the lowlands (Bolivian Chaco), 17 “dark morph” T. infestans were analyzed. None of them were positive for parasites after microscopic examination, although one TcI stock and one TcII stock were identified using MMPCR and sequencing. Conclusions/Significance By exploring large-scale DTUs that infect the wild populations of T. infestans, this study opens the discussion on the origin of TcI and TcV DTUs that are predominant in domestic Bolivian cycles. PMID:22685616

  5. Genetic Characterization Of Syrian Erwinia Amylovora Strains By Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammouneh, H.; Arabi, M.; Shoaib, A.

    2011-01-01

    Thirty Erwinia amylovora strains, collected from the main rosaceous crop-growing regions in Syria, were chosen as representatives of all major pathogenicity groups and were genetically studied by AFLP. Eight primer combinations were utilized and approximately 300 scorable bands in total were generated. Based on similarity coefficient, E. amylovora strains were placed into a main cluster containing two sub clusters, indicating very low genetic variations among the studied pathogen. The existence of two plasmids, pEA29 (present in nearly all E. amylovora isolates) and pEL60 (present mainly in Lebanese strains), was confirmed using multiplex PCR in all tested Syrian E. amylovora strains, indicating that Lebanese and Syrian isolates may share a common origin.(author)

  6. Genetic diversity and molecular characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from winemaking environments

    OpenAIRE

    Schuller, Dorit Elisabeth

    2004-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Ciências The principal aim of the present work is to assess the genetic diversity of fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains found in vineyards belonging to the Vinho Verde Region in order to create a strain collection representing the region’s biodiversity wealth as a basis for future strain selection and improvement programs. Validation of molecular techniques for accurate genotyping is an indispensable prerequisite for biogeographical surveys. Molecular ty...

  7. Viscometric characterization of cobalt nanoparticle-based magnetorheological fluids using genetic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhuri, Anirban; Wereley, Norman M.; Kotha, Sanjay; Radhakrishnan, Ramachandran; Sudarshan, Tirumalai S.

    2005-01-01

    The rheological flow curves (shear stress vs. shear rate) of a nanoparticle cobalt-based magnetorheological fluid can be modeled using Bingham-plastic and Herschel-Bulkley constitutive models. Steady-state rheological flow curves were measured using a parallel disk rheometer for constant shear rates as a function of applied magnetic field. Genetic algorithms were used to identify constitutive model parameters from the flow curve data

  8. Muscle and liver transcriptome characterization and genetic marker discovery in the farmed meagre, Argyrosomus regius

    OpenAIRE

    Manousaki, T.; Tsakogiannis, A.; Lagnel, Jacques; Kyriakis, D.; Duncan, N.; Estevez, A.; Tsigenopoulos, C.S.

    2018-01-01

    Meagre (Argyrosomus regius), a teleost fish of the family Sciaenidae, is part of a group of marine fish species considered new for Mediterranean aquaculture representing the larger fish cultured in the region. Meagre aquaculture started ~ 25 years ago in West Mediterranean, and the supply of juveniles has been dominated by few hatcheries. This fact has raised concerns on possible inbreeding, urging the need for genetic information on the species and for an assessment of the polymorphisms foun...

  9. Molecular Characterization of Melanoma Cases in Denmark Suspected of Genetic Predisposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadt, Karin A. W.; Aoude, Lauren G.; Krogh, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    Both environmental and host factors influence risk of cutaneousmelanoma (CM), and worldwide, the incidence varies depending on constitutional determinants of skin type and pigmentation, latitude, and patterns of sun exposure. We performed genetic analysis of CDKN2A, CDK4, BAP1, MC1R, and MITFp.E3...... cases of CM. In addition, we recommend that testing of BAP1 should not be conducted routinely in CM families but should be reserved for families with CM and uveal melanoma, or mesothelioma....

  10. New views on American colonization: critical tests from South America

    OpenAIRE

    O'Rourke, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    The traditional view of colonization of the Americas as a migration across Beringia and subsequent dispersal southward following the last glacial maximum is being increasingly questioned. In North America, archaeological links to Siberia are tenuous and genetic data are more consistent with an earlier entry of people into the Americas, from Central rather than Northeast Siberia. An entry of populations into the Americas prior to the last glacial maximum forces a reconsideration not only of ti...

  11. Phenotypic Characterization and Genetic Dissection of Growth Period Traits in Soybean (Glycine max) Using Association Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhangxiong; Li, Huihui; Fan, Xuhong; Huang, Wen; Yang, Jiyu; Li, Candong; Wen, Zixiang; Li, Yinghui; Guan, Rongxia; Guo, Yong; Chang, Ruzhen; Wang, Dechun; Wang, Shuming; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2016-01-01

    The growth period traits are important traits that affect soybean yield. The insights into the genetic basis of growth period traits can provide theoretical basis for cultivated area division, rational distribution, and molecular breeding for soybean varieties. In this study, genome-wide association analysis (GWAS) was exploited to detect the quantitative trait loci (QTL) for number of days to flowering (ETF), number of days from flowering to maturity (FTM), and number of days to maturity (ETM) using 4032 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers with 146 cultivars mainly from Northeast China. Results showed that abundant phenotypic variation was presented in the population, and variation explained by genotype, environment, and genotype by environment interaction were all significant for each trait. The whole accessions could be clearly clustered into two subpopulations based on their genetic relatedness, and accessions in the same group were almost from the same province. GWAS based on the unified mixed model identified 19 significant SNPs distributed on 11 soybean chromosomes, 12 of which can be consistently detected in both planting densities, and 5 of which were pleotropic QTL. Of 19 SNPs, 7 SNPs located in or close to the previously reported QTL or genes controlling growth period traits. The QTL identified with high resolution in this study will enrich our genomic understanding of growth period traits and could then be explored as genetic markers to be used in genomic applications in soybean breeding.

  12. Characterization of clinical and genetic risk factors associated with dyslipidemia after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numakura, Kazuyuki; Kagaya, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Ryohei; Komine, Naoki; Saito, Mitsuru; Hiroshi, Tsuruta; Akihama, Susumu; Inoue, Takamitsu; Narita, Shintaro; Tsuchiya, Norihiko; Habuchi, Tomonori; Niioka, Takenori; Miura, Masatomo; Satoh, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    We determined the prevalence of dyslipidemia in a Japanese cohort of renal allograft recipients and investigated clinical and genetic characteristics associated with having the disease. In total, 126 patients that received renal allograft transplants between February 2002 and August 2011 were studied, of which 44 recipients (34.9%) were diagnosed with dyslipidemia at 1 year after transplantation. Three clinical factors were associated with a risk of having dyslipidemia: a higher prevalence of disease observed among female than male patients (P = 0.021) and treatment with high mycophenolate mofetil (P = 0.012) and prednisolone (P = 0.023) doses per body weight at 28 days after transplantation. The genetic association between dyslipidemia and 60 previously described genetic polymorphisms in 38 putative disease-associated genes was analyzed. The frequency of dyslipidemia was significantly higher in patients with the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) Bcl1 G allele than in those with the CC genotype (P = 0.001). A multivariate analysis revealed that the NR3C1 Bcl1 G allele was a significant risk factor for the prevalence of dyslipidemia (odds ratio = 4.6; 95% confidence interval = 1.8-12.2). These findings may aid in predicting a patient's risk of developing dyslipidemia.

  13. Phenotypic Characterization and Genetic Dissection of Growth Period Traits in Soybean (Glycine max Using Association Mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhangxiong Liu

    Full Text Available The growth period traits are important traits that affect soybean yield. The insights into the genetic basis of growth period traits can provide theoretical basis for cultivated area division, rational distribution, and molecular breeding for soybean varieties. In this study, genome-wide association analysis (GWAS was exploited to detect the quantitative trait loci (QTL for number of days to flowering (ETF, number of days from flowering to maturity (FTM, and number of days to maturity (ETM using 4032 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers with 146 cultivars mainly from Northeast China. Results showed that abundant phenotypic variation was presented in the population, and variation explained by genotype, environment, and genotype by environment interaction were all significant for each trait. The whole accessions could be clearly clustered into two subpopulations based on their genetic relatedness, and accessions in the same group were almost from the same province. GWAS based on the unified mixed model identified 19 significant SNPs distributed on 11 soybean chromosomes, 12 of which can be consistently detected in both planting densities, and 5 of which were pleotropic QTL. Of 19 SNPs, 7 SNPs located in or close to the previously reported QTL or genes controlling growth period traits. The QTL identified with high resolution in this study will enrich our genomic understanding of growth period traits and could then be explored as genetic markers to be used in genomic applications in soybean breeding.

  14. Genetic characterization of the complete genome of a mutant canine parvovirus isolated in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuanfeng; Tang, Jingyu; Chen, Zongyan; Li, Qi; Huang, Zhenhua; Wang, Quan; Meng, Chunchun; Wang, Yong; Liu, Guangqing

    2018-02-01

    A field canine parvovirus (CPV) strain, CPV-SH14, was previously isolated from an outbreak of severe gastroenteritis in Shanghai in 2014. The complete genome of CPV-SH14 was determined by using PCR with modified primers. When compared to other CPV-2 strains, several insertions, deletions, and point mutations were identified in the 5' and 3' UTR, with key amino acid (aa) mutations (K19R, E572K in NS1 and F267Y, Y324I and T440A in VP2) also being observed in the coding regions of CPV-SH14. These results indicated that significant and unique genetic variations have occurred at key sites or residues in the genome of CPV-SH14, suggesting the presence of a novel genetic variant of new CPV-2a. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP2 gene revealed that CPV-SH14 may have the potential to spread worldwide. In conclusion, CPV-SH14 may be a novel genetic variant of new CPV-2a, potentially with a selective advantage over other strains.

  15. Genetic Characterization of Bombyx mori (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae) Breeding and Hybrid Lines With Different Geographic Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furdui, Emilia M.; Mărghitaş, Liviu A.; Dezmirean, Daniel S.; Paşca, Ioan; Pop, Iulia F.; Erler, Silvio; Schlüns, Ellen A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The domesticated silkworm Bombyx mori L. comprises a large number of geographical breeds and hybrid lines. Knowing the genetic structure of those may provide information to improve the conservation of commercial lines by estimating inbreeding over generations and the consequences of excessive use of those lineages. Here, we analyzed the genetic diversity of seven breeds and eight hybrid lines from Eastern Europe and Asia using highly polymorphic microsatellites markers to determine its genetical impact on their use in global breeding programs. No consistent pattern of deviation from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium was found for most breed and hybrids; and the absence of a linkage disequilibrium also suggests that the strains are in equilibrium. A principal coordinate analysis revealed a clear separation of two silkworm breeds from the rest: one (IBV) originated from India and the other one (RG 90 ) from Romania/Japan. The tendency of the other breeds from different geographic origins to cluster together in a general mix might be due to similar selection pressures (climate and anthropogenic factors) in different geographic locations. Phylogenetic analyses grouped the different silkworm breeds but not the hybrids according to their geographic origin and confirmed the pattern found in the principal coordinate analysis. PMID:25502023

  16. Molecular Identification and Genetic Characterization of Macrophomina phaseolina Strains Causing Pathogenicity on Sunflower and Chickpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali N. Khan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Macrophomina phaseolina is the most devastating pathogen which causes charcoal rot and root rot diseases in various economically important crops. Three strains M. phaseolina 1156, M. phaseolina 1160, and M. phaseolina PCMC/F1 were tested for their virulence on sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. and chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.. The strains showed high virulence on both hosts with a disease score of 2 on chickpea and sunflower. The strains also increased the hydrogen per oxide (H2O2 content by 1.4- to 1.6-fold in root as well as shoot of chickpea and sunflower. A significant increase in antioxidant enzymes was observed in fungal infected plants which indicated prevalence of oxidative stress during pathogen propagation. The M. phaseolina strains also produced hydrolytic enzymes such as lipase, amylase, and protease with solubilization zone of 5–43 mm, 5–45 mm, and 12–35 mm, respectively. The M. phaseolina strains were identified by 18S rRNA and analyzed for genetic diversity by using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD markers. The findings based on RAPD markers and 18S rRNA sequence analysis clearly indicate genetic variation among the strains collected from different hosts. The genetically diverse strains were found to be pathogenic to sunflower and chickpea.

  17. Characterizing the population structure and genetic diversity of maize breeding germplasm in Southwest China using genome-wide SNP markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Zhang, Hua; Li, Lujiang; Lan, Hai; Ren, Zhiyong; Liu, Dan; Wu, Ling; Liu, Hailan; Jaqueth, Jennifer; Li, Bailin; Pan, Guangtang; Gao, Shibin

    2016-08-31

    Maize breeding germplasm used in Southwest China has high complexity because of the diverse ecological features of this area. In this study, the population structure, genetic diversity, and linkage disequilibrium decay distance of 362 important inbred lines collected from the breeding program of Southwest China were characterized using the MaizeSNP50 BeadChip with 56,110 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). With respect to population structure, two (Tropical and Temperate), three (Tropical, Stiff Stalk and non-Stiff Stalk), four [Tropical, group A germplasm derived from modern U.S. hybrids (PA), group B germplasm derived from modern U.S. hybrids (PB) and Reid] and six (Tropical, PB, Reid, Iowa Stiff Stalk Synthetic, PA and North) subgroups were identified. With increasing K value, the Temperate group showed pronounced hierarchical structure with division into further subgroups. The Genetic Diversity of each group was also estimated, and the Tropical group was more diverse than the Temperate group. Seven low-genetic-diversity and one high-genetic-diversity regions were collectively identified in the Temperate, Tropical groups, and the entire panel. SNPs with significant variation in allele frequency between the Tropical and Temperate groups were also evaluated. Among them, a region located at 130 Mb on Chromosome 2 showed the highest genetic diversity, including both number of SNPs with significant variation and the ratio of significant SNPs to total SNPs. Linkage disequilibrium decay distance in the Temperate group was greater (2.5-3 Mb) than that in the entire panel (0.5-0.75 Mb) and the Tropical group (0.25-0.5 Mb). A large region at 30-120 Mb of Chromosome 7 was concluded to be a region conserved during the breeding process by comparison between S37, which was considered a representative tropical line in Southwest China, and its 30 most similar derived lines. For the panel covered most of widely used inbred lines in Southwest China, this work

  18. Genetic characterization of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (sensu lato) ticks from dogs in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Maia, Carla; Latrofa, Maria Stefania; Annoscia, Giada; Cardoso, Luís; Otranto, Domenico

    2017-03-13

    The taxonomic status of the brown dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus (sensu stricto) is a subject of on-going debate; there is a consensus that populations of this tick species should be referred to as R. sanguineus (sensu lato) until its taxonomic status is resolved. Recent genetic studies revealed the existence of more than one lineage of R. sanguineus (s.l.) in temperate countries. In this study, we assessed the genetic identity of ticks collected from rural dogs living in several areas located in all major geographical regions of Portugal. A total of 347 ticks were collected from rural dogs living in different regions of Portugal. These ticks were morphologically identified and partial mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene sequences (~300 bp) were obtained from representative specimens. The ticks were morphologically identified as Ixodes ricinus (seven males and 27 females), Rhipicephalus bursa (one male), Rhipicephalus pusillus (one female) and R. sanguineus (s.l.) (two larvae, 101 nymphs, 108 males and 100 females). Partial mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained from 58 R. sanguineus (s.l.) specimens, and all of them were genetically identified as belonging to the so-called temperate lineage of R. sanguineus (s.l.) CONCLUSIONS: These results strongly suggest that the temperate species of R. sanguineus (s.l.) is the only representative of this tick group found on dogs in Portugal. It also adds weight to the hypothesis that Rhipicephalus turanicus is not present in this country, although further investigations are necessary to confirm this.

  19. Phenotypic characterization of a genetically diverse panel of mice for behavioral despair and anxiety.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke H Miller

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Animal models of human behavioral endophenotypes, such as the Tail Suspension Test (TST and the Open Field assay (OF, have proven to be essential tools in revealing the genetics and mechanisms of psychiatric diseases. As in the human disorders they model, the measurements generated in these behavioral assays are significantly impacted by the genetic background of the animals tested. In order to better understand the strain-dependent phenotypic variability endemic to this type of work, and better inform future studies that rely on the data generated by these models, we phenotyped 33 inbred mouse strains for immobility in the TST, a mouse model of behavioral despair, and for activity in the OF, a model of general anxiety and locomotor activity.We identified significant strain-dependent differences in TST immobility, and in thigmotaxis and distance traveled in the OF. These results were replicable over multiple testing sessions and exhibited high heritability. We exploited the heritability of these behavioral traits by using in silico haplotype-based association mapping to identify candidate genes for regulating TST behavior. Two significant loci (-logp >7.0, gFWER adjusted p value <0.05 of approximately 300 kb each on MMU9 and MMU10 were identified. The MMU10 locus is syntenic to a major human depressive disorder QTL on human chromosome 12 and contains several genes that are expressed in brain regions associated with behavioral despair.We report the results of phenotyping a large panel of inbred mouse strains for depression and anxiety-associated behaviors. These results show significant, heritable strain-specific differences in behavior, and should prove to be a valuable resource for the behavioral and genetics communities. Additionally, we used haplotype mapping to identify several loci that may contain genes that regulate behavioral despair.

  20. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers and analysis of genetic variability in Curculigo latifolia Dryand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei, Nahid; Abdullah, Nur Ashikin Psyquay; Saleh, Ghizan; Abdullah, Thohirah Lee

    2012-11-01

    Curculin, a sweet protein found in Curculigo latifolia fruit has great potential for the pharmaceutical industry. This protein interestingly has been found to have both sweet taste and taste-modifying capacities comparable with other natural sweeteners. According to our knowledge this is the first reported case on the isolation of microsatellite loci in this genus. Hence, the current development of microsatellite markers for C. latifolia will facilitate future population genetic studies and breeding programs for this valuable plant. In this study 11 microsatellite markers were developed using 3' and 5' ISSR markers. The primers were tested on 27 accessions from all states of Peninsular Malaysia. The number of alleles per locus ranged from three to seven, with allele size ranging from 141 to 306 bp. The observed and expected heterozygosity ranged between 0.00-0.65 and 0.38-0.79, respectively. The polymorphic information content ranged from 0.35 to 0.74 and the Shannon's information index ranged from 0.82 to 1.57. These developed polymorphic microsatellites were used for constructing a dendrogram by unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean cluster analysis using the Dice's similarity coefficient. Accessions association according to their geographical origin was observed. Based on characteristics of isolated microsatellites for C. latifolia accessions all genotype can be distinguished using these 11 microsatellite markers. These polymorphic markers could also be applied to studies on uniformity determination and somaclonal variation of tissue culture plantlets, varieties identification, genetic diversity, analysis of phylogenetic relationship, genetic linkage maps and quantitative trait loci in C. latifolia.

  1. Genetic and pathogenic characterization of Akabane viruses isolated from cattle with encephalomyelitis in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oem, Jae-Ku; Yoon, Hyo-Jeong; Kim, Hye-Ryoung; Roh, In-Soon; Lee, Kyung-Hyun; Lee, O-Soo; Bae, You-Chan

    2012-08-17

    A large-scale outbreak of Akabane viral encephalomyelitis in cattle was reported in the southern part of Korea in 2010. Fifteen Akabane virus (AKAV) strains were isolated from the brain and spinal cord samples by using BHK-21 and/or HmLu-1 cells. To examine the genetic relationships and characteristics of the isolates, nucleotide sequences of the S, M, and L segments of the 15 isolates were determined and analyzed. Complete sequence analysis of the 15 AKAV isolates showed 99.9-100% amino acid identities, indicating that the 15 isolates originated from a single strain. The S and M RNA segments of a representative isolate (AKAV-7/SKR/2010) were also compared with the segments of representative reference sequences. This AKAV-7/SKR/2010 strain showed the highest identity with the Iriki and KM-1/Br/06 strains. Neighbor-joining phylogenetic trees of S and M RNA segments were constructed. Four representative AKAV isolates were classified into subgroup Ia, which contains the Iriki and KM-1/Br/06 strains recognized to cause encephalomyelitis in calves and adult cattle in Japan. Moreover, experimental intraperitoneal infection was performed using the AKAV-7/SKR/2010 and AKAV-17/SKR/2010 strains to assess pathogenesis in suckling mice. The 2 isolates, genetically related to the Iriki strain, were neurovirulent and caused neurological signs in suckling mice. In contrast, the 93FMX strain and the K0505 strain, related to the OBE-1 strain, were avirulent in mice. The present results indicate that these isolates most likely had originated from the Iriki strain and are closely related to the Iriki strain both genetically and pathogenically. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Functional characterization of genetic polymorphisms identified in the promoter region of the bovine PEPS gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Zhihua; Zheng, Xue; Huang, Jinming; Qi, Chao; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jianbin; Zhong, Jifeng; Wang, Changfa

    2012-06-01

    Peptidase S (PEPS) is a metallopeptidase that cleaves N-terminal residues from proteins and peptides. PEPS is used as a cell maintenance enzyme with critical roles in peptide turnover. The promoter region located upstream of the initiation site plays an important role in regulating gene expression. Polymorphism in the promoter region can alter gene expression and lead to biological changes. In the current study, polymorphisms in the promoter region of the PEPS gene were investigated. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism and DNA sequencing methods were used to screen sequence variations in the promoter region of DNA samples from 743 Chinese Holstein cattle. Two polymorphisms (g. -534 T>C and g. -2545 G>A) were identified and eight haplotypes were classified by haplotype analysis. The two genetic polymorphisms and haplotypes were associated with fat percentage and somatic cell score in Chinese Holstein cattle. The results of real-time PCR showed that cow kidneys exhibit the highest PEPS expression level. Moreover, bioinformatics analysis predicted that the single-nucleotide polymorphism g. -534 T>C is located in the core promoter region and in the transcription factor binding sites. The promoter activities of the polymorphism of -543 T>C were measured by luciferase assay in the human kidney epithelial cell line 293T. Transcriptional activity is significantly lower in cell lines transfected with the reporter construct containing 2.5 kb upstream fragments with -543 C than in those with wild-type -543 T. The results indicated that genetic variation at locus -543 influences PEPS promoter activity. The genetic variation in the promoter region of PEPS gene may regulate PEPS gene transcription and might have consequences at a regulatory level.

  3. Characterization of genetic polymorphism of novel MHC B-LB II alleles in Chinese indigenous chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rifu; Li, Kui; Chen, Guohong; Xu, Hui; Qiang, Bayangzong; Li, Changchun; Liu, Bang

    2007-02-01

    Genetic polymorphism of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) B-LB II gene was studied by amplification of exon 2 using PCR, followed by cloning and DNA sequencing in eight indigenous Chinese chicken populations. To reveal the genetic variation of the B-LB II gene, 37 types of patterns detected by PCR-SSCP were investigated first, which would be used to screen novel B-LB II sequences within the breeds. The types of PCR-SSCP patterns and final sequencing allowed for the identification of 31 novel MHC B-LB II alleles from 30 unrelated individuals of Chinese chickens that were sampled. These are the first designators for the alleles of chicken MHC B-LB II gene based on the rule of assignment for novel mammalian alleles. Sequence alignment of the 31 B-LB II alleles revealed a total of 68 variable sites in the fragment of exon 2, of which 51 parsimony informative and 17 singleton variable sites were observed. Among the polymorphic sites, the nucleotide substitutions in the first and second positions of the codons accounted for 36.76% and 35.29%, respectively. The sequence similarities between the alleles were estimated to be 90.6%-99.5%. The relative frequencies of synonymous and nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions within the region were 2.92%+/-0.94% and 14.64%+/-2.67%, respectively. These results indicated that the genetic variation within exon 2 appeared to have largely arisen by gene recombination and balancing selection. Alignment of the deduced amino acid sequences of the beta1 domain coded by exon 2 revealed 6 synonymous mutations and 27 nonsynonymous substitutions at the 33 disparate sites. In particular, the nonsynonymous substitutions at the putative peptide-binding sites are considered to be associated with immunological specificity of MHC B-LB II molecule in Chinese native chickens. These results can provide a molecular biological basis for the study of disease resistance in chicken breeding.

