WorldWideScience

Sample records for ambulatory human motion

  1. Flexible Capacitive Electrodes for Minimizing Motion Artifacts in Ambulatory Electrocardiograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Su Lee

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes the use of flexible capacitive electrodes for reducing motion artifacts in a wearable electrocardiogram (ECG device. The capacitive electrodes have conductive foam on their surface, a shield, an optimal input bias resistor, and guarding feedback. The electrodes are integrated in a chest belt, and the acquired signals are transmitted wirelessly for ambulatory heart rate monitoring. We experimentally validated the electrode performance with subjects standing and walking on a treadmill at speeds of up to 7 km/h. The results confirmed the highly accurate heart rate detection capacity of the developed system and its feasibility for daily-life ECG monitoring.

  2. Ambulatory measurement of knee motion and physical activity: preliminary evaluation of a smart activity monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malchau Henrik

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is currently a paucity of devices available for continuous, long-term monitoring of human joint motion. Non-invasive, inexpensive devices capable of recording human activity and joint motion have many applications for medical research. Such a device could be used to quantify range of motion outside the gait laboratory. The purpose of this study was to test the accuracy of the modified Intelligent Device for Energy Expenditure and Activity (IDEEA in measuring knee flexion angles, to detect different physical activities, and to quantify how often healthy subjects use deep knee flexion in the ambulatory setting. Methods We compared Biomotion Laboratory (BML "gold standard" data to simultaneous IDEEA measures of knee motion and gait, step up/down, and stair descent in 5 healthy subjects. In addition, we used a series of choreographed physical activities outside the BML to confirm the IDEEA's ability to accurately measure 7 commonly-performed physical activities. Subjects then continued data collection during ordinary activities outside the gait laboratory. Results Pooled correlations between the BML and IDEEA knee flexion angles were .97 +/- .03 for step up/down, .98 +/- .02 for stair descent, and .98 +/- .01 for gait. In the BML protocol, the IDEEA accurately identified gait, but was less accurate in identifying step up/down and stair descent. During sampling outside the BML, the IDEEA accurately detected walking, running, stair ascent, stair descent, standing, lying, and sitting. On average, subjects flexed their knees >120° for 0.17% of their data collection periods outside the BML. Conclusion The modified IDEEA system is a useful clinical tool for evaluating knee motion and multiple physical activities in the ambulatory setting. These five healthy subjects rarely flexed their knees >120°.

  3. Motion Belts: Visualization of Human Motion Data on a Timeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Hiroshi; Kaihara, Ryota; Saito, Suguru; Nakajima, Masayuki

    Because motion capture system enabled us to capture a number of human motions, the demand for a method to easily browse the captured motion database has been increasing. In this paper, we propose a method to generate simple visual outlines of motion clips, for the purpose of efficient motion data browsing. Our method unfolds a motion clip into a 2D stripe of keyframes along a timeline that is based on semantic keyframe extraction and the best view point selection for each keyframes. With our visualization, timing and order of actions in the motions are clearly visible and the contents of multiple motions are easily comparable. In addition, because our method is applicable for a wide variety of motions, it can generate outlines for a large amount of motions fully automatically.

  4. Computer Vision Method in Human Motion Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Li; FANG Shuai; XU Xin-he

    2007-01-01

    Human motion detection based on computer vision is a frontier research topic and is causing an increasing attention in the field of computer vision research. The wavelet transform is used to sharpen the ambiguous edges in human motion image. The shadow's effect to the image processing is also removed. The edge extraction can be successfully realized.This is an effective method for the research of human motion analysis system.

  5. The Eigenmode Analysis of Human Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Juyong; Gonzalez, Marta C

    2016-01-01

    Rapid advances in modern communication technology are enabling the accumulation of large-scale, high-resolution observational data of spatiotemporal movements of humans. Classification and prediction of human mobility based on the analysis of such data carry great potential in applications such as urban planning as well as being of theoretical interest. A robust theoretical framework is therefore required to study and properly understand human motion. Here we perform the eigenmode analysis of human motion data gathered from mobile communication records, which allows us to explore the scaling properties and characteristics of human motion.

  6. Quantitative assessment of human motion using video motion analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probe, John D.

    1993-01-01

    In the study of the dynamics and kinematics of the human body a wide variety of technologies has been developed. Photogrammetric techniques are well documented and are known to provide reliable positional data from recorded images. Often these techniques are used in conjunction with cinematography and videography for analysis of planar motion, and to a lesser degree three-dimensional motion. Cinematography has been the most widely used medium for movement analysis. Excessive operating costs and the lag time required for film development, coupled with recent advances in video technology, have allowed video based motion analysis systems to emerge as a cost effective method of collecting and analyzing human movement. The Anthropometric and Biomechanics Lab at Johnson Space Center utilizes the video based Ariel Performance Analysis System (APAS) to develop data on shirtsleeved and space-suited human performance in order to plan efficient on-orbit intravehicular and extravehicular activities. APAS is a fully integrated system of hardware and software for biomechanics and the analysis of human performance and generalized motion measurement. Major components of the complete system include the video system, the AT compatible computer, and the proprietary software.

  7. Ambulatory Surgical Measures - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Ambulatory Surgical Center Quality Reporting (ASCQR) Program seeks to make care safer and more efficient through quality reporting. ASCs eligible for this...

  8. Ambulatory Surgical Measures - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Ambulatory Surgical Center Quality Reporting (ASCQR) Program seeks to make care safer and more efficient through quality reporting. ASCs eligible for this...

  9. Ambulatory Surgical Measures - Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Ambulatory Surgical Center Quality Reporting (ASCQR) Program seeks to make care safer and more efficient through quality reporting. ASCs eligible for this...

  10. Interactive inverse kinematics for human motion estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell-Nørregård, Morten Pol; Hauberg, Søren; Lapuyade, Jerome;

    2009-01-01

    We present an application of a fast interactive inverse kinematics method as a dimensionality reduction for monocular human motion estimation. The inverse kinematics solver deals efficiently and robustly with box constraints and does not suffer from shaking artifacts. The presented motion estimat...

  11. Predictive Navigation by Understanding Human Motion Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yun Chung

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available To make robots coexist and share the environments with humans, robots should understand the behaviors or the intentions of humans and further predict their motions. In this paper, an A*-based predictive motion planner is represented for navigation tasks. A generalized pedestrian motion model is proposed and trained by the statistical learning method. To deal with the uncertainty, a localization, tracking and prediction framework is also introduced. The corresponding recursive Bayesian formula represented as DBNs (Dynamic Bayesian Networks is derived for real time operation. Finally, the simulations and experiments are shown to validate the idea of this paper.

  12. An experimental characterization of human torso motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafolla, Daniele; Chen, I.-Ming; Ceccarelli, Marco

    2015-12-01

    The torso plays an important role in the human-like operation of humanoids. In this paper, a method is proposed to analyze the behavior of the human torso by using inertial and magnetic sensing tools. Experiments are conducted to characterize the motion performance of the human torso during daily routine operations. Furthermore, the forces acting on the human body during these operations are evaluated to design and validate the performance of a humanoid robot.

  13. Human Perception of Ambiguous Inertial Motion Cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guan-Lu

    2010-01-01

    Human daily activities on Earth involve motions that elicit both tilt and translation components of the head (i.e. gazing and locomotion). With otolith cues alone, tilt and translation can be ambiguous since both motions can potentially displace the otolithic membrane by the same magnitude and direction. Transitions between gravity environments (i.e. Earth, microgravity and lunar) have demonstrated to alter the functions of the vestibular system and exacerbate the ambiguity between tilt and translational motion cues. Symptoms of motion sickness and spatial disorientation can impair human performances during critical mission phases. Specifically, Space Shuttle landing records show that particular cases of tilt-translation illusions have impaired the performance of seasoned commanders. This sensorimotor condition is one of many operational risks that may have dire implications on future human space exploration missions. The neural strategy with which the human central nervous system distinguishes ambiguous inertial motion cues remains the subject of intense research. A prevailing theory in the neuroscience field proposes that the human brain is able to formulate a neural internal model of ambiguous motion cues such that tilt and translation components can be perceptually decomposed in order to elicit the appropriate bodily response. The present work uses this theory, known as the GIF resolution hypothesis, as the framework for experimental hypothesis. Specifically, two novel motion paradigms are employed to validate the neural capacity of ambiguous inertial motion decomposition in ground-based human subjects. The experimental setup involves the Tilt-Translation Sled at Neuroscience Laboratory of NASA JSC. This two degree-of-freedom motion system is able to tilt subjects in the pitch plane and translate the subject along the fore-aft axis. Perception data will be gathered through subject verbal reports. Preliminary analysis of perceptual data does not indicate that

  14. Robotics-based synthesis of human motion

    KAUST Repository

    Khatib, O.

    2009-05-01

    The synthesis of human motion is a complex procedure that involves accurate reconstruction of movement sequences, modeling of musculoskeletal kinematics, dynamics and actuation, and characterization of reliable performance criteria. Many of these processes have much in common with the problems found in robotics research. Task-based methods used in robotics may be leveraged to provide novel musculoskeletal modeling methods and physiologically accurate performance predictions. In this paper, we present (i) a new method for the real-time reconstruction of human motion trajectories using direct marker tracking, (ii) a task-driven muscular effort minimization criterion and (iii) new human performance metrics for dynamic characterization of athletic skills. Dynamic motion reconstruction is achieved through the control of a simulated human model to follow the captured marker trajectories in real-time. The operational space control and real-time simulation provide human dynamics at any configuration of the performance. A new criteria of muscular effort minimization has been introduced to analyze human static postures. Extensive motion capture experiments were conducted to validate the new minimization criterion. Finally, new human performance metrics were introduced to study in details an athletic skill. These metrics include the effort expenditure and the feasible set of operational space accelerations during the performance of the skill. The dynamic characterization takes into account skeletal kinematics as well as muscle routing kinematics and force generating capacities. The developments draw upon an advanced musculoskeletal modeling platform and a task-oriented framework for the effective integration of biomechanics and robotics methods.

  15. National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) is designed to collect data on the utilization and provision of ambulatory care services in hospital...

  16. Predicting Articulated Human Motion from Spatial Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauberg, Søren; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup

    2011-01-01

    We present a probabilistic interpretation of inverse kinematics and extend it to sequential data. The resulting model is used to estimate articulated human motion in visual data. The approach allows us to express the prior temporal models in spatial limb coordinates, which is in contrast to most...

  17. Human v6: the medial motion area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitzalis, S; Sereno, M I; Committeri, G; Fattori, P; Galati, G; Patria, F; Galletti, C

    2010-02-01

    Cortical-surface-based functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging mapping techniques and wide-field retinotopic stimulation were used to verify the presence of pattern motion sensitivity in human area V6. Area V6 is highly selective for coherently moving fields of dots, both at individual and group levels and even with a visual stimulus of standard size. This stimulus is a functional localizer for V6. The wide retinotopic stimuli used here also revealed a retinotopic map in the middle temporal cortex (area MT/V5) surrounded by several polar-angle maps that resemble the mosaic of small areas found around macaque MT/V5. Our results suggest that the MT complex (MT+) may be specialized for the analysis of motion signals, whereas area V6 may be more involved in distinguishing object and self-motion.

  18. Model of human visual-motion sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, A. B.; Ahumada, A. J., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A model of how humans sense the velocity of moving images is proposed. The model exploits constraints provided by human psychophysics, notably that motion-sensing elements appear tuned for two-dimensional spatial frequency, and by the frequency spectrum of a moving image, namely, that its support lies in the plane in which the temporal frequency equals the dot product of the spatial frequency and the image velocity. The first stage of the model is a set of spatial-frequency-tuned, direction-selective linear sensors. The temporal frequency of the response of each sensor is shown to encode the component of the image velocity in the sensor direction. At the second stage, these components are resolved in order to measure the velocity of image motion at each of a number of spatial locations and spatial frequencies. The model has been applied to several illustrative examples, including apparent motion, coherent gratings, and natural image sequences. The model agrees qualitatively with human perception.

  19. Effects of sodium intake on cardiovascular variables in humans during posture changes and ambulatory conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Morten; Gabrielsen, Anders; Heer, Martina;

    2002-01-01

    and controlled laboratory conditions at the end of two consecutive 5-day periods with sodium intakes of 70 (low) and 250 (high) mmol/24 h or vice versa, respectively. Comparing high and low sodium intake, plasma volume and plasma protein concentrations were 9 and 8% higher in the seated and the supine position......The hypothesis was tested that cardiac output (CO) and stroke volume (SV) are increased by a moderate physiological elevation in sodium intake with a more pronounced effect in the ambulatory upright seated than supine position. Fourteen healthy males were investigated during ambulatory......, respectively. When seated during laboratory conditions, CO was 5.3 +/- 0.2 l/min on the high sodium intake vs. 4.8 +/- 0.2 l/min on the low (P intake...

  20. Human Muscle Fatigue Model in Dynamic Motions

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Ruina; Bennis, Fouad; Ma, Liang

    2012-01-01

    Human muscle fatigue is considered to be one of the main reasons for Musculoskeletal Disorder (MSD). Recent models have been introduced to define muscle fatigue for static postures. However, the main drawbacks of these models are that the dynamic effect of the human and the external load are not taken into account. In this paper, each human joint is assumed to be controlled by two muscle groups to generate motions such as push/pull. The joint torques are computed using Lagrange's formulation to evaluate the dynamic factors of the muscle fatigue model. An experiment is defined to validate this assumption and the result for one person confirms its feasibility. The evaluation of this model can predict the fatigue and MSD risk in industry production quickly.

  1. Ambulatory electrocardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Iñaki

    2013-01-01

    About 50 years ago, Norman Jefferis Holter invented a device that opened the possibility of recording heart activity over long periods of time. This invention, together with the rapid developments in electronics, has enabled a revolutionary change in the diagnosis and management of cardiac diseases. Ambulatory cardiac monitors have decreased in size to the point of becoming wearable or implantable and are able to monitor heart activity for months or even years. In addition, new telecommunication systems allow clinicians to remotely access cardiac events and to respond within a short period of time. Novel advances in computing and algorithm development are expanding the clinical applications of ambulatory devices with more complex automatic interpretation of the electrocardiographic signal. This article reviews the state of the art of these techniques from both clinical and technical approaches, covering a historic perspective up to today, and discusses current applications, challenges, and future directions. PMID:23422020

  2. Delayed Response to Animate Implied Motion in Human Motion Processing Areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorteije, Jeannette A.M.; Kenemans, J. Leon; Jellema, Tjeerd; Lubbe, van der Rob H.J.; Heer, de Frederiek; Wezel, van Richard J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Viewing static photographs of objects in motion evokes higher fMRI activation in the human medial temporal complex (MT+) than looking at similar photographs without this implied motion. As MT+ is traditionally thought to be involved in motion perception (and not in form perception), this finding sug

  3. Delayed response to animate implied motion in human motion processing areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorteije, J.A.M.; Kenemans, J.L.; Jellema, T.; Lubbe, R.H.J. van der; Heer, F. de; Wezel, R.J.A. van

    2006-01-01

    Viewing static photographs of objects in motion evokes higher fMRI activation in the human medial temporal complex (MT+) than looking at similar photographs without this implied motion. As MT+ is traditionally thought to be involved in motion perception (and not in form perception), this finding sug

  4. Measurement and Quantification of Gross Human Shoulder Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy T. Newkirk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The shoulder girdle plays an important role in the large pointing workspace that humans enjoy. The goal of this work was to characterize the human shoulder girdle motion in relation to the arm. The overall motion of the human shoulder girdle was characterized based on motion studies completed on test subjects during voluntary (natural/unforced motion. The collected data from the experiments were used to develop surface fit equations that represent the position and orientation of the glenohumeral joint for a given humeral pointing direction. These equations completely quantify gross human shoulder girdle motion relative to the humerus. The equations are presented along with goodness-of-fit results that indicate the equations well approximate the motion of the human glenohumeral joint. This is the first time the motion has been quantified for the entire workspace, and the equations provide a reference against which to compare future work.

  5. Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Webinars Publications & Resources Clinical Practice Guidelines SAMBA Link Digital ... We Represent Ambulatory and Office-Based Anesthesia The Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia provides educational opportunities, encourages research ...

  6. Perception of complex motion in humans and pigeons (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nankoo, Jean-François; Madan, Christopher R; Spetch, Marcia L; Wylie, Douglas R

    2014-06-01

    In the primate visual system, local motion signals are pooled to create a global motion percept. Like primates, many birds are highly dependent on vision for their survival, yet relatively little is known about motion perception in birds. We used random-dot stimuli to investigate pigeons' ability to detect complex motion (radial, rotation, and spiral) compared to humans. Our human participants had a significantly lower threshold for rotational and radial motion when compared to spiral motion. The data from the pigeons, however, showed that the pigeons were most sensitive to rotational motion and least sensitive to radial motion, while sensitivity for spiral motion was intermediate. We followed up the pigeon results with an investigation of the effect of display aperture shape for rotational motion and velocity gradient for radial motion. We found no effect of shape of the aperture on thresholds, but did observe that radial motion containing accelerating dots improved thresholds. However, this improvement did not reach the thresholds levels observed for rotational motion. In sum, our experiments demonstrate that the pooling mechanism in the pigeon motion system is most efficient for rotation.

  7. Survey on Human Motion Detection In Static Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Merin Kuriakose

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, computer vision has increasingly focused on building systems for observing humans and understanding their looks, activity, and behavior providing advanced interfaces for interacting with human beings, and creating models of humans for various purposes. For any of the system to function, it requires methods for detecting people from a given input video or a image. Visual analysis of human motion is presently one of the most active research topics in computer vision. Here the moving human body detection is the most important part of the human body motion analysis, thus the need of human body motion detection is to detect the moving human body from the background image in video sequences, and for the follow-up treatment like target classification, human motion tracking and behavior understanding and its effective detection plays an important role. Human motion analyses are concerned with the detection, tracking and recognition of human behaviors. According to the result of human motion detection research on video sequences, this paper presents a new algorithm for detecting human motion from a static background based on background subtraction.

  8. Humans deceived by predatory stealth strategy camouflaging motion.

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Andrew James; McOwan, Peter William

    2003-01-01

    Motion camouflage is a stealth strategy that allows a predator to conceal its apparent motion as it approaches a moving prey. Although male hoverflies have been observed to move in a manner consistent with motion camouflage to track females, the successful application of the technique has not previously been demonstrated. This article describes the implementation and results of a psychophysical experiment suggesting that humans are susceptible to motion camouflage. The experiment masqueraded ...

  9. HCUP State Ambulatory Surgery Databases (SASD) - Restricted Access Files

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The State Ambulatory Surgery Databases (SASD) contain the universe of hospital-based ambulatory surgery encounters in participating States. Some States include...

  10. Electric Wheelchair Controlled by Human Body Motion Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Sho; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Ohyama, Yasuhiro; She, Jin-Hua

    This research studies the possibility of an intuitive interface for an electric wheelchair by using human body except hands. For this purpose, we focused on the human body motion which has relation to actions or behavior. This motion comes from the human stabilization function for holding expectable collapsing caused by voluntary motion. Thus this motion is considered as a kind of characteristics of human motion, and is linked to intentions unconsciously. Therefore, the interface which does not require conscious and complex motion is realized by applying this human body motion to the interface of electric wheelchair. In this paper, first, we did experiment to search a part which vividly shows the pressure change on the seat. As a result, it was confirmed that pressure change of the seat back vividly shows the human body motion. Next, we designed the prototype based on this evidence. Finally, experiment was conducted by using 10 subjects and SD method to evaluate feeling of operation. For this result, it was turned out that all subjects feel that proposed interface was intuitive, or to control at their direction. Therefore it was confirmed that human body motion interface has a possibility to be used for an interface of electric wheelchair.

  11. Interactive Low-Dimensional Human Motion Synthesis by Combining Motion Models and PIK

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Schubert; Boulic, Ronan; Thalmann, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the issue of interactive low-dimensional human motion synthesis. We compare the performances of two motion models, i.e. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) or Probabilistic PCA (PPCA), for solving a constrained optimization problem within a low-dimensional latent space. We use PCA or PPCA as a first step of preprocessing to reduce the dimensionality of the database to make it tractable, and to encapsulate only the essential aspects of a specific motion pattern. Interactive...

  12. Ubiquitous human upper-limb motion estimation using wearable sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Wong, Wai-Choong; Wu, Jian-Kang

    2011-07-01

    Human motion capture technologies have been widely used in a wide spectrum of applications, including interactive game and learning, animation, film special effects, health care, navigation, and so on. The existing human motion capture techniques, which use structured multiple high-resolution cameras in a dedicated studio, are complicated and expensive. With the rapid development of microsensors-on-chip, human motion capture using wearable microsensors has become an active research topic. Because of the agility in movement, upper-limb motion estimation has been regarded as the most difficult problem in human motion capture. In this paper, we take the upper limb as our research subject and propose a novel ubiquitous upper-limb motion estimation algorithm, which concentrates on modeling the relationship between upper-arm movement and forearm movement. A link structure with 5 degrees of freedom (DOF) is proposed to model the human upper-limb skeleton structure. Parameters are defined according to Denavit-Hartenberg convention, forward kinematics equations are derived, and an unscented Kalman filter is deployed to estimate the defined parameters. The experimental results have shown that the proposed upper-limb motion capture and analysis algorithm outperforms other fusion methods and provides accurate results in comparison to the BTS optical motion tracker.

  13. Using Human Motion Intensity as Input for Urban Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Esben Skouboe; Andersen, Hans Jørgen; Gade, Rikke;

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a study investigating the potential use of human motion intensities as input for parametric urban design. Through a computer vision analysis of thermal images, motion intensity maps are generated and utilized as design drivers for urban design patterns; and, through a case stu...

  14. Marker-Free Human Motion Capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grest, Daniel

    of correspondences, which are used simultaneously in the estimation without making approximations to the motion or optimization function, namely 3D-3D correspondences from stereo algorithms and 3D-2D correspondences from image silhouettes and 2D point tracking....

  15. Sensing human hand motions for controlling dexterous robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Beth A.; Churchill, Philip J.; Little, Arthur D.

    1988-01-01

    The Dexterous Hand Master (DHM) system is designed to control dexterous robot hands such as the UTAH/MIT and Stanford/JPL hands. It is the first commercially available device which makes it possible to accurately and confortably track the complex motion of the human finger joints. The DHM is adaptable to a wide variety of human hand sizes and shapes, throughout their full range of motion.

  16. Biodynamics of deformable human body motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, A. M.; Huston, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The objective is to construct a framework wherein the various models of human biomaterials fit in order to describe the biodynamic response of the human body. The behavior of the human body in various situations, from low frequency, low amplitude vibrations to impact loadings in automobile and aircraft crashes, is very complicated with respect to all aspects of the problem: materials, geometry and dynamics. The materials problem is the primary concern, but the materials problem is intimately connected with geometry and dynamics.

  17. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) is a national survey designed to meet the need for objective, reliable information about the provision and use...

  18. A New Paradigm For Testing Human And Machine Motion Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathomas, Thomas V.; Gorea, Andrei

    1989-08-01

    We present a new paradigm for studying motion perception. This approach is based on a class of stimuli that we devised for testing the relative strength of stimulus attributes (luminance, color, spatial frequency, orientation, binocular disparity, etc.) in eliciting motion perception by correspondence matching. In this class of stimuli, different attributes are matched simultaneously in the spatio-temporal domain in a systematic, algorithmic manner which allows each attribute to produce motion in an arbitrary direction (if, of course, it is a token for movement perception), independently of the other attributes. This results in animation sequences in which many different motion paths may co-exist, each path due to a different attribute. Such an arrangement allows a direct comparison of the strength of attributes in eliciting movement. Results from psychophysical experiments based on our paradigm can be used to develop complex motion detection models for machine vision systems which attempt to approximate human performance. Similar methods are discussed for studying stereopsis mechanisms.

  19. Human motion estimation with multiple frequency modulated continuous wave radars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorp, Ph. van; Groen, F.C.A.

    2010-01-01

    Human motion estimation is an important issue in automotive, security or home automation applications. Radar systems are well suited for this because they are robust, are independent of day or night conditions and have accurate range and speed domain. The human response in a radar range-speed-time m

  20. Indoor Localization Algorithms for an Ambulatory Human Operated 3D Mobile Mapping System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Corso

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Indoor localization and mapping is an important problem with many applications such as emergency response, architectural modeling, and historical preservation. In this paper, we develop an automatic, off-line pipeline for metrically accurate, GPS-denied, indoor 3D mobile mapping using a human-mounted backpack system consisting of a variety of sensors. There are three novel contributions in our proposed mapping approach. First, we present an algorithm which automatically detects loop closure constraints from an occupancy grid map. In doing so, we ensure that constraints are detected only in locations that are well conditioned for scan matching. Secondly, we address the problem of scan matching with poor initial condition by presenting an outlier-resistant, genetic scan matching algorithm that accurately matches scans despite a poor initial condition. Third, we present two metrics based on the amount and complexity of overlapping geometry in order to vet the estimated loop closure constraints. By doing so, we automatically prevent erroneous loop closures from degrading the accuracy of the reconstructed trajectory. The proposed algorithms are experimentally verified using both controlled and real-world data. The end-to-end system performance is evaluated using 100 surveyed control points in an office environment and obtains a mean accuracy of 10 cm. Experimental results are also shown on three additional datasets from real world environments including a 1500 meter trajectory in a warehouse sized retail shopping center.

  1. Indoor Localization Algorithms for an Ambulatory Human Operated 3D Mobile Mapping System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corso, N; Zakhor, A

    2013-12-03

    Indoor localization and mapping is an important problem with many applications such as emergency response, architectural modeling, and historical preservation. In this paper, we develop an automatic, off-line pipeline for metrically accurate, GPS-denied, indoor 3D mobile mapping using a human-mounted backpack system consisting of a variety of sensors. There are three novel contributions in our proposed mapping approach. First, we present an algorithm which automatically detects loop closure constraints from an occupancy grid map. In doing so, we ensure that constraints are detected only in locations that are well conditioned for scan matching. Secondly, we address the problem of scan matching with poor initial condition by presenting an outlier-resistant, genetic scan matching algorithm that accurately matches scans despite a poor initial condition. Third, we present two metrics based on the amount and complexity of overlapping geometry in order to vet the estimated loop closure constraints. By doing so, we automatically prevent erroneous loop closures from degrading the accuracy of the reconstructed trajectory. The proposed algorithms are experimentally verified using both controlled and real-world data. The end-to-end system performance is evaluated using 100 surveyed control points in an office environment and obtains a mean accuracy of 10 cm. Experimental results are also shown on three additional datasets from real world environments including a 1500 meter trajectory in a warehouse sized retail shopping center.

  2. Design of Robotic Arm Control System Mimics Human Arm Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Salam Al-Ammri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a control system to make the robotic hand mimic human hand motion in real time and offline mode. The human hand tracking system is a wearable sensing arm (potentiometers used to determine the position in space and to sense the grasping task of human hand. The maskable sensing arm was designed with same geometrical arrangement of robotic hand that needs to be controlled. The control software of a robot was implemented using Visual Basic and supported with graphical user interface (GUI. The control algorithm depends on joint to joint mapping method to match between the motions at each joint of portable sensing arm with corresponding joint of a robot in order to make the robot mimic the motion.

  3. Self-motion facilitates echo-acoustic orientation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallmeier, Ludwig; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2014-11-01

    The ability of blind humans to navigate complex environments through echolocation has received rapidly increasing scientific interest. However, technical limitations have precluded a formal quantification of the interplay between echolocation and self-motion. Here, we use a novel virtual echo-acoustic space technique to formally quantify the influence of self-motion on echo-acoustic orientation. We show that both the vestibular and proprioceptive components of self-motion contribute significantly to successful echo-acoustic orientation in humans: specifically, our results show that vestibular input induced by whole-body self-motion resolves orientation-dependent biases in echo-acoustic cues. Fast head motions, relative to the body, provide additional proprioceptive cues which allow subjects to effectively assess echo-acoustic space referenced against the body orientation. These psychophysical findings clearly demonstrate that human echolocation is well suited to drive precise locomotor adjustments. Our data shed new light on the sensory-motor interactions, and on possible optimization strategies underlying echolocation in humans. PMID:26064556

  4. Human Motion Energy Harvesting for AAL Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development into the topic of ambient assisted living has led to an increasing range of devices that facilitate a person's life. The issue of the power supply of these modern mobile systems however has not been solved satisfactorily yet. In this paper a flat inductive multi-coil harvester for integration into the shoe sole is presented. The device is designed for ambient assisted living (AAL) applications and particularly to power a self-lacing shoe. The harvester exploits the horizontal swing motion of the foot to generate energy. Stacks of opposing magnets move through a number of equally spaced coils to induce a voltage. The requirement of a flat structure which can be integrated into the shoe sole is met by a reduced form factor of the magnet stack. In order to exploit the full width of the shoe sole, supporting structures are used to parallelize the harvester and therefore increase the number of active elements, i.e. magnets and coils. The development and characterization of different harvester variations is presented with the best tested design generating an average power of up to 2.14 mW at a compact device size of 75 × 41.5 × 15 mm3 including housing

  5. Recurrence plots and recurrence quantification analysis of human motion data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josiński, Henryk; Michalczuk, Agnieszka; Świtoński, Adam; Szczesna, Agnieszka; Wojciechowski, Konrad

    2016-06-01

    The authors present exemplary application of recurrence plots, cross recurrence plots and recurrence quantification analysis for the purpose of exploration of experimental time series describing selected aspects of human motion. Time series were extracted from treadmill gait sequences which were recorded in the Human Motion Laboratory (HML) of the Polish-Japanese Academy of Information Technology in Bytom, Poland by means of the Vicon system. Analysis was focused on the time series representing movements of hip, knee, ankle and wrist joints in the sagittal plane.

  6. An Embedded System for Tracking Human Motion and Humanoid Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-June Tsai

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is using embedded CPU to develop a human motion tracking system and construct a motion replication interface for a humanoid robot. In the motion tracking system, we use a CPLD (Complex Programmable Logic Device which is built in a central control unit (CCU to generate synchronous signals for all the periphery devices and control the data flow from CCD boards to a PC via a USB chip. An embedded DSP on the CCD board is adopted to control the CCD exposure and conduct image processing. The peak position of exposure was computed by the on-board DSP within sub-pixel accuracy. In the construction of a motion replication interface, the same CCU is used to generate the PWM signals to drive the motors of the humanoid robot. All of the respective firmware coding methods are discussed in this article.

  7. A Self-Powered Insole for Human Motion Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yingzhou; Cao, Yalu; Zhao, Jingjing; Yin, Yajiang; Ye, Liangchen; Wang, Xiaofeng; You, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Biomechanical energy harvesting is a feasible solution for powering wearable sensors by directly driving electronics or acting as wearable self-powered sensors. A wearable insole that not only can harvest energy from foot pressure during walking but also can serve as a self-powered human motion recognition sensor is reported. The insole is designed as a sandwich structure consisting of two wavy silica gel film separated by a flexible piezoelectric foil stave, which has higher performance compared with conventional piezoelectric harvesters with cantilever structure. The energy harvesting insole is capable of driving some common electronics by scavenging energy from human walking. Moreover, it can be used to recognize human motion as the waveforms it generates change when people are in different locomotion modes. It is demonstrated that different types of human motion such as walking and running are clearly classified by the insole without any external power source. This work not only expands the applications of piezoelectric energy harvesters for wearable power supplies and self-powered sensors, but also provides possible approaches for wearable self-powered human motion monitoring that is of great importance in many fields such as rehabilitation and sports science. PMID:27649188

  8. A Self-Powered Insole for Human Motion Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingzhou Han

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Biomechanical energy harvesting is a feasible solution for powering wearable sensors by directly driving electronics or acting as wearable self-powered sensors. A wearable insole that not only can harvest energy from foot pressure during walking but also can serve as a self-powered human motion recognition sensor is reported. The insole is designed as a sandwich structure consisting of two wavy silica gel film separated by a flexible piezoelectric foil stave, which has higher performance compared with conventional piezoelectric harvesters with cantilever structure. The energy harvesting insole is capable of driving some common electronics by scavenging energy from human walking. Moreover, it can be used to recognize human motion as the waveforms it generates change when people are in different locomotion modes. It is demonstrated that different types of human motion such as walking and running are clearly classified by the insole without any external power source. This work not only expands the applications of piezoelectric energy harvesters for wearable power supplies and self-powered sensors, but also provides possible approaches for wearable self-powered human motion monitoring that is of great importance in many fields such as rehabilitation and sports science.

  9. A Self-Powered Insole for Human Motion Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yingzhou; Cao, Yalu; Zhao, Jingjing; Yin, Yajiang; Ye, Liangchen; Wang, Xiaofeng; You, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Biomechanical energy harvesting is a feasible solution for powering wearable sensors by directly driving electronics or acting as wearable self-powered sensors. A wearable insole that not only can harvest energy from foot pressure during walking but also can serve as a self-powered human motion recognition sensor is reported. The insole is designed as a sandwich structure consisting of two wavy silica gel film separated by a flexible piezoelectric foil stave, which has higher performance compared with conventional piezoelectric harvesters with cantilever structure. The energy harvesting insole is capable of driving some common electronics by scavenging energy from human walking. Moreover, it can be used to recognize human motion as the waveforms it generates change when people are in different locomotion modes. It is demonstrated that different types of human motion such as walking and running are clearly classified by the insole without any external power source. This work not only expands the applications of piezoelectric energy harvesters for wearable power supplies and self-powered sensors, but also provides possible approaches for wearable self-powered human motion monitoring that is of great importance in many fields such as rehabilitation and sports science. PMID:27649188

  10. Decoding the direction of auditory motion in blind humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolbers, Thomas; Zahorik, Pavel; Giudice, Nicholas A

    2011-05-15

    Accurate processing of nonvisual stimuli is fundamental to humans with visual impairments. In this population, moving sounds activate an occipito-temporal region thought to encompass the equivalent of monkey area MT+, but it remains unclear whether the signal carries information beyond the mere presence of motion. To address this important question, we tested whether the processing in this region retains functional properties that are critical for accurate motion processing and that are well established in the visual modality. Specifically, we focussed on the property of 'directional selectivity', because MT+ neurons in non-human primates fire preferentially to specific directions of visual motion. Recent neuroimaging studies have revealed similar properties in sighted humans by successfully decoding different directions of visual motion from fMRI activation patterns. Here we used fMRI and multivariate pattern classification to demonstrate that the direction in which a sound is moving can be reliably decoded from dorsal occipito-temporal activation in the blind. We also show that classification performance is at chance (i) in a control region in posterior parietal cortex and (ii) when motion information is removed and subjects only hear a sequence of static sounds presented at the same start and end positions. These findings reveal that information about the direction of auditory motion is present in dorsal occipito-temporal responses of blind humans. As such, this area, which appears consistent with the hMT+ complex in the sighted, provides crucial information for the generation of a veridical percept of moving non-visual stimuli. PMID:20451630

  11. Human behavioral regularity, fractional Brownian motion, and exotic phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohui; Yang, Guang; An, Kenan; Huang, Jiping

    2016-08-01

    The mix of competition and cooperation (C&C) is ubiquitous in human society, which, however, remains poorly explored due to the lack of a fundamental method. Here, by developing a Janus game for treating C&C between two sides (suppliers and consumers), we show, for the first time, experimental and simulation evidences for human behavioral regularity. This property is proved to be characterized by fractional Brownian motion associated with an exotic transition between periodic and nonperiodic phases. Furthermore, the periodic phase echoes with business cycles, which are well-known in reality but still far from being well understood. Our results imply that the Janus game could be a fundamental method for studying C&C among humans in society, and it provides guidance for predicting human behavioral activity from the perspective of fractional Brownian motion.

  12. 3D Reconstruction of Human Motion from Monocular Image Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandt, Bastian; Ackermann, Hanno; Rosenhahn, Bodo

    2016-08-01

    This article tackles the problem of estimating non-rigid human 3D shape and motion from image sequences taken by uncalibrated cameras. Similar to other state-of-the-art solutions we factorize 2D observations in camera parameters, base poses and mixing coefficients. Existing methods require sufficient camera motion during the sequence to achieve a correct 3D reconstruction. To obtain convincing 3D reconstructions from arbitrary camera motion, our method is based on a-priorly trained base poses. We show that strong periodic assumptions on the coefficients can be used to define an efficient and accurate algorithm for estimating periodic motion such as walking patterns. For the extension to non-periodic motion we propose a novel regularization term based on temporal bone length constancy. In contrast to other works, the proposed method does not use a predefined skeleton or anthropometric constraints and can handle arbitrary camera motion. We achieve convincing 3D reconstructions, even under the influence of noise and occlusions. Multiple experiments based on a 3D error metric demonstrate the stability of the proposed method. Compared to other state-of-the-art methods our algorithm shows a significant improvement.

  13. 3D Reconstruction of Human Motion from Monocular Image Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandt, Bastian; Ackermann, Hanno; Rosenhahn, Bodo

    2016-08-01

    This article tackles the problem of estimating non-rigid human 3D shape and motion from image sequences taken by uncalibrated cameras. Similar to other state-of-the-art solutions we factorize 2D observations in camera parameters, base poses and mixing coefficients. Existing methods require sufficient camera motion during the sequence to achieve a correct 3D reconstruction. To obtain convincing 3D reconstructions from arbitrary camera motion, our method is based on a-priorly trained base poses. We show that strong periodic assumptions on the coefficients can be used to define an efficient and accurate algorithm for estimating periodic motion such as walking patterns. For the extension to non-periodic motion we propose a novel regularization term based on temporal bone length constancy. In contrast to other works, the proposed method does not use a predefined skeleton or anthropometric constraints and can handle arbitrary camera motion. We achieve convincing 3D reconstructions, even under the influence of noise and occlusions. Multiple experiments based on a 3D error metric demonstrate the stability of the proposed method. Compared to other state-of-the-art methods our algorithm shows a significant improvement. PMID:27093439

  14. Coupled motions direct electrons along human microsomal P450 Chains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R Pudney

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein domain motion is often implicated in biological electron transfer, but the general significance of motion is not clear. Motion has been implicated in the transfer of electrons from human cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR to all microsomal cytochrome P450s (CYPs. Our hypothesis is that tight coupling of motion with enzyme chemistry can signal "ready and waiting" states for electron transfer from CPR to downstream CYPs and support vectorial electron transfer across complex redox chains. We developed a novel approach to study the time-dependence of dynamical change during catalysis that reports on the changing conformational states of CPR. FRET was linked to stopped-flow studies of electron transfer in CPR that contains donor-acceptor fluorophores on the enzyme surface. Open and closed states of CPR were correlated with key steps in the catalytic cycle which demonstrated how redox chemistry and NADPH binding drive successive opening and closing of the enzyme. Specifically, we provide evidence that reduction of the flavin moieties in CPR induces CPR opening, whereas ligand binding induces CPR closing. A dynamic reaction cycle was created in which CPR optimizes internal electron transfer between flavin cofactors by adopting closed states and signals "ready and waiting" conformations to partner CYP enzymes by adopting more open states. This complex, temporal control of enzyme motion is used to catalyze directional electron transfer from NADPH→FAD→FMN→heme, thereby facilitating all microsomal P450-catalysed reactions. Motions critical to the broader biological functions of CPR are tightly coupled to enzyme chemistry in the human NADPH-CPR-CYP redox chain. That redox chemistry alone is sufficient to drive functionally necessary, large-scale conformational change is remarkable. Rather than relying on stochastic conformational sampling, our study highlights a need for tight coupling of motion to enzyme chemistry to give vectorial electron

  15. Human motion behavior while interacting with an industrial robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortot, Dino; Ding, Hao; Antonopolous, Alexandros; Bengler, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Human workers and industrial robots both have specific strengths within industrial production. Advantageously they complement each other perfectly, which leads to the development of human-robot interaction (HRI) applications. Bringing humans and robots together in the same workspace may lead to potential collisions. The avoidance of such is a central safety requirement. It can be realized with sundry sensor systems, all of them decelerating the robot when the distance to the human decreases alarmingly and applying the emergency stop, when the distance becomes too small. As a consequence, the efficiency of the overall systems suffers, because the robot has high idle times. Optimized path planning algorithms have to be developed to avoid that. The following study investigates human motion behavior in the proximity of an industrial robot. Three different kinds of encounters between the two entities under three robot speed levels are prompted. A motion tracking system is used to capture the motions. Results show, that humans keep an average distance of about 0,5m to the robot, when the encounter occurs. Approximation of the workbenches is influenced by the robot in ten of 15 cases. Furthermore, an increase of participants' walking velocity with higher robot velocities is observed.

  16. An Exoskeleton Robot for Human Forearm and Wrist Motion Assist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranathunga Arachchilage Ruwan Chandra Gopura; Kiguchi, Kazuo

    The exoskeleton robot is worn by the human operator as an orthotic device. Its joints and links correspond to those of the human body. The same system operated in different modes can be used for different fundamental applications; a human-amplifier, haptic interface, rehabilitation device and assistive device sharing a portion of the external load with the operator. We have been developing exoskeleton robots for assisting the motion of physically weak individuals such as elderly or slightly disabled in daily life. In this paper, we propose a three degree of freedom (3DOF) exoskeleton robot (W-EXOS) for the forearm pronation/ supination motion, wrist flexion/extension motion and ulnar/radial deviation. The paper describes the wrist anatomy toward the development of the exoskeleton robot, the hardware design of the exoskeleton robot and EMG-based control method. The skin surface electromyographic (EMG) signals of muscles in forearm of the exoskeletons' user and the hand force/forearm torque are used as input information for the controller. By applying the skin surface EMG signals as main input signals to the controller, automatic control of the robot can be realized without manipulating any other equipment. Fuzzy control method has been applied to realize the natural and flexible motion assist. Experiments have been performed to evaluate the proposed exoskeleton robot and its control method.

  17. Human Motion Recognition Based on Incremental Learning and Smartphone Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chengxuan; DONG Zhenjiang; XIE Siyuan; PEI Ling

    2016-01-01

    Batch processing mode is widely used in the training process of human motion recognition. After training, the motion classi⁃fier usually remains invariable. However, if the classifier is to be expanded, all historical data must be gathered for retrain⁃ing. This consumes a huge amount of storage space, and the new training process will be more complicated. In this paper, we use an incremental learning method to model the motion classifier. A weighted decision tree is proposed to help illus⁃trate the process, and the probability sampling method is also used. The results show that with continuous learning, the mo⁃tion classifier is more precise. The average classification pre⁃cision for the weighted decision tree was 88.43% in a typical test. Incremental learning consumes much less time than the batch processing mode when the input training data comes continuously.

  18. Motion Segmentation and Recognition for Imitation Learning and Influence of Bias for Learning Walking Motion of Humanoid Robot Based on Human Demonstrated Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Yasutake; Hatano, Hiroki; Maida, Yosuke; Usui, Kazuyuki; MAEDA, Yoichiro

    2015-01-01

    Two main issues arise in practical imitation learningby humanoid robots observing human behavior –the first is segmenting and recognizing motion demonstratednaturally by a human beings and the second isutilizing the demonstrated motion for imitation learning.Specifically, the first involves motion segmentationand recognition based on the humanoid robotmotion repertoire for imitation learning and the secondintroduces learning bias based on demonstratedmotion in the humanoid robot’s imitation l...

  19. Comparing biological motion perception in two distinct human societies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Pica

    Full Text Available Cross cultural studies have played a pivotal role in elucidating the extent to which behavioral and mental characteristics depend on specific environmental influences. Surprisingly, little field research has been carried out on a fundamentally important perceptual ability, namely the perception of biological motion. In this report, we present details of studies carried out with the help of volunteers from the Mundurucu indigene, a group of people native to Amazonian territories in Brazil. We employed standard biological motion perception tasks inspired by over 30 years of laboratory research, in which observers attempt to decipher the walking direction of point-light (PL humans and animals. Do our effortless skills at perceiving biological activity from PL animations, as revealed in laboratory settings, generalize to people who have never before seen representational depictions of human and animal activity? The results of our studies provide a clear answer to this important, previously unanswered question. Mundurucu observers readily perceived the coherent, global shape depicted in PL walkers, and experienced the classic inversion effects that are typically found when such stimuli are turned upside down. In addition, their performance was in accord with important recent findings in the literature, in the abundant ease with which they extracted direction information from local motion invariants alone. We conclude that the effortless, veridical perception of PL biological motion is a spontaneous and universal perceptual ability, occurring both inside and outside traditional laboratory environments.

  20. A miniature electromechanical generator design utilizing human motion

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, Nicholas G.

    2010-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The use of Faraday's Law to design and realize a miniature electromechanical generator that converts mechanical energy from human motion into stored electrical energy was investigated in this thesis. The design incorporates simple materials composed of ferrite cores, a coil, springs and permanent magnets to convert mechanical energy provided by a user to electrical energy for storage. The generator takes advantage of a dual air-gapped ...

  1. MEMS Rotational Electret Energy Harvester for Human Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, J.; Komori, K.; Hattori, Y.; Suzuki, Y.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the development of MEMS rotational electret energy harvester (EH) for capturing kinetic energy of human motion. Optimal design method of rotational electret EH is proposed by considering both the rate of overlapping-area-change and the parasitic capacitance. A rotational MEMS electret EH with embedded ball bearing has been successfully developed. Up to 3.6 μW has been obtained at 1 rps rotation with an early prototype.

  2. Feasible Human-Spine Motion Simulators Based on Parallel Manipulators

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Si-Jun; Huang, Zhen; Zhao, Ming-Yang

    2008-01-01

    Considering the characteristics of a human spine including nearly isotropic kinematical performance, fast speed, available under both active and passive modes and reachable workspace, three 3R2T 5-DoF fully-symmetrical parallel manipulators with base-actuator, including 5-RRR(RR), 5-(RRR)RR, 5-(RRR)(RR) are adopted as feasible human spine motion simulators. To decrease machining difficulty and guarantee the machining precision, 5RRR(RR) is designed and manufactured as the prototype of spine m...

  3. Human motion energy harvesting using a piezoelectric MFC patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassani, Giulia; Filippeschi, Alessandro; Ruffaldi, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    The improvements in efficiency of electronic components and miniaturization is quickly pushing wearable devices. Kinetic human energy harvesting is a way to power these components reducing the need of batteries replacement since walking or running is how humans already expend much of their daily energy. This work explores the case of kinetic energy from bending of a piezoelectric patch. For assessing the quality of the system, a testing setup has been designed and controlled by means of knee joint recordings obtained from a large motion dataset. The promising result of the chosen patch is an output power of 2.6μW associated to a run activity. PMID:26737431

  4. Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Take the mystery out of motion. Our resource gives you everything you need to teach young scientists about motion. Students will learn about linear, accelerating, rotating and oscillating motion, and how these relate to everyday life - and even the solar system. Measuring and graphing motion is easy, and the concepts of speed, velocity and acceleration are clearly explained. Reading passages, comprehension questions, color mini posters and lots of hands-on activities all help teach and reinforce key concepts. Vocabulary and language are simplified in our resource to make them accessible to str

  5. Camera systems in human motion analysis for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Lim Chee; Basah, Shafriza Nisha; Yaacob, Sazali; Juan, Yeap Ewe; Kadir, Aida Khairunnisaa Ab.

    2015-05-01

    Human Motion Analysis (HMA) system has been one of the major interests among researchers in the field of computer vision, artificial intelligence and biomedical engineering and sciences. This is due to its wide and promising biomedical applications, namely, bio-instrumentation for human computer interfacing and surveillance system for monitoring human behaviour as well as analysis of biomedical signal and image processing for diagnosis and rehabilitation applications. This paper provides an extensive review of the camera system of HMA, its taxonomy, including camera types, camera calibration and camera configuration. The review focused on evaluating the camera system consideration of the HMA system specifically for biomedical applications. This review is important as it provides guidelines and recommendation for researchers and practitioners in selecting a camera system of the HMA system for biomedical applications.

  6. Development of enhanced piezoelectric energy harvester induced by human motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Y; Nakamachi, E

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a high frequency piezoelectric energy harvester converted from the human low vibrated motion energy was newly developed. This hybrid energy harvester consists of the unimorph piezoelectric cantilever and a couple of permanent magnets. One magnet was attached at the end of cantilever, and the counterpart magnet was set at the end of the pendulum. The mechanical energy provided through the human walking motion, which is a typical ubiquitous presence of vibration, is converted to the electric energy via the piezoelectric cantilever vibration system. At first, we studied the energy convert mechanism and the performance of our energy harvester, where the resonance free vibration of unimorph cantilever with one permanent magnet under a rather high frequency was induced by the artificial low frequency vibration. The counterpart magnet attached on the pendulum. Next, we equipped the counterpart permanent magnet pendulum, which was fluctuated under a very low frequency by the human walking, and the piezoelectric cantilever, which had the permanent magnet at the end. The low-to-high frequency convert "hybrid system" can be characterized as an enhanced energy harvest one. We examined and obtained maximum values of voltage and power in this system, as 1.2V and 1.2 µW. Those results show the possibility to apply for the energy harvester in the portable and implantable Bio-MEMS devices.

  7. Development of enhanced piezoelectric energy harvester induced by human motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Y; Nakamachi, E

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a high frequency piezoelectric energy harvester converted from the human low vibrated motion energy was newly developed. This hybrid energy harvester consists of the unimorph piezoelectric cantilever and a couple of permanent magnets. One magnet was attached at the end of cantilever, and the counterpart magnet was set at the end of the pendulum. The mechanical energy provided through the human walking motion, which is a typical ubiquitous presence of vibration, is converted to the electric energy via the piezoelectric cantilever vibration system. At first, we studied the energy convert mechanism and the performance of our energy harvester, where the resonance free vibration of unimorph cantilever with one permanent magnet under a rather high frequency was induced by the artificial low frequency vibration. The counterpart magnet attached on the pendulum. Next, we equipped the counterpart permanent magnet pendulum, which was fluctuated under a very low frequency by the human walking, and the piezoelectric cantilever, which had the permanent magnet at the end. The low-to-high frequency convert "hybrid system" can be characterized as an enhanced energy harvest one. We examined and obtained maximum values of voltage and power in this system, as 1.2V and 1.2 µW. Those results show the possibility to apply for the energy harvester in the portable and implantable Bio-MEMS devices. PMID:23366218

  8. Realistic glottal motion and airflow rate during human breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinherr, Adam; Bailly, Lucie; Boiron, Olivier; Lagier, Aude; Legou, Thierry; Pichelin, Marine; Caillibotte, Georges; Giovanni, Antoine

    2015-09-01

    The glottal geometry is a key factor in the aerosol delivery efficiency for treatment of lung diseases. However, while glottal vibrations were extensively studied during human phonation, the realistic glottal motion during breathing is poorly understood. Therefore, most current studies assume an idealized steady glottis in the context of respiratory dynamics, and thus neglect the flow unsteadiness related to this motion. This is particularly important to assess the aerosol transport mechanisms in upper airways. This article presents a clinical study conducted on 20 volunteers, to examine the realistic glottal motion during several breathing tasks. Nasofibroscopy was used to investigate the glottal geometrical variations simultaneously with accurate airflow rate measurements. In total, 144 breathing sequences of 30s were recorded. Regarding the whole database, two cases of glottal time-variations were found: "static" or "dynamic" ones. Typically, the peak value of glottal area during slow breathing narrowed from 217 ± 54 mm(2) (mean ± STD) during inspiration, to 178 ± 35 mm(2) during expiration. Considering flow unsteadiness, it is shown that the harmonic approximation of the airflow rate underevaluates the inertial effects as compared to realistic patterns, especially at the onset of the breathing cycle. These measurements provide input data to conduct realistic numerical simulations of laryngeal airflow and particle deposition. PMID:26159687

  9. Digital anthropomorphic phantoms of non-rigid human respiratory and voluntary body motion for investigating motion correction in emission imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of methods for correcting patient motion in emission tomography has been receiving increased attention. Often the performance of these methods is evaluated through simulations using digital anthropomorphic phantoms, such as the commonly used extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom, which models both respiratory and cardiac motion based on human studies. However, non-rigid body motion, which is frequently seen in clinical studies, is not present in the standard XCAT phantom. In addition, respiratory motion in the standard phantom is limited to a single generic trend. In this work, to obtain a more realistic representation of motion, we developed a series of individual-specific XCAT phantoms, modeling non-rigid respiratory and non-rigid body motions derived from the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisitions of volunteers. Acquisitions were performed in the sagittal orientation using the Navigator methodology. Baseline (no motion) acquisitions at end-expiration were obtained at the beginning of each imaging session for each volunteer. For the body motion studies, MRI was again acquired only at end-expiration for five body motion poses (shoulder stretch, shoulder twist, lateral bend, side roll, and axial slide). For the respiratory motion studies, an MRI was acquired during free/regular breathing. The magnetic resonance slices were then retrospectively sorted into 14 amplitude-binned respiratory states, end-expiration, end-inspiration, six intermediary states during inspiration, and six during expiration using the recorded Navigator signal. XCAT phantoms were then generated based on these MRI data by interactive alignment of the organ contours of the XCAT with the MRI slices using a graphical user interface. Thus far we have created five body motion and five respiratory motion XCAT phantoms from the MRI acquisitions of six healthy volunteers (three males and three females). Non-rigid motion exhibited by the volunteers was reflected in both respiratory

  10. Human Ensuing Self-balancing Automaton Based on Motion Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kishhanth

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Travel has become one among rudimentary necessities for every individual. Handling baggage plays an important role while travelling and for typical nomads it is cumbersome when heavy. With the proposed concept which will be dealt in this study, the baggage need not be pulled by us; it just follows us detecting our presence. Hence, the baggage is simply nothing but a robot. Prototype of motion sensor based human following robot that can balance itself in two wheels, thus behaving as a suitcase with intelligence and hence named Smart Suitcase. Concept of inverted pendulum helps in balancing. Regenerative power saving is established, when on its normal movement by the user wherein the saved power can be used for charging mobiles, laptops, torch lights etc. (low voltage applications. Passive infrared sensors fed with inbuilt intelligence in responding only to human presence helps this robot get even smarter.

  11. Adding Image Constraints to Inverse Kinematics for Human Motion Capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaume-i-Capó Antoni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study human motion in biomechanical applications, a critical component is to accurately obtain the 3D joint positions of the user's body. Computer vision and inverse kinematics are used to achieve this objective without markers or special devices attached to the body. The problem of these systems is that the inverse kinematics is "blinded" with respect to the projection of body segments into the images used by the computer vision algorithms. In this paper, we present how to add image constraints to inverse kinematics in order to estimate human motion. Specifically, we explain how to define a criterion to use images in order to guide the posture reconstruction of the articulated chain. Tests with synthetic images show how the scheme performs well in an ideal situation. In order to test its potential in real situations, more experiments with task specific image sequences are also presented. By means of a quantitative study of different sequences, the results obtained show how this approach improves the performance of inverse kinematics in this application.

  12. Dynamics and cortical distribution of neural responses to 2D and 3D motion in human

    OpenAIRE

    Cottereau, Benoit R.; McKee, Suzanne P.; Norcia, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    The perception of motion-in-depth is important for avoiding collisions and for the control of vergence eye-movements and other motor actions. Previous psychophysical studies have suggested that sensitivity to motion-in-depth has a lower temporal processing limit than the perception of lateral motion. The present study used functional MRI-informed EEG source-imaging to study the spatiotemporal properties of the responses to lateral motion and motion-in-depth in human visual cortex. Lateral mot...

  13. Generating action descriptions from statistically integrated representations of human motions and sentences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Wataru; Kusajima, Ikuo; Nakamura, Yoshihiko

    2016-08-01

    It is desirable for robots to be able to linguistically understand human actions during human-robot interactions. Previous research has developed frameworks for encoding human full body motion into model parameters and for classifying motion into specific categories. For full understanding, the motion categories need to be connected to the natural language such that the robots can interpret human motions as linguistic expressions. This paper proposes a novel framework for integrating observation of human motion with that of natural language. This framework consists of two models; the first model statistically learns the relations between motions and their relevant words, and the second statistically learns sentence structures as word n-grams. Integration of these two models allows robots to generate sentences from human motions by searching for words relevant to the motion using the first model and then arranging these words in appropriate order using the second model. This allows making sentences that are the most likely to be generated from the motion. The proposed framework was tested on human full body motion measured by an optical motion capture system. In this, descriptive sentences were manually attached to the motions, and the validity of the system was demonstrated.

