WorldWideScience

Sample records for ambulance drivers

  1. Occupational accidents among ambulance drivers in the emergency relief Accidentes del trabajo de conductores de ambulancia que brindan atención de urgencia Acidentes de trabalho com motoristas de ambulâncias que realizam socorro de urgência

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabete Takeda

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the occurrence of occupational accidents (OA among ambulance drivers in Emergency Relief (ER, with a view to disclosing the types of events and their causes. A quantitative-qualitative study was carried out through the interview of 22 workers in a city in São Paulo, Brazil. The subjects were male, between 36 and 40 years old (40.9%, married (81.82%, with uncompleted primary education (40.9%, individual (90.9% and family (54.55% income between two and four Brazilian minimum wages, not performing any other paid occupation (45.45%. The majority of the OA were typical, due to an excess of exercises and vigorous and repeated movements (42.11% and aggression through body strength and other means (26.33%. The OA occurs mainly because drivers carry out tasks that do not suit their professional formation.Fue estudiada la frecuencia de accidentes del trabajo (AT con chóferes de ambulancia que brinda Atención de Urgencia (AU, buscando encontrar los tipos de accidentes y sus causas. La investigación fue cuanti-cualitativa, para lo cual fueron entrevistados 22 trabajadores de una ciudad en el Estado de São Paulo. Los sujetos eran de sexo masculino, con edades entre 36 y 40 años (40,9%, casados (81,82%, con educación primaria incompleta (40,9%, sueldo individual (90,9%, sueldo familiar (54,55% entre dos y cuatro sueldos mínimos y sin otra ocupación (45,45%. La gran mayoría de los AT fueron típicos, por exceso de ejercicios, movimientos enérgicos y repetidos (42,11% y daño por fuerza corporal y otras formas (26,33%. Los AT se dieron principalmente porque los chóferes realizaban actividades que no iban de acuerdo con su formación profesional.Estudou-se a ocorrência de acidentes de trabalho (AT com motoristas de ambulância que realizam Socorro de Urgência (SU, buscando evidenciar os tipos desses eventos e suas causas. A investigação foi quanti-qualitativa, entrevistando-se 22 trabalhadores que atuam em uma cidade paulista. Os

  2. Ambulance 3G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banitsas, Konstantinos; Perakis, Konstantinos; Koutsouris, Dimitrios; Konis, Georgios; Tachakra, Sapal

    2005-01-01

    Minimising the time required for a patient to receive primary care has always been the concern of the Accidents and Emergency units. Ambulances are usually the first to arrive on the scene and to administer first aid. However, as the time that it takes to transfer the patient to the hospital increases, so does the fatality rate. In this paper, a mobile teleconsultation system is presented, based primarily on third generation mobile links and on Wi-Fi hotspots around a city. This system can be installed inside an ambulance and will permit high-resolution videoconferencing between the moving vehicle and a doctor or a consultant within a base station (usually a hospital). In addition to video and voice, high quality still images and screenshots from medical equipment can also be sent. The test was carried out in Athens, Greece where a 3G system was recently deployed by Vodafone. The results show that the system can perform satisfactory in most conditions and can effectively increase the patient's quality of service, while having a modest cost.

  3. Intelligent Ambulance Traffic Assistance System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RONOJOY GHOSH

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available With the increase in traffic road density, several causalities occur due to delay in taking a patient to the hospital in an ambulance. In this paper, we have developed an algorithm to find the shortest path to reach the required destination. As required the software will identify the present location of the vehicle and ask the user for the destination. Then it will show all the available paths, highlighting the shortest one or in several cases the most optimum one. Further we made the traffic signals automated for special vehicles like an ambulance or a fire-engine such that the signals will go green for the ambulance as it comes in the vicinity of the traffic signal, thus providing them with a clear path to reach its destination. The original signal is restored as soon as the ambulance goes undetected by the Bluetooth scanner of the traffic signal.

  4. [Ambulant treatment of alcohol withdrawal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nüstedt, Volker

    2016-07-01

    Most of the patients addicted to alcohol are socially well integrated. The offer of a low threshold ambulant withdrawal therapy opens an opportunity to build a sustainable therapeutic relationship. The so started empathic addiction therapy will be well accepted and will lead to a satisfying outcome. Using Clomethiazole or Oxazepam in a daily reduced dose and with daily personal contacts, the ambulant withdrawal in patients without seizures or delir in medical history is a secure and successful therapeutic option.

  5. Physical workload of ambulance assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doormaal, M T; Driessen, A P; Landeweerd, J A; Drost, M R

    1995-02-01

    The physical workload of ambulance assistants was assessed by means of the Ovako Working posture Analysis System (OWAS) observation method and a Work and Health Questionnaire (WHQ) for measuring perceived workload. In addition, a biomechanical model was applied to several specifically strenuous conditions that were simulated in a laboratory situation. Bad postures were identified for a number of activities: 16% to 29% of a work shift was spent in harmful positions. Strenuous situations occur particularly during rides in emergency situations. The results of observed and perceived workload are generally in agreement. A number of practical recommendations are made. They concern, for example, the equipment in ambulance cars, training of ambulance assistants and adaptations in working procedures.

  6. A Theory of Ambulance Chasing

    CERN Document Server

    Backović, Mihailo

    2016-01-01

    Ambulance chasing is a common socio-scientific phenomenon in particle physics. I argue that despite the seeming complexity, it is possible to gain insight into both the qualitative and quantitative features of ambulance chasing dynamics. Compound-Poisson statistics suffices to accommodate the time evolution of the cumulative number of papers on a topic, where basic assumptions that the interest in the topic as well as the number of available ideas decrease with time appear to drive the time evolution. It follows that if the interest scales as an inverse power law in time, the cumulative number of papers on a topic is well described by a di-gamma function, with a distinct logarithmic behavior at large times. In cases where the interest decreases exponentially with time, the model predicts that the total number of papers on the topic will converge to a fixed value as time goes to infinity. I demonstrate that the two models are able to fit at least 9 specific instances of ambulance chasing in particle physics us...

  7. Riding Third: Social Work in Ambulance Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Hilary; Rasmussen, Brian

    2012-01-01

    This research explored the possible role of social work alongside emergency ambulance services. An ethnographic study included semistructured interviews and direct observations collected over 300 hours while riding in ambulances in an urban setting. The data suggest that social work could play a role by providing needed psychosocial care during…

  8. Air ambulance medical transport advertising and marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP), the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP), the Air Medical Physician Association (AMPA), the Association of Air Medical Services (AAMS), and the National Association of State EMS Officials (NASEMSO) believe that patient care and outcomes are optimized by using air medical transport services that are licensed air ambulance providers with robust physician medical director oversight and ongoing quality assessment and review. Only air ambulance medical transport services with these credentials should advertise/market themselves as air ambulance services.

  9. 42 CFR 410.41 - Requirements for ambulance suppliers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for ambulance suppliers. 410.41... § 410.41 Requirements for ambulance suppliers. (a) Vehicle. A vehicle used as an ambulance must meet the... ALS services. (c) Billing and reporting requirements. An ambulance supplier must comply with...

  10. Improving community ambulation after stroke: the AMBULATE trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindley Richard

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been reported that following rehabilitation, only 7% of stroke survivors are able to walk at a level commensurate with community participation. Previous research indicates that treadmill and overground walking training can improve walking capacity in people living in the community after stroke. The main objectives of the AMBULATE trial are to determine (i whether a 4-month treadmill walking program is more effective than a 2-month program, compared to control, in improving walking capacity, health and community participation and (ii the "threshold" walking speed that results in sufficient walking capacity that makes walking self-sustaining. Methods/Design A prospective randomised controlled trial of unsupported treadmill training with a 12 month follow-up with concealed allocation and blinded assessment will be conducted. 210 community-dwelling people after stroke who are able to walk independently but slowly will be recruited and randomly allocated to either a 4 month training group, 2 month training group or the control (no intervention group. Intervention for the two training groups will occur 3 days per week for 30 minutes each session. Measurements of walking, health and community participation will be taken at baseline, 2 months, 4 months, 6 months and 12 months. This study has obtained ethical approval from the relevant Human Research Ethics Committees. Discussion By improving stroke survivors' walking ability, it is likely also to improve their general wellbeing by promoting better health and greater community participation. Furthermore, if stroke survivors can reach a point where their walking and community participation is self-sustaining, this will reduce the burden of care on family and friends as well as the economic burden on the health system. Given the major demographic shift in developed nations involving significant growth in the aged population, this research will make an important evidence

  11. Ambulance officers' use of online clinical evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westbrook Mary T

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospital-based clinicians have been shown to use and attain benefits from online evidence systems. To our knowledge there have been no studies investigating whether and how ambulance officers use online evidence systems if provided. We surveyed ambulance officers to examine their knowledge and use of the Clinical Information Access Program (CIAP, an online evidence system providing 24-hour access to information to support evidence-based practice. Methods A questionnaire was completed by 278 ambulance officers in New South Wales, Australia. Comparisons were made between those who used CIAP and officers who had heard of, but not used CIAP. Results Half the sample (48.6% knew of, and 28.8% had used CIAP. Users were more likely to have heard of CIAP from a CIAP representative/presentation, non-users from written information. Compared to ambulance officers who had heard of but had not used CIAP, users were more likely to report better computer skills and that their supervisors regarded use of CIAP as a legitimate part of ambulance officers' clinical role. The main reasons for non-use were lack of access(49.0% and training(31.4%. Of users, 51.3% rated their skills at finding information as good/very good, 67.5% found the information sought all/most of the time, 87.3% believed CIAP had the potential to improve patient care and 28.2% had directly experienced this. Most access to CIAP occurred at home. The databases frequently accessed were MIMS (A medicines information database (73.8% and MEDLINE(67.5%. The major journals accessed were Journal of Emergency Nursing(37.5%, American Journal of Medicine(30.0% and JAMA(27.5%. Conclusion Over half of ambulance officers had not heard of CIAP. The proportion who knew about and used CIAP was also low. Reasons for this appear to be a work culture not convinced of CIAP's relevance to pre-hospital patient care and lack of access to CIAP at work. Ambulance officers who used CIAP accessed it

  12. CERN'S Fire and Rescue Group Gets New Ambulance

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The ambulance is to replace another based on the off-road vehicle design which was originally acquired for the civil engineering phase of LEP construction. Just one figure, in 1999, the CERN ambulance was called out 195 times.

  13. User reflection on actions in ambulance telemedicine systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Much information is shared, interpreted and recreated between caller, emergency dispatch personnel and ambulance crew during an emergency call. This paper studies the use of reflection in the ambulance control center based on the information an ambulance crew produces during patient treatment in ...... to understand and use the feedback delivered through the system. The paper argues for broadening the scope of telemedicine use outside the boundaries of communication between ambulance and emergency department....... in the ambulance. The study is based on an ethnographical single case study of a Danish ambulance control center that uses a system called “amPHI” to monitor outgoing and homebound ambulance runs from scene of injury to arrival at the emergency department. The paper finds that the control center uses...

  14. Shoes versus sneakers in toddler ambulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, N

    1985-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relative values and differences between shoes and sneakers for young children just learning to walk. In phase 1 of the study, 79 toddlers (47 females and 32 males), ranging in age from 11 months to 3 years, were carefully measured for footwear. Only 15 toddlers (19%) could be properly fitted in the medium-width sneakers that are currently available on the market. The majority of the measured toddlers required widths greater than D, and to accommodate these wider feet, it was necessary to fit them with longer sneakers than they actually needed otherwise, thus making ambulation a bit more difficult and clumsy. In phase 2, eight toddlers, randomly selected except for sex (four male and four female), ranging in age from 11 to 16 months who had been ambulating 2 weeks to 5 months, were tagged with an identifying letter and videotaped in four walking situations: sneakers on tile, shoes on tile, sneakers on rugging, and shoes on rugging. Four hours of video taping was edited down to one-half hour. Twenty-three observers (orthopaedic surgeons, pediatricians, and shoe fitters) carefully reviewed the tape on multiple occasions and came to the following conclusions: better fit, stance, gait, cadence, and stability were noted with shoes in all the toddlers and in all situations. Falls were three times more frequent in sneakers as compared to shoes on tile surfaces and five times more frequent on rugging. It was concluded that the slight economic advantage of sneakers over shoes was not that great to warrant jeopardizing the capabilities of the toddler in the earliest stages of ambulation.

  15. Leg Spasticity and Ambulation in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swathi Balantrapu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Spasticity of the legs is common in multiple sclerosis (MS, but there has been limited research examining its association with ambulatory outcomes. Objective. This study examined spasticity of the legs and its association with multiple measures of ambulation in persons with MS. Methods. The sample included 84 patients with MS. Spasticity of the legs was measured using a 5-point rating scale ranging between 0 (normal and 4 (contracted. Patients completed the 6-minute walk (6 MW, timed 25 foot walk (T25FW, and timed up-and-go (TUG, and O2 cost of walking was measured during the 6 MW. The patients undertook two walking trials on a GAITRite (CIR systems, Inc. for measuring spatial and temporal parameters of gait. The patients completed the Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12 (MSWS-12 and wore an accelerometer over a seven-day period. Results. 52% (n=44 of the sample presented with spasticity of the legs. Those with leg spasticity had significantly worse ambulation as measured by 6 MW (P=0.0001, d=-0.86, T25FW (P=0.003,d=0.72, TUG (P=0.001, d=0.84, MSWS-12 (P=0.0001,d=1.09, O2 cost of walking (P=0.001, d=0.75, average steps/day (P<0.05, d=-0.45, and walking velocity (P<0.05, d=-0.53 and cadence (P<0.05, d=-0.46. Conclusion. Leg spasticity was associated with impairments in ambulation, including alterations in spatiotemporal parameters and free-living walking.

  16. Computer assisted assessment and advice for "non-serious" 999 ambulance service callers: the potential impact on ambulance despatch

    OpenAIRE

    Dale, Jeremy; Higgins, J.; Williams, S.; Foster, T.; Snooks, Helen; Crouch, R; Hartley-Sharpe, C; Glucksman, E; Hooper, R.; George, S.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the potential impact for ambulance services of telephone assessment and\\ud triage for callers who present with non-serious problems (Category C calls) as classified by ambulance\\ud service call takers.\\ud Design: Pragmatic controlled trial. Calls identified using priority dispatch protocols as non-serious\\ud were allocated to intervention and control groups according to time of call. Ambulance dispatch\\ud occurred according to existing procedures. During intervention...

  17. Actively-controlled Beds for Ambulances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takahiko Ono; Hikaru Inooka

    2009-01-01

    During transportation by ambulance,a patient is exposed to inertial acceleration when an ambulance decelerates or turns a corner.Such acceleration often gives a patient physical stress such as blood pressure variation or body sway,which causes strong pain,feeling of discomfort or sometimes critical damage for seriously injured persons.To reduce this undesirable effect of the acceleration,the authors developed the actively-controlled bed (ACB) which controls the posture of a stretcher in real time to reduce foot-to-head and lateral acceleration acting on a supine person.This paper describes development of the ACB,including control system design and performance evaluation.The control system is designed by Zakian's framework,which comprises the principle of matching and the method of inequalities,so that the design specifications on the tracking error and the motor torque are satisfied.From the results of driving experiments and simulation,it is estimated that the ACB can reduce the acceleration acting on a patient by 65% in the foot-to-head direction and by 75% in the lateral direction.

  18. Design of an Efficient Integrated System for Ambulance Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raid S. Sarhan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Because the increases in accidents and emergencies require less time and faster access whenever possible in order to reduce the chances of death, This study designed an ambulance management system (AMaSy which utilize GIS, GPS, and GPRS that was tested in principle in Al-Mansoura City - EGYPT. The proposed system takes into consideration the emergency cases that could possibly occur. The research work considers all possible cases. While an ambulance could already be occupied with one patient, the system considers it as an available ambulance and requests it for another case, being that the ambulance only needs a short period of time to drop-off the current case and that the second case is relatively close to the ambulance. This forces the ambulance to quicken the processes of drop-off and pick-up between the two cases. The main objective of this research work is to make an ambulance system which enables ambulances to have faster arrivals and take less time to reach accident sites

  19. Offload zone patient selection criteria to reduce ambulance offload delay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, Corine M.; Vanberkel, Peter T.; Boucherie, Richard J.; Carter, Alix J.E.

    2016-01-01

    Emergency department overcrowding is a widespread problem and often leads to ambulance offload delay. If no bed is available when a patient arrives, the patient has to wait with the ambulance crew. A recent Canadian innovation is the offload zone—an area where multiple patients can wait with a singl

  20. Board Certification. Registered EMT-Paramedic. Registered EMT-Intermediate. Registered EMT-Ambulance. Registered EMT-Non-Ambulance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians, Columbus, OH.

    These three brochures outline entry requirements and certification information for: (1) emergency medical technician (EMT)-ambulance and EMT-non-ambulance; (2) EMT-intermediate; and (3) EMT-paramedic. Each brochure provides information on entry requirements, including provisional registration and expiration date; lapsed registration; examination…

  1. Understanding the factors that influence patient satisfaction with ambulance services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolova, Svetlana; Tan, P J; Dunn, S P; Bizjak-Mikic, M

    2016-01-01

    The quality of ambulance services has an immense impact on patients' future well-being and quality of life. Patient satisfaction is one of the key metrics for evaluating the quality of this service. Yet, the patient satisfaction measurement may be limited in its ability to accurately reflect this service quality, and even reflect factors beyond the patient experiences. We analyze 10 years of survey data to reveal a number of factors that systematically bias ambulance satisfaction ratings. Taking into account these biases provides more robust comparison of ambulance performance over time or across different jurisdictions.

  2. DRIVER INATTENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard TAY

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Driver inattention, especially driver distraction, is an extremely influential but generally neglected contributing factor of road crashes. This paper explores some of the common behaviours associated with several common forms of driver inattention, with respect to their perceived crash risks, rates of self-reported behaviours and whether drivers regulate such behaviours depending on the road and traffic environment, and provides some policy recommendations to address issues raised.

  3. Efficacy and safety of intravenous fentanyl administered by ambulance personnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friesgaard, Kristian Dahl; Nikolajsen, Lone; Giebner, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Management of pain in the pre-hospital setting is often inadequate. In 2011, ambulance personnel were authorized to administer intravenous fentanyl in the Central Denmark Region. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravenous fentanyl administered...... by ambulance personnel. METHODS: Pre-hospital medical charts from 2348 adults treated with intravenous fentanyl by ambulance personnel during a 6-month period were reviewed. The primary outcome was the change in pain intensity on a numeric rating scale (NRS) from before fentanyl treatment to hospital arrival...... patients (1.3%) and hypotension observed in 71 patients (3.0%). CONCLUSION: Intravenous fentanyl caused clinically meaningful pain reduction in most patients and was safe in the hands of ambulance personnel. Many patients had moderate to severe pain at hospital arrival. As the protocol allowed higher doses...

  4. Would You Feel Safe in A Driverless Ambulance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... configuration, while they had mixed feelings about the autopilot configuration," said Rice, an associate professor of human ... people's emotional responses to it because ambulances on autopilot aren't a part of our everyday lives ...

  5. Cardiac arrest: comparison of paramedic and conventional ambulance services.

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    A prospective study conducted in the Greater Vancouver area compared survival rates in prehospital cardiac arrest managed by an advanced life support (paramedic) service with those in cardiac arrest managed by conventional ambulance service. Management by the paramedic service was associated with higher survival rates for patients found in cardiac arrest but not for patients who suffered the arrest while the ambulance was present. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation by bystanders was associated wit...

  6. Superior Ambulance Call Out Rate Forecasting Using Meteorological Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, M. A.; Thornes, J. E.; Bloss, W.; Pope, F.

    2015-12-01

    Ambulances are an integral part of a country's infrastructure ensuring its citizens and visitors are kept healthy. The impact of weather, climate and climate change on ambulance services around the world has received increasing attention in recent years but most studies have been area specific and there is a need to establish basic relationships between ambulance data (both response and illness data) and meteorological parameters. In this presentation, the effects of temperature and relative humidity on ambulance call out rates for different medical categories will be investigated. We use call out data obtained from the London Ambulance Service (LAS) and meteorological data from a central London meteorological station. A time-series analysis was utilized to understand the relation between temperature, relative humidity, air pollutants and different call out categories. There are statistically significant relationships between mean temperature and ambulance callout rate for most of the categories investigated. Most categories show a negative dependence on temperature, i.e. call outs increase with decreasing temperature but some categories showed a positive dependence such as alcohol related call outs. Relative humidity is significant for some categories but in general is much less important than temperature. Significant time lag effects were observed for most of the categories related to infectious illnesses, which are transferrable through human contact. These findings support the opinion that ambulance attendance callouts records are an effective and well-timed source of data and can be used for health early warning systems. Furthermore the presented results can much improve our understanding of the relationships between meteorological conditions and human health thereby allowing for better prediction of ambulance use through the application of long and short-term weather forecasts.

  7. Private Ambulance Services, ambulance zone, Published in 2008, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Box Elder County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Private Ambulance Services dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2008. It is described as...

  8. Evaluation on Ambulance Design and Musculoskeletal Disorders Risk Factors among Ambulance Emergency Medical Service Per¬sonnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baba M. DEROS

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Injuries or pains occurred at various body's joints, ligaments, muscles, nerves, tendons, limbs, back and neck are classified as musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs. A single forceful exertion or repeated exposure to force, vibration or awkward posture can result in MSDs. This study was carried out by evaluating the relevant physical measurements of Class B ambulance used in Malaysia. The two main objectives of the study are to evaluate on the ambulance physical dimensions and workstation design and to conduct a Rapid Entire Body Assessment (REBA to examine ambulance’s emergency medical service (EMS workers’ activities and their associated MSDs risk factors.Methods: The two methodologies adopted for the study conducted in 2014 were direct measurement of the ambulance physical dimensions and workstation layout; and in-depth interviews of five EMS workers that provides patient care during transporting patient to a public hospital in Kota Bharu, Kelantan. REBA was conducted on seven commonly performed activities by EMS workers for identifying postural risks.Results: The study found ambulance width is too narrow and workstation layout may exposed EMS workers to MSDs risks. REBA scores for the seven commonly performed activities in the ambulance ranges from medium to very high. Conclusion: Seven important MSDs risk factors to be considered in the design of the Class B ambulance for performing patient care activities that may lead towards EMS workers’ injury are awkward posture, bumping, instability, narrow workspace dimension, inappropriate arrangement of storage cabinet, inappropriate arrangement of medical equipment, inadequate railing and seat, and inappropriate stretcher.  Keywords: Musculoskeletal disorders, Ambulance, EMS, Workers, REBA, Risks

  9. CERN'S Fire and Rescue Group Gets New Ambulance

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The arrival of a new vehicle is always an important moment in the life of a fire station. So when a new ambulance was delivered to the CERN Fire Brigade on Wednesday 16 September 2000, it was given a warm welcome, attended by staff of the different divisions involved in its purchase. It took a year from the first administrative moves to the day of acquisition. On the one hand there were the calls for tender needed for such a purchase and on the other the development of this custom-designed ambulance with its unique features. Three visits to the manufacturer had to be made, including two to the head office of the Miesen factory at Bonn to study and incorporate in the ambulance the special requirements called for by its future users. These requirements, born from the past experience of CERN’s ambulance crews, concerned not only interior arrangements but also included a new side panel, opening up a stowage compartment where everything will be put that gets dirty during ambulance operations. This will minimize ...

  10. Influence of ambulance use on early reperfusion therapies for acute myocardial infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Li; HU Da-yi; YAN Hong-bing; YANG Jin-gang; SUN Yi-hong; LI Chao; LIU Shu-shan; WU Dong; FENG Qi

    2008-01-01

    Background Ambulance use expedites the definitive treatment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ambulance use on the administration of early reperfusion therapies for patients with AMI in Beijing, China.Methods Data were prospectively collected from 498 patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who were admitted within 12 hours of symptom onset to 19 hospitals in Beijing between November 1,2005 and December 31, 2006. The baseline characteristics of and the initial management of the ambulance users and the non-ambulance users were compared.Results Only 186 (37.3%) patients used an ambulance as transportation to the hospital. Ambulance users were, on average, older and at relatively higher risk on presentation than the non-ambulance users. After adjustment for patient and hospital characteristics, ambulance use was associated with a greater early reperfusion rate, mainly because of a greater incidence of primary percutaneous coronary intervention. In addition, ambulance users had a significantly shorter median door-to-balloon (120 compared with 145 minutes, P<0.001) and symptom onset-to-balloon (223 compared with 300 minutes, P<0.001) time than non-ambulance users.Conclusions Ambulances are underused by AMI patients in Beijing. Ambulance use may lead to more frequent and faster receipt of early reperfusion therapies. New public health strategies should be developed to facilitate an increased use of ambulances by AMI patients.

  11. Health status in the ambulance services: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hem Erlend

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Researchers have become increasingly aware that ambulance personnel may be at risk of developing work-related health problems. This article systematically explores the literature on health problems and work-related and individual health predictors in the ambulance services. Methods We identified the relevant empirical literature by searching several electronic databases including Medline, EMBASE, PsychINFO, CINAHL, and ISI Web of Science. Other relevant sources were identified through reference lists and other relevant studies known by the research group. Results Forty-nine studies are included in this review. Our analysis shows that ambulance workers have a higher standardized mortality rate, higher level of fatal accidents, higher level of accident injuries and a higher standardized early retirement on medical grounds than the general working population and workers in other health occupations. Ambulance workers also seem to have more musculoskeletal problems than the general population. These conclusions are preliminary at present because each is based on a single study. More studies have addressed mental health problems. The prevalence of post-traumatic stress symptom caseness was > 20% in five of seven studies, and similarly high prevalence rates were reported for anxiety and general psychopathology in four of five studies. However, it is unclear whether ambulance personnel suffer from more mental health problems than the general working population. Conclusion Several indicators suggest that workers in the ambulance services experience more health problems than the general working population and workers in other health occupations. Several methodological challenges, such as small sample sizes, non-representative samples, and lack of comparisons with normative data limit the interpretation of many studies. More coordinated research and replication are needed to compare data across studies. We discuss some strategies for

  12. An integration of Emergency Department Information and Ambulance Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harbi, Nada; El-Masri, Samir; Saddik, Basema

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we propose an Emergency Department Information System that will be integrated with the ambulance system to improve the communication, enhance the quality of provided emergency services and facilitate information sharing. The proposed system utilizes new advanced technologies such as mobile web services that overcome the problems of interoperability between different systems, HL7 and GPS. The system is unique in that it allows ambulance officers to locate the nearest specialized hospital and allows access to the patient's electronic health record as well as providing the hospital with required information to prepare for the incoming patient.

  13. Masculinity and Lifting Accidents among Danish Ambulance Personnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Claus D.; Nielsen, Kent J

    Background Work injuries related to lifting are the most prevalent among ambulance personnel (AP) despite the introduction of ‘assistive technologies’ (AT) that help reduce situations of manual lifting. One third of the AP report using AT only ‘sometimes’ and 10% report having lifted a patient...... alone. For those 5% scoring lowest on MRNI the probability of reporting lifting alone was 6% while this figure was 17% for those scoring above the 95th percentile. Conclusion This study suggests that male ambulance workers performance of masculinity might pose a threat to their safety. AP...

  14. Older Drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in this topic was provided by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Topic last reviewed: March 2015 For ... see Traffic Safety Facts 2012: Older Population. (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration). Crashes Down Among Older Drivers Fortunately, ...

  15. Risk of Transmission of MRSA on Contact Surfaces in Ambulance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukas, R. -P.; Keppler, P. -A.; Brinkrolf, P.; Friedrich, A. W.; Van Aken, H.; Bohn, A.

    2015-01-01

    The gram-positive bacterium methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most frequent causes of treatment-associated nosocomial infections. The incidence of MRSA among the population and in hospitalised patients is growing worldwide. Ambulance service is an interface between the

  16. 29 CFR 553.215 - Ambulance and rescue service employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... employees have received training in the rescue of fire, crime, and accident victims or firefighters or law... REGULATIONS APPLICATION OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT TO EMPLOYEES OF STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Fire... rescue service employees. (a) Ambulance and rescue service employees of a public agency other than a...

  17. Is the Ability to Ambulate Associated with Better Employment Outcomes in Participants with Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, James S.

    2010-01-01

    The author compares current employment status after spinal cord injury between participants who were independent in ambulation (required no assistance from others) and those who were dependent in ambulation (required assistance from at least one other person to ambulate). Those who were independent of assistance from others in ambulation were…

  18. Mobile-Based Medical Emergency Ambulance Scheduling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassey Isong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Effective and efficient public service delivery like healthcare services are very important in today's society, especially in the rural areas. People in rural areas are expected to have access to public facilities at all times. However, these services are not always available when they are needed. This paper discusses the problems faced by rural areas of Mafikeng in South Africa (SA when public and basic healthcare facilities like medical ambulance transports are needed during emergency situation. The challenges ranges from poor communication, poor road network and unstructured address to non-arrival of ambulances leading loss of lives that are preventable. This paper designed and implemented a system prototype using mobile application technologies to offer cost-effective services to patients during emergencies. It is intended to reduce long queues in hospitals and long waiting periods for an ambulance via location-based services. By using this application, lives in the rural areas can be made easier and loss of lives prevented by providing timely response from the appropriate healthcare providers during emergencies.

  19. Approach to decreasing emergency department ambulance diversion hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilke, Gary M; Brown, Lana; Skogland, Patty; Simmons, Charles; Guss, David A

    2004-02-01

    Analysis between two local Emergency Departments (EDs) suggested an oscillatory phenomenon for ambulance diversion: When one hospital went on diversion it led to a disproportionate flow of ambulance traffic to a neighboring facility that subsequently was forced to go on divert. We hypothesized if one hospital could avoid diversion status, the need for diversion could be averted in the neighboring facility. ED A secured additional resources and made a commitment to no diversion for 1 week. No changes in operations occurred in hospital B. We found no differences in ambulance runs or ED census at either facility comparing the week before, during, and after the trial. There was a dramatic decline in diversion hours from 19.7 to 1.4 and 27.7 to 0 at hospitals A and B, respectively, during the trial period (p < 0.05) compared to the weeks before and after. We conclude that reciprocating effects can be decreased with one institution's commitment to avoid diversion, thus decreasing the need for diversion at a neighboring facility.

  20. The Barbados Emergency Ambulance Service: High Frequency of Nontransported Calls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherwin E. Phillips

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. There are no published studies on the Barbados Emergency Ambulance Service and no assessment of the calls that end in nontransported individuals. We describe reasons for the nontransport of potential clients. Methods. We used the Emergency Medical Dispatch (Medical Priority Dispatch System instrument, augmented with five local call types, to collect information on types of calls. The calls were categorised under 7 headings. Correlations between call types and response time were calculated. Results. Most calls were from the category medical (54%. Nineteen (19% percent of calls were in the non-transported category. Calls from call type Cancelled accounted for most of these and this was related to response time, while Refused service was inversely related (. Conclusions. The Barbados Ambulance Service is mostly used by people with a known illness and for trauma cases. One-fifth of calls fall into a category where the ambulance is not used often due to cancellation which is related to response time. Other factors such as the use of alternative transport are also important. Further study to identify factors that contribute to the non-transported category of calls is necessary if improvements in service quality are to be made.

  1. Clinical characteristics affecting motor recovery and ambulation in stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetisgin, Alparslan

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] To describe the clinical characteristics affecting motor recovery and ambulation in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Demographic and clinical characteristics of 53 stroke patients (31 M, 22 F), such as age, gender, etiology, hemiplegic side, Brunnstrom stage, functional ambulation scale scores, history of rehabilitation, and presence of shoulder pain and complex regional pain syndrome were evaluated. [Results] The etiology was ischemic in 79.2% of patients and hemorrhagic in 20.8%. Brunnstrom hand and upper extremity values in females were lower than in males. Complex regional pain syndrome was observed at a level of 18.9% in all patients (more common in females). Brunnstrom hand stage was lower in complex regional pain syndrome patients than in those without the syndrome. Shoulder pain was present in 44.4% of patients. Brunnstrom lower extremity values and functional ambulation scale scores were higher in rehabilitated than in non-rehabilitated cases. [Conclusion] Brunnstrom stages of hand and upper extremity were lower and complex regional pain syndrome was more common in female stroke patients. Shoulder pain and lower Brunnstrom hand stages were related to the presence of complex regional pain syndrome. PMID:28265142

  2. Perioperative transfusion threshold and ambulation after hip revision surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kamilla; Johansson, Pär I; Dahl, Benny;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transfusion with red blood cells (RBC) may be needed during hip revision surgery but the appropriate haemoglobin concentration (Hb) threshold for transfusion has not been well established. We hypothesized that a higher transfusion threshold would improve ambulation after hip revision...... received RBC. CONCLUSIONS: A Hb transfusion threshold of 8.9 g/dL was associated with a statistically significantly faster TUG after hip revision surgery compared to a threshold of 7.3 g/dL but the clinical importance is questionable and the groups did not differ in Hb at the time of testing....

  3. An exploration of factors influencing ambulance and emergency nurses protocol adherence in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebben, Remco; Vloet, Lilian; Mintjes, Joke; Achterberg, Theo van

    2012-01-01

    Adherence to ambulance and ED protocols is often suboptimal. Insight into factors influencing adherence is a requisite for improvement of adherence. This study aims to gain an in-depth understanding of factors that influence ambulance and emergency nurses’ adherence to protocols.

  4. 75 FR 62639 - Air Ambulance and Commercial Helicopter Operations, Part 91 Helicopter Operations, and Part 135...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ...--Nautical mile NTSB--National Transportation Safety Board NVG--Night vision goggles NVIS--Night-vision... ambulances have varying situational- awareness technology (such as night vision goggles, HTAWS, radio... during night conditions as four common factors in helicopter air ambulance accidents. A review...

  5. Prognostic Predictors for Ambulation in Thai Children With Cerebral Palsy Aged 2 to 18 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeratisiroj, Orawan; Thawinchai, Nuanlaor; Siritaratiwat, Wantana; Buntragulpoontawee, Montana

    2015-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine prognostic predictors for ambulation among Thai children with cerebral palsy and identify their ambulatory status. A retrospective cohort study was performed at 6 special schools or hospitals for children with physical disabilities. The prognostic predictors for ambulation were analyzed by multivariable ordinal continuation ratio logistic regression. The 533 participants aged 2 to 18 years were divided into 3 groups: 186 with independent ambulation (Gross Motor Function Classification System [GMFCS I-II]), 71 with assisted ambulation (Gross Motor Function Classification System III), and 276 with nonambulation (Gross Motor Function Classification System IV-V). The significant positive predictors for ambulation were type of cerebral palsy (spastic diplegia, spastic hemiplegia, dyskinesia, ataxia, hypotonia, and mixed type), sitting independently at age 2 years, and eating independently. These predictors were used to develop clinical scoring for predicting the future ability to walk among Thai children with cerebral palsy.

  6. Stylistic analysis of the poem "Ambulance" by Philip Larkin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Yasir Khan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Philip Larkin is known as a movement poet, because there are many poems which were published in the book of poetic movement, New Lines. This movement was started in 1950, against the unreasonable, inflated and extortionate romanticism of 1930's and 1940's. The common features of movement poetry are; the use of irony and wit, an element of satire, the loneliness of modern man, pessimistic outlook on life, realism, use of ordinary diction, use of symbols, and loss of religious faith. Robert Conquest is known as the representative poet of this movement. The poets of this movement believed that the language of poetry should be simple, lucid and intelligible. The poem Ambulance deals with the important features of movement poetry. Through the stylistics study of this poem the researchers will show the loneliness and concept of death in modern man.

  7. How public ambulance arrivals impact on Emergency Department workload and resource use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Ferri

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To examine patient’s characteristics associated with ED arrival mode, and to determine EMS impact on ED clinical resource use, workload and crowding. Methods: This is a retrospective study of patients seen at Sant’Andrea Hospital ED. Comparison focused on visit characteristics, and on resource use. Results: The use of EMS ambulance confirms association to older age, higher rate of hospital admission, longer length of stay, and severity of injury. Moreover our data show that ambulance referred patients are triaged into a higher acuity category and have a greater intensive care unit admission. Conclusion: Ambulance arrivals have a significant impact on ED resource use, workload and crowding.

  8. Occupant accelerations and injury potential during an ambulance-to-curb impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ellen L; Hayes, Wilson C

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents real world acceleration data for an ambulance driving up and over a curb. A full scale reenactment was performed for a litigated case in which a patient on a gurney in an ambulance claimed a variety of bodily injuries after the ambulance struck a curb. A height and weight matched surrogate rode on the gurney during the tests. Results demonstrated that peak vehicle and occupant accelerations never exceeded 1.1g's. To address the claimed injuries, the accelerations likely sustained by the patient were compared to those experienced during daily life. Since ambulances are wide vehicles that travel fast on potentially narrow arterial, collector or local roadways, curb or median impacts may occur during the normal course of driving. Thus, these results may be useful for forensic experts in dealing with similar cases involving claimed injuries following curb impacts.

  9. [Design of a mechanical system for the balanceable system of ambulance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi; Luo, Yibin; Zhang, Guangpeng; Zhang, Zhide; Chen, Chaomin

    2010-08-01

    This is the design of a mechanical systems for use in the balanceable system of ambulance, which can keep the medical service bed at the ambulance level, whatever the terrain is. A level detector will detect the level state of the bed and turn it to a signal. The central processing unit will use this signal to analyse and control the movement of the motor. By this design (which uses the rolling rail as a drive transmission and makes three supports of the bed go up and down), the bed will keep level. With the use of this design, the balanceable system of ambulance can counteract 35 degrees. The error is controlled within +/- 1 degree. And the response time is within 0.3 s. The method of registration can be effective for keeping the bed at the ambulance level, and for reducing the chance of making the patient get hurt on the way to hospital.

  10. The Fire Brigade acquires a new ambulance with all the bells and whistles!

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    On 19 April the Fire Brigade unveiled its latest acquisition: a brand-new ambulance specially designed for CERN.   One of the Fire Brigade's two ambulances has just been replaced by a state-of-the-art vehicle tailor-made to meet CERN's unique requirements. At 4.6 metres long it's much more spacious than its predecessors, providing plenty of room for patient, doctor and paramedic. The ambulance's design and manufacture are the result of a successful collaboration between the Fire Brigade and the technicians from Profile Vehicles, the Finnish company that won the contract following a call for tenders launched in June 2011. "It took us six months to finalise the specification for our new ambulance," explains Patrick Berlinghi, who is responsible for the Fire Brigade's logistics. "We wanted it to be spacious enough for us to be able to work comfortably and to have the latest safety and patient care equipment.  We also reques...

  11. Improving community ambulation after hip fracture: protocol for a randomised, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Orwig

    2017-01-01

    Discussion: This multicentre randomised study will be the first to test whether a home-based multi-component physiotherapy intervention targeting specific precursors of community ambulation (PUSH is more likely to lead to community ambulation than a home-based non-specific multi-component physiotherapy intervention (PULSE in older adults after hip fracture. The study will also estimate the potential economic value of the interventions.

  12. Demand Forecast Using Data Analytics for the Preallocation of Ambulances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Albert Y; Lu, Tsung-Yu; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Sun, Wei-Zen

    2016-07-01

    The objective of prehospital emergency medical services (EMSs) is to have a short response time. By increasing the operational efficiency, the survival rate of patients could potentially be increased. The geographic information system (GIS) is introduced in this study to manage and visualize the spatial distribution of demand data and forecasting results. A flexible model is implemented in GIS, through which training data are prepared with user-desired sizes for the spatial grid and discretized temporal steps. We applied moving average, artificial neural network, sinusoidal regression, and support vector regression for the forecasting of prehospital emergency medical demand. The results from these approaches, as a reference, could be used for the preallocation of ambulances. A case study is conducted for the EMS in New Taipei City, where prehospital EMS data have been collected for three years. The model selection process has chosen different models with different input features for the forecast of different areas. The best daily mean absolute percentage error during testing of the EMS demand forecast is 23.01%, which is a reasonable forecast based on Lewis' definition. With the acceptable prediction performance, the proposed approach has its potential to be applied to the current practice.

  13. Weather factors in the short-term forecasting of daily ambulance calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ho-Ting; Lai, Poh-Chin

    2014-07-01

    The daily ambulance demand for Hong Kong is rising, and it has been shown that weather factors (temperature and humidity) play a role in the demand for ambulance services. This study aimed at developing short-term forecasting models of daily ambulance calls using the 7-day weather forecast data as predictors. We employed the autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) method to analyze over 1.3 million cases of emergency attendance in May 2006 through April 2009 and the 7-day weather forecast data for the same period. Our results showed that the ARIMA model could offer reasonably accurate forecasts of daily ambulance calls at 1-7 days ahead of time and with improved accuracy by including weather factors. Specifically, the inclusion of average temperature alone in our ARIMA model improved the predictability of the 1-day forecast when compared to that of a simple ARIMA model (8.8% decrease in the root mean square error, RMSE=53 vs 58). The improvement in the 7-day forecast with average temperature as a predictor was more pronounced, with a 10% drop in prediction error (RMSE=62 vs 69). These findings suggested that weather forecast data can improve the 1- to 7-day forecasts of daily ambulance demand. As weather forecast data are readily accessible from Hong Kong Observatory's official website, there is virtually no cost to including them in the ARIMA models, which yield better prediction for forward planning and deployment of ambulance manpower.

  14. Driver Behavior and Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Patricia

    School bus driver behavior and motivation are continuing concerns for leaders/administrators in the field of transportation. Motivation begins with selection of a potential new driver. Drivers must like children and be patient, loyal, and punctual. The applicant's background must be verified, in view of the national concern for child safety.…

  15. Health problems and help-seeking in a nationwide sample of operational Norwegian ambulance personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekeberg Øivind

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To estimate the prevalence of anxiety and depression symptoms, and their association with professional help-seeking, among operational ambulance personnel and a general working population, and to study the symptoms of musculoskeletal pain and disturbed sleep among ambulance personnel. Methods The results of a comprehensive nationwide questionnaire survey of operational ambulance personnel (n = 1180 were compared with the findings of a population-based Norwegian health study of working people (n = 31,987. The questionnaire included measures of help-seeking, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Subjective Health Complaints Questionnaire, the Karolinska Sleep Questionnaire and the Need for Recovery after Work Scale. Results Compared with those in the reference population, the mean of level anxiety symptoms in the ambulance sample was lower for men (3.5 vs. 3.9, P 0.001 and women (4.0 vs. 4.4, P 0.05, and the mean level of depression symptoms in ambulance workers was lower for men (2.3 vs. 2.8, P 0.05 but not for women (2.9 vs. 3.1, P = 0.22. A model adjusted for anxiety and depression symptoms indicated that ambulance personnel had lower levels of help-seeking except for seeing a chiropractor (12% vs. 5%, P 0.01. In the ambulance sample, symptoms of musculoskeletal pain were most consistently associated with help-seeking. In the adjusted model, only symptoms of disturbed sleep were associated with help-seeking from a psychologist/psychiatrist (total sample = 2.3%. Help-seeking was more often reported by women but was largely unaffected by age. Conclusion The assumption that ambulance personnel have more anxiety and depression symptoms than the general working population was not supported. The level of musculoskeletal pain and, accordingly, the level of help-seeking from a chiropractor were higher for ambulance workers. More research should address the physical strains among ambulance personnel.