  4. Genetic Characterization of Northwestern Colombian Chikungunya Virus Strains from the 2014–2015 Epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodas, Juan D.; Kautz, Tiffany; Camacho, Erwin; Paternina, Luis; Guzmán, Hilda; Díaz, Francisco J.; Blanco, Pedro; Tesh, Robert; Weaver, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya fever, an acute and often chronic arthralgic disease caused by the mosquito-borne alphavirus, chikungunya virus (CHIKV), spread into the Americas in late 2013. Since then it has caused epidemics in nearly all New World countries, the second largest being Colombia with over 450,000 suspected cases beginning in September, 2014, and focused in Bolivar Department in the north. We examined 32 human sera from suspected cases, including diverse age groups and both genders, and sequenced the CHIKV envelope glycoprotein genes, known determinants of vector host range. As expected for Asian lineage CHIKV strains, these isolates lacked known Aedes albopictus–adaptive mutations. All the Colombian strains were closely related to those from the Virgin Islands, Saint Lucia, Mexico, Puerto Rico, and Brazil, consistent with a single, point-source introduction from the southeast Asia/Pacific region. Two substitutions in the E2 and E1 envelope glycoprotein genes were found in the Colombian strains, especially E1-K211E involving a residue shown previously to affect epistatically the penetrance of the E1-A226V A. albopictus–adaptive substitution. We also identified two amino acid substitutions unique to all American CHIKV sequences: E2-V368A and 6K-L20M. Only one codon, 6K-47, had a high nonsynonymous substitution rate suggesting positive selection. PMID:27430542

  5. Characterizing novel endogenous retroviruses from genetic variation inferred from short sequence reads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourier, Tobias; Mollerup, Sarah; Vinner, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    From Illumina sequencing of DNA from brain and liver tissue from the lion, Panthera leo, and tumor samples from the pike-perch, Sander lucioperca, we obtained two assembled sequence contigs with similarity to known retroviruses. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that the pike-perch retrovirus belongs...... to the epsilonretroviruses, and the lion retrovirus to the gammaretroviruses. To determine if these novel retroviral sequences originate from an endogenous retrovirus or from a recently integrated exogenous retrovirus, we assessed the genetic diversity of the parental sequences from which the short Illumina reads...

  6. Genetic and antigenic characterization of enterovirus 71 in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, 2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Phan Kim Thoa

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 frequently causes fatal infections in young children in Asia. In 2011, EV71 epidemics occurred in southern Vietnam. We conducted genetic and antigenic analysis of the EV71 isolates and found that 94% of them were genotype C4a related to two lineages circulating in China and 6% were genotype C5 which have circulated in Vietnam since 2003. Antigenic variants were not detected. EV71 vaccines are being developed. Longitudinal enterovirus surveillance data are critical to formulate vaccination policy in Vietnam.

  7. Genetic and antigenic characterization of enterovirus 71 in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoa, Le Phan Kim; Chiang, Pai-Shan; Khanh, Truong Huu; Luo, Shu-Ting; Dan, Tran Ngoc Hanh; Wang, Ya-Fang; Thuong, Tang Chi; Chung, Wan-Yu; Hung, Nguyen Thanh; Wang, Jen-Ren; Nhan, Le Nguyen Thanh; Thinh, Le Quoc; Su, Ih-Jen; Dung, Than Duc; Lee, Min-Shi

    2013-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) frequently causes fatal infections in young children in Asia. In 2011, EV71 epidemics occurred in southern Vietnam. We conducted genetic and antigenic analysis of the EV71 isolates and found that 94% of them were genotype C4a related to two lineages circulating in China and 6% were genotype C5 which have circulated in Vietnam since 2003. Antigenic variants were not detected. EV71 vaccines are being developed. Longitudinal enterovirus surveillance data are critical to formulate vaccination policy in Vietnam.

  8. Genetic characterization of the three medicinal Echinacea species using RAPD analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieri, P; Adinolfi, B; Morelli, I; Breschi, M C; Simoni, G; Martinotti, E

    2003-07-01

    The three medicinal species of the Echinacea genus, E. angustifolia DC., E. pallida (Nutt.) Nutt. and E. purpurea (L.) Moench were distinguished using the RAPD (random amplified polymorphic DNA) technique. Species-specific markers were identified from amplicons obtained with four of the twenty 10-mer primers contained in the Operon RAPD kit A. In particular, one marker was identified for E. angustifolia (OPA 20, 1800 pb) and E. pallida (OPA 10, 600 pb) and three markers for E. purpurea (OPA 11 : 1250 pb; OPA 17 : 750, 1800 pb). Genetic distance analysis indicated a high degree of difference among the three species with a relative lower difference between E. angustifolia and E. pallida.

  9. Genetic characterization of Rio de Janeiro for different Y-STR sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannuzzi, Juliana; Domingues, Patrícia; Simão, Filipa; da Silva Chaves, Anna Carolina; de Carvalho, Elizeu Fagundes; Gusmão, Leonor

    2018-01-22

    In this work, the YfilerPlus kit was used to investigate a sample of 258 males from Rio de Janeiro. In addition, the previous database of 760 Yfiler profiles deposited in the YHRD was updated to 1610. YfilerPlus markers showed a high haplotype diversity (0.99997), with only one haplotype shared by two individuals. When only considering the Yfiler markers, the haplotype diversity was slightly lower (0.99976), with 5 haplotypes shared by two individuals and 1 haplotype shared by three individuals. Low genetic distances were found between the Rio de Janeiro and European populations as well as the European/Hispanic American samples.

  10. Characterization and genetics of multiple soybean aphid biotype resistance in five soybean plant introductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) is the most important soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] insect pest in the USA. The objectives of this study were to characterize the resistance expressed in the five plant introductions (PIs) to four soybean aphid biotypes, determine the mode of resistance in...

  11. Genetic characterization of uncultured fungal endophytes from Bouteloua eriopoda and Atriplex canescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary E. Lucero; Jerry R. Barrow; Ruth Sedillo; Pedro Osuna-Avila; Isaac Reyes-Vera

    2008-01-01

    Obligate fungal endophytes form cryptic communities in vascular plants that can defy detection and isolation by microscopic examination of reproductive structures. Molecular detection by PCR amplification of fungal DNA sequences alone is insufficient, since target endophyte sequences are unknown and difficult to distinguish from sequences already characterized as plant...

  12. Genetic characterization of Phytophthora nicotianae by the analysis of polymorphic regions of the mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new method based on the analysis of mitochondrial intergenic regions characterized by intraspecific variation in DNA sequences was developed and applied to the study of the plant pathogen Phytophthora nicotianae. Two regions flanked by genes trny and rns and trnw and cox2 were identified by compa...

  13. Characterization and genetic variation of vibrio cholerae isolated from clinical and environmental sources in Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siriphap, Achiraya; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Kaas, Rolf Sommer

    2017-01-01

    Cholera is still an important public health problem in several countries, including Thailand. In this study, a collection of clinical and environmental V. cholerae serogroup O1, O139, and non-O1/non-O139 strains originating from Thailand (1983 to 2013) was characterized to determine phenotypic an...

  14. Racial characterization and genetic diversity of sunflower broomrape populations from Northern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jebri MALEK

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In Spain, sunflower broomrape (Orobanche cumana Wallr. has been restricted to Cuenca province in Central Spain, and the Guadalquivir Valley in Southern Spain, that represent different gene pools of the species. This pathogenic plant has now spread to other areas such as Castilla y León region in Northern Spain. The racial status and genetic diversity were investigated in six populations of sunflower broomrape collected in several provinces of Castilla y León. Evaluation of virulence to a set of differential host genotypes classified three of the populations as race F, while the other three populations were classified as a race below F, probably race E. Genetic diversity analysis using a set of 20 SSR markers showed that the broomrape populations from new areas of Northern Spain are mainly derived from the Guadalquivir Valley gene pool. Introgression from the Cuenca gene pool was observed in one of the populations, in which the percentage of polymorphic loci was 31%, Shanon´s diversity index was 0.17, and the average number of pairwise differences was 1.69, compared to zero for the three parameters in the other five populations. The absence of race F individuals in the populations classified as race below F indicated that seed migration took place, probably before the generalized expansion of race F in the Guadalquivir Valley area, at the beginning of the 1990s.

  15. Genetic marking and characterization of Tac2-expressing neurons in the central and peripheral nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The neurocircuits that process somatic sensory information in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord are still poorly understood, with one reason being the lack of Cre lines for genetically marking or manipulating selective subpopulations of dorsal horn neurons. Here we describe Tac2-Cre mice that were generated to express the Cre recombinase gene from the Tac2 locus. Tachykinin 2 (Tac2 encodes a neurotransmitter, neurokinin B (NKB. Results By crossing Tac2-Cre mice with ROSA26-tdTomato reporter mice, we directly visualized Tac2 lineage neurons in the dorsal root ganglia, the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, and many parts of the brain including the olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, amygdala, hippocampus, habenula, hypothalamus, and cerebellum. This Tac2-Cre allele itself was a null allele for the Tac2 gene. Behavioral analyses showed that Tac2 homozygous null mice responded normally to a series of algogenic (pain-inducing and pruritic (itch-inducing stimuli. Conclusions Tac2-Cre mice are a useful tool to mark specific subsets of neurons in the sensory ganglia, the dorsal spinal cord, and the brain. These mice can also be used for future genetic manipulations to study the functions of Tac2-expressing neurons or the functions of genes expressed in these neurons.

  16. Isolation, characterization, and genetic complementation of a cellular mutant resistant to retroviral infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Sumit; Harada, Josephine; Schreifels, Jeffrey; Lech, Patrycja; Nikolai, Bryan; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Chanda, Sumit K.; Somia, Nikunj V.

    2006-01-01

    By using a genetic screen, we have isolated a mammalian cell line that is resistant to infection by retroviruses that are derived from the murine leukemia virus, human immunodeficiency virus type 1, and feline immunodeficiency virus. We demonstrate that the cell line is genetically recessive for the resistance, and hence it is lacking a factor enabling infection by retroviruses. The block to infection is early in the life cycle, at the poorly understood uncoating stage. We implicate the proteasome at uncoating by completely rescuing the resistant phenotype with the proteasomal inhibitor MG-132. We further report on the complementation cloning of a gene (MRI, modulator of retrovirus infection) that can also act to reverse the inhibition of infection in the mutant cell line. These data implicate a role for the proteasome during uncoating, and they suggest that MRI is a regulator of this activity. Finally, we reconcile our findings and other published data to suggest a model for the involvement of the proteasome in the early phase of the retroviral life cycle. PMID:17043244

  17. Methodology based on genetic heuristics for in-vivo characterizing the patient-specific biomechanical behavior of the breast tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lago, M A; Rúperez, M J; Martínez-Martínez, F; Martínez-Sanchis, S; Bakic, P R; Monserrat, C

    2015-11-30

    This paper presents a novel methodology to in-vivo estimate the elastic constants of a constitutive model proposed to characterize the mechanical behavior of the breast tissues. An iterative search algorithm based on genetic heuristics was constructed to in-vivo estimate these parameters using only medical images, thus avoiding invasive measurements of the mechanical response of the breast tissues. For the first time, a combination of overlap and distance coefficients were used for the evaluation of the similarity between a deformed MRI of the breast and a simulation of that deformation. The methodology was validated using breast software phantoms for virtual clinical trials, compressed to mimic MRI-guided biopsies. The biomechanical model chosen to characterize the breast tissues was an anisotropic neo-Hookean hyperelastic model. Results from this analysis showed that the algorithm is able to find the elastic constants of the constitutive equations of the proposed model with a mean relative error of about 10%. Furthermore, the overlap between the reference deformation and the simulated deformation was of around 95% showing the good performance of the proposed methodology. This methodology can be easily extended to characterize the real biomechanical behavior of the breast tissues, which means a great novelty in the field of the simulation of the breast behavior for applications such as surgical planing, surgical guidance or cancer diagnosis. This reveals the impact and relevance of the presented work.

  18. Characterization of a genetically engineered mouse model of hemophilia A with complete deletion of the F8 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, B N; Baldwin, W H; Healey, J F; Parker, E T; Shafer-Weaver, K; Cox, C; Jiang, P; Kanellopoulou, C; Lollar, P; Meeks, S L; Lenardo, M J

    2016-02-01

    ESSENTIALS: Anti-factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitory antibody formation is a severe complication in hemophilia A therapy. We genetically engineered and characterized a mouse model with complete deletion of the F8 coding region. F8(TKO) mice exhibit severe hemophilia, express no detectable F8 mRNA, and produce FVIII inhibitors. The defined background and lack of FVIII in F8(TKO) mice will aid in studying FVIII inhibitor formation. The most important complication in hemophilia A treatment is the development of inhibitory anti-Factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies in patients after FVIII therapy. Patients with severe hemophilia who express no endogenous FVIII (i.e. cross-reacting material, CRM) have the greatest incidence of inhibitor formation. However, current mouse models of severe hemophilia A produce low levels of truncated FVIII. The lack of a corresponding mouse model hampers the study of inhibitor formation in the complete absence of FVIII protein. We aimed to generate and characterize a novel mouse model of severe hemophilia A (designated the F8(TKO) strain) lacking the complete coding sequence of F8 and any FVIII CRM. Mice were created on a C57BL/6 background using Cre-Lox recombination and characterized using in vivo bleeding assays, measurement of FVIII activity by coagulation and chromogenic assays, and anti-FVIII antibody production using ELISA. All F8 exonic coding regions were deleted from the genome and no F8 mRNA was detected in F8(TKO) mice. The bleeding phenotype of F8(TKO) mice was comparable to E16 mice by measurements of factor activity and tail snip assay. Similar levels of anti-FVIII antibody titers after recombinant FVIII injections were observed between F8(TKO) and E16 mice. We describe a new C57BL/6 mouse model for severe hemophilia A patients lacking CRM. These mice can be directly bred to the many C57BL/6 strains of genetically engineered mice, which is valuable for studying the impact of a wide variety of genes on FVIII inhibitor formation on a

  19. Genome wide characterization of simple sequence repeats in watermelon genome and their application in comparative mapping and genetic diversity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huayu; Song, Pengyao; Koo, Dal-Hoe; Guo, Luqin; Li, Yanman; Sun, Shouru; Weng, Yiqun; Yang, Luming

    2016-08-05

    Microsatellite markers are one of the most informative and versatile DNA-based markers used in plant genetic research, but their development has traditionally been difficult and costly. The whole genome sequencing with next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies provides large amounts of sequence data to develop numerous microsatellite markers at whole genome scale. SSR markers have great advantage in cross-species comparisons and allow investigation of karyotype and genome evolution through highly efficient computation approaches such as in silico PCR. Here we described genome wide development and characterization of SSR markers in the watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) genome, which were then use in comparative analysis with two other important crop species in the Cucurbitaceae family: cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) and melon (Cucumis melo L.). We further applied these markers in evaluating the genetic diversity and population structure in watermelon germplasm collections. A total of 39,523 microsatellite loci were identified from the watermelon draft genome with an overall density of 111 SSRs/Mbp, and 32,869 SSR primers were designed with suitable flanking sequences. The dinucleotide SSRs were the most common type representing 34.09 % of the total SSR loci and the AT-rich motifs were the most abundant in all nucleotide repeat types. In silico PCR analysis identified 832 and 925 SSR markers with each having a single amplicon in the cucumber and melon draft genome, respectively. Comparative analysis with these cross-species SSR markers revealed complicated mosaic patterns of syntenic blocks among the genomes of three species. In addition, genetic diversity analysis of 134 watermelon accessions with 32 highly informative SSR loci placed these lines into two groups with all accessions of C.lanatus var. citorides and three accessions of C. colocynthis clustered in one group and all accessions of C. lanatus var. lanatus and the remaining accessions of C. colocynthis

  20. Heart Failure in North America

    OpenAIRE

    Blair, John E. A; Huffman, Mark; Shah, Sanjiv J

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure is a major health problem that affects patients and healthcare systems worldwide. Within the continent of North America, differences in economic development, genetic susceptibility, cultural practices, and trends in risk factors and treatment all contribute to both inter-continental and within-continent differences in heart failure. The United States and Canada represent industrialized countries with similar culture, geography, and advanced economies and infrastructure. During t...

  1. Biologic and genetic characteristics of Toxoplasma gondii isolates in free-range chickens from Nicaragua, Central America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dubey, J.P.; Sundar, N.; Pineda, N.

    2006-01-01

    The prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in free-ranging chickens is a good indicator of the prevalence of T. gondii oocysts in the soil because chickens feed from the ground. The prevalence of T. gondii in 98 free-range chickens (Gallus domesticus) from Nicragua was determined. Antibodies to T. gondii...... from the same household, indicating multiple genotypes were circulating in the same environment. This may explain the high frequency of mixed infections observed. High rate of mixed infection in intermediate hosts such as chickens may facilitate genetic exchange between different parasite lineages...... died of toxoplasmosis. Genotyping of these 48 isolates (47 from mice and 1 from pooled tissues) using polymorphisms at the loci SAG1, SAG2, SAG3, BTUB and GRA6 revealed eight genotypes. Six isolates had Type I alleles, three isolate had Type II alleles and six isolates had Type III alleles at all loci...

  2. Clinical, histological and genetic characterization of reducing body myopathy caused by mutations in FHL1

    OpenAIRE

    Schessl, Joachim; Taratuto, Ana L.; Sewry, Caroline; Battini, Roberta; Chin, Steven S.; Maiti, Baijayanta; Dubrovsky, Alberto L.; Erro, Marcela G.; Espada, Graciela; Robertella, Monica; Saccoliti, Maria; Olmos, Patricia; Bridges, Leslie R.; Standring, Peter; Hu, Ying

    2008-01-01

    We recently identified the X-chromosomal four and a half LIM domain gene FHL1 as the causative gene for reducing body myopathy, a disorder characterized by progressive weakness and intracytoplasmic aggregates in muscle that exert reducing activity on menadione nitro-blue-tetrazolium (NBT). The mutations detected in FHL1 affected highly conserved zinc coordinating residues within the second LIM domain and lead to the formation of aggregates when transfected into cells. Our aim was to define th...

  3. Characterization of Soybean Storage and Allergen Proteins Affected by Environmental and Genetic Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Savithiry; Khan, Farooq; Song, Qijian; Lakshman, Sukla; Cregan, Perry; Scott, Roy; Shipe, Emerson; Garrett, Wesley

    2016-02-17

    There is limited information on the influence of genetic and environmental variability on soybean protein composition. This study aimed to determine the role of genotype (G), environments (E), and the interrelationship of genotype and environment (G×E) on soybean seed protein. Three sets of nine soybean genotypes were grown in replicated trials at Maryland, South Carolina, and South Dakota. At each location, the nine genotypes were grown with two planting/sowing dates. We applied two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to study the variability of soybean storage and allergen proteins. Statistical analysis of 47 storage and 8 allergen proteins, in terms of differentially expressed protein spots significant at the p<0.005 level, was performed. We found more spots that showed statistically significant differences in expression among E compared to G and G×E interaction.

  4. Genetic characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi natural clones from the state of Paraíba, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Barnabé

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen Trypanosoma cruzi stocks from the state of Paraíba, Brazil, isolated from man, wild mammals, and triatomine bugs were studied by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and random primed amplified polymorphic DNA. Despite the low number of stocks, a notable genetic, genotypic, and phylogenetic diversity was recorded. The presence of the two main phylogenetic subdivisions, T. cruzi I and II, was recorded. The strong linkage disequilibrium observed in the population under survey suggests that T. cruzi undergoes predominant clonal evolution in this area too, although this result should be confirmed by a broader sample. The pattern of clonal variation does not suggests a recent origin by founder effect with a limited number of different genotypes.

  5. [Genetic characterization of wild leguminous nodular bacteria living in the South Urals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baĭmiev, An Kh; Ivanova, E S; Ptitsyn, K G; Belimov, A A; Safronova, V I; Baĭmiev, Al Kh

    2012-01-01

    Genetic diversity and phylogeny of rhizobia that nodulate 18 species of wild-growing bean plants of South Urals from 8 genera belonging to 4 tribes (Loteae, Genisteae, Galegeaev and Hedysareae) was studied. It was demonstrated that for the wild-growing plants of Galegeae and Hedysareae tribes symbiotic interaction with various strains of nodule bacteria that closely related to bacteria of Mesorhizobium sp. was typical of the plants of Genisteae tribe--to bacteria of Bradyrhizobium sp. In the nodules of Lortus ucrainicus from Loteae tribe we have found a rhizobium that is closely related to the bacteria of Mesorhizobium sp., and at Coronilla varia rhizobia strains obtained by us were close by sequence of a 16S pRNA gene to Rhizobium sp. In the nodules of some kinds of the investigated plants we found also minor species of a rhizobia, which structure is under the great influence of conditions of the host plant growth.

  6. High-resolution mapping and genetic characterization of the Lazy-2 gravitropic mutant of tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behringer, F. J.; Lomax, T. L.

    1999-01-01

    Mutation of the Lazy-2 (Lz-2) gene in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum mill.) produces a phytochrome-dependent reversal of shoot gravitropism, providing a unique genetic resource for investigating how signals from light modulate gravitropism. We mapped the Lz-2 gene using RFLPs and a PCR-based technique to assess the feasibility of positional cloning. Analysis of a 1338 plant backcross population between L. esculentum and L. pennellii placed Lz-2 within a 1.2 cM interval on chromosome 5, 0.4 cM from TG504-CT201A interval. The inabililty to resolve these markers indicates that Lz-2 resides in a centromeric region in which recombination is highly suppressed. Lazy-2 is tightly linked to but does not encode the gene for ACC4, an enzyme involved in ethylene biosynthesis. We also observed that Lz-2 is partially dominant under certain conditions and stages of development.

  7. A spontaneous mutant of microcystin biosynthesis: genetic characterization and effect on Daphnia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kabernick, M.; Rohrlack, T.; Christoffersen, K.

    2001-01-01

    Microcystis aeruginosa strain MRC is unique in its' possession of the mcyA-J gene cluster, which encodes microcystin synthetase, but its' inability to produce microcystins. M. aeruginosa strain MRD is genetically identical to MRC at numerous genomic loci examined, but produces a variety...... of microcystins, mainly with the amino acid tyrosine in the molecule. Zooplankton studies with Daphnia galeata and D. pulicaria, using the mutant (MRC) and its' wild type (MRD), showed for the first time that microcystins other than microcystin-LR can be responsible for the poisoning of Daphnia by Microcystis....... Regardless of microcystin content, both Daphnia exhibited significantly reduced ingestion rates when fed with either strain of M. aeruginosa compared with the green alga Scenedesmus acutus. A disruption of the molting process in both Daphnia spp. was noted when these species were fed with MRC cells...

