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Sample records for ambulatory care practitioners

  1. [Present and future ambulatory nursing care in Switzerland: what general practitioners should know].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber-Yaskevich, Olga; Reber, Alexandra; Gillabert, Cédric

    2011-09-28

    In response to the ambulatorization of medical care, the panel of ambulatory nursing medical care is operating important changes. Since 2011, "acute and transitional medical care" is being prescribed by hospital practitioners, implying a new definition of the nurse's profession. The consequence is more complex and more autonomous nursing care: an academic formation has been created for nurses (bachelor and master) and their assistants (healthcare and community assistants). The futur will probably be made of ambulatory case management by nurses (advanced nurse practictioner). General practictioners will not only collaborate with the nurses but also assign them with tasks handled until then by themselves, prescribing, among other things, domiciliary "long-term" medical care.

  2. National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) is designed to collect data on the utilization and provision of ambulatory care services in hospital...

  3. Communication in acute ambulatory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Marleah; Oetzel, John; Sklar, David P

    2014-12-01

    Effective communication has been linked to better health outcomes, higher patient satisfaction, and treatment adherence. Communication in ambulatory care contexts is even more crucial, as providers typically do not know patients' medical histories or have established relationships, conversations are time constrained, interruptions are frequent, and the seriousness of patients' medical conditions may create additional tension during interactions. Yet, health communication often unduly emphasizes information exchange-the transmission and receipt of messages leading to a mutual understanding of a patient's condition, needs, and treatments. This approach does not take into account the importance of rapport building and contextual issues, and may ultimately limit the amount of information exchanged.The authors share the perspective of communication scientists to enrich the current approach to medical communication in ambulatory health care contexts, broadening the under standing of medical communication beyond information exchange to a more holistic, multilayered viewpoint, which includes rapport and contextual issues. The authors propose a socio-ecological model for understanding communication in acute ambulatory care. This model recognizes the relationship of individuals to their environment and emphasizes the importance of individual and contextual factors that influence patient-provider interactions. Its key elements include message exchange and individual, organizational, societal, and cultural factors. Using this model, and following the authors' recommendations, providers and medical educators can treat communication as a holistic process shaped by multiple layers. This is a step toward being able to negotiate conflicting demands, resolve tensions, and create encounters that lead to positive health outcomes.

  4. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) is a national survey designed to meet the need for objective, reliable information about the provision and use of...

  5. Planning an ambulatory care joint venture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpster, L M

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses ambulatory care joint ventures by hospitals and selected members of their medical staffs and emphasizes the resolution of problems in the early planning stages. Failure to follow an orderly and thoughtful planning process not only risks valuable resources of the venture partners, but also jeopardizes the working relationship between the hospital and its medical staff.

  6. Ambulatory Care Skills: Do Residents Feel Prepared?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Bonds

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine resident comfort and skill in performing ambulatory care skills. Methods: Descriptive survey of common ambulatory care skills administered to internal medicine faculty and residents at one academic medical center. Respondents were asked to rate their ability to perform 12 physical exam skills and 6 procedures, and their comfort in performing 7 types of counseling, and obtaining 6 types of patient history (4 point Likert scale for each. Self-rated ability or comfort was compared by gender, status (year of residency, faculty, and future predicted frequency of use of the skill. Results: Residents reported high ability levels for physical exam skills common to both the ambulatory and hospital setting. Fewer felt able to perform musculoskeletal, neurologic or eye exams easily alone. Procedures generally received low ability ratings. Similarly, residents’ comfort in performing common outpatient counseling was also low. More residents reported feeling very comfortable in obtaining history from patients. We found little variation by gender, year of training, or predicted frequency of use. Conclusion: Self-reported ability and comfort for many common ambulatory care skills is low. Further evaluation of this finding in other training programs is warranted.

  7. Ambulatory Assessment of Depression in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-29

    Statement The auth~r hereby certifies that the use of any copyrighted material in the thesis manuscript entitled: "AMBULATORY ASSESSMENT OF DEPRESSION IN...Department Medical and Clinical Psychology Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences 11 iii Abstract Depression is common among individuals in...primary care. Despite the prevalence of depression in primary care, patients are usually not adequately treated for depression . Often the treatment

  8. Equine wellness care in ambulatory practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Claudia; True, Claudia

    2012-04-01

    Clients want dependable veterinary care and to understand how the services will benefit and meet their horse’s needs. Wellness visits provide ambulatory practitioners with great opportunities to strengthen the doctor-client-patient bond; effective communication with clients during wellness visits, where new literature or facts can be presented, can offer opportunities for demonstrating the value of having the veterinarian maintain a primary role in disease control. The criteria for selecting vaccines, interpreting FECs, and diagnosing dental pathology require the continued need for veterinary involvement. When providing wellness services, veterinarians should discuss those services, the reasons for them, as well as the possibility of adverse reactions. In so doing, the veterinarian is able to clearly distinguish himself or herself from a technician who is merely giving a "shot." Although some of these services can be performed by clients and lay professionals, the knowledge and training that veterinarians bring to these tasks add benefits to the horse beyond the services provided. For example, by targeting treatment and conveying the goals and limitations of FECs and deworming to clients, the speed at which anthelmintic resistance occurs will be diminished, and veterinarians will regain control over equine parasite management. Additional client education, such as demonstrating dental pathology to clients and how veterinary treatment benefits their horse, will not only improve the health of the horse further but also solidify the veterinarian’s role in preventative medicine. While all components of a wellness program were not detailed here, services such as nutritional consultation, blood work, and lameness evaluation should be offered based on the practice’s equine population. With the increasing population of geriatric horses, dentistry, nutrition, blood work, and lameness should be assessed annually or biannually. Each practice has its own set of criteria

  9. Redesigning ambulatory care business processes supporting clinical care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, C; Sinkewich, M; Short, J; Callas, E

    1997-04-01

    The first step in redesigning the health care delivery process for ambulatory care begins with the patient and the business processes that support the patient. Patient-related business processes include patient access, service documentation, billing, follow-up, collection, and payment. Access is the portal to the clinical delivery and care management process. Service documentation, charge capture, and payment and collection are supporting processes to care delivery. Realigned provider networks now demand realigned patient business services to provide their members/customers/patients with improved service delivery at less cost. Purchaser mandates for cost containment, health maintenance, and enhanced quality of care have created an environment where every aspect of the delivery system, especially ambulatory care, is being judged. Business processes supporting the outpatient are therefore being reexamined for better efficiency and customer satisfaction. Many health care systems have made major investments in their ambulatory care environment, but have pursued traditional supporting business practices--such as multiple access points, lack of integrated patient appointment scheduling and registration, and multiple patient bills. These are areas that are appropriate for redesign efforts--all with the customer's needs and convenience in mind. Similarly, setting unrealistic expectations, underestimating the effort required, and ignoring the human elements of a patient-focused business service redesign effort can sabotage the very sound reasons for executing such an endeavor. Pitfalls can be avoided if a structured methodology, coupled with a change management process, are employed. Deloitte & Touche Consulting Group has been involved in several major efforts, all with ambulatory care settings to assist with the redesign of their business practices to consider the patient as the driver, instead of the institution providing the care.

  10. [Hospitalisations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freund, T.; Heller, G.; Szecsenyi, J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: On the basis of the assumption that a significant proportion of hospitalisations for so-called ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs) are potentially avoidable by ambulatory care measures, hospitalisation rates for ACSCs are used internationally as population based indicators for a

  11. Predictors of antibiotic prescription in respiratory tract infections by ambulatory care practitioners Predictores de la prescripción de antibióticos en infecciones del tracto respiratorio por médicos de atención ambulatoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireya Aznar

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of antibiotics in viral respiratory infections (common cold, acute rhinosinusitis and acute bronchitis promotes the emergence and spread of resistant bacteria. Studies have found that antibiotics are prescribed for 50-70% of respiratory tract infections, despite the fact that most of them have a viral etiology. The objective of the study was to determine predictors of antibiotic use in acute respiratory infections. It was conducted as a cross-sectional study on physicians' practices for antibiotic use. The subjects were internists and otolaryngologists of adult patients in an ambulatory setting in Buenos Aires. The instrument was a questionnaire with 20 clinical vignettes that included relevant variables for making decisions regarding antibiotic use in acute respiratory infections. The vignettes were constructed with a fractional factorial design with nine clinical variables. The absolute and relative weight of each clinical variable that predicted antibiotic use were calculated for each individual practitioner using multiple linear regression. The predictors with the greatest absolute weight in the decision to prescribe antibiotics were nasal discharge and cough (24% and 21% of total weight. The correlation between predictors and individual physician answers was high (r² = 0.73. The mean probability and the rate of antibiotic prescription were both about 50%. Predictors of antibiotic use for acute respiratory infections among ambulatory physicians in this sample differ from internationally accepted guidelines. The likelihood of prescribing antibiotics for these illnesses is high. Wider implementation of management guidelines for acute respiratory infections could improve cost effective antibiotic use and decrease the development of antibiotic resistance.El uso excesivo de antibióticos promueve la aparición y diseminación de bacterias resistentes. Se ha encontrado una tasa de prescripción de antibióticos en infecciones

  12. The ten successful elements of an ambulatory care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, G

    1997-01-01

    Experts in healthcare predict that in the future, over 80% of all care will be provided either in the home or ambulatory care centers. How radiology facilities position themselves for this shifting market is critical to their long-term success, even though it appears there are endless opportunities for providing care in this atmosphere. The ten most critical elements that healthcare providers must address to ensure their preparedness are discussed. Location is critical, particularly since patients no longer want to travel to regional medical centers. The most aggressive providers are building local care centers to serve specific populations. Ambulatory care centers should project a high tech, high touch atmosphere. Patient comfort and the appeal of the overall environment must be considered. Centers need to focus on their customers' needs in multiple areas of care. A quick and easy registration process, providing dressing gowns in patient areas, clear billing functions--these are all important areas that centers should develop. Physicians practicing in the ambulatory care center are key to its overall success and can set the tone for all staff members. Staff members must be friendly and professional in their work with patients. The hours offered by the center must meet the needs of its client base, perhaps by offering evening and weekend appointments. Keeping appointments on schedule is critical if a center wants satisfied customers. It's important to identify the target before developing your marketing plan. Where do your referrals come from? Look to such sources as referring physicians, managed care plans and patients themselves. Careful billing is critical for survival in the ambulatory care world. Costs are important and systems that can track cost per exam are useful. Know your bottom line. Service remains the central focus of all successful ambulatory care center functions.

  13. A vision for ambulatory care in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, A M

    1998-01-01

    The 1990's have been a remarkable decade for ambulatory care providers. Ambulatory care services have flourished in an era of rapidly increasing demands and seemingly limitless potential. Will the first decade of the next millennium continue this trend or is something new on the horizon? Ambulatory care's future prospects need to be evaluated within the context of the overall health care delivery environment of the future. At this time, three alternative "futures" seem plausible for the next decade. Managed care dominates. This scenario appears most likely at present with managed care poised to make significant inroads into Medicaid and Medicare populations. National health insurance is instituted. Some believe that this is a logical reaction to the excesses of the current competitive marketplace and is possible following the presidential election of 2004. Slow evolution of current system. This scenario may be viewed as the status quo alternative and is likely in the absence of a crisis or a better, generally agreed upon way in which to improve health care delivery.

  14. General practitioner's reported use of clinical guidelines for hypertension and ambulatory blood pressure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flynn, E

    2012-03-01

    ABPM is an invaluable clinical tool, as it has been shown to improve blood pressure control in primary care. Many clinical guidelines for hypertension advocate ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. This study aims to quantify the use of clinical guidelines for hypertension and to explore the role of ABPM in Primary Care. A questionnaire survey was sent to GPs working in the West of Ireland. 88% (n=139) of GPs use clinical guidelines that recommend the use of ABPM. 82% (n=130) of GPs find use of clinic blood pressure monitoring insufficient for the diagnosis and monitoring of hypertension. Despite good access to ABPM, GPs report lack of remuneration, 72% (n=116), cost 68% (n=108), and lack of time, 51% (n=83) as the main limiting factors to use of ABPM. GPs recognise the clinical value of ABPM, but this study identifies definite barriers to the use of ABPM in Primary Care.

  15. Annotated Bibliography: Understanding Ambulatory Care Practices in the Context of Patient Safety and Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, Maria F; Mehdi, Harshal; Nash, David B

    2016-11-01

    The ambulatory care setting is an increasingly important component of the patient safety conversation. Inpatient safety is the primary focus of the vast majority of safety research and interventions, but the ambulatory setting is actually where most medical care is administered. Recent attention has shifted toward examining ambulatory care in order to implement better health care quality and safety practices. This annotated bibliography was created to analyze and augment the current literature on ambulatory care practices with regard to patient safety and quality improvement. By providing a thorough examination of current practices, potential improvement strategies in ambulatory care health care settings can be suggested. A better understanding of the myriad factors that influence delivery of patient care will catalyze future health care system development and implementation in the ambulatory setting.

  16. Quality assurance in the ambulatory care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, R D

    1989-01-01

    One of the most utilitarian developments in the field of quality assurance in health care has been the introduction of industrial concepts of quality management. These concepts, coupled with buyer demand for accountability, are bringing new perspectives to health care quality assurance. These perspectives provide a new view of quality assurance as a major responsibility and strategic opportunity for management; a competitive and marketable commodity; and a method of improving safety, effectiveness, and satisfaction with medical care.

  17. Cognitive assessment on elderly people under ambulatory care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Zortea

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the cognitive state of elderly people under ambulatory care and investigating the connection between such cognitive state and sociodemographic variables, health conditions, number of and adhesion to medicine. Methods: transversal, exploratory, and descriptive study, with a quantitative approach, realized with 107 elderly people under ambulatory care in a university hospital in southern Brazil, in november, 2013. The following variables were used: gender, age, civil status, income, schooling, occupation, preexisting noncommunicable diseases, number and type of prescribed medications, adhesion, mini-mental state examination score, and cognitive status. Data was analyzed through inferential and descriptive statistics. Results: the prevalence of cognitive deficit was of 42.1% and had a statistically significant connection to schooling, income, civil status, hypertension, and cardiopathy. Conclusion: nurses can intervene to avoid the increase of cognitive deficit through an assessment of the elderly person, directed to facilitative strategies to soften this deficit.

  18. Ambulatory Melanoma Care Patterns in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew L. Ji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine trends in melanoma visits in the ambulatory care setting. Methods. Data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS from 1979 to 2010 were used to analyze melanoma visit characteristics including number of visits, age and gender of patients, and physician specialty. These data were compared to US Census population estimates during the same time period. Results. The overall rate of melanoma visits increased ( at an apparently higher rate than the increase in population over this time. The age of patients with melanoma visits increased at approximately double the rate (0.47 year per interval year, of the population increase in age (0.23 year per interval year. There was a nonsignificant decline in the proportion of female patients seen over the study interval. Lastly, ambulatory care has shifted towards dermatologists and other specialties managing melanoma patients and away from family/internal medicine physicians and general/plastic surgeons. Conclusions. The number and age of melanoma visits has increased over time with respect to the overall population, mirroring the increase in melanoma incidence over the past three decades. These trends highlight the need for further studies regarding melanoma management efficiency.

  19. Ambulatory Medical Care Utilization Estimates for 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Jennifer H. Madans, Ph.D., Associate Director for Science Division of Health Care Statistics Jane E. Sisk, Ph.D., Director Contents Abstract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... no 26. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2010. 4. ... [computer software]. Research Triangle Park, NC: Research Triangle Institute. ...

  20. A nurse practitioner patient care team: implications for pediatric oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Julia Rose

    2014-01-01

    The role of the pediatric advanced practice registered nurse continues to evolve within the ever-changing field of health care. In response to increased demand for health care services and because of a variety of changes in the health care delivery system, nurse practitioner patient care teams are an emerging trend in acute care settings. Care provided by nurse practitioner teams has been shown to be effective, efficient, and comprehensive. In addition to shorter hospital stays and reduced costs, nurse practitioner teams offer increased quality and continuity of care, and improved patient satisfaction. Nurse practitioner patient care teams are well suited to the field of pediatric oncology, as patients would benefit from care provided by specialized clinicians with a holistic focus. This article provides health care professionals with information about the use of nurse practitioner patient care teams and implications for use in pediatric oncology.

  1. Regional variations in ambulatory care and incidence of cardiovascular events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Jack V.; Chu, Anna; Maclagan, Laura; Austin, Peter C.; Johnston, Sharon; Ko, Dennis T.; Cheung, Ingrid; Atzema, Clare L.; Booth, Gillian L.; Bhatia, R. Sacha; Lee, Douglas S.; Jackevicius, Cynthia A.; Kapral, Moira K.; Tu, Karen; Wijeysundera, Harindra C.; Alter, David A.; Udell, Jacob A.; Manuel, Douglas G.; Mondal, Prosanta; Hogg, William

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Variations in the prevalence of traditional cardiac risk factors only partially account for geographic variations in the incidence of cardiovascular disease. We examined the extent to which preventive ambulatory health care services contribute to geographic variations in cardiovascular event rates. METHODS: We conducted a cohort study involving 5.5 million patients aged 40 to 79 years in Ontario, Canada, with no hospital stays for cardiovascular disease as of January 2008, through linkage of multiple population-based health databases. The primary outcome was the occurrence of a major cardiovascular event (myocardial infarction, stroke or cardiovascular-related death) over the following 5 years. We compared patient demographics, cardiac risk factors and ambulatory health care services across the province’s 14 health service regions, known as Local Health Integration Networks (LHINs), and evaluated the contribution of these variables to regional variations in cardiovascular event rates. RESULTS: Cardiovascular event rates across LHINs varied from 3.2 to 5.7 events per 1000 person-years. Compared with residents of high-rate LHINs, those of low-rate health regions received physician services more often (e.g., 4.2 v. 3.5 mean annual family physician visits, p value for LHIN-level trend = 0.01) and were screened for risk factors more often. Low-rate LHINs were also more likely to achieve treatment targets for hypercholes-terolemia (51.8% v. 49.6% of patients, p = 0.03) and controlled hypertension (67.4% v. 53.3%, p = 0.04). Differences in patient and health system factors accounted for 74.5% of the variation in events between LHINs, of which 15.5% was attributable to health system factors alone. INTERPRETATION: Preventive ambulatory health care services were provided more frequently in health regions with lower cardiovascular event rates. Health system interventions to improve equitable access to preventive care might improve cardiovascular outcomes. PMID

  2. Health care practitioners and dying patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Pentaris

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A full understanding of and a competent approach to dying patients may lead to a more qualitative service delivery, an enhanced quality of life paradigms, and the patients’ wellbeing, all of which remain the ultimate goal of health care practice. The modern world has developed in parallel with secularism and religious diversity. This paper aims to illustrate the secularization process in Britain (with indications of generalized meanings and juxtaposes it with a description of the needs of dying patients regarding the meanings of religion and nonreligion. Although this paper draws on and provides a review of selected theoretical literature, it also addresses a significant challenge: the lack of scientifi c research on the subject. Hence, this paper aims to give an overview of the issues, but not synthesise them. The arguments that are elaborated in the paper are also supported by the author’s current research project in the city of London. The approach here is client oriented, and concerns social and health care. Practitioners ought to become competent, and maintain their competence throughout their professional career. Religious competence seems to have not been at the centre of discussions, regardless of the historical pathway that religious discourse has drawn since the beginnings of humanity. The paper concludes with certain suggestions for future research and inclusive approaches regarding religious matters.

  3. Does general practitioner gatekeeping curb health care expenditure?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delnoij, D.; Merode, G. van; Paulus, A.; Groenewegen, P.

    2000-01-01

    Objectives: It is generally assumed that health care systems in which specialist and hospital care is only accessible after referral by a general practitioner (GP) have lower total health care costs. In this study, the following questions were addressed: do health care systems with GPs acting as gat

  4. Translating caring theory across the continuum from inpatient to ambulatory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonges, Mary; McCann, Meghan; Strickler, Jeff

    2014-06-01

    While theory-based practice is a Magnet® characteristic, translating theories to practice remains challenging. As a result, theory-guided practice remains an ideal rather than a realized goal in many organizations. This article provides an overview of a research-derived caring theory, a translational model for theory-driven practice, implementation of a delivery model designed to translate theory across the acute and ambulatory care continuum, and resulting outcomes in oncology clinics and the emergency department.

  5. Adopting Ambulatory Breast Cancer Surgery as the Standard of Care in an Asian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Ying Ru Ng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ambulatory surgery is not commonly practiced in Asia. A 23-hour ambulatory (AS23 service was implemented at our institute in March 2004 to allow more surgeries to be performed as ambulatory procedures. In this study, we reviewed the impact of the AS23 service on breast cancer surgeries and reviewed surgical outcomes, including postoperative complications, length of stay, and 30-day readmission. Methods. Retrospective review was performed of 1742 patients who underwent definitive breast cancer surgery from 1 March 2004 to 31 December 2010. Results. By 2010, more than 70% of surgeries were being performed as ambulatory procedures. Younger women (P<0.01, those undergoing wide local excision (P<0.01 and those with ductal carcinoma-in situ or early stage breast cancer (P<0.01, were more likely to undergo ambulatory surgery. Six percent of patients initially scheduled for ambulatory surgery were eventually managed as inpatients; a third of these were because of perioperative complications. Wound complications, 30-day readmission and reoperation rates were not more frequent with ambulatory surgery. Conclusion. Ambulatory breast cancer surgery is now the standard of care at our institute. An integrated workflow facilitating proper patient selection and structured postoperativee outpatient care have ensured minimal complications and high patient acceptance.

  6. Active ambulatory care management supported by short message services and mobile phone technology in patients with arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, Anton R; Gridnev, Vladimir I; Shvartz, Vladimir A; Posnenkova, Olga M; Dovgalevsky, Pavel Ya

    2012-01-01

    The use of short message services and mobile phone technology for ambulatory care management is the most accessible and most inexpensive way to transition from traditional ambulatory care management to active ambulatory care management in patients with arterial hypertension (AH). The aim of this study was to compare the clinical efficacy of active ambulatory care management supported by short message services and mobile phone technology with traditional ambulatory care management in AH patients. The study included 97 hypertensive patients under active ambulatory care management and 102 patients under traditional ambulatory care management. Blood pressure levels, body mass, and smoking history of patients were analyzed in the study. The duration of study was 1 year. In the active ambulatory care management group, 36% of patients were withdrawn from the study within a year. At the end of the year, 77% of patients from the active care management group had achieved the goal blood pressure level. That was more than 5 times higher than that in the traditional ambulatory care management group (P mobile phone improves the quality of ambulatory care of hypertensive patients.

  7. Indicators for Evaluating the Performance and Quality of Care of Ambulatory Care Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapin, Joachim; D'Amour, Danielle; Dubois, Carl-Ardy

    2015-01-01

    The quality and safety of nursing care vary from one service to another. We have only very limited information on the quality and safety of nursing care in outpatient settings, an expanding area of practice. Our aim in this study was to make available, from the scientific literature, indicators potentially sensitive to nursing that can be used to evaluate the performance of nursing care in outpatient settings and to integrate those indicators into the theoretical framework of Dubois et al. (2013). We conducted a scoping review in three databases (CINAHL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE) and the bibliographies of selected articles. From a total of 116 articles, we selected 22. The results of our study not only enable that framework to be extended to ambulatory nursing care but also enhance it with the addition of five new indicators. Our work offers nurses and managers in ambulatory nursing units indicators potentially sensitive to nursing that can be used to evaluate performance. For researchers, it presents the current state of knowledge on this construct and a framework with theoretical foundations for future research in ambulatory settings. This work opens an unexplored field for further research.

  8. Sharing and expanding academic and practitioner knowledge in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartunek, Jean; Trullen, Jordi; Bonet, Eduard; Sauquet, Alfonso

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to expand understanding of academic-practitioner knowledge-sharing in the service of enhanced knowledge creation in health care. To this end, we describe the tacit and explicit knowledge of academics and practitioners and how this knowledge exists within their communities of practice. We also discuss benefits of, difficulties with, and some underlying dynamics of academic-practitioner knowledge-sharing. We then propose what might be done, based on appreciation of these dynamics, to foster joint knowledge-sharing and knowledge creation. We illustrate our arguments with examples from health care settings.

  9. Ibuprofen timing for hand surgery in ambulatory care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Enrico; Bianchi, Anna; Marcuzzi, Augusto; Landi, Antonio; Barbieri, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of pre-operative administration of ibuprofen on post-operative pain control vs. early post-operative administration for hand surgery procedures performed under local anaesthesia in ambulatory care. METHODS: Candidates to trigger finger release by De Quervain tenosynovitis and carpal tunnel operation under local anesthesia were enrolled in the study. Group A received 400 mg ibuprofen before the operation and placebo after the procedure; group B received placebo before the operation and ibuprofen 400 mg at the end of the procedure; both groups received ibuprofen 400 mg every 6h thereafter. Visual analogue scale (VAS) was measured at fixed times before and every 6h after surgery, for a total follow-up of 18h. RESULTS: Groups were similar according to age, gender and type of surgery. Median VAS values did not produce any statistical significance, while there was a statistically significant difference on pre-operative and early post-operative VAS values between groups (A -8.53 mm vs. B 3.36 mm, p=0.0085). CONCLUSION: Average pain levels were well controlled by local anesthesia and post-operative ibuprofen analgesia. Pre-operative ibuprofen administration can contribute to improve early pain management. Level of Evidence II, Therapeutic Studies. PMID:26327799

  10. Physical therapy plus general practitioners' care versus general practitioners' care alone for sciatica: a randomised clinical trial with a 12-month follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Luijsterburg, Pim; Verhagen, Arianne; Ostelo, Raymond; Hoogen, Hans; Peul, Wilco; Avezaat, Cees; Koes, Bart

    2008-01-01

    textabstractA randomised clinical trial in primary care with a 12-months follow-up period. About 135 patients with acute sciatica (recruited from May 2003 to November 2004) were randomised in two groups: (1) the intervention group received physical therapy (PT) added to the general practitioners' care, and (2) the control group with general practitioners' care only. To assess the effectiveness of PT additional to general practitioners' care compared to general practitioners' care alone, in pa...

  11. Commentary on the required skills for ambulatory cardiac care in the young: is training necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boris, Jeffrey R

    2015-12-01

    Extensive supplemental training exists for many subspecialty disciplines within fellowship training for paediatric cardiology in the United States of America. These disciplines, or domains, such as echocardiography, cardiac intensive care, interventional cardiology, and electrophysiology, allow for initial exposure and training during the basic 3 years of fellowship, plus mandate a 4th year of advanced training; however, ambulatory cardiology has no in-depth or additional training beyond the basic clinical exposure during fellowship training. Ambulatory cardiology is not included in the recommended scheduling of the various domains of cardiology training. This document reviews the reasons to consider augmenting the depth and breadth of training in ambulatory paediatric cardiology.

  12. Evaluation of a Professional Practice Model in the Ambulatory Care Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-10

    patient satisfaction , nurse -sensitive indicators of quality care as measured by...Project Number: N10-C04 Aim one Evaluate levels of nursing and patient satisfaction in ambulatory care clinics following implementation of a...Clarke, S.P., Sloane, D., Lake, E.T., Cheney, T. (2008). Effects of hospital care environment on patient mortality and nurse outcomes. Journal of Nursing

  13. A cluster randomized trial evaluating electronic prescribing in an ambulatory care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Sherman

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medication errors, adverse drug events and potential adverse drug events are common and serious in terms of the harms and costs that they impose on the health system and those who use it. Errors resulting in preventable adverse drug events have been shown to occur most often at the stages of ordering and administration. This paper describes the protocol for a pragmatic trial of electronic prescribing to reduce prescription error. The trial was designed to overcome the limitations associated with traditional study design. Design This study was designed as a 65-week, cluster randomized, parallel study. Methods The trial was conducted within ambulatory outpatient clinics in an academic tertiary care centre in Ontario, Canada. The electronic prescribing software for the study is a Canadian electronic prescribing software package which provides physician prescription entry with decision support at the point of care. Using a handheld computer (PDA the physician selects medications using an error minimising menu-based pick list from a comprehensive drug database, create specific prescription instructions and then transmit the prescription directly and electronically to a participating pharmacy via facsimile or to the physician's printer using local area wireless technology. The unit of allocation and randomization is by 'week', i.e. the system is "on" or "off" according to the randomization scheme and the unit of analysis is the prescription, with adjustment for clustering of patients within practitioners. Discussion This paper describes the protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomized trial of point-of-care electronic prescribing, which was specifically designed to overcome the limitations associated with traditional study design. Trial Registration This trial has been registered with clinicaltrials.gov (ID: NCT00252395

  14. Hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions, Minas Gerais, Southeastern Brazil, 2000 and 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Maria Rodrigues-Bastos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze hospitalization rates and the proportion of deaths due to ambulatory care-sensitive hospitalizations and to characterize them according to coverage by the Family Health Strategy, a primary health care guidance program. METHODS An ecological study comprising 853 municipalities in the state of Minas Gerais, under the purview of 28 regional health care units, was conducted. We used data from the Hospital Information System of the Brazilian Unified Health System. Ambulatory care-sensitive hospitalizations in 2000 and 2010 were compared. Population data were obtained from the demographic censuses. RESULTS The number of ambulatory care-sensitive hospitalizations declined from 20.75/1,000 inhabitants [standard deviation (SD = 10.42 in 2000 to 14.92/thousand inhabitants (SD = 10.04 in 2010 Heart failure was the most frequent cause in both years. Hospitalizations rates for hypertension, asthma, and diabetes mellitus, decreased, whereas those for angina pectoris, prenatal and birth disorders, kidney and urinary tract infections, and other acute infections increased. Hospitalization durations and the proportion of deaths due to ambulatory care-sensitive hospitalizations increased significantly. CONCLUSIONS Mean hospitalization rates for sensitive conditions were significantly lower in 2010 than in 2000, but no correlation was found with regard to the expansion of the population coverage of the Family Health Strategy. Hospitalization rates and proportion of deaths were different between the various health care regions in the years evaluated, indicating a need to prioritize the primary health care with high efficiency and quality.

  15. Exploring the link between ambulatory care and avoidable hospitalizations at the Veteran Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pracht, Etienne E; Bass, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the link between utilization of ambulatory care and the likelihood of rehospitalization for an avoidable reason in veterans served by the Veteran Health Administration (VA). The analysis used administrative data containing healthcare utilization and patient characteristics stored at the national VA data warehouse, the Corporate Franchise Data Center. The study sample consisted of 284 veterans residing in Florida who had been hospitalized at least once for an avoidable reason. A bivariate probit model with instrumental variables was used to estimate the probability of rehospitalization. Veterans who had at least 1 ambulatory care visit per month experienced a significant reduction in the probability of rehospitalization for the same avoidable hospitalization condition. The findings suggest that ambulatory care can serve as an important substitute for more expensive hospitalization for the conditions characterized as avoidable.

  16. Oncology Advanced Practitioners Bring Advanced Community Oncology Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Wendy H

    2016-01-01

    Oncology care is becoming increasingly complex. The interprofessional team concept of care is necessary to meet projected oncology professional shortages, as well as to provide superior oncology care. The oncology advanced practitioner (AP) is a licensed health care professional who has completed advanced training in nursing or pharmacy or has completed training as a physician assistant. Oncology APs increase practice productivity and efficiency. Proven to be cost effective, APs may perform varied roles in an oncology practice. Integrating an AP into an oncology practice requires forethought given to the type of collaborative model desired, role expectations, scheduling, training, and mentoring.

  17. An overview of patients' preference for, and satisfaction with, care provided by general practitioners and nurse practitioners.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laurant, M.G.H.; Hermens, R.P.M.G.; Braspenning, J.C.C.; Akkermans, R.P.; Sibbald, B.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2008-01-01

    AIM AND OBJECTIVES: To assess patients' views on the care provided by nurse practitioners compared with that provided by general practitioners and to determine factors influencing these views. BACKGROUND: Many countries have sought to shift aspects of primary care provision from doctors to nurses. I

  18. Hospital admissions due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions among children by age group and health region

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    Kelly Holanda Prezotto

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE to describe hospital admissions for ambulatory care sensitive conditions in children under five years of age in the State of Paraná, Brazil by condition type, age group and health region. METHOD a temporal ecological study was conducted using data from the Unified Health System Hospital Information System for the period 2000 to 2011. Conditions were grouped in accordance with the list of ambulatory care sensitive conditions in Brazil. RESULTS there was an increase in the rate of admissions for ambulatory care sensitive conditions in all age groups in 50% of the health regions, with a marked increase in children under the age of one. Pneumonia, gastroenteritis and asthma were the main causes of admissions. There was an increase in the proportion of overall admissions accounted for by pneumonia and gastroenteritis. CONCLUSION the increase in admissions reveals the need for actions to improve access to primary healthcare and provide effective treatment of the main ambulatory care sensitive conditions in order to prevent hospital admissions among children.

  19. Provider practice models in ambulatory oncology practice: analysis of productivity, revenue, and provider and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buswell, Lori A; Ponte, Patricia Reid; Shulman, Lawrence N

    2009-07-01

    Physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants often work in teams to deliver cancer care in ambulatory oncology practices. This is likely to become more prevalent as the demand for oncology services rises, and the number of providers increases only slightly.

  20. Process visibility analysis in ambulatory care: a simulation study with RFID data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Chin; Padman, Rema

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare is primarily delivered in the ambulatory care setting worldwide. The high variability in service delivery encountered in this environment negatively impacts process efficiency and patient satisfaction. In this study, we analyze care delivery process in ambulatory care using time and location stamped data collected via Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)-enabled badges worn by patients, clinicians, and staff as they complete each clinic visit. With the objective of improving process visibility and minimizing patient waiting time, we examine this data to delineate the major components of waiting time and use simulation modeling to evaluate the impact of possible interventions. Results indicate that as a prevalent strategy, different appointment scheduling rules can only reduce patient waiting time in the waiting room. Surprisingly, waiting time in the exam room is unchanged, requiring new approaches to improve care coordination that address this delay. The results also highlight the value of RFID technology and the challenges in deploying them to improve service delivery.

  1. Nurse practitioner care improves renal outcome in patients with CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Mieke J; van Zuilen, Arjan D; van den Brand, Jan A J G; Bots, Michiel L; van Buren, Marjolijn; Ten Dam, Marc A G J; Kaasjager, Karin A H; Ligtenberg, Gerry; Sijpkens, Yvo W J; Sluiter, Henk E; van de Ven, Peter J G; Vervoort, Gerald; Vleming, Louis-Jean; Blankestijn, Peter J; Wetzels, Jack F M

    2014-02-01

    Treatment goals for patients with CKD are often unrealized for many reasons, but support by nurse practitioners may improve risk factor levels in these patients. Here, we analyzed renal endpoints of the Multifactorial Approach and Superior Treatment Efficacy in Renal Patients with the Aid of Nurse Practitioners (MASTERPLAN) study after extended follow-up to determine whether strict implementation of current CKD guidelines through the aid of nurse practitioners improves renal outcome. In total, 788 patients with moderate to severe CKD were randomized to receive nurse practitioner support added to physician care (intervention group) or physician care alone (control group). Median follow-up was 5.7 years. Renal outcome was a secondary endpoint of the MASTERPLAN study. We used a composite renal endpoint of death, ESRD, and 50% increase in serum creatinine. Event rates were compared with adjustment for baseline serum creatinine concentration and changes in estimated GFR were determined. During the randomized phase, there were small but significant differences between the groups in BP, proteinuria, LDL cholesterol, and use of aspirin, statins, active vitamin D, and antihypertensive medications, in favor of the intervention group. The intervention reduced the incidence of the composite renal endpoint by 20% (hazard ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.66 to 0.98; P=0.03). In the intervention group, the decrease in estimated GFR was 0.45 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year less than in the control group (P=0.01). In conclusion, additional support by nurse practitioners attenuated the decline of kidney function and improved renal outcome in patients with CKD.

  2. Improving the quality of palliative care for ambulatory patients with lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Plessen, Christian; Aslaksen, Aslak

    2005-01-01

    PROBLEM: Most patients with advanced lung cancer currently receive much of their health care, including chemotherapy, as outpatients. Patients have to deal with the complex and time consuming logistics of ambulatory cancer care. At the same time, members of staff often waste considerable time......; satisfaction among patients. STRATEGIES FOR CHANGE: Rescheduled patients' appointments, automated retrieval of blood test results, systematic reporting in patients' files, design of an information leaflet, and refurnishing of the waiting area at the clinic. EFFECTS OF CHANGE: Interventions resulted...

  3. Ambulatory Care Visits to Pediatricians in Taiwan: A Nationwide Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Yu Yang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pediatricians play a key role in the healthy development of children. Nevertheless, the practice patterns of pediatricians have seldom been investigated. The current study analyzed the nationwide profiles of ambulatory visits to pediatricians in Taiwan, using the National Health Insurance Research Database. From a dataset that was randomly sampled one out of every 500 records among a total of 309,880,000 visits in 2012 in the country, 9.8% (n = 60,717 of the visits were found paid to pediatricians. Children and adolescents accounted for only 69.3% of the visits to pediatricians. Male pediatricians provided 80.5% of the services and the main workforces were those aged 40–49 years. The most frequent diagnoses were respiratory tract diseases (64.7% and anti-histamine agents were prescribed in 48.8% of the visits to pediatricians. Our detailed results could contribute to evidence-based discussions on health policymaking.

  4. Hospitalization for ambulatory care sensitive conditions and the role of primary care in Italian regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Rosano

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract
    Background: Hospitalization may often be prevented by timely and effective outpatient care either by preventing the onset of an illness, controlling an acute illness or managing a chronic disease with an appropriate follow-up. The objective of the study is to examine the variability of hospital admissions within Italian regions for Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (ACSCs, and their relationship with primary care supply.
    Methods: Hospital discharge data aggregated at a regional level collected in 2005 were analysed by type of ACS conditions. Main outcome measures were regional hospital admission rates for ACSCs. Negative binomial models were used to analyse the association with individual risk factors (age and gender and regional risk factors (propensity to hospitalisation and prevalence of specific conditions.
    Non-parametric correlation indexes between standardised hospital admission rates and quantitative measures of primary care services were calculated.
    Results: ACSC admissions accounted for 6.6% of total admissions, 35.7% were classified as acute conditions and 64.3% as chronic conditions. Admission rates for ACSCs varied widely across Italian regions with different patterns for chronic and acute conditions. Southern regions showed significantly higher rates for chronic conditions and North-eastern regions for acute conditions. We found a significant negative association between the provision of ambulatory specialist services and standardised hospitalization rates
    (SHR for ACS chronic conditions (r=-0.50; p=0.02 and an inverse correlation among SHR for ACS acute conditions and the rate of GPs per 1,000 residents, although the latter was not statistically significant.
    Conclusions: In Italy, about 480,000 inpatient hospital admissions in 2005 were attributable to ACSCs. Even
    adjusting for potential confounders

  5. Anesthesiologists' practice patterns for treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting in the ambulatory Post Anesthesia Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claybon Louis

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When patients are asked what they find most anxiety provoking about having surgery, the top concerns almost always include postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV. Only until recently have there been any published recommendations, mostly derived from expert opinion, as to which regimens to use once a patient develops PONV. The goal of this study was to assess the responses to a written survey to address the following questions: 1 If no prophylaxis is administered to an ambulatory patient, what agent do anesthesiologists use for treatment of PONV in the ambulatory Post-Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU?; 2 Do anesthesiologists use non-pharmacologic interventions for PONV treatment?; and 3 If a PONV prophylaxis agent is administered during the anesthetic, do anesthesiologists choose an antiemetic in a different class for treatment? Methods A questionnaire with five short hypothetical clinical vignettes was mailed to 300 randomly selected USA anesthesiologists. The types of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions for PONV treatment were analyzed. Results The questionnaire was completed by 106 anesthesiologists (38% response rate, who reported that on average 52% of their practice was ambulatory. If a patient develops PONV and received no prophylaxis, 67% (95% CI, 62% – 79% of anesthesiologists reported they would administer a 5-HT3-antagonist as first choice for treatment, with metoclopramide and dexamethasone being the next two most common choices. 65% (95% CI, 55% – 74% of anesthesiologists reported they would also use non-pharmacologic interventions to treat PONV in the PACU, with an IV fluid bolus or nasal cannula oxygen being the most common. When PONV prophylaxis was given during the anesthetic, the preferred PONV treatment choice changed. Whereas 3%–7% of anesthesiologists would repeat dose metoclopramide, dexamethasone, or droperidol, 26% (95% confidence intervals, 18% – 36% of practitioners would re

  6. Preconception care by family physicians and general practitioners in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fetters Michael D

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preconception care provided by family physicians/general practitioners (FP/GPs can provide predictable benefits to mothers and infants. The objective of this study was to elucidate knowledge of, attitudes about, and practices of preconception care by FP/GPs in Japan. Methods A survey was distributed to physician members of the Japanese Academy of Family Medicine. The questionnaire addressed experiences of preconception education in medical school and residency, frequency of preconception care in clinical practice, attitudes about providing preconception care, and perceived need for preconception education to medical students and residents. Results Two hundred and sixty-eight of 347 (77% eligible physicians responded. The most common education they reported receiving was about smoking cessation (71%, and the least was about folic acid supplementation (12%. Many participants reported providing smoking cessation in their practice (60%, though only about one third of respondents advise restricting alcohol intake. Few reported advising calcium supplementation (10% or folic acid supplementation (4%. About 70% reported their willingness to provide preconception care. Almost all participants believe medical students and residents should have education about preconception care. Conclusion FP/GPs in Japan report little training in preconception care and few currently provide it. With training, most participants are willing to provide preconception care themselves and think medical students and residents should receive this education.

  7. Primary care nurse practitioners' integrity when faced with moral conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laabs, Carolyn Ann

    2007-11-01

    Primary care presents distressful moral problems for nurse practitioners (NPs) who report frustration, powerlessness, changing jobs and leaving advanced practice. The purpose of this grounded theory study was to describe the process NPs use to manage moral problems common to primary care. Twenty-three NPs were interviewed, commenting on hypothetical situations depicting ethical issues common to primary care. Coding was conducted using a constant comparative method. A theory of maintaining moral integrity emerged consisting of the phases of encountering conflict, drawing a line, finding a way without crossing the line, and evaluating actions. The NPs varied in their awareness and the discord encountered in conflict, and in clarity, flexibility and justification of the line drawn. A critical juncture occurred when NPs evaluated how well integrity had been maintained. Some experienced no distress while others experienced self-doubt, regret, outrage and frustration at external constraints, and attempted to reconcile through avoiding, convincing themselves, and compensating.

  8. Pharmacists implementing transitions of care in inpatient, ambulatory and community practice settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen S

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To introduce pharmacists to the process, challenges, and opportunities of creating transitions of care (TOC models in the inpatient, ambulatory, and community practice settings. Methods: TOC literature and resources were obtained through searching PubMed, Ovid, and GoogleScholar. The pharmacist clinicians, who are the authors in this manuscript are reporting their experiences in the development, implementation of, and practice within the TOC models. Results: Pharmacists are an essential part of the multidisciplinary team and play a key role in providing care to patients as they move between health care settings or from a health care setting to home. Pharmacists can participate in many aspects of the inpatient, ambulatory care, and community pharmacy practice settings to implement and ensure optimal TOC processes. This article describes establishing the pharmacist’s TOC role and practicing within multiple health care settings. In these models, pharmacists focus on medication reconciliation, discharge counseling, and optimization of medications. Additionally, a checklist has been created to assist other pharmacists in developing the pharmacist’s TOC roles in a practice environment or incorporating more TOC elements in their practice setting. Conclusion: Optimizing the TOC process, reducing medication errors, and preventing adverse events are important focus areas in the current health care system, as emphasized by The Joint Commission and other health care organizations. Pharmacists have the unique opportunity and skillset to develop and participate in TOC processes that will enhance medication safety and improve patient care.

  9. Outcomes assessment of a pharmacist-directed seamless care program in an ambulatory oncology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Scott J; Abbott, Rick; Edwards, Jonathan; LeBlanc, Michael; Dranitsaris, George; Donnan, Jennifer; Laing, Kara; Whelan, Maria A; MacKinnon, Neil J

    2014-02-01

    The primary goal of seamless care is improved patient outcomes and improved standards of care for patients with cancer. The pharmacy service of the Newfoundland Cancer Treatment and Research Foundation conducted a randomized control study that measured clinical and humanistic outcomes of a pharmacist-directed seamless care program in an ambulatory oncology clinic. This article focuses on the intervention group, particularly the identification of drug-related problems (DRPs) and utilization of health care services as well the satisfaction of 3 types of health professionals with the services provided by the pharmacist-directed seamless care program. Overall, the seamless care pharmacist (SCP) identified an average of 3.7 DRPs per intervention patient; the most common DRP reported was a patient not receiving or taking a drug therapy for which there is an indication. The SCP identified more DRPs in patients receiving adjuvant treatment compared to those receiving palliative treatment. On average, family physicians, oncology nurses, and hospital pharmacists were satisfied with the SCP intervention indicating that they agreed the information collected and distributed by the SCP was useful to them. Pharmacist-directed seamless care services in an ambulatory oncology clinic have a significant impact on clinical outcomes and processes of patient care. The presence of a SCP can help identify and resolve DRPs experienced by patients in an outpatient oncology clinic, ensuring that patients are receiving the highest standard of care.

  10. Marketing ambulatory care to women: a segmentation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, G D; Fors, M F

    1985-01-01

    Although significant changes are occurring in health care delivery, in many instances the new offerings are not based on a clear understanding of market segments being served. This exploratory study suggests that important differences may exist among women with regard to health care selection. Five major women's segments are identified for consideration by health care executives in developing marketing strategies. Additional research is suggested to confirm this segmentation hypothesis, validate segmental differences and quantify the findings.

  11. The predictive value of selected job rewards on occupational therapists' job satisfaction in ambulatory care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, J; Akroyd, D; Wilson, S; Figuers, C

    1995-01-01

    Using a perceived reward model of overall job satisfaction, this study utilized a correlational research design with multiple regression analysis to determine the predictive power of extrinsic rewards and intrinsic rewards, collectively and individually, as determinants of overall job satisfaction among registered occupational therapists (OTR) working full-time in ambulatory care settings. The intrinsic rewards (task involvement and task autonomy), collectively and individually, were perceived to be significant overall job satisfaction determinants. General working conditions was the only significant extrinsic reward. Given the demand for OTRs in ambulatory care settings, a better understanding of factors that influence overall job satisfaction among OTRs could prove beneficial in developing appropriate recruitment and retention job design strategies.

  12. Manager's leadership is the main skill for ambulatory health care plan success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Gustavo Horacio; Silberman, Martin; Colombo, Maria Virginia; Ozaeta, Belen; Henen, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    To demonstrate effectiveness of ambulatory health care plan implementation among institutions and variables associated with the differences observed. Randomized selection of primary health care (PHC) centers was done. Leadership ability of the plan manager was explored. Univariate/bivariate analyses were performed to observe correlation between variables. Two groups of PHC centers were established according to the efficacy of plan implementation: high and low performance. Differences between groups were observed (592%-1023% more efficacy in controls and practices; P < .001). Leadership was responsible for the main differences observed. Leadership of manager for implementation of the health care plan was the major important variable to reach the best efficacy standards.

  13. Strengthening the Effectiveness of State-Level Community Health Worker Initiatives Through Ambulatory Care Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Caitlin; Nell Brownstein, J.; Jayapaul-Philip, Bina; Matos, Sergio; Mirambeau, Alberta

    2017-01-01

    The transformation of the US health care system and the recognition of the effectiveness of community health workers (CHWs) have accelerated national, state, and local efforts to engage CHWs in the support of vulnerable populations. Much can be learned about how to successfully integrate CHWs into health care teams, how to maximize their impact on chronic disease self-management, and how to strengthen their role as emissaries between clinical services and community resources; we share examples of effective strategies. Ambulatory care staff members are key partners in statewide initiatives to build and sustain the CHW workforce and reduce health disparities. PMID:26049655

  14. Language barriers in mental health care: a survey of primary care practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisset, Camille; Leanza, Yvan; Rosenberg, Ellen; Vissandjée, Bilkis; Kirmayer, Laurence J; Muckle, Gina; Xenocostas, Spyridoula; Laforce, Hugues

    2014-12-01

    Many migrants do not speak the official language of their host country. This linguistic gap has been found to be an important contributor to disparities in access to services and health outcomes. This study examined primary care mental health practitioners' experiences with linguistic diversity. 113 practitioners in Montreal completed a self-report survey assessing their experiences working with allophones. About 40% of practitioners frequently encountered difficulties working in mental health with allophone clients. Few resources were available, and calling on an interpreter was the most common practice. Interpreters were expected to play many roles, which went beyond basic language translation. There is a clear need for training of practitioners on how to work with different types of interpreters. Training should highlight the benefits and limitations of the different roles that interpreters can play in health care delivery and the differences in communication dynamics with each role.

  15. Experts Foresee a Major Shift From Inpatient to Ambulatory Care

    OpenAIRE

    Beans, Bruce E.

    2016-01-01

    An American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Research and Education Foundation report predicts trends in health care delivery and financing, drug development and therapeutics, pharmaceutical marketplace, pharmacy workforce, and more.

  16. AMBULATORY CARE - SENSITIVE CONDITIONS IN CHILDREN UNDER FIVE YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Araújo Figueiredo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective:analyzethe extent to which the incidence rate of primary care sensitivehospitalizations in children under five years is influenced by the percentage of coverage of theprimary care.Methods:This was a cross-sectional ecological study that combines coverage ofprimary careand theambulatorycare-sensitiveconditionsin 2000 and 2010. We used data from theHospital Information System (HIS and the Information System of Primary Care (SIAB.Results:The data revealed that the increased coverage providedprimary carereductionrateofhospitalization diseases studied. In 2000 the reduction was greater for gastroenteritis (51% inchildren under 01 years and 30% in children 01-04 years in 2010 for respiratory diseases (51% inchildren under 01years and 33% in children aged 01-04 years.Conclusion:we found an association between the coverage ofprimary careand admission rates, however seem to affect othervariables, suggesting the need for further studies.

  17. [Management and organization of ambulatory medical care in a district].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, K; Keune, H G; Miethe, D; Ringel, M; Szkibik, B

    1990-01-01

    An analysis is given of the management and organization of out-patient medical care in 15 districts and of the District Physician's responsibilities as well as the profile of a District Health Department. Compared to the situation of a decade ago, substantial changes in the territorial health organization have occurred (decentralization, formation of care areas, affiliation of small health facilities to bigger ones). The District Physician's scope of responsibility is increasingly determined by activities within the framework of the District Council, the proportion of organizational work has increased. In order to be able to fulfill his tasks the District Physician needs the support of a special Health Department. Skeleton regulations for out-patient medical care are necessary.

  18. Developing Staffing Models to Support Population Health Management And Quality Oucomes in Ambulatory Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Sheila A; Vlasses, Frances; Havey, Julia

    2016-01-01

    There are multiple demands and challenges inherent in establishing staffing models in ambulatory heath care settings today. If health care administrators establish a supportive physical and interpersonal health care environment, and develop high-performing interprofessional teams and staffing models and electronic documentation systems that track performance, patients will have more opportunities to receive safe, high-quality evidence-based care that encourages patient participation in decision making, as well as provision of their care. The health care organization must be aligned and responsive to the community within which it resides, fully invested in population health management, and continuously scanning the environment for competitive, regulatory, and external environmental risks. All of these challenges require highly competent providers willing to change attitudes and culture such as movement toward collaborative practice among the interprofessional team including the patient.

  19. Prescribing quality indicators of type 2 diabetes mellitus ambulatory care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martirosyan, L.; Braspenning, J.; Denig, P.; de Grauw, W. J. C.; Bouma, M.; Storms, F.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, F. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Existing performance indicators for assessing quality of care in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) focus mostly on registration of measurements and clinical outcomes, and not on quality of prescribing. Objective: To develop a set of valid prescribing quality indicators (PQI) for internal u

  20. Attitudes toward nurse practitioner-led chronic disease management to improve outpatient quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamanna, Christopher N; Alvarez, Kristy; Miller, Judith; Gary, Tiffany; Bowen, Mary

    2006-01-01

    To understand the acceptability for a model of chronic disease management, in which primary care patients see nurse practitioners for structured visits using an evidence-based encounter form, the authors sent a mailed survey to primary care physicians and nurse practitioners. A total of 212 subjects completed the survey, for a total response rate of 53% (physicians, 44%; nurse practitioners, 61%). Most physicians (79.5%) reported that nurse practitioners saw patients in their practice. Most physicians (80.0%) and nurse practitioners (95.7%) believed that the proposed model of care would improve the control of chronic illnesses. In addition, most physicians (73.8%) and nurse practitioners (87.6%) believed that the model of care would be of interest to similar providers. Overall, the high level of support for the model and the presence of nurse practitioners in most physician offices suggests that future studies are warranted to understand how best to implement this.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of physical therapy and general practitioner care for sciatica.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijsterburg, P.A.; Lamers, L.M.; Verhagen, A.P.; Ostelo, R.W.J.G.; Hoogen, H.J.M. van den; Peul, W.C.; Avezaat, C.J.; Koes, B.W.

    2007-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: An economic evaluation alongside a randomized clinical trial in primary care. A total of 135 patients were randomly allocated to physical therapy added to general practitioners' care (n = 67) or to general practitioners' care alone (n = 68). OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the cost-effectivenes

  2. Record of hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions: validation of the hospital information system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Cristina Morais Santa Barbara Rehem

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to estimate the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values of the Unified Health System's Hospital Information System for the appropriate recording of hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions. METHOD: the hospital information system records for conditions which are sensitive to ambulatory care, and for those which are not, were considered for analysis, taking the medical records as the gold standard. Through simple random sampling, a sample of 816 medical records was defined and selected by means of a list of random numbers using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences. RESULT: the sensitivity was 81.89%, specificity was 95.19%, the positive predictive value was 77.61% and the negative predictive value was 96.27%. In the study setting, the Hospital Information System (SIH was more specific than sensitive, with nearly 20% of care sensitive conditions not detected. CONCLUSION: there are no validation studies in Brazil of the Hospital Information System records for the hospitalizations which are sensitive to primary health care. These results are relevant when one considers that this system is one of the bases for assessment of the effectiveness of primary health care.

  3. Evaluation of The Products of Ambulatory Care and Products of Ambulatory Surgery Classification System For the Military Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-14

    98.97 IV Problem 13 24 Diagnostic Investigation with 21 .27 99.24 Nuclear or Computerized Axial Tomgrpy Imaging 14 2 Annual Well Care Examination, Child...720 7209 Spondylitis , Inflammatory, Unspec 72101 7210 Spondylosis, Cervical W/O Myelopathy 72131 7213 Spondylosis, Lumbosacral 7219 72190 Spondylosis

  4. [The social hygienic assessment of significance of diseases under organization of ambulatory polyclinic care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babenko, A I; Murakhovskiy, A G; Tomtchuk, A A; Bravve, Yu I

    2013-01-01

    The article presents the results of analysis of appealability of adult population of Omsk to municipal polyclinic on the subject of diseases. The coefficients of relative importance of different classes of diseases to determine the groups af their significance were calculated on the basis of integrated evaluation of common and primary morbidity and diseases of patients under dispensarization monitoring. The established character of formation of flows of appealabiliy of population on the subject of diseases is a basic one to determine demand in medical technologies and planning of activities of ambulatory polyclinic section of health care.

  5. Daily Energy Expenditure and Its Relation to Health Care Costs in Patients Undergoing Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Jason; Abdulla, Rami Khoury; Yeow, Raymond; Aggarwal, Anshul; Boura, Judith; Wegner, James; Franklin, Barry A

    2017-02-15

    Our increasingly sedentary lifestyle is associated with a heightened risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and cardiovascular mortality. Using the recently developed heart rate index formula in 843 patients (mean ± SD age 62.3 ± 15.7 years) who underwent 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring, we estimated average and peak daily energy expenditure, expressed as metabolic equivalents (METs), and related these data to subsequent hospital encounters and health care costs. In this cohort, estimated daily average and peak METs were 1.7 ± 0.7 and 5.5 ± 2.1, respectively. Patients who achieved daily bouts of peak energy expenditure ≥5 METs had fewer hospital encounters (p = 0.006) and median health care costs that were nearly 50% lower (p health care costs depending on whether they achieved monitoring (p = 0.005). Interestingly, patients who achieved ≥5 METs had lower and no significant difference in their health care costs, regardless of their body mass index (p = 0.46). Patients with previous percutaneous coronary intervention who achieved ≥5 METs had lower health care costs (p = 0.044) and fewer hospital encounters (p = 0.004) than those who achieved monitoring may provide useful information regarding health care utilization in patients with and without previous percutaneous coronary intervention, irrespective of body habitus. Our findings are the first to link lower intensities of peak daily energy expenditure, estimated from ambulatory ECG monitoring, with increased health care utilization.

  6. Identifying consumer segments in health services markets: an application of conjoint and cluster analyses to the ambulatory care pharmacy market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrol, N V; Gagon, J P

    1983-01-01

    Because of increasing competition, it is becoming more important that health care providers pursue consumer-based market segmentation strategies. This paper presents a methodology for identifying and describing consumer segments in health service markets, and demonstrates the use of the methodology by presenting a study of consumer segments in the ambulatory care pharmacy market.

  7. Educational needs of general practitioners in palliative care : Outcome of a focus group study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijler, WJ; Van Heest, F; Otter, R; Sleijfer, DT

    2005-01-01

    Background. The objective of this study was to identify the general practitioner's perception of educational needs in palliative care. Method. A qualitative study with focus groups was performed. Results. General practitioners estimate palliative care as an important and valuable part of primary car

  8. 75 FR 4655 - National Practitioner Data Bank for Adverse Information on Physicians and Other Health Care...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-28

    .... Individual health care practitioners and entities can self-query. The reporting of information under section... 1921 specifically requires the reporting of a health care practitioner who, or entity that, voluntarily... in Sec. 60.3), respectively. With respect to reporting by private accreditation entities, we...

  9. Health problems presented in general practice by survivors before and after a fireworks disaster: associations with mental health care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouden, D.J. den; Dirkzwager, A.J.E.; IJzermans, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the health problems presented to general practitioners by disaster survivors who received specialized ambulatory mental health care. Design: (Longitudinal) case-control study based on general practitioners' electronic medical records. Setting: General practice and a mental health

  10. Hepatitis B Vaccination and Screening Awareness in Primary Care Practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Said

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The goals of Healthy People US 2020 have called for increased screening and vaccination of high-risk groups for Hepatitis B (HBV. Methods. We performed a survey of 400 randomly chosen primary care practitioners (PCPs in Wisconsin to assess their knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding screening and vaccination for HBV. Results. Screening rates of patients at risk of sexual transmission were low, with 61% of respondents stating that they screen patients who had more than 1 sex partner in 6 months and 86% screening patients with a history of sex with prostitutes. Screening rate for persons with a history of intravenous drug use was 94%. Children of immigrants were screened by 65%, persons on hemodialysis by 73%, and prison inmates by 69%. Screening increased with provider experience with HBV. Deficiencies in vaccination rates mirrored screening practices. Major barriers to screening were cost, someone else’s responsibility, time constraints, or lack of knowledge. Conclusions. Without improved education and practices of PCPs about HBV screening and vaccination, the goals of healthy people 2020 regarding HBV will not be met. Barriers to screening and vaccination need to be addressed. Cost-effectiveness of alternative strategies such as universal vaccination under the age of 50 should be explored.

  11. Marketing strategy adjustments in the ambulatory care center industry: implications for community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J H

    1989-01-01

    Each stage of a product's life cycle requires marketing strategy modifications in response to changing demand levels. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in ambulatory care center (ACC) operational characteristics indicative of product, market, and distribution channel adjustments that could have a competitive impact upon community pharmacy practice. A questionnaire was mailed to a national sample of 325 ACC managers. Evidence of new product feature additions includes increased emphasis on continued care and increased prevalence of prescription drug dispensing. Expansion into new market segments and distribution channels was demonstrated by increased participation in HMO and employer relationships. The observed adjustments in ACC marketing strategies present obvious challenges as well as less obvious opportunities for community pharmacy practice.

  12. Physical therapy plus general practitioners' care versus general practitioners' care alone for sciatica: a randomised clinical trial with a 12-month follow-up.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijsterburg, P.A.; Verhagen, A.P.; Ostelo, R.W.J.G.; Hoogen, H.J.M. van den; Peul, W.C.; Avezaat, C.J.; Koes, B.W.

    2008-01-01

    A randomised clinical trial in primary care with a 12-months follow-up period. About 135 patients with acute sciatica (recruited from May 2003 to November 2004) were randomised in two groups: (1) the intervention group received physical therapy (PT) added to the general practitioners' care, and (2)

  13. Physical therapy plus general practitioners' care versus general practitioners' care alone for sciatica: a randomised clinical trial with a 12-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luijsterburg, Pim A J; Verhagen, Arianne P; Ostelo, Raymond W J G; van den Hoogen, Hans J M M; Peul, Wilco C; Avezaat, Cees J J; Koes, Bart W

    2008-04-01

    A randomised clinical trial in primary care with a 12-months follow-up period. About 135 patients with acute sciatica (recruited from May 2003 to November 2004) were randomised in two groups: (1) the intervention group received physical therapy (PT) added to the general practitioners' care, and (2) the control group with general practitioners' care only. To assess the effectiveness of PT additional to general practitioners' care compared to general practitioners' care alone, in patients with acute sciatica. There is a lack of knowledge concerning the effectiveness of PT in patients with sciatica. The primary outcome was patients' global perceived effect (GPE). Secondary outcomes were severity of leg and back pain, severity of disability, general health and absence from work. The outcomes were measured at 3, 6, 12 and 52 weeks after randomisation. At 3 months follow-up, 70% of the intervention group and 62% of the control group reported improvement (RR 1.1; 95% CI 0.9-1.5). At 12 months follow-up, 79% of the intervention group and 56% of the control group reported improvement (RR 1.4; 95% CI 1.1; 1.8). No significant differences regarding leg pain, functional status, fear of movement and health status were found at short-term or long-term follow-up. At 12 months follow-up, evidence was found that PT added to general practitioners' care is only more effective regarding GPE, and not more cost-effective in the treatment of patients with acute sciatica than general practitioners' care alone. There are indications that PT is especially effective regarding GPE in patients reporting severe disability at presentation.

