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Sample records for amebicides

  1. Amebicidal activity of plant extracts from Southeast Asia on Acanthamoeba spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, D M; Miles, H; Toney, D; Ngyuen, C; Marciano-Cabral, F

    1998-09-01

    The effect of 100 polar and 100 nonpolar plant extract materials obtained from Southeast Asia were evaluated for amebicidal activity in vitro against three species of Acanthamoeba. A. culbertsoni, A. castellanii, and A. polyphaga, the causative agents of granulomatous amebic encephalitis and amebic keratitis, were studied in vitro to determine whether the plant extracts exhibited amebicidal activity or induced encystment of the amebae. Of the 200 plant extracts tested, extracts obtained from three plants (Ipomoea sp., Kaempferia galanga, and Cananga odorata) were amebicidal for all three species of Acanthamoeba and a fourth extract prepared from Gastrochilus panduratum was lytic for A. polyphaga and growth-inhibitory for A. castellanii and A. culbertsoni. Three plant extracts induced encystment of all three species of Acanthamoeba. Select plant extracts were tested as well for tumoricidal activity against B103 neuroblastoma cells. Some plant extracts that exhibited tumoricidal activity for B103 cells were not amebicidal for Acanthamoeba spp. Additionally, the polar and nonpolar extracts that exhibited amebicidal activity were also tested for activity against primary murine peritoneal macrophage cultures. Plant extracts that demonstrated tumoricidal or amebicidal activity were not lytic for normal macrophage cultures.

  2. Amebicidal activity of the essential oils of Lippia spp. (Verbenaceae) against Acanthamoeba polyphaga trophozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Israel Gomes de Amorim; Scher, Ricardo; Rott, Marilise Brittes; Menezes, Leociley Rocha; Costa, Emmanoel Vilaça; Cavalcanti, Sócrates Cabral de Holanda; Blank, Arie Fitzgerald; Aguiar, Jaciana dos Santos; da Silva, Teresinha Gonçalves; Dolabella, Silvio Santana

    2016-02-01

    Amoebic keratitis and granulomatous amoebic encephalitis are caused by some strains of free-living amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba. In the case of keratitis, one of the greatest problems is the disease recurrence due to the resistance of parasites, especially the cystic forms, to the drugs that are currently used. Some essential oils of plants have been used as potential active agents against this protist. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the amebicidal activity of essential oils from plants of the genus Lippia against Acanthamoeba polyphaga trophozoites. To that end, 8 × 10(4) trophozoites were exposed for 24 h to increasing concentrations of essential oils from Lippia sidoides, Lippia gracilis, Lippia alba, and Lippia pedunculosa and to their major compounds rotundifolone, carvone, and carvacrol. Nearly all concentrations of oils and compounds showed amebicidal activity. The IC50 values for L. sidoides, L. gracilis L. alba, and L. pedunculosa were found to be 18.19, 10.08, 31.79, and 71.47 μg/mL, respectively. Rotundifolone, carvacrol, and carvone were determined as the major compounds showing IC50 of 18.98, 24.74, and 43.62 μg/mL, respectively. With the exception of oil from L. alba, the other oils evaluated showed low cytotoxicity in the NCI-H292 cell line. Given these results, the oils investigated here are promising sources of compounds for the development of complementary therapy against amoebic keratitis and granulomatous amoebic encephalitis and can also be incorporated into cleaning solutions to increase their amebicidal efficiency.

  3. Isolation of nematicidal constituents from essential oil of Kaempferia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    long history of fragrance use to help restlessness, stress, anxiety and depression [13]. This herb has broad-spectrum biological activities including larvicidal [14], amebicidal [15], nematicidal [16-18], antimicrobial [19] and repellent effects [20]. However, to the best of our knowledge, there have been no reports to date.

  4. In vitro evaluation of the effectiveness of new water-stable cationic carbosilane dendrimers against Acanthamoeba castellanii UAH-T17c3 trophozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredero-Bermejo, I; Copa-Patiño, J L; Soliveri, J; García-Gallego, S; Rasines, B; Gómez, R; de la Mata, F J; Pérez-Serrano, J