  8. Genetic characterization of over hundred years old Caretta caretta specimens from Italian and Maltese museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Garofalo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Museum collections have proven to be a useful source of samples for the reconstruction of evolutionary history and phylogeography of many taxa. This study was aimed at assessing the success rate in a genetic analysis of historical material, in order to explore the feasibility and eventually begin the diachronic description of Caretta caretta stocks in Italian and Maltese coastal waters. The endangered status of the species and the difficulty to study it in the wild make its common occurrence in Italian museum collections a valuable resource. We used minimally invasive methods to collect biological material from specimens dating from the end of the 19th century to 2003, belonging to four museums. As a control for amplification success and absence of cross-contamination, four dinucleotide microsatellite loci of different average length (Cc7, Cc141, Cm72 and Cm84 were typed. All individuals with two or more successfully amplified microsatellites (36% displayed distinct genotypes, thus excluding contamination as a major flaw in the data. We then targeted 380 bp of the mtDNA control region, which allows comparisons with many living populations worldwide and represents the optimal marker for the philopatric behaviour of this species. All individuals but 2 were successfully sequenced. Haplotype CC-A2 was found in 68 individuals, whereas CC-A1 and CC-A3 were found only in one Tyrrhenian and one S-Adriatic specimens, respectively. This study demonstrates that genetic analysis of marine turtles from museum specimens is feasible. Data generated from cohorts of several generations ago are potentially useful for research and dissemination purposes.

  9. Genetic characterization and fine mapping of the novel Phytophthora resistance gene in a Chinese soybean cultivar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiqing; Xia, Changjian; Wang, Xiaoming; Duan, Canxing; Sun, Suli; Wu, Xiaofei; Zhu, Zhendong

    2013-06-01

    Phytophthora root rot (PRR), caused by Phytophthora sojae Kaufmann & Gerdemann, is one of the most destructive diseases of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]. Deployment of resistance genes is the most economical and effective way of controlling the disease. The soybean cultivar 'Yudou 29' is resistant to many P. sojae isolates in China. The genetic basis of the resistance in 'Yudou 29' was elucidated through an inheritance study and molecular mapping. In response to 25 P. sojae isolates, 'Yudou 29' displayed a new resistance reaction pattern distinct from those of differentials carrying known Rps genes. A population of 214 F2:3 families from a cross between 'Jikedou 2' (PRR susceptible) and 'Yudou 29' was used for Rps gene mapping. The segregation fit a ratio of 1:2:1 for resistance:segregation:susceptibility within this population, indicating that resistance in 'Yudou 29' is controlled by a single dominant gene. This gene was temporarily named RpsYD29 and mapped on soybean chromosome 03 (molecular linkage group N; MLG N) flanked by SSR markers SattWM82-50 and Satt1k4b at a genetic distance of 0.5 and 0.2 cM, respectively. Two nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR) type genes were detected in the 204.8 kb region between SattWM82-50 and Satt1k4b. These two genes showed high similarity to Rps1k in amino acid sequence and could be candidate genes for PRR resistance. Based on the phenotype reactions and the physical position on soybean chromosome 03, RpsYD29 might be a novel allele at, or a novel gene tightly linked to, the Rps1 locus.

  10. Molecular characterization of norovirus variants and genetic diversity of noroviruses and sapoviruses in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaimongkol, Natthawan; Khamrin, Pattara; Malasao, Rungnapa; Thongprachum, Aksara; Kongsricharoern, Tipachan; Ukarapol, Nuthapong; Ushijima, Hiroshi; Maneekarn, Niwat

    2014-07-01

    Norovirus (NoV) and Sapovirus (SaV) have been reported as a common cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. For a decade, surveillances of NoV and SaV have been conducted continually in Thailand. To monitor the epidemiological situation and to determine the genetic variation of NoV and SaV in Chiang Mai, Thailand, 567 samples collected from pediatric patients hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis were examined during 2007, and 2010-2011 by semi-nested RT-PCR and nucleotide sequencing methods. NoV was detected at 15.9%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed multiple NoV genotypes, GI/14 (1.1%), GII/1 (1.1%), GII/2 (1.1%), GII/3 (4.4%), GII/4 (65.6%), GII/6 (10.0%), GII/7 (2.2%), GII/12 (4.4%), GII/13 (3.3%), GII/16 (5.7%), and unclassified genotype (1.1%), circulating in this area. Among these, NoV GII/4 was the most prevalent genotype with a predominance of GII/4 2009 over other variants, 1996, 2006a, and 2006b. For SaV, the prevalence was 1.2% which was much lower than those of NoV and only SaV GI/1 was detected. This study highlights the epidemiology of NoV and SaV and genetic diversity of viruses circulating in pediatric patients hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Chiang Mai, Thailand. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. ZnO thin film characterization by X-ray reflectivity optimization using genetic algorithm and Fourier transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solookinejad, Ghahraman; Rozatian, Amir Sayid Hassan; Habibi, Mohammad Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin film was fabricated by sol-gel spin coating method on glass substrate. X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and its optimization have been used for characterization and extracting physical parameters of the film. Genetic algorithm (GA) has been applied for this optimization process. The model independent information was needed to establish data analyzing process for X-ray reflectivity before optimization process. Independent information was exploited from Fourier transform of Fresnel reflectivity normalized X-ray reflectivity. This Fourier transformation (Auto Correlation Function) yields thickness of each coated layer on substrate. This information is a keynote for constructing optimization process. Specular X-ray reflectivity optimization yields structural parameters such as thickness, roughness of surface and interface and electron density profile of the film. Acceptable agreement exists between results obtained from Fourier transformation and X-ray reflectivity fitting.

  12. Characterization and genetic relatedness among 37 yardlong bean and cowpea accessions based on morphological characters and RAPD analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinich Saereeprasert

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Twenty four yardlong bean and 13 cowpea accessions were planted in the field to characterize their morphology and genetic relatedness. A randomized complete block design (RCBD with two replicationswas used. Growth habit, days to flowering, pod color, pod length, number of pods/plant, yield/plant and consumption quality were recorded. The results showed that pod length, number of pods/plant and podyield/plant among 37 accessions were highly significant differerence. Mean pod yield and pod length of 24 yardlong bean accessions were 212.1 g/plant and 48.7 cm, respectively, while mean pod yield and pod lengthof 13 cowpea accessions were 117.4 g/plant and 21.3 cm, respectively. Twenty two yardlong bean accessions exhibited indeterminate growth habit while 10 of 13 cowpea had determinate growth habit and the restsexhibited semi-determinate growth. Genetic variation and relationships among accessions were investigated based on RAPD technique. Total DNA was extracted from young leaf samples of all accessions using CTAB buffer. One hundred and twenty decamer oligonucleotide primers were screened and 5 primers (OPC-06,OPR-12, OPZ-03, OPZ-08, OPZ-13 were chosen for further evaluation. A dendrogram of genetic similarity was constructed based on 23 polymorphic bands obtained from 5 primers using UPGMA in SPSS program,which revealed separate groups between yardlong bean and cowpea. The similarity coefficient among yardlong bean and cowpea accessions ranged from 0.515 to 1.000 and 0.548 to 1.000, respectively.

  13. Molecular and genetic characterization of natural HIV-1 Tat Exon-1 variants from North India and their functional implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larance Ronsard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Designing an ideal vaccine against HIV-1 has been difficult due to enormous genetic variability as a result of high replication rate and lack of proofreading activity of reverse transcriptase leading to emergence of genetic variants and recombinants. Tat transactivates HIV-1 LTR, resulting in a remarkable increase in viral gene expression, and plays a vital role in pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to characterize the genetic variations of Tat exon-1 from HIV-1 infected patients from North India. METHODS: Genomic DNA was isolated from PBMCs and Tat exon-1 was PCR amplified with specific primers followed by cloning, sequencing and sequence analyses using bioinformatic tools for predicting HIV-1 subtypes, recombination events, conservation of domains and phosphorylation sites, and LTR transactivation by luciferase assay. RESULTS: Phylogenetic analysis of Tat exon-1 variants (n = 120 revealed sequence similarity with South African Tat C sequences and distinct geographical relationships were observed for B/C recombinants. Bootscan analysis of our variants showed 90% homology to Tat C and 10% to B/C recombinants with a precise breakpoint. Natural substitutions were observed with high allelic frequencies which may be beneficial for virus. High amino acid conservation was observed in Tat among Anti Retroviral Therapy (ART recipients. Barring few changes, most of the functional domains, predicted motifs and phosphorylation sites were well conserved in most of Tat variants. dN/dS analysis revealed purifying selection, implying the importance of functional conservation of Tat exon-1. Our Indian Tat C variants and B/C recombinants showed differential LTR transactivation. CONCLUSIONS: The possible role of Tat exon-1 variants in shaping the current HIV-1 epidemic in North India was highlighted. Natural substitutions across conserved functional domains were observed and provided evidence for the emergence of B/C recombinants within the

  14. Molecular and genetic characterization of natural HIV-1 Tat Exon-1 variants from North India and their functional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronsard, Larance; Lata, Sneh; Singh, Jyotsna; Ramachandran, Vishnampettai G; Das, Shukla; Banerjea, Akhil C

    2014-01-01

    Designing an ideal vaccine against HIV-1 has been difficult due to enormous genetic variability as a result of high replication rate and lack of proofreading activity of reverse transcriptase leading to emergence of genetic variants and recombinants. Tat transactivates HIV-1 LTR, resulting in a remarkable increase in viral gene expression, and plays a vital role in pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to characterize the genetic variations of Tat exon-1 from HIV-1 infected patients from North India. Genomic DNA was isolated from PBMCs and Tat exon-1 was PCR amplified with specific primers followed by cloning, sequencing and sequence analyses using bioinformatic tools for predicting HIV-1 subtypes, recombination events, conservation of domains and phosphorylation sites, and LTR transactivation by luciferase assay. Phylogenetic analysis of Tat exon-1 variants (n = 120) revealed sequence similarity with South African Tat C sequences and distinct geographical relationships were observed for B/C recombinants. Bootscan analysis of our variants showed 90% homology to Tat C and 10% to B/C recombinants with a precise breakpoint. Natural substitutions were observed with high allelic frequencies which may be beneficial for virus. High amino acid conservation was observed in Tat among Anti Retroviral Therapy (ART) recipients. Barring few changes, most of the functional domains, predicted motifs and phosphorylation sites were well conserved in most of Tat variants. dN/dS analysis revealed purifying selection, implying the importance of functional conservation of Tat exon-1. Our Indian Tat C variants and B/C recombinants showed differential LTR transactivation. The possible role of Tat exon-1 variants in shaping the current HIV-1 epidemic in North India was highlighted. Natural substitutions across conserved functional domains were observed and provided evidence for the emergence of B/C recombinants within the ORF of Tat exon-1. These events are likely to have

  15. Genetic characterization of the cacao cultivar CCN 51: its impact and significance on global cacao improvement and production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) is an important cash crop in tropical growing regions of the world and particularly for small cacao farmers. Cacao production in the Americas constitutes ˜13.0% of global production. Ecuador is the second-largest cacao producer in South America and its Nacional beans are...

  16. An improved in vitro model to characterize invasive growing cancer cells simultaneously by function and genetic aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, V; Wullich, B; Kamradt, J; Stöckle, M; Unteregger, G

    2007-03-01

    Invasion into the surrounding tissue and bone metastasis is a common feature of advanced prostate cancer. Chromosomal and other genetic or epigenetic abnormalities were aligned to this behaviour mostly by using permanent cell lines, paraffin embedded tissue or primary tumour samples. Both attempts fail to reflect either the original situation or functional information in the patient's tissue. Thus, we developed an improved in vitro assay to follow invasion of prostate cancer cells derived from fresh samples of radical prostatectomy specimens. Fresh tumour samples were applied onto Matrigeltrade mark-coated invasion chambers using a cocultivation model. Invasive growing cells were harvested from the bottom of the membrane or from the underlying gel and further characterized using comparative genomic hybridization. Prostate cancer cells have the capability to invasively grow through the barrier of a Matrigeltrade mark and could easily be sampled in a pad of Matrigeltrade mark. Comparative genomic hybridization revealed characteristic chromosomal aberrations of the invasive growing cells. Noteworthy is their ability to spheroid formation, which allows for further cell propagation by standard cell culture methods. Thus, our improved invasion model is a tool for the sampling of invasive growing cancer cells from fresh human tumour material allowing for functional as well as genetic studies.

  17. Characterization of resistance mechanisms and genetic relatedness of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from blood, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliavacca, Roberta; Espinal, Paula; Principe, Luigi; Drago, Monica; Fugazza, Giulia; Roca, Ignasi; Nucleo, Elisabetta; Bracco, Silvia; Vila, Jordi; Pagani, Laura; Luzzaro, Francesco

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the resistance mechanisms and genetic relatedness of 21 carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii blood isolates collected in Italy during a 1-year multicenter prospective surveillance study. Genes coding for carbapenemase production were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multiplex PCRs for group identification, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were used to determine genetic relationships. Carbapenem resistance was consistently related to the production of oxacillinases, mostly the plasmid-mediated OXA-58 enzyme. Strains producing the OXA-23 enzyme (chromosomally mediated) were also detected. Seven PFGE clones were identified, some of which being related to international (ICL- I and ICL-II) or national clonal lineages. Multiplex PCRs identified 4 different groups (group 2 being dominant), further distinguishable in 6 sequence types by MLST. The heterogeneity of profiles highlights the diffusion of international and national clonal lineages in Italy. Continuous surveillance is needed for monitoring the spread of these worrisome strains equipped with multiple drug resistance mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A survey of the clinicopathological and molecular characteristics of patients with suspected Lynch syndrome in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Benedito Mauro; Palmero, Edenir Inêz; López-Kostner, Francisco; Sarroca, Carlos; Vaccaro, Carlos Alberto; Spirandelli, Florencia; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia; Rodriguez, Yenni; de Campos Reis Galvão, Henrique; Reis, Rui Manuel; Escremim de Paula, André; Capochin Romagnolo, Luis Gustavo; Alvarez, Karin; Della Valle, Adriana; Neffa, Florencia; Kalfayan, Pablo German; Spirandelli, Enrique; Chialina, Sergio; Gutiérrez Angulo, Melva; Castro-Mujica, Maria Del Carmen; Sanchez de Monte, Julio; Quispe, Richard; da Silva, Sabrina Daniela; Rossi, Norma Teresa; Barletta-Carrillo, Claudia; Revollo, Susana; Taborga, Ximena; Morillas, L Lena; Tubeuf, Hélène; Monteiro-Santos, Erika Maria; Piñero, Tamara Alejandra; Dominguez-Barrera, Constantino; Wernhoff, Patrik; Martins, Alexandra; Hovig, Eivind; Møller, Pål; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev

    2017-09-05

    Genetic counselling and testing for Lynch syndrome (LS) have recently been introduced in several Latin America countries. We aimed to characterize the clinical, molecular and mismatch repair (MMR) variants spectrum of patients with suspected LS in Latin America. Eleven LS hereditary cancer registries and 34 published LS databases were used to identify unrelated families that fulfilled the Amsterdam II (AMSII) criteria and/or the Bethesda guidelines or suggestive of a dominant colorectal (CRC) inheritance syndrome. We performed a thorough investigation of 15 countries and identified 6 countries where germline genetic testing for LS is available and 3 countries where tumor testing is used in the LS diagnosis. The spectrum of pathogenic MMR variants included MLH1 up to 54%, MSH2 up to 43%, MSH6 up to 10%, PMS2 up to 3% and EPCAM up to 0.8%. The Latin America MMR spectrum is broad with a total of 220 different variants which 80% were private and 20% were recurrent. Frequent regions included exons 11 of MLH1 (15%), exon 3 and 7 of MSH2 (17 and 15%, respectively), exon 4 of MSH6 (65%), exons 11 and 13 of PMS2 (31% and 23%, respectively). Sixteen international founder variants in MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 were identified and 41 (19%) variants have not previously been reported, thus representing novel genetic variants in the MMR genes. The AMSII criteria was the most used clinical criteria to identify pathogenic MMR carriers although microsatellite instability, immunohistochemistry and family history are still the primary methods in several countries where no genetic testing for LS is available yet. The Latin America LS pathogenic MMR variants spectrum included new variants, frequently altered genetic regions and potential founder effects, emphasizing the relevance implementing Lynch syndrome genetic testing and counseling in all of Latin America countries.

  19. Prevalence, Genetic Characterization, and 18S Small Subunit Ribosomal RNA Diversity of Trypanosoma rangeli in Triatomine and Mammal Hosts in Endemic Areas for Chagas Disease in Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofia; Aguirre-Villacis, Fernanda; Pinto, C. Miguel; Vallejo, Gustavo A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Trypanosoma rangeli is a nonpathogenic parasite for humans; however, its medical importance relies in its similarity and overlapping distribution with Trypanosoma cruzi, causal agent of Chagas disease in the Americas. The genetic diversity of T. rangeli and its association with host species (triatomines and mammals) has been identified along Central and the South America; however, it has not included data of isolates from Ecuador. This study reports infection with T. rangeli in 18 genera of mammal hosts and five species of triatomines in three environments (domestic, peridomestic, and sylvatic). Higher infection rates were found in the sylvatic environment, in close association with Rhodnius ecuadoriensis. The results of this study extend the range of hosts infected with this parasite and the geographic range of the T. rangeli genotype KP1(−)/lineage C in South America. It was not possible to detect variation on T. rangeli from the central coastal region and southern Ecuador with the analysis of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU-rRNA) gene, even though these areas are ecologically different and a phenotypic subdivision of R. ecuadoriensis has been found. R. ecuadoriensis is considered one of the most important vectors for Chagas disease transmission in Ecuador due to its wide distribution and adaptability to diverse environments. An extensive knowledge of the trypanosomes circulating in this species of triatomine, and associated mammal hosts, is important for delineating transmission dynamics and preventive measures in the endemic areas of Ecuador and Northern Peru. PMID:26645579

  20. Prevalence, Genetic Characterization, and 18S Small Subunit Ribosomal RNA Diversity of Trypanosoma rangeli in Triatomine and Mammal Hosts in Endemic Areas for Chagas Disease in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofia; Aguirre-Villacis, Fernanda; Pinto, C Miguel; Vallejo, Gustavo A; Grijalva, Mario J

    2015-12-01

    Trypanosoma rangeli is a nonpathogenic parasite for humans; however, its medical importance relies in its similarity and overlapping distribution with Trypanosoma cruzi, causal agent of Chagas disease in the Americas. The genetic diversity of T. rangeli and its association with host species (triatomines and mammals) has been identified along Central and the South America; however, it has not included data of isolates from Ecuador. This study reports infection with T. rangeli in 18 genera of mammal hosts and five species of triatomines in three environments (domestic, peridomestic, and sylvatic). Higher infection rates were found in the sylvatic environment, in close association with Rhodnius ecuadoriensis. The results of this study extend the range of hosts infected with this parasite and the geographic range of the T. rangeli genotype KP1(-)/lineage C in South America. It was not possible to detect variation on T. rangeli from the central coastal region and southern Ecuador with the analysis of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU-rRNA) gene, even though these areas are ecologically different and a phenotypic subdivision of R. ecuadoriensis has been found. R. ecuadoriensis is considered one of the most important vectors for Chagas disease transmission in Ecuador due to its wide distribution and adaptability to diverse environments. An extensive knowledge of the trypanosomes circulating in this species of triatomine, and associated mammal hosts, is important for delineating transmission dynamics and preventive measures in the endemic areas of Ecuador and Northern Peru.

  1. Functional characterization of cotton genes responsive to Verticillium dahliae through bioinformatics and reverse genetics strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lian; Zhang, Wenwen; He, Xin; Liu, Min; Zhang, Kun; Shaban, Muhammad; Sun, Longqing; Zhu, Jiachen; Luo, Yijing; Yuan, Daojun; Zhang, Xianlong; Zhu, Longfu

    2014-12-01

    Verticillium wilt causes dramatic cotton yield loss in China. Although some genes or biological processes involved in the interaction between cotton and Verticillium dahliae have been identified, the molecular mechanism of cotton resistance to this disease is still poorly understood. The basic innate immune response for defence is somewhat conserved among plant species to defend themselves in complex environments, which makes it possible to characterize genes involved in cotton immunity based on information from model plants. With the availability of Arabidopsis databases, a data-mining strategy accompanied by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and heterologous expression were adopted in cotton and tobacco, respectively, for global screening and gene function characterization. A total of 232 Arabidopsis genes putatively involved in basic innate immunity were screened as candidate genes, and bioinformatic analysis suggested a role of these genes in the immune response. In total, 38 homologous genes from cotton were singled out to characterize their response to V. dahliae and methyl jasmonate treatment through quantitative real-time PCR. The results revealed that 24 genes were differentially regulated by pathogen inoculation, and most of these genes responded to both Verticillium infection and jasmonic acid stimuli. Furthermore, the efficiency of the strategy was illustrated by the functional identification of six candidate genes via heterologous expression in tobacco or a knock-down approach using VIGS in cotton. Functional categorization of these 24 differentially expressed genes as well as functional analysis suggest that reactive oxygen species, salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-signalling pathways are involved in the cotton disease resistance response to V. dahliae. Our data demonstrate how information from model plants can allow the rapid translation of information into non-model species without complete genome sequencing, via high-throughput screening and

  2. Identification and characterization of mobile genetic elements LINEs from Brassica genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouroz, Faisal; Noreen, Shumaila; Khan, Muhammad Fiaz; Ahmed, Shehzad; Heslop-Harrison, J S Pat

    2017-09-05

    Among transposable elements (TEs), the LTR retrotransposons are abundant followed by non-LTR retrotransposons in plant genomes, the lateral being represented by LINEs and SINEs. Computational and molecular approaches were used for the characterization of Brassica LINEs, their diversity and phylogenetic relationships. Four autonomous and four non-autonomous LINE families were identified and characterized from Brassica. Most of the autonomous LINEs displayed two open reading frames, ORF1 and ORF2, where ORF1 is a gag protein domain, while ORF2 encodes endonuclease (EN) and a reverse transcriptase (RT). Three of four families encoded an additional RNase H (RH) domain in pol gene common to 'R' and 'I' type of LINEs. The PCR analyses based on LINEs RT fragments indicate their high diversity and widespread occurrence in tested 40 Brassica cultivars. Database searches revealed the homology in LINE sequences in closely related genera Arabidopsis indicating their origin from common ancestors predating their separation. The alignment of 58 LINEs RT sequences from Brassica, Arabidopsis and other plants depicted 4 conserved domains (domain II-V) showing similarity to previously detected domains. Based on RT alignment of Brassica and 3 known LINEs from monocots, Brassicaceae LINEs clustered in separate clade, further resolving 4 Brassica-Arabidopsis specific families in 2 sub-clades. High similarities were observed in RT sequences in the members of same family, while low homology was detected in members across the families. The investigation led to the characterization of Brassica specific LINE families and their diversity across Brassica species and their cultivars. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. PERMANENT GENETIC RESOURCES: Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci from the Arctic cisco (Coregonus autumnalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, A; Graziano, S L; Nielsen, J L

    2008-03-01

    Eight polymorphic microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized for the Arctic cisco, Coregonus autumnalis. Loci were evaluated in 21 samples from the Colville River subsistence fishery. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 18. Observed heterozygosity of loci varied from 0.10 to 1.00, and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.09 to 0.92. All eight microsatellite markers were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The loci presented here will be useful in describing population structure and exploring populations of origin for Arctic cisco. © 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd No claim to original US government works.