  14. Generating action descriptions from statistically integrated representations of human motions and sentences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Wataru; Kusajima, Ikuo; Nakamura, Yoshihiko

    2016-08-01

    It is desirable for robots to be able to linguistically understand human actions during human-robot interactions. Previous research has developed frameworks for encoding human full body motion into model parameters and for classifying motion into specific categories. For full understanding, the motion categories need to be connected to the natural language such that the robots can interpret human motions as linguistic expressions. This paper proposes a novel framework for integrating observation of human motion with that of natural language. This framework consists of two models; the first model statistically learns the relations between motions and their relevant words, and the second statistically learns sentence structures as word n-grams. Integration of these two models allows robots to generate sentences from human motions by searching for words relevant to the motion using the first model and then arranging these words in appropriate order using the second model. This allows making sentences that are the most likely to be generated from the motion. The proposed framework was tested on human full body motion measured by an optical motion capture system. In this, descriptive sentences were manually attached to the motions, and the validity of the system was demonstrated. PMID:27138360

  15. Capturing Human Motion based on Modified Hidden Markov Model in Multi-View Image Sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Yanan Liu; Lian Kun Jia; Wen Yu Yu

    2014-01-01

    Human motion capturing is of great importance in video information retrieval, hence, in this paper, we propose a novel approach to effectively capturing human motions based on modified hidden markov model from multi-view image sequences. Firstly, the structure of the human skeleton model is illustrated, which is extended from skeleton root and spine root, and this skeleton consists of right leg, left leg and spine. Secondly, our proposed human motion capturing system is made up of data traini...

  16. A Combined Softening and Hardening Mechanism for Low Frequency Human Motion Energy Harvesting Application

    OpenAIRE

    Khalis Suhaimi; Roszaidi Ramlan; Azma Putra

    2014-01-01

    This paper concerns the mechanism for harvesting energy from human body motion. The vibration signal from human body motion during walking and jogging was first measured using 3-axes vibration recorder placed at various places on the human body. The measured signal was then processed using Fourier series to investigate its frequency content. A mechanism was proposed to harvest the energy from the low frequency-low amplitude human motion. This mechanism consists of the combined nonlinear hard...

  17. Electrical Properties of PPy-Coated Conductive Fabrics for Human Joint Motion Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyong Hu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Body motion signals indicate several pathological features of the human body, and a wearable human motion monitoring system can respond to human joint motion signal in real time, thereby enabling the prevention and treatment of some diseases. Because conductive fabrics can be well integrated with the garment, they are ideal as a sensing element of wearable human motion monitoring systems. This study prepared polypyrrole conductive fabric by in situ polymerization, and the anisotropic property of the conductive fabric resistance, resistance–strain relationship, and the relationship between resistance and the human knee and elbow movements are discussed preliminarily.

  18. Energy harvesting from human motion: exploiting swing and shock excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern compact and low power sensors and systems are leading towards increasingly integrated wearable systems. One key bottleneck of this technology is the power supply. The use of energy harvesting techniques offers a way of supplying sensor systems without the need for batteries and maintenance. In this work we present the development and characterization of two inductive energy harvesters which exploit different characteristics of the human gait. A multi-coil topology harvester is presented which uses the swing motion of the foot. The second device is a shock-type harvester which is excited into resonance upon heel strike. Both devices were modeled and designed with the key constraint of device height in mind, in order to facilitate the integration into the shoe sole. The devices were characterized under different motion speeds and with two test subjects on a treadmill. An average power output of up to 0.84 mW is achieved with the swing harvester. With a total device volume including the housing of 21 cm3 a power density of 40 μW cm−3 results. The shock harvester generates an average power output of up to 4.13 mW. The power density amounts to 86 μW cm−3 for the total device volume of 48 cm3. Difficulties and potential improvements are discussed briefly. (paper)

  19. Human Action Recognition Using Ordinal Measure of Accumulated Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Wonjun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for recognizing human actions from a single query action video. We propose an action recognition scheme based on the ordinal measure of accumulated motion, which is robust to variations of appearances. To this end, we first define the accumulated motion image (AMI using image differences. Then the AMI of the query action video is resized to a subimage by intensity averaging and a rank matrix is generated by ordering the sample values in the sub-image. By computing the distances from the rank matrix of the query action video to the rank matrices of all local windows in the target video, local windows close to the query action are detected as candidates. To find the best match among the candidates, their energy histograms, which are obtained by projecting AMI values in horizontal and vertical directions, respectively, are compared with those of the query action video. The proposed method does not require any preprocessing task such as learning and segmentation. To justify the efficiency and robustness of our approach, the experiments are conducted on various datasets.

  20. Energy Harvesting from Human Motion Using Footstep-Induced Airflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, H.; Xu, R.; Seto, K.; Yeatman, E. M.; Kim, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an unobtrusive in-shoe energy harvester converting foot-strike energy into electricity to power wearable or portable devices. An air-pumped turbine system is developed to address the issues of the limited vertical deformation of shoes and the low frequency of human motion that impede harvesting energy from this source. The air pump is employed to convert the vertical foot-strike motion into airflow. The generated airflow passes through the miniaturized wind turbine whose transduction is realized by an electromagnetic generator. Energy is extracted from the generator with a higher frequency than that of footsteps, boosting the output power of the device. The turbine casing is specifically designed to enable the device to operate continuously with airflow in both directions. A prototype was fabricated and then tested under different situations. A 6 mW peak power output was obtained with a 4.9 Ω load. The achievable power from this design was estimated theoretically for understanding and further improvement.

  1. Humans perceive object motion in world coordinates during obstacle avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajen, Brett R; Parade, Melissa S; Matthis, Jonathan S

    2013-07-25

    A fundamental question about locomotion in the presence of moving objects is whether movements are guided based upon perceived object motion in an observer-centered or world-centered reference frame. The former captures object motion relative to the moving observer and depends on both observer and object motion. The latter captures object motion relative to the stationary environment and is independent of observer motion. Subjects walked through a virtual environment (VE) viewed through a head-mounted display and indicated whether they would pass in front of or behind a moving obstacle that was on course to cross their future path. Subjects' movement through the VE was manipulated such that object motion in observer coordinates was affected while object motion in world coordinates was the same. We found that when moving observers choose routes around moving obstacles, they rely on object motion perceived in world coordinates. This entails a process, which has been called flow parsing (Rushton & Warren, 2005; Warren & Rushton, 2009a), that recovers the component of optic flow due to object motion independent of self-motion. We found that when self-motion is real and actively generated, the process by which object motion is recovered relies on both visual and nonvisual information to factor out the influence of self-motion. The remaining component contains information about object motion in world coordinates that is needed to guide locomotion.

  2. Adaptive Human aware Navigation based on Motion Pattern Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tranberg, Søren; Svenstrup, Mikael; Andersen, Hans Jørgen;

    2009-01-01

    Respecting people’s social spaces is an important prerequisite for acceptable and natural robot navigation in human environments. In this paper, we describe an adaptive system for mobile robot navigation based on estimates of whether a person seeks to interact with the robot or not. The estimates...... are based on run-time motion pattern analysis compared to stored experience in a database. Using a potential field centered around the person, the robot positions itself at the most appropriate place relative to the person and the interaction status. The system is validated through qualitative tests...... in a real world setting. The results demonstrate that the system is able to learn to navigate based on past interaction experiences, and to adapt to different behaviors over time....

  3. Non-Parametric Bayesian Human Motion Recognition Using a Single MEMS Tri-Axial Accelerometer

    OpenAIRE

    Ejaz Ahmed, M.; Ju Bin Song

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a non-parametric clustering method to recognize the number of human motions using features which are obtained from a single microelectromechanical system (MEMS) accelerometer. Since the number of human motions under consideration is not known a priori and because of the unsupervised nature of the proposed technique, there is no need to collect training data for the human motions. The infinite Gaussian mixture model (IGMM) and collapsed Gibbs sampler are adopted to cl...

  4. A Real-Time Model-Based Human Motion Tracking and Analysis for Human-Computer Interface Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Lin Huang

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a real-time model-based human motion tracking and analysis method for human computer interface (HCI. This method tracks and analyzes the human motion from two orthogonal views without using any markers. The motion parameters are estimated by pattern matching between the extracted human silhouette and the human model. First, the human silhouette is extracted and then the body definition parameters (BDPs can be obtained. Second, the body animation parameters (BAPs are estimated by a hierarchical tritree overlapping searching algorithm. To verify the performance of our method, we demonstrate different human posture sequences and use hidden Markov model (HMM for posture recognition testing.

  5. Predictive coding for motion stimuli in human early visual cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, Wouter; van Wezel, Richard J A; Petridou, Natalia; Ramsey, Nick F.; Raemaekers, Mathijs

    2016-01-01

    The current study investigates if early visual cortical areas, V1, V2 and V3, use predictive coding to process motion information. Previous studies have reported biased visual motion responses at locations where novel visual information was presented (i.e., the motion trailing edge), which is plausi

  6. Predictive coding for motion stimuli in human early visual cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, Wouter; Wezel, van Richard J.A.; Petridou, Natalia; Ramsey, Nick F.; Raemeakers, Mathijs; Zaborszky, L.; Zilles, K.

    2014-01-01

    The current study investigates if early visual cortical areas, V1, V2 and V3, use predictive coding to process motion information. Previous studies have reported biased visual motion responses at locations where novel visual information was presented (i.e., the motion trailing edge), which is plausi

  7. Implied motion because of instability in Hokusai Manga activates the human motion-sensitive extrastriate visual cortex: an fMRI study of the impact of visual art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaka, Naoyuki; Matsuyoshi, Daisuke; Ikeda, Takashi; Osaka, Mariko

    2010-03-10

    The recent development of cognitive neuroscience has invited inference about the neurosensory events underlying the experience of visual arts involving implied motion. We report functional magnetic resonance imaging study demonstrating activation of the human extrastriate motion-sensitive cortex by static images showing implied motion because of instability. We used static line-drawing cartoons of humans by Hokusai Katsushika (called 'Hokusai Manga'), an outstanding Japanese cartoonist as well as famous Ukiyoe artist. We found 'Hokusai Manga' with implied motion by depicting human bodies that are engaged in challenging tonic posture significantly activated the motion-sensitive visual cortex including MT+ in the human extrastriate cortex, while an illustration that does not imply motion, for either humans or objects, did not activate these areas under the same tasks. We conclude that motion-sensitive extrastriate cortex would be a critical region for perception of implied motion in instability.

  8. Numerical and experimental investigations of human swimming motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hideki; Nakashima, Motomu; Sato, Yohei; Matsuuchi, Kazuo; Sanders, Ross H

    2016-08-01

    This paper reviews unsteady flow conditions in human swimming and identifies the limitations and future potential of the current methods of analysing unsteady flow. The capability of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been extended from approaches assuming steady-state conditions to consideration of unsteady/transient conditions associated with the body motion of a swimmer. However, to predict hydrodynamic forces and the swimmer's potential speeds accurately, more robust and efficient numerical methods are necessary, coupled with validation procedures, requiring detailed experimental data reflecting local flow. Experimental data obtained by particle image velocimetry (PIV) in this area are limited, because at present observations are restricted to a two-dimensional 1.0 m(2) area, though this could be improved if the output range of the associated laser sheet increased. Simulations of human swimming are expected to improve competitive swimming, and our review has identified two important advances relating to understanding the flow conditions affecting performance in front crawl swimming: one is a mechanism for generating unsteady fluid forces, and the other is a theory relating to increased speed and efficiency. PMID:26699925

  9. Human motion retrieval from hand-drawn sketch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Min-Wen; Lin, Chao-Hung; Assa, Jackie; Lee, Tong-Yee

    2012-05-01

    The rapid growth of motion capture data increases the importance of motion retrieval. The majority of the existing motion retrieval approaches are based on a labor-intensive step in which the user browses and selects a desired query motion clip from the large motion clip database. In this work, a novel sketching interface for defining the query is presented. This simple approach allows users to define the required motion by sketching several motion strokes over a drawn character, which requires less effort and extends the users’ expressiveness. To support the real-time interface, a specialized encoding of the motions and the hand-drawn query is required. Here, we introduce a novel hierarchical encoding scheme based on a set of orthonormal spherical harmonic (SH) basis functions, which provides a compact representation, and avoids the CPU/processing intensive stage of temporal alignment used by previous solutions. Experimental results show that the proposed approach can well retrieve the motions, and is capable of retrieve logically and numerically similar motions, which is superior to previous approaches. The user study shows that the proposed system can be a useful tool to input motion query if the users are familiar with it. Finally, an application of generating a 3D animation from a hand-drawn comics strip is demonstrated. PMID:21383410

  10. Measuring response saturation in human MT and MST as a function of motion density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Szonya; Furlan, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The human brain areas MT and MST have been studied in great detail using fMRI with regards to their motion processing properties; however, to what extent this corresponds with single cell recordings remains to be fully described. Average response over human MT+ has been shown to increase linearly with motion coherence, similar to single cell responses. In response to motion density some single cell data however suggest a rapid saturation. We ask how the combination of these responses is reflected in the population response. We measured the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) response function of MT and MST using a motion density signal, comparing with area V1. We used spatially fixed apertures containing motion stimuli to manipulate the area covered by motion. We found that MT and MST responded above baseline to a very minimal amount of motion and showed a rather flat response to motion density, indicative of saturation. We discuss how this may be related to the size of the receptive fields and inhibitory interactions, although necessarily residual attention effects also need to be considered. We then compared different types of motion and found no difference between coherent and random motion at any motion density, suggesting that when combining response over several motion stimuli covering the visual field, a linear relationship of MT and MST population response as a function of motion coherence might not hold. PMID:25057944

  11. Interactions between motion and form processing in the human visual system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George eMather

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The predominant view of motion and form processing in the human visual system assumes that these two attributes are handled by separate and independent modules. Motion processing involves filtering by direction-selective sensors, followed by integration to solve the aperture problem. Form processing involves filtering by orientation-selective and size-selective receptive fields, followed by integration to encode object shape. It has long been known that motion signals can influence form processing in the well-known Gestalt principle of common fate; texture elements which share a common motion property are grouped into a single contour or texture region. However recent research in psychophysics and neuroscience indicates that the influence of form signals on motion processing is more extensive than previously thought. First, the salience and apparent direction of moving lines depends on how the local orientation and direction of motion combine to match the receptive field properties of motion-selective neurons. Second, orientation signals generated by ‘motion-streaks’ influence motion processing; motion sensitivity, apparent direction and adaptation are affected by simultaneously present orientation signals. Third, form signals generated by human body shape influence biological motion processing, as revealed by studies using point-light motion stimuli. Thus form-motion integration seems to occur at several different levels of cortical processing, from V1 to STS.

  12. Human joint motion estimation for electromyography (EMG)-based dynamic motion control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin; Hosoda, Ryo; Venture, Gentiane

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to investigate a joint motion estimation method from Electromyography (EMG) signals during dynamic movement. In most EMG-based humanoid or prosthetics control systems, EMG features were directly or indirectly used to trigger intended motions. However, both physiological and nonphysiological factors can influence EMG characteristics during dynamic movements, resulting in subject-specific, non-stationary and crosstalk problems. Particularly, when motion velocity and/or joint torque are not constrained, joint motion estimation from EMG signals are more challenging. In this paper, we propose a joint motion estimation method based on muscle activation recorded from a pair of agonist and antagonist muscles of the joint. A linear state-space model with multi input single output is proposed to map the muscle activity to joint motion. An adaptive estimation method is proposed to train the model. The estimation performance is evaluated in performing a single elbow flexion-extension movement in two subjects. All the results in two subjects at two load levels indicate the feasibility and suitability of the proposed method in joint motion estimation. The estimation root-mean-square error is within 8.3% ∼ 10.6%, which is lower than that being reported in several previous studies. Moreover, this method is able to overcome subject-specific problem and compensate non-stationary EMG properties.

  13. Human body motion capture from multi-image video sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Apuzzo, Nicola

    2003-01-01

    In this paper is presented a method to capture the motion of the human body from multi image video sequences without using markers. The process is composed of five steps: acquisition of video sequences, calibration of the system, surface measurement of the human body for each frame, 3-D surface tracking and tracking of key points. The image acquisition system is currently composed of three synchronized progressive scan CCD cameras and a frame grabber which acquires a sequence of triplet images. Self calibration methods are applied to gain exterior orientation of the cameras, the parameters of internal orientation and the parameters modeling the lens distortion. From the video sequences, two kinds of 3-D information are extracted: a three-dimensional surface measurement of the visible parts of the body for each triplet and 3-D trajectories of points on the body. The approach for surface measurement is based on multi-image matching, using the adaptive least squares method. A full automatic matching process determines a dense set of corresponding points in the triplets. The 3-D coordinates of the matched points are then computed by forward ray intersection using the orientation and calibration data of the cameras. The tracking process is also based on least squares matching techniques. Its basic idea is to track triplets of corresponding points in the three images through the sequence and compute their 3-D trajectories. The spatial correspondences between the three images at the same time and the temporal correspondences between subsequent frames are determined with a least squares matching algorithm. The results of the tracking process are the coordinates of a point in the three images through the sequence, thus the 3-D trajectory is determined by computing the 3-D coordinates of the point at each time step by forward ray intersection. Velocities and accelerations are also computed. The advantage of this tracking process is twofold: it can track natural points

  14. Non-Parametric Bayesian Human Motion Recognition Using a Single MEMS Tri-Axial Accelerometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ejaz Ahmed

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a non-parametric clustering method to recognize the number of human motions using features which are obtained from a single microelectromechanical system (MEMS accelerometer. Since the number of human motions under consideration is not known a priori and because of the unsupervised nature of the proposed technique, there is no need to collect training data for the human motions. The infinite Gaussian mixture model (IGMM and collapsed Gibbs sampler are adopted to cluster the human motions using extracted features. From the experimental results, we show that the unanticipated human motions are detected and recognized with significant accuracy, as compared with the parametric Fuzzy C-Mean (FCM technique, the unsupervised K-means algorithm, and the non-parametric mean-shift method.

  15. Non-parametric Bayesian human motion recognition using a single MEMS tri-axial accelerometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, M Ejaz; Song, Ju Bin

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a non-parametric clustering method to recognize the number of human motions using features which are obtained from a single microelectromechanical system (MEMS) accelerometer. Since the number of human motions under consideration is not known a priori and because of the unsupervised nature of the proposed technique, there is no need to collect training data for the human motions. The infinite Gaussian mixture model (IGMM) and collapsed Gibbs sampler are adopted to cluster the human motions using extracted features. From the experimental results, we show that the unanticipated human motions are detected and recognized with significant accuracy, as compared with the parametric Fuzzy C-Mean (FCM) technique, the unsupervised K-means algorithm, and the non-parametric mean-shift method. PMID:23201992

  16. Correction for human head motion in helical x-ray CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.-H.; Sun, T.; Alcheikh, A. R.; Kuncic, Z.; Nuyts, J.; Fulton, R.

    2016-02-01

    Correction for rigid object motion in helical CT can be achieved by reconstructing from a modified source-detector orbit, determined by the object motion during the scan. This ensures that all projections are consistent, but it does not guarantee that the projections are complete in the sense of being sufficient for exact reconstruction. We have previously shown with phantom measurements that motion-corrected helical CT scans can suffer from data-insufficiency, in particular for severe motions and at high pitch. To study whether such data-insufficiency artefacts could also affect the motion-corrected CT images of patients undergoing head CT scans, we used an optical motion tracking system to record the head movements of 10 healthy volunteers while they executed each of the 4 different types of motion (‘no’, slight, moderate and severe) for 60 s. From these data we simulated 354 motion-affected CT scans of a voxelized human head phantom and reconstructed them with and without motion correction. For each simulation, motion-corrected (MC) images were compared with the motion-free reference, by visual inspection and with quantitative similarity metrics. Motion correction improved similarity metrics in all simulations. Of the 270 simulations performed with moderate or less motion, only 2 resulted in visible residual artefacts in the MC images. The maximum range of motion in these simulations would encompass that encountered in the vast majority of clinical scans. With severe motion, residual artefacts were observed in about 60% of the simulations. We also evaluated a new method of mapping local data sufficiency based on the degree to which Tuy’s condition is locally satisfied, and observed that areas with high Tuy values corresponded to the locations of residual artefacts in the MC images. We conclude that our method can provide accurate and artefact-free MC images with most types of head motion likely to be encountered in CT imaging, provided that the motion can

  17. Content-Based Human Motion Retrieval with Scene Description Language

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    As commercial motion capture systems are widely used, more and more 3D motion libraries become available, reinforcing the demand for efficient indexing and retrieving methods. Usually, the user will only have a sketchy idea of which kind of motion to look for in the motion database. As a result, how to clearly describe the user's demands is a bottleneck for motion retrieval system. This paper presented a framework that can handle this problem effectively for motion retrieval. This content-based retrieval system supports two kinds of query modes:textual query mode and query-by-example mode. In both query modes, user's input is translated into scene description language first, which can be processed by the system efficiently. By using various kinds of qualitative features and adaptive segments of motion capture data stream, indexing and retrieval methods are carried out at the segment level rather than at the frame level, making them quite efficient. Some experimental examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed algorithms.

  18. The 3D Human Motion Control Through Refined Video Gesture Annotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yohan; Suk, Myunghoon; Prabhakaran, B.

    In the beginning of computer and video game industry, simple game controllers consisting of buttons and joysticks were employed, but recently game consoles are replacing joystick buttons with novel interfaces such as the remote controllers with motion sensing technology on the Nintendo Wii [1] Especially video-based human computer interaction (HCI) technique has been applied to games, and the representative game is 'Eyetoy' on the Sony PlayStation 2. Video-based HCI technique has great benefit to release players from the intractable game controller. Moreover, in order to communicate between humans and computers, video-based HCI is very crucial since it is intuitive, easy to get, and inexpensive. On the one hand, extracting semantic low-level features from video human motion data is still a major challenge. The level of accuracy is really dependent on each subject's characteristic and environmental noises. Of late, people have been using 3D motion-capture data for visualizing real human motions in 3D space (e.g, 'Tiger Woods' in EA Sports, 'Angelina Jolie' in Bear-Wolf movie) and analyzing motions for specific performance (e.g, 'golf swing' and 'walking'). 3D motion-capture system ('VICON') generates a matrix for each motion clip. Here, a column is corresponding to a human's sub-body part and row represents time frames of data capture. Thus, we can extract sub-body part's motion only by selecting specific columns. Different from low-level feature values of video human motion, 3D human motion-capture data matrix are not pixel values, but is closer to human level of semantics.

  19. Human confort response to random motions with a dominant rolling motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, R. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Subjective ride comfort response ratings were measured on a visual motion simulator with rolling velocity inputs with various power spectra shapes and magnitudes. The results show only little influence of spectra shape on comfort response. The effects of magnitude on comfort response indicate the applicability of psychophysical precepts for comfort modeling.

  20. Automatic Video-based Analysis of Human Motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fihl, Preben

    foreground camouflage, shadows, and moving backgrounds. The method continuously updates the background model to maintain high quality segmentation over long periods of time. Within action recognition the thesis presents work on both recognition of arm gestures and gait types. A key-frame based approach...... is presented to recognize arm gestures. The method extracts a set of characteristic poses and describes them by their local motion resulting in motion primitives. A probabilistic edit distance is used to classify a sequence of motion primitives as a gesture. This 2D recognition process is extended into a view......-invariant recognition of arm gestures by use of a range camera that generates 3D data and allows for a 3D equivalent of motion primitives. The recognition of gait types takes a different approach and extracts silhouettes that are matched against a database. A gait continuum is introduced to better describe the whole...

  1. WearDY: Wearable dynamics. A prototype for human whole-body force and motion estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latella, Claudia; Kuppuswamy, Naveen; Nori, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    Motion capture is a powerful tool used in a large range of applications towards human movement analysis. Although it is a well-established technique, its main limitation is the lack of dynamic information such as forces and torques during the motion capture. In this paper, we present a novel approach for human wearable dynamic (WearDY) motion capture for the simultaneous estimation of whole-body forces along with the motion. Our conceptual framework encompasses traditional passive markers based methods, inertial and contact force sensor modalities and harnesses a probabilistic computational framework for estimating dynamic quantities originally proposed in the domain of humanoid robot control. We present preliminary experimental analysis of our framework on subjects performing a two Degrees-of-Freedom bowing task and we estimate the motion and dynamic quantities. We discuss the implication of our proposal towards the design of a novel wearable force and motion capture suit and its applications.

  2. Teleoperation of a robot manipulator from 3D human hand-arm motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofman, Jonathan; Verma, Siddharth; Wu, Xianghai; Luu, Timothy

    2003-10-01

    The control of a robot manipulator by a human operator is often necessary in unstructured dynamic environments with unfamiliar objects. Remote teleoperation is required when human presence at the robot site is undesirable or difficult, such as in handling hazardous materials and operating in dangerous or inaccessible environments. Previous approaches have employed mechanical or other contacting interfaces which require unnatural motions for object manipulation tasks or hinder dexterous human motion. This paper presents a non-contacting method of teleoperating a robot manipulator by having the human operator perform the 3D human hand-arm motion that would naturally be used to compete an object manipulation task and tracking the motion with a stereo-camera system at a local site. The 3D human hand-arm motion is reconstructed at the remote robot site and is used to control the position and orientation of the robot manipulator end-effector in real-time. Images captured of the robot interacting with objects at the remote site provide visual feedback to the human operator. Tests in teleoperation of the robot manipulator have demonstrated the ability of the human to carry out object manipulator tasks remotely and the teleoperated robot manipulator system to copy human-arm motions in real-time.

  3. Viewing the motion of human body parts activates different regions of premotor, temporal, and parietal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, Kylie J; Thompson, James C; Syngeniotis, Ari; Abbott, David F; Puce, Aina

    2004-05-01

    Activation of premotor and temporoparietal cortex occurs when we observe others movements, particularly relating to objects. Viewing the motion of different body parts without the context of an object has not been systematically evaluated. During a 3T fMRI study, 12 healthy subjects viewed human face, hand, and leg motion, which was not directed at or did not involve an object. Activation was identified relative to static images of the same human face, hand, and leg in both individual subject and group average data. Four clear activation foci emerged: (1) right MT/V5 activated to all forms of viewed motion; (2) right STS activated to face and leg motion; (3) ventral premotor cortex activated to face, hand, and leg motion in the right hemisphere and to leg motion in the left hemisphere; and (4) anterior intraparietal cortex (aIP) was active bilaterally to viewing hand motion and in the right hemisphere leg motion. In addition, in the group data, a somatotopic activation pattern for viewing face, hand, and leg motion occurred in right ventral premotor cortex. Activation patterns in STS and aIP were more complex--typically activation foci to viewing two types of human motion showed some overlap. Activation in individual subjects was similar; however, activation to hand motion also occurred in the STS with a variable location across subjects--explaining the lack of a clear activation focus in the group data. The data indicate that there are selective responses to viewing motion of different body parts in the human brain that are independent of object or tool use.

  4. Distinct mechanisms of form-from-motion perception in human extrastriate cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Blanke, O; Brooks, A.; Mercier, M.; Spinelli, L.; Adriani, M.; Lavanchy, L.; Safran, A B; Landis, T

    2007-01-01

    The exquisite sensitivity of the human visual system to form-from-motion (FfM) cues is well documented. However, identifying the neural correlates of this sensitivity has proven difficult, particularly determining the respective contributions of different motion areas in extrastriate visual cortex. Here we measured visual FfM perception and more elementary visual motion (VM) perception in a group of 32 patients suffering from acute posterior brain damage, and performed MRI-based lesion analys...

  5. S3-3: Misbinding of Color and Motion in Human V2 Revealed by Color-Contingent Motion Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Fang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Wu, Kanai, & Shimojo (2004 Nature 429 262 described a compelling illusion demonstrating a steady-state misbinding of color and motion. Here, we took advantage of the illusion and performed psychophysical and fMRI adaptation experiments to explore the neural mechanism of color-motion misbinding. The stimulus subtended 20 deg by 14 deg of visual angle and contained two sheets of random dots, one sheet moving up and the other moving down. On the upward-moving sheet, dots in the right-end area (4 deg by 14 deg were red, and the rest of the dots were green. On the downward-moving sheet, dots in the right-end area were green, and the rest of the dots were red. When subjects fixated at the center of the stimulus, they bound the color and motion of the dots in the right-end area erroneously–the red dots appeared to move downwards and the green dots appeared to move upwards. In the psychophysical experiment, we measured the color-contingent motion aftereffect in the right-end area after adaptation to the illusory stimulus. A significant aftereffect was observed as if subjects had adapted to the perceived binding of color and motion, rather than the physical binding. For example, after adaptation, stationary red dots appeared to move upwards, and stationary green dots appeared to move downwards. In the fMRI experiment, we measured direction-selective motion adaptation effects in V1, V2, V3, V4, V3A/B, and V5. Relative to other cortical areas, V2 showed a much stronger adaptation effect to the perceived motion direction (rather than the physical direction for both the red and green dots. Significantly, the fMRI adaptation effect in V2 correlated with the color-contingent motion aftereffect across twelve subjects. This study provides the first human evidence that color and motion could be misbound at a very early stage of visual processing.

  6. Nonlinear Synchronization for Automatic Learning of 3D Pose Variability in Human Motion Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozerov M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A dense matching algorithm that solves the problem of synchronizing prerecorded human motion sequences, which show different speeds and accelerations, is proposed. The approach is based on minimization of MRF energy and solves the problem by using Dynamic Programming. Additionally, an optimal sequence is automatically selected from the input dataset to be a time-scale pattern for all other sequences. The paper utilizes an action specific model which automatically learns the variability of 3D human postures observed in a set of training sequences. The model is trained using the public CMU motion capture dataset for the walking action, and a mean walking performance is automatically learnt. Additionally, statistics about the observed variability of the postures and motion direction are also computed at each time step. The synchronized motion sequences are used to learn a model of human motion for action recognition and full-body tracking purposes.

  7. Low-cost human motion capture system for postural analysis onboard ships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocerino, Erica; Ackermann, Sebastiano; Del Pizzo, Silvio; Menna, Fabio; Troisi, Salvatore

    2011-07-01

    The study of human equilibrium, also known as postural stability, concerns different research sectors (medicine, kinesiology, biomechanics, robotics, sport) and is usually performed employing motion analysis techniques for recording human movements and posture. A wide range of techniques and methodologies has been developed, but the choice of instrumentations and sensors depends on the requirement of the specific application. Postural stability is a topic of great interest for the maritime community, since ship motions can make demanding and difficult the maintenance of the upright stance with hazardous consequences for the safety of people onboard. The need of capturing the motion of an individual standing on a ship during its daily service does not permit to employ optical systems commonly used for human motion analysis. These sensors are not designed for operating in disadvantageous environmental conditions (water, wetness, saltiness) and with not optimal lighting. The solution proposed in this study consists in a motion acquisition system that could be easily usable onboard ships. It makes use of two different methodologies: (I) motion capture with videogrammetry and (II) motion measurement with Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU). The developed image-based motion capture system, made up of three low-cost, light and compact video cameras, was validated against a commercial optical system and then used for testing the reliability of the inertial sensors. In this paper, the whole process of planning, designing, calibrating, and assessing the accuracy of the motion capture system is reported and discussed. Results from the laboratory tests and preliminary campaigns in the field are presented.

  8. A Combined Softening and Hardening Mechanism for Low Frequency Human Motion Energy Harvesting Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalis Suhaimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns the mechanism for harvesting energy from human body motion. The vibration signal from human body motion during walking and jogging was first measured using 3-axes vibration recorder placed at various places on the human body. The measured signal was then processed using Fourier series to investigate its frequency content. A mechanism was proposed to harvest the energy from the low frequency-low amplitude human motion. This mechanism consists of the combined nonlinear hardening and softening mechanism which was aimed at widening the bandwidth as well as amplifying the low human motion frequency. This was realized by using a translation-to-rotary mechanism which converts the translation motion of the human motion into the rotational motion. The nonlinearity in the system was realized by introducing a winding spring stiffness and the magnetic stiffness. Quasi-static and dynamic measurement were conducted to investigate the performance of the mechanism. The results show that, with the right degree of nonlinearity, the two modes can be combined together to produce a wide flat response. For the frequency amplification, the mechanism manages to increase the frequency by around 8 times in terms of rotational speed.

  9. WiFi-Based Real-Time Calibration-Free Passive Human Motion Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Liangyi; Yang, Wu; Man, Dapeng; Dong, Guozhong; Yu, Miao; Lv, Jiguang

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of WLAN technology, wireless device-free passive human detection becomes a newly-developing technique and holds more potential to worldwide and ubiquitous smart applications. Recently, indoor fine-grained device-free passive human motion detection based on the PHY layer information is rapidly developed. Previous wireless device-free passive human detection systems either rely on deploying specialized systems with dense transmitter-receiver links or elaborate off-line training process, which blocks rapid deployment and weakens system robustness. In the paper, we explore to research a novel fine-grained real-time calibration-free device-free passive human motion via physical layer information, which is independent of indoor scenarios and needs no prior-calibration and normal profile. We investigate sensitivities of amplitude and phase to human motion, and discover that phase feature is more sensitive to human motion, especially to slow human motion. Aiming at lightweight and robust device-free passive human motion detection, we develop two novel and practical schemes: short-term averaged variance ratio (SVR) and long-term averaged variance ratio (LVR). We realize system design with commercial WiFi devices and evaluate it in typical multipath-rich indoor scenarios. As demonstrated in the experiments, our approach can achieve a high detection rate and low false positive rate. PMID:26703612

  10. WiFi-Based Real-Time Calibration-Free Passive Human Motion Detection †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Liangyi; Yang, Wu; Man, Dapeng; Dong, Guozhong; Yu, Miao; Lv, Jiguang

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of WLAN technology, wireless device-free passive human detection becomes a newly-developing technique and holds more potential to worldwide and ubiquitous smart applications. Recently, indoor fine-grained device-free passive human motion detection based on the PHY layer information is rapidly developed. Previous wireless device-free passive human detection systems either rely on deploying specialized systems with dense transmitter-receiver links or elaborate off-line training process, which blocks rapid deployment and weakens system robustness. In the paper, we explore to research a novel fine-grained real-time calibration-free device-free passive human motion via physical layer information, which is independent of indoor scenarios and needs no prior-calibration and normal profile. We investigate sensitivities of amplitude and phase to human motion, and discover that phase feature is more sensitive to human motion, especially to slow human motion. Aiming at lightweight and robust device-free passive human motion detection, we develop two novel and practical schemes: short-term averaged variance ratio (SVR) and long-term averaged variance ratio (LVR). We realize system design with commercial WiFi devices and evaluate it in typical multipath-rich indoor scenarios. As demonstrated in the experiments, our approach can achieve a high detection rate and low false positive rate. PMID:26703612

  11. WiFi-Based Real-Time Calibration-Free Passive Human Motion Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangyi Gong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of WLAN technology, wireless device-free passive human detection becomes a newly-developing technique and holds more potential to worldwide and ubiquitous smart applications. Recently, indoor fine-grained device-free passive human motion detection based on the PHY layer information is rapidly developed. Previous wireless device-free passive human detection systems either rely on deploying specialized systems with dense transmitter-receiver links or elaborate off-line training process, which blocks rapid deployment and weakens system robustness. In the paper, we explore to research a novel fine-grained real-time calibration-free device-free passive human motion via physical layer information, which is independent of indoor scenarios and needs no prior-calibration and normal profile. We investigate sensitivities of amplitude and phase to human motion, and discover that phase feature is more sensitive to human motion, especially to slow human motion. Aiming at lightweight and robust device-free passive human motion detection, we develop two novel and practical schemes: short-term averaged variance ratio (SVR and long-term averaged variance ratio (LVR. We realize system design with commercial WiFi devices and evaluate it in typical multipath-rich indoor scenarios. As demonstrated in the experiments, our approach can achieve a high detection rate and low false positive rate.

  12. Revisiting the importance of common body motion in human action perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, Steven M; Lu, Hongjing

    2016-01-01

    Human actions are complex dynamic stimuli comprised of two principle motion components: 1) common body motion, which represents the translation of the body when a person moves through space, and 2) relative limb movements, resulting from articulation of limbs after factoring out common body motion. Historically, most research in biological motion has focused primarily on relative limb movements while discounting the role of common body motion in human action perception. The current study examined the relative contribution of posture change resulting from relative limb movements and translation of body position resulting from common body motion in discriminating human walking versus running actions. We found that faster translation speeds of common body motion evoked significantly more responses consistent with running when discriminating ambiguous actions morphed between walking and running. Furthermore, this influence was systematically modulated by the uncertainty associated with intrinsic cues as determined by the degree of limited-lifetime spatial sampling. The contribution of common body motion increased monotonically as the reliability of inferring posture changes on the basis of intrinsic cues decreased. These results highlight the importance of translational body movements and their interaction with posture change as a result of relative limb movements in discriminating human actions when visual input information is sparse and noisy.

  13. Comparison of Flight Simulators Based on Human Motion Perception Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente Pais, Ana R.; Correia Gracio, Bruno J.; Kelly, Lon C.; Houck, Jacob A.

    2015-01-01

    In flight simulation, motion filters are used to transform aircraft motion into simulator motion. When looking for the best match between visual and inertial amplitude in a simulator, researchers have found that there is a range of inertial amplitudes, rather than a single inertial value, that is perceived by subjects as optimal. This zone, hereafter referred to as the optimal zone, seems to correlate to the perceptual coherence zones measured in flight simulators. However, no studies were found in which these two zones were compared. This study investigates the relation between the optimal and the coherence zone measurements within and between different simulators. Results show that for the sway axis, the optimal zone lies within the lower part of the coherence zone. In addition, it was found that, whereas the width of the coherence zone depends on the visual amplitude and frequency, the width of the optimal zone remains constant.

  14. A human motion model based on maps for navigation systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiser Susanna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Foot-mounted indoor positioning systems work remarkably well when using additionally the knowledge of floor-plans in the localization algorithm. Walls and other structures naturally restrict the motion of pedestrians. No pedestrian can walk through walls or jump from one floor to another when considering a building with different floor-levels. By incorporating known floor-plans in sequential Bayesian estimation processes such as particle filters (PFs, long-term error stability can be achieved as long as the map is sufficiently accurate and the environment sufficiently constraints pedestrians' motion. In this article, a new motion model based on maps and floor-plans is introduced that is capable of weighting the possible headings of the pedestrian as a function of the local environment. The motion model is derived from a diffusion algorithm that makes use of the principle of a source effusing gas and is used in the weighting step of a PF implementation. The diffusion algorithm is capable of including floor-plans as well as maps with areas of different degrees of accessibility. The motion model more effectively represents the probability density function of possible headings that are restricted by maps and floor-plans than a simple binary weighting of particles (i.e., eliminating those that crossed walls and keeping the rest. We will show that the motion model will help for obtaining better performance in critical navigation scenarios where two or more modes may be competing for some of the time (multi-modal scenarios.

  15. Biomechanical energy harvesting from human motion: theory, state of the art, design guidelines, and future directions

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro Amir; Riemer Raziel

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Biomechanical energy harvesting from human motion presents a promising clean alternative to electrical power supplied by batteries for portable electronic devices and for computerized and motorized prosthetics. We present the theory of energy harvesting from the human body and describe the amount of energy that can be harvested from body heat and from motions of various parts of the body during walking, such as heel strike; ankle, knee, hip, shoulder, and elbow joint motio...

  16. Segmentation and Classification of Human Actions and Actor Characteristics with 3d Motion Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ali Etemad

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have used 3D motion capture data with the aim of detecting and classifying specifichuman actions. In addition to recognition of basic action classes, actor styles and characteristics such asgender, age, and energy level have also been subject to classification. We have applied and compared threemain methods: nearest neighbour search, hidden Markov models, and artificial neural networks. Usingthese techniques, we have proposed exhaustive algorithms for detection of actions in a motion piece andsubsequently classifying the segmented actions and respective characteristics of the actors. We have testedthe methods for various sequences and compared the results for a comprehensive evaluation of each of theproposed techniques. Our findings can be largely used for general classification of human motion data formultimedia applications as well as sorting and classifying data sets of human motion data especially thoseacquired using visual marker-based motion capture systems such as the one employed in this research.

  17. Design of a Wearable Sensing System for Human Motion Monitoring in Physical Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Cagnoni

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Human motion monitoring and analysis can be an essential part of a wide spectrum of applications, including physical rehabilitation among other potential areas of interest. Creating non-invasive systems for monitoring patients while performing rehabilitation exercises, to provide them with an objective feedback, is one of the current challenges. In this paper we present a wearable multi-sensor system for human motion monitoring, which has been developed for use in rehabilitation. It is composed of a number of small modules that embed high-precision accelerometers and wireless communications to transmit the information related to the body motion to an acquisition device. The results of a set of experiments we made to assess its performance in real-world setups demonstrate its usefulness in human motion acquisition and tracking, as required, for example, in activity recognition, physical/athletic performance evaluation and rehabilitation.

  18. Variable structure multiple model for articulated human motion tracking from monocular video sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Hong; TONG MingLei; CHEN ZhiChao; FAN YouJian

    2012-01-01

    A new model-based human body tracking framework with learning-based theory is introduced inthis paper.We propose a variable structure multiple model (VSMM) framework to address challenging problems such as uncertainty of motion styles,imprecise detection of feature points,and ambiguity of joint locations.Key human joint points are detected automatically and the undetected points are estimated with Kalman filters.Multiple motion models are learned from motion capture data using a ridge regression method.The model set that covers the total motion set is designed on the basis of topological and compatibility relationships,while the VSMM algorithm is used to estimate quaternion vectors of joint rotation.Experiments using real image sequences and simulation videos demonstrate the high efficiency of our proposed human tracking framework.

  19. Nonlinear time-varying potential bistable energy harvesting from human motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Junyi; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Shengxi; Inman, Daniel J.; Lin, Jing

    2015-10-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation into nonlinear bistable energy harvesting with time-varying potential energy is presented. The motivation for examining time-varying potentials comes from the desire to harvest energy from human motion. Time-varying potential energy function of bistable oscillator with respect to the swing angle are established to derive the governing electromechanical model for harvesting vibration energy from the swaying motion during human walking or running. Numerical simulations show good agreement with the experimental potential energy function under different swing angles. Various motion speed treadmill tests are performed to demonstrate the advantage of time-varying bistable harvesters over linear and monostable ones in harvesting energy from human motion.

  20. Ambulatory anaesthesia and cognitive dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lars S; Steinmetz, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    anaesthesia in the outpatient setting. Cognitive complications such as delirium and postoperative cognitive dysfunction are less frequent in ambulatory surgery than with hospitalization. SUMMARY: The elderly are especially susceptible to adverse effects of the hospital environment such as immobilisation...

  1. Measuring Accurate Body Parameters of Dressed Humans with Large-Scale Motion Using a Kinect Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidan Du

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-contact human body measurement plays an important role in surveillance, physical healthcare, on-line business and virtual fitting. Current methods for measuring the human body without physical contact usually cannot handle humans wearing clothes, which limits their applicability in public environments. In this paper, we propose an effective solution that can measure accurate parameters of the human body with large-scale motion from a Kinect sensor, assuming that the people are wearing clothes. Because motion can drive clothes attached to the human body loosely or tightly, we adopt a space-time analysis to mine the information across the posture variations. Using this information, we recover the human body, regardless of the effect of clothes, and measure the human body parameters accurately. Experimental results show that our system can perform more accurate parameter estimation on the human body than state-of-the-art methods.

  2. Human Hand Motion Analysis and Synthesis of Optimal Power Grasps for a Robotic Hand

    OpenAIRE

    Francesca Cordella; Loredana Zollo; Antonino Salerno; Dino Accoto; Eugenio Guglielmelli; Bruno Siciliano

    2014-01-01

    Biologically inspired robotic systems can find important applications in biomedical robotics, since studying and replicating human behaviour can provide new insights into motor recovery, functional substitution and human-robot interaction. The analysis of human hand motion is essential for collecting information about human hand movements useful for generalizing reaching and grasping actions on a robotic system. This paper focuses on the definition and extraction of quantitative indicators fo...

  3. Measuring Accurate Body Parameters of Dressed Humans with Large-Scale Motion Using a Kinect Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Sidan Du; Yang Li; Yao Yu; Yu Zhou; Huanghao Xu

    2013-01-01

    Non-contact human body measurement plays an important role in surveillance, physical healthcare, on-line business and virtual fitting. Current methods for measuring the human body without physical contact usually cannot handle humans wearing clothes, which limits their applicability in public environments. In this paper, we propose an effective solution that can measure accurate parameters of the human body with large-scale motion from a Kinect sensor, assuming that the people are wearing clo...

  4. 42 CFR 419.31 - Ambulatory payment classification (APC) system and payment weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ambulatory payment classification (APC) system and... Outpatient Services § 419.31 Ambulatory payment classification (APC) system and payment weights. (a) APC... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM FOR...

  5. 78 FR 56711 - Health Insurance Exchanges; Application by the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ... accreditation program to conduct surveys for ambulatory surgery centers that wish to participate in the Medicare... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Health Insurance Exchanges; Application by the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care To Be a Recognized Accrediting Entity for the...

  6. Optimal Configuration of Human Motion Tracking Systems: A Systems Engineering Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Human motion tracking systems represent a crucial technology in the area of modeling and simulation. These systems, which allow engineers to capture human motion for study or replication in virtual environments, have broad applications in several research disciplines including human engineering, robotics, and psychology. These systems are based on several sensing paradigms, including electro-magnetic, infrared, and visual recognition. Each of these paradigms requires specialized environments and hardware configurations to optimize performance of the human motion tracking system. Ideally, these systems are used in a laboratory or other facility that was designed to accommodate the particular sensing technology. For example, electromagnetic systems are highly vulnerable to interference from metallic objects, and should be used in a specialized lab free of metal components.

  7. Preference for Point-Light Human Biological Motion in Newborns: Contribution of Translational Displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidet-Ildei, Christel; Kitromilides, Elenitsa; Orliaguet, Jean-Pierre; Pavlova, Marina; Gentaz, Edouard

    2014-01-01

    In human newborns, spontaneous visual preference for biological motion is reported to occur at birth, but the factors underpinning this preference are still in debate. Using a standard visual preferential looking paradigm, 4 experiments were carried out in 3-day-old human newborns to assess the influence of translational displacement on perception…

  8. Rapid telomere motions in live human cells analyzed by highly time-resolved microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xueying

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Telomeres cap chromosome ends and protect the genome. We studied individual telomeres in live human cancer cells. In capturing telomere motions using quantitative imaging to acquire complete high-resolution three-dimensional datasets every second for 200 seconds, telomere dynamics were systematically analyzed. Results The motility of individual telomeres within the same cancer cell nucleus was widely heterogeneous. One class of internal heterochromatic regions of chromosomes analyzed moved more uniformly and showed less motion and heterogeneity than telomeres. The single telomere analyses in cancer cells revealed that shorter telomeres showed more motion, and the more rapid telomere motions were energy dependent. Experimentally increasing bulk telomere length dampened telomere motion. In contrast, telomere uncapping, but not a DNA damaging agent, methyl methanesulfonate, significantly increased telomere motion. Conclusion New methods for seconds-scale, four-dimensional, live cell microscopic imaging and data analysis, allowing systematic tracking of individual telomeres in live cells, have defined a previously undescribed form of telomere behavior in human cells, in which the degree of telomere motion was dependent upon telomere length and functionality.

  9. Emergent Structural Mechanisms for High-Density Collective Motion Inspired by Human Crowds

    CERN Document Server

    Bottinelli, Arianna; Silverberg, Jesse L

    2016-01-01

    Collective motion of large human crowds often depends on their density. In extreme cases like heavy metal concerts and Black Friday sales events, motion is dominated by physical interactions instead of conventional social norms. Here, we study an active matter model inspired by situations when large groups of people gather at a point of common interest. Our analysis takes an approach developed for jammed granular media and identifies Goldstone modes, soft spots, and stochastic resonance as structurally-driven mechanisms for potentially dangerous emergent collective motion.

  10. The development of human factors experimental evaluation technology - 3-dimensional measurement system for motion analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kyung Soo; Pan, Young Hwan; Lee, Ahn Jae; Lee, Kyung Tae; Lim, Chi Hwan; Chang, Pil Sik; Lee, Seok Woo; Han, Sung Wook; Park, Chul Wook [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-07-01

    Measurement of human motion is important in the application of ergonomics. We developed a system which can measure body movement, especially= hand movement using advanced direct video measurement technology. This system has as dynamic accuracy with 1% error and the sampling rate to 6 - 10 Hz, and can analyse the trajectory and speed of the marker. The use of passive marker obviates the need for a marker telemetry system and minimize motion disruption. 18 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs. (author)

  11. Human motion recognition based on features and models selected HMM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haixiang; Zhou, Hongjun

    2015-03-01

    This paper research on the motion recognition based on HMM with Kinect. Kinect provides skeletal data consist of 3D body joints with its lower price and convenience. In this work, several methods are used to determine the optimal subset of features among Cartesian coordinates, distance to hip center, velocity, angle and angular velocity, in order to improve the recognition rate. K-means is used for vector quantization and HMM is used as recognition method. HMM is an effective signal processing method which contains time calibration, provides a learning mechanism and recognition ability. Cluster numbers of K-means, structure and state numbers of HMM are optimized as well. The proposed methods are applied to the MSR Action3D dataset. Results show that the proposed methods obtain better recognition accuracy than the state of the art methods.

  12. Human face detection using motion and color information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yang-Gyun; Bang, Man-Won; Park, Soon-Young; Choi, Kyoung-Ho; Hwang, Jeong-Hyun

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, we present a hardware implementation of a face detector for surveillance applications. To come up with a computationally cheap and fast algorithm with minimal memory requirement, motion and skin color information are fused successfully. More specifically, a newly appeared object is extracted first by comparing average Hue and Saturation values of background image and a current image. Then, the result of skin color filtering of the current image is combined with the result of a newly appeared object. Finally, labeling is performed to locate a true face region. The proposed system is implemented on Altera Cyclone2 using Quartus II 6.1 and ModelSim 6.1. For hardware description language (HDL), Verilog-HDL is used.

  13. Postures and Motions Library Development for Verification of Ground Crew Human Systems Integration Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Mariea Dunn; Dischinger, Charles; Stambolian, Damon; Henderson, Gena

    2012-01-01

    Spacecraft and launch vehicle ground processing activities require a variety of unique human activities. These activities are being documented in a Primitive motion capture library. The Library will be used by the human factors engineering in the future to infuse real to life human activities into the CAD models to verify ground systems human factors requirements. As the Primitive models are being developed for the library the project has selected several current human factors issues to be addressed for the SLS and Orion launch systems. This paper explains how the Motion Capture of unique ground systems activities are being used to verify the human factors analysis requirements for ground system used to process the STS and Orion vehicles, and how the primitive models will be applied to future spacecraft and launch vehicle processing.

  14. Postures and Motions Library Development for Verification of Ground Crew Human Factors Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambolian, Damon; Henderson, Gena; Jackson, Mariea Dunn; Dischinger, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Spacecraft and launch vehicle ground processing activities require a variety of unique human activities. These activities are being documented in a primitive motion capture library. The library will be used by human factors engineering analysts to infuse real to life human activities into the CAD models to verify ground systems human factors requirements. As the primitive models are being developed for the library, the project has selected several current human factors issues to be addressed for the Space Launch System (SLS) and Orion launch systems. This paper explains how the motion capture of unique ground systems activities is being used to verify the human factors engineering requirements for ground systems used to process the SLS and Orion vehicles, and how the primitive models will be applied to future spacecraft and launch vehicle processing.

  15. Markerless human motion capture by Markov random field and dynamic graph cuts with color constraints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jia; WAN ChengKai; ZHANG DianYong; MIAO ZhenJiang; YUAN BaoZong

    2009-01-01

    Currently, many vision-based motion capture systems require passive markers attached to key lca-tions on the human body. However, such systems are intrusive with limited application. The algorithm that we use for human motion capture in this paper is based on Markov random field (MRF) and dynamic graph cuts. It takes full account of the impact of 3D reconstruction error and integrates human motion capture and 3D reconstruction into MRF-MAP framework. For more accurate and robust performance, we extend our algorithm by incorporating color constraints Into the pose estimation process. The ad-vantages of incorporating color constraints are demonstrated by experimental results on several video sequences.

  16. Dynamic engagement of human motion detectors across space-time coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Peter

    2014-06-18

    Motion detection is a fundamental property of the visual system. The gold standard for studying and understanding this function is the motion energy model. This computational tool relies on spatiotemporally selective filters that capture the change in spatial position over time afforded by moving objects. Although the filters are defined in space-time, their human counterparts have never been studied in their native spatiotemporal space but rather in the corresponding frequency domain. When this frequency description is back-projected to spatiotemporal description, not all characteristics of the underlying process are retained, leaving open the possibility that important properties of human motion detection may have remained unexplored. We derived descriptors of motion detectors in native space-time, and discovered a large unexpected dynamic structure involving a >2× change in detector amplitude over the first ∼100 ms. This property is not predicted by the energy model, generalizes across the visual field, and is robust to adaptation; however, it is silenced by surround inhibition and is contrast dependent. We account for all results by extending the motion energy model to incorporate a small network that supports feedforward spread of activation along the motion trajectory via a simple gain-control circuit. PMID:24948800

  17. The Use of the Matrix Method for the Study of Human Motion:Theory and Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong-Ming Li; Jesse A. Fisk; Savio L-Y. Woo

    2003-01-01

    Kinematics has been successfully used to describe body motion without reference to the kinetics (or forces causing the motion). In this article, both the theory and applications of the matrix method are provided to describe complex human motion. After the definition of a Cartesian coordinate frame is introduced, the description of transformations between multiple coordinate frames is given; the decomposition of a transformation matrix into anatomical joint motion parameters (e.g. Euler angles) is then explained. The advantages of the matrix method are illustrated by three examples related to biomechanical studies. The first describes a reaching and grasping task in which matrix transformations are applied to position the hand with respect to an object during grasping. The second example demonstrates the utility of the matrix method in revealing the coupling motion of the wrist between flexion-extension and radial-ulnar deviation. The last example highlights the indispensable use of the matrix method for the study of knee biomechanics, including the description of knee joint kinematics during functional activities and determination of in-situ ligament forces using robotic technology, which has advanced our understanding of the functions of the cruciate ligaments to knee joint kinematics. It is hoped that the theoretical development and biomechanical application examples will help the readers apply the matrix method to research problems related to human motion.

  18. Motion Cueing Algorithm Development: Human-Centered Linear and Nonlinear Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, Jacob A. (Technical Monitor); Telban, Robert J.; Cardullo, Frank M.

    2005-01-01

    While the performance of flight simulator motion system hardware has advanced substantially, the development of the motion cueing algorithm, the software that transforms simulated aircraft dynamics into realizable motion commands, has not kept pace. Prior research identified viable features from two algorithms: the nonlinear "adaptive algorithm", and the "optimal algorithm" that incorporates human vestibular models. A novel approach to motion cueing, the "nonlinear algorithm" is introduced that combines features from both approaches. This algorithm is formulated by optimal control, and incorporates a new integrated perception model that includes both visual and vestibular sensation and the interaction between the stimuli. Using a time-varying control law, the matrix Riccati equation is updated in real time by a neurocomputing approach. Preliminary pilot testing resulted in the optimal algorithm incorporating a new otolith model, producing improved motion cues. The nonlinear algorithm vertical mode produced a motion cue with a time-varying washout, sustaining small cues for longer durations and washing out large cues more quickly compared to the optimal algorithm. The inclusion of the integrated perception model improved the responses to longitudinal and lateral cues. False cues observed with the NASA adaptive algorithm were absent. The neurocomputing approach was crucial in that the number of presentations of an input vector could be reduced to meet the real time requirement without degrading the quality of the motion cues.