    2013-03-01

    Acanthamoeba is one of the most common free-living amoebas which is widespread in the environment and can infect humans, causing diseases such as keratitis and encephalitis. In this paper we examine for the first time the amebicidal activity of the family of cationic dendrimers nG-[Si{(CH(2))(3)N(+)(Me)(Et)(CH(2))(2)NMe(3) (+)}2I(-)]( x ) (where n denotes the generations: zero (n = 0, x = 1), first (n = 1, x = 4), and second (n = 2, x = 8); for simplicity, they were named as 0G-CNN2, 1G-CNN8, and 2G-CNN16, respectively) against Acanthamoeba castellanii UAH-T17c3 trophozoites. In order to test the amebicidal activity, we cultured the strain A. castellanii UAH-T17c3 in PYG-Bactocasitone medium and later, we treated it with different concentrations of these dendrimers and monitored the effects and damage by optical count, flow cytometry, and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that all the nanosystems assayed had a strong amebicidal activity. The dendrimer 1G-CNN8 was the most effective against the amoeba. In the morphology of treated throphozoites of A. castellanii UAH-T17c3 analyzed by light and scanning electron microscopy techniques, morphological changes were evident in amoeba cells, such as loss of pseudopodia, ectoplasm increase, roundness, and cellular lysis. Furthermore, flow cytometry results showed alterations in cell granularity, which was dose-time dependent. In conclusion, this family of cationic carbosilane dendrimers has a strong amebicidal activity against the trophozoites of A. castellanii UAH-T17c3 in vitro. They could potentially become new agents significant to the development of new amebicidal compounds for prevention and therapy of Acanthamoeba infections.

  5. Effects of magainins on ameba and cyst stages of Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, F L; Jacob, L S

    1992-01-01

    Amebic keratitis produced by Acanthamoeba spp. is an increasingly important ocular infection in extended-use contact lens wearers. Problems associated with the infection are compounded by the lack of effective and well-tolerated chemotherapeutic agents. The magainins, a group of naturally occurring and synthetic membrane-active peptide compounds, have been shown to be active in vitro against a clinical isolate of Acanthamoeba polyphaga. Two magainins tested extensively had minimal inhibitory and minimal amebicidal values of 20 and 25 micrograms/ml for magainin MSI-103 and 25 and 40 micrograms/ml for magainin MSI-94, respectively. Both amebastatic and amebicidal activities are enhanced by combining the magainins with silver nitrate (200 micrograms/ml) and/or other marginally effective antimicrobial agents. These combinations have activity against both trophic and cystic stages in the Acanthamoeba life cycle and have promise as antimicrobial agents in the treatment of amebic keratitis. PMID:1416825

  6. Inhibition of Acanthamoeba species by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: rationale for their selective exclusion in corneal ulcers and contact lens care systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, M N; Perez, A A; Madayag, R M; Bottone, E J

    1993-01-01

    Cocultivation of Acanthamoeba castellanii and Acanthamoeba polyphaga with live Pseudomonas aeruginosa and with broth filtrates of P. aeruginosa proved equally lethal to the Acanthamoeba spp. The P. aeruginosa-induced amebicidal activity is apparently toxin mediated and has two operative modes: it can function through binding of P. aeruginosa to the ameba membrane and in the presence of one or more P. aeruginosa exoproducts. Images PMID:8349772

  7. In Vitro Efficacy of Ebselen and BAY 11-7082 Against Naegleria fowleri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjan Debnath

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM is a fatal infection caused by the free-living ameba Naegleria fowleri, popularly known as the “brain-eating ameba.” The drugs of choice in treating PAM are the antifungal amphotericin B and an antileishmanial miltefosine, but these are not FDA-approved for this indication and use of amphotericin B is associated with severe adverse effects. Moreover, very few patients treated with the combination therapy have survived PAM. Therefore, development of efficient drugs is a critical unmet need to avert future deaths of children. Since N. fowleri causes extensive inflammation in the brain it is important to select compounds that can enter brain to kill ameba. In this study, we identified two central nervous system (CNS active compounds, ebselen and BAY 11-7082 as amebicidal with EC50 of 6.2 and 1.6 μM, respectively. The closely related BAY 11-7085 was also found active against N. fowleri with EC50 similar to BAY 11-7082. We synthesized a soluble ebselen analog, which had amebicidal activity similar to ebselen. Transmission electron microscopy of N. fowleri trophozoites incubated for 48 h with EC50 concentration of ebselen showed alteration in the cytoplasmic membrane, loss of the nuclear membrane, and appearance of electron-dense granules. Incubation of N. fowleri trophozoites with EC50 concentrations of BAY 11-7082 and BAY 11-7085 for 48 h showed the presence of large lipid droplets in the cytoplasm, disruption of cytoplasmic and nuclear membranes and appearance of several vesicles and chromatin residues. Blood-brain barrier permeable amebicidal compounds have potential as new drug leads for Naegleria infection.