  4. Characterization of PV panel and global optimization of its model parameters using genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, M.S.; Moghavvemi, M.; Mahlia, T.M.I.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Genetic Algorithm optimization ability had been utilized to extract parameters of PV panel model. • Effect of solar radiation and temperature variations was taken into account in fitness function evaluation. • We used Matlab-Simulink to simulate operation of the PV-panel to validate results. • Different cases were analyzed to ascertain which of them gives more accurate results. • Accuracy and applicability of this approach to be used as a valuable tool for PV modeling were clearly validated. - Abstract: This paper details an improved modeling technique for a photovoltaic (PV) module; utilizing the optimization ability of a genetic algorithm, with different parameters of the PV module being computed via this approach. The accurate modeling of any PV module is incumbent upon the values of these parameters, as it is imperative in the context of any further studies concerning different PV applications. Simulation, optimization and the design of the hybrid systems that include PV are examples of these applications. The global optimization of the parameters and the applicability for the entire range of the solar radiation and a wide range of temperatures are achievable via this approach. The Manufacturer’s Data Sheet information is used as a basis for the purpose of parameter optimization, with an average absolute error fitness function formulated; and a numerical iterative method used to solve the voltage-current relation of the PV module. The results of single-diode and two-diode models are evaluated in order to ascertain which of them are more accurate. Other cases are also analyzed in this paper for the purpose of comparison. The Matlab–Simulink environment is used to simulate the operation of the PV module, depending on the extracted parameters. The results of the simulation are compared with the Data Sheet information, which is obtained via experimentation in order to validate the reliability of the approach. Three types of PV modules

  5. Characterization of LEDGF/p75 genetic variants and association with HIV-1 disease progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Messiaen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75 is an important co-factor involved in HIV-1 integration, the LEDGF/p75-IN interaction is a promising target for the new class of allosteric HIV integrase inhibitors (LEDGINs. Few data are available on the genetic variability of LEDGF/p75 and the influence on HIV disease in vivo. This study evaluated the relation between LEDGF/p75 genetic variation, mRNA expression and HIV-1 disease progression in order to guide future clinical use of LEDGINs. METHODS: Samples were derived from a therapy-naïve cohort at Ghent University Hospital and a Spanish long-term-non-progressor cohort. High-resolution melting curve analysis and Sanger sequencing were used to identify all single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the coding region, flanking intronic regions and full 3'UTR of LEDGF/p75. In addition, two intronic tagSNPs were screened based on previous indication of influencing HIV disease. LEDGF/p75 mRNA was quantified in patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC using RT-qPCR. RESULTS: 325 samples were investigated from patients of Caucasian (n = 291 and African (n = 34 origin, including Elite (n = 49 and Viremic controllers (n = 62. 21 SNPs were identified, comprising five in the coding region and 16 in the non-coding regions and 3'UTR. The variants in the coding region were infrequent and had no major impact on protein structure according to SIFT and PolyPhen score. One intronic SNP (rs2737828 was significantly under-represented in Caucasian patients (P<0.0001 compared to healthy controls (HapMap. Two SNPs showed a non-significant trend towards association with slower disease progression but not with LEDGF/p75 expression. The observed variation in LEDGF/p75 expression was not correlated with disease progression. CONCLUSIONS: LEDGF/p75 is a highly conserved protein. Two non-coding polymorphisms were identified indicating a correlation with disease outcome, but further

  6. Globalization’s unexpected impact on soybean production in South America: linkages between preferences for non-genetically modified crops, eco-certifications, and land use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Rachael D.; Rueda, Ximena; Lambin, Eric F.

    2013-12-01

    The land use impacts of globalization and of increasing global food and fuel demand depend on the trade relationships that emerge between consuming and producing countries. In the case of soybean production, increasing trade between South American farmers and consumers in Asia and Europe has facilitated soybean expansion in the Amazon, Chaco, and Cerrado biomes. While these telecouplings have been well documented, there is little understanding of how quality preferences influence trade patterns and supply chains, incentivizing or discouraging particular land use practices. In this study we provide empirical evidence that Brazil’s continued production of non-genetically modified (GM) soybeans has increased its competitive advantage in European countries with preferences against GM foods. Brazil’s strong trade relationship with European consumers has facilitated an upgrading of the soybean supply chain. Upgraded soybean supply chains create new conservation opportunities by allowing farmers to differentiate their products based on environmental quality in order to access premiums in niche markets in Europe. These interactions between GM preferences, trade flows, and supply chain structure help to explain why Brazilian soybean farmers have adopted environmental certification programs on a larger scale than Argentinian, Bolivian, Paraguayan, and Uruguayan soybean producers.

  7. Globalization’s unexpected impact on soybean production in South America: linkages between preferences for non-genetically modified crops, eco-certifications, and land use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, Rachael D; Rueda, Ximena; Lambin, Eric F

    2013-01-01

    The land use impacts of globalization and of increasing global food and fuel demand depend on the trade relationships that emerge between consuming and producing countries. In the case of soybean production, increasing trade between South American farmers and consumers in Asia and Europe has facilitated soybean expansion in the Amazon, Chaco, and Cerrado biomes. While these telecouplings have been well documented, there is little understanding of how quality preferences influence trade patterns and supply chains, incentivizing or discouraging particular land use practices. In this study we provide empirical evidence that Brazil’s continued production of non-genetically modified (GM) soybeans has increased its competitive advantage in European countries with preferences against GM foods. Brazil’s strong trade relationship with European consumers has facilitated an upgrading of the soybean supply chain. Upgraded soybean supply chains create new conservation opportunities by allowing farmers to differentiate their products based on environmental quality in order to access premiums in niche markets in Europe. These interactions between GM preferences, trade flows, and supply chain structure help to explain why Brazilian soybean farmers have adopted environmental certification programs on a larger scale than Argentinian, Bolivian, Paraguayan, and Uruguayan soybean producers. (letter)

  8. Emergence of quinolone resistance among extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in the Central African Republic: genetic characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Thierry

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cross-resistance to quinolones and beta-lactams is frequent in Enterobacteriaceae, due to the wide use of these antibiotics clinically and in the food industry. Prescription of one of these categories of antibiotic may consequently select for bacteria resistant to both categories. Genetic mechanisms of resistance may be secondary to a chromosomal mutation located in quinolone resistance determining region of DNA gyrase or topoisomerase IV or to a plasmid acquisition. The insertion sequence ISCR1 is often associated with qnr and may favour its dissemination in Gram-negative bacteria. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic mechanism of quinolone resistance among extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae strains in the Central African Republic. Findings Among seventeen ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolated from urine, pus or stool between January 2003 and October 2005 in the Central African Republic, nine were resistant to ciprofloxacin (seven from community patients and two from hospitalized patients. The ESBL were previously characterized as CTX-M-15 and SHV-12. Susceptibility to nalidixic acid, norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin, and the minimal inhibitory concentrations of these drugs were determined by disc diffusion and agar dilution methods, respectively. The presence of plasmid-borne ISCR1-qnrA region was determined by PCR and amplicons, if any, were sent for sequencing. Quinolone resistance determining region of DNA gyrase gyrA gene was amplified by PCR and then sequenced for mutation characterization. We found that all CTX-M-producing strains were resistant to the tested quinolones. All the isolates had the same nucleotide mutation at codon 83 of gyrA. Two Escherichia coli strains with the highest MICs were shown to harbour an ISCR1-qnrA1 sequence. This genetic association might favour dissemination of resistance to quinolone and perhaps other antibiotics among Enterobacteriaceae

  9. Characterization and genetic dissection of resistance to spotted alfalfa aphid (Therioaphis trifolii) in Medicago truncatula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphuis, Lars G.; Lichtenzveig, Judith; Peng, Kefan; Guo, Su-Min; Klingler, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Aphids cause significant yield losses in agricultural crops worldwide. Medicago truncatula, a model legume, cultivated pasture species in Australia and close relative of alfalfa (Medicago sativa), was used to study the defence response against Therioaphis trifolii f. maculate [spotted alfalfa aphid (SAA)]. Aphid performance and plant damage were compared among three accessions. A20 is highly susceptible, A17 has moderate resistance, and Jester is strongly resistant. Subsequent analyses using A17 and A20, reciprocal F1s and an A17×A20 recombinant inbred line (RIL) population revealed that this moderate resistance is phloem mediated and involves antibiosis and tolerance but not antixenosis. Electrical penetration graph analysis also identified a novel waveform termed extended potential drop, which occurred following SAA infestation of M. truncatula. Genetic dissection using the RIL population revealed three quantitative trait loci on chromosomes 3, 6, and 7 involved in distinct modes of aphid defence including antibiosis and tolerance. An antibiosis locus resides on linkage group 3 (LG3) and is derived from A17, whereas a plant tolerance and antibiosis locus resides on LG6 and is derived from A20, which exhibits strong temporary tolerance. The loci identified reside in regions harbouring classical resistance genes, and introgression of these loci in current medic cultivars may help provide durable resistance to SAA, while elucidation of their molecular mechanisms may provide valuable insight into other aphid–plant interactions. PMID:24058162

  10. Genetic characterization of caffeine degradation by bacteria and its potential applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Ryan M; Mohanty, Sujit K; Gopishetty, Sridhar; Subramanian, Mani

    2015-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to grow on caffeine as sole carbon and nitrogen source has been known for over 40 years. Extensive research into this subject has revealed two distinct pathways, N-demethylation and C-8 oxidation, for bacterial caffeine degradation. However, the enzymological and genetic basis for bacterial caffeine degradation has only recently been discovered. This review article discusses the recent discoveries of the genes responsible for both N-demethylation and C-8 oxidation. All of the genes for the N-demethylation pathway, encoding enzymes in the Rieske oxygenase family, reside on 13.2-kb genomic DNA fragment found in Pseudomonas putida CBB5. A nearly identical DNA fragment, with homologous genes in similar orientation, is found in Pseudomonas sp. CES. Similarly, genes for C-8 oxidation of caffeine have been located on a 25.2-kb genomic DNA fragment of Pseudomonas sp. CBB1. The C-8 oxidation genes encode enzymes similar to those found in the uric acid metabolic pathway of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Various biotechnological applications of these genes responsible for bacterial caffeine degradation, including bio-decaffeination, remediation of caffeine-contaminated environments, production of chemical and fuels and development of diagnostic tests have also been demonstrated. PMID:25678373

  11. Genetic characterization of H5N1 influenza A viruses isolated from zoo tigers in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amonsin, Alongkorn; Payungporn, Sunchai; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje; Suradhat, Sanipa; Pariyothorn, Nuananong; Tantilertcharoen, Rachod; Damrongwantanapokin, Sudarat; Buranathai, Chantanee; Chaisingh, Arunee; Songserm, Thaweesak; Poovorawan, Yong

    2006-01-20

    The H5N1 avian influenza virus outbreak among zoo tigers in mid-October 2004, with 45 animals dead, indicated that the avian influenza virus could cause lethal infection in a large mammalian species apart from humans. In this outbreak investigation, six H5N1 isolates were identified and two isolates (A/Tiger/Thailand/CU-T3/04 and A/Tiger/Thailand/CU-T7/04) were selected for whole genome analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of the 8 gene segments showed that the viruses clustered within the lineage of H5N1 avian isolates from Thailand and Vietnam. The hemagglutinin (HA) gene of the viruses displayed polybasic amino acids at the cleavage site, identical to those of the 2004 H5N1 isolates, which by definition are highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). In addition, sequence analyses revealed that the viruses isolated from tigers harbored few genetic changes compared with the viruses having infected chicken, humans, tigers and a leopard isolated from the early 2004 H5N1 outbreaks. Sequence analyses also showed that the tiger H5N1 isolated in October 2004 was more closely related to the chicken H5N1 isolated in July than that from January. Interestingly, all the 6 tiger H5N1 isolates contained a lysine substitution at position 627 of the PB2 protein similar to the human, but distinct from the original avian isolates.

  12. Corneal virulence, cytopathic effect on human keratocytes and genetic characterization of Acanthamoeba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badenoch, P R; Adams, M; Coster, D J

    1995-02-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is a sight-threatening complication of corneal trauma or contact lens wear. Although the majority of corneal isolates of Acanthamoeba belong to Group II in the Pussard-Pons classification based on cyst morphology, they have been placed in at least six species and their genetic relatedness is uncertain. The aim of this study was to determine the virulence of, and the relationship among, strains derived from the cornea, the nasal mucosa, and other environmental sources. To assess virulence, 10(4) trophozoites of each strain were incubated with monolayers of human corneal fibroblasts. By day 7, 12 of 29 strains tested had induced significant cytopathic changes. In addition, inocula of 10(4) cysts or trophozoites with 10(6) Corynebacterium xerosis were injected into the corneas of Porton rats; 11 amoebic strains induced infection within 7 days. The correlation between the virulence of trophozoites in vitro and in vivo was 86%. Using allozyme electrophoresis, 23 Acanthamoeba strains clustered into 5 major phylogenic divisions. Three divisions contained one or more strains that were virulent in the rat cornea. Virulent Pussard-Pons Group II strains clustered tightly to a fixed allelic difference of 13.6%. The eight corneal isolates clustered to 33%, dividing into three lineages. Five avirulent nasal isolates were strongly differentiated from other Group II strains. The results were not in accord with species designations based primarily on morphological criteria. These data suggest that particular subsets of Acanthamoeba strains are virulent in the human cornea.

  13. Mitochondrial genetic characterization of Gujar population living in the Northwest areas of Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inam Ullah

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diversity of communities with specific cultural, ethnic, lingual and geographical backgrounds makes Pakistani society a suitable study subject to unravel the early human migrations, evolutionary history of population having about 18 ethnic groups. Gujars are mostly Indic-speaking nomadic herders with the claims of multiple origins in the sub-continent. Present study was aimed at the determination of maternal lineage of Gujars by mitochondrial DNA analysis. Methods: Total DNA from the human buccal cells was isolated using modified phenol chloroform method. Purified DNA was used for the PCR amplification of mitochondrial Hyper Variable Region 1 and 2 (HVR1 & 2. The nucleotide sequences of amplified PCR products were used to explore the maternal lineage of the Gujar population residing in Northern Pakistan. Results: Haplotypes, allele frequencies and population data of the mitochondrial control region was determined in 73 unrelated individuals belonging to Gujar ethnic group of Northwest areas of Pakistan. Total 46 diverse haplotypes were identified out of which 29 were found unique with (0.9223 genetic diversity and (0.9097 power of discrimination. Haplogroup R was the most frequent (48% followed by haplogroup M (45% and N (7%. Conclusion: We found that the Gujar population has multiple maternal gene pool comprising of South Asian, West Eurasian, East Eurasian, Southeast Asian and fractions of Eastern Asian, Eastern Europe and Northern Asian lineages. This study will contribute for the development of mitochondrial DNA database for Pakistani population.

  14. [Genetic characterization of poliovirus isolates from environmental sewage surveillance in Shandong, 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Ji, Sheng-Xiang; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Li, Yan; Zhang, Yong; Tao, Ze-Xin; Wang, Hai-Yan; Zhu, Shuang-Li; Song, Li-Zhi; Feng, Yi; Liu, Yao; Ji, Feng; Lin, Xiao-Juan; Feng, Lei; Hiromu, Yoshida; Xu, Ai-Qiang

    2011-07-01

    To investigate the genetic characteristics of poliovirus isolates from environmental sewage surveillance in Shandong province, we collected sewage samples in Jinan and Linyi City. Serotyping and VP1/ 3D sequencing were performed on polioviruses isolated from the concentrated sewage samples, and VP1 mutation and recombination were analyzed. Thirty-two of sewage samples were collected, and polioviruses were detected in 10 of the samples with a positive rate of 31.3%. Eighteen Sabin strains were isolated including three type 1, nine type 2, and six type 3 polioviruses, and the number of nucleotide substitutions in VP1 coding region varied from 0 to 4. Recombination was found in three Sabin 2 and four Sabin 3 polioviruses. Analysis of neurovirulence sites of VP1 revealed that one Sabin 1 vaccine strain had a nucleotide change of A to G at nt 2749, one Sabin 2 strain had a nucleotide change of A to G at nt 2908, three Sabin 2 strains had a nucleotide change of U to C at nt 2909, and all six Sabin 3 strains had a nucleotide change of C to U at nt 2493. Poliovirus vaccine strains could be isolated from environmental sewage with a high rate of gene recombination and back mutation of neuvirulence-associated sites. None of wild-type poliovirus or vaccine-derived poliovirus was detected.

  15. Characterization and genetic dissection of resistance to spotted alfalfa aphid (Therioaphis trifolii) in Medicago truncatula

    KAUST Repository

    Kamphuis, L. G.

    2013-09-21

    Aphids cause significant yield losses in agricultural crops worldwide. Medicago truncatula, a model legume, cultivated pasture species in Australia and close relative of alfalfa (Medicago sativa), was used to study the defence response against Therioaphis trifolii f. maculate [spotted alfalfa aphid (SAA)]. Aphid performance and plant damage were compared among three accessions. A20 is highly susceptible, A17 has moderate resistance, and Jester is strongly resistant. Subsequent analyses using A17 and A20, reciprocal F1s and an A17×A20 recombinant inbred line (RIL) population revealed that this moderate resistance is phloem mediated and involves antibiosis and tolerance but not antixenosis. Electrical penetration graph analysis also identified a novel waveform termed extended potential drop, which occurred following SAA infestation of M. truncatula. Genetic dissection using the RIL population revealed three quantitative trait loci on chromosomes 3, 6, and 7 involved in distinct modes of aphid defence including antibiosis and tolerance. An antibiosis locus resides on linkage group 3 (LG3) and is derived from A17, whereas a plant tolerance and antibiosis locus resides on LG6 and is derived from A20, which exhibits strong temporary tolerance. The loci identified reside in regions harbouring classical resistance genes, and introgression of these loci in current medic cultivars may help provide durable resistance to SAA, while elucidation of their molecular mechanisms may provide valuable insight into other aphid–plant interactions.

  16. Molecular characterization of melanoma cases in Denmark suspected of genetic predisposition.

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    Karin A W Wadt

    Full Text Available Both environmental and host factors influence risk of cutaneous melanoma (CM, and worldwide, the incidence varies depending on constitutional determinants of skin type and pigmentation, latitude, and patterns of sun exposure. We performed genetic analysis of CDKN2A, CDK4, BAP1, MC1R, and MITFp.E318K in Danish high-risk melanoma cases and found CDKN2A germline mutations in 11.3% of CM families with three or more affected individuals, including four previously undescribed mutations. Rare mutations were also seen in CDK4 and BAP1, while MC1R variants were common, occurring at more than twice the frequency compared to Danish controls. The MITF p.E318K variant similarly occurred at an approximately three-fold higher frequency in melanoma cases than controls. To conclude, we propose that mutation screening of CDKN2A and CDK4 in Denmark should predominantly be performed in families with at least 3 cases of CM. In addition, we recommend that testing of BAP1 should not be conducted routinely in CM families but should be reserved for families with CM and uveal melanoma, or mesothelioma.

  17. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of methicillin-resistant staphylococci isolated from veterinary hospitals in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Bo Youn; Youn, Jung-Ho; Shin, Sook; Hwang, Sun Young; Park, Yong Ho

    2012-05-01

    Staphylococci were isolated from veterinary staff, hospitalized animals, and medical equipment from 2 major tertiary veterinary hospitals in South Korea to investigate antimicrobial resistance and genetic relatedness. The detection rate for staphylococci was 55.2% (111/201 samples), and 11 species were identified among the collected staphylococcal strains. The most prevalent species were Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (52/111, 46.8%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (21/111, 18.9%), and Staphylococcus aureus (19/111, 17.1%). The methicillin-resistance rates of staphylococci isolated from veterinary staff and medical equipment were higher than those from hospitalized animals. The genotype of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains in the current study was sequence type (ST)72-SCCmec IVc-t324, which is similar to the genotype of prevalent MRSA strains in human beings and food animals in South Korea. Among the mecA-positive S. pseudintermedius isolates, SCCmec V was most prevalent in strains originating from both veterinary staff and hospitalized animals. SCCmec IVa was detected in methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis, whereas SCCmec IVc was found in other methicillin-resistant, coagulase-negative staphylococci. The SCCmec typing, antimicrobial susceptibility tests, and pulsed field gel electrophoresis results showed that methicillin-resistant staphylococci dissemination between hospitalized animals and veterinary staff is possible in South Korean veterinary hospitals.

  18. Genetic algorithms-based inversion of multimode guided waves for cortical bone characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochud, N.; Vallet, Q.; Bala, Y.; Follet, H.; Minonzio, J.-G.; Laugier, P.

    2016-10-01

    Recent progress in quantitative ultrasound has exploited the multimode waveguide response of long bones. Measurements of the guided modes, along with suitable waveguide modeling, have the potential to infer strength-related factors such as stiffness (mainly determined by cortical porosity) and cortical thickness. However, the development of such model-based approaches is challenging, in particular because of the multiparametric nature of the inverse problem. Current estimation methods in the bone field rely on a number of assumptions for pairing the incomplete experimental data with the theoretical guided modes (e.g. semi-automatic selection and classification of the data). The availability of an alternative inversion scheme that is user-independent is highly desirable. Thus, this paper introduces an efficient inversion method based on genetic algorithms using multimode guided waves, in which the mode-order is kept blind. Prior to its evaluation on bone, our proposal is validated using laboratory-controlled measurements on isotropic plates and bone-mimicking phantoms. The results show that the model parameters (i.e. cortical thickness and porosity) estimated from measurements on a few ex vivo human radii are in good agreement with the reference values derived from x-ray micro-computed tomography. Further, the cortical thickness estimated from in vivo measurements at the third from the distal end of the radius is in good agreement with the values delivered by site-matched high-resolution x-ray peripheral computed tomography.

  19. America's challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, G N

    1968-01-01

    As government increasingly recognizes its own obligations to support and provide family planning as a health and social measure, serious questions are raised as to the proper role for Planned Parenthood World Federation as a private organization. Federal programs both at home and abroad tend to make private fundraising more difficult, whatever the role of this organization may be. Contrary to common impression, experience thus far indicates that the existence of governmental programs does not decrease demands on Planned Parenthood as a private agency. A wide gap also exists between public acceptance, which has been realized, and public conviction, which still has not been accepted. Only those who feel distress at the vision of an all-encompassing megalopolis, only those with concern for the qualify of life in the crowd, and only those who see finite limits of resources recognize that the US must someday plan a halt to population growth. As the gap between the developed and the underdeveloped world widens, economists point out that the US, with less than 6% of the world's population, already consumes some 50% of the world's available raw materials. Business and government leaders are beginning to understand the rate at which an industrial and affluent society consumes the world's substance and threatens the environment. If the assumption is correct that the population explosion constitutes a major threat to life on earth, then America's own attitudes and actions at home, as well as abroad and in the developing countries, are vital. In the next few years Planned Parenthood faces the task of converting the tide of public acceptance into one of conviction and effective action on a giant scale both at home and abroad. In its effort, Planned Parenthood has continued to expand its own service functions. It now has 157 local affiliates with an additional 30 in the organizational stage. In 1967 Planned Parenthood affiliates operated 470 family planning centers, 71 more than

  20. Chemical and genetic characterization of bacteriocins: antimicrobial peptides for food safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Abigail B; Worobo, Randy W

    2014-01-15

    Antimicrobial peptides are produced across all domains of life. Among these diverse compounds, those produced by bacteria have been most successfully applied as agents of biocontrol in food and agriculture. Bacteriocins are ribosomally synthesized, proteinaceous compounds that inhibit the growth of closely related bacteria. Even within the subcategory of bacteriocins, the peptides vary significantly in terms of the gene cluster responsible for expression, and chemical and structural composition. The polycistronic gene cluster generally includes a structural gene and various combinations of immunity, secretion, and regulatory genes and modifying enzymes. Chemical variation can exist in amino acid identity, chain length, secondary and tertiary structural features, as well as specificity of active sites. This diversity posits bacteriocins as potential antimicrobial agents with a range of functions and applications. Those produced by food-grade bacteria and applied in normally occurring concentrations can be used as GRAS-status food additives. However, successful application requires thorough characterization. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Genetic Characterization of a Panel of Diverse HIV-1 Isolates at Seven International Sites.

