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Sample records for ambulatory anticoagulant adverse

  1. Characteristics of ambulatory anticoagulant adverse drug events: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eckstrand Julie

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the high frequency with which adverse drug events (ADEs occur in outpatient settings, detailed information regarding these events remains limited. Anticoagulant drugs are associated with increased safety concerns and are commonly involved in outpatient ADEs. We therefore sought to evaluate ambulatory anticoagulation ADEs and the patient population in which they occurred within the Duke University Health System (Durham, NC, USA. Methods A retrospective chart review of ambulatory warfarin-related ADEs was conducted. An automated trigger surveillance system identified eligible events in ambulatory patients admitted with an International Normalized Ratio (INR >3 and administration of vitamin K. Event and patient characteristics were evaluated, and quality/process improvement strategies for ambulatory anticoagulation management are described. Results A total of 169 events in 167 patients were identified from December 1, 2006-June 30, 2008 and included in the study. A median supratherapeutic INR of 6.1 was noted, and roughly half of all events (52.1% were associated with a bleed. Nearly 74% of events resulted in a need for fresh frozen plasma; 64.8% of bleeds were classified as major. A total of 59.2% of events were at least partially responsible for hospital admission. Median patient age was 68 y (range 36-95 y with 24.9% initiating therapy within 3 months prior to the event. Of events with a prior documented patient visit (n = 157, 73.2% were seen at a Duke clinic or hospital within the previous month. Almost 80% of these patients had anticoagulation therapy addressed, but only 60.0% had a follow-up plan documented in the electronic note. Conclusions Ambulatory warfarin-related ADEs have significant patient and healthcare utilization consequences in the form of bleeding events and associated hospital admissions. Recommendations for improvement in anticoagulation management include use of information technology to assist

  2. Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation. Is there a gap in care for ambulatory patients?

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Atrial fibrillation (AF) substantially increases risk of stroke. Evidence suggests that anticoagulation to reduce risk is underused (a "care gap"). Our objectives were to clarify measures of this gap in care by including data from family physicians and to determine why eligible patients were not receiving anticoagulation therapy. DESIGN: Telephone survey of family physicians regarding specific patients in their practices. SETTING: Nova Scotia. PARTICIPANTS: Ambulatory AF patients n...

  3. Evaluation of patient perceptions and outcomes related to anticoagulation point-of-care testing in ambulatory care clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fermo JD

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, Prothrombin Time/International Normalized Ratio (PT/INR measurements have typically been used to monitor patients on warfarin through institutional laboratories via venous puncture. The Point-of-Care Testing (POCT device has revolutionized the patient care process by allowing for laboratory testing outside of the central laboratory. Objective: To analyze humanistic and clinical outcomes in patients currently treated with warfarin and monitored through a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic using point-of-care testing (POCT device versus venipuncture within ambulatory care clinics at our institution. Methods: All patients currently treated with warfarin therapy who were managed by clinical pharmacists for anticoagulation monitoring at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC Family Medicine Center and University Diagnostic Center, were enrolled. Patients were asked to complete a satisfaction survey regarding their anticoagulation monitoring. In addition, data related to emergency department (ED visits, hospitalizations and percent of time in the INR therapeutic range for 6 months pre- and post-implementation of POCT device was collected. This information was obtained through an electronic patient information database, Oacis. Results: A total of 145 patients were included in the data collection from the two clinics. The majority (41% of these patients were taking warfarin for atrial fibrillation. Satisfaction surveys were completed by 86 (59 % of patients. The surveys revealed that POCT device was preferred over venipuncture in 95% of patients. Reasons for the preference included more face-to-face interaction, less wait time, less pain, less blood needed, and quicker results. Of the 145 patients who were included in the objective data analysis, no significant differences were found in the number of hospitalizations, ED visits, or percent of time in the INR therapeutic range pre- and post- implementation of POCT device

  4. Systematic review of the incidence and characteristics of preventable adverse drug events in ambulatory care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Linda Aagaard; Winterstein, Almut G; Søndergaard, Birthe;

    2007-01-01

    (1993-March 2007), EMBASE (1980-February 2007), and Web of Science (1945-March 2007). Key words included medication error, adverse drug reaction, iatrogenic disease, outpatient, ambulatory care, primary health care, general practice, patient admission, hospitalization, observational study, retrospective.......5 per 1000 person-months. Cardiovascular drugs, analgesics, and hypoglycemic agents together accounted for 86.5% of pADEs, and 77.2% of pADEs resulted in symptoms of the central nervous system, electrolyte/renal system, and gastrointestinal tract. Medication errors resulting in pADEs occurred in the...

  5. Adverse events in patients initiated on dabigatran etexilate therapy in a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donaldson M

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin K antagonists have been the treatment of choice in preventing thromboembolic events, but problems such as frequent dose adjustment and monitoring of coagulation status, including multiple drug and food interactions, make their use difficult. Dabigatran etexilate is a new oral direct thrombin inhibitor not requiring routine monitoring and since its approval in the United States, many clinicians have been interested in utilizing this new therapy. Objective: This study documented adverse drug events (ADEs recorded in patients started on dabigatran therapy, including those who were previously controlled on warfarin and those who were anticoagulant naïve. Methods: In an outpatient pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic, a total of 221 patients were initiated on dabigatran therapy over an 18-month period. 43.0% of these patients were previously controlled on warfarin.Results: 54 of the 221 patients (24.4% developed an ADE while on dabigatran. The average time to event was 48.4 days. Nine of the fifty-four patients experienced a major bleeding ADE; six patients developed a serious non-bleeding ADE. Five of these fifteen patients died; one death was directly related to dabigatran therapy. The remaining thirty-nine of the fifty-four patients experienced a clinically relevant non-major ADE. Of the fifty-four patients who experienced an ADE, thirty were male. The average age was 73.8 years and the average weight was 92.8kg. Fifty-four percent of those who experienced an ADE were previously anticoagulant naïve.Conclusions: While many clinicians have been interested in utilizing the new direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran etexilate, this new therapy is not without risks. This study documented adverse drug events in 24.4% of patients who were initiated on dabigatran etexilate therapy over an eighteen month period. ADEs were more common in patients who were anticoagulant naïve prior to dabigatran etexilate therapy and not those who

  6. Adverse events associated with the use of direct-acting oral anticoagulants in clinical practice: beyond bleeding complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschi, Emanuel; Bianchin, Matteo; Ageno, Walter; De Ponti, Roberto; De Ponti, Fabrizio

    2016-08-25

    Non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants, also known as direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), have entered the market in 2008 with the expected breakthrough potential of circumventing limitations related to treatment with vitamin K antagonists (eg, warfarin) by virtue of their pharmacological properties. Although data derived from premarketing randomized clinical trials have largely demonstrated the clinical benefit of DOACs, especially in terms of reduced risk of intracranial bleeding, it is important to monitor the safety in the postmarketing phase, which better reflects real-world patients with comorbidities and polypharmacotherapy, in order to assess the actual risk-benefit profile. In this critical review, we aimed to evaluate the evidence on the latest debated safety issues. In the first section, we will discuss: 1) the need for pharmacovigilance (ie, the science and activities relating to the detection, assessment, understanding, and prevention of adverse effects or any other drug-related problems in the real-world setting), and 2) the importance of properly interpreting postmarketing data to avoid unnecessary alarm. In the second section, emerging and debated safety issues potentially associated with the use of DOACs in the postmarketing setting will be assessed: 1) the potential coronary risk (which emerged during the preapproval period); 2) the occurrence of liver injury (a risk undetected in clinical trials and highlighted by case reports or series); and 3) the potential for renal damage (a still unclear safety issue). It is anticipated that hepatic and renal issues still require dedicated postauthorization safety studies to ultimately assess causality. PMID:27578223

  7. [Ambulatory treatment of deep venous thrombosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, D; Hezard, N; Brasselet, C

    2001-11-01

    Conventional treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) has been based, until recently, on non-fractionated heparin by continuous intravenous infusion in hospital until effective anticoagulation could be obtained by oral anticoagulants introduced early. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) seems to be as effective and has a better bio-availability, which means that there are fewer adverse effects. This usage has logically led to the increase in the possibilities of treatment of DVT at home. However, certain precautions are necessary, especially the evaluation of the individual patient's risk with this strategy. This requires multidisciplinary collaboration and the respect of strict rules (precise diagnostic objective, hospital admission at the slightest doubt of pulmonary embolism) to demonstrate the value of ambulatory LMWH therapy which would improve patient comfort and allow early mobilisation. PMID:11794978

  8. Ambulatory Phlebectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stretch Marks Sun-damaged Skin Unwanted Hair Unwanted Tattoos Varicose Veins Vitiligo Wrinkles Treatments and Procedures Ambulatory ... Stretch Marks Sun-damaged Skin Unwanted Hair Unwanted Tattoos Varicose Veins Vitiligo Wrinkles Treatments and Procedures Ambulatory ...

  9. Evaluation of a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic: Improving patient care

    OpenAIRE

    Bungard, Tammy J; Gardner, Leslie; Archer, Stephen L.; Hamilton, Peter; Ritchie, Bruce; Tymchak, Wayne; Tsuyuki, Ross T.

    2009-01-01

    Background Anticoagulation management services (AMSs) are widely used for anticoagulation management in many countries. Our AMS is a pharmacist-run ambulatory clinic with a physician advisory committee that manages patients referred with complicated anticoagulation histories. This paper assesses the adequacy of anticoagulation, rates of anticoagulant-related events and associated health care resource utilization for patients before and after referral to our AMS. Methods Consecutive patients r...

  10. Thromboprophylaxis Guidelines in Cancer with a Primary Focus on Ambulatory Patients Receiving Chemotherapy: A Review from the Southern Network on Adverse Reactions (SONAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Whitney D.; Bennett, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with cancer are at increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Factors related to cancer type, site, stage, duration, and extent of disease contribute to the oncology patient’s risk of VTE. Patient-specific factors such as history of prior VTE and comorbidity are also contributory. The role of treatment-related factors, including chemotherapy regimen, has been a focus of recent investigation because most cases of VTE in the oncology setting occur in ambulatory patients. Thus, an emerging area of clinical research is primary VTE prophylaxis in the ambulatory cancer setting. Clinical guidelines currently recommend primary thromboprophylaxis in cancer patients who are undergoing surgery, who are hospitalized, and who are in a specific subset of high-risk ambulatory cancer patients. Validated risk stratification tools are essential for identification of patients who are at high risk of thrombosis. Emerging data from recently published clinical trials, as well as ongoing studies, are likely to advance our understanding of the potential utility of antithrombotic agents for primary prophylaxis in ambulatory patients with cancer and may influence future clinical guideline recommendations. PMID:23111863

  11. Excessive anticoagulation with warfarin or phenprocoumon may have multiple causes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meegaard, Peter Martin; Holck, Line H V; Pottegård, Anton;

    2012-01-01

    Excessive anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists is a serious condition with a substantial risk of an adverse outcome. We thus found it of interest to review a large case series to characterize the underlying causes of excessive anticoagulation....

  12. Thromboprophylaxis Guidelines in Cancer with a Primary Focus on Ambulatory Patients Receiving Chemotherapy: A Review from the Southern Network on Adverse Reactions (SONAR)

    OpenAIRE

    Maxwell, Whitney D.; Bennett, Charles L.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with cancer are at increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Factors related to cancer type, site, stage, duration, and extent of disease contribute to the oncology patient’s risk of VTE. Patient-specific factors such as history of prior VTE and comorbidity are also contributory. The role of treatment-related factors, including chemotherapy regimen, has been a focus of recent investigation because most cases of VTE in the oncology setting occur in ambulatory patients. Thus, an...

  13. Anticoagulant rodenticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Barbara E; Proudfoot, Alex T; Bradberry, Sally M; Vale, J Allister

    2005-01-01

    Anticoagulant pesticides are used widely in agricultural and urban rodent control. The emergence of warfarin-resistant strains of rats led to the introduction of a new group of anticoagulant rodenticides variously referred to as 'superwarfarins', 'single dose' or 'long-acting'. This group includes the second generation 4-hydroxycoumarins brodifacoum, bromadiolone, difenacoum, flocoumafen and the indanedione derivatives chlorophacinone and diphacinone. Most cases of anticoagulant rodenticide exposure involve young children and, as a consequence, the amounts ingested are almost invariably small. In contrast, intentional ingestion of large quantities of long-acting anticoagulant rodenticides may cause anticoagulation for several weeks or months. Occupational exposure has also been reported. Anticoagulant rodenticides inhibit vitamin K(1)-2,3 epoxide reductase and thus the synthesis of vitamin K and subsequently clotting factors II, VII, IX and X. The greater potency and duration of action of long-acting anticoagulant rodenticides is attributed to their: (i) greater affinity for vitamin K(1)-2,3-epoxide reductase; (ii) ability to disrupt the vitamin K(1)-epoxide cycle at more than one point; (iii) hepatic accumulation; and (iv) unusually long biological half-lives due to high lipid solubility and enterohepatic circulation. Substantial ingestion produces epistaxis, gingival bleeding, widespread bruising, haematomas, haematuria with flank pain, menorrhagia, gastrointestinal bleeding, rectal bleeding and haemorrhage into any internal organ; anaemia may result. Spontaneous haemoperitoneum has been described. Severe blood loss may result in hypovolaemic shock, coma and death. The first clinical signs of bleeding may be delayed and patients may remain anticoagulated for several days (warfarin) or days, weeks or months (long-acting anticoagulants) after ingestion of large amounts. There are now sufficient data in young children exposed to anticoagulant rodenticides to

  14. Lupus anticoagulant is the main predictor of adverse pregnancy outcomes in aPL-positive patients: validation of PROMISSE study results

    OpenAIRE

    Yelnik, Cecile M; Laskin, Carl A.; Porter, T. Flint; Branch, D Ware; Buyon, Jill P.; Guerra, Marta M; Lockshin, Michael D; Petri, Michelle; Merrill, Joan T; Sammaritano, Lisa R; Kim, Mimi Y; Salmon, Jane E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective We previously reported that lupus anticoagulant (LAC) is the main predictor of poor pregnancy outcome in antiphospholipid antibody (aPL)-positive patients. We sought to confirm this finding in an independent group of patients who were subsequently recruited into the PROMISSE study. Methods The PROMISSE study is a multicentre, prospective, observational study of pregnancy outcomes in women with aPL and/or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) that enrolled patients from 2003 to 2015. Al...

  15. Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... We Represent Ambulatory and Office-Based Anesthesia The Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia provides educational opportunities, encourages research ... 6620 | E-mail: info@sambahq.org Copyright | 2016 Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia Home | Search | Terms | Privacy Policy | ...

  16. Self-reported adverse drug events and the role of illness perception and medication beliefs in ambulatory heart failure patients : A cross-sectional survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Smedt, Ruth H. E.; Denig, Petra; van der Meer, Klaas; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2011-01-01

    Background: Identifying patients with heart failure (HF) who are at risk of experiencing symptomatic adverse drug events (ADEs) is important for improving patient care and quality of life. Several demographic and clinical variables have been identified as potential risk factors for ADEs but limited

  17. Comparing new anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, James M

    2012-12-01

    For years, the pharmaceutical industry has been trying to find a safe and effective drug to replace warfarin. Although warfarin is an effective anticoagulant, its pharmacology, adverse effects, and risk profiles dictate that patients taking this medication must be monitored judiciously. The US Food and Drug Administration has approved two drugs for commercial use, dabigatran and rivaroxaban, that will compete directly with warfarin for use in specific indications. Because of direct marketing to patients, physicians are being asked to comment on these new medications. This brief review illustrates the data available for the two new drugs when compared to warfarin for the specified indications. For some patients, these drugs may be highly beneficial and offer an excellent alternative to warfarin. For others, warfarin may still be the preferred drug. PMID:23211502

  18. Pharmacologic Therapies in Anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Joana Lima; Wipf, Joyce E

    2016-07-01

    Anticoagulants are beneficial for prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. The development of target-specific oral anticoagulants is changing the landscape of anticoagulation therapy and created growing interest on this subject. Understanding the pharmacology of different anticoagulants is the first step to adequately treat patients with best available therapy while avoiding serious bleeding complications. This article reviews the pharmacology of the main anticoagulant classes (vitamin K antagonists, direct oral anticoagulants, and heparins) and their clinical indications based on evidence-based data currently available in the literature. PMID:27235611

  19. Venous Thromboembolism Anticoagulation Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘泽霖

    2009-01-01

    @@ VTE of the main treatment for anticoagulant thera-py, anticoagulant therapy drug of choice for low molecu-lar weight heparin (LMWH) for the overwhelming major-ity of clinicians agree that long-term oral anticoagulant therapy is still Vit. K antagonist (mainly warfarin).

  20. Ambulatory Surgical Measures - Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Ambulatory Surgical Center Quality Reporting (ASCQR) Program seeks to make care safer and more efficient through quality reporting. ASCs eligible for this...

  1. Thrombolytic-plus-Anticoagulant Therapy versus Anticoagulant-Alone Therapy in Submassive Pulmonary Thromboembolism (TVASPE Study): A Randomized Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Taherkhani; Adineh Taherkhani; SeyedReza Hashemi; Taraneh Faghihi-Langroodi; Roxana Sadeghi; Mohammadreza Beyranvand

    2014-01-01

    Background: The use of thrombolytic agents in the treatment of hemodynamically stable patients with acute submassive pulmonary embolism (PTE) remains controversial. We, therefore, conducted this study to compare the effect of thrombolytic plus anticoagulation versus anticoagulation alone on early death and adverse outcome following submassive PTE.Methods: We conducted a study of patients with acute pulmonary embolism and pulmonary hypertension or right ventricular dilatation/dysfunction but w...

  2. To anticoagulate or not to anticoagulate patients with cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, S P

    2001-11-01

    The current published literature does not indicate whether the long-term effect of anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy contributes to mortality reduction in patients with LV dysfunction. Evaluating patients for personal risk for emboli or for ischemic coronary artery events may influence the choice of therapies. As more is learned about the mechanisms of drug effects in different populations, physicians may be better able to direct appropriate therapies. Until that time, one must weigh the risks and benefits of each drug alone and in combination. In NYHA class IV patients, the risk for thrombosis owing to spontaneous clotting increases as does the adverse potential of warfarin and the adverse effects of inhibiting prostaglandin mediated vasodilation by aspirin. In NYHA class I and II patients, the quality of life and convenience of multidrug therapy is weighed against the devastating effect of a major stroke. In less symptomatic patients, the long-term risk for acute coronary events may be higher than previously identified. This would suggest that all patients with depressed LV function should be on some type of antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy. The current WATCH study will provide much needed information about the outcome differences between these agents. Conclusions based on available data include the following: Heart failure is increasing in incidence and prevalence. Atherosclerotic disease is an important causative factor for the development of heart failure or may be a comorbid condition in these patients. There is a measurable rate of stroke in patients with heart failure, although the cause of death in large studies is more often owing to sudden death or progressive heart failure. Sudden death may be from new ischemic events, asystole, or from ventricular tachyarrhythmias. In patients with heart failure, not all strokes are cardioembolic in origin. The benefits and risks of warfarin may be increased as the EF worsens or heart failure functional class

  3. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000547.htm Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lupus anticoagulants are antibodies against substances in the lining ...

  4. Anticoagulants in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howie, P W

    1986-06-01

    Thromboembolic disorders are still a serious problem in pregnancy and anticoagulants have an important part to play in both treatment and prevention. Warfarin is the most convenient drug to give but can cause maternal and fetal bleeding problems, especially during late pregnancy and delivery. There are also small risks of embryopathy from warfarin in early pregnancy but these may have been overstated. Heparin, which has to be given parenterally, does not cross the placental barrier but can still cause bleeding problems in pregnancy. Full intravenous heparin is only suitable for short-term use, and subcutaneous heparin has been introduced for long-term therapy. This regimen is a useful advance but long-term use still has problems of bruising and maternal bone demineralization. The standard treatment of acute thromboembolic events in pregnancy is continuous intravenous heparin followed by either subcutaneous heparin or warfarin, the latter being changed at 36 weeks gestation. In the prophylaxis of thromboembolism, the trend is towards a more selective approach, anticoagulants being given during pregnancy to those at highest risk and during labour and the puerperium to all with a previous history of thromboembolism. Anticoagulants during pregnancy are necessary in patients with artificial heart valves and, because subcutaneous heparin is not sufficient, warfarin should be used until 36 weeks followed by continuous intravenous heparin until delivery. No method of anticoagulation during pregnancy is entirely free of risk and all management policies must be based on an estimate of risk-benefit ratio in individual patients. PMID:2426029

  5. Cataract surgery and anticoagulants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, SA; VanRij, G

    1996-01-01

    A questionnaire was sent to 240 members of the Netherlands Intraocular implant Club (NIOIC) to register their policy followed in 1993 with regard to anticoagulant therapy (ACT) and the use of aspirin in patients having cataract surgery. Ninety-one (32%) forms were suitable for analysis. Most eye sur

  6. Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Benjamin A; Piccini, Jonathan P

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, which is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The use of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation at moderate or high risk of stroke, estimated by established criteria, improves outcomes. However, to ensure that the benefits exceed the risks of bleeding, appropriate patient selection is essential. Vitamin K antagonism has been the mainstay of treatment; however, newer drugs with novel mechanisms are also available. These novel oral anticoagulants (direct thrombin inhibitors and factor Xa inhibitors) obviate many of warfarin's shortcomings, and they have demonstrated safety and efficacy in large randomized trials of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. However, the management of patients taking warfarin or novel agents remains a clinical challenge. There are several important considerations when selecting anticoagulant therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation. This review will discuss the rationale for anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation; risk stratification for treatment; available agents; the appropriate implementation of these agents; and additional, specific clinical considerations for treatment. PMID:24733535

  7. Anticoagulation in Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Yousif; YH Lip, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) are at increased thromboembolic risk, and they suffer more severe strokes with worse outcomes. Most thromboembolic complications of AF are eminently preventable with oral anticoagulation, and the increasing numbers of AF patients mean antithrombotic therapy is the most crucial management aspect of this common arrhythmia. Despite the proven efficacy of warfarin, a string of limitations have meant that it is underused by physicians and patients alike. This...

  8. Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Steinberg, Benjamin A; Piccini, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, which is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The use of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation at moderate or high risk of stroke, estimated by established criteria, improves outcomes. However, to ensure that the benefits exceed the risks of bleeding, appropriate patient selection is essential. Vitamin K antagonism has been the mainstay of treatment; however, newer drugs with novel mechanisms are also availabl...

  9. Thrombolytic-plus-Anticoagulant Therapy versus Anticoagulant-Alone Therapy in Submassive Pulmonary Thromboembolism (TVASPE Study: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Taherkhani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of thrombolytic agents in the treatment of hemodynamically stable patients with acute submassive pulmonary embolism (PTE remains controversial. We, therefore, conducted this study to compare the effect of thrombolytic plus anticoagulation versus anticoagulation alone on early death and adverse outcome following submassive PTE.Methods: We conducted a study of patients with acute pulmonary embolism and pulmonary hypertension or right ventricular dilatation/dysfunction but without arterial hypotension or shock. The patients were randomly assigned in a single-blind fashion to receive an anticoagulant [Enoxaparin (1 mg/kg twice a day] plus a thrombolytic [Alteplase (100 mg or Streptokinase (1500000 u/2 hours] or an anticoagulant [Enoxaparin (1 mg/kg twice a day] alone. The primary endpoint was in-hospital death or clinical deterioration requiring an escalation of treatment. The secondary endpoints of the study were major bleeding, pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular dilatation at the end of the first week, and exertional dyspnea at the end of the first month.Results: Of 50 patients enrolled, 25 patients were randomly assigned to receive an anticoagulant plus a thrombolytic and the other 25 patients were given an anticoagulant alone. The incidence of the primary endpoints was significantly higher in the anticoagulant-alone group than in the thrombolytic-plus-anticoagulant group (p value = 0.022. At the time of discharge, pulmonary artery pressure was significantly higher in the anticoagulant-alone group than in the thrombolytic- plus-anticoagulant group (p value = 0.018; however, reduction in the right ventricular size or normalization of the right ventricle showed non-significant differences between the two groups. There was no significant difference regarding the New York Heat Association (NYHA functional class between the two groups at the end of the first month (p value = 0.213. No fatal bleeding or cerebral bleeding

  10. Effective management of venous thromboembolism in the community: non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel R

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Raj Patel Department of Haematological Medicine, King's Thrombosis Centre, King's College Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Anticoagulation therapy is essential for the effective treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE. For many years, anticoagulation for acute VTE was limited to the use of initial parenteral heparin, overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist. Although highly effective, this regimen has several limitations and is particularly challenging when given in an ambulatory setting. Current treatment pathways for most patients with deep-vein thrombosis typically involve initial hospital or community-based ambulatory care with subsequent follow-up in a secondary care setting. With the introduction of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs into routine clinical practice, it is now possible for the initial acute management of patients with deep-vein thrombosis to be undertaken by primary care. As hospital admissions associated with VTE become shorter, primary care will play an increasingly important role in the long-term management of these patients. Although the NOACs can potentially simplify patient management and improve clinical outcomes, primary care physicians may be less familiar with these new treatments compared with traditional therapy. To assist primary care physicians in further understanding the role of the NOACs, this article outlines the main differences between NOACs and traditional anticoagulation therapy and discusses the benefit–risk profile of the different NOACs in the treatment and secondary prevention of recurrent VTE. Key considerations for the use of NOACs in the primary care setting are highlighted, including dose transition, risk assessment and follow-up, duration of anticoagulant therapy, how to minimize bleeding risks, and the importance of patient education and counseling. Keywords: venous thromboembolism, oral anticoagulant, prevention, treatment, primary

  11. Ambulatory surgery for the patient with breast cancer: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Ern Yu; Pek, Chong Han; Tey,Boon Lim, John

    2016-01-01

    Chong Han Pek,1 John Tey,2 Ern Yu Tan1 1Department of General Surgery, 2Department of Anaesthesiology, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, Singapore Abstract: Ambulatory breast cancer surgery is well accepted and is the standard of care at many tertiary centers. Rather than being hospitalized after surgery, patients are discharged on the day of surgery or within 23 hours. Such early discharge does not adversely affect patient outcomes and has the added benefit...

  12. Ambulatory assessed implicit affect is associated with salivary cortisol

    OpenAIRE

    Joram eMossink; Bart eVerkuil; Andreas Michael Burger; Tollenaar, Marieke S.; Brosschot, Jos F.

    2015-01-01

    One of the presumed pathways linking negative emotions to adverse somatic health is an overactive HPA-axis, usually indicated by elevated cortisol levels. Traditionally, research has focused on consciously reported negative emotions. Yet, given that the majority of information processing occurs without conscious awareness, stress physiology might also be influenced by affective processes that people are not aware of. In a 24-hour ambulatory study we examined whether cortisol levels were assoc...

  13. Ambulatory assessed implicit affect is associated with salivary cortisol

    OpenAIRE

    Mossink, Joram C. L.; Verkuil, Bart; Burger, Andreas M.; Tollenaar, Marieke S.; Brosschot, Jos F.

    2015-01-01

    One of the presumed pathways linking negative emotions to adverse somatic health is an overactive HPA-axis, usually indicated by elevated cortisol levels. Traditionally, research has focused on consciously reported negative emotions. Yet, given that the majority of information processing occurs without conscious awareness, stress physiology might also be influenced by affective processes that people are not aware of. In a 24-h ambulatory study we examined whether cortisol levels were associat...

  14. Anticoagulant induced leukoagglutination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low leukocyte count secondary to leukocyte aggregation caused by an ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) occur in both benign and malignant disorders. We report a 71-year-old male patient who was admitted to the hospital with acute chest infection. Complete blood count (CBC) collected in ETDA tube and analyzed by sysmex instrument (SE/9500) revealed low hemoglobin level of 9.4g/dl, white blood cell (WBC) count of 8.2x109/L. Peripheral blood smear review shows multiple leukocyte aggregation (one clump in each field). When we asked for another blood sample in citrate anticoagulant, the CBC showed WBC count of 11.8x109/L and neutrophils of 6.26x109/L. This is a case of low leukocyte count secondary to leukocyte aggregation induced by EDTA. (author)

  15. Characteristics of ambulatory care clinics and pharmacists in Veterans Affairs medical centers. IMPROVE investigators. Impact of Managed Pharmaceutical Care on Resource Utilization and Outcomes in Veterans Affairs Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsuwaidan, S; Malone, D C; Billups, S J; Carter, B L

    1998-01-01

    The type and extent of ambulatory care clinical pharmaceutical services in selected Veterans Affairs medical centers (VAMCs) were studied as part of a larger project. Questionnaires were sent to the 174 VAMCs to determine the extent of clinical pharmacy activity in ambulatory care clinics, characteristics of outpatient pharmacies and clinics, and characteristics of ambulatory care pharmacists in VAMCs and to identify sites for the IMPROVE (Impact of Managed Pharmaceutical Care on Resource Utilization and Outcomes in Veterans Affairs Medical Centers) project. Fifty VAMCs responded to the survey. There were 512 ambulatory care clinics within these VAMCs. There was some pharmacist coverage in 75% of the clinics. The highest pharmacist coverage was in walk-in refill, therapeutic drug monitoring, and anticoagulation clinics. Clinical pharmacists at 68% of the VAMCs had prescribing privileges in ambulatory care clinics. Clinical pharmacists managed 29.9% of the clinics. The types of clinics most commonly managed by pharmacists were therapeutic drug monitoring, anticoagulation, walk-in refill, and lipid clinics. Nurse practitioners or physician assistants also were providing primary care in 41% of the clinics. There were 242 ambulatory care clinical pharmacy specialists practicing in the 50 VAMCs. Of these, 41.3% had three years or less of ambulatory care experience. Most pharmacists were in the clinic five days per week. A Pharm.D. degree was the highest degree obtained for 76.9%. Ambulatory care pharmaceutical services are common in VAMCs and are being provided by numerous clinical pharmacists. PMID:9437478

  16. Lupus anticoagulant, disease activity and low complement in the first trimester are predictive of pregnancy loss

    OpenAIRE

    Mankee, Anil; Petri, Michelle; Magder, Laurence S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Multiple factors, including proteinuria, antiphospholipid syndrome, thrombocytopenia and hypertension, are predictive of pregnancy loss in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In the PROMISSE study of predictors of pregnancy loss, only a battery of lupus anticoagulant tests was predictive of a composite of adverse pregnancy outcomes. We examined the predictive value of one baseline lupus anticoagulant test (dilute Russell viper venom time) with pregnancy loss in women with SLE. Me...

  17. National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) is designed to collect data on the utilization and provision of ambulatory care services in hospital...

  18. Anticoagulation Considerations for Travel to High Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2015-09-01

    DeLoughery, Thomas G. Anticoagulation considerations for travel to high altitude. High Alt Med Biol 16:181-185, 2015.-An increasing percentage of the population are on anticoagulation medicine for clinical reasons ranging from stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation to long term prevention of deep venous thrombosis. In recent years, several new direct oral anticoagulants have entered the market. The key questions that should be kept in mind when approaching a potential traveler on anticoagulation are: 1) why is the patient on anticoagulation? 2) do they need to stay on anticoagulation? 3) what are the choices for their anticoagulation? 4) will there be any drug interactions with medications needed for travel? and 5) how will they monitor their anticoagulation while traveling? Knowing the answers to these questions then can allow for proper counseling and planning for the anticoagulated traveler's trip. PMID:26186419

  19. Biomedical Wireless Ambulatory Crew Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiel, Alan; Humphreys, Brad

    2009-01-01

    A compact, ambulatory biometric data acquisition system has been developed for space and commercial terrestrial use. BioWATCH (Bio medical Wireless and Ambulatory Telemetry for Crew Health) acquires signals from biomedical sensors using acquisition modules attached to a common data and power bus. Several slots allow the user to configure the unit by inserting sensor-specific modules. The data are then sent real-time from the unit over any commercially implemented wireless network including 802.11b/g, WCDMA, 3G. This system has a distributed computing hierarchy and has a common data controller on each sensor module. This allows for the modularity of the device along with the tailored ability to control the cards using a relatively small master processor. The distributed nature of this system affords the modularity, size, and power consumption that betters the current state of the art in medical ambulatory data acquisition. A new company was created to market this technology.

  20. Personalized antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy: applications and significance of pharmacogenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beitelshees AL

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Amber L Beitelshees,1,* Deepak Voora,2,* Joshua P Lewis,1,* 1Program for Personalized and Genomic Medicine and Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Nutrition, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Center for Applied Genomics & Precision Medicine, Department of Medicine, Duke School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA*All authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: In recent years, substantial effort has been made to better understand the influence of genetic factors on the efficacy and safety of numerous medications. These investigations suggest that the use of pharmacogenetic data to inform physician decision-making has great potential to enhance patient care by reducing on-treatment clinical events, adverse drug reactions, and health care-related costs. In fact, integration of such information into the clinical setting may be particularly applicable for antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapeutics, given the increasing body of evidence implicating genetic variation in variable drug response. In this review, we summarize currently available pharmacogenetic information for the most commonly used antiplatelet (ie, clopidogrel and aspirin and anticoagulation (ie, warfarin medications. Furthermore, we highlight the currently known role of genetic variability in response to next-generation antiplatelet (prasugrel and ticagrelor and anticoagulant (dabigatran agents. While compelling evidence suggests that genetic variants are important determinants of antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy response, significant barriers to clinical implementation of pharmacogenetic testing exist and are described herein. In addition, we briefly discuss development of new diagnostic targets and therapeutic strategies as well as implications for enhanced patient care. In conclusion, pharmacogenetic testing can provide important information to assist clinicians with prescribing the most personalized and effective antiplatelet and

  1. Effective management of venous thromboembolism in the community: non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulation therapy is essential for the effective treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE). For many years, anticoagulation for acute VTE was limited to the use of initial parenteral heparin, overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist. Although highly effective, this regimen has several limitations and is particularly challenging when given in an ambulatory setting. Current treatment pathways for most patients with deep-vein thrombosis typically involve initial hospital or community-based ambulatory care with subsequent follow-up in a secondary care setting. With the introduction of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) into routine clinical practice, it is now possible for the initial acute management of patients with deep-vein thrombosis to be undertaken by primary care. As hospital admissions associated with VTE become shorter, primary care will play an increasingly important role in the long-term management of these patients. Although the NOACs can potentially simplify patient management and improve clinical outcomes, primary care physicians may be less familiar with these new treatments compared with traditional therapy. To assist primary care physicians in further understanding the role of the NOACs, this article outlines the main differences between NOACs and traditional anticoagulation therapy and discusses the benefit–risk profile of the different NOACs in the treatment and secondary prevention of recurrent VTE. Key considerations for the use of NOACs in the primary care setting are highlighted, including dose transition, risk assessment and follow-up, duration of anticoagulant therapy, how to minimize bleeding risks, and the importance of patient education and counseling. PMID:27217793

  2. Role of Antiplatelet Therapy and Anticoagulation in Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carazo, Matthew; Berger, Jeffrey S; Reyentovich, Alex; Katz, Stuart D

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the United States. The pathophysiology of heart failure involves the activation of complex neurohormonal pathways, many of which mediate not only hypertrophy and fibrosis within ventricular myocardium and interstitium, but also activation of platelets and alteration of vascular endothelium. Platelet activation and vascular endothelial dysfunction may contribute to the observed increased risk of thromboembolic events in patients with chronic heart failure. However, current data from clinical trials do not support the routine use of chronic antiplatelet or oral anticoagulation therapy for ambulatory heart failure patients without other indications (atrial fibrillation and/or coronary artery disease) as the risk of bleeding seems to outweigh the potential benefit related to reduction in thromboembolic events. In this review, we consider the potential clinical utility of targeting specific pathophysiological mechanisms of platelet and vascular endothelial activation to guide clinical decision making in heart failure patients. PMID:26501990

  3. Anticoagulation in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jeffrey C; Pugliese, Steven C; Fox, Daniel L; Badesch, David B

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by molecular and pathologic alteration to the pulmonary circulation, resulting in increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular failure, and eventual death. Pharmacologic treatment of PAH consists of use of a multitude of pulmonary vasodilators, sometimes in combination. PAH has been associated with increased thrombosis and disrupted coagulation and fibrinolysis, making anticoagulation an attractive and frequently employed therapeutic modality. Observational studies have provided some insight into the therapeutic potential of anticoagulation in idiopathic PAH, but there is a distinct lack of well-controlled prospective trials. Due to the conflicting evidence, there is a large amount of heterogeneity in the application of therapeutic anticoagulation in PAH and further well-controlled prospective trials are needed to clarify its role in treating PAH. PMID:27137522

  4. Concentrations of anticoagulant rodenticides in stoats Mustela erminea and weasels Mustela nivalis from Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmeros, Morten; Christensen, Thomas Kjær; Lassen, Pia

    2011-05-15

    Anticoagulant rodenticides are widely used to control rodent populations but they also pose a risk of secondary poisoning in non-target predators. Studies on anticoagulant rodenticide exposure of non-target species have mainly reported on frequency of occurrence. They have rarely analyzed variations in residue concentrations. We examine the occurrence and concentrations of five anticoagulant rodenticides in liver tissue from 61 stoats (Mustela erminea) and 69 weasels (Mustela nivalis) from Denmark. Anticoagulant rodenticides were detected in 97% of stoats and 95% of weasels. 79% of the animals had detectable levels of more than one substance. Difenacoum had the highest prevalence (82% in stoats and 88% in weasels) but bromadiolone was detected in the highest concentrations in both stoat (1.290 μg/g ww) and weasel (1.610 μg/g ww). Anticoagulant rodenticide concentrations were highest during autumn and winter and varied with sampling method. Anticoagulant rodenticide concentrations were higher in stoats and weasels with unknown cause of death than in specimens killed by physical trauma. There was a negative correlation between anticoagulant rodenticide concentrations and body condition. Our results suggest that chemical rodent control in Denmark results in an extensive exposure of non-target species and may adversely affect the fitness of some stoats and weasels. PMID:21477845

  5. Anticoagulation in Older Adults with Multimorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Anna L; Fang, Margaret C

    2016-05-01

    The number of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) who are of advanced age or have multiple comorbidities is expected to increase substantially. Older patients with AF generally gain a net benefit from anticoagulation. Guidelines typically recommend anticoagulation. There are multiple challenges in the safe use of anticoagulation in frail patients, including bleeding risk, monitoring and adherence, and polypharmacy. Although there are options for chronic oral anticoagulation, clinicians must understand the unique advantages and disadvantages of these medications when developing a management plan. This article reviews issues surrounding the appropriate use and selection of anticoagulants in complex older patients with AF. PMID:27113150

  6. Evaluation of anticoagulant control in a pharmacist operated anticoagulant clinic.

    OpenAIRE

    Radley, A S; Hall, J; Farrow, M.; Carey, P J

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To compare the quality of outpatient anticoagulant control before and after the transfer of dosing responsibility to designated trained pharmacists from rotating junior medical staff. METHODS--All International Normalised Ratio (INR) values for an eight month period either side of the staff changeover were assessed for precision of therapeutic control according to described standards. Allowing for patient associated effects, observed and expected frequencies of "successful" control for ...

  7. Nebulized anticoagulants limit pulmonary coagulopathy, but not inflammation, in a model of experimental lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, Jorrit J; Vlaar, Alexander P; Cornet, Alexander D; Dixon, Barry; Roelofs, Joris J; Choi, Goda; van der Poll, Tom; Levi, Marcel; Schultz, Marcus J

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary coagulopathy may contribute to an adverse outcome in lung injury. We assessed the effects of local anticoagulant therapy on bronchoalveolar and systemic haemostasis in a rat model of endotoxemia-induced lung injury. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were intravenously challenge

  8. Nebulized Anticoagulants Limit Pulmonary Coagulopathy, But Not Inflammation, in a Model of Experimental Lung Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Hofstra; A.P. Vlaar; A.D. Cornet; B. Dixon; J.J. Roelofs; G. Choi; T. van der Poll; M. Levi; M.J. Schultz

    2010-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary coagulopathy may contribute to an adverse outcome in lung injury. We assessed the effects of local anticoagulant therapy on bronchoalveolar and systemic haemostasis in a rat model of endotoxemia-induced lung injury. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were intravenously challenge

  9. The challenges of lupus anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chighizola, Cecilia Beatrice; Raschi, Elena; Banzato, Alessandra; Borghi, Maria Orietta; Pengo, Vittorio; Meroni, Pier Luigi

    2016-01-01

    The term "lupus anticoagulant" (LA) refers to a heterogeneous group of immunoglobulins behaving as acquired in vitro inhibitors of coagulation. These antibodies, namely anti-β2GPI and anti-prothrombin antibodies, induce the in vitro elongation of clotting time interfering with phospholipid-dependent coagulation cofactors. Positive LA is associated with thrombosis and pregnancy complications, providing one of the three laboratory criteria for the classification of the anti-phospholipid syndrome. LA is the strongest predictor of clinical events, especially when associated with other anti-phospholipid antibodies. Much more controversial is the risk conveyed by isolated and weak LA. LA detection is technically laborious, envisaging screening, mixing and confirming tests. Hopefully critical issues in LA detection, such as the interference of anticoagulants, will be overcome, in the next future. PMID:26789237

  10. Anticoagulant treatment for acute pulmonary embolism: a pathophysiology-based clinical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnelli, Giancarlo; Becattini, Cecilia

    2015-04-01

    The management of patients with acute pulmonary embolism is made challenging by its wide spectrum of clinical presentation and outcome, which is mainly related to patient haemodynamic status and right ventricular overload. Mechanical embolic obstruction and neurohumorally mediated pulmonary vasoconstriction are responsible for right ventricular overload. The pathophysiology of acute pulmonary embolism is the basis for risk stratification of patients as being at high, intermediate and low risk of adverse outcomes. This risk stratification has been advocated to tailor clinical management according to the severity of pulmonary embolism. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of the treatment of acute pulmonary embolism. New direct oral anticoagulants, which are easier to use than conventional anticoagulants, have been compared with conventional anticoagulation in five randomised clinical trials including >11 000 patients with pulmonary embolism. Patients at high risk of pulmonary embolism (those with haemodynamic compromise) were excluded from these studies. Direct oral anticoagulants have been shown to be as effective and at least as safe as conventional anticoagulation in patients with pulmonary embolism without haemodynamic compromise, who are the majority of patients with this disease. Whether these agents are appropriate for the acute-phase treatment of patients at intermediate-high risk pulmonary embolism (those with both right ventricle dysfunction and injury) regardless of any risk stratification remains undefined. PMID:25700388

  11. Ambulatory ST segment monitoring after myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mickley, H

    1994-01-01

    as important reasons for the inconsistent findings. The precise role of ambulatory ST segment monitoring in clinical practice has yet to be established. Direct comparisons with exercise stress testing may not be appropriate for two reasons. Firstly, the main advantage of ambulatory monitoring may be...

  12. Surgical Site Infection Surveillance Following Ambulatory Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Rhee, Chanu; Huang, Susan S.; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I.; Kaganov, Rebecca; Bruce, Christina; Lankiewicz, Julie; Platt, Richard; Yokoe, Deborah S.

    2015-01-01

    We assessed 4045 ambulatory surgery patients for surgical site infection (SSI) using claims-based triggers for medical chart review. Of 98 patients flagged by codes suggestive of SSI, 35 had confirmed SSIs. SSI rates ranged from 0 to 3.2% for common procedures. Claims may be useful for SSI surveillance following ambulatory surgery.

  13. Novel oral anticoagulants for heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelley, Jessica W; Kyle, Jeffrey A; Roberts, Rachel A

    2016-08-01

    To review the use of the novel oral anticoagulant (NOAC) agents for the treatment of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) from relevant clinical trial data. A MEDLINE, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, ClinicalTrials.gov, and Google-Scholar searches (1966-March 2016) were conducted using the keywords: thrombocytopenia, NOACs, dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban, edoxaban, Xa inhibitor, direct thrombin inhibitor. Articles evaluating the new oral anticoagulants for thrombocytopenia published in English and using human subjects were selected. Eight clinical trials were identified. References cited in identified articles were used for additional citations. Approximately 12 million hospitalized patients each year are exposed to heparin for thromboprophylaxis. HIT, an immune-mediated, prothrombotic adverse reaction is a potential complication of heparin therapy. As a result, heparin products must be immediately withdrawn and replaced by alternative anticoagulants to compensate for the thrombotic risk associated with HIT. Limitations exist with the only currently FDA approved heparin alternative, argatroban. NOACs have been considered as potential alternatives to traditional agents based on their pharmacologic activity. Case reports have indicated positive results in patients, with clinical outcomes and tolerability supporting the use of the NOACs as alternative agents in the treatment of HIT. Positive results have been reported for the use of NOACs in the treatment of HIT. Further robust studies are needed for definitive decision making by clinicians. PMID:27102287

  14. Selection of an aptamer antidote to the anticoagulant drug bivalirudin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Martin

    Full Text Available Adverse drug reactions, including severe patient bleeding, may occur following the administration of anticoagulant drugs. Bivalirudin is a synthetic anticoagulant drug sometimes employed as a substitute for heparin, a commonly used anticoagulant that can cause a condition called heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT. Although bivalrudin has the advantage of not causing HIT, a major concern is lack of an antidote for this drug. In contrast, medical professionals can quickly reverse the effects of heparin using protamine. This report details the selection of an aptamer to bivalirudin that functions as an antidote in buffer. This was accomplished by immobilizing the drug on a monolithic column to partition binding sequences from nonbinding sequences using a low-pressure chromatography system and salt gradient elution. The elution profile of binding sequences was compared to that of a blank column (no drug, and fractions with a chromatographic difference were analyzed via real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction and used for further selection. Sequences were identified by 454 sequencing and demonstrated low micromolar dissociation constants through fluorescence anisotropy after only two rounds of selection. One aptamer, JPB5, displayed a dose-dependent reduction of the clotting time in buffer, with a 20 µM aptamer achieving a nearly complete antidote effect. This work is expected to result in a superior safety profile for bivalirudin, resulting in enhanced patient care.

  15. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants: considerations on once- vs. twice-daily regimens and their potential impact on medication adherence

    OpenAIRE

    Vrijens, Bernard; Heidbuchel, Hein

    2015-01-01

    Suboptimal medication adherence is a widespread problem in ambulatory care of chronic diseases, with deviations in either direction from the prescribed dosing regimen. For the non-vitamin Kantagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs), such deviations occur and can lead to bleeding or clotting, as suboptimal adherence involves temporary periods of either overdosing or underdosing. In this expert review, we discuss: (a) the proper definition of adherence in terms of its three elements: initiation, im...

  16. Blood cultures in ambulatory outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laupland Kevin B

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blood cultures are a gold standard specific test for diagnosing many infections. However, the low yield may limit their usefulness, particularly in low-risk populations. This study was conducted to assess the utility of blood cultures drawn from ambulatory outpatients. Methods Blood cultures drawn at community-based collection sites in the Calgary Health Region (population 1 million in 2001 and 2002 were included in this study. These patients were analyzed by linkages to acute care health care databases for utilization of acute care facilities within 2 weeks of blood culture draw. Results 3102 sets of cultures were drawn from 1732 ambulatory outpatients (annual rate = 89.4 per 100,000 population. Significant isolates were identified from 73 (2.4% sets of cultures from 51 patients, including Escherichia coli in 18 (35% and seven (14% each of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Compared to patients with negative cultures, those with positive cultures were older (mean 49.6 vs. 40.1 years, p Conclusion Blood cultures drawn in outpatient settings are uncommonly positive, but may define patients for increased intensity of therapy. Strategies to reduce utilization without excluding patients with positive cultures need to be developed for this patient population.

  17. Anticoagulant Medicine: Potential for Drug-Food Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AerobiKa® Cardiology Medications Anticoagulant Medicine Anticoagulants and Drug-Food Interactions COPD Medications Bronchodilators Anti-Inflammatories Antibiotics Managing Your Medications Devices ...

  18. Anticoagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... even if it is not listed below. Aspirin Acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol, Excedrin) Ibuprofen (e.g., Motrin, ... skin or eyes (jaundice) Rare side effects: Headache Dizziness Shortness of breath Mouth sores or bleeding gums ...

  19. Specific antidotes against direct oral anticoagulants: A comprehensive review of clinical trials data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummala, Ramyashree; Kavtaradze, Ana; Gupta, Anjan; Ghosh, Raktim Kumar

    2016-07-01

    The Vitamin K antagonist warfarin was the only oral anticoagulant available for decades for the treatment of thrombosis and prevention of thromboembolism until Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOACs); a group of new oral anticoagulants got approved in the last few years. Direct thrombin inhibitor: dabigatran and factor Xa inhibitors: apixaban, rivaroxaban, and edoxaban directly inhibit the coagulation cascade. DOACs have many advantages over warfarin. However, the biggest drawback of DOACs has been the lack of specific antidotes to reverse the anticoagulant effect in emergency situations. Activated charcoal, hemodialysis, and activated Prothrombin Complex Concentrate (PCC) were amongst the nonspecific agents used in a DOAC associated bleeding but with limited success. Idarucizumab, the first novel antidote against direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran was approved by US FDA in October 2015. It comprehensively reversed dabigatran-induced anticoagulation in a phase I study. A phase III trial on Idarucizumab also complete reversal of anticoagulant effect of dabigatran. Andexanet alfa (PRT064445), a specific reversal agent against factor Xa inhibitors, showed a complete reversal of anticoagulant activity of apixaban and rivaroxaban within minutes after administration without adverse effects in two recently completed parallel phase III trials ANNEXA-A and ANNEXA-R respectively. It is currently being studied in ANNEXA-4, a phase IV study. Aripazine (PER-977), the third reversal agent, has shown promising activity against dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban, as well as subcutaneous fondaparinux and LMWH. This review article summarizes pharmacological characteristics of these novel antidotes, coagulation's tests affected, available clinical and preclinical data, and the need for phase III and IV studies. PMID:27082776

  20. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) is a national survey designed to meet the need for objective, reliable information about the provision and use...

  1. Ambulatory Medical Care Utilization Estimates for 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the caveats discussed in the ‘‘Methods’’ section. The relationship between characteristics of the patient’s ZIP Code and the choice of ambulatory care setting is shown in Table 5. For persons ...

  2. Ambulatory and Community-Based Services

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Fred

    1999-01-01

    The shift in the site of service delivery from inpatient and institutional to ambulatory and community settings has been prompted by concerns over cost and the prospect for improving the quality of life. In response to these concerns, Medicare has implemented several demonstrations that emphasize ambulatory and community-based services. In this issue, articles are presented on four demonstrations, which focus on the extent to which coordinated care models reduce health care costs, and the cos...

  3. Assessment of ambulatory activity in the Republic of Korea Navy submarine crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seong-Woo; Lee, Jae-Ho; Jang, Young-Keun; Kim, Jung-Ryul

    2010-01-01

    A submarine crew in the Republic of the Korea Navy experienced significant physical inactivity during undersea deployment because of the narrow and confined space. Physical inactivity is known to be associated with a number of adverse health conditions in the long-term perspective. This study aimed to assess the ambulatory activity of submarine crew using pedometers. Study subjects (n=109) were the submarine crew from two diesel submarines and personnel from the Submarine Command. The subjects wore pedometers at their waistline and recorded their walking steps daily for a month. The submarine crew walked more than 7000 steps/day on average during the stationed period. However, the ambulatory activity of the submarine crew greatly declined to a level of around 2000 steps/day during deployment, which corresponded to the sedentary status category. Active exercise is recommended for the submarine crew to prevent potential adverse health outcomes related to the physical inactivity. PMID:21226392

  4. Optical profiling of anticoagulation status (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshikudi, Diane M.; Tripathi, Markandey M.; Hajjarian, Zeinab; Nadkarni, Seemantini K.

    2016-02-01

    Defective blood coagulation resulting from excessive procoagulant activity often leads to thrombotic disorders such as stroke and myocardial infarction. A variety of oral and injectable anticoagulant drugs are prescribed to prevent or treat life-threatening thrombosis. However, due to bleeding complications often associated with anticoagulant treatment, routine monitoring and accurate dosing of anticoagulant therapy is imperative. We have developed Optical thromboelastography (OTEG), a non-contact approach that utilizes a drop of whole blood to measure blood coagulation status in patients. Here, we demonstrate the capability of OTEG for rapidly monitoring anticoagulation in whole blood samples. OTEG monitors coagulation status by assessing changes in blood viscosity from temporal intensity fluctuations of laser speckle patterns during clotting. In OTEG a blood drop is illuminated with coherent light and the blood viscosity is measured from the speckle intensity autocorrelation curve, g2 (t). The metrics, clotting time (R+k), clot progression (angle) and maximum clot stiffness (MA) are then extracted. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the accuracy of OTEG in assessing anticoagulation status of common anticoagulants including heparin, argatroban and rivaroxaban status. A dose-dependent prolongation of R+k was observed in anticoagulated blood, which closely corresponded with standard-reference Thromboelastography (TEG) (r 0.87-0.99, P>0.01 for all cases). OTEG angle was unaltered by anticoagulation whereas TEG angle presented a dose-dependent diminution probably linked to clot rupture. In both OTEG and TEG, MA was unaffected by heparin, argatroban or rivaroxaban. We conclude that OTEG can accurately monitor anticoagulation status following treatment, potentially providing a powerful tool for routine monitoring of patients in the doctor's office or in the home setting.

  5. [Direct oral anticoagulant associated bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godier, A; Martin, A-C; Rosencher, N; Susen, S

    2016-07-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) are recommended for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. However, they are associated with hemorrhagic complications. Management of DOAC-induced bleeding remains challenging. Activated or non-activated prothrombin concentrates are proposed, although their efficacy to reverse DOAC is uncertain. Therapeutic options also include antidotes: idarucizumab, antidote for dabigatran, has been approved for use whereas andexanet alpha, antidote for anti-Xa agents, and aripazine, antidote for all DOAC, are under development. Other options include hemodialysis for the treatment of dabigatran-associated bleeding and administration of oral charcoal if recent DOAC ingestion. DOAC plasma concentration measurement is necessary to guide DOAC reversal. We propose an update on DOAC-associated bleeding, integrating the availability of dabigatran antidote and the critical place of DOAC concentration measurements. PMID:27297642

  6. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring and Circadian Rhythm of Blood Pressure in Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Matteucci; Ottavio Giampietro

    2013-01-01

    Systolic and diastolic blood pressures display a circadian rhythmicity that can be assessed by 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and analysed using the cosinor procedure. Altered characteristics to the circadian rhythm of blood pressure, which may result in adverse health outcomes, have been observed in both prediabetes and diabetes. We have investigated the circadian variability of blood pressure in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Chronobiologically interpreted ambulator...

  7. Relationship between protein C antigen and anticoagulant activity during oral anticoagulation and in selected disease states.

    OpenAIRE

    Vigano D'Angelo, S; Comp, P C; Esmon, C T; D'Angelo, A.

    1986-01-01

    Protein C is a natural vitamin K-dependent plasma anticoagulant, deficiencies of which have been found in patients with recurrent thrombosis and warfarin-induced skin necrosis. To appreciate more fully the role of protein C in disease states and during oral anticoagulation, a new functional assay for protein C involving adsorption of plasma protein C on a Ca+2-dependent monoclonal antibody, elution, quantitative activation, and assessment of plasma anticoagulant activity, has been developed. ...

  8. Anticoagulation, ferrotoxicity and the future of translational lung cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharski, Leo R

    2016-06-01

    Numerous studies have shown that elements of coagulation reactions mediate tumor cell proliferation, motility (invasiveness), tissue remodeling and metastasis. Coagulation activation is virtually a universal feature of human malignancy that differs from the clotting response to injury in that it is self-perpetuating rather than self-attenuating. Coagulation activation participates in tumor matrix deposition and local inflammation, and predicts subsequent cancer risk and adverse cancer outcomes. Several clinical trials of anticoagulants have shown improved outcomes in small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCCL) that have been correlated with assembly on the tumor cells of an intact coagulation pathway. However, variable efficacy of anticoagulant therapy has raised doubts about the coagulation hypothesis. Recently, initiators of coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways have been identified that mediate tumor inception and progression. Notable among these is oxidative stress driven by iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen species that may be the basis for local coagulation activation, tumor matrix deposition, inflammation and aberrant properties characteristic of the malignant phenotype. Recognition of important biological characteristics of individual tumor types, disease stage, choice of standard therapy including chemotherapy and the iron status of the host may clarify mechanisms. All of these are subject to modification based on controlled clinical trial design. Further tests of the coagulation hypothesis may lead to novel, low cost and relatively non-toxic approaches to treatment of malignancy including lung cancer that contrast with certain current cancer treatment paradigms. PMID:27413710

  9. Anticoagulation, ferrotoxicity and the future of translational lung cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that elements of coagulation reactions mediate tumor cell proliferation, motility (invasiveness), tissue remodeling and metastasis. Coagulation activation is virtually a universal feature of human malignancy that differs from the clotting response to injury in that it is self-perpetuating rather than self-attenuating. Coagulation activation participates in tumor matrix deposition and local inflammation, and predicts subsequent cancer risk and adverse cancer outcomes. Several clinical trials of anticoagulants have shown improved outcomes in small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCCL) that have been correlated with assembly on the tumor cells of an intact coagulation pathway. However, variable efficacy of anticoagulant therapy has raised doubts about the coagulation hypothesis. Recently, initiators of coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways have been identified that mediate tumor inception and progression. Notable among these is oxidative stress driven by iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen species that may be the basis for local coagulation activation, tumor matrix deposition, inflammation and aberrant properties characteristic of the malignant phenotype. Recognition of important biological characteristics of individual tumor types, disease stage, choice of standard therapy including chemotherapy and the iron status of the host may clarify mechanisms. All of these are subject to modification based on controlled clinical trial design. Further tests of the coagulation hypothesis may lead to novel, low cost and relatively non-toxic approaches to treatment of malignancy including lung cancer that contrast with certain current cancer treatment paradigms.

