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Sample records for america genetic characterization

  1. Zika virus in the Americas: Early epidemiological and genetic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Nuno Rodrigues; Azevedo, Raimunda do Socorro da Silva; Kraemer, Moritz U G; Souza, Renato; Cunha, Mariana Sequetin; Hill, Sarah C; Thézé, Julien; Bonsall, Michael B; Bowden, Thomas A; Rissanen, Ilona; Rocco, Iray Maria; Nogueira, Juliana Silva; Maeda, Adriana Yurika; Vasami, Fernanda Giseli da Silva; Macedo, Fernando Luiz de Lima; Suzuki, Akemi; Rodrigues, Sueli Guerreiro; Cruz, Ana Cecilia Ribeiro; Nunes, Bruno Tardeli; Medeiros, Daniele Barbosa de Almeida; Rodrigues, Daniela Sueli Guerreiro; Nunes Queiroz, Alice Louize; da Silva, Eliana Vieira Pinto; Henriques, Daniele Freitas; Travassos da Rosa, Elisabeth Salbe; de Oliveira, Consuelo Silva; Martins, Livia Caricio; Vasconcelos, Helena Baldez; Casseb, Livia Medeiros Neves; Simith, Darlene de Brito; Messina, Jane P; Abade, Leandro; Lourenço, José; Carlos Junior Alcantara, Luiz; de Lima, Maricélia Maia; Giovanetti, Marta; Hay, Simon I; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Santos; Lemos, Poliana da Silva; de Oliveira, Layanna Freitas; de Lima, Clayton Pereira Silva; da Silva, Sandro Patroca; de Vasconcelos, Janaina Mota; Franco, Luciano; Cardoso, Jedson Ferreira; Vianez-Júnior, João Lídio da Silva Gonçalves; Mir, Daiana; Bello, Gonzalo; Delatorre, Edson; Khan, Kamran; Creatore, Marisa; Coelho, Giovanini Evelim; de Oliveira, Wanderson Kleber; Tesh, Robert; Pybus, Oliver G; Nunes, Marcio R T; Vasconcelos, Pedro F C

    2016-04-15

    Brazil has experienced an unprecedented epidemic of Zika virus (ZIKV), with ~30,000 cases reported to date. ZIKV was first detected in Brazil in May 2015, and cases of microcephaly potentially associated with ZIKV infection were identified in November 2015. We performed next-generation sequencing to generate seven Brazilian ZIKV genomes sampled from four self-limited cases, one blood donor, one fatal adult case, and one newborn with microcephaly and congenital malformations. Results of phylogenetic and molecular clock analyses show a single introduction of ZIKV into the Americas, which we estimated to have occurred between May and December 2013, more than 12 months before the detection of ZIKV in Brazil. The estimated date of origin coincides with an increase in air passengers to Brazil from ZIKV-endemic areas, as well as with reported outbreaks in the Pacific Islands. ZIKV genomes from Brazil are phylogenetically interspersed with those from other South American and Caribbean countries. Mapping mutations onto existing structural models revealed the context of viral amino acid changes present in the outbreak lineage; however, no shared amino acid changes were found among the three currently available virus genomes from microcephaly cases. Municipality-level incidence data indicate that reports of suspected microcephaly in Brazil best correlate with ZIKV incidence around week 17 of pregnancy, although this correlation does not demonstrate causation. Our genetic description and analysis of ZIKV isolates in Brazil provide a baseline for future studies of the evolution and molecular epidemiology of this emerging virus in the Americas.

  2. Genomic characterization and phylogenetic analysis of Zika virus circulating in the Americas.

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    Ye, Qing; Liu, Zhong-Yu; Han, Jian-Feng; Jiang, Tao; Li, Xiao-Feng; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2016-09-01

    The rapid spread and potential link with birth defects have made Zika virus (ZIKV) a global public health problem. The virus was discovered 70years ago, yet the knowledge about its genomic structure and the genetic variations associated with current ZIKV explosive epidemics remains not fully understood. In this review, the genome organization, especially conserved terminal structures of ZIKV genome were characterized and compared with other mosquito-borne flaviviruses. It is suggested that major viral proteins of ZIKV share high structural and functional similarity with other known flaviviruses as shown by sequence comparison and prediction of functional motifs in viral proteins. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that all ZIKV strains circulating in the America form a unique clade within the Asian lineage. Furthermore, we identified a series of conserved amino acid residues that differentiate the Asian strains including the current circulating American strains from the ancient African strains. Overall, our findings provide an overview of ZIKV genome characterization and evolutionary dynamics in the Americas and point out critical clues for future virological and epidemiological studies. PMID:27156653

  3. Complete genome and clinicopathological characterization of a virulent Newcastle disease virus isolate from South America.

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    Diel, Diego G; Susta, Leonardo; Cardenas Garcia, Stivalis; Killian, Mary L; Brown, Corrie C; Miller, Patti J; Afonso, Claudio L

    2012-02-01

    Newcastle disease (ND) is one of the most important diseases of poultry, negatively affecting poultry production worldwide. The disease is caused by Newcastle disease virus (NDV) or avian paramyxovirus type 1 (APMV-1), a negative-sense single-stranded RNA virus of the genus Avulavirus, family Paramyxoviridae. Although all NDV isolates characterized to date belong to a single serotype of APMV-1, significant genetic diversity has been described between different NDV isolates. Here we present the complete genome sequence and the clinicopathological characterization of a virulent Newcastle disease virus isolate (NDV-Peru/08) obtained from poultry during an outbreak of ND in Peru in 2008. Phylogenetic reconstruction and analysis of the evolutionary distances between NDV-Peru/08 and other isolates representing established NDV genotypes revealed the existence of large genomic and amino differences that clearly distinguish this isolate from viruses of typical NDV genotypes. Although NDV-Peru/08 is a genetically distinct virus, pathogenesis studies conducted with chickens revealed that NDV-Peru/08 infection results in clinical signs characteristic of velogenic viscerotropic NDV strains. Additionally, vaccination studies have shown that an inactivated NDV-LaSota/46 vaccine conferred full protection from NDV-Peru/08-induced clinical disease and mortality. This represents the first complete characterization of a virulent NDV isolate from South America.

  4. Genetic Relationships Between Cercospora kikuchii Populations from South America and Japan.

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    Imazaki, I; Homma, Y; Kato, M; Vallone, S; Yorinori, J T; Henning, A A; Iizumi, H; Koizumi, S

    2006-09-01

    ABSTRACT A collection 160 isolates of Cercospora kikuchii was made from South America and 245 from Japan. DNA fingerprint patterns were analyzed based on amplified fragment length polymorphism among the sample isolates, dividing the isolates into seven lineages (I to VII). Partial nucleotide sequence analyses of the beta-tubulin gene supported this division into seven lineages. Lineages I and III commonly existed in South America and Japan. In all, 136 of the 160 isolates from South America and 223 of the 245 isolates from Japan belonged to lineage I, indicating that lineage I was the major lineage in each area; 5 isolates from South America and 8 isolates from Japan belonged to lineage III. Lineages II (12 isolates) and IV (2 isolates) were specific to Japan and lineages V (3 isolates), VI (1 isolate), and VII (15 isolates) specifically existed in South America. These results suggest that the population genetic structure of C. kikuchii was different between South America and Japan, but the dominance of lineage I was common between the two areas.

  5. Biologic and genetic characteristics of Toxoplasma gondii isolates in free-range chickens from Nicaragua, Central America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dubey, J.P.; Sundar, N.; Pineda, N.;

    2006-01-01

    :10 or less were pooled and fed to three T. gondii-free cats. Hearts and brains of 66 chickens with titers of 1:20 or higher were bioassayed in mice. Feces of cats were examined for oocysts. The cat fed tissues from eight chickens with titers of 1:10 shed T. gondii oocysts. The two cats fed tissues of 24...... from the same household, indicating multiple genotypes were circulating in the same environment. This may explain the high frequency of mixed infections observed. High rate of mixed infection in intermediate hosts such as chickens may facilitate genetic exchange between different parasite lineages...... in definitive feline hosts. This is the first report of genetic characterization of T. gondii isolates from Nicragua, Central America....

  6. Genetic characterization of Neotropical Jabiru Storks: Insights for conservation

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    Lopes, I.F.; Haig, S.M.; Lama, S.N.D.

    2010-01-01

    Jabiru Stork (Jabiru mycteria is listed under Appendix I of CITES and considered threatened in Central America. The first population genetic analysis of Jabiru Storks was carried out using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences (520 bp) and five heterologous microsatellite loci. Samples were collected from the field (N = 49) and museum skins (N = 22) in Central (mainly Belize, Nicaragua and Costa Rica) and South America (Colombia, Venezuela, Peru and Brazil). A decline of mtDNA diversity was observed in comparisons between past (N = 20) and present (N = 40) samples collected in Central America and northern South America. Similar levels of microsatellite loci diversity were observed among contemporary samples. Lower levels of mtDNA variability were observed in samples from Central America and northern South America when compared to the Brazilian Pantanal region. Significant levels of genetic differentiation were found between contemporary locations sampled, whereas non-significant results were observed for historic samples. The non-geographic association of haplotypes observed at the cladograms and the recent divergence times estimated between locations are indicative of an evolutionary history of a large population size with limited population structure. Reconnection of populations via increased gene flow, particularly in Central America, is recommended if genetic structure and status are to be restored.

  7. Genetic variability of Aedes aegypti in the Americas using a mitochondrial gene: evidence of multiple introductions

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    José Eduardo Bracco

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available To analyze the genetic relatedness and phylogeographic structure of Aedes aegypti, we collected samples from 36 localities throughout the Americas (Brazil, Peru, Venezuela, Guatemala, US, three from Africa (Guinea, Senegal, Uganda, and three from Asia (Singapore, Cambodia, Tahiti. Amplification and sequencing of a fragment of the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 gene identified 20 distinct haplotypes, of which 14 are exclusive to the Americas, four to African/Asian countries, one is common to the Americas and Africa, and one to the Americas and Asia. Nested clade analysis (NCA, pairwise distribution, statistical parsimony, and maximum parsimony analyses were used to infer evolutionary and historic processes, and to estimate phylogenetic relationships among haplotypes. Two clusters were found in all the analyses. Haplotypes clustered in the two clades were separated by eight mutational steps. Phylogeographic structure detected by the NCA was consistent with distant colonization within one clade and fragmentation followed by range expansion via long distance dispersal in the other. Three percent of nucleotide divergence between these two clades is suggestive of a gene pool division that may support the hypothesis of occurrence of two subspecies of Ae. aegypti in the Americas.

  8. Genetic distinctions between autoimmune hepatitis in Italy and North America

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paolo Muratori; Marco Lenzi; Francesco B. Bianchi; Albert J. Czaja; Luigi Muratori; Georgios Pappas; Silvana Maccariello; Fabio Cassani; Alessandro Granito; Rodolfo Ferrari; Vilma Mantovani

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Our goals were to analyze the known genetic predispositions for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) in AIH Italian population and to compare them with North American counterparts.METHODS: Human leukocyte antigens (HLA) B8, C7, DR3,DR4, DR7, DR11, DR13, DQ2 and the B8-DR3-DQ2phenotype were determined by microlymphocytotoxicity and polymerase chain reaction in 74 Italian patients (57with type 1 and 17 with type 2 AIH) and 149 North American patients with type 1 AIH, and in adequate controls.RESULTS: B8-DR3-DQ2 occurred more frequently in Italian patients with type 1 AIH than in Italian controls (30% vs 7%, P<0.0001), but less frequently than in North American counterparts (30% vs48%, P = 0.02). DR4 occurred less frequently in Italian patients with type 1 AIH (23% vs43%,P= 0.01) and in controls (16% vs34%, P= 0.0003) than in North American counterparts. No differences were found in alleles' frequency between type 1 and type 2Italian AIH patients. DR11 had a frequency lower in type 1 Italian AIH patients than controls (17% vs35%, P= 0.01).CONCLUSION: HLA DR4 is not associated with AIH in Italy. The known HLA risk factors for ATH occur similarly in Italian patients with type 1 and type 2 AIH, and they are less frequent than in North American patients. B8-DR3-DQ2 is the predominant phenotype of type 1 AIH also in Italy, and HLA DR11 may be a regionally distinctive protective factor against type 1 AIH.

  9. Genetic characterization and cotyledon color in lentil

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    Cahit Erdoğan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Genetic characterization of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. cultivars is important for lentil breeding. Therefore, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE analysis were carried out to evaluate genetic diversity in 13 Turkish lentil cultivars. A total of eight RAPD primers were used in this study; 61 bands were produced and 55 of them were polymorphic (89.78%. The RAPD primers OPA-10, OPB-11, and OPI-13 had the highest polymorphism ratio (100%. As a result of SDS-PAGE analysis, variations in the seed protein pattern were observed among the lentil cultivars being studied. The SDS-PAGE similarity matrices indicated higher genetic similarity estimates among the lentil cultivars than RAPD. In addition, principal components analysis (PCA was performed for both SDS-PAGE and RAPD where the first three components accounted for 75.760% and 68.121% of the total variation for SDS-PAGE and RAPD analysis, respectively. It was noted that the lentil cultivars with factor loadings greater than 0.5 for each principal component (PC were also grouped together in the SDS-PAGE and RAPD dendrogram. In addition to genetic diversity, cotyledon color (an important market criterion values were measured for lightness (L*, redness (a*, and yellowness (b*. As for cotyledon color, values for brightness, redness, and yellowness varied significantly among lentil cultivars. Among the red lentil cultivars, 'Cagil' and 'Yerli Kirmizi' had the highest cotyledon L* values of 70.83 and 70.74, respectively. The results of both genetic diversity analyses and cotyledon color of lentil cultivars would help in planning future breeding programs to improve high yielding marketable lentil cultivars.

  10. Genetic diversity and host specificity varies across three genera of blood parasites in ducks of the Pacific Americas Flyway.

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    Andrew B Reeves

    Full Text Available Birds of the order Anseriformes, commonly referred to as waterfowl, are frequently infected by Haemosporidia of the genera Haemoproteus, Plasmodium, and Leucocytozoon via dipteran vectors. We analyzed nucleotide sequences of the Cytochrome b (Cytb gene from parasites of these genera detected in six species of ducks from Alaska and California, USA to characterize the genetic diversity of Haemosporidia infecting waterfowl at two ends of the Pacific Americas Flyway. In addition, parasite Cytb sequences were compared to those available on a public database to investigate specificity of genetic lineages to hosts of the order Anseriformes. Haplotype and nucleotide diversity of Haemoproteus Cytb sequences was lower than was detected for Plasmodium and Leucocytozoon parasites. Although waterfowl are presumed to be infected by only a single species of Leucocytozoon, L. simondi, diversity indices were highest for haplotypes from this genus and sequences formed five distinct clades separated by genetic distances of 4.9%-7.6%, suggesting potential cryptic speciation. All Haemoproteus and Leucocytozoon haplotypes derived from waterfowl samples formed monophyletic clades in phylogenetic analyses and were unique to the order Anseriformes with few exceptions. In contrast, waterfowl-origin Plasmodium haplotypes were identical or closely related to lineages found in other avian orders. Our results suggest a more generalist strategy for Plasmodium parasites infecting North American waterfowl as compared to those of the genera Haemoproteus and Leucocytozoon.

  11. Characterization of low-pathogenicity H5N1 avian influenza viruses from North America

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    Spackman, Erica; Swayne, David E.; Suarez, David L.; Senne, Dennis A.; Pedersen, Janice C.; Killian, Mary Lea; Pasick, John; Handel, Katherine; Somanathan Pillai, Smitha; Lee, Chang-Won; Stallknecht, David; Slemons, Richard; Ip, Hon S.; Deliberto, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Wild-bird surveillance in North America for avian influenza (AI) viruses with a goal of early identification of the Asian H5N1 highly pathogenic AI virus has identified at least six low-pathogenicity H5N1 AI viruses between 2004 and 2006. The hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes from all 6 H5N1 viruses and an additional 38 North American wild-bird-origin H5 subtype and 28 N1 subtype viruses were sequenced and compared with sequences available in GenBank by phylogenetic analysis. Both HA and NA were phylogenetically distinct from those for viruses from outside of North America and from those for viruses recovered from mammals. Four of the H5N1 AI viruses were characterized as low pathogenicity by standard in vivo pathotyping tests. One of the H5N1 viruses, A/MuteSwan/MI/451072-2/06, was shown to replicate to low titers in chickens, turkeys, and ducks. However, transmission of A/MuteSwan/MI/451072-2/06 was more efficient among ducks than among chickens or turkeys based on virus shed. The 50% chicken infectious dose for A/MuteSwan/MI/451072-2/06 and three other wild-waterfowl-origin H5 viruses were also determined and were between 105.3 and 107.5 50% egg infective doses. Finally, seven H5 viruses representing different phylogenetic clades were evaluated for their antigenic relatedness by hemagglutination inhibition assay, showing that the antigenic relatedness was largely associated with geographic origin. Overall, the data support the conclusion that North American H5 wild-bird-origin AI viruses are low-pathogenicity wild-bird-adapted viruses and are antigenically and genetically distinct from the highly pathogenic Asian H5N1 virus lineage.

  12. Antigenic Characterization of H3 Subtypes of Avian Influenza A Viruses from North America.

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    Bailey, Elizabeth; Long, Li-Ping; Zhao, Nan; Hall, Jeffrey S; Baroch, John A; Nolting, Jacqueline; Senter, Lucy; Cunningham, Frederick L; Pharr, G Todd; Hanson, Larry; Slemons, Richard; DeLiberto, Thomas J; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2016-05-01

    Besides humans, H3 subtypes of influenza A viruses (IAVs) can infect various animal hosts, including avian, swine, equine, canine, and sea mammal species. These H3 viruses are both antigenically and genetically diverse. Here, we characterized the antigenic diversity of contemporary H3 avian IAVs recovered from migratory birds in North America. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays were performed on 37 H3 isolates of avian IAVs recovered from 2007 to 2011 using generated reference chicken sera. These isolates were recovered from samples taken in the Atlantic, Mississippi, Central, and Pacific waterfowl migration flyways. Antisera to all the tested H3 isolates cross-reacted with each other and, to a lesser extent, with those to H3 canine and H3 equine IAVs. Antigenic cartography showed that the largest antigenic distance among the 37 avian IAVs is about four units, and each unit corresponds to a 2 log 2 difference in the HI titer. However, none of the tested H3 IAVs cross-reacted with ferret sera derived from contemporary swine and human IAVs. Our results showed that the H3 avian IAVs we tested lacked significant antigenic diversity, and these viruses were antigenically different from those circulating in swine and human populations. This suggests that H3 avian IAVs in North American waterfowl are antigenically relatively stable. PMID:27309078

  13. Antigenic characterization of H3 subtypes of avian influenza A viruses from North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Elizabeth; Long, Li-Pong; Zhao, Nan; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Baroch, John A; Nolting, Jaqueline; Senter, Lucy; Cunningham, Frederick L; Pharr, G Todd; Hanson, Larry; Slemons, Richard; DeLiberto, Thomas J.; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Besides humans, H3 subtypes of influenza A viruses (IAVs) can infect various animal hosts, including avian, swine, equine, canine, and sea mammal species. These H3 viruses are both antigenically and genetically diverse. Here, we characterized the antigenic diversity of contemporary H3 avian IAVs recovered from migratory birds in North America. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays were performed on 37 H3 isolates of avian IAVs recovered from 2007 to 2011 using generated reference chicken sera. These isolates were recovered from samples taken in the Atlantic, Mississippi, Central, and Pacific waterfowl migration flyways. Antisera to all the tested H3 isolates cross-reacted with each other and, to a lesser extent, with those to H3 canine and H3 equine IAVs. Antigenic cartography showed that the largest antigenic distance among the 37 avian IAVs is about four units, and each unit corresponds to a 2 log 2 difference in the HI titer. However, none of the tested H3 IAVs cross-reacted with ferret sera derived from contemporary swine and human IAVs. Our results showed that the H3 avian IAVs we tested lacked significant antigenic diversity, and these viruses were antigenically different from those circulating in swine and human populations. This suggests that H3 avian IAVs in North American waterfowl are antigenically relatively stable.

  14. Antigenic Characterization of H3 Subtypes of Avian Influenza A Viruses from North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Elizabeth; Long, Li-Ping; Zhao, Nan; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Baroch, John A.; Nolting, Jacqueline; Senter, Lucy; Cunningham, Frederick L.; Pharr, G. Todd; Hanson, Larry; Slemons, Richard; DeLiberto, Thomas J.; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Besides humans, H3 subtypes of influenza A viruses (IAVs) can infect various animal hosts including avian, swine, equine, canine, and sea mammals. These H3 viruses are both antigenically and genetically diverse. Here we characterized the antigenic diversity of contemporary H3 avian IAVs recovered from migratory birds in North America. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays were performed on 37 H3 isolates of avian IAVs recovered from 2007 to 2011 using generated reference chicken sera. These isolates were recovered from samples taken in the Atlantic, Mississippi, Central, and Pacific waterfowl migration flyways. Antisera to all the tested H3 isolates cross-reacted with each other, and, to a lesser extent, with those to H3 canine and H3 equine IAVs. Antigenic cartography showed that the largest antigenic distance among the 37 avian IAVs is about 4 units, and each unit corresponds to a 2log2 difference in the HI titer. However, none of the tested H3 IAVs cross-reacted with ferret sera derived from contemporary swine and human IAVs. Our results showed that the H3 avian IAVs we tested lacked significant antigenic diversity, and these viruses were antigenically different from those circulating in swine and human populations. This suggests that H3 avian IAVs in North American waterfowl are antigenically relatively stable. PMID:27309078

  15. [Mangrove characterization of Central America with remote sensors].

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    Lizano, O G; Amador, J; Soto, R

    2001-12-01

    Satellite images were used to study the mangrove distribution patterns in two different climatic regions of Central America: Gulf of Fonseca in Honduras-El Salvador and Sierpe-Térraba in Costa Rica. The Gulf of Fonseca has higher temperature and solar radiation, and lower precipitation, which can explain the higher structural development and species mixing of the Sierpe-Térraba mangrove. In the latter the transition between species or between heights in the same species is clear. The automatic classification made by the Geographic Information System (IDRISI) fits well the field mangrove distribution, but it was necessary to regroup some subdivisions that represent the same land use as identified by transects and an aerial video. Mixed species and clouds produced less satisfactory results in Sierpe-Térraba indicating a need for better satellite image resolution. PMID:15264547

  16. Genetic structure of avian influenza viruses from ducks of the Atlantic flyway of North America.

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    Yanyan Huang

    Full Text Available Wild birds, including waterfowl such as ducks, are reservoir hosts of influenza A viruses. Despite the increased number of avian influenza virus (AIV genome sequences available, our understanding of AIV genetic structure and transmission through space and time in waterfowl in North America is still limited. In particular, AIVs in ducks of the Atlantic flyway of North America have not been thoroughly investigated. To begin to address this gap, we analyzed 109 AIV genome sequences from ducks in the Atlantic flyway to determine their genetic structure and to document the extent of gene flow in the context of sequences from other locations and other avian and mammalian host groups. The analyses included 25 AIVs from ducks from Newfoundland, Canada, from 2008-2011 and 84 available reference duck AIVs from the Atlantic flyway from 2006-2011. A vast diversity of viral genes and genomes was identified in the 109 viruses. The genetic structure differed amongst the 8 viral segments with predominant single lineages found for the PB2, PB1 and M segments, increased diversity found for the PA, NP and NS segments (2, 3 and 3 lineages, respectively, and the highest diversity found for the HA and NA segments (12 and 9 lineages, respectively. Identification of inter-hemispheric transmissions was rare with only 2% of the genes of Eurasian origin. Virus transmission between ducks and other bird groups was investigated, with 57.3% of the genes having highly similar (≥99% nucleotide identity genes detected in birds other than ducks. Transmission between North American flyways has been frequent and 75.8% of the genes were highly similar to genes found in other North American flyways. However, the duck AIV genes did display spatial distribution bias, which was demonstrated by the different population sizes of specific viral genes in one or two neighbouring flyways compared to more distant flyways.

  17. Acceptance of a food of animal origin obtained through genetic modification and cloning in South America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnettler, Berta; Velásquez, Carlos; Miranda, Horacio;

    2015-01-01

    With the aim of comparing the acceptance of milk obtained from cloned, genetically modified (GM) and conventionally bred cows among working adults and university students, and identifying and characterizing typologies among both subsamples in terms of their preferences, a survey was applied to 40...

  18. Genetic diversity and population genetics of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae: Culex spp.) from the Sonoran Desert of North America.

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    Pfeiler, Edward; Flores-López, Carlos A; Mada-Vélez, Jesús Gerardo; Escalante-Verdugo, Juan; Markow, Therese A

    2013-01-01

    The population genetics and phylogenetic relationships of Culex mosquitoes inhabiting the Sonoran Desert region of North America were studied using mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite molecular markers. Phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) from mosquitoes collected over a wide geographic area, including the Baja California peninsula, and mainland localities in southern Arizona, USA and Sonora, Mexico, showed several well-supported partitions corresponding to Cx. quinquefasciatus, Cx. tarsalis, and two unidentified species, Culex sp. 1 and sp. 2. Culex quinquefasciatus was found at all localities and was the most abundant species collected. Culex tarsalis was collected only at Tucson, Arizona and Guaymas, Sonora. The two unidentified species of Culex were most abundant at Navojoa in southern Sonora. Haplotype and nucleotide diversities in the COI gene segment were substantially lower in Cx. quinquefasciatus compared with the other three species. Analysis of molecular variance revealed little structure among seven populations of Cx. quinquefasciatus, whereas significant structure was found between the two populations of Cx. tarsalis. Evidence for an historical population expansion beginning in the Pleistocene was found for Cx. tarsalis. Possible explanations for the large differences in genetic diversity between Cx. quinquefasciatus and the other species of Culex are presented.

  19. Genetic Diversity and Population Genetics of Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae: Culex spp. from the Sonoran Desert of North America

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    Edward Pfeiler

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The population genetics and phylogenetic relationships of Culex mosquitoes inhabiting the Sonoran Desert region of North America were studied using mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite molecular markers. Phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI from mosquitoes collected over a wide geographic area, including the Baja California peninsula, and mainland localities in southern Arizona, USA and Sonora, Mexico, showed several well-supported partitions corresponding to Cx. quinquefasciatus, Cx. tarsalis, and two unidentified species, Culex sp. 1 and sp. 2. Culex quinquefasciatus was found at all localities and was the most abundant species collected. Culex tarsalis was collected only at Tucson, Arizona and Guaymas, Sonora. The two unidentified species of Culex were most abundant at Navojoa in southern Sonora. Haplotype and nucleotide diversities in the COI gene segment were substantially lower in Cx. quinquefasciatus compared with the other three species. Analysis of molecular variance revealed little structure among seven populations of Cx. quinquefasciatus, whereas significant structure was found between the two populations of Cx. tarsalis. Evidence for an historical population expansion beginning in the Pleistocene was found for Cx. tarsalis. Possible explanations for the large differences in genetic diversity between Cx. quinquefasciatus and the other species of Culex are presented.

  20. Genetic Diversity and Population Genetics of Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae: Culex spp.) from the Sonoran Desert of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiler, Edward; Flores-López, Carlos A.; Mada-Vélez, Jesús Gerardo; Escalante-Verdugo, Juan; Markow, Therese A.

    2013-01-01

    The population genetics and phylogenetic relationships of Culex mosquitoes inhabiting the Sonoran Desert region of North America were studied using mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite molecular markers. Phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) from mosquitoes collected over a wide geographic area, including the Baja California peninsula, and mainland localities in southern Arizona, USA and Sonora, Mexico, showed several well-supported partitions corresponding to Cx. quinquefasciatus, Cx. tarsalis, and two unidentified species, Culex sp. 1 and sp. 2. Culex quinquefasciatus was found at all localities and was the most abundant species collected. Culex tarsalis was collected only at Tucson, Arizona and Guaymas, Sonora. The two unidentified species of Culex were most abundant at Navojoa in southern Sonora. Haplotype and nucleotide diversities in the COI gene segment were substantially lower in Cx. quinquefasciatus compared with the other three species. Analysis of molecular variance revealed little structure among seven populations of Cx. quinquefasciatus, whereas significant structure was found between the two populations of Cx. tarsalis. Evidence for an historical population expansion beginning in the Pleistocene was found for Cx. tarsalis. Possible explanations for the large differences in genetic diversity between Cx. quinquefasciatus and the other species of Culex are presented. PMID:24302868

  1. Molecular characterization of adenovirus circulating in Central and South America during the 2006–2008 period

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    García, Josefina; Sovero, Merly; Laguna‐Torres, Victor Alberto; Gomez, Jorge; Chicaiza, Wilson; Barrantes, Melvin; Sanchez, Felix; Jimenez, Mirna; Comach, Guillermo; De Rivera, Ivette L.; Agudo, Roberto; Arango, Ana E.; Barboza, Alma; Aguayo, Nicolas; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2009-01-01

    Background  Human Adenoviruses are recognized pathogens, causing a broad spectrum of diseases. Serotype identification is critical for epidemiological surveillance, detection of new strains and understanding of HAdvs pathogenesis. Little data is available about HAdvs subtypes in Latin America. Methods  In this study, we have molecularly characterized 213 adenoviruses collected from ILI presenting patients, during 2006‐08, in Central and South America. Results  Our results indicate that 161(76%) adenoviruses belong to subgroup C, 45 (21%) to subgroup B and 7 (3%) to subtype E4. PMID:19903214

  2. Genetic relationships among five zebu breeds naturalized in America accessed with molecular markers

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    Axel Villalobos-Cortés

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to analyze the within-breed genetic diversity and determine the genetic relationships among the most important zebu populations introduced in the American continent from Asia. Gyr (GYR, Red Sindhi (SIN, Nellore (NEL, Guzerat (GUZ and the synthetic Brahman (BRH breeds have been established especially in American tropical regions. Estimates of genetic structure and diversity were carried out within and among the five populations studied. The results of withinbreed genetic diversity showed medium to high medium values of diversity in all genetic parameters [observed heterozygosity (Ho=0.622±0.022; expected heterozygosity (He=0.662±0.023; number of alleles (Na=5.71±1.63; and allelic richness (Ar=4.097±0.958]. The lowest value of Ho was observed in NEL (0.569±0.019 and the highest in BRH (0.688±0.015. Lowest value of He was also observed in NEL (0.612±0.024 and the highest in BRH (0.700±0.020. Gyr, GUZ and NEL showed high estimations of inbreeding, 9.98, 7.92 and 6.83% respectively. Values of Na varied between 4.93±1.52 in GUZ and 7.04±1.99 in BRH and the Ar values ranged between 3.687±0.895 in NEL and 4.42±1.91 in SIN. On the other hand, although phenotypically, the five breeds are clearly distinguishable, the genetic analysis of structure and kinship demonstrates a total independence among GYR, GUZ and NEL, while BRH and Red Sindhi show a closed relationship. These facts support that GYR, GUZ and NEL have had a diverse origin but also different models of introgression in America. Brahman and SIN could be explained by the intervention of the Sindhi ancestors in the formation of the American synthetic Brahma.

  3. Characterization of Genetic Variation in Icelandic Cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars-Erik; Das, Ashutosh; Momeni, Jamal;

    Identification of genetic variation in cattle breeds using next-generation sequencing technology has focused on the modern production cattle breeds. We focused on one of the oldest indigenous breeds, the Icelandic cattle breed. Sequencing of two individuals enabled identification of more than 8...... million SNPs and more than one million short indels. Annotation of the genetic variants identified a substantial number of functional SNPs and variants. The number of genetic variants identified in the Icelandic cattle breed is on the same level as previously seen in other studies on Holstein cattle...

  4. Mapping agricultural landscapes and characterizing adaptive capacity in Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, M. B.; Imbach, P. A.; Bouroncle, C.; Donatti, C.; Leguia, E.; Martinez, M.; Medellin, C.; Saborio-Rodriguez, M.; Shamer, S.; Zamora, J.

    2013-12-01

    One of the key challenges in developing adaptation strategies for smallholder farmers in developing countries is that of a data-poor environment, where spatially-explicit information about where the most vulnerable smallholder communities are located is lacking. Developing countries tend to lack consistent and reliable maps on agricultural land use, and have limited information available on smallholder adaptive capacity. We developed a novel participatory and expert mapping process to overcome these barriers and develop detailed national-scale maps that allow for a characterization of unique agricultural landscapes based on profiles of adaptive capacity for smallholder agriculture in each area. This research focuses specifically on the Central American nations of Costa Rica, Guatemala, and Honduras, where our focus is on coffee and basic grains as the two main cropping systems. Here we present the methodology and results of a series of in-depth interviews and participatory mapping sessions with experts working within the broader agricultural sector in each country. We held individual interviews and mapping sessions with approximately thirty experts from each country, and used a detailed survey instrument for each mapping session to both spatially identify distinct agricultural landscapes, and to further characterize each area based on specific farm practices and social context. The survey also included a series of questions to help us assess the relative adaptive capacity of smallholder agriculture within each landscape. After all expert mapping sessions were completed in each country we convened an expert group to assist in both validating and refining the set of landscapes already defined. We developed a characterization of adaptive capacity by aggregating indicators into main assets-based criteria (e.g. land tenure, access to credit, access to technical assistance, sustainable farm practices) derived from further expert weighting of indicators through an online

  5. Chemical Mineralogy, Geochemical Characterization and Petrography of the Cambumbia Stock, Northern Andes, South America, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Lequerica, Salvador; María Jaramillo Mejía, José; Concha Perdomo, Ana Elena; Jimenez Quintero, Camilo

    2013-04-01

    The Cambumbia Stock is located on the western flank of the Central Cordillera of the northern Andes, South America. The goals of this study were to characterize the mineral chemistry, the geochemical composition and the petrography of the Cambumbia igneous body and to establish its petrogenesis. We collected 41 samples, selected 28 for thin section petrographic analysis, 14 for whole rock elementary chemical determination by ICP-MS and 4 for chemical mineralogy by LA-ICP(JEOL JXA-8200). Petrographically the samples were classified as 30 % hornblende-gabbro, 30% pyroxene-gabbros, 10% diorites, 10% olivine-gabbro, 7% gabbronorites, 7% tonalities and 3% norite, 3% wehrlite, the rock varies from medium to coarse hipidiomorfic and holocristaline texture, with local microporfiritic texture. Spot elemental chemical analysis of the some minerals in 4 samples show the range of the major elemental composition is plagioclase (labradorite), clinopyroxene (augite), horblende (magnesiohornblende), olivine (fayalite())Chemical mineralogy shows the variety of minerals in this rock, essential minerals correspond to bytownite, augite, magnesio-honblende, fallaite and titanite. We conclude base on the SiO2 Vs Total Alkalis graph that the samples correspond to the sub-alkaline series with low K content, mainly in the calc-alkaline series. By using the SiO2 vs TiO2, Th/Yb vs Ta/Yb and Zr/117-Th-Nb/16 diagrams it was determined that these rocks were generated in two geotectonic environments: one type MOR (extension) and other island arc (subduction, compression). Recently, a U/Pb age was obtained by the Universidad de Caldas in zircon in 2009 (not published data), yielded an age of 233.41 ± 3.4 Ma (Carnian - Upper Triassic). Petrographic geochemical and geochronology comparisons between the rocks of Cambumbia Stock and Diorite and Gabbro El Pueblito (located about 25 km to the north-west) and with U/Pb age 231 ± 8 may postulate a possible genetic link between them. These ages are

  6. The Pentro horse: genetic characterization by microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Pilla

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Pentro horse population is an autochthonous breed from a breeding area characterized by climatic and geographicpeculiarities. The horse population is interesting because of its rusticity, however, has run the risk of loosing its identitybecause of the introduction of exotic genetic material. This study presents data of the genetic characterization by meansof microsatellite markers. A total of 12 microsatellite loci were used to score 147 individuals among those with the Pentrophenotype, as well as 16 individuals representing the variable part of the population. Allele frequencies were calculatedfor each locus, with the mean number of alleles (Nall = 6.7 and the expected heterozygosity (He = 0.724. The meanobserved heterozygosity was 0.695. The obtained data were used to compare the genetic structure of the Pentro horseto six other Italian breeds. The N-J tree computed on individual genetic distances showed that 93% of Pentro horses clusteredtogether.

  7. Genetic characterization of adult infratentorial gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Tomoru; Hirose, Yuichi; Sasaki, Hikaru; Ikeda, Eiji; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kawase, Takeshi

    2009-02-01

    Adult infratentorial gliomas are rare and have not been well studied. We therefore conducted genetic analysis of those tumors to see if there was any characteristic that could be relevant in clinical management and understanding of tumorigenesis. Nineteen adult infratentorial gliomas were analyzed for chromosomal aberration by comparative genomic hybridization, and for expression of p53 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by immunohistochemistry. The most frequent chromosomal aberration was the gain of 7p, and five of the seven cerebellar or fourth ventricle malignant gliomas had that aberration. However, the gain of 7q, the characteristic abnormality of supratentorial astrocytomas commonly associated with the gaining of 7p, was observed only in 1 of 11 adult infratentorial astrocytic tumors. Combined losses of 1p and 19q, the genetic hallmark of oligodendroglioma, were not observed. Results of immunohistochemistry of p53 and EGFR were comparable to those reported in supratentorial gliomas. Our findings might suggest the presence of distinct tumorigenic pathway in adult infratentorial gliomas.

  8. Genetic Differentiation within the Puccinia triticina Population in South America and Comparison with the North American Population Suggests Common Ancestry and Intercontinental Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf rust, caused by Puccinia triticina is the most prevalent and widespread disease of wheat in South America. The objective of this study was to determine the number of genetically differentiated groups of P. triticina that are currently present in South America, and to compare the South American ...

  9. Characterization of the genetic profile of five Danish dog breeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pertoldi, Cino; Kristensen, T. N.; Loeschcke, Volker;

    2013-01-01

    This investigation presents results from a genetic characterization of 5 Danish dog breeds genotyped on the CanineHD BeadChip microarray with 170,000 SNP. The breeds investigated were 1) Danish Spitz (DS; n = 8), 2) Danish-Swedish Farm Dog (DSF; n = 18), 3) Broholmer (BR; n = 22), 4) Old Danish P...... strategies for the preservation of the genetic pool of these dog breeds. © 2013 American Society of Animal Science. All rights reserved....

  10. Genetic characterization of Barbari goats using microsatellite markers

    OpenAIRE

    Ramamoorthi, J.; K.Thilagam; Sivaselvam, S. N.; Karthickeyan, S. M. K.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic variation in Barbari goats, a highly prolific breed distributed widely in the northern part of India, known for better milk and meat quality, was studied as a part of genetic characterization and conservation. The genomic DNA from 50 unrelated Barbari goats were amplified via PCR with a panel of 21 microsatellite markers, and resolved through 6 per cent denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by silver staining. The number of alleles ranged from 4 to 11, with allele siz...

  11. Differential effects of landscape-level environmental features on genetic structure in three codistributed tree species in Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelchau, Monica F; Hamrick, J L

    2012-10-01

    Landscape genetic studies use spatially explicit population genetic information to determine the physical and environmental causes of population genetic structure on regional scales. Comparative studies that identify common barriers to gene flow across multiple species within a community are important to both understand the evolutionary trajectories of populations and prioritize habitat conservation. Here, we use a comparative landscape genetic approach to ask whether gradients in temperature or precipitation seasonality structure genetic variation across three codistributed tree species in Central America, or whether a simpler (geographic distance) or more complex, species-specific environmental niche model is necessary to individually explain population genetic structure. Using descriptive statistics and causal modelling, we find that different factors best explain genetic distance in each of the three species: environmental niche distance in Bursera simaruba, geographic distance in Ficus insipida and historical barriers to gene flow or cryptic reproductive barriers for Brosimum alicastrum. This study confirms suggestions from previous studies of Central American tree species that imply that population genetic structure of trees in this region is determined by complex interactions of both historical and current barriers to gene flow.

  12. Genetic characterisation of Toxoplasma gondii in wildlife from North America revealed widespread and high prevalence of the fourth clonal type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J.P.; Velmurugan, G.V.; Ragendran, C.; Yabsley, M.J.; Thomas, N.J.; Beckmen, K.B.; Sinnett, D.; Ruid, D.; Hart, J.; Fair, P.A.; McFee, W.E.; Shearn-Bochsler, V.; Kwok, O.C.H.; Ferreira, L.R.; Choudhary, S.; Faria, E.B.; Zhou, H.; Felix, T.A.; Su, C.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known of the genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii circulating in wildlife. In the present study wild animals, from the USA were examined for T. gondii infection. Tissues of naturally exposed animals were bioassayed in mice for isolation of viable parasites. Viable T. gondii was isolated from 31 animals including, to our knowledge for the first time, from a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), five gray wolves (Canis lupus), a woodrat (Neotoma micropus), and five Arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus). Additionally, 66 T. gondii isolates obtained previously, but not genetically characterised, were revived in mice. Toxoplasma gondii DNA isolated from these 97 samples (31+66) was characterised using 11 PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) markers (SAG1, 5'- and 3'-SAG2, alt.SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1 and Apico). A total of 95 isolates were successfully genotyped. In addition to clonal Types II, and III, 12 different genotypes were found. These genotype data were combined with 74 T. gondii isolates previously characterised from wildlife from North America and a composite data set of 169 isolates comprised 22 genotypes, including clonal Types II, III and 20 atypical genotypes. Phylogenetic network analysis showed limited diversity with dominance of a recently designated fourth clonal type (Type 12) in North America, followed by the Type II and III lineages. These three major lineages together accounted for 85% of strains in North America. The Type 12 lineage includes previously identified Type A and X strains from sea otters. This study revealed that the Type 12 lineage accounts for 46.7% (79/169) of isolates and is dominant in wildlife of North America. No clonal Type I strain was identified among these wildlife isolates. These results suggest that T. gondii strains in wildlife from North America have limited diversity, with the occurrence of only a few major clonal types.

  13. Genetic Structuration, Demography and Evolutionary History of Mycobacterium tuberculosis LAM9 Sublineage in the Americas as Two Distinct Subpopulations Revealed by Bayesian Analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann Reynaud

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB remains broadly present in the Americas despite intense global efforts for its control and elimination. Starting from a large dataset comprising spoligotyping (n = 21183 isolates and 12-loci MIRU-VNTRs data (n = 4022 isolates from a total of 31 countries of the Americas (data extracted from the SITVIT2 database, this study aimed to get an overview of lineages circulating in the Americas. A total of 17119 (80.8% strains belonged to the Euro-American lineage 4, among which the most predominant genotypic family belonged to the Latin American and Mediterranean (LAM lineage (n = 6386, 30.1% of strains. By combining classical phylogenetic analyses and Bayesian approaches, this study revealed for the first time a clear genetic structuration of LAM9 sublineage into two subpopulations named LAM9C1 and LAM9C2, with distinct genetic characteristics. LAM9C1 was predominant in Chile, Colombia and USA, while LAM9C2 was predominant in Brazil, Dominican Republic, Guadeloupe and French Guiana. Globally, LAM9C2 was characterized by higher allelic richness as compared to LAM9C1 isolates. Moreover, LAM9C2 sublineage appeared to expand close to twenty times more than LAM9C1 and showed older traces of expansion. Interestingly, a significant proportion of LAM9C2 isolates presented typical signature of ancestral LAM-RDRio MIRU-VNTR type (224226153321. Further studies based on Whole Genome Sequencing of LAM strains will provide the needed resolution to decipher the biogeographical structure and evolutionary history of this successful family.

  14. Normalization references for Europe and North America for application with USEtox™ characterization factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurent, Alexis; Lautier, Anne; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.;

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In life cycle impact assessment, normalization can be a very effective tool for the life cycle assessment practitioner to interpret results and put them into perspective. The paper presents normalization references for the recently developed USEtox™ model, which aims at calculating...... globally applicable characterization factors. Normalization references for Europe and North America are determined, and guidance for expansions to other geographical regions is provided. Materials and methods The base years of the European and North American inventories are 2004 and 2002/2008, respectively......, a similar coverage of substances was obtained for both regions with relatively high representation of metals and a number of organic compounds, mainly consisting of non-methane volatile organic compounds and pesticides. The two inventory sets were eventually characterized with the characterization factors...

  15. The characterization of goat genetic diversity : Towards a genomic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ajmone-Marsan, P.; Colli, L.; Han, J. L.; Achilli, A.; Lancioni, H.; Joost, S.; Crepaldi, P.; Pilla, F.; Stella, A.; Taberlet, P.; Boettcher, P.; Negrini, R.; Lenstra, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of genetic diversity at molecular level has been proposed as a valuable complement and sometimes proxy to phenotypic diversity of local breeds and is presently considered as one of the FAO priorities for breed characterization. By recommending a set of selected molecular markers fo

  16. Molecular characterization of H1N1 influenza A viruses from human cases in North America

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Bin; WANG ChengMin; DONG GuoYing; LUO Jing; ZHAO BaoHua; HE HongXuan

    2009-01-01

    Subtypes of H1N1 influenza virus can be found in humans in North America,while they are also associated with the infection of swine.Characterization of the genotypes of viral strains in human populations is important to understand the source and distribution of viral strains.Genomic and protein sequences of 10 isolates of the 2009 outbreak of influenza A (H1N1) virus in North America were obtained from GenBank database.To characterize the genotypes of these viruses,phylogenetic trees of genes PB2,PB1,PA,HA,NP,NA,NS and M were constructed by Phylip3.67 program and N-Linked glycosylation sites of HA,NA,PB2,NS1 and M2 proteins were analyzed online by NetNGIyc1.0 program.Phylogenetic analysis indicated that these isolates are virtually identical but may be recombinant viruses because their genomic fragments come from different viruses.The isolates also contain a characteristic lowly pathogenic amino acid motif at their HA cleavage sites (IPSIQSR↓GL),and an E residue at position 627 of the PB2 protein which shows its high affinity to humans.The homologous model of M proteins showed that the viruses had obtained the ability of anti-amantadine due to the mutation at the drug-sensitive site,while sequence analysis of NA proteins indicated that the viruses are still susceptible to the neuraminidase inhibitor drug (i.e.oseltamivir and zanamivir) because no mutations have been observed.Our results strongly suggested that the viruses responsible for the 2009 outbreaks of influenza A (H1N1) virus have the ability to cross species barriers to infect human and mammalian animals based on molecular analysis.These findings may further facilitate the therapy and prevention of possible transmission from North America to other countries.

  17. Complete Genome and Clinicopathological Characterization of a Virulent Newcastle Disease Virus Isolate from South America

    OpenAIRE

    Diel, Diego G.; Susta, Leonardo; Cardenas Garcia, Stivalis; Killian, Mary L.; Brown, Corrie C.; Patti J Miller; Afonso, Claudio L.

    2012-01-01

    Newcastle disease (ND) is one of the most important diseases of poultry, negatively affecting poultry production worldwide. The disease is caused by Newcastle disease virus (NDV) or avian paramyxovirus type 1 (APMV-1), a negative-sense single-stranded RNA virus of the genus Avulavirus, family Paramyxoviridae. Although all NDV isolates characterized to date belong to a single serotype of APMV-1, significant genetic diversity has been described between different NDV isolates. Here we present th...

  18. Genetic Characterization of Bacillus anthracis 17 JB strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakineh Seyed-Mohamadi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Bacillus anthracis is one of the most homogenous bacteria ever described. Bacillus anthracis 17JB is a laboratory strain. It is broadly used as a challenge strain in guinea pigs for potency test of anthrax vaccine.Material and Methods: This work describes genetic characterization of B. anthracis 17 JB strain using the SNPs and MLVA genotyping.Results and Conclusion: In SNPs typing, the originally French 17JB strain represented the A. Br. 008/009 subgroup. In Levy's genotyping method, 843, 451 and 864 bp long fragments were identified at AA03, AJ03 and AA07 loci, respectively. In the vaccine manufacturer perspective these findings are much valuable on their own account, but similar research is required to extend molecular knowledge of B. anthracis epidemiology in Persia.Keywords: Bacillus anthracis 17JB, Genetic characterization, SNPs typing

  19. Psychiatric characterization of children with genetic causes of hyperandrogenism

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, Sven; Ng, Pamela; Sinaii, Ninet; Leschek, Ellen; Green-Golan, Liza; VanRyzin, Carol; Ernst, Monique; Merke, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Very little is known about the mental health status in children with genetic causes of hyperandrogenism. This study sought to characterize psychiatric morbidity in this group. Design/methods: Children (8-18 years) with the diagnosis of classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) or familial male precocious puberty (FMPP) underwent a semi-structured psychiatric interview, the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia-Present and Lifetime Version. According to sex an...

  20. Genetic characterization of a polymorphic dipeptidyl aminopeptidase of Apis mellifera

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Antonio Del Lama,; Boraschi, Daniele; Ademilson Espencer Egea Soares,; Duran, Ximena

    2004-01-01

    International audience Dipeptidyl aminopeptidase (DAP) activity towards L-leucylglycine-$\\beta$-naphthylamide (Leu-Gly NA) was characterized in pupae and adult extracts of Apis mellifera. Enzyme activity was more conspicuous in pupae than in adult extracts and it seemed to be concentrated in digestive tract tissues. Two genetically determined electrophoretic variants were observed in honeybee samples from the USA and Chile; in Brazilian Africanized bees, two additional variants were observ...

  1. Genetic characterization of senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, K

    1997-01-01

    The Senescence-Accelerated Mouse (SAM) strains are unique and appropriate models for genetic studies on aging because the SAMP strains have an "accelerated senescence" phenotype for which the SAMR strains are controls, and each SAMP strain has a strain-specific age-associated disorder. Furthermore, because they have gone through sufficient generations of sister-brother mating, they can be considered inbred strains, which can be analyzed genetically. There are now 11 SAMP strains and 3 SAMR strains descended from the progenitor litters. Analysis with the Gompertz function shows that the SAMP strains have the same initial mortality rate (IMR) as the SAMR strains but a shorter mortality rate doubling time (MRDT), presumably due to genes that accelerated the rate of senescence in the SAMP strains. This accelerated senescence may also occur in cultured fibroblast-like cells. We performed molecular genetic characterization of all the SAM strains to acquire a base of genetic information from which we could develop hypotheses on the mechanism of development of SAM strains and genetic factors that contribute to accelerated senescence. PMID:9088910

  2. Genetic characterization of some Romanian red wine grapevine varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghetea, Ligia Gabriela; Motoc, Rozalia Magda; Niculescu, Ana-Maria; Litescu, Simona Carmen; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Popescu, Carmen Florentina

    2008-04-01

    In our study we have considered three of the most valuable Romanian red wine grapevine cultivars: Feteasca neagra, Feteasca alba and Novac. We have chosen to study grapevine because grapes and wine are an important part of a healthy diet, and because red grapes have the highest content of proanthocyanidins, that act as antioxidants (free radical scavengers) in the human body. Proanthocyanidins possess anti-mutagenic, anti-tumor, anti-viral activities and they present many other confirmed or potential benefits. Genotyping method was applied in order to asses the genetic profile at 14 microsatellite loci, for two cultivars: Feteasca neagra and Feteasca alba. In order to achieve this, the HPLC-DAD method was used. The content of anthocyans in grape skin from two cultivars - Feteasca neagra and Novac - was measured. Microsatellite markers have been certified as powerful tools for assessing genetic identities and genetic relationships between grapevine gene pools. Genetic characterization of grapevine cultivars can certify their authenticity and purity, two features that have a direct effect on the quality and value of the finished product, the wine. In our country, this is the first attempt in order to establish a genetic profile for valuable Romanian origin grapevine varieties. In some of the 14 microsatellitic loci, Feteasca neagra and Feteasca alba cultivars presented allele size variants different from the values cited in the literature, proving that these cultivars belong to a geographical distinct gene pool. The content of anthocyans in Feteasca neagra grape skin was significantly higher than in Novac.

  3. The use of genetics for the management of a recovering population: temporal assessment of migratory peregrine falcons in North America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff A Johnson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our ability to monitor populations or species that were once threatened or endangered and in the process of recovery is enhanced by using genetic methods to assess overall population stability and size over time. This can be accomplished most directly by obtaining genetic measures from temporally-spaced samples that reflect the overall stability of the population as given by changes in genetic diversity levels (allelic richness and heterozygosity, degree of population differentiation (F(ST and D(EST, and effective population size (N(e. The primary goal of any recovery effort is to produce a long-term self-sustaining population, and these genetic measures provide a metric by which we can gauge our progress and help make important management decisions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The peregrine falcon in North America (Falco peregrinus tundrius and anatum was delisted in 1994 and 1999, respectively, and its abundance will be monitored by the species Recovery Team every three years until 2015. Although the United States Fish and Wildlife Service makes a distinction between tundrius and anatum subspecies, our genetic results based on eleven microsatellite loci suggest limited differentiation that can be attributed to an isolation by distance relationship and warrant no delineation of these two subspecies in its northern latitudinal distribution from Alaska through Canada into Greenland. Using temporal samples collected at Padre Island, Texas during migration (seven temporal time periods between 1985-2007, no significant differences in genetic diversity or significant population differentiation in allele frequencies between time periods were observed and were indistinguishable from those obtained from tundrius/anatum breeding locations throughout their northern distribution. Estimates of harmonic mean N(e were variable and imprecise, but always greater than 500 when employing multiple temporal genetic methods. CONCLUSIONS

  4. The complex biogeography of the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa: genetic evidence of introductions and Subspecific introgression in Central America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Nunney

    Full Text Available The bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogen with a history of economically damaging introductions of subspecies to regions where its other subspecies are native. Genetic evidence is presented demonstrating the introduction of two new taxa into Central America and their introgression into the native subspecies, X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa. The data are from 10 genetic outliers detected by multilocus sequence typing (MLST of isolates from Costa Rica. Six (five from oleander, one from coffee defined a new sequence type (ST53 that carried alleles at six of the eight loci sequenced (five of the seven MLST loci diagnostic of the South American subspecies Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca which causes two economically damaging plant diseases, citrus variegated chlorosis and coffee leaf scorch. The two remaining loci of ST53 carried alleles from what appears to be a new South American form of X. fastidiosa. Four isolates, classified as X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa, showed a low level of introgression of non-native DNA. One grapevine isolate showed introgression of an allele from X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca while the other three (from citrus and coffee showed introgression of an allele with similar ancestry to the alleles of unknown origin in ST53. The presence of X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca in Central America is troubling given its disease potential, and establishes another route for the introduction of this economically damaging subspecies into the US or elsewhere, a threat potentially compounded by the presence of a previously unknown form of X. fastidiosa.

  5. The complex biogeography of the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa: genetic evidence of introductions and Subspecific introgression in Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunney, Leonard; Ortiz, Beatriz; Russell, Stephanie A; Ruiz Sánchez, Rebeca; Stouthamer, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogen with a history of economically damaging introductions of subspecies to regions where its other subspecies are native. Genetic evidence is presented demonstrating the introduction of two new taxa into Central America and their introgression into the native subspecies, X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa. The data are from 10 genetic outliers detected by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of isolates from Costa Rica. Six (five from oleander, one from coffee) defined a new sequence type (ST53) that carried alleles at six of the eight loci sequenced (five of the seven MLST loci) diagnostic of the South American subspecies Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca which causes two economically damaging plant diseases, citrus variegated chlorosis and coffee leaf scorch. The two remaining loci of ST53 carried alleles from what appears to be a new South American form of X. fastidiosa. Four isolates, classified as X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa, showed a low level of introgression of non-native DNA. One grapevine isolate showed introgression of an allele from X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca while the other three (from citrus and coffee) showed introgression of an allele with similar ancestry to the alleles of unknown origin in ST53. The presence of X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca in Central America is troubling given its disease potential, and establishes another route for the introduction of this economically damaging subspecies into the US or elsewhere, a threat potentially compounded by the presence of a previously unknown form of X. fastidiosa. PMID:25379725

  6. Genetic Characterization of Human Populations: From ABO to a Genetic Map of the British People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodmer, Walter

    2015-01-01

    From 1900, when Landsteiner first described the ABO blood groups, to the present, the methods used to characterize the genetics of human populations have undergone a remarkable development. Concomitantly, our understanding of the history and spread of human populations across the earth has become much more detailed. As has often been said, a better understanding of the genetic relationships among the peoples of the world is one of the best antidotes to racial prejudices. Such an understanding provides us with a fascinating, improved insight into our origins as well as with valuable information about population differences that are of medical relevance. The study of genetic polymorphisms has been essential to the analysis of the relationships between human populations. The evolution of methods used to study human polymorphisms and the resulting contributions to our understanding of human health and history is the subject of this Perspectives. PMID:25657345

  7. Mitochondrial DNA-based genetic diversity of genus Lygus (Hemiptera: Miridae) in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genus Lygus is widely distributed in North American and Eurasian continents. It is the most-studied genus in the family Miridae. However, very less information on the genetic diversity of this genus is available. Studying genetic variation among Lygus pest species and thereby constructing a ...

  8. Genetic characterization of Microcystis aeruginosa isolates from Portuguese freshwater systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Cristiana; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2016-07-01

    Cyanobacteria are microorganisms that pose a serious threat to the aquatic waterways through the production of dense blooms under eutrophic conditions and the release of toxic secondary metabolites-cyanotoxins. Within cyanobacteria, the colonial planktonic Microcystis aeruginosa is widely distributed in both fresh and brackish aquatic environments throughout the world being frequently observed in the Portuguese water systems. Apart from the well-established distribution of M. aeruginosa in Portugal, knowledge of its genetic diversity and population structure is unknown. Therefore, in this study twenty-seven strains were obtained from the North, Centre and South regions of Portugal and were subjected to extensive phylogenetic analyses using simultaneously four distinct genetic markers (16S rRNA, 16S-23S ITS, DNA gyrase subunit ß and cell division protein (ftsZ)) encompassing in total 2834 bp. With this work we characterized the phylogenetic relationship among the Portuguese strains, with the southern strains showing higher genetic structure relatively to the North and Centre strains. A total of fifteen genotypes were determined for M. aeruginosa in Portuguese water systems revealing a high genetic diversity. This is also the first study to report geographic variation on the population structure of the Portuguese M. aeruginosa.

  9. Genetic Characterization of Four Strains Borrelia Burgdorferi Isolated in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾霞; 王树声; 张涛; 毕胜利; 周永东

    2004-01-01

    To study the genetic characterization of four strains of Borrelia burgdorferi isolated in China. PCR technique was used to amplify the 5S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer DNA from the whole cellular DNA of isolated GXLD-4, 9, 18 and Chang 14, and then the amplified products were cloned into plasmid pGEM-T Easy and sequenced. It was found that the 5S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer DNA of the four isolates was 242 bp, revealing the nucleotide sequence identity of more than 99%. The four isolates had higher sequence identify with Borrelia valaisiana than with other genetic groups. These four isolates most likely belong to Borrelia valaisiana genomic group.

  10. Genetic diversity, endemism and phylogeny of lampreys within the genus Lampetra sensu stricto (Petromyzontiformes: Petromyzontidae) in western North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguski, D A; Reid, S B; Goodman, D H; Docker, M F

    2012-11-01

    Phylogenetic structure of four Lampetra species from the Pacific drainage of North America (western brook lamprey Lampetra richardsoni, Pacific brook lamprey Lampetra pacifica, river lamprey Lampetra ayresii and Kern brook lamprey Lampetra hubbsi) and unidentified Lampetra specimens (referred to as Lampetra sp.) from 36 locations was estimated using the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. Maximum parsimony and Bayesian inferences did not correspond with any taxonomic scheme proposed to date. Rather, although L. richardsoni (from Alaska to California) and L. ayresii (from British Columbia to California) together constituted a well-supported clade distinct from several genetically divergent Lampetra populations in Oregon and California, these two species were not reciprocally monophyletic. The genetically divergent populations included L. pacifica (from the Columbia River basin) and L. hubbsi (from the Kern River basin) and four Lampetra sp. populations in Oregon (Siuslaw River and Fourmile Creek) and California (Kelsey and Mark West Creeks). These four Lampetra sp. populations showed genetic divergence between 2.3 and 5.7% from any known species (and up to 8.0% from each other), and may represent morphologically cryptic and thus previously undescribed species. A fifth population (from Paynes Creek, California) may represent a range extension of L. hubbsi into the Upper Sacramento River. PMID:23130690

  11. Genetic characterization and phylogeography of the wild boar Sus scrofa introduced into Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela García

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The European wild boar Sus scrofa was first introduced into Uruguay, in southern South America during the early decades of the last century. Subsequently, and starting from founder populations, its range spread throughout the country and into the neighbouring Brazilian state Rio Grande do Sul. Due to the subsequent negative impact, it was officially declared a national pest. The main aim in the present study was to provide a more comprehensive scenario of wild boar differentiation in Uruguay, by using mtDNA markers to access the genetic characterization of populations at present undergoing rapid expansion. A high level of haplotype diversity, intermediate levels of nucleotide diversity and considerable population differentiation, were detected among sampled localities throughout major watercourses and catchment dams countrywide. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of two different phylogroups, thereby reflecting two deliberate introduction events forming distantly genetic lineages in local wild boar populations. Our analysis lends support to the hypothesis that the invasive potential of populations emerge from introgressive hybridization with domestic pigs. On taking into account the appreciable differentiation and reduced migration between locales in wild boar populations, management strategies could be effective if each population were to be considered as a single management unit.

  12. Molecular biology characterization, origin and spread of human and animal fascioliasis in the Americas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In Latin America, our collaboration studies have proved that numerous countries present great public health problems caused by Fasciola hepatica. Fascioliasis is a zoonotic disease of domestic ruminants caused by liver fluke parasites and transmitted by freshwater lymnaeid snail vectors. This disease is of well-known veterinary importance because of its great pathogenicity and impact in livestock, especially sheep, goats and cattle, but also pigs, buffaloes and donkeys, as well as horses, camelids and other domestic herbivores. Moreover, this disease is today emerging in humans in Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas, with 51 countries presenting human infection. A large hot spot of the disease has been detected in altitude areas of Andean countries as Argentina, Chile, Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador and Venezuela, with very high prevalence in livestock and humans in endemic areas where transmission and epidemiology follow whether altiplanic-permanent or valley-seasonal patterns related to vectors of the Galba/Fossaria group. Another hot spot includes Caribbean islands as Cuba and Central American countries as Mexico in which transmission and epidemiology are marked by lymnaeids as Lymnaea cubensis and Pseudosuccinea columella, and where animals present very high prevalence and intensities and a hypoendemic situation with periodic epidemics in humans. Molecular studies were performed during several years to ascertain the origin and spread of fascioliasis in the New World. Specific objectives were the genetic characterisations of both liver flukes and lymnaeid vectors by combined haplotyping. Molecular markers obtained were the complete sequences of the nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacers ITS-1 and ITS-2 and the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (cox1) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit I (nad1) and respective aminoacid sequences of the proteins COX1 and NAD1. Respective sequence lengths proved to be of 432

  13. Non invasive methods for genetic analysis applied to ecological and behavioral studies in Latino-America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana González

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Documenting the presence and abundance of the neotropical mammals is the first step for understanding their population ecology, behavior and genetic dynamics in designing conservation plans. The combination of field research with molecular genetics techniques are new tools that provide valuable biological information avoiding the disturbance in the ecosystems, trying to minimize the human impact in the process to gather biological information. The objective of this paper is to review the available non invasive sampling techniques that have been used in Neotropical mammal studies to apply to determine the presence and abundance, population structure, sex ratio, taxonomic diagnostic using mitochondrial markers, and assessing genetic variability using nuclear markers. There are a wide range of non invasive sampling techniques used to determine the species identification that inhabit an area such as searching for tracks, feces, and carcasses. Other useful equipment is the camera traps that can generate an image bank that can be valuable to assess species presence and abundance by morphology. With recent advances in molecular biology, it is now possible to use the trace amounts of DNA in feces and amplify it to analyze the species diversity in an area, and the genetic variability at intraspecific level. This is particularly helpful in cases of sympatric and cryptic species in which morphology failed to diagnose the taxonomic status of several species of brocket deer of the genus Mazama.

  14. Genetic diversity populations of the blue orchard bee (Osmia lignaria) in eastern and western North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    The blue orchard bee (Osmia lignaria) is a native pollinator that is an excellent candidate to supplement the honeybee in agricultural settings. Genetic diversity of wild-caught bees from several locations in eastern and western USA is being measured with mitochondrial and nuclear DNA segments. Ther...

  15. Short communication: Genetic characterization of digital cushion thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomou, G; Banos, G; Machado, V; Caixeta, L; Bicalho, R C

    2014-01-01

    Dairy cow lameness is a serious animal welfare issue. It is also a significant cause of economic losses, reducing reproductive efficiency and milk production and increasing culling rates. The digital cushion is a complex structure composed mostly of adipose tissue located underneath the distal phalanx and has recently been phenotypically associated with incidence of claw horn disruption lesions (CHDL); namely, sole ulcers and white line disease. The objective of this study was to characterize digital cushion thickness genetically and to investigate its association with body condition score (BCS), locomotion score (LOCO), CHDL, and milk production. Data were collected from 1 large closely monitored commercial dairy farm located in upstate New York; 923 dairy cows were used. Before trimming, the following data were collected by a member of the research team: BCS, cow height measurement, and LOCO. Presence or not of CHDL (sole ulcer or white line disease, or both) was recorded at trimming. Immediately after the cows were hoof trimmed, they underwent digital sonographic B-mode examination for the measurement of digital cushion thickness. Factors such as parity number, stage of lactation, calving date, mature-equivalent 305-d milk yield (ME305MY), and pedigree information were obtained from the farm's dairy management software (DairyCOMP 305; Valley Agricultural Software, Tulare, CA). Univariate animal models were used to obtain variance component estimations for each studied trait (CHDL, BCS, digital cushion thickness average, LOCO, height, and ME305MY) and a 6-variate analysis was conducted to estimate the genetic, residual, and phenotypic correlations between the studied traits. The heritability estimate of DCTA was 0.33±0.09, whereas a statistically significant genetic correlation was estimated between DCTA and CHDL (-0.60±0.29). Of the other genetic correlations, significant estimates were derived for BCS with LOCO (-0.49±0.19) and ME305MY (-0.48±0.20). Digital

  16. Short communication: Genetic characterization of digital cushion thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomou, G; Banos, G; Machado, V; Caixeta, L; Bicalho, R C

    2014-01-01

    Dairy cow lameness is a serious animal welfare issue. It is also a significant cause of economic losses, reducing reproductive efficiency and milk production and increasing culling rates. The digital cushion is a complex structure composed mostly of adipose tissue located underneath the distal phalanx and has recently been phenotypically associated with incidence of claw horn disruption lesions (CHDL); namely, sole ulcers and white line disease. The objective of this study was to characterize digital cushion thickness genetically and to investigate its association with body condition score (BCS), locomotion score (LOCO), CHDL, and milk production. Data were collected from 1 large closely monitored commercial dairy farm located in upstate New York; 923 dairy cows were used. Before trimming, the following data were collected by a member of the research team: BCS, cow height measurement, and LOCO. Presence or not of CHDL (sole ulcer or white line disease, or both) was recorded at trimming. Immediately after the cows were hoof trimmed, they underwent digital sonographic B-mode examination for the measurement of digital cushion thickness. Factors such as parity number, stage of lactation, calving date, mature-equivalent 305-d milk yield (ME305MY), and pedigree information were obtained from the farm's dairy management software (DairyCOMP 305; Valley Agricultural Software, Tulare, CA). Univariate animal models were used to obtain variance component estimations for each studied trait (CHDL, BCS, digital cushion thickness average, LOCO, height, and ME305MY) and a 6-variate analysis was conducted to estimate the genetic, residual, and phenotypic correlations between the studied traits. The heritability estimate of DCTA was 0.33±0.09, whereas a statistically significant genetic correlation was estimated between DCTA and CHDL (-0.60±0.29). Of the other genetic correlations, significant estimates were derived for BCS with LOCO (-0.49±0.19) and ME305MY (-0.48±0.20). Digital

  17. Drug resistance associated genetic polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax collected in Honduras, Central America

    OpenAIRE

    Jovel Irina T; Mejía Rosa E; Banegas Engels; Piedade Rita; Alger Jackeline; Fontecha Gustavo; Ferreira Pedro E; Veiga Maria I; Enamorado Irma G; Bjorkman Anders; Ursing Johan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background In Honduras, chloroquine and primaquine are recommended and still appear to be effective for treatment of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax malaria. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of resistance associated genetic polymorphisms in P. falciparum and P. vivax collected in Honduras. Methods Blood samples were collected from patients seeking medical attention at the Hospital Escuela in Tegucigalpa from 2004 to 2006 as well as three regional hospi...

  18. Drug resistance associated genetic polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax collected in Honduras, Central America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovel Irina T

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Honduras, chloroquine and primaquine are recommended and still appear to be effective for treatment of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax malaria. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of resistance associated genetic polymorphisms in P. falciparum and P. vivax collected in Honduras. Methods Blood samples were collected from patients seeking medical attention at the Hospital Escuela in Tegucigalpa from 2004 to 2006 as well as three regional hospitals, two health centres and one regional laboratory during 2009. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt, multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1, dihydrofolate reductase (pfdhfr and dihydropteroate synthase (pfdhps genes and in P. vivax multidrug resistance 1 (pvmdr1 and dihydrofolate reductase (pvdhfr genes were detected using PCR based methods. Results Thirty seven P. falciparum and 64 P. vivax samples were collected. All P. falciparum infections acquired in Honduras carried pfcrt, pfmdr1, pfdhps and pfdhfr alleles associated with chloroquine, amodiaquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine sensitivity only. One patient with parasites acquired on a Pacific Island had pfcrt 76 T and pfmdr1 86Y alleles. That patient and a patient infected in West Africa had pfdhfr 51I, 59 R and 108 N alleles. Pvmdr1 976 F was found in 7/37 and two copies of pvmdr1 were found in 1/37 samples. Pvdhfr 57 L + 58 R was observed in 2/57 samples. Conclusion The results indicate that P. falciparum from Honduras remain sensitive to chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine. This suggests that chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine should be efficacious for treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria, supporting current national treatment guidelines. However, genetic polymorphisms associated with chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine tolerance were detected in local P. vivax and imported P. falciparum infections. Continuous

  19. Environmental effects on allergen levels in commercially grown non-genetically modified soybeans: assessing variation across North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severin E. Stevenson

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Soybean (Glycine max is a hugely valuable soft commodity that generates tens of billions of dollars annually. This value is due in part to the balanced composition of the seed which is roughly 1:2:2 oil, starch and protein by weight. In turn, the seeds have many uses with various derivatives appearing broadly in processed food products. As is true with many edible seeds, soybeans contain proteins that are anti-nutritional factors and allergens. Soybean, along with milk, eggs, fish, crustacean shellfish, tree nuts, peanuts and wheat, elicit a majority of food allergy reactions in the United States. Soybean seed composition can be affected by breeding, environmental conditions (e.g. temperature, moisture, insect/pathogen load, and/or soil nutrient levels. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of genotype and environment on allergen and anti-nutritional proteins in soybean. To address genetic and environmental effects, four varieties of non-GM soybeans were grown in six geographically distinct regions of North America (Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, Ontario, and Pennsylvania. Absolute quantification of proteins by mass spectrometry can be achieved with a technique called multiple reaction monitoring (MRM, during which signals from an endogenous protein are compared to those from a synthetic heavy-labeled internal standard. Using MRM, eight allergens were absolutely quantified for each variety in each environment. Statistical analyses show that for most allergens, the effects of environment far outweigh the differences between varieties brought about by breeding.