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    Bhavna Hora

    Full Text Available HIV-1 subtypes and drug resistance are routinely tested by many international surveillance groups. However, results from different sites often vary. A systematic comparison of results from multiple sites is needed to determine whether a standardized protocol is required for consistent and accurate data analysis. A panel of well-characterized HIV-1 isolates (N = 50 from the External Quality Assurance Program Oversight Laboratory (EQAPOL was assembled for evaluation at seven international sites. This virus panel included seven subtypes, six circulating recombinant forms (CRFs, nine unique recombinant forms (URFs and three group O viruses. Seven viruses contained 10 major drug resistance mutations (DRMs. HIV-1 isolates were prepared at a concentration of 107 copies/ml and compiled into blinded panels. Subtypes and DRMs were determined with partial or full pol gene sequences by conventional Sanger sequencing and/or Next Generation Sequencing (NGS. Subtype and DRM results were reported and decoded for comparison with full-length genome sequences generated by EQAPOL. The partial pol gene was amplified by RT-PCR and sequenced for 89.4%-100% of group M viruses at six sites. Subtyping results of majority of the viruses (83%-97.9% were correctly determined for the partial pol sequences. All 10 major DRMs in seven isolates were detected at these six sites. The complete pol gene sequence was also obtained by NGS at one site. However, this method missed six group M viruses and sequences contained host chromosome fragments. Three group O viruses were only characterized with additional group O-specific RT-PCR primers employed by one site. These results indicate that PCR protocols and subtyping tools should be standardized to efficiently amplify diverse viruses and more consistently assign virus genotypes, which is critical for accurate global subtype and drug resistance surveillance. Targeted NGS analysis of partial pol sequences can serve as an alternative

  2. Isolation and characterization of functional tripartite group II introns using a Tn5-based genetic screen.

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    Christine Ritlop

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Group II introns are RNA enzymes that splice themselves from pre-mRNA transcripts. Most bacterial group II introns harbour an open reading frame (ORF, coding for a protein with reverse transcriptase, maturase and occasionally DNA binding and endonuclease activities. Some ORF-containing group II introns were shown to be mobile retroelements that invade new DNA target sites. From an evolutionary perspective, group II introns are hypothesized to be the ancestors of the spliceosome-dependent nuclear introns and the small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs--U1, U2, U4, U5 and U6 that are important functional elements of the spliceosome machinery. The ability of some group II introns fragmented in two or three pieces to assemble and undergo splicing in trans supports the theory that spliceosomal snRNAs evolved from portions of group II introns. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a transposon-based genetic screen to explore the ability of the Ll.LtrB group II intron from the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis to be fragmented into three pieces in vivo. Trans-splicing tripartite variants of Ll.LtrB were selected using a highly efficient and sensitive trans-splicing/conjugation screen. We report that numerous fragmentation sites located throughout Ll.LtrB support tripartite trans-splicing, showing that this intron is remarkably tolerant to fragmentation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work unveils the great versatility of group II intron fragments to assemble and accurately trans-splice their flanking exons in vivo. The selected introns represent the first evidence of functional tripartite group II introns in bacteria and provide experimental support for the proposed evolutionary relationship between group II introns and snRNAs.

  3. Identification and genetic characterization of hepacivirus and pegivirus in commercial equine serum products in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Gang; Huang, Ji; Yang, Qiliang; Xu, Haibin; Wu, Peixin; Fu, Cheng; Li, Shoujun

    2017-01-01

    Equine hepacivirus (EqHV), equine pegivirus (EPgV) and Theiler's disease-associated virus (TDAV) are three novel equine viruses in the family Flaviviridae. EqHV and EPgV have been identified to circulate in the equine population worldwide, whereas TDAV has not been detected in equines since the first reported case. To date, no studies have focused on investigating EqHV, EPgV and TDAV in commercial equine sera or equine blood products in China. Considering the potential threat of EqHV, EPgV and TDAV to biosecurity and considering their possible influences on research results, equine sera for cell culture propagation and pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG) were purchased from different companies in China and investigated for EqHV, EPgV and TDAV in this study. By performing nested PCR or two rounds of PCR targeting the viral NS3 gene, four serum samples were confirmed to be EqHV-, EPgV-, or TDAV-RNA positive; all of the PMSG samples were negative for these three viruses. Subsequent sequencing results indicated that the serum samples contained multiple viral variants of EqHV, EPgV or TDAV, and a genetic analysis based on the partial NS3 gene of the three equine viruses was performed. Our study is the first to confirm the presence of EqHV, EPgV and TDAV in equine sera for cell culture propagation that is commercially available in China and provides the first demonstration of the presence of TDAV in China.

  4. Phenotypic and Genetic Characterization of a Cohort of Pediatric Wilson Disease Patients

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    Elnaghy Suzan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Egypt, Wilson disease seems to be under diagnosed and clinical data on large cohorts are limited. The aim of this study is to highlight the clinical, laboratory and genetic characteristics of this disease in our pediatric population as well as to report our experience with both treatment options and outcome. Methods The study included 77 patients from 50 unrelated families (62 were followed up for a mean period of 58.9 ± 6.4 months and 27 were asymptomatic siblings. Data were collected retrospectively by record analysis and patient interviews. Diagnosis was confirmed by sequencing of the ATP7B gene in 64 patients Results Our patients had unique characteristics compared to other populations. They had a younger age of onset (median: 10 years, higher prevalence of Kayser-Fleischer rings (97.6% in the symptomatic patients, low ceruloplasmin (93.5%, high rate of parental consanguinity (78.9% as well as a more severe course. 71.42% of those on long term D-penicillamine improved or were stable during the follow up with severe side effects occurring in only 11.5%. Preemptive treatment with zinc monotherapy was an effective non-toxic alternative to D-penicillamine. Homozygous mutations were found in 85.7%, yet limited by the large number of mutations detected, it was difficult to find genotype-phenotype correlations. Missense mutations were the most common while protein-truncating mutations resulted in a more severe course with higher incidence of acute liver failure and neurological symptoms. Conclusions Egyptian children with Wilson disease present with early Kayser-Fleischer rings and early onset of liver and neurological disease. The mutational spectrum identified differs from that observed in other countries. The high rate of homozygous mutations (reflecting the high rate of consanguinity may potentially offer further insights on genotype-phenotype correlation

  5. Prevalence and genetic characterization of pertactin-deficient Bordetella pertussis in Japan.

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    Nao Otsuka

    Full Text Available The adhesin pertactin (Prn is one of the major virulence factors of Bordetella pertussis, the etiological agent of whooping cough. However, a significant prevalence of Prn-deficient (Prn(- B. pertussis was observed in Japan. The Prn(- isolate was first discovered in 1997, and 33 (27% Prn(- isolates were identified among 121 B. pertussis isolates collected from 1990 to 2009. Sequence analysis revealed that all the Prn(- isolates harbor exclusively the vaccine-type prn1 allele and that loss of Prn expression is caused by 2 different mutations: an 84-bp deletion of the prn signal sequence (prn1ΔSS, n = 24 and an IS481 insertion in prn1 (prn1::IS481, n = 9. The frequency of Prn(- isolates, notably those harboring prn1ΔSS, significantly increased since the early 2000s, and Prn(- isolates were subsequently found nationwide. Multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA revealed that 24 (73% of 33 Prn(- isolates belong to MLVA-186, and 6 and 3 Prn(- isolates belong to MLVA-194 and MLVA-226, respectively. The 3 MLVA types are phylogenetically closely related, suggesting that the 2 Prn(- clinical strains (harboring prn1ΔSS and prn1::IS481 have clonally expanded in Japan. Growth competition assays in vitro also demonstrated that Prn(- isolates have a higher growth potential than the Prn(+ back-mutants from which they were derived. Our observations suggested that human host factors (genetic factors and immune status that select for Prn(- strains have arisen and that Prn expression is not essential for fitness under these conditions.

  6. Genetic and molecular characterization of three novel S-haplotypes in sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Tatsuya; Potter, Daniel; Tao, Ryutaro; Vieira, Cristina P; Vieira, Jorge; Iezzoni, Amy F

    2008-01-01

    Tetraploid sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) exhibits gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) whereby the specificity of self-pollen rejection is controlled by alleles of the stylar and pollen specificity genes, S-RNase and SFB (S haplotype-specific F-box protein gene), respectively. As sour cherry selections can be either self-compatible (SC) or self-incompatible (SI), polyploidy per se does not result in SC. Instead the genotype-dependent loss of SI in sour cherry is due to the accumulation of non-functional S-haplotypes. The presence of two or more non-functional S-haplotypes within sour cherry 2x pollen renders that pollen SC. Two new S-haplotypes from sour cherry, S(33) and S(34), that are presumed to be contributed by the P. fruticosa species parent, the complete S-RNase and SFB sequences of a third S-haplotype, S(35), plus the presence of two previously identified sweet cherry S-haplotypes, S(14) and S(16) are described here. Genetic segregation data demonstrated that the S(16)-, S(33)-, S(34)-, and S(35)-haplotypes present in sour cherry are fully functional. This result is consistent with our previous finding that 'hetero-allelic' pollen is incompatible in sour cherry. Phylogenetic analyses of the SFB and S-RNase sequences from available Prunus species reveal that the relationships among S-haplotypes show no correspondence to known organismal relationships at any taxonomic level within Prunus, indicating that polymorphisms at the S-locus have been maintained throughout the evolution of the genus. Furthermore, the phylogenetic relationships among SFB sequences are generally incongruent with those among S-RNase sequences for the same S-haplotypes. Hypotheses compatible with these results are discussed.

  7. WAGNER syndrome: anatomic, functional and genetic characterization of a Portuguese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Joana R; Tavares-Ferreira, João; Estrela-Silva, Sérgio; Rocha, Paulo; Brandão, Elisete; Faria, Pedro Alves; Falcão-Reis, Fernando; Rocha-Sousa, Amândio

    2018-01-01

    To report the clinical (anatomic and functional) and genetic findings of Wagner Syndrome (WS) in a Portuguese family. Nine members of the family agreed to be examined. All had complete clinical eye examinations. The proband and selected patients underwent color fundus photography, spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), automatic static white-on-white computerized perimetry, and electrophysiology assessment (flash ERG, multifocal(mf) ERG and dark adaptometry). A pedigree was constructed based on interviews with known affected subjects. Genomic DNA samples derived from venous blood were collected from all affected family members examined. Twenty-eight family members are affected. This family has the typical features of Wagner Syndrome, namely an empty vitreous cavity with veils, mild myopia and cataract. Four examined patients underwent vitreoretinal surgery due to abnormal peripheral vitreoretinal adhesions with peripheral retinal traction (n = 3). Retinal detachment was observed in 5 of the examined subjects. Four of them occurred between the ages of 5 and 15 years. Chorioretinal atrophy is also a frequent finding which results in moderate to severe visual field and advanced rod-cone dystrophy from younger ages, also confirmed by absence of scotopic function on dark adaptation. The macular dysfunction on mfERG was profound and of early onset. A heterozygous mutation in intron 7 of the VCAN gene (c.4004-1G > A) was found. We described a rare autosomal dominant vitreoretinopathy with near complete penetrance in a Portuguese family. Abnormal peripheral vitreoretinal adhesions, retinal detachment and chorioretinal atrophy are present in most of the examined individuals at young ages. Early onset of advanced visual field and electrophysiologic abnormalities were observed in this family. We also added relevant information to the literature by reporting our experience in surgical management of Wagner Syndrome patients with, and at risk of, retinal

  8. Genetic and antigenic characterization of novel pestivirus genotypes: implications for classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becher, Paul; Avalos Ramirez, Ramiro; Orlich, Michaela; Cedillo Rosales, Sibilina; Koenig, Matthias; Schweizer, Matthias; Stalder, Hanspeter; Schirrmeier, Horst; Thiel, Heinz-Juergen

    2003-01-01

    Currently, the genus Pestivirus comprises the four approved species Bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 (BVDV-1), BVDV-2, Classical swine fever virus (CSFV), and Border disease virus (BDV) and one tentative fifth species represented by a single strain (H138) isolated from a giraffe in Kenya more than 30 years ago. To further address the issue of heterogeneity of pestiviruses we have determined the entire N pro and E2 coding sequences for several new pestivirus isolates. Interestingly, phylogenetic analysis revealed that one pestivirus isolated in the 1990s in Africa is closely related to strain H138. Moreover, several novel pestiviruses isolated from sheep group together with the previously described strain V60 (Reindeer-1) isolated from a reindeer, whereas one ovine pestivirus strain (Gifhorn) significantly differs from all previously described pestiviruses, including BDV. We propose to term these mainly sheep-derived pestiviruses BDV-2 (V60-like isolates) and BDV-3 (Gifhorn); consequently, the 'classical' BDV isolates should be termed BDV-1. As an additional criterion for segregation of pestiviruses, the antigenic relatedness of pestivirus isolates covering all observed major genotypes was studied by cross-neutralization assays. Analysis of the antigenic similarities indicated the presence of seven major antigenic groups corresponding to BVDV-1, BVDV-2, CSFV, BDV-1, BDV-2, BDV-3, and 'giraffe'. Taking into account the host origin, the lack of differences concerning the course of disease, and the results of our genetic and antigenic analyses, we suggest that BDV-1, BDV-2, and BDV-3 should be considered as major genotypes within the species BDV

  9. Genetic characterization of Cryptosporidium in animal and human isolates from Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijjawi, Nawal; Mukbel, Rami; Yang, Rongchang; Ryan, Una

    2016-09-15

    Little is known about the epidemiology of Cryptosporidium in Jordan and to date, only one genotyping study has been conducted on Cryptosporidium isolates from Jordanian children. In the present study, a total of 284 faecal samples from Jordanian cattle, sheep, goats and chicken and 48 human faecal samples were screened for the presence of Cryptosporidium using an 18S quantitative PCR (qPCR) and a C. parvum/C. hominis specific qPCR at a lectin locus. Of these, 37 of 284 animal faecal samples were positive by qPCR at the 18S locus giving an overall prevalence of 11.6%. The point prevalence of Cryptosporidium in chickens, sheep, horses, cattle and goats ranged from 4.8% (chickens) to 18.7% (cattle). A total of six species were detected; C. xiaoi (n=9),C. andersoni (n=7),C. ryanae (n=5),C. parvum (n=4),C. baileyi (n=1) and a genetically distinct and potentially novel species in two isolates from horses. Sub-genotype analysis of the 4 C. parvum isolates at the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60) locus identified subtype IIaA19G2R1 (n=2) and IIaA16GR1 (n=2). For the human samples, 4 positives (8.3% prevalence) were detected. Of these, two were C. parvum (subtypes IIdA20G1 and IIaA15G2R1) and two were C. hominis (subtypes 1bA9G3 and 1bA10G2R2). Further studies are required to better understand the epidemiology and transmission of Cryptosporidium in Jordan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A Binary Genetic Approach to Characterize TRPM5 Cells in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumakshi, Soumya; Voigt, Anja; Hübner, Sandra; Hermans-Borgmeyer, Irm; Ortalli, Ana; Pyrski, Martina; Dörr, Janka; Zufall, Frank; Flockerzi, Veit; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Montmayeur, Jean-Pierre; Boehm, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    Transient receptor potential channel subfamily M member 5 (TRPM5) is an important downstream signaling component in a subset of taste receptor cells making it a potential target for taste modulation. Interestingly, TRPM5 has been detected in extra-oral tissues; however, the function of extra-gustatory TRPM5-expressing cells is less well understood. To facilitate visualization and manipulation of TRPM5-expressing cells in mice, we generated a Cre knock-in TRPM5 allele by homologous recombination. We then used the novel TRPM5-IRES-Cre mouse strain to report TRPM5 expression by activating a τGFP transgene. To confirm faithful coexpression of τGFP and TRPM5 we generated and validated a new anti-TRPM5 antiserum enabling us to analyze acute TRPM5 protein expression. τGFP cells were found in taste bud cells of the vallate, foliate, and fungiform papillae as well as in the palate. We also detected TRPM5 expression in several other tissues such as in the septal organ of Masera. Interestingly, in the olfactory epithelium of adult mice acute TRPM5 expression was detected in only one (short microvillar cells) of two cell populations previously reported to express TRPM5. The TRPM5-IC mouse strain described here represents a novel genetic tool and will facilitate the study and tissue-specific manipulation of TRPM5-expressing cells in vivo. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. An altered redox balance and increased genetic instability characterize primary fibroblasts derived from xeroderma pigmentosum group A patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parlanti, Eleonora; Pietraforte, Donatella; Iorio, Egidio; Visentin, Sergio; De Nuccio, Chiara; Zijno, Andrea; D’Errico, Mariarosaria; Simonelli, Valeria; Sanchez, Massimo; Fattibene, Paola; Falchi, Mario; Dogliotti, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Increased levels and different types of intracellular radical species as well as an altered glutathione redox state characterize XP-A human cells when compared to normal. • A more glycolytic metabolism and higher ATP levels are associated with alteration of mitochondrial morphology and response to mitochondrial toxicants when XPA is defective. • XP-A human cells show increased spontaneous micronuclei frequency, a hallmark of cancer risk. - Abstract: Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP)-A patients are characterized by increased solar skin carcinogenesis and present also neurodegeneration. XPA deficiency is associated with defective nucleotide excision repair (NER) and increased basal levels of oxidatively induced DNA damage. In this study we search for the origin of increased levels of oxidatively generated DNA lesions in XP-A cell genome and then address the question of whether increased oxidative stress might drive genetic instability. We show that XP-A human primary fibroblasts present increased levels and different types of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) as compared to normal fibroblasts, with O 2− · and H 2 O 2 being the major reactive species. Moreover, XP-A cells are characterized by decreased reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratios as compared to normal fibroblasts. The significant increase of ROS levels and the alteration of the glutathione redox state following silencing of XPA confirmed the causal relationship between a functional XPA and the control of redox balance. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1 H NMR) analysis of the metabolic profile revealed a more glycolytic metabolism and higher ATP levels in XP-A than in normal primary fibroblasts. This perturbation of bioenergetics is associated with different morphology and response of mitochondria to targeted toxicants. In line with cancer susceptibility, XP-A primary fibroblasts showed increased spontaneous micronuclei (MN) frequency, a hallmark of cancer

  12. An altered redox balance and increased genetic instability characterize primary fibroblasts derived from xeroderma pigmentosum group A patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parlanti, Eleonora [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Pietraforte, Donatella; Iorio, Egidio; Visentin, Sergio; De Nuccio, Chiara [Department of Cell Biology and Neurosciences, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Zijno, Andrea; D’Errico, Mariarosaria; Simonelli, Valeria [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Sanchez, Massimo [Department of Cell Biology and Neurosciences, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Fattibene, Paola [Department of Technology and Health, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Falchi, Mario [National AIDS Center, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Dogliotti, Eugenia, E-mail: dogliotti@iss.it [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Increased levels and different types of intracellular radical species as well as an altered glutathione redox state characterize XP-A human cells when compared to normal. • A more glycolytic metabolism and higher ATP levels are associated with alteration of mitochondrial morphology and response to mitochondrial toxicants when XPA is defective. • XP-A human cells show increased spontaneous micronuclei frequency, a hallmark of cancer risk. - Abstract: Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP)-A patients are characterized by increased solar skin carcinogenesis and present also neurodegeneration. XPA deficiency is associated with defective nucleotide excision repair (NER) and increased basal levels of oxidatively induced DNA damage. In this study we search for the origin of increased levels of oxidatively generated DNA lesions in XP-A cell genome and then address the question of whether increased oxidative stress might drive genetic instability. We show that XP-A human primary fibroblasts present increased levels and different types of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) as compared to normal fibroblasts, with O{sub 2−}· and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} being the major reactive species. Moreover, XP-A cells are characterized by decreased reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratios as compared to normal fibroblasts. The significant increase of ROS levels and the alteration of the glutathione redox state following silencing of XPA confirmed the causal relationship between a functional XPA and the control of redox balance. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR) analysis of the metabolic profile revealed a more glycolytic metabolism and higher ATP levels in XP-A than in normal primary fibroblasts. This perturbation of bioenergetics is associated with different morphology and response of mitochondria to targeted toxicants. In line with cancer susceptibility, XP-A primary fibroblasts showed increased spontaneous micronuclei (MN) frequency, a

  13. Partial genetic characterization of Stearoyl Coa-Desaturase´s structural region in Bubalus bubalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.B. Thomazine

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Conjugated Linoleic Acids (CLAs comprise a family of positional and geometric isomers of linoleic acid. The main form of CLA, cis-9, trans-11-C18:2 show positive effects in cancer prevention and treatment. The major dietary sources of these fatty acids are derived from ruminant animals, in particular dairy products. In these animals, the endogenous synthesis mainly occurs in mammary gland by the action of enzyme Stearoyl CoA Desaturase (SCD. Different levels of expression and activity of SCD in mammary gland can explain partially the variation of CLA levels in fat milk. Considering a great fat concentration in bubaline milk and the benefit of a high and positive correlation between fat milk and CLA production, this study was carried on with the intention of sequencing and characterizing part of the gene that codifies SCD in buffaloes. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples of lactating bubaline which begins to the breed Murrah. After the (acho que nao precisa desse the extractions, PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction reactions were made by using primers Z43D1 and E143F1. The fragments obtained in PCR were cloned into “T” vectors and transformed in competent cells DH10B line. After this, three samples of each fragment were sequenced from 5’ and 3’ extremities using a BigDye kit in an automatic sequencer. Sequences were edited in a consensus of each fragment and were submitted to BLAST-n / NCBI for similarity comparisions among other species. The sequence obtained with Z43D1 primers shows 938 bp enclosing exons 1 and 2 and intron 1. The primers E143F1 show 70 bp corresponding to exon 3 of bubaline SCD gene. Similarities were obtained between 85% and 97% among bubaline sequences and sequences of SCD gene described in human, mouse, rat, swine, bovine, caprine and ovine species. This study has permitted the identification and partial characterization of SCD codifing region in Bubalus bubalis specie.