  10. HCUP State Ambulatory Surgery Databases (SASD) - Restricted Access Files

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The State Ambulatory Surgery Databases (SASD) contain the universe of hospital-based ambulatory surgery encounters in participating States. Some States include...

  11. Parenteral anticoagulation in patients with cancer who have no therapeutic or prophylactic indication for anticoagulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A. Akl; S. Gunukula; M. Barba; V.E.D. Yosuico; F.F. van Doormaal; S. Kuipers; S. Middeldorp; H.O. Dickinson; A. Bryant; H. Schuenemann

    2011-01-01

    Background Anticoagulation may improve survival in patients with cancer through an antitumor effect in addition to the perceived antithrombotic effect. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy and safety of parenteral anticoagulants in patients with cancer with no therapeutic or prophylactic indication f

  12. Anticoagulation control in atrial fibrillation patients present to outpatient clinic of cardiology versus anticoagulant clinics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Xin; MA Chang-sheng; LIU Xiao-hui; DONG Jian-zeng; WANG Jun-nan; CHENG Xiao-jing

    2005-01-01

    @@ Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia in clinical practice, which if untreated results in a doubling of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. AF is an independent predictor of stroke, with an annual risk 5 to 6 times higher than patients in sinus rhythm.1 During recent years, several randomised clinical trials conducted by investigators around the world involving 13 843 participants with NVAF have demonstrated convincingly the value of warfarin therapies for stroke prevention in high risk patients.2-8 However, the dose response of warfarin is complex and its activity is easily altered by concurrent medications, food interactions, alcohol and illnesses. Adherence to medical advice and routine monitoring of the international normalized ratio (INR) is important, because low anticoagulant intensity predisposes the patients to thromboembolic complications and high intensity to haemorrhage. Studies suggested that anticoagulant clinics could improve the quality of anticoagulation control,9 and anticoagulant clinics are common in western countries. However, in China, most AF patients taking warfarin usually attend the outpatient clinic of cardiology, while the quality of anticoagulation control is never investigated. We therefore assessed anticoagulation control in the outpatient clinic of cardiology, and the quality of anticoagulation control since the establishment of anticoagulant clinics.

  13. Anticoagulation after anterior myocardial infarction and the risk of stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob A Udell

    MI there was no benefit from the use of warfarin up to 90 days post-MI to prevent ischemic stroke. Our data suggests that routine anticoagulation of patients with anterior-wall MI may not be indicated. Prospective randomized trials are needed to determine the optimal antithrombin strategy for preventing this common and serious adverse outcome.

  14. Diagnostic Errors in Ambulatory Care: Dimensions and Preventive Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hardeep; Weingart, Saul N.

    2009-01-01

    Despite an increasing focus on patient safety in ambulatory care, progress in understanding and reducing diagnostic errors in this setting lag behind many other safety concerns such as medication errors. To explore the extent and nature of diagnostic errors in ambulatory care, we identified five dimensions of ambulatory care from which errors may…

  15. Ambulatory Care Skills: Do Residents Feel Prepared?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Bonds

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine resident comfort and skill in performing ambulatory care skills. Methods: Descriptive survey of common ambulatory care skills administered to internal medicine faculty and residents at one academic medical center. Respondents were asked to rate their ability to perform 12 physical exam skills and 6 procedures, and their comfort in performing 7 types of counseling, and obtaining 6 types of patient history (4 point Likert scale for each. Self-rated ability or comfort was compared by gender, status (year of residency, faculty, and future predicted frequency of use of the skill. Results: Residents reported high ability levels for physical exam skills common to both the ambulatory and hospital setting. Fewer felt able to perform musculoskeletal, neurologic or eye exams easily alone. Procedures generally received low ability ratings. Similarly, residents’ comfort in performing common outpatient counseling was also low. More residents reported feeling very comfortable in obtaining history from patients. We found little variation by gender, year of training, or predicted frequency of use. Conclusion: Self-reported ability and comfort for many common ambulatory care skills is low. Further evaluation of this finding in other training programs is warranted.

  16. Regional anesthesia techniques for ambulatory orthopedic surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Brian D

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to present advances in the use of regional anesthetic techniques in ambulatory orthopedic surgery. New findings regarding the use of both neuraxial anesthesia and peripheral nerve block are discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: Neuraxial anesthesia: The use of short-acting local anesthetic agents such as mepivacaine, 2-chloroprocaine, and articaine permits rapid onset intrathecal anesthesia with early recovery profiles. Advantages and limitations of these agents are discussed.Peripheral nerve block: Peripheral nerve blocks in limb surgery have the potential to transform this patient cohort into a truly ambulatory, self-caring group. Recent trends and evidence regarding the benefits of regional anesthesia techniques are presented.Continuous perineural catheters permit extension of improved perioperative analgesia into the ambulatory home setting. The role and reported safety of continuous catheters are discussed. SUMMARY: In summary, shorter acting, neuraxial, local anesthetic agents, specific to the expected duration of surgery, may provide superior recovery profiles in the ambulatory setting. A trend towards more peripheral and selective nerve blocks exists. The infrapatellar block is a promising technique to provide analgesia following knee arthroscopy. Improved analgesia seen in the perioperative period can be safely and effectively extended to the postoperative period with the use of perineural catheters.

  17. Ambulatory Measurement of Ground Reaction Forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltink, Peter H.; Liedtke, Christian; Droog, Ed

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of ground reaction forces is important in the biomechanical analysis of gait and other motor activities. It is the purpose of this study to show the feasibility of ambulatory measurement of ground reaction forces using two six degrees of freedom sensors mounted under the shoe. One se

  18. [How to provide practical treatment for ambulatory patients with deep venous thrombosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achkar, A; Samama, M M

    1999-02-01

    Much interest has been focused on low molecular weight heparins (LMWH), light weight fragments of standard heparin, for the management of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) without pulmonary embolism (PE). LMWHs offer several advantages: predictable anticoagulant activity, better bioavailability, longer half-life, better patient and caretaker comfort, safety and efficacy at least comparable to continuous intravenous heparin. Ambulatory treatment is quite attractive and a large number of patients with DVT are now being managed as outpatients. There are however certain precautions which must be taken to avoid unsatisfactory anticoagulation and subsequent consequences which have nevertheless been shown to be exceptional in well-designed and well-conducted trials excluding patients with high risk for hemorrhage and based on attentive medical control. The purpose of this review is to propose clear and simple protocols for everyday practice aimed at a global diagnostic and therapeutic management of venous thromboembolism. The review of the literature draws attention to the need for confirmation of the clinical suspicion of DVT, practical application of the anticoagulant treatment, and the importance of the etiology search in order to avoid missing a congenital or acquired state of thrombophilia or an occult cancer revealed by DVT. Half of all cases of thrombosis are caused by these two etiologies. In addition, with the development of noninvasive methods for diagnosing DVT, the efficacy of clear therapeutic regimens and the simplification of coagulation tests warrant outpatient management in many cases of DVT in compliance with certain rules of good clinical practice: confirmation of the diagnosis and regular treatment controls. An essential element is the close collaboration between the patient, the physician, the nursing staff, the laboratory and the pharmacist. PMID:10192039

  19. Predicting recovery at home after Ambulatory Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayala Guillermo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The correct implementation of Ambulatory Surgery must be accompanied by an accurate monitoring of the patient post-discharge state. We fit different statistical models to predict the first hours postoperative status of a discharged patient. We will also be able to predict, for any discharged patient, the probability of needing a closer follow-up, or of having a normal progress at home. Background The status of a discharged patient is predicted during the first 48 hours after discharge by using variables routinely used in Ambulatory Surgery. The models fitted will provide the physician with an insight into the post-discharge progress. These models will provide valuable information to assist in educating the patient and their carers about what to expect after discharge as well as to improve their overall level of satisfaction. Methods A total of 922 patients from the Ambulatory Surgery Unit of the Dr. Peset University Hospital (Valencia, Spain were selected for this study. Their post-discharge status was evaluated through a phone questionnaire. We pretend to predict four variables which were self-reported via phone interviews with the discharged patient: sleep, pain, oral tolerance of fluid/food and bleeding status. A fifth variable called phone score will be built as the sum of these four ordinal variables. The number of phone interviews varies between patients, depending on the evolution. The proportional odds model was used. The predictors were age, sex, ASA status, surgical time, discharge time, type of anaesthesia, surgical specialty and ambulatory surgical incapacity (ASI. This last variable reflects, before the operation, the state of incapacity and severity of symptoms in the discharged patient. Results Age, ambulatory surgical incapacity and the surgical specialty are significant to explain the level of pain at the first call. For the first two phone calls, ambulatory surgical incapacity is significant as a predictor for all

  20. Interrupting Anticoagulation in Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Yates, Scott W

    2014-01-01

    No agents are approved to reverse the effects of newer anticoagulants used to reduce the risk of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. This review focuses on ways to monitor, interrupt, and reverse such anticoagulation.

  1. Anticoagulant conversion in the elderly: pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nasser, Bassam

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of medical conditions representing a risk for thromboembolic complications and requiring antithrombotic therapy increases gradually with age. Two cases of fatal noncritical organ bleeding complication that occurred during the conversion period from initial fondaparinux to vitamin K antagonist are presented. An 81-year-old obese female patient (body mass index 43 kg/m(2)) with previous postoperative thrombosis underwent uneventful total knee replacement under spinal anesthesia. She presented with popliteal hematoma during conversion to oral anticoagulant. A 92-year-old female patient (body mass index 33 kg/m(2)) with left lower limb thrombosis was referred to our orthopedics department from her senior citizens' home for right lower limb hematoma and ischemia that occurred during conversion to oral anticoagulant. Thromboembolic and bleeding events in the elderly are real public health problems. Specific guidelines dedicated to this particular population are needed, which will improve the management of anticoagulation and decrease risk of complications. PMID:26547115

  2. Pharmacology of anticoagulants used in the treatment of venous thromboembolism

    OpenAIRE

    Nutescu, Edith A.; Burnett, Allison; Fanikos, John; Spinler, Sarah; Wittkowsky, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulant drugs are the foundation of therapy for patients with VTE. While effective therapeutic agents, anticoagulants can also result in hemorrhage and other side effects. Thus, anticoagulant therapy selection should be guided by the risks, benefits and pharmacologic characteristics of each agent for each patient. Safe use of anticoagulants requires not only an in-depth knowledge of their pharmacologic properties but also a comprehensive approach to patient management and education. Thi...

  3. Ambulatory anesthetic care in pediatric tonsillectomy: challenges and risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins C

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Corey Collins Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Department of Anesthesiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Pediatric tonsillectomy is a common surgery around the world. Surgical indications are obstructive sleep apnea and recurrent tonsillitis. Despite the frequency of tonsillectomy in children, most aspects of perioperative care are supported by scant evidence. Recent guidelines provide important recommendations although clinician adherence or awareness of published guidance is variable and inconsistent. Current guidelines establish criteria for screening children for post-tonsillectomy observation, though most are based on low-grade evidence or consensus. Current recommendations for admission are: age <3 years; significant obstructive sleep apnea; obesity; and significant comorbid medical conditions. Recent reports have challenged each criterion and recommend admission criteria that are based on clinically relevant risks or observed clinical events such as adverse respiratory events in the immediate recovery period. Morbidity and mortality are low though serious complications occur regularly and may be amenable to improvements in postoperative monitoring, improved analgesic regimens, and parental education. Careful consideration of risks attributable to individual patients is vital to determine overall suitability for ambulatory discharge. Keywords: adverse airway events, complications, guidelines, mortality, OSA, pediatric anesthesia

  4. Hematometra secondary to anticoagulant rodenticide toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An adult, intact female Australian shepherd presented for frank vaginal bleeding of unknown duration. The only coagulation profile abnormality upon presentation was mild prolongation of the partial thromboplastin time (PTT). The uterus was removed at surgery and contained a large amount of coagulated blood. Clotting profiles were markedly abnormal48 hours postoperatively. Serum analysis was positive for brodifacoum, an anticoagulant rodenticide. Preoperative coagulation was most likely normalized by vitamin K-1 therapy administered prior to presentation. The only manifestation of anticoagulant rodenticide was hematometra. Rodenticide intoxication should be considered in the differential diagnosis list of hematometra or metrorrhagia

  5. Fatal pulmonary hemorrhage after taking anticoagulation medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel P. Hammar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 64-year-old man with extensive diffuse acute lung hemorrhage, presumably as a result of anticoagulation therapy. We evaluated reports in the literature concerning acute exacerbation (acute lung injury of unknown cause in UIP and other forms of fibrotic interstitial pneumonias. We also evaluated autopsy tissue in this case in order to determine the cause of death in this 64-year-old man, who was initially thought to have an asbestos-related disease. Based on the autopsy findings, this man died as a result of anticoagulation therapy; specifically, the use of Xarelto® (rivaroxaban.

  6. [Pharmacologic heterogeneity of new anticoagulants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samamaa, M-M; Conard, J; Flaujac, C; Combe, S; Horellou, M-H

    2011-12-01

    Amongst numerous promising anticoagulant molecules, rivaroxaban (Xarelto(®)), dabigatran (Pradaxa(®)) and apixaban (Eliquis(®)) have been registered outside the USA in the prevention of thromboembolic events in patients undergoing total hip or knee prosthetic replacement. Rivaroxaban however has been granted authorisation by the FDA for the thromboprophylaxis after surgery for total hip or knee surgery. Dabigatran has been granted authorisation by the FDA in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (RE-LY trial) while rivaroxaban is expecting approval in this same indication (ROCKET trial). Phase III results in the treatment and in the secondary prevention of established venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism are encouraging. These small molecules are obtained by chemical synthesis, their molecular weight is lower than 500 daltons. Many coagulation tests may be affected by these molecules. Those modifications should be known in order to avoid misinterpretation of the tests but could also be used to measure plasma concentrations of these products. The choice of a non specific global and readily available test has been documented (Quick time for rivaroxaban and aPTT for dabigatran). Anti-Xa (for rivaroxaban) and anti-IIa (for dabigatran) activities should however be preferred, expressed in ng/ml with calibrated plasmas (containing predetermined concentration of the tested drug). The half-life is around 8 to 12 hours, with a peak activity 2 to 4 hours after ingestion. Dabigatran is mainly eliminated via the kidney, hence requiring dose-adjustment in case of moderate renal insufficiency, and contra-indicated in case of severe renal insufficiency. Rivaroxaban being excreted via kidney and liver, some precautions should apply in case of liver insufficiency. No data are available in pregnancy or pediatrics, clinical trials are ongoing. There are few interactions with concomitant drugs, which should not be ignored. The short half-life of these new agents compensates for the

  7. Gastrointestinal bleedings during therapy with new oral anticoagulants are rarely reported

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay-Nielsen, Morten; Kampmann, Jens Peter; Bisgaard, Thue

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Post-marketing surveillance of drugs relies on spontaneous reporting of adverse drug events to the Danish Health and Medicines Authority. A number of new oral anticoagulants (NOAC) have recently been marketed in Denmark. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reporting of......, Surgical Section, Hvidovre Hospital, during a one-year-period. Patients in treatment with NOAC and admitted for gastrointestinal bleeding were identified. Relevant patients were cross-checked for a reported adverse drug event in the Danish Health and Medi-cines Authority's database on adverse medical...... underreported which questions the current effectiveness of post-marketing surveillance of adverse drug effects. FUNDING: not relevant. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The study was registered with clin-icaltrials.gov (NCT02107651)....

  8. Nine-year experience with a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, R R; Kehoe, W A; Nielson, N; Lodhia, H

    1986-10-01

    A pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic is described, and information on patient outcome during a nine-year period is presented. Since 1974, a pharmacist has managed an anticoagulation clinic for ambulatory patients and inpatients at San Francisco General Hospital Medical Center. The pharmacist's primary responsibilities include the following: educating patients about their diseases and the importance of drug therapy, monitoring patients' vital signs, performing physical examinations, and adjusting warfarin dosage to maintain prothrombin times within the therapeutic range (1.7-2.5 times normal using control values of 1.0-1.2). These patients are also under the care of their primary physicians. The pharmacist's work is checked by the chief of the cardiac clinic at the end of each clinic session. The effectiveness of the pharmacist in managing clinic patients is reviewed periodically; from January 1975 through June 1984, the pharmacist had treated 140 patients (141 courses of therapy). Of 1792 prothrombin times taken during this time, 1060 (59.2%) were within the therapeutic range of 17-25 seconds, 510 (28.5%) were less than 17 seconds, and 222 (12.4%) were greater than 25 seconds. Only four major hemorrhagic events (0.002 hemorrhages per patient-treatment month) and 89 minor events (0.05 hemorrhages per patient-treatment month) occurred. The recurrence rate of thromboembolic events was 0.007 per patient-treatment month. Pharmacist-managed warfarin therapy in these clinic patients resulted in a level of anticoagulation control and morbidity that was acceptable to physicians. PMID:3788996

  9. Safety and Efficacy Outcomes of Home and Hospital Warfarin Management Within a Pediatric Anticoagulation Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sophie; McLoughlin, Siobhan; Piovesan, Dana; Savoia, Helen; Monagle, Paul; Newall, Fiona

    2016-04-01

    The complexity of managing children with chronic disease has led to an increase in the use of long-term warfarin therapy. Time in therapeutic range (TTR) is the preferred method for determining efficacy and stability of warfarin management. This study aimed to determine the TTR achievement and incidence of adverse events among pediatric warfarin patients managed by an anticoagulation clinic over 12 months and to compare TTR achievement between patients self-testing (PST) at home and those monitored using routine methods. International normalized ratio (INR) results reported for 2012 for children currently having their warfarin therapy managed by a dedicated pediatric anticoagulation clinic were analyzed. Warfarin-related adverse events were recorded. A total of 164 patients were included. In total, 93 children performed PST and 71 children tested their INR at a hospital or pathology service. TTR achievement for the cohort was 67.1% (95% confidence interval, 64.4-69.7). A total of 69.2% of INR tests conducted at home were within the TTR compared with 64.3% of INR tests conducted at a hospital or pathology service (P=0.07). One major bleeding event occurred and there was 1 thrombotic episode. PST demonstrated noninferior warfarin stability compared with routine methods. Routine outcome evaluation of pediatric anticoagulation management within single institutions is necessary to confirm the success of such programs. PMID:26808370

  10. Pharmacology of anticoagulants used in the treatment of venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutescu, Edith A; Burnett, Allison; Fanikos, John; Spinler, Sarah; Wittkowsky, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulant drugs are the foundation of therapy for patients with VTE. While effective therapeutic agents, anticoagulants can also result in hemorrhage and other side effects. Thus, anticoagulant therapy selection should be guided by the risks, benefits and pharmacologic characteristics of each agent for each patient. Safe use of anticoagulants requires not only an in-depth knowledge of their pharmacologic properties but also a comprehensive approach to patient management and education. This paper will summarize the key pharmacologic properties of the anticoagulant agents used in the treatment of patients with VTE. PMID:26780737

  11. Subcutaneous enoxaparin for outpatient anticoagulation therapy in a patient with an aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, H J; Smith, J A; Garris, R E

    1998-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight heparins have been administered for a variety of clinical conditions. A patient with a mechanical aortic valve replacement patient underwent elective transurethral prostatectomy. Anticoagulation was managed with unfractionated heparin immediately preoperatively and postoperatively. Warfarin was begun on postoperative day 1. The patient had a prolonged hospitalization due to subtherapeutic international normalized ratios (INR) despite warfarin administration. Because he intended to leave the hospital against medical advice before therapeutic INR was achieved, enoxaparin 1 mg/kg subcutaneously every 12 hours was prescribed to provide anticoagulation, facilitating discharge and improving the patient's quality of life. Enoxaparin was associated with an approximate saving of $4500 over warfarin. The only adverse event reported was bruising at the injection site. PMID:9545164

  12. Advances in ambulatory monitoring: regulatory considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckles, David; Aguel, Felipe; Brockman, Randall; Cheng, James; Demian, Cindy; Ho, Charles; Jensen, Donald; Mallis, Elias

    2004-01-01

    Conventional ambulatory electrocardiogram (ECG) (Holter) monitoring involves 2 or 3 surface leads recorded with electrode positions and signal characteristics that are different from diagnostic quality 12-lead ECGs due to the limitations imposed by technology on the ambulatory recorders. The rapid pace of technological development for medical devices, particularly electrocardiography, has now enabled the recording of diagnostic quality 12-lead ECG waveforms for extended time periods. This capability allows Holter recording to become another source for diagnostic 12-lead ECG records on a par with other modalities such as resting ECG and exercise stress testing. Additionally, other diagnostic techniques such as S-T segment analysis and Q-T interval analysis that rely on diagnostic quality waveforms can now be applied. All of these enhancements to the traditional Holter modality have altered the regulatory perspective of these devices, since the enhancements may represent a new intended use for the device. PMID:15534803

  13. Evaluation of Ambulatory Care Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Simborg, Donald W.; Whiting-O'Keefe, Quinn E.

    1980-01-01

    The central purpose of an ambulatory care information system is to communicate information to the practitioner to facilitate clinical decision making. The clinical decision can be considered the dependent output variable in a process having the information system, the patient, clinician characteristics, and the environment as the independent input variables. Evaluation approaches using patient outcomes are problematic because of the indirect relationship between the information system and pat...

  14. Ambulatory cardiac arrhythmias in relation to mild hypokalaemia and prognosis in community dwelling middle-aged and elderly subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Nick; Sadjadieh, Golnaz; Kumarathurai, Preman;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Severe hypokalaemia can aggravate arrhythmia tendency and prognosis, but less is known about risk of mild hypokalaemia, which is a frequent finding. We examined the associations between mild hypokalaemia and ambulatory cardiac arrhythmias and their prognosis. METHODS AND RESULTS: Subjects f......: In middle-aged and elderly subjects with no manifest heart disease, mild hypokalaemia is associated with increased rate of ventricular but not supraventricular arrhythmias. Hypokalaemia interacts synergistically with increased ventricular ectopy to increase the risk of adverse events....

  15. Comprehensive Ambulatory Medicine Training for Categorical Internal Medicine Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Bharel, Monica; Jain, Sharad; Hollander, Harry

    2003-01-01

    It is challenging to create an educational and satisfying experience in the outpatient setting. We developed a 3-year ambulatory curriculum that addresses the special needs of our categorical medicine residents with distinct learning objectives for each year of training and clinical experiences and didactic sessions to meet these goals. All PGY1 residents spend 1 month on a general medicine ambulatory care rotation. PGY2 residents spend 3 months on an ambulatory block focusing on 8 core medic...

  16. Risk of postoperative hypoxemia in ambulatory orthopedic surgery patients with diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea: a retrospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Yan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is unclear when it is safe to discharge patients with a diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA after ambulatory surgical procedures due to concern for postoperative respiratory compromise and hypoxemia. Our OSA patients undergoing ambulatory-type orthopedic procedures are monitored overnight in the PACU, thus we reviewed patient records to determine incidence of complications. Methods Two hundred and six charts of patients with preoperative diagnosis of OSA based on ICD-9 codes were reviewed for outcomes including episodes of hypoxemia. Univariate analysis followed by logistic regression and propensity analysis was performed to determine independent risk factors for hypoxemia and association with adverse outcomes. Results The majority of patients had regional anesthesia (95%. Thirty four percent of patients had hypoxemia in the PACU. Initial risk factors for hypoxemia identified by univariate analysis were BMI ≥ 35, increased age, history of COPD, upper extremity procedure, and use of peripheral nerve block. Independent risk factors identified by logistic regression were history of COPD (OR 3.64 with 95% CI 1.03-12.88 and upper extremity procedure (2.53, 1.36-4.68. After adjustment with propensity scores, adverse events were rare, and unplanned hospital admission after PACU stay was not increased with hypoxemia (11% vs 16% Conclusions Episodes of postoperative hypoxemia in OSA patients undergoing ambulatory surgery with regional anesthesia are not associated with increased adverse outcomes or unplanned hospital admission.

  17. Acupuncture in ambulatory anesthesia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norheim AJ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Arne Johan Norheim,1 Ingrid Liodden,1 Terje Alræk1,2 1National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM, Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, 2The Norwegian School of Health Sciences, Institute of Acupuncture, Kristiania University College, Oslo, NorwayBackground: Post-anesthetic morbidities remain challenging in our daily practice of anesthesia. Meta-analyses and reviews of acupuncture and related techniques for postoperative nausea and vomiting (POVN and postoperative vomiting (POV show promising results while many clinicians remain skeptical of the value of acupuncture. Given the interest in finding safe non-pharmacological approaches toward postoperative care, this body of knowledge needs to be considered. This review critically appraises and summarizes the research on acupuncture and acupressure in ambulatory anesthesia during the last 15 years.Methods: Articles were identified through searches of Medline, PubMed, and Embase using the search terms “acupuncture” or “acupuncture therapy” in combination with “ambulatory anesthesia” or “ambulatory surgery” or “day surgery” or “postoperative”. A corresponding search was done using “acupressure” and “wristbands”. The searches generated a total of 104, 118, and 122 references, respectively.Results: Sixteen studies were included; eight studies reported on acupuncture and eight on acupressure. Nine studies found acupuncture or acupressure effective on primary endpoints including postoperative nausea and vomiting, postoperative pain, sore throat, and emergence agitation. Four studies found acupuncture had a similar effect to antiemetic medication.Conclusion: Overall, the studies were of fairly good quality. A large proportion of the reviewed papers highlights an effect of acupuncture or acupressure on postoperative morbidities in an ambulatory setting

  18. Anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A S; Idorn, L; Nørager, B;

    2015-01-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease are a growing population. One of the major challenges in the care of these patients is to prevent thromboembolic episodes. Despite relative young age and no typical cardiovascular risk factors, this cohort has a high prevalence of thrombotic events. It is....... Furthermore, there is a lack of scientific evidence regarding how to prevent thromboembolic events with anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature pertaining to anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease and hence enable...... difficult to use treatment algorithms from the general adult population with acquired heart disease in this heterogeneous population due to special conditions such as myocardial scarring after previous surgery, atypical atrial flutter, prothrombotic conditions and the presence of interatrial shunts...

  19. Lupus anticoagulants: pathogenesis and laboratory diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, E L

    1997-12-01

    The pathogenesis of the lupus anticoagulant (LA) has been the focus of much research over the past decade, and a plethora of laboratory tests have been developed to detect it. This essay reviews the nature of LA and its pathogenesis, and a number of approaches employed in its diagnosis. These range from well established tests such as the kaolin clotting time (KCT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and tissue thromboplastin inhibition test (TTI), to the 'newer' tests such as the dilute Russell's viper venom time (DRVVT) and more recent snake venom tests such as the textarin/ecarin ratio and Taipan snake venom time (TSVT). The criteria for diagnosis are discussed, including pre-analytical variables such as sample preparation, and the effects of therapeutic anticoagulants used to treat thrombotic manifestations of the syndrome or an underlying disease process. PMID:9624740

  20. [Therapeutic equivalence of the new oral anticoagulants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Villar, A; Nacle López, I; Barbero Hernández, M J; Lizan Tudela, L

    2015-10-01

    In an attempt to minimize the economic impact due to the incorporation of innovative drugs, health authorities have promoted and supported the evaluation and market positioning of drugs, as equivalent therapeutic alternatives. This issue has recently gained importance, possibly due to the current economic crisis. The equivalent therapeutic alternatives are justified by the need to compete on price, and by the authorities recommendation to establish therapeutic equivalence, price and financing of medicinal products at the same time. The establishment of the new oral anticoagulants and the equivalent therapeutic alternatives is a problematic issue if it is based on the absence of direct comparisons between different drugs and the questionable methodology used in the current indirect comparisons. Currently, it is difficult to determine when a new oral anticoagulant is more recommendable than others, but efforts are being made in order to propose alternatives for the decision based on patient characteristics. PMID:26146035

  1. Heterofucans from Dictyota menstrualis have anticoagulant activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.R.L. Albuquerque

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Fucan is a term used to denote a family of sulfated L-fucose-rich polysaccharides which are present in the extracellular matrix of brown seaweed and in the egg jelly coat of sea urchins. Plant fucans have several biological activities, including anticoagulant and antithrombotic, related to the structural and chemical composition of polysaccharides. We have extracted sulfated polysaccharides from the brown seaweed Dictyota menstrualis by proteolytic digestion, followed by separation into 5 fractions by sequential acetone precipitation. Gel electrophoresis using 0.05 M 1,3-diaminopropane-acetate buffer, pH 9.0, stained with 0.1% toluidine blue, showed the presence of sulfated polysaccharides in all fractions. The chemical analyses demonstrated that all fractions are composed mainly of fucose, xylose, galactose, uronic acid, and sulfate. The anticoagulant activity of these heterofucans was determined by activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT using citrate normal human plasma. Only the fucans F1.0v and F1.5v showed anticoagulant activity. To prolong the coagulation time to double the baseline value in the APTT, the required concentration of fucan F1.0v (20 µg/ml was only 4.88-fold higher than that of the low molecular weight heparin Clexane® (4.1 µg/ml, whereas 80 µg/ml fucan 1.5 was needed to obtain the same effect. For both fucans this effect was abolished by desulfation. These polymers are composed of fucose, xylose, uronic acid, galactose, and sulfate at molar ratios of 1.0:0.8:0.7:0.8:0.4 and 1.0:0.3:0.4:1.5:1.3, respectively. This is the fist report indicating the presence of a heterofucan with higher anticoagulant activity from brown seaweed.

  2. [New orally anticoagulants and brain stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczorowska, Beata; Pawełczyk, Małgorzata; Przybyła, Monika

    2016-05-26

    Brain stroke is a grave society problem. About 20% ischemic strokes are cardiac related problems. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cause of ischemic strokes. Decision to deploy anticoagulant treatment with AF patient depends on bleeding and thrombo-embolic risk which summerise scale CHA2DS2VASc and HAS-BLED. Past recent years in AF treatment anticoagulants from the group of vitamin K antagonist were used. At present in brain stroke prevention and systemic emboilment, new oral anticoagulants (NOA) which weren't worst than vitamin K antagonists, and they are recomendet in most cases of AF unrelated with heart valve defets. Useing NOA causes lower risk of bleeding, including intracranial heamorrhage. It is believed that this is related to the selective inhibition of specific coagulation factors, and respect other hemostatic mechanisms. Results from clinical studies NOA are encouraging, but still lacks clear answers regarding, among other things: long-term safety of treatment and economically viable in everyday clinical practice. In addition, to date there is no specific antidote for this group of drugs. PMID:27234866

  3. Novel oral anticoagulants in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, C F; Reid, A J

    2016-05-01

    Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have emerged as a good alternative to warfarin in the prevention of stroke for patients with atrial fibrillation. NOAC use is increasing rapidly; therefore, greater understanding of their use in the perioperative period is important for optimal care. Studies and reviews that reported on the use of NOACs were identified, with particular focus on the perioperative period. PubMed was searched for relevant articles published between January 2000 and August 2015. The inevitable rise in the use of NOACs such as rivaroxaban (Xarelto™), apixaban (Eliquis™), edoxaban (Lixiana™) and dabigatran (Pradaxa™) may present a simplified approach to perioperative anticoagulant management due to fewer drug interactions, rapidity of onset of action and relatively short half-lives. Coagulation status, however, cannot reliably be monitored and no antidotes are currently available. When planning for discontinuation of NOACs, special consideration of renal function is required. Advice regarding the management of bleeding complications is provided for consideration in emergency surgery. In extreme circumstances, haemodialysis may be considered for bleeding with the use of dabigatran. NOACs will increasingly affect operative planning in plastic surgery. In order to reduce the incidence of complications associated with anticoagulation, the management of NOACs in the perioperative period requires knowledge of the time of last dose, renal function and the bleeding risk of the planned procedure. Consideration of these factors will allow appropriate interpretation of the current guidelines. PMID:27013144

  4. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulation agents in anticoagulant naive atrial fibrillation patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Sørensen, Rikke; Hansen, Morten Lock;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulation (NOAC) agents have been approved for stroke prophylaxis in atrial fibrillation (AF). We investigated 'real-world' information on how these drugs are being adopted. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using Danish nationwide administrative registers, we...... the drug came on market. By October, 2013, 40% were being started on warfarin and dabigatran, respectively, and another 20% were started on either rivaroxaban or apixaban. Rivaroxaban and apixaban users generally had a higher predicted risk of stroke and bleeding compared with warfarin and dabigatran users....... Older age, female gender, and prior stroke were some of the factors associated with NOAC use vs. warfarin, whereas chronic kidney disease, myocardial infarction, and heart failure showed the opposite association. CONCLUSION: Among oral anticoagulation-naïve AF patients initiated on oral anticoagulation...

  5. Pharmacist-managed oral anticoagulation therapy in the community setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwmeester, Carla; Chim, Christine

    2013-05-01

    Pharmacists are at the forefront when caring for patients requiring anticoagulation resulting from chronic conditions, complex medications therapy, or at risk for drug interactions. As a consequence, there is a greater need for pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinics in the community setting. This article will review special considerations for oral anticoagulant therapy in the elderly, collaborative therapy management, establishment of policies and procedures, documentation of patient visits, patient counseling, and barriers to successful anticoagulation management. It will also discuss evidence-based guidelines for the use of oral anticoagulants and compare the agents currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Finally, barriers to anticoagulation management will be examined, including issues with adherence and communication with patients and health care providers. PMID:23649677

  6. An audit of anticoagulant management to assess anticoagulant control using decision support software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Paul; Harper, Joe; Hill, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of a computerised self-adjusting anticoagulant algorithm to predict appropriate warfarin dosing and to assess its use in clinical practice. Design A 3-year audit of anticoagulant control in patients managed by doctors and pharmacists using computer decision support and an evaluation of the impact of dose adjustments made by the users. Participants 3660 patients on oral anticoagulants; one-third of patients managed by doctors and two-thirds by pharmacists. Setting Anticoagulant supervision in primary care and pharmacies at 60 sites in New Zealand. Main outcome measures The time in the therapeutic range (TTR), the outcome of adherence to the computer dosing algorithm, the percentage of time the clinicians over-ride the algorithm and the impact of their intervention on anticoagulant control. Results A TTR of 72.9% was achieved for all patients. The TTR was significantly better in patients managed by pharmacists than doctors (75.1% versus 67.4%, ppharmacists. Conclusions The clinicians predominantly change the dose when the INR is below the therapeutic range. The changes are not necessary to correct for inaccuracies in the algorithm. The most likely explanation is the clinician's belief that their own dose adjustment would achieve better control; however, in practice, their changes tend to underdose patients. The doctors achieved poorer control than the pharmacists; this is in part due to the action of the doctors over-riding the algorithm. Our results imply that clinicians could achieve better anticoagulant control if they more closely followed the computer algorithm. PMID:25183709

  7. Use of anticoagulants in elderly patients: practical recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helia Robert-Ebadi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Helia Robert-Ebadi, Grégoire Le Gal, Marc RighiniDivision of Angiology and Hemostasis (HRE, MR, Department of Internal Medicine, Geneva University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland, and Department of Internal Medicine and Chest Diseases, EA 3878 (GETBO, Brest University Hospital, Brest, France (GLGAbstract: Elderly people represent a patient population at high thromboembolic risk, but also at high hemorrhagic risk. There is a general tendency among physicians to underuse anticoagulants in the elderly, probably both because of underestimation of thromboembolic risk and overestimation of bleeding risk. The main indications for anticoagulation are venous thromboembolism (VTE prophylaxis in medical and surgical settings, VTE treatment, atrial fibrillation (AF and valvular heart disease. Available anticoagulants for VTE prophylaxis and initial treatment of VTE are low molecular weight heparins (LMWH, unfractionated heparin (UFH or synthetic anti-factor Xa pentasaccharide fondaparinux. For long-term anticoagulation vitamin K antagonists (VKA are the first choice and only available oral anticoagulants nowadays. Assessing the benefit-risk ratio of anticoagulation is one of the most challenging issues in the individual elderly patient, patients at highest hemorrhagic risk often being those who would have the greatest benefit from anticoagulants. Some specific considerations are of utmost importance when using anticoagulants in the elderly to maximize safety of these treatments, including decreased renal function, co-morbidities and risk of falls, altered pharmacodynamics of anticoagulants especially VKAs, association with antiplatelet agents, patient education. Newer anticoagulants that are currently under study could simplify the management and increase the safety of anticoagulation in the future.Keywords: anticoagulation, elderly patients, venous thromboembolism, hemorrhagic risk, atrial fibrillation, thrombin inhibitors, factor Xa

  8. New anticoagulants for the prevention of venous thromboembolism

    OpenAIRE

    Becattini, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    Cecilia Becattini, Alessandra Lignani, Giancarlo AgnelliInternal and Cardiovascular Medicine and Stroke Unit, University of Perugia, ItalyAbstract: Anticoagulant drugs have an essential role in the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic diseases. Currently available anticoagulants substantially reduce the incidence of thromboembolic events in a number of clinical conditions. However, these agents have limitations that strengthen the case for the development of new anticoagulants. An ideal...

  9. Anticoagulation for the Acute Management of Ischemic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Austin A.; Ikuta, Kevin; Soverow, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Few prospective studies support the use of anticoagulation during the acute phase of ischemic stroke, though observational data suggest a role in certain populations. Depending on the mechanism of stroke, systemic anticoagulation may prevent recurrent cerebral infarction, but concomitantly carries a risk of hemorrhagic transformation. In this article, we describe a case where anticoagulation shows promise for ischemic stroke and review the evidence that has discredited its use in some circums...

  10. Secretion of a proteolytic anticoagulant by Ancylostoma hookworms

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Hookworms of the genus Ancylostoma secrete an anticoagulant that both inhibits the clotting of human plasma and promotes fibrin clot dissolution. This anticoagulant activity is attributable to a 36,000 dalton proteolytic enzyme. The protease can degrade fibrinogen into five smaller polypeptides that intrinsically have anticoagulating properties, covert plasminogen to a mini-plasminogen-like molecule, and hydrolyze a synthetic peptide substrate with specificity for elastolytic enzymes. It is h...

  11. Efficacy and Safety of Novel Anticoagulants Compared with Established Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Rybak, Iwona; Ehle, Michael; Buckley, Leo; Fanikos, John

    2011-01-01

    Dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban are novel oral anticoagulants that offer major advantages over existing agents. The onset of the anticoagulant effect of these agents is rapid. Each agent has a predictable anticoagulant response that eliminates the need for monitoring. Clinical trials have been completed with all three agents in the prevention and treatment of the three leading causes of cardiovascular death: myocardial infarction, stroke, and venous thromboembolism (VTE). Novel agents h...

  12. Degree of Ambulatory Disability: Effects on Rural Siblings' Social Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Theresa Nowak; Ross-Reynolds, Jane

    1993-01-01

    Interviews with 22 mothers of children with ambulatory disability and 33 nondisabled siblings showed no differences in sibling's child care responsibilities, general home responsibilities, or independence related to severity of the ambulatory disability. A difference in the amount of social activity, reported by mothers, was not confirmed by…

  13. The Kaiser Permanente Colorado Clinical Pharmacy Anticoagulation Service as a model of modern anticoagulant care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Daniel M

    2008-01-01

    The Clinical Pharmacy Anticoagulation Service (CPAS) at Kaiser Permanente Colorado grew from a single pharmacist assisting a single physician to a comprehensive service staffed by over 20 employees. CPAS provides care for over 7200 patients with each CPAS pharmacist managing all aspects of anticoagulation therapy for 150 to 500 patients. Unique aspects of CPAS include its centralized organization structure, the use of telepharmacy, collaboration drug therapy management agreement with referring physicians and a robust research agenda. Results of various CPAS research projects have been published in the peer-reviewed medical literature. PMID:18804262

  14. Home and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring: when? who?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarci, Gülçin

    2013-12-01

    Blood pressure measurement in the diagnosis and management of hypertension, including the technique required for ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and home blood pressure monitoring, will be reviewed in this article. Home and ambulatory measurements are widely used, both to confirm the diagnosis and to improve adherence to therapy. The major advantage of out-of-office blood pressure monitoring is that it provides a large number of blood pressure measurements away from the medical environment, which represents a more reliable assessment of actual blood pressure than office blood pressure. The advantage of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is its unique ability to measure nocturnal blood pressure. Although not fully validated in large-scale clinical trials, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring appears to correlate best with prognosis. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and home blood pressure monitoring provide somewhat different information on the subject's blood pressure status, and the two methods should thus be regarded as complementary, rather than competitive or alternative. PMID:25019016

  15. [2015 Update in ambulatory general internal medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasche, Sephora; Favrod-Coune, Thierry; Lanier, Cédric; Spechbach, Hervé; Siewe, Sandrine Tchokoteu; Vieira De Melo-Pulla, Drenusha; Wagner, Élise; Jackson, Yves

    2016-01-20

    This article summarizes a selection of recently published clinical and public health articles of interest to primary care physicians. It touches upon the use of new oral anticoagulant in atrial fibrillation, the efficacy of baclofen for alcohol dependence, the pathogen identification in community acquired pneumonia, the accuracy of emergency room diagnosis in patients with ill-defined symptoms, the relationship between sleep and susceptibility to infection, the benefits of smoking cessation and of a new vaccine against zoster in elderly patients and finally the distribution of health literacy in Europe. PMID:26946787

  16. Regional Anticoagulation with Citrate is Superior to Systemic Anticoagulation with Heparin in Critically Ill Patients Undergoing Continuous Venovenous Hemodiafiltration

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Joon-Sung; Kim, Gheun-Ho; Kang, Chong Myung; Lee, Chang Hwa

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Short hemofilter survival and anticoagulation-related life-threatening complications are major problems in systemic anticoagulation with heparin (SAH) for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). The present study examined if regional anticoagulation with citrate (RAC) using commercially available solutions can overcome the associated problems of SAH to produce economical benefits. Methods Forty-six patients were assigned to receive SAH or RAC. We assessed the coagulation ...

  17. 76 FR 6572 - Non-Ambulatory Disabled Veal Calves and Other Non-Ambulatory Disabled Livestock at Slaughter...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-07

    ... provision that permits veal calves that are tired or cold to be set aside and treated (74 FR 11465... Slaughter'' (72 FR 38700)). The Agency had prohibited the slaughter of non-ambulatory disabled cattle for...-Ambulatory Disabled Following Ante-Mortem Inspection'' (74 FR 11464)). In that rulemaking the Agency...

  18. Anticoagulation therapy in intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation: Does IABP really need anti-coagulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋晨阳; 赵莉莉; 王建安; 单江; MOHAMMODBalgaith

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate if intra-aortic balloon pump(IABP) is contraindicated without anticoag-ulation therapy. Methods: Some 153 IABP patients in the King Abdulaziz Cardiac Center(KSA) were random-ly assigned into two groups. Anticoagulation group( Group A) consisted of 71 patients who were given heparin intravenously with target aPTT 50 - 70 seconds. Non-anticoagulation group( Group B) consisted of 82 patients without intravenous heparin during balloon pumping. Hematological parameters including platelet count, D-dimer, Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and fibrinogen degradation products(FDP) were checked respectively at the point of baseline, 24 hours, 48 hours and 24 hours post IABP counterpulsation. Clot deposits on balloon surface, vascular complications from IABP including bleeding and limb ischemia were recorded.Results: Platelet count and PAI-1 level decreased at 24 hours and 48 hours in both groups ( P 0.05) . Three patients in Group A and 2 patients in Group B developed minor limb ischemia( P > 0.05). No major limb ischemia in either group. Two patients in Group A suffered major bleeding and required blood transfusion or surgical intervention, whereas no patient had major bleeding in Group B. Eight patients had minor bleeding in Group A, but only 2 patients in Group B ( P <0.05). No clot deposit developed on IABP surface in either group. Conclusion: IABP is safe without routine anticoagulation therapy. Selecting appropriate artery approach and early detection intervention are key methods for preventing complications.

  19. Anticoagulation therapy in intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation:Does IABP really need anti-coagulation?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Chen-yang(蒋晨阳); ZHAO Li-li(赵莉莉); WANG Jian-an(王建安); SAN Jiang(单江); MOHAMMOD Balgaith

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate if intra-aortic balloon pump(IABP) is contraindicated without anticoagulation therapy. Methods: Some 153 IABP patients in the King Abdulaziz Cardiac Center(KSA) were randomly assigned into two groups. Anticoagulation group(Group A) consisted of 71 patients who were given heparin intravenously with target aPTT 50-70 seconds. Non-anticoagulation group(Group B) consisted of 82 patients without intravenous heparin during balloon pumping. Hematological parameters including platelet count, D-dimer, Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1(PAI-1) and fibrinogen degradation products(FDP) were checked respectively at the point of baseline, 24 hours, 48 hours and 24 hours post IABP counterpulsation. Clot deposits on balloon surface, vascular complications from IABP including bleeding and limb ischemia were recorded. Results: Platelet count and PAI-1 level decreased at 24 hours and 48 hours in both groups (P0.05). Three patients in Group A and 2 patients in Group B developed minor limb ischemia(P>0.05). No major limb ischemia in either group. Two patients in Group A suffered major bleeding and required blood transfusion or surgical intervention, whereas no patient had major bleeding in Group B. Eight patients had minor bleeding in Group A, but only 2 patients in Group B(P<0.05). No clot deposit developed on IABP surface in either group. Conclusion: IABP is safe without routine anticoagulation therapy. Selecting appropriate artery approach and early detection intervention are key methods for preventing complications.

  20. The Role of Anticoagulation Clinics in the Era of New Oral Anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Testa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anticoagulation Clinics (ACs are services specialized in management of patients on anticoagulant treatment. At present, ACs manage patients chiefly on antivitamin K antagonists (AVKs, but patient population has already changed in the last few years, because of an increase of treatments with other anticoagulant drugs, which require different management systems. The strong increase in the number of patients at AC, mainly on long-term treatment, has determined the development of web management, through telemedicine systems, improving the quality of life and maintaining the same clinical quality levels. New oral anticoagulants (NOAs have shown to be as effective as AVK antagonists in stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and for treatment of venous thromboembolism in addition to VTE prophylaxis in orthopaedic surgery, when administered at a fixed dose, but patient adherence and compliance are crucial for good quality treatment. At present, lacking data from the real world, an oversimplification of treatment with NOAs could cause unjustified risks for patients and also a possible future underuse of good drugs. For these reasons the vigilance must be high and ACs can have a crucial role in defining which is the best management for NOA patients and how to do it, as it happened for AVKs.

  1. Current issues in patient adherence and persistence: focus on anticoagulants for the treatment and prevention of thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick P Kneeland

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Patrick P Kneeland, Margaret C FangThe University of California, San Francisco Division of Hospital Medicine, San Francisco, CA, USAAbstract: Warfarin therapy reduces morbidity and mortality related to thromboembolism. Yet adherence to long-term warfarin therapy remains challenging due to the risks of anticoagulantassociated complications and the burden of monitoring. The aim of this paper is to review determinants of adherence and persistence on long-term anticoagulant therapy for atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism. We evaluate what the current literature reveals about the impact of warfarin on quality of life, examine warfarin trial data for patterns of adherence, and summarize known risk factors for warfarin discontinuation. Studies suggest only modest adverse effects of warfarin on quality of life, but highlight the variability of individual lifestyle experiences of patients on warfarin. Interestingly, clinical trials comparing anticoagulant adherence to alternatives (such as aspirin show that discontinuation rates on warfarin are not consistently higher than in control arms. Observational studies link a number of risk factors to warfarin non-adherence including younger age, male sex, lower stroke risk, poor cognitive function, poverty, and higher educational attainment. In addition to differentiating the relative impact of warfarin-associated complications (such as bleeding versus the lifestyle burdens of warfarin monitoring on adherence, future investigation should focus on optimizing patient education and enhancing models of physician–patient shared-decision making around anticoagulation.Keywords: anticoagulation, warfarin, adherence, persistence, thromboembolism

  2. Adverse Effects of Bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo

    2010-01-01

    tolerated by the majority of patients, but serious adverse events have been recorded in some cases. Only the most common of adverse effects are robustly observable in clinical trials. In general, studies were not powered to detect effects that were lower in incidence than fractures. This review of adverse...

  3. Adverse effects of bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo

    2010-01-01

    tolerated by the majority of patients, but serious adverse events have been recorded in some cases. Only the most common of adverse effects are robustly observable in clinical trials. In general, studies were not powered to detect effects that were lower in incidence than fractures. This review of adverse...

  4. Vitamin K requirement in Danish anticoagulant-resistant Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette D.; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Nielsen, Robert;

    2003-01-01

    Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus, Denmark, anticoagulant rodenticide resistance, vitamin K requirement......Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus, Denmark, anticoagulant rodenticide resistance, vitamin K requirement...

  5. Antibodies for detecting and quantifying anticoagulant agents

    OpenAIRE

    Salvador, Juan Pablo; Marco, María Pilar

    2012-01-01

    [EN] The present invention relates to the design of haptens that are structurally related to coumarin oral anticoagulant compounds (COAC), to be used for the production of specific antibodies against said type of substances and the subsequent use thereof for the development of diagnosis tools for use in laboratories or in point-of-care (PoC) devices. In particular, the produced antibodies have been used to develop a diagnosis tool that enables the plasma levels of COAC to be quantified in pat...

  6. Anticoagulant activity of original synthetic peptide derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd, N N; Tolstenkov, A S; Makarov, V A; Miphtakhova, N T; Voyushina, T L; Sergeev, M E

    2008-01-01

    Original synthetic peptide derivatives exhibit anticoagulant activity in vitro and in vivo. They delayed fibrin clot formation from human blood plasma in tests for the intrinsic coagulation pathway (activated partial thromboplastin time) and final stage of plasma coagulation (thrombin time) and inhibited amidolytic activity of thrombin. We determined the minimum effective dose of the most active compound providing a 2-fold lengthening of blood clotting time (activated partial thromboplastin time test and thrombin time test), which persisted for 2-3 h. PMID:19024001

  7. Shortfalls using second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borst, G H A; Counotte, G H M

    2002-03-01

    Second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides can give rise to unexpected casualties in nontarget species in zoos. The first two offspring of a pair of turkey vultures (Cathartes aura) died of brodifacoum toxicosis. The adult birds fed rodenticide-killed mice to their offspring. There are previous case reports of small carnivorous birds (Dacelo novae-guinae and Tockus deckeni) killed eating poisoned (difenacoum and brodifacoum) mice. Even a granivorous species (Rollulus roulroul) died, probably by contamination of its food by cockroaches that transported the rodenticide. PMID:12216801

  8. New anticoagulants for the prevention of venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Becattini

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Cecilia Becattini, Alessandra Lignani, Giancarlo AgnelliInternal and Cardiovascular Medicine and Stroke Unit, University of Perugia, ItalyAbstract: Anticoagulant drugs have an essential role in the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic diseases. Currently available anticoagulants substantially reduce the incidence of thromboembolic events in a number of clinical conditions. However, these agents have limitations that strengthen the case for the development of new anticoagulants. An ideal anticoagulant should be at least as effective as those currently in use, as well as safe, simple to use, and widely applicable. The majority of new anticoagulants currently under investigation are small molecules with a selective and direct anti-Xa or antithrombin action, allowing oral administration in fixed doses. These new agents are in different phases of clinical development. The anti-Xa agent rivaroxaban and the antithrombin agent dabigatran are already available for the prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in some countries. Apixaban is in an advanced phase of clinical development and several anti-Xa agents are currently approaching phase III clinical trials. Promising results in terms of efficacy and safety profiles have been obtained with these agents in different clinical conditions. Differences in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics could offer the potential for individualized anticoagulant therapies in the near future.Keywords: anticoagulant therapy, antithrombotic therapy, anticoagulants, direct thrombin inhibitors, factor Xa inhibitors

  9. Clinical considerations of anticoagulation therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu ZHANG

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) increases the risk of stroke.New anticoagulation agents have recently provided alternative and promising approaches.This paper reviews the current state of anticoagulation therapy in AF patients,focusing on various clinical scenarios and on comparisons,where possible,between western and eastern populations.

  10. Effects of computer-assisted oral anticoagulant therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Corell, Pernille; Madsen, Poul;

    2012-01-01

    UNLABELLED: BACKGROUND: Computer-assistance and self-monitoring lower the cost and may improve the quality of anticoagulation therapy. The main purpose of this clinical investigation was to use computer-assisted oral anticoagulant therapy to improve the time to reach and the time spent within the...

  11. Evaluation of patient perceptions and outcomes related to anticoagulation point-of-care testing in ambulatory care clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Fermo JD; Whitley HP; Thompson AM; Ragucci KR

    2009-01-01

    Until recently, Prothrombin Time/International Normalized Ratio (PT/INR) measurements have typically been used to monitor patients on warfarin through institutional laboratories via venous puncture. The Point-of-Care Testing (POCT) device has revolutionized the patient care process by allowing for laboratory testing outside of the central laboratory. Objective: To analyze humanistic and clinical outcomes in patients currently treated with warfarin and monitored through a pharmacist-managed an...

  12. Novel oral anticoagulants in the management of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Sean R; Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen; Schneider, David J

    2016-08-01

    Despite advances in interventional and pharmacologic therapy, survivors of myocardial infarction remain at an increased risk of subsequent cardiovascular events. Initial pharmacological management includes both platelet inhibition and parenteral anticoagulation, whereas long-term pharmacological therapy relies on antiplatelet therapy for prevention of thrombotic complications. Biomarkers showing ongoing thrombin generation after acute coronary syndromes suggest that anticoagulants may provide additional benefit in reducing cardiovascular events. We review the pharmacokinetics of novel anticoagulants, clinical trial results, the role of monitoring, and future directions for the use of novel oral anticoagulants in the treatment of coronary artery disease. Clinical trials have shown that long-term use of oral anticoagulants decreases the risk of cardiovascular events, but they do so at a cost of an increased risk of bleeding. Future studies will need to identify optimal treatment combinations for selected patients and conditions that address both the appropriate combination of therapy and the appropriate dosage of each agent when used in combination. PMID:27228186

  13. Intracranial hemorrhage in cancer patients treated with anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Matthew J; Uhlmann, Erik J; Zwicker, Jeffrey I

    2016-04-01

    Both venous thromboembolism and intracranial metastases are common complications in the setting of primary brain tumors and metastatic malignancies. Anticoagulation is indicated in the presence of cancer-associated thrombosis in order to limit the risk of pulmonary embolism; however, there is reluctance to initiate anticoagulation in the setting of intracranial metastatic disease due to potential for intracranial hemorrhage. Recent evidence suggests that therapeutic anticoagulation can be safely administered in the setting of metastatic brain tumors. This review examines the current understanding of the pathophysiology of intracranial hemorrhage in malignancy, describes the incidence of intracranial hemorrhage in the setting of brain tumors with therapeutic anticoagulation, and outlines management strategies relevant to the treatment of intracranial hemorrhage in the setting of anticoagulation. PMID:27067980

  14. New anticoagulants for the treatment of venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Julio Cesar dos Santos Fernandes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, venous thromboembolism (VTE is among the leading causes of death from cardiovascular disease, surpassed only by acute myocardial infarction and stroke. The spectrum of VTE presentations ranges, by degree of severity, from deep vein thrombosis to acute pulmonary thromboembolism. Treatment is based on full anticoagulation of the patients. For many decades, it has been known that anticoagulation directly affects the mortality associated with VTE. Until the beginning of this century, anticoagulant therapy was based on the use of unfractionated or low-molecular-weight heparin and vitamin K antagonists, warfarin in particular. Over the past decades, new classes of anticoagulants have been developed, such as factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors, which significantly changed the therapeutic arsenal against VTE, due to their efficacy and safety when compared with the conventional treatment. The focus of this review was on evaluating the role of these new anticoagulants in this clinical context.