  8. In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Anjan; Nelson, Andrew T; Silva-Olivares, Angélica; Shibayama, Mineko; Siegel, Dionicio; McKerrow, James H

    2018-01-01

    Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a fatal infection caused by the free-living ameba Naegleria fowleri , popularly known as the "brain-eating ameba." The drugs of choice in treating PAM are the antifungal amphotericin B and an antileishmanial miltefosine, but these are not FDA-approved for this indication and use of amphotericin B is associated with severe adverse effects. Moreover, very few patients treated with the combination therapy have survived PAM. Therefore, development of efficient drugs is a critical unmet need to avert future deaths of children. Since N. fowleri causes extensive inflammation in the brain it is important to select compounds that can enter brain to kill ameba. In this study, we identified two central nervous system (CNS) active compounds, ebselen and BAY 11-7082 as amebicidal with EC 50 of 6.2 and 1.6 μM, respectively. The closely related BAY 11-7085 was also found active against N. fowleri with EC 50 similar to BAY 11-7082. We synthesized a soluble ebselen analog, which had amebicidal activity similar to ebselen. Transmission electron microscopy of N. fowleri trophozoites incubated for 48 h with EC 50 concentration of ebselen showed alteration in the cytoplasmic membrane, loss of the nuclear membrane, and appearance of electron-dense granules. Incubation of N. fowleri trophozoites with EC 50 concentrations of BAY 11-7082 and BAY 11-7085 for 48 h showed the presence of large lipid droplets in the cytoplasm, disruption of cytoplasmic and nuclear membranes and appearance of several vesicles and chromatin residues. Blood-brain barrier permeable amebicidal compounds have potential as new drug leads for Naegleria infection.

  9. In Vitro Efficacy of Ebselen and BAY 11-7082 Against Naegleria fowleri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Anjan; Nelson, Andrew T.; Silva-Olivares, Angélica; Shibayama, Mineko; Siegel, Dionicio; McKerrow, James H.

    2018-01-01

    Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a fatal infection caused by the free-living ameba Naegleria fowleri, popularly known as the “brain-eating ameba.” The drugs of choice in treating PAM are the antifungal amphotericin B and an antileishmanial miltefosine, but these are not FDA-approved for this indication and use of amphotericin B is associated with severe adverse effects. Moreover, very few patients treated with the combination therapy have survived PAM. Therefore, development of efficient drugs is a critical unmet need to avert future deaths of children. Since N. fowleri causes extensive inflammation in the brain it is important to select compounds that can enter brain to kill ameba. In this study, we identified two central nervous system (CNS) active compounds, ebselen and BAY 11-7082 as amebicidal with EC50 of 6.2 and 1.6 μM, respectively. The closely related BAY 11-7085 was also found active against N. fowleri with EC50 similar to BAY 11-7082. We synthesized a soluble ebselen analog, which had amebicidal activity similar to ebselen. Transmission electron microscopy of N. fowleri trophozoites incubated for 48 h with EC50 concentration of ebselen showed alteration in the cytoplasmic membrane, loss of the nuclear membrane, and appearance of electron-dense granules. Incubation of N. fowleri trophozoites with EC50 concentrations of BAY 11-7082 and BAY 11-7085 for 48 h showed the presence of large lipid droplets in the cytoplasm, disruption of cytoplasmic and nuclear membranes and appearance of several vesicles and chromatin residues. Blood-brain barrier permeable amebicidal compounds have potential as new drug leads for Naegleria infection. PMID:29559968

  10. Susceptibility of Acanthamoeba castellanii to contact lens disinfecting solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, S; Fiori, P L; Pinna, A; Usai, S; Carta, F; Fadda, G

    1995-01-01

    A corneal isolate of Acanthamoeba castellanii was exposed to commercial contact lens disinfecting solutions containing hydrogen peroxide, benzalkonium chloride, polyaminopropyl biguanide, polyquaternium 1, and chlorhexidine-thimerosal. The minimum trophozoite amebicidal concentration and exposure times required to kill trophozoites and cysts were determined. Solutions containing hydrogen peroxide or chlorhexidine-thimerosal were active against both trophozoites and cysts. The benzalkonium chloride-based solution was effective only against trophozoites. Solutions containing polyaminopropyl biguanide or polyquaternium 1 were completely ineffective. The need for adequate exposure times must be stressed. PMID:7492111

  11. Potential Value of Cellulose Synthesis Inhibitors Combined With PHMB in the Treatment of Acanthamoeba Keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Eun-Kyung; Hong, Yeonchul; Chung, Dong-Il; Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Kong, Hyun-Hee

