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Sample records for ambulatory anticoagulant adverse

  1. Adverse effects of anticoagulation treatment: clinically significant upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Skok

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the last years, the use of oral anticoagulant treatment has increased dramatically, principally for the prevention of venous thrombosis and thrombembolic events. This treatment is demanding, especially among the elderly with concommitant diseases and different medication. Aim of the study to evaluate the rate of serious complications, clinically significant hemorrhage from upper gastointestinal tract in patients treated with oral antiocoagulants in a prospective cohort study.Patients and methods: Included were patients admitted to our institution between January 1, 1994 and December 31, 2003 due to gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Emergency endoscopy and laboratory testing was performed in all patients.Results: 6416 patients were investigated: 2452 women (38.2 % and 3964 men (61.8 %, mean age 59.1 years, SD 17.2. Among our patients, 55 % were aged over 60 years. In 86.4 % of patients the source of bleeding was confirmed in the upper gastrointestinal tract. In the last week prior to bleeding, 20.4 % (1309/6416 of all patients were regularly taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anticoagulant therapy or antiplatelet agents in single daily doses at least. 6.3 % of patients (82/1309 with abundant hemorrhage from upper gastrointestinal tract were using oral anticoagulant therapy and had INR > 5 at admission, 25.6 % of them had INR > 10. The mortality of patients using oral anticoagulants and INR > 5 was 17.1 %.Conclusions: Upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a serious complication of different medications, particularly in elderly patients. Safe use of anticoagulant therapy is based on careful selection of patients and correct intake of the prescribed drugs.

  2. An analysis of risk factors and adverse events in ambulatory surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent C

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Kent, Julia Metzner, Laurent BollagDepartment of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USAAbstract: Care for patients undergoing ambulatory procedures is a broad and expanding area of anesthetic and surgical practice. There were over 35 million ambulatory surgical procedures performed in the US in 2006. Ambulatory procedures are diverse in both type and setting, as they span the range from biopsies performed under local anesthesia to intra-abdominal laparoscopic procedures, and are performed in offices, freestanding ambulatory surgery centers, and ambulatory units of hospitals. The information on adverse events from these varied settings comes largely from retrospective reviews of sources, such as quality-assurance databases and closed malpractice claims. Very few if any ambulatory procedures are emergent, and in comparison to the inpatient population, ambulatory surgical patients are generally healthier. They are still however subject to most of the same types of adverse events as patients undergoing inpatient surgery, albeit at a lower frequency. The only adverse events that could be considered to be unique to ambulatory surgery are those that arise out of the circumstance of discharging a postoperative patient to an environment lacking skilled nursing care. There is limited information on these types of discharge-related adverse events, but the data that are available are reviewed in an attempt to assist the practitioner in patient selection and discharge decision making. Among ambulatory surgical patients, particularly those undergoing screening or cosmetic procedures, expectations from all parties involved are high, and a definition of adverse events can be expanded to include any occurrence that interrupts the rapid throughput of patients or interferes with early discharge and optimal patient satisfaction. This review covers all types of adverse events, but focuses on the more

  3. Using the Symmetry Analysis Design to Screen for Adverse Effects of Non-vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellfritzsch, Maja; Rasmussen, Lotte; Hallas, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Knowledge on adverse effects (AEs) related to non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in real-world populations is sparse. Objective: Our objective was to identify signals of potential AEs in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) initiating NOAC treatment using...

  4. Adverse outcome pathway and risks of anticoagulant rodenticides to predatory wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, Barnett A.; Lazarus, Rebecca S.; Elliott, John E.; Shore, Richard F.; van den Brink, Nico

    2014-01-01

    Despite a long history of successful use, routine application of some anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) may be at a crossroad due to new regulatory guidelines intended to mitigate risk. An adverse outcome pathway for ARs was developed to identify information gaps and end points to assess the effectiveness of regulations. This framework describes chemical properties of ARs, established macromolecular interactions by inhibition of vitamin K epoxide reductase, cellular responses including altered clotting factor processing and coagulopathy, organ level effects such as hemorrhage, organism responses with linkages to reduced fitness and mortality, and potential consequences to predator populations. Risk assessments have led to restrictions affecting use of some second-generation ARs (SGARs) in North America. While the European regulatory community highlighted significant or unacceptable risk of ARs to nontarget wildlife, use of SGARs in most EU member states remains authorized due to public health concerns and the absence of safe alternatives. For purposes of conservation and restoration of island habitats, SGARs remain a mainstay for eradication of invasive species. There are significant data gaps related to exposure pathways, comparative species sensitivity, consequences of sublethal effects, potential hazards of greater AR residues in genetically resistant prey, effects of low-level exposure to multiple rodenticides, and quantitative data on the magnitude of nontarget wildlife mortality.

  5. Adverse Effects with Ambulatory Intravenous Immunoglobulin Administration in Adult Patients with Common Variable Immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Alicia Rodríguez-Mireles

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Common variable immunode ciency (CVID is the most frequent symptomatic primary immunodeficiency, affecting 1:25,000- 75,000 people. It is characterized by the absence or decrease antibody production. Treatment for CVID consists on human immunoglobulin administration, and the intravenous route is the most common route for administration, at 400-800 mg/kg of weight every 3-4 weeks. Adverse effects associated with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg use occur in 25% of all infusions, with severe adverse reactions presenting in less than 1% of all patients. Acute renal failure can occur as a severe adverse reaction, which presents 1-10 days after starting IVIg treatment. In our center we implemented an ambulatory scheme for IVIg administration, which allows its administration in an average of 3 hours, without severe adverse effects. Objectives: To describe adverse effects and to evaluate the frequency of renal failure secondary to ambulatory IVIg administration in patients with common variable immunode ciency. Material and method: A descriptive and prospective study was done including adult patients con de nitive diagnosis of common variable immunodeficiency, receiving IVIg at replacement dose every 3 weeks. All patients were evaluated with clinical exploration, somatometry, serum creatinine, albumin and urea determination, 24 hours creatinine clearance, glomerular ltration rate with CKD-EPI, and immediate renal function associated with accumulated IVIg. Results were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Results: We determined adverse effects in 25 patients with common variable immunode ciency (15 women and 10 men, average age 36.7 years, during a 10 months period (January-September 2013. During this period 284 IVIg infusions were administered using our scheme, frequency of adverse effects were 12.9%, with 5.2% of early adverse effects and 7.7% late adverse effects, all being mild to moderate, in some cases required analgesic and

  6. Perioperative Respiratory Adverse Events in Pediatric Ambulatory Anesthesia: Development and Validation of a Risk Prediction Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanyam, Rajeev; Yeramaneni, Samrat; Hossain, Mohamed Monir; Anneken, Amy M; Varughese, Anna M

    2016-05-01

    Perioperative respiratory adverse events (PRAEs) are the most common cause of serious adverse events in children receiving anesthesia. Our primary aim of this study was to develop and validate a risk prediction tool for the occurrence of PRAE from the onset of anesthesia induction until discharge from the postanesthesia care unit in children younger than 18 years undergoing elective ambulatory anesthesia for surgery and radiology. The incidence of PRAE was studied. We analyzed data from 19,059 patients from our department's quality improvement database. The predictor variables were age, sex, ASA physical status, morbid obesity, preexisting pulmonary disorder, preexisting neurologic disorder, and location of ambulatory anesthesia (surgery or radiology). Composite PRAE was defined as the presence of any 1 of the following events: intraoperative bronchospasm, intraoperative laryngospasm, postoperative apnea, postoperative laryngospasm, postoperative bronchospasm, or postoperative prolonged oxygen requirement. Development and validation of the risk prediction tool for PRAE were performed using a split sampling technique to split the database into 2 independent cohorts based on the year when the patient received ambulatory anesthesia for surgery and radiology using logistic regression. A risk score was developed based on the regression coefficients from the validation tool. The performance of the risk prediction tool was assessed by using tests of discrimination and calibration. The overall incidence of composite PRAE was 2.8%. The derivation cohort included 8904 patients, and the validation cohort included 10,155 patients. The risk of PRAE was 3.9% in the development cohort and 1.8% in the validation cohort. Age ≤ 3 years (versus >3 years), ASA physical status II or III (versus ASA physical status I), morbid obesity, preexisting pulmonary disorder, and surgery (versus radiology) significantly predicted the occurrence of PRAE in a multivariable logistic regression

  7. Switching, Adverse Effects and Use of Over-the-Counter Analgesics among Users of Oral Anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellfritzsch, Maja; Hyllested, Lea Maria Ronneberg; Meegaard, Line

    2017-01-01

    ) to a NOAC. Switching was most frequently caused by inconvenience (34%) and adverse effects (23%). Although half of all patients had recently bought over-the-counter analgesics, purchase of ibuprofen and aspirin was rare (6%). More VKA users than NOAC users felt limited in their everyday life because...

  8. Adverse outcomes of anticoagulant use among hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease: a comparison of the rates of major bleeding events between unfractionated heparin and enoxaparin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Saheb Sharif-Askari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anticoagulation therapy is usually required in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD for treatment or prevention of thromboembolic diseases. However, this benefit could easily be offset by the risk of bleeding. OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence of adverse outcomes of anticoagulants in hospitalized patients with CKD, and to compare the rates of major bleeding events between the unfractionated heparin (UFH and enoxaparin users. METHODS: One year prospective observational study was conducted in patients with CKD stages 3 to 5 (estimated GFR, 10-59 ml/min/1.73 m(2 who were admitted to the renal unit of Dubai Hospital. Propensity scores for the use of anticoagulants, estimated for each of the 488 patients, were used to identify a cohort of 117 pairs of patients. Cox regression method was used to estimate association between anticoagulant use and adverse outcomes. RESULTS: Major bleeding occurred in 1 in 3 patients who received anticoagulation during hospitalization (hazard ratio [HR], 4.61 [95% confidence interval [CI], 2.05-10.35]. Compared with enoxaparin users, patients who received anticoagulation with unfractionated heparin had a lower mean [SD] serum level of platelet counts (139.95 [113] × 10(3/µL vs 205.56 [123] × 10(3/µL; P<0.001, and had a higher risk of major bleeding (HR, 4.79 [95% CI, 1.85-12.36]. Furthermore, compared with those who did not receive anticoagulants, patients who did had a higher in-hospital mortality (HR, 2.54 [95% CI, 1.03-6.25]; longer length of hospitalization (HR, 1.04 [95% CI, 1.01-1.06]; and higher hospital readmission at 30 days (HR, 1.79 [95% CI, 1.10-2.91]. CONCLUSIONS: Anticoagulation among hospitalized patients with CKD was significantly associated with an increased risk of bleeding and in-hospital mortality. Hence, intensive monitoring and preventive measures such as laboratory monitoring and/or dose adjustment are warranted.

  9. Geriatric Patient Safety Indicators Based on Linked Administrative Health Data to Assess Anticoagulant-Related Thromboembolic and Hemorrhagic Adverse Events in Older Inpatients: A Study Proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pogam, Marie-Annick; Quantin, Catherine; Reich, Oliver; Tuppin, Philippe; Fagot-Campagna, Anne; Paccaud, Fred; Peytremann-Bridevaux, Isabelle; Burnand, Bernard

    2017-05-11

    Frail older people with multiple interacting conditions, polypharmacy, and complex care needs are particularly exposed to health care-related adverse events. Among these, anticoagulant-related thromboembolic and hemorrhagic events are particularly frequent and serious in older inpatients. The growing use of anticoagulants in this population and their substantial risk of toxicity and inefficacy have therefore become an important patient safety and public health concern worldwide. Anticoagulant-related adverse events and the quality of anticoagulation management should thus be routinely assessed to improve patient safety in vulnerable older inpatients. This project aims to develop and validate a set of outcome and process indicators based on linked administrative health data (ie, insurance claims data linked to hospital discharge data) assessing older inpatient safety related to anticoagulation in both Switzerland and France, and enabling comparisons across time and among hospitals, health territories, and countries. Geriatric patient safety indicators (GPSIs) will assess anticoagulant-related adverse events. Geriatric quality indicators (GQIs) will evaluate the management of anticoagulants for the prevention and treatment of arterial or venous thromboembolism in older inpatients. GPSIs will measure cumulative incidences of thromboembolic and bleeding adverse events based on hospital discharge data linked to insurance claims data. Using linked administrative health data will improve GPSI risk adjustment on patients' conditions that are present at admission and will capture in-hospital and postdischarge adverse events. GQIs will estimate the proportion of index hospital stays resulting in recommended anticoagulation at discharge and up to various time frames based on the same electronic health data. The GPSI and GQI development and validation process will comprise 6 stages: (1) selection and specification of candidate indicators, (2) definition of administrative data

  10. Systematic review of the incidence and characteristics of preventable adverse drug events in ambulatory care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Linda Aagaard; Winterstein, Almut G; Søndergaard, Birthe

    2007-01-01

    studies, health services research, and follow-up studies. Additional articles were found in the reference sections of retrieved articles. STUDY SELECTION AND DATA EXTRACTION: Peer-reviewed articles assessing pADEs in ambulatory care, with detailed descriptions/frequency distributions of (1) ADE....../pADE incidence, (2) clinical outcomes, (3) associated drug groups, and/or (4) underlying medication errors were included. Study country, year and design, sample size, follow-up time, ADE/pADE identification method, proportion of ADEs/pADEs and ADEs/pADEs requiring hospital admission, and frequency distribution......-months, and the pADE incidence was 5.6 per 1000 person-months (1.1-10.1). The median ADE preventability rate was 21% (11-38%). The median incidence of ADEs requiring hospital admission was 0.45 (0.10-13.1) per 1000 person-months, and the median incidence of pADEs requiring hospital admission was 4.5 per 1000 person...

  11. SAMe-TT2R2 Score in the Outpatient Anticoagulation Clinic to Predict Time in Therapeutic Range and Adverse Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivatto Junior, Fernando; Scheffel, Rafael Selbach; Ries, Lucas; Wolkind, Ricardo Roitman; Marobin, Roberta; Barkan, Sabrina Sigal; Amon, Luís Carlos; Biolo, Andréia

    2017-04-01

    The SAMe-TT2R2 score was developed to predict which patients on oral anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) will reach an adequate time in therapeutic range (TTR) (> 65%-70%). Studies have reported a relationship between this score and the occurrence of adverse events. To describe the TTR according to the score, in addition to relating the score obtained with the occurrence of adverse events in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF) on oral anticoagulation with VKAs. Retrospective cohort study including patients with nonvalvular AF attending an outpatient anticoagulation clinic of a tertiary hospital. Visits to the outpatient clinic and emergency, as well as hospital admissions to the institution, during 2014 were evaluated. The TTR was calculated through the Rosendaal´s method. We analyzed 263 patients (median TTR, 62.5%). The low-risk group (score 0-1) had a better median TTR as compared with the high-risk group (score ≥ 2): 69.2% vs. 56.3%, p = 0.002. Similarly, the percentage of patients with TTR ≥ 60%, 65% or 70% was higher in the low-risk group (p vitamina K (AVKs) atingirão um tempo na faixa terapêutica (TFT) adequado (> 65%-70%) no seguimento. Estudos também o relacionaram com a ocorrência de eventos adversos. Descrever o TFT de acordo com o escore, além de relacionar a pontuação obtida com a ocorrência de eventos adversos adversos em pacientes com fibrilação atrial (FA) não valvar em anticoagulação oral com AVKs. Estudo de coorte retrospectivo incluindo pacientes com FA não valvar em acompanhamento em ambulatório de anticoagulação de um hospital terciário. Foi realizada uma avaliação retrospectiva de consultas ambulatoriais, visitas a emergência e internações hospitalares na instituição no período de janeiro-dezembro/2014. O TFT foi calculado aplicando-se o método de Rosendaal. Foram analisados 263 pacientes com TFT mediano de 62,5%. O grupo de baixo risco (0-1 ponto) obteve um TFT mediano maior em

  12. Ambulatory Phlebectomy

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    ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products In This Section Dermatologic Surgery What is dermatologic ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products Ambulatory Phlebectomy What is ambulatory phlebectomy? Ambulatory phlebectomy ...

  13. Bridging Anticoagulation

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    ... clinical centers in the United States, Canada, and Brazil. A more detailed description of the study is ... Your Personal Message Send Message Share on Social Media Bridging Anticoagulation The BRIDGE Study Investigators Circulation. 2012; ...

  14. Anticoagulant Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte

    Although sewer rat control is carried out in more than 80 % of all Danish municipalities, with usage of large amounts of anticoagulant rodenticides, knowledge on anticoagulant resistance among rats living in the sewers is limited. As rat problems in urban areas are believed to be related to sewer...... problems (70-90 % in UK and DK) unawareness of resistance amongst these populations of Brown rats may constitute a future control problem and knowledge on this issue has become crucial. Rats were captured in sewers from seven different locations in the suburban area of Copenhagen. Locations was chosen...... to represent different sewer rat management strategies i) no anticoagulants for approx. 20 years ii) no anticoagulants for the last 5 years and iii) continuous control for many years. Animals were tested for resistance to bromadiolone by Blood-Clotting Response test, as bromadiolone is the most frequently used...

  15. Epidemiology of dyslipidaemia in professional drivers: results of RACER-ABPM (Risk of Adverse Cardiovascular Events among professional dRivers in Poland - Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzowski, Bartosz; Płatek, Anna E; Szymański, Filip M; Ryś, Anna; Semczuk-Kaczmarek, Karolina; Adamkiewicz, Karolina; Kotkowski, Marcin; Filipiak, Krzysztof J

    2018-01-01

    Professional drivers are a group exposed to many cardiovascular risk factors. Non-systematic working hours, prolonged stress, low physical activity, along with irregular, and in most cases, unhealthy meals are common aspects of the normal working schedule of most of the professional drivers. These translate into high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of the current analysis was to establish the prevalence of dyslipidaemia in a group of continuous professional drivers. The RACER (Risk of Adverse Cardiovascular Events among professional dRivers in Poland - Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring) study is a prospective study focused on assessing cardiovascular risk factors in professional drivers. Patients included in the study were screened for classical and non-classical cardiovascular risk factors and had an ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) performed. Out of the whole RACER study population, 144 drivers were included into the RACER-ABPM study. Out of this group 135 (95.7%) were male, and the mean age was 50.2 ± 9.3 years, and mean body mass index was 32.3 ± 3.0 kg/m². A family history of CVD was noted in 21.3% of patients, 28.1% were current smokers, and 2.9% had diabetes mellitus. Out of those patients, 72.2% had low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level > 115 mg/dL, 85.5% had LDL-C > 100 mg/dL, and 96.7% had LDL-C > 70 mg/dL. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol 150 mg/dL were found in 28.9% of cases. In conclusion, dyslipidaemia is highly prevalent in professional drivers. Obesity is one of the major contributors to the cardiovascular risk, and dyslipidaemia along with other risk factors highly prevalent in this subgroup accounts for poorer prognosis.

  16. Excessive anticoagulation with warfarin or phenprocoumon may have multiple causes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meegaard, Peter Martin; Holck, Line H V; Pottegård, Anton

    2012-01-01

    Excessive anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists is a serious condition with a substantial risk of an adverse outcome. We thus found it of interest to review a large case series to characterize the underlying causes of excessive anticoagulation.......Excessive anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists is a serious condition with a substantial risk of an adverse outcome. We thus found it of interest to review a large case series to characterize the underlying causes of excessive anticoagulation....

  17. Do Geriatric Conditions Increase Risk of Adverse Drug Reactions in Ambulatory Elders? Results From the VA GEM Drug Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Joseph T.; Sloane, Richard J.; Boscardin, W. John; Schmader, Kenneth E.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Many clinicians prescribe cautiously to older adults with common geriatric conditions for fear of causing adverse drug reactions (ADRs). However, little is known about the association between these conditions and risk of ADRs. Methods. Using data from the VA Geriatric Evaluation and Management Drug Study, we determined any, preventable, and serious ADRs in 808 elders for 12 months after hospital discharge using a validated process involving patient self-report and chart review adjudicated by two health care professionals. Eight common geriatric conditions (activities of daily living, dementia, incontinence, falls, difficulty ambulating, malnourishment, depression, and prolonged bed rest) were evaluated at study baseline through self-report and structured assessments. We used Poisson regression to model the relationship between these geriatric conditions and ADRs. Results. Participants had a mean of 2.9 ± 1.2 geriatric conditions. Over the 12-month follow-up period, 497 ADRs occurred in 269 participants, including 187 ADRs considered preventable and 127 considered severe. On multivariable analyses, participants with dependency in one or more activities of daily living were less likely to suffer ADRs than those who were fully independent (incidence rate ratio: 0.78, 95% confidence interval = 0.62–1.00). None of the other seven geriatric conditions assessed were associated with ADR risk. Results were similar for preventable and serious ADRs, although participants with a history of falls were more likely to develop serious ADRs (incidence rate ratio: 1.49, 95% confidence interval = 1.00–2.21). Conclusions. Many geriatric conditions were not associated with risk of ADRs. Although it is prudent to prescribe judiciously in patients with these conditions, excessive caution may not be warranted. PMID:21321003

  18. Ambulatory anaesthesia and cognitive dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lars S; Steinmetz, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    serious adverse outcomes, hence difficult to obtain sound scientific evidence for avoiding complications. RECENT FINDINGS: Few studies have assessed recovery of cognitive function after ambulatory surgery, but it seems that both propofol and modern volatile anaesthetics are rational choices for general...... anaesthesia in the outpatient setting. Cognitive complications such as delirium and postoperative cognitive dysfunction are less frequent in ambulatory surgery than with hospitalization. SUMMARY: The elderly are especially susceptible to adverse effects of the hospital environment such as immobilisation...

  19. Side effects after ambulatory lumbar iohexol myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sand, T.; Myhr, G.; Stovner, L.J.; Dale, L.G.; Tangerud, A.

    1989-01-01

    Side effect incidences after ambulatory (22G needle and two h bed rest) and after non-ambulatory (22 and 20G needles and 20 h bed rest) lumbar iohexol myelography have been estimated and compared. Headache incidence was significantly greater in ambulatory (50%, n=107) as compared to nonambulatory myelography (26%, n=58). Headaches in the ambulatory group tended to be of shorter duration and the difference between severe headaches in ambulatory and non-ambulatory groups was not significant. Serious adverse reactions did not occur and none of the ambulatory patients required readmission because of side effects. The headache was predominantly postural and occurred significantly earlier in the ambulatory group. Headache incidence was significantly greater after 20G needle myelography (44%, n=97) as compared to 22G needle iohexol myelography (26%, n=58). The results support the hypothesis that CSF leakage is a major cause of headache after lumbar iohexol myelography. (orig.)

  20. Association between Oral Anticoagulation Knowledge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Association between Oral Anticoagulation Knowledge, Anticoagulation Control, and Demographic Characteristics of Patients Attending an Anticoagulation Clinic in Saudi Arabia: A Cross-Sectional Prospective Evaluation.

  1. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood clots - lupus anticoagulants; DVT - anticoagulants ... Most often, lupus anticoagulants and aPL are found in people with diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Lupus anticoagulants and ...

  2. Comparing new anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, James M

    2012-12-01

    For years, the pharmaceutical industry has been trying to find a safe and effective drug to replace warfarin. Although warfarin is an effective anticoagulant, its pharmacology, adverse effects, and risk profiles dictate that patients taking this medication must be monitored judiciously. The US Food and Drug Administration has approved two drugs for commercial use, dabigatran and rivaroxaban, that will compete directly with warfarin for use in specific indications. Because of direct marketing to patients, physicians are being asked to comment on these new medications. This brief review illustrates the data available for the two new drugs when compared to warfarin for the specified indications. For some patients, these drugs may be highly beneficial and offer an excellent alternative to warfarin. For others, warfarin may still be the preferred drug.

  3. Ambulatory percutaneous nephrolithotomy: initial series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrour, Walid; Andonian, Sero

    2010-12-01

    To assess the safety and feasibility of ambulatory percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). PCNL is the gold standard for the management of large renal stones. Although tubeless PCNL has been previously described, no case series have been published of ambulatory PCNL. The criteria for ambulatory PCNL were: single tract, stone-free status documented by flexible nephroscopy, adequate pain control, and satisfactory postoperative hematocrit level and chest radiographic findings. Patient information, including operating room and fluoroscopy times, stone size and Hounsfield units, and number of needle punctures, were collected prospectively. The time spent in the recovery room, in addition to the amount of narcotics used in the recovery room and at home, was documented. Of 10 patients, 8 had nephrostomy tracts established intraoperatively by the urologist and 2 had preoperative nephrostomy tubes placed. The median operating and fluoroscopy time was 83.5 and 4.45 minutes, respectively. The median stone diameter was 20 mm (800 Hounsfield units) in addition to a patient with a staghorn calculus. The patients spent a median of 240 minutes in the recovery room and had received a median of 19.25 mg of morphine equivalents. Only 3 patients (30%) used narcotics at home. No intraoperative complications occurred, and none of the patients required transfusions. Two postoperative complications developed: a deep vein thrombosis requiring outpatient anticoagulation and multiresistant Escherichia coli infection requiring intravenous antibiotics. In highly selected patients, ambulatory PCNL is safe and feasible. More patients are needed to verify the criteria for patients undergoing the ambulatory approach. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Bleeding in patients using new anticoagulants or antiplatelet agents: Risk factors and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, M.M.; Eerenberg, E.; Löwenberg, E.; Kamphuisen, P.W.

    2010-01-01

    The most important adverse effect of antithrombotic treatment is the occurrence of bleeding. in case of serious or even life-threatening bleeding in a patient who uses anticoagulant agents or when patient on anticoagulants needs to undergo an urgent invasive procedure, anticoagulant treatment can be

  5. The impact of being involved in a medical adverse event on GP's (General Physicians) professional behavior in an ambulatory healthcare fund

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manor, Orly

    2017-01-01

    Assurance behavior: performing unnecessary tests so as to deter patients from filing complaints or medical malpractice suits Avoidance behavior: choosing to behave in a way that prevents recurrence of an unpleasant stimulus This thesis examines the impact of involvement in a medical adverse event on

  6. Anticoagulant rodenticides and wildlife: Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brink, Nico W.; Elliott, John E.; Shore, Richard F.; Rattner, Barnett A.; van den Brink, Nico W.; Elliott, John E.; Shore, Richard F.; Rattner, Barnett A.

    2018-01-01

    Rodents have interacted with people since the beginning of systematic food storage by humans in the early Neolithic era. Such interactions have had adverse outcomes such as threats to human health, spoiling and consumption of food sources, damage to human infrastructure and detrimental effects on indigenous island wildlife (through inadvertent anthropogenic assisted introductions). These socio/economic and environmental impacts illustrate the clear need to control populations of commensal rodents. Different methods have been applied historically but the main means of control in the last decades is through the application of rodenticides, mainly anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) that inhibit blood clotting. The so-called First Generation Anticoagulant Rodenticides (FGARs) proved highly effective but rodents increasingly developed resistance. This led to a demand for more effective alternative compounds and paved the way to the development of Second Generation Anticoagulant Rodenticides (SGARs). These were more acutely toxic and persistent, making them more effective but also increasing the risks of exposure of non-target species and secondary poisoning of predatory species. SGARs often fail the environmental thresholds of different regulatory frameworks because of these negative side-effects, but their use is still permitted because of the overwhelming societal needs for rodent control and the lack of effective alternatives. This book provides a state-of-the-art overview of the scientific advancements in assessment of environmental exposure, effects and risks of currently used ARs. This is discussed in relation to the societal needs for rodent control, including risk mitigation and development of alternatives.

  7. [New oral anticoagulant drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovits, Alejandro; Aizman, Andrés; Zúñiga, Pamela; Pereira, Jaime; Mezzano, Diego

    2011-10-01

    Thromboembolic disease (TED) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The hallmark of oral long-term anticoagulant therapy has been the use of vitamin K antagonists, whose anticoagulant effect is exerted inhibiting vitamin K epoxide reductase. Warfarin and acenocoumarol are the most commonly used. In the last five years several new drugs for long term anticoagulation have been developed, which can inhibit single clotting factors with the purpose of improving drug therapeutic range and, ideally, minimizing bleeding risks. This review addresses the state of the art on the clinical use of inhibitors of activated factor X and thrombin.

  8. Ambulatory Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Ryan W; Wycoff, Andrea M; Trull, Timothy J

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, significant technological advances have changed our understanding of dynamic processes in clinical psychology. A particularly important agent of change has been ambulatory assessment (AA). AA is the assessment of individuals in their daily lives, combining the twin benefits of increased ecological validity and minimized retrospective biases. These benefits make AA particularly well-suited to the assessment of dynamic processes, and recent advancements in technology are providing exciting new opportunities to understand these processes in new ways. In the current article, we briefly detail the capabilities currently offered by smartphones and mobile physiological devices, as well as some of the practical and ethical challenges of incorporating these new technologies into AA research. We then provide several examples of recent innovative applications of AA methodology in clinical research, assessment, and intervention and provide a case example of AA data generated from a study utilizing multiple mobile devices. In this way, we aim to provide a sense of direction for researchers planning AA studies of their own.

  9. Providing value in ambulatory anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosnot, Caroline D; Fleisher, Lee A; Keogh, John

    2015-12-01

    colonoscopies. With this projected increase in the demand for anesthesia services nationwide comes the analysis of its financial feasibility. Some early data looking at endoscopist-administered sedation conclude that it offers higher patient satisfaction, there were less adverse effects than anesthesiologist-administered sedation, and is economically advantageous. This and future retrospective studies will help to guide healthcare policymakers and physicians to come to a conclusion about providing ambulatory services for these millions of patients. Ambulatory anesthesia's popularity continues to rise and anesthetic techniques will continue to morph and adapt to the needs of patients seeking ambulatory surgery. Alterations in already existing medications are promising as these modifications allow for quicker recovery from anesthesia or minimization of the already known undesirable side-effects. PONV, pain, obstructive sleep apnea, and chronic comorbidities (hypertension, cardiac disease, and diabetes mellitus) are perioperative concerns in ambulatory settings as more patients are safely being treated in ambulatory settings. Regional anesthesia stands out as a modality that has multiple advantages to general anesthesia, providing a minimal recovery period and a decrease in postanesthesia care unit stay. The implementation of the Affordable Healthcare Act specifically affects ambulatory settings as the demand and need for patients to have screening procedures with anesthesia. The question remains what the best strategy is to meet the needs of our future patients while preserving economically feasibility within an already strained healthcare system.

  10. Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SAMBA Link Digital Newsletter Educational Bibliography Research IARS/Anesthesia & Analgesia SCOR About SCOR Sponsor SAMBA Meetings Affinity Sponsor Program We Represent Ambulatory and Office-Based Anesthesia The Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia provides educational opportunities, ...

  11. [Drug compliance of patients on anticoagulant treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadó, Klára; Kocsis, Eszter; Zelkó, Romána; Hankó, Balázs; Kovácsné Balogh, Judit; Forczig, Mónika; Domján, Gyula

    2015-08-09

    Despite several therapeutic possibilities the morbidity and mortality of thromboembolic disorders remain high. Improving drug compliance - i. e. keeping up the doctor's prescriptions - may be an effective tool to reach better results. To improve patients' compliance, the risk factors of non-compliance should be recognized. Among these patients' fear of adverse effects of drugs, their lack of knowledge about their illness and medication, forgetfulness, and other social, economic factors may be the most important. Furthermore, adherence may be worsened when the patient feels that the decision has been made over his/her head. Sustained medical adherence is important because anticoagulation may be a life-long treatment. The new oral anticoagulants make the matter of compliance to be current. These new type of drugs do not need regular laboratory monitoring and, therefore, compliance cannot be strictly followed. There are several studies concerning drug compliance to anticoagulant medications. Improvement of adherence is based on regular patient education after reviewing the factors of non-compliance, which needs teamwork with important roles of doctors, pharmacists, dietetics and nurses. Careful and accurate work of the participants of primary care might be complemented by the activity of anticoagulant clinics.

  12. Influence of novel oral anticoagulants on anticoagulation care management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzic, Andrej; Kos, Mitja

    2017-09-01

    Anticoagulation treatment was recently improved by the introduction of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs). Using a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods, this study explores the effects of the introduction of NOACs on anticoagulation care in Slovenia. Face-to-face interviews with key stakeholders revealed evolvement and challenges of anticoagulation care from different perspectives. Obtained information was further explored through the analysis of nationwide data of drug prescriptions and realization of health care services. Simplified management of anticoagulation treatment with NOACs and their high penetration expanded the capacity of anticoagulation clinics, and consequentially the treated population increased by more than 50 % in the last 5 years. The main challenge concerned the expenditures for medicines, which increased approximately 10 times in just a few years. At the same time, the anticoagulation clinics and their core organisation were not affected, which is not expected to change, since they are vital in delivering high-quality care.

  13. Chronic kidney disease and anticoagulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sciascia, Savino; Radin, Massimo; Schreiber, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Anticoagulation in patients with impaired kidney function can be challenging since drugs' pharmacokinetics and bioavailability are altered in this setting. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) treated with conventional anticoagulant agents [vitamin K antagonist (VKA), low-molecular weight...... are eliminated via the kidneys pose additional challenges. More recently, two classes of direct oral anticoagulant agents (DOACs) have been investigated for the prevention and management of venous thromboembolic events: the direct factor Xa inhibitors rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban, and the direct thrombin...

  14. The future of anticoagulation clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macik, B Gail

    2003-01-01

    Anticoagulation therapy is the foundation of treatment for thromboembolic disorders; and coumarin derivatives (warfarin in the United States) are the only orally administered anticoagulant medications currently available. Due to the expense and relative difficulties associated with this route of administration, parenteral drugs are not used routinely for long-term therapy, leaving warfarin as the anticoagulant of choice in the outpatient setting. The management of warfarin is problematic, however, due the nuances of its pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profile and the requirement for frequent monitoring of blood levels. Although management by anticoagulation clinics is considered the gold standard for warfarin therapy, management by an anticoagulation clinic may not be the optimal option from a clinician's view and, in many cases, may not be an option at all. Anticoagulation clinics may impinge on the doctor-patient relationship. Difficulties of communication and reimbursement are not ameliorated by a specialty clinic. Innovations in warfarin management, including patient self-management and computerized dosing programs, are alternatives for improved care that are available with or without input by an anticoagulation service. New oral drugs on the horizon do not require the same intensity of monitoring and do not present the same pharmacodynamic problems associated with warfarin. Warfarin will become obsolete in the foreseeable future. If anticoagulation clinics continue, they must re-define their role as the major part of the workload, warfarin management, disappears. To adapt, clinics must strengthen and enhance their role as coordinators and educators, and less so, managers of anticoagulation therapy.

  15. Idarucizumab for Reversing Dabigatran-Induced Anticoagulation: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Nathan; Morrill, Amanda M; Willett, Kristine C

    The approval of the oral direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate, gave patients an alternative to oral anticoagulation with warfarin. Like all anticoagulants, the primary adverse event (AE) associated with dabigatran is bleeding. Until the FDA approval of idarucizumab, there had been no reversal agent for dabigatran-induced anticoagulation in patients with life-threatening or uncontrollable bleeding, or those requiring emergent procedures. The primary purpose of this review is to summarize the safety and efficacy of idarucizumab, a monoclonal antibody fragment, and its use as a reversal agent for dabigatran. A literature search was conducted through MEDLINE (1946 to November week 1 2015) and Embase (1980-2015 week 46) using the search term idarucizumab. Clinicaltrials.gov was consulted for a comprehensive list of ongoing and completed studies. Additional studies were identified through bibliographical citations. Clinical trials in animals and humans published in English evaluating the safety and efficacy of idarucizumab for reversal of anticoagulant treatment with dabigatran were included for review. Idarucizumab has been shown to significantly reverse the anticoagulant effects of dabigatran in both healthy volunteers and patients requiring a reversal agent because of either overt bleeding or an emergency surgery or invasive procedure. The most common AEs were headache, nasopharyngitis, back pain, skin irritation, hypokalemia, delirium, constipation, pyrexia, and pneumonia. Deaths reported in idarucizumab studies were attributed to either the index event or a preexisting comorbidity. Most adverse effects were minor, but 21 serious AEs have been reported in the published data including thrombotic events. Given the increased use of direct oral anticoagulants, such as dabigatran, a need for specific reversal agents exists. Idarucizumab has been shown to be safe and effective in the reversal of dabigatran-induced anticoagulation in patients requiring emergent

  16. [Clinical scores for the risk of bleeding with or without anticoagulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod, Alain

    2016-09-14

    The assessment of hemorragic risk related to therapeutic anticoagulation is made difficult because of the variety of existing drugs, the heterogeneity of treatment strategies and their duration. Six prognostic scores have been analyzed. For three of them, external validations have revealed a marked decrease in the discrimination power. One British study, Qbleed, based on the data of more than 1 million of ambulatory patients, has repeatedly satisfied quality criteria. Two scores have also studied the bleeding risk during hospital admission for acute medical disease. The development of new and effective anticoagulants with fewer side-effects is more likely to solve this problem than the production of new clinical scores.

  17. Direct oral anticoagulants: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco Moreno, Ana Isabel; Martín Díaz, Rosa María; García Navarro, María José

    2017-12-30

    Vitamin K antagonists were the only choice for chronic oral anticoagulation for more than half a century. Over the past few years, direct oral anticoagulants have emerged, including one direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran etexilate) and three factor Xa inhibitors (apixaban, edoxaban and rivaroxaban). In randomised controlled trials comparing direct oral anticoagulants with traditional vitamin K antagonists, the direct oral anticoagulants all showed a favourable benefit-risk balance in their safety and efficacy profile, in prevention of thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation and in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and acute coronary syndrome. In 2008, dabigatran was the first direct oral anticoagulant approved by the European Medicine Agency. Subsequently, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban were also authorised. This article reviews the evidence related to the use of these drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Ambulatory Surgical Measures - Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Ambulatory Surgical Center Quality Reporting (ASCQR) Program seeks to make care safer and more efficient through quality reporting. ASCs eligible for this...

  19. Postpartum wound and bleeding complications in women who received peripartum anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Jane S; Grotegut, Chad A; Thames, Elizabeth; Dotters-Katz, Sarah K; Brancazio, Leo R; James, Andra H

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare wound and bleeding complications between women who received anticoagulation after cesarean delivery due to history of prior venous thromboembolic disease, arterial disease, or being a thrombophilia carrier with adverse pregnancy outcome, to women not receiving anticoagulation. Women in the Duke Thrombosis Center Registry who underwent cesarean delivery during 2003-2011 and received postpartum anticoagulation (anticoagulation group, n=77), were compared with a subset of women who delivered during the same time period, but did not receive anticoagulation (no anticoagulation group, n=77). The no anticoagulation group comprised women who were matched to the anticoagulation group by age, body mass index, type of cesarean (no labor vs. labor), and date of delivery. Bleeding and wound complications were compared between the two groups. A multivariable logistic regression model was constructed to determine if anticoagulation was an independent predictor of wound complication. Women who received anticoagulation during pregnancy had a greater incidence of wound complications compared to those who did not (30% vs. 8%, p<0.001). Using multivariable logistic regression, while controlling for race, diabetes, chorioamnionitis, and aspirin use, anticoagulation predicted the development of any wound complication (OR 5.8, 95% CI 2.2, 17.6), but there were no differences in the mean estimated blood loss at delivery (782 vs. 778 ml, p=0.91), change in postpartum hematocrit (5.4 vs. 5.2%, p=0.772), or percent of women receiving blood products (6.5 vs. 1.3%, p=0.209) between the two groups. Anticoagulation following cesarean delivery is associated with an increased risk of post-cesarean wound complications, but not other postpartum bleeding complications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Bleeding events associated with novel anticoagulants: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaee, Sam; Tran, Tara Thi Thien; Amerena, John

    2013-12-01

    Until lately warfarin was the only valuable oral anticoagulant in stroke reduction in high risk cases with non valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Although with warfarin the rate of stroke reduced notably, the major concern is the risk of serious bleeding and difficulty of establishing and maintaining the international normalised ratio (INR) within the therapeutic range. With the development of the novel anticoagulants we now have for the first time since the innovation of Warfarin feasible alternatives to it to decrease stroke rates in high risk patients with NVAF. To diminish adverse bleeding events with the novel anticoagulant proper selection of patients prior starting treatment is essential. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Fatal consequences of synergistic anticoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen P

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs are increasingly being preferred by clinicians (and patients because they have a wide therapeutic window and therefore do not require monitoring of anticoagulant effect. Herein, we describe the unfortunate case of a patient who had fatal consequences as a result of switching from warfarin to rivaroxaban. Case Summary: A 90-year-old Caucasian woman, with atrial fibrillation on chronic anticoagulation with warfarin, was admitted to the hospital for pneumonia. She was treated with levofloxacin. In the same admission, her warfarin was switched to rivaroxaban. On Day 3 after the switch, her INR was found to be 6, and she developed a cervical epidural hematoma from C2 to C7. She ultimately developed respiratory arrest, was put on comfort care and died. Discussion: Rivaroxaban and warfarin are known to have a synergistic anticoagulant effect, usually seen shortly after switching. Antibiotics also increase the effects of warfarin by the inhibition of metabolizing isoenzymes. It is hypothesized that these two effects led to the fatal cervical spinal hematoma. Conclusion: The convenience of a wide therapeutic window and no requirement of laboratory monitoring makes the NOACs a desirable option for anticoagulation. However, there is lack of data and recommendations on how to transition patients from Warfarin to NOACs or even how to transition from one NOAC to another. Care should be taken to ensure continuous monitoring of anticoagulation when stopping, interrupting or switching between NOACS to avoid the possibility of fatal bleeding and strokes.

  2. New antithrombotic agents in the ambulatory setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Neville M; Weightman, William M; Watts, Stephen A

    2014-12-01

    Many patients presenting for surgical or other procedures in an ambulatory setting are taking new antiplatelet or anticoagulant agents. This review assesses how the novel features of these new agents affect the management of antithrombotic therapy in the ambulatory setting. There have been very few studies investigating the relative risks of continuing or ceasing new antithrombotic agents. Recent reviews indicate that the new antithrombotic agents offer greater efficacy or ease of administration but are more difficult to monitor or reverse. They emphasize the importance of assessing the bleeding risk of the procedure, the thrombotic risk if the agent is ceased, and patient factors that increase the likelihood of bleeding. The timing of cessation of the agent, if required, depends on its pharmacokinetics and patients' bleeding risks. Patients at high risk of thrombotic complications may require bridging therapy. Once agreed upon, the perioperative plan should be made clear to all involved. As there are few clinical studies to guide management, clinicians must make rational decisions in relation to continuing or ceasing new antithrombotic agents. This requires knowledge of their pharmacokinetics, and a careful multidisciplinary assessment of the relative thrombotic and bleeding risks in individual patients.

  3. Effective management of venous thromboembolism in the community: non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel R

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Raj Patel Department of Haematological Medicine, King's Thrombosis Centre, King's College Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Anticoagulation therapy is essential for the effective treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE. For many years, anticoagulation for acute VTE was limited to the use of initial parenteral heparin, overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist. Although highly effective, this regimen has several limitations and is particularly challenging when given in an ambulatory setting. Current treatment pathways for most patients with deep-vein thrombosis typically involve initial hospital or community-based ambulatory care with subsequent follow-up in a secondary care setting. With the introduction of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs into routine clinical practice, it is now possible for the initial acute management of patients with deep-vein thrombosis to be undertaken by primary care. As hospital admissions associated with VTE become shorter, primary care will play an increasingly important role in the long-term management of these patients. Although the NOACs can potentially simplify patient management and improve clinical outcomes, primary care physicians may be less familiar with these new treatments compared with traditional therapy. To assist primary care physicians in further understanding the role of the NOACs, this article outlines the main differences between NOACs and traditional anticoagulation therapy and discusses the benefit–risk profile of the different NOACs in the treatment and secondary prevention of recurrent VTE. Key considerations for the use of NOACs in the primary care setting are highlighted, including dose transition, risk assessment and follow-up, duration of anticoagulant therapy, how to minimize bleeding risks, and the importance of patient education and counseling. Keywords: venous thromboembolism, oral anticoagulant, prevention, treatment, primary

  4. Does plasmin have anticoagulant activity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Hoover-Plow

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Jane Hoover-PlowJoseph J Jacobs Center for Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, Departments of Cardiovascular Medicine and Molecular Cardiology, Lerner Research Institute Cleveland Clinic, Ohio, USAAbstract: The coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways regulate hemostasis and thrombosis, and an imbalance in these pathways may result in pathologic hemophilia or thrombosis. The plasminogen system is the primary proteolytic pathway for fibrinolysis, but also has important proteolytic functions in cell migration, extracellular matrix degradation, metalloproteinase activation, and hormone processing. Several studies have demonstrated plasmin cleavage and inactivation of several coagulation factors, suggesting plasmin may be not only be the primary fibrinolytic enzyme, but may have anticoagulant properties as well. The objective of this review is to examine both in vitro and in vivo evidence for plasmin inactivation of coagulation, and to consider whether plasmin may act as a physiological regulator of coagulation. While several studies have demonstrated strong evidence for plasmin cleavage and inactivation of coagulation factors FV, FVIII, FIX, and FX in vitro, in vivo evidence is lacking for a physiologic role for plasmin as an anticoagulant. However, inactivation of coagulation factors by plasmin may be useful as a localized anticoagulant therapy or as a combined thrombolytic and anticoagulant therapy.Keywords: thrombosis, anticoagulant, cardiovascular disease, plasminogen’s protease, blood

  5. Ambulatory Feedback System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Herbert; Weeks, Bill

    1985-01-01

    This presentation discusses instrumentation that will be used for a specific event, which we hope will carry on to future events within the Space Shuttle program. The experiment is the Autogenic Feedback Training Experiment (AFTE) scheduled for Spacelab 3, currently scheduled to be launched in November, 1984. The objectives of the AFTE are to determine the effectiveness of autogenic feedback in preventing or reducing space adaptation syndrome (SAS), to monitor and record in-flight data from the crew, to determine if prediction criteria for SAS can be established, and, finally, to develop an ambulatory instrument package to mount the crew throughout the mission. The purpose of the Ambulatory Feedback System (AFS) is to record the responses of the subject during a provocative event in space and provide a real-time feedback display to reinforce the training.

  6. Direct Oral Anticoagulants and Women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, Hannah; Arachchillage, Deepa R. J.; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; Middeldorp, Saskia; Kadir, Rezan A.

    2016-01-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) provide an effective, safe, and convenient therapeutic alternative to warfarin and other vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), and are now established for a wide range of indications. The use of DOACs in women merits special consideration due to two main situations: first,

  7. Generic switching of warfarin and risk of excessive anticoagulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellfritzsch, Maja; Rathe, Jette; Stage, Tore Bjerregaard

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Generic switching of warfarin was recently repealed in Denmark, as adverse drug reaction (ADR) reports suggested risk of excessive anticoagulation following switches from branded to generic warfarin. We investigated this putative association in a formalized pharmacoepidemiological analysis....... METHODS: We conducted a nationwide cohort study based on Danish healthcare registries, including data from the introduction of generic warfarin until the repeal (January 2011-April 2015). We followed Danish warfarin users over time and compared the rate of incident hospitalizations due to excessive...... anticoagulation (i.e. increased INR or any bleeding requiring hospitalization) in periods following a recent switch to generic warfarin to the rate in periods without a recent switch. RESULTS: We included 105,751 warfarin users, filling a total of 1,539,640 prescriptions for warfarin (2.5% for generic warfarin...

  8. Pediatric ambulatory anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    August, David A; Everett, Lucinda L

    2014-06-01

    Pediatric patients often undergo anesthesia for ambulatory procedures. This article discusses several common preoperative dilemmas, including whether to postpone anesthesia when a child has an upper respiratory infection, whether to test young women for pregnancy, which children require overnight admission for apnea monitoring, and the effectiveness of nonpharmacological techniques for reducing anxiety. Medication issues covered include the risks of anesthetic agents in children with undiagnosed weakness, the use of remifentanil for tracheal intubation, and perioperative dosing of rectal acetaminophen. The relative merits of caudal and dorsal penile nerve block for pain after circumcision are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Secondary osteoporosis induced by anticoagulants?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riess, H; Loew, A; Himmelreich, G

    2001-07-01

    Generalized osteoporosis is a result of different causes and pathogenic mechanisms, which often combine forces to become clinically relevant. Among the different exogenic factors, drugs play an important role, frequently in connection with other factors such as immobilization or pregnancy. It has been suggested that anticoagulation therapy with heparins or coumarins may induce osteoporotic changes or enhance the development of osteoporosis for other reasons. According to in vitro experiments, preclinical trials, and clinical investigations, it seems reasonable to assume that heparins induce increased bone loss in a time- and dose-related manner. Low-molecular-weight heparins most likely have less effect on bone turnover when compared to unfractionated heparin. Oral anticoagulation therapy with vitamin K-antagonists is believed to have a weak effect on induction of osteoporosis, but clinical studies are contradictory. In spite of the fact that a relevant effect of these drugs on the induction of osteoporosis is questionable, it must be taken into consideration that anticoagulant drugs may enhance the negative effects on bone density of other risk factors capable of inducing osteoporosis such as immobilization, pregnancy, or endocrinological disorders.

  10. Unanticipated hospital admission in pediatric patients with congenital heart disease undergoing ambulatory noncardiac surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuki, Koichi; Koutsogiannaki, Sophia; Lee, Sandra; DiNardo, James A

    2018-05-18

    An increasing number of surgical and nonsurgical procedures are being performed on an ambulatory basis in children. Analysis of a large group of pediatric patients with congenital heart disease undergoing ambulatory procedures has not been undertaken. The objective of this study was to characterize the profile of children with congenital heart disease who underwent noncardiac procedures on an ambulatory basis at our institution, to determine the incidence of adverse cardiovascular and respiratory adverse events, and to determine the risk factors for unscheduled hospital admission. This is a retrospective study of children with congenital heart disease who underwent noncardiac procedures on an ambulatory basis in a single center. Using the electronic preoperative anesthesia evaluation form, we identified 3010 patients with congenital heart disease who underwent noncardiac procedures of which 1028 (34.1%) were scheduled to occur on an ambulatory basis. Demographic, echocardiographic and functional status data, cardiovascular and respiratory adverse events, and reasons for postprocedure admission were recorded. Univariable analysis was conducted. The unplanned hospital admission was 2.7% and univariable analysis demonstrated that performance of an echocardiogram within 6 mo of the procedure and procedures performed in radiology were associated with postoperative admission. Cardiovascular adverse event incidence was 3.9%. Respiratory adverse event incidence was 1.8%. Ambulatory, noncomplex procedures can be performed in pediatric patients with congenital heart disease and good functional status with a relatively low unanticipated hospital admission rate. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Managing reversal of direct oral anticoagulants in emergency situations Anticoagulation Education Task Force White Paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ageno, Walter; Büller, Harry R.; Falanga, Anna; Hacke, Werner; Hendriks, Jeroen; Lobban, Trudie; Merino, Jose; Milojevic, Ivan S.; Moya, Francisco; van der Worp, H. Bart; Randall, Gary; Tsioufis, Konstantinos; Verhamme, Peter; Camm, A. John

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulation is the cornerstone of prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the mechanisms by which anticoagulants confer therapeutic benefit also increase the risk of bleeding. As such, reversal strategies

  12. Direct oral anticoagulants and venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Franchini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE, consisting of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a major clinical concern associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The cornerstone of management of VTE is anticoagulation, and traditional anticoagulants include parenteral heparins and oral vitamin K antagonists. Recently, new oral anticoagulant drugs have been developed and licensed, including direct factor Xa inhibitors (e.g. rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban and thrombin inhibitors (e.g. dabigatran etexilate. This narrative review focusses on the characteristics of these direct anticoagulants and the main results of published clinical studies on their use in the prevention and treatment of VTE.

  13. Secondary poisoning of owls by anticoagulant rodenticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendenhall, Vivian M.; Pank, L.F.

    1980-01-01

    Anticoagulants-compounds that prevent clotting of the blood-are extensively used for control of small mammal pests. The potential secondary hazards of 6 anticoagulant rodenticides to birds of prey were examined in this study. Whole rats or mice were killed with each anticoagulant and were fed to 1-3 species of owls. Owls died of hemorrhaging after feeding on rats killed with bromadiolone, brodifacoum, or diphacinone; sublethal hemorrhaging occurred in owls fed rats killed with difenacoum. These results demonstrate potential secondary hazards of 4 anticoagulants to avian predators. No abnormalities were observed in owls fed rats killed with fumarin and chlorophacinone

  14. [Ambulatory pediatrics: a challenge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransy, V; Gevers, B; Landsberg, M

    2006-01-01

    Ambulatory paediatrics in University hospitals has remarkably evolved during the past decade, along with technological progress and the current need for undelayed information and attention; demand for hospital medical advice increases consequently, either directly in outpatients wards or indirectly by phone or e-mails. Specific medico-social aspects linked essentially to populations' migration, poverty, chronic stress and family splitting are regularly encountered. Hospital architecture and adequacy of medical and nursing staff must both be adjusted to these changing medical demands including medical teaching. We now face the ever-growing challenge of providing an adequate management of actual medico-psycho-social aspects and integrating up-to-date paediatrics in our daily practices.

  15. Graves’ Disease and Treatment Effects on Warfarin Anticoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Howard-Thompson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hyperthyroidism causes an increased hypoprothrombinemic response to warfarin anticoagulation. Previous studies have demonstrated that patients with hyperthyroidism require lower dosages of warfarin to achieve a therapeutic effect. As hyperthyroidism is treated and euthyroidism is approached, patients may require increasing warfarin dosages to maintain appropriate anticoagulation. We describe a patient’s varying response to warfarin during treatment of Graves’ disease. Case Presentation. A 48-year-old African American female presented to the emergency room with tachycardia, new onset bilateral lower extremity edema, gradual weight loss, palpable goiter, and generalized sweating over the prior 4 months. She was admitted with Graves’ disease and new onset atrial fibrillation. Primary stroke prophylaxis was started using warfarin; the patient developed a markedly supratherapeutic INR likely due to hyperthyroidism. After starting methimazole, her free thyroxine approached euthyroid levels and the INR became subtherapeutic. She remained subtherapeutic over several months despite steadily increasing dosages of warfarin. Immediately following thyroid radioablation and discontinuation of methimazole, the patient’s warfarin dose and INR stabilized. Conclusion. Clinicians should expect an increased response to warfarin in patients with hyperthyroidism and close monitoring of the INR is imperative to prevent adverse effects. As patients approach euthyroidism, insufficient anticoagulation is likely without vigilant follow-up, INR monitoring, and increasing warfarin dosages.

  16. Nebulized anticoagulants limit pulmonary coagulopathy, but not inflammation, in a model of experimental lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, Jorrit J; Vlaar, Alexander P; Cornet, Alexander D; Dixon, Barry; Roelofs, Joris J; Choi, Goda; van der Poll, Tom; Levi, Marcel; Schultz, Marcus J

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary coagulopathy may contribute to an adverse outcome in lung injury. We assessed the effects of local anticoagulant therapy on bronchoalveolar and systemic haemostasis in a rat model of endotoxemia-induced lung injury. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were intravenously

  17. Recommendations for the anticoagulation of pregnant patients with mechanical heart valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schapkaitz, Elise; Jacobson, Barry Frank; Manga, Pravin; Chitsike, Rufaro Saeed; Benade, Estee; Haas, Sylvia; Buller, Harry R.

    2015-01-01

    The management of pregnant patients with mechanical heart valves remains challenging because there are no large randomised studies to provide guidelines for effective anticoagulant therapy. Both vitamin K antagonists and heparins may be associated with maternal and foetal adverse events. The

  18. Anticoagulant activity of ginger ( Zingiber officinale Rosc ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Herbal medicines with anticoagulant therapeutic claims could serve as veritable sources of new oral anticoagulant drugs with possible wider safety margins than the currently available ones. Objectives: This work was aimed at evaluating a Ginger Rhizome Methanolic Extract in vivo in rats for its potential ...

  19. Anticoagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rounds Seminar Series & Daily Conferences Fellowships and Residencies School of Perfusion Technology Education Resources Library & Learning Resource Center CME Resources THI Journal THI Cardiac Society Register for the Cardiac Society ...

  20. Impact of INR monitoring, reversal agent use, heparin bridging, and anticoagulant interruption on rebleeding and thromboembolism in acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyoshi Nagata

    Full Text Available Anticoagulant management of acute gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB during the pre-endoscopic period has not been fully addressed in American, European, or Asian guidelines. This study sought to evaluate the risks of rebleeding and thromboembolism in anticoagulated patients with acute GIB.Baseline, endoscopy, and outcome data were reviewed for 314 patients with acute GIB: 157 anticoagulant users and 157 age-, sex-, and important risk-matched non-users. Data were also compared between direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs and warfarin users.Between anticoagulant users and non-users, of whom 70% underwent early endoscopy, no endoscopy-related adverse events or significant differences were found in the rate of endoscopic therapy need, transfusion need, rebleeding, or thromboembolism. Rebleeding was associated with shock, comorbidities, low platelet count and albumin level, and low-dose aspirin use but not HAS-BLED score, any endoscopic results, heparin bridge, or international normalized ratio (INR ≥ 2.5. Risks for thromboembolism were INR ≥ 2.5, difference in onset and pre-endoscopic INR, reversal agent use, and anticoagulant interruption but not CHA2DS2-VASc score, any endoscopic results, or heparin bridge. In patients without reversal agent use, heparin bridge, or anticoagulant interruption, there was only one rebleeding event and no thromboembolic events. Warfarin users had a significantly higher transfusion need than DOACs users.Endoscopy appears to be safe for anticoagulant users with acute GIB compared with non-users. Patient background factors were associated with rebleeding, whereas anticoagulant management factors (e.g. INR correction, reversal agent use, and drug interruption were associated with thromboembolism. Early intervention without reversal agent use, heparin bridge, or anticoagulant interruption may be warranted for acute GIB.

  1. Falls in ambulatory individuals with spinal cord injury : incidence, risk factors and perceptions of falls

    OpenAIRE

    Jørgensen, Vivien

    2016-01-01

    Background: Falls in ambulatory individuals with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) are common and may have adverse consequences. Little and inconclusive research has been done in this population, and there is a need for more knowledge in order to develop prevention strategies appropriate for this population. Aim: The overall aim of this thesis was to study the incidence of and identify the risk factors for recurrent (>2) and injurious falls in ambulatory individuals with SCI...

  2. The first pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic under a collaborative practice agreement in Qatar: clinical and patient-oriented outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elewa, H F; AbdelSamad, O; Elmubark, A E; Al-Taweel, H M; Mohamed, A; Kheir, N; Mohamed Ibrahim, M I; Awaisu, A

    2016-08-01

    Optimal outpatient anticoagulation management requires a systematic and coordinated approach. Extensive evidence regarding the benefits of pharmacist-managed anticoagulation services has been reported in the literature. The quality and outcomes associated with pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinics under collaborative practice agreements in the Middle East have rarely been reported. The first pharmacist-managed ambulatory anticoagulation clinic in Qatar was launched at Al-Wakrah Hospital in March 2013. The objectives of this study were to: (i) describe the practice model of the clinic, (ii) evaluate the quality of the clinic [i.e. the time in therapeutic range (TTR)] and the clinical outcomes (i.e. the efficacy and safety), and (iii) determine the patients' satisfaction and overall quality of life (QoL). Clinical outcome data were collected through a retrospective chart review of all patients managed from March 2013 to October 2014 at the pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic. Furthermore, the patient-oriented outcomes data were prospectively collected using the 24-item Duke Anticoagulation Satisfaction Scale (DASS). Each item was assessed using a 7-point Likert-type scale on which lower scores indicated better QoL and greater satisfaction. The clinical outcome data analyses included 119 patients who were enrolled at the clinic during the 19-month study period. The mean number of international normalized ratio (INR) tests/month was 65 ± 9, the average testing frequency was 2·7 ± 1·6 weeks, and the average %TTR was 76·8 ± 22·9%. There was one major bleeding event (0·67%/year), 12 minor bleeding events (8%/year) and two thromboembolic events (1·35%/year) recorded during the study period. Of the 119 patients, 50 participated in the satisfaction and QoL survey. The median (IQR) total QoL score of these subjects was 63 (48) (minimum-maximum achievable score: 24-168). Seventy-six per cent of the patients indicated 'a lot to very much' in terms of their

  3. Anticoagulation period in idiopathic venous thromboembolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farraj, Rami S.

    2004-01-01

    The period of anticoagulation of a first episode of idiopathic venous thromboembolism has been 6 months. It is unclear if such patients would benefit from longer treatment, as there appears to be an increased risk of recurrence after anticoagulation is stopped. In a randomized prospective study of 64 patients admitted to King Hussein Medical city, Amman, Jordan, who developed a first episode of venous thromboembolism, 32 patients were given warfarin for 24-months, while 32 patients stopped anticoagulation after completion of 6-months of therapy. Our goal was to determine the effects of extended anticoagulation on rates of recurrence of symptomatic venous thromboembolism and bleeding. The patients were followed for 12-months after stopping anticoagulation. After 24-months, 7 of the 32 patients (21%) who had standard anticoagulation for 6-months had a recurrent episode of thromboembolism compared to one of the 32 patients who received anticoagulation for 24 months (3%). Extended warfarin therapy for 24-months has resulted in an absolute risk reduction of 0.1% (p<0.05). This translates into 8 patients having to be treated for 24-months to avoid one recurrence without increasing the risk of major bleeding. Two patients in each group (6%) had major nonfatal bleeding, all 4 bleeding episodes occurring within the first 3-months of anticoagulation. After 36-months of follow up, the recurrence rate of extended warfarin therapy was only 3 patients (9%), which is a 43% relative reduction in recurrence of thromboembolism compared to standard therapy for 6-months. Patients with first episodes of idiopathic venous thromboembolism have an increased risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism and should be treated with oral anticoagulants for longer than 6-months, probably 24-months. (author)

  4. Lupus anticoagulant, disease activity and low complement in the first trimester are predictive of pregnancy loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankee, Anil; Petri, Michelle; Magder, Laurence S

    2015-01-01

    Multiple factors, including proteinuria, antiphospholipid syndrome, thrombocytopenia and hypertension, are predictive of pregnancy loss in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In the PROMISSE study of predictors of pregnancy loss, only a battery of lupus anticoagulant tests was predictive of a composite of adverse pregnancy outcomes. We examined the predictive value of one baseline lupus anticoagulant test (dilute Russell viper venom time) with pregnancy loss in women with SLE. From the Hopkins Lupus Cohort, there were 202 pregnancies from 175 different women after excluding twin pregnancies and pregnancies for which we did not have a first trimester assessment of lupus anticoagulant. We determined the percentage of women who had a pregnancy loss in groups defined by potential risk factors. The lupus anticoagulant was determined by dilute Russell viper venom time with appropriate mixing and confirmatory testing. Generalised estimating equations were used to calculate p values, accounting for repeated pregnancies in the same woman. The age at pregnancy was 40 (3%). 55% were Caucasian and 34% African-American. Among those with lupus anticoagulant during the first trimester, 6/16 (38%) experienced a pregnancy loss compared with only 16/186 (9%) of other pregnancies (p=0.003). In addition, those with low complement or higher disease activity had a higher rate of pregnancy loss than those without (p=0.049 and 0.005, respectively). In contrast, there was no association between elevated anticardiolipin in the first trimester and pregnancy loss. The strongest predictor of pregnancy loss in SLE in the first trimester is the lupus anticoagulant. In addition, moderate disease activity by the physician global assessment and low complement measured in the first trimester were predictive of pregnancy loss. These data suggest that treatment of the lupus anticoagulant could be considered, even in the absence of history of pregnancy loss.

  5. Gaps in monitoring during oral anticoagulation: insights into care transitions, monitoring barriers, and medication nonadherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Adam J; Miller, Donald R; Ozonoff, Al; Berlowitz, Dan R; Ash, Arlene S; Zhao, Shibei; Reisman, Joel I; Hylek, Elaine M

    2013-03-01

    Among patients receiving oral anticoagulation, a gap of > 56 days between international normalized ratio tests suggests loss to follow-up that could lead to poor anticoagulation control and serious adverse events. We studied long-term oral anticoagulation care for 56,490 patients aged 65 years and older at 100 sites of care in the Veterans Health Administration. We used the rate of gaps in monitoring per patient-year to predict percentage time in therapeutic range (TTR) at the 100 sites. Many patients (45%) had at least one gap in monitoring during an average of 1.6 years of observation; 5% had two or more gaps per year. The median gap duration was 74 days (interquartile range, 62-107). The average TTR for patients with two or more gaps per year was 10 percentage points lower than for patients without gaps (P < .001). Patient-level predictors of gaps included nonwhite race, area poverty, greater distance from care, dementia, and major depression. Site-level gaps per patient-year varied from 0.19 to 1.78; each one-unit increase was associated with a 9.2 percentage point decrease in site-level TTR (P < .001). Site-level gap rates varied widely within an integrated care system. Sites with more gaps per patient-year had worse anticoagulation control. Strategies to address and reduce gaps in monitoring may improve anticoagulation control.

  6. Biomedical Wireless Ambulatory Crew Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiel, Alan; Humphreys, Brad

    2009-01-01

    A compact, ambulatory biometric data acquisition system has been developed for space and commercial terrestrial use. BioWATCH (Bio medical Wireless and Ambulatory Telemetry for Crew Health) acquires signals from biomedical sensors using acquisition modules attached to a common data and power bus. Several slots allow the user to configure the unit by inserting sensor-specific modules. The data are then sent real-time from the unit over any commercially implemented wireless network including 802.11b/g, WCDMA, 3G. This system has a distributed computing hierarchy and has a common data controller on each sensor module. This allows for the modularity of the device along with the tailored ability to control the cards using a relatively small master processor. The distributed nature of this system affords the modularity, size, and power consumption that betters the current state of the art in medical ambulatory data acquisition. A new company was created to market this technology.

  7. National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) is designed to collect data on the utilization and provision of ambulatory care services in hospital...

  8. Isolation and characterization of anticoagulant compound from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GIS

    2013-10-02

    Oct 2, 2013 ... The structural characterization of anticoagulant GAG was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared ... for pharmaceutical use are currently not available. However ... methods and sold live in the market for human consump- tion.

  9. Anaesthesia for Ambulatory Paediatric Surgery: Common ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Ambulatory surgical care accounts for over 70% of elective procedures in Northern America. Ambulatory paediatric surgical practice is not widespread in Nigeria. This report examined clinical indicators for quality care in paediatric ambulatory surgery using common outcomes after day case procedures as ...