  14. GM1-gangliosidosis in American black bears: clinical, pathological, biochemical and molecular genetic characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Torres, Paola A; Wang, Betty C; Zeng, Bai Jin; Eaton, Samuel; Erdelyi, Ildiko; Ducore, Rebecca; Maganti, Rajanikarath; Keating, John; Perry, Bain J; Tseng, Florina S; Waliszewski, Nicole; Pokras, Mark; Causey, Robert; Seger, Rita; March, Philip; Tidwell, Amy; Pfannl, Rolf; Seyfried, Thomas; Kolodny, Edwin H; Alroy, Joseph

    2014-04-01

    G(M1)-gangliosidosis is a rare progressive neurodegenerative disorder due to an autosomal recessively inherited deficiency of lysosomal β-galactosidase. We have identified seven American black bears (Ursus americanus) found in the Northeast United States suffering from G(M1)-gangliosidosis. This report describes the clinical features, brain MRI, and morphologic, biochemical and molecular genetic findings in the affected bears. Brain lipids were compared with those in the brain of a G(M1)-mouse. The bears presented at ages 10-14 months in poor clinical condition, lethargic, tremulous and ataxic. They continued to decline and were humanely euthanized. The T(2)-weighted MR images of the brain of one bear disclosed white matter hyperintensity. Morphological studies of the brain from five of the bears revealed enlarged neurons with foamy cytoplasm containing granules. Axonal spheroids were present in white matter. Electron microscopic examination revealed lamellated membrane structures within neurons. Cytoplasmic vacuoles were found in the liver, kidneys and chondrocytes and foamy macrophages within the lungs. Acid β-galactosidase activity in cultured skin fibroblasts was only 1-2% of control values. In the brain, ganglioside-bound sialic acid was increased more than 2-fold with G(M1)-ganglioside predominating. G(A1) content was also increased whereas cerebrosides and sulfatides were markedly decreased. The distribution of gangliosides was similar to that in the G(M1)-mouse brain, but the loss of myelin lipids was greater in the brain of the affected bear than in the brain of the G(M1) mouse. Isolated full-length cDNA of the black bear GLB1 gene revealed 86% homology to its human counterpart in nucleotide sequence and 82% in amino acid sequence. GLB1 cDNA from liver tissue of an affected bear contained a homozygous recessive T(1042) to C transition inducing a Tyr348 to His mutation (Y348H) within a highly conserved region of the GLB1 gene. The coincidence of several

  15. Identification, characterization and genetic mapping of TLR1 loci in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palti, Yniv; Rodriguez, M. Fernanda; Gahr, Scott A.; Purcell, Maureen K.; Rexroad, Caird E.; Wiens, Gregory D.

    2010-01-01

    Induction of innate immune pathways is critical for early anti-microbial defense but there is limited understanding of how teleosts recognize microbial molecules and activate these pathways. In mammals, Toll-like receptors (TLR) 1 and 2 form a heterodimer involved in recognizing peptidoglycans and lipoproteins of microbial origin. Herein, we identify and describe the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) TLR1 gene ortholog and its mRNA expression. Two TLR1 loci were identified from a rainbow trout bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library using DNA sequencing and genetic linkage analyses. Full length cDNA clone and direct sequencing of four BACs revealed an intact omTLR1 open reading frame (ORF) located on chromosome 14 and a second locus on chromosome 25 that contains a TLR1 pseudogene. The duplicated trout loci exhibit conserved synteny with other fish genomes that extends beyond the TLR1 gene sequences. The omTLR1 gene includes a single large coding exon similar to all other described TLR1 genes, but unlike other teleosts it also has a 5' UTR exon and intron preceding the large coding exon. The omTLR1 ORF is predicted to encode an 808 amino-acid protein with 69% similarity to the Fugu TLR1 and a conserved pattern of predicted leucine-rich repeats (LRR). Phylogenetic analysis grouped omTLR1 with other fish TLR1 genes on a separate branch from the avian TLR1 and mammalian TLR1, 6 and 10. omTLR1 expression levels in rainbow trout anterior kidney leukocytes were not affected by the human TLR2/6 and TLR2/1 agonists diacylated lipoprotein (Pam2CSK4) and triacylated lipoprotein (Pam3CSK4). However, due to the lack of TLR6 and 10 genes in teleost genomes and up-regulation of TLR1 mRNA in response to LPS and bacterial infection in other fish species we hypothesize an important role for omTLR1 in anti-microbial immunity. Therefore, the identification of a TLR2 ortholog in rainbow trout and the development of assays to measure ligand binding and downstream signaling are

  16. Detection and characterization of small insertion and deletion genetic variants in modern layer chicken genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschiero, Clarissa; Gheyas, Almas A; Ralph, Hannah K; Eory, Lel; Paton, Bob; Kuo, Richard; Fulton, Janet; Preisinger, Rudolf; Kaiser, Pete; Burt, David W

    2015-07-31

    Small insertions and deletions (InDels) constitute the second most abundant class of genetic variants and have been found to be associated with many traits and diseases. The present study reports on the detection and characterisation of about 883 K high quality InDels from the whole-genome analysis of several modern layer chicken lines from diverse breeds. To reduce the error rates seen in InDel detection, this study used the consensus set from two InDel-calling packages: SAMtools and Dindel, as well as stringent post-filtering criteria. By analysing sequence data from 163 chickens from 11 commercial and 5 experimental layer lines, this study detected about 883 K high quality consensus InDels with 93% validation rate and an average density of 0.78 InDels/kb over the genome. Certain chromosomes, viz, GGAZ, 16, 22 and 25 showed very low densities of InDels whereas the highest rate was observed on GGA6. In spite of the higher recombination rates on microchromosomes, the InDel density on these chromosomes was generally lower relative to macrochromosomes possibly due to their higher gene density. About 43-87% of the InDels were found to be fixed within each line. The majority of detected InDels (86%) were 1-5 bases and about 63% were non-repetitive in nature while the rest were tandem repeats of various motif types. Functional annotation identified 613 frameshift, 465 non-frameshift and 10 stop-gain/loss InDels. Apart from the frameshift and stopgain/loss InDels that are expected to affect the translation of protein sequences and their biological activity, 33% of the non-frameshift were predicted as evolutionary intolerant with potential impact on protein functions. Moreover, about 2.5% of the InDels coincided with the most-conserved elements previously mapped on the chicken genome and are likely to define functional elements. InDels potentially affecting protein function were found to be enriched for certain gene-classes e.g. those associated with cell proliferation

  17. Molecular Genetic Characterization of Individual Cancer Cells Isolated via Single-Cell Printing.

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    Julian Riba

    Full Text Available Intratumoral genetic heterogeneity may impact disease outcome. Gold standard for dissecting clonal heterogeneity are single-cell analyses. Here, we present an efficient workflow based on an advanced Single-Cell Printer (SCP device for the study of gene variants in single cancer cells. To allow for precise cell deposition into microwells the SCP was equipped with an automatic dispenser offset compensation, and the 384-microwell plates were electrostatically neutralized. The ejection efficiency was 99.7% for fluorescent beads (n = 2304 and 98.7% for human cells (U-2 OS or Kasumi-1 cancer cell line, acute myeloid leukemia [AML] patient; n = 150. Per fluorescence microscopy, 98.8% of beads were correctly delivered into the wells. A subset of single cells (n = 81 was subjected to whole genome amplification (WGA, which was successful in all cells. On empty droplets, a PCR on LINE1 retrotransposons yielded no product after WGA, verifying the absence of free-floating DNA in SCP-generated droplets. Representative gene variants identified in bulk specimens were sequenced in single-cell WGA DNA. In U-2 OS, 22 of 25 cells yielded results for both an SLC34A2 and TET2 mutation site, including cells harboring the SLC34A2 but not the TET2 mutation. In one cell, the TET2 mutation analysis was inconclusive due to allelic dropout, as assessed via polymorphisms located close to the mutation. Of Kasumi-1, 23 of 33 cells with data on both the KIT and TP53 mutation site harbored both mutations. In the AML patient, 21 of 23 cells were informative for a TP53 polymorphism; the identified alleles matched the loss of chromosome arm 17p. The advanced SCP allows efficient, precise and gentle isolation of individual cells for subsequent WGA and routine PCR/sequencing-based analyses of gene variants. This makes single-cell information readily accessible to a wide range of applications and can provide insights into clonal heterogeneity that were indeterminable solely by

  18. Clinical and genetic characterization of a Danish family with North Carolina macular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Thomas; Roos, Ben; Johnsen, Thorkild; Bech, Niels; Scheetz, Todd E; Larsen, Michael; Stone, Edwin M; Fingert, John H

    2010-12-09

    To describe the phenotype of a family with an autosomal dominant macular dystrophy and identify the chromosomal location of the gene that causes this phenotype. Twelve members of a three-generation family underwent routine clinical examination, including fundus photography. Four of the patients underwent extended examination with Goldmann perimetry, full-field electroretinogram, dark adaptation, and color vision testing, and two patients underwent optical coherence tomography and fundus autofluorescence examination. DNA samples were obtained from 12 family members and 3 spouses and genotyped at the known North Carolina Macular Dystrophy (NCMD) locus on chromosome 6q (MCDR1: OMIM 136550) using short tandem repeat polymorphisms. DNA samples were subsequently examined with a genome-wide scan of single nucleotide polymorphisms and the genotypes that were produced were studied with linkage and haplotype analyses. The 10 affected family members had clinical findings of macular lesions that are typical for NCMD. The small drusen-like yellowish lesions of mild NCMD were hyperautofluorescent. Hyperpigmented foveal lesions were surrounded by a zone of confluent hyperautofluorescence. Linkage analysis of short tandem repeat polymorphism genetic markers excluded the NCMD locus on chromosome 6. However, analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism genotypes from a genome-wide scan showed that NCMD in our pedigree is linked to a region on chromosome 5p that overlaps the previously mapped macular dystrophy (MCDR3) locus with a maximum log of the odds (LOD) score of 2.69 at a recombination fraction of 0.00 (markers D5S406, D5S1987, and D5S2505). We report the first pedigree with NCMD from Scandinavia, and the first confirmation that a gene for this condition is located on chromosome 5p13-p15. The bright elements or lesions typical of NCMD differed from drusen in that no sign of accumulation of material between the retinal pigment epithelium and Bruch's membrane was seen. While the

  19. Flavobacterium columnare isolated from red tilapia (Oreochromis sp.): emphasis on genetic characterization and virulence of rhizoid and non-rhizoid morphotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavobacterium columnare is the causative agent of columnaris disease and severely affects various freshwater fish species worldwide. Here, we described the phenotypic and genetic characterization of F. columnare isolates isolated from farmed red tilapia in Thailand. Additionally, the virulence as w...

  20. Isolation and genetic characterization of a tembusu virus strain isolated from mosquitoes in Shandong, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Y; Diao, Y; Chen, H; Ou, Q; Liu, X; Gao, X; Yu, C; Wang, L

    2015-04-01

    Tembusu virus (TMUV) is a flavivirus, presumed to be a mosquito-borne flavivirus of the Ntaya virus subgroup. To date, however, there have been no reports indicating that mosquitoes are involved in the spread of TMUV. In this study, we report the first isolation of TMUV from Culex mosquitoes. We describe the isolation and characterization of a field strain of TMUV from mosquitoes collected in Shandong Province, China. The virus isolate, named TMUV-SDMS, grows well in mosquito cell line C6/36, in Vero and duck embryo fibroblast (DEF) cell lines, and causes significant cytopathic effects in these cell cultures. The TMUV-SDMS genome is a single-stranded RNA, 10 989 nt in length, consisting of a single open reading frame encoding a polyprotein of 3410 amino acids, with 5' and 3' untranslated regions of 142 and 617 nt, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of the E and NS5 genes revealed that the TMUV-SDMS is closely related to the TMUV YY5 and BYD strains which cause severe egg-drop in ducks. The 3'NTR of TMUV-SDMS contains two pairs of tandem repeat CS and one non-duplicate CS, which have sequence similarities to the same repeats in the YY5 and BYD strains. Our findings indicate that mosquitoes carrying the TMUV may play an important role in the spread of this virus and in disease outbreak. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Genetic characterization and phylogeny of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I from Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, E; Cartier, L; Villota, C; Fernandez, J

    2002-03-20

    Infection with Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus type I (HTLV-I) have been associated with the development of the HTLV-I associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Phylogenetic analyses of HTLV-I isolates have revealed that HTLV-I can be classified into three major groups: the Cosmopolitan, Central African and Melanesian. In the present study, we analyzed the tax, 5' ltr, gag, pol, and env sequences of proviruses of PBMC from ten HAM/TSP patients to investigate the phylogenetic characterization of HTLV-I in Chilean patients. HTLV-I provirus in PBMC from ten Chilean patients with HAM/TSP were amplified by PCR using primers of tax, 5' ltr, gag, pol, and env genes. Amplified products of the five genes were purified and nucleotide sequence was determined by the dideoxy termination procedure. DNA sequences were aligned with the CLUSTAL W program. The results of this study showed that the tax, 5' ltr, gag, pol, and env gene of the Chilean HTLV-I strains had a nucleotide homology ranged from 98.1 to 100%, 95 to 97%, 98.9 to 100%, 94 to 98%, and 94.2 to 98.5% respect to ATK-1 clone, respectively. According to molecular phylogeny with 5' ltr gene, the Chilean HTLV-I strains were grouped with each other suggesting one cluster included in Transcontinental subgroup.

  2. Genetic characterization of wild-type measles viruses isolated in China, 2006-2007

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    Nan Lijuan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Molecular characterization of wild-type measles viruses in China during 1995-2004 demonstrated that genotype H1 was endemic and widely distributed throughout the country. H1-associated cases and outbreaks caused a resurgence of measles beginning in 2005. A total of 210,094 measles cases and 101 deaths were reported by National Notifiable Diseases Reporting System (NNDRS and Chinese Measles Laboratory Network (LabNet from 2006 to 2007, and the incidences of measles were 6.8/100,000 population and 7.2/100,000 population in 2006 and 2007, respectively. Five hundred and sixty-five wild-type measles viruses were isolated from 24 of 31 provinces in mainland China during 2006 and 2007, and all of the wild type virus isolates belonged to cluster 1 of genotype H1. These results indicated that H1-cluster 1 viruses were the predominant viruses circulating in China from 2006 to 2007. This study contributes to previous efforts to generate critical baseline data about circulating wild-type measles viruses in China that will allow molecular epidemiologic studies to help measure the progress made toward China's goal of measles elimination by 2012.

  3. First genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii in stray cats from Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekkour, Feriel; Aubert, Dominique; Mercier, Aurélien; Murat, Jean-Benjamin; Khames, Mammar; Nguewa, Paul; Ait-Oudhia, Khatima; Villena, Isabelle; Bouchene, Zahida

    2017-05-30

    Toxoplasmosis is a parasitic disease with worldwide distribution and a major public health problem. In Algeria, no data are currently available about genotypes of Toxoplasma gondii isolated from animals or humans. The present study assesses for the first time the seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis in stray cats, and provides molecular characterization of T. gondii strains circulating in this feline population in Algiers, the capital city of Algeria. Sera from 96 stray cats were tested for the presence of antibodies against T. gondii using the modified agglutination test. The seroprevalence was 50% (48/96) using 1:6 as the positivity cut-off. Different organs samples from stray cats, including heart samples, were tested for the presence of Toxoplasma DNA using real-time PCR. T. Gondii DNA was detected in 90.6% (87/96) of hearts. Of these parasitic DNAs, 22 were submitted to genotyping through the analysis of 15 microsatellite markers. The identified genotypes (12 of 22) mainly belonged to the type II lineage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetic characterization and evolutionary analysis of Newcastle disease virus isolated from domestic duck in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Satish; Kim, Ji-Ye; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Jung, Suk Chan; Choi, Kang-Seuk

    2016-03-15

    Domestic ducks are considered a potential reservoir of Newcastle disease virus. In the study, a Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolated from a domestic duck during surveillance in South Korea was characterized. The complete genome of the NDV isolate was sequenced, and the phylogenetic relationship to reference strains was studied. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the strain clustered in genotype I of Class II ND viruses, has highly phylogenetic similarity to NDV strains isolated from waterfowl in China, but was distant from the viruses isolated in chickens and vaccine strains used in South Korea. Pathogenicity experiment in chickens revealed it to be a lentogenic virus. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cleavage site of the fusion (F) protein confirmed that the isolate contained the avirulent motif (112)GKQGRL(117) at the cleavage site and caused no apparent disease in chickens and ducks. With phylogeographic analysis based on fusion gene, we estimate the origin of an ancestral virus of the isolate and its sister strain located in China around 1998. It highlights the need of continuous surveillance to enhance current understanding of the molecular epidemiology and evolution of the pathogenic strains. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetic Characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. among Children with Diarrhea in Tehran and Qazvin Provinces, Iran

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    E Nazemalhoseini Mojarad

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Cryptosporidium is an intracellular apicomplexan parasite that infects a wide range of vertebrates including humans. Cryptosporidiosis is a major cause of diarrhea in children with and without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection in developing countries. More recently, the molecular methods for identification of morphologically indistin­guishable species have been developed. The aim of this study was to determine the characterization of various species of this coccidian among children with diarrhea by using molecular methods."nMethods: Fecal samples were collected from 1263 children with diarrhea who referred to Pediatrics Medical Centers in Qazvin and Tehran, two central provinces of Iran. Initial identification of Cryptosporidium was carried out by Zeihl-Neel­sen acid-fast staining method of stool samples. DNA was extracted from positive microscopically samples and were sub­jected to a two step nested PCR-RFLP based on SSU-rRNA gene."nResults: Out of 1263 collected samples, 31 (2.5% were found to be contained Cryptosporidium oocysts. RFLP analysis showed that 80.6% of the positive isolates were Cryptosporidium parvum, 16.1% C. hominis and 3.2% had mix infection pattern of both C. parvum and C. hominis."nConclusion: Our results showed that the zoonotic pattern of transmission is predominant and has considerable significance in epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis in the study areas.

  6. Characterization of genetic predisposition and autoantibody profile in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurjar, Bahadur Singh; Sriharsha, T Manikanta; Bhasym, Angika; Prabhu, Savit; Puraswani, Mamta; Khandelwal, Priyanka; Saini, Himanshi; Saini, Savita; Verma, Anita Kamra; Chatterjee, Priyadarshini; Gucchait, Prasenjit; Bal, Vineeta; George, Anna; Rath, Satyajit; Sahu, Arvind; Sharma, Amita; Hari, Pankaj; Sinha, Aditi; Bagga, Arvind

    2018-02-27

    We previously reported that Indian pediatric patients of atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS) showed high frequencies of anti-complement factor H (FH) autoantibodies that are correlated with homozygous deletion of the genes for FH-related proteins 1 and 3 (FHR1 and FHR3) (FHR1/3-/-). We now report that Indian pediatric aHUS patients without anti-FH autoantibodies also showed modestly higher frequencies of the FHR1/3-/- genotype. Further, when we characterized epitope specificities and binding avidities of anti-FH autoantibodies in aHUS patients, most anti-FH autoantibodies were directed towards the FH cell-surface anchoring polyanionic binding site-containing C-terminal short conservative regions (SCRs) 17-20 with higher binding avidities than for native FH. FH SCR17-20-binding anti-FH autoantibodies also bound the other cell-surface anchoring polyanionic binding site-containing region FH SCR5-8, at lower binding avidities. Anti-FH autoantibody avidities correlated with antibody titres. These anti-FH autoantibody characteristics did not differ between aHUS patients with or without the FHR1/3-/- genotype. Our data suggest a complex matrix of interactions between FHR1-FHR3 deletion, immunomodulation and anti-FH autoantibodies in the etiopathogenesis of aHUS. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Salicornia as a crop plant in temperate regions: selection of genetically characterized ecotypes and optimization of their cultivation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Devesh; Buhmann, Anne K; Flowers, Tim J; Seal, Charlotte E; Papenbrock, Jutta

    2014-11-10

    Rising sea levels and salinization of groundwater due to global climate change result in fast-dwindling sources of freshwater. Therefore, it is important to find alternatives to grow food crops and vegetables. Halophytes are naturally evolved salt-tolerant plants that are adapted to grow in environments that inhibit the growth of most glycophytic crop plants substantially. Members of the Salicornioideae are promising candidates for saline agriculture due to their high tolerance to salinity. Our aim was to develop genetically characterized lines of Salicornia and Sarcocornia for further breeding and to determine optimal cultivation conditions. To obtain a large and diverse genetic pool, seeds were collected from different countries and ecological conditions. The external transcribed spacer (ETS) sequence of 62 Salicornia and Sarcocornia accessions was analysed: ETS sequence data showed a clear distinction between the two genera and between different Salicornia taxa. However, in some cases the ETS was not sufficiently variable to resolve morphologically distinct species. For the determination of optimal cultivation conditions, experiments on germination, seedling establishment and growth to a harvestable size were performed using different accessions of Salicornia spp. Experiments revealed that the percentage germination was greatest at lower salinities and with temperatures of 20/10 °C (day/night). Salicornia spp. produced more harvestable biomass in hydroponic culture than in sand culture, but the nutrient concentration requires optimization as hydroponically grown plants showed symptoms of stress. Salicornia ramosissima produced more harvestable biomass than Salicornia dolichostachya in artificial sea water containing 257 mM NaCl. Based on preliminary tests on ease of cultivation, gain in biomass, morphology and taste, S. dolichostachya was investigated in more detail, and the optimal salinity for seedling establishment was found to be 100 mM. Harvesting of S

  8. Genetic characterization of chayote [Sechium edule (Jacq.) Swartz.] landraces of North Eastern Hills of India and conservation measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Veerendra Kumar; Pandey, Avinash; Jha, Anjani Kumar; Ngachan, S V

    2017-10-01

    Chayote or chow-chow is an underutilized cucurbit vegetable crop, widely cultivated by farmers in the backyards and Jhum lands for its tender leaves, fruits and tuberous root. In order to initiate crop improvement program in this crop, the present study was undertaken to assess the genetic variations in the 74 chow-chow landraces collected from the North Eastern Hill region of India. Wide variations for fruit colors, fruit length (6.5-21.5 cm), fruit width (4.2-10.7 cm), fruit weight (60-560 g), vitamin-C (2.6-13.8 mg/100 g), reducing sugar (0.18-2.77%), total sugar (1.09-2.94%) and phenol content (0.17-3.85 mg/100 g FW) were recorded among the landraces. All the landraces were also characterized using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. In RAPD analyses, out of 28 primers a total of 198 reproducible amplicons were formed at an average of 7.01 per primer and an overall polymorphism of 88.38%. Eight fragments were specific to landraces with light green fruits. Four fragments were observed to be specific to RCSC-22 (dark green fruits) and another four specific to a RCSC-30 (pale yellow fruits). Out of 30 ISSR, only 5 primers generated a total of 32 reproducible amplicons with an average of 6.4 per primer and overall polymorphism of 62.5%. The pair wise similarity coefficient values ranged from 0.55 to 0.96. The grouping of landraces in cluster analysis was found to be independent of their respective geographic locations. The cuttings of suckers and shoot top (2 months old) treated with indole-3-butyric acid (200 mg l -1 ) provide an alternative for the conservation of the diverse genetic materials to the researchers.

  9. Genetic basis of 17 traits and viscosity parameters characterizing the eating and cooking quality of rice grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L Q; Liu, W J; Xu, Y; He, Y Q; Luo, L J; Xing, Y Z; Xu, C G; Zhang, Qifa

    2007-08-01

    A recombinant inbred line population derived from a cross between Zhenshan 97 and Delong 208 was used to analyze the genetic basis of the cooking and eating quality of rice as reflected by 17 traits (or parameters). These traits include amylose content (AC), gel consistency (GC), alkali spreading value (ASV), cooked rice elongation (CRE), and 13 parameters from the viscosity profile. All the traits, except peak paste viscosity (PKV), time needed from gelatinization to peak (BAtime), and CRE, can be divided into two classes according to their interrelationship. The first class consists of AC, GC, and most of the paste viscosity parameters that form a major determinant of eating quality. The second class includes ASV, pasting temperature (Atemp) and pasting time (Atime), which characterize cooking process. We identified 26 QTL (quantitative trait locus or loci) in 2 years; nine QTL clusters emerged. The two major clusters, which correspond to the Wx and Alk loci, control the traits in the first and second classes, respectively. Some QTL are co-located for the traits belonging to the same class and also for the traits to a different class. The Wx locus also affects on ASV while the Alk locus also makes minor contributions to GC and some paste viscosity parameters. The QTL clusters on other chromosomes are similar to the Wx locus or Alk locus, although the variations they explained are relatively minor. QTL for CRE and PKV are dispersed and independent of the Wx locus. Low paste viscosity corresponds to low AC and soft gel, which represents good eating quality for most Chinese consumers; high ASV and low Atemp, together with reduced time to gelatinization and PKV, indicate preferred cooking quality. The genetic basis of Atemp, Atime, BAtime, peak temperature, peak time, paste viscosity at 95 degrees C, and final paste viscosity is newly examined to reveal a complete and dynamic viscosity profile.