  15. [New anticoagulants in the treatment of venous thromboembolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bura-Rivière, Alessandra

    2013-09-01

    Anticoagulant therapy is the cornerstone of treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE). The treatment needs rapid initial anticoagulaton to minimize the risk of thrombus extension and fata pulmonary embolism, followed by an extended anticoagulation, aimed at preventing recurrent VTE. Till very recently, immediate anticoagulation can only be achieved with parenteral agents, such as heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, or fondaparinux. Extended treatment usually involves the administration of vitamin K antagonists, such as warfarin. Emerging direct oral anticoagulants have the potential to streamline VTE treatment. These agents include oral anticoagulants that target thrombin or factor Xa. This article reviews the characteristics of these agents, describes the results of clinical trials in venous thromboembolic disease and outlines their strengths and weakness. PMID:24167902

  16. The treatment of venous thromboembolism with new oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Imberti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditional anticoagulants, such as low molecular weight heparin, unfractionated heparin, fondaparinux and vitamin K antagonists, have been the mainstay of treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE in the clinical hospital setting and after discharge. These anticoagulants are effective, but are associated with some limitations that may lead to their underuse in many settings. Based on the results of large, randomized clinical trials, new oral anticoagulants have been validated for the treatment of acute deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, and for the prevention of recurrent VTE. These drugs represent a landmark shift in anticoagulation care and may overcome some of the limitations of traditional agents, with the potential of improving adherence to anticoagulation therapy.

  17. [The practice guideline 'Neuraxis blockade and anticoagulation'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lange, J J; Van Kleef, J W; Van Everdingen, J J E

    2004-07-31

    In a patient with a coagulation disorder, the administration of a local anaesthetic by means of a needle or via the insertion of a catheter into the epidural space or spinal cavity may lead to bleeding and haematoma formation, with a danger of pressure on the spinal cord or nerve roots. Employing the method of the Dutch Institute for Healthcare (CBO) for the development of practice guidelines, a working group of anaesthesiologists, a haematologist and a hospital chemist have drawn up recommendations for neuraxis blockade in combination with anticoagulant therapy. In patients with a clinically acquired tendency toward increased bleeding, the management is highly dependent on the cause of the bleeding tendency. If the patient uses acetylsalicylic acid or clopidogrel, the medication must be withdrawn at least 10 days before neuraxis blockade is started. Therapy with glycoprotein-IIb/IIIa-receptor antagonists is an absolute contra-indication for neuraxis blockade. In patients who are using coumarin derivatives, neuraxis blockade results in an increased risk of a neuraxial haematoma. The coumarin derivative should then be withdrawn and replaced by a different form of anticoagulation. The use of low-molecular-weight heparin at the usual prophylactic dosage is not a contra-indication for neuraxis blockade and the risk of a neuraxial haematoma following neuraxis blockade is also not increased significantly by the subcutaneous administration of unfractionated heparin. PMID:15366721

  18. New oral anticoagulants – a practical guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciurus, Tomasz; Sobczak, Sebastian; Cichocka-Radwan, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Oral direct inhibitors of thrombin and activated factor Xa are approved as new anticoagulant drugs. In contrast to vitamin K antagonists (VKA) and heparins, the new agents have single targets in the coagulation cascade and more predictable pharmacokinetics, but they lack validated and available antidotes. Unlike VKA, they do not require routine monitoring of coagulation. However, the measurement of their pharmacologic effects might be of value in selected patients. They interfere with the routine coagulation tests, which should be interpreted with caution. Specific tests exist and can be used in case of emergencies. Adequate supportive care and temporary removal of all antithrombotic agents constitute the basis for management of serious bleeding complications. The administration of coagulation factors, such as fresh frozen plasma, prothrombin complex concentrates or recombinant activated FVII, can benefit in life-threatening bleeding or emergency surgery. Specific antidotes for non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants are in clinical development. This review aims at answering in a brief and simplified manner some clinical questions. PMID:26336492

  19. Growing ambulatory care nurse leaders in a multigenerational workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moye, Janet P; Swan, Beth Ann

    2009-01-01

    Ambulatory care faces challenges in sustaining a nursing workforce in the future as newly licensed nurses are heavily recruited to inpatient settings and retirements will impact ambulatory care sooner than other areas. Building a diverse team by recruiting nurses of different ages (generations) and skills may result in a more successful and robust organization. Knowledge about generational characteristics and preferences will aid nurse leaders and recruiters in attracting high-quality, talented nurses. Nurses of Generations X and Y can increase their likelihood of success in ambulatory care by better understanding intergenerational issues. PMID:20050492

  20. Surgical complications of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, M C; Swartzendruber, D J; Fenoglio, M E; Moore, J T; Haun, W E

    1990-12-01

    Surgical experience with 260 consecutive patients with chronic renal failure receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) at one medical center from 1980 to 1989 is reviewed. Patients received CAPD for a mean of 24.2 months (range: 3 days to 91 months). Catheter longevity consistently improved in all but 1 year from 1984 to 1989, as did exit-site and tunnel infections. Of 311 catheters inserted, 151 (49%) required removal, of which 111 (74%) were attributed to peritonitis. Cumulative patient survival was 80%, 60%, and 53% at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively. Diabetic patients had statistically significant lower survival rates. Additional complications including catheter leakage, catheter malposition, catheter obstruction, and abdominal wall hernias were negligible. Although CAPD is not free from serious complications, our data show remarkable improvement since 1980 in catheter longevity, hospital stay, and infection rates. PMID:2252113

  1. [Ambulatory surgery. Patients and patient education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredland, T; Duesund, R

    1996-02-20

    This article reviews the concept of day surgery and shows how the treatment can be organized pre-, per- and post-operatively. It can be established in a hospital-integrated unit, a unit separate from the hospital, but connected with it, or a satellite ambulatory facility. Because the patient spends only a short time in hospital it is necessary to have structured preparations before admission, for the benefit of both patient and staff. It should be easy to identify patients suitable for day surgery from the waiting lists, and preparations should be directed at treatment by day surgery right from the start. Rules must be worked out for selecting patients, as well as guidelines for information to patients. It is also necessary to plan the operation programme, and to agree how nurses and doctors should take care of the patient during the different steps of treatment. PMID:8658453

  2. Ambulatory assessed implicit affect is associated with salivary cortisol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joram eMossink

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the presumed pathways linking negative emotions to adverse somatic health is an overactive HPA-axis, usually indicated by elevated cortisol levels. Traditionally, research has focused on consciously reported negative emotions. Yet, given that the majority of information processing occurs without conscious awareness, stress physiology might also be influenced by affective processes that people are not aware of. In a 24-hour ambulatory study we examined whether cortisol levels were associated with two implicit measures. Implicit affect was assessed using the Implicit Positive and Negative Affect Test, and implicit negative memory bias was assessed with the word fragment completion tasks. In 55 healthy participants, we measured subjective stress levels, worries, implicit and explicit affect each hour during waking hours. Also, saliva samples were collected at three fixed times during the day, as well as upon waking and 30 minutes thereafter (cortisol awakening response. Multilevel analyses of the daytime cortisol levels revealed that the presence of an implicit negative memory bias was associated with increased cortisol levels. Additionally, implicit PA and, unexpectedly, implicit NA were negatively associated with cortisol levels. Finally, participants demonstrating higher levels of implicit sadness during the first measurement day, had a stronger cortisol rise upon awakening at the next day. Contrary to previous research, no associations between explicit affect and cortisol were apparent. The current study was the first to examine the concurrent relation between implicit measures and stress physiology in daily life. The results suggest that the traditional focus on consciously reported feelings and emotions is limited, and that implicit measures can add to our understanding of how stress and emotions contribute to daily physiological activity and, in the long term, health problems.

  3. Ambulatory assessed implicit affect is associated with salivary cortisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossink, Joram C L; Verkuil, Bart; Burger, Andreas M; Tollenaar, Marieke S; Brosschot, Jos F

    2015-01-01

    One of the presumed pathways linking negative emotions to adverse somatic health is an overactive HPA-axis, usually indicated by elevated cortisol levels. Traditionally, research has focused on consciously reported negative emotions. Yet, given that the majority of information processing occurs without conscious awareness, stress physiology might also be influenced by affective processes that people are not aware of. In a 24-h ambulatory study we examined whether cortisol levels were associated with two implicit measures. Implicit affect was assessed using the Implicit Positive and Negative Affect Test, and implicit negative memory bias was assessed with the word fragment completion tasks. In 55 healthy participants, we measured subjective stress levels, worries, implicit, and explicit affect each hour during waking hours. Also, saliva samples were collected at three fixed times during the day, as well as upon waking and 30 min thereafter (cortisol awakening response). Multilevel analyses of the daytime cortisol levels revealed that the presence of an implicit negative memory bias was associated with increased cortisol levels. Additionally, implicit PA and, unexpectedly, implicit NA were negatively associated with cortisol levels. Finally, participants demonstrating higher levels of implicit sadness during the first measurement day, had a stronger cortisol rise upon awakening at the next day. Contrary to previous research, no associations between explicit affect and cortisol were apparent. The current study was the first to examine the concurrent relation between implicit measures and stress physiology in daily life. The results suggest that the traditional focus on consciously reported feelings and emotions is limited, and that implicit measures can add to our understanding of how stress and emotions contribute to daily physiological activity and, in the long term, health problems. PMID:25713550

  4. Adverse events in patients initiated on dabigatran etexilate therapy in a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Donaldson M; Norbeck AO

    2013-01-01

    Background: Vitamin K antagonists have been the treatment of choice in preventing thromboembolic events, but problems such as frequent dose adjustment and monitoring of coagulation status, including multiple drug and food interactions, make their use difficult. Dabigatran etexilate is a new oral direct thrombin inhibitor not requiring routine monitoring and since its approval in the United States, many clinicians have been interested in utilizing this new therapy. Objective: This study docume...

  5. Emergency reversal of anticoagulation with a three-factor prothrombin complex concentrate in patients with intracranial haemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imberti, Davide; Barillari, Giovanni; Biasioli, Chiara; Bianchi, Marina; Contino, Laura; Duce, Rita; D’Incà, Marco; Gnani, Maria Cristina; Mari, Elisa; Ageno, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Background Intracranial haemorrhage is a serious and potentially fatal complication of oral anticoagulant therapy. Prothrombin complex concentrates can substantially shorten the time needed to reverse the effects of oral anticoagulants. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of a prothrombin complex concentrate for rapid reversal of oral anticoagulant therapy in patients with intracranial haemorrhage. Methods Patients receiving oral anticoagulant therapy and suffering from acute intracranial haemorrhage were eligible for this prospective cohort study if their International Normalised Ratio (INR) was higher than or equal to 2.0. The prothrombin complex concentrate was infused at doses of 35–50 IU/kg, stratified according to the initial INR. Results Forty-six patients (25 males; mean age: 75 years; range 38–92 years) were enrolled. The median INR at presentation was 3.5 (range, 2–9). At 30 minutes after administration of the prothrombin complex concentrate, the median INR was 1.3 (range, 0.9–3), and the INR then declined to less than or equal to 1.5 in 75% of patients. The benefit of the prothrombin complex concentrate was maintained for a long time, since the median INR remained lower than or equal to 1.5 (median, 1.16; range, 0.9–2.2) at 96% of all post-infusion time-points up to 96 hours. No thrombotic complications or significant adverse events were observed during hospitalisation; six patients (13%) died, but none of these deaths was judged to be related to administration of the prothrombin complex concentrate. Conclusions Prothrombin complex concentrates are an effective, rapid and safe treatment for the urgent reversal of oral anticoagulation in patients with intracranial haemorrhage. Broader use of prothrombin complex concentrates in this clinical setting appears to be appropriate. PMID:21251465

  6. Management of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy for endoscopic procedures: introduction to novel oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha L. González-Bárcenas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of novel antithrombotic therapy in the past few years and its prescription in patients with cardiovascular and circulatory disease has widened the spectrum of drugs that need to be considered when performing an endoscopic procedure. The balance between the thrombotic risk patients carry due to their medical history and the bleeding risk involved in endoscopic procedures should be thoroughly analyzed by Gastroenterologists. New oral anticoagulants (NOACs impose an additional task. These agents, that specifically target factor IIa or Xa, do not dispose of an anticoagulation monitoring method nor have an antidote to revert their effect, just as with antiplatelet agents. Understanding the fundamental aspects of these drugs provides the necessary knowledge to determine the ideal period the antithrombotic therapy should be interrupted in order to perform the endoscopic procedure, offering maximum safety for patients and optimal results.

  7. Long-Term Population-Based Cerebral Ischemic Event and Cognitive Outcomes of Direct Oral Anticoagulants Compared With Warfarin Among Long-term Anticoagulated Patients for Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Victoria; May, Heidi T; Bair, Tami L; Crandall, Brian G; Cutler, Michael J; Day, John D; Mallender, Charles; Osborn, Jeffrey S; Stevens, Scott M; Weiss, J Peter; Woller, Scott C; Bunch, T Jared

    2016-07-15

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have been used in clinical practice in the United States for the last 4 to 6 years. Although DOACs may be an attractive alternative to warfarin in many patients, long-term outcomes of use of these medications are unknown. We performed a propensity-matched analysis to report patient important outcomes of death, stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA), bleeding, major bleeding, and dementia in patients taking a DOAC or warfarin. Patients receiving long-term anticoagulation from June 2010 to December 2014 for thromboembolism prevention with either warfarin or a DOAC were matched 1:1 by index date and propensity score. Multivariable Cox hazard regression was performed to determine the risk of death, stroke/TIA, major bleed, and dementia by the anticoagulant therapy received. A total of 5,254 patients were studied (2,627 per group). Average age was 72.4 ± 10.9 years, and 59.0% were men. Most patients were receiving long-term anticoagulation for AF management (warfarin: 96.5% vs DOAC: 92.7%, p <0.0001). Rivaroxaban (55.3%) was the most commonly used DOAC, followed by apixaban (22.5%) and dabigatran (22.2%). The use of DOACs compared with warfarin was associated with a reduced risk of long-term adverse outcomes: death (p = 0.09), stroke/TIA (p <0.0001), major bleed (p <0.0001), and bleed (p = 0.14). No significant outcome variance was noted in DOAC-type comparison. In the AF multivariable model patients taking DOAC were 43% less likely to develop stroke/TIA/dementia (hazard ratio 0.57 [CI 0.17, 1.97], p = 0.38) than those taking warfarin. Our community-based results suggest better long-term efficacy and safety of DOACs compared with warfarin. DOAC use was associated with a lower risk of cerebral ischemic events and new-onset dementia. PMID:27236255

  8. Comparing Ambulatory Preceptors’ and Students’ Perceptions of Educational Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Qualters, Donna M.; Regan, Mary Beth; O’Brien, Mary Callery; Stone, Sarah L

    1999-01-01

    To compare ambulatory preceptors’ and students’ perceptions of the use of educational planning (setting goals, assessing needs, formulating objectives, choosing methods, and providing feedback and evaluation) in the office setting, we mailed a survey, which was returned by 127 longitudinal ambulatory preceptors and 168 first-year and second-year medical students. Faculty perceptions did not match student perceptions of what occurred in the longitudinal preceptor program teaching sessions in e...

  9. Computerized adaptive testing--ready for ambulatory monitoring?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Matthias; Bjørner, Jakob; Fischer, Felix;

    2012-01-01

    Computerized adaptive tests (CATs) have abundant theoretical advantages over established static instruments, which could improve ambulatory monitoring of patient-reported outcomes (PROs). However, an empirical demonstration of their practical benefits is warranted.......Computerized adaptive tests (CATs) have abundant theoretical advantages over established static instruments, which could improve ambulatory monitoring of patient-reported outcomes (PROs). However, an empirical demonstration of their practical benefits is warranted....

  10. Management of comorbidities in ambulatory anesthesia: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Dabu-Bondoc S; Shelley KH

    2015-01-01

    Susan Dabu-Bondoc, Kirk Shelley Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USAAbstract: Advances in medical science now allow people with significant medical issues to live at home. As the outpatient population ages and surgical techniques advance, the ambulatory anesthesiologist has to be prepared to handle these “walking wounded”. The days of restricting ambulatory surgery procedures to American Society of Anesthesiologists class 1 and 2 pa...

  11. Management of comorbidities in ambulatory anesthesia: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Shelley, Kirk

    2015-01-01

    Susan Dabu-Bondoc, Kirk Shelley Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USAAbstract: Advances in medical science now allow people with significant medical issues to live at home. As the outpatient population ages and surgical techniques advance, the ambulatory anesthesiologist has to be prepared to handle these “walking wounded”. The days of restricting ambulatory surgery procedures to American Society of Anesthesiologists class 1 ...

  12. Pros and cons of the ambulatory surgery center joint venture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    If a physician group has determined that it has a realistic patient base to establish an ambulatory surgery center, it may be beneficial to consider a partner to share the costs and risks of this new joint venture. Joint ventures can be a benefit or liability in the establishment of an ambulatory surgery center. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of a hospital physician-group joint venture. PMID:18061764

  13. Anxiety and Postoperative Recovery in Ambulatory Surgery Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Parris, Winston C.V.; Matt, Denise; Jamison, Robert N.; Maxson, Wayne

    1988-01-01

    There has been a growing trend toward one-day ambulatory surgery. Unfortunately, there has been little research evaluating how patients recover at home after one-day surgery. This study examined the relationship between preoperative anxiety and postoperative recovery in ambulatory surgery patients. Fifty women who were scheduled for a laparascopy completed a series of questionnaires on the day before surgery and on each of three days after surgery. One month after surgery, the patients were t...

  14. Home and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring: when? who?

    OpenAIRE

    Gülçin KANTARCI

    2013-01-01

    Blood pressure measurement in the diagnosis and management of hypertension, including the technique required for ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and home blood pressure monitoring, will be reviewed in this article. Home and ambulatory measurements are widely used, both to confirm the diagnosis and to improve adherence to therapy. The major advantage of out-of-office blood pressure monitoring is that it provides a large number of blood pressure measurements away from the medical environme...

  15. Survey of the use of warfarin and the newer anticoagulant dabigatran in patients with atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi JC

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jiyoon C Choi,1 Marco d DiBonaventura,2 Lewis Kopenhafer,2 Winnie W Nelson31LifeScan, Inc, West Chester, PA, 2Health Sciences Practice, Kantar Health, New York, NY, 3Janssen Scientific Affairs LLC, Raritan, NJ, USABackground: Oral dabigatran was recently approved as an alternative to warfarin for prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Unlike warfarin, dabigatran has a fixed dosage and few drug interactions, and does not require anticoagulation monitoring or dietary restrictions.Methods: This study aimed to describe and compare characteristics of patients with atrial fibrillation who used dabigatran or only warfarin. Patients with a self-reported diagnosis of atrial fibrillation aged ≥18 years who were receiving (or had received warfarin or dabigatran completed an online survey. Differences in characteristics of dabigatran and warfarin users were tested using chi-squared tests and analysis of variance for categorical and continuous variables, respectively.Results: Overall, 364 patients were surveyed (204 warfarin users, 160 dabigatran users. The mean age was 65.1 years, and 68.7% were male. Dabigatran users were more likely than warfarin users to be female (36.9% versus 27.0% and to have experienced adverse events, including gastrointestinal bleeding, in the 3 months before the survey (21.9% versus 6.9%; P<0.05. Both groups reported high medication adherence (dabigatran users 0.65 versus warfarin users 0.63 missed doses/month. Dabigatran users were more likely than warfarin users to discuss treatment options with their physician before beginning therapy (36.9% versus 24.5%; P<0.05 and less likely to switch anticoagulant medication (10.7% versus 31.9%; P<0.05. Although dabigatran users were more likely to experience adverse events, they reported greater satisfaction with anticoagulation treatment than warfarin users.Conclusion: The efficacy and convenience reported by dabigatran users

  16. New oral anticoagulants: key messages for clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Giorgi-Pierfranceschi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available New oral anticoagulants are an effective and safe alternative to vitamin K antagonists in many fields of clinical practice. The use of the direct inhibitors of activated Factor II (dabigatran and activated Factor X (apixaban and rivaroxaban, both in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF and those with acute venous thromboembolism (VTE, is of great interest for internal medicine physicians. This paper aims to give practical guidance on management (starting therapy, follow up and bleeding complications of patients treated with dabigatran, rivaroxaban or apixaban for NVAF or acute VTE providing practical tables concerning the phases of therapy, management of complications, drug interaction and dose adjustment if renal impairment occurs.

  17. Thromboembolism and anticoagulation after Fontan surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Sangeetha

    2016-01-01

    This review attempts to answer the common questions faced by a clinician regarding thromboembolism and thromboprophylaxis in patients following Fontan surgery. The review is in an easy to understand question and answer format and discusses the currently available literature on the subject in an attempt to arrive at practical clinically relevant solutions. Patients who have undergone the Fontan operation are at a high risk for thromboembolism. Based on available evidence, there is a strong rationale for thromboprophylaxis. However, it is not clear as to which agent should be administered to prevent thromboembolic events. While the available evidence suggests that antiplatelet agents alone may be as good as oral anticoagulants, there is a need for a large multicenter randomized control trial comparing these two common strategies to deliver a clear verdict. PMID:27625521

  18. Synthetic oligosaccharides as heparin-mimetics displaying anticoagulant properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, Fikri Y; Karst, Nathalie A; Linhardt, Robert J

    2003-01-01

    Heparin and low molecular weight heparins are major clinical anticoagulants and the drugs of choice for the treatment of deep venous thrombosis. The discovery of an antithrombin binding domain in heparin focused interest on understanding the mechanism of heparin's antithrombotic/ anticoagulant activity. Various heparin-mimetic oligosaccharides have been prepared in an effort to replace polydisperse heparin and low molecular weight heparins with a structurally-defined anticoagulant. The goal of attaining a heparin-mimetic with no unwanted side-effects has also provided motivation for these efforts. This article reviews structure-activity relationship (SAR) of structurally-defined heparin-mimetic oligosaccharides. PMID:14529394

  19. Periablative Anticoagulation Strategies in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo B. Saad

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is associated with thromboembolic events that may cause important impairment on quality of life. Pulmonary vein isolation is the treatment of choice in cases that are refractory to medical therapy. Once sheaths and catheters are manipulated inside the left atrium, anticoagulation with heparin must be used during the procedure to protect patients from thromboembolic phenomena. Different strategies of anticoagulation are used at different centers. This review summarizes the pathophysiology of thrombus formation in the left atrium, defines which patients are under high risk and describes the main strategies used for anticoagulation.

  20. Patient survey of a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, S M; Kroner, B A

    1997-11-01

    The literature describing pharmacy involvement with anticoagulation services primarily does not include information about patients' perceptions of this involvement. A 22-question survey was developed and administered to 296 patients enrolled in the anticoagulation clinic at the VA Pittsburgh Health Care System. Excluded patients had fewer than four clinic visits or were followed outside of the anticoagulation clinic. The study period was nine weeks and any missed patients were telephoned. The median response to each question was determined. Similar questions were analyzed for acquiescent trends. Results indicate that, overall, patients are comfortable with pharmacists providing warfarin monitoring and dose adjustments. PMID:10174757

  1. Emergency management of patients being treated with oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Manzato

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin K antagonists (VKA are among the most widely prescribed drugs in the industrialized world. In fact, for decades, VKA have been the only orally available anticoagulant for the primary and secondary prevention of venous and arterial thrombotic events. Their efficacy has been widely demonstrated in a series of studies carried out in the 1990s. Since the incidences of atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism increase exponentially with age, the number of anticoagulated patients is destined to increase. This paper examines anticoagulation therapy management with particular attention to the use of VKA.

  2. Pharmacists implementing transitions of care in inpatient, ambulatory and community practice settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen S

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To introduce pharmacists to the process, challenges, and opportunities of creating transitions of care (TOC models in the inpatient, ambulatory, and community practice settings. Methods: TOC literature and resources were obtained through searching PubMed, Ovid, and GoogleScholar. The pharmacist clinicians, who are the authors in this manuscript are reporting their experiences in the development, implementation of, and practice within the TOC models. Results: Pharmacists are an essential part of the multidisciplinary team and play a key role in providing care to patients as they move between health care settings or from a health care setting to home. Pharmacists can participate in many aspects of the inpatient, ambulatory care, and community pharmacy practice settings to implement and ensure optimal TOC processes. This article describes establishing the pharmacist’s TOC role and practicing within multiple health care settings. In these models, pharmacists focus on medication reconciliation, discharge counseling, and optimization of medications. Additionally, a checklist has been created to assist other pharmacists in developing the pharmacist’s TOC roles in a practice environment or incorporating more TOC elements in their practice setting. Conclusion: Optimizing the TOC process, reducing medication errors, and preventing adverse events are important focus areas in the current health care system, as emphasized by The Joint Commission and other health care organizations. Pharmacists have the unique opportunity and skillset to develop and participate in TOC processes that will enhance medication safety and improve patient care.

  3. Anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing coronary stent implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, A; Fauchier, L; Pellegrin, C; Clementy, N; Saint Etienne, C; Banerjee, A; Naudin, D; Angoulvant, D

    2013-09-01

    In patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) undergoing coronary stent implantation, the optimal antithrombotic strategy is unclear. We evaluated whether use of oral anticoagulation (OAC) was associated with any benefit in morbidity or mortality in patients with AF, high risk of thromboembolism (TE) (CHA2DS2-VASC score ≥ 2) and coronary stent implantation. Among 8,962 unselected patients with AF seen between 2000 and 2010, a total of 2,709 (30%) had coronary artery disease and 417/2,709 (15%) underwent stent implantation while having CHA2DS2-VASC score ≥ 2. During follow-up (median=650 days), all TE, bleeding episodes, and major adverse cardiac events (i.e. death, acute myocardial infarction, target lesion revascularisation) were recorded. At discharge, 97/417 patients (23%) received OAC, which was more likely to be prescribed in patients with permanent AF and in those treated for elective stent implantation. The incidence of outcome event rates was not significantly different in patients treated and those not treated with OAC. However, in multivariate analysis, the lack of OAC at discharge was independently associated with increased risk of death/stroke/systemic TE (relative risk [RR] =2.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-4.67, p=0.04), with older age (RR =1.12, 1.04-1.20, p=0.003), heart failure (RR =3.26, 1.18-9.01, p=0.02), and history of stroke (RR =18.87, 3.11-111.11, p=0.001). In conclusion, in patients with AF and high thromboembolic risk after stent implantation, use of OAC was independently associated with decreased risk of subsequent death/stroke/systemic TE, suggesting that OAC should be systematically used in this patient population. PMID:23846210

  4. Recent developments in the use of oral anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Michael R

    2009-01-01

    For many years, vitamin K antagonists, unfractionated heparins, low-molecular-weight heparins and a pentasaccharide were the only anticoagulant drugs available for the prevention of venous thromboembolism after surgery. However, their benefits were associated with disadvantages, such as their...

  5. Surgical Site Infections Following Pediatric Ambulatory Surgery: An Epidemiologic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke, Michael L; Jan, Dominique; Nassim, Janelle; Choi, Jaeun; Choi, Steven J

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify surgical site infection (SSI) rates following pediatric ambulatory surgery, SSI outcomes and risk factors, and sensitivity and specificity of SSI administrative billing codes. DESIGN Retrospective chart review of pediatric ambulatory surgeries with International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for SSI, and a systematic random sampling of 5% of surgeries without SSI ICD-9 codes, all adjudicated for SSI on the basis of an ambulatory-adapted National Healthcare Safety Network definition. SETTING Urban pediatric tertiary care center April 1, 2009-March 31, 2014. METHODS SSI rates and sensitivity and specificity of ICD-9 codes were estimated using sampling design, and risk factors were analyzed in case-rest of cohort, and case-control, designs. RESULTS In 15,448 pediatric ambulatory surgeries, 34 patients had ICD-9 codes for SSI and 25 met the adapted National Healthcare Safety Network criteria. One additional SSI was identified with systematic random sampling. The SSI rate following pediatric ambulatory surgery was 2.9 per 1,000 surgeries (95% CI, 1.2-6.9). Otolaryngology surgeries demonstrated significantly lower SSI rates compared with endocrine (P=.001), integumentary (P=.001), male genital (PSSI were admitted, 88% received antibiotics, and 15% returned to the operating room. No risk factors were associated with SSI. The sensitivity of ICD-9 codes for SSI following ambulatory surgery was 55.31% (95% CI, 12.69%-91.33%) and specificity was 99.94% (99.89%-99.97%). CONCLUSIONS SSI following pediatric ambulatory surgery occurs at an appreciable rate and conveys morbidity on children. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:931-938. PMID:27121727

  6. Cuff inflation during ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and heart rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Skov-Madsen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Mia Skov-Madsen, My Svensson, Jeppe Hagstrup ChristensenDepartment of Nephrology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, DenmarkIntroduction: Twenty four-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is a clinically validated procedure in evaluation of blood pressure (BP. We hypothesised that the discomfort during cuff inflation would increase the heart rate (HR measured with 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring compared to a following HR measurement with a 24-h Holter monitor.Methods: The study population (n = 56 were recruited from the outpatient’s clinic at the Department of Nephrology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital at Aalborg, Denmark. All the patients had chronic kidney disease (CKD. We compared HR measured with a 24-h Holter monitor with a following HR measured by a 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring.Results: We found a highly significant correlation between the HR measured with the Holter monitor and HR measured with 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (r = 0.77, p < 0.001. Using the Bland-Altman plot, the mean difference in HR was only 0.5 beat/min during 24 hours with acceptable limits of agreement for both high and low HR levels. Dividing the patients into groups according to betablocker treatment, body mass index, age, sex, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor treatment, statins treatment, diuretic treatment, or calcium channel blocker treatment revealed similar results as described above.Conclusion: The results indicate that the discomfort induced by cuff inflation during 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring does not increase HR. Thus, 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring may be a reliable measurement of the BP among people with CKD.Keywords: ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, Holter monitoring, heart rate, chronic kidney disease, hypertension

  7. Update of oral surgery management in orally anticoagulated patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Evrosimovska, Biljana; Pandilova, Maja; Kovacevska, Ivona; Zabokova-Bilbilova, Efka

    2013-01-01

    Aim of this study is to review the evidence of different therapy approach, to highlight the areas of major concern and to suggest specific oral surgery treatment for patients on oral anticoagulants. The aim of operative treatment is to minimize the risk of hemorrhage while continuing to protect the patient against thromboembolism formation. The ordinary treatment includes the interruption of anticoagulant therapy for oral surgery interventions to prevent hemorrhage. However, this practice may...

  8. Use of tranexamic acid in anticoagulated oral surgery patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Papakoca, Kiro; Kovacevska, Ivona; Kamceva, Gordana

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTIONS: The oral surgeons are frequently asked to manage patients who are receiving oral anticoagulants. The goal of treatment is to minimize the risk of hemorrhage while continuing to protect the patient against thromboembolism formation. The ordinary treatment includes the interruption of anticoagulant therapy for oral surgery interventions to prevent hemorrhage. AIM:However, this practice may logically increase the risk of a potentially life-threatening thromboembolism. Thus, thi...

  9. Management of oral surgery procedures in orally anticoagulated patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena

    2010-01-01

    The oral and maxillofacial surgeons are frequently asked to manage patients who are receiving oral anticoagulants. The goal of treatment is to minimize the risk of hemorrhage while continuing to protect the patient against thromboembolism formation. The ordinary treatment includes the interruption of anticoagulant therapy for oral surgery interventions to prevent hemorrhage. However, this practice may logically increase the risk of a potentially life-threatening thromboembolism. Thus, this is...

  10. Management of oral surgery procedures in oral anticoagulated patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena

    2010-01-01

    The oral and maxillofacial surgeons are frequently asked to manage patients who are receiving oral anticoagulants. The goal of treatment is to minimize the risk of hemorrhage while continuing to protect the patient against thromboembolism formation. The ordinary treatment includes the interruption of anticoagulant therapy for oral surgery interventions to prevent hemorrhage. However, this practice may logically increase the risk of a potentially life-threatening thromboembolism. Thus, this is...

  11. New perspectives and recommendations for anticoagulant therapy post orthopedic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo Kropf; Cleidson Alves Bergami; Felipe Dias Leal; Claudia Oliveira Dias Passos; Zilda de Santana Gonsalves; Isabela Laudares Marques; Isabela Azevedo Mota; Marcele Lima Monte Gonçalves

    2011-01-01

    Anticoagulant therapy is essential for the prevention of risks associated with the formation of thrombus in patients after surgery, especially in orthopedics. Recently, new oral anticoagulants were introduced in the therapeutic arsenal. This fact is important, because the current drug of choice in clinical practice is enoxaparin, a low molecular weight heparin. As all injecting drugs, enoxaparin may reduce patients' adherence to treatment by dissatisfaction with and resistance to the administ...

  12. Use of antifibrinolytic mouthwash solution in anticoagulated oral surgery patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Evrosimovska, Biljana; Papakoca, Kiro; Georgiev, Zlatko; Angelovska, Bistra; Ristoska, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Introduction:The ordinary treatment of anticoagulated patients includes the interruption of anticoagulant therapy for oral surgery interventions to prevent hemorrhage. However, this practice may logically increase the risk of a potentially life-threatening thromboembolism, so this issue is still controversial. The aim of the study was to evaluate the antifibrinolitic mouthwash solution (tranexamic acid) as a local haemostatic modality after oral surgery interventions. Methods:To realize the a...

  13. The Comprehensive Management of Anticoagulation: Ochsner Coumadin Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Barrios, Annette C.; Ventura, Hector O.; Milani, Richard V.

    2002-01-01

    Clinical privileging of pharmacists and the effective use of support staff and information technology have helped create an efficient pharmacist-operated anticoagulation clinic at Ochsner Clinic Foundation that will support future growth efforts for improved patient care. Developed by Ochsner's Department of Cardiology, the pharmacist-operated anticoagulation clinic cares for 2000 patients with a clinical pharmacist, staff pharmacist, registered nurse, and medical assistants. Patients are man...

  14. Anticoagulant Rodenticide Intoxication in Animals – A Review

    OpenAIRE

    VALCHEV, Ivan; Binev, Rumen; YORDANOVA, Veska; Nikolov, Yordan

    2008-01-01

    The newest measures for the control of harmful rodent populations are from the anticoagulant rodenticide group, which are divided into 2 subgroups: first and second generations, and indandione derivatives. Non-target organisms are potentially at risk of direct consumption of baits (primary hazard) and of eating poisoned rodents (secondary hazard). Anticoagulant rodenticides inhibit the enzyme vitamin K-dependent carboxylase and thus impair the reactivation of vitamin K1, indirectly affecting ...

  15. Mechanical Prosthetic Valves and Pregnancy: A therapeutic dilemma of anticoagulation

    OpenAIRE

    Prashanth Panduranga; Mohammed El-Deeb; Chitra Jha

    2014-01-01

    Choosing the best anticoagulant therapy for a pregnant patient with a mechanical prosthetic valve is controversial and the published international guidelines contain no clear-cut consensus on the best approach. This is due to the fact that there is presently no anticoagulant which can reliably decrease thromboembolic events while avoiding damage to the fetus. Current treatments include either continuing oral warfarin or substituting warfarin for subcutaneous unfractionated heparin or low-mole...

  16. Novel Anticoagulants in Atrial Fibrillation: Monitoring, Reversal and Perioperative Management

    OpenAIRE

    Fadi Shamoun; Hiba Obeid; Harish Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation continues to be a significant source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Effective anticoagulation remains the cornerstone of outpatient and inpatient treatment. The use of the new generation of anticoagulants (NOACs) continues to grow. Recently published data indicate their cost-effectiveness and overall safety in stroke prevention; compared to vitamin K antagonists, they can be prescribed in fixed doses for long-term therapy without the need for coagulation monitoring....

  17. Benefiting from ambulatory EHR implementation: solidarity, six sigma, and willingness to strive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaroukian, Michael H; Sierra, Arlene

    2006-01-01

    Ambulatory electronic health record systems have the potential to improve healthcare quality. Optimizing the value of EHR implementation requires that providers and staff become effective and efficient EHR users so paper charts are no longer required or desired. Transitioning from paper charts to EHR systems requires new learning, significant effort, and workflow changes associated with an initial adverse effect on provider efficiency. This case study describes how timely EHR implementation and regular use in a large academic internal medicine clinic was encouraged, achieved, and demonstrated. Critical success factors included readiness to change, solidarity in EHR use, a commitment to striving, and process improvement strategies that used the EHR system to repair suboptimal clinic workflows. Observed benefits include improvements in patient access, workflow efficiency, communication, decision support use, and financial performance. These success factors and implementation strategies may help others seeking to encourage greater adoption and use of EHRs. PMID:16429959

  18. Colecistectomia videolaparoscópica ambulatorial Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in an ambulatory care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Cruz Henriques

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Os autores apresentam sua experiência com 50 pacientes operados de colecistectomia videolaparoscópica em regime ambulatorial, no Hospital de Ensino da Faculdade de Medicina do ABC. MÉTODO: Quarenta e dois pacientes (84% eram do sexo feminino e oito (16% do masculino, a idade variou de 23 a 60 anos, com média de 41,5 anos. Foram submetidos ao procedimento pacientes com diagnóstico de colecistite crônica calculosa, que obedeciam aos seguintes critérios: inexistência de colecistite aguda, idade máxima de 60 anos, ausência de suspeita de coledocolitíase, avaliação clínica pré-operatória ASA I ou II, aprovação do paciente quanto ao método e período de internação empregados e presença de acompanhante. O posicionamento da equipe e a técnica utilizada foram os preconizados pela escola americana. RESULTADOS: O tempo cirúrgico variou de 50 minutos a 2 horas, com média de 1 hora e 25 minutos. A colangiografia intra-operatória foi realizada em 35 pacientes (70%, demonstrando coledocolitíase em um caso (2%, que necessitou conversão para cirurgia aberta. As complicações mais freqüentes no período pós-operatório imediato foram náuseas e vômitos em três casos (6%, seguidas de dor abdominal intensa em dois casos (4%. Foram tratados com antieméticos e analgésicos e tiveram a alta hospitalar adiada para o dia seguinte à operação. Quarenta e quatro pacientes (88% tiveram condições de alta no mesmo dia. O período de permanência hospitalar foi entre nove e 12 horas. O retorno ambulatorial era programado para o sétimo e trigésimo dias pós-operatório, não havendo necessidade de reinternação em nenhum caso. CONCLUSÕES: A colecistectomia videolaparoscópica ambulatorial é um procedimento seguro.BACKGROUND: The authors present their experience with 50 patients undergoing videolaparoscopic cholecystectomy in an ambulatory care setting at University Hospital, ABC Medical School. METHODS:Forty-two patients (84

  19. Adherence to a new oral anticoagulant treatment prescription: dabigatran etexilate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Bellamy

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available L Bellamy1, N Rosencher1, BI Eriksson21Anaesthesiology Department, Hôpital Cochin (AP-HP, René Descartes University, Paris 75014 France; 2Orthopaedic Department, University Hospital Sahlgrenska/Ostra, Gothenburg, SwedenAbstract: The recent development of new oral anticoagulants, of which dabigatran etexilate is currently at the most advanced stage of development, is the greatest advance in the provision of convenient anticoagulation therapy for many years. A new oral anticoagulation treatment, dabigatran etexilate, is already on the market in Europe. The main interest probably will be to improve the prescription and the adherence to an effective thromboprophylaxis in medical conditions such as atrial fibrillation without bleeding side effects, without the need for monitoring coagulation, and without drug and food interactions such as vitamin K anticoagulant (VKA treatment. Dabigatran is particularly interesting for extended thromboprophylaxis after major orthopedic surgery in order to avoid daily injection for a month. However, oral long-term treatments such as VKA are not systematically associated with a higher compliance level than injected treatments such as low-molecular-weight heparins. Indeed, adherence to an oral treatment, instead of the usual daily injection in major orthopedic surgery, is complex, and based not only on the frequency of dosing but also on patient motivation, understanding, and socio-economic status. New oral anticoagulants may be useful in this way but education and detection of risk factors of nonadherence to treatment are still essential.Keywords: oral anticoagulant, adherence, compliance, education, dabigatran

  20. New anticoagulants for the prevention of venous thromboembolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becattini, Cecilia; Lignani, Alessandra; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2010-01-01

    Anticoagulant drugs have an essential role in the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic diseases. Currently available anticoagulants substantially reduce the incidence of thromboembolic events in a number of clinical conditions. However, these agents have limitations that strengthen the case for the development of new anticoagulants. An ideal anticoagulant should be at least as effective as those currently in use, as well as safe, simple to use, and widely applicable. The majority of new anticoagulants currently under investigation are small molecules with a selective and direct anti-Xa or antithrombin action, allowing oral administration in fixed doses. These new agents are in different phases of clinical development. The anti-Xa agent rivaroxaban and the antithrombin agent dabigatran are already available for the prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in some countries. Apixaban is in an advanced phase of clinical development and several anti-Xa agents are currently approaching phase III clinical trials. Promising results in terms of efficacy and safety profiles have been obtained with these agents in different clinical conditions. Differences in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics could offer the potential for individualized anticoagulant therapies in the near future. PMID:20531960

  1. [Duration of anticoagulant therapy in venous thromboembolic complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, M R; Leontyev, S G; Neskhodimov, L A; Tolstikhin, V Yu; Khotinskiy, A A

    2016-01-01

    Adequate anticoagulant therapy is a general approach to treatment of deep vein thrombosis. However, the duration of anticoagulant therapy is not strictly specified in everyday clinical practice. The present article deals with various approaches to selecting the duration of therapy with anticoagulants based on the findings of studies, national and foreign clinical guidelines. The minimal duration of therapy for deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism amounts to 3 months in accordance with the national and American recommendations. For some cohorts of patients, continuation of therapy above 3 months is considered: patients with idiopathic thrombosis (the recommended duration of therapy of not less than 6 months), patients having persisting risk factor for relapse of thrombosis on termination of the main therapeutic course, oncological patients (6 month therapy followed by assessing the risk and benefit of continuing therapy with anticoagulants). Prolonged therapy of venous thromboembolism using unfractionated heparin or low-molecular-weight heparin followed by changing over to vitamin K antagonists is associated with decreased risk for thrombosis relapse approximately by 90%, however increasing the risk of haemorrhage. Currently, as an alternative, it is possible to consider administration of novel oral anticoagulants (rivaroxaban, dabigatran, apixaban) which beside high efficacy are associated with less risk of bleeding. The route of administration, no necessity to control the INR, and the minimal number of drug and food interactions make administration of new oral anticoagulants an attractive alternative to therapy with heparins and vitamin K antagonists. PMID:27100556

  2. Establishing an outpatient anticoagulation clinic in a community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, J L; Gibson, D L

    1996-05-15

    The establishment of a pharmacist-managed out-patient anticoagulation clinic in a private community hospital is described. Discussions by pharmacy with office-based physicians at a 187-bed, private, nonprofit community medical center indicated that the traditional system of anticoagulation management was not ideal for the physicians or their patients. Development of a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic began in fall 1993; operations began in spring 1994. Planning included analyzing existing practices, reviewing the relevant literature, obtaining physician input, visiting an established anticoagulation clinic, formulating a business plan, and developing clinical protocols. Collaborative relationships were established with the hospital laboratory, business office, and risk management, information services, and medical records departments. Two pharmacists were trained to work in the clinic and provide coverage 24 hours a day. Services include patient assessment, monitoring of anticoagulation, warfarin dosage adjustment, medication management, patient education, follow-up care, and providing feedback to referring and attending physicians. The clinic has met with physician and patient satisfaction, has reduced the number of admissions to treat warfarin-related bleeding, and has been able to cover its direct costs. A pharmacist-managed anti-coagulation clinic was successfully established in a private community hospital. PMID:8734675

  3. Postoperative analgesia at home after ambulatory hand surgery: a controlled comparison of tramadol, metamizol, and paracetamol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawal, N; Allvin, R; Amilon, A; Ohlsson, T; Hallén, J

    2001-02-01

    We compared in a prospective, randomized, double-blinded study the analgesic efficacy of three drugs in 120 ASA I and II patients scheduled to undergo ambulatory hand surgery with IV regional anesthesia. At discharge, oral analgesic tablets were prescribed as follows: tramadol 100 mg every 6 h, metamizol 1 g every 6 h, and paracetamol (acetaminophen) 1 g every 6 h. Rescue medication consisted of oral dextropropoxyphene 100 mg on demand. Analgesic efficacy was evaluated by self-assessment of pain intensity by visual analog score at six different time intervals during the 48-h study period. Patients also recorded global pain relief on a 5-grade scale, total number of study and rescue analgesic tablets, frequency and severity of adverse effects, sleep pattern, and overall satisfaction. None of the study drugs alone provided effective analgesia in all patients. The percentage of patients who required supplementary analgesics was 23% with tramadol, 31% with metamizol, and 42% with acetaminophen. Tramadol was the most effective analgesic, as evidenced by low pain scores, least rescue medication, and fewest number of patients with sleep disturbance. However, the incidence of side effects was also increased with tramadol. Seven patients (17.5%) withdrew from the study because of the severity of nausea and dizziness associated with the use of tramadol. Metamizol and acetaminophen provided good analgesia in about 70% and 60% of patients, respectively, with a decreased incidence of side effects. Despite receiving oral analgesic medication, up to 40% of patients undergoing hand surgery experienced inadequate analgesia in this controlled trial. Although tramadol was more effective, its use was associated with the highest frequency and intensity of adverse effects and the most patient dissatisfaction. Metamizol and acetaminophen provided good analgesia with a small incidence of side effects. For patients undergoing ambulatory hand surgery, postoperative pain can last longer than

  4. Adverse reactions to cosmetics

    OpenAIRE

    Dogra A; Minocha Y; Kaur S

    2003-01-01

    Adverse reaction to cosmetics constitute a small but significant number of cases of contact dermatitis with varied appearances. These can present as contact allergic dermatitis, photodermatitis, contact irritant dermatitis, contact urticaria, hypopigmentation, hyperpigmentotion or depigmentation, hair and nail breakage. Fifty patients were included for the study to assess the role of commonly used cosmetics in causing adverse reactions. It was found that hair dyes, lipsticks and surprisingly ...

  5. Ambulatory anesthesia in plastic surgery: opportunities and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Facque AR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Alexander R Facque, Peter J Taub Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, USA Abstract: In 2013, there were 17 million procedures performed by plastic and reconstructive surgeons in the United States in the private office or ambulatory “surgicenter” setting, as well as additional operations performed in hospitals on an outpatient basis. As interest in performing increasingly complex surgical procedures on an outpatient basis continues to grow, the surgeon and anesthesiologist alike must be prepared to offer safe and reliable anesthesia and analgesia in the ambulatory setting. Surgeons must be aware of the possible techniques that will be employed in their surgeries in order to anticipate and prepare patients for possible postoperative side effects, and anesthesiologists must be prepared to offer such techniques in order to ensure a relatively rapid return to normal activity despite potentially having undergone major surgery. The following is a review of the specific considerations that should be given to ambulatory plastic surgery patients with comments on recent developments in the techniques used to safely administer agreeable and effective anesthesia. Keywords: ambulatory surgery, cosmetic anesthesia, outpatient, ambulatory anesthesia

  6. Transitioning the RN to Ambulatory Care: An Investment in Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Juliet Walshe

    2016-01-01

    Registered nurses (RNs) struggle when transitioning from the inpatient setting to the outpatient clinical environment because it results in a diverse skill-set shift. The RN, considered an outpatient revenue source, experiences a decrease in peer-to-peer relationships, changes in leadership responsibilities, and changes in workgroup dynamics (supervision of unlicensed clinical personnel who function under the direction of the physician, not the RN). Ambulatory organizations find themselves implementing clinical orientation programs that may not delineate the attributes of the RN. This diminishes their value while emphasizing the unlicensed technical skill set. Creating a core RN orientation program template is paramount for the transition of the RN to the ambulatory setting. The literature reveals several areas where improving the value of the RN will ultimately enhance recruitment and retention, patient care outcomes, and leverage the RN role within any organization. Eleven 30-minute in-depth telephone interviews were conducted in addition to 4 nurse observations to explore the lived experience of the RN in ambulatory care. The findings disclosed an overarching theme of nurse isolation and offered insightful underpinnings for the nurse leader as ambulatory growth continues and nurse leaders further endorse the RN presence in the ambulatory setting. PMID:26938183

  7. Patient satisfaction and positive patient outcomes in ambulatory anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah U

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ushma Shah, David T Wong, Jean Wong Department of Anesthesia, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Most surgeries in North America are performed on an ambulatory basis, reducing health care costs and increasing patient comfort. Patient satisfaction is an important outcome indicator of the quality of health care services incorporated by the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA. Patient satisfaction is a complex concept that is influenced by multiple factors. A patient's viewpoint and knowledge plays an influential role in patient satisfaction with ambulatory surgery. Medical optimization and psychological preparation of the patient plays a pivotal role in the success of ambulatory surgery. Postoperative pain, nausea, and vomiting are the most important symptoms for the patient and can be addressed by multimodal drug regimens. Shared decision making, patient–provider relationship, communication, and continuity of care form the main pillars of patient satisfaction. Various psychometrically developed instruments are available to measure patient satisfaction, such as the Iowa Satisfaction with Anesthesia Scale and Evaluation du Vecu de I'Anesthesie Generale, but none have been developed specifically for ambulatory surgery. The ASA has made recommendations for data collection for patient satisfaction surveys and emphasized the importance of reporting the data to the Anesthesia Quality Institute. Future research is warranted to develop a validated tool to measure patient satisfaction in ambulatory surgery. Keywords: patient, satisfaction, anesthesia, outcomes, questionnaire, perspectives

  8. Ambulatory laparoscopic cholecystectomy: Is it safe and cost effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Athar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC is the most commonly performed minimal invasive surgery. However, practice of its use as an ambulatory surgery in our hospital settings is uncommon. Objective : To evaluate safety and cost effectiveness of LC as an ambulatory day care surgery. Study Design : Quasiexperimental. Setting : Department of surgery, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan. Materials and Methods : Patients with uncomplicated symptomatic gallstones were selected for Ambulatory LC. They were admitted electively on the same day and operated on in the morning hours and discharged after a check by the surgeon 6-8 hrs later. Results : Of fifty (n = 50 patients selected for ambulatory LC, 92% were discharged successfully after 6-8 hrs observation. No significant perioperative complications were noted. Unplanned admission and readmission rate was 8 and 2%, respectively. Cost saving for the daycare surgery was Rs. 6,200, Rs. 13,300, and Rs.22,800 per patient as compared to in patient general, semiprivate, and private ward package, respectively. Conclusion : Practice ambulatory LC is safe and cost-effective in selected patients with uncomplicated symptomatic gallstones.

  9. A review of the safety of anticoagulants in older people using the medicines management pathway: weighing the benefits against the risks

    OpenAIRE

    Bajorek, Beata

    2011-01-01

    Anticoagulant drugs maintain a high potential for adverse events due to their inherent risk of haemorrhage and/or complex pharmacology. In addition, compromising the safety of these agents is the context in which they are principally used; that is, in the long-term prevention of thromboembolic diseases in an older patient population. These challenges are especially pronounced in the prevention of stroke in older persons with atrial fibrillation (AF), where the need for thromboprophylaxis is p...

  10. Anticoagulation reversal in the era of the non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enriquez, Andres; Lip, Gregory Y H; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have emerged as an alternative to warfarin for the prevention and treatment of thrombo-embolic disease. Large randomized trials have demonstrated that these agents, which act by directly targeting thrombin (dabigatran) and factor Xa....... New specific antidotes (e.g. idarucizumab, andexanet alfa, and ciraparantag) show promising data, and may soon become available for clinical use. In this article, we review the pharmacology of these agents, the incidence and outcomes of haemorrhagic complications, the available strategies for...

  11. [Ambulatory invasive and noninvasive blood pressure monitoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, K; Wortmann, A; Engels, G

    1989-08-01

    Indirect arterial blood pressure measurement has not changed substantially since its introduction by Riva-Rocci in 1986, Korotkoff in 1905 and Recklinghausen in 1906. Random measurements in the clinic or practice reflect only incompletely the dynamic nature of the blood pressure. Blood pressure recordings by patients themselves have provided more information through better temporal resolution, however, exact characterization of the pressure response throughout the entire day and, in particular, during physical exertion are not enabled; the latter are especially important with regard to diagnosis and treatment of hypertension. In 1966, therefore, radiotelemetric transmission of direct, continuously-measured arterial blood pressure was developed which enabled beat-to-beat registration of blood pressure, outside the laboratory, during normal daily life and sport activities. The initial results showed a marked variability of the blood pressure during the course of the day (Figure 1). Excessive blood pressure increases were observed during exposure to cold, static and dynamic exercise and to a lesser degree during automobile driving and exposure to heat (Figure 3). Recording of the pressure curves via transmission by radiotelemetry shows a high degree of accuracy and temporal resolution, spatial and situational freedom but is invasive and costly in terms of personnel. The same holds true for direct continuous blood pressure registration and storage on a portable tape recorder. Portable, automatic blood pressure measuring units for ambulatory monitoring employ indirect auscultatory or oscillometric recording with a cuff. As compared with the radiotelemetric direct continuous blood pressure measuring method, the indirect method has subordinate temporal resolution, that is, the measurements are only intermittent.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2676813

  12. Anticoagulant and anti-thrombotic treatments in the management of hematological malignancies in a home care program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Tendas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Anticoagulants (AC and anti-platelet (AP agents are widely administered to patients with hematological malignancies (HM. However, HM patients may be at high risk of bleeding and hemorrhagic complications, because of different form of coagulopathies and several degrees of thrombocytopenia. Materials and Methods: A prospective evaluation of the use of anticoagulant and anti-thrombotic agents as well as of bleeding and thrombotic complications in a consecutive cohort of patients, which were followed during the first semester of 2010 by our home care service, was performed. In this regard, three pharmacological class of agents, such as oral anticoagulants (warfarin and acenocumarine, low molecular weight heparin (LMWH and anti-platelet (AP drugs were considered. Results: Out of 129 patients, 26 (20% were treated with AC/AP drugs. Warfarin, acenocumarine, LMWH as well as AP were used in 7, 11 and 12 patients, respectively. Adverse events (bleeding were observed in 3 patients (11.5%, 2 cases being on warfarin (replaced by LMWH and 1 being AP (suspension without replacement; out of the 3 patients with bleeding, none presented thrombocytopenia. Conclusions: Despite the frequent findings of hemostatic disorders in a population of frail patients managed in a home care setting, our experience demonstrated that the use of AC/AP drugs has been very rarely responsible for significant complications.