  10. Non-hemorrhage-related adverse effects of rivaroxaban

    OpenAIRE

    Christopoulou, Eliza C.; Filippatos, Theodosios D.; Elisaf, Moses S.

    2017-01-01

    The direct oral anticoagulant rivaroxaban is useful in various indications that include venous deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis/treatment after knee/hip replacement surgery and prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Its mechanism of action has been mostly associated with hemorrhage-related adverse effects; thus a number of non-hemorrhage-related adverse effects of the drug have received less attention or go unrecognized. These adverse effects mainly include li...

  11. Anesthesia for ambulatory anorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudaityte, Jūrate; Marchertiene, Irena; Pavalkis, Dainius

    2004-01-01

    The prevalence of minor anorectal diseases is 4-5% of adult Western population. Operations are performed on ambulatory or 24-hour stay basis. Requirements for ambulatory anesthesia are: rapid onset and recovery, ability to provide quick adjustments during maintenance, lack of intraoperative and postoperative side effects, and cost-effectiveness. Anorectal surgery requires deep levels of anesthesia. The aim is achieved with 1) regional blocks alone or in combination with monitored anesthesia care or 2) deep general anesthesia, usually with muscle relaxants and tracheal intubation. Modern general anesthetics provide smooth, quickly adjustable anesthesia and are a good choice for ambulatory surgery. Popular regional methods are: spinal anesthesia, caudal blockade, posterior perineal blockade and local anesthesia. The trend in regional anesthesia is lowering the dose of local anesthetic, providing selective segmental block. Adjuvants potentiating analgesia are recommended. Postoperative period may be complicated by: 1) severe pain, 2) urinary retention due to common nerve supply, and 3) surgical bleeding. Complications may lead to hospital admission. In conclusion, novel general anesthetics are recommended for ambulatory anorectal surgery. Further studies to determine an optimal dose and method are needed in the group of regional anesthesia.

  12. Anticoagulation and high dose liver radiation. A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lightdale, C.J.; Wasser, J.; Coleman, M.; Brower, M.; Tefft, M.; Pasmantier, M.

    1979-01-01

    Two groups of patients were observed for evidence of acute radiation hepatitis during high dose radiation to the liver. The first group of 18 patients with metastatic liver disease received an average of 4,050 rad to the whole liver. Half received anticoagulation with warfarin. One patient on anticoagulation developed evidence of acute radiation hepatitis while 2 patients did so without anticoagulation. Eleven patients with Hodgkin's disease received 4,000 rad to the left lobe of the liver during extended field radiation. Four of these 11 patients were anticoagulated to therapeutic range. Only one of the fully anticoagulated patients showed changes on liver scan consistent with radiation hepatitis whereas three did so without anticoagulation. No serious sequelae from anticoagulation occurred in either group. These preliminary data suggest that anticoagulation may be safely administered with high dose hepatic radiation and that further trials with anticoagulation are warranted

  13. [Face-lift surgery in ambulatory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulhiard, F

    2017-10-01

    The proposal is to demonstrate that facelift surgery is particularly suitable for the care in ambulatory. Between 2010 and 2016, 246 patients were operated for a facelift in ambulatory. No major complication arose in this series (241). Among the patients, 98% expressed their satisfaction and would accept again this intervention in ambulatory. The facelift can be realized in ambulatory with complete safety. The rate of satisfaction shows a very strong support of the patients for the ambulatory care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Anticoagulant rodenticides and wildlife: Concluding remarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brink, Nico W.; Elliott, John E.; Shore, Richard F.; Rattner, Barnett A.

    2018-01-01

    Rodents are known to affect human society globally in various adverse ways, resulting in a widespread demand for their continuous control. Anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) have been, and currently remain, the cornerstone of rodent control throughout the world. Although alternative control methods exist, they are generally less effective. ARs work by affecting vitamin K metabolism, thereby preventing the activation of blood clotting factors and eventual coagulopathy. Since ARs are non-selective, their undoubted benefits for rodent control have to be balanced against the environmental risks that these compounds pose. Although they have been used for decades, pharmacokinetic and toxicokinetic data are mainly available for laboratory mammals and have concentrated on acute effects. Limited information is available on chronic exposure scenarios and for wildlife species. Important gaps exist in our understanding of the large inter- and intra-species differences in sensitivity to ARs, especially for non-target species, and in our knowledge about the occurrence and importance of sub-lethal effects in wildlife. It is clear that mere presence of AR residues in the body tissues may not indicate the occurrence of effects, although unequivocal assessment of effects under field conditions is difficult. Ante-mortem symptoms, like lethargy, subdued behaviour and unresponsiveness are generally not very specific as is true for more generic post-mortem observations (e.g. pallor of the mucous membranes or occurrence of haemorrhages). It is only by combining ante or post-mortem data with information on exposure that effects in the field may be confirmed. We do know however that a wide variety of non-target species are directly exposed to ARs. Secondary exposure in predators is also widespread although there is limited information on whether this exposure causes actual effects. Exposure is driven by ecological factors and is context specific with respect to spatial habitat configuration

  15. Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Indexes in Cushing's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battocchio, Marialberta; Rebellato, Andrea; Grillo, Andrea; Dassie, Francesca; Maffei, Pietro; Bernardi, Stella; Fabris, Bruno; Carretta, Renzo; Fallo, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    Long-standing exposure to endogenous cortisol excess is associated with high cardiovascular risk. The aim of our study was to investigate arterial stiffness, which has been recognized as an independent predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcome, in a group of patients with Cushing's syndrome. Twenty-four patients with Cushing's syndrome (3 males, mean age 49±13 years; 20 pituitary-dependent Cushing's disease and 4 adrenal adenoma) underwent 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and evaluation of cardiovascular risk factors. The Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Index (AASI) and symmetric AASI (sAASI) were derived from ABPM tracings. Cushing patients were divided into 8 normotensive (NOR-CUSH) and 16 hypertensive (HYP-CUSH) patients, and were compared with 8 normotensive (NOR-CTR) and 16 hypertensive (HYP-CTR) control subjects, matched for demographic characteristics, 24-h ABPM and cardiometabolic risk factors. The AASI and sAASI indexes were significantly higher in Cushing patients than in controls, either in the normotensive (p=0.048 for AASI and p=0.013 for sAASI) or in the hypertensive (p=0.004 for AASI and p=0.046 for sAASI) group. No difference in metabolic parameters was observed between NOR-CUSH and NOR-CTR or between HYP-CUSH and HYP-CTR groups. AASI and sAASI were both correlated with urinary cortisol in patients with endogenous hypercortisolism (Spearman's rho=0.40, p=0.05, and 0.61, p=0.003, respectively), while no correlation was found in controls. Both AASI and sAASI are increased in Cushing syndrome, independent of BP elevation, and may represent an additional cardiovascular risk factor in this disease. The role of excess cortisol in arterial stiffness has to be further clarified. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. The Anticoagulation of Calf Thrombosis (ACT project: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horner Daniel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Half of all lower limb deep vein thrombi (DVT in symptomatic ambulatory patients are located in the distal (calf veins. While proximal disease warrants therapeutic anticoagulation to reduce the associated risks, distal DVT often goes untreated. However, a proportion of untreated distal disease will undoubtedly propagate or embolize. Concern also exists that untreated disease could lead to long-term post thrombotic changes. Currently, it is not possible to predict which distal thrombi will develop such complications. Whether these potential risks outweigh those associated with unrestricted anticoagulation remains unclear. The Anticoagulation of Calf Thrombosis (ACT trial aims to compare therapeutic anticoagulation against conservative management for patients with acute symptomatic distal deep vein thrombosis. Methods ACT is a pragmatic, open-label, randomized controlled trial. Adult patients diagnosed with acute distal DVT will be allocated to either therapeutic anticoagulation or conservative management. All patients will undergo 3 months of clinical and assessor blinded sonographic follow-up, followed by 2-year final review. The project will commence initially as an external pilot study, recruiting over a 16-month period at a single center to assess feasibility measures and clinical event rates. Primary outcome measures will assess feasibility endpoints. Secondary clinical outcomes will be collected to gather accurate data for the design of a definitive clinical trial and will include: (1 a composite endpoint combining thrombus propagation to the popliteal vein or above, development of symptomatic pulmonary embolism or sudden death attributable to venous thromboembolic disease; (2 the incidence of major and minor bleeding episodes; (3 the incidence of post-thrombotic leg syndrome at 2 years using a validated screening tool; and (4 the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE recurrence at 2 years. Discussion The ACT trial

  17. Postoperative pain management following ambulatory anesthesia: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schug SA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stephan A Schug,1,2 Chandani Chandrasena2 1School of Medicine and Pharmacology, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia; 2Department of Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, WA, Australia Abstract: Worldwide, there is an increasing trend toward performing more and more complex surgery in an ambulatory setting, partially driven by economic considerations. Provision of appropriate pain relief is still often inadequate in this setting; poor pain control and adverse effects of opioids provided for pain control are common reasons for readmission, with human and economic consequences. Therefore, improved analgesia after ambulatory surgery is an important goal; appropriate strategies include identification of at-risk patients, provision of multimodal analgesia, and early use of rescue strategies. Multimodal analgesia is based on the combined use of multiple medications or techniques for pain control, which have different mechanisms of action or act on different sites at the pain pathways. Thereby, such an approach improves analgesia, reduces opioid requirements, and reduces adverse effects of opioids. Important components of multimodal analgesia are nonopioids (acetaminophen and anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, and alpha-2-delta modulators (gabapentin, pregabalin, but most importantly the use of local and regional anesthesia techniques. Here, the use of adjuvants is one way to increase the duration of pain relief, but, increasingly, continuous peripheral nerve blocks via catheters are used in ambulatory patients, too. Finally, the planning of discharge medications needs a balancing act between the requirements for provision of good analgesia and the risk of opioids going out into the community. Keywords: ambulatory surgery, short-stay surgery, multimodal analgesia, nonopioids, local anesthetics, regional anesthesia

  18. Assessing Bleeding Risk in Patients Taking Anticoagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoeb, Marwa; Fang, Margaret C.

    2013-01-01

    Anticoagulant medications are commonly used for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolism. Although highly effective, they are also associated with significant bleeding risks. Numerous individual clinical factors have been linked to an increased risk of hemorrhage, including older age, anemia, and renal disease. To help quantify hemorrhage risk for individual patients, a number of clinical risk prediction tools have been developed. These risk prediction tools differ in how they were derived and how they identify and weight individual risk factors. At present, their ability to effective predict anticoagulant-associated hemorrhage remains modest. Use of risk prediction tools to estimate bleeding in clinical practice is most influential when applied to patients at the lower spectrum of thromboembolic risk, when the risk of hemorrhage will more strongly affect clinical decisions about anticoagulation. Using risk tools may also help counsel and inform patients about their potential risk for hemorrhage while on anticoagulants, and can identify patients who might benefit from more careful management of anticoagulation. PMID:23479259

  19. Evidence-Based Management of Anticoagulant Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Sam; Witt, Daniel M.; Vandvik, Per Olav; Fish, Jason; Kovacs, Michael J.; Svensson, Peter J.; Veenstra, David L.; Crowther, Mark; Guyatt, Gordon H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: High-quality anticoagulation management is required to keep these narrow therapeutic index medications as effective and safe as possible. This article focuses on the common important management questions for which, at a minimum, low-quality published evidence is available to guide best practices. Methods: The methods of this guideline follow those described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: Most practical clinical questions regarding the management of anticoagulation, both oral and parenteral, have not been adequately addressed by randomized trials. We found sufficient evidence for summaries of recommendations for 23 questions, of which only two are strong rather than weak recommendations. Strong recommendations include targeting an international normalized ratio of 2.0 to 3.0 for patients on vitamin K antagonist therapy (Grade 1B) and not routinely using pharmacogenetic testing for guiding doses of vitamin K antagonist (Grade 1B). Weak recommendations deal with such issues as loading doses, initiation overlap, monitoring frequency, vitamin K supplementation, patient self-management, weight and renal function adjustment of doses, dosing decision support, drug interactions to avoid, and prevention and management of bleeding complications. We also address anticoagulation management services and intensive patient education. Conclusions: We offer guidance for many common anticoagulation-related management problems. Most anticoagulation management questions have not been adequately studied. PMID:22315259

  20. Risk of gastrointestinal bleeding during anticoagulant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanas-Gimeno, Aitor; Lanas, Angel

    2017-06-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) is a major problem in patients on oral anticoagulation therapy. This issue has become even more pressing since the introduction of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in 2009. Areas covered: Here we review current evidence related to GIB associated with oral anticoagulants, focusing on randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, and post-marketing observational studies. Dabigatran 150 mg twice daily and rivaroxaban 20 mg once daily increase the risk of GIB compared to warfarin. The risk increase with edoxaban is dose-dependent, while apixaban shows apparently, no increased risk. We summarize what is known about GIB risk factors for individual anticoagulants, the location of GIB in patients taking these compounds, and prevention strategies that lower the risk of GIB. Expert opinion: Recently there has been an important shift in the clinical presentation of GIB. Specifically, upper GIB has decreased with the decreased incidence of peptic ulcers due to the broad use of proton pump inhibitors and the decreased prevalence of H. pylori infections. In contrast, the incidence of lower GIB has increased, due in part to colonic diverticular bleeding and angiodysplasia in the elderly. In this population, the addition of oral anticoagulation therapy, especially DOACs, seems to increase the risk of lower GIB.

  1. Reversal of target-specific oral anticoagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, D.M.; Cuker, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Target-specific oral anticoagulants (TSOACs) provide safe and effective anticoagulation for the prevention and treatment of thrombosis in a variety of clinical settings by interfering with the activity of thrombin (dabigatran) or factor Xa (rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban, betrixaban). Although TSOACs have practical advantages over vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), there are currently no antidotes to reverse their anticoagulant effect. Herein we summarize the available evidence for TSOAC reversal using nonspecific and specific reversal agents. We discuss important limitations of existing evidence, which is derived from studies in human volunteers, animal models and in vitro experiments. Studies evaluating the safety and efficacy of reversal agents on clinical outcomes such as bleeding and mortality in patients with TSOAC-associated bleeding are needed. PMID:24880102

  2. Evaluation of hematuria in anticoagulated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuttino, J.T.; Clark, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of investigating hematuria in anticoagulated patients the authors examined records of 25 consecutive patients with hematuria who were on an anticoagulation regimen with sodium warfarin (Coumadin) for various thromboembolic disorders. All had undergone intravenous urography (IVU) and 12 had undergone cystoscopy. Potential bleeding sources were discovered in 14 patients by IVU and in seven patients by cystoscopy. Disorders found were renal stones (4), transitional carcinoma (1), lymphoma (1), retroperitoneal hematoma (1), bladder tumors (2), calcified renal mass (1), hemorrhagic cystitis (2), and enlarged prostate (7). In 18 (72%) patients, the findings on IVU and/or cystoscopy were abnormal. Hematuria is a serious symptom that warrants investigation in anticoagulated as well as nonanticoagulated patients

  3. Infection management following ambulatory surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin AB

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Anne B Chin, Elizabeth C Wick Department of Surgery, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Surgical site infections (SSIs are frequent postoperative complications that are linked to measures of surgical quality and payment determinations. As surgical procedures are increasingly performed in the ambulatory setting, management of SSIs must transition with this trend. Prevention of SSIs should include optimization of patient comorbidities, aggressive infection control policies including appropriate skin decontamination, maintenance of normothermia, and appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis. Systems must also be set in place to provide adequate surveillance for identification of SSIs when they do occur as well as provide direct feedback to surgeons regarding SSI rates. This may require utilization of claims-based surveillance. Patient education and close follow-up with the clinical team are essential for early identification and management of SSIs. Therapy should remain focused on source control and appropriate antibiotic therapy. Keywords: ambulatory surgery, SSI, infection

  4. MARINE LEECH ANTICOAGULANT DIVERSITY AND EVOLUTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessler, Michael; Marancik, David; Champagne, Donald; Dove, Alistair; Camus, Alvin; Siddall, Mark E; Kvist, Sebastian

    2018-03-16

    Leeches (Annelida: Hirudinea) possess powerful salivary anticoagulants and, accordingly, are frequently employed in modern, authoritative medicine. Members of the almost exclusively marine family Piscicolidae account for 20% of leech species diversity, and feed on host groups (e.g., sharks) not encountered by their freshwater and terrestrial counterparts. Moreover, some species of Ozobranchidae feed on endangered marine turtles and have been implicated as potential vectors for the tumor-associated turtle herpesvirus. In spite of their ecological importance and unique host associations, there is a distinct paucity of data regarding the salivary transcriptomes of either of these families. Using next generation sequencing, we profiled transcribed, putative anticoagulants and other salivary bioactive compounds that have previously been linked to bloodfeeding from 7 piscicolid species (3 elasmobranch-feeders; 4 non-cartilaginous fish-feeders) and 1 ozobranchid species (2 samples). In total, 149 putative anticoagulants and bioactive loci were discovered in varying constellations throughout the different samples. The putative anticoagulants showed a broad spectrum of described antagonistic pathways, such as inhibition of factor Xa and platelet aggregation, that likely have similar bioactive roles in marine fish and turtles. A transcript with homology to ohanin, originally isolated from king cobras, was found in Cystobranchus vividus but is otherwise unknown from leeches. Estimation of selection pressures for the putative anticoagulants recovered evidence for both positive and purifying selection along several isolated branches in the gene trees and positive selection was also estimated for a few select codons in a variety of marine species. Similarly, phylogenetic analyses of the amino acid sequences for several anticoagulants indicated divergent evolution.

  5. Citrate Anticoagulation during Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Davide; Panicali, Laura; Facchini, Maria Grazia; Mancini, Elena

    2017-01-01

    During extracorporeal dialysis, some anticoagulation strategy is necessary to prevent the coagulation of blood. Heparin has historically been used as an anticoagulant because of its efficacy combined with low cost. However, a variable incidence of hemorrhagic complications (5-30%) has been documented in patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) with heparin as an anticoagulant. Citrate has anticoagulation properties secondary to its ability to chelate calcium, which is necessary for the coagulation cascade. Citrate may thus be used in a regional anticoagulation (RCA), limited to the extracorporeal circuit of CRRT, to avoid systemic anticoagulation. Recent meta-analysis confirmed the advantage of RCA over heparin in terms of incidence of bleeding during CRRT. Moreover, an increase in filter lifespan is documented, with a secondary advantage in reaching the prescribed dialysis dose. In our experience, we could confirm this positive effect. In fact, with a progressive increase in the proportion of CRRT with citrate as RCA, we obtained a reduction in the number of filters used for every 72 h of treatment (from 2.4 in 2011 to 1.3 in 2015), and most importantly, a reduction in the difference between the prescribed and delivered dialysis doses (from 22 to 7%). Citrate has an intense effect on the acid-base balance as well, if fully metabolized through the Krebs cycle, due to the production of bicarbonate. Even more severely ill patients, such as those with liver dysfunction, may be treated with RCA without severe complications, because modern machines for CRRT are equipped with simple systems that are able to manage the citrate infusion and control the calcium levels, with minimal risks of metabolic derangements. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Hematometra secondary to anticoagulant rodenticide toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padgett, S.L.; Stokes, J.E.; Tucker, R.L.; Wheaton, L.G.

    1998-01-01

    An adult, intact female Australian shepherd presented for frank vaginal bleeding of unknown duration. The only coagulation profile abnormality upon presentation was mild prolongation of the partial thromboplastin time (PTT). The uterus was removed at surgery and contained a large amount of coagulated blood. Clotting profiles were markedly abnormal48 hours postoperatively. Serum analysis was positive for brodifacoum, an anticoagulant rodenticide. Preoperative coagulation was most likely normalized by vitamin K-1 therapy administered prior to presentation. The only manifestation of anticoagulant rodenticide was hematometra. Rodenticide intoxication should be considered in the differential diagnosis list of hematometra or metrorrhagia

  7. Anticoagulant Medicine: Potential for Drug-Food Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medications Anticoagulants and Drug-Food Interactions Anticoagulants and Drug-Food Interactions Make an Appointment Ask a Question Refer Patient ... Jewish Health wants you to be aware these drug-food interactions when taking anticoagulant medicine. Ask your health care ...

  8. The pharmacology of recombinant hirudin, a new anticoagulant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A new anticoagulant, recombinant hirudin, was given to healthy volunteers (5 per test dose) in single .intravenous doses of 0,01, 0,02, 0,04, 0,07 and 0,1 mg/kg to study its anticoagulant effects, how it was tolerated and its pharmacokinetics. Hirudin proved to be a potent anticoagulant with important effects on thrombin ...

  9. Synthesis of Fucosylated Chondroitin Sulfate Glycoclusters: A Robust Route to New Anticoagulant Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Yao, Wang; Xu, Xiaojiang; Sun, Huifang; Zhao, Jinhua; Meng, Xiangbao; Wu, Mingyi; Li, Zhongjun

    2018-02-01

    Fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FuCS) is a structurally distinct glycosaminoglycan with excellent anticoagulant activity. Studies show that FuCS and its depolymerized fragments exhibit a different anticoagulant mechanism from that of heparin derivatives, with decreased risks of adverse effects and bleeding. However, further exploitation has been hindered by the scarcity of structurally defined oligosaccharides. Herein, facile method is reported for the synthesis of the repeating trisaccharide unit of FuCS based on the degradation of chondroitin sulfate polymers. A series of simplified FuCS glycomimetics that have highly tunable structures, controllable branches, and defined sulfation motifs were generated by copper-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition. Remarkable improvement in activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) assay activities was observed as the branches increased, but no significant influences were observed for prothrombin time (PT) and thrombin time (TT) assay activities. Further FXase inhibition tests suggested that glycoclusters 33 b-40 b selectively inhibited intrinsic anticoagulant activities, but had little effect on the extrinsic and common coagulation pathways. Notably, glycoclusters with the 2,4-di-O-sulfated fucosyl residue displayed the most potency, which was in consistent with that of natural polysaccharides. These FuCS clusters demonstrated potency to mimic linear glycosaminoglycans and offer a new framework for the development of novel anticoagulant agents. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Prescribing Safety in Ambulatory Care: Physician Perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rundall, Thomas G; Hsu, John; Lafata, Jennifer E; Fung, Vicki; Paez, Kathryn A; Simpkins, Jan; Simon, Steven R; Robinson, Scott B; Uratsu, Connie; Gunter, Margaret J; Soumerai, Stephen B; Selby, Joseph V

    2005-01-01

    .... We asked about current safety practices, perceptions of ambulatory prescribing safety. Using a content analysis approach, three investigators independently coded responses into thematic categories...

  11. Subdural hematoma and oral anticoagulant therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintzen, A. R.; Tijssen, J. G.

    1982-01-01

    In a retrospective study of the period 1959 to 1978, the role of anticoagulant therapy (ACT) in the development of subdural hematoma (SH) was investigated. Of 212 cases, 46 were receiving ACT, a proportion highly in excess of the frequency of ACT in the general population of the Leiden area. In this

  12. Severe jaundice due to intrahepatic cholestasis after initiating anticoagulation with rivaroxaban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Abdullah N; Sari, Cenk; Baştuğ, Serdal; Sari, Sevil Ö; Akçay, Murat; Durmaz, Tahir; Bozkurt, Engin

    2016-03-01

    Rivaroxaban, a highly selective direct factor Xa inhibitor, is a new oral anticoagulant approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in November 2011 for stroke prophylaxis in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Because of its efficacy and once-a-day dosing, it is commonly preferred in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and intolerance to warfarin in clinical practice. However, it can result in some adverse effects such as bleeding, rashes and liver injury. Here, we described a very rare adverse reaction of rivaroxaban, jaundice due to intrahepatic cholestasis, appeared in a 71-year-old male patient after taking rivaroxaban.

  13. Ambulatory surgery for the patient with breast cancer: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pek CH

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Chong Han Pek,1 John Tey,2 Ern Yu Tan1 1Department of General Surgery, 2Department of Anaesthesiology, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore Abstract: Ambulatory breast cancer surgery is well accepted and is the standard of care at many tertiary centers. Rather than being hospitalized after surgery, patients are discharged on the day of surgery or within 23 hours. Such early discharge does not adversely affect patient outcomes and has the added benefits of better psychological adjustment for the patient, economic savings, and a more efficient utilization of health care resources. The minimal care needed post-discharge also means that the caregiver is not unduly burdened. Unplanned conversions to inpatient admission and readmission rates are low. Wound complications are infrequent and no issues with drain care have been reported. Because the period of postoperative observation is short and monitoring is not as intensive, ambulatory surgery is only suitable for low-risk procedures such as breast cancer surgery and in patients without serious comorbidities, where the likelihood of major perioperative events is low. Optimal management of pain, nausea, and vomiting is essential to ensure a quick recovery and return to normal function. Regional anesthesia such as the thoracic paravertebral block has been employed to improve pain control during the surgery and in the immediate postoperative period. The block provides excellent pain relief and reduces the need for opiates, which also consequently reduces the incidence of nausea and vomiting. The increasing popularity of total intravenous anesthesia with propofol has also helped reduce the incidence of nausea and vomiting in the postoperative period. Ambulatory surgery can be safely carried out in centers where there is a well-designed workflow to ensure proper patient selection, counseling, and education, and where patients and caregivers have easy access to

  14. Ambulatory ST segment monitoring after myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mickley, H

    1994-01-01

    as important reasons for the inconsistent findings. The precise role of ambulatory ST segment monitoring in clinical practice has yet to be established. Direct comparisons with exercise stress testing may not be appropriate for two reasons. Firstly, the main advantage of ambulatory monitoring may...

  15. Optimizing anesthesia techniques in the ambulatory setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Galvin (Eilish)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAmbulatory surgery refers to the process of admitting patients, administering anesthesia and surgical care, and discharging patients home following an appropriate level of recovery on the same day. The word ambulatory is derived from the latin word ambulare, which means ''to walk''. This

  16. Percutaneous left atrial appendage occlusion in atrial fibrillation patients with a contraindication to oral anticoagulation: a focused review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Marin; Sab, Shiv; Reeves, Ryan R; Hsu, Jonathan C

    2017-12-08

    Stroke is the most feared complication of atrial fibrillation (AF). Although oral anticoagulation with non-vitamin K antagonist and non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been established to significantly reduce risk of stroke, real-world use of these agents are often suboptimal due to concerns for adverse events including bleeding from both patients and clinicians. Particularly in patients with previous serious bleeding, oral anticoagulation may be contraindicated. Left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO), mechanically targeting the source of most of the thrombi in AF, holds an immense potential as an alternative to OAC in management of stroke prophylaxis. In this focused review, we describe the available evidence of various LAAO devices, detailing data regarding their use in patients with a contraindication for oral anticoagulation. Although some questions of safety and appropriate use of these new devices in patients who cannot tolerate anticoagulation remain, LAAO devices offer a significant step forward in the management of patients with AF, including those patients who may not be able to be prescribed OAC at all. Future studies involving patients fully contraindicated to OAC are warranted in the era of LAAO devices for stroke risk reduction. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Anticoagulant rodenticide toxicity to non-target wildlife under controlled exposure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, Barnett A.; Mastrota, F. Nicholas; van den Brink, Nico; Elliott, J.; Shore, R.; Rattner, B.

    2018-01-01

    Much of our understanding of anticoagulant rodenticide toxicity to non-target wildlife has been derived from molecular through whole animal research and registration studies in domesticated birds and mammals, and to a lesser degree from trials with captive wildlife. Using these data, an adverse outcome pathway identifying molecular initiating and anchoring events (inhibition of vitamin K epoxide reductase, failure to activate clotting factors), and established and plausible linkages (coagulopathy, hemorrhage, anemia, reduced fitness) associated with toxicity, is presented. Controlled exposure studies have demonstrated that second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides (e.g., brodifacoum) are more toxic than first- and intermediate-generation compounds (e.g., warfarin, diphacinone), however the difference in potency is diminished when first- and intermediate-generation compounds are administered on multiple days. Differences in species sensitivity are inconsistent among compounds. Numerous studies have compared mortality rate of predators fed prey or tissue containing anticoagulant rodenticides. In secondary exposure studies in birds, brodifacoum appears to pose the greatest risk, with bromadiolone, difenacoum, flocoumafen and difethialone being less hazardous than brodifacoum, and warfarin, coumatetralyl, coumafuryl, chlorophacinone and diphacinone being even less hazardous. In contrast, substantial mortality was noted in secondary exposure studies in mammals ingesting prey or tissue diets containing either second- or intermediate-generation compounds. Sublethal responses (e.g., prolonged clotting time, reduced hematocrit and anemia) have been used to study the sequelae of anticoagulant intoxication, and to some degree in the establishment of toxicity thresholds or toxicity reference values. Surprisingly few studies have undertaken histopathological evaluations to identify cellular lesions and hemorrhage associated with anticoagulant rodenticide exposure in non

  18. Anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A S; Idorn, L; Nørager, B

    2015-01-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease are a growing population. One of the major challenges in the care of these patients is to prevent thromboembolic episodes. Despite relative young age and no typical cardiovascular risk factors, this cohort has a high prevalence of thrombotic events....... Furthermore, there is a lack of scientific evidence regarding how to prevent thromboembolic events with anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature pertaining to anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease and hence enable....... It is difficult to use treatment algorithms from the general adult population with acquired heart disease in this heterogeneous population due to special conditions such as myocardial scarring after previous surgery, atypical atrial flutter, prothrombotic conditions and the presence of interatrial shunts...

  19. Collaborative Care in Ambulatory Psychiatry: Content Analysis of Consultations to a Psychiatric Pharmacist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotlib, Dorothy; Bostwick, Jolene R; Calip, Seema; Perelstein, Elizabeth; Kurlander, Jacob E; Fluent, Thomas

    2017-09-15

    To determine the volume and nature (or topic) of consultations submitted to a psychiatric pharmacist embedded in an ambulatory psychiatry clinic, within a tertiary care academic medical center and to increase our understanding about the ways in which providers consult with an available psychiatric pharmacist. Authors analyze and describe the ambulatory psychiatric pharmacist consultation log at an academic ambulatory clinic. All consultation questions were submitted between July 2012 and October 2014. Psychiatry residents, attending physicians, and advanced practice nurse practitioners submitted 280 primary questions. The most common consultation questions from providers consulted were related to drug-drug interactions (n =70), drug formulations/dosing (n =48), adverse effects (n =43), and pharmacokinetics/lab monitoring/cross-tapering (n =36). This is a preliminary analysis that provides information about how psychiatry residents, attending physicians, and advanced practice nurse practitioners at our health system utilize a psychiatric pharmacist. This collaborative relationship may have implications for the future of psychiatric care delivery.

  20. Heterofucans from Dictyota menstrualis have anticoagulant activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.R.L. Albuquerque

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Fucan is a term used to denote a family of sulfated L-fucose-rich polysaccharides which are present in the extracellular matrix of brown seaweed and in the egg jelly coat of sea urchins. Plant fucans have several biological activities, including anticoagulant and antithrombotic, related to the structural and chemical composition of polysaccharides. We have extracted sulfated polysaccharides from the brown seaweed Dictyota menstrualis by proteolytic digestion, followed by separation into 5 fractions by sequential acetone precipitation. Gel electrophoresis using 0.05 M 1,3-diaminopropane-acetate buffer, pH 9.0, stained with 0.1% toluidine blue, showed the presence of sulfated polysaccharides in all fractions. The chemical analyses demonstrated that all fractions are composed mainly of fucose, xylose, galactose, uronic acid, and sulfate. The anticoagulant activity of these heterofucans was determined by activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT using citrate normal human plasma. Only the fucans F1.0v and F1.5v showed anticoagulant activity. To prolong the coagulation time to double the baseline value in the APTT, the required concentration of fucan F1.0v (20 µg/ml was only 4.88-fold higher than that of the low molecular weight heparin Clexane® (4.1 µg/ml, whereas 80 µg/ml fucan 1.5 was needed to obtain the same effect. For both fucans this effect was abolished by desulfation. These polymers are composed of fucose, xylose, uronic acid, galactose, and sulfate at molar ratios of 1.0:0.8:0.7:0.8:0.4 and 1.0:0.3:0.4:1.5:1.3, respectively. This is the fist report indicating the presence of a heterofucan with higher anticoagulant activity from brown seaweed.

  1. Evaluation of computerized decision support for oral anticoagulation management based in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzmaurice, D A; Hobbs, F D; Murray, E T; Bradley, C P; Holder, R

    1996-09-01

    Increasing indications for oral anticoagulation has led to pressure on general practices to undertake therapeutic monitoring. Computerized decision support (DSS) has been shown to be effective in hospitals for improving clinical management. Its usefulness in primary care has previously not been investigated. To test the effectiveness of using DSS for oral anticoagulation monitoring in primary care by measuring the proportions of patients adequately controlled, defined as within the appropriate therapeutic range of International Normalised Ratio (INR). All patients receiving warfarin from two Birmingham inner city general practices were invited to attend a practice-based anticoagulation clinic. In practice A all patients were managed using DSS. In practice B patients were randomized to receive dosing advice either through DSS or through the local hospital laboratory. Clinical outcomes, adverse events and patient acceptability were recorded. Forty-nine patients were seen in total. There were significant improvements in INR control from 23% to 86% (P > 0.001) in the practice where all patients received dosing through DSS. In the practice where patients were randomized to either DSS or hospital dosing, logistic regression showed a significant trend for improvement in intervention patients which was not apparent in the hospital-dosed patients (P DSS through the full 12 months (24 days to 36 days) (P = 0.033). Adverse events were comparable between hospital and practice-dosed patients, although a number of esoteric events occurred. Patient satisfaction with the practice clinics was high. Computerized DSS enables the safe and effective transfer of anticoagulation management from hospital to primary care and may result in improved patient outcome in terms of the level of control, frequency of review and general acceptability.

  2. Antiplatelet and Anticoagulant Drugs in Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altenburg, Alexander; Haage, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    In treating peripheral arterial disease, a profound knowledge of antiplatelet and anticoagulative drug therapy is helpful to assure a positive clinical outcome and to anticipate and avoid complications. Side effects and drug interactions may have fatal consequences for the patient, so interventionalists should be aware of these risks and able to control them. Aspirin remains the first-line agent for antiplatelet monotherapy, with clopidogrel added where dual antiplatelet therapy is required. In case of suspected antiplatelet drug resistance, the dose of clopidogrel may be doubled; prasugrel or ticagrelor may be used alternatively. Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (abciximab or eptifibatide) may help in cases of hypercoagulability or acute embolic complications. Desmopressin, tranexamic acid, or platelet infusions may be used to decrease antiplatelet drug effects in case of bleeding. Intraprocedurally, anticoagulant therapy treatment with unfractionated heparin (UFH) still is the means of choice, although low molecular-weight heparins (LMWH) are suitable, particularly for postinterventional treatment. Adaption of LMWH dose is often required in renal insufficiency, which is frequently found in elderly patients. Protamine sulphate is an effective antagonist for UFH; however, this effect is less for LMWH. Newer antithrombotic drugs, such as direct thrombin inhibitors or factor X inhibitors, have limited importance in periprocedural treatment, with the exception of treating patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). Nevertheless, knowing pharmacologic properties of the newer drugs facilitate correct bridging of patients treated with such drugs. This article provides a comprehensive overview of antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs for use before, during, and after interventional radiological procedures.

  3. Direct oral anticoagulants: what can we learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marongiu, Francesco; Barcellona, Doris

    2018-03-02

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) represent an innovation because they avoid periodic laboratory monitoring, and also reduce cerebral bleeding. An examination of the performance of DOACs versus warfarin in randomized clinical trials dedicated to atrial fibrillation would reveal the poor performance of warfarin because the percentage of major bleeding is always above 3%; however, the percentage of major bleeding is less than half of that when the management is done in anticoagulation clinics (ACs). Several years ago, a common opinion was that ACs would disappear as soon as DOACs enter the market. We proposed then that ACs could be transformed into thrombosis centres (TCs) because we envisaged many new activities in terms of diagnostic tools and therapeutic choices. After the introduction of DOACs, the role of the ACs has been re-evaluated because their role may be crucial in selecting both the most appropriate diagnostic approach and the best therapeutic option (including anti-vitamin K drugs) for the single patient. TCs can organize a regular follow-up to improve patient adherence to DOACs. Marketing might have a role in the decision making of the single doctor. Efforts should be made for limiting the relationships between doctors and pharmaceutical companies. It seems reasonable to better prepare doctors, during their university courses, for them to develop a greater scientific culture that would enable them to critically read clinical studies and acquire an independent opinion. Ideally, an expert in haemostasis and thrombosis should handle new and old anticoagulants.

  4. Laboratory Assessment of the Anticoagulant Activity of Direct Oral Anticoagulants: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelson, Bethany T; Cuker, Adam; Siegal, Deborah M; Crowther, Mark; Garcia, David A

    2017-01-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are the treatment of choice for most patients with atrial fibrillation and/or noncancer-associated venous thromboembolic disease. Although routine monitoring of these agents is not required, assessment of anticoagulant effect may be desirable in special situations. The objective of this review was to summarize systematically evidence regarding laboratory assessment of the anticoagulant effects of dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban. PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science were searched for studies reporting relationships between drug levels and coagulation assay results. We identified 109 eligible studies: 35 for dabigatran, 50 for rivaroxaban, 11 for apixaban, and 13 for edoxaban. The performance of standard anticoagulation tests varied across DOACs and reagents; most assays, showed insufficient correlation to provide a reliable assessment of DOAC effects. Dilute thrombin time (TT) assays demonstrated linear correlation (r 2  = 0.67-0.99) across a range of expected concentrations of dabigatran, as did ecarin-based assays. Calibrated anti-Xa assays demonstrated linear correlation (r 2  = 0.78-1.00) across a wide range of concentrations for rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban. An ideal test, offering both accuracy and precision for measurement of any DOAC is not widely available. We recommend a dilute TT or ecarin-based assay for assessment of the anticoagulant effect of dabigatran and anti-Xa assays with drug-specific calibrators for direct Xa inhibitors. In the absence of these tests, TT or APTT is recommended over PT/INR for assessment of dabigatran, and PT/INR is recommended over APTT for detection of factor Xa inhibitors. Time since last dose, the presence or absence of drug interactions, and renal and hepatic function should impact clinical estimates of anticoagulant effect in a patient for whom laboratory test results are not available. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier

  5. Use of anticoagulants in elderly patients: practical recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helia Robert-Ebadi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Helia Robert-Ebadi, Grégoire Le Gal, Marc RighiniDivision of Angiology and Hemostasis (HRE, MR, Department of Internal Medicine, Geneva University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland, and Department of Internal Medicine and Chest Diseases, EA 3878 (GETBO, Brest University Hospital, Brest, France (GLGAbstract: Elderly people represent a patient population at high thromboembolic risk, but also at high hemorrhagic risk. There is a general tendency among physicians to underuse anticoagulants in the elderly, probably both because of underestimation of thromboembolic risk and overestimation of bleeding risk. The main indications for anticoagulation are venous thromboembolism (VTE prophylaxis in medical and surgical settings, VTE treatment, atrial fibrillation (AF and valvular heart disease. Available anticoagulants for VTE prophylaxis and initial treatment of VTE are low molecular weight heparins (LMWH, unfractionated heparin (UFH or synthetic anti-factor Xa pentasaccharide fondaparinux. For long-term anticoagulation vitamin K antagonists (VKA are the first choice and only available oral anticoagulants nowadays. Assessing the benefit-risk ratio of anticoagulation is one of the most challenging issues in the individual elderly patient, patients at highest hemorrhagic risk often being those who would have the greatest benefit from anticoagulants. Some specific considerations are of utmost importance when using anticoagulants in the elderly to maximize safety of these treatments, including decreased renal function, co-morbidities and risk of falls, altered pharmacodynamics of anticoagulants especially VKAs, association with antiplatelet agents, patient education. Newer anticoagulants that are currently under study could simplify the management and increase the safety of anticoagulation in the future.Keywords: anticoagulation, elderly patients, venous thromboembolism, hemorrhagic risk, atrial fibrillation, thrombin inhibitors, factor Xa

  6. The mythology of anticoagulation therapy interruption for dental surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    Continuous anticoagulation therapy is used to prevent heart attacks, strokes, and other embolic complications. When patients receiving anticoagulation therapy undergo dental surgery, a decision must be made about whether to continue anticoagulation therapy and risk bleeding complications or briefly interrupt anticoagulation therapy and increase the risk of developing embolic complications. Results from decades of studies of thousands of dental patients receiving anticoagulation therapy reveal that bleeding complications requiring more than local measures for hemostasis have been rare and never fatal. However, embolic complications (some of which were fatal and others possibly permanently debilitating) sometimes have occurred in patients whose anticoagulation therapy was interrupted for dental procedures. Although there is now virtually universal consensus among national medical and dental groups and other experts that anticoagulation therapy should not be interrupted for most dental surgery, there are still some arguments made supporting anticoagulation therapy interruption. An analysis of these arguments shows them to be based on a collection of myths and half-truths rather than on logical scientific conclusions. The time has come to stop anticoagulation therapy interruption for dental procedures. Copyright © 2018 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimal duration of anticoagulation in patients with venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prandoni, Paolo; Piovella, Chiara; Spiezia, Luca; Dalla Valle, Fabio; Pesavento, Raffaele

    2011-07-01

    The risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) approaches 40 per cent of all patients after 10 yr of follow up. This risk is higher in patients with permanent risk factors of thrombosis such as active cancer, prolonged immobilization from medical diseases, and antiphospholipid syndrome; in carriers of several thrombophilic abnormalities, including deficiencies of natural anticoagulants; and in patients with unprovoked presentation. Patients with permanent risk factors of thrombosis should receive indefinite anticoagulation, consisting of subtherapeutic doses of low molecular weight heparin in cancer patients, and oral anticoagulants in all other conditions. Patients whose VTE is triggered by major surgery or trauma should be offered three months of anticoagulation. Patients with unprovoked VTE, including carriers of thrombophilia, and those whose thrombotic event is associated with minor risk factors (such as hormonal treatment, minor injuries, long travel) should receive at least three months of anticoagulation. The decision as to go on or discontinue anticoagulation after this period should be individually tailored and balanced against the haemorrhagic risk. Post-baseline variables, such as the D-dimer determination and the ultrasound assessment of residual thrombosis can help identify those patients in whom anticoagulation can be safely discontinued. As a few emerging anti-Xa and anti-IIa compounds seem to induce fewer haemorrhagic complications than conventional anticoagulation, while preserving at least the same effectiveness, these have the potential to open new scenarios for decisions regarding the duration of anticoagulation in patients with VTE.

  8. Ambulatory thyroidectomy: A multistate study of revisits and complications

    OpenAIRE

    Orosco, RK; Lin, HW; Bhattacharyya, N

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. Objective. Determine rates and reasons for revisits after ambulatory adult thyroidectomy. Study Design. Cross-sectional analysis of multistate ambulatory surgery and hospital databases. Setting. Ambulatory surgery data from the State Ambulatory Surgery Databases of California, Florida, Iowa, and New York for calendar years 2010 and 2011. Subjects and Methods. Ambulatory thyroidectomy cases were linked to state ambul...

  9. Polynomial analysis of ambulatory blood pressure measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwinderman, A. H.; Cleophas, T. A.; Cleophas, T. J.; van der Wall, E. E.

    2001-01-01

    In normotensive subjects blood pressures follow a circadian rhythm. A circadian rhythm in hypertensive patients is less well established, and may be clinically important, particularly with rigorous treatments of daytime blood pressures. Polynomial analysis of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring

  10. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) is a national survey designed to meet the need for objective, reliable information about the provision and use of...

  11. Measuring the educational environment in ambulatory settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnoldo Riquelme

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: The 50-item ACLEEM inventory is a multidimensional and valid instrument requiring only 15 respondents for reliable results. We recommend using it to measure the EE in the ambulatory postgraduate Spanish-speaking programs.

  12. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring - comparison with office ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ambulatory blood pressure recordings in private practice ... position according to established guidelines. ... white-coat effect was defined as a difference of at least 20 .... patients with hypertension: Importance of blood pressure response to ...

  13. Ambulatory care visits by Taiwanese dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hwa Su

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: There were inequalities in risks of ambulatory care use among Taiwan's dentists. Further studies should be conducted to investigate the causes responsible for the observed geographic and institutional variations in the risk of morbidity among dentists in Taiwan.

  14. Ambulatory cleft lip surgery: A value analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneja, Jugpal S; Mitton, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Socialized health systems face fiscal constraints due to a limited supply of resources and few reliable ways to control patient demand. Some form of prioritization must occur as to what services to offer and which programs to fund. A data-driven approach to decision making that incorporates outcomes, including safety and quality, in the setting of fiscal prudence is required. A value model championed by Michael Porter encompasses these parameters, in which value is defined as outcomes divided by cost. To assess ambulatory cleft lip surgery from a quality and safety perspective, and to assess the costs associated with ambulatory cleft lip surgery in North America. Conclusions will be drawn as to how the overall value of cleft lip surgery may be enhanced. A value analysis of published articles related to ambulatory cleft lip repair over the past 30 years was performed to determine what percentage of patients would be candidates for ambulatory cleft lip repair from a quality and safety perspective. An economic model was constructed based on costs associated with the inpatient stay related to cleft lip repair. On analysis of the published reports in the literature, a minority (28%) of patients are currently discharged in an ambulatory fashion following cleft lip repair. Further analysis suggests that 88.9% of patients would be safe candidates for same-day discharge. From an economic perspective, the mean cost per patient for the overnight admission component of ambulatory cleft surgery to the health care system in the United States was USD$2,390 and $1,800 in Canada. The present analysis reviewed germane publications over a 30-year period, ultimately suggesting that ambulatory cleft lip surgery results in preservation of quality and safety metrics for most patients. The financial model illustrates a potential cost saving through the adoption of such a practice change. For appropriately selected patients, ambulatory cleft surgery enhances overall health care value.

  15. Reversing anticoagulant effects of novel oral anticoagulants: role of ciraparantag, andexanet alfa, and idarucizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu TY

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tiffany Y Hu,1 Vaibhav R Vaidya,2 Samuel J Asirvatham2,31Mayo Medical School, 2Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, 3Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs are increasingly used in clinical practice, but lack of commercially available reversal agents is a major barrier for mainstream use of these therapies. Specific antidotes to NOACs are under development. Idarucizumab (aDabi-Fab, BI 655075 is a novel humanized mouse monoclonal antibody that binds dabigatran and reverses its anticoagulant effect. In a recent Phase III study (Reversal Effects of Idarucizumab on Active Dabigatran, a 5 g intravenous infusion of idarucizumab resulted in the normalization of dilute thrombin time in 98% and 93% of the two groups studied, with normalization of ecarin-clotting time in 89% and 88% patients. Two other antidotes, andexanet alfa (PRT064445 and ciraparantag (PER977 are also under development for reversal of NOACs. In this review, we discuss commonly encountered management issues with NOACs such as periprocedural management, laboratory monitoring of anticoagulation, and management of bleeding. We review currently available data regarding specific antidotes to NOACs with respect to pharmacology and clinical trials.Keywords: novel oral anticoagulant, dabigatran, idarucizumab, reversal

  16. Initiation of anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundlund, A.; Staerk, L.; Fosbøl, E. L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The use of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) for stroke prophylaxis in atrial fibrillation (AF) is increasing rapidly. We compared characteristics of AF patients initiated on NOACs versus vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). Methods: Using Danish nationwide registry data, we...... compared with a VKA [odds ratio (OR) 1.35, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28–1.43]. By contrast, patients with a history of myocardial infarction were less likely to be initiated on a NOAC compared with a VKA (OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.67–0.77). Conclusions: Atrial fibrillation patients who were initiated...

  17. Vitamin K requirement in Danish anticoagulant-resistant Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette D.; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Nielsen, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus, Denmark, anticoagulant rodenticide resistance, vitamin K requirement......Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus, Denmark, anticoagulant rodenticide resistance, vitamin K requirement...

  18. Measuring interdependence in ambulatory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katerndahl, David; Wood, Robert; Jaen, Carlos R

    2017-04-01

    Complex systems differ from complicated systems in that they are nonlinear, unpredictable and lacking clear cause-and-effect relationships, largely due to the interdependence of their components (effects of interconnectedness on system behaviour and consequences). The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the potential for network density to serve as a measure of interdependence, assess its concurrent validity and test whether the use of valued or binary ties yields better results. This secondary analysis used the 2010 National Ambulatory Care Medical Survey to assess interdependence of 'top 20' diagnoses seen and medications prescribed for 14 specialties. The degree of interdependence was measured as the level of association between diagnoses and drug interactions among medications. Both valued and binary network densities were computed for each specialty. To assess concurrent validity, these measures were correlated with previously-derived valid measures of complexity of care using the same database, adjusting for diagnosis and medication diversity. Partial correlations between diagnosis density, and both diagnosis and total input complexity, were significant, as were those between medication density and both medication and total output complexity; for both diagnosis and medication densities, adjusted correlations were higher for binary rather than valued densities. This study demonstrated the feasibility and validity of using network density as a measure of interdependence. When adjusted for measure diversity, density-complexity correlations were significant and higher for binary than valued density. This approach complements other methods of estimating complexity of care and may be applicable to unique settings. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Utilization of oral anticoagulation in a teaching hospital in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mean age of the patients was 53.4 years and more females than males were on anticoagulation and monitoring (F14:M12). The most common indications for anticoagulation include deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism, congestive heart failure with atrial fibrillation and mitral valve disease with atrial fibrillation.

  20. Atrial Fibrillation in Embolic Stroke: Anticoagulant Therapy at UNTH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The decision to commence anticoagulation in a patient with embolic stroke and atrial fibrillation (AF) is often a difficult one for many clinicians. The result can have significant impact on the patient. This study was therefore undertaken to review the use of anticoagulation in embolic stroke in the setting of atrial ...

  1. Antithrombotic/anticoagulant and anticancer activities of selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antithrombotic/anticoagulant and anticancer activities of selected medicinal plants from South Africa. NLA Kee, N Mnonopi, H Davids, RJ Naudé, CL Frost. Abstract. Nine plants available in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa were tested for antithrombotic and/or anticoagulant activity. Organic (methanol) and aqueous ...

  2. Anticoagulation knowledge in patients with atrial fibrillation: An Australian survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obamiro, Kehinde O; Chalmers, Leanne; Lee, Kenneth; Bereznicki, Bonnie J; Bereznicki, Luke R E

    2018-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most commonly diagnosed arrhythmia in clinical practice, and is associated with a significant medical and economic burden. Anticoagulants reduce the risk of stroke and systemic embolism by approximately two-thirds compared with no therapy. Knowledge regarding anticoagulant therapy can influence treatment outcomes in patients with AF. To measure the level of anticoagulation knowledge in patients with AF taking oral anticoagulants (OACs), investigate the association between patient-related factors and anticoagulation knowledge, and compare these results in patients taking warfarin and direct-acting oral anticoagulant (DOACs). Participants were recruited for an online survey via Facebook. Survey components included the Anticoagulation Knowledge Tool, the Perception of Anticoagulant Treatment Questionnaires (assessing treatment expectations, convenience and satisfaction), a modified Cancer Information Overload scale and the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Treatment groups were compared and predictors of OAC knowledge were identified. Participants taking warfarin had a higher knowledge score compared with those taking DOACs (n = 386, 73% ± 13% vs 66% ± 14%, Pcounselling sessions to help identify and resolve knowledge deficits. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. New oral anticoagulant-induced bleeding: clinical presentation and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levy, Jerrold H.; Levi, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Bleeding is a significant complication of anticoagulant therapy. With the emergence of new oral anticoagulants (NOACs; ie, direct factor IIa or Xa inhibitors), this risk is further compounded by the lack of validated reversal strategies for these agents. Emerging postmarketing evidence suggests that

  4. Ambulatory heart rate is underestimated when measured by an Ambulatory Blood Pressure device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijkotte, T.G.M.; de Geus, E.J.C.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To test the validity of ambulatory heart rate (HR) assessment with a cuff ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) monitor. Design: Cross-instrument comparison of HR measured intermittently by a cuff ABP monitor (SpaceLabs, Redmond, Washington, USA), with HR derived from continuous

  5. Ambulatory heart rate is underestimated when measured by an ambulatory blood pressure device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijkotte, T. G.; de Geus, E. J.

    2001-01-01

    To test the validity of ambulatory heart rate (HR) assessment with a cuff ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) monitor. Cross-instrument comparison of HR measured intermittently by a cuff ABP monitor (SpaceLabs, Redmond, Washington, USA), with HR derived from continuous electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings

  6. Ambulatory heart rate is underestimated when measured by an ambulatory blood pressure device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijkotte, T.G.M.; de Geus, E.J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To test the validity of ambulatory heart rate (HR) assessment with a cuff ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) monitor. Design: Cross-instrument comparison of HR measured intermittently by a cuff ABP monitor (SpaceLabs, Redmond, Washington, USA), with HR derived from continuous

  7. Effects of computer-assisted oral anticoagulant therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Corell, Pernille; Madsen, Poul

    2012-01-01

    : Patients randomized to computer-assisted anticoagulation and the CoaguChek® system reached the therapeutic target range after 8 days compared to 14 days by prescriptions from physicians (p = 0.04). Time spent in the therapeutic target range did not differ between groups. The median INR value measured...... prescribed by physicians, and the total time spent within the therapeutic target range was similar. Thus computer-assisted oral anticoagulant therapy may reduce the cost of anticoagulation therapy without lowering the quality. INR values measured by CoaguChek® were reliable compared to measurements......UNLABELLED: BACKGROUND: Computer-assistance and self-monitoring lower the cost and may improve the quality of anticoagulation therapy. The main purpose of this clinical investigation was to use computer-assisted oral anticoagulant therapy to improve the time to reach and the time spent within...

  8. Anticoagulant therapy and its impact on dental patients: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thean, D; Alberghini, M

    2016-06-01

    Several new oral anticoagulants have been studied in the past decade, and have now started to enter the market. These drugs are reported to be as effective as, or more effective than, warfarin. In Australia, the Therapeutic Goods Administration has approved dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban. The use of these newer anticoagulants is likely to increase in time, and it is important for dentists to have a sound understanding of the mechanisms of action, reversal strategies, and management guidelines for patients taking oral anticoagulants. This article discusses the process of coagulation, available anticoagulants and their monitoring and reversal, and provides clinical advice on the management of patients on anticoagulants who require dental treatment. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  9. Current issues in patient adherence and persistence: focus on anticoagulants for the treatment and prevention of thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick P Kneeland

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Patrick P Kneeland, Margaret C FangThe University of California, San Francisco Division of Hospital Medicine, San Francisco, CA, USAAbstract: Warfarin therapy reduces morbidity and mortality related to thromboembolism. Yet adherence to long-term warfarin therapy remains challenging due to the risks of anticoagulantassociated complications and the burden of monitoring. The aim of this paper is to review determinants of adherence and persistence on long-term anticoagulant therapy for atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism. We evaluate what the current literature reveals about the impact of warfarin on quality of life, examine warfarin trial data for patterns of adherence, and summarize known risk factors for warfarin discontinuation. Studies suggest only modest adverse effects of warfarin on quality of life, but highlight the variability of individual lifestyle experiences of patients on warfarin. Interestingly, clinical trials comparing anticoagulant adherence to alternatives (such as aspirin show that discontinuation rates on warfarin are not consistently higher than in control arms. Observational studies link a number of risk factors to warfarin non-adherence including younger age, male sex, lower stroke risk, poor cognitive function, poverty, and higher educational attainment. In addition to differentiating the relative impact of warfarin-associated complications (such as bleeding versus the lifestyle burdens of warfarin monitoring on adherence, future investigation should focus on optimizing patient education and enhancing models of physician–patient shared-decision making around anticoagulation.Keywords: anticoagulation, warfarin, adherence, persistence, thromboembolism

  10. Vaccine Adverse Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... in the primary immunization series in infants Report Adverse Event Report a Vaccine Adverse Event Contact FDA ( ...

  11. Ambulatory phlebectomy at radiologic outpatient clinic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Chang Jin; Kang, Sung Gwon; Choi, Sang Il [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University, Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    To evaluate safety, efficacy, and patient's satisfaction of an ambulatory phlebectomy, performed at a radiology outpatient clinic. Between 2003 and 2006, an ambulatory phlebectomy was performed in 12 patients. Endovenous radiofrequency ablation was performed through a venotomy. The venotomy was ligated after RF ablation, and the ambulatory phlebectomy was performed. The patients visited the radiology outpatient clinic one day, one week, and 2 months after the procedure. The improvement in the clinical symptoms, cosmetic change in varicosity, and the procedure related complications were evaluated. The patient's satisfaction was evaluated using a 5-grade scale. RF ablation through a venotomy was performed successfully in all 12 patients. On average, 4.5 incisions were made, and 12.5 cm of varicosity had been removed. The mean procedure time was one hour and forty minutes. The complications of the ambulatory phlebectomy were bruising in one patient, and skin pigmentation in another. The complications associated with RF ablation were a hard palpable vein in 7 patients, numbness in 7 patients, and skin pigmentation along the vein in 2 patients. Follow-up duplex sonography was performed at 2 months after the procedure, showed complete occlusion in all 12 patients. The clinical symptoms had improved in 11 patients, and the varicosity disappeared cosmetically in 11 patients. An ambulatory phlebectomy, combined with RF ablation of the greater saphenous vein, can be performed safely and effectively at a radiology outpatient clinic.

  12. Ambulatory phlebectomy at radiologic outpatient clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Chang Jin; Kang, Sung Gwon; Choi, Sang Il; Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate safety, efficacy, and patient's satisfaction of an ambulatory phlebectomy, performed at a radiology outpatient clinic. Between 2003 and 2006, an ambulatory phlebectomy was performed in 12 patients. Endovenous radiofrequency ablation was performed through a venotomy. The venotomy was ligated after RF ablation, and the ambulatory phlebectomy was performed. The patients visited the radiology outpatient clinic one day, one week, and 2 months after the procedure. The improvement in the clinical symptoms, cosmetic change in varicosity, and the procedure related complications were evaluated. The patient's satisfaction was evaluated using a 5-grade scale. RF ablation through a venotomy was performed successfully in all 12 patients. On average, 4.5 incisions were made, and 12.5 cm of varicosity had been removed. The mean procedure time was one hour and forty minutes. The complications of the ambulatory phlebectomy were bruising in one patient, and skin pigmentation in another. The complications associated with RF ablation were a hard palpable vein in 7 patients, numbness in 7 patients, and skin pigmentation along the vein in 2 patients. Follow-up duplex sonography was performed at 2 months after the procedure, showed complete occlusion in all 12 patients. The clinical symptoms had improved in 11 patients, and the varicosity disappeared cosmetically in 11 patients. An ambulatory phlebectomy, combined with RF ablation of the greater saphenous vein, can be performed safely and effectively at a radiology outpatient clinic

  13. New oral anticoagulants: key messages for clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Giorgi-Pierfranceschi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available New oral anticoagulants are an effective and safe alternative to vitamin K antagonists in many fields of clinical practice. The use of the direct inhibitors of activated Factor II (dabigatran and activated Factor X (apixaban and rivaroxaban, both in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF and those with acute venous thromboembolism (VTE, is of great interest for internal medicine physicians. This paper aims to give practical guidance on management (starting therapy, follow up and bleeding complications of patients treated with dabigatran, rivaroxaban or apixaban for NVAF or acute VTE providing practical tables concerning the phases of therapy, management of complications, drug interaction and dose adjustment if renal impairment occurs.

  14. Modeling Exposure of Mammalian Predatorsto Anticoagulant Rodenticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topping, Christopher John; Elmeros, Morten

    2016-01-01

    as vectors of AR, and was used to evaluate likely impacts of restrictions imposed on AR use in Denmark banning the use of rodenticides for plant protection in woodlands and tree-crops. The model uses input based on frequencies and timings of baiting for rodent control for urban, rural and woodland locations......Anticoagulant rodenticides (AR) are a widespread and effective method of rodent control but there is concern about the impact these may have on non-target organisms, in particular secondary poisoning of rodent predators. Incidence and concentration of AR in free-living predators in Denmark is very...... high. We postulate that this is caused by widespread exposure due to widespread use of AR in Denmark in and around buildings. To investigate this theory a spatio-temporal model of AR use and mammalian predator distribution was created. This model was supported by data from an experimental study of mice...

  15. Ambulatory care registered nurse performance measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Beth Ann; Haas, Sheila A; Chow, Marilyn

    2010-01-01

    On March 1-2, 2010, a state-of-the-science invitational conference titled "Ambulatory Care Registered Nurse Performance Measurement" was held to focus on measuring quality at the RN provider level in ambulatory care. The conference was devoted to ambulatory care RN performance measurement and quality of health care. The specific emphasis was on formulating a research agenda and developing a strategy to study the testable components of the RN role related to care coordination and care transitions, improving patient outcomes, decreasing health care costs, and promoting sustainable system change. The objectives were achieved through presentations and discussion among expert inter-professional participants from nursing, public health, managed care, research, practice, and policy. Conference speakers identified priority areas for a unified practice, policy, and research agenda. Crucial elements of the strategic dialogue focused on issues and implications for nursing and inter-professional practice, quality, and pay-for-performance.

  16. Ambulatory movements, team dynamics and interactions during robot-assisted surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nabeeha; Hussein, Ahmed A; Cavuoto, Lora; Sharif, Mohamed; Allers, Jenna C; Hinata, Nobuyuki; Ahmad, Basel; Kozlowski, Justen D; Hashmi, Zishan; Bisantz, Ann; Guru, Khurshid A

    2016-07-01

    To analyse ambulatory movements and team dynamics during robot-assisted surgery (RAS), and to investigate whether congestion of the physical space associated with robotic technology led to workflow challenges or predisposed to errors and adverse events. With institutional review board approval, we retrospectively reviewed 10 recorded robot-assisted radical prostatectomies in a single operating room (OR). The OR was divided into eight zones, and all movements were tracked and described in terms of start and end zones, duration, personnel and purpose. Movements were further classified into avoidable (can be eliminated/improved) and unavoidable (necessary for completion of the procedure). The mean operating time was 166 min, of which ambulation constituted 27 min (16%). A total of 2 896 ambulatory movements were identified (mean: 290 ambulatory movements/procedure). Most of the movements were procedure-related (31%), and were performed by the circulating nurse. We identified 11 main pathways in the OR; the heaviest traffic was between the circulating nurse zone, transit zone and supply-1 zone. A total of 50% of ambulatory movements were found to be avoidable. More than half of the movements during RAS can be eliminated with an improved OR setting. More studies are needed to design an evidence-based OR layout that enhances access, workflow and patient safety. © 2016 The Authors BJU International © 2016 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. HCUP State Ambulatory Surgery Databases (SASD) - Restricted Access Files

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The State Ambulatory Surgery Databases (SASD) contain the universe of hospital-based ambulatory surgery encounters in participating States. Some States include...

  18. Disadvantages of VKA and requirements for novel anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shameem, Raji; Ansell, Jack

    2013-06-01

    Vitamin K antagonists have been in wide use for over 70 years. Warfarin, the most commonly used vitamin K antagonist, has been shown to be highly effective in treating and preventing thrombosis. Despite this, warfarin has many disadvantages, which has led to the development of a new class of oral anticoagulants targeted to specific coagulation factors designated as target-specific oral anticoagulants (TSOAs). TSOAs include the thrombin inhibitors (dabigatran) and factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban). This chapter reviews the disadvantages of warfarin and evaluates both the advantages and disadvantages of the new oral anticoagulants. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Hemorrhagic stroke and oral anticoagulants: What is to be done?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Domashenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic stroke (HS is associated with high mortality and disability rates. Due to the introduction of the current guidelines for the prevention of systemic thromboembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillations and to an increase in the number of older patients, there has been a rise in the incidence of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH associated with the use of oral anticoagulants. The paper discusses medical treatment in patients with HS during therapy with vitamin K antagonists (warfarin and novel oral anticoagulants (dabigatran. rivaroxaban, apixaban, as well as an anticoagulant resumption policy after prior ICH in patients at high risk for thromboembolic events.

  20. Impact of anticoagulation therapy on valve haemodynamic deterioration following transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Trigo, María; Muñoz-García, Antonio J; Latib, Azeem; Auffret, Vincent; Wijeysundera, Harindra C; Nombela-Franco, Luis; Gutierrez, Enrique; Cheema, Asim N; Serra, Vicenç; Amat-Santos, Ignacio J; Kefer, Joelle; Benitez, Luis Miguel; Leclercq, Florence; Mangieri, Antonio; Le Breton, Hervé; Jiménez-Quevedo, Pilar; Garcia Del Blanco, Bruno; Dager, Antonio; Abdul-Jawad Altisent, Omar; Puri, Rishi; Pibarot, Philippe; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the changes in transvalvular gradients and the incidence of valve haemodynamic deterioration (VHD) following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), according to use of anticoagulation therapy. This multicentre study included 2466 patients (46% men; mean age 81±7 years) who underwent TAVR with echocardiography performed at 12-month follow-up. Anticoagulation therapy was used in 707 patients (28.7%) following TAVR (AC group). A total of 663 patients received vitamin K antagonists, and 44 patients received direct oral anticoagulants. A propensity score matching analysis was performed to adjust for intergroup (AC vs non-AC post-TAVR) differences. A total of 622 patients per group were included in the propensity-matched analysis. VHD was defined as a ≥10 mm Hg increase in the mean transprosthetic gradient at follow-up (vs hospital discharge). The mean clinical follow-up was 29±18 months. The mean transvalvular gradient significantly increased at follow-up in the non-AC group within the global cohort (P=0.003), whereas it remained stable over time in the AC group (P=0.323). The incidence of VHD was significantly lower in the AC group (0.6%) compared with the non-AC group (3.7%, P<0.001), and these significant differences remained within the propensity-matched populations (0.6% vs 3.9% in the AC and non-AC groups, respectively, P<0.001). The occurrence of VHD did not associate with an increased risk of all-cause death (P=0.468), cardiovascular death (P=0.539) or stroke (P=0.170) at follow-up. The lack of anticoagulation therapy post-TAVR was associated with significant increments in transvalvular gradients and a greater risk of VHD. VHD was subclinical in most cases and did not associate with major adverse clinical events. Future randomised trials are needed to determine if systematic anticoagulation therapy post-TAVR would reduce the incidence of VHD. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article

  1. Survey of Botulinum Toxin Injections in Anticoagulated Patients: Korean Physiatrists' Preference in Controlling Anticoagulation Profile Prior to Intramuscular Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yongjun; Park, Geun-Young; Park, Jihye; Choi, Asayeon; Kim, Soo Yeon; Boulias, Chris; Phadke, Chetan P; Ismail, Farooq; Im, Sun

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate Korean physiatrists' practice of performing intramuscular botulinum toxin injection in anticoagulated patients and to assess their preference in controlling the bleeding risk before injection. As part of an international collaboration survey study, a questionnaire survey was administered to 100 Korean physiatrists. Physiatrists were asked about their level of experience with botulinum toxin injection, the safe international normalized ratio range in anticoagulated patients undergoing injection, their tendency for injecting into deep muscles, and their experience of bleeding complications. International normalized ratio injection by 41% of the respondents. Thirty-six respondents replied that the international normalized ratio should be lowered to sub-therapeutic levels before injection, and 18% of the respondents reported that anticoagulants should be intentionally withheld and discontinued prior to injection. In addition, 20%-30% of the respondents answered that they were uncertain whether they should perform the injection regardless of the international normalized ratio values. About 69% of the respondents replied that they did have any standardized protocols for performing botulinum toxin injection in patients using anticoagulants. Only 1 physiatrist replied that he had encountered a case of compartment syndrome. In accordance with the lack of consensus in performing intramuscular botulinum toxin injection in anticoagulated patients, our survey shows a wide range of practices among many Korean physiatrists; they tend to avoid botulinum toxin injection in anticoagulated patients and are uncertain about how to approach these patients. The results of this study emphasize the need for formulating a proper international consensus on botulinum toxin injection management in anticoagulated patients.