  16. Ambulation following spinal cord injury and its correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Menon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess walking ability of spinal cord injury (SCI patients and observe its correlation with functional and neurological outcomes. Patients and Methods: The present prospective, observational study was conducted in a tertiary research hospital in India with 66 patients (46 males between January 2012 and December 2013. Mean age was 32.62 ± 11.85 years (range 16-65 years, mean duration of injury was 85.3 ± 97.6 days (range 14-365 days and mean length of stay in the rehabilitation unit was 38.08 ± 21.66 days (range 14-97 days in the study. Walking Index for spinal cord injury (WISCI II was used to assess ambulation of the SCI patients. Functional recovery was assessed using Barthel Index (BI and Spinal Cord Independence Measures (SCIM. Neurological recovery was assessed using ASIA impairment scale (AIS. We tried to correlate ambulatory ability of the patients with functional and neurological recovery. Results: Ambulatory ability of the patients improved significantly using WISCI II (P < 0.001 when admission and discharge scores were compared (1.4 ± 3.5 vs 7.6 ± 6.03. Similarly, functional (BI: 31.7 ± 20.5 vs 58.4 ± 23.7 and SCIM: 29.9 ± 15.1 vs 56.2 ± 20.6 and neurological recovery were found to be very significant (P < 0.001 when admission vs discharge scores were compared. Improvement in WISCI II scores was significantly correlated with improvement in neurological (using AIS scores and functional status (using BI and SCIM scores (P < 0.001. Conclusions: Significant improvement was seen in WISCI II, BI, and SCIM scores after in-patient rehabilitation. Improvement in WISCI II scores also significantly correlated with functional and neurological recovery.

  17. Ontogeny of sex differences in open-field ambulation in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slob, A K; Huizer, T; Van der Werff ten Bosch, J J

    1986-01-01

    The effects of age and gonads were studied in rats subjected to open-field tests, during which ambulation behavior was recorded. Subjects were three groups of male and female rats: sham-operation on day 1 and day 21; gonadectomy on day 1 and sham-operation on day 21; and sham-operation on day 1 and gonadectomy on day 21. Half of each group were tested in a circular open field (3 min/day, 3 consecutive days) on days 28-30; the others were tested on days 47-49. Representatives of both batches were tested again in a square open field on days 76-78. There was a sex difference in ambulation at 77 days, but not at earlier ages. In animals gonadectomized on day 1 or day 21 the sex difference in adulthood failed to occur, because castration caused the males to ambulate as much as sham-operated and ovariectomized females. On the basis of our results and reports in the literature it is suggested that testicular secretions around puberty have an organizing effect on ambulation behavior. The intact adult male rat ambulates less than the adult female and this difference persists after castration in adulthood. Castration well before puberty prevents the development of the adult sex difference.

  18. National Driver Register (NDR) -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Information regarding individuals who have had their driver licenses revoked, suspended or otherwise denied for cause, or who have been convicted of certain traffic...

  19. Variation in ambulance call rates for care homes in Torbay, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Jason; Matthews, Justin; Ukoumunne, Obioha C; Lang, Iain; Somerfield, David; Wenman, James; Dickens, Chris

    2016-08-31

    Emergency ambulance calls represent one of the routes of emergency hospital admissions from care homes. We aimed to describe the pattern of ambulance call rates from care homes and identify factors predicting those homes calling for an ambulance most frequently. We obtained data from South Western Ambulance Service NHS Foundation Trust on 3138 ambulance calls relating to people aged 65 and over from care homes in the Torbay region between 1 April 2012 and 31 July 2013. We supplemented this with data from the Care Quality Commission (CQC) website on home characteristics and outcomes of CQC inspections. We used descriptive statistics to identify variation in ambulance call rates for residential and nursing homes and fitted negative binomial regression models to determine if call rates were predicted by home type (nursing versus residential), the five standards in the CQC reports, dementia care status or travel time to hospital. One hundred and forty-six homes (119 residential and 27 nursing) were included in the analysis. The number of calls made ranged from 1 to 99. The median number (IQR; range) of calls per resident per year was 0.51 (0.21-0.89; 0.03-2.45). Nursing homes had a lower call rate than residential homes [adjusted rate ratio (ARR) 0.29; 95% CI: 0.22-0.40; P call rate compared to those who passed (ARR 0.67; 95% CI: 0.50-0.90; P = 0.006); and homes specialising in dementia had a higher call rate compared to those not specialising (ARR 1.56; 95% CI: 1.23-1.96; P call rate variability reflects the different needs of resident populations or differences in care home policies and practice.

  20. Suicidal ideation and suicide attempts in a nationwide sample of operational Norwegian ambulance personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterud, Tom; Hem, Erlend; Lau, Bjørn; Ekeberg, Oivind

    2008-01-01

    This is the first paper on suicidal ideation and attempts among ambulance personnel. This study aimed to investigate levels of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among ambulance personnel, and to identify important correlates and the factors to which ambulance personnel attribute their serious suicidal ideation. A comprehensive nationwide questionnaire survey of 1,180 operational ambulance personnel was conducted. Measurements included: Paykel's Suicidal Feelings in the General Population questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale, the Subjective Health Complaints Questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Job Satisfaction Scale, the Basic Character Inventory, and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. Lifetime prevalence ranged from 28% for feelings that life was not worth living to 10.4% for seriously considered suicide and 3.1% for a suicide attempt. Serious suicidal ideation was independently associated with job-related emotional exhaustion (feelings of being overextended and depleted of resources) (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.0) and bullying at work (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.02-2.7), younger age, not married/cohabitant, depression symptoms, low self-esteem and the personality trait reality weakness. In general, suicidal thoughts were hardly attributable to working conditions, since only 1.8% of ambulance personnel attributed suicidal ideation to work problems alone. In conclusion, ambulance personnel reported a moderate level of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. Although serious suicidal ideation was rarely attributed to working conditions in general, this study suggests that job-related factors like emotional exhaustion and bullying may be of importance.

  1. Mission impossible or border security – Practical and effective infection control on air ambulances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kuhn*

    2013-12-01

    These principles have been applied to our air ambulance system based from Lanseria International Airport. By combining preventative and control measures, there has been no breach in our infection control strategies, as evidenced by no growth noted on specific and random swabs even when more and more ”super bugs” are being identified in hospital. As an air ambulance service flying patients from various African countries, we have the responsibility to conduct our own ”Border Security” to keep our hospitals, patients, aircraft and crews clean and safe. In this presentation we will share our ”Border Security” principles and experiences with the audience.

  2. Impact of subtropical climate on frequency of ambulance use for trauma patients in a coastal area of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuqiang Chen; Yucheng Lai; Jiajie Ke; Yuefeng Chen; Yuling Xu; Yuqin Ma; Jiayin Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose:To explore the impact of subtropical maritime monsoon climate on the frequency of ambulance use for trauma patients in a coastal region in China.Method:Statistical analysis of data on ambulance use from the 120 Emergency Command Center in Shantou City,Guangdong Province,from January to December 2012 as well as daily meteorological data from a Shantou observatory was performed to determine how climatic factors (seasons,time,and weather) affect the frequency of ambulance use for trauma patients.Results:The daily ambulance use for trauma patients differed between spring and summer or autumn (p < 0.05),between sunny and rainy days (p < 0.05),and between cloudy and lightly or moderately rainy days (p < 0.05).We found a linear correlation between daily maximum temperature and daily ambulance use for trauma patients (R2 =0.103,p < 0.05).In addition,there was significant difference in ambulance use between good and bad weather (p < 0.05).Conclusion:Frequency of ambulance use for trauma patients is affected by the subtropical maritime monsoon climate in the coastal region.Better weather contributes to increased daily frequency of ambulance use,which is the highest in autumn and lowest in spring.

  3. A Simple Wave Driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temiz, Burak Kagan; Yavuz, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    This study was done to develop a simple and inexpensive wave driver that can be used in experiments on string waves. The wave driver was made using a battery-operated toy car, and the apparatus can be used to produce string waves at a fixed frequency. The working principle of the apparatus is as follows: shortly after the car is turned on, the…

  4. Young novice drivers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2013-01-01

    In The Netherlands, young novice drivers (18-24 years of age) show a crash rate that is five times higher than that of experienced drivers (30-59 years of age). The rate of young males is even seven times as high. The main reasons are lack of driving experience and hazardous behaviour typical of ado

  5. Ambulation with the reciprocating-gait orthosis - Experience in 15 children with myelomeningocele or paraplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GerritsmaBleeker, CLE; Heeg, M; VosNiel, H

    1997-01-01

    We reviewed 15 children with spina bifida or paraplegia who have used a reciprocating-gait orthosis between 1985 and 1995. All were nonfunctional ambulators. The level of the spinal lesions ranged from Th10 to L3. The mean age of fitting the orthosis was 5 years. 8 children have stopped using it at

  6. Community ambulation in patients with chronic stroke : How is it related to gait speed?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Port, Ingrid G.; Kwakkel, Gert; Lindeman, Eline

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the strength of the association between gait speed and community ambulation and whether this association is significantly distorted by other variables. Design: Cross-sectional study conducted 3 years after stroke. Subjects: A total of 102 patients after first-ever stroke follow

  7. Spinal fusion in children with spina bifida : influence on ambulation level and functional abilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenmakers, MAGC; Gulmans, VAM; Gooskens, RHJM; Pruijs, JEH; Helders, PJM

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of spinal fusion on ambulation and functional abilities in children with spina bifida for whom early mobilization was stimulated. Ten children (three males and seven females) with myelomeningocele were prospectively followed. Their mean age at ope

  8. Osteogenesis imperfecta in childhood : effects of spondylodesis on functional ability, ambulation and perceived competence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolboom, N; Cats, EA; Helders, PJM; Pruijs, JEH; Engelbert, RHH

    2004-01-01

    We studied the effects of spondylodesis on spinal curvature, functional outcome, level of ambulation and perceived competence in 11 children with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). Mean age at surgical intervention was 13.1 years (SD 2.5 years) and follow-up amounted to 3.4 years (SD 2.3 years). Spinal c

  9. A strategic approach for the ambulance covering of the province of Friesland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, J.A.M.; Macfarlane, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    In the summer of 1995 the University of Twente, commissioned by the Province of Friesland, carried out research into the consequences of alternative locations for ambulances. The approach to this research was based on a network model, which represents the area to be covered. With this model the atte

  10. Radiology trainer. Surgical ambulance. 2. rev. and enl. ed.; Roentgen-Trainer. Chirurgische Ambulanz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, Ole [Wedau-Kliniken Duisburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Unfallchirurgie; Ruchholtz, Steffen [Universitaetsklinikum Giessen und Marburg GmbH, Marburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Unfall-, Hand- und Wiederherstellungschirurgie; Siemann, Holger [LVR Klinikum Essen (Germany); Barkhausen, Joerg [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin

    2013-08-01

    The radiology trainer for surgical ambulance includes informative X-ray imaging examples for the following issues: zygoma, nasal bone, spinal cord, clavicle, shoulder, upper arms, elbow, forearms, wrist, hand, phalanx, thorax, sternum, pelvis, abdomen, hips, femur, knee, lower leg, ankle, feet.

  11. Design and methods of European Ambulance Acute Coronary Syndrome Angiography Trial (EUROMAX)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steg, Philippe Gabriel; van 't Hof, Arnoud; Clemmensen, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    In patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) triaged to primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), anticoagulation often is initiated in the ambulance during transfer to a PCI site. In this prehospital setting, bivalirudin has not been compared with standard-of-care...

  12. A clinical prediction rule for ambulation outcomes after traumatic spinal cord injury: a longitudinal cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middendorp, J.J. van; Hosman, A.J.F.; Donders, A.R.T.; Pouw, M.H.; Ditunno Jr., J.F.; Curt, A.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Meent, H. van de

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traumatic spinal cord injury is a serious disorder in which early prediction of ambulation is important to counsel patients and to plan rehabilitation. We developed a reliable, validated prediction rule to assess a patient's chances of walking independently after such injury. METHODS: We

  13. Cross-cultural validation of the Italian version of the Cumulated Ambulation Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grana, Elisa; Verzellotti, Simone; Grassi, Federico A;

    2016-01-01

    Hip fractures are common in elderly patients, and walking impairment is a frequent complication. The Cumulated Ambulation Score (CAS) is a validated functional scale used to monitor easily three basic mobility activities in patients with hip fracture. The aim of this study was to translate, cross...

  14. Knee disarticulation : Survival, wound healing and ambulation. A historic cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Duis, K.; Bosmans, J. C.; Voesten, H. G. J.; Geertzen, J. H. B.; Dijkstra, P. U.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze survival, wound healing and ambulation after knee disarticulation (KD). A historic cohort study using medical records and nursing home records was performed. Data included demographics, reason for amputation, concomitant diseases, survival, wound healing, re-ampu

  15. Self-paced brain-computer interface control of ambulation in a virtual reality environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Po T.; King, Christine E.; Chui, Luis A.; Do, An H.; Nenadic, Zoran

    2012-10-01

    Objective. Spinal cord injury (SCI) often leaves affected individuals unable to ambulate. Electroencephalogram (EEG) based brain-computer interface (BCI) controlled lower extremity prostheses may restore intuitive and able-body-like ambulation after SCI. To test its feasibility, the authors developed and tested a novel EEG-based, data-driven BCI system for intuitive and self-paced control of the ambulation of an avatar within a virtual reality environment (VRE). Approach. Eight able-bodied subjects and one with SCI underwent the following 10-min training session: subjects alternated between idling and walking kinaesthetic motor imageries (KMI) while their EEG were recorded and analysed to generate subject-specific decoding models. Subjects then performed a goal-oriented online task, repeated over five sessions, in which they utilized the KMI to control the linear ambulation of an avatar and make ten sequential stops at designated points within the VRE. Main results. The average offline training performance across subjects was 77.2±11.0%, ranging from 64.3% (p = 0.001 76) to 94.5% (p = 6.26×10-23), with chance performance being 50%. The average online performance was 8.5±1.1 (out of 10) successful stops and 303±53 s completion time (perfect = 211 s). All subjects achieved performances significantly different than those of random walk (p ambulation after only 10 minutes training. The ability to achieve such BCI control with minimal training indicates that the implementation of future BCI-lower extremity prosthesis systems may be feasible.

  16. Proactive driver training program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vossler, W. [Kinetic Safety Consulting Inc., Grande Prairie, AB (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    Skid avoidance training is a recent approach to driver training and has been employed in various countries with a high degree of success. Among top ranked countries, motor vehicle incidents trends indicate higher incident rates among drivers are often due to lack of knowledge, experience and risk awareness. If lowered age limit experience is attained under direct supervision and in safe training conditions, it was suggested, incident frequency is reduced. A Norway study confirmed an increase in vehicle incident rates after drivers had received skid control training. The drivers were unable to maintain skill levels needed to react to critical driving tasks and had unrealistic expectations of skill after training. However, a skid avoidance training program launched in Sweden in 1999 has resulted in a 50 per cent reduction of vehicle incidents in the last 2 years. Details of the Skidcar System were presented, including details of the driving simulator, where simulation of actual driving situations is achieved by simply adjusting the amount of grip the vehicle has with the driving surface. Instructors modify driving behaviors based upon the driver's ability to maintain grip. There are over 200 units in North America. In addition, a Proactive Light Vehicle Driver Training/ Heavy Vehicle Assessment Program was initiated in 2003, with a motor vehicle incident rate reduction of 50 per cent at the end of 2004. Various examples of situations in which drivers have used their skid avoidance skills to avoid incidents were included. It was noted that the trend among driver training professionals has been towards decision-based rather than skills-based training, as skills-based training will diminish over time, and requires frequent re-training periods. Cognitive and perceptual skills were examined, as well as cognitive, associative and autonomous learning phases. It was concluded that skid avoidance is largely a decision-based skill. tabs, figs.

  17. Basic life support and automated external defibrillator skills among ambulance personnel: a manikin study performed in a rural low-volume ambulance setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Anne

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ambulance personnel play an essential role in the ‘Chain of Survival’. The prognosis after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest was dismal on a rural Danish island and in this study we assessed the cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance of ambulance personnel on that island. Methods The Basic Life Support (BLS and Automated External Defibrillator (AED skills of the ambulance personnel were tested in a simulated cardiac arrest. Points were given according to a scoring sheet. One sample t test was used to analyze the deviation from optimal care according to the 2005 guidelines. After each assessment, individual feedback was given. Results On 3 consecutive days, we assessed the individual EMS teams responding to OHCA on the island. Overall, 70% of the maximal points were achieved. The hands-off ratio was 40%. Correct compression/ventilation ratio (30:2 was used by 80%. A mean compression depth of 40–50 mm was achieved by 55% and the mean compression depth was 42 mm (SD 7 mm. The mean compression rate was 123 per min (SD 15/min. The mean tidal volume was 746 ml (SD 221 ml. Only the mean tidal volume deviated significantly from the recommended (p = 0.01. During the rhythm analysis, 65% did not perform any visual or verbal safety check. Conclusion The EMS providers achieved 70% of the maximal points. Tidal volumes were larger than recommended when mask ventilation was applied. Chest compression depth was optimally performed by 55% of the staff. Defibrillation safety checks were not performed in 65% of EMS providers.

  18. Characteristics of Chinese Driver Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, J.

    2014-01-01

    The high growth rate of vehicle ownership and many novel drivers in China determine the special features of Chinese driver behavior. This thesis introduces a comparative study on driver behavior by the analysis of saturation flow at urban intersections, Driver Behavior Questionnaire surveys, focus g

  19. Characteristics of Chinese Driver Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    LI J

    2014-01-01

    The high growth rate of vehicle ownership and many novel drivers in China determine the special features of Chinese driver behavior. This thesis introduces a comparative study on driver behavior by the analysis of saturation flow at urban intersections, Driver Behavior Questionnaire surveys, focus group discussion, and in-car tests. The main characteristics of Chinese driver behavior have been identified. A new method is developed for a simulation model calibration based on the study results.

  20. Prosthetic ambulation in a paraplegic patient with a transfemoral amputation and radial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, J C; Park, C; Kim, D Y; Choi, Y S; Kim, Y K; Seong, Y J

    2000-08-01

    Great importance and caution should be placed on prosthetic fitting for a paraplegic patient with an anesthetic residual limb if functional ambulation is to be achieved. The combination of paraplegia with a transfemoral amputation and radial nerve palsy is a complex injury that makes the rehabilitation process difficult. This article describes a case of L2 paraplegia with a transfemoral amputation and radial nerve palsy on the right side. Following the rehabilitation course, the patient independently walked using a walker at indoor level with a transfemoral prosthesis with ischial containment socket, polycentric knee assembly, endoskeletal shank and multiaxis foot assembly and a knee ankle foot orthosis on the sound side. The difficulties of fitting a functional prosthesis to an insensate limb and the rehabilitation stages leading to functional ambulation are reviewed.

  1. Contributing factors and issues associated with rural ambulance crashes: literature review and annotated bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanddal, Nels D; Albert, Steve; Hansen, Joseph D; Kupas, Douglas F

    2008-01-01

    Ambulance crashes occur with greater frequency and severity than crashes involving vehicles of similar size and weight characteristics. Crashes in rural areas tend to be more severe in terms of injury or death to vehicle occupants. The purpose of this article was to examine the extant literature, as well as summarize and discuss the overlapping findings of that body of literature. A stepwise literature search was conducted using the following MeSH search terms ambulance; accident, traffic; emergency medical technician; occupational health; and rural in descending combination. MEDLINE was used as the primary database but was augmented by searches of Academic Search Premier, Comprehensive Index of Nursing, Allied Health Literature, and ProQuest Dissertation International. The search resulted in 32 article citations, and of these, 28 were included. An annotated bibliography is followed by a discussion and conclusion that identify opportunities for prevention activities in the areas of education, enforcement, and engineering.

  2. Pre-Hospital Fast Positive Cases Identified by DFB Ambulance Paramedics – Final Clinical Diagnosis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Feeney, A

    2016-04-01

    Ischaemic stroke clinical outcomes are improved by earlier treatment with intravenous thrombolysis. An existing pathway at the Mater University Hospital for assessment of suspected acute stroke in the Emergency Department was updated, aiming to shorten ‘door to needle time’. This study examines the final clinical diagnosis of Dublin Fire Brigade Ambulance Paramedic identified Face Arm Speech Test (FAST) positive patients presenting to the Emergency Department over a 7 month period. A retrospective analysis was carried out of 177 consecutive FAST positive patients presenting between March and November 2014. The final clinical diagnosis was acute stroke in 57.1% (n=101) of patients. Of these, 76 were ischaemic strokes of whom 56.5% (n=43) were thrombolysed. In the pre-hospital setting Ambulance Paramedics can identify, with reasonable accuracy, acute stroke using the FAST test. Over half of the ischaemic stroke patients presenting via this pathway can be treated with intravenous thrombolysis

  3. Prediction of postoperative morbidity, mortality and rehabilitation in hip fracture patients: the cumulated ambulation score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Bang; Kristensen, Morten Tange; Kehlet, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    to short-term outcome parameters. RESULTS: The cumulated ambulation score was a highly significant predictor for length of hospitalization, time to discharge status, 30-day mortality and postoperative medical complications (P ...OBJECTIVE: To validate the cumulated ambulation score as an early postoperative predictor of short-term outcome in hip fracture patients. DESIGN: Prospective, descriptive study. SETTING: An orthopaedic hip fracture unit in a university hospital. PATIENTS: Four hundred and twenty-six consecutive hip...... fracture patients with an independent walking function admitted from their own home. Rehabilitation followed a well-defined multimodal rehabilitation regimen and discharge criteria. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Admission tests with a new mobility score to assess prefracture functional mobility and a short mental...

  4. 10-year experience of CO2-laser application in ambulance gynecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachanov, Michael L.; Masychev, Victor I.; Velsher, Leonid Z.; Kirkin, Vladimir V.; Zhashkov, Roman V.; Kocharian, Emilia A.

    2000-10-01

    CO2-laser surgical systems have come to stay in everyday practice of modern physicians and are successfully used in colposcopic and laparoscopic surgery. Results, obtained in ambulance gynecology are especially impressing. CO2- laser provides high medical- and cost-effective treatment. Presented work describes many-years experience of CO2- laser application. 439 patients with various vulvaric and cervix diseases were operated within this period. Laser beam parameters were selected according to requirements ((tau) =4 J/cm2) treatment without carbonization. Analyses of the results showed that the laser successfully destructs uterine cervix erosion, endocervicosis, dysplasia, leukoplakia, eritoplakia of uterine cervix, various benignant pathologies and focus degenerative process in ambulate conditions.

  5. The role of physician-staffed ambulances:the outcome of a pilot study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A Haner; P rninge; A Khorram-Manesh

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the outcome of physician-staffed ambulances in a pilot study. Methods:All physician-staffed ambulance missions conducted in Gothenburg, Sweden, in 2013 were retrospectively reviewed and evaluated for the type of missions and the need of a physician. Results:Out of 1 381 physician-staffed missions, 511 were cancelled or managed by telephone. Around 239 (17%) missions required active intervention, of which only one was considered directly life-saving. Conclusions: Most of the missions neither required the interventional skills of a physician, nor could they be performed at distance. However, the added medical value of physicians was found to be in other prehospital situations, such as critical decision-making, staff education and research.

  6. Neurotherapeutic and neuroprosthetic effects of implanted functional electrical stimulation for ambulation after incomplete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Stephanie Nogan; Hardin, Elizabeth C; Kobetic, Rudi; Boggs, Lisa M; Pinault, Gilles; Triolo, Ronald J

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this single-subject study was to determine the neurotherapeutic and neuroprosthetic effects of an implanted functional electrical stimulation (FES) system designed to facilitate walking in an individual with a longstanding motor and sensory incomplete spinal cord injury. An implanted pulse generator and eight intramuscular stimulating electrodes were installed unilaterally, activating weak or paralyzed hip flexors, hip and knee extensors, and ankle dorsiflexors during 36 sessions of gait training with FES. The neurotherapeutic effects were assessed by a comparison of pre- and posttraining volitional walking. The neuroprosthetic effects were assessed by a comparison of posttraining volitional and FES-assisted walking. Treatment resulted in significant (p ambulation to limited community ambulation. Additionally, the subject could perform multiple walks per day when using FES-assisted gait, which was impossible with volitional effort alone.

  7. Effects of adductor-canal-blockade on pain and ambulation after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenstrup, M T; Jæger, P; Lund, J;

    2012-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is associated with intense post-operative pain. Besides providing optimal analgesia, reduction in side effects and enhanced mobilization are important in this elderly population. The adductor-canal-blockade is theoretically an almost pure sensory blockade. We...... hypothesized that the adductor-canal-blockade may reduce morphine consumption (primary endpoint), improve pain relief, enhance early ambulation ability, and reduce side effects (secondary endpoints) after TKA compared with placebo....

  8. Ambulance emergency services for patients with coronary heart disease in Lancashire: achieving standards and improving performance

    OpenAIRE

    Stoykova, B; Dowie, R; Bastow, P; Rowsell, K; GREGORY, R.

    2004-01-01

    Methods: Audit datasets on two cohorts of patients with chest pain and suspected AMI were assembled by the Lancashire Ambulance Service NHS Trust in north west England: 3706 patients during 1996/97 and 3423 in 2001. They were transported to four hospitals. The analyses covered journey timings, role of rapid response vehicles (RRV), and clinical procedures and the results were compared with prevailing national standards.

  9. Relation Between Objectively Measured Growth Determinants and Ambulation in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    GÖKKAYA, N. Kutay ORDU; ÇALIŞKAN, Aslı; KARAKUŞ, Dilek; Uçan, Halil

    2009-01-01

    Aims: Cerebral palsy (CP) is a well-known neurodevelopmental condition beginning in early childhood and persisting throughout one´s life span. Feeding problems and eating impairments in CP children are well documented in the literature. The aims of our study were to determine the prevalence of linear growth retardation and the other growth determinants in this patient group and to identify the contributing factors and their relationship with ambulation. Materials and Methods: A cross-section...

  10. Emergency ambulance assistance in The Netherlands: is the Dutch situation optimal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vugt, A B; van Olden, G D; Edwards, M J

    1995-12-01

    The system of prehospital trauma care in the Netherlands is the subject of great concern. Although many improvements have been achieved in the last decade, there are still some deficits. Legislation concerning the minimal level of education for ambulance attendants was recently upgraded to 'registered nurse', a standard which must be achieved by 1997. Standardization with regard to extrication techniques, equipment and methods of treatment in prehospital trauma care does not yet exist. Although aware of the fact that large regional differences exist throughout the USA, a system of care in accordance with the advanced trauma life support (ATLS) standard of the American College of Surgeons (ACS) and by means of prehospital and advanced trauma life support (PHTLS) given according to the standards of the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians (NAEMS) was considered to be the 'golden standard'. Nineteen ground ambulance and two helicopter services in different states of the USA, working according to ACS/NAEMS standard, were visited to analyse the system of care, with special reference to (para)medical education, communication, logistics, and immobilization materials and techniques. In the Netherlands all 41 central post ambulance services (CPAs) were asked to return a questionnaire. This resulted in a 90% (37 out of 41) response. The deficits of the Dutch system of care related to the PHTLS/ATLS standard are pointed out, resulting in recommendations to improve the Dutch system. The requirements of the dispatcher are far inferior to the optimal situation, which, together with the lack of technical equipment, results in serious communication problems. The Dutch ambulance attendant education, in which in the present system the education level reaches 'registered nurse' in only 91% and specialized courses are not mandatory, should be upgraded to the PHTLS level of care.

  11. Design and validation of a platform robot for determination of ankle impedance during ambulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Elliott J; Hargrove, Levi J; Peshkin, Michael A; Kuiken, Todd A

    2011-01-01

    In order to provide natural, biomimetic control to recently developed powered ankle prostheses, we must characterize the impedance of the ankle during ambulation tasks. To this end, a platform robot was developed that can apply an angular perturbation to the ankle during ambulation and simultaneously acquire ground reaction force data. In this study, we detail the design of the platform robot and characterize the impedance of the ankle during quiet standing. Subjects were perturbed by a 3° dorsiflexive ramp perturbation with a length of 150 ms. The impedance was defined parametrically, using a second order model to map joint angle to the torque response. The torque was determined using the inverted pendulum assumption, and impedance was identified by the least squares best estimate, yielding an average damping coefficient of 0.03 ± 0.01 Nms/° and an average stiffness coefficient of 3.1 ± 1.2 Nm/°. The estimates obtained by the proposed platform robot compare favorably to those published in the literature. Future work will investigate the impedance of the ankle during ambulation for powered prosthesis controller development.

  12. Manager-employee interaction in ambulance services: an exploratory study of employee perspectives on management communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordby, Halvor

    2015-01-01

    Managers of ambulance stations face many communicative challenges in their interaction with employees working in prehospital first-line services. The article presents an exploratory study of how paramedics experience these challenges in communication with station leaders. On the basis of a dialogue perspective in qualitative method, 24 paramedics were interviewed in one-to-one and focus group settings. Naturalistic and phenomenological approaches were used to analyze the interviews. All the paramedics said that they wished to be more involved in decision processes and that station managers should provide better explanations of information "from above." The paramedics understood that it was difficult for the managers to find time for extensive dialogue, but many thought that the managers should give more priority to communication. The paramedics' views correspond to theoretical assumptions in human resource management. According to this model, employees should be involved in decision processes on management levels, as long as it is realistically possible to do so. Furthermore, expressing emotional support and positive attitudes does not take much time, and the study suggests that many ambulance managers should focus more on interpersonal relations to employees. It has been extensively documented that management communication affects organizational performance. The study indicates that managers of ambulance stations should be more aware of how their leadership style affects professional commitment and motivation in the first-line services.

  13. Alternate laser fusion drivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pleasance, L.D.

    1979-11-01

    Over the past few years, several laser systems have been considered as possible laser fusion drivers. Recently, there has been an increasing effort to evaluate these systems in terms of a reactor driver application. The specifications for such a system have become firmer and generally more restrictive. Several of the promising candidates such as the group VI laser, the metal vapor excimers and some solid state lasers can be eliminated on the basis of inefficiency. New solid state systems may impact the long range development of a fusion driver. Of the short wavelength gas lasers, the KrF laser used in conjunction with Raman compression and pulse stacking techniques is the most promising approach. Efficiencies approaching 10% may be possible with this system. While technically feasible, these approaches are complex and costly and are unsatisfying in an aethetic sense. A search for new lasers with more compelling features is still needed.

  14. Really Scary Drivers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马莲花

    2005-01-01

    A new wave of "road killers", or new drivers, on Beijing's streets has prompted traffic authorities to do something to make driving tests more difficult. This year, the move has targeted new drivers to keep them from posing a threat, the Beijing Traffic Management Bureau says. The new test has been adopted citywide and the average pass rate is down to 50 per cent from a previous 80 per cent, at the city's 22 test centers, said Jiang Jing, a bureau press officer. The test now has six mandatory items chosen r...

  15. Feasibility, Reliability and Predictive Value Of In-Ambulance Heart Rate Variability Registration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Yperzeele

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability (HRV is a parameter of autonomic nervous system function. A decrease of HRV has been associated with disease severity, risk of complications and prognosis in several conditions.We aim to investigate the feasibility and the reliability of in-ambulance HRV registration during emergency interventions, and to evaluate the association between prehospital HRV parameters, patient characteristics, vital parameters and short-term outcome.We conducted a prospective study using a non-invasive 2-lead ECG registration device in 55 patients transported by the paramedic intervention team of the Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel. HRV assessment included time domain parameters, frequency domain parameters, nonlinear analysis, and time-frequency analysis. The correlation between HRV parameters and patient and outcome characteristics was analyzed and compared to controls.Artifact and ectopic detection rates were higher in patients during ambulance transportation compared to controls in resting conditions, yet technical reasons precluding in-ambulance HRV analysis occurred in only 9.6% of cases. HRV acquisition was possible without safety issues or interference with routine emergency care. Reliability of the results was considered sufficient for Sample entropy (SampEn, good for the ratio of low frequency and high frequency components (LF/HF ratio in the frequency and the time frequency domain, and excellent for the triangular interpolation of the NN interval histogram (TINN, and for the short-term scaling exponent of the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA α1. HRV indices were significantly reduced inpatients with unfavorable outcome compared to patients with favorable outcome and controls. Multivariate analysis identified lower DFA α1 as an independent predictor of unfavorable outcome (OR, 0.155; 95% CI 0.024-0.966; p = 0.049.In-ambulance HRV registration is technically and operationally feasible and produces reliable results for parameters

  16. Portable pneumatic biventricular driver for the Thoratec ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, D J; Buck, K E; Coulter, J H; Kupa, E J

    1997-01-01

    As patients with left ventricular (LVAD) and biventricular assist devices are supported for increasingly long durations while awaiting heart transplantation or cardiac recovery, there is a need to facilitate greater patient mobility and ambulation. To meet these needs, the authors have developed the Thoratec TLC-II Portable VAD Driver, which is a small brief-case sized (33 x 34 x 13 cm) pneumatic unit for Thoratec's paracorporeal and implantable VADs. The TLC-II consists of an electric motor driven air compressor for supplying both positive and negative air pressure, solenoid valves for switching between LVAD/RVAD filling and ejection, and microcontroller based electronics and firmware. Four power sources are provided: external power, two rechargeable lithium-ion battery packs, and an emergency battery that drives an independent electronic back-up system. The 8 kg TLC-II can be carried by hand, with a shoulder strap, or pushed on a wheeled mobility cart. Trend information stored in the TLC-II can be accessed by an external system computer with a color touchscreen mounted on a docking station, which also houses the battery charger. Control configurations (univentricular/biventricular operation, beat rates, etc.) are entered on the touchscreen and programmed into the TLC-II. In vitro testing demonstrates the ability to pump VAD outputs up to 7 L/min. By providing improved patient mobility, this small driver will enhance rehabilitation and improve the quality of life of VAD patients.

  17. Improving Driver Performance. A Curriculum for Licensed Drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highway Users Federation for Safety and Mobility, Washington, DC.

    Curriculum material presented in this manual is for use in the development of an instructional program for drivers who either want or need to improve their driving performance. Three principal units are included: man and highway transportation, driver performance, and factors influencing driver behavior. Each unit is further divided into episodes…

  18. Simulators in driver training.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2009-01-01

    In 2010, about 150 driving simulators were being used for the basic driver training in the Netherlands. According to theories about how people learn, simulator training has both advantages and disadvantages. In order to be able to learn something from a simulator, its technical quality must be adequ

  19. Seven Performance Drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Recent work with automotive e-commerce clients led to the development of a performance analysis methodology called the Seven Performance Drivers, including: standards, incentives, capacity, knowledge and skill, measurement, feedback, and analysis. This methodology has been highly effective in introducing and implementing performance improvement.…

  20. Bed rest versus early ambulation with standard anticoagulation in the management of deep vein thrombosis: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenlei Liu

    Full Text Available Bed rest has been considered as the cornerstone of management of deep vein thrombosis (DVT for a long time, though it is not evidence-base, and there is growing evidence favoring early ambulation.Electronic databases including Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Library and three Chinese databases were searched with key words of "deep vein thrombosis", "pulmonary embolism", "venous thrombosis", "bed rest", "immobilization", "mobilization" and "ambulation". We considered randomized controlled trials, prospective or retrospective cohort studies that compared the outcomes of acute DVT patients managed with early ambulation versus bed rest, in addition to standard anticoagulation. Meta-analysis pertaining to the incidence of new pulmonary embolism (PE, progression of DVT, and DVT related deaths were conducted, as well as the extent of remission of pain and edema.13 studies were included with a total of 3269 patients. Compared to bed rest, early ambulation was not associated with a higher incidence of new PE, progression of DVT, or DVT related deaths (RD -0.03, 95% CI -0.05∼ -0.02; Z = 1.24, p = 0.22; random effect model, Tau2 = 0.01. Moreover, if the patients suffered moderate or severe pain initially, early ambulation was related to a better outcome, with respect to remission of acute pain in the affected limb (SMD 0.42, 95%CI 0.09∼0.74; Z = 2.52, p = 0.01; random effect model, Tau2 = 0.04. Meta-analysis of alleviation of edema cannot elicit a solid conclusion because of significant heterogeneity among the few studies.Compared to bed rest, early ambulation of acute DVT patients with anticoagulation was not associated with a higher incidence of new PE, progression of DVT, and DVT related deaths. Furthermore, for the patients suffered moderate or severe pain initially, a better outcome can be seen in early ambulation group, regarding to the remission of acute pain in the affected limb.

  1. Daily variations in ambulance calls for selected causes in Arkhangelsk, Russia: potential role of excessive alcohol consumption on weekends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei N. Drachev

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To assess daily variations in ambulance calls for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs, mental and behavioral disorders, and external causes in Arkhangelsk, Northwest Russia, in 2000–2008. Study design. A population-based study. Methods. Data about all ambulance calls during the years 2000–2008 were obtained from the Arkhangelsk ambulance station. Information about patient's gender, age, doctor's diagnosis according to International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, and the date of call were recorded. Pearson's Chi-squared tests were used for comparing proportions of ambulance calls across the week for CVDs (I00-99, mental and behavioral disorders (F00-F99, and external causes (S00-T98, V01-Y98. The ratio of incidence of ambulance calls on Saturday, Sunday, and Monday versus the rest of week was also calculated. Results. There is a significant daily variation (p < 0.001 in calls for CVDs in men and women aged 18–59 and women aged 60 years and older, with increased numbers of calls on weekends and Mondays varying between 2 and 3% excess calls. For mental and behavioral disorders, a similar pattern was found in the age group of 18–59 year-olds. Ratios for the number of calls during weekends and Mondays vs. the rest of the week were 1.05 (95% CI: 1.02–1.08 among women and 1.02 (95% CI: 1.00–1.05 among men. For external causes, a significant variation and an increase in ambulance calls during Saturdays, Sundays, and Mondays from 4 to 17% excess calls was observed for both age and gender groups. Conclusions. The observed daily variations in ambulance calls with an increased number of calls on weekends and Mondays for CVDs, mental and behavioral disorders, and external causes may be associated with excessive alcohol consumption on the weekends. Further research using data on individual levels of alcohol consumption are warranted.

  2. Measuring and Ranking Value Drivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Akalu

    2002-01-01

    textabstractAnalysis of the strength of value drivers is crucial to understand their influence in the process of free cash flow generation. The paper addresses the issue of value driver measurement and ranking. The research reveals that, value drivers have similar pattern across industries. Furtherm

  3. Configuring a powered knee and ankle prosthesis for transfemoral amputees within five specific ambulation modes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann M Simon

    Full Text Available Lower limb prostheses that can generate net positive mechanical work may restore more ambulation modes to amputees. However, configuration of these devices imposes an additional burden on clinicians relative to conventional prostheses; devices for transfemoral amputees that require configuration of both a knee and an ankle joint are especially challenging. In this paper, we present an approach to configuring such powered devices. We developed modified intrinsic control strategies--which mimic the behavior of biological joints, depend on instantaneous loads within the prosthesis, or set impedance based on values from previous states, as well as a set of starting configuration parameters. We developed tables that include a list of desired clinical gait kinematics and the parameter modifications necessary to alter them. Our approach was implemented for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis in five ambulation modes (level-ground walking, ramp ascent/descent, and stair ascent/descent. The strategies and set of starting configuration parameters were developed using data from three individuals with unilateral transfemoral amputations who had previous experience using the device; this approach was then tested on three novice unilateral transfemoral amputees. Only 17% of the total number of parameters (i.e., 24 of the 140 had to be independently adjusted for each novice user to achieve all five ambulation modes and the initial accommodation period (i.e., time to configure the device for all modes was reduced by 56%, to 5 hours or less. This approach and subsequent reduction in configuration time may help translate powered prostheses into a viable clinical option where amputees can more quickly appreciate the benefits such devices can provide.

  4. Configuring a powered knee and ankle prosthesis for transfemoral amputees within five specific ambulation modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ann M; Ingraham, Kimberly A; Fey, Nicholas P; Finucane, Suzanne B; Lipschutz, Robert D; Young, Aaron J; Hargrove, Levi J

    2014-01-01

    Lower limb prostheses that can generate net positive mechanical work may restore more ambulation modes to amputees. However, configuration of these devices imposes an additional burden on clinicians relative to conventional prostheses; devices for transfemoral amputees that require configuration of both a knee and an ankle joint are especially challenging. In this paper, we present an approach to configuring such powered devices. We developed modified intrinsic control strategies--which mimic the behavior of biological joints, depend on instantaneous loads within the prosthesis, or set impedance based on values from previous states, as well as a set of starting configuration parameters. We developed tables that include a list of desired clinical gait kinematics and the parameter modifications necessary to alter them. Our approach was implemented for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis in five ambulation modes (level-ground walking, ramp ascent/descent, and stair ascent/descent). The strategies and set of starting configuration parameters were developed using data from three individuals with unilateral transfemoral amputations who had previous experience using the device; this approach was then tested on three novice unilateral transfemoral amputees. Only 17% of the total number of parameters (i.e., 24 of the 140) had to be independently adjusted for each novice user to achieve all five ambulation modes and the initial accommodation period (i.e., time to configure the device for all modes) was reduced by 56%, to 5 hours or less. This approach and subsequent reduction in configuration time may help translate powered prostheses into a viable clinical option where amputees can more quickly appreciate the benefits such devices can provide.

  5. Emerging organizational structures in the ambulance industry in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narad, R A

    2000-01-01

    This analysis seeks to identify emerging forms of organizations in emergency medical services (EMS) in the United States, to provide examples of them, to relate them to changes in healthcare generally, and to apply a classification scheme. Public policy issues related to these new forms of organizations and lessons from other areas of the healthcare system are identified. Recent changes in the healthcare system in the United States have been marked by modifications in the structure of organizations that provide and pay for health services. New forms of organizations and alliances among existing organizations have emerged in an effort to improve the efficiency of the services provided and to improve organizations' market positions. Reflecting increased competition within EMS and the demands of the changing health-care delivery system, several types of organizations have begun to emerge in EMS that resemble those occurring in health care generally. These include forms of horizontal integration, such as consolidated ambulance services and various models of ambulance service networks; and forms of vertical integration, such as demand management programs and public-private joint ventures. The ultimate end might be complete integration with a carve-out of all non-scheduled care. Although changes in EMS organizations result largely from marketplace decisions by sellers and purchasers, this does not mean that there is no public policy role. While new organizational forms may increase the ambulance industry's efficiency, public policy makers must be concerned about quality and access as well. Some policy responses will promote marketplace changes, others will accept them generally, but will seek to correct problems, and a third group will attempt to restrain the market.

  6. EFFECT OF SHOE RAISE ALONG WITH MOTOR RELEARNING PROGRAMME (MRP ON AMBULATION IN CHRONIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajanan Bhalerao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke subjects face reduced tolerance to activity and sedentary lifestyle due to various impairments, such as muscle weakness, pain, spasticity, and poor balance. Thus, loss of independent ambulation especially outdoors is generally observed in them. Methods: Chronic stroke patients (> 6 months with Functional Ambulation Category score > 2 and able to walk at least 10 meters of distance with and without assistance from a tertiary healthcare centre were selected and treated. Subjects were randomly divided into 2 groups control group (n=14 and experimental group (n=13. Each group received Motor Relearning Programme for 60 minutes, 6 times a week for 4 weeks. The experimental group received an additional shoe-raise of 1 cm on the unaffected side along with while ambulating during therapy as well as at home. Pre and post treatment the patients were assessed for spatio-temporal parameters using foot print analysis method and Rivermead Visual Gait Assessment (RVGA Score using RVGA scale. Results: There was significant improvement seen in almost all the spatio-temporal gait parameters and RVGA score in within group analysis. Whereas on between group the results from between group comparison suggests that subjects in MRP with shoe-raise group showed better results in spatio-temporal parameters of gait than subjects receiving MRPalone. But there was no additional benefit of shoe-raise seen on RGVA score and angle of toe-out parameter. Conclusion: Additional use of shoe-raise helps to improve spatio-temporal gait parameters. However, there was no additional change seen in RVGA score.

  7. Training Persons with Spinal Cord Injury to Ambulate Using a Powered Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselin, Pierre K; Avedissian, Manuel; Knezevic, Steven; Kornfeld, Stephen; Spungen, Ann M

    2016-06-16

    Powered exoskeletons have become available for overground ambulation in persons with paralyses due to spinal cord injury (SCI) who have intact upper extremity function and are able to maintain upright balance using forearm crutches. To ambulate in an exoskeleton, the user must acquire the ability to maintain balance while standing, sitting and appropriate weight shifting with each step. This can be a challenging task for those with deficits in sensation and proprioception in their lower extremities. This manuscript describes screening criteria and a training program developed at the James J. Peters VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY to teach users the skills needed to utilize these devices in institutional, home or community environments. Before training can begin, potential users are screened for appropriate range of motion of the hip, knee and ankle joints. Persons with SCI are at an increased risk of sustaining lower extremity fractures, even with minimal strain or trauma, therefore a bone mineral density assessment is performed to reduce the risk of fracture. Also, as part of screening, a physical examination is performed in order to identify additional health-related contraindications. Once the person has successfully passed all screening requirements, they are cleared to begin the training program. The device is properly adjusted to fit the user. A series of static and dynamic balance tasks are taught and performed by the user before learning to walk. The person is taught to ambulate in various environments ranging from indoor level surfaces to outdoors over uneven or changing surfaces. Once skilled enough to be a candidate for home use with the exoskeleton, the user is then required to designate a companion-walker who will train alongside them. Together, the pair must demonstrate the ability to perform various advanced tasks in order to be permitted to use the exoskeleton in their home/community environment.