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to improve the cytopathic effect (CPE) of antiamebic agents by combining with cellulose synthesis inhibitor as an encystation inhibitor. Cellulose synthesis inhibitors, 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB) and isoxaben were used to block encystation of Acanthamoeba during cultivation. Cultured human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells and Acanthamoeba were treated with polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) combined with cellulose synthesis inhibitors to evaluate the CPE as an antiamebic agent. 0.02% PHMB showed a 51.9% CPE on HCE cells within 30 minutes but exhibited significant toxic effects on Acanthamoeba. At a level of 0.00125%, PHMB had no significant CPEs on HCE cells, whereas 100 μM DCB and 10 μM isoxaben significantly inhibited the formation of the inner cyst wall of Acanthamoeba during encystation, and Acanthamoeba trophozoites failed to convert into mature cysts. Although a low concentration (0.00125%) of PHMB was used, the novel combinations with 100 μM DCB or 10 μM isoxaben had 23.4% or 18.7% additional amebicidal effects on Acanthamoeba. However, 100 μM DCB and 10 μM isoxaben had no CPEs on HCE cells. The combination of cellulose synthesis inhibitors with low concentrations of PHMB reduced the CPE on HCE cells and improved the amebicidal effect on Acanthamoeba by inhibition of encystation.

  12. Azole Antifungal Agents To Treat the Human Pathogens Acanthamoeba castellanii and Acanthamoeba polyphaga through Inhibition of Sterol 14α-Demethylase (CYP51).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, David C; Warrilow, Andrew G S; Rolley, Nicola J; Parker, Josie E; Nes, W David; Smith, Stephen N; Kelly, Diane E; Kelly, Steven L

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we investigate the amebicidal activities of the pharmaceutical triazole CYP51 inhibitors fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole against Acanthamoeba castellanii and Acanthamoeba polyphaga and assess their potential as therapeutic agents against Acanthamoeba infections in humans. Amebicidal activities of the triazoles were assessed by in vitro minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) determinations using trophozoites of A. castellanii and A. polyphaga. In addition, triazole effectiveness was assessed by ligand binding studies and inhibition of CYP51 activity of purified A. castellanii CYP51 (AcCYP51) that was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. Itraconazole and voriconazole bound tightly to AcCYP51 (dissociation constant [Kd] of 10 and 13 nM), whereas fluconazole bound weakly (Kd of 2,137 nM). Both itraconazole and voriconazole were confirmed to be strong inhibitors of AcCYP51 activity (50% inhibitory concentrations [IC50] of 0.23 and 0.39 μM), whereas inhibition by fluconazole was weak (IC50, 30 μM). However, itraconazole was 8- to 16-fold less effective (MIC, 16 mg/liter) at inhibiting A. polyphaga and A. castellanii cell proliferation than voriconazole (MIC, 1 to 2 mg/liter), while fluconazole did not inhibit Acanthamoeba cell division (MIC, >64 mg/liter) in vitro. Voriconazole was an effective inhibitor of trophozoite proliferation for A. castellanii and A. polyphaga; therefore, it should be evaluated in trials versus itraconazole for controlling Acanthamoeba infections. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Delivery of amphotericin B nanosuspensions to the brain and determination of activity against Balamuthia mandrillaris amebas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Andreas; Kiderlen, Albrecht F; Petri, Boris; Kayser, Oliver

    2010-08-01

    Amphotericin B was formulated as nanosuspensions to develop a nanoparticulate brain delivery system. Nanosuspensions were produced with different surfactant solutions by high-pressure homogenization and then characterized by laser diffractometry and photon correlation spectroscopy. Before in vitro and in vivo testing all nanosuspensions were investigated for protein adsorption by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to predict brain-targeting capacities. Selected nanosuspensions were tested for amebicidal activity against Balamuthia mandrillaris, an agent of lethal encephalitis. Our results indicate that nanosuspensions coated with polysorbate 80 and sodium cholate markedly increased drug brain delivery and inhibited the parasite in vitro, though less in vivo. From the clinical editor: The antifungal Amphotericin B was formulated as nanosuspensions to develop a nanoparticulate brain delivery system. The results indicate that nanosuspensions coated with polysorbate 80 and sodium cholate markedly increased drug brain delivery and inhibited the parasite in vitro, though less in vivo. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Keratitis caused by Acanthamoeba in patients with contact lenses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miguel, I; Ferrando, R; Santan, O E; Martín-Sánchez, A M