  2. Outpatient and Ambulatory Surgery Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (OAS CAHPS) survey for ambulatory surgical centers - Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of ambulatory surgical center ratings for the Outpatient and Ambulatory Surgery Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (OAS CAHPS) survey....

  3. Efeitos adversos no tratamento da tuberculose: experiência em serviço ambulatorial de um hospital-escola na cidade de São Paulo Adverse effects of tuberculosis treatment: experience at an outpatient clinic of a teaching hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Eri Onodera Vieira

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Verificar a freqüência de efeitos adversos com o uso do Esquema I para tratamento da tuberculose e a necessidade de alterações no tratamento devido a esses efeitos. MÉTODOS: Foi feita uma análise retrospectiva de 329 prontuários de pacientes que foram tratados com o Esquema I e receberam alta por cura entre março de 2000 e abril de 2006 no Ambulatório de Tuberculose da Clínica de Pneumologia da Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo. Foram analisados os dados referentes aos efeitos adversos, época de seu aparecimento e modificações do esquema de tratamento subseqüentes. RESULTADOS: Foram incluídos 297 pacientes, e 146 (49,1% apresentaram um ou mais efeitos adversos relacionados às drogas antituberculose. A freqüência dos efeitos colaterais menores foi de 41,1%, e a dos efeitos maiores foi de 12,8%. Os efeitos relacionados ao trato gastrointestinal (40,3% e pele (22,1% foram os mais freqüentes. Os efeitos adversos foram mais freqüentes nos primeiros dois meses de tratamento (58,4%. Houve necessidade de modificação do esquema de tratamento em 11 casos (3,7% do total. A hepatite induzida por medicamentos foi o efeito colateral que mais exigiu modificações. CONCLUSÕES: A freqüência de efeitos adversos relacionados ao tratamento da tuberculose com o Esquema I foi de 49,1% neste grupo de pacientes. Entretanto, na maioria dos casos, não houve necessidade da modificação do esquema de tratamento devido aos efeitos adversos.OBJECTIVES: To determine the frequency of adverse effects related to the use of the tuberculosis treatment regimen designated Regimen I and the need for regimen alterations due to these effects. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 329 medical charts of patients who were treated with Regimen I and discharged after cure between March 2000 and April 2006 was carried out at the Tuberculosis Outpatient Clinic, Department of Pulmonology of the Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo Hospital in

  4. New anticoagulants for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J McRae

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Simon J McRae, Jeffrey S GinsbergDepartment of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, CanadaAbstract: Anticoagulant therapy is effective at preventing the development of venous thromboembolism in high-risk patients, and reduces morbidity and mortality in individuals with established thromboembolic disease. Vitamin K antagonists and heparins are currently the most commonly used anticoagulant drugs, but they have practical limitations. Therefore, new antithrombotic agents with predictable dose-responses (thereby decreasing the need for monitoring without compromising efficacy or safety, ideally available in an oral formulation and with a rapidly reversible anticoagulant effect, are needed. New drugs fulfilling some of the above criteria have been developed and have proven to be effective agents for the treatment and prevention of venous thromboembolism.Keywords: venous thromboembolism, anticoagulants, antithrombotic

  5. Prevalence of Lupus Anticoagulant in Women with Spontaneous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-10-26

    Oct 26, 2017 ... ... pregnancy. Presence of lupus anticoagulant (LA), one of the antiphospholipid antibodies, ... pregnancy outcomes such as preeclampsia/eclampsia and small for date deliveries. ... changes in a background of APL syndrome.

  6. Side effects of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, M.S. van der; Lenders, J.W.M.; Thien, Th.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the experiences and complaints of patients who underwent 24 h blood pressure monitoring. METHODS: Two groups of hypertensive patients of a tertiary outpatient clinic were asked to fill in a nine-item questionnaire about the side effects of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring

  7. Ambulatory Care Skills: Do Residents Feel Prepared?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Bonds

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine resident comfort and skill in performing ambulatory care skills. Methods: Descriptive survey of common ambulatory care skills administered to internal medicine faculty and residents at one academic medical center. Respondents were asked to rate their ability to perform 12 physical exam skills and 6 procedures, and their comfort in performing 7 types of counseling, and obtaining 6 types of patient history (4 point Likert scale for each. Self-rated ability or comfort was compared by gender, status (year of residency, faculty, and future predicted frequency of use of the skill. Results: Residents reported high ability levels for physical exam skills common to both the ambulatory and hospital setting. Fewer felt able to perform musculoskeletal, neurologic or eye exams easily alone. Procedures generally received low ability ratings. Similarly, residents’ comfort in performing common outpatient counseling was also low. More residents reported feeling very comfortable in obtaining history from patients. We found little variation by gender, year of training, or predicted frequency of use. Conclusion: Self-reported ability and comfort for many common ambulatory care skills is low. Further evaluation of this finding in other training programs is warranted.

  8. Clinical Assessment Applications of Ambulatory Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Stephen N.; Yoshioka, Dawn T.

    2007-01-01

    Ambulatory biosensor assessment includes a diverse set of rapidly developing and increasingly technologically sophisticated strategies to acquire minimally disruptive measures of physiological and motor variables of persons in their natural environments. Numerous studies have measured cardiovascular variables, physical activity, and biochemicals…

  9. Ambulatory Measurement of Ground Reaction Forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltink, Peter H.; Liedtke, Christian; Droog, Ed

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of ground reaction forces is important in the biomechanical analysis of gait and other motor activities. It is the purpose of this study to show the feasibility of ambulatory measurement of ground reaction forces using two six degrees of freedom sensors mounted under the shoe. One

  10. Ambulatory assessment of ankle and foot dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, H. Martin; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.; Veltink, Petrus H.

    Ground reaction force (GRF) measurement is important in the analysis of human body movements. The main drawback of the existing measurement systems is the restriction to a laboratory environment. This paper proposes an ambulatory system for assessing the dynamics of ankle and foot, which integrates

  11. Can information technology improve my ambulatory practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eHealth is the use of information and communication technologies for health. mHealth is the use of mobile technology in health. As with all information technology (IT), advances in development are rapidly taking place. The application of such technology to individual ambulatory anaesthesia practice should improve the ...

  12. Regional anesthesia techniques for ambulatory orthopedic surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Brian D

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to present advances in the use of regional anesthetic techniques in ambulatory orthopedic surgery. New findings regarding the use of both neuraxial anesthesia and peripheral nerve block are discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: Neuraxial anesthesia: The use of short-acting local anesthetic agents such as mepivacaine, 2-chloroprocaine, and articaine permits rapid onset intrathecal anesthesia with early recovery profiles. Advantages and limitations of these agents are discussed.Peripheral nerve block: Peripheral nerve blocks in limb surgery have the potential to transform this patient cohort into a truly ambulatory, self-caring group. Recent trends and evidence regarding the benefits of regional anesthesia techniques are presented.Continuous perineural catheters permit extension of improved perioperative analgesia into the ambulatory home setting. The role and reported safety of continuous catheters are discussed. SUMMARY: In summary, shorter acting, neuraxial, local anesthetic agents, specific to the expected duration of surgery, may provide superior recovery profiles in the ambulatory setting. A trend towards more peripheral and selective nerve blocks exists. The infrapatellar block is a promising technique to provide analgesia following knee arthroscopy. Improved analgesia seen in the perioperative period can be safely and effectively extended to the postoperative period with the use of perineural catheters.

  13. Use of antifibrinolytic mouthwash solution in anticoagulated oral surgery patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Evrosimovska, Biljana; Papakoca, Kiro; Georgiev, Zlatko; Angelovska, Bistra; Ristoska, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Introduction:The ordinary treatment of anticoagulated patients includes the interruption of anticoagulant therapy for oral surgery interventions to prevent hemorrhage. However, this practice may logically increase the risk of a potentially life-threatening thromboembolism, so this issue is still controversial. The aim of the study was to evaluate the antifibrinolitic mouthwash solution (tranexamic acid) as a local haemostatic modality after oral surgery interventions. Methods:To realize the a...

  14. Hematin-derived anticoagulant. Generation in vitro and in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Prolongation of clotting times produced by hematin was investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Hematin-derived anticoagulant (HDA) was found to be due to a degradative product or derivative of hematin, and was generated in vitro in standing (aging) aqueous solutions of the parent compound. Generation of HDA in vitro was inhibited by antioxidants. The anticoagulant effect of HDA was inhibited by freshly prepared hematin, fresh Sn-protoporphyrin, imidazole, or the iron chelator desferrioxamine....

  15. Survey of the use of warfarin and the newer anticoagulant dabigatran in patients with atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi JC

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jiyoon C Choi,1 Marco d DiBonaventura,2 Lewis Kopenhafer,2 Winnie W Nelson31LifeScan, Inc, West Chester, PA, 2Health Sciences Practice, Kantar Health, New York, NY, 3Janssen Scientific Affairs LLC, Raritan, NJ, USABackground: Oral dabigatran was recently approved as an alternative to warfarin for prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Unlike warfarin, dabigatran has a fixed dosage and few drug interactions, and does not require anticoagulation monitoring or dietary restrictions.Methods: This study aimed to describe and compare characteristics of patients with atrial fibrillation who used dabigatran or only warfarin. Patients with a self-reported diagnosis of atrial fibrillation aged ≥18 years who were receiving (or had received warfarin or dabigatran completed an online survey. Differences in characteristics of dabigatran and warfarin users were tested using chi-squared tests and analysis of variance for categorical and continuous variables, respectively.Results: Overall, 364 patients were surveyed (204 warfarin users, 160 dabigatran users. The mean age was 65.1 years, and 68.7% were male. Dabigatran users were more likely than warfarin users to be female (36.9% versus 27.0% and to have experienced adverse events, including gastrointestinal bleeding, in the 3 months before the survey (21.9% versus 6.9%; P<0.05. Both groups reported high medication adherence (dabigatran users 0.65 versus warfarin users 0.63 missed doses/month. Dabigatran users were more likely than warfarin users to discuss treatment options with their physician before beginning therapy (36.9% versus 24.5%; P<0.05 and less likely to switch anticoagulant medication (10.7% versus 31.9%; P<0.05. Although dabigatran users were more likely to experience adverse events, they reported greater satisfaction with anticoagulation treatment than warfarin users.Conclusion: The efficacy and convenience reported by dabigatran users

  16. Predicting recovery at home after Ambulatory Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayala Guillermo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The correct implementation of Ambulatory Surgery must be accompanied by an accurate monitoring of the patient post-discharge state. We fit different statistical models to predict the first hours postoperative status of a discharged patient. We will also be able to predict, for any discharged patient, the probability of needing a closer follow-up, or of having a normal progress at home. Background The status of a discharged patient is predicted during the first 48 hours after discharge by using variables routinely used in Ambulatory Surgery. The models fitted will provide the physician with an insight into the post-discharge progress. These models will provide valuable information to assist in educating the patient and their carers about what to expect after discharge as well as to improve their overall level of satisfaction. Methods A total of 922 patients from the Ambulatory Surgery Unit of the Dr. Peset University Hospital (Valencia, Spain were selected for this study. Their post-discharge status was evaluated through a phone questionnaire. We pretend to predict four variables which were self-reported via phone interviews with the discharged patient: sleep, pain, oral tolerance of fluid/food and bleeding status. A fifth variable called phone score will be built as the sum of these four ordinal variables. The number of phone interviews varies between patients, depending on the evolution. The proportional odds model was used. The predictors were age, sex, ASA status, surgical time, discharge time, type of anaesthesia, surgical specialty and ambulatory surgical incapacity (ASI. This last variable reflects, before the operation, the state of incapacity and severity of symptoms in the discharged patient. Results Age, ambulatory surgical incapacity and the surgical specialty are significant to explain the level of pain at the first call. For the first two phone calls, ambulatory surgical incapacity is significant as a predictor for all

  17. Direct Oral Anticoagulants in Emergency Trauma Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maegele, Marc; Grottke, Oliver; Schöchl, Herbert; Sakowitz, Oliver A; Spannagl, Michael; Koscielny, Jürgen

    2016-09-05

    Direct (non-vitamin-K-dependent) oral anticoagulants (DOAC) are given as an alternative to vitamin K antagonists (VKA) to prevent stroke and embolic disease in patients with atrial fibrillation that is not due to pathology of the heart valves. Fatal hemorrhage is rarer when DOACs are given (nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: odds ratio [OR] 0.68; 95% confidence interval [95% CI: 0.48; 0.96], and venous thromboembolism: OR 0.54; [0.22; 1.32]). 48% of emergency trauma patients need an emergency operation or early surgery. Clotting disturbances elevate the mortality of such patients to 43%, compared to 17% in patients without a clotting disturbance. This underscores the impor tance of the proper, targeted treatment of trauma patients who are aking DOAC. This review is based on articles retrieved by a selective search in PubMed and on a summary of expert opinion and the recommendations of the relevant medical specialty societies. Peak DOAC levels are reached 2-4 hours after the drug is taken. In patients with normal renal and hepatic function, no drug accumulation, and no drug interactions, the plasma level of DOAC 24 hours after administration is generally too low to cause any clinically relevant risk of bleeding. The risk of drug accumulation is higher in patients with renal dysfunction (creatinine clearance [CrCl] of 30 mL/min or less). Dabigatran levels can be estimated from the thrombin time, ecarin clotting time, and diluted thrombin time, while levels of factor Xa inhibitors can be estimated by means of calibrated chromogenic anti-factor Xa activity tests. Routine clotting studies do not reliably reflect the anticoagulant activity of DOAC. Surgery should be postponed, if possible, until at least 24-48 hours after the last dose of DOAC. For patients with mild, non-life threatening hemorrhage, it suffices to discontinue DOAC; for patients with severe hemorrhage, there are special treatment algorithms that should be followed. DOACs in the setting of hemorrhage are a

  18. Pathology consultation on anticoagulation monitoring: factor X-related assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wool, Geoffrey D; Lu, Chuanyi M

    2013-11-01

    To review various anticoagulation therapies and related laboratory monitoring issues, with a focus on factor X-related chromogenic assays. A case-based approach is used to review pertinent published literatures and product inserts of anticoagulation drugs and to look back on clinical use of factor X-related chromogenic assays. The number of anticoagulants available to clinicians has increased greatly in the past decade. Whether and how these anticoagulants should be monitored are areas of uncertainty for clinicians, which can lead to misuse of laboratory assays and suboptimal patient management. Factor X-related assays are of particular concern because of the similar and often confusing test names. Based on a common clinical case scenario and literature review regarding anticoagulant monitoring, an up-to-date discussion and review of the various factor X-related assays are provided, focusing on the differences in test designs and clinical utilities between the chromogenic anti-Xa and chromogenic factor X activity assays. Anticoagulation therapy and related laboratory monitoring are rapidly evolving areas of clinical practices. A good knowledge of relevant laboratory assays and their clinical applications is necessary to help optimize patient care.

  19. Adherence to a new oral anticoagulant treatment prescription: dabigatran etexilate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Bellamy

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available L Bellamy1, N Rosencher1, BI Eriksson21Anaesthesiology Department, Hôpital Cochin (AP-HP, René Descartes University, Paris 75014 France; 2Orthopaedic Department, University Hospital Sahlgrenska/Ostra, Gothenburg, SwedenAbstract: The recent development of new oral anticoagulants, of which dabigatran etexilate is currently at the most advanced stage of development, is the greatest advance in the provision of convenient anticoagulation therapy for many years. A new oral anticoagulation treatment, dabigatran etexilate, is already on the market in Europe. The main interest probably will be to improve the prescription and the adherence to an effective thromboprophylaxis in medical conditions such as atrial fibrillation without bleeding side effects, without the need for monitoring coagulation, and without drug and food interactions such as vitamin K anticoagulant (VKA treatment. Dabigatran is particularly interesting for extended thromboprophylaxis after major orthopedic surgery in order to avoid daily injection for a month. However, oral long-term treatments such as VKA are not systematically associated with a higher compliance level than injected treatments such as low-molecular-weight heparins. Indeed, adherence to an oral treatment, instead of the usual daily injection in major orthopedic surgery, is complex, and based not only on the frequency of dosing but also on patient motivation, understanding, and socio-economic status. New oral anticoagulants may be useful in this way but education and detection of risk factors of nonadherence to treatment are still essential.Keywords: oral anticoagulant, adherence, compliance, education, dabigatran

  20. Ambulatory anesthetic care in pediatric tonsillectomy: challenges and risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins C

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Corey Collins Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Department of Anesthesiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Pediatric tonsillectomy is a common surgery around the world. Surgical indications are obstructive sleep apnea and recurrent tonsillitis. Despite the frequency of tonsillectomy in children, most aspects of perioperative care are supported by scant evidence. Recent guidelines provide important recommendations although clinician adherence or awareness of published guidance is variable and inconsistent. Current guidelines establish criteria for screening children for post-tonsillectomy observation, though most are based on low-grade evidence or consensus. Current recommendations for admission are: age <3 years; significant obstructive sleep apnea; obesity; and significant comorbid medical conditions. Recent reports have challenged each criterion and recommend admission criteria that are based on clinically relevant risks or observed clinical events such as adverse respiratory events in the immediate recovery period. Morbidity and mortality are low though serious complications occur regularly and may be amenable to improvements in postoperative monitoring, improved analgesic regimens, and parental education. Careful consideration of risks attributable to individual patients is vital to determine overall suitability for ambulatory discharge. Keywords: adverse airway events, complications, guidelines, mortality, OSA, pediatric anesthesia

  1. Dermatotoxicity of epicutaneously applied anticoagulant warfarin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataranovski, Milena; Prokic, Vera; Kataranovski, Dragan; Zolotarevski, Lidija; Majstorovic, Ivana

    2005-01-01

    Dermatotoxic effects of epicutaneous application of a first-generation anticoagulant, warfarin (WF) were examined in rats. Selected parameters of skin activity were determined 24 h following warfarin application, including metabolic viability of skin explants, some aspects of oxidative activity in skin tissue homogenates and inflammatory/immune relevant activity of epidermal cells from warfarin-treated skin. No changes in skin metabolic viability (MTT reduction) were noted ex vivo following WF application, suggesting the absence of immediate toxicity for skin. In contrast, increased formation of malondialdehyde (MDA), with a decrease in protein and non-protein thiols in homogenates of warfarin-treated skin was demonstrated, pointing to prooxidant activity in warfarin-treated skin. Increased costimulatory activity of epidermal cells isolated from warfarin-exposed skin in Con-A-stimulated T-cell activation/proliferation assay was noted, reflecting proinflammatory and immune-modulating capacity of warfarin for epidermis. No evident differences in skin histology between control and warfarin-treated skin were found at that time point, while striking changes in tissue integrity, cellularity and appearance 72 h following WF application were noted. The observed histological picture probably reflects a regenerative/inflammatory program related to oxidant/inflammation-type warfarin-evoked injury to the skin. Presented data demonstrate the potential of epicutaneously applied warfarin to modulate local skin activity in rats

  2. Lupus anticoagulants: first French interlaboratory Etalonorme survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussi, J; Roisin, J P; Goguel, A

    1996-06-01

    In 1994, the, French National Quality Control Group for Hematology, Etalonorme, conducted a large-scale interlaboratory survey concerning the detection of lupus anticoagulants (LA) involving all the 4,500 French laboratories. Each laboratory received the same batch of a lyophilized citrated plasma (94B3) prepared from a patient with LA that had been confirmed by all the techniques used in the intralaboratory study. In the interlaboratory survey, the screening test was activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT); mean APTT calculated from the results reported by 4,029 labs was prolonged (clotting ratio = 1.44) with a large dispersion (coefficients of variation = 18.8%). APTT of the mixture 94B3 + normal plasma were performed by 2,698 laboratories. No correction of APTT was obtained (R = 1.36, Rosner index = 24) with a wide variation between reagents (17 kaolin. This survey allowed Etalonorme to inform French biologists and draft an educational program for the biologic detection of LA and the identification of its mechanism of action.

  3. Prospective evaluation of dermatologic surgery complications including patients on multiple antiplatelet and anticoagulant medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeaux, Jeremy S; Martires, Kathryn J; Goldberg, Dori; Pattee, Sean F; Fu, Pingfu; Maloney, Mary E

    2011-09-01

    Few prospective studies have evaluated the safety of dermatologic surgery. We sought to determine rates of bleeding, infection, flap and graft necrosis, and dehiscence in outpatient dermatologic surgery, and to examine their relationship to type of repair, anatomic location of repair, antibiotic use, antiplatelet use, or anticoagulant use. Patients presenting to University of Massachusetts Medical School Dermatology Clinic for surgery during a 15-month period were prospectively entered. Medications, procedures, and complications were recorded. Of the 1911 patients, 38% were on one anticoagulant or antiplatelet medication, and 8.0% were on two or more. Risk of hemorrhage was 0.89%. Complex repair (odds ratio [OR] = 5.80), graft repair (OR = 7.58), flap repair (OR = 11.93), and partial repair (OR = 43.13) were more likely to result in bleeding than intermediate repair. Patients on both clopidogrel and warfarin were 40 times more likely to have bleeding complications than all others (P = .03). Risk of infection was 1.3%, but was greater than 3% on the genitalia, scalp, back, and leg. Partial flap necrosis occurred in 1.7% of flaps, and partial graft necrosis occurred in 8.6% of grafts. Partial graft necrosis occurred in 20% of grafts on the scalp and 10% of grafts on the nose. All complications resolved without sequelae. The study was limited to one academic dermatology practice. The rate of complications in dermatologic surgery is low, even when multiple oral anticoagulant and antiplatelet medications are continued, and prophylactic antibiotics are not used. Closure type and use of warfarin or clopidogrel increase bleeding risk. However, these medications should be continued to avoid adverse thrombotic events. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Biobarcode assay for the oral anticoagulant acenocoumarol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broto, Marta; Salvador, J Pablo; Galve, Roger; Marco, M Pilar

    2018-02-01

    A novel approach for therapeutic drug monitoring of oral anticoagulants (OA) in clinical samples is reported, based on a NP-based biobarcode assay. The proposed strategy uses specific antibodies for acenocumarol (ACL) covalently bound to magnetic particles (pAb236-MP) and a bioconjugate competitor (hACL-BSA) linked to encoded polystyrene probes (hACL-BSA-ePSP) on a classical competitive immunochemical format. By using this scheme ACL can be detected in low nM range (LOD, 0.96 ± 0.26, N = 3, in buffer) even in complex samples such as serum or plasma (LOD 4 ± 1). The assay shows a high reproducibility (%CV 1.1 day-to-day) and is robust, as it is demonstrated by the fact that ACL can be quantified in complex biological samples with a very good accuracy (slope = 0.97 and R 2 = 0.91, of the linear regression obtained when analyzing spiked vs measured values). Moreover, we have demonstrated that the biobarcode approach has the potential to overcome one of the main challenges of the multiplexed diagnostic, which is the possibility to measure in a single run biomarker targets present at different concentration ranges. Thus, it has been proven that the signal and the detectability can be modulated by just modifying the oligonucleotide load of the encoded probes. This fact opens the door for combining in the same assay encoded probes with the necessary oligonucleotide load to achieve the detectability required for each biomarker target. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Beyond the clinic: redefining hospital ambulatory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogut, L

    1997-07-01

    Responding to changes in health care financing, government policy, technology, and clinical judgment, and the rise of managed care, hospitals are shifting services from inpatient to outpatient settings and moving them into the community. Institutions are evolving into integrated delivery systems, developing the capacity to provide a continuum of coordinated services in an array of settings and to share financial risk with physicians and managed care organizations. Over the past several years, hospitals in New York City have shifted considerable resources into ambulatory care. In their drive to expand and enhance services, however, they face serious challenges, including a well-established focus on hospitals as inpatient centers of tertiary care and medical education, a heavy reliance upon residents as providers of medical care, limited access to capital, and often inadequate physical plants. In 1995, the United Hospital Fund awarded $600,000 through its Ambulatory Care Services Initiative to support hospitals' efforts to meet the challenges of reorganizing services, compete in a managed care environment, and provide high-quality ambulatory care in more efficient ways. Through the initiative, 12 New York City hospitals started projects to reorganize service delivery and build an infrastructure of systems, technology, and personnel. Among the projects undertaken by the hospitals were:--broad-based reorganization efforts employing primary care models to improve and expand existing ambulatory care services, integrate services, and better coordinate care;--projects to improve information management, planning and testing new systems for scheduling appointments, registering patients, and tracking ambulatory care and its outcomes;--training programs to increase the supply of primary care providers (both nurse practitioners and primary care physicians), train clinical and support staff in the skills needed to deliver more efficient and better ambulatory care, prepare staff

  6. Patient Satisfaction with Kimbrough Ambulatory Care Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-02-01

    few are going to opt to change health plans. 14. SUBJECT TERMS PATIENT SATISFACTION; CONSUMER SATISFACTION; SURVEY 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 57 16...to address is overall patient satisfaction with Kimbrough’s current health care system. I surveyed customers on: how satisfied or dissatisfied they...research project was designed to determine how satisfied customers are with Kimbrough Ambulatory Care Center. A patient satisfaction survey developed by

  7. The evolution of ambulatory ECG monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Harold L

    2013-01-01

    Ambulatory Holter electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring has undergone continuous technological evolution since its invention and development in the 1950s era. With commercial introduction in 1963, there has been an evolution of Holter recorders from 1 channel to 12 channel recorders with increasingly smaller storage media, and there has evolved Holter analysis systems employing increasingly technologically advanced electronics providing a myriad of data displays. This evolution of smaller physical instruments with increasing technological capacity has characterized the development of electronics over the past 50 years. Currently the technology has been focused upon the conventional continuous 24 to 48 hour ambulatory ECG examination, and conventional extended ambulatory monitoring strategies for infrequent to rare arrhythmic events. However, the emergence of the Internet, Wi-Fi, cellular networks, and broad-band transmission has positioned these modalities at the doorway of the digital world. This has led to an adoption of more cost-effective strategies to these conventional methods of performing the examination. As a result, the emergence of the mobile smartphone coupled with this digital capacity is leading to the recent development of Holter smartphone applications. The potential of point-of-care applications utilizing the Holter smartphone and a vast array of new non-invasive sensors is evident in the not too distant future. The Holter smartphone is anticipated to contribute significantly in the future to the field of global health. © 2013.

  8. Stratifying the risks of oral anticoagulation in patients with liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efird, Lydia M; Mishkin, Daniel S; Berlowitz, Dan R; Ash, Arlene S; Hylek, Elaine M; Ozonoff, Al; Reisman, Joel I; Zhao, Shibei; Jasuja, Guneet K; Rose, Adam J

    2014-05-01

    Chronic liver disease presents a relative contraindication to warfarin therapy, but some patients with liver disease nevertheless require long-term anticoagulation. The goal is to identify which patients with liver disease might safely receive warfarin. Among 102 134 patients who received warfarin from the Veterans Affairs from 2007 to 2008, International Classification of Diseases-Ninth Revision codes identified 1763 patients with chronic liver disease. Specific diagnoses and laboratory values (albumin, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, creatinine, and cholesterol) were examined to identify risk of adverse outcomes, while controlling for available bleeding risk factors. Outcomes included percent time in therapeutic range, a measure of anticoagulation control, and major hemorrhagic events, by International Classification of Diseases-Ninth Revision codes. Patients with liver disease had lower mean time in therapeutic range (53.5%) when compared with patients without (61.7%; P<0.001) and more hemorrhages (hazard ratio, 2.02; P<0.001). Among patients with liver disease, serum albumin and creatinine levels were the strongest predictors of both outcomes. We created a 4-point score system: patients received 1 point each for albumin (2.5-3.49 g/dL) or creatinine (1.01-1.99 mg/dL), and 2 points each for albumin (<2.5 g/dL) or creatinine (≥2 mg/dL). This score predicted both anticoagulation control and hemorrhage. When compared with patients without liver disease, those with a score of zero had modestly lower time in therapeutic range (56.7%) and no increase in hemorrhages (hazard ratio, 1.16; P=0.59), whereas those with the worst score (4) had poor control (29.4%) and high hazard of hemorrhage (hazard ratio, 8.53; P<0.001). Patients with liver disease receiving warfarin have poorer anticoagulation control and more hemorrhages. A simple 4-point scoring system using albumin and creatinine identifies those at risk for poor outcomes. © 2014 American

  9. Pharmacology of new oral anticoagulants: mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to their mechanism of action, the new oral anticoagulants are named direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs. Dabigatran is a selective, competitive, direct inhibitor of thrombin (Factor IIa while rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban act by directly inhibiting the activated Factor X (FXa in a selective and competitive manner. DOACs have a relatively short half-life and almost immediate anticoagulant activity, and rapidly reach the plasma peak concentration. Therefore, they do not need a phase of overlapping with parenteral anticoagulants. After their withdrawal, their removal is sufficiently rapid, although influenced by renal function. Dabigatran is the only DOACs to be administered as a pro-drug and becomes active after drug metabolization. The route of elimination of dabigatran is primarily renal, whereas FXa inhibitors are mainly eliminated by the biliary-fecal route. The drug interactions of DOACs are mainly limited to drugs that act on P-glycoprotein for dabigatran and on P-glycoprotein and/or cytochrome P3A4 for anti-Xa. DOACs have no interactions with food. Given their linear pharmacodynamics, with a predictable dose/response relationship and anticoagulant effect, DOACs are administered at a fixed dose and do not require routine laboratory monitoring.

  10. Adherence to oral anticoagulant therapy in secondary stroke prevention – impact of the novel oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luger S

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sebastian Luger,1 Carina Hohmann,2 Daniela Niemann,1 Peter Kraft,3 Ignaz Gunreben,3 Tobias Neumann-Haefelin,2 Christoph Kleinschnitz,3 Helmuth Steinmetz,1 Christian Foerch,1 Waltraud Pfeilschifter1 1Department of Neurology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, 2Department of Neurology, Klinikum Fulda gAG, Fulda, 3Department of Neurology, University Hospital Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany Background: Oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT potently prevents strokes in patients with atrial fibrillation. Vitamin K antagonists (VKA have been the standard of care for long-term OAT for decades, but non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOAC have recently been approved for this indication, and raised many questions, among them their influence on medication adherence. We assessed adherence to VKA and NOAC in secondary stroke prevention. Methods: All patients treated from October 2011 to September 2012 for ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack with a subsequent indication for OAT, at three academic hospitals were entered into a prospective registry, and baseline data and antithrombotic treatment at discharge were recorded. At the 1-year follow-up, we assessed the adherence to different OAT strategies and patients’ adherence to their respective OAT. We noted OAT changes, reasons to change treatment, and factors that influence persistence to the prescribed OAT. Results: In patients discharged on OAT, we achieved a fatality corrected response rate of 73.3% (n=209. A total of 92% of these patients received OAT at the 1-year follow-up. We observed good adherence to both VKA and NOAC (VKA, 80.9%; NOAC, 74.8%; P=0.243 with a statistically nonsignificant tendency toward a weaker adherence to dabigatran. Disability at 1-year follow-up was an independent predictor of lower adherence to any OAT after multivariate analysis, whereas the choice of OAT did not have a relevant influence. Conclusion: One-year adherence to OAT after stroke is strong (>90% and patients

  11. Anticoagulant and anti-thrombotic treatments in the management of hematological malignancies in a home care program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Tendas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Anticoagulants (AC and anti-platelet (AP agents are widely administered to patients with hematological malignancies (HM. However, HM patients may be at high risk of bleeding and hemorrhagic complications, because of different form of coagulopathies and several degrees of thrombocytopenia. Materials and Methods: A prospective evaluation of the use of anticoagulant and anti-thrombotic agents as well as of bleeding and thrombotic complications in a consecutive cohort of patients, which were followed during the first semester of 2010 by our home care service, was performed. In this regard, three pharmacological class of agents, such as oral anticoagulants (warfarin and acenocumarine, low molecular weight heparin (LMWH and anti-platelet (AP drugs were considered. Results: Out of 129 patients, 26 (20% were treated with AC/AP drugs. Warfarin, acenocumarine, LMWH as well as AP were used in 7, 11 and 12 patients, respectively. Adverse events (bleeding were observed in 3 patients (11.5%, 2 cases being on warfarin (replaced by LMWH and 1 being AP (suspension without replacement; out of the 3 patients with bleeding, none presented thrombocytopenia. Conclusions: Despite the frequent findings of hemostatic disorders in a population of frail patients managed in a home care setting, our experience demonstrated that the use of AC/AP drugs has been very rarely responsible for significant complications.

  12. Anticoagulant therapy for venous thromboembolism detected by Doppler ultrasound in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer receiving bevacizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suenaga M

    2015-01-01

    -related severe adverse events or deaths. Severe thromboembolism was not observed in the other 68 patients.Conclusion: Our anticoagulant protocol for asymptomatic thrombosis detected by Doppler ultrasound imaging was effective at preventing severe thromboembolism during continued treatment with Bev. Keywords: venous thromboembolism, Bev, anticoagulant therapy, colorectal cancer

  13. Acupuncture in ambulatory anesthesia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norheim AJ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Arne Johan Norheim,1 Ingrid Liodden,1 Terje Alræk1,2 1National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM, Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, 2The Norwegian School of Health Sciences, Institute of Acupuncture, Kristiania University College, Oslo, NorwayBackground: Post-anesthetic morbidities remain challenging in our daily practice of anesthesia. Meta-analyses and reviews of acupuncture and related techniques for postoperative nausea and vomiting (POVN and postoperative vomiting (POV show promising results while many clinicians remain skeptical of the value of acupuncture. Given the interest in finding safe non-pharmacological approaches toward postoperative care, this body of knowledge needs to be considered. This review critically appraises and summarizes the research on acupuncture and acupressure in ambulatory anesthesia during the last 15 years.Methods: Articles were identified through searches of Medline, PubMed, and Embase using the search terms “acupuncture” or “acupuncture therapy” in combination with “ambulatory anesthesia” or “ambulatory surgery” or “day surgery” or “postoperative”. A corresponding search was done using “acupressure” and “wristbands”. The searches generated a total of 104, 118, and 122 references, respectively.Results: Sixteen studies were included; eight studies reported on acupuncture and eight on acupressure. Nine studies found acupuncture or acupressure effective on primary endpoints including postoperative nausea and vomiting, postoperative pain, sore throat, and emergence agitation. Four studies found acupuncture had a similar effect to antiemetic medication.Conclusion: Overall, the studies were of fairly good quality. A large proportion of the reviewed papers highlights an effect of acupuncture or acupressure on postoperative morbidities in an ambulatory setting

  14. Recent developments in separation of low molecular weight heparin anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Radosław; Gadzała-Kopciuch, Renata; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2017-10-05

    The general function of anticoagulants is to prevent blood clotting and growing of the existing clots in blood vessels. In recent years, there has been a significant improvement in developing methods of prevention as well as pharmacologic and surgical treatment of thrombosis. For over the last two decades, low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) have found their application in the antithrombotic diseases treatment. These types of drugs are widely used in clinical therapy. Despite the biological and medical importance of LMWHs, they have not been completely characterized in terms of their chemical structure. Due to both, the structural complexity of these anticoagulants and the presence of impurities, their structural characterization requires the employment of advanced analytical techniques. Since separation techniques play the key role in these endeavors, this review will focus on the presentation of recent developments in the separation of LMWH anticoagulants. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Management of Periprocedural Anticoagulation: A Survey of Contemporary Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaker, Greg C; Theriot, Paul; Binder, Lea G; Dobesh, Paul P; Cuker, Adam; Doherty, John U

    2016-07-12

    Interruption of oral anticoagulation (AC) for surgery or an invasive procedure is a complicated process. Practice guidelines provide only general recommendations, and care of such patients occurs across multiple specialties. The availability of direct oral anticoagulants further complicates decision making and guidance here is limited. To evaluate current practice patterns in the United States for bridging AC, a survey was developed by the American College of Cardiology Anticoagulation Work Group. The goal of the survey was to assess how general and subspecialty cardiologists, internists, gastroenterologists, and orthopedic surgeons currently manage patients who receive AC and undergo surgery or an invasive procedure. The survey was completed by 945 physicians involved in the periprocedural management of AC. The results provide a template for educational and research projects geared toward the development of clinical pathways and point-of-care tools to improve this area of health care. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Anticoagulant Preferences and Concerns among Venous Thromboembolism Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutsey, Pamela L; Horvath, Keith J; Fullam, Lisa; Moll, Stephan; Rooney, Mary R; Cushman, Mary; Zakai, Neil A

    2018-03-01

     Warfarin and direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are used for the initial treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE), and have similar efficacy. Patient concerns and preferences are important considerations when selecting an anticoagulant, yet these are not well studied.  VTE patients ( n  = 519) were surveyed from online sources (clotconnect.org, stoptheclot.org and National Blood Clot Alliance Facebook followers [ n  = 495]) and a haematology clinic in Vermont ( n  = 24).  Patients were 83% females and on average (±standard deviation [SD]) 45.7 ± 13.1 years; 65% self-reported warfarin as their initial VTE treatment and 35% a DOAC. Proportions reporting being extremely concerned about the following outcomes were as follows: recurrent VTE 33%, major bleeding 21%, moderate bleeding 16% and all-cause death 29%. When asked about oral anticoagulant characteristics, patients strongly preferred anticoagulants that are reversible (53%), and for which blood drug levels can be monitored (30%). Lower proportions agreed with statements that regular blood testing is inconvenient (18%), that they are comfortable using the newest drug versus an established drug (15%) and that it is difficult to change their diet to accommodate their anticoagulant (17%). In multivariable-adjusted models, patients tended to have had as their initial treatment, and to currently be taking, the oral anticoagulant option they personally preferred.  Patients held the greatest concern for recurrent VTE and mortality, regardless of which treatment they were prescribed. Potential weaknesses of warfarin (e.g., dietary restrictions, regular monitoring) were generally not considered onerous, while warfarin's advantages (e.g., ability to monitor) were viewed favourably. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  17. Collaborative Care in Ambulatory Psychiatry: Content Analysis of Consultations to a Psychiatric Pharmacist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotlib, Dorothy; Bostwick, Jolene R.; Calip, Seema; Perelstein, Elizabeth; Kurlander, Jacob E.; Fluent, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To determine the volume and nature (or topic) of consultations submitted to a psychiatric pharmacist embedded in an ambulatory psychiatry clinic, within a tertiary care academic medical center and to increase our understanding about the ways in which providers consult with an available psychiatric pharmacist. Experimental Design Authors analyze and describe the ambulatory psychiatric pharmacist consultation log at an academic ambulatory clinic. All consultation questions were submitted between July 2012 and October 2014. Principal Observations Psychiatry residents, attending physicians, and advanced practice nurse practitioners submitted 280 primary questions. The most common consultation questions from providers consulted were related to drug-drug interactions (n =70), drug formulations/dosing (n =48), adverse effects (n =43), and pharmacokinetics/lab monitoring/cross-tapering (n =36). Conclusions This is a preliminary analysis that provides information about how psychiatry residents, attending physicians, and advanced practice nurse practitioners at our health system utilize a psychiatric pharmacist. This collaborative relationship may have implications for the future of psychiatric care delivery. PMID:28936009

  18. Assessment of Human Ambulatory Speed by Measuring Near-Body Air Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Salati

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurements of physical activity are important for the diagnosis of the exacerbation of chronic diseases. Accelerometers have been widely employed in clinical research for measuring activity intensity and investigating the association between physical activity and adverse health conditions. However, the ability of accelerometers in assessing physical activity intensity such as walking speed has been constrained by the inter-individual variability in sensor output and by the necessity of developing unobtrusive low-power monitoring systems. This paper will present a study aimed at investigating the accuracy of a wearable measuring system of near-body air flow to determine ambulatory speed in the field.

  19. Ambulatory anesthesia: optimal perioperative management of the diabetic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polderman JAW

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Jorinde AW Polderman, Robert van Wilpe, Jan H Eshuis, Benedikt Preckel, Jeroen Hermanides Department of Anaesthesiology, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands Abstract: Given the growing number of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM and the growing number of surgical procedures performed in an ambulatory setting, DM is one of the most encountered comorbidities in patients undergoing ambulatory surgery. Perioperative management of ambulatory patients with DM requires a different approach than patients undergoing major surgery, as procedures are shorter and the stress response caused by surgery is minimal. However, DM is a risk factor for postoperative complications in ambulatory surgery, so should be managed carefully. Given the limited time ambulatory patients spend in the hospital, improvement in management has to be gained from the preanesthetic assessment. The purpose of this review is to summarize current literature regarding the anesthesiologic management of patients with DM in the ambulatory setting. We will discuss the risks of perioperative hyperglycemia together with the pre-, intra-, and postoperative considerations for these patients when encountered in an ambulatory setting. Furthermore, we provide recommendations for the optimal perioperative management of the diabetic patient undergoing ambulatory surgery. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, perioperative period, ambulatory surgery, insulin, complications, GLP-1 agonist, DPP-4 inhibitor

  20. Risk of postoperative hypoxemia in ambulatory orthopedic surgery patients with diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea: a retrospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Yan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is unclear when it is safe to discharge patients with a diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA after ambulatory surgical procedures due to concern for postoperative respiratory compromise and hypoxemia. Our OSA patients undergoing ambulatory-type orthopedic procedures are monitored overnight in the PACU, thus we reviewed patient records to determine incidence of complications. Methods Two hundred and six charts of patients with preoperative diagnosis of OSA based on ICD-9 codes were reviewed for outcomes including episodes of hypoxemia. Univariate analysis followed by logistic regression and propensity analysis was performed to determine independent risk factors for hypoxemia and association with adverse outcomes. Results The majority of patients had regional anesthesia (95%. Thirty four percent of patients had hypoxemia in the PACU. Initial risk factors for hypoxemia identified by univariate analysis were BMI ≥ 35, increased age, history of COPD, upper extremity procedure, and use of peripheral nerve block. Independent risk factors identified by logistic regression were history of COPD (OR 3.64 with 95% CI 1.03-12.88 and upper extremity procedure (2.53, 1.36-4.68. After adjustment with propensity scores, adverse events were rare, and unplanned hospital admission after PACU stay was not increased with hypoxemia (11% vs 16% Conclusions Episodes of postoperative hypoxemia in OSA patients undergoing ambulatory surgery with regional anesthesia are not associated with increased adverse outcomes or unplanned hospital admission.

  1. Direct anticoagulants and nursing: an approach from patient's safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Ruiz, Adolfo; Romero-Arana, Adolfo; Gómez-Salgado, Juan

    In recent years, a new line of treatment for the prevention of stroke in non-valvular atrial fibrillation, the so-called direct anticoagulants or new anticoagulants has appeared. The proper management and follow-up of these patients is essential to minimize their side effects and ensure patient safety. In this article, a description of these drugs is given, analyzing their characteristics, functioning and interactions together with the most habitual nursing interventions, as well as a reflection on the implications for the practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. A comparative assessment of efficacy of three anticoagulant rodenticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renapurkar, D M

    1982-01-01

    Results are presented of feeding tests carried out with three common anticoagulant rodenticides viz., coumatetralyl, fumarin and warfarin on three common species of commensal rodents i.e., Rattus rattus, Rattus norvegicus and Bandicota bengalensis. All three species of rodents were susceptible to anticoagulant rodenticides. However, the action of these compounds in B. bengalensis was comparatively slow. Coumatetralyl was found to be the most effective rodenticide followed by fumarin and warfarin. Liquid baits of these compounds are more effective in comparison to food baits.

  3. Unexpected disappearance of portal cavernoma on long-term anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Junior, Gilberto; Turon, Fanny; Hernandez-Gea, Virginia; Darnell, Anna; García-Criado, Ángeles; García-Pagán, Juan Carlos

    2014-08-01

    Idiopathic non-cirrhotic portal hypertension is a rare disease of unknown etiology. Patients with idiopathic non-cirrhotic portal hypertension have an increased risk of developing portal vein thrombosis and this is especially prevalent when HIV is also present. We describe a unique case of a patient with idiopathic non-cirrhotic portal hypertension associated to HIV, who developed acute portal vein thrombosis that despite anticoagulation transformed in portal cavernoma and disappeared completely after five years of follow-up on continuous anticoagulation. Copyright © 2014 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Cost effectiveness of novel oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation depending on the quality of warfarin anticoagulation control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzic, Andrej; Kos, Mitja

    2015-04-01

    Vitamin K antagonists, such as warfarin, are standard treatments for stroke prophylaxis in patients with atrial fibrillation. Patient outcomes depend on quality of warfarin management, which includes regular monitoring and dose adjustments. Recently, novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) that do not require regular monitoring offer an alternative to warfarin. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether cost effectiveness of NOACs for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation depends on the quality of warfarin control. We developed a Markov decision model to simulate warfarin treatment outcomes in relation to the quality of anticoagulation control, expressed as percentage of time in the therapeutic range (TTR). Standard treatment with adjusted-dose warfarin and improved anticoagulation control by genotype-guided dosing were compared with dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban. The analysis was performed from the Slovenian healthcare payer perspective using 2014 costs. In the base case, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for apixaban, dabigatran and edoxaban was below the threshold of €25,000 per quality-adjusted life-years compared with adjusted-dose warfarin with a TTR of 60%. The probability that warfarin was a cost-effective option was around 1%. This percentage rises as the quality of anticoagulation control improves. At a TTR of 70%, warfarin was the preferred treatment in half the iterations. The cost effectiveness of NOACs for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation who are at increased risk for stroke is highly sensitive to warfarin anticoagulation control. NOACs are more likely to be cost-effective options in settings with poor warfarin management than in settings with better anticoagulation control, where they may not represent good value for money.

  5. Adverse Effects of Bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo

    2010-01-01

    and are tolerated by the majority of patients, but serious adverse events have been recorded in some cases. Only the most common of adverse effects are robustly observable in clinical trials. In general, studies were not powered to detect effects that were lower in incidence than fractures. This review of adverse...

  6. Adverse effects of bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo

    2010-01-01

    and are tolerated by the majority of patients, but serious adverse events have been recorded in some cases. Only the most common of adverse effects are robustly observable in clinical trials. In general, studies were not powered to detect effects that were lower in incidence than fractures. This review of adverse...

  7. Evaluating the efficacy of citrate anticoagulation during CRRT in cardiac patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Караськов

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Systemic anticoagulation during renal replacement therapy in cardiac patients increases the risk of postoperative complications. Citrate anticoagulation is a promising alternative. The objective of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of citrate anticoagulation and its influence on the parameters of hemostasis and complications.

  8. APPLICATIONS OF PHARMACOGENETIC TESTING FOR PERSONALIZATION OF THERAPY WITH ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS IN RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Sychev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical significance of the patient genetic characteristics in the individual pharmacological response to oral anticoagulants is considered. Possible tactics of warfarin dosing and new oral anticoagulants choice on the basis of pharmacogenetic testing as well as indications for this approach in clinical practice are discussed. It should increase efficacy and safety of anticoagulant therapy.

  9. Anticoagulant drugs increase natural killer cell activity in lung cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bobek, M.; Boubelík, Michael; Fišerová, Anna; Luptovcová, Martina; Vannucci, Luca; Kacprzak, G.; Kolodzej, J.; Majewski, A.M.; Hoffman, R. M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 2 (2005), s. 215-223 ISSN 0169-5002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : anticoagulant drugs * lung cancer * NK cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.172, year: 2005

  10. Vitamin K and stability of oral anticoagulant therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rombouts, Eva Karolien

    2011-01-01

    One of the causes of unstable anticoagulation is a variable vitamin K intake. The main objective of this thesis was to test the hypothesis that the INR is particularly sensitive to changes in vitamin K intake when vitamin K status is low, and that patients with a low vitamin K intake would therefore

  11. Utilization of Oral Anticoagulation in a Teaching Hospital in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    optimal antithrombotic effect. The oral drugs ... vitamin K-dependent clotting factors, which include factors. II, VII, IX, and X, ... hyperthyroidism) and those that decrease INR (pharmacokinetic: Barbiturates ... of anticoagulation, drug dosing, treatment outcome and .... national guidelines, and performance on quality measures.

  12. Citrate Anticoagulation for CRRT in Children: Comparison with Heparin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Nicole Fernández

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional anticoagulation with citrate is an alternative to heparin in continuous renal replacement therapies, which may prolong circuit lifetime and decrease hemorrhagic complications. A retrospective comparative cohort study based on a prospective observational registry was conducted including critically ill children undergoing CRRT. Efficacy, measured as circuit survival, and secondary effects of heparin and citrate were compared. 12 patients on CRRT with citrate anticoagulation and 24 patients with heparin anticoagulation were analyzed. Median citrate dose was 2.6 mmol/L. Median calcium dose was 0.16 mEq/kg/h. Median heparin dose was 15 UI/kg/h. Median circuit survival was 48 hours with citrate and 31 hours with heparin (P=0.028. 66.6% of patients treated with citrate developed mild metabolic alkalosis, which was directly related to citrate dose. There were no cases of citrate intoxication: median total calcium/ionic calcium index (CaT/I of 2.16 and a maximum CaT/I of 2.33, without metabolic acidosis. In the citrate group, 45.5% of patients developed hypochloremia and 27.3% hypomagnesemia. In the heparin group, 27.8% developed hypophosphatemia. Three patients were moved from heparin to citrate to control postoperatory bleeding. In conclusion citrate is a safe and effective anticoagulation method for CRRT in children and it achieves longer circuit survival than heparin.

  13. Self-management of oral anticoagulant therapy in two centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Hanna; Grove, E; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard

    of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus; 3Department of Cardiology, Aalborg Hospital & Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark haana_86@hotmail.com Objectives: Patient-self-management (PSM) of oral anticoagulant therapy with vitamin K antagonists have...

  14. Bleeding complications during anticoagulant treatment in patients with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuisen, Pieter W.; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan

    Patients with cancer have an increased risk of bleeding complications, of which some are fatal. This risk is influenced by chemotherapy, cancer type and stage, thrombocytopenia, renal function, and previous bleeding. Since many cancer patients receive anticoagulant treatment for prophylaxis or

  15. Standardisation of the Laboratory Control of Anticoagulant Therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-09-11

    Sep 11, 1974 ... Anticoagulant therapy with the coumarin group of drugs has been used in clinical practice for more than a quarter of a century. The most widely used form of laboratory control of the treatment is the Quick one-stage prothrom·- bin time. I. This simple test proved to be satisfactory in most cases, but discrepant ...

  16. Haemorrhage in the labyrinth caused by anticoagulant therapy: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callonnec, F.; Gerardin, E.; Thiebot, J.; Marie, J.P.; Andrieu Guitrancourt, J.; Marsot-Dupuch, K.

    1999-01-01

    We report a patient who experienced a severe vertiginous episode with bilateral tinnitus and progressive right-sided hearing loss. She had Marfan's disease and was on anticoagulant treatment. The fluid in the labyrinth gave higher signal than cerebrospinal fluid on T1-weighted images, suggesting haemorrhage. The radiological follow-up is discussed. (orig.)

  17. Haemorrhage in the labyrinth caused by anticoagulant therapy: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callonnec, F; Gerardin, E; Thiebot, J [Department of Radiology, Rouen University Hospital, 1 rue de Germont, F-76031 Rouen cedex (France); Marie, J P; Andrieu Guitrancourt, J [Department of Otolaryngology, Rouen University Hospital (France); Marsot-Dupuch, K [Department of Radiology, St. Antoine, Paris University Hospital (France)

    1999-06-01

    We report a patient who experienced a severe vertiginous episode with bilateral tinnitus and progressive right-sided hearing loss. She had Marfan`s disease and was on anticoagulant treatment. The fluid in the labyrinth gave higher signal than cerebrospinal fluid on T1-weighted images, suggesting haemorrhage. The radiological follow-up is discussed. (orig.) With 2 figs., 11 refs.

  18. A pilot audit of a protocol for ambulatory investigation of predicted low-risk patients with possible pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, A H; Murphy, R

    2011-09-01

    Patients with possible pulmonary embolism (PE) commonly present to acute medical services. Research has led to the identification of low-risk patients suitable for ambulatory management. We report on a protocol designed to select low-risk patients for ambulatory investigation if confirmatory imaging is not available that day. The protocol was piloted in the Emergency Department and Medical Assessment Area at the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh. We retrospectively analysed electronic patient records in an open observational audit of all patients managed in the ambulatory arm over five months of use. We analysed 45 patients' records. Of these, 91.1% required imaging to confirm or refute PE, 62.2% received a computed tomography pulmonary angiogram (CTPA). In 25% of patients, PE was confirmed with musculoskeletal pain (22.7%), and respiratory tract infection (15.9%) the next most prevalent diagnoses. Alternative diagnoses was provided by CTPA in 32% of cases. We identified no adverse events or readmissions but individualised follow-up was not attempted. The data from this audit suggests this protocol can be applied to select and manage low-risk patients suitable for ambulatory investigation of possible PE. A larger prospective comparative study would be required to accurately define the safety and effectiveness of this protocol.

  19. Center of mass movement estimation using an ambulatory measurement sytem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, H. Martin; Veltink, Petrus H.

    2007-01-01

    Center of Mass (CoM) displacement, an important variable to characterize human walking, was estimated in this study using an ambulatory measurement system. The ambulatory system was compared to an optical reference system. Root-mean-square differences between the magnitudes of the CoM appeared to be

  20. The effect anticoagulation status on geriatric fall trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Julia; Baldawi, Mustafa; Heidt, David

    2016-12-01

    This research study aims to identify the effect of anticoagulation status on hospital course, complications, and outcomes among geriatric fall trauma patients. The study design is a retrospective cohort study, looking at fall trauma among patients aged 60 to 80 years from 2009 to 2013 at a university hospital in the United States. The statistical analysis, conducted with SPSS software with a threshold for statistical significance of P patients included in this study was 1,121. Compared with patients not on anticoagulation, there was a higher LOS among patients on anticoagulation (6.3 ± 6.2 vs 4.9 ± 5.2, P = .001). A higher LOS (7.2 ± 6.8 vs 5.0 ± 5.3, P = .001) and days in the ICU (2.1 ± 5.4 vs 1.1 ± 3.8, P = .010) was observed in patients on warfarin. A higher mortality (7.1% vs 2.8%, P = .013), LOS (6.3 ± 6.2 vs 5.1 ± 5.396, P = .036), and complication rate (49.1 vs 36.7, P = .010) was observed among patients on clopidogrel. In this study, a higher mortality and complication rate were seen among clopidogrel, and a greater LOS and number of days in the ICU were seen in patients on warfarin. These differences are important, as they can serve as a screening tool for triaging the severity of a geriatric trauma patient's condition and complication risk. For patients on clopidogrel, it is essential that these patients are recognized early as high-risk patients who will need to be monitored more closely. For patients on clopidogrel or warfarin, bridging a patient's anticoagulation should be initiated as soon as possible to prevent unnecessary increased LOS. At last, these data also provide support against prescribing patients clopidogrel when other anticoagulation options are available. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulation agents in anticoagulant naïve atrial fibrillation patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Sørensen, Rikke; Hansen, Morten Lock

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulation (NOAC) agents have been approved for stroke prophylaxis in atrial fibrillation (AF). We investigated 'real-world' information on how these drugs are being adopted. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using Danish nationwide administrative registers, we identif...

  2. Oral Anticoagulant Use After Bariatric Surgery: A Literature Review and Clinical Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Karlyn A; Lee, Craig R; Farrell, Timothy M; Moll, Stephan

    2017-05-01

    Bariatric surgery may alter the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or elimination (disposition) of orally administered drugs via changes to the gastrointestinal tract anatomy, body weight, and adipose tissue composition. As some patients who have undergone bariatric surgery will need therapeutic anticoagulation for various indications, appropriate knowledge is needed regarding anticoagulant drug disposition and resulting efficacy and safety in this population. We review general considerations about oral drug disposition in patients after bariatric surgery, as well as existing literature on oral anticoagulation after bariatric surgery. Overall, available evidence on therapeutic anticoagulation is very limited, and individual drug studies are necessary to learn how to safely and effectively use the direct oral anticoagulants. Given the sparsity of currently available data, it appears most prudent to use warfarin with international normalized ratio monitoring, and not direct oral anticoagulants, when full-dose anticoagulation is needed after bariatric surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Anticoagulated patient's perception of their illness, their beliefs about the anticoagulant therapy prescribed and the relationship with adherence: impact of novel oral anticoagulant therapy - study protocol for The Switching Study: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auyeung, Vivian; Patel, Jignesh P; Abdou, John K; Vadher, Bipin; Bonner, Lynda; Brown, Alison; Roberts, Lara N; Patel, Raj K; Arya, Roopen

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulant therapy is prescribed for millions of patients worldwide for the prevention and treatment of both arterial and venous thrombosis. Historically, only vitamin K antagonists have been available for clinicians to prescribe. The anticoagulation landscape is changing. The recent availability of the novel oral anticoagulants overcome many of the disadvantages associated with vitamin K antagonists. However the lack of formal monitoring and clinic follow-up is a concern for clinicians, as medication adherence is being assumed, which is known to decline in patients prescribed medications for chronic conditions. The switching study is a programme of work investigating the association between medication adherence and patient's beliefs about anticoagulation therapy (warfarin and subsequently novel oral anticoagulants), together with beliefs about their illness and anticoagulation related quality of life. The anticoagulation database at King's College Hospital will be interrogated and two groups of patients will be identified; those with a time in therapeutic range on warfarin of ≥75 % and those beliefs about medications compared. Those patients in the time in therapeutic range beliefs about medications, re-evaluated on the novel agent. The results from these sub-studies, will inform a clinical pathway to support patients on these novel agents, which will be evaluated in an independent group of patients. The results from the switching study will be used to develop a clinical pathway to support patient's prescribed novel oral anticoagulant therapy long-term.

  4. Transportation cost of anticoagulation clinic visits in an urban setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jamie M; Clemente, Jennifer; Sharma, Krishna P; Taylor, Thomas N; Garwood, Candice L

    2011-10-01

    Patients being managed on warfarin make frequent or regular visits to anticoagulation monitoring appointments. International studies have evaluated transportation cost and associated time related to anticoagulation clinic visits. To our knowledge, no studies have evaluated the cost of transportation to such clinic visits in the United States. To describe the methods of transportation and estimate the average total cost of transportation to and from an anticoagulation clinic in an urban setting. We prospectively conducted a survey of patients treated at the Harper Anticoagulation Clinic located in Detroit, Michigan, during November 2010. The survey was given to patients while waiting at their regularly scheduled clinic appointments and included questions regarding mode of transportation, distance traveled in miles, parking payment, and time missed from work for clinic appointments. The mean distance traveled was translated into cost assuming 50 cents per mile based on 2010 estimates by the Internal Revenue Service. Sixty patients responded to the 11-item survey; response rates for individual items varied because participants were instructed to skip questions that did not pertain to them. Of the 47 participants responding to demographic questions, 70.2% were female, and 46.8% were older than 60 years. Transportation by private vehicle (80.0%), either driven by patients (41.7%) or someone else (38.3%), was the most common method reported. Use of private automobile translated into a cost of $11.19 per round trip. Other means of transportation identified include a ride from a medical transportation service (10.0%), bus (5.0%), walking (3.3%), and taxi (1.7%). The mean (SD) distance traveled to the clinic for all methods of transportation was 8.34 (7.7) miles. We estimated the average cost of round-trip transportation to be $10.78 weighted for all transportation modes. This is a direct nonmedical cost that is paid for by most patients out of pocket. However, 9 of 44 (20

  5. The impact of pre-injury anticoagulation therapy in the older adult patient experiencing a traumatic brain injury: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karen; Weeks, Susan

    2012-01-01

    studies, the overall incidence of hospitalized TBI patients was 235 incidents/per 100,000 individuals, with a mortality rate of 15.4 deaths/per 100,000 of the population.The association between medications that alter a patient's coagulation function and adverse trauma outcome continues to be an important area of interest and study. The percentage of Americans on anticoagulant and antiplatelet agents continues to increase with the long-term trend towards longer life expectancies. Older adults are prescribed anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents to prevent thromboembolic complications of artial fibrillation; prosthetic cardiac valves; cerebral, coronary, and peripheral vascular disease; as well as several other medical conditions. One of the most frequently prescribed anticoagulant medications is warfarin. The prevalence of warfarin use in the Unites States is unknown, but the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) estimates that more than 31 million prescriptions were written in 2004. Newer, more potent antiplatelet medications like clopidogrel (Plavix) pose an even greater risk for uncontrolled bleeding in trauma patients. The uncertainty regarding the impact on trauma outcomes is compounded by the variable response of patients to anticoagulant or antiplatelet medication for an associated comorbidity. Evidence suggests that outcomes for TBI are worse, and there may be delayed intracranial hemorrhage in this population of patients.According to a Western Australian study, trauma patients are theoretically at risk for prolonged major bleeding. Studies of traumatic intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) suggest that patients taking anticoagulants have two to six times greater mortality. Mina et al. noted that the trauma patient with preinjury anticoagulation such as warfarin or even aspirin who had an intracranial injury had a four to five fold higher risk of death than the non-anticoagulated patient. Franko et al. concluded that mortality of patients over age 70 was significantly higher

  6. Therapeutic strategies after coronary stenting in chronically anticoagulated patients: the MUSICA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambola, A; Ferreira-González, I; Angel, J; Alfonso, F; Maristany, J; Rodríguez, O; Bueno, H; López-Minguez, J R; Zueco, J; Fernández-Avilés, F; San Román, A; Prendergast, B; Mainar, V; García-Dorado, D; Tornos, P

    2009-09-01

    To identify the therapeutic regimens used at discharge in patients receiving oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) who undergo stenting percutaneous coronary intervention and stent implantation (PCI-S), and to assess the safety and efficacy associated with different therapeutic regimens according to thromboembolic risk. A prospective multicentre registry. In hospital, after discharge and follow-up by telephone call. 405 patients (328 male/77 female; mean (SD) age 71 (9) years) receiving OAT who underwent PCI-S between November 2003 and June 2006 from nine catheterisation laboratories of tertiary care teaching hospitals in Spain and one in the United Kingdom were included. Three therapeutic regimens were identified at discharge: triple therapy (TT) -- that is, any anticoagulant (AC) plus double antiplatelet therapy (DAT; 278 patients (68.6%); AC and a single antiplatelet (AC+AT; 46 (11.4%)) and DAT only (81 (20%)). At 6 months, patients receiving TT showed the greatest rate of bleeding events. No patients receiving DAT at low thromboembolic risk presented a bleeding event (14.8% receiving TT, 11.8% receiving AC+AT and 0% receiving DAT, p = 0.033) or cardiovascular event (6.7% receiving TT, 0% receiving AC+AT and 0% receiving DAT, p = 0.126). The combination of AC+AT showed the worst rate of adverse events in the whole cohort, especially in patients at moderate-high thromboembolic risk. In patients receiving OAT, TT was the most commonly used regimen after PCI-S. DAT was associated with the lowest rate of bleeding events and a similar efficacy to TT in patients at low thromboembolic risk. TT should probably be restricted to patients at moderate-high thromboembolic risk.

  7. Achieving the AAAs of Ambulatory Care: Aptitude, Appeal, and Appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybolt, Ann H.; Staton, Lisa J.; Panda, Mukta; Jones, Roger C.

    2009-01-01

    Background In the current health care environment more patient care has moved from in-hospital care to the ambulatory primary care settings; however, fewer internal medicine residents are pursuing primary care careers. Barriers to residents developing a sense of competency and enjoyment in ambulatory medicine include the complexity of practice-based systems, patients with multiple chronic diseases, and the limited time that residents spend in the outpatient setting. Objective In an effort to accelerate residents' ambulatory care competence and enhance their satisfaction with ambulatory practice, we sought to change the learning environment. Interns were provided a series of intensive, focused, ambulatory training sessions prior to beginning their own continuity clinic sessions. The sessions were designed to enable them to work confidently and effectively in their continuity clinic from the beginning of the internship year, and it was hoped this would have a positive impact on their perception of the desirability of ambulatory practice. Methods Improvement needs assessment after a performance, so we developed a structured, competency-based, multidisciplinary curriculum for initiation into ambulatory practice. The curriculum focused on systems-based practice, patient safety, quality improvement, and collaborative work while emphasizing the importance of continuity of care and long-term doctor-patient relationships. Direct observation of patient encounters was done by an attending physician to evaluate communication and physical examination skills. Systems of care commonly used in the clinic were demonstrated. Resources for practice-based learning were used. Conclusion The immersion of interns in an intensive, hands-on experience using a structured ambulatory care orientation curriculum early in training may prepare the intern to be a successful provider and learner in the primary care ambulatory setting. PMID:21975724

  8. Direct Oral Anticoagulants: An Overview for the Interventional Radiologist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Pradesh, E-mail: pradeshkumar@doctors.org.uk; Ravi, Rajeev, E-mail: rajeev.ravi@aintree.nhs.uk; Sundar, Gaurav, E-mail: gaurav.sundar@aintree.nhs.uk [Aintree University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Radiology Department (United Kingdom); Shiach, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.shiach@aintree.nhs.uk [Aintree University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Haematology Department (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-15

    The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have emerged as a good alternative for the treatment of thromboembolic diseases, and their use in clinical practice is increasing rapidly. The DOACs act by blocking the activity of one single step in the coagulation cascade. These drugs act downstream in the common pathway of the coagulation cascade by directly antagonising the action of thrombin or factor Xa. The development of DOACs represents a paradigm shift from the oral vitamin K antagonists such as warfarin. This article aims to describe the properties of the currently available DOACs including pharmacology and dosing. We also address the strategies for periprocedural management and reversal of anticoagulation of patients treated with these agents.