  8. The equestrian sport-related injury workload of a regional doctor-led air ambulance unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleetman, David

    2012-12-01

    The Great Western Ambulance Service Air Support Unit (ASU) was established in July 2007. The helicopter carries a doctor, providing a Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) model of care. Equestrian sport-related injuries account for 6.8% of the unit's total attended case load. Horse riding has a higher rate of severe injury than motorcycle racing and 45% of patients admitted with equestrian injuries require surgical intervention. Orthopaedic injuries to the extremities are commonest, superseding head injuries since the introduction of protective headwear. The majority of equestrian sport-related injuries occur in areas inaccessible to land crews. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the ASU mission database from July 2008 to December 2009 (18 months) and identified 29 patients that were attended to by the ASU. The patient cohort had a female majority with an average age of 31.9. 10 Patients (34.5%) were under the age of 20. The ISS ranged from 1 to 75 (mean, 4.8; median, 1) and injuries to the extremities were commonest. The location of the accident was inaccessible to land ambulance in 55.2% of missions. The average mission time was over 2h. Doctors delivered more advanced (medical) interventions in 20.7% of missions. In 41.4% of missions, there were no such interventions performed by the attending doctor and no access to land ambulance. We therefore conclude that a large proportion of ASU dispatches were due to limited access rather than for the delivery of advanced interventions. However, our results support the opinion that horse riding carries some risk of serious injury and when employed appropriately, HEMS doctors on the ASU are a useful resource for a minority of equestrian sport-related injuries.

  9. Automobile Driver Fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enev Miro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Today’s automobiles leverage powerful sensors and embedded computers to optimize efficiency, safety, and driver engagement. However the complexity of possible inferences using in-car sensor data is not well understood. While we do not know of attempts by automotive manufacturers or makers of after-market components (like insurance dongles to violate privacy, a key question we ask is: could they (or their collection and later accidental leaks of data violate a driver’s privacy? In the present study, we experimentally investigate the potential to identify individuals using sensor data snippets of their natural driving behavior. More specifically we record the in-vehicle sensor data on the controllerarea- network (CAN of a typical modern vehicle (popular 2009 sedan as each of 15 participants (a performed a series of maneuvers in an isolated parking lot, and (b drove the vehicle in traffic along a defined ~ 50 mile loop through the Seattle metropolitan area. We then split the data into training and testing sets, train an ensemble of classifiers, and evaluate identification accuracy of test data queries by looking at the highest voted candidate when considering all possible one-vs-one comparisons. Our results indicate that, at least among small sets, drivers are indeed distinguishable using only incar sensors. In particular, we find that it is possible to differentiate our 15 drivers with 100% accuracy when training with all of the available sensors using 90% of driving data from each person. Furthermore, it is possible to reach high identification rates using less than 8 minutes of training data. When more training data is available it is possible to reach very high identification using only a single sensor (e.g., the brake pedal. As an extension, we also demonstrate the feasibility of performing driver identification across multiple days of data collection

  10. Preoperative Predictors of Ambulation Ability at Different Time Points after Total Hip Arthroplasty in Patients with Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Kamimura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to identify the preoperative factors influencing ambulation ability at different postoperative time points after total hip arthroplasty (THA and to examine the cutoff values of predictive preoperative factors by receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves. Forty-eight women with unilateral THA were measured for hip extensor, hip abductor, and knee extensor muscle strength in both legs; hip pain (visual analog scale, VAS; and the Timed Up and Go (TUG test pre- and postoperatively. Multiple regression analysis indicated that preoperative knee extensor strength (β=-0.379,R2=0.409 at 3 weeks, hip abductor strength (β=-0.572,R2=0.570 at 4 months, and age (β=0.758,R2= 0.561 at 7 months were strongly associated with postoperative ambulation, measured using the TUG test. Optimal preoperative cutoff values for ambulation ability were 0.56 Nm/kg for knee extensor strength, 0.24 Nm/kg for hip abductor strength, and 73 years of age. Our results suggest that preoperative factors predicting ambulation ability vary by postoperative time point. Preoperative knee extensor strength, hip abductor strength, and age were useful predictors of ambulation ability at the early, middle, and late time points, respectively, after THA.

  11. Risk Management Analysis of Air Ambulance Blood Product Administration in Combat Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Combat Operations 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Nicole Powell-Dunford, Jose F. Quesada , Robert F...Analysis of Air Ambulance Blood Product Administration in Combat Operations Nicole Powell-Dunford , Jose F. Quesada , Robert F. Malsby , Victoria...Schofi eld Barracks, Wahiawa, HI; Jose F. Quesada , M.S., M.D., 440th Blood Support Detachment, and Robert Gerhardt, M.D., M.P.H., FACEP, U.S. Army

  12. Why did the patient die? The relationship between ambulance accidents and death of patients: forensic medical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, Gokhan; Ersoy, Ozlem; Yuksekbas, Ozlem; Kurnaz, Gulay; Akyildiz, Elif Ulker; Ekemen, Suheyla

    2012-11-01

    This article's aim is investigating traumatic consequences of ambulance accident on patients and discussing difficulties to give a decision about the relation between death and accident at these cases. The cases were selected among the forensic medical reports concluded between 1996 and 2005 years. They were documented for age, sex, causes of urgent call, localization and extent of traumatic lesion, properties of events and board decisions. A total of 21 cases were found. 15 cases died on the day of the accident. Skin injuries at head (8 cases) and legs (6 cases) were most common traumatic lesions. Totally 6 deaths were found related with ambulance accident. Death of patient after ambulance accidents may not be associated easily to the accident. Delay due to accident or concomitant contributing medical conditions may also facilitate the death in this type of cases. Reliable medical records were needed for accurate medicolegal evaluation.

  13. Neurotherapeutic and neuroprosthetic effects of implanted functional electrical stimulation for ambulation after incomplete spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald J. Triolo, PhD

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this single-subject study was to determine the neurotherapeutic and neuroprosthetic effects of an implanted functional electrical stimulation (FES system designed to facilitate walking in an individual with a long-standing motor and sensory incomplete spinal cord injury. An implanted pulse generator and eight intramuscular stimulating electrodes were installed unilaterally, activating weak or paralyzed hip flexors, hip and knee extensors, and ankle dorsiflexors during 36 sessions of gait training with FES. The neurotherapeutic effects were assessed by a comparison of pre- and posttraining volitional walking. The neuroprosthetic effects were assessed by a comparison of posttraining volitional and FES-assisted walking. Treatment resulted in significant (p < 0.005 volitional improvements in 6-minute walking distance and speed, speed during maximum walk, double support time, and 10 m walking speed. Posttraining FES-assisted walking resulted in significant additional improvements in all these measures, except 10 m walking speed. When the subject was using FES-assisted gait, maximum walking distance, peak knee flexion in swing, peak ankle dorsiflexion in swing, and knee extension moment also significantly increased. Neuroprosthetic gains were sufficient to enable the subject to advance from household ambulation to limited community ambulation. Additionally, the subject could perform multiple walks per day when using FES-assisted gait, which was impossible with volitional effort alone.

  14. Benefits of microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knees to limited community ambulators: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannenberg, Andreas; Zacharias, Britta; Pröbsting, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knees (MPKs) have been well established in community ambulators (Medicare Functional Classification Level [MFCL]-3) with a transfemoral amputation (TFA). A systematic review of the literature was performed to analyze whether limited community ambulators (MFCL-2) may also benefit from using an MPK in safety, performance-based function and mobility, and perceived function and satisfaction. We searched 10 scientific databases for clinical trials with MPKs and identified six publications with 57 subjects with TFA and MFCL-2 mobility grade. Using the criteria of a Cochrane Review on prosthetic components, we rated methodological quality moderate in four publications and low in two publications. MPK use may significantly reduce uncontrolled falls by up to 80% as well as significantly improve indicators of fall risk. Performance-based outcome measures suggest that persons with MFCL-2 mobility grade may be able to walk about 14% to 25% faster on level ground, be around 20% quicker on uneven surfaces, and descend a slope almost 30% faster when using an MPK. The results of this systematic review suggest that trial fittings may be used to determine whether or not individuals with TFA and MFCL-2 mobility grade benefit from MPK use. Criteria for patient selection and assessment of trial fitting success or failure are proposed.

  15. Ambulation and independence among Veterans with nontraumatic bilateral lower–limb loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherene E. Sharath, MPH

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In describing functional outcomes and independent living in a cohort of bilateral major amputees, we sought to provide current estimates of function and independence after a second major amputation in an elderly Veteran population with peripheral arterial disease and/or diabetes. After retrospectively reviewing and excluding the electronic health records of those failing to meet the inclusion criteria, we identified 40 patients with a history of unilateral major amputation who underwent a second major amputation during the defined study period. Of these, 43% (17 were bilateral transfemoral amputations (TFAs; bilateral transtibial amputations (TTAs and TFA–TTA accounted for the rest (33% and 25%, respectively. Of the 19 (48% patients who were ambulatory prior to bilateral amputation, only 2 (11% remained ambulatory after the second amputation, while 17 (89% patients lost ambulatory capabilities. Compared with those who were ambulate precontralateral amputation (p = 0.03. All patients with bilateral TFA were nonambulatory. Independence postcontralateral amputation decreased from 88% (35 to 53% (21. When data were available (58%, pre and post Functional Independence Measure scores showed a decrease in 74% of patients, while 22% showed an increase. In conclusion, bilateral lower–limb amputation among dysvascular Veterans is highly associated with a loss of ambulation.

  16. Improving community ambulation after hip fracture: protocol for a randomised, controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orwig, D; Mangione, KK; Baumgarten, M; Terrin, M; Fortinsky, R; Kenny, AM; Gruber-Baldini, AL; Beamer, B; Tosteson, ANA; Shardell, M; Magder, L; Binder, E; Koval, K; Resnick, B; Craik, RL; Magaziner, J

    2017-01-01

    Introduction After a hip fracture in older persons, significant disability often remains; dependency in functional activities commonly persists beyond 3 months after surgery. Endurance, dynamic balance, quadriceps strength, and function are compromised, and contribute to an inability to walk independently in the community. In the United States, people aged 65 years and older are eligible to receive Medicare funding for physiotherapy for a limited time after a hip fracture. A goal of outpatient physiotherapy is independent and safe household ambulation 2 to 3 months after surgery. Current Medicare-reimbursed post-hip-fracture rehabilitation fails to return many patients to pre-fracture levels of function. Interventions delivered in the home after usual hip fracture physiotherapy has ended could promote higher levels of functional independence in these frail and older adult patients. Primary objective To evaluate the effect of a specific multicomponent physiotherapy intervention (PUSH), compared with a non-specific multi-component control physiotherapy intervention (PULSE), on the ability to ambulate independently in the community 16 weeks after randomisation. Design Parallel, two-group randomised multicentre trial of 210 older adults with a hip fracture assessed at baseline and 16 weeks after randomisation, and at 40 weeks after randomisation for a subset of approximately 150 participants. Participants and setting A total of 210 hip fracture patients are being enrolled at three clinical sites and randomised up to 26 weeks after admission. Study inclusion criteria are: closed, non-pathologic, minimal trauma hip fracture with surgical fixation; aged ≥ 60 years at the time of randomisation; community residing at the time of fracture and randomisation; ambulating without human assistance 2 months prior to fracture; and being unable to walk at least 300 m in 6 minutes at baseline. Participants are ineligible if the interventions are deemed to be unsafe or unfeasible

  17. Using HSPA to improve the telemedical links on a moving ambulance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banitsas, Konstantinos; Tachakra, Sapal; Stefanidis, Euclid; Boletis, Konstantinos

    2008-01-01

    As the demand for faster and more effective health care increases, there is a growing need to establish mobile, high-speed communications between a moving ambulance and a consultation point (usually a hospital). The recent addition of HSPA (HSDPA and HSUPA) into the UMTS suite provides higher bandwidth and reduced delays, making this choice ideal for real-time telemedical applications. In this paper, we will describe a set of scenarios that took place in a typical large city area, along with their equivalent results: a moving ambulance was linked with a consultation station using HSPA and several videoconferencing sessions were initiated. Best-case, worst-case and average scenarios were recorded. Furthermore, in areas where the UMTS reception was marginal, a repeater was placed on top of the vehicle to boost up the signal power and thus maintain the higher bandwidth. Finally, treating doctors were asked to evaluate the effectiveness of this system's outputs, based on a variety of objective and subjective criteria.

  18. Humeral fracture in non-ambulant infants - a possible accidental mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somers, John M.; Halliday, Katharine E. [Nottingham University Hospitals, Radiology Department, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Chapman, Stephen [Birmingham Children' s Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15

    Humeral fracture in a non-ambulant infant younger than 1 year is suspicious for a non-accidental injury unless there is a credible accidental explanation. A previously unrecognised accidental mechanism was described in 1996 whereby a 5-month-old infant was rolled by a 3-year-old sibling from a prone to a supine position. To investigate the widely accepted view that an infant with limited mobility cannot sustain a fracture of the humerus by his or her own actions in the absence of the intervention of an external party. We present seven cases of non-ambulant infants between 4 and 7 months of age in whom an isolated humeral fracture was the only injury present. In each case the caregiver described the fracture occurring when the child rolled over, trapping the dependent arm, without the intervention of another party. There is no proof for this mechanism in the form of an independent witness or video recording. However, we propose that this mechanism is worthy of further consideration as a rare and unusual cause for the injury. Further study is required. (orig.)

  19. Four Square Step Test in ambulant persons with multiple sclerosis: validity, reliability, and responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Joanne M; Norris, Rosemary A; Van Dillen, Linda R; Thomas, Florian P; Naismith, Robert T

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the concurrent validity and relative and absolute reliability, define the minimal detectable change, and evaluate the floor and ceiling effects of the Four Square Step Test (FSST) in ambulant persons with multiple sclerosis (pwMS). Twenty-five pwMS performed the FSST on two occasions, 8.1±4.1 days apart. During the first testing, session participants also reported their fall history, performed the Berg Balance Scale, Dynamic Gait Index, and completed the Activities-Specific Balance Confidence Scale. Performance on the FSST was significantly (P<0.001) and strongly associated with performance on the Berg Balance Scale (rs=-0.84), Dynamic Gait Index (rs=-0.81), and Activities-Specific Balance Confidence Scale (rs=-0.78). Relative reliability of the FSST was excellent (ICC2,1=0.922). The minimal detectable change estimate for the FSST was 4.6 s. The FSST is a valid and reliable measure of dynamic standing balance in ambulant pwMS. However, because a substantial change (43%) is required to demonstrate a real change in individual performance, the FSST is unlikely to be sensitive in detecting longitudinal change in dynamic standing balance.

  20. Benefits of microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knees to limited community ambulators: Systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Kannenberg, MD, PhD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knees (MPKs have been well established in community ambulators (Medicare Functional Classification Level [MFCL]-3 with a transfemoral amputation (TFA. A systematic review of the literature was performed to analyze whether limited community ambulators (MFCL-2 may also benefit from using an MPK in safety, performance-based function and mobility, and perceived function and satisfaction. We searched 10 scientific databases for clinical trials with MPKs and identified six publications with 57 subjects with TFA and MFCL-2 mobility grade. Using the criteria of a Cochrane Review on prosthetic components, we rated methodological quality moderate in four publications and low in two publications. MPK use may significantly reduce uncontrolled falls by up to 80% as well as significantly improve indicators of fall risk. Performance-based outcome measures suggest that persons with MFCL-2 mobility grade may be able to walk about 14% to 25% faster on level ground, be around 20% quicker on uneven surfaces, and descend a slope almost 30% faster when using an MPK. The results of this systematic review suggest that trial fittings may be used to determine whether or not individuals with TFA and MFCL-2 mobility grade benefit from MPK use. Criteria for patient selection and assessment of trial fitting success or failure are proposed.

  1. The Medical Duty Officer: An Attempt to Mitigate the Ambulance At-Hospital Interval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan H. Halliday

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A lack of coordination between emergency medical services (EMS, emergency departments (ED and systemwide management has contributed to extended ambulance at-hospital times at local EDs. In an effort to improve communication within the local EMS system, the Baltimore City Fire Department (BCFD placed a medical duty officer (MDO in the fire communications bureau. It was hypothesized that any real-time intervention suggested by the MDO would be manifested in a decrease in the EMS at-hospital time. Methods: The MDO was implemented on November 11, 2013. A senior EMS paramedic was assigned to the position and was placed in the fire communication bureau from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., seven days a week. We defined the pre-intervention period as August 2013 - October 2013 and the post-intervention period as December 2013 - February 2014. We also compared the post-intervention period to the “seasonal match control” one year earlier to adjust for seasonal variation in EMS volume. The MDO was tasked with the prospective management of city EMS resources through intensive monitoring of unit availability and hospital ED traffic. The MDO could suggest alternative transport destinations in the event of ED crowding. We collected and analyzed data from BCFD computer-aided dispatch (CAD system for the following: ambulance response times, ambulance at-hospital interval, hospital diversion and alert status, and “suppression wait time” (defined as the total time suppression units remained on scene until ambulance arrival. The data analysis used a pre/post intervention design to examine the MDO impact on the BCFD EMS system. Results: There were a total of 15,567 EMS calls during the pre-intervention period, 13,921 in the post-intervention period and 14,699 in the seasonal match control period one year earlier. The average at-hospital time decreased by 1.35 minutes from pre- to post-intervention periods and 4.53 minutes from the pre- to seasonal match

  2. Counter-driver shock tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamba, T.; Nguyen, T. M.; Takeya, K.; Harasaki, T.; Iwakawa, A.; Sasoh, A.

    2015-11-01

    A "counter-driver" shock tube was developed. In this device, two counter drivers are actuated with an appropriate delay time to generate the interaction between a shock wave and a flow in the opposite direction which is induced by another shock wave. The conditions for the counter drivers can be set independently. Each driver is activated by a separate electrically controlled diaphragm rupture device, in which a pneumatic piston drives a rupture needle with a temporal jitter of better than 1.1 ms. Operation demonstrations were conducted to evaluate the practical performance.

  3. Driver behaviour at roadworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Guy; Calvert, Malcolm

    2015-11-01

    There is an incompatibility between how transport engineers think drivers behave in roadworks and how they actually behave. As a result of this incompatibility we are losing approximately a lane's worth of capacity in addition to those closed by the roadworks themselves. The problem would have little significance were it not for the fact a lane of motorway costs approx. £30 m per mile to construct and £43 k a year to maintain, and that many more roadworks are planned as infrastructure constructed 40 or 50 years previously reaches a critical stage in its lifecycle. Given current traffic volumes, and the sensitivity of road networks to congestion, the effects of roadworks need to be accurately assessed. To do this requires a new ergonomic approach. A large-scale observational study of real traffic conditions was used to identify the issues and impacts, which were then mapped to the ergonomic knowledge-base on driver behaviour, and combined to developed practical guidelines to help in modelling future roadworks scenarios with greater behavioural accuracy. Also stemming from the work are novel directions for the future ergonomic design of roadworks themselves.

  4. Driver Fatigue Features Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gengtian Niu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Driver fatigue is the main cause of traffic accidents. How to extract the effective features of fatigue is important for recognition accuracy and traffic safety. To solve the problem, this paper proposes a new method of driver fatigue features extraction based on the facial image sequence. In this method, first, each facial image in the sequence is divided into nonoverlapping blocks of the same size, and Gabor wavelets are employed to extract multiscale and multiorientation features. Then the mean value and standard deviation of each block’s features are calculated, respectively. Considering the facial performance of human fatigue is a dynamic process that developed over time, each block’s features are analyzed in the sequence. Finally, Adaboost algorithm is applied to select the most discriminating fatigue features. The proposed method was tested on a self-built database which includes a wide range of human subjects of different genders, poses, and illuminations in real-life fatigue conditions. Experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  5. Fast SCR Thyratron Driver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, M.N.; /SLAC

    2007-06-18

    As part of an improvement project on the linear accelerator at SLAC, it was necessary to replace the original thyratron trigger generator, which consisted of two chassis, two vacuum tubes, and a small thyratron. All solid-state, fast rise, and high voltage thyratron drivers, therefore, have been developed and built for the 244 klystron modulators. The rack mounted, single chassis driver employs a unique way to control and generate pulses through the use of an asymmetric SCR, a PFN, a fast pulse transformer, and a saturable reactor. The resulting output pulse is 2 kV peak into 50 {Omega} load with pulse duration of 1.5 {mu}s FWHM at 180 Hz. The pulse risetime is less than 40 ns with less than 1 ns jitter. Various techniques are used to protect the SCR from being damaged by high voltage and current transients due to thyratron breakdowns. The end-of-line clipper (EOLC) detection circuit is also integrated into this chassis to interrupt the modulator triggering in the event a high percentage of line reflections occurred.

  6. What an ambulance nurse needs to know: a content analysis of curricula in the specialist nursing programme in prehospital emergency care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölin, Helena; Lindström, Veronica; Hult, Håkan; Ringsted, Charlotte; Kurland, Lisa

    2015-04-01

    In Sweden, ambulances must be staffed by at least one registered nurse. Twelve universities offer education in ambulance nursing. There is no national curriculum for detailed course content and there is a lack of knowledge about the educational content that deals with the ambulance nurse practical professional work. The aim of this study was to describe the content in course curricula for ambulance nurses. A descriptive qualitative research design with summative content analysis was used. Data were generated from 49 courses in nursing and medical science. The result shows that the course content can be described as medical, nursing and contextual knowledge with a certain imbalance with largest focus on medical knowledge. There is least focus on nursing, the registered nurses' main profession. This study clarifies how the content in the education for ambulance nurses in Sweden looks today but there are reasons to discuss the content distribution.

  7. Driver style and driver skills – clustering drivers differing in their potential danger in traffic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Laila Marianne; Møller, Mette; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    The Driver Behavior Questionnaire (DBQ) and the Driver Skill Inventory (DSI) are two of the most frequently used measures of driving style and driving skill. The motivation behind the present study was to test drivers’ insight into their own driving ability based on a combined use of the DBQ......, annual mileage and accident involvement. 3908 drivers aged 18–84 participated in the survey. The results suggested that the drivers have good insight into their own driving ability, as the driving skill level mirrored the frequency of aberrant driving behaviors. K-means cluster analysis revealed four...... and the DSI. Moreover, the joint use of the two instruments was applied to identify sub-groups of drivers that differ in their potential danger in traffic, as well as to test for heterogeneity across the population, namely whether the sub-groups of drivers differed in characteristics such as age, gender...

  8. Evaluation of an algorithm for estimating a patient's life threat risk from an ambulance call

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moriwaki Yoshihiro

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Utilizing a computer algorithm, information from calls to an ambulance service was used to calculate the risk of patients being in a life-threatening condition (life threat risk, at the time of the call. If the estimated life threat risk was higher than 10%, the probability that a patient faced a risk of dying was recognized as very high and categorized as category A+. The present study aimed to review the accuracy of the algorithm. Methods Data collected for six months from the Yokohama new emergency system was used. In the system, emergency call workers interviewed ambulance callers to obtain information necessary to assess triage, which included consciousness level, breathing status, walking ability, position, and complexion. An emergency patient's life threat risk was then estimated by a computer algorithm applying logistic models. This study compared the estimated life threat risk occurring at the time of the emergency call to the patients' state or severity of condition, i.e. death confirmed at the scene by ambulance crews, resulted in death at emergency departments, life-threatening condition with occurrence of cardiac and/or pulmonary arrest (CPA, life-threatening condition without CPA, serious but not life-threatening condition, moderate condition, and mild condition. The sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and likelihood ratios of the algorithm for categorizing A+ were calculated. Results The number of emergency dispatches over the six months was 73,992. Triage assessment was conducted for 68,692 of these calls. The study targets account for 88.8% of patients who were involved in triage calls. There were 2,349 cases where the patient had died or had suffered CPA. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, positive likelihood ratio and negative likelihood ratio of the algorithm at predicting cases that would result in a death or CPA were 80.2% (95% confidence interval

  9. Effect of Planned Early Recommended Ambulation Technique on Selected Post caesarean Biophysiological Health Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti V. Dube

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caesarean section has been a part of human culture since ancient times. It has been used effectively throughout the 20th century and among the major abdominal surgeries, it is the most common, oldest worldwide surgery performed in obstetrics. Despite the life saving advantages, there are several adverse consequences of caesarean delivery for a woman and to her household. The rate and risk of these complications increases due to the increasing incidence mainly in countries like India. The role of nurse midwife is to act in the best interest of patient and newborn and make the patient independent in carrying out the activities of daily living as soon as possible. This can lead to a faster recovery and shorter hospital stay. Also it can indirectly help in reducing the complications associated with prolonged bed rest and can improve the maternal newborn bonding. Aim and Objectives: The present study was done to evaluate the effect of planned early ambulation on selected biophysiological health parameters of post caesarean patients. Material and Methods: The study included total 500 study subjects, 250 in experimental and 250 in control group. Quasi experimental approach with multiple time series design was adopted for the study. The experimental group was given an early planned recommended ambulation technique starting from the day of surgery. This consisted of deep breathing exercise, cough exercise, leg exercise and early mobilization. Over and above, the routine general health care was given by the doctors and nurses. The control group received only by routine general care by doctors and nurses and mobilization on third post operative day as per strategy adopted by the hospital. The deep breathing exercises, coughing exercises and leg exercises were not given routinely and hence were not given to the control group. Post caesarean biophysiological parameters chart was used to assess the selected parameters for first five post operative

  10. Emergency obstetric referral in rural Sierra Leone: what can motorbike ambulances contribute? A mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhopal, Sunil S; Halpin, Stephen J; Gerein, Nancy

    2013-08-01

    Giving birth remains a dangerous endeavour for many of the world's women. Progress to improve this has been slow in sub-Saharan Africa. The second delay, where transport infrastructure is key in allowing a woman to reach care, has been a relatively neglected field of study. Six eRanger motorbike ambulances, specifically engineered for use on poor roads in resource-poor situations were provided in 2006 as part of an emergency referral system in rural Sierra Leone. The aim of this study was to evaluate the implementation of this referral system in terms of its use, acceptability and accessibility. Data were collected from usage records, and a series of semi-structured interviews and focus groups conducted to provide deeper understanding of the service. A total of 130 records of patients being transported to a health facility were found, 1/3 of which were for obstetric cases. The ambulance is being used regularly to transport patients to a health care facility. It is well known to the communities, is acceptable and accessible, and is valued by those it serves. District-wide traditional birth attendant training and the sensitisation activities provided a foundation for the introduction of the ambulance service, creating a high level of awareness of the service and its importance, particularly for women in labour. Motorbike ambulances are suited to remote areas and can function on poor roads inaccessible to other vehicles.

  11. Feasibility of AmbulanCe-Based Telemedicine (FACT) Study : Safety, Feasibility and Reliability of Third Generation Ambulance Telemedicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yperzeele, Laetitia; Van Hooff, Robbert-Jan; De Smedt, Ann; Espinoza, Alexis Valenzuela; Van Dyck, Rita; Van de Casseye, Rohny; Convents, Andre; Hubloue, Ives; Lauwaert, Door; De Keyser, Jacques; Brouns, Raf

    2014-01-01

    Background: Telemedicine is currently mainly applied as an in-hospital service, but this technology also holds potential to improve emergency care in the prehospital arena. We report on the safety, feasibility and reliability of in-ambulance teleconsultation using a telemedicine system of the third

  12. High intertester reliability of the cumulated ambulation score for the evaluation of basic mobility in patients with hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Andersen, Lene; Bech-Jensen, Rie;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the intertester reliability of the three activities of the Cumulated Ambulation Score (CAS) and the total CAS, and to define limits for the smallest change in basic mobility that indicates a real change in patients with hip fracture. DESIGN: An intertester reliability study....

  13. Early ambulance initiation versus in-hospital initiation of high dose clopidogrel in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, S.; Dambrink, J.H.; Ottervanger, J.P.; Gosselink, A.T.M.; Koopmans, P.C.; Berg, J.M. van den; Suryapranata, H.; Hof, A.W. van 't

    2014-01-01

    Pre-hospital infarct diagnosis gives the opportunity to start anti-platelet and anti-thrombotic agents before arrival at the PCI centre. However, more evidence is necessary to demonstrate whether high dose (HD) clopidogrel (600 mg) administered in the ambulance is associated with improved initial pa

  14. Cumulated Ambulation Score to evaluate mobility is feasible in geriatric patients and in patients with hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding; Nielsen, Jesper Westphal;

    2012-01-01

    Regaining basic mobility independence is considered important for elderly hospitalised patients. The Cumulated Ambulation Score (CAS) is a valid tool for evaluating these patients' basic mobility (getting in and out of bed, sit-to-stand from a chair and walking) in orthopaedic wards, and its use...

  15. Drivers of Collaborative Advantage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weihe, Gudrid

    Drawing upon extant alliance literature, this article substantiates the argument that we need to look beyond mere structural and formative aspects of cooperation in order to fully understand the performance antecedents of public-private partnerships. Currently, scholarly work on operational...... processes and behavioural dimensions is practically non-existent. This article tries to remedy the current gap in the literature by reviewing research findings on interfirm collaboration (alliances). On that basis a conceptual framework for analyzing partnership processes is developed. Finally......, the antecedents of collaborative advantage are theoretically examined, and the organizational competences contributing to collaborative success are identified. The conclusion is that operational processes and social dynamics are vital drivers of collaborative advantage. Another significant conclusion...

  16. Use of Functional Ambulation Performance Score as measurement of gait ability: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Gouelle, PhD

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Gait analysis systems are widely used for the assessment of gait disabilities and provide more accurate and detailed information than clinical tests. Scores and indexes have been proposed to summarize the large volume of data produced, each emphasizing different aspects of gait. Based on specific spatiotemporal gait parameters, the Functional Ambulation Performance Score (FAPS quantifies gait at a self-selected speed. Integrated within electronic walkways, the FAPS is commonly used for clinical evaluations and has been used in an increasing number of publications over the past few years. However, its use is sometimes distorted by misunderstandings of its composition and calculation, practical and/or conceptual limits, and even the meaning of the score. This technical report reviews the use of the FAPS for the evaluation of gait based on peer-reviewed articles and clinical experience and addresses important issues that must be considered for an optimal unbiased understanding and analysis of the score.

  17. [The evaluation of health of medical personnel of ambulance care and impacting factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of self-assessment of medical personnel of ambulance care revealed that 13.2% of respondents consider themselves as healthy persons, 35.1%--as practically healthy, 39.2%--as rarely being ill, 12%--as often being ill According to the poll data, deterioration of health is promoted by such personal factors as disregard of one's health (35%) and chronic diseases (25.3%). Its own role play such external factors as professional characteristics (34%). ecological conditions (23%), poor conditions of work (22.2%). The amelioration of health is supported mainly by sport exercises (42.8%). The significant role in this process play the improvement of work conditions, the enhancement of quality of medical examninations and the introduction of professional dispanserization.

  18. Geographic information system data from ambulances applied in the emergency department: effects on patient reception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaber, Nikolaj; Pedersen, Iben Duvald; Riddervold, Ingunn Skogstad;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Emergency departments (ED) recognize crowding and handover from prehospital to in-hospital settings to be major challenges. Prehospital Geographical Information Systems (GIS) may be a promising tool to address such issues. In this study, the use of prehospital GIS data was implemented...... was displayed in the ED. Data included real-time estimated time of arrival, distance to ED, dispatch criteria, patient data and ambulance contact information. Data was used by coordinating nurses for time activation of TT and MET involved in the initial treatment of severely-injured or critically-ill patients....... DISCUSSION: The contradiction of measured median wait time and nurses perceived improved timing of team activation may result from having both RT- ETA and supplemental patient information not only for seriously-injured or critically-ill patients received by the TT and MET, but for all patients transported...

  19. Design and Development of an Intelligent Mobile Health Tele-assistance System in Ambulance Practice Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid Merzougui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our attention has focused on the choice of a relevant work. It concerns an implemented and conceived service of medical Teleassistance for monitoring risky persons brought by ambulance service. Thus, a medical bulletin is automatically filled on mobile terminal, immediately transmitted to the service of the emergency (on doctors mobile terminal, data base of clinic. This paper recalls a complete architecture of an economic wireless transmission system with the implementation of an effective application, adapted to the portable phone, allowing the doctor to have the medical information of patients who have a risk of accident. Thus, the stakes of setting up such systems are numerous, so much for patients, medical staff and the society in general.

  20. Early ambulation and prevention of post-operative thrombo-embolic risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talec, P; Gaujoux, S; Samama, C M

    2016-12-01

    The prevention of post-operative risk of venous thrombo-embolism (VTE) is of fundamental importance, but preventive methods have progressed with the introduction of direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC), the development of ambulatory surgery and enhanced recovery programs (ERP) after surgery. Surgery is, inherently a trigger for venous thrombo-embolic disease, as is prolonged immobilization. However, the risk of VTE is very low following ambulatory surgery, especially in this selected population. ERP, consists of a set of measures to optimize the patient's peri-operative management while reducing length of stay, costs and morbidity and mortality; one measure is the encouragement of early ambulation. This will undoubtedly have an impact on the incidence of VTE and lessen the need for prolonged thrombo-prophylaxis.

  1. Reducing Ambulance Diversion at Hospital and Regional Levels: Systemic Review of Insights from Simulation Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Kit Delgado

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Optimal solutions for reducing diversion without worsening emergency department (ED crowding are unclear. We performed a systematic review of published simulation studies to identify: 1 the tradeoff between ambulance diversion and ED wait times; 2 the predicted impact of patient flow interventions on reducing diversion; and 3 the optimal regional strategy for reducing diversion.Methods: Data Sources: Systematic review of articles using MEDLINE, Inspec, Scopus. Additional studies identified through bibliography review, Google Scholar, and scientific conference proceedings. Study Selection: Only simulations modeling ambulance diversion as a result of ED crowding or inpatient capacity problems were included. Data extraction: Independent extraction by two authors using predefined data fields.Results: We identified 5,116 potentially relevant records; 10 studies met inclusion criteria. In models that quantified the relationship between ED throughput times and diversion, diversion was found to only minimally improve ED waiting room times. Adding holding units for inpatient boarders and ED-based fast tracks, improving lab turnaround times, and smoothing elective surgery caseloads were found to reduce diversion considerably. While two models found a cooperative agreement between hospitals is necessary to prevent defensive diversion behavior by a hospital when a nearby hospital goes on diversion, one model found there may be more optimal solutions for reducing region wide wait times than a regional ban on diversion.Conclusion: Smoothing elective surgery caseloads, adding ED fast tracks as well as holding units for inpatient boarders, improving ED lab turnaround times, and implementing regional cooperative agreements among hospitals. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(5:489-498.

  2. Telehealth-Enabled Emergency Medical Services Program Reduces Ambulance Transport to Urban Emergency Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R. Langabeer II

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency medical services (EMS agencies transport a significant majority of patients with low acuity and non-emergent conditions to local emergency departments (ED, affecting the entire emergency care system’s capacity and performance. Opportunities exist for alternative models that integrate technology, telehealth, and more appropriately aligned patient navigation. While a limited number of programs have evolved recently, no empirical evidence exists for their efficacy. This research describes the development and comparative effectiveness of one large urban program. Methods: The Houston Fire Department initiated the Emergency Telehealth and Navigation (ETHAN program in 2014. ETHAN combines telehealth, social services, and alternative transportation to navigate primary care-related patients away from the ED where possible. Using a case-control study design, we describe the program and compare differences in effectiveness measures relative to the control group. Results: During the first 12 months, 5,570 patients participated in the telehealth-enabled program, which were compared against the same size control group. We found a 56% absolute reduction in ambulance transports to the ED with the intervention compared to the control group (18% vs. 74%, P<.001. EMS productivity (median time from EMS notification to unit back in service was 44 minutes faster for the ETHAN group (39 vs. 83 minutes, median. There were no statistically significant differences in mortality or patient satisfaction. Conclusion: We found that mobile technology-driven delivery models are effective at reducing unnecessary ED ambulance transports and increasing EMS unit productivity. This provides support for broader EMS mobile integrated health programs in other regions.

  3. How urgent are cases brought to the emergency department by ambulance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melih Yuksel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Emergency departments are the first places to which patients present with unexpected or unforeseen health problems. The purpose of this study was to assess the urgency of cases brought by ambulance to the Hospital on the basis of a three-level triage system. Methods: This study was performed between 01.06.2013 and 31.09.2013 at the Diyarbakır Education and Research Hospital. Our emergency service unit is a third degree service for all adult patient groups and all child trauma types. Triage of patients brought to the emergency department by ambulance was performed by emergency medicine specialists. Patients’ vital findings, identity data and triage categories were assessed. Results: 712 patients were included, 382 (53.7% male and 330 (46.3% female, with a mean age of 45. In this study, 619 (86.9% patients were transferred from the scene and 93 (13.1 between hospitals, 483 (67.8% patients were brought by emergency medicine technician (EMT teams, 107 (15% by physician-led teams, 107 (15 by paramedic teams and 15 (2.1% by other teams, 442 (62.1% patients were assessed as yellow, 141 (19.8% as green and 129 (19.1% as red zone. Five hundred eighty (81.5% patients were discharged and 115 (15.9% were hospitalized. Conclusion: Emergency health services are clearly developing rapidly in Turkey. In order for pre-hospital emergency health services not to be abused, we think that these services should be up to the standards of those in developed countries and that public awareness needs to be increased, particularly with regard to triage. J Clin Exp Invest 2015; 6 (2: 126-129

  4. Effects of Weather and Heliophysical Conditions on Emergency Ambulance Calls for Elevated Arterial Blood Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jone Vencloviene

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that weather and space weather conditions were associated with the exacerbation of essential hypertension. The study was conducted during 2009–2010 in the city of Kaunas, Lithuania. We analyzed 13,475 cards from emergency ambulance calls (EACs, in which the conditions for the emergency calls were made coded I.10–I.15. The Kaunas Weather Station provided daily records of air temperature (T, wind speed (WS, relative humidity, and barometric pressure (BP. We evaluated the associations between daily weather variables and daily number of EACs by applying a multivariate Poisson regression. Unfavorable heliophysical conditions (two days after the active-stormy geomagnetic field or the days with solar WS > 600 km/s increased the daily number of elevated arterial blood pressure (EABP by 12% (RR = 1.12; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.04–1.21; and WS ≥ 3.5 knots during days of T < 1.5 °C and T ≥ 12.5 °C by 8% (RR = 1.08; CI 1.04–1.12. An increase of T by 10 °C and an elevation of BP two days after by 10 hPa were associated with a decrease in RR by 3%. An additional effect of T was detected during days of T ≥ 17.5 °C only in females. Women and patients with grade III arterial hypertension at the time of the ambulance call were more sensitive to weather conditions. These results may help in the understanding of the population’s sensitivity to different weather conditions.

  5. Rosalind Driver studentships

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-11-01

    The School of Education at King's College London can now offer funded studentships to those wishing to undertake research in science education. These studentships, which are funded through the generous benefaction of the late Rosalind Driver, can be for a full-time student (over a maximum of three years) or several part-time students (a maximum of six years). Applications from anyone working in science education are welcome but preference will be given to those originating from practising science teachers. Applicants will be expected to register for the award of a MPhil/PhD or EdD and are normally expected to have a first degree. Preliminary ideas about a topic for investigation would also be helpful. Further details and application forms are obtainable from Chiz Dube, School of Education, King's College London, Franklin - Wilkins Building, Waterloo Road, London SE1 8WA (tel: 020-7848-3089, e-mail: chiz.dube@kcl.ac.uk). The deadline for the first round of applications was the middle of October, but preliminary informal enquiries may be made to Dr Jonathan Osborne at the School of Education (tel: 020-7848-3094, e-mail: jonathan.osborne@kcl.ac.uk).

  6. Planning like an Olympian. How London Ambulance Service successfully handled their 'summer of sport'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killens, Jason

    2013-03-01

    LOCOG Medical managed thousands of patient contacts across all the Games venues without our intervention. A polyclinic in the athlete's village had extensive diagnostic options, including X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging for athletes and the Olympic family. These helped limit the number of patients who needed transport to the ED. Although the delivery was seamless, there were "behind the scenes" moments in the final stages of planning that made us think. We received additional requests for ambulance cover at training venues that hadn't been planned for on short notice. In addition, the torch relay attracted bigger crowds than initially planned for. Some of the planning assumptions and agreements changed on short notice for various reasons. This meant we had to adjust our plans while also solving human resource issues that you would expect to see among a workforce of around 500 across a six-week period. As part of the National Health Service (NHS) ambulance service Games cohort, more than 500 staff were deployed across 18 venues and 30 days of sport in London. In doing so, they delivered in excess of 165,000 hours of standby and care, responded to nearly 1,500 Games-related incidents and conveyed 800 patients to emergency departments across the capital. After such an influx, it wasn't easy to return to business as usual. Officials with previous host cities had advised us that there would be a feeling of "what next" once the Games concluded. When I first heard this, I thought the opposite would be the case. I expected feeling relieved of overwhelming emotion as well as from the exhaustion of the long days. I do have to say that although this was the case, it's also true that there is a "post Games" come down. We had just been part of a fantastic summer of sport with a brilliant medal tally from Team Great Britain and Paralympics Great Britain that, of course, helped the euphoria. But we did feel real sense of uncertainty about what to do next. We had spent five

  7. L’ambulantage : Représentations du commerce ambulant ou informel et métropolisation

    OpenAIRE

    MONNET, Jérôme

    2006-01-01

    Les représentations sociales font du commerce dit ambulant, informel ou de rue un ensemble flou d’activités liées à l’illégalité, à l’archaïsme et au sous-développement. En première partie, une cybergéographie de ces représentations présente les trois identifications dominantes de ce type de commerce et différencie des approches selon que l’on s’exprime en anglais ou en français et en espagnol. Cependant, elles ont en commun de marginaliser le commerce ambulant, et en particulier de ne pas co...

  8. Locomotor diseases among male long-haul truck drivers and other professional drivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anker; Kaerlev, Linda; Tüchsen, Finn

    2007-01-01

    -249) and for other truck drivers (SHR: 130, 95% CI: 108-156) compared to bus drivers (SHR: 110, 95% CI: 79-149). All drivers had high SHR for lesions of the ulnar nerve (SHR: 159, 95% CI: 119-207), especially bus drivers (SHR: 197, 95% CI: 116-311). Long-haul truck drivers had high SHRs for synovitis and bursitis...

  9. Differences in police, ambulance, and emergency department reporting of traffic injuries on Karachi-Hala road, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lagarde Emmanuel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research undertaken in developing countries has assessed discrepancies in police reporting of Road Traffic Injury (RTI for urban settings only. The objective of this study was to assess differences in RTI reporting across police, ambulance, and hospital Emergency Department (ED datasets on an interurban road section in Pakistan. Methods The study setting was the 196-km long Karachi-Hala road section. RTIs reported to the police, Edhi Ambulance Service (EAS, and five hospital EDs in Karachi during 2008 (Jan to Dec were compared in terms of road user involved (pedestrians, motorcyclists, four-wheeled vehicle occupants and outcome (died or injured. Further, records from these data were matched to assess ascertainment of traffic injuries and deaths by the three datasets. Results A total of 143 RTIs were reported to the police, 531 to EAS, and 661 to hospital EDs. Fatality per hundred traffic injuries was twice as high in police records (19 per 100 RTIs than in ambulance (10 per 100 RTIs and hospital ED records (9 per 100 RTIs. Pedestrian and motorcyclist involvement per hundred traffic injuries was lower in police records (8 per 100 RTIs than in ambulance (17 per 100 RTIs and hospital ED records (43 per 100 RTIs. Of the 119 deaths independently identified after matching, police recorded 22.6%, EAS 46.2%, and hospital ED 50.4%. Similarly, police data accounted for 10.6%, EAS 43.5%, and hospital ED 54.9% of the 1 095 independently identified injured patients. Conclusions Police reporting, particularly of non-fatal RTIs and those involving vulnerable road users, should be improved in Pakistan.