  13. Comparing ambulatory preceptors' and students' perceptions of educational planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualters, D M; Regan, M B; O'Brien, M C; Stone, S L

    1999-03-01

    To compare ambulatory preceptors' and students' perceptions of the use of educational planning (setting goals, assessing needs, formulating objectives, choosing methods, and providing feedback and evaluation) in the office setting, we mailed a survey, which was returned by 127 longitudinal ambulatory preceptors and 168 first-year and second-year medical students. Faculty perceptions did not match student perceptions of what occurred in the longitudinal preceptor program teaching sessions in educational planning areas. Students perceived these activities were occurring with much less frequency than faculty perceived. Medical education needs to move beyond the usual faculty development workshop paradigm to a more comprehensive educational development model that includes training both faculty and students in core educational skills. This will enable the ambulatory setting to reach its full educational potential in training future physicians. PMID:10203628

  14. Preventable and potentially preventable serious adverse reactions induced by oral protein kinase inhibitors through a database of adverse drug reaction reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egron, Adeline; Olivier-Abbal, Pascale; Gouraud, Aurore; Babai, Samy; Combret, Sandrine; Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Bondon-Guitton, Emmanuelle

    2015-06-01

    Antineoplastic drugs are one of the pharmacological classes more frequently involved in occurrence of "serious" adverse drug reactions. However, few epidemiological data are available regarding the preventability of adverse drug reactions with ambulatory cancer chemotherapy. We assessed the rate and characteristics of "preventable" or "potentially preventable" "serious" adverse drug reactions induced by oral protein kinase inhibitors (PKIs). We performed a retrospective study with all "serious" adverse drug reactions (ADRs) recorded from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2009 in the French Pharmacovigilance Database with the eight oral protein kinase inhibitors marketed in France: sorafenib, imatinib, erlotinib, sunitinib, dasatinib, lapatinib, nilotinib and everolimus (Afinitor®) using the French adverse drug reactions preventability scale. This study was carried out on 265 spontaneous notifications. Most of adverse drug reactions were "unpreventable" (63.8 %). Around one third were "unevaluable" due to notifications poorly documented (medical history, dosage, use of drugs as first or second intention, concomitant drugs). One (0.4 %) adverse drug reaction was "preventable" with dasatinib (subdural hematoma) and three (1.1 %) were "potentially preventable" (hepatic adverse drug reactions): two with imatinib and one with sorafenib. For these four cases, we identified some characteristics: incorrect dosages, drug interactions and off-label uses. An appropriate prescription could avoid the occurrence of 1.5 % "serious" adverse drug reactions with oral PKIs. This rate is low and further studies are needed to compare our results by using other preventability instruments and to improve the French ADRs Preventability Scale. PMID:25056801

  15. [Hospital Costs of Ambulatory Care-Sensitive Conditions in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbach, D

    2016-03-01

    Ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACSC) are defined as conditions that lead to a hospital admission of which the onset could have been prevented through a more easily accessible ambulatory sector or one that provides better quality care. They are used by health-care systems as a quality indicator for the ambulatory sector. The definition for ACSC varies internationally. Sets of conditions have been defined and evaluated already in various countries, e. g., USA, England, New Zealand and Canada, but not yet for Germany. Therefore this study aims to evaluate the hospital costs of ACSC in Germany using the National Health Service's set of ACSC. In order to calculate these costs a model has been set up for the time period between 2003 and 2010. It is based on G-DRG browsers issued by the German Institute for the Hospital Remuneration System as required by German law. Within these browsers all relevant DRG-ICD combinations have been extracted. The number of cases per combination was then multiplied by their corresponding cost weights and the average effective base rates. The results were then aggregated into their corresponding ICD groups and then into their respective conditions which lead to the costs per condition and the total costs. The total number of cases and total costs were then compared to another second source. These calculations resulted in 11.7 million cases, of which 10.7% were defined as ambulatory care-sensitive. Within the analysed time period the number of ambulatory care-sensitive cases increased by 6% in total and had a 0.9% CAGR. The corresponding costs amounted to a total of EUR 37.6B and to EUR 3.3B for ACSC. 60% of the costs were caused by three of the 19 ACSC. These results validate that it is worthwhile to further investigate this quality indicator for the ambulatory sector. PMID:25918929

  16. Major cerebral events in Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis: is anticoagulant therapy safe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Snygg-Martin, Ulrika; Olaison, Lars;

    2009-01-01

    -hospital mortality was 23% (95% CI: 17-29%), and there was no significant difference between those with or without anticoagulation. CONCLUSIONS: We found no increased risk of cerebral haemorrhage in S. aureus IE patients receiving anticoagulation. Anticoagulation was associated with a reduced risk of cerebral events...... before initiation of antibiotics. Data support the continuance of anticoagulation in S. aureus IE patients when indicated.......OBJECTIVES: To study the impact of anticoagulation on major cerebral events in patients with left-sided Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis (IE). METHODS: A prospective cohort study; the use of anticoagulation and the relation to major cerebral events was evaluated separately at onset...

  17. Abordagem ambulatorial do nutricionista em anemia hemolítica Nutritional ambulatory approach in hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Vieira

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Descreve a atuação do nutricionista em ambulatório de Hematologia Pediátrica em um hospital escola e relata as condutas dietéticas necessárias na abordagem de crianças com anemia hemolítica com e sem sobrecarga de ferro, e também as atitudes mais freqüentes dos familiares em relação à alimentação desses pacientes.The Authors describe the performance of the Dietitian in a Pediatric Hematology Ambulatory. They emphasize the necessary dietetic procedures for adequate management of children with hemolytic anemia, with and without iron overload. Furthermore, they approach the family's attitude towards the patient's nutrition.

  18. [Ambulatory surgery in France: practical and medicolegal considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodey, E; de la Brière, F

    2013-12-01

    In France, ambulatory anaesthesia and surgery seem to be well codified. Many recommendations have been published by the Health Authority and the professional associations: they are summarized in this review. However, numerous practical problems persist: for example, two situations specific to paediatric practice are problematic parental comprehension and application of the information provided and poor access to strong analgesics outside the hospital. Despite this, the paediatric population is an ideal target for ambulatory care because of its usual good health and quicker recovery after minor injury as proven by the small percentage of failure and readmission. PMID:24209990

  19. Survey of Botulinum Toxin Injections in Anticoagulated Patients: Korean Physiatrists' Preference in Controlling Anticoagulation Profile Prior to Intramuscular Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yongjun; Park, Geun-Young; Park, Jihye; Choi, Asayeon; Kim, Soo Yeon; Boulias, Chris; Phadke, Chetan P.; Ismail, Farooq

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate Korean physiatrists' practice of performing intramuscular botulinum toxin injection in anticoagulated patients and to assess their preference in controlling the bleeding risk before injection. Methods As part of an international collaboration survey study, a questionnaire survey was administered to 100 Korean physiatrists. Physiatrists were asked about their level of experience with botulinum toxin injection, the safe international normalized ratio range in anticoagulated patients undergoing injection, their tendency for injecting into deep muscles, and their experience of bleeding complications. Results International normalized ratio <2.0 was perceived as an ideal range for performing Botulinum toxin injection by 41% of the respondents. Thirty-six respondents replied that the international normalized ratio should be lowered to sub-therapeutic levels before injection, and 18% of the respondents reported that anticoagulants should be intentionally withheld and discontinued prior to injection. In addition, 20%–30% of the respondents answered that they were uncertain whether they should perform the injection regardless of the international normalized ratio values. About 69% of the respondents replied that they did have any standardized protocols for performing botulinum toxin injection in patients using anticoagulants. Only 1 physiatrist replied that he had encountered a case of compartment syndrome. Conclusion In accordance with the lack of consensus in performing intramuscular botulinum toxin injection in anticoagulated patients, our survey shows a wide range of practices among many Korean physiatrists; they tend to avoid botulinum toxin injection in anticoagulated patients and are uncertain about how to approach these patients. The results of this study emphasize the need for formulating a proper international consensus on botulinum toxin injection management in anticoagulated patients. PMID:27152278

  20. Anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning in animals of Apulia and Basilicata, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscarella, Marilena; Armentano, Antonio; Iammarino, Marco; Palermo, Carmen; Amorena, Michele

    2016-06-30

    This study evaluates the presence of anticoagulant rodenticides in animals with a diagnosis of suspected poisoning and in bait samples. The survey was carried out from 2010 to 2012, in 2 regions of South Italy (Puglia and Basilicata) on 300 organs of animals and 90 suspected bait samples. The qualitative and quantitative analyses were conducted using an analytical method based on high‑performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorimetric detection (FLD) for the simultaneous determination of 8 anticoagulant rodenticides (bromadiolone, brodifacoum, coumachlor, coumafuryl, coumatetralyl, difenacoum, flocoumafen, and warfarin). The presence of anticoagulant rodenticides was detected in 33 organs of animals (11% of the total) and 6 bait samples (7% of the total). The most commonly detected compound was coumachlor (47% of 39 positive samples) followed by bromadiolone (24%), and brodifacoum (11%). The species mostly involved in anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning were dogs and cats. This study emphasizes the relevance of the determinations of anticoagulant rodenticides in cases of suspected poisoning in veterinary practice. PMID:27393877

  1. Retrospective evaluation of a pharmacist-managed warfarin anticoagulation clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garabedian-Ruffalo, S M; Gray, D R; Sax, M J; Ruffalo, R L

    1985-02-01

    The effectiveness of a pharmacist-managed warfarin anticoagulation clinic in maintaining therapeutic prothrombin times and preventing hospitalizations secondary to inadequate control of anticoagulation was evaluated. Patients who had received warfarin sodium for at least one year before being referred to the anticoagulation clinic were studied using retrospective chart reviews. Clinical pharmacists provided patient education, monitored patients for hemorrhagic and thromboembolic complications, and adjusted warfarin sodium dosage to maintain therapeutic prothrombin times. The patients' primary physicians retained responsibility for overall care and were consulted by pharmacists regarding complications of anticoagulation and patient unreliability. The percentage of patients requiring hospitalization (39% versus 4%) and the percentage of prothrombin times outside the therapeutic range (35.8% versus 14.4%) were significantly higher during the preclinic phase (before referral to the clinic) than during the clinic phase. Eight patients were hospitalized for hemorrhagic complications and four for thromboembolism during the preclinic phase; only one hospitalization for hemorrhage occurred during the clinic phase. The warfarin anticoagulation clinic staffed by specially trained pharmacists provided improved therapy compared with treatment received by patients before their referral to the clinic. PMID:3976675

  2. Pharmacology of new oral anticoagulants: mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to their mechanism of action, the new oral anticoagulants are named direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs. Dabigatran is a selective, competitive, direct inhibitor of thrombin (Factor IIa while rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban act by directly inhibiting the activated Factor X (FXa in a selective and competitive manner. DOACs have a relatively short half-life and almost immediate anticoagulant activity, and rapidly reach the plasma peak concentration. Therefore, they do not need a phase of overlapping with parenteral anticoagulants. After their withdrawal, their removal is sufficiently rapid, although influenced by renal function. Dabigatran is the only DOACs to be administered as a pro-drug and becomes active after drug metabolization. The route of elimination of dabigatran is primarily renal, whereas FXa inhibitors are mainly eliminated by the biliary-fecal route. The drug interactions of DOACs are mainly limited to drugs that act on P-glycoprotein for dabigatran and on P-glycoprotein and/or cytochrome P3A4 for anti-Xa. DOACs have no interactions with food. Given their linear pharmacodynamics, with a predictable dose/response relationship and anticoagulant effect, DOACs are administered at a fixed dose and do not require routine laboratory monitoring.

  3. Adesão medicamentosa em idosos em seguimento ambulatorial Medicine adeshion in eldery people in an ambulatorial attendance

    OpenAIRE

    Fernanda Aparecida Cintra; Maria Elena Guariento; Lilian Akemi Miyasaki

    2010-01-01

    Este estudo objetivou avaliar a adesão ao tratamento medicamentoso em idosos em seguimento ambulatorial e identificar os fatores relacionados a esta adesão. Foram entrevistados 165 idosos em seguimento ambulatorial no Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Unicamp), São Paulo. Utilizou-se instrumento próprio, com informações relativas à identificação dos sujeitos, dados de saúde autorreferidos e relativos à terapêutica medicamentosa. Os dados foram submetidos às análises ...

  4. Adherence to oral anticoagulant therapy in secondary stroke prevention – impact of the novel oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luger S

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sebastian Luger,1 Carina Hohmann,2 Daniela Niemann,1 Peter Kraft,3 Ignaz Gunreben,3 Tobias Neumann-Haefelin,2 Christoph Kleinschnitz,3 Helmuth Steinmetz,1 Christian Foerch,1 Waltraud Pfeilschifter1 1Department of Neurology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, 2Department of Neurology, Klinikum Fulda gAG, Fulda, 3Department of Neurology, University Hospital Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany Background: Oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT potently prevents strokes in patients with atrial fibrillation. Vitamin K antagonists (VKA have been the standard of care for long-term OAT for decades, but non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOAC have recently been approved for this indication, and raised many questions, among them their influence on medication adherence. We assessed adherence to VKA and NOAC in secondary stroke prevention. Methods: All patients treated from October 2011 to September 2012 for ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack with a subsequent indication for OAT, at three academic hospitals were entered into a prospective registry, and baseline data and antithrombotic treatment at discharge were recorded. At the 1-year follow-up, we assessed the adherence to different OAT strategies and patients’ adherence to their respective OAT. We noted OAT changes, reasons to change treatment, and factors that influence persistence to the prescribed OAT. Results: In patients discharged on OAT, we achieved a fatality corrected response rate of 73.3% (n=209. A total of 92% of these patients received OAT at the 1-year follow-up. We observed good adherence to both VKA and NOAC (VKA, 80.9%; NOAC, 74.8%; P=0.243 with a statistically nonsignificant tendency toward a weaker adherence to dabigatran. Disability at 1-year follow-up was an independent predictor of lower adherence to any OAT after multivariate analysis, whereas the choice of OAT did not have a relevant influence. Conclusion: One-year adherence to OAT after stroke is strong (>90% and patients

  5. Scientists Trace Adversity's Toll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2012-01-01

    The stress of a spelling bee or a challenging science project can enhance a student's focus and promote learning. But the stress of a dysfunctional or unstable home life can poison a child's cognitive ability for a lifetime, according to new research. Those studies show that stress forms the link between childhood adversity and poor academic…

  6. Dilute Russell's viper venom and activated partial thromboplastin time in lupus anticoagulant diagnosis: is mixing essential?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrashekar, Vani

    2016-06-01

    Dilute Russell's viper venom (DRVV) testing and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) have been effectively used in combination for lupus anticoagulant testing. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the role of mixing in activated partial thromboplastin and dilute Russell's viper venom testing for evaluation of lupus anticoagulants. Citrated blood from patients who were not on oral anticoagulant therapy was studied. Mixing study with 1 : 1 normal plasma for elevated APTT and also few samples with elevated screen time was carried out. Elevated APTT was seen in only 48.1% of patients with lupus anticoagulant. Correction of APTT was seen in 27.8% of lupus anticoagulant-positive patients. DRVV test on mixing resulted in 83.8% false-negative values. Integrated DRVV test could be a standalone test for testing lupus anticoagulant. Mixing study may be restricted for patients on oral anticoagulants or patients with strong lupus anticoagulant. PMID:26626041

  7. [Treatments with immunoglobulin and thrombotic adverse events].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnige, L; Lillo-Le Louët, A

    2014-01-01

    Treatments with intravenous or subcutaneous immunoglobulin (Ig) are used in a broad variety of disorders. Tolerance of Ig is usually good but adverse events, including some serious ones, have been reported and may differ among different Ig preparations. Thrombotic complications occur in 0.6 to 13% of cases and can involve arterial or venous circulation, rarely both. Deep venous thrombosis with or without pulmonary embolism, stroke or myocardial infarction remained the most frequent thrombotic complications. Some risk factors have been identified, mainly old age, multiple cardiovascular risk factors, and past history of thrombo-embolic manifestations. Several mechanisms are suggested to explain this increased risk of thrombotic complications. Indeed, Ig treatments increase the plasma viscosity, increase and activate platelets, can trigger the coagulation cascade through the presence of activated factor XI in some Ig preparations, and release vasoactive molecules responsible for vasospasm. Patients have to be carefully monitored and risk factors to be identified as soon as possible. The role of antiplatelets or anticoagulation is not well determined but should probably be proposed to patients with high risk. PMID:24011913

  8. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of oral anticoagulants, especially phenprocoumon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haustein, K O

    1999-01-01

    Anticoagulants of the cumarin-type (warfarin, phenprocoumon, and acenocoumarol) are drugs for the long-term treatment and prevention of thromboembolic disorders. Because of their narrow therapeutic range, many patients have bleedings of variable severity or have recurrent thrombotic events. For this reason, the study of the pharmacokinetic parameters of phenprocoumon (PPC), considering its influence on blood clotting factors, is of high interest. The elimination kinetics of PPC, its interaction with phytomenadion (vitamin K), and the pharmacokinetic behavior of the anticoagulant under steady-state conditions have been investigated in studies with healthy volunteers and patients taking anticoagulants. The maintenance dose and the plasma levels of PPC were correlated with prothrombin time (PT) in 89 patients treated with PPC. Varying parameters in each patient (e.g., elimination kinetics of PPC, activity of the cumarin-dependent blood-clotting factors, endogenous phytomenadion stores), render it impossible to use a different means of monitoring than that of PT determination. PMID:10327214

  9. A pharmacologic overview of current and emerging anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutescu, Edith A; Shapiro, Nancy L; Chevalier, Aimee; Amin, Alpesh N

    2005-04-01

    For over 50 years, anticoagulant options for the treatment and prevention of thrombosis have been limited mainly to traditional agents such as unfractionated heparin and oral vitamin K antagonists such as warfarin. These traditional agents are fraught with limitations that complicate their clinical use. A variety of novel anticoagulants with improved pharmacologic and clinical profiles have recently been introduced or are in development, offering benefits over traditional therapies. Specifically, progress has been made in the development of low-molecular-weight heparins, factor Xa inhibitors, and direct thrombin inhibitors. Because of their convenience and ease of use, some of these novel compounds are competing with the traditional anticoagulants and are needed additions to the antithrombotic arsenal. PMID:15853173

  10. T-wave Alternans Analysis In Ambulatory ECG Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Ch?apinski, Jakub; Kaminski, Marek; Sakowicz, Bartosz; Kotas, Rafa?

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the research presented in this paper was to test and evaluate the possibility of T-wave alternans (TWA) detection with the use of standard ambulatory ECG monitors. In development work there is proposal of author's advanced method allowing to remove from signal any distortion and disturbances making impossible further analysis.

  11. Extensive peritoneal calcifications associated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peritoneal calcification, which can lead to intestinal obstruction and potentially lethal hemoperitoneum, is a rare complication of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. We describe a case in which extensive peritoneal calcification had arisen for this reason. Although the patient was asymptomatic, extensive calcification was present on the parietal and visceral peritoneum, including the hepatic and splenic surface. (author)

  12. Computerized ambulatory monitoring in mood disorders: feasibility, compliance, and reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husky, Mathilde M; Gindre, Claire; Mazure, Carolyn M; Brebant, Catherine; Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan; Sanacora, Gerard; Swendsen, Joel

    2010-07-30

    Patients with depression (n=20) or bipolar disorder (n=21) completed computerized ambulatory monitoring for three consecutive days. Results indicate satisfactory rates of acceptance and compliance, with no salient fatigue effects. However, some evidence for reactive effects was found. The findings provide support for this approach in the study of mood disorders. PMID:20488558

  13. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Clinical Practice: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viera, Anthony J.; Shimbo, Daichi

    2016-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring offers the ability to collect blood pressure readings several times an hour across a 24-hour period. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring facilitates the identification of white-coat hypertension, the phenomenon whereby certain individuals who are not on antihypertensive medication show elevated blood pressure in a clinical setting but show non-elevated blood pressure averages when assessed by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Additionally, readings can be segmented into time windows of particular interest, e.g., mean daytime and nighttime values. During sleep, blood pressure typically decreases, or dips, such that mean sleep blood pressure is lower than mean awake blood pressure. A non-dipping pattern and nocturnal hypertension are strongly associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Approximately 70% of individuals dip ≥10% at night, while 30% have non-dipping patterns, when blood pressure remains similar to daytime average, or occasionally rises above daytime average. The various blood pressure categorizations afforded by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring are valuable for clinical management of high blood pressure since they increase accuracy for diagnosis and the prediction of cardiovascular risk. PMID:25107387

  14. Bidirectional peritoneal transport of albumin in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joffe, P; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1995-01-01

    The present study was undertaken in order to assess bidirectional peritoneal kinetics of albumin after simultaneous i.v. and i.p. injection of radioiodinated albumin tracers (125I-RISA and 131I-RISA) in eight clinically stable uraemic patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis...... mass at the end of the dialysis (54 +/- 19 mumol, P

  15. Evaluating the impact of new anticoagulants in the hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braidy N

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The short-comings of current anticoagulants have led to the development of newer, albeit more expensive, oral alternatives.Objective: To explore the potential impact the new anticoagulants dabigatran and rivaroxaban in the local hospital setting, in terms of utilisation and subsequent costing.Method: A preliminary costing analysis was performed based on a prospective 2-week clinical audit (29th June - 13th July 2009. Data regarding current anticoagulation management were extracted from the medical files of patients admitted to Ryde Hospital. To model potential costing implications of using the newer agents, the reported incidence of VTE/stroke and bleeding events were obtained from key clinical trials.Results: Data were collected for 67 patients treated with either warfarin (n=46 or enoxaparin (n=21 for prophylaxis of VTE/stroke. At least two-thirds of all patients were deemed suitable candidates for the use of newer oral anticoagulants (by current therapy: warfarin: 65.2% (AF, 34.8% (VTE; enoxaparin: 100%, (VTE. The use of dabigatran in VTE/stroke prevention was found to be more cost-effective than warfarin and enoxaparin due to significantly lower costs of therapeutic monitoring and reduced administration costs. Rivaroxaban was more cost-effective than warfarin and enoxaparin for VTE/stroke prevention when supplier-rebates (33% were factored into costing.Conclusion: This study highlights the potential cost-effectiveness of newer anticoagulants, dabigatran and rivaroxaban, compared to warfarin and enoxaparin. These agents may offer economic advantages, as well as clinical benefits, in the hospital-based management of anticoagulated patients.

  16. Comparison of pharmacist managed anticoagulation with usual medical care in a family medicine clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Dillon Carla; Twells Laurie; Bishop Lisa; Young Stephanie; Hawboldt John; O'Shea Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The beneficial outcomes of oral anticoagulation therapy are dependent upon achieving and maintaining an optimal INR therapeutic range. There is growing evidence that better outcomes are achieved when anticoagulation is managed by a pharmacist with expertise in anticoagulation management rather than usual care by family physicians. This study compared a pharmacist managed anticoagulation program (PC) to usual physician care (UC) in a family medicine clinic. Methods A retros...

  17. An overview of anesthetic procedures, tools, and techniques in ambulatory care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messieha Z

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zakaria Messieha Department of Anesthesiology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Ambulatory surgical and anesthesia care (ASAC, also known as Same Day Surgery or Day Care in some countries, is the fastest growing segment of ambulatory surgical and anesthesia care. Over 50 million ambulatory surgical procedures are conducted annually comprising over 60% of all anesthesia care with an impressive track record of safety and efficiency. Advances in ambulatory anesthesia care have been due to newer generation of inhalation and intravenous anesthetics as well as airway management technology and techniques. Successful ambulatory anesthesia care relies on patient selection, adequate facilities, highly trained personnel and quality improvement policies and procedures. Favoring one anesthetic technique over the other should be patient and procedure-specific. Effective management of post-operative pain as well as nausea and vomiting are the final pieces in assuring success in ambulatory anesthesia care. Keywords: ambulatory anesthesia, out-patient anesthesia, Day-Care anesthesia

  18. Novel oral anticoagulants in the treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feher, G; Illes, Z; Komoly, S; Hargroves, D

    2015-01-01

    (NOACs) have been extensively studied in patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE) and non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). The aim of our work to review the available evidence for NOACs in the treatment of CVT. Based on our literature search there is insufficient evidence to......Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon cause of stroke with extremely diverse clinical features, predisposing factors, brain imaging findings, and outcome. Anticoagulation is the cornerstone of CVT management, however, it is not supported by high-quality evicence. Novel oral anticoagulants...

  19. Novel oral anticoagulants in the treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feher, Gergely; Illes, Zsolt; Komoly, Samuel; Hargroves, David

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon cause of stroke with extremely diverse clinical features, predisposing factors, brain imaging findings, and outcome. Anticoagulation is the cornerstone of CVT management, however, it is not supported by high-quality evicence. Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been extensively studied in patients with deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and non-valvular atrial fibrillation. The aim of our work was to review the available evidence for NOACs in the treatment of CVT. Based on our literature search there is insufficient evidence to support the use of NOACs in CVT, although case series with rivaroxaban and dabigatran have showed promising results. PMID:25994451

  20. Management of acute stroke in patients taking novel oral anticoagulants

    OpenAIRE

    Hankey, Graeme J; Norrving, Bo; Hacke, Werner; Steiner, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Each year, 1·0–2·0% of individuals with atrial fibrillation and 0·1–0·2% of those with venous thromboembolism who are receiving one of the novel oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, or apixaban) can be expected to experience an acute ischemic stroke. Additionally, 0·2–0·5% of individuals with atrial fibrillation who are receiving one of the novel oral anticoagulants can be expected to experience an intracranial hemorrhage. This opinion piece addresses the current literature and offer...

  1. Citrate anticoagulation for continuous renal replacement therapy in small children

    OpenAIRE

    Soltysiak, Jolanta; Warzywoda, Alfred; Kociński, Bartłomiej; Ostalska-Nowicka, Danuta; Benedyk, Anna; Silska-Dittmar, Magdalena; Zachwieja, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Background Regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA) is one of the methods used to prevent clotting in continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). The aim of this study was to describe the outcomes and complications of RCA-CRRT in comparison to heparin anticoagulation (HA)-CRRT in critically ill children. Methods This study was a retrospective review of 30 critically ill children (16 on RCA- and 14 on HA-CRRT) who underwent at least 24 h of CRRT. The mean body weight of the children was 8.69 ± ...

  2. [Serious surgical complications associated with chronic anticoagulant therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitrák, V; Hadacová, I; Hochová, I; Hoch, J

    2001-06-01

    Chronic anticoagulant treatment is administered mostly for cardiological reasons. Cumarin derivatires are used in the majority of cases (Warfarin, Pelentan). It is necessary to monitor this treatment regularly and to control the dose according to the INR value. Different complications can occur; the haemorrhage represents a serious one. The authors discuss several aspects of anticoagulant therapy and possible prevention of the complications. The importance of the problems is demonstrated on the authors' clinical experience--two cases of haemorrhage after Warfarin administration simulating an acute surgical event. PMID:11482149

  3. Ambulatory pressure monitoring in the assessment of antihypertensive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, A J; Conway, J; Somers, V K; Isea, J E; Sleight, P

    1989-06-01

    A low-cost, ambulatory blood-pressure monitor has been calibrated and validated against a random zero sphygmomanometer. The repeatability of ambulatory pressure recordings after a placebo month in 44 mild to moderate untreated hypertensives was assessed. Systolic blood pressure showed a mean difference over 1 month of 2.0 mmHg, with a standard deviation of differences of 9.3 mmHg. The diastolic blood pressure mean difference was 0.1 mmHg (SD = 6.3 mmHg). This variability was much less than for clinic readings (SD = 17.3 mmHg) or for single home pressure readings (SD = 19.7 mmHg). Using ambulatory monitoring to detect a drop in pressure of 8/5 mmHg with a power of 0.9, the number of subjects needed in a parallel group trial is reduced from 360 to 68, and in a crossover study from 88 to 16 subjects. The usefulness of ambulatory pressure monitoring is demonstrated in a placebo-controlled comparison of atenolol, nifedipine retard, or their combination in random order. Eleven subjects, 21-60 years, with initial average blood pressures of 166.5/104.7 mmHg, showed a reduction in pressure with atenolol 50 mg a day of 15.1/10.0 mmHg, with nifedipine retard 20 mg b.i.d. of 21.0/11.6 mmHg, and with atenolol 50 mg and nifedipine retard 20 mg once a day of 26.2/16.8 mmHg. Ambulatory monitoring of pressure improved the accuracy of the trial and demonstrated a reduction in the alerting response with atenolol. PMID:2487802

  4. Management of comorbidities in ambulatory anesthesia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dabu-Bondoc S

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Susan Dabu-Bondoc, Kirk Shelley Department of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USAAbstract: Advances in medical science now allow people with significant medical issues to live at home. As the outpatient population ages and surgical techniques advance, the ambulatory anesthesiologist has to be prepared to handle these “walking wounded”. The days of restricting ambulatory surgery procedures to American Society of Anesthesiologists class 1 and 2 patients are rapidly fading into the past. To remain competitive and economically viable, the modern ambulatory surgery center needs to expand its practice to include patients with medical comorbidities. In an environment where production and economic pressures exist, maintaining safety and good outcomes in high-risk patients for ambulatory surgery can be arduous. Adding to the complexity of this challenge is the rapid evolution of the therapeutic approaches to a variety of medical issues. For example, there has been a significant increase in the number and types of insulin a diabetic patient might be prescribed in recent years. In the case of the patient with coronary artery disease, the variety of both drug and nondrug eluding stents or new antithrombotic agents has also increased the complexity of perioperative management. Complex patients need careful, timely, and team-based preoperative evaluation by an anesthesia provider who is knowledgeable of outpatient care. Optimizing comorbidities preoperatively is a crucial initial step in minimizing risk. This paper will examine a number of common medical issues and explore their impact on managing outpatient surgical procedures.Keywords: ambulatory surgery, medical comorbidities, diabetes, coronary artery disease, respiratory disease, obesity

  5. Critique on the use of the standardized avian acute oral toxicity test for first generation anticoagulant rodenticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Nimish B.; Rattner, Barnett A.

    2012-01-01

    Avian risk assessments for rodenticides are often driven by the results of standardized acute oral toxicity tests without regards to a toxicant's mode of action and time course of adverse effects. First generation anticoagulant rodenticides (FGARs) generally require multiple feedings over several days to achieve a threshold concentration in tissue and cause adverse effects. This exposure regimen is much different than that used in the standardized acute oral toxicity test methodology. Median lethal dose values derived from standardized acute oral toxicity tests underestimate the environmental hazard and risk of FGARs. Caution is warranted when FGAR toxicity, physiological effects, and pharmacokinetics derived from standardized acute oral toxicity testing are used for forensic confirmation of the cause of death in avian mortality incidents and when characterizing FGARs' risks to free-ranging birds.

  6. Prognostic significance of hyponatremia among ambulatory patients with heart failure and preserved and reduced ejection fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavishi, Chirag; Ather, Sameer; Bambhroliya, Arvind; Jneid, Hani; Virani, Salim S; Bozkurt, Biykem; Deswal, Anita

    2014-06-01

    Hyponatremia in heart failure (HF) is an established predictor of adverse outcomes in hospitalized patients with reduced ejection fraction (EF). However, there is a paucity of data in ambulatory patients with HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). We examined the prevalence, risk factors, and long-term outcomes of hyponatremia (serum sodium ≤135 mEq/L) in ambulatory HFpEF and HF with reduced EF (HFrEF) in a national cohort of 8,862 veterans treated in Veterans Affairs clinics. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with hyponatremia, and multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were used for analysis of outcomes. The cohort consisted of 6,185 patients with HFrEF and 2,704 patients with HFpEF with a 2-year follow-up. Hyponatremia was present in 13.8% and 12.9% patients in HFrEF and HFpEF, respectively. Hyponatremia was independently associated with younger age, diabetes, lower systolic blood pressure, anemia, body mass index <30 kg/m(2), and spironolactone use, whereas African-American race and statins were inversely associated. In multivariate analysis, hyponatremia remained a significant predictor of all-cause mortality in both HFrEF (hazards ratio [HR] 1.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.11 to 1.44, p <0.001) and HFpEF (HR 1.40, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.75, p = 0.004) and a significant predictor of all-cause hospitalization in patients with HFrEF (HR 1.18, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.31, p = 0.001) but not in HFpEF (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.92 to 1.27, p = 0.33). In conclusion, hyponatremia is prevalent at a similar frequency of over 10% in ambulatory patients with HFpEF and HFrEF. Hyponatremia is an independent prognostic marker of mortality across the spectrum of patients with HFpEF and HFrEF. In contrast, it is an independent predictor for hospitalization in patients with HFrEF but not in patients with HFpEF. PMID:24837261

  7. APPLICATIONS OF PHARMACOGENETIC TESTING FOR PERSONALIZATION OF THERAPY WITH ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS IN RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Sychev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The clinical significance of the patient genetic characteristics in the individual pharmacological response to oral anticoagulants is considered. Possible tactics of warfarin dosing and new oral anticoagulants choice on the basis of pharmacogenetic testing as well as indications for this approach in clinical practice are discussed. It should increase efficacy and safety of anticoagulant therapy.

  8. Medication-related problem type and appearance rate in ambulatory hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drayer Debra K

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemodialysis (HD patients are at risk for medication-related problems (MRP. The MRP number, type, and appearance rate over time in ambulatory HD patients has not been investigated. Methods Randomly selected HD patients were enrolled to receive monthly pharmaceutical care visits. At each visit, MRP were identified through review of the patient chart, electronic medical record, patient interview, and communications with other healthcare disciplines. All MRP were categorized by type and medication class. MRP appearance rate was determined as the number of MRP identified per month/number of months in study. The number of MRP per patient-drug exposures were determined using: {[(number of patients × (mean number of medications]/(number of months of study} /number of MRP identified. Results were expressed as mean ± standard deviation or percentages. Results Patients were 62.6 ± 15.9 years old, had 6.4 ± 2.0 comorbid conditions, were taking 12.5 ± 4.2 medications, and 15.7 ± 7.2 doses per day at baseline. Medication-dosing problems (33.5%, adverse drug reactions (20.7%, and an indication that was not currently being treated (13.5% were the most common MRP. 5,373 medication orders were reviewed and a MRP was identified every 15.2 medication exposures. Overall MRP appearance rate was 0.68 ± 0.46 per patient per month. Conclusion MRP continue to occur at a high rate in ambulatory HD patients. Healthcare providers taking care of HD patients should be aware of this problem and efforts to avoid or resolve MRP should be undertaken at all HD clinics.

  9. Adverse reactions to cosmetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogra A

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Adverse reaction to cosmetics constitute a small but significant number of cases of contact dermatitis with varied appearances. These can present as contact allergic dermatitis, photodermatitis, contact irritant dermatitis, contact urticaria, hypopigmentation, hyperpigmentotion or depigmentation, hair and nail breakage. Fifty patients were included for the study to assess the role of commonly used cosmetics in causing adverse reactions. It was found that hair dyes, lipsticks and surprisingly shaving creams caused more reaction as compared to other cosmetics. Overall incidence of contact allergic dermatitis seen was 3.3% with patients own cosmetics. Patch testing was also done with the basic ingredients and showed positive results in few cases where casual link could be established. It is recommended that labeling of the cosmetics should be done to help the dermatologists and the patients to identify the causative allergen in cosmetic preparation.

  10. Thesis on Adverse Possession

    OpenAIRE

    O'Dwyer, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Adverse possession has been described as a “debilitating” experience and acts as a “blunt instrument” of necessary legislation in modern society. It is a device that ends litigation. Legislation for abolition would lead to greater societal difficulties. Statistically land theft is rare and given that ownership of property carries a duty an owner should be vigilant. One sentence on the property folio could alert an owner of the danger of inadequate fencing. Although aspects of notification ...

  11. Adverse effects of benzodiazepines

    OpenAIRE

    Claire Gudex

    1990-01-01

    The growing realisation that the benzodiazepines have potential for causing serious harm has caused concern due to their wide and common use. This has stimulated interest in the costs and benefits of their use. This paper is a review of the adverse effects of benzodiazepines, and concentrates on four areas of particular concern: drug dependence which the consequent withdrawal symptoms; psychological effects while on the drugs; use by the elderly’ and tolerance to the drug effects. Although th...

  12. Lupus anticoagulant: a unique case with lupus anticoagulant and habitual abortion together with antifactor II antibody and bleeding tendency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stormorken, H; Gjemdal, T; Bjøro, K

    1988-01-01

    Lupus anticoagulants (LA) are associated with various forms of thrombotic events. Of particular interest to obstetrics is the association with placental infarcts and habitual abortion. In the case described a near full-term viable infant was delivered subsequent to four early miscarriages. However, the mother had then developed an antifactor II antibody leading to grave hypoprothrombinemia with bleeding tendency, indicating efficient autoanticoagulation. This natural experiment indicates that these patients should receive anticoagulation during pregnancy, possibly in combination with steroids to depress the LA level. PMID:3139508

  13. Perioperative anticoagulation for children with prosthetic mechanical valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, P; Grech, V

    2000-04-01

    The insertion of a mechanical heart valve predisposes to thrombosis and embolism, and for this reason, individuals with mechanical valves who undergo dental/surgical procedures must take special precautions. In this article, we illustrate a protocol for anticoagulation during such procedures in individuals with mechanical valves. PMID:22368581

  14. Do we have to anticoagulated patients with cerebral venous thrombosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feher, G; Illes, Z; Hargroves, D; Komoly, S

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare form of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Although anticoagulation is recommended for the initial and long term treatment with regards to thrombotic risks for patients with CVT, the role of anticogalution has not been fully elucidated. The aim of...

  15. Anticoagulants used in plasma collection affect adipokine multiplexed measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allione, Alessandra; Di Gaetano, Cornelia; Dani, Nadia; Barberio, Davide; Sieri, Sabina; Krogh, Vittorio; Matullo, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is an important health problem worldwide. Adipose tissue acts as an endocrine organ that secretes various bioactive substances, called adipokines, including pro-inflammatory biomarkers such as TNF-α, IL-6, leptin and C-reactive protein (CRP) and anti-inflammatory molecules such as adiponectin. The deregulated production of adipokines in obesity is linked to the pathogenesis of various disease processes and monitoring their variation is critical to understand metabolic diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the plasma concentration of adipokines in healthy subjects by multiplexed measurements and the effect of anticoagulants on their levels. Plasma samples from 10 healthy donors were collected in two different anticoagulants (sodium citrate or heparin). All markers, excluding TNF-α, showed significantly higher concentrations in heparinized compared to citrate plasma. However, levels of adipokines in different plasma samples were highly correlated for most of these markers. We reported that different anticoagulants used in the preparation of the plasma samples affected the measurements of some adipokines. The importance of the present results in epidemiology is relevant when comparing different studies in which blood samples were collected with different anticoagulants. PMID:26945995

  16. Anticoagulant drugs increase natural killer cell activity in lung cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bobek, M.; Boubelík, Michael; Fišerová, Anna; Luptovcová, Martina; Vannucci, Luca; Kacprzak, G.; Kolodzej, J.; Majewski, A.M.; Hoffman, R. M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 2 (2005), s. 215-223. ISSN 0169-5002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : anticoagulant drugs * lung cancer * NK cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.172, year: 2005

  17. Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism With New Anticoagulant Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becattini, Cecilia; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2016-04-26

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common disease associated with high risk for recurrences, death, and late sequelae, accounting for substantial health care costs. Anticoagulant agents are the mainstay of treatment for deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. The recent availability of oral anticoagulant agents that can be administered in fixed doses, without laboratory monitoring and dose adjustment, is a landmark change in the treatment of VTE. In Phase III trials, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban (antifactor Xa agents), and dabigatran (an antithrombin agent) were noninferior and probably safer than conventional anticoagulation therapy (low-molecular-weight heparin followed by vitamin K antagonists). These favorable results were confirmed in specific patient subgroups, such as the elderly and fragile. However, some patients, such as those with cancer or with intermediate- to high-risk pulmonary embolism, were underrepresented in the Phase III trials. Further clinical research is required before new oral anticoagulant agents can be considered standard of care for the full spectrum of patients with VTE. PMID:27102510

  18. Haemorrhage in the labyrinth caused by anticoagulant therapy: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a patient who experienced a severe vertiginous episode with bilateral tinnitus and progressive right-sided hearing loss. She had Marfan's disease and was on anticoagulant treatment. The fluid in the labyrinth gave higher signal than cerebrospinal fluid on T1-weighted images, suggesting haemorrhage. The radiological follow-up is discussed. (orig.)

  19. Structure and anticoagulant properties of sulfated glycosaminoglycans from primitive Chordates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAVÃO MAURO S. G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatan sulfates and heparin, similar to the mammalian glycosaminoglycans, but with differences in the degree and position of sulfation were previously isolated from the body of the ascidian Styela plicata and Ascidia nigra. These differences produce profound effects on their anticoagulant properties. S. plicata dermatan sulfate composed by 2-O-sulfatedalpha-L-iduronic acid and 4-O-sulfated N-acetyl-beta-D-galactosamine residues is a potent anticoagulant due to a high heparin cofactor II activity. Surprisingly, it has a lower potency to prevent thrombus formation on an experimental model and a lower bleeding effect in rats than the mammalian dermatan sulfate. In contrast, A. nigra dermatan sulfate, also enriched in 2-O-sulfated alpha-L-iduronic acid, but in this case sulfated at O-6 of the N-acetyl-beta-D-galactosamine units, has no in vitro or in vivo anticoagulant activity, does not prevent thrombus formation but shows a bleeding effect similar to the mammalian glycosaminoglycan. Ascidian heparin, composed by 2-O-sulfated alpha-L-iduronic acid, N- and 6-O-sulfated glucosamine (75% and alpha-L-iduronic acid, N- and 6-O-sulfated glucosamine (25% disaccharide units has an anticoagulant activity 10 times lower than the mammalian heparin, is about 20 times less potent in the inhibition of thrombin by antithrombin, but has the same heparin cofactor II activity as mammalian heparin.

  20. Citrate Anticoagulation for CRRT in Children: Comparison with Heparin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Nicole Fernández

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional anticoagulation with citrate is an alternative to heparin in continuous renal replacement therapies, which may prolong circuit lifetime and decrease hemorrhagic complications. A retrospective comparative cohort study based on a prospective observational registry was conducted including critically ill children undergoing CRRT. Efficacy, measured as circuit survival, and secondary effects of heparin and citrate were compared. 12 patients on CRRT with citrate anticoagulation and 24 patients with heparin anticoagulation were analyzed. Median citrate dose was 2.6 mmol/L. Median calcium dose was 0.16 mEq/kg/h. Median heparin dose was 15 UI/kg/h. Median circuit survival was 48 hours with citrate and 31 hours with heparin (P=0.028. 66.6% of patients treated with citrate developed mild metabolic alkalosis, which was directly related to citrate dose. There were no cases of citrate intoxication: median total calcium/ionic calcium index (CaT/I of 2.16 and a maximum CaT/I of 2.33, without metabolic acidosis. In the citrate group, 45.5% of patients developed hypochloremia and 27.3% hypomagnesemia. In the heparin group, 27.8% developed hypophosphatemia. Three patients were moved from heparin to citrate to control postoperatory bleeding. In conclusion citrate is a safe and effective anticoagulation method for CRRT in children and it achieves longer circuit survival than heparin.

  1. Citrate Anticoagulation for CRRT in Children: Comparison with Heparin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Sara Nicole; Santiago, Maria José; López-Herce, Jesús; García, Miriam; Del Castillo, Jimena; Alcaraz, Andrés José; Bellón, Jose María

    2014-01-01

    Regional anticoagulation with citrate is an alternative to heparin in continuous renal replacement therapies, which may prolong circuit lifetime and decrease hemorrhagic complications. A retrospective comparative cohort study based on a prospective observational registry was conducted including critically ill children undergoing CRRT. Efficacy, measured as circuit survival, and secondary effects of heparin and citrate were compared. 12 patients on CRRT with citrate anticoagulation and 24 patients with heparin anticoagulation were analyzed. Median citrate dose was 2.6 mmol/L. Median calcium dose was 0.16 mEq/kg/h. Median heparin dose was 15 UI/kg/h. Median circuit survival was 48 hours with citrate and 31 hours with heparin (P = 0.028). 66.6% of patients treated with citrate developed mild metabolic alkalosis, which was directly related to citrate dose. There were no cases of citrate intoxication: median total calcium/ionic calcium index (CaT/I) of 2.16 and a maximum CaT/I of 2.33, without metabolic acidosis. In the citrate group, 45.5% of patients developed hypochloremia and 27.3% hypomagnesemia. In the heparin group, 27.8% developed hypophosphatemia. Three patients were moved from heparin to citrate to control postoperatory bleeding. In conclusion citrate is a safe and effective anticoagulation method for CRRT in children and it achieves longer circuit survival than heparin. PMID:25157369

  2. Vitamin K and stability of oral anticoagulant therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rombouts, Eva Karolien

    2011-01-01

    One of the causes of unstable anticoagulation is a variable vitamin K intake. The main objective of this thesis was to test the hypothesis that the INR is particularly sensitive to changes in vitamin K intake when vitamin K status is low, and that patients with a low vitamin K intake would therefore

  3. Haemorrhage in the labyrinth caused by anticoagulant therapy: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callonnec, F.; Gerardin, E.; Thiebot, J. [Department of Radiology, Rouen University Hospital, 1 rue de Germont, F-76031 Rouen cedex (France); Marie, J.P.; Andrieu Guitrancourt, J. [Department of Otolaryngology, Rouen University Hospital (France); Marsot-Dupuch, K. [Department of Radiology, St. Antoine, Paris University Hospital (France)

    1999-06-01

    We report a patient who experienced a severe vertiginous episode with bilateral tinnitus and progressive right-sided hearing loss. She had Marfan`s disease and was on anticoagulant treatment. The fluid in the labyrinth gave higher signal than cerebrospinal fluid on T1-weighted images, suggesting haemorrhage. The radiological follow-up is discussed. (orig.) With 2 figs., 11 refs.

  4. Antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy in elective percutaneous coronary intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verheugt Freek WA

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thrombosis plays a major role in acute vessel closure both after coronary balloon angioplasty and after stenting. This review will address the role of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy in preventing early thrombotic complications after percutaneous coronary intervention. The focus will be on agents that are routinely available and commonly used.

  5. Laboratory monitoring of novel oral anticoagulants rivaroxaban and dabigatran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerenberg, E.S.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Sijpkens, M.K.; Meijers, J.C.; Büller, H.R.; Levi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Rivaroxaban and dabigatran are new oral anticoagulants that both have been licensed worldwide for the treatment of atrial fibrillation and rivaroxaban also for venous thrombosis. Both drugs specifically inhibit one coagulation factor, factor Xa and thrombin, respectively, and both compou

  6. Perioperative anticoagulation for children with prosthetic mechanical valves

    OpenAIRE

    Grech, Victor E.; Rees, P.

    2000-01-01

    The insertion of a mechanical heart valve predisposes to thrombosis and embolism, and for this reason, individuals with mechanical valves who undergo dental/surgical procedures must take special precautions. In this article, we illustrate a protocol for anticoagulation during such procedures in individuals with mechanical valves.

  7. Qualitative identification of rodenticide anticoagulants by LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleberg, Robert A; Homan, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Rodenticide anticoagulants are used in the control of rodent populations. In addition to accidental ingestions in humans, such agents have also been used for homicidal and suicidal purposes. There are two major groups of rodenticide anticoagulants - hydroxycoumarins and indanediones. Before the advent of LC-MS/MS, analysis for such agents was relegated to such techniques as TLC and HPLC with nonspecific modes of detection. LC-MS/MS has been used to determine any given number of rodenticide anticoagulants in animal tissues, foods, plasma, etc. Use of this technique allows for the simultaneous identification of individual compounds within both classes of rodenticide anticoagulants. The LC-MS/MS method presented allows for simultaneous qualitative identification of brodifacoum, bromadiolone, chlorphacinone, dicumarol, difenacoum, diphacinone, and warfarin in blood, serum, and plasma using ESI in the negative mode. Two transitions are monitored for each analyte after a simple sample preparation. Chromatographic separation is accomplished using a gradient of ammonium hydroxide in water and ammonium hydroxide in methanol. Chloro-warfarin is used as internal standard. PMID:22767114

  8. Use of Oral Anticoagulation Therapy in Atrial Fibrillation after Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Stine Funder; Christensen, Louisa M; Christensen, Anders;

    2013-01-01

    Background. The knowledge is still sparse about patient related factors, influencing oral anticoagulation therapy (OAC) rates, in stroke patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Aims. To assess the use of OAC in ischemic stroke patients diagnosed with AF and to identify patient related factors...

  9. Personalised treatment with oral anticoagulant drugs : clinical and economic issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, T.I.

    2013-01-01

    Coumarin derivatives such as acenocoumarol, phenprocoumon and warfarin are frequently used for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation or for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. These oral anticoagulants have a narrow therapeutic range and a large var

  10. Modeling intracerebral hemorrhage growth and response to anticoagulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles H Greenberg

    Full Text Available The mechanism for hemorrhage enlargement in the brain, a key determinant of patient outcome following hemorrhagic stroke, is unknown. We performed computer-based stochastic simulation of one proposed mechanism, in which hemorrhages grow in "domino" fashion via secondary shearing of neighboring vessel segments. Hemorrhages were simulated by creating an initial site of primary bleeding and an associated risk of secondary rupture at adjacent sites that decayed over time. Under particular combinations of parameters for likelihood of secondary rupture and time-dependent decay, a subset of lesions expanded, creating a bimodal distribution of microbleeds and macrobleeds. Systematic variation of the model to simulate anticoagulation yielded increases in both macrobleed occurrence (26.9%, 53.2%, and 70.0% of all hemorrhagic events under conditions simulating no, low-level, and high-level anticoagulation and final hemorrhage size (median volumes 111, 276, and 412 under the same three conditions, consistent with data from patients with anticoagulant-related brain hemorrhages. Reversal from simulated high-level anticoagulation to normal coagulation was able to reduce final hemorrhage size only if applied relatively early in the course of hemorrhage expansion. These findings suggest that a model based on a secondary shearing mechanism can account for some of the clinically observed properties of intracerebral hemorrhage, including the bimodal distribution of volumes and the enhanced hemorrhage growth seen with anticoagulation. Future iterations of this model may be useful for elucidating the effects of hemorrhage growth of factors related to secondary shearing (such as small vessel pathology or time-dependent decay (such as hemostatic agents.

  11. Worldwide management of oral anticoagulant therapy: the ISAM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengo, Vittorio; Pegoraro, Cinzia; Cucchini, Umberto; Iliceto, Sabino

    2006-02-01

    A multicenter, observational, retrospective, cross-sectional study of patients, receiving oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT) for stroke prophylaxis in chronic non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) was conducted in the US, Canada, France, Italy and Spain according to their predominant model of care [routine medical care (RMC) or Anticoagulation Clinic care (ACC)]. The study objectives were to assess anticoagulation control (time in target range), and to describe the features of the local model of care. Consecutive patients were recruited on the basis of a minimum of 60 days of oral anticoagulant treatment over a 12 month period, and clinic and physician details were captured by means of a structured face-to-face or telephone interview. Time in therapeutic range (TTR) was calculated by using linear interpolation between INR values. A total of 1511 patients were recruited, of whom 1445 were included in the analysis of TTR. TTR was higher in ACC (69.5% and 64.9% for Italy and Spain, respectively) with respect to RMC (58.1%, 62.8% and 59.3% for the US, Canada and France, respectively). Mean intervals between INR determinations were between 3 and 4 weeks. Dose changes in case of INR outside therapeutic range were more frequent in Spain and less frequent in France. Striking differences were observed in type of VKA used, specialists involved in patient management, and dosage instructions. Studying of anticoagulation management based on local models of care highlights important discrepancies among countries and suggests further standardization of the management of this important therapy is necessary. PMID:16475046

  12. [Adverse reaction of pseudoephedrine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Lois, G; Gómez Carrasco, J A; García de Frías, E

    2005-04-01

    We present a case of a 7 years old girl who developed an episode of myoclonic movements and tremors after being medicated with a not well quantified amount of a pseudoephedrine/antihistamine combination. We want to highlight the potential toxicity of pseudoephedrine, usually administered as part of cold-syrup preparations which are used for symptomatic treatment of upper respiratory tract cough and congestion associated with the common cold and allergic rhinitis. Although these products are generally considered to be safe either by physicians and parents, we can't underestimate the potential adverse events and toxic effects that can occur when administering these medications. PMID:15826569

  13. A cluster randomized trial evaluating electronic prescribing in an ambulatory care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Sherman

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medication errors, adverse drug events and potential adverse drug events are common and serious in terms of the harms and costs that they impose on the health system and those who use it. Errors resulting in preventable adverse drug events have been shown to occur most often at the stages of ordering and administration. This paper describes the protocol for a pragmatic trial of electronic prescribing to reduce prescription error. The trial was designed to overcome the limitations associated with traditional study design. Design This study was designed as a 65-week, cluster randomized, parallel study. Methods The trial was conducted within ambulatory outpatient clinics in an academic tertiary care centre in Ontario, Canada. The electronic prescribing software for the study is a Canadian electronic prescribing software package which provides physician prescription entry with decision support at the point of care. Using a handheld computer (PDA the physician selects medications using an error minimising menu-based pick list from a comprehensive drug database, create specific prescription instructions and then transmit the prescription directly and electronically to a participating pharmacy via facsimile or to the physician's printer using local area wireless technology. The unit of allocation and randomization is by 'week', i.e. the system is "on" or "off" according to the randomization scheme and the unit of analysis is the prescription, with adjustment for clustering of patients within practitioners. Discussion This paper describes the protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomized trial of point-of-care electronic prescribing, which was specifically designed to overcome the limitations associated with traditional study design. Trial Registration This trial has been registered with clinicaltrials.gov (ID: NCT00252395

  14. Newer non-vitamin K-antagonist direct oral anticoagulants in acute coronary syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Rubboli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available standard dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT of aspirin and clopidogrel is associated with a substantial absolute incidence of adverse events, including death, myocardial infarction and stroke after an acute coronary syndrome (ACs. Combination therapy of an oral anticoagulant and DAPT has been previously proposed in order to improve efficacy, but has not gained popularity owing to the cumbersome management of vitamin K-antagonists (VKA. The recent introduction of newer, non-VKA, direct oral anticoagulants (NOAC, including dabigatran, apixaban, and rivaroxaban, has renewed the interest in combination therapy, owing to the more favorable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of these drugs. Whereas phase II studies with dabigatran, apixaban, and rivaroxaban have consistently shown an increased bleeding risk with combination therapy, a potential increased efficacy has emerged for apixaban and rivaroxaban, thereby prompting phase III studies, namely APPRAIsE-2 with apixaban and ATLAs ACs 2-TIMI 51 with rivaroxaban. Both APPRAIsE-2 and ATLAs ACs 2-TIMI 51 studies confirmed a dose-dependent increase in major, including intracranial, bleeding with apixaban and rivaroxaban when combined with DAPT. Low-dose rivaroxaban on the other hand, was associated with significantly higher efficacy on the occurrence of combined cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke, as well as of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction and stent thrombosis. Owing to the persistent uncertainty regarding the net clinical benefit of combined therapy of NOAC, namely low-dose rivaroxaban, and DAPT, further studies are warranted to identify the ACs patient who will benefit most from such treatment, also in comparison to current standard DAPT of aspirin and prasugrel or ticagrelor.

  15. Interdisciplinary Shared Governance in Ambulatory Care: One Health System's Journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Sharon; Bacon, Cynthia Thornton

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of shared governance structures in acute care has illustrated the positive relationship between shared decision making and nurse empowerment and positive nurse and patient outcomes. Little is known, however, about interdisciplinary shared governance, and even less is known about shared governance in ambulatory care. This article details one health system's experience with the implementation of an interdisciplinary shared governance structure in ambulatory care over a 4-year period. The authors report lessons learned, positive health system outcomes that resulted including improved communication, better preparedness for accreditation visits, improved assessment of fall risk, and a streamlined documentation system. Also discussed are mechanisms to enhance sustainability of the structure and discussion of future opportunities and challenges. PMID:27259130

  16. Blood Pressure Measurement: Clinic, Home, Ambulatory, and Beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Drawz, Paul E; ABDALLA, MOHAMED; Rahman, Mahboob

    2012-01-01

    Blood pressure has traditionally been measured in the clinic setting using the auscultory method and a mercury sphygmomanometer. Technological advances have led to improvements in measuring clinic blood pressure and allowed for measuring blood pressures outside the clinic. This review outlines various methods for evaluating blood pressure and the clinical utility of each type of measurement. Home blood pressures and 24 hour ambulatory blood pressures have improved our ability to evaluate risk...

  17. Ambulatory anesthesia in plastic surgery: opportunities and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Facque AR; Taub PJ

    2015-01-01

    Alexander R Facque, Peter J Taub Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, USA Abstract: In 2013, there were 17 million procedures performed by plastic and reconstructive surgeons in the United States in the private office or ambulatory “surgicenter” setting, as well as additional operations performed in hospitals on an outpatient basis. As interest in performing increasingly complex surgical procedures on an ...

  18. Ambulatory anesthesia in plastic surgery: opportunities and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Facque, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Alexander R Facque, Peter J Taub Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, USA Abstract: In 2013, there were 17 million procedures performed by plastic and reconstructive surgeons in the United States in the private office or ambulatory “surgicenter” setting, as well as additional operations performed in hospitals on an outpatient basis. As interest in performing increasingly complex surgical procedure...

  19. Analysis of Patient Service Time in Ambulatory Clinics: Patient Tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Zerbe, Tony R.; Zerbe, Shirleen D.

    1990-01-01

    Historically, analysis of patient service time (patient tracking) in ambulatory clinics has been performed manually. A case study of Eye and Ear Clinic in Pittsburgh, PA, revealed that this approach to patient data collection was prone to clerical error and did not satisfy the clinic's information-processing needs. Initial attempts at automation identified the features required of a successful computerized scheduling and patient tracking system.

  20. Patient satisfaction and positive patient outcomes in ambulatory anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Jean; Shah, Ushma; Wong, David

    2015-01-01

    Ushma Shah, David T Wong, Jean Wong Department of Anesthesia, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Most surgeries in North America are performed on an ambulatory basis, reducing health care costs and increasing patient comfort. Patient satisfaction is an important outcome indicator of the quality of health care services incorporated by the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA). Patient satisfaction is a complex concep...

  1. Use of extramural ambulatory care curricula in postgraduate medical training

    OpenAIRE

    Talwalkar, Jaideep S.; Satcher, D’Juanna; Turner, Teri L.; Sisson, Stephen D.; Fenick, Ada M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Extramural curricula developed for the purpose of sharing with other institutions have been designed to improve education on important topics in ambulatory care. We sought to assess the usage rates of these curricula among paediatric, internal medicine, and combined medicine-paediatrics residency programmes in the United States. Methods Surveys on aspects of trainee continuity clinic were sent to paediatric and medicine-paediatrics programme directors in 2012. Surveys contained a...