  20. Characterization of Large Structural Genetic Mosaicism in Human Autosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiela, Mitchell J.; Zhou, Weiyin; Sampson, Joshua N.; Dean, Michael C.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Black, Amanda; Brinton, Louise A.; Chang, I-Shou; Chen, Chu; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kexin; Cook, Linda S.; Crous Bou, Marta; De Vivo, Immaculata; Doherty, Jennifer; Friedenreich, Christine M.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hartge, Patricia; Henderson, Brian E.; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hosgood, H. Dean; Hsiung, Chao A.; Hu, Wei; Hunter, David J.; Jessop, Lea; Kim, Hee Nam; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Klein, Robert; Kraft, Peter; Lan, Qing; Lin, Dongxin; Liu, Jianjun; Le Marchand, Loic; Liang, Xiaolin; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Lingeng; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Matsuo, Keitaro; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Park, Jae Yong; Pooler, Loreall; Prescott, Jennifer; Rastogi, Radhai; Risch, Harvey A.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Seow, Adeline; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Shen, Hongbing; Sheng, Xin; Shin, Min-Ho; Shu, Xiao-Ou; VanDen Berg, David; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Yi-Long; Xia, Lucy; Yang, Hannah P.; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Abnet, Christian C.; Albanes, Demetrius; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Amos, Christopher; Amundadottir, Laufey T.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Blot, William J.; Bock, Cathryn H.; Bracci, Paige M.; Burdett, Laurie; Buring, Julie E.; Butler, Mary A.; Carreón, Tania; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Chung, Charles C.; Cook, Michael B.; Cullen, Michael; Davis, Faith G.; Ding, Ti; Duell, Eric J.; Epstein, Caroline G.; Fan, Jin-Hu; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Freedman, Neal D.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M.; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giles, Graham G.; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Goldin, Lynn; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Greene, Mark H.; Hallmans, Goran; Harris, Curtis C.; Henriksson, Roger; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hu, Nan; Hutchinson, Amy; Jenab, Mazda; Johansen, Christoffer; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kooperberg, Charles; Krogh, Vittorio; Kurtz, Robert C.; LaCroix, Andrea; Landgren, Annelie; Landi, Maria Teresa; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M.; Malats, Nuria; McGlynn, Katherine A.; McNeill, Lorna H.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Melin, Beatrice S.; Mirabello, Lisa; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M.; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Purdue, Mark; Qiao, You-Lin; Rabe, Kari G.; Rajaraman, Preetha; Real, Francisco X.; Riboli, Elio; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M.; Savage, Sharon A.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Schwartz, Kendra L.; Sesso, Howard D.; Severi, Gianluca; Silverman, Debra T.; Spitz, Margaret R.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Stram, Daniel; Tang, Ze-Zhong; Taylor, Philip R.; Teras, Lauren R.; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Viswanathan, Kala; Wacholder, Sholom; Wang, Zhaoming; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K.; Wolpin, Brian M.; Wu, Xifeng; Wunder, Jay S.; Yu, Kai; Zanetti, Krista A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Ziegler, Regina G.; de Andrade, Mariza; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Beaty, Terri H.; Bierut, Laura J.; Desch, Karl C.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Feenstra, Bjarke; Ginsburg, David; Heit, John A.; Kang, Jae H.; Laurie, Cecilia A.; Li, Jun Z.; Lowe, William L.; Marazita, Mary L.; Melbye, Mads; Mirel, Daniel B.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Nelson, Sarah C.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Rice, Kenneth; Wiggs, Janey L.; Wise, Anastasia; Tucker, Margaret; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A.; Laurie, Cathy C.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Yeager, Meredith; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data have revealed that detectable genetic mosaicism involving large (>2 Mb) structural autosomal alterations occurs in a fraction of individuals. We present results for a set of 24,849 genotyped individuals (total GWAS set II [TGSII]) in whom 341 large autosomal abnormalities were observed in 168 (0.68%) individuals. Merging data from the new TGSII set with data from two prior reports (the Gene-Environment Association Studies and the total GWAS set I) generated a large dataset of 127,179 individuals; we then conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the patterns of detectable autosomal mosaicism (n = 1,315 events in 925 [0.73%] individuals). Restricting to events >2 Mb in size, we observed an increase in event frequency as event size decreased. The combined results underscore that the rate of detectable mosaicism increases with age (p value = 5.5 × 10−31) and is higher in men (p value = 0.002) but lower in participants of African ancestry (p value = 0.003). In a subset of 47 individuals from whom serial samples were collected up to 6 years apart, complex changes were noted over time and showed an overall increase in the proportion of mosaic cells as age increased. Our large combined sample allowed for a unique ability to characterize detectable genetic mosaicism involving large structural events and strengthens the emerging evidence of non-random erosion of the genome in the aging population. PMID:25748358

  1. West African cattle breeds characterizations: Review of CIRDES genetic works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The improvement of domestical animal breeds productivity or the animal genetic diversity maintenance to allow breeders to select animals or to create new breeds in order to adapt to environmental modifications, new diseases and societies needs, requires first a detailed inventory and, secondly, a genetic characterization of domestic animal breeds. Indeed, in developing countries, the notion of breed is not clear; visual parameters are often used even if these procedures are subjective. So it is necessary to complete this phenotypic approach by a genomic one in order to contribute to an efficient characterization. At CIRDES, a regional center for subhumid livestock research and development, these studies have been conducted during the past ten years. They permitted (i) to describe the cattle phenotypic traits and their geographical localization and to highlight the breeds threatened with extinction, (ii) to determine zebu introgression level in taurine trypanotolerant cattle (iii) to identify specific alleles of different cattle breeds, and (iv) to quantify the importance of Robertson translocation in livestock production. Data collection has been realized using a bibliography study, completed by investigations in seven countries of West Africa. Blood collection has been also done for an analysis of 4 categories of genome markers (11 blood group systems, 3 blood protein loci, microsatellites and chromosomes). According to phenotypic description and to the conceptions of autochtone human population, 13 local cattle breeds have been identified: Ndama, Kouri, the group Baoule-Somba, the group Lagoon cattle, zebu Azawak, zebu Maure, zebu Touareg, zebu Goudali, zebu Bororo, zebu White Fulani, zebu Djelli, zebu peuhl soudanien, zebu Gobra, and their crossbreds (Zebu x Ndama and Zebu x West African Shorthorns). Nine exotic breeds have been also identified: American Brahman, Gir, Girolando, Droughtmaster, Santa Gertrudis, Holstein, Montbeliarde, Jersey and Brown

  2. Antigenic and genetic characterization of rabies virus isolates from Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Helena; Castilho, Juliana Galera; Souto, Juanita; Oliveira, Rafael de Novaes; Carrieri, Maria Luiza; Kotait, Ivanete

    2013-05-01

    After 25 years without any reported cases of rabies in Uruguay, the northern region of the country experienced an epizootic of bovine paralytic rabies in October 2007. The outbreak affected bovines and equines, and the main source of infection was the bat Desmodus rotundus, the only hematophagous species in the country. From October 2007 to July 2008, 42 bovine, 3 equine and 120 chiropteran samples were submitted to the National Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory for rabies testing. A total of 12 samples (7 bovine, 2 equine and 3 from D. rotundus) were positive by the fluorescent antibody test, and viruses were isolated by the mouse inoculation test. The objective of this study was to compare the antigenic and genetic characteristics of these isolates and three isolates from insectivorous bats from other regions. Antigenic typing using a panel of eight monoclonal antibodies identified all 12 viruses as variant 3 (AgV3), a variant associated with D. rotundus. Two isolates from insectivorous bats (Tadarida brasiliensis and Molossus sp.) were characterized as antigenic variant 4 (AgV4) while the third, from Myotis sp., could not be characterized using this panel as its reactivity pattern did not match that of any of the known antigenic variants. Partial N-gene sequences (nt 149-1420) of these isolates were aligned with homologous sequences derived from GenBank by the CLUSTAL/W method and used to build a neighbor-joining distance tree with the Kimura 2-parameter model. All 12 isolates were genetically grouped into the D. rotundus cluster as they shared 100% identity. In the phylogenetic analysis, the three isolates from insectivorous bats segregated into three clusters: one related to T. brasiliensis, one to Myotis sp. and the other to Lasiurus sp., although the isolate associated with the latter came from a Molossus sp. specimen. These results indicate that AgV3 was associated with the outbreak of bovine paralytic rabies in Uruguay. This is the first report of rabies

  3. Genetic structure along an altitudinal gradient in Lippia origanoides, a promising aromatic plant species restricted to semiarid areas in northern South America

    OpenAIRE

    Vega-Vela, Nelson Enrique; Sánchez, María Isabel Chacón

    2012-01-01

    The genetic diversity and population structure of Lippia origanoides, a species of the Verbenaceae family that shows promise as a crop plant, was investigated along an altitudinal gradient in the basin of the Chicamocha River in northeastern Colombia. The economic importance of the species, quality of its essential oils, and the fact that it is restricted to some few semiarid areas in northern South America may put the species at risk in a scenario of uncontrolled harvest of natural populatio...

  4. Dynamic characterization of oil fields, complex stratigraphically using genetic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel methodology is presented in this paper for the characterization of highly heterogeneous oil fields by integration of the oil fields dynamic information to the static updated model. The objective of the oil field's characterization process is to build an oil field model, as realistic as possible, through the incorporation of all the available information. The classical approach consists in producing a model based in the oil field's static information, having as the process final stage the validation model with the dynamic information available. It is important to clarify that the term validation implies a punctual process by nature, generally intended to secure the required coherence between productive zones and petrophysical properties. The objective of the proposed methodology is to enhance the prediction capacity of the oil field's model by previously integrating, parameters inherent to the oil field's fluid dynamics by a process of dynamic data inversion through an optimization procedure based on evolutionary computation. The proposed methodology relies on the construction of the oil field's high-resolution static model, escalated by means of hybrid techniques while aiming to preserve the oil field's heterogeneity. Afterwards, using an analytic simulator as reference, the scaled model is methodically modified by means of an optimization process that uses genetic algorithms and production data as conditional information. The process's final product is a model that observes the static and dynamic conditions of the oil field with the capacity to minimize the economic impact that generates production historical adjustments to the simulation tasks. This final model features some petrophysical properties (porosity, permeability and water saturation), as modified to achieve a better adjustment of the simulated production's history versus the real one history matching. Additionally, the process involves a slight modification of relative permeability, which has

  5. Genetic characterization of trh positive Vibrio spp. isolated from Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anette eBauer Ellingsen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH and/or TDH-related hemolysin (TRH genes are carried by most virulent Vibrio parahaemolyticus serovars. In Norway, trh+ V. parahaemolyticus constitute 4.4% and 4.5 % of the total number of V. parahaemolyticus isolated from blue mussel (Mytilus edulis and water, respectively. The trh gene is located in a region close to the gene cluster for urease production (ure. This region was characterized in V. parahaemolyticus strain TH3996 and it was found that a nickel transport operon (nik was located between the first gene (ureR and the rest of the ure cluster genes. The organization of the trh-ureR-nik-ure gene cluster in the Norwegian trh+ isolates was unknown. In this study, we explore the gene organization within the trh-ureR-nik-ure cluster for these isolates. PCR analyses revealed that the genes within the trh-ureR-nik-ure gene cluster of Norwegian trh+ isolates were organized in a similar fashion as reported previously for TH33996. Additionally, the phylogenetic relationship among these trh+ isolates was investigated using Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST. Analysis by MLST or ureR-trh sequences generated two different phylogenetic trees for the same strains analyzed, suggesting that ureR-trh genes have been acquired at different times in Norwegian V. parahaemolyticus isolates. MLST results revealed that some pathogenic and non-pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus isolates in Norway appear to be highly genetically related.

  6. Genetic characterization of dengue viruses prevalent in Kerala State, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, N Pradeep; Jayakumar, P R; George, Kochurani; Kamaraj, T; Krishnamoorthy, K; Sabesan, S; Jambulingam, P

    2013-04-01

    Dengue fever is re-emerging as a major scourge in south-east Asian countries, affecting about 50-100 million people and causing about 25,000 deaths annually. The Indian population as a whole is at risk of succumbing to this disease. This study genetically characterized viruses causing dengue infection in Kerala, one of the worst affected states of the country, during the disease outbreaks in 2008-2010. All four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV), DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4, were found to be prevalent in the state. The genotypes recognized for these were III, IV, III and I, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the re-emergence of serotype DENV-4 reported in Maharashtra and Andhra Pradesh recently is spreading to different regions of the country. The circulation of all four DENV serotypes in Kerala may lead to an increase in the prevalence of more severe complications of this emerging disease, such as dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. PMID:23288429

  7. Performing monkeys of Bangladesh: characterizing their source and genetic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, M Kamrul; Feeroz, M Mostafa; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Engel, Gregory A; Akhtar, Sharmin; Kanthaswamy, Sree; Smith, David Glenn

    2016-04-01

    The acquisition and training of monkeys to perform is a centuries-old tradition in South Asia, resulting in a large number of rhesus macaques kept in captivity for this purpose. The performing monkeys are reportedly collected from free-ranging populations, and may escape from their owners or may be released into other populations. In order to determine whether this tradition involving the acquisition and movement of animals has influenced the population structure of free-ranging rhesus macaques in Bangladesh, we first characterized the source of these monkeys. Biological samples from 65 performing macaques collected between January 2010 and August 2013 were analyzed for genetic variation using 716 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA. Performing monkey sequences were compared with those of free-ranging rhesus macaque populations in Bangladesh, India and Myanmar. Forty-five haplotypes with 116 (16 %) polymorphic nucleotide sites were detected among the performing monkeys. As for the free-ranging rhesus population, most of the substitutions (89 %) were transitions, and no indels (insertion/deletion) were observed. The estimate of the mean number of pair-wise differences for the performing monkey population was 10.1264 ± 4.686, compared to 14.076 ± 6.363 for the free-ranging population. Fifteen free-ranging rhesus macaque populations were identified as the source of performing monkeys in Bangladesh; several of these populations were from areas where active provisioning has resulted in a large number of macaques. The collection of performing monkeys from India was also evident. PMID:26758818

  8. Genetic Characterization and Classification of Human and Animal Sapoviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoichiro Oka

    Full Text Available Sapoviruses (SaVs are enteric caliciviruses that have been detected in multiple mammalian species, including humans, pigs, mink, dogs, sea lions, chimpanzees, and rats. They show a high level of diversity. A SaV genome commonly encodes seven nonstructural proteins (NSs, including the RNA polymerase protein NS7, and two structural proteins (VP1 and VP2. We classified human and animal SaVs into 15 genogroups (G based on available VP1 sequences, including three newly characterized genomes from this study. We sequenced the full length genomes of one new genogroup V (GV, one GVII and one GVIII porcine SaV using long range RT-PCR including newly designed forward primers located in the conserved motifs of the putative NS3, and also 5' RACE methods. We also determined the 5'- and 3'-ends of sea lion GV SaV and canine GXIII SaV. Although the complete genomic sequences of GIX-GXII, and GXV SaVs are unavailable, common features of SaV genomes include: 1 "GTG" at the 5'-end of the genome, and a short (9~14 nt 5'-untranslated region; and 2 the first five amino acids (M [A/V] S [K/R] P of the putative NS1 and the five amino acids (FEMEG surrounding the putative cleavage site between NS7 and VP1 were conserved among the chimpanzee, two of five genogroups of pig (GV and GVIII, sea lion, canine, and human SaVs. In contrast, these two amino acid motifs were clearly different in three genogroups of porcine (GIII, GVI and GVII, and bat SaVs. Our results suggest that several animal SaVs have genetic similarities to human SaVs. However, the ability of SaVs to be transmitted between humans and animals is uncertain.

  9. Genetic Characterization and Classification of Human and Animal Sapoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Tomoichiro; Lu, Zhongyan; Phan, Tung; Delwart, Eric L; Saif, Linda J; Wang, Qiuhong

    2016-01-01

    Sapoviruses (SaVs) are enteric caliciviruses that have been detected in multiple mammalian species, including humans, pigs, mink, dogs, sea lions, chimpanzees, and rats. They show a high level of diversity. A SaV genome commonly encodes seven nonstructural proteins (NSs), including the RNA polymerase protein NS7, and two structural proteins (VP1 and VP2). We classified human and animal SaVs into 15 genogroups (G) based on available VP1 sequences, including three newly characterized genomes from this study. We sequenced the full length genomes of one new genogroup V (GV), one GVII and one GVIII porcine SaV using long range RT-PCR including newly designed forward primers located in the conserved motifs of the putative NS3, and also 5' RACE methods. We also determined the 5'- and 3'-ends of sea lion GV SaV and canine GXIII SaV. Although the complete genomic sequences of GIX-GXII, and GXV SaVs are unavailable, common features of SaV genomes include: 1) "GTG" at the 5'-end of the genome, and a short (9~14 nt) 5'-untranslated region; and 2) the first five amino acids (M [A/V] S [K/R] P) of the putative NS1 and the five amino acids (FEMEG) surrounding the putative cleavage site between NS7 and VP1 were conserved among the chimpanzee, two of five genogroups of pig (GV and GVIII), sea lion, canine, and human SaVs. In contrast, these two amino acid motifs were clearly different in three genogroups of porcine (GIII, GVI and GVII), and bat SaVs. Our results suggest that several animal SaVs have genetic similarities to human SaVs. However, the ability of SaVs to be transmitted between humans and animals is uncertain.

  10. Genetic Characterization and Classification of Human and Animal Sapoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Tomoichiro; Lu, Zhongyan; Phan, Tung; Delwart, Eric L.; Saif, Linda J.; Wang, Qiuhong

    2016-01-01

    Sapoviruses (SaVs) are enteric caliciviruses that have been detected in multiple mammalian species, including humans, pigs, mink, dogs, sea lions, chimpanzees, and rats. They show a high level of diversity. A SaV genome commonly encodes seven nonstructural proteins (NSs), including the RNA polymerase protein NS7, and two structural proteins (VP1 and VP2). We classified human and animal SaVs into 15 genogroups (G) based on available VP1 sequences, including three newly characterized genomes from this study. We sequenced the full length genomes of one new genogroup V (GV), one GVII and one GVIII porcine SaV using long range RT-PCR including newly designed forward primers located in the conserved motifs of the putative NS3, and also 5' RACE methods. We also determined the 5’- and 3’-ends of sea lion GV SaV and canine GXIII SaV. Although the complete genomic sequences of GIX-GXII, and GXV SaVs are unavailable, common features of SaV genomes include: 1) “GTG” at the 5′-end of the genome, and a short (9~14 nt) 5′-untranslated region; and 2) the first five amino acids (M [A/V] S [K/R] P) of the putative NS1 and the five amino acids (FEMEG) surrounding the putative cleavage site between NS7 and VP1 were conserved among the chimpanzee, two of five genogroups of pig (GV and GVIII), sea lion, canine, and human SaVs. In contrast, these two amino acid motifs were clearly different in three genogroups of porcine (GIII, GVI and GVII), and bat SaVs. Our results suggest that several animal SaVs have genetic similarities to human SaVs. However, the ability of SaVs to be transmitted between humans and animals is uncertain. PMID:27228126

  11. Genetic diversification without obvious genitalic morphological divergence in harvestmen (Opiliones, Laniatores, Sclerobunus robustus) from montane sky islands of western North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derkarabetian, Shahan; Ledford, Joel; Hedin, Marshal

    2011-12-01

    The southern Rocky Mountains and adjacent Intermontane Plateau Highlands region of western North America is a geographically diverse area with an active geologic history. Given the topological complexity and extensive geologic activity, organisms inhabiting this region are expected to show some degree of morphological and genetic divergence, especially populations found on the southern montane 'sky islands' of this region. Here we examine the phylogeographic history and diversification of a montane forest inhabiting harvestmen, Sclerobunus robustus, using a combination of genetic and morphological data. Divergence time estimates indicate that much of the diversification within and between major groups S. robustus predate the Pleistocene glacial cycles. The most widespread subspecies, Sclerobunus robustus robustus, is recovered as six genetically distinct, geographically cohesive mitochondrial phylogroups. Gene tree data for a single nuclear gene reveals congruent, albeit slightly more conservative, patterns of genetic divergence. Despite high levels of genetic divergence throughout their distribution, phylogroups show extreme conservation in somatic and reproductive morphology. This uncoupling of morphological and genetic differentiation may be due to morphological conservatism associated with a conserved microhabitat preference. Based on these data, it is obvious that S. robustus has undergone some level of cryptic diversification. PMID:21864691

  12. Comprehensive Genetic Characterization of a Spanish Brugada Syndrome Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabet Selga

    Full Text Available Brugada syndrome (BrS is a rare genetic cardiac arrhythmia that can lead to sudden cardiac death in patients with a structurally normal heart. Genetic variations in SCN5A can be identified in approximately 20-25% of BrS cases. The aim of our work was to determine the spectrum and prevalence of genetic variations in a Spanish cohort diagnosed with BrS.We directly sequenced fourteen genes reported to be associated with BrS in 55 unrelated patients clinically diagnosed. Our genetic screening allowed the identification of 61 genetic variants. Of them, 20 potentially pathogenic variations were found in 18 of the 55 patients (32.7% of the patients, 83.3% males. Nineteen of them were located in SCN5A, and had either been previously reported as pathogenic variations or had a potentially pathogenic effect. Regarding the sequencing of the minority genes, we discovered a potentially pathogenic variation in SCN2B that was described to alter sodium current, and one nonsense variant of unknown significance in RANGRF. In addition, we also identified 40 single nucleotide variations which were either synonymous variants (four of them had not been reported yet or common genetic variants. We next performed MLPA analysis of SCN5A for the 37 patients without an identified genetic variation, and no major rearrangements were detected. Additionally, we show that being at the 30-50 years range or exhibiting symptoms are factors for an increased potentially pathogenic variation discovery yield.In summary, the present study is the first comprehensive genetic evaluation of 14 BrS-susceptibility genes and MLPA of SCN5A in a Spanish BrS cohort. The mean pathogenic variation discovery yield is higher than that described for other European BrS cohorts (32.7% vs 20-25%, respectively, and is even higher for patients in the 30-50 years age range.

  13. Genetic characterization of Lithuanian honeybee lines based on ISSR polymorphism

    OpenAIRE

    Ceksteryte, Violeta; Paplauskiene, Vanda; Tamasauskiene, Diana; Pasakinskiene, Izolda; Mazeikiene, Ingrida

    2012-01-01

    International audience This study presents the first results from the selection and evaluation of inter-simple sequence repeat markers for the genetic assessment of honeybee lines developed in Lithuania and introduced subspecies. Two Lithuania-bred lines of Apis mellifera carnica were compared to those introduced from Czech Republic and Slovenia and also to a subspecies introduced from the Caucasus (Apis mellifera caucasica) and local Buckfast hybrids. The genetic constitution was assayed ...

  14. Morphological characterization and genetic analysis of Drechslera teres isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Frazzon, A.P.G.; A.T.S. Matsumura; S.T.Van Der Sand

    2002-01-01

    Net blotch, caused by the phytopathogen Drechslera teres, is a common disease of barley (Hordeum vulgare L) and is responsible for large economic losses in some barley growing areas. In this study the morphology and genetic variability of eight D. teres isolates from different regions of the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul were investigated. Colony morphology was studied on potato-dextrose-agar (PDA) and genetic variability investigated using the random amplified polymorphic-DNA (RAPD) t...

  15. Genetic characterization of fig tree mutants with molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, M G F; Martins, A B G; Desidério, J A; Bertoni, B W; Alves, M C

    2012-01-01

    The fig (Ficus carica L.) is a fruit tree of great world importance and, therefore, the genetic improvement becomes an important field of research for better crops, being necessary to gather information on this species, mainly regarding its genetic variability so that appropriate propagation projects and management are made. The improvement programs of fig trees using conventional procedures in order to obtain new cultivars are rare in many countries, such as Brazil, especially due to the little genetic variability and to the difficulties in obtaining plants from gamete fusion once the wasp Blastophaga psenes, responsible for the natural pollinating, is not found in Brazil. In this way, the mutagenic genetic improvement becomes a solution of it. For this reason, in an experiment conducted earlier, fig plants formed by cuttings treated with gamma ray were selected based on their agronomic characteristics of interest. We determined the genetic variability in these fig tree selections, using RAPD and AFLP molecular markers, comparing them to each other and to the Roxo-de-Valinhos, used as the standard. For the reactions of DNA amplification, 140 RAPD primers and 12 primer combinations for AFLP analysis were used. The selections did not differ genetically between themselves and between them and the Roxo-de-Valinhos cultivar. Techniques that can detect polymorphism between treatments, such as DNA sequencing, must be tested. The phenotypic variation of plants may be due to epigenetic variation, necessitating the use of techniques with methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes.

  16. Characterizing dispersal patterns in a threatened seabird with limited genetic structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, Laurie A.; Palsboll, Per J.; Beissinger, Steven R.; Harvey, James T.; Berube, Martine; Raphael, Martin G.; Nelson, S. Kim; Golightly, Richard T.; Mcfarlane-Tranquilla, Laura; Newman, Scott H.; Peery, M. Zachariah

    2009-01-01

    Genetic assignment methods provide an appealing approach for characterizing dispersal patterns on ecological time scales, but require sufficient genetic differentiation to accurately identify migrants and a large enough sample size of migrants to, for example, compare dispersal between sexes or age

  17. Genetic characterization of isolates of the basidiomycete Agaricus blazei by RAPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colauto Nelson Barros

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic divergence of five isolates of Agaricus blazei was determined based on RAPD data. Results indicate that there is little genetic variability among the commercialized strains and that RAPD is a feasible and low cost technique that can be used to characterize this fungus.

  18. Genetic characterization of isolates of the basidiomycete Agaricus blazei by RAPD

    OpenAIRE

    Colauto Nelson Barros; Dias Eustáquio Souza; Gimenes Marcos Aparecido; Eira Augusto Ferreira da

    2002-01-01

    The genetic divergence of five isolates of Agaricus blazei was determined based on RAPD data. Results indicate that there is little genetic variability among the commercialized strains and that RAPD is a feasible and low cost technique that can be used to characterize this fungus.

  19. Avian influenza at both ends of a migratory flyway: characterizing viral genomic diversity to optimize surveillance plans for North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, John M.; Ramey, Andrew M.; Flint, Paul L.; Koehler, Anson V.; Fleskes, Joseph P.; Franson, J. Christian; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Derksen, Dirk V.; Ip, Hon S.

    2009-01-01

    Although continental populations of avian influenza viruses are genetically distinct, transcontinental reassortment in low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses has been detected in migratory birds. Thus, genomic analyses of LPAI viruses could serve as an approach to prioritize species and regions targeted by North American surveillance activities for foreign origin highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). To assess the applicability of this approach, we conducted a phylogenetic and population genetic analysis of 68 viral genomes isolated from the northern pintail (Anas acuta) at opposite ends of the Pacific migratory flyway in North America. We found limited evidence for Asian LPAI lineages on wintering areas used by northern pintails in California in contrast to a higher frequency on breeding locales of Alaska. Our results indicate that the number of Asian LPAI lineages observed in Alaskan northern pintails, and the nucleotide composition of LPAI lineages, is not maintained through fall migration. Accordingly, our data indicate that surveillance of Pacific Flyway northern pintails to detect foreign avian influenza viruses would be most effective in Alaska. North American surveillance plans could be optimized through an analysis of LPAI genomics from species that demonstrate evolutionary linkages with European or Asian lineages and in regions that have overlapping migratory flyways with areas of HPAI outbreaks.

  20. Characterization of Trypanosoma rangeli Strains Isolated in Central and South America: an Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grisard Edmundo C

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma rangeli is a hemoflagelate parasite that infects domestic and sylvatic animals, as well as man, in Central and South America. T. rangeli has an overlapping distribution with T. cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, sharing several animal reservoirs and triatomine vectors. We have isolated T. rangeli strains in the State of Santa Catarina, in southern Brazil, which dramatically increased the distribution area of this parasite. This brief review summarizes several studies comparing T. rangeli strains isolated in Santa Catarina with others isolated in Colombia, Honduras and Venezuela. The different methods used include indirect immunofluorescence and western blot assays, lectin agglutination, isoenzyme electrophoresis and random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, triatomine susceptibility, in vitro cell infection assays, and mini-exon gene analysis.

  1. Plans for characterization of salt sites in the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characterization plans presented in this paper are considered to be basic in nature and are the minimum program that meets project needs. The proposed basic program can be applied to any of the salt sites under consideration. It has been designed to provide the data required to support the design, performance assessment, and licensing of each of the principal project elements: the repository, the shafts, and the surface facilities. The work has been sequenced to meet the design and licensing schedule. It is anticipated that additional characterization activities will be performed to address site-specific considerations and to provide additional information to address questions which arise during the evaluation of characterization data. The information obtained during the characterization program will be incorporated into: the site characterization plan, the site recommendation report, the environmental impact statement, and the construction authorization application

  2. Genetic characterization of the Bardigiano horse using microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed at investigating the genetic structure of the Bardigiano horse and its relationships with the Haflinger, Maremmano and Arabian breeds using 11 microsatellite markers. A total of 94 alleles were detected across the breeds, with a mean of 8.5 alleles per locus and a mean observed heterozygosity of 0.69. Compared to the other breeds, the Bardigiano horse showed quite a high genetic variability, as indicated by the mean number of alleles (7.0 vs 6.1÷7.6 and by the observed heterozygosity (0.72 vs 0.66÷0.71. Moreover, the genotype distributions in the Bardigiano groups of different sex and age were not significantly different. The overall FST value showed that the genetic differences among breeds accounted for 7.8% (P=0.001 of the total variation, and the pairwise FST values were all significant. The assignment test allocated between 96.8 and 98.9% of the individuals to the population they were collected from, with a mean probability of assignment of about 97% for all breeds, except for the Arabian, where it approached 100%. The results have highlighted that the Bardigiano breed has a high within and between breed variability, which is considerably more than could be expected by looking at its evolution history. This justifies the need for the development of additional breeding strategies to preserve the existing genetic variability.

  3. Genetic variation and population structure of American mink Neovison vison from PCB-contaminated and non-contaminated locales in eastern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirgin, Isaac; Maceda, Lorraine; Waldman, John; Mayack, David T

    2015-11-01

    American mink Neovison vison may be particularly vulnerable to toxicities of persistent contaminants such as PCBs because of their aquatic-based diet, position near the top of the food web, and small deme sizes. Furthermore, ranched mink are sensitive to reproductive toxicities of fish diets from PCB-polluted sites. The upper Hudson River is highly contaminated with PCBs and previous studies have shown elevated hepatic burdens of total and coplanar PCBs in mink collected near the river compared with those from more distant locales in New York and elsewhere. We hypothesized that bioaccumulation of PCBs in Hudson River mink has reduced their levels of genetic diversity or altered their genetic population structure. To address this, we conducted microsatellite DNA analysis on collections made in proximity to and from more distant locales in the Hudson River watershed, elsewhere in New York State, and at other sites in eastern North America including New Brunswick, four locales in Ontario, multiple drainages in Maine, and two ecoregions in Rhode Island. We did not find reduced genetic diversity at the individual or population levels in mink collected near (State and elsewhere. Depending on the analytical approach used, genetically distinct populations numbered between 16 when using STRUCTURE to 19-20 when using Exact G tests, F ST, or AMOVA analyses. Genetically distinct population units were found among major ecoregions and minor ecoregions in New York State, among different hydrologic subunits within the Hudson River watershed, among spatially separate locales in Ontario, and among most watersheds in Maine. However, despite this localization and potential heightened impact of stressors, genetic diversity and genetic population structure in mink does not seem to be affected by their bioaccumulation of high levels of PCBs of Hudson River origin. PMID:26374638

  4. Genetic characterization of Chikungunya virus in the Central African Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desdouits, Marion; Kamgang, Basile; Berthet, Nicolas; Tricou, Vianney; Ngoagouni, Carine; Gessain, Antoine; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude; Nakouné, Emmanuel; Kazanji, Mirdad

    2015-07-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an alphavirus transmitted by the bite of mosquito vectors. Over the past 10 years, the virus has gained mutations that enhance its transmissibility by the Aedes albopictus vector, resulting in massive outbreaks in the Indian Ocean, Asia and Central Africa. Recent introduction of competent A. albopictus vectors into the Central African Republic (CAR) pose a threat of a Chikungunya fever (CHIKF) epidemic in this region. We undertook this study to assess the genetic diversity and background of CHIKV strains isolated in the CAR between 1975 and 1984 and also to estimate the ability of local strains to adapt to A. albopictus. Our results suggest that, local CHIKV strains have a genetic background compatible with quick adaptation to A. albopictus, as previously observed in other Central African countries. Intense surveillance of the human and vector populations is necessary to prevent or anticipate the emergence of a massive CHIKF epidemic in the CAR.

  5. Morphological characterization and genetic analysis of Drechslera teres isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frazzon A.P.G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Net blotch, caused by the phytopathogen Drechslera teres, is a common disease of barley (Hordeum vulgare L and is responsible for large economic losses in some barley growing areas. In this study the morphology and genetic variability of eight D. teres isolates from different regions of the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul were investigated. Colony morphology was studied on potato-dextrose-agar (PDA and genetic variability investigated using the random amplified polymorphic-DNA (RAPD technique. 27 commercially available primers were tested of which 16 were selected for use in polymorphic analysis due to their good resolution and reproducibility. Similarity coefficients were used to construct dendrograms based on colony morphology and RAPD data showing the relationship between the eight isolates studied. Colony morphology showed variability between the isolates while RAPD assays showed high similarity coefficients, but grouping of the isolates according to the geographic origins of the seeds from which they were isolated was not possible.

  6. Characterization of Genetic Networks Associated with Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Tran, Linh; Emilsson, Valur; Zhu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    At the molecular level, the genetics of complex disease such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) manifests itself as series of alterations in the molecular interactions in pathways and networks that define biological processes underlying the pathophysiological states of disease. While large-scale genome-wide association (GWA) studies of late-onset alzheimer's disease (LOAD) have uncovered prominent genomic regions linked to the disease, the cause for the vast majority of LOAD cases still remains unknown. Increasingly available large-scale genomic and genetic data related to LOAD has made it possible to comprehensively uncover the mechanisms causally lined to LOAD in a completely data-driven manner. Here we review the various aspects of systems/network biology approaches and methodology in constructing genetic networks associated with AD from large sampling of postmortem brain tissues. We describe in detail a multiscale network modeling approach (MNMA) that integrates interaction and causal gene networks to analyze large-scale DNA, gene expression and pathophysiological data from multiple post-mortem brain regions of LOAD patients as well non-demented normal controls. MNMA first employs weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) to construct multi-tissue networks that simultaneously capture intra-tissue and inter-tissue gene-gene interactions and then quantifies the change in connectivity among highly co-expressed genes in LOAD with respect to the normal state. Co-expressed gene modules are then rank ordered by relevance to pathophysiological traits and enrichment of genes differentially expressed in LOAD. Causal regulatory relationships among the genes in each module are then determined by a Bayesian network inference framework that is used to formally integrate genetic and gene expression information. MNMA has uncovered a massive remodeling of network structures in LOAD and identified novel subnetworks and key regulators that are causally linked to LOAD. In the

  7. Genetic characterization of Aberdeen Angus cattle using molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasconcellos Luciana Pimentel de Mello Klocker

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberdeen Angus beef cattle from the Brazilian herd were studied genetically using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP of the kappa-casein - HinfI (CSN3 - HinfI, beta-lactoglobulin - HaeIII (LGB - HaeIII and growth hormone AluI (GH- AluI genes, as well as four microsatellites (TEXAN15, CSFM50, BM1224 and BM7160. The RFLP genotypes were determined using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR followed by digestion with restriction endonucleases and electrophoresis in agarose gels. With the exception of the microsatellite BM7160, which was analyzed in an automatic sequencer, the PCR products were genotyped by silver staining. The allele and genotype frequencies, heterozygosities and gene diversity were estimated. The values for these parameters of variability were comparable to other cattle breeds. The genetic relationship of the Aberdeen Angus to other breeds (Caracu, Canchim, Charolais, Guzerath, Gyr, Nelore, Santa Gertrudis and Simmental was investigated using Nei's genetic distance. Cluster analysis placed the Aberdeen Angus in an isolated group in the Bos taurus breeds branch. This fact is in agreement with the geographic origin of this breed.

  8. Characterizing genetic syndromes involved in cancer and radiogenic cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The COG project 2806A (1995), reviewed the On-line Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database of genetic syndromes to identify those syndromes, genes, and DNA sequences implicated in some way in the cancer process, and especially in radiogenic cancer risk. The current report describes a recent update of the survey in light of two years of further progress in the Human Genome project, and is intended to supply a comprehensive list of those genetic syndromes, genes, DNA sequences and map locations that define genes likely to be involved in cancer risk. Of the 8203 syndromes in OMIM in 1997 June, 814 are associated, even if marginally, with cancer. Of the 814 syndromes so linked, 672 have been mapped to a chromosome, and 476 have been mapped to a chromosome and had a DNA sequence associated with their messenger RNA (or cDNA) sequences. In addition, 35 syndromes have sequences not associated with map locations, and the remaining 107 have neither been mapped nor sequenced. We supply the list of the various genetic syndromes sorted by chromosome location and by OMIM descriptor, together with all the associated but unmapped and unsequenced syndromes. (author)

  9. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Clinical Isolates from Northern Colombia, South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio A. Guerra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC are major causes of childhood diarrhea in low and middle income countries including Colombia, South America. To understand the diversity of ETEC strains in the region, clinical isolates obtained from northern Colombia children were evaluated for multiple locus sequencing typing, serotyping, classical and nonclassical virulence genes, and antibiotic susceptibility. Among 40 ETEC clinical isolates evaluated, 21 (52.5% were positive for LT gene, 13 (32.5% for ST gene, and 6 (15% for both ST and LT. The most prevalent colonization surface antigens (CS were CS21 and CFA/I identified in 21 (50% and 13 (32.5% isolates, respectively. The eatA, irp2, and fyuA were the most common nonclassical virulence genes present in more than 60% of the isolates. Ampicillin resistance (80% of the strains was the most frequent phenotype among ETEC strains followed by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance (52.5%. Based on multiple locus sequencing typing (MLST, we recognize that 6 clonal groups of ETEC clinical isolates circulate in Colombia. ETEC clinical isolates from children in northern Colombia are highly diverse, yet some isolates circulating in the community belong to well-defined clonal groups that share a unique set of virulence factors, serotypes, and MLST sequence types.

  10. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli clinical isolates from northern Colombia, South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Julio A; Romero-Herazo, Yesenia C; Arzuza, Octavio; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are major causes of childhood diarrhea in low and middle income countries including Colombia, South America. To understand the diversity of ETEC strains in the region, clinical isolates obtained from northern Colombia children were evaluated for multiple locus sequencing typing, serotyping, classical and nonclassical virulence genes, and antibiotic susceptibility. Among 40 ETEC clinical isolates evaluated, 21 (52.5%) were positive for LT gene, 13 (32.5%) for ST gene, and 6 (15%) for both ST and LT. The most prevalent colonization surface antigens (CS) were CS21 and CFA/I identified in 21 (50%) and 13 (32.5%) isolates, respectively. The eatA, irp2, and fyuA were the most common nonclassical virulence genes present in more than 60% of the isolates. Ampicillin resistance (80% of the strains) was the most frequent phenotype among ETEC strains followed by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance (52.5%). Based on multiple locus sequencing typing (MLST), we recognize that 6 clonal groups of ETEC clinical isolates circulate in Colombia. ETEC clinical isolates from children in northern Colombia are highly diverse, yet some isolates circulating in the community belong to well-defined clonal groups that share a unique set of virulence factors, serotypes, and MLST sequence types.

  11. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of complex hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Eleanna; Tucci, Arianna; Manzoni, Claudia; Lynch, David S; Elpidorou, Marilena; Bettencourt, Conceicao; Chelban, Viorica; Manole, Andreea; Hamed, Sherifa A; Haridy, Nourelhoda A; Federoff, Monica; Preza, Elisavet; Hughes, Deborah; Pittman, Alan; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Brandner, Sebastian; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Wiethoff, Sarah; Schottlaender, Lucia; Proukakis, Christos; Morris, Huw; Warner, Tom; Bhatia, Kailash P; Korlipara, L V Prasad; Singleton, Andrew B; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W; Lewis, Patrick A; Houlden, Henry

    2016-07-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias are a heterogeneous group of degenerative disorders that are clinically classified as either pure with predominant lower limb spasticity, or complex where spastic paraplegia is complicated with additional neurological features, and are inherited in autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked patterns. Genetic defects have been identified in over 40 different genes, with more than 70 loci in total. Complex recessive spastic paraplegias have in the past been frequently associated with mutations in SPG11 (spatacsin), ZFYVE26/SPG15, SPG7 (paraplegin) and a handful of other rare genes, but many cases remain genetically undefined. The overlap with other neurodegenerative disorders has been implied in a small number of reports, but not in larger disease series. This deficiency has been largely due to the lack of suitable high throughput techniques to investigate the genetic basis of disease, but the recent availability of next generation sequencing can facilitate the identification of disease-causing mutations even in extremely heterogeneous disorders. We investigated a series of 97 index cases with complex spastic paraplegia referred to a tertiary referral neurology centre in London for diagnosis or management. The mean age of onset was 16 years (range 3 to 39). The SPG11 gene was first analysed, revealing homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in 30/97 (30.9%) of probands, the largest SPG11 series reported to date, and by far the most common cause of complex spastic paraplegia in the UK, with severe and progressive clinical features and other neurological manifestations, linked with magnetic resonance imaging defects. Given the high frequency of SPG11 mutations, we studied the autophagic response to starvation in eight affected SPG11 cases and control fibroblast cell lines, but in our restricted study we did not observe correlations between disease status and autophagic or lysosomal markers. In the remaining cases, next

  12. The Use of Genetics for the Management of a Recovering Population: Temporal Assessment of Migratory Peregrine Falcons in North America

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Jeff A; Sandra L Talbot; Sage, George K.; Kurt K Burnham; Brown, Joseph W.; Maechtle, Tom L.; William S Seegar; Yates, Michael A.; Bud Anderson; David P Mindell

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Our ability to monitor populations or species that were once threatened or endangered and in the process of recovery is enhanced by using genetic methods to assess overall population stability and size over time. This can be accomplished most directly by obtaining genetic measures from temporally-spaced samples that reflect the overall stability of the population as given by changes in genetic diversity levels (allelic richness and heterozygosity), degree of population differentia...

  13. Genetic characterization of early maturing maize hybrids (Zea mays L. obtained by protein and RAPD markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauer Iva

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of maize germplasm genetic diversity is important for planning breeding programmes, germplasm conservation per se etc. Genetic variability of maize hybrids grown in the fields is also very important because genetic uniformity implies risks of genetic vulnerability to stress factors and can cause great losts in yield. Early maturing maize hybrids are characterized by shorter vegetation period and they are grown in areas with shorter vegetation season. Because of different climatic conditions in these areas lines and hybrids are developed with different features in respect to drought resistance and disease resistance. The objective of our study was to characterize set of early maturing maize hybrids with protein and RAPD markers and to compare this clasification with their pedigree information. RAPD markers gave significantly higher rate of polymorphism than protein markers. Better corelation was found among pedigree information and protein markers.

  14. Genetic characterization of the ABO blood group in Neandertals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertranpetit Jaume

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high polymorphism rate in the human ABO blood group gene seems to be related to susceptibility to different pathogens. It has been estimated that all genetic variation underlying the human ABO alleles appeared along the human lineage, after the divergence from the chimpanzee lineage. A paleogenetic analysis of the ABO blood group gene in Neandertals allows us to directly test for the presence of the ABO alleles in these extinct humans. Results We have analysed two male Neandertals that were retrieved under controlled conditions at the El Sidron site in Asturias (Spain and that appeared to be almost free of modern human DNA contamination. We find a human specific diagnostic deletion for blood group O (O01 haplotype in both Neandertal individuals. Conclusion These results suggest that the genetic change responsible for the O blood group in humans predates the human and Neandertal divergence. A potential selective event associated with the emergence of the O allele may have therefore occurred after humans separated from their common ancestor with chimpanzees and before the human-Neandertal population divergence.

  15. Genetic characterization of the gypsy moth from China (Lepidoptera, Lymantriidae using inter simple sequence repeats markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Chen

    Full Text Available This study provides the first genetic characterization of the gypsy moth from China (Lymantriadispar, one of the most recognized pests of forests and ornamental trees in the world. We assessed genetic diversity and structure in eight geographic populations of gypsy moths from China using five polymorphic Inter simple sequence repeat markers, which produced reproducible banding patterns. We observed 102 polymorphic loci across the 176 individuals sampled. Overall genetic diversity (Nei's, H was 0.2357, while the mean genetic diversity within geographic populations was 0.1845 ± 0.0150. The observed genetic distance among the eight populations ranged from 0.0432 to 0.1034. Clustering analysis (using an unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean and multidimensional scaling, revealed strong concordance between the strength of genetic relationships among populations and their geographic proximity. Analysis of molecular variance demonstrated that 25.43% of the total variability (F ST = 0.2543, P < 0.001 was attributable to variation among geographic populations. The results of our analyses investigating the degree of polymorphism, genetic diversity (Nei's and Shannon and genetic structure, suggest that individuals from Hebei may be better able to adapt to different environments and to disperse to new habitats. This study provides crucial genetic information needed to assess the distribution and population dynamics of this important pest species of global concern.

  16. Bile salt hydrolase of Bifidobacterium longum - Biochemical and genetic characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanaka, H; Hashiba, Honoo; Kok, Jan; Mierau, Igor

    2000-01-01

    A bile salt hydrolase (BSH) was isolated from Bifidobacterium longum SBT2928, purified, and characterized, Furthermore, we describe for the first time cloning and analysis of the gene encoding BSII (bsh) in a member of the genus Bifidobacterium. The enzyme has a native molecular weight of 125,000 to

  17. Genetic and Physiologic Characterization of Urease of Actinomyces naeslundii

    OpenAIRE

    Morou-Bermudez, Evangelia; Burne, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Ammonia production from urea by ureolytic oral bacteria is believed to have a significant impact on oral health and the ecological balance of oral microbial populations. In this study we cloned and characterized the urease gene cluster of Actinomyces naeslundii, which is one of the pioneer organisms in the oral cavity and a significant constituent of supragingival and subgingival dental plaque in children and adults. An internal fragment of the ureC gene of A. naeslundii WVU45 was initially a...

  18. Genetic characterization of rabies field isolates from Venezuela.

    OpenAIRE

    de Mattos, C A; de Mattos, C C; Smith, J S; Miller, E. T.; Papo, S; Utrera, A; Osburn, B. I.

    1996-01-01

    Twenty samples from cases of rabies in humans and domestic animals diagnosed in Venezuela between 1990 and 1994 and one sample from a vampire bat collected in 1976 were characterized by reactivity to monoclonal antibodies against the viral nucleoprotein and by patterns of nucleotide substitution in the nucleoprotein gene. Three antigenic variants were found: 1, 3, and 5. Antigenic variant 1 included all samples from dogs and humans infected by contact with rabid dogs. Unique substitutions per...

  19. Is the genetic structure of human personality universal? A cross-cultural twin study from North America, Europe, and Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, Shinji; Suzuki, Atsunobu; Ando, Juko; Ono, Yutaka; Kijima, Nobuhiko; Yoshimura, Kimio; Ostendorf, Fritz; Angleitner, Alois; Riemann, Rainer; Spinath, Frank M; Livesley, W John; Jang, Kerry L

    2006-06-01

    This study examined whether universality of the 5-factor model (FFM) of personality operationalized by the Revised NEO Personality Inventory is due to genetic influences that are invariant across diverse nations. Factor analyses were conducted on matrices of phenotypic, genetic, and environmental correlations estimated in a sample of 1,209 monozygotic and 701 dizygotic twin pairs from Canada, Germany, and Japan. Five genetic and environmental factors were extracted for each sample. High congruence coefficients were observed when phenotypic, genetic, and environmental factors were compared in each sample as well as when each factor was compared across samples. These results suggest that the FFM has a solid biological basis and may represent a common heritage of the human species.

  20. Molecular characterization of Blau syndrome: Genetic linkage to chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tromp, G.; Duivaniemi, H.; Christiano, A. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Blau syndrome is an autosomal, dominantly-inherited disease characterized by multi-organ, tissue-specific inflammation. Its clinical phenotype includes granulomatous uveitis, arthritis and skin rash. The syndrome is unique in that it is the sole human model for a variety of multi-system inflammatory diseases that afflict a significant percentage of the population. Karyotypic analysis of the large, three generation kindred whose disease originally characterized the syndrome was unremarkable. Following exclusion of a number of extracellular matrix candidates genes, a genome-wide search was undertaken of the Blau susceptibility locus. Fifty-seven members of the family were genotyped for about 200 highly polymorphic dinucleotide repeat markers. Linkage analysis was performed using the LINKAGE package of programs under a model of dominant inheritance with reduced penetrance. Five liability classes were used to specify penetrances and phenocopy rates for those affected the arthritis, uveitis, skin rash and combinations thererof. In addition, five age-dependent penetrance classes were used for unaffected individuals. The marker D16S298 gave a maximum lod score of 3.6 at {theta} = 0.05 with two-point analysis. Lod scores for flanking markers were consistent. These data provide convincing evidence that the Blau susceptibility locus is situated within the 16p12-q21 interval. Fine mapping of the candidate interval with additional families exhibiting the Blau phenotype, as well as with more polymorphic markers, is underway.

  1. Genetic Characterization of Atypical Mansonella (Mansonella) ozzardi Microfilariae in Human Blood Samples from Northeastern Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos, Luis A.; Arrospide, Nancy; Recuenco, Sergio; Cabezas, Cesar; Gary J Weil; Fischer, Peter U.

    2012-01-01

    DNA sequence comparisons are useful for characterizing proposed new parasite species or strains. Microfilariae with an atypical arrangement of nuclei behind the cephalic space have been recently described in human blood samples from the Amazon region of Peru. Three blood specimens containing atypical microfilariae were genetically characterized using three DNA markers (5S ribosomal DNA, 12S ribosomal DNA, and cytochrome oxidase I). All atypical microfilariae were clustered into the Mansonella...

  2. Haemoproteus erythrogravidus n. sp. (Haemosporida, Haemoproteidae): Description and molecular characterization of a widespread blood parasite of birds in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Juan S; González, Angie D; Lotta, Ingrid A; Moens, Michaël; Pacheco, M Andreína; Escalante, Ananias A; Valkiūnas, Gediminas; Moncada, Ligia I; Pérez-Tris, Javier; Matta, Nubia E

    2016-07-01

    The great diversity of birds and ecosystems in the Andean mountains has been understudied in terms of their parasite species. We describe a new Haemoproteus parasite, H. (Parahaemoproteus) erythrogravidus infecting Zonotrichia capensis (Rufous-Collared Sparrow) in South America. The description of this blood parasite species is supported by morphological and molecular data based on a fragment of cytochrome b gene (cyt b) and complete mitochondrial genome sequences. The new species is closely related to H. (Parahaemoproteus) coatneyi, and it can be readily distinguished from the latter parasite due to morphology of its blood stages, particularly 1) the formation of a marked protrusion on envelope of infected erythrocytes by the majority of developing gametocytes, a feature which is unique for this Haemoproteus species and 2) the extremely attenuated width of the growing dumbbell-shaped macro- and microgametocytes. Additionally, Haemoproteus erythrogravidus is shown to be a monophyletic taxon that diverges from Haemoproteus coatneyi at the molecular level. We provide the complete mitochondrial DNA genome for both H. coatneyi and H. erythrogravidus. Molecular and morphological evidences indicate that H. erythrogravidus is present in Ecuador and Colombia, and genetic lineages with 100% of identity for the cyt b gene were reported in Chile, Perú, and Venezuela. Our study also indicates that H. erythrogravidus and H. coatneyi are sympatric sister taxa sharing Z. capensis as a host species across its distribution, which could be the result of sympatric speciation or complex biogeographic processes. Further studies on the distribution and evolutionary history of Z. capensis and its parasites H. erythrogravidus and H. coatneyi insight for our better understanding of the factors and dynamics driving parasite speciation. PMID:26995696

  3. Epidemiology and Genetic Characterization of Hepatitis A Virus Genotype IIA▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbois, Delphine; Couturier, Elisabeth; Mackiewicz, Vincent; Graube, Arielle; Letort, Marie-José; Dussaix, Elisabeth; Roque-Afonso, Anne-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Three hepatitis A virus (HAV) genotypes, I, II, and III, divided into subtypes A and B, infect humans. Genotype I is the most frequently reported, while genotype II is hardly ever isolated, and its genetic diversity is unknown. From 2002 to 2007, a French epidemiological survey of HAV identified 6 IIA isolates, mostly from patients who did not travel abroad. The possible African origin of IIA strains was investigated by screening the 2008 mandatory notification records of HAV infection: 171 HAV strains from travelers to West Africa and Morocco were identified. Genotyping was performed by sequencing of the VP1/2A junction in 68 available sera. Entire P1 and 5′ untranslated regions of IIA strains were compared to reference sequences of other genotypes. The screening retrieved 5 imported IIA isolates. An additional autochthonous case and 2 more African cases were identified in 2008 and 2009, respectively. A total of 14 IIA isolates (8 African and 6 autochthonous) were analyzed. IIA sequences presented lower nucleotide and amino acid variability than other genotypes. The highest variability was observed in the N-terminal region of VP1, while for other genotypes the highest variability was observed at the VP1/2A junction. Phylogenetic analysis identified 2 clusters, one gathering all African and two autochthonous cases and a second including only autochthonous isolates. In conclusion, most IIA strains isolated in France are imported by travelers returning from West Africa. However, the unexplained contamination mode of autochthonous cases suggests another, still to be discovered geographical origin or a French reservoir to be explored. PMID:20592136

  4. Epidemiology and genetic characterization of hepatitis A virus genotype IIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbois, Delphine; Couturier, Elisabeth; Mackiewicz, Vincent; Graube, Arielle; Letort, Marie-José; Dussaix, Elisabeth; Roque-Afonso, Anne-Marie

    2010-09-01

    Three hepatitis A virus (HAV) genotypes, I, II, and III, divided into subtypes A and B, infect humans. Genotype I is the most frequently reported, while genotype II is hardly ever isolated, and its genetic diversity is unknown. From 2002 to 2007, a French epidemiological survey of HAV identified 6 IIA isolates, mostly from patients who did not travel abroad. The possible African origin of IIA strains was investigated by screening the 2008 mandatory notification records of HAV infection: 171 HAV strains from travelers to West Africa and Morocco were identified. Genotyping was performed by sequencing of the VP1/2A junction in 68 available sera. Entire P1 and 5' untranslated regions of IIA strains were compared to reference sequences of other genotypes. The screening retrieved 5 imported IIA isolates. An additional autochthonous case and 2 more African cases were identified in 2008 and 2009, respectively. A total of 14 IIA isolates (8 African and 6 autochthonous) were analyzed. IIA sequences presented lower nucleotide and amino acid variability than other genotypes. The highest variability was observed in the N-terminal region of VP1, while for other genotypes the highest variability was observed at the VP1/2A junction. Phylogenetic analysis identified 2 clusters, one gathering all African and two autochthonous cases and a second including only autochthonous isolates. In conclusion, most IIA strains isolated in France are imported by travelers returning from West Africa. However, the unexplained contamination mode of autochthonous cases suggests another, still to be discovered geographical origin or a French reservoir to be explored. PMID:20592136

  5. Genetic characterization of type A enterotoxigenic Clostridium perfringens strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agi Deguchi

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens type A, is both a ubiquitous environmental bacterium and a major cause of human gastrointestinal disease, which usually involves strains producing C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE. The gene (cpe encoding this toxin can be carried on the chromosome or a large plasmid. Interestingly, strains carrying cpe on the chromosome and strains carrying cpe on a plasmid often exhibit different biological characteristics, such as resistance properties against heat. In this study, we investigated the genetic properties of C. perfringens by PCR-surveying 21 housekeeping genes and genes on representative plasmids and then confirmed those results by Southern blot assay (SB of five genes. Furthermore, sequencing analysis of eight housekeeping genes and multilocus sequence typing (MLST analysis were also performed. Fifty-eight C. perfringens strains were examined, including isolates from: food poisoning cases, human gastrointestinal disease cases, foods in Japan or the USA, or feces of healthy humans. In the PCR survey, eight of eleven housekeeping genes amplified positive reactions in all strains tested. However, by PCR survey and SB assay, one representative virulence gene, pfoA, was not detected in any strains carrying cpe on the chromosome. Genes involved in conjugative transfer of the cpe plasmid were also absent from almost all chromosomal cpe strains. MLST showed that, regardless of their geographic origin, date of isolation, or isolation source, chromosomal cpe isolates, i assemble into one definitive cluster ii lack pfoA and iii lack a plasmid related to the cpe plasmid. Similarly, independent of their origin, strains carrying a cpe plasmid also appear to be related, but are more variable than chromosomal cpe strains, possibly because of the instability of cpe-borne plasmid(s and/or the conjugative transfer of cpe-plasmid(s into unrelated C. perfringens strains.

  6. Genetic characterization of Arcobacter isolates from various sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, A H; Saleha, A A; Zunita, Z; Cheah, Y K; Murugaiyah, M; Korejo, N A

    2012-12-01

    Arcobacter is getting more attention due to its detection from wide host-range and foods of animal origin. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of Arcobacter spp. in various sources at farm level and beef retailed in markets in Malaysia and to assess the genetic relatedness among them. A total of 273 samples from dairy cattle including cattle (n=120), floor (n=30), water (n=18) and milk (n=105) as well as 148 beef samples collected from retail markets were studied. The overall prevalence of Arcobacter in various sources was 15% (63/421). However, source-wise detection rate of Arcobacter spp. was recorded as 26.66% (8/30) in floor, 26.3% (39/148) in beef, 11.11% (2/18) in water, 7.6% (8/105) in milk and 6.66% (8/120) in cattle. Arcobacter butzleri was the frequently isolated species however, a total of 75%, 66.7%, 53.8%, 50% and 12.5%% samples from floor, milk, beef, water and cattle, respectively, were carrying more than one species simultaneously. One (12.5%) cattle and beef sample (2.5%) found to be carrying one Arcobacter spp., A. skirrowii, only. Typing of Arcobacter isolates was done though pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) after digested with Eag1 restriction endonuclease (RE). Digestion of genomic DNA of Arcobacter from various sources yielded 12 major clusters (≥ 50% similarity) which included 29 different band patterns. A number of closely related A. butzleri isolates were found from beef samples which indicate cross contamination of common type of Arcobacter. Fecal shedding of Arcobacter by healthy animals can contaminate water and milk which may act as source of infection in humans. PMID:22739058

  7. Genetic Characterization of Streptococcus iniae in Diseased Farmed Rainbow Trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Erfanmanesh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic characterization of strains of Streptococcus iniae recovered from morbidity and mortality of farmed rainbow trout in different provinces of Iran were studied. The Gram-positive cocci isolates were obtained from the kidney tissues of diseased rainbow trout on blood agar at 25°C for 72 h. The grown bacteria were then characterized using biochemical and molecular works. The identified 26 isolates of S. iniae producing a 513 bp in PCR procedure were then compared using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis using 9 random primers. The phylogenetic tree of the RAPD product using UPMGA software included these strains in one genetic group but into two clusters. The results of this study show that S. iniae strains from the diseased rainbow trout in the north part of Iran are genetically similar to those strains in the south and west parts of the country.

  8. Isolation and genetic characterization of swinepox virus from pigs in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyesh, Thachamvally; Barua, Sanjay; Kumar, Naveen; Jindal, Naresh; Bera, Bidhan Chandra; Narang, Gulshan; Mahajan, Nand Kishore; Arora, Devan; Anand, Taruna; Vaid, Rajesh Kumar; Yadav, Mansi; Chandel, Surender Singh; Malik, Praveen; Tripathi, Bhupendra Nath; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Swinepox virus (SWPV), a member of the genus Suipoxvirus causes generalized pock-like lesions on the body of domestic and wild pigs. Although outbreak has been reported in India since 1987, virus isolation and genetic characterization remained elusive. In September 2013, an outbreak of acute skin infection occurred in piglets in a commercial piggery unit at Rohtak district in Haryana, India. The presence of SWPV in scab samples collected from piglets succumbed to infection was confirmed by virus isolation, PCR amplification of SWPV-specific gene segments and nucleotide sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of host-range genes of the SWPV revealed that the Indian isolate is genetically closely related to reference isolate SWPV/pig/U.S.A/1999/Nebraska. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report on isolation and genetic characterization of SWPV from pigs in India. PMID:27260812

  9. Isolation and genetic characterization of toxoplasma gondii from striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) from Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxoplasma gondii infection in marine mammals is of interest because of mortality and mode of transmission. It has been suggested that marine mammals become infected with T. gondii oocysts washed from land to the sea. We report the isolation and genetic characterization of viable T. gondii from a st...

  10. An interview study of phenotypic characterization of genetically-modified mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thon, R.; Vondeling, H.; Lassen, J.; Hansen, A.K.; Ritskes-Hoitinga, M.

    2009-01-01

    An interview study was carried out with the aim of clarifying the reasons for the limited use of phenotypic characterization of genetically-modified mice (GMM) and identifying issues hindering its implementation. A total of 15 users of GMM participated in semi-structured face-to-face interviews, whi

  11. Using Genetic Algorithm and MODFLOW to Characterize Aquifer System of Northwest Florida (Published Proceedings)

    Science.gov (United States)

    By integrating Genetic Algorithm and MODFLOW2005, an optimizing tool is developed to characterize the aquifer system of Region II, Northwest Florida. The history and the newest available observation data of the aquifer system is fitted automatically by using the numerical model c...

  12. Using Genetic Algorithm and MODFLOW to Characterize Aquifer System of Northwest Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    By integrating Genetic Algorithm and MODFLOW2005, an optimizing tool is developed to characterize the aquifer system of Region II, Northwest Florida. The history and the newest available observation data of the aquifer system is fitted automatically by using the numerical model c...

  13. Characterization of milk fatty acids based on genetic and herd parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heck, J.M.L.; Valenberg, van H.J.F.; Bovenhuis, H.; Dijkstra, J.; Hooijdonk, van A.C.M.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the fatty acids (FA) in milk based on genetic and herd parameters to investigate the origin of the different FA in milk. Milk samples of 1912 Dutch Holstein-Friesian cows were analysed for 39 different FA including odd and branched-chain fatty acids. T

  14. Diversity of the breadfruit complex (Artocarpus, Moraceae): Genetic characterization of critical germplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis, Moraceae) is a traditional staple starch crop in Oceania and has been introduced throughout the tropics. This study uses microsatellite markers to characterize the genetic diversity of breadfruit and its wild relatives housed in the USDA National Plant Germplasm Syste...

  15. An interview study of phenotypic characterization of genetically-modified mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thon, R.; Vondeling, H.; Lassen, J.; Hansen, A.K.; Ritskes-Hoitinga, M.

    2009-01-01

    An interview study was carried out with the aim of clarifying the reasons for the limited use of phenotypic characterization of genetically-modified mice (GMM) and identifying issues hindering its implementation. A total of 15 users of GMM participated in semi-structured face-to-face interviews, whi

  16. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  17. Genetic characterization of somatic recombination in Trichoderma pseudokoningii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barcellos Fernando Gomes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Crossing experiments via hyphal anastomosis between two strains contrasting for auxotrophic markers of Trichoderma pseudokoningii were conducted to characterize the somatic recombination process in this specie. Four crossings were made and a total of 1052 colonies obtained from conidial suspensions of the heterokaryotic colonies were analyzed. Sixty-eight recombinant colonies, from four growing generations, were analyzed for the auxotrophic markers. Of the 68 colonies analyzed, 58 were stable after four generations and the remainders were unstable, reverting to one of the parentals. Most of the recombinant colonies were unstable through subculture and after four growing generations they showed the leu ino met markers (auxotrophic for leucin, inositol and metionin respectively. The unstable recombinant colonies showed irregular growing borders, sparse sporulation and frequent sector formation. The results suggest the occurrence of recombination mechanisms in the heterokaryon (somatic recombination, different from those described for the parasexual cycle or parameiosis. Therefore, we proposed the ocurrence of nuclei degradation from one parental (non prevalent parental in the heterokaryon and that the resulting chromosomal fragments may be incorporated into whole nuclei of the another parental (prevalent parental. However the parameiosis as originally described cannot be excluded.

  18. Genetic and morphological divergence among Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) populations breeding in north-central and western North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Rosenfield, Robert N.; Bielefeldt, John; Murphy, Robert K.; Stewart, Andrew C.; Stout, William C.; Driscoll, Timothy G.; Bozek, Michael A.; Sloss, Brian L.; Talbot, Sandra L.

    2012-01-01

    Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) populations breeding in the northern portion of the species' range exhibit variation in morphological traits that conforms to predictions based on differences in prey size, tree stand density, and migratory behavior. We examined genetic structure and gene flow and compared divergence at morphological traits (PST) and genetic markers (FST) to elucidate mechanisms (selection or genetic drift) that promote morphological diversification among Cooper's Hawk populations. Cooper's Hawks appear to conform to the genetic pattern of an east-west divide. Populations in British Columbia are genetically differentiated from north-central populations (Wisconsin, Minnesota, and North Dakota; pairwise microsatellite FST= 0.031-0.050; mitochondrial DNA ΦST = 0.177-0.204), which suggests that Cooper's Hawks were restricted to at least two Pleistocene glacial refugia. The strength of the Rocky Mountains—Great Plains area as a barrier to dispersal is further supported by restricted gene-flow rates between British Columbia and other sampled breeding populations. Divergence in morphological traits (PST) was also observed across study areas, but with British Columbia and North Dakota differentiated from Wisconsin and Minnesota, a pattern not predicted on the basis of FST and ΦST interpopulation estimates. Comparison of PSTand FSTestimates suggests that heterogeneous selection may be acting on Cooper's Hawks in the northern portion of their distribution, which is consistent with hypotheses that variation in prey mass and migratory behavior among populations may be influencing overall body size and wing chord. We were unable to distinguish between the effects of genetic drift and selection on tail length in the study populations.

  19. Molecular characterization of Chlamydia pneumoniae in animals and humans from Argentina: Genetic characterization of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frutos, María C; Monetti, Marina S; Mosmann, Jessica; Kiguen, Ana X; Venezuela, Fernando R; Ré, Viviana E; Cuffini, Cecilia G

    2016-10-01

    In this study, genetic diversity of Chlamydia pneumoniae was investigated and the relationships between sequences amplified of different sources, clinical conditions and geographical regions of central Argentina were established. Samples amplified were similar to human C. pneumoniae patterns and show the high clonality of the population. PMID:27328126

  20. Acceptance of a food of animal origin obtained through genetic modification and cloning in South America: a comparative study among university students and working adults

    OpenAIRE

    Schnettler, Berta; Velásquez, Carlos; Horacio MIRANDA; Lobos, Germán; Orellana, Ligia; José SEPÚLVEDA; Edgardo MIRANDA; Adasme-Berríos, Cristian; Klaus GRUNERT

    2015-01-01

    AbstractWith the aim of comparing the acceptance of milk obtained from cloned, genetically modified (GM) and conventionally bred cows among working adults and university students, and identifying and characterizing typologies among both subsamples in terms of their preferences, a survey was applied to 400 people in southern Chile, distributed using a simple allocation among the subsamples. Using a conjoint analysis, it was found that consumers preferred milk from a conventional cow. Using a c...

  1. Characterization of fruit development and potential health benefits of arrayan (Luma apiculata), a native berry of South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Lida; Valdenegro, Mónika; Gómez, María-Graciela; Ayala-Raso, Aníbal; Quiroga, Evelyn; Martínez, Juan-Pablo; Vinet, Raúl; Caballero, Eduardo; Figueroa, Carlos R

    2016-04-01

    The arrayan berry (Luma apiculata) is a native fruit from South America that belongs to the Myrtaceae family. To elucidate and characterize the developmental process and the potential health benefits of this edible fruit, quality and physiological parameters, along with antioxidant capacity, were evaluated during four clearly defined developmental stages of the fruit in two seasons. Fruit firmness slowly decreases during fruit development, whereas the solid soluble content/titratable acidity ratio (SSC/TA) increases significantly in the final stages of development. The measurement of low respiration rates and low ethylene production during growth and ripening suggested that the arrayan berry should be classified as a non-climacteric fruit. Arrayan berries show a significant increase in their antioxidant capacity from small green to black ripe fruit. FRAP and TEAC assays showed high correlations with total polyphenolic content (TPC) during ripening and high antioxidant capacity at all fruit stages, showing greater values in ripe fruit (FRAP: 24 ± 2 and 28 ± 3 μM FeSO4/gFW; TEAC: 18 ± 2 and 20 ± 1 Eq. Trolox/gFW for each season, respectively) than those observed in the blueberry (FRAP: 10 ± 2 and 19 ± 3 μM FeSO4/gFW; TEAC: 10 ± 2 and 17 ± 3). In addition, bioactive assays using ripe fruit extracts show presence of flavonol and anthocyanins, a high ORAC value (62,500 ± 7000 μmol/gDW) and a concentration-dependent vascular protection under high glucose conditions. The results obtained show that these endemic berry fruits have a promising potential as functional food.

  2. Characterization of fruit development and potential health benefits of arrayan (Luma apiculata), a native berry of South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Lida; Valdenegro, Mónika; Gómez, María-Graciela; Ayala-Raso, Aníbal; Quiroga, Evelyn; Martínez, Juan-Pablo; Vinet, Raúl; Caballero, Eduardo; Figueroa, Carlos R

    2016-04-01

    The arrayan berry (Luma apiculata) is a native fruit from South America that belongs to the Myrtaceae family. To elucidate and characterize the developmental process and the potential health benefits of this edible fruit, quality and physiological parameters, along with antioxidant capacity, were evaluated during four clearly defined developmental stages of the fruit in two seasons. Fruit firmness slowly decreases during fruit development, whereas the solid soluble content/titratable acidity ratio (SSC/TA) increases significantly in the final stages of development. The measurement of low respiration rates and low ethylene production during growth and ripening suggested that the arrayan berry should be classified as a non-climacteric fruit. Arrayan berries show a significant increase in their antioxidant capacity from small green to black ripe fruit. FRAP and TEAC assays showed high correlations with total polyphenolic content (TPC) during ripening and high antioxidant capacity at all fruit stages, showing greater values in ripe fruit (FRAP: 24 ± 2 and 28 ± 3 μM FeSO4/gFW; TEAC: 18 ± 2 and 20 ± 1 Eq. Trolox/gFW for each season, respectively) than those observed in the blueberry (FRAP: 10 ± 2 and 19 ± 3 μM FeSO4/gFW; TEAC: 10 ± 2 and 17 ± 3). In addition, bioactive assays using ripe fruit extracts show presence of flavonol and anthocyanins, a high ORAC value (62,500 ± 7000 μmol/gDW) and a concentration-dependent vascular protection under high glucose conditions. The results obtained show that these endemic berry fruits have a promising potential as functional food. PMID:26593612

  3. Phylogeography and genetic variation of Triatoma dimidiata, the main Chagas disease vector in Central America, and its position within the genus Triatoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Dolores Bargues

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Among Chagas disease triatomine vectors, the largest genus, Triatoma, includes species of high public health interest. Triatoma dimidiata, the main vector throughout Central America and up to Ecuador, presents extensive phenotypic, genotypic, and behavioral diversity in sylvatic, peridomestic and domestic habitats, and non-domiciliated populations acting as reinfestation sources. DNA sequence analyses, phylogenetic reconstruction methods, and genetic variation approaches are combined to investigate the haplotype profiling, genetic polymorphism, phylogeography, and evolutionary trends of T. dimidiata and its closest relatives within Triatoma. This is the largest interpopulational analysis performed on a triatomine species so far. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: Triatomines from Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Cuba, Colombia, Ecuador, and Brazil were used. Triatoma dimidiata populations follow different evolutionary divergences in which geographical isolation appears to have had an important influence. A southern Mexican-northern Guatemalan ancestral form gave rise to two main clades. One clade remained confined to the Yucatan peninsula and northern parts of Chiapas State, Guatemala, and Honduras, with extant descendants deserving specific status. Within the second clade, extant subspecies diversity was shaped by adaptive radiation derived from Guatemalan ancestral populations. Central American populations correspond to subspecies T. d. dimidiata. A southern spread into Panama and Colombia gave the T. d. capitata forms, and a northwestern spread rising from Guatemala into Mexico gave the T. d. maculipennis forms. Triatoma hegneri appears as a subspecific insular form. CONCLUSIONS: The comparison with very numerous Triatoma species allows us to reach highly supported conclusions not only about T. dimidiata, but also on different, important Triatoma species groupings and their evolution. The very large intraspecific genetic

  4. Characterizing and prototyping genetic networks with cell-free transcription-translation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Melissa K; Hayes, Clarmyra A; Chappell, James; Sun, Zachary Z; Murray, Richard M; Noireaux, Vincent; Lucks, Julius B

    2015-09-15

    A central goal of synthetic biology is to engineer cellular behavior by engineering synthetic gene networks for a variety of biotechnology and medical applications. The process of engineering gene networks often involves an iterative 'design-build-test' cycle, whereby the parts and connections that make up the network are built, characterized and varied until the desired network function is reached. Many advances have been made in the design and build portions of this cycle. However, the slow process of in vivo characterization of network function often limits the timescale of the testing step. Cell-free transcription-translation (TX-TL) systems offer a simple and fast alternative to performing these characterizations in cells. Here we provide an overview of a cell-free TX-TL system that utilizes the native Escherichia coli TX-TL machinery, thereby allowing a large repertoire of parts and networks to be characterized. As a way to demonstrate the utility of cell-free TX-TL, we illustrate the characterization of two genetic networks: an RNA transcriptional cascade and a protein regulated incoherent feed-forward loop. We also provide guidelines for designing TX-TL experiments to characterize new genetic networks. We end with a discussion of current and emerging applications of cell free systems.

  5. Characterization of new microsatellite loci for population genetic studies in the Smooth Cauliflower Coral (Stylophora sp.)

    KAUST Repository

    Banguera-Hinestroza, E.

    2013-01-09

    A total of one hundred microsatellites loci were selected from the draft genome of Stylophora pistillata and evaluated in previously characterized samples of Stylophora cf pistillata from the Red Sea. 17 loci were amplified successfully and tested in 24 individuals from samples belonging to a single population from the central region of the Red Sea. The number of alleles ranged from 3 to 15 alleles per locus, while observed heterozygosity ranged from 0. 292 to 0. 95. Six of these loci showed significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) expectations, and 4/136 paired loci comparisons suggested linkage disequilibrium after Bonferroni corrections. After excluding loci with significant HWE deviation and evidence of null alleles, average genetic diversity over loci in the population studied (N = 24, Nloci = 11) was 0. 701 ± 0. 380. This indicates that these loci can be used effectively to evaluate genetic diversity and undertake population genetics studies in Stylophora sp. populations. 2013 The Author(s).

  6. Genetic characterization of Trichomonas vaginalis isolates by use of multilocus sequence typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Denise C; Robinson, D Ashley; Muzny, Christina A; Mena, Leandro A; Aanensen, David M; Lushbaugh, William B; Meade, John C

    2012-10-01

    In this study, we introduce a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme, comprised of seven single-copy housekeeping genes, to genetically characterize Trichomonas vaginalis. Sixty-eight historical and recent isolates of T. vaginalis were sampled from the American Type Culture Collection and female patients at area health care facilities, respectively, to assess the usefulness of this typing method. Forty-three polymorphic nucleotide sites, 51 different alleles, and 60 sequence types were distinguished among the 68 isolates, revealing a diverse T. vaginalis population. Moreover, this discriminatory MLST scheme retains the ability to identify epidemiologically linked isolates such as those collected from sexual partners. Population genetic and phylogenetic analyses determined that T. vaginalis population structure is strongly influenced by recombination and is composed of two separate populations that may be nonclonal. MLST is useful for investigating the epidemiology, genetic diversity, and population structure of T. vaginalis. PMID:22855512

  7. Global and local genetic diversity at two microsatellite loci in Plasmodium vivax parasites from Asia, Africa and South America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Mette L; Ranjitkar, Samir; Rajakaruna, Rupika S;

    2014-01-01

    diversity are vital to the evaluation of drug and vaccine efficacy, tracking of P. vivax outbreaks, and assessing geographical differentiation between parasite populations. METHODS: The genetic diversity of eight P. vivax populations (n = 543) was investigated by using two microsatellites (MS), m1501 and m......3502, chosen because of their seven and eight base-pair (bp) repeat lengths, respectively. These were compared with published data of the same loci from six other P. vivax populations. RESULTS: In total, 1,440 P. vivax samples from 14 countries on three continents were compared. There was highest...

  8. Genetic characterization of Italian field strains of Schmallenberg virus based on N and NSs genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Francesca; Cosseddu, Gian Mario; Polci, Andrea; Iapaolo, Federica; Pinoni, Chiara; Capobianco Dondona, Andrea; Valleriani, Fabrizia; Monaco, Federica

    2016-08-01

    Following its first identification in Germany in 2011, the Schmallenberg virus (SBV) has rapidly spread to many other European countries. Despite the wide dissemination, the molecular characterization of the circulating strains is limited to German, Belgian, Dutch, and Swiss viruses. To fill this gap, partial genetic characterization of 15 Italian field strains was performed, based on S segment genes. Samples were collected in 2012 in two different regions where outbreaks occurred during distinct epidemic seasons. The comparative sequence analysis demonstrated a high molecular stability of the circulating viruses; nevertheless, we identified several variants of the N and NSs proteins not described in other SBV isolates circulating in Europe. PMID:27059241

  9. Genetic characterization of atypical Mansonella (Mansonella) ozzardi microfilariae in human blood samples from northeastern Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Luis A; Arrospide, Nancy; Recuenco, Sergio; Cabezas, Cesar; Weil, Gary J; Fischer, Peter U

    2012-09-01

    DNA sequence comparisons are useful for characterizing proposed new parasite species or strains. Microfilariae with an atypical arrangement of nuclei behind the cephalic space have been recently described in human blood samples from the Amazon region of Peru. Three blood specimens containing atypical microfilariae were genetically characterized using three DNA markers (5S ribosomal DNA, 12S ribosomal DNA, and cytochrome oxidase I). All atypical microfilariae were clustered into the Mansonella group and indistinguishable from M. ozzardi based on these DNA markers. PMID:22826497

  10. Genetic characterization of broodstock brown trout from Bled fish-farm, Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Marić, Saša; Simonović, Predrag; Razpet, Andrej

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Due to environmental and economic concerns, Bled fish-farm is interested in establishing broodstocks of native brown trout (Salmo trutta L.). Progeny would be reared and released into rivers managed by the Fishing Club Bled. In this study was performed genetic characterization of broodstock from Bled fish-farm in order to assess hybridization of native brown trout of Danubian phylogeographic lineage with trout of the allochtonous Atlantic lineage. Material and Meth...