  10. Effect evaluation of a heated ambulance mattress-prototype on thermal comfort and patients’ temperatures in prehospital emergency care – an intervention study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Aléx

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ambulance milieu does not offer good thermal comfort to patients during the cold Swedish winters. Patients’ exposure to cold temperatures combined with a cold ambulance mattress seems to be the major factor leading to an overall sensation of discomfort. There is little research on the effect of active heat delivered from underneath in ambulance care. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an electrically heated ambulance mattress-prototype on thermal comfort and patients’ temperatures in the prehospital emergency care. Methods: A quantitative intervention study on ambulance care was conducted in the north of Sweden. The ambulance used for the intervention group (n=30 was equipped with an electrically heated mattress on the regular ambulance stretcher whereas for the control group (n=30 no active heat was provided on the stretcher. Outcome variables were measured as thermal comfort on the Cold Discomfort Scale (CDS, subjective comments on cold experiences, and finger, ear and air temperatures. Results: Thermal comfort, measured by CDS, improved during the ambulance transport to the emergency department in the intervention group (p=0.001 but decreased in the control group (p=0.014. A significant higher proportion (57% of the control group rated the stretcher as cold to lie down compared to the intervention group (3%, p<0.001. At arrival, finger, ear and compartment air temperature showed no statistical significant difference between groups. Mean transport time was approximately 15 minutes. Conclusions: The use of active heat from underneath increases the patients’ thermal comfort and may prevent the negative consequences of cold stress.

  11. Emergency department visits, ambulance calls, and mortality associated with an exceptional heat wave in Sydney, Australia, 2011: a time-series analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaffer Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From January 30-February 6, 2011, New South Wales was affected by an exceptional heat wave, which broke numerous records. Near real-time Emergency Department (ED and ambulance surveillance allowed rapid detection of an increase in the number of heat-related ED visits and ambulance calls during this period. The purpose of this study was to quantify the excess heat-related and all-cause ED visits and ambulance calls, and excess all-cause mortality, associated with the heat wave. Methods ED and ambulance data were obtained from surveillance and administrative databases, while mortality data were obtained from the state death registry. The observed counts were compared with the average counts from the same period from 2006/07 through 2009/10, and a Poisson regression model was constructed to calculate the number of excess ED visits, ambulance and deaths after adjusting for calendar and lag effects. Results During the heat wave there were 104 and 236 ED visits for heat effects and dehydration respectively, and 116 ambulance calls for heat exposure. From the regression model, all-cause ED visits increased by 2% (95% CI 1.01-1.03, all-cause ambulance calls increased by 14% (95% CI 1.11-1.16, and all-cause mortality increased by 13% (95% CI 1.06-1.22. Those aged 75 years and older had the highest excess rates of all outcomes. Conclusions The 2011 heat wave resulted in an increase in the number of ED visits and ambulance calls, especially in older persons, as well as an increase in all-cause mortality. Rapid surveillance systems provide markers of heat wave impacts that have fatal outcomes.

  12. Strategies to reduce the configuration time for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis across multiple ambulation modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ann M; Fey, Nicholas P; Finucane, Suzanne B; Lipschutz, Robert D; Hargrove, Levi J

    2013-06-01

    Recently developed powered lower limb prostheses allow users to more closely mimic the kinematics and kinetics of non-amputee gait. However, configuring such a device, in particular a combined powered knee and ankle, for individuals with a transfemoral amputation is challenging. Previous attempts have relied on empirical tuning of all control parameters. This paper describes modified stance phase control strategies - which mimic the behavior of biological joints or depend on the instantaneous loads within the prosthesis - developed to reduce the number of control parameters that require individual tuning. Three individuals with unilateral transfemoral amputations walked with a powered knee and ankle prosthesis across five ambulation modes (level ground walking, ramp ascent/descent, and stair ascent/descent). Starting with a nominal set of impedance parameters, the modified control strategies were applied and the devices were individually tuned such that all subjects achieved comfortable and safe ambulation. The control strategies drastically reduced the number of independent parameters that needed to be tuned for each subject (i.e., to 21 parameters instead of a possible 140 or approximately 4 parameters per mode) while relative amplitudes and timing of kinematic and kinetic data remained similar to those previously reported and to those of non-amputee subjects. Reducing the time necessary to configure a powered device across multiple ambulation modes may allow users to more quickly realize the benefits such powered devices can provide.

  13. [Implantation of the emergency ambulance service in Salvador, Bahia: reality and challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Célia Maria Sales; Mussi, Fernanda Carneiro

    2008-12-01

    The goal of this study was to describe the implementation of the emergency ambulance service of Salvador, Bahia (SAMU-192). The Ministry of Health provided the legal basis and regulations for its implementation. The main purpose of this service is the provision of free primary level healthcare to individuals, with clinical, surgical, traumatic and psychiatric aggravations that cause suffering, sequels or death and occur outside the hospital environment. The specific goals of SAMU-192 was to grant free healthcare to urgency and emergency situations, under the hierarchy and regulations of the Single Health System (SUS) of the Brazilian government, assuring that public resources will be available and integrated to the complementary healthcare network. Investments for the installation of the service were agreed on in the city and with federal and state management commissions. To turn SAMU-192 into reality, several challenges need to be accomplished, including community education, professional qualification and evaluation of human and material resources so as to provide basic emergency care with the appropriate quality.

  14. [Helpful Factors of Ambulant Art Therapy in the Group and Changes of Experiences in Psychosomatic Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Jörg; Moser, Anna Sophie; Danner-Weinberger, Alexandra; von Wietersheim, Jörn

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the experiences of patients suffering from mostly chronic psychosomatic disorders in an ambulant art therapy in the group. Especially, the focus was on the experienced changes, helpful factors and specifics of the therapy as well as on the experienced benefit. For this, 30 patients were interviewed in a semi-standardized way. Additionally, the symptom-based strain was psychometrically recorded in a part of the patients (21) at the beginning of the therapy and after at least 6 months of participation. The evaluation of those interviews with the qualitative analysis of the therapy subjects surrendered an improvement of the health state in most of the participants. Especially group factors, art as a mean of communication, becoming aware of feelings but also diversion and fun were proved to be beneficial. The art therapy also serves for structuring the week as well as a contact point and a resource in the interpersonal communication of everyday life. Nearly all of the patients referred to some important turning point pictures. Mostly, the benefit was valued as being high. But, in contrast, the psychometric measure did not show any significant change. The results emphasize the stabilizing function of art therapy in the examined patients, whereat the classification of the psychometric result is complicated by the absence of a control group.

  15. Solving the dynamic ambulance relocation and dispatching problem using approximate dynamic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Verena

    2012-06-16

    Emergency service providers are supposed to locate ambulances such that in case of emergency patients can be reached in a time-efficient manner. Two fundamental decisions and choices need to be made real-time. First of all immediately after a request emerges an appropriate vehicle needs to be dispatched and send to the requests' site. After having served a request the vehicle needs to be relocated to its next waiting location. We are going to propose a model and solve the underlying optimization problem using approximate dynamic programming (ADP), an emerging and powerful tool for solving stochastic and dynamic problems typically arising in the field of operations research. Empirical tests based on real data from the city of Vienna indicate that by deviating from the classical dispatching rules the average response time can be decreased from 4.60 to 4.01 minutes, which corresponds to an improvement of 12.89%. Furthermore we are going to show that it is essential to consider time-dependent information such as travel times and changes with respect to the request volume explicitly. Ignoring the current time and its consequences thereafter during the stage of modeling and optimization leads to suboptimal decisions.

  16. Leg Lengthening as a Means of Improving Ambulation Following an Internal Hemipelvectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakyo Sato

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstructive surgery following an internal hemipelvectomy for a malignant pelvic tumor is difficult due to the structural complexity of the pelvis and the massive extension of the tumor. While high complication rates have been encountered in various types of reconstructive surgery, resection without reconstruction reportedly involved fewer complications. However, this method often results in limb shortening with resultant instability during walking. We reported herein leg lengthening performed to correct lower limb shortening after an internal hemipelvectomy, which improved ambulatory stability and overall QOL. An 18-year-old male patient came to our hospital to correct a lower limb discrepancy resulting from a left internal hemipelvectomy. His left pelvis and proximal femur had been resected, and the femur remained without an acetabular roof. His left lower limb was about 8 centimeters shorter. The left tibia was lengthened 8 centimeters with an external fixator. After the lengthening, the patient was able to walk without support and his gait remarkably improved. Additionally he no longer required placing a wallet in his back pocket as a pad as a means of raising the left side of his torso while sitting. Leg lengthening was a useful method of improving ambulation after an internal hemipelvectomy.

  17. Powered ankle-foot prosthesis for the improvement of amputee ambulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Samuel K; Herr, Hugh; Weber, Jeff; Martinez-Villalpando, Ernesto C

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the mechanical design, control scheme, and clinical evaluation of a novel, motorized ankle-foot prosthesis, called MIT Powered Ankle-Foot Prosthesis. Unlike a conventional passive-elastic ankle-foot prosthesis, this prosthesis can provide active mechanical power during the stance period of walking. The basic architecture of the prosthesis is a unidirectional spring, configured in parallel with a force-controllable actuator with series elasticity. With this architecture, the anklefoot prosthesis matches the size and weight of the human ankle, and is also capable of delivering high mechanical power and torque observed in normal human walking. We also propose a biomimetic control scheme that allows the prosthesis to mimic the normal human ankle behavior during walking. To evaluate the performance of the prosthesis, we measured the rate of oxygen consumption of three unilateral transtibial amputees walking at self-selected speeds to estimate the metabolic walking economy. We find that the powered prosthesis improves amputee metabolic economy from 7% to 20% compared to the conventional passive-elastic prostheses (Flex-Foot Ceterus and Freedom Innovations Sierra), even though the powered system is twofold heavier than the conventional devices. This result highlights the benefit of performing net positive work at the ankle joint to amputee ambulation and also suggests a new direction for further advancement of an ankle-foot prosthesis.

  18. Key drivers of airline loyalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolnicar, Sara; Grabler, Klaus; Grün, Bettina; Kulnig, Anna

    2011-10-01

    This study investigates drivers of airline loyalty. It contributes to the body of knowledge in the area by investigating loyalty for a number of a priori market segments identified by airline management and by using a method which accounts for the multi-step nature of the airline choice process. The study is based on responses from 687 passengers. Results indicate that, at aggregate level, frequent flyer membership, price, the status of being a national carrier and the reputation of the airline as perceived by friends are the variables which best discriminate between travellers loyal to the airline and those who are not. Differences in drivers of airline loyalty for a number of segments were identified. For example, loyalty programs play a key role for business travellers whereas airline loyalty of leisure travellers is difficult to trace back to single factors. For none of the calculated models satisfaction emerged as a key driver of airline loyalty.

  19. Key drivers of airline loyalty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolnicar, Sara; Grabler, Klaus; Grün, Bettina; Kulnig, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates drivers of airline loyalty. It contributes to the body of knowledge in the area by investigating loyalty for a number of a priori market segments identified by airline management and by using a method which accounts for the multi-step nature of the airline choice process. The study is based on responses from 687 passengers. Results indicate that, at aggregate level, frequent flyer membership, price, the status of being a national carrier and the reputation of the airline as perceived by friends are the variables which best discriminate between travellers loyal to the airline and those who are not. Differences in drivers of airline loyalty for a number of segments were identified. For example, loyalty programs play a key role for business travellers whereas airline loyalty of leisure travellers is difficult to trace back to single factors. For none of the calculated models satisfaction emerged as a key driver of airline loyalty. PMID:27064618

  20. Calls Forecast for the Moscow Ambulance Service. The Impact of Weather Forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordin, Vladimir; Bykov, Philipp

    2015-04-01

    We use the known statistics of the calls for the current and previous days to predict them for tomorrow and for the following days. We assume that this algorithm will work operatively, will cyclically update the available information and will move the horizon of the forecast. Sure, the accuracy of such forecasts depends on their lead time, and from a choice of some group of diagnoses. For comparison we used the error of the inertial forecast (tomorrow there will be the same number of calls as today). Our technology has demonstrated accuracy that is approximately two times better compared to the inertial forecast. We obtained the following result: the number of calls depends on the actual weather in the city as well as on its rate of change. We were interested in the accuracy of the forecast for 12-hour sum of the calls in real situations. We evaluate the impact of the meteorological errors [1] on the forecast errors of the number of Ambulance calls. The weather and the Ambulance calls number both have seasonal tendencies. Therefore, if we have medical information from one city only, we should separate the impacts of such predictors as "annual variations in the number of calls" and "weather". We need to consider the seasonal tendencies (associated, e. g. with the seasonal migration of the population) and the impact of the air temperature simultaneously, rather than sequentially. We forecasted separately the number of calls with diagnoses of cardiovascular group, where it was demonstrated the advantage of the forecasting method, when we use the maximum daily air temperature as a predictor. We have a chance to evaluate statistically the influence of meteorological factors on the dynamics of medical problems. In some cases it may be useful for understanding of the physiology of disease and possible treatment options. We can assimilate some personal archives of medical parameters for the individuals with concrete diseases and the relative meteorological archive. As a

  1. TwinDrivers: Semi-Automatic Derivation of Fast and Safe Hypervisor Network Drivers from Guest OS Drivers

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    In a virtualized environment, device drivers are often run inside a virtual machine (VM) rather than in the hypervisor. Doing so protects the hypervisor from bugs in the driver, and also allows the reuse of the device driver and its support infrastructure in the VM. Unfortunately, this approach results in poor performance for I/O intensive devices such as network cards. The alternative approach is to run device drivers directly in the hypervisor. Although this approach results in better perfo...

  2. Fuel-Cell Drivers Wanted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Todd; Jones, Rick

    2004-01-01

    While the political climate seems favorable for the development of fuel-cell vehicles for personal transportation, the market's demand may not be so favorable. Nonetheless, middle level students will be the next generation of drivers and voters, and they need to be able to make informed decisions regarding the nation's energy and transportation…

  3. Drivers and Limits for Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Niels Buus; Nielsen, Thomas A. Sick; Gudmundsson, Henrik;

    This report summarizes key outcomes of the study ’Drivers and Limits’ that was supported for the period 2009-2013 by a research grant from the Danish Strategic Research Council. The project investigated - for the empirical context of Denmark - key driving forces behind transport growth, as well...

  4. Driver ASICs for Advanced Deformable Mirrors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall goal of the SBIR program is to develop a new Application Specified Integrated Circuit (ASIC) driver to be used in driver electronics of a deformable...

  5. Characterization of Artifacts produced by gel displacement on non-invasive Brain-Machine Interfaces during ambulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro eCosta

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available So far, Brain-Machine Interfaces (BMIs have been mainly used to study brain potentials during movement-free conditions. Recently, due to the emerging concern of improving rehabilitation therapies, these systems are also being used during gait experiments. Under this new condition, the evaluation of motion artifacts has become a critical point to assure the validity of the results obtained. Due to the high signal to noise ratio provided, the use of wet electrodes is a widely accepted technic to acquire electroencephalographic (EEG signals. To perform these recordings it is necessary to apply a conductive gel between the scalp and the electrodes. This work is focused on the study of gel displacements produced during ambulation and how they affect the amplitude of EEG signals. Data recorded during three ambulation conditions (gait training and one movement-free condition (BMI motor imagery task are compared to perform this study.Two phenomenons, manifested as unusual increases of the signals' amplitude, have been identified and characterized during this work. Results suggest that they are caused by abrupt changes on the conductivity between the electrode and the scalp due to gel displacement produced during ambulation and head movements. These artifacts significantly increase the Power Spectral Density (PSD of EEG recordings at all frequencies from 5 to 90 Hz, corresponding to the main bandwidth of electrocortical potentials. They should be taken into consideration before performing EEG recordings in order to asses the correct gel allocation and to avoid the use of electrodes on certain scalp areas depending on the experimental conditions.

  6. Effects of robot-assisted gait training on the balance and gait of chronic stroke patients: focus on dependent ambulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Duk Youn; Park, Si-Woon; Lee, Min Jin; Park, Dae Sung; Kim, Eun Joo

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to confirm the effect of robot-assisted gait training on the balance and gait ability of stroke patients who were dependent ambulators. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty stroke patients participated in this study. The participants were allocated to either group 1, which received robot-assisted gait training for 4 weeks followed by conventional physical therapy for 4 weeks, or group 2, which received the same treatments in the reverse order. Robot-assisted gait training was conducted for 30 min, 3 times a week for 4 weeks. The Berg Balance Scale, Modified Functional Reach Test, Functional Ambulation Category, Modified Ashworth Scale, Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Motricity Index, and Modified Barthel Index were assessed before and after treatment. To confirm the characteristics of patients who showed a significant increase in Berg Balance Scale after robot-assisted gait training as compared with physical therapy, subgroup analysis was conducted. [Results] Only lateral reaching and the Functional Ambulation Category were significantly increased following robot-assisted gait training. Subscale analyses identified 3 patient subgroups that responded well to robot-assisted gait training: a subgroup with hemiplegia, a subgroup in which the guidance force needed to be decreased to needed to be decreased to ≤45%, and a subgroup in which weight bearing was decreased to ≤21%. [Conclusion] The present study showed that robot-assisted gait training is not only effective in improving balance and gait performance but also improves trunk balance and motor skills required by high-severity stroke patients to perform activities daily living. Moreover, subscale analyses identified subgroups that responded well to robot-assisted gait training.

  7. A holistic perspective on corporate sustainability drivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano, R.

    2013-01-01

    Since company boards are increasingly discussing 'sustainability', it becomes necessary to examine the nature of sustainability drivers. Most approaches to corporate sustainability drivers have focused either on internal or external drivers. This paper is aimed at providing a more holistic perspecti

  8. A holistic perspective on corporate sustainability drivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Since company boards are increasingly discussing 'sustainability', it becomes necessary to examine the nature of sustainability drivers. Most approaches to corporate sustainability drivers have focused either on internal or external drivers. This paper is aimed at providing a more holistic perspecti

  9. Response times of ambulances to calls from Midwife Obstetric Units of the Peninsula Maternal and Neonatal Service (PMNS in Cape Town

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Marcus

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Response times of ambulances to calls from Midwife Obstetric Units, although varied, are perceived as slow. Delays in transporting women experiencing complications during or after their pregnancies to higher levels of care may have negative consequences such as fetal, neonatal or maternal morbidity or death. An exploratory descriptive study was undertaken to investigate the response times of ambulances of the Western Cape Emergency Medical Services to calls from midwife obstetric units (MOUs in the Peninsula Maternal and Neonatal Services (PMNS in Cape Town. Response times were calculated from data collected in specific MOUs using a specifically developed instrument. Recorded data included time of call placed requesting transfer, diagnosis or reason for transfer, priority of call and the time of arrival of ambulance to the requesting facility. Mean, median and range of response times, in minutes, to various MOUs and priorities of calls were calculated. These were then compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test. A comparison was then made between the recorded and analysed response times to national norms and recommendations for ambulance response times and maternal transfer response times respectively.A wide range of response times was noted for the whole sample. Median response times across all priorities of calls and to all MOUs in sample fell short of national norms and recommendations. No statistical differences were noted between various priorities of calls and MOUs.The perception of delayed response times of ambulances to MOUs in the PMNS was confirmed in this pilot study.

  10. Indications and results of the unilateral /sup 123/I-hippurate-clearance in an ambulant urological-nephrological patients collective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariss, P.; Haubold, E.

    1988-02-01

    In 572 nephrological-urological ambulant patients 688 estimations of unilateral renal plasma flow were performed after application of 300 kBq/kg /sup 123/I-hippurate using a large field scintillation camera, external scintillation probe over the right shoulder and a computer system. The indications were patients with hypertension, chronic pyelonephritis, unilateral nephrocirrhosis, exclusion or approval of renal failure, furthermore diverse malformations of the urovesical system, nephrolithiasis and follow-up after urological operations. The unilateral renal clearance by /sup 123/I-hippurate represents an important diagnostic tool in urological-nephrological patients with special diseases in addition to morphological and microbiological methods.

  11. Ambulant photodynamic therapy of superficial malignomas with 5-ALA in combination with folic acid and use of noncoherent light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindra, R H; Kubin, A; Kolbabek, H; Alth, G; Dobrowsky, W

    1999-01-01

    This study reports our first results of ambulant photodynamic treatment with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) in combination with folic acid and subsequent illumination with a noncoherent light source. The compound was topically applied to avoid total body skin sensitivity which occurs in the case of systemic administration. If no therapeutic response could be proved, we added folic acid to 5-ALA for a further treatment attempt. Illumination was performed by broad band red thermic light to also excitate reaction products with absorption bands located near to that of the sensitizer. As a result, we observed a response in all cases, however, in some cases only after the addition of folic acid.

  12. Otimização da localização das bases de ambulâncias e do dimensionamento das suas regiões de cobertura em rodovias Optimizing the location of ambulance bases and the districting of their covering regions on highways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Iannoni

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo combinamos extensões do modelo hipercubo de filas com algoritmos genéticos para otimizar a configuração e operação de sistemas médicos emergenciais em rodovias. Inicialmente apresentamos um método para localizar as bases de ambulâncias ao longo da rodovia, de forma a otimizar as principais medidas de desempenho do sistema. Em seguida estendemos a abordagem para apoiar duas decisões combinadas: a localização das bases de ambulâncias e o dimensionamento das regiões de cobertura de cada base na rodovia. Por exemplo, a abordagem permite determinar os locais para posicionar as bases de ambulâncias e dimensionar os tamanhos das suas áreas de atuação, tais que minimizem o tempo médio de resposta aos usuários e/ou o desbalanceamento das cargas de trabalho das ambulâncias do sistema. Para ilustrar a aplicação dos métodos propostos, analisamos os resultados de dois estudos de caso em rodovias brasileiras.In this paper we combine extensions of the hypercube queueing model with genetic algorithms to optimize the configuration and operation of emergency medical systems on highways. Initially we present a method to locate the ambulance bases along the highway so that the main system performance measures are optimized. Then we extend the approach to support combined decisions: the location of ambulance bases and the districting of the covering regions of each base on the highway. For instance, the approach can search for locals to place the ambulance bases and determine the sizes of their operation areas, such that the mean user response time and/or the ambulance workload imbalance are minimized. To illustrate the application of the proposed methods, we analyze the results of two case studies of Brazilian highways.

  13. Factors Contributing to Crashes among Young Drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyndel J. Bates

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Young drivers are the group of drivers most likely to crash. There are a number of factors that contribute to the high crash risk experienced by these drivers. While some of these factors are intrinsic to the young driver, such as their age, gender or driving skill, others relate to social factors and when and how often they drive. This article reviews the factors that affect the risk of young drivers crashing to enable a fuller understanding of why this risk is so high in order to assist in developing effective countermeasures.

  14. Factors Contributing to Crashes among Young Drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Lyndel J; Davey, Jeremy; Watson, Barry; King, Mark J; Armstrong, Kerry

    2014-08-01

    Young drivers are the group of drivers most likely to crash. There are a number of factors that contribute to the high crash risk experienced by these drivers. While some of these factors are intrinsic to the young driver, such as their age, gender or driving skill, others relate to social factors and when and how often they drive. This article reviews the factors that affect the risk of young drivers crashing to enable a fuller understanding of why this risk is so high in order to assist in developing effective countermeasures.

  15. Visualization drivers for Geant4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beretvas, Andy; /Fermilab

    2005-10-01

    This document is on Geant4 visualization tools (drivers), evaluating pros and cons of each option, including recommendations on which tools to support at Fermilab for different applications. Four visualization drivers are evaluated. They are OpenGL, HepRep, DAWN and VRML. They all have good features, OpenGL provides graphic output without an intermediate file. HepRep provides menus to assist the user. DAWN provides high quality plots and even for large files produces output quickly. VRML uses the smallest disk space for intermediate files. Large experiments at Fermilab will want to write their own display. They should proceed to make this display graphics independent. Medium experiment will probably want to use HepRep because of it's menu support. Smaller scale experiments will want to use OpenGL in the spirit of having immediate response, good quality output and keeping things simple.

  16. Physical and psychosocial work environment factors and their association with health outcomes in Danish ambulance personnel - a cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Claus D; Rasmussen, Kurt; Kyed, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Background Reviews of the literature on the health and work environment of ambulance personnel have indicated an increased risk of work-related health problems in this occupation. The aim of this study was to compare health status and exposure to different work environmental factors among ambulance......,691) and was compared to reference samples of the Danish work force. The questionnaire contained measures of physical and psychosocial work environment as well as measures of musculoskeletal pain, mental health, self-rated health and sleep quality. Results Ambulance personnel have half the prevalence of poor self...... and meaningfulness of and commitment to work, and substantially lower levels of quantitative demands and influence at work. Only one out of ten aspects of physical work environment was consistently associated with higher levels of musculoskeletal pain. Emotional demands was the only psychosocial work factor...

  17. The drivers of tropical speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brian Tilston; McCormack, John E; Cuervo, Andrés M; Hickerson, Michael J; Aleixo, Alexandre; Cadena, Carlos Daniel; Pérez-Emán, Jorge; Burney, Curtis W; Xie, Xiaoou; Harvey, Michael G; Faircloth, Brant C; Glenn, Travis C; Derryberry, Elizabeth P; Prejean, Jesse; Fields, Samantha; Brumfield, Robb T

    2014-11-20

    Since the recognition that allopatric speciation can be induced by large-scale reconfigurations of the landscape that isolate formerly continuous populations, such as the separation of continents by plate tectonics, the uplift of mountains or the formation of large rivers, landscape change has been viewed as a primary driver of biological diversification. This process is referred to in biogeography as vicariance. In the most species-rich region of the world, the Neotropics, the sundering of populations associated with the Andean uplift is ascribed this principal role in speciation. An alternative model posits that rather than being directly linked to landscape change, allopatric speciation is initiated to a greater extent by dispersal events, with the principal drivers of speciation being organism-specific abilities to persist and disperse in the landscape. Landscape change is not a necessity for speciation in this model. Here we show that spatial and temporal patterns of genetic differentiation in Neotropical birds are highly discordant across lineages and are not reconcilable with a model linking speciation solely to landscape change. Instead, the strongest predictors of speciation are the amount of time a lineage has persisted in the landscape and the ability of birds to move through the landscape matrix. These results, augmented by the observation that most species-level diversity originated after episodes of major Andean uplift in the Neogene period, suggest that dispersal and differentiation on a matrix previously shaped by large-scale landscape events was a major driver of avian speciation in lowland Neotropical rainforests.

  18. Living in critical times: The impact of critical incidents on frontline ambulance personnel--a qualitative perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the impact of Critical Incidents (CIs) on the lives of ambulance personnel. One-to-one interviews were conducted with 27 participants who had experienced CIs during the previous 12 months in order to: assess the nature and impact of CIs on health and well-being; examine attitudes toward support services; and explore barriers to service use. The results showed that incidents involving children, suicides, and grotesque mutilation were the most distressing. Participants reported a wide range of physical and mental health problems including sleep difficulties, angry outbursts, irrationality and feelings of alienation. Key themes included: low support service uptake due to fears relating to confidentiality and machismo; a perceived lack of concern and support from management; and a need for professional counselling and stress awareness training. Emergency Medical Controllers (EMCs) also reported a number of difficulties unique to their role. The findings suggest that exposure to CIs has a significant impact on health and well-being; this has important implications for recognizing and appropriately addressing the health and training needs of ambulance personnel, including the effective management of Critical Incident Stress.

  19. Hospital survival upon discharge of ill-neonates transported by ground or air ambulance to a tertiary center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luis Alvarado-Socarras

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the differences in hospital survival between modes of transport to a tertiary center in Colombia for critically ill neonates. Methods: Observational study of seriously ill neonates transported via air or ground, who required medical care at a center providing highly complex services. Data on sociodemographic, clinical, the Transport Risk Index of Physiologic Stability (TRIPS, and mode of transport were collected. Patients were described, followed by a bivariate analysis with condition (live or dead at time of discharge as the dependent variable. A multiple Poisson regression with robust variance model was used to adjust associations. Results: A total of 176 neonates were transported by ambulance (10.22% by air over six months. The transport distances were longer by air (median: 237.5 km than by ground (median: 11.3 km. Mortality was higher among neonates transported by air (33.33% than by ground (7.79%. No differences in survival were found between the two groups when adjusted by the multiple model. An interaction between mode of transport and distance was observed. Live hospital discharge was found to be associated with clinical severity upon admittance, birth weight, hemorrhaging during the third trimester, and serum potassium levels when admitted. Conclusions: Mode of transport was not associated with the outcome. In Colombia, access to medical services through air transport is a good option for neonates in critical condition. Further studies would determine the optimum distance (time of transportation to obtain good clinical outcomes according type of ambulance.

  20. Minimally Invasive Posterior Stabilization Improved Ambulation and Pain Scores in Patients with Plasmacytomas and/or Metastases of the Spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph H. Schwab

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The incidence of spine metastasis is expected to increase as the population ages, and so is the number of palliative spinal procedures. Minimally invasive procedures are attractive options in that they offer the theoretical advantage of less morbidity. Purpose. The purpose of our study was to evaluate whether minimally invasive posterior spinal instrumentation provided significant pain relief and improved function. Study Design. We compared pre- and postoperative pain scores as well as ambulatory status in a population of patients suffering from oncologic conditions in the spine. Patient Sample. A consecutive series of patients with spine tumors treated minimally invasively with stabilization were reviewed. Outcome Measures. Visual analog pain scale as well as pre- and postoperative ambulatory status were used as outcome measures. Methods. Twenty-four patients who underwent minimally invasive posterior spinal instrumentation for metastasis were retrospectively reviewed. Results. Seven (29% patients were unable to ambulate secondary to pain and instability prior to surgery. All patients were ambulating within 2 to 3 days after having surgery (=0.01. The mean visual analog scale value for the preoperative patients was 2.8, and the mean postoperative value was 1.0 (=0.001. Conclusion. Minimally invasive posterior spinal instrumentation significantly improved pain and ambulatory status in this series.

  1. Transporte de crianças em ambulâncias terrestres: segurança e conhecimentos dos profissionais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Faria

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: O transporte de crianças em ambulâncias terrestres é uma problemática ainda insuficientemente investigada em todo o mundo. Neste contexto pretende-se conhecer as medidas de segurança usadas no transporte de crianças em ambulâncias terrestres e identificar o conhecimento dos profissionais acerca das medidas a adotar para este tipo de transporte. Materiais e Métodos: Estudo quantitativo, exploratório descritivo. A análise das medidas de segurança usadas no transporte de crianças tem por base as recomendações da National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Aplicado um questionário a 135 enfermeiros e bombeiros/tripulantes de ambulâncias portuguesas baseado em 4 possíveis situações de transporte e abrangendo 5 faixas etárias pediátricas. Resultados: Os profissionais adotam uma grande variedade de medidas de segurança na prática havendo uma diferença significativa entre a forma como transportam as crianças e o modo que consideram ser o ideal. Os resultados da avaliação do transporte situam-se mais próximos dos níveis de segurança aceitáveis do que dos níveis recomendados como ideais. Verifica-se que mulheres, profissionais graduados e enfermeiros de pediatria transportam as crianças em ambulâncias com mais segurança. Discussão e Conclusões: Muitos profissionais desconhecem as possibilidades de transporte seguro para as crianças nem conhecem recomendações para este tipo de transporte. A dispersão apurada na forma como o transporte é efetuado e os resultados obtidos sugerem a necessidade de regulamentação deste transporte, de investimento na formação dos profissionais e de sensibilização das instituições de saúde para a importância do uso de sistemas de retenção para crianças durante o seu transporte. Cómo citar este artículo: Faria S, Lomba L, Carvalhais M, Apóstolo J. Transporte de crianças em ambulâncias terrestres: segurança e conhecimentos dos profissionais. Rev Cuid

  2. Driver style and driver skill – Clustering sub-groups of drivers differing in their potential danger in traffic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Laila Marianne; Møller, Mette; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    The Driver Behavior Questionnaire (DBQ) and the Driver Skill Inventory (DSI) are two of the most frequently used measures of self-reported driving style and driving skill. The motivation behind the present study was to test drivers’ consistency or judgment of their own self-reported driving ability...... based on a combined use of the DBQ and the DSI. Moreover, the joint use of the two instruments was applied to identify sub-groups of drivers that differ in their potential danger in traffic (as measured by frequency of aberrant driving behaviors and level of driving skills), as well as to test whether...... the sub-groups of drivers differed in characteristics such as age, gender, annual mileage and accident involvement. 3908 drivers aged 18–84 participated in the survey. The results suggested that the drivers are consistent in their reporting of driving ability, as the self-reported driving skill level...

  3. Cognitive characteristics of older Japanese drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susilowati Indri H

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some causes of accidents among older drivers are: not paying attention to traffic signals; missing stop lines; and having to deal with and misjudging emergency situations. These causes of accidents reveal problems with attention and cognition. Such incidents are also related to driver perception and stress-coping mechanisms. It is important to examine the relation of stress reactions to attention and cognition as a factor influencing the causes of accidents commonly involving older drivers. Finding Subjects were 10 young drivers (23.3 ± 3.33 years and 25 older drivers divided into two groups (older1 [60 to 65 years] and older2 [> 65 years]. This study revealed the correlation within driver stress inventory and driver coping questionnaires parameters was observed only in older drivers. They also needed a longer response time for Trail Making Test A and B. The factors affected the attention and cognition of older drivers by age but not driving experience itself, and coping parameters such as emotion focus, reappraisal, and avoidance were not included as stress inventory parameters. Being prone to fatigue was less for younger drivers than older drivers. Because they have shorter distances, shorter drive times, and no need for expressways, older drivers also had a significantly lower risk of thrill-seeking behaviour and more patience. Conclusion The intervention addressing their attention skills, aggressive feelings, and emotion focus should be considered. The technological improvements in cars will make older drivers feel safer and make driving easier which might lower the attention paid to the road, and regular driving training might be needed to assess and enhance their safety.

  4. Driver models for personalised driving assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Stéphanie; Carvalho, Ashwin; Gao, Yiqi; Tseng, H. Eric; Borrelli, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    We propose a learning-based driver modelling approach which can identify manoeuvres performed by drivers on the highway and predict the future driver inputs. We show how this approach can be applied to provide personalised driving assistance. In a first example, the driver model is used to predict unintentional lane departures and a model predictive controller is used to keep the car in the lane. In a second example, the driver model estimates the preferred acceleration of the driver during lane keeping, and a model predictive controller is implemented to provide a personalised adaptive cruise control. For both applications, we use a combination of real data and simulation to evaluate the proposed approaches.

  5. Precise Characterization of a Laser Current Driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troxel, Daylin

    2009-10-01

    I will be presenting a characterization of our unique low-noise laser current driver. Our current driver improves on the typical model used in laboratories, giving extra current stability and lower noise. I will discuss our techniques for measuring the noise and drift and the results we obtained. The current driver has a lower noise and drift than any other current driver with a published value, so it has value in making precision measurements. Many other labs have expressed interest in our design as there is a need for this type of current driver in many applications. The current driver demonstrates some interesting applications of electronics principles and uses of electric components, as well as practical considerations in designing circuitry.

  6. Modelling Driver Assitance Systems by Optimal Control

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, M.; Daamen, W.; Hoogendoorn, S.P.; Van Arem, B.

    2012-01-01

    Driver assistance systems support drivers in operating vehicles in a safe, comfortable and efficient way, and thus may induce changes in traffic flow characteristics. This paper put forward a receding horizon control framework to model driver assistance systems. The accelerations of automated vehicles are determined to optimise a cost function, assuming other vehicles driving at stationary conditions over a prediction horizon. The flexibility of the framework is demonstrated with controller d...

  7. Comparative evaluation of ambulation patterns and isokinetic muscle strength for the application of rehabilitation exercise in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soonyoung

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in the ambulation patterns and knee joint performance between people with and without patellofemoral pain. The present study also aimed to utilize these results as a basis for the development of pain-alleviating and performance-improving treatment programs. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects consisted of 32 adult females diagnosed with patellofemoral pain syndrome and 25 adult females without patellofemoral pain (controls). Contact ratio patterns during ambulation and isokinetic muscle strength around the knee joint were measured in both groups and then compared. [Results] Ambulation patterns, specifically the contact ratios of the left forefoot and right forefoot, differed significantly between patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome and controls. An isokinetic muscle strength test demonstrated that left and right knee extensor and flexor torques also significantly differed between these two groups. [Conclusion] Basic analysis based on ambulation patterns and muscle strength can be used to indicate functional recovery from patellofemoral pain syndrome and provide insight into improving the rehabilitation of patients.

  8. Economic drivers of mineral supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Lorie A.; Sullivan, Daniel E.; Sznopek, John L.

    2003-01-01

    The debate over the adequacy of future supplies of mineral resources continues in light of the growing use of mineral-based materials in the United States. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, the quantity of new materials utilized each year has dramatically increased from 161 million tons2 in 1900 to 3.2 billion tons in 2000. Of all the materials used during the 20th century in the United States, more than half were used in the last 25 years. With the Earth?s endowment of natural resources remaining constant, and increased demand for resources, economic theory states that as depletion approaches, prices rise. This study shows that many economic drivers (conditions that create an economic incentive for producers to act in a particular way) such as the impact of globalization, technological improvements, productivity increases, and efficient materials usage are at work simultaneously to impact minerals markets and supply. As a result of these economic drivers, the historical price trend of mineral prices3 in constant dollars has declined as demand has risen. When price is measured by the cost in human effort, the price trend also has been almost steadily downward. Although the United States economy continues its increasing mineral consumption trend, the supply of minerals has been able to keep pace. This study shows that in general supply has grown faster than demand, causing a declining trend in mineral prices.

  9. Field testing of a remote controlled robotic tele-echo system in an ambulance using broadband mobile communication technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Ryohei; Harada, Hiroshi; Masuda, Kohji; Ota, Gen-ichiro; Yokoi, Masaki; Teramura, Nobuyasu; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2008-06-01

    We report the testing of a mobile Robotic Tele-echo system that was placed in an ambulance and successfully transmitted clear real time echo imaging of a patient's abdomen to the destination hospital from where this device was being remotely operated. Two-way communication between the paramedics in this vehicle and a doctor standing by at the hospital was undertaken. The robot was equipped with an ultrasound probe which was remotely controlled by the clinician at the hospital and ultrasound images of the patient were transmitted wirelessly. The quality of the ultrasound images that were transmitted over the public mobile telephone networks and those transmitted over the Multimedia Wireless Access Network (a private networks) were compared. The transmission rate over the public networks and the private networks was approximately 256 Kbps, 3 Mbps respectively. Our results indicate that ultrasound images of far higher definition could be obtained through the private networks.

  10. A atividade de trabalho de motoristas de ambulância sob o ponto de vista ergológico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francinaldo do Monte Pinto

    Full Text Available Objetivo: analisar a atividade dos motoristas de ambulância do Serviço Móvel de Urgência (SAMU. Métodos: foi empregada a perspectiva ergológica, que se opera a partir da concepção de vida-saúde-doença postulada por George Canguilhem, e a Ergonomia da Atividade. Foram realizadas onze entrevistas dialógicas com motoristas da Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Móvel, em 2010, no estado da Paraíba. Resultados: os motoristas atribuem as principais dificuldades para realizar o trabalho ao modo de organização prescrita do trabalho no SAMU, à gestão temporal da atividade, à atividade no trânsito, à relação com a população usuária e ao risco de contrair doenças. Em contraposição, os motoristas adquirem sentido no trabalho ao salvarem vidas, em uma conjunção de valores – solidariedade, confiança e cooperação – em relação aos socorridos e aos seus acompanhantes. Quando essa possibilidade não se concretiza, o coletivo de trabalho serve de apoio para que permaneçam na profissão, apesar das frustrações. Conclusão: evidenciou-se que, mesmo diante das variabilidades cotidianas da atividade de trabalho, os motoristas de ambulâncias produzem modos operatórios para dar conta das situações de trabalho, cooperando para solução dos problemas e/ou manejando as imprevisibilidades no trabalho em equipe.

  11. Mechanical CPR devices compared to manual CPR during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and ambulance transport: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ong Marcus

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims The aim of this paper was to conduct a systematic review of the published literature to address the question: “In pre-hospital adult cardiac arrest (asystole, pulseless electrical activity, pulseless Ventricular Tachycardia and Ventricular Fibrillation, does the use of mechanical Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR devices compared to manual CPR during Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and ambulance transport, improve outcomes (e.g. Quality of CPR, Return Of Spontaneous Circulation, Survival”. Methods Databases including PubMed, Cochrane Library (including Cochrane database for systematic reviews and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Embase, and AHA EndNote Master Library were systematically searched. Further references were gathered from cross-references from articles and reviews as well as forward search using SCOPUS and Google scholar. The inclusion criteria for this review included manikin and human studies of adult cardiac arrest and anti-arrhythmic agents, peer-review. Excluded were review articles, case series and case reports. Results Out of 88 articles identified, only 10 studies met the inclusion criteria for further review. Of these 10 articles, 1 was Level of Evidence (LOE 1, 4 LOE 2, 3 LOE 3, 0 LOE 4, 2 LOE 5. 4 studies evaluated the quality of CPR in terms of compression adequacy while the remaining six studies evaluated on clinical outcomes in terms of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC, survival to hospital admission, survival to discharge and Cerebral Performance Categories (CPC. 7 studies were supporting the clinical question, 1 neutral and 2 opposing. Conclusion In this review, we found insufficient evidence to support or refute the use of mechanical CPR devices in settings of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and during ambulance transport. While there is some low quality evidence suggesting that mechanical CPR can improve consistency and reduce interruptions in chest compressions, there is no

  12. Upper limb strength and function changes during a one-year follow-up in non-ambulant patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: an observational multicenter trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Mihaela Seferian

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Upper limb evaluation of patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is crucially important to evaluations of efficacy of new treatments in non-ambulant patients. In patients who have lost ambulation, there are few validated and informative outcome measures. In addition, longitudinal data demonstrating sensitivity to clinical evolution of outcome measures over short-term periods are lacking. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We report here the results of a one-year multicenter study using specifically designed tools to assess grip, pinch strength, and hand function in wheelchair-bound patients. Our study assessed 53 non-ambulant patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy aged 17.1 ± 4.8 years (range: 9 - 28.1 years. The average Brooke functional score of these patients was 4.6 ± 1.1. The average forced vital capacity was 44.5% predicted and 19 patients used non-invasive ventilation. Patients were assessed at baseline, 6 months, and one year using the Motor Function Measure and innovative devices (namely the MyoSet composed of MyoGrip, MyoPinch, and MoviPlate. RESULTS: Our study confirmed preliminary data previously reported regarding feasibility of use and of reliability of the MyoSet and the correlation at baseline between distal strength and clinical outcomes such as FVC, Brooke score, age, and duration since loss of ambulation. A significant correlation was observed between the distal upper limb strength and clinical variables. The sensitive dynamometers (MyoGrip and MyoPinch and MoviPlate captured a 12-month change in non-ambulant Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients of all ages. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00993161 NCT00993161.

  13. Should Passengers Be Responsible For Drunk Drivers?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In late September, China’s Ministry of Public Security expanded its nationwide campaign against drunk driving by releasing a document suggesting that passengers sharing a car with a drunk driver be punished together with the driver and that passengers who do not prevent drunk driving be fined.

  14. Intelligent Speed Adaptation for involuntary drivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, Niels; Tradisauskas, Nerius; Juhl, Jens

    2012-01-01

    The Danish Intelligent Speed Adaptation (ISA) trial ISA C included 26 commercial cars and 51 drivers a number of whom were involuntary. After a baseline period, ISA was activated for one year. The drivers should identify themselves with a personal key ID before driving. As well as being informative...