  2. Influenza A Outbreak in an Ambulatory Stem Cell Transplant Center

    OpenAIRE

    Apewokin, Senu; Vyas, Keyur; Lester, Laura K.; Grazzuitti, Monica; Haselow, Dirk T.; Wolfe, Frankie; Roberts, Michelle; Bellamy, William; Kumar, Naveen Sanath; Hunter, Dolris; Lee, Jeannette; Laudadio, Jennifer; Wheeler, J. Gary; Bradsher, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background  In the era of cost-consciousness regarding healthcare , provision of medical services in an outpatient setting has become increasingly attractive. We report an influenza outbreak in an ambulatory stem cell transplant center in 2013 that highlights unique identification and infection control challenges in this setting. Methods  Nasopharyngeal swabs were performed on patients with suspected influenza-like illnesses (ILI), defined by subjective fever or measured temperature of ≥37.7°...

  3. Development of Ambulatory Quality Assurance Program Using Computerized Medical Records

    OpenAIRE

    Shrader, J.; Wright, C; Mieczkowski, L.; McDonald, S.

    1993-01-01

    As part of the computerization of the ambulatory teaching facility for our residency program, we have successfully utilized a comprehensive computerized medical records system to develop a specific quality assurance program. Our QA program includes allergy audits, health screening audits, drug utilization and recall audits, and nursing care plan audits. With a computerized QA program, specific question about individual patients as well as questions regarding our patient population are quickly...

  4. Analysis of depression in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jung Ah; Lee, Yung Kee; Huh, Woo Seong; Kim, Yoon-Goo; Kim, Dae Joong; Oh, Ha-Young; Kang, Soon Ah; Kim Moon, Yang Ha; Kim, Han-Woo; Kim, Ji-Hae

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that depression and sense of hopelessness worsen the quality of life in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients receiving dialysis. However, the characteristics of depression in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients have not been analyzed in detail. We performed this study to investigate the severity of depression and the factors affecting depression in CAPD patients. With 96 CAPD patients, we evaluated each patient's depressive mood and hopelessness with ...

  5. Reproducibility of ambulatory oesophageal pH monitoring.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnsson, F; Joelsson, B

    1988-01-01

    To evaluate the reproducibility of ambulatory 24 hour intraoesophageal pH monitoring, 20 patients were randomly selected to undergo two consecutive investigations. Fifteen patients were classified as either abnormal, or normal on both test days. The amount of acid reflux, expressed as percentage of time with oesophageal pH below 4.0 during the two 24 hour periods, showed 77% concordance. The upright and recumbent periods of measurement showed different degrees of concordance: 83% and 62%, res...

  6. 48-hour ambulatory electrocardiography in dynamite workers and controls

    OpenAIRE

    Hogstedt, C; Söderholm, B; Bodin, L

    1980-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sudden deaths and chronic cardiovascular diseases have been reported in excess frequency from the explosives industry. Forty-two active dynamite workers and 43 healthy, unexposed workers have been studied by ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring during two 24-hour periods covering an exposed shift and the “abstinence phase,” 40-64 hours after the last exposure to dynamite. To achieve comparability the non-exposed individuals were screened for risk factors of heart disease in the...

  7. Gait improvement surgery in ambulatory children with diplegic cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Terjesen, Terje; Lofterød, Bjørn; Skaaret, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Instrumented 3-D gait analyses (GA) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) have shown improved gait function 1 year postoperatively. Using GA, we assessed the outcome after 5 years and evaluated parental satisfaction with the surgery and the need for additional surgery. Patients and methods 34 ambulatory children with spastic diplegia had preoperative GA. Based on this GA, the children underwent 195 orthopedic procedures on their lower limbs at a mean age of 11.6 (6–19) y...

  8. Adverse reactions to radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text. An adverse reaction can occur following administration of a radio pharmaceutical, but fortunately reactions are uncommon. They are usually mild and do not require intensive treatment. This is probably related to the fact that only small chemical quantities of material are administered to patients and that only one or a small number of doses are administered. Since symptoms are unrelated to any known pharmacology of the agents, they can be described as Type B reactions according to the classification of Rawlings and Thompson. Types of reaction that occur and possible mechanisms will be described. The reactions most commonly observed are skin rashes and vasomotor symptoms. It is important that, as far as possible, a cause - effect relationship can be established between the administration of the radio pharmaceutical and the symptoms caused. Some classification schemes therefore exclude vasomotor reactions such as hypotension and slow pulse, since such events can arise in a variety of clinical situations unrelated to radio pharmaceutical administration. It is important for nuclear medicine departments to be aware of the nature of reactions such that they can be recognized and appropriate re-assurance and/or prompt treatment can be given to their patients. Radio pharmaceuticals most frequently mentioned in reporting schemes are di phosphonates used for bone imaging. This probably reflect the fact that these agents are the most frequently used in current practice rather than that they cause more reactions. Problems in establishing the overall frequency of adverse reactions to radio pharmaceuticals include the fact that events may not be recognized if they occur after the patient has left the Nuclear Medicine Department and that reactions are never reported. Two recent studies have attempted to obtain more definitive information by performing prospective studies in a large number of departments. A study in the USA found that there was a rate of 2.3 events per

  9. Ambulatory Versus Inpatient Rotations in Teaching Third-Year Students Internal Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Kalet, Adina; Schwartz, Mark D.; Capponi, Louis J; Mahon-Salazar, Carol; Bateman, W Barry

    1998-01-01

    We studied 63 randomly selected third-year students who split their 10-week medicine clerkship between ambulatory and inpatient components. Compared with their inpatient experience, during the ambulatory rotation, the 63 students felt more like doctors, more responsible for patients, and more able to know and help their patients. Students reported that ambulatory attending staff appeared happier and less stressed, and did not embarrass them as frequently. Compared with their 619 “inpatient” c...

  10. An assessment of 24-hour ambulatory EEG/ECG monitoring in a neurology clinic.

    OpenAIRE

    Cull, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The relative merits of 24-hour ambulatory EEG/ECG monitoring and routine EEG recording have been compared in a group of 62 patients attending a neurological clinic because of episodes of loss of consciousness. Overall, ambulatory EEG abnormalities were detected in 21 cases (34%) compared with 16 cases (26%) for routine EEG. Ambulatory EEG mainly improved the detection of generalised paroxysmal activity, but in some cases lateralised abnormalities were detected which were not present on the ro...

  11. Ambulatory arterial stiffness index and 24-hour ambulatory pulse pressure as predictors of mortality in Ohasama, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Asayama, Kei; Metoki, Hirohito; Imai, Yutaka; Satoh, Hiroshi; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Li, Yan; Kikuya, Masahiro; Thijs, Lutgarde; Staessen, Jan A.; Hoshi, Haruhisa; Wang, Ji-Guang; Dolan, Eamon; Hashimoto, Junichiro; O'Brien, Eoin; Obara, Taku

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) and pulse pressure (PP) are indexes of arterial stiffness and can be computed from 24-hour blood pressure recordings. We investigated the prognostic value of AASI and PP in relation to fatal outcomes. METHODS: In 1542 Ohasama residents (baseline age, 40 to 93 years; 63.4% women), we applied Cox regression to relate mortality to AASI and PP while adjusting for sex, age, BMI, 24-hour MAP, smoking and drinking habits, diabetes me...

  12. In-vitro anticoagulant activity of fucoidan derivatives from brown seaweed Laminaria japonica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jing; ZHANG Quanbin; ZHANG Zhongshan; HOU Yun; ZHANG Hong

    2011-01-01

    Fucoidan, a group of sulfated heteropolysaccharides, was extracted from Laminariajaponica,an important economic alga species in China. The anticoagulant activity of fucoidan and its derivatives (including sulfated, phosphorylated, and aminated fucoidan) was examined using in-vitro anticoagulant systems. The correlation between chemical variations within the fucoidan group and anticoagulant activity was determined. The in-vitro anticoagulant properties of fucoidan and its derivatives were determined by measuring activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), and thrombin time (TT).The results indicate anticoagulant activity in all samples using APTT and TT assays; however, only the fucoidan derivatives affected the PT assay. Thus, the fucoidan derivatives were able to inhibit both intrinsic and extrinsic blood coagulants. Fucoidan (FPS) and its derivatives presented better anticoagulant activity than low molecular weight fucoidan (DFPS) and its derivatives, suggesting that molecular weight and proper conformation are contributing factors for anticoagulant activity of polysaccharides. Amino groups have a positive charge and can thus change the charge density of fucoidan. Accordingly, among the tested samples, aminated fucoidan (NF) was the most active reflecting the importance of charge density for anticoagulant activity. Available data obtained using in-vitro models suggest that the sulfate content,sulfate/total-sugar ratio, molecular weight, and the substituted group of fucoidan are important factors for anticoagulant activity but that the influence of sulfate, phosphate and amino groups on anticoagulant activity was different.

  13. In-vitro anticoagulant activity of fucoidan derivatives from brown seaweed Laminaria japonica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Quanbin; Zhang, Zhongshan; Hou, Yun; Zhang, Hong

    2011-05-01

    Fucoidan, a group of sulfated heteropolysaccharides, was extracted from Laminaria japonica, an important economic alga species in China. The anticoagulant activity of fucoidan and its derivatives (including sulfated, phosphorylated, and aminated fucoidan) was examined using in-vitro anticoagulant systems. The correlation between chemical variations within the fucoidan group and anticoagulant activity was determined. The in-vitro anticoagulant properties of fucoidan and its derivatives were determined by measuring activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), and thrombin time (TT). The results indicate anticoagulant activity in all samples using APTT and TT assays; however, only the fucoidan derivatives affected the PT assay. Thus, the fucoidan derivatives were able to inhibit both intrinsic and extrinsic blood coagulants. Fucoidan (FPS) and its derivatives presented better anticoagulant activity than low molecular weight fucoidan (DFPS) and its derivatives, suggesting that molecular weight and proper conformation are contributing factors for anticoagulant activity of polysaccharides. Amino groups have a positive charge and can thus change the charge density of fucoidan. Accordingly, among the tested samples, aminated fucoidan (NF) was the most active reflecting the importance of charge density for anticoagulant activity. Available data obtained using in-vitro models suggest that the sulfate content, sulfate/total-sugar ratio, molecular weight, and the substituted group of fucoidan are important factors for anticoagulant activity but that the influence of sulfate, phosphate and amino groups on anticoagulant activity was different.

  14. [Use of direct oral anticoagulants in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickley, Frank; Geigenmüller, Grit; Schinköthe, Claudia

    2015-12-01

    Equal safety and efficacy of direct oral anticoagulants as compared to vitamin K antagonists have been shown in elderly and very old patients. The use of these seem to have certain advantages in this special patient cohort: higher drug safety, no need for lab monitoring, less drug-drug interactions and a lower rate of intracranial hemorrhages. However, more data is needed to quantify the exact bleeding risk for geriatric patients. Elderly patients suffer quite frequently from significant comorbidities, such as renal failure, dementia, vision loss etc., which might put them at higher risk to suffer from medication side effects, especially bleeding complications. Routine clinical examinations combined with monitoring of renal function are therefore of paramount importance. Regarding these precautions the use of the new oral anticoagulants in the elderly is hence quite justified and rising. PMID:26625228

  15. Emergent Bleeding in Patients Receiving Direct Oral Anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Richard L; Sterling, Sarah A

    2016-01-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) offer clinical advantages over warfarin, such as minimal medication and food interactions and fixed dosing without the need for routine monitoring of coagulation status. As with all anticoagulants, bleeding, either spontaneous or provoked, is the most common complication. The long-term use of these drugs is increasing, and there is a crucial need for emergency medicine service professionals to understand the optimal management of associated bleeding. This review aims to describe the indications and pharmacokinetics of available DOACs; to discuss the risk of bleeding; to provide a treatment algorithm to manage DOAC-associated emergency bleeding; and to discuss future directions in bleeding management, including the role of specific reversal agents, such as the recently approved idarucizumab for reversal of the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran. Because air medical personnel are increasingly likely to encounter patients receiving DOACs, it is important that they have an understanding of how to manage patients with emergent bleeding. PMID:27255877

  16. Patients' attitude and knowledge about oral anticoagulation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amara, Walid; Larsen, Torben B; Sciaraffia, Elena; Hernández Madrid, Antonio; Chen, Jian; Estner, Heidi; Todd, Derick; Bongiorni, Maria G; Potpara, Tatjana S; Dagres, Nikolaos; Sagnol, Pascal; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association survey was to assess the attitude, level of education, and knowledge concerning oral anticoagulants (OACs) among patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) taking vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs) or antiplatelets. A...... total of 1147 patients with AF [mean age 66 ± 13 years, 529 (45%) women] from 8 selected European countries responded to this survey. The overall use of OACs and antiplatelets was 77 and 15.3%, respectively. Of the patients taking OACs, 67% were on VKAs, 33% on NOACs, and 17.9% on a combination of OACs...... and antiplatelets. Among patients on VKAs, 91% correctly stated the target international normalized ratio (INR) level. The proportion of patients on VKA medication who were aware that monthly INR monitoring was required for this treatment and the proportion of patients on NOAC who knew that renal...

  17. Predictors of recurrent venous thromboembolism and bleeding on anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menapace, Laurel A; McCrae, Keith R; Khorana, Alok A

    2016-04-01

    The impact of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in the cancer population remains substantial despite significant advances in detecting and treating thrombotic events. While there is extensive literature regarding predictors of first VTE event in cancer patients as well as a validated predictive score, less data exist regarding recurrent VTE in cancer cohorts and associated predictive variables. A similar paucity of data in regard to bleeding events in cancer patients receiving anticoagulation has been observed. This review article will highlight clinical risk factors as well as predictive biomarkers associated with recurrent VTE and bleeding in cancer patients receiving therapeutic anticoagulation. Predictive risk assessment models for cancer-associated recurrent VTE and bleeding are also discussed. PMID:27067987

  18. Self-management of oral anticoagulant therapy in two centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Hanna; Grove, E; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard;

    endpoints: all-cause mortality, major thromboembolism and bleeding events, percentage of time within therapeutic International Normalized Ratio (INR) target range (TTR) and variance of the INR value. Patient data was obtained from two databases in the two centers, where all data had been prospectively......Self-management of oral anticoagulant therapy in two centers: 11.000 patient-years of follow-up H Nilsson1,2,3, EL Grove2, TB Larsen3, M Maegaard1, TD Christensen1 1Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery & Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus; 2Department of...... registered. Results: Results are pending but baseline characteristics (age, gender, indication for anticoagulant therapy) and data on all-cause mortality, major thromboembolism and bleeding events, TTR, INR-variance will be presented at the meeting. Conclusions: We hope to find a good quality of treatment...

  19. Difficulties in anticoagulation management during coadministration of warfarin and rifampin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C R; Thrasher, K A

    2001-10-01

    The clinical significance of rifampin's induction of warfarin metabolism is well documented, but no published studies or case reports have quantified this interaction with respect to the international normalized ratio (INR). A patient receiving concomitant rifampin and warfarin to treat a mycobacterial infection and intraventricular thrombus, respectively, underwent routine INR testing at a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic to assess his anticoagulation regimen. A 233% increase in warfarin dosage over 4 months proved insufficient to attain a therapeutic INR during long-term rifampin therapy More aggressive titration of the warfarin dosage was needed. In addition, a gradual 70% reduction in warfarin dosage over 4-5 weeks was necessary to maintain a therapeutic INR after rifampin discontinuation, demonstrating the clinically significant offset of this drug interaction. Extensive changes in warfarin dosage are required to attain and maintain a therapeutic INR during the initiation, maintenance, and discontinuation of rifampin. PMID:11601670

  20. Evaluation of a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, I A; Hutchison, T A; Kirking, D M; Shue, M E

    1985-06-01

    Medical records were retrospectively analyzed to evaluate the success of a pharmacist-managed Anticoagulation Surveillance Clinic (ASC). The 78 patients in group I were followed by the ASC. The 17 patients in Group II were followed by other Veterans Administration Medical Center clinics. Demographic characteristics, warfarin indication and potentially complicating conditions were comparable between the groups. Group I patients had shorter intervals between visits to the clinic than Group II patients. Although not statistically different compared to Group II, Group I patients had better prothrombin time control. Group I patients also had fewer complications per treatment year (6.9% vs 9.0%) and received fewer potentially interacting drugs. The ASC was at least as successful as the other clinics in managing patients on warfarin, and results compared very favorably to those reported in the literature for other anticoagulation clinics. PMID:4019790

  1. AParadigm Shift: The New Novel Oral Anticoagulation Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Wajeeha; Burke, James F; Mirrani, Ghazi; Sirinivasa, Minisha; Nabi, Usman; Hayat, Umar; Khan, Zubair; Sardar, Muhammad Rizwan

    2016-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia and represents one-third of the arrhythmia-related hospital admissions in the developed countries. Embolic strokes associated with AF are more severe and disabling. Thromboembolic stroke prevention is a major goal in treatment of AF and Warfarin has successfully served this purpose for many years. Drug-drug interaction and regular monitoring with Warfarin pose a significant challenge where health care system has limited resources; and lack of a well-structured health system, hinders regular International Normalized Ratio (INR) monitoring. Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have opened up a new exciting chapter in the field of anticoagulation in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). This review discussed the landmark trials that led to the development of NOACs and explored the potentials of these new agents with simultaneous comparison of Warfarin. PMID:27504556

  2. New oral anticoagulants – the newest update in dental surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Kovacevska, Ivona; Angelovska, Bistra

    2013-01-01

    Aim of this study is to review the evidence of different therapy approach, to highlight the areas of major concern, and to suggest specific oral surgery treatment for patients on new oral anticoagulants. A Medline and an extensive hand search were performed on English-language publications beginning in 1971 till now. The pertinent literature and clinical protocols of hospital dentistry departments have been extensively reviewed, presented and discussed. Several evolving clinical practic...

  3. Direct oral anticoagulants: a guide for daily practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Pierre; Robert-Ebadi, Helia; Bounameaux, Henri; Boehlen, Françoise; Righini, Marc

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, small oral compounds that specifically block activated coagulation factor X (FXa) or thrombin (FIIa) have become alternatives to the anticoagulants that had been used for several decades. As of today, these direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) include dabigatran etexilate (thrombin inhibitor) and apixaban, edoxaban and rivaroxaban (inhibitors of FXa). While there is no doubt that DOACs represent a major step forward in the management of patients with venous thromboembolic disease and atrial fibrillation, new challenges have arisen. They need to be addressed with the necessary pragmatism on the basis of evidence. Indeed, a better understanding of the management of these last-generation antithrombotics will favour safer use and increase confidence of the practitioner for the prescription of these drugs. The aim of this article is to present practical suggestions for the prescription and use of these drugs in everyday clinical practice, based on clinical experience and recently updated recommendations of the European Heart Rhythm Association and the American College of Chest Physicians among other scientific organisations. We address issues such as pharmacokinetics, dosing, side effects, limitations of use, drug interactions, switching from and to other anticoagulants, renal function, concomitant administration of antiplatelet agents and perioperative use. We also address the issue of monitoring and reversal, taking advantage of the most recent development in this latter area. Rather than being one additional set of recommendations, our narrative review aims at assisting the practicing physician in his or her daily handling of these novel anticoagulant compounds, based on frequently asked questions to the authors, a group of experienced specialists in the field who have, however, no commitment to issue guidelines. PMID:26964028

  4. Colorimetric measurement of iron in plasma samples anticoagulated with EDTA.

    OpenAIRE

    Walmsley, T. A.; George, P M; Fowler, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To determine if the iron in EDTA anticoagulated plasma samples can be measured by colorimetric assays using Ferrozine. METHODS: Paired samples of serum and EDTA plasma were obtained from 24 patients and analysed by three commercial iron methods. The EDTA plasmas were also analysed using methods modified by the addition of zinc sulphate or with different concentrations of Ferrozine. The iron contamination of EDTA sample tubes was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. RESULTS: Two c...

  5. Anticoagulation in chronic kidney disease patients—the practical aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Stephen; Szeki, Iren; Nash, Michael J; Thachil, Jecko

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness about the risks of arterial and venous thromboembolism (TE) in hospital patients and general public which has led to consideration of thrombosis prevention measures in earnest. Early recognition of the symptoms of TE disease has led to timely administration of antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs, translating to better outcome in many of these patients. In this respect, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) represent a special group. They indeed represent...

  6. New oral anticoagulants in the prevention of stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Konrad Jarząbek; Dawid Bąkowski; Beata Wożakowska-Kapłon

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is associated with a few folds higher risk of stroke. Traditional vitamin K antagonists used in the prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation are often not efficient enough due to their interactions with a broad range of substances including medicines or food ingridients and problems with monitoring the treatment. New oral anticoagulants pose an alternative for the vitamin K antagonists. They are equally efficient in the prevention of stroke, ...

  7. Coagulation assessment with the new generation of oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Charles V

    2016-06-01

    Long-term oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapy is used for the treatment and prevention of thrombosis and thromboembolism. As OAC use is so widespread, emergency physicians are likely to encounter patients on anticoagulant therapy in the emergency department (ED) on a regular basis, either for the same reasons as the population in general or as a result of the increased bleeding risk that OAC use entails.The vitamin K antagonist warfarin has been the standard OAC for several decades, but recently, the newer agents dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban and apixaban (collectively, novel OACs, non-vitamin K OACs, or simply 'NOACs') have become available for long-term use. Protocols for assessing and managing warfarin-treated patients in the ED are well established and include international normalised ratio (INR) testing, which helps guide patient management. However, the INR does not give an accurate evaluation of coagulation status with NOACs, and alternative tests are therefore needed for use in emergency settings. This paper discusses what information the INR provides for a patient taking warfarin and which coagulation tests can guide the physician when treating patients on one of the NOACs, as well as other differences in emergency anticoagulation management. PMID:25987596

  8. Improvements of anticoagulant activities of silk fibroin films with fucoidan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Fucoidan (FC),an effective anticoagulant constituent extracted from brown algae,was introduced into silk fibroin (SF) for improving its blood compatibility.The SF and SF/FC blend films were characterized by attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR),X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS),scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and dynamic contact angle determinator (CA).The in vitro anticoagulant activities of the films were evaluated by activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT),thrombin time (TT) and prothrombin time (PT) measurements.The endothelial cell attachment and proliferation viability on the film were assessed by micropipette aspiration technique and MTT assay,respectively.The testing results indicated that the introduction of FC increased the roughness,hydrophilicity and sulfate component of the film surface without impeding the formation of β-sheet conformation in SF.More important,FC brought excellent anticoagulant activity and better endothelial cell affinity to SF.The SF/FC blend film was hopeful to be used as blood-contacting biomaterials.

  9. [Influence of anticoagulants on the appearance of chronic subdural hematoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupa, Mariusz; Moskała, Marek; Składzień, Tomasz; Grzywna, Ewelina

    2009-01-01

    In recent years in the Department of Neurotraumatology in Cracow it has been noticed the frequent connection between appearance of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) and treatment by anticoagulant medications. The aim of this study is to draw attention to the problem of insufficient control of anticoagulants consumption, especially by patients treated for cardiovascular system diseases that increases the risk of bleeding and CSDH development. The paper is based on data from questionnaires that was sent to patients with CSDH, cured in the Department of Neurotraumatology form 2004 to 2005. Analyzed was the group of 51 patients with chronic subdural hematoma; 37 individuals (72.5%) confirmed taking acetylsalicylic acid in the period of 3 months before admission to the Department, 9 (17.6%) patients answered that they were taking low-molecular weight heparin. One patient (1.9%) was taking chronically derivative of cumarin. The authors would inform that anticoagulant treatment might favour increase of chronic subdural hematoma incidence. It's especially important, because the average life expectancy has been prolonged in Poland and there are more people taking acetylsalicylic acid. This can be an epidemiological problem in future. PMID:20043584

  10. New anticoagulants in the treatment of stroke:future promise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emre Kumral; Tuba Cerraho(g)lu (S)irin

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence is leading to the replacement of vitamin K antagonists,the efficacy of which in preventing stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) is well established,with better tolerated and more manageable new anticoagulant drugs,with a lower risk of intracranial bleeding,no clear interactions with food,fewer interactions with medications,and no need for frequent laboratory monitoring and dose adjustments.Among new anticoagulants,dabigatran etexilate is a direct,competitive inhibitor of thrombin.It was evaluated for patients with AF in the RE-LY trial,showing lower rates of stroke and systemic embolism at a dose of 150 mg twice daily with similar rates of major hemorrhage compared with warfarin; and non-inferiority compared with warfarin for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism at a dose of 110 mg twice daily,with lower rates of major bleeding.Beside dabigatran,oral factor X a inhibitors are also emerging for the prevention of thromboembolic events in AF.Despite the obvious advantages of these new oral anticoagulants over vitamin K antagonists,further information is still needed on how to prioritize the patients deriving the greatest benefit from these novel agents on the basis of patient characteristics or drug pharmacokinetics.There is also a need for assessing their long-term efficacy and safety over decades in the real-world setting.

  11. Electroconvulsive therapy and anticoagulation after pulmonary embolism: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar Lazaro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is considered the most effective treatment for catatonia regardless its underlying condition. The rigid fixed posture and immobility observed in catatonia may lead to several clinical complications, of which, pulmonary embolism (PE is one of the most severe. The rapid improvement of the psychiatric condition in catatonia-related PE is essential, since immobility favors the occurrence of new thromboembolic events and further complications. In that scenario, ECT should be considered, based on a risk-benefit analysis, aiming at the faster resolution of the catatonia. Methods Case report and literature review. Results A 66-years-old woman admitted to the psychiatric ward with catatonia due to a depressive episode presented bilateral PE. Clinically stable, but still severely depressed after a trial of antidepressants, she was treated with ECT in the course of full anticoagulation with enoxaparin. After five ECT sessions, her mood was significantly better and she was walking and eating spontaneously. She did not present complications related either to PE or to anticoagulation. After the eighth ECT session, she evolved with hypomania, which was managed with oral medication adjustments. The patient was completely euthymic at discharge. Conclusion The case we presented provides further evidence to the anecdotal case reports on the safety of ECT in the course of concomitant full anticoagulant therapy after PE, and illustrates how, with the proper precautions, the benefits of ECT in such condition might outweigh its risks.

  12. Ambulatory surgery with chloroprocaine spinal anesthesia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghisi D

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Daniela Ghisi, Stefano Bonarelli Department of Anaesthesia and Postoperative Intensive Care, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy Abstract: Spinal anesthesia is a reliable and safe technique for procedures of the lower extremities. Nevertheless, some of its characteristics may limit its use for ambulatory surgery, including delayed ambulation, risk of urinary retention, and pain after block regression. The current availability of short-acting local anesthetics has renewed interest for this technique also in the context of short- and ultra-short procedures. Chloroprocaine (CP is an amino-ester local anesthetic with a very short half-life. It was introduced and has been successfully used for spinal anesthesia since 1952. Sodium bisulfite was then added as a preservative after 1956. The drug was then abandoned in the 1980s for several reports of neurological deficits in patients receiving accidentally high doses of intrathecal CP during epidural labor analgesia. Animal studies have proven the safety of the preservative-free formulation, which has been extensively evaluated in volunteer studies as well as in clinical practice with a favorable profile in terms of both safety and efficacy. In comparison with bupivacaine, 2-chloroprocaine (2-CP showed faster offset times to end of anesthesia, unassisted ambulation, and discharge from hospital. These findings suggests that 2-CP may be a suitable alternative to low doses of long-acting local anesthetics in ambulatory surgery. Its safety profile also suggests that 2-CP could be a valid substitute for intrathecal short- and intermediate-acting local anesthetics, such as lidocaine and mepivacaine – often causes of transient neurological symptoms. In this context, literature suggests a dose ranging between 30 and 60 mg of 2-CP for procedures lasting 60 minutes or less, while 10 mg is considered the no-effect dose. The present review describes recent evidence about 2-CP as an anesthetic agent for

  13. Improving outpatient access and patient experiences in academic ambulatory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Sarah; Calderon, Sherry; Casella, Joanne; Wood, Elizabeth; Carvelli-Sheehan, Jayne; Zeidel, Mark L

    2012-02-01

    Effective scheduling of and ready access to doctor appointments affect ambulatory patient care quality, but these are often sacrificed by patients seeking care from physicians at academic medical centers. At one center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, the authors developed interventions to improve the scheduling of appointments and to reduce the access time between telephone call and first offered appointment. Improvements to scheduling included no redirection to voicemail, prompt telephone pickup, courteous service, complete registration, and effective scheduling. Reduced access time meant being offered an appointment with a physician in the appropriate specialty within three working days of the telephone call. Scheduling and access were assessed using monthly "mystery shopper" calls. Mystery shoppers collected data using standardized forms, rated the quality of service, and transcribed their interactions with schedulers. Monthly results were tabulated and discussed with clinical leaders; leaders and frontline staff then developed solutions to detected problems. Eighteen months after the beginning of the intervention (in June 2007), which is ongoing, schedulers had gone from using 60% of their registration skills to over 90%, customer service scores had risen from 2.6 to 4.9 (on a 5-point scale), and average access time had fallen from 12 days to 6 days. The program costs $50,000 per year and has been associated with a 35% increase in ambulatory volume across three years. The authors conclude that academic medical centers can markedly improve the scheduling process and access to care and that these improvements may result in increased ambulatory care volume. PMID:22193182

  14. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: established oral anticoagulants versus novel anticoagulants-translating clinical trial data into practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezekowitz, Michael D; Spahr, Judy; Ghosh, Pradeepto; Corelli, Kathryn

    2014-09-01

    Anticoagulation for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) is effective. Pivotal trials RE-LY, ROCKET AF, ARISTOTLE, and ENGAGE-AF TIMI 48 tested novel agents against warfarin (W). In RE-LY, an open-label trial, dabigatran 150 mg BID (D150) was superior (35%) and 110 mg BID (D110) was noninferior to W. D150 reduced ischemic strokes by 25% and intracerebral bleeds by 74%, but increased major GI bleeds by 0.5 % per year. In ROCKET AF, a double-blind study, rivaroxaban 20 mg daily, downtitrated to 15 mg daily (if CrCl was 80; weight, 1.5 mg) was superior for safety (31%), efficacy (21%), and all-cause mortality (11%). In ENGAGE-AF TIMI 48, edoxaban 60 mg once daily (30 mg once daily if CrCl 30-50 ml/min, weight <60 kg, or concomitant verapamil or quinidine) was noninferior to W for efficacy, but reduced major bleeding (20%). To translate clinical trials to practice, understanding the disease and each anticoagulant is essential. For all novel agents, rapid anticoagulation, absence of monitoring, and a short half-life differentiate them from W. Bleed rates were either noninferior or lower than for W, without an antidote. Patient compliance is critical. Knowledge of renal function is essential and maintaining patients on therapy is key. PMID:24880227

  15. Patient costs in anticoagulation management: a comparison of primary and secondary care.

    OpenAIRE

    Parry, D; Bryan, S; Gee, K; Murray, E.; Fitzmaurice, D

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The demand for anticoagulation management is increasing. This has led to care being provided in non-hospital settings. While clinical studies have similarly demonstrated good clinical care in these settings, it is still unclear as to which alternative is the most efficient. AIM: To determine the costs borne by patients when attending an anticoagulation management clinic in either primary or secondary care and to use this information to consider the cost-effectiveness of anticoagul...

  16. Citrate pharmacokinetics and calcium levels during high-flux dialysis with regional citrate anticoagulation

    OpenAIRE

    Kozik-Jaromin, Justyna; Nier, Volker; Heemann, Uwe; Kreymann, Bernhard; Böhler, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Background. Regional citrate anticoagulation is a very effective anticoagulation method for haemodialysis. However, it is not widely used, primarily due to the risk of hypocalcaemia. We studied citrate and calcium kinetics to better understand safety aspects of this anticoagulation method. Methods. During 15 haemodialysis treatments with a calcium-free dialysis solution, citrate was infused pre-dialyser and calcium was substituted post-dialyser. Systemic and extracorporeal citrate and calcium...

  17. Flexible Capacitive Electrodes for Minimizing Motion Artifacts in Ambulatory Electrocardiograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Su Lee

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes the use of flexible capacitive electrodes for reducing motion artifacts in a wearable electrocardiogram (ECG device. The capacitive electrodes have conductive foam on their surface, a shield, an optimal input bias resistor, and guarding feedback. The electrodes are integrated in a chest belt, and the acquired signals are transmitted wirelessly for ambulatory heart rate monitoring. We experimentally validated the electrode performance with subjects standing and walking on a treadmill at speeds of up to 7 km/h. The results confirmed the highly accurate heart rate detection capacity of the developed system and its feasibility for daily-life ECG monitoring.

  18. Is aerobic workload positively related to ambulatory blood pressure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korshøj, Mette; Clays, Els; Lidegaard, Mark;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Cardiovascular disease is prevalent among workers with high levels of occupational physical activity. The increased risk may be due to a high relative aerobic workload, possibly leading to increased blood pressure. However, studies investigating the relation between relative aerobic...... workload and ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) are lacking. The aim was to explore the relationship between objectively measured relative aerobic workload and ABP. METHODS: A total of 116 cleaners aged 18-65 years were included after informed consent was obtained. A portable device (Spacelabs 90217) was...

  19. Scheduling of procedures and staff in an ambulatory surgery center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pash, Joel; Kadry, Bassam; Bugrara, Suhabe; Macario, Alex

    2014-06-01

    For ambulatory surgical centers (ASC) to succeed financially, it is critical for ASC managers to schedule surgical procedures in a manner that optimizes operating room (OR) efficiency. OR efficiency is maximized by using historical data to accurately predict future OR workload, thereby enabling OR time to be properly allocated to surgeons. Other strategies to maintain a well-functioning ASC include recruiting and retaining the right staff and ensuring patients and surgeons are satisfied with their experience. This article reviews different types of procedure scheduling systems. Characteristics of well-functioning ASCs are also discussed. PMID:24882135

  20. The long-term effect of ambulatory oxygen in normoxaemic COPD patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringbaek, Thomas; Martinez, Gerd; Lange, Peter

    2013-01-01

    To study the long-term benefits of ambulatory oxygen (AO) in combination with pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients experiencing exertional desaturation.......To study the long-term benefits of ambulatory oxygen (AO) in combination with pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients experiencing exertional desaturation....

  1. 42 CFR 419.31 - Ambulatory payment classification (APC) system and payment weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ambulatory payment classification (APC) system and... Outpatient Services § 419.31 Ambulatory payment classification (APC) system and payment weights. (a) APC... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM FOR...

  2. MODERN APPROACHES TO ANTICOAGULANT THERAPY DURING CATHETER ABLATION TREATMENT OF NON-VALVULAR ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. Belikov; K. V. Davtyan; O. N. Tkacheva

    2015-01-01

    Prevention of thromboembolic complications in patients with atrial fibrillation during catheter pulmonary veins isolation is discussed. This subject review is presented with special consideration to new anticoagulants.

  3. Anticoagulation to prevent stroke in atrial fibrillation and its implications for managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, D E

    1998-03-12

    Nonrheumatic atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most potent common risk factor for stroke, raising the risk of stroke 5-fold. Six randomized trials of anticoagulation in AFib consistently demonstrated a reduction in the risk of stroke by about two-thirds. In these trials, anticoagulation in AFib was quite safe. In contrast, randomized trials indicate that aspirin confers only a small reduction in risk of stroke, at best. Pooled data from the first set of randomized trials indicate that prior stroke, hypertension, diabetes, and increasing age are independent risk factors for future stroke with AFib. Individuals AFib increases greatly at INR levels AFib depend on maintaining the INR between 2.0-3.0. Cost-effectiveness studies indicate that anticoagulation for AFib is among the most efficient preventive interventions in adults. Importantly, the benefits of anticoagulation in AFib accrue immediately. The implications for managed care organizations are that anticoagulation for AFib should be encouraged in their covered populations, and that dedicated anticoagulation services should be developed to promote system-wide control of anticoagulation intensity. Quality measures would include the proportion of patients with AFib who are anticoagulated, and the percentage of time patients' INR levels are between 2.0-3.0. Managed care organizations can benefit from recent research on anticoagulation for AFib; they have a responsibility to support future research and development efforts. PMID:9525571

  4. Pharmacist-patient relationship development in an ambulatory clinic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermansen, C J; Wiederholt, J B

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the pharmacist-patient relationship, conceptualizing its interpersonal constructs and dynamics using social exchange principles. The constructs of felt indebtedness (FI), collaborative willingness (CW), interpersonal relationship quality (IRQ), medication use beliefs (MUBs), and critical interpersonal incidents (CII) between pharmacist and patient were proposed, measured, and modeled. Patient responses were collected using interviews and mail surveys in 2 pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinics. Higher IRQ levels predicted greater FI toward and CW with pharmacists (p pharmacists, and not their therapy, may lead to increased interpersonal exchange and patient collaboration in care. PMID:11550853

  5. Comparison of two methods for INR determination in a pharmacist-based oral anticoagulation clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamreudeewong, W; Johnson, J V; Cassidy, T G; Berg, J T

    1996-01-01

    Warfarin is a commonly used oral anticoagulant that is usually initiated after the definitive diagnosis of a certain thromboembolic disorder or disease. Warfarin therapy will usually be prescribed for 6-12 weeks or more, and some patients may continue therapy throughout life, depending on the type of thromboembolic disorder. Major problems associated with warfarin therapy include adverse effects such as bleeding complications and drug-drug or drug-food interactions. In addition, thromboembolic complications may occur due to subtherapeutic dosages of warfarin. The laboratory reference standards for monitoring warfarin therapy are the prothrombin time (PT) and the International Normalized Ratio (INR). While both the PT or INR will reflect the clinical response in the patient, results reported as INR values have been shown to be more accurate than those reported as PT values. Thirty-two patients were enrolled in this study. Our objectives were to compare INR values measured by both the Coumatrak and conventional laboratory method, and to demonstrate the effects of pharmacist intervention on managing patients receiving warfarin therapy. Results from our study reveal that INR monitoring by Coumatrak is similar to the conventional laboratory method. In addition, our study indicates that patients receiving warfarin therapy can be monitored and managed effectively by pharmacists. PMID:8947990

  6. Ambulatory oxygen: why do COPD patients not use their portable systems as prescribed? A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenwick Angela

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with COPD on long term oxygen therapy frequently do not adhere to their prescription, and they frequently do not use their ambulatory oxygen systems as intended. Reasons for this lack of adherence are not known. The aim of this study was to obtain in-depth information about perceptions and use of prescribed ambulatory oxygen systems from patients with COPD to inform ambulatory oxygen design, prescription and management. Methods A qualitative design was used, involving semi-structured face-to-face interviews informed by a grounded theory approach. Twenty-seven UK community-dwelling COPD patients using NHS prescribed ambulatory systems were recruited. Ambulatory oxygen systems comprised cylinders weighing 3.4 kg, a shoulder bag and nasal cannulae. Results Participants reported that they: received no instruction on how to use ambulatory oxygen; were uncertain of the benefits; were afraid the system would run out while they were using it (due to lack of confidence in the cylinder gauge; were embarrassed at being seen with the system in public; and were unable to carry the system because of the cylinder weight. The essential role of carers was also highlighted, as participants with no immediate carers did not use ambulatory oxygen outside the house. Conclusions These participants highlighted previously unreported problems that prevented them from using ambulatory oxygen as prescribed. Our novel findings point to: concerns with the lack of specific information provision; the perceived unreliability of the oxygen system; important carer issues surrounding managing and using ambulatory oxygen equipment. All of these issues, as well as previously reported problems with system weight and patient embarrassment, should be addressed to improve adherence to ambulatory oxygen prescription and enhance the physical and social benefits of maintaining mobility in this patient group. Increased user involvement in both system development

  7. Psychophysiological ambulatory assessment of affective dysregulation in borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebner-Priemer, Ulrich W; Welch, Stacy S; Grossman, Paul; Reisch, Thomas; Linehan, Marsha M; Bohus, Martin

    2007-04-15

    Many experts now believe that pervasive problems in affect regulation constitute the central area of dysfunction in borderline personality disorder (BPD). However, data is sparse and inconclusive. We hypothesized that patients with BPD, in contrast to healthy gender and nationality-matched controls, show a higher frequency and intensity of self-reported emotions, altered physiological indices of emotions, more complex emotions and greater problems in identifying specific emotions. We took a 24-hour psychophysiological ambulatory monitoring approach to investigate affect regulation during everyday life in 50 patients with BPD and in 50 healthy controls. To provide a typical and unmanipulated sample, we included only patients who were currently in treatment and did not alter their medication schedule. BPD patients reported more negative emotions, fewer positive emotions, and a greater intensity of negative emotions. A subgroup of non-medicated BPD patients manifested higher values of additional heart rate. Additional heart rate is that part of a heart rate increase that does not directly result from metabolic activity, and is used as an indicator of emotional reactivity. Borderline participants were more likely to report the concurrent presence of more than one emotion, and those patients who just started treatment in particular had greater problems in identifying specific emotions. Our findings during naturalistic ambulatory assessment support emotional dysregulation in BPD as defined by the biosocial theory of [Linehan, M.M., 1993. Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder. The Guildford Press, New York.] and suggest the potential utility for evaluating treatment outcome. PMID:17321599

  8. The treatment of ambulatory venous ulcer patients with warming therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, G W; Wilson, J

    1999-09-01

    The standard treatment for ambulatory patients with venous ulcers is compression therapy. The aim of the present study was to develop a warming regimen to treat venous ulcers, which could be easily used by patients in their home or work environment. Five patients with a mean age of 66 years (51-80) who had venous ulcers for an average of 8 months (3-13) were treated with zip-up compression stockings (gradient compression 40 mmHg at the ankle) and a warming dressing. The latter was controlled by the patient to warm the ulcer to 38 degrees C for 1 hour three times daily. Warming therapy was carried out for 2 weeks and patients' ulcers were monitored for healing for 12 weeks. In all but one of the patients following warming therapy, there was marked increase in granulation tissue as well as a decrease in pain. Four of the five patients completely healed during the 12-week period. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated that warming therapy can be used by ambulatory patients with venous ulcers in conjunction with compression therapy. A randomized prospective study is in progress. PMID:10655876

  9. Clinical Indications and Adverse Reactions of Platelet Apheresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the clinical indications and adverse reactions of platelet apheresis procedure. Study Design: Cross-sectional, observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Blood Bank of Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission General Hospital, Islamabad, from January 2010 to December 2014. Methodology: Indications and adverse reaction verified for 200 consecutive platelet apheresis donations performed for 125 patients was included in this study. Data was analysed for descriptive variables using SPSS version 16. Results: Donor deferral rate in the study was 63.83 percentage. All the donors were males (100 percentage) and replacement donors. Most prevalent blood type was B-positive (n=63, 31.5 percentage), followed by O-positive (n=59, 29.5 percentage). Rh negative groups constituted 13.5 percentage (n=27) of all the donors. Average age of platelet apheresis donors was 28.56 ± 5.77 years. Maximum numbers of donors were in age range 20 - 30 years. Average weight of the donors was 73.96 ± 11.96 kg. Mean pre-procedure platelet count of donors was 268,000/ micro L. The postprocedure average platelet count was approximately 200,000/ micro L. The mean duration of a platelet apheresis session was 78.27 ± 26.07 minutes. Average volume of the final product was 412.53 ± 45.33 ml. Average volume of anti-coagulant acid citrate dextrose used per procedure was 300 ± 40 ml, 245 ml returned to donor along with returned blood while 55 ml used as anticoagulant in final concentrate. Of total 200, two (1 percentage) final products were contaminated with red cells. Three (1.5 percentage) products were not issued and finally expired. Of the 125 patients for which plateletpheresis procedures were performed, 54 (43.2 percentage) patients were males and 71 (56.8 percentage) were females (M: F=0.76:1). Six donors (3 percentage) had adverse events: three donors (1.5 percentage) had mild reactions, two (1 percentage) moderate reaction, and one donor (0.5 percentage) developing

  10. Conservatively managed pineal apoplexy in an anticoagulated patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werder, Gabriel M. [William Beaumont Hospital, Department of Radiology, 3600 West Thirteen Mile Road, Royal Oak, MI 48073 (United States); St Christopher Iba Mar Diop College of Medicine, Luton (United Kingdom)], E-mail: gabriel_werder@yahoo.com; Razdan, Rahul S.; Gagliardi, Joseph A.; Chaddha, Shashi K.B. [St Vincent' s Medical Center, Bridgeport, CT (United States)

    2008-02-15

    We present a case of pineal apoplexy in an anticoagulated and hypertensive 56-year-old Hispanic male. At presentation, the patient's international normalized ratio (INR) was 10.51 and his blood pressure was 200/130 mmHg. His presenting symptoms included acute onset of headache, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, vertigo, and visual disturbance. Neuroimaging demonstrated hemorrhage into a morphologically normal pineal gland. Under conservative management, the patient experienced gradual resolution of all symptoms excluding the disturbance of upward gaze.

  11. Inflammation is strongly associated with lupus anticoagulant positivity, indepentent of know autoimmune disease and recent venous or arterial thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Just, Søren Andreas; Nybo, Mads; Laustrup, Helle;

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is strongly associated with lupus anticoagulant positivity, indepentent of know autoimmune disease and recent venous or arterial thrombosis......Inflammation is strongly associated with lupus anticoagulant positivity, indepentent of know autoimmune disease and recent venous or arterial thrombosis...

  12. Relationship between diet and anticoagulant response to warfarin – A factor analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet composition is one of the factors that may contribute to intraindividual variability in the anticoagulant response to warfarin. The aim of this study was to determine the associations between food pattern and anticoagulant response to warfarin in a group of Brazilian patients with vascular dis...

  13. Acute and chronic effects of aerobic and resistance exercise on ambulatory blood pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crivaldo Gomes Cardoso Jr

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a ubiquitous and serious disease. Regular exercise has been recommended as a strategy for the prevention and treatment of hypertension because of its effects in reducing clinical blood pressure; however, ambulatory blood pressure is a better predictor of target-organ damage than clinical blood pressure, and therefore studying the effects of exercise on ambulatory blood pressure is important as well. Moreover, different kinds of exercise might produce distinct effects that might differ between normotensive and hypertensive subjects. The aim of this study was to review the current literature on the acute and chronic effects of aerobic and resistance exercise on ambulatory blood pressure in normotensive and hypertensive subjects. It has been conclusively shown that a single episode of aerobic exercise reduces ambulatory blood pressure in hypertensive patients. Similarly, regular aerobic training also decreases ambulatory blood pressure in hypertensive individuals. In contrast, data on the effects of resistance exercise is both scarce and controversial. Nevertheless, studies suggest that resistance exercise might acutely decrease ambulatory blood pressure after exercise, and that this effect seems to be greater after low-intensity exercise and in patients receiving anti-hypertensive drugs. On the other hand, only two studies investigating resistance training in hypertensive patients have been conducted, and neither has demonstrated any hypotensive effect. Thus, based on current knowledge, aerobic training should be recommended to decrease ambulatory blood pressure in hypertensive individuals, while resistance exercise could be prescribed as a complementary strategy.

  14. Challenges of pain control and the role of the ambulatory pain specialist in the outpatient surgery setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Kai, Alice M; Kodumudi, Vijay; Berger, Jack M

    2016-01-01

    Ambulatory surgery is on the rise, with an unmet need for optimum pain control in ambulatory surgery centers worldwide. It is important that there is a proportionate increase in the availability of acute pain-management services to match the rapid rise of clinical patient load with pain issues in the ambulatory surgery setting. Focus on ambulatory pain control with its special challenges is vital to achieve optimum pain control and prevent morbidity and mortality. Management of perioperative pain in the ambulatory surgery setting is becoming increasingly complex, and requires the employment of a multimodal approach and interventions facilitated by ambulatory surgery pain specialists, which is a new concept. A focused ambulatory pain specialist on site at each ambulatory surgery center, in addition to providing safe anesthesia, could intervene early once problematic pain issues are recognized, thus preventing emergency room visits, as well as readmissions for uncontrolled pain. This paper reviews methods of acute-pain management in the ambulatory setting with risk stratification, the utilization of multimodal interventions, including pharmacological and nonpharmacological options, opioids, nonopioids, and various routes with the goal of preventing delayed discharge and unexpected hospital admissions after ambulatory surgery. Continued research and investigation in the area of pain management with outcome studies in acute surgically inflicted pain in patients with underlying chronic pain treated with opioids and the pattern and predictive factors for pain in the ambulatory surgical setting is needed. PMID:27382329

  15. Optimising postoperative pain management in the ambulatory patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Allan B; Gan, Tong J

    2003-01-01

    Over 60% of surgery is now performed in an ambulatory setting. Despite improved analgesics and sophisticated drug delivery systems, surveys indicate that over 80% of patients experience moderate to severe pain postoperatively. Inadequate postoperative pain relief can prolong recovery, precipitate or increase the duration of hospital stay, increase healthcare costs, and reduce patient satisfaction. Effective postoperative pain management involves a multimodal approach and the use of various drugs with different mechanisms of action. Local anaesthetics are widely administered in the ambulatory setting using techniques such as local injection, field block, regional nerve block or neuraxial block. Continuous wound infusion pumps may have great potential in an ambulatory setting. Regional anaesthesia (involving anaesthetising regional areas of the body, including single extremities, multiple extremities, the torso, and the face or jaw) allows surgery to be performed in a specific location, usually an extremity, without the use of general anaesthesia, and potentially with little or no sedation. Opioids remain an important component of any analgesic regimen in treating moderate to severe acute postoperative pain. However, the incorporation of non-opioids, local anaesthetics and regional techniques will enhance current postoperative analgesic regimens. The development of new modalities of treatment, such as patient controlled analgesia, and newer drugs, such as cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors, provide additional choices for the practitioner. While there are different routes of administration for analgesics (e.g. oral, parenteral, intramuscular, transmucosal, transdermal and sublingual), oral delivery of medications has remained the mainstay for postoperative pain control. The oral route is effective, the simplest to use and typically the least expensive. The intravenous route has the advantages of a rapid onset of action and easier titratibility, and so is recommended for the

  16. Tolerability of the Oscar 2 ambulatory blood pressure monitor among research participants: a cross-sectional repeated measures study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinderliter Alan L

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM is increasingly used to measure blood pressure (BP in research studies. We examined ease of use, comfort, degree of disturbance, reported adverse effects, factors associated with poor tolerability, and association of poor tolerability with data acquisition of 24-hour ABPM using the Oscar 2 monitor in the research setting. Methods Sixty adults participating in a research study of people with a history of borderline clinic BP reported on their experience with ABPM on two occasions one week apart. Poor tolerability was operationalized as an overall score at or above the 75th percentile using responses to questions adapted from a previously developed questionnaire. In addition to descriptive statistics (means for responses to Likert-scaled "0 to 10" questions and proportions for Yes/No questions, we examined reproducibility of poor tolerability as well as associations with poor tolerability and whether poor tolerability was associated with removal of the monitor or inadequate number of BP measurements. Results The mean ambulatory BP of participants by an initial ABPM session was 148/87 mm Hg. After wearing the monitor the first time, the degree to which the monitor was felt to be cumbersome ranged from a mean of 3.0 to 3.8, depending on whether at work, home, driving, or other times. The most bother was interference with normal sleeping pattern (mean 4.2. Wearers found the monitor straightforward to use (mean 7.5. Nearly 67% reported that the monitor woke them after falling asleep, and 8.6% removed it at some point during the night. Reported adverse effects included pain (32%, skin irritation (37%, and bruising (7%. Those categorized as having poor tolerability (kappa = 0.5 between sessions, p = 0.0003 were more likely to report being in fair/poor health (75% vs 22%, p = 0.01 and have elevated 24-hour BP average (systolic: 28% vs 17%, p = 0.56; diastolic: 30% vs 17%, p = 0.37. They were

  17. Use of direct oral anticoagulants with regional anesthesia in orthopedic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelleri, Gianluca; Fanelli, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    The use of direct oral anticoagulants including apixaban, rivaroxaban, and dabigatran, which are approved for several therapeutic indications, can simplify perioperative and postoperative management of anticoagulation. Utilization of regional neuraxial anesthesia in patients receiving anticoagulants carries a relatively small risk of hematoma, the serious complications of which must be acknowledged. Given the extensive use of regional anesthesia in surgery and the increasing number of patients receiving direct oral anticoagulants, it is crucial to understand the current clinical data on the risk of hemorrhagic complications in this setting, particularly for anesthesiologists. We discuss current data, guideline recommendations, and best practice advice on effective management of the direct oral anticoagulants and regional anesthesia, including in specific clinical situations, such as patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery at high risk of a thromboembolic event, or patients with renal impairment at an increased risk of bleeding. PMID:27290980

  18. Interference from lupus anticoagulant on von Willebrand factor measurement in splenic marginal zone lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinholt, Pernille J; Nybo, Mads

    2015-01-01

    We present a case concerning a patient with splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) and isolated prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) caused by lupus anticoagulant. Von Willebrand factor (VWF) activity and antigen were immeasurable by latex particle immunoturbidimetric assays, and...... several coagulation factor levels were decreased. However, VWF activity and antigen were normal when analyzed by other methods. Also, coagulation factor levels were normal if an aPTT reagent with low lupus anticoagulant sensitivity or a chromogenic method was applied. Altogether, the initial findings were...... because of lupus anticoagulant interference and in fact, the patient had normal VWF activity and coagulation status. Interference of lupus anticoagulant in clot-based assays is well known but has not previously been described in VWF assays. This is furthermore the first report in which lupus anticoagulant...

  19. Procoagulants and anticoagulants in fetal blood. A literature survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Uszyński

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In intrauterine life, hemostasis is maintained by the same components as in extrauterine life (blood platelets, coagulation and fibrinolysis systems, involvement of the vascular wall; in the fetus, however, these components show significant differences of a quantitative/qualitative nature. In the present study, we surveyed the literature on the coagulation system in the fetus. We focused on the velocity of development of the coagulation system, being reflected in the increased concentration of all procoagulants and anticoagulants (a rise from approximately 20% in the middle of pregnancy to about 60% or more in the period of labor; exceptions: factors V, VIII and XIII which in the labor period reach the adult level and screening test results (prothrombin time, aPTT - activated prothrombin time, and thrombin time. Reference values were given for the 19-38 weeks of pregnancy and the labor term. Biochemical features of fetal fibrinogen and PIVKA factors were also discussed. The role of activated protein C (APC in the maintenance of balance between procoagulants and anticoagulants was postulated as well as the role of APC in the formation of thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI.

  20. Reservations against new oral anticoagulants after stroke and cerebral bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöllberger, Claudia; Finsterer, Josef

    2013-07-15

    Dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban are the new oral anticoagulants (NOAC) which have been investigated in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) for primary and secondary prevention of stroke and thromboembolism. In these trials NOAC had a similar efficacy and safety profile compared to traditional vitamin-K-antagonists such as warfarin. We advise caution in the use of NOAC in patients with stroke or cerebral hemorrhage because of the following reasons: 1) Patients with cerebral bleeding were excluded from the trials. 2) Stroke within 14 days and severe stroke within 6 months before screening were exclusion criteria in the trials investigating dabigatran and rivaroxaban. 3) There is no antidote for reversal and no reliable laboratory monitoring of the anticoagulant effect for emergency situations. 4) NOAC are either substrates of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) or are metabolized by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) system, or both. Drug-drug interactions between NOAC and P-gp and CYP-affecting drugs are largely unknown. 5) Long-term effects of thrombin generation inhibition on the occurrence of infections, malignancies, dementia, and other diseases are unknown. Based on these considerations it is our opinion that studies of NOAC in patients with stroke compared with other prevention strategies, as well as more post marketing surveillance data, are required. PMID:23628464

  1. [Anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning in dogs in The Netherlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robben, J H; Mout, H C; Kuijpers, E A

    1997-09-01

    The occurrence, the diagnosis, and the treatment of anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning in dogs in the Netherlands was evaluated by a survey among Dutch veterinarians carried out by the National Poisons Control Center (NPCC). The survey included information on 54 dogs, 32 being treated by veterinarians who consulted the NPCC and 22 that were admitted to the Utrecht University Clinic for Companion Animals (UUCCA). The poisons that were suspected were brodifacoum (n = 19), bromadiolone (n = 14), difenacoum (n = 8), difethialone (n = 6) and chlorophacinone (n = 1). In 6 dogs the identity of the poison was unknown. Of 31 dogs with hemorrhages, 2 died shortly after presentation to practitioners and 2 died shortly after admission to the UUCCA. Signs of bleeding occurred especially in poisoning by brodifacoum (n = 16). In all but one of the dogs without hemorrhages, the intake of poison had taken place within 24 hours before presentation. The method of treatment varied, with the induction of vomiting and the use of vitamin K mentioned most. The choice of therapy was determined by the length of time after intake of the poison, the clinical signs and whether or not an anticoagulant toxicosis was suspected at the time of the initial examination. These findings provide the basis for discussion of several aspects of diagnosis and treatment. PMID:9534772

  2. The comprehensive management of anticoagulation: ochsner coumadin clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Annette C; Ventura, Hector O; Milani, Richard V

    2002-01-01

    Clinical privileging of pharmacists and the effective use of support staff and information technology have helped create an efficient pharmacist-operated anticoagulation clinic at Ochsner Clinic Foundation that will support future growth efforts for improved patient care. Developed by Ochsner's Department of Cardiology, the pharmacist-operated anticoagulation clinic cares for 2000 patients with a clinical pharmacist, staff pharmacist, registered nurse, and medical assistants. Patients are managed by face-to-face and telephone encounters. The pharmacists are privileged by medical staff to write prescriptions for warfarin, adjust warfarin doses, and conduct appropriate laboratory monitoring. Patients attend a mandatory initial visit where they are given medication instructions and educational materials. The pharmacist determines the treatment dose and schedules follow-up appointments. A software system developed by Ochsner's Information Services Department imports patient data from the institution's central computer system, allowing for a limited electronic patient record. Once fully implemented, this program will allow for more specific patient tracking and assist with quality improvement efforts. At present, approximately 68% of our patient population is within therapeutic range. PMID:22822313

  3. Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) is a computerized information database designed to support the FDA's post-marketing safety surveillance program for all...