  11. Genetic Characterization of Escherichia coli Populations from Host Sources of Fecal Pollution by Using DNA Fingerprinting†

    OpenAIRE

    McLellan, Sandra L; Daniels, Annette D.; Salmore, Alissa K.

    2003-01-01

    Escherichia coli isolates were obtained from common host sources of fecal pollution and characterized by using repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) PCR fingerprinting. The genetic relationship of strains within each host group was assessed as was the relationship of strains among different host groups. Multiple isolates from a single host animal (gull, human, or dog) were found to be identical; however, in some of the animals, additional strains occurred at a lower frequency. REP PCR finge...

  12. Fine-mapping of breast cancer susceptibility loci characterizes genetic risk in African Americans

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Fang; Chen, Gary K.; Millikan, Robert C.; John, Esther M; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Bernstein, Leslie; Zheng, Wei; Jennifer J Hu; Ziegler, Regina G.; Deming, Sandra L.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Nyante, Sarah; Palmer, Julie R.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Sue A Ingles

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed 19 common genetic variants that are associated with breast cancer risk. Testing of the index signals found through GWAS and fine-mapping of each locus in diverse populations will be necessary for characterizing the role of these risk regions in contributing to inherited susceptibility. In this large study of breast cancer in African-American women (3016 cases and 2745 controls), we tested the 19 known risk variants identified by GWAS and re...

  13. Genetic characterization of natural populations of pineapple guava (Acca sellowiana, with heterologous microsatellites markers

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    Karine Louise dos Santos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Pineapple guava (Acca sellowiana is a native species from south Brazil and northeast Uruguay, and due to the unique flavor of its fruits, it is an income-generating alternative to small farmers. Knowledge on genetic diversity is an important tool for genetic improvement and conservation. Aiming to increase the knowledge with regarde to the species genetic diversity, fi ve natural populations of A. sellowiana were analyzed through microsatellites markers developed from Eucalyptus grandis W. Hill ex Maiden x E. urophylla S.T. Blake complex. Using 10 pairs of selected markers, 122 plants were characterized. The mean values for expected and observed heterozigosity were 0.42 and 0.47, respectively. The fˆ estimates did not differ from zero to four out of the five populations evaluated, suggesting a small inbreeding effect. In addition, private alleles and high genetic divergence was observed. the average genetic divergence among the populations was st Fˆ = 0,13 e st Rˆ = 0,14, mostly due to the incidenceof rare or exclusive alleles among some populations.

  14. Genetic Characterization of Green Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Accessions from Turkey with SCAR and SSR Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madakbaş, Seher Yıldız; Sarıkamış, Gölge; Başak, Hakan; Karadavut, Ufuk; Özmen, Canan Yüksel; Daşçı, Mete Gürhan; Çayan, Selin

    2016-08-01

    Characterization, conservation, and utilization of genetic resources is essential for the sustainability in agriculture. Plant genetic resources are important for breeding efforts designed for the generation of new cultivars or for the improvement of existing ones. Green bean has been cultivated extensively in Turkey giving rise to local accessions through selection over time and adaptation to various environmental conditions. The objective of the present study was to determine the genetic relationships of green bean accessions collected from Kırşehir Province of Turkey, located at the central Anatolia. Within a population of 275 green bean accessions, 50 accessions were selected on the basis of morphological observations for further evaluation with SSR and STS/SCAR markers together with 4 reference cultivars of Andean and Mesoamerican origin. SSR markers selected on the basis of high polymorphism information content revealed the genetic relatedness of selected green bean accessions. STS/SCAR markers associated with bean anthracnose, common bacterial blight, white mold, halo blight, and phaseolin protein demonstrated the inheritance of resistance traits of local accessions at the selected loci. These findings may help better utilize genetic resources and furthermore are expected to facilitate forthcoming breeding studies for the generation of novel cultivars well adapted to the region. PMID:27156082

  15. Characterization of the genetic diversity, structure and admixture of British chicken breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, S; Wiener, P; Teverson, D; Haley, C S; Hocking, P M

    2012-10-01

    The characterization of livestock genetic diversity can inform breed conservation initiatives. The genetic diversity and genetic structure were assessed in 685 individual genotypes sampled from 24 British chicken breeds. A total of 239 alleles were found across 30 microsatellite loci with a mean number of 7.97 alleles per locus. The breeds were highly differentiated, with an average F(ST) of 0.25, similar to that of European chicken breeds. The genetic diversity in British chicken breeds was comparable to that found in European chicken breeds, with an average number of alleles per locus of 3.59, ranging from 2.00 in Spanish to 4.40 in Maran, and an average expected heterozygosity of 0.49, ranging from 0.20 in Spanish to 0.62 in Araucana. However, the majority of breeds were not in Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium, as indicated by heterozygote deficiency in the majority of breeds (average F(IS) of 0.20), with an average observed heterozygote frequency of 0.39, ranging from 0.15 in Spanish to 0.49 in Cochin. Individual-based clustering analyses revealed that most individuals clustered to breed origin. However, genetic subdivisions occurred in several breeds, and this was predominantly associated with flock supplier and occasionally by morphological type. The deficit of heterozygotes was likely owing to a Wahlund effect caused by sampling from different flocks, implying structure within breeds. It is proposed that gene flow amongst flocks within breeds should be enhanced to maintain the current levels of genetic diversity. Additionally, certain breeds had low levels of both genetic diversity and uniqueness. Consideration is required for the conservation and preservation of these potentially vulnerable breeds. PMID:22497565

  16. Agronomic Evaluation and Genetic Characterization of Different Accessions in Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Bacchi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Lentil is an important winter-sown legume for semi-arid and temperate areas, food consumption of seed is considerable in several countries of Mediterranean Basin. In Central and Southern Italy different lentil landraces are cultivated within specific marginal areas and commercialized with a recognizable geographical indication of origin. Considering the extensive germplasm and the economic importance of lentil in several rural areas, detailed knowledge of existing genetic variation from different regions is the first important step both for conservation and exploitation of genetic resources, allowing to develop breeding programs. In field experiments over three cropping seasons (2002-2005, 25 lentil accessions from Plant Genetic Institute of National Research Council (Bari, representing part of a large germplasm collection from different areas, were carried out at the University of Reggio Calabria in order to characterize the agronomic performances in a semi-arid environment and to study genetic variability. For this purpose, 10 AFLP primer combinations and 6 SSR markers were used. The agronomic results highlighted the influence of different climatic conditions on phenological, biometrical and yielding traits. A considerable production level of lentil (2,55 t ha-1 and a low yield variability in the three years was observed, showing the high adaptability of the germplasm tested to semi-arid environment. The earliness and the plant height appeared as the most important traits negatively correlated to grain yield; in particular the earliness was confirmed as suitable mechanism of escape from abiotic stress. Genetic characterization showed that a few number of microsatellites and primer combinations are able to provide significant insights on genetic diversity combining the 25 accessions in 3 large clusters that mainly mirror their geographic origin. Principal Component Analysis that consider genetic as well as morphological and agronomic data

  17. Continental-scale assessment of genetic diversity and population structure in quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides)

    OpenAIRE

    Callahan, Colin M.; Rowe, Carol A.; Ryel, Ronald J.; Shaw, John D.; Madritch, Michael D.; Mock, Karen E.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) has the largest natural distribution of any tree native to North America. The primary objectives of this study were to characterize range-wide genetic diversity and genetic structuring in quaking aspen, and to assess the influence of glacial history and rear-edge dynamics. Location: North America. Methods: Using a sample set representing the full longitudinal and latitudinal extent of the species’ distribution, we examined geographical patterns o...

  18. Characterization of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor genetics and comprehensive genotyping by pyrosequencing in rhesus macaques

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    Parham Peter

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs play a critical role in governing the immune response to neoplastic and infectious disease. Rhesus macaques serve as important animal models for many human diseases in which KIRs are implicated; however, the study of KIR activity in this model is hindered by incomplete characterization of KIR genetics. Results Here we present a characterization of KIR genetics in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta. We conducted a survey of KIRs in this species, identifying 47 novel full-length KIR sequences. Using this expanded sequence library to build upon previous work, we present evidence supporting the existence of 22 Mamu-KIR genes, providing a framework within which to describe macaque KIRs. We also developed a novel pyrosequencing-based technique for KIR genotyping. This method provides both comprehensive KIR genotype and frequency estimates of transcript level, with implications for the study of KIRs in all species. Conclusions The results of this study significantly improve our understanding of macaque KIR genetic organization and diversity, with implications for the study of many human diseases that use macaques as a model. The ability to obtain comprehensive KIR genotypes is of basic importance for the study of KIRs, and can easily be adapted to other species. Together these findings both advance the field of macaque KIRs and facilitate future research into the role of KIRs in human disease.

  19. PRELIMINARY RESEARCHES REGARDING THE GENETIC AND MORPHOMETRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF HONEYBEES (A. MELLIFERA L. FROM ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELIZA CAUIA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The international investigations regarding the honeybees’ diversity carried out until now have revealed a certain degree of genetic pollution in different countries from Europe, because of the import of more productive honeybees’ races or of some interracial honeybees’ hybrids. This fact might have a negative impact on the success adaptability of honeybees at the ecosystem. Although, the Romanian honeybees (Apis mellifera carpathica are well adapted to the local conditions and express a good resistance to diseases, the introgression (genetic pollution of different honeybees’ races could be an imminent event. So that, starting from 2007, by a cooperation between the Institute for Beekeeping Research and Development from Bucharest and the Institute of Genetics of the University of Bucharest, we have initiated different investigations in order to obtain a more accurate state of the Romanian honeybees’ diversity. We have performed specific molecular analyses, using mtDNA (the COI-COII test extracted from 32 different honeybees samples collected from several regions from Romania. For a better and detailed characterization of the collected honeybee’s samples we have also carried out some morphometric measurements of their wings. Our data have shown that the Romanian population of honeybees is almost homogenous from the genetic and the morphometric points of views. These types of investigations represent a premiere for Romania.

  20. Genetic Characterization and Comparative Genome Analysis of Brucella melitensis Isolates from India

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    Sarwar Azam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is the most frequent zoonotic disease worldwide, with over 500,000 new human infections every year. Brucella melitensis, the most virulent species in humans, primarily affects goats and the zoonotic transmission occurs by ingestion of unpasteurized milk products or through direct contact with fetal tissues. Brucellosis is endemic in India but no information is available on population structure and genetic diversity of Brucella spp. in India. We performed multilocus sequence typing of four B. melitensis strains isolated from naturally infected goats from India. For more detailed genetic characterization, we carried out whole genome sequencing and comparative genome analysis of one of the B. melitensis isolates, Bm IND1. Genome analysis identified 141 unique SNPs, 78 VNTRs, 51 Indels, and 2 putative prophage integrations in the Bm IND1 genome. Our data may help to develop improved epidemiological typing tools and efficient preventive strategies to control brucellosis.

  1. Morphological characterization and assessment of genetic diversity in minicore collection of pigeonpea [Cajanus Cajan (L. Millsp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muniswamy, S., Lokesha, R. *, Dharmaraj, P.S., Yamanura1 and Diwan, J.R.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was undertaken to ascertain the extent of genetic diversity present among 196 pigeon pea genotypes using D2 statistic. A wider genetic diversity was observed for nine characters as evidenced by formation of 13 clusters. Number of pods per plant contributed most (59.83% towards divergence, followed by plant height ( 21.55 The highest inter cluster distance was observed between the cluster XIII and VII, followed by cluster V and XIII, II and XIII and cluster XII and VII, which indicates that the crosses among the genotypes between these clusters may result in better segregants and high heterotic combinations. Cluster mean analysis indicated that cluster V contains dwarf and early maturing genotypes and cluster XIII possess high yielding entries. Morphological characterization was also carried out for 15 traits can be used in varietal purification and seed production.

  2. Genetic Characterization and Comparative Genome Analysis of Brucella melitensis Isolates from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Sarwar; Rao, Sashi Bhushan; Jakka, Padmaja; NarasimhaRao, Veera; Bhargavi, Bindu; Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Radhakrishnan, Girish

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is the most frequent zoonotic disease worldwide, with over 500,000 new human infections every year. Brucella melitensis, the most virulent species in humans, primarily affects goats and the zoonotic transmission occurs by ingestion of unpasteurized milk products or through direct contact with fetal tissues. Brucellosis is endemic in India but no information is available on population structure and genetic diversity of Brucella spp. in India. We performed multilocus sequence typing of four B. melitensis strains isolated from naturally infected goats from India. For more detailed genetic characterization, we carried out whole genome sequencing and comparative genome analysis of one of the B. melitensis isolates, Bm IND1. Genome analysis identified 141 unique SNPs, 78 VNTRs, 51 Indels, and 2 putative prophage integrations in the Bm IND1 genome. Our data may help to develop improved epidemiological typing tools and efficient preventive strategies to control brucellosis. PMID:27525259

  3. Genetic characterization of Gaddi goat breed of Western Himalayas using microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurdeep Singh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In the present study, genetic characterization of Gaddi goat breed, a native to north temperate western Himalayan region of India, was carried out for the purpose of breed characterization and assessing existing intra-population genetic diversity. Materials and Methods: Totally, 75 blood samples procured at random from genetically unrelated animals of two sexes and different age groups and true to breed type were collected from different locations in the breeding tract of these goats in Himachal Pradesh, of which only 51 samples with desired quantity and quality were subjected to further processing for DNA isolation. The multi-locus genotype data were generated on 51 Gaddi goats sampled across different regions of the breeding tract in Himachal Pradesh using 15 FAO recommended goat specific microsatellite markers, which gave amplification and observed and effective number of alleles, gene frequency, observed and expected heterozygosity were estimated through PopGene software (1.3.1. Results: A total of 135 distinct alleles were observed with mean observed and effective number of alleles as 9.0000±0.82 and 6.5874±0.56 respectively across all 15 studied loci. The maximum (15 alleles were contributed by loci DRBP1 and P19/DYA and the least (5 by SRCRSP5. The mean heterozygosity was observed to be 0.8347±0.01 ranging from 0.7584 (SRCRSP5 to 0.9156 (P19-DYA across all loci. The mean observed (HO and expected (HE heterozygosities across all loci were 0.7484±0.02 and 0.8431±0.01 respectively. The polymorphism information content (PIC value ranged from 0.7148 (SRCPS5 to 0.909 (P19-DYA with mean PIC of 0.8105±0.01 in the present study. The average heterozygosity was observed to be 0.8347±0.01 ranging from 0.7584 (SRCRSP5 to 0.9156 P19 (DYA across all loci. Conclusion: Microsatellite analysis revealed high level of polymorphism across studied microsatellite markers and informativeness of the markers for genetic diversity analysis studies in

  4. Genetic and environmental characterization of Abies alba Mill. populations at its western rear edge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sancho-Knapik, D.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The genetic structure of ten Abies alba populations at the western rear edge in the Spanish Pyrenees was characterized and compared with two German populations, looking for the role of climatic factors in the fir decline. Growth, defoliation, aridity and cumulative summer water deficit summer were also characterized. Spanish populations show a lower genetic diversity and a high genetic differentiation than German ones, mainly established by an East (higher diversity-West (lower diversity gradient. The three defoliated populations are the western ones, with higher summer aridity. Contrastingly, the southern population (Guara shows climatic variables close to western sites but without defoliation and with a higher genetic diversity, indicating a possible adaptation to the sub-Mediterranean conditions. Silver fir in the Spanish Pyrenees constitutes a “stable” rear edge because of their isolation, small sized and small genetic diversity. Western Pyrenean sites subjected to dryer conditions and presenting lower genetic diversity are prone to drought-induced mortality in the context of global warming.Se ha caracterizado la estructura genética de diez poblaciones de Abies alba en la retaguardia occidental de su distribución en el Pirineo español en comparación con dos poblaciones de Alemania, buscando la influencia de factores climáticos en el decaimiento del abeto. También se caracterizó crecimiento, defoliación, aridez y déficit acumulado de agua durante el verano. Las poblaciones españolas mostraron una menor diversidad genética y una mayor diferenciación genética que las poblaciones alemanas, establecida principalmente a través de un eje Este (mayor diversidad-Oeste (menor diversidad. Las tres poblaciones con defoliación son las del suroeste, con mayor aridez estival. Por el contrario, la población más meridional (Guara muestra variables climáticas cercanas a estas poblaciones del suroeste pero sin defoliación y con mayor

  5. Development and characterization of highly polymorphic long TC repeat microsatellite markers for genetic analysis of peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macedo Selma E

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. is a crop of economic and social importance, mainly in tropical areas, and developing countries. Its molecular breeding has been hindered by a shortage of polymorphic genetic markers due to a very narrow genetic base. Microsatellites (SSRs are markers of choice in peanut because they are co-dominant, highly transferrable between species and easily applicable in the allotetraploid genome. In spite of substantial effort over the last few years by a number of research groups, the number of SSRs that are polymorphic for A. hypogaea is still limiting for routine application, creating the demand for the discovery of more markers polymorphic within cultivated germplasm. Findings A plasmid genomic library enriched for TC/AG repeats was constructed and 1401 clones sequenced. From the sequences obtained 146 primer pairs flanking mostly TC microsatellites were developed. The average number of repeat motifs amplified was 23. These 146 markers were characterized on 22 genotypes of cultivated peanut. In total 78 of the markers were polymorphic within cultivated germplasm. Most of those 78 markers were highly informative with an average of 5.4 alleles per locus being amplified. Average gene diversity index (GD was 0.6, and 66 markers showed a GD of more than 0.5. Genetic relationship analysis was performed and corroborated the current taxonomical classification of A. hypogaea subspecies and varieties. Conclusions The microsatellite markers described here are a useful resource for genetics and genomics in Arachis. In particular, the 66 markers that are highly polymorphic in cultivated peanut are a significant step towards routine genetic mapping and marker-assisted selection for the crop.

  6. Preliminary investigation of genetic characterization of native and endemic fowl types of Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Red Jungle Fowl (Gallus gallus) is generally considered to be main ancestor of the domestic fowl (Callus domesticus). However, it is also believed that other wild Callus species might have contributed to the modern genetic make-up of the domestic fowl, one wild species being the Ceylon Jungle Fowl (Gallus lafayetti), endemic to Sri Lanka, which could have contributed to the domestic stock of Sri Lankan native poultry. The present study was conducted in order to investigate the origin of native fowl in Sri Lanka and to establish genetic relationships among them and the Ceylon Jungle Fowl. Morphological characters of endemic, indigenous and exotic fowl types were recorded. These included Ceylon Jungle fowl; eleven types of native chicken from Sri Lanka; and two exotic chicken breeds (Cornish and Rhode Island Red). Blood samples were collected for DNA extraction. Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was carried out using sixteen non-specific primers. The results of morphological characterization revealed many variations in plumage and colour pattern. Single and pea comb types were found in both native and exotic types of chicken. A prominent yellow colour marking on a red comb was a unique feature in Ceylon Jungle fowl. The presence of white spots in red earlobes was a distinguishing feature of all native chicken types. Sixteen non-specific primers were used in the study, and produced 22 polymorphic bands ranging from 500 to 1960 bp. Genetic similarity indices ranged from 0.5 to 1.1 in average genetic distance scale, indicating a broad genetic base in the samples studied. Cluster analysis revealed a clear separation of Ceylon Jungle Fowl from all other types studied, indicating that contribution in data analysis, and the Director and staff, National Zoological Gardens, Sri Lanka, for their help in sampling Ceylon Jungle Fowl. (author)

  7. Preparation and characterization of morph-genetic aluminum nitride/carbon composites from filter paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morph-genetic aluminum nitride/carbon composites with cablelike structure were prepared from filter paper template through the surface sol-gel process and carbothermal nitridation reaction. The resulting materials have a hierarchical structure originating from the morphology of cellulose paper. The aluminum nitride/carbon composites have the core-shell microstructure, the core is graphitic carbon, and the shell is aluminum nitride nanocoating formed by carbothermal nitridation reduction of alumina with the interfacial carbon in nitrogen atmosphere. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscope were employed to characterize the structural morphology and phase compositions of the final products

  8. Detection and genetic characterization of a novel parvovirus distantly related to human bufavirus in domestic pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargitai, Renáta; Pankovics, Péter; Kertész, Attila Mihály; Bíró, Hunor; Boros, Ákos; Phan, Tung Gia; Delwart, Eric; Reuter, Gábor

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a novel parvovirus (strain swine/Zsana3/2013/HUN, KT965075) was detected in domestic pigs and genetically characterized by viral metagenomics and PCR methods. The novel parvovirus was distantly related to the human bufaviruses and was detected in 19 (90.5 %) of the 21 and five (33.3 %) of the 15 faecal samples collected from animals with and without cases of posterior paraplegia of unknown etiology from five affected farms and one control farm in Hungary, respectively. Swine/Zsana3/2013/HUN is highly prevalent in domestic pigs and potentially represents a novel parvovirus species in the subfamily Parvovirinae.

  9. Complete genetic characterization of a Brazilian dengue virus type 3 strain isolated from a fatal outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marize Pereira Miagostovich

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available We have determined the complete nucleotide and the deduced amino acid sequences of Brazilian dengue virus type 3 (DENV-3 from a dengue case with fatal outcome, which occurred during an epidemic in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 2002. This constitutes the first complete genetic characterization of a Brazilian DENV-3 strain since its introduction into the country in 2001. DENV-3 was responsible for the most severe dengue epidemic in the state, based on the highest number of reported cases and on the severity of clinical manifestations and deaths reported.

  10. Phenotypic, genetic and molecular characterization of a maize low phytic acid mutant (lpa241)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilu, R.; Panzeri, D.; Gavazzi, G.;

    2003-01-01

    of potassium and magnesium, although phytates contain other mineral cations such as iron and zinc. During germination, phytates are broken down by the action of phytases, releasing their P, minerals and myo-inositol which become available to the growing seedling. Phytic acid represents an anti...... 90% reduction of phytic acid and about a tenfold increase in seed-free phosphate content. Although germination rate was decreased by about 30% compared to wild-type, developement of mutant plants was apparentely unaffected. The results of the genetic, biochemical and molecular characterization...

  11. TRANSLATING ECOLOGY, PHYSIOLOGY, BIOCHEMISTRY, AND POPULATION GENETICS RESEARCH TO MEET THE CHALLENGE OF TICK AND TICK-BORNE DISEASES IN NORTH AMERICA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve-Gassent, Maria D; Castro-Arellano, Ivan; Feria-Arroyo, Teresa P; Patino, Ramiro; Li, Andrew Y; Medina, Raul F; de León, Adalberto A Pérez; Rodríguez-Vivas, Roger Iván

    2016-05-01

    Emerging and re-emerging tick-borne diseases threaten public health and the wellbeing of domestic animals and wildlife globally. The adoption of an evolutionary ecology framework aimed to diminish the impact of tick-borne diseases needs to be part of strategies to protect human and animal populations. We present a review of current knowledge on the adaptation of ticks to their environment, and the impact that global change could have on their geographic distribution in North America. Environmental pressures will affect tick population genetics by selecting genotypes able to withstand new and changing environments and by altering the connectivity and isolation of several tick populations. Research in these areas is particularly lacking in the southern United States and most of Mexico with knowledge gaps on the ecology of these diseases, including a void in the identity of reservoir hosts for several tick-borne pathogens. Additionally, the way in which anthropogenic changes to landscapes may influence tick-borne disease ecology remains to be fully understood. Enhanced knowledge in these areas is needed in order to implement effective and sustainable integrated tick management strategies. We propose to refocus ecology studies with emphasis on metacommunity-based approaches to enable a holistic perspective addressing whole pathogen and host assemblages. Network analyses could be used to develop mechanistic models involving multihost-pathogen communities. An increase in our understanding of the ecology of tick-borne diseases across their geographic distribution will aid in the design of effective area-wide tick control strategies aimed to diminish the burden of pathogens transmitted by ticks. PMID:27062414

  12. In vitro characterization of genetically expressed absorbing proteins using photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Jan; Jathoul, Amit; Pule, Martin; Beard, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Genetically expressed fluorescent proteins have been shown to provide photoacoustic contrast. However, they can be limited by low photoacoustic generation efficiency and low optical absorption at red and near infrared wavelengths, thus limiting their usefulness in mammalian small animal models. In addition, many fluorescent proteins exhibit low photostability due to photobleaching and transient absorption effects. In this study, we explore these issues by synthesizing and characterizing a range of commonly used fluorescent proteins (dsRed, mCherry, mNeptune, mRaspberry, AQ143, E2 Crimson) and novel non-fluorescent chromoproteins (aeCP597 and cjBlue and a non-fluorescent mutant of E2 Crimson). The photoacoustic spectra, photoacoustic generation efficiency and photostability of each fluorescent protein and chromoprotein were measured. Compared to the fluorescent proteins, the chromoproteins were found to exhibit higher photoacoustic generation efficiency due to the absence of radiative relaxation and ground state depopulation, and significantly higher photostability. The feasibility of converting an existing fluorescent protein into a non-fluorescent chromoprotein via mutagenesis was also demonstrated. The chromoprotein mutant exhibited greater photoacoustic signal generation efficiency and better agreement between the photoacoustic and the specific extinction coefficient spectra than the original fluorescent protein. Lastly, the genetic expression of a chromoprotein in mammalian cells was demonstrated. This study suggests that chromoproteins may have potential for providing genetically encoded photoacoustic contrast.

  13. Characterization and genetic diversity of pepper (Capsicum spp) parents and interspecific hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, M P S D; do Rêgo, M M; da Silva, A P G; do Rêgo, E R; Barroso, P A

    2016-01-01

    Pepper species exhibit broad genetic diversity, which enables their use in breeding programs. The objective of this study was to characterize the diversity between the parents of different species and their interspecific hybrids using morphological and molecular markers. The parents of Capsicum annuum (UFPB-01 and -137), C. baccatum (UFPB-72), and C. chinense (UFPB-128) and their interspecific hybrids (01x128, 72x128, and 137x128) were used for morphological and molecular characterization. Fruit length and seed yield per fruit (SYF) traits showed the highest variability, and three groups were formed based on these data. CVg/CVe ratio values (>1.0) were calculated for leaf length (1.67) and SYF (5.34). The trait that most contributed to divergence was the largest fruit diameter (26.42%), and the trait that least contributed was pericarp thickness (0.33%), which was subject to being discarded. The 17 primers produced 58 polymorphic bands that enabled the estimation of genetic diversity between parents and hybrids, and these results confirmed the results of the morphological data analyses. The principal component analysis results also corroborated the morphological and random-amplified polymorphic DNA data, and three groups that contained the same individuals were identified. These results confirmed reports in the literature regarding the phylogenetic relationships of the species used as parents, which demonstrated that C. annuum was closer to C. chinense as compared to C. baccatum. PMID:27173311

  14. Morphological characterization and reproductive aspects in genetic variability studies of forage peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Marilda Augusta Peres

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphological characterization and the study of reproductive behavior are important procedures to identify desirable traits of progenitors to be included in breeding programs. Morphological descriptors and the reproductive behavior of parental accessions of the legumes Arachis pintoi Krapov & W.C.Gregory and A. repens Handro were analyzed looking for the probable causes of seed production variability. Morphological and reproductive characterization were used for the estimation of the genetic variability of five A. pintoi and two A. repens accessions, with crosses being conducted in a greenhouse. Parents and hybrids have shown high pollen stainability, regular meiosis (2n=20, and presented distinctive reproductive behaviors: A. pintoi accessions GK 12787, V 13468 and V 6791-wf are prolific seed producers, while A. pintoi V 13167, V 13338 and A. repens Nc 1579 and Nc 1578, rarely produce seeds. Intraspecific crosses generated fertile F1 and F2 hybrids from five combinations. Interspecific crosses produced sterile F1 hybrids. Stigma morphology and distinct mode of reproduction present among accessions suggest possible barriers for seed production in some cross-combinations. Euclidian distance range between parents was 0.20 to 5.52. Accessions GK 12787 and Nc 1579 presented the maximum distance: 5.52, and V 13468 and Nc 1579 the minimum distance: 0.20. The Euclidian distance was considered an adequate methodology to study genetic diversity of parental accessions.

  15. Characterization of type and genetic diversity among soybean cyst nematode differentiators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éder Matsuo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines Ichinohe, resistant genotypes with high yields has been one of the objectives of soybean (Glycine max (L. Merrill breeding programs. The objective of this study was to characterize the pathotype of soybean cyst nematodes and analyze the genetic diversity of ten differentiator lines ('Lee 74', Peking, Pickett, PI 88788, PI 90763, PI 437654, PI 209332, PI 89772, PI 548316 and 'Hartwig'. Inoculum was obtained from plants cultivated in field soil in Viçosa, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Thirty-four days after inoculating each plant with 4,000 eggs, the number of females, female index, total number of eggs, number of eggs per female, reproduction factor, plant height, number of nodes, fresh and dry matter weights were assessed. The differential lines were first grouped with Scott-Knott test. Subsequently, the genetic diversity was evaluated using dendrograms, graphic analysis and the Tocher grouping method. The inoculum of H. glycines obtained from NBSGBP-UFV was characterized as HG Type 0. The differentiating lines were divergent, and PI 89772, PI 437654, 'Hartwig' and 'Peking' had the greatest potential for use in breeding programs.

  16. Clinical and genetic characterization of pituitary gigantism: an international collaborative study in 208 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostomyan, Liliya; Daly, Adrian F; Petrossians, Patrick; Nachev, Emil; Lila, Anurag R; Lecoq, Anne-Lise; Lecumberri, Beatriz; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Salvatori, Roberto; Moraitis, Andreas G; Holdaway, Ian; Kranenburg-van Klaveren, Dianne J; Chiara Zatelli, Maria; Palacios, Nuria; Nozieres, Cecile; Zacharin, Margaret; Ebeling, Tapani; Ojaniemi, Marja; Rozhinskaya, Liudmila; Verrua, Elisa; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Filipponi, Silvia; Gusakova, Daria; Pronin, Vyacheslav; Bertherat, Jerome; Belaya, Zhanna; Ilovayskaya, Irena; Sahnoun-Fathallah, Mona; Sievers, Caroline; Stalla, Gunter K; Castermans, Emilie; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Sorkina, Ekaterina; Auriemma, Renata Simona; Mittal, Sachin; Kareva, Maria; Lysy, Philippe A; Emy, Philippe; De Menis, Ernesto; Choong, Catherine S; Mantovani, Giovanna; Bours, Vincent; De Herder, Wouter; Brue, Thierry; Barlier, Anne; Neggers, Sebastian J C M M; Zacharieva, Sabina; Chanson, Philippe; Shah, Nalini Samir; Stratakis, Constantine A; Naves, Luciana A; Beckers, Albert

    2015-10-01

    Despite being a classical growth disorder, pituitary gigantism has not been studied previously in a standardized way. We performed a retrospective, multicenter, international study to characterize a large series of pituitary gigantism patients. We included 208 patients (163 males; 78.4%) with growth hormone excess and a current/previous abnormal growth velocity for age or final height >2 s.d. above country normal means. The median onset of rapid growth was 13 years and occurred significantly earlier in females than in males; pituitary adenomas were diagnosed earlier in females than males (15.8 vs 21.5 years respectively). Adenomas were ≥10 mm (i.e., macroadenomas) in 84%, of which extrasellar extension occurred in 77% and invasion in 54%. GH/IGF1 control was achieved in 39% during long-term follow-up. Final height was greater in younger onset patients, with larger tumors and higher GH levels. Later disease control was associated with a greater difference from mid-parental height (r=0.23, P=0.02). AIP mutations occurred in 29%; microduplication at Xq26.3 - X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) - occurred in two familial isolated pituitary adenoma kindreds and in ten sporadic patients. Tumor size was not different in X-LAG, AIP mutated and genetically negative patient groups. AIP-mutated and X-LAG patients were significantly younger at onset and diagnosis, but disease control was worse in genetically negative cases. Pituitary gigantism patients are characterized by male predominance and large tumors that are difficult to control. Treatment delay increases final height and symptom burden. AIP mutations and X-LAG explain many cases, but no genetic etiology is seen in >50% of cases.

  17. Clinical and genetic characterization of pituitary gigantism: an international collaborative study in 208 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostomyan, Liliya; Daly, Adrian F; Petrossians, Patrick; Nachev, Emil; Lila, Anurag R; Lecoq, Anne-Lise; Lecumberri, Beatriz; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Salvatori, Roberto; Moraitis, Andreas G; Holdaway, Ian; Kranenburg-van Klaveren, Dianne J; Chiara Zatelli, Maria; Palacios, Nuria; Nozieres, Cecile; Zacharin, Margaret; Ebeling, Tapani; Ojaniemi, Marja; Rozhinskaya, Liudmila; Verrua, Elisa; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Filipponi, Silvia; Gusakova, Daria; Pronin, Vyacheslav; Bertherat, Jerome; Belaya, Zhanna; Ilovayskaya, Irena; Sahnoun-Fathallah, Mona; Sievers, Caroline; Stalla, Gunter K; Castermans, Emilie; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Sorkina, Ekaterina; Auriemma, Renata Simona; Mittal, Sachin; Kareva, Maria; Lysy, Philippe A; Emy, Philippe; De Menis, Ernesto; Choong, Catherine S; Mantovani, Giovanna; Bours, Vincent; De Herder, Wouter; Brue, Thierry; Barlier, Anne; Neggers, Sebastian J C M M; Zacharieva, Sabina; Chanson, Philippe; Shah, Nalini Samir; Stratakis, Constantine A; Naves, Luciana A; Beckers, Albert

    2015-10-01

    Despite being a classical growth disorder, pituitary gigantism has not been studied previously in a standardized way. We performed a retrospective, multicenter, international study to characterize a large series of pituitary gigantism patients. We included 208 patients (163 males; 78.4%) with growth hormone excess and a current/previous abnormal growth velocity for age or final height >2 s.d. above country normal means. The median onset of rapid growth was 13 years and occurred significantly earlier in females than in males; pituitary adenomas were diagnosed earlier in females than males (15.8 vs 21.5 years respectively). Adenomas were ≥10 mm (i.e., macroadenomas) in 84%, of which extrasellar extension occurred in 77% and invasion in 54%. GH/IGF1 control was achieved in 39% during long-term follow-up. Final height was greater in younger onset patients, with larger tumors and higher GH levels. Later disease control was associated with a greater difference from mid-parental height (r=0.23, P=0.02). AIP mutations occurred in 29%; microduplication at Xq26.3 - X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) - occurred in two familial isolated pituitary adenoma kindreds and in ten sporadic patients. Tumor size was not different in X-LAG, AIP mutated and genetically negative patient groups. AIP-mutated and X-LAG patients were significantly younger at onset and diagnosis, but disease control was worse in genetically negative cases. Pituitary gigantism patients are characterized by male predominance and large tumors that are difficult to control. Treatment delay increases final height and symptom burden. AIP mutations and X-LAG explain many cases, but no genetic etiology is seen in >50% of cases. PMID:26187128

  18. Characterization of genetic diversity of native 'Ancho' chili populations of Mexico using microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío Toledo-Aguilar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available 'Ancho' type chilis (Capsicum annuum L. var. annuum are an important ingredient in the traditional cuisine of Mexico and so are in high demand. It includes six native sub-types with morphological and fruit color differences. However, the genetic diversity of the set of these sub­types has not been determined. The objective of this study was to characterize the genetic diversity of native Mexican ancho chili populations using microsatellites and to determine the relationship among these populations. Twenty-four microsatellite loci were used to analyze 38 native populations of 'Ancho' chilis collected in seven states of Mexico; three populations different from the ancho type ('Piquin', 'Guajillo', and 'Chilaca' and three hybrids (Capulin, Abedul, and green pepper were included as controls. The number of alleles per locus, number and percentage of polymorphic loci, polymorphic information content (PIC, expected heterozygosity, and Wright F statistics were obtained. Moreover, an analysis of principal components and a cluster analysis were carried out. We detected 220 alleles, with an average of 9.2 alleles per locus; PIC varied between 0.07 and 1, and expected heterozygosity was between 0.36 and 0.59. Also we identified 59 unique alleles and eight alleles common to all of the populations. The F statistics revealed broad genetic differentiation among populations. Both the analysis of principal components and the cluster analysis were able to separate the populations by origin (southern, central, and northern Mexico. The broad genetic diversity detected in the native ancho chili populations of Mexico was found in greater proportion within the populations than between populations.

  19. Acceptance of a food of animal origin obtained through genetic modification and cloning in South America: a comparative study among university students and working adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta SCHNETTLER

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWith the aim of comparing the acceptance of milk obtained from cloned, genetically modified (GM and conventionally bred cows among working adults and university students, and identifying and characterizing typologies among both subsamples in terms of their preferences, a survey was applied to 400 people in southern Chile, distributed using a simple allocation among the subsamples. Using a conjoint analysis, it was found that consumers preferred milk from a conventional cow. Using a cluster analysis, in both subsamples two segments sensitive to production technology were identified. Rejection of cloning was greatest among university students, whereas a higher proportion of working adults rejected GM. The segments differed in terms of area of residence, knowledge about GM, and milk consumption habits. Contrary to what was expected, no differences were found according to education, gender or degree of satisfaction with food-related life.

  20. Genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii isolates from Portugal, Austria, and Israel reveals higher genetic variability within the type II lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study compared genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii isolates from Portugal, Austria and Israel. For this, we genotyped 90 T. gondii isolates (16 from Portugal, 67 from Austria and 7 from Israel) using 10 nested PCR-restriction length polymorphism (RFLP) genetic markers and 15 microsatellite (...

  1. Genetic characterization of theileria equi infecting horses in North America: evidence for a limited source of U.S. introductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theileria equi is a tick-borne Apicomplexan hemoparasite that causes equine piroplasmosis (EP). This parasite has a worldwide distribution, but until recent outbreaks the United States has been considered to be free of EP. Maximum parsimony analysis of 18S rRNA gene sequences of North American T. eq...

  2. Characterization of the active microbiotas associated with honey bees reveals healthier and broader communities when colonies are genetically diverse

    OpenAIRE

    Mattila, Heather R.; Daniela Rios; Walker-Sperling, Victoria E.; Guus Roeselers; Newton, Irene L.G.

    2012-01-01

    Recent losses of honey bee colonies have led to increased interest in the microbial communities that are associated with these important pollinators. A critical function that bacteria perform for their honey bee hosts, but one that is poorly understood, is the transformation of worker-collected pollen into bee bread, a nutritious food product that can be stored for long periods in colonies. We used 16S rRNA pyrosequencing to comprehensively characterize in genetically diverse and genetically ...

  3. Global Characterization of Genetic Variation by Using High-Throughput Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhan, Bujie

    Genetic variation, variation in alleles of genomes, occurs bith within and among populations and individuals. Genetic variation is important because it provides the "raw material" for evolution. Discovery of vatiants that determine phenotypes became a fundamental premise of genetic research...

  4. Distribution of Capnocytophaga canimorsus in dogs and cats with genetic characterization of isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Kaoru; Hatakeyama, Risa; Abe, Takuto; Takakura, Koh-ichi; Wada, Takayuki; Ogasawara, Jun; Sanada, Shu-ichi; Hase, Atsushi

    2014-06-25

    Capnocytophaga canimorsus, which is often found in the oral cavities of dogs and cats, is sometimes transmitted to humans, causing severe infection. To elucidate the risk of C. canimorsus in humans and animals, this study was undertaken to characterize this bacterium epidemiologically and genetically. We examined the distribution of C. canimorsus in dogs and cats, and analyzed the correlation between the presence of bacteria and individual factors statistically. We also compared C. canimorsus isolates genetically using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). C. canimorsus was detected in 76 of 109 dogs (69.7%) and 57 of 104 cats (54.8%). A relation between C. canimorsus presence and some individual factors was detected both in dogs and cats, but the predictive factors of carrying the bacterium differed between dogs and cats. 16S rRNA gene sequences from C. canimorsus isolates in this study were combined with previously published sequences to assess their intra-specific phylogeny. Results show that C. canimorsus is classifiable into two main groups (I and II) with differing γ-glutamyl aminopeptidase activity. Strains from human patients belonged unevenly to group I, possibility suggesting that group I can be transmitted to humans and group II is indigenous only to the oral cavities of dogs and cats. PFGE genotyping showed high discriminatory power, and the dendrogram accorded with genetic segregation between isolates of group I and II. Sma I-digest PFGE developed for this study is useful as a molecular typing method for additional epidemiological and phylogenetic studies of C. canimorsus. PMID:24745627

  5. Distribution of Capnocytophaga canimorsus in dogs and cats with genetic characterization of isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Kaoru; Hatakeyama, Risa; Abe, Takuto; Takakura, Koh-ichi; Wada, Takayuki; Ogasawara, Jun; Sanada, Shu-ichi; Hase, Atsushi

    2014-06-25

    Capnocytophaga canimorsus, which is often found in the oral cavities of dogs and cats, is sometimes transmitted to humans, causing severe infection. To elucidate the risk of C. canimorsus in humans and animals, this study was undertaken to characterize this bacterium epidemiologically and genetically. We examined the distribution of C. canimorsus in dogs and cats, and analyzed the correlation between the presence of bacteria and individual factors statistically. We also compared C. canimorsus isolates genetically using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). C. canimorsus was detected in 76 of 109 dogs (69.7%) and 57 of 104 cats (54.8%). A relation between C. canimorsus presence and some individual factors was detected both in dogs and cats, but the predictive factors of carrying the bacterium differed between dogs and cats. 16S rRNA gene sequences from C. canimorsus isolates in this study were combined with previously published sequences to assess their intra-specific phylogeny. Results show that C. canimorsus is classifiable into two main groups (I and II) with differing γ-glutamyl aminopeptidase activity. Strains from human patients belonged unevenly to group I, possibility suggesting that group I can be transmitted to humans and group II is indigenous only to the oral cavities of dogs and cats. PFGE genotyping showed high discriminatory power, and the dendrogram accorded with genetic segregation between isolates of group I and II. Sma I-digest PFGE developed for this study is useful as a molecular typing method for additional epidemiological and phylogenetic studies of C. canimorsus.

  6. Prevalence and genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii infection in bats in southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H H; Qin, S Y; Wang, W; He, B; Hu, T S; Wu, J M; Fan, Q S; Tu, C C; Liu, Q; Zhu, X Q

    2014-07-14

    Toxoplasma gondii can infect a wide variety of warm-blooded animals, including bats. Limited information on T. gondii infection in bats is available in China. The objective of the present study was to determine prevalence and genetic diversity of T. gondii infection in bats in southern China. A total of 608 bats representing 12 species, including 120 Aselliscus stoliczkanus, 59 Myotis chinensis, 11 Miniopterus schreibersii, 53 Rhinolophus affinis, 32 Rhinolophus pusillus, 81 Hipposideros armiger, 28 Hipposideros fulvus, 32 Cynopterus brachyotis, 14 Cynopterus sphinx, 45 Eonycteris spelaea, 109 Hipposideros larvatus, and 24 Taphozous melanopogon, were collected from Yunnan and Guangxi provinces, southern China. They were examined for the presence of T. gondii DNA by amplification of the B1 gene using a nested PCR, and the positive samples were genotyped at 11 genetic loci (SAG1, 5'- and 3'-SAG2, alternative SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1 and Apico) using multilocus polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technology. Fifty-nine (9.7%) of these bats were detected positive by PCR but only five of these positive DNA samples were completely typed at all loci; of which 4 samples, 2 from A. stoliczkanus, and 2 from H. larvatus, belonged to ToxoDB Genotype #10, and the other one from H. larvatus was identified as ToxoDB Genotype #9 (http://toxodb.org/toxo/). To our knowledge, this is the first report of molecular detection and genetic characterization of T. gondii infection in bats in China. The results show that these bats are potential reservoirs for T. gondii transmission, which may pose a threat to human health. PMID:24813744

  7. Genetics of Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Latin America Information For... Media Policy Makers Genetics of Hearing Loss Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... of hearing loss in babies is due to genetic causes. There are also a number of things ...

  8. Genetic characterization of measles viruses isolated in Turkey during 2000 and 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellini William J

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular epidemiologic studies have made significant contributions to measles surveillance activities by helping to identify source and transmission pathways of the virus. This report describes the genetic characterization of wild-type measles viruses isolated in Turkey in 2000 and 2001. Results Wild-type measles viruses were isolated from 24 cases from five provinces in Turkey during 2001. The viruses were analyzed using the standard genotyping protocols. All isolates were classified as genotype D6, the same genotype that was identified in Turkey in previous outbreaks during 1998. Conclusion Turkey has begun implementation of a national program to eliminate measles by 2010. Therefore, this baseline genotype data will provide a means to monitor the success of the elimination program.

  9. Oil Well Characterization and Artificial Gas Lift Optimization Using Neural Networks Combined with Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chukwuka G. Monyei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the characterization of six oil wells and the allocation of gas considering limited and unlimited case scenario. Artificial gas lift involves injecting high-pressured gas from the surface into the producing fluid column through one or more subsurface valves set at predetermined depths. This improves recovery by reducing the bottom-hole pressure at which wells become uneconomical and are thus abandoned. This paper presents a successive application of modified artificial neural network (MANN combined with a mild intrusive genetic algorithm (MIGA to the oil well characteristics with promising results. This method helps to prevent the overallocation of gas to wells for recovery purposes while also maximizing oil production by ensuring that computed allocation configuration ensures maximum economic accrual. Results obtained show marked improvements in the allocation especially in terms of economic returns.

  10. Genetic characterization of peste des petits ruminants virus, Turkey, 2009-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şevik, Murat; Sait, Ahmet

    2015-08-01

    Peste des petits ruminants is an endemic disease of small ruminants in Turkey and vaccination has been the method of control but sporadic outbreaks have been reported. This study was carried out to characterize the local peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) by sequencing fusion (F) protein and nucleoprotein (N) gene segments and phylogenetic analysis, so as to focus on genetic variation in the field viruses. Samples were collected from sheep and goats clinically suspected of having PPRV infection in Central and Mediterranean regions of Turkey during 2009-2013. Phylogenetic analysis based on the F gene sequences showed that the field isolates in the present study belong to lineage 4 with other Middle East isolates. While N gene sequences revealed a different pattern, the field isolates in the present study clustered with previous Turkish isolates, which probably represents the true picture of molecular epidemiology for PPRV. PMID:26022069

  11. Genetic characterization of measles viruses that circulated in Thailand from 1998 to 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattamadilok, Sirima; Incomserb, Patcha; Primsirikunawut, Athiwat; Lukebua, Atchariya; Rota, Paul A; Sawanpanyalert, Pathom

    2012-05-01

    During the period between 1998 and 2008, 48 representative measles viruses (MeVs) circulating in Thailand were subjected to genetic characterization. Three genotypes, G2, D5, and D9 were detected. The results suggested that measles genotype D5, which has been circulating since at least 1998, is the endemic genotype in Thailand. Genotype G2 was detected between 1998 and 2001. In addition, almost all of the MeVs detected throughout the country in 2008 were genotype D9. This is the first report of genotype D9 in Thailand. This report provides important baseline data about measles genotypes in Thailand and this information will be needed to help verify measles elimination in Thailand.

  12. Identification and genetic characterization of maize cell wall variation for improved biorefinery feedstock characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauly, Markus [UC Berkeley; Hake, Sarah [USDA Albany

    2013-10-31

    The objectives of this program are to 1) characterize novel maize mutants with altered cell walls for enhanced biorefinery characteristics and 2) find quantitative trait loci (QTLs) related to biorefinery characteristics by taking advantage of the genetic diversity of maize. As a result a novel non-transgenic maize plant (cal1) has been identified, whose stover (leaves and stalk) contain more glucan in their walls leading to a higher saccharification yield, when subjected to a standard enzymatic digestion cocktail. Stacking this trait with altered lignin mutants yielded evene higher saccharification yields. Cal-1 mutants do not show a loss of kernel and or biomass yield when grown in the field . Hence, cal1 biomass provides an excellent feedstock for the biofuel industry.

  13. Genetic and biological characterization of a densovirus isolate that affects dengue virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Pamplona Mosimann

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Brevidensoviruses have an encapsidated, single-stranded DNA genome that predominantly has a negative polarity. In recent years, they have received particular attention due to their potential role in the biological control of pathogenic arboviruses and to their unnoticed presence in cell cultures as contaminants. In addition, brevidensoviruses may also be useful as viral vectors. This study describes the first genetic and biological characterization of a mosquito densovirus that was isolated in Brazil; moreover, we examined the phylogenetic relationship between this isolate and the other brevidensoviruses. We further demonstrate that this densovirus has the potential to be used to biologically control dengue virus (DENV infection with in vitro co-infection experiments. The present study provides evidence that this densovirus isolate is a fast-spreading virus that affects cell growth and DENV infection.

  14. Characterization and Genetic Analysis of Rumpled and Twisted Leaf Mutant (rt/1) in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Yun-xia; SONG Xiu-juan; PENG You-lin; DONG Guo-jun; Guo Long-biao; ZENG Da-li; ZHANG Guang-heng; YAN Hong-lan; QIAN Qian

    2011-01-01

    A rumpled and twisted leaf 1 (rt/1) mutant was generated from a japonica cultivar Nipponbare by ethyl methanesulfonate treatment,which was characterized as rumpled and twisted leaf at the seedling stage.The F2 populations were constructed by crossing with indica cultivars TN1 and Zhefu 802,respectively.Genetic analysis demonstrated that the phenotype was controlled by a single recessive nuclear gene.The closely linked simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker RM1155 was obtained from bulked segregant analysis.Subsequently,sequence tagged site (STS) markers were developed using the published rice genome sequence.Finally,RTL1 was located between an STS marker T1591 and an SSR marker RM1359,at the distances of 0.48 cM and 0.96 cM,respectively.These results will facilitate the cloning of the target gene in further studies.

  15. Characterization of Isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae from Diseased Farmed and Wild Marine Fish from the U.S. Gulf Coast, Latin America, and Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Esteban; Wang, Rui; Wiles, Judy; Baumgartner, Wes; Green, Christopher; Plumb, John; Hawke, John

    2015-06-01

    We examined Lancefield serogroup B Streptococcus isolates recovered from diseased, cultured hybrid Striped Bass (Striped Bass Morone saxatilis × White Bass M. chrysops) and wild and cultured Gulf Killifish Fundulus grandis from coastal waters of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico (Gulf coast) and compared those isolates to strains from tilapias Oreochromis spp. reared in Mississippi, Thailand, Ecuador, and Honduras and to the original Gulf coast strain identified by Plumb et al. ( 1974 ). The isolates were subjected to phylogenetic, biochemical, and antibiotic susceptibility analyses. Genetic analysis was performed using partial sequence comparison of (1) the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene; (2) the sipA gene, which encodes a surface immunogenic protein; (3) the cspA gene, which encodes a cell surface-associated protein; and (4) the secY gene, which encodes components of a general protein secretion pathway. Phylogenies inferred from sipA, secY, and cspA gene sequence comparisons were more discriminating than that inferred from the 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison. The U.S. Gulf coast strains showed a high degree of similarity to strains from South America and Central America and belonged to a unique group that can be distinguished from other group B streptococci. In agreement with the molecular findings, biochemical and antimicrobial resistance analyses demonstrated that the isolates recovered from the U.S. Gulf coast and Latin America were more similar to each other than to isolates from Thailand. Three laboratory challenge methods for inducing streptococcosis in Gulf Killifish were evaluated-intraperitoneal (IP) injection, immersion (IMM), and immersion plus abrasion (IMMA)-using serial dilutions of S. agalactiae isolate LADL 97-151, a representative U.S. Gulf coast strain. The dose that was lethal to 50% of test fish by 14 d postchallenge was approximately 2 CFU/fish via IP injection. In contrast, the fish that were challenged via IMM or IMMA presented cumulative mortality

  16. Genetic characterization of Perna viridis L. in peninsular Malaysia using microsatellite markers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C. C. Ong; K. Yusoff; C. K. Yap; S. G. Tan

    2009-08-01

    A total of 19 polymorphic microsatellite loci were used to analyse levels of genetic variation for 10 populations of Perna viridis L. collected from all over peninsular Malaysia. The populations involved in this study included Pulau Aman in Penang, Tanjung Rhu in Kedah, Bagan Tiang in Perak, Pulau Ketam in Selangor, Muar, Parit Jawa, Pantai Lido and Kampung Pasir Puteh in Johore, and Kuala Pontian and Nenasi in Pahang state. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to seven, with an average of 3.1. Heterozygote deficiencies were observed across all the 10 populations. Characterization of the populations revealed that local populations of P. viridis in peninsular Malaysia were genetically similar enough to be used as a biomonitoring agent for heavy metal contamination in the Straits of Malacca. Cluster analysis grouped the P. viridis populations according to their geographical distributions with the exception of Parit Jawa. The analysis also revealed that P. viridis from the northern parts of peninsular Malaysia were found to be the most distant populations among the populations of mussels investigated and P. viridis from the eastern part of peninsular Malaysia were closer to the central and southern populations than to the northern populations.

  17. Identification and genetic characterization of Clostridium botulinum serotype A strains from commercially pasteurized carrot juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Kristin M; Nowaczyk, Louis; Raphael, Brian H; Skinner, Guy E; Rukma Reddy, N

    2014-12-01

    Clostridium botulinum is an important foodborne pathogen capable of forming heat resistant endospores and producing deadly botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs). In 2006, C. botulinum was responsible for an international outbreak of botulism attributed to the consumption of commercially pasteurized carrot juice. The purpose of this study was to isolate and characterize strains of C. botulinum from the adulterated product. Carrot juice bottles retrieved from the manufacturing facility were analyzed for the presence of BoNT and BoNT-producing isolates using DIG-ELISA. Toxigenic isolates from the carrot juice were analyzed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and DNA microarray analysis to determine their genetic relatedness to the original outbreak strains CDC51348 and CDC51303. PFGE revealed that isolates CJ4-1 and CJ10-1 shared an identical pulsotype with strain CDC51303, whereas isolate CJ5-1 displayed a unique restriction banding pattern. DNA microarray analysis identified several phage related genes unique to strain CJ5-1, and Southern hybridization analysis of XhoI digested and nondigested DNA showed their chromosomal location, while a homolog to pCLI_A009 of plasmid pCLI of C. botulinum serotype Langeland F, was located on a small plasmid. The acquisition or loss of bacteriophages and other mobile genetic elements among C. botulinum strains has epidemiological and evolutionary implications.

  18. Genetic characterization of complete open reading frame of glycoprotein C gene of bovine herpesvirus 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Majumder

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To characterize one of the major glycoprotein genes viz., glycoprotein C (gC; UL44, unique long region 44 of bovineherpesvirus 1(BoHV1 of Indian origin at genetic and phylogenetic level.Materials and Methods: A bovine herpesvirus 1 isolate viz., (BoHV1/IBR 216 II/ 1976/ India maintained at Division ofVirology, IVRI, Mukteswar was used for the current study. The DNA was extracted using commercial kit and the completeORF of gC gene was amplified, cloned, and sequenced by conventional Sanger sequencing method. The sequence wasgenetically and phylogenetically analysed using various bioinformatic tools. The sequence was submitted in the Genbankwith accession number Kc756965.Results: The complete ORF of gC gene was amplified and sequenced. It showed 100% sequence homology with referencecooper strain of BoHV1 and divergence varied from 0% to 2.7% with other isolates of BoHV1. The isolate under study haddivergence of 9.2%, 13%, 26.6%, and 9.2% with BoHV5 (Bovine herpesvirus 5, CvHV1 (Cervid herpesvirus 1, CpHV1(Caprine herpesvirus 1, and BuHV1 (Bubaline herpesvirus 1, respectively.Conclusion: This is the first genetic characterization of complete open reading frame (ORF of glycoprotein C gene (UL44 ofIndian isolate of BoHV1. The gC gene of BoHV1 is highly conserved among all BoHV1 isolates and it can be used as a targetfor designing diagnostic primers for the specific detection of BoHV1.

  19. Building America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brad Oberg

    2010-12-31

    IBACOS researched the constructability and viability issues of using high performance windows as one component of a larger approach to building houses that achieve the Building America 70% energy savings target.

  20. Preliminary investigation on genetic characterization of native and endemic fowl types in Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    non-specific primers. The results of morphological characterization revealed many variations in plumage color pattern. Single and pea comb types were found in both native and exotic types of chicken. A prominent yellow color marking on red color comb was a unique feature in Ceylon Jungle fowl. In the sample tested only one indigenous chicken type showed feathered shank character. Another distinguishing feature observed was the presence of white spot in red color earlobes of all native chicken types except naked neck type, which is believed to be a cross of exotic and indigenous. Sixteen non-specific primers used in the study produced 22 polymorphic bands ranging from 500 base pair (bp) to 1957.6 bp. There were two monomorphic bands common to all chicken types tested. Genetic similarity coefficient detected according to Noeingen Index ranged from 0.5 to 1.1 indicating a wide genetic base of tested samples of chicken. According to the results of cluster analysis there was a clear separation of Ceylon Jungle fowl from the other chicken types used in the study. This indicates that there was an early separation and divergent evolution of Ceylon Jungle fowl from all the other domestic chicken types tested. It appears that the contribution of Ceylon Jungle Fowl in development of Sri Lankan native chicken is minute or very marginal. However, the present study was carried out with limited sample size and from the present results it can be confirmed that RAPD is an effective method, though the repeatability is low, in genetic characterization of animal populations with wide genetic basis. (author)

  1. Genetic Characterization of Rubella Virus Strains Detected in Spain, 1998-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Torres, Alex O.; Mosquera, María M.; De Ory, Fernando; González-Praetorius, Alejandro; Echevarría, Juan E.

    2016-01-01

    The National Plan for the Elimination of Rubella was implemented in Spain in 2008 using the logistics of the National Plan for the Elimination of Measles that have been employed since year 2000. Molecular characterization of rubella virus (RUBV) is important for disease surveillance and for monitoring elimination of the disease throughout the world. We describe the first complete series of data regarding the circulation of RUBV genotypes in Spain. The 739-nucleotide fragment designated by the WHO for RUBV genotyping was sequenced in 88 selected cases collected from 1998 to 2014. Five genotypes were identified: 1E, 2B, 1J, 1I, and 1a. Genotype 1E was predominant between 1998 and 2003 but was replaced by genotype 2B, which was detected in sporadic cases in 2004, 2006, 2008, 2012, 2013 and 2014. There was an outbreak of genotype 2B in Algeciras (Andalusia) in 2008. Genotype 1J caused an outbreak in Madrid in 2004/2005 and sporadic cases in 2005 and 2007. Genotype 1I was found to have infected an immune-suppressed patient with neurological symptoms in 2008. Finally, vaccine strain RA 27/3 was detected in three sporadic cases, two of them immune-suppressed and without a recent history of vaccination. This suggests that during these years there were a series of imported sporadic cases and outbreaks, confirming the findings of epidemiological data analysis. The importation sources were generally consistent with our geographic and cultural ties, mainly with Europe (genotypes 1E, 2B, 1I) and Latin America (1J). PMID:27622271

  2. Genetic Characterization of Rubella Virus Strains Detected in Spain, 1998-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Torres, Alex O; Mosquera, María M; De Ory, Fernando; González-Praetorius, Alejandro; Echevarría, Juan E

    2016-01-01

    The National Plan for the Elimination of Rubella was implemented in Spain in 2008 using the logistics of the National Plan for the Elimination of Measles that have been employed since year 2000. Molecular characterization of rubella virus (RUBV) is important for disease surveillance and for monitoring elimination of the disease throughout the world. We describe the first complete series of data regarding the circulation of RUBV genotypes in Spain. The 739-nucleotide fragment designated by the WHO for RUBV genotyping was sequenced in 88 selected cases collected from 1998 to 2014. Five genotypes were identified: 1E, 2B, 1J, 1I, and 1a. Genotype 1E was predominant between 1998 and 2003 but was replaced by genotype 2B, which was detected in sporadic cases in 2004, 2006, 2008, 2012, 2013 and 2014. There was an outbreak of genotype 2B in Algeciras (Andalusia) in 2008. Genotype 1J caused an outbreak in Madrid in 2004/2005 and sporadic cases in 2005 and 2007. Genotype 1I was found to have infected an immune-suppressed patient with neurological symptoms in 2008. Finally, vaccine strain RA 27/3 was detected in three sporadic cases, two of them immune-suppressed and without a recent history of vaccination. This suggests that during these years there were a series of imported sporadic cases and outbreaks, confirming the findings of epidemiological data analysis. The importation sources were generally consistent with our geographic and cultural ties, mainly with Europe (genotypes 1E, 2B, 1I) and Latin America (1J). PMID:27622271

  3. RNA viral metagenome of whiteflies leads to the discovery and characterization of a whitefly-transmitted carlavirus in North America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karyna Rosario

    Full Text Available Whiteflies from the Bemisia tabaci species complex have the ability to transmit a large number of plant viruses and are some of the most detrimental pests in agriculture. Although whiteflies are known to transmit both DNA and RNA viruses, most of the diversity has been recorded for the former, specifically for the Begomovirus genus. This study investigated the total diversity of DNA and RNA viruses found in whiteflies collected from a single site in Florida to evaluate if there are additional, previously undetected viral types within the B. tabaci vector. Metagenomic analysis of viral DNA extracted from the whiteflies only resulted in the detection of begomoviruses. In contrast, whiteflies contained sequences similar to RNA viruses from divergent groups, with a diversity that extends beyond currently described viruses. The metagenomic analysis of whiteflies also led to the first report of a whitefly-transmitted RNA virus similar to Cowpea mild mottle virus (CpMMV Florida (genus Carlavirus in North America. Further investigation resulted in the detection of CpMMV Florida in native and cultivated plants growing near the original field site of whitefly collection and determination of its experimental host range. Analysis of complete CpMMV Florida genomes recovered from whiteflies and plants suggests that the current classification criteria for carlaviruses need to be reevaluated. Overall, metagenomic analysis supports that DNA plant viruses carried by B. tabaci are dominated by begomoviruses, whereas significantly less is known about RNA viruses present in this damaging insect vector.

  4. RNA viral metagenome of whiteflies leads to the discovery and characterization of a whitefly-transmitted carlavirus in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Karyna; Capobianco, Heather; Ng, Terry Fei Fan; Breitbart, Mya; Polston, Jane E

    2014-01-01

    Whiteflies from the Bemisia tabaci species complex have the ability to transmit a large number of plant viruses and are some of the most detrimental pests in agriculture. Although whiteflies are known to transmit both DNA and RNA viruses, most of the diversity has been recorded for the former, specifically for the Begomovirus genus. This study investigated the total diversity of DNA and RNA viruses found in whiteflies collected from a single site in Florida to evaluate if there are additional, previously undetected viral types within the B. tabaci vector. Metagenomic analysis of viral DNA extracted from the whiteflies only resulted in the detection of begomoviruses. In contrast, whiteflies contained sequences similar to RNA viruses from divergent groups, with a diversity that extends beyond currently described viruses. The metagenomic analysis of whiteflies also led to the first report of a whitefly-transmitted RNA virus similar to Cowpea mild mottle virus (CpMMV Florida) (genus Carlavirus) in North America. Further investigation resulted in the detection of CpMMV Florida in native and cultivated plants growing near the original field site of whitefly collection and determination of its experimental host range. Analysis of complete CpMMV Florida genomes recovered from whiteflies and plants suggests that the current classification criteria for carlaviruses need to be reevaluated. Overall, metagenomic analysis supports that DNA plant viruses carried by B. tabaci are dominated by begomoviruses, whereas significantly less is known about RNA viruses present in this damaging insect vector.

  5. Tectonic evolution of the continental crust of South America and its importance in the characterization of uraniferous provinces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tectonic evolution of the South American Continent and its relationship with uranium mineralization is discussed. During the Phanerozoic at least three phases are identified as related to the Andean chain, namely, in the lower Palaeozoic, in the upper Palaeozoic and in the Meso-Cenozoic. Recent systematic age dating of the Precambrian indicates the period of 450-700 million years (m.y.) (Brazilian Cycle) as one of the most important tectonic events in South America. Another age-dating cluster corresponds to the 1700-2100 m.y. interval (Transamazonic Cycle). An even older event within the Archean is identified with datings older than 2600 m.y. in Venezuela (Estado Bolivar), Surinam and Brazil (Bahia, Santa Catarina, Goias). All the Brazilian uranium deposits related to the Brazilian platform, such as Amorinopolis, are located on the eastern border of the platform where the Brazilian tectonic cycle is dominant. The uranium source rocks are of alkaline granitic nature. Other deposits (Itataia, Campos Belos) are associated with polycyclic rocks belonging to the basement of the Brazilian Cycle but were affected by the 450-700 m.y. tectonic event; these amphibolitic facies rocks show alkaline metamorphism and magmatization processes which indicate large geochemical mobility during which important uranium mobilization has taken place. Finally, the Pocos de Caldas deposit is excellent evidence of the important relationship of tectonic reactivations and uranium enrichments within the Brazilian platform. (author)

  6. Novel Tetra-nucleotide Microsatellite DNA Markers for Assessing the Evolutionary Genetics and Demographics of Northern Snakehead (Channa argus) Invading North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Timothy L.; Johnson, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    We document the isolation and characterization of 19 tetra-nucleotide microsatellite DNA markers in northern snakehead (Channa argus) fish that recently colonized Meadow Lake, New York City, New York. These markers displayed moderate levels of allelic diversity (averaging 6.8 alleles/locus) and heterozygosity (averaging 74.2%). Demographic analyses suggested that the Meadow Lake collection has not achieved mutation-drift equilibrium. These results were consistent with instances of deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and the presence of some linkage disequilibrium. A comparison of individual pair-wise distances suggested the presence of multiple differentiated groups of related individuals. Results of all analyses are consistent with a pattern of multiple, recent introductions. The microsatellite markers developed for C. argus yielded sufficient genetic diversity to potentially: (1) delineate kinship; (2) elucidate fine-scale population structure; (3) define management (eradication) units; (4) estimate dispersal rates; (5) estimate population sizes; and (6) provide unique demographic perspectives of control or eradication effectiveness

  7. Application of whole genome shotgun sequencing for detection and characterization of genetically modified organisms and derived products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst-Jensen, Arne; Spilsberg, Bjørn; Arulandhu, Alfred J; Kok, Esther; Shi, Jianxin; Zel, Jana

    2016-07-01

    The emergence of high-throughput, massive or next-generation sequencing technologies has created a completely new foundation for molecular analyses. Various selective enrichment processes are commonly applied to facilitate detection of predefined (known) targets. Such approaches, however, inevitably introduce a bias and are prone to miss unknown targets. Here we review the application of high-throughput sequencing technologies and the preparation of fit-for-purpose whole genome shotgun sequencing libraries for the detection and characterization of genetically modified and derived products. The potential impact of these new sequencing technologies for the characterization, breeding selection, risk assessment, and traceability of genetically modified organisms and genetically modified products is yet to be fully acknowledged. The published literature is reviewed, and the prospects for future developments and use of the new sequencing technologies for these purposes are discussed. PMID:27100228

  8. Application of whole genome shotgun sequencing for detection and characterization of genetically modified organisms and derived products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst-Jensen, Arne; Spilsberg, Bjørn; Arulandhu, Alfred J; Kok, Esther; Shi, Jianxin; Zel, Jana

    2016-07-01

    The emergence of high-throughput, massive or next-generation sequencing technologies has created a completely new foundation for molecular analyses. Various selective enrichment processes are commonly applied to facilitate detection of predefined (known) targets. Such approaches, however, inevitably introduce a bias and are prone to miss unknown targets. Here we review the application of high-throughput sequencing technologies and the preparation of fit-for-purpose whole genome shotgun sequencing libraries for the detection and characterization of genetically modified and derived products. The potential impact of these new sequencing technologies for the characterization, breeding selection, risk assessment, and traceability of genetically modified organisms and genetically modified products is yet to be fully acknowledged. The published literature is reviewed, and the prospects for future developments and use of the new sequencing technologies for these purposes are discussed.

  9. Genetic and Filogenetic Characterization of some Newcastle Strains Isolated from Poultry in Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARSEL BORAKAJ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract section. In this study, we present the molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of three strains of NDV, isolated from the Tirana region in Albania during the 2011-2014 years. Three strains with number 28, 29 and 31, isolated from a different farm of poultry in Tirana Region (Rural flocks, which were diagnosed clinically with the ND. The Intracerebral Pathogenicity Index in SPF bird one day old was determined by doing the proteolytic sequencing at the cleavage, and specifying the aminoacid motif at proteolytic cleavage site. More over we performed BLAST search and phylogenetic analysis of obtained RNA sequences. All strains replicated well in the SPF –chicken emryo eggs. The isolates displayed an aminoacid motif at the proteolytic cleavage site at the Fusion (F protein with multiple basic amino acids as a well a Phenylalanine on position 117. For one isolate (28 numerous nucleotide positions had signals for at last two nucleotides, making it imposible to conclude on a specific sequence. The pathogenicity of all three isolates (28, 29 and 33, was assessed by the analysis of the F protein cleavage site and by standart ICPI. The ICPI (pathogenicity index of our strains varies from of 1.85, 2 and 1.75, respectively which according [19,7] are typical for velogenic strains of NDV. We found that two NDV strain has a most close genetic relationship with the Serbia 2007 NDV, having 98% similarity at nucleotide level.Velogenic viscerotropic strains are considered endemic in our country.

  10. Morphological and genetic characterization of endophytic bacteria isolated from roots of different maize genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Angela Cristina; Bassani, Luciana Lange; Adamoski, Douglas; Stringari, Danyelle; Cordeiro, Vanessa Kava; Glienke, Chirlei; Steffens, Maria Berenice Reynaud; Hungria, Mariangela; Galli-Terasawa, Lygia Vitoria

    2013-01-01

    Maize is one of the most important crops worldwide, and in Brazil, the state of Paraná stands as its largest producer. The crop demands high inputs of N fertilizers, therefore all strategies aiming to optimize the grain production with lower inputs are very relevant. Endophytic bacteria have a high potential to increment maize grain yield by means of input via biological nitrogen fixation and/or plant growth promotion, in this last case increasing the absorption of water and nutrients by the plants. In this study, we established a collection of 217 endophytic bacteria, isolated from roots of four lineages and three hybrid genotypes of maize, and isolated in four different N-free culture media. Biochemical-comprising growth in different carbon sources, intrinsic tolerance to antibiotics, and biochemical tests for catalase, nitrate reductase, urease, and growth in N-free media in vitro-and genetic characterization by BOX-PCR revealed great variability among the isolates. Both commercial hybrids and homozygous lineages were broadly colonized by endophytes, and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene revealed the presence of bacteria belonging to the genera Pantoea, Bacillus, Burkholderia, and Klebsiella. Qualitative differences in endophytic colonization were detected between lineages and hybrid genotypes.

  11. Genetic characterization of canine rotavirus isolated from a puppy in Korea and experimental reproduction of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bo Kyu; Song, Dae Sub; Jung, Kwon Il; Lee, Chul Seung; Park, Sung Jun; Oh, Jin Sik; An, Dong Jun; Yang, Jeong Sun; Moon, Hyoung Joon; Lee, Sang Sun; Yoon, Young Dhuk; Park, Bong Kyun

    2007-01-01

    Canine rotavirus was isolated from feces of a Korean Jindo dog with mild diarrhea, and the isolate was genetically characterized. Rotaviral antigen was detected in the feces using a commercial rotavirus antigen detection kit and cytopathic effects were observed in a cell line inoculated with the feces. The virus isolate (GC/KS05) was identified as subtype G3P[3] using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The strain displayed 98% and 90% identity with the VP7 genes of a canine rotavirus isolate (RV52/96) from Italy and the simian rotavirus strain (RRV) respectively. However, the GC/KS05 isolate exhibited only 83% and 82% identity, respectively, with the G3 serotype canine strains, RV198/95 and K9. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP7 and VP4 genes of GC/KS05 strain led to the classification of VP7 in a different cluster than other canine rotavirus VP7 genes, and VP4 within the cluster of canine rotavirus VP4 genes. The Korean isolate was thus more closely related to the RV52/96 isolate than the other isolates for which sequence data is available. Detailed analysis of the VP7 region revealed 6 amino acid variations between the new isolate and RV52/96. After 5 passages in cell culture, the GC/KS05 strain remained pathogenic for young pups, in which inoculation resulted in diarrhea and virus shedding in the feces. PMID:17459836

  12. [Genetical analysis and characterization of a new mutant, black tremor appearing in the Syrian hamster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, M; Katsuie, Y; Umezawa, H; Kuramasu, S

    1986-04-01

    A black coat-color mutant with tremor was discovered in babies of 61 generations of an inbred strain APG of Syrian hamster which had been maintained in the Nippon Institute for Biological Science, Laboratory Animal Research Station. The genetical analysis by matings between four inbred strains which had different genes in the E and B loci and four mutant strains which were introduced the mutant gene into the four inbred strains and characterization were carried out on the mutant. The results obtained are summarized as follows: 1) The mutation occurred in a different locus with E and B loci. 2) The mutant was controlled by an autosomal recessive gene designated as "bt", and it was thought that both tremor and black coat-color were the pleiotropic effect of bt gene. 3) At least one E gene in the E locus was necessary for the appearance of black coat color. Therefore, the coat-color remained cream in ee (cream) hamsters showing only trembling. 4) The degree of blackness of the coat-color of EE hamsters differed from Ee ones. The former was darker than the latter. 5) The mutant may be a useful animal model for studying abnormal myelogenesis and biosynthesis of melanin. PMID:3732409

  13. Detection and genetic characterization of relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia miyamotoi in Estonian ticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Julia; Nazarova, Lidia; Katargina, Olga; Järvekülg, Lilian; Fomenko, Natalya; Golovljova, Irina

    2012-01-01

    During the years 2008-2010 I. ricinus and I. persulcatus ticks were collected from 64 sites in mainland Estonia and on the island Saaremaa. Presence of B. miyamotoi was found in 0.9% (23/2622) of ticks. The prevalence in I. persulcatus and I. ricinus ticks differed significantly, 2.7% (15/561) and 0.4% (8/2061), respectively. The highest prevalence rates were in found South-Eastern Estonia in an area of I. persulcatus and I. ricinus sympatry and varied from 1.4% (1/73) to 2.8% (5/178). Co-infections with B. burgdorferi s.l. group spirochetes and tick-borne encephalitis virus were also revealed. Genetic characterization of partial 16S rRNA, p66 and glpQ genes demonstrated that Estonian sequences belong to two types of B. miyamotoi and cluster with sequences from Europe and the European part of Russia, as well as with sequences from Siberia, Asia and Japan, here designated as European and Asian types, respectively. Estonian sequences of the European type were obtained from I. ricinus ticks only, whereas the Asian type of B. miyamotoi was shown for both tick species in the sympatric regions.