  15. Switched mode piezo-panel driver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slakhorst, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The subject of this thesis is the design of a system which can drive piezo-panels. This system is called the piezo driver. The piezo-panels are used for an Active Noise Cancelling (ANC) system which is being developed to be used inside the cabin of airplanes. The piezo driver fills the gap

  16. Developing Linux kernel space device driver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Wei; Wang Qinruo; Wu Naiyou

    2003-01-01

    This thesis introduces how to develop kernel level device drivers on Linux platform in detail. On the basis of comparing proc file system with dev file system, we choose PCI devices and USB devices as instances to introduce the method of writing device drivers for character devices by using these two file systems.

  17. Physics at an upgraded Fermilab proton driver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2005-07-01

    In 2004 the Fermilab Long Range Planning Committee identified a new high intensity Proton Driver as an attractive option for the future, primarily motivated by the recent exciting developments in neutrino physics. Over the last few months a physics study has developed the physics case for the Fermilab Proton Driver. The potential physics opportunities are discussed.

  18. 49 CFR 177.816 - Driver training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Driver training. 177.816 Section 177.816... Information and Regulations § 177.816 Driver training. (a) In addition to the training requirements of § 177... employee who will operate a motor vehicle has been trained in the applicable requirements of 49 CFR...

  19. The drivers of plant diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristine Engemann

    In this thesis we use a “big data” approach to describe and explain large-scale patterns of plant diversity. The botanical data used for the six papers come from three different databases covering the New World, North America, and Europe respectively. The data on plant distributions were combined...... and beta diversity over time for woody forest communities in North America, using a 20 year forest plot dataset from the United States Department of Agriculture Forest Inventory and Analysis program. To assess functional diversity, we combined the plot data with data on four functional traits. Over time...... with environmental data on climate, soil, topography, and disturbance to identify the drivers of macroecological plant diversity patterns. Unless otherwise stated, the botanical data used in the papers come from the Botanical Information and Ecology Network. Paper I describes how we compiled a new plant growth form...

  20. BDC 500 branch driver controller

    CERN Document Server

    Dijksman, A

    1981-01-01

    This processor has been designed for very fast data acquisition and date pre-processing. The dataway and branch highway speeds have been optimized for approximately 1.5 mu sec. The internal processor cycle is approximately 0.8 mu sec. The standard version contains the following functions (slots): crate controller type A1; branch highway driver including terminator; serial I/O port (TTY, VDU); 24 bit ALU and 24 bit program counter; 16 bit memory address counter and 4 word stack; 4k bit memory for program and/or data; battery backup for the memory; CNAFD and crate LAM display; request/grant logic for time- sharing operation of several BDCs. The free slots can be equipped with e.g. extra RAM, computer interfaces, hardware multiplier/dividers, etc. (0 refs).

  1. Displaceable Gear Torque Controlled Driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Joseph S., Jr. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a torque driver including a displaceable gear to limit torque transfer to a fastener at a precisely controlled torque limit. A biasing assembly biases a first gear into engagement with a second gear for torque transfer between the first and second gear. The biasing assembly includes a pressurized cylinder controlled at a constant pressure that corresponds to a torque limit. A calibrated gage and valve is used to set the desired torque limit. One or more coiled output linkages connect the first gear with the fastener adaptor which may be a socket for a nut. A gear tooth profile provides a separation force that overcomes the bias to limit torque at the desired torque limit. Multiple fasteners may be rotated simultaneously to a desired torque limit if additional output spur gears are provided. The torque limit is adjustable and may be different for fasteners within the same fastener configuration.

  2. Stability analysis of automobile driver steering control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    In steering an automobile, the driver must basically control the direction of the car's trajectory (heading angle) and the lateral deviation of the car relative to a delineated pathway. A previously published linear control model of driver steering behavior which is analyzed from a stability point of view is considered. A simple approximate expression for a stability parameter, phase margin, is derived in terms of various driver and vehicle control parameters, and boundaries for stability are discussed. A field test study is reviewed that includes the measurement of driver steering control parameters. Phase margins derived for a range of vehicle characteristics are found to be generally consistent with known adaptive properties of the human operator. The implications of these results are discussed in terms of driver adaptive behavior.

  3. Visual behaviour analysis and driver cognitive model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baujon, J.; Basset, M.; Gissinger, G.L. [Mulhouse Univ., (France). MIPS/MIAM Lab.

    2001-07-01

    Recent studies on driver behaviour have shown that perception - mainly visual but also proprioceptive perception - plays a key role in the ''driver-vehicle-road'' system and so considerably affects the driver's decision making. Within the framework of the behaviour analysis and studies low-cost system (BASIL), this paper presents a correlative, qualitative and quantitative study, comparing the information given by visual perception and by the trajectory followed. This information will help to obtain a cognitive model of the Rasmussen type according to different driver classes. Many experiments in real driving situations have been carried out for different driver classes and for a given trajectory profile, using a test vehicle and innovative, specially designed, real-time tools, such as the vision system or the positioning module. (orig.)

  4. Reducing risky driver behaviour through the implementation of a driver risk management system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Luke

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available South Africa has one of the highest incidences of road accidents in the world. Most accidents are avoidable and are caused by driver behaviour and errors. The purpose of this article was to identify the riskiest driver behaviours in commercial fleets in South Africa, to determine the business impact of such behaviour, to establish a framework for the management of risky driver behaviour and to test the framework by applying a leading commercial driver behaviour management system as a case study. The case study comprised three South African commercial fleets. Using data from these fleets, critical incident triangles were used to determine the ratio data of risky driver behaviour to near-collisions and collisions. Based on managing the riskiest driver behaviours as causes of more serious incidents and accidents, the results indicated that through the implementation of an effective driver risk management system, risky incidents were significantly reduced.

  5. Modeling aggressive driver behavior at unsignalized intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaysi, Isam A; Abbany, Ali S

    2007-07-01

    The processing of vehicles at unsignalized intersections is a complex and highly interactive process, whereby each driver makes individual decisions about when, where, and how to complete the required maneuver, subject to his perceptions of distances, velocities, and own car's performance. Typically, the performance of priority-unsignalized intersections has been modeled with probabilistic approaches that consider the distribution of gaps in the major-traffic stream and their acceptance by the drivers of minor street vehicles based on the driver's "critical gap". This paper investigates the aggressive behavior of minor street vehicles at intersections that are priority-unsignalized but operate with little respect of control measures. The objective is to formulate a behavioral model that predicts the probability that a driver performs an aggressive maneuver as a function of a set of driver and traffic attributes. Parameters that were tested and modeled include driver characteristics (gender and age), car characteristics (performance and model year), and traffic attributes (number of rejected gaps, total waiting time at head of queue, and major-traffic speed). Binary probit models are developed and tested, based on a collected data set from an unsignalized intersection in the city of Beirut, to determine which of the studied variables are statistically significant in determining the aggressiveness of a specific driver. Primary conclusions reveal that age, car performance, and average speed on the major road are the major determinants of aggressive behavior. Another striking conclusion is that the total waiting time of the driver while waiting for an acceptable gap is of little significance in incurring the "forcing" behavior. The obtained model is incorporated in a simple simulation framework that reflects driver behavior and traffic stream interactions in estimating delay and conflict measures at unsignalized intersections. The simulation results were then compared

  6. Análise da configuração de SAMU utilizando múltiplas alternativas de localização de ambulâncias Analysis of SAMU configuration using multiple alternatives of ambulance location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regiane Máximo de Souza

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available O Sistema de Atendimento Móvel de Urgência (SAMU no Brasil é um sistema médico emergencial de responsabilidade do poder público, em que a demanda de usuários em uma região urbana é usualmente separada por subregiões e classes de chamados emergenciais. Essa demanda pode mudar de forma significativa ao longo do dia, geograficamente e temporalmente, devido à sua natureza aleatória, mas também devido aos diferentes padrões de comportamentos da população ao longo do dia. Por exemplo, tipicamente há menos demanda durante a noite do que de dia. Os objetivos deste trabalho são: verificar se o conhecido modelo hipercubo de filas espacialmente distribuídas é adequado para analisar medidas de desempenho do SAMU, tais como tempos médios de resposta aos usuários, e utilizar este modelo para analisar múltiplas alternativas de localização das ambulâncias, explorando variações importantes da demanda e do serviço ao longo do dia. Para verificar a viabilidade e a aplicabilidade desta abordagem, foi realizado um estudo de caso no SAMU de Ribeirão Preto-SP.The Brazilian emergency medical system SAMU (Sistema de Atendimento Móvel de Urgência is an emergency medical system of public government liability, in which the users' service demand in an urban region is usually separated into subregions and classes of emergency calls. This demand can change substantially during the day, geographically and temporally, due to its random nature and also to the different behavior patterns of the population throughout the day. For instance, typically there is less demand during the night hours than during the day. The goals of this study are to verify whether the hypercube queuing model is adequate to analyze performance measures of SAMU, such as mean response times to the users, and use this model to analyze multiple alternatives of ambulance location considering significant variations in the demand and service throughout the day. In order to verify

  7. Assessing the relationship between the Driver Behavior Questionnaire and the Driver Skill Inventory: Revealing sub-groups of drivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Laila Marianne; Møller, Mette; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    The Driver Behavior Questionnaire and the Driver Skill Inventory are two of the most frequently used measures of self-reported driving style and driving skill. The motivation behind the present study was to identify sub-groups of drivers that potentially act dangerously in traffic (as measured by...... driving behaviors, and vice versa. The present findings highlight the need to look into driver’s attitudes towards safety, and to devise differential interventions targeting specific problematic groups of the population in the attempt to improve road safety nationwide....

  8. Tarantula: Killing driver bugs before they hatch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawall, Julia Laetitia; Muller, Gilles; Urunuela, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The Linux operating system is undergoing continual evolution. Evolution in the kernel and generic driver modules often triggers the need for corresponding evolutions in specific device drivers. Such collateral evolutions are tedious, because of the large number of device drivers, and error......-prone, because of the complexity of the code modifications involved. We propose an automatic tool, Tarantula, to aid in this process. In this paper, we examine some recent evolutions in Linux and the collateral evolutions they trigger, and assess the corresponding requirements on Tarantula....

  9. LC Oscillator Driver for Safety Critical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Horsky, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    A CMOS harmonic signal LC oscillator driver for automotive applications working in a harsh environment with high safety critical requirements is described. The driver can be used with a wide range of external components parameters (LC resonance network of a sensor). Quality factor of the external LC network can vary two decades. Amplitude regulation of the driver is digitally controlled and the DAC is constructed as exponential with piece-wise-linear (PWL) approximation. Low current consumption for high quality resonance networks is achieved. Realized oscillator is robust, used in safety critical application and has low EMC emissions.

  10. CMOS Law-jitter Clock Driver Design

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    [ANGLÈS] Design of a low-jitter, low-phase noise clock driver in 40 nm CMOS technology. The work is in the field of analog integrated circuit (IC) design in nanometer CMOS technologies. [CASTELLÀ] Diseño de un circuito integrado "clock driver" de bajo jitter y bajo ruido de fase en tecnología CMOS 40 nm. El trabajo se contextualiza en el campo del diseño de circuitos integrados analógicos en tecnologías CMOS nanométricas. [CATALÀ] Disseny d'un circuit "clock driver" de baix jitter i bai...

  11. Optimizing the Universal Robots ROS driver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Timm

    In this report I will examine both the current and the possible performance of one of the most popular robotics platforms in research, the Universal Robot manipulator. I will solely focus on the ROS based approaches and show how the current driver can be improved. I will look at performance...... improvement both in terms of faster reaction as well as making it possible to control the robot using either ros_control or ordinary joint speed commands, which is required for many types of sensory based control like visual servoing. The developed driver is compared to the drivers already existing in the ROS...

  12. Assessing the relationship between the Driver Behavior Questionnaire and the Driver Skill Inventory: Revealing sub-groups of drivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Laila Marianne; Møller, Mette; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    The Driver Behavior Questionnaire and the Driver Skill Inventory are two of the most frequently used measures of self-reported driving style and driving skill. The motivation behind the present study was to identify sub-groups of drivers that potentially act dangerously in traffic (as measured...... by frequency of aberrant driving behaviors and level of driving skills), as well as to test whether the sub-groups differ in characteristics such as age, gender, annual mileage and accident involvement. Furthermore, the joint analysis of the two instruments was used to test drivers’ assessment of their own...... self-reported driving skills and whether the reported skill level was reflected in the reported aberrant driving behaviors. 3908 drivers aged 18–84 participated in the survey. K-means cluster analysis revealed four distinct sub-groups that differed in driving skills and frequency of aberrant driving...

  13. A Case of Blunt Traumatic Cardiac Tamponade Successfully Treated by Out-of-hospital Pericardial Drainage in a "Doctor-helicopter" Ambulance Staffed by Skilled Emergency Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Hiroyuki; Sato, Toshiki; Morita, Seiji; Nakagawa, Yoshihide; Inokuchi, Sadaki

    2016-03-20

    We report a 55-year-old man who relapsed into a state of shock in an ambulance before arriving at our critical care center after a fall injury. The diagnosis of cardiac tamponade was made by portable ultrasound, and immediate pericardiocentesis and drainage were performed at the heliport. He was then transported immediately to our hospital with continuous drainage and surgery was performed. After surgery, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit in stable condition. After undergoing rehabilitation, he made a full recovery and was discharged. This case illustrates that such patients can be treated reliably by pericardial drainage performed by skilled emergency physicians in the field by making use of the "doctor-helicopter" ambulance transportation system, followed by emergency surgery in a critical care center.

  14. DriverNet: uncovering the impact of somatic driver mutations on transcriptional networks in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashashati, Ali; Haffari, Gholamreza; Ding, Jiarui; Ha, Gavin; Lui, Kenneth; Rosner, Jamie; Huntsman, David G; Caldas, Carlos; Aparicio, Samuel A; Shah, Sohrab P

    2012-12-22

    Simultaneous interrogation of tumor genomes and transcriptomes is underway in unprecedented global efforts. Yet, despite the essential need to separate driver mutations modulating gene expression networks from transcriptionally inert passenger mutations, robust computational methods to ascertain the impact of individual mutations on transcriptional networks are underdeveloped. We introduce a novel computational framework, DriverNet, to identify likely driver mutations by virtue of their effect on mRNA expression networks. Application to four cancer datasets reveals the prevalence of rare candidate driver mutations associated with disrupted transcriptional networks and a simultaneous modulation of oncogenic and metabolic networks, induced by copy number co-modification of adjacent oncogenic and metabolic drivers. DriverNet is available on Bioconductor or at http://compbio.bccrc.ca/software/drivernet/.

  15. Quality Control Circle of Standard Management of Ambulance%提高抢救车规范管理达标率的品管圈实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓梅; 张国梅; 邵继凤; 张玉莲; 刘红梅

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the practice and effect of quality control circle (QCC) in the standard management of ambulance. Methods A QCC team was established then improvement measures were formulated after the analysis of the reasons for non-standard management of ambulances then the effect of 6-month practice was assessed. Results The rate of standard management of ambulance was improved from 49% to 79% after QCC practice and memebers in QCC team regarded that the practice benefited the improvement of management awareness and working ability. Conclusion QCC practice benefits the management of ambulances and the improvement of QCC team members ’ ability, which promotes nursing management and nursing quality.%目的:探讨品管圈活动在抢救车规范管理中的实践和效果。方法成立品管圈小组,应用品管圈活动步骤,对全院57辆抢救车管理不规范原因进行分析,制定改进措施,规范抢救车管理,实施6个月后评价效果。结果实施品管圈活动后,抢救车规范管理达标率由活动前的49%提高到活动后的79%,圈员认为本次品管圈活动提升了参与管理的意识和工作能力。结论开展品管圈活动规范了全院抢救车的管理,提高了圈员能力,对提高精细化管理水平、提升护理质量起到了积极推动的作用。

  16. Skylab IMSS checklist application study for emergency medical care. [emergency medical care operations involving the use and operation of the portable ambulance module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, J. G.; Furukawa, S.

    1975-01-01

    A manual is presented that provides basic technical documentation to support the operation and utilization of the Portable Ambulance Module (PAM) in the field. The PAM is designed to be used for emergency resuscitation and victim monitoring. The functions of all the controls, displays, and stowed equipment of the unit are defined. Supportive medical and physiological data in those areas directly related to the uses of the PAM unit are presented.

  17. Driver ASICs for Advanced Deformable Mirrors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The program leverages on our extensive expertise in developing high-performance driver ASICs for deformable mirror systems and seeks to expand the capacities of the...

  18. The importance of sight for drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Pas-Wyroślak

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Sight is the basic sense for drivers. Condition of the eye determines correct, comfortable and safe performance of the work as drivers. This article presents various factors influencing the sight condition. There are two groups of factors, external (environment, the kind and time of work, stress caused by work and internal (systemic and local disorders. All these factors can reduce significantly visual functions, such as visual acuity, field of vision, color vision, strereoscopic vision, twilight vision and glare sensitivity. There are also presented actual requirements for drivers and causes of the car accidents in various age groups. Impairments in vision functions can be dangerous for both the driver and other road users. Med Pr 2013;64(3:419–425

  19. Physics at a new Fermilab proton driver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geer, Steve; /Fermilab

    2006-04-01

    In 2004, motivated by the recent exciting developments in neutrino physics, the Fermilab Long Range Planning Committee identified a new high intensity Proton Driver as an attractive option for the future. At the end of 2004 the APS ''Study on the Physics of Neutrinos'' concluded that the future US neutrino program should have, as one of its components, ''A proton driver in the megawatt class or above and neutrino superbeam with an appropriate very large detector capable of observing Cp violation and measuring the neutrino mass-squared differences and mixing parameters with high precision''. The presently proposed Fermilab Proton Driver is designed to accomplish these goals, and is based on, and would help develop, Linear Collider technology. In this paper the Proton Driver parameters are summarized, and the potential physics program is described.

  20. Driver circuit for solid state light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, Fred; Denvir, Kerry; Allen, Steven

    2016-02-16

    A driver circuit for a light source including one or more solid state light sources, a luminaire including the same, and a method of so driving the solid state light sources are provided. The driver circuit includes a rectifier circuit that receives an alternating current (AC) input voltage and provides a rectified AC voltage. The driver circuit also includes a switching converter circuit coupled to the light source. The switching converter circuit provides a direct current (DC) output to the light source in response to the rectified AC voltage. The driver circuit also includes a mixing circuit, coupled to the light source, to switch current through at least one solid state light source of the light source in response to each of a plurality of consecutive half-waves of the rectified AC voltage.

  1. Posicionamento de ambulâncias do SAMU através de Programação Inteira e Teoria de Filas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Barreto

    Full Text Available Resumo: A configuração de redes logísticas para serviços de emergência é questão estratégica de imensa importância, visto que pequenas variações no tempo de resposta podem implicar na morte do solicitante. Partindo dessa premissa, o trabalho propõe novas alternativas de posicionamento para as ambulâncias do sistema SAMU na cidade de Duque de Caxias, RJ, capazes de reduzir o tempo de resposta do serviço. Essas propostas de reposicionamento das ambulâncias foram construídas em duas etapas: na primeira, dois modelos de Programação Inteira foram aplicados para se obter soluções que provejam maior cobertura à população. Posteriormente, o Modelo do Hipercubo foi empregado para avaliar a disponibilidade dos servidores, dentre outros indicadores de desempenho relevantes, como o tempo médio de resposta e a taxa de ocupação das ambulâncias.

  2. Pilot Field Test: The Ability to Ambulate After Landing as Assessed with Seat Egress, Walk, and Obstacle Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, E. A.; Fomina, E. V.; Reschke, M. F.; Cerisano, J. M.; Kofman, I. S.; Gadd, N. E.; Phillips, T. R.; Lee, S. M. C.; Laurie, S. S.; Stenger, M. B.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Tomilovskaya, E. S.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts experience alterations in multiple physiological systems due to exposure to the microgravity conditions of space flight. These changes lead to disruption in the ability to ambulate and perform functional tasks during the initial reintroduction to a gravitational environment. Figure 1 shows a schematic representation of the components involved in postflight ataxia. Full functional recovery has not been sufficiently investigated for long-duration crewmembers. The joint U.S./Russian Pilot Field Test (PFT) experiment (a pre-cursor to Field Test (FT)) was developed to address this gap in knowledge. The PFT was conducted on crewmembers traveling on Soyuz expeditions 34S - 41S and was comprised of several tasks designed to study the recovery of sensorimotor abilities of crewmembers during the first 24 hours after landing and for several days thereafter. Closing this gap will allow us to characterize the ability of crewmembers to perform critical mission tasks that they will be expected to perform after an unassisted landing following 6 to 12 months in microgravity. The Seat Egress, Walk and Obstacle (SEWO) Test will be discussed in this poster.

  3. Advanced glycation end-products in the peritoneal fluid and in the peritoneal membrane of continuous ambulant peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahiout, A; Ehlerding, G; Brunkhorst, R

    1996-01-01

    In patients on continuous ambulant peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) treatment, the peritoneal membrane is continuously exposed to the high glucose concentration contained in the dialysate. This may lead to the local generation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). To test this hypothesis we evaluated the plasma and dialysate AGE concentrations in five CAPD patients. The dialysate was measured after a 1 h and after a 12 h dwell time. Additionally, in two patients an immunohistochemical investigation of the peritoneal membrane for AGE was performed. For the determination of AGE an ELISA using a polyclonal antibody against AGE bovine serum albumin was used; the immunohistochemical staining was performed using the streptavidin-biotin complex method. We found only low concentrations of AGE in the dialysate after a 1 h dwell time; after 12 h, however, the dialysate AGE was even greater than the plasma concentration. In both peritoneal specimens we found positive staining for AGE in the interstitium of the mesothelial layer. The dialysate AGE contained a high proportion of high-molecular-weight AGE proteins and low-molecular-weight AGE was found to be in the same concentration range as the total serum AGE. We conclude that there is local generation of AGE in the peritoneal membrane and a 'washing out' of AGE from the peritoneal membrane during longer dwell times. We speculate that the accumulation of AGE might lead to some of the functional and morphological alterations observed after long-term CAPD.

  4. The effect of active warming in prehospital trauma care during road and air ambulance transportation - a clinical randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naredi Peter

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevention and treatment of hypothermia by active warming in prehospital trauma care is recommended but scientifical evidence of its effectiveness in a clinical setting is scarce. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of additional active warming during road or air ambulance transportation of trauma patients. Methods Patients were assigned to either passive warming with blankets or passive warming with blankets with the addition of an active warming intervention using a large chemical heat pad applied to the upper torso. Ear canal temperature, subjective sensation of cold discomfort and vital signs were monitored. Results Mean core temperatures increased from 35.1°C (95% CI; 34.7-35.5°C to 36.0°C (95% CI; 35.7-36.3°C (p Conclusions In mildly hypothermic trauma patients, with preserved shivering capacity, adequate passive warming is an effective treatment to establish a slow rewarming rate and to reduce cold discomfort during prehospital transportation. However, the addition of active warming using a chemical heat pad applied to the torso will significantly improve thermal comfort even further and might also reduce the cold induced stress response. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01400152

  5. An art therapy intervention for cancer patients in the ambulant aftercare - results from a non-randomised controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geue, K; Richter, R; Buttstädt, M; Brähler, E; Singer, S

    2013-05-01

    Art therapy in psycho-oncology is gaining increasing importance, but systematic evaluations of its effects are rare. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of an art therapy intervention for cancer patients in ambulant aftercare on psychological distress and coping. The intervention consisted of 22 sessions. At three points of measurement (t1: before intervention, t2: following intervention, t3: 6 months after t2), participants responded to questionnaires (Freiburg Questionnaire on Coping with Illness, Perceived Adjustment to Chronic Illness Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). A group of haemato-oncological patients served as the comparison group (CG). Pre-post comparisons and analyses of variance were applied for statistical analysis. Relevant confounders were controlled. Fifty-four patients (intervention group, IG) with various cancer diagnoses completed the intervention. One hundred and twenty-nine data sets were available for the CG. Analyses of variance included group membership (IG vs. CG) and the following factors: gender, other psychosocial help and major life events. None of these variables was a predictor for changes in depression, anxiety and coping. Therefore, we could not prove intervention effects over time. Our results contradict those of preliminary studies and raise important questions. Further work on evaluating art therapy is necessary to explore which intervention concepts in which setting at which treatment stage show significant effects. Therefore, controlling for relevant confounders is needed.

  6. Identification of drivers for modular production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunoe, Thomas Ditlev; Bossen, Jacob; Nielsen, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    Todays competitive environment in industry creates a need for companies to enhance their ability to introduce new products faster. To increase rampup speed reconfigurable manufacturing systems is a promising concept, however to implement this production platforms and modular manufacturing...... is required. This paper presents an analysis whether and which module drivers from general product development can be applied to the development process of a modular manufacturing system. The result is a compiled list of modular drivers for manufacturing and examples of their use....

  7. Drivers of desertification and their impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantel, S.; Van Lynden, G. V. L.; Karavitis, C. A.; Kosmas, C.; Van der Werff ten Bosch, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    Drivers of desertification and their impact An inventory was made of drivers of desertification and how they impact on the degradation process. The major drivers of desertification were analysed and compared between 16 sites around the globe. For each of these sites factors were scored with a perceived influence on desertification. Most of these factors, from the socio-cultural, environmental, and economic dimensions, appeared to be related to land management and planning and to (de-)population. They cause a number of temporary or permanent changes in the landscape, which, by themselves or in combination, lead to degradation of vegetation and soils. Most sites have several forms of land degradation occurring in and around their study area of which erosion by water is the dominant one. Other degradation types occurring in sites were: wind erosion, soil salinization, seawater intrusion in the groundwater, vegetation and biodiversity decline, groundwater depletion, decreased productivity/ carrying capacity, soil fertility decline, water logging and water pollution. As a first step, data and information was gathered on policies, desertification status and processes and on socio-economic conditions. The DPSIR framework (Driving force, Pressure, State, Impact, Response) provides a structure for assessment of the impact of past measures on the status of the environment or to formulate effective measures. In analysing the data, the different data items were structured in and formulated to elements fitting the DPSIR chain. Then possible connections between these different aspects were analysed. In our analysis nine major drivers were reported for the various sites, of which one was environmental, three drivers were related to land management, one driver was related to planning and policies, three drivers were related to socio-economic conditions, and one driver related to legal land status. Depending on the specific desertification process, factors may be positively or

  8. Important information for drivers in France

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    From 1 July 2012, any driver of a motorised road vehicle, excluding two- or three-wheeled vehicles whose engine capacity does not exceed 50cm3, must be in possession of a breathalyser in full working order. With effect from 1 November 2012*, drivers failing to produce a breathalyser run the risk of being served with an 11 euro fine. A breathalyser is used to measure the alcohol content in the motorist's breath. The permissible level of alcohol for drivers is less than 0.5 g of alcohol per litre of blood, or 0.25 mg of alcohol per litre of air exhaled. The obligation to have a breathalyser on board the vehicle also applies to all drivers on the French part of the CERN site. All vehicles belonging to or leased by the Organization must also carry a breathalyser together with all the requisite documentation (cf. Operational Circular No. 4). Drivers of privately owned vehicles can obtain breathalysers from car accessory dealers, service stations or pharmacies, etc. Drivers of vehicles belonging to or l...

  9. Workshop on transport for a common ion driver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, C.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lee, E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Langdon, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This report contains research in the following areas related to beam transport for a common ion driver: multi-gap acceleration; neutralization with electrons; gas neutralization; self-pinched transport; HIF and LIF transport, and relevance to common ion driver; LIF and HIF reactor concepts and relevance to common ion driver; atomic physics for common ion driver; code capabilities and needed improvement.

  10. 49 CFR 391.53 - Driver investigation history file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Driver investigation history file. 391.53 Section... QUALIFICATIONS OF DRIVERS AND LONGER COMBINATION VEHICLE (LCV) DRIVER INSTRUCTORS Files and Records § 391.53 Driver investigation history file. (a) After October 29, 2004, each motor carrier must maintain...

  11. Effects of driver behavior style differences and individual differences on driver sleepiness detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyong Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Driving sleepiness is still a major causes of traffic accidents. Individual drivers, under various conditions, act and respond in different manners. This article presents the attempt of a straight-line driving simulator study that examined the effects of driver behavior style differences and individual differences on driver sleepiness detection which is based on driving performance measures. A total of 15 drivers who were classified into two categories through subjective assessment based on a Driver Behavior Questionnaire participated in driving simulator experiments. A total of 18 detection models, including 15 SE models for each subject, an A model for the aggressive drivers, an NA model for the non-aggressive drivers, and a G model for all experiment participants, were developed using support vector machine method based on driving performance characteristic parameters. The results show that the G model is not suitable for all drivers due to its lower mean accuracy of 69.88% (standard deviation = 7.70% and higher standard deviation. The SE models for each subject show the best detection accuracy performance of 84.26% (standard deviation = 5.38%; however, it is impossible to set up a special detection model for every individual driver. The SD models on different style categories show an accuracy value of 77.54% (standard deviation = 5.78%. The results demonstrate that driver style differences as well as individual differences have great effects on driver sleepiness detection (F = 19.148, p < 0.000.

  12. Novice drivers' individual trajectories of driver behavior over the first three years of driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Gabriela D; Poulter, Damian; Barker, Edward; McKenna, Frank P; Rowe, Richard

    2015-09-01

    Identifying the changes in driving behavior that underlie the decrease in crash risk over the first few months of driving is key to efforts to reduce injury and fatality risk in novice drivers. This study represented a secondary data analysis of 1148 drivers who participated in the UK Cohort II study. The Driver Behavior Questionnaire was completed at 6 months and 1, 2 and 3 years after licensure. Linear latent growth models indicated significant increases across development in all four dimensions of aberrant driving behavior under scrutiny: aggressive violations, ordinary violations, errors and slips. Unconditional and conditional latent growth class analyses showed that the observed heterogeneity in individual trajectories was explained by the presence of multiple homogeneous groups of drivers, each exhibiting specific trajectories of aberrant driver behavior. Initial levels of aberrant driver behavior were important in identifying sub-groups of drivers. All classes showed positive slopes; there was no evidence of a group of drivers whose aberrant behavior decreased over time that might explain the decrease in crash involvement observed over this period. Male gender and younger age predicted membership of trajectories with higher levels of aberrant behavior. These findings highlight the importance of early intervention for improving road safety. We discuss the implications of our findings for understanding the behavioral underpinnings of the decrease in crash involvement observed in the early months of driving.

  13. Assisting Driver Sovereignty: A Fail-Safe Design Approach to Driver Distraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gijssel, A.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis investigates the potential of a fail-safe approach to driver distraction through novel interface concepts for integrated Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS). Traffic accidents are a negative side effect of the universal and economical desire for mobility. The year 2009 saw the alar

  14. Redesign of Transjakarta Bus Driver's Cabin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardi Safitri, Dian; Azmi, Nora; Singh, Gurbinder; Astuti, Pudji

    2016-02-01

    Ergonomic risk at work stations with type Seated Work Control was one of the problems faced by Transjakarta bus driver. Currently “Trisakti” type bus, one type of bus that is used by Transjakarta in corridor 9, serving route Pinang Ranti - Pluit, gained many complaints from drivers. From the results of Nordic Body Map questionnaires given to 30 drivers, it was known that drivers feel pain in the neck, arms, hips, and buttocks. Allegedly this was due to the seat position and the button/panel bus has a considerable distance range (1 meter) to be achieved by drivers. In addition, preliminary results of the questionnaire using Workstation Checklist identified their complaints about uncomfortable cushion, driver's seat backrest, and the exact position of the AC is above the driver head. To reduce the risk level of ergonomics, then did research to design the cabin by using a generic approach to designing products. The risk analysis driver posture before the design was done by using Rapid Upper Limb Assessment (RULA), Rapid Entire Body Assessment (REBA), and Quick Exposure Checklist (QEC), while the calculation of the moment the body is done by using software Mannequin Pro V10.2. Furthermore, the design of generic products was done through the stages: need metric-matrix, house of quality, anthropometric data collection, classification tree concept, concept screening, scoring concept, design and manufacture of products in the form of two-dimensional. While the design after design risk analysis driver posture was done by using RULA, REBA, and calculation of moments body as well as the design visualized using software 3DMax. From the results of analysis before the draft design improvements cabin RULA obtained scores of 6, REBA 9, and the result amounted to 57.38% QEC and moment forces on the back is 247.3 LbF.inch and on the right hip is 72.9 LbF.in. While the results of the proposed improvements cabin design RULA obtained scores of 3, REBA 4, and the moment of force on

  15. Short-term exposure to ambient particulate matter and emergency ambulance dispatch for acute illness in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasmin, Saira; Ueda, Kayo; Stickley, Andrew; Yasumoto, Shinya; Phung, Vera Ling Hui; Oishi, Mizuki; Yasukouchi, Shusuke; Uehara, Yamato; Michikawa, Takehiro; Nitta, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    Short-term exposure to air pollution may be linked to negative health outcomes that require an emergency medical response. However, few studies have been undertaken on this phenomenon to date. The aim of this study therefore was to examine the association between short-term exposure to ambient suspended particulate matter (SPM) and emergency ambulance dispatches (EADs) for acute illness in Japan. Daily EAD data, daily mean SPM and meteorological data were obtained for four prefectures in the Kanto region of Japan for the period from 2007 to 2011. The area-specific association between daily EAD for acute illness and SPM was explored using generalized linear models while controlling for ambient temperature, relative humidity, seasonality, long-term trends, day of the week and public holidays. Stratified analyses were conducted to evaluate the modifying effects of age, sex and medical conditions. Area-specific estimates were combined using meta-analyses. For the total study period the mean level of SPM was 23.7μg/m(3). In general, higher SPM was associated with a significant increase in EAD for acute illness [estimated pooled relative risk (RR): 1.008, 95% CI: 1.007 to 1.010 per 10μg/m(3) increase in SPM at lag 0-1]. The effects of SPM on EAD for acute illness were significantly greater for moderate/mild medical conditions (e.g. cases that resulted in 3weeks hospitalization or which resulted in death). Using EAD data, this study has shown the adverse health effects of ambient air pollution. This highlights the importance of reducing the level of air pollution in order to maintain population health and well-being.

  16. A cross-sectional study of Victorian mobile intensive care ambulance paramedics knowledge of the Valsalva manoeuvre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyle Malcolm J

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Valsalva Manoeuvre (VM is a primary measure for terminating haemodynamically stable supraventricular tachycardia (SVT in the emergency care setting. The clinical use and termination success of the VM in the prehospital setting has not been investigated to date. The objective of this study was to determine Melbourne Mobile Intensive Care Ambulance (MICA Paramedic knowledge of the VM, and to compare this understanding with an evidence-based model of VM performance. Methods A cross-sectional study in the form of a face-to-face interview was used to determine Melbourne MICA Paramedic understanding of VM instruction between January and February, 2008. The results were then compared with an evidence-based model of VM performance to ascertain compliance with the three criteria of position, pressure and duration. Ethics approval was granted. Results There were 28 participants (60.9% who elected a form of supine posturing, some 23 participants (50% selected the syringe method of pressure generation, with 16 participants (34.8% selecting the "as long as you can" option for duration. On comparison, one out of 46 MICA Paramedics correctly identified the three evidence-based criteria. Conclusions The formal education of Melbourne's MICA Paramedics would benefit from the introduction of an evidence based model of VM performance, which would impact positively on patient care and may improve reversion success in the prehospital setting. The results of this study also demonstrate that an opportunity exists to promote the evidence-based VM criteria across the primary emergency care field.

  17. Development of an implanted intramuscular EMG-triggered FES system for ambulation after incomplete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Anirban; Kobetic, Rudi; Triolo, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Ambulation after spinal cord injury is possible with the aid of neuroprosthesis employing functional electrical stimulation (FES). Individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI) retain partial volitional control of muscles below the level of injury, necessitating careful integration of FES with intact voluntary motor function for efficient walking. In this study, the intramuscular electromyogram (iEMG) was used to detect the intent to step and trigger FES-assisted walking in a volunteer with iSCI via an implanted neuroprosthesis consisting of two channels of bipolar iEMG signal acquisition and 12 independent channels of stimulation. The detection was performed with two types of classifiers- a threshold-based classifier that compared the running mean of the iEMG with a discrimination threshold to generate the trigger and a pattern recognition classifier that compared the time-history of the iEMG with a specified template of activity to generate the trigger whenever the cross-correlation coefficient exceeded a discrimination threshold. The pattern recognition classifier generally outperformed the threshold-based classifier, particularly with respect to minimizing False Positive triggers. The overall True Positive rates for the threshold-based classifier were 61.6% and 87.2% for the right and left steps with overall False Positive rates of 38.4% and 33.3%. The overall True Positive rates for the left and right step with the pattern recognition classifier were 57.2% and 93.3% and the overall False Positive rates were 11.9% and 24.4%. The subject showed no preference for either the threshold or pattern recognition-based classifier as determined by the Usability Rating Scale (URS) score collected after each trial and both the classifiers were perceived as moderately easy to use.

  18. Determinants and Drivers of Infectious Disease Threat Events in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenza, Jan C; Lindgren, Elisabet; Balkanyi, Laszlo; Espinosa, Laura; Almqvist, My S; Penttinen, Pasi; Rocklöv, Joacim

    2016-04-01

    Infectious disease threat events (IDTEs) are increasing in frequency worldwide. We analyzed underlying drivers of 116 IDTEs detected in Europe during 2008-2013 by epidemic intelligence at the European Centre of Disease Prevention and Control. Seventeen drivers were identified and categorized into 3 groups: globalization and environment, sociodemographic, and public health systems. A combination of >2 drivers was responsible for most IDTEs. The driver category globalization and environment contributed to 61% of individual IDTEs, and the top 5 individual drivers of all IDTEs were travel and tourism, food and water quality, natural environment, global trade, and climate. Hierarchical cluster analysis of all drivers identified travel and tourism as a distinctly separate driver. Monitoring and modeling such disease drivers can help anticipate future IDTEs and strengthen control measures. More important, intervening directly on these underlying drivers can diminish the likelihood of the occurrence of an IDTE and reduce the associated human and economic costs.

  19. Square Wave Driver for Piezoceramic Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slawomir Jakiela

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We present the circuit and performance of a square wave driver and power supply for piezoceramic actuators characterized by large capacitance, up to 3 μF. Capacitance of piezoceramic element is the key factor that limits the use of powerful actuators operating at high frequencies (kHz. It is thus important to build a driver that allows use of a possible wide set of actuators in the widest range of frequencies appropriate for the piezoelement. The driver that we report uses the properties of non-inductive resistors that allow for operation at high frequencies. Our report details the design, construction, tests and limitations of the device and its application to the control of a microfluidic valve.

  20. Linear transformer driver for pulse generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Alexander A; Mazarakis, Michael G; Sinebryukhov, Vadim A; Volkov, Sergey N; Kondratiev, Sergey S; Alexeenko, Vitaly M; Bayol, Frederic; Demol, Gauthier; Stygar, William A

    2015-04-07

    A linear transformer driver includes at least one ferrite ring positioned to accept a load. The linear transformer driver also includes a first power delivery module that includes a first charge storage devices and a first switch. The first power delivery module sends a first energy in the form of a first pulse to the load. The linear transformer driver also includes a second power delivery module including a second charge storage device and a second switch. The second power delivery module sends a second energy in the form of a second pulse to the load. The second pulse has a frequency that is approximately three times the frequency of the first pulse. The at least one ferrite ring is positioned to force the first pulse and the second pulse to the load by temporarily isolating the first pulse and the second pulse from an electrical ground.

  1. Drivers and moderators of business decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Pretorius

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Reports of business failure elicit various reactions, while research in this domain often appears to be limited by a lack of access to information about failure and by the negativity that surrounds it. Those who have experienced failure do not readily talk about it, or they disappear from the radar screen of researchers. Yet failure is preceded by decline which, when focused on strategically, can reduce eventual failures if early action is taken. The main purpose of this study is to develop a conceptual framework or typology of the drivers and moderators of business decline. Design/methodology/approach: After applying the "grounded theory" approach to the academic literature on decline and failure, a conceptual framework for the variables that drive and moderate business decline is proposed. Findings: The study proposes that decline has three core drivers, three peripheral drivers and four moderators. The core drivers identified are: resource munificence; leadership as origin; and causality (strategic versus operational origin of decline. The three peripheral drivers are: unique preconditions; continuous decisions impact; and extremes dichotomy. The study describes four moderators of the drivers: life cycle stage; stakeholder perspective; quantitative versus qualitative nature of signs and causes; and finally the age and size effects. Research limitations/implications: The proposed conceptual framework is based on literature only, although it has found support during discussions with practitioners. It is proposed to readers of this journal for scrutiny and validation. Practical implications: Strategists need to understand what drives decline in order to act timeously; practitioners who have an insight into the moderators with their impacts could make better decisions in response to decline in organisations and possibly avoid business failure. Originality/Value: Understanding business decline is still a huge theoretical challenge, which

  2. Understanding Collateral Evolution in Linux Device Drivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Padioleau, Yoann; Lawall, Julia Laetitia; Muller, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    no tools to help in this process, collateral evolution is thus time consuming and error prone.In this paper, we present a qualitative and quantitative assessment of collateral evolution in Linux device driver code. We provide a taxonomy of evolutions and collateral evolutions, and use an automated patch......-analysis tool that we have developed to measure the number of evolutions and collateral evolutions that affect device drivers between Linux versions 2.2 and 2.6. In particular, we find that from one version of Linux to the next, collateral evolutions can account for up to 35% of the lines modified in such code....

  3. Resource utilization and outcomes of intoxicated drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camera Lindsay J

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high risk behavior of intoxicated drivers, impaired reaction time, lack of seat belt use, and increased incidence of head injury raises questions of whether pre-hospital use of alcohol leads to a higher injury severity score and worse clinical outcomes. We therefore compared intoxicated and non-intoxicated drivers of motor vehicle crashes with respect to outcome measurements and also describe the resources utilized to achieve those outcomes at our Level 1 trauma center. Methods Retrospective descriptive study (Jan 2002-June 2007 of our trauma registry and financial database comparing intoxicated drivers with blood alcohol levels (BAC > 80 mg/dl (ETOH > 80 with drivers who had a BAC of 0 mg/dl (ETOH = 0. Drivers without a BAC drawn or who had levels ranging from 1 mg/dL to 80 mg/dL were excluded. Data was collected on demographic information (age, gender, injury severity score or ISS, outcome variables (mortality, complications, ICU and hospital LOS, ventilator days and resource utilization (ED LOS, insurance, charges, costs, payments. Statistical analysis: p 80; stratified chi square. Results Out of 1732 drivers, the combined study group (n = 987 of 623 ETOH = 0 and 364 ETOH > 80 had a mean age of 38.8 ± 17.9, ISS of 18.0 ± 12.1, and 69.8%% male. There was no difference in ISS (p = 0.67 or complications (p = 0.38. There was a trend towards decreased mortality (p = 0.06. The ETOH = 0 group had more patients with a prolonged ICU LOS (≥ 5 days, ventilator days (≥ 8 days, and hospital LOS (> 14 days when compared to the ETOH > 80 group (p 80 group tended to be self pay (4.9% vs. 0.7%, p Conclusions The data suggests that intoxicated drivers may have better outcomes and a trend towards reduced mortality. They appeared to be less likely to have prolonged hospital LOS, ICU LOS, and ventilator days. We also observed that intoxicated drivers were more likely to be self-pay, less likely to have charges > $50K, and less likely

  4. Enhancing digital driver models: identification of distinct postural strategies used by drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyung, Gyouhyung; Nussbaum, Maury A; Babski-Reeves, Kari L

    2010-03-01

    Driver workspace design and evaluation is, in part, based on assumed driving postures of users and determines several ergonomic aspects of a vehicle, such as reach, visibility and postural comfort. Accurately predicting and specifying standard driving postures, hence, are necessary to improve the ergonomic quality of the driver workspace. In this study, a statistical clustering approach was employed to reduce driving posture simulation/prediction errors, assuming that drivers use several distinct postural strategies when interacting with automobiles. 2-D driving postures, described by 16 joint angles, were obtained from 38 participants with diverse demographics (age, gender) and anthropometrics (stature, body mass) and in two vehicle classes (sedans and SUVs). Based on the proximity of joint angle sets, cluster analysis yielded three predominant postural strategies in each vehicle class (i.e. 'lower limb flexed', 'upper limb flexed' and 'extended'). Mean angular differences between clusters ranged from 3.8 to 52.4 degrees for the majority of joints, supporting the practical relevance of the distinct clusters. The existence of such postural strategies should be considered when utilising digital human models (DHMs) to enhance and evaluate driver workspace design ergonomically and proactively. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: This study identified drivers' distinct postural strategies, based on actual drivers' behaviours. Such strategies can facilitate accurate positioning of DHMs and hence help design ergonomic driver workspaces.