  14. Diagnosing malignant melanoma in ambulatory care: a systematic review of clinical prediction rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Emma; Clyne, Barbara; Wesseling, Nieneke; Sandhu, Harkiran; Armstrong, Laura; Bennett, Holly; Fahey, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Malignant melanoma has high morbidity and mortality rates. Early diagnosis improves prognosis. Clinical prediction rules (CPRs) can be used to stratify patients with symptoms of suspected malignant melanoma to improve early diagnosis. We conducted a systematic review of CPRs for melanoma diagnosis in ambulatory care. Design Systematic review. Data sources A comprehensive search of PubMed, EMBASE, PROSPERO, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and SCOPUS was conducted in May 2015, using combinations of keywords and medical subject headings (MeSH) terms. Study selection and data extraction Studies deriving and validating, validating or assessing the impact of a CPR for predicting melanoma diagnosis in ambulatory care were included. Data extraction and methodological quality assessment were guided by the CHARMS checklist. Results From 16 334 studies reviewed, 51 were included, validating the performance of 24 unique CPRs. Three impact analysis studies were identified. Five studies were set in primary care. The most commonly evaluated CPRs were the ABCD, more than one or uneven distribution of Colour, or a large (greater than 6 mm) Diameter (ABCD) dermoscopy rule (at a cut-point of >4.75; 8 studies; pooled sensitivity 0.85, 95% CI 0.73 to 0.93, specificity 0.72, 95% CI 0.65 to 0.78) and the 7-point dermoscopy checklist (at a cut-point of ≥1 recommending ruling in melanoma; 11 studies; pooled sensitivity 0.77, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.88, specificity 0.80, 95% CI 0.59 to 0.92). The methodological quality of studies varied. Conclusions At their recommended cut-points, the ABCD dermoscopy rule is more useful for ruling out melanoma than the 7-point dermoscopy checklist. A focus on impact analysis will help translate melanoma risk prediction rules into useful tools for clinical practice. PMID:28264830

  15. The nurse practitioner and policy in end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, Janet C; Reed, Pamela G

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this column is the interface between policy and end-of-life care, particularly as provided by advanced nurse practitioners. The complexities of end-of-life along with barriers in practice can diminish quality of life for patients and their families. Changes in policy are needed to enable nurse practitioners their full scope of practice in a way that benefits patients and families at end-of-life. Three areas particularly relevant to policy for nursing practitioners and end-of-life care are addressed: scope of practice, reimbursement, and prescribing practices. Other recommendations for policy and end-of-life care are discussed.

  16. Bridging the Gap – Electronic Messaging between Home Health Care and General Practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Communication between health care providers is essential for the safe delivery of care to patients. The health care service is fragmented and the tools designed to support communication between health care providers has been unsatisfactory, in particular between home health care nurses and general practitioners (GPs). Three sub-studies were conducted to; 1) describe the experiences of home health care nurses with an e-messaging system and to determine how e-messaging influenced their communic...

  17. Systematic review of the incidence and characteristics of preventable adverse drug events in ambulatory care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Linda Aagaard; Winterstein, Almut G; Søndergaard, Birthe

    2007-01-01

    .4%; range 22.2-69.8%). Failure to prescribe prophylaxis to patients taking nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs or antiplatelet drugs frequently caused gastrointestinal toxicity, whereas lack of monitoring of diuretic, hypoglycemic, and anticoagulant use caused over- or under-diuresis, hyper- or hypoglycemia......-months. Cardiovascular drugs, analgesics, and hypoglycemic agents together accounted for 86.5% of pADEs, and 77.2% of pADEs resulted in symptoms of the central nervous system, electrolyte/renal system, and gastrointestinal tract. Medication errors resulting in pADEs occurred in the prescribing and monitoring stages......, and bleeding. CONCLUSIONS: ADEs in ambulatory care are common, with many being preventable and many resulting in hospitalization. Quality improvement programs should target errors in prescribing and monitoring, especially for patients using cardiovascular, analgesic, and hypoglycemic agents....

  18. Perceived Stress, Multimorbidity, and Risk for Hospitalizations for Ambulatory Care-sensitive Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prior, Anders; Vestergaard, Mogens; Davydow, Dimitry S;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psychiatric disorders are associated with an increased risk for ambulatory care-sensitive condition (ACSC)-related hospitalizations, but it remains unknown whether this holds for individuals with nonsyndromic stress that is more prevalent in the general population. OBJECTIVES......: To determine whether perceived stress is associated with ACSC-related hospitalizations and rehospitalizations, and posthospitalization 30-day mortality. RESEARCH DESIGN AND MEASURES: Population-based cohort study with 118,410 participants from the Danish National Health Survey 2010, which included data...... on Cohen's Perceived Stress Scale, followed from 2010 to 2014, combined with individual-level national register data on hospitalizations and mortality. Multimorbidity was assessed using health register information on diagnoses and drug prescriptions within 39 condition categories. RESULTS: Being...

  19. Columbia University's Competency and Evidence-based Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Christine R.; Roberts, W. Dan

    2002-01-01

    Columbia University's acute care nurse practitioner curriculum incorporates evaluation strategies and standards to assess clinical competence and foster evidence-based practice. The curriculum consists of four core courses, supporting sciences, and specialty courses. (Contains 17 references.) (SK)

  20. ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES GUIDE FOR PERFORMING MAJOR AMBULATORY AND SHORT-STAY SURGERY IN COORDINATION WITH THE PRIMARY HEALTH CARE TEAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Cruz Rodríguez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there are constraints on coordination between the primary and secondary levels of care, and we lack a regulatory document for surgical activity in major ambulatory and short-stay surgery, which affects the quality of this modality of care. Such reasons led to the design of the “Organization and Procedures Guide for Performing Major Ambulatory and Short-stay Surgery in Coordination with the Primary Health Care Team". The guide was assessed by 90 experts with experience in the primary and secondary levels of care, who endorsed the quality and relevance of the proposal. It contains recommendations to help primary and secondary care professionals involved in surgical care to select the most appropriate approach to conditions treated by means of ambulatory or short-stay surgery. The recommendations are based on the latest available scientific evidence supporting the use of ambulatory surgery, short-stay surgery and home hospitalization.

  1. Brief Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Compared to Optimised General Practitioners? Care for Depression: A Randomised Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schene, A. H.; Baas, K. D.; Koeter, M.; Lucassen, P.; Bockting, C. L. H.; Wittkampf, K. F.; van Weert, H. C.; Huyser, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: How to treat Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) in primary care? Studies that compared (brief) Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) with care as usual by the General Practitioner (GP) found the first to be more effective. However, to make a fair comparison GP care should be optimised and pro

  2. Hospitalization for ambulatory care sensitive conditions at health insurance organization hospitals in Alexandria, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosallam, Rasha A; Guirguis, Wafaa W; Hassan, Mona Ha

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at estimating the percentage of hospital discharges and days of care accounted for by Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (ACSCs) at Health Insurance Organization (HIO) hospitals in Alexandria, calculating hospitalization rates for ACSCs among HIO population and identifying determinants of hospitalization for those conditions. A sample of 8300 medical records of patients discharged from three hospitals affiliated to HIO at Alexandria was reviewed. The rate of monthly discharges for ACSCs was estimated on the basis of counting number of combined ACSCs detected in the three hospitals and the hospitals' average monthly discharges. ACSCs accounted for about one-fifth of hospitalizations and days of care at HIO hospitals (21.8% and 20.8%, respectively). Annual hospitalization rates for ACSCs were 152.5 per 10,000 insured population. The highest rates were attributed to cellulitis/abscess (47.3 per 10,000 population), followed by diabetes complications and asthma (42.8 and 20.8 per 10,00 population). Logistic regression indicated that age, number of previous admissions, and admission department are significant predictors for hospitalization for an ACSC.

  3. Physical therapy plus general practitioners' care versus general practitioners' care alone for sciatica: A randomised clinical trial with a 12-month follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A.J. Luijsterburg (Pim); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne); R.W.J.G. Ostelo (Raymond); H.J. van den Hoogen (Hans); W.C. Peul (Wilco); C.J.J. Avezaat (Cees); B.W. Koes (Bart)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractA randomised clinical trial in primary care with a 12-months follow-up period. About 135 patients with acute sciatica (recruited from May 2003 to November 2004) were randomised in two groups: (1) the intervention group received physical therapy (PT) added to the general practitioners' ca

  4. What do practitioners think? A qualitative study of a shared care mental health and nutrition primary care program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jann Paquette-Warren

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop an in-depth understanding of a shared care model from primary mental health and nutrition care practitioners with a focus on program goals, strengths, challenges and target population benefits. Design: Qualitative method of focus groups. Setting/Participants: The study involved fifty-three practitioners from the Hamilton Health Service Organization Mental Health and Nutrition Program located in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Method: Six focus groups were conducted to obtain the perspective of practitioners belonging to various disciplines or health care teams. A qualitative approach using both an editing and template organization styles was taken followed by a basic content analysis. Main findings: Themes revealed accessibility, interdisciplinary care, and complex care as the main goals of the program. Major program strengths included flexibility, communication/collaboration, educational opportunities, access to patient information, continuity of care, and maintenance of practitioner and patient satisfaction. Shared care was described as highly dependent on communication style, skill and expertise, availability, and attitudes toward shared care. Time constraint with respect to collaboration was noted as the main challenge. Conclusion: Despite some challenges and variability among practices, the program was perceived as providing better patient care by the most appropriate practitioner in an accessible and comfortable setting.

  5. Celebrating a commitment to care: building concernful practices among practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Linda L; Williams, Margaret G

    2011-01-01

    Caring can be discussed and achieved in a variety of ways within various professional nursing settings. The purpose of our Commitment to Care Celebration was to share common experiences of caring among students, faculty, and staff to build community at a small midwestern college of nursing. The concernful practices of schooling learning teaching were the backbone of designing this caring experience. Narrative pedagogy invited stories of caring among participants in small circular groups to discover what was most important in caring for self and others. This event revealed a true caring experience for students, faculty, and staff, and supported how concernful practices engendered a community of learners.

  6. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: tobacco intervention practices in outpatient clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Thomas J; Chen, Chieh-I; Baker, Christine L; Shah, Sonali N; Pashos, Chris L; Boulanger, Luke

    2012-09-01

    Tobacco use remains the leading cause of preventable death. The outpatient medical clinic represents an important venue for delivering evidence-based interventions to large numbers of tobacco users. Extensive evidence supports the effectiveness of brief interventions. In a retrospective database analysis of 11,827 adult patients captured in the 2005 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (of which 2,420 were tobacco users), we examined the degree to which a variety of patient demographic, clinical and physician-related variables predict the delivery of tobacco counseling during a routine outpatient visit in primary care settings. In 2005, 21.7% of identified tobacco users received a tobacco intervention during their visit. The probability of receiving an intervention differed by gender, geographic region and source of payment. Individuals presenting with tobacco-related health conditions were more likely to receive an intervention. Most physicians classified as specialists were less likely to intervene. The provision of tobacco intervention services appears to be increasing at a modest rate, but remains well below desirable levels. It is a priority that brief interventions be routinely implemented to reduce the societal burden of tobacco use.

  7. Support for neonatal intensive care nurses by the advanced practitioner in psychiatric nursing

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    D.Cur. The goal of this research was to generate and describe a support approach for the advanced practitioner in psychiatric nursing to utilize for the neonatal intensive care nurse, working in a neonatal intensive care unit, in order to promote, to maintain and to restore mental health as integral part of health. Many changes occurred in the health care industry during the twentieth century. In South Africa, health care and social services that have developed, are grossly inefficient and...

  8. Complementary and alternative medicine practitioners' standard of care: responsibilities to patients and parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, Joan; Harrison, Christine; Asadi, Leyla; Cohen, Michael H; Vohra, Sunita

    2011-11-01

    In this article we explain (1) the standard of care that health care providers must meet and (2) how these principles apply to complementary and alternative medicine practitioners. The scenario describes a 14-year-old boy who is experiencing back pain and whose chiropractor performed spinal manipulation but did not recognize or take steps to rule out serious underlying disease-in this case, testicular cancer--either initially or when the patient's condition continued to deteriorate despite treatment. We use chiropractic care for a patient with a sore back as an example, because back pain is such a common problem and chiropracty is a common treatment chosen by both adult and pediatric patients. The scenario illustrates the responsibilities that complementary and alternative medicine practitioners owe patients/parents, the potential for liability when deficient care harms patients, and the importance of ample formal pediatric training for practitioners who treat pediatric patients.

  9. Caring for dementia carers: the role of general practitioners in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, C

    2011-01-29

    BACKGROUND: Dementia patients in Ireland live 8 years on average after diagnosis and health policy aims to ensure patients are cared for in the home for as long as possible. AIM: To assess the role of general practitioners in Ireland caring for dementia carers. METHODS: A PubMed search (1980-2010) was performed using MeSH terms "caregivers or carers", "Dementia or Alzheimer\\'s disease", "family physician or general practitioner". An English language restriction was imposed and the search continued to June 24th 2010. RESULTS: Psychosocial multidisciplinary interventions that unite education, skills training, management of psychological problems and family support in the community are effective in managing the problems of carers and should be facilitated by general practitioners. CONCLUSIONS: Dementia carers form an important yet understated patient group who present unique challenges for general practitioners in Ireland.

  10. Caring for dementia carers: the role of general practitioners in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, C

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Dementia patients in Ireland live 8 years on average after diagnosis and health policy aims to ensure patients are cared for in the home for as long as possible. AIM: To assess the role of general practitioners in Ireland caring for dementia carers. METHODS: A PubMed search (1980-2010) was performed using MeSH terms "caregivers or carers", "Dementia or Alzheimer\\'s disease", "family physician or general practitioner". An English language restriction was imposed and the search continued to June 24th 2010. RESULTS: Psychosocial multidisciplinary interventions that unite education, skills training, management of psychological problems and family support in the community are effective in managing the problems of carers and should be facilitated by general practitioners. CONCLUSIONS: Dementia carers form an important yet understated patient group who present unique challenges for general practitioners in Ireland.

  11. Demystifying the role of nurse practitioners in hospice: nurse practitioners as an integral part of the hospice plan of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Beginning January 1, 2011, as a result of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act healthcare-reform law that was signed in March 2010, Medicare requires that all patients entering their third or later hospice benefit period must have a face-to-face encounter with a hospice physician or nurse practitioner (NP) to validate hospice eligibility. Medicare has allowed NPs to function as a patient's hospice attending physician since 2003, but they may not certify or recertify a patient's terminal illness or function in the role of the hospice physician in the hospice interdisciplinary team. The allowance of Medicare for the NP to complete the hospice face-to-face encounter allows a greater role for a NP in the realm of hospice care.

  12. National Practitioner Data Bank for Adverse Information on Physicians and Other Health Care Practitioners: reporting on adverse and negative actions. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-28

    This final rule revises existing regulations under sections 401 through 432 of the Health Care Quality Improvement Act of 1986, governing the National Practitioner Data Bank for Adverse Information on Physicians and Other Health Care Practitioners, to incorporate statutory requirements under section 1921 of the Social Security Act, as amended by section 5(b) of the Medicare and Medicaid Patient and Program Protection Act of 1987 (MMPPPA), and as amended by the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990 (OBRA). The MMPPPA, along with certain additional provisions in the OBRA, was designed to protect program beneficiaries from unfit health care practitioners, and otherwise improve the anti-fraud provisions of Medicare and State health care programs. Section 1921, the statutory authority upon which this regulatory action is based, requires each State to adopt a system of reporting to the Secretary of Health and Human Services (the Secretary) certain adverse licensure actions taken against health care practitioners and health care entities licensed or otherwise authorized by a State (or a political subdivision thereof) to provide health care services. It also requires each State to report any negative actions or findings that a State licensing authority, peer review organization, or private accreditation entity has concluded against a health care practitioner or health care entity.

  13. Cost-effectiveness analysis of computerized ECG interpretation system in an ambulatory health care organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carel, R S

    1982-04-01

    The cost-effectiveness of a computerized ECG interpretation system in an ambulatory health care organization has been evaluated in comparison with a conventional (manual) system. The automated system was shown to be more cost-effective at a minimum load of 2,500 patients/month. At larger monthly loads an even greater cost-effectiveness was found, the average cost/ECG being about $2. In the manual system the cost/unit is practically independent of patient load. This is primarily due to the fact that 87% of the cost/ECG is attributable to wages and fees of highly trained personnel. In the automated system, on the other hand, the cost/ECG is heavily dependent on examinee load. This is due to the relatively large impact of equipment depreciation on fixed (and total) cost. Utilization of a computer-assisted system leads to marked reduction in cardiologists' interpretation time, substantially shorter turnaround time (of unconfirmed reports), and potential provision of simultaneous service at several remotely located "heart stations."

  14. Brief Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Compared to Optimised General Practitioners? Care for Depression: A Randomised Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Schene, A.H.; Baas, K.D.; Koeter, M; Lucassen, P.; Bockting, C.L.H.; Wittkampf, K. F.; van Weert, H.C.; Huyser, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: How to treat Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) in primary care? Studies that compared (brief) Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) with care as usual by the General Practitioner (GP) found the first to be more effective. However, to make a fair comparison GP care should be optimised and protocolised according to current evidence based guidelines for depression. So far this has not been the case. We studied whether a protocolised 8 session CBT is more effective than optimised and prot...

  15. Hospitalisations and costs relating to ambulatory care sensitive conditions in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheridan, A

    2012-03-08

    BACKGROUND: Ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs) are conditions for which the provision of timely and effective outpatient care can reduce the risks of hospitalisation by preventing, controlling or managing a chronic disease or condition. AIMS: The aims of this study were to report on ACSCs in Ireland, and to provide a baseline for future reference. METHODS: Using HIPE, via Health Atlas Ireland, inpatient discharges classified as ACSCs using definitions from the Victorian ACSC study were extracted for the years 2005-2008. Direct methods of standardisation allowed comparison of rates using the EU standard population as a comparison for national data, and national population as comparison for county data. Costs were estimated using diagnosis-related groups. RESULTS: The directly age-standardised discharge rate for ACSC-related discharges increased slightly, but non-significantly, from 15.40 per 1,000 population in 2005 to 15.75 per 1,000 population in 2008. The number of discharges increased (9.5%) from 63,619 in 2005 to 69,664 in 2008, with the estimated associated hospital costs increasing (31.5%) from 267.8 million in 2005 to 352.2 million in 2008. Across the country, there was considerable variation in the discharge rates for the Top-10 ACSCs for the years 2005-2008. Significantly lower rates of hospitalisation were observed in more urban areas including Cork, Dublin and Galway. The most common ACSC in 2008 was diabetes with complications (29.8%). CONCLUSIONS: The variation in rates observed indicates the scope of reducing hospitalisations and associated costs for ACSCs, across both adult\\'s and children\\'s services and particularly in relation to diabetes complications.

  16. Evaluation of patient perceptions and outcomes related to anticoagulation point-of-care testing in ambulatory care clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fermo JD

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, Prothrombin Time/International Normalized Ratio (PT/INR measurements have typically been used to monitor patients on warfarin through institutional laboratories via venous puncture. The Point-of-Care Testing (POCT device has revolutionized the patient care process by allowing for laboratory testing outside of the central laboratory. Objective: To analyze humanistic and clinical outcomes in patients currently treated with warfarin and monitored through a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic using point-of-care testing (POCT device versus venipuncture within ambulatory care clinics at our institution. Methods: All patients currently treated with warfarin therapy who were managed by clinical pharmacists for anticoagulation monitoring at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC Family Medicine Center and University Diagnostic Center, were enrolled. Patients were asked to complete a satisfaction survey regarding their anticoagulation monitoring. In addition, data related to emergency department (ED visits, hospitalizations and percent of time in the INR therapeutic range for 6 months pre- and post-implementation of POCT device was collected. This information was obtained through an electronic patient information database, Oacis. Results: A total of 145 patients were included in the data collection from the two clinics. The majority (41% of these patients were taking warfarin for atrial fibrillation. Satisfaction surveys were completed by 86 (59 % of patients. The surveys revealed that POCT device was preferred over venipuncture in 95% of patients. Reasons for the preference included more face-to-face interaction, less wait time, less pain, less blood needed, and quicker results. Of the 145 patients who were included in the objective data analysis, no significant differences were found in the number of hospitalizations, ED visits, or percent of time in the INR therapeutic range pre- and post- implementation of POCT device

  17. The establishment of a primary spine care practitioner and its benefits to health care reform in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Murphy R

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It is widely recognized that the dramatic increase in health care costs in the United States has not led to a corresponding improvement in the health care experience of patients or the clinical outcomes of medical care. In no area of medicine is this more true than in the area of spine related disorders (SRDs. Costs of medical care for SRDs have skyrocketed in recent years. Despite this, there is no evidence of improvement in the quality of this care. In fact, disability related to SRDs is on the rise. We argue that one of the key solutions to this is for the health care system to have a group of practitioners who are trained to function as primary care practitioners for the spine. We explain the reasons we think a primary spine care practitioner would be beneficial to patients, the health care system and society, some of the obstacles that will need to be overcome in establishing a primary spine care specialty and the ways in which these obstacles can be overcome.

  18. Potential collaboration with the private sector for the provision of ambulatory care in the Mekong region, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, Ha Anh; Sabin, Lora L.; Cuong, Le Quang; Thien, Duong Duc; Feeley, Rich

    2012-01-01

    Background Over the past two decades, health insurance in Vietnam has expanded nationwide. Concurrently, Vietnam's private health sector has developed rapidly and become an increasingly integral part of the health system. To date, however, little is understood regarding the potential for expanding public-private partnerships to improve health care access and outcomes in Vietnam. Objective To explore possibilities for public-private collaboration in the provision of ambulatory care at the primary level in the Mekong region, Vietnam. Design We employed a mixed methods research approach. Qualitative methods included focus group discussions with health officials and in-depth interviews with managers of private health facilities. Quantitative methods encompassed facility assessments, and exit surveys of clients at the same private facilities. Results Discussions with health officials indicated generally favorable attitudes towards partnerships with private providers. Concerns were also voiced, regarding the over- and irrational use of antibiotics, and in terms of limited capacity for regulation, monitoring, and quality assurance. Private facility managers expressed a willingness to collaborate in the provision of ambulatory care, and private providers facilites were relatively well staffed and equipped. The client surveys indicated that 80% of clients first sought treatment at a private facility, even though most lived closer to a public provider. This choice was motivated mainly by perceptions of quality of care. Clients who reported seeking care at both a public and private facility were more satisfied with the latter. Conclusions Public-private collaboration in the provision of ambulatory care at the primary level in Vietnam has substantial potential for improving access to quality services. We recommend that such collaboration be explored by Vietnamese policy-makers. If implemented, we strongly urge attention to effectively managing such partnerships, establishing a

  19. Potential collaboration with the private sector for the provision of ambulatory care in the Mekong region, Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha Anh Duc

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the past two decades, health insurance in Vietnam has expanded nationwide. Concurrently, Vietnam's private health sector has developed rapidly and become an increasingly integral part of the health system. To date, however, little is understood regarding the potential for expanding public-private partnerships to improve health care access and outcomes in Vietnam. Objective: To explore possibilities for public-private collaboration in the provision of ambulatory care at the primary level in the Mekong region, Vietnam. Design: We employed a mixed methods research approach. Qualitative methods included focus group discussions with health officials and in-depth interviews with managers of private health facilities. Quantitative methods encompassed facility assessments, and exit surveys of clients at the same private facilities. Results: Discussions with health officials indicated generally favorable attitudes towards partnerships with private providers. Concerns were also voiced, regarding the over- and irrational use of antibiotics, and in terms of limited capacity for regulation, monitoring, and quality assurance. Private facility managers expressed a willingness to collaborate in the provision of ambulatory care, and private providers facilites were relatively well staffed and equipped. The client surveys indicated that 80% of clients first sought treatment at a private facility, even though most lived closer to a public provider. This choice was motivated mainly by perceptions of quality of care. Clients who reported seeking care at both a public and private facility were more satisfied with the latter. Conclusions: Public-private collaboration in the provision of ambulatory care at the primary level in Vietnam has substantial potential for improving access to quality services. We recommend that such collaboration be explored by Vietnamese policy-makers. If implemented, we strongly urge attention to effectively managing such

  20. "Tossing out the baby with the bath water": New Zealand general practitioners on maternity care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaye, Chrystal; Mason, Zara; Miller, Dawn

    2013-01-01

    A rapid decline in the number of general practitioners practicing obstetrics followed legislative changes in New Zealand during the early 1990s that changed the maternity care landscape. The resulting repositioning of maternity care professions has seen medical dominance give way to midwifery dominance in the maternity marketplace. Drawing on our research, we suggest that current and former general practitioner obstetricians harbor grievances relating to (1) the loss of obstetrics from the 'cradle to grave' philosophy of general practice, and (2) policies encouraging competition between maternity care providers. We argue that these perspectives represent truth games that are generated by the disciplinary blocks of the maternity care professions, and reveal the moral nature of the political economy of maternity care.

  1. Model of learning for practitioners in dementia care with music therapy as the joint focal point

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Aase Marie

    Abstract to the 21st Nordic Congress of Gerontology in June 10th - 13th, 2012 Title Model of learning for practitioners in dementia care with music therapy as the joint focal point The project is a PhD research in progress, which aims to develop a model of learning for practitioners in dementia...... of tangible tools from the musical activities? And further: What impact does the emphasis on development of the care provider’s musical and interpersonal competencies have on quality of life and well-being among persons suffering from dementia? The model of learning includes using the Dementia Care Mapping...... care, which has music therapy as the joint focal point and focus on the relational meeting.Through development of a cross-disciplinary cooperation between the music therapist and the care providers in connection with a course of music therapy, will following areas be elucidated: How can the musical...

  2. Integrated Modular Teaching of Human Biology for Primary Care Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, Michael S.

    1977-01-01

    Describes the use of integrated modular teaching of the human biology component of the Health Associate Program at Johns Hopkins University, where the goal is to develop an understanding of the sciences as applied to primary care. Discussion covers the module sequence, the human biology faculty, goals of the human biology faculty, laboratory…

  3. Charging for Ambulatory Care in Military Health Care Facilities: An Evaluation and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-25

    health care facilities, with resulting income used to subsidize CHAMPUS. This proposal, calling for $5.00 per visit as submitted by Senator Daniel...Analysis of Current Methods and Their Development," Inquiry, 16, Fall 1979, 230-246. 32 Jack Hadley, John Holahan , and William Scanlon, "Can Fee-for...other) were combined into a single category called "commercial insurance". An additional category, "Do Not Know", was added to reflect those

  4. Brief cognitive behavioral therapy compared to general practitioners care for depression in primary care: a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bockting Claudi LH

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depressive disorders are highly prevalent in primary care (PC and are associated with considerable functional impairment and increased health care use. Research has shown that many patients prefer psychological treatments to pharmacotherapy, however, it remains unclear which treatment is most optimal for depressive patients in primary care. Methods/Design A randomized, multi-centre trial involving two intervention groups: one receiving brief cognitive behavioral therapy and the other receiving general practitioner care. General practitioners from 109 General Practices in Nijmegen and Amsterdam (The Netherlands will be asked to include patients aged between 18-70 years presenting with depressive symptomatology, who do not receive an active treatment for their depressive complaints. Patients will be telephonically assessed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I to ascertain study eligibility. Eligible patients will be randomized to one of two treatment conditions: either 8 sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy by a first line psychologist or general practitioner's care according to The Dutch College of General Practitioners Practice Guideline (NHG- standaard. Baseline and follow-up assessments are scheduled at 0, 6, 12 and 52 weeks following the start of the intervention. Primary outcome will be measured with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 (HDRS-17 and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9. Outcomes will be analyzed on an intention to treat basis. Trial Registration ISRCTN65811640

  5. Ambulatory Surgical Measures - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Ambulatory Surgical Center Quality Reporting (ASCQR) Program seeks to make care safer and more efficient through quality reporting. ASCs eligible for this...

  6. Ambulatory Surgical Measures - Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Ambulatory Surgical Center Quality Reporting (ASCQR) Program seeks to make care safer and more efficient through quality reporting. ASCs eligible for this...

  7. Barriers to the implementation of preconception care guidelines as perceived by general practitioners: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazza Danielle

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite strong evidence of the benefits of preconception interventions for improving pregnancy outcomes, the delivery and uptake of preconception care and periconceptional folate supplementation remain low. General practitioners play a central role in the delivery of preconception care. Understanding general practitioners’ perceptions of the barriers and enablers to implementing preconception care allows for more appropriate targeting of quality improvement interventions. Consequently, the aim of this study was to examine the barriers and enablers to the delivery and uptake of preconception care guidelines from general practitioners’ perspective using theoretical domains related to behaviour change. Methods We conducted a qualitative study using focus groups consisting of 22 general practitioners who were recruited from three regional general practice support organisations. Questions were based on the theoretical domain framework, which describes 12 domains related to behaviour change. General practitioners’ responses were classified into predefined themes using a deductive process of thematic analysis. Results Beliefs about capabilities, motivations and goals, environmental context and resources, and memory, attention and decision making were the key domains identified in the barrier analysis. Some of the perceived barriers identified by general practitioners were time constraints, the lack of women presenting at the preconception stage, the numerous competing preventive priorities within the general practice setting, issues relating to the cost of and access to preconception care, and the lack of resources for assisting in the delivery of preconception care guidelines. Perceived enablers identified by general practitioners included the availability of preconception care checklists and patient brochures, handouts, and waiting room posters outlining the benefits and availability of preconception care consultations

  8. Alternative Health Care Practitioners in a Chinese American Community: A Preliminary Report of Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Jessica Ching-Yi

    This paper provides a brief review of the literature on traditional Chinese medicine in both China and the United States and presents observations from a preliminary study of Chinese practitioners in the Chinatown section of Los Angeles, California. The dualistic health care system in Chinese culture is described as comprising both scholarly and…

  9. Practitioner perspectives from seven health professional groups on core competencies in the context of chronic care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouche, Christa; Kenealy, Timothy; Mace, Jennifer; Shaw, John

    2014-11-01

    The prevalence of chronic illness is growing worldwide and management is increasingly undertaken by interprofessional teams, yet education is still generally provided in separate professions. The aim of this study was to explore the perspectives of New Zealand healthcare practitioners from seven professional groups involved in chronic care (general practice medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physiotherapy, social work, and speech language therapy) on the core competencies required of those working in this area. The study was set in the context of the chronic care and shared decision-making (SDM) models. The core competencies for chronic care practitioners proposed by the World Health Organisation were used to shape the research questions. Focus groups with expert clinicians (n = 20) and semi-structured interviews with practitioners (n = 32) were undertaken. Findings indicated a high level of agreement that the core competencies were appropriate and relevant for chronic care practitioners but that many educational and practice gaps existed and interprofessional education in New Zealand was not currently addressing these gaps. Among the key issues highlighted for attention by educators and policy-makers were the following: teams and teamwork, professional roles and responsibilities, interprofessional communication, cultural competence, better engagement with patients, families, and carers, and common systems, information sharing and confidentiality.

  10. Managing the marketing function for advanced nurse practitioners in a managed care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakis, S

    1997-09-01

    Delivering quality, cost-efficient health care is a desired service in the health care market today. Advanced nurse practitioners are positioned to deliver this product. The key in today's market is clearly defining the product, identifying the customers of the product, and crafting the message for each customer. The development of marketing strategies to address each of the above points will assist an organization in targeting resources and evaluating the effectiveness of the message being delivered.

  11. Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Practice Characteristics: Barriers and Opportunities for Interprofessional Teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Norful, Allison A; Martsolf, Grant R

    Developing team-based care models and expanding nurse practitioner (NP) workforce in primary care are recommended by policy makers to meet demand. Little is known how to promote interprofessional teamwork. Using a mixed-methods design, we analyzed qualitative interview and quantitative survey data from primary care NPs to explore practice characteristics important for teamwork. The Interprofessional Teamwork for Health and Social Care Framework guided the study. We identified NP-physician and NP-administration relationships; organizational support and governance; time and space for teamwork; and regulations and economic impact as important. Practice and policy change addressing these factors is needed for effective interprofessional teamwork.

  12. Treatment goals for ambulatory blood pressure and plasma lipids after stroke are often not reached

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Aase Worså; Kofoed, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    In Danish health care, secondary prevention after stroke is currently handled mainly by general practitioners using office blood pressure (OBP) assessment of hypertension. The aim of this study was to compare the OBP approach to 24-hour assessment by ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) monitoring....... Furthermore, we aimed to record the degree of adherence to recommended therapy goals for blood pressure and plasma lipids....

  13. Treatment goals for ambulatory blood pressure and plasma lipids after stroke are often not reached

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Aase Worså; Kofoed, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    In Danish health care, secondary prevention after stroke is currently handled mainly by general practitioners using office blood pressure (OBP) assessment of hypertension. The aim of this study was to compare the OBP approach to 24-hour assessment by ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) monitoring. Fu....... Furthermore, we aimed to record the degree of adherence to recommended therapy goals for blood pressure and plasma lipids....

  14. National observatory on the therapeutic management in ambulatory care patients aged 65 and over, with type 2 diabetes, chronic pain or atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becquemont, Laurent; Benattar-Zibi, Linda; Bertin, Philippe; Berrut, Gilles; Corruble, Emmanuelle; Danchin, Nicolas; Delespierre, Tiba; Derumeaux, Geneviève; Falissard, Bruno; Forette, Francoise; Hanon, Olivier; Pasquier, Florence; Pinget, Michel; Ourabah, Rissane; Piedvache, Céline

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of the S.AGES cohort is to describe the real-life therapeutic care of elderly patients. Patients and methods. This is a prospective observational cohort study of 3 700 non-institutionalized patients over the age of 65 years with either type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), chronic pain or atrial fibrillation (AF) recruited by French general practitioners (GPs). Follow-up is planned for 3 years. Baseline characteristics. In the chronic pain sub-cohort, 33% of patients are treated with only grade 1 analgesics, 29% with grade 2 analgesics and 3% with grade 3 analgesics, and 22% have no pain treatment. In the T2DM sub-cohort, 61% of patients have well-controlled diabetes (Hb1c<7%) and 18% are treated with insulin. In the AF sub-cohort, 65% of patients have a CHADS2 score greater than 2, 77% are treated with oral anticoagulants, 17% with platelet inhibitors, 40% with antiarrhythmic drugs and 56% with rate slowing medications. Conclusion. The S.AGES cohort presents a unique opportunity to clarify the real-life therapeutic management of ambulatory elderly subjects and will help to identify the factors associated with the occurrence of major clinical events.

  15. Shared care between specialised psychiatric services and primary care: The experiences and expectations of General Practitioners in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Agyapong, Vincent Israel Opoku

    2012-04-17

    Objective. The study aims to explore the views of General Practitioners in Ireland on shared care between specialised psychiatric services and primary care. Method. A self-administered questionnaire was designed and posted to 400 randomly selected General Practitioners working in Ireland. Results. Of the respondents, 189 (94%) reported that they would support a general policy on shared care between primary care and specialised psychiatric services for patients who are stable on their treatment. However, 124 (61.4%) reported that they foresaw difficulties for patients in implementing such a policy including: a concern that primary care is not adequately resourced with allied health professionals to support provision of psychiatric care (113, 53.2%); a concern this would result in increased financial burden on some patients (89, 48.8%); a lack of adequate cooperation between primary care and specialised mental health services (84, 41.8%); a concern that some patients may lack confidence in GP care (55, 27.4%); and that primary care providers are not adequately trained to provide psychiatric care (29, 14.4% ). Conclusion. The majority of GPs in Ireland would support a policy of shared care of psychiatric patients; however they raise significant concerns regarding practical implications of such a policy in Ireland.

  16. Evaluation of the Medical Care of Patients with Hypertension in an Emergency Department and in Ambulatory Hypertension Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Nobre

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the characteristics of the patients receiving medical care in the Ambulatory of Hypertension of the Emergency Department, Division of Cardiology, and in the Emergency Unit of the Clinical Hospital of the Ribeirão Preto Medical School. METHODS: Using a protocol, we compared the care of the same hypertensive patients in on different occasions in the 2 different places. The characteristics of 62 patients, 29 men with a mean age of 57 years, were analyzed between January 1996 and December 1997. RESULTS: The care of these patients resulted in different medical treatment regardless of their clinical features and blood pressure levels. Thus, in the Emergency Unit, 97% presented with symptoms, and 64.5% received medication to rapidly reduce blood pressure. In 50% of the cases, nifedipine SL was the elected medication. Patients who applied to the Ambulatory of Hypertension presenting with similar features, or, in some cases, presenting with similar clinically higher levels of blood pressure, were not prescribed medication for a rapid reduction of blood pressure at any of the appointments. CONCLUSION: The therapeutic approach to patients with high blood pressure levels, symptomatic or asymptomatic, was dependent on the place of treatment. In the Emergency Unit, the conduct was, in the majority of cases, to decrease blood pressure immediately, whereas in the Ambulatory of Hypertension, the same levels of blood pressure, in the same individuals, resulted in therapeutic adjustment with nonpharmacological management. These results show the need to reconsider the concept of hypertensive crises and their therapeutical implications.

  17. A qualitative study of nurse practitioner promotion of interprofessional care across institutional settings: Perspectives from different healthcare professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Hurlock-Chorostecki

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: Nurse practitioners in acute care hospital and long-term care settings have valued attributes that can promote interprofessional care. Effective strategies to promote interprofessional care emerge from these role attributes. However, the interprofessional relationship type perceived could enhance or impede the contribution of the strategies to interprofessional care promotion.

  18. General dental practitioners' opinions on orthodontics in primary and secondary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, J A

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 232 general dental practitioners was undertaken by the purchasing authorities in Hereford and Worcester, England, in 1993, to establish local practitioners' views on primary and secondary care orthodontics. The response rate was 90.1%. The dentists overestimated their orthodontic case-load: 66.6% of contract holders submitted no claims for upper removable appliances (URA) treatment, but 70.8% claimed they undertook removable appliance therapy. Dentists believed orthodontics should be a feature of the General Dental Services (GDS) but did not seem inclined to commit themselves to providing it. A majority of GDPs (54.9%) felt orthodontics was uneconomic under the GDS. There was support for the treatment planning role of hospitals, but although this was available locally it did not appear to have stimulated primary care provision. Consultant outreach clinics were not generally supported but there was a desire for more opportunities for hospital clinical attachments in orthodontics. The implications for the policies of National Health Service (NHS) purchasers are considered: purchasing health authorities need to carry out systematic assessment of the views of their general dental practitioners and take account of their desired patterns of specialist provision. Policies encouraging the shift of orthodontics into primary care are called into question by this study. If demand for orthodontics is to be met, policy should concentrate on the development of hospital services and specialist practitioners.

  19. Nurse practitioners--where do they belong within the organizational structure of the acute care setting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Sherif, C

    1995-01-01

    Nurse practitioners are expanding their scope of practice and moving into acute care settings. Striving to be part of the nursing organizational structure in the acute care setting will keep NP's practice firmly rooted in nursing theory. Remaining within the nursing realm will enable them to receive support and guidance from their nursing colleagues while advancing the profession through their knowledge and expertise. Within the nursing organizational structure, NPs can become leaders as clinicians and role models. Without the formal support of the nursing organizational structure, the unique skills and contributions nurse practitioners furnish to the profession will be lost, as others will then dictate the NP role and scope of practice within the acute care setting.

  20. Predictive value of ambulatory blood pressure shortly after withdrawal of antihypertensive drugs in primary care patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beltman, FW; Heesen, WF; Smit, AJ; May, JF; deGraeff, PA; Havinga, TK; Schuurman, FH; vanderVeur, E; Lie, KI; MeyboomdeJong, B

    1996-01-01

    Objective-To determine whether ambulatory blood pressure eight weeks after withdrawal of antihypertensive medication is a more sensitive measure than seated blood pressure to predict blood pressure in the long term. Design-Patients with previously untreated diastolic hypertension were treated with a

  1. Supply sensitive services in Swiss ambulatory care: An analysis of basic health insurance records for 2003-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Künzi Beat

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Swiss ambulatory care is characterized by independent, and primarily practice-based, physicians, receiving fee for service reimbursement. This study analyses supply sensitive services using ambulatory care claims data from mandatory health insurance. A first research question was aimed at the hypothesis that physicians with large patient lists decrease their intensity of services and bill less per patient to health insurance, and vice versa: physicians with smaller patient lists compensate for the lack of patients with additional visits and services. A second research question relates to the fact that several cantons are allowing physicians to directly dispense drugs to patients ('self-dispensation' whereas other cantons restrict such direct sales to emergencies only. This second question was based on the assumption that patterns of rescheduling patients for consultations may differ across channels of dispensing prescription drugs and therefore the hypothesis of different consultation costs in this context was investigated. Methods Complete claims data paid for by mandatory health insurance of all Swiss physicians in own practices were analyzed for the years 2003-2007. Medical specialties were pooled into six main provider types in ambulatory care: primary care, pediatrics, gynecology & obstetrics, psychiatrists, invasive and non-invasive specialists. For each provider type, regression models at the physician level were used to analyze the relationship between the number of patients treated and the total sum of treatment cost reimbursed by mandatory health insurance. Results The results show non-proportional relationships between patient numbers and total sum of treatment cost for all provider types involved implying that treatment costs per patient increase with higher practice size. The related additional costs to the health system are substantial. Regions with self-dispensation had lowest treatment cost for primary care

  2. Effect of an audit and feedback intervention on hospitalized oncology patients' perception of nurse practitioner care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulko, Dorothy; Mooney, Kathi

    2010-01-01

    Although patient satisfaction has been used traditionally as a measure of excellence, research has suggested that the perception of being well cared for is likely a more promising indicator of quality than satisfaction alone. Expectations, physical environment, communication, participation and involvement, technical competence, and the influence of healthcare organizations are factors that may impair patients' ability to distinguish nursing care from their overall healthcare experience. This study evaluated the effect of a nurse practitioner audit and feedback intervention on hospitalized patients' perception of care.

  3. Preparing general practitioners to receive cancer patients following treatment in secondary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guassora, Ann Dorrit Kristiane; Jarlbæk, Lene; Thorsen, Thorkil

    2015-01-01

    for professionals in both primary and secondary healthcare. Participants discussed solutions to problems which had previously been identified in patient interviews and in focus groups with general practitioners (GPs), hospital doctors, and nursing staff. The data were analyzed using framework analysis. Results......Background: Many patients consider the interface between secondary and primary care difficult, and in particular, the transition of care between these different parts of the healthcare system presents problems. This interface has long been recognized as a critical point for quality of care...

  4. Care for patients with severe mental illness: the general practitioner's role perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groenier Klaas H

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with severe mental illness (SMI experience distress and disabilities in several aspects of life, and they have a higher risk of somatic co-morbidity. Both patients and their family members need the support of an easily accessible primary care system. The willingness of general practitioners and the impeding factors for them to participate in providing care for patients with severe mental illness in the acute and the chronic or residual phase were explored. Methods A questionnaire survey of a sample of Dutch general practitioners spread over the Netherlands was carried out. This comprised 20 questions on the GP's 'Opinion and Task Perspective', 19 questions on 'Treatment and Experiences', and 27 questions on 'Characteristics of the General Practitioner and the Practice Organisation'. Results 186 general practitioners distributed over urban areas (49%, urbanised rural areas (38% and rural areas (15% of the Netherlands participated. The findings were as follows: GPs currently considered themselves as the first contact in the acute psychotic phase. In the chronic or residual phase GPs saw their core task as to diagnose and treat somatic co-morbidity. A majority would be willing to monitor the general health of these patients as well. It appeared that GP trainers and GPs with a smaller practice setting made follow-up appointments and were willing to monitor the self-care of patients with SMI more often than GPs with larger practices. GPs also saw their role as giving support and information to the patient's family. However, they felt a need for recognition of their competencies when working with mental health care specialists. Conclusion GPs were willing to participate in providing care for patients with SMI. They considered themselves responsible for psychotic emergency cases, for monitoring physical health in the chronic phase, and for supporting the relatives of psychotic patients.

  5. Self-care and Professional Quality of Life: Predictive Factors among MSW Practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kori R Bloomquist

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the effects of self-care practices and perceptions on positive and negative indicators of professional quality of life, including burnout, secondary traumatic stress, and compassion satisfaction among MSW practitioners. Results reveal that while social workers value and believe self-care is effective in alleviating job-related stress, they engage in self-care on a limited basis. Findings indicate that MSW programs and employers do not teach social workers how to effectively engage in self-care practice. Various domains of self-care practice contribute differently to indicators of professional quality of life. This study sheds light on the under-studied relationship between social worker self-care and professional quality of life, provides insights into the types of activities practiced and not practiced by MSW practitioners, and identifies gaps between perceived value and effective teaching of self-care. Implications exist for social work educators and employers and the potential to support a healthier, sustainable workforce.

  6. The Role of Ambulatory Care Pharmacists in an HIV Multidisciplinary Team within a Free and Bilingual Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann M. Fugit, Pharm.D., BCPS

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Describe the role and integration of ambulatory care pharmacists in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV clinic within a free and bilingual clinic with regards to types of interventions made during the patient-pharmacist visit. Design: Retrospective, single-centered, chart review. Setting: Free, bilingual clinic in Richmond, VA. Participants: Thirty-two adult patients with diagnosed HIV receiving care in the clinic between June 30, 2010 and January 26, 2011. Main Outcome Measure: Types of interventions documented during the patient-pharmacist visit, categorized as medication review, patient education, or adherence monitoring. Results: Total of 32 patients accounted for 55 patient-pharmacist visits and 296 interventions. The most common interventions were medication review (66.9%, patient education (23.3%, and adherence monitoring (9.8%. Post-hoc analysis suggests Hispanic patients are more likely to be diagnosed with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS (P = 0.01, have current or history of opportunistic infection (OI (P=0.01, and have current or history of OI prophylaxis (P = 0.03. Adherence monitoring was less common amongst the non-Hispanics (7.1% compared to the Hispanic sub-population (16.5%, (P = 0.04. Conclusion: The role of ambulatory care pharmacists in a free and bilingual clinic goes beyond adherence monitoring. Pharmacists can be a valuable part of the patient care team by providing medication review and patient education for HIV and other co-morbidities within free clinics. Further research is warranted to assess outcomes and to further explore the underlying barriers to early HIV diagnosis and adherence within the Hispanic population.

  7. "Creative Blocs": Action Research Study on the Implementation of Lego as a Tool for Reflective Practice with Social Care Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaliero, Tamsin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether Lego could be used as a tool for reflective practice with social care practitioners (SCPs) and student practitioners. This article outlines an action research study conducted in an institute of higher education in Ireland. Findings from this study suggest that Lego can be used to support student…

  8. The patient perspective: arthritis care provided by Advanced Clinician Practitioner in Arthritis Care program-trained clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warmington K

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kelly Warmington,1 Carol A Kennedy,2 Katie Lundon,3 Leslie J Soever,4 Sydney C Brooks,5 Laura A Passalent,6 Rachel Shupak,7 Rayfel Schneider,8 1Learning Institute, Hospital for Sick Children, 2Musculoskeletal Health and Outcomes Research, St Michael’s Hospital, 3Continuing Professional Development, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, 4University Health Network, 5Ontario Division, Arthritis Society, 6Toronto Western Hospital, 7Division of Rheumatology, St Michael's Hospital, 8Division of Rheumatology, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Objective: To assess patient satisfaction with the arthritis care services provided by graduates of the Advanced Clinician Practitioner in Arthritis Care (ACPAC program. Materials and methods: This was a cross-sectional evaluation using a self-report questionnaire for data collection. Participants completed the Patient–Doctor Interaction Scale, modified to capture patient–practitioner interactions. Participants completed selected items from the Group Health Association of America's Consumer Satisfaction Survey, and items capturing quality of care, appropriateness of wait times, and a comparison of extended-role practitioner (ERP services with previously received arthritis care. Results: A total of 325 patients seen by 27 ERPs from 15 institutions completed the questionnaire. Respondents were primarily adults (85%, female (72%, and living in urban areas (79%. The mean age of participants was 54 years (range 3–92 years, and 51% were not working. Patients with inflammatory (51% and noninflammatory conditions (31% were represented. Mean (standard deviation Patient–Practitioner Interaction Scale subscale scores ranged from 4.50 (0.60 to 4.63 (0.48 (1 to 5 [greater satisfaction]. Overall satisfaction with the quality of care was high (4.39 [0.77], as was satisfaction with wait times (referral to appointment, 4.27 [0.86]; in clinic, 4.24 [0.91]. Ninety-eight percent of

  9. The Association Between Internet Use and Ambulatory Care-Seeking Behaviors in Taiwan: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tsung-Fu; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Lin, Tzu-Bin; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Background Compared with the traditional ways of gaining health-related information from newspapers, magazines, radio, and television, the Internet is inexpensive, accessible, and conveys diverse opinions. Several studies on how increasing Internet use affected outpatient clinic visits were inconclusive. Objective The objective of this study was to examine the role of Internet use on ambulatory care-seeking behaviors as indicated by the number of outpatient clinic visits after adjusting for confounding variables. Methods We conducted this study using a sample randomly selected from the general population in Taiwan. To handle the missing data, we built a multivariate logistic regression model for propensity score matching using age and sex as the independent variables. The questionnaires with no missing data were then included in a multivariate linear regression model for examining the association between Internet use and outpatient clinic visits. Results We included a sample of 293 participants who answered the questionnaire with no missing data in the multivariate linear regression model. We found that Internet use was significantly associated with more outpatient clinic visits (P=.04). The participants with chronic diseases tended to make more outpatient clinic visits (P<.01). Conclusions The inconsistent quality of health-related information obtained from the Internet may be associated with patients’ increasing need for interpreting and discussing the information with health care professionals, thus resulting in an increasing number of outpatient clinic visits. In addition, the media literacy of Web-based health-related information seekers may also affect their ambulatory care-seeking behaviors, such as outpatient clinic visits. PMID:27927606

  10. Manual therapy, physical therapy, or continued care by a general practitioner for patients with neck pain: a randomized, controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, J.L.; Koes, B.W.; Vet, H.C.W. de; Windt, D.A.W.M. van der; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Mameren, H. van; Devillé, W.L.J.M.; Pool, J.J.M.; Scholten, R.J.P.M.; Bouter, L.M.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neck pain is a common problem, but the effectiveness of frequently applied conservative therapies has never been directly compared. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of manual therapy, physical therapy, and continued care by a general practitioner. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled

  11. General practitioners' reasoning about using mobile distance-spanning technology in home care and in nursing home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wälivaara, Britt-Marie; Andersson, Staffan; Axelsson, Karin

    2011-03-01

    The trend for health care and nursing care turns from hospital to health care and nursing care at home. Studies have shown that health care professionals have no access to patient records in home and nursing home settings. Technological development creates opportunities for a host of mobile technology solutions. The aim of this study was to describe the reasoning among general practitioners (GPs) about the use of mobile distance-spanning technology (MDST) in care at home and in nursing homes. Seventeen GPs were divided in five groups for a group interview. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The qualitative content analysis resulted in four areas about the MDST, MDST has an impact on GPs' work, the nurses' profession, and the patient and the family, with nine adherent categories. The findings were interpreted and formulated in the theme: MDST should be used with caution. The results show quite a few expressions about the MDST as useful and valuable in health care at home and in nursing home settings; however, in every category, there were text that we interpreted as caution when using the MDST. The MDST cannot be used in all situations and cannot replace human meetings in health care and nursing care at home and in nursing homes. The MDST should primarily be a tool for the profession, and understanding the professions' reasoning about technology use in health care at home and in nursing home settings must be the base for implementing MDST.

  12. Non-EEG based ambulatory seizure detection designed for home use : What is available and how will it influence epilepsy care?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Andel, Judith; Thijs, Roland D.; de Weerd, Al; Arends, Johan; Leijten, Frans

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to (1) evaluate available systems and algorithms for ambulatory automatic seizure detection and (2) discuss benefits and disadvantages of seizure detection in epilepsy care. METHODS: PubMed and EMBASE were searched up to November 2014, using variations and synonyms of sea

  13. Patient characteristics and clinical management of patients with shoulder pain in U.S. primary care settings: Secondary data analysis of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansfield Richard J

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although shoulder pain is a commonly encountered problem in primary care, there are few studies examining its presenting characteristics and clinical management in this setting. Methods We performed secondary data analysis of 692 office visits for shoulder pain collected through the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (Survey years 1993–2000. Information on demographic characteristics, history and place of injury, and clinical management (physician order of imaging, physiotherapy, and steroid intraarticular injection were examined. Results Shoulder pain was associated with an injury in one third (33.2% (230/692 of office visits in this population of US primary care physicians. Males, and younger adults (age ≤ 52 more often associated their shoulder pain with previous injury, but there were no racial differences in injury status. Injury-related shoulder pain was related to work in over one-fifth (21.3% (43/202 of visits. An x-ray was performed in 29.0% (164/566 of office visits, a finding that did not differ by gender, race, or by age status. Other imaging (CT scan, MRI, or ultrasound was infrequently performed (6.5%, 37/566. Physiotherapy was ordered in 23.9% (135/566 of visits for shoulder pain. Younger adults and patients with a history of injury more often had physiotherapy ordered, but there was no significant difference in the ordering of physiotherapy by gender or race. Examination of the use of intraarticular injection was not possible with this data set. Conclusion These data from the largest sample of patients with shoulder pain presenting to primary care settings offer insights into the presenting characteristics and clinical management of shoulder pain at the primary care level. The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey is a useful resource for examining the clinical management of specific symptoms in U.S. primary care offices.

  14. How do general practitioners experience providing care to refugees with mental health problems? A qualitative study from Denmark

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen Natasja Koitzsch; Norredam Marie; Priebe Stefan; Krasnik Allan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Refugees are a particularly vulnerable group in relation to the development of mental illness and many may have been subjected to torture or other traumatic experiences. General practitioners are gatekeepers for access to several parts of the psychiatric system and knowledge of their patients’ refugee background is crucial to secure adequate care. The aim of this study is to investigate how general practitioners experience providing care to refugees with mental health prob...

  15. The Character Strengths of Special Forces Personnel: Insights for Civilian Health Care Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayton, Scott D; Kehoe, E James

    2016-09-01

    Civilian employees, contractors, and private community clinicians are increasingly providing health treatment to currently serving and former military personnel. This study addresses recent calls for evidence-based information to assist civilian practitioners in understanding the perspectives of their military clients. To this end, the self-reported character strengths of military personnel were elicited as an operationalized expression of their underlying personal values that shape their perspectives and conduct as soldiers. Specifically, Australian Army Special Forces operators and support personnel (N = 337) were asked to rank themselves on 24 character strengths. The three character strengths of integrity, teamworker, and good judgment were ranked significantly above random assignment. Nearly all the respondents (84%) gave a top rank to at least one of these character strengths. Differences between the operators and support personnel were modest. Results are discussed with respect to establishing an effective relationship between military clients and civilian health care practitioners.

  16. A nurse practitioner-led urgent care center: meeting the needs of the patient with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruegg, Tracy A

    2013-08-01

    Providing comprehensive care for patients with cancer is complex with regard to severe treatment-related side effects. Hundreds of thousands of patients with cancer visit the emergency department (ED) each year, and more than half report multiple visits. In the United States, few of the National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers have an ED specifically for patients with cancer. EDs often are an overcrowded and expensive way in which to care for the urgent needs of patients with cancer. In addition, a looming shortage exists for both primary care providers and oncologists who can address symptom issues. As the Affordable Care Act is implemented, more patients will enter the healthcare system, placing a demand on providers that the current supply cannot meet. A report from the Institute of Medicine advocates that nurse practitioners (NPs) are more than competent to provide for the unique urgent care needs of patients with cancer. The aim of this article is to describe an NP-led urgent care center for patients with cancer and how that care center provides access to vital, expeditious, and cost-effective care.

  17. Nurse practitioner organizational climate in primary care settings: implications for professional practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poghosyan, Lusine; Nannini, Angela; Stone, Patricia W; Smaldone, Arlene

    2013-01-01

    The expansion of the nurse practitioner (NP) workforce in primary care is key to meeting the increased demand for care. Organizational climates in primary care settings affect NP professional practice and the quality of care. This study investigated organizational climate and its domains affecting NP professional practice in primary care settings. A qualitative descriptive design, with purposive sampling, was used to recruit 16 NPs practicing in primary care settings in Massachusetts. An interview guide was developed and pretested with two NPs and in 1 group interview with 7 NPs. Data collection took place in spring of 2011. Individual interviews lasted from 30-70 minutes, were audio recorded, and transcribed. Data were analyzed using Atlas.ti 6.0 software by 3 researchers. Content analysis was applied. Three previously identified themes, NP-physician relations, independent practice and autonomy, and professional visibility, as well as two new themes, organizational support and resources and NP-administration relations emerged from the analyses. NPs reported collegial relations with physicians, challenges in establishing independent practice, suboptimal relationships with administration, and lack of support. NP contributions to patient care were invisible. Favorable organizational climates should be promoted to support the expanding of NP workforce in primary care and to optimize recruitment and retention efforts.

  18. Factors associated with health information exchange system usage in a safety-net ambulatory care clinic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vest, Joshua R; Gamm, Larry D; Ohsfeldt, Robert L; Zhao, Hongwei; Jasperson, 'Jon Sean

    2012-08-01

    The Meaningful Use criteria promises to make health information exchange (HIE) much more widespread. However, the usage of the information systems made available by existing HIE efforts tends to be very low. This study sought to examine the factors associated with usage of an operational HIE system during ambulatory care visits to safety-net clinics. Overall the HIE system was accessed for 21% of encounters. However, system access took on two distinct forms. In general, usage was more likely for patients with recent emergency department visits and chronic conditions. This study indicates the organizational commitment to engage in HIE does not necessarily mean that the information systems will be always used. In addition, system usage will take on various forms for different reasons. These results reveal considerations for the development, operation and evaluation of HIE efforts.

  19. Hotel-based ambulatory care for complex cancer patients: a review of the University College London Hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sive, Jonathan; Ardeshna, Kirit M; Cheesman, Simon; le Grange, Franel; Morris, Stephen; Nicholas, Claire; Peggs, Karl; Statham, Paula; Goldstone, Anthony H

    2012-12-01

    Since 2005, University College London Hospital (UCLH) has operated a hotel-based Ambulatory Care Unit (ACU) for hematology and oncology patients requiring intensive chemotherapy regimens and hematopoietic stem cell transplants. Between January 2005 and 2011 there were 1443 patient episodes, totaling 9126 patient days, with increasing use over the 6-year period. These were predominantly for hematological malignancy (82%) and sarcoma (17%). Median length of stay was 5 days (range 1-42), varying according to treatment. Clinical review and treatment was provided in the ACU, with patients staying in a local hotel at the hospital's expense. Admission to the inpatient ward was arranged as required, and there was close liaison with the inpatient team to preempt emergency admissions. Of the 523 unscheduled admissions, 87% occurred during working hours. An ACU/hotel-based treatment model can be safely used for a wide variety of cancers and treatments, expanding hospital treatment capacity, and freeing up inpatient beds for those patients requiring them.

  20. The role of the surgical care practitioner within the surgical team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Julie

    Changes to the surgical workforce and the continued development of health policy have perpetuated the requirement for innovative perioperative roles. The surgical care practitioner is a nurse or allied health professional who works within a surgical team and has advanced perioperative skills, including the ability to undertake surgical interventions.With only limited literature evaluating this role, any benefits of their inclusion to a surgical team are largely anecdotal. This article presents the findings of an autoethnographic inquiry that explored the experiences of surgical team members who worked with the nurse researcher in her role as surgical care practitioner. Surgeons identified the provision of a knowledgeable, competent assistant and operator who enhanced patient care, helped maintain surgical services and supported the training of junior doctors. The professional, ethical and legal obligations of advanced perioperative practice were upheld. Interprofessional collaboration was improved, as was service provision. This further enhanced the patient experience. The traditional viewpoint that nurses who undertake tasks previously associated with medicine should be working to the standard of a doctor is challenged but requires further examination.

  1. Health and homelessness: weaving a net of care as a specialist practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordham, Maria

    2014-06-01

    Reflective practice was used as a process of self-inquiry and transformation in a PhD study of my specialist role in single and family homelessness. New to homelessness when I embarked on the study, there was little to guide my nursing practice and, notably, there was insufficient research evidence to demonstrate the effectiveness of specialist practice with homeless people. Through my reflexive narrative study, that research gap was addressed. The aim of the narrative was to inform the reader of the reflexive journey and my transformation as a specialist practitioner in homeless health care, and to invite readers to reflect on their own perceptions of homelessness along with the health needs of homeless people. Study findings illuminated the key ethical role that mainstream health professionals, including specialist community public health nurses (SCPHNs), have towards effective engagement to reduce suffering and prevent homeless people and families falling through the net of care. As my research progressed I metaphorically understood the specialist practitioner role as a clinical and strategic 'net-weaver' in a net of care between homeless people, multi-agency partnerships, community and acute health services, and in education.

  2. Older adults' pain communication during ambulatory medical visits: an exploration of communication accommodation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehl, Jennifer; McDonald, Deborah Dillon

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this descriptive secondary analysis was to explore the use of Communication Accommodation Theory as a framework to examine pain communication strategies used by older adults and their primary care practitioners during medical ambulatory care visits. Ambulatory medical visits for 22 older adults with moderate or greater osteoarthritis pain were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and coded by two independent raters for six a priori communication strategies derived from the attuning strategies of Communication Accommodation Theory: (1) patient selecting the pain topic; (2) patient taking a turn; (3) patient maintaining focus on the pain topic; (4) practitioner using an open-ended question without social desirability to start the pain discussion; (5) practitioner encouraging the patient to take a turn by asking open-ended questions; and (6) practitioner interruptions. The majority of practitioners did not start the pain discussion with an open-ended question, but did not interrupt the older adults as they discussed their pain. Five (22.7%) of the older adults did not discuss their osteoarthritis pain during the ambulatory medical visit. The majority of patients took their turn during the pain discussion, but did not maintain focus while describing important osteoarthritis pain information to their practitioner. Practitioners might assist older adults to communicate more information about their pain by initiating the pain discussion with an open-ended pain question. Older adults might provide more pain information to their practitioner by staying on the pain topic until they have completed all of the pain information they wish to discuss with the practitioner.