  14. Detection and Genetic Characterization of Lineage IV Peste Des Petits Ruminant Virus in Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, R A; Orynbayev, M B; Sultankulova, K T; Strochkov, V M; Omarova, Z D; Shalgynbayev, E K; Rametov, N M; Sansyzbay, A R; Parida, S

    2015-10-01

    Peste des petits ruminant (PPR) is endemic in many Asian countries with expansion of the range in recent years including across China during 2013-2014 (OIE, 2014). Till the end of 2014, no cases of PPR virus (PPRV) were officially reported to the Office Internationale des Epizooties (OIE) from Kazakhstan. This study describes for the first time clinicopathological, epidemiological and genetic characterization of PPRV in 3 farm level outbreaks reported for the first time in Zhambyl region (oblast), southern Kazakhstan. Phylogenetic analysis based on partial N gene sequence data confirms the lineage IV PPRV circulation, similar to the virus that recently circulated in China. The isolated viruses are 99.5-99.7% identical to the PPRV isolated in 2014 from Heilongjiang Province in China and therefore providing evidence of transboundary spread of PPRV. There is a risk of further maintenance of virus in young stock despite vaccination of adult sheep and goats, along livestock trade and pastoral routes, threatening both small livestock and endangered susceptible wildlife populations throughout Kazakhstan. PMID:26259931

  15. Genetic characterization of Amazonian bovine papillomavirus reveals the existence of four new putative types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Flavio R C; Daudt, Cíntia; Streck, André F; Weber, Matheus N; Filho, Ronaldo V Leite; Driemeier, David; Canal, Cláudio W

    2015-08-01

    Papillomaviruses are small and complex viruses that belong to the Papillomaviridae family, which comprises 39 genera. The bovine papillomavirus (BPV) causes an infectious disease that is characterized by chronic and proliferative benign tumors that affect cattle worldwide. Different genotypes of BPVs can cause distinct skin and mucosal lesions and the immunity they raise has low cross-protection. This report aimed to genotype BPVs in cattle from Northern Brazil based on nucleotide partial sequences of the L1 ORF. Skin wart samples from 39 bovines clinically and histopathologically diagnosed as cutaneous papillomatosis from Acre and Rondônia States were analyzed. The results revealed four already reported BPV types (BPVs 1, 2, 11, and 13), nine putative new BPV subtypes and four putative new BPV types as well as two putative new BPV types that were already reported. To our knowledge, this is the first record of BPVs from the Brazilian Amazon region that identified new possible BPV types and subtypes circulating in this population. These findings point to the great genetic diversity of BPVs that are present in this region and highlight the importance of this knowledge before further studies about vaccination are attempted. PMID:26116287

  16. Genetic characterization of the domestic pig (Sus scrofa domestica in Cerete-Colombia, using microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Meléndez G.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to characterize a population of domestic pig (Sus scrofa domestica in Cereté, Córdoba, using 20 microsatellite; calculate heterozygosity per locus and average heterozygosity. Materials and methods. Hair samples were collected from 62 specimens. DNA was extracted by proteinase K digestion and phenol-chloroform purification. Information from 20 microsatellites was selected out of those recommended for swine biodiversity studies. PCR products were separated by a vertical polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The bands were visualized by staining with silver nitrate. Results. All microsatellites used were polymorphic. Between 3 (SW1067 and 15 (IFNG alleles were detected with an average number of 6.7 and a total de 134 alleles. The average expected and observed heterozygosities were 0.5278 and 0.5479, respectively. PIC values ranged between 0.1999 and 0.8300 for loci SW1067 and SW911, respectively. Conclusions. Levels of observed and expected heterozygosity found in the present study indicate that the domestic pig (Sus scrofa domestica in Córdoba Cereté show high degree of genetic variability

  17. Isolation, Characterization, and Genetic Diversity of Ice Nucleation Active Bacteria on Various Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIANA ELIZABETH WATURANGI

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Ice nucleation active (INA bacteria is a group of bacteria with the ability to catalyze the ice formation at temperature above -10 oC and causing frost injury in plants. Since, most of the literature on INA bacteria were from subtropical area, studies of INA bacteria from tropical area are needed. We sampled eight fruits and 36 leaves of 21 plant species, and then identified through biochemical and genetic analysis. INA bacteria were characterized for INA protein classification, pH stability, and optimization of heat endurance. We discovered 15 INA bacteria from seven plants species. Most of bacteria are oxidase and H2S negative, catalase and citrate positive, gram negative, and cocoid formed. These INA bacteria were classified in to three classes based on their freezing temperature. Most of the isolates were active in heat and pH stability assay. Some isolates were analysed for 16S rRNA gene. We observed that isolates from Morinda citrifolia shared 97% similiarity with Pseudomonas sp. Isolate from Piper betle shared 93% similarity with P. pseudoalcaligenes. Isolate from Carica papaya shared 94% similarity with Pseudomonas sp. While isolate from Fragaria vesca shared 90% similarity with Sphingomonas sp.

  18. Genetic-molecular characterization of backcross generations for sexual conversion in papaya (Carica papaya L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, H C C; Pereira, M G; Pereira, T N S; Barros, G B A; Ferreguetti, G A

    2014-12-04

    The low number of improved cultivars limits the expansion of the papaya crop, particularly because of the time required for the development of new varieties using classical procedures. Molecular techniques associated with conventional procedures accelerate this process and allow targeted improvements. Thus, we used microsatellite markers to perform genetic-molecular characterization of papaya genotypes obtained from 3 backcross generations to monitor the inbreeding level and parental genome proportion in the evaluated genotypes. Based on the analysis of 20 microsatellite loci, 77 genotypes were evaluated, 25 of each generation of the backcross program as well as the parental genotypes. The markers analyzed were identified in 11 of the 12 linkage groups established for papaya, ranging from 1 to 4 per linkage group. The average values for the inbreeding coefficient were 0.88 (BC1S4), 0.47 (BC2S3), and 0.63 (BC3S2). Genomic analysis revealed average values of the recurrent parent genome of 82.7% in BC3S2, 64.4% in BC1S4, and 63.9% in BC2S3. Neither the inbreeding level nor the genomic proportions completely followed the expected average values. This demonstrates the significance of molecular analysis when examining different genotype values, given the importance of such information for selection processes in breeding programs.

  19. Genetic characterization of ebi reveals its critical role in Drosophila wing growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Cherryl D; Orme, Mariam H; Leevers, Sally J

    2011-01-01

    The ebi gene of Drosophila melanogaster has been implicated in diverse signaling pathways, cellular functions and developmental processes. However, a thorough genetic analysis of this gene has been lacking and the true extent of its biological roles is unclear. Here, we characterize eleven ebi mutations and find that ebi has a novel role in promoting growth of the wing imaginal disc: viable combinations of mutant alleles give rise to adults with small wings. Wing discs with reduced EBI levels are correspondingly small and exhibit downregulation of Notch target genes. Furthermore, we show that EBI colocalizes on polytene chromosomes with Smrter (SMR), a transcriptional corepressor, and Suppressor of Hairless (SU(H)), the primary transcription factor involved in Notch signaling. Interestingly, the mammalian orthologs of ebi, transducin β-like 1 (TBL1) and TBL-related 1 (TBLR1), function as corepressor/coactivator exchange factors and are required for transcriptional activation of Notch target genes. We hypothesize that EBI acts to activate (de-repress) transcription of Notch target genes important for Drosophila wing growth by functioning as a corepressor/coactivator exchange factor for SU(H). PMID:22041576

  20. Characterization of Rhizobacteria from field grown Genetically Modified (GM and non-GM maizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Wihkochombom Bumunang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was done to examine the rhizobacteria from field grown Genetically Modified (GM maize and its non-GM counterpart. Rhizospheric soil samples were collected at 30 days after sowing (DAS and at post-harvest from two experimental fields in Gauteng, South Africa. Total rhizobacteria (cfu/g in GM and non-GM soil samples was not significantly different across the different media 30 DAS and at post-harvest. Rhizobacterial isolates obtained were biochemically characterized using the analytical profile index. Species of Pseudomonas, Aeromonas, Sphingomonas, Burkholderia, Stenotrophomonas, Achromobacter, Ewingella and Bacillus were screened in vitro for plant growth promoting traits such as, ammonia production, catalase activity, indole acetic acid production, phosphate solubilisation, hydrogen cyanide production and antifungal activity. All the 32 rhizobacterial strains tested in this study were positive for catalase activity, ammonia production and IAA production; 90.6% were positive for phosphate solubilisation, 34.3% for indicate antifungal activity but none for hydrogen cyanide production. These findings contributed to the quest for potential biofertilizers and biocontrol agents for sustainable agriculture.

  1. Genetic relatedness of commensal Escherichia coli from nursery pigs in intensive pig production in Denmark and molecular characterization of genetically different strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrero Fresno, Ana; Larsen, Inge; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2015-01-01

    faecal samples (N = 4 pigs) from five intensive Danish pigs farms was analysed by repetitive extragenic palindromic-PCR (REP-PCR) and 42 unique REP-profiles were detected (similarity farms differed significantly in the diversity of commensal E. coli......AIMS: To determine the genetic relatedness and the presence of virulence and antibiotic resistance genes in commensal Escherichia coli from nursery pigs in Danish intensive production. METHODS AND RESULTS: The genetic diversity of 1000 E. coli strains randomly picked (N = 50 isolates) from cultured......: between eight and 21 different profiles per farm were detected. One to three strains representing each REP-profile were characterized by multilocus typing scheme-typing, as well as for presence of antimicrobial and virulence genes and serogrouping through microarray analysis. The 42 REP-profiles were...

  2. Illiterate America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozol, Jonathan

    Intended for those involved in American social service and educational communities, this book addresses the widespread problem of illiteracy in the United States and the social consequences of this problem. Following an introduction, the chapters in the first section of the book discuss the growing crisis of illiterate America, specifically, the…

  3. Characterization of Movement Disorder Phenomenology in Genetically Proven, Familial Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasca-Salas, Carmen; Masellis, Mario; Khoo, Edwin; Shah, Binit B.; Fisman, David; Lang, Anthony E.; Kleiner-Fisman, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Background Mutations in granulin (PGRN) and tau (MAPT), and hexanucleotide repeat expansions near the C9orf72 genes are the most prevalent genetic causes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Although behavior, language and movement presentations are common, the relationship between genetic subgroup and movement disorder phenomenology is unclear. Objective We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature characterizing the spectrum and prevalence of movement disorders in genetic frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Methods Electronic databases were searched using terms related to frontotemporal lobar degeneration and movement disorders. Articles were included when cases had a proven genetic cause. Study-specific prevalence estimates for clinical features were transformed using Freeman-Tukey arcsine transformation, allowing for pooled estimates of prevalence to be generated using random-effects models. Results The mean age at onset was earlier in those with MAPT mutations compared to PGRN (p<0.001) and C9orf72 (p = 0.024). 66.5% of subjects had an initial non-movement presentation that was most likely a behavioral syndrome (35.7%). At any point during the disease, parkinsonism was the most common movement syndrome reported in 79.8% followed by progressive supranuclear palsy (PSPS) and corticobasal (CBS) syndromes in 12.2% and 10.7%, respectively. The prevalence of movement disorder as initial presentation was higher in MAPT subjects (35.8%) compared to PGRN subjects (10.1). In those with a non-movement presentation, language disorder was more common in PGRN subjects (18.7%) compared to MAPT subjects (5.4%). Summary This represents the first systematic review and meta-analysis of the occurrence of movement disorder phenomenology in genetic frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Standardized prospective collection of clinical information in conjunction with genetic characterization will be crucial for accurate clinico-genetic correlation. PMID:27100392

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of New World screwworm fly, Cochliomyia hominivorax, suggests genetic isolation of some Caribbean island populations following colonization from South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonagh, L; García, R; Stevens, J R

    2009-06-01

    Larval infestations of the New World screwworm (NWS) fly, Cochliomyia hominivorax, cause considerable economic losses through the direct mortality and reduced production of livestock. Since the 1950s, NWS populations in North and Central America have been the target of virtually continuous eradication attempts by sterile insect technique (SIT). Nevertheless, in some areas, such as Jamaica, SIT-based control programmes have failed. Reasons for the failure of SIT-based programmes in some locations are unknown, but it is hypothesized that failure may be related to the mating incompatibility between sterile and wild flies or to the existence of sexually incompatible cryptic species. Accordingly, the current research investigates intraspecific phylogenetic relationships and associated biogeographic patterns between NWS populations from the Caribbean and South America, which represent those populations involved in, or earmarked for, forthcoming SIT programmes. Uniquely, this study also includes analyses of two North American samples, collected in Texas in 1933 and 1953 prior to initiation of the SIT-based eradication programme. The study utilizes three nucleotide datasets: elongation factor-1alpha (nuclear); cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (mitochondrial), and 12S rRNA (mitochondrial). Phylogenetic analysis of these data, representing populations from across the Caribbean, South America and Texas, indicates sub-structuring of fly populations on several of the larger Caribbean islands, suggesting a period of isolation and/or founder effects following colonization from South America; significantly, our findings do not support a North American origin for Cuban flies. The importance of these findings in the light of proposed SIT programmes in the region is discussed. PMID:19335826

  5. Functional characterization of genetic polymorphisms in the H2AFX distal promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretherick, Karla L. [Canada' s Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, BC Cancer Agency, 675W 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3 (Canada); Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, C201 – 4500 Oak Street, Vancouver, British Columbia V6H 3N1 (Canada); Leach, Stephen [Canada' s Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, BC Cancer Agency, 675W 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3 (Canada); Brooks-Wilson, Angela R., E-mail: abrooks-wilson@bcgsc.ca [Canada' s Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, BC Cancer Agency, 675W 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3 (Canada); Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, C201 – 4500 Oak Street, Vancouver, British Columbia V6H 3N1 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology, Simon Fraser University, K9625 – 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • The H2AFX 3′untranslated region contains a previously unreported 197 bp intron. • rs643788 disrupts YY1 transcription factor binding. • rs2509049 influences binding strength for an unidentified protein complex. • H2AFX upstream haplotype does not influence gene expression in lymphoblast cells. • H2AFX upstream haplotype does not influence cell survival after irradiation. - Abstract: Due to the critical role of the H2AX histone variant in double-strand break repair, genetic variants in the H2AX gene, H2AFX, may influence cancer susceptibility. Genetic association studies have correlated H2AFX upstream variants with cancer risk; however it is unclear if any are causal. H2AFX has at least two alternate transcripts that encode the same reading frame; a short 0.6 kb transcript that lacks an intron or poly-A tail and is predicted to be highly expressed during the replication stage of the cell cycle, and a long 1.6 kb poly-A tailed transcript that is expressed in a replication-independent manner. To examine the functional impact of the rs643788, rs8551, rs7759, and rs2509049 upstream variants, we characterized their influence on gene expression, cell survival after DNA assault, and transcription factor binding. Analysis of allelic imbalance using quantitative sequencing of cDNA from lymphoblast cell lines did not reveal any difference in expression of the 1.6 kb polyadenylated transcript between the common H2AFX upstream haplotypes. We did, however, identify a previously unreported 197 base pair intron in the H2AFX 3′untranslated region that appears to be present regardless of haplotype. Assessment of cell survival after irradiation treatment did not show any difference in survival between cell lines of different haplotypes. Gel shift assays revealed that the rs643788 C allele disrupts YY1 transcription factor binding and the rs2509049 C allele binds more strongly to a protein complex than does the rs2509049 T allele. Though we did not identify

  6. Genetic characterization of Hawaiian isolates of Plasmodium relictum reveals mixed-genotype infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvi, S.I.; Farias, M.E.M.; Atkinson, C.T.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The relatively recent introduction of a highly efficient mosquito vector and an avian pathogen (Plasmodium relictum) to an isolated island ecosystem with nai??ve, highly susceptible avian hosts provides a unique opportunity to investigate evolution of virulence in a natural system. Mixed infections can significantly contribute to the uncertainty in host-pathogen dynamics with direct impacts on virulence. Toward further understanding of how host-parasite and parasite-parasite relationships may impact virulence, this study characterizes within-host diversity of malaria parasite populations based on genetic analysis of the trap (thrombospondin-related anonymous protein) gene in isolates originating from Hawaii, Maui and Kauai Islands. Methods: A total of 397 clones were produced by nested PCR amplification and cloning of a 1664 bp fragment of the trap gene from two malarial isolates, K1 (Kauai) and KV115 (Hawaii) that have been used for experimental studies, and from additional isolates from wild birds on Kauai, Maui and Hawaii Islands. Diversity of clones was evaluated initially by RFLP-based screening, followed by complete sequencing of 33 selected clones. Results: RFLP analysis of trap revealed a minimum of 28 distinct RFLP haplotypes among the 397 clones from 18 birds. Multiple trap haplotypes were detected in every bird evaluated, with an average of 5.9 haplotypes per bird. Overall diversity did not differ between the experimental isolates, however, a greater number of unique haplotypes were detected in K1 than in KV115. We detected high levels of clonal diversity with clear delineation between isolates K1 and KV115 in a haplotype network. The patterns of within-host haplotype clustering are consistent with the possibility of a clonal genetic structure and rapid within-host mutation after infection. Conclusion: Avian malaria (P. relictum) and Avipoxvirus are the significant infectious diseases currently affecting the native Hawaiian avifauna. This

  7. A framework for detecting and characterizing genetic background-dependent imprinting effects

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Jason B.; Cheverud, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Genomic imprinting, where the effects of alleles depend on their parent-of-origin, can be an important component of the genetic architecture of complex traits. Although there has been a rapidly increasing number of studies of genetic architecture that have examined imprinting effects, none have examined whether imprinting effects depend on genetic background. Such effects are critical for the evolution of genomic imprinting because they allow the imprinting state of a locus to evolve as a fun...

  8. GENETIC CHARACTERIZATION OF A BOVINE BREED (TABAPUA) UNDER ARTIFICIAL SELECTION LOCATED IN THE AMAZON REGION

    OpenAIRE

    Ednaldo da Silva Filho; Marcone Helmer da Silva; Jose Elivalto Guimaraes Campelo; Maria Lucia Harada; Marcia Rocha DeRosia

    2012-01-01

    Brazil currently has the biggest commercial bovine cattle population in the world. Several different breeds that come from Europe and India compose it. They are primarily used for dairy and meat production. In Brazil, several high quality genetic background cattle are kept in a condition known as pure breed, meaning no other animal of different genetic background is interbreeding with them and consequently, affecting their genetic variability. Hence, these cattle are apparently vulnerable to ...

  9. Genetic characterization of Iranian safflower (Carthamus tinctorius) using inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) markers

    OpenAIRE

    Panahi, Bahman; Ghorbanzadeh Neghab, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    Safflower (Carthamus tinctorious L.) is valued as a source of high quality vegetable oil. 20 ISSR primers were used to assess the genetic diversity of 18 accessions of safflower collected from different geographical regions of Iran. The ISSR primers combinations revealed 57.6 % polymorphism, among 338 genetic loci amplified from the accessions. The sum of effective number of alleles and observed number of alleles were 29.76 and 36.77, respectively. To understand genetic relationships among th...

  10. Genetic profile characterization of 10 X-STRs in four populations of the southeastern region of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Joyce A; Costa, Jeane C; Paneto, Greiciane G; Figueiredo, Raquel F; Gusmão, Leonor; Sánchez-Diz, Paula; Carracedo, Angel; Cicarelli, Regina M B

    2010-09-01

    Ten X-chromosomal short tandem repeats (DXS8378, DXS9902, DXS7132, DXS9898, DXS6809, DXS6789, DXS7133, GATA172D05, GATA31E08 and DXS7423) were analyzed in four populations of the southeastern region of Brazil (São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Vitória and Belo Horizonte). No deviations from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were observed for any of the analyzed loci in the four populations. The average diversity per locus varied between 68% for DXS8378, DXS7133, and DXS7423 and 83%, for DXS6809, with Rio de Janeiro being the most diverse population. Overall power of discrimination values in females varied between 0.99999999990 and 0.99999999997 and between 0.9999991 and 0.9999995 in males. These high values show the potential of this system for forensic application and relationships' testing in the studied groups. Genetic comparisons (exact tests of population differentiation and pairwise genetic distances) revealed significant differences between Brazilian and other populations from Europe, Latin America and Africa, as well as among different Brazilian populations.

  11. Genetic characterization of psp encoding the DING protein in Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25

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    Zhang Xue-Xian

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DING proteins constitute a conserved and broadly distributed set of proteins found in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals (including humans. Characterization of DING proteins from animal and plant tissues indicated ligand-binding ability suggesting a role for DING proteins in cell signaling and biomineralization. Surprisingly, the genes encoding DING proteins in eukaryotes have not been identified in the eukaryotic genome or EST databases. Recent discovery of a DING homologue (named Psp here in the genome of Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 provided a unique opportunity to investigate the physiological roles of DING proteins. P. fluorescens SBW25 is a model bacterium that can efficiently colonize plant surfaces and enhance plant health. In this report we genetically characterize Psp with a focus on conditions under which psp is expressed and the protein exported. Results Psp is closely related to the periplasmic Pi binding component of the ABC-type phosphate transporter system (Pst. psp is flanked by a gene cluster predicted to function as a type II protein secretion system (Hxc. Deletion analysis combined with chromosomally integrated 'lacZ fusions showed that both psp and pstC are induced by Pi limitation and that pstC is required for competitive growth of the bacterium in Pi limited medium. hxcR is not regulated by Pi limitation. Psp was detected (using anti-DING serum in the supernatant of wild-type culture but was greatly reduced in the supernatant of an isogenic strain carrying an hxcR mutation (ΔhxcR. A promoter fusion between hxcR and a promoterless copy of a gene ('dapB essential for growth in the plant environment showed that expression of hxcR is elevated during colonization of sugar beet seedlings. A similar analysis of psp showed that it is not induced in the plant environment. Conclusion Psp gene is expressed under conditions of Pi limitation. It is an exoprotein secreted mainly via the Hxc type II secretion

  12. Genetic characterization of fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli associated with bovine mastitis in India

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    Sangeetha Balakrishnan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken to characterize the mutation in gyrA (DNA gyrase and parC (topoisomerase IV genes responsible for fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli isolates associated with the bovine mastitis. Materials and Methods: A total of 92 milk samples from bovine mastitis cases were sampled in and around Puducherry (Southern India. Among these samples, 30 isolates were bacteriologically characterized as E. coli. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC of fluoroquinolones of these 30 E. coli isolates were evaluated by resazurin microtiter assay. Then, the quinolone resistance determining region (QRDR (gyrA and parC genes of these E. coli isolates was genetically analyzed for determining the chromosomal mutation causing fluoroquinolone resistance. Results: E. coli isolates showed a resistance rate of 63.33%, 23.33% and 30.03% to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin, respectively. Mutations were found at 83rd and 87th amino acid position of gyrA gene, and at 80th and 108th amino acid position of parC gene in our study isolates. Among these five isolates, one had a single mutation at 83 amino acid position of gyrA with reduced susceptibility (0.5 μg/ml to ciprofloxacin. Then, in remaining four isolates, three isolates showed triple mutation (at gyrA: S83gL and D87gN; at parC: S80gI and the fifth isolate showed an additional mutation at codon 108 of parC (A108gT with the increased ciprofloxacin MIC of 16-128 μg/ml. The most common mutation noticed were at S83gL and D87gN of gyrA and S80gI of ParC. Conclusion: The study confirms the presence of mutation/s responsible for fluoroquinolone resistance in QRDR of gyrA and parC genes of E. coli isolates of animal origin, and there is increased rate of fluoroquinolone resistance with high-level of MIC. The mutations observed in this study were similar to that of human isolates.

  13. Genetic characterization of Babesia and Theileria parasites in water buffaloes in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Tattiyapong, Muncharee; Fukushi, Shintaro; Hayashida, Kyoko; Kothalawala, Hemal; Silva, Seekkuge Susil Priyantha; Vimalakumar, Singarayar Caniciyas; Kanagaratnam, Ratnam; Meewewa, Asela Sanjeewa; Suthaharan, Kalpana; Puvirajan, Thamotharampillai; de Silva, Weligodage Kumarawansa; Igarashi, Ikuo; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2014-02-24

    Water buffaloes are thought to be the reservoir hosts for several hemoprotozoan parasites that infect cattle. In the present study, we surveyed Sri Lankan bred water buffaloes for infections with Babesia bovis, Babesia bigemina, Theileria annulata, and Theileria orientalis using parasite-specific PCR assays. When 320 blood-derived DNA samples from water buffaloes reared in three different districts (Polonnaruwa, Mannar, and Mullaitivu) of Sri Lanka were PCR screened, B. bovis, B. bigemina, and T. orientalis were detected. While T. orientalis was the predominant parasite (82.5%), low PCR-positive rates were observed for B. bovis (1.9%) and B. bigemina (1.6%). Amplicons of the gene sequences of the Rhoptry Associated Protein-1 (RAP-1) of B. bovis, the Apical Membrane Antigen-1 (AMA-1) of B. bigemina, and the Major Piroplasm Surface Protein (MPSP) of T. orientalis were compared with those characterized previously in Sri Lankan cattle. While the B. bigemina AMA-1 sequences from water buffaloes shared high identity values with those from cattle, B. bovis RAP-1 sequences from water buffaloes diverged genetically from those of cattle. For T. orientalis, none of the MPSP sequence types reported previously in Sri Lankan cattle (types 1, 3, 5, and 7) were detected in the water buffaloes, and the MPSP sequences analyzed in the present study belonged to types N1 or N2. In summary, in addition to reporting the first PCR-based survey of Babesia and Theileria parasites in water buffaloes in Sri Lanka, the present study found that the predominant variants of water buffalo-derived B. bovis RAP-1 and T. orientalis MPSP sequences were different from those previously described from cattle in this country.

  14. “Tinca Gobba Dorata del Pianalto di Poirino”: genetic characterization by microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Di Stasio

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Tinca Gobba Dorata del Pianalto di Poirino (Golden humped tench of Poirino highland, PO, the only Italian fish with the Protected Designation of Origin, was characterized by seven microsatellites and compared to three wild populations living in different lakes of Italy (Valagola, VA; Trasimeno. TR; Bolsena, BO. The PO population showed high variability values (number of effective alleles: 2.70 vs 1.62 to 2.20; expected heterozygosity: 0.49 vs 0.29 to 0.40. The analysis of between-population differentiation indicated that PO significantly differed from the others (FST = 0.039 to 0.097, P< 0.05, while BO and TR were the most similar, consistently with their geographic proximity. The Neigbour-Joining tree revealed a clear separation between Northern and Central populations, with a bootstrap support of 97%. The population differentiation was reflected by the results of the assignement test, with 64% to 92% of the individuals correctly assigned to the original population, and a probability ranging from 76% to 95%. No individuals belonging to other populations were erroneously assigned to PO. A more detailed analysis of the PO population, showed a similar genetic variability within the 15 considered ponds and a low degree of differentiation between ponds, with the exception of one “historical” pond, which can be considered as the reservoir of the variability, thus deserving to be preserved. The results indicate that the Tinca Gobba Dorata del Pianalto di Poirino, despite being farmed, has a high level of within-population diversity and is greatly differentiated from the other Italian populations considered. The possibility of applying the assignment test in the framework of the product traceability deserves further investigation.

  15. GENETIC DIVESITY AND MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF MUNGBEAN GENOTYPES (Vigna radiata (L. Wilczek

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    B. Laxmi Prasanna

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was undertaken to examine the genetic divergence in 50 mungbean germplasm lines for 13 characters using Mahalanobis D2 statistics. The genotypes grouped into eight clusters. Cluster VII had maximum intra-cluster distance while inter-cluster distance was highest between clusters V and VII. Cluster means indicated that none of the clusters was superior for all the characters studied. Therefore, hybridization between genotypes belonging to different clusters is suggested for development of superior genotypes. 10 SSR primers were used for molecular study of which only one gave slight difference among 19 mungbean genotypes. The quality and quantity of DNA used for amplification by PCR is the key to reproducible results and success of genotyping. Especially, DNA purity is extremely crucial for obtaining clear and discriminate patterns. DNA extraction from mungbean is difficult due to presence of contaminants such as phenols. Therefore, the present study was under taken to obtain high quality and pure DNA in mungbean. With few modifications four different DNA extraction protocols were tried in the present study to obtain high quality and pure DNA viz., (I Doyle and Doyle (1987, (ii Method of Murray and Thompson (1980, (iii Porebski et al.(1997, and (iv Lin et al. (2001. Out of the four methods tried for DNA extraction, the method of Lin et al. (2001 was found most efficient, as the DNA obtained through this protocol was relatively pure which gave amplyfying products in the PCR. The genotype used for the standardization was MGG -361. Molecular characterization of 19 randomly chosen mungbean genotypes was attempted with the eight standardized primers. None of the primers showed scorable polymorphism. The primers VR4, VR5 and VR9, exhibited non specific bands, in addition to the monomorphic bands

  16. Genetic characterization of the influenza A pandemic (H1N1 2009 virus isolates from India.

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    Varsha A Potdar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Influenza A pandemic H1N1 2009 (H1N1pdm virus appeared in India in May 2009 and thereafter outbreaks with considerable morbidity and mortality have been reported from many parts of the country. Continuous monitoring of the genetic makeup of the virus is essential to understand its evolution within the country in relation to global diversification and to track the mutations that may affect the behavior of the virus. METHODS: H1N1pdm viruses were isolated from both recovered and fatal cases representing major cities and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses of six concatenated whole genomes and the hemagglutinin (HA gene of seven more isolates from May-September 2009 was performed with reference to 685 whole genomes of global isolates available as of November 24, 2009. Molecular characterization of all the 8 segments was carried out for known pathogenic markers. RESULTS: The first isolate of May 2009 belonged to clade 5. Although clade 7 was the dominant H1N1pdm lineage in India, both clades 6 and 7 were found to be co-circulating. The neuraminidase of all the Indian isolates possessed H275, the marker for sensitivity to the neuraminidase inhibitor Oseltamivir. Some of the mutations in HA are at or in the vicinity of antigenic sites and may therefore be of possible antigenic significance. Among these a D222G mutation in the HA receptor binding domain was found in two of the eight Indian isolates obtained from fatal cases. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of the 13 Indian isolates grouped in the globally most widely circulating H1N1pdm clade 7. Further, correlations of the mutations specific to clade 7 Indian isolates to viral fitness and adaptability in the country remains to be understood. The D222G mutation in HA from isolates of fatal cases needs to be studied for pathogenicity.

  17. Isolation and characterization of renal erythropoietin-producing cells from genetically produced anemia mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Pan

    Full Text Available Understanding the nature of renal erythropoietin-producing cells (REPs remains a central challenge for elucidating the mechanisms involved in hypoxia and/or anemia-induced erythropoietin (Epo production in adult mammals. Previous studies have shown that REPs are renal peritubular cells, but further details are lacking. Here, we describe an approach to isolate and characterize REPs. We bred mice bearing an Epo gene allele to which green fluorescent protein (GFP reporter cDNA was knocked-in (Epo(GFP with mice bearing an Epo gene allele lacking the 3' enhancer (Epo(Δ3'E. Mice harboring the mutant Epo(GFP/Δ3'E gene exhibited anemia (average Hematocrit 18% at 4 to 6 days after birth, and this perinatal anemia enabled us to identify and purify REPs based on GFP expression from the kidney. Light and confocal microscopy revealed that GFP immunostaining was confined to fibroblastic cells that reside in the peritubular interstitial space, confirming our previous observation in Epo-GFP transgenic reporter assays. Flow cytometry analyses revealed that the GFP fraction constitutes approximately 0.2% of the whole kidney cells and 63% of GFP-positive cells co-express CD73 (a marker for cortical fibroblasts and Epo-expressing cells in the kidney. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses confirmed that Epo expression was increased by approximately 100-fold in the purified population of REPs compared with that of the unsorted cells or CD73-positive fraction. Gene expression analyses showed enrichment of Hif2α and Hif3α mRNA in the purified population of REPs. The genetic approach described here provides a means to isolate a pure population of REPs, allowing the analysis of gene expression of a defined population of cells essential for Epo production in the kidney. This has provided evidence that positive regulation by HIF2α and negative regulation by HIF3α might be necessary for correct renal Epo induction.

  18. Genetic characterization of hepatitis C virus strains in Estonia: fluctuations in the predominating subtype with time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallo, Tatjana; Norder, Helene; Tefanova, Valentina; Krispin, Tõnu; Schmidt, Jelena; Ilmoja, Madis; Orgulas, Karen; Pruunsild, Kaije; Priimägi, Ludmilla; Magnius, Lars O

    2007-04-01

    During the last decade, there has been a dramatic increase in intravenous drug use in young adults in Estonia with an increased incidence of both hepatitis B and C as a consequence. Since genetic data are limited regarding hepatitis C virus (HCV) strains in Estonia, the aim of the study was to characterize HCV strains in different risk groups to determine their relatedness to strains from other geographical regions. Three hundred fifty-three anti-HCV positive sera collected during 1994-2004 from hospitalized patients, blood donors and health care workers were used as source of HCV RNA. Two hundred nine (59%) of the sera were positive for HCV RNA by PCR directed to the 5'-UTR region. For 174 strains the HCV subtype was determined by analyses of the NS5B and/or the 5'UTR-core regions. 1b (71%) was the most common subtype followed by 3a (24%), 2c (2%), 1a (1%), and 2a (1%). The 1b and 3a strains were similar to strains from other regions of the former USSR. Within genotype 1b there were several HCV lineages. However, for 3a there seemed to be two separate introductions into Estonia. There was a relative shift from subtype 1b to 3a in 1999-2000 with a further replacement of 3a with 1b in intravenous drug users in 2001 and onwards (P < 0.05). However, both subtypes were found to co-circulate in the community independent of risk factors. One patient was infected with the 2k/1b recombinant presumed to originate from St. Petersburg being the first isolate of this recombinant recovered outside Russia. PMID:17311333

  19. Genetic diversity and molecular characterization of several Heliconia species in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaza, L; Marulanda, M L; López, A M

    2012-12-19

    Researchers have classified the Heliconia genus as a group of highly variable and diverse plants. Species and cultivars are visually differentiated primarily on the basis of the color and size of inflorescence bracts. At taxonomic level, flower type (parabolic, sigmoid, or erect) and size are taken into account. The vast morphological diversity of heliconias at intra-specific, intra-population, and varietal levels in central-west Colombia prompted the present study. We characterized the genetic variability of 67 genotypes of cultivated heliconias belonging to Heliconia caribaea Lamarck, H. bihai (L.) L., H. orthotricha L. Andersson, H. stricta Huber, H. wagneriana Petersen, and H. psittacorum L. f., as well as that of several interspecific hybrids such as H. psittacorum L. f. x H. spathocircinata Aristeguieta and H. caribaea Lamarck x H. bihai (L.) L. We also created an approximation to their phylogenetic analysis. Molecular analysis using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers revealed a total of 170 bands. Two large, well-defined groups resulted: the first grouped cultivars of the very closely related H. caribaea and H. bihai species with those of H. orthotricha and H. psittacorum, and the second grouped H. stricta and H. wagneriana cultivars. The lowest percentage of polymorphism was found in H. psittacorum (17.65%) and the highest was in H. stricta (55.88%). Using AFLP, phylogenetic analysis of the species studied revealed the monophyletic origin of the Heliconiaceae family, and identified the Heliconia subgenus as monophyletic while providing evidence of the polyphyletic origin of several representatives of the Stenochlamys subgenus.

  20. Genetic diversity and molecular characterization of several Heliconia species in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaza, L; Marulanda, M L; López, A M

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have classified the Heliconia genus as a group of highly variable and diverse plants. Species and cultivars are visually differentiated primarily on the basis of the color and size of inflorescence bracts. At taxonomic level, flower type (parabolic, sigmoid, or erect) and size are taken into account. The vast morphological diversity of heliconias at intra-specific, intra-population, and varietal levels in central-west Colombia prompted the present study. We characterized the genetic variability of 67 genotypes of cultivated heliconias belonging to Heliconia caribaea Lamarck, H. bihai (L.) L., H. orthotricha L. Andersson, H. stricta Huber, H. wagneriana Petersen, and H. psittacorum L. f., as well as that of several interspecific hybrids such as H. psittacorum L. f. x H. spathocircinata Aristeguieta and H. caribaea Lamarck x H. bihai (L.) L. We also created an approximation to their phylogenetic analysis. Molecular analysis using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers revealed a total of 170 bands. Two large, well-defined groups resulted: the first grouped cultivars of the very closely related H. caribaea and H. bihai species with those of H. orthotricha and H. psittacorum, and the second grouped H. stricta and H. wagneriana cultivars. The lowest percentage of polymorphism was found in H. psittacorum (17.65%) and the highest was in H. stricta (55.88%). Using AFLP, phylogenetic analysis of the species studied revealed the monophyletic origin of the Heliconiaceae family, and identified the Heliconia subgenus as monophyletic while providing evidence of the polyphyletic origin of several representatives of the Stenochlamys subgenus. PMID:23212400

  1. Genetic characterization of three Cuban Trichomonas vaginalis virus. Phylogeny of Totiviridae family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Jorge; Rojas, Lazara; Sariego, Idalia; Fernández-Calienes, Ayme

    2012-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis can be infected with double stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses known as T. vaginalis virus (TVV). This viral infection may have important implications for trichomonal virulence and disease pathogenesis. In this study we identified and genetic characterized three strains of TVVs isolated from T. vaginalis in Cuba. The three new predicted sequences of capsid protein and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase amounted to the previously determined 20 TVV sequences and other 21 viruses of Totiviridae family were used for a phylogenetic analysis. Four distinct monophyletic clades are shown in a phylogenetic tree. One corresponds with TVVs, other with Victorivirus, Leishmaniavirus and Eimeria brunetti virus and, other with viruses of the genus Totivirus and the last with Giardiavirus. The E. brunetti virus is identified in the phylogenetic tree as independent taxon between Leishmaniavirus and Victorivirus isolates, most closely related to Victorivirus. TVV constitute a monophyletic cluster distinguishable from all other viruses in Totiviridae family. This result suggested that TVV may be grouped in a separated genus and not inside of Giardiavirus. TVVs appear to be more closely related to protozoan viruses in the genus Leishmaniavirus and to fungal viruses in the genus Victorivirus than to other protozoan and fungal viruses in Giardiavirus and Totivirus. Among TVVs, four main groups can be recognized within Trichomonasvirus cluster, which correspond with the previous species classification proposed. Further studies, with more TVV strains, especially TVV3 and 4 strains, are needed in order to determine the phylogenetic relationship among Trichomonasvirus genus and specifically if TVV2 and 3 each also constitute a well-delimited group. PMID:22075038

  2. Characterizing the physical and genetic structure of the lodgepole pine × jack pine hybrid zone: mosaic structure and differential introgression

    OpenAIRE

    Cullingham, Catherine I; James, Patrick M. A.; Cooke, Janice E.K.; Coltman, David W

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the physical and genetic structure of hybrid zones can illuminate factors affecting their formation and stability. In north-central Alberta, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud. var. latifolia) and jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb) form a complex and poorly defined hybrid zone. Better knowledge of this zone is relevant, given the recent host expansion of mountain pine beetle into jack pine. We characterized the zone by genotyping 1998 lodgepole, jack pine, and hybrids f...

  3. Definition of Genetically Distinct Attenuation Mechanisms in Naturally Virulence-Attenuated Listeria monocytogenes by Comparative Cell Culture and Molecular Characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Angela; Chan, Yvonne; Wiedmann, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen able to cause serious disease in humans and animals. Not all isolates are equally pathogenic, however, and several isolates have been characterized as naturally virulence attenuated. We sought to identify the genetic basis of natural virulence attenuation using cell culture assays and molecular techniques. By comparing the phenotypes of naturally virulence-attenuated isolates to those of defined virulence gene mutants in plaque, cytotoxicity, and...

  4. Common Ancestry of Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato Strains from North America and Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Postic, D; Ras, N. Marti; Lane, R S; Humair, P.-F.; Wittenbrink, M. M.; Baranton, G

    1999-01-01

    Ten atypical European Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (Borrelia spp.) strains were genetically characterized, and the diversity was compared to that encountered among related Borrelia spp. from North America. Phylogenetic analyses of a limited region of the genome and of the whole genome extend existing knowledge about borrelial diversity reported earlier in Europe and the United States. Our results accord with the evidence that North American and European strains may have a common ancestry.

  5. Integrating mechanistic and polymorphism data to characterize human genetic susceptibility for environmental chemical risk assessment in the 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortensen, Holly M., E-mail: mortensen.holly@epa.gov [Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, National Center for Computational Toxicology, US EPA, 109 TW Alexander Dr., Mailcode B205-01, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Euling, Susan Y. [Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, National Center for Environmental Assessment, US EPA, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Mail Code 8623P, Washington, DC 20460 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Response to environmental chemicals can vary widely among individuals and between population groups. In human health risk assessment, data on susceptibility can be utilized by deriving risk levels based on a study of a susceptible population and/or an uncertainty factor may be applied to account for the lack of information about susceptibility. Defining genetic susceptibility in response to environmental chemicals across human populations is an area of interest in the NAS' new paradigm of toxicity pathway-based risk assessment. Data from high-throughput/high content (HT/HC), including -omics (e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) technologies, have been integral to the identification and characterization of drug target and disease loci, and have been successfully utilized to inform the mechanism of action for numerous environmental chemicals. Large-scale population genotyping studies may help to characterize levels of variability across human populations at identified target loci implicated in response to environmental chemicals. By combining mechanistic data for a given environmental chemical with next generation sequencing data that provides human population variation information, one can begin to characterize differential susceptibility due to genetic variability to environmental chemicals within and across genetically heterogeneous human populations. The integration of such data sources will be informative to human health risk assessment.

  6. Integrating mechanistic and polymorphism data to characterize human genetic susceptibility for environmental chemical risk assessment in the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Response to environmental chemicals can vary widely among individuals and between population groups. In human health risk assessment, data on susceptibility can be utilized by deriving risk levels based on a study of a susceptible population and/or an uncertainty factor may be applied to account for the lack of information about susceptibility. Defining genetic susceptibility in response to environmental chemicals across human populations is an area of interest in the NAS' new paradigm of toxicity pathway-based risk assessment. Data from high-throughput/high content (HT/HC), including -omics (e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) technologies, have been integral to the identification and characterization of drug target and disease loci, and have been successfully utilized to inform the mechanism of action for numerous environmental chemicals. Large-scale population genotyping studies may help to characterize levels of variability across human populations at identified target loci implicated in response to environmental chemicals. By combining mechanistic data for a given environmental chemical with next generation sequencing data that provides human population variation information, one can begin to characterize differential susceptibility due to genetic variability to environmental chemicals within and across genetically heterogeneous human populations. The integration of such data sources will be informative to human health risk assessment

  7. Characterization of soybean storage and allergen protein affected by environmental and genetic factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowledge of the impact of genetic variability and diverse environments on the protein composition of crop seed is of value for the comparative safety assessments in the development of genetically engineered (GMO) crops. The objective of this study was to determine the role of genotype (G), environ...

  8. Physical and genetic characterization of the IncI plasmid R144-drd3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartskeerl, R.A.; Guchte, M. v.d.; Zuidweg, E.M.; Hoekstra, W.P.M.

    1984-01-01

    A physical and genetic map of the IncI plasmid R144-drd3 was obtained by determining restriction endonuclease sites and by physical and genetic analysis of cloned fragments, of TnI insertion mutants and of deletion mutants.

  9. Genetic diversity characterization of cassava cultivars (Manihot esculenta Crantz.: I RAPD markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colombo Carlos

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available RAPD markers were used to investigate the genetic diversity of 31 Brazilian cassava clones. The results were compared with the genetic diversity revealed by botanical descriptors. Both sets of variates revealed identical relationships among the cultivars. Multivariate analysis of genetic similarities placed genotypes destinated for consumption "in nature" in one group, and cultivars useful for flour production in another. Brazil?s abundance of landraces presents a broad dispersion and is consequently an important resource of genetic variability. The botanical descriptors were not able to differentiate thirteen pairs of cultivars compared two-by-two, while only one was not differentiated by RAPD markers. These results showed the power of RAPD markers over botanical descriptors in studying genetic diversity, identifying duplicates, as well as validating, or improving a core collection. The latter is particularly important in this vegetatively propagated crop.

  10. Genetic characterization of Greek population isolates reveals strong genetic drift at missense and trait-associated variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Hatzikotoulas, Konstantinos; Xifara, Dionysia Kiara; Colonna, Vincenza; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Ritchie, Graham R S; Southam, Lorraine; Gilly, Arthur; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Fatumo, Segun; Matchan, Angela; Rayner, Nigel W; Ntalla, Ioanna; Mezzavilla, Massimo; Chen, Yuan; Kiagiadaki, Chrysoula; Zengini, Eleni; Mamakou, Vasiliki; Athanasiadis, Antonis; Giannakopoulou, Margarita; Kariakli, Vassiliki-Eirini; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Karabarinde, Alex; Sandhu, Manjinder; McVean, Gil; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Tsafantakis, Emmanouil; Karaleftheri, Maria; Xue, Yali; Dedoussis, George; Zeggini, Eleftheria

    2014-01-01

    Isolated populations are emerging as a powerful study design in the search for low-frequency and rare variant associations with complex phenotypes. Here we genotype 2,296 samples from two isolated Greek populations, the Pomak villages (HELIC-Pomak) in the North of Greece and the Mylopotamos villages (HELIC-MANOLIS) in Crete. We compare their genomic characteristics to the general Greek population and establish them as genetic isolates. In the MANOLIS cohort, we observe an enrichment of missense variants among the variants that have drifted up in frequency by more than fivefold. In the Pomak cohort, we find novel associations at variants on chr11p15.4 showing large allele frequency increases (from 0.2% in the general Greek population to 4.6% in the isolate) with haematological traits, for example, with mean corpuscular volume (rs7116019, P=2.3 × 10(-26)). We replicate this association in a second set of Pomak samples (combined P=2.0 × 10(-36)). We demonstrate significant power gains in detecting medical trait associations.

  11. The influence of the arid Andean high plateau on the phylogeography and population genetics of guanaco (Lama guanicoe) in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Juan C; González, Benito A; Poulin, Elie; Casey, Ciara S; Johnson, Warren E

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the phylogeography and population genetics of the largest wild artiodactyl in the arid and cold-temperate South American environments, the guanaco (Lama guanicoe) was conducted. Patterns of molecular genetic structure were described using 514 bp of mtDNA sequence and 14 biparentally inherited microsatellite markers from 314 samples. These individuals originated from 17 localities throughout the current distribution across Peru, Bolivia, Argentina and Chile. This confirmed well-defined genetic differentiation and subspecies designation of populations geographically separated to the northwest (L. g. cacsilensis) and southeast (L. g. guanicoe) of the central Andes plateau. However, these populations are not completely isolated, as shown by admixture prevalent throughout a limited contact zone, and a strong signal of expansion from north to south in the beginning of the Holocene. Microsatellite analyses differentiated three northwestern and 4-5 southeastern populations, suggesting patterns of genetic contact among these populations. Possible genetic refuges were identified, as were source-sink patterns of gene flow at historical and recent time scales. Conservation and management of guanaco should be implemented with an understanding of these local population dynamics while also considering the preservation of broader adaptive variation and evolutionary processes.

  12. Genetic characterization of Bagarius species using cytochrome c oxidase I and cytochrome b genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Muniyandi; Raja, Manikam; Vikram, Potnuru

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we first inferred the genetic variability of two Bagarius bagarius populations collected from Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers of India using two mtDNA markers. Sequence analysis of COI gene did not show significant differences between two populations whereas cytochrome b gene showed significant differences between two populations. Followed by, genetic relationship of B. bagarius and B. yarrielli was analyzed using COI and cytochrome b gene and the results showed a higher level genetic variation between two species. The present study provides support for the suitability of COI and cytochrome b genes for the identification of B. bagarius and B. yarrielli.

  13. Development of molecular tools for characterization and genetic diversity analysis in Tunisian fig (Ficus carica) cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatti, Khaled; Baraket, Ghada; Ben Abdelkrim, Ahmed; Saddoud, Olfa; Mars, Messaoud; Trifi, Mokhtar; Salhi Hannachi, Amel

    2010-10-01

    Fig, Ficus carica L., is a useful genetic resource for commercial cultivation. In this study, RAPD (60), ISSR (48), RAMPO (63), and SSR (34) markers were compared to detect polymorphism and to establish genetic relationships among Tunisian fig tree cultivars. The statistical procedures conducted on the combined data show considerable genetic diversity, and the tested markers discriminated all fig genotypes studied. The identification key established on the basis of SSR permitted the unambiguous discrimination of cultivars and confirmed the reliability of SSR for fingerprinting fig genotypes. The study findings are discussed in relation to the establishment of a national reference collection that will aid in the conservation of Tunisian fig resources.

  14. [Genetics and genetic counseling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzi, Claudia; Liut, Francesca; Dallera, Nadia; Mazza, Cinzia; Magistroni, Riccardo; Savoldi, Gianfranco; Scolari, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is the most frequent genetic disease, characterized by progressive development of bilateral renal cysts. Two causative genes have been identified: PKD1 and PKD2. ADPKD phenotype is highly variable. Typically, ADPKD is an adult onset disease. However, occasionally, ADPKD manifests as very early onset disease. The phenotypic variability of ADPKD can be explained at three genetic levels: genic, allelic and gene modifier effects. Recent advances in molecular screening for PKD gene mutations and the introduction of the new next generation sequencing (NGS)- based genotyping approach have generated considerable improvement regarding the knowledge of genetic basis of ADPKD. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the genetics of ADPKD, focusing on new insights in genotype-phenotype correlation and exploring novel clinical approach to genetic testing. Evaluation of these new genetic information requires a multidisciplinary approach involving a nephrologist and a clinical geneticist. PMID:27067213

  15. Genetic characterization of the Neotropical catfish Pimelodus maculatus (Pimelodidae, Siluriformes) in the Upper Uruguay River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribolli, Josiane; de Melo, Cláudio Manoel Rodrigues; Zaniboni-Filho, Evoy

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater fish present unique challenges when one attempts to understand the factors that determine the structure of their populations. Habitat fragmentation is a leading cause of population decline that threatens ecosystems worldwide. In this study, we investigated the conservation status of genetic variability in the Neotropical catfish (Pimelodus maculatus). Specifically, we examined the structure and genetic diversity of this species in a region of the Upper Uruguay River fragmented by natural barriers and dams. There was no genetic structure among the four sites analyzed, indicating the existence of only one population group. A combination of environmental management and genetic monitoring should be used to minimize the impact of impoundment on panmitic populations of migratory fish species. PMID:23271936

  16. Genetic characterization of an elite coffee germplasm assessed by gSSR and EST-SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missio, R F; Caixeta, E T; Zambolim, E M; Pena, G F; Zambolim, L; Dias, L A S; Sakiyama, N S

    2011-10-06

    Coffee is one of the main agrifood commodities traded worldwide. In 2009, coffee accounted for 6.1% of the value of Brazilian agricultural production, generating a revenue of US$6 billion. Despite the importance of coffee production in Brazil, it is supported by a narrow genetic base, with few accessions. Molecular differentiation and diversity of a coffee breeding program were assessed with gSSR and EST-SSR markers. The study comprised 24 coffee accessions according to their genetic origin: arabica accessions (six traditional genotypes of C. arabica), resistant arabica (six leaf rust-resistant C. arabica genotypes with introgression of Híbrido de Timor), robusta (five C. canephora genotypes), Híbrido de Timor (three C. arabica x C. canephora), triploids (three C. arabica x C. racemosa), and racemosa (one C. racemosa). Allele and polymorphism analysis, AMOVA, the Student t-test, Jaccard's dissimilarity coefficient, cluster analysis, correlation of genetic distances, and discriminant analysis, were performed. EST-SSR markers gave 25 exclusive alleles per genetic group, while gSSR showed 47, which will be useful for differentiating accessions and for fingerprinting varieties. The gSSR markers detected a higher percentage of polymorphism among (35% higher on average) and within (42.9% higher on average) the genetic groups, compared to EST-SSR markers. The highest percentage of polymorphism within the genetic groups was found with gSSR markers for robusta (89.2%) and for resistant arabica (39.5%). It was possible to differentiate all genotypes including the arabica-related accessions. Nevertheless, combined use of gSSR and EST-SSR markers is recommended for coffee molecular characterization, because EST-SSRs can provide complementary information.

  17. Antigenic and genetic characterization of Bordetella pertussis recovered from Quebec, Canada, 2002-2014: detection of a genetic shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuel, Michelle; Lefebvre, Brigitte; Whyte, Kathleen; Hayden, Kristy; De Serres, Gaston; Brousseau, Nicholas; Tsang, Raymond S W

    2016-05-01

    Despite vaccination, cyclical peaks of Bordetella pertussis incidence rates are still observed in Canada and other developed countries, making pertussis one of the most prevalent vaccine preventable bacterial diseases. In the postacellular vaccine era, evolution of bacterial strains has resulted in strains with altered vaccine antigens. Previous Canadian studies have focused on isolates mainly from the provinces of Ontario and Alberta, with only small numbers of isolates from other provinces. Therefore, in this study, we examined a larger sample (n = 52) of isolates from Quebec, Canada, between 2002 and 2014. Isolates were characterized by serotype, sequence type, and prevalence of pertactin deficiency. The Quebec isolates shared characteristics similar to other Canadian isolates and to isolates circulating globally. Although pertactin-deficient isolates were not present, a significant shift in sequence type was observed in more recent years. This study highlights the importance of continually monitoring disease-causing isolates to track evolutionary trends and gain a better understanding of the molecular epidemiology of pertussis in Canada.

  18. Genetic Characterization of Legionella pneumophila Isolated from a Common Watershed in Comunidad Valenciana, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Busó, Leonor; Coscollá, Mireia; Pinto-Carbó, Marta; Catalán, Vicente; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila infects humans to produce legionellosis and Pontiac fever only from environmental sources. In order to establish control measures and study the sources of outbreaks it is essential to know extent and distribution of strain variants of this bacterium in the environment. Sporadic and outbreak-related cases of legionellosis have been historically frequent in the Comunidad Valenciana region (CV, Spain), with a high prevalence in its Southeastern-most part (BV). Environmental investigations for the detection of Legionella pneumophila are performed in this area routinely. We present a population genetics study of 87 L. pneumophila strains isolated in 13 different localities of the BV area irrigated from the same watershed and compare them to a dataset of 46 strains isolated in different points of the whole CV. Our goal was to compare environmental genetic variation at two different geographic scales, at county and regional levels. Genetic diversity, recombination and population structure were analyzed with Sequence-Based Typing data and three intergenic regions. The results obtained reveal a low, but detectable, level of genetic differentiation between both datasets, mainly, but not only, attributed to the occurrence of unusual variants of the neuA locus present in the BV populations. This differentiation is still detectable when the 10 loci considered are analyzed independently, despite the relatively high incidence of the most common genetic variant in this species, sequence type 1 (ST-1). However, when the genetic data are considered without their associated geographic information, four major groups could be inferred at the genetic level which did not show any correlation with sampling locations. The overall results indicate that the population structure of these environmental samples results from the joint action of a global, widespread ST-1 along with genetic differentiation at shorter geographic distances, which in this case are related to

  19. Microsatellite characterization of grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) genetic diversity in Asturias (Northern Spain)

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno-Sanz, Paula; Dolores, María; Suárez, Belén

    2013-01-01

    The genetic heritage of the Asturian grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) has been declining over the past century due to the phylloxera attack and the further abandonment of this culture. In addition, efforts in recent years to restore the Asturian vineyard with the pulling-up of old vineyards and replanting with cultivars endorsed by Cangas Quality Wine regulations are contributing even more to this genetic erosion. The aim of this study was the evaluation and identification of the phytogenetic...

  20. Transference of microsatellite markers from Eucalyptus spp to Acca sellowiana and the successful use of this technique in genetic characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Louise dos Santos

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The pineapple guava (Acca sellowiana, known in portuguese as the goiabeira-serrana or "Feijoa", is a native fruit tree from southern Brazil and northern Uruguay that has commercial potential due to the quality and unique flavor of its fruits. Knowledge of genetic variability is an important tool in various steps of a breeding program, which can be facilitated by the use of molecular markers. The conservation of repeated sequences among related species permits the transferability of microsatellite markers from Eucalyptus spp. to A. sellowiana for testing. We used primers developed for Eucalyptus to characterize A. sellowiana accessions. Out of 404 primers tested, 180 amplified visible products and 38 were polymorphic. A total of 48 alleles were detected with ten Eucalyptus primer pairs against DNA from 119 A. sellowiana accessions. The mean expected heterozygosity among accessions was 0.64 and the mean observed heterozygosity 0.55. A high level of genetic diversity was also observed in the dendrogram, where the degree of genetic dissimilarity ranged from 0 to 65% among the 119 genotypes tested. This study demonstrates the possibility of transferring microsatellite markers between species of different genera in addition to evaluating the extent of genetic variability among plant accessions.

  1. Characterization of the single stranded DNA binding protein SsbB encoded in the Gonoccocal Genetic Island.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samta Jain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae carry a Gonococcal Genetic Island which encodes a type IV secretion system involved in the secretion of ssDNA. We characterize the GGI-encoded ssDNA binding protein, SsbB. Close homologs of SsbB are located within a conserved genetic cluster found in genetic islands of different proteobacteria. This cluster encodes DNA-processing enzymes such as the ParA and ParB partitioning proteins, the TopB topoisomerase, and four conserved hypothetical proteins. The SsbB homologs found in these clusters form a family separated from other ssDNA binding proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In contrast to most other SSBs, SsbB did not complement the Escherichia coli ssb deletion mutant. Purified SsbB forms a stable tetramer. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and fluorescence titration assays, as well as atomic force microscopy demonstrate that SsbB binds ssDNA specifically with high affinity. SsbB binds single-stranded DNA with minimal binding frames for one or two SsbB tetramers of 15 and 70 nucleotides. The binding mode was independent of increasing Mg(2+ or NaCl concentrations. No role of SsbB in ssDNA secretion or DNA uptake could be identified, but SsbB strongly stimulated Topoisomerase I activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that these novel SsbBs play an unknown role in the maintenance of genetic islands.

  2. Insights to genetic characterization tools for epidemiological tracking of Francisella tularensis in Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Wahab

    Full Text Available Tularaemia, caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis, is endemic in Sweden and is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of three different genetic typing systems to link a genetic type to the source and place of tularemia infection in Sweden. Canonical single nucleotide polymorphisms (canSNPs, MLVA including five variable number of tandem repeat loci and PmeI-PFGE were tested on 127 F. tularensis positive specimens collected from Swedish case-patients. All three typing methods identified two major genetic groups with near-perfect agreement. Higher genetic resolution was obtained with canSNP and MLVA compared to PFGE; F. tularensis samples were first assigned into ten phylogroups based on canSNPs followed by 33 unique MLVA types. Phylogroups were geographically analysed to reveal complex phylogeographic patterns in Sweden. The extensive phylogenetic diversity found within individual counties posed a challenge to linking specific genetic types with specific geographic locations. Despite this, a single phylogroup (B.22, defined by a SNP marker specific to a lone Swedish sequenced strain, did link genetic type with a likely geographic place. This result suggests that SNP markers, highly specific to a particular reference genome, may be found most frequently among samples recovered from the same location where the reference genome originated. This insight compels us to consider whole-genome sequencing (WGS as the appropriate tool for effectively linking specific genetic type to geography. Comparing the WGS of an unknown sample to WGS databases of archived Swedish strains maximizes the likelihood of revealing those rare geographically informative SNPs.

  3. Genetic characterization of fast-growing rhizobia able to nodulate Prosopis alba in North Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Olga; Rivas, Raúl; García-Fraile, Paula; Abril, Adriana; Mateos, Pedro F; Martinez-Molina, Eustoquio; Velázquez, Encarna

    2007-12-01

    Prosopis is a Mimosaceae legume tree indigenous to South America and not naturalized in Europe. In this work 18 rhizobial strains nodulating Prosopis alba roots were isolated from a soil in North Spain that belong to eight different randomly amplified polymorphic DNA groups phylogenetically related to Sinorhizobium medicae, Sinorhizobium meliloti and Rhizobium giardinii according to their intergenic spacer and 16S rRNA gene sequences. The nodC genes of isolates close to S. medicae and S. meliloti were identical to those of S. medicae USDA 1,037(T) and S. meliloti LMG 6,133(T) and accordingly all these strains were able to nodulate both alfalfa and Prosopis. These nodC genes were phylogenetically divergent from those of the isolates close to R. giardinii that were identical to that of R. giardinii H152(T) and therefore all these strains formed nodules in common beans and Prosopis. The nodC genes of the strains isolated in Spain were phylogenetically divergent from that carried by Mesorhizobium chacoense Pr-5(T) and Sinorhizobium arboris LMG 1,4919(T) nodulating Prosopis in America and Africa, respectively. Therefore, Prosopis is a promiscuous host which can establish symbiosis with strains carrying very divergent nodC genes and this promiscuity may be an important advantage for this legume tree to be used in reforestation.

  4. Morphological Characterization and Assessment of Genetic Variability, Character Association, and Divergence in Soybean Mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Malek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity is important for crop improvement. An experiment was conducted during 2011 to study genetic variability, character association, and genetic diversity among 27 soybean mutants and four mother genotypes. Analysis of variance revealed significant differences among the mutants and mothers for nine morphological traits. Eighteen mutants performed superiorly to their mothers in respect to seed yield and some morphological traits including yield attributes. Narrow differences between phenotypic and genotypic coefficients of variation (PCV and GCV for most of the characters revealed less environmental influence on their expression. High values of heritability and genetic advance with high GCV for branch number, plant height, pod number, and seed weight can be considered as favorable attributes for soybean improvement through phenotypic selection and high expected genetic gain can be achieved. Pod and seed number and maturity period appeared to be the first order traits for higher yield and priority should be given in selection due to their strong associations and high magnitudes of direct effects on yield. Cluster analysis grouped 31 genotypes into five groups at the coefficient value of 235. The mutants/genotypes from cluster I and cluster II could be used for hybridization program with the mutants of clusters IV and V in order to develop high yielding mutant-derived soybean varieties for further improvement.

  5. GENETIC CHARACTERIZATION OF A BOVINE BREED (TABAPUA UNDER ARTIFICIAL SELECTION LOCATED IN THE AMAZON REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ednaldo da Silva Filho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brazil currently has the biggest commercial bovine cattle population in the world. Several different breeds that come from Europe and India compose it. They are primarily used for dairy and meat production. In Brazil, several high quality genetic background cattle are kept in a condition known as pure breed, meaning no other animal of different genetic background is interbreeding with them and consequently, affecting their genetic variability. Hence, these cattle are apparently vulnerable to lose of their genetic variability by continuous interbreed. This scenario has encouraged this study to evaluate the genetic variability of one cattle type, known in Brazil as Tabapua breed, located at the Brazilian Amazon, by using DNA microsatellites loci as molecular markers. Blood samples were randomly taken from 60 animals and submitted to DNA extraction, followed by multiplex PCR, using 11 microsatellites primers recommended by International Society of Animal Genetics (ISAG for paternity test in bovine. PCR products were genotyped in an automated DNA sequencer and polymorphic loci were found. They presented the following data: Average allele number: 6.727±1.679; Average effective allele number: 3.772±1.266; Shannon index: 1.454±0.302; Average heterozygosis: 0.706±0.101. Polymorphic Informative Content (PIC varied from 0.452 to 0.815; Average Fis was -0.037±0.054. The probability for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was not significant (p>0.05 for all loci. The power of discrimination and power exclusion were >0.999 and >0.981 respectively, for PE1 (with offspring and their parental genotypes and PE2 (without one of the parental genotypes. The pure bovine breed Tabapua evaluated in this study showed significantly high genetic variability. Because Tabapua is a commercial breed, in which reproductive animals are selected for business, the high genetic variability can be linked to the high circulation of animals purchased for reproduction

  6. Characterization and genetic variability of feed-borne and clinical animal/human Aspergillus fumigatus strains using molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Gabriela A; Coelho, Irene; Reynoso, María M; Soleiro, Carla; Cavaglieri, Lilia R

    2015-09-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus, the major etiological agent of human and animal aspergillosis, is a toxigenic fungus largely regarded as a single species by macroscopic and microscopic features. However, molecular studies have demonstrated that several morphologically identified A. fumigatus strains might be genetically distinct. This work was aimed to apply PCR-restriction length fragment polymorphisms (PCR-RFLP) and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) molecular markers to characterize a set of feed-borne and clinical A. fumigatus sensu lato strains isolated from Argentina and Brazil and to determine and compare their genetic variability. All A. fumigatus strains had the same band profile and those typical of A. fumigatus sensu stricto positive controls by PCR-RFLP. Moreover, all Argentinian and Brazilian strains typified by RAPD showed similar band patterns to each other and to A. fumigatus sensu stricto reference strains regardless of their isolation source (animal feeds or human/animal clinical cases) and geographic origin. Genetic similarity coefficients ranged from 0.61 to 1.00, but almost all isolates showed 78% of genetic similarly suggesting that genetic variability was found at intraspecific level. Finally, benA sequencing confirmed its identification as A. fumigatus sensu stricto species. These results suggest that A. fumigatus sensu stricto is a predominant species into Aspergillus section Fumigati found in animal environments as well as in human/animal clinical cases, while other species may be rarely isolated. The strains involved in human and animal aspergillosis could come from the environment where this fungus is frequently found. Rural workers and animals would be constantly exposed.

  7. Genetic Characterization of Toxoplasma gondii from Zoo Wild¬life and Pet Birds in Fujian, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renfeng CHEN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Toxoplasmosis, a worldwide zoonotic disease, is caused by Toxo­plasma gondii. The distribution of genetic diversity of T. gondii in wild animals is of great importance to understand the transmission of the parasite in the environ­ment. However, little is known about T. gondii prevalence in wild animals and birds in China.Methods: We conducted the genetic characterization of T. gondii isolated from Zoo Wild Animals and Pet Birds in Fujian Province, Southeastern China. Heart tissues were collected from 45 zoo animals and 140 pet birds. After identified using B1 gene, the genetic diversity of T. gondii isolates were typed at 11 genetic markers, including SAG1,5’ and3’-SAG2, alternative SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, Apico, and CS3.Results: Seven of 45 zoo animals and 3 of 140 pet birds were positive by PCR amplifi­cation using T. gondii B1 gene specific primers. Of these positive isolates, 3 isolates from Black-capped (Cebus apella, Peacock (Peafowl and Budgerigar (Melopsitta­cus undulatus were successfully genotyped at 11 genetic loci, and grouped to three distinct genotypes: ToxoDB Genotype #9, #2 and #10, respectively.Conclusion: This is the first genotyping of T. gondii isolated from zoo wild animals and pet birds in Fujian, China. There is a potential risk for the transmission of this parasite through zoo wild animals and pet birds in this region.

  8. Characterizing the Genetic Diversity of Rainbow Trout in Support of Broodstock Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of molecular genetic technologies for broodstock management and selective breeding of aquaculture species is becoming increasingly more common with the continued development of species-specific genome tools and reagents. Rainbow trout are the most widely produced salmonid in the US, attract...

  9. Genetic characterization of Russian honey bee stock selected for improved resistance to Varroa destructor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maintenance of genetic diversity among breeding lines is important in selective breeding and stock management. The Russian Honey Bee Breeding Program has strived to maintain high levels of heterozygosity among its breeding lines since its inception in 1997. After numerous rounds of selection for res...

  10. Isolation and genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii from the gray wolf Canis lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known of the genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii circulating in wildlife. In the present study feral gray wolf (Canis lupus) from Minnesota were examined for T. gondii infection. Antibodies to T. gondii were detected in 130 (52.4%) of 248 wolves tested by the modified agglutination test...

  11. Genetic characterization of Golden mahseer (Tor putitora) populations using mitochondrial DNA markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sati, Jyoti; Kumar, Rohit; Sahoo, Prabhati Kumari; Patiyal, Rabindar S; Ali, Shahnawaz; Barat, Ashoktaru

    2015-02-01

    Golden Mahseer (Tor putitora) is an economically important fish of India and Southeast Asia. The present study examined the genetic variations between seven geographically isolated populations of T. putitora using Cyt b (Cytochrome b) and ATPase6/8 gene sequences of mitochondrial DNA. Analysis of 133 sequences of Cyt b (1141 bp) and 130 sequences of ATPase6/8 gene (842 bp) revealed 47 and 44 haplotypes, respectively. The estimated haplotype and nucleotide diversity was high in River Jia Bhoreli (Bhalukpong) population (h = 1.00000, π = 0.007121 for Cyt b and h = 0.90441 π = 0.004867 for ATPase6/8). Results of AMOVA indicated that majority of the genetic variations in both genes were due to variation among populations (60.79% for Cyt b and 51.41% for ATPase6/8 gene). The pairwise F(ST) comparison and neighbor-joining tree revealed high genetic divergence of River Jia Bhoreli population from other populations. The understanding of genetic variations of T. putitora populations will play a key role in conservation and management of this endangered fish species.

  12. Genetic characterization of egg weight, egg production and age at first egg in quails

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marubayashi Hidalgo, A.; Martins, E.N.; Santos, A.L.; Quadros, T.C.O.; Ton, A.P.S.; Teixeira, R.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research was to estimate genetic parameters for the traits egg weight, egg production in 189 days and age at first egg in three laying quails and one meat line of quails. Data was analyzed by Bayesian procedures using Gibbs sampling. The heritability estimates for egg weight, e

  13. Rat reverse genetics : generation and characterization of chemically induced rat mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boxtel, R.

    2010-01-01

    The use of animal models has been crucial for studying the function of genetic elements in the human genome. Embryonic stem (ES) cell-based homologous recombination (HR) has proven a very efficient technique for gene manipulation. However, this technique is not (yet) available for all model organism

  14. Introgression and genetic characterization of alien Fusarium head blight resistance in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alien species are an important source of genetic variability in wheat (Triticum spp.) and carry genes for resistance to numerous pathogens, including Fusarium graminearum Schwabe, the causal agent of Fusarium head blight (FHB). The goal of this project was to develop breeder-friendly, FHB-resistant ...

  15. Population genetics strategies to characterize long-distance dispersal of insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Population genetics strategies offer an alternative and powerful approach for obtaining information about long-distance movement, and have been widely used for examining patterns and magnitude of insect dispersal over geographic and temporal scales. Such strategies are based on the principle that ge...

  16. 美欧转基因食品安全政策比较研究%The Comparation Research about the Genetically Modified Food in Europe and America

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡日查; 马晨颉

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development of genetically modified food security of United States and Europe,the United States and Europe comparative analysis of the characteristics of genetically modified food safety policy and the causes,examine the problems and deficiencies of GM food safety policy exists. So our GM food safety policy development,should be based on the protection of national physical and mental health,through technical support,policy guidance and capacity building,promoting turn commercial application of gene technology research and genetically modified food,to protect our food security and food safety to provide support.%首先阐述了美欧转基因食品安全的发展现状,比较分析美欧转基因食品安全政策特点及形成原因,考察了我国转基因食品安全政策存在的问题和不足。为此,我国转基因食品安全政策制定,应在保障国民身心健康的基础上,通过相关技术支持、政策引导和能力建设,推进转基因技术的研发及转基因食品的商业化应用,为保障我国粮食安全和食品安全提供支撑。

  17. The Comparation Research about the Genetically Modified Food in Europe and America%美欧转基因食品安全政策比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡日查; 马晨颉

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development of genetically modified food security of United States and Europe,the United States and Europe comparative analysis of the characteristics of genetically modified food safety policy and the causes,examine the problems and deficiencies of GM food safety policy exists. So our GM food safety policy development,should be based on the protection of national physical and mental health,through technical support,policy guidance and capacity building,promoting turn commercial application of gene technology research and genetically modified food,to protect our food security and food safety to provide support.%首先阐述了美欧转基因食品安全的发展现状,比较分析美欧转基因食品安全政策特点及形成原因,考察了我国转基因食品安全政策存在的问题和不足。为此,我国转基因食品安全政策制定,应在保障国民身心健康的基础上,通过相关技术支持、政策引导和能力建设,推进转基因技术的研发及转基因食品的商业化应用,为保障我国粮食安全和食品安全提供支撑。

  18. Genetic characterization of avian influenza subtype H4N6 and H4N9 from live bird market, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitikoon Pravina

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A one year active surveillance program for influenza A viruses among avian species in a live-bird market (LBM in Bangkok, Thailand was conducted in 2009. Out of 970 samples collected, influenza A virus subtypes H4N6 (n = 2 and H4N9 (n = 1 were isolated from healthy Muscovy ducks. All three viruses were characterized by whole genome sequencing with subsequent phylogenetic analysis and genetic comparison. Phylogenetic analysis of all eight viral genes showed that the viruses clustered in the Eurasian lineage of influenza A viruses. Genetic analysis showed that H4N6 and H4N9 viruses display low pathogenic avian influenza characteristics. The HA cleavage site and receptor binding sites were conserved and resembled to LPAI viruses. This study is the first to report isolation of H4N6 and H4N9 viruses from birds in LBM in Thailand and shows the genetic diversity of the viruses circulating in the LBM. In addition, co-infection of H4N6 and H4N9 in the same Muscovy duck was observed.

  19. Characterizing the physical and genetic structure of the lodgepole pine × jack pine hybrid zone: mosaic structure and differential introgression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullingham, Catherine I; James, Patrick M A; Cooke, Janice E K; Coltman, David W

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the physical and genetic structure of hybrid zones can illuminate factors affecting their formation and stability. In north-central Alberta, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud. var. latifolia) and jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb) form a complex and poorly defined hybrid zone. Better knowledge of this zone is relevant, given the recent host expansion of mountain pine beetle into jack pine. We characterized the zone by genotyping 1998 lodgepole, jack pine, and hybrids from British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario, and Minnesota at 11 microsatellites. Using Bayesian algorithms, we calculated genetic ancestry and used this to model the relationship between species occurrence and environment. In addition, we analyzed the ancestry of hybrids to calculate the genetic contribution of lodgepole and jack pine. Finally, we measured the amount of gene flow between the pure species. We found the distribution of the pine classes is explained by environmental variables, and these distributions differ from classic distribution maps. Hybrid ancestry was biased toward lodgepole pine; however, gene flow between the two species was equal. The results of this study suggest that the hybrid zone is complex and influenced by environmental constraints. As a result of this analysis, range limits should be redefined. PMID:23346232

  20. Characterization of Carambola (Averrhoa carambola L. Plant Collection of Cibinong Plant Germplasm Garden Based on Phenotypic and Genetic Characters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dody Priadi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia as a rich biodiversity country has many superior fruit plant germplasms such as sweet star fruit or carambola (Averrhoa carambola L.. Some varieties of carambola which collected at the Germplasm Garden of Research Center for Biotechnology-LIPI have been used for parent trees of fruit plant production. Therefore, they have to be characterized both phenotypically and genetically. The objective of the study was to analyze the relationship between eight varieties of carambola i.e. Malaysia, Penang, Rawasari, Bangkok, Sembiring, Dewabaru, Demak and Dewimurni at the germplasm garden based on phenotypic and genetic characters. Phenotypic characters were observed directly in the field, whereas genetic characters were observed with RAPD markers using 10 primers. Phylogenetic analysis was done using NT-SYS software showed that there were three clusters of carambola varieties. Meanwhile, Malaysia and Penang varieties have closed relationships (96% compared with the other varieties. The result of the study would be dedicated to updating and completing the existing fruit plant collection database of Plants Germplasm Garden. 