  9. Direct Oral Anticoagulants: An Overview for the Interventional Radiologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Pradesh; Ravi, Rajeev; Sundar, Gaurav; Shiach, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have emerged as a good alternative for the treatment of thromboembolic diseases, and their use in clinical practice is increasing rapidly. The DOACs act by blocking the activity of one single step in the coagulation cascade. These drugs act downstream in the common pathway of the coagulation cascade by directly antagonising the action of thrombin or factor Xa. The development of DOACs represents a paradigm shift from the oral vitamin K antagonists such as warfarin. This article aims to describe the properties of the currently available DOACs including pharmacology and dosing. We also address the strategies for periprocedural management and reversal of anticoagulation of patients treated with these agents.

  10. Oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senoo, Keitaro; Lane, Deirdre A; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2014-09-01

    The availability of 4 non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs), that is, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban, has changed the landscape of stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. This review article provides an overview of the 4 phase III studies that have compared these NOACs, examining major outcomes of efficacy and safety. A range of practical questions relating to the NOACs have emerged, including topics such as patient selection, treating patients with renal impairment, treating elderly patients, and combining anticoagulant therapy with antiplatelet drugs. We also address the interaction of various patient characteristics with the treatments and suggest the features can assist the physician in the choice of a particular NOAC for a particular patient(s). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Net clinical benefit of combination anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy versus anticoagulation alone in atrial fibrillation patients: Results from the amadeus trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lane, Deirdre; Kamphuisen, Pieter; Minini, Pascal; De Peuter, Olaf R.; Buller, Harry R.; Lip, Gregory Y. H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: To compare the effect of combination anticoagulant and antiplatelet (AP) therapy with anticoagulation alone on stroke and bleeding risk in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients and examine predictors of clinically relevant bleeding. Methods: Post-hoc analysis of 4576 AF patients [mean (SD)

  12. Recent developments in the use of oral anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Michael R

    2009-01-01

    , such as their subcutaneous route of administration or the need for coagulation monitoring. Research was challenged to develop new drugs that would simplify thromboprophylaxis while showing equivalent or better efficacy. Rivaroxaban and dabigatran are now available in some countries for the prevention of venous......For many years, vitamin K antagonists, unfractionated heparins, low-molecular-weight heparins and a pentasaccharide were the only anticoagulant drugs available for the prevention of venous thromboembolism after surgery. However, their benefits were associated with disadvantages...

  13. Conservatively managed pineal apoplexy in an anticoagulated patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werder, Gabriel M.; Razdan, Rahul S.; Gagliardi, Joseph A.; Chaddha, Shashi K.B.

    2008-01-01

    We present a case of pineal apoplexy in an anticoagulated and hypertensive 56-year-old Hispanic male. At presentation, the patient's international normalized ratio (INR) was 10.51 and his blood pressure was 200/130 mmHg. His presenting symptoms included acute onset of headache, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, vertigo, and visual disturbance. Neuroimaging demonstrated hemorrhage into a morphologically normal pineal gland. Under conservative management, the patient experienced gradual resolution of all symptoms excluding the disturbance of upward gaze

  14. Non arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy; does anticoagulation help?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aftab, A.M.; Iqbal, M.; Ali, A.; Rauf, A.

    2017-01-01

    Non Arteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy (NAION) is the most common acute optic neuropathy in patients over 50 years of age. This study was conducted to determine the beneficial effects of anticoagulation with Heparin and Warfarin in patients with NAION presenting within 4 weeks of onset of symptoms Methods: A prospective, interventional, pilot study was conducted in Eye- A unit of Khyber Teaching Hospital from July 2010 onwards on patients with NAION presenting within 4 weeks of onset of symptoms. Patients underwent complete ophthalmological examination including Snellen's visual acuity (latter converted to Log MAR), pupil examination, fundus examination and automated Humphrey visual field analysis. Hematologic tests, Thrombophilia screening, Echocardiography and carotid Doppler ultrasound were carried on patients. All patients were anticoagulated with Heparin and Warfarin after obtaining informed written consent. Patients were examined at 1 Month, 3 months and 6 months' time period. Primary parameter measured was improvement in visual acuity. Results: Total number of patients in our study was 24. Regarding visual outcome total number of patients having significant improvement of visual acuity in our study was 16 (66.6 percent), while 4 (16.7 percent) patients had marginal improvement of visual acuity. Three (12.5 percent) patients maintained stable visual acuity of 6/6 throughout the study period in presence of thrombophilic disorders. One patient (4.1 percent) suffered a decline in visual acuity compared to VA at baseline presentation. Conclusions: Anticoagulation using heparin and warfarin does benefit patients with NAION presenting within 4 weeks of onset of symptoms. In our study a higher proportion of patients experienced significant improvement of visual acuity following anticoagulation as compared to the highest reported spontaneous improvement in such patients. (author)

  15. Personalized prophylactic anticoagulation decision analysis in patients with membranous nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taewoo; Biddle, Andrea K.; Lionaki, Sofia; Derebail, Vimal K.; Barbour, Sean J.; Tannous, Sameer; Hladunewich, Michelle A.; Hu, Yichun; Poulton, Caroline J.; Mahoney, Shannon L.; Jennette, J. Charles; Hogan, Susan L.; Falk, Ronald J.; Cattran, Daniel C.; Reich, Heather N.; Nachman, Patrick H.

    2014-01-01

    Primary membranous nephropathy is associated with increased risk of venous thromboembolic events, which are inversely correlated with serum albumin levels. To evaluate the potential benefit of prophylactic anticoagulation (venous thromboembolic events prevented) relative to the risk (major bleeds), we constructed a Markov decision model. The venous thromboembolic event risk according to serum albumin was obtained from an inception cohort of 898 patients with primary membranous nephropathy. Risk estimates of hemorrhage were obtained from a systematic literature review. Benefit-to-risk ratios were predicted according to bleeding risk and serum albumin. This ratio increased with worsening hypoalbuminemia from 4.5:1 for an albumin under 3 g/dl to 13.1:1 for an albumin under 2 g/dl in patients at low bleeding risk. Patients at intermediate bleeding risk with an albumin under 2 g/dl have a moderately favorable benefit-to-risk ratio (under 5:1). Patients at high bleeding risk are unlikely to benefit from prophylactic anticoagulation regardless of albuminemia. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis, to account for uncertainty in risk estimates, confirmed these trends. From these data, we constructed a tool to estimate the likelihood of benefit based on an individual’s bleeding risk profile, serum albumin level, and acceptable benefit-to-risk ratio (http://www.gntools.com). This tool provides an approach to the decision of prophylactic anticoagulation personalized to the individual’s needs and adaptable to dynamic changes in health status and risk profile. PMID:24336031

  16. Diagnostic imaging of severe rectus sheath hematoma complicating anticoagulant therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, A.; Bui, P.; Boccaccini, H.; Bresler, L.; Claudon, M.; Boissel, P.; Regent, D.

    1995-01-01

    CT were performed in thirteen patients (12 women, 1 man) aged from 53 to 90 (mean age, 74) with severe RSH. Five patients also underwent ultrasound examination and three MR examination. Nine patients (69%) were receiving subcutaneous injection of heparin, three (23%) oral anticoagulant therapy and one continuous IV infusion of heparin. Clinical diagnosis was reached in 6 cases. Excessive activity of anticoagulant therapy was noted in 4 cases. The location of the RSH, their densities and their signals were analysed. All the RSH were mostly developed in the lower third of the abdominal wall, had a large spreading into the Retzius space and compressed the bladder and/or the bowels. RSH were all hyperdense and in 8 cases (61%) a fluid-fluid level due to the hematocrit effect was noted. In one case, a retroperitoneal hematoma was discovered. The extension of the RSH was well delineated with MRI. The RSH showed itself with heterogeneous signal intensities with areas of high-signal-intensity on T1-weighted images. Fluid-fluid levels and a concentric ring sign were also noted. Older women with subcutaneous injection of heparin are especially prone to RSH even though there is no overall excessive activity of anticoagulant therapy. Clinical and biological diagnosis may be difficult. CT scan is the exam of choice to reach a precise and acute diagnosis of RSH. (authors). 34 refs., 8 figs

  17. Anticoagulant Effect of Sugammadex: Just an In Vitro Artifact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkmann, Daniel; Britten, Martin W; Pauling, Henning; Weidle, Juliane; Volbracht, Lothar; Görlinger, Klaus; Peters, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    Sugammadex prolongs activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombin time (PT) suggestive of anticoagulant effects. To pinpoint its presumed anticoagulant site of action, the authors assessed Sugammadex's impact on a panel of coagulation assays. Sugammadex, Rocuronium, Sugammadex and Rocuronium combined, or saline were added to blood samples from healthy volunteers and analyzed using plasmatic (i.e., aPTT, thrombin time, and fibrinogen concentration) (n = 8 each), PT (quick), activities of plasmatic coagulation factors, and whole blood (extrinsically and intrinsically activated thromboelastometry) assays (n = 18 each). Furthermore, dose-dependent effects of Sugammadex were also assessed (n = 18 each) in diluted Russel viper venom time (DRVVT) assays with low (DRVVT1) and high (DRVVT2) phospholipid concentrations and in a highly phospholipid-sensitive aPTT assay. Sugammadex increased PT (+9.1%; P Sugammadex dose-dependently prolonged both DRVVT1 and the highly phospholipid-sensitive aPTT assays, but additional phospholipids in the DRVVT2 assay almost abolished these prolongations. Thrombin time, a thromboelastometric thrombin generation assay, clot firmness, clot lysis, fibrinogen concentration, and activities of other coagulation factors were unaltered. Rocuronium, Sugammadex and Rocuronium combined, and saline exerted no effects. Sugammadex significantly affects various coagulation assays, but this is explainable by an apparent phospholipid-binding effect, suggesting that Sugammadex`s anticoagulant effects are likely an in vitro artifact.

  18. New Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOAC and Their Use Today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Schwarb

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The ideal anticoagulant is oral, has a wide therapeutic range, predictable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, a rapid onset of action, an available antidote, minimal side effects and minimal interactions with other drugs or food. With the development of the novel direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC, we now have an alternative to the traditional vitamin K antagonists (VKA for the prevention and treatment of thrombosis. DOACs have limited monitoring requirements and very predictable pharmacokinetic profiles. They were shown to be non-inferior or superior to VKA in the prophylaxis or treatment of thromboembolic events. Particularly in terms of safety they were associated with less major bleeding, including intracranial bleeding, thus providing a superior benefit for the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. Despite these advantages, there are remaining limitations with DOACs: their dependence on renal and hepatic function for clearance and the lack of an approved reversal agent, whereas such antidotes are successively being made available. DOACs do not need regular monitoring to assess the treatment effect but, on the other hand, they interact with other drugs and interfere with functional coagulation assays. From a practical point of view, the properties of oral administration, simple dosing without monitoring, a short half-life allowing for the possibility of uncomplicated switching or bridging, and proven safety overwhelm the disadvantages, making them an attractive option for short- or long-term anticoagulation.

  19. Spontaneous pharyngo-laryngeal hematoma and anticoagulation. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleny CASASOLA-GIRÓN

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Objective: Spontaneous pharyngeal-laryngeal hematoma shows the importance of a complete ENT examination in the face of symptoms of banal appearance and a correct history that, in the case reported, unveiled the therapeutic use of anticoagulants. Case description: A 55 year old woman comes to emergency because of unexplained dysphagia. The inspection shows the presence of a hematoma in the pharyngeal-laryngeal region that, after the anticoagulant therapy was reversed, evolved favorably with conservative treatment. Discussion: In this case, apart from medical management performed by the hematology department, we focus our therapeutic approach in the protection of the airway and the prevention of a possible massive bleeding. Determining which patients require endotracheal intubation or tracheostomy and hemostatic surgery is the key to treatment. Conclusions: The anticoagulant therapy involves several complications that ENT specialists must consider in the face of clinical symptoms of dysphagia, dysphonia, dyspnea or signs of bleeding and they must know the possibilities of performance depending on the severity of each case.

  20. Electroconvulsive therapy and anticoagulation after pulmonary embolism: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar Lazaro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is considered the most effective treatment for catatonia regardless its underlying condition. The rigid fixed posture and immobility observed in catatonia may lead to several clinical complications, of which, pulmonary embolism (PE is one of the most severe. The rapid improvement of the psychiatric condition in catatonia-related PE is essential, since immobility favors the occurrence of new thromboembolic events and further complications. In that scenario, ECT should be considered, based on a risk-benefit analysis, aiming at the faster resolution of the catatonia. Methods Case report and literature review. Results A 66-years-old woman admitted to the psychiatric ward with catatonia due to a depressive episode presented bilateral PE. Clinically stable, but still severely depressed after a trial of antidepressants, she was treated with ECT in the course of full anticoagulation with enoxaparin. After five ECT sessions, her mood was significantly better and she was walking and eating spontaneously. She did not present complications related either to PE or to anticoagulation. After the eighth ECT session, she evolved with hypomania, which was managed with oral medication adjustments. The patient was completely euthymic at discharge. Conclusion The case we presented provides further evidence to the anecdotal case reports on the safety of ECT in the course of concomitant full anticoagulant therapy after PE, and illustrates how, with the proper precautions, the benefits of ECT in such condition might outweigh its risks.

  1. Oral Anticoagulation in Patients With Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Arman; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Greenberger, Norton J; Giugliano, Robert P

    2018-05-15

    Patients with liver disease are at increased risks of both thrombotic and bleeding complications. Many have atrial fibrillation (AF) or venous thromboembolism (VTE) necessitating oral anticoagulant agents (OACs). Recent evidence has contradicted the assumption that patients with liver disease are "auto-anticoagulated" and thus protected from thrombotic events. Warfarin and non-vitamin K-antagonist OACs have been shown to reduce thrombotic events safely in patients with either AF or VTE. However, patients with liver disease have largely been excluded from trials of OACs. Because all currently approved OACs undergo metabolism in the liver, hepatic dysfunction may cause increased bleeding. Thus, the optimal anticoagulation strategy for patients with AF or VTE who have liver disease remains unclear. This review discusses pharmacokinetic and clinical studies evaluating the efficacy and safety of OACs in patients with liver disease and provides a practical, clinically oriented approach to the management of OAC therapy in this population. Copyright © 2018 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Anticoagulant and antimicrobial finishing of non-woven polypropylene textiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degoutin, S; Jimenez, M; Casetta, M; Bellayer, S; Chai, F; Blanchemain, N; Neut, C; Kacem, I; Traisnel, M; Martel, B

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to prepare non-woven polypropylene (PP) textile functionalized with bioactive molecules in order to improve its anticoagulation and antibacterial properties. This paper describes the optimization of the grafting process of acrylic acid (AA) on low-pressure cold-plasma pre-activated PP, the characterization of the modified substrates and the effect of these modifications on the in vitro biological response towards cells. Then, the immobilization of gentamicin (aminoglycoside antibiotic) and heparin (anticoagulation agent) has been carried out on the grafted samples by either ionic interactions or covalent linkages. Their bioactivity has been investigated and related to the nature of their interactions with the substrate. For gentamicin-immobilized AA-grafted samples, an inhibition radius and a reduction of 99% of the adhesion of Escherichia coli have been observed when gentamicin was linked by ionic interactions, allowing the release of the antibiotic. By contrast, for heparin-immobilized AA-grafted PP samples, a strong increase of the anticoagulant effect up to 35 min has been highlighted when heparin was covalently bonded on the substrate, by contact with the blood drop. (paper)

  3. Renal Infarction during Anticoagulant Therapy after Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Onda

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Liver transplant recipients are at risk for complications of vascular thrombosis. The reconstructed hepatic artery and portal vein thrombosis potentially result in hepatic failure and graft loss. Renal infarction is a rare clinical condition, but in severe cases, it may lead to renal failure. We herein report a case of renal infarction after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT during anticoagulant therapy. Case Presentation: A 60-year-old woman with end-stage liver disease due to primary biliary cholangitis underwent LDLT with splenectomy. Postoperatively, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroid were used for initial immunosuppression therapy. On postoperative day (POD 5, enhanced computed tomography (CT revealed splenic vein thrombosis, and anticoagulant therapy with heparin followed by warfarin was given. Follow-up enhanced CT on POD 20 incidentally demonstrated right renal infarction. The patient’s renal function was unchanged and the arterial flow was good, and the splenic vein thrombosis resolved. At 4 months postoperatively, warfarin was discontinued, but she developed recurrent splenic vein thrombosis 11 months later, and warfarin was resumed. As of 40 months after transplantation, she discontinued warfarin and remains well without recurrence of splenic vein thrombosis or renal infarction. Conclusion: Renal infarction is a rare complication of LDLT. In this case, renal infarction was incidentally diagnosed during anticoagulant therapy and was successfully treated.

  4. Ambulatory assessed implicit affect is associated with salivary cortisol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joram eMossink

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the presumed pathways linking negative emotions to adverse somatic health is an overactive HPA-axis, usually indicated by elevated cortisol levels. Traditionally, research has focused on consciously reported negative emotions. Yet, given that the majority of information processing occurs without conscious awareness, stress physiology might also be influenced by affective processes that people are not aware of. In a 24-hour ambulatory study we examined whether cortisol levels were associated with two implicit measures. Implicit affect was assessed using the Implicit Positive and Negative Affect Test, and implicit negative memory bias was assessed with the word fragment completion tasks. In 55 healthy participants, we measured subjective stress levels, worries, implicit and explicit affect each hour during waking hours. Also, saliva samples were collected at three fixed times during the day, as well as upon waking and 30 minutes thereafter (cortisol awakening response. Multilevel analyses of the daytime cortisol levels revealed that the presence of an implicit negative memory bias was associated with increased cortisol levels. Additionally, implicit PA and, unexpectedly, implicit NA were negatively associated with cortisol levels. Finally, participants demonstrating higher levels of implicit sadness during the first measurement day, had a stronger cortisol rise upon awakening at the next day. Contrary to previous research, no associations between explicit affect and cortisol were apparent. The current study was the first to examine the concurrent relation between implicit measures and stress physiology in daily life. The results suggest that the traditional focus on consciously reported feelings and emotions is limited, and that implicit measures can add to our understanding of how stress and emotions contribute to daily physiological activity and, in the long term, health problems.

  5. Adverse Weather Evokes Nostalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilburg, Wijnand A P; Sedikides, Constantine; Wildschut, Tim

    2018-03-01

    Four studies examined the link between adverse weather and the palliative role of nostalgia. We proposed and tested that (a) adverse weather evokes nostalgia (Hypothesis 1); (b) adverse weather causes distress, which predicts elevated nostalgia (Hypothesis 2); (c) preventing nostalgia exacerbates weather-induced distress (Hypothesis 3); and (d) weather-evoked nostalgia confers psychological benefits (Hypothesis 4). In Study 1, participants listened to recordings of wind, thunder, rain, and neutral sounds. Adverse weather evoked nostalgia. In Study 2, participants kept a 10-day diary recording weather conditions, distress, and nostalgia. We also obtained meteorological data. Adverse weather perceptions were positively correlated with distress, which predicted higher nostalgia. Also, adverse natural weather was associated with corresponding weather perceptions, which predicted elevated nostalgia. (Results were mixed for rain.) In Study 3, preventing nostalgia (via cognitive load) increased weather-evoked distress. In Study 4, weather-evoked nostalgia was positively associated with psychological benefits. The findings pioneer the relevance of nostalgia as source of comfort in adverse weather.

  6. Underuse of Anticoagulation in Older Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and CHADS2 Score ≥ 2: Are We Doing Better Since the Marketing of Direct Oral Anticoagulants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrard, Séverine; Vandenabeele, Caroline; Marien, Sophie; Boland, Benoit; Dalleur, Olivia

    2017-11-01

    Our objectives were to (1) describe the evolution of the underuse of anticoagulants in older people with atrial fibrillation (AF) and a CHADS 2 score ≥ 2 since direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) were introduced to the market and (2) describe factors associated with this underuse. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study including geriatric patients admitted during the pre-DOAC (2008-2011) and post-DOAC (2013-2015) periods in an academic hospital in Belgium. Five inclusion criteria were met: age ≥ 75 years, diagnosis of AF, indication for anticoagulation (CHADS 2 score ≥ 2), risk of functional decline (Identification of Seniors At Risk [ISAR] score ≥ 2), and comprehensive geriatric assessment. The use of anticoagulants and antiplatelets at home before admission was recorded. Risks of stroke and bleeding were calculated using CHADS 2 and HEMORR 2 HAGES scores, respectively. Three different logistic regression models were performed to describe the evolution of and factors associated with the underuse of anticoagulants after DOAC marketing. Anticoagulant underuse, present in 209 of 614 (34%) geriatric patients with AF, was lower in patients with a history of stroke (28.5%) or congestive heart failure (26.9%) but higher in those receiving antiplatelets (56.2%) and in older individuals. Anticoagulant underuse decreased significantly from the pre-DOAC (37.3%) to the post-DOAC (29.7%) era, as shown by two analyses using propensity scores. In older patients with AF, anticoagulant underuse was mainly associated with antiplatelet use. Anticoagulant underuse and antiplatelet use have both decreased since DOAC marketing. Underuse of anticoagulants was still a concern for three in ten geriatric patients with AF at high risk of stroke (CHADS 2 score ≥ 2).

  7. The effect of the amiodarone-warfarin interaction on anticoagulation quality in a single, high-quality anticoagulation center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ryan D; Riggs, Kyle W; Ege, Ed J; Petroski, Gregory F; Koerber, Scott M; Flaker, Greg

    2016-03-01

    Clinical trials have reported a low time in therapeutic range (TTR) in patients with atrial fibrillation treated with both warfarin andamiodarone. These trials included centers and countries with both high and low TTRs. What is the impact of amiodarone on the TTR in a single, high-quality anticoagulation clinic? TTR was assessed in amiodarone and nonamiodarone-treated patients from a University anticoagulation clinic. Baseline characteristics between patients ever-taking or never-taking amiodarone were similar, except more amiodarone patients were smokers (19.5 vs. 6.1%, P = 0.0031). The TTR calculated from 8901international normalized ratios (INRs) in 249 nonamiodarone patients with a mean follow-up of 34 ± 20 months (mean INR 36 ± 18) was 66 ± 16.6% compared with 61.3 ± 16.2% (P = 0.111) from 1455 INRs in 41 amiodarone-treated patients with a mean follow-up of 28 ± 20 months (mean INR 35 ± 22). Factors associated with a low TTR were male sex (P = 0.0013), smoker (P = 0.0048), and amiodarone use (P = 0.0374). A second on-treatment analysis, in which the TTR was calculated only during amiodarone therapy, resulted in similar findings; however, amiodarone did not emerge as a predictor of a low TTR. In 11 patients, the TTR prior to amiodarone (54.5 ± 22.2%) was not significantly different in the first 3 months (54.6 ± 33.4%) or after 3 months (67.2 ± 33.7%) of amiodarone. In a single high-quality anticoagulation center, anticoagulation quality, as measured by the TTR, can be comparable in amiodarone and nonamiodarone-treated patients.

  8. Development of Quality Metrics in Ambulatory Pediatric Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Devyani; Gurvitz, Michelle; Marelli, Ariane; Anderson, Jeffrey; Baker-Smith, Carissa; Diab, Karim A; Edwards, Thomas C; Hougen, Tom; Jedeikin, Roy; Johnson, Jonathan N; Karpawich, Peter; Lai, Wyman; Lu, Jimmy C; Mitchell, Stephanie; Newburger, Jane W; Penny, Daniel J; Portman, Michael A; Satou, Gary; Teitel, David; Villafane, Juan; Williams, Roberta; Jenkins, Kathy

    2017-02-07

    The American College of Cardiology Adult Congenital and Pediatric Cardiology (ACPC) Section had attempted to create quality metrics (QM) for ambulatory pediatric practice, but limited evidence made the process difficult. The ACPC sought to develop QMs for ambulatory pediatric cardiology practice. Five areas of interest were identified, and QMs were developed in a 2-step review process. In the first step, an expert panel, using the modified RAND-UCLA methodology, rated each QM for feasibility and validity. The second step sought input from ACPC Section members; final approval was by a vote of the ACPC Council. Work groups proposed a total of 44 QMs. Thirty-one metrics passed the RAND process and, after the open comment period, the ACPC council approved 18 metrics. The project resulted in successful development of QMs in ambulatory pediatric cardiology for a range of ambulatory domains. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Discrepancies between Patients' Preferences and Educational Programs on Oral Anticoagulant Therapy: A Survey in Community Pharmacies and Hospital Consultations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Macquart de Terline

    Full Text Available Oral anticoagulation therapy is increasingly used for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic complications in various clinical situations. Nowadays, education programs for patients treated with anticoagulants constitute an integrated component of their management. However, such programs are usually based on the healthcare providers' perceptions of what patients should know, rather than on patients' preferences.To investigate patients' viewpoints on educational needs and preferred modalities of information delivery.We conducted an observational study based on a self-administered questionnaire. To explore several profiles of patients, the study was designed for enrolling patients in two settings: during outpatient consultations in a cardiology department (Saint Antoine Hospital, Paris, France and in community pharmacies throughout France.Of the 371 patients who completed the questionnaire, 187 (50.4% were recruited during an outpatient consultation and 184 (49.6% were recruited in community pharmacies. 84.1% of patients were receiving a vitamin K antagonist and 15.6% a direct oral anticoagulant. Patients ranked 16 of 21 (76.2% questionnaire items on information about their treatment as important or essential; information on adverse effects of treatment was the highest ranked domain (mean score 2.38, 95% CI 2.30-2.46. Pharmacists (1.69, 1.58-1.80, nurses (1.05, 0.95-1.16, and patient associations (0.36, 0.29-0.44, along with group sessions (0.85, 0.75-0.95, the internet (0.77, 0.67-0.88, and delivery of material at the patient's home (1.26, 1.14-1.38, were ranked poorly in terms of delivering educational material.This study revealed substantial discrepancies between patient preferences and current educational programs. These findings should be useful for tailoring future educational programs that are better adapted to patients, with a potential associated enhancement of their effectiveness.

  10. [Adverse effects of oxcarbazepine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shu; Gong, Zhi-Cheng

    2015-04-01

    Oxcarbazepine is a new antiepileptic drug. The results of clinical trials suggest that oxcarbazepine is well tolerated and has less drug interactions. It is being used more and more widely in clinical practice, but its adverse effects should not be ignored. The most common adverse effects of oxcarbazepine are usually related to the central nervous system and digestive system, including fatigue, drowsiness, diplopia, dizziness, nausea and vomit. The common skin adverse reaction is rash. Long-term use of oxcarbazepine may also cause hyponatremia. This article reviews the literature from China and overseas about the adverse effets of oxcarbazepine over the last 10 years in order to find information about rational clinical use of oxcarbazepine.

  11. Pros and cons of the ambulatory surgery center joint venture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    If a physician group has determined that it has a realistic patient base to establish an ambulatory surgery center, it may be beneficial to consider a partner to share the costs and risks of this new joint venture. Joint ventures can be a benefit or liability in the establishment of an ambulatory surgery center. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of a hospital physician-group joint venture.

  12. Computerized adaptive testing--ready for ambulatory monitoring?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Matthias; Bjørner, Jakob; Fischer, Felix

    2012-01-01

    Computerized adaptive tests (CATs) have abundant theoretical advantages over established static instruments, which could improve ambulatory monitoring of patient-reported outcomes (PROs). However, an empirical demonstration of their practical benefits is warranted.......Computerized adaptive tests (CATs) have abundant theoretical advantages over established static instruments, which could improve ambulatory monitoring of patient-reported outcomes (PROs). However, an empirical demonstration of their practical benefits is warranted....

  13. Fall risk and anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation in the elderly: A delicate balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagerty, Tracy; Rich, Michael W

    2017-01-01

    Guidelines for managing atrial fibrillation recommend systemic anticoagulation for almost all patients age 65 and older, but in practice up to 50% of older patients do not receive maintenance anticoagulation therapy. The most common reason physicians cite for withholding anticoagulation in older patients with atrial fibrillation is a perception of a high risk of falling and associated bleeding, especially intracranial hemorrhage. Copyright © 2017 Cleveland Clinic.

  14. Control of anticoagulant therapy and quality of life of patients with atrial fibrillation (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shvarts Y.G.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The review presents the published data on the relevance of the problem of thromboembolic complications in atrial fibrillation, the peculiarities of anticoagulant therapy for this disease. The relationship of clinical characteristics of patients with anticoagulant dose adjustment algorithms has been described. The problem of ethical issues of out of clinical trials patients and the dynamics of their quality of life against the background of long-term use of anticoagulant have been considered.

  15. Ambulatory laparoscopic minor hepatic surgery: Retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, M; Tranchart, H; Lainas, P; Tzanis, D; Franco, D; Dagher, I

    2015-11-01

    Over the last decade, laparoscopic hepatic surgery (LHS) has been increasingly performed throughout the world. Meanwhile, ambulatory surgery has been developed and implemented with the aims of improving patient satisfaction and reducing health care costs. The objective of this study was to report our preliminary experience with ambulatory minimally invasive LHS. Between 1999 and 2014, 172 patients underwent LHS at our institution, including 151 liver resections and 21 fenestrations of hepatic cysts. The consecutive series of highly selected patients who underwent ambulatory LHS were included in this study. Twenty patients underwent ambulatory LHS. Indications were liver cysts in 10 cases, liver angioma in 3 cases, focal nodular hyperplasia in 3 cases, and colorectal hepatic metastasis in 4 cases. The median operative time was 92 minutes (range: 50-240 minutes). The median blood loss was 35 mL (range: 20-150 mL). There were no postoperative complications or re-hospitalizations. All patients were hospitalized after surgery in our ambulatory surgery unit, and were discharged 5-7 hours after surgery. The median postoperative pain score at the time of discharge was 3 (visual analogue scale: 0-10; range: 0-4). The median quality-of-life score at the first postoperative visit was 8 (range: 6-10) and the median cosmetic satisfaction score was 8 (range: 7-10). This series shows that, in selected patients, ambulatory LHS is feasible and safe for minor hepatic procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Abnormal uterine bleeding in women receiving direct oral anticoagulants for the treatment of venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Richard; Marcoux, Violaine; Tagalakis, Vicky

    2017-08-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is a common complication of anticoagulant therapy in premenopausal women affected with acute venous thromboembolism. AUB impacts quality of life, and can lead to premature cessation of anticoagulation. There is increasing data to suggest that the direct oral anticoagulants when used for the treatment of venous thromboembolism differ in their menstrual bleeding profile. This article aims to review the existing literature regarding the association between AUB and the direct oral anticoagulants and make practical recommendations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Developing an Anti-Xa-Based Anticoagulation Protocol for Patients with Percutaneous Ventricular Assist Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieg, Adam; Mardis, B Andrew; Mardis, Caitlin R; Huber, Michelle R; New, James P; Meadows, Holly B; Cook, Jennifer L; Toole, J Matthew; Uber, Walter E

    2015-01-01

    Because of the complexities associated with anticoagulation in temporary percutaneous ventricular assist device (pVAD) recipients, a lack of standardization exists in their management. This retrospective analysis evaluates current anticoagulation practices at a single center with the aim of identifying an optimal anticoagulation strategy and protocol. Patients were divided into two cohorts based on pVAD implanted (CentriMag (Thoratec; Pleasanton, CA) / TandemHeart (CardiacAssist; Pittsburgh, PA) or Impella (Abiomed, Danvers, MA)), with each group individually analyzed for bleeding and thrombotic complications. Patients in the CentriMag/TandemHeart cohort were subdivided based on the anticoagulation monitoring strategy (activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) or antifactor Xa unfractionated heparin (anti-Xa) values). In the CentriMag/TandemHeart cohort, there were five patients with anticoagulation titrated based on anti-Xa values; one patient developed a device thrombosis and a major bleed, whereas another patient experienced major bleeding. Eight patients received an Impella pVAD. Seven total major bleeds in three patients and no thrombotic events were detected. Based on distinct differences between the devices, anti-Xa values, and outcomes, two protocols were created to guide anticoagulation adjustments. However, anticoagulation in patients who require pVAD support is complex with constantly evolving anticoagulation goals. The ideal level of anticoagulation should be individually determined using several coagulation laboratory parameters in concert with hemodynamic changes in the patient's clinical status, the device, and the device cannulation.

  18. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in nonagenarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formiga, Francesc; Ferrer, Assumpta; Sobrino, Javier; Coca, Antonio; Riera, Antoni; Pujol, Ramón

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in a sample of Spanish nonagenarians. We also analyzed the misdiagnosis of hypertension and investigated blood pressure (BP) control in treated hypertensive nonagenarians. Twenty-four-hour ABPM was undertaken in a group of 42 nonagenarians. The 24-h mean, daytime BP, nighttime BP and heart rate (HR) were extracted from the ABPM. Sociodemographic data, the ability to perform basic daily activities, measured by the Barthel index (BI) or instrumental activities revealed by the Lawton and Brody index (LI), cognition, and comorbidity were evaluated. Thirty-one subjects were receiving antihypertensive drug treatment. Twenty-four hour, daytime and sleeping pressures averaged 130/65, 131/68 and 128/63mmHg, respectively. Seventeen (40.5%) of the 42 patients had a daytime BP of 135/85 or higher. In terms of the BP pattern, 8 (19%) subjects were dippers, 19 (45%) non-dippers, and 15 (36%) were risers. Five (45.46%) out of 11 patients with no evidence of hypertension (normotensive patients) had a daytime BP of 135/85 or higher. The mean daytime BP was 135/85 or higher in 12 (38.7%) out of 31 nonagenarians who had previously received therapy for hypertension. In, conclusion a high prevalence of hypertension, misdiagnosis and inadequate BP control was found in nonagenarians treated for hypertension.

  19. Usability Testing of Two Ambulatory EHR Navigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultman, Gretchen; Marquard, Jenna; Arsoniadis, Elliot; Mink, Pamela; Rizvi, Rubina; Ramer, Tim; Khairat, Saif; Fickau, Keri; Melton, Genevieve B

    2016-01-01

    Despite widespread electronic health record (EHR) adoption, poor EHR system usability continues to be a significant barrier to effective system use for end users. One key to addressing usability problems is to employ user testing and user-centered design. To understand if redesigning an EHR-based navigation tool with clinician input improved user performance and satisfaction. A usability evaluation was conducted to compare two versions of a redesigned ambulatory navigator. Participants completed tasks for five patient cases using the navigators, while employing a think-aloud protocol. The tasks were based on Meaningful Use (MU) requirements. The version of navigator did not affect perceived workload, and time to complete tasks was longer in the redesigned navigator. A relatively small portion of navigator content was used to complete the MU-related tasks, though navigation patterns were highly variable across participants for both navigators. Preferences for EHR navigation structures appeared to be individualized. This study demonstrates the importance of EHR usability assessments to evaluate group and individual performance of different interfaces and preferences for each design.

  20. [Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring for hypertension diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijón Conde, T; Banegas, J R

    2017-01-01

    The early and accurate diagnosis of hypertension is essential given its importance in the development of cardiovascular disease. The boundaries between normal blood pressure (BP) and hypertension are arbitrary and based on the benefits of treating exceeding those of not treating. Conventional BP measurement at the clinic only offers information of a particular time and presents multiple biases dependent on inherent variability of BP and measurement technique itself. Multiple studies have demonstrated the prognosis superiority in the development of cardiovascular disease of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM), allows detection of white coat hypertension, avoiding overdiagnosis and overtreatment, and the detection of patients with masked hypertension who are at risk of underdetection and undertreatment. ABPM also assess nightime BP and circadian variability, providing additional prognostic value. ABPM is recognized in the diagnosis of hypertension in 2011 British NICE Guidelines, very argued at the 2013 European Society of Hypertension guidelines, and recommended in the US Preventive Services Task Force in 2015, 2016 Canadian Guidelines and the 2016 Spanish Program of Preventive Activities and Health Promotion (PAPPS). Its generalization is likely to be only a matter of time. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Hipertension-Liga Española para la Lucha de la Hipertensión Arterial (SEH-LELHA). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. From aviation to medicine: applying concepts of aviation safety to risk management in ambulatory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilf-Miron, R; Lewenhoff, I; Benyamini, Z; Aviram, A

    2003-02-01

    The development of a medical risk management programme based on the aviation safety approach and its implementation in a large ambulatory healthcare organisation is described. The following key safety principles were applied: (1). errors inevitably occur and usually derive from faulty system design, not from negligence; (2). accident prevention should be an ongoing process based on open and full reporting; (3). major accidents are only the "tip of the iceberg" of processes that indicate possibilities for organisational learning. Reporting physicians were granted immunity, which encouraged open reporting of errors. A telephone "hotline" served the medical staff for direct reporting and receipt of emotional support and medical guidance. Any adverse event which had learning potential was debriefed, while focusing on the human cause of error within a systemic context. Specific recommendations were formulated to rectify processes conducive to error when failures were identified. During the first 5 years of implementation, the aviation safety concept and tools were successfully adapted to ambulatory care, fostering a culture of greater concern for patient safety through risk management while providing support to the medical staff.

  2. From aviation to medicine: applying concepts of aviation safety to risk management in ambulatory care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilf-Miron, R; Lewenhoff, I; Benyamini, Z; Aviram, A

    2003-01-01

    

 The development of a medical risk management programme based on the aviation safety approach and its implementation in a large ambulatory healthcare organisation is described. The following key safety principles were applied: (1) errors inevitably occur and usually derive from faulty system design, not from negligence; (2) accident prevention should be an ongoing process based on open and full reporting; (3) major accidents are only the "tip of the iceberg" of processes that indicate possibilities for organisational learning. Reporting physicians were granted immunity, which encouraged open reporting of errors. A telephone "hotline" served the medical staff for direct reporting and receipt of emotional support and medical guidance. Any adverse event which had learning potential was debriefed, while focusing on the human cause of error within a systemic context. Specific recommendations were formulated to rectify processes conducive to error when failures were identified. During the first 5 years of implementation, the aviation safety concept and tools were successfully adapted to ambulatory care, fostering a culture of greater concern for patient safety through risk management while providing support to the medical staff. PMID:12571343

  3. Management of anticoagulation in hip fractures: A pragmatic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassa, Rafik; Khalfaoui, Mahdi Yacine; Hujazi, Ihab; Sevenoaks, Hannah; Dunkow, Paul

    2017-09-01

    Hip fractures are common and increasing with an ageing population. In the United Kingdom, the national guidelines recommend operative intervention within 36 hours of diagnosis. However, long-term anticoagulant treatment is frequently encountered in these patients which can delay surgical intervention. Despite this, there are no set national standards for management of drug-induced coagulopathy pre-operatively in the context of hip fractures.The aim of this study was to evaluate the management protocols available in the current literature for the commonly encountered coagulopathy-inducing agents.We reviewed the current literature, identified the reversal agents used in coagulopathy management and assessed the evidence to determine the optimal timing, doses and routes of administration.Warfarin and other vitamin K antagonists (VKA) can be reversed effectively using vitamin K with a dose in the range of 2 mg to 10 mg intravenously to correct coagulopathy.The role of fresh frozen plasma is not clear from the current evidence while prothrombin complex remains a reliable and safe method for immediate reversal of VKA-induced coagulopathy in hip fracture surgery or failed vitamin K treatment reversal.The literature suggests that surgery should not be delayed in patients on classical antiplatelet medications (aspirin or clopidogrel), but spinal or regional anaesthetic methods should be avoided for the latter. However, evidence regarding the use of more novel antiplatelet medications (e.g. ticagrelor) and direct oral anticoagulants remains a largely unexplored area in the context of hip fracture surgery. We suggest treatment protocols based on best available evidence and guidance from allied specialties.Hip fracture surgery presents a common management dilemma where semi-urgent surgery is required. In this article, we advocate an evidence-based algorithm as a guide for managing these anticoagulated patients. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2:394-402. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.2.160083.

  4. Cuff inflation during ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and heart rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Skov-Madsen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Mia Skov-Madsen, My Svensson, Jeppe Hagstrup ChristensenDepartment of Nephrology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, DenmarkIntroduction: Twenty four-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is a clinically validated procedure in evaluation of blood pressure (BP. We hypothesised that the discomfort during cuff inflation would increase the heart rate (HR measured with 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring compared to a following HR measurement with a 24-h Holter monitor.Methods: The study population (n = 56 were recruited from the outpatient’s clinic at the Department of Nephrology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital at Aalborg, Denmark. All the patients had chronic kidney disease (CKD. We compared HR measured with a 24-h Holter monitor with a following HR measured by a 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring.Results: We found a highly significant correlation between the HR measured with the Holter monitor and HR measured with 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (r = 0.77, p < 0.001. Using the Bland-Altman plot, the mean difference in HR was only 0.5 beat/min during 24 hours with acceptable limits of agreement for both high and low HR levels. Dividing the patients into groups according to betablocker treatment, body mass index, age, sex, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor treatment, statins treatment, diuretic treatment, or calcium channel blocker treatment revealed similar results as described above.Conclusion: The results indicate that the discomfort induced by cuff inflation during 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring does not increase HR. Thus, 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring may be a reliable measurement of the BP among people with CKD.Keywords: ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, Holter monitoring, heart rate, chronic kidney disease, hypertension

  5. Anticoagulation Quality and Complications of using Vitamin K Antagonists in the Cardiac Surgery Outpatient Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Augusto Cray da Costa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: In patients with mechanical prosthetic heart valves or atrial fibrillation requiring anticoagulation to prevent thromboembolic events, several factors influence adherence and anticoagulation complications. Objective: To evaluate the factors that interfere with the quality and complications of anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of 100 patients, in the period from 2011 to 2014, was performed. Anticoagulation conditions in the last year, regarding the presence of complications (embolisms/bleeding and inadequate treatment were assessed: achievement of less than 8 annual prothrombin times and International Normalized Ratio outside therapeutic target in more than 40% of prothrombin times. Results: There were 31 complications (22 minor bleeding without hospitalization and 9 major complications: 7 bleeding with hospitalization and two emboli; 70 were with International Normalized Ratio outside the target in more than 40% of the tests and 36 with insufficient number of prothrombin times. Socioeconomic factors, anticoagulant type and anticoagulation reason had no relationship with complications or with inadequate treatment. There were more complications in patients with longer duration of anticoagulation (P=0.001. Women had more International Normalized Ratio outside the target range (OR 2.61, CI:1.0-6.5; P=0.04. Patients with lower number of annual prothrombin times had longer times of anticoagulation (P=0.03, less annual consultations (P=0.02 and less dose adjustments (P=0.003. Patients with longer duration of anticoagulation have more complications (P=0.001. Conclusion: There was a high rate of major complications and International Normalized Ratio was outside the goal. Less annual prothrombin times was related to longer duration of anticoagulation, less annual consultations and less dose adjustments. More major complications occurred in patients with longer duration of

  6. Anticoagulants Influence the Performance of In Vitro Assays Intended for Characterization of Nanotechnology-Based Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Cedrone

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The preclinical safety assessment of novel nanotechnology-based drug products frequently relies on in vitro assays, especially during the early stages of product development, due to the limited quantities of nanomaterials available for such studies. The majority of immunological tests require donor blood. To enable such tests one has to prevent the blood from coagulating, which is usually achieved by the addition of an anticoagulant into blood collection tubes. Heparin, ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA, and citrate are the most commonly used anticoagulants. Novel anticoagulants such as hirudin are also available but are not broadly used. Despite the notion that certain anticoagulants may influence assay performance, a systematic comparison between traditional and novel anticoagulants in the in vitro assays intended for immunological characterization of nanotechnology-based formulations is currently not available. We compared hirudin-anticoagulated blood with its traditional counterparts in the standardized immunological assay cascade, and found that the type of anticoagulant did not influence the performance of the hemolysis assay. However, hirudin was more optimal for the complement activation and leukocyte proliferation assays, while traditional anticoagulants citrate and heparin were more appropriate for the coagulation and cytokine secretion assays. The results also suggest that traditional immunological controls such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS are not reliable for understanding the role of anticoagulant in the assay performance. We observed differences in the test results between hirudin and traditional anticoagulant-prepared blood for nanomaterials at the time when no such effects were seen with traditional controls. It is, therefore, important to recognize the advantages and limitations of each anticoagulant and consider individual nanoparticles on a case-by-case basis.

  7. Conservatively managed pineal apoplexy in an anticoagulated patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werder, Gabriel M. [William Beaumont Hospital, Department of Radiology, 3600 West Thirteen Mile Road, Royal Oak, MI 48073 (United States); St Christopher Iba Mar Diop College of Medicine, Luton (United Kingdom)], E-mail: gabriel_werder@yahoo.com; Razdan, Rahul S.; Gagliardi, Joseph A.; Chaddha, Shashi K.B. [St Vincent' s Medical Center, Bridgeport, CT (United States)

    2008-02-15

    We present a case of pineal apoplexy in an anticoagulated and hypertensive 56-year-old Hispanic male. At presentation, the patient's international normalized ratio (INR) was 10.51 and his blood pressure was 200/130 mmHg. His presenting symptoms included acute onset of headache, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, vertigo, and visual disturbance. Neuroimaging demonstrated hemorrhage into a morphologically normal pineal gland. Under conservative management, the patient experienced gradual resolution of all symptoms excluding the disturbance of upward gaze.

  8. Bivalirudin for Pediatric Procedural Anticoagulation: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, Katherine L; DiNardo, James A; Nasr, Viviane G

    2018-02-14

    Bivalirudin (Angiomax; The Medicines Company, Parsippany, NJ), a direct thrombin inhibitor, has found increasing utilization as a heparin alternative in the pediatric population, most commonly for the treatment of thrombosis secondary to heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. Due to the relative rarity of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia as well as the lack of Food and Drug Administration-approved indications in this age group, much of what is known regarding the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of bivalirudin in this population has been extrapolated from adult data. This narrative review will present recommendations regarding the use of bivalirudin for procedural anticoagulation in the pediatric population based on the published literature.

  9. Ambulatory blood pressure profiles in familial dysautonomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Lior; Bar-Aluma, Bat-El; Krauthammer, Alex; Efrati, Ori; Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2018-02-12

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a rare genetic disease that involves extreme blood pressure fluctuations secondary to afferent baroreflex failure. The diurnal blood pressure profile, including the average, variability, and day-night difference, may have implications for long-term end organ damage. The purpose of this study was to describe the circadian pattern of blood pressure in the FD population and relationships with renal and pulmonary function, use of medications, and overall disability. We analyzed 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring recordings in 22 patients with FD. Information about medications, disease severity, renal function (estimated glomerular filtration, eGFR), pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1 s, FEV1) and an index of blood pressure variability (standard deviation of systolic pressure) were analyzed. The mean (± SEM) 24-h blood pressure was 115 ± 5.6/72 ± 2.0 mmHg. The diurnal blood pressure variability was high (daytime systolic pressure standard deviation 22.4 ± 1.5 mmHg, nighttime 17.2 ± 1.6), with a high frequency of a non-dipping pattern (16 patients, 73%). eGFR, use of medications, FEV1, and disability scores were unrelated to the degree of blood pressure variability or to dipping status. This FD cohort had normal average 24-h blood pressure, fluctuating blood pressure, and a high frequency of non-dippers. Although there was evidence of renal dysfunction based on eGFR and proteinuria, the ABPM profile was unrelated to the measures of end organ dysfunction or to reported disability.

  10. INR targets and site-level anticoagulation control: results from the Veterans AffaiRs Study to Improve Anticoagulation (VARIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, A J; Berlowitz, D R; Miller, D R; Hylek, E M; Ozonoff, A; Zhao, S; Reisman, J I; Ash, A S

    2012-04-01

    Not all clinicians target the same International Normalized Ratio (INR) for patients with a guideline-recommended target range of 2-3. A patient's mean INR value suggests the INR that was actually targeted. We hypothesized that sites would vary by mean INR, and that sites of care with mean values nearest to 2.5 would achieve better anticoagulation control, as measured by per cent time in therapeutic range (TTR). To examine variations among sites in mean INR and the relationship with anticoagulation control in an integrated system of care. We studied 103,897 patients receiving oral anticoagulation with an expected INR target between 2 and 3 at 100 Veterans Health Administration (VA) sites from 1 October 2006 to 30 September 2008. Key site-level variables were: proportion near 2.5 (that is, percentage of patients with mean INR between 2.3 and 2.7) and mean risk-adjusted TTR. Site mean INR ranged from 2.22 to 2.89; proportion near 2.5, from 30 to 64%. Sites' proportions of patients near 2.5, below 2.3 and above 2.7 were consistent from year to year. A 10 percentage point increase in the proportion near 2.5 predicted a 3.8 percentage point increase in risk-adjusted TTR (P < 0.001). Proportion of patients with mean INR near 2.5 is a site-level 'signature' of care and an implicit measure of targeted INR. This proportion varies by site and is strongly associated with site-level TTR. Our study suggests that sites wishing to improve TTR, and thereby improve patient outcomes, should avoid the explicit or implicit pursuit of non-standard INR targets. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  11. Performance measurement for ambulatory care: moving towards a new agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roski, J; Gregory, R

    2001-12-01

    Despite a shift in care delivery from inpatient to ambulatory care, performance measurement efforts for the different levels in ambulatory care settings such as individual physicians, individual clinics and physician organizations have not been widely instituted in the United States (U.S.). The Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set (HEDIS), the most widely used performance measurement set in the U.S., includes a number of measures that evaluate preventive and chronic care provided in ambulatory care facilities. While HEDIS has made important contributions to the tracking of ambulatory care quality, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the measurement set could be improved by providing quality of care information at the levels of greatest interest to consumers and purchasers of care, namely for individual physicians, clinics and physician organizations. This article focuses on the improvement opportunities for quality performance measurement systems in ambulatory care. Specific challenges to creating a sustainable performance measurement system at the level of physician organizations, such as defining the purpose of the system, the accountability logic, information and reporting needs and mechanisms for sustainable implementation, are discussed.

  12. Transitioning the RN to Ambulatory Care: An Investment in Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Juliet Walshe

    2016-01-01

    Registered nurses (RNs) struggle when transitioning from the inpatient setting to the outpatient clinical environment because it results in a diverse skill-set shift. The RN, considered an outpatient revenue source, experiences a decrease in peer-to-peer relationships, changes in leadership responsibilities, and changes in workgroup dynamics (supervision of unlicensed clinical personnel who function under the direction of the physician, not the RN). Ambulatory organizations find themselves implementing clinical orientation programs that may not delineate the attributes of the RN. This diminishes their value while emphasizing the unlicensed technical skill set. Creating a core RN orientation program template is paramount for the transition of the RN to the ambulatory setting. The literature reveals several areas where improving the value of the RN will ultimately enhance recruitment and retention, patient care outcomes, and leverage the RN role within any organization. Eleven 30-minute in-depth telephone interviews were conducted in addition to 4 nurse observations to explore the lived experience of the RN in ambulatory care. The findings disclosed an overarching theme of nurse isolation and offered insightful underpinnings for the nurse leader as ambulatory growth continues and nurse leaders further endorse the RN presence in the ambulatory setting.

  13. Advances in the use of intravenous techniques in ambulatory anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eng MR

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Matthew R Eng,1 Paul F White1,2 1Department of Anesthesiology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2White Mountain Institute, The Sea Ranch, CA, USA Summary statement: Advances in the use of intravenous techniques in ambulatory anesthesia has become important for the anesthesiologist as the key perioperative physician in outpatient surgery. Key techniques and choices of anesthetics are important in accomplishing fast track goals of ambulatory surgery. Purpose of review: The anesthesiologist in the outpatient environment must focus on improving perioperative efficiency and reducing recovery times while accounting for patients' well-being and safety. This review article focuses on recent intravenous anesthetic techniques to accomplish these goals. Recent findings: This review is an overview of techniques in intravenous anesthesia for ambulatory anesthesia. Intravenous techniques may be tailored to accomplish outpatient surgery goals for the type of surgical procedure and individual patient needs. Careful anesthetic planning and the application of the plans are critical to an anesthesiologist's success with fast-track ambulatory surgery. Conclusion: Careful planning and application of intravenous techniques are critical to an anesthesiologist's success with fast-track ambulatory surgery. Keywords: intravenous anesthesia, outpatient anesthesia, fast-track surgery

  14. Patient satisfaction and positive patient outcomes in ambulatory anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah U

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ushma Shah, David T Wong, Jean Wong Department of Anesthesia, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Most surgeries in North America are performed on an ambulatory basis, reducing health care costs and increasing patient comfort. Patient satisfaction is an important outcome indicator of the quality of health care services incorporated by the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA. Patient satisfaction is a complex concept that is influenced by multiple factors. A patient's viewpoint and knowledge plays an influential role in patient satisfaction with ambulatory surgery. Medical optimization and psychological preparation of the patient plays a pivotal role in the success of ambulatory surgery. Postoperative pain, nausea, and vomiting are the most important symptoms for the patient and can be addressed by multimodal drug regimens. Shared decision making, patient–provider relationship, communication, and continuity of care form the main pillars of patient satisfaction. Various psychometrically developed instruments are available to measure patient satisfaction, such as the Iowa Satisfaction with Anesthesia Scale and Evaluation du Vecu de I'Anesthesie Generale, but none have been developed specifically for ambulatory surgery. The ASA has made recommendations for data collection for patient satisfaction surveys and emphasized the importance of reporting the data to the Anesthesia Quality Institute. Future research is warranted to develop a validated tool to measure patient satisfaction in ambulatory surgery. Keywords: patient, satisfaction, anesthesia, outcomes, questionnaire, perspectives

  15. Does novel oral anticoagulant improve anticoagulation for non-valvular atrial fibrillation associated stroke: An inpatient registration study in Shanghai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Di Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstracts: Objective: To summarize the use rate, safety, efficacy of antithrombotics in stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA prevention, and reasons for not using dabigatran etexilate (DE in Shanghai, China. Methods: Non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF-associated stroke patients were prospectively registered as an electronic database. Use rate of antithrombotics and reasons for not using DE were extracted during follow-up. Patients' baseline characteristics, recurrent ischemic stroke/TIA events and bleeding complications were analyzed. Patients: From April 2012 to August 2014, 110 inpatients with NVAF-associated stroke were studied in our hospital. NVAF was diagnosed by 12-lead electrocardiogram, 24 h Holter and echocardiography. Results: Before introduction of DE (April 2013, use rates of warfarin and antiplatelets were 28.9% (11/38 and 60.5% (23/38 respectively; after that, use rates of warfarin, DE, and antiplatelets were 20.8% (15/72, 12.5% (9/72, and 43.1% (31/72. The DE did not improve use of anticoagulants (P = 0.639. There were 19 (17.3% recurrent ischemic stroke events up to October 2015; two (9.5% in the non-user group, 10 (18.5% in the antiplatelet group, and seven (20.0% in the anticoagulants group (P = 0.570. Furthermore, recurrence rates were similar between the DE group (20.0% and the Warfarin group (20.0%, P = 1.000. The most common reason for not using DE was financial concerns (61.0%, followed by inconvenience to purchase (14.0% and hemorrhage concerns (11.0%. Two patients using warfarin found fecal occult blood so they stopped warfarin and began to use antiplatelet drugs. No bleeding event occurred in the other groups. Only one patient had side effects (dyspepsia and gastroesophageal reflux from DE. Conclusion: The use rate of either DE or warfarin in Shanghai was low; DE had not improved anticoagulation therapy for NVAF patients in Shanghai mainly because DE had not been covered by health insurance. Keywords

  16. Prediction of the risk of bleeding during anticoagulant treatment for venous thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijer, P. M.; Hutten, B. A.; Prins, M. H.; Büller, H. R.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To construct and validate the bleeding risk prediction score, which is based on variables identified in the literature that can be easily obtained before the institution of anticoagulant therapy, in a large independent cohort of patients who were treated with anticoagulant therapy for

  17. Treatment Changes among Users of Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Maja Hellfritzsch; Husted, Steen Elkjær; Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2017-01-01

    Patients with atrial fibrillation discontinuing anticoagulant therapy are left unprotected against ischaemic stroke. Further, switching between oral anticoagulants may be associated with a transiently increased risk of bleeding or thromboembolism. However, there is a paucity of real-life data on ...

  18. Safety and efficacy of anticoagulation for secondary stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation patients: The AMADEUS trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lane, D.A.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Minini, P.; Buller, H.R.; Lip, G.Y.H.

    2010-01-01

    ackground: Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and previous ischemic stroke are at high risk of recurrent stroke, but are also perceived to be at increased bleeding risk while treated with anticoagulants. Methods: Post-hoc analyses examined the efficacy and safety of anticoagulation of 4576 AF

  19. Stabilization of the E* Form Turns Thrombin into an Anticoagulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bah, Alaji; Carrell, Christopher J.; Chen, Zhiwei; Gandhi, Prafull S.; Di Cera, Enrico; (WU-MED)

    2009-07-31

    Previous studies have shown that deletion of nine residues in the autolysis loop of thrombin produces a mutant with an anticoagulant propensity of potential clinical relevance, but the molecular origin of the effect has remained unresolved. The x-ray crystal structure of this mutant solved in the free form at 1.55 {angstrom} resolution reveals an inactive conformation that is practically identical (root mean square deviation of 0.154 {angstrom}) to the recently identified E* form. The side chain of Trp215 collapses into the active site by shifting >10 {angstrom} from its position in the active E form, and the oxyanion hole is disrupted by a flip of the Glu192-Gly193 peptide bond. This finding confirms the existence of the inactive form E* in essentially the same incarnation as first identified in the structure of the thrombin mutant D102N. In addition, it demonstrates that the anticoagulant profile often caused by a mutation of the thrombin scaffold finds its likely molecular origin in the stabilization of the inactive E* form that is selectively shifted to the active E form upon thrombomodulin and protein C binding.

  20. New oral anticoagulant and antiplatelet agents for neurosurgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimpton, George; Dabbous, Bassam; Leach, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, warfarin, clopidogrel and aspirin have provided the mainstay for prevention of thrombotic disease in cardiac patients. However, new classes of drugs have recently emerged that promise better clinical outcomes and lower risks. Use of such agents has increased, but increased risk and severity of intra-cranial haemorrhage (ICH) still remain. These cases of intra-cranial bleeds present as emergencies to neurosurgical units. It is of paramount importance that neurosurgical practitioners are aware of those new drugs, useful monitoring tests and available emergency reversal options in case the patient needs emergency intervention. In this review we survey newly available agents in the U.K. at the time of publication. We look at the data provided by the manufacturers, related publications and international guidelines for their use and reversal. New anticoagulants offer a lower incidence of ICH compared with warfarin. Advanced and accurate monitoring tests are emerging, as are prospective data on reversal of anticoagulation in bleeding. Some standard coagulation tests may be of use, whilst reversal agents are available and being evaluated. The trial data shows that new antiplatelet agents have similar or increased incidence and severity of intra-cranial ICH compared with clopidogrel. There is currently limited data on monitoring or reversal. We suggest they may be managed similarly to clopidogrel by using platelet reactivity assays, optimising platelet count and using platelet transfusion with adjunctive agents.

  1. Managing direct oral anticoagulants in patients undergoing dentoalveolar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, J P; Woolcombe, S A; Patel, R K; Obisesan, O; Roberts, L N; Bryant, C; Arya, R

    2017-02-24

    Our objective was to describe our experience of managing a cohort of adult patients prescribed direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) undergoing dentoalveolar procedures between November 2012 and May 2016. Prior to conducting a procedure a formal assessment was made of each patient's anticoagulation treatment. A specific plan was then formulated, balancing the risk of bleeding with the risk of thrombosis. Patients received a telephone consultation one week following treatment to assess any post-operative bleeding. Eighty-two patients underwent 111 oral surgical procedures, the majority of which were dental extractions. In the case of 35 (32%) procedures, advice was given to omit the DOAC, either before or after treatment. There was no bleeding following the majority of procedures. Persistent bleeding followed 15 (13.5%) procedures, of which 7 (6.3%) procedures required specific intervention. The majority of patients prescribed DOACs can undergo dentoalveolar procedures safely. Important considerations when planning treatment are: (i) when the patient usually takes their dose of DOAC, (ii) the time the procedure is performed and, (iii) when the DOAC is taken post-procedure. In our experience, if these factors are considered carefully, omission of DOAC doses is unlikely to be required for most patients.

  2. Comparing intracerebral hemorrhages associated with direct oral anticoagulants or warfarin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurogi, Ryota; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Nakai, Michikazu; Kada, Akiko; Kamitani, Satoru; Nakagawara, Jyoji; Toyoda, Kazunori; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Ono, Junichi; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Aruga, Toru; Miyachi, Shigeru; Nagata, Izumi; Matsuda, Shinya; Yoshimura, Shinichi; Okuchi, Kazuo; Suzuki, Akifumi; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Onozuka, Daisuke; Ido, Keisuke; Kurogi, Ai; Mukae, Nobutaka; Nishimura, Ataru; Arimura, Koichi; Kitazono, Takanari; Hagihara, Akihito

    2018-01-01

    Objectives This cross-sectional survey explored the characteristics and outcomes of direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC)–associated nontraumatic intracerebral hemorrhages (ICHs) by analyzing a large nationwide Japanese discharge database. Methods We analyzed data from 2,245 patients who experienced ICHs while taking anticoagulants (DOAC: 227; warfarin: 2,018) and were urgently hospitalized at 621 institutions in Japan between April 2010 and March 2015. We compared the DOAC- and warfarin-treated patients based on their backgrounds, ICH severities, antiplatelet therapies at admission, hematoma removal surgeries, reversal agents, mortality rates, and modified Rankin Scale scores at discharge. Results DOAC-associated ICHs were less likely to cause moderately or severely impaired consciousness (DOAC-associated ICHs: 31.3%; warfarin-associated ICHs: 39.4%; p = 0.002) or require surgical removal (DOAC-associated ICHs: 5.3%; warfarin-associated ICHs: 9.9%; p = 0.024) in the univariate analysis. Propensity score analysis revealed that patients with DOAC-associated ICHs also exhibited lower mortality rates within 1 day (odds ratio [OR] 4.96, p = 0.005), within 7 days (OR 2.29, p = 0.037), and during hospitalization (OR 1.96, p = 0.039). Conclusions This nationwide study revealed that DOAC-treated patients had less severe ICHs and lower mortality rates than did warfarin-treated patients, probably due to milder hemorrhages at admission and lower hematoma expansion frequencies. PMID:29490916

  3. Self-monitoring and self-management of oral anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneghan, Carl J; Garcia-Alamino, Josep M; Spencer, Elizabeth A; Ward, Alison M; Perera, Rafael; Bankhead, Clare; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Fitzmaurice, David; Mahtani, Kamal R; Onakpoya, Igho J

    2016-07-05

    The introduction of point-of-care devices for the management of patients on oral anticoagulation allows self-testing by the patient at home. Patients who self-test can either adjust their medication according to a pre-determined dose-INR (international normalized ratio) schedule (self-management), or they can call a clinic to be told the appropriate dose adjustment (self-monitoring). Increasing evidence suggests self-testing of oral anticoagulant therapy is equal to or better than standard monitoring. This is an updated version of the original review published in 2010. To evaluate the effects on thrombotic events, major haemorrhages, and all-cause mortality of self-monitoring or self-management of oral anticoagulant therapy compared to standard monitoring. For this review update, we re-ran the searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), 2015, Issue 6, the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to June week 4 2015), Embase (Ovid, 1980 to 2015 week 27) on 1 July 2015. We checked bibliographies and contacted manufacturers and authors of relevant studies. We did not apply any language restrictions . Outcomes analysed were thromboembolic events, mortality, major haemorrhage, minor haemorrhage, tests in therapeutic range, frequency of testing, and feasibility of self-monitoring and self-management. Review authors independently extracted data and we used a fixed-effect model with the Mantzel-Haenzel method to calculate the pooled risk ratio (RR) and Peto's method to verify the results for uncommon outcomes. We examined heterogeneity amongst studies with the Chi(2) and I(2) statistics and used GRADE methodology to assess the quality of evidence. We identified 28 randomised trials including 8950 participants (newly incorporated in this update: 10 trials including 4227 participants). The overall quality of the evidence was generally low to moderate. Pooled estimates showed a reduction in thromboembolic events (RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.45 to 0

  4. Synthesis and biological activity of the novel indanedione anticoagulant rodenticides containing fluorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Liu, Liping; Bai, Zengguo; Zhang, Tianhua; Zhao, Keke

    2017-01-02

    Here, 3 fluorinated intermediates of drug were synthesized: (M1), (M2), (M3). Three new anticoagulant rodenticides were designed which were based on 4-hydroxycoumarin or 1,3-indandione, added acute toxicity groups containing fluorine. The structures of synthesized compounds were analyzed and proved by FT-IR spectroscopy and 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1 H-NMR). The compounds were also evaluated for their anticoagulant and acute biologic activity. In addition, both the acute orally toxicity and the feeding indexes of R 1 and R 2 were tested. The result of the experiment proved that the new synthesis of 1, 3 - indan diketone for maternal new anticoagulant rodenticide can replace the current 4 - hydroxyl coumarin as the mother of the second generation anticoagulant rodenticide and 1, 3 - indan diketone for maternal new anticoagulant rodenticides will have a good development prospect.