  5. A Movement Monitor Based on Magneto-Inertial Sensors for Non-Ambulant Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: A Pilot Study in Controlled Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Gaëlle Le Moing

    Full Text Available Measurement of muscle strength and activity of upper limbs of non-ambulant patients with neuromuscular diseases is a major challenge. ActiMyo® is an innovative device that uses magneto-inertial sensors to record angular velocities and linear accelerations that can be used over long periods of time in the home environment. The device was designed to insure long-term stability and good signal to noise ratio, even for very weak movements. In order to determine relevant and pertinent clinical variables with potential for use as outcome measures in clinical trials or to guide therapy decisions, we performed a pilot study in non-ambulant neuromuscular patients. We report here data from seven Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD patients (mean age 18.5 ± 5.5 years collected in a clinical setting. Patients were assessed while wearing the device during performance of validated tasks (MoviPlate, Box and Block test and Minnesota test and tasks mimicking daily living. The ActiMyo® sensors were placed on the wrists during all the tests. Software designed for use with the device computed several variables to qualify and quantify muscular activity in the non-ambulant subjects. Four variables representative of upper limb activity were studied: the rotation rate, the ratio of the vertical component in the overall acceleration, the hand elevation rate, and an estimate of the power of the upper limb. The correlations between clinical data and physical activity and the ActiMyo® movement parameters were analyzed. The mean of the rotation rate and mean of the elevation rate appeared promising since these variables had the best reliability scores and correlations with task scores. Parameters could be computed even in a patient with a Brooke functional score of 6. The variables chosen are good candidates as potential outcome measures in non-ambulant patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and use of the ActiMyo® is currently being explored in home environment

  6. Efficiency of the prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation of 785 patients treaded by the team of the Berlin-Friedrichshain-ambulance between 1995 and 1998

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Between 1995 and 1998 the Berlin-Friedrichshain-Ambulance (BFA) started 785 cardiopulmonary resuscitations (CPR) (96,2 % adults). Registered are 498 (66,0 %) male and 257 (34,0 %) female persons at the age between 18 and 94 years (ys) (63,7 ± 16,7 ys). In 40,7 % the CPR has been initial successful. 37 patients have been discharged from the hospital. That means only 4,9 % of all registered adults (n = 755) have been discharged, it also means that 12,1 % of the initial successful treated...

  7. Physician presence in an ambulance car is associated with increased survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a prospective cohort analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihito Hagihara

    Full Text Available The presence of a physician seems to be beneficial for pre-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. However, the effectiveness of a physician's presence during CPR before hospital arrival has not been established. We conducted a prospective, non-randomized, observational study using national data from out-of-hospital cardiac arrests between 2005 and 2010 in Japan. We performed a propensity analysis and examined the association between a physician's presence during an ambulance car ride and short- and long-term survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Specifically, a full non-parsimonious logistic regression model was fitted with the physician presence in the ambulance as the dependent variable; the independent variables included all study variables except for endpoint variables plus dummy variables for the 47 prefectures in Japan (i.e., 46 variables. In total, 619,928 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases that met the inclusion criteria were analyzed. Among propensity-matched patients, a positive association was observed between a physician's presence during an ambulance car ride and return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC before hospital arrival, 1-month survival, and 1-month survival with minimal neurological or physical impairment (ROSC: OR = 1.84, 95% CI 1.63-2.07, p = 0.00 in adjusted for propensity and all covariates; 1-month survival: OR = 1.29, 95% CI 1.04-1.61, p = 0.02 in adjusted for propensity and all covariates; cerebral performance category (1 or 2: OR = 1.54, 95% CI 1.03-2.29, p = 0.04 in adjusted for propensity and all covariates; and overall performance category (1 or 2: OR = 1.50, 95% CI 1.01-2.24, p = 0.05 in adjusted for propensity and all covariates. A prospective observational study using national data from out-of-hospital cardiac arrests shows that a physician's presence during an ambulance car ride was independently associated with

  8. Reduced Component Count RGB LED Driver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Pedro, I.; Ackermann, B.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this master thesis is to develop new drive and contrololutions, for creating white light from mixing the light of different-color LEDs, aiming at a reduced component count resulting in less space required by the electronics and lower cost. It evaluates the LED driver concept proposed in

  9. A pneumatic driver for shock wave production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leftwich, Megan; Mejila-Alvarez, R.; Prestridge, K.

    2011-11-01

    We are presenting a novel technique to generate shock waves in shock tube experiments. Typically this is done with a high pressure driver section that is separated from the low pressure driven section by a physical membrane. The membrane is burst at a specific pressure and a shock wave is formed. This process limits the repetition of experiments, and membrane particles must be removed from the shock tube after each experiment. The driver presented here does not contain a membrane. Instead, it uses a series of high pressure chambers and fast-acting pistons to create the pressure jump between the high pressure driver section and low pressure driven section. The entire system is controlled remotely and requires no insertion or cleanup of membranes between experiments. The system is designed to achieve shock waves exceeding Mach 3 with air as the working fluid (higher Mach numbers can be generated with other working fluids). It will allow high repetition rates, even in challenging experimental environments (such as a vertical shock tube configuration). We present results from the initial characterization of this driver system.

  10. Drivers for Malaysian SMEs to Go Green

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Krishna Moorthy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs around the world have little knowledge about environmental management and do not understand the concept of environmental management. The concept of green is still very new to Malaysian SME owners/managers, although many green conferences, seminars and campaigns have been carried out for quite some time. The concept for green process and products in Malaysia is at the infancy stage. The drivers of environmental behavior in SMEs are relatively under-researched (Worthington & Patton, 2005 and more needs to be done to help SME owner-managers adopt environmental initiatives (Hitchens et al., 2003 as poor environmental performance is not simply the outcome of negative attitudes by SME owner-managers to the environment. This study identifies five key drivers of environmental management practice for SMEs go green. The five drivers are: economic benefits, financial incentives, stakeholders demand, legislation, resources, motivation and knowledge. The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB is considered as the most appropriate theory to study the drivers of green environment behavior and to investigate the owners’/managers’ perception and attitude towards Malaysian SMEs’ green concept.

  11. Innovation drivers and barriers in food processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fortuin, F.T.J.M.; Omta, S.W.F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose - The food processing industry, confronted with increased global competition and more stringent customer demands, is pressurized to improve the pace and quality of its innovation processes. This paper aims to find out what factors constitute the main drivers and barriers to innovation and to

  12. A Research on Darkness Adaptation of Drivers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the results of darkness adaptation test fordrivers. It is shown that there is a significant difference (p10 s is 7.3%, implying that the high accident rate of the drivers in accident group might be caused by their longer darkness adaptation time.

  13. What Are Drivers for Informal Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürmann, Eva; Beausaert, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The topic of informal learning at work has received increasing attention in the past years. The purpose of this study is to explore in which informal learning activities employees engage and what are the drivers for informal learning. Design/Methodology/Approach: Semi-structured interviews were taken from ten human resources (HR) and ten…

  14. Driver behavior at urban roads in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, J.; van Zuylen, H.J.; van der Horst, E.

    2014-01-01

    Driver behavior in China shows remarkable differences from that in western countries. In this study, six focus groups were organized to investigate Chinese drivers’ attitudes, expectations, intended actions, their preferences, and habits in different situations in urban areas. The outcomes show that

  15. Pilates based core stability training in ambulant individuals with multiple sclerosis: protocol for a multi-centre randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freeman Jennifer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with Multiple Sclerosis (MS frequently experience balance and mobility impairments, including reduced trunk stability. Pilates-based core stability training, which is aimed at improving control of the body's stabilising muscles, is popular as a form of exercise with people with MS and therapists. A replicated single case series study facilitated by the Therapists in MS Group in the United Kingdom (UK provides preliminary evidence that this approach can improve balance and mobility in ambulant people with MS; further evidence is needed to substantiate these findings to ensure that limited time, energy, finances and resources are used to best effect. This study builds upon the pilot work undertaken in the case series study by implementing a powered randomised controlled study, with the aims of: 1 Establishing the effectiveness of core stability training 2 Comparing core stability training with standardised physiotherapy exercise 3 Exploring underlying mechanisms of change associated with this intervention Methods This is a multi-centre, double blind, block randomised, controlled trial. Eligible participants will be recruited from 4 UK centres. Participants will be randomly allocated to one of three groups: Pilates based core stability training, standardised physiotherapy exercise or contract-relax relaxation sessions (placebo control. All will receive face to face training sessions over a 12 week period; together with a 15 minute daily home programme. All will be assessed by a blinded assessor before training, at the end of the 12 week programme and at 4 week follow-up. The primary outcome measure is the 10 metre timed walk. Secondary outcome measures are the MS walking Scale (MSWS-12, the Functional Reach (forwards and lateral, a 10 point Numerical Rating Scale to determine "Difficulty in carrying a drink when walking", and the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC Scale. In addition, ultrasound imaging of the

  16. Towards a general theory of driver behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Ray

    2005-05-01

    Taylor [Taylor, D.H., 1964. Drivers' galvanic skin response and the risk of accident. Ergonomics 7, 439-451] argued that drivers attempt to maintain a constant level of anxiety when driving which Wilde [Wilde, G.J.S., 1982. The theory of risk homeostasis: implications for safety and health. Risk Anal. 2, 209-225] interpreted to be coupled to subjective estimates of the probability of collision. This theoretical paper argues that what drivers attempt to maintain is a level of task difficulty. Naatanen and Summala [Naatanen, R., Summala, H., 1976. Road User Behaviour and Traffic Accidents. North Holland/Elsevier, Amsterdam, New York] similarly rejected the concept of statistical risk as a determinant of driver behaviour, but in so doing fell back on the learning process to generate a largely automatised selection of appropriate safety margins. However it is argued here that driver behaviour cannot be acquired and executed principally in such S-R terms. The concept of task difficulty is elaborated within the framework of the task-capability interface (TCI) model, which describes the dynamic interaction between the determinants of task demand and driver capability. It is this interaction which produces different levels of task difficulty. Implications of the model are discussed regarding variation in performance, resource allocation, hierarchical decision-making and the interdependence of demand and capability. Task difficulty homeostasis is proposed as a key sub-goal in driving and speed choice is argued to be the primary solution to the problem of keeping task difficulty within selected boundaries. The relationship between task difficulty and mental workload and calibration is clarified. Evidence is cited in support of the TCI model, which clearly distinguishes task difficulty from estimates of statistical risk. However, contrary to expectation, ratings of perceived risk depart from ratings of statistical risk but track difficulty ratings almost perfectly. It now

  17. Double detonation drivers for a shock tube/tunnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Hong; FENG; Heng; YU; Hongru

    2004-01-01

    Recent progress on detonation drivers is reviewed. Performances of the forward detonation driver and backward detonation driver have been observed. To eliminate occurrence of a Taylor wave following the detonation wave in the primary driver and to improve the performance of the detonation driver, an additional backward detonation driver was proposed to attach to the end of the forward detonation driver.When the ratio of the initial pressures between the additional and the primary drivers becomes larger than or equal to a critical value, the Taylor wave will disappear, and thus a homogeneous driving gas with high pressure and high temperature can be generated.Furthermore, an over-driving detonation wave will be also obtained, which can increase the driving capability.

  18. 77 FR 10608 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... requirement red, green, and amber (49 CFR 391.41(b)(10)). FMCSA recognizes that some drivers do not meet the... because distances between them are more compact. These conditions tax visual capacity and driver...

  19. 75 FR 79081 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... standard red, green, and amber (49 CFR 391.41(b)(10)). FMCSA recognizes that some drivers do not meet the... because distances between them are more compact. These conditions tax visual capacity and driver...

  20. 78 FR 41188 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... showing requirement red, green, and amber (49 CFR 391.41(b)(10)). FMCSA recognizes that some drivers do... more compact. These conditions tax visual capacity and driver response just as intensely as...

  1. 75 FR 70078 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ... standard red, green, and amber (49 CFR 391.41(b)(10)). FMCSA recognizes that some drivers do not meet the... distances between them are more compact. These conditions tax visual capacity and driver response just...

  2. 78 FR 22602 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-16

    ... showing requirement red, green, and amber (49 CFR 391.41(b)(10)). FMCSA recognizes that some drivers do... more compact. These conditions tax visual capacity and driver response just as intensely as...

  3. 78 FR 63295 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... individuals for exemptions from the prohibition against persons with insulin- treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM... individual assessment of drivers with diabetes mellitus, and be consistent with the criteria described in... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications;...

  4. 78 FR 65034 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ... exemptions from the prohibition against persons with insulin- treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating... drivers with diabetes mellitus, and be consistent with the criteria described in section 4018 of the... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications;...

  5. 78 FR 78479 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... prohibition against persons with insulin- treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating commercial motor vehicles... individual assessment of drivers with diabetes mellitus, and be consistent with the criteria described in... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications;...

  6. 77 FR 33554 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... individuals for exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM... individual assessment of drivers with diabetes mellitus, and be consistent with the criteria described in... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications;...

  7. 78 FR 63280 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... exemptions from the prohibition against persons with insulin- treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating... drivers with diabetes mellitus, and be consistent with the criteria described in section 4018 of the... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications;...

  8. 78 FR 63285 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... exemptions from the prohibition against persons with insulin- treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating... must provide for individual assessment of drivers with diabetes mellitus, and be consistent with the... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications;...

  9. 77 FR 33551 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating commercial motor vehicles... drivers with diabetes mellitus, and be consistent with the criteria described in section 4018 of the... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications;...

  10. 78 FR 63298 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... individuals for exemptions from the prohibition against persons with insulin- treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM... must provide for individual assessment of drivers with diabetes mellitus, and be consistent with the... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications;...

  11. Oregon Air Ambulance Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    34 SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THjIS PAGE (147.- D.In Enieod) REPORT DO~ CUMEN ~TATIONI PAGE REAL) 1NST1RucTrIONSMB 1E1ORE COMP1LETI-’YNG FORM 1 . REPORT NUMBER... reactions to flight must be guarded. 4. Aeromedical Transport. A breakdown of the 152 patients transported by agency is presented on Table 8. Agency No. 11

  12. The Groningen Ambulance Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svilaas, T; Dijk, WA; Busman, JP; Dassen, WRM; de Vos, R; Zijlstra, F

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the effects of a treatment protocol for patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction, which was introduced in 2004. The setup of the new approach is described. The principle goal is to minimize time between onset of symptoms associated with acute myocardial infarction and re

  13. Analog Video Line Driver with Adaptive Impedance Matching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, Bram; Dijkstra, Marcel B.

    1998-01-01

    A new principle for an adaptive line driver is presented. This type of line driver can adapt its output impedance automatically to the applied load. This results in automatically corrected output impedance for different cables with terminations. Also, the line-driver output impedance becomes insensi

  14. Non-planar driver's side rearview mirrors: A survey of mirror types and european driver experience and a driver behavior study on the influence of experience and driver age on gap acceptance and vehicle detection (final report)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, A.P. de

    2000-01-01

    Some European drivers have been using different types of convex, driver-side rear-view mirrors which provide a wider field-of-view than flat mirrors, but produce a minified image. With a minified image, some drivers may have difficulty judging distances and approach speeds. To assess the potential b

  15. Peptic ulcer among urban bus drivers in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netterstrøm, Bo; Juel, K

    1990-01-01

    As part of a survey on the work environment of bus drivers, 2045 (83%) of 2465 male bus drivers in the three major cities in Denmark in 1978 answered a postal questionnaire on health and working conditions. In order to evaluate the relative occurrence of peptic ulcer among the bus drivers, a foll...

  16. Social capital, health, and elderly driver status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbel, Stephen T; Berry, Helen L

    2016-03-01

    Driving a car enables many people to engage in meaningful activities that, in turn, help develop and maintain personal social capital. Social capital, a combination of community participation and social cohesion, is important in maintaining well-being. This paper argues that social capital can provide a framework for investigating the general role of transportation and driving a car specifically to access activities that contribute to connectedness and well-being among older people. This paper proposes theoretically plausible and empirically testable hypotheses about the relationship between driver status, social capital, and well-being. A longitudinal study may provide a new way of understanding, and thus of addressing, the well-being challenges that occur when older people experience restrictions to, or loss of, their driver's license.

  17. Driver's Face Tracking Based on Improved CAMShift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamarul Hawari Bin Ghazali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The statistic shows that the number of casualty increase in every year due to road accident related to driver drowsiness. After long journey or sleepless night, vehicle driver will perform some bio-features with regard to drowsiness on them face. It is self-evident that getting location information of head in continuous monitoring and surveillance system rapidly and accurately can help prevent many accidents, and consequently save money and reduce personal suffering. In this paper, according the real situation in vehicle, an improved CAMShift approach is proposed to tracking motion of driver’s head. Results from experiment show the significant performance of proposed approach in driver’s head tracking.

  18. Identifying driver mutations in sequenced cancer genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raphael, Benjamin J; Dobson, Jason R; Oesper, Layla

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing is revolutionizing the study of cancer and enabling the measurement of the somatic mutations that drive cancer development. However, the resulting sequencing datasets are large and complex, obscuring the clinically important mutations in a background of errors, noise......, and random mutations. Here, we review computational approaches to identify somatic mutations in cancer genome sequences and to distinguish the driver mutations that are responsible for cancer from random, passenger mutations. First, we describe approaches to detect somatic mutations from high-throughput DNA...... sequencing data, particularly for tumor samples that comprise heterogeneous populations of cells. Next, we review computational approaches that aim to predict driver mutations according to their frequency of occurrence in a cohort of samples, or according to their predicted functional impact on protein...

  19. Driver Behavior Modeling: Developments and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najah AbuAli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The advances in wireless communication schemes, mobile cloud and fog computing, and context-aware services boost a growing interest in the design, development, and deployment of driver behavior models for emerging applications. Despite the progressive advancements in various aspects of driver behavior modeling (DBM, only limited work can be found that reviews the growing body of literature, which only targets a subset of DBM processes. Thus a more general review of the diverse aspects of DBM, with an emphasis on the most recent developments, is needed. In this paper, we provide an overview of advances of in-vehicle and smartphone sensing capabilities and communication and recent applications and services of DBM and emphasize research challenges and key future directions.

  20. Data Fusion for Driver Behaviour Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carmona

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A driver behaviour analysis tool is presented. The proposal offers a novel contribution based on low-cost hardware and advanced software capabilities based on data fusion. The device takes advantage of the information provided by the in-vehicle sensors using Controller Area Network Bus (CAN-BUS, an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU and a GPS. By fusing this information, the system can infer the behaviour of the driver, providing aggressive behaviour detection. By means of accurate GPS-based localization, the system is able to add context information, such as digital map information, speed limits, etc. Several parameters and signals are taken into account, both in the temporal and frequency domains, to provide real time behaviour detection. The system was tested in urban, interurban and highways scenarios.

  1. Ergonomic Evaluation on Taxi Drivers Compartment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jimmy; SF; Chan; YW; Chui; Reggie; Kwan; K; K; Chau

    2002-01-01

    Driving involves long hours of physical work within c onfined compartment. Taxi drivers usually work with prolonged working hours, add itional stress may likely be induced on particular body limbs. Occupational heal th may occur and working efficiency may potentially be affected resulting fr om fatigues, pains or diseases. These problems, however, could be remedied if mo re attention is paid on seating design, the workplace and driving postures adopt ed. Ergonomics design can provide better understanding...

  2. Drivers for Malaysian SMEs to Go Green

    OpenAIRE

    M. Krishna Moorthy; Peter a/l Yacob; Mahendra Kumar a/l Chelliah; Lawrence Arokiasamy

    2012-01-01

    Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) around the world have little knowledge about environmental management and do not understand the concept of environmental management. The concept of green is still very new to Malaysian SME owners/managers, although many green conferences, seminars and campaigns have been carried out for quite some time. The concept for green process and products in Malaysia is at the infancy stage. The drivers of environmental behavior in SMEs are relatively under-researche...

  3. Minimizing driver's irritation at a roadblock

    CERN Document Server

    Vleugels, C J J; Anthonissen, M J H; Seidman, T I

    2013-01-01

    Urban traffic is a logistic issue which can have many societal implications, especially when, due to a too high density of cars, the network of streets of a city becomes blocked, and consequently, pedestrians, bicycles, and cars start sharing the same traffic conditions potentially leading to high irritations (of people) and therefore to chaos. In this paper we focus our attention on a simple scenario: We model the driver's irritation induced by the presence of a roadblock. As a natural generalization, we extend the model for the two one-way crossroads traffic presented by M.E. Fouladvand and M. Nematollahi to that of a roadblock. Our discrete model defines and minimizes the total waiting time. The novelty lies in introducing the (total) driver's irritation and its minimization. Finally, we apply our model to a real-world situation: rush hour traffic in Hillegom, The Netherlands. We observe that minimizing the total waiting time and minimizing the total driver's irritation lead to different traffic light stra...

  4. Vehicle Dynamics Approach to Driver Warning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef A. Ghoneim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses a concept for enhanced active safety by introducing a driver warning system based on vehicle dynamics that predicts a potential loss of control condition prior to stability control activation. This real-time warning algorithm builds on available technologies such as the Electronic Stability Control (ESC. The driver warning system computes several indices based on yaw rate, side-slip velocity, and vehicle understeer using ESC sensor suite. An arbitrator block arbitrates between the different indices and determines the status index of the driving vehicle. The status index is compared to predetermined stability levels which correspond to high and low stability levels. If the index exceeds the high stability level, a warning signal (haptic, acoustic, or visual is issued to alert the driver of a potential loss of control and ESC activation. This alert will remain in effect until the index is less than the low stability level at which time the warning signal will be terminated. A vehicle speed advisory algorithm is integrated with the warning algorithm to provide a desired vehicle speed of a vehicle traveling on a curve. Simulation results and vehicle tests were conducted to illustrate the effectiveness of the warning algorithm.

  5. Driver behavior following an automatic steering intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Nicola; Griesche, Stefan; Schieben, Anna; Hesse, Tobias; Baumann, Martin

    2015-10-01

    The study investigated driver behavior toward an automatic steering intervention of a collision mitigation system. Forty participants were tested in a driving simulator and confronted with an inevitable collision. They performed a naïve drive and afterwards a repeated exposure in which they were told to hold the steering wheel loosely. In a third drive they experienced a false alarm situation. Data on driving behavior, i.e. steering and braking behavior as well as subjective data was assessed in the scenarios. Results showed that most participants held on to the steering wheel strongly or counter-steered during the system intervention during the first encounter. Moreover, subjective data collected after the first drive showed that the majority of drivers was not aware of the system intervention. Data from the repeated drive in which participants were instructed to hold the steering wheel loosely, led to significantly more participants holding the steering wheel loosely and thus complying with the instruction. This study seems to imply that without knowledge and information of the system about an upcoming intervention, the most prevalent driving behavior is a strong reaction with the steering wheel similar to an automatic steering reflex which decreases the system's effectiveness. Results of the second drive show some potential for countermeasures, such as informing drivers shortly before a system intervention in order to prevent inhibiting reactions.

  6. Urinalysis and hair analysis for illicit drugs of driver applicants and drivers in the trucking industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieczkowski, Tom

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to compare the differential rate of detection of illicit drugs when using two distinct sample types, hair and urine specimens. The specimens were collected from persons who applied for employment as a truck driver, or were collected from randomly selected currently employed truck drivers. The data is examined for job applicants and employees to determine if any differences in outcomes are associated with employment status or specimen type. The data is also assessed for specific patterns associated with particular drugs and their assay outcomes. Overall, it was determined that drug positive cases are relatively rare. Job applicants are more likely to test positive for an illicit drug than a currently employed driver. Applicants are more frequently positive for a drug by a factor of 3 for both urinalysis and hair analysis when compared to currently employed drivers. Approximately 2% of applicants were urine positive and 9% hair positive for an illegal drug. Considering employed truck drivers 0.6% were drug positive by urinalysis and 3% when using hair analysis. It is concluded that hair assays detect more drug use than urinalysis. It is also concluded that when urine and hair assay outcomes are non-concordant the typical case is a positive hair analysis with a negative urinalysis.

  7. Fusion of optimized indicators from Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) for driver drowsiness detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daza, Iván García; Bergasa, Luis Miguel; Bronte, Sebastián; Yebes, Jose Javier; Almazán, Javier; Arroyo, Roberto

    2014-01-09

    This paper presents a non-intrusive approach for monitoring driver drowsiness using the fusion of several optimized indicators based on driver physical and driving performance measures, obtained from ADAS (Advanced Driver Assistant Systems) in simulated conditions. The paper is focused on real-time drowsiness detection technology rather than on long-term sleep/awake regulation prediction technology. We have developed our own vision system in order to obtain robust and optimized driver indicators able to be used in simulators and future real environments. These indicators are principally based on driver physical and driving performance skills. The fusion of several indicators, proposed in the literature, is evaluated using a neural network and a stochastic optimization method to obtain the best combination. We propose a new method for ground-truth generation based on a supervised Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS). An extensive evaluation of indicators, derived from trials over a third generation simulator with several test subjects during different driving sessions, was performed. The main conclusions about the performance of single indicators and the best combinations of them are included, as well as the future works derived from this study.

  8. Fusion of Optimized Indicators from Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS for Driver Drowsiness Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván G. Daza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a non-intrusive approach for monitoring driver drowsiness using the fusion of several optimized indicators based on driver physical and driving performance measures, obtained from ADAS (Advanced Driver Assistant Systems in simulated conditions. The paper is focused on real-time drowsiness detection technology rather than on long-term sleep/awake regulation prediction technology. We have developed our own vision system in order to obtain robust and optimized driver indicators able to be used in simulators and future real environments. These indicators are principally based on driver physical and driving performance skills. The fusion of several indicators, proposed in the literature, is evaluated using a neural network and a stochastic optimization method to obtain the best combination. We propose a new method for ground-truth generation based on a supervised Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS. An extensive evaluation of indicators, derived from trials over a third generation simulator with several test subjects during different driving sessions, was performed. The main conclusions about the performance of single indicators and the best combinations of them are included, as well as the future works derived from this study.

  9. Driver exposure to particulate matter in Bangkok.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinsart, W; Kaewmanee, C; Inoue, M; Hara, K; Hasegawa, S; Karita, K; Tamura, K; Yano, E

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters > or = 2.5 microm (PM2.5) and 2.5-10 microm (PM10-2.5) exposure levels of drivers and to analyze the proportion of elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) in PM2.5 in Bangkok, Thailand. Four bus routes were selected. Measurements were conducted over 10 days in August (rainy season) 2008 and 8 days in January (dry season) 2009. The mean PM2.5 exposure level of the Tuk-tuk drivers was 86 microg/m3 in August and 198 microg/m3 in January. The mean for the non-air-conditioned bus drivers was 63 microg/m3 in August and 125 microg/m3 in January. The PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 exposure levels of the drivers in January were approximately twice as high as those in August. The proportion of total carbon (TC) in PM2.5 to the PM2.5 level in August (0.97 +/- 0.28 microg/m3) was higher than in January (0.65 +/- 0.13 microg/m3). The proportion of OC in the TC of the PM2.5 in August (0.51 +/- 0.08 microg/m3) was similar to that in January (0.65 +/- 0.07 microg/m3). The TC exposure by PM25 in January (81 +/- 30 microg/m3) remained higher than in August (56-21 microg/m3). The mean level of OC in the PM2.5 was 29 +/- 13 microg/m3 in August and 50 +/- 24 microg/m3 in January. In conclusion, the PM exposure level in Bangkok drivers was higher than that in the general environment, which was already high, and it varied with the seasons and vehicle type. This study also demonstrated that the major component of the PM was carbon, likely derived from vehicles.

  10. [Drivers of advanced age in traffic accidents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilban, Marjan

    2002-12-01

    The elderly are vulnerable and potentially unpredictable active participants in traffic who deserve special attention. Longer life expectancy entails a greater number of senior drivers, that is, persons with various health problems and difficulties accompanying old age. At the turn of the millennium, the share of population aged 65 or more in Slovenia was around 13%, and in 25 years it will be near as much as 19%. The share of drivers from this age group was 28% a year ago, and it is expected to reach about 54%. Numerous studies have shown that there are many differences in driving attitude between the young and the elderly. The young are by large active victims, and their main offense and cause of accident is speeding, while the elderly are more passive and their main offense is ignoring and enforcing the right of way. This paper focuses on the differences in the occurrence and type of injuries between the young and the elderly drivers, based on an analysis of all road accidents in Slovenia in the period between 1998-2000. Older people (over 65) caused only 4.7% of all road accidents (16.7% of all accidents involving pedestrians, 11.5% of all involving cyclists, 2.7% involving motorcyclists and 5% of all accidents involving car drivers). Of all accidents, 89.3% were without injuries, and the fatal outcome was registered in 0.4% accidents. Among the elderly (65-74 years of age), however, this share was 1%, and rising to 2.7% with the age 75 and above. By calculating the weight index, which discriminates between minor and severe injuries, and the fatal outcome, it was established that age groups 65-74 and > or = 75 cause three and five times greater damage, respectively than age groups from 18 to 54 years. With years, psychophysical changes lead to a drop in driving ability, which in turn increases the risk of road accidents. It is true that elderly people cause less traffic accidents (and also drive less) than the young, but when they are involved in an accident

  11. Work fatigue in urban bus drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Makowiec-Dąbrowska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bus drivers are a special group of professional drivers who are at a very high risk of fatigue. The aim of the study was to examine whether the driver’s subjective assessment of fatigue allows for the determination of its level and identification of its causes. Material and Methods: The study group comprised 45 randomly selected bus drivers (mean age – 43.7±7.9 years, period of employment as drivers – 14.7±8.6 years. Examinations were performed in all subjects four times – before and after work on the “easy” route (outside the city center, small traffic intensity and before and after work on the “difficult” route (city center, heavy traffic. The fatigue test questionnaire, based on the list of symptoms of fatigue prepared by the Japan Research Committee of Fatigue, was used in the study. Results: The rating of fatigue after the work was significantly higher than that before the work. The profile of fatigue after work was not influenced by the type of route, but the assessment of most symptoms of fatigue reached a higher level after the “difficult” routes and the differences were statistically significant for 7 symptoms. Only the ratings of leg fatigue, feeling of heaviness, and the necessity to squint eyes and gaze with effort reached the higher levels after driving the “easy” routes. It has been found that the level of fatigue was significantly correlated with the job characteristics (driving time, the length of the route, number of stops, etc. and with the abundance of food ingested and type of beverage (coffee vs. others drunk prior to driving. Conclusions: The questionnaire used in our study to assess the subjective feeling of fatigue has proved to be a sensitive and useful tool for indicating the level and causes of fatigue. The relationship between the symptoms of fatigue and the characteristics of job and lifestyle shows that actions must be taken by both the employers and employees to prevent fatigue

  12. A learning-based autonomous driver: emulate human driver's intelligence in low-speed car following

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Junqing; Dolan, John M.; Litkouhi, Bakhtiar

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, an offline learning mechanism based on the genetic algorithm is proposed for autonomous vehicles to emulate human driver behaviors. The autonomous driving ability is implemented based on a Prediction- and Cost function-Based algorithm (PCB). PCB is designed to emulate a human driver's decision process, which is modeled as traffic scenario prediction and evaluation. This paper focuses on using a learning algorithm to optimize PCB with very limited training data, so that PCB can have the ability to predict and evaluate traffic scenarios similarly to human drivers. 80 seconds of human driving data was collected in low-speed (car-following scenarios. In the low-speed car-following tests, PCB was able to perform more human-like carfollowing after learning. A more general 120 kilometer-long simulation showed that PCB performs robustly even in scenarios that are not part of the training set.

  13. Investigation of the contamination of air and articles in ambulance and the effect of disinfection observation%救护车内空气、物品染菌量调查及干预效果观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨丽萍

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the bacterial contamination of air and articles in ambulance, and observe the effect of disinfection. Methods: The bacterial contamination of the air and articles in one ambulance were detected before and after disinfection in early,middle and end per month from May. 2009 to Oct. 2009. Results :The pollution situation of air and articles in ambulance was serious before disinfection. The bacterial contamination was decreased significantly after disinfection. And the difference was statistically significant( P < 0.01 ). Conclusions: The pollution situation of air and articles in ambulance is serious. It is necessary to establish a strict disinfection management system.%目的:调查救护车内空气、物品的染菌量情况,观察消毒处理的效果.方法:2009年5~10月的每月上、中、下旬对3辆救护车内空气和物品表面进行消毒前后染菌量监测.结果:消毒前救护车内空气和物品的污染情况严重,消毒后染菌量明显下降(P<0.01).结论:救护车内空气和物品的污染状况严重,需加强其消毒和监测工作.

  14. A comparison of adherence to correctly documented triage level of critically ill patients between emergency department and the ambulance service nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, Kenneth; Fridlund, Bengt

    2013-07-01

    Priority or triage has always occurred in emergency care. Today it is performed by both nurses in emergency departments (EDs) and ambulance services (ASs) to ensure patient safety. Recent studies have shown that nurses are unlikely to change their first impressions and patients suffering from blunt trauma are undertriaged. Our study aimed to compare and evaluate the adherence to correct triage level documentation, between nurses in the ED and the AS, according to current regulations. Of 592 analysed triage records from a university, a central and a district hospital, the adherence was 64% by ED nurses and 43% by AS nurses (pnurses do not adhere to the triage system and do not correctly document the triage level. Internal feedback and control are two approaches to improve the patient outcome, indicating that organisational actions must be taken.

  15. Anàlisi dels referents culturals en les traduccions catalana i castellana de la pel·lícula 'El castell ambulant'

    OpenAIRE

    Gorgas Canals, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Els referents culturals són un fenomen que ha estat molt estudiat en el camp de la traducció a causa de la complexitat que suposa expressar una realitat pròpia d'una llengua i d'una cultura en una altra llengua diferent. En aquest treball de final de grau es pretén realitzar una anàlisi i una classificació dels referents culturals que apareixen a la pel•lícula d'animació japonesa d'El Castell Ambulant i de la traducció que se n'ha fet a les versions espanyola i catalana. Aprofitant que dispos...

  16. Weakness and the Inability to Ambulate in a 14-Month-Old Female: A Case Report and Concise Review of Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A. Bloch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS is an acquired disease of the peripheral nervous system which causes demyelination and leads to weakness, ataxia, and areflexia. There are a variety of forms of the syndrome, and although it is found in all age groups, it is rare in children less than two years of age. The present complaint of weakness, ataxia, or lower extremity pain in the pediatric population should cause the practitioner to consider GBS in the differential. We describe a case of a 14-month-old girl presenting with weakness and the inability to ambulate who was diagnosed with GBS. The purpose of this paper is to review the emergency medicine diagnosis and management of Guillain-Barre syndrome in children.

  17. On-scene alternatives for emergency ambulance crews attending patients who do not need to travel to the accident and emergency department: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snooks, H A; Dale, J; Hartley-Sharpe, C; Halter, M

    2004-03-01

    With rising demand and recognition of the variety of cases attended by emergency ambulance crews, services have been considering alternative ways of providing non-urgent care. This paper describes and appraises the research literature concerning on-scene alternatives to conveyance to an emergency department, focusing on the: (1) profile and outcomes of patients attended but not conveyed by emergency crews; (2) triage ability of crews; (3) effectiveness and safety of protocols that allow crews to convey patients to alternative receiving units or to self care. The literature search was conducted through standard medical databases, supplemented with manual searches. Very few "live" studies were identified, and fewer still that included a control group. Findings indicated a complex area, with the introduction of protocols allowing crews to leave patients at scene carrying clinical risk. Robust research evidence concerning alternatives to current emergency care models is needed urgently to inform service and practice development.

  18. An artificial neural network to safely reduce the number of ambulance ECGs transmitted for physician assessment in a system with prehospital detection of ST elevation myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forberg Jakob L

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pre-hospital electrocardiogram (ECG transmission to an expert for interpretation and triage reduces time to acute percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI in patients with ST elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI. In order to detect all STEMI patients, the ECG should be transmitted in all cases of suspected acute cardiac ischemia. The aim of this study was to examine the ability of an artificial neural network (ANN to safely reduce the number of ECGs transmitted by identifying patients without STEMI and patients not needing acute PCI. Methods Five hundred and sixty ambulance ECGs transmitted to the coronary care unit (CCU in routine care were prospectively collected. The ECG interpretation by the ANN was compared with the diagnosis (STEMI or not and the need for an acute PCI (or not as determined from the Swedish coronary angiography and angioplasty register. The CCU physician's real time ECG interpretation (STEMI or not and triage decision (acute PCI or not were registered for comparison. Results The ANN sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for STEMI was 95%, 68%, 18% and 99%, respectively, and for a need of acute PCI it was 97%, 68%, 17% and 100%. The area under the ANN's receiver operating characteristics curve for STEMI detection was 0.93 (95% CI 0.89-0.96 and for predicting the need of acute PCI 0.94 (95% CI 0.90-0.97. If ECGs where the ANN did not identify a STEMI or a need of acute PCI were theoretically to be withheld from transmission, the number of ECGs sent to the CCU could have been reduced by 64% without missing any case with STEMI or a need of immediate PCI. Conclusions Our ANN had an excellent ability to predict STEMI and the need of acute PCI in ambulance ECGs, and has a potential to safely reduce the number of ECG transmitted to the CCU by almost two thirds.

  19. Upper limb evaluation and one-year follow up of non-ambulant patients with spinal muscular atrophy: an observational multicenter trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Mihaela Seferian

    Full Text Available Assessment of the upper limb strength in non-ambulant neuromuscular patients remains challenging. Although potential outcome measures have been reported, longitudinal data demonstrating sensitivity to clinical evolution in spinal muscular atrophy patients are critically lacking. Our study recruited 23 non-ambulant patients, 16 patients (males/females = 6/10; median age 15.4 years with a range from 10.7 to 31.1 years with spinal muscular atrophy type II and 7 patients (males/females = 2/5; median age 19.9 years with a range from 8.3 to 29.9 years with type III. The Brooke functional score was on median 3 with a range from 2 to 6. The average total vital capacity was 46%, and seven patients required non-invasive ventilation at night. Patients were assessed at baseline, 6 months, and 1 year using the Motor Function Measure and innovative devices MyoGrip, MyoPinch, and MoviPlate, which assess handgrip strength, key pinch strength, and hand/finger extension-flexion function, respectively. The study demonstrated the feasibility and reliability of these measures for all patients, and sensitivity to negative changes after the age of 14 years. The younger patients showed an increase of the distal force in the follow-up period. The distal force measurements and function were correlated to different functional scales. These data represent an important step in the process of validating these devices as potential outcome measures for future clinical trials.

  20. Global drivers, sustainable manufacturing and systems ergonomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemieniuch, C E; Sinclair, M A; Henshaw, M J deC

    2015-11-01

    This paper briefly explores the expected impact of the 'Global Drivers' (such as population demographics, food security; energy security; community security and safety), and the role of sustainability engineering in mitigating the potential effects of these Global Drivers. The message of the paper is that sustainability requires a significant input from Ergonomics/Human Factors, but the profession needs some expansion in its thinking in order to make this contribution. Creating a future sustainable world in which people experience an acceptable way of life will not happen without a large input from manufacturing industry into all the Global Drivers, both in delivering products that meet sustainability criteria (such as durability, reliability, minimised material requirement and low energy consumption), and in developing sustainable processes to deliver products for sustainability (such as minimum waste, minimum emissions and low energy consumption). Appropriate changes are already being implemented in manufacturing industry, including new business models, new jobs and new skills. Considerable high-level planning around the world is in progress and is bringing about these changes; for example, there is the US 'Advanced Manufacturing National Program' (AMNP)', the German 'Industrie 4.0' plan, the French plan 'la nouvelle France industrielle' and the UK Foresight publications on the 'Future of Manufacturing'. All of these activities recognise the central part that humans will continue to play in the new manufacturing paradigms; however, they do not discuss many of the issues that systems ergonomics professionals acknowledge. This paper discusses a number of these issues, highlighting the need for some new thinking and knowledge capture by systems ergonomics professionals. Among these are ethical issues, job content and skills issues. Towards the end, there is a summary of knowledge extensions considered necessary in order that systems ergonomists can be fully

  1. Drivers for animal welfare policies in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Villa, P; Matthews, L R; Alessandrini, B; Messori, S; Migliorati, G

    2014-04-01

    The European region has been, and remains, a global leader in the development of animal welfare policies. The region has a great diversity of cultures and religions, different levels of socio-economic development, and varied legislation, policies and practices. Nevertheless, there are common drivers for animal welfare policy based on a history of animal welfare ethics and obligations to animal users and society in general. A unifying goal of countries in the region is to achieve sustainable compliance with the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) standards on animal health and welfare. Ethics isthe overarching driver, supported by the actions of governmental, inter-governmental and non-governmental activities, markets and trade, science and knowledge. Historically, organisations involved in promoting animal welfare have tended to act in isolation. For example, non-governmental organisations (NGOs) have run campaigns to influence retailers and the welfare policies of their farmer suppliers. Increasingly, different organisations with common or complementary goals are working together. For example, competent authorities, inter-governmental bodies and NGOs have combined their efforts to address dog population control across several countries in the region. Also, animal welfare is becoming integrated into the corporate social responsibility targets of private companies. Science and knowledge, as drivers and tools, are assisting with the harmonisation of welfare standards, e.g. by providing a common basis for measuring welfare impacts through animal-based measures and widespread sharing of this information. Current trends suggest that there will be greater collaboration among the organisations driving change, and increasing convergence of animal welfare strategies and welfare assessment tools. The result will be increased harmonisation of animal welfare standards throughout the region.

  2. Ludic interfaces. Driver and product of gamification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Fuchs

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The recent success of non-standard and playful interface devices like Wii Remote, Move, and Kinect is an indicator of a process that demonstrates that ludic interfaces might be the core driver for a transformation in the sector of video games cultures and beyond. Yet, ludic interfaces are drivers—as well as driven by social developments known as the ludification (Raessens, 2006; Fuchs & Strouhal, 2008, or the gamification of society (Schell, 2010; Bogost, 2010; Ionifides, 2011; Deterding, Khaled, Nacke, & Dixon, 2011.

  3. Optimizing the Universal Robots ROS driver.

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Thomas Timm

    2015-01-01

    In this report I will examine both the current and the possible performance of one of the most popular robotics platforms in research, the Universal Robot manipulator. I will solely focus on the ROS based approaches and show how the current driver can be improved. I will look at performance improvement both in terms of faster reaction as well as making it possible to control the robot using either ros_control or ordinary joint speed commands, which is required for many types of sensory based ...

  4. A CENTURY SELECTING DRIVERS IN SPAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRISTINA CIVERA MOLLÁ

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the Directorial 91/439 of Cee Council who regulate driving licence, the drivers abilities and requiredproves to prove true them. The Reglamento General de Conductores required from all of candidates toobtein/renewad licence submitted to physical an psychological examination to obtain driving licence. TheReglamento General de Conductores maintained psychological test and a preventive pattern, legalized at 1934,although any City Halls required it for public transport. We offered an analysis of internal and external evolutionof the model, and the importance in proffesional labour of psychologist and the popularity of the society.