  19. A wearable wireless ultrasonic sensor network for human arm motion tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yongbin; Soh, Cheong Boon; Gunawan, Erry; Low, Kay-Soon

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel method for arm flexion/extension angles measurement using wireless ultrasonic sensor network. The approach uses unscented Kalman filter and D-H kinematical chain model to retrieve the joint angles. This method was experimentally validated by calculating the 2-dimensional wrist displacements from one mobile, placed on the point of subject's wrist, and four anchors. The performance of the proposed ultrasonic motion analysis system was bench-marked by commercial camera motion capture system. The experimental results demonstrate that a favorable performance of the proposed system in the estimation of upper limb motion. The proposed system is wireless, easy to wear, to use and much cheaper than current camera system. Thus, it has the potential to become a new and useful tool for routine clinical assessment of human motion. PMID:25571354

  20. Human Motion Recognition Using Ultra-Wideband Radar and Cameras on Mobile Robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Tuanjie; GE Mengmeng

    2009-01-01

    Cameras can reliably detect human motions in a normal environment, but they are usually affected by sudden illumination changes and complex conditions, which are the major obstacles to the reliability and robustness of the system. To solve this problem, a novel integration method was proposed to combine bi-static uitra-wideband radar and cameras. In this recognition system, two cameras are used to localize the object's region, regions while a radar is used to obtain its 3D motion models on a mobile robot. The recognition results can be matched in the 3D motion library in order to recognize its motions. To confirm the effectiveness of the proposed method, the experi-mental results of recognition using vision sensors and those of recognition using the integration method were com-pared in different environments. Higher correct-recognition rate is achieved in the experiment.

  1. Biomedical Wireless Ambulatory Crew Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiel, Alan; Humphreys, Brad

    2009-01-01

    A compact, ambulatory biometric data acquisition system has been developed for space and commercial terrestrial use. BioWATCH (Bio medical Wireless and Ambulatory Telemetry for Crew Health) acquires signals from biomedical sensors using acquisition modules attached to a common data and power bus. Several slots allow the user to configure the unit by inserting sensor-specific modules. The data are then sent real-time from the unit over any commercially implemented wireless network including 802.11b/g, WCDMA, 3G. This system has a distributed computing hierarchy and has a common data controller on each sensor module. This allows for the modularity of the device along with the tailored ability to control the cards using a relatively small master processor. The distributed nature of this system affords the modularity, size, and power consumption that betters the current state of the art in medical ambulatory data acquisition. A new company was created to market this technology.

  2. Human motion classification using a particle filter approach: multiple model particle filtering applied to the micro-Doppler spectrum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, S.; Harmanny, R.; Driessen, H.; Yarovoy, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, a novel motion model-based particle filter implementation is proposed to classify human motion and to estimate key state variables, such as motion type, i.e. running or walking, and the subject’s height. Micro-Doppler spectrum is used as the observable information. The system and me

  3. Segmentation and Classification of Human Actions and Actor Characteristics with 3d Motion Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ali Etemad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have used 3D motion capture data with the aim of detecting and classifying specific human actions. In addition to recognition of basic action classes, actor styles and characteristics such as gender, age, and energy level have also been subject to classification. We have applied and compared three main methods: nearest neighbour search, hidden Markov models, and artificial neural networks. Using these techniques, we have proposed exhaustive algorithms for detection of actions in a motion piece and subsequently classifying the segmented actions and respective characteristics of the actors. We have tested the methods for various sequences and compared the results for a comprehensive evaluation of each of the proposed techniques. Our findings can be largely used for general classification of human motion data for multimedia applications as well as sorting and classifying data sets of human motion data especially those acquired using visual marker-based motion capture systems such as the one employed in this research.

  4. A binocular rivalry study of motion perception in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutoussis, K; Keliris, G; Kourtzi, Z; Logothetis, N

    2005-08-01

    The relationship between brain activity and conscious visual experience is central to our understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying perception. Binocular rivalry, where monocular stimuli compete for perceptual dominance, has been previously used to dissociate the constant stimulus from the varying percept. We report here fMRI results from humans experiencing binocular rivalry under a dichoptic stimulation paradigm that consisted of two drifting random dot patterns with different motion coherence. Each pattern had also a different color, which both enhanced rivalry and was used for reporting which of the two patterns was visible at each time. As the perception of the subjects alternated between coherent motion and motion noise, we examined the effect that these alternations had on the strength of the MR signal throughout the brain. Our results demonstrate that motion perception is able to modulate the activity of several of the visual areas which are known to be involved in motion processing. More specifically, in addition to area V5 which showed the strongest modulation, a higher activity during the perception of motion than during the perception of noise was also clearly observed in areas V3A and LOC, and less so in area V3. In previous studies, these areas had been selectively activated by motion stimuli but whether their activity reflects motion perception or not remained unclear; here we show that they are involved in motion perception as well. The present findings therefore suggest a lack of a clear distinction between 'processing' versus 'perceptual' areas in the brain, but rather that the areas involved in the processing of a specific visual attribute are also part of the neuronal network that is collectively responsible for its perceptual representation. PMID:15924938

  5. Emotion recognition using Kinect motion capture data of human gaits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shun; Cui, Liqing; Zhu, Changye; Li, Baobin

    2016-01-01

    Automatic emotion recognition is of great value in many applications, however, to fully display the application value of emotion recognition, more portable, non-intrusive, inexpensive technologies need to be developed. Human gaits could reflect the walker’s emotional state, and could be an information source for emotion recognition. This paper proposed a novel method to recognize emotional state through human gaits by using Microsoft Kinect, a low-cost, portable, camera-based sensor. Fifty-nine participants’ gaits under neutral state, induced anger and induced happiness were recorded by two Kinect cameras, and the original data were processed through joint selection, coordinate system transformation, sliding window gauss filtering, differential operation, and data segmentation. Features of gait patterns were extracted from 3-dimentional coordinates of 14 main body joints by Fourier transformation and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The classifiers NaiveBayes, RandomForests, LibSVM and SMO (Sequential Minimal Optimization) were trained and evaluated, and the accuracy of recognizing anger and happiness from neutral state achieved 80.5% and 75.4%. Although the results of distinguishing angry and happiness states were not ideal in current study, it showed the feasibility of automatically recognizing emotional states from gaits, with the characteristics meeting the application requirements. PMID:27672492

  6. The use of wearable inertial motion sensors in human lower limb biomechanics studies: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Chan, Yue-Yan

    2010-01-01

    Wearable motion sensors consisting of accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetic sensors are readily available nowadays. The small size and low production costs of motion sensors make them a very good tool for human motions analysis. However, data processing and accuracy of the collected data are important issues for research purposes. In this paper, we aim to review the literature related to usage of inertial sensors in human lower limb biomechanics studies. A systematic search was done in the following search engines: ISI Web of Knowledge, Medline, SportDiscus and IEEE Xplore. Thirty nine full papers and conference abstracts with related topics were included in this review. The type of sensor involved, data collection methods, study design, validation methods and its applications were reviewed.

  7. The Use of Wearable Inertial Motion Sensors in Human Lower Limb Biomechanics Studies: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Yan Chan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Wearable motion sensors consisting of accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetic sensors are readily available nowadays. The small size and low production costs of motion sensors make them a very good tool for human motions analysis. However, data processing and accuracy of the collected data are important issues for research purposes. In this paper, we aim to review the literature related to usage of inertial sensors in human lower limb biomechanics studies. A systematic search was done in the following search engines: ISI Web of Knowledge, Medline, SportDiscus and IEEE Xplore. Thirty nine full papers and conference abstracts with related topics were included in this review. The type of sensor involved, data collection methods, study design, validation methods and its applications were reviewed.

  8. Analysis of Human's Motions Based on Local Mean Decomposition in Through-wall Radar Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qi; Liu, Cai; Zeng, Zhaofa; Li, Jing; Zhang, Xuebing

    2016-04-01

    Observation of human motions through a wall is an important issue in security applications and search-and rescue. Radar has advantages in looking through walls where other sensors give low performance or cannot be used at all. Ultrawideband (UWB) radar has high spatial resolution as a result of employment of ultranarrow pulses. It has abilities to distinguish the closely positioned targets and provide time-lapse information of targets. Moreover, the UWB radar shows good performance in wall penetration when the inherently short pulses spread their energy over a broad frequency range. Human's motions show periodic features including respiration, swing arms and legs, fluctuations of the torso. Detection of human targets is based on the fact that there is always periodic motion due to breathing or other body movements like walking. The radar can gain the reflections from each human body parts and add the reflections at each time sample. The periodic movements will cause micro-Doppler modulation in the reflected radar signals. Time-frequency analysis methods are consider as the effective tools to analysis and extract micro-Doppler effects caused by the periodic movements in the reflected radar signal, such as short-time Fourier transform (STFT), wavelet transform (WT), and Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT).The local mean decomposition (LMD), initially developed by Smith (2005), is to decomposed amplitude and frequency modulated signals into a small set of product functions (PFs), each of which is the product of an envelope signal and a frequency modulated signal from which a time-vary instantaneous phase and instantaneous frequency can be derived. As bypassing the Hilbert transform, the LMD has no demodulation error coming from window effect and involves no negative frequency without physical sense. Also, the instantaneous attributes obtained by LMD are more stable and precise than those obtained by the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) because LMD uses smoothed local

  9. Determination of Gender and Age Based on Pattern of Human Motion Using AdaBoost Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handri, Santoso; Nomura, Shusaku; Nakamura, Kazuo

    Automated human identification by their walking behavior is a challenge attracting much interest among machine vision researchers. However, practical systems for such identification remain to be developed. In this study, a machine learning approach to understand human behavior based on motion imagery was proposed as the basis for developing pedestrian safety information systems. At the front end, image and video processing was performed to separate foreground from background images. Shape-width was then analyzed using 2D discrete wavelet transformation to extract human motion features. Finally, an adaptive boosting (AdaBoost) algorithm was performed to classify human gender and age into its class. The results demonstrated capability of the proposed systems to classify gender and age highly accurately.

  10. 76 FR 6572 - Non-Ambulatory Disabled Veal Calves and Other Non-Ambulatory Disabled Livestock at Slaughter...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-07

    ... euthanized. The second petition, submitted by Farm Sanctuary, requests that the Agency amend the Federal meat... prevent potential human exposure to the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE)agent (``Prohibition of the... Slaughter'' (72 FR 38700)). The Agency had prohibited the slaughter of non-ambulatory disabled cattle...

  11. Controlling Urban Lighting by Human Motion Patterns results from a full Scale Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Esben Skouboe; Andersen, Hans Jørgen; Jensen, Ole B.;

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a full-scale experiment investigating the use of human motion intensities as input for interactive illumination of a town square in the city of Aalborg in Denmark. As illuminators sixteen 3.5 meter high RGB LED lamps were used. The activity on the square was monitored by three...

  12. Population activity in the human dorsal pathway predicts the accuracy of visual motion detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donner, T.H.; Siegel, M.; Oostenveld, R.; Fries, P.; Bauer, M.; Engel, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    A person's ability to detect a weak visual target stimulus varies from one viewing to the next. We tested whether the trial-to-trial fluctuations of neural population activity in the human brain are related to the fluctuations of behavioral performance in a "yes-no" visual motion-detection task. We

  13. The integration of disparity, shading and motion parallax cues for depth perception in humans and monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Schiller, Peter H.; Slocum, Warren M.; Jao, Brian; Weiner, Veronica S.

    2011-01-01

    A visual stimulus display was created that enabled us to examine how effectively the three depth cues of disparity, motion parallax and shading can be integrated in humans and monkeys. The display was designed to allow us to present these three depth cues separately and in various combinations. Depth was processed most effectively and most rapidly when all three cues were presented together indicating that these separate cues are integrated at yet unknown sites in the brain. Testing in humans...

  14. Motion and flexibility in human cytochrome p450 aromatase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhua Jiang

    Full Text Available The crystal structures of human placental aromatase in complex with the substrate androstenedione and exemestane have revealed an androgen-specific active site and the structural basis for higher order organization. However, X-ray structures do not provide accounts of movements due to short-range fluctuations, ligand binding and protein-protein association. In this work, we conduct normal mode analysis (NMA revealing the intrinsic fluctuations of aromatase, deduce the internal modes in membrane-free and membrane-integrated monomers as well as the intermolecular modes in oligomers, and propose a quaternary organization for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane integration. Dynamics of the crystallographic oligomers from NMA is found to be in agreement with the isotropic thermal factors from the X-ray analysis. Calculations of the root mean square fluctuations of the C-alpha atoms from their equilibrium positions confirm that the rigid-core structure of aromatase is intrinsic regardless of the changes in steroid binding interactions, and that aromatase self-association does not deteriorate the rigidity of the catalytic cleft. Furthermore, NMA on membrane-integrated aromatase shows that the internal modes in all likelihood contribute to breathing of the active site access channel. The collective intermolecular hinge bending and twisting modes provide the flexibility in the quaternary association necessary for membrane integration of the aromatase oligomers. Taken together, fluctuations of the active site, the access channel, and the heme-proximal cavity, and a dynamic quaternary organization could all be essential components of the functional aromatase in its role as an ER membrane-embedded steroidogenic enzyme.

  15. Validating hyperbilirubinemia and gut mucosal atrophy with a novel ultramobile ambulatory total parenteral nutrition piglet model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) provides all nutrition intravenously. Although TPN therapy has grown enormously, it causes significant complications, including gut and hepatic dysfunction. Current models use animal tethering which is unlike ambulatory human TPN delivery and is cost prohibitive. We ...

  16. Spatio-Temporal Constrained Human Trajectory Generation from the PIR Motion Detector Sensor Network Data: A Geometric Algebra Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhaoyuan; Yuan, Linwang; Luo, Wen; Feng, Linyao; Lv, Guonian

    2015-12-30

    Passive infrared (PIR) motion detectors, which can support long-term continuous observation, are widely used for human motion analysis. Extracting all possible trajectories from the PIR sensor networks is important. Because the PIR sensor does not log location and individual information, none of the existing methods can generate all possible human motion trajectories that satisfy various spatio-temporal constraints from the sensor activation log data. In this paper, a geometric algebra (GA)-based approach is developed to generate all possible human trajectories from the PIR sensor network data. Firstly, the representation of the geographical network, sensor activation response sequences and the human motion are represented as algebraic elements using GA. The human motion status of each sensor activation are labeled using the GA-based trajectory tracking. Then, a matrix multiplication approach is developed to dynamically generate the human trajectories according to the sensor activation log and the spatio-temporal constraints. The method is tested with the MERL motion database. Experiments show that our method can flexibly extract the major statistical pattern of the human motion. Compared with direct statistical analysis and tracklet graph method, our method can effectively extract all possible trajectories of the human motion, which makes it more accurate. Our method is also likely to provides a new way to filter other passive sensor log data in sensor networks.

  17. Spatio-Temporal Constrained Human Trajectory Generation from the PIR Motion Detector Sensor Network Data: A Geometric Algebra Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoyuan Yu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Passive infrared (PIR motion detectors, which can support long-term continuous observation, are widely used for human motion analysis. Extracting all possible trajectories from the PIR sensor networks is important. Because the PIR sensor does not log location and individual information, none of the existing methods can generate all possible human motion trajectories that satisfy various spatio-temporal constraints from the sensor activation log data. In this paper, a geometric algebra (GA-based approach is developed to generate all possible human trajectories from the PIR sensor network data. Firstly, the representation of the geographical network, sensor activation response sequences and the human motion are represented as algebraic elements using GA. The human motion status of each sensor activation are labeled using the GA-based trajectory tracking. Then, a matrix multiplication approach is developed to dynamically generate the human trajectories according to the sensor activation log and the spatio-temporal constraints. The method is tested with the MERL motion database. Experiments show that our method can flexibly extract the major statistical pattern of the human motion. Compared with direct statistical analysis and tracklet graph method, our method can effectively extract all possible trajectories of the human motion, which makes it more accurate. Our method is also likely to provides a new way to filter other passive sensor log data in sensor networks.

  18. Spatio-Temporal Constrained Human Trajectory Generation from the PIR Motion Detector Sensor Network Data: A Geometric Algebra Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhaoyuan; Yuan, Linwang; Luo, Wen; Feng, Linyao; Lv, Guonian

    2015-01-01

    Passive infrared (PIR) motion detectors, which can support long-term continuous observation, are widely used for human motion analysis. Extracting all possible trajectories from the PIR sensor networks is important. Because the PIR sensor does not log location and individual information, none of the existing methods can generate all possible human motion trajectories that satisfy various spatio-temporal constraints from the sensor activation log data. In this paper, a geometric algebra (GA)-based approach is developed to generate all possible human trajectories from the PIR sensor network data. Firstly, the representation of the geographical network, sensor activation response sequences and the human motion are represented as algebraic elements using GA. The human motion status of each sensor activation are labeled using the GA-based trajectory tracking. Then, a matrix multiplication approach is developed to dynamically generate the human trajectories according to the sensor activation log and the spatio-temporal constraints. The method is tested with the MERL motion database. Experiments show that our method can flexibly extract the major statistical pattern of the human motion. Compared with direct statistical analysis and tracklet graph method, our method can effectively extract all possible trajectories of the human motion, which makes it more accurate. Our method is also likely to provides a new way to filter other passive sensor log data in sensor networks. PMID:26729123

  19. Application Of Three-Dimensional Videography To Human Motion Studies: Constraints, Assumptions, And Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rab, George T.

    1988-02-01

    Three-dimensional human motion analysis has been used for complex kinematic description of abnormal gait in children with neuromuscular disease. Multiple skin markers estimate skeletal segment position, and a sorting and smoothing routine provides marker trajectories. The position and orientation of the moving skeleton in space are derived mathematically from the marker positions, and joint motions are calculated from the Eulerian transformation matrix between linked proximal and distal skeletal segments. Reproduceability has been excellent, and the technique has proven to be a useful adjunct to surgical planning.

  20. Virtual Character Animations from Human Body Motion by Automatic Direct and Inverse Kinematics-based Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Sanna

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Motion capture systems provide an efficient and interactive solution for extracting information related to a human skeleton, which is often exploited to animate virtual characters. When the character cannot be assimilated to an anthropometric shape, the task to map motion capture data onto the armature to be animated could be extremely challenging. This paper presents two methodologies for the automatic mapping of a human skeleton onto virtual character armatures. Kinematics chains of the human skeleton are analyzed in order to map joints, bones and end-effectors onto an arbitrary shaped armatures. Both forward and inverse kinematics are considered. A prototype implementation has been developed by using the Microsoft Kinect as body tracking device. Results show that the proposed solution can already be used to animate truly different characters ranging from a Pixar-like lamp to different kinds of animals.

  1. Energy Harvesting from Upper-Limb Pulling Motions for Miniaturized Human-Powered Generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Jeongjin; Ryu, Mun-ho; Yang, Yoonseok

    2015-01-01

    The human-powered self-generator provides the best solution for individuals who need an instantaneous power supply for travel, outdoor, and emergency use, since it is less dependent on weather conditions and occupies less space than other renewable power supplies. However, many commercial portable self-generators that employ hand-cranking are not used as much as expected in daily lives although they have enough output capacity due to their intensive workload. This study proposes a portable human-powered generator which is designed to obtain mechanical energy from an upper limb pulling motion for improved human motion economy as well as efficient human-mechanical power transfer. A coreless axial-flux permanent magnet machine (APMM) and a flywheel magnet rotor were used in conjunction with a one-way clutched power transmission system in order to obtain effective power from the pulling motion. The developed prototype showed an average energy conversion efficiency of 30.98% and an average output power of 0.32 W with a maximum of 1.89 W. Its small form factor (50 mm × 32 mm × 43.5 mm, 0.05 kg) and the substantial electricity produced verify the effectiveness of the proposed method in the utilization of human power. It is expected that the developed generator could provide a mobile power supply. PMID:26151204

  2. Energy Harvesting from Upper-Limb Pulling Motions for Miniaturized Human-Powered Generators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongjin Yeo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The human-powered self-generator provides the best solution for individuals who need an instantaneous power supply for travel, outdoor, and emergency use, since it is less dependent on weather conditions and occupies less space than other renewable power supplies. However, many commercial portable self-generators that employ hand-cranking are not used as much as expected in daily lives although they have enough output capacity due to their intensive workload. This study proposes a portable human-powered generator which is designed to obtain mechanical energy from an upper limb pulling motion for improved human motion economy as well as efficient human-mechanical power transfer. A coreless axial-flux permanent magnet machine (APMM and a flywheel magnet rotor were used in conjunction with a one-way clutched power transmission system in order to obtain effective power from the pulling motion. The developed prototype showed an average energy conversion efficiency of 30.98% and an average output power of 0.32 W with a maximum of 1.89 W. Its small form factor (50 mm × 32 mm × 43.5 mm, 0.05 kg and the substantial electricity produced verify the effectiveness of the proposed method in the utilization of human power. It is expected that the developed generator could provide a mobile power supply.

  3. Energy Harvesting from Upper-Limb Pulling Motions for Miniaturized Human-Powered Generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Jeongjin; Ryu, Mun-ho; Yang, Yoonseok

    2015-07-03

    The human-powered self-generator provides the best solution for individuals who need an instantaneous power supply for travel, outdoor, and emergency use, since it is less dependent on weather conditions and occupies less space than other renewable power supplies. However, many commercial portable self-generators that employ hand-cranking are not used as much as expected in daily lives although they have enough output capacity due to their intensive workload. This study proposes a portable human-powered generator which is designed to obtain mechanical energy from an upper limb pulling motion for improved human motion economy as well as efficient human-mechanical power transfer. A coreless axial-flux permanent magnet machine (APMM) and a flywheel magnet rotor were used in conjunction with a one-way clutched power transmission system in order to obtain effective power from the pulling motion. The developed prototype showed an average energy conversion efficiency of 30.98% and an average output power of 0.32 W with a maximum of 1.89 W. Its small form factor (50 mm × 32 mm × 43.5 mm, 0.05 kg) and the substantial electricity produced verify the effectiveness of the proposed method in the utilization of human power. It is expected that the developed generator could provide a mobile power supply.

  4. Observation and analysis of high-speed human motion with frequent occlusion in a large area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of computer vision technology in collecting and analyzing statistics during sports matches or training sessions is expected to provide valuable information for tactics improvement. However, the measurements published in the literature so far are either unreliably documented to be used in training planning due to their limitations or unsuitable for studying high-speed motion in large area with frequent occlusions. A sports annotation system is introduced in this paper for tracking high-speed non-rigid human motion over a large playing area with the aid of motion camera, taking short track speed skating competitions as an example. The proposed system is composed of two sub-systems: precise camera motion compensation and accurate motion acquisition. In the video registration step, a distinctive invariant point feature detector (probability density grads detector) and a global parallax based matching points filter are used, to provide reliable and robust matching across a large range of affine distortion and illumination change. In the motion acquisition step, a two regions' relationship constrained joint color model and Markov chain Monte Carlo based joint particle filter are emphasized, by dividing the human body into two relative key regions. Several field tests are performed to assess measurement errors, including comparison to popular algorithms. With the help of the system presented, the system obtains position data on a 30 m × 60 m large rink with root-mean-square error better than 0.3975 m, velocity and acceleration data with absolute error better than 1.2579 m s−1 and 0.1494 m s−2, respectively

  5. Human discrimination of visual direction of motion with and without smooth pursuit eye movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukowski, Anton E.; Pirog, Kathleen A.; Beutter, Brent R.; Brooks, Kevin R.; Stone, Leland S.

    2003-01-01

    It has long been known that ocular pursuit of a moving target has a major influence on its perceived speed (Aubert, 1886; Fleischl, 1882). However, little is known about the effect of smooth pursuit on the perception of target direction. Here we compare the precision of human visual-direction judgments under two oculomotor conditions (pursuit vs. fixation). We also examine the impact of stimulus duration (200 ms vs. 800 ms) and absolute direction (cardinal vs. oblique). Our main finding is that direction discrimination thresholds in the fixation and pursuit conditions are indistinguishable. Furthermore, the two oculomotor conditions showed oblique effects of similar magnitudes. These data suggest that the neural direction signals supporting perception are the same with or without pursuit, despite remarkably different retinal stimulation. During fixation, the stimulus information is restricted to large, purely peripheral retinal motion, while during steady-state pursuit, the stimulus information consists of small, unreliable foveal retinal motion and a large efference-copy signal. A parsimonious explanation of our findings is that the signal limiting the precision of direction judgments is a neural estimate of target motion in head-centered (or world-centered) coordinates (i.e., a combined retinal and eye motion signal) as found in the medial superior temporal area (MST), and not simply an estimate of retinal motion as found in the middle temporal area (MT).

  6. Human Classification Based on Gestural Motions by Using Components of PCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lately, a study of human capabilities with the aim to be integrated into machine is the famous topic to be discussed. Moreover, human are bless with special abilities that they can hear, see, sense, speak, think and understand each other. Giving such abilities to machine for improvement of human life is researcher's aim for better quality of life in the future. This research was concentrating on human gesture, specifically arm motions for differencing the individuality which lead to the development of the hand gesture database. We try to differentiate the human physical characteristic based on hand gesture represented by arm trajectories. Subjects are selected from different type of the body sizes, and then acquired data undergo resampling process. The results discuss the classification of human based on arm trajectories by using Principle Component Analysis (PCA)

  7. Sensory versus motor loci for integration of multiple motion signals in smooth pursuit eye movements and human motion perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yu-Qiong; Lisberger, Stephen G

    2011-08-01

    We have investigated how visual motion signals are integrated for smooth pursuit eye movements by measuring the initiation of pursuit in monkeys for pairs of moving stimuli of the same or differing luminance. The initiation of pursuit for pairs of stimuli of the same luminance could be accounted for as a vector average of the responses to the two stimuli singly. When stimuli comprised two superimposed patches of moving dot textures, the brighter stimulus suppressed the inputs from the dimmer stimulus, so that the initiation of pursuit became winner-take-all when the luminance ratio of the two stimuli was 8 or greater. The dominance of the brighter stimulus could be not attributed to either the latency difference or the ratio of the eye accelerations for the bright and dim stimuli presented singly. When stimuli comprised either spot targets or two patches of dots moving across separate locations in the visual field, the brighter stimulus had a much weaker suppressive influence; the initiation of pursuit could be accounted for by nearly equal vector averaging of the responses to the two stimuli singly. The suppressive effects of the brighter stimulus also appeared in human perceptual judgments, but again only for superimposed stimuli. We conclude that one locus of the interaction of two moving visual stimuli is shared by perception and action and resides in local inhibitory connections in the visual cortex. A second locus resides deeper in sensory-motor processing and may be more closely related to action selection than to stimulus selection. PMID:21593392

  8. Folded Elastic Strip-Based Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Harvesting Human Motion Energy for Multiple Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yue; Wang, Bo; Dai, Shuge; Liu, Guanlin; Pu, Yanping; Hu, Chenguo

    2015-09-16

    A folded elastic strip-based triboelectric nanogenerator (FS-TENG) made from two folded double-layer elastic strips of Al/PET and PTFE/PET can achieve multiple functions by low frequency mechanical motion. A single FS-TENG with strip width of 3 cm and length of 27 cm can generate a maximum output current, open-circuit voltage, and peak power of 55 μA, 840 V, and 7.33 mW at deformation frequency of 4 Hz with amplitude of 2.5 cm, respectively. This FS-TENG can work as a weight sensor due to its good elasticity. An integrated generator assembled by four FS-TENGs (IFS-TENG) can harvest the energy of human motion like flapping hands and walking steps. In addition, the IFS-TENG combined with electromagnetically induced electricity can achieve a completely self-driven doorbell with flashing lights. Moreover, a box-like generator integrated by four IFS-TENGs inside can work in horizontal or random motion modes and can be improved to harvest energy in all directions. This work promotes the research of completely self-driven systems and energy harvesting of human motion for applications in our daily life.

  9. Folded Elastic Strip-Based Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Harvesting Human Motion Energy for Multiple Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yue; Wang, Bo; Dai, Shuge; Liu, Guanlin; Pu, Yanping; Hu, Chenguo

    2015-09-16

    A folded elastic strip-based triboelectric nanogenerator (FS-TENG) made from two folded double-layer elastic strips of Al/PET and PTFE/PET can achieve multiple functions by low frequency mechanical motion. A single FS-TENG with strip width of 3 cm and length of 27 cm can generate a maximum output current, open-circuit voltage, and peak power of 55 μA, 840 V, and 7.33 mW at deformation frequency of 4 Hz with amplitude of 2.5 cm, respectively. This FS-TENG can work as a weight sensor due to its good elasticity. An integrated generator assembled by four FS-TENGs (IFS-TENG) can harvest the energy of human motion like flapping hands and walking steps. In addition, the IFS-TENG combined with electromagnetically induced electricity can achieve a completely self-driven doorbell with flashing lights. Moreover, a box-like generator integrated by four IFS-TENGs inside can work in horizontal or random motion modes and can be improved to harvest energy in all directions. This work promotes the research of completely self-driven systems and energy harvesting of human motion for applications in our daily life. PMID:26305461

  10. Biomechanical energy harvesting from human motion: theory, state of the art, design guidelines, and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapiro Amir

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biomechanical energy harvesting from human motion presents a promising clean alternative to electrical power supplied by batteries for portable electronic devices and for computerized and motorized prosthetics. We present the theory of energy harvesting from the human body and describe the amount of energy that can be harvested from body heat and from motions of various parts of the body during walking, such as heel strike; ankle, knee, hip, shoulder, and elbow joint motion; and center of mass vertical motion. Methods We evaluated major motions performed during walking and identified the amount of work the body expends and the portion of recoverable energy. During walking, there are phases of the motion at the joints where muscles act as brakes and energy is lost to the surroundings. During those phases of motion, the required braking force or torque can be replaced by an electrical generator, allowing energy to be harvested at the cost of only minimal additional effort. The amount of energy that can be harvested was estimated experimentally and from literature data. Recommendations for future directions are made on the basis of our results in combination with a review of state-of-the-art biomechanical energy harvesting devices and energy conversion methods. Results For a device that uses center of mass motion, the maximum amount of energy that can be harvested is approximately 1 W per kilogram of device weight. For a person weighing 80 kg and walking at approximately 4 km/h, the power generation from the heel strike is approximately 2 W. For a joint-mounted device based on generative braking, the joints generating the most power are the knees (34 W and the ankles (20 W. Conclusions Our theoretical calculations align well with current device performance data. Our results suggest that the most energy can be harvested from the lower limb joints, but to do so efficiently, an innovative and light-weight mechanical design is

  11. Using Fuzzy Gaussian Inference and Genetic Programming to Classify 3D Human Motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Mehdi; Liu, Honghai

    This research introduces and builds on the concept of Fuzzy Gaussian Inference (FGI) (Khoury and Liu in Proceedings of UKCI, 2008 and IEEE Workshop on Robotic Intelligence in Informationally Structured Space (RiiSS 2009), 2009) as a novel way to build Fuzzy Membership Functions that map to hidden Probability Distributions underlying human motions. This method is now combined with a Genetic Programming Fuzzy rule-based system in order to classify boxing moves from natural human Motion Capture data. In this experiment, FGI alone is able to recognise seven different boxing stances simultaneously with an accuracy superior to a GMM-based classifier. Results seem to indicate that adding an evolutionary Fuzzy Inference Engine on top of FGI improves the accuracy of the classifier in a consistent way.

  12. A stretchable strain sensor based on a metal nanoparticle thin film for human motion detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaehwan; Kim, Sanghyeok; Lee, Jinjae; Yang, Daejong; Park, Byong Chon; Ryu, Seunghwa; Park, Inkyu

    2014-09-01

    Wearable strain sensors for human motion detection are being highlighted in various fields such as medical, entertainment and sports industry. In this paper, we propose a new type of stretchable strain sensor that can detect both tensile and compressive strains and can be fabricated by a very simple process. A silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) thin film patterned on the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp by a single-step direct transfer process is used as the strain sensing material. The working principle is the change in the electrical resistance caused by the opening/closure of micro-cracks under mechanical deformation. The fabricated stretchable strain sensor shows highly sensitive and durable sensing performances in various tensile/compressive strains, long-term cyclic loading and relaxation tests. We demonstrate the applications of our stretchable strain sensors such as flexible pressure sensors and wearable human motion detection devices with high sensitivity, response speed and mechanical robustness.Wearable strain sensors for human motion detection are being highlighted in various fields such as medical, entertainment and sports industry. In this paper, we propose a new type of stretchable strain sensor that can detect both tensile and compressive strains and can be fabricated by a very simple process. A silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) thin film patterned on the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp by a single-step direct transfer process is used as the strain sensing material. The working principle is the change in the electrical resistance caused by the opening/closure of micro-cracks under mechanical deformation. The fabricated stretchable strain sensor shows highly sensitive and durable sensing performances in various tensile/compressive strains, long-term cyclic loading and relaxation tests. We demonstrate the applications of our stretchable strain sensors such as flexible pressure sensors and wearable human motion detection devices with high sensitivity, response

  13. Human Arm Motion Tracking by Orientation-Based Fusion of Inertial Sensors and Kinect Using Unscented Kalman Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atrsaei, Arash; Salarieh, Hassan; Alasty, Aria

    2016-09-01

    Due to various applications of human motion capture techniques, developing low-cost methods that would be applicable in nonlaboratory environments is under consideration. MEMS inertial sensors and Kinect are two low-cost devices that can be utilized in home-based motion capture systems, e.g., home-based rehabilitation. In this work, an unscented Kalman filter approach was developed based on the complementary properties of Kinect and the inertial sensors to fuse the orientation data of these two devices for human arm motion tracking during both stationary shoulder joint position and human body movement. A new measurement model of the fusion algorithm was obtained that can compensate for the inertial sensors drift problem in high dynamic motions and also joints occlusion in Kinect. The efficiency of the proposed algorithm was evaluated by an optical motion tracker system. The errors were reduced by almost 50% compared to cases when either inertial sensor or Kinect measurements were utilized. PMID:27428461

  14. Human Arm Motion Tracking by Orientation-Based Fusion of Inertial Sensors and Kinect Using Unscented Kalman Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atrsaei, Arash; Salarieh, Hassan; Alasty, Aria

    2016-09-01

    Due to various applications of human motion capture techniques, developing low-cost methods that would be applicable in nonlaboratory environments is under consideration. MEMS inertial sensors and Kinect are two low-cost devices that can be utilized in home-based motion capture systems, e.g., home-based rehabilitation. In this work, an unscented Kalman filter approach was developed based on the complementary properties of Kinect and the inertial sensors to fuse the orientation data of these two devices for human arm motion tracking during both stationary shoulder joint position and human body movement. A new measurement model of the fusion algorithm was obtained that can compensate for the inertial sensors drift problem in high dynamic motions and also joints occlusion in Kinect. The efficiency of the proposed algorithm was evaluated by an optical motion tracker system. The errors were reduced by almost 50% compared to cases when either inertial sensor or Kinect measurements were utilized.

  15. Contribution to a marker-free system for human motion analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calais, Elodie F.; Legrand, Louis; Voisin, Yvon; Diou, Alan

    2002-07-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to human gait analysis using a marker-free system. The devised acquisition system is composed of three synchronized and calibrated charge coupled device cameras. The aim of this work is to recognize in gray level image sequences the leg of a walking human and to reconstruct it in the three-dimensional space. An articulated three- dimensional (3D) model of the human body, based on the use of tapered superquadric curves, is first introduced. A motion-based segmentation, using morphological operators, is then applied to the image sequences in order to extract the boundaries of the leg in motion. A reconstruction process, based on the use of a least median of squares regression is next performed, to determine the location of the human body in the 3D space. Finally, a spatial coherence is imposed on the reconstructed curves in order to better fit the anatomy of the leg and to take into account the articulated model. Each stage of the proposed methodology has been tested both on synthetic images and on real world images of walking humans. The obtained results suggest that this approach is quite promising and should be useful in the study of the gait.

  16. Compression of Human Motion Animation Using the Reduction of Interjoint Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shiyu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We propose two compression methods for the human motion in 3D space, based on the forward and inverse kinematics. In a motion chain, a movement of each joint is represented by a series of vector signals in 3D space. In general, specific types of joints such as end effectors often require higher precision than other general types of joints in, for example, CG animation and robot manipulation. The first method, which combines wavelet transform and forward kinematics, enables users to reconstruct the end effectors more precisely. Moreover, progressive decoding can be realized. The distortion of parent joint coming from quantization affects its child joint in turn and is accumulated to the end effector. To address this problem and to control the movement of the whole body, we propose a prediction method further based on the inverse kinematics. This method achieves efficient compression with a higher compression ratio and higher quality of the motion data. By comparing with some conventional methods, we demonstrate the advantage of ours with typical motions.

  17. Compression of Human Motion Animation Using the Reduction of Interjoint Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyu Li

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose two compression methods for the human motion in 3D space, based on the forward and inverse kinematics. In a motion chain, a movement of each joint is represented by a series of vector signals in 3D space. In general, specific types of joints such as end effectors often require higher precision than other general types of joints in, for example, CG animation and robot manipulation. The first method, which combines wavelet transform and forward kinematics, enables users to reconstruct the end effectors more precisely. Moreover, progressive decoding can be realized. The distortion of parent joint coming from quantization affects its child joint in turn and is accumulated to the end effector. To address this problem and to control the movement of the whole body, we propose a prediction method further based on the inverse kinematics. This method achieves efficient compression with a higher compression ratio and higher quality of the motion data. By comparing with some conventional methods, we demonstrate the advantage of ours with typical motions.

  18. Failure of the human lumbar motion-segments resulting from anterior shear fatigue loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypiec, Daniel M; Nagel, Katrin; Sellenschloh, Kay; Klein, Anke; Püschel, Klaus; Morlock, Michael M; Huber, Gerd

    2016-08-01

    An in-vitro experiment was designed to investigate the mode of failure following shear fatigue loading of lumbar motion-segments. Human male lumbar motion-segments (age 32-42 years, n=6) were immersed in Ringer solution at 37°C and repeatedly loaded, using a modified materials testing machine. Fatigue loading consisted of a sinusoidal shear load from 0 N to 1,500 N (750 N±750 N) applied to the upper vertebra of the motion-segment, at a frequency of 5 Hz. During fatigue experiments, several failure events were observed in the dynamic creep curves. Post-test x-ray, CT and dissection revealed that all specimens had delamination of the intervertebral disc. Anterior shear fatigue predominantly resulted in fracture of the apophyseal processes of the upper vertebrae (n=4). Exposure to the anterior shear fatigue loading caused motion-segment instability and resulted in vertebral slip corresponding to grade I and 'mild' grade II spondylolisthesis, as observed clinically. PMID:26829975

  19. Failure of the human lumbar motion-segments resulting from anterior shear fatigue loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    SKRZYPIEC, Daniel M.; NAGEL, Katrin; SELLENSCHLOH, Kay; KLEIN, Anke; PÜSCHEL, Klaus; MORLOCK, Michael M.; HUBER, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    An in-vitro experiment was designed to investigate the mode of failure following shear fatigue loading of lumbar motion-segments. Human male lumbar motion-segments (age 32–42 years, n=6) were immersed in Ringer solution at 37°C and repeatedly loaded, using a modified materials testing machine. Fatigue loading consisted of a sinusoidal shear load from 0 N to 1,500 N (750 N±750 N) applied to the upper vertebra of the motion-segment, at a frequency of 5 Hz. During fatigue experiments, several failure events were observed in the dynamic creep curves. Post-test x-ray, CT and dissection revealed that all specimens had delamination of the intervertebral disc. Anterior shear fatigue predominantly resulted in fracture of the apophyseal processes of the upper vertebrae (n=4). Exposure to the anterior shear fatigue loading caused motion-segment instability and resulted in vertebral slip corresponding to grade I and ‘mild’ grade II spondylolisthesis, as observed clinically. PMID:26829975

  20. Towards ambulatory mental stress measurement from physiological parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijsman, Jacqueline; Vullers, Ruud; Polito, Salvatore; Agell, Carlos; Penders, Julien; Hermens, Hermie

    2013-01-01

    Ambulatory mental stress monitoring requires longterm physiological measurements. This paper presents a data collection protocol for ambulatory recording of physiological parameters for stress measurement purposes. We present a wearable sensor system for ambulatory recording of ECG, EMG, respiration

  1. The dart-throwing motion of the wrist: is it unique to humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Scott W; Crisco, Joseph J; Orr, Caley M; Marzke, Mary W

    2006-11-01

    Kinematic analysis has shown a near-stationary proximal carpal row during the dart-thrower's motion, which is believed to provide a stable platform for the generation of force and accuracy during certain power and precision grip activities. This finding is consistent with evidence in the human hand of adaptations that enabled effective manipulation of stones, cylindric wood, and bone tools for throwing and clubbing. There are at least two possible explanations for the observed human proximal carpal row kinematics. One is that it is retained from a previous common ancestor with great apes and previously adapted to some form of foraging or locomotor behavior involving the hands, but was recruited for tool use after we diverged from the apes. The second is that it evolved after our divergence from apes, in synchrony with adaptations in the human hand to the manipulation of tools, and central to the development of the human's unique ability to aim and accelerate tools and weapons.

  2. Long-Range Motion Trajectories Extraction of Articulated Human Using Mesh Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuanyuan; He, Xiaohai; Kang, Byeongkeun; Song, Haiying; Nguyen, Truong Q.

    2016-04-01

    This letter presents a novel approach to extract reliable dense and long-range motion trajectories of articulated human in a video sequence. Compared with existing approaches that emphasize temporal consistency of each tracked point, we also consider the spatial structure of tracked points on the articulated human. We treat points as a set of vertices, and build a triangle mesh to join them in image space. The problem of extracting long-range motion trajectories is changed to the issue of consistency of mesh evolution over time. First, self-occlusion is detected by a novel mesh-based method and an adaptive motion estimation method is proposed to initialize mesh between successive frames. Furthermore, we propose an iterative algorithm to efficiently adjust vertices of mesh for a physically plausible deformation, which can meet the local rigidity of mesh and silhouette constraints. Finally, we compare the proposed method with the state-of-the-art methods on a set of challenging sequences. Evaluations demonstrate that our method achieves favorable performance in terms of both accuracy and integrity of extracted trajectories.

  3. Robotic Assistance of Human Motion using Active-backdrivability on a Geared Electromagnetic Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Jorge Claros

    2016-03-01

    bandwidth and also providing controllable assistance and resistance forces to the user’s movements, without the use of any biological signal. Validation of the proposed approach is shown by the construction of a powered orthosis for the knee, used to test the system’s performance under real human motion conditions. The proposed system was tested on one healthy subject by measuring electromyographic levels both with and without the orthosis, under controlled flexion and extension cycles. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach in detecting the user’s intentions regarding motion, reducing and increasing muscular activity when configured for assistance and resistance, respectively, and also increasing the transparency of the actuation system when perfect tracking of the limbs is needed.

  4. Determinants of motion response anisotropies in human early visual cortex: the role of configuration and eccentricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Ryan T; Watson, Tamara L; Clifford, Colin W G

    2014-10-15

    Anisotropies in the cortical representation of various stimulus parameters can reveal the fundamental mechanisms by which sensory properties are analysed and coded by the brain. One example is the preference for motion radial to the point of fixation (i.e. centripetal or centrifugal) exhibited in mammalian visual cortex. In two experiments, this study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to explore the determinants of these radial biases for motion in functionally-defined areas of human early visual cortex, and in particular their dependence upon eccentricity which has been indicated in recent reports. In one experiment, the cortical response to wide-field random dot kinematograms forming 16 different complex motion patterns (including centrifugal, centripetal, rotational and spiral motion) was measured. The response was analysed according to preferred eccentricity within four different eccentricity ranges. Response anisotropies were characterised by enhanced activity for centripetal or centrifugal patterns that changed systematically with eccentricity in visual areas V1-V3 and hV4 (but not V3A/B or V5/MT+). Responses evolved from a preference for centrifugal over centripetal patterns close to the fovea, to a preference for centripetal over centrifugal at the most peripheral region stimulated, in agreement with previous work. These effects were strongest in V2 and V3. In a second experiment, the stimuli were restricted to within narrow annuli either close to the fovea (0.75-1.88°) or further in the periphery (4.82-6.28°), in a way that preserved the local motion information available in the first experiment. In this configuration a preference for radial motion (centripetal or centrifugal) persisted but the dependence upon eccentricity disappeared. Again this was clearest in V2 and V3. A novel interpretation of the dependence upon eccentricity of motion anisotropies in early visual cortex is offered that takes into account the spatiotemporal

  5. Self-organizing neural integration of pose-motion features for human action recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, German I; Weber, Cornelius; Wermter, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The visual recognition of complex, articulated human movements is fundamental for a wide range of artificial systems oriented toward human-robot communication, action classification, and action-driven perception. These challenging tasks may generally involve the processing of a huge amount of visual information and learning-based mechanisms for generalizing a set of training actions and classifying new samples. To operate in natural environments, a crucial property is the efficient and robust recognition of actions, also under noisy conditions caused by, for instance, systematic sensor errors and temporarily occluded persons. Studies of the mammalian visual system and its outperforming ability to process biological motion information suggest separate neural pathways for the distinct processing of pose and motion features at multiple levels and the subsequent integration of these visual cues for action perception. We present a neurobiologically-motivated approach to achieve noise-tolerant action recognition in real time. Our model consists of self-organizing Growing When Required (GWR) networks that obtain progressively generalized representations of sensory inputs and learn inherent spatio-temporal dependencies. During the training, the GWR networks dynamically change their topological structure to better match the input space. We first extract pose and motion features from video sequences and then cluster actions in terms of prototypical pose-motion trajectories. Multi-cue trajectories from matching action frames are subsequently combined to provide action dynamics in the joint feature space. Reported experiments show that our approach outperforms previous results on a dataset of full-body actions captured with a depth sensor, and ranks among the best results for a public benchmark of domestic daily actions. PMID:26106323

  6. Self-organizing neural integration of pose-motion features for human action recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, German I; Weber, Cornelius; Wermter, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The visual recognition of complex, articulated human movements is fundamental for a wide range of artificial systems oriented toward human-robot communication, action classification, and action-driven perception. These challenging tasks may generally involve the processing of a huge amount of visual information and learning-based mechanisms for generalizing a set of training actions and classifying new samples. To operate in natural environments, a crucial property is the efficient and robust recognition of actions, also under noisy conditions caused by, for instance, systematic sensor errors and temporarily occluded persons. Studies of the mammalian visual system and its outperforming ability to process biological motion information suggest separate neural pathways for the distinct processing of pose and motion features at multiple levels and the subsequent integration of these visual cues for action perception. We present a neurobiologically-motivated approach to achieve noise-tolerant action recognition in real time. Our model consists of self-organizing Growing When Required (GWR) networks that obtain progressively generalized representations of sensory inputs and learn inherent spatio-temporal dependencies. During the training, the GWR networks dynamically change their topological structure to better match the input space. We first extract pose and motion features from video sequences and then cluster actions in terms of prototypical pose-motion trajectories. Multi-cue trajectories from matching action frames are subsequently combined to provide action dynamics in the joint feature space. Reported experiments show that our approach outperforms previous results on a dataset of full-body actions captured with a depth sensor, and ranks among the best results for a public benchmark of domestic daily actions.

  7. Self-Organizing Neural Integration of Pose-Motion Features for Human Action Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    German Ignacio Parisi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The visual recognition of complex, articulated human movements is fundamental for a wide range of artificial systems oriented towards human-robot communication, action classification, and action-driven perception. These challenging tasks may generally involve the processing of a huge amount of visual information and learning-based mechanisms for generalizing a set of training actions and classifying new samples. To operate in natural environments, a crucial property is the efficient and robust recognition of actions, also under noisy conditions caused by, for instance, systematic sensor errors and temporarily occluded persons. Studies of the mammalian visual system and its outperforming ability to process biological motion information suggest separate neural pathways for the distinct processing of pose and motion features at multiple levels and the subsequent integration of these visual cues for action perception. We present a neurobiologically-motivated approach to achieve noise-tolerant action recognition in real time. Our model consists of self-organizing Growing When Required (GWR networks that obtain progressively generalized representations of sensory inputs and learn inherent spatiotemporal dependencies. During the training, the GWR networks dynamically change their topological structure to better match the input space. We first extract pose and motion features from video sequences and then cluster actions in terms of prototypical pose-motion trajectories. Multi-cue trajectories from matching action frames are subsequently combined to provide action dynamics in the joint feature space. Reported experiments show that our approach outperforms previous results on a dataset of full-body actions captured with a depth sensor, and ranks among the best 21 results for a public benchmark of domestic daily actions.

  8. Ambulatory spine surgery: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Evan O; Brietzke, Sasha C; Weinberg, Alan D; McAnany, Steven J; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Cho, Samuel K; Hecht, Andrew C

    2014-08-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional study. Objective To assess the current practices of spine surgeons performing ambulatory surgery in the United States. Methods An electronic survey was distributed to members of the International Society for the Advancement of Spine Surgery. Data were initially examined in a univariate manner; variables with a p value ambulatory spine surgery, and 49.1% were investors in an ambulatory surgery center. Surgeon investors in ambulatory surgery centers were more likely to perform procedures of increased complexity than noninvestors, though limited data precluded a statistical correlation. Surgeons in private practice were more likely to perform ambulatory surgery (94.3%; p = 0.0176), and nonacademic surgeons were both more likely to invest in ambulatory surgery centers (p = 0.0024) and perform surgery at least part of the time in a surgery center (p = 0.0039). Conclusions Though the numbers were too few to calculate statistical significance, there was a trend toward the performance of high-risk procedures on an ambulatory basis being undertaken by those with investment status in an ambulatory center. It is possible that this plays a role in the decision to perform these procedures in this setting versus that of a hospital, where a patient may have better access to care should a complication arise requiring emergent assessment and treatment by a physician. This decision should divest itself of financial incentives and focus entirely on patient safety.

  9. Optimizing anesthesia techniques in the ambulatory setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Galvin

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAmbulatory surgery refers to the process of admitting patients, administering anesthesia and surgical care, and discharging patients home following an appropriate level of recovery on the same day. The word ambulatory is derived from the latin word ambulare, which means ''to walk''. This

  10. Surgical Site Infection Surveillance Following Ambulatory Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Rhee, Chanu; Huang, Susan S.; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I.; Kaganov, Rebecca; Bruce, Christina; Lankiewicz, Julie; Platt, Richard; Yokoe, Deborah S.

    2015-01-01

    We assessed 4045 ambulatory surgery patients for surgical site infection (SSI) using claims-based triggers for medical chart review. Of 98 patients flagged by codes suggestive of SSI, 35 had confirmed SSIs. SSI rates ranged from 0 to 3.2% for common procedures. Claims may be useful for SSI surveillance following ambulatory surgery.

  11. On the Orientation Error of IMU: Investigating Static and Dynamic Accuracy Targeting Human Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Luca; Taffoni, Fabrizio; Formica, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy in orientation tracking attainable by using inertial measurement units (IMU) when measuring human motion is still an open issue. This study presents a systematic quantification of the accuracy under static conditions and typical human dynamics, simulated by means of a robotic arm. Two sensor fusion algorithms, selected from the classes of the stochastic and complementary methods, are considered. The proposed protocol implements controlled and repeatable experimental conditions and validates accuracy for an extensive set of dynamic movements, that differ in frequency and amplitude of the movement. We found that dynamic performance of the tracking is only slightly dependent on the sensor fusion algorithm. Instead, it is dependent on the amplitude and frequency of the movement and a major contribution to the error derives from the orientation of the rotation axis w.r.t. the gravity vector. Absolute and relative errors upper bounds are found respectively in the range [0.7° ÷ 8.2°] and [1.0° ÷ 10.3°]. Alongside dynamic, static accuracy is thoroughly investigated, also with an emphasis on convergence behavior of the different algorithms. Reported results emphasize critical issues associated with the use of this technology and provide a baseline level of performance for the human motion related application. PMID:27612100

  12. Extract the Relational Information of Static Features and Motion Features for Human Activities Recognition in Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Both static features and motion features have shown promising performance in human activities recognition task. However, the information included in these features is insufficient for complex human activities. In this paper, we propose extracting relational information of static features and motion features for human activities recognition. The videos are represented by a classical Bag-of-Word (BoW) model which is useful in many works. To get a compact and discriminative codebook with small dimension, we employ the divisive algorithm based on KL-divergence to reconstruct the codebook. After that, to further capture strong relational information, we construct a bipartite graph to model the relationship between words of different feature set. Then we use a k-way partition to create a new codebook in which similar words are getting together. With this new codebook, videos can be represented by a new BoW vector with strong relational information. Moreover, we propose a method to compute new clusters from the divisive algorithm's projective function. We test our work on the several datasets and obtain very promising results.

  13. On the Orientation Error of IMU: Investigating Static and Dynamic Accuracy Targeting Human Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Luca; Taffoni, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy in orientation tracking attainable by using inertial measurement units (IMU) when measuring human motion is still an open issue. This study presents a systematic quantification of the accuracy under static conditions and typical human dynamics, simulated by means of a robotic arm. Two sensor fusion algorithms, selected from the classes of the stochastic and complementary methods, are considered. The proposed protocol implements controlled and repeatable experimental conditions and validates accuracy for an extensive set of dynamic movements, that differ in frequency and amplitude of the movement. We found that dynamic performance of the tracking is only slightly dependent on the sensor fusion algorithm. Instead, it is dependent on the amplitude and frequency of the movement and a major contribution to the error derives from the orientation of the rotation axis w.r.t. the gravity vector. Absolute and relative errors upper bounds are found respectively in the range [0.7° ÷ 8.2°] and [1.0° ÷ 10.3°]. Alongside dynamic, static accuracy is thoroughly investigated, also with an emphasis on convergence behavior of the different algorithms. Reported results emphasize critical issues associated with the use of this technology and provide a baseline level of performance for the human motion related application. PMID:27612100

  14. Complex Human Activity Recognition Using Smartphone and Wrist-Worn Motion Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J M

    2016-03-24

    The position of on-body motion sensors plays an important role in human activity recognition. Most often, mobile phone sensors at the trouser pocket or an equivalent position are used for this purpose. However, this position is not suitable for recognizing activities that involve hand gestures, such as smoking, eating, drinking coffee and giving a talk. To recognize such activities, wrist-worn motion sensors are used. However, these two positions are mainly used in isolation. To use richer context information, we evaluate three motion sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope and linear acceleration sensor) at both wrist and pocket positions. Using three classifiers, we show that the combination of these two positions outperforms the wrist position alone, mainly at smaller segmentation windows. Another problem is that less-repetitive activities, such as smoking, eating, giving a talk and drinking coffee, cannot be recognized easily at smaller segmentation windows unlike repetitive activities, like walking, jogging and biking. For this purpose, we evaluate the effect of seven window sizes (2-30 s) on thirteen activities and show how increasing window size affects these various activities in different ways. We also propose various optimizations to further improve the recognition of these activities. For reproducibility, we make our dataset publicly available.

  15. On using the Microsoft Kinect$^{\\rm TM}$ sensor in the analysis of human motion

    CERN Document Server

    Malinowski, M J; Roth, S

    2014-01-01

    The present paper explores the possibility of using the Microsoft Kinect$^{\\rm TM}$ sensor in the analysis of human motion; we attempt the validation of the output of the original version of the sensor on the basis of a marker-based system which is assumed to provide the reference solution (baseline, `ground truth'). The similarity between the two outputs is assessed after comparing a number of waveforms, representing the variation within the gait cycle of quantities which are commonly used in order to characterise (and model) motion. The data acquisition involved a commercially-available treadmill and five velocity settings: walking data were acquired at $5$ km/h, running data at $8$, $10$, $11$, and $12$ km/h. The analysis revealed three problems with such an application of the Kinect sensor: the systematic underestimation of the knee angle by about $25 \\%$, the appearance of artefacts in the motion of the lower leg of the subject, and the inability of the sensor to capture reliably the details regarding th...

  16. Ultrasensitive, passive and wearable sensors for monitoring human muscle motion and physiological signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Feng; Yi, Changrui; Liu, Shichang; Wang, Yan; Liu, Lacheng; Liu, Xiaoqing; Xu, Xuming; Wang, Li

    2016-03-15

    Flexible sensors have attracted more and more attention as a fundamental part of anthropomorphic robot research, medical diagnosis and physical health monitoring. Here, we constructed an ultrasensitive and passive flexible sensor with the advantages of low cost, lightness and wearability, electric safety and reliability. The fundamental mechanism of the sensor is based on triboelectric effect inducing electrostatic charges on the surfaces between two different materials. Just like a plate capacitor, current will be generated while the distance or size of the parallel capacitors changes caused by the small mechanical disturbance upon it and therefore the output current/voltage will be produced. Typically, the passive sensor unambiguously monitors muscle motions including hand motion from stretch-clench-stretch, mouth motion from open-bite-open, blink and respiration. Moreover, this sensor records the details of the consecutive phases in a cardiac cycle of the apex cardiogram, and identify the peaks including percussion wave, tidal wave and diastolic wave of the radial pulse wave. To record subtle human physiological signals including radial pulsilogram and apex cardiogram with excellent signal/noise ratio, stability and reproducibility, the sensor shows great potential in the applications of medical diagnosis and daily health monitoring.