  3. Psychometric properties of the Persian version of the Ambulatory Care Learning Educational Environment Measure (ACLEEM questionnaire, Shiraz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvizi MM

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad Mahdi Parvizi,1,2 Mitra Amini,2 Mohammad Reza Dehghani,2 Peyman Jafari,3 Zahra Parvizi,1 1Health Policy Research Center, 2Quality Improvement in Clinical Education Research Center, 3Department of Biostatistics, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Fars, Iran Purpose: Evaluation is the main component in design and implementation of educational activities and rapid growth of educational institution programs. Outpatient medical education and clinical training environment is one of the most important parts of training of medical residents. This study aimed to determine the validity and reliability of the Persian version of Ambulatory Care Learning Educational Environment Measure (ACLEEM questionnaire, as an instrument for assessment of educational environments in residency medical clinics. Materials and methods: This study was performed on 180 residents in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran, in 2014–2015. The questionnaire designers’ electronic permission (by email and the residents’ verbal consent were obtained before distributing the questionnaires. The study data were gathered using ACLEEM questionnaire developed by Arnoldo Riquelme in 2013. The data were analyzed using the SPSS statistical software, version 14, and MedCalc® software. Then, the construct validity, including convergent and discriminant validities, of the Persian version of ACLEEM questionnaire was assessed. Its internal consistency was also checked by Cronbach’s alpha coefficient. Results: Five team members who were experts in medical education were consulted to test the cultural adaptation, linguistic equivalency, and content validity of the Persian version of the questionnaire. Content validity indexes were >0.9 in all items. In factor analysis of the instrument, the ­Kaiser–Meyer–Olkin index was 0.928 and Barlett’s sphericity test yielded the following results: X 2=6,717.551, df =1,225, and P ≤0.001. Besides, Cronbach

  4. Psychometric properties of the Persian version of the Ambulatory Care Learning Educational Environment Measure (ACLEEM) questionnaire, Shiraz, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvizi, Mohammad Mahdi; Amini, Mitra; Dehghani, Mohammad Reza; Jafari, Peyman; Parvizi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Evaluation is the main component in design and implementation of educational activities and rapid growth of educational institution programs. Outpatient medical education and clinical training environment is one of the most important parts of training of medical residents. This study aimed to determine the validity and reliability of the Persian version of Ambulatory Care Learning Educational Environment Measure (ACLEEM) questionnaire, as an instrument for assessment of educational environments in residency medical clinics. Materials and methods This study was performed on 180 residents in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran, in 2014–2015. The questionnaire designers’ electronic permission (by email) and the residents’ verbal consent were obtained before distributing the questionnaires. The study data were gathered using ACLEEM questionnaire developed by Arnoldo Riquelme in 2013. The data were analyzed using the SPSS statistical software, version 14, and MedCalc® software. Then, the construct validity, including convergent and discriminant validities, of the Persian version of ACLEEM questionnaire was assessed. Its internal consistency was also checked by Cronbach’s alpha coefficient. Results Five team members who were experts in medical education were consulted to test the cultural adaptation, linguistic equivalency, and content validity of the Persian version of the questionnaire. Content validity indexes were >0.9 in all items. In factor analysis of the instrument, the Kaiser–Meyer–Olkin index was 0.928 and Barlett’s sphericity test yielded the following results: X2=6,717.551, df =1,225, and P≤0.001. Besides, Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of ACLEEM questionnaire was 0.964. Cronbach’s alpha coefficients were also >0.80 in all the three domains of the questionnaire. Overall, the Persian version of ACLEEM showed excellent convergent validity and acceptable discriminant validity, except for the clinical training domain

  5. Direct observation of the nutrition care practices of Australian general practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ball LE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Nutrition care refers to nutrition-related advice or counselling provided by health professionals in an attempt to improve the nutrition behaviour of patients. AIM: The aim of this study was to describe the practices of a sample of Australian general practitioners (GPs when providing nutrition care to adult patients. METHODS: Eighteen GPs (13 male, 5 female were observed by fourth-year medical students during their general practice rotation. Each GP was observed for five consultations that included nutrition care, totalling 90 observed consultations. In each consultation, students completed a 31-item nutrition care checklist of nutrition care practices that could feasibly occur in a standard consultation. Each practice was marked with either a ‘yes’ (completed, ‘no’ (did not complete or ‘completed by practice nurse prior to or after the consultation’. RESULTS: Twenty-eight nutrition care practices were observed at least once. The most frequently observed practices were measuring and discussing blood pressure (76.7%; n=69, followed by general questions about current diet (74.4%; n=67. Approximately half of the consultations included a statement of a nutrition-related problem (52.2%; n=47, and the provision of nutrition advice that focused on a nutrient (45.6%; n=41 or food group (52.2%; n=47. Consultations with male GPs, as well as GPs with more than 25 years of experience, were associated with an increased number of nutrition care practices per consultation. DISCUSSION: The GPs performed nutrition care practices in varying frequencies. Further research is required to identify the most effective GP nutrition care practices to improve the nutrition behaviour of patients.

  6. An analysis of risk factors and adverse events in ambulatory surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent C

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Kent, Julia Metzner, Laurent BollagDepartment of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USAAbstract: Care for patients undergoing ambulatory procedures is a broad and expanding area of anesthetic and surgical practice. There were over 35 million ambulatory surgical procedures performed in the US in 2006. Ambulatory procedures are diverse in both type and setting, as they span the range from biopsies performed under local anesthesia to intra-abdominal laparoscopic procedures, and are performed in offices, freestanding ambulatory surgery centers, and ambulatory units of hospitals. The information on adverse events from these varied settings comes largely from retrospective reviews of sources, such as quality-assurance databases and closed malpractice claims. Very few if any ambulatory procedures are emergent, and in comparison to the inpatient population, ambulatory surgical patients are generally healthier. They are still however subject to most of the same types of adverse events as patients undergoing inpatient surgery, albeit at a lower frequency. The only adverse events that could be considered to be unique to ambulatory surgery are those that arise out of the circumstance of discharging a postoperative patient to an environment lacking skilled nursing care. There is limited information on these types of discharge-related adverse events, but the data that are available are reviewed in an attempt to assist the practitioner in patient selection and discharge decision making. Among ambulatory surgical patients, particularly those undergoing screening or cosmetic procedures, expectations from all parties involved are high, and a definition of adverse events can be expanded to include any occurrence that interrupts the rapid throughput of patients or interferes with early discharge and optimal patient satisfaction. This review covers all types of adverse events, but focuses on the more

  7. Integrating physiotherapists within primary health care teams: perspectives of family physicians and nurse practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, Sinéad Patricia; Brown, Judith; Deborah Lucy, S

    2014-09-01

    The international literature suggests a number of benefits related to integrating physiotherapists into primary health care (PHC) teams. Considering the mandate of PHC teams in Canada, emphasizing healthy living and chronic disease management, a broad range of providers, inclusive of physiotherapists is required. However, physiotherapists are only sparsely integrated into these teams. This study explores the perspectives of "core" PHC team members, family physicians and nurse practitioners, regarding the integration of physiotherapists within Ontario (Canada) PHC teams. Twenty individual semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted, transcribed verbatim, and then analyzed following an iterative process drawing from an interpretive phenomenological approach. Five key themes emerged which highlighted "how physiotherapists could and do contribute as team members within PHC teams particularly related to musculoskeletal health and chronic disease management". The perceived value of physiotherapists within Ontario, Canada PHC teams was a unanimous sentiment particularly in terms of musculoskeletal health, chronic disease management and maximizing health human resources efficiency to ensure the right care, is delivered by the right practitioner, at the right time.

  8. How could health information exchange better meet the needs of care practitioners?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kierkegaard, Patrick; Kaushal, Rainu; Vest, Joshua R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Health information exchange (HIE) has the potential to improve the quality of healthcare by enabling providers with better access to patient information from mul-tiple sources at the point of care. However, HIE efforts have historically been difficult to establish in the US...... and the failure rates of organizations created to foster HIE have been high. Objectives: We sought to better understand how RHIO-based HIE systems were used in practice and the challenges care practitioners face using them. The objective of our study were to so investigate how HIE can better meet the needs......, HIE facilitating organizations, and states can help support HIE adoption by ensuring patient information is accessible to providers through increasing patient consents, fostering broader participation, and by ensuring systems are usable....

  9. Defining the role of primary health care nurse practitioners in rural Nova Scotia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Misener, Ruth; Reilly, Sandra M; Vollman, Ardene Robinson

    2010-06-01

    This article reports on a mixed methods study to define the role of nurse practitioners (NPs) in rural Nova Scotia, Canada, by collecting the perceptions of rural health board chairpersons and health-care providers. Qualitative data were collected in telephone interviews with health board chairpersons. Quantitative data were collected in a survey of NPs, family physicians, public health nurses, and family practice nurses.The authors describe participants' perspectives on the health needs of rural communities, the gaps in the current model of primary health care services, the envisaged role of NPs in rural communities, and the facilitators of and barriers to NP role implementation. Optimizing the benefits of the NP role for residents of rural communities requires attention to the barriers that impede deployment and integration of the role.

  10. Problems and needs for improving primary care of osteoarthritis patients : the views of patients, general practitioners and practice nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosemann, T.J.; Wensing, M.J.P.; Joest, K.; Backenstrass, M.; Mahler, C.; Szecsenyi, J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis (OA) is highly prevalent and has substantial impact on quality of life as well as on healthcare costs. The general practitioner (GP) often is the first care provider for patients with this chronic disease. The aim of this study was to identify health care needs of patients

  11. Effectiveness of exercise therapy added to general practitioner care in patients with hip osteoarthritis: A pragmatic randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H. Teirlinck (Carolien H.); P.A.J. Luijsterburg (Pim); J.H.M. Dekker (Joost); A.M. Bohnen (Arthur); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); M.A. Koopmanschap (Marc); P. van Es (Pauline); B.W. Koes (Bart); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To assess the effectiveness of exercise therapy added to general practitioner (GP) care compared with GP care alone, in patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA) during 12 months follow-up. Methods: We performed a multi-center parallel pragmatic randomized controlled trial in 120

  12. Between two roles - Experiences of newly trained nurse practitioners in surgical care in Sweden: A qualitative study using repeated interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangland, Eva; Yngman Uhlin, Pia; Arakelian, Erebouni

    2016-11-01

    The position of Nurse Practitioner is a new role in Nordic countries. The transition from a registered nurse to the Nurse Practitioner role has been reported to be a personal challenge. This study, guided by the Nordic theoretical model for use in the education of advanced practice nurses, represents a unique opportunity to describe this transition for newly graduated Nurse Practitioners in an interprofessional surgical care team in Sweden. The aim was to explore how the first Nurse Practitioners in surgical care experienced the transition into a new role and what competences they used in the team. Eight new Nurse Practitioners with parallel work in clinical practice were interviewed twice around the time of their graduation. The qualitative analyses show that the participants integrated several central competences, but the focus in this early stage in their new role was on direct clinical praxis, consultation, cooperation, case management, and coaching. Transition from the role of clinical nurse specialist to nurse practitioner was a challenging process in which the positive response from patients was a driving force for the new Nurse Practitioners. The participants felt prepared for and determined to solve the challenging situations they approached working in the interprofessional team.

  13. Quality of care in sickle cell disease: Cross-sectional study and development of a measure for adults reporting on ambulatory and emergency department care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evensen, Christian T; Treadwell, Marsha J; Keller, San; Levine, Roger; Hassell, Kathryn L; Werner, Ellen M; Smith, Wally R

    2016-08-01

    Documented deficiencies in adult sickle cell disease (SCD) care include poor access to knowledgeable providers and inadequate treatment in emergency departments (EDs).The aim of this study was to create patient-reported outcome measures of the quality of ambulatory and ED care for adults with SCD.We developed and pilot tested SCD quality of care questions consistent with Consumer Assessments of Healthcare Providers and Systems surveys. We applied psychometric methods to develop scores and evaluate reliability and validity.The participants of this study were adults with SCD (n = 556)-63% aged 18 to 34 years; 64% female; 64% SCD-SS-at 7 US sites.The measure used was Adult Sickle Cell Quality of Life Measurement information system Quality of Care survey.Most participants (90%) reported at least 1 severe pain episode (pain intensity 7.8 ± 2.3, 0-10 scale) in the past year. Most (81%) chose to manage pain at home rather than the ED, citing negative ED experiences (83%). Using factor analysis, we identified Access, Provider Interaction, and ED Care composites with reliable scores (Cronbach α 0.70-0.83) and construct validity (r = 0.32-0.83 correlations with global care ratings). Compared to general adult Consumer Assessments of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores, adults with SCD had worse care, adjusted for age, education, and general health.Results were consistent with other research reflecting deficiencies in ED care for adults with SCD. The Adult Sickle Cell Quality of Life Measurement Quality of Care measure is a useful self-report measure for documenting and tracking disparities in quality of SCD care.

  14. Reducing patient wait times and improving resource utilization at British Columbia Cancer Agency's ambulatory care unit through simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santibáñez, Pablo; Chow, Vincent S; French, John; Puterman, Martin L; Tyldesley, Scott

    2009-12-01

    We consider an ambulatory care unit (ACU) in a large cancer centre, where operational and resource utilization challenges led to overcrowding, excessive delays, and concerns regarding safety of critical patient care duties. We use simulation to analyze the simultaneous impact of operations, scheduling, and resource allocation on patient wait time, clinic overtime, and resource utilization. The impact of these factors has been studied before, but usually in isolation. Further, our model considers multiple clinics operating concurrently, and includes the extra burden of training residents and medical students during patient consults. Through scenario analyses we found that the best outcomes were obtained when not one but multiple changes were implemented simultaneously. We developed configurations that achieve a reduction of up to 70% in patient wait times and 25% in physical space requirements, with the same appointment volume. The key findings of the study are the importance of on time clinic start, the need for improved patient scheduling; and the potential improvements from allocating examination rooms flexibly and dynamically among individual clinics within each of the oncology programs. These findings are currently being evaluated for implementation by senior management.

  15. Are managed care organizations in the United States impeding the delivery of primary care by nurse practitioners? A 2012 update on managed care organization credentialing and reimbursement practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen-Turton, Tine; Ware, Jamie; Bond, Lisa; Doria, Natalie; Cunningham, Patrick

    2013-10-01

    In 2014, the Affordable Care Act will create an estimated 16 million newly insured people. Coupled with an estimated shortage of over 60,000 primary care physicians, the country's public health care system will be at a challenging crossroads, as there will be more patients waiting to see fewer doctors. Nurse practitioners (NPs) can help to ease this crisis. NPs are health care professionals with the capability to provide important and critical access to primary care, particularly for vulnerable populations. However, despite convincing data about the quality of care provided by NPs, many managed care organizations (MCOs) across the country do not credential NPs as primary care providers, limiting the ability of NPs to be reimbursed by private insurers. To assess current credentialing practices of health plans across the United States, a brief telephone survey was administered to 258 of the largest health maintenance organizations (HMOs) in the United States, operated by 98 different MCOs. Results indicated that 74% of these HMOs currently credential NPs as primary care providers. Although this represents progress over prior assessments, findings suggest that just over one fourth of major HMOs still do not recognize NPs as primary care providers. Given the documented shortage of primary care physicians in low-income communities in the United States, these credentialing policies continue to diminish the ability of NPs to deliver primary care to vulnerable populations. Furthermore, these policies could negatively impact access to care for thousands of newly insured Americans who will be seeking a primary care provider in 2014.

  16. Quality of private and public ambulatory health care in low and middle income countries: systematic review of comparative studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Berendes

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In developing countries, the private sector provides a substantial proportion of primary health care to low income groups for communicable and non-communicable diseases. These providers are therefore central to improving health outcomes. We need to know how their services compare to those of the public sector to inform policy options. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We summarised reliable research comparing the quality of formal private versus public ambulatory health care in low and middle income countries. We selected studies against inclusion criteria following a comprehensive search, yielding 80 studies. We compared quality under standard categories, converted values to a linear 100% scale, calculated differences between providers within studies, and summarised median values of the differences across studies. As the results for for-profit and not-for-profit providers were similar, we combined them. Overall, median values indicated that many services, irrespective of whether public or private, scored low on infrastructure, clinical competence, and practice. Overall, the private sector performed better in relation to drug supply, responsiveness, and effort. No difference between provider groups was detected for patient satisfaction or competence. Synthesis of qualitative components indicates the private sector is more client centred. CONCLUSIONS: Although data are limited, quality in both provider groups seems poor, with the private sector performing better in drug availability and aspects of delivery of care, including responsiveness and effort, and possibly being more client orientated. Strategies seeking to influence quality in both groups are needed to improve care delivery and outcomes for the poor, including managing the increasing burden of non-communicable diseases.

  17. [Evaluation of the quality of performance of general practitioners. What is the problem with primary care quality indicators in Hungary?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolozsvári, László Róbert; Rurik, Imre

    2016-02-28

    The Hungarian primary care quality indicator system has been introduced in 2009, and has been continuously developed since then. The system offers extra financing for family physicians who are achieving the expected levels of indicators. There are currently 16 indicators for adult and mixed practices and 8 indicators are used in paediatric care. Authors analysed the influencing factors of the indicators other than those related to the performance of family physicians. Expectations and compliance of patients, quality of outpatient (ambulatory) care services, insufficient flow of information, inadequate primary care softwares which need to be updated could be considered as the most important factors. The level of financial motivations should also be significantly increased besides changes in the reporting system. It is recommended, that decision makers in health policy and financing have to declare clearly their expectations, and professional bodies should find the proper solution. These indicators could contribute properly to the improvement of the quality of primary care services in Hungary.

  18. Challenges in the care for consanguineous couples: an exploratory interview study among general practitioners and midwives

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    Teeuw Marieke E

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is often suggested that an effort must be made to increase awareness among consanguineous couples of their reproductive risk, and to refer them for genetic counseling if needed. Primary care professionals are considered most appropriate for addressing the subject and identifying couples at risk during consultations in their practice. This Dutch study aims to explore the experiences, attitudes and beliefs of such professionals regarding their care for consanguineous couples. Methods Sixteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with midwives and general practitioners. Results Although most primary care professionals considered it their task to inform couples about the risks of consanguinity, during consultations the topic was generally only briefly touched upon and quickly abandoned. Important reasons for this were professionals’ beliefs about religious and social values of couples, their low perception of the couples’ reproductive risk and expected limited feasibility of referral. Feelings of embarrassment regarding addressing consanguinity did not seem to play a significant role. Conclusions Primary care professional beliefs about their clients’ religious and social values, their attitudes toward the risk, and perceived limited options for referral seem to conflict with the professional norm to address the topic of consanguinity.

  19. General practitioners' use and experiences of palliative care services: a survey in south east England

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    Higginson Irene J

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of the General Practitioner (GP is central to community palliative care. Good liaison between the different professionals involved in a patient's care is extremely important in palliative care patients. In cases where GPs have previously been dissatisfied with palliative services, this may be seen as a barrier to referral when caring for other patients. The aim of this survey is to investigate the use and previous experiences of GPs of two palliative care services, with particular emphasis on barriers to referral and to explore issues surrounding the GP's role in caring for palliative patients. Methods Design: Descriptive postal survey of use and experience of palliative care services with particular emphasis on barriers to referral. Setting: One Primary Care Trust (PCT, south London, England, population 298,500. Subjects: 180 GPs in the PCT, which is served by two hospice services (A&B. Results An overall questionnaire response rate of 77% (138 was obtained, with 69% (124 used in analysis. Over 90% of GPs were satisfied with the palliative care services over the preceding two years. Two areas of possible improvement emerged; communication and prescribing practices. GPs identified some patients that they had not referred, most commonly when patients or carers were reluctant to accept help, or when other support was deemed sufficient. Over half of the GPs felt there were areas where improvement could be made; with clarification of the rules and responsibilities of the multi disciplinary team being the most common. The majority of GPs were working, and want to work with, the specialist services as part of an extended team. However, a greater number of GPs want to hand over care to the specialist services than are currently doing so. Conclusion A large number of GPs were happy with the service provision of the palliative care services in this area. They suggested that 3 out of 4 terminally ill patients needed specialist

  20. Finding falls in ambulatory care clinical documents using statistical text mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCart, James A; Berndt, Donald J; Jarman, Jay; Finch, Dezon K; Luther, Stephen L

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine how well statistical text mining (STM) models can identify falls within clinical text associated with an ambulatory encounter. Materials and Methods 2241 patients were selected with a fall-related ICD-9-CM E-code or matched injury diagnosis code while being treated as an outpatient at one of four sites within the Veterans Health Administration. All clinical documents within a 48-h window of the recorded E-code or injury diagnosis code for each patient were obtained (n=26 010; 611 distinct document titles) and annotated for falls. Logistic regression, support vector machine, and cost-sensitive support vector machine (SVM-cost) models were trained on a stratified sample of 70% of documents from one location (dataset Atrain) and then applied to the remaining unseen documents (datasets Atest–D). Results All three STM models obtained area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) scores above 0.950 on the four test datasets (Atest–D). The SVM-cost model obtained the highest AUC scores, ranging from 0.953 to 0.978. The SVM-cost model also achieved F-measure values ranging from 0.745 to 0.853, sensitivity from 0.890 to 0.931, and specificity from 0.877 to 0.944. Discussion The STM models performed well across a large heterogeneous collection of document titles. In addition, the models also generalized across other sites, including a traditionally bilingual site that had distinctly different grammatical patterns. Conclusions The results of this study suggest STM-based models have the potential to improve surveillance of falls. Furthermore, the encouraging evidence shown here that STM is a robust technique for mining clinical documents bodes well for other surveillance-related topics. PMID:23242765

  1. The importance of Resilience to Primary Care Practitioners: an Interactive Psycho-Social Model

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    Dr Robert Muller

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, it is argued that an understanding of the factors that make up resilience canenhance communication and concordance between practitioner and patient. A model ispresented demonstrating that resilience is an interaction between factors in the internaldomain, comprising psychological characteristics and resources, and the external domain,comprising the social environment surrounding the individual. As resilience manifests itselfin different ways across the life-cycle, and according to individual circumstances, time is alsoan important part of the model presented in this paper. Understanding this model of resiliencecan lead to an insight that there are factors that can be influenced whereby the primary carepractitioner can treat the patient, or refer them after a process of concordance through adeeper understanding of the factors that surround a patient’s current health status. Underlyingthe model is the view that resilience is linked to the assets model of health, seeking topromote and maintain health and prevent illness. Therefore, primary care practitioners,through a deeper understanding of the circumstances of the patient, and throughunderstanding the factors that promote resilience, may be better able to take action in healthpromotion and maintenance.

  2. Evaluation of health care service quality in Poland with the use of SERVQUAL method at the specialist ambulatory health care center

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    Manulik S

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Stanisław Manulik,1 Joanna Rosińczuk,2 Piotr Karniej3 1Non-Public Health Care Institution, “Ambulatory of Cosmonauts” Ltd. Liability Company, 2Department of Nervous System Diseases, Faculty of Health Science, 3Department of Organization and Management, Faculty of Health Science, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland Introduction: Service quality and customer satisfaction are very important components of competitive advantage in the health care sector. The SERVQUAL method is widely used for assessing the quality expected by patients and the quality of actually provided services.Objectives: The main purpose of this study was to determine if patients from state and private health care facilities differed in terms of their qualitative priorities and assessments of received services.Materials and methods: The study included a total of 412 patients: 211 treated at a state facility and 201 treated at a private facility. Each of the respondents completed a 5-domain, 22-item SERVQUAL questionnaire. The actual quality of health care services in both types of facilities proved significantly lower than expected.Results: All the patients gave the highest scores to the domains constituting the core aspects of health care services. The private facility respondents had the highest expectations with regard to equipment, and the state facility ones regarding contacts with the medical personnel.Conclusion: Health care quality management should be oriented toward comprehensive optimization in all domains, rather than only within the domain identified as the qualitative priority for patients of a given facility. Keywords: health care service quality, patients’ expectations, qualitative priorities, outpatient health care facilities

  3. Development and Evaluation of CAHPS® Questions to Assess the Impact of Health Information Technology on Patient Experiences with Ambulatory Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, D. Keith; Brown, Julie A.; Hays, Ron D.; Gallagher, Patricia; Ralston, James D.; Hugh, Mildred; Kanter, Michael; Serrato, Carl A.; Cosenza, Carol; Halamka, John; Ding, Lin; Cleary, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about whether health information technology (HIT) affects patient experiences with health care. Objective To develop HIT questions that assess patients care experiences not evaluated by existing ambulatory CAHPS measures. Research Design We reviewed published articles and conducted focus groups and cognitive testing to develop survey questions. We collected data, using mail and the internet, from patients of 69 physicians receiving care at an academic medical center and two regional integrated delivery systems in late 2009 and 2010. We evaluated questions and scales about HIT using factor analysis, item-scale correlations, and reliability (internal consistency and physician-level) estimates. Results We found support for three HIT composites: doctor use of computer (2 items), e-mail (2 items), and helpfulness of provider’s website (4 items). Corrected item-scale correlations were 0.37 for the two doctor use of computer items and 0.71 for the two e-mail items, and ranged from 0.50 to 0.60 for the provider’s website items. Cronbach’s alpha was high for e-mail (0.83) and provider’s website (0.75), but only 0.54 for doctor use of computer. As few as 50 responses per physician would yield reliability of 0.70 for e-mail and provider’s website. Two HIT composites, doctor use of computer (p<0.001) and provider’s website (p=0.02), were independent predictors of overall ratings of doctors. Conclusions New CAHPS HIT items were identified that measure aspects of patient experiences not assessed by the CAHPS C&G 1.0 survey. PMID:23064271

  4. Expanding acute care nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist education: invasive procedure training and human simulation in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hravnak, Marilyn; Tuite, Patricia; Baldisseri, Marie

    2005-01-01

    Programs educating advanced practice nurses (APNs), including acute care nurse practitioners (ACNPs) and clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) may struggle with the degree to which technical and cognitive skills necessary and unique to the care of critically ill patients should be incorporated within training programs, and the best ways these skills can be synthesized and retained for clinical practice. This article describes the critical care technical skills training mechanisms and use of a High-Fidelity Human Simulation (HFHS) Laboratory in the ACNP and CNS programs at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing. The mechanisms for teaching invasive procedures are reviewed including an abbreviated course syllabus and documentation tools. The use of HFHS is discussed as a measure to provide students with technical and cognitive preparation to manage critical incidents. The HFHS Laboratory, scenario development and implementation, and the debriefing process are discussed. Critical care technical skills training and the use of simulation in the curriculum have had a favorable response from students and preceptors at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, and have enhanced faculty's ability to prepare APNs.

  5. Measuring practitioner/therapist effects in randomised trials of low back pain and neck pain interventions in primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Martyn; Morley, Stephen; van der Windt, Danielle A W M; Hay, Elaine; Jellema, Petra; Dziedzic, Krysia; Main, Chris J

    2010-11-01

    In psychological health treatment studies it has been shown that differences between therapists account for some of the non-specific effect of treatment but this phenomenon has not so far systematically been investigated in musculoskeletal disorders. In this study we evaluated and compared the size and potential influence of the 'practitioner effect' (or 'therapist effect') in three randomised treatment trials of low back pain and neck pain patients in primary care. We calculated the proportion of variance in outcomes attributable to differences across practitioners, i.e. the practitioner-variance partition coefficient (p-vpc). As measures of outcome, we focused on self-reported disability as the primary outcome, but we also investigated assessed psychological outcomes. The p-vpc for the disability measures ranged from 2.6% to 7.1% across trials and time points (post treatment and follow up). Estimates differed between treatment subgroups within trials; being highest in treatment subgroups assigned to psychosocial-based interventions. A 'practitioner effect' does exist and is more pronounced in treatments involving greater psychosocial emphasis. This has implications for both practice and research in this clinical area. It highlights the importance of patient-practitioner interactions, and the need to address practitioner effects in designing and analysing outcome studies in low back pain and neck pain in primary care.

  6. How do general practitioners experience providing care to refugees with mental health problems? A qualitative study from Denmark

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    Jensen Natasja Koitzsch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Refugees are a particularly vulnerable group in relation to the development of mental illness and many may have been subjected to torture or other traumatic experiences. General practitioners are gatekeepers for access to several parts of the psychiatric system and knowledge of their patients’ refugee background is crucial to secure adequate care. The aim of this study is to investigate how general practitioners experience providing care to refugees with mental health problems. Methods The study was conducted as part of an EU project on European Best Practices in Access, Quality and Appropriateness of Health Services for Immigrants in Europe (EUGATE. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with nine general practitioners in the vicinity of Copenhagen purposively selected from areas with a high proportion of immigrants. The analysis of the interviews is inspired by qualitative content analysis. Results One of the main themes identified in the analysis is communication. This includes the use of professional interpreters and that communication entails more than sharing a common language. Quality of care is another theme that emerges and includes awareness of possible trauma history, limited possibilities for refugees to participate in certain treatments due to language barriers and feelings of hopelessness in the general practitioners. The general practitioners may also choose different referral pathways for refugees and they report that their patients lack understanding regarding the differences between psychological problems and physical symptoms. Conclusion General practitioners experience that providing care to refugees differs from providing care for patients from the majority population. The different strategies employed by the general practitioners in the health care treatment of refugees may be the result of the great diversity in the organisation of general practice in Denmark and the lack of a national strategy

  7. Extending nurse practitioner care using the virtual reality world of second life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Elizabeth E; Elasy, Tom; Lorenzi, Nancy M; McNew, Ryan; Shackleford, Laura; Wolff, Kathleen; Martin, Stephanie; Benson, Christy

    2012-01-01

    The growth of Internet applications has substantially broadened the potential for its use in global telehealth. This pilot project used the virtual reality world of Second Life for diabetic patients to meet with their nurse practitioners for their maintenance visits. Using avatars and the online patient portal, these scheduled visits were designed to meet the needs of the patients as determined by the results from a questionnaire completed by patients prior to the visit. The virtual visits took place in the replicated building where patients typically receive their care, the Eskind Diabetes Clinic. Orientation sessions to Second Life were made available prior to the actual visit, and additional online resources were made available after the visit was over. Although only seven pilot patients have currently completed visits, data illustrate the positive potential use of this treatment modality for future study.

  8. Knowledge and beliefs concerning evidence-based practice amongst complementary and alternative medicine health care practitioners and allied health care professionals: A questionnaire survey

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    Khan Khalid S

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-based practice (EBP has become an important competency in many allied and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM health care practitioners' professional standards of proficiency. Methods To compliment an EBP course for allied health care professionals and CAM practitioners, we undertook a questionnaire survey to assess learning needs. We developed a questionnaire to measure allied health care professionals and CAM practitioners' basic knowledge, skills and beliefs concerning the main principles of EBP. The questionnaires were administered to all attendees of one-day EBP workshops. Results During 2004–5 we surveyed 193 allied health care professionals and CAM practitioners who attended one-day EBP courses prior to commencement of teaching. Of the respondents 121 (62.7% were allied health care professionals and 65 (33.7% practitioners stated that they work in the CAM field Our survey found that the majority of the respondents had not previously attended a literature appraisal skills workshop (87.3% or received formal training in research methods (69.9%, epidemiology (91.2% or statistics (80.8%. Furthermore, 67.1% of practitioners specified that they felt that they had not had adequate training in EBM and they identified that they needed more training and education in the principles of EBM (86.7%. Differences in knowledge and beliefs concerning EBP amongst allied and CAM practitioners were found and length of time since qualification was also found to be an important factor in practitioner's beliefs. More CAM practitioners compared to allied health professionals accessed educational literature via the Internet (95.3% v 68.1%, p = 0.008. Whilst, practitioners with more than 11 years experience felt that original research papers were far more confusing (p = 0.02 than their less experienced colleagues. Conclusion The results demonstrate that practitioner's learning needs do vary according to the type of profession

  9. A comparison of paediatric dentists' and general dental practitioners' care patterns in paediatric dental care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schorer-Jensma, M.A.; Veerkamp, J.S.J.

    2010-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to compare the care patterns of paediatric dentists and general dentists in the dental treatment of children in the Netherlands. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A case control study was completed based on the financial records of one of the largest Dutch health insurance com

  10. Measuring factors that influence the utilisation of preventive care services provided by general practitioners in Australia

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    Oldenburg Brian

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relatively little research attention has been given to the development of standardised and psychometrically sound scales for measuring influences relevant to the utilisation of health services. This study aims to describe the development, validation and internal reliability of some existing and new scales to measure factors that are likely to influence utilisation of preventive care services provided by general practitioners in Australia. Methods Relevant domains of influence were first identified from a literature review and formative research. Items were then generated by using and adapting previously developed scales and published findings from these. The new items and scales were pre-tested and qualitative feedback was obtained from a convenience sample of citizens from the community and a panel of experts. Principal Components Analyses (PCA and internal reliability testing (Cronbach's alpha were then conducted for all of the newly adapted or developed scales utilising data collected from a self-administered mailed survey sent to a randomly selected population-based sample of 381 individuals (response rate 65.6 per cent. Results The PCA identified five scales with acceptable levels of internal consistency were: (1 social support (ten items, alpha 0.86; (2 perceived interpersonal care (five items, alpha 0.87, (3 concerns about availability of health care and accessibility to health care (eight items, alpha 0.80, (4 value of good health (five items, alpha 0.79, and (5 attitudes towards health care (three items, alpha 0.75. Conclusion The five scales are suitable for further development and more widespread use in research aimed at understanding the determinants of preventive health services utilisation among adults in the general population.

  11. Psychiatric services in primary care settings: a survey of general practitioners in Thailand

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    Saipanish Ratana

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background General Practitioners (GPs in Thailand play an important role in treating psychiatric disorders since there is a shortage of psychiatrists in the country. Our aim was to examine GP's perception of psychiatric problems, drug treatment and service problems encountered in primary care settings. Methods We distributed 1,193 postal questionnaires inquiring about psychiatric practices and service problems to doctors in primary care settings throughout Thailand. Results Four hundred and thirty-four questionnaires (36.4% were returned. Sixty-seven of the respondents (15.4% who had taken further special training in various fields were excluded from the analysis, giving a total of 367 GPs in this study. Fifty-six per cent of respondents were males and they had worked for 4.6 years on average (median = 3 years. 65.6% (SD = 19.3 of the total patients examined had physical problems, 10.7% (SD = 7.9 had psychiatric problems and 23.9% (SD = 16.0 had both problems. The most common psychiatric diagnoses were anxiety disorders (37.5%, alcohol and drugs abuse (28.1%, and depressive disorders (29.2%. Commonly prescribed psychotropic drugs were anxiolytics and antidepressants. The psychotropic drugs most frequently prescribed were diazepam among anti-anxiety drugs, amitriptyline among antidepressant drugs, and haloperidol among antipsychotic drugs. Conclusion Most drugs available through primary care were the same as what existed 3 decades ago. There should be adequate supply of new and appropriate psychotropic drugs in primary care. Case-finding instruments for common mental disorders might be helpful for GPs whose quality of practice was limited by large numbers of patients. However, the service delivery system should be modified in order to maintain successful care for a large number of psychiatric patients.

  12. [Prioritizing prescriptions in a ambulatory care setting: a tool to achieve appropriateness of care in public health management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeraro, V; Zantedeschi, E; Pasquarella, A; Guerrera, C; Guasticchi, G

    2012-01-01

    Waiting lists are one of the main Public Health issues within developed countries. To promote appropriateness about General Practitioners' (GPs) prescriptions, during 2009 the project "Priority setting in outpatient prescriptions" in Latium Region has been approved. Regional referees, Latium Public Health Agency managers and advisors, managers and advisors of three Local Public Health Units (LPHUs) within the Latium region and some voluntarily recruited General Practitioners (each one with more than 800 patients enrolled) were included in a team work with the duty to develop the project. During two selected months of 2010, 46 GPs have forwarded overall 2.229 medical prescriptions. The six most numerous prescriptions were picked out and analyzed by the team work. 42% of these prescriptions were identified as belonging to category D of the priority level--"standard", while 42% and 41% of prescriptions bore the expressions of "control" and "diagnostic purpose" respectively. Among these ones, 75% were represented by bilateral mammography, prescribed to women aged between 50 and 69 years: but for those people bilateral mammography is already provided free of charge within the regional program of breast cancer screening, making the routine prescription by their physician a useless duplication, unacceptable in a healthcare system of good quality. Therefore at the conclusion of the project, the team work suggests proper standards be applied by healthcare professionals and GPs to achieve a significant objective: mammography appropriateness prescriptions.

  13. Impact of Safety-Related Regulatory Action on Drug Use in Ambulatory Care in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piening, S.; Reber, K. C.; Wieringa, J. E.; Straus, S. M. J. M.; de Graeff, P. A.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, F. M.; Mol, P. G. M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of Direct Healthcare Professional Communications (DHPCs) informing health-care providers of serious drug safety issues has been questioned. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of DHPCs on drug use. Nationwide dispensing data for the period 2000-2008 for new users of 46 drugs

  14. A Break-Even Analysis of Optimum Faculty Assignment for Ambulatory Primary Care Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xakellis, George C.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A computer simulation was developed to estimate the number of medical residents one or two faculty teachers could supervise in a university-based primary medical care teaching clinic. With no non-teaching tasks, it was shown that two teachers could supervise 11 residents, while one teacher was able to supervise only three residents under similar…

  15. General practitioners are bearing an increasing burden of the care of common mental disorders in France

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    Joanna Norton

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In France, general practice is playing an increasing role in the management of common mental disorders. This is due to a variety of factors, among which the way general practice and specialised mental health services have evolved over time. Methods: A description of the status quo in France, with a comparison between France, the UK and the Netherlands. A review of reasons for the present position. Results: The general practitioner (GP is often the only medical carer to be contacted in cases of psychological distress and over 80% of psychotropic medications are prescribed in this setting. Although most common forms of mental disorder can be managed at the primary care level, GPs need to be able to refer patients rapidly to specialised mental health services. Yet there are delays for consultations with both private and public psychiatrists along with difficulties in finding beds for full-time hospitalisation. The situation is predicted to get worse with the reduction in the number of psychiatrists and GPs forecasted for the coming years. 'Psychiatric sectorisation' has led to a substantial development of community mental health care services, yet this has not compensated fully for the reduction in full-time hospital beds. Furthermore, community mental health care services remain relatively isolated from other community health services with very limited exchanges with general practice. Conclusion: GPs report an urgent need for training in mental health. Along with improving their ability to accurately detect and treat mental disorders, it is crucial also to improve communication between GPs and psychiatrists and increase shared case-management. Structural changes are also necessary to ensure a quicker and easier access to specialised mental health care services.

  16. Practitioner-Raised Issues and End-of-Life Care for Adults with Down Syndrome and Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watchman, Karen

    2005-01-01

    The author interviewed a small group of practitioners working in intellectual disability and palliative care settings about their perceptions of a number of end-of-life issues related to people with Down syndrome who were affected by dementia. The study, which took place in Scotland, identified a number of issues and perceptions expressed by the…

  17. 75 FR 26759 - Health Care Integrity and Protection Data Bank (HIPDB) and National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... Administration Health Care Integrity and Protection Data Bank (HIPDB) and National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB... in a report on the HRSA and Data Bank Web sites ( http://www.hrsa.gov and http://www.npdb-hipdb.hrsa...].'' Beginning no later than July 1, 2010, the Department will publish a report on the HRSA and Data Bank...

  18. Computerized extraction of information on the quality of diabetes care from free text in electronic patient records of general practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorham, Jaco; Denig, Petra

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated a computerized method for extracting numeric clinical measurements related to diabetes care from free text in electronic patient records (EPR) of general practitioners. Design and Measurements: Accuracy of this number-oriented approach was compared to manual chart abs

  19. Family nurse practitioners in primary care: a study of practice and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesznecker, B L; Draye, M A

    1978-10-01

    In this nationwide study 8,905 patients were seen by 356 family nurse practitioners (FNPs) during February through April 1977. The ratio of white to black and white to "other" patients was six to one. Racial minorities were seen significantly more often than were whites in public clinics supported predominantly by public tax monies. The smallest number of patients seen was in the "elderly" age group, 65 and over. Elderly patients were located to a greater extent in the South and they used both private and public clinics. The number of infants and children seen was greater in the Western region and in semi-urban areas. The predominant patient problems seen by FNPs were Prevention/Health Supervision and Respiratory. Although there were similarities between top ranking primary care problems seen by FNPs in this study compared with primary care physicians in other studies, proportionately more FNP patient contacts were for Prevention/Health Supervision and the patients tended to be in the younger age group.

  20. Management of orthodontic emergencies in primary care - self-reported confidence of general dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popat, H; Thomas, K; Farnell, D J J

    2016-07-08

    Objective To determine general dental practitioners' (GDPs) confidence in managing orthodontic emergencies.Design Cross-sectional study.Setting Primary dental care.Subjects and methods An online survey was distributed to dentists practicing in Wales. The survey collected basic demographic information and included descriptions of ten common orthodontic emergency scenarios.Main outcome measure Respondents' self-reported confidence in managing the orthodontic emergency scenarios on a 5-point Likert scale. Differences between the Likert responses and the demographic variables were investigated using chi-squared tests.Results The median number of orthodontic emergencies encountered by respondents over the previous six months was 1. Overall, the self-reported confidence of respondents was high with 7 of the 10 scenarios presented scoring a median of 4 indicating that GDPs were 'confident' in their management. Statistical analysis revealed that GDPs who saw more orthodontic emergencies in the previous six months were more confident when managing the presented scenarios. Other variables such as age, gender, geographic location of practice and number of years practising dentistry were not associated with self-reported confidence.Conclusions Despite GDPs encountering very few orthodontic emergencies in primary care, they appear to be confident in dealing with commonly arising orthodontic emergency situations.

  1. Consultations in primary care for symptoms attributed to electromagnetic fields – a survey among general practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Röösli Martin

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Five percent of the Swiss population attribute symptoms to electromagnetic fields (EMF. General practitioners (GPs might play a key role in recognising an emerging health risk, since they are the first to observe and follow up persons who attribute symptoms to EMF. It is unclear to what extent EMFs have become an issue in general practice and which experiences GPs report from the consultations. Methods We conducted telephone interviews in a random sample of GPs in Switzerland in order to assess the frequency of consultations in primary care due to EMF and the GPs' experience with these patients. Results 342 general practitioners were interviewed, corresponding to a response rate of 28.2%. 69% of the GPs reported at least one consultation due to EMF, but GPs with a certificate in complementary medicine were much more likely to report EMF consultations. The median of EMF consultation numbers within one year was three. An overview of the most recent EMF-related consultation per GP yielded sleep disorders, headaches and fatigue as the most often reported symptoms and mobile phone base stations, power lines and the own use of mobile phones as the main EMF sources suspected to be associated to symptoms. GPs judged the association between EMF and the symptoms to be plausible in 54% of the cases. There was no combination of symptoms and EMF sources that was remarkably and consistently judged to be a plausible cause of the symptoms. Conclusion In our survey, GPs often judged the association between the health problems and the suspected exposure to be plausible. This plausibility assessment seems to be based on grounds of preventive positions in a situation of scientific uncertainty. More research effort is needed to obtain more insight on a potential association between long term EMF exposure and unspecific symptoms.

  2. Influenza-like-illness and clinically diagnosed flu: disease burden, costs and quality of life for patients seeking ambulatory care or no professional care at all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilcke, Joke; Coenen, Samuel; Beutels, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    This is one of the first studies to (1) describe the out-of-hospital burden of influenza-like-illness (ILI) and clinically diagnosed flu, also for patients not seeking professional medical care, (2) assess influential background characteristics, and (3) formally compare the burden of ILI in patients with and without a clinical diagnosis of flu. A general population sample with recent ILI experience was recruited during the 2011-2012 influenza season in Belgium. Half of the 2250 respondents sought professional medical care, reported more symptoms (especially more often fever), a longer duration of illness, more use of medication (especially antibiotics) and a higher direct medical cost than patients not seeking medical care. The disease and economic burden were similar for ambulatory ILI patients, irrespective of whether they received a clinical diagnosis of flu. On average, they experienced 5-6 symptoms over a 6-day period; required 1.6 physician visits and 86-91% took medication. An average episode amounted to €51-€53 in direct medical costs, 4 days of absence from work or school and the loss of 0.005 quality-adjusted life-years. Underlying illness led to greater costs and lower quality-of-life. The costs of ILI patients with clinically diagnosed flu tended to increase, while those of ILI patients without clinically diagnosed flu tended to decrease with age. Recently vaccinated persons experienced lower costs and a higher quality-of-life, but this was only the case for patients not seeking professional medical care. This information can be used directly to evaluate the implementation of cost-effective prevention and control measures for influenza. In particular to inform the evaluation of more widespread seasonal influenza vaccination, including in children, which is currently considered by many countries.

  3. Overview of hospitalizations by ambulatory care sensitive conditions in the municipality of Cotia, Brazil

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    Renata Laszlo Torres

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To describe the profile of Hospitalizations by Amulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (HACSC, in the Municipality of Cotia, from 2008 to 2012. Method ecological, exploratory, longitudinal study with a quantitative approach. Data on HACSC, by age group and sex, were obtained from the Department of the Unified Health System. For data analysis descriptive statistics were used. Results During the period, there were 46,676 admissions, excluding deliveries, 7,753 (16.61% by HACSC. The main causes were cerebrovascular diseases, 16.96%, heart failure, 15.50%, hypertension, 10.80% and infection of the kidney and urinary tract, 10.51%. Regarding gender, HACSC occurred predominantly in males. There was a greater number of HACSC at extreme age ranges, especially in the elderly. Conclusion Chronic diseases predominate among the leading causes of HACSC and there was no significant difference between sex.

  4. Petroleum jelly (vaseline balls) for the treatment of constipation: a survey of hospice and palliative care practitioners.

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    Tavares, Candice Noelle; Kimbrel, Jason M; Protus, Bridget McCrate; Grauer, Phyllis A

    2014-12-01

    Constipation is a common symptom at end of life, impacting patient outcomes and healthcare costs. Hospice and palliative care professionals often use practices based on anecdotal evidence. One such intervention is an oral preparation of petroleum jelly (OPJ), referred to as "Vaseline balls." This survey was designed to collect information regarding healthcare practitioners' knowledge and attitudes toward the use of OPJ for the management of constipation in hospice and palliative care. An online survey was distributed to physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists who work with hospice and palliative care patients. A total of 67% (n=237/353) of responders reported being familiar with the use of OPJ. Results indicate there is a need for further clinical research on the use of OPJ to guide practice.

  5. Medical care of asylum seekers: a descriptive study of the appropriateness of nurse practitioners' care compared to traditional physician-based care in a gatekeeping system

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    Pécoud Alain

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical care for asylum seekers is a complex and critical issue worldwide. It is influenced by social, political, and economic pressures, as well as premigration conditions, the process of migration, and postmigration conditions in the host country. Increasing needs and healthcare costs have led public health authorities to put nurse practitioners in charge of the management of a gatekeeping system for asylum seekers. The quality of this system has never been evaluated. We assessed the competencies of nurses and physicians in identifying the medical needs of asylum seekers and providing them with appropriate treatment that reflects good clinical practice. Methods This cross-sectional descriptive study evaluated the appropriateness of care provided to asylum seekers by trained nurse practitioners in nursing healthcare centers and by physicians in private practices, an academic medical outpatient clinic, and the emergency unit of the university hospital in Lausanne, Switzerland. From 1687 asylum seeking patients who had consulted each setting between June and December 2003, 450 were randomly selected to participate. A panel of experts reviewed their medical records and assessed the appropriateness of medical care received according to three parameters: 1 use of appropriate procedures to identify medical needs (medical history, clinical examination, complementary investigations, and referral, 2 provision of access to treatment meeting medical needs, and 3 absence of unnecessary medical procedures. Results In the nurse practitioner group, the procedures used to identify medical needs were less often appropriate (79% of reports vs. 92.4% of reports; p Conclusion Although the nursing gatekeeping system provides appropriate treatment to asylum seekers, it might be improved with further training in recording medical history and performing targeted clinical examination.

  6. General practitioners' perspectives of education and collaboration with physiotherapists in Primary Health Care: a discourse analysis.

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    Paz-Lourido, Berta; Kuisma, Raija M E

    2013-05-01

    This paper explores the educational factors that underlie the poor collaboration between general practitioners (GPs) and physiotherapists (PTs) in Primary Health Care (PHC), from the GP's perspective. This study was conducted in Majorca, the Balearic Islands (Spain). Participants were nine GPs who graduated from different universities in mainland Spain. A discourse analysis study was developed employing the social-critical paradigm as theoretical framework and in-depth interviews for data collection. The perceived lack of knowledge about physiotherapy was considered by the interviewees as a major factor in the current poor communication between GPs and PTs. The individual learning during medical studies and poor interprofessional learning during clinical residency influenced their gatekeeper role, putting at risk the equity of the health system. Collaboration was considered beneficial for patients but challenging to improve in context due to multiple factors ranging from individual to systemic. The latter encompasses inadequate resources and organization for interprofessional learning. There is a need to further explore other factors influencing the poor collaboration, including PTs' views on this process.

  7. An Overview of the Peer Assessment Rating (par) Index for Primary Dental Care Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James Ij

    2016-11-01

    The Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) index is a valid and reliable measure of orthodontic treatment outcome and is the most widely accepted such index. Assessing outcomes with the PAR index requires the examination of pre-treatment and post-treatment orthodontic study models. Beginning with the pre-treatment models, a score is given to each feature that deviates from an ideal occlusion (all anatomical contact points adjacent, good interdigitation between posterior teeth and non-excessive overjet/overbite), the scores are then added together to give a total that represents the severity of the malocclusion. The process is then repeated with the post-treatment models. The difference between the pre-treatment and the post-treatment scores reflects the improvement that has taken place during treatment. A score of zero represents an ideal occlusion and in general the higher the score, the more extensive the malocclusion. It is currently a condition of the NHS orthodontic contract for providers to monitor a proportion of their cases using the PAR index. This paper aims to provide primary dental care practitioners with an overview of the PAR index and should provide a useful guide for those wishing to seek calibration in the use of the index.

  8. Collaboration between general practitioners and mental health care professionals: a qualitative study

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    Haavet Ole R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collaboration between general practice and mental health care has been recognised as necessary to provide good quality healthcare services to people with mental health problems. Several studies indicate that collaboration often is poor, with the result that patient' needs for coordinated services are not sufficiently met, and that resources are inefficiently used. An increasing number of mental health care workers should improve mental health services, but may complicate collaboration and coordination between mental health workers and other professionals in the treatment chain. The aim of this qualitative study is to investigate strengths and weaknesses in today's collaboration, and to suggest improvements in the interaction between General Practitioners (GPs and specialised mental health service. Methods This paper presents a qualitative focus group study with data drawn from six groups and eight group sessions with 28 health professionals (10 GPs, 12 nurses, and 6 physicians doing post-doctoral training in psychiatry, all working in the same region and assumed to make professional contact with each other. Results GPs and mental health professionals shared each others expressions of strengths, weaknesses and suggestions for improvement in today's collaboration. Strengths in today's collaboration were related to common consultations between GPs and mental health professionals, and when GPs were able to receive advice about diagnostic treatment dilemmas. Weaknesses were related to the GPs' possibility to meet mental health professionals, and lack of mutual knowledge in mental health services. The results describe experiences and importance of interpersonal knowledge, mutual accessibility and familiarity with existing systems and resources. There is an agreement between GPs and mental health professionals that services will improve with shared knowledge about patients through systematic collaborative services, direct cell

  9. Physician - nurse practitioner teams in chronic disease management: the impact on costs, clinical effectiveness, and patients' perception of care.

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    Litaker, David; Mion, Lorraine; Planavsky, Loretta; Kippes, Christopher; Mehta, Neil; Frolkis, Joseph

    2003-08-01

    Increasing demand to deliver and document therapeutic and preventive care sharpens the need for disease management strategies that accomplish these goals efficiently while preserving quality of care. The purpose of this study was to compare selected outcomes for a new chronic disease management program involving a nurse practitioner - physician team with those of an existing model of care. One hundred fifty-seven patients with hypertension and diabetes mellitus were randomly assigned to their primary care physician and a nurse practitioner or their primary care physician alone. Costs for personnel directly involved in patient management, calculated from hourly rates and encounter time with patients, and pre- and post-study glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), satisfaction with care and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) were assessed. Although 1-year costs for personnel were higher in the team-treated group, participants experienced significant improvements in mean HbA(1c) ( - 0.7%, p = 0.02) and HDL-c ( + 2.6 mg dL( - 1), p = 0.02). Additionally, satisfaction with care improved significantly for team-treated subjects in several sub-scales whereas the mean change over time in HRQoL did not differ significantly between groups. This study demonstrates the value of a complementary team approach to chronic disease management in improving patient-derived and clinical outcomes at modest incremental costs.

  10. Transforming youth care through online simulation gaming. Aligning the positions of practitioners and observers

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    Kees JM van Haaster

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Transforming youth care through online simulation gaming. Aligning the positions of practitioners and observersThe youth care service in the Netherlands is currently undergoing a major transition from national and regional finance and control to localized regulation and responsibility. The aim is to initiate a transformation towards greater intervention value and to support greater self-reliance in social networks. Effective youth care depends largely on the quality of the network exchange. If efficiency is our concern, we should look into the methods and techniques of network exchange. When it comes to solving hard problems, the significance of situational knowledge construction and network coordination must not be underrated. Professional deliberation is directed toward understanding, acting and analysis. We need smart and flexible ways to direct systems information from practice to network reflection, and to guide results from network consultation to practice.This article presents a proposal for a case study, as a follow-up to a recent dissertation about online simulation gaming for youth care network exchange (Van Haaster, 2014. The results of that research show that it is a valuable exercise to model intricate issues from practice using simulation game design and that youth care professionals appreciate the relevance, usability and usefulness of this new tool. The question in this paper is how to develop a practicable approach using online simulation gaming to improve patterns of action and reflection on dilemmas and hard-to-solve problems in youth care practice. Child-rearing conditions and family behaviour are usually enhanced through sequences of exploration, experimentation and evaluation. Step-by-step progressions are characterized by balancing acting and thinking. The author elaborates this observation through a model that alternates acting in practice with retrospect and prospect reflection in online game sessions

  11. Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... We Represent Ambulatory and Office-Based Anesthesia The Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia provides educational opportunities, encourages research ... 6620 | E-mail: info@sambahq.org Copyright | 2016 Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia Home | Search | Terms | Privacy Policy | ...

  12. Brand name and generic proton pump inhibitor prescriptions in the United States: insights from the national ambulatory medical care survey (2006-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawron, Andrew J; Feinglass, Joseph; Pandolfino, John E; Tan, Bruce K; Bove, Michiel J; Shintani-Smith, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) are one of the most commonly prescribed medication classes with similar efficacy between brand name and generic PPI formulations. Aims. We determined demographic, clinical, and practice characteristics associated with brand name PPI prescriptions at ambulatory care visits in the United States. Methods. Observational cross sectional analysis using the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) of all adult (≥18 yrs of age) ambulatory care visits from 2006 to 2010. PPI prescriptions were identified by using the drug entry code as brand name only or generic available formulations. Descriptive statistics were reported in terms of unweighted patient visits and proportions of encounters with brand name PPI prescriptions. Global chi-square tests were used to compare visits with brand name PPI prescriptions versus generic PPI prescriptions for each measure. Poisson regression was used to determine the incidence rate ratio (IRR) for generic versus brand PPI prescribing. Results. A PPI was prescribed at 269.7 million adult ambulatory visits, based on 9,677 unweighted visits, of which 53% were brand name only prescriptions. In 2006, 76.0% of all PPI prescriptions had a brand name only formulation compared to 31.6% of PPI prescriptions in 2010. Visits by patients aged 25-44 years had the greatest proportion of brand name PPI formulations (57.9%). Academic medical centers and physician-owned practices had the greatest proportion of visits with brand name PPI prescriptions (58.9% and 55.6% of visits with a PPI prescription, resp.). There were no significant differences in terms of median income, patient insurance type, or metropolitan status when comparing the proportion of visits with brand name versus generic PPI prescriptions. Poisson regression results showed that practice ownership type was most strongly associated with the likelihood of receiving a brand name PPI over the entire study period. Compared to HMO visits

  13. Breastfeeding: Mothers and health practitioners in the context of private medical care in Gauteng

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    Diana du Plessis

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the well-documented health benefits of breastfeeding and recommendations by the Department of Health for women to exclusively breastfeed for approximately the first six months of life and continuation beyond one year, a large percentage of South African women do not breastfeed their infants, or only do so for a short period of time. No national South African statistics are available but figures emerging from the attendance of mothers at a baby clinic on the West Rand in Gauteng indicated the following: 64% of the mothers breastfeed up to six weeks, after which the figure rapidly declines to less than 20% at three months (Truter 2007. Several studies have assessed the attitudes of health care personnel towards breastfeeding, but little is known of the type of information given to breastfeeding mothers by private medical practitioners who are the frontline of contact with clients and who may convey information that either promotes or discourages breastfeeding. The following question was thus formulated: With regard to breastfeeding, what are the constraints to breastfeeding in private practice?

    Therefore, in order to understand the constraints to breastfeeding, the purpose of this study was to assess the breastfeeding information given to pregnant women by health professionals in private practice. The specific objectives of the study were to determine the breastfeeding recommendations made by private health professionals during pregnancy, to describe the management of breastfeeding in the consulting rooms of private medical practitioners, and to describe women’s experiences of breastfeeding in private hospitals. In Phase 1 of the study the population comprised all mothers who attended a support group for new mothers at a private post-natal clinic In Phase 2 the population comprised all mothers who attended a community baby clinic or support group. The sample consisted of all primigravidae who breastfed or attempted to breastfeed in the

  14. Practitioner research to promote practice development: the continued development by means of practitioner research of a multidisciplinary learning environment within neurorehabilitation care for older persons

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    Cyrilla van der Donk

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Continuous innovation is required to help clinical practice adapt to healthcare demand and there is a pressing need for sufficient numbers of professionals trained to work in this ever-changing context. New environments for learning are needed to enhance the development of these skills for existing and future care professionals. This article gives an account of how practitioner research was used to further develop a multidisciplinary learning environment for students of the Institute of Health Studies and the Institute of Nursing Studies of HAN University of Applied Sciences in a department specialising in neurorehabilitation for older persons from ZZG Herstelhotel, a public hospital offering long-term residential care in the Netherlands. Aim: The aim of the study was to pursue the development of the learning environment by exploring stakeholders’ visions of their ideal multidisciplinary learning environment. Method: Practitioner research was chosen as a methodology as it deliberately seeks to generate local knowledge and theories through exploring different perspectives, and to encourage learning and reflection. A research group was formed consisting of the first author and three practice supervisors. A mixed-methods approach was used by the research group. First, a selection of relevant publications was reviewed by the group. This was followed by learning sessions in which students, supervisors and managers were invited to dream and design on the basis of their own experiences, thereby linking up with the constructionist-based change approach of Appreciative Inquiry. Results: A collective view of the characteristics of a workbased learning environment was developed by students, supervisors and managers. These characteristics were placed in one of four ideal perspectives: the core professional competencies to be acquired; the resources available; the learning culture; and the supervision. Not all students valued multidisciplinary

  15. "My Favourite Day Is Sunday": Community Perceptions of (Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis and Ambulatory Tuberculosis Care in Kara Suu District, Osh Province, Kyrgyzstan.

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    Doris Burtscher

    Full Text Available Kyrgyzstan is one of the 27 high multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB burden countries listed by the WHO. In 2012, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF started a drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB project in Kara Suu District. A qualitative study was undertaken to understand the perception of TB and DR-TB in order to improve the effectiveness and acceptance of the MSF intervention and to support advocacy strategies for an ambulatory model of care.This paper reports findings from 63 interviews with patients, caregivers, health care providers and members of communities. Data was analysed using a qualitative content analysis. Validation was ensured by triangulation and a 'thick' description of the research context, and by presenting deviant cases.Findings show that the general population interprets TB as the 'lungs having a cold' or as a 'family disease' rather than as an infectious illness. From their perspective, individuals facing poor living conditions are more likely to get TB than wealthier people. Vulnerable groups such as drug and alcohol users, homeless persons, ethnic minorities and young women face barriers in accessing health care. As also reported in other publications, TB is highly stigmatised and possible side effects of the long treatment course are seen as unbearable; therefore, people only turn to public health care quite late. Most patients prefer ambulatory treatment because of the much needed emotional support from their social environment, which positively impacts treatment concordance. Health care providers favour inpatient treatment only for a better monitoring of side effects. Health staff increasingly acknowledges the central role they play in supporting DR-TB patients, and the importance of assuming a more empathic attitude.Health promotion activities should aim at improving knowledge on TB and DR-TB, reducing stigma, and fostering the inclusion of vulnerable populations. Health seeking delays and adherence problems will

  16. PS1-10: How Can the Same Practice Be Classified as Having 2 and 900 MDs? NAMCS Data Collection in a Changing Ambulatory Care Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halley, Meghan; Gillespie, Katherine; Rendle, Katharine; Luft, Harold

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Since 1973, the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS), administered by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) has been widely used in studies of ambulatory care. With the growth in large multispecialty practices – including many members of the HMORN – there is a need to understand how NAMCS data are collected and whether current processes yield accurate and reliable data. NAMCS collects data from physicians about their practices and abstracts a sample of patient visit records. This study reports on the physician component. Methods In collaboration with NCHS, nine physicians were randomly sampled from a multispecialty clinic using standard NAMCS recruitment procedures; eight physicians were eligible and agreed to participate. Using their standard protocols, three Field Representatives (FRs) conducted NAMCS physician interviews while a trained ethnographer (MH, KR) observed and audio-recorded each interview. Transcripts and field notes were analyzed using a grounded theory approach to identify key themes. Results Data have been collected and analyzed. They are currently undergoing standard confidentiality review by NCHS. However, this process has been delayed due to the government shutdown. We fully anticipate that results will be released in time for presentation at the HMORN conference. Conclusions Though we are precluded from disseminating results at this time, we will provide a full report of our results in our HMORN conference presentation.