  5. Do drivers have a realistic view of their driving ability?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Laila Marianne; Møller, Mette; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    The Driver Behavior Questionnaire (DBQ) and the Driver Skill Inventory (DSI) are two of the most frequently used measures of driving style and driving skill. The motivation behind the present study was to test drivers’ insight into their own driving ability based on a combined use of the DBQ......, annual mileage and accident involvement. 3908 drivers aged 18–84 participated in the survey. The results suggested that the drivers have good insight into their own driving ability, as the driving skill level mirrored the frequency of aberrant driving behaviors. K-means cluster analysis revealed four...... and the DSI. Moreover, the joint use of the two instruments was applied to identify sub-groups of drivers that differ in their potential danger in traffic, as well as to test for heterogeneity across the population, namely whether the sub-groups of drivers differed in characteristics such as age, gender...

  6. Development of Accomodation Models for Soldiers in Vehicles: Driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Ebert 2013). Posture and position data were recorded for male and female enlisted personnel at three Army posts as they sat in a driver mockup ...Figure 1). Figure 1. Driver and squad mockups . The current study used data from 145 men and women tested in the driver mockup . Table 1 lists...UNCLASSIFIED 10 Figure 2 shows the garb levels used for measurements in the mockup . At the Advanced Combat Uniform (ACU) level, Soldiers wore their own

  7. Artefacts of questionnaire-based psychological testing of drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Łuczak

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this article is to draw attention to a significant role of social approval variable in the qustionnairebased diagnosis of drivers' psychological aptitude. Material and Methods: Three questionnaires were used: Formal Characteristics of Behavior - Temperament Inventory (FCB-TI, Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ-R(S and Impulsiveness Questionnaire (Impulsiveness, Venturesomeness, Empathy - IVE. Three groups of drivers were analyzed: professional "without crashes" (N = 46, nonprofessional "without crashes" (N = 75, and nonprofessional "with crashes" (N = 75. Results: Nonprofessional drivers "without crashes" significantly stood up against other drivers. Their personality profile, indicating a significantly utmost perseveration, emotional reactivity, neuroticism, impulsiveness and the lowest endurance did not fit in to the requirements to be met by drivers. The driver safety profile was characteristic of professional drivers (the lowest level of perseveration, impulsiveness and neuroticism and the highest level of endurance. Similar profile occurred among nonprofessional drivers - the offenders of road crashes. Compared to the nonprofessional "without crashes" group, professional drivers and offenders of road crashes were also characterized by a significantly higher score on the Lie scale, determining the need for social approval. This is likely to result from the study procedure according to which the result of professional drivers testing had an impact on a possible continuity of their job and that of nonprofessional drivers "with crashes" decided about possible recovery of the driving license. Conclusions: The variable of social approval can be a significant artifact in the study of psychological drivers' testing and reduce the reliability of the results of questionnaire methods. Med Pr 2014;65(3:373–385

  8. Driver reactions on ecological feedback via different HMI modalities

    OpenAIRE

    Staubach, Maria; Kassner, Astrid; Fricke, Nicola; Schießl, Caroline; Brockmann, Martin; Kuck, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays there already exists a large amount of driving-related information displayed in the dashboard and thus additional information concerning ecological driving might enlarge the workload of the driver further. This raises the question whether the presentation of additional ecologic information via the haptic channel is more efficient and comfortable for the driver compared to a visual presentation. Previous studies proved the impact of driver feedback systems on the reduction of fuel con...

  9. Driver support in congestion : an assessment of user needs and impacts on driver and traffic flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, van Cornelia Jacoba Geertje

    2007-01-01

    Mobility is a key factor for modern societies. However, it also brings about problems, such as congestion, accidents and pollution. High expectations rest on in-vehicle systems to contribute to solving these problems. These so-called driver support systems use advanced information and communication

  10. Driver D220.12 DRIVER-test-bed: Architecture, Integration and Orchestration

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, T.W. van den

    2015-01-01

    This deliverable describes the recommended architecture of the DRIVER Test Bed. The architecture description is developed in two iterations identified by the deliverable numbers D22.11 D220.12, and this deliverable concerns the second iteration, with initial and preliminary information on test bed services.

  11. Driver D220.12 DRIVER-test-bed: Architecture, Integration and Orchestration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, T.W. van den

    2015-01-01

    This deliverable describes the recommended architecture of the DRIVER Test Bed. The architecture description is developed in two iterations identified by the deliverable numbers D22.11 D220.12, and this deliverable concerns the second iteration, with initial and preliminary information on test bed s

  12. Drivers Recall and Attitudes Towards Road Safety Advertising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel José Fonseca

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to analyse Portuguese drivers recall and attitudes towards road safety advertising campaigns. Through a quantitative method the authors used a sample of Portuguese drivers. More than a half of the subjects didn’t recall any road safety advertising campaign. The appeals that most influenced driving behaviour were moderate speed and use of seatbelt. The dramatic approach was the one that had most impact, and the death of familiars of the driver the consequence that most influenced drivers. DOI: 10.5585/remark.v9i2.2112

  13. Feasibility of a driver performance data acquisition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, R.J.; Spelt, P.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Goodman, M.J. [National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Crash Avoidance Research

    1994-06-01

    The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) envisions many future situations in which the effectiveness and consequences of new intelligent vehicle-highway systems technologies will need to be studied in actual production vehicles. Such studies will enable evaluations in vehicles which are familiar to drivers. These studies would be future enhanced by the availability of an instrumentation package that can be easily installed in these vehicles to enable specific vehicle configurations of interest to be evaluated, thereby increasing the variety of vehicle options that are available for study. Ideally, an approach is needed that would allow data collection from a variety of vehicle models and types, and would address the issue of driver familiarity. Such an approach is embodied in the concept of a driver performance data acquisition system that could be installed in a wide range of vehicles within a relatively short period of time. As a universally adaptable system, it would provide researchers with the ability to manually input data as well as directly record information on driver, vehicle, roadway, and environmental parameters. Furthermore, it would enable the measurement of driver performance in the driver`s own vehicle, thereby ensuring vehicle familiarity. In addition, it would be possible to measure driver performance in relation to any vehicle design characteristic at relatively little expense and effort, and would make it easy to update existing models of driver/vehicle behavior to reflect performance characteristics in vehicles of current manufacture.

  14. 'The best drivers in the world'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fynbo, Lars; Järvinen, Margaretha Maria

    2011-01-01

    The paper analyses risk behaviour as described by a group of convicted drink-drivers. Risk assessment is seen as a part of a complicated process reflecting moral values in specific socio-cultural settings and within a specific framework of time. The respondents’ retrospective accounts of their dr......The paper analyses risk behaviour as described by a group of convicted drink-drivers. Risk assessment is seen as a part of a complicated process reflecting moral values in specific socio-cultural settings and within a specific framework of time. The respondents’ retrospective accounts...... of their drink-driving are interpreted as part of moral identity negotiations, focusing on four dimensions: drink-driving as non-voluntary behaviour, drink-driving as strategic behaviour, drink-driving and control, and drink-driving and ‘normalcy’. Central to these negotiations is the fact that many respondents...... come from social environments (be that friend groups or workmate groups) where drink-driving is common and that they therefore do not regard—or did not regard—drink-driving as deviant behaviour....

  15. Convenience food products. Drivers for consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Thomas A; van der Horst, Klazine; Siegrist, Michael

    2010-12-01

    Convenience is one of the big trends in the food business. The demand for convenience food products is steadily increasing; therefore, understanding convenience food consumption is an important issue. Despite being vital properties of convenience food, saving time and effort have not been very successful constructs for predicting convenience food consumption. To examine a wide range of possible drivers for convenience food consumption, the present study uses a convenience food frequency questionnaire that asks about consumption behavior. A paper-and-pencil questionnaire was sent out to a representative sample of people in German-speaking Switzerland and yielded N = 918 complete datasets from persons mainly responsible for buying and preparing food in the household. The various convenience food products could be categorized into four groups, which we labeled as highly processed food items, moderately processed food items, single components, and salads. Fifteen drivers were found to have a significant impact either on total convenience consumption or on one of the identified categories. Strong predictors were age, concern about naturalness, nutrition knowledge, and cooking skills.

  16. Inertially confined fusion using heavy ion drivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bangerter, R.O. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Bock, R. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Hogan, W.J.; Lindl, J.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1991-10-01

    The various technical issues of HIF will be briefly reviewed in this paper. It will be seen that there are numerous areas in common in all the approaches to HIF. In the recent International Symposium on Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion, the attendees met in specialized workshop sessions to consider the needs for research in each area. Each of the workshop groups considered the key questions of this report: (1) Is this an appropriate time for international collaboration in HIF? (2) Which problems are most appropriate for such collaboration? (3) Can the sharing of target design information be set aside until other driver and systems issues are better resolved, by which time it might be supposed that there could be a relaxation of classification of target issues? (4) What form(s) of collaboration are most appropriate, e.g., bilateral or multilateral? (5) Can international collaboration be sensibly attempted without significant increases in funding for HIF? The authors of this report share the conviction that collaboration on a broad scale is mandatory for HIF to have the resources, both financial and personnel, to progress to a demonstration experiment. Ultimately it may be possible for a single driver with the energy, power, focusibility, and pulse shape to satisfy the needs of the international community for target physics research. Such a facility could service multiple experimental chambers with a variety of beam geometries and target concepts.

  17. Inertially confined fusion using heavy ion drivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)); Bangerter, R.O. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Bock, R. (Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany)); Hogan, W.J.; Lindl, J.D. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1991-10-01

    The various technical issues of HIF will be briefly reviewed in this paper. It will be seen that there are numerous areas in common in all the approaches to HIF. In the recent International Symposium on Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion, the attendees met in specialized workshop sessions to consider the needs for research in each area. Each of the workshop groups considered the key questions of this report: (1) Is this an appropriate time for international collaboration in HIF (2) Which problems are most appropriate for such collaboration (3) Can the sharing of target design information be set aside until other driver and systems issues are better resolved, by which time it might be supposed that there could be a relaxation of classification of target issues (4) What form(s) of collaboration are most appropriate, e.g., bilateral or multilateral (5) Can international collaboration be sensibly attempted without significant increases in funding for HIF The authors of this report share the conviction that collaboration on a broad scale is mandatory for HIF to have the resources, both financial and personnel, to progress to a demonstration experiment. Ultimately it may be possible for a single driver with the energy, power, focusibility, and pulse shape to satisfy the needs of the international community for target physics research. Such a facility could service multiple experimental chambers with a variety of beam geometries and target concepts.

  18. Facilitation as a ubiquitous driver of biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntire, Eliot J B; Fajardo, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Models describing the biotic drivers that create and maintain biological diversity within trophic levels have focused primarily on negative interactions (i.e. competition), leaving marginal room for positive interactions (i.e. facilitation). We show facilitation to be a ubiquitous driver of biodiversity by first noting that all species use resources and thus change the local biotic or abiotic conditions, altering the available multidimensional niches. This can cause a shift in local species composition, which can cause an increase in beta, and sometimes alpha, diversity. We show that these increases are ubiquitous across ecosystems. These positive effects on diversity occur via a broad host of disparate direct and indirect mechanisms. We identify and unify several of these facilitative mechanisms and discuss why it has been easy to underappreciate the importance of facilitation. We show that net positive effects have a long history of being considered ecologically or evolutionarily unstable, and we present recent evidence of its potential stability. Facilitation goes well beyond the common case of stress amelioration and it probably gains importance as community complexity increases. While biodiversity is, in part, created by species exploiting many niches, many niches are available to exploit only because species create them.

  19. Lateral driving assistance using embedded driver-vehicle-road mode

    OpenAIRE

    Glaser, S.; Mammar, S.; Sainte-Marie, J.

    2002-01-01

    This article presents a vehicle model devoted to the development of driver longitudinal and lateral assistance in curves. Each module of vehicle dynamics is described and several complexity levels are detailed. The adopted formalism for the description of the vehicle dynamics allows an easy interface to road, driver and control modules. Finally, a lateral active steering driving assistance is presented.

  20. Kantian Critique as a possible Driver for Planned Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Martin Lund; Bordum, Anders

    2015-01-01

    In this article it is revealed that planned change approaches operate with multiple drivers for change, but often neglect critique as a relevant driver for change. This is in contradistinction to approaches within the social sciences, where critique is often seen as a relevant approach to creatin...

  1. Vehicle handling aspects by drivers with special needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekstra, A.; Kempeneers, R.

    1999-01-01

    The requirements and assessment criteria to determine the medical fitness to drive and the driving skills of the European driver are outlined in the driving licence directive (91/439/EEG). All drivers must comply to these criteria. An expert judgement on compliance is made at least once for each dri

  2. Design and validation of advanced driver assistance systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gietelink, O.J.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents new tools and methods for the design and validation of advanced driver assistance systems (ADASs). ADASs aim to improve driving comfort and traffic safety by assisting the driver in recognizing and reacting to potentially dangerous traffic situations. A major challenge in design

  3. Behavioural impacts of advanced driver assistance systems : an overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brookhuis, K.A.; Waard, D. de; Janssen, W.H.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) is that driver error will be reduced or even eliminated, and efficiency in traffic and transport is enhanced. The benefits of ADAS implementations are potentially considerable because of a significant decrease in human suffering, economical co

  4. 49 CFR 391.15 - Disqualification of drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Disqualification of drivers. (e) Disqualification for violation of prohibition of texting while driving a...) of this section. (2) Duration. Disqualification for violation of prohibition of texting while driving...) General. A driver who is disqualified shall not drive a commercial motor vehicle. A motor carrier...

  5. 49 CFR 383.51 - Disqualification of drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... motor vehicle traffic control prohibiting texting while driving.2 60 days Not applicable 120 days Not... holder of a CDL who is disqualified must not drive a CMV. (2) An employer must not knowingly allow, require, permit, or authorize a driver who is disqualified to drive a CMV. (3) A driver is subject...

  6. Lane-changing model with dynamic consideration of driver's propensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Jianqiang; Zhang, Jinglei; Ban, Xuegang Jeff

    2015-07-01

    Lane-changing is the driver's selection result of the satisfaction degree in different lane driving conditions. There are many different factors influencing lane-changing behavior, such as diversity, randomicity and difficulty of measurement. So it is hard to accurately reflect the uncertainty of drivers' lane-changing behavior. As a result, the research of lane-changing models is behind that of car-following models. Driver's propensity is her/his emotion state or the corresponding preference of a decision or action toward the real objective traffic situations under the influence of various dynamic factors. It represents the psychological characteristics of the driver in the process of vehicle operation and movement. It is an important factor to influence lane-changing. In this paper, dynamic recognition of driver's propensity is considered during simulation based on its time-varying discipline and the analysis of the driver's psycho-physic characteristics. The Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) method is used to quantify the hierarchy of driver's dynamic lane-changing decision-making process, especially the influence of the propensity. The model is validated using real data. Test results show that the developed lane-changing model with the dynamic consideration of a driver's time-varying propensity and the AHP method are feasible and with improved accuracy.

  7. Distraction and inattention in the driver model library

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogema, J.H.; Martens, M.H.; Ubink, E.M.

    2011-01-01

    TNO is developing a Driver Model Library (DML) to provide computational models of driver behaviour and decision making for use as a cross-platform plug-in for traffic simulations. The DML is based on a multi-agent cognitive framework which models the individual driving tasks (such as navigation, ove

  8. Improved Squeaky Wheel Optimisation for Driver Scheduling

    CERN Document Server

    Aickelin, Uwe; Li, Jingpeng

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a technique called Improved Squeaky Wheel Optimisation for driver scheduling problems. It improves the original Squeaky Wheel Optimisations effectiveness and execution speed by incorporating two additional steps of Selection and Mutation which implement evolution within a single solution. In the ISWO, a cycle of Analysis-Selection-Mutation-Prioritization-Construction continues until stopping conditions are reached. The Analysis step first computes the fitness of a current solution to identify troublesome components. The Selection step then discards these troublesome components probabilistically by using the fitness measure, and the Mutation step follows to further discard a small number of components at random. After the above steps, an input solution becomes partial and thus the resulting partial solution needs to be repaired. The repair is carried out by using the Prioritization step to first produce priorities that determine an order by which the following Construction step then schedul...

  9. Conceptualizing distal drivers in land use competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niewhöner, Jörg; Nielsen, Jonas Ø; Gasparri, Gasparri

    2016-01-01

    competition and by acknowledging that this contingency requires a methodological–analytical approach to dynamics that goes beyond linear cause–effect relationships. A critical component of future research will be a better understanding of different types of feedback processes reaching from biophysical......This introductory chapter explores the notion of ‘distal drivers’ in land use competition. Research has moved beyond proximate causes of land cover and land use change to focus on the underlying drivers of these dynamics. We discuss the framework of telecoupling within human–environment systems...... for the analysis of land use competition as a distributed process to consider the role of knowledge and power, technology, and different temporalities within a relational or systemic analysis of practices of land use competition. We conclude by pointing toward the historical and social contingency of land use...

  10. Cyclotrons as Drivers for Precision Neutrino Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Adelmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As we enter the age of precision measurement in neutrino physics, improved flux sources are required. These must have a well defined flavor content with energies in ranges where backgrounds are low and cross-section knowledge is high. Very few sources of neutrinos can meet these requirements. However, pion/muon and isotope decay-at-rest sources qualify. The ideal drivers for decay-at-rest sources are cyclotron accelerators, which are compact and relatively inexpensive. This paper describes a scheme to produce decay-at-rest sources driven by such cyclotrons, developed within the DAEδALUS program. Examples of the value of the high precision beams for pursuing Beyond Standard Model interactions are reviewed. New results on a combined DAEδALUS—Hyper-K search for CP violation that achieve errors on the mixing matrix parameter of 4° to 12° are presented.

  11. FRIB driver linac vacuum model and benchmarks

    CERN Document Server

    Durickovic, Bojan; Kersevan, Roberto; Machicoane, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is a superconducting heavy-ion linear accelerator that is to produce rare isotopes far from stability for low energy nuclear science. In order to achieve this, its driver linac needs to achieve a very high beam current (up to 400 kW beam power), and this requirement makes vacuum levels of critical importance. Vacuum calculations have been carried out to verify that the vacuum system design meets the requirements. The modeling procedure was benchmarked by comparing models of an existing facility against measurements. In this paper, we present an overview of the methods used for FRIB vacuum calculations and simulation results for some interesting sections of the accelerator. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Drivers of Changes in Product Development Rules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, John K.; Varnes, Claus J.

    2015-01-01

    regimes. However, the analysis here indicates that there are different drivers, both internal and external, that cause companies to adopt new rules or modify their existing ones, such as changes in organizational structures, organizational conflicts, and changes in ownership or strategy. In addition......, contrary to the predictions in previous research, companies sometimes move back and forth between different generations of rules. Companies that have moved to a more flexible third generation of rules might revert to their second generation rules, or supplement their flexibility with an increased level...... indicate that many factors influence the modification of rules, and that there is no simple linear progression from one generation to another. Organizational learning is one among several other factors that influences the dynamics of rules for managing product development. Further research is needed...

  13. Inherent robust stability of driver support systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王龙; J.; Ackermann

    1999-01-01

    Presented are the fact that the transfer function from the front steering angle to yaw rate is strictly positive real, irrespective of the uncertain mass and uncertain velocity, how to determine the positivity margin for this transfer function (some stabilization results are obtained), and how to check the positivity of a controller family. Furthermore,by exploiting the intrinsic structure of system equations and uncertainties, a nonconservative PID stabilization criterion for driver support systems is established. Some interesting results on positivity and connections of PID controllers are shown. Finally, some extreme point results on PID α-stabilization are obtained. These results give certain explanations and justifications for the simulation results performed at German Aerospace Research Center.

  14. Global Greening Is Firm, Drivers Are Mixed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppi, P.; Meyfroidt, P.; Ausubel, J. H.; Graven, H. D.; Birdsey, R.; Posch, M.; Wernick, I.; Myneni, R. B.; Stenberg, P.

    2015-12-01

    Evidence for global greening is converging, asserting an increase in CO2 uptake and biomass of the terrestrial biosphere. Global greening refers to global net increases in the area of green canopy, stocks of carbon, and the duration of the growing season. The growing seasons in general have prolonged while the stock of biomass carbon has increased and the rate of deforestation has decelerated, although these trends are mixed in the Tropics. Evidence for these trends comes from firm empirical data obtained through atmospheric CO2 observations, remote sensing, forest inventories and land use statistics. The drivers of global greening cannot be assessed based only on unambiguous empirical measurements. They include spatially and temporally heterogeneous combinations of changing land use and management - including green revolution and increasing yields, afforestation, forest protection and management, and abandonment of agricultural land -, changes in the global environment (increased CO2, warmer temperatures and longer growing seasons in the northern latitudes, acceleration of the global nitrogen cycle), and shifts in demand for forest and farm products. The global trade of biomass-derived commodities affects the link between consumption patterns and the land cover impact. Global greening confirms the immediacy of global change and may be associated with more or less biodiversity and diverse environmental and human consequences depending on local circumstances. Understanding causes, mechanisms, and implications of global greening requires integrated analyses spanning land use and management, demand for products of the terrestrial biosphere, and the atmosphere and climate. Understanding the pace and drivers of global greening matters crucially for assessing the future of the terrestrial C sink; ecological, economic, social, and cultural assessments of the bio-economy; and the preservation of ecosystems.

  15. The definition of and drivers of new product performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Kristina Risom; Juhl, Hans Jørn

    In the last three decades academic research on new product development has tried to identify the drivers of new product development performance. This body of research is characterised by a vast amount of different definitions of both the drivers of new product performance and the performance...... concept. Hence it may be difficult to compare results from different studies and to come up with more general conclusions about the most influential drivers of new product performance. This article is an attempt to summarize, categorize and analyze the results from the most often cited studies...... on the drivers of new product development performance. Firstly this article will provide a discussion and a categorization of drivers and a discussion and categorization of the different measures of new product performance. In that part of the article we will also discuss the pros and cons of the different...

  16. Attitudes and behavior of Chinese drivers regarding seatbelt use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Zhang, Wei; Murphy, Lauren; Shi, Guangyuan; Lin, Yanjie

    2011-05-01

    In the current study, research was conducted in five cities in China to examine seatbelt use and to explore Chinese drivers' attitudes toward using seatbelts. Multiple data collection methods consisted of 35 initial semi-structured interviews to create questions for an in-person survey and 500 driver observations that included administering the in-person survey. Questions explored were why Chinese drivers use or do not use seatbelts and what they think would be the best interventions to increase the rate of seatbelt use in Chinese drivers. The relationships between various personal characteristics and seatbelt use rates were investigated. Also examined were the relationships between seatbelt use (both objective observation and subjective self-reported use) and self-reported car crashes and traffic violations. This study provides insight into the attitudes of Chinese drivers on seatbelt use and potential interventions.

  17. PTSD in railroad drivers under the Federal employers' liability act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Kenneth J; Farrell, J Michael

    2006-01-01

    Railroad and subway drivers can experience psychological trauma when trains strike or nearly miss other trains, motor vehicles, or persons or become instruments of death. Derailments, collisions, and suicides on the tracks can induce feelings of helplessness, horror, guilt, and anxiety in the drivers. Although some drivers experience acute stress disorder (ASD) or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), their conditions are not always acknowledged within the occupational setting. The world literature suggests that PTSD has been an increasing focus of concern, giving rise to detailed intervention protocols. In the United States, the Federal Employers' Liability Act (FELA) governs the adjudication of work-related injuries among railroad employees. In practice, it is difficult for railroad drivers with PTSD to receive benefits if there was no "direct impact" linked to the employer's negligence. In this article, the authors review the literature on PTSD among railroad drivers, discuss relevant case law, and explain how the FELA militates against some employees with PTSD.

  18. Effects of different kinds of artificial airway in prehospital ambulance%不同人工气道在院外救护车内的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张吉新; 李士华; 张颖; 毕宝林; 崔兆伟

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects in cardiopulmonary resuscitation of 3 kinds of artificial airway: conventional tracheal intubation, blind insertion of laryngeal mask, and esophageal-tracheal combined tube in prehospital ambulance.Methods 328 cases undergoing CPR in the prehospital ambulance were Randomly divided into 3 groups: Group A (n=68) undergoing conventional tracheal intubation, Group B (n=140) undergoing blind insertion of laryngeal mask, and Group C (n=l 10) undergoing insertion of esophageal-tracheal combined tube. The time needed to establish artificial airway, one-time success rate of insertion, and resuscitation success rate were compared among these 3 groups. Results The time needed to establish artificial airway of Group B was (26±11.3) s, significantly shorter than those of Groups A and C[(l46±14.7)s and (81±16.5)s respectively , both P0.05). There were not significant differences in the resuscitation success rate among these 3 groups (26.5%,25.7% and 27.3%). Conclusion blind insertion of laryngeal mask is the best choice for CPR in prehospital ambulance, followed by insertion of esophageal tracheal combitube.%目的 探讨院外急救车上心肺复苏(CPR)建立人工气道通气的最佳方法和对复苏成功率的影响.方法 对院外急救车上发生心跳呼吸骤停患者318例,根据当时CPR时对患者随机建立人工气道的3种不同方法,将其分为3组,进行回顾性分析,A组68例,常规行气管导管插管;B组140例,盲插喉罩通气;C组110例,食管气管联合导管通气.结果 B组建立人工通气需(26±11.3)s,显著短于A组和C组[分别为(146±14.7)s和(81±16.5),均P<0.05].A组建立人工通气所需时间显著长于C组(P<0.05).盲插喉罩通气时间最短,其次是食管气管联合导管插管术,气管插管术最慢.B组一次插管成功率为100%,显著高于A组(60.3%,P<0.05),与C组的差异无显著性(98.2%,P>0.05).B组与C组之间差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).A

  19. Observed and reported driver behaviour at junctions : implications for driver training

    OpenAIRE

    Bottomley, David M.

    1991-01-01

    Over half of the accidents on British roads occur at junctions and it was the primary goal of this research to develop an increased understanding of the underlying factors behind these accidents. The vast majority of all road accidents are attributable to human error and the research investigated junction negotiation with respect to drivers' perceptions of the social and environmental components of driving. The first part of the research, an observation study, gathe...

  20. Do Restricted Driver's Licenses Lower Crash Risk among Older Drivers? A Survival Analysis of Insurance Data from British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasvadi, Glenyth Caragata; Wister, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Faced with an aging driving population, interest is increasing in the use of restricted licenses or "graduated delicensing" for older drivers to allow them to safely retain a driver's license. The primary purpose of this study was to determine whether restricted licenses are successful at mitigating number of crashes per year…

  1. Design of an Integrated Vehicle Chassis Control System with Driver Behavior Identification

    OpenAIRE

    Bing Zhu; Yizhou Chen; Jian Zhao; Yunfu Su

    2015-01-01

    An integrated vehicle chassis control strategy with driver behavior identification is introduced in this paper. In order to identify the different types of driver behavior characteristics, a driver behavior signals acquisition system was established using the dSPACE real-time simulation platform, and the driver inputs of 30 test drivers were collected under the double lane change test condition. Then, driver behavior characteristics were analyzed and identified based on the preview optimal cu...

  2. An Overview on Study of Identification of Driver Behavior Characteristics for Automotive Control

    OpenAIRE

    Na Lin; Changfu Zong; Masayoshi Tomizuka; Pan Song; Zexing Zhang; Gang Li

    2014-01-01

    Driver characteristics have been the research focus for automotive control. Study on identification of driver characteristics is provided in this paper in terms of its relevant research directions and key technologies involved. This paper discusses the driver characteristics based on driver’s operation behavior, or the driver behavior characteristics. Following the presentation of the fundamental of the driver behavior characteristics, the key technologies of the driver behavior characteristi...

  3. The driver, the road, the rules … and the rest? A systems-based approach to young driver road safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Parker, B; Goode, N; Salmon, P

    2015-01-01

    The persistent overrepresentation of young drivers in road crashes is universally recognised. A multitude of factors influencing their behaviour and safety have been identified through methods including crash analyses, simulated and naturalistic driving studies, and self-report measures. Across the globe numerous, diverse, countermeasures have been implemented; the design of the vast majority of these has been informed by a driver-centric approach. An alternative approach gaining popularity in transport safety is the systems approach which considers not only the characteristics of the individual, but also the decisions and actions of other actors within the road transport system, along with the interactions amongst them. This paper argues that for substantial improvements to be made in young driver road safety, what has been learnt from driver-centric research needs to be integrated into a systems approach, thus providing a holistic appraisal of the young driver road safety problem. Only then will more effective opportunities and avenues for intervention be realised.

  4. What happens when drivers face hazards on the road?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventsislavova, Petya; Gugliotta, Andres; Peña-Suarez, Elsa; Garcia-Fernandez, Pedro; Eisman, Eduardo; Crundall, David; Castro, Candida

    2016-06-01

    The current study aims to obtain knowledge about the nature of the processes involved in Hazard Perception, using measurement techniques to separate and independently quantify these suspected sub-processes: Sensation, Situation Awareness (recognition, location and projection) and decision-making. It applies Signal Detection Theory analysis to Hazard Perception and Prediction Tasks. To enable the calculation of Signal Detection Theory parameters, video-recorded hazardous vs. quasi-hazardous situations were presented to the participants. In the hazardous situations it is necessary to perform an evasive action, for instance, braking or swerving abruptly, while the quasi-hazardous situations do not require the driver to make any evasive manoeuvre, merely to carry on driving at the same speed and following the same trajectory. A first Multiple Choice Hazard Perception and Prediction test was created to measure participants' performance in a What Happens Next? Task. The sample comprised 143 participants, 47 females and 94 males. Groups of non-offender drivers (learner, novice and experienced) and offender drivers (novice and experienced) were recruited. The Multiple Choice Hazard Perception and Prediction test succeeded in finding differences between drivers according to their driving experience. In fact, differences exist with regard to the level of hazard discrimination (d' prime) by drivers with different experience (learner, novice and experienced drivers) and profile (offenders and non-offenders) and these differences emerge from Signal Detection Theory analysis. In addition, it was found that experienced drivers show higher Situation Awareness than learner or novice drivers. On the other hand, although offenders do worse than non-offenders on the hazard identification question, they do just as well when their Situation Awareness is probed (in fact, they are as aware as non-offenders of what the obstacles on the road are, where they are and what will happen next

  5. Risky attitudes towards road use in pre-drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waylen, Andrea E; McKenna, Frank P

    2008-05-01

    Motor vehicle accidents are one of the principal causes of adolescent disability or mortality and male drivers are more likely to be involved in road accidents than female drivers. In part such associations between driver age and sex have been linked to differences in risky behaviour (e.g. speed, violations) and individual characteristics (e.g. sensation seeking, deviant behaviour). The aim of this research is to determine whether associations between risky road user behaviour and individual characteristics are a function of driver behaviour or whether they are intrinsic and measurable in individuals too young to drive. Five hundred and sixty-seven pre-driver students aged 11-16 from three secondary schools completed questionnaires measuring enthusiasm for speed, sensation seeking, deviant behaviour and attitudes towards driver violations. Boys reported more risky attitudes than girls for all measures. Associations between sensation seeking, deviant behaviour and attitudes towards risky road use were present from early adolescence and were strongest around age 14, before individuals learn to drive. Risky attitudes towards road use are associated with individual characteristics and are observed in adolescents long before they learn to drive. Safe attitudes towards road use and driver behaviour should be promoted from childhood in order to be effective.

  6. Towards an understanding of driver inattention: taxonomy and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Michael A; Strayer, David L

    2014-01-01

    There is little agreement in the scientific literature about what the terms "driver distraction" and "driver inattention" mean, and what the relationship is between them. In 2011, Regan, Hallett and Gordon proposed a taxonomy of driver inattention in which driver distraction is conceptualized as just one of several processes that give rise to driver inattention. Since publication of that paper, two other papers have emerged that bear on the taxonomy. In one, the Regan et al taxonomy was used, for the first time, to classify data from an in-depth crash investigation in Australia. In the other, another taxonomy of driver inattention was proposed and described. In this paper we revisit the original taxonomy proposed by Regan et al. in light of these developments, and make recommendations for how the original taxonomy might be improved to make it more useful as a tool for classifying and coding crash and critical incident data. In addition, we attempt to characterize, theoretically, the processes within each category of the original taxonomy that are assumed to give rise to driver inattention. Recommendations are made for several lines of research: to further validate the original taxonomy; to understand the impact of each category of inattention in the taxonomy on driving performance, crash type and crash risk; and to revise and align with the original taxonomy existing crash and incident investigation protocols, so that they provide more comprehensive, reliable and consistent information regarding the contribution of inattention to crashes of all types.

  7. Modeling Driver Behavior near Intersections in Hidden Markov Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; He, Qinglian; Zhou, Hang; Guan, Yunlin; Dai, Wei

    2016-12-21

    Intersections are one of the major locations where safety is a big concern to drivers. Inappropriate driver behaviors in response to frequent changes when approaching intersections often lead to intersection-related crashes or collisions. Thus to better understand driver behaviors at intersections, especially in the dilemma zone, a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) is utilized in this study. With the discrete data processing, the observed dynamic data of vehicles are used for the inference of the Hidden Markov Model. The Baum-Welch (B-W) estimation algorithm is applied to calculate the vehicle state transition probability matrix and the observation probability matrix. When combined with the Forward algorithm, the most likely state of the driver can be obtained. Thus the model can be used to measure the stability and risk of driver behavior. It is found that drivers' behaviors in the dilemma zone are of lower stability and higher risk compared with those in other regions around intersections. In addition to the B-W estimation algorithm, the Viterbi Algorithm is utilized to predict the potential dangers of vehicles. The results can be applied to driving assistance systems to warn drivers to avoid possible accidents.

  8. Discriminating Drivers through Human Factor and Behavioral Difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Seok Oh

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Since Greenwood and Woods' (1919 study in tendency of accident, many researchers have insisted that various human factors (sensation seeking, anger, anxiety are highly correlated with reckless driving and traffic accidents. Oh and Lee (2011 designed the Driving Behavior Determinants Questionnaire, a psychological tool to predict danger level of drivers and discriminate them into three groups (normal, unintentionally reckless, and intentionally reckless by their characteristics, attitude, and expected reckless behavior level. This tool's overall accuracy of discrimination was 70%. This study aimed to prove that the discrimination reflects the behavioral difference of drivers. Twenty-four young drivers were requested to react to the visual stimuli (tests for subjective speed sense, simple visual reaction time, and left turning at own risk. The results showed no differences in subjective speed sense among the driver groups, which means drivers' excessive speeding behaviors occur due to intention based on personality and attitude, not because of sensory disorders. In addition, there were no differences in simple reaction time among driver groups. However, the results of the ‘Left turning at drivers’ own risk task” revealed significant group differences. All reckless drivers showed a greater degree of dangerous left turning behaviors than the normal group did.

  9. Determining the Feasibility of Ambulance-Based Randomised Controlled Trials in Patients with Ultra-Acute Stroke: Study Protocol for the "Rapid Intervention with GTN in Hypertensive Stroke Trial" (RIGHT, ISRCTN66434824).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankolekar, Sandeep; Sare, Gillian; Geeganage, Chamila; Fuller, Michael; Stokes, Lynn; Sprigg, Nikola; Parry, Ruth; Siriwardena, A Niroshan; Bath, Philip M W

    2012-01-01

    Background. Time from acute stroke to enrolment in clinical trials needs to be reduced to improve the chances of finding effective treatments. No completed randomised controlled trials of ambulance-based treatment for acute stroke have been reported in the UK, and the practicalities of recruiting, consenting, and treating patients are unknown. Methods. RIGHT is an ambulance based, single-blind, randomised controlled trial with blinded-outcome assessment. The trial will assess feasibility of using ambulance services to deliver ultra-acute stroke treatments; a secondary aim is to assess the effect of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) on haemodynamic variables and functional outcomes. Initial consent, randomisation, and treatment are performed by paramedics prior to hospitalisation. Patients with ultra-acute stroke (≤4 hours of onset) are randomised to transdermal GTN (5 mg/24 hours) or gauze dressing daily for 7 days. The primary outcome is systolic blood pressure at 2 hours. Secondary outcomes include feasibility, haemodynamics, dependency, and other functional outcomes. A nested qualitative study is included. Trial Status. The trial has all relevant ethics and regulatory approvals and recruitment started on February 15, 2010. The trial stopped recruitment in December 2011 after 41 patients were recruited. Trial Registration. The trial registration number is ISRCTN66434824 and EudraCT number is 2007-004766-40.

  10. Estimating likelihood of future crashes for crash-prone drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subasish Das

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available At-fault crash-prone drivers are usually considered as the high risk group for possible future incidents or crashes. In Louisiana, 34% of crashes are repeatedly committed by the at-fault crash-prone drivers who represent only 5% of the total licensed drivers in the state. This research has conducted an exploratory data analysis based on the driver faultiness and proneness. The objective of this study is to develop a crash prediction model to estimate the likelihood of future crashes for the at-fault drivers. The logistic regression method is used by employing eight years' traffic crash data (2004–2011 in Louisiana. Crash predictors such as the driver's crash involvement, crash and road characteristics, human factors, collision type, and environmental factors are considered in the model. The at-fault and not-at-fault status of the crashes are used as the response variable. The developed model has identified a few important variables, and is used to correctly classify at-fault crashes up to 62.40% with a specificity of 77.25%. This model can identify as many as 62.40% of the crash incidence of at-fault drivers in the upcoming year. Traffic agencies can use the model for monitoring the performance of an at-fault crash-prone drivers and making roadway improvements meant to reduce crash proneness. From the findings, it is recommended that crash-prone drivers should be targeted for special safety programs regularly through education and regulations.

  11. Immediate Return to Ambulation and Improved Functional Capacity for Rehabilitation in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome following Early Implantation of a Spinal Cord Stimulation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Jesse Goff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a neuropathic pain condition that is characterized by vasomotor, sensory, sudomotor, and motor symptoms. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS has been successfully utilized for the treatment of pain refractory to conventional therapies. We present a case of a previously highly functioning 54-year-old female who developed a rarely reported case of idiopathic CRPS of the right ankle which spontaneously occurred four months after an uncomplicated anterior cervical disc fusion. This condition resulted in severe pain and functional impairment that was unresponsive to pharmacological management. The patient’s rehabilitation was severely stymied by her excruciating pain. However, with the initiation of spinal cord stimulation, her pain was adequately controlled allowing for progression to full unassisted ambulation, advancing functional capacity, and improving quality of life. This case report supports the concept that rapid progression to neuromodulation, rather than delays that occur due to attempts at serial sympathetic blocks, may better control symptoms leading allowing for a more meaningful recovery.

  12. Integrated Suit Test 1 - A Study to Evaluate Effects of Suit Weight, Pressure, and Kinematics on Human Performance during Lunar Ambulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernhardt, Michael L.; Norcross, Jason; Vos, Jessica R.

    2008-01-01

    In an effort to design the next generation Lunar suit, NASA has initiated a series of tests aimed at understanding the human physiological and biomechanical affects of space suits under a variety of conditions. The first of these tests was the EVA Walkback Test (ICES 2007-01-3133). NASA-JSC assembled a multi-disciplinary team to conduct the second test of the series, titled Integrated Suit Test 1 (IST-1), from March 6 through July 24, 2007. Similar to the Walkback Test, this study was performed with the Mark III (MKIII) EVA Technology Demonstrator suit, a treadmill, and the Partial Gravity Simulator in the Space Vehicle Mock-Up Facility at Johnson Space Center. The data collected for IST-1 included metabolic rates, ground reaction forces, biomechanics, and subjective workload and controllability feedback on both suited and unsuited (shirt-sleeve) astronaut subjects. For IST-1 the center of gravity was controlled to a nearly perfect position while the weight, pressure and biomechanics (waist locked vs. unlocked) were varied individually to evaluate the effects of each on the ability to perform level (0 degree incline) ambulation in simulated Lunar gravity. The detailed test methodology and preliminary key findings of IST-1 are summarized in this report.

  13. Neutral Caregivers or Military Support? The British Red Cross, the Friends’ Ambulance Unit, and the Problems of Voluntary Medical Aid in Wartime

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    During the First World War the British Red Cross Society (BRCS) served as the coordinating body for voluntary medical aid giving in Britain. Among the many units which came within its purview was the Friends’ Ambulance Unit (FAU), formed by a group of young men whose desire to serve their nation in wartime conflicted with their pacifist principles. Both the BRCS and the FAU were wracked by ideological conflicts in the years which preceded and throughout the war. These struggles over voluntarist identity highlight the contested meanings of service and conscience in wartime. Through a critical examination of the language of official histories and biographies, this article will argue that the war formed a key moment in the relationship between the British state and voluntary medical aid, with the state’s increasing role in the work of such organizations raising questions about the voluntarist principles to which aid organizations laid claim. The struggles that both organizations and individuals within them faced in reconciling the competing pressures that this new relationship created form a legacy of the war which continues to have important implications for the place of medical voluntarism in wartime today. PMID:26213442

  14. Neutral Caregivers or Military Support? The British Red Cross, the Friends' Ambulance Unit, and the Problems of Voluntary Medical Aid in Wartime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jessica

    2015-05-01

    During the First World War the British Red Cross Society (BRCS) served as the coordinating body for voluntary medical aid giving in Britain. Among the many units which came within its purview was the Friends' Ambulance Unit (FAU), formed by a group of young men whose desire to serve their nation in wartime conflicted with their pacifist principles. Both the BRCS and the FAU were wracked by ideological conflicts in the years which preceded and throughout the war. These struggles over voluntarist identity highlight the contested meanings of service and conscience in wartime. Through a critical examination of the language of official histories and biographies, this article will argue that the war formed a key moment in the relationship between the British state and voluntary medical aid, with the state's increasing role in the work of such organizations raising questions about the voluntarist principles to which aid organizations laid claim. The struggles that both organizations and individuals within them faced in reconciling the competing pressures that this new relationship created form a legacy of the war which continues to have important implications for the place of medical voluntarism in wartime today.

  15. Monitoring the effect of air pollution episodes on health care consultations and ambulance call-outs in England during March/April 2014: A retrospective observational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Alex J; Smith, Sue; Dobney, Alec; Thornes, John; Smith, Gillian E; Vardoulakis, Sotiris

    2016-07-01

    There is an increasing body of evidence illustrating the negative health effects of air pollution including increased risk of respiratory, cardiac and other morbid conditions. During March and April 2014 there were two air pollution episodes in England that occurred in close succession. We used national real-time syndromic surveillance systems, including general practitioner (GP) consultations, emergency department attendances, telehealth calls and ambulance dispatch calls to further understand the impact of these short term acute air pollution periods on the health seeking behaviour of the general public. Each air pollution period was comparable with respect to particulate matter concentrations (PM10 and PM2.5), however, the second period was longer in duration (6 days vs 3 days) and meteorologically driven 'Sahara dust' contributed to the pollution. Health surveillance data revealed a greater impact during the second period, with GP consultations, emergency department attendances and telehealth (NHS 111) calls increasing for asthma, wheeze and difficulty breathing indicators, particularly in patients aged 15-64 years. Across regions of England there was good agreement between air quality levels and health care seeking behaviour. The results further demonstrate the acute impact of short term air pollution episodes on public health and also illustrate the potential role of mass media reporting in escalating health care seeking behaviour.

  16. Documenting and automating collateral evolutions in Linux device drivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Padioleau, Yoann; Hansen, René Rydhof; Lawall, Julia;

    2008-01-01

    The internal libraries of Linux are evolving rapidly, to address new requirements and improve performance. These evolutions, however, entail a massive problem of collateral evolution in Linux device drivers: for every change that affects an API, all dependent drivers must be updated accordingly....... Because Linux programmers are accustomed to manipulating program modifications in terms of patch files, this tool uses a language based on the patch syntax to express transformations, extending patches to semantic patches. Coccinelle preserves the coding style of the original driver, as would a human...... the code correctly. Finally, several patches derived from the use of Coccinelle have been accepted into the Linux kernel....

  17. Drivers of Sales Innovation in Business-To-Business Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Thomas; Geersbro, Jens

    2014-01-01

    This paper defines the term sales innovation, offers an operationalization of the concept, and discusses antecedents of sales innovation in terms of important internal and external drivers. An empirical analysis of 409 B2B firms identifies the internal drivers of sales innovation as increased top...... pressure leads to less innovation in sales. Finally the paper suggests managerial implications as well as avenues of further research in this area....... management focus and increased resource allocation as well as increasing customer and competitor dynamics as external drivers. Despite the suggested positive impact of the degree of competitive pressure on sales innovation, the empirical results suggest a significant negative impact, i.e. competitive...