  17. Ultrasensitive, passive and wearable sensors for monitoring human muscle motion and physiological signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Feng; Yi, Changrui; Liu, Shichang; Wang, Yan; Liu, Lacheng; Liu, Xiaoqing; Xu, Xuming; Wang, Li

    2016-03-15

    Flexible sensors have attracted more and more attention as a fundamental part of anthropomorphic robot research, medical diagnosis and physical health monitoring. Here, we constructed an ultrasensitive and passive flexible sensor with the advantages of low cost, lightness and wearability, electric safety and reliability. The fundamental mechanism of the sensor is based on triboelectric effect inducing electrostatic charges on the surfaces between two different materials. Just like a plate capacitor, current will be generated while the distance or size of the parallel capacitors changes caused by the small mechanical disturbance upon it and therefore the output current/voltage will be produced. Typically, the passive sensor unambiguously monitors muscle motions including hand motion from stretch-clench-stretch, mouth motion from open-bite-open, blink and respiration. Moreover, this sensor records the details of the consecutive phases in a cardiac cycle of the apex cardiogram, and identify the peaks including percussion wave, tidal wave and diastolic wave of the radial pulse wave. To record subtle human physiological signals including radial pulsilogram and apex cardiogram with excellent signal/noise ratio, stability and reproducibility, the sensor shows great potential in the applications of medical diagnosis and daily health monitoring. PMID:26520253

  18. Complex Human Activity Recognition Using Smartphone and Wrist-Worn Motion Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J M

    2016-01-01

    The position of on-body motion sensors plays an important role in human activity recognition. Most often, mobile phone sensors at the trouser pocket or an equivalent position are used for this purpose. However, this position is not suitable for recognizing activities that involve hand gestures, such as smoking, eating, drinking coffee and giving a talk. To recognize such activities, wrist-worn motion sensors are used. However, these two positions are mainly used in isolation. To use richer context information, we evaluate three motion sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope and linear acceleration sensor) at both wrist and pocket positions. Using three classifiers, we show that the combination of these two positions outperforms the wrist position alone, mainly at smaller segmentation windows. Another problem is that less-repetitive activities, such as smoking, eating, giving a talk and drinking coffee, cannot be recognized easily at smaller segmentation windows unlike repetitive activities, like walking, jogging and biking. For this purpose, we evaluate the effect of seven window sizes (2-30 s) on thirteen activities and show how increasing window size affects these various activities in different ways. We also propose various optimizations to further improve the recognition of these activities. For reproducibility, we make our dataset publicly available. PMID:27023543

  19. Human Motion Generation Based on FASGPLVM%基于FASGPLVM的人体运动生成

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    瞿师; 吴玲达; 魏迎梅; 于荣欢; 冯晓萌

    2011-01-01

    为解决传统逆向运动学算法计算繁琐、效果不逼真的问题,提出一种快速自适应比例高斯过程隐变量模型(FASGPLVM),并基于该模型实现人体运动生成.实验结果表明,FASGPLVM模型具有较快的收敛速度和收敛精度,能自适应运动编辑的方向,扩大运动捕获数据的可编辑幅度.%In order to void cockamamie computation and pose distortion existing in traditional inverse kinematics, this paper presents a Fast Adaptive Scaled Gaussian Process Latent Variable Model(FASGPLVM), then realizes human motion generation based on it. Experimental results show that FASGPLVM has higher convergence velocity and precision and extends editing range of motion capture data by adapting motion editing direction.

  20. Cross-sensory facilitation reveals neural interactions between visual and tactile motion in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica eGori

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Many recent studies show that the human brain integrates information across the different senses and that stimuli of one sensory modality can enhance the perception of other modalities. Here we study the processes that mediate cross-modal facilitation and summation between visual and tactile motion. We find that while summation produced a generic, non-specific improvement of thresholds, probably reflecting higher-order interaction of decision signals, facilitation reveals a strong, direction-specific interaction, which we believe reflects sensory interactions. We measured visual and tactile velocity discrimination thresholds over a wide range of base velocities and conditions. Thresholds for both visual and tactile stimuli showed the characteristic dipper function, with the minimum thresholds occurring at a given pedestal speed. When visual and tactile coherent stimuli were combined (summation condition the thresholds for these multi-sensory stimuli also showed a dipper function with the minimum thresholds occurring in a similar range to that for unisensory signals. However, the improvement of multisensory thresholds was weak and not directionally specific, well predicted by the maximum likelihood estimation model (agreeing with previous research. A different technique (facilitation did, however, reveal direction-specific enhancement. Adding a non-informative pedestal motion stimulus in one sensory modality (vision or touch selectively lowered thresholds in the other, by the same amount as pedestals in the same modality. Facilitation did not occur for neutral stimuli like sounds (that would also have reduced temporal uncertainty, nor for motion in opposite direction, even in blocked trials where the subjects knew that the motion was in the opposite direction showing that the facilitation was not under subject control. Cross-sensory facilitation is strong evidence for functionally relevant cross-sensory integration at early levels of sensory

  1. Sensory versus motor loci for integration of multiple motion signals in smooth pursuit eye movements and human motion perception

    OpenAIRE

    Niu, Yu-Qiong; Lisberger, Stephen G.

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated how visual motion signals are integrated for smooth pursuit eye movements by measuring the initiation of pursuit in monkeys for pairs of moving stimuli of the same or differing luminance. The initiation of pursuit for pairs of stimuli of the same luminance could be accounted for as a vector average of the responses to the two stimuli singly. When stimuli comprised two superimposed patches of moving dot textures, the brighter stimulus suppressed the inputs from the dimmer ...

  2. Mathematics of Human Motion: from Animation towards Simulation (A View form the Outside)

    CERN Document Server

    Zhmakin, A I

    2011-01-01

    Simulation of human motion is the subject of study in a number of disciplines: Biomechanics, Robotics, Computer Animation, Control Theory, Neurophysiology, Medicine, Ergonomics. Since the author has never visited any of these fields, this review is indeed a passer-by's impression. On the other hand, he happens to be a human (who occasionally is moving) and, as everybody else, rates himself an expert in Applied Common Sense. Thus the author hopes that this view from the {\\em outside} will be of some interest not only for the strangers like himself, but for those who are {\\em inside} as well. Two flaws of the text that follows are inevitable. First, some essential issues that are too familar to the specialists to discuss them may be missing. Second, the author probably failed to provide the uniform "level-of-detail" for this wide range of topics.

  3. Spherical, rolling magnet generators for passive energy harvesting from human motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Benjamin J.; Arnold, David P.

    2009-09-01

    In this work, non-resonant, vibrational energy harvester architectures intended for human-motion energy scavenging are researched. The basic design employs a spherical, unidirectionally magnetized permanent magnet (NdFeB) ball that is allowed to move arbitrarily in a spherical cavity wrapped with copper coil windings. As the ball rotates and translates within the cage, the time-varying magnetic flux induces a voltage in the coil according to Faraday's Law. Devices ranging from 1.5 cm3 to 4 cm3 in size were tested under human activity scenarios—held in the user's hand or placed in the user's pocket while walking (4 km h-1) and running (14.5 km h-1). These harvesters have demonstrated rms voltages ranging from ~80 mV to 700 mV and time-averaged power densities up to 0.5 mW cm-3.

  4. Real World Testing Of A Piezoelectric Rotational Energy Harvester For Human Motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvesting energy from human motion is challenging because the frequencies are generally low and random compared to industrial machinery that vibrates at much higher frequencies. One of the most promising and popular strategies to overcome this is frequency up-conversion. The transducing element is actuated at its optimal frequency of operation, higher than the source excitation frequency, through some kind of catch and release mechanism. This is beneficial for efficient power generation. Such devices have now been investigated for a few years and this paper takes a previously introduced piezoelectric rotational harvester, relying on beam plucking for the energy conversion, to the next step by testing the device during a half marathon race. The prototype and data acquisition system are described in detail and the experimental results presented. A comparison of the input excitation, based on an accelerometer readout, and the output voltage of the piezoelectric beam, recorded at the same time, confirm the successful implementation of the system. For a device functional volume of 1.85 cm3, a maximum power output of 7 μW was achieved when the system was worn on the upper arm. However, degradation of the piezoelectric material meant that the performance dropped rapidly from this initial level; this requires further research. Furthermore, the need for intermediate energy storage solutions is discussed, as human motion harvesters only generate power as long as the wearer is actually moving

  5. Human-robot trust. Is motion fluency an effective behavioral style for regulating robot trustworthiness?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligthart, M.; Brule, R. van den; Haselager, W.F.G.

    2013-01-01

    Finding good behavioral styles to express robot trustworthiness will optimize the usage of robots. In previous research, motion fluency as behavioral style was studied. Smooth robot motions were compared with trembling robot motions. In a video experiment an effect of motion fluency on trust was fou

  6. Appraising the Recital of Joints in Human Running Gait through 3D Optical Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid Ali

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Recital costing of Joints in human running is biometrics evaluation technology. It has skillful series of realizations in scientific research in the last decade. In this work, we present a human running joints (hip, knee and ankle valuation recital based on the statistical computation techniques. We use the One-way ANOVA, least significant difference (LSD test and Bartlett's test for equality of variances to determine which joint has more variation with others joints during human running gait. These three joints rotation angle data were computed from the Biovision Hierarchical data (BVH motion file, because these joints provide the richest information of the human lower body joints (hip, knee and ankle. The use of BVH file to estimate the participation and performance of the joints during running gait is a novel feature of our study. The experimental results indicated that, the knee joint has the decisive influence (variation as compared to the other two joints, hip and ankle, during running gait.

  7. Redesigning ambulatory care business processes supporting clinical care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, C; Sinkewich, M; Short, J; Callas, E

    1997-04-01

    The first step in redesigning the health care delivery process for ambulatory care begins with the patient and the business processes that support the patient. Patient-related business processes include patient access, service documentation, billing, follow-up, collection, and payment. Access is the portal to the clinical delivery and care management process. Service documentation, charge capture, and payment and collection are supporting processes to care delivery. Realigned provider networks now demand realigned patient business services to provide their members/customers/patients with improved service delivery at less cost. Purchaser mandates for cost containment, health maintenance, and enhanced quality of care have created an environment where every aspect of the delivery system, especially ambulatory care, is being judged. Business processes supporting the outpatient are therefore being reexamined for better efficiency and customer satisfaction. Many health care systems have made major investments in their ambulatory care environment, but have pursued traditional supporting business practices--such as multiple access points, lack of integrated patient appointment scheduling and registration, and multiple patient bills. These are areas that are appropriate for redesign efforts--all with the customer's needs and convenience in mind. Similarly, setting unrealistic expectations, underestimating the effort required, and ignoring the human elements of a patient-focused business service redesign effort can sabotage the very sound reasons for executing such an endeavor. Pitfalls can be avoided if a structured methodology, coupled with a change management process, are employed. Deloitte & Touche Consulting Group has been involved in several major efforts, all with ambulatory care settings to assist with the redesign of their business practices to consider the patient as the driver, instead of the institution providing the care. PMID:10181605

  8. Human motion energy harvesting: numerical analysis of electromagnetic swing-excited structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylli, K.; Hoffmann, D.; Willmann, A.; Folkmer, B.; Manoli, Y.

    2016-09-01

    Energy harvesting from human motion has constantly attracted scientific interest over recent years. A location where a harvesting device can easily and unobtrusively be integrated is the shoe sole, which also protects the device from exterior influences. In this work a numerical system model is developed, which can be used to simulate different inductive harvester geometries and predict their power output. Real world acceleration data is used as a model input. The model is implemented in Matlab/Simulink and subdivided into a mechanical and an electromagnetic model. The key features including the motion model and the calculation of the electromagnetic coupling coefficient are explained in detail and the model is briefly evaluated experimentally. A total of six inductive architectures, i.e. different cylindrical and rectangular magnet-coil arrangements, are then investigated in detail. The geometrical parameters are optimized for each architecture to find the best geometry within the size of 71 mm × 37.5 mm × 12.5 mm, which can be integrated into the sole. With the best overall design an average power output of 42.7 mW is simulated across an ohmic load of 41 Ohms. In addition to the respective best designs, the (dis-)advantages of each architecture are explained.

  9. The human translational vestibulo-ocular reflex in response to complex motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Mark; Liao, Ke

    2011-09-01

    We studied the translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR) in four healthy human subjects during complex, unpredictable sum-of-sines head motion (combination of 0.73, 1.33, 1.93, and 2.93 Hz), while subjects viewed a target 15 cm away. Ideal eye velocity was calculated from recorded head motion; actual eye velocity was measured with scleral coils. The gain and phase for each frequency component was determined by least-squares optimization. Gain averaged approximately 40% and did not change with frequency; phase lag increased with frequency to a maximum of 66°. Fitting actual to ideal eye velocity predicted a tVOR latency of 48 m/s for vertical and 38 m/s for horizontal translation. These findings provide further evidence that the normal tVOR is considerably undercompensatory, even at low frequencies if the stimulus is not predictable. The similarity of this behavior to that of pursuit suggests that these two eye movements may share some aspects of neural processing.

  10. Ambulatory Medical Care Utilization Estimates for 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the caveats discussed in the ‘‘Methods’’ section. The relationship between characteristics of the patient’s ZIP Code and the choice of ambulatory care setting is shown in Table 5. For persons ...

  11. Setting up of ambulatory hysteroscopy service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolhe, Shilpa

    2015-10-01

    There is an obvious trend towards developing ambulatory procedures in gynaecology with ambulatory hysteroscopy as its mainstay. In the recent years, the fast pace of modern technological advances in gynaecologic endoscopy, and particularly in the field of hysteroscopy, have been both thrilling and spectacular. Despite this, the uptake of operative hysteroscopy in ambulatory settings has been relatively slow. There is some apprehension amongst gynaecologists to embark on therapeutic outpatient hysteroscopy, and an organisational change is required to alter the mindset. Although there are best practice guidelines for outpatient hysteroscopy, there are unresolved issues around adequate training and accreditation of future hysteroscopists. Virtual-reality simulation training for operative hysteroscopy has shown promising preliminary results, and it is being aggressively evaluated and validated. This review article is an attempt to provide a useful practical guide to all those who wish to implement ambulatory hysteroscopy services in their outpatient departments. PMID:25979350

  12. Ambulatory and Community-Based Services

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Fred

    1999-01-01

    The shift in the site of service delivery from inpatient and institutional to ambulatory and community settings has been prompted by concerns over cost and the prospect for improving the quality of life. In response to these concerns, Medicare has implemented several demonstrations that emphasize ambulatory and community-based services. In this issue, articles are presented on four demonstrations, which focus on the extent to which coordinated care models reduce health care costs, and the cos...

  13. Estimation of hurdle clearance parameters using a monocular human motion tracking method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzeszowski, Tomasz; Przednowek, Krzysztof; Wiktorowicz, Krzysztof; Iskra, Janusz

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a method of monocular human motion tracking for estimation of hurdle clearance kinematic parameters. The analysis involved 10 image sequences of five hurdlers at various training levels. Recording of the sequences was carried out under simulated starting conditions of a 110 m hurdle race. The parameters were estimated using the particle swarm optimization algorithm and they are based on analysis of the images recorded with a 100 Hz camera. The proposed method does not involve using any special clothes, markers, inertial sensors, etc. As the quality criteria, the mean absolute error and mean relative error were used. The level of computed errors justifies the use of this method to estimate hurdle clearance parameters. PMID:26838547

  14. Investigation of Pendulum Structures for Rotational Energy Harvesting from Human Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylli, K.; Hoffmann, D.; Willmann, A.; Folkmer, B.; Manoli, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Energy Harvesting from human motion as a means of powering body-worn devices has been in the focus of research groups for several years now. This work presents a rotational inductive energy harvester that can generate a sufficient amount of energy during normal walking to power small electronic systems. Three pendulum structures and their geometrical parameters are investigated in detail through a system model and system simulations. Based on these results a prototype device is fabricated. The masses and angles between pendulum arms can be changed for the experiments. The device is tested under real-world conditions and generates an average power of up to 23.39 mW across a resistance equal to the coil resistance of the optimal pendulum configuration. A regulated power output of the total system including power management of 3.3 mW is achieved.

  15. Functional mapping of the human visual cortex with intravoxel incoherent motion MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Federau

    Full Text Available Functional imaging with intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is demonstrated. Images were acquired at 3 Tesla using a standard Stejskal-Tanner diffusion-weighted echo-planar imaging sequence with multiple b-values. Cerebro-spinal fluid signal, which is highly incoherent, was suppressed with an inversion recovery preparation pulse. IVIM microvascular perfusion parameters were calculated according to a two-compartment (vascular and non-vascular diffusion model. The results obtained in 8 healthy human volunteers during visual stimulation are presented. The IVIM blood flow related parameter fD* increased 170% during stimulation in the visual cortex, and 70% in the underlying white matter.

  16. OCT Study of Mechanical Properties Associated with Trabecular Meshwork and Collector Channel Motion in Human Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Chen; Johnstone, Murray; Wang, Ningli; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-01-01

    We report the use of a high-resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging platform to identify and quantify pressure-dependent aqueous outflow system (AOS) tissue relationships and to infer mechanical stiffness through examination of tissue properties in ex vivo human eyes. Five enucleated human eyes are included in this study, with each eye prepared with four equal-sized quadrants, each encompassing 90 degrees of the limbal circumference. In radial limbal segments perfusion pressure within Schlemm’s canal (SC) is controlled by means of a perfusion cannula inserted into the canal lumen, while the other end of the cannula leads to a reservoir at a height that can control the pressure in the cannula. The OCT system images the sample with a spatial resolution of about 5 μm from the trabecular meshwork (TM) surface. Geometric parameters are quantified from the 2D OCT images acquired from the sample subjected to controlled changes in perfusion pressures; parameters include area and height of the lumen of SC, collector channel entrances (CCE) and intrascleral collector channels (ISCC). We show that 3D OCT imaging permits the identification of 3-D relationships of the SC, CCE and ISCC lumen dimensions. Collagen flaps or leaflets are found at CCE that are attached or hinged at only one end, whilst the flaps are connected to the TM by cylindrical structures spanning SC. Increasing static SC pressures resulted in SC lumen enlargement with corresponding enlargement of the CCE and ISCC lumen. Pressure-dependent SC lumen area and height changes are significant at the 0.01 levels for ANOVA, and at the 0.05 for both polynomial curves and Tukey paired comparisons. Dynamic measurements demonstrate a synchronous increase in SC, CCE and ISCC lumen height in response to pressure changes from 0 to 10, 30 or 50 mm Hg, respectively, and the response time is within the 50-millisecond range. From the measured SC volume and corresponding IOP values, we demonstrate that an

  17. Directional asymmetries and age effects in human self-motion perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roditi, Rachel E; Crane, Benjamin T

    2012-06-01

    Directional asymmetries in vestibular reflexes have aided the diagnosis of vestibular lesions; however, potential asymmetries in vestibular perception have not been well defined. This investigation sought to measure potential asymmetries in human vestibular perception. Vestibular perception thresholds were measured in 24 healthy human subjects between the ages of 21 and 68 years. Stimuli consisted of a single cycle of sinusoidal acceleration in a single direction lasting 1 or 2 s (1 or 0.5 Hz), delivered in sway (left-right), surge (forward-backward), heave (up-down), or yaw rotation. Subject identified self-motion directions were analyzed using a forced choice technique, which permitted thresholds to be independently determined for each direction. Non-motion stimuli were presented to measure possible response bias. A significant directional asymmetry in the dynamic response occurred in 27% of conditions tested within subjects, and in at least one type of motion in 92% of subjects. Directional asymmetries were usually consistent when retested in the same subject but did not occur consistently in one direction across the population with the exception of heave at 0.5 Hz. Responses during null stimuli presentation suggested that asymmetries were not due to biased guessing. Multiple models were applied and compared to determine if sensitivities were direction specific. Using Akaike information criterion, it was found that the model with direction specific sensitivities better described the data in 86% of runs when compared with a model that used the same sensitivity for both directions. Mean thresholds for yaw were 1.3±0.9°/s at 0.5 Hz and 0.9±0.7°/s at 1 Hz and were independent of age. Thresholds for surge and sway were 1.7±0.8 cm/s at 0.5 Hz and 0.7±0.3 cm/s at 1.0 Hz for subjects 50 years old. Heave thresholds were higher and were independent of age. PMID:22402987

  18. Wearable and superhydrophobic hardware for ambulatory biopotential acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Tabares, F J; Delgado-Trejos, E; Castellanos-Dominguez, G

    2013-01-01

    Wearable monitoring devices are a promising trend for ambulatory and real time biosignal processing, because they improve access and coverage by means of comfortable sensors, with real-time communication via mobile networks. In this paper, we present a garment for ambulatory electrocardiogram monitoring, a smart t-shirt with a textile electrode that conducts electricity and has a coating designed to preserve the user's hygiene, allowing long-term mobile measurements. Silicon dioxide nanoparticles were applied on the surface of the textile electrodes to preserve conductivity and impart superhydrophobic properties. A model to explain these results is proposed. The best result of this study is obtained when the contact angles between the fluid and the fabric exceeded 150°, while the electrical resistivity remained below 5 Ω·cm, allowing an acquisition of high quality electrocardiograms in moving patients. Thus, this tool represents an interesting alternative for medium and long-term measurements, preserving the textile feeling of clothing and working under motion conditions. PMID:24110070

  19. Detection of (Inactivity Periods in Human Body Motion Using Inertial Sensors: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Damas

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Determination of (inactivity periods when monitoring human body motion is a mandatory preprocessing step in all human inertial navigation and position analysis applications. Distinction of (inactivity needs to be established in order to allow the system to recompute the calibration parameters of the inertial sensors as well as the Zero Velocity Updates (ZUPT of inertial navigation. The periodical recomputation of these parameters allows the application to maintain a constant degree of precision. This work presents a comparative study among different well known inertial magnitude-based detectors and proposes a new approach by applying spectrum-based detectors and memory-based detectors. A robust statistical comparison is carried out by the use of an accelerometer and angular rate signal synthesizer that mimics the output of accelerometers and gyroscopes when subjects are performing basic activities of daily life. Theoretical results are verified by testing the algorithms over signals gathered using an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU. Detection accuracy rates of up to 97% are achieved.

  20. Markerless human motion tracking using hierarchical multi-swarm cooperative particle swarm optimization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Saini

    Full Text Available The high-dimensional search space involved in markerless full-body articulated human motion tracking from multiple-views video sequences has led to a number of solutions based on metaheuristics, the most recent form of which is Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO. However, the classical PSO suffers from premature convergence and it is trapped easily into local optima, significantly affecting the tracking accuracy. To overcome these drawbacks, we have developed a method for the problem based on Hierarchical Multi-Swarm Cooperative Particle Swarm Optimization (H-MCPSO. The tracking problem is formulated as a non-linear 34-dimensional function optimization problem where the fitness function quantifies the difference between the observed image and a projection of the model configuration. Both the silhouette and edge likelihoods are used in the fitness function. Experiments using Brown and HumanEva-II dataset demonstrated that H-MCPSO performance is better than two leading alternative approaches-Annealed Particle Filter (APF and Hierarchical Particle Swarm Optimization (HPSO. Further, the proposed tracking method is capable of automatic initialization and self-recovery from temporary tracking failures. Comprehensive experimental results are presented to support the claims.

  1. Crystallographic evaluation of internal motion of human alpha-lactalbumin refined by full-matrix least-squares method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harata, K; Abe, Y; Muraki, M

    1999-03-26

    The low temperature form of human alpha-lactalbumin (HAL) was crystallized from a 2H2O solution and its structure was refined to the R value of 0.119 at 1.15 A resolution by the full-matrix least-squares method. Average estimated standard deviations of atomic parameters for non-hydrogen atoms were 0.038 A for coordinates and 0.044 A2 for anisotropic temperature factors (Uij). The magnitude of equivalent isotropic temperature factors (Ueqv) was highly correlated with the distance from the molecular centroid and fitted to a quadratic equation as a function of atomic coordinates. The atomic thermal motion was rather isotropic in the core region and the anisotropy increased towards the molecular surface. The statistical analysis revealed the out-of-plane motion of main-chain oxygen atoms, indicating that peptide groups are in rotational vibration around a Calpha.Calpha axis. The TLS model, which describes the rigid-body motion in terms of translation, libration, and screw motions, was adopted for the evaluation of the molecular motion and the TLS parameters were determined by the least-squares fit to Uij. The reproduced Ueqvcal from the TLS parameters was in fair agreement with observed Ueqv, but differences were found in regions of residues, 5-22, 44-48, 70-75, and 121-123, where Ueqv was larger than Ueqvcal because of large local motions. To evaluate the internal motion of HAL, the contribution of the rigid-body motion was determined to be 42.4 % of Ueqv in magnitude, which was the highest estimation to satisfy the condition that the Uijint tensors of the internal motion have positive eigen values. The internal motion represented with atomic thermal ellipsoids clearly showed local motions different from those observed in chicken-type lysozymes which have a backbone structure very similar to HAL. The result indicates that the internal motion is closely related to biological function of proteins. PMID:10080897

  2. A New Approach for Human Forearm Motion Assist by Actuated Artificial Joint-An Inner Skeleton Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Subrata Kumar; Kiguchi, Kazuo; Teramoto, Kenbu

    In order to help the physical activities of the elderly or physically disabled persons, we propose a new concept of a power-assist inner skeleton robot (i.e., actuated artificial joint) that is supposed to assist the human daily life motion from inside of the human body. This paper presents an implantable 2 degree of freedom (DOF) inner skeleton robot that is designed to assist human elbow flexion-extension motion and forearm supination-pronation motion for daily life activities. We have developed a prototype of the inner skeleton robot that is supposed to assist the motion from inside of the body and act as an actuated artificial joint. The proposed system is controlled based on the activation patterns of the electromyogram (EMG) signals of the user's muscles by applying fuzzy-neuro control method. A joint actuator with angular position sensor is designed for the inner skeleton robot and a T-Mechanism is proposed to keep the bone arrangement similar to the normal human articulation after the elbow arthroplasty. The effectiveness of the proposed system has been evaluated by experiment.

  3. Combining High-Speed Cameras and Stop-Motion Animation Software to Support Students' Modeling of Human Body Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Victor R.

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanics, and specifically the biomechanics associated with human movement, is a potentially rich backdrop against which educators can design innovative science teaching and learning activities. Moreover, the use of technologies associated with biomechanics research, such as high-speed cameras that can produce high-quality slow-motion video,…

  4. Compensation of Wave-Induced Motion and Force Phenomena for Ship-Based High Performance Robotic and Human Amplifying Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, LJL

    2003-09-24

    The decrease in manpower and increase in material handling needs on many Naval vessels provides the motivation to explore the modeling and control of Naval robotic and robotic assistive devices. This report addresses the design, modeling, control and analysis of position and force controlled robotic systems operating on the deck of a moving ship. First we provide background information that quantifies the motion of the ship, both in terms of frequency and amplitude. We then formulate the motion of the ship in terms of homogeneous transforms. This transformation provides a link between the motion of the ship and the base of a manipulator. We model the kinematics of a manipulator as a serial extension of the ship motion. We then show how to use these transforms to formulate the kinetic and potential energy of a general, multi-degree of freedom manipulator moving on a ship. As a demonstration, we consider two examples: a one degree-of-freedom system experiencing three sea states operating in a plane to verify the methodology and a 3 degree of freedom system experiencing all six degrees of ship motion to illustrate the ease of computation and complexity of the solution. The first series of simulations explore the impact wave motion has on tracking performance of a position controlled robot. We provide a preliminary comparison between conventional linear control and Repetitive Learning Control (RLC) and show how fixed time delay RLC breaks down due to the varying nature wave disturbance frequency. Next, we explore the impact wave motion disturbances have on Human Amplification Technology (HAT). We begin with a description of the traditional HAT control methodology. Simulations show that the motion of the base of the robot, due to ship motion, generates disturbances forces reflected to the operator that significantly degrade the positioning accuracy and resolution at higher sea states. As with position-controlled manipulators, augmenting the control with a Repetitive

  5. Human Control Law and Brain Activity of Voluntary Motion by Utilizing a Balancing Task with an Inverted Pendulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Suzuki

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human characteristics concerning voluntary motion control are investigated, because this motion is fundamental for the machine operation and human-computer system. Using a force feedback haptic device and a balancing task of a virtual inverted pendulum, participants were trained in the task, and hand motion/force was measured, and brain activity was monitored. First, through brain analysis by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS and motion analysis of the pendulum, we identified a participant who was the most expert. Next, control characteristics of the most expert were investigated by considering the operational force and delay factor of a human. As a result, it was found that predictive control based on velocity information was used predominantly although a perception feedback control against the pendulum posture worked. And it was shown that an on-off intermittency control, which was a strategy for the skilled balancing, can be described well by a liner model involving two types of time shifts for the position and velocity. In addition, it was confirmed that the cortex activity for observation in an ocular motor control area and visual processing area was strong to enhance above-mentioned control strategies.

  6. Highly Stretchable and Transparent Microfluidic Strain Sensors for Monitoring Human Body Motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sun Geun; Koo, Hyung-Jun; Chang, Suk Tai

    2015-12-16

    We report a new class of simple microfluidic strain sensors with high stretchability, transparency, sensitivity, and long-term stability with no considerable hysteresis and a fast response to various deformations by combining the merits of microfluidic techniques and ionic liquids. The high optical transparency of the strain sensors was achieved by introducing refractive-index matched ionic liquids into microfluidic networks or channels embedded in an elastomeric matrix. The microfluidic strain sensors offer the outstanding sensor performance under a variety of deformations induced by stretching, bending, pressing, and twisting of the microfluidic strain sensors. The principle of our microfluidic strain sensor is explained by a theoretical model based on the elastic channel deformation. In order to demonstrate its capability of practical usage, the simple-structured microfluidic strain sensors were performed onto a finger, wrist, and arm. The highly stretchable and transparent microfluidic strain sensors were successfully applied as potential platforms for distinctively monitoring a wide range of human body motions in real time. Our novel microfluidic strain sensors show great promise for making future stretchable electronic devices.

  7. Caveat of measuring perfusion indexes using intravoxel incoherent motion magnetic resonance imaging in the human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wen-Chau [National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Oncology, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei (China); Chen, Ya-Fang; Yang, Shun-Chung; My, Pei-Chi [National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei (China); Tseng, Han-Min [National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Taipei (China)

    2015-08-15

    To numerically and experimentally investigate the robustness of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) magnetic resonance imaging in measuring perfusion indexes in the human brain. Eighteen healthy volunteers were imaged on a 3 T clinical system. Data of IVIM imaging (12 b-values ranging from 0 to 1000 s/mm{sup 2}, 12 repetitions) were fitted with a bi-exponential model to extract blood volume fraction (f) and pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D*). The robustness of measurement was assessed by bootstrapping. Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) imaging and arterial spin-labelling (ASL) imaging were performed for cross-modal comparison. Numerical simulations were performed to assess the accuracy and precision of f and D* estimates at varied signal-to-noise ratio (SNR{sub b1000}). Based on our experimental setting (SNR{sub b1000} ∝ 30), the average error/variability is ∝ 5 %/25 % for f and ∝ 100 %/30 % for D* in gray matter, and ∝ 10 %/50 % for f and ∝ 300 %/60 % for D* in white matter. Correlation was found between f and DSC-derived cerebral blood volume in gray matter (r = 0.29 - 0.48 across subjects, p < 10{sup -5}), but not in white matter. No correlation was found between f-D* product and ASL-derived cerebral blood flow. f may provide noninvasive measurement of cerebral blood volume, particularly in gray matter. D* has limited robustness and should be interpreted with caution. (orig.)

  8. Distinct Regions of Right Temporal Cortex Are Associated with Biological and Human-Agent Motion: Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Neuropsychological Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Zaizhu; Bi, Yanchao; Chen, Jing; Chen, Quanjing; He, Yong; Caramazza, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    In human lateral temporal cortex, some regions show specific sensitivity to human motion. Here we examine whether such effects reflect a general biological-nonbiological organizational principle or a process specific to human-agent processing by comparing processing of human, animal, and tool motion in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment with healthy participants and a voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) study of patients with brain damage (77 stroke patients). The...

  9. Study of human body: Kinematics and kinetics of a martial arts (Silat) performers using 3D-motion capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Ahmad Afiq Sabqi Awang; Jafri, Mohd Zubir Mat; Azraai, Nur Zaidi

    2015-04-01

    The Interest in this studies of human kinematics goes back very far in human history drove by curiosity or need for the understanding the complexity of human body motion. To find new and accurate information about the human movement as the advance computing technology became available for human movement that can perform. Martial arts (silat) were chose and multiple type of movement was studied. This project has done by using cutting-edge technology which is 3D motion capture to characterize and to measure the motion done by the performers of martial arts (silat). The camera will detect the markers (infrared reflection by the marker) around the performer body (total of 24 markers) and will show as dot in the computer software. The markers detected were analyzing using kinematic kinetic approach and time as reference. A graph of velocity, acceleration and position at time,t (seconds) of each marker was plot. Then from the information obtain, more parameters were determined such as work done, momentum, center of mass of a body using mathematical approach. This data can be used for development of the effectiveness movement in martial arts which is contributed to the people in arts. More future works can be implemented from this project such as analysis of a martial arts competition.

  10. Gesture Recognition from Data Streams of Human Motion Sensor Using Accelerated PSO Swarm Search Feature Selection Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Fong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human motion sensing technology gains tremendous popularity nowadays with practical applications such as video surveillance for security, hand signing, and smart-home and gaming. These applications capture human motions in real-time from video sensors, the data patterns are nonstationary and ever changing. While the hardware technology of such motion sensing devices as well as their data collection process become relatively mature, the computational challenge lies in the real-time analysis of these live feeds. In this paper we argue that traditional data mining methods run short of accurately analyzing the human activity patterns from the sensor data stream. The shortcoming is due to the algorithmic design which is not adaptive to the dynamic changes in the dynamic gesture motions. The successor of these algorithms which is known as data stream mining is evaluated versus traditional data mining, through a case of gesture recognition over motion data by using Microsoft Kinect sensors. Three different subjects were asked to read three comic strips and to tell the stories in front of the sensor. The data stream contains coordinates of articulation points and various positions of the parts of the human body corresponding to the actions that the user performs. In particular, a novel technique of feature selection using swarm search and accelerated PSO is proposed for enabling fast preprocessing for inducing an improved classification model in real-time. Superior result is shown in the experiment that runs on this empirical data stream. The contribution of this paper is on a comparative study between using traditional and data stream mining algorithms and incorporation of the novel improved feature selection technique with a scenario where different gesture patterns are to be recognized from streaming sensor data.

  11. Ambulatory Measurement of Ground Reaction Forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltink, Peter H.; Liedtke, Christian; Droog, Ed

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of ground reaction forces is important in the biomechanical analysis of gait and other motor activities. It is the purpose of this study to show the feasibility of ambulatory measurement of ground reaction forces using two six degrees of freedom sensors mounted under the shoe. One se

  12. Regional anesthesia techniques for ambulatory orthopedic surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Brian D

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to present advances in the use of regional anesthetic techniques in ambulatory orthopedic surgery. New findings regarding the use of both neuraxial anesthesia and peripheral nerve block are discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: Neuraxial anesthesia: The use of short-acting local anesthetic agents such as mepivacaine, 2-chloroprocaine, and articaine permits rapid onset intrathecal anesthesia with early recovery profiles. Advantages and limitations of these agents are discussed.Peripheral nerve block: Peripheral nerve blocks in limb surgery have the potential to transform this patient cohort into a truly ambulatory, self-caring group. Recent trends and evidence regarding the benefits of regional anesthesia techniques are presented.Continuous perineural catheters permit extension of improved perioperative analgesia into the ambulatory home setting. The role and reported safety of continuous catheters are discussed. SUMMARY: In summary, shorter acting, neuraxial, local anesthetic agents, specific to the expected duration of surgery, may provide superior recovery profiles in the ambulatory setting. A trend towards more peripheral and selective nerve blocks exists. The infrapatellar block is a promising technique to provide analgesia following knee arthroscopy. Improved analgesia seen in the perioperative period can be safely and effectively extended to the postoperative period with the use of perineural catheters.

  13. Ambulatory Care Skills: Do Residents Feel Prepared?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Bonds

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine resident comfort and skill in performing ambulatory care skills. Methods: Descriptive survey of common ambulatory care skills administered to internal medicine faculty and residents at one academic medical center. Respondents were asked to rate their ability to perform 12 physical exam skills and 6 procedures, and their comfort in performing 7 types of counseling, and obtaining 6 types of patient history (4 point Likert scale for each. Self-rated ability or comfort was compared by gender, status (year of residency, faculty, and future predicted frequency of use of the skill. Results: Residents reported high ability levels for physical exam skills common to both the ambulatory and hospital setting. Fewer felt able to perform musculoskeletal, neurologic or eye exams easily alone. Procedures generally received low ability ratings. Similarly, residents’ comfort in performing common outpatient counseling was also low. More residents reported feeling very comfortable in obtaining history from patients. We found little variation by gender, year of training, or predicted frequency of use. Conclusion: Self-reported ability and comfort for many common ambulatory care skills is low. Further evaluation of this finding in other training programs is warranted.

  14. Planning an ambulatory care joint venture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpster, L M

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses ambulatory care joint ventures by hospitals and selected members of their medical staffs and emphasizes the resolution of problems in the early planning stages. Failure to follow an orderly and thoughtful planning process not only risks valuable resources of the venture partners, but also jeopardizes the working relationship between the hospital and its medical staff.

  15. Predicting recovery at home after Ambulatory Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayala Guillermo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The correct implementation of Ambulatory Surgery must be accompanied by an accurate monitoring of the patient post-discharge state. We fit different statistical models to predict the first hours postoperative status of a discharged patient. We will also be able to predict, for any discharged patient, the probability of needing a closer follow-up, or of having a normal progress at home. Background The status of a discharged patient is predicted during the first 48 hours after discharge by using variables routinely used in Ambulatory Surgery. The models fitted will provide the physician with an insight into the post-discharge progress. These models will provide valuable information to assist in educating the patient and their carers about what to expect after discharge as well as to improve their overall level of satisfaction. Methods A total of 922 patients from the Ambulatory Surgery Unit of the Dr. Peset University Hospital (Valencia, Spain were selected for this study. Their post-discharge status was evaluated through a phone questionnaire. We pretend to predict four variables which were self-reported via phone interviews with the discharged patient: sleep, pain, oral tolerance of fluid/food and bleeding status. A fifth variable called phone score will be built as the sum of these four ordinal variables. The number of phone interviews varies between patients, depending on the evolution. The proportional odds model was used. The predictors were age, sex, ASA status, surgical time, discharge time, type of anaesthesia, surgical specialty and ambulatory surgical incapacity (ASI. This last variable reflects, before the operation, the state of incapacity and severity of symptoms in the discharged patient. Results Age, ambulatory surgical incapacity and the surgical specialty are significant to explain the level of pain at the first call. For the first two phone calls, ambulatory surgical incapacity is significant as a predictor for all

  16. Human motion characteristics in relation to feeling familiar or frightened during an announced short interaction with a proactive humanoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddoura, Ritta; Venture, Gentiane

    2014-01-01

    During an unannounced encounter between two humans and a proactive humanoid (NAO, Aldebaran Robotics), we study the dependencies between the human partners' affective experience (measured via the answers to a questionnaire) particularly regarding feeling familiar and feeling frightened, and their arm and head motion [frequency and smoothness using Inertial Measurement Units (IMU)]. NAO starts and ends its interaction with its partners by non-verbally greeting them hello (bowing) and goodbye (moving its arm). The robot is invested with a real and useful task to perform: handing each participant an envelope containing a questionnaire they need to answer. NAO's behavior varies from one partner to the other (Smooth with X vs. Resisting with Y). The results show high positive correlations between feeling familiar while interacting with the robot and: the frequency and smoothness of the human arm movement when waving back goodbye, as well as the smoothness of the head during the whole encounter. Results also show a negative dependency between feeling frightened and the frequency of the human arm movement when waving back goodbye. The principal component analysis (PCA) suggests that, in regards to the various motion measures examined in this paper, the head smoothness and the goodbye gesture frequency are the most reliable measures when it comes to considering the familiar experienced by the participants. The PCA also points out the irrelevance of the goodbye motion frequency when investigating the participants' experience of fear in its relation to their motion characteristics. The results are discussed in light of the major findings of studies on body movements and postures accompanying specific emotions.

  17. Improvement of gagCEST imaging in the human lumbar intervertebral disc by motion correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate whether motion correction improves glycosaminoglycan chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging (gagCEST imaging) of intervertebral discs (IVDs). Magnetic resonance gagCEST imaging of 12 volunteers was obtained in lumbar IVDs at 3 T using a prototype pulse sequence. The data were motion-corrected using a prototype diffeomorphism-based motion compensation technique. For both the data with and that without motion correction (datac, datauc), CEST evaluation was performed using the magnetisation transfer ratio asymmetry (MTRasym) as a means of quantifying CEST effects. MTRasym and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the MTRasym map in the nucleus pulposus (NP) were compared for datac and datauc. A visual grading analysis was performed by a radiologist in order to subjectively quantify the quality of the MTRasym analysis (score 1: best quality, score 5: worst quality). Furthermore, a landmark analysis was performed in order to objectively quantify the motion between CEST images using the mean landmark distance dmean. MTRasym and SNR were significantly higher for the motion-corrected data than for the uncorrected CEST data (MTRasym(datac) = 3.77 % ± 0.95 %, MTRasym(datauc) = 3.41 % ± 1.54 %, p value = 0.001; SNR(datac) = 3.88 ± 2.04, SNR(datauc) = 2.77 ± 1.55, p value c (maximum score = 2) compared with datauc (maximum score = 5). The landmark analysis demonstrated the superiority of the motion-corrected data (dmean(datac) =0.08 mm ±0.09 mm, dmean(datauc) = 0.36 mm ±0.09 mm, p value = 0.001). Our study showed significant improvements in the ability to quantify CEST imaging in IVDs after the application of motion correction compared with uncorrected datasets. (orig.)

  18. Human motion perception and smooth eye movements show similar directional biases for elongated apertures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutter, B. R.; Stone, L. S.

    1998-01-01

    Although numerous studies have examined the relationship between smooth-pursuit eye movements and motion perception, it remains unresolved whether a common motion-processing system subserves both perception and pursuit. To address this question, we simultaneously recorded perceptual direction judgments and the concomitant smooth eye-movement response to a plaid stimulus that we have previously shown generates systematic perceptual errors. We measured the perceptual direction biases psychophysically and the smooth eye-movement direction biases using two methods (standard averaging and oculometric analysis). We found that the perceptual and oculomotor biases were nearly identical, suggesting that pursuit and perception share a critical motion processing stage, perhaps in area MT or MST of extrastriate visual cortex.

  19. Improvement of gagCEST imaging in the human lumbar intervertebral disc by motion correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Lutz, Anja; Schleich, Christoph; Topgoez, Melike; Pentang, Gael; Antoch, Gerald; Wittsack, Hans-Joerg; Miese, Falk [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Dusseldorf (Germany); Schmitt, Benjamin [Siemens Ltd. Australia, Healthcare Sector, Macquarie Park, NSW (Australia)

    2014-10-23

    To investigate whether motion correction improves glycosaminoglycan chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging (gagCEST imaging) of intervertebral discs (IVDs). Magnetic resonance gagCEST imaging of 12 volunteers was obtained in lumbar IVDs at 3 T using a prototype pulse sequence. The data were motion-corrected using a prototype diffeomorphism-based motion compensation technique. For both the data with and that without motion correction (data{sub c}, data{sub uc}), CEST evaluation was performed using the magnetisation transfer ratio asymmetry (MTR{sub asym}) as a means of quantifying CEST effects. MTR{sub asym} and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the MTR{sub asym} map in the nucleus pulposus (NP) were compared for data{sub c} and data{sub uc}. A visual grading analysis was performed by a radiologist in order to subjectively quantify the quality of the MTR{sub asym} analysis (score 1: best quality, score 5: worst quality). Furthermore, a landmark analysis was performed in order to objectively quantify the motion between CEST images using the mean landmark distance d{sub mean}. MTR{sub asym} and SNR were significantly higher for the motion-corrected data than for the uncorrected CEST data (MTR{sub asym}(data{sub c}) = 3.77 % ± 0.95 %, MTR{sub asym}(data{sub uc}) = 3.41 % ± 1.54 %, p value = 0.001; SNR(data{sub c}) = 3.88 ± 2.04, SNR(data{sub uc}) = 2.77 ± 1.55, p value < 0.001, number of IVDs = 48). The visual grading analysis revealed a higher reliability for data{sub c} (maximum score = 2) compared with data{sub uc} (maximum score = 5). The landmark analysis demonstrated the superiority of the motion-corrected data (d{sub mean}(data{sub c}) =0.08 mm ±0.09 mm, d{sub mean}(data{sub uc}) = 0.36 mm ±0.09 mm, p value = 0.001). Our study showed significant improvements in the ability to quantify CEST imaging in IVDs after the application of motion correction compared with uncorrected datasets. (orig.)

  20. The Influences of Arm Resist Motion on a CAR Crash Test Using Hybrid III Dummy with Human-Like Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongchul; Youm, Youngil; Bae, Hanil; Choi, Hyeonki

    Safety of the occupant during the crash is very essential design element. Many researches have been investigated in reducing the fatal injury of occupant. They are focusing on the development of a dummy in order to obtain the real human-like motion. However, they have not considered the arm resist motion during the car accident. In this study, we would like to suggest the importance of the reactive force of the arm in a car crash. The influences of reactive force acting on the human upper extremity were investigated using the impedance experimental method with lumped mass model of hand system and a Hybrid III dummy with human-like arm. Impedance parameters (e.g. inertia, spring constant and damping coefficient) of the elbow joint in maximum activation level were measured by free oscillation test using single axis robot. The results showed that without seat belt, the reactive force of human arm reduced the head, chest, and femur injury, and the flexion moment of the neck is higher than that of the conventional dummy.

  1. Mapping the organization of axis of motion selective features in human area MT using high-field fMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Zimmermann

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI at high magnetic fields has made it possible to investigate the columnar organization of the human brain in vivo with high degrees of accuracy and sensitivity. Until now, these results have been limited to the organization principles of early visual cortex (V1. While the middle temporal area (MT has been the first identified extra-striate visual area shown to exhibit a columnar organization in monkeys, evidence of MT's columnar response properties and topographic layout in humans has remained elusive. Research using various approaches suggests similar response properties as in monkeys but failed to provide direct evidence for direction or axis of motion selectivity in human area MT. By combining state of the art pulse sequence design, high spatial resolution in all three dimensions (0.8 mm isotropic, optimized coil design, ultrahigh field magnets (7 Tesla and novel high resolution cortical grid sampling analysis tools, we provide the first direct evidence for large-scale axis of motion selective feature organization in human area MT closely matching predictions from topographic columnar-level simulations.

  2. Advances in ambulatory monitoring: regulatory considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckles, David; Aguel, Felipe; Brockman, Randall; Cheng, James; Demian, Cindy; Ho, Charles; Jensen, Donald; Mallis, Elias

    2004-01-01

    Conventional ambulatory electrocardiogram (ECG) (Holter) monitoring involves 2 or 3 surface leads recorded with electrode positions and signal characteristics that are different from diagnostic quality 12-lead ECGs due to the limitations imposed by technology on the ambulatory recorders. The rapid pace of technological development for medical devices, particularly electrocardiography, has now enabled the recording of diagnostic quality 12-lead ECG waveforms for extended time periods. This capability allows Holter recording to become another source for diagnostic 12-lead ECG records on a par with other modalities such as resting ECG and exercise stress testing. Additionally, other diagnostic techniques such as S-T segment analysis and Q-T interval analysis that rely on diagnostic quality waveforms can now be applied. All of these enhancements to the traditional Holter modality have altered the regulatory perspective of these devices, since the enhancements may represent a new intended use for the device. PMID:15534803

  3. Cochlear implant in an ambulatory surgery center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Aimee M; Lassen, L Frederick

    2013-02-01

    Presbycusis, or sensorineural hearing loss in the elderly population, affects approximately 40% to 50% of people over the age of 75. A variety of devices are available to those with hearing loss. Cochlear implants, for example, are especially useful for those with severe-to-profound hearing loss. The population is aging, so the demand for cochlear implantation in ambulatory surgery centers will likely increase. Ambulatory surgery centers (ASC) can provide a more convenient and less expensive location for cochlear implant surgery than hospital-based operating facilities. Patient selection using standard ASC criteria, coupled with an understanding of the unique surgical and anesthetic needs of cochlear implant patients, are key to bringing this once exotic inpatient procedure into the ASC.

  4. Advances in ambulatory monitoring: regulatory considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckles, David; Aguel, Felipe; Brockman, Randall; Cheng, James; Demian, Cindy; Ho, Charles; Jensen, Donald; Mallis, Elias

    2004-01-01

    Conventional ambulatory electrocardiogram (ECG) (Holter) monitoring involves 2 or 3 surface leads recorded with electrode positions and signal characteristics that are different from diagnostic quality 12-lead ECGs due to the limitations imposed by technology on the ambulatory recorders. The rapid pace of technological development for medical devices, particularly electrocardiography, has now enabled the recording of diagnostic quality 12-lead ECG waveforms for extended time periods. This capability allows Holter recording to become another source for diagnostic 12-lead ECG records on a par with other modalities such as resting ECG and exercise stress testing. Additionally, other diagnostic techniques such as S-T segment analysis and Q-T interval analysis that rely on diagnostic quality waveforms can now be applied. All of these enhancements to the traditional Holter modality have altered the regulatory perspective of these devices, since the enhancements may represent a new intended use for the device.

  5. Evaluation of Ambulatory Care Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Simborg, Donald W.; Whiting-O'Keefe, Quinn E.

    1980-01-01

    The central purpose of an ambulatory care information system is to communicate information to the practitioner to facilitate clinical decision making. The clinical decision can be considered the dependent output variable in a process having the information system, the patient, clinician characteristics, and the environment as the independent input variables. Evaluation approaches using patient outcomes are problematic because of the indirect relationship between the information system and pat...

  6. The neurophysiology of human biological motion processing: a high-density electrical mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowski, Aaron I; Ross, Lars A; Snyder, Adam C; Sehatpour, Pejman; Kelly, Simon P; Foxe, John J

    2011-05-01

    The neural processing of biological motion (BM) is of profound experimental interest since it is often through the movement of another that we interpret their immediate intentions. Neuroimaging points to a specialized cortical network for processing biological motion. Here, high-density electrical mapping and source-analysis techniques were employed to interrogate the timing of information processing across this network. Participants viewed point-light-displays depicting standard body movements (e.g. jumping), while event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded and compared to ERPs to scrambled motion control stimuli. In a pair of experiments, three major phases of BM-specific processing were identified: 1) The earliest phase of BM-sensitive modulation was characterized by a positive shift of the ERP between 100 and 200 ms after stimulus onset. This modulation was observed exclusively over the right hemisphere and source-analysis suggested a likely generator in close proximity to regions associated with general motion processing (KO/hMT). 2) The second phase of BM-sensitivity occurred from 200 to 350 ms, characterized by a robust negative-going ERP modulation over posterior middle temporal regions bilaterally. Source-analysis pointed to bilateral generators at or near the posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS). 3) A third phase of processing was evident only in our second experiment, where participants actively attended the BM aspect of the stimuli, and was manifest as a centro-parietal positive ERP deflection, likely related to later cognitive processes. These results point to very early sensory registration of biological motion, and highlight the interactive role of the posterior STS in analyzing the movements of other living organisms. PMID:21276862

  7. The evolution of ambulatory ECG monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Harold L

    2013-01-01

    Ambulatory Holter electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring has undergone continuous technological evolution since its invention and development in the 1950s era. With commercial introduction in 1963, there has been an evolution of Holter recorders from 1 channel to 12 channel recorders with increasingly smaller storage media, and there has evolved Holter analysis systems employing increasingly technologically advanced electronics providing a myriad of data displays. This evolution of smaller physical instruments with increasing technological capacity has characterized the development of electronics over the past 50 years. Currently the technology has been focused upon the conventional continuous 24 to 48 hour ambulatory ECG examination, and conventional extended ambulatory monitoring strategies for infrequent to rare arrhythmic events. However, the emergence of the Internet, Wi-Fi, cellular networks, and broad-band transmission has positioned these modalities at the doorway of the digital world. This has led to an adoption of more cost-effective strategies to these conventional methods of performing the examination. As a result, the emergence of the mobile smartphone coupled with this digital capacity is leading to the recent development of Holter smartphone applications. The potential of point-of-care applications utilizing the Holter smartphone and a vast array of new non-invasive sensors is evident in the not too distant future. The Holter smartphone is anticipated to contribute significantly in the future to the field of global health.

  8. Violating instructed human agency: An fMRI study on ocular tracking of biological and nonbiological motion stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertz, Hanna; Hilger, Maximilian; Hegele, Mathias; Fiehler, Katja

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that beliefs about the human origin of a stimulus are capable of modulating the coupling of perception and action. Such beliefs can be based on top-down recognition of the identity of an actor or bottom-up observation of the behavior of the stimulus. Instructed human agency has been shown to lead to superior tracking performance of a moving dot as compared to instructed computer agency, especially when the dot followed a biological velocity profile and thus matched the predicted movement, whereas a violation of instructed human agency by a nonbiological dot motion impaired oculomotor tracking (Zwickel et al., 2012). This suggests that the instructed agency biases the selection of predictive models on the movement trajectory of the dot motion. The aim of the present fMRI study was to examine the neural correlates of top-down and bottom-up modulations of perception-action couplings by manipulating the instructed agency (human action vs. computer-generated action) and the observable behavior of the stimulus (biological vs. nonbiological velocity profile). To this end, participants performed an oculomotor tracking task in an MRI environment. Oculomotor tracking activated areas of the eye movement network. A right-hemisphere occipito-temporal cluster comprising the motion-sensitive area V5 showed a preference for the biological as compared to the nonbiological velocity profile. Importantly, a mismatch between instructed human agency and a nonbiological velocity profile primarily activated medial-frontal areas comprising the frontal pole, the paracingulate gyrus, and the anterior cingulate gyrus, as well as the cerebellum and the supplementary eye field as part of the eye movement network. This mismatch effect was specific to the instructed human agency and did not occur in conditions with a mismatch between instructed computer agency and a biological velocity profile. Our results support the hypothesis that humans activate a specific

  9. Motion Blending of Virtual Human in Walking Locomotion%虚拟人行走的动作融合

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何志毅; 田金萍; 李天松; 陈名松

    2009-01-01

    研究在行走时虚拟人动作与虚拟地形之间的交互性.通过碰撞检测来确定人体在地面之上的正确位置.利用动作融合的方法,即将几个典型动作按合适的权重结合产生新的动作数据,实时地驱动虚拟人并使之对环境变化的反应满足视觉上的逼真性.融合过程中各原始动作的权重取决于沿着和垂直于人体运动方向的2个地面坡度,同时也通过对地形的几何分析来实现虚拟人对其周边地形的感知.%A study is performed on the interactivity of virtual humans with the virtual terraifi during locomotion by walking. Collision detection is implemented to locate the walker correctly above the ground in the virtual world. Approach of motion blending is employed to generate new motion data to animate in real-time the virtual humans in a believable reaction to the change of environment. The blending weights of the walking motion are determined by the two gradients of the terrain along and across the locomotion direction. Geometric analysis on the terrain is also carried out for the virtual humans' perception to the terrain around.