  1. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers for genetic analysis of a Brazilian endangered tree species Caryocar brasiliense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collevatti, R G; Brondani, R V; Grattapaglia, D

    1999-12-01

    In this work we report the development and characterization of 10 microsatellite loci for the endangered tree species Caryocar brasiliense. Using genomic library enrichment, the efficiency of SSR marker development was 14.4% from sequencing data to operationally useful loci. Primer sequences for this set of 10 loci are made available together with their estimates of expected heterozygosity, probability of paternity exclusion and probability of identity. Mendelian inheritance and segregation was confirmed for all 10 loci in open-pollinated half-sib families as well as the absolute transferability of these 10 loci to five other species of the same genus. Number of alleles per locus ranged from 10 to 22 with a mean value of 16 and expected heterozygosity varying from 0.84 to 0.94. The combined probability of genetic identity was on the order of 10-17 clearly demonstrating that SSR multilocus genotypes are likely to be unique and capable of readily discriminating individuals of C. brasiliense. The very high combined probability of paternity exclusion (0.99999995) also indicates that these markers will permit detailed parentage studies in natural populations even in situations where both maternity and paternity are unknown. The battery of microsatellite markers developed and characterized in this study opens a new perspective for the generation of fundamental population genetic data for devising sound collection and conservation procedures for C. brasiliense and related species of the genus. PMID:10651920

  2. Characterization of pre breeding genetic stocks of urdbean (Vigna mungo L. Hepper) induced through mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pre-breeding genetic stocks using different doses of EMS, gamma rays and combination of both (EMS and Gamma rays) in two urdbean cultivar viz., PU-19 (Pant Urd-19) and PU-30 (Pant Urd-30) were induced. Out of a total 14 macro mutation selected from the different treatments of the mutagens in PU-19, narrow leaf mutant exhibited significantly higher yield/ plant as compared to the parent and some other mutants viz., Non hairy, Tall, and tendriller showed at par grain yield. All the seed and pod colour double mutations selected from the PU-30 showed significantly higher yield as compared. Such breeding stocks can be used for the further genetic enhancement of this crop. (author)

  3. Characterizing the genetic diversity of the monkey malaria parasite Plasmodium cynomolgi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Patrick L; Luo, Zunping; Divis, Paul C S; Friedrich, Volney K; Conway, David J; Singh, Balbir; Barnwell, John W; Carlton, Jane M; Sullivan, Steven A

    2016-06-01

    Plasmodium cynomolgi is a malaria parasite that typically infects Asian macaque monkeys, and humans on rare occasions. P. cynomolgi serves as a model system for the human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax, with which it shares such important biological characteristics as formation of a dormant liver stage and a preference to invade reticulocytes. While genomes of three P. cynomolgi strains have been sequenced, genetic diversity of P. cynomolgi has not been widely investigated. To address this we developed the first panel of P. cynomolgi microsatellite markers to genotype eleven P. cynomolgi laboratory strains and 18 field isolates from Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. We found diverse genotypes among most of the laboratory strains, though two nominally different strains were found to be genetically identical. We also investigated sequence polymorphism in two erythrocyte invasion gene families, the reticulocyte binding protein and Duffy binding protein genes, in these strains. We also observed copy number variation in rbp genes. PMID:26980604

  4. Genetic associations and functional characterization of M1 aminopeptidases and immune-mediated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, N; Brown, M A

    2014-12-01

    Endosplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1), endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 2 (ERAP2) and puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase (NPEPPS) are key zinc metallopeptidases that belong to the oxytocinase subfamily of M1 aminopeptidase family. NPEPPS catalyzes the processing of proteosome-derived peptide repertoire followed by trimming of antigenic peptides by ERAP1 and ERAP2 for presentation on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class I molecules. A series of genome-wide association studies have demonstrated associations of these aminopeptidases with a range of immune-mediated diseases such as ankylosing spondylitis, psoriasis, Behçet's disease, inflammatory bowel disease and type I diabetes, and significantly, genetic interaction between some aminopeptidases and HLA Class I loci with which these diseases are strongly associated. In this review, we highlight the current state of understanding of the genetic associations of this class of genes, their functional role in disease, and potential as therapeutic targets. PMID:25142031

  5. Genetic variability of bottle gourd Lagenaria siceraria (Mol. Standley and its morphological characterization by multivariate analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Emina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of bottle gourd Lagenaria siceraria (Mol. Standley germplasm was collected from different parts of the world. Genetic resource preservation and determination of genetic variability was carried out as a foundation for future breeding work. The germplasm diversity collected in Serbia is a result of its adaptation to diverse ecological conditions and farmers’ selection in accordance with their preference and ethnobotanical utilization. The broad intraspecific variation of the plant, fruit and seed morphology is a direct result of the research carried out. Principal component analysis (PCA of L. siceraria with 13 quantitative traits showed continuous variation among accessions, primarily due to fruit and seed size and shape. The evident reduction in trait variation is a direct result of the preference for ornamental use that favored certain shapes and sizes of the fruit, which has not significantly changed over the centuries.

  6. Genetic characterization of a noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus 2b isolated from cattle in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Shi, Xinchuan; Chen, Chaoyang; Wu, Hua

    2014-10-01

    In January 2013, several clinical signs of cattle with diarrhea, cough, nasal discharge, and fever were reported in Jilin province, China. One virus named SD1301 was isolated and identified. Complete genome of the virus is 12258nt in length and contains a 5'UTR, one open reading frame encoding a polyprotein of 3,897 amino acids and a 3'UTR. Phylogenetic analysis of 5'UTR, N(pro), E1 and E2 gene demonstrated the virus belonged to BVDV 2b, and genetically related to the BVDV strain Hokudai-Lab/09 from Japan in 2010. This bovine viral diarrhea virus displays a unique genetic signature with 27-nucleotide deletion in the 5'UTR, which is similar to the bovine viral diarrhea virus C413 (AF002227). This was the first confirmed isolation of ncp BVDV2b circulating in bovine herd of China.

  7. Production and Characterization of Chemically Inactivated Genetically Engineered Clostridium difficile Toxoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidunas, Eugene; Mathews, Antony; Weaver, Michele; Cai, Ping; Koh, Eun Hee; Patel-Brown, Sujata; Yuan, Hailey; Zheng, Zi-Rong; Carriere, Marjolaine; Johnson, J Erik; Lotvin, Jason; Moran, Justin

    2016-07-01

    A recombinant Clostridium difficile expression system was used to produce genetically engineered toxoids A and B as immunogens for a prophylactic vaccine against C. difficile-associated disease. Although all known enzymatic activities responsible for cytotoxicity were genetically abrogated, the toxoids exhibited residual cytotoxic activity as measured in an in vitro cell-based cytotoxicity assay. The residual cytotoxicity was eliminated by treating the toxoids with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide. Mass spectrometry and amino acid analysis of the EDC-inactivated toxoids identified crosslinks, glycine adducts, and β-alanine adducts. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated that modifications resulting from the chemical treatment did not appreciably affect recognition of epitopes by both toxin A- and B-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. Compared to formaldehyde-inactivated toxoids, the EDC/N-hydroxysuccinimide-inactivated toxoids exhibited superior stability in solution with respect to reversion of cytotoxic activity. PMID:27233688

  8. Phenotypic and genetic characterization of a novel phenotype in pigs characterized by juvenile hairlessness and age dependent emphysema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Camilla S.; Jørgensen, Claus B.; Bay, Lene;

    2008-01-01

    of musculi arrectores pili, and at puberty or later localized areas of emphysema are seen in the lungs. Comparative mapping predicted that the porcine ITGB6 and ITGAV orthologs map to SSC15. In an experimentall family (n=113), showing segregation of the trait, the candidate region was confirmed by linkage...... analysis with four microsatellite markers. Mapping of the porcine ITGB6 and ITGAV in the IMpRH radiation hybrid panel confirmed the comparative mapping information. Sequencing of the ITGB6 and ITGAV coding sequences from affected and normal pigs revealed no evidence of a causative mutation, but alternative...... resembling the integrin ß6-/- knockout phenotype seen in mice has been characterized in the pig. The candidate region on SSC15 has been confirmed by linkage analysis but molecular and functional analyses have excluded that the mutated phenotype is caused by structural mutations in or ablation of any...

  9. ISSR as new markers for genetic characterization and evaluation of relationships among phytoplankton

    OpenAIRE

    Bornet, Benjamin; Antoine, Elisabeth; Bardouil, Michele; Marcaillou-le Baut, Claire

    2004-01-01

    In order to increase the molecular tools and markers needed for the identification of phytoplankton species, the inter simple sequence repeat ( ISSR) fingerprinting was adapted to micro-algae and its use in genetic analysis was demonstrated. Twelve strains, 6 Alexandrium, 4 Pseudo-nitzschia, 1 Skeletonema and 1 Tetraselmis were analysed for the first time with ISSR amplifications. The patterns were highly polymorphic and very reproducible. The 6 primers gave 223 polymorphic markers that clear...

  10. Characterization of casein gene complex and genetic diversity analysis in Indian goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, P K; Kumar, A; Mandal, A; Laloe, D; Singh, S K; Roy, R

    2010-04-01

    Milk protein polymorphism plays an important role in genetic diversity analysis, phylogenetic studies, establishing geographical diversity, conservation decision, and improving breeding goals. Milk protein polymorphism in Indian goat breeds has not been well studied; therefore, an investigation was carried out to analyze the genetic structure of the casein gene and milk protein diversity at six milk protein loci in nine Indian goat breeds/genetic groups from varied agro-climatic zones. Milk protein genotyping was carried out in 1098 individual milk samples by SDS-PAGE at alphaS1-CN (CSN1S1), beta-CN (CSN2), alphaS2-CN (CSN1S2), kappa-CN (CSN3), beta-LG, and alpha-LA loci. Indian goats exhibited alphaS1-casein A allele in higher frequency in the majority of breeds except Ganjam and local goats. The alphaS1-casein A allele frequencies varied from 0.45 to 0.77. A total of 16 casein haplotypes were observed in seven breeds and breed specific haplotypes were observed with respect to geographic region. The average number of alleles was lowest in Ganjam (1.66 +/- 0.81) and highest in Sirohi goats (2.50 +/- 1.05). Expected heterozygosity at six different loci demonstrated genetic diversity and breed fragmentation. Neighbor-Joining tree was built basing on Nei's distance. There was about 16.95% variability due to differences between breeds, indicating a strong subdivision. Principal component analysis was carried out to highlight the relationship among breeds. The variability among goat breeds was contributed by alphaS2-CN, beta-LG and alphaS1-CN. The Indian goats exhibited alphaS1-CN (CSN1S1) A allele in higher frequency in all the breeds indicating the higher casein yield in their milk.

  11. PRELIMINARY RESEARCHES REGARDING THE GENETIC AND MORPHOMETRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF HONEYBEES (A. MELLIFERA L.) FROM ROMANIA

    OpenAIRE

    ELIZA CAUIA; DANIELA USURELU; LAURA MONICA MAGDALENA; Cimponeriu, D; POMPILIA APOSTOL; A. SICEANU; ALINA HOLBAN; L. Gavrila

    2013-01-01

    The international investigations regarding the honeybees’ diversity carried out until now have revealed a certain degree of genetic pollution in different countries from Europe, because of the import of more productive honeybees’ races or of some interracial honeybees’ hybrids. This fact might have a negative impact on the success adaptability of honeybees at the ecosystem. Although, the Romanian honeybees (Apis mellifera carpathica) are well adapted to the local conditions and express a good...

  12. Genetic Characterization of Zika Virus Strains: Geographic Expansion of the Asian Lineage

    OpenAIRE

    Haddow, Andrew D.; Amy J Schuh; Yasuda, Chadwick Y.; Kasper, Matthew R.; Vireak Heang; Rekol Huy; Hilda Guzman; Tesh, Robert B.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus distributed throughout much of Africa and Asia. Infection with the virus may cause acute febrile illness that clinically resembles dengue fever. A recent study indicated the existence of three geographically distinct viral lineages; however this analysis utilized only a single viral gene. Although ZIKV has been known to circulate in both Africa and Asia since at least the 1950s, little is known about the genetic relationships between...

  13. Genetic and biological characterization of the anorexic anx/anx mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Johansen, Jeanette

    2001-01-01

    Pathological deviations in body weight is a major health problem. It is currently unclear how normal body weight and food intake is controlled. There is even less understanding of the mechanisms behind abnormal eating behavior as in anorexia and obesity. Major support for the concept of genetic control of body weight and food intake has emerged from different animal models as well as twin- and family- studies in humans. A number of genes have been found which have an effect ...

  14. Behavioral, neurochemical, and electrophysiological characterization of a genetic mouse model of depression

    OpenAIRE

    El Yacoubi, Malika; Bouali, Saoussen; Popa, Daniela; Naudon, Laurent; Leroux-Nicollet, Isabelle; Hamon, Michel; Costentin, Jean; Adrien, Joëlle; Vaugeois, Jean-Marie

    2003-01-01

    Depression is a multifactorial illness and genetic factors play a role in its etiology. The understanding of its physiopathology relies on the availability of experimental models potentially mimicking the disease. Here we describe a model built up by selective breeding of mice with strikingly different responses in the tail suspension test, a stress paradigm aimed at screening potential antidepressants. Indeed, “helpless” mice are essentially immobile in the tail suspension test, as well as t...

  15. Occurrence and genetic characterization of Echinococcus granulosus in naturally infected adult sheep and cattle in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrea, Ioan Liviu; Ionita, Mariana; Costin, Irina Ioana; Predoi, Gabriel; Avram, Eugeniu; Rinaldi, Laura; Maurelli, Maria Paola; Cringoli, Giuseppe; Genchi, Claudio

    2014-12-15

    An epidemiological and molecular study was conducted to investigate the occurrence and genetic diversity of Echinococcus granulosus isolates from adult sheep and cattle in Romania. Overall, 642 sheep (aged over 3 years) and 1878 cattle (aged over 5 years) from 16 counties were examined for hydatid cysts. Of them, 421 (65.6%) sheep and 754 (40.1%) cattle were found infected by cystic echinococcosis (CE). Germinal layers were collected from 98 individual cysts (one cyst per animal; 31 from sheep and 67 from cattle), DNA was extracted and two different mitochondrial DNA genes, namely cytochrome c oxidase subunits 1 (CO1) and 12S ribosomal DNA (12S rDNA) were used as genetic markers. The assessment of the genetic diversity of the Echinococcus strains showed the presence of the E. granulosus sensu stricto complex and disclosed an apparent dominance of the G1 genotype within the G1–G3 complex. Furthermore, several mitochondrial variants were identified for the G1 and G2 genotypes of E. granulosus s.s. complex. Overall, the findings were of epidemiological relevance and highlighted a high potential risk of zoonotic infection.

  16. Characterization of Clinical and Genetic Risk Factors Associated with Dyslipidemia after Kidney Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyuki Numakura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We determined the prevalence of dyslipidemia in a Japanese cohort of renal allograft recipients and investigated clinical and genetic characteristics associated with having the disease. In total, 126 patients that received renal allograft transplants between February 2002 and August 2011 were studied, of which 44 recipients (34.9% were diagnosed with dyslipidemia at 1 year after transplantation. Three clinical factors were associated with a risk of having dyslipidemia: a higher prevalence of disease observed among female than male patients P=0.021 and treatment with high mycophenolate mofetil P=0.012 and prednisolone P=0.023 doses per body weight at 28 days after transplantation. The genetic association between dyslipidemia and 60 previously described genetic polymorphisms in 38 putative disease-associated genes was analyzed. The frequency of dyslipidemia was significantly higher in patients with the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1 Bcl1 G allele than in those with the CC genotype P=0.001. A multivariate analysis revealed that the NR3C1 Bcl1 G allele was a significant risk factor for the prevalence of dyslipidemia (odds ratio = 4.6; 95% confidence interval = 1.8–12.2. These findings may aid in predicting a patient’s risk of developing dyslipidemia.

  17. Selkirk Rex: morphological and genetic characterization of a new cat breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filler, Serina; Alhaddad, Hasan; Gandolfi, Barbara; Kurushima, Jennifer D; Cortes, Alejandro; Veit, Christine; Lyons, Leslie A; Brem, Gottfried

    2012-01-01

    Rexoid, curly hair mutations have been selected to develop new domestic cat breeds. The Selkirk Rex is the most recently established curly-coated cat breed originating from a spontaneous mutation that was discovered in the United States in 1987. Unlike the earlier and well-established Cornish and Devon Rex breeds with curly-coat mutations, the Selkirk Rex mutation is suggested as autosomal dominant and has a different curl phenotype. This study provides a genetic analysis of the Selkirk Rex breed. An informal segregation analysis of genetically proven matings supported an autosomal, incomplete dominant expression of the curly trait in the Selkirk Rex. Homozygous curl cats can be distinguished from heterozygous cats by head and body type, as well as the presentation of the hair curl. Bayesian clustering of short tandem repeat (STR) genotypes from 31 cats that represent the future breeding stock supported the close relationship of the Selkirk Rex to the British Shorthair, Scottish Fold, Persian, and Exotic Shorthair, suggesting the Selkirk as part of the Persian breed family. The high heterozygosity of 0.630 and the low mean inbreeding coefficient of 0.057 suggest that Selkirk Rex has a diverse genetic foundation. A new locus for Selkirk autosomal dominant Rex, SADRE, is suggested for the curly trait.

  18. Characterization of the active microbiotas associated with honey bees reveals healthier and broader communities when colonies are genetically diverse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather R Mattila

    Full Text Available Recent losses of honey bee colonies have led to increased interest in the microbial communities that are associated with these important pollinators. A critical function that bacteria perform for their honey bee hosts, but one that is poorly understood, is the transformation of worker-collected pollen into bee bread, a nutritious food product that can be stored for long periods in colonies. We used 16S rRNA pyrosequencing to comprehensively characterize in genetically diverse and genetically uniform colonies the active bacterial communities that are found on honey bees, in their digestive tracts, and in bee bread. This method provided insights that have not been revealed by past studies into the content and benefits of honey bee-associated microbial communities. Colony microbiotas differed substantially between sampling environments and were dominated by several anaerobic bacterial genera never before associated with honey bees, but renowned for their use by humans to ferment food. Colonies with genetically diverse populations of workers, a result of the highly promiscuous mating behavior of queens, benefited from greater microbial diversity, reduced pathogen loads, and increased abundance of putatively helpful bacteria, particularly species from the potentially probiotic genus Bifidobacterium. Across all colonies, Bifidobacterium activity was negatively correlated with the activity of genera that include pathogenic microbes; this relationship suggests a possible target for understanding whether microbes provide protective benefits to honey bees. Within-colony diversity shapes microbiotas associated with honey bees in ways that may have important repercussions for colony function and health. Our findings illuminate the importance of honey bee-bacteria symbioses and examine their intersection with nutrition, pathogen load, and genetic diversity, factors that are considered key to understanding honey bee decline.

  19. Characterization of the active microbiotas associated with honey bees reveals healthier and broader communities when colonies are genetically diverse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Heather R; Rios, Daniela; Walker-Sperling, Victoria E; Roeselers, Guus; Newton, Irene L G

    2012-01-01

    Recent losses of honey bee colonies have led to increased interest in the microbial communities that are associated with these important pollinators. A critical function that bacteria perform for their honey bee hosts, but one that is poorly understood, is the transformation of worker-collected pollen into bee bread, a nutritious food product that can be stored for long periods in colonies. We used 16S rRNA pyrosequencing to comprehensively characterize in genetically diverse and genetically uniform colonies the active bacterial communities that are found on honey bees, in their digestive tracts, and in bee bread. This method provided insights that have not been revealed by past studies into the content and benefits of honey bee-associated microbial communities. Colony microbiotas differed substantially between sampling environments and were dominated by several anaerobic bacterial genera never before associated with honey bees, but renowned for their use by humans to ferment food. Colonies with genetically diverse populations of workers, a result of the highly promiscuous mating behavior of queens, benefited from greater microbial diversity, reduced pathogen loads, and increased abundance of putatively helpful bacteria, particularly species from the potentially probiotic genus Bifidobacterium. Across all colonies, Bifidobacterium activity was negatively correlated with the activity of genera that include pathogenic microbes; this relationship suggests a possible target for understanding whether microbes provide protective benefits to honey bees. Within-colony diversity shapes microbiotas associated with honey bees in ways that may have important repercussions for colony function and health. Our findings illuminate the importance of honey bee-bacteria symbioses and examine their intersection with nutrition, pathogen load, and genetic diversity, factors that are considered key to understanding honey bee decline.

  20. Genetic organization and molecular characterization of secA2 locus in Listeria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Krishna K; Mendonca, Marcelo; Aroonnual, Amornrat; Burkholder, Kristin M; Bhunia, Arun K

    2011-12-10

    The translocation of proteins across the bacterial cell wall is carried out by the general secretory (Sec) system. Most bacteria have a single copy of the secA gene, with the exception of a few Gram-positive bacteria, which have an additional copy of secA, designated secA2. secA2 is present in Listeria monocytogenes and is responsible for secretion and translocation of several proteins including virulence factors; however, little is known about the secA2 gene and its genetic organization in nonpathogenic members of the genus Listeria. The goal of this study was to determine the presence of secA2 locus and analyze the genetic relatedness among pathogenic and nonpathogenic Listeria species. Cloning experiments revealed that secA2 is present in all analyzed pathogenic (L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii) and nonpathogenic (L. welshimeri, L. innocua, L. seeligeri, L. grayi and L. marthii) Listeria species except L. rocourtiae. Likewise, SecA2 transcripts were also detected in all species. Sequence analysis further revealed that 2331 nucleotides (776 amino acids) are conserved in L. monocytogenes, L. welshimeri, L. innocua and L. marthii. Three nucleotides are deleted in L. ivanovii and L. seeligeri and six in L. grayi, resulting in amino acid counts of 775, 775 and 774, respectively. secA2 is flanked upstream by iap (encoding p60) and downstream by a putative membrane protein (lmo0583, lmo f2365_0613) in all analyzed Listeria species, demonstrating conserved genetic organization of the secA2 locus in pathogenic and nonpathogenic species. Deletion of secA2 in L. innocua impaired accumulation of SecA2 substrate, N-acetyl muramidase (NamA) in the cell wall, providing evidence for the presence of functional SecA2 in nonpathogenic Listeria.

  1. Construction and characterization of VL-VH tail-parallel genetically engineered antibodies against staphylococcal enterotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xianzhi; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Pengchong; Liu, Li; Deng, Hui; Huang, Jinhai

    2015-03-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) produced by Staphylococcus aureus have increasingly given rise to human health and food safety. Genetically engineered small molecular antibody is a useful tool in immuno-detection and treatment for clinical illness caused by SEs. In this study, we constructed the V(L)-V(H) tail-parallel genetically engineered antibody against SEs by using the repertoire of rearranged germ-line immunoglobulin variable region genes. Total RNA were extracted from six hybridoma cell lines that stably express anti-SEs antibodies. The variable region genes of light chain (V(L)) and heavy chain (V(H)) were cloned by reverse transcription PCR, and their classical murine antibody structure and functional V(D)J gene rearrangement were analyzed. To construct the eukaryotic V(H)-V(L) tail-parallel co-expression vectors based on the "5'-V(H)-ivs-IRES-V(L)-3'" mode, the ivs-IRES fragment and V(L) genes were spliced by two-step overlap extension PCR, and then, the recombined gene fragment and V(H) genes were inserted into the pcDNA3.1(+) expression vector sequentially. And then the constructed eukaryotic expression clones termed as p2C2HILO and p5C12HILO were transfected into baby hamster kidney 21 cell line, respectively. Two clonal cell lines stably expressing V(L)-V(H) tail-parallel antibodies against SEs were obtained, and the antibodies that expressed intracytoplasma were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunofluorescence assay, and flow cytometry. SEs can stimulate the expression of some chemokines and chemokine receptors in porcine IPEC-J2 cells; mRNA transcription level of four chemokines and chemokine receptors can be blocked by the recombinant SE antibody prepared in this study. Our results showed that it is possible to get functional V(L)-V(H) tail-parallel genetically engineered antibodies in same vector using eukaryotic expression system.

  2. Genetic and antigenic characterization of bovine viral diarrhea viruses isolated from cattle in Hokkaido, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yuri; Tamura, Tomokazu; Torii, Shiho; Wakamori, Shiho; Nagai, Makoto; Mitsuhashi, Kazuya; Mine, Junki; Fujimoto, Yuri; Nagashima, Naofumi; Yoshino, Fumi; Sugita, Yukihiko; Nomura, Takushi; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Kida, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    In our previous study, we genetically analyzed bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDVs) isolated from 2000 to 2006 in Japan and reported that subgenotype 1b viruses were predominant. In the present study, 766 BVDVs isolated from 2006 to 2014 in Hokkaido, Japan, were genetically analyzed to understand recent epidemics. Phylogenetic analysis based on nucleotide sequences of the 5'-untranslated region of viral genome revealed that 766 isolates were classified as genotype 1 (BVDV-1; 544 isolates) and genotype 2 (BVDV-2; 222). BVDV-1 isolates were further divided into BVDV-1a (93), 1b (371) and 1c (80) subgenotypes, and all BVDV-2 isolates were grouped into BVDV-2a subgenotype (222). Further comparative analysis was performed with BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a viruses isolated from 2001 to 2014. Phylogenetic analysis based on nucleotide sequences of the viral glycoprotein E2 gene, a major target of neutralizing antibodies, revealed that BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a isolates were further classified into several clusters. Cross-neutralization tests showed that BVDV-1b isolates were antigenically different from BVDV-1a isolates, and almost BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a isolates were antigenically similar among each subgenotype and each E2 cluster. Taken together, BVDV-1b viruses are still predominant, and BVDV-2a viruses have increased recently in Hokkaido, Japan. Field isolates of BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a show genetic diversity on the E2 gene with antigenic conservation among each subgenotype during the last 14 years.

  3. Phenotypic characterization of a genetically diverse panel of mice for behavioral despair and anxiety.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke H Miller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animal models of human behavioral endophenotypes, such as the Tail Suspension Test (TST and the Open Field assay (OF, have proven to be essential tools in revealing the genetics and mechanisms of psychiatric diseases. As in the human disorders they model, the measurements generated in these behavioral assays are significantly impacted by the genetic background of the animals tested. In order to better understand the strain-dependent phenotypic variability endemic to this type of work, and better inform future studies that rely on the data generated by these models, we phenotyped 33 inbred mouse strains for immobility in the TST, a mouse model of behavioral despair, and for activity in the OF, a model of general anxiety and locomotor activity. RESULTS: We identified significant strain-dependent differences in TST immobility, and in thigmotaxis and distance traveled in the OF. These results were replicable over multiple testing sessions and exhibited high heritability. We exploited the heritability of these behavioral traits by using in silico haplotype-based association mapping to identify candidate genes for regulating TST behavior. Two significant loci (-logp >7.0, gFWER adjusted p value <0.05 of approximately 300 kb each on MMU9 and MMU10 were identified. The MMU10 locus is syntenic to a major human depressive disorder QTL on human chromosome 12 and contains several genes that are expressed in brain regions associated with behavioral despair. CONCLUSIONS: We report the results of phenotyping a large panel of inbred mouse strains for depression and anxiety-associated behaviors. These results show significant, heritable strain-specific differences in behavior, and should prove to be a valuable resource for the behavioral and genetics communities. Additionally, we used haplotype mapping to identify several loci that may contain genes that regulate behavioral despair.

  4. Genetic and antigenic characterization of bovine viral diarrhea viruses isolated from cattle in Hokkaido, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yuri; Tamura, Tomokazu; Torii, Shiho; Wakamori, Shiho; Nagai, Makoto; Mitsuhashi, Kazuya; Mine, Junki; Fujimoto, Yuri; Nagashima, Naofumi; Yoshino, Fumi; Sugita, Yukihiko; Nomura, Takushi; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Kida, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    In our previous study, we genetically analyzed bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDVs) isolated from 2000 to 2006 in Japan and reported that subgenotype 1b viruses were predominant. In the present study, 766 BVDVs isolated from 2006 to 2014 in Hokkaido, Japan, were genetically analyzed to understand recent epidemics. Phylogenetic analysis based on nucleotide sequences of the 5'-untranslated region of viral genome revealed that 766 isolates were classified as genotype 1 (BVDV-1; 544 isolates) and genotype 2 (BVDV-2; 222). BVDV-1 isolates were further divided into BVDV-1a (93), 1b (371) and 1c (80) subgenotypes, and all BVDV-2 isolates were grouped into BVDV-2a subgenotype (222). Further comparative analysis was performed with BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a viruses isolated from 2001 to 2014. Phylogenetic analysis based on nucleotide sequences of the viral glycoprotein E2 gene, a major target of neutralizing antibodies, revealed that BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a isolates were further classified into several clusters. Cross-neutralization tests showed that BVDV-1b isolates were antigenically different from BVDV-1a isolates, and almost BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a isolates were antigenically similar among each subgenotype and each E2 cluster. Taken together, BVDV-1b viruses are still predominant, and BVDV-2a viruses have increased recently in Hokkaido, Japan. Field isolates of BVDV-1a, 1b and 2a show genetic diversity on the E2 gene with antigenic conservation among each subgenotype during the last 14 years. PMID:26400674

  5. Characterizing novel endogenous retroviruses from genetic variation inferred from short sequence reads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourier, Tobias; Mollerup, Sarah; Vinner, Lasse;

    2015-01-01

    From Illumina sequencing of DNA from brain and liver tissue from the lion, Panthera leo, and tumor samples from the pike-perch, Sander lucioperca, we obtained two assembled sequence contigs with similarity to known retroviruses. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that the pike-perch retrovirus belongs...... to the epsilonretroviruses, and the lion retrovirus to the gammaretroviruses. To determine if these novel retroviral sequences originate from an endogenous retrovirus or from a recently integrated exogenous retrovirus, we assessed the genetic diversity of the parental sequences from which the short Illumina reads...

  6. Genetic and antigenic characterization of enterovirus 71 in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, 2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Phan Kim Thoa

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 frequently causes fatal infections in young children in Asia. In 2011, EV71 epidemics occurred in southern Vietnam. We conducted genetic and antigenic analysis of the EV71 isolates and found that 94% of them were genotype C4a related to two lineages circulating in China and 6% were genotype C5 which have circulated in Vietnam since 2003. Antigenic variants were not detected. EV71 vaccines are being developed. Longitudinal enterovirus surveillance data are critical to formulate vaccination policy in Vietnam.

  7. Genetic and morphometric characterization of a local Vietnamese Swamp Buffalo population

    OpenAIRE

    Rognon, Xavier; Van T Nhu; Berthouly, A.; Thanh Hoang, H.; Bed'hom, Bertrand; Laloë, Denis; Vu Chi, C.; Verrier, Etienne; Maillard, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    The water buffalo plays a key role in the socio-economy of South-East Asia as it is the main draught power for paddy rice cultivation. While in the Indian subcontinent the water buffalo is the riverine type, in South-East Asia the majority of buffaloes are of the swamp type. In the poor remote northern province of Ha Giang in Vietnam, improvement of the swamp buffalo breed may be one of the best ways to increase sustainability of farming systems. Therefore, analysis of the genetic structure o...

  8. Genetic characterization of the cacao cultivar CCN 51: its impact and significance on global cacao improvement and production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) is an important cash crop in tropical growing regions of the world and particularly for small cacao farmers. Cacao production in the Americas constitutes ˜13.0% of global production. Ecuador is the second-largest cacao producer in South America and its Nacional beans are...

  9. The genetics of monarch butterfly migration and warning coloration

    OpenAIRE

    Zhan, Shuai; Zhang, Wei; Niitepõld, Kristjan; Hsu, Jeremy; Haeger, Juan Fernández; Myron P Zalucki; Altizer, Sonia; Jacobus C de Roode; Reppert, Steven M.; Kronforst, Marcus R.

    2014-01-01

    The monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, is famous for its spectacular annual migration across North America, recent worldwide dispersal, and orange warning coloration. Despite decades of study and broad public interest, we know little about the genetic basis of these hallmark traits. By sequencing 101 monarch genomes from around the globe, we uncover the history of the monarch's evolutionary origin and global dispersal, characterize the genes and pathways associated with migratory behavior, ...

  10. Globalization’s unexpected impact on soybean production in South America: linkages between preferences for non-genetically modified crops, eco-certifications, and land use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Rachael D.; Rueda, Ximena; Lambin, Eric F.

    2013-12-01

    The land use impacts of globalization and of increasing global food and fuel demand depend on the trade relationships that emerge between consuming and producing countries. In the case of soybean production, increasing trade between South American farmers and consumers in Asia and Europe has facilitated soybean expansion in the Amazon, Chaco, and Cerrado biomes. While these telecouplings have been well documented, there is little understanding of how quality preferences influence trade patterns and supply chains, incentivizing or discouraging particular land use practices. In this study we provide empirical evidence that Brazil’s continued production of non-genetically modified (GM) soybeans has increased its competitive advantage in European countries with preferences against GM foods. Brazil’s strong trade relationship with European consumers has facilitated an upgrading of the soybean supply chain. Upgraded soybean supply chains create new conservation opportunities by allowing farmers to differentiate their products based on environmental quality in order to access premiums in niche markets in Europe. These interactions between GM preferences, trade flows, and supply chain structure help to explain why Brazilian soybean farmers have adopted environmental certification programs on a larger scale than Argentinian, Bolivian, Paraguayan, and Uruguayan soybean producers.

  11. Globalization’s unexpected impact on soybean production in South America: linkages between preferences for non-genetically modified crops, eco-certifications, and land use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The land use impacts of globalization and of increasing global food and fuel demand depend on the trade relationships that emerge between consuming and producing countries. In the case of soybean production, increasing trade between South American farmers and consumers in Asia and Europe has facilitated soybean expansion in the Amazon, Chaco, and Cerrado biomes. While these telecouplings have been well documented, there is little understanding of how quality preferences influence trade patterns and supply chains, incentivizing or discouraging particular land use practices. In this study we provide empirical evidence that Brazil’s continued production of non-genetically modified (GM) soybeans has increased its competitive advantage in European countries with preferences against GM foods. Brazil’s strong trade relationship with European consumers has facilitated an upgrading of the soybean supply chain. Upgraded soybean supply chains create new conservation opportunities by allowing farmers to differentiate their products based on environmental quality in order to access premiums in niche markets in Europe. These interactions between GM preferences, trade flows, and supply chain structure help to explain why Brazilian soybean farmers have adopted environmental certification programs on a larger scale than Argentinian, Bolivian, Paraguayan, and Uruguayan soybean producers. (letter)

  12. Genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii from Brazilian wildlife revealed abundant new genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.N. Vitaliano

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to isolate and genotype T. gondii from Brazilian wildlife. For this purpose, 226 samples were submitted to mice bioassay and screened by PCR based on 18S rRNA sequences. A total of 15 T. gondii isolates were obtained, including samples from four armadillos (three Dasypus novemcinctus, one Euphractus sexcinctus, three collared anteaters (Tamandua tetradactyla, three whited-lipped peccaries (Tayassu pecari, one spotted paca (Cuniculus paca, one oncilla (Leopardus tigrinus, one hoary fox (Pseudalopex vetulus, one lineated woodpecker (Dryocopus lineatus and one maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus. DNA from the isolates, originated from mice bioassay, and from the tissues of the wild animal, designated as “primary samples”, were genotyped by PCR–restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR/RFLP, using 12 genetic markers (SAG1, SAG2, alt.SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L258, PK1, CS3 and Apico. A total of 17 genotypes were identified, with 13 identified for the first time and four already reported in published literature. Results herein obtained corroborate previous studies in Brazil, confirming high diversity and revealing unique genotypes in this region. Given most of genotypes here identified are different from previous studies in domestic animals, future studies on T. gondii from wildlife is of interest to understand population genetics and structure of this parasite.

  13. Genetic characterization of Mytilus coruscus and M. galloprovincialis using microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J H; Lee, J M; Noh, E S; Park, J Y; An, C M

    2013-01-01

    Korean (hard-shelled) mussels (Mytilus coruscus) are an economically important endemic marine bivalve mollusk of Korea; yet, the population has rapidly declined because of overharvesting and habitat competition from the invasive Mytilus galloprovincialis species. The population structures of M. coruscus and M. galloprovincialis were analyzed by next-generation sequencing using 5 microsatellite markers specifically developed for M. coruscus. M. galloprovincialis had an average of 5.4 alleles per locus (range = 2-10), with an average allelic richness of 4.9 per locus (range = 2.0-9.3). M. coruscus had an average of 5.7 alleles per locus (range = 2-13), with an average allelic richness of 5.2 per locus (range = 2.0-11.9). Excessive homozygosity was observed at 3 loci, which was assumed to be due to the presence of null alleles at these loci. Pairwise multilocus FST estimates showed that the M. coruscus and M. galloprovincialis populations were clearly separated. Six populations of M. galloprovincialis from the western, eastern, and southern coast of Korea formed 2 separate clusters, indicating that more than 2 populations of M. galloprovincialis have been introduced to the Korean Peninsula. Hybrids between M. coruscus and M. galloprovincialis were not identified, probably because of genetic differences or different habitat preferences. Further genetic information is required to perform selective breeding, population management, and restoration of M. coruscus.

  14. [Genetic characterization of echovirus 6 isolated from meningitis and encephalitis cases in Shandong Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiao-Juan; Tao, Ze-Xin; Liu, Gui-Fang; Wang, Min; Song, Li-Zhi; Wang, Su-Ting; Ji, Feng; Wang, Hai-Yan; Xu, Ai-Qiang

    2014-03-01

    To analyze the genetic characteristics of echovirus 6 (E6) isolated from meningitis and encephalitis cases in Shandong Province, China, we collected cerebrospinal fluid samples from meningitis and encephalitis cases in Shandong Province from 2007 to 2012 for virus isolation. Viral RNAs were extracted from positive isolates, and complete VP1 coding regions were amplified by RT-PCR and sequenced. Homology comparison and phylogenetic analysis were performed. Six isolates were identified as E6 by microneutralization assay and molecular typing. The homology analysis showed that the six isolates had 78. 6%-99. 8% nucleotide and 95. 5%-100. 0% amino acid identities with each other, as well as 76. 9%-78. 4% nucleotide and 92. 3%-95. 1% amino acid identities with the prototype strain (D' Amori). The phylogenetic analysis based on the integrated VP1 sequences indicated that all Shandong E6 isolates could be separated into four clusters, designated as A, B, C, and D. The six E6 isolates belonged to clusters A, B, and D. Our study reveals high genetic differences between Shandong E6 isolates and suggests different transmission lineages of E6 co-circulated in Shandong Province.

  15. Isolation and genetic characterization of a fertility-restoring revertant induced from cytoplasmic male sterile rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A male fertile revertant was isolated from M1 of a cytoplasmic male sterile indica rice line II-32A, the dry seeds of which were treated with 60Co-γ rays at a dose of 290 Gy. The acquired revertant T24 was morphologically and agronomically similar to II-32B, the maintainer of II-32A. Testcrosses of the revertant with II-32A and Zhenshan 97A showed that the revertant was able to restore the fertility of CMS lines. Genetic analysis of the progenies between T24 and II-32A, Zhenshan 97A XieqingzaoA and DZhenshan 97A, which have different cytoplasms, showed that the fertility restoration of four CMS lines by T24 involved one nuclear gene, indicating that T24 was a result of the mutation of one nuclear gene. The mechanism of the restoration of CMS line by T24 was obviously different from other restorers such as Minghui 63 and 20964, which were shown to behave in two gene mode in fertility restoration. The discovery of the revertant T24 contributes to the understanding of CMS and fertility restoration of CMS in rice. The T24 and its parent II-32A may constitute a pair of near isogenic lines for the restoring gene, which should be valuable materials for molecular genetic analysis of CMS

  16. Isolation and Characterization of Mobile Genetic Elements from Microbial Assemblages Obtained from the Field Research Center Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patricia Sobecky; Cassie Hodges; Kerri Lafferty; Mike Humphreys; Melanie Raimondo; Kristin Tuttle; Tamar Barkay

    2004-03-17

    Considerable knowledge has been gained from the intensive study of a relatively limited group of bacterial plasmids. Recent efforts have begun to focus on the characterization of, at the molecular level, plasmid populations and associated mobile genetic elements (e.g., transposons, integrons) occurring in a wider range of aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Surprisingly, however, little information is available regarding the incidence and distribution of mobile genetic elements extant in contaminated subsurface environments. Such studies will provide greater knowledge on the ecology of plasmids and their contributions to the genetic plasticity (and adaptation) of naturally occurring subsurface microbial communities. We requested soil cores from the DOE NABIR Field Research Center (FRC) located on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The cores, received in February 2003, were sampled from four areas on the Oak Ridge Site: Area 1, Area 2, Area 3 (representing contaminated subsurface locales) and the background reference sites. The average core length (24 in) was subdivided into three profiles and soil pH and moisture content were determined. Uranium concentration was also determined in bulk samples. Replicate aliquots were fixed for total cell counts and for bacterial isolation. Four different isolation media were used to culture aerobic and facultative microbes from these four study areas. Colony forming units ranged from a minimum of 100 per gram soil to a maximum of 10,000 irrespective of media composition used. The vast majority of cultured subsurface isolates were gram-positive isolates and plasmid characterization was conducted per methods routinely used in the Sobecky laboratory. The percentage of plasmid incidence ranged from 10% to 60% of all isolates tested. This frequency appears to be somewhat higher than the incidence of plasmids we have observed in other habitats and we are increasing the number of isolates screened to confirm this observation. We are also

  17. Genetic Characterization of the Capsulation Locus of Haemophilus influenzae Serotype e▿

    OpenAIRE

    Giufrè, Maria; Cardines, Rita; Mastrantonio, Paola; Cerquetti, Marina

    2010-01-01

    The capsulation (cap) locus of Haemophilus influenzae type e (Hie) was characterized and sequenced. No IS1016 element was found to flank the locus. The 18.2-kb locus included 14 open reading frames (ORFs), which were grouped into three functional regions. Eight new ORFs (named ecs1 to ecs8) were identified in the Hie capsule-specific region II.

  18. Genetic characterization of Phytophthora nicotianae by the analysis of polymorphic regions of the mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new method based on the analysis of mitochondrial intergenic regions characterized by intraspecific variation in DNA sequences was developed and applied to the study of the plant pathogen Phytophthora nicotianae. Two regions flanked by genes trny and rns and trnw and cox2 were identified by compa...

  19. Functional, genetic and chemical characterization of biosurfactants produced by plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas putida 267

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijt, M.; Tran, H.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: Plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas putida strain 267, originally isolated from the rhizosphere of black pepper, produces biosurfactants that cause lysis of zoospores of the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora capsici. The biosurfactants were characterized, the biosynthesis gene(s) partially identif

  20. Characterization and Genetic Analysis of a Novel Mutant mst of Rice Defective in Flower Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yun; XU Pei-zhou; ZHANG Hong-yu; FU Shao-hong; YANG Jin; ZHANG Ru-quan; WU Xian-jun

    2009-01-01

    A spontaneous mutant with multiple stigmas (mst) was found in an indica rice line 466. The mst mutant exhibits normal at the vegetative development stage and produces normal inflorescence structures. The difference between the mutant and the wild type was observed when the stamen primordium began to develop. In the mst florets, palea and lemma opened, lodicules were homeotically transformed into palea/lemma-like structures, and stamens were homeotically transformed into carpel-like structures. It looked like multiple stigmas being full of the whole floret. The phenotypic changes of mst were very similar to that of B-like mutant spw1. Compared with other mutants with pistillate morphologies, the severe mst florets showed that the inner three floral organs were completely changed into palea/lemma-like structures. Moreover, the mutant was female sterile. Occasionally, with the changing environment, one or two stamens were fertile. Genetic analysis indicated that the mutant traits were controlled by a single recessive gene.

  1. Molecular Characterization of Melanoma Cases in Denmark Suspected of Genetic Predisposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadt, Karin A. W.; Aoude, Lauren G.; Krogh, Lotte;

    2015-01-01

    Both environmental and host factors influence risk of cutaneousmelanoma (CM), and worldwide, the incidence varies depending on constitutional determinants of skin type and pigmentation, latitude, and patterns of sun exposure. We performed genetic analysis of CDKN2A, CDK4, BAP1, MC1R, and MITFp.E318......K in Danish high-risk melanoma cases and found CDKN2A germline mutations in 11.3% of CM families with three or more affected individuals, including four previously undescribed mutations. Rare mutations were also seen in CDK4 and BAP1, while MC1R variants were common, occurring at more than twice...... cases of CM. In addition, we recommend that testing of BAP1 should not be conducted routinely in CM families but should be reserved for families with CM and uveal melanoma, or mesothelioma....

  2. A Review of Fatty Acids and Genetic Characterization of Safflower (Carthamus Tinctorius L.) Seed Oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Liu; Ling-Liang Guan; Yu-Xia Yang

    2016-01-01

    Safflower, Carthamus tinctorius L., is an annual oilseed crop that is cultivated on small plots all over the world. The seed oil content ranges from 20%to 45%;the oil is high in linoleic acid, an unsaturated fatty acid that aids in lowering the blood cholesterol level. Thus, safflower has long been used as medical plant in many countries, especially in China and India. However, for industrial purposes, it has long been neglected because of the low seed yield or oil content, until its physical role was revealed. In recent years, research works carried out in many countries mostly focused on improving the seed or oil yield. In this review, after illustrating the fatty acid composition of safflower seed oil as well as the genetic characteristics of safflower and their relationships with agronomic traits, a brief analysis of the current worldwide situation and future prospects of safflower utilization are presented.

  3. Genetic characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi natural clones from the state of Paraíba, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Barnabé

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen Trypanosoma cruzi stocks from the state of Paraíba, Brazil, isolated from man, wild mammals, and triatomine bugs were studied by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and random primed amplified polymorphic DNA. Despite the low number of stocks, a notable genetic, genotypic, and phylogenetic diversity was recorded. The presence of the two main phylogenetic subdivisions, T. cruzi I and II, was recorded. The strong linkage disequilibrium observed in the population under survey suggests that T. cruzi undergoes predominant clonal evolution in this area too, although this result should be confirmed by a broader sample. The pattern of clonal variation does not suggests a recent origin by founder effect with a limited number of different genotypes.

  4. Genetic characterization of a Chinese family with familial idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xin; JIANG Jun; CHEN Wei-jun; SU Long-xiang; XIE Li-xin

    2012-01-01

    Background Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic inflammatory interstitial lung disease with an unknown cause.Recent studies have shown that genetic factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of IPF.Methods To explore the genetic background of patients with IPF,a candidate gene approach was employed to screen for mutations in seven genes among members with familial IPF in mainland of China.Results Within six of the candidate genes,a total of 31 point mutations were identified.Among the missense mutations,the SFTPA1 exon 6 CAG>AAG (GIn238Lys) and SFTPB exon 2 CAC>CCC (His2Pro) mutations caused changes in the physical and chemical properties of amino acids.Each sequence alteration was identified in sporadic IPF patients,control specimens (pneumonia patients and healthy persons).Genotype frequencies and allele frequencies of codon 238 in exon 6 of SFTFA1 were noted significantly higher in patients with IPF than those in other two control subjects.The computational protein structure prediction by protein homology modeling confirmed differences in three-dimensional structure between mutant SFTPA1 and original SFTPA1.Conclusions Although the functions of the mutant candidate genes vary,these genes may ultimately result in damage to alveolar epithelial cells,initiating the progress of pulmonary fibrosis.In particular,while pathophysiological mechanisms need to be illustrated,the GIn238Lys missense variant of exon 6 in the SFTPA1 may have potential susceptibility in the development of IPF,which was shown in patients with sporadic IPF with a statistically higher frequency.

  5. Characterizing the genetic structure of a forensic DNA database using a latent variable approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijver, Maarten

    2016-07-01

    Several problems in forensic genetics require a representative model of a forensic DNA database. Obtaining an accurate representation of the offender database can be difficult, since databases typically contain groups of persons with unregistered ethnic origins in unknown proportions. We propose to estimate the allele frequencies of the subpopulations comprising the offender database and their proportions from the database itself using a latent variable approach. We present a model for which parameters can be estimated using the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm. This approach does not rely on relatively small and possibly unrepresentative population surveys, but is driven by the actual genetic composition of the database only. We fit the model to a snapshot of the Dutch offender database (2014), which contains close to 180,000 profiles, and find that three subpopulations suffice to describe a large fraction of the heterogeneity in the database. We demonstrate the utility and reliability of the approach with three applications. First, we use the model to predict the number of false leads obtained in database searches. We assess how well the model predicts the number of false leads obtained in mock searches in the Dutch offender database, both for the case of familial searching for first degree relatives of a donor and searching for contributors to three-person mixtures. Second, we study the degree of partial matching between all pairs of profiles in the Dutch database and compare this to what is predicted using the latent variable approach. Third, we use the model to provide evidence to support that the Dutch practice of estimating match probabilities using the Balding-Nichols formula with a native Dutch reference database and θ=0.03 is conservative. PMID:27128695

  6. Characterization and genetic analysis of bovine alpha S1-casein I variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lühken, G; Caroli, A; Ibeagha-Awemu, E M; Erhardt, G

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the molecular genetic origin underlying the I variant of alpha(s1)-casein and to develop a DNA-based test for this polymorphism as a tool for genetic analyses independent of milk sample testing. All coding exons and flanking regions of the alpha(s1)-casein gene were sequenced in DNA samples from cattle of known alpha(s1)-casein genotypes (BI, CI, II, CC), determined by isoelectric focusing of milk samples. A nucleotide substitution (A>T) in exon 11 (g.19836A>T) leads to the exchange of Glu with Asp at amino acid position 84 of the mature protein (p.Glu84Asp) and perfectly co-segregated with the presence of the alpha(s1)-casein I variant in the milk of the analysed animals. Genotyping of a total of 680 DNA samples from 31 Bos taurus and Bos indicus cattle breeds and from Bos grunniens, Bison bison and Bison bonasus by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed the occurrence of Asp at position 84 at low frequencies in Bos taurus and Bos indicus breeds and established its origin from the alpha(s1)-casein C variant (p.Glu192Gly). Ten different intragenic haplotypes in the gene region from intron 8 to intron 12 were observed by sequencing, of which two occurred in Bison bison and one in Bison bonasus only. Using available casein gene complex information, an association of Asp at position 84 to beta-casein A(2) and kappa-casein B was shown in the Bos indicus breed Banyo Gudali. Taken together, we can postulate that the alpha(s1)-casein variant I is caused by a non-synonymous nucleotide substitution in exon 11 of the gene and that it originated within Bos indicus and spread to Bos taurus subsequently.

  7. Genetic characterization of Zika virus strains: geographic expansion of the Asian lineage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D Haddow

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is a mosquito-borne flavivirus distributed throughout much of Africa and Asia. Infection with the virus may cause acute febrile illness that clinically resembles dengue fever. A recent study indicated the existence of three geographically distinct viral lineages; however this analysis utilized only a single viral gene. Although ZIKV has been known to circulate in both Africa and Asia since at least the 1950s, little is known about the genetic relationships between geographically distinct virus strains. Moreover, the geographic origin of the strains responsible for the epidemic that occurred on Yap Island, Federated States of Micronesia in 2007, and a 2010 pediatric case in Cambodia, has not been determined.To elucidate the genetic relationships of geographically distinct ZIKV strains and the origin of the strains responsible for the 2007 outbreak on Yap Island and a 2010 Cambodian pediatric case of ZIKV infection, the nucleotide sequences of the open reading frame of five isolates from Cambodia, Malaysia, Nigeria, Uganda, and Senegal collected between 1947 and 2010 were determined. Phylogenetic analyses of these and previously published ZIKV sequences revealed the existence of two main virus lineages (African and Asian and that the strain responsible for the Yap epidemic and the Cambodian case most likely originated in Southeast Asia. Examination of the nucleotide and amino acid sequence alignments revealed the loss of a potential glycosylation site in some of the virus strains, which may correlate with the passage history of the virus.The basal position of the ZIKV strain isolated in Malaysia in 1966 suggests that the recent outbreak in Micronesia was initiated by a strain from Southeast Asia. Because ZIKV infection in humans produces an illness clinically similar to dengue fever and many other tropical infectious diseases, it is likely greatly misdiagnosed and underreported.

  8. Genetic characterization of over hundred years old Caretta caretta specimens from Italian and Maltese museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Garofalo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Museum collections have proven to be a useful source of samples for the reconstruction of evolutionary history and phylogeography of many taxa. This study was aimed at assessing the success rate in a genetic analysis of historical material, in order to explore the feasibility and eventually begin the diachronic description of Caretta caretta stocks in Italian and Maltese coastal waters. The endangered status of the species and the difficulty to study it in the wild make its common occurrence in Italian museum collections a valuable resource. We used minimally invasive methods to collect biological material from specimens dating from the end of the 19th century to 2003, belonging to four museums. As a control for amplification success and absence of cross-contamination, four dinucleotide microsatellite loci of different average length (Cc7, Cc141, Cm72 and Cm84 were typed. All individuals with two or more successfully amplified microsatellites (36% displayed distinct genotypes, thus excluding contamination as a major flaw in the data. We then targeted 380 bp of the mtDNA control region, which allows comparisons with many living populations worldwide and represents the optimal marker for the philopatric behaviour of this species. All individuals but 2 were successfully sequenced. Haplotype CC-A2 was found in 68 individuals, whereas CC-A1 and CC-A3 were found only in one Tyrrhenian and one S-Adriatic specimens, respectively. This study demonstrates that genetic analysis of marine turtles from museum specimens is feasible. Data generated from cohorts of several generations ago are potentially useful for research and dissemination purposes.

  9. Genetic characterization of 2006-2008 isolates of Chikungunya virus from Kerala, South India, by whole genome sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreekumar, E; Issac, Aneesh; Nair, Sajith; Hariharan, Ramkumar; Janki, M B; Arathy, D S; Regu, R; Mathew, Thomas; Anoop, M; Niyas, K P; Pillai, M R

    2010-02-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), a positive-stranded alphavirus, causes epidemic febrile infections characterized by severe and prolonged arthralgia. In the present study, six CHIKV isolates (2006 RGCB03, RGCB05; 2007 RGCB80, RGCB120; 2008 RGCB355, RGCB356) from three consecutive Chikungunya outbreaks in Kerala, South India, were analyzed for genetic variations by sequencing the 11798 bp whole genome of the virus. A total of 37 novel mutations were identified and they were predominant in the 2007 and 2008 isolates among the six isolates studied. The previously identified E1 A226V critical mutation, which enhances mosquito adaptability, was present in the 2007 and 2008 samples. An important observation was the presence of two coding region substitutions, leading to nsP2 L539S and E2 K252Q change. These were identified in three isolates (2007 RGCB80 and RGCB120; 2008 RGCB355) by full-genome analysis, and also in 13 of the 31 additional samples (42%), obtained from various parts of the state, by sequencing the corresponding genomic regions. These mutations showed 100% co-occurrence in all these samples. In phylogenetic analysis, formation of a new genetic clade by these isolates within the East, Central and South African (ECSA) genotypes was observed. Homology modeling followed by mapping revealed that at least 20 of the identified mutations fall into functionally significant domains of the viral proteins and are predicted to affect protein structure. Eighteen of the identified mutations in structural proteins, including the E2 K252Q change, are predicted to disrupt T-cell epitope immunogenicity. Our study reveals that CHIK virus with novel genetic changes were present in the severe Chikungunya outbreaks in 2007 and 2008 in South India. PMID:19851853

  10. Genetic characterization of an H5N1 avian influenza virus from a vaccinated duck flock in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Vuong Nghia; Ogawa, Haruko; Trinh, Dai Quang; Nguyen, Tham Hong Thi; Pham, Nga Thi; Truong, Duc Anh; Bui, Anh Ngoc; Runstadler, Jonathan; Imai, Kunitoshi; Nguyen, Khong Viet

    2014-10-01

    This study reports the genetic characterization of a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 isolated from a moribund domestic duck in central Vietnam during 2012. In the moribund duck's flock, within 6 days after vaccination with a commercial H5N1 vaccine (Re-5) to 59-day-old birds, 120 out of 2,000 ducks died. Genetic analysis revealed a substantial number of mutations in the HA gene of the isolate in comparison with the vaccine strains, Re-1 and Re-5. Similar mutations were also found in selected Vietnamese H5N1 strains isolated since 2009. Mutations in the HA gene involved positions at antigenic sites associated with antibody binding and also neutralizing epitopes, with some of the mutations resulting in the modification of N-linked glycosylation of the HA. Those mutations may be related to the escape of virus from antibody binding and the infection of poultry, interpretations which may be confirmed through a reverse genetics approach. The virus also carried an amino acid substitution in the M2, which conferred a reduced susceptibility to amantadine, but no neuraminidase inhibitor resistance markers were found in the viral NA gene. Additional information including vaccination history in the farm and the surrounding area is needed to fully understand the background of this outbreak. Such understanding and expanded monitoring of the H5N1 influenza viruses circulating in Vietnam is an urgent need to provide updated information to improve effective vaccine strain selection and vaccination protocols, aiding disease control, and biosecurity to prevent H5N1 infection in both poultry and humans. PMID:24880916

  11. Ultrasonic and sensory characterization of dry-cured ham fat from Iberian pigs with different genetics and feeding backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niñoles, L; Sanjuan, N; Ventanas, S; Benedito, J

    2008-11-01

    The textural and ultrasonic properties of the subcutaneous fat from five batches of dry-cured hams from animals with different genetics (Iberian, Iberian×Duroc) and type of feeding ("montanera", concentrate feeds with different oleic acid content) were studied and related to the sensory traits (oiliness and brightness) of their biceps femoris muscle. The different genetics and feeding backgrounds found in the batches brought about differences in their ultrasonic velocities (average velocity from 4 to 20°C ranged from 1608 to 1650m/s) and textural parameters (maximum force at 8°C ranged from 11 to 21N). On average, batches with lower textural parameters had lower velocities and higher sensory scores. Ultrasonic measurements were used to carry out a discriminant analysis which allowed 78.3% of the samples to be correctly classified in the batches considered. Therefore, ultrasonic and sensory techniques could be useful in the characterization and differentiation of dry-cured hams from Iberian pigs.

  12. Development of a Synthetic Oxytetracycline-Inducible Expression System for Streptomycetes Using de Novo Characterized Genetic Parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weishan; Yang, Tongjian; Li, Yihong; Li, Shanshan; Yin, Shouliang; Styles, Kathryn; Corre, Christophe; Yang, Keqian

    2016-07-15

    Precise control of gene expression using exogenous factors is of great significance. To develop ideal inducible expression systems for streptomycetes, new genetic parts, oxytetracycline responsive repressor OtrR, operator otrO, and promoter otrBp from Streptomyces rimosus, were selected de novo and characterized in vivo and in vitro. OtrR showed strong affinity to otrO (KD = 1.7 × 10(-10) M) and oxytetracycline induced dissociation of the OtrR/DNA complex in a concentration-dependent manner. On the basis of these genetic parts, a synthetic inducible expression system Potr* was optimized. Induction of Potr* with 0.01-4 μM of oxytetracycline triggered a wide-range expression level of gfp reporter gene in different Streptomyces species. Benchmarking Potr* against the widely used constitutive promoters ermE* and kasOp* revealed greatly enhanced levels of expression when Potr* was fully induced. Finally, Potr* was used as a tool to activate and optimize the expression of the silent jadomycin biosynthetic gene cluster in Streptomyces venezuelae. Altogether, the synthetic Potr* presents a new versatile tool for fine-tuning gene expression in streptomycetes. PMID:27100123

  13. Genetic Characterization of Plasmodium Putative Pantothenate Kinase Genes Reveals Their Essential Role in Malaria Parasite Transmission to the Mosquito

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Robert J.; Cornillot, Emmanuel; Abraham, Amanah; Molina, Emily; Nation, Catherine S.; Ben Mamoun, Choukri; Aly, Ahmed S. I.

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic machinery for the biosynthesis of Coenzyme A (CoA) from exogenous pantothenic acid (Vitamin B5) has long been considered as an excellent target for the development of selective antimicrobials. Earlier studies in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum have shown that pantothenate analogs interfere with pantothenate phosphorylation and block asexual blood stage development. Although two eukaryotic-type putative pantothenate kinase genes (PanK1 and PanK2) have been identified in all malaria parasite species, their role in the development of Plasmodium life cycle stages remains unknown. Here we report on the genetic characterization of PanK1 and PanK2 in P. yoelii. We show that P. yoelii parasites lacking either PanK1 or PanK2 undergo normal asexual stages development and sexual stages differentiation, however they are severely deficient in ookinete, oocyst and sporozoite formation inside the mosquito vector. Quantitative transcriptional analyses in wild-type and knockout parasites demonstrate an important role for these genes in the regulation of expression of other CoA biosynthesis genes. Together, our data provide the first genetic evidence for the importance of the early steps of pantothenate utilization in the regulation of CoA biosynthesis and malaria parasite transmission to Anopheles mosquitoes. PMID:27644319

  14. Genetic Characterization of Plasmodium Putative Pantothenate Kinase Genes Reveals Their Essential Role in Malaria Parasite Transmission to the Mosquito.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Robert J; Cornillot, Emmanuel; Abraham, Amanah; Molina, Emily; Nation, Catherine S; Ben Mamoun, Choukri; Aly, Ahmed S I

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic machinery for the biosynthesis of Coenzyme A (CoA) from exogenous pantothenic acid (Vitamin B5) has long been considered as an excellent target for the development of selective antimicrobials. Earlier studies in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum have shown that pantothenate analogs interfere with pantothenate phosphorylation and block asexual blood stage development. Although two eukaryotic-type putative pantothenate kinase genes (PanK1 and PanK2) have been identified in all malaria parasite species, their role in the development of Plasmodium life cycle stages remains unknown. Here we report on the genetic characterization of PanK1 and PanK2 in P. yoelii. We show that P. yoelii parasites lacking either PanK1 or PanK2 undergo normal asexual stages development and sexual stages differentiation, however they are severely deficient in ookinete, oocyst and sporozoite formation inside the mosquito vector. Quantitative transcriptional analyses in wild-type and knockout parasites demonstrate an important role for these genes in the regulation of expression of other CoA biosynthesis genes. Together, our data provide the first genetic evidence for the importance of the early steps of pantothenate utilization in the regulation of CoA biosynthesis and malaria parasite transmission to Anopheles mosquitoes. PMID:27644319

  15. Imaging voltage in zebrafish as a route to characterizing a vertebrate functional connectome: promises and pitfalls of genetically encoded indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibat, Caroline; Krishnan, Seetha; Ramaswamy, Mahathi; Baker, Bradley J; Jesuthasan, Suresh

    2016-06-01

    Neural circuits are non-linear dynamical systems that transform information based on the pattern of input, current state and functional connectivity. To understand how a given stimulus is processed, one would ideally record neural activity across the entire brain of a behaving animal, at cellular or even subcellular resolution, in addition to characterizing anatomical connectivity. Given their transparency and relatively small size, larval zebrafish provide a powerful system for brain-wide monitoring of neural activity. Genetically encoded calcium indicators have been used for this purpose, but cannot directly report hyperpolarization or sub-threshold activity. Voltage indicators, in contrast, have this capability. Here, we test whether two different genetically encoded voltage reporters, ASAP1 and Bongwoori, can be expressed and report activity in the zebrafish brain, using widefield, two-photon and light sheet microscopy. We were unable to express ASAP1 in neurons. Bongwoori, in contrast expressed well, and because of its membrane localization, allowed visualization of axon trajectories in 3D. Bongwoori displayed stimulus-evoked changes in fluorescence, which could be detected in single trials. However, under high laser illumination, puncta on neural membranes underwent spontaneous fluctuations in intensity, suggesting that the probe is susceptible to blinking artefacts. These data indicate that larval zebrafish can be used to image electrical activity in the brain of an intact vertebrate at high resolution, although care is needed in imaging and analysis. Recording activity across the whole brain will benefit from further developments in imaging hardware and indicators. PMID:27328843

  16. Genetical and morphological characterization of cold tolerance at fertilization stage in rice

    OpenAIRE

    Shinada, Hiroshi; Iwata, Natsuko; Sato, Takashi; Fujino, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Cold temperature during the reproductive phase leads to seed sterility, which reduces yield and decreases the grain quality of rice. The fertilization stage, ranging from pollen maturation to the completion of fertilization, is sensitive to unsuitable temperature. Improving cold tolerance at the fertilization stage (CTF) is an important objective of rice breeding program in cold temperature areas. In this study, we characterized fertilization behavior under cold temperature to define the phen...

  17. Characterization of Genetically Targeted Neuron Types in the Zebrafish Optic Tectum

    OpenAIRE

    Estuardo eRobles; Smith, Stephen J.; Herwig eBaier

    2011-01-01

    The optically transparent larval zebrafish is ideally suited for in vivo analyses of neural circuitry controlling visually guided behaviors. However, there is a lack of information regarding specific cell types in the major retinorecipient brain region of the fish, the optic tectum. Here we report the characterization of three previously unidentified tectal cell types that are specifically labeled by dlx5/6 enhancer elements. In vivo laser scanning microscopy in conjunction with ex vivo ar...

  18. Genetic and structural characterization of the growth hormone gene and protein from tench, Tinca tinca

    OpenAIRE

    Panicz, R.; J. Sadowski; Drozd, R.

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of the tench growth hormone gene structure revealed a comparable organization of coding and non-coding regions than other from cyprinid species. Based on the performed mRNA and amino acid sequence alignments, gh tench is related to Asian than to European representatives of Cyprinidae family. Second aim of the work was to characterize and predict protein structure of the tench growth hormone. Tinca tinca GH share many common features with human GH molecule. The Tench GH protein bi...

  19. Phenotypic and genetic characterization of Dunaliella (Chlorophyta) from Indian salinas and their diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Preetha, Krishna; John, Lijo; Subin, Cherampillil Sukumaran; Vijayan, Koyadan Kizhakkedath

    2012-01-01

    Background The genus Dunaliella (Class – Chlorophyceae) is widely studied for its tolerance to extreme habitat conditions, physiological aspects and many biotechnological applications, such as a source of carotenoids and many other bioactive compounds. Biochemical and molecular characterization is very much essential to fully explore the properties and possibilities of the new isolates of Dunaliella. In India, hyper saline lakes and salt pans were reported to bloom with Dunaliella spp. Howeve...

  20. Phylogeography and population dynamics of dengue viruses in the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allicock, Orchid M; Lemey, Philippe; Tatem, Andrew J; Pybus, Oliver G; Bennett, Shannon N; Mueller, Brandi A; Suchard, Marc A; Foster, Jerome E; Rambaut, Andrew; Carrington, Christine V F

    2012-06-01

    Changes in Dengue virus (DENV) disease patterns in the Americas over recent decades have been attributed, at least in part, to repeated introduction of DENV strains from other regions, resulting in a shift from hypoendemicity to hyperendemicity. Using newly sequenced DENV-1 and DENV-3 envelope (E) gene isolates from 11 Caribbean countries, along with sequences available on GenBank, we sought to document the population genetic and spatiotemporal transmission histories of the four main invading DENV genotypes within the Americas and investigate factors that influence the rate and intensity of DENV transmission. For all genotypes, there was an initial invasion phase characterized by rapid increases in genetic diversity, which coincided with the first confirmed cases of each genotype in the region. Rapid geographic dispersal occurred upon each genotype's introduction, after which individual lineages were locally maintained, and gene flow was primarily observed among neighboring and nearby countries. There were, however, centers of viral diversity (Barbados, Puerto Rico, Colombia, Suriname, Venezuela, and Brazil) that were repeatedly involved in gene flow with more distant locations. For DENV-1 and DENV-2, we found that a "distance-informed" model, which posits that the intensity of virus movement between locations is inversely proportional to the distance between them, provided a better fit than a model assuming equal rates of movement between all pairs of countries. However, for DENV-3 and DENV-4, the more stochastic "equal rates" model was preferred. PMID:22319149

  1. From upstream to downstream: Megatrends and latest developments in Latin America`s hydrocarbons sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Kang; Pezeshki, S.; McMahon, J.

    1995-08-01

    In recent years, Latin America`s hydrocarbons sector has been characterized by reorganization, revitalization, regional cooperation, environmental awakening, and steady expansion. The pattern of these changes, which appear to be the megatrends of the region`s hydrocarbons sector development, will continue during the rest of the 1990s. To further study the current situation and future prospects of Latin America`s hydrocarbons sector, we critically summarize in this short article the key issues in the region`s oil and gas development. These megatrends in Latin America`s hydrocarbons sector development will impact not only the future energy demand and supply in the region, but also global oil flows in the North American market and across the Pacific Ocean. Each country is individually discussed; pipelines to be constructed are discussed also.

  2. Streptococcus salivarius urease: genetic and biochemical characterization and expression in a dental plaque streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y Y; Clancy, K A; Burne, R A

    1996-01-01

    The hydrolysis of urea by urease enzyme of oral bacteria is believed to have a major impact on oral microbial ecology and to be intimately involved in oral health and diseases. To begin to understand the biochemistry and genetics of oral ureolysis, a study of the urease of Streptococcus salivarius, a highly ureolytic organism which is present in large numbers on the soft tissues of the oral cavity, has been initiated. By using as a probe a 0.6-kpb internal fragment of the S. salivarius 57.I ureC gene, two clones from subgenomic libraries of S. salivarius 57.I in an Escherichia coli plasmid vector were identified. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed the presence of one partial and six complete open reading frames which were most homologous to ureIAB-CEFGD of other ureolytic bacteria. Plasmid clones were generated to construct a complete gene cluster and used to transform E. coli and Streptococcus gordonii DL1, a nonureolytic, dental plaque microorganism. The recombinant organisms expressed high levels of urease activity when the growth medium was supplemented with NiCl2. The urease enzyme was purified from E. coli, and its biochemical properties were compared with those of the urease produced by S. salivarius and those of the urease produced by S. gordonii carrying the plasmid-borne ure genes. In all cases, the enzyme had a Km of 3.5 to 4.1 mM, a pH optimum near 7.0, and a temperature optimum near 60 degrees C. S. gordonii carrying the urease genes was then demonstrated to have a significant capacity to temper glycolytic acidification in vitro in the presence of concentrations of urea commonly found in the oral cavity. The ability to genetically engineer plaque bacteria that can modulate environmental pH through ureolysis will open the way to using recombinant ureolytic organisms to test hypotheses regarding the role of oral ureolysis in dental caries, calculus formation, and periodontal diseases. Such recombinant organisms may eventually prove useful for

  3. Characterization of PV panel and global optimization of its model parameters using genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Genetic Algorithm optimization ability had been utilized to extract parameters of PV panel model. • Effect of solar radiation and temperature variations was taken into account in fitness function evaluation. • We used Matlab-Simulink to simulate operation of the PV-panel to validate results. • Different cases were analyzed to ascertain which of them gives more accurate results. • Accuracy and applicability of this approach to be used as a valuable tool for PV modeling were clearly validated. - Abstract: This paper details an improved modeling technique for a photovoltaic (PV) module; utilizing the optimization ability of a genetic algorithm, with different parameters of the PV module being computed via this approach. The accurate modeling of any PV module is incumbent upon the values of these parameters, as it is imperative in the context of any further studies concerning different PV applications. Simulation, optimization and the design of the hybrid systems that include PV are examples of these applications. The global optimization of the parameters and the applicability for the entire range of the solar radiation and a wide range of temperatures are achievable via this approach. The Manufacturer’s Data Sheet information is used as a basis for the purpose of parameter optimization, with an average absolute error fitness function formulated; and a numerical iterative method used to solve the voltage-current relation of the PV module. The results of single-diode and two-diode models are evaluated in order to ascertain which of them are more accurate. Other cases are also analyzed in this paper for the purpose of comparison. The Matlab–Simulink environment is used to simulate the operation of the PV module, depending on the extracted parameters. The results of the simulation are compared with the Data Sheet information, which is obtained via experimentation in order to validate the reliability of the approach. Three types of PV modules

  4. Characterization of LEDGF/p75 genetic variants and association with HIV-1 disease progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Messiaen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75 is an important co-factor involved in HIV-1 integration, the LEDGF/p75-IN interaction is a promising target for the new class of allosteric HIV integrase inhibitors (LEDGINs. Few data are available on the genetic variability of LEDGF/p75 and the influence on HIV disease in vivo. This study evaluated the relation between LEDGF/p75 genetic variation, mRNA expression and HIV-1 disease progression in order to guide future clinical use of LEDGINs. METHODS: Samples were derived from a therapy-naïve cohort at Ghent University Hospital and a Spanish long-term-non-progressor cohort. High-resolution melting curve analysis and Sanger sequencing were used to identify all single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the coding region, flanking intronic regions and full 3'UTR of LEDGF/p75. In addition, two intronic tagSNPs were screened based on previous indication of influencing HIV disease. LEDGF/p75 mRNA was quantified in patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC using RT-qPCR. RESULTS: 325 samples were investigated from patients of Caucasian (n = 291 and African (n = 34 origin, including Elite (n = 49 and Viremic controllers (n = 62. 21 SNPs were identified, comprising five in the coding region and 16 in the non-coding regions and 3'UTR. The variants in the coding region were infrequent and had no major impact on protein structure according to SIFT and PolyPhen score. One intronic SNP (rs2737828 was significantly under-represented in Caucasian patients (P<0.0001 compared to healthy controls (HapMap. Two SNPs showed a non-significant trend towards association with slower disease progression but not with LEDGF/p75 expression. The observed variation in LEDGF/p75 expression was not correlated with disease progression. CONCLUSIONS: LEDGF/p75 is a highly conserved protein. Two non-coding polymorphisms were identified indicating a correlation with disease outcome, but further

  5. Emergence of quinolone resistance among extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in the Central African Republic: genetic characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Thierry

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cross-resistance to quinolones and beta-lactams is frequent in Enterobacteriaceae, due to the wide use of these antibiotics clinically and in the food industry. Prescription of one of these categories of antibiotic may consequently select for bacteria resistant to both categories. Genetic mechanisms of resistance may be secondary to a chromosomal mutation located in quinolone resistance determining region of DNA gyrase or topoisomerase IV or to a plasmid acquisition. The insertion sequence ISCR1 is often associated with qnr and may favour its dissemination in Gram-negative bacteria. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic mechanism of quinolone resistance among extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae strains in the Central African Republic. Findings Among seventeen ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolated from urine, pus or stool between January 2003 and October 2005 in the Central African Republic, nine were resistant to ciprofloxacin (seven from community patients and two from hospitalized patients. The ESBL were previously characterized as CTX-M-15 and SHV-12. Susceptibility to nalidixic acid, norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin, and the minimal inhibitory concentrations of these drugs were determined by disc diffusion and agar dilution methods, respectively. The presence of plasmid-borne ISCR1-qnrA region was determined by PCR and amplicons, if any, were sent for sequencing. Quinolone resistance determining region of DNA gyrase gyrA gene was amplified by PCR and then sequenced for mutation characterization. We found that all CTX-M-producing strains were resistant to the tested quinolones. All the isolates had the same nucleotide mutation at codon 83 of gyrA. Two Escherichia coli strains with the highest MICs were shown to harbour an ISCR1-qnrA1 sequence. This genetic association might favour dissemination of resistance to quinolone and perhaps other antibiotics among Enterobacteriaceae

  6. PERMANENT GENETIC RESOURCES: Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci from the Arctic cisco (Coregonus autumnalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, A; Graziano, S L; Nielsen, J L

    2008-03-01

    Eight polymorphic microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized for the Arctic cisco, Coregonus autumnalis. Loci were evaluated in 21 samples from the Colville River subsistence fishery. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 18. Observed heterozygosity of loci varied from 0.10 to 1.00, and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.09 to 0.92. All eight microsatellite markers were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The loci presented here will be useful in describing population structure and exploring populations of origin for Arctic cisco.