  10. Genetic and Pharmacological Inhibition of PDK1 in Cancer Cells: Characterization of a Selective Allosteric Kinase Inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagashima, Kumiko; Shumway, Stuart D.; Sathyanarayanan, Sriram; Chen, Albert H.; Dolinski, Brian; Xu, Youyuan; Keilhack, Heike; Nguyen, Thi; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Li, Lixia; Lutterbach, Bart A.; Chi, An; Paweletz, Cloud; Allison, Timothy; Yan, Youwei; Munshi, Sanjeev K.; Klippel, Anke; Kraus, Manfred; Bobkova, Ekaterina V.; Deshmukh, Sujal; Xu, Zangwei; Mueller, Uwe; Szewczak, Alexander A.; Pan, Bo-Sheng; Richon, Victoria; Pollock, Roy; Blume-Jensen, Peter; Northrup, Alan; Andersen, Jannik N. (Merck)

    2013-11-20

    Phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) is a critical activator of multiple prosurvival and oncogenic protein kinases and has garnered considerable interest as an oncology drug target. Despite progress characterizing PDK1 as a therapeutic target, pharmacological support is lacking due to the prevalence of nonspecific inhibitors. Here, we benchmark literature and newly developed inhibitors and conduct parallel genetic and pharmacological queries into PDK1 function in cancer cells. Through kinase selectivity profiling and x-ray crystallographic studies, we identify an exquisitely selective PDK1 inhibitor (compound 7) that uniquely binds to the inactive kinase conformation (DFG-out). In contrast to compounds 1-5, which are classical ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors (DFG-in), compound 7 specifically inhibits cellular PDK1 T-loop phosphorylation (Ser-241), supporting its unique binding mode. Interfering with PDK1 activity has minimal antiproliferative effect on cells growing as plastic-attached monolayer cultures (i.e. standard tissue culture conditions) despite reduced phosphorylation of AKT, RSK, and S6RP. However, selective PDK1 inhibition impairs anchorage-independent growth, invasion, and cancer cell migration. Compound 7 inhibits colony formation in a subset of cancer cell lines (four of 10) and primary xenograft tumor lines (nine of 57). RNAi-mediated knockdown corroborates the PDK1 dependence in cell lines and identifies candidate biomarkers of drug response. In summary, our profiling studies define a uniquely selective and cell-potent PDK1 inhibitor, and the convergence of genetic and pharmacological phenotypes supports a role of PDK1 in tumorigenesis in the context of three-dimensional in vitro culture systems.

  11. Genetic and Molecular Epidemiological Characterization of a Novel Adenovirus in Antarctic Penguins Collected between 2008 and 2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sook-Young Lee

    Full Text Available Antarctica is considered a relatively uncontaminated region with regard to the infectious diseases because of its extreme environment, and isolated geography. For the genetic characterization and molecular epidemiology of the newly found penguin adenovirus in Antarctica, entire genome sequencing and annual survey of penguin adenovirus were conducted. The entire genome sequences of penguin adenoviruses were completed for two Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica and two Gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua. The whole genome lengths and G+C content of penguin adenoviruses were found to be 24,630-24,662 bp and 35.5-35.6%, respectively. Notably, the presence of putative sialidase gene was not identified in penguin adenoviruses by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE-PCR as well as consensus specific PCR. The penguin adenoviruses were demonstrated to be a new species within the genus Siadenovirus, with a distance of 29.9-39.3% (amino acid, 32.1-47.9% in DNA polymerase gene, and showed the closest relationship with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3 in phylogenetic analysis. During the 2008-2013 study period, the penguin adenoviruses were annually detected in 22 of 78 penguins (28.2%, and the molecular epidemiological study of the penguin adenovirus indicates a predominant infection in Chinstrap penguin population (12/30, 40%. Interestingly, the genome of penguin adenovirus could be detected in several internal samples, except the lymph node and brain. In conclusion, an analysis of the entire adenoviral genomes from Antarctic penguins was conducted, and the penguin adenoviruses, containing unique genetic character, were identified as a new species within the genus Siadenovirus. Moreover, it was annually detected in Antarctic penguins, suggesting its circulation within the penguin population.

  12. Genetic and Molecular Epidemiological Characterization of a Novel Adenovirus in Antarctic Penguins Collected between 2008 and 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Seo, Tae-Kun; No, Jin Sun; Kim, Hankyeom; Kim, Won-Keun; Choi, Han-Gu; Kang, Sung-Ho; Song, Jin-Won

    2016-01-01

    Antarctica is considered a relatively uncontaminated region with regard to the infectious diseases because of its extreme environment, and isolated geography. For the genetic characterization and molecular epidemiology of the newly found penguin adenovirus in Antarctica, entire genome sequencing and annual survey of penguin adenovirus were conducted. The entire genome sequences of penguin adenoviruses were completed for two Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) and two Gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua). The whole genome lengths and G+C content of penguin adenoviruses were found to be 24,630-24,662 bp and 35.5-35.6%, respectively. Notably, the presence of putative sialidase gene was not identified in penguin adenoviruses by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE-PCR) as well as consensus specific PCR. The penguin adenoviruses were demonstrated to be a new species within the genus Siadenovirus, with a distance of 29.9-39.3% (amino acid, 32.1-47.9%) in DNA polymerase gene, and showed the closest relationship with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3) in phylogenetic analysis. During the 2008-2013 study period, the penguin adenoviruses were annually detected in 22 of 78 penguins (28.2%), and the molecular epidemiological study of the penguin adenovirus indicates a predominant infection in Chinstrap penguin population (12/30, 40%). Interestingly, the genome of penguin adenovirus could be detected in several internal samples, except the lymph node and brain. In conclusion, an analysis of the entire adenoviral genomes from Antarctic penguins was conducted, and the penguin adenoviruses, containing unique genetic character, were identified as a new species within the genus Siadenovirus. Moreover, it was annually detected in Antarctic penguins, suggesting its circulation within the penguin population.

  13. Phylodynamic analysis of avian infectious bronchitis virus in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marandino, Ana; Pereda, Ariel; Tomás, Gonzalo; Hernández, Martín; Iraola, Gregorio; Craig, María Isabel; Hernández, Diego; Banda, Alejandro; Villegas, Pedro; Panzera, Yanina; Pérez, Ruben

    2015-06-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is a coronavirus of chickens that causes great economic losses to the global poultry industry. The present study focuses on South American IBVs and their genetic relationships with global strains. We obtained full-length sequences of the S1 coding region and N gene of IBV field isolates from Uruguay and Argentina, and performed Phylodynamic analysis to characterize the strains and estimate the time of the most recent common ancestor. We identified two major South American genotypes, which were here denoted South America I (SAI) and Asia/South America II (A/SAII). The SAI genotype is an exclusive South American lineage that emerged in the 1960s. The A/SAII genotype may have emerged in Asia in approximately 1995 before being introduced into South America. Both SAI and A/SAII genotype strains clearly differ from the Massachusetts strains that are included in the vaccine formulations being used in most South American countries. © 2015 The Authors.

  14. Genetic characterization and evolutionary inference of TNF-α through computational analysis

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    Gauri Awasthi

    Full Text Available TNF-α is an important human cytokine that imparts dualism in malaria pathogenicity. At high dosages, TNF-α is believed to provoke pathogenicity in cerebral malaria; while at lower dosages TNF-α is protective against severe human malaria. In order to understand the human TNF-α gene and to ascertain evolutionary aspects of its dualistic nature for malaria pathogenicity, we characterized this gene in detail in six different mammalian taxa. The avian taxon, Gallus gallus was included in our study, as TNF-α is not present in birds; therefore, a tandemly placed duplicate of TNF-α (LT-α or TNF-β was included. A comparative study was made of nucleotide length variations, intron and exon sizes and number variations, differential compositions of coding to non-coding bases, etc., to look for similarities/dissimilarities in the TNF-α gene across all seven taxa. A phylogenetic analysis revealed the pattern found in other genes, as humans, chimpanzees and rhesus monkeys were placed in a single clade, and rats and mice in another; the chicken was in a clearly separate branch. We further focused on these three taxa and aligned the amino acid sequences; there were small differences between humans and chimpanzees; both were more different from the rhesus monkey. Further, comparison of coding and non-coding nucleotide length variations and coding to non-coding nucleotide ratio between TNF-α and TNF-β among these three mammalian taxa provided a first-hand indication of the role of the TNF-α gene, but not of TNF-β in the dualistic nature of TNF-α in malaria pathogenicity.

  15. Identification and Genetic Characterization of Ralstonia solanacearum Species Complex Isolates from Cucurbita maxima in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Xiaoman; Yu, Lin; Lan, Guobing; Tang, Yafei; He, Zifu

    2017-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum species complex is a devastating phytopathogen with an unusually wide host range, and new host plants are continuously being discovered. In June 2016, a new bacterial wilt on Cucurbita maxima was observed in Guangdong province, China. Initially, in the adult plant stage, several leaves of each plant withered suddenly and drooped; the plant then wilted completely, and the color of their vasculature changed to dark brown, ultimately causing the entire plant to die. Creamy-whitish bacterial masses were observed to ooze from crosscut stems of these diseased plants. To develop control strategies for C. maxima bacterial wilt, the causative pathogenic isolates were identified and characterized. Twenty-four bacterial isolates were obtained from diseased C. maxima plants, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing and pathogenicity analysis results indicated that the pathogen of C. maxima bacterial wilt was Ralstonia solanacearum . The results from DNA-based analysis, host range determination and bacteriological identification confirmed that the 24 isolates belonged to R. solanacearum phylotype I, race 1, and eight of these isolates belonged to biovar 3, while 16 belonged to biovar 4. Based on the results of partial egl gene sequence analysis, the 24 isolates clustered into three egl- sequence type groups, sequevars 17, 45, and 56. Sequevar 56 is a new sequevar which is described for the first time in this paper. An assessment of the resistance of 21 pumpkin cultivars revealed that C. moschata cv. Xiangyu1 is resistant to strain RS378, C. moschata cv. Xiangmi is moderately resistant to strain RS378, and 19 other pumpkin cultivars, including four C. maxima cultivars and 15 C. moschata cultivars, are susceptible to strain RS378. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of C. maxima bacterial wilt caused by R. solanacearum race 1 in the world. Our results provide valuable information for the further development of control strategies for C. maxima wilt

  16. Identification and Genetic Characterization of Ralstonia solanacearum Species Complex Isolates from Cucurbita maxima in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoman She

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ralstonia solanacearum species complex is a devastating phytopathogen with an unusually wide host range, and new host plants are continuously being discovered. In June 2016, a new bacterial wilt on Cucurbita maxima was observed in Guangdong province, China. Initially, in the adult plant stage, several leaves of each plant withered suddenly and drooped; the plant then wilted completely, and the color of their vasculature changed to dark brown, ultimately causing the entire plant to die. Creamy-whitish bacterial masses were observed to ooze from crosscut stems of these diseased plants. To develop control strategies for C. maxima bacterial wilt, the causative pathogenic isolates were identified and characterized. Twenty-four bacterial isolates were obtained from diseased C. maxima plants, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing and pathogenicity analysis results indicated that the pathogen of C. maxima bacterial wilt was Ralstonia solanacearum. The results from DNA-based analysis, host range determination and bacteriological identification confirmed that the 24 isolates belonged to R. solanacearum phylotype I, race 1, and eight of these isolates belonged to biovar 3, while 16 belonged to biovar 4. Based on the results of partial egl gene sequence analysis, the 24 isolates clustered into three egl- sequence type groups, sequevars 17, 45, and 56. Sequevar 56 is a new sequevar which is described for the first time in this paper. An assessment of the resistance of 21 pumpkin cultivars revealed that C. moschata cv. Xiangyu1 is resistant to strain RS378, C. moschata cv. Xiangmi is moderately resistant to strain RS378, and 19 other pumpkin cultivars, including four C. maxima cultivars and 15 C. moschata cultivars, are susceptible to strain RS378. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of C. maxima bacterial wilt caused by R. solanacearum race 1 in the world. Our results provide valuable information for the further development of control strategies

  17. Characterization of genetic defects of hemophilia A in patients of Chinese origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Shu-Wha; Lin, Shu-Rung; Shen, Ming-Ching (National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China))

    1993-12-01

    The molecular characterization of hemophilia A of Chinese origin was carried out by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing of patient's factor VIII genes. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and dideoxy fingerprinting (ddF) were used as screening methods to detect mutated DNAs. A total of 102 individuals from 87 different families, including 10 patients (10 families) with mild-to-moderate and 92 patients (77 families) with severe hemophilia A, were analyzed by PCR-SSCP and PCR-ddF. Of the 87 independent cases, 40 revealed a single mutation in the coding regions of their factor VIII genes. These mutations include 21 with single base changes resulting in 8 nonsense and 13 missense codons, 16 with deletion or insertion of 1-11 nucleotides, and 3 with deletion of large DNA fragments. The frequency of 8 of the identified factor VIII polymorphisms or silent mutations was also determined among Chinese. The frequencies for codons 1241, 1269, and 2223 (the numbering system follows J. Gitschier et al., 1984, Nature 312: 326-330) were found to be different from those reported for other populations. As for the 47 severe cases whose mutational events were not readily detected by PCR-SSCP and PCR-ddF, the reverse transcriptase PCR method was applied. In 24 such cases analyzed, 17 were found to be of the [open quotes]intron 22 mutations[close quotes] as described by Naylor et al. (1992, The Lancet, 342: 1066-1067), accounting for 39% of Chinese patients with hemophilia A. 31 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Multilocus Genetic Characterization of Lactobacillus fermentum Isolated from Ready-to-Eat Canned Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Irshad M; Jacobs, Emily; Simpson, Steven; Kerdahi, Khalil

    2017-06-01

    The primary mission of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is to enforce the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and regulate food, drug, and cosmetic products. Thus, this agency monitors the presence of pathogenic microorganisms in these products, including canned foods, as one of the regulatory action criteria and also ensures that these products are safe for human consumption. This study was carried out to investigate the effectiveness of pathogen control and integrity of ready-to-eat canned food containing Black Bean Corn Poblano Salsa. A total of nine unopened and recalled canned glass jars from the same lot were examined initially by conventional microbiologic protocols that involved a two-step enrichment, followed by streaking on selective agar plates, for the presence of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Of the eight subsamples examined for each sample, all subsamples of one of the containers were found positive for the presence of slow-growing rod-shaped, gram-positive, facultative anaerobic bacteria. The recovered isolates were subsequently sequenced at rRNA and gyrB loci. Afterward, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was performed characterizing 11 additional known MLST loci (clpX, dnaA, dnaK, groEL, murC, murE, pepX, pyrG, recA, rpoB, and uvrC). Analyses of the nucleotide sequences of rRNA, gyrB, and 11 MLST loci confirmed these gram-positive bacteria recovered from canned food to be Lactobacillus fermentum . Thus, the DNA sequencing of housekeeping MLST genes can provide species identification of L. fermentum and can be used in the canned food monitoring program of public health importance.

  19. Genetic diversity, safety and technological characterization of lactic acid bacteria isolated from artisanal Pico cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingos-Lopes, M F P; Stanton, C; Ross, P R; Dapkevicius, M L E; Silva, C C G

    2017-05-01

    A total of 114 lactic acid bacteria were isolated at one and 21 days of ripening from a traditional raw cow's milk cheese without the addition of starter culture, produced by three artisanal cheese-makers in Azores Island (Pico, Portugal). Identification to species and strain level was accomplished by16S rRNA gene and PFGE analysis. Carbohydrate utilization profiles were obtained with the relevant API kits. Isolates were evaluated according to safety and technological criteria. The most frequently observed genus identified by 16S rRNA sequencing analysis was Enterococcus, whereas API system mostly identified Lactobacillus. The highest percentages of antibiotic resistance were to nalidixic acid (95%), and aminoglycosides (64-87%). All isolates were sensitive to several beta-lactam antibiotics and negative for histamine and DNase production. Gelatinase activity was detected in 49.1% of isolates, 43% were able to degrade casein and 93% were α-hemolytic. Most enterococci presented virulence genes, such as gelE, asaI, ace. Diacetyl production was found to be species dependent and one strain (Leu. citreum) produced exopolysaccharides. Selected strains were further studied for technological application and were found to be slow acid producers in milk and experimental cheeses, a desirable trait for adjunct cultures. Two strains were selected on the basis of technological and safety application as adjunct cultures in cheese production and presented the best cheese aroma and flavor in consumer preference tests. This is the first effort to characterize Pico cheese LAB isolates for potential application as adjunct cultures; the results suggest the potential of two strains to improve the quality of this traditional raw milk product. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of root agravitropism induced by genetic, chemical, and developmental constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.; Fondren, W.M.; Marcum, H.

    1987-01-01

    The patterns and rates of organelle redistribution in columella (i.e., putative statocyte) cells of agravitropic agt mutants of Zea mays are not significantly different from those of columella cells in graviresponsive roots. Graviresponsive roots of Z. mays are characterized by a strongly polar movement of 45 Ca 2+ across the root tip from the upper to the lower side. Horizontally-oriented roots of agt mutants exhibit only a minimal polar transport of 45 Ca 2+ . Exogenously-induced asymmetries of Ca result in curvature of agt roots toward the Ca source. A similar curvature can be induced by a Ca asymmetry in normally nongraviresponsive (i.e., lateral) roots of Phaseolus vulgaris. Similarly, root curvature can be induced by placing the roots perpendicular to an electric field. This electrotropism increase with (1) currents between 8-35 mA, and (2) time between 1-9 hr when the current is constant. Electrotropism is reduced significantly by treating roots with triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA), an inhibitor of auxin transport. These results suggest that (1) if graviperception occurs via the sedimentation of amyloplasts in columella cells, then nongraviresponsive roots apparently sense gravity as do graviresponsive roots, (2) exogenously induced asymmetries of a gravitropic effector (i.e., Ca) can induce curvature of normally nongraviresponsive roots, (3) the gravity-induced downward movement of exogenously-applied 45 Ca 2+ across tips of graviresponsive roots does not occur in nongraviresponsive roots, (4) placing roots in an electrical field (i.e., one favoring the movement of ions such as Ca 2+ ) induces root curvature and (5) electrically-induced curvature is apparently dependent on auxin transport. These result are discussed relative to a model to account for the lack of graviresponsiveness by these roots

  1. Amplification of the cap20 pathogenicity gene and genetic characterization using different markers molecular in Colletotrichum gloeosporioides isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielli Barreto Maciel

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies were performed to analyze the genetic characterization using RFLP-ITS and Intron (primer EI1 markers and the amplification of the cap20 pathogenicity gene by PCR in Colletotrichum gloeosporioides isolates of different hosts plant. The genetic variability was accessed using RFLP-ITS and Intron markers and grouping by UPGMA method. Primers to cap20 gene were constructed using selected sequences of the GenBank (National Center of Biotechnology Information, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov with the Primer 3 program. The dendrograms analysis showed that the RFLP-ITS marker was more informative to separate the Colletotrichum sp, and that primer EI1 demonstrated greater genetic diversity. The amplification of the DNA of the Colletotrichum isolates to the cap20 gene with primers P1 and P2 indicated that this gene could present variations into C. gloeosporioides related with the host, and also that it was present in other Colletotrichum sp.Estudos foram realizados para analisar a caracterização genética usando marcadores de RFLP-ITS e ISSP e a amplicação do gene de patogenicidade cap20 por PCR em isolados de Colletotrichum gloeosporioides de diferentes hospedeiros. Primers para o gene cap20 foram construídos a partir de seqüências selecionadas do GenBank (National Center of Biotechnology Information, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov com o programa Primer 3. A análise dos dendrogramas revelou que o marcador RFLP-ITS foi mais informativo em separar as espécies de Colletotrichum, e que o primer EI1 evidenciou maior diversidade genética. A amplificação do DNA dos isolados de Colletotrichum para o gene cap20 com os primers P1 e P2 indicou que este gene pode apresentar variações dentro de C. gloeosporioides relacionada ao hospedeiro, e que também está presente em outras espécies de Colletotrichum.