  10. Acupuncture in ambulatory anesthesia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norheim AJ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Arne Johan Norheim,1 Ingrid Liodden,1 Terje Alræk1,2 1National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM, Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, 2The Norwegian School of Health Sciences, Institute of Acupuncture, Kristiania University College, Oslo, NorwayBackground: Post-anesthetic morbidities remain challenging in our daily practice of anesthesia. Meta-analyses and reviews of acupuncture and related techniques for postoperative nausea and vomiting (POVN and postoperative vomiting (POV show promising results while many clinicians remain skeptical of the value of acupuncture. Given the interest in finding safe non-pharmacological approaches toward postoperative care, this body of knowledge needs to be considered. This review critically appraises and summarizes the research on acupuncture and acupressure in ambulatory anesthesia during the last 15 years.Methods: Articles were identified through searches of Medline, PubMed, and Embase using the search terms “acupuncture” or “acupuncture therapy” in combination with “ambulatory anesthesia” or “ambulatory surgery” or “day surgery” or “postoperative”. A corresponding search was done using “acupressure” and “wristbands”. The searches generated a total of 104, 118, and 122 references, respectively.Results: Sixteen studies were included; eight studies reported on acupuncture and eight on acupressure. Nine studies found acupuncture or acupressure effective on primary endpoints including postoperative nausea and vomiting, postoperative pain, sore throat, and emergence agitation. Four studies found acupuncture had a similar effect to antiemetic medication.Conclusion: Overall, the studies were of fairly good quality. A large proportion of the reviewed papers highlights an effect of acupuncture or acupressure on postoperative morbidities in an ambulatory setting

  11. Human body motion tracking based on quantum-inspired immune cloning algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hong; Yue, Lichuan; Jiao, Licheng; Wu, Xing

    2009-10-01

    In a static monocular camera system, to gain a perfect 3D human body posture is a great challenge for Computer Vision technology now. This paper presented human postures recognition from video sequences using the Quantum-Inspired Immune Cloning Algorithm (QICA). The algorithm included three parts. Firstly, prior knowledge of human beings was used, the key joint points of human could be detected automatically from the human contours and skeletons which could be thinning from the contours; And due to the complexity of human movement, a forecasting mechanism of occlusion joint points was addressed to get optimum 2D key joint points of human body; And then pose estimation recovered by optimizing between the 2D projection of 3D human key joint points and 2D detection key joint points using QICA, which recovered the movement of human body perfectly, because this algorithm could acquire not only the global optimal solution, but the local optimal solution.

  12. A single theoretical framework for circular features processing in humans: orientation and direction of motion compared

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzvetomir eTzvetanov

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Common computational principles underly processing of various visual features in the cortex. They are considered to create similar patterns of contextual modulations in behavioral studies for different features as orientation and direction of motion. Here, I studied the possibility that a single theoretical framework, implemented in different visual areas, of circular feature coding and processing could explain these similarities in observations. Stimuli were created that allowed direct comparison of the contextual effects on orientation and motion direction with two different psychophysical probes: changes in weak and strong signal perception. One unique simplified theoretical model of circular feature coding including only inhibitory interactions, and decoding through standard vector average, successfully predicted the similarities in the two domains, while different feature population characteristics explained well the differences in modulation on both experimental probes. These results demonstrate how a single computational principle underlies processing of various features across the cortices.

  13. Temporal Motion Models for Monocular and Multiview 3–D Human Body Tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Urtasun, Raquel; FLEET David; Fua, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    We explore an approach to 3D people tracking with learned motion models and deterministic optimization. The tracking problem is formulated as the minimization of a differ- entiable criterion whose differential structure is rich enough for optimization to be accom- plished via hill-climbing. This avoids the computational expense of Monte Carlo methods, while yielding good results under challenging conditions. To demonstrate the generality of the approach we show that we can learn and track cyc...

  14. Design of a central pattern generator using reservoir computing for learning human motion

    OpenAIRE

    Wyffels, Francis; Schrauwen, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    To generate coordinated periodic movements, robot locomotion demands mechanisms which are able to learn and produce stable rhythmic motion in a controllable way. Because systems based on biological central pattern generators (CPGs) can cope with these demands, these kind of systems are gaining in success. In this work we introduce a novel methodology that uses the dynamics of a randomly connected recurrent neural network for the design of CPGs. When a randomly connected recurrent neural netwo...

  15. The validation of a human force model to predict dynamic forces resulting from multi-joint motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Abhilash K.; Maida, James C.; Aldridge, Ann M.; Hasson, Scott M.; Woolford, Barbara J.

    1992-01-01

    The development and validation is examined of a dynamic strength model for humans. This model is based on empirical data. The shoulder, elbow, and wrist joints were characterized in terms of maximum isolated torque, or position and velocity, in all rotational planes. This data was reduced by a least squares regression technique into a table of single variable second degree polynomial equations determining torque as a function of position and velocity. The isolated joint torque equations were then used to compute forces resulting from a composite motion, in this case, a ratchet wrench push and pull operation. A comparison of the predicted results of the model with the actual measured values for the composite motion indicates that forces derived from a composite motion of joints (ratcheting) can be predicted from isolated joint measures. Calculated T values comparing model versus measured values for 14 subjects were well within the statistically acceptable limits and regression analysis revealed coefficient of variation between actual and measured to be within 0.72 and 0.80.

  16. The Mechanism of Yaw Torque Compensation in the Human and Motion Design for Humanoid Robots

    OpenAIRE

    Si Zhang; Qiang Huang; Huaping Wang; Wei Xu; Gan Ma; Yunhui Liu; Zhangguo Yu

    2013-01-01

    When a humanoid robot walks fast or runs, the yaw torque is so large that the supporting foot slips easily and the robot may become unstable. The compensation for the yaw torque is important for fast humanoid walking and many studies have been focusing on yaw torque compensation. However, the issue of humanoid robot motion design that can make the movements of the robot more human‐like, as well as guarantee the stability of the robot, has not been studied in‐depth. In this paper, the mechanis...

  17. Time and motion, experiment M151. [human performance and space flight stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubis, J. F.; Elrod, J. T.; Rusnak, R.; Mcbride, G. H.; Barnes, J. E.; Saxon, S. C.

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut work performance during the preparation and execution of experiments in simulated Skylab tests was analyzed according to time and motion in order to evaluate the efficiency and consistency of performance (adaptation function) for several different types of activity over the course of the mission; to evaluate the procedures to be used by the same experiment in Skylab; to generate characteristic adaptation functions for later comparison with Skylab data; and to examine astronaut performance for any behavioral stress due to the environment. The overall results indicate that the anticipated adaptation function was obtained both for individual and for averaged data.

  18. Lubricin in human achilles tendon: The evidence of intratendinous sliding motion and shear force in achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-Long; Wei, Zhuang; Zhao, Chunfeng; Jay, Gregory D; Schmid, Thomas M; Amadio, Peter C; An, Kai-Nan

    2015-06-01

    Achilles tendon is one of the most commonly injured tendons. Mechanical force is regarded as a major causative factor. However, the biomechanics of Achilles tendon and mechanical mechanism of the injuries are unclear. Lubricin expresses at regions exposed to sliding motion and shear force in a number of tissues. This study investigated the distribution and concentration of lubricin in human Achilles tendons for better understanding the biomechanics of Achilles tendon. Achilles tendons were harvested from nine cadavers. Lubricin was extracted from various locations proximal to the calcaneal insertion and quantified with ELISA. The distribution of lubricin was investigated with immunohistochemistry. Lubricin was mainly identified at the interfaces of tendon fascicles, especially in the mid-portion of the tendon. The concentration of lubricin in Achilles tendons varied by individual and the distance from its calcaneal insertion. The distal portion of the tendon had a higher concentration of lubricin than the proximal regions of the tendon. This study suggests the presence of intratendinous sliding motion of fascicles and shear force at interfaces of fascicles in human Achilles tendon. Shear force could be an important mechanical factor for the development of Achilles tendinopathy and rupture.

  19. An Ambulatory Program for Surgical Residents and Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Margaret

    1988-01-01

    A pilot program based in a freestanding ambulatory surgery center at the Chicago Medical School Department of Surgery is described, its curriculum outlined, and the daily activities of the residents and medical students are detailed. A brief history of ambulatory surgery is given. (Author/MLW)

  20. Degree of Ambulatory Disability: Effects on Rural Siblings' Social Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Theresa Nowak; Ross-Reynolds, Jane

    1993-01-01

    Interviews with 22 mothers of children with ambulatory disability and 33 nondisabled siblings showed no differences in sibling's child care responsibilities, general home responsibilities, or independence related to severity of the ambulatory disability. A difference in the amount of social activity, reported by mothers, was not confirmed by…

  1. 42 CFR 410.165 - Payment for rural health clinic services and ambulatory surgical center services: Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ambulatory surgical center services: Conditions. 410.165 Section 410.165 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Payment of SMI Benefits § 410.165 Payment for rural health clinic services...

  2. Range of motion, neuromechanical and architectural daptations to plantar flexor stretch training in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blazevich, Anthony John; Cannavan, Dale; Waugh, Charlie M;

    2014-01-01

    The neuromuscular adaptations in response to muscle stretch training have not been clearly described. In the present study, changes in muscle (at fascicular and whole muscle levels) and tendon mechanics, muscle activity and spinal motoneuron excitability were examined during standardized plantar...... elongation or tendon stiffness following training. A lack of change in MVC moment and RFD at any joint angle was taken to indicate a lack of change in series compliance of the muscle-tendon unit. Thus, increases in end ROM were underpinned by increases in maximum tolerable passive joint moment ('stretch...... flexor stretches after 3 wk of twice-daily stretch training (4×30-s). No changes were observed in a non-exercising control group (N=9), however stretch training elicited a 19.9% increase in dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) and 28% increase in passive joint moment at end ROM (N=12). Only a trend toward...

  3. A rotary multimodal hybrid energy harvesting device powered by human motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Miles R.

    This thesis presents a novel hybrid multimodal energy harvesting device consisting of an unbalanced rotary disk that supports two transduction methods, piezoelectric and electromagnetic. The device generates electrical energy from oscillatory motion either orthogonal or parallel to the rotary axis to power electronic devices. Analytical models of the device were developed, from which numerical simulations were performed for several different generator sizes. Two prototypes, 180 mm and 100 mm in diameter, respectively, were fabricated and characterized experimentally with a modal shaker. The 180 mm prototype generated 120 mW from the electromagnetic system at 5 Hz and 0.8g, and 4.23 mW from the piezoelectric system at 20.2 Hz and 0.4g excitation acceleration. Finally, the power generation capabilities of the two prototypes were compared to other similar devices.

  4. Generation of human-like motion on anthropomorphic systems using inverse dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Saab, Layale; Souères, Philippe; Mansard, Nicolas; Fourquet, Jean-Yves

    2012-01-01

    This work deals with the generation of human-like whole-body movements on anthropomorphic systems. We propose a general framework to generate robot movements from the definition of ordered stack of tasks and a global resolution scheme that enables to consider different kinds of constraints. We compare qualitatively the robot movements generated from this software with similar recorded human movements. We start with a direct global comparison of body movements. Then we analyze the magnitude of...

  5. Directional Asymmetries and Age Effects in Human Self-Motion Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Roditi, Rachel E.; Crane, Benjamin T.

    2012-01-01

    Directional asymmetries in vestibular reflexes have aided the diagnosis of vestibular lesions; however, potential asymmetries in vestibular perception have not been well defined. This investigation sought to measure potential asymmetries in human vestibular perception. Vestibular perception thresholds were measured in 24 healthy human subjects between the ages of 21 and 68 years. Stimuli consisted of a single cycle of sinusoidal acceleration in a single direction lasting 1 or 2 s (1 or 0.5 Hz...

  6. Self-organizing neural integration of pose-motion features for human action recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Parisi, German I.; Weber, Cornelius; Wermter, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The visual recognition of complex, articulated human movements is fundamental for a wide range of artificial systems oriented toward human-robot communication, action classification, and action-driven perception. These challenging tasks may generally involve the processing of a huge amount of visual information and learning-based mechanisms for generalizing a set of training actions and classifying new samples. To operate in natural environments, a crucial property is the efficient and robust...

  7. Self-Organizing Neural Integration of Pose-Motion Features for Human Action Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    German Ignacio Parisi; Cornelius eWeber; Stefan eWermter

    2015-01-01

    The visual recognition of complex, articulated human movements is fundamental for a wide range of artificial systems oriented towards human-robot communication, action classification, and action-driven perception. These challenging tasks may generally involve the processing of a huge amount of visual information and learning-based mechanisms for generalizing a set of training actions and classifying new samples. To operate in natural environments, a crucial property is the efficient and robus...

  8. Managing hypertension with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, William B; Gulati, Vinay

    2015-02-01

    There has been a dramatic shift in the manner in which blood pressure (BP) is measured to provide far more comprehensive clinical information than that provided by a single set of office BP readings. Extensive clinical and epidemiological research shows an important role of ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) in the management of hypertensive patients. A 24-h BP profile helps to determine the absence of nocturnal dipping status and evaluate BP control in patients on antihypertensive therapy. The ability to detect white-coat or masked hypertension is enhanced by ambulatory BP monitoring. In 2001, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services approved ABPM for reimbursement for the identification of patients with white-coat hypertension. In 2011, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) in the UK published guidelines that recommended the routine use of ABPM in all patients suspected of having hypertension. The European Society of Hypertension (ESH) 2013 guidelines also support greater use of ABPM in clinical practice. While the advantages of ABPM are apparent from a clinical perspective, its use should be considered in relation to its cost, the complexity of data evaluation, as well as patient inconvenience. In this review, we evaluate the clinical importance of ABPM, highlighting its role in the current management of hypertension.

  9. Harvesting energy from the motion of human limbs: the design and analysis of an impact-based piezoelectric generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Michael; Fiorini, Paolo; van Schaijk, Rob; van Hoof, Chris

    2009-03-01

    Vibration energy harvesters can replace batteries and serve as clean and renewable energy sources in low-consumption wireless applications. Harvesters delivering sufficient power for sensors operating in an industrial environment have been developed, but difficulties are encountered when the devices to be powered are located on the human body. In this case, classical harvester designs (resonant systems) are not adapted to the low-frequency and high-amplitude characteristics of the motion. For this reason, we propose in this paper an alternative design based on the impact of a moving mass on piezoelectric bending structures. A model of the system is presented and analysed in order to determine the parameters influencing the device performances in terms of energy harvesting. A prototype of the impact harvester is experimentally characterized: for a generator occupying approximately 25 cm3 and weighing 60 g, an output power of 47 µW was measured across a resistive load when the device was rotated by 180° each second. 600 µW were obtained for a 10 Hz frequency and 10 cm amplitude linear motion. Further optimization of the piezoelectric transducer is possible, allowing a large increase in these values, bringing the power density for the two cases respectively to 10 and 120 µW cm-3.

  10. Effects of spatial and feature attention on disparity-rendered structure-from-motion stimuli in the human visual cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ifan Betina Ip

    Full Text Available An important advance in the study of visual attention has been the identification of a non-spatial component of attention that enhances the response to similar features or objects across the visual field. Here we test whether this non-spatial component can co-select individual features that are perceptually bound into a coherent object. We combined human psychophysics and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to demonstrate the ability to co-select individual features from perceptually coherent objects. Our study used binocular disparity and visual motion to define disparity structure-from-motion (dSFM stimuli. Although the spatial attention system induced strong modulations of the fMRI response in visual regions, the non-spatial system's ability to co-select features of the dSFM stimulus was less pronounced and variable across subjects. Our results demonstrate that feature and global feature attention effects are variable across participants, suggesting that the feature attention system may be limited in its ability to automatically select features within the attended object. Careful comparison of the task design suggests that even minor differences in the perceptual task may be critical in revealing the presence of global feature attention.

  11. Dopamine Activation Preserves Visual Motion Perception Despite Noise Interference of Human V5/MT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Nada; Fu, Richard Z.; Abou-El-Ela Bourquin, Bilal; Bhrugubanda, Vamsee; Schultz, Simon R.

    2016-01-01

    When processing sensory signals, the brain must account for noise, both noise in the stimulus and that arising from within its own neuronal circuitry. Dopamine receptor activation is known to enhance both visual cortical signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and visual perceptual performance; however, it is unknown whether these two dopamine-mediated phenomena are linked. To assess this, we used single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) applied to visual cortical area V5/MT to reduce the SNR focally and thus disrupt visual motion discrimination performance to visual targets located in the same retinotopic space. The hypothesis that dopamine receptor activation enhances perceptual performance by improving cortical SNR predicts that dopamine activation should antagonize TMS disruption of visual perception. We assessed this hypothesis via a double-blinded, placebo-controlled study with the dopamine receptor agonists cabergoline (a D2 agonist) and pergolide (a D1/D2 agonist) administered in separate sessions (separated by 2 weeks) in 12 healthy volunteers in a William's balance-order design. TMS degraded visual motion perception when the evoked phosphene and the visual stimulus overlapped in time and space in the placebo and cabergoline conditions, but not in the pergolide condition. This suggests that dopamine D1 or combined D1 and D2 receptor activation enhances cortical SNR to boost perceptual performance. That local visual cortical excitability was unchanged across drug conditions suggests the involvement of long-range intracortical interactions in this D1 effect. Because increased internal noise (and thus lower SNR) can impair visual perceptual learning, improving visual cortical SNR via D1/D2 agonist therapy may be useful in boosting rehabilitation programs involving visual perceptual training. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this study, we address the issue of whether dopamine activation improves visual perception despite increasing sensory noise in the visual cortex

  12. Channel Selection and Feature Projection for Cognitive Load Estimation Using Ambulatory EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Lan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an ambulatory cognitive state classification system to assess the subject's mental load based on EEG measurements. The ambulatory cognitive state estimator is utilized in the context of a real-time augmented cognition (AugCog system that aims to enhance the cognitive performance of a human user through computer-mediated assistance based on assessments of cognitive states using physiological signals including, but not limited to, EEG. This paper focuses particularly on the offline channel selection and feature projection phases of the design and aims to present mutual-information-based techniques that use a simple sample estimator for this quantity. Analyses conducted on data collected from 3 subjects performing 2 tasks (n-back/Larson at 2 difficulty levels (low/high demonstrate that the proposed mutual-information-based dimensionality reduction scheme can achieve up to 94% cognitive load estimation accuracy.

  13. A framework of motion capture system based human behaviours simulation for ergonomic analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Ruina; Bennis, Fouad; Ma, Liang

    2011-01-01

    With the increasing of computer capabilities, Computer aided ergonomics (CAE) offers new possibilities to integrate conventional ergonomic knowledge and to develop new methods into the work design process. As mentioned in [1], different approaches have been developed to enhance the efficiency of the ergonomic evaluation. Ergonomic expert systems, ergonomic oriented information systems, numerical models of human, etc. have been implemented in numerical ergonomic software. Until now, there are ergonomic software tools available, such as Jack, Ergoman, Delmia Human, 3DSSPP, and Santos, etc. [2-4]. The main functions of these tools are posture analysis and posture prediction. In the visualization part, Jack and 3DSSPP produce results to visualize virtual human tasks in 3-dimensional, but without realistic physical properties. Nowadays, with the development of computer technology, the simulation of physical world is paid more attention. Physical engines [5] are used more and more in computer game (CG) field. The a...

  14. Analysis of Golf Swing Motion and Applied Loads on the Human Body Using Soft-Golf {sup TM} Club

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Ki Young; So, Ha Ju; Kim, Sung Hyeon; Kim, Dong Wook [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Nam Gyun [Colar Seven Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the kinetic effect of Soft-golf {sup TM} instrument on the human body structure. To analyze the kinetic effect of Soft-golf {sup TM} instrument, Golf swing using Soft-golf {sup TM} instrument and regular golf instrument was captured. And then Upper limbs and lumbar joint torques was calculated via computer simulation. Five man participated this study. Subjects performed golf swing using a regular golf and Soft-golf {sup TM} instrument. Golf swing motion was captured using three position sensor, active infrared LED maker and force plate. Golf swing model was generated and simulated using ADAMS/LifeMOD program. As a results, joint torque during Soft-golf swing were lower than regular golf swing. Thus soft-golf swing have joint load lower than regular golf swing and contribute to reduce joint injury.

  15. Large-scale assembly of highly sensitive Si-based flexible strain sensors for human motion monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing-Chang; Wang, Hui; Zhao, Yu; Li, Fan; Ou, Xue-Mei; Sun, Bao-Quan; Zhang, Xiao-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Silicon is the dominant semiconductor in modern society, but the rigid nature of most Si structures hinders its applications in flexible electronics. In this work, Si-based flexible strain sensors are fabricated with Si fabric consisting of long Si nanowires. The as-obtained sensors demonstrate a large strain range of 50% and a gauge factor of up to 350, which are sufficient to detect human motions with superior performance over traditional sensors. The results reveal that the assembling strategy may potentially be applied to large-scale fabrication of highly sensitive, flexible strain sensors for emerging applications such as healthcare and sports monitoring. Moreover, the Si fabric would also enable broad applications of Si materials in other flexible and wearable devices such as flexible optoelectronics and displays.Silicon is the dominant semiconductor in modern society, but the rigid nature of most Si structures hinders its applications in flexible electronics. In this work, Si-based flexible strain sensors are fabricated with Si fabric consisting of long Si nanowires. The as-obtained sensors demonstrate a large strain range of 50% and a gauge factor of up to 350, which are sufficient to detect human motions with superior performance over traditional sensors. The results reveal that the assembling strategy may potentially be applied to large-scale fabrication of highly sensitive, flexible strain sensors for emerging applications such as healthcare and sports monitoring. Moreover, the Si fabric would also enable broad applications of Si materials in other flexible and wearable devices such as flexible optoelectronics and displays. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The morphological and structural characterization of the silicon nanowires, the plot of the relative resistance change versus cubic strain, and the relationship between the width of the gap and the exerted strain. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07546g

  16. Two eyes, one vision: binocular motion perception in human visual cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barendregt, M.

    2016-01-01

    An important aspect of human vision is the fact that it is binocular, i.e. that we have two eyes. As a result, the brain nearly always receives two slightly different images of the same visual scene. Yet, we only perceive a single image and thus our brain has to actively combine the binocular visual

  17. Human fixation and voluntary pursuit: the interaction between central and peripheral motion stimuli.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.P. Tamminga (Ernst Peter)

    1983-01-01

    textabstractVision is, for a human being, one of the most important senses. The basic function of vision, which is relevant for all species which have a form of vision, is spatial orientatione This function is important for postural control in tasks such as standing upright, walking around, guiding

  18. Comparative study of the two versions of the Microsoft Kinect$^{\\rm TM}$ sensor in regard to the analysis of human motion

    CERN Document Server

    Malinowski, M J

    2015-01-01

    The present paper is part of a broader programme, exploring the possibility of involving the Microsoft Kinect$^{\\rm TM}$ sensor in the analysis of human motion. In this study, the output obtained from the two available versions of this sensor is critically examined. We demonstrate that the two outputs differ in regard to the variation of the physical quantities involved in the modelling of the human motion. As the original sensor has been found unsuitable for applications requiring high precision, the observed differences in the output of the two sensors call for the validation of the upgraded sensor on the basis of a marker-based system.

  19. Human Hand Motion Analysis and Synthesis of Optimal Power Grasps for a Robotic Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Cordella

    2014-03-01

    and experimental trials on an arm-hand robotic system. The obtained results have shown the effectiveness of the extracted indicators to reduce the non-linear optimization problem complexity and lead to the synthesis of a grasping posture able to replicate the human behaviour while ensuring grasp stability. The experimental results have also highlighted the limitations of the adopted robotic platform (mainly due to the mechanical structure to achieve the optimal grasp configuration.

  20. Hearing in slow-motion: Humans underestimate the speed of moving sounds

    OpenAIRE

    Irene Senna; Parise, Cesare V.; Marc O. Ernst

    2015-01-01

    Perception can often be described as a statistically optimal inference process whereby noisy and incomplete sensory evidence is combined with prior knowledge about natural scene statistics. Previous evidence has shown that humans tend to underestimate the speed of unreliable moving visual stimuli. This finding has been interpreted in terms of a Bayesian prior favoring low speed, given that in natural visual scenes objects are mostly stationary or slowly-moving. Here we investigated whether an...

  1. Perceptual Learning of Motion Direction Discrimination with Suppressed and Unsuppressed MT in Humans: An fMRI Study

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Benjamin; Tjan, Bosco S.; Liu, Zili

    2013-01-01

    The middle temporal area of the extrastriate visual cortex (area MT) is integral to motion perception and is thought to play a key role in the perceptual learning of motion tasks. We have previously found, however, that perceptual learning of a motion discrimination task is possible even when the training stimulus contains locally balanced, motion opponent signals that putatively suppress the response of MT. Assuming at least partial suppression of MT, possible explanations for this learning ...

  2. Growing ambulatory care nurse leaders in a multigenerational workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moye, Janet P; Swan, Beth Ann

    2009-01-01

    Ambulatory care faces challenges in sustaining a nursing workforce in the future as newly licensed nurses are heavily recruited to inpatient settings and retirements will impact ambulatory care sooner than other areas. Building a diverse team by recruiting nurses of different ages (generations) and skills may result in a more successful and robust organization. Knowledge about generational characteristics and preferences will aid nurse leaders and recruiters in attracting high-quality, talented nurses. Nurses of Generations X and Y can increase their likelihood of success in ambulatory care by better understanding intergenerational issues. PMID:20050492

  3. Computer database of ambulatory EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakar, P B; Brusse, E; Patrick, J P; Shwedyk, E; Seshia, S S

    1987-01-01

    The paper describes an ambulatory EEG database. The database contains segments of AEEGs done on 45 subjects. Each epoch (1/8th second or more) of AEEG data has been annotated into 1 of 40 classes. The classes represent background activity, paroxysmal patterns and artifacts. The majority of classes have over 200 discrete epochs. The structure is flexible enough to allow additional epochs to be readily added. The database is stored on transportable media such as digital magnetic tape or hard disk and is thus available to other researchers in the field. The database can be used to design, evaluate and compare EEG signal processing algorithms and pattern recognition systems. It can also serve as an educational medium in EEG laboratories.

  4. Ambulatory ST segment monitoring after myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mickley, H

    1994-01-01

    The prevalence of transient myocardial ischaemia after myocardial infarction seems to be lower than in other subgroups with coronary artery disease. In postinfarction patients, however, a greater proportion of ischaemic episodes are silent. At present there is substantial evidence that transient...... ischaemia provides prognostic information in different subsets of patients with previous myocardial infarction, but there is considerable disagreement about how this is expressed in terms of cardiac events. Small patient numbers, patient selection, and different timing of ambulatory monitoring are proposed...... be that it can be performed early after infarction at the time of maximum risk. Secondly, it can be performed in most patients after infarction, including those recognised as being at high risk who are unable to perform an exercise stress test....

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the STAS Domains of Rat Prestin and Human Pendrin Reveal Conformational Motions in Conserved Flexible Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok K. Sharma

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Molecular dynamics (MD simulations provide valuable information on the conformational changes that accompany time-dependent motions in proteins. The reported crystal structure of rat prestin (PDB 3LLO is remarkable for an α1-α2 inter-helical angle that differs substantially from those observed in bacterial STAS domains of SulP anion transporters and anti-sigma factor antagonists. However, NMR data on the rat prestin STAS domain in solution suggests dynamic features at or near the α1-α2 helical region (Pasqualetto et al JMB, 2010. We therefore performed a 100 ns 300K MD simulation study comparing the STAS domains of rat prestin and (modeled human pendrin, to explore possible conformational flexibility in the region of the α1 and α2 helices. Methods: The conformation of the loop missing in the crystal structure of rat prestin STAS (11 amino acids between helix α1 and strand β3 was built using Modeller. MD simulations were performed with GROMACSv4.6 using GROMOS96 53a6 all-atom force field. Results: A subset of secondary structured elements of the STAS domains exhibits significant conformational changes during the simulation time course. The conformationally perturbed segments include the majority of loop regions, as well as the α1 and α2 helices. A significant decrease in the α1-α2 inter-helical angle observed across the simulation trajectory leads to closer helical packing at their C-termini. The end-simulation conformations of the prestin and pendrin STAS domains, including their decreased α1-α2 inter-helical angles, resemble more closely the packing of corresponding helices in the STAS structures of bacterial SulP transporters Rv1739c and ychM, as well as those of the anti-sigma factor antagonists. Several structural segments of the modeled human pendrin STAS domain exhibit larger atomic motions and greater conformational deviations than the corresponding regions of rat prestin, predicting that the human pendrin STAS

  6. Reflex responses to combined hip and knee motion in human chronic spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Wu, PhD

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The relative contributions of hip and knee proprioceptors to the origination of extensor spasms were examined in 11 subjects with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI. Ramp and hold extension and combined hip and knee oscillation movements were imposed to the right leg while the ankle was held in a static position by a custom-designed robot. Isometric joint torques of the hip, knee, and ankle and surface electromyograms (EMGs from seven leg muscles were recorded following controlled hip and knee extension. A stereotypical torque response consisting of hip flexion, knee extension, and ankle plantar flexion was observed following hip and knee perturbations. Further, the hip or knee joint posture modulated the spastic reflexes triggered by the extension movement of the other joint, with larger responses observed with the hip and knee extended. In addition, combined hip and knee oscillation movements were imposed to one leg with four different phasing conditions. The phasing between the hip and knee modulated the reflex activity triggered by hip and knee oscillations. The EMG patterns of the spastic reflexes were generally consistent with muscle timing during locomotion in human SCI. This knowledge may help identify rehabilitation strategies that produce functional movements in human SCI.

  7. Design and experiments of a self-charged power bank by harvesting sustainable human motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longhan Xie

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a self-charged power bank integrated with an energy harvester was developed to harness human biomechanical energy and sustainably recharge a power bank. In the energy harvester, a spring–mass damping system is used to transform the human body’s movement during walking into the rotation of a gear train and drive rotary generators to produce electricity to recharge the battery through a rectifying circuit. A mathematical model was built to examine the power output of the energy harvester under different excitation conditions. A prototype was built to test the performances of the harvester, and experiments on the prototype fixed on the ankle, wrist, and torso were conducted, which indicated that the measured power output was 0.35 W, 0.16 W, and 10 mW, respectively, when testers walked at 2.0 m/s (the circular frequency of foot step is about 14.5 rad/s. The experiments indicate that a higher walking velocity as well as excitation amplitude and frequency could result in higher output power.

  8. Highly flexible self-powered sensors based on printed circuit board technology for human motion detection and gesture recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuh, Yiin-Kuen; Ho, Hsi-Chun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a new integration of printed circuit board (PCB) technology-based self-powered sensors (PSSs) and direct-write, near-field electrospinning (NFES) with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) micro/nano fibers (MNFs) as source materials. Integration with PCB technology is highly desirable for affordable mass production. In addition, we systematically investigate the effects of electrodes with intervals in the range of 0.15 mm to 0.40 mm on the resultant PSS output voltage and current. The results show that at a strain of 0.5% and 5 Hz, a PSS with a gap interval 0.15 mm produces a maximum output voltage of 3 V and a maximum output current of 220 nA. Under the same dimensional constraints, the MNFs are massively connected in series (via accumulation of continuous MNFs across the gaps ) and in parallel (via accumulation of parallel MNFs on the same gap) simultaneously. Finally, encapsulation in a flexible polymer with different interval electrodes demonstrated that electrical superposition can be realized by connecting MNFs collectively and effectively in serial/parallel patterns to achieve a high current and high voltage output, respectively. Further improvement in PSSs based on the effect of cooperativity was experimentally realized by rolling-up the device into a cylindrical shape, resulting in a 130% increase in power output due to the cooperative effect. We assembled the piezoelectric MNF sensors on gloves, bandages and stockings to fabricate devices that can detect different types of human motion, including finger motion and various flexing and extensions of an ankle. The firmly glued PSSs were tested on the glove and ankle respectively to detect and harvest the various movements and the output voltage was recorded as ∼1.5 V under jumping movement (one PSS) and ∼4.5 V for the clenched fist with five fingers bent concurrently (five PSSs). This research shows that piezoelectric MNFs not only have a huge impact on harvesting various external

  9. Highly flexible self-powered sensors based on printed circuit board technology for human motion detection and gesture recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuh, Yiin-Kuen; Ho, Hsi-Chun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a new integration of printed circuit board (PCB) technology-based self-powered sensors (PSSs) and direct-write, near-field electrospinning (NFES) with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) micro/nano fibers (MNFs) as source materials. Integration with PCB technology is highly desirable for affordable mass production. In addition, we systematically investigate the effects of electrodes with intervals in the range of 0.15 mm to 0.40 mm on the resultant PSS output voltage and current. The results show that at a strain of 0.5% and 5 Hz, a PSS with a gap interval 0.15 mm produces a maximum output voltage of 3 V and a maximum output current of 220 nA. Under the same dimensional constraints, the MNFs are massively connected in series (via accumulation of continuous MNFs across the gaps ) and in parallel (via accumulation of parallel MNFs on the same gap) simultaneously. Finally, encapsulation in a flexible polymer with different interval electrodes demonstrated that electrical superposition can be realized by connecting MNFs collectively and effectively in serial/parallel patterns to achieve a high current and high voltage output, respectively. Further improvement in PSSs based on the effect of cooperativity was experimentally realized by rolling-up the device into a cylindrical shape, resulting in a 130% increase in power output due to the cooperative effect. We assembled the piezoelectric MNF sensors on gloves, bandages and stockings to fabricate devices that can detect different types of human motion, including finger motion and various flexing and extensions of an ankle. The firmly glued PSSs were tested on the glove and ankle respectively to detect and harvest the various movements and the output voltage was recorded as ∼1.5 V under jumping movement (one PSS) and ∼4.5 V for the clenched fist with five fingers bent concurrently (five PSSs). This research shows that piezoelectric MNFs not only have a huge impact on harvesting various external

  10. Highly flexible self-powered sensors based on printed circuit board technology for human motion detection and gesture recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuh, Yiin-Kuen; Ho, Hsi-Chun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a new integration of printed circuit board (PCB) technology-based self-powered sensors (PSSs) and direct-write, near-field electrospinning (NFES) with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) micro/nano fibers (MNFs) as source materials. Integration with PCB technology is highly desirable for affordable mass production. In addition, we systematically investigate the effects of electrodes with intervals in the range of 0.15 mm to 0.40 mm on the resultant PSS output voltage and current. The results show that at a strain of 0.5% and 5 Hz, a PSS with a gap interval 0.15 mm produces a maximum output voltage of 3 V and a maximum output current of 220 nA. Under the same dimensional constraints, the MNFs are massively connected in series (via accumulation of continuous MNFs across the gaps ) and in parallel (via accumulation of parallel MNFs on the same gap) simultaneously. Finally, encapsulation in a flexible polymer with different interval electrodes demonstrated that electrical superposition can be realized by connecting MNFs collectively and effectively in serial/parallel patterns to achieve a high current and high voltage output, respectively. Further improvement in PSSs based on the effect of cooperativity was experimentally realized by rolling-up the device into a cylindrical shape, resulting in a 130% increase in power output due to the cooperative effect. We assembled the piezoelectric MNF sensors on gloves, bandages and stockings to fabricate devices that can detect different types of human motion, including finger motion and various flexing and extensions of an ankle. The firmly glued PSSs were tested on the glove and ankle respectively to detect and harvest the various movements and the output voltage was recorded as ∼1.5 V under jumping movement (one PSS) and ∼4.5 V for the clenched fist with five fingers bent concurrently (five PSSs). This research shows that piezoelectric MNFs not only have a huge impact on harvesting various external

  11. 基于JACK的虚拟人维修动作生成设计%Virtual Human Maintenance Motion Generation Design Based on JACK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王华; 陈永科; 杨艾军; 何伟

    2014-01-01

    针对动作仿真软件 JACK 已不能满足虚拟维修训练和仿真需要的问题,设计基于 JACK 软件的虚拟维修动作生成系统。在分析某型防空火箭武器系统维修性的基础上,构建虚拟人维修动作生成系统的基本框架,根据我国国情对JACK软件人体模型的相关参数进行调整,在构建了虚拟人树形分层模型后,对IK算法进行改进,使生成的动作连贯、自然、流畅,并将生成的维修动作转化为JackScript脚本,在JACK仿真软件中进行虚拟人的维修动作仿真。当前这种维修动作生成设计已应用于某型防空火箭武器系统虚拟维修仿真中。%The motion simulation software JACK can’t meet the requirements of virtual maintenance training and simulation, design virtual maintenance motion generation system based on JACK software. Based on analyzing certain type air defense rocket weapon system maintenance, establish basic frame of virtual human maintenance motion generation system. According to domestic situations, debug corresponding parameters of JACK software human model, after establish virtual human tree stratification model, improve IK algorithm to make the motion coherent, natural and fluent. At last change the maintenance motion into JackScript script, simulate virtual human maintenance motion in JACK simulation. The design has been applied into certain type air strike rocket weapon system virtual maintenance simulation.

  12. A Parametric Approach to Gait Signature Extraction for Human Motion Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The extraction and analysis of human gait characteristics using image sequences are currently anintense area of research. Identifying individuals using biometric methods has recently gainedgrowing interest from computer vision researchers for security purposes at places like airport,banks etc. Gait recognition aims essentially to address this problem by identifying people at adistance based on the way they walk i.e., by tracking a number of feature points or gaitsignatures. We describe a new model-based feature extraction analysis is presented usingHough transform technique that helps to read the essential parameters used to generate gaitsignatures that automatically extracts and describes human gait for recognition. In thepreprocessing steps, the picture frames taken from video sequences are given as input to Cannyedge detection algorithm which helps to detect edges of the image by extracting foreground frombackground also it reduces the noise using Gaussian filter. The output from edge detection isgiven as input to the Hough transform. Using the Hough transform image, a clear line basedmodel is designed to extract gait signatures. A major difficulty of the existing gait signatureextraction methods are the good tracking the requisite feature points. In the proposed work, wehave used five parameters to successfully extract the gait signatures. It is observed that when thecamera is placed at 90 and 270 degrees, all the parameters used in the proposed work areclearly visible. The efficiency of the model is tested on a variety of body position and strideparameters recovered in different viewing conditions on a database consisting of 20 subjectswalking at both an angled and frontal-parallel view with respect to the camera, both indoors andoutdoors and find the method to be highly successful. The test results show good clarity rates,with a high level of confidence and it is suggested that the algorithm reported here could form thebasis of a robust

  13. Comprehensive ambulatory medicine training for categorical internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharel, Monica; Jain, Sharad; Hollander, Harry

    2003-04-01

    It is challenging to create an educational and satisfying experience in the outpatient setting. We developed a 3-year ambulatory curriculum that addresses the special needs of our categorical medicine residents with distinct learning objectives for each year of training and clinical experiences and didactic sessions to meet these goals. All PGY1 residents spend 1 month on a general medicine ambulatory care rotation. PGY2 residents spend 3 months on an ambulatory block focusing on 8 core medicine subspecialties. Third-year residents spend 2 months on an advanced ambulatory rotation. The curriculum was started in July 2000 and has been highly regarded by the house staff, with statistically significant improvements in the PGY2 and PGY3 evaluation scores. By enhancing outpatient clinical teaching and didactics with an emphasis on the specific needs of our residents, we have been able to reframe the thinking and attitudes of a group of inpatient-oriented residents. PMID:12709096

  14. Ambulatory Pessary Trial Unmasks Occult Stress Urinary Incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Chughtai

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion. An ambulatory pessary trial is an effective, easy, and inexpensive method to approximate anatomic results achieved by surgery under real-life conditions. In our series, 20% of patients with occult SUI were identified by pessary trial alone.

  15. Prevalência ambulatorial em um hospital geral de marcadores para hepatites B e C em pacientes com infecção pelo vírus da imunodeficiência humana Ambulatorial prevalence of hepatitis B and C markers in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection in a general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Valle Tovo

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: Os vírus das hepatites B (VHB e C (VHC e da imunodeficiência humana (HIV utilizam a mesma rota de transmissão, sendo a prevalência de VHB e VHC em pacientes infectados pelo HIV maior do que aquela encontrada na população em geral. OBJETIVO: Determinar a prevalência de marcadores para hepatites B e C em uma população de pacientes com HIV, bem como os fatores de risco envolvidos. PACIENTES E MÉTODOS: Dentre os 5 870 prontuários de pacientes com HIV em acompanhamento no Serviço de Infectologia do Hospital Nossa Senhora da Conceição, Porto Alegre, RS, foram aleatoriamente selecionados 587 prontuários. Destes, foram considerados para análise retrospectiva aqueles em que havia sido pesquisado algum marcador para hepatites B (HBsAg, anti-HBc ou anti-HBs ou C (anti-VHC, perfazendo o total de 343 pacientes. RESULTADOS: O HBsAg foi positivo em 14 de 306 (4,6% pacientes, anticorpo anti-HBs, em 40 de 154 (26,0% pacientes, e anti-HBc em 79 de 205 (38,5% pacientes. Dentre aqueles que realizaram anti-VHC, 126 de 330 (38,2% tinham-no positivo. Co-infecção por vírus B e C foi observada em 7 dentre os 296 pacientes que realizaram tanto o HBsAg, quanto o anti-VHC (2,4%. Dentre aqueles HBsAg positivos, a principal categoria de exposição foi o relacionamento homossexual masculino (50,0%. Dentre aqueles anti-VHC positivos, a principal categoria de exposição foi o uso de drogas ilícitas injetáveis (75,3%. Naqueles monoinfectados com HIV (185 pacientes, o fator de risco mais prevalente foi relacionamento heterossexual promíscuo ou com cônjuge infectado por HIV em 83 pacientes (44,9%. CONCLUSÃO: Em nosso meio, as co-infecções VHB-HIV e VHC-HIV são freqüentes, sendo observado maior impacto na associação do VHC com o HIV.BACKGROUND: Hepatitis B and C viruses and human immunodeficiency virus share the same route of transmission, and the prevalence of HBV and HCV infection in patients infected with HIV is greater than it is in the

  16. Computerized adaptive testing--ready for ambulatory monitoring?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Matthias; Bjørner, Jakob; Fischer, Felix;

    2012-01-01

    Computerized adaptive tests (CATs) have abundant theoretical advantages over established static instruments, which could improve ambulatory monitoring of patient-reported outcomes (PROs). However, an empirical demonstration of their practical benefits is warranted.......Computerized adaptive tests (CATs) have abundant theoretical advantages over established static instruments, which could improve ambulatory monitoring of patient-reported outcomes (PROs). However, an empirical demonstration of their practical benefits is warranted....

  17. Pros and cons of the ambulatory surgery center joint venture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    If a physician group has determined that it has a realistic patient base to establish an ambulatory surgery center, it may be beneficial to consider a partner to share the costs and risks of this new joint venture. Joint ventures can be a benefit or liability in the establishment of an ambulatory surgery center. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of a hospital physician-group joint venture. PMID:18061764

  18. Comparing Ambulatory Preceptors’ and Students’ Perceptions of Educational Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Qualters, Donna M.; Regan, Mary Beth; O’Brien, Mary Callery; Stone, Sarah L

    1999-01-01

    To compare ambulatory preceptors’ and students’ perceptions of the use of educational planning (setting goals, assessing needs, formulating objectives, choosing methods, and providing feedback and evaluation) in the office setting, we mailed a survey, which was returned by 127 longitudinal ambulatory preceptors and 168 first-year and second-year medical students. Faculty perceptions did not match student perceptions of what occurred in the longitudinal preceptor program teaching sessions in e...

  19. Pros and cons of the ambulatory surgery center joint venture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    If a physician group has determined that it has a realistic patient base to establish an ambulatory surgery center, it may be beneficial to consider a partner to share the costs and risks of this new joint venture. Joint ventures can be a benefit or liability in the establishment of an ambulatory surgery center. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of a hospital physician-group joint venture.

  20. Human Motion Tracking and Glove-Based User Interfaces for Virtual Environments in ANVIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Joseph D., II

    2002-01-01

    The Army/NASA Virtual Innovations Laboratory (ANVIL) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) provides an environment where engineers and other personnel can investigate novel applications of computer simulation and Virtual Reality (VR) technologies. Among the many hardware and software resources in ANVIL are several high-performance Silicon Graphics computer systems and a number of commercial software packages, such as Division MockUp by Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) and Jack by Unigraphics Solutions, Inc. These hardware and software platforms are used in conjunction with various VR peripheral I/O (input / output) devices, CAD (computer aided design) models, etc. to support the objectives of the MSFC Engineering Systems Department/Systems Engineering Support Group (ED42) by studying engineering designs, chiefly from the standpoint of human factors and ergonomics. One of the more time-consuming tasks facing ANVIL personnel involves the testing and evaluation of peripheral I/O devices and the integration of new devices with existing hardware and software platforms. Another important challenge is the development of innovative user interfaces to allow efficient, intuitive interaction between simulation users and the virtual environments they are investigating. As part of his Summer Faculty Fellowship, the author was tasked with verifying the operation of some recently acquired peripheral interface devices and developing new, easy-to-use interfaces that could be used with existing VR hardware and software to better support ANVIL projects.

  1. Electrets substituting external bias voltage in dielectric elastomer generators: application to human motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dielectric elastomer generators offer great potential for soft applications involving fluid or human interactions. These scavengers are light, compliant, have a wide range of functions and develop an important energy density. Nevertheless, these systems are passive and require an external bias source, namely a high voltage source and complex power circuits. This cumbersome polarization complexes the system in a drastic way and slows down the development of dielectric generators. In order to remove these problems, we propose here new transducers based on the use of an electret coupled with dielectric elastomer, thus avoiding the use of a high external voltage source, and leading to the design of a soft autonomous dielectric generator. By combining a dielectric model and the electret theory, an electromechanical model was developed to evaluate the capabilities of such a generator. This generator was then produced starting from Teflon™ as electret and silicone PolyPower™ as electroactive polymer. A good agreement between the model and the experiment were obtained. An experimental energy density of 0.55 mJ g−1 was reached for 50% strain (electret potential of −1000 V). Once optimized in its design, such a soft generator could produce energy density up to 1.42 mJ g−1. An energy density of 4.16 mJ g−1 is expected with an electret potential of −2000 V. (paper)

  2. Electrets substituting external bias voltage in dielectric elastomer generators: application to human motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu-Cong, T.; Jean-Mistral, C.; Sylvestre, A.

    2013-02-01

    Dielectric elastomer generators offer great potential for soft applications involving fluid or human interactions. These scavengers are light, compliant, have a wide range of functions and develop an important energy density. Nevertheless, these systems are passive and require an external bias source, namely a high voltage source and complex power circuits. This cumbersome polarization complexes the system in a drastic way and slows down the development of dielectric generators. In order to remove these problems, we propose here new transducers based on the use of an electret coupled with dielectric elastomer, thus avoiding the use of a high external voltage source, and leading to the design of a soft autonomous dielectric generator. By combining a dielectric model and the electret theory, an electromechanical model was developed to evaluate the capabilities of such a generator. This generator was then produced starting from Teflon™ as electret and silicone PolyPower™ as electroactive polymer. A good agreement between the model and the experiment were obtained. An experimental energy density of 0.55 mJ g-1 was reached for 50% strain (electret potential of -1000 V). Once optimized in its design, such a soft generator could produce energy density up to 1.42 mJ g-1. An energy density of 4.16 mJ g-1 is expected with an electret potential of -2000 V.

  3. 基于分块主成分分析的人体运动合成%Human Motion Synthesis Based on Block Principal Component Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李妙洋; 蓝荣祎; 孙怀江

    2013-01-01

    在高维运动数据处理中,传统降维方法过度关注于保护拓扑结构和重构信息,导致低维子空间参数具有不可理解性。针对该问题,提出一种基于分块主成分分析的运动合成方法。对根据人体骨骼结构特点分组的运动数据进行分块主成分分析,获得具有特定语义的低维子空间参数。以跳跃运动为例进行实验,结果表明,该方法通过直观地改变具有语义的运动参数,可实时合成满足要求的运动结果。%Human motion analysis based on traditional dimensional reduction methods often overstresses topology preservation and reconstruction precision which results in incomprehensible low-dimensional subspaces. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a Block Principal Component Analysis(BPCA) based method to analyze motion capture data and further synthesize human motions interactively. By applying BPCA to different body parts, low-dimensional motion parameters which are semantically meaningful can be obtained. Taking jumping motion as the example, experimental results show that by intuitively adjusting these motion parameters, desired new motions can be generated in real-time.

  4. List-Mode PET Motion Correction Using Markerless Head Tracking: Proof-of-Concept With Scans of Human Subject

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Sullivan, Jenna M.; Mulnix, Tim;

    2013-01-01

    scanner. Head motion was independently measured, with a commercial marker-based device and the proposed vision-based system. A list-mode event-by-event reconstruction algorithm using the detected motion was applied. A phantom study with hand-controlled continuous random motion was obtained. Motion......A custom designed markerless tracking system was demonstrated to be applicable for positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging. Precise head motion registration is crucial for accurate motion correction (MC) in PET imaging. State-of-the-art tracking systems applied with PET brain imaging rely...... on markers attached to the patient's head. The marker attachment is the main weakness of these systems. A healthy volunteer participating in a cigarette smoking study to image dopamine release was scanned twice for 2 h with $^{11}{\\rm C}$-racolopride on the high resolution research tomograph (HRRT) PET...

  5. Mechanical properties and motion of the cupula of the human semicircular canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selva, Pierre; Oman, Charles M; Stone, Howard A

    2009-01-01

    The mathematical model for the dynamics of the cupula-endolymph system of the inner ear semicircular canal, as elaborated by numerous investigators, remains a foundational tool in all of vestibular physiology. Most models represent the cupula as a linear spring-like element of stiffness K=DeltaP/DeltaV, where DeltaV is the volume displaced upon application of a pressure difference DeltaP. The parameter K directly influences the long time constant of the cupula-endolymph system. Given estimates of K based on experiments, we use thick and thin bending membrane theory, and also finite-element simulations based on more realistic cupula morphologies, to estimate the human cupula's Young's modulus E approximately 5.4 Pa. We show that for a model morphology, thick bending membrane theory and finite-element predictions are in good agreement, and conclude that the morphology of the attachment of the cupula to the slope of the crista should not greatly influence the volume displacement. We note, however, that other biological materials with very low E are hydrogels that have significant viscoelastic properties. Experiments to directly measure E and investigate potential viscoelastic behavior ultimately may be needed. In addition, based on experimental images we study two other different shapes for the cupula and quantify their impact on the deflection of the cupula. We also use a three-dimensional finite-element model to analyze both the shear strain distribution and its time evolution near the sensory epithelium. We conclude that stimulation of sensory hair cells probably begins at the centre of the crista and spreads toward the periphery of the cupula and down the sides of the crista. Thus, spatio-temporal variations in the shearing stimulus are predicted to impact subsequent transduction and encoding. Finally, modeling the fluid-filled vertical channels believed to lie within the cupula, we investigate the impact of different tube diameters on the transverse displacement

  6. Perceptual learning of motion direction discrimination with suppressed and unsuppressed MT in humans: an fMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Thompson

    Full Text Available The middle temporal area of the extrastriate visual cortex (area MT is integral to motion perception and is thought to play a key role in the perceptual learning of motion tasks. We have previously found, however, that perceptual learning of a motion discrimination task is possible even when the training stimulus contains locally balanced, motion opponent signals that putatively suppress the response of MT. Assuming at least partial suppression of MT, possible explanations for this learning are that 1 training made MT more responsive by reducing motion opponency, 2 MT remained suppressed and alternative visual areas such as V1 enabled learning and/or 3 suppression of MT increased with training, possibly to reduce noise. Here we used fMRI to test these possibilities. We first confirmed that the motion opponent stimulus did indeed suppress the BOLD response within hMT+ compared to an almost identical stimulus without locally balanced motion signals. We then trained participants on motion opponent or non-opponent stimuli. Training with the motion opponent stimulus reduced the BOLD response within hMT+ and greater reductions in BOLD response were correlated with greater amounts of learning. The opposite relationship between BOLD and behaviour was found at V1 for the group trained on the motion-opponent stimulus and at both V1 and hMT+ for the group trained on the non-opponent motion stimulus. As the average response of many cells within MT to motion opponent stimuli is the same as their response to non-directional flickering noise, the reduced activation of hMT+ after training may reflect noise reduction.

  7. Optimization-based human motion prediction using an inverse-inverse dynamics technique implemented in the AnyBody Modeling System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farahani, Saeed Davoudabadi; Andersen, Michael Skipper; de Zee, Mark;

    2012-01-01

    derived from the detailed musculoskeletal analysis. The technique is demonstrated on a human model pedaling a bicycle. We use a physiology-based cost function expressing the mean square of all muscle activities over the cycle to predict a realistic motion pattern. Posture and motion prediction...... are important because they enhance the usability of digital manikins for different purposes. In the field of product design for instance, movement prediction techniques entail the possibility for product designers to reduce the number of time consuming and costly experiments. From an orthopedics point...

  8. Human resources needs for universal access to antiretroviral therapy in South Africa: a time and motion study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hontelez Jan AC

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although access to life-saving treatment for patients infected with HIV in South Africa has improved substantially since 2004, treating all eligible patients (universal access remains elusive. As the prices of antiretroviral drugs have dropped over the past years, availability of human resources may now be the most important barrier to achieving universal access to HIV treatment in Africa. We quantify the number of HIV health workers (HHWs required to be added to the current HIV workforce to achieve universal access to HIV treatment in South Africa, under different eligibility criteria. Methods We performed a time and motion study in three HIV clinics in a rural, primary care-based HIV treatment program in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, to estimate the average time per patient visit for doctors, nurses, and counselors. We estimated the additional number of HHWs needed to achieve universal access to HIV treatment within one year. Results For universal access to HIV treatment for all patients with a CD4 cell count of ≤350 cells/μl, an additional 2,200 nurses, 3,800 counselors, and 300 doctors would be required, at additional annual salary cost of 929 million South African rand (ZAR, equivalent to US$ 141 million. For universal treatment (‘treatment as prevention’, an additional 6,000 nurses, 11,000 counselors, and 800 doctors would be required, at an additional annual salary cost of ZAR 2.6 billion (US$ 400 million. Conclusions Universal access to HIV treatment for patients with a CD4 cell count of ≤350 cells/μl in South Africa may be affordable, but the number of HHWs available for HIV treatment will need to be substantially increased. Treatment as prevention strategies will require considerable additional financial and human resources commitments.