  5. Optical sensing of anticoagulation status: Towards point-of-care coagulation testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane M Tshikudi

    Full Text Available Anticoagulant overdose is associated with major bleeding complications. Rapid coagulation sensing may ensure safe and accurate anticoagulant dosing and reduce bleeding risk. Here, we report the novel use of Laser Speckle Rheology (LSR for measuring anticoagulation and haemodilution status in whole blood. In the LSR approach, blood from 12 patients and 4 swine was placed in disposable cartridges and time-varying intensity fluctuations of laser speckle patterns were measured to quantify the viscoelastic modulus during clotting. Coagulation parameters, mainly clotting time, clot progression rate (α-angle and maximum clot stiffness (MA were derived from the clot viscoelasticity trace and compared with standard Thromboelastography (TEG. To demonstrate the capability for anticoagulation sensing in patients, blood samples from 12 patients treated with warfarin anticoagulant were analyzed. LSR clotting time correlated with prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin time (r = 0.57-0.77, p<0.04 and all LSR parameters demonstrated good correlation with TEG (r = 0.61-0.87, p<0.04. To further evaluate the dose-dependent sensitivity of LSR parameters, swine blood was spiked with varying concentrations of heparin, argatroban and rivaroxaban or serially diluted with saline. We observed that anticoagulant treatments prolonged LSR clotting time in a dose-dependent manner that correlated closely with TEG (r = 0.99, p<0.01. LSR angle was unaltered by anticoagulation whereas TEG angle presented dose-dependent diminution likely linked to the mechanical manipulation of the clot. In both LSR and TEG, MA was largely unaffected by anticoagulation, and LSR presented a higher sensitivity to increased haemodilution in comparison to TEG (p<0.01. Our results establish that LSR rapidly and accurately measures the response of various anticoagulants, opening the opportunity for routine anticoagulation monitoring at the point-of-care or for patient self-testing.

  6. Ambulatory surgery centers best practices for the 90s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, J A

    1994-05-01

    Outpatient surgery will be the driving force in the continued growth of ambulatory care in the 1990s. Providing efficient, high-quality ambulatory surgical services should therefore be a priority among healthcare providers. Arthur Andersen conducted a survey to discover best practices in ambulatory surgical service. General success characteristics of best performers were business-focused relationships with physicians, the use of clinical protocols, patient convenience, cost management, strong leadership, teamwork, streamlined processes and efficient design. Other important factors included scheduling to maximize OR room use; achieving surgical efficiencies through reduced case pack assembly errors and equipment availability; a focus on cost capture rather than charge capture; sound materiel management practices, such as standardization and vendor teaming; and the appropriate use of automated systems. It is important to evaluate whether the best practices are applicable to your environment and what specific changes to your current processes would be necessary to adopt them.

  7. Characteristics and significance of ischemia detected by ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabel, E.G.; Rocco, M.B.; Selwyn, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    Ambulatory electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring of ischemia in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) provides a new technique for the assessment of ischemic activity and the evaluation of therapies outside of the hospital. Numerous studies have demonstrated that the majority of patients with CAD have episodes of symptomatic and asymptomatic ST segment depression during routine daily activities. Rubidium-82 positron-emission tomographic studies have provided evidence for decreased myocardial perfusion during these episodes of ST segment depression. The prognostic importance of asymptomatic ischemia has been shown in patients with unstable angina to be a marker for early unfavorable cardiac events. Preliminary results suggest a poorer outcome for those patients with chronic stable angina who show episodes of ischemia as well. Ambulatory monitoring studies suggest that total ischemic activity may be underestimated by conventional testing. Whether all ischemic activity detected by ambulatory monitoring requires treatment awaits further study. 69 references

  8. 75 FR 73088 - Medicare Program; Application by the American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services [CMS-2332-PN] Medicare Program; Application by the American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery... Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF) for recognition as a national...

  9. Abordagem ambulatorial do nutricionista em anemia hemolítica Nutritional ambulatory approach in hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Vieira

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Descreve a atuação do nutricionista em ambulatório de Hematologia Pediátrica em um hospital escola e relata as condutas dietéticas necessárias na abordagem de crianças com anemia hemolítica com e sem sobrecarga de ferro, e também as atitudes mais freqüentes dos familiares em relação à alimentação desses pacientes.The Authors describe the performance of the Dietitian in a Pediatric Hematology Ambulatory. They emphasize the necessary dietetic procedures for adequate management of children with hemolytic anemia, with and without iron overload. Furthermore, they approach the family's attitude towards the patient's nutrition.

  10. Rodenticide incidents of exposure and adverse effects on non-raptor birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Nimish B.

    2017-01-01

    Interest in the adverse effects of rodenticides on birds has focused primarily on raptors. However, non-raptor birds are also poisoned (rodenticide exposure resulting in adverse effects including mortality) by rodenticides through consumption of the rodenticide bait and contaminated prey. A literature search for rodenticide incidents (evidence of exposure to a rodenticide, adverse effects, or exposure to placebo baits) involving non-raptor birds returned 641 records spanning the years 1931 to 2016. The incidents included 17 orders, 58 families, and 190 non-raptor bird species. Nineteen anticoagulant and non-anticoagulant rodenticide active ingredients were associated with the incidents. The number of incidents and species detected were compared by surveillance method. An incident was considered to have been reported through passive surveillance if it was voluntarily reported to the authorities whereas the report of an incident found through field work that was conducted with the objective of documenting adverse effects on birds was determined to be from active surveillance. More incidents were reported from passive surveillance than with active surveillance but a significantly greater number of species were detected in proportion to the number of incidents found through active surveillance than with passive surveillance (z = 7.61, p raptor bird poisonings from rodenticides may increase incident reportings and can strengthen the predictions of harm characterized by risk assessments.

  11. 76 FR 66929 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; The American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ...] Medicare and Medicaid Programs; The American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities... receipt of a deeming application from the American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery... of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF's) request for deeming authority for RHCs. This notice also...

  12. ANTICOAGULANT TREATMENT OF AF: FOCUS ON THE WARFARIN DOSAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kovbasniuk

    2015-10-01

      Summary Authors analyzed the results of some studies of AF and warfarin dosing. Than investigation of 75 patient with AF (permanent type was performed. According to demographic, anthropometric data and related conditions (diabetes mellitus type 2, myocardial infarction, acute cerebrovascular ischemia, pulmonary embolism, alcohol abuse - drinking more than one ounce of ≥3 weekly predictive model of warfarin dosing was developed: warfarin dose = 0.097 * BMI - 0.03 * AGE + 0.30 *ASS.Status+ 0.02 *WC+ 1, 88. After testing of final model authors concluded what derived formula was representative, to determine the optimal dose of warfarin given to patient based on demographic characteristics. Considering all of the abovementioned, this model can be recommended for use determining the treatment strategy in patients with AF. Keywords: anticoagulant treatment, warfarin, atrial fibrillation.

  13. Lumbar puncture in patients using anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renan Domingues

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents has largely increased. Diagnostic lumbar puncture in patients taking these drugs represents a challenge considering the opposing risks of bleeding and thrombotic complications. To date there are no controlled trials, specific guidelines, nor clear recommendations in this area. In the present review we make some recommendations about lumbar puncture in patients using these drugs. Our recommendations take into consideration the pharmacology of these drugs, the thrombotic risk according to the underlying disease, and the urgency in cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Evaluating such information and a rigorous monitoring of neurological symptoms after lumbar puncture are crucial to minimize the risk of hemorrhage associated neurological deficits. An individualized patient decision-making and an effective communication between the assistant physician and the responsible for conducting the lumbar puncture are essential to minimize potential risks.

  14. Vitamin K for improved anticoagulation control in patients receiving warfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahtani, Kamal R; Heneghan, Carl J; Nunan, David; Roberts, Nia W

    2014-05-15

    Effective use of warfarin involves keeping the international normalised ratio (INR) within a relatively narrow therapeutic range. However, patients respond widely to their dose of warfarin. Overcoagulation can lead to an increased risk of excessive bleeding, while undercoagulation can lead to increased clot formation. There is some evidence that patients with a variable response to warfarin may benefit from a concomitant low dose of vitamin K. To assess the effects of concomitant supplementation of low-dose oral vitamin K for anticoagulation control in patients being initiated on or taking a maintenance dose of warfarin. To identify previous reviews, we searched the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE via The Cochrane Library, Wiley) (Issue 2, 2011). To identify primary studies, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL via The Cochrane Library, Wiley) (Issue 2, 2014), Ovid MEDLINE (R) In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations database and Ovid MEDLINE (R) (OvidSP) (1946 to 25 February 2014), Embase (OvidSP) (1974 to week 8 of 2014), Science Citation Index Expanded™ & Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science (Web of Science™) (1945 to 27 February 2014), and the NHS Economics Evaluations Database (NHS EED) (via The Cochrane Library, Wiley) (Issue 2, 2014). We did not apply any language or date restrictions. We used additional methods to identify grey literature and ongoing studies. Randomised controlled trials comparing the addition of vitamin K versus placebo in patients initiating warfarin or already taking warfarin. Two review authors independently selected and extracted data from included studies. When disagreement arose, a third author helped reached a consensus. We also assessed risk of bias. We identified two studies with a total of 100 participants for inclusion in the review. We found the overall risk of bias to be unclear in a number of domains. Neither study reported the time taken to the first INR in

  15. Anticoagulant treatment in patients with atrial fibrillation and ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner-Frandsen, Nicole; Dammann Andersen, Andreas; Ashournia, Hamoun

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac dysrhythmia, with a lifetime risk of 25%, and it is a well-known independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. Over the last 15 years, efforts have been made to initiate relevant treatment in patients with AF. A retrospective study...... was set up to clarify whether this effort has resulted in a decreased proportion of patients with known AF experiencing an ischemic stroke. METHODS: Patients admitted to the Department of Neurology, Vejle Hospital, Denmark, with ischemic stroke from January 1997 to December 2012 were included in the study....... RESULTS: A total of 4134 patients were included in the study. Overall, the yearly proportion of patients with known AF varied between 9% and 18%. No significant change was observed (P = .511). The proportion of patients with known AF treated with anticoagulants at the time of the stroke and the proportion...

  16. Cerebrovascular Accident due to Thyroid Storm: Should We Anticoagulate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Gonzalez-Bossolo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid storm is a life-threatening condition that occurs secondary to an uncontrolled hyperthyroid state. Atrial fibrillation is a cardiovascular complication occurring in up to 15% of patients experiencing thyroid storm, and if left untreated this condition could have up to a 25% mortality rate. Thyroid storm with stroke is a rare presentation. This case report details a left middle cerebral artery (MCA stroke with global aphasia and thyroid storm in a 53-year-old Hispanic male patient. Although uncommon, this combination has been reported in multiple case series. Although it is well documented that dysfunctional thyroid levels promote a hypercoagulable state, available guidelines from multiple entities are unclear on whether anticoagulation therapy is appropriate in this situation.

  17. Effect of post-filter anticoagulation on mortality in patients with cancer-associated pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jieun; Kim, Seon Ok; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang-Do; Lee, Jae Seung

    2018-05-17

    Malignancy is associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism. Inferior vena cava filters are a viable alternative when anticoagulation is infeasible because of the risk of bleeding. Although the current guidelines recommend that all patients with a vena cava filter be treated with anticoagulation treatment when the risk of bleeding is reduced, studies concerning the role of concomitant anticoagulation after vena cava filter insertion in high-risk patients are scarce. Since many cancer patients suffer from a high risk of hemorrhagic complications, we aimed to determine the effect of post-filter anticoagulation on mortality in patients with a malignant solid tumor. A retrospective cohort study of patients with pulmonary embolism was performed between January 2010 and May 2016. Patients with a solid tumor and vena cava filter inserted because of pulmonary embolism were included. Using Cox proportional hazards model, the prognostic effect of clinical variables was analyzed. A total of 180 patients were analyzed, with 143 patients receiving and 37 patients not receiving post-filter anticoagulation treatment. Mortality was not significantly different between the two groups. The presence of metastatic cancer and that of pancreatobiliary cancer were significant risk factors for mortality. However, post-filter anticoagulation did not show significant effect on mortality regardless of the stage of cancer. In patients with cancer-associated pulmonary embolism, the effect of post-filter anticoagulation on mortality may not be critical, especially in patients with a short life expectancy.

  18. In vitro anticoagulation monitoring of low-molecular-weight heparin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian-qi; SHI Xu-bo; YANG Jin-gang; HU Da-yi

    2009-01-01

    Background Although low-molecular-weight heparin has replaced unfractionated heparin to become the primary anticoagulation drug for treatment of acute coronary syndrome, there is no convenient bedside monitoring method. We explored the best laboratory monitoring method of low-molecular-weight heparins (enoxapadn, dalteparin, and nadroparin) by use of the Sonoclot coagulation analyzer to monitor the activated clotting time.Methods Atotal of 20 healthy volunteers were selected and 15 ml of fasting venous blood samples were collected and incubated. Four coagulants, kaolin, diatomite, glass bead, and magnetic stick, were used to determine the activated clotting time of the low-molecular-weight heparins at different in vitro anti-Xa factor concentrations. A correlation analysis was made to obtain the regression equation. The activated clotting time of the different low-molecular-weight heparins with the same anti-Xa factor concentration was monitored when the coagulant glass beads were applied. Results The activated clotting time measured using the glass beads, diatomite, kaolin, and magnetic stick showed a linear correlation with the concentration of nadroparin (r= 0.964, 0.966, 0.970, and 0.947, respectively). The regression equation showed that the linear slopes of different coagulants were significantly different (glass beads 230.03 s/IU,diatomite 89.91 s/IU, kaolin 50.87 s/IU, magnetic stick could not be calculated). When the concentration of the anti-Xa factor was the same for different low-molecular-weight heparins, the measured activated clotting time was different after the application of the glass bead coagulant.Conclusions The glass bead coagulant is most feasible for monitoring the in vitro anticoagulation activity of nadroparin.The different effects of different low-molecular-weight heparins on the activated clotting time may be related to the different anti-Ila activities.

  19. Comparing intracerebral hemorrhages associated with direct oral anticoagulants or warfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurogi, Ryota; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Nakai, Michikazu; Kada, Akiko; Kamitani, Satoru; Nakagawara, Jyoji; Toyoda, Kazunori; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Ono, Junichi; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Aruga, Toru; Miyachi, Shigeru; Nagata, Izumi; Matsuda, Shinya; Yoshimura, Shinichi; Okuchi, Kazuo; Suzuki, Akifumi; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Onozuka, Daisuke; Ido, Keisuke; Kurogi, Ai; Mukae, Nobutaka; Nishimura, Ataru; Arimura, Koichi; Kitazono, Takanari; Hagihara, Akihito; Iihara, Koji

    2018-03-27

    This cross-sectional survey explored the characteristics and outcomes of direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC)-associated nontraumatic intracerebral hemorrhages (ICHs) by analyzing a large nationwide Japanese discharge database. We analyzed data from 2,245 patients who experienced ICHs while taking anticoagulants (DOAC: 227; warfarin: 2,018) and were urgently hospitalized at 621 institutions in Japan between April 2010 and March 2015. We compared the DOAC- and warfarin-treated patients based on their backgrounds, ICH severities, antiplatelet therapies at admission, hematoma removal surgeries, reversal agents, mortality rates, and modified Rankin Scale scores at discharge. DOAC-associated ICHs were less likely to cause moderately or severely impaired consciousness (DOAC-associated ICHs: 31.3%; warfarin-associated ICHs: 39.4%; p = 0.002) or require surgical removal (DOAC-associated ICHs: 5.3%; warfarin-associated ICHs: 9.9%; p = 0.024) in the univariate analysis. Propensity score analysis revealed that patients with DOAC-associated ICHs also exhibited lower mortality rates within 1 day (odds ratio [OR] 4.96, p = 0.005), within 7 days (OR 2.29, p = 0.037), and during hospitalization (OR 1.96, p = 0.039). This nationwide study revealed that DOAC-treated patients had less severe ICHs and lower mortality rates than did warfarin-treated patients, probably due to milder hemorrhages at admission and lower hematoma expansion frequencies. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  20. [Adverse events prevention ability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparo, Ugo Luigi; Aparo, Andrea

    2007-03-01

    The issue of how to address medical errors is the key to improve the health care system performances. Operational evidence collected in the last five years shows that the solution is only partially linked to future technological developments. Cultural and organisational changes are mandatory to help to manage and drastically reduce the adverse events in health care organisations. Classical management, merely based on coordination and control, is inadequate. Proactive, self-organising network based structures must be put in place and managed using adaptive, fast evolving management tools.

  1. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in clinical trials with antihypertensive agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H. van den Meiracker (Anton)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractAmbulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is being used increasingly for the evaluation of antihypertensive agents in clinical trials. In this brief review several aspects of ABPM are discussed. In particular, attention is paid to the extent to which ABPM is subject to a placebo

  2. Ambulatory Estimation of Relative Foot Positions using Ultrasound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weenk, D.; van der Coelen, Michiel; Geessink, Arno A.G.; van der Hoek, Frank J.; Verstoep, Bart; Kortier, H.G.; van Meulen, Fokke; van Beijnum, Bernhard J.F.; Veltink, Petrus H.

    2013-01-01

    The recording of human movement is used for biomedical applications like physical therapy and sports training. Over the last few years inertial sensors have been proven to be a useful ambulatory alternative to traditional optical systems. An example of a successful application is the instrumented

  3. Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care: Ambulatory Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Care Ambulatory Care To prevent health care errors, patients are urged to... SpeakUP TM Everyone has a ... he or she has confused you with another patient. P ay attention to the ... for their identification (ID) badges. • Notice whether your caregivers have washed ...

  4. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Clinical Practice: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viera, Anthony J.; Shimbo, Daichi

    2016-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring offers the ability to collect blood pressure readings several times an hour across a 24-hour period. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring facilitates the identification of white-coat hypertension, the phenomenon whereby certain individuals who are not on antihypertensive medication show elevated blood pressure in a clinical setting but show non-elevated blood pressure averages when assessed by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Additionally, readings can be segmented into time windows of particular interest, e.g., mean daytime and nighttime values. During sleep, blood pressure typically decreases, or dips, such that mean sleep blood pressure is lower than mean awake blood pressure. A non-dipping pattern and nocturnal hypertension are strongly associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Approximately 70% of individuals dip ≥10% at night, while 30% have non-dipping patterns, when blood pressure remains similar to daytime average, or occasionally rises above daytime average. The various blood pressure categorizations afforded by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring are valuable for clinical management of high blood pressure since they increase accuracy for diagnosis and the prediction of cardiovascular risk. PMID:25107387

  5. Challenges to Safe Injection Practices in Ambulatory Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Laura; Weissburg, Benjamin; Rogers, Kelli; Musuuza, Jackson; Safdar, Nasia; Shirley, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Most recent infection outbreaks caused by unsafe injection practices in the United States have occurred in ambulatory settings. We utilized direct observation and a survey to assess injection practices at 31 clinics. Improper vial use was observed at 13 clinics (41.9%). Pharmacy support and healthcare worker education may improve injection practices. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:614-616.

  6. [Comparative analysis of efficiency indicators in ambulatory surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Ortega, María; Porrero Carro, José Luis; Aranaz Andrés, Jesús María; Castillo Fe, María José; Alonso García, María Teresa; Sánchez-Cabezudo Díaz-Guerra, Carlos

    2017-05-25

    To find comparative elements for quality control in major ambulatory surgery (MAS) units. Descriptive and comparative study of the Ambulatory Care Index (AI) and Substitution Index (SI) in the Santa Cristina Hospital Surgery Service (Madrid, Spain) compared to Key Indicators (KI) of the National Health Service (NHS). 7,817 MAS procedures (between 2006 and 2014) were analysed. The average annual AI was 54%, higher (p <0.0001) than «ambulatory surgery» KI. The hernia outpatient procedures (average 72%) were also superior to the national KI (p <0.0001), but ambulatory haemorrhoidectomy (average 33.6%) was clearly lower (p <0.0001). KI of the NHS are useful and allow to establish a proper development in the global AI and hernia outpatient surgery with opportunities for improvement in haemorrhoidectomy. Their collection should be careful, not including minor surgeries. Also, their usefulness could be increased if data was broken down by speciality and by complexity. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Feasibility of ambulatory, continuous 24-hour finger arterial pressure recording

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imholz, B. P.; Langewouters, G. J.; van Montfrans, G. A.; Parati, G.; van Goudoever, J.; Wesseling, K. H.; Wieling, W.; Mancia, G.

    1993-01-01

    We tested Portapres, an innovative portable, battery-operated device for the continuous, noninvasive, 24-hour ambulatory measurement of blood pressure in the finger. Portapres is based on Finapres, a stationary device for the measurement of finger arterial pressure. Systems were added to record

  8. Quality of life in automated and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michels, Wieneke M.; van Dijk, Sandra; Verduijn, Marion; le Cessie, Saskia; Boeschoten, Elisabeth W.; Dekker, Friedo W.; Krediet, Raymond T.; Apperloo, A. J.; Bijlsma, J. A.; Boekhout, M.; Boer, W. H.; van der Boog, P. J. M.; Büller, H. R.; van Buren, M.; de Charro, F. Th; Doorenbos, C. J.; van den Dorpel, M. A.; van Es, A.; Fagel, W. J.; Feith, G. W.; de Fijter, C. W. H.; Frenken, L. A. M.; Grave, W.; van Geelen, J. A. C. A.; Gerlag, P. G. G.; Gorgels, J. P. M. C.; Huisman, R. M.; Jager, K. J.; Jie, K.; Koning-Mulder, W. A. H.; Koolen, M. I.; Kremer Hovinga, T. K.; Lavrijssen, A. T. J.; Luik, A. J.; van der Meulen, J.; Parlevliet, K. J.; Raasveld, M. H. M.; van der Sande, F. M.; Schonck, M. J. M.; Schuurmans, M. M. J.; Siegert, C. E. H.; Stegeman, C. A.; Stevens, P.; Thijssen, J. G. P.; Valentijn, R. M.; Vastenburg, G. H.; Verburgh, C. A.; Vincent, H. H.; Vos, P. F.

    2011-01-01

    Despite a lack of strong evidence, automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) is often prescribed on account of an expected better quality of life (QoL) than that expected with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Our aim was to analyze differences in QoL in patients starting dialysis on APD

  9. Clinical value of ambulatory blood pressure: evidence and limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancia, Giuseppe; Verdecchia, Paolo

    2015-03-13

    This article reviews the clinical value of ambulatory blood pressure (BP) vis-à-vis the traditional BP measurements taken in the physician's office or in the hospital. Mention is initially made that longitudinal studies conducted in the general population or in hypertensive cohorts have shown that ambulatory BP provides a more accurate prediction of outcome than office BP. Namely, that (1) the risk of cardiovascular events increases in a less steep fashion with office than with 24-hour mean BP, (2) the 24-hour BP-dependent prediction is maintained after adjustment for office BP values, and (3) among individuals with normal office BP, those with increased ambulatory BP (masked hypertension) have an increased prevalence of organ damage, a more frequent unfavorable metabolic profile and a higher risk of new onset sustained hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular events than those with normal ambulatory BP. It is further mentioned, however, that more recently similar observations have been made for individuals with high office but normal ambulatory BP (white coat hypertension) suggesting a complementary role of out-of-office and office BP values in the determination of patients' prognosis. The evidence in favor of an independent prognostic value also of some within 24-hour BP phenomena (night BP reduction or absolute values, short-term BP variations, and morning BP surge) is then critically appraised for its elements of strength and weakness. Finally, whether the clinical advantages of ambulatory BP make this approach necessary for all patients with hypertension is discussed. The conclusion is that this is at present still premature because crucial evidence pro or against routine use of this approach in untreated and treated hypertensives is not yet available. It will be crucial for future studies to determine whether, compared with a treatment guided by office BP, a treatment tailored on ambulatory BP allows to improve prevention or regression of organ

  10. Will NOACs become the new standard of care in anticoagulation therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergene Oktay

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia in the general population, with a prevalence of 1–3%, which increases with age, reaching 15% in elderly people. Prophylaxis of ischemic stroke with warfarin was the gold standard of medical management for many years. On the other hand heparin and warfarin was the main pharmacologic agents for the prophylaxis/treatment of venous thromboembolism. In the last 5 years warfarin is getting replaced by non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants at least partly. In this article it is attempted to foresee whether new oral anticoagulants will become the new standard of care in anticoagulation therapy.

  11. Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in patients taking direct oral anticoagulants: A case series and discussion of management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph H. McMordie, MD

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Direct oral anticoagulants are becoming more commonplace for the treatment of nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and deep vein thrombosis. Unfortunately, effective reversal agents are not widely available limiting options for neurosurgical intervention during active anticoagulation. We report a case series of 3 patients treated for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage while taking direct oral anticoagulants. All three underwent open surgical clipping after adequate time was allowed for drug metabolism. Decision-making must take into account timing of intervention, drug half-life, and currently available reversal agents.

  12. Fatal rebleeding following coil embolization of cerebral aneurysms: the role of long-term systemic anticoagulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinson, G.; Bagley, L.J.; Hurst, R.W.; Flamm, E.S.

    2001-01-01

    Embolization of cerebral aneurysms has become a common technique. Its impact on subsequent medical management of the patient is not well known. We report two patients who presented in a poor neurological grade after subarachnoid hemorrhage from posterior communicating artery aneurysms. Both were treated by coil embolization and both developed subclavian vein thrombosis, requiring systemic anticoagulation, initiated 11 and 21 days after embolization, respectively. Both developed a large, fatal intracranial hemorrhage adjacent to the embolized aneurysm in the fourth week of anticoagulation. Systemic anticoagulation of patients who have had a ruptured aneurysm treated by coil embolization may carry a significant risk of rebleeding. Alternate management strategies should be considered in these patients. (orig.)

  13. Fatal rebleeding following coil embolization of cerebral aneurysms: the role of long-term systemic anticoagulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinson, G. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bagley, L.J.; Hurst, R.W. [Dept. of Radiology-Neuroradiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Flamm, E.S. [Hyman-Newman Institute for Neurology and Neurosurgery, New York, NY (United States)

    2001-05-01

    Embolization of cerebral aneurysms has become a common technique. Its impact on subsequent medical management of the patient is not well known. We report two patients who presented in a poor neurological grade after subarachnoid hemorrhage from posterior communicating artery aneurysms. Both were treated by coil embolization and both developed subclavian vein thrombosis, requiring systemic anticoagulation, initiated 11 and 21 days after embolization, respectively. Both developed a large, fatal intracranial hemorrhage adjacent to the embolized aneurysm in the fourth week of anticoagulation. Systemic anticoagulation of patients who have had a ruptured aneurysm treated by coil embolization may carry a significant risk of rebleeding. Alternate management strategies should be considered in these patients. (orig.)

  14. Lupus anticoagulant-hypoprothrombinemia syndrome and catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome in a patient with antidomain I antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, Joris; Mohamed, Shirine; Revuz, Sabine; de Maistre, Emmanuel; de Laat, Bas; Marie, Pierre-Yves; Zuily, Stéphane; Lévy, Bruno; Regnault, Véronique; Wahl, Denis

    2016-07-01

    Lupus anticoagulant-hypoprothrombinemia syndrome is a rare condition characterized by the association of acquired factor II deficiency and lupus anticoagulant. Contrary to classical antiphospholipid syndrome, it may cause severe life-threatening bleeding (89% of published cases). We report a patient, positive for antidomain I antibodies, with initially primary lupus anticoagulant-hypoprothrombinemia syndrome without previous clinical manifestation or underlying systemic disease. Five years later, he experienced the first systemic lupus erythematous flare. Within a few days, catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome was diagnosed with heart, liver and kidney involvement. The patient recovered under pulse steroids, intravenous heparin and intravenous immunoglobulins.

  15. Practical considerations in emergency management of bleeding in the setting of target-specific oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michael P; Trujillo, Toby C; Nordenholz, Kristen E

    2014-04-01

    The recent arrival of the target-specific oral anticoagulants (TSOACs) offers potential advantages in the field of anticoagulation. However, there are no rapid and accurate and routinely available laboratory assays to evaluate their contribution to clinical bleeding. With the expanding clinical indications for the TSOACs, and the arrival of newer reversal agents on the market, the emergency clinician will need to be familiar with drug specifics as well as methods for anticoagulation reversal. This review offers a summary of the literature and some practical strategies for the approach to the patient taking TSOACs and the management of bleeding in these cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Multicentre randomised placebo-controlled trial of oral anticoagulation with apixaban in systemic sclerosis-related pulmonary arterial hypertension: the SPHInX study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderone, Alicia; Stevens, Wendy; Prior, David; Nandurkar, Harshal; Gabbay, Eli; Proudman, Susanna M; Williams, Trevor; Celermajer, David; Sahhar, Joanne; Wong, Peter K K; Thakkar, Vivek; Dwyer, Nathan; Wrobel, Jeremy; Chin, Weng; Liew, Danny; Staples, Margaret; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Nikpour, Mandana

    2016-12-08

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a severe and costly multiorgan autoimmune connective tissue disease characterised by vasculopathy and fibrosis. One of the major causes of SSc-related death is pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), which develops in 12-15% of patients with SSc and accounts for 30-40% of deaths. In situ thrombosis in the small calibre peripheral pulmonary vessels resulting from endothelial dysfunction and an imbalance of anticoagulant and prothrombotic mediators has been implicated in the complex pathophysiology of SSc-related PAH (SSc-PAH), with international clinical guidelines recommending the use of anticoagulants for some types of PAH, such as idiopathic PAH. However, anticoagulation has not become part of standard clinical care for patients with SSc-PAH as only observational evidence exists to support its use. Therefore, we present the rationale and methodology of a phase III randomised controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate the efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness of anticoagulation in SSc-PAH. This Australian multicentre RCT will compare 2.5 mg apixaban with placebo, in parallel treatment groups randomised in a 1:1 ratio, both administered twice daily for 3 years as adjunct therapy to stable oral PAH therapy. The composite primary outcome measure will be the time to death or clinical worsening of PAH. Secondary outcomes will include functional capacity, health-related quality of life measures and adverse events. A cost-effectiveness analysis of anticoagulation versus placebo will also be undertaken. Ethical approval for this RCT has been granted by the Human Research Ethics Committees of all participating centres. An independent data safety monitoring board will review safety and tolerability data for the duration of the trial. The findings of this RCT are to be published in open access journals. ACTRN12614000418673, Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  17. Preliminary study of percutaneous nephrolithotomy on an ambulatory basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Tabey, Magdy Ahmed; Abd-Allah, Osama Abdel-Wahab; Ahmed, Ahmed Sebaey; El-Barky, Ehab Mohammed; Noureldin, Yasser Abdel-Sattar

    2013-02-01

    Preliminary study to assess the feasibility and safety of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) as an ambulatory procedure. Between February 2011 and September 2012, 84 patients with renal calculi fulfilling the inclusion criteria were admitted to the Urology Department of Benha University Hospitals for PCNL. All patients were subjected to a full medical history, clinical, laboratory and radiological examinations. Tubeless PCNLs were done in the supine position, and an antegrade double-J stent was inserted. Operative time and intraoperative complications were recorded. Postoperatively, the hematocrit value, postoperative pain and analgesics, need of blood transfusion, stone-free rate, and length of hospital stay were recorded. Stable patients that could be safely discharged within 24 hours after surgery were considered ambulatory. All cases of tubeless PCNL were successfully done and no cases converted to open surgery. The overall stone-free rate was 91.7%, the mean postoperative pain score measured by the visual analog scale was 4.4 ± 1.2, the mean overall hematocrit deficit was 4.8 ± 2.2% and the mean hospital stay was 33.4 ± 17.5 hours. Ambulatory PCNL was accomplished in 60 out of 84 patients (71.4%) and double-J stents were removed 7-10 days postoperatively. In the non-ambulatory cases, double-J stents were removed after auxillary procedures were done according to each case. PCNL can be safely done on an ambulatory basis under strict criteria, but further studies are needed to confirm and expand these findings.

  18. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring: Is 24 hours necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vornovitsky, Michael; McClintic, Benjamin R; Beck, G Ronald; Bisognano, John D

    2013-01-01

    The variability of blood pressure (BP) makes any single measurement a poor indicator of a patient's true BP. Multiple studies have confirmed the superiority of ambulatory BP measurements over clinic BP measurements in predicting cardiovascular risk; however, this method presents the problem of patient acceptance as it causes frequent arm discomfort and sleep disturbance. We hypothesized that 6 h of daytime BP measurements would result in slightly higher BP readings, yet reveal similar clinical decision making when compared to 24 h of BP measurements. The source for writing this article was a retrospective analysis of 30 patients who underwent ambulatory BP monitoring. Data obtained included: age, sex, ethnicity, baseline medical problems, medications, laboratory values, reason given for ordering 24-h ambulatory BP measurements, ambulatory BP measurements, and a subsequent decision to change medication. The average BP of the 24-h measurements was 127/75 mm Hg and the average BP of the 6-h daytime measurements was 131/79 mm Hg (SD 15, p = 0.009). Twenty-six out of 30 patients were at goal or pre-hypertensive. Two out of 30 patients had stage 1 hypertension and 2 out of 30 patients had stage 2 hypertension. Thirteen out of 30 patients had nocturnal dipping. Twelve out of 30 patients had a change in medication, but those changes were not associated with the presence or absence of nocturnal dipping (p = 0.5) or other factors beyond mean BP. Although there was a statistically significant, 4 mm Hg systolic difference between 24-h and 6-h average BP readings, there was no evidence that this difference led to changes in clinical management. The presence or absence of nocturnal dipping was not associated with a change in medication. We conclude that 6-h daytime ambulatory BP measurements provide sufficient information to guide clinical decision making without the problems of patient acceptance, arm discomfort, and sleep disturbance associated with 24-h BP measurements.

  19. Management of comorbidities in ambulatory anesthesia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dabu-Bondoc S

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Susan Dabu-Bondoc, Kirk Shelley Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USAAbstract: Advances in medical science now allow people with significant medical issues to live at home. As the outpatient population ages and surgical techniques advance, the ambulatory anesthesiologist has to be prepared to handle these “walking wounded”. The days of restricting ambulatory surgery procedures to American Society of Anesthesiologists class 1 and 2 patients are rapidly fading into the past. To remain competitive and economically viable, the modern ambulatory surgery center needs to expand its practice to include patients with medical comorbidities. In an environment where production and economic pressures exist, maintaining safety and good outcomes in high-risk patients for ambulatory surgery can be arduous. Adding to the complexity of this challenge is the rapid evolution of the therapeutic approaches to a variety of medical issues. For example, there has been a significant increase in the number and types of insulin a diabetic patient might be prescribed in recent years. In the case of the patient with coronary artery disease, the variety of both drug and nondrug eluding stents or new antithrombotic agents has also increased the complexity of perioperative management. Complex patients need careful, timely, and team-based preoperative evaluation by an anesthesia provider who is knowledgeable of outpatient care. Optimizing comorbidities preoperatively is a crucial initial step in minimizing risk. This paper will examine a number of common medical issues and explore their impact on managing outpatient surgical procedures.Keywords: ambulatory surgery, medical comorbidities, diabetes, coronary artery disease, respiratory disease, obesity

  20. The ten successful elements of an ambulatory care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, G

    1997-01-01

    Experts in healthcare predict that in the future, over 80% of all care will be provided either in the home or ambulatory care centers. How radiology facilities position themselves for this shifting market is critical to their long-term success, even though it appears there are endless opportunities for providing care in this atmosphere. The ten most critical elements that healthcare providers must address to ensure their preparedness are discussed. Location is critical, particularly since patients no longer want to travel to regional medical centers. The most aggressive providers are building local care centers to serve specific populations. Ambulatory care centers should project a high tech, high touch atmosphere. Patient comfort and the appeal of the overall environment must be considered. Centers need to focus on their customers' needs in multiple areas of care. A quick and easy registration process, providing dressing gowns in patient areas, clear billing functions--these are all important areas that centers should develop. Physicians practicing in the ambulatory care center are key to its overall success and can set the tone for all staff members. Staff members must be friendly and professional in their work with patients. The hours offered by the center must meet the needs of its client base, perhaps by offering evening and weekend appointments. Keeping appointments on schedule is critical if a center wants satisfied customers. It's important to identify the target before developing your marketing plan. Where do your referrals come from? Look to such sources as referring physicians, managed care plans and patients themselves. Careful billing is critical for survival in the ambulatory care world. Costs are important and systems that can track cost per exam are useful. Know your bottom line. Service remains the central focus of all successful ambulatory care center functions.

  1. An overview of anesthetic procedures, tools, and techniques in ambulatory care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messieha Z

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zakaria Messieha Department of Anesthesiology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Ambulatory surgical and anesthesia care (ASAC, also known as Same Day Surgery or Day Care in some countries, is the fastest growing segment of ambulatory surgical and anesthesia care. Over 50 million ambulatory surgical procedures are conducted annually comprising over 60% of all anesthesia care with an impressive track record of safety and efficiency. Advances in ambulatory anesthesia care have been due to newer generation of inhalation and intravenous anesthetics as well as airway management technology and techniques. Successful ambulatory anesthesia care relies on patient selection, adequate facilities, highly trained personnel and quality improvement policies and procedures. Favoring one anesthetic technique over the other should be patient and procedure-specific. Effective management of post-operative pain as well as nausea and vomiting are the final pieces in assuring success in ambulatory anesthesia care. Keywords: ambulatory anesthesia, out-patient anesthesia, Day-Care anesthesia

  2. Dabigatran for anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation - early clinical experience in a hospital population and comparison to trial data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Jonathan; Mundell, David; Boga, Tau; Sasse, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Dabigatran is a recently introduced direct thrombin inhibitor licensed for use as an oral anticoagulant for stroke prevention in non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Our prospective observational study aimed to assess the adverse effects, tolerability and patient satisfaction of dabigatran therapy in a hospital-practice population. Patients starting dabigatran, after its release in June 2011, were identified from clinical practice at two Wellington hospitals, New Zealand. Baseline characteristics were recorded from the clinical record and a telephone interview was performed in January 2012. Primary outcomes included adverse events, adherence, and satisfaction with treatment. Data were available for 70 patients: median age 71.9 years (IQR 62.7-79.0), weight 80 kg (IQR 71-95), CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score 3 (IQR 2-4). Seventy-one percent of patients reported adverse events although the majority were minor. Twenty-four percent (16/70) had discontinued treatment with dabigatran; four due to predominantly gastrointestinal side effects, three due to bleeding (one severe), one as a result of adverse media coverage with the remainder comprising planned treatment discontinuation and undetermined. In total, 29% reported bleeding events, predominantly minor bleeding and bruising. There were no cerebrovascular events. Nineteen percent reported some difficulty with twice daily dosing adherence with 13 of 70 reporting missed doses. Seventy-seven percent reported treatment satisfaction and 79% of those previously treated with warfarin preferred dabigatran. In this population our study demonstrates a discontinuation rate of 10% due to side effects of dabigatran, similar to the rate reported in RE-LY. The majority of patients are satisfied with their treatment and preferred dabigatran to warfarin, mainly due to the reduced requirement for blood testing. Copyright © 2012 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and

  3. Preoperative testing and risk assessment: perspectives on patient selection in ambulatory anesthetic procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stierer TL

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tracey L Stierer,1,2 Nancy A Collop3,41Department of Anesthesiology, 2Department of Critical Care Medicine, Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Department of Medicine, 4Department of Neurology, Emory University, Emory Sleep Center, Wesley Woods Center, Atlanta, GA, USAAbstract: With recent advances in surgical and anesthetic technique, there has been a growing emphasis on the delivery of care to patients undergoing ambulatory procedures of increasing complexity. Appropriate patient selection and meticulous preparation are vital to the provision of a safe, quality perioperative experience. It is not unusual for patients with complex medical histories and substantial systemic disease to be scheduled for discharge on the same day as their surgical procedure. The trend to “push the envelope” by triaging progressively sicker patients to ambulatory surgical facilities has resulted in a number of challenges for the anesthesia provider who will assume their care. It is well known that certain patient diseases are associated with increased perioperative risk. It is therefore important to define clinical factors that warrant more extensive testing of the patient and medical conditions that present a prohibitive risk for an adverse outcome. The preoperative assessment is an opportunity for the anesthesia provider to determine the status and stability of the patient’s health, provide preoperative education and instructions, and offer support and reassurance to the patient and the patient’s family members. Communication between the surgeon/proceduralist and the anesthesia provider is critical in achieving optimal outcome. A multifaceted approach is required when considering whether a specific patient will be best served having their procedure on an outpatient basis. Not only should the patient's comorbidities be stable and optimized, but details regarding the planned procedure and the resources available

  4. Medication-related problem type and appearance rate in ambulatory hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drayer Debra K

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemodialysis (HD patients are at risk for medication-related problems (MRP. The MRP number, type, and appearance rate over time in ambulatory HD patients has not been investigated. Methods Randomly selected HD patients were enrolled to receive monthly pharmaceutical care visits. At each visit, MRP were identified through review of the patient chart, electronic medical record, patient interview, and communications with other healthcare disciplines. All MRP were categorized by type and medication class. MRP appearance rate was determined as the number of MRP identified per month/number of months in study. The number of MRP per patient-drug exposures were determined using: {[(number of patients × (mean number of medications]/(number of months of study} /number of MRP identified. Results were expressed as mean ± standard deviation or percentages. Results Patients were 62.6 ± 15.9 years old, had 6.4 ± 2.0 comorbid conditions, were taking 12.5 ± 4.2 medications, and 15.7 ± 7.2 doses per day at baseline. Medication-dosing problems (33.5%, adverse drug reactions (20.7%, and an indication that was not currently being treated (13.5% were the most common MRP. 5,373 medication orders were reviewed and a MRP was identified every 15.2 medication exposures. Overall MRP appearance rate was 0.68 ± 0.46 per patient per month. Conclusion MRP continue to occur at a high rate in ambulatory HD patients. Healthcare providers taking care of HD patients should be aware of this problem and efforts to avoid or resolve MRP should be undertaken at all HD clinics.

  5. Prevalence of Polyherbacy in Ambulatory Visits to Traditional Chinese Medicine Clinics in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming-Hwai; Chang, Hsiao-Ting; Tu, Chun-Yi; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2015-01-01

    Patients with a polyherbal prescription are more likely to receive duplicate medications and thus suffer from adverse drug reactions. We conducted a population-based retrospective study to examine the items of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) per prescription in the ambulatory care of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in Taiwan. We retrieved complete TCM ambulatory visit datasets for 2010 from the National Health Insurance database in Taiwan. A total of 59,790 patients who received 313,482 CHM prescriptions were analyzed. Drug prescriptions containing more than five drugs were classified as polyherbal prescriptions; 41.6% of patients were given a polyherbal prescription. There were on average 5.2 ± 2.5 CHMs: 2.3 ± 1.1 compound herbal formula items, and 3.0 ± 2.5 single Chinese herb items in a single prescription. Approximately 4.6% of patients were prescribed 10 CHMs or more. Men had a lower odds ratio (OR) among polyherbal prescriptions (OR = 0.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.92–0.99), and middle-aged patients (35–49 years) had the highest frequency of polyherbal prescription (OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.13–1.26). Patients with neoplasm, skin and subcutaneous tissue disease, or genitourinary system disease were more likely to have a polyherbal prescription; OR = 2.20 (1.81–2.67), 1.65 (1.50–1.80), and 1.52 (1.40–1.64), respectively. Polyherbal prescription is widespread in TCM in Taiwan. Potential herb interactions and iatrogenic risks associated with polyherbal prescriptions should be monitored. PMID:26287228

  6. Determination of the frequency and direct cost of the adverse drug events in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, Estela; Rodríguez, Claudio; Pampliega, Eneas; Filinger, Ester

    2009-05-01

    To determine the frequency and the direct costs of adverse drug reactions, in an ambulatory population of the City of Buenos Aires, Argentina and its area of influence. A retrospective study was done during a period of three months on approximately 300.000 residents of the Buenos Aires area, gathering data according to the selected variables by means of the electronic capture of prescriptions dispensed in pharmacies of the area. This method enables the detection and registration of potential conflicts that may arise between a prescribed drug and factors such as: patient's demographic, clinical and drug profile. The analysis unit was defined as the happening of a moderate or severe adverse event reported by the system. The selected variables were the incidence of these effects and the direct cost was calculated as the value of the drugs that induced the adverse event. The events were classified according to the following interactions: a) drug-drug, b) drug-pediatrics, c) drug-gender, d) drug-pregnancy and abuse of controlled substances. The observed frequency shows great variability and the shortage of available data for ambulatory populations. We found 6.74% of reported events over the total of processed items, which generated an additional cost equivalent to 4.58% of the total pharmaceutical expenses. This study has only evaluated the cost occurred by the use of a drug that will lead to an adverse reaction. Moderate and severe reactions were included regardless of the important indirect costs, hospitalization costs, tests, physician fees, etc.

  7. Antiplatelet agents and/or anticoagulants are not associated with worse outcome following nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teles-Sampaio, Elvira; Maia, Luís; Salgueiro, Paulo; Marcos-Pinto, Ricardo; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Pedroto, Isabel

    2016-11-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding emerges as a major complication of using antiplatelet agents and/or anticoagulants and represents a clinical challenge in patients undergoing these therapies. To characterize patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding related to antithrombotics and their management, and to determine clinical predictors of adverse outcomes. Retrospective cohort of adults who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy after nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding from 2010 to 2012. The outcomes were compared between patients exposed and not exposed to antithrombotics. Five hundred and forty-eight patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (67% men; mean age 66.5 ± 16.4 years) were included, of which 43% received antithrombotics. Most patients had comorbidities. Peptic ulcer was the main diagnosis and endoscopic therapy was performed in 46% of cases. The 30-day mortality rate was 7.7% (n = 42), and 36% were bleeding-related. The recurrence rate was 9% and 14% of patients with initial endoscopic treatment needed endoscopic retreatment. There were no significant differences between the exposed and non-exposed groups in most outcomes. Co-morbidities, hemodynamic instability, high Rockall score, low hemoglobin (7.76 ± 2.72 g/dL) and higher international normalized ratio (1.63 ± 1.13) were associated significantly with mortality in a univariate analysis. Adverse outcomes were not associated with antithrombotic use. The management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding constitutes a challenge to clinical performance optimization and clinical cooperation.

  8. Anticoagulation: Where have we come from and where are we going ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is its predictable renal excretion, with low inter- and intra-individual variability.[11] Clinically, this ... recent meta-analysis of 50 000 patients requiring anticoagulation ... data supporting the use of NOACs in secondary stroke prevention in. NVAF.

  9. Anticoagulant Prairie Dog Bait Risk Mitigation Measures to Protect Endangered Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Web page contains information on how certified pesticide applicators can use anticoagulant prairie dog bait products such as Rozol and Kaput-D while minimizing exposure risks to listed and non-target species.

  10. Recurrent venous thromboembolism and abnormal uterine bleeding with anticoagulant and hormone therapy use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinelli, Ida; Lensing, Anthonie W. A.; Middeldorp, Saskia; Levi, Marcel; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; van Bellen, Bonno; Bounameaux, Henri; Brighton, Timothy A.; Cohen, Alexander T.; Trajanovic, Mila; Gebel, Martin; Lam, Phuong; Wells, Philip S.; Prins, Martin H.

    2016-01-01

    Women receiving vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) require adequate contraception because of the potential for fetal complications. It is unknown whether the use of hormonal therapy, especially those containing estrogens, is associated with recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) during anticoagulation.

  11. Congenital Malformations Associated with the Administration of Oral Anticoagulants During Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettifor, J. M.; Benson, R.

    1975-01-01

    Reported are case histories of three infants with congenital malformations (including defective formation of the nose and hands) associated with ingestion of oral anticoagulants during the first trimester of pregnancy. (CL)

  12. Aspirin or anticoagulants for treating recurrent miscarriage in women without antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaandorp, Stef; Di Nisio, Marcello; Goddijn, Mariette; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2009-01-01

    Background Since hypercoagulability might result in recurrent miscarriage, anticoagulant agents could potentially increase the live-birth rate in subsequent pregnancies in women with either inherited thrombophilia or unexplained recurrent miscarriage. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy and safety

  13. Anticoagulants for the treatment of recurrent pregnancy loss in women without antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Nisio, M.; Peters, L. W.; Middeldorp, S.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since hypercoagulability might result in recurrent pregnancy loss, anticoagulant agents could potentially increase the live-birth rate in subsequent pregnancies in women with either inherited thrombophilia or unexplained pregnancy loss. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of

  14. Reproductive success of bromadiolone-resistant rats in absence of anticoagulant pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Leirs, Herwig; Siegismund, Hans Redlef

    2006-01-01

    Resistance to anticoagulant rodenticides in brown rats (Rattus norvegicus Berk.) is associated with pleiotropic effects, notably with an increased dietary vitamin K requirement. Owing to this disadvantage, resistance is believed to be selected against if anticoagulant selection is absent. In small...... experimental populations of wild brown rats, an investigation was carried out to establish whether tolerance to anticoagulant exposure changed over a period of 2 years. In the same populations, DNA microsatellite markers were used to infer parentage, and this made it possible to estimate reproductive success...... of sensitive and resistant rats and estimate effective population size, Ne. Even though there was evidence for a selection against resistant rats with high vitamin K requirement, anticoagulant tolerance was not seen to be significantly influenced in the absence of bromadiolone selection. As the population size...

  15. Old and new oral anticoagulants for secondary stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Sacquegna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin K antagonists, such as warfarin, used in oral anticoagulation therapy currently represent the standard drugs for the primary and secondary prevention of stroke in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF, with a relative risk reduction close to 70%. Newer oral anticoagulants, such as direct thrombin inhibitors (i.e., dabigatran and direct factor Xa inhibitors (i.e., apixaban and rivaroxaban have been recently compared with warfarin in large randomized trials for stroke prevention in AF. The new oral anticoagulants showed, compared with warfarin, no statistically significant difference in the rate of stroke or systemic embolism in secondary prevention (patients with previous transient ischemic attack or stroke subgroups. With regard to safety, the risk of intracranial bleeding was reduced with new anticoagulants compared with warfarin. Indirect treatment comparisons of clinical trials on secondary prevention cohorts showed no significant difference in efficacy among apixaban, rivaroxaban, and dabigatran; but dabigatran 110 mg was associated with less intracranial bleedings than rivaroxaban.

  16. Improved late survival and disability after stroke with therapeutic anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation: a population study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, Niamh

    2011-09-01

    Although therapeutic anticoagulation improves early (within 1 month) outcomes after ischemic stroke in hospital-admitted patients with atrial fibrillation, no information exists on late outcomes in unselected population-based studies, including patients with all stroke (ischemic and hemorrhagic).

  17. Quality of anticoagulation therapy in neurological patients in a tertiary care hospital in north India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhat Singh

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: It may be concluded that stable therapeutic INR is difficult to maintain in neurological patients. Optimal modification of diet, drug and dose of oral anticoagulant may help in stabilization of INR.

  18. Guideline-related barriers to optimal prescription of oral anticoagulants in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukenhorst, A. L.; Arts, D. L.; Lucassen, W.; Jager, K. J.; van der Veer, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    Guidelines provide recommendations for antithrombotic treatment to prevent stroke in people with atrial fibrillation, but oral anticoagulant prescriptions in Dutch primary care are often discordant with these recommendations. Suboptimal guideline features (i.e. format and content) have been

  19. Patterns in neurosurgical adverse events: endovascular neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Judith M; Ziewacz, John E; Panchmatia, Jaykar R; Bader, Angela M; Pandey, Aditya S; Thompson, B Gregory; Frerichs, Kai; Gawande, Atul A

    2012-11-01

    As part of a project to devise evidence-based safety interventions for specialty surgery, the authors sought to review current evidence in endovascular neurosurgery concerning the frequency of adverse events in practice, their patterns, and current methods of reducing the occurrence of these events. This review represents part of a series of papers written to consolidate information about these events and preventive measures as part of an ongoing effort to ascertain the utility of devising system-wide policies and safety tools to improve neurosurgical practice. Based on a review of the literature, thromboembolic events appeared to be the most common adverse events in endovascular neurosurgery, with a reported incidence ranging from 2% to 61% depending on aneurysm rupture status and mode of detection of the event. Intraprocedural and periprocedural prevention and rescue regimens are advocated to minimize this risk; however, evidence on the optimal use of anticoagulant and antithrombotic agents is limited. Furthermore, it is unknown what proportion of eligible patients receive any prophylactic treatment. Groin-site hematoma is the most common access-related complication. Data from the cardiac literature indicate an overall incidence of 9% to 32%, but data specific to neuroendovascular therapy are scant. Manual compression, compression adjuncts, and closure devices are used with varying rates of success, but no standardized protocols have been tested on a broad scale. Contrast-induced nephropathy is one of the more common causes of hospital-acquired renal insufficiency, with an incidence of 30% in high-risk patients after contrast administration. Evidence from medical fields supports the use of various preventive strategies. Intraprocedural vessel rupture is infrequent, with the reported incidence ranging from 1% to 9%, but it is potentially devastating. Improvements in device technology combined with proper endovascular technique play an important role in reducing

  20. The anticoagulation choices of internal medicine residents for stroke prevention in non-valvular atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulson, Nathaniel; McIntyre, William F; Oqab, Zardasht; Yazdan-Ashoori, Payam; Quinn, Kieran L; van Oosten, Erik; Hopman, Wilma M; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2017-06-01

    To explore the oral anticoagulation (OAC) prescribing choices of Canadian internal medicine residents, at different training levels, in comparison with the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) guidelines for non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Cross-sectional, web-based survey, involving clinical scenarios designed to favour the use of non-vitamin K antagonists (NOACs) as per the 2014 CCS NVAF guidelines. Additional questions were also designed to determine resident attitudes towards OAC prescribing. A total of 518 internal medicine responses were analysed, with 196 postgraduate year (PGY)-1s, 169 PGY-2s and 153 PGY-3s. The majority of residents (81%) reported feeling comfortable choosing OAC, with 95% having started OAC in the past 3 months. In the initial clinical scenario involving an uncomplicated patient with a CHADS2 score of 3, warfarin was favoured over any of the NOACs by PGY-1s (81.6% vs 73.9%), but NOACs were favoured by PGY-3s (88.3% vs 83.7%). This was the only scenario where OAC choices varied by PGY year, as each of the subsequent clinical scenarios residents generally favoured warfarin over NOACs irrespective of level of training. The majority of residents stated that they would no longer prescribe warfarin once NOAC reversal agents are available, and residents felt risk of adverse events was the most important factor when choosing OAC. Canadian internal medicine residents favoured warfarin over NOACs for patients with NVAF, which is in discordance with the evidence-based CCS guidelines. This finding persisted throughout the 3 years of core internal medicine training. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Acute management of stroke patients taking non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants Addressing Real-world Anticoagulant Management Issues in Stroke (ARAMIS) Registry: Design and rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Ying; Hernandez, Adrian F; Harding, Tina; Fonarow, Gregg C; Bhatt, Deepak L; Suter, Robert E; Khan, Yosef; Schwamm, Lee H; Peterson, Eric D

    2016-12-01

    Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban) have been increasingly used as alternatives to warfarin for stroke prophylaxis in patients with atrial fibrillation. Yet there is substantial lack of information on how patients on NOACs are currently treated when they have an acute ischemic stroke and the best strategies for treating intracerebral hemorrhage for those on chronic anticoagulation with warfarin or a NOAC. These are critical unmet needs for real world clinical decision making in these emergent patients. The ARAMIS Registry is a multicenter cohort study of acute stroke patients who were taking chronic anticoagulation therapy prior to admission and are admitted with either an acute ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage. Built upon the existing infrastructure of American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Get With the Guidelines Stroke, the ARAMIS Registry will enroll a total of approximately 10,000 patients (5000 with acute ischemic stroke who are taking a NOAC and 5000 with anticoagulation-related intracerebral hemorrhage who are on warfarin or a NOAC). The primary goals of the ARAMIS Registry are to provide a comprehensive picture of current treatment patterns and outcomes of acute ischemic stroke patients on NOACs, as well as anticoagulation-related intracerebral hemorrhage in patients on either warfarin or NOACs. Beyond characterizing the index hospitalization, up to 2500 patients (1250 ischemic stroke and 1250 intracerebral hemorrhage) who survive to discharge will be enrolled in an optional follow-up sub-study and interviewed at 3 and 6 months after discharge to assess longitudinal medication use, downstream care, functional status, and patient-reported outcomes. The ARAMIS Registry will document the current state of management of NOAC treated patients with acute ischemic stroke as well as contemporary care and outcome of anticoagulation-related intracerebral hemorrhage. These

  2. D-dimer: a useful tool in gauging optimal duration of oral anticoagulant therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Silingardi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY Optimal duration of oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT in idiopathic venous thromboembolism (VTE is unknown. Indefinite OAT carries an unacceptable risk of major bleeding and prospective studies have demonstrated that OAT is no longer protective after its withdrawal. How to identify the patients at risk for recurrence? D-dimer is a marker of thrombin activity. Early prospective studies showed that elevated D-dimer levels after anticoagulation had a highly predictive value for a recurrent episode. Does D-dimer assay have a role in gauging the appropriate duration of anticoagulant therapy? The PROLONG study tries to answer this question. METHOD D-dimer assay was performed one month after stopping anticoagulation. Patiens with normal D-dimer levels did not resume anticoagulation while patients with elevated D-dimer levels were randomized to discontinue or resume anticoagulation. Study end-points was the composite of recurrent VTE and major bleeding during an average follow-up of 1.4 years. RESULTS The rate of recurrence is significantly higher in patients with elevated D-dimer levels who discontinued anticoagulation. Resuming anticoagulation in this cohort of patients markedly reduces recurrent events without increasing major bleeding. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS PROLONG study is provocative, because D-dimer assay is simple, thus not requiring dedicated laboratory facilities. D-dimer test has otherwise high sensitivity but low specificity in VTE diagnosis. Aspecifically elevated D-dimer levels are available in the elderly and the majority of patients included in the study were > 65 years old, thus introducing a possible selection bias. Nonetheless the results of the study are useful for the clinician. Prolongation of vitamin K antagonists in patients with elevated D-dimer levels one month after discontinuation of OAT for a first unprovoked episode of VTE results in a favourable risk-benefit relationship. Probably this

  3. Synthesis and biological activity of the novel indanedione anticoagulant rodenticides containing fluorine

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Feng; Liu, Liping; Bai, Zengguo; Zhang, Tianhua; Zhao, Keke

    2016-01-01

    Here, 3 fluorinated intermediates of drug were synthesized: (M1), (M2), (M3). Three new anticoagulant rodenticides were designed which were based on 4-hydroxycoumarin or 1,3-indandione, added acute toxicity groups containing fluorine. The structures of synthesized compounds were analyzed and proved by FT-IR spectroscopy and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR). The compounds were also evaluated for their anticoagulant and acute biologic activity. In addition, both the acute orally toxicity ...

  4. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOAC) in the treatment of venous thromboembolism

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian Werth; Jan Beyer-Westendorf

    2015-01-01

    In case of venous thromboembolism (VTE) e ective anticoagulation is needed. The introduction of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) for VTE therapy o ers new treatment options and, in general, simpli es VTE therapy compared to the concept of LMWH/ VKA. At the same time, NOACs may help to improve the clinical outcome of patients with VTE as trial results consistently indicated the reduction in major bleeding complications. There are several reasons to use NOAC in special p...

  5. Anticoagulation therapy a risk factor for the development of chronic subdural hematoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aspegren, Oskar P.; Åstrand, Ramona; Lundgren, Maria I.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common disease among the elderly and with increasing incidence we have chosen to focus on associations between development and recurrence of CSDH and anticoagulation and/or antiplatelet agent therapy.......Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common disease among the elderly and with increasing incidence we have chosen to focus on associations between development and recurrence of CSDH and anticoagulation and/or antiplatelet agent therapy....

  6. Real life anticoagulation treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilke, Thomas; Groth, Antje; Pfannkuche, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Oral anticoagulation (OAC) with either new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) or Vitamin-K antagonists (VKAs) is recommended by guidelines for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and a moderate to high risk of stroke. Based on a claims-based data set the aim of this study was to quantify the stroke-r...... that both patient/disease characteristics and treatment environment/general prescribing behaviour of physicians may explain the OAC under-use in AF patients....

  7. Evaluation of computerized decision support for oral anticoagulation management based in primary care.

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzmaurice, D A; Hobbs, F D; Murray, E T; Bradley, C P; Holder, R

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increasing indications for oral anticoagulation has led to pressure on general practices to undertake therapeutic monitoring. Computerized decision support (DSS) has been shown to be effective in hospitals for improving clinical management. Its usefulness in primary care has previously not been investigated. AIM: To test the effectiveness of using DSS for oral anticoagulation monitoring in primary care by measuring the proportions of patients adequately controlled, defined as with...

  8. Could Some Geriatric Characteristics Hinder the Prescription of Anticoagulants in Atrial Fibrillation in the Elderly?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paule Denoël

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported underprescription of anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation (AF. We conducted an observational study on 142 out of a total of 995 consecutive ≥75 years old patients presenting AF (14% when admitted in an emergency unit of a general hospital, in search of geriatric characteristics that might be associated with the underprescription of anticoagulation therapy (mostly antivitamin K at the time of the study. The following data was collected from patients presenting AF: medical history including treatment and comorbidities, CHADS2 score, ISAR scale (frailty, Lawton’s scale (ADL, GDS scale (mood status, MUST (nutrition, and blood analysis (INR, kidney function, and albumin. Among those patients for who anticoagulation treatment was recommended (73%, only 61% were treated with it. In the group with anticoagulation therapy, the following characteristics were observed more often than in the group without such therapy: a recent (≤6 months hospitalization and medical treatment including digoxin or based on >3 different drugs. Neither the value of the CHADS2 score, nor the geriatric characteristics could be correlated with the presence or the absence of an anticoagulation therapy. More research is thus required to identify and clarify the relative importance of patient-, physician-, and health care system-related hurdles for the prescription of oral anticoagulation therapy in older patients with AF.

  9. Healthcare resources and needs in anticoagulant therapy for patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. SAMOA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, V; Egocheaga-Cabello, M I; Gállego-Culleré, J; Ignacio-García, E; Manzano-Espinosa, L; Martín-Martínez, A; Mateo-Arranz, J; Polo-García, J; Vargas-Ortega, D

    2017-05-01

    To determine, in the various medical specialties, the healthcare process for anticoagulated patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, to determine the available and necessary resources and to identify potential areas of improvement in the care of these patients. We performed a cross-sectional survey of primary care and specialised physicians involved in the care of anticoagulated patients. The questionnaires referred to the healthcare process, the indication and prescription of anticoagulant therapy and the barriers and deficiencies present for these patients. A total of 893 physicians participated in the study, 437 of whom worked in primary care and 456 of whom were specialists (mostly cardiologists). Forty-two percent of the family doctors indicated that they assessed and prescribed anticoagulant therapy, and 66% performed the regular follow-up of these patients. In both healthcare settings, the physicians noted the lack of standardised protocols. There was also a lack of quality control in the treatment. The role of primary care in managing anticoagulated patients has grown compared with previous reports. The responses of the participating physicians suggest marked gaps in the standardisation of the healthcare process and several areas for improvement in these patients' follow-up. The promotion of training in direct-acting anticoagulant drugs remains pivotal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  10. Nonoclusive thrombosis of mechanical mitral valve prosthesis caused by inadequate treatment of anticoagulant therapy resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović Branislava

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Oral anticoagulants have been used in the prevention of thromboembolic complications for over six decades. A rare, but possible problem in the application of these medications could be resistance to them. Case report. We presented a patient with nonocclusive thrombosis of the mechanical mitral prosthesis due to inadequately treated resistance to peroral anticoagulant therapy. Resistance to oral anticoagulant medications was proven by an increased dosage of warfarin up to 20 mg and, after that, acenokumarol to 15 mg over ten days which did not lead to an increase in the international normalized ratio (INR value over 1.2. On the basis of information that she did not take food rich in vitamin K or medications which could reduce effects of oral anticoagulants, and that she did not have additional illnesses and conditions that could cause an inadequate response to anticoagulant therapy, it was circumstantially concluded that this was a hereditary form of resistance. Because of the existing mechanical prosthetics on the mitral position, low molecular heparin has been introduced into the therapy. The patient reduced it on her own initiative, leading to nonocclusive valvular thrombosis. Conclusion. When associated complications like absolute arrhithmia does not exist, the finding of resistance to oral anticoagulant agents is an indication for the replacement of a mechanical prosthetic with a biological one which has been done in this patients.

  11. Standards of care issues with anticoagulation in real-world populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Current guidelines recommend anticoagulants for reducing the risk of stroke in appropriate patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) and for the acute treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and the prevention of recurrent VTE. Warfarin is the standard of care for both NVAF and VTE, yet International Normalized Ratio (INR) control remains suboptimal, even in the clinical trial setting. Maintaining INR within the recommended therapeutic range is associated with better outcomes in these distinct populations. In VTE, high rates of recurrence have been reported during the first few weeks of treatment, emphasizing the importance of surveillance during this time and of early optimization of anticoagulation therapy. The NVAF population tends to have more comorbidities and requires longer-term therapy. It is important to keep in mind that real-world patient populations are more complex than those in controlled studies. Patients with multiple comorbidities are particularly challenging, and physicians may focus on clinically urgent issues rather than anticoagulation optimization. Despite the many complexities associated with the use of warfarin, it remains a mainstay of anticoagulation therapy. Aligning financial incentives and improving care coordination are important factors in moving toward better outcomes for patients who need anticoagulation therapy. The increased focus on value-based care and evolving approaches to patient treatment could lead more physicians and payers to consider alternatives to warfarin, including the use of novel oral anticoagulants.

  12. Management of novel oral anticoagulants in emergency and trauma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho-Gomes, Ana-Catarina; Hague, Adam; Ghosh, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    The compelling safety, efficacy and predictable effect of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) is driving a rapid expansion in their therapeutic indications. Management of the increasing number of patients on those new agents in the setting of emergency or trauma surgery can be challenging and the absence of specific reversal agents has been a matter of concern. This review summarises the key principles that underpin the management of those patients with a particular emphasis on the recent development of specific antidotes. As of 2015, a new line of antidotes, specific for these drugs, are at different stages of their development with their release imminent. However, as NOACs are innately reversible due to their short half-life, the use of reversal agents will probably be restricted to a few exceptional cases. Post-marketing surveillance will be paramount to better clarify the role of these promising drugs. Management of patients on NOACs in the context of emergency or trauma surgery relies on best supportive care in combination with the blood products and/or specific antidotes as required. Familiarity with the new reversal agents is essential but further evidence on their indications, safety and efficacy as well as consensus guidelines are warranted prior to widespread adoption. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Newer Anticoagulants for Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Harburger

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-valvular atrial fibrillation is a recognized risk factor for stroke and systemic embolism. It has been clearly established that warfarin reduces the risk of stroke and systemic embolism in persons with atrial fibrillation and additional risk factors for stroke. The use of warfarin, however, requires frequent monitoring, and there is great variability in patient response to warfarin. Warfarin interacts with several medications and foods. In addition, warfarin use portends a significant risk of bleeding. For these reasons, warfarin is frequently not prescribed to persons for whom the drug would provide a clear benefit. Over the past decade, attempts have been made to develop drugs that are at least as safe and effective as warfarin for the treatment of atrial fibrillation that do not require monitoring nor have as many interactions. Initial studies of compounds in this regard ultimately failed due to safety concerns, but over the past two years two novel agents have been approved by the United States Food and Drug Association for anticoagulation in non-valvular atrial fibrillation, another drug is under review, and additional compounds are being studied. This article will review the use of warfarin and these new agents in the treatment of non-valvular atrial fibrillation.