  7. Genetic characterization and molecular cloning of the tripeptide permease (tpp) genes of Salmonella typhimurium.

    OpenAIRE

    Gibson, M M; Price, M; Higgins, C F

    1984-01-01

    Of the three bacterial peptide transport systems only one, the oligopeptide permease, has been characterized in any detail. We have now isolated Salmonella typhimurium mutants deficient in a second transport system, the tripeptide permease (Tpp), using the toxic peptide alafosfalin. Alafosfalin resistance mutations map at three loci, the gene encoding peptidase A (pepA) and two transport-defective loci, tppA and tppB. Locus tppA has been mapped to 74 min on the S. typhimurium chromosome, cotr...

  8. Genetic algorithms-based inversion of multimode guided waves for cortical bone characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochud, N.; Vallet, Q.; Bala, Y.; Follet, H.; Minonzio, J.-G.; Laugier, P.

    2016-10-01

    Recent progress in quantitative ultrasound has exploited the multimode waveguide response of long bones. Measurements of the guided modes, along with suitable waveguide modeling, have the potential to infer strength-related factors such as stiffness (mainly determined by cortical porosity) and cortical thickness. However, the development of such model-based approaches is challenging, in particular because of the multiparametric nature of the inverse problem. Current estimation methods in the bone field rely on a number of assumptions for pairing the incomplete experimental data with the theoretical guided modes (e.g. semi-automatic selection and classification of the data). The availability of an alternative inversion scheme that is user-independent is highly desirable. Thus, this paper introduces an efficient inversion method based on genetic algorithms using multimode guided waves, in which the mode-order is kept blind. Prior to its evaluation on bone, our proposal is validated using laboratory-controlled measurements on isotropic plates and bone-mimicking phantoms. The results show that the model parameters (i.e. cortical thickness and porosity) estimated from measurements on a few ex vivo human radii are in good agreement with the reference values derived from x-ray micro-computed tomography. Further, the cortical thickness estimated from in vivo measurements at the third from the distal end of the radius is in good agreement with the values delivered by site-matched high-resolution x-ray peripheral computed tomography.

  9. Occurrence, genetic characterization and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella isolated from chicken meat and giblets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elghany, S M; Sallam, K I; Abd-Elkhalek, A; Tamura, T

    2015-04-01

    SUMMARY This study was undertaken to survey the presence of Salmonella in 200 chicken samples collected from Mansoura, Egypt. Salmonella was detected in 16% (8/50), 28% (14/50), 32% (16/50) and 60% (30/50) of whole chicken carcasses, drumsticks, livers and gizzards, respectively, with an overall prevalence of 34% (68/200) among all samples. One hundred and sixty-six isolates were identified biochemically as Salmonella, and confirmed genetically by PCR, based on the presence of invA and stn genes. The spvC gene, however, was detected in only 25.3% (42/166) of the isolates. Isolates were serotyped as Salmonella Enteritidis (37.3%), S. Typhimurium (30.1%), S. Kentucky (10.8%), S. Muenster (8.4%), S. Virchow (4.8%), S. Anatum (4.8%), S. Haifa (1.2%), and four were non-typable. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests of the Salmonella isolates revealed that 100% were resistant to each of erythromycin, penicillin, and amoxicillin, while 98.8%, 96.4%, 95.2%, and 91.6% were resistant to nalidixic acid, sulphamethoxazole, oxytetracycline, and ampicillin, respectively. Multidrug resistance was evident for 92.8% of the isolates. The high contamination level of chicken meat with multidrug-resistant Salmonella can constitute a problem for public health.

  10. Isolation and characterization of novel microsatellite markers for molecular genetic diversity in Siganus fuscescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Y F; Li, Z B; Li, Q H; Dai, G; Shangguan, J B; Yuan, Y; Huang, Y S

    2015-01-15

    The rabbitfish Siganus fuscescens is an economically valuable species that is widely distributed throughout the estuaries, intertidal, and offshore coasts of the Indo-Pacific and eastern Mediterranean. Ten novel microsatellite loci from the genome of S. fuscescens were developed using the fast isolation protocol with amplified fragment length polymorphism of sequences containing repeats. Polymorphisms in these 10 microsatellite markers were determined from 32 wild individuals. The number of alleles per locus and the polymorphism information content ranged from 2 to 5 and from 0.059 to 0.668, respectively. The observed and expected heterozygosities varied from 0.063 to 0.781 and from 0.062 to 0.731, respectively. Although 1 locus (LZY-X7, P < 0.005) showed significant deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, no deviations were detected in the other 9 loci. These microsatellite loci may be useful for further population genetic studies, conservation studies, population structure assessment, and linkage map construction of S. fuscescens.

  11. Genetic Characterization of Goutanap Virus, a Novel Virus Related to Negeviruses, Cileviruses and Higreviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Kallies

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Pools of mosquitoes collected in Côte d’Ivoire and Mexico were tested for cytopathic effects on the mosquito cell line C6/36. Seven pools induced strong cytopathic effects after one to five days post infection and were further investigated by deep sequencing. The genomes of six virus isolates from Côte d’Ivoire showed pairwise nucleotide identities of ~99% among each other and of 56%–60% to Dezidougou virus and Wallerfield virus, two insect-specific viruses belonging to the proposed new taxon Negevirus. The novel virus was tentatively named Goutanap virus. The isolate derived from the Mexican mosquitoes showed 95% pairwise identity to Piura virus and was suggested to be a strain of Piura virus, named C6.7-MX-2008. Phylogenetic inferences based on a concatenated alignment of the methyltransferase, helicase, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase domains showed that the new taxon Negevirus formed two monophyletic clades, named Nelorpivirus and Sandewavirus after the viruses grouping in these clades. Branch lengths separating these clades were equivalent to those of the related genera Cilevirus, Higrevirus and Blunervirus, as well as to those within the family Virgaviridae. Genetic distances and phylogenetic analyses suggest that Nelorpivirus and Sandewavirus might form taxonomic groups on genus level that may define alone or together with Cilevirus, Higrevirus and Blunervirus a viral family.

  12. Morphological characterization and genetic diversity in lentil (Lens culinaris medikus ssp. Culinaris germplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.U. Ahamed

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic divergence of 110 lentil germplasm with checks was assessed based on morphological traits using multivariate analysis. Mahalanobis generalized distance (D2 analysis was used to group the lentil genotypes. Significant variations among lentil genotypes were observed in respect of days to 1st flowering, days to 50% flowering, days to maturity, plant height, and number of pods per peduncle, number of pods per plant, number of seeds per plant, 100 seed weight and yield per plant. Considering the mean values, the germplasm were grouped into ten clusters. The highest number of genotypes (17 was in cluster X and lowest (5 both in cluster II and IV. Cluster IV had the highest cluster mean for number of pods per plant (297.08, number of seeds per plant (594.16, 100 seed weight (1.44 g and yield per plant (8.53 g. Among them, the highest inter-cluster distance was obtained between the cluster IV and I (24.61 followed by IV and III (22.33, while the lowest was between IX and II (1.63. The maximum value of inter-cluster distance indicated that genotypes belonging to cluster IV were far diverged from those of cluster I. The first female flower initiation was earlier in BD-3812 (49 days in cluster I and cluster IV had highest grain yield per plant (8.53. BD-3807 produced significant maximum number of pods per plant (298.40 in cluster IV.

  13. Molecular characterization of melanoma cases in Denmark suspected of genetic predisposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin A W Wadt

    Full Text Available Both environmental and host factors influence risk of cutaneous melanoma (CM, and worldwide, the incidence varies depending on constitutional determinants of skin type and pigmentation, latitude, and patterns of sun exposure. We performed genetic analysis of CDKN2A, CDK4, BAP1, MC1R, and MITFp.E318K in Danish high-risk melanoma cases and found CDKN2A germline mutations in 11.3% of CM families with three or more affected individuals, including four previously undescribed mutations. Rare mutations were also seen in CDK4 and BAP1, while MC1R variants were common, occurring at more than twice the frequency compared to Danish controls. The MITF p.E318K variant similarly occurred at an approximately three-fold higher frequency in melanoma cases than controls. To conclude, we propose that mutation screening of CDKN2A and CDK4 in Denmark should predominantly be performed in families with at least 3 cases of CM. In addition, we recommend that testing of BAP1 should not be conducted routinely in CM families but should be reserved for families with CM and uveal melanoma, or mesothelioma.

  14. Preparation of Mealybugs (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) for Genetic Characterization and Morphological Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahder, B W; Bollinger, M L; Sudarshana, M R; Zalom, F G

    2015-01-01

    Mealybugs (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) are economically significant agricultural pests on many different crops. Because of their small size and lack of easily visible characters for identification, determination of their taxonomic status is difficult and requires technical competency to prepare a slide-mounted specimen. The standard mounting technique does not allow for analysis of the genome of the specimen. Conversely, preparatory techniques for genetic analysis of mealybugs cause either loss of the entire individual or physical damage that can make morphology-based identification difficult. This study describes a simple protocol that does not impact physical integrity of the specimen for fixation and microscopic examination yet enables simultaneous DNA extraction for DNA-based identification of four mealybug species. All species prepared yielded high quality slide mounts, identified as Planococcus citri Risso, Pseudococcus viburni Signoret, Rhizoecus kondonis Kuwana, or Rhizoecus californicus Ferris. DNA extracted in this manner had higher purity and yield in the final eluate than in samples extracted using standard methods. DNA extracted was successfully amplified by polymerase chain reaction using primers for the cytochrome oxidase I gene and subsequently sequenced for all specimens. This protocol is likely to be applicable to other Hemiptera taxa that are preserved by slide mounting, allowing for both the preparation of a high-quality voucher specimen for morphological identification and simultaneous analysis of DNA for the same specimen. The methods used are technically less challenging than current standard procedures.

  15. Genetic and antigenic characterization of influenza A virus circulating in Danish swine during the past decade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fobian, Kristina; Kirk, Isa Kristina; Breum, Solvej Østergaard;

    Influenza A virus has been endemic in Danish swine for the last 30 years, with H1N1 and H1N2 being the dominating subtypes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the genetic and antigenic evolution of the influenza viruses found in Danish swine during the last 10 years. A total of 78 samples......-synonymous substitutions for H1, N1 and N2 were found to be in agreement with previously observed values for Eurasian swine lineages. Calculation of possible glycosylation sites in the hemagglutinin gene revealed that the H1N2 and H1N1 subtypes had three well conserved glycosylation sites in common. The results of the HI...... to the complex epidemiology of circulating swine influenza virus in Denmark and indicates that vaccine development targeted against Danish H1N1 and H1N2 need only to include few components for the induction of cross protection against the predominant strains. The study was supported by grants from “European...

  16. Genetic characterization of caffeine degradation by bacteria and its potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Ryan M; Mohanty, Sujit K; Gopishetty, Sridhar; Subramanian, Mani

    2015-05-01

    The ability of bacteria to grow on caffeine as sole carbon and nitrogen source has been known for over 40 years. Extensive research into this subject has revealed two distinct pathways, N-demethylation and C-8 oxidation, for bacterial caffeine degradation. However, the enzymological and genetic basis for bacterial caffeine degradation has only recently been discovered. This review article discusses the recent discoveries of the genes responsible for both N-demethylation and C-8 oxidation. All of the genes for the N-demethylation pathway, encoding enzymes in the Rieske oxygenase family, reside on 13.2-kb genomic DNA fragment found in Pseudomonas putida CBB5. A nearly identical DNA fragment, with homologous genes in similar orientation, is found in Pseudomonas sp. CES. Similarly, genes for C-8 oxidation of caffeine have been located on a 25.2-kb genomic DNA fragment of Pseudomonas sp. CBB1. The C-8 oxidation genes encode enzymes similar to those found in the uric acid metabolic pathway of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Various biotechnological applications of these genes responsible for bacterial caffeine degradation, including bio-decaffeination, remediation of caffeine-contaminated environments, production of chemical and fuels and development of diagnostic tests have also been demonstrated.

  17. Genetic Characterization of ExPEC-Like Virulence Plasmids among a Subset of NMEC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Bryon A; West, Aaron C; Mangiamele, Paul; Barbieri, Nicolle; Wannemuehler, Yvonne; Nolan, Lisa K; Logue, Catherine M; Li, Ganwu

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal Meningitis Escherichia coli (NMEC) is one of the most common causes of neonatal bacterial meningitis in the US and elsewhere resulting in mortality or neurologic deficits in survivors. Large plasmids have been shown experimentally to increase the virulence of NMEC in the rat model of neonatal meningitis. Here, 9 ExPEC-like plasmids were isolated from NMEC and sequenced to identify the core and accessory plasmid genes of ExPEC-like virulence plasmids in NMEC and create an expanded plasmid phylogeny. Results showed sequenced virulence plasmids carry a strongly conserved core of genes with predicted functions in five distinct categories including: virulence, metabolism, plasmid stability, mobile elements, and unknown genes. The major functions of virulence-associated and plasmid core genes serve to increase in vivo fitness by adding multiple iron uptake systems to the genetic repertoire to facilitate NMEC's survival in the host's low iron environment, and systems to enhance bacterial resistance to host innate immunity. Phylogenetic analysis based on these core plasmid genes showed that at least two lineages of ExPEC-like plasmids could be discerned. Further, virulence plasmids from Avian Pathogenic E. coli and NMEC plasmids could not be differentiated based solely on the genes of the core plasmid genome. PMID:26800268

  18. Genetic Characterization of ExPEC-Like Virulence Plasmids among a Subset of NMEC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryon A Nicholson

    Full Text Available Neonatal Meningitis Escherichia coli (NMEC is one of the most common causes of neonatal bacterial meningitis in the US and elsewhere resulting in mortality or neurologic deficits in survivors. Large plasmids have been shown experimentally to increase the virulence of NMEC in the rat model of neonatal meningitis. Here, 9 ExPEC-like plasmids were isolated from NMEC and sequenced to identify the core and accessory plasmid genes of ExPEC-like virulence plasmids in NMEC and create an expanded plasmid phylogeny. Results showed sequenced virulence plasmids carry a strongly conserved core of genes with predicted functions in five distinct categories including: virulence, metabolism, plasmid stability, mobile elements, and unknown genes. The major functions of virulence-associated and plasmid core genes serve to increase in vivo fitness by adding multiple iron uptake systems to the genetic repertoire to facilitate NMEC's survival in the host's low iron environment, and systems to enhance bacterial resistance to host innate immunity. Phylogenetic analysis based on these core plasmid genes showed that at least two lineages of ExPEC-like plasmids could be discerned. Further, virulence plasmids from Avian Pathogenic E. coli and NMEC plasmids could not be differentiated based solely on the genes of the core plasmid genome.

  19. Characterization, Genetic Variation, and Combining Ability of Maize Traits Relevant to the Production of Cellulosic Ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, A. J.; Coors, J. G.; de Leon, N.; Wolfrum, E. J.; Hames, B. R.; Sluiter, A. D.; Weimer, P. J.

    2009-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) stover has been identified as an important feedstock for the production of cellulosic ethanol. Our objectives were to measure hybrid effect and combining ability patterns of traits related to cellulosic ethanol production, determine if germplasm and mutations used for silage production would also be beneficial for feedstock production, and examine relationships between traits that are relevant to selective breeding. We evaluated grain hybrids, germplasm bred for silage production, brown-midrib hybrids, and a leafy hybrid. Yield and composition traits were measured in four environments. There was a 53% difference in stover yield between commercial grain hybrids that were equivalent for other production-related traits. Silage germplasm may be useful for increasing stover yield and reducing lignin concentration. We found much more variation among hybrids than either in vitro ruminal fermentability or polysaccharide concentration. Correlations between traits were mostly favorable or nonexistent. Our results suggest that utilizing standing genetic variation of maize in breeding programs could substantially increase the amount of biofuels produced from stover per unit area of land.

  20. Characterization and genetic dissection of resistance to spotted alfalfa aphid (Therioaphis trifolii) in Medicago truncatula

    KAUST Repository

    Kamphuis, L. G.

    2013-09-21

    Aphids cause significant yield losses in agricultural crops worldwide. Medicago truncatula, a model legume, cultivated pasture species in Australia and close relative of alfalfa (Medicago sativa), was used to study the defence response against Therioaphis trifolii f. maculate [spotted alfalfa aphid (SAA)]. Aphid performance and plant damage were compared among three accessions. A20 is highly susceptible, A17 has moderate resistance, and Jester is strongly resistant. Subsequent analyses using A17 and A20, reciprocal F1s and an A17×A20 recombinant inbred line (RIL) population revealed that this moderate resistance is phloem mediated and involves antibiosis and tolerance but not antixenosis. Electrical penetration graph analysis also identified a novel waveform termed extended potential drop, which occurred following SAA infestation of M. truncatula. Genetic dissection using the RIL population revealed three quantitative trait loci on chromosomes 3, 6, and 7 involved in distinct modes of aphid defence including antibiosis and tolerance. An antibiosis locus resides on linkage group 3 (LG3) and is derived from A17, whereas a plant tolerance and antibiosis locus resides on LG6 and is derived from A20, which exhibits strong temporary tolerance. The loci identified reside in regions harbouring classical resistance genes, and introgression of these loci in current medic cultivars may help provide durable resistance to SAA, while elucidation of their molecular mechanisms may provide valuable insight into other aphid–plant interactions.

  1. Isolation and genetic charac-terization of a fragile plantmutant in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The fragile rice mutant was isolated from an M2 population of indica variety Shuang Ke Zao (SKZ) treated with (-rays, and designated as fp1 (fragile plant 1) because of its fragile leaves and culms. To map FP1 locus, an F2 mapping population was derived from a cross between the fp1 and C-bao, a polymorphic japonic variety. The primary mapping result places the FP1 locus in an interval between two molecular markers, microsatellite marker RM16 (3.1 cM proximal to FP1) and STS marker G144a (9.1 cM distal to FP1) in the centromere region of chromosome 3. A CAPS marker C524a was further developed between RM16 and G144a, with 0.4 cM genetic distances to the FP1 locus, providing a practical starting point for constructing a BAC contig spanning the FP1 locus and cloning the fp1 gene. Allelism test demonstrated that fp1 is allelic to bc1, a fragile rice mutant reported previously.

  2. Genetic screening and functional characterization of PDGFRB mutations associated with Basal Ganglia Calcification of Unknown Etiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Contreras, Monica; Baker, Matthew C.; Finch, NiCole A.; Nicholson, Alexandra; Wojtas, Aleksandra; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Ross, Owen A.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Rademakers, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Three causal genes for Idiopathic Basal Ganglia Calcification (IBGC) have been identified. Most recently, mutations in PDGFRB, encoding a member of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor family type β, and PDGFB, encoding PDGF-B, the specific ligand of PDGFRβ, were found implicating the PDGF-B/PDGFRβ pathway in abnormal brain calcification. In this study we aimed to identify and study mutations in PDGFRB and PDGFB in a series of 26 patients from the Mayo Clinic Florida Brain Bank with moderate to severe basal ganglia calcification (BCG) of unknown etiology. No mutations in PDGFB were found. However, we identified one mutation in PDGFRB, p.R695C located in the tyrosine kinase domain, in one BGC patient. We further studied the function of p.R695C mutant PDGFRβ and two previously reported mutants, p.L658P and p.R987W PDGFRβ in cell culture. We show that, in response to PDGF-BB stimulation, the p.L658P mutation completely suppresses PDGFRβ autophosphorylation whereas the p.R695C mutation results in partial loss of autophosphorylation. For the p.R987W mutation, our data suggest a different mechanism involving reduced protein levels. These genetic and functional studies provide the first insight into the pathogenic mechanisms associated with PDGFRB mutations and provide further support for a pathogenic role of PDGFRB mutations in BGC. PMID:24796542

  3. Biochemical and genetic characterization of arazyme, an extracellular metalloprotease produced from Serratia proteamaculans HY-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Jangyul; Lee, Kieun; Shin, Dong-Ha; Maeng, Jin-Soo; Park, Doo-Sang; Oh, Hyun Woo; Son, Kwang-Hee; Bae, Kyung-Sook; Park, Ho-Yong

    2007-05-01

    Serratia proteamaculans HY-3 isolated from the digestive tract of a spider produces an extracellular protease named arazyme, with an estimated molecular mass of 51.5 kDa. The purified enzyme was characterized as having high activities at wide pH and temperature ranges. We further characterized biochemical features of the enzymatic reactions under various reaction conditions. The protease efficiently hydrolyzed a broad range of protein substrates including albumin, keratin, and collagen. The dependence of enzymatic activities on the presence of metal ions such as calcium and zinc indicated that the enzyme is a metalloprotease, together with the previous observation that the proteolytic activity of the enzyme was not inhibited by aspartate, cysteine, or serine protease inhibitors, but strongly inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline and EDTA. The araA gene encoding the exoprotease was isolated as a 5.6 kb BamHl fragment after PCR amplification using degenerate primers and subsequent Southern hybridization. The nucleotide sequence revealed that the deduced amino acid sequences shared extensive similarity with those of the serralysin family of metalloproteases from other enteric bacteria. A gene (inh) encoding a putative protease inhibitor was also identified immediately adjacent to the araA structural gene. PMID:18051297

  4. An altered redox balance and increased genetic instability characterize primary fibroblasts derived from xeroderma pigmentosum group A patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlanti, Eleonora; Pietraforte, Donatella; Iorio, Egidio; Visentin, Sergio; De Nuccio, Chiara; Zijno, Andrea; D'Errico, Mariarosaria; Simonelli, Valeria; Sanchez, Massimo; Fattibene, Paola; Falchi, Mario; Dogliotti, Eugenia

    2015-12-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP)-A patients are characterized by increased solar skin carcinogenesis and present also neurodegeneration. XPA deficiency is associated with defective nucleotide excision repair (NER) and increased basal levels of oxidatively induced DNA damage. In this study we search for the origin of increased levels of oxidatively generated DNA lesions in XP-A cell genome and then address the question of whether increased oxidative stress might drive genetic instability. We show that XP-A human primary fibroblasts present increased levels and different types of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) as compared to normal fibroblasts, with O₂₋• and H₂O₂ being the major reactive species. Moreover, XP-A cells are characterized by decreased reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratios as compared to normal fibroblasts. The significant increase of ROS levels and the alteration of the glutathione redox state following silencing of XPA confirmed the causal relationship between a functional XPA and the control of redox balance. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (¹H NMR) analysis of the metabolic profile revealed a more glycolytic metabolism and higher ATP levels in XP-A than in normal primary fibroblasts. This perturbation of bioenergetics is associated with different morphology and response of mitochondria to targeted toxicants. In line with cancer susceptibility, XP-A primary fibroblasts showed increased spontaneous micronuclei (MN) frequency, a hallmark of cancer risk. The increased MN frequency was not affected by inhibition of ROS to normal levels by N-acetyl-L-cysteine. PMID:26546826

  5. Comparative genotyping of Clostridium thermocellum strains isolated from biogas plants: genetic markers and characterization of cellulolytic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeck, Daniela E; Zverlov, Vladimir V; Liebl, Wolfgang; Schwarz, Wolfgang H

    2014-07-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is among the most prevalent of known anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria. In this study, genetic and phenotypic variations among C. thermocellum strains isolated from different biogas plants were determined and different genotyping methods were evaluated on these isolates. At least two C. thermocellum strains were isolated independently from each of nine different biogas plants via enrichment on cellulose. Various DNA-based genotyping methods such as ribotyping, RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA) and VNTR (Variable Number of Tandem Repeats) were applied to these isolates. One novel approach - the amplification of unknown target sequences between copies of a previously discovered Random Inserted Mobile Element (RIME) - was also tested. The genotyping method with the highest discriminatory power was found to be the amplification of the sequences between the insertion elements, where isolates from each biogas plant yielded a different band pattern. Cellulolytic potentials, optimal growth conditions and substrate spectra of all isolates were characterized to help identify phenotypic variations. Irrespective of the genotyping method used, the isolates from each individual biogas plant always exhibited identical patterns. This is suggestive of a single C. thermocellum strain exhibiting dominance in each biogas plant. The genotypic groups reflect the results of the physiological characterization of the isolates like substrate diversity and cellulase activity. Conversely, strains isolated across a range of biogas plants differed in their genotyping results and physiological properties. Both strains isolated from one biogas plant had the best specific cellulose-degrading properties and might therefore achieve superior substrate utilization yields in biogas fermenters.

  6. Genetic structure of different cat populations in Europe and South America at a microgeographic level: importance of the choice of an adequate sampling level in the accuracy of population genetics interpretations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ruiz-Garcia

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The phenotypic markers, coat color, pattern and hair length, of natural domestic cat populations observed in four cities (Barcelona, Catalonia; Palma Majorca, Balearic Islands; Rimini, Italy and Buenos Aires, Argentina were studied at a microgeographical level. Various population genetics techniques revealed that the degree of genetic differentiation between populations of Felis catus within these cities is relatively low, when compared with that found between populations of other mammals. Two different levels of sampling were used. One was that of "natural" colonies of cat families living together in specific points within the cities, and the other referred to "artificial" subpopulations, or groups of colonies, inhabiting the same district within a city. For the two sampling levels, some of the results were identical: 1 little genic heterogeneity, 2 existence of panmixia, 3 similar levels of expected heterozygosity in all populations analyzed, 4 no spatial autocorrelation, with certain differentiation in the Buenos Aires population compared to the others, and 5 very high correlations between colonies and subpopulations with the first factors from a Q factor analysis. Nevertheless, other population genetic statistics were greatly affected by the differential choice of sampling level. This was the case for: 1 the amount of heterogeneity of the FST and GST statistics between the cities, which was greater at the subpopulation level than at colony level, 2 the existence of correlations between genic differentiation statistics and size variables at subpopulation level, but not at the colony level, and 3 the relationships between the genetic variables and the principal factors of the R factorial analysis. This suggests that care should be taken in the choice of the sampling unit, for inferences on population genetics to be valid at the microgeographical level.Os marcadores fenotípicos cor da pelagem, padrão e comprimento dos pelos de popula

  7. Characterization of Capsicum annuum Genetic Diversity and Population Structure Based on Parallel Polymorphism Discovery with a 30K Unigene Pepper GeneChip

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Theresa A.; Hamid Ashrafi; Sebastian Reyes-Chin-Wo; JiQiang Yao; Kevin Stoffel; Maria-Jose Truco; Alexander Kozik; Michelmore, Richard W; Allen Van Deynze

    2013-01-01

    The widely cultivated pepper, Capsicum spp., important as a vegetable and spice crop world-wide, is one of the most diverse crops. To enhance breeding programs, a detailed characterization of Capsicum diversity including morphological, geographical and molecular data is required. Currently, molecular data characterizing Capsicum genetic diversity is limited. The development and application of high-throughput genome-wide markers in Capsicum will facilitate more detailed molecular characterizat...

  8. Characterization of the genetic diversity of extensively-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Cáceres

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Peru holds the fourth highest burden of tuberculosis in the Americas. Despite an apparently well-functioning DOTS control program, the prevalence of multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB continues to increase. To worsen this situation, cases of extensively drug resistance tuberculosis (XDR-TB have been detected. Little information exists about the genetic diversity of drug-susceptible vs. MDR-TB and XDR-TB. METHODS: Cryopreserved samples of XDR strains from 2007 to 2009 (second semester, were identified and collected. Starting from 227 frozen samples, a total of 142 XDR-TB strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC; 1 isolate per patient were retained for this study. Each strain DNA was analyzed by spoligotyping and the 15-loci Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit (MIRU-15. RESULTS: Among the 142 isolates analyzed, only 2 samples (1.41% could not be matched to any lineage. The most prevalent sublineage was Haarlem (43.66%, followed by T (27.46%, LAM (16.2%, Beijing (9.15%, and X clade (1.41%. Spoligotype analysis identified clustering for 128/142 (90.1% isolates vs. 49/142 (34.5% with MIRUs. Of the samples, 90.85% belonged to retreated patients. The drug resistant profile demonstrated that 62.67% showed resistance to injectable drugs capreomycin (CAP and kanamycin (KAN vs. 15.5% to CAP alone and 21.8% to KAN alone. The SIT219/T1 and SIT50/H3 were the most prevalent patterns in our study. The spoligoforest analysis showed that SIT53/T1 was at the origin of many of the T lineage strains as well as a big proportion of Haarlem lineage strains (SIT50/H3, followed by SIT47/H1, SIT49/H3, and SIT2375/H1, as opposed to the SIT1/Beijing strains that did not appear to evolve into minor Beijing sublineages among the XDR-TB strains. CONCLUSION: In contrast with other Latin-American countries where LAM sublineage is the most predominant, we found the Haarlem to be the most common followed by T sublineage among the XDR-TB strains.

  9. Phenotypic and Genetic Characterization of a Cohort of Pediatric Wilson Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaghy Suzan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Egypt, Wilson disease seems to be under diagnosed and clinical data on large cohorts are limited. The aim of this study is to highlight the clinical, laboratory and genetic characteristics of this disease in our pediatric population as well as to report our experience with both treatment options and outcome. Methods The study included 77 patients from 50 unrelated families (62 were followed up for a mean period of 58.9 ± 6.4 months and 27 were asymptomatic siblings. Data were collected retrospectively by record analysis and patient interviews. Diagnosis was confirmed by sequencing of the ATP7B gene in 64 patients Results Our patients had unique characteristics compared to other populations. They had a younger age of onset (median: 10 years, higher prevalence of Kayser-Fleischer rings (97.6% in the symptomatic patients, low ceruloplasmin (93.5%, high rate of parental consanguinity (78.9% as well as a more severe course. 71.42% of those on long term D-penicillamine improved or were stable during the follow up with severe side effects occurring in only 11.5%. Preemptive treatment with zinc monotherapy was an effective non-toxic alternative to D-penicillamine. Homozygous mutations were found in 85.7%, yet limited by the large number of mutations detected, it was difficult to find genotype-phenotype correlations. Missense mutations were the most common while protein-truncating mutations resulted in a more severe course with higher incidence of acute liver failure and neurological symptoms. Conclusions Egyptian children with Wilson disease present with early Kayser-Fleischer rings and early onset of liver and neurological disease. The mutational spectrum identified differs from that observed in other countries. The high rate of homozygous mutations (reflecting the high rate of consanguinity may potentially offer further insights on genotype-phenotype correlation

  10. Prevalence and genetic characterization of pertactin-deficient Bordetella pertussis in Japan.

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    Nao Otsuka

    Full Text Available The adhesin pertactin (Prn is one of the major virulence factors of Bordetella pertussis, the etiological agent of whooping cough. However, a significant prevalence of Prn-deficient (Prn(- B. pertussis was observed in Japan. The Prn(- isolate was first discovered in 1997, and 33 (27% Prn(- isolates were identified among 121 B. pertussis isolates collected from 1990 to 2009. Sequence analysis revealed that all the Prn(- isolates harbor exclusively the vaccine-type prn1 allele and that loss of Prn expression is caused by 2 different mutations: an 84-bp deletion of the prn signal sequence (prn1ΔSS, n = 24 and an IS481 insertion in prn1 (prn1::IS481, n = 9. The frequency of Prn(- isolates, notably those harboring prn1ΔSS, significantly increased since the early 2000s, and Prn(- isolates were subsequently found nationwide. Multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA revealed that 24 (73% of 33 Prn(- isolates belong to MLVA-186, and 6 and 3 Prn(- isolates belong to MLVA-194 and MLVA-226, respectively. The 3 MLVA types are phylogenetically closely related, suggesting that the 2 Prn(- clinical strains (harboring prn1ΔSS and prn1::IS481 have clonally expanded in Japan. Growth competition assays in vitro also demonstrated that Prn(- isolates have a higher growth potential than the Prn(+ back-mutants from which they were derived. Our observations suggested that human host factors (genetic factors and immune status that select for Prn(- strains have arisen and that Prn expression is not essential for fitness under these conditions.

  11. Characterizing genetic risk at known prostate cancer susceptibility loci in African Americans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Haiman

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available GWAS of prostate cancer have been remarkably successful in revealing common genetic variants and novel biological pathways that are linked with its etiology. A more complete understanding of inherited susceptibility to prostate cancer in the general population will come from continuing such discovery efforts and from testing known risk alleles in diverse racial and ethnic groups. In this large study of prostate cancer in African American men (3,425 prostate cancer cases and 3,290 controls, we tested 49 risk variants located in 28 genomic regions identified through GWAS in men of European and Asian descent, and we replicated associations (at p≤0.05 with roughly half of these markers. Through fine-mapping, we identified nearby markers in many regions that better define associations in African Americans. At 8q24, we found 9 variants (p≤6×10(-4 that best capture risk of prostate cancer in African Americans, many of which are more common in men of African than European descent. The markers found to be associated with risk at each locus improved risk modeling in African Americans (per allele OR = 1.17 over the alleles reported in the original GWAS (OR = 1.08. In summary, in this detailed analysis of the prostate cancer risk loci reported from GWAS, we have validated and improved upon markers of risk in some regions that better define the association with prostate cancer in African Americans. Our findings with variants at 8q24 also reinforce the importance of this region as a major risk locus for prostate cancer in men of African ancestry.

  12. Genetic and molecular characterization of three novel S-haplotypes in sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Tatsuya; Potter, Daniel; Tao, Ryutaro; Vieira, Cristina P; Vieira, Jorge; Iezzoni, Amy F

    2008-01-01

    Tetraploid sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) exhibits gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) whereby the specificity of self-pollen rejection is controlled by alleles of the stylar and pollen specificity genes, S-RNase and SFB (S haplotype-specific F-box protein gene), respectively. As sour cherry selections can be either self-compatible (SC) or self-incompatible (SI), polyploidy per se does not result in SC. Instead the genotype-dependent loss of SI in sour cherry is due to the accumulation of non-functional S-haplotypes. The presence of two or more non-functional S-haplotypes within sour cherry 2x pollen renders that pollen SC. Two new S-haplotypes from sour cherry, S(33) and S(34), that are presumed to be contributed by the P. fruticosa species parent, the complete S-RNase and SFB sequences of a third S-haplotype, S(35), plus the presence of two previously identified sweet cherry S-haplotypes, S(14) and S(16) are described here. Genetic segregation data demonstrated that the S(16)-, S(33)-, S(34)-, and S(35)-haplotypes present in sour cherry are fully functional. This result is consistent with our previous finding that 'hetero-allelic' pollen is incompatible in sour cherry. Phylogenetic analyses of the SFB and S-RNase sequences from available Prunus species reveal that the relationships among S-haplotypes show no correspondence to known organismal relationships at any taxonomic level within Prunus, indicating that polymorphisms at the S-locus have been maintained throughout the evolution of the genus. Furthermore, the phylogenetic relationships among SFB sequences are generally incongruent with those among S-RNase sequences for the same S-haplotypes. Hypotheses compatible with these results are discussed. PMID:18617504

  13. Characterization of equine CSN1S2 variants considering genetics, transcriptomics, and proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieslak, Jakub; Pawlak, Piotr; Wodas, Lukasz; Borowska, Alicja; Stachowiak, Anna; Puppel, Kamila; Kuczynska, Beata; Luczak, Magdalena; Marczak, Lukasz; Mackowski, Mariusz

    2016-02-01

    Currently, research interest is increasing in horse milk composition and its effect on human health. Despite previously published studies describing the presence of intra- and interbreed variability of equine milk components, no investigations have focused on the genetic background of this variation. Among horse caseins and the genes encoding them, least is known about the structure and expression of the α-S2 casein gene, CSN1S2. Herein, based on direct sequencing of the equine CSN1S2 coding sequence, we describe the presence of 51-bp insertion-deletion (in/del) polymorphism, which significantly changes the protein sequence (lack or presence of 17-amino acid serine-rich peptide). Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the observed in/del polymorphism spanned exactly 2 exons; therefore, we hypothesized that we were observing different CSN1S2 splicing isoforms. However, further investigation indicated that the detected sequence variation was caused by a large (1.3-kb) deletion in the genomic DNA. We found that the polymorphic forms (A, longer; B, shorter; KP658381 and KP658382 GenBank records, respectively) were unevenly distributed among different horse breeds (the highest frequency of variant B was observed in coldblood horses and Haflingers). We propose that the analyzed polymorphism is associated with CSN1S2 expression level (the highest expression was recorded for individuals carrying the BB genotype), which was much more pronounced for milk CSN1S2 protein content than for relative transcript abundance (measured in milk somatic cells). Our results provide insight into the equine CSN1S2 structure and lay a foundation for further functional analyses regarding, for example, allergenicity or physiochemical properties of the observed CSN1S2 variants.

  14. Genetic and antigenic characterization of novel pestivirus genotypes: implications for classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, the genus Pestivirus comprises the four approved species Bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 (BVDV-1), BVDV-2, Classical swine fever virus (CSFV), and Border disease virus (BDV) and one tentative fifth species represented by a single strain (H138) isolated from a giraffe in Kenya more than 30 years ago. To further address the issue of heterogeneity of pestiviruses we have determined the entire Npro and E2 coding sequences for several new pestivirus isolates. Interestingly, phylogenetic analysis revealed that one pestivirus isolated in the 1990s in Africa is closely related to strain H138. Moreover, several novel pestiviruses isolated from sheep group together with the previously described strain V60 (Reindeer-1) isolated from a reindeer, whereas one ovine pestivirus strain (Gifhorn) significantly differs from all previously described pestiviruses, including BDV. We propose to term these mainly sheep-derived pestiviruses BDV-2 (V60-like isolates) and BDV-3 (Gifhorn); consequently, the 'classical' BDV isolates should be termed BDV-1. As an additional criterion for segregation of pestiviruses, the antigenic relatedness of pestivirus isolates covering all observed major genotypes was studied by cross-neutralization assays. Analysis of the antigenic similarities indicated the presence of seven major antigenic groups corresponding to BVDV-1, BVDV-2, CSFV, BDV-1, BDV-2, BDV-3, and 'giraffe'. Taking into account the host origin, the lack of differences concerning the course of disease, and the results of our genetic and antigenic analyses, we suggest that BDV-1, BDV-2, and BDV-3 should be considered as major genotypes within the species BDV

  15. Biochemical and genetical characterization of nitrate reductase deficient mutants of Petunia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, A; Schieder, O

    1984-08-01

    Four NR(-) lines were selected by their resistance to 100 mM chlorate from X-ray irradiated protoplasts of haploid Petunia hybrida var. Mitchell. The four cell lines were characterized by the presence of xanthine dehydrogenase activity and by complementation tests via protoplast fusion. One mutant (line 1) was classified as defective in the NR apoprotein (tentatively, nia-type) and the other three (lines 2, 3, 4) in the molybdenum cofactor (tentatively, cnx-type). Some NR activity (15 %) could be restored by adding unphysiologically high concentrations of molybdate to the culture medium in two of the cnx-lines (lines 3 and 4). The third cnx-line (line 2) had no NR activity. A complementation analysis via protoplast fusion confirmed that the mutants comprised 3 non-allelic groups. From these results it can be concluded that these NR(-) mutants are recessive and that two of the cnx-mutants (lines 3, 4) are allelic.

  16. Prevalence, characterization and antibiotic resistance of Salmonella isolates in large corvid species of europe and north America between 2010 and 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecko, N; Čížek, A; Halová, D; Karpíšková, R; Myšková, P; Literák, I

    2015-06-01

    It is well understood that Salmonella is carried by animals and in majority of cases as asymptomatic hosts. Surveillance efforts have focused on the role of agriculture and contamination points along the food chain as the main source of human infection; however, very little attention has been paid to the contribution of wildlife in the dissemination of Salmonella and what effect anthropogenic sources have on the circulation of antibiotic resistant Salmonella serovars in wildlife species. A purposive survey was taken of large corvids roosting yearly between November and March in Europe and North America. Two thousand and seven hundred and seventy-eight corvid faecal specimens from 11 countries were submitted for Salmonella spp. culture testing. Presumptive positive isolates were further serotyped, susceptibility tested and analysed for antibiotic resistance genes. Overall, 1.40% (39/2778) (CI = 1.01, 1.90) of samples were positive for Salmonella spp. Salmonella Enteritidis was the most prevalent serovar followed by S. Infantis, S. Montevideo and S. Typhimurium. No significant difference (P > 0.05) was found in the proportion of Salmonella recovered in Europe versus North America. The most variability of serovars within a site was in Kansas, USA with five different serovars recovered. European sites were significantly more likely to yield Salmonella resistant to more than one antibiotic (OR 71.5, P Salmonella and resistance genes between human and animal populations and across great distances. This information adds to the knowledge base of zoonotic pathogen prevalence and antibiotic resistance ecology in wild birds.

  17. Genetic characterization of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coil O26 : H11 strains isolated from animal, food, and clinical samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krueger, Alejandra; Lucchesi, Paula M. A.; Mariel Sanso, A.; Etcheverria, Analia I.; Bustamante, Ana V.; Burgan, Julia; Fernandez, Luciana; Fernandez, Daniel; Leotta, Gerardo; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Padola, Nora L.; Rossen, John W. A.

    2015-01-01

    The Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) may cause serious illness in human. Here we analyze O26:H11 strains known to be among the most reported STEC strains causing human infections. Genetic characterization of strains isolated from animal, food, and clinical specimens in Argentina showed

  18. Genetic and biochemical characterization of carotenoid biosynthesis mutants of Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, G A; Schmidt, A; Sandmann, G; Hearst, J E

    1990-05-15

    We have used genetic and biochemical techniques to study carotenoid biosynthesis (crt) mutants of Rhodobacter capsulatus, a purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacterium. All nine identified crt genes are located within the 46-kilobase pair photosynthesis gene cluster, and eight of the crt genes form a subcluster. We have studied the operon structure of the crt gene cluster using transposon Tn5.7 mutants. The Tn5.7 insertion sites in 10 mutants have been mapped to high resolution (25-267 base pairs) by Southern hybridization. Two insertions each map within the coding regions of the crtA, crtC, crtE, and crtF genes, and one insertion lies within the crtI gene. The insertion in crtI is not polar on the downstream crtB gene, suggesting that crtI and crtB may form two separate operons. Another insertion located in the 5' noncoding region between the divergent crtA and crtI genes has no effect on wild-type pigmentation and apparently lies between the promoters for these operons. A Tn5.7 mutation in the 3' region of crtA yields a bacteriochlorophyll-minus phenotype, while a 5' insertion affects only carotenoid biosynthesis. Regulatory signals for transcription of a downstream operon required for bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis may thus overlap the coding region of crtA. We also present the first evidence for the functions of the crtB, crtE, and crtJ gene products using a new in vitro assay for the incorporation of [14C]isopentenyl pyrophosphate into carotenoid precursors and phytoene in cell-free extracts. Extracts from a crtE mutant accumulate [14C]prephytoene pyrophosphate, while those from crtB and crtJ mutants accumulate [14C]geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. We therefore propose that CrtE is the phytoene synthetase and that CrtB, and possibly CrtJ, are components of the prephytoene pyrophosphate synthetase.

  19. Identification, characterization and genetic mapping of TLR1 loci in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palti, Yniv; Rodriguez, M. Fernanda; Gahr, Scott A.; Purcell, Maureen K.; Rexroad, Caird E.; Wiens, Gregory D.

    2010-01-01

    Induction of innate immune pathways is critical for early anti-microbial defense but there is limited understanding of how teleosts recognize microbial molecules and activate these pathways. In mammals, Toll-like receptors (TLR) 1 and 2 form a heterodimer involved in recognizing peptidoglycans and lipoproteins of microbial origin. Herein, we identify and describe the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) TLR1 gene ortholog and its mRNA expression. Two TLR1 loci were identified from a rainbow trout bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library using DNA sequencing and genetic linkage analyses. Full length cDNA clone and direct sequencing of four BACs revealed an intact omTLR1 open reading frame (ORF) located on chromosome 14 and a second locus on chromosome 25 that contains a TLR1 pseudogene. The duplicated trout loci exhibit conserved synteny with other fish genomes that extends beyond the TLR1 gene sequences. The omTLR1 gene includes a single large coding exon similar to all other described TLR1 genes, but unlike other teleosts it also has a 5' UTR exon and intron preceding the large coding exon. The omTLR1 ORF is predicted to encode an 808 amino-acid protein with 69% similarity to the Fugu TLR1 and a conserved pattern of predicted leucine-rich repeats (LRR). Phylogenetic analysis grouped omTLR1 with other fish TLR1 genes on a separate branch from the avian TLR1 and mammalian TLR1, 6 and 10. omTLR1 expression levels in rainbow trout anterior kidney leukocytes were not affected by the human TLR2/6 and TLR2/1 agonists diacylated lipoprotein (Pam2CSK4) and triacylated lipoprotein (Pam3CSK4). However, due to the lack of TLR6 and 10 genes in teleost genomes and up-regulation of TLR1 mRNA in response to LPS and bacterial infection in other fish species we hypothesize an important role for omTLR1 in anti-microbial immunity. Therefore, the identification of a TLR2 ortholog in rainbow trout and the development of assays to measure ligand binding and downstream signaling are

  20. Partial genetic characterization of Stearoyl Coa-Desaturase´s structural region in Bubalus bubalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.B. Thomazine

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Conjugated Linoleic Acids (CLAs comprise a family of positional and geometric isomers of linoleic acid. The main form of CLA, cis-9, trans-11-C18:2 show positive effects in cancer prevention and treatment. The major dietary sources of these fatty acids are derived from ruminant animals, in particular dairy products. In these animals, the endogenous synthesis mainly occurs in mammary gland by the action of enzyme Stearoyl CoA Desaturase (SCD. Different levels of expression and activity of SCD in mammary gland can explain partially the variation of CLA levels in fat milk. Considering a great fat concentration in bubaline milk and the benefit of a high and positive correlation between fat milk and CLA production, this study was carried on with the intention of sequencing and characterizing part of the gene that codifies SCD in buffaloes. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples of lactating bubaline which begins to the breed Murrah. After the (acho que nao precisa desse the extractions, PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction reactions were made by using primers Z43D1 and E143F1. The fragments obtained in PCR were cloned into “T” vectors and transformed in competent cells DH10B line. After this, three samples of each fragment were sequenced from 5’ and 3’ extremities using a BigDye kit in an automatic sequencer. Sequences were edited in a consensus of each fragment and were submitted to BLAST-n / NCBI for similarity comparisions among other species. The sequence obtained with Z43D1 primers shows 938 bp enclosing exons 1 and 2 and intron 1. The primers E143F1 show 70 bp corresponding to exon 3 of bubaline SCD gene. Similarities were obtained between 85% and 97% among bubaline sequences and sequences of SCD gene described in human, mouse, rat, swine, bovine, caprine and ovine species. This study has permitted the identification and partial characterization of SCD codifing region in Bubalus bubalis specie.

  1. Genetic characterization of St. Louis encephalitis virus isolated from human in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Luiza Simões dos Santos

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The molecular characterization of SPH253157, a new strain of St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV, isolated in 2004 from the first case of human infection recognized in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, is reported. The patient, presenting a febrile illness without neurological involvement, was hospitalized as a probable case of dengue fever. Genomic RNA was isolated from the supernatant of C6/36 cells infected with acute phase-serum specimen of the patient and the envelope gene was amplified by reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The complete nucleotide sequence of the envelope gene of this isolate was directly sequenced from the amplified products and compared with other Brazilian and American SLEV strains. Phylogenetic analyses were carried out under maximum likelihood criterion with outgroups both included and excluded. Outgroups comprised four flavivirus of the Japanese encephalitis group. Phylogeny also included Bayesian analysis. The results indicated that the new SLEV isolate belongs to lineage III, being closely related to an Argentinean strain recovered from Culex sp. in 1979. It is concluded that there are at least 3 lineages of SLEV in Brazil.

  2. Isolation and characterization of koi herpesvirus (KHV) from Indonesia: identification of a new genetic lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunarto, A; McColl, K A; Crane, M St J; Sumiati, T; Hyatt, A D; Barnes, A C; Walker, P J

    2011-02-01

    Koi herpesvirus (KHV) is the aetiological agent of an emerging disease (KHVD) associated with mass mortalities in koi and common carp and reported from at least 30 countries. We report the first isolation of KHV from koi and common carp in Indonesia and initial characterization of the isolates. Clinical signs, histopathology and virion morphology are similar to those of isolates from other countries. Phylogenetic analyses using the thymidine kinase gene amplified from each isolate and from carp tissue samples collected from KHVD outbreaks throughout Indonesia indicated that the Indonesian isolates are more closely related to the Asian than the European KHV lineage. Sequence analysis of two other variable regions between ORF29 and ORF31 (marker I) and near the start of ORF 133 (marker II) indicated that all Indonesian isolates displayed a marker I allele (I(++)) previously identified only in isolates of the Asian lineage. However, in the marker II region, all Indonesian isolates displayed the II(-) allele, which has been reported previously only amongst isolates of the European lineage, and nine of these displayed a mixed genotype (II(+)II(-)). The I(++)II(-) genotype has not been reported previously and appears to represent a new intermediate lineage that may have emerged in Indonesia.

  3. Genetic characterization of wild-type measles viruses isolated in China, 2006-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Lijuan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Molecular characterization of wild-type measles viruses in China during 1995-2004 demonstrated that genotype H1 was endemic and widely distributed throughout the country. H1-associated cases and outbreaks caused a resurgence of measles beginning in 2005. A total of 210,094 measles cases and 101 deaths were reported by National Notifiable Diseases Reporting System (NNDRS and Chinese Measles Laboratory Network (LabNet from 2006 to 2007, and the incidences of measles were 6.8/100,000 population and 7.2/100,000 population in 2006 and 2007, respectively. Five hundred and sixty-five wild-type measles viruses were isolated from 24 of 31 provinces in mainland China during 2006 and 2007, and all of the wild type virus isolates belonged to cluster 1 of genotype H1. These results indicated that H1-cluster 1 viruses were the predominant viruses circulating in China from 2006 to 2007. This study contributes to previous efforts to generate critical baseline data about circulating wild-type measles viruses in China that will allow molecular epidemiologic studies to help measure the progress made toward China's goal of measles elimination by 2012.

  4. Geographic distribution and genetic characterization of Lassa virus in sub-Saharan Mali.

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    David Safronetz

    Full Text Available Lassa fever is an acute viral illness characterized by multi-organ failure and hemorrhagic manifestations. Lassa fever is most frequently diagnosed in Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea, although sporadic cases have been recorded in other West African countries, including Mali. The etiological agent of Lassa fever is Lassa virus (LASV, an Arenavirus which is maintained in nature and frequently transmitted to humans by Mastomys natalensis. The purpose of this study was to better define the geographic distribution of LASV-infected rodents in sub-Saharan Mali.Small mammals were live-trapped at various locations across Mali for the purpose of identifying potential zoonotic pathogens. Serological and molecular assays were employed and determined LASV infected rodents were exclusively found in the southern Mali near the border of Côte d'Ivoire. Overall, 19.4% of Mastomys natalensis sampled in this region had evidence of LASV infection, with prevalence rates for individual villages ranging from 0 to 52%. Full-length genomic sequences were determined using high throughput sequencing methodologies for LASV isolates generated from tissue samples of rodents collected in four villages and confirmed the phylogenetic clustering of Malian LASV with strain AV.The risk of human infections with LASV is greatest in villages in southern Mali. Lassa fever should be considered in the differential diagnosis for febrile individuals and appropriate diagnostic techniques need to be established to determine the incidence of infection and disease in these regions.

  5. Isolation and genetic characterization of a tembusu virus strain isolated from mosquitoes in Shandong, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Y; Diao, Y; Chen, H; Ou, Q; Liu, X; Gao, X; Yu, C; Wang, L

    2015-04-01

    Tembusu virus (TMUV) is a flavivirus, presumed to be a mosquito-borne flavivirus of the Ntaya virus subgroup. To date, however, there have been no reports indicating that mosquitoes are involved in the spread of TMUV. In this study, we report the first isolation of TMUV from Culex mosquitoes. We describe the isolation and characterization of a field strain of TMUV from mosquitoes collected in Shandong Province, China. The virus isolate, named TMUV-SDMS, grows well in mosquito cell line C6/36, in Vero and duck embryo fibroblast (DEF) cell lines, and causes significant cytopathic effects in these cell cultures. The TMUV-SDMS genome is a single-stranded RNA, 10 989 nt in length, consisting of a single open reading frame encoding a polyprotein of 3410 amino acids, with 5' and 3' untranslated regions of 142 and 617 nt, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of the E and NS5 genes revealed that the TMUV-SDMS is closely related to the TMUV YY5 and BYD strains which cause severe egg-drop in ducks. The 3'NTR of TMUV-SDMS contains two pairs of tandem repeat CS and one non-duplicate CS, which have sequence similarities to the same repeats in the YY5 and BYD strains. Our findings indicate that mosquitoes carrying the TMUV may play an important role in the spread of this virus and in disease outbreak. PMID:23711093

  6. Genetic and Molecular Epidemiological Characterization of a Novel Adenovirus in Antarctic Penguins Collected between 2008 and 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Seo, Tae-Kun; No, Jin Sun; Kim, Hankyeom; Kim, Won-keun; Choi, Han-Gu; Kang, Sung-Ho; Song, Jin-Won

    2016-01-01

    Antarctica is considered a relatively uncontaminated region with regard to the infectious diseases because of its extreme environment, and isolated geography. For the genetic characterization and molecular epidemiology of the newly found penguin adenovirus in Antarctica, entire genome sequencing and annual survey of penguin adenovirus were conducted. The entire genome sequences of penguin adenoviruses were completed for two Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) and two Gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua). The whole genome lengths and G+C content of penguin adenoviruses were found to be 24,630–24,662 bp and 35.5–35.6%, respectively. Notably, the presence of putative sialidase gene was not identified in penguin adenoviruses by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE-PCR) as well as consensus specific PCR. The penguin adenoviruses were demonstrated to be a new species within the genus Siadenovirus, with a distance of 29.9–39.3% (amino acid, 32.1–47.9%) in DNA polymerase gene, and showed the closest relationship with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3) in phylogenetic analysis. During the 2008–2013 study period, the penguin adenoviruses were annually detected in 22 of 78 penguins (28.2%), and the molecular epidemiological study of the penguin adenovirus indicates a predominant infection in Chinstrap penguin population (12/30, 40%). Interestingly, the genome of penguin adenovirus could be detected in several internal samples, except the lymph node and brain. In conclusion, an analysis of the entire adenoviral genomes from Antarctic penguins was conducted, and the penguin adenoviruses, containing unique genetic character, were identified as a new species within the genus Siadenovirus. Moreover, it was annually detected in Antarctic penguins, suggesting its circulation within the penguin population. PMID:27309961

  7. Characterization of polymorphisms and isoforms of the Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C gene (plc) reveals high genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Flávia F; Almeida, Marcelle O; Barroca, Tatiana M; Horta, Carolina C R; Carmo, Anderson O; Silva, Rodrigo O S; Pires, Prhiscylla S; Lobato, Francisco C F; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes

    2012-10-12

    Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C (Cp-PLC), also called alpha-toxin, is encoded by the plc gene and has been implicated in several diseases; however, only a few studies have described polymorphisms in this gene. The aim of this study was to analyze polymorphisms in the Cp-PLC nucleotide and amino acid sequences obtained from isolates from different regions and to compare them to Clostridium phospholipase C sequences deposited in the NCBI database. Environmental samples (sediment, poultry feed, sawdust) and stool samples (from poultry, bovine, swine, horse, caprine, bird, dog, rabbit, toucan) were collected from healthy and sick animals. A total of 73 isolates were analyzed with the majority of samples belonging to the toxin type A subtype and possessing the gene encoding for the beta-2 toxin. Comparison of plc gene sequences from respective isolates revealed a high genetic diversity in the nucleotide sequences of mature Cp-PLC. Sequence comparisons identified 30 amino acid substitutions and 34 isoforms including some isoforms with substitutions in amino acids critical to toxin function. Comparison of sequences obtained in this study to Cp-PLC sequences obtained from the NCBI database resulted in the identification of 11 common haplotypes and 22 new isoforms. Phylogenetic analysis of phospholipase C sequences obtained from other Clostridium species identified relationships previously described. This report describes a broad characterization of the genetic diversity in the C. perfringens plc gene resulting in the identification of various isoforms. A better understanding of sequences encoding phospholipase C isoforms may reveal changes associated with protein function and C. perfringens virulence.

  8. Genetic and Pharmacological Inhibition of PDK1 in Cancer Cells: Characterization of a Selective Allosteric Kinase Inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagashima, Kumiko; Shumway, Stuart D.; Sathyanarayanan, Sriram; Chen, Albert H.; Dolinski, Brian; Xu, Youyuan; Keilhack, Heike; Nguyen, Thi; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Li, Lixia; Lutterbach, Bart A.; Chi, An; Paweletz, Cloud; Allison, Timothy; Yan, Youwei; Munshi, Sanjeev K.; Klippel, Anke; Kraus, Manfred; Bobkova, Ekaterina V.; Deshmukh, Sujal; Xu, Zangwei; Mueller, Uwe; Szewczak, Alexander A.; Pan, Bo-Sheng; Richon, Victoria; Pollock, Roy; Blume-Jensen, Peter; Northrup, Alan; Andersen, Jannik N. (Merck)

    2013-11-20

    Phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) is a critical activator of multiple prosurvival and oncogenic protein kinases and has garnered considerable interest as an oncology drug target. Despite progress characterizing PDK1 as a therapeutic target, pharmacological support is lacking due to the prevalence of nonspecific inhibitors. Here, we benchmark literature and newly developed inhibitors and conduct parallel genetic and pharmacological queries into PDK1 function in cancer cells. Through kinase selectivity profiling and x-ray crystallographic studies, we identify an exquisitely selective PDK1 inhibitor (compound 7) that uniquely binds to the inactive kinase conformation (DFG-out). In contrast to compounds 1-5, which are classical ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors (DFG-in), compound 7 specifically inhibits cellular PDK1 T-loop phosphorylation (Ser-241), supporting its unique binding mode. Interfering with PDK1 activity has minimal antiproliferative effect on cells growing as plastic-attached monolayer cultures (i.e. standard tissue culture conditions) despite reduced phosphorylation of AKT, RSK, and S6RP. However, selective PDK1 inhibition impairs anchorage-independent growth, invasion, and cancer cell migration. Compound 7 inhibits colony formation in a subset of cancer cell lines (four of 10) and primary xenograft tumor lines (nine of 57). RNAi-mediated knockdown corroborates the PDK1 dependence in cell lines and identifies candidate biomarkers of drug response. In summary, our profiling studies define a uniquely selective and cell-potent PDK1 inhibitor, and the convergence of genetic and pharmacological phenotypes supports a role of PDK1 in tumorigenesis in the context of three-dimensional in vitro culture systems.

  9. Genetic and Molecular Epidemiological Characterization of a Novel Adenovirus in Antarctic Penguins Collected between 2008 and 2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sook-Young Lee

    Full Text Available Antarctica is considered a relatively uncontaminated region with regard to the infectious diseases because of its extreme environment, and isolated geography. For the genetic characterization and molecular epidemiology of the newly found penguin adenovirus in Antarctica, entire genome sequencing and annual survey of penguin adenovirus were conducted. The entire genome sequences of penguin adenoviruses were completed for two Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica and two Gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua. The whole genome lengths and G+C content of penguin adenoviruses were found to be 24,630-24,662 bp and 35.5-35.6%, respectively. Notably, the presence of putative sialidase gene was not identified in penguin adenoviruses by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE-PCR as well as consensus specific PCR. The penguin adenoviruses were demonstrated to be a new species within the genus Siadenovirus, with a distance of 29.9-39.3% (amino acid, 32.1-47.9% in DNA polymerase gene, and showed the closest relationship with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3 in phylogenetic analysis. During the 2008-2013 study period, the penguin adenoviruses were annually detected in 22 of 78 penguins (28.2%, and the molecular epidemiological study of the penguin adenovirus indicates a predominant infection in Chinstrap penguin population (12/30, 40%. Interestingly, the genome of penguin adenovirus could be detected in several internal samples, except the lymph node and brain. In conclusion, an analysis of the entire adenoviral genomes from Antarctic penguins was conducted, and the penguin adenoviruses, containing unique genetic character, were identified as a new species within the genus Siadenovirus. Moreover, it was annually detected in Antarctic penguins, suggesting its circulation within the penguin population.

  10. Genetic basis of 17 traits and viscosity parameters characterizing the eating and cooking quality of rice grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L Q; Liu, W J; Xu, Y; He, Y Q; Luo, L J; Xing, Y Z; Xu, C G; Zhang, Qifa

    2007-08-01

    A recombinant inbred line population derived from a cross between Zhenshan 97 and Delong 208 was used to analyze the genetic basis of the cooking and eating quality of rice as reflected by 17 traits (or parameters). These traits include amylose content (AC), gel consistency (GC), alkali spreading value (ASV), cooked rice elongation (CRE), and 13 parameters from the viscosity profile. All the traits, except peak paste viscosity (PKV), time needed from gelatinization to peak (BAtime), and CRE, can be divided into two classes according to their interrelationship. The first class consists of AC, GC, and most of the paste viscosity parameters that form a major determinant of eating quality. The second class includes ASV, pasting temperature (Atemp) and pasting time (Atime), which characterize cooking process. We identified 26 QTL (quantitative trait locus or loci) in 2 years; nine QTL clusters emerged. The two major clusters, which correspond to the Wx and Alk loci, control the traits in the first and second classes, respectively. Some QTL are co-located for the traits belonging to the same class and also for the traits to a different class. The Wx locus also affects on ASV while the Alk locus also makes minor contributions to GC and some paste viscosity parameters. The QTL clusters on other chromosomes are similar to the Wx locus or Alk locus, although the variations they explained are relatively minor. QTL for CRE and PKV are dispersed and independent of the Wx locus. Low paste viscosity corresponds to low AC and soft gel, which represents good eating quality for most Chinese consumers; high ASV and low Atemp, together with reduced time to gelatinization and PKV, indicate preferred cooking quality. The genetic basis of Atemp, Atime, BAtime, peak temperature, peak time, paste viscosity at 95 degrees C, and final paste viscosity is newly examined to reveal a complete and dynamic viscosity profile. PMID:17593343

  11. Genetic characterization of a novel G3P[14] rotavirus strain causing gastroenteritis in 12 year old Australian child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Celeste M; Manuelpillai, Nicholas M; Cowley, Daniel; Roczo-Farkas, Susie; Buttery, Jim P; Crawford, Nigel W; Kirkwood, Carl D

    2014-07-01

    A genotype G3P[14] rotavirus strain was identified in a 12year old child presenting to the Emergency Department of the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, with gastroenteritis. G3P[14] strains have been previously identified in rabbits in Japan, China, the USA and Italy and a single lapine-like strain from a child in Belgium. Full genome sequence analysis of RVA/Human-wt/AUS/RCH272/2012/G3P[14] (RCH272) revealed that the strain contained the novel genome constellation G3-P[14]-I2-R3-C3-M3-A9-N2-T6-E2-H3. The genome was genetically divergent to previously characterized lapine viruses and the genes were distantly related to a range of human bovine-like strains and animal strains of bovine, bat and canine/feline characteristics. The VP4, VP6, NSP2, NSP3, NSP4 and NSP5 genes of RCH272 clustered within bovine lineages in the phylogenetic analysis and shared moderate genetic similarity with an Australian bovine-like human strain RVA/Human-tc/AUS/MG6/1993/G6P[14]. Bayesian coalescent analysis suggested these genes of RCH272 and RVA/Human-tc/AUS/MG6/1993/G6P[14] were derived from a population of relatively homogenous bovine-like ancestral strains circulating between 1943 and 1989. The VP7, VP1, VP2 and NSP1 genes shared moderate genetic similarity with the Chinese strain RVA/Bat-tc/CHN/MSLH14/2011/G3P[3] and the VP3 gene clustered within a lineage comprised of canine and feline strains. This strain may represent the direct transmission from an unknown host species or be derived via multiple reassortment events between strains originating from various species. The patient lived in a household containing domesticated cats and dogs and in close proximity to a colony of Gray-headed Flying-foxes. However, without screening numerous animal populations it is not possible to determine the origins of this strain. PMID:24780429

  12. Amplification of the cap20 pathogenicity gene and genetic characterization using different markers molecular in Colletotrichum gloeosporioides isolates

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    Danielli Barreto Maciel

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies were performed to analyze the genetic characterization using RFLP-ITS and Intron (primer EI1 markers and the amplification of the cap20 pathogenicity gene by PCR in Colletotrichum gloeosporioides isolates of different hosts plant. The genetic variability was accessed using RFLP-ITS and Intron markers and grouping by UPGMA method. Primers to cap20 gene were constructed using selected sequences of the GenBank (National Center of Biotechnology Information, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov with the Primer 3 program. The dendrograms analysis showed that the RFLP-ITS marker was more informative to separate the Colletotrichum sp, and that primer EI1 demonstrated greater genetic diversity. The amplification of the DNA of the Colletotrichum isolates to the cap20 gene with primers P1 and P2 indicated that this gene could present variations into C. gloeosporioides related with the host, and also that it was present in other Colletotrichum sp.Estudos foram realizados para analisar a caracterização genética usando marcadores de RFLP-ITS e ISSP e a amplicação do gene de patogenicidade cap20 por PCR em isolados de Colletotrichum gloeosporioides de diferentes hospedeiros. Primers para o gene cap20 foram construídos a partir de seqüências selecionadas do GenBank (National Center of Biotechnology Information, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov com o programa Primer 3. A análise dos dendrogramas revelou que o marcador RFLP-ITS foi mais informativo em separar as espécies de Colletotrichum, e que o primer EI1 evidenciou maior diversidade genética. A amplificação do DNA dos isolados de Colletotrichum para o gene cap20 com os primers P1 e P2 indicou que este gene pode apresentar variações dentro de C. gloeosporioides relacionada ao hospedeiro, e que também está presente em outras espécies de Colletotrichum.

  13. Purification and Characterization of Botulinum Neurotoxin FA from a Genetically Modified Clostridium botulinum Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellett, Sabine; Tepp, William H; Bradshaw, Marite; Kalb, Suzanne R; Dykes, Janet K; Lin, Guangyun; Nawrocki, Erin M; Pier, Christina L; Barr, John R; Maslanka, Susan E; Johnson, Eric A

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), produced by neurotoxigenic clostridial species, are the cause of the severe disease botulism in humans and animals. Early research on BoNTs has led to their classification into seven serotypes (serotypes A to G) based upon the selective neutralization of their toxicity in mice by homologous antibodies. Recently, a report of a potential eighth serotype of BoNT, designated "type H," has been controversial. This novel BoNT was produced together with BoNT/B2 in a dual-toxin-producing Clostridium botulinum strain. The data used to designate this novel toxin as a new serotype were derived from culture supernatant containing both BoNT/B2 and novel toxin and from sequence information, although data from two independent laboratories indicated neutralization by antibodies raised against BoNT/A1, and classification as BoNT/FA was proposed. The sequence data indicate a chimeric structure consisting of a BoNT/A1 receptor binding domain, a BoNT/F5 light-chain domain, and a novel translocation domain most closely related to BoNT/F1. Here, we describe characterization of this toxin purified from the native strain in which expression of the second BoNT (BoNT/B) has been eliminated. Mass spectrometry analysis indicated that the toxin preparation contained only BoNT/FA and confirmed catalytic activity analogous to that of BoNT/F5. The in vivo mouse bioassay indicated a specific activity of this toxin of 3.8 × 10(7) mouse 50% lethal dose (mLD50) units/mg, whereas activity in cultured human neurons was very high (50% effective concentration [EC50] = 0.02 mLD50/well). Neutralization assays in cells and mice both indicated full neutralization by various antibodies raised against BoNT/A1, although at 16- to 20-fold-lower efficiency than for BoNT/A1. IMPORTANCE Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), produced by anaerobic bacteria, are the cause of the potentially deadly, neuroparalytic disease botulism. BoNTs have been classified into seven serotypes, serotypes A

  14. Genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii isolates and toxoplasmosis seroprevalence in stray cats of Izmir, Turkey.

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    Hüseyin Can

    Full Text Available Currently, some Toxoplasma gondii genotypes are being associated with serious clinical presentations. A recent report showing the Africa 1 genotype in two local congenital toxoplasmosis cases acquired in Turkey formed the basis of this study because atypical Africa 1 genotype is most frequently detected in animals and patients from sub-Saharan Africa. Since stray cats are considered as the linkage between wild life and urban life in T. gondii transmission, the present study aimed to isolate and characterize T. gondii strains circulating in stray cats of İzmir (Western Turkey. A secondary objective was to determine toxoplasmosis seroprevalence in this cat population. Tissues obtained from 100 deceased stray cats were bioassayed and isolated strains were genotyped using 15 microsatellite markers. In addition, toxoplasmosis seroprevalence was analyzed in 1121 cat sera collected from several large veterinary clinics in İzmir. Among the 22 isolates, 19 were Type II (86.3%, two were Type III (9% and one was Africa 1 genotype (4.5%. The overall seropositivity rates in cats were 42-48% and 33.4-34.4% according to IFA and ELISA, respectively. Seroprevalence in deceased cats was significantly higher than in healthy cats (P = 0.0033. Finding both the major clonal Type II lineage together with the Type III lineage also found in Middle East, and an atypical genotype, Africa 1 appears consistent with the specific geographic location of Turkey between three continents and raises the possibility of transportation of these strains between continents through trade routes or long distance migratory birds. In addition, the first large study of toxoplasma seroprevalence in a stray cat population was also reported. The relatively high seropositivity rates and the variety of T. gondii genotypes confirm the local stray cat population as a risk factor for human toxoplasmosis in İzmir.

  15. Genetic, physiological and biochemical characterization of multiple methanol methyltransferase isozymes in Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, Matthew A; Metcalf, William W

    2005-06-01

    Biochemical evidence suggests that methanol catabolism in Methanosarcina species requires the concerted effort of methanol:5-hydroxybenzimidazolylcobamide methyltransferase (MtaB), a corrinoid-containing methyl-accepting protein (MtaC) and Co-methyl-5-hydroxybenzimidazolylcobamide:2-mercapto-ethanesulphonic acid methyltransferase (MtaA). Here we show that Methanosarcina acetivorans possesses three operons encoding putative methanol-specific MtaB and corrinoid proteins: mtaCB1, mtaCB2 and mtaCB3. Deletion mutants lacking the three operons, in all possible combinations, were constructed and characterized. Strains deleted for any two of the operons grew on methanol, whereas strains lacking all three did not. Therefore, each operon encodes a bona fide methanol-utilizing MtaB/corrinoid protein pair. Most of the mutants were similar to the wild-type strain, with the exception of the DeltamtaCB1 DeltamtaCB2 double mutant, which grew more slowly and had reduced cell yields on methanol medium. However, all mutants displayed significantly longer lag times when switching from growth on trimethylamine to growth on methanol. This indicates that all three operons are required for wild-type growth on methanol and suggests that each operon has a distinct role in the metabolism of this substrate. The combined methanol:CoM methyltransferase activity of strains carrying only mtaCB1 was twofold higher than strains carrying only mtaCB2 and fourfold higher than strains carrying only mtaCB3. Interestingly, the presence of the mtaCB2 and mtaCB3 operons, in addition to the mtaCB1 operon, did not increase the overall methyltransferase activity, suggesting that these strains may be limited by MtaA availability. All deletion mutants were unaffected with respect to growth on trimethylamine and acetate corroborating biochemical evidence indicating that each methanogenic substrate has specific methyltransfer enzymes. PMID:15882413

  16. Characterization of genetic defects of hemophilia A in patients of Chinese origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Shu-Wha; Lin, Shu-Rung; Shen, Ming-Ching (National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China))

    1993-12-01

    The molecular characterization of hemophilia A of Chinese origin was carried out by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing of patient's factor VIII genes. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and dideoxy fingerprinting (ddF) were used as screening methods to detect mutated DNAs. A total of 102 individuals from 87 different families, including 10 patients (10 families) with mild-to-moderate and 92 patients (77 families) with severe hemophilia A, were analyzed by PCR-SSCP and PCR-ddF. Of the 87 independent cases, 40 revealed a single mutation in the coding regions of their factor VIII genes. These mutations include 21 with single base changes resulting in 8 nonsense and 13 missense codons, 16 with deletion or insertion of 1-11 nucleotides, and 3 with deletion of large DNA fragments. The frequency of 8 of the identified factor VIII polymorphisms or silent mutations was also determined among Chinese. The frequencies for codons 1241, 1269, and 2223 (the numbering system follows J. Gitschier et al., 1984, Nature 312: 326-330) were found to be different from those reported for other populations. As for the 47 severe cases whose mutational events were not readily detected by PCR-SSCP and PCR-ddF, the reverse transcriptase PCR method was applied. In 24 such cases analyzed, 17 were found to be of the [open quotes]intron 22 mutations[close quotes] as described by Naylor et al. (1992, The Lancet, 342: 1066-1067), accounting for 39% of Chinese patients with hemophilia A. 31 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Characterization of genetically targeted neuron types in the zebrafish optic tectum

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    Estuardo eRobles

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The optically transparent larval zebrafish is ideally suited for in vivo analyses of neural circuitry controlling visually guided behaviors. However, there is a lack of information regarding specific cell types in the major retinorecipient brain region of the fish, the optic tectum. Here we report the characterization of three previously unidentified tectal cell types that are specifically labeled by dlx5/6 enhancer elements. In vivo laser scanning microscopy in conjunction with ex vivo array tomography revealed that these neurons differ in their morphologies, synaptic connectivity, and neurotransmitter phenotypes. The first type is an excitatory bistratified periventricular interneuron (bsPVIN that forms a dendritic arbor in the retinorecipient stratum fibrosum griseum et superficiale (SFGS and an axonal arbor in the stratum griseum centrale (SGC. The second type, a GABAergic nonstratified periventricular interneuron (nsPVIN, extends a bushy arbor containing both dendrites and axons into the SGC and the deepest sublayers of the SFGS. The third type is a GABAergic periventricular projection neuron (PVPN that extends a dendritic arbor into the SGC and a long axon to the torus semicircularis, medulla oblongata, and anterior hindbrain. Interestingly, the same axons form en passant synapses within the deepest neuropil layer of the tectum, the stratum album centrale. This approach revealed several novel aspects of tectal circuitry, including: (1 a glutamatergic mode of transmission from the superficial, retinorecipient neuropil layers to the deeper, output layers, (2 the presence of interneurons with mixed dendrite/axon arbors likely involved in local processing, and (3 a heretofore unknown GABAergic tectofugal projection to midbrain and hindbrain. These observations establish a framework for studying the morphological and functional differentiation of neural circuits in the zebrafish visual system.