  17. Optimizing anesthesia techniques in the ambulatory setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Galvin

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAmbulatory surgery refers to the process of admitting patients, administering anesthesia and surgical care, and discharging patients home following an appropriate level of recovery on the same day. The word ambulatory is derived from the latin word ambulare, which means ''to walk''. This

  18. [Reflection on the Differences and Similarities of Mental Health Care in Virginia and Taiwan: Geography, History, Culture, and Nurse Practitioners].

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    Lu, Chueh-Fen; Tung, Ching-Chuan; Ely, Linda

    2016-12-01

    Sponsored by the pilot overseas internships project of the Ministry of Education, Taiwan, the authors and ten undergraduate students from Taiwan visited several mental health facilities in Virginia for one month. These facilities included the Catawba State Hospital, Salem Veteran Affairs Medical Center, Carilion Saint Albans Behavioral Health (New River Valley Medical Center), Warm Hearth Village, Adult & Child Family Counseling private outpatient clinic, the Free Clinic of the New River Valley, New Life Clubhouse, and Self-Government Program for Assertive Community Treatment. In-depth dialogue and participation in nursing care under the supervision of registered nurses facilitated the authors' reflection on mental health care and the roles and functions of Taiwanese nurse practitioners. The present article adopts a macro view in order to compare the related issues between Taiwan and Virginia, including: geographic features, history, culture of health-seeking behavior, healthcare insurance, and the relationships among various professionals. How these issues relate to social-cultural background and how the overall healthcare environment impacts upon the roles of nurse practitioners in Taiwan are rarely discussed in literature. We expect that this cross-cultural contrast and reflection will elicit a better understanding of how these factors have shaped and affected the roles of Taiwanese nurse practitioners. Further, suggestions about how to improve the nursing profession in Taiwan are presented.

  19. Nonurgent Use of the Emergency Department by Pediatric Patients: A Theory-Guided Approach for Primary and Acute Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohns, Mary Jean; Oliver-McNeil, Sandra; Nantais-Smith, Leanne M; George, Nancy M

    2016-01-01

    Providing quality, cost-effective care to children and their families in the appropriate setting is the goal of nurse practitioners in primary and acute care. However, increased utilization of the emergency department (ED) for nonurgent care threatens cost-effective quality care, interrupts continuity of care, and contributes to ED overcrowding. To date, descriptive research has identified demographics of those using the ED for nonurgent care, the chief complaints of children seeking nonurgent care, the cost to the health care system of pediatric nonurgent care, and characteristics of associated primary care settings. Using Donabedian's Model of Quality of Healthcare and a Theory of Dependent Care by Taylor and colleagues, acute and primary care pediatric nurse practitioners can incorporate interventions that will channel care to the appropriate setting and educate caregivers regarding common childhood illnesses and the value of continuity of care. By using a theoretical framework as a guide, this article will help both acute and primary care pediatric nurse practitioners understand why parents seek nonurgent care for their children in the ED and actions they can take to ensure that care is provided in an optimal setting.

  20. General practitioner attitudes to the care of people with epilepsy: an examination of clustering within practices and prediction of patient-rated quality of care

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    Thapar Ajay K

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is wide variation in the quality of care provided by primary care practices to individuals with chronic illnesses. Individual doctor attitudes and interest have been demonstrated to influence patient outcomes in some instances. Given the trend towards larger practices and part-time working, continuity of care is likely to fall and thus practice-based rather than individual general practitioner attributes and attitudes are likely to become increasingly important. The aim in this paper was to examine the extent to which individual general practitioner (G.P. attitudes to the care of people with epilepsy cluster within practices and predict patient-rated quality of care. Methods The sample consisted of 1255 people with active epilepsy (a recent seizure or on anti-convulsant medication for epilepsy and 199 GPs from 82 general practices. Measures of GP attitudes (a 17-item GP attitudes questionnaire and patient-rated quality of epilepsy care were obtained. 1210 individuals completed initial questionnaires and 975 patients filled in final questionnaires one year later. Responses were achieved from 64 practices (83% of total and 115 GPs (60% of total. Results 2 main factors were found to underlie GP attitudes to the care of people with epilepsy and these demonstrated clustering within practices "epilepsy viewed as a primary care responsibility" (Eigenvalue 3.98, intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC 0.40, and "medication skills"(Eigenvalue 2.74, ICC 0.35. GP-rated scores on "epilepsy care being a primary care responsibility" were a significant predictor of patient-rated quality of GP care (p = 0.031. Other contributory factors were seizure frequency (p = 0.044, and patient-rated "shared decision making" (p = 0.022. Conclusion Specific general practitioner attitudes to the care of people with epilepsy cluster within practices and are significantly associated with patient-rated quality of epilepsy care. It is important to take

  1. Current experiences and educational preferences of general practitioners and staff caring for people with dementia living in residential facilities

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    Scherer Samuel

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Residential care is important for older adults, particularly for those with advanced dementia and their families. Education interventions that achieve sustainable improvement in the care of older adults are critical to quality care. There are few systematic data available regarding the educational needs of Residential Care Facility (RCF staff and General Practitioners (GPs relating to dementia, or the sustainability of educational interventions. We sought to determine participation in dementia education, perceived levels of current knowledge regarding dementia, perceived unmet educational needs, current barriers, facilitators and preferences for dementia education. Methods A mixed methods study design was utilised. A survey was distributed to a convenience sample of general practitioners, and staff in 223 consecutive residential care facilities in Perth, Western Australia. Responses were received from 102 RCF staff working in 10 facilities (out of 33 facilities who agreed to distribute the survey and 202 GPs (19% of metropolitan GPs. Quantitative survey data were summarised descriptively and chi squared statistics were used to analyse the distribution of categorical variables. Qualitative data were collected from general practitioners, staff in residential care facilities and family carers of people with dementia utilizing individual interviews, surveys and focus groups. Qualitative data were analysed thematically. Results Among RCF staff and GPs attending RCF, participation in dementia education was high, and knowledge levels generally perceived as good. The individual experiences and needs of people with dementia and their families were emphasised. Participants identified the need for a person centred philosophy to underpin educational interventions. Limited time was a frequently mentioned barrier, especially in relation to attending dementia care education. Perceived educational needs relating to behaviours of concern

  2. Contextualising professional ethics: the impact of the prison context on the practices and norms of health care practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Karolyn L A; Jordens, Christopher F C; Kerridge, Ian

    2014-09-01

    Health care is provided in many contexts-not just hospitals, clinics, and community health settings. Different institutional settings may significantly influence the design and delivery of health care and the ethical obligations and practices of health care practitioners working within them. This is particularly true in institutions that are established to constrain freedom, ensure security and authority, and restrict movement and choice. We describe the results of a qualitative study of the experiences of doctors and nurses working within two women's prisons in the state of New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Their accounts make clear how the provision and ethics of health care may be compromised by the physical design of the prison, the institutional policies and practices restricting movement of prisoners and practitioners, the focus on maintaining control and security, and the very purpose of the prison and prison system itself. The results of this study make clear the impact that context has on professional practice and illustrate the importance of sociology and anthropology to bioethics and to the development of a more nuanced account of professional ethics.

  3. Recruitment difficulties in a primary care cluster randomised trial: investigating factors contributing to general practitioners' recruitment of patients

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    McKenzie Joanne E

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recruitment of patients by health professionals is reported as one of the most challenging steps when undertaking studies in primary care settings. Numerous investigations of the barriers to patient recruitment in trials which recruit patients to receive an intervention have been published. However, we are not aware of any studies that have reported on the recruitment barriers as perceived by health professionals to recruiting patients into cluster randomised trials where patients do not directly receive an intervention. This particular subtype of cluster trial is commonly termed a professional-cluster trial. The aim of this study was to investigate factors that contributed to general practitioners recruitment of patients in a professional-cluster trial which evaluated the effectiveness of an intervention to increase general practitioners adherence to a clinical practice guideline for acute low-back pain. Method General practitioners enrolled in the study were posted a questionnaire, consisting of quantitative items and an open-ended question, to assess possible reasons for poor patient recruitment. Descriptive statistics were used to summarise quantitative items and responses to the open-ended question were coded into categories. Results Seventy-nine general practitioners completed at least one item (79/94 = 84%, representing 68 practices (85% practice response rate, and 44 provided a response to the open-ended question. General practitioners recalled inviting a median of two patients with acute low-back pain to participate in the trial over a seven-month period; they reported that they intended to recruit patients, but forgot to approach patients to participate; and they did not perceive that patients had a strong interest or disinterest in participating. Additional open-ended comments were generally consistent with the quantitative data. Conclusion A number of barriers to the recruitment of patients with acute low

  4. Mind-Mindedness in Infant Child-Care: Associations with Early Childhood Practitioner Sensitivity and Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degotardi, Sheila; Sweller, Naomi

    2012-01-01

    The significance of mind-mindedness, or the tendency of adults to ascribe mental states and processes when describing and interpreting children's behavior, is well established in home contexts. The purpose of this study was to explore the prevalence and pedagogical implications of the mind-mindedness of 24 early childhood practitioners working…

  5. The Effect of Mobile App Follow-up Care on the Number of In-person Visits Following Ambulatory Surgery: A Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Kathleen; Coyte, Peter; Semple, John

    2015-01-01

    Women's College Hospital (WCH) in Toronto offers specialized ambulatory surgical procedures. A feasibility study using a mobile appliciation (app) to supplement in-person follow-up care after surgery suggests that the mobile app adequately detects postoperative complications, eliminates the need for in-person follow-up care and is cost-effective. This is concordant with other postoperative telemedicine studies. The purpose of this study is to determine if we can avert in-person follow-up care through the use of mobile app compared to conventional, in-person follow-up care in the first month following surgery amongst breast reconstruction patients at WCH. This will be a pragmatic, single-centre, open, controlled, 2-arm parallel-group superiority randomized trial. Mobile app follow-up care is a novel approach to managing patients postoperatively with the potential to avert in-person follow-up and generate cost-savings for the healthcare system and patient.

  6. General practitioners believe that hypnotherapy could be a useful treatment for irritable bowel syndrome in primary care

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    de Lusignan Simon

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Irritable bowel syndrome is a common condition in general practice. It occurs in 10 to 20% of the population, but less than half seek medical assistance with the complaint. Methods A questionnaire was sent to the 406 GPs listed on the West Sussex Health Authority Medical List to investigate their views of this condition and whether they felt hypnotherapy had a place in its management Results 38% of general practitioners responded. The achieved sample shared the characteristics of target sample. Nearly half thought that irritable bowel syndrome (IBS was a "nervous complaint" and used a combination of "the placebo effect of personal care," therapeutic, and dietary advice. There is considerable divergence in the perceived effectiveness of current approaches. Over 70% thought that hypnotherapy may have a role in the management of patients with IBS; though the majority (68% felt that this should not be offered by general practitioners. 84% felt that this should be offered by qualified hypnotherapist, with 40% feeling that this should be offered outside the health service. Conclusions General practitioners vary in their perceptions of what constitutes effective therapy in IBS. They are willing to consider referral to a qualified hypnotherapist.

  7. Women's preference for traditional birth attendants and modern health care practitioners in Akpabuyo community of Cross River State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpabio, Idongesit I; Edet, Olaide B; Etifit, Rita E; Robinson-Bassey, Grace C

    2014-01-01

    The proportion of women who patronized traditional birth attendants (TBAs) or modern health care practitioners (MHCPs) was compared, including reasons for their choices. A comparative design was adopted to study 300 respondents selected through a multistage systematic random sampling technique. The instrument for data collection was a validated 21-item structured questionnaire. We observed that 75 (25%) patronized and 80 (27%) preferred TBAs, and 206 (69%) patronized and 220 (75%) preferred MHCPs, while 19 (6%) patronized both. The view that TBAs prayed before conducting deliveries was supported by a majority 75 (94%) of the respondents who preferred them. Factors associated with preference for TBAs should be addressed.

  8. Detection of missed injuries in a pediatric trauma center with the addition of acute care pediatric nurse practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resler, Julia; Hackworth, Jodi; Mayo, Erin; Rouse, Thomas M

    2014-01-01

    Missed injuries contribute to increased morbidity in trauma patients. A retrospective chart review was conducted of pediatric trauma patients from 2010 to 2013 with a documented missed injury. A significant percentage of missed injuries were identified (3.01% during July 2012 to December 2013 vs 0.39% during January 2010 to July 2012) with the addition of acute care trained pediatric nurse practitioners to the trauma service at a pediatric trauma center. The increase is thought to be due to improvement in charting, consistent personnel performing tertiary examinations, and improved radiology reads of outside films.

  9. Referral patterns between the child health care, general practitioners and secondary health care: a prospective descriptive study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Einhorn, R.; Eekhof, J.A.H. van; Engelberts, A.C.; Groeneveld, Y.; Verkerk, P.H.; Wit, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: In the Netherlands, preventive child health service (CHS) screening plays an important role in the early detection of congenital, developmental, physical, and mental disorders. Objective: To obtain insight into the referral patterns of children from CHS to general practitioners and from

  10. Teamwork in primary care: perspectives of general practitioners and community nurses in Lithuania

    OpenAIRE

    Jaruseviciene, Lina; Liseckiene, Ida; Valius, Leonas; Kontrimiene, Ausrine; Jarusevicius, Gediminas; Lapão, Luís Velez

    2013-01-01

    Background A team approach in primary care has proven benefits in achieving better outcomes, reducing health care costs, satisfying patient needs, ensuring continuity of care, increasing job satisfaction among health providers and using human health care resources more efficiently. However, some research indicates constraints in collaboration within primary health care (PHC) teams in Lithuania. The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of the phenomenon of teamwork in Lithuania...

  11. Management of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in UK primary care: a survey of general practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, Suzanne; Wilton, Lynda; Murray, Macey; Hodgkins, Paul; Asherson, Philip; Wong, Ian CK

    2013-01-01

    Background: Compared to existing literature on childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), little published adult data are available, particularly outside of the United States. Using General Practitioner (GP) questionnaires from the United Kingdom, this study aimed to examine a number of issues related to ADHD in adults, across three cohorts of patients, adults who received ADHD drug treatment in childhood/adolescence but stopped prior to adulthood; adults who received ADHD dru...

  12. [A guide to good practice for information security in the handling of personal health data by health personnel in ambulatory care facilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Henarejos, Ana; Fernández-Alemán, José Luis; Toval, Ambrosio; Hernández-Hernández, Isabel; Sánchez-García, Ana Belén; Carrillo de Gea, Juan Manuel

    2014-04-01

    The appearance of electronic health records has led to the need to strengthen the security of personal health data in order to ensure privacy. Despite the large number of technical security measures and recommendations that exist to protect the security of health data, there is an increase in violations of the privacy of patients' personal data in healthcare organizations, which is in many cases caused by the mistakes or oversights of healthcare professionals. In this paper, we present a guide to good practice for information security in the handling of personal health data by health personnel, drawn from recommendations, regulations and national and international standards. The material presented in this paper can be used in the security audit of health professionals, or as a part of continuing education programs in ambulatory care facilities.

  13. The capabilities and scope-of-practice requirements of advanced life support practitioners undertaking critical care transfers: A Delphi study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Venter

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Critical care transfers (CCT refer to the high level of care given during transport (via ambulance, helicopter or fixed-wing aircraft of patients who are of high acuity. In South Africa (SA, advanced life support (ALS paramedics undertake CCTs. The scope of ALS in SA has no extended protocol regarding procedures or medications in terms of dealing with these CCTs. Aim. The aim of this study was to obtain the opinions of several experts in fields pertaining to critical care and transport and to gain consensus on the skills and scope-of-practice requirements of paramedics undertaking CCTs in the SA setting. Methods. A modified Delphi study consisting of three rounds was undertaken using an online survey platform. A heterogeneous sample (n=7, consisting of specialists in the fields of anaesthesiology, emergency medicine, internal medicine, critical care, critical care transport and paediatrics, was asked to indicate whether, in their opinion, selected procedures and medications were needed within the scope of practice of paramedics undertaking CCTs. Results. After three rounds, consensus was obtained in 70% (57/81 of procedures and medications. Many of these items are not currently within the scope of paramedics’ training. The panel felt that paramedics undertaking these transfers should have additional postgraduate training that is specific to critical care. Conclusion. Major discrepancies exist between the current scope of paramedic practice and the suggested required scope of practice for CCTs. An extended scope of practice and additional training should be considered for these practitioners.

  14. Division of primary care services between physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners for older patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Christine M; Thorpe, Carolyn T; Palta, Mari; Carayon, Pascale; Gilchrist, Valerie J; Smith, Maureen A

    2013-10-01

    Team-based care involving physician assistants and/or nurse practitioners (PA/NPs) in the patient-centered medical home is one approach to improving care quality. However, little is known about how to incorporate PA/NPs into primary care teams. Using data from a large physician group, we describe the division of patients and services (e.g., acute, chronic, preventive, other) between primary care providers for older diabetes patients on panels with varying levels of PA/NP involvement (i.e., no role, supplemental provider, or usual provider of care). Panels with PA/NP usual providers had higher proportions of patients with Medicaid, disability, and depression. Patients with physician usual providers had similar probabilities of visits with supplemental PA/NPs and physicians for all service types. However, patients with PA/NP usual providers had higher probabilities of visits with a supplemental physician. Understanding how patients and services are divided between PA/NPs and physicians will assist in defining provider roles on primary care teams.

  15. Educational Implications of Nurse Practitioner Students and Medical Residents' Attitudes toward Managed Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breer, M. Lynn; Pohl, Joanne M.; Stommel, Manfred; Barkauskas, Violet H.; Schillo, Barbara; Oakley, Deborah

    2002-01-01

    Attitudes toward managed care of 431 medical residents and 153 advanced practice nursing students were compared. Medical students were more likely to agree that managed care emphasizes cost over quality and threatens autonomy. Nursing students were more likely to agree that it encourages preventive care. Medical students were less enthusiastic…

  16. Practitioner Perceptions of the A3 Method for Process Improvement in Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visich, John K.; Wicks, Angela M.; Zalila, Faiza

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this article is to present students' perceptions of the recently developed A3 method, a structured problem-solving approach based on lean concepts and tools that have been adapted to the health care environment. The students were all employees of a large health care provider and were enrolled in a customized health care executive MBA…

  17. Nutritional counselling in primary health care: a randomized comparison of an intervention by general practitioner or dietician

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willaing, Ingrid; Ladelund, Steen; Jørgensen, Torben

    2004-01-01

    AIMS: To compare health effects and risk reduction in two different strategies of nutritional counselling in primary health care for patients at high risk of ischaemic heart disease. METHODS: In a cluster-randomized trial 60 general practitioners (GPs) in the Copenhagen County were randomized...... of cardiovascular disease and addressed these when counselling. The guidance from a GP was of significant importance for risk reduction in relation to IHD. However, a long-term lifestyle intervention by GP was difficult to implement. In the case of obesity it was effective to refer to long-term nutritional....... Risk of cardiovascular disease was calculated by The Copenhagen Risk Score. Data on use of medicine and primary health care was obtained from central registers. RESULTS: Altogether 339 (67%) patients completed the intervention. Weight loss was larger in the dietician group (mean 4.5 kg vs. 2.4 kg...

  18. Effects of general practitioner training and family support services on the care of home-dwelling dementia patients - Results of a controlled cluster-randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wunder Sonja

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than 90% of dementia patients are cared for by their general practitioners, who are decisively involved in the diagnosis, therapy and recommendation of support services. Objective: To test whether special training of general practitioners alters the care of dementia patients through their systematic recommendation of caregiver counseling and support groups. Method 129 general practitioners enrolled 390 dementia patients and their informal caregivers in a prospective, three-arm cluster-randomized 2-year study. Arm A constituted usual care, in Arm B and C support groups and caregiver counseling (in Arm B one year after baseline, in Arm C at baseline were recommended by the general practitioners. The general practitioners received arm-specific training. Diagnostic and therapeutic behavior of physicians was recorded at baseline. Informal caregivers were questioned in follow-up after 2 years about the utilization of support services. Results The diagnostic behavior of the general practitioners conforms to relevant guidelines. The procedure in newly-diagnosed patients does not differ from previously diagnosed patients with the exception of the rate of referral to a specialist. About one-third of the newly-diagnosed dementia patients are given an anti-dementia drug. The utilization of support groups and counseling increased five- and fourfold, respectively. Utilization of other support services remained low ( Conclusion Trained general practitioners usually act in conformity with guidelines with respect to diagnosing dementia, and partly in conformity with the guidelines with respect to recommended drug therapy. Recommendations of support services for informal caregivers by the general practitioner are successful. They result in a marked increase in the utilization rate for the recommended services compared to offers which are not recommended by the general practitioner. Trial registration ISRCTN68329593

  19. Health care consumers’ perspectives on pharmacist integration into private general practitioner clinics in Malaysia: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saw PS

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pui San Saw,1 Lisa M Nissen,2,3 Christopher Freeman,2,4 Pei Se Wong,3 Vivienne Mak5 1School of Postgraduate Studies and Research, International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2School of Clinical Sciences, Queensland University Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 3School of Pharmacy, International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 4School of Pharmacy, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia; 5School of Pharmacy, Monash University Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia Background: Pharmacists are considered medication experts but are underutilized and exist mainly at the periphery of the Malaysian primary health care team. Private general practitioners (GPs in Malaysia are granted rights under the Poison Act 1952 to prescribe and dispense medications at their primary care clinics. As most consumers obtain their medications from their GPs, community pharmacists’ involvement in ensuring safe use of medicines is limited. The integration of a pharmacist into private GP clinics has the potential to contribute to quality use of medicines. This study aims to explore health care consumers’ views on the integration of pharmacists within private GP clinics in Malaysia.Methods: A purposive sample of health care consumers in Selangor and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, were invited to participate in focus groups and semi-structured interviews. Sessions were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim and thematically analyzed using NVivo 10. Results: A total of 24 health care consumers participated in two focus groups and six semi-structured interviews. Four major themes were identified: 1 pharmacists’ role viewed mainly as supplying medications, 2 readiness to accept pharmacists in private GP clinics, 3 willingness to pay for pharmacy services, and 4 concerns about GPs’ resistance to pharmacist integration. Consumers felt that a pharmacist integrated into a private GP clinic could offer potential benefits such as to provide trustworthy

  20. Continuity of care : is the personal doctor still important? : A survey of general practitioners and family physicians in England and Wales, the United States, and The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokes, T.; Tarrant, C.; Mainous, A.G.; Schers, H.J.; Freeman, G.; Baker, R.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: We determined the reported value general practitioners/family physicians in 3 different health care systems place on the various types of continuity of care. METHODS: We conducted a postal questionnaire survey in England and Wales, the United States, and The Netherlands. The participants we

  1. Appraisal of cooperation with a palliative care case manager by general practitioners and community nurses: a cross-sectional questionnaire study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plas, A.G.M. van der; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.; Vissers, K.C.; Deliens, L.; Jansen, W.J.J.; Francke, A.L.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To investigate how general practitioners and community nurses value the support that they receive from a nurse case manager with expertise in palliative care, whether they think the case manager is helpful in realizing appropriate care and what characteristics of the patient and case managemen

  2. Beginning to explore the experience of managing a direct payment for someone with dementia: The perspectives of suitable people and adult social care practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laybourne, Anne H; Jepson, Marcus J; Williamson, Toby; Robotham, Dan; Cyhlarova, Eva; Williams, Val

    2016-01-01

    Following legal improvements made around mental capacity together with the Health and Social Care Act, it is now possible for a direct payment to be paid to a 'Suitable Person' to manage on someone's behalf to purchase directly care and support services. People with dementia are a key group affected by this change in England of adult social care. We interviewed nine social care practitioners and seven Suitable People for people with dementia across five English local authorities to begin to examine their experiences of this new method of social care provision. Findings from thematic analyses suggest positive outcomes and multiple beneficiaries, but some challenges: potentially inappropriate processes, support planning, divergence in attitudes towards care and support outcomes. Implications for practice include obfuscation of recipients' and Suitable People's best interests and supporting practitioners to explore fully clients' aspirations for care and support.

  3. 'Making every contact count': Evaluation of the impact of an intervention to train health and social care practitioners in skills to support health behaviour change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Wendy; Black, Christina; Tinati, Tannaze; Cradock, Sue; Begum, Rufia; Jarman, Megan; Pease, Anna; Margetts, Barrie; Davies, Jenny; Inskip, Hazel; Cooper, Cyrus; Baird, Janis; Barker, Mary

    2016-02-01

    A total of 148 health and social care practitioners were trained in skills to support behaviour change: creating opportunities to discuss health behaviours, using open discovery questions, listening, reflecting and goal-setting. At three time points post-training, use of the skills was evaluated and compared with use of skills by untrained practitioners. Trained practitioners demonstrated significantly greater use of these client-centred skills to support behaviour change compared to their untrained peers up to 1 year post-training. Because it uses existing services to deliver support for behaviour change, this training intervention has the potential to improve public health at relatively low cost.

  4. Processo de cuidar do idoso em Diálise Peritoneal Ambulatorial Contínua no domicílio Proceso de cuidar del anciano, que hace Diálisis Peritoneal Ambulatorial Contínua en el domicilio Home care for the elderly undergoing Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Favaro Ribeiro

    2009-12-01

    DPAC.Objectives: To describe the elders with end stage renal disease (ESRD undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD, their caregivers, and the care the caregivers provide to the elders. Methods: This was a qualitative study with 9 caregivers. Data were collected through oral history. Data analysis consisted of thematic content analysis. Results: The sample consisted of 5 male and 4 female elders and all them were dependent on caregivers to change the dialysis collection bag. The mean age of the participants was 70 years. Among the caregivers, 8 of them were female with a mean age of 41.5 years and they provided 8 hours of care to the elders daily. The main theme emerging from the content analysis was "home care for the elderly undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis." Conclusion: Caregivers need support for the development of knowledge and skills to deal with the elders' demand of care, particularly in regard to the management of CAPD.

  5. Brief cognitive behavioral therapy compared to general practitioners care for depression in primary care: a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.D. Baas; M.W.J. Koeter; H.C. van Weert; P. Lucassen; C.L.H. Bockting; K.A. Wittkampf; A.H. Schene

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Depressive disorders are highly prevalent in primary care (PC) and are associated with considerable functional impairment and increased health care use. Research has shown that many patients prefer psychological treatments to pharmacotherapy, however, it remains unclear which t

  6. Ambulatory spine surgery: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Evan O; Brietzke, Sasha C; Weinberg, Alan D; McAnany, Steven J; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Cho, Samuel K; Hecht, Andrew C

    2014-08-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional study. Objective To assess the current practices of spine surgeons performing ambulatory surgery in the United States. Methods An electronic survey was distributed to members of the International Society for the Advancement of Spine Surgery. Data were initially examined in a univariate manner; variables with a p value ambulatory spine surgery, and 49.1% were investors in an ambulatory surgery center. Surgeon investors in ambulatory surgery centers were more likely to perform procedures of increased complexity than noninvestors, though limited data precluded a statistical correlation. Surgeons in private practice were more likely to perform ambulatory surgery (94.3%; p = 0.0176), and nonacademic surgeons were both more likely to invest in ambulatory surgery centers (p = 0.0024) and perform surgery at least part of the time in a surgery center (p = 0.0039). Conclusions Though the numbers were too few to calculate statistical significance, there was a trend toward the performance of high-risk procedures on an ambulatory basis being undertaken by those with investment status in an ambulatory center. It is possible that this plays a role in the decision to perform these procedures in this setting versus that of a hospital, where a patient may have better access to care should a complication arise requiring emergent assessment and treatment by a physician. This decision should divest itself of financial incentives and focus entirely on patient safety.

  7. PRESCRIBING PRACTICES OF NON TEACHING GENERAL PRACTITIONERS OF PRIVATE CLINICS AND PHYSICIANS OF A TERTIARY CARE TEACHING HOSPITAL: A COMPARATIVE CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudar Codi R, Samiya Khan, Manimekalai K

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Doctor’s prescription provides vivid information and instruction to the patient. In spite of the WHO programs, irrational prescribing is still a common practice. Aim: To evaluate and compare the prescribing pattern of private practitioners and physicians of a tertiary care teaching hospital in a semi urban area and detect their rationality. Materials & methods: 150 prescriptions, each prescribed by private practitioners and physicians of a tertiary care hospital were collected over a period of two months and evaluated. Information regarding the drugs used, drugs from the essential drug list, the use of injections, fixed dose combinations, drug prescribed by generic names were observed. Results: The average number of drugs per prescription prescribed by the private practitioners was 2.47 compared to 1.58 by the physicians of a tertiary care hospital. 82% of prescriptions of private practitioners had one injection prescribed in the prescription compared to 12% by physicians of a tertiary care hospital. 30 unnecessary drugs, 46 unnecessary injections and 8 irrational fixed dose combinations were prescribed by the private practitioners, whereas only 6 unnecessary drugs and 2 unnecessary injections were prescribed by the physicians of a tertiary care hospital respectively. There was no irrational fixed dose combination prescribed by them. The private practitioners prescribed 12 (3.2% drugs by generic names, whereas the physicians of a tertiary care hospital prescribed 72 (30.3% drugs by generic names. (P<0.000. 36 (9.7% drugs prescribed by the private practitioners were not included in the essential drug list and only 2 (0.8% drugs prescribed by the physicians of a tertiary care hospital were not included in the essential drug list. Conclusion: Private practitioners prescribe more irrational prescriptions on comparison with the physicians of a tertiary care teaching hospital. This may be due to the promotional pharmaceutical incentives

  8. How do General Practitioners experience providing care for their psychotic patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oud, Marian J. T.; Schuling, Jan; Slooff, Cees J.; Meyboom-de Jong, Betty

    2007-01-01

    Background: In primary care, GPs usually provide care for patients with chronic diseases according to professional guidelines. However, such guidelines are not available in the Netherlands for patients with recurring psychoses. It seems that the specific difficulties that GPs experience in providing

  9. The Ryan Report (2009. A Practitioner's Perspective on Implications for Residential Child Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Howard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article suggests that recent abuse reports and the Ryan Report in particular are now warning signs etched in the consciousness of social care workers. Quite rightly, this consciousness will determine how social care workers approach their work with children in the care system. In many care units the incessant, ostensibly plausible, demands of bureaucracy mean that children exist in an artificial, sanitised care bubble where they are bereft of structure, empathy, spontaneity and real relationships – the very things they crave. Written in a personal capacity and based on the author’s background practice experience, some of this article represents points of view rather than evidential conclusions. The article’s purpose is to contribute to debate, so necessary if lessons of the Ryan Report are really to be learned.

  10. A study evaluating knowledge, attitude and practices of practitioners in the medicine department of tertiary care teaching rural hospital with respect to antihypertensives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatin Patel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate knowledge, attitude and practices of practitioners in the medicine department of tertiary care teaching rural hospital with respect to antihypertensives and find out the disparity between the recommended and actual practices for pharmacological management. Methods: It was survey type of study, carried out using feedback questionnaire related to use of antihypertensives. Total 25 consultants were included in the study. Results: It was found that in mild hypertension single drug and two drugs in combination were preferred by 15 and 10 practitioners respectively. In moderate hypertension single drug, two drugs in combination, and greater than two drugs were preferred by 3, 13, and 7 practitioners respectively. In severe hypertension two drugs in combination and greater than two drugs were preferred by 16 and 9 practitioners respectively; none preferred single drug. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors /angiotensin receptor blockers, beta blockers, Calcium channel blockers, diuretics were preferred as first line drug by 7, 4, 8, and 16 practitioners respectively. Most commonly preferred combination was Losartan and amlodipine by 16 practitioners. In pregnancy nifedipine was preferred as the first line drug while in elderly diuretics were preferred. In hypertensive patients with age less than 40 years all practitioners preferred ACEIs/ARBs. In diabetics ACEIs/ARBs was preferred by all practitioners. Each practitioner claimed to follow Joint National Committee (JNC 7 criteria. Cost of drug was an important consideration in all their prescribing patterns. Conclusion: The knowledge, attitudes and practices followed by the practitioners of Dhiraj hospital were satisfactory and guidelines oriented. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(3.000: 715-717

  11. Nutritional counselling in primary health care: a randomized comparison of an intervention by general practitioner or dietician

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willaing, Ingrid; Ladelund, Steen; Jørgensen, Torben;

    2004-01-01

    AIMS: To compare health effects and risk reduction in two different strategies of nutritional counselling in primary health care for patients at high risk of ischaemic heart disease. METHODS: In a cluster-randomized trial 60 general practitioners (GPs) in the Copenhagen County were randomized...... to give nutritional counselling or to refer patients to a dietician. Patients were included after opportunistically screening (n=503 patients), and received nutritional counselling by GP or dietician over 12 months. Health effects were measured by changes in weight, waist circumference and blood lipids...... of cardiovascular disease and addressed these when counselling. The guidance from a GP was of significant importance for risk reduction in relation to IHD. However, a long-term lifestyle intervention by GP was difficult to implement. In the case of obesity it was effective to refer to long-term nutritional...

  12. The burden of care: a focus group study of healthcare practitioners in Scotland talking about parental drug misuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Anne; Williams, Nigel; Chandler, Amy; Cunningham-Burley, Sarah; McGorm, Kelly; Mathews, Gillian

    2016-09-01

    Parenting and family support are key prevention and intervention strategies for improving outcomes for children and families affected by parental drug misuse. However, little is known about the delivery of parenting support for drug-dependent parents, particularly within universal healthcare services. This study aimed to explore the way healthcare practitioners engage with this challenging agenda. Four multidisciplinary focus groups involving a purposive sample of 18 experienced healthcare professionals were conducted in Scotland. Participants included general practitioners, midwives, public health nurses and addiction staff who work together to provide care for vulnerable families. A focus group topic guide was developed to explore the views and experiences of these healthcare professionals in relation to providing parenting support for drug-using parents, predominantly those receiving opioid substitution therapy. Data were analysed using a constant comparison method and thematic approach. The overarching narrative which united the focus group discussions was about the 'burden of care' that these families pose for frontline healthcare professionals. Recurring themes centred on three key issues: the problematic nature of drug-using parents themselves; clinical challenges in living up to the ideals of professional practice; and the wider context in which current practice is governed. Professionals expressed ambivalence over their parenting support role; anxiety over responsibility for intervening with this 'hard-to-engage' population; and concern over 'dwindling' resources and lack of organisational support. Nevertheless, strategies and opportunities for providing parenting support were acknowledged and there was consensus about the need for further skills training. Despite a proliferation of policy and good practice guidance on the delivery of parenting support for drug-dependent parents, the findings of this study suggest that significant challenges remain

  13. White coat hypertension: improving the patient–health care practitioner relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cobos B

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Briana Cobos, Kelly Haskard-Zolnierek, Krista Howard Department of Psychology, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX, USA Abstract: White coat hypertension is characterized by the variability of a patient's blood pressure measurements between the physician’s office and the patient’s home environment. A patient with white coat hypertension has high blood pressure levels in the physician's office and normal blood pressure levels in their typical environment. This condition is likely caused by the patient’s anxiety within the physician’s office and in the presence of the physician. Research has shown that improving the relationship between a patient and their health care provider can decrease the patient’s anxiety, with the implication of decreasing the patient’s likelihood of demonstrating white coat hypertension. This review provides an overview of the previous literature regarding white coat hypertension, its prevalence, and the consequences for those who develop persistent hypertension. Furthermore, this review discusses the implications of improving patient and health care provider interactions through effective communication, empathy, and trust, as well as the implications for future research studies in improving the patient and health care provider’s relationship. Keywords: white coat hypertension, anxiety, health care professional–patient relationship, physician–patient communication 

  14. Research Priorities for Fertility and Conception Research as Identified by Multidisciplinary Health Care Practitioners and Researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Lisa J; Spencer, Laura; Russell, Darryl L; Hull, Mary Louise; Robertson, Sarah A; Varcoe, Tamara J; Davies, Michael J; Brown, Hannah M; Rodgers, Raymond J

    2016-01-13

    The Robinson Research Institute of the University of Adelaide convened a multidisciplinary group of n = 33 clinicians, researchers and representatives of government organisations on the 2 October 2014 for a workshop entitled "Promoting fertility and healthy conception. How do we generate greater reproductive health awareness?" The key aim of the workshop was to assess the body of knowledge that informs clinical practice and government policy, and to identify questions and additional information needed by health practitioners and government representatives working in the field of reproductive health and to frame future research and policy. The workshop identified topics that fell mostly into three categories: lifestyle-related, societal and biological factors. The lifestyle topics included nutrition and diet, exercise, obesity, shift work and other factors deemed to be modifiable at the level of the individual. The societal topics included discussions of matters that are structural, and resistant to change by individuals, including specific ethical issues, social disadvantage, government and educational policies. The biological factors are intrinsic physical states of the individual, and included many factors where there is a dense body of scientific knowledge which may not be readily accessible in less academic language. This workshop thus provided an opportunity to identify further actions that could be undertaken to meet the needs of diverse organisations and groups of professionals with an interest in human fertility. Since so many factors in our social and biological environment can impact fertility and preconception health, it is imperative to involve many disciplines or levels of government or societal organisations that have not traditionally been involved in this area.

  15. Acute Gastroenteritis and Campylobacteriosis in Swiss Primary Care: The Viewpoint of General Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bless, Philipp J.; Muela Ribera, Joan; Schmutz, Claudia; Zeller, Andreas; Mäusezahl, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AG) is frequently caused by infectious intestinal diseases (IID) including food- and waterborne pathogens of public health importance. Among these pathogens, Campylobacter spp. plays a major role. Many European countries monitor selected IIDs within disease surveillance systems. In Switzerland, the information on IIDs is restricted to limited surveillance data, while no data is available for AG. We conducted a qualitative study among Swiss general practitioners (GPs) to investigate the case management of AG and campylobacteriosis patients, the associated disease burden and the determinants leading to registration in the National Notification System for Infectious Diseases (NNSID). Interviews were conducted with a semi-structured questionnaire and underwent inductive content analysis based on Grounded Theory. The questionnaire was repeatedly adapted to capture emerging themes until the point of theoretical saturation. GPs perceived AG and campylobacteriosis of little relevance to their daily work and public health in general. According to GP self-estimates each consults about two cases of AG per week and diagnoses a median of five campylobacteriosis cases per year. A large proportion of AG cases receives telephone consultations only and gets medical advice from the practice nurse. Antibiotic therapy is considered useful and stool diagnostics are performed for about a fifth of consulting AG patients. Stool diagnostics (“test”) and antibiotic therapy (“treat”) are interrelated and follow four strategies: “Wait & See”, “Treat & See”, “Treat & Test”, and “Test & See”. AG case management is diverse and includes different triage steps. A small proportion of AG patients have stool diagnostics performed and only positive tested patients are reported to the NNSID. As a result severe cases and cases with a history of travel abroad are overrepresented in the NNSID. The use of multiplex PCR panels in routine diagnostics likely

  16. Research Priorities for Fertility and Conception Research as Identified by Multidisciplinary Health Care Practitioners and Researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa J. Moran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Robinson Research Institute of the University of Adelaide convened a multidisciplinary group of n = 33 clinicians, researchers and representatives of government organisations on the 2 October 2014 for a workshop entitled “Promoting fertility and healthy conception. How do we generate greater reproductive health awareness?” The key aim of the workshop was to assess the body of knowledge that informs clinical practice and government policy, and to identify questions and additional information needed by health practitioners and government representatives working in the field of reproductive health and to frame future research and policy. The workshop identified topics that fell mostly into three categories: lifestyle-related, societal and biological factors. The lifestyle topics included nutrition and diet, exercise, obesity, shift work and other factors deemed to be modifiable at the level of the individual. The societal topics included discussions of matters that are structural, and resistant to change by individuals, including specific ethical issues, social disadvantage, government and educational policies. The biological factors are intrinsic physical states of the individual, and included many factors where there is a dense body of scientific knowledge which may not be readily accessible in less academic language. This workshop thus provided an opportunity to identify further actions that could be undertaken to meet the needs of diverse organisations and groups of professionals with an interest in human fertility. Since so many factors in our social and biological environment can impact fertility and preconception health, it is imperative to involve many disciplines or levels of government or societal organisations that have not traditionally been involved in this area.

  17. Screening for High Blood Pressure in Adults During Ambulatory Nonprimary Care Visits: Opportunities to Improve Hypertension Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, Joel; Mohan, Yasmina; Kanter, Michael H; Reynolds, Kristi; Li, Xia; Nguyen, Miki; Young, Deborah R; Koebnick, Corinna

    2015-06-01

    Visits with nonprimary care providers such as optometrists may be missed opportunities for the detection of high blood pressure (BP). For this study, normotensive adults with at least 12 months of health plan membership on January 1, 2009 (n=1,075,522) were followed-up for high BP through March 14, 2011. Of 111,996 patients with a BP measurement ≥140/90 mm Hg, 82.7% were measured during primary care visits and 17.3% during nonprimary care visits. Individuals with a BP ≥140/90 mm Hg measured during nonprimary care visits were older and more likely to be male and non-Hispanic white. The proportion of patients with follow-up and false-positives were comparable between primary and nonprimary care. The main nonprimary care specialty to identify a first BP ≥140/90 mm Hg was ophthalmology/optometry with 24.5% of all patients. Results suggest that expanding screening for hypertension to nonprimary care settings may improve the detection of hypertension.

  18. Problems and needs for improving primary care of osteoarthritis patients: the views of patients, general practitioners and practice nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Backenstrass Matthias

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA is highly prevalent and has substantial impact on quality of life as well as on healthcare costs. The general practitioner (GP often is the first care provider for patients with this chronic disease. The aim of this study was to identify health care needs of patients with OA and to reveal possible obstacles for improvements in primary care management of OA patients. Methods We performed semi-structured interviews with a stratified sample of 20 patients, 20 GPs and 20 practice nurses. Results Diagnosing OA posed no major problem, but during the course of OA, GPs found it difficult to distinguish between complaints resulting from the affection of the joints and complaints related to a concomitant depression. Patients felt to be well informed about the degenerative nature of the disease and possible side effects of medications, but they lacked information on individual consequences of the disease. Therefore, the most important concerns of many patients were pain and fear of disability which they felt to be addressed by GPs only marginally. Regarding pain treatment, physicians and patients had an ambivalent attitude towards NSAIDs and opiates. Therefore, pain treatment was not performed according to prevailing guidelines. GPs felt frustrated about the impact of counselling regarding life style changes but on the other hand admitted to have no systematic approach to it. Patients stated to be aware of the impact of life style on OA but lacked detailed information e.g. on how to exercise. Several suggestions were made concerning improvement. Conclusion GPs should focus more on disability and pain and on giving information about treatment since these topics are inadequately addressed. Advanced approaches are needed to increase GPs impact on patients' life style. Being aware of the problem of labelling patients as chronically ill, a more proactive, patient-centred care is needed.

  19. Are primary care practitioners in Barbados following hypertension guidelines? - a chart audit

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    Carter Anne O

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About 55% of the population 40 to 80 years of age in Barbados is hypertensive. The quality of hypertension primary care compared to available practice guidelines is uncertain. Findings Charts of hypertensive and diabetic patients were randomly sampled at all public and 20 private sector primary care clinics. Charts of all hypertensive patients ≥ 40 years of age were then selected and processes of care and blood pressure (BP maintenance 343 charts of hypertensive patients (170 public, and 173 private were audited. Patients had the following characteristics: mean age 64 years, female gender 63%, mean duration of diagnosis 9.1 years, and diabetes diagnosed 58%. Patients had an average of 4.7 clinic visits per year, 70% were prescribed a thiazide diuretic, 42% a calcium channel blocker, 40% an angiotensin receptor blocker, and 19% a beta blocker. Public patients compared to private patients were more likely to be female (73% vs. 52%, p Conclusions Improvements are needed in following guidelines for basic interventions such as body mass assessment, accurate BP measurement, use of thiazide diuretics and lifestyle advice. BP control is inadequate.

  20. General practitioner views on the determinants of test ordering: a theory-based qualitative approach to the development of an intervention to improve immunoglobulin requests in primary care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cadogan, S L

    2016-07-19

    Research suggests that variation in laboratory requesting patterns may indicate unnecessary test use. Requesting patterns for serum immunoglobulins vary significantly between general practitioners (GPs). This study aims to explore GP\\'s views on testing to identify the determinants of behaviour and recommend feasible intervention strategies for improving immunoglobulin test use in primary care.

  1. Barriers and facilitators to evidence based care of type 2 diabetes patients : experiences of general practitioners participating to a quality improvement program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goderis, G.; Borgermans, L.D.A.; Mathieu, C.; Broeke, C. Van Den; Hannes, K.; Heyrman, J.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the barriers and facilitators to high-quality diabetes care as experienced by general practitioners (GPs) who participated in an 18-month quality improvement program (QIP). This QIP was implemented to promote compliance with international guidelines. METHODS: Twenty

  2. Manual therapy, physical therapy, or continued care by the general practitioner for patients with neck pain: long-term results from a pragmatic randomized clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, J.L.; Vet, H.C.W. de; Koes, B.W.; Mameren, H. van; Devillé, W.L.J.M.; Windt, D.A.W.M. van der; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Pool, J.J.M.; Scholten, R.J.P.M.; Korthals-de Bos, I.B.C.; Bouter, L.M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The authors' goals were to compare the effectiveness of manual therapy (MT; mainly spinal mobilization), physical therapy (PT; mainly exercise therapy), and continued care by the general practitioner (GP; analgesics, counseling and education) over a period of 1 year. METHODS: One hundred

  3. Use of an electronic drug monitoring system for ambulatory patients with chronic disease: how does it impact on nurses' time spent documenting clinical care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordern, Antonia; Callen, Joanne; Gibson, Kathryn; Robertson, Louise; Li, Ling; Hains, Isla M; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2012-01-01

    Medication monitoring of ambulatory rheumatology patients on Disease Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs (DMARDS) is time consuming and complex, with possibilities for error. Electronic systems have the potential to improve the process. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of an electronic Drug Monitoring System (eDMS) on the time nurses' spent on clinical documentation associated with monitoring. The study was conducted with all nurses (n=4) in the Rheumatology Department of a large metropolitan Australian teaching hospital. The eDMS was designed as a module of the Hospital Clinical Information System (HCIS) to assist clinicians in monitoring rheumatology patients on DMARDS. Timing data were collected using a modified time and motion work measurement technique using software on a handheld computer. Data included the time nurses spent on documentation regarding medication monitoring before and after the implementation of the eDMS. Results showed that following implementation of the eDMS nurses spent significantly less time documenting medication monitoring information (13.6% to 7.2%, PeDMS. Consequently, there was a significant decrease in the time nurses spent using the HCIS (13.01% to 2.8%, peDMS made the process of drug monitoring quicker and simpler for nurses and thus permitted them to increase their time spent in direct patient care.

  4. From bed to bench: Which attitude towards the laboratory liver tests should health care practitioners strike?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    There is a general consensus in re-interpreting the so-called liver function tests in the light of novel discoveries. At the same time, recent evidence favours the use of different laboratory data to assess liver damage, fibrosis or regenerative process, but this point is not always shared. Actually, balancing the need for diagnosis, prognostic evaluation and therapy response of liver disease with a good cost/benefit ratio is very difficult. New tests are probably not needed but the aim should be for better utilization of existing tests to contain the increasing cost of health care.

  5. The perceived meaning of a (wholistic view among general practitioners and district nurses in Swedish primary care: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borgquist Lars

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The definition of primary care varies between countries. Swedish primary care has developed from a philosophic viewpoint based on quality, accessibility, continuity, co-operation and a holistic view. The meaning of holism in international literature differs between medicine and nursing. The question is, if the difference is due to different educational traditions. Due to the uncertainties in defining holism and a holistic view we wished to study, in depth, how holism is perceived by doctors and nurses in their clinical work. Thus, the aim was to explore the perceived meaning of a holistic view among general practitioners (GPs and district nurses (DNs. Methods Seven focus group interviews with a purposive sample of 22 GPs and 20 nurses working in primary care in two Swedish county councils were conducted. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results The analysis resulted in three categories, attitude, knowledge, and circumstances, with two, two and four subcategories respectively. A professional attitude involves recognising the whole person; not only fragments of a person with a disease. Factual knowledge is acquired through special training and long professional experience. Tacit knowledge is about feelings and social competence. Circumstances can either be barriers or facilitators. A holistic view is a strong motivator and as such it is a facilitator. The way primary care is organised can be either a barrier or a facilitator and could influence the use of a holistic approach. Defined geographical districts and care teams facilitate a holistic view with house calls being essential, particularly for nurses. In preventive work and palliative care, a holistic view was stated to be specifically important. Consultations and communication with the patient were seen as important tools. Conclusion 'Holistic view' is multidimensional, well implemented and very much alive among both

  6. The 'wise list'- a comprehensive concept to select, communicate and achieve adherence to recommendations of essential drugs in ambulatory care in Stockholm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Lars L; Wettermark, Björn; Godman, Brian; Andersén-Karlsson, Eva; Bergman, Ulf; Hasselström, Jan; Hensjö, Lars-Olof; Hjemdahl, Paul; Jägre, Ingrid; Julander, Margaretha; Ringertz, Bo; Schmidt, Daniel; Sjöberg, Susan; Sjöqvist, Folke; Stiller, Carl-Olav; Törnqvist, Elisabeth; Tryselius, Rolf; Vitols, Sigurd; von Bahr, Christer

    2011-04-01

    The aim was to present and evaluate the impact of a comprehensive strategy over 10 years to select, communicate and achieve adherence to essential drug recommendations (EDR) in ambulatory care in a metropolitan healthcare region. EDRs were issued and launched as a 'Wise List' by the regional Drug and Therapeutics Committee in Stockholm. This study presents the concept by: (i) documenting the process for selecting, communicating and monitoring the impact of the 'Wise List'; (ii) analysing the variation in the number of drug substances recommended between 2000 and 2010; (iii) assessing the attitudes to the 'Wise List' among prescribers and the public; (iv) evaluating the adherence to recommendations between 2003 and 2009. The 'Wise List' consistently contained 200 drug substances for treating common diseases. The drugs were selected based on their efficacy, safety, suitability and cost-effectiveness. The 'Wise List' was known among one-third of a surveyed sample of the public in 2002 after initial marketing campaigns. All surveyed prescribers knew about the concept and 81% found the recommendations trustworthy in 2005. Adherence to recommendations increased from 69% in 1999 to 77% in 2009. In primary care, adherence increased from 83% to 87% from 2003 to 2009. The coefficient of variation (CV%) decreased from 6.1% to 3.8% for 156 healthcare centres between these years. The acceptance of the 'Wise List' in terms of trust among physicians and among the public and increased adherence may be explained by clear criteria for drug recommendations, a comprehensive communication strategy, electronic access to recommendations, continuous medical education and involvement of professional networks and patients.

  7. Interprofessional teamwork innovations for primary health care practices and practitioners: evidence from a comparison of reform in three countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris MF

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mark F Harris,1 Jenny Advocat,2 Benjamin F Crabtree,3 Jean-Frederic Levesque,1,4 William L Miller,5 Jane M Gunn,6 William Hogg,7 Cathie M Scott,8 Sabrina M Chase,9 Lisa Halma,10 Grant M Russell11 1Center for Primary Health Care and Equity, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, 2Southern Academic Primary Care Research Unit, School of Primary Health Care, Monash University, Notting Hill, VIC, Australia; 3Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ, USA; 4Bureau of Health Information, NSW Government, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 5Department of Family Medicine, Lehigh Valley Health Network, Allentown, PA, USA; 6Department of General Practice, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 7The CT Lamont Primary Care Research Center, The University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, 8Alberta Centre for Child, Family, and Community Research, University of Calgary, AB, Canada; 9Rutgers University, Rutgers School of Nursing, Rutgers, NJ, USA; 10Alberta Health Services, Lethbridge, AB, Canada; 11School of Primary Health Care, Monash University, Notting Hill, VIC, Australia Context: A key aim of reforms to primary health care (PHC in many countries has been to enhance interprofessional teamwork. However, the impact of these changes on practitioners has not been well understood.Objective: To assess the impact of reform policies and interventions that have aimed to create or enhance teamwork on professional communication relationships, roles, and work satisfaction in PHC practices.Design: Collaborative synthesis of 12 mixed methods studies.Setting: Primary care practices undergoing transformational change in three countries: Australia, Canada, and the USA, including three Canadian provinces (Alberta, Ontario, and Quebec.Methods: We conducted a synthesis and secondary analysis of 12 qualitative and quantitative studies conducted by the authors in order to understand the impacts and how they

  8. Atención médica ambulatoria en México: el costo para los usuarios Ambulatory medical care in Mexico: the cost for users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Arredondo

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Analizar los resultados de la Encuesta Nacional de Salud II (ENSA-II, en lo relativo a los costos del proceso de búsqueda y obtención de la atención médica ambulatoria en diferentes instituciones del sector público y privado. Material y métodos. La informacion se obtuvo a partir de los indicadores de costos de la atención médica que notificó la población de estudio de la ENSA-II. Los costos para el bolsillo del consumidor fueron la variable dependiente, y las independientes, la condición de aseguramiento y el ingreso económico. La significancia de los niveles de variación se identificó aplicando la prueba de Duncan. Resultados. Los costos en todo el país, en dólares estadunidenses, fueron: transporte, $ 2.20; consulta general, $ 7.90; medicamentos, $ 9.60, y estudios de diagnóstico, $13.6. El costo promedio total de la atención ambulatoria fue de $ 22.70. Los hallazgos empíricos permiten sugerir una nueva propuesta de análisis de los costos en salud, tanto directos como indirectos, en que incurren los consumidores de servicios de salud; dichos costos representan una carga importante en relación con el ingreso familiar, situación que se agudiza en el caso de la población no asegurada. Conclusiones. La incorporación de la perspectiva económica en el análisis de los problemas de los sistemas de salud, no debe limitarse a los costos de producción de servicios en que incurren los proveedores, sobre todo si lo que se busca es resolver los problemas de equidad y accesibilidad que actualmente caracterizan a la oferta de servicios médicos en México.Objective. To analyze the results of the National Health Survey (ENSA-II as to the costs generated by the search and obtainment of ambulatory medical attention in various intitutions of the private and public health sector. Material and methods. Information was raised from the health care cost indicators reported by the study population of the ENSA-II. The dependent

  9. Developing a public health policy-research nexus: an evaluation of Nurse Practitioner models in aged care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, Brenton; Clark, Shannon; Davey, Rachel; Parker, Rhian

    2013-10-01

    A frustration often expressed by researchers and policy-makers in public health is an apparent mismatch between respective priorities and expectations for research. Academics bemoan an oversimplification of their work, a reticence for independent critique and the constant pressure to pursue evaluation funding. Meanwhile, policy-makers look for research reports written in plain language with clear application, which are attuned to current policy settings and produced quickly. In a context where there are calls in western nations for evidence based policy with stronger links to academic research, such a mismatch can present significant challenges to policy program evaluation. The purpose of this paper is to present one attempt to overcome these challenges. Specifically, the paper describes the development of a conceptual framework for a large-scale, multifaceted evaluation of an Australian Government health initiative to expand Nurse Practitioner models of practice in aged care service delivery. In doing so, the paper provides a brief review of key points for the facilitation of a strong research-policy nexus in public health evaluations, as well as describes how this particular evaluation embodies these key points. As such, the paper presents an evaluation approach which may be adopted and adapted by others undertaking public health policy program evaluations.

  10. Why are some evidence-based care recommendations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease better implemented than others? Perspectives of medical practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston KN

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Kylie N Johnston1, Mary Young2, Karen A Grimmer-Somers1, Ral Antic3, Peter A Frith41International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; 2Transitional and Community Services, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; 3Department of Thoracic Medicine, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; 4Respiratory, Allergy and Sleep Services, Repatriation General Hospital and Flinders University Adelaide, South Australia, AustraliaBackground: Clinical guidelines for management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD include recommendations based on high levels of evidence, but gaps exist in their implementation. The aim of this study was to examine the perspectives of medical practitioners regarding implementation of six high-evidence recommendations for the management of people with COPD.Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with medical practitioners involved with care of COPD patients in hospital and general practice. Interviews sought medical practitioners' experience regarding implementation of smoking cessation, influenza vaccination, pulmonary rehabilitation, guideline-based medications, long-term oxygen therapy for hypoxemia and plan and advice for future exacerbations. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using content analysis.Results: Nine hospital-based medical practitioners and seven general practitioners participated. Four major categories were identified which impacted on implementation of the target recommendations in the care of patients with COPD: (1 role clarity of the medical practitioner; (2 persuasive communication with the patient; (3 complexity of behavioral change required; (4 awareness and support available at multiple levels. For some recommendations, strength in all four categories provided significant enablers supporting implementation. However, with regard to

  11. The effects of involving a nurse practitioner in primary care for adult patients with urinary incontinence: The PromoCon study (Promoting Continence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severens Johan

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urinary incontinence affects approximately 5% (800.000 of the Dutch population. Guidelines recommend pelvic floor muscle/bladder training for most patients. Unfortunately, general practitioners use this training only incidentally, but prescribe incontinence pads. Over 50% of patients get such pads, costing €160 million each year. Due to ageing of the population a further increase of expenses is expected. Several national reports recommend to involve nurse specialists to support general practitioners and improve patient care. The main objective of our study is to investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of involving nurse specialists in primary care for urinary incontinence. This paper describes the study protocol. Methods/Design In a pragmatic prospective multi centre two-armed randomized controlled trial in the Netherlands the availability and involvement for the general practitioners of a nurse specialist will be compared with usual care. All consecutive patients consulting their general practitioner within 1 year for urinary incontinence and patients already diagnosed with urinary incontinence are eligible. Included patients will be followed for 12 months. Primary outcome is severity of urinary incontinence (measured with the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form (ICIQ-UI SF. Based on ICIQ-UI SF outcome data the number of patients needed to include is 350. For the economic evaluation quality of life and costs will be measured alongside the clinical trial. For the longer term extrapolation of the economic evaluation a Markov modelling approach will be used. Discussion/Conclusion This is, to our knowledge, the first trial on care for patients with urinary incontinence in primary care that includes a full economic evaluation and cost-effectiveness modelling exercise from the societal perspective. If this intervention proves to be effective and cost-effective, implementation of this

  12. Ongoing evaluation of ease-of-use and usefulness of wireless tablet computers within an ambulatory care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kevin C; Wong, Frances L; Martin, Lee Ann; Edmiston, Dave

    2009-01-01

    This ongoing research is to assess user acceptance of wireless convertible tablet portable computers in their support of patient care within the clinic environment and to determine their impact on workload reduction for the information staff. A previous publication described our initial experience with a limited wireless environment. There, we tested the premise that wireless convertible tablet computers were equivalent to desktop computers in their support of user tasks. Feedback from users demonstrated that convertible tablet computers were not able to replace desktop computers. Poor network access was a weakness as well as the "cognitive overhead" encountered due to technical problems. This paper describes our further experience with a centre-wide wireless implementation while using a new wireless device. The new tablets, which have some unique functions that existing desktop computers do not provide, have been well received by the clinicians.

  13. General practitioner advice on physical activity: Analyses in a cohort of older primary health care patients (getABI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiem Ulrich

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the benefits of physical activity for health and functioning are recognized to extend throughout life, the physical activity level of most older people is insufficient with respect to current guidelines. The primary health care setting may offer an opportunity to influence and to support older people to become physically active on a regular basis. Currently, there is a lack of data concerning general practitioner (GP advice on physical activity in Germany. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the rate and characteristics of older patients receiving advice on physical activity from their GP. Methods This is a cross-sectional study using data collected at 7 years of follow-up of a prospective cohort study (German epidemiological trial on ankle brachial index, getABI. 6,880 unselected patients aged 65 years and above in the primary health care setting in Germany were followed up since October 2001. During the 7-year follow-up telephone interview, 1,937 patients were asked whether their GP had advised them to get regular physical activity within the preceding 12 months. The interview also included questions on socio-demographic and lifestyle variables, medical conditions, and physical activity. Logistic regression analysis (unadjusted and adjusted for all covariables was used to examine factors associated with receiving advice. Analyses comprised only complete cases with regard to the analysed variables. Results are expressed as odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI. Results Of the 1,627 analysed patients (median age 77; range 72-93 years; 52.5% women, 534 (32.8% stated that they had been advised to get regular physical activity. In the adjusted model, those more likely to receive GP advice on physical activity were men (OR [95% CI] 1.34 [1.06-1.70], patients suffering from pain (1.43 [1.13-1.81], coronary heart disease and/or myocardial infarction (1.56 [1.21-2.01], diabetes mellitus (1

  14. Awareness and use of Benzodiazepines in healthy volunteers and ambulatory patients visiting a tertiary care hospital: a cross sectional survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Raoof

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Indiscriminate prescription of Benzodiazepines in Pakistan and subsequent availability over-the-counter without prescription is a major public health problem, requiring systematic inquiry through research. Additionally, there is limited data on the awareness and use of Benzodiazepines from developing countries making it impossible to devise meaningful health policies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This was an Observational, Cross-Sectional study. conducted at Aga Khan University. A total of 475 (58.5% males, 41.5% females people visiting a tertiary care hospital were interviewed by means of a structured questionnaire. The results showed that majority of population was aware of one or more Benzodiazepines (80.4% and 30.4% had used them at some point in life. 42.4% of the users had been using it for more than a year. Commonest reason for use was sleep disturbance. Frequency of usage was higher for females, married individuals, educated (>Grade12, high socioeconomic status and housewives. More (59% were prescribed than not and of them most by GP (58.5%. Only 36.5% of them were particularly told about the long-term addiction potential by the use of these drugs. CONCLUSION: Easy availability, access to re-fills without prescription and self prescription compounded with the lack of understanding of abuse potential of benzodiazepines constitutes a significant problem demanding serious consideration from health policy makers.