  4. Factors affecting the quality of anticoagulation with warfarin: experience of one cardiac centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciurus, Tomasz; Cichocka-Radwan, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The risk of complications in anticoagulation therapy can be reduced by maximising the percentage of time spent by the patient in the optimal therapeutic range (TTR). However, little is known about the predictors of anticoagulation control. The aim of this paper was to assess the quality of anticoagulant therapy in patients on warfarin and to identify the factors affecting its deterioration. Material and methods We studied 149 patients who required anticoagulant therapy with warfarin due to non-valvular atrial fibrillation and/or venous thromboembolism. Each patient underwent proper training regarding the implemented treatment and remained under constant medical care. Results The mean age of the patients was 68.8 ± 12.6 years, and 59% were male. A total of 2460 international normalised ratio (INR) measurements were collected during the 18-month period. The mean TTR in the studied cohort was 76 ± 21%, and the median was 80%. The level at which high-quality anticoagulation was recorded for this study was based on TTR values above 80%. Seventy-five patients with TTR ≥ 80% were included in the stable anticoagulation group (TTR ≥ 80%); the remaining 74 patients constituted the unstable anticoagulation group (TTR < 80%). According to multivariate stepwise regression analysis, the independent variables increasing the risk of deterioration of anticoagulation quality were: arterial hypertension (OR 2.74 [CI 95%: 1.06-7.10]; p = 0.038), amiodarone therapy (OR 4.22 [CI 95%: 1.30-13.70]; p = 0.017), and obesity (OR 1.11 [CI 95%: 1.02-1.21]; p = 0.013). Conclusions The presence of obesity, hypertension, or amiodarone therapy decreases the quality of anticoagulation with warfarin. High quality of anticoagulation can be achieved through proper monitoring and education of patients. PMID:26855650

  5. What Ambulatory Care Managers Need to Know About Examination Room Utilization Measurement and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarich, Mark J; Rea, Ronald W; Lal, Tarun Mohan; Garcia, Angel L; Steffens, Fay L

    2016-01-01

    Demand for ambulatory care visits is projected to increase 22% between 2008 and 2025. Given this growth, ambulatory care managers need to proactively plan for efficient use of scarce resources (ie, space, equipment, and staff). One important component of ambulatory care space (the number of examination rooms) is dependent on multiple factors, including variation in demand, hours of operation, scheduling, and staff. The authors (1) outline common data collection methods, (2) highlight analysis and reporting considerations for examination room utilization, and (3) provide a strategic framework for short- and long-term decision making for facility design or renovation. PMID:27232683

  6. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, Edward; Chipman, J.K.; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald C.; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-30

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or poorly characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows. Gene expression changes in fathead minnow ovaries in response to 7 different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. We examined potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide using two mutual information theory methods, ARACNE and CLR to infer gene regulatory networks and potential adverse outcome pathways. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict a network path from stressor to adverse outcome as a candidate AOP. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biologic processes, biomarkers or alternative endpoints, which could be used to monitor an adverse outcome pathway. Finally, we identify the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology, and attempt to provide a road map for the utilization of these tools. Key Words: mechanism of action, toxicology, microarray, network inference

  7. Reproducibility of the ambulatory arterial stiffness index in hypertensive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dechering, D.G.; Steen, M.S. van der; Adiyaman, A.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We studied the repeatability of the ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI), which can be computed from 24-h blood pressure (BP) recordings as unity minus the regression slope of diastolic on systolic BP. METHODS: One hundred and fifty-two hypertensive outpatients recruited in...... Nijmegen (mean age = 46.2 years; 76.3% with systolic and diastolic hypertension) and 145 patients enrolled in the Systolic Hypertension in Europe (Syst-Eur) trial (71.0 years) underwent 24-h BP monitoring at a median interval of 8 and 31 days, respectively. We used the repeatability coefficient, which is...... were approximately 30%. Differences in AASI between paired recordings were correlated with differences in the goodness of fit (r2) of the AASI regression line as well as with differences in the night-to-day BP ratio. However, in sensitivity analyses stratified for type of hypertension, r2, or dipping...

  8. [Low-power Wireless Micro Ambulatory Electrocardiogram Node].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhipeng; Luo, Kan; Li, Jianqing

    2016-02-01

    Ambulatory electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring can effectively reduce the risk and death rate of patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). The Body Sensor Network (BSN) based ECG monitoring is a new and efficien method to protect the CVDs patients. To meet the challenges of miniaturization, low power and high signal quality of the node, we proposed a novel 50 mmX 50 mmX 10 mm, 30 g wireless ECG node, which includes the single-chip an alog front-end AD8232, ultra-low power microprocessor MSP430F1611 and Bluetooth module HM-11. The ECG signal quality is guaranteed by the on-line digital filtering. The difference threshold algorithm results in accuracy of R-wave detection and heart rate. Experiments were carried out to test the node and the results showed that the pro posed node reached the design target, and it has great potential in application of wireless ECG monitoring. PMID:27382732

  9. Ambulatory major surgery of benign tumors of the thyroid gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A descriptive and prospective study on the practice of ambulatory major surgery to eliminate benign tumours of the thyroid gland, was carried out in the General Surgery Service of 'Dr. Joaquin Castillo Duany' Teaching Clinical Surgical Hospital in Santiago de Cuba during the years 1996-2008, both included, through a previous clinical evaluation of 74 patients in the Endocrinology Outpatient Department, where it was decided that they could definitely have a surgical treatment. The female sex, the age groups from 31 to 45 years, the hemithyroidectomy as surgical technique, acupuncture as analgesic procedure and the follicular adenoma as cytohistological result prevailed in the case material. Mild complications occurred in 5 members of the sample, but recovery was absolute in all, so that even 72 of them were discharged before the 24 hours. Due to its good acceptance, this surgical method is beneficial for patient and hospital institutions.(author)

  10. Accelerometer recorder and display system for ambulatory patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berka, Martin; Żyliński, Marek; Niewiadomski, Wiktor; Cybulski, Gerard

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the design of a compact, wearable, rechargeable acceleration recorder to support long-term monitoring of ambulatory patients with motor disorders, and of software to display and analyze its output. The device consists of a microcontroller, operational amplifier, accelerometer, SD card, indicator LED, rechargeable battery, and associated minor components. It can operate for over a day without charging and can continuously collect data for three weeks without downloading to an outside system, as currently configured. With slight modifications, this period could be extended to several months. The accompanying software provides flexible visualization of the acceleration data over long periods, basic file operations and compression for easier archiving, annotation of segments of interest, and functions for calculation of various parameters and detection of immobility and vibration frequencies. Applications in analysis of gait and other movements are discussed.

  11. Worksite Physical Activity Intervention for Ambulatory Clinic Nursing Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Sharon; Farrington, Michele; Lanningham-Foster, Lorraine M; Clark, M Kathleen; Dawson, Cindy; Quinn, Geralyn J; Laffoon, Trudy; Perkhounkova, Yelena

    2016-07-01

    Health behaviors, including physical activity (PA), of registered nurses (RNs) and medical assistants (MAs) are suboptimal but may improve with worksite programs. Using a repeated-measures crossover design, the authors explored if integrating a 6-month worksite non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) intervention, with and without personalized health coaching via text messaging into workflow could positively affect sedentary time, PA, and body composition of nursing staff without jeopardizing work productivity. Two ambulatory clinics were randomly assigned to an environmental NEAT intervention plus a mobile text message coaching for either the first 3 months (early texting group, n = 27) or the last 3 months (delayed texting group, n = 13), with baseline 3-month and 6-month measurements. Sedentary and PA levels, fat mass, and weight improved for both groups, significantly only for the early text group. Productivity did not decline for either group. This worksite intervention is feasible and may benefit nursing staff. PMID:27143144

  12. Features of ambulatory blood pressure in 540 patients with chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王成

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the features and influencing factors of ambulatory blood pressure in chronic kidney disease(CKD)patients.Methods A total of 540 CKD patients from May 2010 to May 2012 in our department

  13. Peritonitis due to Brevibacterium otitidis in a patient undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Wauters, Georges; Van Bosterhaut, B; Avesani, V; Cuvelier, R.; Charlier, Jacqueline; Janssens, Michèle; Delmée, Michel

    2000-01-01

    Brevibacterium otitidis is a coryneform rod and, as far as is known, is isolated only from infected ears. We report the first known case of peritonitis caused by B. otitidis in a patient undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

  14. Peritonitis by Scedosporium apiospermum in a patient undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEVERO Luiz Carlos

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of peritonitis due to Scedosporium apiospermum in a boy undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis is reported. The finding of suggestive tissual form of the fungus in the effluent hastened the diagnosis of the infection.

  15. The development of a shared governance model in the ambulatory setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolensky, L A; Zuzak, C; Adams, J; Mackaly, L

    1999-01-01

    Many individuals within the ambulatory division have benefited both personally and professionally as a result of this shared governance model and its concepts. Staff who rarely volunteered for projects became involved, and others developed their leadership skills. Although the ambulatory division's shared governance model did not reach maturity, many tasks were accomplished through collaborative efforts. As a result, there were many positive staff outcomes such as a greater understanding of their workplace, and a greater appreciation of their peers. PMID:10711156

  16. Ambulatory oral surgery: 1-year experience with 11 680 patients from Zagreb district, Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Jokić, Dražen; Macan, Darko; Perić, Berislav; Tadić, Marinka; Biočić, Josip; Đanić, Petar; Brajdić, Davor

    2013-01-01

    Aim To examine the types and frequencies of oral surgery diagnoses and ambulatory oral surgical treatments during one year period at the Department of Oral Surgery, University Hospital Dubrava in Zagreb, Croatia. Methods Sociodemographic and clinical data on 11 680 ambulatory patients, treated between January 1 and of December 31, 2011 were retrieved from the hospital database using a specific protocol. The obtained data were subsequently analyzed in order to assess th...

  17. Results of ambulatory arterial blood pressure monitoring in children with obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Faruk Öktem

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The relationship between obesity and essential hypertension is well known. In this study, we aimed to evaluate ambulatory arterial blood pressure monitoring of obese and non-obese children who had similar demographic characteristics.Materials and methods: Seventy one children and adolescents (n=39 obesity, n=32 controls) were studied. Blood pressure of the children were measured by 24 hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring device.Results: Obese children had significantly higher...

  18. Ambulatory care training during core internal medicine residency training: the Canadian experience.

    OpenAIRE

    McLeod, P. J.; Meagher, T W

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the status of ambulatory care training of core internal medicine residents in Canada. DESIGN: Mail survey. PARTICIPANTS: All 16 program directors of internal medicine residency training programs in Canada. OUTCOME MEASURES: The nature and amount of ambulatory care training experienced by residents, information about the faculty tutors, and the sources and types of patients seen by the residents. As well, the program directors were asked for their opinions on the ideal ...

  19. A qualitative analysis of an electronic health record (EHR) implementation in an academic ambulatory setting

    OpenAIRE

    Kahyun Yoon-Flannery; Stephanie Zandieh; Gilad Kuperman; Daniel Langsam; Daniel Hyman; Rainu Kaushal

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To determine pre-implementation perspectives of institutional, practice and vendor leadership regarding best practice for implementation of two ambulatory electronic health records (EHRs) at an academic institution. Design Semi-structured interviews with ambulatory care network and information systems leadership, medical directors, practice managers and vendors before EHR implementation. Results were analysed using grounded theory with ATLAS.ti version 5.0. Measurements Quali...

  20. How to successfully select and implement electronic health records (EHR) in small ambulatory practice settings

    OpenAIRE

    Detmer Don E; Kouroubali Angelina; Lorenzi Nancy M; Bloomrosen Meryl

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Adoption of EHRs by U.S. ambulatory practices has been slow despite the perceived benefits of their use. Most evaluations of EHR implementations in the literature apply to large practice settings. While there are similarities relating to EHR implementation in large and small practice settings, the authors argue that scale is an important differentiator. Focusing on small ambulatory practices, this paper outlines the benefits and barriers to EHR use in this setting, and pro...

  1. Differentiation of parenteral anticoagulants in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adiguzel Cafer

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevention of venous thromboembolism has been identified as a leading priority in hospital safety. Recommended parenteral anticoagulant agents with different indications for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism include unfractionated heparin, low-molecular-weight heparins and fondaparinux. Prescribing decisions in venous thromboembolism management may seem complex due to the large range of clinical indications and patient types, and the range of anticoagulants available. Methods MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched to identify relevant original articles. Results Low-molecular-weight heparins have nearly replaced unfractionated heparin as the gold standard antithrombotic agent. Low-molecular-weight heparins currently available in the US are enoxaparin, dalteparin, and tinzaparin. Each low-molecular-weight heparin is a distinct pharmacological entity with different licensed indications and available clinical evidence. Enoxaparin is the only low-molecular-weight heparin that is licensed for both venous thromboembolism prophylaxis and treatment. Enoxaparin also has the largest body of clinical evidence supporting its use across the spectrum of venous thromboembolism management and has been used as the reference standard comparator anticoagulant in trials of new anticoagulants. As well as novel oral anticoagulant agents, biosimilar and/or generic low-molecular-weight heparins are now commercially available. Despite similar anticoagulant properties, studies report differences between the branded and biosimilar and/or generic agents and further clinical studies are required to support the use of biosimilar low-molecular-weight heparins. The newer parenteral anticoagulant, fondaparinux, is now also licensed for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in surgical patients and the treatment of acute deep-vein thrombosis; clinical experience with this anticoagulant is expanding. Conclusions Parenteral

  2. Cerebrovascular Accident due to Thyroid Storm: Should We Anticoagulate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Gonzalez-Bossolo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid storm is a life-threatening condition that occurs secondary to an uncontrolled hyperthyroid state. Atrial fibrillation is a cardiovascular complication occurring in up to 15% of patients experiencing thyroid storm, and if left untreated this condition could have up to a 25% mortality rate. Thyroid storm with stroke is a rare presentation. This case report details a left middle cerebral artery (MCA stroke with global aphasia and thyroid storm in a 53-year-old Hispanic male patient. Although uncommon, this combination has been reported in multiple case series. Although it is well documented that dysfunctional thyroid levels promote a hypercoagulable state, available guidelines from multiple entities are unclear on whether anticoagulation therapy is appropriate in this situation.

  3. Clinical and economic effectiveness of an inpatient anticoagulation service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamdani, M M; Racine, E; McCreadie, S; Zimmerman, C; O'Sullivan, T L; Jensen, G; Ragatzki, P; Stevenson, J G

    1999-09-01

    We conducted a prospective cohort study to evaluate clinical and economic end points achieved by a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation service compared with usual care (50 patients/group). The primary therapeutic end point was the time between starting heparin therapy and surpassing the activated partial thromboplastin time therapeutic threshold. The primary economic end point was the direct variable cost of hospitalization from admission to discharge. No significant differences between groups were noted for the primary therapeutic end point. Total hospital costs were significantly lower for patients receiving pharmacist-managed care than for those receiving usual care ($1594 and $2014, respectively, 1997 dollars, p=0.04). Earlier start of warfarin (p=0.05) and shorter hospital stay (5 and 7 days, p=0.05) were associated with the pharmacist-managed group. PMID:10610013

  4. Discrepancies between Patients’ Preferences and Educational Programs on Oral Anticoagulant Therapy: A Survey in Community Pharmacies and Hospital Consultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macquart de Terline, Diane; Hejblum, Gilles; Fernandez, Christine; Cohen, Ariel; Antignac, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Background Oral anticoagulation therapy is increasingly used for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic complications in various clinical situations. Nowadays, education programs for patients treated with anticoagulants constitute an integrated component of their management. However, such programs are usually based on the healthcare providers’ perceptions of what patients should know, rather than on patients’ preferences. Objective To investigate patients’ viewpoints on educational needs and preferred modalities of information delivery. Methods We conducted an observational study based on a self-administered questionnaire. To explore several profiles of patients, the study was designed for enrolling patients in two settings: during outpatient consultations in a cardiology department (Saint Antoine Hospital, Paris, France) and in community pharmacies throughout France. Results Of the 371 patients who completed the questionnaire, 187 (50.4%) were recruited during an outpatient consultation and 184 (49.6%) were recruited in community pharmacies. 84.1% of patients were receiving a vitamin K antagonist and 15.6% a direct oral anticoagulant. Patients ranked 16 of 21 (76.2%) questionnaire items on information about their treatment as important or essential; information on adverse effects of treatment was the highest ranked domain (mean score 2.38, 95% CI 2.30–2.46). Pharmacists (1.69, 1.58–1.80), nurses (1.05, 0.95–1.16), and patient associations (0.36, 0.29–0.44), along with group sessions (0.85, 0.75–0.95), the internet (0.77, 0.67–0.88), and delivery of material at the patient’s home (1.26, 1.14–1.38), were ranked poorly in terms of delivering educational material. Conclusion This study revealed substantial discrepancies between patient preferences and current educational programs. These findings should be useful for tailoring future educational programs that are better adapted to patients, with a potential associated enhancement of their

  5. Anticoagulação durante gravidez de mulher portadora de cardiopatia Anticoagulation during pregnancy of woman with heart diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walkiria Samuel Ávila

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diretrizes em muito contribuem para minimizar os potenciais riscos obstétricos e fetais e melhorar a assistência durante o ciclo gravídico-puerperal. Contudo, há controvérsias a respeito do manuseio da anticoagulação em mulheres portadoras de cardiopatias. A importância deste assunto assenta-se no fato de que o tromboembolismo é considerado uma das principais causas de morte materna em portadoras de cardiopatia, o que torna obrigatório o conhecimento sobre sua prevenção. A estratégia do tratamento antitrombótico é ponderada pelo risco de trombose imposto pela situação clínica materna e pelos efeitos adversos que os anticoagulantes podem causar ao concepto. Neste artigo, serão discutidas a estratificação do risco materno ao tromboembolismo, as propriedades dos anticoagulantes indicados para a sua prevenção e a estratégia terapêutica nos diversos momentos da gestação, parto e puerpério da mulher portadora de cardiopatia.Guidelines provide great contribution to the reduction of potential obstetric and fetal risks and to the improvement of health care during pregnancy and puerperium. However, there are still controversies regarding the management of anticoagulation in women with heart diseases. The importance of this issue is based on the fact that thromboembolism is considered one of the main causes of maternal death in women with heart diseases; therefore, the acquisition of knowledge about how to prevent this disorder is mandatory. The strategy of the antithrombotic treatment is based on the risk of thrombosis imposed by the maternal clinical picture and on the adverse effects of the anticoagulants for the conceptus. In the present study, we discussed the stratification of maternal risk of thromboembolism, the properties of the anticoagulants indicated for its prevention, and the therapeutic strategy at different moments of pregnancy, delivery and puerperium of women with heart diseases.

  6. Outpatient treatment of low-risk venous thromboembolism with monotherapy oral anticoagulation: patient quality of life outcomes and clinician acceptance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kline JA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey A Kline,1,2 Zachary P Kahler,1,3 Daren M Beam1,2 1Department of Emergency Medicine, 2Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, 3Department of Emergency Medicine, University of South Carolina Greenville School of Medicine, Greenville, SC, USA Background: Oral monotherapy anticoagulation has facilitated home treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE in outpatients. Objectives: The aim of this study was to measure efficacy, safety, as well as patient and physician perceptions produced by a protocol that selected VTE patients as low-risk patients by the Hestia criteria, and initiated home anticoagulation with an oral factor Xa antagonist. Methods: Patients were administered the Venous Insufficiency Epidemiological and Economic Study Quality of life/Symptoms ques­tionnaire [VEINEs QoL/Sym] and the physical component summary [PCS] from the Rand 36-Item Short Form Health Survey [SF36]. The primary outcomes were VTE recurrence and hemorrhage at 30 days. Secondary outcomes compared psychometric test scores between patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT to those with pulmonary embolism (PE. Patient perceptions were abstracted from written comments and physician perceptions specific to PE outpatient treatment obtained from structured survey. Results: From April 2013 to September 2015, 253 patients were treated, including 67 with PE. Within 30 days, 2/ 253 patients had recurrent DVT and 2/253 had major hemor­rhage; all four had DVT at enrollment. The initial PCS scores did not differ between DVT and PE patients (37.2±13.9 and 38.0±12.1, respectively and both DVT and PE patients had similar improvement over the treatment period (42.2±12.9 and 43.4±12.7, respectively, consistent with prior literature. The most common adverse event was menorrhagia, present in 15% of women. Themes from patient-written responses reflected satisfaction with increased autonomy. Physicians’ (N=116

  7. Outpatient treatment of low-risk venous thromboembolism with monotherapy oral anticoagulation: patient quality of life outcomes and clinician acceptance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Jeffrey A; Kahler, Zachary P; Beam, Daren M

    2016-01-01

    Background Oral monotherapy anticoagulation has facilitated home treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in outpatients. Objectives The aim of this study was to measure efficacy, safety, as well as patient and physician perceptions produced by a protocol that selected VTE patients as low-risk patients by the Hestia criteria, and initiated home anticoagulation with an oral factor Xa antagonist. Methods Patients were administered the Venous Insufficiency Epidemiological and Economic Study Quality of life/Symptoms questionnaire [VEINEs QoL/Sym] and the physical component summary [PCS] from the Rand 36-Item Short Form Health Survey [SF36]). The primary outcomes were VTE recurrence and hemorrhage at 30 days. Secondary outcomes compared psychometric test scores between patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) to those with pulmonary embolism (PE). Patient perceptions were abstracted from written comments and physician perceptions specific to PE outpatient treatment obtained from structured survey. Results From April 2013 to September 2015, 253 patients were treated, including 67 with PE. Within 30 days, 2/253 patients had recurrent DVT and 2/253 had major hemorrhage; all four had DVT at enrollment. The initial PCS scores did not differ between DVT and PE patients (37.2±13.9 and 38.0±12.1, respectively) and both DVT and PE patients had similar improvement over the treatment period (42.2±12.9 and 43.4±12.7, respectively), consistent with prior literature. The most common adverse event was menorrhagia, present in 15% of women. Themes from patient-written responses reflected satisfaction with increased autonomy. Physicians’ (N=116) before-to-after protocol comfort level with home treatment of PE increased 48% on visual analog scale. Conclusion Hestia-negative VTE patients treated with oral monotherapy at home had low rates of VTE recurrence and bleeding, as well as quality of life measurements similar to prior reports.

  8. Chemically sulfated natural galactomannans with specific antiviral and anticoagulant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschin, Tegshi; Budragchaa, Davaanyam; Kanamoto, Taisei; Nakashima, Hideki; Ichiyama, Koji; Yamamoto, Naoki; Shuqin, Han; Yoshida, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Naturally occurring galactomannans were sulfated to give sulfated galactomannans with degrees of substitution of 0.7-1.4 per sugar unit and molecular weights of M¯n=0.6×10(4)-2.4×10(4). Sulfated galactomannans were found to have specific biological activities in vitro such as anticoagulant, anti-HIV and anti-Dengue virus activities. The biological activities were compared with those of standard dextran and curdlan sulfates, which are polysaccharides with potent antiviral activity and low cytotoxicity. It was found that sulfated galactomannans had moderate to high anticoagulant activity, 13.4-36.6unit/mg, compared to that of dextran and curdlan sulfates, 22.7 and 10.0unit/mg, and high anti-HIV and anti-Dengue virus activities, 0.04-0.8μg/mL and 0.2-1.1μg/mL, compared to those curdlan sulfates, 0.1μg/mL, respectively. The cytotoxicity on MT-4 and LCC-MK2 cells was low. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of sulfated galactomannans revealed strong interaction with poly-l-lysine as a model compound of virus proteins, and suggested that the specific biological activities might originate in the electrostatic interaction of negatively charged sulfate groups of sulfated galactomannans and positively charged amino groups of surface proteins of viruses. These results suggest that sulfated galactomannans effectively prevented the infection of cells by viruses and the degree of substitution and molecular weights played important roles in the biological activities. PMID:27154517

  9. In vitro anticoagulation monitoring of low-molecular-weight heparin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian-qi; SHI Xu-bo; YANG Jin-gang; HU Da-yi

    2009-01-01

    Background Although low-molecular-weight heparin has replaced unfractionated heparin to become the primary anticoagulation drug for treatment of acute coronary syndrome, there is no convenient bedside monitoring method. We explored the best laboratory monitoring method of low-molecular-weight heparins (enoxapadn, dalteparin, and nadroparin) by use of the Sonoclot coagulation analyzer to monitor the activated clotting time.Methods Atotal of 20 healthy volunteers were selected and 15 ml of fasting venous blood samples were collected and incubated. Four coagulants, kaolin, diatomite, glass bead, and magnetic stick, were used to determine the activated clotting time of the low-molecular-weight heparins at different in vitro anti-Xa factor concentrations. A correlation analysis was made to obtain the regression equation. The activated clotting time of the different low-molecular-weight heparins with the same anti-Xa factor concentration was monitored when the coagulant glass beads were applied. Results The activated clotting time measured using the glass beads, diatomite, kaolin, and magnetic stick showed a linear correlation with the concentration of nadroparin (r= 0.964, 0.966, 0.970, and 0.947, respectively). The regression equation showed that the linear slopes of different coagulants were significantly different (glass beads 230.03 s/IU,diatomite 89.91 s/IU, kaolin 50.87 s/IU, magnetic stick could not be calculated). When the concentration of the anti-Xa factor was the same for different low-molecular-weight heparins, the measured activated clotting time was different after the application of the glass bead coagulant.Conclusions The glass bead coagulant is most feasible for monitoring the in vitro anticoagulation activity of nadroparin.The different effects of different low-molecular-weight heparins on the activated clotting time may be related to the different anti-Ila activities.

  10. Real life anticoagulation treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilke, Thomas; Groth, Antje; Pfannkuche, Matthias;

    2015-01-01

    Oral anticoagulation (OAC) with either new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) or Vitamin-K antagonists (VKAs) is recommended by guidelines for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and a moderate to high risk of stroke. Based on a claims-based data set the aim of this study was to quantify the stroke...... have been recommended for 56.1/62.9 % of the patients (regarding factors disfavouring VKA/NOAC use). For 38.88/39.20 % of the patient-days in 2010 we could not observe any coverage by anticoagulants. Dementia of patients (OR 2.656) and general prescription patterns of the treating physician (OR 1...

  11. Monitoring the Effects and Antidotes of the Non-vitamin K Oral Anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahmat, Nur A; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, we have witnessed the emergence of the oral non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs), which have numerous advantages compared with the vitamin K antagonists, particularly their lack of need for monitoring; as a result their use is increasing. Nonetheless, the NOACs face two...... major challenges: the need for reliable laboratory assays to assess their anticoagulation effect, and the lack of approved antidotes to reverse their action. This article provides an overview of monitoring the anticoagulant effect of NOACs and their potential specific antidotes in development....

  12. High exposure rates of anticoagulant rodenticides in predatory bird species in intensively managed landscapes in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Thomas Kjær; Lassen, Pia; Elmeros, Morten

    2012-10-01

    The extensive use of anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) for rodent control has led to widespread secondary exposure in nontarget predatory wildlife species. We investigated exposure rates and concentrations of five ARs in liver samples from five raptors and six owls from Denmark. A total of 430 birds were analysed. ARs were detected in 84-100 % of individual birds within each species. Multiple AR exposure was detected in 73 % of all birds. Average number of substances detected in individual birds was 2.2 with no differences between owls and raptors. Difenacoum, bromadiolone, and brodifacoum were the most prevalent substances and occurred in the highest concentrations. Second-generation ARs made up 96 % of the summed AR burden. Among the six core species (sample size >30), summed AR concentrations were lower in rough-legged buzzard (Buteo lagopus) and long-eared owl (Asio otus) than in barn owl (Tyto alba), buzzard (B. buteo), kestrel (Falco tinnunculus), and tawny owl (Strix aluco). There was a strong tendency for seasonal variations in the summed AR concentration with levels being lowest during autumn, which is probably related to an influx of less-exposed migrating birds from northern Scandinavia during autumn. High hepatic AR residue concentrations (>100 ng/g wet weight), which have been associated with symptoms of rodenticide poisoning and increased mortality, were recorded high frequencies (12.9-37.4 %) in five of the six core species. The results suggest that the present use of ARs in Denmark, at least locally, may have adverse effects on reproduction and, ultimately, population status in some raptors and owls. PMID:22588365

  13. Adverse Childhood Experiences and Hallucinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, C.L.; Dube, S.R.; Felitti, V.J.; Anda, R.F.

    2005-01-01

    Objective:: Little information is available about the contribution of multiple adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) to the likelihood of reporting hallucinations. We used data from the ACE study to assess this relationship. Methods:: We conducted a survey about childhood abuse and household dysfunction while growing up, with questions about health…

  14. Emergency Management of Major Bleeding in a Case of Maxillofacial Trauma and Anticoagulation: Utility of Prothrombin Complex Concentrates in the Shock Room

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro Morotti; Mauro Felice Frascisco

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening bleeding in anticoagulation with Warfarin is an emergency challenging issue. Several approaches are available to treat bleeding in either over-anticoagulation or proper-anticoagulation, including vitamin K, fresh frozen plasma and prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC) administration. In coexisting trauma-induced bleeding and anticoagulation, reversal of anticoagulation must be a rapid and highly effective procedure. Furthermore the appropriate treatment must be directly avai...

  15. Defining Content for a Competency-based (CanMEDS) Postgraduate Curriculum in Ambulatory Care: a Delphi Study

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, René

    2012-01-01

    Background Ambulatory training in internal medicine has been noted to be dysfunctional and inadequate. In this study, we developed a set of competency-based outcomes specific to ambulatory care to guide the design, implementation and evaluation of instructional events to ensure that societal needs are addressed. Methods In 2007 a Delphi technique was used to reach consensus and define the priorities for competency-based training in ambulatory care for internal medicine residents. Four groups ...

  16. Blood pressure variability in relation to outcome in the International Database of Ambulatory blood pressure in relation to Cardiovascular Outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Thijs, Lutgarde; Richart, Tom;

    2010-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring provides information not only on the BP level but also on the diurnal changes in BP. In the present review, we summarized the main findings of the International Database on Ambulatory BP in relation to Cardiovascular Outcome (IDACO) with regard to risk.......1%. In conclusion, the IDACO observations support the concept that BP variability adds to risk stratification, but above all highlight that 24-h ambulatory BP level remains the main predictor to be considered in clinical practice....

  17. Self-Inflicted Intraoral Hematoma in a Cardiac Patient Receiving Oral Anticoagulant Therapy- A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantala Arunkumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraoral hematoma secondary to systemic anticoagulant therapy is rare, but it is a potentially fatal condition requiring immediate medical management. Case report: Here we report a case of self-inflicted hematoma in the anterior maxillary gingival region in a 65year old female cardiac patient who was on systemic anticoagulant therapy with a poor periodontal condition, manifesting as a periodontal swelling for a period of one week. Oral anticoagulant therapy is considerably imperative to prevent thromboembolic complications in various medical conditions, in such patients there are chances for spontaneous bleeding or hematoma by means of minor trauma due to sharp teeth or dental prosthesis in the mouth leading to life threatening complications such as partial or complete airway blockage. Therefore,directives about possible bleeding complications secondary to anticoagulant drugs in the oral cavity and the importance of maintaining oral health hygiene are necessary for the patient.

  18. Reproductive success of bromadiolone-resistant rats in absence of anticoagulant pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Leirs, Herwig; Siegismund, Hans Redlef

    2006-01-01

    Resistance to anticoagulant rodenticides in brown rats (Rattus norvegicus Berk.) is associated with pleiotropic effects, notably with an increased dietary vitamin K requirement. Owing to this disadvantage, resistance is believed to be selected against if anticoagulant selection is absent. In small...... experimental populations of wild brown rats, an investigation was carried out to establish whether tolerance to anticoagulant exposure changed over a period of 2 years. In the same populations, DNA microsatellite markers were used to infer parentage, and this made it possible to estimate reproductive success...... of sensitive and resistant rats and estimate effective population size, Ne. Even though there was evidence for a selection against resistant rats with high vitamin K requirement, anticoagulant tolerance was not seen to be significantly influenced in the absence of bromadiolone selection. As the...

  19. Prognostic impact of anticardiolipin antibodies in women with recurrent miscarriage negative for the lupus anticoagulant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henriette Svarre; Christiansen, Ole Bjarne

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA) are found with increased prevalence in women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage (RM) but their impact on future pregnancy outcome in lupus anticoagulant (LAC) negative patients needs better quantification. METHODS: The impact of a repeatedly positive...

  20. Bleeding Risk, Management and Outcome in Patients Receiving Non-VKA Oral Anticoagulants (NOACs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, Sebastian; Breslin, Tomás; NiAinle, Fionnuala; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan

    2015-08-01

    Modern direct-acting anticoagulants are rapidly replacing vitamin K antagonists (VKA) in the management of millions of patients worldwide who require anticoagulation. These drugs include agents that inhibit activated factor X (FXa) (such as apixaban and rivaroxaban) or thrombin (such as dabigatran), and are collectively known today as non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs). Since bleeding is the most common and most dangerous side effect of long-term anticoagulation, and because NOACs have very different mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetics compared with VKA, physicians are naturally concerned about the lack of experience regarding frequency, management and outcome of NOAC-associated bleeding in daily care. This review appraises trial and registry (or "real-world") data pertaining to bleeding complications in patients taking NOACs and VKA and provides practical recommendations for the management of acute bleeding situations. PMID:25940651

  1. Oral Anticoagulants and Atrial Fibrillation: An Update for the Clinical Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, Inna E

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulation is an important strategy for the prevention of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation. Development of new oral agents has created a need to educate nurses to administer these medications and provide patient education. PMID:26306367

  2. Multicomponent determination of 4-hydroxycoumarin anticoagulant rodenticides in blood serum by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felice, L J; Chalermchaikit, T; Murphy, M J

    1991-01-01

    A sensitive liquid chromatographic method was developed for the analysis of 4-hydroxycoumarin anticoagulant rodenticides in blood serum. The method can simultaneously measure the serum levels of five anticoagulant rodenticides: brodifacoum, bromadiolone, coumatetralyl, difenacoum, and warfarin. Serum proteins are precipitated with acetonitrile and the supernatant is mixed with ethyl ether. The organic phase is separated, evaporated to dryness, and the residue subjected to chromatographic analysis. The anticoagulants are separated by reversed-phase gradient chromatography with fluorescence detection at an excitation wavelength of 318 nm and emission wavelength of 390 nm. Extraction efficiencies of 68.1 to 98.2% were obtained. The within-run precision (CV) ranged from 2.19 to 3.79% and the between-run precision (CV) from 3.72 to 9.57%. The anticoagulants can be quantitated at serum levels of 10 to 20 ng/mL. PMID:1943055

  3. Reversed-phase HPLC determination of eight anticoagulant rodenticides in animal liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauconnet, V; Pouliquen, H; Pinault, L

    1997-01-01

    A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for the analysis of eight anticoagulant rodenticides in animal liver. Coumarinic anticoagulant rodenticides (brodifacoum, bromadiolone, coumachlor, coumatetralyl, difenacoum, and warfarin) were detected by using a gradient elution and a fluorimetric detection. Indanedione anticoagulant rodenticides (chlorophacinone and diphacinone) were detected by using an isocratic elution and an UV detection. Anticoagulants were extracted from liver with mixtures of acetone/diethylether and acetone/chloroform. Extracts were applied to solid-phase extraction cartridges. Linearity was checked over the concentration range 0.1-0.6 microgram/g. Relative standard deviations of within-run and between-run variability were all between 5.7 and 10.3%. Recoveries from spiked liver samples were between 51.7 (difenacoum) and 78.2% (warfarin). Limits of detection were between 0.01 (difenacoum and warfarin) and 0.11 microgram/g (chlorophacinone). PMID:9399124

  4. Pros and cons of vitamin K antagonists and non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Nicoletta; Ageno, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Anticoagulant treatment can be currently instituted with two different classes of drugs: the vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) and the newer, "novel" or non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant drugs (NOACs). The NOACs have several practical advantages over VKAs, such as the rapid onset/offset of action, the lower potential for food and drug interactions, and the predictable anticoagulant response. However, the VKAs currently have a broader spectrum of indications, a standardized monitoring test, and established reversal strategies. The NOACs emerged as alternative options for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Nevertheless, there remain some populations for whom the VKAs remain the most appropriate anticoagulant drug. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of VKAs and NOACs. PMID:25703519

  5. Improved late survival and disability after stroke with therapeutic anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation: a population study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, Niamh

    2011-09-01

    Although therapeutic anticoagulation improves early (within 1 month) outcomes after ischemic stroke in hospital-admitted patients with atrial fibrillation, no information exists on late outcomes in unselected population-based studies, including patients with all stroke (ischemic and hemorrhagic).

  6. Old and new oral anticoagulants for secondary stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Sacquegna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin K antagonists, such as warfarin, used in oral anticoagulation therapy currently represent the standard drugs for the primary and secondary prevention of stroke in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF, with a relative risk reduction close to 70%. Newer oral anticoagulants, such as direct thrombin inhibitors (i.e., dabigatran and direct factor Xa inhibitors (i.e., apixaban and rivaroxaban have been recently compared with warfarin in large randomized trials for stroke prevention in AF. The new oral anticoagulants showed, compared with warfarin, no statistically significant difference in the rate of stroke or systemic embolism in secondary prevention (patients with previous transient ischemic attack or stroke subgroups. With regard to safety, the risk of intracranial bleeding was reduced with new anticoagulants compared with warfarin. Indirect treatment comparisons of clinical trials on secondary prevention cohorts showed no significant difference in efficacy among apixaban, rivaroxaban, and dabigatran; but dabigatran 110 mg was associated with less intracranial bleedings than rivaroxaban.

  7. Dental Procedures in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and New Oral Anticoagulants

    OpenAIRE

    Tsolka, Pepie

    2014-01-01

    This review discusses the basic pharmacology of new oral anticoagulants that are used for prevention of thromboembolism in patients with atrial fibrillation. It presents available evidence, and provides recommendations for the management of patients requiring invasive procedures in dental practice.

  8. Anticoagulation dilemma in a high-risk patient with On-X valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ami M Karkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thromboembolism continues to be a major concern in patients with mechanical heart valves, especially in those with unsatisfactory anticoagulation levels. The new On-X valve (On-X Life Technologies, Austin, TX, USA has been reported as having unique structural characteristics that offer lower thrombogenicity to the valve. We report a case where the patient received no or minimal systemic anticoagulation after placement of On-X mitral and aortic valves due to development of severe mucosal arterio-venous malformations yet did not show any evidence of thromboembolism. This case report reinforces the findings of recent studies that lower anticoagulation levels may be acceptable in patients with On-X valves and suggests this valve may be particularly useful in those in whom therapeutic levels of anticoagulation cannot be achieved due to increased risk of bleeding.

  9. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in solid organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh Prasad, G V

    2012-01-01

    Solid organ transplant recipients are at an increased risk for hypertension and cardiovascular disease. To assist in their management, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) has become increasingly used in both clinical research settings and practice. ABPM has been used to better define post-transplant hypertension incidence and prevalence in different solid organ transplantation populations. ABPM provides additional information on cardiovascular risk beyond that obtained by clinic-based readings, based on its ability to assess 24-h blood pressure (BP) load, detect nocturnal non-dipping, and predict target organ damage. It has provided some assurance about the safety of living kidney donation. Information from ABPM can be used to guide living kidney donor selection, and because ABPM-related data has been correlated with clinically important kidney and heart transplant recipient outcomes, it may be a valuable adjunct in their management. Despite these advantages, barriers to wider use of ABPM include expense, clinical inertia in hypertension management, lack of prospective clinical trial data, and clinical problems that compete with hypertension for attention such as acute or chronic allograft dysfunction. The increasing amount of research and clinical use for ABPM may allow for closer assessment and intervention to help address the increased cardiovascular risk faced by many solid organ transplant recipients. PMID:22220828

  10. CT features of peritonitis associated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the CT findings of peritonitis associated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis(CAPD). We retrospectively analyzed CT scans of 14 symptomatic patients with peritonitis after CAPD. Diffuse abdominal pain was present in 11, fever in two, and abdominal mass with vomiting in one. The mean duration of CAPD ranged from 10 months to 5 years(mean : 3.9 years). On abdominal CT, we evaluated the presence and location of ascites, bowel wall thickening, cocoon formation, the pattern of enhancement of peritoneal thickening, the presence of calcifications in the peritoneum, and mesenteric and omental change. On enhanced CT, multiloculated ascites was observed in all cases(n=14) ; it was located mainly in the pelvic cavity with small multi-loculated fluid collections in the peritoneal cavity(n=13), including the lesser sac(n=3). In one patient, ascites was located in the space between the greater omentum and anterior peritoneal surface. CT showed ileus in 12 cases, small bowel wall thickening in 11, and cocoon formation in five. Uneven but smooth thickening of the peritoneum, with contrast enhancement, was seen in eight cases, and in five of these, peritoneal thickening was more prominent in the anterior peritoneum. Other findings included reticular opacity in two cases, hematoma of the rectus muscle in one, and umbilical hernia in one. Multiloculated fluid collection, ileus, small bowel wall thickening, uneven but smooth peritoneal thickening, and cocoon formation appear to be CT features of CAPD peritonitis

  11. Silent myocardial ischemia evaluated by ambulatory left ventricular function monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imai, Kamon; Yumikura, Sei; Araki, Yasushi; Ando, Tatsuo; Saito, Satoshi; Ozawa, Yukio; Hatano, Michinobu; Kamata, Rikisaburo (Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1989-12-01

    To determine whether left ventricular function is less disturbed in asymptomatic ischemia than in symptomatic ischemia, exercise-induced left ventricular function was measured in beat-to-beat using an ambulatory left ventricular function monitoring system. The study subjects were 22 patients with coronary artery disease. Supine and sitting ergometer exercise tests were performed. Of 44 exercise tests, 33 showed significant ST depression on electro-cardiograms. Among these 33, 17 were asymptomatic: 16, symptomatic. The left ventricular functions during exercise of these 33 were analyzed and compared with those of five normal controls. The changes in end-diastolic volume were not so significant either in controls or in the asymptomatic and symptomatic groups, but the changes in end-systolic volume were reversed in the diseased group, particularly in the symptomatic group. The changes in ejection fraction (EF), therefore, were significantly negative in the diseased group, particularly in the symptomatic group. The correlation between exercise-induced left ventricular dysfunction and symptoms was evaluated among the 33 patients. Symptoms were present in 35% (6/17) in <10% decrease in EF, 44% (4/9) in 10{approx}15% decrease, and 85% (6/7)in {ge}15% decrease, respectively. Thus, asymptomatic ischemia represents a lesser degree of myocardial ischemia as indicated by mild left ventricular dysfunction, compared with symptomatic ischemia. However, some cases of severe myocardial ischemia did not develop symptoms. We concluded that silent myocardial ischemia is responsible for a lesser degree of myocardial ischemia and decreased pain perception. (author).

  12. Mobile Personal Health System for Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Vanessa G.; Ostos, Rodolfo; Gonzalez, Jesus A.; Cervantes, Armando; Ochoa, Armando; Ruiz, Carlos; Ramos, Roberto; Maestre, Gladys E.

    2013-01-01

    The ARVmobile v1.0 is a multiplatform mobile personal health monitor (PHM) application for ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) monitoring that has the potential to aid in the acquisition and analysis of detailed profile of ABP and heart rate (HR), improve the early detection and intervention of hypertension, and detect potential abnormal BP and HR levels for timely medical feedback. The PHM system consisted of ABP sensor to detect BP and HR signals and smartphone as receiver to collect the transmitted digital data and process them to provide immediate personalized information to the user. Android and Blackberry platforms were developed to detect and alert of potential abnormal values, offer friendly graphical user interface for elderly people, and provide feedback to professional healthcare providers via e-mail. ABP data were obtained from twenty-one healthy individuals (>51 years) to test the utility of the PHM application. The ARVmobile v1.0 was able to reliably receive and process the ABP readings from the volunteers. The preliminary results demonstrate that the ARVmobile 1.0 application could be used to perform a detailed profile of ABP and HR in an ordinary daily life environment, bedsides of estimating potential diagnostic thresholds of abnormal BP variability measured as average real variability. PMID:23762189

  13. Utilization of lean management principles in the ambulatory clinic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Jessica T; Brinton, Thomas S; Gonzalez, Chris M

    2009-03-01

    The principles of 'lean management' have permeated many sectors of today's business world, secondary to the success of the Toyota Production System. This management method enables workers to eliminate mistakes, reduce delays, lower costs, and improve the overall quality of the product or service they deliver. These lean management principles can be applied to health care. Their implementation within the ambulatory care setting is predicated on the continuous identification and elimination of waste within the process. The key concepts of flow time, inventory and throughput are utilized to improve the flow of patients through the clinic, and to identify points that slow this process -- so-called bottlenecks. Nonessential activities are shifted away from bottlenecks (i.e. the physician), and extra work capacity is generated from existing resources, rather than being added. The additional work capacity facilitates a more efficient response to variability, which in turn results in cost savings, more time for the physician to interact with patients, and faster completion of patient visits. Finally, application of the lean management principle of 'just-in-time' management can eliminate excess clinic inventory, better synchronize office supply with patient demand, and reduce costs. PMID:19265856

  14. Development and application of a general purpose ambulatory monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petley, G W; Clitheroe, S; Clewlow, F; Deakin, C D; Chauhan, A J

    1998-01-01

    This paper details the development and application of a multi-channel, general purpose, lightweight, portable monitor. The monitor is constructed with separate analogue and digital circuitry so that a dedicated analogue board may be developed for each new application with the same general purpose digital board, the latter requiring only changes to the firmware. At the heart of the digital circuit is an Arizona Microchip PIC 16C64 microcontroller, which can communicate with a computer via a serial port and perform both simple and relatively complex data analysis prior to storing data in memory. The low-power design enables the circuit to operate for potentially longer than a week on one set of batteries. Designed with medical applications in mind, preliminary data from three studies utilising the monitor are described. These include measurements of bladder pressure, personal exposure to pollutant gases and body temperature. The studies demonstrate the system's versatility in a variety of investigations requiring different signal processing and sampling protocols. It is hoped that, in the future, this ambulatory device will contribute to the diagnosis, treatment and understanding of a wide variety of disease conditions. PMID:9664283

  15. Laboratory evaluation of urinary tract infections in an ambulatory clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, K C; Hale, D C; Von Boerum, D H; Reich, G C; Hamilton, L T; Matsen, J M

    1994-01-01

    A 4-month evaluation of ambulatory patients with a suspicion of a urinary tract infection was performed. Specific objectives included assessment of five urinary screening methods, reevaluation of the necessity of the phenylethyl alcohol plate (PEA), and cost-effectiveness of screening for low colony count bacteriuria. Urine samples were collected as midstream, clean-caught specimens. A total of 142 samples, 87 from 79 symptomatic patients and 55 negative controls, were evaluated. All urine specimens were cultured using a 0.01 mL loop and a 0.001 mL loop onto Columbia sheep blood agar, MacConkey agar, and PEA agar. Twenty-four specimens (17%) were sterile, 64 (45%) were contaminated, and 54 (38%) were infected. Five urine screening methods were performed. These tests and their associated sensitivity and specificity are as follows. The Chemstrip 9 (Behring, Inc., Somerville, NJ) for leukocyte esterase and nitrate, 67%, 98%; microscopic analysis on spun urine, 79%, 93%; methylene blue stain for pyuria, 60%, 99%; Gram stain for pyuria, 45%, 93%; Gram stain for bacteriuria, 65%, 75%; and the URISCREEN (Analytab Products, Plainview, NY), 92%, 89%. Inclusion of a PEA plate for isolation of gram-positive organisms provided no additional information. Routine culture of urine samples at 10(-2) mL increased the contamination rate by 19%. PMID:7506476

  16. Adesão medicamentosa em idosos em seguimento ambulatorial Medicine adeshion in eldery people in an ambulatorial attendance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Aparecida Cintra

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo objetivou avaliar a adesão ao tratamento medicamentoso em idosos em seguimento ambulatorial e identificar os fatores relacionados a esta adesão. Foram entrevistados 165 idosos em seguimento ambulatorial no Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Unicamp, São Paulo. Utilizou-se instrumento próprio, com informações relativas à identificação dos sujeitos, dados de saúde autorreferidos e relativos à terapêutica medicamentosa. Os dados foram submetidos às análises descritiva e de comparação. A maioria dos idosos revelou adesão ao tratamento (88,5%, dentre os quais 91,1% moravam acompanhados. Os idosos que moravam sozinhos apresentaram três vezes mais chances de não aderência ao tratamento (OR: 3,655. Os efeitos colaterais dos medicamentos mostraram sete vezes mais chances de não aderência (OR: 7,092. Os fatores combinados que apresentaram maior chance de predizer a não adesão à terapêutica foram "mora sozinho" (OR: 4,346 e "efeitos colaterais" (OR: 8,219.The objectives of this study were to evaluate the elderly drug adhesion in an outpatient geriatric service linked to the State University Hospital of Campinas (São Paulo, Brazil as well as to identify the related events to this adhesion. One hundred sixty five elders were submitted to an interview. It was used an instrument to collect information about the patients' identification, besides the self-reported state of health and drug utilization. The data were evaluated through the descriptive and comparative analysis. They showed that most of the elderly (88.5% have confirmed the drug adhesion and among them 91.1% were living with company. The elderly who were living alone presented three-time more chance of non-adhesion to the drug therapy (OR: 3.655. Those that have referred drug side effects presented seven-time more chance of non-adhesion (OR: 7.092. The associated events which better predict the drug non-adhesion were: "living alone" (OR

  17. CN-15ADVERSE EFFECTS OF BEVACIZUMAB IN BRAIN TUMOR PATIENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Tushar; Ladha, Harshad; Mandel, Jacob; Gilbert, Mark; O'Brien, Barbara; Hamza, Mohamed; Armstrong, Terri

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bevacizumab is humanized monoclonal antibody inhibiting angiogenesis and the only FDA approved treatment for recurrent glioblastoma. The aim of this study was to look at the occurrence of various adverse effects associated with use of bevacizumab in recurrent glioblastoma. METHODS: In this retrospective chart review, we studied 280 patients with recurrent glioblastoma treated with Bevacizumab between 2005-2011 to characterize the known adverse effects of bevacizumab including hypertension, grade 3-4 myelosuppression, wound healing complications, thrombo-embolic events, stroke, hemorrhage and gastrointestinal complications. RESULTS: The study population included 168 males and 112 females. The median age was 53.5 years(range 8.1-81.3). TREATMENT: Bevacizumab only(58), Bevacizumab + CPT(11), Bevacizumab + TMZ(32) or Bevacizumab + Other(34). Patients were treated at recurrence(1st = 96; 2nd = 126, 3rd = 58). Hypertension was the most common adverse effect occurring in 131(49%). The median duration from treatment start to development was 82 days (Range 7-1143). However, only 33(25%) were started on antihypertensive medication. Grade 3-4 Myelosuppression occurred in 52(19%)causing treatment discontinuation in 8. Thrombo-embolic events were reported in 5%(15) patients including DVT(9), PE(2), Central venous thrombosis(1) and Stroke(3). Thirty-six patients (13%) were on anti-coagulant medication at bevacizumab initiation. Median time to a thromboembolic complication was 113 days (Range 8-1145). Wound healing complications were noted in 7(3%) patients, 3 craniotomy dehiscence and 4 at soft tissue sites. Five patients (2%) developed GI complications, including perforations(3), pancreatitis(1), and diverticulitis(1). Median time to development was 92 days(Range 10-651). There was a high rate 46%(129) of grade 3-4 lymphocytopenia; median time to develop lymphocytopenia was 50 days(Range = 3-564). CONCLUSION: The range of toxicities was similar to other reports

  18. Triple antithrombotic therapy versus double antiplatelet therapy after percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation in patients requiring chronic oral anticoagulation: a meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jayswal Saheb K; DENG Bing-qing; HU Qing-song; XIE Shuang-lun; GENG Deng-feng; NIE Ru-qiong

    2013-01-01

    Background Whether an addition of OAC to double antiplatelet therapy for patients with an indication of chronic oral anticoagulation undergoing PCI-S may improve clinical outcomes is still debated.This meta-analysis aimed to update and re-compare the benefits and risks of triple antithrombotic therapy (TT) with double anti-platelet therapy (DAPT) after in patients who requiring oral anticoagulation after percutaneous coronary interventions with stenting (PCI-s).Methods Ten reports of observational retrospective or prospective studies were retrieved,including a total of 6296 patients,follow-up period ranging from 1 year to 2 years.Results Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups.The main finding of this study is the overall incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE),myocardial infarction (MI) and stent thrombosis was comparable between two groups.Patients with П was associated with significant reduction in ischemic stroke (OR:0.27; 95% CI:0.13-0.57;P=0.0006) as compared to DAPT.We reaffirmed triple therapy significantly increased the risk of major bleeding (OR:1.47;95% CI:1.22-1.78; P <0.0001) and minor bleeding (OR:1.55; 95% CI:1.07-2.24; P=0.02).Conclusions Triple therapy is more efficacious in reducing the occurrence of ischemic stroke in PCI-s patients with an indication of chronic oral anticoagulation (OAC),compared with DAPT.However,it significantly increased major and minor risk of bleeding.It is imperative that further prospective randomized controlled trials are required to define the best therapeutic strategy for patients with an indication of chronic OAC undergoing PCI-s.

  19. Inpatient Oral Anticoagulation Management by Clinical Pharmacists: Safety and Cost effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Hosmane, Sharath R.; Tucker, Johanna; Osman, Dave; Williams, Steve; Waterworth, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Background Warfarin prescription for anticoagulation after cardiac surgery has always been a challenge for junior medical staff. Methods A prospective study was carried out to assess the quality of anticoagulation control by junior doctors compared with clinical pharmacists at South Manchester University hospitals NHS Trust. The junior medical staff prescribed warfarin for 50 consecutive patients from April to September 2006 (group A, n = 50) and experienced clinical pharmacists dosed 46 cons...

  20. New oral anticoagulants -the newest update in patients undergo oral surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Kovacevska, Ivona; Angelovska, Bistra

    2013-01-01

    During the past 20 years, the approval of anticoagulants such as low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs), indirect factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors has signaled a growing interest in antithrombotic compounds that have relatively discrete targets within the coagulation pathway. Aim of this study is to review the evidence of different therapy approach, to highlight the areas of major concern, and to suggest specific oral surgery treatment for patients on new oral anticoagul...

  1. Direct oral anticoagulants for secondary prevention in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Masotti; Mario Di Napoli; Walter Ageno; Davide Imberti; Cecilia Becattini; Maurizio Paciaroni; Daniel Augustin Godoy; Roberto Cappelli; Giancarlo Landini; Grazia Panigada; Ido Iori; Domenico Prisco; Giancarlo Agnelli

    2013-01-01

    The patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), both permanent and paroxysmal, and history of previous transient ischemic attack (TIA) or stroke represent a category of patients at high risk of new embolic events, independently of the presence of other risk factors. In these patients, national and international guidelines recommend oral anticoagulants as first choice for antithrombotic prevention. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have been demonstrated to be not inferior to warfa...