  2. Genetics, Host Range, and Molecular and Pathogenic Characterization of Verticillium dahliae From Sunflower Reveal Two Differentiated Groups in Europe

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    Alberto Martín-Sanz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Verticillium wilt and leaf mottle of sunflower, caused by the fungus Verticillium dahliae (Vd has become a major constraint to sunflower oil production in temperate European countries. Information about Vd from sunflower is very scarce despite genetics, molecular traits and pathogenic abilities of fungal strains affecting many other crops being widely known. Understanding and characterizing the diversity of Vd populations in those countries where sunflowers are frequent and severely affected by the fungus are essential for efficient breeding for resistance. In this study, we have analyzed genetic, molecular and pathogenic traits of Vd isolates affecting sunflower in European countries. When their genetics was investigated, almost all the isolates from France, Italy, Spain, Argentina, and Ukraine were assigned to vegetative compatibility group (VCG 2B. In Bulgaria, Turkey, Romania, and Ukraine, some isolates were assigned to VCG6, but some others could not be assigned to any VCG. Genotyping markers used for Vd affecting crops other than sunflower showed that all the isolates were molecularly identified as race 2 and that markers of defoliating (D and non-defoliating (ND pathotypes distinguished two well-differentiated clusters, one (E grouping those isolates from Eastern Europe and the other (W all those from the Western Europe and Argentina. All the isolates in cluster W were VCG2B, while the isolates in cluster E belonged to an unknown VCG or to VCG6. When the host range was investigated in the greenhouse, the fungus was highly pathogenic to artichoke, showing the importance of farming alternatives in the management of Verticillium attacks. Sunflower genotypes were inoculated with a selection of isolates in two experiments. Two groups were identified, one including the isolates from Western Europe, Argentina, and Ukraine, and the other including isolates from Bulgaria, Romania, and Turkey. Three pathogenic races were differentiated: V1, V2-EE

  3. Genome-wide characterization of genetic variants and putative regions under selection in meat and egg-type chicken lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschiero, Clarissa; Moreira, Gabriel Costa Monteiro; Gheyas, Almas Ara; Godoy, Thaís Fernanda; Gasparin, Gustavo; Mariani, Pilar Drummond Sampaio Corrêa; Paduan, Marcela; Cesar, Aline Silva Mello; Ledur, Mônica Corrêa; Coutinho, Luiz Lehmann

    2018-01-25

    Meat and egg-type chickens have been selected for several generations for different traits. Artificial and natural selection for different phenotypes can change frequency of genetic variants, leaving particular genomic footprints throghtout the genome. Thus, the aims of this study were to sequence 28 chickens from two Brazilian lines (meat and white egg-type) and use this information to characterize genome-wide genetic variations, identify putative regions under selection using Fst method, and find putative pathways under selection. A total of 13.93 million SNPs and 1.36 million INDELs were identified, with more variants detected from the broiler (meat-type) line. Although most were located in non-coding regions, we identified 7255 intolerant non-synonymous SNPs, 512 stopgain/loss SNPs, 1381 frameshift and 1094 non-frameshift INDELs that may alter protein functions. Genes harboring intolerant non-synonymous SNPs affected metabolic pathways related mainly to reproduction and endocrine systems in the white-egg layer line, and lipid metabolism and metabolic diseases in the broiler line. Fst analysis in sliding windows, using SNPs and INDELs separately, identified over 300 putative regions of selection overlapping with more than 250 genes. For the first time in chicken, INDEL variants were considered for selection signature analysis, showing high level of correlation in results between SNP and INDEL data. The putative regions of selection signatures revealed interesting candidate genes and pathways related to important phenotypic traits in chicken, such as lipid metabolism, growth, reproduction, and cardiac development. In this study, Fst method was applied to identify high confidence putative regions under selection, providing novel insights into selection footprints that can help elucidate the functional mechanisms underlying different phenotypic traits relevant to meat and egg-type chicken lines. In addition, we generated a large catalog of line-specific and common

  4. Functional characterization of an alkaline exonuclease and single strand annealing protein from the SXT genetic element of Vibrio cholerae

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    Huang Jian-dong

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SXT is an integrating conjugative element (ICE originally isolated from Vibrio cholerae, the bacterial pathogen that causes cholera. It houses multiple antibiotic and heavy metal resistance genes on its ca. 100 kb circular double stranded DNA (dsDNA genome, and functions as an effective vehicle for the horizontal transfer of resistance genes within susceptible bacterial populations. Here, we characterize the activities of an alkaline exonuclease (S066, SXT-Exo and single strand annealing protein (S065, SXT-Bet encoded on the SXT genetic element, which share significant sequence homology with Exo and Bet from bacteriophage lambda, respectively. Results SXT-Exo has the ability to degrade both linear dsDNA and single stranded DNA (ssDNA molecules, but has no detectable endonuclease or nicking activities. Adopting a stable trimeric arrangement in solution, the exonuclease activities of SXT-Exo are optimal at pH 8.2 and essentially require Mn2+ or Mg2+ ions. Similar to lambda-Exo, SXT-Exo hydrolyzes dsDNA with 5'- to 3'-polarity in a highly processive manner, and digests DNA substrates with 5'-phosphorylated termini significantly more effectively than those lacking 5'-phosphate groups. Notably, the dsDNA exonuclease activities of both SXT-Exo and lambda-Exo are stimulated by the addition of lambda-Bet, SXT-Bet or a single strand DNA binding protein encoded on the SXT genetic element (S064, SXT-Ssb. When co-expressed in E. coli cells, SXT-Bet and SXT-Exo mediate homologous recombination between a PCR-generated dsDNA fragment and the chromosome, analogous to RecET and lambda-Bet/Exo. Conclusions The activities of the SXT-Exo protein are consistent with it having the ability to resect the ends of linearized dsDNA molecules, forming partially ssDNA substrates for the partnering SXT-Bet single strand annealing protein. As such, SXT-Exo and SXT-Bet may function together to repair or process SXT genetic elements within infected V

  5. Genetic characterization of ØVC8 lytic phage for Vibrio cholerae O1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís-Sánchez, Alejandro; Hernández-Chiñas, Ulises; Navarro-Ocaña, Armando; De la Mora, Javier; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan; Eslava-Campos, Carlos

    2016-03-22

    Epidemics and pandemics of cholera, a diarrheal disease, are attributed to Vibrio cholera serogroups O1 and O139. In recent years, specific lytic phages of V. cholera have been proposed to be important factors in the cyclic occurrence of cholera in endemic areas. However, the role and potential participation of lytic phages during long interepidemic periods of cholera in non-endemic regions have not yet been described. The purpose of this study was to isolate and characterize specific lytic phages of V. cholera O1 strains. Sixteen phages were isolated from wastewater samples collected at the Endhó Dam in Hidalgo State, Mexico, concentrated with PEG/NaCl, and purified by density gradient. The lytic activity of the purified phages was tested using different V. cholerae O1 and O139 strains. Phage morphology was visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and phage genome sequencing was performed using the Genome Analyzer IIx System. Genome assembly and bioinformatics analysis were performed using a set of high-throughput programs. Phage structural proteins were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Sixteen phages with lytic and lysogenic activity were isolated; only phage ØVC8 showed specific lytic activity against V. cholerae O1 strains. TEM images of ØVC8 revealed a phage with a short tail and an isometric head. The ØVC8 genome comprises linear double-stranded DNA of 39,422 bp with 50.8 % G + C. Of the 48 annotated ORFs, 16 exhibit homology with sequences of known function and several conserved domains. Bioinformatics analysis showed multiple conserved domains, including an Ig domain, suggesting that ØVC8 might adhere to different mucus substrates such as the human intestinal epithelium. The results suggest that ØVC8 genome utilize the "single-stranded cohesive ends" packaging strategy of the lambda-like group. The two structural proteins sequenced and analyzed are proteins of known function. ØVC8 is a lytic phage with specific activity against V. cholerae

  6. Functional, genetic and bioinformatic characterization of a calcium/calmodulin kinase gene in Sporothrix schenckii

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    Rodriguez-del Valle Nuri

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sporothrix schenckii is a pathogenic, dimorphic fungus, the etiological agent of sporotrichosis, a subcutaneous lymphatic mycosis. Dimorphism in S. schenckii responds to second messengers such as cAMP and calcium, suggesting the possible involvement of a calcium/calmodulin kinase in its regulation. In this study we describe a novel calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase gene in S. schenckii, sscmk1, and the effects of inhibitors of calmodulin and calcium/calmodulin kinases on the yeast to mycelium transition and the yeast cell cycle. Results Using the PCR homology approach a new member of the calcium/calmodulin kinase family, SSCMK1, was identified in this fungus. The cDNA sequence of sscmk1 revealed an open reading frame of 1,221 nucleotides encoding a 407 amino acid protein with a predicted molecular weight of 45.6 kDa. The genomic sequence of sscmk1 revealed the same ORF interrupted by five introns. Bioinformatic analyses of SSCMK1 showed that this protein had the distinctive features that characterize a calcium/calmodulin protein kinase: a serine/threonine protein kinase domain and a calmodulin-binding domain. When compared to homologues from seven species of filamentous fungi, SSCMK1 showed substantial similarities, except for a large and highly variable region that encompasses positions 330 – 380 of the multiple sequence alignment. Inhibition studies using calmodulin inhibitor W-7, and calcium/calmodulin kinase inhibitors, KN-62 and lavendustin C, were found to inhibit budding by cells induced to re-enter the yeast cell cycle and to favor the yeast to mycelium transition. Conclusion This study constitutes the first evidence of the presence of a calcium/calmodulin kinase-encoding gene in S. schenckii and its possible involvement as an effector of dimorphism in this fungus. These results suggest that a calcium/calmodulin dependent signaling pathway could be involved in the regulation of dimorphism in this fungus

  7. Consensus between genes and stones in the biogeographic and evolutionary history of Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-García, Tania Anaid; Vázquez-Domínguez, Ella

    2013-05-01

    Results from genetic and geologic studies can be combined to elucidate some general patterns of the biogeographic and evolutionary history of Central America (CA) and of its biota. Based on an ample review of geologic, biogeographic and genetic studies, our aim was to examine how common genetic patterns can be linked with geologic processes. Considering information about geologic and tectonic evolution of CA, we subdivided the region into four tectonic blocks: Maya, Chortis, Chorotega and Chocó. Species exchange between North/South America and CA encompasses three events: a first migration during the Late Cretaceous-Early Paleocene, a second through a terrestrial corridor preceding the formation of the Isthmus of Panama (IP), and the third involving a major dispersion through the IP. Such events caused similar genetic differentiation patterns and left a signature on the diversification of extant taxa, which we propose as three evolutionary groups: 1) Mayan, characterized by marked genetic structure and divergence, multiple refugia and formation of cryptic species; 2) Mid-CA, defined by high differentiation at the population level and between highland and lowlands, associated with intense volcanic activity; 3) Panamian, distinguished by migration from north to south and vice versa via de IP, with markedly high species divergence and speciation.

  8. Comparative genotyping of Clostridium thermocellum strains isolated from biogas plants: genetic markers and characterization of cellulolytic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeck, Daniela E; Zverlov, Vladimir V; Liebl, Wolfgang; Schwarz, Wolfgang H

    2014-07-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is among the most prevalent of known anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria. In this study, genetic and phenotypic variations among C. thermocellum strains isolated from different biogas plants were determined and different genotyping methods were evaluated on these isolates. At least two C. thermocellum strains were isolated independently from each of nine different biogas plants via enrichment on cellulose. Various DNA-based genotyping methods such as ribotyping, RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA) and VNTR (Variable Number of Tandem Repeats) were applied to these isolates. One novel approach - the amplification of unknown target sequences between copies of a previously discovered Random Inserted Mobile Element (RIME) - was also tested. The genotyping method with the highest discriminatory power was found to be the amplification of the sequences between the insertion elements, where isolates from each biogas plant yielded a different band pattern. Cellulolytic potentials, optimal growth conditions and substrate spectra of all isolates were characterized to help identify phenotypic variations. Irrespective of the genotyping method used, the isolates from each individual biogas plant always exhibited identical patterns. This is suggestive of a single C. thermocellum strain exhibiting dominance in each biogas plant. The genotypic groups reflect the results of the physiological characterization of the isolates like substrate diversity and cellulase activity. Conversely, strains isolated across a range of biogas plants differed in their genotyping results and physiological properties. Both strains isolated from one biogas plant had the best specific cellulose-degrading properties and might therefore achieve superior substrate utilization yields in biogas fermenters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Genetic characterizations of Giardia duodenalis in sheep and goats in Heilongjiang Province, China and possibility of zoonotic transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weizhe Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Giardia duodenalis is a widespread intestinal protozoan of both humans and mammals. To date, few epidemiological studies have assessed the potential and importance of zoonotic transmission; and the human giardiasis burden attributable to G. duodenalis of animal origin is unclear. No information about occurrence and genotyping data of sheep and goat giardiasis is available in China. The aim of the present study was to determine prevalence and distribution of G. duodenalis in sheep and goats in Heilongjiang Province, China, and to characterize G. duodenalis isolates and assess the possibility of zoonotic transmission. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 678 fecal specimens were collected from sheep and goats on six farms ranging in age from one month to four years in Heilongjiang Province, China. The average prevalence of G. duodenalis infection was 5.0% (34/678 by microscopy after Lugol's iodine staining, with 5.6% (30/539 for the sheep versus 2.9% (4/139 for the goats. Molecular analysis was conducted on 34 G. duodenalis isolates based on the triosephosphate isomerase (tpi gene. 29 tpi gene sequences were successfully obtained and identified as assemblages A (n = 4, B (n = 2 and E (n = 23. High heterogeneity was observed within assemblage E at the tpi locus, with five novel subtypes found out of seven subtypes. Two subtypes of assemblage A were detected, including subtype AI (n = 3 and a novel subtype (designated as subtype AIV (n = 1. Two assemblage B isolates were identical to each other in the tpi gene sequences. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of G. duodenalis infections in sheep and goats in China. The present data revealed the unique endemicity on prevalence, distribution and genetic characterization of G. duodenalis in sheep and goats in Heilongjiang Province. The findings of assemblages A and B in sheep and goats implied the potential of zoonotic transmission.

  10. Prevalence, characterization and antibiotic resistance of Salmonella isolates in large corvid species of europe and north America between 2010 and 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecko, N; Čížek, A; Halová, D; Karpíšková, R; Myšková, P; Literák, I

    2015-06-01

    It is well understood that Salmonella is carried by animals and in majority of cases as asymptomatic hosts. Surveillance efforts have focused on the role of agriculture and contamination points along the food chain as the main source of human infection; however, very little attention has been paid to the contribution of wildlife in the dissemination of Salmonella and what effect anthropogenic sources have on the circulation of antibiotic resistant Salmonella serovars in wildlife species. A purposive survey was taken of large corvids roosting yearly between November and March in Europe and North America. Two thousand and seven hundred and seventy-eight corvid faecal specimens from 11 countries were submitted for Salmonella spp. culture testing. Presumptive positive isolates were further serotyped, susceptibility tested and analysed for antibiotic resistance genes. Overall, 1.40% (39/2778) (CI = 1.01, 1.90) of samples were positive for Salmonella spp. Salmonella Enteritidis was the most prevalent serovar followed by S. Infantis, S. Montevideo and S. Typhimurium. No significant difference (P > 0.05) was found in the proportion of Salmonella recovered in Europe versus North America. The most variability of serovars within a site was in Kansas, USA with five different serovars recovered. European sites were significantly more likely to yield Salmonella resistant to more than one antibiotic (OR 71.5, P American sites, where no resistance was found. Resistance to nalidixic acid, a quinolone, was recovered in nine isolates from four serovars in four different sites across Europe. Large corvids contribute to the transmission and dissemination of Salmonella and resistance genes between human and animal populations and across great distances. This information adds to the knowledge base of zoonotic pathogen prevalence and antibiotic resistance ecology in wild birds. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Clinical and Genetic Characterization of Tunisian Children with Hereditary 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D-Resistant Rickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ameur, Salma; Silve, Caroline; Chabchoub, Imene; Damak, Fatma; Kamoun, Fatma; Toussaint, Aurélie; Kmiha, Sana; Sfaihi, Lamia; Maaloul, Ines; Kamoun, Thouraya; Aloulou, Hajer; Hachicha, Mongia

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary vitamin D-resistant rickets (HVDRR) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the early onset of rickets and is caused by mutations in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene. Some HVDRR patients also have alopecia. We retrospectively studied the clinical features, laboratory findings, genetic defects, as well as responses to treatment in a series of children with HVDRR. Eight patients from 7 families met the inclusion criteria. Alopecia was noted in 7 patients. Two different homozygous mutations in the VDR gene were identified in 6 patients: the p.K45E mutation located in the DNA-binding domain (5 patients with alopecia) and a novel p.T415R mutation located in the ligand-binding domain. A p.E143del CYP24A1 mutation, in the gene encoding the 25-hydroxyvitamin D3-24-hydroxylase, was identified in 2 brothers carrying the VDR gene mutation p.K45E. Six patients were treated with intermittent intravenous calcium treatment via the peripheral route with a clear improvement in 5 cases. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first major series reporting on HVDRR in Tunisia. The same mutation (p.K45E) was found in 5 apparently unrelated affected individuals. We have also extended the mutation spectrum by studying 1 novel VDR mutation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Biological and Genetic Characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis Isolates from Five Hydrographical Basins in Northern Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Maria João; Soares, Sónia; de Lurdes Delgado, Maria; Figueiredo, João; Magalhães, Elisabete Silva; Castro, António; Viana Da Costa, Alexandra; Correia da Costa, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    To understand the situation of water contamination with Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. in the northern region of Portugal, we have established a long-term program aimed at pinpointing the sources of surface water and environmental contamination, working with the water-supply industry. Here, we describe the results obtained with raw water samples collected in rivers of the 5 hydrographical basins. A total of 283 samples were analyzed using the Method 1623 EPA, USA. Genetic characterization was performed by PCR and sequencing of genes 18S rRNA of Cryptosporidium spp. and β-giardin of Giardia spp. Infectious stages of the protozoa were detected in 72.8% (206 of 283) of the water samples, with 15.2% (43 of 283) positive for Giardia duodenalis cysts, 9.5% (27 of 283) positive for Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts, and 48.1% (136 of 283) samples positive for both parasites. The most common zoonotic species found were G. duodenalis assemblages A-I, A-II, B, and E genotypes, and Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium andersoni, Cryptosporidium hominis, and Cryptosporidium muris. These results suggest that cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis are important public health issues in northern Portugal. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report evaluating the concentration of environmental stages of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in raw water samples in the northern region of Portugal. PMID:20585525

  13. Molecular characterization of a genetic variant of the steroid hormone-binding globulin gene in heterozygous subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, D.O.; Catterall, J.F. [Population Council, New York, NY (United States); Carino, C. [Instituto National de la Nutricion, Mexico City, MX (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    Steroid hormone-binding globulin in human serum displays different isoelectric focusing (IEF) patterns among individuals, suggesting genetic variation in the gene for this extracellular steroid carrier protein. Analysis of allele frequencies and family studies suggested the existence of two codominant alleles of the gene. Subsequent determination of the molecular basis of a variant of the gene was carried out using DNA from homozygous individuals from a single Belgian family. It was of interest to characterize other variant individuals to determine whether all variants identified by IEF phenotyping were caused by the same mutation or whether other mutations occurred in the gene in different populations. Previous studies identified Mexican subjects who were heterozygous for the variant IEF phenotype. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to localize the mutation in these subjects and to purify the variant allele for DNA sequence analysis. The results show that the mutation in this population is identical to that identified in the Belgian family, and no other mutations were detected in the gene. These data represent the first analysis of steroid hormone-binding globulin gene variation in heterozygous subjects and further support the conclusion of biallelism of the gene worldwide. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Distribution Characterization of Leaf and Hull Pubescences and Genetic Analysis of Their Numbers in japonica Rice (Oryza sativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-biao ZHU

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Distributions of pubescences on leaf blade and hull in japonica rice were observed under an optical microscope. Numbers of leaf and hull pubescences in P1, P2, F1, B1, B2 and F2 generations were investigated in three combinations of japonica rice (Sidao 10A/Wuyujing 3R, Wuyujing 3A/Sidao 10R and Liuyan 189A/HR-122, and genetic analysis for these two traits were conducted by using the joint analysis method of P1, P2, F1, B1, B2 and F2 generations with the mixed major gene plus polygene inheritance models. Leaf pubescences characterized by swollen base and fine tip distributed regularly on the boundary between dark green stripe and light green stripe of leaf blade. Hull pubescences with various lengths distributed irregularly on the whole hull. Numbers of leaf pubescences in the reciprocal combinations of Sidao 10A/Wuyujing 3R and Wuyujing 3A/Sidao 10R and numbers of hull pubescences in all the three combinations were controlled by one pair of additive major genes plus additive-dominant polygenes. In the combination of Liuyan 189A/HR-122, number of leaf pubescences was controlled by one pair of additive-dominant major genes plus additive-dominant polygenes. Both numbers of leaf and hull pubescences were mainly governed by major genes.

  15. Characterization of genetic deletions in Becker muscular dystrophy using monoclonal antibodies against a deletion-prone region of dystrophin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanh, L.T.; Man, Nguyen Thi; Morris, G.E. [Wales Institute, Clwyd (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-08-28

    We have produced a new panel of 20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against a region of the dystrophin protein corresponding to a deletion-prone region of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene (exons 45-50). We show that immunohistochemistry or Western blotting with these {open_quotes}exon-specific{close_quotes} mAbs can provide a valuable addition to Southern blotting or PCR methods for the accurate identification of genetic deletions in Becker muscular dystrophy patients. The antibodies were mapped to the following exons: exon 45 (2 mAbs), exon 46 (6), exon 47 (1), exons 47/48 (4), exons 48-50 (6), and exon 50 (1). PCR amplification of single exons or groups of exons was used both to produce specific dystrophin immunogens and to map the mAbs obtained. PCR-mediated mutagenesis was also used to identify regions of dystrophin important for mAb binding. Because the mAbs can be used to characterize the dystrophin produced by individual muscle fibres, they will also be useful for studying {open_quotes}revertant{close_quotes} fibres in Duchenne muscle and for monitoring the results of myoblast therapy trials in MD patients with deletions in this region of the dystrophin gene. 27 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Theoretical Characterization of the H-Bonding and Stacking Potential of Two Non-Standard Nucleobases Expanding the Genetic Alphabet

    KAUST Repository

    Chawla, Mohit

    2016-02-16

    We report a quantum chemical characterization of the non-natural (synthetic) H-bonded base pair formed by 6-amino-5-nitro-2(1H)-pyridone (Z) and 2-amino-imidazo [1,2-a]-1,3,5-triazin-4(8H)-one (P). The Z:P base pair, orthogonal to the classical G:C base pair, has been introduced in DNA molecules for expanding the genetic code. Our results indicate that the Z:P base pair closely mimics the G:C base pair both in terms of structure and stability. To clarify the role of the NO2 group on the C5 position of the Z base, we compared the stability of the Z:P base pair with that of base pairs having different functional group on the C5 position of Z. Our results indicate that the electron donating/withdrawing properties of the group in the C5 position has a clear impact on the stability of the Z:P base pair, with the strong electron withdrawing nitro group achieving the largest stabilizing effect on the H-bonding interaction, and the strong electron donating NH2 group destabilizing the Z:P pair by almost 4 kcal/mol. Finally, our gas phase and in water calculations confirm that the Z-nitro group reinforce the stacking interaction with its adjacent purine or pyrimidine ring.

  17. Genetic characterization of infectious bursal disease viruses associated with gumboro outbreaks in commercial broilers from asyut province, egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Moemen A; Elzanaty, Kamal E S; Bakhit, Bakhit M; Safwat, Marwa M

    2014-01-01

    Ten infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) field strains were isolated from 15 broiler flocks located in various parts of Asyut, Egypt. Seven strains were subjected to comparative sequencing and phylogenetic analyses to help provide optimal control program for protection against IBDV infection. Sequence analysis of a 530 bp hypervariable region in the VP2 gene revealed that the rate of identity and homology was around 95.6~99.1%. Sequence characterization revealed the 7 strains identified as vvIBDV with the four amino acids residues typical of vvIBDV (242I, 256I, 294I, 299S). The BURSA-VAC vaccine was the nearest vaccine in sequence similarity to the local examined IBDV strains followed by CEVACIBDL then Bursine plus and Nobilis Gumboro indicating its probable success in the face of incoming outbreaks when using these vaccines. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the presence of three clusters for the examined strains and are grouped with reference very virulent IBDVs of European and Asian origin (Japanese and Hong Kong) strains suggesting the different ancestors of our isolates. The antigenic index showed a number of changes on the major and minor hydrophilic antigenic peaks of the virus surface structures indicating a new genetic evolution of the surface structure epitopes that may lead to vaccination failure and reemergence of the disease.

  18. Phenotypic characterization, genetic mapping and candidate gene analysis of a source conferring reduced plant height in sunflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, María Laura; Altieri, Emiliano; Bulos, Mariano; Sala, Carlos A

    2013-01-01

    Reduced height germplasm has the potential to increase stem strength, standability, and also yields potential of the sunflower crop (Helianthus annuus L. var. macrocarpus Ckll.). In this study, we report on the inheritance, mapping, phenotypic and molecular characterization of a reduced plant height trait in inbred lines derived from the source DDR. This trait is controlled by a semidominant allele, Rht1, which maps on linkage group 12 of the sunflower public consensus map. Phenotypic effects of this allele include shorter height and internode length, insensibility to exogenous gibberellin application, normal skotomorphogenetic response, and reduced seed set under self-pollination conditions. This later effect presumably is related to the reduced pollen viability observed in all DDR-derived lines studied. Rht1 completely cosegregated with a haplotype of the HaDella1 gene sequence. This haplotype consists of a point mutation converting a leucine residue in a proline within the conserved DELLA domain. Taken together, the phenotypic, genetic, and molecular results reported here indicate that Rht1 in sunflower likely encodes an altered DELLA protein. If the DELPA motif of the HaDELLA1 sequence in the Rht1-encoded protein determines by itself the observed reduction in height is a matter that remains to be investigated.

  19. Evolution of CCL11: genetic characterization in lagomorphs and evidence of positive and purifying selection in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Fabiana; Abrantes, Joana; Esteves, Pedro J