  15. Systematic care for caregivers of people with dementia in the ambulatory mental health service: designing a multicentre, cluster, randomized, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adang Eddy

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Care for people with dementia and their informal caregivers is a challenging aim in healthcare. There is an urgent need for cost-effective support programs that prevent informal caregivers of people with dementia from becoming overburdened, which might result in a delay or decrease of patient institutionalization. For this reason, we have developed the Systematic Care Program for Dementia (SCPD. The SCPD consists of an assessment of caregiver's sense of competence and suggestions on how to deal with competence deficiencies. The efficiency of the SCPD will be evaluated in our study. Methods and design In our ongoing, cluster, randomized, single-blind, controlled trial, the participants in six mental health services in four regions of the Netherlands have been randomized per service. Professionals of the ambulatory mental health services (psychologists and social psychiatric nurses have been randomly allocated to either the intervention group or the control group. The study population consists of community-dwelling people with dementia and their informal caregivers (patient-caregiver dyads coming into the health service. The dyads have been clustered to the professionals. The primary outcome measure is the patient's admission to a nursing home or home for the elderly at 12 months of follow-up. This measure is the most important variable for estimating cost differences between the intervention group and the control group. The secondary outcome measure is the quality of the patient's and caregiver's lives. Discussion A novelty in the SCPD is the pro-active and systematic approach. The focus on the caregiver's sense of competence is relevant to economical healthcare, since this sense of competence is an important determinant of delay of institutionalization of people with dementia. The SCPD might be able to facilitate this with a relatively small cost investment for caregivers' support, which could result in a major decrease in

  16. Out of hours care: a profile analysis of patients attending the emergency department and the general practitioner on call

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buylaert Walter

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overuse of emergency departments (ED is of concern in Western society and it is often referred to as 'inappropriate' use. This phenomenon may compromise efficient use of health care personnel, infrastructure and financial resources of the ED. To redirect patients, an extensive knowledge of the experiences and attitudes of patients and their choice behaviour is necessary. The aim of this study is to quantify the patients and socio-economical determinants for choosing the general practitioner (GP on call or the ED. Methods Data collection was conducted simultaneously in 4 large cities in Belgium. All patients who visited EDs or used the services of the GP on call during two weekends in January 2005 were enrolled in the study in a prospective manner. We used semi-structured questionnaires to interview patients from both services. Results 1611 patient contacts were suitable for further analysis. 640 patients visited the GP and 971 went to the ED. Determinants that associated with the choice of the ED are: being male, having visited the ED during the past 12 months at least once, speaking another language than Dutch or French, being of African (sub-Saharan as well as North African nationality and no medical insurance. We also found that young men are more likely to seek help at the ED for minor trauma, compared to women. Conclusions Patients tend to seek help at the service they are acquainted with. Two populations that distinctively seek help at the ED for minor medical problems are people of foreign origin and men suffering minor trauma. Aiming at a redirection of patients, special attention should go to these patients. Informing them about the health services' specific tasks and the needlessness of technical examinations for minor trauma, might be a useful intervention.

  17. Ambulatory anesthesia: optimal perioperative management of the diabetic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polderman JAW

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Jorinde AW Polderman, Robert van Wilpe, Jan H Eshuis, Benedikt Preckel, Jeroen Hermanides Department of Anaesthesiology, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands Abstract: Given the growing number of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM and the growing number of surgical procedures performed in an ambulatory setting, DM is one of the most encountered comorbidities in patients undergoing ambulatory surgery. Perioperative management of ambulatory patients with DM requires a different approach than patients undergoing major surgery, as procedures are shorter and the stress response caused by surgery is minimal. However, DM is a risk factor for postoperative complications in ambulatory surgery, so should be managed carefully. Given the limited time ambulatory patients spend in the hospital, improvement in management has to be gained from the preanesthetic assessment. The purpose of this review is to summarize current literature regarding the anesthesiologic management of patients with DM in the ambulatory setting. We will discuss the risks of perioperative hyperglycemia together with the pre-, intra-, and postoperative considerations for these patients when encountered in an ambulatory setting. Furthermore, we provide recommendations for the optimal perioperative management of the diabetic patient undergoing ambulatory surgery. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, perioperative period, ambulatory surgery, insulin, complications, GLP-1 agonist, DPP-4 inhibitor

  18. [Care networks, mobile palliative and supportive teams. What benefits are there for patients, natural caregivers and general practitioners in patient homes?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubault, Philippe; Chataigner, Bernard; Diquero, Vincent; Cesbron, Jean-Yves; Pommateau, Romuald; Cotinat, Jean-Paul; Guitard, Véronique; Mathien, Laurence; Thetas, Elisabeth

    2009-06-20

    Civil society at large and all caregivers, whether at home or within institutions, are involved in palliative care However, procedures may vary considerably, excluding a single approach. So as to best adapt their responses, the authors recorded everyone's expectations. Such a participatory methodology is, sine 1990, behind the establishment of local networks providing assistance, support and training to physicians non-specialized in palliative care (general practitioners, specialists, students or residents facing specific aspects of this medical management, as well as other health and social workers).

  19. Improving patient satisfaction with ambulatory surgical care through quality control circle activities%开展品管圈活动提升门诊手术患者满意度

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张健; 白晓霞

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of quality control circle (QCC) activities on patient satisfaction with ambulatory surgical care.Methods The operating room nursing staff formed a QCC,delved into problems affecting patient satisfaction with ambulatory surgical care,and formulated solutions to the problems through brainstorming.They put forward improvement schemes and put them into practice.Results Patient overall satisfaction with ambulatory surgical care increased from (6.80 ± 0.57) points before QCC activities to (7.41±0.44) points after the activities,with significant difference found in the scores (P<0.01).Nurses' consciousness in participating nursing management,and job satisfaction were enhanced,and staff's enthusiasm,creativity,and initiative were fully exercised.Conclusion QCC activities help improve quality of ambulatory surgical care and patient satisfaction.%目的 探讨品管圈活动用于提升门诊手术患者满意度的效果.方法 由手术室一线护理人员组成品管圈小组,通过脑力激荡,讨论分析门诊手术患者满意度不高的原因,制订相应的整改措施并组织实施.结果 门诊手术患者总体满意度由活动前(6.80±0.57)分提高到活动后的(7.41±0.44)分,效果显著(P<0.01);护理人员参与护理管理的意识和工作满足感增强,护理人员的积极性、创造性、主动性得到充分发挥.结论 品管圈活动的开展,有利于提高门诊手术服务质量、提升门诊手术患者满意度.

  20. Renal disease in pregnancy ambulatory issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Sharon T

    2012-09-01

    Acute and chronic renal disease will complicate prenatal care. Normal physiological changes during pregnancy make the urinary tract system more vulnerable to infectious complications or worsening of preexisting disease. Much of the focus of prenatal care includes screening for these concerns both at the onset of prenatal care and through the pregnancy and postpartum course. With careful and attentive care, the pregnancy outcome for women with significant renal disease has improved and the occurrence of renal injury or obstetric complications due to infectious insults has decreased. This manuscript reviews the current ambulatory prenatal care as it relates to the urinary tract in pregnancy.

  1. Blood cultures in ambulatory outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laupland Kevin B

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blood cultures are a gold standard specific test for diagnosing many infections. However, the low yield may limit their usefulness, particularly in low-risk populations. This study was conducted to assess the utility of blood cultures drawn from ambulatory outpatients. Methods Blood cultures drawn at community-based collection sites in the Calgary Health Region (population 1 million in 2001 and 2002 were included in this study. These patients were analyzed by linkages to acute care health care databases for utilization of acute care facilities within 2 weeks of blood culture draw. Results 3102 sets of cultures were drawn from 1732 ambulatory outpatients (annual rate = 89.4 per 100,000 population. Significant isolates were identified from 73 (2.4% sets of cultures from 51 patients, including Escherichia coli in 18 (35% and seven (14% each of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Compared to patients with negative cultures, those with positive cultures were older (mean 49.6 vs. 40.1 years, p Conclusion Blood cultures drawn in outpatient settings are uncommonly positive, but may define patients for increased intensity of therapy. Strategies to reduce utilization without excluding patients with positive cultures need to be developed for this patient population.

  2. Anticoagulation management in the ambulatory surgical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein, Diana Hill

    2012-04-01

    Many people receiving maintenance anticoagulation therapy require surgery each year in ambulatory surgery centers. National safety organizations focus attention toward improving anticoagulation management, and the American College of Chest Physicians has established guidelines for appropriate anticoagulation management to balance the risk of thromboembolism when warfarin is discontinued with the risk of bleeding when anticoagulation therapy is maintained. The guidelines recommend that patients at high or moderate risk for thromboembolism should be bridged with subcutaneous low-molecular-weight heparin or IV unfractionated heparin with the interruption of warfarin, and low-risk patients may require subcutaneous low-molecular-weight heparin or no bridging with the interruption of warfarin. The guidelines recommend the continuation of warfarin for patients who are undergoing minor dermatologic or dental procedures or cataract removal. The literature reveals, however, that there is not adequate adherence to these recommendations and guidelines. Management of anticoagulation therapy by a nurse practitioner may improve compliance and safety in ambulatory surgery centers.

  3. New tools for an old trade: a socio-technical appraisal of how electronic decision support is used by primary care practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris, David; Usherwood, Tim; Weeramanthri, Tarun; Cass, Alan; Patel, Anushka

    2011-11-01

    This article explores Australian general practitioners' (GPs) views on a novel electronic decision support (EDS) tool being developed for cardiovascular disease management. We use Timmermans and Berg's technology-in-practice approach to examine how technologies influence and are influenced by the social networks in which they are placed. In all, 21 general practitioners who piloted the tool were interviewed. The tool occupied an ill-defined middle ground in a dialectical relationship between GPs' routine care and factors promoting best practice. Drawing on Lipsky's concept of 'street-level bureaucrats', the tool's ability to process workloads expeditiously was of greatest appeal to GPs. This feature of the tool gave it the potential to alter the structure, process and content of healthcare encounters. The credibility of EDS tools appears to be mediated by fluid notions of best practice, based on an expert scrutiny of the evidence, synthesis via authoritative guidelines and dissemination through trusted and often informal networks. Balanced against this is the importance of 'soft' forms of knowledge such as intuition and timing in everyday decision-making. This resonates with Aristotle's theory of phronesis (practical wisdom) and may render EDS tools inconsequential if they merely process biomedical data. While EDS tools show promise in improving health practitioner performance, the socio-technical dimensions of their implementation warrant careful consideration.

  4. Primary care practitioner and patient understanding of the concepts of multimorbidity and self-management: A qualitative study

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    Cassandra Kenning

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this article is to offer insight into how professionals and patients understand and experience multimorbidity and how these accounts differ, and how they affect attitudes and engagement with self-management. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 20 primary healthcare practitioners and 20 patients with at least 2 long-term conditions (including coronary heart disease, diabetes, osteoarthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and depression. Thematic analysis was used, and themes were identified using an open-coding method. Results: Practitioners associated multimorbidity with complexity and uncertainty in the clinic, leading to emotional strain and ‘heart sink’. Patient accounts differed. Some described multimorbidity as problematic when it exacerbated their symptoms and caused emotional and psychological strain. Others did not perceive multimorbidity as problematic. Self-management was seen by practitioners and patients to be a key element of managing multiple conditions, but drivers for prompting and engaging in self-management differed between patients and practitioners. Conclusion: This study suggests that recommendations for clinical practice for multimorbid patients should take into account the gap in perceptions between practitioner and patients about experiences of multimorbidity. Not least, practice would need to reflect the tension between practitioners’ and patients’ accounts about the role and benefits of self-management in the presence of multimorbidity.

  5. Effectiveness of in-office blood pressure measurement by eye care practitioners in early detection and management of hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saud; A.Al; Anazi; Uchechukwu; L.Osuagwu; Turki; M.Al; Mubrad; Hany; K.Ahmed; Kelechi; C.Ogbuehi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the number of hypertensive patients, the optometrist is able to identify by routinely taking blood pressure(BP) measurements for patients in "at-risk" groups, and to sample patients’ opinions regarding in-office BP measurement. Many of the optometrists in Saudi Arabia practice in optical stores.These stores are wide spread, easily accessible and seldom need appointments. The expanding role of the optometrist as a primary health care provider(PHCP) and the increasing global prevalence of hypertension,highlight the need for an integrated approach towards detecting and monitoring hypertension.METHODS: Automated BP measurements were made twice(during the same session) at five selected optometry practices using a validated BP monitor(Omron M6) to assess the number of patients with high BP(HBP)- in at-risk groups-visiting the eye clinic routinely. Prior to data collection, practitioners underwent a two-day training workshop by a cardiologist on hypertension and how to obtain accurate BP readings. A protocol for BP measurement was distributed and retained in all participating clinics. The general,,.,attitude towards cardiovascular health of 480 patients aged 37.2(±12.4)y and their opinion towards in-office BP measurement was assessed using a self-administered questionnaire.RESULTS: A response rate of 83.6% was obtained for the survey. Ninety-three of the 443 patients(21.0%)tested for BP in this study had HBP. Of these,(62subjects) 67.7% were unaware of their HBP status. Thirty of the 105 subjects(28.6%) who had previously been diagnosed with HBP, still had HBP at the time of this study, and only 22(73.3%) of these patients were on medication. Also, only 25% of the diagnosed hypertensive patients owned a BP monitor.CONCLUSION: Taking BP measurements in optometry practices, we were able to identify one previously undiagnosed patient with HBP for every 8 adults tested.We also identified 30 of 105 previously diagnosed patients whose BP was poorly

  6. Escuta psicanalítica de gestantes no contexto ambulatorial: uma experiência em grupos de fala = Psychoanalytic care of pregnant women in the context of an ambulatory: the experience of words group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilas Boas, Laís Macêdo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A gestação é um momento de mudanças significativas na vida da mulher, permeado por afetos, fantasias e expectativas em relação ao parto e ao bebê. A existência de um espaço de fala, no qual a futura mãe possa de algum modo elaborar tais conteúdos psíquicos, pode auxiliar tanto no processo de construção do lugar materno, como na preparação para o parto e para a interação com o bebê. O presente trabalho é uma proposta de reflexão a partir da experiência que se desenvolve no chamado Grupo de Palavras – espaço de fala e partilha de experiências de gestantes sobre questões relativas à gravidez, criado na sala de espera de um ambulatório – com objetivo de discutir nuances do processo psíquico envolvido na construção do ser mãe e a possibilidade de elaboração de tal processo por meio da fala, bem como os desafios do trabalho de escuta psicanalítica no contexto ambulatorial

  7. Useful tool for general practitioners, home health care nurses and social workers in assessing determinants of the health status and treatment of patients visited in their homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Brodziak

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The necessity is emphasized to distinguish between the traditional model of data acquisition reported by a patient in doctor’s office and the more valuable and desired model to become acquainted with the core of the problem by going to a patient’s domicile. In the desired model it is possible to come across various determinants of health during home visits. Family members can be approached and there is a possibility to evaluate the relationships between the patient and his loved ones. One can visually assess one’s living conditions and predictable environmental hazard. For several years, the desired model has been put into practice by general practitioners and home health care nurses. Recently this model is also promoted by “health care therapists” who are members of “teams of home health care”. The authors, being convinced of the merits of “home and environmental model” of practical medicine, have developed a method of recording and illustrating data collected during visits in patient’s home. The elaborated tool helps to communicate and exchange information among general practitioners, home health care nurses, social workers of primary health care centers and specialists. The method improves the formulation of the plan of further therapeutic steps and remedial interventions in psycho-social relations and living conditions of patients.

  8. A Atenção Primária à Saúde no sul de Santa Catarina: uma análise das internações por condições sensíveis à atenção ambulatorial, no período de 1999 a 2004 Primary Health Care in the south of Santa Catarina: analysis of admissions for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions, in the 1999-2004 period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Elias

    2008-12-01

    ção adequada a sua magnitude foi muito menor. As taxas de internação por Acidente Vascular Cerebral foram crescentes em município com atenção adequada, com tênue queda linear para a população atendida de forma não adequada. Em relação às internações por Infarto Agudo do Miocárdio, tanto nos municípios com atenção adequada quanto naqueles com atenção não adequada, as taxas apresentaram tendência ao aumento, com tendência um pouco menor nos municípios com PSF adequado. CONCLUSÃO: É possível perceber algumas mudanças positivas na evolução de algumas taxas de internações por condições sensíveis à atenção ambulatorial, que podem estar associadas a maior cobertura e a melhor atenção recebida pelo PSF.INTRODUCTION: The reorientation of the health care model in Brazil is based on a strategy to structure a primary care network to cover the health needs of the population through access to family health teams. The impact of primary care on the health of the population can be assessed by tracking hospital admissions due to conditions sensitive to ambulatory care, an initiative that has been developed in recent years in several countries and also in Brazil OBJECTIVE: To analyze hospital admission trends for some conditions sensitive to ambulatory care in the Association of Cities of the South End of Santa Catarina - AMESC, associating it to the quality of care offered by the Family Health Program-PSF METHOD: An exploratory research with characteristics of an ecological study that qualified the primary care offered, based on a questionnaire directed to PSF professionals and information collected through national data information, defining two population groups: one assisted by services with a basic standard and another one assisted by services below this standard. Hospital admissions for some selected causes of these two populations were compared in the 1999-2004 period, analyzing their trend and statistical association. RESULTS: The statistical

  9. Use of Self-Care and Practitioner-Based Forms of Complementary and Alternative Medicine before and after a Diagnosis of Breast Cancer

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    Alissa R. Link

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We examine factors associated with self-care, use of practitioner-based complementary and alternative medicine (CAM, and their timing in a cohort of women with breast cancer. Methods. Study participants were women with breast cancer who participated in the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project. Self-care is defined as the use of multivitamins, single vitamins, botanicals, other dietary supplements, mind-body practices, special diets, support groups, and prayer. Within each modality, study participants were categorized as continuous users (before and after diagnosis, starters (only after diagnosis, quitters (only before diagnosis, or never users. Multivariable logistic regression was used for the main analyses. Results. Of 764 women who provided complete data, 513 (67.2% initiated a new form of self-care following breast cancer diagnosis. The most popular modalities were those that are ingestible, and they were commonly used in combination. The strongest predictor of continuous use of one type of self-care was continuous use of other types of self-care. Healthy behaviors, including high fruit/vegetable intake and exercise, were more strongly associated with continuously using self-care than starting self-care after diagnosis. Conclusions. Breast cancer diagnosis was associated with subsequent behavioral changes, and the majority of women undertook new forms of self-care after diagnosis. Few women discontinued use of modalities they used prior to diagnosis.

  10. Assessment of activities performed by clinical nurse practitioners and implications for staffing and patient care at primary health care level in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jude Igumbor

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The shortage of nurses in public healthcare facilities in South Africa is well documented; finding creative solutions to this problem remains a priority.Objective: This study sought to establish the amount of time that clinical nurse practitioners (CNPs in one district of the Western Cape spend on clinical services and the implications for staffing and skills mix in order to deliver quality patient care.Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted across 15 purposively selected clinics providing primary health services in 5 sub-districts. The frequency of activities and time CNPs spent on each activity in fixed and mobile clinics were recorded. Time spent on activities and health facility staff profiles were correlated and predictors of the total time spent by CNPs with patients were identified.Results: The time spent on clinical activities was associated with the number of CNPs in the facilities. CNPs in fixed clinics spent a median time of about 13 minutes with each patient whereas CNPs in mobile clinics spent 3 minutes. Fixed-clinic CNPs also spent more time on their non-core functions than their core functions, more time with patients, and saw fewer patients compared to mobile-clinic CNPs.Conclusions: The findings give insight into the time CNPs in rural fixed and mobile clinics spend with their patients, and how patient caseload may affect consultation times. Two promising strategies were identified – task shifting and adjustments in health workerd eployment – as ways to address staffing and skills mix, which skills mix creates the potential for using healthcare workers fully whilst enhancing the long-term health of these rural communities.

  11. How do patients with urinary incontinence perceive care given by their general practitioner? A cross-sectional study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers-Heitner, P.; Berghmans, L.C.M.; Nieman, F.H.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.; Winkens, R.A.G.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Urinary incontinence (UI) is a widespread problem, affecting quality of life and leading to high costs, mainly caused by incontinence pads. It seems that, despite guidelines, many UI patients get pads from their general practitioner (GP) without adequate diagnostics or treatment. OBJECTI

  12. Single incision laparoscopic primary and incisional ventral hernia repair as the standard of care in the ambulatory setting; Does less equal better outcomes; Case series and literature review

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    Ross O. Downes

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: SILS prosthetic repair of primary and incisional ventral hernia is easily feasible. In our series, SILS ventral hernia repair appears to be safe and effective. It may decrease parietal trauma augmenting its use in the ambulatory setting. Technology will continue to improve the wide applicability of this technique. Larger randomized trial studies are required to determine the rates of port-site incisional hernia compared with multiport laparoscopy.

  13. Patient-Centered Homes and Integrated Behavioral Health Care: Reclaiming the Role of "Consultant" for Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltis-Jarrett, Victoria

    2016-06-01

    The notion of patient-centered care has long been linked with nursing practice since Florence Nightingale. The discipline of nursing is focused on the holistic care of individuals, families, and communities in times of sickness and/or health. However, in psychiatric-mental health nursing, the concepts of mental health and psychiatric illness still remain marginalized in our health care delivery systems, as well as in nursing education, knowledge development, and practice. Even with the concept of patient-centered homes, acute and primary care providers are reluctant to embrace care of those with psychiatric illness in their respective settings. Psychiatric illness was and continues to be in the shadows, hidden and often ignored by the larger community as well as by health care providers. This paper describes a Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA) Advanced Nursing Education (ANE) training grant's objective of reintegrating psychiatric-mental health practice into ALL health care delivery systems using the concept of patient-centered nursing care as a foundation for, and promotion of, the Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMH-NP) as the "navigator" for not only the patients and their families, but also for their acute and primary care colleagues using an Interprofessional Education Model. The major barriers and lessons learned from this project as well as the need for psychiatric-mental health nurses to reclaim their role as a consultant/liaison in acute, primary, and long-term care settings will be discussed. The PMHNP as a consultant/liaison is being revitalized as an innovative advanced practice nursing health care model in North Carolina.

  14. How to coordinate the care for patients with chronic diseases when general practitioners have no gatekeeping function?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basak, O.; Boerma, W.; Guldal, D.; Schellevis, F.

    2014-01-01

    Justification and interest of the workshop Coordination of care is a core function of primary care and its goal is to support patients, especially those with chronic diseases and their families to receive effective health care within an increasingly complex healthcare system. Coordinated care is cha

  15. Development of the 24/7 Nurse Practitioner Model on the Inpatient Pediatric General Surgery Service at a Large Tertiary Care Children's Hospital and Associated Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejtar, Marketa; Ranstrom, Lee; Allcox, Christina

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) have been providing high-quality and safe patient care for a few decades, and evidence showing the extent of their impact is emerging. This article describes the implementation of a 24/7 NP patient care model on an inpatient pediatric general surgery service in a tertiary free-standing Children's Hospital in the Northeastern United States. The literature shows that there is limited evidence regarding NP models of care and their effect on patient outcomes. In response to policy changes leading to reduction of resident work hours and a more acute and complex inpatient pediatric general surgery patient population, our existing NP model evolved into a 24/7 NP Model in June 2011. The results from two quality improvement projects showed positive registered nurse and attending surgeon staff satisfaction with the 24/7 NP Model of care and a decreased trend of unplanned intensive care unit patient transfers after the 24/7 NP Model implementation. These findings further support the evidence in the literature that NPs provide safe and quality patient care.

  16. Can biomedical and traditional health care providers work together? Zambian practitioners' experiences and attitudes towards collaboration in relation to STIs and HIV/AIDS care: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Höjer Bengt

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The World Health Organization's World health report 2006: Working together for health underscores the importance of human resources for health. The shortage of trained health professionals is among the main obstacles to strengthening low-income countries' health systems and to scaling up HIV/AIDS control efforts. Traditional health practitioners are increasingly depicted as key resources to HIV/AIDS prevention and care. An appropriate and effective response to the HIV/AIDS crisis requires reconsideration of the collaboration between traditional and biomedical health providers (THPs and BHPs. The aim of this paper is to explore biomedical and traditional health practitioners' experiences of and attitudes towards collaboration and to identify obstacles and potential opportunities for them to collaborate regarding care for patients with sexually transmitted infections (STIs and HIV/AIDS. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in two Zambian urban sites, using structured questionnaires. We interviewed 152 biomedical health practitioners (BHPs and 144 traditional health practitioners (THPs who reported attending to patients with STIs and HIV/AIDS. Results The study showed a very low level of experience of collaboration, predominated by BHPs training THPs (mostly traditional birth attendants on issues of safe delivery. Intersectoral contacts addressing STIs and HIV/AIDS care issues were less common. However, both groups of providers overwhelmingly acknowledged the potential role of THPs in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Obstacles to collaboration were identified at the policy level in terms of legislation and logistics. Lack of trust in THPs by individual BHPs was also found to inhibit collaboration. Nevertheless, as many as 40% of BHPs expressed an interest in working more closely with THPs. Conclusion There is indication that practitioners from both sectors seem willing to strengthen collaboration with each other. However

  17. A Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Program: Meeting the Needs of the Community and Veterans as Students as Well as Care Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughill, Ann P; Dunford, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The goal of excellence in nursing education has led to efforts to recruit students into baccalaureate and graduate programs. Additionally, a need exists to prepare practitioners to meet the mental health needs of health care recipients, including veterans. As a strategy for meeting these objectives, educators from an urban private college proposed a Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) program. This program was developed in response to an identified need in the community for improved mental health services. Although several groups in need would be served, attention was focused on veterans in need of care as well as those veteran students interested in Psychiatric Mental Health (PMH) nursing. Some factors that supported this thinking included the proximity of the campus to the Veterans Administration Medical Center and other veteran community services, the college's significant number of student veterans, and its distinction as among the most veteran friendly campuses in the nation. This article reviews the literature that supports the need for graduate education in this specialty and the value of providing educational opportunities for interested veterans.

  18. Putting prevention into practice: qualitative study of factors that inhibit and promote preventive care by general practitioners, with a focus on elderly patients

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    Hussein Rugzan J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background General practitioners (GPs have a key role in providing preventive care, particularly for elderly patients. However, various factors can inhibit or promote the implementation of preventive care. In the present study, we identified and examined factors that inhibit and promote preventive care by German GPs, particularly for elderly patients, and assessed changes in physicians' attitudes toward preventive care throughout their careers. Methods A qualitative, explorative design was used to identify inhibitors and promoters of preventive care in German general medical practice. A total of 32 GPs in Berlin and Hannover were surveyed. Questions about factors that promote or inhibit implementation of preventive care and changes in physicians' perceptions of promoting and inhibiting factors throughout their careers were identified. Episodic interviews, which encouraged the reporting of anecdotes regarding daily knowledge and experiences, were analyzed using ATLAS/ti. Socio-demographic data of GPs and structural information about their offices were collected using short questionnaires. The factors identified as inhibitory or promoting were classified as being related to patients, physicians, or the healthcare system. The changes in GP attitudes toward preventive care throughout their careers were classified as personal transitions or as social and health policy transitions. Results Most of the identified barriers to preventive care were related to patients, such as a lack of motivation for making lifestyle changes and a lack of willingness to pay for preventive interventions. In addition, the healthcare system seemed to inadequately promote preventive care, mainly due to poor reimbursement for preventive care and fragmentation of care. GPs own attitudes and health habits seemed to influence the implementation of preventive care. GPs recognized their own lack of awareness of effective preventive interventions, particularly for elderly

  19. Barriers and facilitators to evidence based care of type 2 diabetes patients: experiences of general practitioners participating to a quality improvement program

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    Hannes Karen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To evaluate the barriers and facilitators to high-quality diabetes care as experienced by general practitioners (GPs who participated in an 18-month quality improvement program (QIP. This QIP was implemented to promote compliance with international guidelines. Methods Twenty out of the 120 participating GPs in the QIP underwent semi-structured interviews that focused on three questions: 'Which changes did you implement or did you observe in the quality of diabetes care during your participation in the QIP?' 'According to your experience, what induced these changes?' and 'What difficulties did you experience in making the changes?' Results Most GPs reported that enhanced knowledge, improved motivation, and a greater sense of responsibility were the key factors that led to greater compliance with diabetes care guidelines and consequent improvements in diabetes care. Other factors were improved communication with patients and consulting specialists and reliance on diabetes nurse educators. Some GPs were reluctant to collaborate with specialists, and especially with diabetes educators and dieticians. Others blamed poor compliance with the guidelines on lack of time. Most interviewees reported that a considerable minority of patients were unwilling to change their lifestyles. Conclusion Qualitative research nested in an experimental trial may clarify the improvements that a QIP may bring about in a general practice, provide insight into GPs' approach to diabetes care and reveal the program's limits. Implementation of a QIP encounters an array of cognitive, motivational, and relational obstacles that are embedded in a patient-healthcare provider relationship.

  20. Regional anesthesia techniques for ambulatory orthopedic surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Brian D

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to present advances in the use of regional anesthetic techniques in ambulatory orthopedic surgery. New findings regarding the use of both neuraxial anesthesia and peripheral nerve block are discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: Neuraxial anesthesia: The use of short-acting local anesthetic agents such as mepivacaine, 2-chloroprocaine, and articaine permits rapid onset intrathecal anesthesia with early recovery profiles. Advantages and limitations of these agents are discussed.Peripheral nerve block: Peripheral nerve blocks in limb surgery have the potential to transform this patient cohort into a truly ambulatory, self-caring group. Recent trends and evidence regarding the benefits of regional anesthesia techniques are presented.Continuous perineural catheters permit extension of improved perioperative analgesia into the ambulatory home setting. The role and reported safety of continuous catheters are discussed. SUMMARY: In summary, shorter acting, neuraxial, local anesthetic agents, specific to the expected duration of surgery, may provide superior recovery profiles in the ambulatory setting. A trend towards more peripheral and selective nerve blocks exists. The infrapatellar block is a promising technique to provide analgesia following knee arthroscopy. Improved analgesia seen in the perioperative period can be safely and effectively extended to the postoperative period with the use of perineural catheters.

  1. An implementation case study. Implementation of the Indian Health Service's Resource and Patient Management System Electronic Health Record in the ambulatory care setting at the Phoenix Indian Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnigan, Anthony; John, Karen; Scott, Andrea; Von Bibra, Lynda; Walling, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The Phoenix Indian Medical Center (PIMC) has successfully implemented the Resource and Patient Management System Electronic Health Record (RPMS-EHR) in its Ambulatory Care departments. One-hundred and twenty-six providers use the system for essentially all elements of documentation, ordering, and coding. Implementation of one function at a time, in one clinical area at a time, allowed for focused training and support. Strong departmental leadership and the development of 'super-users' were key elements. Detailed assessments of each clinic prior to implementation were vital, resulting in optimal workstation utilization and a greater understanding of each clinic's unique flow. Each phase saw an increasing reluctance to revert to old paper processes. The success of this implementation has placed pressure on the remainder of the hospital to implement the RPMS-EHR, and has given the informatics team an increased awareness of what resources are required to achieve this result.

  2. Swedish physicians' perspectives on work and the medical care system--III: Private practitioners on the public system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twaddle, A C

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports the results of focused interviews in 1978-1979 with Swedish physicians in private practice about the public system of medical care in Sweden. They were asked about the system as a work environment for physicians and as a system of care for patients. Respondents, who were outside the public system (although financed mainly by public mechanisms) said the public system as a place to work had advantages in its high technical quality, facilities for research and training, and the capacity to treat complicated disease; its disadvantages were said to be inefficiency, lack of communication, poor patient care, and blocked mobility for physicians without doctorates. As a system of care, its one advantage was said to be that it provided care at less out-of-pocket cost to patients; its reported disadvantages were poor quality care and a tendency to be overly comprehensive. These perspectives are discussed with respect to their structural and historical contexts.

  3. Evaluation of a general practitioner-led urgent care centre in an urban setting: description of service model and plan of analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramzan, Farzan; Ladbrooke, Tim; Millington, Hugh; Islam, Saiful; Car, Josip; Majeed, Azeem

    2013-01-01

    Estimates of patients attending with conditions deemed non-urgent or inappropriate for accident and emergency services vary widely, from 6 to 80%. Previous research suggests that general practitioners (GPs) working in emergency departments can reduce referral rates, diagnostic testing, the proportion of patients who become emergency hospital admissions, and inappropriate attendances. However, little of this previous research is recent and new models of care for GPs working in emergency departments have now been developed, which remain to be evaluated. In this paper, we describe an integrated urgent care model, which was commissioned by NHS Hammersmith and Fulham in 2009 to manage the rising number of urgent attendances at local hospitals and its associated evaluation. The evaluation will include examining the effect of the system on outcomes such as utilization of diagnostic tests and effect on unplanned hospital admissions. If the new model of care is shown to be both clinically effective and cost-effective, the model and the proposed plan of evaluation will also be helpful to other areas that are considering the introduction of similar models of GP-led urgent care. PMID:23885294

  4. Practitioner Review: Children in Foster Care--Vulnerabilities and Evidence-Based Interventions that Promote Resilience Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leve, Leslie D.; Harold, Gordon T.; Chamberlain, Patricia; Landsverk, John A.; Fisher, Philip A.; Vostanis, Panos

    2012-01-01

    Background: An increasing number of children are placed in foster care (i.e., a kin or nonkin family home other than the biological parent) due to experiences of physical, sexual, emotional, or psychological abuse, and/or neglect. Children in foster care are at increased risk for a host of negative outcomes encompassing emotional, behavioral,…

  5. Consumer satisfaction among patients and their general practitioners about involving nurse specialists in primary care for patients with urinary incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.P. Albers-Heitner (C. P.); R.A.G. Winkens (R. A G); B. Berghmans; M.A. Joore (Manuela); F.H. Nieman (Fred); J.L. Severens (Hans); T. Lagro-Janssen (Toine)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractUrinary incontinence (UI) is a very common problem, but existing guidelines on UI are not followed. To bring care in line with guidelines, we planned an intervention to involve nurse specialists on UI in primary care and assessed this in a randomised controlled trial. Alongside this inte

  6. Effective analgesic modalities for ambulatory patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Martin; Florence, Barry; Glass, Peter S A

    2003-06-01

    The introduction of government-mandated standards for pain management has focused our attention on postoperative pain. With the recent JACHO standards' for ambulatory surgery, it is imperative that all health care workers who care for these patients are familiar with appropriate pain management. Developments in our understanding of the pathophysiology of acute pain have further enhanced our ability to improve pain management for postoperative ambulatory patients. This has led to the concept of preventive analgesia (inhibition of physiological and pathological secondary inflammatory pain). Extensive work has shown that this is best achieved using a multimodel approach usually consisting of an NSAID, opioid, and local anesthetic. NMDA antagonists (ketamine, dextromethorphan) and alpha-2 agnoists (clonodine) show potential supplements to further enhance pain management, especially if given preemptively. Nonpharmacological intervention such as cold therapy or acupuncture may also be considered. The armanentarium for effective pain management has improved substantially over the past few years. The challenge is for health care workers to implement these therapies to obtain optimum pain management in ambulatory surgical patients.

  7. Not only what you do, but how you do it: working with health care practitioners on gender equality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonn, Sharon

    2003-01-01

    The Women's Health Project, School of Public Health, Johannesburg, South Africa, has for more than the past decade been running various gender and health training courses for participants from at least 20 different countries. In this paper I interrogate the motivation behind and methods of the gender training and offer three prompts that assist facilitators in promoting participants' understanding of gender theory. (1) Does this program/action take gender into account? (2) Does this program/action challenge gender norms? (3) Does this program/action promote women's autonomy? Examples of training sessions are described to illustrate how our methods iterate with the content of the courses and, in particular, how the training links to actions practitioners may engage in to redress gender inequalities at work. I go on to argue that both structural and inter-relational aspects of health programs are important in addressing gender and health concerns and discuss the impact of such training on participants and health services.

  8. 24 Hours chronomics of ambulatory blood pressure and its relation with circadian rhythm of 6-sulfatoxy melatonin in night shift health care workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Anjum

    2015-08-01

    Results: Ambulatory BP and HR were recorded at every 30 min intervals in day time and each hour in night time synchronically with circadian pattern of 6 sulfatoxy melatonin during shift duties. Highly Significant difference was found in double amplitude (2DA of blood pressure between night and day shift (p<0.001. In night shift, hyperbaric index (HBI of mean systolic blood pressure was found to be increased at 00-03 am (midnight while during day shift, peak was found at 06-09 am. Peak melatonin was to be found in early morning as compared to mid night in both the shift. Conclusions: The present study concluded that the desynchronization was appeared during night shift and entrainment of circadian rhythm in the day shift. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(8.000: 1922-1931

  9. Effects of a graduate-level interprofessional education program on adult nurse practitioner student and internal medicine resident physician attitudes towards interprofessional care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanyok, Laura A; Walton-Moss, Benita; Tanner, Elizabeth; Stewart, Rosalyn W; Becker, Kathleen

    2013-11-01

    This article describes the development, implementation and evaluation of a longitudinal interprofessional education (IPE) experience for adult nurse practitioner students and internal medicine residents. This experience focused on providing care for complex community based patients during clinic and home visits, preceded by didactic learning that emphasized understanding one another's professional roles and education, teamwork and conflict management. Evaluation demonstrated significant improvements in attitudes and beliefs associated with professional role, respect among health professions' disciplines and conflict management. Results with regards to attitudes towards IPE and interprofessional practice, and valuing teamwork training were mixed. In particular, the curricular intervention did not change participants'self-reported skill in communication and did not affect attitudes and beliefs towards effects of interprofessional education on patient outcomes.

  10. What is involved in medicines management across care boundaries? A qualitative study of healthcare practitioners' experiences in the case of acute kidney injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Rebecca L; Blakeman, Tom; Ashcroft, Darren M

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To examine the role of individual and collective cognitive work in managing medicines for acute kidney injury (AKI), this being an example of a clinical scenario that crosses the boundaries of care organisations and specialties. Design Qualitative design, informed by a realist perspective and using semistructured interviews as the data source. The data were analysed using template analysis. Setting Primary, secondary and intermediate care in England. Participants 12 General practitioners, 10 community pharmacists, 7 hospital doctors and 7 hospital pharmacists, all with experience of involvement in preventing or treating AKI. Results We identified three main themes concerning participants' experiences of managing medicines in AKI. In the first theme, challenges arising from the clinical context, AKI is identified as a technically complex condition to identify and treat, often requiring judgements to be made about renal functioning against the context of the patient's general well-being. In the second theme, challenges arising from the organisational context, the crossing of professional and organisational boundaries is seen to introduce problems for the coordination of clinical activities, for example by disrupting information flows. In the third theme, meeting the challenges, participants identify ways in which they overcome the challenges they face in order to ensure effective medicines management, for example by adapting their work practices and tools. Conclusions These themes indicate the critical role of cognitive work on the part of healthcare practitioners, as individuals and as teams, in ensuring effective medicines management during AKI. Our findings suggest that the capabilities underlying this work, for example decision-making, communication and team coordination, should be the focus of training and work design interventions to improve medicines management for AKI or for other conditions. PMID:28100559

  11. Consultations with complementary and alternative medicine practitioners amongst wider care options for back pain: a study of a nationally representative sample of 1,310 Australian women aged 60-65 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Vijayendra; Sibbritt, David; Adams, Jon; Broom, Alex; Kirby, Emma; Refshauge, Kathryn M

    2014-02-01

    Back pain is a significant health service issue in Australia and internationally. Back pain sufferers can draw upon a range of health care providers including complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners. Women are higher users of health services than men and tend to use CAM frequently for musculoskeletal conditions. However, there remain important gaps in our understanding of women's consultation patterns with CAM practitioners for back pain. The objective of this study is to examine the prevalence of use and characteristics of women who use CAM practitioners for back pain. The method used was a survey of a nationally representative sample of women aged 60-65 years from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. Women consulted a massage therapist (44.1 %, n = 578) and a chiropractor (37.3 %, n = 488) more than other CAM practitioners for their back pain. Consultations with a chiropractor for back pain were lower for women who consulted a General Practitioner (GP) (OR, 0.56; 95 % CI 0.41, 0.76) or a physiotherapist (OR, 0.53; 95 % CI 0.39, 0.72) than for those who did not consult a GP or a physiotherapist. CAM practitioner consultations for back pain were greater for women who visited a pharmacist (OR, 1.99; 95 % CI 1.23, 3.32) than for women who did not visit a pharmacist. There is substantial use of CAM practitioners alongside conventional practitioners amongst women for back pain, and there is a need to provide detailed examination of the communication between patients and their providers as well as across the diverse range of health professionals involved in back pain care.

  12. The development of leadership outcome-indicators evaluating the contribution of clinical specialists and advanced practitioners to health care: a secondary analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Elliott, Naomi

    2014-05-01

    To report a secondary analysis of data collected from the case study phase of a national study of advanced practitioners and to develop leadership outcome-indicators appropriate for advanced practitioners.

  13. An Integrated System of Early Childhood Education and Care Governance in Turkey: Views of Policy-Makers, Practitioners, and Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gören Niron, Demet

    2013-01-01

    Despite a wealth of evidence showing the benefits of early childhood education and care (ECEC), in Turkey participation remains low and inequitably distributed, even though access to services is soaring. Drawing from previous findings, this paper will focus on different stakeholders' views on a more integrated system of ECEC governance in Turkey.…

  14. The Early Childhood Education and Care Partnership for Bilingualism in Minority Language Schooling: Collaboration between Bilingual Families and Pedagogical Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergroth, Mari; Palviainen, Åsa

    2016-01-01

    Educational partnerships occur at the intersection of early childhood education and care (ECEC), families, and the surrounding community, and have been shown to play a significant role in student success rates in education. There is, however, a gap in research on the role and potential of "partnership" in the case of bilingual families…

  15. Occupational closure in nursing work reconsidered: UK health care support workers and assistant practitioners: A focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traynor, Michael; Nissen, Nina; Lincoln, Carol; Buus, Niels

    2015-07-01

    In healthcare, occupational groups have adopted tactics to maintain autonomy and control over their areas of work. Witz described a credentialist approach to occupational closure adopted by nursing in the United Kingdom during the 19th and early 20th centuries. However, the recent advancement of assistant, 'non-qualified' workers by governments and managers forms part of a reconfiguration of traditional professional work. This research used focus groups with three cohorts of healthcare support workers undertaking assistant practitioner training at a London university from 2011 to 13 (6 groups, n = 59). The aim was to examine how these workers positioned themselves as professionals and accounted for professional boundaries. A thematic analysis revealed a complex situation in which participants were divided between articulating an acceptance of a subordinate role within traditional occupational boundaries and a usurpatory stance towards these boundaries. Participants had usually been handpicked by managers and some were ambitious and confident in their abilities. Many aspired to train to be nurses claiming that they will gain recognition that they do not currently get but which they deserve. Their scope of practice is based upon their managers' or supervisors' perception of their individual aptitude rather than on a credentialist claim. They 'usurp' nurses claim to be the healthcare worker with privileged access to patients, saying they have taken over what nursing has considered its core work, while nurses abandon it for largely administrative roles. We conclude that the participants are the not unwilling agents of a managerially led project to reshape the workforce that cuts across existing occupational boundaries.

  16. Use of marketing to disseminate brief alcohol intervention to general practitioners: promoting health care interventions to health promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, C A; Kaner, E F

    2000-11-01

    Health research findings are of little benefit to patients or society if they do not reach the audience they are intended to influence. Thus, a dissemination strategy is needed to target new findings at its user group and encourage a process of consideration and adoption or rejection. Social marketing techniques can be utilized to aid successful dissemination of research findings and to speed the process by which new information reaches practice. Principles of social marketing include manipulating the marketing mix of product, price, place and promotion. This paper describes the development of a marketing approach and the outcomes from a trial evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of manipulating promotional strategies to disseminate actively a screening and brief alcohol intervention (SBI) programme to general practitioners (GPs). The promotional strategies consisted of postal marketing, telemarketing and personal marketing. The study took place in general practices across the Northern and Yorkshire Regional Health Authority. Of the 614 GPs eligible for the study, one per practice, 321 (52%) took the programme and of those available to use it for 3 months (315), 128 (41%) actively considered doing so, 73 (23%) actually went on to use it. Analysis of the specific impact of the three different promotional strategies revealed that while personal marketing was the most effective overall dissemination and implementation strategy, telemarketing was more cost-effective. The findings of our work show that using a marketing approach is promising for conveying research findings to GPs and in particular a focus on promotional strategies can facilitate high levels of uptake and consideration in this target group.

  17. Enfermagem em cirurgia ambulatorial de um hospital escola: clientela, procedimentos e necessidades biológicas e psicossociais Enfermería en cirugía ambulatoria en hospital escuela: clientela, procedimientos y necesidades biológicas y psicosociales Nursing care in ambulatory surgery at a teaching hospital: patients, procedures and biological and psychosocial needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane Vegette Pinto

    2005-04-01

    local con o sin sedación. Como necesidades biológicas fueron identificadas: alteraciones en la tensión arterial, alteraciones electrocardiográficas, uso de medicamentos y alergias a los mismos, ayuno prolongado, náusea, vómito y dolor; como necesidades psicosociales: preocupación, miedo, ansiedad, incomodo por la espera para realizarse el procedimiento y dudas o desconocimiento respecto a los cuidados perioperatorios.This descriptive study aimed to characterize the profile of 167 subjects who were treated at the Ambulatory Surgical Center of a University Hospital in São Paulo State and procedures realized at the Ambulatory Surgical Center, as well as to identify the biological and psychosocial needs of these patients. Data were obtained through a semistructured interview and patients' files and were subject to descriptive analysis. The group was characterized by an equal number of individuals from both genders; average age was 51 years and socioeconomic levels were poor. The most common surgical and anesthetic procedures were ophthalmologic procedures and use of local anesthesia with or without sedation. The biological needs were: altered arterial pressure, electrocardiographic alterations, use of medication, allergy to medication, prolonged fasting, nausea, vomits and pain. The psychosocial needs were: worry, fear, anxiety, discomfort caused by waiting for the realization of procedures and doubts or lack of information concerning perioperative care.

  18. Patient satisfaction and positive patient outcomes in ambulatory anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah U

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ushma Shah, David T Wong, Jean Wong Department of Anesthesia, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Most surgeries in North America are performed on an ambulatory basis, reducing health care costs and increasing patient comfort. Patient satisfaction is an important outcome indicator of the quality of health care services incorporated by the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA. Patient satisfaction is a complex concept that is influenced by multiple factors. A patient's viewpoint and knowledge plays an influential role in patient satisfaction with ambulatory surgery. Medical optimization and psychological preparation of the patient plays a pivotal role in the success of ambulatory surgery. Postoperative pain, nausea, and vomiting are the most important symptoms for the patient and can be addressed by multimodal drug regimens. Shared decision making, patient–provider relationship, communication, and continuity of care form the main pillars of patient satisfaction. Various psychometrically developed instruments are available to measure patient satisfaction, such as the Iowa Satisfaction with Anesthesia Scale and Evaluation du Vecu de I'Anesthesie Generale, but none have been developed specifically for ambulatory surgery. The ASA has made recommendations for data collection for patient satisfaction surveys and emphasized the importance of reporting the data to the Anesthesia Quality Institute. Future research is warranted to develop a validated tool to measure patient satisfaction in ambulatory surgery. Keywords: patient, satisfaction, anesthesia, outcomes, questionnaire, perspectives

  19. General practitioner management of shoulder pain in comparison with rheumatologist expectation of care and best evidence: an Australian national survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachelle Buchbinder

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine whether current care for common shoulder problems in Australian general practice is in keeping with rheumatologist expectations and the best available evidence. METHODS: We performed a mailed survey of a random sample of 3500 Australian GPs and an online survey of all 270 rheumatologists in Australia in June 2009. Each survey included four vignettes (first presentation of shoulder pain due to rotator cuff tendinopathy, acute rotator cuff tear in a 45 year-old labourer and early and later presentation of adhesive capsulitis. For each vignette, GPs were asked to indicate their management, rheumatologists were asked to indicate appropriate primary care, and we determined best available evidence from relevant Cochrane and other systematic reviews and published guidelines. RESULTS: Data were available for at least one vignette for 614/3500 (17.5% GPs and 64 (23.8% rheumatologists. For first presentation of rotator cuff tendinopathy, 69% and 82% of GPs and 50% and 56% rheumatologists would order a shoulder X-ray and ultrasound respectively (between group comparisons P = 0.004 and P<0001. Only 66% GPs and 60% rheumatologists would refer to an orthopaedic surgeon for the acute rotator cuff tear. For adhesive capsulitis, significantly more rheumatologists recommended treatments of known benefit (e.g. glucocorticoid injection (56% versus 14%, P<0.0001, short course of oral glucocorticoids (36% versus 6%, p<0.0001 and arthrographic distension of the glenohumeral joint (41% versus 19%, P<0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: There is a mismatch between the stated management of common shoulder problems encountered in primary care by GPs, rheumatologist expectations of GP care and the available evidence.

  20. Cost-effectiveness of exercise therapy versus general practitioner care for osteoarthritis of the hip: design of a randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verhaar Jan AN

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common joint disease, causing pain and functional impairments. According to international guidelines, exercise therapy has a short-term effect in reducing pain/functional impairments in knee OA and is therefore also generally recommended for hip OA. Because of its high prevalence and clinical implications, OA is associated with considerable (healthcare costs. However, studies evaluating cost-effectiveness of common exercise therapy in hip OA are lacking. Therefore, this randomised controlled trial is designed to investigate the cost-effectiveness of exercise therapy in conjunction with the general practitioner's (GP care, compared to GP care alone, for patients with hip OA. Methods/Design Patients aged ≥ 45 years with OA of the hip, who consulted the GP during the past year for hip complaints and who comply with the American College of Rheumatology criteria, are included. Patients are randomly assigned to either exercise therapy in addition to GP care, or to GP care alone. Exercise therapy consists of (maximally 12 treatment sessions with a physiotherapist, and home exercises. These are followed by three additional treatment sessions in the 5th, 7th and 9th month after the first treatment session. GP care consists of usual care for hip OA, such as general advice or prescribing pain medication. Primary outcomes are hip pain and hip-related activity limitations (measured with the Hip disability Osteoarthritis Outcome Score [HOOS], direct costs, and productivity costs (measured with the PROductivity and DISease Questionnaire. These parameters are measured at baseline, at 6 weeks, and at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months follow-up. To detect a 25% clinical difference in the HOOS pain score, with a power of 80% and an alpha 5%, 210 patients are required. Data are analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle. Effectiveness is evaluated using linear regression models with repeated measurements. An

  1. Becoming an interprofessional practitioner: factors promoting the application of pre-qualification learning to professional practice in maternity care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray-Davis, Beth; Marshall, Michelle; Gordon, Frances

    2014-01-01

    Teamwork and collaboration have been recognized as essential competencies for health care providers in the field of maternity care. Health care policy and regulatory bodies have stressed the importance of Interprofessional Education (IPE) for learners in this field; however, there is little evidence of sustained application of pre-qualifying IPE to the realm of interprofessional collaboration (IPC) in practice following qualification. The aim of this research was to understand how newly qualified midwives applied their IPE training to professional practice. A purposive sample of midwifery students, educators, new midwives and Heads of Midwifery from four universities in the United Kingdom participated in semi-structured interviews, questionnaires and focus groups. Qualitative, grounded theory methodology was used to develop the emerging theory. Newly qualified midwives appeared better able to integrate their IPE training into practice when IPE occurred in a favourable learning environment that facilitated acquisition and application of IPE skills and that recognized the importance of shared partnership between the university and the clinical workplace.

  2. Does participation in preventive child health care at the general practitioner minimise social differences in the use of specialist care outside the hospital system?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mårtensson, Solvej; Hansen, Kristine Halling; Olsen, Kim Rose;

    2012-01-01

    was listed. RESULTS: If the children attended any preventive child health care visits, they had the same probability of contact with a specialist regardless of the parents' income. However, children from low-income families not participating in any preventive care had a lower probability of contact...... with a specialist than children from more affluent families. CONCLUSIONS: Ensuring participation in preventive child health care at the GP may reduce the social gap in utilisation of specialised health care that exists between children from families of different income levels....... the association between the socioeconomic position of the family and subsequent use of specialised health care outside the hospital system. METHODS: The study population was children born in 1999 and living in Denmark between 1 January 2002 and 31 December 2006 (n=68,366). The study investigated whether...

  3. Time, Cost, Information Seeking Skills and Format of Resources Present Barriers to Information Seeking by Primary Care Practitioners in a Research Environment. A review of: Andrews James E., Kevin A. Pearce, Carol Ireson, and Margaret M. Love. “Information‐Seeking Behaviors of Practitioners in a Primary Care Practice‐Based Research Network (PBRN.” Journal of the Medical Library Association 93.2 (Apr. 2005: 206‐12.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Ingrid Preddie

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To determine the information seeking behaviors of primary care practitioners in order to inform future efforts towards the design of information services that would support quality inprimary care.Design – A cross‐sectional survey.Setting – A primary care practice based research network (PBRN of caregivers who serve a broad population while simultaneously studying and disseminating innovations aimed at improvements in quality, efficiency and/or safety of primaryhealth care in the United States.Subjects – All primary care practitioners in the PBRN including family practitioners, general practitioners, nurse practitioners and physician assistants.Methods – A questionnaire comprising twenty‐six questions was distributed to 116 practitioners. Practitioners attached to academic centres (who were also members of the PBRN were excluded in order “to achieve a sample of practices more representative of the primary care practising population” (208. Descriptive data were collected and analyzed. SPSS v11.5 was used for statistical analyses.Main results – There was a response rate of 51% (59 of 116. Fifty‐eight percent of the respondents stated that they sought information (excluding drug dosing or drug interactions information to support patient care several times a week. Sixty‐eight per cent sought this information while the patient waited. Almost half of therespondents had access to a small medical library (48% or a hospital library (46%, while 21% used a university medical library.Approximately 14% had no immediate access to a medical library. Almost 60% of practitioners stated that they had an e‐mail account. Thirty‐four percent agreed that the use of e‐mail to communicate with patients enhanced medical practice, while 24% disagreed. There was frequent prescribing of Internet‐based consumer health information to patients by only 16% of the practitioners, while Internet support groups were frequently recommended

  4. The Impact of Maternal Health Literacy on Structures, Interpersonal Processes and Outcomes of Ambulatory Care for Low-Income Latino Children

    OpenAIRE

    Fry-Bowers, Eileen Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Child health outcomes depend on a parent's ability to read, communicate, analyze, and use health information to participate in their child's care. Low maternal health literacy (HL) may disrupt access to pediatric health care, impede informed parent decision-making, and exacerbate pediatric health disparities. This dissertation explores relationships between maternal (HL), maternal self-efficacy (SE) in communication, interpersonal interactions with health care providers (HCPs), a...

  5. The evolution of ambulatory ECG monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Harold L

    2013-01-01

    Ambulatory Holter electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring has undergone continuous technological evolution since its invention and development in the 1950s era. With commercial introduction in 1963, there has been an evolution of Holter recorders from 1 channel to 12 channel recorders with increasingly smaller storage media, and there has evolved Holter analysis systems employing increasingly technologically advanced electronics providing a myriad of data displays. This evolution of smaller physical instruments with increasing technological capacity has characterized the development of electronics over the past 50 years. Currently the technology has been focused upon the conventional continuous 24 to 48 hour ambulatory ECG examination, and conventional extended ambulatory monitoring strategies for infrequent to rare arrhythmic events. However, the emergence of the Internet, Wi-Fi, cellular networks, and broad-band transmission has positioned these modalities at the doorway of the digital world. This has led to an adoption of more cost-effective strategies to these conventional methods of performing the examination. As a result, the emergence of the mobile smartphone coupled with this digital capacity is leading to the recent development of Holter smartphone applications. The potential of point-of-care applications utilizing the Holter smartphone and a vast array of new non-invasive sensors is evident in the not too distant future. The Holter smartphone is anticipated to contribute significantly in the future to the field of global health.

  6. Advances in the use of intravenous techniques in ambulatory anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eng MR

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Matthew R Eng,1 Paul F White1,2 1Department of Anesthesiology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2White Mountain Institute, The Sea Ranch, CA, USA Summary statement: Advances in the use of intravenous techniques in ambulatory anesthesia has become important for the anesthesiologist as the key perioperative physician in outpatient surgery. Key techniques and choices of anesthetics are important in accomplishing fast track goals of ambulatory surgery. Purpose of review: The anesthesiologist in the outpatient environment must focus on improving perioperative efficiency and reducing recovery times while accounting for patients' well-being and safety. This review article focuses on recent intravenous anesthetic techniques to accomplish these goals. Recent findings: This review is an overview of techniques in intravenous anesthesia for ambulatory anesthesia. Intravenous techniques may be tailored to accomplish outpatient surgery goals for the type of surgical procedure and individual patient needs. Careful anesthetic planning and the application of the plans are critical to an anesthesiologist's success with fast-track ambulatory surgery. Conclusion: Careful planning and application of intravenous techniques are critical to an anesthesiologist's success with fast-track ambulatory surgery. Keywords: intravenous anesthesia, outpatient anesthesia, fast-track surgery

  7. Common mental health disorders in children and adolescents in primary care: A survey of knowledge, skills and attitudes among general practitioners in a newly developed European country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Buhagiar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: General Practitioners (GPs are generally the first point of contact for children and adolescents with mental health problems. This study investigates the confidence, beliefs, and knowledge of GPs regarding common mental health problems in youngsters. Methods: A self-designed questionnaire was distributed to nearly all registered GPs in a middle-income European country in order to address the aims of the study. Results: Response rate was 58%. Many GPs reported relatively low confidence on a number of issues, including diagnosis (70.0%, initiating management (86.6%, assessing the child-caregiver relationship (72.0% and the ability to distinguish between normal and pathological behavioural problems (75.1%. However, GPs showed greater inclination to conduct follow-up care after assessment by specialist services (53.5%. Few GPs considered psychosocial interventions to play a role in the treatment of anxiety disorders (18.5%, hyperkinetic disorders (24.2%, depression (22.9% and disruptive behaviour disorders (18.5% and this largely came from younger GPs (p < 0.001. Conclusions: Confidence of GPs in the management of youngsters with mental health problems is generally low. They may require significant back-up from specialist services in the form of both training and clinical collaboration.

  8. Effectiveness of manual therapy compared to usual care by the general practitioner for chronic tension-type headache: design of a randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dekker Joost

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with Chronic Tension Type Headache (CTTH report functional and emotional impairments (loss of workdays, sleep disturbances, emotional well-being and are at risk for overuse of medication. Manual therapy may improve symptoms through mobilisation of the spine, correction of posture, and training of cervical muscles. We present the design of a randomised clinical trial (RCT evaluating the effectiveness of manual therapy (MT compared to usual care by the general practitioner (GP in patients with CTTH. Methods and design Patients are eligible for participation if they present in general practice with CTTH according to the classification of the International Headache Society (IHS. Participants are randomised to either usual GP care according to the national Dutch general practice guidelines for headache, or manual therapy, consisting of mobilisations (high- and low velocity techniques, exercise therapy for the cervical and thoracic spine and postural correction. The primary outcome measures are the number of headache days and use of medication. Secondary outcome measures are severity of headache, functional status, sickness absence, use of other healthcare resources, active cervical range of motion, algometry, endurance of the neckflexor muscles and head posture. Follow-up assessments are conducted after 8 and 26 weeks. Discussion This is a pragmatic trial in which interventions are offered as they are carried out in everyday practice. This increases generalisability of results, but blinding of patients, GPs and therapists is not possible. The results of this trial will contribute to clinical decision making of the GP regarding referral to manual therapy in patients with chronic tension headache.

  9. Child and adolescent psychiatry: which knowledge and skills do primary care physicians need to have? A survey in general practitioners and paediatricians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempp, Thomas; Heinzel-Gutenbrunner, Monika; Bachmann, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Primary care physicians (PCPs) play a key role in the initial assessment and management of children and adolescents with mental health problems. However, it is unclear whether current medical education curricula sufficiently equip PCPs for this task. The aim of this study was to investigate, which child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP)-related skills and knowledge PCPs say they require in their daily practice. A questionnaire was generated, employing a modified two-step Delphi approach. Besides socio-demographic items, the questionnaire contained 17 CAP-related knowledge items and 13 CAP-related skills items, which had to be rated by importance in daily practice. The questionnaire was distributed to 348 office-based paediatricians and 500 general practitioners (GPs) in Germany. The overall return rate was 51.3% (435/848). Regarding CAP-related knowledge, both paediatricians and GPs rated somatoform disorders and obesity as highly important for daily practice. Moreover, paediatricians also deemed regulatory disorders during infancy (e.g. crying, sleep disorders) as important, while GPs assessed knowledge on paediatric depression as relevant. For paediatricians and GPs, the most relevant CAP-related skills were communicating with children and adolescents and their parents. Additionally, paediatricians rated differentiating between non-pathologic and clinically relevant behaviour problems very relevant, while GPs considered basic psychotherapeutic skills essential. The CAP-related knowledge and skills perceived relevant for doctors in primary care differ from the majority of current medical school CAP curricula, which cover mainly typical, epitomic CAP disorders and are predominantly knowledge-oriented. Therefore, medical education in CAP should be amended to reflect the needs of PCPs to improve healthcare for children and adolescents with mental health problems.