  2. Extensive Thrombosis Following Lead Extraction: Further Justification for Routine Post-operative Anticoagulation

    OpenAIRE

    Hanninen, Mikael; Cassagneau, Romain; Manlucu, Jaimie; Yee, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Lead extraction is becoming increasingly common as indications for pacing and ICD insertion expand. Periop management varies between extraction centers, and no clinical guidelines have addressed the need for perioperative anticoagulation. We report a case of massive thrombosis which occurred shortly after laser lead extraction and is undoubtedly related to the trauma of the extraction and ensuing hypercoagulabiilty. Routine post-operative anticoagulation has been advocated as a means to preve...

  3. Efficacy of long-term anticoagulant treatment in subgroups of patients after myocardial infarction.

    OpenAIRE

    Bergen, P. F. van; Deckers, J.W.; Jonker, J. J.; van Domburg, R. T.; Azar, A J; Hofman, A.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the efficacy of long term oral anticoagulant treatment in subgroups of patients after myocardial infarction. DESIGN--Analysis of the effect of anticoagulant treatment in subgroups of hospital survivors of myocardial infarction based upon age, gender, history of hypertension, previous myocardial infarction, smoking habits, diabetes mellitus, Killip class, anterior location of infarction, thrombolytic therapy, and use of beta blockers. SUBJECTS--Participants of a multi...

  4. Ancylostoma caninum anticoagulant peptide: a hookworm-derived inhibitor of human coagulation factor Xa.

    OpenAIRE

    Cappello, M; Vlasuk, G P; Bergum, P W; Huang, S.; Hotez, P. J.

    1995-01-01

    Human hookworm infection is a major cause of gastrointestinal blood loss and iron deficiency anemia, affecting up to one billion people in the developing world. These soil-transmitted helminths cause blood loss during attachment to the intestinal mucosa by lacerating capillaries and ingesting extravasated blood. We have isolated the major anticoagulant used by adult worms to facilitate feeding and exacerbate intestinal blood loss. This 8.7-kDa peptide, named the Ancylostoma caninum anticoagul...

  5. THE PROBLEM OF THE USE OF NEW ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS IN CANCER PATIENTS RECEIVING CHEMOTHERAPY

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Rumyantsev; I. A. Pokataev; T.V. Kozlov; N.A. Rumyantsev

    2015-01-01

    Despite large number of known risk factors of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in cancer patients existing prediction models do not allow definite identification of cancer patients that have indications for anticoagulant prevention. Besides, heparin and warfarin use for VTE prevention in cancer is accompanied by some problems. New oral anticoagulants (NOAC) are promising drugs for use in oncology practice; however their use is complicated by the lack of data on efficacy and safety in these patien...

  6. Effective management of venous thromboembolism in the community: non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    OpenAIRE

    Patel R

    2016-01-01

    Raj Patel Department of Haematological Medicine, King's Thrombosis Centre, King's College Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Anticoagulation therapy is essential for the effective treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE). For many years, anticoagulation for acute VTE was limited to the use of initial parenteral heparin, overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist. Although highly effective, this regimen has several limitations and is particularly cha...

  7. Effective management of venous thromboembolism in the community: non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Raj Patel Department of Haematological Medicine, King's Thrombosis Centre, King's College Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Anticoagulation therapy is essential for the effective treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE). For many years, anticoagulation for acute VTE was limited to the use of initial parenteral heparin, overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist. Although highly effective, this regimen has several limitations and is particul...

  8. D-dimer: a useful tool in gauging optimal duration of oral anticoagulant therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Silingardi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY Optimal duration of oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT in idiopathic venous thromboembolism (VTE is unknown. Indefinite OAT carries an unacceptable risk of major bleeding and prospective studies have demonstrated that OAT is no longer protective after its withdrawal. How to identify the patients at risk for recurrence? D-dimer is a marker of thrombin activity. Early prospective studies showed that elevated D-dimer levels after anticoagulation had a highly predictive value for a recurrent episode. Does D-dimer assay have a role in gauging the appropriate duration of anticoagulant therapy? The PROLONG study tries to answer this question. METHOD D-dimer assay was performed one month after stopping anticoagulation. Patiens with normal D-dimer levels did not resume anticoagulation while patients with elevated D-dimer levels were randomized to discontinue or resume anticoagulation. Study end-points was the composite of recurrent VTE and major bleeding during an average follow-up of 1.4 years. RESULTS The rate of recurrence is significantly higher in patients with elevated D-dimer levels who discontinued anticoagulation. Resuming anticoagulation in this cohort of patients markedly reduces recurrent events without increasing major bleeding. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS PROLONG study is provocative, because D-dimer assay is simple, thus not requiring dedicated laboratory facilities. D-dimer test has otherwise high sensitivity but low specificity in VTE diagnosis. Aspecifically elevated D-dimer levels are available in the elderly and the majority of patients included in the study were > 65 years old, thus introducing a possible selection bias. Nonetheless the results of the study are useful for the clinician. Prolongation of vitamin K antagonists in patients with elevated D-dimer levels one month after discontinuation of OAT for a first unprovoked episode of VTE results in a favourable risk-benefit relationship. Probably this

  9. Anticoagulation and delayed bowel resection in the management of mesenteric venous thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Acute mesenteric venous thrombosis is potentially lethal because it can result in mesenteric ischemia and, ultimately, bowel infarction requiring surgical intervention. Systemic anticoagulation for the prevention of thrombus propagation is a well-recognized treatment modality and the current mainstay therapy for patients with acute mesenteric venous thrombosis. However, the decision between prompt surgical exploration vs conservative treatment with anticoagulation is somewhat difficult in pat...

  10. Dose Dependence of the Anticoagulant Effect of Intravenously Administered Cellulose Sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd, N N; Kuznetsova, S A; Kalinina, T B; Vasilieva, N Yu

    2016-04-01

    Experiments on rabbits showed that increasing the dose of intravenously administered cellulose sulfate from wheat straw (dynamic viscosity 3.4 cP, sulfur content 14.1%) increased plasma clotting time in some coagulation tests and plasma anticoagulant activity. When cellulose sulfate was administered in the dose of 1 mg/kg, plasma clotting time in the presence of the anticoagulant (5 min after administration) was ~3-fold higher than after saline administration. PMID:27165079

  11. Could Some Geriatric Characteristics Hinder the Prescription of Anticoagulants in Atrial Fibrillation in the Elderly?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paule Denoël

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported underprescription of anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation (AF. We conducted an observational study on 142 out of a total of 995 consecutive ≥75 years old patients presenting AF (14% when admitted in an emergency unit of a general hospital, in search of geriatric characteristics that might be associated with the underprescription of anticoagulation therapy (mostly antivitamin K at the time of the study. The following data was collected from patients presenting AF: medical history including treatment and comorbidities, CHADS2 score, ISAR scale (frailty, Lawton’s scale (ADL, GDS scale (mood status, MUST (nutrition, and blood analysis (INR, kidney function, and albumin. Among those patients for who anticoagulation treatment was recommended (73%, only 61% were treated with it. In the group with anticoagulation therapy, the following characteristics were observed more often than in the group without such therapy: a recent (≤6 months hospitalization and medical treatment including digoxin or based on >3 different drugs. Neither the value of the CHADS2 score, nor the geriatric characteristics could be correlated with the presence or the absence of an anticoagulation therapy. More research is thus required to identify and clarify the relative importance of patient-, physician-, and health care system-related hurdles for the prescription of oral anticoagulation therapy in older patients with AF.

  12. Increased sulphation improves the anticoagulant activities of heparan sulphate and dermatan sulphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofosu, F A; Modi, G J; Blajchman, M A; Buchanan, M R; Johnson, E A

    1987-01-01

    Heparan sulphate and dermatan sulphate have both antithrombotic and anticoagulant properties. These are, however, significantly weaker than those of a comparable amount of standard pig mucosal heparin. Antithrombotic and anticoagulant effects of glycosaminoglycans depend on their ability to catalyse the inhibition of thrombin and/or to inhibit the activation of prothrombin. Since heparan sulphate and dermatan sulphate are less sulphated than unfractionated heparin, we investigated whether the decreased sulphation contributes to the lower antithrombotic and anticoagulant activities compared with standard heparin. To do this, we compared the anticoagulant activities of heparan sulphate and dermatan sulphate with those of their derivatives resulphated in vitro. The ratio of sulphate to carboxylate in these resulphated heparan sulphate and dermatan sulphate derivatives was approximately twice that of the parent compounds and similar to that of standard heparin. Anticoagulant effects were assessed by determining (a) the catalytic effects of each glycosaminoglycan on the inhibition of thrombin added to plasma, and (b) the ability of each glycosaminoglycan to inhibit the activation of 125I-prothrombin in plasma. The least sulphated glycosaminoglycans were least able to catalyse the inhibition of thrombin added to plasma and to inhibit the activation of prothrombin. Furthermore, increasing the degree of sulphation improved the catalytic effects of glycosaminoglycans on the inhibition of thrombin by heparin cofactor II in plasma. The degree of sulphation therefore appears to be an important functional property that contributes significantly to the anticoagulant effects of the two glycosaminoglycans. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:2963622

  13. Occurrence, elimination, and risk of anticoagulant rodenticides and drugs during wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Canela, Cristian; Barata, Carlos; Lacorte, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Anticoagulants are biocides widely used as pest control agents in agriculture, urban infrastructures, and domestic applications for the control of rodents. Other anticoagulants such as warfarin and acenocoumarol are also used as drugs against thrombosis. After use, anticoagulants are discharged to sewage grids and enter wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Our hypothesis is that WWTP effluents can be a source of anticoagulants to receiving waters and that these can affect aquatic organisms and other nontarget species. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to determine the occurrence of 11 anticoagulants in WWTPs receiving urban and agricultural wastewaters. Warfarin was the most ubiquitous compound detected in influent waters and was partially eliminated during the activated sludge treatment, and low nanograms per liter concentration were found in the effluents. Other detected compounds were coumatetralyl, ferulenol, acenocoumarol, flocoumafen, brodifacoum, bromadiolone, and difenacoum at concentrations of 0.86-87.0 ng L(-1). Considering water volumes of each WWTP, daily emissions were estimated to be 0.02 to 21.8 g day(-1), and thus, WWTPs contribute to the loads of anticoagulants to receiving waters. However, low aquatic toxicity was observed using Daphnia magna as a model aquatic organism. PMID:24622989

  14. National survey of training and credentialing methods in pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlberg, J; Wittkowsky, A K; Possidente, C

    1998-05-15

    A national survey of pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinics was conducted to determine how pharmacists are trained to provide care in such clinics. In June 1996 a survey was mailed to 177 pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinics in the United States. A total of 128 surveys were returned (response rate, 72%). One hundred ten surveys representing 42 states and a variety of institutions were usable. Twenty-five (23%) of the 110 clinics offered an anticoagulation training program for their pharmacists. Most training programs had both didactic and experiential components and had been in existence for one to five years. Thirty-two (29%) of the 110 responding clinics had at least one pharmacist who had completed the ASHP Research and Education Foundation's Anticoagulation Service Traineeship. Twenty-three of the 25 clinics with a training program required successful completion of the program before a pharmacist could practice in the clinic. The overall quality of pharmacists' performance was regularly assessed by 22 of the 25 clinics. Most pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinics in the United States do not offer formal training in anticoagulation therapy to pharmacists who practice in that setting. PMID:9606455

  15. New perspectives and recommendations for anticoagulant therapy post orthopedic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Kropf

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anticoagulant therapy is essential for the prevention of risks associated with the formation of thrombus in patients after surgery, especially in orthopedics. Recently, new oral anticoagulants were introduced in the therapeutic arsenal. This fact is important, because the current drug of choice in clinical practice is enoxaparin, a low molecular weight heparin. As all injecting drugs, enoxaparin may reduce patients' adherence to treatment by dissatisfaction with and resistance to the administration. This article reviews the available literature on the overall utility of these innovative medicines, approaching the pharmacology, the compared efficacy in relation to current agents, and the potential targets for new agents, as well as points to new trends in research and development. The article also contributes with a practical guide for use and recommendations to health professionals, especially focusing on the reversibility of hemorrhagic events, and discusses the importance of convenience/satisfaction of use, the cost of treatment, and the risk-benefit profile for patients.A terapia anticoagulante é fundamental para a prevenção de riscos associados à formação de trombos em pacientes pós-cirúrgicos, principalmente em ortopedia. Recentemente, novos anticoagulantes orais foram introduzidos no arsenal terapêutico. Tal fato é importantíssimo, visto que o atual medicamento de primeira escolha na prática clínica é a enoxaparina, uma heparina de baixo peso molecular. Por ser de uso injetável, a enoxaparina pode diminuir a adesão do paciente ao tratamento, devido à insatisfação e à resistência quanto à via de administração. Este artigo revisa a literatura disponível sobre a utilidade total desses medicamentos inovadores ao abordar a farmacologia, a eficácia em comparação com os agentes atuais e os alvos potenciais para novos agentes, bem como aponta as novas tendências em pesquisa e desenvolvimento. O artigo também contribui

  16. Adverse Effects of Plasma Transfusion

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Suchitra; Vyas, Girish N

    2012-01-01

    Plasma utilization has increased over the last two decades, and there is a growing concern that many plasma transfusions are inappropriate. Plasma transfusion is not without risk, and certain complications are more likely with plasma than other blood components. Clinical and laboratory investigations of the patients suffering reactions following infusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) define the etiology and pathogenesis of the panoply of adverse effects. We review here the pathogenesis, diagno...

  17. Optimal Contracting under Adverse Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenells, Jonatan; Stea, Diego; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2015-01-01

    We study a model of adverse selection, hard and soft information, and mentalizing ability--the human capacity to represent others' intentions, knowledge, and beliefs. By allowing for a continuous range of different information types, as well as for different means of acquiring information, we...... that information. This strategy affects the properties of the optimal contract, which grows closer to the first best. This research provides insights into the implications of mentalizing for agency theory....

  18. Cardiovascular adverse effects of phenytoin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guldiken, B; Rémi, J; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2016-05-01

    Phenytoin is an established drug in the treatment of acute repetitive seizures and status epilepticus. One of its main advantages over benzodiazepines is the less sedative effect. However, the possibility of cardiovascular adverse effects with the intravenous use of phenytoin cause a reluctance to its usage, and this has lead to a search for safer anticonvulsant drugs. In this study, we aimed to review the studies which evaluated the safety of phenytoin with respect to cardiovascular adverse effects. The original clinical trials and case reports listed in PUBMED in English language between the years of 1946-2014 were evaluated. As the key words, "phenytoin, diphenylhydantoin, epilepsy, seizure, cardiac toxicity, asystole, arrhythmia, respiratory arrest, hypotension, death" were used. Thirty-two clinical trials and ten case reports were identified. In the case reports, a rapid infusion rate (>50 mg/min) of phenytoin appeared as the major cause of increased mortality. In contrast, no serious cardiovascular adverse effects leading to death were met in the clinical trials which applied the recommended infusion rate and dosages. An infusion rate of 50 mg/min was reported to be safe for young patients. For old patients and patients with a cardiovascular co-morbidity, a slower infusion rate was recommended with a careful follow-up of heart rhythm and blood pressure. No cardiovascular adverse effect was reported in oral phenytoin overdoses except one case with a very high serum phenytoin level and hypoalbuminemia. Phenytoin is an effective and well tolerated drug in the treatment of epilepsy. Intravenous phenytoin is safe when given at recommended infusion rates and doses. PMID:26645393

  19. ADVERSE SELECTION AND MANAGERIAL INCENTIVES

    OpenAIRE

    Javier M. López Cuñat

    2000-01-01

    We analyze managerial contracts (i.e. incentive schemes based on a linear combination of profits and sales) under asymmetric information about costs. In the competitive setting with ex ante symmetric information, standard strategic effects appear. Under adverse selection in both, monopolistic and competitive settings, we show that, in order to decrease the manager's expected informational rents, the owner will optimally pay the manager to keep sales low or, on the contrary, keep them high. Mo...

  20. Cardioversion and Risk of Adverse Events with Dabigatran versus Warfarin-A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannik Langtved Pallisgaard

    Full Text Available Cardioversion can rapidly and effectively restore sinus rhythm in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation. Since 2011 dabigatran has been available as an alternative to warfarin to prevent thromboembolic events in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation undergoing cardioversion. We studied time to cardioversion, risk of adverse events, and risk of readmission with atrial fibrillation after cardioversion according to anticoagulation therapy.Through the nationwide Danish registries we included 1,230 oral anticoagulation naïve patients with first time non-valvular atrial fibrillation and first time cardioversion from 2011 to 2012; 37% in the dabigatran group (n = 456, and 63% in the warfarin group (n = 774. Median time to cardioversion was 4.0 (interquartile range [IQR] 2.9 to 6.5 and 6.9 (IQR 3.9 to 12.1 weeks in the dabigatran and warfarin groups respectively, and the adjusted odds ratio of cardioversion within the first 4 weeks was 2.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7 to 3.1 in favor of dabigatran. The cumulative incidence of composite endpoint of stroke, bleeding or death were 2.0% and 1.0% at 30 weeks in the warfarin and dabigatran groups respectively, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.33 (95% CI 0.33 to 5.42. Cumulative incidence of readmission with atrial fibrillation after 30 weeks were 9% and 11% in the warfarin and dabigatran groups, respectively, and an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.66 (95% CI 0.41 to 1.08.Anticoagulation treatment with dabigatran allows shorter time to cardioversion for atrial fibrillation than warfarin, and appears to be an effective and safe alternative treatment strategy to warfarin.

  1. SMA CARNIVAL TRIAL PART II: a prospective, single-armed trial of L-carnitine and valproic acid in ambulatory children with spinal muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John T Kissel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple lines of evidence have suggested that valproic acid (VPA might benefit patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA. The SMA CARNIVAL TRIAL was a two part prospective trial to evaluate oral VPA and L-carnitine in SMA children. Part 1 targeted non-ambulatory children ages 2-8 in a 12 month cross over design. We report here Part 2, a twelve month prospective, open-label trial of VPA and L-carnitine in ambulatory SMA children. METHODS: This study involved 33 genetically proven type 3 SMA subjects ages 3-17 years. Subjects underwent two baseline assessments over 4-6 weeks and then were placed on VPA and L-carnitine for 12 months. Assessments were performed at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months. Primary outcomes included safety, adverse events and the change at 6 and 12 months in motor function assessed using the Modified Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale Extend (MHFMS-Extend, timed motor tests and fine motor modules. Secondary outcomes included changes in ulnar compound muscle action potential amplitudes (CMAP, handheld dynamometry, pulmonary function, and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory scores. RESULTS: Twenty-eight subjects completed the study. VPA and carnitine were generally well tolerated. Although adverse events occurred in 85% of subjects, they were usually mild and transient. Weight gain of 20% above body weight occurred in 17% of subjects. There was no significant change in any primary outcome at six or 12 months. Some pulmonary function measures showed improvement at one year as expected with normal growth. CMAP significantly improved suggesting a modest biologic effect not clinically meaningful. CONCLUSIONS: This study, coupled with the CARNIVAL Part 1 study, indicate that VPA is not effective in improving strength or function in SMA children. The outcomes used in this study are feasible and reliable, and can be employed in future trials in SMA. TRIAL REGSITRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00227266.

  2. Management of patients taking antiplatelet or anticoagulant medication requiring invasive breast procedures: United Kingdom survey of radiologists' and surgeons' current practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To determine the current practice in the UK National Health Service Breast Screening Programme for invasive diagnostic procedures and surgery in patients taking anticoagulant and antiplatelet medication. Materials and methods: Lead radiologists and surgeons at each breast screening service were surveyed to determine current practice. One hundred and five respondents provided information regarding their services, protocols, and willingness to proceed with combinations of procedures and anti-haemostatic medications. Results: Between units there was wide variation in practice. Within 21 services providing more than one response, 10 (48%) disagreed on whether protocols existed. Decisions to perform biopsies were unrelated to professional group. The taking of a drug history was variable. Surgeons reported more adverse effects than radiologists [21 (48%) versus 12 (26%)], but no difference in self-assessment of knowledge. Conclusion: Both radiologists and surgeons have expressed uncertainty about their understanding of anticoagulant and antiplatelet treatment. This is reflected in a wide range of practice. Guidance regarding the management of these patients is suggested

  3. Management of patients taking antiplatelet or anticoagulant medication requiring invasive breast procedures: United Kingdom survey of radiologists' and surgeons' current practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritchard, M.G. [West Midlands Breast Screening Quality Assurance Reference Centre, West Midlands Cancer Intelligence Unit, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Townend, J.N.; Lester, W.A. [University Hospital Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Edgbaston, Birmingham (United Kingdom); England, D.W. [South Birmingham Breast Screening Programme, Breast Assessment Unit, University Hospital Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham Women' s Hospital, Edgbaston, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Kearins, O. [West Midlands Breast Screening Quality Assurance Reference Centre, West Midlands Cancer Intelligence Unit, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Bradley, S.A. [South Birmingham Breast Screening Programme, Breast Assessment Unit, University Hospital Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham Women' s Hospital, Edgbaston, Birmingham (United Kingdom)], E-mail: sally.bradley@uhb.nhs.uk

    2008-03-15

    Aim: To determine the current practice in the UK National Health Service Breast Screening Programme for invasive diagnostic procedures and surgery in patients taking anticoagulant and antiplatelet medication. Materials and methods: Lead radiologists and surgeons at each breast screening service were surveyed to determine current practice. One hundred and five respondents provided information regarding their services, protocols, and willingness to proceed with combinations of procedures and anti-haemostatic medications. Results: Between units there was wide variation in practice. Within 21 services providing more than one response, 10 (48%) disagreed on whether protocols existed. Decisions to perform biopsies were unrelated to professional group. The taking of a drug history was variable. Surgeons reported more adverse effects than radiologists [21 (48%) versus 12 (26%)], but no difference in self-assessment of knowledge. Conclusion: Both radiologists and surgeons have expressed uncertainty about their understanding of anticoagulant and antiplatelet treatment. This is reflected in a wide range of practice. Guidance regarding the management of these patients is suggested.

  4. Factors Associated With Unplanned Hospitalizations Among Patients With Nonmetastatic Colorectal Cancers Intended for Treatment in the Ambulatory Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessele, Kristen L.; Hayat, Matthew J.; Mayer, Deborah K.; Atkins, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy administration and supportive management for solid tumors is intended to take place in the ambulatory setting, but little is known about why some patients experience treatment-related, adverse events so severe as to require acute inpatient care. Objective Identify predictors of initial and repeated unplanned hospitalizations and potential financial impact among Medicare patients with early-stage (stages I–III) colorectal cancer receiving outpatient chemotherapy. Methods Advanced statistical modeling was used to analyze a cohort of patients (N = 1485) from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)–Medicare database diagnosed from 2003–2007 with colorectal cancer as their first primary malignancy. Patients were age 66 and older at diagnosis, had uninterrupted Medicare Parts A and B coverage with no health maintenance organization (HMO) component, and received chemotherapy at least one time. Results Female sex, younger age, multiple comorbidities, rural geography, higher high school completion rates, and lower median income per census tract were significant predictors of the likelihood of initial unplanned hospitalizations. Non-White race, receipt of radiation therapy, rural geography and higher weighted comorbidity scores were factors associated with the number of hospitalizations experienced. The total Medicare charges calculated for these admissions was $38,976,171, with the median charge per admission at $20,412. Discussion Demographic and clinical factors were identified that form the foundation of work towards development of a risk factor profile for unplanned hospitalization. Further work is needed to incorporate additional clinical data to create a clinically applicable model. PMID:26657478

  5. Tramadol/paracetamol combination tablet for postoperative pain following ambulatory hand surgery: a double-blind, double-dummy, randomized, parallel-group trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawal N

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Narinder Rawal1, Valery Macquaire2, Elena Catalá3, Marco Berti4, Rui Costa5, Markus Wietlisbach61Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; 2Clinique du Parc Leopold, Brussels, Belgium; 3Pain Clinic, Department Anesthesiology, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain; 4Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Parma Hospital, Parma, Italy; 5Garcia de Orta Hospital, Almada, Portugal; 6Department of Anesthesiology, Sursee Hospital, Sursee, SwitzerlandAbstract: This randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, multicenter trial compared efficacy and safety of tramadol HCL 37.5 mg/paracetamol 325 mg combination tablet with tramadol HCL 50 mg capsule in the treatment of postoperative pain following ambulatory hand surgery with iv regional anesthesia. Patients received trial medication at admission, immediately after surgery, and every 6 hours after discharge until midnight of the first postoperative day. Analgesic efficacy was assessed by patients (n = 128 in each group, full analysis set and recorded in a diary on the evening of surgery day and of the first postoperative day. They also documented the occurrence of adverse events. By the end of the first postoperative day, the proportion of treatment responders based on treatment satisfaction (primary efficacy variable was comparable between the groups (78.1% combination, 71.9% tramadol; P = 0.24 and mean pain intensity (rated on a numerical scale from 0 = no pain to 10 = worst imaginable pain had been reduced to 1.7 ± 2.0 for both groups. Under both treatments, twice as many patients experienced no pain (score = 0 on the first postoperative day compared to the day of surgery (35.9% vs 16.4% for tramadol/paracetamol and 36.7% vs 18% for tramadol treatment. Rescue medication leading to withdrawal (diclofenac 50 mg was required by 17.2% patients with tramadol/paracetamol and 13.3% with tramadol. Adverse events (mainly nausea, dizziness

  6. : Emergency Physician Patterns Related to Anticoagulation of Patients with Recent-Onset Atrial Fibrillation and Flutter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraish Misra, MD

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Guidelines strongly recommend long-term anticoagulation with warfarin for patients with newly recognized AF who have high embolic risk by virtue of a CHADS2 (Congestive Heart Failure, Hypertension, Age >65, Diabetes, History of Stroke score ≥ 2. The goal of this study was to determine patterns of emergency department-initiated anticoagulation among eligible patients discharged from Canadian centers with an episode of recent-onset atrial fibrillation and flutter (RAFF and determine if decision-making is driven by the CHADS2 score or other factors. This was accomplished by examining health records using uniform case identification and data abstraction as well as centralized quality control; it was conducted in 8 Canadian university emergency departments over a 12-month period. Eligible patients for this analysis demonstrated RAFF requiring emergency management, were not already taking warfarin and were not admitted to hospital. Univariate analyses were conducted using T-test or Chi-square to select factors associated with anticoagulation initiation at a significance level of p < 0.15 and multiple logistic regression was employed to evaluate independent predictors after adjustment for confounders. Among 633 eligible patients, only 21 out of 120 patients (18% with a CHADS2 score ≥ 2 received anticoagulation and among 70 patients who were given anticoagulation only 21 (30% had a CHADS2 score ≥ 2. Independent predictors of anticoagulation included age by 10-year strata: (OR = 1.7; 95% CI 1.3 – 2.1, heparin use in the anticoagulation (OR = 9.6; 95% CI 4.9 – 18.9, a new prescription for metoprolol (OR = 9.6; 95% CI 4.9 – 18.9 and being referred to cardiology for follow-up (OR = 5.6; 95% CI 2.6 – 12.0. CHADS2 ≥ 2 doubled the likelihood of being prescribed anticoagulation (OR= 2.0; 95% CI 1.5 – 3.5 but was not an independent predictor. It was thus determined that patients discharged from the emergency department in this study were not

  7. Concerns of stem cell transplant patients during routine ambulatory assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein C

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lisa Kennedy Sheldon,1 Maryum Kazmi,1 Cynthia Klein,2 Donna L Berry31University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston, MA, 2Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA, 3Phyllis Cantor Center for Research in Nursing and Patient Care Services, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USABackground: Stem cell transplant (SCT is a treatment choice for many hematological malignancies. There is currently a lack of evidence regarding the self-reported concerns of SCT patients before and after SCT.Aim and design: This exploratory study performed a secondary analysis of self-reported, written concerns of SCT patients before and after transplant to determine patients' concerns.Methods: Content analysis of text box entries of SCT patients collected between 2005 and 2007 at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. Text box entries were collected as part of symptom assessment using the Electronic Self-Report Assessment – Cancer instrument. The assessment was presented to 137 patients undergoing SCT at two time points: prior to ambulatory visits before any therapy had begun (T1 and at the first visit after hospital discharge following SCT (T2.Results: Text box entries were made before (n = 52 and after (n = 87 the transplant, resulting in 139 text box entries made by 137 patients representing 133 concerns. Using content analysis, the entries were categorized and ranked according to frequency. After symptom concerns, patients ranked work and financial issues the most frequent concerns prior to SCT. After SCT, symptoms remained the most frequently entered area of concern, followed by survival.Conclusion: Oncology providers need to assess SCT patients for work and financial concerns before and after transplant. Appropriate and timely referrals may ease the burden of these concerns for patients. Thus, assessment of financial and work concerns by the oncology team should be an integral part of quality health care for patients undergoing SCT.Keywords: self-report, electronic

  8. Anticoagulant activities of piperlonguminine in vitro and in vivo

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    Wonhwa Lee

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Piperlonguminine (PL, an important component of Piperlongum fruits, is known to exhibit anti-hyperlipidemic, antiplateletand anti-melanogenic activities. Here, the anticoagulantactivities of PL were examined by monitoring activatedpartial-thromboplastin-time (aPTT, prothrombin-time (PT, andthe activities of thrombin and activated factor X (FXa. Theeffects of PL on the expressions of plasminogen activatorinhibitor type 1 (PAI-1 and tissue-type plasminogen activator(t-PA were also tested in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-αactivated HUVECs. The results showed that PL prolonged aPTTand PT significantly and inhibited the activities of thrombin andFXa. PL inhibited the generation of thrombin and FXa inHUVECs. In accordance with these anticoagulant activities, PLprolonged in vivo bleeding time and inhibited TNF-α inducedPAI-1 production. Furthermore, PAI-1/t-PA ratio was significantlydecreased by PL. Collectively, our results suggest that PLpossesses antithrombotic activities and that the current studycould provide bases for the development of new anticoagulantagents. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(10: 484-489

  9. Anticoagulation Management in Patients with Pacemaker-Detected Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poposka, Lidija; Boskov, Vladimir; Risteski, Dejan; Taleski, Jane; Georgievska-Ismail, Ljubica

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In patients with an implanted pacemaker, asymptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with an increased risk of thrombo-embolic complications. There is still no consensus which duration of episodes of atrial fibrillation should be taken as an indicator for inclusion of oral anticoagulation therapy (OAC). MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 104 patients who had no AF episodes in the past and have an indication for permanent pacing were included in the study. RESULTS: During an average follow-up of 18 months, 33 of the patients developed episodes of AF. Inclusion of OAC was performed in 17 patients, in whom AF was recorded, although in all patients CHA2DS2-VASc score was ≥ 1. The inclusion of OAC showed a statistically significant correlation with increasing duration of episodes of AF (r = 0.502, p = 0.003). During the follow-up period none of the patients developed thrombo-embolic complication. CONCLUSION: Considering that our group of patients had no thrombo-embolic events, we could conclude that dividing the AF episodes in less than 1% in 24 hours and longer than 1% within 24 hours could be an indicator for decision-making to include OAK if the CHA2DS2-VASc score is ≥ 1. PMID:27335594

  10. Left Atrial Thrombus Despite Anticoagulation: The Importance Of Homocystein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. J. David Spence

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Patients in atrial fibrillation may have left atrial thrombi or strokes despite adequate anticoagulation. It is important to consider elevated plasma total homocysteine (tHcy as a treatable clotting factor that may explain such cases. Metabolic B12 deficiency is common even in patients with a “normal” serum B12. Measurement of holotranscobalamin, methylmalonic acid or, in folate-replete patients, tHcy are necessary to diagnose metabolic B12 deficiency when the serum B12 is below 400 pmol/L. Elevated tHcy quadruples the risk of stroke in atrial fibrillation, and is far more common than the usual clotting factors for which testing is commonly performed: among patients attending a secondary stroke prevention clinic, tHcy > 14 mmol/L is present in 20% at age 40, and in 40% at age 80. B vitamin therapy does reduce the risk of stroke; key issues are renal impairment and adequacy of vitamin B12. This intervention should be considered routinely in patients with AF.

  11. Structure versus anticoagulant and antithrombotic actions of marine sulfated polysaccharides

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    Vitor Hugo Pomin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Marine sulfated polysaccharides (MSP, such as sulfated fucans (SF, sulfated galactans (SG and glycosaminoglycans (GAG isolated from either algae or invertebrate animals, are highly anionic polysaccharides capable of interacting with certain cationic proteins, such as (co-factors of the coagulation cascade during clotting-inhibition processes. These molecular complexes between MSP and coagulation-related proteins might, at first glance, be assumed to be driven mostly by electrostatic interactions. However, a systematic comparison using several novel sulfated polysaccharides composed of repetitive oligosaccharides with clear sulfation patterns has shown that these molecular interactions are regulated essentially by the stereochemistry of the glycans (which depends on a conjunction of anomericity, monosaccharide, conformational preference, and glycosylation and sulfation sites, rather than just a simple consequence of their negative charge density (mainly the number of sulfate groups. Here, we present an overview of the structure-function relationships of MSP, correlating their structures with their potential anticoagulant and antithrombotic actions, since pathologies related to the cardiovascular system are one of the major causes of illness and mortality in the world.

  12. Anticoagulation in pregnant females with mechanical heart valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the complications and outcome of anticoagulation therapy in pregnant females with valvular heart diseases. All pregnant females with prosthetic heart valves admitted in Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology from Jan 2004 to Dec 2004 were included in this study Basic demographic data including age, duration of pregnancy and complications observed were recorded. Warfarin was replaced with un-fractionated heparin (UFH) in first trimester and after that warfarin was continued with a targeted INR between 2.0-3.0. At 36 weeks warfarin was stopped and UFH was added; however, if patient went into spontaneous labour before this then immediate caesarian section was performed and UFH was restarted 4-6 hours after delivery along with oral warfarin. Out of 21 patients, sixteen (76.1%) had mitral valve diseases and five (23.9%) had both mitral and atrial. Majority (42.3%)of patients were in age group 26-30 years. Eleven (52.2%) reported in 9th month of gestation. Complications observed were hypertension (1), transient ischaemic attacks (1), pulmonary embolism (1), haemoptysis (1) and abortion (1). All patients, except one had successful completion of pregnancy. No case of foetal abnormality was seen. In 76% patients, daily dose of warfarin was <5 mg. Thrombo-prophylaxis in pregnancy with warfarin and UFH with an INR of 2.0-3.0 is effective in preventing thrombotic complications in females with mechanical valves without resulting in increase hemorrhagic complications. (author)

  13. Value of trans-oesophageal echocardiography as a method of encouraging patients with chronic atrial fibrillation to use anticoagulation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bakalli, Aurora; Kamberi, Lulzim; Dragusha, Gani; Zeqiri, Nexhmi; Gashi, Fitim; Prekpalaj, Lazer

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite the indisputable role of anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation (AF) patients at risk for stroke, anticoagulants remain under-used in everyday clinical practice. We assumed that by performing trans-oesophageal echocardiography (TEE) on patients with AF who were not on anticoagulation treatment prior to the procedure, and by explaining to them the TEE images obtained, as well as the possible consequences of these findings, we could convince patients to start anticoa...

  14. Life threatening biphasic adverse reactions to desmopressin: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijun; Chen, Ruijun; Tian, Fang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Li; Yu, Baojun; Huang, Xianwen; Zhang, Yuehui; Su, Shengyuan; Ma, Guangnian; Wang, Kaichen

    2016-08-01

    Treatment with desmopressin diacetate arginine vasopressin (DDAVP) and its withdrawal are associated with side effects. We present a rare case of severe biphasic adverse reactions induced by DDAVP and its withdrawal in a 63-year-old female patient. A lump in the left axillary region was biopsied, and she received DDAVP after surgery. The following day, she lost consciousness, with foaming at the mouth and seizures. Hypotonic encephalopathy was considered. DDAVP was ceased, and she received electrolytes. On day 1, she displayed low blood pressure and increased urine output. She received DDAVP and dopamine as well as electrolytes. The patient was ambulatory on day 7 and was discharged without brain abnormalities on MRI. In conclusion, severe hyponatremia induced by DDAVP and massive polyuria and hypovolemic shock induced by DDAVP withdrawal are life-threatening conditions. This case underlines the need to be vigilant when administering DDAVP and to monitor for any side effects. PMID:27142268

  15. Ambulatory electroencephalogram in children: A prospective clinical audit of 100 cases

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    Nahin Hussain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ambulatory electroencephalogram has been used for differentiating epileptic from nonepileptic events, recording seizure frequency and classification of seizure type. We studied 100 consecutive children prospectively aged 11 days to 16 years that were referred for an ambulatory electroencephalogram to a regional children′s hospital. Ambulatory electroencephalogram was clinically useful in contributing to a clinical diagnosis in 71% of children who were referred with a range of clinical questions. A diagnosis of epileptic disorder was confirmed by obtaining an ictal record in 26% and this included 11 children that had previously normal awake and or sleep electroencephalogram. We recommend making a telephone check of the current target event frequency and prioritising those with typical events on most days in order to improve the frequency of recording a typical attack.

  16. A 2-wk reduction of ambulatory activity attenuates peripheral insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Thyfault, John P; Broholm, Christa; Mortensen, Ole Hartvig; Olsen, Rasmus H.; Mounier, Remi; Plomgaard, Peter; van Hall, Gerrit; Booth, Frank W; Pedersen, Bente K

    2010-01-01

    US adults take between approximately 2,000 and approximately 12,000 steps per day, a wide range of ambulatory activity that at the low range could increase risk for developing chronic metabolic diseases. Dramatic reductions in physical activity induce insulin resistance; however, it is uncertain if...... and how low ambulatory activity would influence peripheral insulin sensitivity. We aimed to explore if healthy, nonexercising subjects who went from a normal to a low level of ambulatory activity for 2 wk would display metabolic alterations including reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity. To do this......, ten healthy young men decreased their daily activity level from a mean of 10,501+/-808 to 1,344+/-33 steps/day for 2 wk. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps with stable isotopes and muscle biopsies, maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max) tests, and blood samples were performed pre- and postintervention...

  17. Anticoagulation therapy prevents portal-splenic vein thrombosis after splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Lai; Shi-Chun Lu; Guan-Yin Li; Chuan-Yun Li; Ju-Shan Wu; Qing-Liang Guo; Meng-Long Wang; Ning Li

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To compare the incidence of early portal or splenic vein thrombosis (PSVT) in patients treated with irregular and regular anticoagulantion alter splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization.METHODS:We retrospectively analyzed 301 patients who underwent splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization for portal hypertension due to cirrhosis between April 2004 and July 2010.Patients were categorized into group A with irregular anticoagulation and group B with regular anticoagulation,respectively.Group A (153 patients) received anticoagulant monotherapy for an undesignated time period or with aspirin or warfarin without low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) irregularly.Group B (148 patients) received subcutaneous injection of LMWH routinely within the first 5 d after surgery,followed by oral warfarin and aspirin for one month regularly.The target prothrombin time/international normalized ratio (PT/INR) was 1.25-1.50.Platelet and PT/INR were monitored.Color Doppler imaging was performed to monitor PSVT as well as the effectiveness of thrombolytic therapy.RESULTS:The patients' data were collected and analyzed retrospectively.Among the patients,94 developed early postoperative mural PSVT,including 63patients in group A (63/153,41.17%) and 31 patients in group B (31/148,20.94%).There were 50 (32.67%)patients in group A and 27 (18.24%) in group B with mural PSVT in the main trunk of portal vein.After the administration of thrombolytic,anticoagulant and antiaggregation therapy,complete or partial thrombus dissolution achieved in 50 (79.37%) in group A and 26 (83.87%) in group B.CONCLUSION:Regular anticoagulation therapy can reduce the incidence of PSVT in patients who undergo splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization,and regular anticoagulant therapy is safer and more effective than irregular anticoagulant therapy.Early and timely thrombolytic therapy is imperative and feasible for the prevention of PSVT.

  18. Comparison of pharmacist managed anticoagulation with usual medical care in a family medicine clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dillon Carla

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The beneficial outcomes of oral anticoagulation therapy are dependent upon achieving and maintaining an optimal INR therapeutic range. There is growing evidence that better outcomes are achieved when anticoagulation is managed by a pharmacist with expertise in anticoagulation management rather than usual care by family physicians. This study compared a pharmacist managed anticoagulation program (PC to usual physician care (UC in a family medicine clinic. Methods A retrospective cohort study was carried out in a family medicine clinic which included a clinical pharmacist. In 2006, the pharmacist assumed anticoagulation management. For a 17-month period, the PC group (n = 112 of patients on warfarin were compared to the UC patients (n = 81 for a similar period prior to 2006. The primary outcome was the percentage of time patients' INR was in the therapeutic range (TTR. Secondary outcomes were the percentage of time in therapeutic range within ± 0.3 units of the recommended range (expanded TTR and percentage of time the INR was >5.0 or Results The baseline characteristics were similar between the groups. Fifty-five percent of the PC group was male with a mean age of 67 years; 51% of the UC group was male with a mean age of 71 years. The most common indications for warfarin in both groups were atrial fibrillation, mechanical heart valves and deep vein thrombosis. The TTR was 73% for PC and 65% for UC (p 5 were 0.3% for PC patients and 0.1% for UC (p Conclusion The pharmacist-managed anticoagulation program within a family practice clinic compared to usual care by the physicians achieved significantly better INR control as measured by the percentage of time patients' INR values were kept in both the therapeutic and expanded range. Based on the results of this study, a collaborative family practice clinic using pharmacists and physicians may be an effective model for anticoagulation management with these results verified in future

  19. Family skills for overcoming adversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Patricia Ardila Hernández

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This section draws on research four families in displacement in Tunja Boyacá step of this research is to present the problem of displacement from another different look that has embargoed regarding this topic. Critical reflection was raised from resilient approach Parsons theory in order to understand families immersed in this conflict as change agents capable of adapting to a new system and overcome adversity. Within this scheme is used to obtain qualitative research of the following categories : adaptation to the new social context risk factors present in families and protective factors.

  20. Adverse Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Chittaranjan; Arumugham, Shyam Sundar; Thirthalli, Jagadisha

    2016-09-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment commonly used for depression and other major psychiatric disorders. We discuss potential adverse effects (AEs) associated with ECT and strategies for their prevention and management. Common acute AEs include headache, nausea, myalgia, and confusion; these are self-limiting and are managed symptomatically. Serious but uncommon AEs include cardiovascular, pulmonary, and cerebrovascular events; these may be minimized with screening for risk factors and by physiologic monitoring. Although most cognitive AEs of ECT are short-lasting, troublesome retrograde amnesia may rarely persist. Modifications of and improvements in treatment techniques minimize cognitive and other AEs. PMID:27514303

  1. Knee Muscle Strength at Varying Angular Velocities and Associations with Gross Motor Function in Ambulatory Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei-Hsien; Chen, Hseih-Ching; Shen, I-Hsuan; Chen, Chung-Yao; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chung, Chia-Ying

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships of muscle strength at different angular velocities and gross motor functions in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy (CP). This study included 33 ambulatory children with spastic CP aged 6-15 years and 15 children with normal development. Children with CP were categorized into level I (n =…

  2. 45 CFR 170.304 - Specific certification criteria for Complete EHRs or EHR Modules designed for an ambulatory setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... or EHR Modules designed for an ambulatory setting. 170.304 Section 170.304 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT... for Complete EHRs or EHR Modules designed for an ambulatory setting. The Secretary adopts the following certification criteria for Complete EHRs or EHR Modules designed to be used in an...

  3. Effect of overtime work on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, T; Kobayashi, Y; Yamaoka, K; Yano, E

    1996-10-01

    Recently, the adverse effects of long working hours on the cardiovascular systems of workers in Japan, including "Karoshi" (death from overwork), have been the focus of social concern. However, conventional methods of health checkups are often unable to detect the early signs of such adverse effects. To evaluate the influence of overtime work on the cardiovascular system, we compared 24-hour blood pressure measurements among several groups of male white-collar workers. As a result, for those with normal blood pressure and those with mild hypertension, the 24-hour average blood pressure of the overtime groups was higher than that of the control groups; for those who periodically did overtime work, the 24-hour average blood pressure and heart rate during the busy period increased. These results indicate that the burden on the cardiovascular system of white-collar workers increases with overtime work. PMID:8899576

  4. Assessment of pedometer-determined physical activity in Danish adults: the importance of non-ambulatory activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothausen, Berit Worm; Gille, Maj-Britt; Biltoft-Jensen, Anja Pia;

    and Physical Activity 2007-08, wore a pedometer (Yamax SW-200 Tokyo, Japan) and recorded daily steps and non-ambulatory activities for seven consecutive days. Time spent on non-ambulatory activities was converted to step equivalents using 1) a simple conversion method (SCM) adding 200 step equivalents......% of men, 62% of women) engaged in non-ambulatory activities during the registration period. The most frequently reported non-ambulatory activity was cycling, especially as transportation, which was reported by 39% (men: 31%, women: 48%) with a mean of 125 min/week (men: 107, women: 138 min/week). Our...... (13-14% increase) vs. 1875–1886 step equivalents/day for women (22% increase), thus significantly higher for women compared to men, p=0.03) Conclusion In populations like the Danish, where cycling and other non-ambulatory activities are popular, it will be relevant to account for these activities when...

  5. Evaluation of Faculty Members’ and Students’ Attitude Towards Ambulatory Teaching Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghafari, M.D.

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Ambulatory medicine is one of the most important parts of medical education. Due to its profound relation with professional future of physicians, ambulatory medicine is especially under attention and many studies have been performed to survey its quality and to design some ways to promote it. There is obvious deficiency in our evidence about ambulatory medicine. The aim of this study was to survey the quality of teaching of the ambulatory medicine from the viewpoint of the faculty members and students of medical faculty of Mazandaran.Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive and cross-sectional study. The study's population consisted of students, residents and clinical faculty members who were included by simple sampling. Data collection was performed by a questionnaire with 22 questions about demographic and educational variables as well as respondents’ opinions about environmental conditions, independent activities, instructors’ supervision, and social training in the ambulatory clinics. The validity of the questionnaire was controlled by content validity with expertise consultation, and its reliability was controlled by test-retest(r=0.85. Data were analyzed using spss13 software.Results: Response rate was 79%, the mean age of 36 faculties was 43.6+- 8.7 years and 32% of them were female. The mean age of 146 students was 25+-3.6 years and 61% were female. The attitude of the majority of the students (88.3% towards the quality of ambulatory teaching was negative, but majority of faculties (66.7% had positive attitudes. There was no significant difference among teaching departments. Attitude of junior trainees was even worse. Attitude of faculty members and students was similar towards inappropriate physical environment of ambulatory clinics, but it was significantly different from independent activities of trainees in clinics (p=0.000; relational drugs prescription (p=0.000; management (p=0.004, and supervision

  6. MOTIVATIONS OF RENAL PATIENT TO CHOOSE THE CONTINUUM AMBULATORIAL PERITONEAL DIALISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Josefina da Silva

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The renal disease imposes to its porter a new conception due. Nowadays, modern techniques, makepossible more freedom to the client, being one of them, continuum Dialise peritoneal ambulatorial. Our objective isto study the election by the method and the feelings related to this chose by the client. We conclude that thermethod, despite its advantages, is not the first option yet, the patient, in some cases are not well trained withintercorrences, but most of them are satisfied with the chose. The nursing still participates just a bit of this processbut it has important role in the ambulatorial and domiciliar attendance of this client, needing more specificformation.

  7. Aluminum concentrations in serum, dialysate, urine and bone among patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joffe, P; Olsen, F; Heaf, J G;

    1989-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) concentration in serum, urine, and dialysate was estimated in 21 patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). In 12 of the patients bone Al concentration was measured as well. Mean serum Al level was 32.4 +/- 21.0 micrograms/l. The Al concentrations in the d......Aluminum (Al) concentration in serum, urine, and dialysate was estimated in 21 patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). In 12 of the patients bone Al concentration was measured as well. Mean serum Al level was 32.4 +/- 21.0 micrograms/l. The Al concentrations...

  8. [Methodology of a cooperative study of response predictors in ambulatory depressive syndrome treated with nomifensine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spriet, A; Beiler, D; Dechorgnat, J; Chigot, C D; Rössner, M; Simon, P

    1978-06-28

    A multicentric therapeutic survey on ambulatory depressive patients has been designed so as to get data allowing response-prediction. The protocol included:--selection of non psychotic ambulatory depressive patients--one month's treatment with nomifensine--collection of data consisting mainly in a series of visual analogue scales, scored by a phisician and given in several random orders to avoid error of proximity. Data treatment indluded:--a step of checking and codification--the study of relations between global appraisal and characteristics of subjects--the study of initial profile of responders and non-responders, using discriminant analysis and correspondance factorial analysis. PMID:673807

  9. The Anxiolytic Effect of Aromatherapy on Patients Awaiting Ambulatory Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hua Ni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine if aromatherapy could reduce preoperative anxiety in ambulatory surgery patients. A total of 109 preoperative patients were randomly assigned to experimental (bergamot essential oil and control (water vapor conditions and their responses to the State Trait Anxiety Inventory and vital signs were monitored. Patients were stratified by previous surgical experience, but that did not influence the results. All those exposed to bergamot essential oil aromatherapy showed a greater reduction in preoperative anxiety than those in the control groups. Aromatherapy may be a useful part of a holistic approach to reducing preoperative anxiety before ambulatory surgery.

  10. CDC Wonder Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) online database on CDC WONDER provides counts and percentages of adverse event case reports after vaccination,...

  11. Consumption of medicinal plants by patients with heart diseases at a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Paula Mendonça; Castilho, Rachel Oliveira; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz Pinho; Martins, Maria Auxiliadora Parreiras

    2016-04-01

    Background Medicinal plants (MP) have been used for many years with the purpose of feeding and curing. Several MP may interfere in drug response and are not always considered as potential drug-interactors in clinical practice. Objective To investigate the consumption of MP by outpatients during a one-year follow-up. Method Patients with cardiopathy diagnosis and indication(s) for long-term use of warfarin were recruited at a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic of a Brazilian public hospital. This research employed a descriptive method. The consumption of MP was examined regarding the type, frequency and forms of use. Results A total of 280 patients were studied. Most patients were female (54.6 %) with an average age of 56.8 ± 13.1 years. The consumption of MP was reported by 46 (16.4 %) patients, totalizing 59 occurrences. Lemon, lemon balm and plantain were the most common MP. The main pharmacological uses involved the digestive, urinary, and respiratory tracts. Tea was the predominant form of consumption (87 %). Twelve (33.3 %) plants presented potential herb-warfarin interactions according to the literature. Conclusion We described the consumption of MP among outpatients characterized by their complex disease status, propensity for adverse events, and socioeconomic limitations. These results may guide pharmacist interventions and procedures to prevent clinical complications. PMID:26941093

  12. Thoracic radiographic features of anticoagulant rodenticide toxicity in fourteen dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoracic radiographs and clinical records from 14 dogs with confirmed anticoagulant rodenticide toxicity were reviewed. Twelve of the 14 dogs were presented with a chief complaint of respiratory distress, and 12 had elevated prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times consistent with a coagulopathy secondary to a clotting factor deficiency. Thoracic radiographs of the 14 dogs were reviewed and abnomalities included increased mediastinal soft tissue opacity with extra and intrathoracic tracheal narrowing (4/14), increased mediastinal soft tissue opacity without tracheal narrowing (8/14), variable degrees of pleural effusion (13/14) and generalized, patchy interstitial/alveolar pulmonary infiltrates (8/14). Radiographic evidence of cardiomegaly and pulmonary artery abnormalities consistent with concurrent heartworm infestation were detected in one dog. In four dogs, dramatic tracheal narrowing was identified on the lateral thoracic radiograph caused by either mediastinal hemorrhage compressing the trachea or submucosal hemorrhage within the tracheal lumen. The trachea was displaced in a ventral direction in two dogs, and extra and intrathoracic luminal diameter narrowing was evident cranially in all four dogs. Two of these four dogs had soft tissue opacity within the dorsal trachea that extended from the larynx to the intrathoracic trachea. Twelve of the 14 dogs survived with standard treatment protocols utilizing injectable and oral vitamin K1. One dog died from pancreatitis and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. The other dog died soon after presentation due to severe, disseminated hemorrhage. Follow-up thoracic radiographs were made in four dogs that survived and showed resolution of the mediastinal, pleural and pulmonary changes within one to five days after the initiation of vitamin K1 therapy

  13. Suboptimal use of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başaran, Özcan; Dogan, Volkan; Beton, Osman; Tekinalp, Mehmet; Aykan, Ahmet Cağri; Kalaycioğlu, Ezgi; Bolat, Ismail; Taşar, Onur; Şafak, Özgen; Kalcik, Macit; Yaman, Mehmet; İnci, Sinan; Altintaş, Bernas; Kalkan, Sedat; Kirma, Cevat; Biteker, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to investigate the potential misuse of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) and the physicians’ adherence to current European guideline recommendations in real-world using a large dataset from Real-life Multicenter Survey Evaluating Stroke Prevention Strategies in Turkey (RAMSES Study). RAMSES study is a prospective, multicenter, nationwide registry (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02344901). In this subgroup analysis of RAMSES study, patients who were on NOACs were classified as appropriately treated (AT), undertreated (UT), and overtreated (OT) according to the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines. The independent predictors of UT and OT were determined by multivariate logistic regression. Of the 2086 eligible patients, 1247 (59.8%) received adequate treatment. However, off-label use was detected in 839 (40.2%) patients; 634 (30.4%) patients received UT and 205 (9.8%) received OT. Independent predictors of UT included >65 years of age, creatinine clearance ≥50 mL/min, urban living, existing dabigatran treatment, and HAS-BLED score of <3, whereas that of OT were creatinine clearance <50 mL/min, ongoing rivaroxaban treatment, and HAS-BLED score of ≥3. The suboptimal use of NOACs is common because of physicians’ poor compliance to the guideline recommendations in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Older patients who were on dabigatran treatment with good renal functions and low risk of bleeding were at risk of UT, whereas patients who were on rivaroxaban treatment with renal impairment and high risk of bleeding were at risk of OT. Therefore, a greater emphasis should be given to prescribe the recommended dose for the specified patients. PMID:27583892

  14. Successful management of anticoagulation therapy during international travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Teresa; Armor, Becky L

    2012-03-01

    Warfarin is considered a high-risk drug because of its narrow therapeutic window, variability in dose response, and multitude of drug and food interactions. Although travel advice is available for patients who are taking warfarin, it is geared toward patients who are traveling to developed countries and tends to be lacking in detail. We describe a 53-year-old woman with two mechanical heart valves and chronic atrial fibrillation who was taking warfarin for thromboembolism prophylaxis and had plans to travel to Vietnam for 10 weeks. Three days before her departure, she was prescribed amiodarone for long-term use. As a result of the extended duration of her travel and the complexities of warfarin use, the pharmacists who managed the patient's anticoagulation reviewed several aspects of a comprehensive management approach with the patient for a safe international trip. They assessed the patient's thromboembolic and hemorrhagic risks, and determined which other drugs (e.g., enoxaparin, phytonadione), dosages, and adequate supplies would be required along with warfarin, as well as how to safely transport these drugs during travel. In addition, the logistics of effectively monitoring international normalized ratio (INR) levels were evaluated, and methods of managing multiple potential scenarios were carefully planned out. Contact with the patient was made through pharmacist-directed telephone visits throughout the travel period. A total of 12 telephone visits were conducted with the patient during the 10 weeks of travel. Her INR was supratherapeutic on three occasions and was subtherapeutic once; however, neither enoxaparin nor phytonadione were needed during the travel period, and the patient returned safely to the United States. Effective and safe use of high-risk drugs for patients leaving the United States requires extensive pretravel planning, and pharmacists can play a central role in optimizing therapeutic outcomes for these patients during international travel

  15. Outcome analysis of a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, V M; Gums, J G; Ahmed, O I; Moore, L M

    1995-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine if a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation monitoring service (AMS) improved the outcomes of patients receiving warfarin in a family practice setting and was cost effective in treating and preventing thromboembolic disorders. A retrospective chart review was performed on all patients at the University of Florida's Family Practice Residency Program who received warfarin pharmacotherapy between October 1, 1988, and December 15, 1993. The outcomes of patients followed by AMS were compared with those of a control group consisting of patients receiving warfarin but followed only by their physician. Outcomes were evaluated based on the number of thromboembolic and hemorrhagic events, as well as unplanned clinic visits, emergency room visits, and hospital admissions. Cost of hospital admissions, emergency room visits, and participation in the AMS were analyzed. During 28 person-years of treatment, control subjects sustained 12 thromboembolic events (2 pulmonary embolisms, 1 cerebrovascular accident, and 9 deep venous thromboses) and 2 minor and 5 major hemorrhagic events. The study group reported two minor hemorrhagic events during a total of 60 person-years. The control group was 20 times more likely than the study group to experience any event (rate ratio 20, 95% CI 5-87). In addition, hospitalization and emergency room charges indicated an actual cost of $119,074.95 for the control group's events. The cost to this group for 28 person-years of participation in the AMS would have been $5040.00. A potential cost avoidance of $4072.68 per person-year of follow-up may have been possible if these patients had been followed by the AMS. A pharmacist-managed AMS in a family practice setting can result in improved outcomes for patients receiving warfarin and is cost effective. PMID:8602380

  16. Preferences for anticoagulation therapy in atrial fibrillation: the patients' view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, Björn; Thate-Waschke, Inga-Marion; Bauersachs, Rupert; Kohlmann, Thomas; Wilke, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Since the introduction of new oral anticoagulants (NOACs), besides vitamin-K antagonists, an additional option for stroke prevention of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) is available. The objective of this study was to assess AF patients' preferences with regard to the attributes of these different treatment options. We conducted a multicenter study among randomly selected physicians. Preferences were assessed by computer-assisted telephone interviews. We used a discrete-choice-experiment (DCE) with four convenience-related treatment dependent attributes (need of bridging: yes/no, interactions with food/nutrition: yes/no, need of INR controls/dose adjustment: yes/no; frequency of intake: once/twice daily) and one comparator attribute (distance to practitioner: 15 km). Preferences measured in the interviews were analyzed descriptively and based on a conditional logit regression model. A total of 486 AF patients (age: 73.9 ± 8.2 years; 43.2 % female; mean CHA2DS2-VASc: 3.7 ± 1.6; current medication: 48.1 % rivaroxaban, 51.9 % VKA) could be interviewed. Regardless of type of medication, patients significantly preferred the attribute levels (in order of patients' importance) "once daily intake" (Level: once = 1 vs. twice = 0; Coefficient = 0.615; p 15 km = 0 vs. ≤1 km = 1; 0.494; p important OAC-attribute for patients' choice followed by "no bridging necessary" and "no interactions with food/nutrition". Thus, patients with AF seem to prefer treatment options which are easier to administer. PMID:26260625

  17. The latest recommendations on the use of new oral anticoagulants in routine practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Witkowski

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs has become a breakthrough in anticoagulant treatment and it is expected to rise significantly in upcoming years. The use of conventional anticoagulants have several limitations: subcutaneous administration of heparin, or close monitoring of INR during application of vitamin K antagonists. In the last decade, target-specific oral anticoagulants (TSOAC including dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban have been marketed for prophylaxis and treatment. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the potential uses, side effects, and management of these agents in routine practice. NOACs have major pharmacologic advantages, including a rapid onset and offset of action, fewer drug interactions than conventional anticoagulants, and predictable pharmacokinetics. These agents are gaining popularity among both physicians and patients because of their easiness of administration and the eliminating the requirement for regular coagulation monitoring. In this review, we focus on discussing practical recommendations for the use of NOACs and the risks and benefits of incorporating them into routine practice.