  14. Anticoagulation in pregnant females with mechanical heart valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafique, H.; Chaudhry, A.; Ayyub, M.

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the complications and outcome of anticoagulation therapy in pregnant females with valvular heart diseases. All pregnant females with prosthetic heart valves admitted in Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology from Jan 2004 to Dec 2004 were included in this study Basic demographic data including age, duration of pregnancy and complications observed were recorded. Warfarin was replaced with un-fractionated heparin (UFH) in first trimester and after that warfarin was continued with a targeted INR between 2.0-3.0. At 36 weeks warfarin was stopped and UFH was added; however, if patient went into spontaneous labour before this then immediate caesarian section was performed and UFH was restarted 4-6 hours after delivery along with oral warfarin. Out of 21 patients, sixteen (76.1%) had mitral valve diseases and five (23.9%) had both mitral and atrial. Majority (42.3%)of patients were in age group 26-30 years. Eleven (52.2%) reported in 9th month of gestation. Complications observed were hypertension (1), transient ischaemic attacks (1), pulmonary embolism (1), haemoptysis (1) and abortion (1). All patients, except one had successful completion of pregnancy. No case of foetal abnormality was seen. In 76% patients, daily dose of warfarin was <5 mg. Thrombo-prophylaxis in pregnancy with warfarin and UFH with an INR of 2.0-3.0 is effective in preventing thrombotic complications in females with mechanical valves without resulting in increase hemorrhagic complications. (author)

  15. Emergency admissions for major haemorrhage associated with direct oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouget, Jacques; Oger, Emmanuel

    2015-12-01

    To describe the population admitted in an emergency department of a teaching hospital for severe bleeding associated with direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC). During a three-year period (2012-2014) patients older than 16 years were prospectively identified by haemorrhagic symptoms from computerised requests. At least one of the following criteria defined major haemorrhage: haemorrhagic shock, unstable haemodynamic, need for transfusion or haemostatic procedure, or a life threatening location. Fifty four patients, 23 receiving dabigatran, 30 rivaroxaban and one apixaban were included, 2 in 2012, 35 in 2013 and 17 in 2014. Median age was 84 years (range 63-99) with a sex ratio of 1.16. Haemorrhagic complications were gastrointestinal (n=27), intracranial (n=12) or miscellaneous (n=15). Indication of DOAC was stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation in 49 cases and deep vein thrombosis in 5 cases. Hospitalization was required for 45 patients (83%) with a mean length of stay of 8.5 days. Sixteen patients needed intensive care. Reversal therapy was prescribed in 11 patients. At 1 month, overall mortality was 24%, reaching 41.7% for intracranial haemorrhage. Among surviving patients, DOAC was stopped in 10 cases, continued in 17 patients and switched for other antithrombotic in 17 patients. Our study contributes to the post marketing surveillance of major haemorrhagic complications associated with DOAC. It takes part to the knowledge about the course of this severe event in emergencies. Careful awareness in risk benefit assessment, especially in elderly, is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cognitive assessment on elderly people under ambulatory care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Zortea

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the cognitive state of elderly people under ambulatory care and investigating the connection between such cognitive state and sociodemographic variables, health conditions, number of and adhesion to medicine. Methods: transversal, exploratory, and descriptive study, with a quantitative approach, realized with 107 elderly people under ambulatory care in a university hospital in southern Brazil, in november, 2013. The following variables were used: gender, age, civil status, income, schooling, occupation, preexisting noncommunicable diseases, number and type of prescribed medications, adhesion, mini-mental state examination score, and cognitive status. Data was analyzed through inferential and descriptive statistics. Results: the prevalence of cognitive deficit was of 42.1% and had a statistically significant connection to schooling, income, civil status, hypertension, and cardiopathy. Conclusion: nurses can intervene to avoid the increase of cognitive deficit through an assessment of the elderly person, directed to facilitative strategies to soften this deficit.

  17. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring for hypertension in general practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, R S; Stockman, J; Kernick, D; Reinhold, D; Shore, A C; Tooke, J E

    1998-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is being increasingly used in general practice. There is at present little published evidence regarding the clinical utility of ABPM in the care of patients with established hypertension in this setting. We examined this issue by undertaking ABPM in a group of patients with established hypertension. 40 patients (aged 33-60 years) currently being treated for hypertension were randomly selected from a general practice list and underwent a single 24-ho...

  18. Differences in Treatment of Chlamydia trachomatis by Ambulatory Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, William S; Gift, Thomas L; Leichliter, Jami S; Jenkins, Wiley D

    2015-12-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) is the most commonly reported sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the US and timely, correct treatment can reduce CT transmission and sequelae. Emergency departments (ED) are an important location for diagnosing STIs. This study compared recommended treatment of CT in EDs to treatment in physician offices. Five years of data (2006-2010) were analyzed from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, and the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Surveys (NHAMCS), including the Outpatient survey (NHAMCS-OPD) and Emergency Department survey (NHAMCS-ED). All visits with a CT diagnosis and those with a diagnosis of unspecified venereal disease were selected for analysis. Differences in receipt of recommended treatments were compared between visits to physician offices and emergency departments using Chi square tests and logistic regression models. During the 5 year period, approximately 3.2 million ambulatory care visits had diagnosed CT or an unspecified venereal disease. A greater proportion of visits to EDs received the recommended treatment for CT compared to visits to physician offices (66.1 vs. 44.9 %, p < .01). When controlling for patients' age, sex and race/ethnicity, those presenting to the ED with CT were more likely to receive the recommended antibiotic treatment than patients presenting to a physician's office (OR 2.16; 95 % CI 1.04-4.48). This effect was attenuated when further controlling for patients' expected source of payment. These analyses demonstrate differences in the treatment of CT by ambulatory care setting as well as opportunities for increasing use of recommended treatments for diagnosed cases of this important STI.

  19. Improving adherence to the Epic Beacon ambulatory workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chackunkal, Ellen; Dhanapal Vogel, Vishnuprabha; Grycki, Meredith; Kostoff, Diana

    2017-06-01

    Computerized physician order entry has been shown to significantly improve chemotherapy safety by reducing the number of prescribing errors. Epic's Beacon Oncology Information System of computerized physician order entry and electronic medication administration was implemented in Henry Ford Health System's ambulatory oncology infusion centers on 9 November 2013. Since that time, compliance to the infusion workflow had not been assessed. The objective of this study was to optimize the current workflow and improve the compliance to this workflow in the ambulatory oncology setting. This study was a retrospective, quasi-experimental study which analyzed the composite workflow compliance rate of patient encounters from 9 to 23 November 2014. Based on this analysis, an intervention was identified and implemented in February 2015 to improve workflow compliance. The primary endpoint was to compare the composite compliance rate to the Beacon workflow before and after a pharmacy-initiated intervention. The intervention, which was education of infusion center staff, was initiated by ambulatory-based, oncology pharmacists and implemented by a multi-disciplinary team of pharmacists and nurses. The composite compliance rate was then reassessed for patient encounters from 2 to 13 March 2015 in order to analyze the effects of the determined intervention on compliance. The initial analysis in November 2014 revealed a composite compliance rate of 38%, and data analysis after the intervention revealed a statistically significant increase in the composite compliance rate to 83% ( p < 0.001). This study supports a pharmacist-initiated educational intervention can improve compliance to an ambulatory, oncology infusion workflow.

  20. Redesigning ambulatory care business processes supporting clinical care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, C; Sinkewich, M; Short, J; Callas, E

    1997-04-01

    The first step in redesigning the health care delivery process for ambulatory care begins with the patient and the business processes that support the patient. Patient-related business processes include patient access, service documentation, billing, follow-up, collection, and payment. Access is the portal to the clinical delivery and care management process. Service documentation, charge capture, and payment and collection are supporting processes to care delivery. Realigned provider networks now demand realigned patient business services to provide their members/customers/patients with improved service delivery at less cost. Purchaser mandates for cost containment, health maintenance, and enhanced quality of care have created an environment where every aspect of the delivery system, especially ambulatory care, is being judged. Business processes supporting the outpatient are therefore being reexamined for better efficiency and customer satisfaction. Many health care systems have made major investments in their ambulatory care environment, but have pursued traditional supporting business practices--such as multiple access points, lack of integrated patient appointment scheduling and registration, and multiple patient bills. These are areas that are appropriate for redesign efforts--all with the customer's needs and convenience in mind. Similarly, setting unrealistic expectations, underestimating the effort required, and ignoring the human elements of a patient-focused business service redesign effort can sabotage the very sound reasons for executing such an endeavor. Pitfalls can be avoided if a structured methodology, coupled with a change management process, are employed. Deloitte & Touche Consulting Group has been involved in several major efforts, all with ambulatory care settings to assist with the redesign of their business practices to consider the patient as the driver, instead of the institution providing the care.

  1. Clinical Indications and Adverse Reactions of Platelet Apheresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amanat, S. T.; Shakoor, H. A.; Raza, M.; Khan, N.; Rauf, A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical indications and adverse reactions of platelet apheresis procedure. Study Design: Cross-sectional, observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Blood Bank of Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission General Hospital, Islamabad, from January 2010 to December 2014. Methodology: Indications and adverse reaction verified for 200 consecutive platelet apheresis donations performed for 125 patients was included in this study. Data was analysed for descriptive variables using SPSS version 16. Results: Donor deferral rate in the study was 63.83 percentage. All the donors were males (100 percentage) and replacement donors. Most prevalent blood type was B-positive (n=63, 31.5 percentage), followed by O-positive (n=59, 29.5 percentage). Rh negative groups constituted 13.5 percentage (n=27) of all the donors. Average age of platelet apheresis donors was 28.56 ± 5.77 years. Maximum numbers of donors were in age range 20 - 30 years. Average weight of the donors was 73.96 ± 11.96 kg. Mean pre-procedure platelet count of donors was 268,000/ micro L. The postprocedure average platelet count was approximately 200,000/ micro L. The mean duration of a platelet apheresis session was 78.27 ± 26.07 minutes. Average volume of the final product was 412.53 ± 45.33 ml. Average volume of anti-coagulant acid citrate dextrose used per procedure was 300 ± 40 ml, 245 ml returned to donor along with returned blood while 55 ml used as anticoagulant in final concentrate. Of total 200, two (1 percentage) final products were contaminated with red cells. Three (1.5 percentage) products were not issued and finally expired. Of the 125 patients for which plateletpheresis procedures were performed, 54 (43.2 percentage) patients were males and 71 (56.8 percentage) were females (M: F=0.76:1). Six donors (3 percentage) had adverse events: three donors (1.5 percentage) had mild reactions, two (1 percentage) moderate reaction, and one donor (0.5 percentage) developing

  2. Ambulatory Melanoma Care Patterns in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, A. L.; Davis, S. A.; Feldman, S. R.; Fleischer, A. B.; Baze, M. R.; Feldman, S. R.; Feldman, S. R.; Fleischer, A. B.

    2013-01-01

    To examine trends in melanoma visits in the ambulatory care setting. Methods. Data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) from 1979 to 2010 were used to analyze melanoma visit characteristics including number of visits, age and gender of patients, and physician specialty. These data were compared to US Census population estimates during the same time period. Results. The overall rate of melanoma visits increased (ρ< 0.0001) at an apparently higher rate than the increase in population over this time. The age of patients with melanoma visits increased at approximately double the rate (0.47 year per interval year, ρ< 0.0001) of the population increase in age (0.23 year per interval year). There was a nonsignificant(ρ=0.19) decline in the proportion of female patients seen over the study interval. Lastly, ambulatory care has shifted towards dermatologists and other specialties managing melanoma patients and away from family/internal medicine physicians and general/plastic surgeons. Conclusions. The number and age of melanoma visits has increased over time with respect to the overall population, mirroring the increase in melanoma incidence over the past three decades. These trends highlight the need for further studies regarding melanoma management efficiency

  3. Pathway to Best Practice in Spirometry in the Ambulatory Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peracchio, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Spirometry performed in the ambulatory setting is an invaluable tool for diagnosis, monitoring, and evaluation of respiratory health in patients with chronic lung disease. If spirometry is not performed according to American Thoracic Society (ATS) guidelines, unnecessary repeated testing, increased expenditure of time and money, and increased patient and family anxiety may result. Two respiratory therapists at Mission Health System in Asheville, NC, identified an increase in patients arriving at the pulmonary function testing (PFT) laboratories with abnormal spirometry results obtained in the ambulatory setting. These abnormal results were due to incorrect testing procedure, not chronic lung disease. Three training methods were developed to increase knowledge of correct spirometry testing procedure in the ambulatory setting. The therapists also created a plan to educate offices that do not perform spirometry on the importance and availability of PFT services at our hospital for the population of patients with chronic lung disease. Notable improvements in posttraining test results were demonstrated. The education process was evaluated by a leading respiratory expert, with improvements suggested and implemented. Next steps are listed.

  4. Ambulatory blood pressure and adherence monitoring: diagnosing pseudoresistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnier, Michel; Wuerzner, Gregoire

    2014-01-01

    A small proportion of the treated hypertensive population consistently has a blood pressure greater than 140/90 mm Hg despite a triple therapy including a diuretic, a calcium channel blocker, and a blocker of the renin-angiotensin system. According to guidelines, these patients have so-called resistant hypertension. The prevalence of this clinical condition is higher in tertiary than primary care centers and often is associated with chronic kidney disease, diabetes, obesity, and sleep apnea syndrome. Exclusion of pseudoresistant hypertension using ambulatory or home blood pressure monitoring is a crucial step in the investigation of patients with resistant hypertension. Thus, among the multiple factors to consider when investigating patients with resistant hypertension, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring should be performed very early. Among other factors to consider, physicians should investigate patient adherence to therapy, assess the adequacy of treatment, exclude interfering factors, and, finally, look for secondary forms of hypertension. Poor adherence to therapy accounts for 30% to 50% of cases of resistance to therapy depending on the methodology used to diagnose adherence problems. This review discusses the clinical factors implicated in the pathogenesis of resistant hypertension with a particular emphasis on pseudoresistance, drug adherence, and the use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring for the diagnosis and management of resistant hypertension.

  5. The demand for ambulatory mental health services from specialty providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horgan, C M

    1986-01-01

    A two-part model is used to examine the demand for ambulatory mental health services in the specialty sector. In the first equation, the probability of having a mental health visit is estimated. In the second part of the model, variations in levels of use expressed in terms of visits and expenditures are examined in turn, with each of these equations conditional on positive utilization of mental health services. In the second part of the model, users are additionally grouped into those with and without out-of-pocket payment for services. This specification accounts for special characteristics regarding the utilization of ambulatory mental health services: (1) a large part of the population does not use these services; (2) of those who use services, the distribution of use is highly skewed; and (3) a large number of users have zero out-of-pocket expenditures. Cost-sharing does indeed matter in the demand for ambulatory mental health services from specialty providers; however, the decision to use mental health services is affected by the level of cost-sharing to a lesser degree than is the decision regarding the level of use of services. The results also show that price is only one of several important factors in determining the demand for services. The lack of significance of family income and of being female is notable. Evidence is presented for the existence of bandwagon effects. The importance of Medicaid in the probability of use equations is noted. PMID:3721874

  6. Improving outpatient access and patient experiences in academic ambulatory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Sarah; Calderon, Sherry; Casella, Joanne; Wood, Elizabeth; Carvelli-Sheehan, Jayne; Zeidel, Mark L

    2012-02-01

    Effective scheduling of and ready access to doctor appointments affect ambulatory patient care quality, but these are often sacrificed by patients seeking care from physicians at academic medical centers. At one center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, the authors developed interventions to improve the scheduling of appointments and to reduce the access time between telephone call and first offered appointment. Improvements to scheduling included no redirection to voicemail, prompt telephone pickup, courteous service, complete registration, and effective scheduling. Reduced access time meant being offered an appointment with a physician in the appropriate specialty within three working days of the telephone call. Scheduling and access were assessed using monthly "mystery shopper" calls. Mystery shoppers collected data using standardized forms, rated the quality of service, and transcribed their interactions with schedulers. Monthly results were tabulated and discussed with clinical leaders; leaders and frontline staff then developed solutions to detected problems. Eighteen months after the beginning of the intervention (in June 2007), which is ongoing, schedulers had gone from using 60% of their registration skills to over 90%, customer service scores had risen from 2.6 to 4.9 (on a 5-point scale), and average access time had fallen from 12 days to 6 days. The program costs $50,000 per year and has been associated with a 35% increase in ambulatory volume across three years. The authors conclude that academic medical centers can markedly improve the scheduling process and access to care and that these improvements may result in increased ambulatory care volume.

  7. Management of abnormal uterine bleeding – focus on ambulatory hysteroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolhe S

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Shilpa Kolhe Ambulatory Gynaecology Unit, Royal Derby Hospital, Derby, UK Abstract: The rapid evolution in ambulatory hysteroscopy (AH has transformed the approach to diagnose and manage abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB. The medical management in primary care remains the mainstay for initial treatment of this common presentation; however, many women are referred to secondary care for further evaluation. To confirm the diagnosis of suspected intrauterine pathology, the traditional diagnostic tool of day case hysteroscopy and dilatation and curettage in a hospital setting under general anesthesia is now no longer required. The combination of ultrasound diagnostics and modern AH now allows thorough evaluation of uterine cavity in an outpatient setting. Advent of miniature hysteroscopic operative systems has revolutionized the ways in which clinicians can not only diagnose but also treat menstrual disorders such as heavy menstrual bleeding, intermenstrual bleeding and postmenopausal bleeding in most women predominantly in a one-stop clinic. This review discussed the approach to manage women presenting with AUB with a focus on the role of AH in the diagnosis and treatment of this common condition in an outpatient setting. Keywords: abnormal uterine bleeding, ambulatory hysteroscopy, endometrial polyps, one-stop clinic, vaginoscopic approach

  8. Biofilm antifungal susceptibility of Candida urine isolated from ambulatory patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora da Luz Becker

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: the association between the biofilm formations an antifungal resistance has been suggested to be an important factor in the pathogenesis of several Candida species. Besides, studies have included invasive candidiasis from hospitalized patients; however there are few studies that evaluated the species distribution, antifungal susceptibility and biofilm formation of Candida species isolated from ambulatory patients. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether biofilm producing contributes to antifungal resistance in Candida isolates from urine sample obtained from ambulatory patients. Methods: During one year, 25 urine samples positive for yeast were collected, stored and plated on agar supplemented with chloramphenicol and Sabouread left at room temperature for 5 days for subsequent: 52% (13/25 were C. albicans, 36% (9/25 C. tropicalis, 8% (2/25 C. krusei and 4% (1/25 C. parapsilosis. Results: The ability to form biofilm was detected in 23 (92% of the yeast studied and 15.4% (2/13 of C. albicans were fluconazole (FLU and ketoconazole (KET resistant, while 11.1% (1/9 of C. tropicalis were ketoconazole resistant and were anidulafungin (ANI non-susceptible. Conclusion: our results showed the high capacity for biofilm formation among Candida isolates from ambulatory patients.

  9. Ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients' knowledge with internet-based education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Katja; Leino-Kilpi, H; Salanterä, S

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing need for patient education and an evaluation of its outcomes. The aim of this study was to compare ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients' knowledge with Internet-based education and face-to-face education with a nurse. The following hypothesis was proposed: Internet-based patient education (experiment) is as effective as face-to-face education with a nurse (control) in increasing patients' level of knowledge and sufficiency of knowledge. In addition, the correlations of demographic variables were tested. The patients were randomized to either an experiment group (n = 72) or a control group (n = 75). Empirical data were collected with two instruments. Patients in both groups showed improvement in their knowledge during their care. Patients in the experiment group improved their knowledge level significantly more in total than those patients in the control group. There were no differences in patients' sufficiency of knowledge between the groups. Knowledge was correlated especially with patients' age, gender and earlier ambulatory surgeries. As a conclusion, positive results concerning patients' knowledge could be achieved with the Internet-based education. The Internet is a viable method in ambulatory care.

  10. Technical and clinical view on ambulatory assessment in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobert, M A; Maetzler, W; Aminian, K; Chiari, L

    2014-09-01

    With the progress of technologies of recent years, methods have become available that use wearable sensors and ambulatory systems to measure aspects of--particular axial--motor function. As Parkinson's disease (PD) can be considered a model disorder for motor impairment, a significant number of studies have already been performed with these patients using such techniques. In general, motion sensors such as accelerometers and gyroscopes are used, in combination with lightweight electronics that do not interfere with normal human motion. A fundamental advantage in comparison with usual clinical assessment is that these sensors allow a more quantitative, objective, and reliable evaluation of symptoms; they have also significant advantages compared to in-lab technologies (e.g., optoelectronic motion capture) as they allow long-term monitoring under real-life conditions. In addition, based on recent findings particularly from studies using functional imaging, we learned that non-motor symptoms, specifically cognitive aspects, may be at least indirectly assessable. It is hypothesized that ambulatory quantitative assessment strategies will allow users, clinicians, and scientists in the future to gain more quantitative, unobtrusive, and everyday relevant data out of their clinical evaluation and can also be designed as pervasive (everywhere) and intensive (anytime) tools for ambulatory assessment and even rehabilitation of motor and (partly) non-motor symptoms in PD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Anti-prothrombin antibodies are associated with adverse pregnancy outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marozio, Luca; Curti, Antonella; Botta, Giovanni; Canuto, Emilie M; Salton, Loredana; Tavella, Anna Maria; Benedetto, Chiara

    2011-11-01

    Women with antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) such as lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin antibodies, and anti-β(2) glycoprotein-1 antibodies are at high risk of late pregnancy complications, such as severe pre-eclampsia, placental insufficiency, and fetal loss. It has been observed that aPL consists of a heterogeneous group of antibodies targeting several phospholipid-binding plasma proteins, including also anti-prothrombin (anti-PT), anti-protein S (anti-PS), and anti-protein C (anti-PC) antibodies. Their potential role in late pregnancy complications is not known. The aim of this work was to investigate the association between those autoantibodies and histories for adverse pregnancy outcome. Anti-PT, anti-PS, and anti-PC antibodies were evaluated in 163 patients with previous severe pre-eclampsia, fetal death, and/or placental abruption and in as many women with previous uneventful pregnancies, negative for aPL. The prevalence of anti-PT antibodies was higher in cases than in controls (OR, 95% CI: 10.92, 4.52-26.38). The highest prevalence was observed in subjects with fetal death. Anti-PT antibodies appear to be associated with adverse pregnancy outcome, irrespectively of aPL. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Cohort study of Anticoagulation Self-Monitoring (CASM): a prospective study of its effectiveness in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Alison; Tompson, Alice; Fitzmaurice, David; Sutton, Stephen; Perera, Rafael; Heneghan, Carl

    2015-07-01

    Trials show that oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT) substantially reduces thromboembolic events without an increase in major haemorrhagic events, but it is not known whether these results translate into routine practice. To estimate the current levels of control and adverse events in patients self-monitoring OAT, explore the factors that predict success, and determine whether the level of side effects reported from randomised controlled trials are translated to a non-selected population. Prospective cohort study in the UK. Participants were aged ≥18 years and registered with a GP. Main outcomes were the proportion of participants, over 12 months, who were still self-monitoring, had not experienced adverse events, and had achieved >80% of time in therapeutic range (TTR). In total, 296 participants were recruited; their median age was 61 years and 55.1% were male. Participants were predominately professional or held a university qualification (82.7%). At 12 months, 267 (90.2%) were still self-monitoring. Mean TTR was 75.3% (standard deviation 16.9).Six serious and two minor adverse events were reported by GPs. Only 45.9% of participants received any in-person training at the outset. Increased age (P = 0.027), general wellbeing (EQ-5D visual score, P = 0.020), and lower target international normalised range (INR, P = 0.032) were all associated with high (>80% TTR) levels of control. The findings show that, even with little training, people on OAT can successfully self-monitor, and even self-manage, their INR. TTR was shown to improve with age. However, widespread use of self-monitoring of INR may be limited by the initial costs, as well as a lack of training and support at the outset. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  13. [Use of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants in Primary Care: ACTUA study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, V; Escobar, C; Lobos, J M; Polo, J; Vargas, D

    2017-10-01

    Approximately 40% of patients with non-valvular auricular fibrillation (NVAF) who receive vitamin K antagonists (VKA) in Primary Care in Spain have poor anticoagulation control. The objective of the study Actuación en antiCoagulación, Tratamiento y Uso de anticoagulantes orales de acción directa (ACOD) en Atención primaria (ACTUA) (Action in Coagulation, Treatment and Use of direct oral anticoagulants [DOACs]) in Primary Care) was to analyse the current situation regarding the use of VKA and non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in patients with NVAF in Primary Care in Spain and the possible issues arising from it. An online survey was created covering various aspects of the use of oral anticoagulants in NAFV. A two-round modified Delphi approach was used. Results were compiled as a set of practical guidelines. Forty-four experts responded to the survey. Consensus was reached in 62% (37/60) of the items. Experts concluded that a considerable number of patients with NVAF who receive VKA do not have a well-controlled INR and that a substantial group of patients who could benefit from being treated with NOACs do not receive them. The use of NOACs increases the probability of having good anticoagulation control and decreases the risk of severe and intracranial haemorrhage. Current limitations to the use of NOACs include administrative barriers, insufficient knowledge about the benefits and risks of NOACs, limited experience of doctors in using them, and their price. Renal insufficiency influences the choice of a particular anticoagulant. The ACTUA study highlights the existing controversies about the use of oral anticoagulants for the treatment of NVAF in Primary Care in Spain, and provides consensus recommendations that may help to improve the use of these medications. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Anticoagulant factor V: factors affecting the integration of novel scientific discoveries into the broader framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBonte, Michelle L

    2014-09-01

    Since its initial discovery in the 1940s, factor V has long been viewed as an important procoagulant protein in the coagulation cascade. However, in the later part of the 20th century, two different scientists proposed novel anticoagulant roles for factor V. Philip Majerus proposed the first anticoagulant function for factor V in 1983, yet ultimately it was not widely accepted by the broader scientific community. In contrast, Björn Dahlbäck proposed a different anticoagulant role for factor V in 1994. While this role was initially contested, it was ultimately accepted and integrated into the scientific framework. In this paper, I present a detailed historical account of these two anticoagulant discoveries and propose three key reasons why Dahlbäck's anticoagulant role for factor V was accepted whereas Majerus' proposed role was largely overlooked. Perhaps most importantly, Dahlbäck's proposed anticoagulant role was of great clinical interest because the discovery involved the study of an important subset of patients with thrombophilia. Soon after Dahlbäck's 1994 work, this patient population was shown to possess the factor V Leiden mutation. Also key in the ultimate acceptance of the second proposed anticoagulant role was the persistence of the scientist who made the discovery and the interest in and ability of others to replicate and reinforce this work. This analysis of two different yet similar discoveries sheds light on factors that play an important role in how new discoveries are incorporated into the existing scientific framework. Copyright © 2014 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Improvement in long-term ECMO by detailed monitoring of anticoagulation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievert, Alicia; Uber, Walter; Laws, Stacey; Cochran, Joel

    2011-01-01

    The use of unfractionated heparin (UFH) as an anticoagulant during long-term extracorporeal support presents a unique challenge for the clinician in balancing the amount of anticoagulant to maintain adequate anticoagulation without causing excessive bleeding. Activated clotting times (ACT) and activated partial thromboplastin times (aPTT) are the most common modality to monitor UFH on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Limitations to these tests include consumptive coagulopathies, clotting factor deficiencies, platelet dysfunction, and fibrinolysis. The following case report describes the use of alternative monitoring strategies to assess more accurately anticoagulation during ECMO. A 20-month-old female presented to the emergency department with a 5-6 day history of cough, fever, tachypnea, and respiratory distress. She was diagnosed with influenza A and B with pneumonia. The patient was placed on veno-venous ECMO (V-V ECMO) after mechanical ventilation failed. On ECMO day eight, the patient developed a thrombus in her inferior vena cava and pleural effusions, obstructing cannula flow. Laboratory tests revealed the ACT was within range, yet the aPTT was dropping, despite increased heparin. Heparin levels were low and antithrombin-III (AT) concentrations were 40%. Recombinant AT was given and subsequent aPTTs were within the therapeutic range. Later, the aPTT decreased to 475 mg/ dL, and Factor VIII >150 IU/dL, suggesting an acute phase reaction or ongoing systemic inflammation, increasing the risk for thrombosis. We maintained heparin assays between 0.5-0.7 IU/mL and AT >60% to assure heparin's effect. The patient showed no signs of excess bleeding, blood product administration, or clots in the circuit, suggesting proper anticoagulation. The patient was successfully weaned on day 33 and is currently alive and at home. Monitoring of anti-Xa UFH and AT proved effective for measuring anticoagulation and detecting inconsistencies in other anticoagulation

  16. Hemorrhagic transformation in patients with acute ischaemic stroke and an indication for anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, E B; Llinas, R H; Hillis, A E; Gottesman, R F

    2013-06-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) can occur in patients following acute ischaemic stroke in the form of hemorrhagic transformation, and results in significant long-term morbidity and mortality. Anticoagulation theoretically increases risk. We evaluated stroke patients with an indication for anticoagulation to determine the factors associated with hemorrhagic transformation. Three-hundred and forty-five patients with ICD-9 codes indicating: (i) acute ischaemic stroke; and (ii) an indication for anticoagulation were screened. One-hundred and twenty-three met inclusion criteria. Data were collected retrospectively. Neuroimaging was reviewed for infarct volume and evidence of ICH. Hemorrhages were classified as: hemorrhagic conversion (petechiae) versus intracerebral hematoma (a space occupying lesion); symptomatic versus asymptomatic. Using multivariable logistic regression, we determined the hypothesized factors associated with intracerebral bleeding. Age [odds ratio (OR) = 1.50 per 10-year increment, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-2.08], infarct volume (OR = 1.10 per 10 ccs, 95% CI 1.06-1.18) and worsening category of renal impairment by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR; OR = 1.95, 95% CI 1.04-3.66) were predictors of hemorrhagic transformation. Ninety- nine out of 123 patients were anticoagulated. Hemorrhage rates of patients on and off anticoagulation did not differ (25.3% vs. 20.8%; P = 0.79); however, all intracerebral hematomas (n = 7) and symptomatic bleeds (n = 8) occurred in the anticoagulated group. The risk of hemorrhagic transformation in patients with acute ischaemic stroke and an indication for anticoagulation is multifactorial, and most closely associated with an individual's age, infarct volume and eGFR. © 2013 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2013 EFNS.

  17. Infection Prevention and Control in Pediatric Ambulatory Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Mobeen H; Jackson, Mary Anne

    2017-11-01

    Since the American Academy of Pediatrics published its statement titled "Infection Prevention and Control in Pediatric Ambulatory Settings" in 2007, there have been significant changes that prompted this updated statement. Infection prevention and control is an integral part of pediatric practice in ambulatory medical settings as well as in hospitals. Infection prevention and control practices should begin at the time the ambulatory visit is scheduled. All health care personnel should be educated regarding the routes of transmission and techniques used to prevent the transmission of infectious agents. Policies for infection prevention and control should be written, readily available, updated every 2 years, and enforced. Many of the recommendations for infection control and prevention from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for hospitalized patients are also applicable in the ambulatory setting. These recommendations include requirements for pediatricians to take precautions to identify and protect employees likely to be exposed to blood or other potentially infectious materials while on the job. In addition to emphasizing the key principles of infection prevention and control in this policy, we update those that are relevant to the ambulatory care patient. These guidelines emphasize the role of hand hygiene and the implementation of diagnosis- and syndrome-specific isolation precautions, with the exemption of the use of gloves for routine diaper changes and wiping a well child's nose or tears for most patient encounters. Additional topics include respiratory hygiene and cough etiquette strategies for patients with a respiratory tract infection, including those relevant for special populations like patients with cystic fibrosis or those in short-term residential facilities; separation of infected, contagious children from uninfected children when feasible; safe handling and disposal of needles and other sharp medical devices; appropriate use of personal

  18. Practical recommendations for the choice of anticoagulants in the management of patients with atrial fibrillation on ibrutinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Khai Li; Rowan, Gail; Seymour, John F; Burbury, Kate; Carney, Dennis; Tam, Constantine S

    2017-12-01

    The management of AF represents a major challenge in patients with CLL, especially in elderly patients with multiple comorbidities who are representative of the majority of patients with CLL. This is especially complex in the case of ibrutinib. Many anticoagulants have potential for pharmacological interaction with ibrutinib, and ibrutinib itself has antiplatelet properties. Use of ibrutinib therapy in these patients mandates review and revision of the need for anticoagulation and best anticoagulant to use. Herein, we review the current knowledge of the metabolism of common anticoagulants and how they may interact with ibrutinib.

  19. Management of patients taking antiplatelet or anticoagulant medication requiring invasive breast procedures: United Kingdom survey of radiologists' and surgeons' current practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pritchard, M.G.; Townend, J.N.; Lester, W.A.; England, D.W.; Kearins, O.; Bradley, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To determine the current practice in the UK National Health Service Breast Screening Programme for invasive diagnostic procedures and surgery in patients taking anticoagulant and antiplatelet medication. Materials and methods: Lead radiologists and surgeons at each breast screening service were surveyed to determine current practice. One hundred and five respondents provided information regarding their services, protocols, and willingness to proceed with combinations of procedures and anti-haemostatic medications. Results: Between units there was wide variation in practice. Within 21 services providing more than one response, 10 (48%) disagreed on whether protocols existed. Decisions to perform biopsies were unrelated to professional group. The taking of a drug history was variable. Surgeons reported more adverse effects than radiologists [21 (48%) versus 12 (26%)], but no difference in self-assessment of knowledge. Conclusion: Both radiologists and surgeons have expressed uncertainty about their understanding of anticoagulant and antiplatelet treatment. This is reflected in a wide range of practice. Guidance regarding the management of these patients is suggested

  20. Benefit of Anticoagulation Therapy in Hyperthyroidism-Related Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Pak-Hei; Hai, Jojo; Yeung, Chun-Yip; Lip, Gregory Y H; Lam, Karen Siu-Ling; Tse, Hung-Fat; Siu, Chung-Wah

    2015-08-01

    Existing data on the risk of ischemic stroke in hyperthyroidism-related atrial fibrillation (AF) and the impact of long-term anticoagulation in these patients, particularly those with self-limiting AF, remain inconclusive. Risk of stroke in hyperthyroidism-related AF is the same as nonhyperthyroid counterparts. This was a single-center observational study of 9727 Chinese patients with nonvalvular AF from July 1997 to December 2011. Patients with AF diagnosed concomitantly with hyperthyroidism were identified. Primary and secondary endpoints were defined as hospitalization with ischemic stroke and intracranial hemorrhage in the first 2 years. Patient characteristics, duration of AF, and choice of antithrombotic therapy were recorded. Self-limiting AF was defined as hyperthyroidism and AF at diagnosis. For stroke prevention, 136 and 243 patients (21.1% and 37.9%) were prescribed warfarin and aspirin, respectively, whereas the remaining patients (41.0%) received no therapy. Ischemic stroke occurred in 50 patients (7.8%), and no patient developed hemorrhagic stroke. Patients with CHA2 DS2 -VASc of 0 did not develop stroke. Warfarin effectively reduced the incidence of stroke compared with aspirin or no therapy in patients with CHA2 DS2 -VASc ≥1 and non-self-limiting AF, but not in those with self-limiting AF or CHA2 DS2 -VASc of 0. Presence of hyperthyroidism did not confer additional risk of ischemic stroke compared with nonhyperthyroid AF. Patients with hyperthyroidism-related AF are at high risk of stroke (3.9% per year). Warfarin confers stroke prevention in patients with CHA2 DS2 -VASc ≥1 and non-self-limiting AF. Overall stroke risk was lower in hyperthyroid non-self-limiting AF patients compared with nonhyperthyroid counterparts. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Effect of Statins and Anticoagulants on Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alizadeh, Moein [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre [Research Center, Department of Statistics, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Zilli, Thomas; Van Nguyen, Thu; Guay, Jean-Pierre; Bahary, Jean-Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Taussky, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.taussky.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Statins and anticoagulants (ACs) have both been associated with a less-aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) and a better outcome after treatment of localized PCa. The results of these studies might have been confounded because patients might often take both medications. We examined their respective influence on PCa aggressiveness at initial diagnosis. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 381 patients treated with either external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy for low-risk (n = 152), intermediate-risk (n = 142), or high-risk (n = 87) localized PCa. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to investigate an association between these drug classes and prostate cancer aggressiveness. We tested whether the concomitant use of statins and ACs had a different effect than that of either AC or statin use alone. Results: Of the 381 patients, 172 (45.1%) were taking statins and 141 (37.0%) ACs; 105 patients (27.6%) used both. On univariate analysis, the statin and AC users were associated with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level (p = .017) and National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (p = .0022). On multivariate analysis, statin use was associated with a PSA level <10 ng/mL (odds ratio, 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-6.8; p = .012) and a PSA level >20 ng/mL (odds ratio, 0.29; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.83; p = .03). The use of ACs was associated with a PSA level >20 ng/mL (odds ratio, 0.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.02-0.59, p = .02). Conclusion: Both AC and statins have an effect on PCa aggressiveness, with statins having a more stringent relationship with the PSA level, highlighting the importance of considering statin use in studies of PCa aggressiveness.

  2. Effect of Statins and Anticoagulants on Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizadeh, Moein; Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre; Zilli, Thomas; Van Nguyen, Thu; Guay, Jean-Pierre; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Taussky, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Statins and anticoagulants (ACs) have both been associated with a less-aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) and a better outcome after treatment of localized PCa. The results of these studies might have been confounded because patients might often take both medications. We examined their respective influence on PCa aggressiveness at initial diagnosis. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 381 patients treated with either external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy for low-risk (n = 152), intermediate-risk (n = 142), or high-risk (n = 87) localized PCa. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to investigate an association between these drug classes and prostate cancer aggressiveness. We tested whether the concomitant use of statins and ACs had a different effect than that of either AC or statin use alone. Results: Of the 381 patients, 172 (45.1%) were taking statins and 141 (37.0%) ACs; 105 patients (27.6%) used both. On univariate analysis, the statin and AC users were associated with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level (p = .017) and National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (p = .0022). On multivariate analysis, statin use was associated with a PSA level 20 ng/mL (odds ratio, 0.29; 95% confidence interval, 0.08–0.83; p = .03). The use of ACs was associated with a PSA level >20 ng/mL (odds ratio, 0.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.02–0.59, p = .02). Conclusion: Both AC and statins have an effect on PCa aggressiveness, with statins having a more stringent relationship with the PSA level, highlighting the importance of considering statin use in studies of PCa aggressiveness.

  3. Practitioner Gender and Quality of Care in Ambulatory Cardiology Practices: A Report From the National Cardiovascular Data Practice Innovation and Clinical Excellence (PINNACLE) Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Dipti; Tang, Fengming; Masoudi, Frederick A; Jones, Philip G; Chan, Paul S; Daugherty, Stacie L

    Some studies suggest that female practitioners are more likely to provide guideline-concordant care than male practitioners; however, little is known about the role of practitioner gender in cardiology. The aim of the study was to measure the association between practitioner gender and adherence to the cardiovascular performance measures in the American College of Cardiology's ambulatory Practice Innovation and Clinical Excellence Registry. Patients with at least 1 outpatient visit with a unique practitioner were included. Among eligible patients, adherence to 7 guideline-supported performance measures for coronary artery disease, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation over 12 months after registry entry was compared by practitioner gender using hierarchical models adjusting for practitioner type (physicians vs advance practice practitioners) and number of visits. The study cohort included 1493 individual practitioners who saw 769 139 patients; 80% of practitioners were men. Male practitioners were more often physicians compared with female practitioners (98.2% vs 43.7%, P < .01). Accounting for practitioner category and visit frequency, guideline adherence rates were similar by practitioner gender for all measures with the exception of marginally higher rates for coronary artery disease performance measures for male practitioners compared with female practitioners (antiplatelet: rate ratio [RR] = 1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.09; β-blockers: RR = 1.06; 95% CI, 1.01-1.10; and lipid-lowering drug: RR = 1.07; 95% CI, 1.04-1.10) and atrial fibrillation (oral anticoagulants: RR = 1.05; 95% CI, 1.01-1.09). Male practitioners marginally outperformed their female counterparts in ambulatory practices enrolled in a voluntary cardiovascular performance improvement registry program. Overall low adherence to some performance measures suggests room for improvement among all practitioners.

  4. Scoring Systems for Estimating the Risk of Anticoagulant-Associated Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Anna L; Fang, Margaret C

    2017-07-01

    Anticoagulant medications are frequently used to prevent and treat thromboembolic disease. However, the benefits of anticoagulants must be balanced with a careful assessment of the risk of bleeding complications that can ensue from their use. Several bleeding risk scores are available, including the Outpatient Bleeding Risk Index, HAS-BLED, ATRIA, and HEMORR 2 HAGES risk assessment tools, and can be used to help estimate patients' risk for bleeding on anticoagulants. These tools vary by their individual risk components and in how they define and weigh clinical factors. However, it is not yet clear how best to integrate bleeding risk tools into clinical practice. Current bleeding risk scores generally have modest predictive ability and limited ability to predict the most devastating complication of anticoagulation, intracranial hemorrhage. In clinical practice, bleeding risk tools should be paired with a formal determination of thrombosis risk, as their results may be most influential for patients at the lower end of thrombosis risk, as well as for highlighting potentially modifiable risk factors for bleeding. Use of bleeding risk scores may assist clinicians and patients in making informed and individualized anticoagulation decisions. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  5. Oral anticoagulation for stroke prevention amongst atrial fibrillation patients with valvular heart disease: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Andrew C T; Verma, Atul; Verma, Subodh

    2017-03-01

    The majority of evidence on the safety and efficacy of oral anticoagulation for stroke prevention amongst patients with atrial fibrillation is derived from those without significant valvular heart disease. This article will review current knowledge, areas of uncertainty and controversy, and ongoing research on oral anticoagulation for stroke prevention amongst patients with valvular heart disease. The rates of stroke, systemic embolism, and major bleeding were similar for patients with and without significant native valvular disease when treated with direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) or vitamin K antagonists. There are very limited prospective data on the safety and efficacy of DOAC use for patients with bioprosthetic valves or rheumatic mitral stenosis. Atrial fibrillation patients with concomitant valvulopathies constitute a group with high thromboembolic risk and should be treated with oral anticoagulation. There is good supportive evidence that DOAC is well tolerated and effective in preventing thromboembolism amongst patients with native valvular disease. Further research is underway to better define the risks and benefits of DOAC use among patients with bioprosthetic valves or rheumatic mitral stenosis in preventing thromboembolic events. Until then, vitamin K antagonists remain the oral anticoagulant of choice for these patient subsets.

  6. [The study of anticoagulants selection in platelet-rich plasma preparation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Lei; Lai, Gui; Zhenjun, Liu; Guie, Ma

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the effect of the anticoagulants on PRP quality, so as to clarify the appropriate anticoagulant used in PRP production. The microstructure change of platelets collected via heparin, citrate, acid citrate dextrose (ACD) and citrate-theophylline-adenosine-dipyridamole ( CTAD) was observed by TEM following time course. The extent of spontaneous activation of platelets in four groups was detected by measuring sP-selectin in plasma. The TGF-β1 release amount of activated PRP of four groups was measured. CTAD is superior to other anticoagulants in maintaining the integrity of platelet structures for a long time and preventing platelet spontaneous activation. ACD slightly surpassed heparin and citrate in above two aspects. ACD-PRP and CTAD-PRP released significantly more TGF-β1 compared with heparin and citrate. The PRP quality and biological effects were strongly associated with the type of Anticoagulants. ACD and CTAD are optimal anticoagulants in PRP production for they can maintain platelet viability at a high level.

  7. Can we withdraw anticoagulation in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome after seroconvertion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciascia, S; Coloma-Bazán, E; Radin, M; Bertolaccini, M L; López-Pedrera, C; Espinosa, Gerard; Meroni, P L; Cervera, R; Cuadrado, M J

    2017-11-01

    The current mainstay of treatment in patients with thrombotic antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is long-term anticoagulation, mainly with Vitamin K antagonist agents. Some recently available studies have created new ground for discussion about the possible discontinuation of anticoagulation therapy in patients with a history of thrombotic APS in whom antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) are not detected any longer (i.e. aPL seroconversion). We report the main points discussed at the last CORA Meeting regarding the issue whether or not anticoagulation can be stopped after aPL seroconversion. In particular, we systematically reviewed the available evidence investigating the clinical outcome of APS patients with aPL seroconversion in whom anticoagulation was stopped when compared to those in whom therapy was continued regardless the aPL profile. Furthermore, the molecular basis for the aPL pathogenicity, the available evidence of non-criteria aPL and their association with thrombosis are addressed. To date, available evidence is still limited to support the indication to stop oral anticoagulation therapy in patients with a previous diagnosis of thrombotic APS who subsequently developed a negative aPL profile. The identification of the whole risk profile for cardiovascular manifestations and possibly of a second level aPL testing in selected patients with aPL might support the eventual clinical decision but further investigation is warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. [Seronegative antiphospholipid syndrome, catastrophic syndrome, new anticoagulants: learning from a difficult case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joalland, F; de Boysson, H; Darnige, L; Johnson, A; Jeanjean, C; Cheze, S; Augustin, A; Auzary, C; Geffray, L

    2014-11-01

    The diagnosis of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is based on clinical and biological criteria including the persistent presence of antiphospholipid antibodies and thrombotic events or pregnancy morbidity. Heparins relayed by vitamin K antagonists (VKA) are the gold standard treatment for thrombosis. We report a 17-year-old man who presented with an initially seronegative antiphospholipid syndrome, in whom the diagnosis was late, only obtained after anticoagulation withdrawing, when a catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS) with cutaneous lesions and disseminated intravascular coagulation syndrome occurred. For personal convenience, this patient was initially treated with fondaparinux followed by a new oral anticoagulant (rivaroxaban) before to return to the conventional VKA treatment. The "seronegative" APS is a controversial concept reflecting the heterogeneity of antigenic targets for aPL. This diagnosis may be considered after a rigorous work-up, with the help of haemostasis laboratories testing new emerging aPL assays. In APS, the new anticoagulants represent an attractive option needing nevertheless prospective studies to evaluate their safety and efficacy. Lupus anticoagulant detection in patients treated by new oral anticoagulants is not easy by usually recommended coagulation tests. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  9. Effects of oversulfated and fucosylated chondroitin sulfates on coagulation. Challenges for the study of anticoagulant polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Roberto J C; Oliveira, Stephan-Nicollas M C G; Pomin, Vitor H; Mecawi, André S; Araujo, Iracema G; Mourão, Paulo A S

    2010-05-01

    We report the effects of a chemically oversulfated chondroitin sulfate and a naturally fucosylated chondroitin sulfate on the coagulation system. The former has been recently identified as a contaminant of heparin preparations and the latter has been proposed as an alternative anticoagulant. The mechanism of action of these polymers on coagulation is complex and target different components of the coagulation system. They have serpin-independent anticoagulant activity, which preponderates in plasma. They also have serpin-dependent anticoagulant activity but differ significantly in the target coagulation protease and preferential serpin. Their anticoagulant effects differ even more markedly when tested as inhibitors of coagulation proteases using plasma as a source of serpins. It is possible that the difference is due to the high availability of fucosylated chondroitin sulfate whereas oversulfated chondroitin sulfate has strong unspecific binding to plasma protein and low availability for the binding to serpins. When tested using a venous thrombosis experimental model, oversulfated chondroitin sulfate is less potent as an antithrombotic agent than fucosylated chondroitin sulfate. These highly sulfated chondroitin sulfates activate factor XII in in vitro assays, based on kallikrein release. However, only fucosylated chondroitin sulfate induces hypotension when intravenously injected into rats. In conclusion, the complexity of the regulatory mechanisms involved in the action of highly sulfated polysaccharides in coagulation requires their analysis by a combination of in vitro and in vivo assays. Our results are relevant due to the urgent need for new anticoagulant drugs or alternative sources of heparin.

  10. Does Aerobic Exercise Increase 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Among Workers With High Occupational Physical Activity? - A RCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korshøj, Mette; Krause, Niklas; Clays, Els

    2017-01-01

    .9–3.8). Cleaners with high aerobic workload exhibited particularly high 24-hour ABP increases: systolic 6.0 mm Hg (95% CI 2.4–9.6), and diastolic 3.8 mm Hg (95% CI 1.3–6.4). CONCLUSION Aerobic exercise increased 24-hour ABP among cleaners. This adverse effect raises questions about the safety and intended benefits......OBJECTIVE High occupational physical activity (OPA) increases cardiovascular risk and aerobic exercise has been recommended for reducing this risk. This paper investigates the effects of an aerobic exercise intervention on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) among cleaners with high OPA....... METHODS Hundred and sixteen cleaners between 18 and 65 years were randomized. During the 4-month intervention period, the aerobic exercise group (AE) (n = 57) performed worksite aerobic exercise (2 × 30 minutes/week), while the reference group (REF) (n = 59) attended lectures. Between-group differences...

  11. Does aerobic exercise increase 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure among workers with high occupational physical activity? - A RCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korshøj, Mette; Krause, Niklas; Clays, Els

    2017-01-01

    .9–3.8). Cleaners with high aerobic workload exhibited particularly high 24-hour ABP increases: systolic 6.0 mm Hg (95% CI 2.4–9.6), and diastolic 3.8 mm Hg (95% CI 1.3–6.4). CONCLUSION Aerobic exercise increased 24-hour ABP among cleaners. This adverse effect raises questions about the safety and intended benefits......OBJECTIVE High occupational physical activity (OPA) increases cardiovascular risk and aerobic exercise has been recommended for reducing this risk. This paper investigates the effects of an aerobic exercise intervention on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) among cleaners with high OPA....... METHODS Hundred and sixteen cleaners between 18 and 65 years were randomized. During the 4-month intervention period, the aerobic exercise group (AE) (n = 57) performed worksite aerobic exercise (2 × 30 minutes/week), while the reference group (REF) (n = 59) attended lectures. Between-group differences...

  12. Twenty-Four-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology assessment was to determine the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) for hypertension. Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population Hypertension occurs when either systolic blood pressure, the pressure in the artery when the heart contracts, or diastolic blood pressure, the pressure in the artery when the heart relaxes between beats, are consistently high. Blood pressure (BP) that is consistently more than 140/90 mmHg (systolic/diastolic) is considered high. A lower threshold, greater than 130/80 mmHg (systolic/diastolic), is set for individuals with diabetes or chronic kidney disease. In 2006 and 2007, the age-standardized incidence rate of diagnosed hypertension in Canada was 25.8 per 1,000 (450,000 individuals were newly diagnosed). During the same time period, 22.7% of adult Canadians were living with diagnosed hypertension. A smaller proportion of Canadians are unaware they have hypertension; therefore, the estimated number of Canadians affected by this disease may be higher. Diagnosis and management of hypertension are important, since elevated BP levels are related to the risk of cardiovascular disease, including stroke. In Canada in 2003, the costs to the health care system related to the diagnosis, treatment, and management of hypertension were over $2.3 billion (Cdn). Technology The 24-hour ABPM device consists of a standard inflatable cuff attached to a small computer weighing about 500 grams, which is worn over the shoulder or on a belt. The technology is noninvasive and fully automated. The device takes BP measurements every 15 to 30 minutes over a 24-to 28-hour time period, thus providing extended, continuous BP recordings even during a patient’s normal daily activities. Information on the multiple BP measurements can be downloaded to a computer. The main detection methods used by the device are auscultation and

  13. The N-terminal-truncated recombinant fibrin(ogen)olytic serine protease improves its functional property, demonstrates in vivo anticoagulant and plasma defibrinogenation activity as well as pre-clinical safety in rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Bandana; Gogoi, Debananda; Tripathy, Debabrata; Kurkalang, Sillarine; Ramani, Sheetal; Chatterjee, Anupam; Mukherjee, Ashis K

    2018-05-01

    An N-terminal truncated fibrino(geno)lytic serine protease gene encoding a ~42kDa protein from Bacillus cereus strain AB01 was produced by error prone PCR, cloned into pET19b vector, and expressed in E5 coli BL21 DE3 cells. The deletion of 24 amino acid residues from N-terminal of wild-type Bacifrinase improves the catalytic activity of [Bacifrinase (ΔN24)]. The anticoagulant potency of [Bacifrinase (ΔN24)] was comparable to Nattokinase and Warfarin and results showed that its anticoagulant action is contributed by progressive defibrinogenation and antiplatelet activities. Nonetheless, at the tested concentration of 2.0μM [Bacifrinase (ΔN24)] did not show in vitro cytotoxicity or chromosomal aberrations on human embryonic kidney cells-293 (HEK-293) and human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBL) cells. [Bacifrinase (ΔN24)], at a dose of 2mg/kg, did not show toxicity, adverse pharmacological effects, tissue necrosis or hemorrhagic effect after 72h of its administration in Swiss albino mice. However, at the tested doses of 0.125 to 0.5mg/kg, it demonstrated significant in anticoagulant effect as well as defibrinogenation after 6h of administration in mice. We propose that [Bacifrinase (ΔN24)] may serve as prototype for the development of potent drug to prevent hyperfibrinogenemia related disorders. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Oral and Topical Antibiotics for Clinically Infected Eczema in Children: A Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial in Ambulatory Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Nick A; Ridd, Matthew J; Thomas-Jones, Emma; Butler, Christopher C; Hood, Kerenza; Shepherd, Victoria; Marwick, Charis A; Huang, Chao; Longo, Mirella; Wootton, Mandy; Sullivan, Frank

    2017-03-01

    Eczema may flare because of bacterial infection, but evidence supporting antibiotic treatment is of low quality. We aimed to determine the effect of oral and topical antibiotics in addition to topical emollient and corticosteroids in children with clinically infected eczema. We employed a 3-arm, blinded, randomized controlled trial in UK ambulatory care. Children with clinical, non-severely infected eczema were randomized to receive oral and topical placebos (control), oral antibiotic (flucloxacillin) and topical placebo, or topical antibiotic (fusidic acid) and oral placebo, for 1 week. We compared Patient Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM) scores at 2 weeks using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). We randomized 113 children (40 to control, 36 to oral antibiotic, and 37 to topical antibiotic). Mean (SD) baseline Patient Oriented Eczema Measure scores were 13.4 (5.1) for the control group, 14.6 (5.3) for the oral antibiotic group, and 16.9 (5.5) for the topical antibiotic group. At baseline, 104 children (93%) had 1 or more of the following findings: weeping, crusting, pustules, or painful skin. Mean (SD) POEM scores at 2 weeks were 6.2 (6.0) for control, 8.3 (7.3) for the oral antibiotic group, and 9.3 (6.2) for the topical antibiotic group. Controlling for baseline POEM score, neither oral nor topical antibiotics produced a significant difference in mean (95% CI) POEM scores (1.5 [-1.4 to 4.4] and 1.5 [-1.6 to 4.5] respectively). There were no significant differences in adverse effects and no serious adverse events. We found rapid resolution in response to topical steroid and emollient treatment and ruled out a clinically meaningful benefit from the addition of either oral or topical antibiotics. Children seen in ambulatory care with mild clinically infected eczema do not need treatment with antibiotics. © 2017 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  15. [Pediatric anesthesia emergence delirium after elective ambulatory surgery: etiology, risk factors and prevalence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gololobov, Alik; Todris, Liat; Berman, Yakov; Rosenberg-Gilad, Zipi; Schlaeffer, Pnina; Kenett, Ron; Ben-Jacob, Ron; Segal, Eran

    2015-04-01

    Emergence delirium (ED) is a common problem among children and adults recovering from general anesthesia after surgery. Its symptoms include psychomotor agitation, hallucinations, and aggressive behavior. The phenomenon, which is most probably an adverse effect of general anesthesia agents, harms the recovery process and endangers the physical safety of patients and their health. Ranging between 10% and 80%, the exact prevalence of ED is unknown, and the risk factors of the phenomenon are unclear. The aim of the current retrospective study was to determine the prevalence rate of ED in 3947 children recovering from general anesthesia after short elective ambulatory surgery, and to map the influence of various risk factors on this phenomenon. Data were collected using electronic medical records. ED severity was assessed using the Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium Scale. Results showed the prevalence of ED among children. ED was significantly correlated with patients' age, type of surgery and premedication. ED was not correlated with severity of pain, type of anesthesia or with patients' sex.

  16. 44-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring: revealing the true burden of hypertension in pediatric hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskin, Orly; Wong, Cynthia J; McCabe, Lonisa; Begin, Brandy; Sutherland, Scott M; Chaudhuri, Abanti

    2015-04-01

    The blood pressure (BP) burden is high in pediatric hemodialysis (HD) patients and adversely affects prognosis. The aim of this study was to examine whether 44-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) provides additional relevant BP data compared with 24-h ABPM. ABPM was initiated at the end of the mid-week dialysis run in 13 stable pediatric HD patients and continued until the next run for 44 h. Day 1 was defined as the initial 24-h ABPM and Day 2 as the time period after that until the next dialysis run. All patients had an echocardiogram to calculate the left ventricular mass index (LVMI). A higher percentage of patients were diagnosed with hypertension from the 44-h ABPM than from the 24-h ABPM. All BP indexes and loads (except nighttime diastolic load) were significantly higher on Day 2 than on Day 1. Patients with BP loads of ≥ 25 % on 44-h ABPM had significantly higher LVMI than those patients with normal BP loads. No such association was found with 24-h ABPM and LVMI. Higher interdialytic weight gain was associated with higher Day-2 nighttime systolic BP load. The 44-h ABPM provides more information than the 24-h ABPM in terms of diagnosing and assessing the true burden of hypertension in pediatric HD patients. Elevated BP loads from 44-h ABPM correlate with a higher LVMI on the echocardiogram.

  17. Effectiveness of transmucosal sedation for special needs populations in the ambulatory care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetef, Sue

    2014-12-01

    Transmucosal is an alternative route for administering medications (ie, dexmedetomidine, midazolam, naloxone) that can be effective for procedural or moderate sedation in patients with special needs when other routes are not practical or are contraindicated. Special needs populations include children, older adults, pregnant and breast-feeding women, and people with disabilities or conditions that limit their ability to function and cope. Understanding the perioperative nurse's role in the care of patients receiving medications via the transmucosal route can lead to better clinical outcomes. Successful use of the transmucosal route requires knowledge of when to administer a medication, how often and how much of a medication should be administered, the onset and duration of action, the adverse effects or contraindications, and the key benefits. In addition, a case study approach suggests that transmucosal sedation can decrease patient stress and anxiety related to undergoing medical procedures or surgery in the ambulatory care setting. Copyright © 2014 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Statement on the safety of glucosamine for patients receiving coumarin anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    2011-01-01

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies to provide a scientific statement on the safety of glucosamine for patients receiving coumarin anticoagulants. More than 40 case reports have been collected by drug-monitoring agencies...... cases haemorrhage occurred in a variety of organs, and in one case this resulted in a persistent vegetative state. The evidence for an interaction between glucosamine and coumarin anticoagulants is strengthened by the observation that in the majority of cases the INR began to fall to normal values when...... glucosamine intake was discontinued. There is insufficient information to conclude on a mechanism for an interaction between glucosamine and coumarin anticoagulants. There are also insufficient data in the case reports to derive a dose-response relationship for glucosamine and to assess the level of risk...

  19. Concurrent use of tramadol and oral vitamin K antagonists and the risk of excessive anticoagulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Meegaard, P. M.; Holck, L. H.

    2013-01-01

    .9-5.2). This corresponds to, on average, one excess case per 250 treatment years (CI 125-584). The result is potentially confounded by concomitant paracetamol use and the presence of acute illness. CONCLUSION: Caution is advised when using tramadol in patients using VKA, and if possible, an alternative pain......OBJECTIVES: The objective was to assess whether the concurrent use of tramadol and vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) leads to an increased risk of excessive anticoagulation. DESIGN: The study was designed as a case-control study, nested within users of VKA and with tramadol use as our main exposure. We...... anticoagulation attributable to the use of tramadol. RESULTS: A total of 178 patients were included, 30 of which were exposed to tramadol, along with 2643 controls, 114 of which were exposed to tramadol. The adjusted odds-ratio for experiencing excessive anticoagulation during use of tramadol was 3.1 (1...

  20. Practice points in gynecardiology: Abnormal uterine bleeding in premenopausal women taking oral anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Angela H E M; Euler, Mia von; Bongers, Marlies Y; Rolden, Herbert J A; Grutters, Janneke P C; Ulrich, Lian; Schenck-Gustafsson, Karin

    2015-12-01

    A growing number of premenopausal women are currently using antithrombotic and/or (dual) antiplatelet therapy for various cardiovascular indications. These may induce or exacerbate abnormal uterine bleeding and more awareness and knowledge among prescribers is required. Heavy and irregular menstrual bleeding is common in women in their forties and may have a variety of underlying causes that require different treatment options. Thus using anticoagulants in premenopausal women demands specific expertise and close collaboration between cardiovascular physicians and gynecologists. In this article we summarize the scope of the problem and provide practical recommendations for the care for young women taking anticoagulants and/or (dual) antiplatelet therapy. We also recommend that more safety data on uterine bleeding with novel anticoagulants in premenopausal women should be obtained. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Target specific oral anticoagulants in the management of thromboembolic disease in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddula, Surekha; Ansell, Jack

    2013-08-01

    The elderly population represents a population at highest risk of thromboembolism, but also the most vulnerable to hemorrhage. In the community setting there is a general tendency to under- treat this patient group. Specific consideration must be taken with elderly patients because they have reduced renal function, co-morbidities and risk of falls, altered pharmacodynamics, and challenges with adherence. Vitamin K antagonists, most often warfarin, have been the first line choice of therapy for long-term anticoagulation and enjoyed an unopposed position in the market for the last 70 years. Recently several new oral anticoagulants have been developed and found to be equally effective as warfarin in phase III studies and may provide an optimal treatment option in the elderly population. In this review we explore the target-specific oral anticoagulants and the pharmacological differences between them with a focus on the elderly population in whom these new drugs would constitute a possible alternative to warfarin therapy.

  2. Cost evaluation of two methods of post tooth extraction hemostasis in patients on anticoagulant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zusman, S P; Lustig, J P; Bin Nun, G

    1993-06-01

    The classical management of patients on oral anticoagulant therapy included hospitalisation, cessation of the anticoagulant agent, and extraction of teeth when the prothrombine levels rise. This method was substituted in the High Risk Dental Clinic at Barzilai Medical Center in Ashkelon by use of a tissue sealant (Tisseel) which does not need hospitalisation nor cessation of the anticoagulant therapy. In comparing the last 23 sessions employing the former method to the first 23 sessions using the new method there were significant differences in the cost effectiveness for the health system, provider, insurer and patient. Despite the fact that from the health system point of view the new method is much more cost effective, there is no financial incentive for the provider (hospital) nor awareness on the part of the insurer (General Sick Fund) to embrace it and 'market' it.

  3. Sulfated modification and anticoagulant activity of pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo, Lady Godiva) polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Li; Ao, Le; Ma, Tao; Ni, Yuanying; Liao, Xiaojun; Hu, Xiaosong; Song, Yi

    2018-01-01

    Sulfated modification of pumpkin polysaccharide using CAS with pyridines as catalysts under different conditions was conducted to obtain different degrees of sulfation on a laboratory scale. Anticoagulant activities of pumpkin polysaccharide and its sulfated derivatives were also investigated employing various established in vitro systems. Results showed that addition of high ratio of CAS/pyridine under constant conditions could increase the degree of substitution. Sulfate substitution was further confirmed by the FT-IR and 13 C NMR analysis. The d f values between 2.11-2.73 indicated the relatively expanded conformation of the sulfated derivatives. The sulfated polysaccharides showed higher anticoagulant activities through activated partial thrombosis time (aPTT), thrombin time (TT), prothrombin time (PT) and anti-Xa activity assay, which revealed that better anticoagulant activities could be obtained when DS remained higher and M w maintained in a moderate range. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Fabrication of anticoagulation layer on titanium surface by sequential immobilization of poly (ethylene glycol) and albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chang-Jiang; Hou, Yan-Hua; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Zhang, Lin-Cai

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a simple method to sequentially immobilize poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) and albumin on titanium surface to enhance the blood compatibility. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) analysis indicated that PEG and albumin were successfully immobilized on the titanium surface. Water contact angle results showed a better hydrophilic surface after the immobilization. The immobilized PEG or albumin can not only obviously prevent platelet adhesion and activation but also prolong activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), leading to the improved anticoagulation. Moreover, immobilization of albumin on PEG-modified surface can further improve the anticoagulation. The approach in the present study provides an effective and efficient method to improve the anticoagulation of blood-contact biomedical devices such as coronary stents.

  5. Parents' satisfaction with pediatric ambulatory anesthesia in northeast of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonmak, Suhattaya; Boonmak, Polpun; Pothiruk, Kittawan; Hoontanee, Nattakhan

    2009-12-01

    Study the satisfaction of parents with ambulatory anesthesia and associated factors, including characteristics of the patients and their parents. This was a prospective, descriptive, observation study. The authors included children who were scheduled for ambulatory anesthetic service between birth and 14 years of age and attended at Srinagarind Hospital, Khon Kaen, Thailand. The authors excluded patients whose parents could not be reached by telephone. Before anesthesia, the authors recorded the patients and parents' characteristics, level of information perception (pre-, peri- and post-anesthesia and complications). After anesthesia, the anesthesia technique and any complications were recorded. The day after anesthesia, the authors made phone calls to the patients to record the parents' satisfaction score (viz, of overall, pre-, peri- and post-anesthesia care, and information about the level of patient care at home), and any anesthesia related complications. Ninety-two patients and their parents were included in the present study. Overall parents 'satisfaction with the anesthesia service was 96.7% (i.e., 89/92) (95% CI 90.8-99.3). Parents' satisfaction with pre- and peri-anesthesia care was 100% (95% CI 96.1-100) and 97.9% (95% CI 92.4-99.7), respectively. Parents' satisfaction with the PACU care and information of patient care at home was 96.7% (95% CI 90.8-99.3) and 91.3% (95% CI 83.6-96.2), respectively. Associated factors where parents were dissatisfied included PACU care satisfaction (i.e., relative risk 22.5 (95% CI 3.2-158)) and patient care information at home (i.e., relative risk 13.3 (95% CI 1.3-136.0)). The present study showed a high level of parents' satisfaction. Parents' dissatisfaction associated with PACU care and information about post anesthesia care at home. Additionally information on parents' characteristics provides invaluable data for improving pediatric ambulatory anesthesia in Srinagarind Hospital.