  10. Predictors of exercise participation in ambulatory and non-ambulatory older people with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Ploughman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Exercise at moderate intensity may confer neuroprotective benefits in multiple sclerosis (MS, however it has been reported that people with MS (PwMS exercise less than national guideline recommendations. We aimed to determine predictors of moderate to vigorous exercise among a sample of older Canadians with MS who were divided into ambulatory (less disabled and non-ambulatory (more disabled groups.Methods. We analysed data collected as part of a national survey of health, lifestyle and aging with MS. Participants (n = 743 were Canadians over 55 years of age with MS for 20 or more years. We identified ‘a priori’ variables (demographic, personal, socioeconomic, physical health, exercise history and health care support that may predict exercise at moderate to vigorous intensity (>6.75 metabolic equivalent hours/week. Predictive variables were entered into stepwise logistic regression until best fit was achieved.Results. There was no difference in explanatory models between ambulatory and non-ambulatory groups. The model predicting exercise included the ability to walk independently (OR 1.90, 95% CI [1.24–2.91]; low disability (OR 1.50, 95% CI [1.34–1.68] for each 10 point difference in Barthel Index score, perseverance (OR 1.17, 95% CI [1.08–1.26] for each additional point on the scale of 0–14, less fatigue (OR 2.01, 95% CI [1.32–3.07] for those in the lowest quartile, fewer years since MS diagnosis (OR 1.58, 95% CI [1.11–2.23] below the median of 23 years and fewer cardiovascular comorbidities (OR 1.55 95% CI [1.02–2.35] one or no comorbidities. It was also notable that the factors, age, gender, social support, health care support and financial status were not predictive of exercise.Conclusions. This is the first examination of exercise and exercise predictors among older, more disabled PwMS. Disability is a major predictor of exercise participation (at moderate to vigorous levels in both ambulatory and non-ambulatory

  11. The Immediate Impact of the 2009 USPSTF Screening Guideline Change on Physician Recommendation of a Screening Mammogram: Findings from a National Ambulatory and Medical Care Survey-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Suja S; Suryavanshi, Manasi S; Karanth, Siddharth; Lairson, David R

    2016-08-26

    Regular screening is considered the most effective method to reduce the mortality and morbidity associated with breast cancer. Nevertheless, contradictory evidence about screening mammograms has led to periodic changes and considerable variations among different screening guidelines. This study is the first to examine the immediate impact of the 2009 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) guideline modification on physician recommendation of mammograms. The study included visits by women aged 40 years and older without prior breast cancer from the National Ambulatory and Medical Care Survey 2008-2010. Bivariate and multiple logistic regressions were used to determine the factors associated with mammography recommendation. Approximately 29,395 visits were included and mammography was recommended during 1350 visits; 50-64-year-old women had 72% higher odds, and 65-74-year-old women had twice the odds of getting a mammogram recommendation compared with 40-49-year-old women in 2009. However, there was no difference in recommendation by age groups in 2008 and 2010. Obstetricians and gynecologists did not modify their recommendation behavior in 2009, unlike all other specialists who reduced their recommendation for 40-49-year-old women in 2009. Other characteristics associated with mammogram recommendations were certain patient comorbidities, physician specialty and primary care physician status, health maintenance organization status of the clinic, and certain visit characteristics. This study demonstrated a temporary effect of the USPSTF screening guideline change on mammogram recommendation. However, in light of conflicting recommendations by different guidelines, the physicians erred toward the more rigorous guidelines and did not permanently reduce their mammogram recommendation for women aged 40-49 years.

  12. Surgical Site Infections Following Pediatric Ambulatory Surgery: An Epidemiologic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke, Michael L; Jan, Dominique; Nassim, Janelle; Choi, Jaeun; Choi, Steven J

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify surgical site infection (SSI) rates following pediatric ambulatory surgery, SSI outcomes and risk factors, and sensitivity and specificity of SSI administrative billing codes. DESIGN Retrospective chart review of pediatric ambulatory surgeries with International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for SSI, and a systematic random sampling of 5% of surgeries without SSI ICD-9 codes, all adjudicated for SSI on the basis of an ambulatory-adapted National Healthcare Safety Network definition. SETTING Urban pediatric tertiary care center April 1, 2009-March 31, 2014. METHODS SSI rates and sensitivity and specificity of ICD-9 codes were estimated using sampling design, and risk factors were analyzed in case-rest of cohort, and case-control, designs. RESULTS In 15,448 pediatric ambulatory surgeries, 34 patients had ICD-9 codes for SSI and 25 met the adapted National Healthcare Safety Network criteria. One additional SSI was identified with systematic random sampling. The SSI rate following pediatric ambulatory surgery was 2.9 per 1,000 surgeries (95% CI, 1.2-6.9). Otolaryngology surgeries demonstrated significantly lower SSI rates compared with endocrine (P=.001), integumentary (P=.001), male genital (Psurgeries. Almost half of patients with an SSI were admitted, 88% received antibiotics, and 15% returned to the operating room. No risk factors were associated with SSI. The sensitivity of ICD-9 codes for SSI following ambulatory surgery was 55.31% (95% CI, 12.69%-91.33%) and specificity was 99.94% (99.89%-99.97%). CONCLUSIONS SSI following pediatric ambulatory surgery occurs at an appreciable rate and conveys morbidity on children. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:931-938.

  13. Systematic care for caregivers of people with dementia in the ambulatory mental health service: designing a multicentre, cluster, randomized, controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijker, A.; Verhey, F.; Graff, M.J.L.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Adang, E.M.M.; Wollersheim, H.C.H.; Vernooy-Dassen, M.J.F.J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Care for people with dementia and their informal caregivers is a challenging aim in healthcare. There is an urgent need for cost-effective support programs that prevent informal caregivers of people with dementia from becoming overburdened, which might result in a delay or decrease of pa

  14. Acupuncture in ambulatory anesthesia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norheim AJ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Arne Johan Norheim,1 Ingrid Liodden,1 Terje Alræk1,2 1National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM, Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, 2The Norwegian School of Health Sciences, Institute of Acupuncture, Kristiania University College, Oslo, NorwayBackground: Post-anesthetic morbidities remain challenging in our daily practice of anesthesia. Meta-analyses and reviews of acupuncture and related techniques for postoperative nausea and vomiting (POVN and postoperative vomiting (POV show promising results while many clinicians remain skeptical of the value of acupuncture. Given the interest in finding safe non-pharmacological approaches toward postoperative care, this body of knowledge needs to be considered. This review critically appraises and summarizes the research on acupuncture and acupressure in ambulatory anesthesia during the last 15 years.Methods: Articles were identified through searches of Medline, PubMed, and Embase using the search terms “acupuncture” or “acupuncture therapy” in combination with “ambulatory anesthesia” or “ambulatory surgery” or “day surgery” or “postoperative”. A corresponding search was done using “acupressure” and “wristbands”. The searches generated a total of 104, 118, and 122 references, respectively.Results: Sixteen studies were included; eight studies reported on acupuncture and eight on acupressure. Nine studies found acupuncture or acupressure effective on primary endpoints including postoperative nausea and vomiting, postoperative pain, sore throat, and emergence agitation. Four studies found acupuncture had a similar effect to antiemetic medication.Conclusion: Overall, the studies were of fairly good quality. A large proportion of the reviewed papers highlights an effect of acupuncture or acupressure on postoperative morbidities in an ambulatory setting

  15. Patient satisfaction and acceptability: a journey through an ambulatory gynaecology clinic in the West of Ireland

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Uzochukwu, I

    2016-06-01

    Ambulatory Gynaecology allows a “see-and-treat” approach to managing gynaecological conditions, providing a more streamlined, integrated care pathway than the traditional gynaecology clinic and inpatient care model. This study was designed to assess patient satisfaction and acceptability of Ambulatory Gynaecology services in Mayo University Hospital, Castlebar, Ireland. It also provided for feedback from patients as to how the service might be improved. \\r\

  16. Cuidando de idosos com Demência: um estudo a partir da prática ambulatorial de enfermagem Cuidando de ancianos con Demencia: pratica de enfermería en el ambulatorio Caring the elderly with Dementia: a study of the ambulatorial nursing practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosimeire Ferreira Santana

    2005-02-01

    characteristics of sixteen elderly and their caregivers in attendence at the neurogeriatrical ambulatory of Rio de Janeiro during 2004; to identify nursing and care diagnosis used by caregivers, through EDG, MEEM, AIVDs and AVDs applied in nursing assessments. The quantitative descriptive method was employed, as a study of each case, obtaining the results: in the client- Disorientation, aggressiveness, skin drought, urinary incontinence, disturbance in the family relationship; In the caregivers- inefficient caregiver/ elderly communication, physical fatigue, lack of knowledge about care; accomplished types of care - feeding, medication and hygiene. In conclusion, educational nursing actions are necessary to improve the care quality to the elderly and their family.

  17. Telemedicine delivery of patient education in remote Ontario communities: feasibility of an Advanced Clinician Practitioner in Arthritis Care (ACPAC)-led inflammatory arthritis education program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmington, Kelly; Flewelling, Carol; Kennedy, Carol A; Shupak, Rachel; Papachristos, Angelo; Jones, Caroline; Linton, Denise; Beaton, Dorcas E; Lineker, Sydney

    2017-01-01

    Objective Telemedicine-based approaches to health care service delivery improve access to care. It was recognized that adults with inflammatory arthritis (IA) living in remote areas had limited access to patient education and could benefit from the 1-day Prescription for Education (RxEd) program. The program was delivered by extended role practitioners with advanced training in arthritis care. Normally offered at one urban center, RxEd was adapted for videoconference delivery through two educator development workshops that addressed telemedicine and adult education best practices. This study explores the feasibility of and participant satisfaction with telemedicine delivery of the RxEd program in remote communities. Materials and methods Participants included adults with IA attending the RxEd program at one of six rural sites. They completed post-course program evaluations and follow-up interviews. Educators provided post-course feedback to identify program improvements that were later implemented. Results In total, 123 people (36 in-person and 87 remote, across 6 sites) participated, attending one of three RxEd sessions. Remote participants were satisfied with the quality of the video-conference (% agree/strongly agree): could hear the presenter (92.9%) and discussion between sites (82.4%); could see who was speaking at other remote sites (85.7%); could see the slides (95.3%); and interaction between sites adequately facilitated (94.0%). Educator and participant feedback were consistent. Suggested improvements included: use of two screens (speaker and slides); frontal camera angles; equal interaction with remote sites; and slide modifications to improve the readability on screen. Interview data included similar constructive feedback but highlighted the educational and social benefits of the program, which participants noted would have been inaccessible if not offered via telemedicine. Conclusion Study findings confirm the feasibility of delivering the RxEd program

  18. The patient as skilled practitioner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilbourn, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare is leaking away from the hospital and clinic into everyday life, disrupting work and play. It is no longer confined to a strictly medical sphere. Overwhelmed medical practitioners care for the expanding ranks of chronic dependents. One solution has to been to expand healthcare activities...

  19. The use and effectiveness of electronic clinical decision support tools in the ambulatory/primary care setting: a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Bryan

    2008-07-01

    Conclusion Although there is validation that CDSS has the potential to produce statistically significant improvement in outcomes, there is much variability among the types and methods of CDSS implementation and resulting effectiveness. As CDSS will likely continue to be at the forefront of the march toward effective standards-based care, more work needs to be done to determine effective implementation strategies for the use of CDSS across multiple settings and patient populations.

  20. The view of pulmonologists on palliative care for patients with COPD: a survey study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duenk, RG; Verhagen, C; Dekhuijzen, PNR; Vissers, KCP; Engels, Y; Heijdra, Y

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Early palliative care is not a common practice for patients with COPD. Important barriers are the identification of patients for palliative care and the organization of such care in this patient group. Objective Pulmonologists have a central role in providing good quality palliative care for patients with COPD. To guide future research and develop services, their view on palliative care for these patients was explored. Methods A survey study was performed by the members of the Netherlands Association of Physicians for Lung Diseases and Tuberculosis. Results The 256 respondents (31.8%) covered 85.9% of the hospital organizations in the Netherlands. Most pulmonologists (92.2%) indicated to distinguish a palliative phase in the COPD trajectory, but there was no consensus about the different criteria used for its identification. Aspects of palliative care in COPD considered important were advance care planning conversation (82%), communication between pulmonologist and general practitioner (77%), and identification of the palliative phase (75.8%), while the latter was considered the most important aspect for improvement (67.6%). Pulmonologists indicated to prefer organizing palliative care for hospitalized patients with COPD themselves (55.5%), while 30.9% indicated to prefer cooperation with a specialized palliative care team (SPCT). In the ambulatory setting, a multidisciplinary cooperation between pulmonologist, general practitioner, and a respiratory nurse specialist was preferred (71.1%). Conclusion To encourage pulmonologists to timely initiate palliative care in COPD, we recommend to conduct further research into more specific identification criteria. Furthermore, pulmonologists should improve their skills of palliative care, and the members of the SPCT should be better informed about the management of COPD to improve care during hospitalization. Communication between pulmonologist and general practitioner should be emphasized in training to improve

  1. Australian mental health care practitioners' practices and attitudes for encouraging smoking cessation and tobacco harm reduction in smokers with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ratika; Meurk, Carla; Bell, Stephanie; Ford, Pauline; Gartner, Coral

    2017-02-03

    Reducing the burden of physical illness among people living with severe mental illnesses (SMI) is a key priority. Smoking is strongly associated with SMIs resulting in excessive smoking related morbidity and mortality in smokers with SMI. Smoking cessation advice and assistance from mental health practitioners would assist with reducing smoking and smoking-related harms in this group. This study examined the attitudes and practices of Australian mental health practitioners towards smoking cessation and tobacco harm reduction for smokers with SMI, including adherence to the 5As (ask, assess, advise, assist and arrange follow up) of smoking cessation. We surveyed 267 Australian mental health practitioners using a cross-sectional, online survey. Most practitioners (77.5%) asked their clients about smoking and provided health education (66.7%) but fewer provided direct assistance (31.1-39.7%). Most believed that tobacco harm reduction strategies are effective for reducing smoking related risks (88.4%) and that abstinence from all nicotine should not be the only goal discussed with smokers with SMI (77.9%). Many respondents were unsure about the safety (56.9%) and efficacy (39.3%) of e-cigarettes. Practitioners trained in smoking cessation were more likely (OR: 2.9, CI: 1.5-5.9) to help their clients to stop smoking. Community mental health practitioners (OR: 0.3, CI: 0.1-0.9) and practitioners who were current smokers (OR: 0.3, CI: 0.1-0.9) were less likely to adhere to the 5As of smoking cessation intervention. The results of this study emphasize the importance and need for providing smoking cessation training to mental health practitioners especially community mental health practitioners.

  2. [Potential coverage and real coverage of ambulatory health care services in the state of Mexico. The case of 3 marginal communities in Atenco and Chalco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nájera-Aguilar, P; Infante-Castañeda, C

    1990-01-01

    Less than a third of the non-insured population studied through a sample in the State of Mexico was covered by the Institute of Health of the State of México. This low coverage was observed in spite the fact that health services were available within 2 kilometer radius. 33 per cent of the non-insured preferred to utilize other services within their own community, and 24 per cent of them traveled to bigger localities to receive care. These results suggest that to attain adequate coverage, utilization patterns should be investigated so that health services can meet the needs of the target population.

  3. Science Translational Medicine – improving human health care worldwide by providing an interdisciplinary forum for idea exchange between basic scientists and clinical research practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forsythe, Katherine

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Science Translational Medicine’s mission is to improve human health care worldwide by providing a forum for communication and interdisciplinary idea exchange between basic scientists and clinical research practitioners from all relevant established and emerging disciplines. The weekly journal debuted in October 2009 and is published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS, the publisher of Science and Science Signaling. The journal features peer-reviewed research articles, perspectives and commentary, and is guided by an international Advisory Board, led by Chief Scientific Adviser, Elias A. Zerhouni, M.D., former Director of the National Institutes of Health, and Senior Scientific Adviser, Elazer R. Edelman, M.D., Ph.D., Thomas D. and Virginia W. Cabot Professor of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The Science Translational Medicine editorial team is led by Katrina L. Kelner, Ph.D., AAAS. A profound transition is required for the science of translational medicine. Despite 50 years of advances in our fundamental understanding of human biology and the emergence of powerful new technologies, the rapid transformation of this knowledge into effective health measures is not keeping pace with the challenges of global health care. Creative experimental approaches, novel technologies, and new ways of conducting scientific explorations at the interface of established and emerging disciplines are now required to an unprecedented degree if real progress is to be made. To aid in this reinvention, Science and AAAS have created a new interdisciplinary journal, Science Translational Medicine. The following interview exemplefies the pioneering content found in Science Translational Medicine. It is an excerpt from a Podcast interview with Dr. Samuel Broder, former director of the National Cancer Institute and current Chief Medical Officer at Celera. The Podcast was produced in tangent with Dr

  4. Herniorrafia ambulatorial comparada à convencional Ambulatory versus conventional herniorraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Nunes e Silva

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O tratamento cirúrgico ambulatorial de hérnias inguinais é uma tendência em muitos serviços de saúde. No entanto, em nosso meio, tal procedimento ainda não perfaz uma rotina. Objetivamos analisar os benefícios e complicações da herniorrafia inguinal ambulatorial comparada à convencional. MÉTODO: Realizamos uma análise retrospectiva envolvendo, inicialmente, 105 pacientes submetidos a herniorrafia inguinal ambulatorial (HIA e internação convencional (IC de fevereiro a outubro de 2002 no Complexo Hospitalar Santa Casa de Porto Alegre (CHSCPA. Foram avaliados os benefícios e complicações no 15º, 90º e 180º dias de pós-operatório. Além disso, foi realizada avaliação dos custos hospitalares. Os métodos de análise incluíram o teste t de Fischer e X² . Foram considerados estatisticamente significativos resultados com pBACKGROUND: Ambulatory inguinal herniorraphy is performed worldwide. However, this procedure is not performed routinely in our reality. Our objetive is to analyze the benefits and complications of ambulatory inguinal herniorraphy in comparison to conventional intervention in our Service. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed with 105 patients who uwderwent ambulatorial or conventional inguinal herniorraphy between February and October of 2002. Variables, including costs, were analyzed at the 15th, 90th and 180th postoperative days. The Fischer's t test and chi-square test were used. Statistical significance was considered for a p value of p<0.05. RESULTS: From 105 patients, seven were excluded. The total rate complication was 36.08%. There was no significative statistical difference between groups at any time. The most common complication was local pain (24.7%. The costs decreased 20% when surgery was performed in an ambulatory basis as well as the waiting time which was also reduced. CONCLUSION: The ambulatory herniorraphy is a safe procedure, decreases hospital stay, costs and it has a

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of headache in the ambulatory care setting: a review of classic presentations and new considerations in diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Natalie; Paauw, Douglas S

    2014-05-01

    Headaches represent the most common constellation of neurologic disorders and are a very common cause of morbidity, lost work time, and decreased quality of life among sufferers. In this article, the diagnostic features, workup, and treatment of common, nuanced, and difficult-to-diagnose headache conditions were addressed. The future will hold a number of changes, with respect to both the diagnosis and treatment of headache disorders. As the aging population continues to grow, primary care providers will need to become increasingly familiar with differentiating between benign primary and more serious secondary headache disorders and will need to be able to treat the headache disorders unique to the elderly. With respect to therapeutic options, the future for treatment of the various headache disorders is promising. With the rise in popularity of complementary medical practices, there is likely to be more research on the roles of acupuncture, herbal and alternative remedies, massage therapy, and mind-body techniques. Further, new research is suggesting that neurostimulation may be useful in certain chronic, intractable headache conditions. Finally, the pathophysiology of headache disorders is still poorly understood and there is great hope that better understanding of the underlying mechanics of headache might contribute to improved treatment modalities and better quality of life for patients.

  6. Biomedical Wireless Ambulatory Crew Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiel, Alan; Humphreys, Brad

    2009-01-01

    A compact, ambulatory biometric data acquisition system has been developed for space and commercial terrestrial use. BioWATCH (Bio medical Wireless and Ambulatory Telemetry for Crew Health) acquires signals from biomedical sensors using acquisition modules attached to a common data and power bus. Several slots allow the user to configure the unit by inserting sensor-specific modules. The data are then sent real-time from the unit over any commercially implemented wireless network including 802.11b/g, WCDMA, 3G. This system has a distributed computing hierarchy and has a common data controller on each sensor module. This allows for the modularity of the device along with the tailored ability to control the cards using a relatively small master processor. The distributed nature of this system affords the modularity, size, and power consumption that betters the current state of the art in medical ambulatory data acquisition. A new company was created to market this technology.

  7. Wound care in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caston, Stephanie S

    2012-04-01

    Care of equine wounds in the field can be a challenging endeavor. Many times, wound care is complicated by chronicity or by prior inappropriate care in addition to the great degree of tissue trauma that occurred when the horse was wounded. Recognizing involvement of synovial structures, loss of skin, and damage to bone are critical in the initial examination of wounds and will guide future care. Education of clients is also important in that preparing them for possible outcomes during healing may help improve compliance and proper treatment of wound. Owners and trainers often perform much of the daily care and monitoring of equine wounds and thus can greatly assist or impede the progress. Bandaging is important to management of equine wounds-especially on the limbs-and is sometimes overlooked because of its labor-intensive nature and the desire for a spray, ointment, or salve that will heal the wound. The practitioner that improves and utilizes his or her understanding of the wound-healing process in concert with his or her knowledge of local anatomy will be the one who is best equipped to care for wounds in ambulatory practice.

  8. Indicadores da qualidade dos registros e da assistência ambulatorial em Maringá, (estado do Paraná, Brasil, 1991: um exercício de avaliação Indicators of quality for medical records and ambulatory care in Maringá (state of Paraná, Brazil, 1991: an exercise in evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Scochi

    1994-09-01

    Full Text Available Buscou-se indicadores de qualidade da assistência passíveis de análise a partir de registros rotineiros na rede ambulatorial de serviços de saúde da Secretaria Municipal de Saúde de Maringá, Paraná (Brasil. Foram avaliados os atendimentos realizados em três Núcleos Integrados de Saúde (NIS com o objetivo de verificar se o que foi registrado permite a formulação de indicadores de qualidade. Pesquisou-se todos os prontuários dos 7.813 pacientes atendidos durante o mês de outubro de 1991. Foram formulados indicadores de qualidade de registro, procedência da clientela, demanda, cobertura e resolutividade por unidade de saúde. Em 49,7% dos prontuários, as hipóteses diagnósticas (HD estavam ausentes e em 14,8% haviam HD ilegíveis; 78% dos atendimentos foram destinados a moradores que residiam na área de abrangência das unidades; a cobertura de gestantes foi baixa 37%; 70% das crianças menores de um ano da comunidade foram atendidas no mês, e as pessoas atendidas tiveram em média três consultas médicas no ano precedente, 4,3% dos prontuários dos usuários atendidos apresentava registro de encaminhamentos para outros serviços. Os prontuários nestes três núcleos funcionam precariamente como fonte de informação, tanto para uso interno como para avaliação. Apesar destas insuficiências foi possível extrair alguns indicadores de qualidade, sendo necessário, melhoras significativas na qualidade do preenchimento, para sustentar avaliações mais aprofundadas.This study sought to establish health-care quality indicators based on data from routine clinical records produced by the Municipal Health Department in Maringá, Paraná State. Records for 7813 patients seen in the month of October 1991 at three Integrated Health Centers (IHC were assessed to determine whether the recorded information allowed for the formulation of quality indicators. Indicators of data quality, demand, coverage, resolubility, and geographic

  9. Management of comorbidities in ambulatory anesthesia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dabu-Bondoc S

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Susan Dabu-Bondoc, Kirk Shelley Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USAAbstract: Advances in medical science now allow people with significant medical issues to live at home. As the outpatient population ages and surgical techniques advance, the ambulatory anesthesiologist has to be prepared to handle these “walking wounded”. The days of restricting ambulatory surgery procedures to American Society of Anesthesiologists class 1 and 2 patients are rapidly fading into the past. To remain competitive and economically viable, the modern ambulatory surgery center needs to expand its practice to include patients with medical comorbidities. In an environment where production and economic pressures exist, maintaining safety and good outcomes in high-risk patients for ambulatory surgery can be arduous. Adding to the complexity of this challenge is the rapid evolution of the therapeutic approaches to a variety of medical issues. For example, there has been a significant increase in the number and types of insulin a diabetic patient might be prescribed in recent years. In the case of the patient with coronary artery disease, the variety of both drug and nondrug eluding stents or new antithrombotic agents has also increased the complexity of perioperative management. Complex patients need careful, timely, and team-based preoperative evaluation by an anesthesia provider who is knowledgeable of outpatient care. Optimizing comorbidities preoperatively is a crucial initial step in minimizing risk. This paper will examine a number of common medical issues and explore their impact on managing outpatient surgical procedures.Keywords: ambulatory surgery, medical comorbidities, diabetes, coronary artery disease, respiratory disease, obesity

  10. Estado nutricional, clínico e padrão alimentar de pessoas vivendo com HIV/Aids em assistência ambulatorial no município de São Paulo Nutritional and clinical status, and dietary patterns of people living with HIV/AIDS in ambulatory care in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Ferrari Rafael Silva

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Atualmente, a abordagem nutricional desempenha papel essencial no tratamento de pessoas que vivem com HIV/aids, particularmente no caso de alterações metabólicas pelo uso da terapia antirretroviral (TARV que podem estar associadas ao maior risco de doenças cardiovasculares (DCV. OBJETIVO: Caracterizar o estado nutricional, clínico e a qualidade da dieta de pessoas que vivem com HIV/aids. METODOLOGIA: Trata-se de um estudo transversal envolvendo pessoas que vivem com HIV/aids em atendimento na rede de serviços especializados no município de São Paulo. Os usuários desta rede, em uso ou não de TARV, foram recrutados no período de dezembro de 2004 a maio de 2006, durante consultas de rotina. Foram coletados dados sociodemográficos, clínicos, bioquímicos, antropométricos e dietéticos. A qualidade da dieta foi avaliada segundo escores de padrão de consumo predominantemente "não protetor" e "protetor" para DCV. RESULTADOS: A amostra foi constituída por 238 pacientes em TARV e 76 sem TARV. A média dos níveis de colesterol total, triglicérides e glicemia foram maiores no grupo TARV (p INTRODUCTION: Nutrition currently plays a key role in the treatment of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA, especially in the case of metabolic alterations due to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, which could be related to cardiovascular diseases (CD. OBJECTIVE: to describe the nutritional and clinical status, and the quality of diet of PLHA. METHODS: It is a cross-sectional study involving a network of ambulatory care facilities for PLHA in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Patients, in use of HAART or not, were selected from December 2004 to may 2006, through routine clinic visits. We collected: socio-demographic, clinical, biochemical, anthropometric measures and dietary data. Diet quality was evaluated according to a "protecting" or "non-protecting" pattern of consumption scores for CD. RESULTS: The sample had 238 patients on

  11. Ambulatory Care Data Base. Part B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-16

    ARA ’-SE ASY I tb I$U, r -MtE IU f Sj 0, ൚ $II , 5 1 "’ l flit’ I z 1 t- _4 1I4 I4 III IIIIP Il , A I SiCA. II, lO~ IRY P US1LA! .I~l.NiOIINN,80...Dermatomycosis 110 25 112- Moniliasis, Excluding Urogenitis 26 1121 Moniliasis, Urogenital , Proven 112.1 27 1310 Trichomoniasis, Urogenital , Proven

  12. Infection prevention and control practitioners: improving engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Ann-Marie

    Every healthcare worker plays a vital part in minimising the risk of cross infection. Infection prevention and control (IPC) practitioners have the skills and competencies to assist organisations in improving engagement among staff and play a vital part in achieving this. IPC practitioners have skills in clinical practice, education, research and leadership, and these skills ensure high-quality care for patients and support strategies for engaging staff. This article highlights how IPC practitioners' skills and competencies are required for preventing infection and improving staff engagement. Engaged staff generate positive outcomes for both patients and staff, which is a welcome result for all healthcare organisations.

  13. Characteristics of ambulatory anticoagulant adverse drug events: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eckstrand Julie

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the high frequency with which adverse drug events (ADEs occur in outpatient settings, detailed information regarding these events remains limited. Anticoagulant drugs are associated with increased safety concerns and are commonly involved in outpatient ADEs. We therefore sought to evaluate ambulatory anticoagulation ADEs and the patient population in which they occurred within the Duke University Health System (Durham, NC, USA. Methods A retrospective chart review of ambulatory warfarin-related ADEs was conducted. An automated trigger surveillance system identified eligible events in ambulatory patients admitted with an International Normalized Ratio (INR >3 and administration of vitamin K. Event and patient characteristics were evaluated, and quality/process improvement strategies for ambulatory anticoagulation management are described. Results A total of 169 events in 167 patients were identified from December 1, 2006-June 30, 2008 and included in the study. A median supratherapeutic INR of 6.1 was noted, and roughly half of all events (52.1% were associated with a bleed. Nearly 74% of events resulted in a need for fresh frozen plasma; 64.8% of bleeds were classified as major. A total of 59.2% of events were at least partially responsible for hospital admission. Median patient age was 68 y (range 36-95 y with 24.9% initiating therapy within 3 months prior to the event. Of events with a prior documented patient visit (n = 157, 73.2% were seen at a Duke clinic or hospital within the previous month. Almost 80% of these patients had anticoagulation therapy addressed, but only 60.0% had a follow-up plan documented in the electronic note. Conclusions Ambulatory warfarin-related ADEs have significant patient and healthcare utilization consequences in the form of bleeding events and associated hospital admissions. Recommendations for improvement in anticoagulation management include use of information technology to assist

  14. Promoting visibility for the nurse practitioner role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, M W

    1988-03-01

    In promoting greater public awareness of nurse practitioners' contributions to health care, two major strategies may be used. Creating broad-based visibility through the use of the basic media and marketing strategies, and utilizing individual client encounters to educate clients about the NP role are both effective. NPs should assume the initiative in seeking out opportunities to create positive images for the nurse practitioner.

  15. Towards ambulatory mental stress measurement from physiological parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijsman, Jacqueline; Vullers, Ruud; Polito, Salvatore; Agell, Carlos; Penders, Julien; Hermens, Hermie

    2013-01-01

    Ambulatory mental stress monitoring requires longterm physiological measurements. This paper presents a data collection protocol for ambulatory recording of physiological parameters for stress measurement purposes. We present a wearable sensor system for ambulatory recording of ECG, EMG, respiration

  16. 预警干预护理在预防脑卒中卧床患者褥疮发病中的应用%Warning intervention in the prevention of stroke care in ambulatory patients bedsore incidence Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白洁琼

    2013-01-01

    目的:对脑卒中卧床患者实施预警干预护理,探讨和分析其预防患者发生褥疮的效果。方法:对我院此次收治的100例脑卒中卧床患者,根据Braden评分法来对患者发生褥疮的危险度进行预测。同时按照分值来进行分组,分为试验组和对照组,各为50例。对照组:对患者采用传统型的分级护理;试验组:对患者采用预警干预护理。结果:试验组:发生褥疮的患者为2例,占4.0%;其中I期1例,II期1例。对照组:发生褥疮的患者为7例,占14.0%;其中I期5例, II期2例。试验组患者发生褥疮的几率明显低于对照组,差异显著,具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:在临床上,对脑卒中卧床患者采用Braden评分法进行预警干预护理,降低患者发生褥疮的几率,促进患者的康复,提高患者的生活质量。%Objective:Implementation of stroke warning intervention nursing bedridden patients to explore and analyze their preventive effect in patients with bedsores. Method:The admit ed in our hospital 100 cases of stroke bedridden patients, according to Braden score for patients to predict the risk of bedsores. Grouped according to both scores were divided into experimental and control groups, each of 50 cases. Control group: patients using traditional type of grading nursing; experimental group: nursing interventions for patients with early warning. Results:The experimental group:patients with pressure ulcers occur in 2 cases, accounting for 4.0%;including one case of stage I, II stage 1 case. Control group:patients with bedsores 7 cases, accounting for 14.0%;including five cases of stage I, II Phase 2 cases. Experimental group were significantly lower than the probability of occurrence of bedsores control group, the difference was significant, with statistical significance (P<0.05). Conclusions: In clinical practice, ambulatory patients with stroke using the Braden score early warning

  17. Advance directives: role of nurse practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenk, J S

    1997-07-01

    Advance directives are documents that guide end of life decisions. Although advance directives are a fairly recent phenomenon in health care, they are grounded in both legal and ethical principles. Studies show few people have completed advance directives. Persons do not tend to complete advance directives for various reasons. Lack of knowledge has been identified, as well as belief that physicians should initiate the discussion and that the topic is appropriate only for the elderly or those in poor health. Many nurse practitioners practice in primary care settings, which are ideal for discussions about advance directives. Nurse practitioners possess the opportunities and skills to discuss advance directives with their patients.

  18. Prevalência de dislipidemias na demanda laboratorial de três diferentes prestadores de assistência Prevalence of dyslipidemias in adult ambulatory laboratory tests from different health care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Lessa

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Detectar diferenças nas prevalências das dislipidemias em adultos da demanda laboratorial de três diferentes prestadores de assistência médica, em Salvador, 1995. MÉTODOS: Estudo seccional, clínico epidemiológico, baseado em resultados das dosagens de lípides séricos de uma amostra probabilística de 25% dos 104 laboratórios que usavam o mesmo método de dosagem e o mesmo padrão para controle de qualidade. O critério de dislipidemia foi o do II Consenso Brasileiro de Dislipidemias para adultos. Os resultados foram agrupados conforme procedência: Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS, convênios (C e seguros privados + particulares (SP. Análise: prevalência com intervalos de confiança (IC a 95%, e teste do chi². RESULTADOS: Dos 5.464 adultos com menção da procedência, 14,8% foram do SUS, 31,6% dos C e 53,6% dos S+P. As mais elevadas prevalências de hipercolesterolemia - 28,0% (IC 24,0; 32,0 e de LDL-c elevado - 30,4% (IC 27,6; 33,2 foram detectadas no grupo C. No grupo S+P concentraram-se as maiores prevalências de HDL-c anormal - 12,3% (IC 10,0; 13,8 e hipertrigliceridemia - 17,8% (IC 16,3; 19,3. Quase todas as diferenças entre as prevalências foram estatisticamente significantes, favoráveis às taxas mais baixas do SUS. CONCLUSÃO: O melhor perfil lipídico do grupo SUS sugere diferenças sociais nas prevalências das dislipidemias. Para os três prestadores de assistência, a prevalência do HDL-c OBJECTIVE: To detect differences in the prevalence of dyslipidemia in adult ambulatory laboratory tests from three different health care providers, in Salvador-Brazil, 1995. METHODS: The study was carried out using a probabilistic sample of 24 out of 104 laboratories (@25% which performed the same enzymatic method for lipid tests with the same quality control. Laboratory tests results were separated into three groups, according to health care provider: Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS, governamental, Health Maintenance

  19. Pain Management in Ambulatory Surgery—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan G. Jakobsson

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Day surgery, coming to and leaving the hospital on the same day as surgery as well as ambulatory surgery, leaving hospital within twenty-three hours is increasingly being adopted. There are several potential benefits associated with the avoidance of in-hospital care. Early discharge demands a rapid recovery and low incidence and intensity of surgery and anaesthesia related side-effects; such as pain, nausea and fatigue. Patients must be fit enough and symptom intensity so low that self-care is feasible in order to secure quality of care. Preventive multi-modal analgesia has become the gold standard. Administering paracetamol, NSIADs prior to start of surgery and decreasing the noxious influx by the use of local anaesthetics by peripheral block or infiltration in surgical field prior to incision and at wound closure in combination with intra-operative fast acting opioid analgesics, e.g., remifentanil, have become standard of care. Single preoperative 0.1 mg/kg dose dexamethasone has a combined action, anti-emetic and provides enhanced analgesia. Additional α-2-agonists and/or gabapentin or pregabalin may be used in addition to facilitate the pain management if patients are at risk for more pronounced pain. Paracetamol, NSAIDs and rescue oral opioid is the basic concept for self-care during the first 3–5 days after common day/ambulatory surgical procedures.

  20. Costs of coordinated versus uncoordinated care in Germany: results of a routine data analysis in Bavaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Antonius; Donnachie, Ewan; Tauscher, Martin; Gerlach, Roman; Maier, Werner; Mielck, Andreas; Linde, Klaus; Mehring, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The efficiency of a gatekeeping system for a health system, as in Germany, remains unclear particularly as access to specialist ambulatory care is not restricted. The aim was to compare the costs of coordinated versus uncoordinated patients (UP) in ambulatory care; with additional subgroup analysis of patients with mental disorders. Design Retrospective routine data analysis of patients with statutory health insurance, using claims data held by the Bavarian Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians. A patient was defined as uncoordinated if he or she visited at least 1 specialist without a referral from a general practitioner within a quarter. Outcomes were compared with propensity score matching analysis. Participants The study encompassed all statutorily insured patients in Bavaria contacting at least 1 ambulatory specialist in the first quarter of 2011 (n=3 616 510). Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcome was total costs of ambulatory care; secondary outcomes were financial claims of general physicians, specialists and for medication. Results The average age was 55.3 years for coordinated patients (CP, n=1 629 302), 48.3 years for UP (n=1 825 840). CP more frequently had chronic diseases (85.4%) as compared with UP (67.5%). The total unadjusted financial claim per patient was higher for UP (€234.52) than for CP (€224.41); the total adjusted difference was −€9.65 (95% CI −11.64 to −7.67), indicating lower costs for CP. The cost differences increased with increasing age. Total adjusted difference per patient with mental diseases as documented with an International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10 F-diagnosis, was −€20.31 (95% CI −26.43 to −14.46). Conclusions Coordination of care is associated with lower ambulatory healthcare expenditures and is of particular importance for patients who are more vulnerable to medical interventions, especially for elderly and patients with mental disorders

  1. Educating Asthmatic Children in European Ambulatory Pediatrics: Facts and Insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robberecht, Marie Noëlle; Beghin, Laurent; Deschildre, Antoine; Hue, Valérie; Reali, Laura; Plevnik-Vodušek, Vesna; Moretto, Marilena; Agustsson, Sigurlaug; Tockert, Emile; Jäger-Roman, Elke; Deplanque, Dominique; Najaf-Zadeh, Abolfazl; Martinot, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the role of European ambulatory pediatricians in caring for asthmatic children, especially in terms of their therapeutic education. We developed a survey that was observational, declarative, retrospective and anonymous in nature. 436 ambulatory pediatricians in Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Luxembourg and Slovenia were asked to participate in the survey providing information on three children over 6 years old suffering from persistent asthma, who had been followed for at least 6 months. We considered the pediatricians' profile, and their role in the therapeutic education of children. 277 pediatricians (64%) responded: 81% were primary care pediatricians; 46% participated in networks; 4% had specific training in Therapeutic Patient Education; 69% followed more than 5 asthmatic children per month, and over long periods (7 ± 4 years). The profiles of 684 children were assessed. Answers diverged concerning the provision of a Personalized Action Plan (60-88%), training the child to measure and interpret his Peak Expiratory Flow (31-99%), and the prescription of pulmonary function tests during the follow-up programme of consultations (62-97%). Answers converged on pediatricians' perception of their role in teaching children about their condition and its treatment (99%), about inhalation techniques (96%), and in improving the children's ability to take preventive measures when faced with risk situations (97%). This study highlights the role of European pediatricians in caring for asthmatic children, and their lack of training in Therapeutic Patient Education. Programmes and tools are required in order to train ambulatory pediatricians in Therapeutic Patient Education, and such resources should be integrated into primary health care, and harmonized at the European level.

  2. Understanding palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Caren McHenry

    2006-09-01

    While most pharmacists and other health care practitioners are familiar with the programs and philosophy of hospice, they may lack a clear understanding of palliative care. Because myths and misconceptions about palliative care abound, a review of the definitions and components of palliative care can enhance the practice of all practitioners who care for patients with chronic diseases.

  3. Institutional and familial cost of patients in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Villarreal-Ríos

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the cost of institutional and familial care for patients with chronic kidney disease replacement therapy with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Methods: a study of the cost of care for patients with chronic kidney disease treated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis was undertaken. The sample size (151 was calculated with the formula of the averages for an infinite population. The institutional cost included the cost of outpatient consultation, emergencies, hospitalization, ambulance, pharmacy, medication, laboratory, x-rays and application of erythropoietin. The family cost included transportation cost for services, cost of food during care, as well as the cost of medication and treatment materials acquired by the family for home care. The analysis included averages, percentages and confidence intervals. Results: the average annual institutional cost is US$ 11,004.3. The average annual family cost is US$ 2,831.04. The average annual cost of patient care in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis including institutional and family cost is US$ 13,835.35. Conclusion: the cost of chronic kidney disease requires a large amount of economic resources, and is becoming a serious problem for health services and families. It's also true that the form of patient management in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis is the most efficient in the use of institutional resources and family.

  4. A systematic review of professional supervision experiences and effects for allied health practitioners working in non-metropolitan health care settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ducat WH

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Wendy H Ducat,1,3 Saravana Kumar2 1Cunningham Centre, Darling Downs Hospital and Health Service, Australia; 2School of Health Sciences, International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, Sansom Institute, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia; 3Rural Clinical School, School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia Introduction: In regional, rural, and remote settings, allied health professional supervision is one organizational mechanism designed to support and retain the workforce, provide clinical governance, and enhance service delivery. A systematic approach to evaluating the evidence of the experience and effects of professional supervision for non-metropolitan allied health practitioners and their service delivery is needed. Methods: Studies investigating the experience and effects of professional supervision across 17 allied health disciplines in non-metropolitan health services were systematically searched for using standardized keywords across seven databases. The initial search identified 1,574 references. Of these studies, five met inclusion criteria and were subject to full methodological appraisal by both reviewers. Two studies were primarily qualitative with three studies primarily quantitative in their approach. Studies were appraised using McMaster critical appraisal tools and data were extracted and synthesized. Results: Studies reported the context specific benefits and challenges of supervision in non-metropolitan areas and the importance of supervision in enhancing satisfaction and support in these areas. Comparison of findings between metropolitan and non-metropolitan settings within one study suggested that allied health in non-metropolitan settings were more satisfied with supervision though less likely to access it and preferred supervision with other non-metropolitan practitioners over access to more experienced supervisors. One study in a regional health service identified the lack

  5. US National Practice Patterns in Ambulatory Operative Management of Lateral Epicondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, Leonard T; Best, Matthew J; Nigen, David; Ialenti, Marc; Baraga, Michael G

    2015-12-01

    Lateral epicondylitis is a common cause of elbow pain, frequently responsive to nonoperative management. There are multiple operative techniques for persistently symptomatic patients who have exhausted conservative therapies. Little is known regarding US national trends in operative management of lateral epicondylitis. We conducted a study to investigate changes in use of ambulatory procedures for lateral epicondylitis. Cases of lateral epicondylitis were identified using the National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery and were analyzed for trends in demographics and use of ambulatory surgery. Between 1994 and 2006, the population-adjusted rate of ambulatory surgical procedures increased from 7.29 to 10.44 per 100,000 capita. The sex-adjusted rate of surgery for lateral epicondylitis increased by 85% among females and decreased by 31% among males. Most patients were between ages 40 and 49 years, and the largest percentage increase in age-adjusted rates was found among patients older than 50 years (275%) between 1994 and 2006. Use of regional anesthesia increased from 17% in 1994 to 30% in 2006. Private insurance remained the most common payer. Awareness of the increasing use of ambulatory surgery for lateral epicondylitis may lead to changes in health care policies and positively affect patient care.

  6. Perspectives on ambulatory anesthesia: the patient’s point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehmbi H

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Herman Sehmbi, Jean Wong, David T WongDepartment of Anesthesia, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CanadaAbstract: Recent advances in anesthetic and surgical techniques have led to tremendous growth of ambulatory surgery. With patients with many co-morbid conditions undergoing complex procedures in an ambulatory setting, the challenges in providing ambulatory surgery and anesthesia are immense. In recent years, the paradigm has shifted from a health-care provider focus involving process compliance and clinical outcomes, to a patient-centered strategy that includes patients’ perspectives of desired outcomes. Improving preoperative patient education while reducing unnecessary testing, improving postoperative pain management, and reducing postoperative nausea and vomiting may help enhance patient satisfaction. The functional status of most patients is reduced postoperatively, and thus the pattern of recovery is an area of ongoing research. Standardized and validated psychometric questionnaires such as Quality of Recovery-40 and Postoperative Quality of Recovery Scale are potential tools to assess this. Patient satisfaction has been identified as an important outcome measure and dedicated tools to assess this in various clinical settings are needed. Identification of key aspects of ambulatory surgery deemed important from patients’ perspectives, and implementation of validated outcome questionnaires, are important in improving patient centered care and patient satisfaction.Keywords: ambulatory, patient, satisfaction, anesthesia, outcomes, questionnaire, perspectives

  7. Preferences of healthy and ill patients for style of general practitioner care: implications for workload and financial incentives under the new contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Bashir, M M; Armstrong, D

    1991-01-01

    Seven hundred and sixty patients from four general practices in an urban health centre were asked to evaluate the relative importance of 20 statements describing different aspects of general practice. Significant differences were observed between sub-groups of the patients, in particular those who would be likely to make greater use of the general practitioner--the elderly and the ill. Patients who reported not good or poor health status were more likely to value second opinions and, conversely, undervalue efficient prescribing, and an emphasis on vaccinations, cervical smears and check ups. Elderly patients placed greater emphasis on second opinions, protection in their relationship with the hospital, routine visits to the elderly and friendly staff, and similarly undervalued an emphasis on vaccinations, cervical smears and check ups. This means that practices which increase their list size to benefit from higher capacitation payments might, depending on their characteristics, attract predominantly healthy people and increase patient numbers without a commensurate increase in workload. Other facets of the payment system, in particular fees for health promotion work, further support this bias against ill patients.

  8. Consultations between Immigrant Patients, Their Interpreters, and Their General Practitioners: Are They Real Meetings or Just Encounters? A Qualitative Study in Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eivor Wiking

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. In Sweden, about 19% of residents have a foreign background. Previous studies reported immigrant patients experience communication difficulties despite the presence of interpreters during consultations. The objective of this study was to gain insights into the participants’ perceptions and reflections of the triangular meeting by means of in-depth interviews with immigrant patients, interpreters, and general practitioners (GPs. Method. A total of 29 participants—10 patients, 9 interpreters, and 10 GPs—participated in face-to-face interviews. Content analysis was used to process the interview material. Results. Six themes were generated and arranged under two subject areas: the interpretation process (the means of interpreting and means of informing and the meeting itself (individual tailored approaches, consultation time, the patient’s feelings, and the role of family members. Conclusion. This paper highlights feelings including frustration and insecurity when interpretation and relationships are suboptimal. Strategies for immigrant patients, interpreters, and GPs for getting a successful consultation may be needed. To transform the triangular meeting from an encounter to a real meeting, our results indicate a need for professional interpreters, for GPs to use a patient-tailored approach, and sufficient consultation time. Practice Implications. Use of professional interpreters is recommended, as is developing cultural competence.

  9. What Do Resource-Oriented Approaches Mean to General Practitioners and How Can They Be Facilitated in Primary Care? A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Prüfer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although resource orientation, as a part of health promotion, should play a major role in general practice, the anchoring and realization of resource-oriented approaches remain small in Germany. The aim of this study was to analyze what resource orientation means to general practitioners (GPs and develop strategies as to how this can be facilitated in GP practice. Within a qualitative research approach, 19 semi-structured telephone interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Within the interviews, the inclusion of the patients’ individual resources is described as core competence of GPs. Supporting the patients’ disease coping strategies and self-help were seen as important by GPs. However, perceptions as to which resources are considered to be fundamental ranged widely across the participant group. The results confirm the important role of resource-oriented approaches in general practice. However, a general definition of resource orientation is needed. In addition, working conditions for GPs need to be taken into account to ensure that these contribute to a healthy work-life balance. The need for GP training was identified to improve communication skills. Further integration of GPs in health promotion and communal structures would be beneficial.

  10. The multicompetent practitioner: a needs analysis in an urban area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, G; Weisbord, A

    1987-02-01

    This study examined the concept of the multicompetent practitioner - the health care worker trained in more than one specialty - as one way of meeting the changing needs of the health care system. Seventy-four hospital administrators, 74 directors of nursing, 14 directors of community health organizations, and 12 private physicians from the Philadelphia metropolitan area were surveyed to explore the feasibility of developing and using multicompetent practitioners at their participating institutions. The results indicated that multicompetent practitioners are already working in some institutions and that there is a willingness to hire this new type of health care worker. How the multicompetent practitioner fits into the institution, the level of education required beyond the original area of skill, and the question of salary were included in the survey. Findings also indicate positive support for the development of multicompetent practitioner training within allied health educational programs.

  11. 77 FR 9137 - National Practitioner Data Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ... liability in a civil action for entities reporting information as required by section 1921 (so long as such... reporting licensure and certification actions taken against a health care practitioner or entity by a State... entity to carry out the reporting activities of Sec. 60.12 due to a Board's failure to comply with...

  12. In a unique position or squeezed out? The professional roles of general practitioners in cancer care in general and of young adult cancer patients in particular

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hølge-Hazelton, B.; Christensen, I.

    2009-01-01

    language, they experience that their patients disappear, they are seldom involved, and they lack knowledge. CONCLUSIONS: GPs have few experiences with YA cancer patients, but they have a potentially unique role in general primary cancer care if they develop their vocational vocabulary, relate more...

  13. The organizational and performance effects of nurse practitioner roles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Offenbeek, MAG; Knip, M

    2004-01-01

    Background. Most studies evaluating the roles of Nurse Practitioners have compared the care delivered by individual Nurse Practitioners with that provided by other professionals. These studies should be complemented by research focusing on a higher unit of analysis, namely the organization of the ca

  14. 75 FR 14606 - Medicare Program; Request for Nominations to the Advisory Panel on Ambulatory Payment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ...; Center for Medicare Management, Hospital & Ambulatory Policy Group, Division of Outpatient Care; 7500... components of the Medicare hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS). The Charter requires that... consist of a chair and up to 15 members who are full- time employees of hospitals, hospital systems,...

  15. Collaboration of general practitioners and exercise providers in promotion of physical activity a written survey among general practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemrijse, C J; de Bakker, D H; Ooms, L; Veenhof, C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: General practitioners have an ideal position to motivate inactive patients to increase their physical activity. Most patients are able to exercise in regular local facilities outside the health care setting. The purpose of this study was to get insight into general practitioners percepti

  16. Collaboration of general practitioners and exercise providers in promotion of physical activity a written survey among general practitioners.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemrijse, C.J.; Bakker, D.H. de; Ooms, L.; Veenhof, C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: General practitioners have an ideal position to motivate inactive patients to increase their physical activity. Most patients are able to exercise in regular local facilities outside the health care setting. The purpose of this study was to get insight into general practitioners percepti

  17. [MODERN EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY MASTERING PRACTICAL SKILLS OF GENERAL PRACTITIONERS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, L I; Prokopchuk, Y V; Naydyonova, O V

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the experience of postgraduate training of general practitioners--family medicine. Identified current trends, forms and methods of pedagogical innovations that enhance the quality of learning and mastering the practical skills of primary professionals providing care.

  18. Can an EASYcare based dementia training programme improve diagnostic assessment and management of dementia by general practitioners and primary care nurses? The design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucassen PL

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early diagnosis of dementia benefits both patient and caregiver. Nevertheless, dementia in primary care is currently under-diagnosed. Some educational interventions developed to improve dementia diagnosis and management were successful in increasing the number of dementia diagnoses and in changing attitudes and knowledge of health care staff. However, none of these interventions focussed on collaboration between GPs and nurses in dementia care. We developed an EASYcare-based Dementia Training Program (DTP aimed at stimulating collaboration in dementia primary care. We expect this program to increase the number of cognitive assessments and dementia diagnoses and to improve attitudes and knowledge of GPs and nurses. Methods The DTP is a complex educational intervention that consists of two workshops, a coaching program, access to an internet forum, and a Computerized Clinical Decision Support System on dementia diagnostics. One hundred duos of GPs and nurses will be recruited, from which 2/3 will be allocated to the intervention group and 1/3 to the control group. The effects of implementation of the DTP will be studied in a cluster-randomised controlled trial. Primary outcomes will be the number of cognitive assessments and dementia diagnoses in a period of 9 months following workshop participation. Secondary outcomes are measured on GP and nurse level: adherence to national guidelines for dementia, attitude, confidence and knowledge regarding dementia diagnosis and management; on patient level: number of emergency calls, visits and consultations and patient satisfaction; and on caregiver level: informal caregiver burden and satisfaction. Data will be collected from GPs' electronic medical records, self-registration forms and questionnaires. Statistical analysis will be performed using the MANOVA-method. Also, exploratory analyses will be performed, in order to gain insight into barriers and facilitators for implementation and

  19. The view of pulmonologists on palliative care for patients with COPD: a survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duenk RG

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available RG Duenk,1 C Verhagen,1 PNR Dekhuijzen,2 KCP Vissers,1 Y Engels,1,* Y Heijdra2,* 1Department of Anesthesiology, Pain and Palliative Medicine, 2Department of Lung Diseases, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, the Netherlands *These authors contributed equally to this work Introduction: Early palliative care is not a common practice for patients with COPD. Important barriers are the identification of patients for palliative care and the organization of such care in this patient group. Objective: Pulmonologists have a central role in providing good quality palliative care for patients with COPD. To guide future research and develop services, their view on palliative care for these patients was explored. Methods: A survey study was performed by the members of the Netherlands Association of Physicians for Lung Diseases and Tuberculosis. Results: The 256 respondents (31.8% covered 85.9% of the hospital organizations in the Netherlands. Most pulmonologists (92.2% indicated to distinguish a palliative phase in the COPD trajectory, but there was no consensus about the different criteria used for its identification. Aspects of palliative care in COPD considered important were advance care planning conversation (82%, communication between pulmonologist and general practitioner (77%, and identification of the palliative phase (75.8%, while the latter was considered the most important aspect for improvement (67.6%. Pulmonologists indicated to prefer organizing palliative care for hospitalized patients with COPD themselves (55.5%, while 30.9% indicated to prefer cooperation with a specialized palliative care team (SPCT. In the ambulatory setting, a multidisciplinary cooperation between pulmonologist, general practitioner, and a respiratory nurse specialist was preferred (71.1%. Conclusion: To encourage pulmonologists to timely initiate palliative care in COPD, we recommend to conduct further research into more specific identification

  20. Type D Personality and Essential Hypertension in Primary Care: A Cross-Sectional Observational Study Within a Cohort of Patients Visiting General Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Francesco; Versino, Elisabetta; Gammino, Lorenzo; Colombi, Nicoletta; Ostacoli, Luca; Carletto, Sara; Furlan, Pier Maria; Picci, Rocco Luigi

    2016-01-01

    To estimate the relationship between type D personality and essential hypertension among patients visiting their GPs for any health problem, 101 hypertensive and 138 nonhypertensive patients were consecutively recruited and assessed using the Type D Personality Scale (DS14). The predictive value of type D personality was determined using a logistic regression model, taking into account the differences in recognized confounders between groups. Type D personality in the hypertension group was twice as frequent as in the no hypertension group and hypertension was more frequent among type D than non-type D patients. Logistic regression showed a significant predictive value of type D personality for hypertension, adjusting for sex, age, body mass index, family history of hypertension, living condition, education, and employment. Therefore, type D personality was strongly related to hypertension and it was a noteworthy predictor of hypertension in a real-world cohort of primary care patients.

  1. Reflective Practitioner Account

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    干青

    2009-01-01

    This article focus on the reflective account of an English teacher learning and teaching in higher education with the British post-graduate certificate program of the Yunnan Agdculture University.As n practitioner for smny years in English learning and teaching for many years,it reflects in four fields.

  2. [Approach to the patient in the ambulatory surgery unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero-Ponce, Montserrat; Romero-Sánchez, Isabel María; López-Barea, José; Martínez-Ramos, Pablo

    2008-01-01

    Ambulatory surgery aims to improve the quality of care, provide services in an environment closer to users' normal surroundings, reduce the risk of nosocomial infection and release hospital beds for other uses demanded by the population, thus reducing health costs. Nursing activity in these units should aim to restore health and aid the rapid recovery of patients in their homes. To achieve this, an effective health education program is required. Such programs should be simple and, at the same time, cover the care that these patients will require during the recovery period at home. The unit covers patients in the Virgen de Rocío University Hospital, The Fleming Peripheral Center for Specialties and the Virgen de los Reyes Peripheral Center for Specialties in Seville, Spain and the the specialties included are plastic surgery, otorhinolaryngology, orthopedic surgery, urology, and general surgery. The duration of the education program will be at most 14-17 h.

  3. Orientation of Medical Residents to the Psychosocial Aspects of Primary Care: Influence of Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenthal, Sherman; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 63 general medical residents found most accepted the psychosocial role of the primary care physician, found it most appropriate in ambulatory care settings, felt ambivalent about their ability to perform it, and assigned it secondary priority in patient care. More attention by training programs to ambulatory care and psychosocial…

  4. Redes integradas, programas de gestão clínica e generalista coordenador: análise das reformas recentes do setor ambulatorial na Alemanha Networks, disease management programs, GP coordinator: analysis of recent ambulatory reforms in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Giovanella

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available O fortalecimento do papel do generalista na condução e coordenação de cuidados especializados, hospitalares e sociais para garantir a continuidade é tendência observada em reformas de saúde recentes em países europeus. Na Alemanha, a partir da segunda metade da década de noventa, impulsionadas por pressões econômicas, legislação específica e iniciativas dos próprios prestadores, foram desenvolvidas novas estruturas organizacionais e modelos assistenciais com o propósito de integração do sistema de saúde e a coordenação da atenção, na forma de redes de consultórios médicos, modelo generalista coordenador, programas de gestão clínica para agravos específicos e assistência integrada. A partir de revisão bibliográfica, análise documental, visitas a serviços e entrevistas com informantes-chave, o artigo analisa a dinâmica destas mudanças organizacionais no setor ambulatorial alemão. Examinam-se os mecanismos de integração e coordenação propostos, discutem-se os impactos potenciais das novas modalidades organizacionais sobre a eficiência e a qualidade e analisam-se motivos e interesses envolvidos, apontando obstáculos para a implementação. Observa-se processo de reforma incremental com tendência à diversificação do panorama assistencial na Alemanha, com presença de modelos integrados de atenção e fortalecimento do papel do médico generalista na função de coordenação dos cuidados aos pacientes.Strengthening the role of the general practitioner in the conduction and coordination of specialized, inpatient and social care to ensure the continuity is a trend observed in recent health reforms in European countries. In Germany, from the second half of the 1990s, driven by economic pressures, a specific legislation and initiatives of the providers themselves have developed new organizational structures and care models for the purpose of the integration of the health care system and the coordination of

  5. 42 CFR 411.406 - Criteria for determining that a provider, practitioner, or supplier knew that services were...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., practitioner, or supplier knew that services were excluded from coverage as custodial care or as not reasonable..., practitioner, or supplier knew that services were excluded from coverage as custodial care or as not reasonable and necessary. (a) Basic rule. A provider, practitioner, or supplier that furnished services...

  6. Strategies to reduce medication errors in pediatric ambulatory settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mehndiratta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, a large number of children are prescribed drugs on an outpatient basis. Medication errors are fairly common in these settings. Though this matter has been well recognized as a cause of concern, limited data is available from ambulatory settings. Medication errors can be defined as errors that may occur at any step, starting from ordering a medication, to dispensing, administration of the drug and the subsequent monitoring. The outcomes of such errors are variable and may range between those that are clinically insignificant to a life-threatening event. The reasons for these medication errors are multi-factorial. Children are unable to administer medications to themselves and also require a strict weight-based dosing regimen. The risk factors associated with medication errors include complex regimens with multiple medications. Overdosing and under-dosing (10-fold calculation errors, an increased or a decreased frequency of dosing or an inappropriate duration of administration of the medication, are frequently detected errors. The lack of availability of proper formulations adds to the confusion. The low level of literacy among the caregivers can aggravate this problem. There is a lack of proper reporting and monitoring mechanisms in most ambulatory settings, hence these errors remain unrecognized and often go unreported. This article summarizes the current available literature on medication errors in ambulatory settings and the possible strategies that can be adopted to reduce the burden of these errors in order to improve child care and patient safety. Voluntary, anonymous reporting can be introduced in the healthcare institutions to determine the incidence of these errors.

  7. Ambulatory surgery with chloroprocaine spinal anesthesia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghisi D

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Daniela Ghisi, Stefano Bonarelli Department of Anaesthesia and Postoperative Intensive Care, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy Abstract: Spinal anesthesia is a reliable and safe technique for procedures of the lower extremities. Nevertheless, some of its characteristics may limit its use for ambulatory surgery, including delayed ambulation, risk of urinary retention, and pain after block regression. The current availability of short-acting local anesthetics has renewed interest for this technique also in the context of short- and ultra-short procedures. Chloroprocaine (CP is an amino-ester local anesthetic with a very short half-life. It was introduced and has been successfully used for spinal anesthesia since 1952. Sodium bisulfite was then added as a preservative after 1956. The drug was then abandoned in the 1980s for several reports of neurological deficits in patients receiving accidentally high doses of intrathecal CP during epidural labor analgesia. Animal studies have proven the safety of the preservative-free formulation, which has been extensively evaluated in volunteer studies as well as in clinical practice with a favorable profile in terms of both safety and efficacy. In comparison with bupivacaine, 2-chloroprocaine (2-CP showed faster offset times to end of anesthesia, unassisted ambulation, and discharge from hospital. These findings suggests that 2-CP may be a suitable alternative to low doses of long-acting local anesthetics in ambulatory surgery. Its safety profile also suggests that 2-CP could be a valid substitute for intrathecal short- and intermediate-acting local anesthetics, such as lidocaine and mepivacaine – often causes of transient neurological symptoms. In this context, literature suggests a dose ranging between 30 and 60 mg of 2-CP for procedures lasting 60 minutes or less, while 10 mg is considered the no-effect dose. The present review describes recent evidence about 2-CP as an anesthetic agent for

  8. Today's students, tomorrow's practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heape, Chris

    2015-01-01

    There is an inherent dilemma that some research indicates ways and means of doing design practice, in particular how practitioners bring what this paper identifies as informal resources into play, that are seldom reflected in how and what design students are taught or learn. The question is posed...... as to whether today’s design students are in fact equipped to be tomorrow’s practitioners. This paper introduces a range of literature and empirical observations that describe a number of different appreciations of process and practice, from both design and non-design perspectives. This in order to draw up...... an alternative understanding of collaborative design practice as participatory inquiry. The paper suggests that participatory inquiry, as it more fully takes into account the learning driven and relational nature of design practice, could help inform alternative design educational strategies....