  18. Genetic and chemical characterization of ibuprofen degradation by Sphingomonas Ibu-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Robert W; Hay, Anthony G

    2013-03-01

    Sphingomonas Ibu-2 has the unusual ability to cleave the acid side chain from the pharmaceutical ibuprofen and related arylacetic acid derivatives to yield corresponding catechols under aerobic conditions via a previously uncharacterized mechanism. Screening a chromosomal library of Ibu-2 DNA in Escherichia coli EPI300 allowed us to identify one fosmid clone (pFOS3G7) that conferred the ability to metabolize ibuprofen to isobutylcatechol. Characterization of pFOS3G7 loss-of-function transposon mutants permitted identification of five ORFs, ipfABDEF, whose predicted amino acid sequences bore similarity to the large and small units of an aromatic dioxygenase (ipfAB), a sterol carrier protein X (SCPx) thiolase (ipfD), a domain of unknown function 35 (DUF35) protein (ipfE) and an aromatic CoA ligase (ipfF). Two additional ORFs, ipfH and ipfI, which encode putative ferredoxin reductase and ferredoxin components of an aromatic dioxygenase system, respectively, were also identified on pFOS3G7. Complementation of a markerless loss-of-function ipfD deletion mutant restored catechol production as did complementation of the ipfF Tn mutant. Expression of subcloned ipfABDEF alone in E. coli did not impart full metabolic activity unless coexpressed with ipfHI. CoA ligation followed by ring oxidation is common to phenylacetic acid pathways. However, the need for a putative SCPx thiolase (IpfD) and DUF35 protein (IpfE) in aerobic arylacetic acid degradation is unprecedented. This work provides preliminary insights into the mechanism behind this novel arylacetic acid-deacylating, catechol-generating activity.

  19. The genetics of monarch butterfly migration and warning colouration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Shuai; Zhang, Wei; Niitepõld, Kristjan; Hsu, Jeremy; Haeger, Juan Fernández; Zalucki, Myron P; Altizer, Sonia; de Roode, Jacobus C; Reppert, Steven M; Kronforst, Marcus R

    2014-10-16

    The monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, is famous for its spectacular annual migration across North America, recent worldwide dispersal, and orange warning colouration. Despite decades of study and broad public interest, we know little about the genetic basis of these hallmark traits. Here we uncover the history of the monarch's evolutionary origin and global dispersal, characterize the genes and pathways associated with migratory behaviour, and identify the discrete genetic basis of warning colouration by sequencing 101 Danaus genomes from around the globe. The results rewrite our understanding of this classic system, showing that D. plexippus was ancestrally migratory and dispersed out of North America to occupy its broad distribution. We find the strongest signatures of selection associated with migration centre on flight muscle function, resulting in greater flight efficiency among migratory monarchs, and that variation in monarch warning colouration is controlled by a single myosin gene not previously implicated in insect pigmentation. PMID:25274300

  20. Functional, genetic and bioinformatic characterization of a calcium/calmodulin kinase gene in Sporothrix schenckii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez-del Valle Nuri

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sporothrix schenckii is a pathogenic, dimorphic fungus, the etiological agent of sporotrichosis, a subcutaneous lymphatic mycosis. Dimorphism in S. schenckii responds to second messengers such as cAMP and calcium, suggesting the possible involvement of a calcium/calmodulin kinase in its regulation. In this study we describe a novel calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase gene in S. schenckii, sscmk1, and the effects of inhibitors of calmodulin and calcium/calmodulin kinases on the yeast to mycelium transition and the yeast cell cycle. Results Using the PCR homology approach a new member of the calcium/calmodulin kinase family, SSCMK1, was identified in this fungus. The cDNA sequence of sscmk1 revealed an open reading frame of 1,221 nucleotides encoding a 407 amino acid protein with a predicted molecular weight of 45.6 kDa. The genomic sequence of sscmk1 revealed the same ORF interrupted by five introns. Bioinformatic analyses of SSCMK1 showed that this protein had the distinctive features that characterize a calcium/calmodulin protein kinase: a serine/threonine protein kinase domain and a calmodulin-binding domain. When compared to homologues from seven species of filamentous fungi, SSCMK1 showed substantial similarities, except for a large and highly variable region that encompasses positions 330 – 380 of the multiple sequence alignment. Inhibition studies using calmodulin inhibitor W-7, and calcium/calmodulin kinase inhibitors, KN-62 and lavendustin C, were found to inhibit budding by cells induced to re-enter the yeast cell cycle and to favor the yeast to mycelium transition. Conclusion This study constitutes the first evidence of the presence of a calcium/calmodulin kinase-encoding gene in S. schenckii and its possible involvement as an effector of dimorphism in this fungus. These results suggest that a calcium/calmodulin dependent signaling pathway could be involved in the regulation of dimorphism in this fungus

  1. Chemical and genetic characterization of Phlomis species and wild hybrids in Crete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, Luciana; Stefanakis, Michalis K; Kokkini, Stella; Katerinopoulos, Haralambos E; Pirintsos, Stergios A

    2016-02-01

    The genus Phlomis is represented in the island of Crete (Greece, Eastern Mediterranean) by three species Phlomis cretica C. Presl., Phlomis fruticosa L., the island endemic Phlomis lanata Willd. and three hybrids Phlomis x cytherea Rech.f. (P. cretica x P. fruticosa), Phlomis x commixta Rech.f. (P. cretica x P. lanata) and Phlomis x sieberi Vierh. (P. fruticosa x P. lanata). This work describes (a) the profile of hybrids and parental species concerning their volatile compounds, (b) the suitability of ribosomal nuclear (ITS region), chloroplast (trnH-psbA), and AFLP markers to identify hybrids and (c) their competence to characterize the different chemotypes of both hybrids and their parental species. The cluster analysis and PCA constructed from chemical data (volatile oils) suggest that there are three groups of taxa. Group IA includes P. cretica and P. fruticosa, group IB includes P. x cytherea, whereas group II consists of P. x commixta, P. x sieberi and P. lanata. Volatile compounds detected only in the hybrids P. x sieberi and P. x commixta correspond to the 3% of the total compounds, value that is much higher in P. x cytherea (21%). Neighbor-joining, statistical parsimony analysis and the observations drawn from ribotypes spectrum of ITS markers divided Phlomis species in two groups, P. lanata and the complex P. cretica/P. fruticosa. In contrast to the ITS region, the plastid DNA marker follows a geographically related pattern. Neighbor-Net, PCA and Bayesian assignment analysis performed for AFLP markers separated the genotypes into three groups corresponding to populations of P. cretica, P. fruticosa, and P. lanata, respectively, while populations of P. x commixta, P. x cytherea, and P. x sieberi presented admixed ancestry. Most of the P. x cytherea samples were identified as F1 hybrids by Bayesian assignment test, while those of P. x commixta and P. x sieberi were identified as F2 hybrids. Overall, high chemical differentiation is revealed in one of the

  2. Genetic characterization of a rare H12N3 avian influenza virus isolated from a green-winged teal in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Vuong Nghia; Ogawa, Haruko; Hussein, Islam T M; Hill, Nichola J; Trinh, Dai Quang; AboElkhair, Mohammed; Sultan, Serageldeen; Ma, Eric; Saito, Keisuke; Watanabe, Yukiko; Runstadler, Jonathan A; Imai, Kunitoshi

    2015-04-01

    This study reports on the genetic characterization of an avian influenza virus, subtype H12N3, isolated from an Eurasian green-winged teal (Anas crecca) in Japan in 2009. The entire genome sequence of the isolate was analyzed, and phylogenetic analyses were conducted to characterize the evolutionary history of the isolate. Phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes indicated that the virus belonged to the Eurasian-like avian lineage. Molecular dating indicated that this H12 virus is likely a multiple reassortant influenza A virus. This is the first reported characterization of influenza A virus subtype H12N3 isolated in Japan and these data contribute to the accumulation of knowledge on the genetic diversity and generation of novel influenza A viruses. PMID:25557930

  3. Genetic characterizations of Giardia duodenalis in sheep and goats in Heilongjiang Province, China and possibility of zoonotic transmission.

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    Weizhe Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Giardia duodenalis is a widespread intestinal protozoan of both humans and mammals. To date, few epidemiological studies have assessed the potential and importance of zoonotic transmission; and the human giardiasis burden attributable to G. duodenalis of animal origin is unclear. No information about occurrence and genotyping data of sheep and goat giardiasis is available in China. The aim of the present study was to determine prevalence and distribution of G. duodenalis in sheep and goats in Heilongjiang Province, China, and to characterize G. duodenalis isolates and assess the possibility of zoonotic transmission. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 678 fecal specimens were collected from sheep and goats on six farms ranging in age from one month to four years in Heilongjiang Province, China. The average prevalence of G. duodenalis infection was 5.0% (34/678 by microscopy after Lugol's iodine staining, with 5.6% (30/539 for the sheep versus 2.9% (4/139 for the goats. Molecular analysis was conducted on 34 G. duodenalis isolates based on the triosephosphate isomerase (tpi gene. 29 tpi gene sequences were successfully obtained and identified as assemblages A (n = 4, B (n = 2 and E (n = 23. High heterogeneity was observed within assemblage E at the tpi locus, with five novel subtypes found out of seven subtypes. Two subtypes of assemblage A were detected, including subtype AI (n = 3 and a novel subtype (designated as subtype AIV (n = 1. Two assemblage B isolates were identical to each other in the tpi gene sequences. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of G. duodenalis infections in sheep and goats in China. The present data revealed the unique endemicity on prevalence, distribution and genetic characterization of G. duodenalis in sheep and goats in Heilongjiang Province. The findings of assemblages A and B in sheep and goats implied the potential of zoonotic transmission.

  4. Molecular evidence to suggest the origin of a colonization: Drosophila subobscura in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araúz, Pedro A; Peris-Bondia, Francesc; Latorre, Amparo; Serra, Luís; Mestres, Francesc

    2011-12-01

    The recent colonization of America by Drosophila subobscura represents a great opportunity for evolutionary biology studies. Knowledge of the populations from which the colonization started would provide an understanding of how genetic composition changed during adaptation to the new environment. Thus, a 793 nucleotide fragment of the Odh (Octanol dehydrogenase) gene was sequenced in 66 chromosomal lines from Barcelona (western Mediterranean) and in 66 from Mt. Parnes (Greece, eastern Mediterranean). No sequence of Odh fragment in Barcelona or Mt. Parnes was identical to any of those previously detected in America. However, an Odh sequence from Barcelona differed in only one nucleotide from another found in American populations. In both cases, the chromosomal lines presented the same inversion: O(7), and the Odh gene was located within this inversion. This evidence suggests a possible western Mediterranean origin for the colonization. Finally, the molecular and inversion data indicate that the colonization was not characterized by multiple reintroductions.

  5. Physiological characterization and genetic modifiers of aberrant root thigmomorphogenesis in mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana MILDEW LOCUS O genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidzinski, Przemyslaw; Noir, Sandra; Shahi, Shermineh; Reinstädler, Anja; Gratkowska, Dominika Marta; Panstruga, Ralph

    2014-12-01

    Root architecture and growth patterns are plant features that are still poorly understood. When grown under in vitro conditions, seedlings with mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana genes MLO4 or MLO11 exhibit aberrant root growth patterns upon contact with hard surfaces, exemplified as tight root spirals. We used a set of physiological assays and genetic tools to characterize this thigmomorphogenic defect in detail. We observed that the mlo4/mlo11-associated root curling phenotype is not recapitulated in a set of mutants with altered root growth patterns or architecture. We further found that mlo4/mlo11-conditioned root curling is not dependent upon light and endogenous flavonoids, but is pH-sensitive and affected by exogenous calcium levels. Based upon the latter two characteristics, mlo4-associated root coiling appears to be mechanistically different from the natural strong root curvature of the Arabidopsis ecotype Landsberg erecta. Gravistimulation reversibly overrides the aberrant thigmomorphogenesis of mlo4 seedlings. Mutants with dominant negative defects in α-tubulin modulate the extent and directionality of mlo4/mlo11-conditioned root coils, whereas mutants defective in polar auxin transport (axr4, aux1) or gravitropism (pgm1) completely suppress the mlo4 root curling phenotype. Our data implicate a joint contribution of calcium signalling, pH regulation, microtubular function, polar auxin transport and gravitropism in root thigmomorphogenesis.

  6. Molecular characterization of a genetic variant of the steroid hormone-binding globulin gene in heterozygous subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, D.O.; Catterall, J.F. [Population Council, New York, NY (United States); Carino, C. [Instituto National de la Nutricion, Mexico City, MX (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    Steroid hormone-binding globulin in human serum displays different isoelectric focusing (IEF) patterns among individuals, suggesting genetic variation in the gene for this extracellular steroid carrier protein. Analysis of allele frequencies and family studies suggested the existence of two codominant alleles of the gene. Subsequent determination of the molecular basis of a variant of the gene was carried out using DNA from homozygous individuals from a single Belgian family. It was of interest to characterize other variant individuals to determine whether all variants identified by IEF phenotyping were caused by the same mutation or whether other mutations occurred in the gene in different populations. Previous studies identified Mexican subjects who were heterozygous for the variant IEF phenotype. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to localize the mutation in these subjects and to purify the variant allele for DNA sequence analysis. The results show that the mutation in this population is identical to that identified in the Belgian family, and no other mutations were detected in the gene. These data represent the first analysis of steroid hormone-binding globulin gene variation in heterozygous subjects and further support the conclusion of biallelism of the gene worldwide. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Sequence and Genetic Characterization of etrA, an fnr Analog that Regulates Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffarini, Daad A.; Nelson, Kenneth H.

    1993-01-01

    An electron transport regulatory gene, etrA, has been isolated and characterized from the obligate respiratory bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens MR-l. The deduced amino acid sequence of etrA (EtrA) shows a high degree of identity to both the Fnr of Escherichia coli (73.6%) and the analogous protein (ANR) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (50.8%). The four active cysteine residues of Fnr are conserved in EtrA, and the amino acid sequence of the DNA-binding domains of the two proteins are identical. Further, S.putrefaciens etrA is able to complement an fnr mutant of E.coli. In contrast to fnr, there is no recognizable Fnr box upstream of the etrA sequence. Gene replacement etr.A mutants of MR-1 were deficient in growth on nitrite, thiosulfate, sulfite, trimethylamine-N-oxide, dimethyl sulfoxide, Fe(III), and fumarate, suggesting that EtrA is involved in the regulation of the corresponding reductase genes. However, the mutants were all positive for reduction of and growth on nitrate and Mn(IV), indicating that EtrA is not involved in the regulation of these two systems. Southern blots of S.putrefaciens DNA with use of etrA as a probe revealed the expected etrA bands and a second set of hybridization signals whose genetic and functional properties remain to be determined.

  8. Characterization of genetic deletions in Becker muscular dystrophy using monoclonal antibodies against a deletion-prone region of dystrophin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanh, L.T.; Man, Nguyen Thi; Morris, G.E. [Wales Institute, Clwyd (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-08-28

    We have produced a new panel of 20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against a region of the dystrophin protein corresponding to a deletion-prone region of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene (exons 45-50). We show that immunohistochemistry or Western blotting with these {open_quotes}exon-specific{close_quotes} mAbs can provide a valuable addition to Southern blotting or PCR methods for the accurate identification of genetic deletions in Becker muscular dystrophy patients. The antibodies were mapped to the following exons: exon 45 (2 mAbs), exon 46 (6), exon 47 (1), exons 47/48 (4), exons 48-50 (6), and exon 50 (1). PCR amplification of single exons or groups of exons was used both to produce specific dystrophin immunogens and to map the mAbs obtained. PCR-mediated mutagenesis was also used to identify regions of dystrophin important for mAb binding. Because the mAbs can be used to characterize the dystrophin produced by individual muscle fibres, they will also be useful for studying {open_quotes}revertant{close_quotes} fibres in Duchenne muscle and for monitoring the results of myoblast therapy trials in MD patients with deletions in this region of the dystrophin gene. 27 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Theoretical Characterization of the H-Bonding and Stacking Potential of Two Non-Standard Nucleobases Expanding the Genetic Alphabet

    KAUST Repository

    Chawla, Mohit

    2016-02-16

    We report a quantum chemical characterization of the non-natural (synthetic) H-bonded base pair formed by 6-amino-5-nitro-2(1H)-pyridone (Z) and 2-amino-imidazo [1,2-a]-1,3,5-triazin-4(8H)-one (P). The Z:P base pair, orthogonal to the classical G:C base pair, has been introduced in DNA molecules for expanding the genetic code. Our results indicate that the Z:P base pair closely mimics the G:C base pair both in terms of structure and stability. To clarify the role of the NO2 group on the C5 position of the Z base, we compared the stability of the Z:P base pair with that of base pairs having different functional group on the C5 position of Z. Our results indicate that the electron donating/withdrawing properties of the group in the C5 position has a clear impact on the stability of the Z:P base pair, with the strong electron withdrawing nitro group achieving the largest stabilizing effect on the H-bonding interaction, and the strong electron donating NH2 group destabilizing the Z:P pair by almost 4 kcal/mol. Finally, our gas phase and in water calculations confirm that the Z-nitro group reinforce the stacking interaction with its adjacent purine or pyrimidine ring.

  10. Theoretical Characterization of the H-Bonding and Stacking Potential of Two Nonstandard Nucleobases Expanding the Genetic Alphabet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Mohit; Credendino, Raffaele; Chermak, Edrisse; Oliva, Romina; Cavallo, Luigi

    2016-03-10

    We report a quantum chemical characterization of the non-natural (synthetic) H-bonded base pair formed by 6-amino-5-nitro-2(1H)-pyridone (Z) and 2-aminoimidazo[1,2-a]-1,3,5-triazin-4(8H)-one (P). The Z:P base pair, orthogonal to the classical G:C base pair, has been introduced into DNA molecules to expand the genetic code. Our results indicate that the Z:P base pair closely mimics the G:C base pair in terms of both structure and stability. To clarify the role of the NO2 group on the C5 position of the Z base, we compared the stability of the Z:P base pair with that of base pairs having different functional groups at the C5 position of Z. Our results indicate that the electron-donating/-withdrawing properties of the group on C5 have a clear impact on the stability of the Z:P base pair, with the strong electron-withdrawing nitro group achieving the largest stabilizing effect on the H-bonding interaction and the strong electron-donating NH2 group destabilizing the Z:P pair by almost 4 kcal/mol. Finally, our gas-phase and in-water calculations confirm that the Z-nitro group reinforces the stacking interaction with its adjacent purine or pyrimidine ring. PMID:26882210

  11. Invasion genetics of the Bermuda buttercup (Oxalis pes-caprae): complex intercontinental patterns of genetic diversity, polyploidy and heterostyly characterize both native and introduced populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Victoria; Barrett, Spencer C H; Castro, Sílvia; Caldeirinha, Patrícia; Navarro, Luis; Loureiro, João; Rodríguez-Echeverría, Susana

    2015-05-01

    Genetic diversity in populations of invasive species is influenced by a variety of factors including reproductive systems, ploidy level, stochastic forces associated with colonization and multiple introductions followed by admixture. Here, we compare genetic variation in native and introduced populations of the clonal plant Oxalis pes-caprae to investigate the influence of reproductive mode and ploidy on levels of diversity. This species is a tristylous geophyte native to South Africa. Invasive populations throughout much of the introduced range are composed of a sterile clonal pentaploid short-styled form. We examined morph ratios, ploidy level, reproductive mode and genetic diversity at nuclear microsatellite loci in 10 and 12 populations from South Africa and the Western Mediterranean region, respectively. Flow cytometry confirmed earlier reports of diploids and tetraploids in the native range, with a single population containing pentaploid individuals. Introduced populations were composed mainly of pentaploids, but sexual tetraploids were also found. There was clear genetic differentiation between ploidy levels, but sexual populations from both regions were not significantly different in levels of diversity. Invasive populations of the pentaploid exhibited dramatically reduced levels of diversity but were not genetically uniform. The occurrence of mixed ploidy levels and stylar polymorphism in the introduced range is consistent with multiple introductions to the Western Mediterranean. This inference was supported by variation patterns at microsatellite loci. Our study indicates that some invasive populations of Oxalis pes-caprae are not entirely clonal, as often assumed, and multiple introductions and recombination have the potential to increase genetic variation in the introduced range. PMID:25604701

  12. Isolation and genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii from naturally infected Canada goose (Branta canadensis) detected two new atypical strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild birds are important in the epidemiology of toxoplasmosis because they can serve as reservoir hosts, and vectors of zoonotic pathogens including Toxoplasma gondii. Canada goose (Branta canadensis) is the most widespread goose in North America. Little is known concerning T. gondii infection in bo...

  13. Genetic characterization and relatedness of wild and farmed Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis: Possible implications for aquaculture practices

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    Sana Ben Khadher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aquaculture of the Eurasian perch, Perca fluviatilis, in recirculating systems has emerged over the past decades to become a significant way of diversification for inland areas in Europe. The development of such a production relies partly on the improvement of growth performance (i.e., reducing production costs, which requires suitable genetic management of broodstocks and the development of selective breeding programs. In this context, the present study was undertaken assessing for the first time the genetic diversity of farmed stocks of perch. Twelve microsatellite loci were used to investigate the genetic diversity of nine farmed stocks (547 individuals from two perch farms located in France and their supposedly wild founder population from Lake Geneva (394 individuals. First, the wild population displayed the lowest genetic diversity and differed genetically from all farmed populations except one, XB2. Second, genetic diversity did not decrease between farmed breeders and their potential offspring. However, in the three groups of broodstock-offspring the number of alleles decreased by 10%, 21%, and 15%, respectively. In addition, effective population size decreased in all offspring groups. A family structuring was also observed among broodstocks and their offspring, with an unequal family contribution being suspected. In the absence of parental information, these results attest to the utility of genetic tools to evaluate genetic diversity and the necessity of a monitoring program to maintain genetic variability among farmed perch. Genetic variability among farmed stocks appears to be sufficient for perch production to be sustainable and selective breeding programs to be developed.

  14. Characterization of a New DGKE Intronic Mutation in Genetically Unsolved Cases of Familial Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, Caterina; Lemaire, Mathieu; Iatropoulos, Paraskevas; Piras, Rossella; Bresin, Elena; Bettoni, Serena; Bick, David; Helbling, Daniel; Veith, Regan; Valoti, Elisabetta; Donadelli, Roberta; Murer, Luisa; Neunhäuserer, Maria; Breno, Matteo; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Lifton, Richard; Noris, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Genetic and acquired abnormalities causing dysregulation of the complement alternative pathway contribute to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), a rare disorder characterized by thrombocytopenia, nonimmune microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute kidney failure. However, in a substantial proportion of patients the disease-associated alterations are still unknown. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing were performed in two unrelated families with infantile recessive aHUS. Sequencing of cDNA from affected individuals was used to test for the presence of aberrant mRNA species. Expression of mutant diacylglycerol kinase epsilon (DGKE) protein was evaluated with western blotting. Results Whole-exome sequencing analysis with conventional variant filtering parameters did not reveal any obvious candidate mutation in the first family. The report of aHUS-associated mutations in DGKE, encoding DGKE, led to re-examination of the noncoding DGKE variants obtained from next-generation sequencing, allowing identification of a novel intronic DGKE mutation (c.888+40A>G) that segregated with disease. Sequencing of cDNA from affected individuals revealed aberrant forms of DGKE mRNA predicted to cause profound abnormalities in the protein catalytic site. By whole-genome sequencing, the same mutation was found in compound heterozygosity with a second nonsense DGKE mutation in all affected siblings of another unrelated family. Homozygous and compound heterozygous patients presented similar clinical features, including aHUS presentation in the first year of life, multiple relapsing episodes, and proteinuria, which are prototypical of DGKE-associated aHUS. Conclusions This is the first report of a mutation located beyond the exon-intron boundaries in aHUS. Intronic mutations such as these are underreported because conventional filtering parameters used to process next-generation sequencing data routinely

  15. Genetic, serological and biochemical characterization of Leishmania tropica from foci in northern Palestine and discovery of zymodeme MON-307

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azmi Kifaya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL have been recorded in the Jenin District based on their clinical appearance. Here, their parasites have been characterized in depth. Methods Leishmanial parasites isolated from 12 human cases of CL from the Jenin District were cultured as promastigotes, whose DNA was extracted. The ITS1 sequence and the 7SL RNA gene were analysed as was the kinetoplast minicircle DNA (kDNA sequence. Excreted factor (EF serotyping and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE were also applied. Results This extensive characterization identified the strains as Leishmania tropica of two very distinct sub-types that parallel the two sub-groups discerned by multilocus microsatellite typing (MLMT done previously. A high degree of congruity was displayed among the results generated by the different analytical methods that had examined various cellular components and exposed intra-specific heterogeneity among the 12 strains. Three of the ten strains subjected to MLEE constituted a new zymodeme, zymodeme MON-307, and seven belonged to the known zymodeme MON-137. Ten of the 15 enzymes in the profile of zymodeme MON-307 displayed different electrophoretic mobilities compared with the enzyme profile of the zymodeme MON-137. The closest profile to that of zymodeme MON-307 was that of the zymodeme MON-76 known from Syria. Strains of the zymodeme MON-307 were EF sub-serotype A2 and those of the zymodeme MON-137 were either A9 or A9B4. The sub-serotype B4 component appears, so far, to be unique to some strains of L. tropica of zymodeme MON-137. Strains of the zymodeme MON-137 displayed a distinctive fragment of 417 bp that was absent in those of zymodeme MON-307 when their kDNA was digested with the endonuclease RsaI. kDNA-RFLP after digestion with the endonuclease MboI facilitated a further level of differentiation that partially coincided with the geographical distribution of the human cases from which the strains

  16. Isolation, Genetic Characterization, and Seroprevalence of Adana Virus, a Novel Phlebovirus Belonging to the Salehabad Virus Complex, in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkan, Cigdem; Alwassouf, Sulaf; Piorkowski, Géraldine; Bichaud, Laurence; Tezcan, Seda; Dincer, Ender; Ergunay, Koray; Ozbel, Yusuf; Alten, Bulent; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A new phlebovirus, Adana virus, was isolated from a pool of Phlebotomus spp. (Diptera; Psychodidae) in the province of Adana, in the Mediterranean region of Turkey. Genetic analysis based on complete coding of genomic sequences indicated that Adana virus belongs to the Salehabad virus species of the genus Phlebovirus in the family Bunyaviridae. Adana virus is the third virus of the Salehabad virus species for which the complete sequence has been determined. To understand the epidemiology of Adana virus, a seroprevalence study using microneutralization assay was performed to detect the presence of specific antibodies in human and domestic animal sera collected in Adana as well as Mersin province, located 147 km west of Adana. The results demonstrate that the virus is present in both provinces. High seroprevalence rates in goats, sheep, and dogs support intensive exposure to Adana virus in the region, which has not been previously reported for any virus included in the Salehabad serocomplex; however, low seroprevalence rates in humans suggest that Adana virus is not likely to constitute an important public health problem in exposed human populations, but this deserves further studies. IMPORTANCE Until recently, in the genus Phlebovirus, the Salehabad virus species consisted of two viruses: Salehabad virus, isolated from sand flies in Iran, and Arbia virus, isolated from sand flies in Italy. Here we present the isolation and complete genome characterization of the Adana virus, which we propose to be included in the Salehabad virus species. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the isolation and complete genome characterization, from sand flies in Turkey, of a Salehabad virus-related phlebovirus with supporting seropositivity in the Mediterranean, Aegean, and Central Anatolia regions, where phleboviruses have been circulating and causing outbreaks. Salehabad species viruses have generally been considered to be a group of viruses with little medical or

  17. Characterization of a Bayesian genetic clustering algorithm based on a Dirichlet process prior and comparison among Bayesian clustering methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morita Mitsuo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A Bayesian approach based on a Dirichlet process (DP prior is useful for inferring genetic population structures because it can infer the number of populations and the assignment of individuals simultaneously. However, the properties of the DP prior method are not well understood, and therefore, the use of this method is relatively uncommon. We characterized the DP prior method to increase its practical use. Results First, we evaluated the usefulness of the sequentially-allocated merge-split (SAMS sampler, which is a technique for improving the mixing of Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms. Although this sampler has been implemented in a preceding program, HWLER, its effectiveness has not been investigated. We showed that this sampler was effective for population structure analysis. Implementation of this sampler was useful with regard to the accuracy of inference and computational time. Second, we examined the effect of a hyperparameter for the prior distribution of allele frequencies and showed that the specification of this parameter was important and could be resolved by considering the parameter as a variable. Third, we compared the DP prior method with other Bayesian clustering methods and showed that the DP prior method was suitable for data sets with unbalanced sample sizes among populations. In contrast, although current popular algorithms for population structure analysis, such as those implemented in STRUCTURE, were suitable for data sets with uniform sample sizes, inferences with these algorithms for unbalanced sample sizes tended to be less accurate than those with the DP prior method. Conclusions The clustering method based on the DP prior was found to be useful because it can infer the number of populations and simultaneously assign individuals into populations, and it is suitable for data sets with unbalanced sample sizes among populations. Here we presented a novel program, DPART, that implements the SAMS

  18. Genetic diversity and molecular characterization of Babesia motasi-like in small ruminants and ixodid ticks from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Qingli; Liu, Zhijie; Yang, Jifei; Yu, Peifa; Pan, Yuping; Zhai, Bintao; Luo, Jianxun; Yin, Hong

    2016-07-01

    Ovine babesioses, an important tick-borne disease of sheep and goats in China, is caused by the reproduction of intraerythrocytic protozoa of the Babesia genus. Babesia motasi-like is a Babesia parasite that infects small ruminant in China, and two sub-groups of B. motasi-like can be subdivided based on differences in the rhoptry-associated-protein-1 gene. This study aimed to characterize the distribution, epidemiology and genetics of B. motasi-like in animals and ticks. A molecular investigation was carried out from 2009 to 2015 in 16 provinces in China. In total, 1081 blood samples were collected from sheep and goats originating from 27 different regions, and 778 ixodid tick samples were collected from 8 regions; the samples were tested for the presence of B. motasi-like using a specific nested PCR assay based on the rap-1b gene. The results indicated that 139 (12.9%), 91 (8.4%), 48 (4.4%) and 6 (0.7%) of the blood samples were positive for general B. motasi-like, Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan and Ningxian), Babesia sp. Tianzhu and Babesia sp. Hebei sub-groups, mixed infections, respectively. Among the collected 778 ixodid ticks (including Haemaphysalis longicornis, Haemaphysalis qinghaiensis, Dermacentor silvarum, Ixodes persulcatus, Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus), the most frequently infected with Babesia were D. silvarum and I. persulcatus (35.7%), followed by H. longicornis (26.8%), H. qinghaiensis (24.8%) and R. sanguineus (9.3%). The PCR results were confirmed by DNA sequencing. The positive rates of B. motasi-like infection in ticks were found to be higher in China, compared with previous studies in other countries. B. motasi-like infections have not previously been reported in D. silvarum, I. persulcatus or R. sanguineus. The findings obtained in this study could be used for planning effective control strategies against babesiosis in China. PMID:26976477

  19. Genetic diversity and morphological characterization of half-sib families of Heliconia bihai L., H. chartacea Lane ex Barreiros, and H. wagneriana Peterson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, F R A; Moraes Filho, R M; Martins, L S S; Montarroyos, A V V; Loges, V

    2016-01-01

    The Neotropical Heliconia genus contains highly diversified plants and up to 220 species have been reported from the north of Mexico to the South of Brazil. Heliconia are cultivated as ornamental garden plants and as cut flowers. All species can be propagated by seeds or vegetatively, through rhizomes. Depending on the species, an individual plant can spread and form large clonal populations. H. bihai L., H. chartacea Lane ex Barreiros, and H. wagneriana Petersen are among the most cultivated Heliconia species. However, they still have undesirable characteristics that could be improved for the international market. This study aimed to characterize 15 half-sib families originating from commercial cultivations, by morphological and molecular markers. The genetic diversity (ĤE), considering all individuals of the three species was 0.103. For H. bihai half-sib families, the value of ĤE was 0.242, showing high genetic diversity. The ĤE value for H. chartacea was 0.068, indicating low genetic diversity. All individuals of H. wagneriana showed the same band patterns, suggesting that the two parental plants were propagated vegetatively from the same plant and may have undergone some endogamic crossings. These results showed that molecular characterization can differentiate individuals closely related as half-siblings for H. bihai and H. chartacea, despite the low variation observed with morphological descriptors. The high genetic diversity observed in H. bihai half-sibling genotypes can provide valuable resources for breeding programs. PMID:27420942

  20. Genetic diversity and morphological characterization of half-sib families of Heliconia bihai L., H. chartacea Lane ex Barreiros, and H. wagneriana Peterson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, F R A; Moraes Filho, R M; Martins, L S S; Montarroyos, A V V; Loges, V

    2016-06-20

    The Neotropical Heliconia genus contains highly diversified plants and up to 220 species have been reported from the north of Mexico to the South of Brazil. Heliconia are cultivated as ornamental garden plants and as cut flowers. All species can be propagated by seeds or vegetatively, through rhizomes. Depending on the species, an individual plant can spread and form large clonal populations. H. bihai L., H. chartacea Lane ex Barreiros, and H. wagneriana Petersen are among the most cultivated Heliconia species. However, they still have undesirable characteristics that could be improved for the international market. This study aimed to characterize 15 half-sib families originating from commercial cultivations, by morphological and molecular markers. The genetic diversity (ĤE), considering all individuals of the three species was 0.103. For H. bihai half-sib families, the value of ĤE was 0.242, showing high genetic diversity. The ĤE value for H. chartacea was 0.068, indicating low genetic diversity. All individuals of H. wagneriana showed the same band patterns, suggesting that the two parental plants were propagated vegetatively from the same plant and may have undergone some endogamic crossings. These results showed that molecular characterization can differentiate individuals closely related as half-siblings for H. bihai and H. chartacea, despite the low variation observed with morphological descriptors. The high genetic diversity observed in H. bihai half-sibling genotypes can provide valuable resources for breeding programs.

  1. Echinococcus multilocularis in North America: the great unknown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massolo Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, studies have begun to shed light on the distribution and genetic characterization of Echinococcus multilocularis, the causative agent of alveolar echinococcosis (AE, in North America. Recent findings indicate that the parasite is likely expanding its range in the central region of the United States and Canada and that invasions of European strains might have occurred. In our review, we present the available data on E. multilocularis infections in wild and domestic animals and humans in North America and emphasize the lack of knowledge on the distribution of the parasite in wild and domestic hosts. Furthermore, we stress the need to better understand the complexity of host communities and their roles in shaping the transmission and distribution of the parasite. We hypothesize that a lack of knowledge about AE by North American physicians might result in the misdiagnosis of cases and an underestimation of disease incidence. The endemic presence of the parasite in urban areas and a recent human case in Alberta, Canada, suggest that the scientific community may need to reconsider the local public health risks, re-assess past cases that might have been overlooked and increase surveillance efforts to identify new cases of human AE.

  2. Use of novel DNA fingerprinting techniques for the detection and characterization of genetic variation in vegetatively propagated crops. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vegetative propagated crops, such as banana and platain, sweet potato, yam, sugarcane and cassava, represent important sources of food in the developing countries. Although some of these crops may produce seeds, they must for practical purposes be propagated vegetatively. As normal plant breeding strategies based on genetic hybridization are of limited value or not applicable to such crops, it is necessary to assess the genetic diversity already existing in these crops and to design breeding strategies accordingly. If the existing genetic variation is shown to be too narrow for breeding purposes, one promising possibility for the introduction of genetic variability is the use of mutations induced by radiation or chemical mutagens. This CRP focused on: the detection of genetic diversity induced by mutagenic treatment or in vitro culture; the development of crop-specific markers; and increasing co-operation between molecular biologists in advanced laboratories and plant breeders and molecular biologists in the developing countries. The success of this CRP is evidenced by the introduction and application of new molecular methods by laboratories in developing countries, specially for the analysis of local crop genetic diversity. These exciting preliminary results show the potential for applications in crop improvement but much work remains to be done. Many of the vegetatively propagated species are ''orphan crops'', under-investigated on the international level. The development of new uses of transgenesis for the development of edible vaccines should not be overlooked. The challenge that remains is in the application of these new tools for practical end-user oriented improvements in vegetatively propagated crops. The present publication summarizes the third and final Research Co-ordination Meeting on the Use of Novel DNA Fingerprinting Techniques for the Detection and Characterization of Genetic Variation in Vegetatively Propagated Crops

  3. Characterization of Capsicum annuum genetic diversity and population structure based on parallel polymorphism discovery with a 30K unigene Pepper GeneChip.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa A Hill

    Full Text Available The widely cultivated pepper, Capsicum spp., important as a vegetable and spice crop world-wide, is one of the most diverse crops. To enhance breeding programs, a detailed characterization of Capsicum diversity including morphological, geographical and molecular data is required. Currently, molecular data characterizing Capsicum genetic diversity is limited. The development and application of high-throughput genome-wide markers in Capsicum will facilitate more detailed molecular characterization of germplasm collections, genetic relationships, and the generation of ultra-high density maps. We have developed the Pepper GeneChip® array from Affymetrix for polymorphism detection and expression analysis in Capsicum. Probes on the array were designed from 30,815 unigenes assembled from expressed sequence tags (ESTs. Our array design provides a maximum redundancy of 13 probes per base pair position allowing integration of multiple hybridization values per position to detect single position polymorphism (SPP. Hybridization of genomic DNA from 40 diverse C. annuum lines, used in breeding and research programs, and a representative from three additional cultivated species (C. frutescens, C. chinense and C. pubescens detected 33,401 SPP markers within 13,323 unigenes. Among the C. annuum lines, 6,426 SPPs covering 3,818 unigenes were identified. An estimated three-fold reduction in diversity was detected in non-pungent compared with pungent lines, however, we were able to detect 251 highly informative markers across these C. annuum lines. In addition, an 8.7 cM region without polymorphism was detected around Pun1 in non-pungent C. annuum. An analysis of genetic relatedness and diversity using the software Structure revealed clustering of the germplasm which was confirmed with statistical support by principle components analysis (PCA and phylogenetic analysis. This research demonstrates the effectiveness of parallel high-throughput discovery and

  4. Characterization of Capsicum annuum genetic diversity and population structure based on parallel polymorphism discovery with a 30K unigene Pepper GeneChip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Theresa A; Ashrafi, Hamid; Reyes-Chin-Wo, Sebastian; Yao, JiQiang; Stoffel, Kevin; Truco, Maria-Jose; Kozik, Alexander; Michelmore, Richard W; Van Deynze, Allen

    2013-01-01

    The widely cultivated pepper, Capsicum spp., important as a vegetable and spice crop world-wide, is one of the most diverse crops. To enhance breeding programs, a detailed characterization of Capsicum diversity including morphological, geographical and molecular data is required. Currently, molecular data characterizing Capsicum genetic diversity is limited. The development and application of high-throughput genome-wide markers in Capsicum will facilitate more detailed molecular characterization of germplasm collections, genetic relationships, and the generation of ultra-high density maps. We have developed the Pepper GeneChip® array from Affymetrix for polymorphism detection and expression analysis in Capsicum. Probes on the array were designed from 30,815 unigenes assembled from expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Our array design provides a maximum redundancy of 13 probes per base pair position allowing integration of multiple hybridization values per position to detect single position polymorphism (SPP). Hybridization of genomic DNA from 40 diverse C. annuum lines, used in breeding and research programs, and a representative from three additional cultivated species (C. frutescens, C. chinense and C. pubescens) detected 33,401 SPP markers within 13,323 unigenes. Among the C. annuum lines, 6,426 SPPs covering 3,818 unigenes were identified. An estimated three-fold reduction in diversity was detected in non-pungent compared with pungent lines, however, we were able to detect 251 highly informative markers across these C. annuum lines. In addition, an 8.7 cM region without polymorphism was detected around Pun1 in non-pungent C. annuum. An analysis of genetic relatedness and diversity using the software Structure revealed clustering of the germplasm which was confirmed with statistical support by principle components analysis (PCA) and phylogenetic analysis. This research demonstrates the effectiveness of parallel high-throughput discovery and application of genome

  5. Genetic and proteomic characterization of rpoB mutations and their effect on nematicidal activity in Photorhabdus luminescens LN2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuehong Qiu

    Full Text Available Rifampin resistant (Rif(R mutants of the insect pathogenic bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens LN2 from entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis indica LN2 were genetically and proteomically characterized. The Rif(R mutants showed typical phase one characters of Photorhabdus bacteria, and insecticidal activity against Galleria mellonella larvae, but surprisingly influenced their nematicidal activity against axenic infective juveniles (IJs of H. bacteriophora H06, an incompatible nematode host. 13 out of 34 Rif(R mutants lost their nematicidal activity against H06 IJs but supported the reproduction of H06 nematodes. 7 nematicidal-producing and 7 non-nematicidal-producing Rif(R mutants were respectively selected for rpoB sequence analysis. rpoB mutations were found in all 14 Rif(R mutants. The rpoB (P564L mutation was found in all 7 mutants which produced nematicidal activity against H06 nematodes, but not in the mutants which supported H06 nematode production. Allelic exchange assays confirmed that the Rif-resistance and the impact on nematicidal activity of LN2 bacteria were conferred by rpoB mutation(s. The non-nematicidal-producing Rif(R mutant was unable to colonize in the intestines of H06 IJs, but able to colonize in the intestines of its indigenous LN2 IJs. Proteomic analysis revealed different protein expression between wild-type strain and Rif(R mutants, or between nematicidal-producing and non nematicidal-producing mutants. At least 7 putative proteins including DsbA, HlpA, RhlE, RplC, NamB (a protein from T3SS, and 2 hypothetical proteins (similar to unknown protein YgdH and YggE of Escherichia coli respectively were probably involved in the nematicidal activity of LN2 bacteria against H06 nematodes. This hypothesis was further confirmed by creating insertion-deletion mutants of three selected corresponding genes (the downregulated rhlE and namB, and upregulated dsbA. These results indicate that the rpoB mutations greatly influence the

  6. Genetic characterization of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus from Bolivia, Ecuador and Peru: identification of a new subtype ID lineage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia V Aguilar

    Full Text Available Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV has been responsible for hundreds of thousands of human and equine cases of severe disease in the Americas. A passive surveillance study was conducted in Peru, Bolivia and Ecuador to determine the arboviral etiology of febrile illness. Patients with suspected viral-associated, acute, undifferentiated febrile illness of <7 days duration were enrolled in the study and blood samples were obtained from each patient and assayed by virus isolation. Demographic and clinical information from each patient was also obtained at the time of voluntary enrollment. In 2005-2007, cases of Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE were diagnosed for the first time in residents of Bolivia; the patients did not report traveling, suggesting endemic circulation of VEEV in Bolivia. In 2001 and 2003, VEE cases were also identified in Ecuador. Since 1993, VEEV has been continuously isolated from patients in Loreto, Peru, and more recently (2005, in Madre de Dios, Peru. We performed phylogenetic analyses with VEEV from Bolivia, Ecuador and Peru and compared their relationships to strains from other parts of South America. We found that VEEV subtype ID Panama/Peru genotype is the predominant one circulating in Peru. We also demonstrated that VEEV subtype ID strains circulating in Ecuador belong to the Colombia/Venezuela genotype and VEEV from Madre de Dios, Peru and Cochabamba, Bolivia belong to a new ID genotype. In summary, we identified a new major lineage of enzootic VEEV subtype ID, information that could aid in the understanding of the emergence and evolution of VEEV in South America.

  7. Gastroenterology training in Latin America

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Henry Cohen; Roque Saenz; Luiz E de Almeida Troncon; Maribel Lizarzabal; Carolina Olano

    2011-01-01

    Latin America is characterized by ethnic, geographical, cultural, and economic diversity; therefore, training in gastroenterology in the region must be considered in this context. The continent's medical education is characterized by a lack of standards and the volume of research continues to be relatively small. There is a multiplicity of events in general gastroenterology and in sub-disciplines, both at regional and local levels, which ensure that many colleagues have access to information. Medical education programs must be based on a clinical vision and be considered in close contact with the patients. The programs should be properly supervised, appropriately defined,and evaluated on a regular basis. The disparity between the patients' needs, the scarce resources available, and the pressures exerted by the health systems on doctors are frequent cited by those complaining of poor professionalism. Teaching development can play a critical role in ensuring the quality of teaching and learning in universities.Continuing professional development programs activities must be planned on the basis of the doctors' needs, with clearly defined objectives and using proper learning methodologies designed for adults. They must be evaluated and accredited by a competent body, so that they may become the basis of a professional regulatory system. The specialty has made progress in the last decades, offering doctors various possibilities for professional development. The world gastroenterology organization has contributed to the speciality through three distinctive, but closely inter-related, programs: Training Centers, Train-the-Trainers, and Global Guidelines, in which Latin America is deeply involved.

  8. Prevent Child Abuse America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... call the police . Crisis and support contacts For Child Abuse Reporting Numbers in your State please visit: Child ... suspected child abuse and neglect. Parent Resources Prevent Child Abuse America (800) CHILDREN A resource for tips, referrals, ...

  9. America in the Eyes of America Watchers:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Huiyun; He, Kai

    2015-01-01

    almost half of the survey participants thought that America would remain the global hegemon in the next ten years. Meanwhile, a large majority was also optimistic that China is a rising great power, especially in the economic sense, in the world. More than half of the respondents saw Asian military...... issues, such as the South China Sea issue, as the most difficult problem between China and the US....

  10. Immigrant America: A Portrait

    OpenAIRE

    Rumbaut, RG; Portes, A.

    2014-01-01

    This revised, updated, and expanded fourth edition of Immigrant America: A Portrait provides readers with a comprehensive and current overview of immigration to the United States in a single volume. Updated with the latest available data, Immigrant America explores the economic, political, spatial, and linguistic aspects of immigration; the role of religion in the acculturation and social integration of foreign minorities; and the adaptation process for the second generation. This revised ed...

  11. Admixture in Latin America: geographic structure, phenotypic diversity and self-perception of ancestry based on 7,342 individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Ruiz-Linares

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The current genetic makeup of Latin America has been shaped by a history of extensive admixture between Africans, Europeans and Native Americans, a process taking place within the context of extensive geographic and social stratification. We estimated individual ancestry proportions in a sample of 7,342 subjects ascertained in five countries (Brazil, Chile, Colombia, México and Perú. These individuals were also characterized for a range of physical appearance traits and for self-perception of ancestry. The geographic distribution of admixture proportions in this sample reveals extensive population structure, illustrating the continuing impact of demographic history on the genetic diversity of Latin America. Significant ancestry effects were detected for most phenotypes studied. However, ancestry generally explains only a modest proportion of total phenotypic variation. Genetically estimated and self-perceived ancestry correlate significantly, but certain physical attributes have a strong impact on self-perception and bias self-perception of ancestry relative to genetically estimated ancestry.

  12. Admixture in Latin America: Geographic Structure, Phenotypic Diversity and Self-Perception of Ancestry Based on 7,342 Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Linares, Andrés; Adhikari, Kaustubh; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Fuentes, Macarena; Pizarro, María; Everardo, Paola; de Avila, Francisco; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; León-Mimila, Paola; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C.; Burley, Mari-Wyn; Konca, Esra; de Oliveira, Marcelo Zagonel; Veronez, Mauricio Roberto; Rubio-Codina, Marta; Attanasio, Orazio; Gibbon, Sahra; Ray, Nicolas; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Rosique, Javier; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M.; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Balding, David; Gonzalez-José, Rolando

    2014-01-01

    The current genetic makeup of Latin America has been shaped by a history of extensive admixture between Africans, Europeans and Native Americans, a process taking place within the context of extensive geographic and social stratification. We estimated individual ancestry proportions in a sample of 7,342 subjects ascertained in five countries (Brazil, Chile, Colombia, México and Perú). These individuals were also characterized for a range of physical appearance traits and for self-perception of ancestry. The geographic distribution of admixture proportions in this sample reveals extensive population structure, illustrating the continuing impact of demographic history on the genetic diversity of Latin America. Significant ancestry effects were detected for most phenotypes studied. However, ancestry generally explains only a modest proportion of total phenotypic variation. Genetically estimated and self-perceived ancestry correlate significantly, but certain physical attributes have a strong impact on self-perception and bias self-perception of ancestry relative to genetically estimated ancestry. PMID:25254375

  13. Characterization of the genetic environment of the blaKPC-2 gene among Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from a Chinese Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Pinghua; Zhang, Ying; Li, Gang; Jiang, Xiaofei

    2016-01-01

    Infection caused by carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae has become a major healthcare threat and KPC-2 enzyme is a dominant factor mediating carbapenems resistance in K. pneumoniae. This study was designed to determine the genetic environment of blaKPC-2, which prevailed in clinical K. pneumoniae isolates recovered in Huashan Hospital, Shanghai, China. Forty-two clinical isolates were included in this study by blaKPC-2 screening. After multilocus sequence typing and plasmid analyses of PCR-based replicon typing (PBRT), junction PCR, mapping PCR and crossing PCR assays, primer walking, and amplicon sequencing were used to analyze the genetic environment of the blaKPC-2 gene. ST423, ST65, ST977, and ST11 were all detected in KPC-2-producing K. pneumoniae. Two types of blaKPC-2-bearing genetic structure were found: Tn1721-blaKPC-2-Tn3 and Tn1721-blaKPC-2-ΔTn3-IS26; and were carried in IncX and IncFII plasmids, respectively. In conclusion, the genetic environment of the blaKPC-2 gene was diverse and Tn1721-blaKPC-2-ΔTn3-IS26 was dominant in clinical K. pneumoniae isolates in Huashan Hospital. This study sheds some light on the genetic environment and should foster further studies about the mechanism of the blaKPC-2 dissemination.

  14. Evidence for the exchange of blood parasites between North America and the Neotropics in blue-winged teal (Anas discors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Andy M.; Reed, John; Walther, Patrick; Link, Paul; Schmutz, Joel A.; Douglas, David; Stallknecht, David E.; Soos, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Blue-winged teal (Anas discors) are abundant, small-bodied dabbling ducks that breed throughout the prairies of the northcentral USA and central Canada and that winter in the southern USA and northern Neotropics. Given the migratory tendencies of this species, it is plausible that blue-winged teal may disperse avian pathogens, such as parasites causing avian malaria, between spatially distant areas. To test the hypothesis that blue-winged teal play a role in the exchange of blood parasites between North America and areas further south, we collected information on migratory tendencies of this species and sampled birds at spatially distant areas during breeding and non-breeding periods to diagnose and genetically characterize parasitic infections. Using a combination of band recovery data, satellite telemetry, molecular diagnostics, and genetic analyses, we found evidence for (1) migratory connectivity of blue-winged teal between our sampling locations in the Canadian prairies and along the US Gulf Coast with areas throughout the northern Neotropics, (2) parasite acquisition at both breeding and non-breeding areas, (3) infection of blue-winged teal sampled in Canada and the USA withPlasmodium parasite lineages associated with the Neotropics, and (4) infection of blue-winged teal with parasites that were genetically related to those previously reported in waterfowl in both North America and South America. Collectively, our results suggest that blue-winged teal likely play a role in the dispersal of blood parasites between the Neotropics and North America, and therefore, the targeting of this species in surveillance programs for the early detection of Neotropical-origin avian pathogens in the USA may be informative.

  15. Molecular genetic characterization of rabies virus glycoprotein gene sequences from rabid dogs in Bangkok and neighboring provinces in Thailand, 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjathummarak, Surachet; Fa-Ngoen, Chanon; Pipattanaboon, Chonlatip; Boonha, Khwanchit; Ramasoota, Pongrama; Pitaksajjakul, Pannamthip

    2016-05-01

    Because of its association with dogs, rabies virus (RABV) is still endemic in Thailand, where it is a serious public health problem. The genetic characterization of RABV in Thailand is limited. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the molecular epidemiology and genetic diversity of RABV in the endemic area. Viral RNA from 48 brain specimens from rabid dogs, collected in Bangkok and seven neighboring provinces in 2013-2014, was extracted and sequenced. The complete rabies glycoprotein (G) gene sequences (1575 nt) were aligned, and a phylogenetic analysis was performed using the maximum-likelihood method. All of the Thai rabies virus isolates belonged to lyssavirus genotype 1 and clustered in the same lineage as isolates from South East Asia (SEA) and China. The Thai rabies virus isolates formed two distinct clades, THA-1 and THA-2. Clade THA-1 was the predominant clade and could be divided into two subclades, THA-1A and THA-1B. Clade THA-2 was closely associated with human Thai isolates collected in a previous study. The overall mean rate of evolution based on the G gene was approximately 1.56 × 10(-4) substitutions/site/year. The genetic identities among the isolates from Thailand and other SEA countries were >88.4 % at the nucleotide sequence level and 95 % at the amino acid sequence level. The deduced amino acid sequences of the G proteins of the RABV isolates were compared. A single amino acid change (N194T) in subclade THA-1A distinguished the Thai RABV isolates from other RABV isolates. Our results suggest that these Thai dog RABV isolates share a common ancestor with the RABV isolates circulating in the endemic regions of SEA countries and China. Furthermore, there were strong genetic relationship to RABV from Cambodia, Vietnam and Laos. These data extend our understanding of the relatedness and genetic variation of RABV in Thailand.

  16. Genetic characterization of Clupisoma garua (Hamilton 1822) from six Indian populations using mtDNA cytochrome b gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswat, Darpan; Lakra, W S; Nautiyal, Prakash; Goswami, Mukunda; Shyamakant, Komal; Malakar, Abhishekh

    2014-02-01

    Clupisoma garua (Hamilton, 1822) is a commercially important freshwater fish and a potential candidate species for aquaculture. This study investigates the genetic diversity and population structure of six Indian populations of C. garua using cytochrome b (cyt b) sequences of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We sequenced cyt b gene of 64 individuals collected from five distant rivers: Ganga, Gomti, Betwa, Gandak and Brahmaputra. Sequencing of 1054 bp cyt b mtDNA fragment revealed the presence of 19 haplotypes with a haplotype diversity value of 1.000 and a nucleotide diversity value of 0.0258 ± 0.00164. The Gandak river fish population showed highest nucleotide diversity. The fixation index analysis indicated significant genetic divergence among populations from different geographical areas. Both the neighbor-joining tree and median-joining network analysis of the haplotype data showed distinct patterns of phylo-geographic structure. The hierarchical analysis of molecular variance revealed that intra-group variation among populations was highly significant. The results of this study suggest that C. garua populations, especially geographically isolated groups, have developed significant genetic structures within the population. In addition, tests of neutrality suggest that C. garua may have experienced a population expansion. The study results establish cyt b as polymorphic and a potential marker to determine the population structure of C. garua. Information of genetic variation and population structure generated from this study would be useful for planning effective strategies for the conservation and rehabilitation of Schilibid cat fishes.

  17. Lipidomic and metabolomic characterization of a genetically modified mouse model of the early stages of human type 1 diabetes pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Anne Julie; Weir, Jacquelyn M; De Souza, David Peter;

    2016-01-01

    The early mechanisms regulating progression towards beta cell failure in type 1 diabetes (T1D) are poorly understood, but it is generally acknowledged that genetic and environmental components are involved. The metabolomic phenotype is sensitive to minor variations in both, and accordingly reflec...

  18. Isolation and characterization of new genetic types of toxoplasma gondii and prevalence of trichinella murrelli from black bear (Ursus americanus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black bears (Ursus americanus) are hosts for two important zoonotic parasites, Toxoplasma gondii and Trichinella spp. and bears are hunted for human consumption in the USA. Little is known of the genetic diversity of T. gondii circulating in wildlife. In the present study, antibodies to T. gondii we...

  19. Genetic signatures from amplification profiles characterize DNA mutation in somatic and radiation-induced sports of chrysanthemum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflora Tzvelev.) cultivars 'Dark Charm', 'Salmon Charm', 'Coral Charm' and 'Dark Bronze Charm' are either radiation-induced mutants or spontaneous sports of 'Charm' and constitute a family or series of plants that primarily differ in flower color. These cultivars, which were difficult to differentiate genetically by DNA amplification fingerprinting (DAF), were easily identified by using arbitrary signatures from amplification profiles (ASAP). Genomic DNA was first amplified with three standard octamer arbitrary primers, all of which produced monomorphic profiles. Products from each of these DNA fingerprints were subsequently reamplified using four minihairpin decamer primers. The 12 primer combinations produced signatures containing approximately 37% polymorphic character loci, which were used to estimate genetic relationships between cultivars. Forty-six (32%) unique amplification products were associated with individual cultivars. The number of ASAP polymorphisms detected provided an estimate of the mutation rate in the mutant cultivars, ranging from 0.03% to 1.6% of nucleotide changes within an average of 18 kb of arbitrary amplified DAF sequence. The ASAP technique permits the clear genetic identification of somatic mutants and radiation-induced sports that are genetically highly homogeneous and should facilitate marker assisted breeding and protection of plant breeders rights of varieties or cultivars

  20. Seroprevalence, isolation, first genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii, and possible congenital transmission in wild moose from Minnesota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxoplasma gondii infections are widespread in white tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) but little is known of its prevalence in other cervids in the USA. Moose (Alces alces) is a popular large game animal, hunted for its meat and trophy antlers. Here, we report seroprevalence, isolation and genet...

  1. Genetic characterization of Clupisoma garua (Hamilton 1822) from six Indian populations using mtDNA cytochrome b gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswat, Darpan; Lakra, W S; Nautiyal, Prakash; Goswami, Mukunda; Shyamakant, Komal; Malakar, Abhishekh

    2014-02-01

    Clupisoma garua (Hamilton, 1822) is a commercially important freshwater fish and a potential candidate species for aquaculture. This study investigates the genetic diversity and population structure of six Indian populations of C. garua using cytochrome b (cyt b) sequences of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We sequenced cyt b gene of 64 individuals collected from five distant rivers: Ganga, Gomti, Betwa, Gandak and Brahmaputra. Sequencing of 1054 bp cyt b mtDNA fragment revealed the presence of 19 haplotypes with a haplotype diversity value of 1.000 and a nucleotide diversity value of 0.0258 ± 0.00164. The Gandak river fish population showed highest nucleotide diversity. The fixation index analysis indicated significant genetic divergence among populations from different geographical areas. Both the neighbor-joining tree and median-joining network analysis of the haplotype data showed distinct patterns of phylo-geographic structure. The hierarchical analysis of molecular variance revealed that intra-group variation among populations was highly significant. The results of this study suggest that C. garua populations, especially geographically isolated groups, have developed significant genetic structures within the population. In addition, tests of neutrality suggest that C. garua may have experienced a population expansion. The study results establish cyt b as polymorphic and a potential marker to determine the population structure of C. garua. Information of genetic variation and population structure generated from this study would be useful for planning effective strategies for the conservation and rehabilitation of Schilibid cat fishes. PMID:23676141

  2. Molecular Characterization and Genetic Diversity Analysis of Sweet Orange Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck Cultivars in Iraq Using RAPD Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Saeed Atiyah AL-Janabi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck is one of the most important commercially cultivated fruit crops of Citrus. Genetic diversity and inter-relationship among 5 cultivars (Indian, Iraqi, Japanese, Syrian, Egyptian of C. sinensis were analyzed based on RAPD markers. Six primers generated reproducible and easily storable RAPD profiles with a number of amplified DNA fragments ranging from 6 to 14 fragment bands. The total number of amplicons detected was 51, including 14 fragments unique bands with average reached 2.8 fragments ̸ primers. While the number of polymorphic ranged from 0 to 8 with an average reached 4.4 fragments ̸ primers with the polymorphic percentage ranged from 0% to 57.1%. While the number of monomorphic ranged from 2 to 5 fragment bands and was total of the monomorphic 15 fragments with an average reached 3 fragments ̸ primers with the monomorphic percentage was 14.2 % to 83.3%. A maximum numbers of amplicons was amplified with primer OPS-238 reached 14 fragments while the minimum number of fragments was amplified with primer OPS-253 reached 6 fragments. The highest number of polymorphic bands reached 8 fragments was obtained with primer OPS-238 with high percentage 57.1%, while the highest number of monomorphic bands reached 5 fragments with high percentage 83.3% was obtained with primer OPS-253. RAPD markers detected genetic distance and similarity, amaximum genetic distance value was observed between Japanese (Jap and Syrian (Syr cultivars reached 0.530 with less similarity value reached 47%, a minimum genetic distance value was observed between sweet Iraqi (Irq and Indian (Ind cultivars reached 0.239 with high similarity value reached 76.1%. The similarity matrices were employed in the cluster analysis to generate a dendrogram using the UPGMA method. The cluster tree analysis showed that the sweet orange cultivars were broadly divided into two main groups A and B with similarity reached 50%. A group including

  3. Structural and functional characterization of pathogenic non- synonymous genetic mutations of human insulin-degrading enzyme by in silico methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Noor A; Kaleemuddin, Mohammed; Banaganapalli, Babajan; Khan, Fazal; Shaik, Nazia S; Ajabnoor, Ghada; Al-Harthi, Sameer E; Bondagji, Nabeel; Al-Aama, Jumana Y; Elango, Ramu

    2014-04-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a key protease involved in degrading insulin and amyloid peptides in human body. Several non-synonymous genetic mutations of IDE gene have been recently associated with susceptibility to both diabetes and Alzheimer's diseases. However, the consequence of these mutations on the structure of IDE protein and its substrate binding characteristics is not well elucidated. The computational investigation of genetic mutation consequences on structural level of protein is recently found to be an effective alternate to traditional in vivo and in vitro approaches. Hence, by using a combination of empirical rule and support vector machine based in silico algorithms, this study was able to identify that the pathogenic nonsynonymous genetic mutations corresponding to p.I54F, p.P122T, p.T533R, p.P581A and p.Y609A have more potential role in structural and functional deviations of IDE activity. Moreover, molecular modeling and secondary structure analysis have also confirmed their impact on the stability and secondary properties of IDE protein. The molecular docking analysis of IDE with combinational substrates has revealed that peptide inhibitors compared to small non-peptide inhibitor molecules possess good inhibitory activity towards mutant IDE. This finding may pave a way to design novel potential small peptide inhibitors for mutant IDE. Additionally by un-translated region (UTR) scanning analysis, two regulatory pathogenic genetic mutations i.e., rs5786997 (3' UTR) and rs4646954 (5' UTR), which can influence the translation pattern of IDE gene through sequence alteration of upstream-Open Reading Frame and Internal Ribosome Entry Site elements were identified. Our findings are expected to help in narrowing down the number of IDE genetic variants to be screened for disease association studies and also to select better competitive inhibitors for IDE related diseases.

  4. Structural and functional characterization of pathogenic non- synonymous genetic mutations of human insulin-degrading enzyme by in silico methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Noor A; Kaleemuddin, Mohammed; Banaganapalli, Babajan; Khan, Fazal; Shaik, Nazia S; Ajabnoor, Ghada; Al-Harthi, Sameer E; Bondagji, Nabeel; Al-Aama, Jumana Y; Elango, Ramu

    2014-04-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a key protease involved in degrading insulin and amyloid peptides in human body. Several non-synonymous genetic mutations of IDE gene have been recently associated with susceptibility to both diabetes and Alzheimer's diseases. However, the consequence of these mutations on the structure of IDE protein and its substrate binding characteristics is not well elucidated. The computational investigation of genetic mutation consequences on structural level of protein is recently found to be an effective alternate to traditional in vivo and in vitro approaches. Hence, by using a combination of empirical rule and support vector machine based in silico algorithms, this study was able to identify that the pathogenic nonsynonymous genetic mutations corresponding to p.I54F, p.P122T, p.T533R, p.P581A and p.Y609A have more potential role in structural and functional deviations of IDE activity. Moreover, molecular modeling and secondary structure analysis have also confirmed their impact on the stability and secondary properties of IDE protein. The molecular docking analysis of IDE with combinational substrates has revealed that peptide inhibitors compared to small non-peptide inhibitor molecules possess good inhibitory activity towards mutant IDE. This finding may pave a way to design novel potential small peptide inhibitors for mutant IDE. Additionally by un-translated region (UTR) scanning analysis, two regulatory pathogenic genetic mutations i.e., rs5786997 (3' UTR) and rs4646954 (5' UTR), which can influence the translation pattern of IDE gene through sequence alteration of upstream-Open Reading Frame and Internal Ribosome Entry Site elements were identified. Our findings are expected to help in narrowing down the number of IDE genetic variants to be screened for disease association studies and also to select better competitive inhibitors for IDE related diseases. PMID:24059301

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Association Histio UK Histiocytosis Association of America National Organization for Rare Disorders Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Langerhans cell histiocytosis, multifocal Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 link) ...

  6. Characterization of genetic and lifestyle factors for determining variation in body mass index, fat mass, percentage of fat mass, and lean mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, H W; Lai, D B; Conway, T; Li, J; Xu, F H; Davies, K M; Recker, R R

    2001-01-01

    In this study, we simultaneously characterized genetic and lifestyle factors (exercise, smoking, and alcohol consumption) in determining variation in body mass index (BMI), fat mass, percentage of fat mass (PFM), and lean mass while adjusting for the effects of age and sex. Six hundred fifty-eight Caucasian individuals from 48 pedigrees were studied for BMI. Among these individuals, 289 from 38 pedigrees were studied for fat mass, PFM, and lean mass measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). After adjusting for age, sex, and lifestyle factors, the heritabilities (h(2)) of BMI, fat mass, PFM, and lean mass ranged from 0.52 to 0.57 with associated standard errors ranging from 0.09 to 0.14. After accounting for significant sex and age effects, exercise had significant effects for all the phenotypes studied, and the effects of smoking and alcohol consumption were not significant. Therefore, significant proportions of variation in BMI, fat mass, PFM, and lean mass were under genetic control, and exercise had a significant effect in reducing BMI, fat mass, and PFM and in increasing lean mass. This study warrants further genetic linkage analyses to search for genes for the obesity-related phenotypes measured by DXA in our population.

  7. Multiple sclerosis care in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Victor M; Medina, Marco Tulio; Duron, Reyna M; Macias, Miguel Angel

    2014-05-01

    Before the advent of diagnostic criteria for multiple sclerosis (MS), it was reported that the prevalence of MS in Mexico was "one of the lowest in the world" (1.6/100,000).(1) The notion that MS was a rare neurologic disease among those living in the tropics of the Americas and Southern latitudes was widely accepted. The geopolitical boundaries of the region identified as Latin America (LA) extend from the southern border of United States with Mexico (32° North latitude) to the Argentinian and Chilean Patagonia in South America (56° South latitude). The largest Spanish-speaking island countries in the Caribbean-Cuba, Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico-are also traditionally considered part of LA. The continental mass includes 17 countries with a population of more than 550 million. Due to centuries of racial intermixing, it is a heterogeneous and genetically complex population. The blended cultures of native Amerindians with white Caucasian Europeans and black Africans has resulted in the predominant ethnic Latin American Mestizo. The influence of African genetics is notable in many areas of the subcontinent and the Caribbean. A common observation across LA is the absence of identification of MS in non-mixed Amerindians(2); the reason for this phenomenon is unclear.

  8. Genetically Determined Insulin Resistance is Characterized by Down-Regulation of Mitochondrial Oxidative Metabolism in Human Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jonas M; Skov, Vibe; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen;

    2010-01-01

    mitochondrial dysfunction is a cause or consequence of insulin resistance remains to be clarified. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial oxidative metabolism was down-regulated in skeletal muscle of patients with genetically determined insulin resistance. Skeletal muscle biopsies......Transcriptional profiling of skeletal muscle from patients with type 2 diabetes and high-risk individuals have demonstrated a co-ordinated down-regulation of oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) genes, suggesting a link between insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction. However, whether.......02), and complex V (ATP5B; p=0.005). Our data demonstrate that genetically determined insulin resistance is associated with a co-ordinated down-regulation of OxPhos components both at the transcriptional and translational level. These findings suggest that an impaired biological response to insulin in skeletal...

  9. Genetic characterization of the honeybee (Apis mellifera) population of Rodrigues Island, based on microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Techer, Maéva Angélique; Clémencet, Johanna; Turpin, Patrick; Volbert, Nicolas; Reynaud, Bernard; Delatte, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    International audience AbstractApis mellifera is present in Rodrigues, an island in the South-West Indian Ocean. The history of the established honeybee population is poorly known, and its biodiversity has never been studied. In this study, maternal origins of A. mellifera in Rodrigues have been assessed with the DraI test and sequencing of the mitochondrial COI-COII region. Nuclear genetic diversity was investigated with 18 microsatellite markers. A total of 524 colonies were sampled from...

  10. Development and Characterization of a Reverse Genetic System for Studying Dengue Virus Serotype 3 Strain Variation and Neutralization

    OpenAIRE

    Messer, William B.; Boyd Yount; Kari E Hacker; Donaldson, Eric F.; Huynh, Jeremy P.; de Silva, Aravinda M.; Baric, Ralph S.

    2012-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENV) are enveloped single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses transmitted by Aedes spp. mosquitoes. There are four genetically distinct serotypes designated DENV-1 through DENV-4, each further subdivided into distinct genotypes. The dengue scientific community has long contended that infection with one serotype confers lifelong protection against subsequent infection with the same serotype, irrespective of virus genotype. However this hypothesis is under increased scrutiny an...

  11. Genetic characterization of the Pacific sheath-tailed bat (Emballonura semicaudata rotensis) using mitochondrial DNA sequence data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Valdez, Ernest W.; O'Shea, Thomas; Fike, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Emballonura semicaudata occurs in the southwestern Pacific and populations on many islands have declined or disappeared. One subspecies (E. semicaudata rotensis) occurs in the Northern Mariana Islands, where it has been extirpated from all but 1 island (Aguiguan). We assessed genetic similarity between the last population of E. s. rotensis and 2 other subspecies, and examined genetic diversity on Aguiguan. We sampled 12 E. s. rotensis, sequenced them at 3 mitochondrial loci, and compared them with published sequences from 2 other subspecies. All 12 E. s. rotensis had identical sequences in each of the 3 regions. Using cytochrome-b (Cytb) data E. s. rotensis was sister to E. s. palauensis in a clade separate from E. s. semicaudata. 12S ribosomal RNA (12S) sequences grouped all E. s. semicaudata in 1 clade with E. s. rotensis in a clade by itself. Genetic distances among the 3 subspecies at Cytb were smallest between E. s. palauensis and E. s. rotensis. Distance between E. s. semicaudata and the other 2 subspecies was not different from the distance between E. s. semicaudata and the full species E. raffrayana. A similar relationship was found using the 12S data. These distances are larger than those typically reported for mammalian subspecies using Cytb sequence and within the range of sister species.

  12. Genetic Characterization of Turkish Snake Melon (Cucumis melo L. subsp. melo flexuosus Group) Accessions Revealed by SSR Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solmaz, Ilknur; Kacar, Yildiz Aka; Simsek, Ozhan; Sari, Nebahat

    2016-08-01

    Snake melon is an important cucurbit crop especially in the Southeastern and the Mediterranean region of Turkey. It is consumed as fresh or pickled. The production is mainly done with the local landraces in the country. Turkey is one of the secondary diversification centers of melon and possesses valuable genetic resources which have different morphological characteristics in case of snake melon. Genetic diversity of snake melon genotypes collected from different regions of Turkey and reference genotypes obtained from World Melon Gene Bank in Avignon-France was examined using 13 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. A total of 69 alleles were detected, with an average of 5.31 alleles per locus. The polymorphism information content of SSR markers ranged from 0.19 to 0.57 (average 0.38). Based on cluster analysis, two major groups were defined. The first major group included only one accession (61), while the rest of all accessions grouped in the second major group and separated into different sub-clusters. Based on SSR markers, cluster analysis indicated that considerably high genetic variability exists among the examined accessions; however, Turkish snake melon accessions were grouped together with the reference snake melon accessions.

  13. Patients with an inherited syndrome characterized by immunodeficiency, microcephaly, and chromosomal instability: genetic relationship to ataxia telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaspers, N.G.; Taalman, R.D.; Baan, C.

    1988-01-01

    Fibroblast cultures from six unrelated patients having a familial type of immunodeficiency combined with microcephaly, developmental delay, and chromosomal instability were studied with respect to their response to ionizing radiation. The cells from five of them resembled those from individuals with ataxia telangiectasia (AT) in that they were two to three times more radiosensitive on the basis of clonogenic cell survival. In addition, after exposure to either X-rays or bleomycin, they showed an inhibition of DNA replication that was less pronounced than that in normal cells and characteristic of AT fibroblasts. However, the patients are clinically very different from AT patients, not showing any signs of neurocutaneous symptoms. Genetic complementation studies in fused cells, with the radioresistant DNA synthesis used as a marker, showed that the patients' cells could complement representatives of all presently known AT complementation groups. Furthermore, they were shown to constitute a genetically heterogeneous group as well. It is concluded that these patients are similar to AT patients with respect to cytological parameters. The clinical differences between these patients and AT patients are a reflection of genetic heterogeneity. The data indicate that the patients suffer from a chromosome-instability syndrome that is distinct from AT.