    1999-11-01

    Keratitis by Acanthamoeba is a severe infectious complication which may be derived from the use and bad preservation of contact lens. This disease la increasingly more frequent and rapid diagnosis and treatment condition the posterior evolution of the disease. The cases of 2 contact lens waters who developed keratitis by Acanthamoeba are presented. The diagnostic methods and treatment are commented upon. Keratitis by Acanthamoeba was diagnosed in 2 patients following analysis of corneal scrapings and of the saline solution used for lens maintenance. Trophozoites and cystes of this parasite were observed in all the samples processed. The evolution was good in the patient treated at 15 days after initiation of the symptoms. However, the evolution was very bad in the patient who delayed in initiating the amebicide treatment. Penetrating keratoplasty was performed in both patients. Specific treatment with derivates of propamidine implemented early may avoid severe ocular complications. As prophylaxis for contact lens users, it is recommended that the contact lens be maintained clean and correctly care for, and the use of home-made saline solutions which are easily contaminated by Acanthamoeba, should be avoided.

  15. In vitro efficacy of corifungin against Acanthamoeba castellanii trophozoites and cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Anjan; Tunac, Josefino B; Silva-Olivares, Angélica; Galindo-Gómez, Silvia; Shibayama, Mineko; McKerrow, James H

    2014-01-01

    Painful blinding keratitis and fatal granulomatous amebic encephalitis are caused by the free-living amebae Acanthamoeba spp. Several prescription eye medications are used to treat Acanthamoeba keratitis, but the infection can be difficult to control because of recurrence of infection. For the treatment of encephalitis, no single drug was found useful, and in spite of the use of a combination of multiple drugs, the mortality rate remains high. Therefore, efficient, novel drugs are urgently needed for the treatment of amebic keratitis and granulomatous amebic encephalitis. In this study, we identified corifungin, a water-soluble polyene macrolide, as amebicidal. In vitro, it was effective against both the trophozoites and the cysts. Transmission electron microscopy of Acanthamoeba castellanii incubated with corifungin showed the presence of swollen mitochondria, electron-dense granules, degeneration of cytoplasm architecture, and loss of nuclear chromatin structure. These changes were followed by lysis of amebae. Corifungin also induced the encystment process of A. castellanii. There were alterations in the cyst cell wall followed by lysis of the cysts. Corifungin is a promising therapeutic option for keratitis and granulomatous amebic encephalitis.

  16. [Investigation of the in vitro effects of Melissa officinalis L., Mentha x piperita L. and Ocimum basilicum L. (Lamiaceae) essential oils on the cysts and trophozoites of Acanthamoeba castellani].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergüden, Ceren; Özkoç, Soykan; Öztürk, Bintuğ; Bayram Delibaş, Songül

    2016-10-01

    Acanthamoeba species are free living amoeba found widely all over the world. They are responsible for Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK), an infection which is especially seen in contact lens users and after minor corneal traumas, that may lead blindness. At present, antifungals and antiseptics are used for the treatment of AK cases, however, some problems such as long treatment periods and the occurrence of side effects, resistance of cyst forms against drugs, emphasize the need for new drugs. There are some published studies that pointed out the effectiveness of plant extracts and essential oils on Acanthamoeba spp. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro effects of essential oils of Mentha x piperita L. (peppermint), Melissa officinalis L. (lemon balm) and Ocimum basilicum L. (basil) belonging to Lamiaceae family, on the cysts and trophozoites of Acanthamoeba castellanii. The strain used in our study, namely A. castellanii T4 genotype, is the most frequently isolated amoeba from environment and also the causative agent of AK and granulomatous amebic encephalitis. For the determination of amebicidal activity, essential oils obtained from Mentha x priperita L., Melissa officinalis L. and Ocimum basilicum L. by Neo-Clevenger type of distillation apparatus have been used. In vitro experiments were performed by using 96-well microplates. Cyst and trophozoite solutions were added on the essential oil dilutions to obtain the last concentrations of 40, 20, 10, 5, 2.5 and 1.25 µg/ml for the cysts, and 10, 5, 2.5, 1.25, 0.625 and 0.313 µg/ml for the trophozoites. After the incubation of microplates at 30oC for 1, 6, 24, 48 and 72 hours, the viability of parasitic forms were evaluated under the light microscope followed by staining trypan blue. It was found that, each essential oil showed amebicidal effect on A.castellani cysts and trophozoites dependent on dosage and time, when compared with the control group, The maximum lethal effect occured with Melissa