  9. Peritonitis during continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, J; Rogers, W A; Taylor, H M; Everett, E D; Prowant, B F; Fruto, L V; Nolph, K D

    1980-01-01

    We initiated a therapeutic program of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis for patients with chronic renal failure. Our program resulted in many episodes of peritonitis arising from contamination due to the technical aspects of the procedure. Microbiologic evaluation showed that 73% of 97 episodes were culture positive, with gram-positive organisms causing most of the cases, especially early in dialysis. Gram-negative rods tended to occur later. Gram stains of dialysate effluent resulted in a disappointingly low yield of only 9% positivity. Cell counts were a dependable indicator of the presence of peritoneal inflammation and also of therapeutic success. Most patients responded well to intraperitoneal cephalothin, 125 mg/L for 10 to 14 d. The occurrence of peritonitis resulted in 0.93 years of hospitalization during the total of 15.45 patient-years on dialysis, which essentially negated the financial advantages of this method of treatment of chronic renal failure. For this to be a successful mode of therapy, advances in the prevention of peritonitis must be made. PMID:6985785

  10. Cuff inflation during ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and heart rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Skov-Madsen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Mia Skov-Madsen, My Svensson, Jeppe Hagstrup ChristensenDepartment of Nephrology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, DenmarkIntroduction: Twenty four-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is a clinically validated procedure in evaluation of blood pressure (BP. We hypothesised that the discomfort during cuff inflation would increase the heart rate (HR measured with 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring compared to a following HR measurement with a 24-h Holter monitor.Methods: The study population (n = 56 were recruited from the outpatient’s clinic at the Department of Nephrology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital at Aalborg, Denmark. All the patients had chronic kidney disease (CKD. We compared HR measured with a 24-h Holter monitor with a following HR measured by a 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring.Results: We found a highly significant correlation between the HR measured with the Holter monitor and HR measured with 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (r = 0.77, p < 0.001. Using the Bland-Altman plot, the mean difference in HR was only 0.5 beat/min during 24 hours with acceptable limits of agreement for both high and low HR levels. Dividing the patients into groups according to betablocker treatment, body mass index, age, sex, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor treatment, statins treatment, diuretic treatment, or calcium channel blocker treatment revealed similar results as described above.Conclusion: The results indicate that the discomfort induced by cuff inflation during 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring does not increase HR. Thus, 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring may be a reliable measurement of the BP among people with CKD.Keywords: ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, Holter monitoring, heart rate, chronic kidney disease, hypertension

  11. Surgical Site Infections Following Pediatric Ambulatory Surgery: An Epidemiologic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke, Michael L; Jan, Dominique; Nassim, Janelle; Choi, Jaeun; Choi, Steven J

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify surgical site infection (SSI) rates following pediatric ambulatory surgery, SSI outcomes and risk factors, and sensitivity and specificity of SSI administrative billing codes. DESIGN Retrospective chart review of pediatric ambulatory surgeries with International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for SSI, and a systematic random sampling of 5% of surgeries without SSI ICD-9 codes, all adjudicated for SSI on the basis of an ambulatory-adapted National Healthcare Safety Network definition. SETTING Urban pediatric tertiary care center April 1, 2009-March 31, 2014. METHODS SSI rates and sensitivity and specificity of ICD-9 codes were estimated using sampling design, and risk factors were analyzed in case-rest of cohort, and case-control, designs. RESULTS In 15,448 pediatric ambulatory surgeries, 34 patients had ICD-9 codes for SSI and 25 met the adapted National Healthcare Safety Network criteria. One additional SSI was identified with systematic random sampling. The SSI rate following pediatric ambulatory surgery was 2.9 per 1,000 surgeries (95% CI, 1.2-6.9). Otolaryngology surgeries demonstrated significantly lower SSI rates compared with endocrine (P=.001), integumentary (P=.001), male genital (Psurgeries. Almost half of patients with an SSI were admitted, 88% received antibiotics, and 15% returned to the operating room. No risk factors were associated with SSI. The sensitivity of ICD-9 codes for SSI following ambulatory surgery was 55.31% (95% CI, 12.69%-91.33%) and specificity was 99.94% (99.89%-99.97%). CONCLUSIONS SSI following pediatric ambulatory surgery occurs at an appreciable rate and conveys morbidity on children. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:931-938.

  12. Surgical Site Infections Following Pediatric Ambulatory Surgery: An Epidemiologic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke, Michael L; Jan, Dominique; Nassim, Janelle; Choi, Jaeun; Choi, Steven J

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify surgical site infection (SSI) rates following pediatric ambulatory surgery, SSI outcomes and risk factors, and sensitivity and specificity of SSI administrative billing codes. DESIGN Retrospective chart review of pediatric ambulatory surgeries with International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for SSI, and a systematic random sampling of 5% of surgeries without SSI ICD-9 codes, all adjudicated for SSI on the basis of an ambulatory-adapted National Healthcare Safety Network definition. SETTING Urban pediatric tertiary care center April 1, 2009-March 31, 2014. METHODS SSI rates and sensitivity and specificity of ICD-9 codes were estimated using sampling design, and risk factors were analyzed in case-rest of cohort, and case-control, designs. RESULTS In 15,448 pediatric ambulatory surgeries, 34 patients had ICD-9 codes for SSI and 25 met the adapted National Healthcare Safety Network criteria. One additional SSI was identified with systematic random sampling. The SSI rate following pediatric ambulatory surgery was 2.9 per 1,000 surgeries (95% CI, 1.2-6.9). Otolaryngology surgeries demonstrated significantly lower SSI rates compared with endocrine (P=.001), integumentary (P=.001), male genital (PSSI were admitted, 88% received antibiotics, and 15% returned to the operating room. No risk factors were associated with SSI. The sensitivity of ICD-9 codes for SSI following ambulatory surgery was 55.31% (95% CI, 12.69%-91.33%) and specificity was 99.94% (99.89%-99.97%). CONCLUSIONS SSI following pediatric ambulatory surgery occurs at an appreciable rate and conveys morbidity on children. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:931-938. PMID:27121727

  13. Collision-free motion planning for virtual human arm%虚拟人手臂无碰撞运动规划

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁科山; 曹玉君; 唐力

    2012-01-01

    Collision-free motion planning for arm is an important problem in maintenance accessibility analysis using virtual human. Base on arm model of virtual human, bidirectional RRTs (rapidly-exploring random trees) arithmetic was used to plan the motion for 9 DOF (degree of freedom) of virtual human arm. Sample, distance definition and interpolation function of RRTs arithmetic were expatiated in detail. And then, physiological limits of articulation range were took into account in plan process, generate collision-free motions path of virtual human arm associated with collision detection. The effectiveness of our method was demonstrated by experiments on Jack software platform, and the method can be used to solve motion plan for multi-DOF virtual human if it is extended.%针对基于虚拟人进行维修可达性分析中的手臂的无碰撞运动规划问题,在建立虚拟人手臂模型的基础上,采用双向RRTs(快速搜索随机树)算法对9自由度虚拟人手臂进行运动规划,并对算法中的抽样、距离定义和差值函数分别做了阐述.规划过程还考虑了手臂关节角度的生理限制,结合碰撞检测得到虚拟人手臂无碰撞运动路径.通过在Jack软件平台上开发的实验环境验证了所用方法的有效性,且此方法可以扩展应用于更多自由度虚拟人的运动规划.

  14. Advances in the use of intravenous techniques in ambulatory anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eng MR

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Matthew R Eng,1 Paul F White1,2 1Department of Anesthesiology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2White Mountain Institute, The Sea Ranch, CA, USA Summary statement: Advances in the use of intravenous techniques in ambulatory anesthesia has become important for the anesthesiologist as the key perioperative physician in outpatient surgery. Key techniques and choices of anesthetics are important in accomplishing fast track goals of ambulatory surgery. Purpose of review: The anesthesiologist in the outpatient environment must focus on improving perioperative efficiency and reducing recovery times while accounting for patients' well-being and safety. This review article focuses on recent intravenous anesthetic techniques to accomplish these goals. Recent findings: This review is an overview of techniques in intravenous anesthesia for ambulatory anesthesia. Intravenous techniques may be tailored to accomplish outpatient surgery goals for the type of surgical procedure and individual patient needs. Careful anesthetic planning and the application of the plans are critical to an anesthesiologist's success with fast-track ambulatory surgery. Conclusion: Careful planning and application of intravenous techniques are critical to an anesthesiologist's success with fast-track ambulatory surgery. Keywords: intravenous anesthesia, outpatient anesthesia, fast-track surgery

  15. Ambulatory anesthesia in plastic surgery: opportunities and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Facque AR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Alexander R Facque, Peter J Taub Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, USA Abstract: In 2013, there were 17 million procedures performed by plastic and reconstructive surgeons in the United States in the private office or ambulatory “surgicenter” setting, as well as additional operations performed in hospitals on an outpatient basis. As interest in performing increasingly complex surgical procedures on an outpatient basis continues to grow, the surgeon and anesthesiologist alike must be prepared to offer safe and reliable anesthesia and analgesia in the ambulatory setting. Surgeons must be aware of the possible techniques that will be employed in their surgeries in order to anticipate and prepare patients for possible postoperative side effects, and anesthesiologists must be prepared to offer such techniques in order to ensure a relatively rapid return to normal activity despite potentially having undergone major surgery. The following is a review of the specific considerations that should be given to ambulatory plastic surgery patients with comments on recent developments in the techniques used to safely administer agreeable and effective anesthesia. Keywords: ambulatory surgery, cosmetic anesthesia, outpatient, ambulatory anesthesia

  16. Patient satisfaction and positive patient outcomes in ambulatory anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah U

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ushma Shah, David T Wong, Jean Wong Department of Anesthesia, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Most surgeries in North America are performed on an ambulatory basis, reducing health care costs and increasing patient comfort. Patient satisfaction is an important outcome indicator of the quality of health care services incorporated by the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA. Patient satisfaction is a complex concept that is influenced by multiple factors. A patient's viewpoint and knowledge plays an influential role in patient satisfaction with ambulatory surgery. Medical optimization and psychological preparation of the patient plays a pivotal role in the success of ambulatory surgery. Postoperative pain, nausea, and vomiting are the most important symptoms for the patient and can be addressed by multimodal drug regimens. Shared decision making, patient–provider relationship, communication, and continuity of care form the main pillars of patient satisfaction. Various psychometrically developed instruments are available to measure patient satisfaction, such as the Iowa Satisfaction with Anesthesia Scale and Evaluation du Vecu de I'Anesthesie Generale, but none have been developed specifically for ambulatory surgery. The ASA has made recommendations for data collection for patient satisfaction surveys and emphasized the importance of reporting the data to the Anesthesia Quality Institute. Future research is warranted to develop a validated tool to measure patient satisfaction in ambulatory surgery. Keywords: patient, satisfaction, anesthesia, outcomes, questionnaire, perspectives

  17. Transitioning the RN to Ambulatory Care: An Investment in Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Juliet Walshe

    2016-01-01

    Registered nurses (RNs) struggle when transitioning from the inpatient setting to the outpatient clinical environment because it results in a diverse skill-set shift. The RN, considered an outpatient revenue source, experiences a decrease in peer-to-peer relationships, changes in leadership responsibilities, and changes in workgroup dynamics (supervision of unlicensed clinical personnel who function under the direction of the physician, not the RN). Ambulatory organizations find themselves implementing clinical orientation programs that may not delineate the attributes of the RN. This diminishes their value while emphasizing the unlicensed technical skill set. Creating a core RN orientation program template is paramount for the transition of the RN to the ambulatory setting. The literature reveals several areas where improving the value of the RN will ultimately enhance recruitment and retention, patient care outcomes, and leverage the RN role within any organization. Eleven 30-minute in-depth telephone interviews were conducted in addition to 4 nurse observations to explore the lived experience of the RN in ambulatory care. The findings disclosed an overarching theme of nurse isolation and offered insightful underpinnings for the nurse leader as ambulatory growth continues and nurse leaders further endorse the RN presence in the ambulatory setting. PMID:26938183

  18. Ambulatory laparoscopic cholecystectomy: Is it safe and cost effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Athar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC is the most commonly performed minimal invasive surgery. However, practice of its use as an ambulatory surgery in our hospital settings is uncommon. Objective : To evaluate safety and cost effectiveness of LC as an ambulatory day care surgery. Study Design : Quasiexperimental. Setting : Department of surgery, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan. Materials and Methods : Patients with uncomplicated symptomatic gallstones were selected for Ambulatory LC. They were admitted electively on the same day and operated on in the morning hours and discharged after a check by the surgeon 6-8 hrs later. Results : Of fifty (n = 50 patients selected for ambulatory LC, 92% were discharged successfully after 6-8 hrs observation. No significant perioperative complications were noted. Unplanned admission and readmission rate was 8 and 2%, respectively. Cost saving for the daycare surgery was Rs. 6,200, Rs. 13,300, and Rs.22,800 per patient as compared to in patient general, semiprivate, and private ward package, respectively. Conclusion : Practice ambulatory LC is safe and cost-effective in selected patients with uncomplicated symptomatic gallstones.

  19. Ambulatory laparoscopic cholecystectomy: A single center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cagri Tiryaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the demographic and clinical parameters affecting the outcomes of ambulatory laparoscopic cholecystectomy (ALC in terms of pain, nausea, anxiety level, and satisfaction of patients in a tertiary health center. Materials and Methods: ALC was offered to 60 patients who met the inclusion criteria. Follow-up (questioning for postoperative pain or discomfort, nausea or vomiting, overall satisfaction was done by telephone contact on the same day at 22:00 p.m. and the first day after surgery at 8: 00 a.m. and by clinical examination one week after operation. STAI I and II data were used for proceeding to the level of anxiety of patients before and/or after the operation. Results: Sixty consecutive patients, with a mean age of 40.6 ± 8.1 years underwent ALC. Fifty-five (92% patients could be sent to their homes on the same day but five patients could not be sent due to anxiety, pain, or social indications. Nausea was reported in four (6.7% cases and not associated with any demographic or clinical features of patients. On the other hand, pain has been reported in 28 (46.7% cases, and obesity and shorter duration of gallbladder disease were associated with the increased pain perception (P = 0.009 and 0.004, respectively. Preopereative anxiety level was significantly higher among patients who could not complete the ALC procedure (P = 0.018. Conclusion: Correct management of these possible adverse effects results in the increased satisfaction of patients and may encourage this more cost-effective and safe method of laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

  20. The Role of Ambulatory Care Pharmacists in an HIV Multidisciplinary Team within a Free and Bilingual Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Ann M. Fugit, Pharm.D., BCPS; Sallie D. Mayer, Pharm.D., MBA, BCPS, CDE; Radha S. Vanmali, Pharm.D., BCACP

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Describe the role and integration of ambulatory care pharmacists in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) clinic within a free and bilingual clinic with regards to types of interventions made during the patient-pharmacist visit. Design: Retrospective, single-centered, chart review. Setting: Free, bilingual clinic in Richmond, VA. Participants: Thirty-two adult patients with diagnosed HIV receiving care in the clinic between June 30, 2010 and January 26, 2011. Main Outcome Measure: T...

  1. Displacement of the medial meniscus within the passive motion characteristics of the human knee joint: an RSA study in human cadaver knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tienen, T G; Buma, P; Scholten, J G F; van Kampen, A; Veth, R P H; Verdonschot, N

    2005-05-01

    The objective of this study was to validate an in vitro human cadaver knee-joint model for the evaluation of the meniscal movement during knee-joint flexion. The question was whether our model showed comparable meniscal displacements to those found in earlier meniscal movement studies in vivo. Furthermore, we determined the influence of tibial torque on the meniscal displacement during knee-joint flexion. Three tantalum beads were inserted in the medial meniscus of six human-cadaver joints. The knee joints were placed and loaded in a loading apparatus, and the movements of the beads were determined by means of RSA during knee-joint flexion and extension with and without internal tibial (IT) and external tibial (ET) torque. During flexion without tibial torque, all menisci moved in posterior and lateral direction. The anterior horn showed significantly greater excursions than the posterior horn in both posterior and lateral direction. Internal tibial torque caused an anterior displacement of the pathway on the tibial plateau. External tibial torque caused a posterior displacement of the pathway. External tibial torque restricted the meniscal displacement during the first 30 degrees of knee-joint flexion. The displacements of the meniscus in this experiment were similar to the displacements described in the in vivo MRI studies. Furthermore, the application of tibial torque confirmed the relative immobility of the posterior horn of the meniscus. During external tibial torque, the posterior displacement of the pathway on the tibial plateau during the first 30 degrees of flexion might be restricted by the attached knee-joint capsule or the femoral condyle. This model revealed representative meniscal displacements during simple knee-joint flexion and also during the outer limits of passive knee-joint motion.

  2. Custom-designed motion-based games for older adults: a review of literature in human-computer interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Gerling, Kathrin; Mandryk, Regan

    2014-01-01

    Many older adults, particularly persons living in senior residences and care homes, lead sedentary lifestyles, which reduces their life expectancy. Motion-based video games encourage physical activity and might be an opportunity for these adults to remain active and engaged; however, research efforts in the field have frequently focused on younger audiences and little is known about the requirements and benefits of motion-based games for elderly players. In this paper, we present an overview ...

  3. A cable-driven wrist robotic rehabilitator using a novel torque-field controller for human motion training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weihai; Cui, Xiang; Zhang, Jianbin; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-06-01

    Rehabilitation technologies have great potentials in assisted motion training for stroke patients. Considering that wrist motion plays an important role in arm dexterous manipulation of activities of daily living, this paper focuses on developing a cable-driven wrist robotic rehabilitator (CDWRR) for motion training or assistance to subjects with motor disabilities. The CDWRR utilizes the wrist skeletal joints and arm segments as the supporting structure and takes advantage of cable-driven parallel design to build the system, which brings the properties of flexibility, low-cost, and low-weight. The controller of the CDWRR is designed typically based on a virtual torque-field, which is to plan "assist-as-needed" torques for the spherical motion of wrist responding to the orientation deviation in wrist motion training. The torque-field controller can be customized to different levels of rehabilitation training requirements by tuning the field parameters. Additionally, a rapidly convergent parameter self-identification algorithm is developed to obtain the uncertain parameters automatically for the floating wearable structure of the CDWRR. Finally, experiments on a healthy subject are carried out to demonstrate the performance of the controller and the feasibility of the CDWRR on wrist motion training or assistance.

  4. Weighted augmented Jacobian matrix with a variable coefficient method for kinematics mapping of space teleoperation based on human-robot motion similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhong; Huang, Xuexiang; Hu, Tianjian; Tan, Qian; Hou, Yuzhuo

    2016-10-01

    Space teleoperation is an important space technology, and human-robot motion similarity can improve the flexibility and intuition of space teleoperation. This paper aims to obtain an appropriate kinematics mapping method of coupled Cartesian-joint space for space teleoperation. First, the coupled Cartesian-joint similarity principles concerning kinematics differences are defined. Then, a novel weighted augmented Jacobian matrix with a variable coefficient (WAJM-VC) method for kinematics mapping is proposed. The Jacobian matrix is augmented to achieve a global similarity of human-robot motion. A clamping weighted least norm scheme is introduced to achieve local optimizations, and the operating ratio coefficient is variable to pursue similarity in the elbow joint. Similarity in Cartesian space and the property of joint constraint satisfaction is analysed to determine the damping factor and clamping velocity. Finally, a teleoperation system based on human motion capture is established, and the experimental results indicate that the proposed WAJM-VC method can improve the flexibility and intuition of space teleoperation to complete complex space tasks.

  5. Human Body Motion Detective Home Security System with Automatic Lamp and User Programmable Text Alert GSM Mobile Phone Number, Unique PIN to Allow Universal Users Using PIR Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyebola B. O

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Insecurity is not a credit to any responsible society, and the conventional use of watch-man has drawbacks of huge risk of life and cost intensive. The use home security system with user programmable text alert GSM mobile phone number with unique PIN to allow universal users with human body motion detective can overcome these limitations. This paper presents reliable security system that is able to recognize human body motion and send an alert message to inform the owner(at any location in the world where there is GSM mobile network coverage of the house through an SMS alert when an unwanted visitor or thief enters the range of the sensor. The system design is in three main phases: the sensitivity, central processing and action. The sensitivity is the perception section that is done through PIR sensor mounted at watch-area, central processing is performed by a programmed microcontroller, and the action (task is done through an interaction of an attached on-board GSM module to the processor (the microcontroller which then send an SMS alert to the user or owner mobile phone number. This system is design to only detect only (or part of human body motion.

  6. Motion sickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bles, W.; Bos, J.E.; Kruit, H.

    2000-01-01

    The number of recently published papers on motion sickness may convey the impression that motion sickness is far from being understood. The current review focusses on a concept which tends to unify the different manifestations and theories of motion sickness. The paper highlights the relations betwe

  7. Abordagem ambulatorial do nutricionista em anemia hemolítica Nutritional ambulatory approach in hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Vieira

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Descreve a atuação do nutricionista em ambulatório de Hematologia Pediátrica em um hospital escola e relata as condutas dietéticas necessárias na abordagem de crianças com anemia hemolítica com e sem sobrecarga de ferro, e também as atitudes mais freqüentes dos familiares em relação à alimentação desses pacientes.The Authors describe the performance of the Dietitian in a Pediatric Hematology Ambulatory. They emphasize the necessary dietetic procedures for adequate management of children with hemolytic anemia, with and without iron overload. Furthermore, they approach the family's attitude towards the patient's nutrition.

  8. Physical activities recognition from ambulatory ECG signals using neuro-fuzzy classifiers and support vector machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kher, Rahul; Pawar, Tanmay; Thakar, Vishvjit; Shah, Hitesh

    2015-02-01

    The use of wearable recorders for long-term monitoring of physiological parameters has increased in the last few years. The ambulatory electrocardiogram (A-ECG) signals of five healthy subjects with four body movements or physical activities (PA)-left arm up down, right arm up down, waist twisting and walking-have been recorded using a wearable ECG recorder. The classification of these four PAs has been performed using neuro-fuzzy classifier (NFC) and support vector machines (SVM). The PA classification is based on the distinct, time-frequency features of the extracted motion artifacts contained in recorded A-ECG signals. The motion artifacts in A-ECG signals have been separated first by the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and the time-frequency features of these motion artifacts have then been extracted using the Gabor transform. The Gabor energy feature vectors have been fed to the NFC and SVM classifiers. Both the classifiers have achieved a PA classification accuracy of over 95% for all subjects. PMID:25641014

  9. Human Motion Synthesis Based on Independent Spatio-Temporal Feature Space%基于独立时空特征空间的人体运动合成

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘更代; 徐明亮; 张明敏

    2011-01-01

    It is still a challenge to generate interactively stylistic human motions satisfying userdefined constraints in computer graphics community. Previous works failed to generate stylistic human motions with both geometric and timing features. As a solution to this problem, a motion model called Independent Spatio-temporal Feature Space is presented in this paper. This model encapsulates spatio-temporal features for motion style which can be extracted from a deformable motion model with an unsupervised machine learning techniques-independent feature subspaceanalysis. The spatio-temporal features are described as several low-dimensional subspaces. Motion style editing is subsequently achieved by blending low-dimensional parameters or solving space-time constrained optimization. Both geometric and timing features are considered in this work and a directly interactive interface is provided. The power and flexibility of this method are demonstrated by taking locomotion as examples. The experimental results show that this method is fast and effective for interactive motion style editing.%如何通过指定约束条件的方式交互式地合成风格化人体运动是计算机动画研究领域的热点和难点,传统的数据驱动办法通常没有全面考虑运动的静态和动态特性.针对这一问题,文中提出人体运动的独立时空特征空间模型,利用一个可变形运动模型和独立特征子空间分析算法提取运动在时空两个域上的特征,并将其封装起来,通过低维子空间进行描述.运动风格的编辑可利用低维运动混合和空时约束优化等方法来实现.该方法充分考虑了运动在时域上的特征,并为用户提供了可编辑接口.文中以各种风格的行走运动为例讨论了该方法的有效性,结果证明效果良好,可用于交互式运动风格编辑.

  10. Reduction of motion artifacts in electrocardiogram monitoring using an optical sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Pecht, Michael G

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of electrocardiogram (ECG) monitors can be significantly impaired by motion artifacts, which can trigger false alarms, cause misdiagnoses, and lead to inappropriate treatment decisions. Skin stretch associated with patient motion is the most significant source of motion artifacts in current ECG monitoring. In this study, motion artifacts are adaptively filtered by using skin strain as the reference variable, measured noninvasively using an optical sensor incorporated into an ECG electrode. The results demonstrate that this new device and method can significantly reduce motion induced ECG artifacts in continuous ambulatory ECG monitoring.

  11. Adesão medicamentosa em idosos em seguimento ambulatorial Medicine adeshion in eldery people in an ambulatorial attendance

    OpenAIRE

    Fernanda Aparecida Cintra; Maria Elena Guariento; Lilian Akemi Miyasaki

    2010-01-01

    Este estudo objetivou avaliar a adesão ao tratamento medicamentoso em idosos em seguimento ambulatorial e identificar os fatores relacionados a esta adesão. Foram entrevistados 165 idosos em seguimento ambulatorial no Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Unicamp), São Paulo. Utilizou-se instrumento próprio, com informações relativas à identificação dos sujeitos, dados de saúde autorreferidos e relativos à terapêutica medicamentosa. Os dados foram submetidos às análises ...

  12. Research on Three-dimensional Motion History Image Model and Extreme Learning Machine for Human Body Movement Trajectory Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the traditional machine vision recognition technology and traditional artificial neural networks about body movement trajectory, this paper finds out the shortcomings of the traditional recognition technology. By combining the invariant moments of the three-dimensional motion history image (computed as the eigenvector of body movements and the extreme learning machine (constructed as the classification artificial neural network of body movements, the paper applies the method to the machine vision of the body movement trajectory. In detail, the paper gives a detailed introduction about the algorithm and realization scheme of the body movement trajectory recognition based on the three-dimensional motion history image and the extreme learning machine. Finally, by comparing with the results of the recognition experiments, it attempts to verify that the method of body movement trajectory recognition technology based on the three-dimensional motion history image and extreme learning machine has a more accurate recognition rate and better robustness.

  13. Prevalência de papilomavirus humano (HPV anal, genital e oral, em ambulatório geral de coloproctologia Prevalence of anal, genital and oral human papillomavirus (HPV in general ambulatory for diseases of colon and rectum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Magi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available O Papilomavirus Humano (HPV anal tem alta prevalência e incidência na população. O objetivo deste trabalho é verificar a prevalência de HPV anal, bucal e genital em ambulatório público de Coloproctologia, com base no exame de captura hibrida. Foram estudados 64 pacientes atendidos no ambulatório geral de Coloproctologia do Hospital Heliópolis, no período de 22/11/2005 a 20/12/2005, onde foram levantados, de forma prospectiva, dados clínicos, pessoais e comportamentais, identificando o perfil do grupo como não sendo de risco para HPV. Nenhum paciente deste grupo veio à consulta com queixa ou apresentando sinais de HPV ou outra doença sexualmente transmissível. Foram colhidos para cada paciente um esfregaço com escova de boca, outro de vulva/pênis e outro do ânus. O resultado mostrou que 15,62% dos pacientes apresentaram HPV anal, bucal ou genital, sendo que 4,68% do total de pacientes apresentavam HPV anal, um paciente de alto risco associado ao HPV genital, outro misto e outro de baixo risco. Trinta por cento dos pacientes HPV+ apresentavam dor anal como queixa principal. A conclusão é que a prevalência de HPV anal, genital e bucal é elevada, sendo que 4,68% apresentavam HPV anal e daqueles HPV positivos 30% apresentavam dor anal na queixa principal.Anal Human Papilomavirus (HPV has a high prevalence and incidence in the population. The purpose of this project is to verify the prevalence of anal, oral and genital HPV at the Coloproctology Clinic, based on the hybrid capture exam. Sixty four patients were assisted at the clinic from November 22nd to December 20th 2005. Clinical, personal and behavioral data of the patients were set up in a prospective way. The group profile was identified as not being a risky one to HPV. No patient of this group, when was assisted, had complained of or had presented any symptoms of HPV or any other sexually transmitted disease (STD. From each patient it was collected a mouth sample, a vulva

  14. Human Simulated Intelligent Control with Double-Direction Dead-Zone Compensation for Joint Motion Control of a Large-Sized Boom System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongsheng Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Joint motion control of a 52-meter-long five-boom system driven by proportional hydraulic system is developed. It has been considered difficult due to strong nonlinearities and parametric uncertainties, the effect of which increases with the size of booms. A human simulated intelligent control scheme is developed to improve control performance by modifying control mode and control parameters. In addition, considering the negative effects caused by frequent and redundant reverse actions of the proportional valve, a double-direction compensation scheme is proposed to deal with the dead-zone nonlinearity of proportional valve. Sinusoidal motions are implemented on a real boom system. The results indicate that HSIC controller can improve control accuracy, and dead-zone nonlinearity is effectively compensated by proposed compensation scheme without introducing frequent reverse actions of proportional valve.

  15. Screening for Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea before Ambulatory Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishman, Stacey L.; Tawfik, Kareem O.; Smith, David F.; Cheung, Kristin; Pringle, Lauren M.; Stephen, Matthew J.; Everett, Tiffany L.; Stierer, Tracey L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The American Society of Anesthesia practice guidelines recommend that pediatric and adult patients who undergo ambulatory surgery be screened for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). With this in mind, our objective was to assess the frequency of screening by anesthesia providers for the signs and symptoms of OSA in children undergoing surgery in an ambulatory setting. Methods: Prospective single-blinded observational study of anesthesia providers' preoperative interview of caregivers of consecutive patients younger than age 18 who were scheduled for ambulatory surgery. Results: One hundred one children (30 females) were identified, with a mean age of 6.9 ± 5.0 years; 54 were classified as white, 33 as black, and 14 as other. Total OSA-18 scores ranged from 18 to 97, with a mean of 33.1 ± 14.8. The mean score for adenotonsillectomy patients was higher than that for children who underwent procedures other than adenotonsillectomy. Thirty-one percent of children were screened for OSA, and snoring was the most common symptom recorded (28%). Patients who were screened for OSA were more likely to have snoring (p Tawfik KO, Smith DF, Cheung K, Pringle LM, Stephen MJ, Everett TL, Stierer TL. Screening for pediatric obstructive sleep apnea before ambulatory surgery. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(7):751–755. PMID:25902820

  16. [Interprofessional pill box management in an ambulatory care setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrecht, Loïc; Anchisi, Annick; Widmer, Daniel; Bugnon, Olivier; Du Pasquier, Sophie; Jotterand, Sébastien; Karlen, Martine; Herzig, Lilli

    2014-11-26

    Complex multimorbid patients are now more common in ambulatory care and the management of their medication more frequently needs interprofessional collaboration. This qualitative study explored health professional's main challenges when introducing, preparing and sharing the use of a pill box for a patient. Another objective of this study was to explore options for improving care in these situations.

  17. T-wave Alternans Analysis In Ambulatory ECG Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Ch?apinski, Jakub; Kaminski, Marek; Sakowicz, Bartosz; Kotas, Rafa?

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the research presented in this paper was to test and evaluate the possibility of T-wave alternans (TWA) detection with the use of standard ambulatory ECG monitors. In development work there is proposal of author's advanced method allowing to remove from signal any distortion and disturbances making impossible further analysis.

  18. Utilizing ambulatory blood pressure recordings to evaluate antihypertensive drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, W B

    1992-04-30

    Until recently, the efficacy and pharmacodynamics of antihypertensive agents were assessed by resting blood pressure measurements in the doctor's office or a research clinic. The limitations of the office or clinic blood pressure measurement include the lack of representation (from recording only 1 point of time in the dosing schedule), the effects of the doctor's office on the patient's blood pressure, and, perhaps more relevant, observer bias. Ambulatory monitoring of the blood pressure has gained worldwide acceptance as an alternative method to assess antihypertensive drug efficacy and the time-effect relation of a drug. The ambulatory monitoring devices have been refined and are smaller, more precise, and more reliable than earlier recording models. Although there are no reference standards for analysis of ambulatory blood pressure data, international consensus groups are presently addressing this problem. Key roles for ambulatory blood pressure recordings in clinical trials of antihypertensive agents now include determination of the entry criteria for patients, improving the assessment of peak/trough pharmacodynamics in the patient's own environment (including nocturnal/sleep readings), and evaluating efficacy through calculation of the hypertensive burden, or blood pressure load. PMID:1575177

  19. An overview of anesthetic procedures, tools, and techniques in ambulatory care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messieha Z

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zakaria Messieha Department of Anesthesiology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Ambulatory surgical and anesthesia care (ASAC, also known as Same Day Surgery or Day Care in some countries, is the fastest growing segment of ambulatory surgical and anesthesia care. Over 50 million ambulatory surgical procedures are conducted annually comprising over 60% of all anesthesia care with an impressive track record of safety and efficiency. Advances in ambulatory anesthesia care have been due to newer generation of inhalation and intravenous anesthetics as well as airway management technology and techniques. Successful ambulatory anesthesia care relies on patient selection, adequate facilities, highly trained personnel and quality improvement policies and procedures. Favoring one anesthetic technique over the other should be patient and procedure-specific. Effective management of post-operative pain as well as nausea and vomiting are the final pieces in assuring success in ambulatory anesthesia care. Keywords: ambulatory anesthesia, out-patient anesthesia, Day-Care anesthesia

  20. Pharmacological treatment of ambulatory schizophrenic patients in Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginster J-Y

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background the objective of this study was twofold: 1 Describe the use of antipsychotic treatments in ambulatory patients suffering from schizophrenia in Belgium. 2 Evaluate to which extend antipsychotic treatment prescribing patterns are in accordance with published treatment guidelines. Method A cross-sectional survey was carried out in 16 Belgian hospitals selected from a sample of 67 hospitals. The hospitals were equally distributed between the north and south part of the country and were representative of Belgian practice. During 2 months, participating psychiatrists were asked to record the medication use as well as demographic parameters of all consecutive ambulatory patients seen at their consultation or attending a day-hospital. Data concerning 1000 ambulatory patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were collected. Results In Belgium, the use of atypical antipsychotics is frequent (69% in ambulatory patients with schizophrenia. In the overall sample, 73% receive only one antipsychotic drug. The majority of patients are treated with drugs of only one antipsychotic drug group, either first- typical (29.8% or second-generation, atypical antipsychotics (53.2%. 15.8% of patients combine different types of antipsychotics. Antipsychotic dosing is adequate for the majority of patients but about one fifth receives a higher than recommended dose as per package inserts. Polypharmacy remains within reasonable limits. The use of concomitant medication varies according the antipsychotic treatment: patients who take second-generation antipsychotics only, receive the least additional drugs. Conclusion Atypical antipsychotics appear to be the first line treatment for schizophrenic psychosis. Psychiatrists working with ambulatory patients are well aware of treatment guidelines and follow them quite adequately.

  1. Management of comorbidities in ambulatory anesthesia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dabu-Bondoc S

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Susan Dabu-Bondoc, Kirk Shelley Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USAAbstract: Advances in medical science now allow people with significant medical issues to live at home. As the outpatient population ages and surgical techniques advance, the ambulatory anesthesiologist has to be prepared to handle these “walking wounded”. The days of restricting ambulatory surgery procedures to American Society of Anesthesiologists class 1 and 2 patients are rapidly fading into the past. To remain competitive and economically viable, the modern ambulatory surgery center needs to expand its practice to include patients with medical comorbidities. In an environment where production and economic pressures exist, maintaining safety and good outcomes in high-risk patients for ambulatory surgery can be arduous. Adding to the complexity of this challenge is the rapid evolution of the therapeutic approaches to a variety of medical issues. For example, there has been a significant increase in the number and types of insulin a diabetic patient might be prescribed in recent years. In the case of the patient with coronary artery disease, the variety of both drug and nondrug eluding stents or new antithrombotic agents has also increased the complexity of perioperative management. Complex patients need careful, timely, and team-based preoperative evaluation by an anesthesia provider who is knowledgeable of outpatient care. Optimizing comorbidities preoperatively is a crucial initial step in minimizing risk. This paper will examine a number of common medical issues and explore their impact on managing outpatient surgical procedures.Keywords: ambulatory surgery, medical comorbidities, diabetes, coronary artery disease, respiratory disease, obesity

  2. Characteristics of ambulatory anticoagulant adverse drug events: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eckstrand Julie

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the high frequency with which adverse drug events (ADEs occur in outpatient settings, detailed information regarding these events remains limited. Anticoagulant drugs are associated with increased safety concerns and are commonly involved in outpatient ADEs. We therefore sought to evaluate ambulatory anticoagulation ADEs and the patient population in which they occurred within the Duke University Health System (Durham, NC, USA. Methods A retrospective chart review of ambulatory warfarin-related ADEs was conducted. An automated trigger surveillance system identified eligible events in ambulatory patients admitted with an International Normalized Ratio (INR >3 and administration of vitamin K. Event and patient characteristics were evaluated, and quality/process improvement strategies for ambulatory anticoagulation management are described. Results A total of 169 events in 167 patients were identified from December 1, 2006-June 30, 2008 and included in the study. A median supratherapeutic INR of 6.1 was noted, and roughly half of all events (52.1% were associated with a bleed. Nearly 74% of events resulted in a need for fresh frozen plasma; 64.8% of bleeds were classified as major. A total of 59.2% of events were at least partially responsible for hospital admission. Median patient age was 68 y (range 36-95 y with 24.9% initiating therapy within 3 months prior to the event. Of events with a prior documented patient visit (n = 157, 73.2% were seen at a Duke clinic or hospital within the previous month. Almost 80% of these patients had anticoagulation therapy addressed, but only 60.0% had a follow-up plan documented in the electronic note. Conclusions Ambulatory warfarin-related ADEs have significant patient and healthcare utilization consequences in the form of bleeding events and associated hospital admissions. Recommendations for improvement in anticoagulation management include use of information technology to assist

  3. Ambulatory pressure monitoring in the assessment of antihypertensive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, A J; Conway, J; Somers, V K; Isea, J E; Sleight, P

    1989-06-01

    A low-cost, ambulatory blood-pressure monitor has been calibrated and validated against a random zero sphygmomanometer. The repeatability of ambulatory pressure recordings after a placebo month in 44 mild to moderate untreated hypertensives was assessed. Systolic blood pressure showed a mean difference over 1 month of 2.0 mmHg, with a standard deviation of differences of 9.3 mmHg. The diastolic blood pressure mean difference was 0.1 mmHg (SD = 6.3 mmHg). This variability was much less than for clinic readings (SD = 17.3 mmHg) or for single home pressure readings (SD = 19.7 mmHg). Using ambulatory monitoring to detect a drop in pressure of 8/5 mmHg with a power of 0.9, the number of subjects needed in a parallel group trial is reduced from 360 to 68, and in a crossover study from 88 to 16 subjects. The usefulness of ambulatory pressure monitoring is demonstrated in a placebo-controlled comparison of atenolol, nifedipine retard, or their combination in random order. Eleven subjects, 21-60 years, with initial average blood pressures of 166.5/104.7 mmHg, showed a reduction in pressure with atenolol 50 mg a day of 15.1/10.0 mmHg, with nifedipine retard 20 mg b.i.d. of 21.0/11.6 mmHg, and with atenolol 50 mg and nifedipine retard 20 mg once a day of 26.2/16.8 mmHg. Ambulatory monitoring of pressure improved the accuracy of the trial and demonstrated a reduction in the alerting response with atenolol. PMID:2487802

  4. Magnetic distortion in motion labs, implications for validating inertial magnetic sensors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, W.H. de; Veeger, H.E.; Baten, C.T.; Helm, F.C.T. van der

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ambulatory 3D orientation estimation with Inertial Magnetic Sensor Units (IMU's) use the earth magnetic field. The magnitude of distortion in orientation in a standard equipped motion lab and its effect on the accuracy of the orientation estimation with IMU's is addressed. METHODS: Orien

  5. Using an Empirical Model of Human Turning Motion to Aid Heading Estimation in a Personal Navigation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakel, Thomas

    With the adoption of Global Navigation Satellite Systems in smart phones, soldier equipment, and emergency responder navigation systems users have realized the usefulness of low cost Personal Navigation Systems. The state-of-the-art Personal Navigation System is a unit that fuses information based on external references with a low cost IMU. Due to the size, weight, power, and cost constraints imposed on a pedestrian navigation systems as well as current IMU performance limitations, the gyroscopes used to determine heading exhibit significant drift limiting the performance of the navigation system. In this thesis biomechanical signals are used to predict the onset of pedestrian turning motion. Experimental data from eight subjects captured in a gait laboratory using a Vicon motion tracking unit is used for validation. The analysis of experimental data shows the heading computed by turn prediction augmented integration is more accurate than open loop gyro integration alone.

  6. On using the Microsoft Kinect$^{\\rm TM}$ sensors to determine the lengths of the arm and leg bones of a human subject in motion

    CERN Document Server

    Malinowski, M J

    2015-01-01

    The present study is part of a broader programme, exploring the possibility of involving the Microsoft Kinect$^{\\rm TM}$ sensor in the analysis of human motion. We examine the output obtained from the two available versions of this sensor in relation to the variability of the estimates of the lengths of eight bones belonging to the subject's extremities: of the humerus (upper arm), ulna (lower arm, forearm), femur (upper leg), and tibia (lower leg, shank). Large systematic effects in the output of the two sensors have been observed.

  7. Research on Three-dimensional Motion History Image Model and Extreme Learning Machine for Human Body Movement Trajectory Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng Chang; Xiaojuan Ban; Qing Shen; Jing Guo

    2015-01-01

    Based on the traditional machine vision recognition technology and traditional artificial neural networks about body movement trajectory, this paper finds out the shortcomings of the traditional recognition technology. By combining the invariant moments of the three-dimensional motion history image (computed as the eigenvector of body movements) and the extreme learning machine (constructed as the classification artificial neural network of body movements), the paper applies the method to the...

  8. [A new human machine interface in neurosurgery: The Leap Motion(®). Technical note regarding a new touchless interface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Tommaso, L; Aubry, S; Godard, J; Katranji, H; Pauchot, J

    2016-06-01

    Currently, cross-sectional imaging viewing is used in routine practice whereas the surgical procedure requires physical contact with an interface (mouse or touch-sensitive screen). This type of contact results in a risk of lack of aseptic control and causes loss of time. The recent appearance of devices such as the Leap Motion(®) (Leap Motion society, San Francisco, USA) a sensor which enables to interact with the computer without any physical contact is of major interest in the field of surgery. However, its configuration and ergonomics produce key challenges in order to adapt to the practitioner's requirements, the imaging software as well as the surgical environment. This article aims to suggest an easy configuration of the Leap Motion(®) in neurosurgery on a PC for an optimized utilization with Carestream(®) Vue PACS v11.3.4 (Carestream Health, Inc., Rochester, USA) using a plug-in (to download at: https://drive.google.com/?usp=chrome_app#folders/0B_F4eBeBQc3ybElEeEhqME5DQkU) and a video tutorial (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yVPTgxg-SIk).

  9. [A new human machine interface in neurosurgery: The Leap Motion(®). Technical note regarding a new touchless interface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Tommaso, L; Aubry, S; Godard, J; Katranji, H; Pauchot, J

    2016-06-01

    Currently, cross-sectional imaging viewing is used in routine practice whereas the surgical procedure requires physical contact with an interface (mouse or touch-sensitive screen). This type of contact results in a risk of lack of aseptic control and causes loss of time. The recent appearance of devices such as the Leap Motion(®) (Leap Motion society, San Francisco, USA) a sensor which enables to interact with the computer without any physical contact is of major interest in the field of surgery. However, its configuration and ergonomics produce key challenges in order to adapt to the practitioner's requirements, the imaging software as well as the surgical environment. This article aims to suggest an easy configuration of the Leap Motion(®) in neurosurgery on a PC for an optimized utilization with Carestream(®) Vue PACS v11.3.4 (Carestream Health, Inc., Rochester, USA) using a plug-in (to download at: https://drive.google.com/?usp=chrome_app#folders/0B_F4eBeBQc3ybElEeEhqME5DQkU) and a video tutorial (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yVPTgxg-SIk). PMID:27234915

  10. A Visual Perception Algorithm for Human Motion by a Kinect%利用Kinect的人体动作视觉感知算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱特浩; 赵群飞; 夏泽洋

    2014-01-01

    A visual perception algorithm of human motion for humanoid robot is proposed to improve the precision of the motion data captured from a Kinect. Firstly, the positions of the joints are transformed into the angles according to the inverse kinematics equations. Secondly, the long-time motion is segmented into episodes automatically based on the change of the angular velocity and acceleration, and then RVM (relevant vector machine) is utilized for estimating the angle trajectories with high accuracy. Finally, the spatial consistence, temporal consistence and smoothness of the angle trajectories are given to evaluate the algorithm, and a motion data series processed by the algorithm is implemented on a NAO robot platform. The experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm effectively improves the spatial and temporal consistence of the motion perception and the smoothness of the trajectory, which provides a foundation for high-precision motion imitation.%提出了一种面向类人机器人的人体动作视觉感知算法,提高了利用Kinect作为视觉输入设备捕捉到的人体动作数据的精度。首先,通过逆运动学方程将捕捉到的关节位移信息转换成角度信息。然后,以角速度和角加速度的变化为依据,将长时间的运动自动分割成独立片段,并用相关向量机原理估计出高精度的角度轨迹。最后,用角度轨迹的空间相似性、时间相似性、平滑度等指标对该算法进行了评估,并在NAO机器人平台上对算法处理后的动作进行了实验验证。实验结果表明,该算法有效提高了动作感知的时空相似性和轨迹平滑度,为高精度的动作模仿奠定了基础。

  11. 人体运动的非线性降维及新运动生成%Nonlinear Dimensional Reduction and Generation of Human Motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    瞿师; 吴玲达; 于荣欢; 魏迎梅; 冯晓萌

    2011-01-01

    为了提高现有运动数据的可重用性,生成更为丰富的新运动,提出快速自适应比例高斯过程隐变量模型,以及基于该模型的人体运动数据降维及运动生成方法.通过对运动数据进行统计学习,获得运动数据在隐空间的一个低维映射来实现非线性降维,同时获得了该运动的姿态空间的概率分布,其大小反映了该姿态的自然逼真程度;在给定末端约束条件下求取满足约束的、同时概率最大的姿态,并将其作为逆向运动学的解,克服了传统逆向运动学算法计算烦琐、效果不逼真的缺点.实验结果表明,该模型具有更快的收敛速度和更高的收敛精度,同时能够自适应运动编辑的方向,有效地扩大运动的可编辑幅度.%To reuse existing motion data to generate new motions, a nonlinear dimensional reduction and generation of human motion is presented, which is based on fast adaptive scaled Gaussian process latent variable models. Through statistical learning, the motion data are mapped from high-dimensional observation space to low-dimensional latent space to implement nonlinear dimensional reduction, and probability distributing of posture space which measures the nature of posture is obtained. The posture which meets constraints and has maximal probability can be computed as the solution of inverse kinematics. This method can avoid cockamamie computation and posture distortion existing in traditional inverse kinematics. The experiments show that our method has higher convergence speed and precision and extends editing range of motion by adapting motion editing direction.

  12. 基于RFID概率泛函的人体运动受力行为分解%Human Motion Mechanical Behavior Decomposition Based on RFID Probability Functional

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    骆勇

    2015-01-01

    In the process human sports training, the human motion force decomposition modeling is used for analyzing the characteristics of split force in quantitative, and it can provides the base of human force action recognition with multi sensor information fusion. In the traditional method, the entropy clustering functional analysis method is used for human motor neuron stress behavior analysis, but it cannot achieve the simulation and analysis of missing force data in complex motion state. An improved human motion force behavior decomposition method is proposed based on RFID missing data probabili⁃ty functional. The acceleration sensor is combined with RFID. The missing data probability functional algorithm is used for perception of the movement joint node stress behavior decomposition, and the different sensor output signal correlation characteristics are extracted. The improved decomposition algorithm and the model of human body motion characteristic be⁃havior is completed. The experimental results show that the model can accurately capture to the exercise stress data of body with upper body and lower limbs. Force behavior decomposition is accurate and concrete. The quantitative description of stress characteristics of human body in motion model is obtained, so as to guide the movement training, so it has good appli⁃cation value.%对人体体育运动训练过程中的受力行为进行分解建模,可以定量分析人体受力特征,为实现多传感器信息融合的运动受力行为识别奠定基础。传统方法中采用熵聚类泛函的人体运动神经元受力行为分析方法,无法实现对复杂运动状态下的人体受力缺失数据的模拟和分析。提出一种基于RFID缺失数据概率泛函的人体运动受力行为分解,将加速度传感器与RFID结合,采用缺失数据概率泛函算法对感知的运动关节节点进行受力行为分解,提取了不同传感器节点输出信号关联特征,实现对人体

  13. Automated ambulatory assessment of cognitive performance, environmental conditions, and motor activity during military operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Harris R.; Kramer, F. Matthew; Montain, Scott J.; Niro, Philip; Young, Andrew J.

    2005-05-01

    Until recently scientists had limited opportunities to study human cognitive performance in non-laboratory, fully ambulatory situations. Recently, advances in technology have made it possible to extend behavioral assessment to the field environment. One of the first devices to measure human behavior in the field was the wrist-worn actigraph. This device, now widely employed, can acquire minute-by-minute information on an individual"s level of motor activity. Actigraphs can, with reasonable accuracy, distinguish sleep from waking, the most critical and basic aspect of human behavior. However, rapid technologic advances have provided the opportunity to collect much more information from fully ambulatory humans. Our laboratory has developed a series of wrist-worn devices, which are not much larger then a watch, which can assess simple and choice reaction time, vigilance and memory. In addition, the devices can concurrently assess motor activity with much greater temporal resolution then the standard actigraph. Furthermore, they continuously monitor multiple environmental variables including temperature, humidity, sound and light. We have employed these monitors during training and simulated military operations to collect information that would typically be unavailable under such circumstances. In this paper we will describe various versions of the vigilance monitor and how each successive version extended the capabilities of the device. Samples of data from several studies are presented, included studies conducted in harsh field environments during simulated infantry assaults, a Marine Corps Officer training course and mechanized infantry (Stryker) operations. The monitors have been useful for documenting environmental conditions experienced by wearers, studying patterns of sleep and activity and examining the effects of nutritional manipulations on warfighter performance.

  14. Ambulatory Surgical Center (ASC) Payment System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This file contains a summary of service utilization by ASC supplier and is derived from 2011 ASC line item level data, updated through June 2012, that is, line...

  15. Ambulatory Surgical Center Payment Rates Archive Page

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — These files contain the procedure codes which may be performed in an ASC under the Medicare program as well as the ASC payment group assigned to each of the...

  16. 基于视觉的人体运动分析综述%A Survey of Vision-Based Human Motion Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮涛涛; 姚明海; 瞿心昱; 楼中望

    2011-01-01

    Vision-based human motion analysis is receiving increasing attention from computer vision researchers.It becomes the hotspot of the field of image analysis, psychology and artificial intelligence.It has a wide application in intelligent video surveillance, virtual reality, user interfaces and motion analysis.In this paper, moving target detection,classification, tracking and human action recognition are overviewed.We analyze some problems and challenges.Finally, some research directions in the future are discussed.%基于视觉的人运动分析越来越受到计算机视觉领域研究者的广泛关注,它成为图像分析、心理学、人工智能等领域的研究热点,在智能视频监控、虚拟现实、用户接口、运动分析等方面有着广泛的应用.从运动目标检测、运动目标分类、人体运动跟踪、人体行为识别与描述四个环节综述了人体运动分析的研究现状,分析了存在的一些问题和未来的研究发展方向.

  17. Shape Contour Feature Extraction and Recognition of Human Behavior Motion%人体行为动作的形状轮廓特征提取及识别

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡石; 梅雪

    2012-01-01

    A method for respectively applying Fourier transform and edge wavelet moments descriptor to recognize human behavioral motion is proposed. In the process of contour feature extraction, contraposing not single line between ccntroid and contour of concave-convex complex images, a kind of directional distance contour description matrix with multi-lines is proposed. Some simulation experiments are done about two kinds of human bodies and four kinds of behavioral motion, experimental results show the edge wavelet moments descriptor has a good description and recognition rates to local feature of shape contour.%将傅里叶变换与边缘小波矩描述子相结合,提出一种人体行为动作的识别方法.凹凸复杂图像的质心到轮廓为非单一直线,据此,给出一种多段定向距离轮廓描述矩阵,实现轮廓特征的提取.分别对2类人体和4种行为动作进行仿真实验,结果表明,边缘小波矩描述子能较好地体现人体行为动作的形状轮廓部特征,具有较高的识别率.

  18. Interdisciplinary Shared Governance in Ambulatory Care: One Health System's Journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Sharon; Bacon, Cynthia Thornton

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of shared governance structures in acute care has illustrated the positive relationship between shared decision making and nurse empowerment and positive nurse and patient outcomes. Little is known, however, about interdisciplinary shared governance, and even less is known about shared governance in ambulatory care. This article details one health system's experience with the implementation of an interdisciplinary shared governance structure in ambulatory care over a 4-year period. The authors report lessons learned, positive health system outcomes that resulted including improved communication, better preparedness for accreditation visits, improved assessment of fall risk, and a streamlined documentation system. Also discussed are mechanisms to enhance sustainability of the structure and discussion of future opportunities and challenges. PMID:27259130

  19. Gait improvement surgery in ambulatory children with diplegic cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Terjesen, Terje; Lofterød, Bjørn; Skaaret, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Instrumented 3-D gait analyses (GA) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) have shown improved gait function 1 year postoperatively. Using GA, we assessed the outcome after 5 years and evaluated parental satisfaction with the surgery and the need for additional surgery. Patients and methods 34 ambulatory children with spastic diplegia had preoperative GA. Based on this GA, the children underwent 195 orthopedic procedures on their lower limbs at a mean age of 11.6 (6–19) y...

  20. Use of extramural ambulatory care curricula in postgraduate medical training

    OpenAIRE

    Talwalkar, Jaideep S.; Satcher, D’Juanna; Turner, Teri L.; Sisson, Stephen D.; Fenick, Ada M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Extramural curricula developed for the purpose of sharing with other institutions have been designed to improve education on important topics in ambulatory care. We sought to assess the usage rates of these curricula among paediatric, internal medicine, and combined medicine-paediatrics residency programmes in the United States. Methods Surveys on aspects of trainee continuity clinic were sent to paediatric and medicine-paediatrics programme directors in 2012. Surveys contained a...

  1. Blood Pressure Measurement: Clinic, Home, Ambulatory, and Beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Drawz, Paul E; ABDALLA, MOHAMED; Rahman, Mahboob

    2012-01-01

    Blood pressure has traditionally been measured in the clinic setting using the auscultory method and a mercury sphygmomanometer. Technological advances have led to improvements in measuring clinic blood pressure and allowed for measuring blood pressures outside the clinic. This review outlines various methods for evaluating blood pressure and the clinical utility of each type of measurement. Home blood pressures and 24 hour ambulatory blood pressures have improved our ability to evaluate risk...

  2. Ambulatory surgery for the patient with breast cancer: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Ern Yu; Pek, Chong Han; Tey,Boon Lim, John

    2016-01-01

    Chong Han Pek,1 John Tey,2 Ern Yu Tan1 1Department of General Surgery, 2Department of Anaesthesiology, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore Abstract: Ambulatory breast cancer surgery is well accepted and is the standard of care at many tertiary centers. Rather than being hospitalized after surgery, patients are discharged on the day of surgery or within 23 hours. Such early discharge does not adversely affect patient outcomes and has the added benefit...

  3. Patient satisfaction and positive patient outcomes in ambulatory anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Jean; Shah, Ushma; Wong, David

    2015-01-01

    Ushma Shah, David T Wong, Jean Wong Department of Anesthesia, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Most surgeries in North America are performed on an ambulatory basis, reducing health care costs and increasing patient comfort. Patient satisfaction is an important outcome indicator of the quality of health care services incorporated by the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA). Patient satisfaction is a complex concep...

  4. Ambulatory anesthesia in plastic surgery: opportunities and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Facque AR; Taub PJ

    2015-01-01

    Alexander R Facque, Peter J Taub Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, USA Abstract: In 2013, there were 17 million procedures performed by plastic and reconstructive surgeons in the United States in the private office or ambulatory “surgicenter” setting, as well as additional operations performed in hospitals on an outpatient basis. As interest in performing increasingly complex surgical procedures on an ...

  5. Ambulatory anesthesia in plastic surgery: opportunities and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Facque, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Alexander R Facque, Peter J Taub Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, USA Abstract: In 2013, there were 17 million procedures performed by plastic and reconstructive surgeons in the United States in the private office or ambulatory “surgicenter” setting, as well as additional operations performed in hospitals on an outpatient basis. As interest in performing increasingly complex surgical procedure...

  6. Ambulatory assessed implicit affect is associated with salivary cortisol

    OpenAIRE

    Joram eMossink; Bart eVerkuil; Andreas Michael Burger; Tollenaar, Marieke S.; Brosschot, Jos F.

    2015-01-01

    One of the presumed pathways linking negative emotions to adverse somatic health is an overactive HPA-axis, usually indicated by elevated cortisol levels. Traditionally, research has focused on consciously reported negative emotions. Yet, given that the majority of information processing occurs without conscious awareness, stress physiology might also be influenced by affective processes that people are not aware of. In a 24-hour ambulatory study we examined whether cortisol levels were assoc...

  7. Ambulatory assessed implicit affect is associated with salivary cortisol

    OpenAIRE

    Mossink, Joram C. L.; Verkuil, Bart; Burger, Andreas M.; Tollenaar, Marieke S.; Brosschot, Jos F.

    2015-01-01

    One of the presumed pathways linking negative emotions to adverse somatic health is an overactive HPA-axis, usually indicated by elevated cortisol levels. Traditionally, research has focused on consciously reported negative emotions. Yet, given that the majority of information processing occurs without conscious awareness, stress physiology might also be influenced by affective processes that people are not aware of. In a 24-h ambulatory study we examined whether cortisol levels were associat...