  14. Genetic characterization of three CRF01_AE full-length HIV type 1 sequences from Fujian Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Hai-long; YAN Yan-sheng; YAN Ping-ping; ZHENG Jian; WU Shou-li; CHENG Ge; LIN Xun; ZHENG Wu-xiong; XIE Mei-rong; ZHANG Jian-ming

    2006-01-01

    Background One of the major characteristics of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is its unusually high degree of genetic variability, which involves in genetic diagnosis, subtyping, vaccine design, and epidemiology. HIV-1 CRF01_AE is a main prevalent HIV-1 recombinant strain in China. In this study, three full-length CRF01_AE genomes from Fujian Province, China were cloned, sequenced, and analyzed; and the further genetic diversity defining and epidemiologic analysis were carried out.Methods Proviral DNA was extracted from non-cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells, the near full-length HIV-1 genome was amplified and the PCR products were cloned into Pcr-XL-TOPO vector and sequenced. 5'-long terminal repeat (LTR) and 3'-LTRs were amplified by additional independent PCR and cloned into Pmd18t vector. Gene-based phylogenic tree was constructed and genetic distances were calculated by MEGA 3.1. Simplot was used for Bootscan analysis.Results The phylogeny and genetic distance analysis of the three near full-length sequences confirmed that these three samples clustered with CRF01_AE isolates, more close to Thailand CRF01_AE strain CM240, and were distantly related to African CRF01_AE strain 90CF402. Analysis of their genomic organization revealed the presence of nine potential open reading frames. There were no major deletions, rearrangements, or insertions in the three sequences, but an in-frame stop codon was found in tat gene of Fj051. LTRs of the three sequences contained a few nucleotides mutation. We did not find new mosaic recombinant in the three sequences. The V3 motif was GPGQ in all the three sequences, and there were only few amino acids differences in all three V3 loop sequences.Conclusion This report reveals the background of the three full-length CRF01_AE genomes, the most dominantly circulating HIV-1 strain in Fujian Province, China. The work is essential for the design and development of an effective AIDS vaccine for the region.

  15. Genetic characterization of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 in Mozambique: transcontinental lineages drive the HTLV-1 endemic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina P Vicente

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1 is the etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. It has been estimated that 10-20 million people are infected worldwide, but no successful treatment is available. Recently, the epidemiology of this virus was addressed in blood donors from Maputo, showing rates from 0.9 to 1.2%. However, the origin and impact of HTLV endemic in this population is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To assess the HTLV-1 molecular epidemiology in Mozambique and to investigate their relationship with HTLV-1 lineages circulating worldwide. METHODS: Blood donors and HIV patients were screened for HTLV antibodies by using enzyme immunoassay, followed by Western Blot. PCR and sequencing of HTLV-1 LTR region were applied and genetic HTLV-1 subtypes were assigned by the neighbor-joining method. The mean genetic distance of Mozambican HTLV-1 lineages among the genetic clusters were determined. Human mitochondrial (mt DNA analysis was performed and individuals classified in mtDNA haplogroups. RESULTS: LTR HTLV-1 analysis demonstrated that all isolates belong to the Transcontinental subgroup of the Cosmopolitan subtype. Mozambican HTLV-1 sequences had a high inter-strain genetic distance, reflecting in three major clusters. One cluster is associated with the South Africa sequences, one is related with Middle East and India strains and the third is a specific Mozambican cluster. Interestingly, 83.3% of HIV/HTLV-1 co-infection was observed in the Mozambican cluster. The human mtDNA haplotypes revealed that all belong to the African macrohaplogroup L with frequencies representatives of the country. CONCLUSIONS: The Mozambican HTLV-1 genetic diversity detected in this study reveals that although the strains belong to the most prevalent and worldwide distributed Transcontinental subgroup of the Cosmopolitan subtype, there is a high HTLV diversity that could be

  16. Genetic Characterization of Old Grapevines collected in Oases of the Atacama Desert Caracterización Genética de Vides Antiguas colectadas en Oasis del Desierto de Atacama

    OpenAIRE

    Ingrid Poblete; Manuel Pinto; María Teresa de Andrés; Patricio Hinrichsen

    2011-01-01

    Old grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) accessions are a source of genes that could be rescued for use per se or in modern breeding programs. The first step in this rescuing is collecting and characterizing the germplasm from a particular region. This study presents the genetic characterization of 21 grapevine accessions collected from the Atacama Desert in the far North of Chile. Characterization was based on 12 microsatellites (Simple Sequence Repeats, or SSRs) supplemented with Amplified Fragmen...

  17. Eelgrass (Zostera marina) Microsatellite DNA Data; Pacific Coast of North America, 2000-2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set contains genetic information collected from eelgrass (Zostera marina) populations along the Pacific coast of North America from Alaska to Baha...

  18. Characterization of a new Vaccinia virus isolate reveals the C23L gene as a putative genetic marker for autochthonous Group 1 Brazilian Vaccinia virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe L Assis

    Full Text Available Since 1999, several Vaccinia virus (VACV isolates, the etiological agents of bovine vaccinia (BV, have been frequently isolated and characterized with various biological and molecular methods. The results from these approaches have grouped these VACV isolates into two different clusters. This dichotomy has elicited debates surrounding the origin of the Brazilian VACV and its epidemiological significance. To ascertain vital information to settle these debates, we and other research groups have made efforts to identify molecular markers to discriminate VACV from other viruses of the genus Orthopoxvirus (OPV and other VACV-BR groups. In this way, some genes have been identified as useful markers to discriminate between the VACV-BR groups. However, new markers are needed to infer ancestry and to correlate each sample or group with its unique epidemiological and biological features. The aims of this work were to characterize a new VACV isolate (VACV DMTV-2005 molecularly and biologically using conserved and non-conserved gene analyses for phylogenetic inference and to search for new genes that would elucidate the VACV-BR dichotomy. The VACV DMTV-2005 isolate reported in this study is biologically and phylogenetically clustered with other strains of Group 1 VACV-BR, the most prevalent VACV group that was isolated during the bovine vaccinia outbreaks in Brazil. Sequence analysis of C23L, the gene that encodes for the CC-chemokine-binding protein, revealed a ten-nucleotide deletion, which is a new Group 1 Brazilian VACV genetic marker. This deletion in the C23L open reading frame produces a premature stop-codon that is shared by all Group 1 VACV-BR strains and may also reflect the VACV-BR dichotomy; the deletion can also be considered to be a putative genetic marker for non-virulent Brazilian VACV isolates and may be used for the detection and molecular characterization of new isolates.

  19. A comparison of parallel pyrosequencing and sanger clone-based sequencing and its impact on the characterization of the genetic diversity of HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binhua Liang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pyrosequencing technology has the potential to rapidly sequence HIV-1 viral quasispecies without requiring the traditional approach of cloning. In this study, we investigated the utility of ultra-deep pyrosequencing to characterize genetic diversity of the HIV-1 gag quasispecies and assessed the possible contribution of pyrosequencing technology in studying HIV-1 biology and evolution. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HIV-1 gag gene was amplified from 96 patients using nested PCR. The PCR products were cloned and sequenced using capillary based Sanger fluorescent dideoxy termination sequencing. The same PCR products were also directly sequenced using the 454 pyrosequencing technology. The two sequencing methods were evaluated for their ability to characterize quasispecies variation, and to reveal sites under host immune pressure for their putative functional significance. A total of 14,034 variations were identified by 454 pyrosequencing versus 3,632 variations by Sanger clone-based (SCB sequencing. 11,050 of these variations were detected only by pyrosequencing. These undetected variations were located in the HIV-1 Gag region which is known to contain putative cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL and neutralizing antibody epitopes, and sites related to virus assembly and packaging. Analysis of the positively selected sites derived by the two sequencing methods identified several differences. All of them were located within the CTL epitope regions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Ultra-deep pyrosequencing has proven to be a powerful tool for characterization of HIV-1 genetic diversity with enhanced sensitivity, efficiency, and accuracy. It also improved reliability of downstream evolutionary and functional analysis of HIV-1 quasispecies.

  20. Boys & Girls Clubs of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National BGC Week Join Our Cause Donate Now Boys & Girls Clubs of America and the UPS Foundation ... the Dangers Faced When Behind-the-Wheel MORE» Boys & Girls Clubs of America Names Jocelyn Woods National ...

  1. America's Children and the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Protection Agency Search Search America's Children and the Environment Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us America's Children and the Environment is an EPA report that presents key information ...

  2. Economic integration in the Americas

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    This pioneering study shows that economic integration in the Americas is not simply a matter of removing trade barriers. Economic Integration in the Americas addresses the pervasive effects of economic integration on the economy as a whole.

  3. Americas at Odds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Despite lingering disputes,the United States keeps a firm grip on Latin America During his presidential campaign,Evo Morales said his election would be a "nightmare" for the United States.The Bolivian president honored his words. On September 10, Morales declared U.S.

  4. Ecodesign in Central America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crul, M.R.M.

    2003-01-01

    This PhD thesis describes and analyses the change process started by the Ecodesign project in Central America, executed between 1998 and 2002. The project started using the concept and praxis developed in Europe. Nine ecodesign projects were performed in industry, and ecodesign was introduced to cou

  5. Literacy in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornberger, Nancy H.

    1991-01-01

    Literacy in South America must be understood in terms of the linguistic diversity there, where only 2 of 14 nations and territories are monolingual. Oral traditions, standardization of indigenous languages, nonstandard varieties of colonial languages, bilingual education and mother tongue literacy, literacy teaching, and politics are discussed.…

  6. Still Teaching for America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronholz, June

    2013-01-01

    In this article, June Kronholz talks to co-chief executives of Teach For America (TFA), Elisa Villanueva Beard and Matt Kramer about how TFA has managed to keep its forward momentum for almost 24 years. Four primary reasons are discussed: (1) Common Vision, Regional Innovation; (2) Data-Driven Improvement; (3) Global Reach; and (4) Stoking the…

  7. Two Visions of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capaldi, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Since the seventeenth century, there have been two narratives about modernity in general and America in particular. The author uses the term "narrative" to include (a) facts, (b) arguments, and most important, (c) a larger vision of how one sees the world and chooses to engage the world. The first and originalist narrative is the Lockean Liberty…

  8. Only "In America"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Maria Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    As the daughter of an interracial couple growing up in a middle-class town on Long Island in the 1970s, Soledad O'Brien learned not to let inappropriate or racist comments throw her. Now as the anchorwoman of CNN's "In America" documentary unit, she says she asks those uncomfortable questions about race all the time. She shines spotlight on…

  9. An Idea Called America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartoonian, Michael; Van Scotter, Richard; White, William E.

    2007-01-01

    America evolved out of the principles of the eighteenth-century Enlightenment, suggesting that individuals could govern themselves and that people were "endowed" with "unalienable rights" such as life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. To secure these principles, Americans would continue to work on forming a more perfect Union, by…

  10. De novo assembly and characterization of the carrot transcriptome reveals novel genes, new markers, and genetic diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matvienko Marta

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among next generation sequence technologies, platforms such as Illumina and SOLiD produce short reads but with higher coverage and lower cost per sequenced nucleotide than 454 or Sanger. A challenge now is to develop efficient strategies to use short-read length platforms for de novo assembly and marker development. The scope of this study was to develop a de novo assembly of carrot ESTs from multiple genotypes using the Illumina platform, and to identify polymorphisms. Results A de novo assembly of transcriptome sequence from four genetic backgrounds produced 58,751 contigs and singletons. Over 50% of these assembled sequences were annotated allowing detection of transposable elements and new carrot anthocyanin genes. Presence of multiple genetic backgrounds in our assembly allowed the identification of 114 computationally polymorphic SSRs, and 20,058 SNPs at a depth of coverage of 20× or more. Polymorphisms were predominantly between inbred lines except for the cultivated x wild RIL pool which had high intra-sample polymorphism. About 90% and 88% of tested SSR and SNP primers amplified a product, of which 70% and 46%, respectively, were of the expected size. Out of verified SSR and SNP markers 84% and 82% were polymorphic. About 25% of SNPs genotyped were polymorphic in two diverse mapping populations. Conclusions This study confirmed the potential of short read platforms for de novo EST assembly and identification of genetic polymorphisms in carrot. In addition we produced the first large-scale transcriptome of carrot, a species lacking genomic resources.

  11. Lateinamerika oder -amerikas? Latin America or Americas?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belén García Timón

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Anhand interdisziplinärer und empirischer Studien wird Lateinamerika als Bühne für die Entwicklung transkultureller Phänomene präsentiert. Geschlechterverhältnisse in unterschiedlichen Kontexten stehen im Mittelpunkt der Untersuchung. Begriffe wie Macht, Rasse oder Raum werden mit dem Ziel, weg von der bisherigen Vorstellung von homogenen kulturellen Einheiten zu kommen, revidiert.Latin America is presented as a stage for the development of transcultural phenomena through the use of interdisciplinary and empirical studies. Gender relations in different contexts lie at the heart of this study. Terms such as power, race, or space are revised with the goal of moving away from current perceptions of homogenous cultural unities.

  12. Genetic and Physiological Characterization of Two Clusters of Quantitative Trait Loci Associated With Seed Dormancy and Plant Height in Rice

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Heng; Beighley, Donn H.; Feng, Jiuhuan; Gu, Xing-You

    2013-01-01

    Seed dormancy and plant height have been well-studied in plant genetics, but their relatedness and shared regulatory mechanisms in natural variants remain unclear. The introgression of chromosomal segments from weedy into cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) prompted the detection of two clusters (qSD1-2/qPH1 and qSD7-2/qPH7) of quantitative trait loci both associated with seed dormancy and plant height. Together, these two clusters accounted for >96% of the variances for plant height and ~71% of t...

  13. The spectrum of BRCA1 and BRCA2 alleles in Latin America and the Caribbean: a clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutil, Julie; Golubeva, Volha A; Pacheco-Torres, Alba L; Diaz-Zabala, Hector J; Matta, Jaime L; Monteiro, Alvaro N

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary cancer predisposition gene testing allows the identification of individuals at high risk of cancer that may benefit from increased surveillance, chemoprevention, and prophylactic surgery. In order to implement clinical genetic strategies adapted to each population's needs and intrinsic genetic characteristic, this review aims to present the current status of knowledge about the spectrum of BRCA pathogenic variants in Latin American populations. We have conducted a comprehensive review of 33 studies published between 1994 and 2015 reporting the prevalence and/or spectrum of BRCA1 (OMIM 113705) and BRCA2 (OMIM 600185) variants. The combined sample size for these studies consisted of 4835 individuals from 13 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, as well as in Hispanics in the United States. A total of 167 unique pathogenic variants have been reported in the existing literature. In unselected breast cancer cases, the prevalence ranged from 1.2 to 27.1%. Some countries presented a few recurrent pathogenic variants, while others were characterized by diverse, non-recurrent variants. The proportion of BRCA pathogenic variants shared between Hispanics in the United States and Latin American populations was estimated at 10.4%. Within Latin America and the Caribbean, 8.2% of the BRCA variants reported were present in more than one country. Countries with high prevalence of BRCA pathogenic variants may benefit from more aggressive testing strategies, while testing of recurrent variant panels might present a cost-effective solution for improving genetic testing in some, but not all, countries.

  14. Genetic characterization of flea-derived Bartonella species from native animals in Australia suggests host-parasite co-evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewmongkol, Gunn; Kaewmongkol, Sarawan; McInnes, Linda M; Burmej, Halina; Bennett, Mark D; Adams, Peter J; Ryan, Una; Irwin, Peter J; Fenwick, Stanley G

    2011-12-01

    Fleas are important arthropod vectors for a variety of diseases in veterinary and human medicine, and bacteria belonging to the genus Bartonella are among the organisms most commonly transmitted by these ectoparasites. Recently, a number of novel Bartonella species and novel species candidates have been reported in marsupial fleas in Australia. In the present study the genetic diversity of marsupial fleas was investigated; 10 species of fleas were collected from seven different marsupial and placental mammal hosts in Western Australia including woylies (Bettongia penicillata), western barred bandicoots (Perameles bougainville), mardos (Antechinus flavipes), bush rats (Rattus fuscipes), red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), feral cats (Felis catus) and rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). PCR and sequence analysis of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) and the 18S rRNA genes from these fleas was performed. Concatenated phylogenetic analysis of the COI and 18S rRNA genes revealed a close genetic relationship between marsupial fleas, with Pygiopsylla hilli from woylies, Pygiopsylla tunneyi from western barred bandicoots and Acanthopsylla jordani from mardos, forming a separate cluster from fleas collected from the placental mammals in the same geographical area. The clustering of Bartonella species with their marsupial flea hosts suggests co-evolution of marsupial hosts, marsupial fleas and Bartonella species in Australia. PMID:21856444

  15. Genetic characterization of natural variants of Vpu from HIV-1 infected individuals from Northern India and their impact on virus release and cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Verma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic studies reveal that vpu is one of the most variable regions in HIV-1 genome. Functional studies have been carried out mostly with Vpu derived from laboratory adapted subtype B pNL 4-3 virus. The rationale of this study was to characterize genetic variations that are present in the vpu gene from HIV-1 infected individuals from North-India (Punjab/Haryana and determine their functional relevance. METHODS: Functionally intact vpu gene variants were PCR amplified from genomic DNA of HIV-1 infected individuals. These variants were then subjected to genetic analysis and unique representative variants were cloned under CMV promoter containing expression vector as well as into pNL 4-3 HIV-1 virus for intracellular expression studies. These variants were characterized with respect to their ability to promote virus release as well as cell death. RESULTS: Based on phylogenetic analysis and extensive polymorphisms with respect to consensus Vpu B and C, we were able to arbitrarily assign variants into two major groups (B and C. The group B variants always showed significantly higher virus release activity and exhibited moderate levels of cell death. On the other hand, group C variants displayed lower virus release activity but greater cell death potential. Interestingly, Vpu variants with a natural S61A mutation showed greater intracellular stability. These variants also exhibited significant reduction in their intracellular ubiquitination and caused greater virus release. Another group C variant that possessed a non-functional β-TrcP binding motif due to two critical serine residues (S52 and S56 being substituted with isoleucine residues, showed reduced virus release activity but modest cytotoxic activity. CONCLUSIONS: The natural variations exhibited by our Vpu variants involve extensive polymorphism characterized by substitution and deletions that contribute toward positive selection. We identified two major groups and an extremely

  16. Genetic, physiological and biochemical characterization of Bacillus sp. strain RMB7 exhibiting plant growth promoting and broad spectrum antifungal activities

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Saira; Hameed, Sohail; Imran, Asma; Iqbal, Mazhar; Lazarovits, George

    2014-01-01

    Background Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are functionally diverse group of bacteria having immense potential as biofertilizers and biopesticides. Depending upon their function, they may serve as partial replacements for chemical fertilizer or pesticides as an eco-friendly and cost-effective alternatives as compared to their synthetic counterparts. Therefore, isolation, characterization and practical evaluation of PGPRs having the aforementioned multifaceted beneficial characteri...

  17. Little People of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Past National Conferences Medical Support Medical Advisory Board Medical Resource Center ELL Position Statement Genetic Biotechnology Research Position Statement Bereavement Medical Articles Regional Skeletal ...

  18. Genetic Relationships among Tall Coconut Palm (Cocos nucifera L. Accessions of the International Coconut Genebank for Latin America and the Caribbean (ICG-LAC, Evaluated Using Microsatellite Markers (SSRs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Mendes Loiola

    Full Text Available The diversity and genetic relationships among two accessions of tall coconut palms collected in Brazil and seven accessions introduced from different geographic regions of the world were analyzed using 25 microsatellite primers, 19 of which were polymorphic and detected between 4 and 10 alleles per locus, with an average of 6.57. The observed and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.25 and 0.40 in the Rennell Islands Tall (RIT accession to 0.54 and 0.62 in the Polynesian Tall (PYT accession. The analysis of genetic structure resulted in the formation of five distinct groups. The first group was formed by the accessions Brazilian Tall-Praia do Forte (BRTPF, Brazilian Tall-Merepe (BRTMe and West African Tall (WAT; the second group consisted of Malaysian Tall (MLT; the third group of RIT; the fourth group of Vanuatu Tall (VTT; and the fifth group of Rotuman Tall (RTMT, Tonga Tall (TONT and PYT. The dendrogram based on the nearest-neighbor method detected the formation of two main groups and five subgroups, indicating that the genetic relationships of the accessions are based on their geographic regions of origin. The analyses revealed genetic relationships between the accessions collected in Brazil and the accession from Africa, and among palms from South East Asia and the South Pacific, confirming the common origin of these accessions. The information obtained in this study can guide decisions on germplasm conservation activities and the efficient selection of genetically divergent parents for use in coconut breeding programs in Brazil, which are attempting to select for disease resistance, mainly to lethal yellowing, among other characteristics.

  19. Genetic Relationships among Tall Coconut Palm (Cocos nucifera L.) Accessions of the International Coconut Genebank for Latin America and the Caribbean (ICG-LAC), Evaluated Using Microsatellite Markers (SSRs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiola, Carina Mendes; Azevedo, Alinne Oliveira Nunes; Diniz, Leandro E. C.; Aragão, Wilson Menezes; Azevedo, Carlos Diego de O.; Santos, Pedro Henrique A. D.; Ramos, Helaine Christine C.; Pereira, Messias Gonzaga; Ramos, Semíramis R. Ramalho

    2016-01-01

    The diversity and genetic relationships among two accessions of tall coconut palms collected in Brazil and seven accessions introduced from different geographic regions of the world were analyzed using 25 microsatellite primers, 19 of which were polymorphic and detected between 4 and 10 alleles per locus, with an average of 6.57. The observed and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.25 and 0.40 in the Rennell Islands Tall (RIT) accession to 0.54 and 0.62 in the Polynesian Tall (PYT) accession. The analysis of genetic structure resulted in the formation of five distinct groups. The first group was formed by the accessions Brazilian Tall—Praia do Forte (BRTPF), Brazilian Tall—Merepe (BRTMe) and West African Tall (WAT); the second group consisted of Malaysian Tall (MLT); the third group of RIT; the fourth group of Vanuatu Tall (VTT); and the fifth group of Rotuman Tall (RTMT), Tonga Tall (TONT) and PYT. The dendrogram based on the nearest-neighbor method detected the formation of two main groups and five subgroups, indicating that the genetic relationships of the accessions are based on their geographic regions of origin. The analyses revealed genetic relationships between the accessions collected in Brazil and the accession from Africa, and among palms from South East Asia and the South Pacific, confirming the common origin of these accessions. The information obtained in this study can guide decisions on germplasm conservation activities and the efficient selection of genetically divergent parents for use in coconut breeding programs in Brazil, which are attempting to select for disease resistance, mainly to lethal yellowing, among other characteristics. PMID:26974540

  20. Genetic Relationships among Tall Coconut Palm (Cocos nucifera L.) Accessions of the International Coconut Genebank for Latin America and the Caribbean (ICG-LAC), Evaluated Using Microsatellite Markers (SSRs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiola, Carina Mendes; Azevedo, Alinne Oliveira Nunes; Diniz, Leandro E C; Aragão, Wilson Menezes; Azevedo, Carlos Diego de O; Santos, Pedro Henrique A D; Ramos, Helaine Christine C; Pereira, Messias Gonzaga; Ramos, Semíramis R Ramalho

    2016-01-01

    The diversity and genetic relationships among two accessions of tall coconut palms collected in Brazil and seven accessions introduced from different geographic regions of the world were analyzed using 25 microsatellite primers, 19 of which were polymorphic and detected between 4 and 10 alleles per locus, with an average of 6.57. The observed and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.25 and 0.40 in the Rennell Islands Tall (RIT) accession to 0.54 and 0.62 in the Polynesian Tall (PYT) accession. The analysis of genetic structure resulted in the formation of five distinct groups. The first group was formed by the accessions Brazilian Tall-Praia do Forte (BRTPF), Brazilian Tall-Merepe (BRTMe) and West African Tall (WAT); the second group consisted of Malaysian Tall (MLT); the third group of RIT; the fourth group of Vanuatu Tall (VTT); and the fifth group of Rotuman Tall (RTMT), Tonga Tall (TONT) and PYT. The dendrogram based on the nearest-neighbor method detected the formation of two main groups and five subgroups, indicating that the genetic relationships of the accessions are based on their geographic regions of origin. The analyses revealed genetic relationships between the accessions collected in Brazil and the accession from Africa, and among palms from South East Asia and the South Pacific, confirming the common origin of these accessions. The information obtained in this study can guide decisions on germplasm conservation activities and the efficient selection of genetically divergent parents for use in coconut breeding programs in Brazil, which are attempting to select for disease resistance, mainly to lethal yellowing, among other characteristics. PMID:26974540

  1. The Mediterranean fruit fly in Central America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various methods of controlling the medfly are available and include the use of insecticides, bait sprays and the sterile insect technique (SIT). Each of these control strategies may be used alone or in sequence. With regard to the application of the SIT, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Atomic Energy in Food and Agriculture through its Insect and Pest Control Section and Entomology Laboratory is in an excellent position to assist in containing the medfly in Central America. For the past 12 years, the laboratory has participated in all phases of medfly control by sterile insect releases in various climates. This involvement has included planning of medfly campaigns, development of pre-release techniques (bait spraying, trapping, etc.) and shipment and release of sterilized medflies. Small-scale field tests utilizing the SIT have been carried out by nine countries: Italy (Procida, Capri), Spain, Cyprus, Israel, Tunisia, Peru, Panama, Costa Rica and Nicaragua. Other field projects presently being counselled and serviced are located in Argentina, Venezuela and the Canary Islands. The research and development that are still needed to effectively stabilize and gain control of the medfly situation in Central America include: The development and use of effective quarantine procedures in various countries; Development of effective conventional medfly control procedures under the conditions found in Central America; Development of methods to determine the geographic origin of medflies introduced into new areas; Medfly mass production (viz. all aspects of rearing Central American strains); Assessing the performance (competitiveness, etc.) of various strains; Logistics, including the development of systems for releasing pre-adult stages; Genetic rearing methods: developmental research in this area is particularly promising since the preferential production of males would allow considerable savings in the rearing costs of medflies for release; Development of adequate surveillance

  2. A reassessment of the phytogeographic characterization of Temperate Pacific South America Una re-evaluación de la caracterización fitogeográfica de la costa temperada del Pacífico de sudamerica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BERNABE SANTELICES

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1980, a study of geographic distribution patterns and geographic affinities of benthic algae of temperate Pacific South America (5-55 ºS provided a first characterization of these coasts. High endemism and limited floristic exchange with the Tropical Pacific and with islands in the South Pacific at various distances from the continent were two outstanding features of the marine flora. A partial blockage of species exchange partially accounted for a peculiar latitudinal pattern of species richness that increases with increasing latitudes. In contrast, there was reduced species richness in comparison with other climatically equivalent regions that have contact with more effective routes of migration. Over the last two decades, more than 30 taxonomic and biogeographic studies on this benthic marine flora have been completed, adding a significant number of new records for the area. New studies test the above characterization and indicate that the new data add support to several key aspects of the phytogeographic characterization of this coastline. The relative importance of the various floristic components at different latitudes, the isolated character of this flora and the latitudinal pattern of increasing species richness to higher latitudes are shownEl estudio de los patrones de distribución geográfica de las algas marinas bentónicas en la costa temperada de Sudamérica (5-55 ºS permitió en 1980 caracterizar estas costas como con un alto grado de endemismo y con intercambio florístico limitado con localidades situadas en el Pacífico Tropical o con las islas oceánicas del Pacífico Sur dispuestas a distintas distancias de la costa. Este bloqueo parcial al intercambio de especies explicaría la baja riqueza de especies de estas costas en comparación con costas climáticamente equivalentes pero con un número mayor de vías de emigración así como el patrón latitudinal de riqueza de especies que en esta zona muestra un incremento en

  3. Molecular evolution of epizootic hemorrhagic disease viruses in North America based on historical isolates using motif fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, W C; Ruder, M G; Jasperson, D; Smith, T P L; Naraghi-Arani, P; Lenhoff, R; Stallknecht, D E; Valdivia-Granda, W A; Sheoran, D

    2016-08-01

    Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) is an orbivirus of the Reoviridae family that has significant impact on wild and captive white-tailed deer. Although closely related to bluetongue virus that can cause disease in sheep and cattle, North American EHDV historically has not been associated with disease in cattle or sheep. Severe disease in cattle has been reported with other EHDV strains from East Asia and the Middle East. To understand the potential role of viral genetics in the epidemiology of epizootic hemorrhagic disease, a molecular characterization of North American EHDV strains from 1955 to 2012 was conducted via conventional phylogenetic analysis and a new classification approach using motif fingerprint patterns. Overall, this study indicates that the genetic make-up of EHDV populations in North America have slowly evolved over time. The data also suggested limited reassortment events between serotypes 1 and 2 and introduces a new analysis tool for more detailed sequence pattern analysis. PMID:27107856

  4. Chum and pink salmon genetics - Genetic and life history variation of southern chum and pink salmon

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The distribution of genetic and life history variation in chum (Oncorhynchus keta) and pink (O. gorbuscha) salmon in their southern range in North America is key to...

  5. Genetic characterization of a potentially novel goose parvovirus circulating in Muscovy duck flocks in Fujian Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shao; Cheng, Xiao-Xia; Chen, Shao-Ying; Zhu, Xiao-Li; Chen, Shi-Long; Lin, Feng-Qiang; Li, Zhao-Long

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel goose parvovirus (MDGPV/PT) isolated from an affected Muscovy duck in Fujian Province, China. In this study, the NS1 sequence analyses indicated a close genetic relationship between MDGPV/PT and Muscovy duck parvovirus (MDPV) strains, although MDGPV/DY, which was isolated from a Muscovy duck in 2006 in Sichuan Province, could be divided into GPV-related groups. Phylogenetic analysis showed that except for differences in the NS1 gene, MDGPV strains PT and DY are closely related to a parvovirus that infects domestic waterfowls. This is the first demonstration of recombination between goose and Muscovy duck parvoviruses in nature, and MDGPV/PT might have led to the generation of a novel waterfowl parvovirus strain circulating in Muscovy duck flocks in China.

  6. Infratentorial low-grade oligoastrocytoma with aggressive clinical behavior in an adult: a case report with genetic characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Keisho; Toda, Masahiro; Sasaki, Hikaru; Kitamura, Yohei; Mikami, Shuji; Hirato, Junko; Inoue, Satoshi; Kawase, Takeshi; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2013-04-01

    Oligoastrocytoma preferentially arises in the cerebral hemisphere, and a cerebellar location is unusual. We report the case of a 35-year-old woman with an aggressive cerebellar tumor histopathologically diagnosed as oligoastrocytoma World Health Organization (WHO) grade II. After partial removal of the tumor, she underwent concomitant temozolomide (TMZ) therapy with local irradiation followed by additional TMZ monotherapy. However, her symptoms gradually worsened, and chronological magnetic resonance imaging showed remarkable tumor enlargement. In accordance with the aggressive clinical course, unfavorable genetic characteristics such as the gain of the entire chromosome 7, loss of 9p, absence of 1p/19q codeletion, absence of methylation of the O6-methylguanine-deoxyribonucleic acid methyltransferase promoter, and absence of the isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 mutation were observed. The present case illustrates that these molecular characteristics represent the biological features of gliomas more closely than the histopathological diagnosis and may also suggest that infratentorial gliomas arise through a distinct tumorigenic pathway from their supratentorial counterparts.

  7. Rapidly characterizing the fast dynamics of RNA genetic circuitry with cell-free transcription-translation (TX-TL) systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Melissa K; Chappell, James; Hayes, Clarmyra A; Sun, Zachary Z; Kim, Jongmin; Singhal, Vipul; Spring, Kevin J; Al-Khabouri, Shaima; Fall, Christopher P; Noireaux, Vincent; Murray, Richard M; Lucks, Julius B

    2015-05-15

    RNA regulators are emerging as powerful tools to engineer synthetic genetic networks or rewire existing ones. A potential strength of RNA networks is that they may be able to propagate signals on time scales that are set by the fast degradation rates of RNAs. However, a current bottleneck to verifying this potential is the slow design-build-test cycle of evaluating these networks in vivo. Here, we adapt an Escherichia coli-based cell-free transcription-translation (TX-TL) system for rapidly prototyping RNA networks. We used this system to measure the response time of an RNA transcription cascade to be approximately five minutes per step of the cascade. We also show that this response time can be adjusted with temperature and regulator threshold tuning. Finally, we use TX-TL to prototype a new RNA network, an RNA single input module, and show that this network temporally stages the expression of two genes in vivo.

  8. Treponema pallidum infection in the wild baboons of East Africa: distribution and genetic characterization of the strains responsible.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin N Harper

    Full Text Available It has been known for decades that wild baboons are naturally infected with Treponema pallidum, the bacterium that causes the diseases syphilis (subsp. pallidum, yaws (subsp. pertenue, and bejel (subsp. endemicum in humans. Recently, a form of T. pallidum infection associated with severe genital lesions has been described in wild baboons at Lake Manyara National Park in Tanzania. In this study, we investigated ten additional sites in Tanzania and Kenya using a combination of macroscopic observation and serology, in order to determine whether the infection was present in each area. In addition, we obtained genetic sequence data from six polymorphic regions using T. pallidum strains collected from baboons at two different Tanzanian sites. We report that lesions consistent with T. pallidum infection were present at four of the five Tanzanian sites examined, and serology was used to confirm treponemal infection at three of these. By contrast, no signs of treponemal infection were observed at the six Kenyan sites, and serology indicated T. pallidum was present at only one of them. A survey of sexually mature baboons at Lake Manyara National Park in 2006 carried out as part of this study indicated that roughly ten percent displayed T. pallidum-associated lesions severe enough to cause major structural damage to the genitalia. Finally, we found that T. pallidum strains from Lake Manyara National Park and Serengeti National Park were genetically distinct, and a phylogeny suggested that baboon strains may have diverged prior to the clade containing human strains. We conclude that T. pallidum infection associated with genital lesions appears to be common in the wild baboons of the regions studied in Tanzania. Further study is needed to elucidate the infection's transmission mode, its associated morbidity and mortality, and the relationship between baboon and human strains.

  9. Development and characterization of a reverse genetic system for studying dengue virus serotype 3 strain variation and neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, William B; Yount, Boyd; Hacker, Kari E; Donaldson, Eric F; Huynh, Jeremy P; de Silva, Aravinda M; Baric, Ralph S

    2012-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENV) are enveloped single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses transmitted by Aedes spp. mosquitoes. There are four genetically distinct serotypes designated DENV-1 through DENV-4, each further subdivided into distinct genotypes. The dengue scientific community has long contended that infection with one serotype confers lifelong protection against subsequent infection with the same serotype, irrespective of virus genotype. However this hypothesis is under increased scrutiny and the role of DENV genotypic variation in protection from repeated infection is less certain. As dengue vaccine trials move increasingly into field-testing, there is an urgent need to develop tools to better define the role of genotypic variation in DENV infection and immunity. To better understand genotypic variation in DENV-3 neutralization and protection, we designed and constructed a panel of isogenic, recombinant DENV-3 infectious clones, each expressing an envelope glycoprotein from a different DENV-3 genotype; Philippines 1982 (genotype I), Thailand 1995 (genotype II), Sri Lanka 1989 and Cuba 2002 (genotype III) and Puerto Rico 1977 (genotype IV). We used the panel to explore how natural envelope variation influences DENV-polyclonal serum interactions. When the recombinant viruses were tested in neutralization assays using immune sera from primary DENV infections, neutralization titers varied by as much as ∼19-fold, depending on the expressed envelope glycoprotein. The observed variability in neutralization titers suggests that relatively few residue changes in the E glycoprotein may have significant effects on DENV specific humoral immunity and influence antibody mediated protection or disease enhancement in the setting of both natural infection and vaccination. These genotypic differences are also likely to be important in temporal and spatial microevolution of DENV-3 in the background of heterotypic neutralization. The recombinant and synthetic tools described here

  10. Genetic and epigenetic characterization of low-grade gliomas reveals frequent methylation of the MLH3 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhotska, Halka; Zemanova, Zuzana; Cechova, Hana; Ransdorfova, Sarka; Lizcova, Libuse; Kramar, Filip; Krejcik, Zdenek; Svobodova, Karla; Bystricka, Dagmar; Hrabal, Petr; Dohnalova, Alena; Michalova, Kyra

    2015-11-01

    Diffuse astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas (WHO grade II) are the most common histological subtypes of low-grade gliomas (LGGs). Several molecular and epigenetic markers have been identified that predict tumor progression. Our aim was in detail to investigate the genetic and epigenetic background of LGGs and to identify new markers that might play a role in tumor behavior. Twenty-three patients with oligodendroglioma or oligoastrocytoma (LGO) and 22 patients with diffuse astrocytoma (LGA) were investigated using several molecular-cytogenetic and molecular methods to assess their copy number variations, mutational status and level of promoter methylation. The most frequent findings were a 1p/19q codeletion in 83% of LGO and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (CN-LOH) of 17p in 72% of LGA. Somatic mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2 (IDH1/IDH2) genes were detected in 96% of LGO and 91% of LGA. The O-6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter was methylated in 83% of LGO and 59% of LGA. MutL homolog 3 (MLH3) promoter methylation was observed in 61% of LGO and 27% of LGA. Methylation of the MGMT promoter, 1p/19q codeletion, mutated IDH1, and CN-LOH of 17p were the most frequent genetic aberrations in LGGs. The findings were more diverse in LGA than in LGO. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time description of methylation of the MLH3 gene promoter in LGGs. Further studies are required to determine the role of the methylated MLH3 promoter and the other aberrations detected.

  11. Genetic and molecular characterization of submergence response identifies Subtol6 as a major submergence tolerance locus in maize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malachy T Campbell

    Full Text Available Maize is highly sensitive to short term flooding and submergence. Early season flooding reduces germination, survival and growth rate of maize seedlings. We aimed to discover genetic variation for submergence tolerance in maize and elucidate the genetic basis of submergence tolerance through transcriptional profiling and linkage analysis of contrasting genotypes. A diverse set of maize nested association mapping (NAM founder lines were screened, and two highly tolerant (Mo18W and M162W and sensitive (B97 and B73 genotypes were identified. Tolerant lines exhibited delayed senescence and lower oxidative stress levels compared to sensitive lines. Transcriptome analysis was performed on these inbreds to provide genome level insights into the molecular responses to submergence. Tolerant lines had higher transcript abundance of several fermentation-related genes and an unannotated Pyrophosphate-Dependent Fructose-6-Phosphate 1-Phosphotransferase gene during submergence. A coexpression network enriched for CBF (C-REPEAT/DRE BINDING FACTOR: C-REPEAT/DRE BINDING FACTOR genes, was induced by submergence in all four inbreds, but was more activated in the tolerant Mo18W. A recombinant inbred line (RIL population derived from Mo18W and B73 was screened for submergence tolerance. A major QTL named Subtol6 was mapped to chromosome 6 that explains 22% of the phenotypic variation within the RIL population. We identified two candidate genes (HEMOGLOBIN2 and RAV1 underlying Subtol6 based on contrasting expression patterns observed in B73 and Mo18W. Sources of tolerance identified in this study (Subtol6 can be useful to increase survival rate during flooding events that are predicted to increase in frequency with climate change.

  12. A variant of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy characterized by recovery of vision and by an unusual mitochondrial genetic etiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackey, D. (Royal Children' s Hospital, Melbourne (Australia)); Howell, N. (Univ. of Texas, Galveston (United States))

    1992-12-01

    The Tas2 and Vic2 Australian families are affected with a variant of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). The risk of developing the optic neuropathy shows strict maternal inheritance, and the opthalmological changes in affected family members are characteristic of LHON. However, in contrast to the common form of the disease, members of these two families show a high frequency of vision recovery. To ascertain the mitochondrial genetic etiology of the LHON in these families, both (a) the nucleotide sequences of the seven mitochondrial genes encoding subunits of respiratory-chain complex I and (b) the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene were determined for representatives of both families. Neither family carries any of the previously identified primary mitochondrial LHON mutations: ND4/11778, ND1/3460, or ND1/4160. Instead, both LHON families carry multiple nucleotide changes in the mitochondrial complex I genes, which produce conservative amino acid changes. From the available sequence data, it is inferred that the Vic2 and Tas2 LHON families are phylogenetically related to each other and to a cluster of LHON families in which mutations in the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene have been hypothesized to play a primary etiological role. However, sequencing analysis establishes that the Vic2 and Tas2 LHON families do not carry these cytochrome b mutations. There are two hypotheses to account for the unusual mitochondrial genetic etiology of the LHON in the Tas2 and Vic2 LHON families. One possibility is that there is a primary LHON mutation within the mitochondrial genome but that it is at a site that was not included in the sequencing analyses. Alternatively, the disease in these families may result from the cumulative effects of multiple secondary LHON mutations that have less severe phenotypic consequences. 29 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Development and characterization of a reverse genetic system for studying dengue virus serotype 3 strain variation and neutralization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William B Messer

    Full Text Available Dengue viruses (DENV are enveloped single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses transmitted by Aedes spp. mosquitoes. There are four genetically distinct serotypes designated DENV-1 through DENV-4, each further subdivided into distinct genotypes. The dengue scientific community has long contended that infection with one serotype confers lifelong protection against subsequent infection with the same serotype, irrespective of virus genotype. However this hypothesis is under increased scrutiny and the role of DENV genotypic variation in protection from repeated infection is less certain. As dengue vaccine trials move increasingly into field-testing, there is an urgent need to develop tools to better define the role of genotypic variation in DENV infection and immunity. To better understand genotypic variation in DENV-3 neutralization and protection, we designed and constructed a panel of isogenic, recombinant DENV-3 infectious clones, each expressing an envelope glycoprotein from a different DENV-3 genotype; Philippines 1982 (genotype I, Thailand 1995 (genotype II, Sri Lanka 1989 and Cuba 2002 (genotype III and Puerto Rico 1977 (genotype IV. We used the panel to explore how natural envelope variation influences DENV-polyclonal serum interactions. When the recombinant viruses were tested in neutralization assays using immune sera from primary DENV infections, neutralization titers varied by as much as ∼19-fold, depending on the expressed envelope glycoprotein. The observed variability in neutralization titers suggests that relatively few residue changes in the E glycoprotein may have significant effects on DENV specific humoral immunity and influence antibody mediated protection or disease enhancement in the setting of both natural infection and vaccination. These genotypic differences are also likely to be important in temporal and spatial microevolution of DENV-3 in the background of heterotypic neutralization. The recombinant and synthetic tools

  14. Genetic design and characterization of novel ultra-high-strength stainless steels strengthened by Ni{sub 3}Ti intermetallic nanoprecipitates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, W., E-mail: w.xu@m2i.nl [Materials Innovation Institute M2i, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS, Delft (Netherlands)] [Novel Aerospace Materials (NovAM) Group, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS, Delft (Netherlands); Rivera-Diaz-del-Castillo, P.E.J. [Novel Aerospace Materials (NovAM) Group, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS, Delft (Netherlands); Wang, W.; Yang, K. [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Bliznuk, V.; Kestens, L.A.I. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, B 9052 Gent (Belgium); Zwaag, S. van der [Novel Aerospace Materials (NovAM) Group, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS, Delft (Netherlands)

    2010-06-15

    A general computational alloy design approach based on thermodynamic and physical metallurgical principles, and coupled with a genetic optimization scheme, is presented. The method is applied to the design of new ultra-high-strength maraging stainless steels strengthened by Ni{sub 3}Ti intermetallics. In the first design round, the alloy composition is optimized on the basis of precipitate formation at a fixed ageing temperature without considering other steps in the heat treatment. In the second round, the alloy is redesigned, applying an integrated model which allows for the simultaneous optimization of alloy composition and the ageing temperature as well as the prior austenitization temperature. The experimental characterizations of prototype alloys clearly demonstrate that alloys designed by the proposed approach achieve the desired microstructures.

  15. Lysyl hydroxylases:characterization of mouse lysyl hydroxylases and generation of genetically modified lysyl hydroxylase 3 mouse lines

    OpenAIRE

    Ruotsalainen, H. (Heidi)

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Lysyl hydroxylase (EC 1.14.11.4, procollagen-lysine, 2-oxyglutarate, 5-dioxygenase, Plod) catalyzes the hydroxylation of certain lysine residues in collagens and in other proteins with collagenous domains. Three lysyl hydroxylase isoforms have been cloned from human and rat. The importance of lysyl hydroxylase 1 in collagen biosynthesis is demonstrated by the heritable disorder, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VI, which is characterized by joint laxity, progressive scoliosis, muscle h...

  16. Establishment and genetic characterization of a novel mixed-phenotype acute leukemia cell line with EP300-ZNF384 fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Ping, Nana; Qiu, Huiying; Wang, Qian; Dai, Haiping; Ruan, Changgeng; Ehrentraut, Stefan; Drexler, Hans G.; MacLeod, Roderick A. F.; Chen, Suning

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we describe the establishment and characterization of the first mixed-phenotype acute leukemia cell line (JIH-5). The JIH-5 cell line was established from leukemia cells with B lymphoid/myeloid phenotype from a female mixed-phenotype acute leukemia patient. JIH-5 cells exhibit an immunophenotype comprised of myeloid and B lymphoid antigens. Whole-exome sequencing revealed somatic mutations in nine genes in JIH-5 cells. Transcriptional sequencing of JIH-5 cells identified EP300-ZNF384 ...

  17. Biological, functional and genetic characterization of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells from pediatric patients affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Conforti

    Full Text Available Alterations in hematopoietic microenvironment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients have been claimed to occur, but little is known about the components of marrow stroma in these patients. In this study, we characterized mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs isolated from bone marrow (BM of 45 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL-MSCs at diagnosis (day+0 and during chemotherapy treatment (days: +15; +33; +78, the time points being chosen according to the schedule of BM aspirates required by the AIEOP-BFM ALL 2009 treatment protocol. Morphology, proliferative capacity, immunophenotype, differentiation potential, immunomodulatory properties and ability to support long-term hematopoiesis of ALL-MSCs were analysed and compared with those from 41 healthy donors (HD-MSCs. ALL-MSCs were also genetically characterized through array-CGH, conventional karyotyping and FISH analysis. Moreover, we compared ALL-MSCs generated at day+0 with those isolated during chemotherapy. Morphology, immunophenotype, differentiation potential and in vitro life-span did not differ between ALL-MSCs and HD-MSCs. ALL-MSCs showed significantly lower proliferative capacity (p<0.001 and ability to support in vitro hematopoiesis (p = 0.04 as compared with HD-MSCs, while they had similar capacity to inhibit in vitro mitogen-induced T-cell proliferation (p = N.S.. ALL-MSCs showed neither the typical translocations carried by the leukemic clone (when present, nor other genetic abnormalities acquired during ex vivo culture. Our findings indicate that ALL-MSCs display reduced ability to proliferate and to support long-term hematopoiesis in vitro. ALL-MSCs isolated at diagnosis do not differ from those obtained during treatment.

  18. Biological, functional and genetic characterization of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells from pediatric patients affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforti, Antonella; Biagini, Simone; Del Bufalo, Francesca; Sirleto, Pietro; Angioni, Adriano; Starc, Nadia; Li Pira, Giuseppina; Moretta, Francesca; Proia, Alessandra; Contoli, Benedetta; Genovese, Silvia; Ciardi, Claudia; Avanzini, Maria Antonietta; Rosti, Vittorio; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Locatelli, Franco; Bernardo, Maria Ester

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in hematopoietic microenvironment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients have been claimed to occur, but little is known about the components of marrow stroma in these patients. In this study, we characterized mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow (BM) of 45 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL-MSCs) at diagnosis (day+0) and during chemotherapy treatment (days: +15; +33; +78), the time points being chosen according to the schedule of BM aspirates required by the AIEOP-BFM ALL 2009 treatment protocol. Morphology, proliferative capacity, immunophenotype, differentiation potential, immunomodulatory properties and ability to support long-term hematopoiesis of ALL-MSCs were analysed and compared with those from 41 healthy donors (HD-MSCs). ALL-MSCs were also genetically characterized through array-CGH, conventional karyotyping and FISH analysis. Moreover, we compared ALL-MSCs generated at day+0 with those isolated during chemotherapy. Morphology, immunophenotype, differentiation potential and in vitro life-span did not differ between ALL-MSCs and HD-MSCs. ALL-MSCs showed significantly lower proliferative capacity (p<0.001) and ability to support in vitro hematopoiesis (p = 0.04) as compared with HD-MSCs, while they had similar capacity to inhibit in vitro mitogen-induced T-cell proliferation (p = N.S.). ALL-MSCs showed neither the typical translocations carried by the leukemic clone (when present), nor other genetic abnormalities acquired during ex vivo culture. Our findings indicate that ALL-MSCs display reduced ability to proliferate and to support long-term hematopoiesis in vitro. ALL-MSCs isolated at diagnosis do not differ from those obtained during treatment. PMID:24244271

  19. Genetic Characterization of Old Grapevines collected in Oases of the Atacama Desert Caracterización Genética de Vides Antiguas colectadas en Oasis del Desierto de Atacama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Poblete

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Old grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. accessions are a source of genes that could be rescued for use per se or in modern breeding programs. The first step in this rescuing is collecting and characterizing the germplasm from a particular region. This study presents the genetic characterization of 21 grapevine accessions collected from the Atacama Desert in the far North of Chile. Characterization was based on 12 microsatellites (Simple Sequence Repeats, or SSRs supplemented with Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphic (AFLP markers. Most of the collected accessions produced red berries and shared the genetic characteristics of the cv. País, an old genotype found throughout America. However, among those red-berried accessions, one showed a severe abortive phenotype (22S7, and another (6S4 differed from ‘País’ in one allele. Both could be examples of somatic mutations, even though no variations in their AFLP patterns were found. On the other hand, the only accession with red berries that exhibited genetic characteristics different from those of ‘País’ (5CN corresponded to ‘Gros Colman’, a supposedly Georgian genotype introduced to this region by the mid-20th century. Greater genetic diversity was detected among the white and pink accessions, which were classified into five clades based on their SSR allelic patterns. Of these genotypes, 11Si was identified as ‘Emperatriz’ or ‘Red Seedless’, an Argentinean variety; accessions 16H1 and 17H2 corresponded to a product of crossing ‘País’ and ‘Muscat of Alexandria’; and, finally, accession 20S5 was identified as ‘Ahmeur bou Ahmeur’, an Algerian genotype harboring pink berries. Two seeded genotypes harboring small and large white berries were not identified as known varieties. The possible use of these accessions for breeding to enhance survival in the harsh environment of the Atacama Desert is discussed.Las accesiones de vid (Vitis vinifera L. de antigua data son una fuente de

  20. Genetic diversity and population structure in Physalis peruviana and related taxa based on InDels and SNPs derived from COSII and IRG markers

    OpenAIRE

    Garzón-Martínez, Gina A.; Osorio-Guarín, Jaime A.; Delgadillo-Durán, Paola; Mayorga, Franklin; Enciso-Rodríguez, Felix E.; Landsman, David; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo; Barrero, Luz Stella

    2015-01-01

    The genus Physalis is common in the Americas and includes several economically important species, among them Physalis peruviana that produces appetizing edible fruits. We studied the genetic diversity and population structure of P. peruviana and characterized 47 accessions of this species along with 13 accessions of related taxa consisting of 222 individuals from the Colombian Corporation of Agricultural Research (CORPOICA) germplasm collection, using Conserved Orthologous Sequences (COSII) a...

  1. Driving in America

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘世一

    2005-01-01

    Mitsuaki recently arrived in the United States to enter university. He wants to do well in his studies and adjust to the new culture. But Mitsuaki has a problem. It's not his roommates. It's not his school fees. It's not even his English ability. Mitsuaki's problem is that he doesn't have a car. And in America, that really makes him a foreigner. Mitsuaki has already discovered a basic fact of American culture : Driving is a way of life.

  2. Electricity in Latin America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breeze, P.

    1998-12-01

    The report provides an overview of the Latin American power market; analyses the power generation, transmission and distribution capabilities of 20 countries in central and south America; includes detailed comparative data on current capacity, shortfall and growth; investigates the existing network infrastructures and projected demand; examines the opportunities for independent power producers resulting from deregulation; assesses indigenous and imported fuel resources; and discusses the broad financial opportunities and restraints.

  3. Making America Great Again?

    OpenAIRE

    Leth, Aksel N.; Lykke, Lærke G.; Dyrbye, Zachary R.; Jordahn, Sally E.; Egholm, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at uncovering the discourses in Donald Trump’s announcement speech and their relation to his campaign slogan Make America Great Again. Through a thorough analysis of his speech, we have identified thematic categories and used critical discourse studies (CDS), to denaturalise the discourses he produces and reproduces in a socio-cultural and socio-political context. Our method of Critical Discourse Analysis is based on Fairclough, complemented by Wodak, Richardson and van Dijk, ...

  4. [Travellers to South America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloveras, Susana Cristina

    2011-12-01

    The geography, tourist attractions and the multiple sites of historical and cultural interest make South America as an important destination chosen by travelers. The continent has a wide climatic variation from north to south, making exposure to risk different between the tropics and the temperate or cold regions. In the countries of tropical South America, the greatest risk is associated with the possibility of acquiring vector-borne diseases, like yellow fever, dengue, malaria and leishmaniasis. The risk of acquiring traveler's diarrhea and food-borne illness is similar across the continent, with some variations according to country and to visit urban or rural areas. Rabies, pertussis and diphtheria have appeared as epidemics in several countries and other diseases such as rickettsiosis, hantavirosis and viral encephalitis have expanded their distribution. The geographic and epidemiological diversity of South America, promotes a challenge for travel medicine specialists because during the pre-travel advice they have to take in account the kind of trip, traveller's medical history, exposure to risk and the dynamics of endemic emerging and reemerging diseases in the region.

  5. Phenotypic and Genetic Characterization of a Novel Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato Isolate from a Patient with Lyme Borreliosis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Guiqing; Dam, Alje P. van; Dankert, Jacob

    1999-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato A14S was cultured from a skin biopsy specimen of a patient with erythema migrans in The Netherlands. This isolate had a unique DNA fingerprint pattern compared to 135 other B. burgdorferi sensu lato isolates. In this study, the isolate A14S was further characterized by protein analysis with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and reactivity with various monoclonal antibodies. In addition, the 16S rRNA, ospA, and ospC genes, as w...

  6. Caracterização e diversidade genética de cultivares de morangueiro Characterization and genetic diversity of strawberry cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizete Beatriz Radmann

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi caracterizar a diversidade genético-molecular, por marcadores RAPD, das dez principais cultivares de morangueiro utilizadas no País: Aromas, Bürkley, Camarosa, Campinas, Dover, Milsei-Tudla, Oso Grande, Santa Clara, Sweet Charlie e Vila Nova. O DNA foi extraído de folhas maduras, as análises RAPD foram realizadas com 26 primers e os produtos de amplificação separados por eletroforese. O coeficiente de Dice foi utilizado para estimar a similaridade genética entre as cultivares e o método UPGMA para gerar o fenograma por meio do NTSYS. Houve amplificação de fragmentos consistentes com 19 primers, tendo sido encontrado polimorfismo em 14. Dos 116 fragmentos gerados, 84 foram polimórficos. As cultivares foram classificadas em dois grupos principais quanto à similaridade genética: cultivares destinadas à industrialização (Bürkley, Santa Clara e Vila Nova e cultivares destinadas ao mercado in natura (demais cultivares. A similaridade foi menor no grupo das cultivares para consumo in natura (44-74%, o que ocorreu em função dos parentais serem diferentes. A maior similaridade genética ocorreu entre as cultivares de indústria Santa Clara e Vila Nova (98%, ambas obtidas pelo programa de melhoramento da Embrapa Clima Temperado, e provenientes dos mesmos parentais ('Konvoy-Cascata' e 'Lassen'. Padrões RAPD foram estabelecidos para a caracterização genética das dez cultivares de morangueiro estudadas.In this work we characterized the genetic-molecular diversity by RAPD markers of the main ten strawberry cultivars cultivated in Brazil: Aromas, Bürkley, Camarosa, Campinas, Dover, Milsei-Tudla, Oso Grande, Santa Clara, Sweet Charlie and Vila Nova. The DNA was extracted from mature leaves, the RAPD analysis were carried out with 26 primers and the amplification products were separated by electrophoreses. The coefficient of Dice was used to estimate the genetic similarity among the cultivars and the UPGMA

  7. The genetic, morphological, and physiological characterization of a dark larval cuticle mutation in the butterfly, Bicyclus anynana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Bear

    Full Text Available Studies on insect melanism have greatly contributed to our understanding of natural selection and the ultimate factors influencing the evolution of darkly pigmented phenotypes. Research on several species of melanic lepidopteran larvae have found that low levels of circulating juvenile hormone (JH titers are associated with a melanic phenotype, suggesting that genetic changes in the JH biosynthetic pathway give rise to increased deposition of melanin granules in the cuticle in this group. But does melanism arise through different molecular mechanisms in different species? The present study reports on a Bicyclus anynana (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae dark larvae single locus mutation, in which larvae exhibit a darker cuticle relative to wild type. Unlike other lepidopteran melanic larvae mutations, this one is autosomal recessive and does not appear to involve a deficiency in JH titers. Unlike JH deficiency mutants, dark larvae mutants display similar growth rates and sexual behaviors as wild type, and topical application of a JH analogue failed to rescue the wild type cuticular coloration. Finally, transmission electron microscopy showed that sclerotization or deposition of diffuse melanin, rather than deposition of melanin granules, produces the dark coloration found in the cuticle of this species. We conclude that different molecular mechanisms underlie larval melanism in different species of Lepidoptera.

  8. Genetic and Phenotypic Characterization of a Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Emerging Strain with Superior Intra-macrophage Replication Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shomer, Inna; Avisar, Alon; Desai, Prerak; Azriel, Shalhevet; Smollan, Gill; Belausov, Natasha; Keller, Nathan; Glikman, Daniel; Maor, Yasmin; Peretz, Avi; McClelland, Michael; Rahav, Galia; Gal-Mor, Ohad

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is one of the ubiquitous Salmonella serovars worldwide and a major cause of food-born outbreaks, which are often associated with poultry and poultry derivatives. Here we report a nation-wide S. Enteritidis clonal outbreak that occurred in Israel during the last third of 2015. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis and whole genome sequencing identified genetically related strains that were circulating in Israel as early as 2008. Global comparison linked this outbreak strain to several clinical and marine environmental isolates that were previously isolated in California and Canada, indicating that similar strains are prevalent outside of Israel. Phenotypic comparison between the 2015 outbreak strain and other clinical and reference S. Enteritidis strains showed only limited intra-serovar phenotypic variation in growth in rich medium, invasion into Caco-2 cells, uptake by J774.1A macrophages, and host cell cytotoxicity. In contrast, significant phenotypic variation was shown among different S. Enteritidis isolates when biofilm-formation, motility, invasion into HeLa cells and uptake by THP-1 human macrophages were studied. Interestingly, the 2015 outbreak clone was found to possess superior intra-macrophage replication ability within both murine and human macrophages in comparison to the other S. Enteritidis strains studied. This phenotype is likely to play a role in the virulence and host-pathogen interactions of this emerging clone.

  9. Genetic characterization and linkage disequilibrium mapping of resistance to gray leaf spot in maize(Zea mays L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liyu; Shi; Xiangling; Lv; Jianfeng; Weng; Hanyong; Zhu; Changlin; Liu; Zhuanfang; Hao; Yu; Zhou; Degui; Zhang; Mingshun; Li; Xiaoke; Ci; Xinhai; Li; Shihuang; Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Gray leaf spot(GLS),caused by Cercospora zeae-maydis,is an important foliar disease of maize(Zea mays L.)worldwide,resistance to which is controlled by multiple quantitative trait loci(QTL).To gain insights into the genetic architecture underlying the resistance to this disease,an association mapping population consisting of 161 inbred lines was evaluated for resistance to GLS in a plant pathology nursery at Shenyang in 2010 and 2011.Subsequently,a genome-wide association study,using 41,101 single-nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs),identified 51 SNPs significantly(P<0.001)associated with GLS resistance,which could be converted into 31 QTL.In addition,three candidate genes related to plant defense were identified,including nucleotidebinding-site/leucine-rich repeat,receptor-like kinase genes similar to those involved in basal defense.Two genic SNPs,PZE-103142893 and PZE-109119001,associated with GLS resistance in chromosome bins 3.07 and 9.07,can be used for marker-assisted selection(MAS)of GLS resistance.These results provide an important resource for developing molecular markers closely linked with the target trait,enhancing breeding efficiency.

  10. Genetic characterization of Lophopyrum elongatum salt tolerance and associated ion regulation as expressed in bread wheat. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-07

    Lophopyrum elongatum is a highly salt-tolerant relative of wheat. Its salt tolerance is partially expressed in the amphiploid from a cross between wheat cv. Chinese Spring and L. elongatum. Genetic studies showed that the tolerance of gradually imposed salt stress is controlled by L. elongatum chromosomes 3E, 4E, 5E, and 7E and the tolerance of suddenly imposed salt stress by chromosomes 3E, 5E, 6E, and 7E. In wheat, rye, barley, and Dasypyrum, chromosomes of the same homoeologous groups, 3, 5, 6, and 7, were found to control the tolerance of these stress regimes. To gain insight into the physiological mechanisms of salt tolerance by wheat and L. elongatum, accumulation of Na and K, 20 protein amino acids, glycinebetaine, aminobutyrate, all TCA cycle intermediates, oxalate, glycerol-3-P, glyceraldehyde-3-P, pyruvate, lactate, ornithine, taurine, glucose, sucrose and other sugars was examined in the amphiploid and Chinese Spring by gas chromatography and H-NMR.

  11. Genetic Characterization of Nematodirella cameli Based on 18S rDNA and Cytochrome c Oxidase Subunit 1 (CO1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan SHARIFIYAZDI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the phylogenic position and genetic diversity of Nematodirella cameli two portions of nuclear ribosomal DNA, 18S rDNA and mitochondrial DNA gene, the subunit 1 of cytochrome C oxidase gene (CO1 were sequenced and compared with those previously reported for other nematodes in Trichostrongylina. The phylogenetic trees constructed based upon the 18S rDNA sequences, yielded strong support for close relationship between the N. cameli and Nematodirus battus, with a high bootstrap value of 100%. In the present research, the level of sequence polymorphism among N. cameli isolates was higher for CO1 with 32 polymorphic sites compared to 18S rDNA sequence. Accordingly, molecular assays based on CO1 mitochondrial marker, demonstrated the existence of at least 11 distinct haplotypes (accession nos. JX305966 to JX305976 with an intraspecific diversity of 3-7% in Iran. Whereas, all of N. cameli samples examined herein (n=11, had a unique 18S sequence (accession no. JX305977. In addition, N. cameli CO1 sequences found in this study showed maximum identities to Haemonchus (88% and Ostertagia (87% in BLAST analysis for existing Trichostrongylina sequences. Further information is necessary to infer interspecific and intraspecific phylogenetic relationships between genera and species in Trichostrongylina. This study describes for the first time the nuclear 18S rDNA and mitochondrial CO1 sequence data from Nematodirella cameli species.

  12. Genetic Characterization and Relatedness among Cherry Cultivars in a Germplasm Bank by Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Moreno

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis was performed on 38 cultivars of cherry (Prunus avium L. grown in the Jerte Valley, Cáceres, Spain. Thirty five selected decamer primers produced 69 reproducible polymorphic amplification products. The degree of polymorphism detected made possible the identification of all the cultivars by combining the RAPD banding patterns of only seven primers: OPK-08, OPQ-14, OPR-09, OPS-19, OPX-02, OPX-15 and OPZ-13. Eleven unique markers allowed identification of nine cultivars while 15 cultivars were identified by unique banding patterns. A similarity matrix derived from the RAPD amplification products generated by all the primers was obtained using the index of similarity of Jaccard. The similarity coefficients among cultivars ranged from 0.27 to 0.81 with an average of 0.50. A dendrogram based on UPGMA clustering method was constructed using the similarity matrix. The dendrogram showed a good correlation between the clustering of cherry cultivars and their geographic origin, especially revealing a stronger genetic proximity between some of the most characteristic cultivars of the Jerte Valley. This result supports the autochthonous origin hypothesis for these cultivars.

  13. Genetic characterization of feline calicivirus strains associated with varying disease manifestations during an outbreak season in Missouri (1995-1996).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prikhodko, Victor G; Sandoval-Jaime, Carlos; Abente, Eugenio J; Bok, Karin; Parra, Gabriel I; Rogozin, Igor B; Ostlund, Eileen N; Green, Kim Y; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V

    2014-02-01

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) is a common cause of mild to severe upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) in cats. FCV strain 21223 was isolated from a kitten with severe pneumonia in a disease outbreak with unusually high mortality (35 %) that occurred in a Missouri feline colony in 1995-1996. Phylogenetic analysis of the genome sequence of strain 21223 indicated the emergence of a new FCV strain. Analysis of the full-length genome sequence of a closely related (99.5 % nucleotide identity) strain, 3786, obtained from an asymptomatic animal in the same colony four months later, showed the presence of seven amino acid substitutions, with six of them located in the VP1 capsid sequence encoded by ORF2. Comparative analysis of the E-region sequences (426-521 aa ORF2) presumably involved in virus-host cell receptor interactions did not identify amino acid substitutions unique to the virulent strain. We determined the complete genome sequences of four virus isolates that were collected in regional catteries in the months following the outbreak that were associated with different manifestations of the disease (URTD, chronic stomatitis, and gingivitis). We show that genetically distinct FCV strains were cocirculating in the area, and no apparent correlation could be made between overall sequence and observed disease. PMID:24217871

  14. Molecular characterization and genetic diversity analysis β-glucan content variability in grain of oat (Avena sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Nevena H.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In grain of ten genetically divergent oat cultivars (Merkur, Minor Abed, Flaming-Kurz, Nuptiele, Prode, Pellerva, Emperor, Astor, Osmo, Simo the variability β-glucan content were investigated. The different value of content of β-glucan was found. Among analyzed oat cultivars, the highest β- glucan contents had Pellerva (6.597%, while the least had Simo (2.971%. The contents of β-glucans were determined by ICC standard Method No 168. The value of β-glucans varied and indicated the differences and similarities between analysed cultivars. The degree of cultivar similarity was determined by dendrogram on which was discriminated two clusters of similar cultivars toward to contents of β-glucan . Within cluster 1, a small group of oats, are five cultivars with small distance (Merkur, Minor Abed, Flamings-Kurz, Nuptiele and Prode. The highest similarity in the range of 88 or the least distance in the range of 12. Within cluster 2 was four oat cultivars (Emperor, Astor, Osmo, Pellerva in which the least differences was between Emperor and Astor with average distance in range 27. Cluster 1 and cluster 2 differed with an average distance of 63. The cultivar Simo expressed the greatest distance to all analysed oat cultivars grouped in two clusters. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31092

  15. Allopatric speciation in ticks: genetic and reproductive divergence between geographic strains of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongejan Frans

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus, economically impact cattle industry in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The morphological and genetic differences among R. microplus strains have been documented in the literature, suggesting that biogeographical and ecological separation may have resulted in boophilid ticks from America/Africa and those from Australia being different species. To test the hypothesis of the presence of different boophilid species, herein we performed a series of experiments to characterize the reproductive performance of crosses between R. microplus from Australia, Africa and America and the genetic diversity of strains from Australia, Asia, Africa and America. Results The results showed that the crosses between Australian and Argentinean or Mozambican strains of boophilid ticks are infertile while crosses between Argentinean and Mozambican strains are fertile. These results showed that tick strains from Africa (Mozambique and America (Argentina are the same species, while ticks from Australia may actually represent a separate species. The genetic analysis of mitochondrial 12S and 16S rDNA and microsatellite loci were not conclusive when taken separately, but provided evidence that Australian tick strains were genetically different from Asian, African and American strains. Conclusion The results reported herein support the hypothesis that at least two different species share the name R. microplus. These species could be redefined as R. microplus (Canestrini, 1887 (for American and African strains and probably the old R. australis Fuller, 1899 (for Australian strains, which needs to be redescribed. However, experiments with a larger number of tick strains from different geographic locations are needed to corroborate these results.

  16. Molecular characterization and genetic diversity in an avocado collection of cultivars and local Spanish genotypes using SSRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz, M L; Hormaza, J I

    2007-12-01

    In this work, 75 avocado accessions maintained in an ex situ germplasm collection at the E.E. la Mayora in Málaga (Spain) were characterized with 16 microsatellites previously developed in this species. This avocado collection includes both local Spanish genotypes obtained through prospection and genotypes obtained by exchange with different countries. A total of 156 different amplification fragments were detected ranging from 4 to 16 per locus with an average of 9.75 alleles per locus. All the microsatellites were highly informative with an expected heterozygosity higher than 0.5 and a probability of identity below 0.36. The total probability of identity was 2.85x10(-14). Fifteen of the 16 loci studied showed a positive Wright's fixation index (F) indicating a deficit of heterozygotes with an average over all the SSRs of 0.18. A dendrogram was generated using UPGMA (unweighted pair group method with arithmetic averages) based on the Nei and Li similarity index. This dendrogram classified most of the genotypes analyzed into three major groups which mainly differed in racial origin although with low bootstrap support probably due to the presence of many interracial hybrids in the collection. All the genotypes studied could be unequivocally distinguished with the combination of SSRs used except some putative mutations of 'Hass' and an additional group of two cultivars. The results obtained indicate that the set of SSRs used is highly informative and are discussed in terms of their implications for avocado germplasm characterization and management.

  17. Genetic characterization of Xylella fastidiosa isolated from citrus and coffee plants Caracterização genética de Xylella fastidiosa isolada de plantas de citros e café

    OpenAIRE

    Vicente Savonitti Miranda; Paulo Roberto Silva Farias; Sérgio Rufo Roberto; Pedro Magalhães Lacava

    2007-01-01

    The Citrus Variegated Chlorosis and the Coffee Leaf Scorch are some of the many destructive diseases caused by Xylella fastidiosa, a gram-negative bacterium limited to the xylem of affected plants. As its genetic characterization is still not well established, different isolates of X. fastidiosa from citrus and coffee were evaluated through RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA) technique to characterize and classify these isolates based on similarity coefficients. Sixteen isolates of X. fas...

  18. Molecular Characterization of Subtype H11N9 Avian Influenza Virus Isolated from Shorebirds in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Hurtado

    Full Text Available Migratory aquatic birds play an important role in the maintenance and spread of avian influenza viruses (AIV. Many species of aquatic migratory birds tend to use similar migration routes, also known as flyways, which serve as important circuits for the dissemination of AIV. In recent years there has been extensive surveillance of the virus in aquatic birds in the Northern Hemisphere; however in contrast only a few studies have been attempted to detect AIV in wild birds in South America. There are major flyways connecting South America to Central and North America, whereas avian migration routes between South America and the remaining continents are uncommon. As a result, it has been hypothesized that South American AIV strains would be most closely related to the strains from North America than to those from other regions in the world. We characterized the full genome of three AIV subtype H11N9 isolates obtained from ruddy turnstones (Arenaria interpres on the Amazon coast of Brazil. For all gene segments, all three strains consistently clustered together within evolutionary lineages of AIV that had been previously described from aquatic birds in North America. In particular, the H11N9 isolates were remarkably closely related to AIV strains from shorebirds sampled at the Delaware Bay region, on the Northeastern coast of the USA, more than 5000 km away from where the isolates were retrieved. Additionally, there was also evidence of genetic similarity to AIV strains from ducks and teals from interior USA and Canada. These findings corroborate that migratory flyways of aquatic birds play an important role in determining the genetic structure of AIV in the Western hemisphere, with a strong epidemiological connectivity between North and South America.

  19. Aroma compounds generation in citrate metabolism of Enterococcus faecium: Genetic characterization of type I citrate gene cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Gabriela P; Quintana, Ingrid M; Espariz, Martín; Blancato, Victor S; Magni, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Enterococcus is one of the most controversial genera belonging to Lactic Acid Bacteria. Research involving this microorganism reflects its dual behavior as regards its safety. Although it has also been associated to nosocomial infections, natural occurrence of Enterococcus faecium in food contributes to the final quality of cheese. This bacterium is capable of fermenting citrate, which is metabolized to pyruvate and finally derives in the production of the aroma compounds diacetyl, acetoin and 2,3 butanediol. Citrate metabolism was studied in E. faecium but no data about genes related to these pathways have been described. A bioinformatic approach allowed us to differentiate cit(-) (no citrate metabolism genes) from cit(+) strains in E. faecium. Furthermore, we could classify them according to genes encoding for the transcriptional regulator, the oxaloacetate decarboxylase and the citrate transporter. Thus we defined type I organization having CitI regulator (DeoR family), CitM cytoplasmic soluble oxaloacetate decarboxylase (Malic Enzyme family) and CitP citrate transporter (2-hydroxy-carboxylate transporter family) and type II organization with CitO regulator (GntR family), OAD membrane oxaloacetate decarboxylase complex (Na(+)-transport decarboxylase enzyme family) and CitH citrate transporter (CitMHS family). We isolated and identified 17 E. faecium strains from regional cheeses. PCR analyses allowed us to classify them as cit(-) or cit(+). Within the latter classification we could differentiate type I but no type II organization. Remarkably, we came upon E. faecium GM75 strain which carries the insertion sequence IS256, involved in adaptative and evolution processes of bacteria related to Staphylococcus and Enterococcus genera. In this work we describe the differential behavior in citrate transport, metabolism and aroma generation of three strains and we present results that link citrate metabolism and genetic organizations in E. faecium for the first time.

  20. Characterization of pellicle inhibition in Gluconacetobacter xylinus 53582 by a small molecule, pellicin, identified by a chemical genetics screen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice L Strap

    Full Text Available Pellicin ([2E]-3-phenyl-1-[2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1,6-benzodioxocin-8-yl]prop-2-en-1-one was identified in a chemical genetics screen of 10,000 small molecules for its ability to completely abolish pellicle production in Gluconacetobacter xylinus. Cells grown in the presence of pellicin grew 1.5 times faster than untreated cells. Interestingly, growth in pellicin also caused G. xylinus cells to elongate. Measurement of cellulose synthesis in vitro showed that cellulose synthase activity was not directly inhibited by pellicin. Rather, when cellulose synthase activity was measured in cells that were pre-treated with the compound, the rate of cellulose synthesis increased eight-fold over that observed for untreated cells. This phenomenon was also apparent in the rapid production of cellulose when cells grown in the presence of pellicin were washed and transferred to media lacking the inhibitor. The rate at which cellulose was produced could not be accounted for by growth of the organism. Pellicin was not detected when intracellular contents were analyzed. Furthermore, it was found that pellicin exerts its effect extracellularly by interfering with the crystallization of pre-cellulosic tactoidal aggregates. This interference of the crystallization process resulted in enhanced production of cellulose II as evidenced by the ratio of acid insoluble to acid soluble product in in vitro assays and confirmed in vivo by scanning electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction. The relative crystallinity index, RCI, of pellicle produced by untreated G. xylinus cultures was 70% while pellicin-grown cultures had RCI of 38%. Mercerized pellicle of untreated cells had RCI of 42%, which further confirms the mechanism of action of pellicin as an inhibitor of the cellulose I crystallization process. Pellicin is a useful tool for the study of cellulose biosynthesis in G. xylinus.