  9. HCUP State Ambulatory Surgery Databases (SASD) - Restricted Access Files

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The State Ambulatory Surgery Databases (SASD) contain the universe of hospital-based ambulatory surgery encounters in participating States. Some States include...

  10. Anabolic steroids: implications for the nurse practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, D J; Shaw, E B

    1985-12-01

    Anabolic steroids are being used by athletes in a wide variety of sports in efforts to enhance their athletic performances. Steroid abuse is complex to evaluate due to the highly emotional subject matter and the limitations in researching anabolic steroids. This article has been written to heighten the practitioner's awareness of the problem of "sports doping" with anabolic steroids. It will provide practical information on possible consequences of steroid use and outline essential information to obtain through the history, physical exam and laboratory studies. Intervention strategies based on the three levels of prevention are described. With awareness of the problem of sports doping and knowledge of how to deal with it in primary care, the nurse practitioner can enhance the health care provided to aspiring athletes, athletes and retired athletes.

  11. Ambulatory ST segment monitoring after myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mickley, H

    1994-01-01

    ischaemia provides prognostic information in different subsets of patients with previous myocardial infarction, but there is considerable disagreement about how this is expressed in terms of cardiac events. Small patient numbers, patient selection, and different timing of ambulatory monitoring are proposed...... as important reasons for the inconsistent findings. The precise role of ambulatory ST segment monitoring in clinical practice has yet to be established. Direct comparisons with exercise stress testing may not be appropriate for two reasons. Firstly, the main advantage of ambulatory monitoring may...... be that it can be performed early after infarction at the time of maximum risk. Secondly, it can be performed in most patients after infarction, including those recognised as being at high risk who are unable to perform an exercise stress test....

  12. Clinical Assessment Applications of Ambulatory Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Stephen N.; Yoshioka, Dawn T.

    2007-01-01

    Ambulatory biosensor assessment includes a diverse set of rapidly developing and increasingly technologically sophisticated strategies to acquire minimally disruptive measures of physiological and motor variables of persons in their natural environments. Numerous studies have measured cardiovascular variables, physical activity, and biochemicals…

  13. Pediatric asthma for the primary care practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanGarsse, Anne; Magie, Richard D; Bruhnding, Aubree

    2015-03-01

    Asthma is a complex disease, involving many different allergic, inflammatory, and environmental components. It is a disease for which patient and family education and a team-based approach are paramount for successful management. Guidelines have been put forth by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, which provide a helpful framework in which to begin to manage patients and to navigate the many medication choices available. It is only through diligent attention to control of asthma symptoms that improved quality of life and prevention of long-term sequelae are possible for the pediatric patient with asthma.

  14. Predicting recovery at home after Ambulatory Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayala Guillermo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The correct implementation of Ambulatory Surgery must be accompanied by an accurate monitoring of the patient post-discharge state. We fit different statistical models to predict the first hours postoperative status of a discharged patient. We will also be able to predict, for any discharged patient, the probability of needing a closer follow-up, or of having a normal progress at home. Background The status of a discharged patient is predicted during the first 48 hours after discharge by using variables routinely used in Ambulatory Surgery. The models fitted will provide the physician with an insight into the post-discharge progress. These models will provide valuable information to assist in educating the patient and their carers about what to expect after discharge as well as to improve their overall level of satisfaction. Methods A total of 922 patients from the Ambulatory Surgery Unit of the Dr. Peset University Hospital (Valencia, Spain were selected for this study. Their post-discharge status was evaluated through a phone questionnaire. We pretend to predict four variables which were self-reported via phone interviews with the discharged patient: sleep, pain, oral tolerance of fluid/food and bleeding status. A fifth variable called phone score will be built as the sum of these four ordinal variables. The number of phone interviews varies between patients, depending on the evolution. The proportional odds model was used. The predictors were age, sex, ASA status, surgical time, discharge time, type of anaesthesia, surgical specialty and ambulatory surgical incapacity (ASI. This last variable reflects, before the operation, the state of incapacity and severity of symptoms in the discharged patient. Results Age, ambulatory surgical incapacity and the surgical specialty are significant to explain the level of pain at the first call. For the first two phone calls, ambulatory surgical incapacity is significant as a predictor for all

  15. Brote por Pseudomonas aeruginosa, en el área de atención ambulatoria de heridas quirúrgicas, en pacientes posmastectomizadas Outbreak of postmastectomy wound infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an ambulatory surgical care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Vilar-Compte

    2003-10-01

    by a ciprofloxacin and gentamycin-resistant P. aeruginosa. The causative Pseudomonas was isolated from a nurse's nostrils and non-sterile gauzes left by her on the Mayo table at the Breast Tumor ambulatory clinic. None of the closed packages was positive to Pseudomonas. On April 14, 2000, the nurse was transferred to another ward and strict infection control practices were established. After this date, 4 additional cases were diagnosed. Radiation therapy was the only risk factor for infection (Or=5.1, 95% cI 1.1-28.4. CONCLUSIONS: This outbreak was probably caused by a common source initially, and later disseminated by cross-infection among patients. The poor compliance with infection control practices during wound cleaning and drainage led to implementing a series of specific preventive interventions.

  16. Acceptance and side effects of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring: evaluation of a new technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltman, F W; Heesen, W F; Smit, A J; May, J F; Lie, K I; Meyboom-de Jong, B

    1996-09-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring is probably becoming a clinically useful procedure for the evaluation of hypertensive patients. Previous reports have shown that the devices are safe and serious side effects are rare. Discomfort and inconveniences associated with its use are more frequent. In this study, patient acceptance of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) was compared with acceptance of other diagnostic procedures and their side effects were assessed. Patients were asked to fill in a form and 129 of 166 patients responded. The acceptance was measured with a visual analogue scale which ranged from 'very annoying' on the left to 'not annoying at all' on the right. All forms were collected anonymously. Mean distance (cm) of the visual likert scale was 8.6 to 9.4 for the diagnostic procedures frequently used in routine patient care. Ambulatory BP measurement (ABPM) scored 6.1 cm. Reported side effects (in 27% of patients) were: plan (9%), skin irritation (8%), noisy device (8%), inconvenience with work (3%), haematoma (2%) and other (4%). Reports from the patients on sleep quality were: 23% normal, 61% minor disturbance, 14% had sleep, and 2% did not sleep at all. It can be concluded that ambulatory BP monitoring was the diagnostic procedure with the lowest patient acceptance. Side effects of this new technology were reported by 27% of patients. However, risks are relatively minor. Sleep disturbances were very frequent and was a serious problem for 16% of patients.

  17. Ambulatory surgery center market share and rates of outpatient surgery in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbeck, Brent K; Hollingsworth, John M; Dunn, Rodney L; Zaojun Ye; Birkmeyer, John D

    2010-12-01

    Relative to outpatient surgery in hospital settings, ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) are more efficient and associated with a lower cost per case. However, these facilities may also spur higher overall procedure utilization and thus lead to greater overall health care costs. The authors used the State Ambulatory Surgery Database from the State of Florida to identify Medicare-aged patients undergoing 4 common ambulatory procedures in 2006, including knee arthroscopy, cystoscopy, cataract removal, and colonoscopy. Hospital service areas (HSAs) were characterized according to ASC market share, that is, the proportion of residents undergoing outpatient surgery in these facilities. The authors then examined relationships between ASC market share and rates of each procedure. Age-adjusted rates of ambulatory surgery ranged from 190.5 cases per 1000 to 320.8 cases per 1000 in HSAs with low and high ASC market shares, respectively (P < .01). For all 4 procedures, adjusted rates of procedures were significantly higher in HSAs with the highest ASC market share. The greatest difference, both in relative and absolute terms, was observed for patients undergoing cystoscopy. In areas of high ASC market share, the age-adjusted rate of cystoscopy was nearly 3-fold higher than in areas with low ASC market share (34.5 vs 11.9 per 1000 population; P < .01). The presence of an ASC is associated with higher utilization of common outpatient procedures in the elderly. Whether ASCs are meeting unmet clinical demand or spurring overutilization is not clear.

  18. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis: nurses' experiences of teaching patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubayra, Amnah

    2015-03-01

    Nine nurses were interviewed to determine nurses' experiences of teaching patients to use continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). The material was analyzed using content analysis. Data were sorted into four themes and ten subthemes. The themes were presented as follows: Importance of language, individualized teaching, teaching needs and structure of care in teaching. The findings highlighted important insights into how nurses experience teaching patients to perform CAPD. The study revealed some barriers for the nurses during teaching. The major barrier was shortage of Arabic speaking nursing staff. Incidental findings involved two factors that played an important role in teaching, retraining and a special team to perform pre-assessments, including home visits. In conclusion, the findings of this study showed several factors that are considered as barriers for the nurses during teaching the CAPD patients and the need to improve the communication and teaching in the peritoneal dialysis units, including the importance of individualized teaching.

  19. Eliminating lateral violence in the ambulatory setting: one center's strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimarino, Tina J

    2011-05-01

    Lateral violence (eg, disruptive, disparaging, or uncivil behavior inflicted by one peer on another) creates an unpleasant work environment that can have harmful effects on individual nurses, team members, patients, and the bottom line of the health care organization. Educating nurses about the most common forms of lateral violence and strategies for handling inappropriate behavior can be the first step toward eliminating this behavior. Effective nursing leaders develop and maintain a "zero-tolerance" culture that includes clear and concise behavioral expectations and consequences for employees who exhibit unprofessional behavior. Use of a code of conduct, open communication, and quick resolution of issues that arise are strategies that one ambulatory surgery center has used to successfully combat lateral violence in the workplace.

  20. Modifications to the postanesthesia score for use in ambulatory surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrete, J A

    1998-06-01

    The Aldrete Score has withstood the changes in anesthesia and surgical care that have developed in the past three decades. Nevertheless, it is imperative that (1) a modification is made to incorporate the most effective monitor of the respiratory and hemodynamic functions, e.g., pulse oximetry; and (2) the five indices previously used be expanded by incorporating five more indices including dressing, pain, ambulation, fasting/feeding, and urine output to evaluate patients undergoing ambulatory surgery and anesthesia. A patient's recovery from anesthesia and surgery, using 10 indices graded 0, 1, or 2, would provide criteria for street fitness and discharge to home when the patient reaches a postanesthesia recovery score of 18 or higher.

  1. Practice management skills for the nurse practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sportsman, S; Hawley, L J; Pollock, S; Varnell, G

    2001-01-01

    The faculties of three schools of nursing involved in a collaborative family nurse practitioner (FNP) program designed a study to address issues involved in preparing the nurse practitioner for the challenges of practice management in the clinical environment. The purposes of the study were to (1) identify business concepts necessary to successfully manage a primary care practice; (2) determine which of these concepts should be incorporated into an FNP curriculum; and (3) clarify information to be taught regarding each identified concept. Fifty-four business concepts related to primary care were identified from a literature review. A survey was then developed to assess the extent to which the identified concepts were necessary for an FNP to effectively manage a practice. Seven experts and five FNP faculty responded to the survey. The Content Validity Index (CVI) defined by Lynn (1986) was applied and 20 concepts necessary for an FNP to effectively manage a practice were identified. A focus group that included nurse practitioners (both faculty and nonfaculty) from the three collaborative sites connected by interactive telecommunications determined that all 20 of the identified concepts should be included in an FNP curriculum. Additionally, the focus group clarified relevant information to be taught regarding each identified concept.

  2. Local Anesthesia Combined With Sedation Compared With General Anesthesia for Ambulatory Operative Hysteroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Lone Dragnes; Thillemann, Theis Muncholm; Nikolajsen, Lone

    2016-01-01

    anesthesia combined with sedation (group LA + S; n = 76) or general anesthesia (group GA; n = 77). Primary outcome was the worst pain intensity score in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) rated by the patients on a numerical rating scale. FINDING: Data from 144 patients were available for analysis (LA + S...... was shorter (P anesthesia with sedation can be recommended as a first choice anesthetic technique for operative ambulatory hysteroscopy....

  3. Medication-related problem type and appearance rate in ambulatory hemodialysis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Drayer Debra K; Manley Harold J; Muther Richard S

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Background Hemodialysis (HD) patients are at risk for medication-related problems (MRP). The MRP number, type, and appearance rate over time in ambulatory HD patients has not been investigated. Methods Randomly selected HD patients were enrolled to receive monthly pharmaceutical care visits. At each visit, MRP were identified through review of the patient chart, electronic medical record, patient interview, and communications with other healthcare disciplines. All MRP were categorize...

  4. General practitioners' management of the long-term sick role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Angela; Porter, Sam; O'Halloran, Peter

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we use qualitative research techniques to examine the role of general practitioners in the management of the long-term sickness absence. In order to uncover the perspectives of all the main agents affected by the actions of general practitioners, a case study approach focussing on one particular employment sector, the public health service, is adopted. The role of family physicians is viewed from the perspectives of health service managers, occupational health physicians, employees/patients, and general practitioners. Our argument is theoretically framed by Talcott Parsons's model of the medical contribution to the sick role, along with subsequent conceptualisations of the social role and position of physicians. Sixty one semi-structured interviews and three focus group interviews were conducted in three Health and Social Care Trusts in Northern Ireland between 2010 and 2012. There was a consensus among respondents that general practitioners put far more weight on the preferences and needs of their patients than they did on the requirements of employing organisations. This was explained by respondents in terms of the propinquity and longevity of relationships between doctors and their patients, and by the ideology of holistic care and patient advocacy that general practitioners viewed as providing the foundations of their approach to patients. The approach of general practitioners was viewed negatively by managers and occupational health physicians, and more positively by general practitioners and patients. However, there is some evidence that general practitioners would be prepared to forfeit their role as validators of sick leave. Given the imperatives of both state and capital to reduce the financial burden of long-term sickness, this preparedness puts into doubt the continued role of general practitioners as gatekeepers to legitimate long-term sickness absence.

  5. Technology and the ambulatory equine practitioner: implementing and affording the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baus, Mark R; Magnus, Robert P

    2012-04-01

    Purchasing new or used capital assets involves both emotional and financial components in the decision making process. In addition, there are intangible factors such as client perceptions and expectations that fit into the equation. Identify the facts from a business perspective and then define whether this investment (expense) is good for the practice and fits with the short- and long-term growth strategies. Ask the tough questions, analyze the numbers, understand the clients’ needs, and tie this together with the practice brand and strategic objectives. The informed and prepared buyer is usually successful in making the right decision.

  6. Avaliação da qualidade de atendimento ambulatorial em pediatria em um hospital universitário Quality-of-care assessment in a university hospital pediatric clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Cristina Franco

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se o ambulatório de Pediatria do Hospital das Clínicas da Unicamp, um serviço didático-assistencial que, inserido no Sistema Único de Saúde, presta assistência secundária e terciária para crianças de 0 a 18 anos. Foram aplicados 221 questionários entre clientes do ambulatório geral de pediatria e de uma de suas especialidades, permitindo comparar diversos indicadores de qualidade da assistência médica prestada. Evidenciou-se um bom nível de conhecimento dos responsáveis pelos usuários sobre seus problemas de saúde. Encontrou-se alto grau de satisfação dos mesmos, embora houvesse baixíssima vinculação entre médico e paciente. Com relação ao atendimento, 43,4% relataram problemas, mas apenas 17,6% propuseram sugestões para melhorá-lo. O tempo de espera nas consultas foi bastante longo. A clientela da especialidade se diferenciou da do ambulatório geral com relação a diversos indicadores.This study focuses on the Pediatric Clinic of the UNICAMP University Hospital, teaching and care facility belonging to the Brazilian National Health System, providing secondary and tertiary health care for children aged 0 to 18 years. A total of 221 questionnaires were applied with users of the general pediatric out-patient services and one of the specialties, allowing for comparison of various medical care indicators. Users were found to be quite knowledgeable about their health conditions and satisfied with the care received, despite a weak link in the physician-patient relationship. 43.4% reported problems related to the services, while only 17.6% made suggestions to improve them. Waiting time was found to be quite long. Users of specialized services differed from general care patients with regard to several indicators.

  7. Defining the unique role of the specialist district nurse practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Anne; Latham, Dinah; Levermore, Joy

    2007-10-01

    Due to the reorganization of primary care trusts across the country, certain trusts proposed a reduction in the specialist district nurse practitioner numbers in favour of less qualified community nurses and health care assistants. Such proposals in one PCT were blocked, partly in response to documentation compiled by practitioners at the sharp end of nursing practice. With the new agenda of practice based commissioning, it is imperative that commissioners and management alike are aware of the scope of specialist district nurse practitioners. This is the first of a series of articles looking at specific case histories where the role of the district nurse is highlighted. It is the intention to stress the importance of the clinical expertise and confidence required by the district nurse to care for patients with complex needs in the community.

  8. The effectiveness of Nurse Practitioners working at a GP cooperative: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wijers Nancy

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many countries out-of-hours care faces serious challenges, including shortage of general practitioners, a high workload, reduced motivation to work out of hours, and increased demand for out-of-hours care. One response to these challenges is the introduction of nurse practitioner as doctor substitutes, in order to maintain the (high accessibility and safety of out of hours care. Although nurse practitioners have proven to provide equally safe and efficient care during daytime primary care, it is unclear whether substitution is effective and efficient in the more complex out of hours primary care. This study aims to assess the effects of substitution of care from general practitioners to nurse practitioners in an out of hours primary care setting. Design A quasi experimental study is undertaken at one “general practitioner cooperative” to offer out-of-hours care for 304.000 people in the South East of the Netherlands. In the experimental condition patient care is provided by a team of one nurse practitioner and four general practitioners; where the nurse practitioner replaces one general practitioner during one day of the weekend from 10 am to 5 pm. In the control condition patient care is provided by a team of five general practitioners during the other day of the weekend, also from 10 am to 5 pm. The study period last 15 months, from April 2011 till July 2012. Methods Data will be collected on number of different outcomes using a range of methods. Our primary outcome is substitution of care. This is calculated using the number and characteristics of patients that have a consultation at the GP cooperative. We compare the number of patients seen by both professionals, type of complaints, resource utilization (e.g. prescription, tests, investigations, referrals and waiting times in the experimental condition and control condition. This data is derived from patient electronic medical records. Secondary outcomes

  9. Investigation on the practitioners'utilization and demand of TCM information system in the Community Health Care Service Center of of Dongcheng District of Beijing City%北京市东城区社区卫生服务医务人员的中医信息系统使用和需求调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹桂丽; 陈玉玲; 沈蔷; 邓红月; 王建辉

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the practitioners' utilization and demand of TCM information system in the Community Health Care Service Center, and to provide information for the improvement of the information system of Community Health Care. Methods Two hundred and seventy-three practitioners in Community Health Care Service Center were investigated with questionnaire, and the data were statistically analyzed. Results The awareness rate and utilization rate of TCM information system for the practitioner was 95.24% and 83.88%, respectively. 64.47% of the practitioners held the opinion that the TCM information system was characteristic and valuable. Most practitioners suggested that the utilization of TCM information system could be improved through increasing net-speed (76.92%), simplifying procedure (73.26%) and content (61.17%), and intensifying training of TCM information (55.68%). Conclusion The utilization of TCM information system is of great value for the application of TCM in Community Health Care Service Center.%目的 了解本机构现运行的信息系统中含中医内容的模块的使用情况和改进需求,为完善社区卫生服务信息系统提供依据.方法 采用问卷调查的方法,对使用系统的全科医生和社区护士273人进行调查,针对调查结果进行分析.结果 现有信息系统中生活方式档案的中医体质测评的内容知晓情况、使用情况分别达到95.24%、83.88%;64.47%的被调查者认为该模块中医特色突出;分别有76.92%、73.26%、61.17%、55.68%的被调查者建议采用提高网速、简化操作流程、加强中医知识培训、简化模块内容等方法提高中医模块的使用.结论 现有的中医模块使用率较高,中医特色较突出,有利于社区卫生服务的中医工作的开展.

  10. Advances in ambulatory monitoring: regulatory considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckles, David; Aguel, Felipe; Brockman, Randall; Cheng, James; Demian, Cindy; Ho, Charles; Jensen, Donald; Mallis, Elias

    2004-01-01

    Conventional ambulatory electrocardiogram (ECG) (Holter) monitoring involves 2 or 3 surface leads recorded with electrode positions and signal characteristics that are different from diagnostic quality 12-lead ECGs due to the limitations imposed by technology on the ambulatory recorders. The rapid pace of technological development for medical devices, particularly electrocardiography, has now enabled the recording of diagnostic quality 12-lead ECG waveforms for extended time periods. This capability allows Holter recording to become another source for diagnostic 12-lead ECG records on a par with other modalities such as resting ECG and exercise stress testing. Additionally, other diagnostic techniques such as S-T segment analysis and Q-T interval analysis that rely on diagnostic quality waveforms can now be applied. All of these enhancements to the traditional Holter modality have altered the regulatory perspective of these devices, since the enhancements may represent a new intended use for the device.

  11. Cochlear implant in an ambulatory surgery center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Aimee M; Lassen, L Frederick

    2013-02-01

    Presbycusis, or sensorineural hearing loss in the elderly population, affects approximately 40% to 50% of people over the age of 75. A variety of devices are available to those with hearing loss. Cochlear implants, for example, are especially useful for those with severe-to-profound hearing loss. The population is aging, so the demand for cochlear implantation in ambulatory surgery centers will likely increase. Ambulatory surgery centers (ASC) can provide a more convenient and less expensive location for cochlear implant surgery than hospital-based operating facilities. Patient selection using standard ASC criteria, coupled with an understanding of the unique surgical and anesthetic needs of cochlear implant patients, are key to bringing this once exotic inpatient procedure into the ASC.

  12. Avaliação da estrutura organizacional da assistência ambulatorial em HIV/Aids no Brasil Evaluation of the organizational structure of HIV/AIDS outpatient care in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Melchior

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: No contexto de acesso universal à terapia antiretroviral, os resultados do Programa de Aids dependem da qualidade do cuidado prestado. O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar a qualidade do cuidado dos serviços ambulatoriais que assistem pacientes de Aids. MÉTODOS: Estudo realizado em sete Estados brasileiros, em 2001 e 2002. Foi avaliada a qualidade do atendimento a pacientes com Aids quanto à disponibilidade de recursos e a organização do trabalho de assistência. Um questionário com 112 questões estruturadas abordando esses aspectos, foi enviado a 336 serviços. RESULTADOS: A taxa de resposta foi de 95,8% (322. Os indicadores de disponibilidade de recursos mostram uma adequação maior do que os indicadores de organização do trabalho. Não faltam antiretrovirais em 95,5% dos serviços, os exames de CD4 e Carga Viral estão disponíveis em quantidade adequada em 59 e 41% dos serviços, respectivamente. Em 90,4% dos serviços há pelo menos um profissional não médico (psicólogo, enfermeiro ou assistente social. Quanto à organização, 80% não agendavam consulta médica com hora marcada; 40,4% agendavam mais que 10 consultas médicas por período; 17% não possuíam gerentes exclusivos na assistência e 68,6% não realizavam reuniões sistemáticas de trabalho com a equipe. CONCLUSÕES: Os resultados apontam que além de garantir a distribuição mais homogênea de recursos, o programa precisa investir no treinamento e disseminação do manejo do cuidado, conforme evidenciado nos resultados da organização de trabalho.OBJECTIVE: In the context of universal access to antiretroviral treatment, the results of the Brazilian AIDS Program will depend on the quality of the care provided. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the healthcare provided by outpatient services for the treatment of AIDS patients. METHODS: The present study was carried out in seven Brazilian States between 2001 and 2002. We evaluated the quality of

  13. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in the Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Diego Mediavilla García; Fernando Jaén Águila; Celia Fernández Torres; Blas Gil Extremera; Juan Jiménez Alonso

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of hypertension is high in the elderly and is present in 2/3 of the patients older than 65 years. Prevalence can reach 90% in patients older than 80 years. The presence of isolated systolic hypertension (ISH) is characteristic of this population. However, the prevalence of hypertension by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is not well known. In this study, we analyzed the special characteristics of hypertension in this population, giving special emphasis on ABPM readings.

  14. Regulating Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners and Acupuncturists in Ontario, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen E. Randall

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2006, the Ontario government passed the Traditional Chinese Medicine Act, which granted Traditional Chinese Medicine practitioners and Acupuncturists (TCM/A practitioners self-regulatory status under the Regulated Health Professions Act, 1991. The goal of the legislation was to create a new regulatory college that would set and enforce high standards of care and safety in order to enhance public protection and access to a range of traditional and alternative therapies. In April 2013, the College of Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners and Acupuncturists of Ontario was officially launched. Several factors account for the government’s decision to delegate self-regulatory authority to TCM/A practitioners through the creation of a regulatory college. In particular, the government’s decision seems to have been influenced by lobbying of some practitioners, greater public acceptance of alternative medicines, patient safety concerns related to acupuncture cases in the media, and the precedence of self-regulatory status being granted to these practitioners in other provinces. The degree to which the legislation has achieved its goals is difficult to determine given the short period of time the regulatory college has existed. However, the fact that the college has developed standards of practice to guide TCM/A practitioners and has a process in place to address public complaints is an early indication of movement toward achieving the policy’s goals.

  15. The Psychiatric Family Nurse Practitioner: A Collaborator in Family Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, Patricia D.

    1999-01-01

    The potential of the psychiatric family nurse practitioner (Psych.F.N.P.) to contribute to family practice through physical care and mental health care exists in the here and now. This role is a synthesis of 2 advanced practice roles, the psychiatric clinical nurse specialist (Psych.C.N.S.) and family nurse practitioner (F.N.P.), both of which continue to have great utility independently. This synthesis is a practical application of concepts that have evolved to meet the changing patterns of ...

  16. Career trends of master's prepared family nurse practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur, J; Zoeller, L H; Talashek, M; Sullivan, J A

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the career trends of family nurse practitioner (FNP) graduates of one master's program. A questionnaire was mailed to all FNPs (N = 113) who graduated 1-11 years earlier; there was a response rate of 83%. The survey revealed that for both first and present jobs the majority were providing direct patient care as a primary care provider or practicing in an indirect role. The study findings indicate that for these graduates there is a long term commitment (demonstrated through continued employment) as well as opportunity to practice in the nurse practitioner role in a direct or indirect capacity.

  17. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Clinical Practice: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, J. Rick; Viera, Anthony J.; Shimbo, Daichi

    2014-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring offers the ability to collect blood pressure readings several times an hour across a 24-hour period. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring facilitates the identification of white-coat hypertension, the phenomenon whereby certain individuals who are not on antihypertensive medication show elevated blood pressure in a clinical setting but show non-elevated blood pressure averages when assessed by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Additionally, readings ca...

  18. Ambulatory anesthesia: optimal perioperative management of the diabetic patient

    OpenAIRE

    Polderman JAW; van Wilpe R; Eshuis JH; Preckel B; Hermanides J

    2016-01-01

    Jorinde AW Polderman, Robert van Wilpe, Jan H Eshuis, Benedikt Preckel, Jeroen Hermanides Department of Anaesthesiology, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands Abstract: Given the growing number of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and the growing number of surgical procedures performed in an ambulatory setting, DM is one of the most encountered comorbidities in patients undergoing ambulatory surgery. Perioperative management of ambulatory patients wi...

  19. Determining resource intensity weights in ambulatory chemotherapy related to nursing workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Esther; Preyra, Colin; Stewart, Janice; McLennan, Cindy; Bland, Rosemary; Dus, Tamara; Langhorn, Marcia; Beattie, Kathy; Cheung, Annie; Hertz, Sherrie; Sechter, Haim; Burns, Judy; Angus, Helen; Sawka, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Ontario cancer programs aim to deliver high-quality nursing care and treatment that is safe for patients and staff. The reality of health care is that financial constraints, inherent in the delivery of care, require that funding mechanisms count not only the cost of drugs, but factors such as pharmacy and nursing human resource costs. While some organizations have developed patient classification systems to measure nursing intensity and workload, these systems apply primarily to inpatient populations, and are fraught with numerous challenges, such as the need for nurses to document to justify the workload required for care. The purpose of this paper is to outline the methodology and engagement of nurses to develop regimen-based resource intensity weights that can be applied to ambulatory chemotherapy suites. The methodology included determination of workload related to nursing time to prepare, teach, counsel and assess patients, as well as time to gather supplies, access lines, monitor, manage adverse reactions, manage symptoms and document care. Resource intensity weights provide better measures of the complexity of care required by cancer patients in ambulatory settings.

  20. Volume of Cataract Surgery and Surgeon Gender: The Florida Ambulatory Surgery Center Experience 2005 Through 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Dustin D; Margo, Curtis E; Campbell, Robert R; Greenberg, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    Cataract is the most common surgically reversible cause of vision loss and the most common major surgical procedure performed in the United States. To understand how gender composition might affect differences in health services, we examined the surgeon gender-specific rates of routine cataract surgery performed in ambulatory surgical centers in Florida. Routine cataract surgeries were identified through the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA) ambulatory surgery center dataset. The background of individual surgeons was determined by linking license numbers in the dataset to physician profiles publicly available from AHCA. From 2005 through 2012, women ophthalmologists in Florida performed roughly half the annual rate of cataract surgery as their male counterparts. This difference is not explained by greater time in clinical practice for men. Further investigation into the causes of this gender-volume disparity is warranted to determine what roles choice and barriers may play.

  1. Perceptions and experiences of allopathic health practitioners on collaboration with traditional health practitioners in post-apartheid South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon M. Nemutandani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The indigenous health system was perceived to be a threat to the allopathic health system. It was associated with ‘witchcraft’, and actively discouraged, and repressed through prohibition laws. The introduction of the Traditional Health Practitioners Act No 22 of 2007 brought hope that those centuries of disrespect for traditional health systems would change. The study examined the perceptions and experiences of allopathic health practitioners on collaboration with traditional health practitioners in post-apartheid South Africa.Methods: Qualitative descriptive research methodology was used to collect data from allopathic health practitioners employed by Limpopo’s Department of Health. In-depth focus group discussions and meetings were conducted between January and August 2014. Perceptions and experiences of working with traditional health practitioners were explored. Ethical clearance was obtained from the University of Pretoria and approval from the Department’s Research Committee.Results: Dominant views were that the two health systems were not compatible with respect to the science involved and the source of knowledge. Overall, quality of health care will be compromised if traditional health practitioners are allowed to work in public health facilities.Conclusion: Allopathic health practitioners do not appear ready to work with traditional health practitioners, citing challenges of quality of health care, differences regarding concept of sciences and source of knowledge; and lack of policy on collaboration. Lack of exposure to traditional medicine seems to impede opportunities to accept and work with traditional healers. Exposure and training at undergraduate level regarding the traditional health system is recommended. Policy guidelines on collaborations are urgently required.

  2. Perceptions and experiences of allopathic health practitioners on collaboration with traditional health practitioners in post-apartheid South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Stephen J.; Mulaudzi, Mavis F.

    2016-01-01

    Background The indigenous health system was perceived to be a threat to the allopathic health system. It was associated with ‘witchcraft’, and actively discouraged, and repressed through prohibition laws. The introduction of the Traditional Health Practitioners Act No 22 of 2007 brought hope that those centuries of disrespect for traditional health systems would change. The study examined the perceptions and experiences of allopathic health practitioners on collaboration with traditional health practitioners in post-apartheid South Africa. Methods Qualitative descriptive research methodology was used to collect data from allopathic health practitioners employed by Limpopo’s Department of Health. In-depth focus group discussions and meetings were conducted between January and August 2014. Perceptions and experiences of working with traditional health practitioners were explored. Ethical clearance was obtained from the University of Pretoria and approval from the Department’s Research Committee. Results Dominant views were that the two health systems were not compatible with respect to the science involved and the source of knowledge. Overall, quality of health care will be compromised if traditional health practitioners are allowed to work in public health facilities. Conclusion Allopathic health practitioners do not appear ready to work with traditional health practitioners, citing challenges of quality of health care, differences regarding concept of sciences and source of knowledge; and lack of policy on collaboration. Lack of exposure to traditional medicine seems to impede opportunities to accept and work with traditional healers. Exposure and training at undergraduate level regarding the traditional health system is recommended. Policy guidelines on collaborations are urgently required. PMID:27380856

  3. Conceptual and methodological aspects in the study of hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions Aspectos conceituais e metodológicos no estudo das hospitalizações por condições sensíveis à atenção primária

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fúlvio Borges Nedel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hospitalization rates for Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions have been used to assess effectiveness of the first level of health care. From a critical analysis of related concepts, we discuss principles for selecting a list of codes and, taking the example of the Brazilian Family Health Program, propose a methodological pathway for identifying variables in order to inform statistical models of analysis. We argue that for the indicator to be comparable between regions, disease codes should be selected based on sensitivity and specificity principles, not on observed disease frequency. Rates of hospitalization will be determined, at a distal level, by the socio-economic environment and their effect on the social and demographic structure. Timely and effective care depends on the organization of health services, their availability and access barriers, which depend on the ways health and related technology are conceptualised and on their adherence to the biomedical model or to the Primary Health Care (PHC principles; performance indicators of the health system will be the proximal determinants. This indicator is potentially useful for primary care evaluation. The historical reconstruction of PHC improves the analysis of the indicator variability.As taxas de hospitalização por condições sensíveis à atenção primária são um indicador da efetividade do primeiro nível de atenção à saúde. Partindo de breve revisão crítica, este artigo discute princípios para a seleção de códigos de internação por essas causas e, com o exemplo do Programa Saúde da Família, propõe um modelo teórico para a seleção de variáveis para análise estatística. A comparabilidade inter-regional do indicador depende da seleção de códigos de doenças baseada em princípios de sensibilidade e especificidade, não na frequência da doença. As taxas de hospitalização serão distalmente determinadas pela situação socioeconômica e seu efeito sobre a

  4. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nurses, or APNs) have a master's degree in nursing (MS or MSN) and board certification in their ... Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) and through local hospitals or nursing schools. Also, many doctors share office space with ...

  5. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is a big part of the pediatric NP's role. Pediatric and family practice NPs can treat acute ( ... Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) and through local hospitals or nursing schools. Also, many doctors share office space with ...

  6. A Librarian Consultation Service Improves Decision-Making and Saves Time for Primary Care Practitioners. A Review of: McGowan, Jessie, William Hogg, Craig Campbell, and Margo Rowan. “Just-in-Time Information Improved Decision-Making in Primary Care: A Randomized Controlled Trial.” PLoS ONE 3.11 (2008: e3785. 10 Mar 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Ganshorn

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives – To determine whether a point-of-care librarian consultation service for primary care practitioners (PCPs improves the quality of PCPs’ decision-making; saves PCPs time; reduces the number of point-of-care questions that go unanswered due to time constraints; and is cost-effective. Overall PCP satisfaction with the service was also assessed.Design – Randomized controlled trial.Setting – Four Family Health Networks (FHNs and 14 Family Health Groups (FHGs in Ontario, Canada. These represent new models for primary care service delivery in Ontario.Subjects – PCPs working within the selected FHNs and FHGs. The majority of these were physicians, but the sample also contained one resident, one nurse, and four nurse-practitioners.Methods – Subjects were trained in the use of a Web-based query form or mobile device to submit their point-of-care questions electronically. They were also trained in query formulation using PICO (patient, intervention, comparison, and outcome. Allocation was concealed by an independent company hired to manage data for the project. Participants were not randomized; rather the questions were randomized using a random-number generator. To ensure blinding of the librarians, all questions submitted were answered by a librarian. Answers to questions in the intervention group were relayed by a third party to the practitioner within minutes. Answers to the questions in the control group were not communicated to the physician. Blinding of the PCP subjects was not possible, as they either received or did not receive an answer. Subjects were asked to respond to a questionnaire 24 hours after submitting their question. If the question was in the control group, subjects were asked to indicate whether they had let the question remain unanswered or pursued an answer on their own. In order to assess cognitive impact of both librarian-provided information and self-sought information, respondents were asked to rate

  7. Utilization of lean management principles in the ambulatory clinic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Jessica T; Brinton, Thomas S; Gonzalez, Chris M

    2009-03-01

    The principles of 'lean management' have permeated many sectors of today's business world, secondary to the success of the Toyota Production System. This management method enables workers to eliminate mistakes, reduce delays, lower costs, and improve the overall quality of the product or service they deliver. These lean management principles can be applied to health care. Their implementation within the ambulatory care setting is predicated on the continuous identification and elimination of waste within the process. The key concepts of flow time, inventory and throughput are utilized to improve the flow of patients through the clinic, and to identify points that slow this process -- so-called bottlenecks. Nonessential activities are shifted away from bottlenecks (i.e. the physician), and extra work capacity is generated from existing resources, rather than being added. The additional work capacity facilitates a more efficient response to variability, which in turn results in cost savings, more time for the physician to interact with patients, and faster completion of patient visits. Finally, application of the lean management principle of 'just-in-time' management can eliminate excess clinic inventory, better synchronize office supply with patient demand, and reduce costs.

  8. The effectiveness of psychosocial interventions delivered by general practitioners.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huibers, M.J.H.; Beurskens, A.J.H.M.; Bleijenberg, G.; Schayck, C.P. van

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many patients visit their general practitioner (GP) because of problems that are psychosocial in origin. However, for many of these problems there is no evidence-based treatment available in primary care, and these patients place time-consuming demands on their GP. Therefore, GPs could b

  9. General practitioner knowledge, skills and attitudes to eating disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Doherty, Sally; McNamee, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Given that general practitioners are perfectly placed to detect eating disorders this summer research study aimed to examine general practitioners’ knowledge, skills and attitudes towards eating disorders. The study aimed to compile a national picture of the diagnosis, referral practices, and management of eating disorders in primary care in Ireland.

  10. An Ambulatory Program for Surgical Residents and Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Margaret

    1988-01-01

    A pilot program based in a freestanding ambulatory surgery center at the Chicago Medical School Department of Surgery is described, its curriculum outlined, and the daily activities of the residents and medical students are detailed. A brief history of ambulatory surgery is given. (Author/MLW)

  11. Cooperative m-learning with nurse practitioner students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Tami H; Krauskopf, Patricia B; Gaylord, Nan M; Ward, Andrew; Huffstutler-Hawkins, Shelley; Goodwin, Linda

    2010-01-01

    New technologies give nurse academicians the opportunity to incorporate innovative teaching-learning strategies into the nursing curricula. Mobile technology for learning, or m-learning, has considerable potential for the nursing classroom but lacks sufficient empirical evidence to support its use. Based on Mayer's multimedia learning theory, the effect of using cooperative and interactive m-learning techniques in enhancing classroom and clinical learning was explored. The relationship between m-learning and students' learning styles was determined through a multimethod educational research study involving nurse practitioner students at two mid-Atlantic universities. During the 16-month period, nurse practitioner students and their faculty used personal digital assistants (PDAs) to participate in various m-learning activities. Findings from focus group and survey responses concluded that PDAs, specifically the Pocket PC, are useful reference tools in the clinical setting and that all students, regardless of learning style, benefited from using PDAs. It was also demonstrated that connecting students with classmates and other nurse practitioner students at distant universities created a cooperative learning community providing additional support and knowledge acquisition. The authors concluded that in order to successfully prepare nurse practitioner graduates with the skills necessary to function in the present and future health care system, nurse practitioner faculty must be creative and innovative, incorporating various revolutionary technologies into their nurse practitioner curricula.

  12. Quality assessment of private practitioners in rural Wardha, Maharashtra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganguly Enakshi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the quality of care provided by private practitioners in rural areas of Wardha district. Methodology: The study was carried out in three primary health centres of Wardha district. 20% of the 44 registered private practitioners were selected randomly for the study. The data was collected using checklist through direct observation for the infrastructure. Assessment of quality of services delivered, 10 consecutive patients were observed and also the medical practitioner was interviewed. Supplies and logistics were assessed through observation. Results: All the facilities were sheltered from weather conditions and 90% had adequate waiting space. But, drinking water and adequate IEC material was available in only 20% facilities. Complete history taking and relevant physical examination was done in only 20% cases. Only 20% practitioners recorded blood pressure and 30% recorded temperature in cases with fever. Provisional diagnosis was not written in any of the case and only 20% explained prescription to the patients. Conclusion: There is considerable scope to improve the quality of services of private practitioners. To achieve this quality assurance programs may be initiated along with the training of private medical practitioners.

  13. Effectiveness of oncogenetics training on general practitioners' consultation skills: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwink, E.J.; Muijtjens, A.M.M.; Teeffelen, S.R. van; Henneman, L.; Rethans, J.J.; Jagt, L.E. van der; Luijk, S.J. van; Dinant, G.J.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Cornel, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: General practitioners are increasingly called upon to deliver genetic services and could play a key role in translating potentially life-saving advancements in oncogenetic technologies to patient care. If general practitioners are to make an effective contribution in this area, their geneti

  14. Tuberculosis management practices by private practitioners in Andhra Pradesh, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanta Achanta

    Full Text Available SETTING: Private medical practitioners in Visakhapatnam district, Andhra Pradesh, India. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate self-reported TB diagnostic and treatment practices amongst private medical practitioners against benchmark practices articulated in the International Standards of Tuberculosis Care (ISTC, and factors associated with compliance with ISTC. DESIGN: Cross- sectional survey using semi-structured interviews. RESULTS: Of 296 randomly selected private practitioners, 201 (68% were assessed for compliance to ISTC diagnostic and treatment standards in TB management. Only 11 (6% followed a combination of 6 diagnostic standards together and only 1 followed a combination of all seven treatment standards together. There were 28 (14% private practitioners who complied with a combination of three core ISTC (cough for tuberculosis suspects, sputum smear examination and use of standardized treatment. Higher ISTC compliance was associated with caring for more than 20 TB patients annually, prior sensitization to TB control guidelines, and practice of alternate systems of medicine. CONCLUSION: Few private practitioners in Visakhapatnam, India reported TB diagnostic and treatment practices that met ISTC. Better engagement of the private sector is urgently required to improve TB management practices and to prevent diagnostic delay and drug resistance.

  15. CAM practitioners in the Australian health workforce: an underutilized resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Sandra

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CAM practitioners are a valuable but underutilizes resource in Australian health care. Despite increasing public support for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM little is known about the CAM workforce. Apart from the registered professions of chiropractic, osteopathy and Chinese medicine, accurate information about the number of CAM practitioners in the workforce has been difficult to obtain. It appears that many non-registered CAM practitioners, although highly qualified, are not working to their full capacity. Discussion Increasing public endorsement of CAM stands in contrast to the negative attitude toward the CAM workforce by some members of the medical and other health professions and by government policy makers. The marginalisation of the CAM workforce is evident in prejudicial attitudes held by some members of the medical and other health professions and its exclusion from government policy making. Inconsistent educational standards has meant that non-registered CAM practitioners, including highly qualified and competent ones, are frequently overlooked. Legitimising their contribution to the health workforce could alleviate workforce shortages and provide opportunities for redesigned job roles and new multidisciplinary teams. Priorities for better utilisation of the CAM workforce include establishing a guaranteed minimum education standard for more CAM occupation groups through national registration, providing interprofessional education that includes CAM practitioners, developing courses to upgrade CAM practitioners' professional skills in areas of indentified need, and increasing support for CAM research. Summary Marginalisation of the CAM workforce has disadvantaged those qualified and competent CAM practitioners who practise evidence-informed medicine on the basis of many years of university training. Legitimising and expanding the important contribution of CAM practitioners could alleviate projected health

  16. 76 FR 6572 - Non-Ambulatory Disabled Veal Calves and Other Non-Ambulatory Disabled Livestock at Slaughter...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-07

    ... inspection regulations to prohibit the slaughter of non-ambulatory disabled pigs, sheep, goats, and other... the mother's colostrum, iron deficient diets, intensive confinement, and lack of activity, result in... to require that non- ambulatory disabled pigs, sheep, goats, and other amenable livestock species...

  17. General practitioners and neurotelemedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, M T; Paiva, T; Jesuino, J C; Magalhães, M

    2000-01-01

    Predicting attitudes towards teleconsultation systems and intentions of use is crucial at the beginning of the implementation phase, due to the critical role of human factors in its acceptance and continuous utilisation. The main objective of this study was to assess and understand GP's attitudes and intentions towards using the teleconsultation system in Neurology, implemented in Lisbon, between Hospital de Santa Maria/Neurology Outpatient Clinic and the Health Care Centers of its Health Unit. The final aim is the promotion of a wide acceptance and utilisation of the system, through the development of adequate communication strategies. A predictive model "Theory of Reasoned Action" was chosen as method. It was operated with the application of a questionnaire to a sample of 53 GP's, developed from the results of a content analysis of 10 interviews. A total of 44 GP's stated that, probably they will use the system, 5 were neutral and 4 probably will not use it. The responses were submitted to factor and multiple regression analysis. Attitude was determined by only one factor "Accessibility and Quality" (b = 0.486; p = 0.007) from the 5 factors obtained. The intention variance was explained in 26.9% by the attitude and subjective norm. However, only the attitudinal factor (b = 0.469; p = 0.002) contributes significantly to its explanation with no significant influence from the subjective norm. GP's intentions towards using the system are very positive. Nevertheless, there are significant differences between the centers that are participating and not participating in the project. Communication strategies envisaging dissemination and generalised acceptance and utilisation should focus on accessibility and quality of care aspects.

  18. A Call for School Counseling Practitioner Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaffenberger, Carol J.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the repeated call to increase the number of practitioner research manuscripts being published in counseling publications, practitioner research accounts for less than five percent of all manuscripts published. This article describes the challenges faced by practitioners seeking to publish their research, defines practitioner research, and…

  19. Ambulatory blood pressure values in healthy children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paripović Dušan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM is an important tool in the diagnosis and management of childhood hypertension. Normal ambulatory blood pressure (ABP values in children with body heights between 100 and 120 cm have not been reported. The aim of the study was to establish the normal range of values for ABPM in these children. 24-hour ABPM was performed in 40 normotensive (auscultatory casual blood pressure was obtained before ABPM subjects, aged from 4 to 6 years (26 males, 14 females with body heights between 95 and 125 cm. ABPM was carried out on non-dominant arm using the oscillometric device (SpaceLab 90207 with appropriate cuff size. The monitor was programmed to measure BP every 15 min. during the day (6 a.m. to 10 p.m. and every 30 min. during the night (10 p.m. to 6 a.m.. The mean daytime SBP/DBP in boys and girls was 108+/-6/67+/-5 and 105+/-5/66+/-1, respectively. The mean nighttime SBP/DBP in boys and girls was 98+/-6/56+/-5 and 97+/-7/56+/-4, respectively. There was a significant difference between day and night readings of SBP, DBP and heart rate (nocturnal fall was observed. The distribution of ABP noted in this study could serve as preliminary reference. A multicenter study should be performed to provide normal ranges of ABP.

  20. Respiratory functions in Kalaripayattu practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, C Kesava; Nair, R Harikumaran; Shashidhar, S

    2004-04-01

    Kalaripayattu, an ancient traditional martial art form of Kerala, is considered as the basis for all martial arts viz. Karate, Kungfu, etc. physiological studies are more concentrated on Karate, Kungfu and other martial arts due to their global acceptance. Considering the limited knowledge available regarding the physiological profiles of Kalaripayattu practitioners, the present study was taken up for filling the lacunae in the field. Lung function tests were carried out in ten Kalari practitioners. Residual volume was measured by indirect method. Higher lung volumes and flow rates were achieved in Kalari practitioners compared to age and height-matched controls. Better mechanical factors and lower airway resistance influenced during Kalari practice might have benefited in improving hung volumes and flow rates.

  1. PRACTITIONERS OF DESIGN FOR QUALITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robotham, Antony John

    1999-01-01

    Building in high quality continues to be the driving force of new product development activity in industry. Yet Design for Quality does not appear to attract the attention or interest of many design researchers. If research attention is not paid to Design for Quality, how can we expect to educate...... and train future design practitioners to master this critical dimension of product development?The purpose of this paper is to consider the current status of Design for Quality, explore the skills designers require to be effective practitioners of Design for Quality, and to identify some of the challenges...... the design research community needs to face.The paper argues that Design for Quality provides a robust framework, which can be used by the industrial, research, and educational communities as a platform for improving the skills and capability of the practitioners of Design for Quality.If engineering...

  2. Ambulatory Patient Groups. An Evaluation for Military Health Care Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Cerebrovascular Events 737 Headache 738 Central Nervous System Diseases Except TIA, CVA, and Headache EYE DISEASES 751 Cataracts 752 Refraction Disorder 753...Child Neglect V6124 V6120 Suspected Child Abuse V6125 V6121 Confirmed Child Abuse V6126 V6121 Non- Accidental Trauma V6180 V618 Other Specified Family...Occlusion of Cerebral Arteries 435 4359 Transient Cerebral Ischemia 43591 4359 Trans lschemic Attck w/Neuro Def (Rine) 4361 436 Cerebrovascular Accident

  3. Air Force Aerospace Medicine Enterprise Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    2 28.57 - - - - - - 1 100.00 Distortion Product Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions 1 7.14 - - 1 100.00... DME and supplies 400 7.68 34 7.67 57 13.73 62 14.76 41 10.41 28 8.83 27 10.00 27 7.12 22 4.26 48 7.66 54 3.79 Traction, splints, and other wound...5.66 52 7.41 59 6.99 153 5.49 DME and supplies 484 6.35 41 7.50 69 12.90 75 15.09 53 10.71 43 10.89 30 9.17 30 6.06 25 3.56 59 6.99 59 2.12

  4. Biofilm models for the practitioner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgenroth, Eberhard Friedrich; van Loosdrecht, M. C. M.; Wanner, O.

    2000-01-01

    Even though mathematical biofilm models are extensively used in biofilm research, there has been very little application of these models in the engineering practice so far. However, practitioners would be interested in models that can be used as tools to control plant operation under dynamic...... conditions or to help them handle complex interactions between particle removal, carbon oxidation, nitrification, denitrification and biological phosphorus removal. But even though there is a whole range of biofilm models available, it is difficult for the practitioner to select the appropriate modeling...

  5. Toxicology for the Equine Practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dissi, Ahmad

    2015-08-01

    A wide variety of toxins cause diseases in the horse and are investigated routinely by veterinarians and veterinary pathologists to identify the cause of illness and death. A complete investigation involves performing a thorough necropsy and requires macroscopic and microscopic examination of lesions and a variety of laboratory testing to obtain an accurate diagnosis. The identification of gross lesions by equine practitioners is often the first step in formulating a diagnostic plan. This article provides a description of selected common toxins producing detectable gross lesions in horses in North America. The article is useful to equine practitioners and veterinary pathologists investigating a toxicology-related death.

  6. Effects of creatine supplementation in taekwondo practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Manjarrez-Montes de Oca

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Taekwondo (TKD is a combat sport, which has also been proposed as a fitness program, with a strong anaerobic component. Creatine (Cr supplementation is used to improve both anaerobic exercise performance and body composition. Therefore, Cr supplementation could be beneficial in TKD. Aims: To determine the effect of Cr supplementation (50 mg/kg body wt on body composition, anaerobic power and blood chemistry in young male TKD practitioners. Methods: Ten male TKD practitioners (age [20 ± 2 yr], height [1.69 ± 0.06 m], and mass [67 ± 9.8 kg] participated in a placebo-controlled, double blind, crossover study. Body composition (DEXA, anaerobic power (Wingate Test, blood lactate and blood chemistry were measured before and after supplementation. Differences between data before and after supplementation were calculated for each treatment (Cr and Placebo and were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: Fat mass (kg decreased after placebo (Mdn [IqR] = -0.75 [-1.44 to 0.03] and increased following Cr intake (0.17 [-0.77 to 1.13] kg (Z = 2.191, p < 0.028, r = 0.49. Serum triglyceride concentration (mg/mL increased after Cr (45.00 [-7.50 to 75.00] and decrease with placebo (-7.00 [-10.75 to 12.00] (Z = 2.090, p < 0.037, r = 0.47. No changes were found in others parameters. Conclusion: Cr supplementation may increase fat mass and serum triglycerides concentration in young male TKD practitioners without improvement in anaerobic power. Cr supplementation appears to be safe, but athletes should be careful when they want to loss fat.

  7. Assessment of antibiotic prescribing in Latvian general practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumpis Uga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Though general antibiotic consumption data is available, information on the actual patterns of prescribing antibiotics locally is difficult to obtain. An easy to use methodology was designed to assess ambulatory management of infections by Latvian general practitioners (GPs. Methods GPs were asked to record data in a patient data collection form for every patient that received antibiotics. Study period – (7 days one week in November, 2008. Data recorded included the following details: an antibiotic, the prescribed dose, dosing interval, route of administration combined with the demographic factors of the patient and clinical diagnosis based on a pre-defined list. Results Two hundred forty eight forms out of the 600 (41% were returned by post. Antibiotics were prescribed in 6.4% (1711/26803 of outpatient consultations. In total, 1763 antibiotics were prescribed during the study period. Ninety seven percent of the patients received monotherapy and only 47 (2.7% patients were prescribed two antibiotics. The most commonly prescribed antibiotics were amoxicillin (33.9% of prescribed, amoxicillin/clavulanate (18,7% and clarithromycin (7.6%. The most commonly treated indications were pharyngitis (29.8%, acute bronchitis (25.3% and rhinosinusitis (10.2%. Pneumonia was mostly treated with amoxicillin/clavulanate (25,7%, amoxicillin (15.7% and clarithromycin (19.3%. Conclusions Methodology employed provided useful additional information on ambulatory practice of prescribing antibiotics and could be used in further assessment studies. Educational interventions should be focused on treatment of acute pharyngitis and bronchitis in children and unnecessary use of quinolones in adults for uncomplicated urinary tract infection.

  8. Marginal ambulatory teaching cost under varying levels of service utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panton, D M; Mushlin, A I; Gavett, J W

    1980-06-01

    The ambulatory component of residency training jointly produces two products, namely, training and patient services. In costing educational programs of this type, two approaches are frequently taken. The first considers the total costs of the educational program, including training and patient services. These costs are usually constructed from historical accounting records. The second approach attempts to cost the joint products separately, based upon estimates of future changes in program costs, if the product in question is added to or removed from the program. The second approach relates to typical decisions facing the managers of medical centers and practices used for teaching purposes. This article reports such a study of costs in a primary-care residency training program in a hospital outpatient setting. The costs of the product, i.e., on-the-job training, are evaluated using a replacement-cost concept under different levels of patient services. The results show that the cost of the product, training, is small at full clinical utilization and is sensitive to changes in the volume of services provided.

  9. Computer database of ambulatory EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakar, P B; Brusse, E; Patrick, J P; Shwedyk, E; Seshia, S S

    1987-01-01

    The paper describes an ambulatory EEG database. The database contains segments of AEEGs done on 45 subjects. Each epoch (1/8th second or more) of AEEG data has been annotated into 1 of 40 classes. The classes represent background activity, paroxysmal patterns and artifacts. The majority of classes have over 200 discrete epochs. The structure is flexible enough to allow additional epochs to be readily added. The database is stored on transportable media such as digital magnetic tape or hard disk and is thus available to other researchers in the field. The database can be used to design, evaluate and compare EEG signal processing algorithms and pattern recognition systems. It can also serve as an educational medium in EEG laboratories.

  10. [Ambulatory ureteral lithotripsy with "Modulith SL-20"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Enguita, C; Calahorra Fernández, F J; García de la Peña, E; Rodríguez-Miñón Cifuentes, J L; Vela Navarrete, R

    1993-03-01

    Analysis of our experience in 'in situ' ambulatory shockwave extracorporeal lithofragmentation of ureteral stones in 104 patients seen in the Lithotrity Unit, Urology Service, Fundación "Jiménez Díaz". Using Modulith SL 20, a third generation lithotripter, 'in situ' disintegration was achieved in 82.69% of cases, 51.92% of which were fragmented in a single lithotrity session. As a first choice, no ureteral handling was used in any of the patients prior to lithotrity. In 9.62% of patients it was necessary to place a 'double J' by-pass catheter, due to the disease presenting with a septic picture. The patient's position was either dorsal or ventral decubitus depending on the lithiatic site, while location and focusing of the stones was done radiologically. All patients were treated ambulatory without hospitalization. Only 18% was given oral or i.v. anaesthesia. Fursemide 40 mg was administered to all patients shortly before starting the session. Each patient received an average of 3,200 shockwaves per session (14-18 Kv, average 16 Kv). Haematuria was the single and modest side effect that happened during the 24 hours following lithofragmentation in 30% of patients, while 20% reported slight discomfort at the time of eliminating the gritted stones. We conclude stating that 'in situ' shockwave extracorporeal lithotrity of ureteral stones with Modulith SL 20 allows for elective disintegration of ureteral stones in whatever location they are found, due to the patient's easy positioning. The simple location and focusing of ureteral stones has allowed us to treat and solve some cases of ureteral lithiasis at the precise moment of the nephritic colic painful emergency, thus speeding up and facilitating the resolution of the condition. Our results and our strategy imply a new change of direction in the management of these lithiasis, as opposed to the well established and historical doctrines in existence regarding stones with ureteral location.

  11. CHALLENGES FACING THE ESP PRACTITIONER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIMION MINODORA OTILIA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The ESP teacher has to face certain challenges in his profession: One of the biggest challenges of the ESP teacher is the fact that he/she lacks the necessary knowledge of the subject to teach Business English, for instance, some researchers believing that such courses should be taught by subject teachers. The task of teaching ESP by ESL teachers is not an easy one. Dudley- Evans and St. John pointed out its complexity, identifying five key roles of the ESP practitioner: teacher, course designer and materials provider, collaborator, researcher and evaluator and this is probably the biggest challenge of the profession. The ESP practitioner has also to be aware of the fact that using a foreign language for workplace or study purposes requires not only linguistic proficiency and knowledge but also knowledge of work –related and disciplinary concepts.Last but not least, another challenge for the ESP practitioner is the use of technology in class, a valuable tool for helping with traditional forms of teaching and for creating new forms of communicating.Thus, the ESP practitioner has many things in common with the teacher of general English: he has to be familiar with linguistic development and teaching theories ,he has to be aware of contemporary ideas related to his position and role and he has to become familiar with the new technologies which can be used to improve his methodology.However,his role is more complex than that of a General English teacher.

  12. Clinical reporting: the practitioner's responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauser, W W

    1980-08-01

    Information contained in a clinical report represents new directions in the practice of physical therapy and provides the stimulus for reseach and growth in the profession. The responsibility of the practitioner to share information on problems and solutions generated in the practice of physical therapy is of paramount importance. A clinical report is one method by which this information can be disseminated.

  13. The National Practitioner Data Bank: the first 4 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshel, R E; Croft, T; Rodak, J

    1995-01-01

    The National Practitioner Data Bank became operational September 1, 1990, as a flagging system to identify health care practitioners who may have been involved in incidents of medical incompetence. Query volumes have grown substantially over the Data Bank's first 4 years of operation. The greatest increase has come in the number of voluntary queries. By the end of 1994, the Data Bank had processed more than 4.5 million requests for information on practitioners, more than 1.5 million of which were received in 1994 alone. The proportion of queries for which the Data Bank contains information on the practitioner in question has grown as the Data Bank has come to contain more reports. During 1994, 7.9 percent of queries were matched. The Data Bank contained more than 97,500 reports at the end of 1994. More than 82 percent of the reports concerned malpractice payments. Licensure reports made up the bulk of the rest. Physicians predominate in reports, accounting for slightly more than 76 percent of the total. The remainder are related to dentists (16 percent) and all other types of practitioners (8 percent). Since reporting of adverse actions is mandatory only for physicians and dentists, the proportion of reports attributable to these types of practitioners is higher than it would be if adverse action reporting requirements were uniform for all practitioners. State malpractice payment rates and adverse action rates vary widely, but a State's rate in any given year is highly correlated with its rate in any other year. State malpractice rates are not strongly correlated with adverse action rates, neither are the rates for physicians strongly correlated with those for dentists. There is a weak tendency for States with smaller physician populations to have higher levels of licensure and privileging actions.

  14. [Family practice diagnosis of patients with venous diseases in relation to severity, diagnosis and practice facilities. Results of the ASAM study "Physician status and factor evaluation study of ambulatory patient management"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopmann, M; Klein-Lange, M; Busse, R; Schwartz, F W; Weber, J

    1996-01-01

    Although venous diseases are very common and represent frequent reasons for consultations in general practices, little is known about the actual ambulatory care for these patients. In a sentinel network consisting of general practitioners, 385 contacts with patients suffering from venous diseases (64% with varicose veins, 24% with phlebitis and 11% with ulcers) were documented. In 9% of the cases, the functional disability was "severe". The diagnostic procedures included laboratory tests in 23%, ECG in 11%, Doppler sonography in 8% and X-ray or angiography in 5%. The frequency of these diagnostic procedures correlated significantly with the degree of severity. The probability of a Doppler sonography in practices with ultrasound equipment compared to practices without it, was-stratified for the degree of severity, the unequal distribution of diseases and the level of acquaintance with the patient-between 2.2 and 2.6 (p always < 0.05), the probability of laboratory tests between 2.4 and 2.6 (p always < 0.001). This significant dependence of diagnostic procedures from the available equipment calls for the introduction of diagnostic standards as measures of quality assurance even for so-called trivial diseases.