  8. Modal-Power-Based Haptic Motion Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Yusuke; Shimono, Tomoyuki; Kuwahara, Hiroaki; Sato, Masataka; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    Motion recognition based on sensory information is important for providing assistance to human using robots. Several studies have been carried out on motion recognition based on image information. However, in the motion of humans contact with an object can not be evaluated precisely by image-based recognition. This is because the considering force information is very important for describing contact motion. In this paper, a modal-power-based haptic motion recognition is proposed; modal power is considered to reveal information on both position and force. Modal power is considered to be one of the defining features of human motion. A motion recognition algorithm based on linear discriminant analysis is proposed to distinguish between similar motions. Haptic information is extracted using a bilateral master-slave system. Then, the observed motion is decomposed in terms of primitive functions in a modal space. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  9. Motion constraint

    OpenAIRE

    Raunhardt, Daniel; Boulic, Ronan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a hybrid postural control approach taking advantage of data-driven and goal-oriented methods while overcoming their limitations. In particular, we take advantage of the latent space characterizing a given motion database. We introduce a motion constraint operating in the latent space to benefit from its much smaller dimension compared to the joint space. This allows its transparent integration into a Prioritized Inverse Kinematics framework. If its priority is high t...

  10. Muscle Motion Solenoid Actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, Shuji

    It is one of our dreams to mechanically recover the lost body for damaged humans. Realistic humanoid robots composed of such machines require muscle motion actuators controlled by all pulling actions. Particularly, antagonistic pairs of bi-articular muscles are very important in animal's motions. A system of actuators is proposed using the electromagnetic force of the solenoids with the abilities of the stroke length over 10 cm and the strength about 20 N, which are needed to move the real human arm. The devised actuators are based on developments of recent modern electro-magnetic materials, where old time materials can not give such possibility. Composite actuators are controlled by a high ability computer and software making genuine motions.

  11. Motion motif extraction from high-dimensional motion information

    OpenAIRE

    Araki, Yutaka; Arita, Daisaku; Taniguchi, Rin-ichiro

    2006-01-01

    Recently, there are a lot of researches on virtual environments for distant human communication. Real-time Human Proxy (RHP), which is a concept for such a virtual environment, has been proposed. For realizing natural communication by RHP, it is necessary to recognize human actions essential for human communication. However, it is difficult for system developers to decide which human actions should be recognized. For supporting the decision, we propose a human motion analysis method which aut...

  12. An assessment of 24-hour ambulatory EEG/ECG monitoring in a neurology clinic.

    OpenAIRE

    Cull, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The relative merits of 24-hour ambulatory EEG/ECG monitoring and routine EEG recording have been compared in a group of 62 patients attending a neurological clinic because of episodes of loss of consciousness. Overall, ambulatory EEG abnormalities were detected in 21 cases (34%) compared with 16 cases (26%) for routine EEG. Ambulatory EEG mainly improved the detection of generalised paroxysmal activity, but in some cases lateralised abnormalities were detected which were not present on the ro...

  13. Comparative analysis of different adaptive filters for tracking lower segments of a human body using inertial motion sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For all segments and tests, a modified Kalman filter and a quasi-static sensor fusion algorithm were equally accurate (precision and accuracy ∼2–3°) compared to normalized least mean squares filtering, recursive least-squares filtering and standard Kalman filtering. The aims were to: (1) compare adaptive filtering techniques used for sensor fusion and (2) evaluate the precision and accuracy for a chosen adaptive filter. Motion sensors (based on inertial measurement units) are limited by accumulative integration errors arising from sensor bias. This drift can partly be handled with adaptive filtering techniques. To advance the measurement technique in this area, a new modified Kalman filter is developed. Differences in accuracy were observed during different tests especially drift in the internal/external rotation angle. This drift can be minimized if the sensors include magnetometers. (paper)

  14. Ambulatory Research and Education Center Oregon Health Science University. Environmental Assesment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-21

    DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-0921) evaluating the proposed construction and operation of the Ambulatory Research and Education Center (AREC), which would be located on the top seven floors of the existing NeuroSensory Research Center (NRC) on the campus of the Oregon Health Sciences University (OHSU) at Portland, Oregon. The proposed action would combine activities scattered across the campus into a central facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  15. Ambulatory activity monitoring: Progress in measurement of activity, posture, and specific motion patterns in daily life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.B.J. Bussmann (Hans); U.W. Ebner-Priemer (Ulrich); J. Fahrenberg (Jochen)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBehavior is central to psychology in almost any definition. Although observable activity is a core aspect of behavior, assessment strategies have tended to focus on emotional, cognitive, or physiological responses. When physical activity is assessed, it is done so mostly with questionnai

  16. Soccer athletes are superior to non-athletes at perceiving soccer-specific and non-sport specific human biological motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eRomeas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that athletes’ domain specific perceptual-cognitive expertise can transfer to everyday tasks. Here we assessed the perceptual-cognitive expertise of athletes and non-athletes using sport specific and non-sport specific biological motion perception tasks. Using a virtual environment, university-level soccer players and university students’ non-athletes were asked to perceive the direction of a point-light walker and to predict the trajectory of a masked-ball during a point-light soccer kick. Angles of presentation were varied for orientation (upright, inverted and distance (2m, 4m, 16m. Accuracy and reaction time were measured to assess observers’ performance. The results highlighted athletes’ superior ability compared to non-athletes to accurately predict the trajectory of a masked soccer ball presented at 2m (reaction time, 4m (accuracy and reaction time and 16m (accuracy of distance. More interestingly, experts also displayed greater performance compared to non-athletes throughout the more fundamental and general point-light walker direction task presented at 2m (reaction time, 4m (accuracy and reaction time and 16m (reaction time of distance. In addition, athletes showed a better performance throughout inverted conditions in the walker (reaction time and soccer kick (accuracy and reaction time tasks. This implies that during human biological motion perception, athletes demonstrate an advantage for recognizing body kinematics that goes beyond sport specific actions.

  17. Induction of sexual arousal in women under conditions of institutional and ambulatory laboratory circumstances: a comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Bloemers; J. Gerritsen; R. Bults; H. Koppeschaar; W. Everaerd; B. Olivier; A. Tuiten

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Measuring under naturally occurring circumstances increases ecological validity. We developed an ambulatory psychophysiological laboratory that allows experiments to be performed at home. Aims.  To compare institutional laboratory task measures with ambulatory laboratory task measures.

  18. Motion analysis report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badler, N. I.

    1985-01-01

    Human motion analysis is the task of converting actual human movements into computer readable data. Such movement information may be obtained though active or passive sensing methods. Active methods include physical measuring devices such as goniometers on joints of the body, force plates, and manually operated sensors such as a Cybex dynamometer. Passive sensing de-couples the position measuring device from actual human contact. Passive sensors include Selspot scanning systems (since there is no mechanical connection between the subject's attached LEDs and the infrared sensing cameras), sonic (spark-based) three-dimensional digitizers, Polhemus six-dimensional tracking systems, and image processing systems based on multiple views and photogrammetric calculations.

  19. Ambulatory surgery with chloroprocaine spinal anesthesia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghisi D

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Daniela Ghisi, Stefano Bonarelli Department of Anaesthesia and Postoperative Intensive Care, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy Abstract: Spinal anesthesia is a reliable and safe technique for procedures of the lower extremities. Nevertheless, some of its characteristics may limit its use for ambulatory surgery, including delayed ambulation, risk of urinary retention, and pain after block regression. The current availability of short-acting local anesthetics has renewed interest for this technique also in the context of short- and ultra-short procedures. Chloroprocaine (CP is an amino-ester local anesthetic with a very short half-life. It was introduced and has been successfully used for spinal anesthesia since 1952. Sodium bisulfite was then added as a preservative after 1956. The drug was then abandoned in the 1980s for several reports of neurological deficits in patients receiving accidentally high doses of intrathecal CP during epidural labor analgesia. Animal studies have proven the safety of the preservative-free formulation, which has been extensively evaluated in volunteer studies as well as in clinical practice with a favorable profile in terms of both safety and efficacy. In comparison with bupivacaine, 2-chloroprocaine (2-CP showed faster offset times to end of anesthesia, unassisted ambulation, and discharge from hospital. These findings suggests that 2-CP may be a suitable alternative to low doses of long-acting local anesthetics in ambulatory surgery. Its safety profile also suggests that 2-CP could be a valid substitute for intrathecal short- and intermediate-acting local anesthetics, such as lidocaine and mepivacaine – often causes of transient neurological symptoms. In this context, literature suggests a dose ranging between 30 and 60 mg of 2-CP for procedures lasting 60 minutes or less, while 10 mg is considered the no-effect dose. The present review describes recent evidence about 2-CP as an anesthetic agent for

  20. Twenty-five years of ambulatory laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno Lledó, José; Granero Castro, Pablo; Gomez I Gavara, Inmaculada; Ibañez Cirión, Jose L; López Andújar, Rafael; García Granero, Eduardo

    2016-10-01

    It is accepted by the surgical community that laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) is the technique of choice in the treatment of symptomatic cholelithiasis. However, more controversial is the standardization of system implementation in Ambulatory Surgery because of its different different connotations. This article aims to update the factors that influence the performance of LC in day surgery, analyzing the 25 years since its implementation, focusing on the quality and acceptance by the patient. Individualization is essential: patient selection criteria and the implementation by experienced teams in LC, are factors that ensure high guarantee of success.

  1. Scheduling of procedures and staff in an ambulatory surgery center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pash, Joel; Kadry, Bassam; Bugrara, Suhabe; Macario, Alex

    2014-06-01

    For ambulatory surgical centers (ASC) to succeed financially, it is critical for ASC managers to schedule surgical procedures in a manner that optimizes operating room (OR) efficiency. OR efficiency is maximized by using historical data to accurately predict future OR workload, thereby enabling OR time to be properly allocated to surgeons. Other strategies to maintain a well-functioning ASC include recruiting and retaining the right staff and ensuring patients and surgeons are satisfied with their experience. This article reviews different types of procedure scheduling systems. Characteristics of well-functioning ASCs are also discussed.

  2. International accreditation of ambulatory surgical centers and medical tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Michael F

    2013-07-01

    The two forces that have driven the increase in accreditation of outpatient ambulatory surgery centers (ASC's) in the United States are reimbursement of facility fees by Medicare and commercial insurance companies, which requires either accreditation, Medicare certification, or state licensure, and state laws which mandate one of these three options. Accreditation of ASC's internationally has been driven by national requirements and by the competitive forces of "medical tourism." The three American accrediting organizations have all developed international programs to meet this increasing demand outside of the United States. PMID:23830758

  3. Increased systolic ambulatory blood pressure and microalbuminuria in treated and non-treated hypertensive smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kaspar; Kristensen, Kjeld S; Bang, Lia E;

    2004-01-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of smoking status on both clinic and ambulatory blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) by using 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring in treated and non-treated hypertensive smokers and non-smokers. A secondary aim was to evaluate...

  4. Adopting Ambulatory Breast Cancer Surgery as the Standard of Care in an Asian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Ying Ru Ng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ambulatory surgery is not commonly practiced in Asia. A 23-hour ambulatory (AS23 service was implemented at our institute in March 2004 to allow more surgeries to be performed as ambulatory procedures. In this study, we reviewed the impact of the AS23 service on breast cancer surgeries and reviewed surgical outcomes, including postoperative complications, length of stay, and 30-day readmission. Methods. Retrospective review was performed of 1742 patients who underwent definitive breast cancer surgery from 1 March 2004 to 31 December 2010. Results. By 2010, more than 70% of surgeries were being performed as ambulatory procedures. Younger women (P<0.01, those undergoing wide local excision (P<0.01 and those with ductal carcinoma-in situ or early stage breast cancer (P<0.01, were more likely to undergo ambulatory surgery. Six percent of patients initially scheduled for ambulatory surgery were eventually managed as inpatients; a third of these were because of perioperative complications. Wound complications, 30-day readmission and reoperation rates were not more frequent with ambulatory surgery. Conclusion. Ambulatory breast cancer surgery is now the standard of care at our institute. An integrated workflow facilitating proper patient selection and structured postoperativee outpatient care have ensured minimal complications and high patient acceptance.

  5. The long-term effect of ambulatory oxygen in normoxaemic COPD patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringbaek, Thomas; Martinez, Gerd; Lange, Peter

    2013-01-01

    To study the long-term benefits of ambulatory oxygen (AO) in combination with pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients experiencing exertional desaturation.......To study the long-term benefits of ambulatory oxygen (AO) in combination with pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients experiencing exertional desaturation....

  6. Ambulatory Surgical Facilities, Identify the locations of Ambulatory Surgical Centers, Published in 2012, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Miami-Dade County, Information Technology Department.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Ambulatory Surgical Facilities dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2012. It is described...

  7. Ambulatory Surgical Facilities, Licensed Ambulatory Sugery Centers, Published in 2007, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, State of California - Office of the State Chief Information Officer.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Ambulatory Surgical Facilities dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of...

  8. Collective Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Czirok, A

    1999-01-01

    With the aim of understanding the emergence of collective motion from local interactions of organisms in a "noisy" environment, we study biologically inspired, inherently non-equilibrium models consisting of self-propelled particles. In these models particles interact with their neighbors by turning towards the local average direction of motion. In the limit of vanishing velocities this behavior results in a dynamics analogous to some Monte Carlo realization of equilibrium ferromagnets. However, numerical simulations indicate the existence of new types of phase transitions which are not present in the corresponding ferromagnets. In particular, here we demonstrate both numerically and analytically that even in certain one dimensional self-propelled particle systems an ordered phase exists for finite noise levels.

  9. Model-Based Motion Tracking of Infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Mikkel Damgaard; Herskind, Anna; Nielsen, Jens Bo;

    2014-01-01

    Even though motion tracking is a widely used technique to analyze and measure human movements, only a few studies focus on motion tracking of infants. In recent years, a number of studies have emerged focusing on analyzing the motion pattern of infants, using computer vision. Most of these studies...

  10. Ambulatory oxygen: why do COPD patients not use their portable systems as prescribed? A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenwick Angela

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with COPD on long term oxygen therapy frequently do not adhere to their prescription, and they frequently do not use their ambulatory oxygen systems as intended. Reasons for this lack of adherence are not known. The aim of this study was to obtain in-depth information about perceptions and use of prescribed ambulatory oxygen systems from patients with COPD to inform ambulatory oxygen design, prescription and management. Methods A qualitative design was used, involving semi-structured face-to-face interviews informed by a grounded theory approach. Twenty-seven UK community-dwelling COPD patients using NHS prescribed ambulatory systems were recruited. Ambulatory oxygen systems comprised cylinders weighing 3.4 kg, a shoulder bag and nasal cannulae. Results Participants reported that they: received no instruction on how to use ambulatory oxygen; were uncertain of the benefits; were afraid the system would run out while they were using it (due to lack of confidence in the cylinder gauge; were embarrassed at being seen with the system in public; and were unable to carry the system because of the cylinder weight. The essential role of carers was also highlighted, as participants with no immediate carers did not use ambulatory oxygen outside the house. Conclusions These participants highlighted previously unreported problems that prevented them from using ambulatory oxygen as prescribed. Our novel findings point to: concerns with the lack of specific information provision; the perceived unreliability of the oxygen system; important carer issues surrounding managing and using ambulatory oxygen equipment. All of these issues, as well as previously reported problems with system weight and patient embarrassment, should be addressed to improve adherence to ambulatory oxygen prescription and enhance the physical and social benefits of maintaining mobility in this patient group. Increased user involvement in both system development

  11. AMBULATORY CARE SENSITIVE CONDITIONS: DIAGNOSTIC RELIABILITY IN SOUTHERN BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Antoniazzi Abaid

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (ACSC are illnesses that could be prevented with adjusted ambulatorial care. ACSC have been used as indicator in effectiveness of the primary healthcare attention, through the evaluation of hospital admissions. However, we do not have studies to certify the reliability of diagnosis of ACSC in our country. Objective: To determine if the classification of ACSC from the main diagnostic field of the authorization of hospital internment (AHI is reliable. Methods: Transversal study carried through February of 2010 to January of 2011, in the city of Santa Cruz of Sul (RS. A random sample of 389 medical records was selected and evaluated by two medical appraisers. The main diagnosis in the AHI was compared with the classification in ACSC or not ACSC given for the appraisers after the study of each medical record. Kappa ratio agreement was used to calculate the reliability of the ACSC diagnostic. Results: The ratio of agreement between diagnosis from the AIH and CSAP assessment contained in the records was 92%, with a kappa coefficient of 0,784. Conclusions: The diagnostic of ACSC found in main diagnostic field of AHI showed agreement ratios over expected by chance, with kappa value equal to 0.784 and the correlation rated between substantial and almost perfect.

  12. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring: coming of age in nephrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, R R; Ford, V

    1996-11-01

    The number of patients undergoing ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and the number of publications using this technique to evaluate the risks and effects of high blood pressure on target organs has been increasing, and dramatically so, in the last 5 years. Much of this growth has centered on the role of the blood pressure load (the percentage of systolic or diastolic readings above a preset value during a specific time period) and the changes in blood pressures levels that occur, with sleep. Although many studies are focused on the interaction between blood pressure (as assessed by ABPM) and the heart, interest is growing in the application of ABPM to the practice of nephrology. This paper discusses some of the technical aspects of ABPM, followed by a review of five areas of clinical research using ABPM, and which are relevant to renal medicine: microalbuminuria, renal function, renovascular hypertension, dialysis (hemodialysis and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis), and transplantation. Despite a general lack of reimbursement for performance of the ABPM procedure, the growth in its usage and the willingness of clinicians to withhold or alter therapy on the basis of ABPM readings is testimony to its clinical value in the management of hypertension. PMID:8959618

  13. Psychophysiological ambulatory assessment of affective dysregulation in borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebner-Priemer, Ulrich W; Welch, Stacy S; Grossman, Paul; Reisch, Thomas; Linehan, Marsha M; Bohus, Martin

    2007-04-15

    Many experts now believe that pervasive problems in affect regulation constitute the central area of dysfunction in borderline personality disorder (BPD). However, data is sparse and inconclusive. We hypothesized that patients with BPD, in contrast to healthy gender and nationality-matched controls, show a higher frequency and intensity of self-reported emotions, altered physiological indices of emotions, more complex emotions and greater problems in identifying specific emotions. We took a 24-hour psychophysiological ambulatory monitoring approach to investigate affect regulation during everyday life in 50 patients with BPD and in 50 healthy controls. To provide a typical and unmanipulated sample, we included only patients who were currently in treatment and did not alter their medication schedule. BPD patients reported more negative emotions, fewer positive emotions, and a greater intensity of negative emotions. A subgroup of non-medicated BPD patients manifested higher values of additional heart rate. Additional heart rate is that part of a heart rate increase that does not directly result from metabolic activity, and is used as an indicator of emotional reactivity. Borderline participants were more likely to report the concurrent presence of more than one emotion, and those patients who just started treatment in particular had greater problems in identifying specific emotions. Our findings during naturalistic ambulatory assessment support emotional dysregulation in BPD as defined by the biosocial theory of [Linehan, M.M., 1993. Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder. The Guildford Press, New York.] and suggest the potential utility for evaluating treatment outcome. PMID:17321599

  14. Study of cyclic and steady particle motion in a realistic human airway model using phase-Doppler anemometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jícha Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Transport and deposition of particles in human airways has been of research interest for many years. Various experimental methods such as constant temperature anemometry, particle image velocimetry and laser-Doppler based techniques were employed for study of aerosol transport in the past. We use Phase-Doppler Particle Analyser (P/DPA for time resolved size and velocity measurement of liquid aerosol particles in a size range 1 to 8 μm. The di-2ethylhexyl sabacate (DEHS particles were produced by condensation monodisperse aerosol generator. A thin-wall transparent model of human airways with non-symmetric bifurcations and non-planar geometry containing parts from throat to 3rd-4th generation of bronchi was fabricated for the study. Several cyclic (sinusoidal breathing regimes were simulated using pneumatic breathing mechanism. Analogous steady-flow regimes were also investigated and used for comparison. An analysis of the particle velocity data was performed with aim to gain deeper understanding of the transport phenomena in the realistic bifurcating airway system. Flows of particles of different sizes in range 1 – 10 μm was found to slightly differ for extremely high Stokes numbers. Differences in steady and cyclic turbulence intensities were documented in the paper. Systematically higher turbulence intensity was found for cyclic flows and mainly in the expiration breathing phase. Negligible differences were found for behaviour of different particle size classes in the inspected range 1 to 8 μm. Possibility of velocity spectra estimation of air flow using the P/DPA data is discussed.

  15. Displacement of the medial meniscus within the passive motion characteristics of the human knee joint: an RSA study in human cadaver knees.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tienen, T.G. van; Buma, P.; Scholten, J.G.; Kampen, A. van; Veth, R.P.H.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to validate an in vitro human cadaver knee-joint model for the evaluation of the meniscal movement during knee-joint flexion. The question was whether our model showed comparable meniscal displacements to those found in earlier meniscal movement studies in vivo. Furth

  16. Challenges of pain control and the role of the ambulatory pain specialist in the outpatient surgery setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Kai, Alice M; Kodumudi, Vijay; Berger, Jack M

    2016-01-01

    Ambulatory surgery is on the rise, with an unmet need for optimum pain control in ambulatory surgery centers worldwide. It is important that there is a proportionate increase in the availability of acute pain-management services to match the rapid rise of clinical patient load with pain issues in the ambulatory surgery setting. Focus on ambulatory pain control with its special challenges is vital to achieve optimum pain control and prevent morbidity and mortality. Management of perioperative pain in the ambulatory surgery setting is becoming increasingly complex, and requires the employment of a multimodal approach and interventions facilitated by ambulatory surgery pain specialists, which is a new concept. A focused ambulatory pain specialist on site at each ambulatory surgery center, in addition to providing safe anesthesia, could intervene early once problematic pain issues are recognized, thus preventing emergency room visits, as well as readmissions for uncontrolled pain. This paper reviews methods of acute-pain management in the ambulatory setting with risk stratification, the utilization of multimodal interventions, including pharmacological and nonpharmacological options, opioids, nonopioids, and various routes with the goal of preventing delayed discharge and unexpected hospital admissions after ambulatory surgery. Continued research and investigation in the area of pain management with outcome studies in acute surgically inflicted pain in patients with underlying chronic pain treated with opioids and the pattern and predictive factors for pain in the ambulatory surgical setting is needed.

  17. Challenges of pain control and the role of the ambulatory pain specialist in the outpatient surgery setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Kai, Alice M; Kodumudi, Vijay; Berger, Jack M

    2016-01-01

    Ambulatory surgery is on the rise, with an unmet need for optimum pain control in ambulatory surgery centers worldwide. It is important that there is a proportionate increase in the availability of acute pain-management services to match the rapid rise of clinical patient load with pain issues in the ambulatory surgery setting. Focus on ambulatory pain control with its special challenges is vital to achieve optimum pain control and prevent morbidity and mortality. Management of perioperative pain in the ambulatory surgery setting is becoming increasingly complex, and requires the employment of a multimodal approach and interventions facilitated by ambulatory surgery pain specialists, which is a new concept. A focused ambulatory pain specialist on site at each ambulatory surgery center, in addition to providing safe anesthesia, could intervene early once problematic pain issues are recognized, thus preventing emergency room visits, as well as readmissions for uncontrolled pain. This paper reviews methods of acute-pain management in the ambulatory setting with risk stratification, the utilization of multimodal interventions, including pharmacological and nonpharmacological options, opioids, nonopioids, and various routes with the goal of preventing delayed discharge and unexpected hospital admissions after ambulatory surgery. Continued research and investigation in the area of pain management with outcome studies in acute surgically inflicted pain in patients with underlying chronic pain treated with opioids and the pattern and predictive factors for pain in the ambulatory surgical setting is needed. PMID:27382329

  18. Construction of Motion Database Based on Real-World Haptics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokokura, Yuki; Katsura, Seiichiro

    This paper proposes a motion database based on real-world haptics. In order to treat advanced types of haptic information, the motion database contains not only the name of motion and position trajectory of a human operator but also force information. Moreover, the motion database is constructed and managed by a motion database management system, which performs the tasks of inserting, updating, retrieving, and deleting information pertaining to human motion. The motion database management system consists of a motion-copying system, which stores and reproduces the simple motions of the human operator. In this research, the validity and feasibility of the proposed method are verified. By using the proposed method, the motions of human operators in the industrial and medical fields can be stored, dynamically reproduced, and referred.

  19. Acute and chronic effects of aerobic and resistance exercise on ambulatory blood pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crivaldo Gomes Cardoso Jr

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a ubiquitous and serious disease. Regular exercise has been recommended as a strategy for the prevention and treatment of hypertension because of its effects in reducing clinical blood pressure; however, ambulatory blood pressure is a better predictor of target-organ damage than clinical blood pressure, and therefore studying the effects of exercise on ambulatory blood pressure is important as well. Moreover, different kinds of exercise might produce distinct effects that might differ between normotensive and hypertensive subjects. The aim of this study was to review the current literature on the acute and chronic effects of aerobic and resistance exercise on ambulatory blood pressure in normotensive and hypertensive subjects. It has been conclusively shown that a single episode of aerobic exercise reduces ambulatory blood pressure in hypertensive patients. Similarly, regular aerobic training also decreases ambulatory blood pressure in hypertensive individuals. In contrast, data on the effects of resistance exercise is both scarce and controversial. Nevertheless, studies suggest that resistance exercise might acutely decrease ambulatory blood pressure after exercise, and that this effect seems to be greater after low-intensity exercise and in patients receiving anti-hypertensive drugs. On the other hand, only two studies investigating resistance training in hypertensive patients have been conducted, and neither has demonstrated any hypotensive effect. Thus, based on current knowledge, aerobic training should be recommended to decrease ambulatory blood pressure in hypertensive individuals, while resistance exercise could be prescribed as a complementary strategy.

  20. Optimising postoperative pain management in the ambulatory patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Allan B; Gan, Tong J

    2003-01-01

    Over 60% of surgery is now performed in an ambulatory setting. Despite improved analgesics and sophisticated drug delivery systems, surveys indicate that over 80% of patients experience moderate to severe pain postoperatively. Inadequate postoperative pain relief can prolong recovery, precipitate or increase the duration of hospital stay, increase healthcare costs, and reduce patient satisfaction. Effective postoperative pain management involves a multimodal approach and the use of various drugs with different mechanisms of action. Local anaesthetics are widely administered in the ambulatory setting using techniques such as local injection, field block, regional nerve block or neuraxial block. Continuous wound infusion pumps may have great potential in an ambulatory setting. Regional anaesthesia (involving anaesthetising regional areas of the body, including single extremities, multiple extremities, the torso, and the face or jaw) allows surgery to be performed in a specific location, usually an extremity, without the use of general anaesthesia, and potentially with little or no sedation. Opioids remain an important component of any analgesic regimen in treating moderate to severe acute postoperative pain. However, the incorporation of non-opioids, local anaesthetics and regional techniques will enhance current postoperative analgesic regimens. The development of new modalities of treatment, such as patient controlled analgesia, and newer drugs, such as cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors, provide additional choices for the practitioner. While there are different routes of administration for analgesics (e.g. oral, parenteral, intramuscular, transmucosal, transdermal and sublingual), oral delivery of medications has remained the mainstay for postoperative pain control. The oral route is effective, the simplest to use and typically the least expensive. The intravenous route has the advantages of a rapid onset of action and easier titratibility, and so is recommended for the

  1. An analysis of risk factors and adverse events in ambulatory surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent C

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Kent, Julia Metzner, Laurent BollagDepartment of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USAAbstract: Care for patients undergoing ambulatory procedures is a broad and expanding area of anesthetic and surgical practice. There were over 35 million ambulatory surgical procedures performed in the US in 2006. Ambulatory procedures are diverse in both type and setting, as they span the range from biopsies performed under local anesthesia to intra-abdominal laparoscopic procedures, and are performed in offices, freestanding ambulatory surgery centers, and ambulatory units of hospitals. The information on adverse events from these varied settings comes largely from retrospective reviews of sources, such as quality-assurance databases and closed malpractice claims. Very few if any ambulatory procedures are emergent, and in comparison to the inpatient population, ambulatory surgical patients are generally healthier. They are still however subject to most of the same types of adverse events as patients undergoing inpatient surgery, albeit at a lower frequency. The only adverse events that could be considered to be unique to ambulatory surgery are those that arise out of the circumstance of discharging a postoperative patient to an environment lacking skilled nursing care. There is limited information on these types of discharge-related adverse events, but the data that are available are reviewed in an attempt to assist the practitioner in patient selection and discharge decision making. Among ambulatory surgical patients, particularly those undergoing screening or cosmetic procedures, expectations from all parties involved are high, and a definition of adverse events can be expanded to include any occurrence that interrupts the rapid throughput of patients or interferes with early discharge and optimal patient satisfaction. This review covers all types of adverse events, but focuses on the more

  2. Landing Motion Control of Articulated Hopping Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Youngil Youm; Sanghak Sung

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the landing motion of an articulated legged robot. Humans use a peculiar crouching motion to land safely which can be characterized by body stiffness and damping. A stiffness controller formulation is used to realize this human behavior for the robot. Using this method, the landing motion is achieved with only the desired body stiffness and damping values, without desired COG(Center of Gravity) or joint paths. To achieve soft landing, variable body stiffness and damping ...

  3. What Ambulatory Care Managers Need to Know About Examination Room Utilization Measurement and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarich, Mark J; Rea, Ronald W; Lal, Tarun Mohan; Garcia, Angel L; Steffens, Fay L

    2016-01-01

    Demand for ambulatory care visits is projected to increase 22% between 2008 and 2025. Given this growth, ambulatory care managers need to proactively plan for efficient use of scarce resources (ie, space, equipment, and staff). One important component of ambulatory care space (the number of examination rooms) is dependent on multiple factors, including variation in demand, hours of operation, scheduling, and staff. The authors (1) outline common data collection methods, (2) highlight analysis and reporting considerations for examination room utilization, and (3) provide a strategic framework for short- and long-term decision making for facility design or renovation. PMID:27232683

  4. Soccer athletes are superior to non-athletes at perceiving soccer-specific and non-sport specific human biological motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeas, Thomas; Faubert, Jocelyn

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that athletes' domain specific perceptual-cognitive expertise can transfer to everyday tasks. Here we assessed the perceptual-cognitive expertise of athletes and non-athletes using sport specific and non-sport specific biological motion perception (BMP) tasks. Using a virtual environment, university-level soccer players and university students' non-athletes were asked to perceive the direction of a point-light walker and to predict the trajectory of a masked-ball during a point-light soccer kick. Angles of presentation were varied for orientation (upright, inverted) and distance (2 m, 4 m, 16 m). Accuracy and reaction time were measured to assess observers' performance. The results highlighted athletes' superior ability compared to non-athletes to accurately predict the trajectory of a masked soccer ball presented at 2 m (reaction time), 4 m (accuracy and reaction time), and 16 m (accuracy) of distance. More interestingly, experts also displayed greater performance compared to non-athletes throughout the more fundamental and general point-light walker direction task presented at 2 m (reaction time), 4 m (accuracy and reaction time), and 16 m (reaction time) of distance. In addition, athletes showed a better performance throughout inverted conditions in the walker (reaction time) and soccer kick (accuracy and reaction time) tasks. This implies that during human BMP, athletes demonstrate an advantage for recognizing body kinematics that goes beyond sport specific actions. PMID:26388828

  5. Ambulatory major surgery of benign tumors of the thyroid gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A descriptive and prospective study on the practice of ambulatory major surgery to eliminate benign tumours of the thyroid gland, was carried out in the General Surgery Service of 'Dr. Joaquin Castillo Duany' Teaching Clinical Surgical Hospital in Santiago de Cuba during the years 1996-2008, both included, through a previous clinical evaluation of 74 patients in the Endocrinology Outpatient Department, where it was decided that they could definitely have a surgical treatment. The female sex, the age groups from 31 to 45 years, the hemithyroidectomy as surgical technique, acupuncture as analgesic procedure and the follicular adenoma as cytohistological result prevailed in the case material. Mild complications occurred in 5 members of the sample, but recovery was absolute in all, so that even 72 of them were discharged before the 24 hours. Due to its good acceptance, this surgical method is beneficial for patient and hospital institutions.(author)

  6. Ambulatory surgery center joint ventures involving tax-exempt entities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, S; Pristave, R J; McConnell, W

    1999-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the tax-exempt related issues for ambulatory surgery center joint ventures involving tax-exempt entities. The article analyzes the key points of analysis of the guidance released by the IRS, in particular General Counsel Memorandum 39862, Revenue Ruling 98-15, and Redlands Surgical Services v. Commissioner of the Internal Revenue Service. These key points include whether the venture results in private inurement to insiders and whether the venture furthers the charitable purposes of the tax-exempt entity. The article also provides practical guidance to analyze the documents and structure of the joint venture to ensure compliance with the IRS guidance. These practical considerations include, among other things, whether the charitable purposes of the tax-exempt entity are clearly expressed in the documents and whether the tax-exempt entity has sufficient control over the joint venture to ensure the charitable purposes are being adhered to.

  7. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring – Clinical Practice Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Mako

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM became a subject of considerable scientific interest. Due to the increasing use of the ABPM in everyday clinical practice it is important that all the users have a correct knowledge on the clinical indications, the methodology of using the device including some technical issues and the interpretation of results. In the last years several guidelines and position papers have been published with recommendations for the monitoring process, reference values, for clinical practice and research. This paper represents a summary of the most important aspects related to the use of ABPM in daily practice, being a synthesis of recommendations from the recent published guidelines and position papers. This reference article presents the practical and technical issues of ABPM, the use of this method in special situations, the clinical interpretation of measured values including the presentation of different ABPM patterns, derived parameters, the prognostic significance and the limitations of this method.

  8. Bidirectional peritoneal transport of albumin in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joffe, P; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1995-01-01

    The present study was undertaken in order to assess bidirectional peritoneal kinetics of albumin after simultaneous i.v. and i.p. injection of radioiodinated albumin tracers (125I-RISA and 131I-RISA) in eight clinically stable uraemic patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis...... (CAPD). The plasma volume, intravascular albumin mass (IVM), and overall extravasation rate of albumin were not significantly different from that found in healthy controls. Albumin flux from the plasma into the peritoneal cavity was 3.71 +/- 0.82 (SD) mumol/h, which was only 3% of the overall...... extravasation rate (137 +/- 52 mumol/h). Albumin flux from the peritoneal cavity into the plasma was substantially lower (0.22 +/- 0.07 mumol/h, P peritoneal accumulation of the albumin from plasma over 4 h was 14 +/- 3.2 mumol, which was significantly lower than the intraperitoneal albumin...

  9. [Approach to the patient in the ambulatory surgery unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero-Ponce, Montserrat; Romero-Sánchez, Isabel María; López-Barea, José; Martínez-Ramos, Pablo

    2008-01-01

    Ambulatory surgery aims to improve the quality of care, provide services in an environment closer to users' normal surroundings, reduce the risk of nosocomial infection and release hospital beds for other uses demanded by the population, thus reducing health costs. Nursing activity in these units should aim to restore health and aid the rapid recovery of patients in their homes. To achieve this, an effective health education program is required. Such programs should be simple and, at the same time, cover the care that these patients will require during the recovery period at home. The unit covers patients in the Virgen de Rocío University Hospital, The Fleming Peripheral Center for Specialties and the Virgen de los Reyes Peripheral Center for Specialties in Seville, Spain and the the specialties included are plastic surgery, otorhinolaryngology, orthopedic surgery, urology, and general surgery. The duration of the education program will be at most 14-17 h.

  10. Reproducibility of the ambulatory arterial stiffness index in hypertensive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dechering, D.G.; Steen, M.S. van der; Adiyaman, A.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We studied the repeatability of the ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI), which can be computed from 24-h blood pressure (BP) recordings as unity minus the regression slope of diastolic on systolic BP. METHODS: One hundred and fifty-two hypertensive outpatients recruited...... in Nijmegen (mean age = 46.2 years; 76.3% with systolic and diastolic hypertension) and 145 patients enrolled in the Systolic Hypertension in Europe (Syst-Eur) trial (71.0 years) underwent 24-h BP monitoring at a median interval of 8 and 31 days, respectively. We used the repeatability coefficient, which...... is twice the SD of the within-participant differences between repeat recordings, and expressed it as a percentage of four times the SD of the mean of the paired measurements. RESULTS: Mean AASI (crude or derived by time-weighted or robust regression) and 24-h pulse pressure (PP) were similar on repeat...

  11. [Low-power Wireless Micro Ambulatory Electrocardiogram Node].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhipeng; Luo, Kan; Li, Jianqing

    2016-02-01

    Ambulatory electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring can effectively reduce the risk and death rate of patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). The Body Sensor Network (BSN) based ECG monitoring is a new and efficien method to protect the CVDs patients. To meet the challenges of miniaturization, low power and high signal quality of the node, we proposed a novel 50 mmX 50 mmX 10 mm, 30 g wireless ECG node, which includes the single-chip an alog front-end AD8232, ultra-low power microprocessor MSP430F1611 and Bluetooth module HM-11. The ECG signal quality is guaranteed by the on-line digital filtering. The difference threshold algorithm results in accuracy of R-wave detection and heart rate. Experiments were carried out to test the node and the results showed that the pro posed node reached the design target, and it has great potential in application of wireless ECG monitoring. PMID:27382732

  12. Is aerobic workload positively related to ambulatory blood pressure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korshøj, Mette; Clays, Els; Lidegaard, Mark;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Cardiovascular disease is prevalent among workers with high levels of occupational physical activity. The increased risk may be due to a high relative aerobic workload, possibly leading to increased blood pressure. However, studies investigating the relation between relative aerobic...... workload and ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) are lacking. The aim was to explore the relationship between objectively measured relative aerobic workload and ABP. METHODS: A total of 116 cleaners aged 18-65 years were included after informed consent was obtained. A portable device (Spacelabs 90217...... relative aerobic workload and ABP were significant. CONCLUSIONS: Because workers may have an elevated relative aerobic workload for several hours each working day, this relationship may elucidate a mechanism behind the increased risk for cardiovascular disease among workers exposed to high levels...

  13. Tuberculous peritonitis in a child undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, T C; Hsu, J C; Chou, L H; Lee, M L

    1994-01-01

    We present a 13-year-old girl with Arnold-Chiari syndrome and uremia secondary to neurogenic bladder. She had been treated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) for 13 months prior to the development of peritonitis. The patient demonstrated no improvement with a 3-day therapy of intraperitoneal vancomycin and netilmicin. Meanwhile, smear of centrifuged dialysate revealed acid fast bacilli on two occasions. We, then, started anti-TB therapy with oral isoniazid (INAH), rifampin and ethambutal. The symptoms subsided within three days. In the first week, the patient lost her peritoneal ultrafiltration and needed daytime automatic peritoneal dialysis. At the last follow-up examination, 12 months after treatment, she remained well on standard CAPD.

  14. Hepatic Dysfunction in Ambulatory Patients With Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Maryjane; Wu, Christina; Givens, Raymond C.; Collado, Ellias; Mancini, Donna M.; Schulze, P. Christian

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score and its modified versions, which are established measures of liver dysfunction, as a tool to assess heart transplantation (HTx) urgency in ambulatory patients with heart failure. Background Liver abnormalities have a prognostic impact on the outcome of patients with advanced heart failure. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 343 patients undergoing HTx evaluation between 2005 and 2009. The prognostic effectiveness of MELD and 2 modifications (MELDNa [includes serum sodium levels] and MELD-XI [does not include international normalized ratio]) for endpoint events, defined as death/HTx/ventricular assist device requirement, was evaluated in our cohort and in subgroups of patients on and off oral anticoagulation. Results The MELD and MELDNa scores were excellent predictors for 1-year endpoint events (areas under the curve: 0.71 and 0.73, respectively). High scores (>12) were strongly associated with poor survival at 1 year (MELD 69.3% vs. 90.4% [p < 0.0001]; MELDNa 70.4% vs. 96.9% [p < 0.0001]). Increased scores were associated with increased risk for HTx (hazard ratio: 1.10 [95% confidence interval: 1.06 to 1.14]; p < 0.0001 for both scores), which was independent of other known risk factors (MELD p = 0.0055; MELDNa p = 0.0083). Anticoagulant use was associated with poor survival at 1 year (73.7% vs. 86.4%; p = 0.0118), and the statistical significance of MELD/MELDNa was higher in patients not receiving oral anticoagulation therapy. MELD-XI was a fair but limited predictor of the endpoint events in patients receiving oral anticoagulation therapy. Conclusions Assessment of liver dysfunction according to the MELD scoring system provides additional risk information in ambulatory patients with heart failure. PMID:23563127

  15. Motion Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    MOOG, Inc. supplies hydraulic actuators for the Space Shuttle. When MOOG learned NASA was interested in electric actuators for possible future use, the company designed them with assistance from Marshall Space Flight Center. They also decided to pursue the system's commercial potential. This led to partnership with InterActive Simulation, Inc. for production of cabin flight simulators for museums, expositions, etc. The resulting products, the Magic Motion Simulator 30 Series, are the first electric powered simulators. Movements are computer-guided, including free fall to heighten the sense of moving through space. A projection system provides visual effects, and the 11 speakers of a digital laser based sound system add to the realism. The electric actuators are easier to install, have lower operating costs, noise, heat and staff requirements. The U.S. Space & Rocket Center and several other organizations have purchased the simulators.

  16. Motion Segmentation based Human Motion Capture Data Recovery via Sparse and Low-rank Decomposition%基于运动分割和稀疏低秩分解的失真人体运动捕捉数据恢复

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭淑娟; 赫高峰; 柳欣; 王华珍; 钟必能

    2015-01-01

    针对人体运动的复杂性和噪声干扰的无序性,提出一种基于运动分割和稀疏低秩分解的失真人体运动捕捉数据恢复方法。首先利用双边滤波对失真运动数据进行预修正,降低干扰数据的奇异信息并保证运动序列的连贯性;其次采用概率主元分析方法将修正后的运动数据进行语义行为自动分割,得到不同姿态的运动语义子区间;再利用加速近端梯度优化算法对每个失真运动子片段数据矩阵根据其更优低秩特性进行稀疏低秩分解,实现运动子片段数据的局部恢复;最后将局部恢复后的各子运动片段根据人体运动序列的时序特性组合,达到整体失真运动捕捉数据恢复的目的。实验结果表明,该方法能够有效地对失真人体运动数据进行恢复,效果显著,有助于重构逼近真实人体姿态的运动捕捉数据。%According to the complexity of human movement and randomness of the noise interference, this paper presents a motion segmentation based approach for human motion capture data recovery via the sparse and low-rank decomposition. The proposed approach first employs the bilateral filter to amend the distorted hu-man motion capture data, featuring on removing singular values and smoothing the motion sequence. Then, the probabilistic principal component analysis (PPCA) method is utilized to segment the motion data into different semantic behaviors automatically. Subsequently, the accelerated proximal gradient algorithm (APG) based sparse and low-rank decomposition is adopted to achieve the partial data recovery with respected to each separated se-mantic behavior. Finally, all the recovered sub-motions are sequentially combined to achieve the whole motion recovery. The experimental results have shown that the proposed motion recovery approach can well restore the distorted human motion data with better performance. The proposed approach can be well utilized to

  17. 人体运动图像动态视点平滑能量衰减过程仿真%Simulation of Dynamic Viewpoint Smooth Energy Attenuation Process in Human Motion Image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康红哲

    2015-01-01

    传统图像平滑能量衰减分析方法,对于人体运动图像高频分量抑制效果较差,且模糊图像边缘,运算效率较低。提出了一种依据替身运动DR算法的人体运动图像动态视点平滑能量衰减过程仿真方法,采用高斯滤波器对人体运动图像进行平滑处理,过滤人体运动图像的噪声,完整保留人体运动图像边缘信息以及细节,用替身描述人体在场景中的运动特征,替身在场景中运动并同其它人体的替身进行交互,采用局部化的人体模型提高人体运动场景的逼真度,通过人体运动图像的DR预测算法,完成人体运动图像动态视点平滑能量衰减过程分析。实验结果说明,所提方法能够确保人体运动图像边缘锐化,有效降低平滑能量、锐化边缘。%Traditional image smoothing energy attenuation analysis method, for the human body movement images high frequency component of the inhibition effect is poorer, and the fuzzy image edge, the computation efficiency is low. Put forward a kind of human movement image based on the double movement of DR algorithm dynamic viewpoint smooth energy attenuation process simulation method, the gaussian filter is adopted to human motion image smoothing, filtering the noise of the human body movement images, intact human body image edge information and details, human motion in the scene is described by using double, double motion in the scene and interact with other human body double, the localization of the human body model to improve the fidelity of human movement scene, by DR prediction algorithm of the human body movement images, complete human motion image dynamic viewpoint smooth energy attenuation process analysis. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method can ensure that human body image edge sharpening, effectively reduce the smooth energy, sharpen edges.

  18. Adaptation to Real Motion Reveals Direction-selective Interactions between Real and Implied Motion Processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorteije, Jeannette A.M.; Kenemans, Leon; Jellema, Tjeerd; Lubbe, van der Rob H.J.; Lommers, Marjolein W.; Wezel, van Richard J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Viewing static pictures of running humans evokes neural activity in the dorsal motion-sensitive cortex. To establish whether this response arises from direction-selective neurons that are also involved in real motion processing, we measured the visually evoked potential to implied motion following a

  19. Adaptation to real motion reveals direction-selective interactions between real and implied motion processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorteije, J.A.M.; Kenemans, J.L.; Jellema, T.; Lubbe, R.H.J. van der; Lommers, M.W.; Wezel, R.J.A. van

    2007-01-01

    Viewing static pictures of running humans evokes neural activity in the dorsal motion-sensitive cortex. To establish whether this response arises from direction-selective neurons that are also involved in real motion processing, we measured the visually evoked potential to implied motion following a

  20. A 2-wk reduction of ambulatory activity attenuates peripheral insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Thyfault, John P; Broholm, Christa;

    2010-01-01

    US adults take between approximately 2,000 and approximately 12,000 steps per day, a wide range of ambulatory activity that at the low range could increase risk for developing chronic metabolic diseases. Dramatic reductions in physical activity induce insulin resistance; however, it is uncertain...... possible biological cause for the public health problem of Type 2 diabetes has been identified. Reduced ambulatory activity for 2 wk in healthy, nonexercising young men significantly reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity, cardiovascular fitness, and lean leg mass....... if and how low ambulatory activity would influence peripheral insulin sensitivity. We aimed to explore if healthy, nonexercising subjects who went from a normal to a low level of ambulatory activity for 2 wk would display metabolic alterations including reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity. To do this, ten...

  1. Peritonitis due to Brevibacterium otitidis in a patient undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Wauters, Georges; Van Bosterhaut, B; Avesani, V; Cuvelier, R.; Charlier, Jacqueline; Janssens, Michèle; Delmée, Michel

    2000-01-01

    Brevibacterium otitidis is a coryneform rod and, as far as is known, is isolated only from infected ears. We report the first known case of peritonitis caused by B. otitidis in a patient undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

  2. Features of ambulatory blood pressure in 540 patients with chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王成

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the features and influencing factors of ambulatory blood pressure in chronic kidney disease(CKD)patients.Methods A total of 540 CKD patients from May 2010 to May 2012 in our department

  3. Specific opsonic activity for staphylococci in peritoneal dialysis effluent during continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Espersen, F; Kharazmi, A;

    1992-01-01

    In a prospective study of intraperitoneal opsonins in 30 patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), the IgG concentration, the fibronectin concentration, the specific antistaphylococcal antibody level, and the opsonic activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis were...

  4. Ambulatory Surgical Facilities, Published in 2010, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Shawano County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Ambulatory Surgical Facilities dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2010....

  5. Peritonitis by Scedosporium apiospermum in a patient undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEVERO Luiz Carlos

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of peritonitis due to Scedosporium apiospermum in a boy undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis is reported. The finding of suggestive tissual form of the fungus in the effluent hastened the diagnosis of the infection.

  6. Provider practice models in ambulatory oncology practice: analysis of productivity, revenue, and provider and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buswell, Lori A; Ponte, Patricia Reid; Shulman, Lawrence N

    2009-07-01

    Physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants often work in teams to deliver cancer care in ambulatory oncology practices. This is likely to become more prevalent as the demand for oncology services rises, and the number of providers increases only slightly.

  7. Motion scaling for high-performance driving simulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berthoz, A.; Bles, W.; Bülthoff, H.H.; Correia Grácio, B.J.; Feenstra, P.; Filliard, N.; Hühne, R.; Kemeny, A.; Mayrhofer, M.; Mulder, M.; Nusseck, H.G.; Pretto, P.; Reymond, G.; Schlüsselberger, R.; Schwandtner, J.; Teufel, H.; Vailleau, B.; Paassen, M.M.R. van; Vidal, M.; Wentink, M.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced driving simulators aim at rendering the motion of a vehicle with maximum fidelity, which requires increased mechanical travel, size, and cost of the system. Motion cueing algorithms reduce the motion envelope by taking advantage of limitations in human motion perception, and the most common

  8. Challenges of pain control and the role of the ambulatory pain specialist in the outpatient surgery setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadivelu N

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nalini Vadivelu,1 Alice M Kai,2 Vijay Kodumudi,3 Jack M Berger4 1Department of Anesthesiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, 2Stony Brook University School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, 3Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, 4Department of Anesthesiology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Ambulatory surgery is on the rise, with an unmet need for optimum pain control in ambulatory surgery centers worldwide. It is important that there is a proportionate increase in the availability of acute pain-management services to match the rapid rise of clinical patient load with pain issues in the ambulatory surgery setting. Focus on ambulatory pain control with its special challenges is vital to achieve optimum pain control and prevent morbidity and mortality. Management of perioperative pain in the ambulatory surgery setting is becoming increasingly complex, and requires the employment of a multimodal approach and interventions facilitated by ambulatory surgery pain specialists, which is a new concept. A focused ambulatory pain specialist on site at each ambulatory surgery center, in addition to providing safe anesthesia, could intervene early once problematic pain issues are recognized, thus preventing emergency room visits, as well as readmissions for uncontrolled pain. This paper reviews methods of acute-pain management in the ambulatory setting with risk stratification, the utilization of multimodal interventions, including pharmacological and nonpharmacological options, opioids, nonopioids, and various routes with the goal of preventing delayed discharge and unexpected hospital admissions after ambulatory surgery. Continued research and investigation in the area of pain management with outcome studies in acute surgically inflicted pain in patients with underlying chronic pain treated with

  9. Theory of Optimal Human Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Albert Loongtak

    1990-01-01

    This thesis presents optimal theories for punching and running. The first is a theory of the optimal karate punch in terms of the duration and the speed of the punch. This theory is solved and compared with experimental data. The theory incorporates the force vs velocity equation (Hill's eq.) and Wilkie's equation for elbow flexation in determining the optimal punch. The time T and the final speed of the punch are dependent on a few physiological parameters for arm muscles. The theoretical punch agrees fairly well with our experiments and other independent experiments. Second, a theory of optimal running is presented, solved and compared with world track records. The theory is similar to Keller's theory for running (1973) except that the power consumed by a runner is assumed to be proportional to the runner's speed v, P = Hv, whereas Keller took P = constant. There are differential equations for velocity and energy, two initial conditions and two constraint inequalities, involving a total of four free parameters. Optimal control techniques are used to solve this problem and minimize the running time T given the race distance D. The resultant predicted times T agree well with the records and the parameter values are consistent with independent physiological measurements.

  10. Ambulatory Gait Behavior in Patients With Dementia: A Comparison With Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Mitoma, Hiroshi; Sanjo, Nobuo; Higuma, Maya; Terashi, Hiroo; Yokota, Takanori

    2016-08-01

    Accelerometry-based gait analysis is a promising approach in obtaining insightful information on the gait characteristics of patients with neurological disorders such as dementia and Parkinson's disease (PD). In order to improve its practical use outside the laboratory or hospital, it is required to design new metrics capable of quantifying ambulatory gait and their extraction procedures from long-term acceleration data. This paper presents a gait analysis method developed for such a purpose. Our system is based on a single trunk-mounted accelerometer and analytical algorithm for the assessment of gait behavior that may be context dependent. The algorithm consists of the detection of gait peaks from acceleration data and the analysis of multimodal patterns in the relationship between gait cycle and vertical gait acceleration. A set of six new measures can be obtained by applying the algorithm to a 24-h motion signal. To examine the performance and utility of our method, we recorded acceleration data from 13 healthy, 26 PD, and 26 mild cognitive impairment or dementia subjects. Each patient group was further classified into two, comprising 13 members each, according to the severity of the disease, and the gait behavior of the five groups was compared. We found that the normal, PD, and MCI/dementia groups show characteristic walking patterns which can be distinguished from one another by the developed gait measure set. We also examined conventional parameters such as gait acceleration, gait cycle, and gait variability, but failed to reproduce the distinct differences among the five groups. These findings suggest that the proposed gait analysis may be useful in capturing disease-specific gait features in a community setting. PMID:26372429

  11. Human motion tracking and gesture prediction based on the RBF neural network%基于RBF神经网络的人体运动跟踪与姿态预测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙光民; 陈德明; 秦圣峰; Wright D. K.; 康金胜; 赵越

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the Radial Basis Function (RBF) neural network is employed to track the human motion and predict the human body gesture. Some tests and comparison experiments have been made to evaluate the performance for the motion tracking and gesture prediction using collected motion data. The experimental results show that the RBF neural network based motion tracking and gesture prediction methods is feasible.%本文采用径向基函数神经网络进行人体运动跟踪与人体姿态预测,利用采集的运动数据对本文提出的运动跟踪与姿态预测方法进行性能评估,给出部分测试和比较实验结果,实验结果表明,基于径向基函数神经网络的人体运动跟踪与人体姿态预测方法是可行的.

  12. Comparison Between Ambulatory and Conventional Urodynamics of the Modified Orthotopic Hautmann Neobladder

    OpenAIRE

    Apostolos, Malioris; Georgios, Dimitriadis; Spyridon, Kampantais; Georgios, Gkotsos; Ioannis, Vakalopoulos; Stavros, Ioannidis; Konstantinos, Hatzimoutatidis; Dimitrios, Hatzichristou

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of conventional and ambulatory urodynamic studies (UDS) in estimating neobladder function. Methods: We evaluated 32 patients who underwent radical cystectomy and orthotopic Hautmann W neobladder with Abol-Enein-Ghoneim uretero-intestinal anastomosis for bladder cancer. The patients were initially examined by using both conventional and ambulatory UDS. Results: Conventional UDS detected a very high mean intravesical...

  13. Patient satisfaction and acceptability: a journey through an ambulatory gynaecology clinic in the West of Ireland

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Uzochukwu, I

    2016-06-01

    Ambulatory Gynaecology allows a “see-and-treat” approach to managing gynaecological conditions, providing a more streamlined, integrated care pathway than the traditional gynaecology clinic and inpatient care model. This study was designed to assess patient satisfaction and acceptability of Ambulatory Gynaecology services in Mayo University Hospital, Castlebar, Ireland. It also provided for feedback from patients as to how the service might be improved. \\r\

  14. Ambulatory care training during core internal medicine residency training: the Canadian experience.

    OpenAIRE

    McLeod, P. J.; Meagher, T W

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the status of ambulatory care training of core internal medicine residents in Canada. DESIGN: Mail survey. PARTICIPANTS: All 16 program directors of internal medicine residency training programs in Canada. OUTCOME MEASURES: The nature and amount of ambulatory care training experienced by residents, information about the faculty tutors, and the sources and types of patients seen by the residents. As well, the program directors were asked for their opinions on the ideal ...

  15. Results of ambulatory arterial blood pressure monitoring in children with obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Faruk Öktem

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The relationship between obesity and essential hypertension is well known. In this study, we aimed to evaluate ambulatory arterial blood pressure monitoring of obese and non-obese children who had similar demographic characteristics.Materials and methods: Seventy one children and adolescents (n=39 obesity, n=32 controls) were studied. Blood pressure of the children were measured by 24 hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring device.Results: Obese children had significantly higher...