  6. AMBULATORY BLOOD PRESSURE PATTERNS IN CHILDREN WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Joshua; Ng, Derek; Flynn, Joseph T.; Mitsnefes, Mark; Poffenbarger, Tim; Warady, Bradley A.; Furth, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is the best method of detecting abnormal blood pressure (BP) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), whose hypertension may be missed with office BP measurements. We report ABPM findings in 332 children 1 year after entry in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) cohort study. All subjects underwent casual and ambulatory BP measurement. BP was categorized based on casual and ABPM results into normal, white coat, masked, and ambulatory hypertension. Only half of the subjects had a normal ABPM. BP load was elevated (>25%) in 52% (n= 172) while mean BP was elevated in 32% (n= 105). In multivariate analysis, those using an ACE inhibitor (ACEi) were 89% more likely to have a normal ABPM than those who did not report using an ACEi (OR: 1.89, 95%CI: 1.17, 3.04). For every 20% faster decline in annualized GFR change, the odds of an abnormal ABPM increased 26% (OR: 1.26, 95%CI: 0.97, 1.64; p= 0.081). A 2.25 fold increase in urine protein:creatinine ratio annualized change was associated with a 39% higher odds of an abnormal ABPM (OR: 1.39, 95%CI: 1.06, 1.82; p= 0.019). Abnormalities on ABPM are common in children with CKD, and are strongly associated with known risk factors for end stage renal disease. Individuals on ACEi were less likely to have abnormal ABPM, suggesting a possible therapeutic intervention. ABPM should be used to monitor risk and guide therapy in children with CKD. PMID:22585950

  7. Social support and ambulatory blood pressure in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Martínez, Mercedes; López-García, Esther; Guallar-Castillón, Pilar; Cruz, Juan J; Orozco, Edilberto; García-Esquinas, Esther; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando; Banegas, José R

    2016-10-01

    Social support has been associated with greater nocturnal decline (dipping) in blood pressure (BP) in younger and middle-aged individuals. However, it is uncertain if aggregated measures of social support are related to ambulatory SBP in older adults, where high SBP is frequent and clinically challenging. We studied 1047 community-living individuals aged at least 60 years in Spain. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory BP was determined under standardized conditions. Social support was assessed with a seven-item questionnaire on marital status, cohabitation, frequency of contact with relatives, or with friends and neighbors, emotional support, instrumental support, and outdoor companionship. A social support score was built by summing the values of the items that were significantly associated with SBP variables, such that the higher the score, the better the support. Participants' mean age was 71.7 years (50.8% men). Being married, cohabiting, and being accompanied when out of home were the support items significantly associated with SBP variables. After adjustment for sociodemographic (age, sex, education), behavioral (BMI, alcohol, tobacco, salt consumption, physical activity, Mediterranean diet score), and clinical variables [sleep quality, mental stress, comorbidity, BP medication, and ambulatory BP levels and heart rate (HR)], one additional point in the social support score built with the abovementioned three support variables, was associated with a decrease of 0.93 mmHg in night-time SBP (P = 0.039), totaling 2.8 mmHg decrease for a score of 3 vs. 0. The three-item social support score was also inversely associated with the night/day SBP ratio (β = -0.006, P = 0.010). In older adults, social support is independently associated with lower nocturnal SBP and greater SBP dipping. Further research is needed in prospective studies to confirm these results.

  8. Measuring hot flash phenomenonology using ambulatory prospective digital diaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, William I.; Thurston, Rebecca C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study provides the description, protocol, and results from a novel prospective ambulatory digital hot flash phenomenon diary. Methods This study included 152 midlife women with daily hot flashes who completed an ambulatory electronic hot flash diary continuously for the waking hours of 3 consecutive days. In this diary, women recorded their hot flashes and accompanying characteristics and associations as the hot flashes occurred. Results Self-reported hot flash severity on the digital diaries indicated that the majority of hot flashes were rated as mild (41.3%) or moderate (43.7%). Severe (13.1%) and very severe (1.8%) hot flashes were less common. Hot flash bother ratings were rated as mild (43%), or moderate (33.5%), with fewer hot flashes reported bothersome (17.5%) or very bothersome (6%). The majority of hot flashes were reported as occurring on the on the face (78.9%), neck (74.7%), and chest (61.3%). Prickly skin was reported concurrently with 32% of hot flashes, 7% with anxiety and 5% with nausea. A novel finding, 38% of hot flashes were accompanied by a premonitory aura. Conclusion A prospective electronic digital hot flash diary allows for a more precise quantitation of hot flashes while overcoming many of the limitations of commonly employed retrospective questionnaires and paper diaries. Unique insights into the phenomenology, loci and associated characteristics of hot flashes were obtained using this device. The digital hot flash phenomenology diary is recommended for future ambulatory studies of hot flashes as a prospective measure of the hot flash experience. PMID:27404030

  9. Nutritional status of adults participating in ambulatory rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Supreet; Miller, Michelle D; Halbert, Julie; Giles, Lynne C; Crotty, Maria

    2008-01-01

    To assess the overall nutritional status of older adults participating in ambulatory rehabilitation and determine its association with relevant outcomes including physical function and quality of life. Cross-sectional. Ambulatory rehabilitation service in the Southern region of Adelaide, Australia. A total of 229 participants recruited as part of a RCT between June 2005 and June 2006, stroke (n=83), elective orthopedic procedure (n=44) and other medical condition (n=102). Nutritional status was measured using Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), Simplified Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire (SNAQ) and Body Mass Index. Functional performance was assessed using the Modified Barthel Index (MBI) and quality of life was measured using the Short Form-36 (SF-36). Sixty-three percent of participants were malnourished or at risk of malnutrition according to the MNA and a third had a risk of >or= 5% weight loss in the subsequent six months, according to the SNAQ. Participants with a diagnosis other than stroke or elective orthopedic procedure were the most vulnerable, with 53% (n=74/140) classified as at risk of malnutrition or malnourished and a longer length of stay in hospital. Functional performance was no different for participants assessed as at risk of malnutrition or malnourished compared to the well nourished, but the SF-36 mental component score was significantly higher for those who were well nourished (p=0.003). Findings emphasise the magnitude of the malnutrition problem in ambulatory rehabilitation settings. Further research is required to evaluate the resource implications against expected benefits of providing nutrition interventions at this point.

  10. Ambulatory surgery with chloroprocaine spinal anesthesia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghisi D

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Daniela Ghisi, Stefano Bonarelli Department of Anaesthesia and Postoperative Intensive Care, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy Abstract: Spinal anesthesia is a reliable and safe technique for procedures of the lower extremities. Nevertheless, some of its characteristics may limit its use for ambulatory surgery, including delayed ambulation, risk of urinary retention, and pain after block regression. The current availability of short-acting local anesthetics has renewed interest for this technique also in the context of short- and ultra-short procedures. Chloroprocaine (CP is an amino-ester local anesthetic with a very short half-life. It was introduced and has been successfully used for spinal anesthesia since 1952. Sodium bisulfite was then added as a preservative after 1956. The drug was then abandoned in the 1980s for several reports of neurological deficits in patients receiving accidentally high doses of intrathecal CP during epidural labor analgesia. Animal studies have proven the safety of the preservative-free formulation, which has been extensively evaluated in volunteer studies as well as in clinical practice with a favorable profile in terms of both safety and efficacy. In comparison with bupivacaine, 2-chloroprocaine (2-CP showed faster offset times to end of anesthesia, unassisted ambulation, and discharge from hospital. These findings suggests that 2-CP may be a suitable alternative to low doses of long-acting local anesthetics in ambulatory surgery. Its safety profile also suggests that 2-CP could be a valid substitute for intrathecal short- and intermediate-acting local anesthetics, such as lidocaine and mepivacaine – often causes of transient neurological symptoms. In this context, literature suggests a dose ranging between 30 and 60 mg of 2-CP for procedures lasting 60 minutes or less, while 10 mg is considered the no-effect dose. The present review describes recent evidence about 2-CP as an anesthetic agent for

  11. Ambulatory anesthesia and postoperative nausea and vomiting: predicting the probability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hegarty AT

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aoife T Hegarty,1 Muiris A Buckley,1 Conan L McCaul1–3 1Department of Anaesthesia, The Rotunda Hospital, 2Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, 3School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland Abstract: Nausea and vomiting are distinctly unpleasant symptoms that may occur after surgery and anesthesia, and high priority is given to their prevention by patients. Research in this area is plentiful and has focused on event prediction and pharmacological prophylaxis but despite this, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV typically occurs in 20%–30% of patients in contemporary practice. Prediction of postoperative and postdischarge nausea and vomiting is particularly important in the ambulatory surgical population as these symptoms may occur following discharge from hospital and continue for up to one week when access to antiemetic therapies is limited. Many of the existing predictive scoring systems are based on data from inpatient populations and limited to the first 24 hours after surgery. Scoring systems based on data from ambulatory surgical populations to predict PONV are only moderately good. The best-performing systems in ambulatory patients are those of Sinclair and Sarin with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.78 and 0.74, respectively, but are limited by the short duration of follow-up and a greater emphasis on nausea than vomiting. Given that the ability to predict both PONV and postdischarge nausea and vomiting is clearly limited, emphasis has been placed on prophylactic strategies that incorporate antiemetic medication, intravenous hydration, and nonnarcotic analgesia. PONV has been reduced to <10% in institutions using multimodal approaches. Scoring systems may facilitate “risk tailoring” in which patient risk profile is used as a stratification method for pharmacointervention. Keywords: postoperative nausea and vomiting, prediction, antiemetics, anesthesia

  12. Childhood adversity and adult personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenman, Stephen; Rodgers, Bryan

    2006-05-01

    To explore how recalled childhood adversity affects trait measures of personality in three age cohorts of an Australian adult population and to examine the effects of particular adversities on adult personality traits. A total of 7485 randomly selected subjects in the age bands of 20-24, 40-44 and 60-64 years were interviewed at the outset of a longitudinal community study of psychological health in the Canberra region of Australia. In the initial interview, subjects answered 17 questions about domestic adversity and three questions on positive aspects of upbringing to age 16 years. Personality traits were measured by Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, Behavioural Activation and Inhibition Scales, Positive and Negative Affect Scales and a measure of dissocial behaviours. Higher levels of childhood adversity substantially increase the risk of high neuroticism (OR = 2.6) and negative affect (OR = 2.6), less for behavioural inhibition (OR = 1.7) and for dissocial behaviour (OR = 1.7). No significant effect is seen for extraversion, psychoticism or behavioural activation. Age and gender had little effect on the pattern of risk. Maternal depression has significant and substantial independent effects on measures of neuroticism and negative affect as well as most other measures of personality. Childhood domestic adversity has substantial associations with clinically important aspects of personality: neuroticism and negative affect. Only small effects are seen on behavioural inhibition and dissocial behaviour, and no significant effect on extraversion and behavioural activation. These unexpected findings contradict clinical belief. Maternal psychological ill-health is pre-eminent among adversities predicting later disadvantageous traits, even for those traits that had only the slightest association with childhood adversity. Consequences of childhood adversity prevail throughout the lifespan in men and women equally. The study underlines the importance of childhood domestic

  13. Childhood Adversity and Pain Sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Dokyoung Sophia; Meagher, Mary W

    Childhood adversity is a vulnerability factor for chronic pain. However, the underlying pain mechanisms influenced by childhood adversity remain unknown. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the impact of childhood adversity on dynamic pain sensitivity in young adults. After screening for childhood adverse events and health status, healthy individuals reporting low (below median; n = 75) or high levels of adversity (the top 5%; n = 51) were invited for pain testing. Both groups underwent heat pain threshold and temporal summation of second pain (TSSP) testing after reporting depressive symptoms. TSSP refers to a progressive increase in pain intensity with repetition of identical noxious stimuli and is attributed to central sensitization. Changes in pain ratings over time (slope) were computed for TSSP sensitization and decay of subsequent aftersensations. The high-adversity group showed greater TSSP sensitization (meanslope, 0.75; SDpositive slope, 1.78), and a trend toward a slower decay (meanslope, -11.9; SD, 3.4), whereas the low-adversity group showed minimal sensitization (meanslope, 0.07; SDnear-zero slope, 1.77), F(1,123) = 5.84, p = .017 and faster decay (meanslope, -13.1; SD, 3.4), F(1,123) = 3.79, p = .054. This group difference remained significant even after adjusting for adult depressive symptoms (p = .033). No group difference was found in heat pain threshold (p = .85). Lastly, the high-adversity group showed blunted cardiac and skin conductance responses. These findings suggest that enhancement of central sensitization may provide a mechanism underlying the pain hypersensitivity and chronicity linked to childhood adversity.

  14. Modelling exposure of mammalian predators to anticoagulant rodenticide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher John Topping

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Anticoagulant rodenticides (AR are a widespread and effective method of rodent control but there is concern about the impact these may have on non-target organisms, in particular secondary poisoning of rodent predators. Incidence and concentration of AR in free-living predators in Denmark is very high. We postulate that this is caused by widespread exposure due to widespread use of AR in Denmark in and around buildings. To investigate this theory a spatio-temporal model of AR use and mammalian predator distribution was created. This model was supported by data from an experimental study of mice as vectors of AR, and was used to evaluate likely impacts of restrictions imposed on AR use in Denmark banning the use of rodenticides for plant protection in woodlands and tree-crops. The model uses input based on frequencies and timings of baiting for rodent control for urban, rural and woodland locations and creates an exposure map based on spatio-temporal modelling of movement of mice-vectored AR (based on Apodemus flavicollis. Simulated predator territories are super-imposed over this exposure map to create an exposure index. Predictions from the model concur with field studies of AR prevalence both before and after the change in AR use. In most cases incidence of exposure to AR is predicted to be greater than 90%, although cessation of use in woodlots and Christmas tree plantations should reduce mean exposure concentrations. Model results suggest that the driver of high AR incidence in non-target small mammal predators is likely to be the pattern of use and not the distance AR is vectored. Reducing baiting frequency by 75% had different effects depending on the landscape simulated, but having a maximum of 12% reduction in exposure incidence, and in one landscape a maximum reduction of <2%. We discuss sources of uncertainty in the model and directions for future development of predictive models for environmental impact assessment of rodenticides. The

  15. Challenges in pediatric ambulatory anesthesia: kids are different.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Corey E; Everett, Lucinda L

    2010-06-01

    The care of the child having ambulatory surgery presents a specific set of challenges to the anesthesia provider. This review focuses on areas of clinical distinction that support the additional attention children often require, and on clinical controversies that require providers to have up-to-date information to guide practice and address parental concerns. These include perioperative risk; obstructive sleep apnea; obesity; postoperative nausea and vomiting; neurocognitive outcomes; and specific concerns regarding common ear, nose, and throat procedures. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Acute effect on ambulatory blood pressure from aerobic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Rasmussen, Charlotte; Nielsen, Line; Linander Henriksen, Marie

    2018-01-01

    session among female cleaners. METHODS: Twenty-two female cleaners were randomised to a cross-over study with a reference and an aerobic exercise session. Differences in 24-h, work hours, leisure time, and sleep ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) were evaluated using repeated measure 2 × 2 mixed...... of 1.5 mmHg (p = 0.03) were found after the aerobic exercise session. During leisure time, the systolic ABP was lowered by 1.7 mmHg (p = 0.04) and the diastolic ABP was unaltered. During sleep, the systolic and diastolic ABP was unaltered. CONCLUSION: A single aerobic exercise session lowered 24-h...

  17. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia: reducing misdiagnosis via collaboration between an inpatient anticoagulation pharmacy service and hospital reference laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Allison E; Bowles, Harmony; Borrego, Matthew E; Montoya, Tiffany N; Garcia, David A; Mahan, Charles

    2016-11-01

    Misdiagnosis of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is common and exposes patients to high-risk therapies and potentially serious adverse events. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of collaboration between an inpatient pharmacy-driven anticoagulation management service (AMS) and hospital reference laboratory to reduce inappropriate HIT antibody testing via pharmacist intervention and use of the 4T pre-test probability score. Secondary objectives included clinical outcomes and cost-savings realized through reduced laboratory testing and decreased unnecessary treatment of HIT. This was a single center, pre-post, observational study. The hospital reference laboratory contacted the AMS when they received a blood sample for an enzyme-linked immunosorbent HIT antibody (HIT Ab). Trained pharmacists prospectively scored each HIT Ab ordered by using the 4T score with subsequent communication to physicians recommending for or against processing and reporting of lab results. Utilizing retrospective chart review and a database for all patients with a HIT Ab ordered during the study period, we compared the incidence of HIT Ab testing before and after implementation of the pharmacy-driven 4T score intervention. Our intervention significantly reduced the number of inappropriate HIT Ab tests processed (176 vs. 63, p reference laboratories can result in reduction of misdiagnosis of HIT and significant cost savings with similar safety.

  18. Characterization and structural analysis of a potent anticoagulant phospholipase A2 from Pseudechis australis snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qianyun Sharon; Trabi, Manuela; Richards, Renée Stirling; Mirtschin, Peter; Madaras, Frank; Nouwens, Amanda; Zhao, Kong-Nan; de Jersey, John; Lavin, Martin F; Guddat, Luke W; Masci, Paul P

    2016-03-01

    Pseudechis australis is one of the most venomous and lethal snakes in Australia. Numerous phospholipase A2 (PLA2) isoforms constitute a major portion of its venom, some of which have previously been shown to exhibit not only enzymatic, but also haemolytic, neurotoxic and anticoagulant activities. Here, we have purified a potent anticoagulant PLA2 (identified as PA11) from P. australis venom to investigate its phospholipase, anticoagulant, haemolytic and cytotoxic activities and shown that addition of 11 nM PA11 resulted in a doubling of the clotting time of recalcified whole blood. We have also demonstrated that PA11 has high PLA2 enzymatic activity (10.9 × 10(4) Units/mg), but low haemolytic activity (0.6% of red blood cells hydrolysed in the presence of 1 nM PA11). PA11 at a concentration lower than 600 nM is not cytotoxic towards human cultured cells. Chemical modification experiments using p-bromophenacyl bromide have provided evidence that the catalytic histidine of PA11 is critical for the anticoagulant activity of this PLA2. PA11 that was subjected to trypsin digestion without previous reduction and alkylation of the disulfide bonds maintained enzymatic and anticoagulant activity, suggesting that proteolysis alone cannot abolish these properties. Consistent with these results, administration of PA11 by gavage in a rabbit stasis thrombosis model increased the clotting time of recalcified citrated whole blood by a factor of four. These data suggest that PA11 has potential to be developed as an anticoagulant in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Honey Bee Venom (Apis mellifera) Contains Anticoagulation Factors and Increases the Blood-clotting Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolfagharian, Hossein; Mohajeri, Mohammad; Babaie, Mahdi

    2015-12-01

    Bee venom (BV) is a complex mixture of proteins and contains proteins such as phospholipase and melittin, which have an effect on blood clotting and blood clots. The mechanism of action of honey bee venom (HBV, Apis mellifera) on human plasma proteins and its anti-thrombotic effect were studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-coagulation effect of BV and its effects on blood coagulation and purification. Crude venom obtained from Apis mellifera was selected. The anti-coagulation factor of the crude venom from this species was purified by using gel filtration chromatography (sephadex G-50), and the molecular weights of the anti-coagulants in this venom estimated by using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Blood samples were obtained from 10 rabbits, and the prothrombin time (PT) and the partial thromboplastin time (PTT) tests were conducted. The approximate lethal dose (LD) values of BV were determined. Crude BV increased the blood clotting time. For BV concentrations from 1 to 4 mg/mL, clotting was not observed even at more than 300 seconds, standard deviations (SDs) = ± 0.71; however, clotting was observed in the control group 13.8 s, SDs = ± 0.52. Thus, BV can be considered as containing anti-coagulation factors. Crude BV is composed 4 protein bands with molecular weights of 3, 15, 20 and 41 kilodalton (kDa), respectively. The LD50 of the crude BV was found to be 177.8 μg/mouse. BV contains anti-coagulation factors. The fraction extracted from the Iranian bees contains proteins that are similar to anti-coagulation proteins, such as phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and melittin, and that can increase the blood clotting times in vitro.

  20. Honey Bee Venom (Apis mellifera Contains Anticoagulation Factors and Increases the Blood-clotting Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Zolfagharian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Bee venom (BV is a complex mixture of proteins and contains proteins such as phospholipase and melittin, which have an effect on blood clotting and blood clots. The mechanism of action of honey bee venom (HBV, Apis mellifera on human plasma proteins and its anti-thrombotic effect were studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-coagulation effect of BV and its effects on blood coagulation and purification. Methods: Crude venom obtained from Apis mellifera was selected. The anti-coagulation factor of the crude venom from this species was purified by using gel filtration chromatography (sephadex G-50, and the molecular weights of the anti-coagulants in this venom estimated by using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. Blood samples were obtained from 10 rabbits, and the prothrombin time (PT and the partial thromboplastin time (PTT tests were conducted. The approximate lethal dose (LD values of BV were determined. Results: Crude BV increased the blood clotting time. For BV concentrations from 1 to 4 mg/mL, clotting was not observed even at more than 300 seconds, standard deviations (SDs = ± 0.71; however, clotting was observed in the control group 13.8 s, SDs = ± 0.52. Thus, BV can be considered as containing anti-coagulation factors. Crude BV is composed 4 protein bands with molecular weights of 3, 15, 20 and 41 kilodalton (kDa, respectively. The LD50 of the crude BV was found to be 177.8 μg/mouse. Conclusion: BV contains anti-coagulation factors. The fraction extracted from the Iranian bees contains proteins that are similar to anti-coagulation proteins, such as phospholipase A2 (PLA2 and melittin, and that can increase the blood clotting times in vitro.

  1. [Anticoagulation in the aged patient with atrial fibrillation: What are prescribing cardiologists, geriatricians and general practitioners?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, P; Vogel, T; Lang, P-O

    2015-08-01

    To assess prescribing of anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation (AF) in the elderly, both a quantitative point of view (rate of anticoagulation) and qualitative (type of anticoagulation). Determinants of prescribing and non-prescribing were also analysed. Prospective survey of practice, based on one clinical case and questionnaire conducted in 60 practitioners (20 cardiologists [C], 20 geriatricians [G] and 20 general practitioners [GP]). In reading the clinical case, 88.3% of physicians would have initiated a treatment; three types of treatments would have been chosen: AVK (68.3%), ODA (20.0%) and platelet antiaggregant (11.7%). Criteria taken into account to initiate anticoagulation varied according to the specialty. Cardiologists considered more the age criteria (C: 95.0%, G: 75.0%, MG: 60.0%; PC: 90.0%, G: 60.0%, MG: 55.0%; PC: 85.0%, G: 55.0%, MG: 60.0%; PC: 80.0%, G: 35.0%, MG: 25.0%; PC: 15.0%, G: 5.0%, MG: 0.0%; PC: 35.0%, G: 5.0%, MG: 45.0%; PC: 70.0%, G: 75.0%, MG: 85.0%; P<0.05). This survey confirms that the FA remains under anticoagulated in the elderly and the barriers to the prescription of oral anticoagulation are often without rational basis. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. The risk of venous thromboembolism with aspirin compared to anticoagulants after hip and knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Janet N; Maselli, Judith; Auerbach, Andrew D; Fang, Margaret C

    2017-07-01

    Recent guidelines include aspirin as an option to prevent venous thromboembolism (VTE) in selected patients undergoing hip or knee replacement surgery. However, the efficacy of aspirin after arthroplasty has not been well-defined, particularly in more contemporary patient populations. We compared rates of post-operative VTE between patients who received aspirin-only versus anticoagulants after hip or knee arthroplasty, using data from a large US-based administrative database. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 231,780 adults who underwent total knee arthroplasty and 110,621 who underwent total hip arthroplasty in 2009-2012 and who received pharmacologic VTE prophylaxis (aspirin or anticoagulant) within the first 7days after surgery. We compared the risk of post-operative VTE between patients receiving aspirin-only vs. anticoagulants, controlling for clinical and hospital characteristics using multivariable logistic regression with propensity score adjustment. Aspirin-only prophylaxis was administered to 7.5% of patients after knee arthroplasty and 8.0% after hip arthroplasty. Post-operative VTE was diagnosed in 2217 (0.96%) patients after knee arthroplasty and 454 (0.41%) after hip arthroplasty. Compared to anticoagulants, aspirin was not associated with a higher risk for post-operative VTE either after knee arthroplasty (adjusted odds ratio and 95% confidence interval [OR] 0.34 [0.24-0.48]) or hip arthroplasty (OR 0.82 [0.45-1.51]). Aspirin was uncommonly administered as the sole prophylactic agent after hip or knee arthroplasty in this study. However, patients who received aspirin-only had similar rates of post-operative VTE compared to patients who received anticoagulants. Further research should focus on distinguishing which patients benefit more from anticoagulants versus aspirin after arthroplasty. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hematology of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus subjected to anesthesia and anticoagulation protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Cristine Weinert

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinical hematology facilitates the diagnosis of disease and can act as a prognostic indicator of pathological conditions in fish. The aim of the present study was to evaluate hematological parameters of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus subjected to different anesthetics and anticoagulants. Thirty apparently healthy fishes (average weight of 473 ± 35. 50 g and mean total length of 29. 33 ± 0. 37 cm, were selected from the local commercial fish farm in the Lages municipality (Santa Catarina, Brazil. The animals were randomly divided into three groups of 10. In two groups, anesthesia was induced with eugenol (70 mg·L- 1 (EG and Benzocaine hydrochloride (100 mg·L-1 (BG, respectively. Anesthesia was not administered to fish of the third group (CG/control group. Blood samples were obtained by venipuncture of the caudal vessels and placed into microtubes containing sodium heparin or Na2EDTA for further analysis. The results were analyzed by Sigma Stat for Windows, the paired t-test for significant differences between anticoagulants of the same group, and analysis of variance followed by the Tukey test for comparison of means between groups (p ? 0. 05. Most of the observed changes in the erythrogram were significantly higher for the anticoagulant heparin and benzocaine group in comparison to the control group. However, the values obtained for the leukogram were significantly higher for all groups subjected to the Na2EDTA anticoagulant, suggesting that heparin may cause cell clumping. The results suggest that the anesthetics under investigation effectively minimizes the effects of stress caused by handling and invasive procedures, and that the anticoagulant heparin causes less hemolysis in comparison to Na2EDTA for Nile tilapia. Thus, the hematological variations attributed to different anesthetic protocols and/or different anticoagulants should be considered for the species Oreochromis niloticus.

  4. Improved anticoagulant effect of fucosylated chondroitin sulfate orally administered as gastro-resistant tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Roberto J C; Sucupira, Isabela D; Oliveira, Stephan Nicollas M C G; Santos, Gustavo R C; Mourão, Paulo A S

    2017-04-03

    Fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FucCS) is a potent anticoagulant polysaccharide extracted from sea cucumber. Its anticoagulant activity is attributed to the presence of unique branches of sulfated fucose. Although this glycosaminoglycan exerts an antithrombotic effect following oral administration, high doses are necessary to achieve the maximum effect. The diminished activity of FucCS following oral administration is likely due to its degradation in the gastrointestinal tract and its limited ability to cross the intestinal cell membranes. The latter aspect is particularly difficult to overcome. However, gastro-resistant tablet formulation may help limit the degradation of FucCS in the gastrointestinal tract. In the present work, we found that the oral administration of FucCS as gastro-resistant tablets produces a more potent and prolonged anticoagulant effect compared with its administration as an aqueous solution, with no significant changes in the bleeding tendency or arterial blood pressure. Experiments using animal models of arterial thrombosis initiated by endothelial injury demonstrated that FucCS delivered as gastro-protective tablets produced a potent antithrombotic effect, whereas its aqueous solution was ineffective. However, there was no significant difference between the effects of FucCS delivered as gastro-resistant tablets or as aqueous solution in a venous thrombosis model, likely due to the high dose of thromboplastin used. New oral anticoagulants tested in these experimental models for comparison showed significantly increased bleeding tendencies. Our study provides a framework for developing effective oral anticoagulants based on sulfated polysaccharides from marine organisms. The present results suggest that FucCS is a promising oral anticoagulant.

  5. Shifting to a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulation agent from vitamin K antagonist in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Emil L; Vinding, Naja Emborg; Lamberts, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Aims: After non-vitamin K antagonist (VKA) oral anticoagulation agents (NOAC) have been approved for thrombo-embolic prophylaxis in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), utilization of oral anticoagulants (OAC) in NVAF has changed. Contemporary shifting from a VKA to a NOAC (dabigatran...

  6. Pharmacogenetics-based warfarin dosing algorithm decreases time to stable anticoagulation and the risk of major hemorrhage: an updated meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Quan; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Peng-Pai; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Sun, Jian; Wang, Jun; Feng, Xiang-Fei; Lu, Qiu-Fen; Li, Yi-Gang

    2015-04-01

    Warfarin is yet the most widely used oral anticoagulant for thromboembolic diseases, despite the recently emerged novel anticoagulants. However, difficulty in maintaining stable dose within the therapeutic range and subsequent serious adverse effects markedly limited its use in clinical practice. Pharmacogenetics-based warfarin dosing algorithm is a recently emerged strategy to predict the initial and maintaining dose of warfarin. However, whether this algorithm is superior over conventional clinically guided dosing algorithm remains controversial. We made a comparison of pharmacogenetics-based versus clinically guided dosing algorithm by an updated meta-analysis. We searched OVID MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library for relevant citations. The primary outcome was the percentage of time in therapeutic range. The secondary outcomes were time to stable therapeutic dose and the risks of adverse events including all-cause mortality, thromboembolic events, total bleedings, and major bleedings. Eleven randomized controlled trials with 2639 participants were included. Our pooled estimates indicated that pharmacogenetics-based dosing algorithm did not improve percentage of time in therapeutic range [weighted mean difference, 4.26; 95% confidence interval (CI), -0.50 to 9.01; P = 0.08], but it significantly shortened the time to stable therapeutic dose (weighted mean difference, -8.67; 95% CI, -11.86 to -5.49; P pharmacogenetics-based algorithm significantly reduced the risk of major bleedings (odds ratio, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.23 to 0.98; P = 0.04), but it did not reduce the risks of all-cause mortality, total bleedings, or thromboembolic events. Our results suggest that pharmacogenetics-based warfarin dosing algorithm significantly improves the efficiency of International Normalized Ratio correction and reduces the risk of major hemorrhage.

  7. Antroduodenal manometry: 24-hour ambulatory monitoring versus short-term stationary manometry in patients with functional dyspepsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jebbink, R. J.; vanBerge-Henegouwen, G. P.; Akkermans, L. M.; Smout, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the interdigestive and postprandial antroduodenal motility patterns of patients with functional dyspepsia using prolonged ambulatory antroduodenal manometry and to compare these findings with conventional stationary manometry. METHODS: Prolonged ambulatory and short-term

  8. Traumatic events involving elderly patients treated with anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation: the downside of stroke prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Riccardi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A group of oral anticoagulant-treated patients affected by permanent atrial fibrillation was evaluated after their access to the emergency room as a result of a traumatic accident. In these patients, the re-evaluation of their risk of thromboembolism and bleeding was performed together with the evaluation of their risk of falling and institutionalization. Results show that the emergency department identifies a cohort of very elderly frail patients, who should be carefully reconsidered for anticoagulant therapy after a traumatic event.

  9. Quality of Life analysis of patients in chronic use of oral anticoagulant: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Geisa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment with oral anticoagulant may influence the quality of life perception as it promotes changes in the patient's life, not offering an evident symptomatic relief and presenting well defined risks, such as bleeding. In this trial, the influence of chronic use of anticoagulants on the quality of life perception has been analyzed in patients assisted at the anticoagulation outpatient unit. Methods The health related quality of life was evaluated through a cross-section study with a sample composed of 72 patients seen from July 23, 2009 to September 2, 2010 at the Anticoagulation Outpatient Unit of the Federal University of Bahia's University Hospital. The study's population was composed by patients with atrial fibrillation and mechanical heart valve. The patients were submitted to two quality of life evaluation questionnaires: a generic questionnaire - the Medical Outcomes Study SF-36 Health Survey (SF36 - and a specific questionnaire - the Duke Anticoagulation Satisfaction Scale (DASS. Results The quality of life perception of the patients studied, based on both the DASS and the SF36, was positive regarding the treatment with oral anticoagulant. The SF36 presented an average score of 62.2 (± 20.0. Among the SF36 evaluated domains, the physical-emotional aspect was the most compromised one regarding life quality perception. The DASS presented an average score of 67.1 (± 18.2 and the domain presenting a greater compromise was the one related to the treatment inconveniences (annoyances, burdens and obligations. Previous hemorrhagic event, comorbidities, drug interactions with medicines that increase the anticoagulant effect, lower education level in the SF36 and younger age group influence a more negative perception of the quality of life, whereas lower education level in the DASS and the duration of treatment for more than 1 year offer a more positive perception. Conclusion Patients seen at the anticoagulation outpatient

  10. Effect of an interactive voice response system on oral anticoagulant management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oake, Natalie; van Walraven, Carl; Rodger, Marc A; Forster, Alan J

    2009-04-28

    Monitoring oral anticoagulants is logistically challenging for both patients and medical staff. We evaluated the effect of adding an interactive voice response system to computerized decision support for oral anticoagulant management. We developed an interactive voice response system to communicate to patients the results of international normalized ratio testing and their dosage schedules for anticoagulation therapy. The system also reminded patients of upcoming and missed appointments for blood tests. We recruited patients whose anticoagulation control was stable after at least 3 months of warfarin therapy. We prospectively examined clinical data and outcomes for these patients for an intervention period of at least 3 months. We also collected retrospective data for each patient for the 3 months before study enrolment. We recruited 226 patients between Nov. 23, 2006, and Aug. 1, 2007. The mean duration of the intervention period (prospective data collection) was 4.2 months. Anticoagulation control was similar for the periods during and preceding the intervention (mean time within the therapeutic range 80.3%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 77.5% to 83.1% v. 79.9%, 95% CI 77.3% to 82.6%). The interactive voice response system delivered 1211 (77.8%) of 1557 scheduled dosage messages, with no further input required from clinic staff. The most common reason for clinic staff having to deliver the remaining messages (accounting for 143 [9.2%] of all messages) was an international normalized ratio that was excessively high or low, (i.e., 0.5 or more outside the therapeutic range). When given the option, 76.6% of patients (164/214) chose to continue with the interactive voice response system for management of their anticoagulation after the study was completed. The system reduced staff workload for monitoring anticoagulation therapy by 48 min/wk, a 33% reduction from the baseline of 2.4 hours. Interactive voice response systems have a potential role in improving the

  11. [Retrospective analysis of correlative factors between digestive system injury and anticoagulant or antiplatelet-agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ning; Luo, Hesheng

    2014-05-27

    To explore the correlative factors and clinical characteristics of digestive system injury during the treatment of anticoagulant and (or) antiplatelet-agents. A total of 1 443 hospitalized patients on anticoagulant and (or) antiplatelet-agents from January 2010 to December 2013 at Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University were analyzed retrospectively. Their length of hospital stay was from 5 to 27 days. Most of them were elderly males (n = 880, 61.0%) with an average age of (62 ± 6) years. 1 138 patients (78.9%) were farmers, workers or someone without a specific occupation. During the treatment of anticoagulant/antiplatelet-agents, statistical difference existed (P = 0.01) between positively and negatively previous digestive disease groups for actively newly occurring digestive system injury (16.0% (41/256) vs 15.9% (189/1 187)). After the dosing of anticoagulant and (or) antiplatelet-agents, 57 (66.3%, 57/86) patients were complicated by hemorrhage of digestive tract, taking 62.9% (61/97) of all positive result patients for Helicobacter pylori test. Comparing preventive PPI group with no PPI group, there was no marked statistical differences (P = 2.67) for digestive system complication (including hemorrhage of digestive tract) while receiving anticoagulant and (or) antiplatelet-agents (13.9% (74/533) vs 17.1% (156/910)). During anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet-agent therapy, 185 patients (12.8%) were complicated by peptic ulcer or peptic ulcer with bleeding, 40 patients (2.8%) had erosive gastritis and 5 (0.3%) developed acute gastric mucosal lesions. And 42 of 76 patients complicated by hemorrhage of digestive tract underwent endoscopic hemostasis while 2 patients were operated. Ninety-seven patients (6.7%) died, including 61 (62.9%, 61/97) from hemorrhage of digestive tract. The remainder became cured, improved and discharged. Moreover, no significant statistical differences existed (P = 2.29) among three combination group (aspirin, clopidogrel, warfarin), two

  12. Major cerebral events in Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis: is anticoagulant therapy safe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Snygg-Martin, Ulrika; Olaison, Lars

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the impact of anticoagulation on major cerebral events in patients with left-sided Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis (IE). METHODS: A prospective cohort study; the use of anticoagulation and the relation to major cerebral events was evaluated separately at onset...... of admission and during hospitalization. RESULTS: Overall, 70 out of 175 patients (40%; 95% CI: 33-47%) experienced major cerebral events during the course of the disease, cerebral ischaemic stroke occured in 59 patients (34%; 95% CI: 27-41%), cerebral infection in 23 patients (14%; 95% CI: 9...

  13. Anticoagulant use for prevention of stroke in a commercial population with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Aarti A; Lennert, Barb; Macomson, Brian; Nelson, Winnie W; Owens, Gary M; Mody, Samir H; Schein, Jeff

    2012-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia, and patients with AF are at an increased risk for stroke. Thromboprophylaxis with vitamin K antagonists reduces the annual incidence of stroke by approximately 60%, but appropriate thromboprophylaxis is prescribed for only approximately 50% of eligible patients. Health plans may help to improve quality of care for patients with AF by analyzing claims data for care improvement opportunities. To analyze pharmacy and medical claims data from a large integrated commercial database to determine the risk for stroke and the appropriateness of anticoagulant use based on guideline recommendations for patients with AF. This descriptive, retrospective claims data analysis used the Anticoagulant Quality Improvement Analyzer software, which was designed to analyze health plan data. The data for this study were obtained from a 10% randomly selected sample from the PharMetrics Integrated Database. This 10% sample resulted in almost 26,000 patients with AF who met the inclusion criteria for this study. Patients with a new or existing diagnosis of AF between July 2008 and June 2010 who were aged ≥18 years were included in this analysis. The follow-up period was 1 year. Demographics, stroke risk level (CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores), anticoagulant use, and inpatient stroke hospitalizations were analyzed through the analyzer software. Of the 25,710 patients with AF (CHADS2 score 0-6) who were eligible to be included in this study, 9093 (35%) received vitamin K antagonists and 16,617 (65%) did not receive any anticoagulant. Of the patients at high risk for stroke, as predicted by CHADS2, 39% received an anticoagulant medication. The rates of patients receiving anticoagulant medication varied by age-group-16% of patients aged <65 years, 22% of those aged 65 to 74 years, and 61% of elderly ≥75 years. Among patients hospitalized for stroke, only 28% were treated with an anticoagulant agent in the outpatient

  14. Efficacy and safety of a pharmacist-managed inpatient anticoagulation service for warfarin initiation and titration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Y M; Quek, Y-N; Tay, J C; Chadachan, V; Lee, H K

    2011-10-01

    Anticoagulation consultations provided by a pharmacist-staffed inpatient service, similar to the experience reported in outpatient anticoagulation clinics, can potentially improve anticoagulation control and outcomes. At Tan Tock Seng Hospital, a 1200-bed acute care teaching hospital in Singapore, pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinics have been in place since 1997. Pharmacist-managed services were extended to inpatient consultations in anticoagulation management from April 2006. Our objective was to assess the effect of implementing a pharmacist-managed inpatient anticoagulation service. This was a single-centre cohort study. Baseline data from 1 January 2006 to 31 March 2006 were collected and compared with post-implementation data from 1 April 2006 to 31 March 2007. Patients newly started on warfarin for deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism or atrial fibrillation in general medicine and surgery departments were included. The three endpoints were as follows: (i) percentage of international normalized ratios (INRs) achieving therapeutic range within 5 days, (ii) INRs more than 4 during titration and (iii) subtherapeutic INRs on discharge. A total of 26 patients in the control period were compared with 144 patients who had received dosing consultations by a pharmacist during the initiation of warfarin. The provision of pharmacist consult resulted in 88% compared to 38% (P < 0·001) of INR values achieving therapeutic range within 5 days. There was a reduction in INR values of more than 4 during titration from 27% to 2% (P < 0·001), and subtherapeutic INR values on discharge without low molecular weight heparin from 15% to 0% (P < 0·001). The mean time to therapeutic INR was reduced from 6·5 to 3·9 days (P < 0·001) and mean length of stay after initiation of warfarin from 11 to 7·7 days (P = 0·004). Inpatient anticoagulation care and outcomes were significantly improved by a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation service. The time to therapeutic INR was

  15. Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) is a computerized information database designed to support the FDA's post-marketing safety surveillance program for all...

  16. Trends in oral anticoagulant choice for acute stroke patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation in Japan: The SAMURAI‐NVAF Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arihiro, Shoji; Todo, Kenichi; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Kimura, Kazumi; Furui, Eisuke; Terasaki, Tadashi; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Kamiyama, Kenji; Takizawa, Shunya; Okuda, Satoshi; Okada, Yasushi; Kameda, Tomoaki; Nagakane, Yoshinari; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Mochizuki, Hiroshi; Ito, Yasuhiro; Nakashima, Takahiro; Takamatsu, Kazuhiro; Nishiyama, Kazutoshi; Kario, Kazuomi; Sato, Shoichiro; Koga, Masatoshi; Nagatsuka, K; Minematsu, K; Nakagawara, J; Akiyama, H; Shibazaki, K; Maeda, K; Shibuya, S; Yoshimura, S; Endo, K; Miyagi, T; Osaki, M; Kobayashi, J; Okata, T; Tanaka, E; Sakamoto, Y; Takizawa, H; Takasugi, J; Tokunaga, K; Homma, K; Kinoshita, N; Matsuki, T; Higashida, K; Shiozawa, M; Kanai, H; Uehara, S

    2015-01-01

    Background Large clinical trials are lack of data on non‐vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants for acute stroke patients. Aim To evaluate the choice of oral anticoagulants at acute hospital discharge in stroke patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and clarify the underlying characteristics potentially affecting that choice using the multicenter Stroke Acute Management with Urgent Risk‐factor Assessment and Improvement‐NVAF registry (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01581502). Method The study included 1192 acute ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (527 women, 77·7 ± 9·9 years old) between September 2011 and March 2014, during which three nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant oral anticoagulants were approved for clinical use. Oral anticoagulant choice at hospital discharge (median 23‐day stay) was assessed. Results Warfarin was chosen for 650 patients, dabigatran for 203, rivaroxaban for 238, and apixaban for 25. Over the three 10‐month observation periods, patients taking warfarin gradually decreased to 46·5% and those taking nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants increased to 48·0%. As compared with warfarin users, patients taking nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants included more men, were younger, more frequently had small infarcts, and had lower scores for poststroke CHADS 2, CHA 2 DS 2‐VASc, and HAS‐BLED, admission National Institutes of Health stroke scale, and discharge modified Rankin Scale. Nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants were started at a median of four‐days after stroke onset without early intracranial hemorrhage. Patients starting nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants earlier had smaller infarcts and lower scores for the admission National Institutes of Health stroke scale and the discharge modified Rankin Scale than those starting later. Choice of nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants was independently associated with 20‐day or

  17. [Considerations on local-regional anesthesia for ambulatory tooth extractions in patients with heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debernardi, G; Borgogna, E

    1975-01-01

    Ambulatory dental extraction was performed on 150 patients with various forms of heart disease. No serious complications were noted with an anaesthetic without vasoconstriction (plain 3% carbocaine). The prior history was carefully studied and pressure values were determined. It is felt that heart disease does not form an absolute contraindication to ambulatory dental extraction.

  18. Increased systolic ambulatory blood pressure and microalbuminuria in treated and non-treated hypertensive smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kaspar; Kristensen, Kjeld S; Bang, Lia E

    2004-01-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of smoking status on both clinic and ambulatory blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) by using 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring in treated and non-treated hypertensive smokers and non-smokers. A secondary aim was to evaluate...

  19. The Use of the Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Index in Patients Suspected of Secondary Hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, J.R.; Adiyaman, A.; Kraayvanger, N.; Dechering, D.G.; Postma, C.T.

    2016-01-01

    The ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) is a marker of arterial stiffness and is derived from ambulatory 24-h blood pressure registration. We studied whether the AASI could be used as a predictive factor for the presence of renal artery stenosis (RAS) in patients with a suspicion of secondary

  20. Ambulatory gait analysis in stroke patients using ultrasound and inertial sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weenk, D.; van Meulen, Fokke; van Beijnum, Bernhard J.F.; Veltink, Petrus H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective ambulatory assessment of movements of patients is important for an optimal recovery. In this study an ambulatory system is used for assessing gait parameters in stroke patients. Ultrasound range estimates are fused with inertial sensors using an extended Kalman filter to estimate 3D

  1. Reproducibility of blood pressure variation in older ambulatory and bedridden subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchihashi, Takuya; Kawakami, Yasunobu; Imamura, Tsuyoshi; Abe, Isao

    2002-06-01

    We investigated the influence of ambulation on the reproducibility of circadian blood pressure variation in older nursing home residents. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was performed twice in 37 older nursing home residents. Nursing home in Japan. Subjects included 18 ambulatory nursing home residents who had no limitation on physical activity and 19 bedridden residents who did not participate in physical activity. Twenty-four-hour, daytime, and nighttime blood pressure levels and their variability. The 24-hour and daytime variability of systolic blood pressure (SBP) was significantly greater in ambulatory than in bedridden subjects, whereas nighttime variability was similar. Significant correlations in SBP averaged for the whole day, daytime, and nighttime were observed between the two examinations in ambulatory (r =.80-.83) and bedridden (r =.83-.91) subjects, but the variabilities of SBP for the whole day and during the daytime of the first measurement were correlated with those of the second measurement in bedridden (r =.67 and r =.47, respectively) but not in ambulatory (r =.39 and r =.28, respectively) subjects. Significant correlations were found between the nocturnal SBP changes at two occasions in both ambulatory (r =.50) and bedridden (r =.51) subjects, but the dipper versus nondipper profiles, defined as reduction in SBP of greater than 10% versus not, showed low reproducibility in ambulatory subjects; five ambulatory (28%) and one bedridden (5%) subjects showed divergent profiles between the two examinations. The reproducibility of blood pressure variation in nursing home residents is influenced by ambulation.

  2. Ambulatory versus home versus clinic blood pressure: the association with subclinical cerebrovascular diseases: the Ohasama Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Azusa; Tanaka, Kazushi; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Kondo, Takeo; Kikuya, Masahiro; Metoki, Hirohito; Hashimoto, Takanao; Satoh, Michihiro; Inoue, Ryusuke; Asayama, Kei; Obara, Taku; Hirose, Takuo; Izumi, Shin-Ichi; Satoh, Hiroshi; Imai, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    The usefulness of ambulatory, home, and casual/clinic blood pressure measurements to predict subclinical cerebrovascular diseases (silent cerebrovascular lesions and carotid atherosclerosis) was compared in a general population. Data on ambulatory, home, and casual/clinic blood pressures and brain MRI to detect silent cerebrovascular lesions were obtained in 1007 subjects aged ≥55 years in a general population of Ohasama, Japan. Of the 1007 subjects, 583 underwent evaluation of the extent of carotid atherosclerosis. Twenty-four-hour, daytime, and nighttime ambulatory and home blood pressure levels were closely associated with the risk of silent cerebrovascular lesions and carotid atherosclerosis (all Ppressure values were simultaneously included in the same regression model, each of the ambulatory blood pressure values remained a significant predictor of silent cerebrovascular lesions, whereas home blood pressure lost its predictive value. Of the ambulatory blood pressure values, nighttime blood pressure was the strongest predictor of silent cerebrovascular lesions. The home blood pressure value was more closely associated with the risk of carotid atherosclerosis than any of the ambulatory blood pressure values when home and one of the ambulatory blood pressure values were simultaneously included in the same regression model. The casual/clinic blood pressure value had no significant association with the risk of subclinical cerebrovascular diseases. Although the clinical indications for ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and home blood pressure measurements may overlap, the clinical significance of each method for predicting target organ damage may differ for different target organs.

  3. 42 CFR 419.31 - Ambulatory payment classification (APC) system and payment weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ambulatory payment classification (APC) system and... Outpatient Services § 419.31 Ambulatory payment classification (APC) system and payment weights. (a) APC... of resource use into APC groups. Except as specified in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, items and...

  4. The long-term effect of ambulatory oxygen in normoxaemic COPD patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringbaek, Thomas; Martinez, Gerd; Lange, Peter

    2013-01-01

    To study the long-term benefits of ambulatory oxygen (AO) in combination with pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients experiencing exertional desaturation.......To study the long-term benefits of ambulatory oxygen (AO) in combination with pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients experiencing exertional desaturation....

  5. Adopting Ambulatory Breast Cancer Surgery as the Standard of Care in an Asian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Ying Ru Ng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ambulatory surgery is not commonly practiced in Asia. A 23-hour ambulatory (AS23 service was implemented at our institute in March 2004 to allow more surgeries to be performed as ambulatory procedures. In this study, we reviewed the impact of the AS23 service on breast cancer surgeries and reviewed surgical outcomes, including postoperative complications, length of stay, and 30-day readmission. Methods. Retrospective review was performed of 1742 patients who underwent definitive breast cancer surgery from 1 March 2004 to 31 December 2010. Results. By 2010, more than 70% of surgeries were being performed as ambulatory procedures. Younger women (P<0.01, those undergoing wide local excision (P<0.01 and those with ductal carcinoma-in situ or early stage breast cancer (P<0.01, were more likely to undergo ambulatory surgery. Six percent of patients initially scheduled for ambulatory surgery were eventually managed as inpatients; a third of these were because of perioperative complications. Wound complications, 30-day readmission and reoperation rates were not more frequent with ambulatory surgery. Conclusion. Ambulatory breast cancer surgery is now the standard of care at our institute. An integrated workflow facilitating proper patient selection and structured postoperativee outpatient care have ensured minimal complications and high patient acceptance.

  6. Structure and anticoagulant activity of a sulfated galactan from the red alga, Gelidium crinale. Is there a specific structural requirement for the anticoagulant action?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Maria G; Benevides, Norma M B; Melo, Marcia R S; Valente, Ana Paula; Melo, Fábio R; Mourão, Paulo A S

    2005-09-05

    Marine red algae are an abundant source of sulfated galactans with potent anticoagulant activity. However, the specific structural motifs that confer biological activity remain to be elucidated. We have now isolated and purified a sulfated galactan from the marine red alga, Gellidium crinale. The structure of this polysaccharide was determined using NMR spectroscopy. It is composed of the repeating structure -4-alpha-Galp-(1-->3)-beta-Galp1--> but with a variable sulfation pattern. Clearly 15% of the total alpha-units are 2,3-di-sulfated and another 55% are 2-sulfated. No evidence for the occurrence of 3,6-anhydro alpha-galactose units was observed in the NMR spectra. We also compared the anticoagulant activity of this sulfated galactan with a polysaccharide from the species, Botryocladia occidentalis, with a similar saccharide chain but with higher amounts of 2,3-di-sulfated alpha-units. The sulfated galactan from G. crinale has a lower anticoagulant activity on a clotting assay when compared with the polysaccharide from B. occidentalis. When tested in assays using specific proteases and coagulation inhibitors, these two galactans showed significant differences in their activity. They do not differ in thrombin inhibition mediated by antithrombin, but in assays where heparin cofactor II replaces antithrombin, the sulfated galactan from G. crinale requires a significantly higher concentration to achieve the same inhibitory effect as the polysaccharide from B. occidentalis. In contrast, when factor Xa instead of thrombin is used as the target protease, the sulfated galactan from G. crinale is a more potent anticoagulant. These observations suggest that the proportion and/or the distribution of 2,3-di-sulfated alpha-units along the galactan chain may be a critical structural motif to promote the interaction of the protease with specific protease and coagulation inhibitors.

  7. Are pharmacological properties of anticoagulants reflected in pharmaceutical pricing and reimbursement policy? Out-patient treatment of venous thromboembolism and utilization of anticoagulants in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochenek, T; Czarnogorski, M; Nizankowski, R; Pilc, A

    2014-06-01

    Pharmacotherapy with vitamin K antagonists (VKA) and low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWH) is a major cost driver in the treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Major representatives of anticoagulants in Europe include: acenocoumarol and warfarin (VKA), enoxaparin, dalteparin, nadroparin, reviparin, parnaparin and bemiparin (LMWH). Aim of this report is to measure and critically assess the utilization of anticoagulants and other resources used in the out-patient treatment of VTE in Poland. To confront the findings with available scientific evidence on pharmacological and clinical properties of anticoagulants. The perspectives of the National Health Fund (NHF) and the patients were adopted, descriptive statistics methods were used. The data were gathered at the NHF and the clinic specialized in treatment of coagulation disorders. Non-pharmacological costs of treatment were for the NHF 1.6 times higher with VKA than with LMWH. Daily cost of pharmacotherapy with LMWH turned out higher than with VKA (234 times for the NHF, 42 times per patient). Within both LMWH and VKA the reimbursement due for the daily doses of a particular medication altered in the manner inversely proportional to the level of patient co-payment. Utilization of long-marketed and cheap VKA was dominated by LMWH, when assessed both through the monetary measures and by the actual volume of sales. Pharmaceutical reimbursement policy favored the more expensive equivalents among VKA and LMWH, whereas in the financial terms the patients were far better off when remaining on a more expensive alternative. The pharmaceutical pricing and reimbursement policy of the state should be more closely related to the pharmacological properties of anticoagulants.

  8. Office blood pressure or ambulatory blood pressure for the prediction of cardiovascular events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Rikke Nørmark; Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Jeppesen, Jørgen Lykke

    2017-01-01

    Aims: To determine the added value of (i) 24-h ambulatory blood pressure relative to office blood pressure and (ii) night-time ambulatory blood pressure relative to daytime ambulatory blood pressure for 10-year person-specific absolute risks of fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events. Methods...... and results: A total of 7927 participants were included from the International Database on Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in relation to Cardiovascular Outcomes. We used cause-specific Cox regression to predict 10-year person-specific absolute risks of fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events....... Discrimination of 10-year outcomes was assessed by time-dependent area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). No differences in predicted risks were observed when comparing office blood pressure and ambulatory blood pressure. The median difference in 10-year risks (1st; 3rd quartile) was -0...

  9. Ambulatory intravenous ceftriaxone in paediatric A&E: a useful alternative to hospital admission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jennifer K; Alexander, Saji; Abrahamson, Ed

    2011-10-01

    Treatment of children with intravenous ceftriaxone on an ambulatory basis is described. This allows a child to remain at home, but also be reviewed regularly when attending the Emergency Department for antibiotics. Indications for, and length of, treatment and laboratory parameters were recorded. Also, a survey of children's parents was undertaken to ascertain opinions regarding ambulatory treatment. 36 patients were treated with ambulatory ceftriaxone over 4 months. Indications included fever without focus, tonsillitis, periorbital cellulitis, urinary tract infection, petechial rash and lymphadenitis. Median duration of treatment was 2.3 days. There was no occult bacteraemia but five positive urine cultures. There was one failure of treatment with subsequent admission for alternative intravenous antibiotics. Parental opinion favours ambulatory treatment, with 94% of parents acknowledging they would choose it again in similar circumstances. Cost analysis favours ambulatory treatment based on predicted costs of a similar length of inpatient stay.

  10. The comprehensive care project: measuring physician performance in ambulatory practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmboe, Eric S; Weng, Weifeng; Arnold, Gerald K; Kaplan, Sherrie H; Normand, Sharon-Lise; Greenfield, Sheldon; Hood, Sarah; Lipner, Rebecca S

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the feasibility, reliability, and validity of comprehensively assessing physician-level performance in ambulatory practice. Ambulatory-based general internists in 13 states participated in the assessment. We assessed physician-level performance, adjusted for patient factors, on 46 individual measures, an overall composite measure, and composite measures for chronic, acute, and preventive care. Between- versus within-physician variation was quantified by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). External validity was assessed by correlating performance on a certification exam. Medical records for 236 physicians were audited for seven chronic and four acute care conditions, and six age- and gender-appropriate preventive services. Performance on the individual and composite measures varied substantially within (range 5-86 percent compliance on 46 measures) and between physicians (ICC range 0.12-0.88). Reliabilities for the composite measures were robust: 0.88 for chronic care and 0.87 for preventive services. Higher certification exam scores were associated with better performance on the overall (r = 0.19; pmeasures and by sampling feasible numbers of patients for each condition. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  11. Developments in ambulatory surgery in orthopedics in France in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulet, C; Rochcongar, G; Court, C

    2017-02-01

    Under the new categorization introduced by the Health Authorities, ambulatory surgery (AS) in France now accounts for 50% of procedures, taking all surgical specialties together. The replacement of full hospital admission by AS is now well established and recognized. Health-care centers have learned, in coordination with the medico-surgical and paramedical teams, how to set up AS units and the corresponding clinical pathways. There is no single model handed down from above. The authorities have encouraged these developments, partly by regulations but also by means of financial incentives. Patient eligibility and psychosocial criteria are crucial determining factors for the success of the AS strategy. The surgeons involved are strongly committed. Feedback from many orthopedic subspecialties (shoulder, foot, knee, spine, hand, large joints, emergency and pediatric surgery) testify to the rise of AS, which now accounts for 41% of all orthopedic procedures. Questions remain, however, concerning the role of the GP in the continuity of care, the role of innovation and teaching, the creation of new jobs, and the attractiveness of AS for surgeons. More than ever, it is the patient who is "ambulatory", within an organized structure in which surgical technique and pain management are well controlled. Not all patients can be eligible, but the AS concept is becoming standard, and overnight stay will become a matter for medical and surgical prescription. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of quality metrics for ambulatory pediatric cardiology: Chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jimmy C; Bansal, Manish; Behera, Sarina K; Boris, Jeffrey R; Cardis, Brian; Hokanson, John S; Kakavand, Bahram; Jedeikin, Roy

    2017-12-01

    As part of the American College of Cardiology Adult Congenital and Pediatric Cardiology Section effort to develop quality metrics (QMs) for ambulatory pediatric practice, the chest pain subcommittee aimed to develop QMs for evaluation of chest pain. A group of 8 pediatric cardiologists formulated candidate QMs in the areas of history, physical examination, and testing. Consensus candidate QMs were submitted to an expert panel for scoring by the RAND-UCLA modified Delphi process. Recommended QMs were then available for open comments from all members. These QMs are intended for use in patients 5-18 years old, referred for initial evaluation of chest pain in an ambulatory pediatric cardiology clinic, with no known history of pediatric or congenital heart disease. A total of 10 candidate QMs were submitted; 2 were rejected by the expert panel, and 5 were removed after the open comment period. The 3 approved QMs included: (1) documentation of family history of cardiomyopathy, early coronary artery disease or sudden death, (2) performance of electrocardiogram in all patients, and (3) performance of an echocardiogram to evaluate coronary arteries in patients with exertional chest pain. Despite practice variation and limited prospective data, 3 QMs were approved, with measurable data points which may be extracted from the medical record. However, further prospective studies are necessary to define practice guidelines and to develop appropriate use criteria in this population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Blood Pressure Measurement: Clinic, Home, Ambulatory, and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drawz, Paul E.; Abdalla, Mohamed; Rahman, Mahboob

    2014-01-01

    Blood pressure has traditionally been measured in the clinic setting using the auscultory method and a mercury sphygmomanometer. Technological advances have led to improvements in measuring clinic blood pressure and allowed for measuring blood pressures outside the clinic. This review outlines various methods for evaluating blood pressure and the clinical utility of each type of measurement. Home blood pressures and 24 hour ambulatory blood pressures have improved our ability to evaluate risk for target organ damage and hypertension related morbidity and mortality. Measuring home blood pressures may lead to more active participation in health care by patients and has the potential to improve blood pressure control. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring enables the measuring nighttime blood pressures and diurnal changes, which may be the most accurate predictors of risk associated with elevated blood pressure. Additionally, reducing nighttime blood pressure is feasible and may be an important component of effective antihypertensive therapy. Finally, estimating central aortic pressures and pulse wave velocity are two of the newer methods for assessing blood pressure and hypertension related target organ damage. PMID:22521624

  14. Effects of health information exchange adoption on ambulatory testing rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Stephen E; Radcliff, Tiffany A; Leblanc, William G; Dickinson, L Miriam; Libby, Anne M; Nease, Donald E

    2013-01-01

    To determine the effects of the adoption of ambulatory electronic health information exchange (HIE) on rates of laboratory and radiology testing and allowable charges. Claims data from the dominant health plan in Mesa County, Colorado, from 1 April 2005 to 31 December 2010 were matched to HIE adoption data on the provider level. Using mixed effects regression models with the quarter as the unit of analysis, the effect of HIE adoption on testing rates and associated charges was assessed. Claims submitted by 306 providers in 69 practices for 34 818 patients were analyzed. The rate of testing per provider was expressed as tests per 1000 patients per quarter. For primary care providers, the rate of laboratory testing increased over the time span (baseline 1041 tests/1000 patients/quarter, increasing by 13.9 each quarter) and shifted downward with HIE adoption (downward shift of 83, prates or imputed charges in either provider group. Ambulatory HIE adoption is unlikely to produce significant direct savings through reductions in rates of testing. The economic benefits of HIE may reside instead in other downstream outcomes of better informed, higher quality care.

  15. Pain Management in Ambulatory Surgery—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan G. Jakobsson

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Day surgery, coming to and leaving the hospital on the same day as surgery as well as ambulatory surgery, leaving hospital within twenty-three hours is increasingly being adopted. There are several potential benefits associated with the avoidance of in-hospital care. Early discharge demands a rapid recovery and low incidence and intensity of surgery and anaesthesia related side-effects; such as pain, nausea and fatigue. Patients must be fit enough and symptom intensity so low that self-care is feasible in order to secure quality of care. Preventive multi-modal analgesia has become the gold standard. Administering paracetamol, NSIADs prior to start of surgery and decreasing the noxious influx by the use of local anaesthetics by peripheral block or infiltration in surgical field prior to incision and at wound closure in combination with intra-operative fast acting opioid analgesics, e.g., remifentanil, have become standard of care. Single preoperative 0.1 mg/kg dose dexamethasone has a combined action, anti-emetic and provides enhanced analgesia. Additional α-2-agonists and/or gabapentin or pregabalin may be used in addition to facilitate the pain management if patients are at risk for more pronounced pain. Paracetamol, NSAIDs and rescue oral opioid is the basic concept for self-care during the first 3–5 days after common day/ambulatory surgical procedures.

  16. An elective course on current concepts in adult ambulatory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Ashley H; Weber, Zachary A

    2014-12-15

    To design and evaluate a doctor of pharmacy course exploring disease states commonly encountered in ambulatory care, while applying literature to clinical practice and promoting a continual learning mindset. This elective incorporated a learner-centered teaching approach. Each week, 2 groups of students were assigned a clinical trial to present to their peers. The focus was on clinical application and impact, rather than literature evaluation. A social networking group on Facebook was used to expose students to pharmacy information outside the classroom. Student grades were determined by multiple activities: presentations, participation and moderation of the Facebook group, class participation, quiz scores, and quiz question development. Course evaluations served as a qualitative assessment of student learning and perceptions, quizzes were the most objective assessment of student learning, and presentation evaluations were the most directed assessment of course goals. This elective was an innovative approach to teaching ambulatory care that effectively filled a curricular void. Successful attainment of the primary course goals and objectives was demonstrated through course evaluations, surveys, and quiz and presentation scores.

  17. Ambulatory oxygen: why do COPD patients not use their portable systems as prescribed? A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenwick Angela

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with COPD on long term oxygen therapy frequently do not adhere to their prescription, and they frequently do not use their ambulatory oxygen systems as intended. Reasons for this lack of adherence are not known. The aim of this study was to obtain in-depth information about perceptions and use of prescribed ambulatory oxygen systems from patients with COPD to inform ambulatory oxygen design, prescription and management. Methods A qualitative design was used, involving semi-structured face-to-face interviews informed by a grounded theory approach. Twenty-seven UK community-dwelling COPD patients using NHS prescribed ambulatory systems were recruited. Ambulatory oxygen systems comprised cylinders weighing 3.4 kg, a shoulder bag and nasal cannulae. Results Participants reported that they: received no instruction on how to use ambulatory oxygen; were uncertain of the benefits; were afraid the system would run out while they were using it (due to lack of confidence in the cylinder gauge; were embarrassed at being seen with the system in public; and were unable to carry the system because of the cylinder weight. The essential role of carers was also highlighted, as participants with no immediate carers did not use ambulatory oxygen outside the house. Conclusions These participants highlighted previously unreported problems that prevented them from using ambulatory oxygen as prescribed. Our novel findings point to: concerns with the lack of specific information provision; the perceived unreliability of the oxygen system; important carer issues surrounding managing and using ambulatory oxygen equipment. All of these issues, as well as previously reported problems with system weight and patient embarrassment, should be addressed to improve adherence to ambulatory oxygen prescription and enhance the physical and social benefits of maintaining mobility in this patient group. Increased user involvement in both system development

  18. Biomarkers of adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Daniel F; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2018-02-01

    Adverse drug reactions can be caused by a wide range of therapeutics. Adverse drug reactions affect many bodily organ systems and vary widely in severity. Milder adverse drug reactions often resolve quickly following withdrawal of the casual drug or sometimes after dose reduction. Some adverse drug reactions are severe and lead to significant organ/tissue injury which can be fatal. Adverse drug reactions also represent a financial burden to both healthcare providers and the pharmaceutical industry. Thus, a number of stakeholders would benefit from development of new, robust biomarkers for the prediction, diagnosis, and prognostication of adverse drug reactions. There has been significant recent progress in identifying predictive genomic biomarkers with the potential to be used in clinical settings to reduce the burden of adverse drug reactions. These have included biomarkers that can be used to alter drug dose (for example, Thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) and azathioprine dose) and drug choice. The latter have in particular included human leukocyte antigen (HLA) biomarkers which identify susceptibility to immune-mediated injuries to major organs such as skin, liver, and bone marrow from a variety of drugs. This review covers both the current state of the art with regard to genomic adverse drug reaction biomarkers. We also review circulating biomarkers that have the potential to be used for both diagnosis and prognosis, and have the added advantage of providing mechanistic information. In the future, we will not be relying on single biomarkers (genomic/non-genomic), but on multiple biomarker panels, integrated through the application of different omics technologies, which will provide information on predisposition, early diagnosis, prognosis, and mechanisms. Impact statement • Genetic and circulating biomarkers present significant opportunities to personalize patient therapy to minimize the risk of adverse drug reactions. ADRs are a significant heath issue

  19. Use of Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants 2008-2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haastrup, Simone; Hellfritzsch, Maja; Rasmussen, Lotte

    2018-01-01

    We aimed to provide detailed utilization data on the total use of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) since their introduction in 2008. Using the nationwide Danish National Prescription Registry, we identified all individuals filling prescriptions for NOACs 2008-2016. We reported...