  18. Comparison of Physicochemical Characteristics and Anticoagulant Activities of Polysaccharides from Three Sea Cucumbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengmin Wang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to search for sulfated polysaccharides in different invertebrate connective tissues and to examine their biological activities, we have isolated three types of polysaccharides from the body wall of the three sea cucumbers Holothuria edulis, Apostichopus japonicas and Holothuria nobilis. The physicochemical properties and anticoagulant activities of these polysaccharides were examined and compared. The chemical composition analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR analysis indicate that two types of polysaccharides, sulfated fucan and fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FuCS, were found in all of the three species and in addition a neutral glycan was observed in H. edulis. The neutral α-glucan was firstly obtained from sea cucumber. The same type of polysaccharides from different species of sea cucumbers have similar physicochemical properties and anticoagulant activities, but those of different types of glycans are significantly different, possibly due to their different monosaccharide compositions, electric charges and average molecular weights. The FuCSs have stronger anticoagulant activities than the sulfated fucans, although the molecular sizes of the FuCSs are lower than those of the sulfated fucans, whereas the neutral glucan has no activity, as expected from the absence of sulfate. Thus, anticoagulant activities of the different type of polysaccharides are likely to relate to monosaccharide composition and sulfate content. Preliminary analysis suggests that the sulfation patterns of the FuCSs may result in the difference in anticoagulant activities. Our data could help elucidate the structure-activity relationship of the sea cucumber polysaccharides.

  19. The use of hirudin as universal anticoagulant in haematology, clinical chemistry and blood grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menssen, H D; Melber, K; Brandt, N; Thiel, E

    2001-12-01

    Undesirable interactions between anticoagulants and diagnostic test kit procedures so far have prevented the development of a single uniform blood sampling tube. Contrary to K2-EDTA, heparin and other anticoagulants, hirudin only minimally alters blood cells and dissolved blood constituents, thus qualifying as a universal anticoagulant for diagnostic purposes. Automated complete blood counts, automated analyses of clinical chemistry analytes and immunohaematology were performed from hirudinised and routinely processed blood obtained from healthy volunteers (n=35) and hospitalised patients (n=45). Hirudin (400 ATU/ml blood) sufficiently anticoagulated blood for diagnostic purposes. The measurements of automated complete blood counts obtained from K2-EDTA-anticoagulated and hirudinised blood correlated significantly as did the measurements of 24 clinical chemistry analytes from hirudinised plasma and serum. Regression analysis revealed that the results of complete blood counts and clinical chemistry tests were predictable from the respective measurements from hirudinised blood (p=0.001). Immunohaematological tests and cross-matching from hirudinised and native blood of the same donors gave identical results. Single clotting factors, but not global coagulation analytes, could be measured from hirudinised blood. Therefore, a universal hirudin-containing blood sampling tube could be designed for automated analysis of haematological, serological and clinical chemistry analytes. PMID:11798089

  20. [An outpatient clinic measure and control system for anticoagulation levels, CoaguChek XS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Guardeño, Araceli; Pérez Lucena, Dolores Amalia

    2009-03-01

    A significant increase during recent years in the number of patients who need Oral Anticoagulant Treatment has meant a greater role for nurses, especially in Primary Health Care Centers, since nurses, along with doctors, are the professionals responsible for treating those patients. This control is carried out by measuring the levels of anticoagulants in the blood, regulating the anticoagulant medicine doses, and providing patients with the essential health education so patients participate in the treatment of their illness. To a large degree, the preponderance of Primary Health Care Centers in the aforementioned control has developed hand-in-hand with the availability of portable, simple and low cost coagulation measuring systems which permit a direct reading of a patient's anticoagulation level with one drop of capillary blood. The objective of this article is introduce the reader to a measuring system appropriate for outpatient clinic control of anticoagulant levels in blood by mans of the CoaguChek XS System, which is described. The authors specify the sample extraction procedure, how to measure coagulant levels, and recommendations to keep in mind while carrying out this procedure. The authors sketch the importance of health education and finally, they describe some advantages and inconveniences this system has. PMID:19462604

  1. Adherence to long-term anticoagulation treatment, what is known and what the future might hold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdou, John K; Auyeung, Vivian; Patel, Jignesh P; Arya, Roopen

    2016-07-01

    Adherence to medication, commonly reported as being 50% in chronic diseases, is of great concern in healthcare. Medication non-adherence is particularly apparent in chronic diseases, where treatment is often preventative and may provide little or no symptomatic relief or feedback for the patient. A lot of research has been undertaken to describe the extent of non-adherence to long-term anticoagulation therapy, particularly with vitamin K antagonists and more recently with direct oral anticoagulants. However, the literature is scarce with respect to describing adherence to anticoagulation in terms of the behavioural aspects that influence medicine use. Utilizing the COM-B (capability, opportunity, motivation and behaviour) psychological model of non-adherence, we present the available evidence, not only in terms of describing the extent of the non-adherence problem, but also describing why patients do not adhere, offering theory-driven and evidence-based solutions to improve long-term adherence to chronic anticoagulation therapy. Lessons learned are not only applicable within the field of anticoagulation but throughout haematology. PMID:27173746

  2. A Summary of the Literature Evaluating Adherence and Persistence with Oral Anticoagulants in Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obamiro, Kehinde O; Chalmers, Leanne; Bereznicki, Luke R E

    2016-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a growing public health concern and remains an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. Warfarin, a commonly used oral anticoagulant, is associated with a 60-70 % relative reduction in stroke risk and a reduction in mortality of 26 %. However, warfarin has several limitations, including a narrow therapeutic window, variable dose response, multiple interactions with other drugs and concurrent illnesses, and the need for frequent laboratory monitoring. In recent years, the direct acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs), including dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban, have been developed to overcome the limitations of warfarin therapy. These treatment strategies are either comparable or superior to warfarin in stroke prevention in AF. Despite the documented effectiveness of oral anticoagulants in AF, patients may not derive optimal benefit if they fail to adhere or fail to continue with their medication. This may lead to treatment failure, increased hospitalization and mortality. This review summarizes the literature regarding adherence and persistence (or discontinuation) rates with oral anticoagulants in the management of AF; the impact of non-adherence and non-persistence on treatment outcomes; and the effectiveness of strategies to improve adherence and persistence with oral anticoagulant therapy. PMID:27262433

  3. Development and implementation of a pharmacist-managed inpatient anticoagulation monitoring program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, Jessica C; Kraus, Peggy S; Burton, Bradley L; Ensor, Christopher R; Nesbit, Todd W; Ross, Patricia A; Thomas, Michelle L; Streiff, Michael B

    2011-05-15

    PURPOSE. A stepwise approach to development and implementation of a program to standardize and increase pharmacists' involvement in anticoagulation therapy at a large academic medical center is described. SUMMARY. In response to the Joint Commission's national goal of improved patient safety in anticoagulation therapy, a work group of pharmacy administrators, educators, clinical specialists, and decentralized pharmacists at the hospital developed the structure for a comprehensive inpatient anticoagulation program (IAP); the work group also developed a list of required competencies, educational materials, assessment methods, and mechanisms for eliciting feedback from IAP pharmacists and other patient care staff. After completion of training that included structured case-review sessions, a one-on-one shadowing experience, and competency assessment, IAP pharmacists began reviewing clinical and laboratory data on patients receiving warfarin and low-molecular-weight heparins and providing recommendations to physicians, nurse practitioners, and other health care team members. Feedback from other clinicians was generally positive, with a majority of those surveyed indicating that increased pharmacist involvement in anticoagulation monitoring and dosage adjustment resulted in improved patient care; about 80% indicated that they concurred with pharmacists' recommendations at least 75% of the time. Results of a survey of IAP pharmacists indicated increased satisfaction with their daily duties but also a need for improved pharmacist-to-pharmacist communication. CONCLUSION. Case-based advanced training and implementation of an IAP in a tertiary care hospital increased pharmacists' involvement in the management of inpatients receiving anticoagulants. PMID:21546645

  4. Anticoagulation inhibits tumor cell-mediated release of platelet angiogenic proteins and diminishes platelet angiogenic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battinelli, Elisabeth M; Markens, Beth A; Kulenthirarajan, Rajesh A; Machlus, Kellie R; Flaumenhaft, Robert; Italiano, Joseph E

    2014-01-01

    Platelets are a reservoir for angiogenic proteins that are secreted in a differentially regulated process. Because of the propensity for clotting, patients with malignancy are often anticoagulated with heparin products, which paradoxically offer a survival benefit by an unknown mechanism. We hypothesized that antithrombotic agents alter the release of angiogenesis regulatory proteins from platelets. Our data revealed that platelets exposed to heparins released significantly decreased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in response to adenosine 5'-diphosphate or tumor cells (MCF-7 cells) and exhibited a decreased angiogenic potential. The releasate from these platelets contained decreased proangiogenic proteins. The novel anticoagulant fondaparinux (Xa inhibitor) demonstrated a similar impact on the platelet angiogenic potential. Because these anticoagulants decrease thrombin generation, we hypothesized that they disrupt signaling through the platelet protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) receptor. Addition of PAR1 antagonists to platelets decreased VEGF release and angiogenic potential. Exposure to a PAR1 agonist in the presence of anticoagulants rescued the angiogenic potential. In vivo studies demonstrated that platelets from anticoagulated patients had decreased VEGF release and angiogenic potential. Our data suggest that the mechanism by which antithrombotic agents increase survival and decrease metastasis in cancer patients is through attenuation of platelet angiogenic potential. PMID:24065244

  5. Childhood adversities in relation to psychiatric disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Pietrek, Christian; Elbert, Thomas; Weierstall, Roland; Müller, Oliver; Rockstroh, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Substantial evidence has documented that adverse childhood experiences exert deleterious effects on mental health. It is less clear to what extent specific maltreatment during specific developmental periods may vary between disorders rather than increasing vulnerability for any particular disorder. The present comparison of characteristics of childhood adversity (type and frequency of adversity, developmental period) between major depressive disorder (MDD), borderline personality disorder (BP...

  6. Adverse effects of antioxidative vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowski, Maciej; Grzegorczyk, Krzysztof

    2012-06-01

    High doses of synthetic antioxidative vitamins: A, E, C and β-carotene are often used on long-term basis in numerous preventive and therapeutic medical applications. Instead of expected health effects, the use of those vitamins may however lead to cases of hypervitaminosis and even to intoxication. The article points out main principles of safety which are to be observed during supplementation with antioxidative vitamins. Toxic effects resulting from erroneous administration of high doses of those substances on organs and systems of the organism are also discussed. Attention is drawn to interactions of antioxidative vitamins with concomitantly used drugs, as well as intensification of adverse effects caused by various exogenous chemical factors. Moreover, the article presents the evaluation of supplementation with these vitamins, which was performed in large studies. PMID:22528540

  7. EFFICACY OF THERAPY WITH INDIRECT ANTICOAGULANTS: ROLE OF THE FOODSTUFF VITAMIN K CONTENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Momot

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The anticoagulants of indirect action during many years serve drugs of basic prophylaxis and therapy of thromboembolic episodes at cardiovascular , neurological, oncology, orthopaedic and other diseases, after surgical interventions and traumas, and also large bunch of the generically caused and acquired (secondary thrombophilie. The contents of vitamin К1 in nutrition depend on a method of product preparation. The highest concentrations are found in dark green vegetables and grass: parsley, spinach, green turnip, and also in cabbage and lettuce. For achievement stable hypocoagulation at assignment of anticoagulants of indirect action the daily entering with nutrition of constant amounts of vitamin K (at a level 65-80 mkg/day is necessary. Thus, a doctor at assignment of anticoagulants, is obliged to pay attention to character of a food and to inform patient about possible undesirable consequences at the use of products keeping high levels of vitamin К1.

  8. Self management of oral anticoagulant therapy in children with congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas D; Attermann, Jørn; Hjortdal, Vibeke E.;

    2001-01-01

    complications requiring doctoral intervention. All the patients and their parents expressed full satisfaction with the treatment. Conclusion: Selfmanagement of oral anticoagulation provides a good quality of treatment, which is feasible and safe in selected children with congenital cardiac disease.......Objective: The concept of self – management of oral anticoagulation has been shown to entail better quality of treatment than conventional management when assessed in selected adults. We have extended the concept of self – management to include children with congenital cardiac disease......, hypothesizing self-management of oral anticoagulation is also possible in this subset of patients. Our aim was to assess the quality of self-management. Methods: We trained 14 children aged from 2.2 to 15.6 years, with a mean age of 9.7 years, and their parents, in domiciliary analysis of the International...

  9. Bromadiolone resistance does not respond to absence of anticoagulants in experimental populations of Norway rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, A.C.; Leirs, H.; Siegismund, Hans Redlef

    how bromadiolone-resistant phenotypes are manifested when bromadiolone selection is absent. Experimental populations were established under semi-natural conditions with wild rats trapped at two Danish farms. The individuals caught on each of the two farms were divided into two experimental groups. One......Resistance to anticoagulant rodenticides in Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) is documented to be associated with pleiotropic effects, notably with an increased dietary vitamin K requirement. The aim of this study was to quantify these effects in small populations of Norway rat in Denmark and to see...... against resistance in the two non-treatment populations was found to be insignificant. Thus, absence of anticoagulant, under the environmental conditions provided, did not lead to a selection favouring anticoagulant-sensitive rats. However, we found some evidence of selection against presumed homozygous...

  10. Real Data on Effectiveness, Tolerability and Safety of New Oral Anticoagulant Agents: Focus on Dabigatran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabile, Eugenio; Izzo, Raffaele; Rozza, Francesco; Losi, Maria Angela; Coscioni, Enrico; Trimarco, Bruno

    2016-06-01

    Vitamin K-dependent antagonists (VKAs) are the most commonly used oral anticoagulants. Non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs), directly target factor IIa (dabigatran) or Xa (rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban) have predictable pharmacological effects and relatively few drug and food interactions compared with VKA. Among NOACs, dabigatran has been extensively tested for stroke prevention in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation eligible for oral anticoagulation with VKA. Dabigatran is at least as effective as warfarin at preventing stroke with advantages of less serious bleeding except for gastrointestinal bleeding, which occurs more often than with warfarin. The findings of dabigatran use in randomized trials, post market registries and specific clinical settings are discussed in this article. PMID:27207360

  11. Practice points in gynecardiology: Abnormal uterine bleeding in premenopausal women taking oral anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Angela H E M; Euler, Mia von; Bongers, Marlies Y; Rolden, Herbert J A; Grutters, Janneke P C; Ulrich, Lian; Schenck-Gustafsson, Karin

    2015-12-01

    A growing number of premenopausal women are currently using antithrombotic and/or (dual) antiplatelet therapy for various cardiovascular indications. These may induce or exacerbate abnormal uterine bleeding and more awareness and knowledge among prescribers is required. Heavy and irregular menstrual bleeding is common in women in their forties and may have a variety of underlying causes that require different treatment options. Thus using anticoagulants in premenopausal women demands specific expertise and close collaboration between cardiovascular physicians and gynecologists. In this article we summarize the scope of the problem and provide practical recommendations for the care for young women taking anticoagulants and/or (dual) antiplatelet therapy. We also recommend that more safety data on uterine bleeding with novel anticoagulants in premenopausal women should be obtained. PMID:26358933

  12. Statement on the safety of glucosamine for patients receiving coumarin anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    2011-01-01

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies to provide a scientific statement on the safety of glucosamine for patients receiving coumarin anticoagulants. More than 40 case reports have been collected by drug-monitoring agencies that...... showed in some patients being prescribed coumarin anticoagulants, especially warfarin, that the International Normalised Ratio (INR) increased after they began taking glucosamine, which indicated an increase in the coagulation time. In most cases the increased INR values were symptomless but in some...... cases haemorrhage occurred in a variety of organs, and in one case this resulted in a persistent vegetative state. The evidence for an interaction between glucosamine and coumarin anticoagulants is strengthened by the observation that in the majority of cases the INR began to fall to normal values when...

  13. The susceptibility of Tatera indica, Nesokia indica and Bandicota bengalensis to three anticoagulant rodenticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, J H; Rehman, A B

    1977-02-01

    Three South-Asian rodent past species were tested for susceptibility to anticoagulant rodenticides. Wheat fluor containing 0-025% warfarin 0-0375% coumatetralyl or 0-005% difenacoum was fed to 260 Tatera indica, 140 Nesokia indica and 81 Bandicota bengalensis for 1-56 days. Tatera was about as susceptible to anticoagulants as Rattus has been reported to be. Nesokia and Bandicota were extremely variable: though the majority were highly susceptible, the slopes of the dose-mortality curves were close to zero. The difenacoum diet appeared to be more toxic than the warfarin diet to all three species, but less toxic than the coumatetralyl diet to Tatera and Nesokia. All of the anticoagulants were eventually lethal to all of the animals tested. PMID:264500

  14. My Patient Taking A Novel Oral Anticoagulant Presents With Major GI Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amartya Kundu; Partha Sardar; Jessica Huston; Parijat Sen; Saurav Chatterjee; Ramez Nairooz; John J. Ryan; Wilbert S. Aronow

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Novel Oral Anticoagulants (NOACs such as Dabigatran, Rivaroxaban, Apixaban and Edoxaban are becoming increasingly popular choices for anticoagulation in place of oral Vitamin K Antagonists in various clinical settings. However, they are thought to be associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. Moreover, no specific antidote is available which can rapidly reverse the anti-coagulant action of NOACs raising concern that gastrointestinal bleeding with NOACs could carry a worse prognosis than that associated with conventional agents. In this review, we describe a case of gastrointestinal bleeding in the setting of NOAC use, followed by a brief overview of the pivotal trials involving NOACs. Clinical issues such as pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of NOAC induced GI bleeding have been described. Future trials will help elucidate the true incidence, risk factors and preventive strategies for NOAC associated gastrointestinal bleeding.

  15. How I treat patients with inherited bleeding disorders who need anticoagulant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Karlyn; Key, Nigel S

    2016-07-14

    Situations that ordinarily necessitate consideration of anticoagulation, such as arterial and venous thrombotic events and prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation, become challenging in patients with inherited bleeding disorders such as hemophilia A, hemophilia B, and von Willebrand disease. There are no evidence-based guidelines to direct therapy in these patients, and management strategies that incorporate anticoagulation must weigh a treatment that carries a risk of hemorrhage in a patient who is already at heightened risk against the potential consequences of not treating the thrombotic event. In this paper, we review atherothrombotic disease, venous thrombotic disease, and atrial fibrillation in patients with inherited bleeding disorders, and discuss strategies for using anticoagulants in this population using cases to illustrate these considerations. PMID:27106121

  16. Use of novel oral anticoagulants for patients with atrial fibrillation: systematic review and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Nancy M

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF), a common arrhythmia, increases the risk of ischemic stroke. Stroke and bleeding scores for patients with AF can help to stratify risk and determine the need for antithrombotic therapy, for which warfarin has been the gold standard. Although highly effective, warfarin has several limitations that can lead to its underuse. Data from randomized, Phase III clinical trials of the novel oral anticoagulants, dabigatran, a direct thrombin inhibitor, and rivaroxaban and apixaban, both factor Xa inhibitors, indicate these drugs are at least noninferior to warfarin for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism. They are easier to administer, and have an equivalent or lower risk of bleeding versus warfarin. A better understanding of the risks and benefits of the novel oral anticoagulants, and their use in clinical practice, will prepare clinicians to anticipate and address educational and clinical needs of AF patients and their families, and promote evidence-based prescription of appropriate and safe anticoagulation therapy. PMID:24373340

  17. Adverse events in healthcare: learning from mistakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafter, N; Hickey, A; Condell, S; Conroy, R; O'Connor, P; Vaughan, D; Williams, D

    2015-04-01

    Large national reviews of patient charts estimate that approximately 10% of hospital admissions are associated with an adverse event (defined as an injury resulting in prolonged hospitalization, disability or death, caused by healthcare management). Apart from having a significant impact on patient morbidity and mortality, adverse events also result in increased healthcare costs due to longer hospital stays. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of adverse events are preventable. Through identifying the nature and rate of adverse events, initiatives to improve care can be developed. A variety of methods exist to gather adverse event data both retrospectively and prospectively but these do not necessarily capture the same events and there is variability in the definition of an adverse event. For example, hospital incident reporting collects only a very small fraction of the adverse events found in retrospective chart reviews. Until there are systematic methods to identify adverse events, progress in patient safety cannot be reliably measured. This review aims to discuss the need for a safety culture that can learn from adverse events, describe ways to measure adverse events, and comment on why current adverse event monitoring is unable to demonstrate trends in patient safety. PMID:25078411

  18. Role Model Ambulatory Care Clinical Training Site in a Community-Based Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magarian, Edward O.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    An interdisciplinary project provided ambulatory care clinical training for pharmacy and nursing students in community-based pharmacies, promoting early detection and medical follow-up of common health problems within the community. Students learned new clinical skills in patient health assessment, new diagnostic technologies, patient education…

  19. Integrated Clinical Geriatric Pharmacy Clerkship in Long Term, Acute and Ambulatory Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, Isabel; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A clinical geriatric pharmacy clerkship containing three separate practice areas (long-term, acute, and ambulatory care) is described. The program follows the medical education clerkship protocol, with a clinical pharmacy specialist, pharmacy practice resident, and student. Participation in medical rounds, interdisciplinary conferences, and…

  20. Effects of an isocaloric healthy Nordic diet on ambulatory blood pressure in metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brader, Lea Johanne; Uusitupa, M; Dragsted, Lars Ove;

    2014-01-01

    beneficial effects on ambulatory BP in subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS).Subjects/methods:In total, 37 subjects were randomized to either a healthy Nordic diet or a control diet. A healthy Nordic diet embraced whole grains, rapeseed oil, berries, fruits, vegetables, fish, nuts and low-fat dairy...

  1. Ambulatory esophageal manometry/pH-metry discriminates between patients with different esophageal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, W G; Beck, I T; Wang, H

    1996-02-01

    Ambulatory esophageal manometry/pH-metry has been used primarily in patients with chest pain of presumed esophageal origin, and it is unclear whether the discriminating power of this test applies to other esophageal symptoms. In the present study, prolonged ambulatory manometry/pH recordings were compared in 17 healthy controls, 12 patients with atypical chest pain, and 11 patients with chest pain and nonstructural dysphagia using the Synectics microdigitrapper system. Chest pain patients tended to have higher values for all the pH variables, but their esophageal motility parameters were no different than controls. On the other hand, the chest pain plus dysphagia group was characterized by a significantly lower proportion of propagated contractions between 10 and 5 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter. This group also tended to have a higher frequency of high-amplitude or prolonged-duration contractions. In comparison to the results of standard stationary esophageal manometry, the prolonged ambulatory recordings were more sensitive in detecting esophageal motor dysfunction in the two patient groups. This study suggests that quantitative analysis of ambulatory pH/motility recordings is a sensitive method of evaluating patients with suspected esophageal dysfunction. PMID:8601383

  2. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BLOOD-PRESSURE DURING HEMODIALYSIS AND AMBULATORY BLOOD-PRESSURE IN BETWEEN DIALYSES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HUISMAN, RM; DEBRUIN, C; KLONT, D; SMIT, AJ

    1995-01-01

    Background. Ambulatory blood pressure measurements in haemodialysis patients are relevant in view of the high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in chronic haemodialysis patients. Methods. Twelve normotensive patients were studied from the beginning of one dialysis until the end of the next (mea

  3. High Prevalence of Obesity in Ambulatory Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, L.; Van de Ven, L.; Katsarou, V.; Rentziou, E.; Doran, M.; Jackson, P.; Reilly, J. J.; Wilson, D.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Obesity prevalence is unusually high among adults with intellectual disability (ID). There is limited and conflicting evidence on obesity prevalence among ambulatory children and adolescents with ID. The present study aimed to estimate obesity prevalence in this group and to compare with population prevalence. Methods: Survey of nine…

  4. Risk prediction models for mortality in ambulatory patients with heart failure: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Alba, Ana C; Agoritsas, Thomas; Jankowski, Milosz; Courvoisier, Delphine; Walter, Stephen D.; Guyatt, Gordon H; Ross, Heather J

    2013-01-01

    Optimal management of heart failure requires accurate assessment of prognosis. Many prognostic models are available. Our objective was to identify studies that evaluate the use of risk prediction models for mortality in ambulatory patients with heart failure and describe their performance and clinical applicability.

  5. Blood pressure load does not add to ambulatory blood pressure level for cardiovascular risk stratification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yan; Thijs, Lutgarde; Boggia, José;

    2014-01-01

    Experts proposed blood pressure (BP) load derived from 24-hour ambulatory BP recordings as a more accurate predictor of outcome than level, in particular in normotensive people. We analyzed 8711 subjects (mean age, 54.8 years; 47.0% women) randomly recruited from 10 populations. We expressed BP...

  6. Higher monetary incentives led to a lowered response rate in ambulatory patients: a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetsenruijter, J.; Lieshout, J. van; Wensing, M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Monetary incentives can increase response rate in patient surveys, but calibration of the optimal incentive level is required. Our aim was to assess the effect of different monetary incentives on response rates to calibrate the optimal monetary incentive for ambulatory patients. STUDY DE

  7. Primary Care, Ambulatory Care, and Family Medicine: Overlapping But Not Synonymous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Robert E.

    1975-01-01

    Defines and depicts graphically the relationships between primary, secondary, and tertiary care functions (from least to most intensified phases of medical care); ambulatory care (care of sick or well people not confined to bed); and family medicine (an emerging medical discipline focusing on complete and longterm care of the family). (JT)

  8. Survival in Mediterranean Ambulatory Patients With Chronic Heart Failure. A Population-based Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frigola Capell, E.; Comin-Colet, J.; Davins-Miralles, J.; Gich-Saladich, I.J.; Wensing, M.; Verdu-Rotellar, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: Scarce research has been performed in ambulatory patients with chronic heart failure in the Mediterranean area. Our aim was to describe survival trends in our target population and the impact of prognostic factors. METHODS: We carried out a population-based retrospective

  9. Self-Selected Walking Speed is Predictive of Daily Ambulatory Activity in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Addie; Fulk, George D; Beets, Michael W; Herter, Troy M; Fritz, Stacy L

    2016-04-01

    Daily ambulatory activity is associated with health and functional status in older adults; however, assessment requires multiple days of activity monitoring. The objective of this study was to determine the relative capabilities of self-selected walking speed (SSWS), maximal walking speed (MWS), and walking speed reserve (WSR) to provide insight into daily ambulatory activity (steps per day) in community-dwelling older adults. Sixty-seven older adults completed testing and activity monitoring (age 80.39 [6.73] years). SSWS (R2 = .51), MWS (R2 = .35), and WSR calculated as a ratio (R2 = .06) were significant predictors of daily ambulatory activity in unadjusted linear regression. Cutpoints for participants achieving steps/day were identified for SSWS (≤ 0.97 m/s, 44.2% sensitivity, 95.7% specificity, 10.28 +LR, 0.58 -LR) and MWS (≤ 1.39 m/s, 60.5% sensitivity, 78.3% specificity, 2.79 +LR, 0.50 -LR). SSWS may be a feasible proxy for assessing and monitoring daily ambulatory activity in older adults. PMID:26371593

  10. Association between endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾玥

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis(CAPD)patients.Methods Ninety-four stable CAPD patients from a single center were enrolled in this cross-sectional study.Ultrasound evaluation was conducted on brachial artery to estimate endothelial-dependent

  11. Circadian variation of blood pressure in patients with chronic renal failure on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, P; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Ladefoged, Jens

    1995-01-01

    The circadian pattern of blood pressure variation was investigated in 10 patients with advanced chronic renal failure on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) and in an age-matched group of controls without renal disease with similar office blood pressure level. Monitoring was done using...

  12. Strategies for reducing potentially avoidable hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freund, T.; Campbell, S.M.; Geissler, S.; Kunz, C.U.; Mahler, C.; Peters-Klimm, F.; Szecsenyi, J.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACSCs) are seen as potentially avoidable with optimal primary care. Little is known, however, about how primary care physicians rate these hospitalizations and whether and how they could be avoided. This study explores the complex c

  13. Limits to Ambulatory Displacement of Coconut Mites in Absence and Presence of Food-Related Cues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W.S. Melo; D.B. Lima; M.W. Sabelis; A. Pallini; M.G.C. Gondim Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Ambulatory movement of plant-feeding mites sets limits to the distances they can cover to reach a new food source. In absence of food-related cues these limits are determined by survival, walking activity, walking path tortuosity and walking speed, whereas in presence of food the limits are also det

  14. Treatment goals for ambulatory blood pressure and plasma lipids after stroke are often not reached

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Aase Worså; Kofoed, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    In Danish health care, secondary prevention after stroke is currently handled mainly by general practitioners using office blood pressure (OBP) assessment of hypertension. The aim of this study was to compare the OBP approach to 24-hour assessment by ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) monitoring...

  15. Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions in Persons with an Intellectual Disability--Development of a Consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, Robert S.; Ouellette-Kuntz, Helene; Brownell, Marni; Colantonio, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is evidence that the primary care provided for persons with an intellectual disability living in the community has been inadequate. Hospitalization rates for ambulatory care sensitive (ACS) conditions are considered an indicator for access to, and quality of, primary care. The objective of this research was to identify ACS…

  16. Differential expression of cytochrome P450 genes between bromadiolone-resistant and anticoagulant-susceptible Norway rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette Drude Kjær; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Fredholm, Merete;

    2008-01-01

    Background: Anticoagulant resistance in Norway rats, Rattus norvegicus (Berk.), has been suggested to be conferred by mutations in the VKORC1 gene, encoding the target protein of anticoagulant rodenticides. Other factors, e.g. pharmacokinetics, may also contribute to resistance, however. To examine...

  17. The response of the Egyptian spiny mouse (Acomys cahirinus) and two other species of commensal rodents to anticoagulant rodenticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, W; Redfern, R

    1981-06-01

    The response of Acomys cahirinus to three anticoagulant rodenticides was investigated in the laboratory. In contrast to the other commensal rodents Rattus rattus and R. norvegicus, this species appears to be naturally very resistant to warfarin, difenacoum and brodifacoum. It is considered unlikely that anticoagulant poisons would be effective in the field for the control of A. cahirinus. PMID:7240734

  18. The New Oral Anticoagulants for the Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism: A New Paradigm Shift in Antithrombotic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taki Galanis, MD

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: These novel, oral anticoagulant agents are legitimate options for the treatment of VTE. A careful assessment of a patient׳s comorbidities, medication use, and laboratory results should be undertaken before prescribing the new oral anticoagulant agents for patients with VTE.

  19. Differential expression of cytochrome P450 genes between bromadiolone-resistant and anticoagulant-susceptible Norway rats:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Mette Drude; Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte; Fredholm, Merete;

    2008-01-01

    Anticoagulant resistance in Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) has been suggested to be due to mutations in the VKORC1 gene, encoding the target protein of anticoagulant rodenticides such as warfarin and bromadiolone. Other factors, e.g. pharmacokinetics, may however also contribute to resistance. W...

  20. Use of aminocaproic acid (ACA in extra-amniotic MTP in patients on anti-coagulant therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kale P

    1992-10-01

    Full Text Available A case of rheumatic heart disease (RHD with prosthetic mitral valve endocarditis receiving anticoagulation with heparin, underwent medical termination of pregnancy in a second trimester. The following report entails the use of aminocaproic acid (ACA in preventing excessive bleeding during and after the procedure, while the patient continued to receive anticoagulant therapy.

  1. Periprocedural anticoagulation of patients undergoing pericardiocentesis for cardiac tamponade complicating catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tao; Bai, Rong; Chen, Ying-wei; Yu, Rong-hui; Tang, Ri-bo; Sang, Cai-hua; Li, Song-nan; Ma, Chang-sheng; Dong, Jian-zeng

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulation of patients with cardiac tamponade (CT) complicating catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) is an ongoing problem. The aim of this study was to survey the clinical practice of periprocedural anticoagulation in such patients. This study analyzed the periprocedural anticoagulation of 17 patients with CT complicating AF ablation. Emergent pericardiocentesis was performed once CT was confirmed. The mean drained volume was 410.0 ± 194.1 mL. Protamine sulfate was administered to neutralize heparin (1 mg neutralizes 100 units heparin) in 11 patients with persistent pericardial bleeding and vitamin K1 (10 mg) was given to reverse warfarin in 3 patients with supratherapeutic INR (INR > 2.1). Drainage catheters were removed 12 hours after echocardiography confirmed absence of intrapericardial bleeding and anticoagulation therapy was restored 12 hours after removing the catheter. Fifteen patients took oral warfarin and 10 of them were given subcutaneous injection of LMWH (1 mg/kg, twice daily) as a bridge to resumption of systemic anticoagulation with warfarin. Two patients with a small amount of persistent pericardial effusion were given LMWH on days 5 and 13, and warfarin on days 6 and 24. The dosage of warfarin was adjusted to keep the INR within 2-3 in all patients. After 12 months of follow-up, all patients had no neurological events and no occurrence of delayed CT. The results showed that it was effective and safe to resume anticoagulation therapy 12 hours after removal of the drainage catheter. This may help to prevent thromboembolic events following catheter ablation of AF. PMID:25503659

  2. Taipan snake venom time coupled with ecarin time enhances lupus anticoagulant detection in nonanticoagulated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Gary W; Culhane, Aidan P; Maloney, James C; Archer, Robert A; Breen, Karen A; Hunt, Beverley J

    2016-06-01

    A study is presented which assesses the diagnostic impact of incorporating Taipan snake venom time (TSVT) with ecarin time confirmatory test into an existing dilute Russell's viper venom time (dRVVT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) repertoire when testing nonanticoagulated patients for lupus anticoagulants. A total of 387 plasma samples from nonanticoagulated patients being investigated for antiphospholipid antibodies were tested for lupus anticoagulant by dRVVT and dilute APTT with confirmatory and mixing tests, and TSVT with ecarin time, with commercially available reagents. All were analyzed on a Sysmex CS2000i automated analyzer. Lupus anticoagulant was not detected by dRVVT, dilute APTT or TSVT screening in 265 of 387 (68.5%) samples. A lupus anticoagulant was detected in 60 (15.5%) samples in dRVVT and/or dilute APTT analysis, but gave normal TSVT ratios. Thirty-nine (10.1%) were positive by TSVT and ecarin time and one or both of dRVVT and dilute APTT testing, whereas a further 23 (5.9%) were only positive in TSVT/ecarin time testing. Most of the lupus anticoagulants manifested in dRVVT and/or APTT analysis, as might be anticipated for this reagent pairing. The samples positive by TSVT/ecarin time only, as has been previously demonstrated, emphasize that the many variables that impact lupus anticoagulant testing mean that even a well established dRVVT and APTT pairing cannot deliver diagnostic certainty. Interference by direct factor Xa inhibitors in dRVVT testing could pave the way for wider adoption of TSVT screening as we gain more evidence of its diagnostic performance. PMID:26656903

  3. Honey Bee Venom (Apis mellifera Contains Anticoagulation Factors and Increases the Blood-clotting Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Zolfagharian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Bee venom (BV is a complex mixture of proteins and contains proteins such as phospholipase and melittin, which have an effect on blood clotting and blood clots. The mechanism of action of honey bee venom (HBV, Apis mellifera on human plasma proteins and its anti-thrombotic effect were studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-coagulation effect of BV and its effects on blood coagulation and purification. Methods: Crude venom obtained from Apis mellifera was selected. The anti-coagulation factor of the crude venom from this species was purified by using gel filtration chromatography (sephadex G-50, and the molecular weights of the anti-coagulants in this venom estimated by using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. Blood samples were obtained from 10 rabbits, and the prothrombin time (PT and the partial thromboplastin time (PTT tests were conducted. The approximate lethal dose (LD values of BV were determined. Results: Crude BV increased the blood clotting time. For BV concentrations from 1 to 4 mg/mL, clotting was not observed even at more than 300 seconds, standard deviations (SDs = ± 0.71; however, clotting was observed in the control group 13.8 s, SDs = ± 0.52. Thus, BV can be considered as containing anti-coagulation factors. Crude BV is composed 4 protein bands with molecular weights of 3, 15, 20 and 41 kilodalton (kDa, respectively. The LD50 of the crude BV was found to be 177.8 μg/mouse. Conclusion: BV contains anti-coagulation factors. The fraction extracted from the Iranian bees contains proteins that are similar to anti-coagulation proteins, such as phospholipase A2 (PLA2 and melittin, and that can increase the blood clotting times in vitro.

  4. Influence of preceding length of anticoagulant treatment and initial presentation of venous thromboembolism on risk of recurrence after stopping treatment: analysis of individual participants’ data from seven trials

    OpenAIRE

    Boutitie, Florent; Pinede, Laurent; Schulman, Sam; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Raskob, Gary; Julian, Jim; Hirsh, Jack; Kearon, Clive

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine how length of anticoagulation and clinical presentation of venous thromboembolism influence the risk of recurrence after anticoagulant treatment is stopped and to identify the shortest length of anticoagulation that reduces the risk of recurrence to its lowest level. Design Pooled analysis of individual participants’ data from seven randomised trials. Setting Outpatient anticoagulant clinics in academic centres. Population 2925 men or women with a first venous thromboem...

  5. MITRAL MECHANICAL PROSTHETIC VALVE THROMBOSIS FOUR YEARS AFTER DISCONTINUING ANTICOAGULATION: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Venkatachelam

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A 40 year s lady who underwent a mitral valve replacement with a mechancial prosthesis nine years ago, stopped oral anticoagulants totally. She was asymptomatic and doing her field job with good exercise tolerance for 4 years without any anticoagulation or follow - up and presented now with acute pulmonary edema due to prosthetic valve thrombosis. Echocardiography revealed a large clot on the mitral valve and increased Doppler gradients across the valve. She was given intravenous streptokinase for 28 hours with relief o f symptoms, re - appearance of prosthetic valve click and normalisation of flow velocities. She was prescribed oral acenocoumarol and discharged in a stable condition.

  6. Quality of Life analysis of patients in chronic use of oral anticoagulant: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Geisa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment with oral anticoagulant may influence the quality of life perception as it promotes changes in the patient's life, not offering an evident symptomatic relief and presenting well defined risks, such as bleeding. In this trial, the influence of chronic use of anticoagulants on the quality of life perception has been analyzed in patients assisted at the anticoagulation outpatient unit. Methods The health related quality of life was evaluated through a cross-section study with a sample composed of 72 patients seen from July 23, 2009 to September 2, 2010 at the Anticoagulation Outpatient Unit of the Federal University of Bahia's University Hospital. The study's population was composed by patients with atrial fibrillation and mechanical heart valve. The patients were submitted to two quality of life evaluation questionnaires: a generic questionnaire - the Medical Outcomes Study SF-36 Health Survey (SF36 - and a specific questionnaire - the Duke Anticoagulation Satisfaction Scale (DASS. Results The quality of life perception of the patients studied, based on both the DASS and the SF36, was positive regarding the treatment with oral anticoagulant. The SF36 presented an average score of 62.2 (± 20.0. Among the SF36 evaluated domains, the physical-emotional aspect was the most compromised one regarding life quality perception. The DASS presented an average score of 67.1 (± 18.2 and the domain presenting a greater compromise was the one related to the treatment inconveniences (annoyances, burdens and obligations. Previous hemorrhagic event, comorbidities, drug interactions with medicines that increase the anticoagulant effect, lower education level in the SF36 and younger age group influence a more negative perception of the quality of life, whereas lower education level in the DASS and the duration of treatment for more than 1 year offer a more positive perception. Conclusion Patients seen at the anticoagulation outpatient

  7. Cost-justification of a clinical pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, David R; Garabedian-Ruffalo, Susan M; Chretien, Steven D

    2007-03-01

    A cost-benefit evaluation of a clinical pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic (AC) was performed. Outpatient and hospital records were examined for 26 patients in the treatment group with an AC clinic and 26 patients in the control group. Therapeutic prothrombin times were maintained within the treatment group to a significantly greater extent than within the control group (ppharmacist-managed AC was effective in maintaining therapeutic prothrombin times, and reducing the incidence of hospitalizations resulting from anticoagulation complications, and can be cost-justified based on a cost-benefit analysis. PMID:17341522

  8. [The preparation of a patient with long-term anticoagulant cumarin treatment for invasive surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penka, M; Buliková, A; Gumulec, J; Matýsková, M; Smejkal, P; Kissová, J; Slechtová, M; Chlupová, G

    2006-03-01

    Coumarins belong to drugs widely used and the spectrum of their use is going to grow. From this point of view and/or because the coumarins are adminstrated in patients who are treated for the other diseases--medical or surgical--at the same time, it is necessary to modify, interrupt or replace peroral anticoagulant treatment in the dependence on various aspects. It requires to compound different algorithms for given situations solution. It is always to decide, if the situation is imperative from the view of solution planed, what risk brings proposed treatment and what is the risk of anticoagulant treatment modification. PMID:16637448

  9. Concurrent use of tramadol and oral vitamin K antagonists and the risk of excessive anticoagulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Meegaard, P. M.; Holck, L. H.;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective was to assess whether the concurrent use of tramadol and vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) leads to an increased risk of excessive anticoagulation. DESIGN: The study was designed as a case-control study, nested within users of VKA and with tramadol use as our main exposure. We......). SUBJECTS: Both cases and controls were selected from users of VKA. Cases were defined by being hospitalised with a main diagnosis indicating excessive anticoagulation. For each case, we selected 15 controls among VKA users, matched by age and sex. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Odds ratio for experiencing excessive...

  10. Health system support and health system strengthening: two key facilitators to the implementation of ambulatory tuberculosis treatment in Uzbekistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Stefan; Asadov, Damin Abdurakhimovich; Bründer, Andreas; Healy, Sean; Khamraev, Atadjan Karimovich; Sergeeva, Natalia; Tinnemann, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Uzbekistan inherited a hospital-based health system from the Soviet Union. We explore the health system-related challenges faced during the scale-up of ambulatory (outpatient) treatment for drug-susceptible and drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in Karakalpakstan in Uzbekistan. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with key informants of the TB services, the ministries of health and finance, and their TB control partners. Structural challenges and resource needs were both discussed as obstacles to the expansion of ambulatory TB treatment. Respondents stated need for revising the financing mechanisms of the TB services to incentivize referral to ambulatory TB treatment. An increased workload and need for transportation in ambulatory TB care were also pointed out by respondents, given the quickly rising outpatient numbers but per capita financing of outpatient care. Policy makers showed strong interest in good practice examples for financing ambulatory-based management of TB in comparable contexts and in guidance for revising the financing of the TB services in a way that strengthens ambulatory TB treatment. To facilitate changing the model of care, TB control strategies emphasizing ambulatory care in hospital-oriented health systems should anticipate health system support and strengthening needs, and provide a plan of action to resolve both. Addressing both types of needs may require not only involving TB control and health financing actors, but also increasing knowledge about viable and tested financing mechanisms that incentivize the adoption of new models of care for TB. PMID:27406392

  11. Ambulatory and central haemodynamics during progressive ascent to high-altitude and associated hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, M G; Climie, R E D; Sharman, J E

    2014-12-01

    High-altitude hypoxia causes major cardiovascular changes, which may result in raised resting brachial blood pressure (BP). However, the effect of high-altitude hypoxia on more sensitive measures of BP control (such as 24 h ambulatory BP and resting central BP) is largely unknown. This study aimed to assess this and compare high-altitude responses to resting brachial BP, as well as determine the haemodynamic correlates of acute mountain sickness (AMS) during a progressive trekking ascent to high-altitude. Measures of oxygen saturation (pulse oximetry), 24 h ambulatory BP, resting brachial and central BP (Pulsecor) were recorded in 10 adults (aged 27±4, 30% male) during a 9-day trek to Mount Everest base camp, Nepal. Data were recorded at sea level (stage 1; <450 m above sea level (ASL)) and at progressive ascension to 3440 m ASL (stage 2), 4350 m ASL (stage 3) and 5164 m ASL (stage 4). The Lake Louise score (LLS) was used to quantify AMS symptoms. Total LLS increased stepwise from sea level to stage 4 (0.3±0.7 vs 4.4±2.0, P=0.012), whereas oxygen saturation decreased to 77±9% (P=0.001). The highest recordings of 24 h ambulatory, daytime, night time, brachial and central systolic BP and diastolic BP were achieved at stage 3, which were significantly greater than at sea level (P<0.005 for all). Twenty-four-hour ambulatory heart rate (HR) and night HR correlated with oxygen saturation (r=-0.741 and -0.608, both P<0.001) and total LLS (r=0.648 and r=0.493, both P<0.001). We conclude that 24 h ambulatory BP, central BP and HR are elevated during high-altitude hypoxia, but AMS symptoms are only related to tachycardia. PMID:24621622

  12. Raquianestesia posterior para cirurgias anorretais em regime ambulatorial: estudo piloto Raquianestesia posterior para cirugías anorrectales en régimen ambulatorial: estudio piloto Restricted dorsal spinal anesthesia for ambulatory anorectal surgery: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Luiz Eduardo Imbelloni; Eneida Maria Vieira; Marildo Assunção Gouveia; José Antônio Cordeiro

    2004-01-01

    JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: O aumento do número de cirurgias ambulatoriais exige o emprego de métodos anestésicos que permitam a liberação do paciente após a cirurgia. Freqüentemente, as cirurgias anorretais são realizadas com os pacientes hospitalizados. Este estudo examina a possibilidade de esses procedimentos serem realizados em regime ambulatorial com baixas doses de bupivacaína hipobárica. MÉTODO: Trinta pacientes, estado físico ASA I e II, foram submetidos à raquianestesia com solução h...

  13. Hemorragias intracraneales de carácter evitable asociadas a anticoagulantes orales en pacientes con fibrilación auricular Avoidable intracranial hemorrhages associated with oral anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. García Luque

    2011-12-01

    , the most adverse reaction to this pharmacological group. The objective of this study is to evaluate the avoidability of the intracranial hemorrhages associated with oral anticoagulants that require hospitalization of patients with atrial fibrillation. Methods: Survey of the medical histories of the patients who were hospitalized in the University Hospital "Virgen del Rocío" (from 01/01/03 to 03/31/07 with intracranial hemorrhages and atrial fibrillation, considering as intracranial hemorrhages associated with oral anticoagulants those with a probable relationship applying the causality algorithm of the Spanish Pharmacological Surveillance System. In order to evaluate the avoidability of the intracranial hemorrhage the risk/benefit ratio of the use of oral anticoagulants has been studied. Results: At least 20 out of 57 (35.1% intracranial hemorrhages associated with oral anticoagulants were potentially avoidable, in 7 cases out of those 20 (35 % death was the outcome, and in 8 out of the remaining 13 (61.5% the survivors suffered after-effects. Omeprazole was the drug more frequently involved in interactions with oral anticoagulants in 11 out of 57 cases (19% although this interaction is categorized as highly probable in the bibliography and the protocols of the Hospital. Conclusions: The risk / benefit ratio of oral anticoagulants, the strict control of the International Normalized Ratio and the possible drug interactions, must be assessed individually and regularly to minimize the risk of intracranial hemorrhage that is often a potentially avoidable lethal adverse event.

  14. Assessment of pedometer-determined physical activity in Danish adults: the importance of non-ambulatory activities

    OpenAIRE

    Rothausen, Berit Worm; Gille, Maj-Britt; Biltoft-Jensen, Anja Pia; Raustorp, Anders; Matthiessen, Jeppe

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To estimate mean values of steps/day in a representative sample of Danish adults (15-75 years) using two different conversion methods for non-ambulatory (non-step) activities. Methods A simple random sample comprising 229 adults (52% men) from the Danish National Survey of Dietary Habits and Physical Activity 2007-08, wore a pedometer (Yamax SW-200 Tokyo, Japan) and recorded daily steps and non-ambulatory activities for seven consecutive days. Time spent on non-ambulatory activities w...

  15. Pharmacogenomics and adverse drug reactions in children

    OpenAIRE

    Rieder, Michael J; Carleton, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions are a common and important complication of drug therapy in children. Over the past decade it has become increasingly apparent that genetically controlled variations in drug disposition and response are important determinants of adverse events for many important adverse events associated with drug therapy in children. While this research has been difficult to conduct over the past decade technical and ethical evolution has greatly facilitated the ability of investigators...

  16. Hospital deaths and adverse events in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavão Ana Luiza B

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adverse events are considered a major international problem related to the performance of health systems. Evaluating the occurrence of adverse events involves, as any other outcome measure, determining the extent to which the observed differences can be attributed to the patient's risk factors or to variations in the treatment process, and this in turn highlights the importance of measuring differences in the severity of the cases. The current study aims to evaluate the association between deaths and adverse events, adjusted according to patient risk factors. Methods The study is based on a random sample of 1103 patient charts from hospitalizations in the year 2003 in 3 teaching hospitals in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The methodology involved a retrospective review of patient charts in two stages - screening phase and evaluation phase. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the relationship between hospital deaths and adverse events. Results The overall mortality rate was 8.5%, while the rate related to the occurrence of an adverse event was 2.9% (32/1103 and that related to preventable adverse events was 2.3% (25/1103. Among the 94 deaths analyzed, 34% were related to cases involving adverse events, and 26.6% of deaths occurred in cases whose adverse events were considered preventable. The models tested showed good discriminatory capacity. The unadjusted odds ratio (OR 11.43 and the odds ratio adjusted for patient risk factors (OR 8.23 between death and preventable adverse event were high. Conclusions Despite discussions in the literature regarding the limitations of evaluating preventable adverse events based on peer review, the results presented here emphasize that adverse events are not only prevalent, but are associated with serious harm and even death. These results also highlight the importance of risk adjustment and multivariate models in the study of adverse events.

  17. PENGARUH ADVERSITY QUOTIENT TERHADAP INTENSI BERWIRAUSAHA

    OpenAIRE

    Zahreni, Siti; Pane, Ratna Sari Dewi

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to know the influence of Adversity Quotienton entrepreneurial intention og college students. This research involves 80 college students from faculty of psychology Universitas Sumatera Utara with sampling technique using convinience sampling. Data obtained processed using Simple linear regression analysis. the measuring instrument used is the scale of entrepreneurial intention and the scale of adversity quotient. Result showed that Adversity Quotient significantl...

  18. Anticoagulation in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: An update on current knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldan, Tamara; Landzberg, Michael J; Deicicchi, David J; Atay, Julie K; Waxman, Aaron B

    2016-02-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a severe clinical condition characterized by molecular and anatomic changes in pulmonary circulation. It is associated with increased pulmonary vascular resistance, which leads to right-sided heart failure if left untreated and, ultimately, death. Treatment of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) involves a complex strategy that takes into consideration disease severity, general and supportive measures, and combination drug regimens. Abnormalities of blood coagulation factors, anti-thrombotic factors, and the fibrinolytic system may contribute to a prothrombotic state in patients with idiopathic PAH. These physiologic changes, in concert with the presence of non-specific risk factors for venous thromboembolism such as heart failure and immobility, are thought to be the basis for oral anticoagulation in PAH. Several observational studies provide helpful information in favor of anticoagulation use in idiopathic PAH but not in other pulmonary hypertension etiologies. Guideline recommendations are based on the lack of prospective comparative trials in this regard. For that reason, large differences exist in the use of anticoagulants in different countries and centers. More studies should be carried out to clarify the risks and the potential benefits of anticoagulant use in a heterogeneous population of patients who are already at considerable life risk. PMID:26527532

  19. Purification and characterization of an anticoagulant oligopeptide from Whitmania pigra Whitman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobei Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dried Whitmania pigra is used for the treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases in traditional Chinese medicine and hot water and alcohol extracts also have anticogulant activity. However, a lower molecular weight and more stable anticogulant is needed. Objective: The objective of the following study is to purify and characterize of an anticoagulant oligopeptide from Hirudo (Whitmania pigra Whitman. Materials and Methods: Gel filtration on Sephadex G 50, ion exchange on diethylaminoethyl cellulose, and semi prepared high performance liquid chromatography were used to purify Hirudo. Automated coagulation analyzer was used for evaluating anticoagulant activity. Molecular weight was measured by Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry. Amino acid sequence of the oligopeptide was measured by amino acid sequence analyzer. Results: A new anticoagulant, named whitide, isolated from Hirudo was purified, with a molecular weight 1997.1 Da. Amino acid sequence of the oligopeptide was identified as Gly-Pro-ALa-Gly-Hyp-Val-Gly-Ala-Hyp-Gly-Gly-Hyp-Gly-Val-Arg-Gly-Leu-Hyp-Gly-Asp-Arg-Gly. The results revealed that its amino acid sequence had strong homology to various types of collagen. Conclusion: Whitide might be an orally anticoagulant for its hot and trypsin stable.

  20. CT Findings of Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism as a Predictor of the Response to Anticoagulant Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the CT findings of an acute pulmonary thromboembolism for the prediction of response to anticoagulant therapy. Forty-eight patients diagnosed with a pulmonary embolism underwent anticoagulant therapy, and underwent pre- and post-treatment CT scans, were selected to be part of the study. Pre-treatment CT scans were retrospectively reviewed for the number and degree of emboli, right ventricular to left ventricular (RV/LV) diameter ratio, pulmonary arterial to aorta (PA/aorta) diameter ratio, ventricular septal bowing, consolidation, mosaic perfusion, and pleural effusion. The response to anticoagulant therapy was assessed by a change in embolic burden on pre-and post-treatment CT scans. The 48 patients were divided into two groups: good responder and poor responder. The pre-treatment CT findings were compared by group to determine if there were any differences in the CT findings. Thirty patients were categorized as good responders (62.5%) and eighteen patients as poor responders (37.5%). A pleura-based wedge-shaped consolidation was observed in 9 of 18 cases (50%) from the poor responder group and one of 30 (3%) cases from the good responder group. The comparison of the finding by group was found to be significantly different (p<0.001). No other CT findings were significantly different between the good and poor responders. The pre-treatment CT scans of patients with acute pulmonary embolism indicate that pleurabased wedge-shaped consolidations can predict a poor response to anticoagulant therapy