  16. [Ambulatory care nursing sites in Italy: results of a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvaro, Rosaria; Venturini, Giulia; Tartaglini, Daniela; Vellone, Ercole; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to map existing ambulatory care nursing sites in Italy, compare operational and organizational methodologies used, and evaluate visibility of the sites in health institutions and the community. Nurses' level of satisfaction with this work experience was also evaluated. The American Academy of Ambulatory Care Nursing and American Nurses Association definition of ambulatory care nursing (1997) was used to select sites for the study. Two hundred fifty ambulatory care sites meeting this definition were listed, most of which provide clinical and educational services to oncology and cardiology patients. Surgical sites provide treatment of surgical wounds and stomas. Results of the study show that ambulatory care nursing sites are not uniformly distributed across Italy and a greater concentration of sites can be found in northern Italy with respect to central and southern Italy. Nurses report having greater professional autonomy and an excellent level of satisfaction. All interviewed nurses attend specific training and continuing education courses. Ambulatory care sites are managed by nurses; medical consultations are requested when necessary and home assistance is assured through coordination with general practitioners. PMID:19629150

  17. Motion control report

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Please note this is a short discount publication. In today's manufacturing environment, Motion Control plays a major role in virtually every project.The Motion Control Report provides a comprehensive overview of the technology of Motion Control:* Design Considerations* Technologies* Methods to Control Motion* Examples of Motion Control in Systems* A Detailed Vendors List

  18. IMU-based ambulatory walking speed estimation in constrained treadmill and overground walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuozhi; Li, Qingguo

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the performance of a walking speed estimation system based on using an inertial measurement unit (IMU), a combination of accelerometers and gyroscopes. The walking speed estimation algorithm segments the walking sequence into individual stride cycles (two steps) based on the inverted pendulum-like behaviour of the stance leg during walking and it integrates the angular velocity and linear accelerations of the shank to determine the displacement of each stride. The evaluation was performed in both treadmill and overground walking experiments with various constraints on walking speed, step length and step frequency to provide a relatively comprehensive assessment of the system. Promising results were obtained in providing accurate and consistent walking speed/step length estimation in different walking conditions. An overall percentage root mean squared error (%RMSE) of 4.2 and 4.0% was achieved in treadmill and overground walking experiments, respectively. With an increasing interest in understanding human walking biomechanics, the IMU-based ambulatory system could provide a useful walking speed/step length measurement/control tool for constrained walking studies.

  19. Two large open-access datasets for fitts' law of human motion and a succinct derivation of the square-root variant

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberg, K.; Faridani, S; Alterovitz, R

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 IEEE. Fitts' law specifies a logarithmic relationship between motion duration and the ratio of target distance over target size. This paper introduces two large open-access datasets from experimental user studies: first a controlled (in-lab) study with 46 participants, and second an uncontrolled online study using a Java applet. We present a succinct derivation of the square-root variant of Fitts' law using optimal control theory and compare three models that relate motion duration to ...

  20. Methods for Motion Correction Evaluation Using 18F-FDG Human Brain Scans on a High-Resolution PET Scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Sune H.; Sibomana, Merence; Olesen, Oline Vinter;

    2012-01-01

    Many authors have reported the importance of motion correction (MC) for PET. Patient motion during scanning disturbs kinetic analysis and degrades resolution. In addition, using misaligned transmission for attenuation and scatter correction may produce regional quantification bias in the reconstr......Many authors have reported the importance of motion correction (MC) for PET. Patient motion during scanning disturbs kinetic analysis and degrades resolution. In addition, using misaligned transmission for attenuation and scatter correction may produce regional quantification bias...... (automated image registration) software. The following 3 QC methods were used to evaluate the EMT and AIR MC: a method using the ratio between 2 regions of interest with gray matter voxels (GM) and white matter voxels (WM), called GM/WM; mutual information; and cross correlation. Results: The results...... of the 3 QC methods were in agreement with one another and with a visual subjective inspection of the image data. Before MC, the QC method measures varied significantly in scans with major motion and displayed limited variations on scans with minor motion. The variation was significantly reduced...

  1. Perception of biological motion from limited-lifetime stimuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beintema, J.A.; Georg, K.; Lappe, M.

    2006-01-01

    The visual perception of human movement from sparse point-light walkers is often believed to rely on local motion analysis. We investigated the role of local motion in the perception of human walking, viewed from the side, in different tasks. The motion signal was manipulated by varying point lifeti

  2. Sensing Movement: Microsensors for Body Motion Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansong Zeng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of body posture and motion is an important physiological function that can keep the body in balance. Man-made motion sensors have also been widely applied for a broad array of biomedical applications including diagnosis of balance disorders and evaluation of energy expenditure. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art sensing components utilized for body motion measurement. The anatomy and working principles of a natural body motion sensor, the human vestibular system, are first described. Various man-made inertial sensors are then elaborated based on their distinctive sensing mechanisms. In particular, both the conventional solid-state motion sensors and the emerging non solid-state motion sensors are depicted. With their lower cost and increased intelligence, man-made motion sensors are expected to play an increasingly important role in biomedical systems for basic research as well as clinical diagnostics.

  3. Silent myocardial ischemia evaluated by ambulatory left ventricular function monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imai, Kamon; Yumikura, Sei; Araki, Yasushi; Ando, Tatsuo; Saito, Satoshi; Ozawa, Yukio; Hatano, Michinobu; Kamata, Rikisaburo (Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1989-12-01

    To determine whether left ventricular function is less disturbed in asymptomatic ischemia than in symptomatic ischemia, exercise-induced left ventricular function was measured in beat-to-beat using an ambulatory left ventricular function monitoring system. The study subjects were 22 patients with coronary artery disease. Supine and sitting ergometer exercise tests were performed. Of 44 exercise tests, 33 showed significant ST depression on electro-cardiograms. Among these 33, 17 were asymptomatic: 16, symptomatic. The left ventricular functions during exercise of these 33 were analyzed and compared with those of five normal controls. The changes in end-diastolic volume were not so significant either in controls or in the asymptomatic and symptomatic groups, but the changes in end-systolic volume were reversed in the diseased group, particularly in the symptomatic group. The changes in ejection fraction (EF), therefore, were significantly negative in the diseased group, particularly in the symptomatic group. The correlation between exercise-induced left ventricular dysfunction and symptoms was evaluated among the 33 patients. Symptoms were present in 35% (6/17) in <10% decrease in EF, 44% (4/9) in 10{approx}15% decrease, and 85% (6/7)in {ge}15% decrease, respectively. Thus, asymptomatic ischemia represents a lesser degree of myocardial ischemia as indicated by mild left ventricular dysfunction, compared with symptomatic ischemia. However, some cases of severe myocardial ischemia did not develop symptoms. We concluded that silent myocardial ischemia is responsible for a lesser degree of myocardial ischemia and decreased pain perception. (author).

  4. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in solid organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh Prasad, G V

    2012-01-01

    Solid organ transplant recipients are at an increased risk for hypertension and cardiovascular disease. To assist in their management, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) has become increasingly used in both clinical research settings and practice. ABPM has been used to better define post-transplant hypertension incidence and prevalence in different solid organ transplantation populations. ABPM provides additional information on cardiovascular risk beyond that obtained by clinic-based readings, based on its ability to assess 24-h blood pressure (BP) load, detect nocturnal non-dipping, and predict target organ damage. It has provided some assurance about the safety of living kidney donation. Information from ABPM can be used to guide living kidney donor selection, and because ABPM-related data has been correlated with clinically important kidney and heart transplant recipient outcomes, it may be a valuable adjunct in their management. Despite these advantages, barriers to wider use of ABPM include expense, clinical inertia in hypertension management, lack of prospective clinical trial data, and clinical problems that compete with hypertension for attention such as acute or chronic allograft dysfunction. The increasing amount of research and clinical use for ABPM may allow for closer assessment and intervention to help address the increased cardiovascular risk faced by many solid organ transplant recipients. PMID:22220828

  5. CT features of peritonitis associated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ji Young; Byun, Jae Young; Lee, Sang Hoon; Kwon, Tae Ahn; Kim, Yeon Kil; Kim, Young Ok; Song, Kyung Sup [The Catholic Univ. of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the CT findings of peritonitis associated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis(CAPD). We retrospectively analyzed CT scans of 14 symptomatic patients with peritonitis after CAPD. Diffuse abdominal pain was present in 11, fever in two, and abdominal mass with vomiting in one. The mean duration of CAPD ranged from 10 months to 5 years(mean : 3.9 years). On abdominal CT, we evaluated the presence and location of ascites, bowel wall thickening, cocoon formation, the pattern of enhancement of peritoneal thickening, the presence of calcifications in the peritoneum, and mesenteric and omental change. On enhanced CT, multiloculated ascites was observed in all cases(n=14) ; it was located mainly in the pelvic cavity with small multi-loculated fluid collections in the peritoneal cavity(n=13), including the lesser sac(n=3). In one patient, ascites was located in the space between the greater omentum and anterior peritoneal surface. CT showed ileus in 12 cases, small bowel wall thickening in 11, and cocoon formation in five. Uneven but smooth thickening of the peritoneum, with contrast enhancement, was seen in eight cases, and in five of these, peritoneal thickening was more prominent in the anterior peritoneum. Other findings included reticular opacity in two cases, hematoma of the rectus muscle in one, and umbilical hernia in one. Multiloculated fluid collection, ileus, small bowel wall thickening, uneven but smooth peritoneal thickening, and cocoon formation appear to be CT features of CAPD peritonitis.

  6. CT features of peritonitis associated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the CT findings of peritonitis associated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis(CAPD). We retrospectively analyzed CT scans of 14 symptomatic patients with peritonitis after CAPD. Diffuse abdominal pain was present in 11, fever in two, and abdominal mass with vomiting in one. The mean duration of CAPD ranged from 10 months to 5 years(mean : 3.9 years). On abdominal CT, we evaluated the presence and location of ascites, bowel wall thickening, cocoon formation, the pattern of enhancement of peritoneal thickening, the presence of calcifications in the peritoneum, and mesenteric and omental change. On enhanced CT, multiloculated ascites was observed in all cases(n=14) ; it was located mainly in the pelvic cavity with small multi-loculated fluid collections in the peritoneal cavity(n=13), including the lesser sac(n=3). In one patient, ascites was located in the space between the greater omentum and anterior peritoneal surface. CT showed ileus in 12 cases, small bowel wall thickening in 11, and cocoon formation in five. Uneven but smooth thickening of the peritoneum, with contrast enhancement, was seen in eight cases, and in five of these, peritoneal thickening was more prominent in the anterior peritoneum. Other findings included reticular opacity in two cases, hematoma of the rectus muscle in one, and umbilical hernia in one. Multiloculated fluid collection, ileus, small bowel wall thickening, uneven but smooth peritoneal thickening, and cocoon formation appear to be CT features of CAPD peritonitis

  7. Mobile Personal Health System for Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis J. Mena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ARVmobile v1.0 is a multiplatform mobile personal health monitor (PHM application for ambulatory blood pressure (ABP monitoring that has the potential to aid in the acquisition and analysis of detailed profile of ABP and heart rate (HR, improve the early detection and intervention of hypertension, and detect potential abnormal BP and HR levels for timely medical feedback. The PHM system consisted of ABP sensor to detect BP and HR signals and smartphone as receiver to collect the transmitted digital data and process them to provide immediate personalized information to the user. Android and Blackberry platforms were developed to detect and alert of potential abnormal values, offer friendly graphical user interface for elderly people, and provide feedback to professional healthcare providers via e-mail. ABP data were obtained from twenty-one healthy individuals (>51 years to test the utility of the PHM application. The ARVmobile v1.0 was able to reliably receive and process the ABP readings from the volunteers. The preliminary results demonstrate that the ARVmobile 1.0 application could be used to perform a detailed profile of ABP and HR in an ordinary daily life environment, bedsides of estimating potential diagnostic thresholds of abnormal BP variability measured as average real variability.

  8. Childhood astrovirus-associated diarrhea in the ambulatory setting in a Public Hospital in Cordoba city, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giordano Miguel O.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Human astroviruses have been increasingly identified as important agents of diarrheal disease in children. However, the disease burden of astrovirus infection is still incompletely assessed. This paper reports results on the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of astrovirus-associated diarrhea, as well as the impact of astrovirus infection on the ambulatory setting at a Public Hospital in Córdoba city, Argentina. From February 2001 through January 2002, 97 randomly selected outpatient visits for diarrhea among children 0.05. According to our estimation about one out of seventy-four children in this cohort would be assisted annually for an astroviral-diarrheal episode in the Public Hospital and one out of eight diarrheal cases could be attributed to astrovirus infection. Astrovirus is a common symptomatic infection in pediatric outpatient visits in the public hospital in the study area, contributing 12.37% of the overall morbidity from diarrhea.

  9. Adesão medicamentosa em idosos em seguimento ambulatorial Medicine adeshion in eldery people in an ambulatorial attendance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Aparecida Cintra

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo objetivou avaliar a adesão ao tratamento medicamentoso em idosos em seguimento ambulatorial e identificar os fatores relacionados a esta adesão. Foram entrevistados 165 idosos em seguimento ambulatorial no Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Unicamp, São Paulo. Utilizou-se instrumento próprio, com informações relativas à identificação dos sujeitos, dados de saúde autorreferidos e relativos à terapêutica medicamentosa. Os dados foram submetidos às análises descritiva e de comparação. A maioria dos idosos revelou adesão ao tratamento (88,5%, dentre os quais 91,1% moravam acompanhados. Os idosos que moravam sozinhos apresentaram três vezes mais chances de não aderência ao tratamento (OR: 3,655. Os efeitos colaterais dos medicamentos mostraram sete vezes mais chances de não aderência (OR: 7,092. Os fatores combinados que apresentaram maior chance de predizer a não adesão à terapêutica foram "mora sozinho" (OR: 4,346 e "efeitos colaterais" (OR: 8,219.The objectives of this study were to evaluate the elderly drug adhesion in an outpatient geriatric service linked to the State University Hospital of Campinas (São Paulo, Brazil as well as to identify the related events to this adhesion. One hundred sixty five elders were submitted to an interview. It was used an instrument to collect information about the patients' identification, besides the self-reported state of health and drug utilization. The data were evaluated through the descriptive and comparative analysis. They showed that most of the elderly (88.5% have confirmed the drug adhesion and among them 91.1% were living with company. The elderly who were living alone presented three-time more chance of non-adhesion to the drug therapy (OR: 3.655. Those that have referred drug side effects presented seven-time more chance of non-adhesion (OR: 7.092. The associated events which better predict the drug non-adhesion were: "living alone" (OR

  10. Do Army Helicopter Training Simulators Need Motion Bases?

    OpenAIRE

    McCauley, Michael E.

    2006-01-01

    United States Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences This report reviews the arguments and the evidence regarding the need for simulator motion bases in training helicopter pilots. It discusses flight simulators, perceptual fidelity, history of motion bases, disturbance versus maneuver motion, human motion sensation, and reviews the empirical evidence for the training effectiveness of motion bases. The section on training effectiveness reviews research f...

  11. 基于虚拟人设计与实现机器人舞蹈动作的一种方法%Design and Realization Method of Robot Dance Motion Based On Virtual Human

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭瑾; 高伟; 刘德山; 徐本强

    2012-01-01

    基于三维虚拟人的骨骼模型仿真实现了机器人的舞蹈动作.分析了机器人舞蹈动作运动的基本规律和实现动作的基本方法,基于此建立了三维虚拟人实现机器人舞蹈动作的关键帧数据库,在此基础上利用中间帧的过渡函数实现了虚拟人骨骼模型仿真机器人舞蹈动作的方法.实验中利用NOBODY机器人舞蹈视频实现了三维虚拟人骨骼模型的仿机器人的舞蹈动画,结果证明了方法的正确性和可行性,对于机器人的三维虚拟化和仿真研究具有重要意义.%This paper introduces realization of robot dance motion based on the simulation of 3D virtual human bone model. First,the basic regular pattern and basic realization method of robot dance motion are analyzed,and then build key frame database of robot dance motion implemented by 3D virtual human. Based on this,the transition function of middle frame is adopted to realize the simulation of robot dance motion by virtual bone model. In the experiment,NOBODY robot dance video is used to realize robot dance animation simulated by 3D virtual human bone model. The result of experiment shows that this method is correct and feasible,and it has important sense to 3D virtualization and simulation research.

  12. Control and Experiment for Exoskeleton Robot Based on Kalman Prediction of Human Motion Intent%基于人体运动意图卡尔曼预测的外骨骼机器人控制及实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙亿; 杜志江; 王伟东

    2015-01-01

    To accurately acquire human motion intent for exoskeleton control, torque sensors are used to measure human-robot interaction information. Based on the single pendulum model of human swing leg, the motion trajectory of lower limb joints is obtained, which is predicted with Kalman filter to compensate the delay of motion intent. The PD (proportional-derivative) control law is used to control exoskeleton to track the joint trajectory of human swing leg, and real-time position of the exoskeleton joint is fed back by the encoder, which forms a closed-loop position control. Experiments on the exoskeleton swing leg are conducted and the results show that motion intent of human swing leg can be predicted with the measured human-robot interaction information using Kalman filter, and the exoskeleton robot can achieve the joint trajectory tracking of human swing leg. Therefore, the proposed method is effective.%为在外骨骼控制中准确获取人体运动意图,本文使用力矩传感器测量人机交互信息。基于人体下肢摆动腿的单摆模型获得摆动腿关节的运动轨迹,并使用卡尔曼滤波进行预测,从而弥补意图延时。使用PD(比例-微分)控制律控制外骨骼跟踪人体摆动腿的关节轨迹,编码器反馈外骨骼关节的实时位置,形成位置闭环控制。进行外骨骼摆动腿实验,结果表明,测得的人机交互信息经过卡尔曼滤波后,可以预测人体摆动腿的运动意图,外骨骼机器人能够实现对人体摆动腿关节轨迹的跟随,所提方法可行。

  13. Slow motion increases perceived intent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Eugene M; Burns, Zachary C; Converse, Benjamin A

    2016-08-16

    To determine the appropriate punishment for a harmful action, people must often make inferences about the transgressor's intent. In courtrooms and popular media, such inferences increasingly rely on video evidence, which is often played in "slow motion." Four experiments (n = 1,610) involving real surveillance footage from a murder or broadcast replays of violent contact in professional football demonstrate that viewing an action in slow motion, compared with regular speed, can cause viewers to perceive an action as more intentional. This slow motion intentionality bias occurred, in part, because slow motion video caused participants to feel like the actor had more time to act, even when they knew how much clock time had actually elapsed. Four additional experiments (n = 2,737) reveal that allowing viewers to see both regular speed and slow motion replay mitigates the bias, but does not eliminate it. We conclude that an empirical understanding of the effect of slow motion on mental state attribution should inform the life-or-death decisions that are currently based on tacit assumptions about the objectivity of human perception. PMID:27482091

  14. A motion retargeting algorithm based on model simplification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    A new motion retargeting algorithm is presented, which adapts the motion capture data to a new character. To make the resulting motion realistic, the physically-based optimization method is adopted. However, the optimization process is difficult to converge to the optimal value because of high complexity of the physical human model. In order to address this problem, an appropriate simplified model automatically determined by a motion analysis technique is utilized, and then motion retargeting with this simplified model as an intermediate agent is implemented. The entire motion retargeting algorithm involves three steps of nonlinearly constrained optimization: forward retargeting, motion scaling and inverse retargeting. Experimental results show the validity of this algorithm.

  15. Motion in radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine Sofia

    2012-01-01

    This review considers the management of motion in photon radiation therapy. An overview is given of magnitudes and variability of motion of various structures and organs, and how the motion affects images by producing artifacts and blurring. Imaging of motion is described, including 4DCT and 4DPET...

  16. Infrared Motion Sensing for Human-Following with Mobile Robots%实现机器人随动的红外感知方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯国栋; 刘敏; 王国利

    2012-01-01

    Considering the requirements for target localization of human-following robots, a hierarchical infrared motion sensing paradigm and its physical implementation using pyroelectric infrared (PIR) sensors are presented. From the perspec-tive of sensing model, the proposed sensing paradigm is structured in two tiers. The bottom tier is the geometric sensing tier, and it is composed of geometric sensing units, which offer multi-view bearing measurements of a moving target within the field of view (FOV) of a robot. The upper tier is the cooperative sensing tier, and it coordinates the geometric sensing units at the bottom tier to localize the moving target. From the perspective of physical implementation, at the bottom tier, the geometric sensing units for measuring the bearing information of the moving target are constructed by combining PIR sensors and Fresnel lens arrays. At the upper tier, the least square optimization is used to fuse the multi-view bearing measurements to obtain the position information of the moving target. The experimental results are given to validate the proposed sensing method in the context of human-following with mobile robots. Compared with the multi-view optical vision techniques, the proposed method has irreplaceable advantages of high sensing efficiency, robustness to illumination and background changes, low-cost and low energy consumption.%结合机器人随动任务对人体运动定位的需求,提出一种分层递阶结构的红外运动感知模式,及基于热释电红外传感器的物理实现方法.在传感模型方面,采用两层递阶结构的感知模式:底层为由多个几何传感单元构成的几何传感层,在机器人视野内实现多视角运动目标的方位测量;上层为协作感知层,用来组织底层各几何传感单元的协作,实现运动目标的定位测量.在物理实现方面,底层组合热释电红外传感阵列与菲涅尔透镜组,构建运动目标方位角测量所需的几何传感单

  17. Ambulatory oral surgery: 1-year experience with 11 680 patients from Zagreb district, Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokić, Dražen; Macan, Darko; Perić, Berislav; Tadić, Marinka; Biočić, Josip; Đanić, Petar; Brajdić, Davor

    2013-01-01

    Aim To examine the types and frequencies of oral surgery diagnoses and ambulatory oral surgical treatments during one year period at the Department of Oral Surgery, University Hospital Dubrava in Zagreb, Croatia. Methods Sociodemographic and clinical data on 11 680 ambulatory patients, treated between January 1 and of December 31, 2011 were retrieved from the hospital database using a specific protocol. The obtained data were subsequently analyzed in order to assess the frequency of diagnoses and differences in sex and age. Results The most common ambulatory procedure was tooth extraction (37.67%) and the most common procedure in ambulatory operating room was alveolectomy (57.25%). The test of proportions showed that significantly more extractions (P apicoectomies were performed among female patients (P < 0.001). A greater prevalence of periodontal disease was found in patients residing in Zagreb than in patients residing in rural areas. Conclusion The data from this study may be useful for planning of ambulatory oral surgery services, budgeting, and sustaining quality improvement, enhancing oral surgical curricula, training and education of primary health care doctors and oral surgery specialists, and promoting patients’ awareness of the importance of oral health. PMID:23444246

  18. Ambulatory assessed implicit affect is associated with salivary cortisol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joram eMossink

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the presumed pathways linking negative emotions to adverse somatic health is an overactive HPA-axis, usually indicated by elevated cortisol levels. Traditionally, research has focused on consciously reported negative emotions. Yet, given that the majority of information processing occurs without conscious awareness, stress physiology might also be influenced by affective processes that people are not aware of. In a 24-hour ambulatory study we examined whether cortisol levels were associated with two implicit measures. Implicit affect was assessed using the Implicit Positive and Negative Affect Test, and implicit negative memory bias was assessed with the word fragment completion tasks. In 55 healthy participants, we measured subjective stress levels, worries, implicit and explicit affect each hour during waking hours. Also, saliva samples were collected at three fixed times during the day, as well as upon waking and 30 minutes thereafter (cortisol awakening response. Multilevel analyses of the daytime cortisol levels revealed that the presence of an implicit negative memory bias was associated with increased cortisol levels. Additionally, implicit PA and, unexpectedly, implicit NA were negatively associated with cortisol levels. Finally, participants demonstrating higher levels of implicit sadness during the first measurement day, had a stronger cortisol rise upon awakening at the next day. Contrary to previous research, no associations between explicit affect and cortisol were apparent. The current study was the first to examine the concurrent relation between implicit measures and stress physiology in daily life. The results suggest that the traditional focus on consciously reported feelings and emotions is limited, and that implicit measures can add to our understanding of how stress and emotions contribute to daily physiological activity and, in the long term, health problems.

  19. Ambulatory assessed implicit affect is associated with salivary cortisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossink, Joram C L; Verkuil, Bart; Burger, Andreas M; Tollenaar, Marieke S; Brosschot, Jos F

    2015-01-01

    One of the presumed pathways linking negative emotions to adverse somatic health is an overactive HPA-axis, usually indicated by elevated cortisol levels. Traditionally, research has focused on consciously reported negative emotions. Yet, given that the majority of information processing occurs without conscious awareness, stress physiology might also be influenced by affective processes that people are not aware of. In a 24-h ambulatory study we examined whether cortisol levels were associated with two implicit measures. Implicit affect was assessed using the Implicit Positive and Negative Affect Test, and implicit negative memory bias was assessed with the word fragment completion tasks. In 55 healthy participants, we measured subjective stress levels, worries, implicit, and explicit affect each hour during waking hours. Also, saliva samples were collected at three fixed times during the day, as well as upon waking and 30 min thereafter (cortisol awakening response). Multilevel analyses of the daytime cortisol levels revealed that the presence of an implicit negative memory bias was associated with increased cortisol levels. Additionally, implicit PA and, unexpectedly, implicit NA were negatively associated with cortisol levels. Finally, participants demonstrating higher levels of implicit sadness during the first measurement day, had a stronger cortisol rise upon awakening at the next day. Contrary to previous research, no associations between explicit affect and cortisol were apparent. The current study was the first to examine the concurrent relation between implicit measures and stress physiology in daily life. The results suggest that the traditional focus on consciously reported feelings and emotions is limited, and that implicit measures can add to our understanding of how stress and emotions contribute to daily physiological activity and, in the long term, health problems. PMID:25713550

  20. Canonical active Brownian motion

    OpenAIRE

    Gluck, Alexander; Huffel, Helmuth; Ilijic, Sasa

    2008-01-01

    Active Brownian motion is the complex motion of active Brownian particles. They are active in the sense that they can transform their internal energy into energy of motion and thus create complex motion patterns. Theories of active Brownian motion so far imposed couplings between the internal energy and the kinetic energy of the system. We investigate how this idea can be naturally taken further to include also couplings to the potential energy, which finally leads to a general theory of cano...

  1. Biological Motion Perception in Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Cusack

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Typically developing adults can readily recognize human actions, even when conveyed to them via point-like markers placed on the body of the actor (Johansson, 1973. Previous research has suggested that children affected by autism spectrum disorder (ASD are not equally sensitive to this type of visual information (Blake et al, 2003, but it remains unknown why ASD would impact the ability to perceive biological motion. We present evidence which looks at how adolescents and adults with autism are affected by specific factors which are important in biological motion perception, such as (eg, inter-agent synchronicity, upright/inverted, etc.

  2. 基于中心距离特征的人体运动序列关键帧提取%Key Frame Extraction Using Central Distance Feature for Human Motion Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭淑娟

    2012-01-01

    运动捕获数据的关键帧是原始运动序列的简洁表示,对于运动压缩、运动检索和运动分割起着重要的作用。提出了一种基于中心距离特征的人体运动捕获数据关键帧提取方法,通过提取四肢到中心点ROOT的距离,得到一组中心距离特征,将特征分为上肢和下肢来分别表示,并提取上下肢的距离模,得到二维的特征向量模;然后采用主成分分析得到一维特征,并提取其局部极值点作为初始关键帧;最后通过对初始关键帧的重新筛选与插入得到最终关键帧序列。实验结果表明,该方法提取的关键帧序列在视觉上能够很好的概括原始运动序列的内容,且具有高压缩率。%The key frames of the motion capture data are the concise description for the original motion sequence,which play an important role for the motion compression,motion retrieval and motion segmentation.A key frame extraction method based on the central distance features for the human motion capture data was proposed.The approach was divided into three main stages.In the first stage,a set of central distance features from the center joint ROOT to limbs was selected,and those features were divided into the upper and lower limbs norms.In the second stage,PCA method was used to get the one dimension principal component,which was used to extract the local optimum as the initial key frames.In the last stage,the initial key frames were filtered and inserted to get the final key frames.Experimental results show that the proposed method can get the needed key frames,which can have good visual generalization of the original motion sequence,and also be of high compression ratio as well.

  3. Animal models in motion sickness research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunton, Nancy G.

    1990-01-01

    Practical information on candidate animal models for motion sickness research and on methods used to elicit and detect motion sickness in these models is provided. Four good potential models for use in motion sickness experiments include the dog, cat, squirrel monkey, and rat. It is concluded that the appropriate use of the animal models, combined with exploitation of state-of-the-art biomedical techniques, should generate a great step forward in the understanding of motion sickness mechanisms and in the development of efficient and effective approaches to its prevention and treatment in humans.

  4. Exploring the link between ambulatory care and avoidable hospitalizations at the Veteran Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pracht, Etienne E; Bass, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the link between utilization of ambulatory care and the likelihood of rehospitalization for an avoidable reason in veterans served by the Veteran Health Administration (VA). The analysis used administrative data containing healthcare utilization and patient characteristics stored at the national VA data warehouse, the Corporate Franchise Data Center. The study sample consisted of 284 veterans residing in Florida who had been hospitalized at least once for an avoidable reason. A bivariate probit model with instrumental variables was used to estimate the probability of rehospitalization. Veterans who had at least 1 ambulatory care visit per month experienced a significant reduction in the probability of rehospitalization for the same avoidable hospitalization condition. The findings suggest that ambulatory care can serve as an important substitute for more expensive hospitalization for the conditions characterized as avoidable.

  5. Ambulatory electroencephalogram in children: A prospective clinical audit of 100 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahin Hussain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ambulatory electroencephalogram has been used for differentiating epileptic from nonepileptic events, recording seizure frequency and classification of seizure type. We studied 100 consecutive children prospectively aged 11 days to 16 years that were referred for an ambulatory electroencephalogram to a regional children′s hospital. Ambulatory electroencephalogram was clinically useful in contributing to a clinical diagnosis in 71% of children who were referred with a range of clinical questions. A diagnosis of epileptic disorder was confirmed by obtaining an ictal record in 26% and this included 11 children that had previously normal awake and or sleep electroencephalogram. We recommend making a telephone check of the current target event frequency and prioritising those with typical events on most days in order to improve the frequency of recording a typical attack.

  6. Self-Selected Walking Speed is Predictive of Daily Ambulatory Activity in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Addie; Fulk, George D; Beets, Michael W; Herter, Troy M; Fritz, Stacy L

    2016-04-01

    Daily ambulatory activity is associated with health and functional status in older adults; however, assessment requires multiple days of activity monitoring. The objective of this study was to determine the relative capabilities of self-selected walking speed (SSWS), maximal walking speed (MWS), and walking speed reserve (WSR) to provide insight into daily ambulatory activity (steps per day) in community-dwelling older adults. Sixty-seven older adults completed testing and activity monitoring (age 80.39 [6.73] years). SSWS (R2 = .51), MWS (R2 = .35), and WSR calculated as a ratio (R2 = .06) were significant predictors of daily ambulatory activity in unadjusted linear regression. Cutpoints for participants achieving 26371593

  7. Blood pressure variability in relation to outcome in the International Database of Ambulatory blood pressure in relation to Cardiovascular Outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Thijs, Lutgarde; Richart, Tom;

    2010-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring provides information not only on the BP level but also on the diurnal changes in BP. In the present review, we summarized the main findings of the International Database on Ambulatory BP in relation to Cardiovascular Outcome (IDACO) with regard to risk...

  8. 45 CFR 170.304 - Specific certification criteria for Complete EHRs or EHR Modules designed for an ambulatory setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... or EHR Modules designed for an ambulatory setting. 170.304 Section 170.304 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT... for Complete EHRs or EHR Modules designed for an ambulatory setting. The Secretary adopts the following certification criteria for Complete EHRs or EHR Modules designed to be used in an...

  9. Knee Muscle Strength at Varying Angular Velocities and Associations with Gross Motor Function in Ambulatory Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei-Hsien; Chen, Hseih-Ching; Shen, I-Hsuan; Chen, Chung-Yao; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chung, Chia-Ying

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships of muscle strength at different angular velocities and gross motor functions in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy (CP). This study included 33 ambulatory children with spastic CP aged 6-15 years and 15 children with normal development. Children with CP were categorized into level I (n =…

  10. The Role of Ambulatory Care Pharmacists in an HIV Multidisciplinary Team within a Free and Bilingual Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann M. Fugit, Pharm.D., BCPS

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Describe the role and integration of ambulatory care pharmacists in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV clinic within a free and bilingual clinic with regards to types of interventions made during the patient-pharmacist visit. Design: Retrospective, single-centered, chart review. Setting: Free, bilingual clinic in Richmond, VA. Participants: Thirty-two adult patients with diagnosed HIV receiving care in the clinic between June 30, 2010 and January 26, 2011. Main Outcome Measure: Types of interventions documented during the patient-pharmacist visit, categorized as medication review, patient education, or adherence monitoring. Results: Total of 32 patients accounted for 55 patient-pharmacist visits and 296 interventions. The most common interventions were medication review (66.9%, patient education (23.3%, and adherence monitoring (9.8%. Post-hoc analysis suggests Hispanic patients are more likely to be diagnosed with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS (P = 0.01, have current or history of opportunistic infection (OI (P=0.01, and have current or history of OI prophylaxis (P = 0.03. Adherence monitoring was less common amongst the non-Hispanics (7.1% compared to the Hispanic sub-population (16.5%, (P = 0.04. Conclusion: The role of ambulatory care pharmacists in a free and bilingual clinic goes beyond adherence monitoring. Pharmacists can be a valuable part of the patient care team by providing medication review and patient education for HIV and other co-morbidities within free clinics. Further research is warranted to assess outcomes and to further explore the underlying barriers to early HIV diagnosis and adherence within the Hispanic population.

  11. A review on epilepsy in the horse and the potential of Ambulatory EEG as a diagnostic tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ree, Marleen; Wijnberg, Inge

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy in the horse is diagnosed based on clinical signs, but diagnosing can be difficult if a grand mal is not present. The future prospects of the horse and potentially the safety of the owner depend on an accurate diagnosis. This review presents information on epilepsy and focuses on the diagnostic potential of (Ambulatory) electroencephalography ((A) EEG). An epileptic seizure is a brain disorder, which expresses itself as a recurrent episode of involuntary abnormal behaviour. The aetiology can originate from inside or outside the brain or is idiopathic. Besides those categories, seizures can be classified as generalised or partial. A typical generalised tonic-clonic seizure is characterised by the prodrome, the ictus and the post-ictal phase. EEG is the graphic recording of rhythmic bioelectric activity which originates predominantly from the cerebral cortex. In human medicine, the 10/20 international basis system for electrode placement is used. This makes comparison more reliable and consistent. The normal human brainwaves recorded are alpha, beta, theta and delta waves. In the horse, fewer descriptions of normal signals are available. In humans suffering from epilepsy, spikes, complexes, spike-and-wave discharges and rhythmical multi-spike activity are seen. In horses suffering from epilepsy, spikes, sharp waves and spike-and-wave discharges are seen. In humans, AEEG has numerous advantages above short-duration EEG in diagnosing epilepsy or intracranial pathology. In future, AEEG might be useful to record brain signals in awake horses expressing their behaviour under natural circumstances.

  12. Evaluation of Faculty Members’ and Students’ Attitude Towards Ambulatory Teaching Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghafari, M.D.

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Ambulatory medicine is one of the most important parts of medical education. Due to its profound relation with professional future of physicians, ambulatory medicine is especially under attention and many studies have been performed to survey its quality and to design some ways to promote it. There is obvious deficiency in our evidence about ambulatory medicine. The aim of this study was to survey the quality of teaching of the ambulatory medicine from the viewpoint of the faculty members and students of medical faculty of Mazandaran.Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive and cross-sectional study. The study's population consisted of students, residents and clinical faculty members who were included by simple sampling. Data collection was performed by a questionnaire with 22 questions about demographic and educational variables as well as respondents’ opinions about environmental conditions, independent activities, instructors’ supervision, and social training in the ambulatory clinics. The validity of the questionnaire was controlled by content validity with expertise consultation, and its reliability was controlled by test-retest(r=0.85. Data were analyzed using spss13 software.Results: Response rate was 79%, the mean age of 36 faculties was 43.6+- 8.7 years and 32% of them were female. The mean age of 146 students was 25+-3.6 years and 61% were female. The attitude of the majority of the students (88.3% towards the quality of ambulatory teaching was negative, but majority of faculties (66.7% had positive attitudes. There was no significant difference among teaching departments. Attitude of junior trainees was even worse. Attitude of faculty members and students was similar towards inappropriate physical environment of ambulatory clinics, but it was significantly different from independent activities of trainees in clinics (p=0.000; relational drugs prescription (p=0.000; management (p=0.004, and supervision

  13. Aluminum concentrations in serum, dialysate, urine and bone among patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joffe, P; Olsen, F; Heaf, J G;

    1989-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) concentration in serum, urine, and dialysate was estimated in 21 patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). In 12 of the patients bone Al concentration was measured as well. Mean serum Al level was 32.4 +/- 21.0 micrograms/l. The Al concentrations in the d......Aluminum (Al) concentration in serum, urine, and dialysate was estimated in 21 patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). In 12 of the patients bone Al concentration was measured as well. Mean serum Al level was 32.4 +/- 21.0 micrograms/l. The Al concentrations...

  14. The Anxiolytic Effect of Aromatherapy on Patients Awaiting Ambulatory Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hua Ni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine if aromatherapy could reduce preoperative anxiety in ambulatory surgery patients. A total of 109 preoperative patients were randomly assigned to experimental (bergamot essential oil and control (water vapor conditions and their responses to the State Trait Anxiety Inventory and vital signs were monitored. Patients were stratified by previous surgical experience, but that did not influence the results. All those exposed to bergamot essential oil aromatherapy showed a greater reduction in preoperative anxiety than those in the control groups. Aromatherapy may be a useful part of a holistic approach to reducing preoperative anxiety before ambulatory surgery.

  15. [Methodology of a cooperative study of response predictors in ambulatory depressive syndrome treated with nomifensine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spriet, A; Beiler, D; Dechorgnat, J; Chigot, C D; Rössner, M; Simon, P

    1978-06-28

    A multicentric therapeutic survey on ambulatory depressive patients has been designed so as to get data allowing response-prediction. The protocol included:--selection of non psychotic ambulatory depressive patients--one month's treatment with nomifensine--collection of data consisting mainly in a series of visual analogue scales, scored by a phisician and given in several random orders to avoid error of proximity. Data treatment indluded:--a step of checking and codification--the study of relations between global appraisal and characteristics of subjects--the study of initial profile of responders and non-responders, using discriminant analysis and correspondance factorial analysis. PMID:673807

  16. MOTIVATIONS OF RENAL PATIENT TO CHOOSE THE CONTINUUM AMBULATORIAL PERITONEAL DIALISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Josefina da Silva

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The renal disease imposes to its porter a new conception due. Nowadays, modern techniques, makepossible more freedom to the client, being one of them, continuum Dialise peritoneal ambulatorial. Our objective isto study the election by the method and the feelings related to this chose by the client. We conclude that thermethod, despite its advantages, is not the first option yet, the patient, in some cases are not well trained withintercorrences, but most of them are satisfied with the chose. The nursing still participates just a bit of this processbut it has important role in the ambulatorial and domiciliar attendance of this client, needing more specificformation.

  17. Processing Motion Signals in Complex Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verghese, Preeti

    2000-01-01

    Motion information is critical for human locomotion and scene segmentation. Currently we have excellent neurophysiological models that are able to predict human detection and discrimination of local signals. Local motion signals are insufficient by themselves to guide human locomotion and to provide information about depth, object boundaries and surface structure. My research is aimed at understanding the mechanisms underlying the combination of motion signals across space and time. A target moving on an extended trajectory amidst noise dots in Brownian motion is much more detectable than the sum of signals generated by independent motion energy units responding to the trajectory segments. This result suggests that facilitation occurs between motion units tuned to similar directions, lying along the trajectory path. We investigated whether the interaction between local motion units along the motion direction is mediated by contrast. One possibility is that contrast-driven signals from motion units early in the trajectory sequence are added to signals in subsequent units. If this were the case, then units later in the sequence would have a larger signal than those earlier in the sequence. To test this possibility, we compared contrast discrimination thresholds for the first and third patches of a triplet of sequentially presented Gabor patches, aligned along the motion direction. According to this simple additive model, contrast increment thresholds for the third patch should be higher than thresholds for the first patch.The lack of a measurable effect on contrast thresholds for these various manipulations suggests that the pooling of signals along a trajectory is not mediated by contrast-driven signals. Instead, these results are consistent with models that propose that the facilitation of trajectory signals is achieved by a second-level network that chooses the strongest local motion signals and combines them if they occur in a spatio-temporal sequence consistent

  18. Motion control for virtual human based on IK by two phases and key frames%基于两段式IK与关键帧的虚拟人运动控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈明志; 陈健; 许春耀

    2012-01-01

    To improve the efficiency of the motion control and displaying effect of virtual human in virtual network environment, a motion control method combining the key frames method and the inverse kinematics (IK) is presented. For the inverse kinematics, the cyclic-coordinate descent (CCD) algorithm is adjusted to calculate IK by two phases, which the backtracking path is shorten to reduce the computational complexity. For the key frames method, those middle frames which are generated the interpolation of quaternion, would be inserted into the key frames to increase the reality sense of virtual human movement. The rotation angles of joints which are solved by IK not only approach postures, but also make joints more resilient. In addition, the motion feature parameters are introduced to make the action model of virtual human more diversified.%为提高网络虚拟环境中虚拟人运动控制的效率与显示效果,提出逆运动学和关键帧法相结合的虚拟人运动控制方法.在逆运动学中设计改进的CCD算法实现分阶段IK计算,因回溯路径的缩短,减少了计算量;在关键帧中插入由四元数插值法生成的中间帧,提高虚拟人运动的真实感;通过IK求解的关节旋转角不仅实现对姿态的逼近,还使关节更具有弹性;引入运动特征参量,可增强虚拟人动作模式的多样性.

  19. Bacteriemia por Chryseobacterium indologenes em diabético em hemodiálise ambulatorial Bacteremia by Chryseobacterium indologenes in a diabetic patient undergoing ambulatory hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Machado Ramos Souza de Souza

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Chryseobacterium indologenes é uma bactéria de baixa virulência, encontrada no meio ambiente, raramente associada às infecções não hospitalares. A maioria das infecções causadas por ela associa-se ao uso de dispositivos invasivos durante a permanência em hospital. O presente relato trata de paciente renal crônico, diabético, apresentando episódios de bacteriemia durante sessões de hemodiálise ambulatorial por meio de cateter permcath.Chryseobacterium indologenes is a low-virulent bacterium found in the environment, which is rarely associated with non-nosocomial infections. Most infections caused by this pathogen are associated with the use of invasive devices in hospitalized patients. This study reports the case of a diabetic patient with chronic renal disease presenting episodes of bacteremia undergoing ambulatory hemodialysis with permcath catheter.

  20. SinoCor: motion correction in SPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Debasis; Eiland, Daniel; Abdallah, Mahmoud; Bouthcko, Rostyslav; Gullberg, Grant T.; Schechtmann, Norberto

    2012-02-01

    Motion is a serious artifact in Cardiac nuclear imaging because the scanning operation takes a long time. Since reconstruction algorithms assume consistent or stationary data the quality of resulting image is affected by motion, sometimes significantly. Even after adoption of the gold standard MoCo(R) algorithm from Cedars-Sinai by most vendors, heart motion remains a significant challenge. Also, any serious study in quantitative analysis necessitates correction for motion artifacts. It is generally recognized that human eye is a very sensitive tool for detecting motion. However, two reasons prevent such manual correction: (1) it is costly in terms of specialist's time, and (2) no such tool for manual correction is available currently. Previously, at SPIE-MIC'11, we presented a simple tool (SinoCor) that allows sinograms to be corrected manually or automatically. SinoCor performs correction of sinograms containing inter-frame patient or respiratory motions using rigid-body dynamics. The software is capable of detecting the patient motion and estimating the body-motion vector using scanning geometry parameters. SinoCor applies appropriate geometrical correction to all the frames subsequent to the frame when the movement has occurred in a manual or automated mode. For respiratory motion, it is capable of automatically smoothing small oscillatory (frame-wise local) movements. Lower order image moments are used to represent a frame and the required rigid body movement compensation is computed accordingly. Our current focus is on enhancement of SinoCor with the capability to automatically detect and compensate for intra-frame motion that causes motion blur on the respective frame. Intra-frame movements are expected in both patient and respiratory motions. For a controlled study we also have developed a motion simulator. A stable version of SinoCor is available under license from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  1. Temporal characteristics of neuronal sources for implied motion perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorteije, J.A.M.; Kenemans, J.L.; Jellema, T.; Lubbe, R.H.J. van der; Heer, F. de; Wezel, R.J.A. van

    2004-01-01

    Viewing photographs of objects in motion evokes higher fMRI activation in human MT+ than similar photographs without this implied motion. MT+ is traditionally considered to be involved in motion perception. Therefore, this finding suggests feedback from object-recognition areas to MT+. To investigat

  2. Compressible motion fields

    OpenAIRE

    Ottaviano, Giuseppe; Kohli, Pushmeet

    2013-01-01

    Traditional video compression methods obtain a compact representation for image frames by computing coarse motion fields defined on patches of pixels called blocks, in order to compensate for the motion in the scene across frames. This piecewise constant approximation makes the motion field efficiently encodable, but it introduces block artifacts in the warped image frame. In this paper, we address the problem of estimating dense motion fields that, while accurately predicting one frame from ...

  3. Objects in Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    One thing scientists study is how objects move. A famous scientist named Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727) spent a lot of time observing objects in motion and came up with three laws that describe how things move. This explanation only deals with the first of his three laws of motion. Newton's First Law of Motion says that moving objects will continue…

  4. Exit from Synchrony in Joint Improvised Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Assi; Noy, Lior; Hart, Yuval; Mayo, Avi; Alon, Uri

    2016-01-01

    Motion synchrony correlates with effective and well-rated human interaction. However, people do not remain locked in synchrony; Instead, they repeatedly enter and exit synchrony. In many important interactions, such as therapy, marriage and parent-infant communication, it is the ability to exit and then re-enter synchrony that is thought to build strong relationship. The phenomenon of entry into zero-phase synchrony is well-studied experimentally and in terms of mathematical modeling. In contrast, exit-from-synchrony is under-studied. Here, we focus on human motion coordination, and examine the exit-from-synchrony phenomenon using experimental data from the mirror game paradigm, in which people perform joint improvised motion, and from human tracking of computer-generated stimuli. We present a mathematical mechanism that captures aspects of exit-from-synchrony in human motion. The mechanism adds a random motion component when the accumulated velocity error between the players is small. We introduce this mechanism to several models for human coordinated motion, including the widely studied HKB model, and the predictor-corrector model of Noy, Dekel and Alon. In all models, the new mechanism produces realistic simulated behavior when compared to experimental data from the mirror game and from tracking of computer generated stimuli, including repeated entry and exit from zero-phase synchrony that generates a complexity of motion similar to that of human players. We hope that these results can inform future research on exit-from-synchrony, to better understand the dynamics of coordinated action of people and to enhance human-computer and human-robot interaction. PMID:27711185

  5. Higher monetary incentives led to a lowered response rate in ambulatory patients: a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetsenruijter, J.; Lieshout, J. van; Wensing, M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Monetary incentives can increase response rate in patient surveys, but calibration of the optimal incentive level is required. Our aim was to assess the effect of different monetary incentives on response rates to calibrate the optimal monetary incentive for ambulatory patients. STUDY DE

  6. 75 FR 14606 - Medicare Program; Request for Nominations to the Advisory Panel on Ambulatory Payment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ...; Center for Medicare Management, Hospital & Ambulatory Policy Group, Division of Outpatient Care; 7500... components of the Medicare hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS). The Charter requires that... consist of a chair and up to 15 members who are full- time employees of hospitals, hospital systems,...

  7. Auricular Acupuncture for Pain Relief after Ambulatory Knee Arthroscopy—A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taras I. Usichenko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Auricular acupuncture (AA is effective in treating various pain conditions, but there have been no analyses of AA for the treatment of pain after ambulatory knee surgery. We assessed the range of analgesic requirements under AA after ambulatory knee arthroscopy. Twenty patients randomly received a true AA procedure (Lung, Shenmen and Knee points or sham procedure (three non-acupuncture points on the auricular helix before ambulatory knee arthroscopy. Permanent press AA needles were retained in situ for one day after surgery. Post-operative pain was treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory ibuprofen, and weak oral opioid tramadol was used for rescue analgesic medication. The quantity of post-operative analgesics and pain intensity were used to assess the effect of AA. The incidence of analgesia-related side effects, time to discharge from the anesthesia recovery room, heart rate and blood pressure were also recorded. Ibuprofen consumption after surgery in the AA group was lower than in the control group: median 500 versus 800 mg, P = 0.043. Pain intensity on a 100 mm visual analogue scale for pain measurement and other parameters were similar in both groups. Thus AA might be useful in reducing the post-operative analgesic requirement after ambulatory knee arthroscopy.

  8. Ambulatory esophageal manometry/pH-metry discriminates between patients with different esophageal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, W G; Beck, I T; Wang, H

    1996-02-01

    Ambulatory esophageal manometry/pH-metry has been used primarily in patients with chest pain of presumed esophageal origin, and it is unclear whether the discriminating power of this test applies to other esophageal symptoms. In the present study, prolonged ambulatory manometry/pH recordings were compared in 17 healthy controls, 12 patients with atypical chest pain, and 11 patients with chest pain and nonstructural dysphagia using the Synectics microdigitrapper system. Chest pain patients tended to have higher values for all the pH variables, but their esophageal motility parameters were no different than controls. On the other hand, the chest pain plus dysphagia group was characterized by a significantly lower proportion of propagated contractions between 10 and 5 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter. This group also tended to have a higher frequency of high-amplitude or prolonged-duration contractions. In comparison to the results of standard stationary esophageal manometry, the prolonged ambulatory recordings were more sensitive in detecting esophageal motor dysfunction in the two patient groups. This study suggests that quantitative analysis of ambulatory pH/motility recordings is a sensitive method of evaluating patients with suspected esophageal dysfunction. PMID:8601383

  9. Limits to Ambulatory Displacement of Coconut Mites in Absence and Presence of Food-Related Cues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W.S. Melo; D.B. Lima; M.W. Sabelis; A. Pallini; M.G.C. Gondim Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Ambulatory movement of plant-feeding mites sets limits to the distances they can cover to reach a new food source. In absence of food-related cues these limits are determined by survival, walking activity, walking path tortuosity and walking speed, whereas in presence of food the limits are also det

  10. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BLOOD-PRESSURE DURING HEMODIALYSIS AND AMBULATORY BLOOD-PRESSURE IN BETWEEN DIALYSES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HUISMAN, RM; DEBRUIN, C; KLONT, D; SMIT, AJ

    1995-01-01

    Background. Ambulatory blood pressure measurements in haemodialysis patients are relevant in view of the high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in chronic haemodialysis patients. Methods. Twelve normotensive patients were studied from the beginning of one dialysis until the end of the next (mea

  11. A 15-year longitudinal study on ambulatory blood pressure tracking from childhood to early adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Zhibin; Snieder, Harold; Harshfield, Gregory A.; Treiber, Frank A.; Wang, Xiaoling

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluates the tracking stability of office blood pressure (BP), ambulatory BP (ABP), BP variability (BPV) and nocturnal BP drops (dipping) from childhood to early adulthood, and their dependence on ethnicity, gender and family history (FH) of essential hypertension (EH). Generalized estim

  12. Blood pressure load does not add to ambulatory blood pressure level for cardiovascular risk stratification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yan; Thijs, Lutgarde; Boggia, José;

    2014-01-01

    Experts proposed blood pressure (BP) load derived from 24-hour ambulatory BP recordings as a more accurate predictor of outcome than level, in particular in normotensive people. We analyzed 8711 subjects (mean age, 54.8 years; 47.0% women) randomly recruited from 10 populations. We expressed BP...

  13. Treatment goals for ambulatory blood pressure and plasma lipids after stroke are often not reached

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Aase Worså; Kofoed, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    In Danish health care, secondary prevention after stroke is currently handled mainly by general practitioners using office blood pressure (OBP) assessment of hypertension. The aim of this study was to compare the OBP approach to 24-hour assessment by ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) monitoring....... Furthermore, we aimed to record the degree of adherence to recommended therapy goals for blood pressure and plasma lipids....

  14. Risk prediction models for mortality in ambulatory patients with heart failure: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Alba, Ana C; Agoritsas, Thomas; Jankowski, Milosz; Courvoisier, Delphine; Walter, Stephen D.; Guyatt, Gordon H; Ross, Heather J

    2013-01-01

    Optimal management of heart failure requires accurate assessment of prognosis. Many prognostic models are available. Our objective was to identify studies that evaluate the use of risk prediction models for mortality in ambulatory patients with heart failure and describe their performance and clinical applicability.

  15. High Prevalence of Obesity in Ambulatory Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, L.; Van de Ven, L.; Katsarou, V.; Rentziou, E.; Doran, M.; Jackson, P.; Reilly, J. J.; Wilson, D.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Obesity prevalence is unusually high among adults with intellectual disability (ID). There is limited and conflicting evidence on obesity prevalence among ambulatory children and adolescents with ID. The present study aimed to estimate obesity prevalence in this group and to compare with population prevalence. Methods: Survey of nine…

  16. The Effects of Choice Making on Toy Engagement in Nonambulatory and Partially Ambulatory Preschool Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liso, Danielle R.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of an experimenter-delivered choice-making procedure. Three nonambulatory and partially ambulatory preschoolers were given access to six teacher-nominated preferred toys in two conditions: child choice and interventionist choice. Using an alternating treatment design and a 10-second momentary time-sampling…

  17. Association between endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾玥

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis(CAPD)patients.Methods Ninety-four stable CAPD patients from a single center were enrolled in this cross-sectional study.Ultrasound evaluation was conducted on brachial artery to estimate endothelial-dependent

  18. Strategies for reducing potentially avoidable hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freund, T.; Campbell, S.M.; Geissler, S.; Kunz, C.U.; Mahler, C.; Peters-Klimm, F.; Szecsenyi, J.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACSCs) are seen as potentially avoidable with optimal primary care. Little is known, however, about how primary care physicians rate these hospitalizations and whether and how they could be avoided. This study explores the complex c

  19. Reliability of the EK scale, a functional test for non-ambulatory persons with Duchenne dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Birgit F.; Hyde, Sylvia A.; Attermann, Jørn;

    2002-01-01

    The EK {Egen Klassifikation} scale was developed to assess overall functional ability in the non-ambulatory stage of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The purpose of this study was to examine the reliability of the EK scale. Six subjects with DMD, selected as representative of the entire range...

  20. Ambulatory surgery center market share and rates of outpatient surgery in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbeck, Brent K; Hollingsworth, John M; Dunn, Rodney L; Zaojun Ye; Birkmeyer, John D

    2010-12-01

    Relative to outpatient surgery in hospital settings, ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) are more efficient and associated with a lower cost per case. However, these facilities may also spur higher overall procedure utilization and thus lead to greater overall health care costs. The authors used the State Ambulatory Surgery Database from the State of Florida to identify Medicare-aged patients undergoing 4 common ambulatory procedures in 2006, including knee arthroscopy, cystoscopy, cataract removal, and colonoscopy. Hospital service areas (HSAs) were characterized according to ASC market share, that is, the proportion of residents undergoing outpatient surgery in these facilities. The authors then examined relationships between ASC market share and rates of each procedure. Age-adjusted rates of ambulatory surgery ranged from 190.5 cases per 1000 to 320.8 cases per 1000 in HSAs with low and high ASC market shares, respectively (P < .01). For all 4 procedures, adjusted rates of procedures were significantly higher in HSAs with the highest ASC market share. The greatest difference, both in relative and absolute terms, was observed for patients undergoing cystoscopy. In areas of high ASC market share, the age-adjusted rate of cystoscopy was nearly 3-fold higher than in areas with low ASC market share (34.5 vs 11.9 per 1000 population; P < .01). The presence of an ASC is associated with higher utilization of common outpatient procedures in the elderly. Whether ASCs are meeting unmet clinical demand or spurring overutilization is not clear.