  20. Monitoring the Effects and Antidotes of the Non-vitamin K Oral Anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahmat, Nur A; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, we have witnessed the emergence of the oral non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs), which have numerous advantages compared with the vitamin K antagonists, particularly their lack of need for monitoring; as a result their use is increasing. Nonetheless, the NOACs face two...

  1. Partial Purification and Characterization of Anticoagulant Factor from the Snake (Echis Carinatus) Venom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrollahi Byoki, Elham; Zare Mirakabadi, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Snake venoms contain complex mixture of proteins with biological activities. Some of these proteins affect blood coagulation and platelet function in different ways. Snake venom toxin may serve as a starting material for drug design to combat several pathophysiological problems such as cardiovascular disorders. In the present study, purification of anticoagulation factor from venom of snake (Echis carinatus) was studied. Materials and Methods: Anticoagulation activity of crude venom, fractions and purified peptide were determined by using prothrombin time (PT) and thrombin time (TT). Three fractions were partially purified from the venom of E. Carinatus by gel filtration on sephadex G-75 and final purification was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with C18 column. A purified anticoagulant factor was derived which showed a single protein band in SDS-PAGE electrophoresis under reducing condition. Results: Results of PT and TT tests for purified peptide (EC217) were found to be 102±4.242 and < 5 min. respectively. Determination of molecular weight revealed that the active purified peptide (EC217) was about 30 KD. Conclusion: The present study showed that the venom of E. carinatus contains at least one anticoagulant factor. PMID:24494065

  2. Partial Purification and Characterization of Anticoagulant Factor from the Snake (Echis carinatus Venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Amrollahi Byoki

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: Snake venoms contain complex mixture of proteins with biological activities. Some of these proteins affect blood coagulation and platelet function in different ways. Snake venom toxin may serve as a starting material for drug design to combat several pathophysiological problems such as cardiovascular disorders. In the present study, purification of anticoagulation factor from venom of snake (Echis carinatus was studied. Anticoagulation activity of crude venom, fractions and purified peptide were determined by using prothrombin time (PT and thrombin time (TT. Three fractions were partially purified from the venom of E. Carinatus by gel filtration on sephadex G-75 and final purification was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC with C18 column. A purified anticoagulant factor was derived which showed a single protein band in SDS-PAGE electrophoresis under reducing condition. Results of PT and TT tests for purified peptide (EC217 were found to be 102±4.242 and < 5 min. respectively. Determination of molecular weight revealed that the active purified peptide (EC217 was about 30 KD. In conclusion, the present study showed that the venom of E. carinatus contains at least one anticoagulant factor.

  3. A plasma coagulation assay for an activated protein C-independent anticoagulant activity of protein S

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijnen, M.; van 't Veer, C.; Meijers, J. C.; Bertina, R. M.; Bouma, B. N.

    1998-01-01

    To study the physiological importance of the activated protein C (APC)-independent anticoagulant activity of protein S, we developed an assay specific for this activity. The ability of protein S to prolong the clotting time in an APC-independent way was expressed as the ratio of the clotting time in

  4. Dental Procedures in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and New Oral Anticoagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This review discusses the basic pharmacology of new oral anticoagulants that are used for prevention of thromboembolism in patients with atrial fibrillation. It presents available evidence, and provides recommendations for the management of patients requiring invasive procedures in dental practice. PMID:26835072

  5. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulation usage according to age among patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staerk, Laila; Fosbøl, Emil Loldrup; Gadsbøll, Kasper

    2016-01-01

    Among atrial fibrillation (AF) patients, Danish nationwide registries (2011-2015) were used to examine temporal trends of initiation patterns of oral anticoagulation (OAC) treatment according to age. Overall, 43,299 AF patients initiating vitamin K antagonists (VKA) (42%), dabigatran (29...

  6. Management strategies for optimal control of anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, Marcel; De Peuter, Olaf R.; Kamphuisen, Pieter W.

    2009-01-01

    Most patients with atrial fibrillation need anticoagulant treatment with vitamin K antagonists for prevention of thromboembolism, in particular ischemic stroke. Many studies show the efficacy of this treatment but also that it is difficult to keep patients who use vitamin K antagonists in the proper

  7. Discontinuation risk comparison among 'real-world' newly anticoagulated atrial fibrillation patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Pan, Xianying; Kamble, Shital

    2018-01-01

    Discontinuation of oral anticoagulants may expose non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) patients to an increased risk of stroke. This study describes the real-world discontinuation rates and compared the risk of drug discontinuation among NVAF patients initiating apixaban, warfarin, dabigatran,...

  8. Local hemostatic measures in anticoagulated patients undergoing oral surgery: a systematized literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Wildson Gurgel Costa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To conduct a systematized review of the literature about the main local hemostatic measures to control postoperative bleeding in anticoagulated patients. METHODS: A systematized review of literature was performed in the electronic database Medline (PubMed without restriction of the publication date. The eligibility criteria were studies involving maintenance of the anticoagulant therapy, prospective studies, retrospective studies, randomized clinical trials, controlled clinical studies, comparative studies, multicentric studies or case-control studies. Studies discontinuing anticoagulant therapy, case reports, literature reviews, in vitro studies, animal experiments and articles written in language not compatible with the search strategy adopted in this work were excluded. RESULTS: Twenty-four articles that met the adopted eligibility criteria were selected, enrolling 3891 subjects under anticoagulant therapy. A total of 171 cases of hemorrhage was observed. Tranexamic acid was the main local hemostatic measure used to controlling of postoperative bleeding. CONCLUSION: The local hemostatic measures proved to be effective according to previously published studies. Nevertheless, further clinical studies should be conducted to confirm this effectiveness.

  9. Interference from lupus anticoagulant on von Willebrand factor measurement in splenic marginal zone lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinholt, Pernille J; Nybo, Mads

    2015-01-01

    We present a case concerning a patient with splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) and isolated prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) caused by lupus anticoagulant. Von Willebrand factor (VWF) activity and antigen were immeasurable by latex particle immunoturbidimetric assays...

  10. Use of oral anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation and renal dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Potpara, Tatjana S; Ferro, Charles J; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2018-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are increasingly prevalent in the general population and share common risk factors such as older age, hypertension and diabetes mellitus. The presence of CKD increases the risk of incident AF, and, likewise, AF increases the risk of CKD de......, where appropriate, use of warfarin with good-quality anticoagulation control....

  11. Does small mammal prey guild affect the exposure of predators to anticoagulant rodenticides?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosh, D.G.; McDonald, R.A.; Bearhop, S.; Lllewellyn, N.R.; Fee, S.; Sharp, E.A.; Barnett, E.A.; Shore, R.F.

    2011-01-01

    Ireland has a restricted small mammal prey guild but still includes species most likely to consume anticoagulant rodenticide (AR) baits. This may enhance secondary exposure of predators to ARs. We compared liver AR residues in foxes (Vulpes vulpes) in Northern Ireland (NI) with those in foxes from Great Britain which has a more diverse prey guild but similar agricultural use of ARs. Liver ARs were detected in 84% of NI foxes, more than in a comparable sample of foxes from Scotland and similar to that of suspected AR poisoned animals from England and Wales. High exposure in NI foxes is probably due to greater predation of commensal rodents and non-target species most likely to take AR baits, and may also partly reflect greater exposure to highly persistent brodifacoum and flocoumafen. High exposure is likely to enhance risk and Ireland may be a sentinel for potential effects on predator populations. - Highlights: → Exposure of a predator to anticoagulant rodenticides was compared in Britain and Ireland. → Exposure was higher in Ireland. → Differences driven by small mammal prey guilds. → Ireland a potential sentinel for predator exposure to anticoagulants. - Restriction of the small mammal prey guild is associated with enhanced exposure of predators to anticoagulant rodenticides.

  12. Recurrent deep venous thrombosis during optimal anticoagulation and overt hyperthyroidism: a case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Squizzato, Alessandro; Vitale, Josè; Gerdes, Victor Ea; Romualdi, Erica; Büller, Harry R.; Ageno, Walter

    2007-01-01

    Recurrent deep venous thrombosis despite well conducted anticoagulant treatment is an uncommon, but possible, event. It has been hypothesized that overt hyperthyroidism may increase thromboembolic risk. We present the case of an elderly man with a recurrent episode of deep venous thrombosis during

  13. Inhibition of adhesion breast cancer cells by anticoagulant drugs and cimetidine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bobek, V.; Boubelík, Michael; Kovařík, J.; Taltynov, O.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 2 (2003), s. 148-151 ISSN 0028-2685 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : cimetidine * breast cancer * anticoagulants Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.782, year: 2003

  14. Reversing the Effect of Oral Anticoagulant Drugs: Established and Newer Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansell, Jack E

    2016-06-01

    The vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) have been the standard (and only) oral anticoagulants used for the long-term treatment or prevention of venous thromboembolism or stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. The coagulopathy induced by VKAs can be reversed with vitamin K, and in urgent situations, the vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors can be replaced by transfusion. In the last decade, a new class of oral anticoagulants has been developed, direct oral anticoagulants that bind to a specific coagulation factor and neutralize it. These compounds were shown to be effective and safe compared with the VKAs and were licensed for specific indications, but without a specific reversal agent. The absence of a reversal agent is a barrier to more widespread use of these agents. Currently, for the management of major life-threatening bleeding with the direct oral anticoagulants, most authorities recommend the use of four factor prothrombin complex concentrates. There are now three reversal agents in development and poised to enter the market. Idarucizumab is a specific antidote targeted to reverse the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran, which was recently approved for use in the USA. Andexanet alfa is an antidote targeted to reverse the oral direct factor Xa inhibitors as well as the indirect inhibitor enoxaparin. Ciraparantag is an antidote targeted to reverse the direct thrombin and factor Xa inhibitors as well as the indirect inhibitor enoxaparin.

  15. Non-Vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulation usage according to age among patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staerk, L.; Fosbøl, E L; Gadsbøll, K.

    2016-01-01

    Among atrial fibrillation (AF) patients, Danish nationwide registries (2011-2015) were used to examine temporal trends of initiation patterns of oral anticoagulation (OAC) treatment according to age. Overall, 43,299 AF patients initiating vitamin K antagonists (VKA) (42%), dabigatran (29...

  16. Home management of oral anticoagulation via telemedicine versus conventional hospital-based treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henry; Lauterlein, Jens-Jacob; Sørensen, Patricia D

    2011-01-01

    We have developed an expert computer system for the control of oral anticoagulation therapy, accessible by the patients via their own computer. To investigate if the weekly measurement and dosing of international normalized ratio (INR) at home using the online Internet-based system was superior t...

  17. Current practice of antiplatelet and anticoagulation management in post-cardiac surgery patients: a national audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosmane, Sharath; Birla, Rashmi; Marchbank, Adrian

    2012-04-01

    The Audit and Guidelines Committee of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery recently published a guideline on antiplatelet and anticoagulation management in cardiac surgery. We aimed to assess the awareness of the current guideline and adherence to it in the National Health Service through this National Audit. We designed a questionnaire consisting of nine questions covering various aspects of antiplatelet and anticoagulation management in post-cardiac surgery patients. A telephonic survey of the on-call cardiothoracic registrars in all the cardiothoracic centres across the UK was performed. All 37 National Health Service hospitals in the UK with 242 consultants providing adult cardiac surgical service were contacted. Twenty (54%) hospitals had a unit protocol for antiplatelet and anticoagulation management in post-cardiac surgery. Only 23 (62.2%) registrars were aware of current European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery guidelines. Antiplatelet therapy is variable in the cardiac surgical units across the country. Low-dose aspirin is commonly used despite the recommendation of 150-300 mg. The loading dose of aspirin within 24 h as recommended by the guideline is followed only by 60.7% of surgeons. There was not much deviation from the guideline with respect to the anticoagulation therapy.

  18. Clinical impact of a pharmacist-led inpatient anticoagulation service: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee T

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tiffany Lee, Erin Davis, Jason Kielly School of Pharmacy, Memorial University, St John's, NL, Canada Background: Anticoagulant therapies provide management options for potentially life-threatening thromboembolic conditions. They also carry significant safety risks, requiring careful consideration of medication dose, close monitoring, and follow-up. Inpatients are particularly at risk, considering the widespread use of anticoagulants in hospitals. This has prompted the introduction of safety goals for anticoagulants in Canada and the USA, which recommend increased pharmacist involvement to reduce patient harm. The goal of this review is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pharmacist-led inpatient anticoagulation services compared to usual or physician-managed care. Methods: This narrative review includes articles identified through a literature search of PubMed, Embase, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts databases, as well as hand searches of the references of relevant articles. Full publications of pharmacist-managed inpatient anticoagulation services were eligible if they were published in English and assessed clinical outcomes. Results: Twenty-six studies were included and further divided into two categories: 1 autonomous pharmacist-managed anticoagulation programs (PMAPs and 2 pharmacist recommendation. Pharmacist management of heparin and warfarin appears to result in improvements in some surrogate outcomes (international normalized ratio [INR] stability and time in INR goal range, while results for others are mixed (time to therapeutic INR, length of stay, and activated partial thromboplastin time [aPTT] measures. There is also some indication that PMAPs may be associated with reduced patient mortality. When direct thrombin inhibitors are managed by pharmacists, there seems to be a shorter time to therapeutic aPTT and a greater percentage of time in the therapeutic range, as well as a decrease in the frequency of medication

  19. Scoring and psychometric validation of the Perception of Anticoagulant Treatment Questionnaire (PACT-Q©

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essers B

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 'Perception of Anti-Coagulant Treatment Questionnaire' (PACT-Q was developed to assess patients' expectations of, and satisfaction with their anticoagulant treatment. This questionnaire needs to be finalised and psychometrically validated. Methods The PACT-Q was included in the United States, the Netherlands and France into three phase III multinational clinical trials conducted to evaluate efficacy and safety of a new long-acting anticoagulant drug (idraparinux compared to vitamin K antagonist (VKA. PACT-Q was administered to patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT, atrial fibrillation (AF or pulmonary embolism (PE at Day 1, to assess patients' expectations, and at 3 and 6 months to assess patients' satisfaction and treatment convenience and burden. The final structure of the PACT-Q (Principal Component Analysis – PCA – with Varimax Rotation was first determined and its psychometric properties were then measured with validity of the structure (Multitrait analysis, internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha coefficients and known-group validity. Results PCA and multitrait analyses showed the multidimensionality of the "Treatment Expectations" dimension, comprising 7 items that had to be scored independently. The "Convenience" and "Burden of Disease and Treatment" dimensions of the hypothesised original structure of the questionnaire were combined, thus resulting in 13 items grouped into the single dimension "Convenience". The "Anticoagulant Treatment Satisfaction" dimension remained unchanged and included 7 items. All items of the "Convenience" and "Anticoagulant Treatment Satisfaction" dimensions displayed good convergent and discriminant validity. The internal consistency reliability was good, with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.84 for the "Convenience" dimension, and 0.76 for the "Anticoagulant Treatment Satisfaction" dimension. Known-group validity was good, especially with regard to occurrence of

  20. Cardioversion and Risk of Adverse Events with Dabigatran versus Warfarin-A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannik Langtved Pallisgaard

    Full Text Available Cardioversion can rapidly and effectively restore sinus rhythm in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation. Since 2011 dabigatran has been available as an alternative to warfarin to prevent thromboembolic events in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation undergoing cardioversion. We studied time to cardioversion, risk of adverse events, and risk of readmission with atrial fibrillation after cardioversion according to anticoagulation therapy.Through the nationwide Danish registries we included 1,230 oral anticoagulation naïve patients with first time non-valvular atrial fibrillation and first time cardioversion from 2011 to 2012; 37% in the dabigatran group (n = 456, and 63% in the warfarin group (n = 774. Median time to cardioversion was 4.0 (interquartile range [IQR] 2.9 to 6.5 and 6.9 (IQR 3.9 to 12.1 weeks in the dabigatran and warfarin groups respectively, and the adjusted odds ratio of cardioversion within the first 4 weeks was 2.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7 to 3.1 in favor of dabigatran. The cumulative incidence of composite endpoint of stroke, bleeding or death were 2.0% and 1.0% at 30 weeks in the warfarin and dabigatran groups respectively, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.33 (95% CI 0.33 to 5.42. Cumulative incidence of readmission with atrial fibrillation after 30 weeks were 9% and 11% in the warfarin and dabigatran groups, respectively, and an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.66 (95% CI 0.41 to 1.08.Anticoagulation treatment with dabigatran allows shorter time to cardioversion for atrial fibrillation than warfarin, and appears to be an effective and safe alternative treatment strategy to warfarin.

  1. The Need for Anticoagulation Following Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement: Systematic Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, Charles E.; Prochazka, Allan

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. To perform a systemic review to determine the effect of anticoagulation on the rates of venous thromboembolism (pulmonary embolus, deep venous thrombosis, inferior vena cava (IVC) filter thrombosis) following placement of an IVC filter. Methods. A comprehensive computerized literature search was performed to identify relevant articles. Data were abstracted by two reviewers. Studies were included if it could be determined whether or not subjects received anticoagulation following filter placement, and if follow-up data were presented. A meta-analysis of patients from all included studies was performed. A total of 14 articles were included in the final analysis, but the data from only nine articles could be used in the meta-analysis; five studies were excluded because they did not present raw data which could be analyzed in the meta-analysis. A total of 1,369 subjects were included in the final meta-analysis. Results. The summary odds ratio for the effect of anticoagulation on venous thromboembolism rates following filter deployment was 0.639 (95% CI 0.351 to 1.159, p = 0.141). There was significant heterogeneity in the results from different studies [Q statistic of 15.95 (p = 0.043)]. Following the meta-analysis, there was a trend toward decreased venous thromboembolism rates in patients with post-filter anticoagulation (12.3% vs. 15.8%), but the result failed to reach statistical significance. Conclusion. Inferior vena cava filters can be placed in patients who cannot receive concomitant anticoagulation without placing them at significantly higher risk of development of venous thromboembolism

  2. Quality of Vitamin K Antagonist Anticoagulation in Spain: Prevalence of Poor Control and Associated Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguita Sánchez, Manuel; Bertomeu Martínez, Vicente; Cequier Fillat, Ángel

    2015-09-01

    To study the prevalence of poorly controlled vitamin K antagonist anticoagulation in Spain in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, and to identify associated factors. We studied 1056 consecutive patients seen at 120 cardiology clinics in Spain between November 2013 and March 2014. We analyzed the international normalized ratio from the 6 months prior to the patient's visit, calculating the prevalence of poorly controlled anticoagulation, defined as < 65% time in therapeutic range using the Rosendaal method. Mean age was 73.6 years (standard deviation, 9.8 years); women accounted for 42% of patients. The prevalence of poorly controlled anticoagulation was 47.3%. Mean time in therapeutic range was 63.8% (25.9%). The following factors were independently associated with poorly controlled anticoagulation: kidney disease (odds ratio = 1.53; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-2.18; P = .018), routine nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (odds ratio = 1.79; 95% confidence interval, 1.20-2.79; P = .004), antiplatelet therapy (odds ratio = 2.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.49-3.12; P < .0001) and absence of angiotensin receptor blockers (odds ratio = 1.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.79; P = .011). There is a high prevalence of poorly controlled vitamin K antagonist anticoagulation in Spain. Factors associated with poor control are kidney disease, routine nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiplatelet use, and absence of angiotensin receptor blockers. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Atrial fibrillation and stroke prevention practices in patients with candidacy for anticoagulation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, I.; Ahmad, S.; Hayat, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stroke secondary to Atrial Fibrillation is usually due to thrombi formed in the left atrium and left atrial appendage embolizing to cause ischemic stroke. Therefore, in patients with Atrial Fibrillation, antithrombotic therapy is recommended to prevent stroke. Vitamin K antagonist therapy is most widely used antithrombotic therapy for patients with valvular and non valvular AF. Aspirin is recommended only in low risk patients. This study was conducted to determine the stroke prevention practices in local patients with atrial fibrillation who were candidates for anticoagulation therapy. Method: This was descriptive cross sectional study conducted at Cardiovascular Department Lady Reading Hospital Peshawar and Cardiology Department Hayatabad Medical Complex Peshawar. Sampling technique was non probability consecutive. Patients visiting OPD of respective hospitals with EKG evidence of AF and having CHADES VASC score 2 or more or having mitral stenosis and AF were included in the study. Patients with additional indications for anticoagulation were excluded from the study. Results: A total of 205 patients with atrial fibrillation were studied. Mean age was 60.7±14.7 years. Male were 55.6 percentage (n=114) while 44.4 percentage (n=91) were female. Of these 149 (72.7 percentage) were candidates for anticoagulation based on CHA2DS2 VASc score of 2 and more or mitral stenosis with AF. Only 27.5 percentage (n=41) patients were adequately treated with anticoagulant therapy using VKA or novel oral anticoagulant drugs. Majority of them were getting dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT). Conclusion: Most patients with AF and high risk characteristics for thromboembolism are not receiving proper stroke prevention therapies. (author)

  4. Factors Affecting Outcome in Treatment of Chronic Subdural Hematoma in ICU Patients: Impact of Anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczygielski, Jacek; Gund, Sina-Maria; Schwerdtfeger, Karsten; Steudel, Wolf-Ingo; Oertel, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    The use of anticoagulants and older age are the main risk factors for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Because the age of the population and use of anticoagulants are increasing, a growing number of CSDH cases is expected. To address this issue, we analyzed the impact of anticoagulants on postsurgical outcome in patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Demographic data, coagulation parameters, surgical details, radiologic appearance of hematoma, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score on admission, and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score on discharge were retrieved and retrospectively analyzed in 98 patients with CSDH treated in the neurosurgical ICU using correlation coefficient tests and multivariate analysis test. Overall outcome was good (GOS score 4 and 5) in 55.1% of patients. Overall mortality was 9.1%. There was a correlation between GCS score on admission and GOS score. There was no correlation between hematoma thickness/radiologic appearance and impaired coagulation. Disturbance in thrombocyte function (usually resulting from aspirin intake) correlated with improved outcome, whereas warfarin-related coagulopathy correlated with poor recovery. Nevertheless, patients with thrombocytopathy presented with better initial GCS scores. Neither hematoma size nor recurrence rate affected the outcome. The size of CSDH was not associated with poor outcome and is not necessarily determined by the use of anticoagulants. Coagulopathy does not rule out a good outcome, but the impact of anticoagulation on treatment results in CSDH varies between the main groups of drugs (warfarin vs. antiplatelet drugs). Patients in good neurologic condition on ICU admission have better chances of recovery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Combined administration of antibiotics and direct oral anticoagulants: a renewed indication for laboratory monitoring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Mattiuzzi, Camilla

    2014-10-01

    The recent development and marketing of novel direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) represents a paradigm shift in the management of patients requiring long-term anticoagulation. The advantages of these compounds over traditional therapy with vitamin K antagonists include a reportedly lower risk of severe hemorrhages and the limited need for laboratory measurements. However, there are several scenarios in which testing should be applied. The potential for drug-to-drug interaction is one plausible but currently underrecognized indication for laboratory assessment of the anticoagulant effect of DOACs. In particular, substantial concern has been raised during Phase I studies regarding the potential interaction of these drugs with some antibiotics, especially those that interplay with permeability glycoprotein (P-gp) and cytochrome 3A4 (CYP3A4). A specific electronic search on clinical trials published so far confirms that clarithromycin and rifampicin significantly impair the bioavailability of dabigatran, whereas clarithromycin, erythromycin, fluconazole, and ketoconazole alter the metabolism of rivaroxaban in vivo. Because of their more recent development, no published data were found for apixaban and edoxaban, or for potential interactions of DOACs with other and widely used antibiotics. It is noteworthy, however, that an online resource based on Food and Drug Administration and social media information, reports several hemorrhagic and thrombotic events in patients simultaneously taking dabigatran and some commonly used antibiotics such as amoxicillin, cephalosporin, and metronidazole. According to these reports, the administration of antibiotics in patients undergoing therapy with DOACs would seem to require accurate evaluation as to whether dose adjustments (personalized or antibiotic class driven) of the anticoagulant drug may be advisable. This might be facilitated by direct laboratory assessments of their anticoagulant effect ex vivo. Thieme Medical Publishers

  6. Evaluation of Oral Anticoagulant-Associated Intracranial Parenchymal Hematomas Using CT Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökçe, E; Beyhan, M; Acu, B

    2015-06-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is one of the most serious and lethal complications of anticoagulants with a reported incidence of 5-18.5 %. Computed tomographic (CT) findings, should be carefully studied because early diagnosis and treatment of oral anticoagulant use-associated hematomas are vitally important. In the present study, CT findings of intraparenchymal hematomas associated with anticoagulant and antihypertensive use are presented. This study included 45 patients (25 men, 20 women) under anticoagulant (21 patients) or antihypertensive (24 patients) treatment who had brain CT examinations due to complaints and findings suggesting cerebrovascular disease during July 2010-October 2013 period. CT examinations were performed to determine hematoma volumes and presence of swirl sign, hematocrit effect, mid-line shift effect, and intraventricular extension. The patients were 40-89 years of age. In four cases, a total of 51 intraparenchymal hematomas (42 cerebral, 7 cerebellar and 2 brain stem) were detected in multiple foci. Hematoma volumes varied from 0.09 to 284.00 ml. Swirl sign was observed in 87.5 and 63.0 % of OAC-associated ICHs and non-OAC-associated ICHs, respectively. In addition, hematocrit effect was observed in 41.6 % of OAC-associated and in 3.7 % of non-OAC-associated ICHs. Volume increases were observed in all 19 hematomas where swirl sign was detected, and follow-up CT scanning was conducted. Mortality of OAC-associated ICHs was correlated with initial volumes of hematoma, mid-line shift amount, and intraventricular extension. Detection of hematocrit effect by CT scanning of intracranial hematomas should be cautionary in oral anticoagulant use, while detection of swirl sign should be suggestive of active hemorrhage.

  7. Economic evaluation of strategies for restarting anticoagulation therapy after a first event of unprovoked venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, M; Ensor, J; Moore, D; Fitzmaurice, D; Jowett, S

    2017-08-01

    Essentials Correct duration of treatment after a first unprovoked venous thromboembolism (VTE) is unknown. We assessed when restarting anticoagulation was worthwhile based on patient risk of recurrent VTE. When the risk over a one-year period is 17.5%, restarting is cost-effective. However, sensitivity analyses indicate large uncertainty in the estimates. Background Following at least 3 months of anticoagulation therapy after a first unprovoked venous thromboembolism (VTE), there is uncertainty about the duration of therapy. Further anticoagulation therapy reduces the risk of having a potentially fatal recurrent VTE but at the expense of a higher risk of bleeding, which can also be fatal. Objective An economic evaluation sought to estimate the long-term cost-effectiveness of using a decision rule for restarting anticoagulation therapy vs. no extension of therapy in patients based on their risk of a further unprovoked VTE. Methods A Markov patient-level simulation model was developed, which adopted a lifetime time horizon with monthly time cycles and was from a UK National Health Service (NHS)/Personal Social Services (PSS) perspective. Results Base-case model results suggest that treating patients with a predicted 1 year VTE risk of 17.5% or higher may be cost-effective if decision makers are willing to pay up to £20 000 per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained. However, probabilistic sensitivity analysis shows that the model was highly sensitive to overall parameter uncertainty and caution is warranted in selecting the optimal decision rule on cost-effectiveness grounds. Univariate sensitivity analyses indicate variables such as anticoagulation therapy disutility and mortality risks were very influential in driving model results. Conclusion This represents the first economic model to consider the use of a decision rule for restarting therapy for unprovoked VTE patients. Better data are required to predict long-term bleeding risks during therapy in this

  8. Andexanet alfa effectively reverses edoxaban anticoagulation effects and associated bleeding in a rabbit acute hemorrhage model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Genmin; Pine, Polly; Leeds, Janet M.; DeGuzman, Francis; Pratikhya, Pratikhya; Lin, Joyce; Malinowski, John; Hollenbach, Stanley J.; Curnutte, John T.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Increasing use of factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors necessitates effective reversal agents to manage bleeding. Andexanet alfa, a novel modified recombinant human FXa, rapidly reverses the anticoagulation effects of direct and indirect FXa inhibitors. Objective To evaluate the ability of andexanet to reverse anticoagulation in vitro and reduce bleeding in rabbits administered edoxaban. Materials and methods In vitro studies characterized the interaction of andexanet with edoxaban and its ability to reverse edoxaban-mediated anti-FXa activity. In a rabbit model of surgically induced, acute hemorrhage, animals received edoxaban vehicle+andexanet vehicle (control), edoxaban (1 mg/kg)+andexanet vehicle, edoxaban+andexanet (75 mg, 5-minute infusion, 20 minutes after edoxaban), or edoxaban vehicle+andexanet prior to injury. Results Andexanet bound edoxaban with high affinity similar to FXa. Andexanet rapidly and dose-dependently reversed the effects of edoxaban on FXa activity and coagulation pharmacodynamic parameters in vitro. In edoxaban-anticoagulated rabbits, andexanet reduced anti-FXa activity by 82% (from 548±87 to 100±41 ng/ml; P<0.0001), mean unbound edoxaban plasma concentration by ~80% (from 100±10 to 21±6 ng/ml; P<0.0001), and blood loss by 80% vs. vehicle (adjusted for control, 2.6 vs. 12.9 g; P = 0.003). The reduction in blood loss correlated with the decrease in anti-FXa activity (r = 0.6993, P<0.0001) and unbound edoxaban (r = 0.5951, P = 0.0035). Conclusion These data demonstrate that andexanet rapidly reversed the anticoagulant effects of edoxaban, suggesting it could be clinically valuable for the management of acute and surgery-related bleeding. Correlation of blood loss with anti-FXa activity supports the use of anti-FXa activity as a biomarker for assessing anticoagulation reversal in clinical trials. PMID:29590221

  9. Using Artificial Intelligence to Reduce the Risk of Nonadherence in Patients on Anticoagulation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labovitz, Daniel L; Shafner, Laura; Reyes Gil, Morayma; Virmani, Deepti; Hanina, Adam

    2017-05-01

    This study evaluated the use of an artificial intelligence platform on mobile devices in measuring and increasing medication adherence in stroke patients on anticoagulation therapy. The introduction of direct oral anticoagulants, while reducing the need for monitoring, have also placed pressure on patients to self-manage. Suboptimal adherence goes undetected as routine laboratory tests are not reliable indicators of adherence, placing patients at increased risk of stroke and bleeding. A randomized, parallel-group, 12-week study was conducted in adults (n=28) with recently diagnosed ischemic stroke receiving any anticoagulation. Patients were randomized to daily monitoring by the artificial intelligence platform (intervention) or to no daily monitoring (control). The artificial intelligence application visually identified the patient, the medication, and the confirmed ingestion. Adherence was measured by pill counts and plasma sampling in both groups. For all patients (n=28), mean (SD) age was 57 years (13.2 years) and 53.6% were women. Mean (SD) cumulative adherence based on the artificial intelligence platform was 90.5% (7.5%). Plasma drug concentration levels indicated that adherence was 100% (15 of 15) and 50% (6 of 12) in the intervention and control groups, respectively. Patients, some with little experience using a smartphone, successfully used the technology and demonstrated a 50% improvement in adherence based on plasma drug concentration levels. For patients receiving direct oral anticoagulants, absolute improvement increased to 67%. Real-time monitoring has the potential to increase adherence and change behavior, particularly in patients on direct oral anticoagulant therapy. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02599259. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. A cost-analysis model for anticoagulant treatment in the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Samir H; Huynh, Lynn; Zhuo, Daisy Y; Tran, Kevin N; Lefebvre, Patrick; Bookhart, Brahim

    2014-07-01

    Rivaroxaban is the first oral factor Xa inhibitor approved in the US to reduce the risk of stroke and blood clots among people with non-valvular atrial fibrillation, treat deep vein thrombosis (DVT), treat pulmonary embolism (PE), reduce the risk of recurrence of DVT and PE, and prevent DVT and PE after knee or hip replacement surgery. The objective of this study was to evaluate the costs from a hospital perspective of treating patients with rivaroxaban vs other anticoagulant agents across these five populations. An economic model was developed using treatment regimens from the ROCKET-AF, EINSTEIN-DVT and PE, and RECORD1-3 randomized clinical trials. The distribution of hospital admissions used in the model across the different populations was derived from the 2010 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project database. The model compared total costs of anticoagulant treatment, monitoring, inpatient stay, and administration for patients receiving rivaroxaban vs other anticoagulant agents. The length of inpatient stay (LOS) was determined from the literature. Across all populations, rivaroxaban was associated with an overall mean cost savings of $1520 per patient. The largest cost savings associated with rivaroxaban was observed in patients with DVT or PE ($6205 and $2742 per patient, respectively). The main driver of the cost savings resulted from the reduction in LOS associated with rivaroxaban, contributing to ∼90% of the total savings. Furthermore, the overall mean anticoagulant treatment cost was lower for rivaroxaban vs the reference groups. The distribution of patients across indications used in the model may not be generalizable to all hospitals, where practice patterns may vary, and average LOS cost may not reflect the actual reimbursements that hospitals received. From a hospital perspective, the use of rivaroxaban may be associated with cost savings when compared to other anticoagulant treatments due to lower drug cost and shorter LOS associated with

  11. Emergency management of major bleeding in a case of maxillofacial trauma and anticoagulation: utility of prothrombin complex concentrates in the shock room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Morotti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Life-threatening bleeding in anticoagulation with Warfarin is an emergency challenging issue. Several approaches are available to treat bleeding in either over-anticoagulation or propeanticoagulation, including vitamin K, fresh frozen plasma and prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC administration. In coexisting trauma-induced bleeding and anticoagulation, reversal of anticoagulation must be a rapid and highly effective procedure. Furthermore the appropriate treatment must be directly available in each shock rooms to guarantee the rapid management of the emergency. PCC require a simple storage, rapid accessibility, fast administration procedures and high effectiveness. Here we report the utility of PCC in management of a craniofacial trauma in proper-anticoagulation.

  12. The adverse effects of inadvertent intraoperative intravenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-03-03

    Mar 3, 2012 ... We present the case of a 24-year-old woman who was scheduled for an elective diagnostic laparoscopy for chronic pelvic pain. ... Shortly afterwards, the patient developed tachycardia with a heart rate up .... healthy 29-year-old male scheduled for an ambulatory coelioscopic cholecystectomy. Their patient ...

  13. The Relationship between Gender, Cumulative Adversities and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Relationship between Gender, Cumulative Adversities and Mental Health of Employees in ... CAs were measured in three forms (family adversities (CAFam), personal adversities ... Age of employees ranged between 18-65 years.

  14. Effect of ambulatory medicine tutorial on clinical performance of 5th year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phisalprapa, Pochamana; Pandejpong, Denla

    2013-02-01

    The present study provided a group learning activity called "Ambulatory Medicine Tutorial-AMT" for 5th year medical students in order to facilitate learning experience at ambulatory setting and to improve medical students' clinical performance. This research aimed specifically to study the effect of AMT. Two groups of twenty 5th-year medical students were enrolled during their ambulatory medicine blocks. Each medical student was assigned to have 8 ambulatory sessions. AMT was assigned to one group while the other group only used conventional learning activity. At the end of the present study, total internal medicine scores, patient satisfaction surveys, and data on average time spent on each clinical encounter were collected and compared. The AMT group received a higher total internal medicine score as compared to the conventional group (76.2 +/- 3.6 vs. 72.9 +/- 2.8, p = 0.003). The AMT group could reduce average time spent on each clinical encounter within their first-6 ambulatory sessions while the conventional group could acquire the same skill later in their last 2 ambulatory sessions. There was no significant difference found on comparing patient satisfaction scores between the 2 groups. AMT helped improving medical students' outcomes as shown from higher total internal medicine score as well as quicker improvement during real-life clinical encounters, AMT could be a good alternative learning activity for medical students at ambulatory setting.

  15. D-dimer to guide the intensity of anticoagulation in Chinese patients after mechanical heart valve replacement: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Zheng, X; Long, Y; Wu, M; Chen, Y; Yang, J; Liu, Z; Zhang, Z

    2017-10-01

    low-intensity group (5/240 vs. 14/237; HR, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.14-0.85). Overall, the total events were less in the D-dimer-guided group (9/240) when compared with the other two control groups (24/241, 20/237; HR, 0.37, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.19-0.72, 0.21-0.90 Conclusions The D-dimer-guided adjustment of anticoagulation intensity could reduce adverse events in Chinese patients after mechanical heart valve replacement. NCT01996657; ClinicalTrials.gov. © 2017 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  16. Impact of Anticoagulation in Elderly Patients With Pulmonary Embolism That Undergo IVC Filter Placement: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falatko, John M; Dalal, Bhavinkumar; Qu, Lihua

    2017-12-01

    Anticoagulation is the primary treatment for pulmonary embolism (PE). Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are an adjunctive intervention to prevent recurrent pulmonary embolism. Long-term outcomes in elderly patients with contraindications to anticoagulation after IVC filter placement for prevention of recurrent pulmonary embolism have yet to be assessed. Patients ≥60years of age, that had an IVC filter placed between 1 January, 2008 and 2 February, 2013, with a primary diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, were included. Patients that died during index hospitalisation, were discharged to hospice, or had active malignancy were excluded. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Patients were divided depending on whether they were treated with an approved anticoagulant for VTE or had no anticoagulant. Of the 152 patients identified, 55 were not anti-coagulated after IVC filter placement. The incidence of death was 0.4 per 1000 filter days and 0.7 per 1000 filter days in the anti-coagulated and untreated groups respectively (p-value=0.06). After statistical correction for co-morbid conditions, the effect of anticoagulation was not significant (HR 0.82 CI 0.49-1.37, p-value 0.46). Age was a significant confounder that was associated with death. Increased BMI was protective. Indications for IVC filter placement were numerous, but similar between the two groups. Treatment with an approved anticoagulant is recommended after IVC filter placement for prevention of recurrent PE, however its effect may be attenuated by advanced age. In elderly patients that have undergone IVC filter placement for prevention of recurrent PE, survival may be more dependent on age and co-morbid conditions than exposure to anticoagulation. Copyright © 2017 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring – Clinical Practice Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Mako

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM became a subject of considerable scientific interest. Due to the increasing use of the ABPM in everyday clinical practice it is important that all the users have a correct knowledge on the clinical indications, the methodology of using the device including some technical issues and the interpretation of results. In the last years several guidelines and position papers have been published with recommendations for the monitoring process, reference values, for clinical practice and research. This paper represents a summary of the most important aspects related to the use of ABPM in daily practice, being a synthesis of recommendations from the recent published guidelines and position papers. This reference article presents the practical and technical issues of ABPM, the use of this method in special situations, the clinical interpretation of measured values including the presentation of different ABPM patterns, derived parameters, the prognostic significance and the limitations of this method.

  18. Ambulatory Surgery Centers and Prices in Hospital Outpatient Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Kathleen

    2017-04-01

    Specialty providers claim to offer a new competitive benchmark for efficient delivery of health care. This article explores this view by examining evidence for price competition between ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) and hospital outpatient departments (HOPDs). I studied the impact of ASC market presence on actual prices paid to HOPDs during 2007-2010 for four common surgical procedures that were performed in both provider types. For the procedures examined, HOPDs received payments from commercial insurers in the range of 3.25% to 5.15% lower for each additional ASC per 100,000 persons in a market. HOPDs may have less negotiating leverage with commercial insurers on price in markets with high ASC market penetration, resulting in relatively lower prices.

  19. Acceptance of Ambulatory Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy in Central Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widjaja, Sandra P; Fischer, Henning; Brunner, Alexander R; Honigmann, Philipp; Metzger, Jürg

    2017-11-01

    Currently, most patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) in Switzerland are inpatients for 2-3 days. Due to a lack of available hospital beds, we asked whether day-case surgery would be an option for patients in central Switzerland. The questions of acceptability of outpatient LC and factors contributing to the acceptability thus arose. Hundred patients suffering from symptomatic cholecystolithiasis, capable of communicating in German, and between 18 and 65 years old, were included. Patients received a pre-operative questionnaire on medical history and social situation when informed consent on surgery and participation in the study was obtained. Exclusion criteria were patients suffering from acute cholecystitis or any type of cancer; having a BMI >40 kg/m 2 ; needing conversion to open cholecystectomy or an intraoperative drainage; and non-German speakers. Surgery was performed laparoscopically. Both surgeon and patient filled in a postoperative questionnaire. The surgeon's questionnaire listed medical and technical information, and the patients' questionnaire listed medical information, satisfaction with the treatment and willingness to be released on the same day. These data from both questionnaires were grouped into social and medical factors and analysed on their influence upon willingness to accept an ambulatory procedure. No outpatient follow-up apart from checking for readmission to our hospital within 1 month after discharge was performed. Of the 100 participants, one-third was male. More than two-thirds were Swiss citizens. Only one participant was ineligible for rapid release evaluation due to need of a drainage. Among the social factors contributing to the acceptability of ambulatory care, we found nationality to be relevant; Swiss citizens preferred an inpatient procedure, whereas non-Swiss citizens were significantly more willing to return home on the same day. Household size, sex and age did not correlate with a preference for

  20. Motivators for physical activity among ambulatory nursing home older residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuh-Min; Li, Yueh-Ping

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore self-identified motivators for regular physical activity among ambulatory nursing home older residents. A qualitative exploratory design was adopted. Purposive sampling was performed to recruit 18 older residents from two nursing homes in Taiwan. The interview transcripts were analyzed by qualitative content analysis. Five motivators of physical activity emerged from the result of analysis: eagerness for returning home, fear of becoming totally dependent, improving mood state, filling empty time, and previously cultivated habit. Research on physical activity from the perspectives of nursing home older residents has been limited. An empirically grounded understanding from this study could provide clues for promoting and supporting lifelong engagement in physical activity among older residents. The motivators reported in this study should be considered when designing physical activity programs. These motivators can be used to encourage, guide, and provide feedback to support older residents in maintaining physical activity.

  1. Is aerobic workload positively related to ambulatory blood pressure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korshøj, Mette; Clays, Els; Lidegaard, Mark

    2016-01-01

    workload and ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) are lacking. The aim was to explore the relationship between objectively measured relative aerobic workload and ABP. METHODS: A total of 116 cleaners aged 18-65 years were included after informed consent was obtained. A portable device (Spacelabs 90217......) was mounted for 24-h measurements of ABP, and an Actiheart was mounted for 24-h heart rate measurements to calculate relative aerobic workload as percentage of relative heart rate reserve. A repeated-measure multi-adjusted mixed model was applied for analysis. RESULTS: A fully adjusted mixed model...... of measurements throughout the day showed significant positive relations (p ABP and 0.30 ± 0.04 mmHg (95 % CI 0.22-0.38 mmHg) in diastolic ABP. Correlations between...

  2. Correction of time resolution of an ambulatory cardiac monitor (VEST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumita, Shin-ichiro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Hayashida, Kohei; Uehara, Toshiisa

    1990-01-01

    Using ambulatory cardiac monitor (VEST) at exercise study, its time resolution is very important factor. We evaluated the time resolution of VEST using pulsate cardiac baloon phantom. Four analysis were carried out; no smoothing (NS) method, 3 points smoothing (3S) method, short sampling interval (SS) method, and digital filter (DF) method. By comparison of |ΔEF| (|EF:HR120-EF: HR60|) among 4 analysis methods, |ΔEF| by DF method was significant small (NS:3.58±3.01, 3S: 4.46±0.95, SS: 3.35±3.26, DF: 1.11±1.28%). We conclude that correction of time resolution by digital filter is necessary when we use VEST during exercise. (author)

  3. Bidirectional peritoneal transport of albumin in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joffe, P; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1995-01-01

    The present study was undertaken in order to assess bidirectional peritoneal kinetics of albumin after simultaneous i.v. and i.p. injection of radioiodinated albumin tracers (125I-RISA and 131I-RISA) in eight clinically stable uraemic patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis...... (CAPD). The plasma volume, intravascular albumin mass (IVM), and overall extravasation rate of albumin were not significantly different from that found in healthy controls. Albumin flux from the plasma into the peritoneal cavity was 3.71 +/- 0.82 (SD) mumol/h, which was only 3% of the overall...... extravasation rate (137 +/- 52 mumol/h). Albumin flux from the peritoneal cavity into the plasma was substantially lower (0.22 +/- 0.07 mumol/h, P peritoneal accumulation of the albumin from plasma over 4 h was 14 +/- 3.2 mumol, which was significantly lower than the intraperitoneal albumin...

  4. Ambulatory major surgery of benign tumors of the thyroid gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzardo Silveira, Ernesto Manuel; Eirin Aranno, Juana Elisa

    2011-01-01

    A descriptive and prospective study on the practice of ambulatory major surgery to eliminate benign tumours of the thyroid gland, was carried out in the General Surgery Service of 'Dr. Joaquin Castillo Duany' Teaching Clinical Surgical Hospital in Santiago de Cuba during the years 1996-2008, both included, through a previous clinical evaluation of 74 patients in the Endocrinology Outpatient Department, where it was decided that they could definitely have a surgical treatment. The female sex, the age groups from 31 to 45 years, the hemithyroidectomy as surgical technique, acupuncture as analgesic procedure and the follicular adenoma as cytohistological result prevailed in the case material. Mild complications occurred in 5 members of the sample, but recovery was absolute in all, so that even 72 of them were discharged before the 24 hours. Due to its good acceptance, this surgical method is beneficial for patient and hospital institutions.(author)

  5. Reproducibility of the ambulatory arterial stiffness index in hypertensive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dechering, D.G.; Steen, M.S. van der; Adiyaman, A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We studied the repeatability of the ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI), which can be computed from 24-h blood pressure (BP) recordings as unity minus the regression slope of diastolic on systolic BP. METHODS: One hundred and fifty-two hypertensive outpatients recruited...... in Nijmegen (mean age = 46.2 years; 76.3% with systolic and diastolic hypertension) and 145 patients enrolled in the Systolic Hypertension in Europe (Syst-Eur) trial (71.0 years) underwent 24-h BP monitoring at a median interval of 8 and 31 days, respectively. We used the repeatability coefficient, which...... were approximately 30%. Differences in AASI between paired recordings were correlated with differences in the goodness of fit (r2) of the AASI regression line as well as with differences in the night-to-day BP ratio. However, in sensitivity analyses stratified for type of hypertension, r2, or dipping...

  6. Ambulatory Care Visits to Pediatricians in Taiwan: A Nationwide Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Yu Yang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pediatricians play a key role in the healthy development of children. Nevertheless, the practice patterns of pediatricians have seldom been investigated. The current study analyzed the nationwide profiles of ambulatory visits to pediatricians in Taiwan, using the National Health Insurance Research Database. From a dataset that was randomly sampled one out of every 500 records among a total of 309,880,000 visits in 2012 in the country, 9.8% (n = 60,717 of the visits were found paid to pediatricians. Children and adolescents accounted for only 69.3% of the visits to pediatricians. Male pediatricians provided 80.5% of the services and the main workforces were those aged 40–49 years. The most frequent diagnoses were respiratory tract diseases (64.7% and anti-histamine agents were prescribed in 48.8% of the visits to pediatricians. Our detailed results could contribute to evidence-based discussions on health policymaking.

  7. Challenges of pain control and the role of the ambulatory pain specialist in the outpatient surgery setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Kai, Alice M; Kodumudi, Vijay; Berger, Jack M

    2016-01-01

    Ambulatory surgery is on the rise, with an unmet need for optimum pain control in ambulatory surgery centers worldwide. It is important that there is a proportionate increase in the availability of acute pain-management services to match the rapid rise of clinical patient load with pain issues in the ambulatory surgery setting. Focus on ambulatory pain control with its special challenges is vital to achieve optimum pain control and prevent morbidity and mortality. Management of perioperative pain in the ambulatory surgery setting is becoming increasingly complex, and requires the employment of a multimodal approach and interventions facilitated by ambulatory surgery pain specialists, which is a new concept. A focused ambulatory pain specialist on site at each ambulatory surgery center, in addition to providing safe anesthesia, could intervene early once problematic pain issues are recognized, thus preventing emergency room visits, as well as readmissions for uncontrolled pain. This paper reviews methods of acute-pain management in the ambulatory setting with risk stratification, the utilization of multimodal interventions, including pharmacological and nonpharmacological options, opioids, nonopioids, and various routes with the goal of preventing delayed discharge and unexpected hospital admissions after ambulatory surgery. Continued research and investigation in the area of pain management with outcome studies in acute surgically inflicted pain in patients with underlying chronic pain treated with opioids and the pattern and predictive factors for pain in the ambulatory surgical setting is needed.

  8. Tolerability of the Oscar 2 ambulatory blood pressure monitor among research participants: a cross-sectional repeated measures study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinderliter Alan L

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM is increasingly used to measure blood pressure (BP in research studies. We examined ease of use, comfort, degree of disturbance, reported adverse effects, factors associated with poor tolerability, and association of poor tolerability with data acquisition of 24-hour ABPM using the Oscar 2 monitor in the research setting. Methods Sixty adults participating in a research study of people with a history of borderline clinic BP reported on their experience with ABPM on two occasions one week apart. Poor tolerability was operationalized as an overall score at or above the 75th percentile using responses to questions adapted from a previously developed questionnaire. In addition to descriptive statistics (means for responses to Likert-scaled "0 to 10" questions and proportions for Yes/No questions, we examined reproducibility of poor tolerability as well as associations with poor tolerability and whether poor tolerability was associated with removal of the monitor or inadequate number of BP measurements. Results The mean ambulatory BP of participants by an initial ABPM session was 148/87 mm Hg. After wearing the monitor the first time, the degree to which the monitor was felt to be cumbersome ranged from a mean of 3.0 to 3.8, depending on whether at work, home, driving, or other times. The most bother was interference with normal sleeping pattern (mean 4.2. Wearers found the monitor straightforward to use (mean 7.5. Nearly 67% reported that the monitor woke them after falling asleep, and 8.6% removed it at some point during the night. Reported adverse effects included pain (32%, skin irritation (37%, and bruising (7%. Those categorized as having poor tolerability (kappa = 0.5 between sessions, p = 0.0003 were more likely to report being in fair/poor health (75% vs 22%, p = 0.01 and have elevated 24-hour BP average (systolic: 28% vs 17%, p = 0.56; diastolic: 30% vs 17%, p = 0.37. They were

  9. Development of quality metrics for ambulatory pediatric cardiology: Infection prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jonathan N; Barrett, Cindy S; Franklin, Wayne H; Graham, Eric M; Halnon, Nancy J; Hattendorf, Brandy A; Krawczeski, Catherine D; McGovern, James J; O'Connor, Matthew J; Schultz, Amy H; Vinocur, Jeffrey M; Chowdhury, Devyani; Anderson, Jeffrey B

    2017-12-01

    In 2012, the American College of Cardiology's (ACC) Adult Congenital and Pediatric Cardiology Council established a program to develop quality metrics to guide ambulatory practices for pediatric cardiology. The council chose five areas on which to focus their efforts; chest pain, Kawasaki Disease, tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries after arterial switch, and infection prevention. Here, we sought to describe the process, evaluation, and results of the Infection Prevention Committee's metric design process. The infection prevention metrics team consisted of 12 members from 11 institutions in North America. The group agreed to work on specific infection prevention topics including antibiotic prophylaxis for endocarditis, rheumatic fever, and asplenia/hyposplenism; influenza vaccination and respiratory syncytial virus prophylaxis (palivizumab); preoperative methods to reduce intraoperative infections; vaccinations after cardiopulmonary bypass; hand hygiene; and testing to identify splenic function in patients with heterotaxy. An extensive literature review was performed. When available, previously published guidelines were used fully in determining metrics. The committee chose eight metrics to submit to the ACC Quality Metric Expert Panel for review. Ultimately, metrics regarding hand hygiene and influenza vaccination recommendation for patients did not pass the RAND analysis. Both endocarditis prophylaxis metrics and the RSV/palivizumab metric passed the RAND analysis but fell out during the open comment period. Three metrics passed all analyses, including those for antibiotic prophylaxis in patients with heterotaxy/asplenia, for influenza vaccination compliance in healthcare personnel, and for adherence to recommended regimens of secondary prevention of rheumatic fever. The lack of convincing data to guide quality improvement initiatives in pediatric cardiology is widespread, particularly in infection prevention. Despite this, three metrics were

  10. An efficient and effective teaching model for ambulatory education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan-Smith, Martha; Young, William W; Keller, Adam M

    2002-07-01

    Teaching and learning in the ambulatory setting have been described as inefficient, variable, and unpredictable. A model of ambulatory teaching that was piloted in three settings (1973-1981 in a university-affiliated outpatient clinic in Portland, Oregon, 1996-2000 in a community outpatient clinic, and 2000-2001 in an outpatient clinic serving Dartmouth Medical School's teaching hospital) that combines a system of education and a system of patient care is presented. Fully integrating learners into the office practice using creative scheduling, pre-rotation learning, and learner competence certification enabled the learners to provide care in roles traditionally fulfilled by physicians and nurses. Practice redesign made learners active members of the patient care team by involving them in such tasks as patient intake, histories and physicals, patient education, and monitoring of patient progress between visits. So that learners can be active members of the patient care team on the first day of clinic, pre-training is provided by the clerkship or residency so that they are able to competently provide care in the time available. To assure effective education, teaching and learning times are explicitly scheduled by parallel booking of patients for the learner and the preceptor at the same time. In the pilot settings this teaching model maintained or improved preceptor productivity and on-time efficiency compared with these outcomes of traditional scheduling. The time spent alone with patients, in direct observation by preceptors, and for scheduled case discussion was appreciated by learners. Increased satisfaction was enjoyed by learners, teachers, clinic staff, and patients. Barriers to implementation include too few examining rooms, inability to manipulate patient appointment schedules, and learners' not being present in a teaching clinic all the time.

  11. [Day hospital in internal medicine: A chance for ambulatory care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasland, A; Mortier, E

    2018-04-16

    Internal medicine is an in-hospital speciality. Along with its expertise in rare diseases, it shares with general medicine the global care of patients but its place in the ambulatory shift has yet to be defined. The objective of our work was to evaluate the benefits of an internal medicine day-hospital devoted to general medicine. Named "Centre Vi'TAL" to underline the link between the city and the hospital, this novel activity was implemented in order to respond quickly to general practitioners having difficulties to synthesize their complex patients or facing diagnostic or therapeutic problems. Using preferentially email for communication, the general practitioners can contact an internist who is committed to respond on the same day and take over the patient within 7 days if day-hospital is appropriate for his condition. The other patients are directed either to the emergency department, consultation or full hospitalization. In 14 months, the center has received 213 (144 women, 69 men) patients, mean age 53.6, addressed by 88 general practitioners for 282 day-hospital sessions. Requests included problem diagnoses (n=105), synthesis reviews for complex patients (n=65), and treatment (n=43). In the ambulatory shift advocated by the authorities, this experience shows that internal medicine should engage in the recognition of day-hospital as a place for diagnosis and synthesis reviews connected with the city while leaving the general practitioners coordinator of their patient care. This activity of synthesis in day-hospital is useful for the patients and efficient for our healthcare system. Copyright © 2018 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical productivity of primary care nurse practitioners in ambulatory settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ying; Tuttle, Jane

    Nurse practitioners are increasingly being integrated into primary care delivery to help meet the growing demand for primary care. It is therefore important to understand nurse practitioners' productivity in primary care practice. We examined nurse practitioners' clinical productivity in regard to number of patients seen per week, whether they had a patient panel, and patient panel size. We further investigated practice characteristics associated with their clinical productivity. We conducted cross-sectional analysis of the 2012 National Sample Survey of Nurse Practitioners. The sample included full-time primary care nurse practitioners in ambulatory settings. Multivariable survey regression analyses were performed to examine the relationship between practice characteristics and nurse practitioners' clinical productivity. Primary care nurse practitioners in ambulatory settings saw an average of 80 patients per week (95% confidence interval [CI]: 79-82), and 64% of them had their own patient panel. The average patient panel size was 567 (95% CI: 522-612). Nurse practitioners who had their own patient panel spent a similar percent of time on patient care and documentation as those who did not. However, those with a patient panel were more likely to provide a range of clinical services to most patients. Nurse practitioners' clinical productivity was associated with several modifiable practice characteristics such as practice autonomy and billing and payment policies. The estimated number of patients seen in a typical week by nurse practitioners is comparable to that by primary care physicians reported in the literature. However, they had a significantly smaller patient panel. Nurse practitioners' clinical productivity can be further improved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in healthy children with parental hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpay, Harika; Ozdemir, Nihal; Wühl, Elke; Topuzoğlu, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) parameters in offspring with at least one hypertensive parent (HP) to offspring with normotensive parents (NP) and to determine whether gender of parent or child might influence the association between parental hypertension and blood pressure (BP). Eighty-nine healthy children (mean age 11.1 +/- 3.9 years) with HP and 90 controls (mean age 10.5 +/- 3.1 years) with NP were recruited. Age, gender, and height did not differ between the two groups, whereas children of HP had higher weight, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference compared with healthy controls. No difference was found in casual BP between the two groups. In contrast, during ABPM daytime and nighttime mean systolic and diastolic BP and mean arterial pressure (MAP) standard deviation scores (SDS) were significantly elevated in children with HP. The mean percentage of nocturnal BP decline (dipping) was not significantly different between the two groups. Children with hypertensive mothers had higher daytime systolic and MAP SDS than controls; no such difference was detected for children with hypertensive fathers. Daytime systolic and MAP SDS were significantly elevated in boys with HP compared with boys with NP but failed to be significant in girls. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that parental history of hypertension (B = 0.29) and BMI (B = 0.03) were independently correlated with increase of daytime MAP SDS. Early changes in ambulatory BP parameters were present in healthy children of HP. BP in HP offspring was influenced by the gender of the affected parent and the offspring.

  14. Differential expression of cytochrome P450 genes between bromadiolone-resistant and anticoagulant-susceptible Norway rats:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette Drude; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Fredholm, Merete

    2008-01-01

    Anticoagulant resistance in Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) has been suggested to be due to mutations in the VKORC1 gene, encoding the target protein of anticoagulant rodenticides such as warfarin and bromadiolone. Other factors, e.g. pharmacokinetics, may however also contribute to resistance. We...... that bromadiolone resistance in Norway rats involves enhanced anticoagulant clearance and metabolism catalyzed by specific cytochrome P450 enzymes, such as Cyp2e1, Cyp3a2 and Cyp3a3. This pharmacokinetically based resistance varies to some extend between the genders....

  15. Differential expression of cytochrome P450 genes between bromadiolone-resistant and anticoagulant-susceptible Norway rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette Drude Kjær; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Fredholm, Merete

    2008-01-01

    Background: Anticoagulant resistance in Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus (Berk.), has been suggested to be conferred by mutations in the VKORC1 gene, encoding the target protein of anticoagulant rodenticides. Other factors, e.g. pharmacokinetics, may also contribute to resistance, however. To examine......, Cyp3a2 and Cyp3a3 genes. On exposure to bromadiolone, females had higher Cyp2e1 expression than males, which possibly explains why female rats are generally more tolerant to anticoagulants than male rats. Conclusion: results suggest that bromadiolone resistance in a Danish strain of Norway rats...

  16. Adverse ocular reactions to drugs.

    OpenAIRE

    Spiteri, M. A.; James, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs acting on various parts of the body may also affect the eye insidiously. Increased awareness of such drug toxicity by the prescribing doctor should encourage him to consider effects on the cornea, lens, retina, optic nerve and elsewhere when checking the patient's progress. The following review concerns adverse ocular effects of systemic drug administration.

  17. Redesigning the regulatory framework for ambulatory care services in New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokshi, Dave A; Rugge, John; Shah, Nirav R

    2014-12-01

    Policy Points: The landscape of ambulatory care services in the United States is rapidly changing on account of payment reform, primary care transformation, and the rise of convenient care options such as retail clinics. New York State has undertaken a redesign of regulatory policy for ambulatory care rooted in the Triple Aim (better health, higher-quality care, lower costs)-with a particular emphasis on continuity of care for patients. Key tenets of the regulatory approach include defining and tracking the taxonomy of ambulatory care services as well as ensuring that convenient care options do not erode continuity of care for patients. While hospitals remain important centers of gravity in the health system, services are increasingly being delivered through ambulatory care. This shift to ambulatory care is giving rise to new delivery structures, such as retail clinics and urgent care centers, as well as reinventing existing ambulatory care capacity, as seen with the patient-centered medical home model and the movement toward team-based care. To protect the public's interests, oversight of ambulatory care services must keep pace with these rapid changes. With this purpose, in January 2013 the New York Public Health and Health Planning Council undertook a redesign of the regulatory framework for the state's ambulatory care services. This article describes the principles undergirding the framework as well as the regulatory recommendations themselves. We explored and analyzed the regulation of ambulatory care services in New York in accordance with the available gray and peer-reviewed literature and legislative documents. The deliberations of the Public Health and Health Planning Council informed our review. The vision of high-performing ambulatory care should be rooted in the Triple Aim (better health, higher-quality care, lower costs), with a particular emphasis on continuity of care for patients. There is a pressing need to better define the taxonomy of ambulatory

  18. Ambulatory surgery and anaesthesia in HUKM, a teaching hospital in Malaysia: the first two years experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norsidah, A M; Yahya, N; Adeeb, N; Lim, A L

    2001-03-01

    Ambulatory or day care surgery is still in its infancy in this part of the world. Our newly built university affiliated hospital started its Day Surgery Centre in February 1998. It is the first multidisciplinary ambulatory surgery centre in a teaching hospital in the country. It caters for Orthopaedic surgery, Urology, Plastic surgery, Otorhinolaryngology, General surgery, Paediatric surgery and Ophthalmology. We have done 2,604 cases and our unanticipated admission rate is less than 2%. There has been no major morbidity or mortality. The problems of setting up a multidisciplinary ambulatory centre in a teaching hospital are discussed.

  19. Prevalence and Risk of Polypharmacy Among Elderly Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy in Ambulatory Oncology Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Ivy; Lai, Olive; Chew, Lita

    2018-03-26

    This was a single center, retrospective cross-sectional study looking into the incidence and types of drug-related problems (DRPs) detected among elderly cancer patients receiving at least three long-term medications concurrent with IV chemotherapy, and the types of intervention taken to address these DRPs. This paper serves to elucidate the prevalence and risk of polypharmacy in our geriatric oncology population in an ambulatory care setting, to raise awareness on this growing issue and to encourage more resource allocation to address this healthcare phenomenon. DRP was detected in 77.6% of elderly cancer patients receiving at least three long-term medications concurrent with IV chemotherapy, with an average incidence of three DRPs per patient. Approximately half of DRPs were related to long-term medications. Forty percent of DRPs required interventions at the prescriber level. The use of five or more medications was shown to almost double the risk of DRP occurrence (OR 1.862, P = 0.039). Out of the eight predefined categories of DRPs, underprescribing was the most common (26.7%), followed by adverse drug reaction (25.0%) and drug non-adherence (16.2%). Polypharmacy leading to DRPs is a common occurrence in elderly cancer patients receiving outpatient IV chemotherapy. There should be systematic measures in place to identify patients who are at greater risk of inappropriate polypharmacy and DRPs, and hence more frequent drug therapy optimization and monitoring. The identification of DRPs is an important step to circumvent serious drug-related harm. Future healthcare interventions directed at reducing DRPs should aim to assess the clinical and economic impact of such interventions.

  20. Combined anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy for high-risk patients with atrial fibrillation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, D A; Raichand, S; Moore, D; Connock, M; Fry-Smith, A; Fitzmaurice, D A

    2013-07-01

    Previous research suggests uncertainty whether or not there is any additional benefit in adding antiplatelet therapy (APT) to anticoagulation therapy (ACT) in patients with high-risk atrial fibrillation (AF) in terms of reduction in vascular events, including stroke. The existing guidelines acknowledge an increased risk of bleeding associated with such a strategy; however, there is no consensus on the treatment pathway. To determine, by undertaking a systematic review, if the addition of APT to ACT is beneficial compared with ACT alone in patients with AF who are considered to be at high risk of thromboembolic events (TEs). Data sources included bibliographic databases {the Cochrane Library [Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL)], MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE, ClinicalTrials.gov, National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Clinical Research Network Portfolio, Current Controlled Trials (CCT) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP)}, reference lists from identified systematic reviews and relevant studies, and contact with clinical experts. Searches were from inception to September 2010 and did not use language restrictions or study design filters. Studies of any design were included to evaluate clinical effectiveness, including randomised controlled trials (RCTs), non-randomised comparisons, cohort studies, case series or registries, longitudinal studies, systematic reviews and meta-analyses, and conference abstracts published after 2008. Inclusion criteria consisted of a population with AF, at high-risk of TEs, aged ≥ 18 years, on combined ACT and APT compared with others on ACT alone or ACT plus placebo. Inclusion decisions, assessment of study quality and data extraction were undertaken using methods to minimise bias. Fifty-three publications were included, reporting five RCTs (11 publications), 18 non-randomised comparisons (24 publications) and 18