  15. The Effect of Physician Delegation to Other Health Care Providers on the Quality of Care for Geriatric Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, Brian J.; Reuben, David B.; Karlamangla, Arun S.; Han, Weijuan; Roth, Carol P.; Wenger, Neil S.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES to examine the effects of delegation on quality of care that patients receive for three common geriatric conditions: dementia, falls, and incontinence. DESIGN pooled analysis of 8 the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE) projects from 1998 to 2010. SETTING 15 ambulatory practice sites across the United States PARTICIPANTS 4,776 patients age ≥ 65 years, of mixed demographic backgrounds who participated in ACOVE studies. INTERVENTION multivariate analysis of prior ACOVE observation and intervention studies was conducted, with in addition to two retrospectively defined variables: “intent to delegate” and “maximum delegation” for each ACOVE quality indicator (QI). MEASUREMENTS The primary outcome for the study was QI pass probability, by level of delegation, for 47 ACOVE quality indicators. RESULTS A total of 4,776 patients were evaluated, with 16,204 QIs included for analysis. Across all studies, QI pass probabilities were 0.36 for physician-performed tasks; 0.55 for nurse practitioner (NP), physician assistant (PA), and registered nurse (RN)-performed tasks; and 0.61 for medical assistant (MA), or licensed vocational nurse (LVN)-performed tasks. In multiply adjusted models, the independent pass-probability effect of delegation to NPs, PAs, or RNs was 1.37 (p = 0.055) CONCLUSIONS Delegation to non-physician providers is associated with higher quality of care for geriatric conditions in community practices and supports the value of interdisciplinary team management for common outpatient conditions among older adults. PMID:26480977

  16. 北京市社区卫生服务机构非中医全科医生和防保人员的中医素养及培训需求调查%Attainment of TCM and the Demand for TCM Training Among non - TCM General Practitioners and Prevention and Health Care Staff in Community Health Service Settings in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘钢; 赵京

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the attainment of TCM and the demand for TCM training among non - TCM general practitioners and prevention and health care staff in community health service settings in Beijing,in order to provide references for the formulation of relevant policies by governmental departments. Methods Using random number table method, we randomly selected 3 to 6 community health service centers from each of 16 districts/ counties of Beijing,and at last 62 community health service centers were selected. We randomly selected one community health service station from each of the 62 centers and selected all together 62 community health service stations. From the selected stations,all non - TCM general practitioners and prevention and health care staff were enrolled by cluster sampling method. From July 16 to August 16 in 2014, questionnaire survey was conducted. The questionnaire had two versions for general practitioners and prevention and health care staff,and the content covered basic information,the attainment of TCM and the demand for TCM training. Results The score of TCM attainment of non - TCM general practitioners was(67. 74 ± 13. 55),and the scores of four dimensions of TCM attainment, namely cognition of appropriate technology for TCM,cognition of policy for TCM,cognition of clinical knowledge of TCM and cognition of elementary theory of TCM,were(39. 09 ± 22. 61),(46. 18 ± 35. 31),(95. 92 ± 10. 80)and(72. 95 ± 27. 25) respectively. There were significant differences in the score of TCM attainment among general practitioners with different educational degrees and between general practitioners that had attended ″ the training on the rational use of Chinese patent medicine for general practitioners in Beijing″ and general practitioners who had not attended that(P < 0. 05). The score of TCM attainment of non - TCM prevention and health care staff was(50. 09 ± 23. 07),and the scores of three dimensions of TCM attainment,namely cognition of TCM

  17. Choosing Your Prenatal Care Provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on midwives. A family nurse practitioner (also called FNP) is a nurse with special education and training ... care of every member of your family. An FNP can take care of you during pregnancy and ...

  18. Computerized adaptive testing--ready for ambulatory monitoring?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Matthias; Bjørner, Jakob; Fischer, Felix

    2012-01-01

    Computerized adaptive tests (CATs) have abundant theoretical advantages over established static instruments, which could improve ambulatory monitoring of patient-reported outcomes (PROs). However, an empirical demonstration of their practical benefits is warranted....

  19. Ambulatory Pessary Trial Unmasks Occult Stress Urinary Incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Chughtai

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion. An ambulatory pessary trial is an effective, easy, and inexpensive method to approximate anatomic results achieved by surgery under real-life conditions. In our series, 20% of patients with occult SUI were identified by pessary trial alone.

  20. Healthcare information technology and medical-surgical nurses: the emergence of a new care partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, An'Nita; Fisher, Kathleen

    2012-03-01

    Healthcare information technology in US hospitals and ambulatory care centers continues to expand, and nurses are expected to effectively and efficiently utilize this technology. Researchers suggest that clinical information systems have expanded the realm of nursing to integrate technology as an element as important in nursing practice as the patient or population being served. This study sought to explore how medical surgical nurses make use of healthcare information technology in their current clinical practice and to examine the influence of healthcare information technology on nurses' clinical decision making. A total of eight medical surgical nurses participated in the study, four novice and four experienced. A conventional content analysis was utilized that allowed for a thematic interpretation of participant data. Five themes emerged: (1) healthcare information technology as a care coordination partner, (2) healthcare information technology as a change agent in the care delivery environment, (3) healthcare information technology-unable to meet all the needs, of all the people, all the time, (4) curiosity about healthcare information technology-what other bells and whistles exist, and (5) Big Brother is watching. The results of this study indicate that a new care partnership has emerged as the provision of nursing care is no longer supplied by a single practitioner but rather by a paired team, consisting of nurses and technology, working collaboratively in an interdependent relationship to achieve established goals.

  1. Creating Quality Online Materials for Specialty Nurse Practitioner Content: Filling a Need for the Graduate Nurse Practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Rosemary L; Klein, Sara Jo; Rosenzweig, Margaret Q

    2016-01-18

    Nurse practitioners are entering specialized areas of practice immediately after graduation from nurse practitioner (NP) education and certification and are finding employment in specialized areas such as oncology. Rapidly achieving a knowledge base in this highly specialized area of medicine coupled with the stress of the new nurse practitioner role can lead to a very difficult orientation and transition period. There are several methods to provide specialized education to NPs during their orientation period. Unfortunately, limitations such as a lack of motivated mentors, limited opportunities to practice the desired skill set or a lack of structure in regards to curriculum quality, and the learning needs of the new nurse hinder the NP's transition to practice. In response to either inadequate or non-standardized orientation to the specialty role of the oncology NP (ONP), a web-enhanced educational tool, funded through the National Cancer Institute, was developed for use in the USA: Oncology Nurse Practitioner Web Education Resource (ONc-PoWER). The development of ONc-PoWER was based upon essential education for NPs new to cancer care, adult learning theory, Bloom's Taxonomy, and foundations of quality online education. The five interactive web-based modules provide specialized education for the nurse practitioner new to oncology along with an on-site mentor to assist the NP in applying the course content to clinical practice.

  2. Pros and cons of the ambulatory surgery center joint venture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    If a physician group has determined that it has a realistic patient base to establish an ambulatory surgery center, it may be beneficial to consider a partner to share the costs and risks of this new joint venture. Joint ventures can be a benefit or liability in the establishment of an ambulatory surgery center. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of a hospital physician-group joint venture.

  3. Nurse practitioner prescribing: an international perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong J

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Jacqueline Fong,1,2 Thomas Buckley,2 Andrew Cashin3 1St George Hospital, Kogarah, 2Sydney Nursing School, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia; 3School of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW, Australia Background: Internationally, the delivery of care provided by nurses and midwives has undergone a significant change due to a variety of interrelated factors, including economic circumstances, a diminishing number of medical providers, the unavailability of adequate health care services in underserved and rural areas, and growing specialization among the professions. One solution to the challenges of care delivery has been the introduction of nurse practitioners (NPs and the authorization of NPs to prescribe medicines. Aim: The aim of this paper was to review the current international literature related to NP prescribing and compare the findings to the Australian context. The review focuses on literature from the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. Methods: Databases were searched from January 2000 to January 2015. The following keywords: “nurse practitioner”, “advanced nurse”, “advanced practice nurse”, “prescri*”, “Australia”, “United States America”, “UK”, “New Zealand”, “Canada”, “Europe”, “drug prescri*”, “prescri* authority”, and “prescri* legislation” were used. Findings: NPs tend to prescribe in differing contexts of practice to provide care in underserved populations and require good systems literacy to practice across complex systems. The key themes identified internationally related to NP prescribing relate to barriers to prescribing, confidence in prescribing, and the unique role of NPs in prescribing medicines, eg, the high prevalence of prescribing pain medicines in several countries, including Australia. Conclusion: Across all countries reviewed, there appears a need for further research into the organizational and

  4. Teamwork in obstetric critical care

    OpenAIRE

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Segel, Sally

    2008-01-01

    Whether seeing a patient in the ambulatory clinic environment, performing a delivery or managing a critically ill patient, obstetric care is a team activity. Failures in teamwork and communication are among the leading causes of adverse obstetric events, accounting for over 70% of sentinel events according to the Joint Commission. Effective, efficient and safe care requires good teamwork. Although nurses, doctors and healthcare staff who work in critical care environments are extremely well t...

  5. Statistical literacy for clinical practitioners

    CERN Document Server

    Holmes, William H

    2014-01-01

    This textbook on statistics is written for students in medicine, epidemiology, and public health. It builds on the important role evidence-based medicine now plays in the clinical practice of physicians, physician assistants and allied health practitioners. By bringing research design and statistics to the fore, this book can integrate these skills into the curricula of professional programs. Students, particularly practitioners-in-training, will learn statistical skills that are required of today’s clinicians. Practice problems at the end of each chapter and downloadable data sets provided by the authors ensure readers get practical experience that they can then apply to their own work.  Topics covered include:   Functions of Statistics in Clinical Research Common Study Designs Describing Distributions of Categorical and Quantitative Variables Confidence Intervals and Hypothesis Testing Documenting Relationships in Categorical and Quantitative Data Assessing Screening and Diagnostic Tests Comparing Mean...

  6. Faculty development for community practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, T G

    1996-12-01

    Developing the academic skills of the individuals who will serve as educators and role models in the community is critical to pediatric resident education in community settings. The main focus of any faculty development program must be on teaching, although for a subset of individuals, the development of research skills should also be a consideration. The three key elements that must be considered for an effective faculty development program include: (1) creating a culture of mutual respect between full-time and community faculty; (2) basing the program on sound principles of education theory, especially adult learning theory, using appropriately trained faculty; and (3) establishing ongoing institutional financial and philosophical support. Effectively addressing these elements should create a faculty development program that will help the community practitioner become an effective role model and practitioner- preceptor-educator.

  7. Nurse practitioner succession planning: forward thinking or just an after-thought?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, Chris

    2013-11-01

    This paper examines the concept of backfill and succession planning for an elite speciality nursing group, nurse practitioners. Nurse practitioners work in many public, private, inpatient and outpatient settings across the country. This discussion is relevant to all practicing nurse practitioners, but especially those with their own specific patient group. A nurse practitioner is an elite nursing specialist with specific speciality skills. While present, nurse practitioners can be most effective at holistically managing their patient group. However, if an endorsed nurse practitioner is no longer present, for a short or long interval, their specific skills and abilities cannot be easily substituted or replaced in the short term. This potential compromise in patient care can be detrimental to the developing reputation of the role of the nurse practitioner. In order to address the shortage of specifically skilled nurse practitioners across the country in all specialties, there is a need to forward plan and consider contingencies for succession in the event of short- or long-term absences from the clinical environment. Succession planning is the key to patient safety and the successful implementation of the role of the nurse practitioner.

  8. Risk perception for paragliding practitioners.

    OpenAIRE

    Paixão, Jairo Antônio da; Tucher, Guilherme

    2012-01-01

    As an adventure sport, paragliding exposes participants to different levels of life risk. However, the boundary between calculated risk and real risk is a subtle one, depending on the practitioner’s perception. Thus, this study aimed to analyze risk perception of 73 paragliding practitioners. The descriptive-exploratory study method was used. Data was col-lected via a questionnaire validated according to the Delphi technique. Variables were evaluated from a bipolar Likert type scale, ranging ...

  9. Software engineering a practitioner's approach

    CERN Document Server

    Pressman, Roger S

    1997-01-01

    This indispensable guide to software engineering exploration enables practitioners to navigate the ins and outs of this rapidly changing field. Pressman's fully revised and updated Fourth Edition provides in-depth coverage of every important management and technical topic in software engineering. Moreover, readers will find the inclusion of the hottest developments in the field such as: formal methods and cleanroom software engineering, business process reengineering, and software reengineering.

  10. Family nurse practitioner clinical competencies in alcohol and substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talashek, M L; Gerace, L M; Miller, A G; Lindsey, M

    1995-02-01

    The prevalence of substance use among patients presenting to primary health care settings mandates clinical competency in the area for nurse practitioners (NPs). An educational intervention with an evaluation component is described. The effect of incorporating substance use content into a Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) curriculum was tested with a convenience sample of 16 FNP students and 8 practicing NPs. Students' knowledge increased significantly; however, differences in students' and practicing NPs' knowledge did not reach significance. Students' clinical competency increased significantly, as demonstrated by standardized patient clinical evaluations, and was significantly better than the practicing NPs in the skill domains of evaluation and record keeping. Educational intervention can improve NP identification of substance-abusing patients in primary health care settings.

  11. The efficacy of ginger added to ondansetron for preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting in ambulatory surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragnadyuti Mandal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV frequently hampers implementation of ambulatory surgery in spite of so many costly antiemetic drugs and regimens. Objective: The study was carried out to compare the efficacy of ginger (Zingiber officinale added to Ondansetron in preventing PONV after ambulatory surgery. Materials and Methods: It was a prospective, double blinded, and randomized controlled study. From March 2008 to July 2010, 100 adult patients of either sex, aged 20-45, of ASA physical status I and II, scheduled for day care surgery, were randomly allocated into Group A[(n = 50 receiving (IV Ondansetron (4 mg and two capsules of placebo] and Group B[(n = 50 receiving IV Ondansetron (4 mg and two capsules of ginger] simultaneously one hour prior to induction of general anaesthesia (GA in a double-blind manner. One ginger capsule contains 0.5 gm of ginger powder. Episodes of PONV were noted at 0.5h, 1h, 2h, 4h, 6h, 12h and 18h post- operatively. Statistical Analysis and Results: Statistically significant difference between groups A and B (P < 0.05, was found showing that ginger ondansetron combination was superior to plain Ondansetron as antiemetic regimen for both regarding frequency and severity. Conclusion: Prophylactic administration of ginger and ondansetron significantly reduced the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting compared to ondansetron alone in patients undergoing day care surgery under general anaesthesia.

  12. Facilitating Ambulatory Electronic Health Record System Implementation: Evidence from a Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Scheck McAlearney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ambulatory care practices have increasing interest in leveraging the capabilities of electronic health record (EHR systems, but little information is available documenting how organizations have successfully implemented these systems. Objective. To characterize elements of successful electronic health record (EHR system implementation and to synthesize the key informants' perspectives about successful implementation practices. Methods. Key informant interviews and focus groups were conducted with a purposive sample of individuals from US healthcare organizations identified for their success with ambulatory EHR implementation. Rigorous qualitative data analyses used both deductive and inductive methods. Results. Participants identified personal and system-related barriers, at both the individual and organization levels, including poor computer skills, productivity losses, resistance to change, and EHR system failure. Implementation success was reportedly facilitated by careful planning and consistent communication throughout distinct stages of the implementation process. A significant element of successful implementation was an emphasis on optimization, both during “go-live” and, subsequently, when users had more experience with the system. Conclusion. Successful EHR implementation requires both detailed planning and clear mechanisms to deal with unforeseen or unintended consequences. Focusing on user buy-in early and including plans for optimization can facilitate greater success.

  13. Drawing on International Experiences to Build General Practitioner System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu; Chang

    2015-01-01

    stablished in 1849,the Royal Dutch Medical Association seeks to promote the academic research and development in medical care to provide high-quality service.At the invitation of the CPAFFC,a 25-member RDMA delegation visited Beijing from March 15 to 20 for in-depth discussions on the general practitioner system with China’s National Health and Family Planning Commission,Beijing Municipal Health and Family Planning Commission,Peking University Health E

  14. Canine aggression toward people: a guide for practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueda, Karen Lynn C; Malamed, Rachel

    2014-05-01

    This article reviews the various causes of human-directed aggression in dogs and provides a step-by-step plan guiding the general practitioner through history taking, behavior observations, diagnosis, consultation, treatment, and follow-up care. Charts summarizing how to obtain behavioral information, the client's management options, treatment recommendations, diagnosis and treatment of human-directed aggression, and the clinician's role in preventing human-directed aggression are included. A graphic illustration of canine body language is also provided.

  15. Introduction to health economics for the medical practitioner

    OpenAIRE

    Kernick, D

    2003-01-01

    Against a background of increasing demands on limited resources, health economics is exerting an influence on decision making at all levels of health care. Health economics seeks to facilitate decision making by offering an explicit decision making framework based on the principle of efficiency. It is not the only consideration but it is an important one and practitioners will need to have an understanding of its basic principles and how it can impact on clinical decision making. This article...

  16. Variation in general practitioners' information-seeking behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Videbæk Le, Jette; Pedersen, Line Bjørnskov; Riisgaard, Helle

    2016-01-01

    from this study indicate that GP characteristics should be taken into consideration when disseminating scientific medical information, to ensure that patients receive medically updated, high-quality care. KEY POINTS Research indicates that information-seeking behaviour is associated with GP......OBJECTIVE: To assess general practitioners' (GPs') information-seeking behaviour and perceived importance of sources of scientific medical information and to investigate associations with GP characteristics. DESIGN: A national cross-sectional survey was distributed electronically in December 2013...

  17. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis: Indian scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Georgi; Mathew, Milli; Hinduja, Anish; Padma, G

    2002-03-01

    Chronic peritoneal dialysis (CPD) has been initiated as a treatment modality for chronic renal failure patients in the Indian subcontinent since 1990. Over a period of 9 years both continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) and continuous cyclic peritoneal dialysis (CCPD) have emerged as accepted forms of renal replacement therapy in our country. Although there were government restrictions on import of dialysis fluid until 1993, the availability of locally manufactured fluid in collapsible bags had facilitated the expansion of the programme to the far corners of the country and in neighbouring countries. Initially majority (78%) of the patients who were started on this programme were diabetics with other comorbid conditions who were drop-outs from haemodialysis and unfit for transplantation. Both CAPD and CCPD have been used for all age groups and for men and women. Majority of the patients do 3 x 2 l exchanges a day on CAPD; 8-10 l using a cycler at night those who are onCCPD. Peritonitis rate was 1 episode every 18 patient months. With the introduction of new connection and disposable sets the incidence of peritonitis is dropping down. The major cause of drop-out is cardiovascular death followed by peritonitis. Malnutrition is a major problem in both CAPD and haemodialysis patients. The programme has been expanded and there are over one thousand patients on this treatment in the country. The introduction of CPD had a major impact on the treatment of renal failure in India.

  18. Video-conferencing: under-used by rural general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Anske

    2002-01-01

    The objective was to investigate the use of and value General Practitioners place on video-conferencing as a tool in providing rural health care. The participants were 8 rural general practitioners in rural Victoria towns. I found that six out of the eight GPs did not value video-conferencing as a tool to assist with patient care, and the other two GPs were interested in the technology only for certain aspects of support with patient consultations and continuing education. In conclude that there needs to be a review of whether video-conferencing equipment should continue to be implemented in the same way that it has been so far in Victoria, and of the cost-effectiveness of providing video-conferencing facilities in rural health services. In particular, there needs to be a review of whether more training and support for rural general practitioners is needed to increase the uptake of video-conferencing. Alternatively, analysis can be undertaken of the intrinsic value of using video-conferencing as an interactive tool for obtaining specialist support for patient care or undertaking continuing education via video-conferencing, and the program discontinued if it is found to be unwarranted.

  19. Cuff inflation during ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and heart rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Skov-Madsen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Mia Skov-Madsen, My Svensson, Jeppe Hagstrup ChristensenDepartment of Nephrology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, DenmarkIntroduction: Twenty four-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is a clinically validated procedure in evaluation of blood pressure (BP. We hypothesised that the discomfort during cuff inflation would increase the heart rate (HR measured with 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring compared to a following HR measurement with a 24-h Holter monitor.Methods: The study population (n = 56 were recruited from the outpatient’s clinic at the Department of Nephrology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital at Aalborg, Denmark. All the patients had chronic kidney disease (CKD. We compared HR measured with a 24-h Holter monitor with a following HR measured by a 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring.Results: We found a highly significant correlation between the HR measured with the Holter monitor and HR measured with 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (r = 0.77, p < 0.001. Using the Bland-Altman plot, the mean difference in HR was only 0.5 beat/min during 24 hours with acceptable limits of agreement for both high and low HR levels. Dividing the patients into groups according to betablocker treatment, body mass index, age, sex, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor treatment, statins treatment, diuretic treatment, or calcium channel blocker treatment revealed similar results as described above.Conclusion: The results indicate that the discomfort induced by cuff inflation during 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring does not increase HR. Thus, 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring may be a reliable measurement of the BP among people with CKD.Keywords: ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, Holter monitoring, heart rate, chronic kidney disease, hypertension

  20. The Paediatric Ambulatory Consulting Service (PACS) program: a role for family pediatricians in the hospital emergency rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigri, Luigi; Piazzolla, Ruggiero; Pettoello-Mantovani, Massimo; Giardino, Ida; Abbinante, Micaela; Gorgoni, Giovanni

    2016-02-25

    This paper describes the Paediatric Ambulatory Consulting Service (PACS) project, developed by ASL-BT (Azienda Sanitaria Locale, Barletta-Andria-Trani), an Italian regional Public Health Centers network, in response to the current global situation of economic distress.PACS consist in integrating existing public health care services that are independently provided by hospitals and the Primary Care Paediatrics network. It has been developed with the aim to establish innovative yet efficient managerial solutions able to rationalize the resources not weakening the quality of services provided to the population.

  1. Ambulatory anesthesia in plastic surgery: opportunities and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Facque AR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Alexander R Facque, Peter J Taub Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, USA Abstract: In 2013, there were 17 million procedures performed by plastic and reconstructive surgeons in the United States in the private office or ambulatory “surgicenter” setting, as well as additional operations performed in hospitals on an outpatient basis. As interest in performing increasingly complex surgical procedures on an outpatient basis continues to grow, the surgeon and anesthesiologist alike must be prepared to offer safe and reliable anesthesia and analgesia in the ambulatory setting. Surgeons must be aware of the possible techniques that will be employed in their surgeries in order to anticipate and prepare patients for possible postoperative side effects, and anesthesiologists must be prepared to offer such techniques in order to ensure a relatively rapid return to normal activity despite potentially having undergone major surgery. The following is a review of the specific considerations that should be given to ambulatory plastic surgery patients with comments on recent developments in the techniques used to safely administer agreeable and effective anesthesia. Keywords: ambulatory surgery, cosmetic anesthesia, outpatient, ambulatory anesthesia

  2. Content Development for 72,000 Learners: An Online Learning Environment for General Practitioners: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilat, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Increasing workload due to reduced numbers of general practitioners, a population boom and an aging population has increased the need for accessible distance learning for the UK's primary care doctors. The Royal College of General Practitioners is now in its eighth year of delivering high quality e-learning to 72,000 registered users via its…

  3. Análise situacional do atendimento ambulatorial prestado a recém-nascidos egressos das unidades de terapia intensiva neonatais no Estado do Rio de Janeiro Situational analysis of outpatient care for newborns discharged from neonatal intensive care units in the State of Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dalva Barbosa Baker Méio

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available A diminuição da mortalidade neonatal contribui para o aumento de crianças que necessitam de maior atenção em relação a morbidades clínicas e à evolução do desenvolvimento neuropsicomotor. O objetivo deste estudo foi discutir a situação da assistência às crianças egressas das Unidades de Terapia Intensiva Neonatais (UTIN em cinco unidades em diferentes regiões do Estado do Rio de Janeiro; em nenhuma havia informações sobre o perfil dos egressos da UTIN. Evidenciou-se restrição ao acesso e baixa estruturação da rede em relação à assistência prestada a esses bebês. Não há uniformidade no atendimento prestado, e ambulatórios específicos para essa população concentram-se na cidade do Rio de Janeiro. Constatou-se deficiência de profissionais nas áreas de reabilitação - fisioterapia motora, terapia ocupacional, fonoaudiologia e psicologia -, e de especialistas para atendimento oftalmológico adequado e para a criança portadora de deficiência auditiva. Os autores discutem possíveis explicações para essa situação, propondo a organização de um sistema de atendimento em graus de complexidade para poder viabilizar o acesso das crianças de risco a um atendimento diferenciado, importante para detecção precoce de anormalidades do desenvolvimento.The decrease in neonatal mortality contributes for the increase of children needing more attention to clinical morbidities and to neuro-psycho-motor development outcome. The objective of this study was to discuss the situation of care of children discharged from the Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU in five units from differents regions of the state of Rio de Janeiro. In none of them were found informations regarding the description of those discharged from the NICU. This study revealed restricted access and scarcy organization of the health network for the care of these babies. The care provided is not uniform, with a concentration of specific outpatient clinics for

  4. Survey shows consumers open to a greater role for physician assistants and nurse practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, Michael J; Pankow, Stacie; Erikson, Clese; Shipman, Scott

    2013-06-01

    Impending physician shortages in the United States will necessitate greater reliance on physician assistants and nurse practitioners, particularly in primary care. But how willing are Americans to accept that change? This study examines provider preferences from patients' perspective, using data from the Association of American Medical Colleges' Consumer Survey. We found that about half of the respondents preferred to have a physician as their primary care provider. However, when presented with scenarios wherein they could see a physician assistant or a nurse practitioner sooner than a physician, most elected to see one of the other health care professionals instead of waiting. Although our findings provide evidence that US consumers are open to the idea of receiving care from physician assistants and nurse practitioners, it is important to consider barriers to more widespread use, such as scope-of-practice regulations. Policy makers should incorporate such evidence into solutions for the physician shortage.

  5. Is it economically viable to employ the nurse practitioner in general practice?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dierick-van Daele, Angelique; Steuten, Lotte M.G.; Romeijn, Aria; Derckx, Emmy W.C.C.; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background:  General practitioners face the challenging task of finding the most efficient and effective mix of professionals in general practice to accommodate future care demands within scarce health care budgets. To enable informed decision-making about skill mix issues, economic information is n

  6. Ambulatory laparoscopic cholecystectomy: A single center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cagri Tiryaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the demographic and clinical parameters affecting the outcomes of ambulatory laparoscopic cholecystectomy (ALC in terms of pain, nausea, anxiety level, and satisfaction of patients in a tertiary health center. Materials and Methods: ALC was offered to 60 patients who met the inclusion criteria. Follow-up (questioning for postoperative pain or discomfort, nausea or vomiting, overall satisfaction was done by telephone contact on the same day at 22:00 p.m. and the first day after surgery at 8: 00 a.m. and by clinical examination one week after operation. STAI I and II data were used for proceeding to the level of anxiety of patients before and/or after the operation. Results: Sixty consecutive patients, with a mean age of 40.6 ± 8.1 years underwent ALC. Fifty-five (92% patients could be sent to their homes on the same day but five patients could not be sent due to anxiety, pain, or social indications. Nausea was reported in four (6.7% cases and not associated with any demographic or clinical features of patients. On the other hand, pain has been reported in 28 (46.7% cases, and obesity and shorter duration of gallbladder disease were associated with the increased pain perception (P = 0.009 and 0.004, respectively. Preopereative anxiety level was significantly higher among patients who could not complete the ALC procedure (P = 0.018. Conclusion: Correct management of these possible adverse effects results in the increased satisfaction of patients and may encourage this more cost-effective and safe method of laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

  7. [Certification of an ambulatory gastroenterologic service fulfilling ISO Law 9001--criteria and national guidelines of the Gastroenterologic Association].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkner, B

    2000-09-01

    The objectives of certification and accreditation are the deployment and examination of quality improvement measures in health care services. The quality management system of the ISO 9001 is created to install measures and tools leading to assured and improved quality in health care. Only some experiences with certification fulfilling ISO 9001 criteria exist in the German health care system. Evidence-based clinical guidelines can serve as references for the development of standards in quality measurement. Only little data exists on the implementation strategy of guidelines and evaluation, respectively. A pilot quality management system in consistence with ISO 9001 criteria was developed for ambulatory, gastroenterological services. National guidelines of the German Society of Gastroenterology and Metabolism and the recommendations of the German Association of Physicians for quality assurance of gastrointestinal endoscopy were included in the documentation and internal auditing. This pilot quality management system is suitable for the first steps in the introduction of quality management in ambulatory health care. This system shows validity for accreditation and certification of gastrointestinal health care units as well.

  8. Delegation of GP-home visits to qualified practice assistants: assessment of economic effects in an ambulatory healthcare centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleßa Steffen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Against the background of a decreasing number of general practitioners (GPs in rural regions in Germany, the AGnES-concept (AGnES = GP-supporting, community-based, e-health-assisted, systemic intervention supports the delegation of regular GP-home visits to qualified practice assistants. The concept was implemented and evaluated in different model projects in Germany. To explore the economic effects of this concept, the development of the number of home visits in an ambulatory healthcare centre was analysed and compared with the number of home visits in the surrounding county. Methods Information about GP-home visits was derived from reimbursement data of the ambulatory healthcare centre and a statutory health insurance. Information about home visits conducted by AGnES-practice assistants was collected from the project documentation over a time period of 12 consecutive quarter years, four quarter years before the beginning of the project and 8 quarter years while the project was implemented, considering background temporal trends on the population level in the study region. Results Within the ambulatory healthcare centre, the home visits by the GPs significantly decreased, especially the number of medically urgent home visits. However, the overall rate of home visits (conducted by the GPs and the AGnES-practice assistants together did not change significantly after implementation of the AGnES-concept. In the surrounding county, the home visit rates of the GPs were continuous; the temporal patterns were approximately equal for both usual and urgent home visits. Conclusion The results of the analyses show that the support by AGnES-practice assistants led to a decrease of GP-home visits rather than an induction of additional home visits by the AGnES-practice assistants. The most extended effect is related to the medically urgent home visits rather than to the usual home visits.

  9. Pediatric ambulatory blood pressure monitoring: indications and interpretations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Joseph T; Urbina, Elaine M

    2012-06-01

    The prevalence of hypertension in children and adolescents is increasing, especially in obese and ethnic children. The adverse long-term effects of hypertension beginning in youth are known; therefore, it is important to identify young patients who need intervention. Unfortunately, measuring blood pressure (BP) is difficult due to the variety of techniques available and innate biologic variation in BP levels. Ambulatory BP monitoring may overcome some of the challenges clinicians face when attempting to categorize a young patient's BP levels. In this article, the authors review the use of ambulatory BP monitoring in pediatrics, discuss interpretation of ambulatory BP monitoring, and discuss gaps in knowledge in usage of this technique in the management of pediatric hypertension.

  10. Programa Saúde da Família e condições sensíveis à atenção primária, Bagé (RS Programa Salud de la Familia y condiciones sensibles a la atención primaria, Sur de Brasil Family Health Program and ambulatory care-sensitive conditions in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fúlvio Borges Nedel

    2008-12-01

    familia, ser usuaria del Programa Salud de la Familia, consulta médica en la emergencia en el mes anterior a la investigación y hospital de internación; b hombres: rango de edad, haber sufrido otra internación en el año anterior a la entrevista y el hospital de internación. CONCLUSIONES: Las condiciones sensibles a la atención primaria permiten identificar grupos carentes de atención a la salud adecuada. A pesar de que el estudio no permita hacer inferencias sobre el riesgo de internación, los análisis por sexo y modelo de atención sugieren que el programa Salud de la Familia es más equitativo que la atención básica tradicional.OBJECTIVE: Ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACSC are health problems managed by actions at the first level of care. The need for hospitalization by these causes is avoidable through an effective and proper primary health care. The objective of the study was to estimate ACSC among patients hospitalized by the Sistema Único de Saúde (Brazilian Health System. METHODS: Hospital-based cross-sectional study involving 1,200 inhabitants of Bagé (Southern Brazil who were inpatients between September/2006 and January/2007. The patients answered a questionnaire applied by interviewers and were classified according to the model of attention utilized prior to hospitalization. ACSC were defined in a workshop promoted by the Ministry of Health. The variables analyzed included demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, health and health services utilized. Multivariate analysis was conducted by the Poisson model, according to a hierarchical conceptual framework, stratified by sex and model of care. RESULTS: ACSC accounted for 42.6% of the hospitalizations. The probability that the main diagnosis for hospitalization is considered an ACSC is greater among women, children under five years of age, individuals with less then five years of schooling, hospitalization in the year prior to the interview, emergency room consultation, and being an

  11. Nurse Practitioner Autonomy and Satisfaction in Rural Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spetz, Joanne; Skillman, Susan M; Andrilla, C Holly A

    2016-01-29

    Rural primary care shortages may be alleviated if more nurse practitioners (NPs) practiced there. This study compares urban and rural primary care NPs (classified by practice location in urban, large rural, small rural, or isolated small rural areas) using descriptive analysis of the 2012 National Sample Survey of NPs. A higher share of rural NPs worked in states without physician oversight requirements, had a DEA (drug enforcement administration) number, hospital admitting privileges, and billed using their own provider identifier. Rural NPs more often reported they were fully using their NP skills, practicing to the fullest extent of the legal scope of practice, satisfied with their work, and planning to stay in their jobs. We found lower per capita NP supply in rural areas, but the proportion in primary care increased with rurality. To meet rural primary care needs, states should support rural NP practice, in concert with support for rural physician practice.

  12. Abordagem ambulatorial do nutricionista em anemia hemolítica Nutritional ambulatory approach in hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Vieira

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Descreve a atuação do nutricionista em ambulatório de Hematologia Pediátrica em um hospital escola e relata as condutas dietéticas necessárias na abordagem de crianças com anemia hemolítica com e sem sobrecarga de ferro, e também as atitudes mais freqüentes dos familiares em relação à alimentação desses pacientes.The Authors describe the performance of the Dietitian in a Pediatric Hematology Ambulatory. They emphasize the necessary dietetic procedures for adequate management of children with hemolytic anemia, with and without iron overload. Furthermore, they approach the family's attitude towards the patient's nutrition.

  13. How to successfully select and implement electronic health records (EHR in small ambulatory practice settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Detmer Don E

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adoption of EHRs by U.S. ambulatory practices has been slow despite the perceived benefits of their use. Most evaluations of EHR implementations in the literature apply to large practice settings. While there are similarities relating to EHR implementation in large and small practice settings, the authors argue that scale is an important differentiator. Focusing on small ambulatory practices, this paper outlines the benefits and barriers to EHR use in this setting, and provides a "field guide" for these practices to facilitate successful EHR implementation. Discussion The benefits of EHRs in ambulatory practices include improved patient care and office efficiency, and potential financial benefits. Barriers to EHRs include costs; lack of standardization of EHR products and the design of vendor systems for large practice environments; resistance to change; initial difficulty of system use leading to productivity reduction; and perceived accrual of benefits to society and payers rather than providers. The authors stress the need for developing a flexible change management strategy when introducing EHRs that is relevant to the small practice environment; the strategy should acknowledge the importance of relationship management and the role of individual staff members in helping the entire staff to manage change. Practice staff must create an actionable vision outlining realistic goals for the implementation, and all staff must buy into the project. The authors detail the process of implementing EHRs through several stages: decision, selection, pre-implementation, implementation, and post-implementation. They stress the importance of identifying a champion to serve as an advocate of the value of EHRs and provide direction and encouragement for the project. Other key activities include assessing and redesigning workflow; understanding financial issues; conducting training that is well-timed and meets the needs of practice staff

  14. Efficacy of a training intervention on the quality of practitioners' decision support for patients deciding about place of care at the end of life: A randomized control trial: Study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Mary Ann

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most people prefer home palliation but die in an institution. Some experience decisional conflict when weighing options regarding place of care. Clinicians can identify patients' decisional needs and provide decision support, yet generally lack skills and confidence in doing so. This study aims to determine whether the quality of clinicians' decision support can be improved with a brief, theory-based, skills-building intervention. Theory The Ottawa Decision Support Framework (ODSF guides an evidence based, practical approach to assist clinicians in providing high-quality decision support. The ODSF proposes that decisional needs [personal uncertainty, knowledge, values clarity, support, personal characteristics] strongly influence the quality of decisions patients make. Clinicians can improve decision quality by providing decision support to address decisional needs [clarify decisional needs, provide facts and probabilities, clarify values, support/guide deliberation, monitor/facilitate progress]. Methods/Design The efficacy of a brief education intervention will be assessed in a two-phase study. In phase one a focused needs assessment will be conducted with key informants. Phase two is a randomized control trial where clinicians will be randomly allocated to an intervention or control group. The intervention, informed by the needs assessment, knowledge transfer best practices and the ODSF, comprises an online tutorial; an interactive skills building workshop; a decision support protocol; performance feedback, and educational outreach. Participants will be assessed: a at baseline (quality of decision support; b after the tutorial (knowledge; and c four weeks after the other interventions (quality of decision support, intention to incorporate decision support into practice and perceived usefulness of intervention components. Between group differences in the primary outcome (quality of decision support scores will be analyzed

  15. Curricula and Organization of Primary Care Residencies in Internal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, John M.

    1980-01-01

    The organization and curricula of internal medicine residencies programs that emphasize primary care are described and compared with traditional residencies in internal medicine. It is noted that primary care residents spend more time in ambulatory care and are allowed more electives in specialties outside of internal medicine. Out-of-hospital…

  16. The integration of public health in European primary care systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kringos, D.S.; Bolibar, Y.; Bourgueil, T.; Cartier, T.; Dedeum, T.; Hasvold, A.; Hutchinson, M.; Lember, M.; Oleszczyk, D.; Rotar Pavlick, I.; Svab, P.; Tedeschi, A.; Wilson, S.; Wilm, A.; Windak, A.; Boerma, W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: A strong primary care (PC) system provides accessible, comprehensive care in an ambulatory setting on a continuous basis and by coordinated care processes. These features give PC the opportunity to play a key role in providing public health (PH) services to their practice population. Th

  17. Accuracy of patient's turnover time prediction using RFID technology in an academic ambulatory surgery center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand-Maillet, Florence; Debes, Claire; Garnier, Fanny; Dufeu, Nicolas; Sciard, Didier; Beaussier, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Patients flow in outpatient surgical unit is a major issue with regards to resource utilization, overall case load and patient satisfaction. An electronic Radio Frequency Identification Device (RFID) was used to document the overall time spent by the patients between their admission and discharge from the unit. The objective of this study was to evaluate how a RFID-based data collection system could provide an accurate prediction of the actual time for the patient to be discharged from the ambulatory surgical unit after surgery. This is an observational prospective evaluation carried out in an academic ambulatory surgery center (ASC). Data on length of stay at each step of the patient care, from admission to discharge, were recorded by a RFID device and analyzed according to the type of surgical procedure, the surgeon and the anesthetic technique. Based on these initial data (n = 1520), patients were scheduled in a sequential manner according to the expected duration of the previous case. The primary endpoint was the difference between actual and predicted time of discharge from the unit. A total of 414 consecutive patients were prospectively evaluated. One hundred seventy four patients (42%) were discharged at the predicted time ± 30 min. Only 24% were discharged behind predicted schedule. Using an automatic record of patient's length of stay would allow an accurate prediction of the discharge time according to the type of surgery, the surgeon and the anesthetic procedure.

  18. Determinants of Diabetes and Hypertension Control in Ambulatory Healthcare in Al Ain, United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latifa M. Baynouna

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available bjectives: This study aims to study determinants for the control of diabetes and hypertension in Al Ain Ambulatory Healthcare patients. Method: This is a cross sectional observational study of patients attending ambulatory healthcare centers in Al Ain, United Arab Emirates in 2009. From a yearly audit evaluating the care of patients with diabetes and hypertension, the determinants for improved diabetes and hypertension outcomes were identified from a total of 512 patients and its association with glycemic and blood pressure control were studied. Results: From all variables studied, only the clinic where the patient was treated helped predict both improved blood sugar and blood pressure control. For patients with diabetes, poor control the year before (p<0.001, the number of chronic disease clinic visits (p=0.042 and triglyceride levels (p=0.007 predicted worse control of diabetes. A predictor of poor control of blood pressure (p<0.001 for patients with hypertension was poor control of blood pressure in the year before. Conclusion: In this population, the healthcare system and the team played major roles as determinants in the control of patient’s diabetes and blood pressure more than any of the other factors examined.

  19. Ambulatory monitoring in the diagnosis and management of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Corral-Peñafiel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA is a highly prevalent disorder associated with complications such as arterial hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and traffic accidents. The resources allocated for OSA are insufficient and OSA is a significant public health problem. Portable recording devices have been developed for the detection of OSA syndrome and have proved capable of providing an equivalent diagnosis to in-laboratory polysomnography (PSG, at least in patients with a high pre-test probability of OSA syndrome. PSG becomes important in patients who have symptoms and certain comorbidities such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or stroke, as well as in patients with a clinical history suggesting a different sleep disorder. Continuous positive airway pressure is the most effective treatment in OSA. Ambulatory monitoring of the therapeutic modalities has been evaluated to enhance the care process and reduce costs compared to the conventional approach, without sacrificing efficiency. This review evaluates the role of portable monitoring devices in the diagnostic process of OSA and the search for alternative strategies based on ambulatory management protocols.

  20. Assessing the need for family nurse practitioners--the Florida experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, M V; Pierce, P M

    1989-01-01

    This article presents results of a descriptive study designed to assess the need for Family Nurse Practitioners (FNPs) in Florida. The need for FNPs was examined within the context of the current crisis in access to health care in the United States and in Florida, where unique features of the state's population and economy combined to create inequities in the health care system. Data were also collected related to the number of primary care agencies already employing nurse practitioners, the educational preparation of these nurses, and the likelihood of agency nurses enrolling in an FNP program if such a program were available. A ten-item questionnaire was mailed to nursing service administrators at 330 health care agencies involved in the delivery of primary care. Ninety-seven questionnaires were returned. Results from the study indicated that the agencies will require increased numbers of primary care providers in the next 5 years. Further, a minority of nurse practitioners are prepared at the Master's level in the surveyed agencies, suggesting a need for increased educational opportunities for nurses if they are to enter advanced practice. The study represents one approach to establishing needs for FNPs that might be used in other states both to develop educational programs and to influence legislators regarding health and nurse practitioner issues affecting access to care.

  1. Electrophysiological correlates of higher states of consciousness during sleep in long-term practitioners of the Transcendental Meditation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, L I; Alexander, C N; Travis, F T; Marsh, G; Orme-Johnson, D W; Gackenbach, J; Mason, D C; Rainforth, M; Walton, K G

    1997-02-01

    Standard ambulatory night sleep electroencephalograph (EEG) of 11 long-term practitioners of the Transcendental Meditation (TM) program reporting "higher states of consciousness" during sleep (the experimental group) was compared to that of nine short-term practitioners and 11 non-practitioners. EEG tracings during stages 3 and 4 sleep showed the experimental group to have: 1) theta-alpha activity simultaneously with delta activity and 2) decreased chin electromyograph (EMG) during deep sleep (p = 0.002) compared to short-term practitioners. Spectral analysis fast Fourier transform (FFT) data of the first three cycles showed that: 3) the experimental subjects had significantly greater theta 2 (6-8 Hz)-alpha 1 (8-10 Hz) relative power during stages 3 and 4 than the combined control groups [t(30) = 5.5, p = 0.0000008] with no difference in time in delta; 4) there was a graded difference across groups during stages 3 and 4 in theta 2-alpha 1 power, with experimentals having greater power than short-term practitioners, who in turn had greater power than non-practitioners [t(30) = 5.08, p = 0.00002]; and 5) experimentals also had increased rapid eye movement (REM) density during REM periods compared to short-term practitioners (p = 0.04). Previous studies have found increased theta-alpha EEG activity during reported periods of "transcendental consciousness" during the TM technique. In the Vedic tradition, as described by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, transcendental consciousness is the first of a sequence of higher states. The maintenance of transcendental consciousness along with deep sleep is said to be a distinctive criterion of further, stabilized higher states of consciousness. The findings of this study are interpreted as physiological support for this model.

  2. Quality indicators and performance measures in diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, David C

    2014-03-01

    The operations of any portion of the healthcare delivery system, eg, ambulatory care, the consultation and referral process, or hospital care, are critically dependent upon their control systems. The quality of health care produced by the system and its components is also subject to "control." One of the regulatory mechanisms involves performance measures. The development of good measures of quality is a complex and dynamic process. Within endocrinology, most measures have addressed diabetes care and most quality measurement in diabetes has focused on the ambulatory setting and mainly includes measures of process and intermediate outcomes. This review addresses quality and performance measures for diabetes, their development, characteristics, use, misuse, and future prospects.

  3. How experienced practitioners gain knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    An evolution in nursing in the United Kingdom in the 1970s from rule-bound toward holistic, autonomous practice engendered an examination of nursing's body of knowledge and how it is incorporated into practice. This article describes Barbara Carper's (1978) Fundamental Patterns of Knowing in Nursing (empiric, ethical, aesthetic, and personal knowledge), and links it to three major worldviews of the way in which knowledge is sought (positivism, naturalism, and critical social theory). Carper's model was used in the United Kingdom as the basis for a curriculum of structured reflective practice using workshops, journaling, and clinical supervision. An example from a practitioner's diary demonstrates how Carper's model informs reflection on an interaction with a patient with newly diagnosed cancer.

  4. Group supervision for general practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galina Nielsen, Helena; Sofie Davidsen, Annette; Dalsted, Rikke;

    2013-01-01

    AIM: Group supervision is a sparsely researched method for professional development in general practice. The aim of this study was to explore general practitioners' (GPs') experiences of the benefits of group supervision for improving the treatment of mental disorders. METHODS: One long...... considered important prerequisites for disclosing and discussing professional problems. CONCLUSION: The results of this study indicate that participation in a supervision group can be beneficial for maintaining and developing GPs' skills in dealing with patients with mental health problems. Group supervision......-established supervision group was studied closely for six months by observing the group sessions, and by interviewing GPs and their supervisors, individually and collectively. The interviews were recorded digitally and transcribed verbatim. The data were analysed using systematic text condensation. RESULTS: The GPs found...

  5. Influence of folk medicine on the family practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gums, J G; Carson, D S

    1987-02-01

    The practice of folk medicine in the United States is increasing. Awareness by the family practitioner is essential in order to effectively communicate and successfully recommend medical treatment to those patients who hold belief in these traditional practices. Root medicine is particularly thriving in the southeastern United States. The influx of refugees into the southern coastal states has introduced new concepts into traditional medical practices. Interaction with patients who are involved with traditional health care providers and the modern medical community occurs more frequently than may be appreciated by the physicians. This article is intended to increase physicians' knowledge of some of the basic philosophies and practices of folk medicine, particularly root medicine, and to provide some insight into the reasons why the practitioners of folk medicine can be strongly influential in the medical and psychologic concerns of patients who believe in the power of the supernatural.

  6. Parent perceptions of pediatric ambulatory surgery: using family feedback for program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voepel-Lewis, T; Andrea, C M; Magee, S S

    1992-04-01

    Pediatric ambulatory surgery programs have grown tremendously during the past decade. However, limited nursing time places severe constraints on the care and education of surgical outpatients. Preoperative teaching, patient support, and postoperative instruction, previously conducted over days, is now completed in several hours. The ambulatory surgical program at Mott Children's Hospital was designed to provide thorough patient and family education, comprehensive patient care, and short-term follow-up. A formal evaluation of the program was conducted to ensure quality care for outpatients. This study evaluated preoperative and discharge preparation, postoperative problems and follow-up, preoperative waiting, stress, and privacy. The sample was composed of 332 families. Of the respondents, 289 (87%) felt very prepared overall for outpatient surgery; 33 families (10%) attended the preoperative tour, and felt significantly better prepared for surgery than families who did not attend; 322 families (97%) felt adequately prepared to very prepared for discharge; 245 families (76%) felt that the recovery time was just right; 40 parents (12%) felt that their children experienced more pain and 34 (10.4%) more nausea and vomiting than expected postoperatively; 54 families called a PACU nurse postoperatively with questions, and 92% rated the call as very helpful; 31 families called the surgical service with concerns, and 61% rated the surgeon as helpful; 83 families (25%) perceived the outpatient experience as being very stressful. Stress correlated significantly with preoperative preparation, preoperative wait, previous outpatient experience, and perceived postoperative pain. Privacy in the environment was rated as fair to poor by 192 families (59%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Preoperative testing and risk assessment: perspectives on patient selection in ambulatory anesthetic procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stierer TL

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tracey L Stierer,1,2 Nancy A Collop3,41Department of Anesthesiology, 2Department of Critical Care Medicine, Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Department of Medicine, 4Department of Neurology, Emory University, Emory Sleep Center, Wesley Woods Center, Atlanta, GA, USAAbstract: With recent advances in surgical and anesthetic technique, there has been a growing emphasis on the delivery of care to patients undergoing ambulatory procedures of increasing complexity. Appropriate patient selection and meticulous preparation are vital to the provision of a safe, quality perioperative experience. It is not unusual for patients with complex medical histories and substantial systemic disease to be scheduled for discharge on the same day as their surgical procedure. The trend to “push the envelope” by triaging progressively sicker patients to ambulatory surgical facilities has resulted in a number of challenges for the anesthesia provider who will assume their care. It is well known that certain patient diseases are associated with increased perioperative risk. It is therefore important to define clinical factors that warrant more extensive testing of the patient and medical conditions that present a prohibitive risk for an adverse outcome. The preoperative assessment is an opportunity for the anesthesia provider to determine the status and stability of the patient’s health, provide preoperative education and instructions, and offer support and reassurance to the patient and the patient’s family members. Communication between the surgeon/proceduralist and the anesthesia provider is critical in achieving optimal outcome. A multifaceted approach is required when considering whether a specific patient will be best served having their procedure on an outpatient basis. Not only should the patient's comorbidities be stable and optimized, but details regarding the planned procedure and the resources available

  8. Atendimento ambulatorial individualizado versus programa de educação em grupo: qual oferece mais mudança de hábitos alimentares e de atividade física em crianças obesas? Individual outpatient care versus group education programs: which leads to greater change in dietary and physical activity habits for obese children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza D. de Mello

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar duas estratégias de manejo da obesidade infantil: atendimento ambulatorial (individual e programa de educação (em grupo. MÉTODO: Foram recrutados aleatoriamente crianças e adolescentes de 7 a 13 anos de idade, divididos em dois grupos: atendimento individual e atendimento em grupo. Foi criado um programa de educação em obesidade infantil, com encontros mensais que consistiam em aulas expositivas com a participação dos pais e trabalhos em grupos. Simultaneamente, o outro grupo era acompanhado individualmente em ambulatório. O acompanhamento ocorreu por 6 meses, sendo avaliados composição corporal, hábitos alimentares e atividade física, antes e depois das intervenções. RESULTADOS: A amostra foi constituída por 38 crianças e adolescentes com média de idade de 9,9 anos. O programa foi mais efetivo no aumento da atividade física (p = 0,003, especialmente caminhadas (p = 0,003, e na redução do colesterol total (p = 0,038. A redução do índice de massa corporal, do índice de obesidade e do consumo energético foi semelhante para os dois grupos. Quanto aos hábitos alimentares, o grupo acompanhado em ambulatório aumentou o consumo de frutas (p = 0,033 e hortaliças (p = 0,002 e reduziu o de salgadinho e batata frita (p = 0,041, enquanto o grupo que participou do programa reduziu o consumo de refrigerantes (p = 0,022, sanduíches, pizza e fast food (p = 0,006. CONCLUSÕES: Ambas as estratégias de manejo da obesidade infantil foram favoráveis a mudanças de hábitos alimentares e de atividade física. O atendimento em grupo, em um programa de educação em nutrição e saúde, foi tão ou mais efetivo que o atendimento individualizado em um ambulatório de referência, firmando-se como alternativa de tratamento à obesidade.OBJECTIVE: To compare two strategies for childhood obesity management: ambulatory assistance (individual and educational program (in group. METHOD: Children and adolescents from 7 to 13

  9. Cultural competence among nurse practitioners working with asylum seekers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suurmond, Jeanine; Seeleman, Conny; Rupp, Ines; Goosen, Simone; Stronks, Karien

    2010-11-01

    Asylum seekers often have complex medical needs. Little is known about the cultural competences health care providers should have in their contact with asylum seekers in order to meet their needs. Cultural competence is generally defined as a combination of knowledge about certain cultural groups, as well as attitudes towards and skills for dealing with cultural diversity. Given asylum seekers' specific care needs, it may be asked whether this set of general competences is adequate for the medical contact with asylum seekers. We explored the cultural competences that nurse practitioners working with asylum seekers thought were important. A purposive sample of 89 nurse practitioners in the Netherlands completed a questionnaire. In addition, six group interviews with nurse practitioners were also conducted. A framework analysis was used to analyse the data of the questionnaires and the interviews. From the analysis, several specific competences emerged, which were required for the medical contact with asylum seekers: knowledge of the political situation in the country of origin; knowledge with regard to diseases common in the country of origin; knowledge of the effects of refugeehood on health; awareness of the juridical context in the host country; ability to deal with asylum seekers' traumatic experiences; and skills to explain the host country's health care system. Apart from these cultural competences specific for the situation of asylum seekers, general cultural competences were also seen as important, such as the ability to use interpretation services. We conclude that insight into these cultural competences may help to develop related education and training for health care providers working with asylum seekers.

  10. Communication Matters: Exploring the Intersection of Family and Practitioner End of Life Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah M. Omilion-Hodges

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available After establishing a baseline understanding of some of the factors that influence and shape family end of life communication, empirical research centered on the communication tendencies of nationally-recognized palliative care clinicians is presented. Because death is no longer confined to the bedroom and individuals are increasingly turning to hospitals and health care institutes to assist with end of life, the role of palliative care practitioners is vital. To that end, common communication-rooted issues that may transpire among various medical personnel are explored. Focus on a shared underlying tension—care vs. cure—links the findings between family and palliative care clinician communication regarding end of life. Practical communication solutions and suggestions are offered to facilitate productive and mindful end of life communication between and among family members and health care practitioners.

  11. Mary Grant Seacole: the first nurse practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messmer, P R; Parchment, Y

    1998-01-01

    Mary Grant Seacole was born in 1805, in Kingston, Jamaica, to a Jamaican doctress (medicine woman) and a Scottish naval officer. Later Seacole became a doctress, nursing British soldiers during epidemics of cholera, dysentery, and yellow fever in Jamaica, Cuba, and Panama. After refusals by both the British government and Florence Nightingale to be allowed to practice in Scutari, she financed her own way to the scene of the Crimean War and then established the British Hotel to serve both the comfort and medical needs of the wounded soldiers. At night, Seacole worked side by side with Nightingale at Scutari as a volunteer nurse. Seacole's fame grew proportionately after she was seen helping wounded soldiers on the battlefields even while the battles were still raging. Seacole died on May 14, 1881, in London. One hundred years later, many members of the London black community, a few members of the Nurses Association of Jamaica and the Friends of Mary Seacole marched to her grave, honoring her as one of the greatest women of all times. Mary Grant Seacole rose above the barriers of racial prejudice and demonstrated the determinism, compassion, and caring that have became the hallmark of nurse practitioners.

  12. Accuracy of complete compression ultrasound in ruling out suspected deep venous thrombosis in the ambulatory setting. A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevestre, Marie-Antoinette; Labarère, José; Casez, Pierre; Bressollette, Luc; Taiar, Mébarka; Pernod, Gilles; Quéré, Isabelle; Bosson, Jean-Luc

    2009-07-01

    Evidence on the safety of complete compression ultrasound for ruling out deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is derived from studies conducted in tertiary care centers, although most patients with suspected DVT are managed in the ambulatory office setting. It was the objective of this study to estimate the rate of venous thromboembolism when anticoagulant therapy is withheld from ambulatory patients with normal findings on a single complete compression ultrasound. As part of a prospective cohort study, 3,871 ambulatory patients with clinically suspected DVT were enrolled by 255 board-certified vascular medicine physicians practicing in private offices in France. Compression ultrasound of the entire lower extremities was performed using a standardised examination protocol. Anticoagulant therapy was withheld from patients with negative findings on compression ultrasound, and 1,254 of them were randomly selected for follow-up. The main outcome measure was the three-month incidence of symptomatic venous thromboembolic events confirmed by objective testing. DVT was detected in 1,023 patients (26.4%), including 454 (11.7%) and 569 (14.7%) cases of proximal and isolated distal DVT, respectively. Of the 1,254 patients with negative results sampled for follow-up, six received anticoagulant therapy during follow-up and five were lost to follow-up. Five of 1,243 patients (0.4%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1-0.9) experienced non-fatal symptomatic venous thromboembolic events (pulmonary embolism in two patients and DVT in three patients) and eight of 1,254 patients (0.6%, 95% CI, 0.3-1.2) died during the three-month follow-up. In conclusion, anticoagulant therapy can be safely withheld after negative complete compression ultrasound without further testing in the ambulatory office setting.

  13. Reproducibility of the ambulatory arterial stiffness index in hypertensive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dechering, D.G.; Steen, M.S. van der; Adiyaman, A.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We studied the repeatability of the ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI), which can be computed from 24-h blood pressure (BP) recordings as unity minus the regression slope of diastolic on systolic BP. METHODS: One hundred and fifty-two hypertensive outpatients recruited...

  14. Ambulatory Estimation of Relative Foot Positions using Ultrasound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weenk, Dirk; Coelen, van der Michiel; Geessink, Arno A.G.; Hoek, van der Frank J.; Verstoep, Bart; Kortier, Henk G.; Meulen, van Fokke B.; Beijnum, van Bert-Jan F.; Veltink, Peter H.

    2013-01-01

    The recording of human movement is used for biomedical applications like physical therapy and sports training. Over the last few years inertial sensors have been proven to be a useful ambulatory alternative to traditional optical systems. An example of a successful application is the instrumented sh

  15. Ambulatory position and orientation tracking fusing magnetic and inertial sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roetenberg, Daniel; Slycke, Per J.; Veltink, Peter H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the design and testing of a portable magnetic system combined with miniature inertial sensors for ambulatory 6 degrees of freedom ( DOF) human motion tracking. The magnetic system consists of three orthogonal coils, the source, fixed to the body and 3-D magnetic sensors, fixed to

  16. Screening for Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea before Ambulatory Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishman, Stacey L.; Tawfik, Kareem O.; Smith, David F.; Cheung, Kristin; Pringle, Lauren M.; Stephen, Matthew J.; Everett, Tiffany L.; Stierer, Tracey L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The American Society of Anesthesia practice guidelines recommend that pediatric and adult patients who undergo ambulatory surgery be screened for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). With this in mind, our objective was to assess the frequency of screening by anesthesia providers for the signs and symptoms of OSA in children undergoing surgery in an ambulatory setting. Methods: Prospective single-blinded observational study of anesthesia providers' preoperative interview of caregivers of consecutive patients younger than age 18 who were scheduled for ambulatory surgery. Results: One hundred one children (30 females) were identified, with a mean age of 6.9 ± 5.0 years; 54 were classified as white, 33 as black, and 14 as other. Total OSA-18 scores ranged from 18 to 97, with a mean of 33.1 ± 14.8. The mean score for adenotonsillectomy patients was higher than that for children who underwent procedures other than adenotonsillectomy. Thirty-one percent of children were screened for OSA, and snoring was the most common symptom recorded (28%). Patients who were screened for OSA were more likely to have snoring (p Tawfik KO, Smith DF, Cheung K, Pringle LM, Stephen MJ, Everett TL, Stierer TL. Screening for pediatric obstructive sleep apnea before ambulatory surgery. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(7):751–755. PMID:25902820

  17. A Practitioner View toward Engaged Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barge, J. Kevin; Jones, Jennifer E.; Kensler, Michael; Polok, Nina; Rianoshek, Richard; Simpson, Jennifer Lyn; Shockley-Zalabak, Pamela

    2008-01-01

    The stories of four practitioners are presented regarding their involvement with the Aspen conference and their reflections on the essays in this forum. Their stories suggest that the ability for academics and practitioners to co-create engaged scholarship depends on articulating common values and interests, creating a shared language that allows…

  18. Roles of social impact assessment practitioners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Cecilia H.M., E-mail: ceciliawonghm@gmail.com; Ho, Wing-chung, E-mail: wingcho@cityu.edu.hk

    2015-01-15

    The effectiveness of social impact assessment (SIA) hinges largely on the capabilities and ethics of the practitioners, yet few studies have dedicated to discuss the expectations for these professionals. Recognising this knowledge gap, we employed the systemic review approach to construct a framework of roles of SIA practitioners from literature. Our conceptual framework encompasses eleven roles, namely project manager of SIA, practitioner of SIA methodologies, social researcher, social strategy developer, social impact management consultant, community developer, visionary, public involvement specialist, coordinator, SIA researcher, and educator. Although these roles have been stratified into three overarching categories, the project, community and SIA development, they are indeed interrelated and should be examined together. The significance of this study is threefold. First, it pioneers the study of the roles of SIA practitioners in a focused and systematic manner. Second, it informs practitioners of the expectations of them thereby fostering professionalism. Third, it prepares the public for SIAs by elucidating the functions and values of the assessment. - Highlights: • We adopt systematic review to construct a framework of roles of social impact assessment (SIA) practitioners from literature. • We use three overarching categorises to stratify the eleven roles we proposed. • This work is a novel attempt to study the work as a SIA practitioner and build a foundation for further exploration. • The framework informs practitioners of the expectations on them thus reinforcing professionalism. • The framework also prepares the public for SIAs by elucidating the functions and values of the assessment.

  19. Teaching Qualitative Research to Practitioner-Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Rebecca D.

    2012-01-01

    Practitioner-researchers are well-positioned to apply qualitative methods to the study of significant problems of educational practice. However, while learning the skills of qualitative inquiry, practitioners may be compelled by forces outside of qualitative research classrooms to think quantitatively. In this article, the author considers two…

  20. Promoting the Priorities of Practitioner Research Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Hazel

    2010-01-01

    One of the aims of the Library and Information Science Research Coalition is to promote library and information science practitioner research. Successfully meeting this aim should result in greater use of the existing knowledge base and the creation of new knowledge on Library and Information Science (LIS) practice. LIS practitioner engagement in…