  18. Note: An improved solenoid driver valve for miniature shock tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, P T

    2016-05-01

    A solenoid driver valve has been built to improve the operating performance of diaphragmless shock tubes, which are used for high pressure, high temperature chemical kinetics, and fluid mechanics studies. For shock tube driver application, the most important characteristics are those of sealing, strength, and quality of the generated shock waves and repeatability of opening characteristics and therefore subsequent post-shock conditions. The main features of the new driver valve are a face o-ring sealing design of the valve, the large internal volume, and through inserts near the solenoid core: adjustable opening characteristics of the valve.

  19. Driver performance data acquisition system for ergonomics research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Engineering Physics and Mathematics Div.; Goodman, M.J. [National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Crash Avoidance Research

    1994-12-31

    A portable ergonomics data acquisition system consisting of state-of-the-art hardware being designed is described here. It will be employed to record driver, vehicle, and environment parameter data from a wide range of vehicles and trucks. The system will be unobtrusive to the driver and inconspicuous to the outside world. It will have three modes of data gathering and provide for extended periods of data collection. Modularity, flexibility, and cost will be key drivers in the development effort. The ergonomics data acquisition system project is being conducted in two phases--a feasibility study and a development, construction, and validation phase.

  20. Global drivers of future river flood risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsemius, Hessel C.; Aerts, Jeroen C. J. H.; van Beek, Ludovicus P. H.; Bierkens, Marc F. P.; Bouwman, Arno; Jongman, Brenden; Kwadijk, Jaap C. J.; Ligtvoet, Willem; Lucas, Paul L.; van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Ward, Philip J.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding global future river flood risk is a prerequisite for the quantification of climate change impacts and planning effective adaptation strategies. Existing global flood risk projections fail to integrate the combined dynamics of expected socio-economic development and climate change. We present the first global future river flood risk projections that separate the impacts of climate change and socio-economic development. The projections are based on an ensemble of climate model outputs, socio-economic scenarios, and a state-of-the-art hydrologic river flood model combined with socio-economic impact models. Globally, absolute damage may increase by up to a factor of 20 by the end of the century without action. Countries in Southeast Asia face a severe increase in flood risk. Although climate change contributes significantly to the increase in risk in Southeast Asia, we show that it is dwarfed by the effect of socio-economic growth, even after normalization for gross domestic product (GDP) growth. African countries face a strong increase in risk mainly due to socio-economic change. However, when normalized to GDP, climate change becomes by far the strongest driver. Both high- and low-income countries may benefit greatly from investing in adaptation measures, for which our analysis provides a basis.

  1. Driver head pose tracking with thermal camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bole, S.; Fournier, C.; Lavergne, C.; Druart, G.; Lépine, T.

    2016-09-01

    Head pose can be seen as a coarse estimation of gaze direction. In automotive industry, knowledge about gaze direction could optimize Human-Machine Interface (HMI) and Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS). Pose estimation systems are often based on camera when applications have to be contactless. In this paper, we explore uncooled thermal imagery (8-14μm) for its intrinsic night vision capabilities and for its invariance versus lighting variations. Two methods are implemented and compared, both are aided by a 3D model of the head. The 3D model, mapped with thermal texture, allows to synthesize a base of 2D projected models, differently oriented and labeled in yaw and pitch. The first method is based on keypoints. Keypoints of models are matched with those of the query image. These sets of matchings, aided with the 3D shape of the model, allow to estimate 3D pose. The second method is a global appearance approach. Among all 2D models of the base, algorithm searches the one which is the closest to the query image thanks to a weighted least squares difference.

  2. Euroscepticism Across Europe: Drivers and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica CONDRUZ-BĂCESCU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the issue of euroscepticism expansion across Europe. This phenomenon has steadily grown into one of the biggest challenges to the European construction, and has consequentially become a major concern to politicians, as well as regular citizens. This analysis uses data from Eurobarometer surveys regarding the decline of public trust in the European institutions. The findings suggest that some of the main drivers of eurosceptics stands include: disagreement with EU policies, economic challenges associated with the enlargement process, as well as the extent of national sovereignty within the EU. Thus, while European leaders develop policies to improve economic crisis, ordinary citizens are beginning to question the legitimacy of the EU, feeling they have been forced to accept things they did not want. This paper argues that the beliefs of the EU member states’ citizens confirm the fears of political actors. It seems extensive bureaucracy, and political failures seem to diminish the trust of the European citizens in the positive effects of further integration, and might support the opposite - disintegration.

  3. Greening of the Earth and its drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zaichun; Piao, Shilong; Myneni, Ranga B.; Huang, Mengtian; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Canadell, Josep G.; Ciais, Philippe; Sitch, Stephen; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Arneth, Almut; Cao, Chunxiang; Cheng, Lei; Kato, Etsushi; Koven, Charles; Li, Yue; Lian, Xu; Liu, Yongwen; Liu, Ronggao; Mao, Jiafu; Pan, Yaozhong; Peng, Shushi; Peñuelas, Josep; Poulter, Benjamin; Pugh, Thomas A. M.; Stocker, Benjamin D.; Viovy, Nicolas; Wang, Xuhui; Wang, Yingping; Xiao, Zhiqiang; Yang, Hui; Zaehle, Sönke; Zeng, Ning

    2016-08-01

    Global environmental change is rapidly altering the dynamics of terrestrial vegetation, with consequences for the functioning of the Earth system and provision of ecosystem services. Yet how global vegetation is responding to the changing environment is not well established. Here we use three long-term satellite leaf area index (LAI) records and ten global ecosystem models to investigate four key drivers of LAI trends during 1982-2009. We show a persistent and widespread increase of growing season integrated LAI (greening) over 25% to 50% of the global vegetated area, whereas less than 4% of the globe shows decreasing LAI (browning). Factorial simulations with multiple global ecosystem models suggest that CO2 fertilization effects explain 70% of the observed greening trend, followed by nitrogen deposition (9%), climate change (8%) and land cover change (LCC) (4%). CO2 fertilization effects explain most of the greening trends in the tropics, whereas climate change resulted in greening of the high latitudes and the Tibetan Plateau. LCC contributed most to the regional greening observed in southeast China and the eastern United States. The regional effects of unexplained factors suggest that the next generation of ecosystem models will need to explore the impacts of forest demography, differences in regional management intensities for cropland and pastures, and other emerging productivity constraints such as phosphorus availability.

  4. Computer vision for driver assistance systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handmann, Uwe; Kalinke, Thomas; Tzomakas, Christos; Werner, Martin; von Seelen, Werner

    1998-07-01

    Systems for automated image analysis are useful for a variety of tasks and their importance is still increasing due to technological advances and an increase of social acceptance. Especially in the field of driver assistance systems the progress in science has reached a level of high performance. Fully or partly autonomously guided vehicles, particularly for road-based traffic, pose high demands on the development of reliable algorithms due to the conditions imposed by natural environments. At the Institut fur Neuroinformatik, methods for analyzing driving relevant scenes by computer vision are developed in cooperation with several partners from the automobile industry. We introduce a system which extracts the important information from an image taken by a CCD camera installed at the rear view mirror in a car. The approach consists of a sequential and a parallel sensor and information processing. Three main tasks namely the initial segmentation (object detection), the object tracking and the object classification are realized by integration in the sequential branch and by fusion in the parallel branch. The main gain of this approach is given by the integrative coupling of different algorithms providing partly redundant information.

  5. Good Old Gamers, Good Drivers: Results from a correlational experiment among older drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchada Vichitvanichphong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In many situations, driving is essential for senior citizens to maintain their independent lifestyle. A systematic literature review was conducted that summarized the age-related physical, visual and cognitive functional declines and their associated risk to driving. Based on these findings, we explored whether the skills required in playing Xbox Kinect video games were correlated with measures of driving performance among older drivers. Fifty-two participants, 65 years of age or older (Mean = 72; SD = 3.84; range 65 – 85 years; 29 males who have access to a car and drive frequently were invited to play Just dance, Table Tennis (ping pong, Bowling, and Dr Kawashima’s Brain Training Exercises on an Xbox Kinect 360. Participants also completed a 25-minute on-road driving task along a predetermined route to assess and identify critical driving errors using a similar instrument as that used by a driving license tester. Bivariate correlation examined the relationship between game scores and these objective driving skills. There was a significant correlation between the Xbox Kinect video games and on-road driving scores (r = 0.861, p <0.001, indicating that ‘good gamers are good drivers’. This was correlation was significant for the males (r = 0.864, p <0.001 as well as for the females (r = 0.878, p <0.001. We suggest that performance on Xbox games may be a suitable, cost-effective and less-risky indicator of on-road driving skills for older drivers, particularly in jurisdictions in which mandatory testing of older citizens has been introduced or is being considered as a requirement in the driver licensing process.

  6. A quality improvement tool - driver diagram: a model of driver diagram to reduce primary caesarean section rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naima Fathima

    2016-05-01

    Results: Various quality improvement tools can be used in the clinical context. Among them, driver diagram is most widely used at the start of an improvement initiative. The driver diagram in this article shows its applicability in one of the clinical aspects of obstetrics, to reduce primary caesarean section rates. Conclusions: Driver diagram is an easy and a simple tool widely used in quality improvement activities. It is essential to use at the beginning of improvement initiatives. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(5.000: 1339-1342

  7. What the drivers do and do not tell you: using verbal protocol analysis to investigate driver behaviour in emergency situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Victoria A; Stanton, Neville A; Harvey, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Although task analysis of pedestrian detection can provide us with useful insights into how a driver may behave in emergency situations, the cognitive elements of driver decision-making are less well understood. To assist in the design of future Advanced Driver Assistance Systems, such as Autonomous Emergency Brake systems, it is essential that the cognitive elements of the driving task are better understood. This paper uses verbal protocol analysis in an exploratory fashion to uncover the thought processes underlying behavioural outcomes represented by hard data collected using the Southampton University Driving Simulator.

  8. 76 FR 37173 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... self- addressed, stamped envelope or postcard or print the acknowledgement page that appears after... immediate steps to revoke the exemption of a driver. Issued on: June 13, 2011. Larry W. Minor,...

  9. 77 FR 64582 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ..., please include a self- addressed, stamped envelope or postcard or print the acknowledgement page that... immediate steps to revoke the exemption of a driver. Issued on: October 9, 2012. Larry W. Minor,...

  10. 76 FR 37168 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... self- addressed, stamped envelope or postcard or print the acknowledgement page that appears after... immediate steps to revoke the exemption of a driver. Issued on: June 13, 2011. Larry W. Minor,...

  11. Cognitive screening of older drivers does not produce safety benefits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siren, Anu Kristiina; Meng, Annette

    2012-01-01

    in the number of older drivers involved in fatal accidents before and after the implementation of the screening process, indicating that the screening had no effect on the safety of older drivers. Second, there was a significant increase in the number of unprotected older (but not younger) road users who were....... Previous research on age-based mandatory screening of older drivers has not been able to demonstrate any safety benefits from screening measures.The present study is a population-based evaluation of the safety effects that the introduction of the cognitive test as an age-based screening tool has had...... killed between the two periods of observation, suggesting that the screening process produced a modal shift among older persons from driving to unprotected, significantly less safe modes of transportation. As a consequence, the number of fatalities in this group increased.Older driver screening...

  12. 75 FR 13647 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-22

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes... exemptions from the diabetes standard; request for comments. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces receipt of applications from 53 individuals for exemptions from the prohibition against persons with insulin- treated...

  13. 75 FR 1449 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-11

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes... with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) from operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in... . Background On October 29, 2009, FMCSA published a notice of receipt of Federal diabetes...

  14. 75 FR 14652 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes... exemptions from the diabetes standard; request for comments. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces receipt of applications from 27 individuals for exemptions from the prohibition against persons with insulin- treated...

  15. Evaluation of the Benefits of Reflectorized Sign Posts to Drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdinç Öner

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In United States Federal Highway Administration (FHWA provides departments of transportation (DOTs the option of using retroreflective material on sign posts when the DOTs determine that there is a need to draw attention to the sign, especially at night. The State of Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT required all Stop, Yield, Do Not Enter, and Wrong Way sign posts to be reflectorized with RED reflective sheeting material and all Chevron, Stop Ahead, and One/Two Large Directional Arrow sign posts to be reflectorized with YELLOW (sign background color reflective sheeting material as part of ODOT Comprehensive Highway Safety Plan and FHWA' recommendations.In this study, a photometric analysis and a human factors analysis were conducted to estimate the benefits of reflectorized sign posts to driver visual perception, driver guidance and driver comprehension. The study showed that the reflectorized sign posts improve detection, recognition, and comprehension of traffic signs for drivers, especially in nighttime driving conditions.

  16. Psychoactive substances in seriously injured drivers in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese; Steentoft, Anni; Bernhoft, Inger Marie

    2013-01-01

    found to be above the Danish legal limit in 4.9% of injured drivers. Young men (median age 31 years) were over-represented among injured drivers who violated Danish law for alcohol and drugs. Diazepam (4.4%), tramadol (3.2%), and clonazepam (3.0%) were the medicinal drugs most frequently detected......This study assesses the presence of a number of psychoactive substances, including alcohol, based on blood samples from 840 seriously injured drivers admitted to five selected hospitals located in five different regions of Denmark. The study was a part of the EU 6th framework program DRUID (Driving...... Under the Influence of Drugs, Alcohol and Medicines). Blood samples were screened for 30 illegal and legal psychoactive substances and metabolites as well as ethanol. Danish legal limits were used to evaluate the frequency of drivers violating the Danish legislation while limit of quantification (LOQ...

  17. Modeling drivers' passing duration and distance in a virtual environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haneen Farah

    2013-07-01

    The main contribution of this paper is in the empirical models developed for passing duration and distance which highlights the factors that affect drivers' passing behavior and can be used to enhance the passing models in simulation programs.

  18. Young drivers and effects from graduated driving license

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønning, Charlotte; Agerholm, Niels

    2016-01-01

    and Taylor Francis Online screened for articles of relevance. The search words will be ‘graduated driver license’, ‘evaluation’, and ‘experience’. In addition, will grey literature from IRTAD and the UN be included in the review. The results will to the highest possible extent be organised and compared...... in the search for clear, explicit effects from specific approaches or a combination of those. Results obtained or expected It is expected that clear evidence on positive effect from advanced driver training can be documented. Also, it is expected that the length of the driver training scheme and the connecting...... with safety effect can clarified. It is, however less likely that nor the type of advanced driver training, the risk of getting punished if violate the rules or the type of training can be documented to have a clear effect on the safety....

  19. Temperature-compensated 8-bit column driver for AMLCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingwall, Andrew G. F.; Lin, Mark L.

    1995-06-01

    An all-digital, 5 V input, 50 Mhz bandwidth, 10-bit resolution, 128- column, AMLCD column driver IC has been designed and tested. The 10-bit design can enhance display definition over 6-bit nd 8-bit column drivers. Precision is realized with on-chip, switched-capacitor DACs plus transparently auto-offset-calibrated, opamp outputs. Increased resolution permits multiple 10-bit digital gamma remappings in EPROMs over temperature. Driver IC features include externally programmable number of output column, bi-directional digital data shifting, user- defined row/column/pixel/frame inversion, power management, timing control for daisy-chained column drivers, and digital bit inversion. The architecture uses fewer reference power supplies.

  20. Analyzing the drivers of green manufacturing with fuzzy approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Govindan, Kannan; Diabat, Ali; Madan Shankar, K.

    2015-01-01

    Green issues have gained more importance in contemporary globalization. Recent years have seen manufacturing processes understand the green issues due to the social and environmental concerns involved. The drivers of green manufacturing, however, have not been thoroughly investigated. Thus...

  1. Analysis of drivers' characteristics in car-following theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Geng; Sun, Di-Hua; Liu, Hui; Zhao, Min

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, the influence of drivers' behaviors on traffic flow has attracted considerable attention according to Transportation Cyber Physical Systems. In this paper, an extended car-following model is presented by considering drivers' timid or aggressive characteristics. The impact of drivers' timid or aggressive characteristics on the stability of traffic flow has been analyzed through linear stability theory and nonlinear reductive perturbation method. Numerical simulation shows that the propagating behavior of traffic density waves near the critical point can be described by the kink-antikink soliton of the mKdV equation. The good agreement between the numerical simulation and the analytical results shows that drivers' characteristics play an important role in traffic jamming transition.

  2. 77 FR 539 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-05

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision... for exemption from the vision requirement in the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations. If granted...) in interstate commerce without meeting the Federal vision requirement. DATES: Comments must...

  3. 77 FR 541 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-05

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision.... SUMMARY: FMCSA announces its decision to exempt seven individuals from the vision requirement in the... commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce without meeting the prescribed vision...

  4. A New Roadway Danger: Drivers Chasing 'Pokemon Go'

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/news/fullstory_161005.html A New Roadway Danger: Drivers Chasing 'Pokemon Go' At least 14 crashes ... it remains imperative for people to understand the dangers of driving with that level of distraction. "This ...

  5. Drivers' perception of vulnerable road users: a hazard perception approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowsky, Avinoam; Oron-Gilad, Tal; Meir, Anat; Parmet, Yisrael

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined how experienced and young-inexperienced drivers (either trained in hazard perception or not) respond to and identify pedestrians when they appear in residential roads within populated neighborhoods and in urban roads located outside neighborhoods and usually less populated. As part of a hazard perception test, participants were connected to an eye tracking system and were asked to observe 58 traffic scene movies and press a response button each time they detected a hazardous situation. Analyzing all pedestrian-related events revealed that, regardless of driving experience or training, drivers detect pedestrians less often when they appear in urban areas and more often when they appear in residential areas. Moreover, experienced drivers processed information more efficiently than young-inexperienced drivers (both trained and untrained) when pedestrians were identified. Visual search patterns in urban and residential traffic environments are discussed.

  6. 78 FR 797 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-04

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision...; request for comments. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces its decision to renew the exemptions from the vision... to exempt individuals from the vision requirement if the exemptions granted will not...

  7. Stress prevention in bus drivers: Evaluation of 13 natural experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kompier, M.A.J.; Aust, B.; Berg, A.M. van den; Siegrist, J.

    2000-01-01

    The research aim was to select, compare, and analyze interventions and preventive actions from international bus companies to decrease bus drivers' occupational stress and sickness absenteeism. Through networking, international surveys, and literature study, 13 "natural experiments" were identified

  8. 77 FR 64841 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ... recognize the colors of traffic signals and devices showing requirement red, green, and amber (49 CFR 391.41... more compact. These conditions tax visual capacity and driver response just as intensely as...

  9. 77 FR 17117 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-23

    ... recognize the colors of traffic signals and devices showing requirement red, green, and amber (49 CFR 391.41... conditions tax visual capacity and driver response just as intensely as interstate driving conditions....

  10. 78 FR 37274 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    ... devices showing requirement red, green, and amber (49 CFR 391.41(b)(10)). FMCSA recognizes that some... distances between them are more compact. These conditions tax visual capacity and driver response just...

  11. 76 FR 2190 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... recognize the colors of traffic signals and devices showing standard red, green, and amber (49 CFR 391.41(b... because distances between them are more compact. These conditions tax visual capacity and driver...

  12. 75 FR 63255 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ... recognize the colors of traffic signals and devices showing standard red, green, and amber (49 CFR 391.41(b... because distances between them are more compact. These conditions tax visual capacity and driver...

  13. 76 FR 67246 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... recognize the colors of traffic signals and devices showing standard red, green, and amber (49 CFR 391.41(b... them are more compact. These conditions tax visual capacity and driver response just as intensely...

  14. 77 FR 3547 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... ability to recognize the colors of traffic signals and devices showing requirement red, green, and amber... more compact. These conditions tax visual capacity and driver response just as intensely as...

  15. 78 FR 76395 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-17

    ... signals and devices showing requirement red, green, and amber (49 CFR 391.41(b)(10)). FMCSA recognizes... conditions tax visual capacity and driver response just as intensely as interstate driving conditions....

  16. Advanced driver assistance systems: behavioural implications of some recent developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Heijden, R.E.C.M.; Marchau, V.A.W.J.

    2005-01-01

    The application of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS), in particular Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS), is expected to improve the performance of road transportation significantly. Public policy makers, among others, are therefore increasingly interested in the implementation of these

  17. Modes of interactions between environmental drivers and marine biota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip eBoyd

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The responses of marine biota to global ocean change is characterised by multiple environmental drivers that interact to cause non-linear changes in organismal performance. Characterising interactions is critical for us to predict whether multiple drivers will accelerate or mitigate future biological responses. There is now a large body of evidence that drivers do not act independently, a common null model, but rather have synergistic or antagonistic effects on organisms. We review the literature on interactions among environmental drivers such as ocean acidification and warming, and identify three common modes of interaction: physicochemical interactions in the seawater media outside organisms, interactions that operate on organisms directly, for example by altering physiological rates; and interactions that occur through changes in ecosystems, like predation. Interactions can also occur across these levels increasing the number of permutations for interaction, and point to a diverse range of modes of interplay. Identifying the appropriate mode will help generalise interaction types to unstudied contexts.

  18. 78 FR 1927 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes... exemption from the diabetes mellitus requirement; request for comments. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces receipt of... diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce. If granted,...

  19. 78 FR 1923 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes... exemption from the diabetes mellitus requirement; request for comments. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces receipt of... diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce. If granted,...

  20. 78 FR 1926 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes... with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) from operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in... notice of receipt of Federal diabetes exemption applications from 12 individuals and requested...

  1. Tennis playing is related to psychomotor speed in older drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmeleira, José; Melo, Filipe; Tlemcani, Mouhaydine; Fernandes, Jorge

    2013-10-01

    The study investigated the association of tennis playing and running with the psychomotor speed of older drivers. Thirty-six active male drivers (M age = 63.2 yr.) participated. A battery of four on-the road driving tests was performed by tennis players, runners, and a control group. Measures of simple and choice reaction time, movement time, and response time were collected under single- and dual-task conditions. A composite driving score was calculated from reaction time measures of all driving tasks to reflect a general drivers' psychomotor speed. Statistically significant differences between groups were found in a braking task; tennis players performed significantly better than controls in simple reaction time and response time. The composite driving score also differed between groups, and tennis players had better results than controls. Regular participation in tennis was related to psychomotor speed of older drivers.

  2. 77 FR 59447 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-27

    ... [Docket No. FMCSA-2012-0281] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY... from the diabetes mellitus requirement; request for comments. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces receipt of... diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce. If granted,...

  3. 78 FR 79062 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... exemption from the diabetes mellitus requirement; request for comments. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces receipt of... diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce. If granted, the... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications;...

  4. 78 FR 50486 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... for exemption from the diabetes mellitus requirement; request for comments. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces... insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications;...

  5. 78 FR 20381 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ... exemption from the diabetes mellitus requirement; request for comments. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces receipt of... diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce. If granted, the... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications;...

  6. 78 FR 26419 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-06

    ... exemption from the diabetes mellitus requirement; request for comments. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces receipt of... diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce. If granted, the... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications;...

  7. 76 FR 21792 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... for exemption from the diabetes mellitus standard; request for comments. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces... insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications;...

  8. 77 FR 3549 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... [Docket No. FMCSA-2011-0368] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY... from the diabetes mellitus requirement; request for comments. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces receipt of... diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce. If granted,...

  9. 75 FR 69734 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ... [Docket No. FMCSA-2010-0355] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY... from the diabetes mellitus standard; request for comments. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces receipt of... diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce. If granted,...

  10. 78 FR 24795 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    ... for exemption from the diabetes mellitus requirement; request for comments. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces... insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications;...

  11. 75 FR 34206 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-16

    ... exemption from the diabetes mellitus standard; request for comments. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces receipt of... diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce. If granted, the... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications;...

  12. 75 FR 63536 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... exemption from the diabetes mellitus standard; request for comments. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces receipt of... diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce. If granted, the... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications;...

  13. 78 FR 56988 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-16

    ... exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). ACTION: Notice of applications...

  14. 78 FR 64267 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... individuals for exemptions from the prohibition against persons with insulin- treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM... diabetes mellitus, and be consistent with the criteria described in section 4018 of the Transportation... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications;...

  15. 77 FR 74271 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... exemption from the diabetes mellitus requirement; request for comments. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces receipt of... diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce. If granted, the... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications;...

  16. 77 FR 27842 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... exemption from the prohibition against persons with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). ACTION: Notice of applications...

  17. 76 FR 17475 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    ... for exemption from the diabetes mellitus standard; request for comments. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces... insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce... for individual assessment of drivers with diabetes mellitus, and be consistent with the...

  18. 77 FR 18302 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    ... for exemption from the diabetes mellitus requirement; request for comments. SUMMARY: FMCSA announces... insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM) operating commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce... for individual assessment of drivers with diabetes mellitus, and be consistent with the...

  19. 78 FR 77780 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ...-CDLs to operate CMVs. Before issuing CDLs, States subject drivers to knowledge and skills tests...), Edgar G. Baxter (FL), Jason W. Bowers (OR), Scott Brady (FL), Ronald A. Cleaver, Jr. (SC), Eric V....

  20. 75 FR 60862 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Renewals; Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-0174] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Renewals; Vision AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety... decision to renew the exemptions from the vision requirement in the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations for 18 individuals. FMCSA has statutory authority to exempt individuals from the...

  1. 76 FR 1499 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-10

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision.... SUMMARY: FMCSA announces its decision to exempt 15 individuals from the vision requirement in the Federal... commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce without meeting the prescribed vision standard....

  2. Anticipating the Environmental Impacts and Behavioral Drivers of Deep Decarbonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is seeking regular and early career applications proposing research that will contribute to an improved ability to understand and anticipate the public health and environmental impacts and behavioral drivers of significant changes in energy consumption

  3. Stability Analysis of Transportation Networks with Multiscale Driver Decisions

    CERN Document Server

    Como, Giacomo; Acemoglu, Daron; Dahleh, Munther A; Frazzoli, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    Stability of Wardrop equilibria is analyzed for dynamical transportation networks in which the drivers' route choices are influenced by information at multiple temporal and spatial scales. The considered model involves a continuum of indistinguishable drivers commuting between a common origin/destination pair in an acyclic transportation network. The drivers' route choices are affected by their, relatively infrequent, perturbed best responses to global information about the current network congestion levels, as well as their instantaneous local observation of the immediate surroundings as they transit through the network. A novel model is proposed for the drivers' route choice behavior, exhibiting local consistency with their preference toward globally less congested paths as well as myopic decisions in favor of locally less congested paths. The simultaneous evolution of the traffic congestion on the network and of the aggregate path preference is modeled by a system of coupled ordinary differential equations...

  4. 78 FR 47818 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... FR 3316). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Elaine M. Papp, Chief, Medical Programs Division, (202... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision... exemption from the vision requirement in the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations. They are unable...

  5. DRIVER: Building a Sustainable Infrastructure of European Scientific Repositories

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The acronym DRIVER stands for “Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research”. Ten partners from eight countries have entered into an international partnership, to connect and network as a first step more than 50 physically distributed institutional repositories to one, large-scale, virtual Knowledge Base of European research. Universities and research organisations around the world currently build repositories, whose overall number is estimated to exceed 600 by far. As the academic information landscape is already highly fragmented, DRIVER is the trans-national catalyst to overcome local, isolated efforts and to stop fragmentation by offering one harmonised, virtual knowledge resource. DRIVER currently builds a production quality test-bed to assist the development of a knowledge infrastructure across Europe. DRIVER as a project, funded by the “Research Infrastructure” unit of the European Commission, is also preparing for the future expansion and upgrade of the Digital Repository in...

  6. Application of trans-theoretical model of behavior in ambulation training of stroke hemiplegic patients%行为转变理论在脑卒中偏瘫患者步行训练中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艳; 陈剑苹; 蒋辛

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of trans-theoretical model of behavior on ambulation training in stroke hemiplegic patients. Methods Sixty hospitalized stroke hemiplegic patients from June to December 2013 were selected as control group. The control group was treated with routine nursing and ambulation training guidance. Sixty-two hospitalized stroke hemiplegia patients, from January 2014 to June 2014, were selected as intervention group. Patients in the intervention group received trans-theoretical model of behavior together with ambulation training guidance for 3 weeks and follow-up record for 6 months. Holden functional ambulation categories ( FAC ) and Bathel index were used to evaluate the effect of ambulation training . Result Trans-theoretical model of behavior training improved the walking function and activities of daily living in intervention group patients , compared with those of the control group. Conclusions Taking trans-theoretical model of behavior in walking training health education can improve the ambulation ability and ability of daily living of stroke hemiplegic patients. Therefore this theory can enhance the stroke hemiplegic patients′life quality.%目的:探讨行为转变理论在脑卒中偏瘫患者步行训练中的应用效果。方法将2013年6~12月在本院住院60例脑卒中偏瘫患者设为对照组,实施常规的护理及步行训练指导;将2014年1~6月在本院住院62例脑卒中偏瘫患者设为干预组,将行为转变理论应用于患者步行训练健康教育中,干预时间3周,随访时间6个月。采用Holden步行功能分级(functional ambulation categories, FAC)和Bathel指数对患者进行测评。结果训练后两组患者FAC测评结果和Bathel得分比较,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05),干预组患者步行功能和日常活动能力均优于对照组。结论将行为转变理论应用于脑卒中偏瘫患者步行训练健康教育中,可提高患者步行能

  7. Look-ahead driver feedback and powertrain management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Rajeev [Eaton Corporation, Menomonee Falls, WI (United States)

    2014-12-31

    Commercial medium and heavy vehicles, though only a small portion of total vehicle population, play a significant role in energy consumption. In 2012, these vehicles accounted for about 5775.5 trillion btu of energy consumption and 408.8 million tons of CO2 emissions annually, which is a quarter of the total energy burden of highway transportation in the United States [1]. This number is expected to surpass passenger car fuel use within the next few decades. In the meantime, most commercial vehicle fleets are running at a very low profit margin. It is a well known fact that fuel economy can vary significantly between drivers, even when they operate the same vehicle on the same route. According to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Natural Resource Canada (NRCan), there is up to 35% fuel economy difference between drivers within the same commercial fleet [2] [3], [4]. Similar results were obtained from a Field Operation Test conducted by Eaton Corporation [5]. During this test as much as 30% fuel economy difference was observed among pick-up-and-delivery drivers and 11% difference was observed among line-haul drivers. The driver variability can be attributed to the fact that different drivers react differently to driving conditions such as road grade, traffic, speed limits, etc. For instance, analysis of over 600k miles of naturalistic heavy duty truck driving data [5] indicates that an experienced driver anticipates a downhill and eases up on the throttle to save fuel while an inexperienced driver lacks this judgment.

  8. Guiding Teen Drivers (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-10-20

    Motor-vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death among teens. Parents have a big influence on young drivers and can help them reduce their risk for being involved in a crash. In this podcast, Amy Jewett discusses what parents can do to help keep young drivers safer on the road.  Created: 10/20/2016 by MMWR.   Date Released: 10/20/2016.

  9. Support Vector Machine for Behavior-Based Driver Identification System

    OpenAIRE

    Huihuan Qian; Yongsheng Ou; Xinyu Wu; Xiaoning Meng; Yangsheng Xu

    2010-01-01

    We present an intelligent driver identification system to handle vehicle theft based on modeling dynamic human behaviors. We propose to recognize illegitimate drivers through their driving behaviors. Since human driving behaviors belong to a dynamic biometrical feature which is complex and difficult to imitate compared with static features such as passwords and fingerprints, we find that this novel idea of utilizing human dynamic features for enhanced security applicat...

  10. Arbitrary waveform generator to improve laser diode driver performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulkerson, Jr, Edward Steven

    2015-11-03

    An arbitrary waveform generator modifies the input signal to a laser diode driver circuit in order to reduce the overshoot/undershoot and provide a "flat-top" signal to the laser diode driver circuit. The input signal is modified based on the original received signal and the feedback from the laser diode by measuring the actual current flowing in the laser diode after the original signal is applied to the laser diode.

  11. An integrated systems model for heavy ion drivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bangerter, R O; Faltens, A; Meier, W R

    1998-09-02

    A source-to-target computer model for an induction linac driver for heavy ion fusion has been developed and used to define a reference case driver that meets the requirements of one current target design. Key features of the model are discussed, and the design parameters of the reference case design are described. Examples of the systems analyses leading to the point design are given, and directions for future work are noted.

  12. Peer pressure and risk taking in young drivers' speeding behavior

    OpenAIRE

    GHEORGHIU, Alexandra; DELHOMME, Patricia; FELONNEAU, Marie Line

    2015-01-01

    Although many countermeasures have been implemented in Europe, young drivers continue to have a high rate of involvement in car crashes. Their crash rate is higher in presence of peer passengers than when driving alone. Peer presence could contribute toward explaining this involvement, especially regarding speeding. Peers are known to often influence young drivers' risky behaviors through proximal (direct and indirect active pressures) and distal (passive pressure) forms of int...

  13. Musculoskeletal Symptoms among Drivers of All-Terrain Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    REHN, B.; BERGDAHL, I. A.; AHLGREN, C.; FROM, C.; JÄRVHOLM, B.; LUNDSTRÖM, R.; NILSSON, T.; SUNDELIN, G.

    2002-05-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to characterize the risk of experiencing musculoskeletal symptoms in the region of the neck, shoulders and upper and lower back for professional drivers of various categories of all-terrain vehicles and to assess the association between symptoms and duration of exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV) and shock from driving all-terrain vehicles. The study group consisted of 215 drivers of forest machines, 137 drivers of snowmobiles and 79 drivers of snowgroomers and a control group of 167 men randomly selected from the general population. The subjects were all from one of the four most northern counties in Sweden and they were all men. Musculoskeletal symptoms were assessed by use of a standardized questionnaire. In addition, the questionnaire held items about the driving time with all-terrain vehicles and a subjective estimation of exposure to unpleasant movements (shock, jolt, irregular sway). The job strain was measured according to Karasek's demands/control model. The prevalence ratios were adjusted for age, smoking and job strain. Among drivers, significantly increased prevalence ratios within the range of 1∂5-2·9 were revealed for symptoms from the neck-shoulder and thoracic regions during the previous year. None of the driver categories had a statistically significantly increased risk of low back pain. Forest vehicles were those most reported to cause unpleasant movements. In conclusion, drivers of all-terrain vehicles exhibit an increased risk of symptoms of musculoskeletal disorders in the neck-shoulder and thoracic regions. The increased risk is suggested to be related to physical factors such as exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV) and shock, static overload or extreme body postures. However, since symptoms of low back pain were not significantly increased, it appears that factors other than WBV would explain the occurrence of symptoms in the group of all-terrain drivers.

  14. Drivers of the international expansion of emerging-market multinationals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Boșcor

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present paper is to analyze the drivers of the international expansion of emerging market multinationals and the strategies applied by these companies in other emerging and developed markets. The paper applies a conceptual approach combined with analyses of statistics and secondary material and presents the company and the country specific advantages. The proposals for the Romanian companies and institutions are based on the comparison between the drivers of expansion in the BRIC countries.

  15. Identifying Cancer Driver Genes Using Replication-Incompetent Retroviral Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M. Bii

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Identifying novel genes that drive tumor metastasis and drug resistance has significant potential to improve patient outcomes. High-throughput sequencing approaches have identified cancer genes, but distinguishing driver genes from passengers remains challenging. Insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have emerged as a powerful tool to identify cancer genes. Unlike replicating retroviruses and transposons, replication-incompetent retroviral vectors lack additional mutagenesis events that can complicate the identification of driver mutations from passenger mutations. They can also be used for almost any human cancer due to the broad tropism of the vectors. Replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have the ability to dysregulate nearby cancer genes via several mechanisms including enhancer-mediated activation of gene promoters. The integrated provirus acts as a unique molecular tag for nearby candidate driver genes which can be rapidly identified using well established methods that utilize next generation sequencing and bioinformatics programs. Recently, retroviral vector screens have been used to efficiently identify candidate driver genes in prostate, breast, liver and pancreatic cancers. Validated driver genes can be potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers. In this review, we describe the emergence of retroviral insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors as a novel tool to identify cancer driver genes in different cancer types.

  16. [The dynamics of physical work capacity among ageing truck drivers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurtsilava, O G; Bashkireva, A S; Khavinson, V Kh

    2013-01-01

    The studies of biological age, ageing rate, physical work capacity in professional lorry drivers were conducted. The examination revealed peculiarities of system organization of functions, which determine the physical work capacity levels. Dynamics of the ageing process of professional driver's organism in relation with calendar age and driving experience were shown using the biological age on physical work capacity model. The results point at the premature decrease of the physical work capacity in professional drivers. There was revealed premature contraction of the range of cardio-vascular system adaptive reactions on submaximum physical load in the drivers as compared with control group. It was proved, that premature age-related changes of physiologic indices in drivers are just "risk indicators", while long driving experience is a real risk factor, accelerating the ageing process. The "risk group" with manifestations of accelerating ageing was observed in 40-49-year old drivers with 15-19 years of professional experience. There was demonstrated the expediency of using the following methods for the age rate estimation according to biologic age indices and necessity of prophylactic measures for premature and accelerated ageing prevention among working population.

  17. Driver's workload comparison in waste collection vehicle routing problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Aida Mauziah; Abdul-Rahman, Syariza

    2016-10-01

    This paper compares the workload of the drivers for a waste collection benchmark problem. The problem involves ten data sets with different number of customers to be served and different number of disposal facilities available. Previous studies proposed a heuristic algorithm, namely Different Initial Customer (DIC) to solve the problem by constructing initial vehicles routes for the drivers with two main objectives; to minimize the total distance travelled and to minimize the total number of vehicles needed to collect the waste. The results from DIC compared well with other solutions in the literature. However, the balance of the workload among the vehicle drivers is not considered in the solutions. Thus in this paper, we evaluate the quality of the solutions in terms of the total number of customers served by each driver. Then the computational result is compared in terms of the total distance travelled which have been presented in a previous study. Comparison results show that the workload of the drivers are unbalance in terms of these two factors that may cause dissatisfaction among the drivers as well as to the managament.

  18. Dependence of loudness evaluation by drivers on vehicle styling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Junji; Igata, Takumi

    2012-12-01

    Influence of participants' impressions of vehicle styling on loudness of acceleration sounds was investigated. A series of images of luxury and sporty vehicles were presented to the participants while acceleration sounds were being replayed. The results indicated that frequent drivers perceived that the sound associated with luxury vehicles was louder than that associated with sporty vehicles. On the other hand, infrequent drivers perceived almost no difference between the loudness of the two vehicle types. Then, the infrequent drivers underwent a pseudo-loudness evaluation test to increase amount of experience for listening vehicle sound with vehicle styling image. After the procedure, the influence of vehicle styling on loudness was investigated again for the infrequent drivers. The result showed that the influence for the infrequent drivers was quite different from that for the frequent drivers. The participants who rarely drove perceived that the sound associated with luxury vehicles was softer than that associated with sporty vehicles. Furthermore, a questionnaire was filled out by both groups to investigate their preferred vehicle characteristics such as exterior design and engine performance. As a result, loudness was clarified to depend on both the participants' impressions of vehicle styling and their preferred vehicle characteristics.

  19. A Driver Face Monitoring System for Fatigue and Distraction Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad-Hoseyn Sigari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Driver face monitoring system is a real-time system that can detect driver fatigue and distraction using machine vision approaches. In this paper, a new approach is introduced for driver hypovigilance (fatigue and distraction detection based on the symptoms related to face and eye regions. In this method, face template matching and horizontal projection of top-half segment of face image are used to extract hypovigilance symptoms from face and eye, respectively. Head rotation is a symptom to detect distraction that is extracted from face region. The extracted symptoms from eye region are (1 percentage of eye closure, (2 eyelid distance changes with respect to the normal eyelid distance, and (3 eye closure rate. The first and second symptoms related to eye region are used for fatigue detection; the last one is used for distraction detection. In the proposed system, a fuzzy expert system combines the symptoms to estimate level of driver hypo-vigilance. There are three main contributions in the introduced method: (1 simple and efficient head rotation detection based on face template matching, (2 adaptive symptom extraction from eye region without explicit eye detection, and (3 normalizing and personalizing the extracted symptoms using a short training phase. These three contributions lead to develop an adaptive driver eye/face monitoring. Experiments show that the proposed system is relatively efficient for estimating the driver fatigue and distraction.

  20. Exploring Driver Injury Severity at Intersection: An Ordered Probit Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaping Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that intersections are the most hazardous locations; however, only little is known about driver injury severity in intersection crashes. Hence, the main goal of this study was to further examine the different factors contributing to driver injury severity involved in fatal crashes at intersections. Data used for the present analysis was from the US DOT-Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS crash database from the year 2011. An ordered probit model was employed to fit the fatal crash data and analyze the factors impacting each injury severity level. The analysis results displayed that driver injury severity is significantly affected by many factors. They include driver age and gender, driver ethnicity, vehicle type and age (years of use, crash type, driving drunk, speeding, violating stop sign, cognitively distracted driving, and seat belt usage. These findings from the current study are beneficial to form a solid basis for adopting corresponding measures to effectively drop injury severity suffering from intersection crash. More insights into the effects of risk factors on driver injury severity could be acquired using more advanced statistical models.

  1. Measurement invariance of the Driver Behavior Questionnaire across samples of young drivers from Finland and Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Markus; Fearghal, O'Brien; Lajunen, Timo; Gormley, Michael; Summala, Heikki

    2015-05-01

    This article investigates the factor structure of the 27-item Driver Behavior Questionnaire (DBQ) in two samples of young drivers (18-25 years of age); one from Finland and the other from Ireland. We compare the two-, three-, and four-factor solutions using Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) and show that the four-factor model (with the latent variables rule violations, aggressive violations, slips and lapses) fits the data from the two countries best. Next, we compare the fit of this model across samples by the means of a measurement invariance analysis in the CFA framework. The analysis shows that the four-factor model fails to fit both samples equally well. This is mainly because the socially-oriented latent variables (rule violations and aggressive violations) are different in nature in the two samples. The cognitively-oriented latent variables (slips and lapses) are, however, similar across countries and the mean values of slips can be compared using latent variable models. However, the common practice of calculating sum scores to represent the four latent DBQ variables and comparing them across subgroups of respondents is unfounded, at least when comparing young respondents from Finland and Ireland.

  2. Conceptual Drivers for an Exploration Medical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonsen, Erik; Hanson, Andrea; Shah, Ronak; Reed, Rebekah; Canga, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Interplanetary spaceflight, such as NASA's proposed three-year mission to Mars, provides unique and novel challenges when compared with human spaceflight to date. Extended distance and multi-year missions introduce new elements of operational complexity and additional risk. These elements include: inability to resupply medications and consumables, inability to evacuate injured or ill crew, uncharted psychosocial conditions, and communication delays that create a requirement for some level of autonomous medical capability. Because of these unique challenges, the approaches used in prior programs have limited application to a Mars mission. On a Mars mission, resource limitations will significantly constrain available medical capabilities, and require a paradigm shift in the approach to medical system design and risk mitigation for crew health. To respond to this need for a new paradigm, the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Element is assessing each Mars mission phase-transit, surface stay, rendezvous, extravehicular activity, and return-to identify and prioritize medical needs for the journey beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). ExMC is addressing both planned medical operations, and unplanned contingency medical operations that meld clinical needs and research needs into a single system. This assessment is being used to derive a gap analysis and studies to support meaningful medical capabilities trades. These trades, in turn, allow the exploration medical system design to proceed from both a mission centric and ethics-based approach, and to manage the risks associated with the medical limitations inherent in an exploration class mission. This paper outlines the conceptual drivers used to derive medical system and vehicle needs from an integrated vision of how medical care will be provided within this paradigm. Keywords: (Max 6 keywords: exploration, medicine, spaceflight, Mars, research, NASA)

  3. 77 FR 24764 - Visual-Manual NHTSA Driver Distraction Guidelines for In-Vehicle Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-25

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Visual-Manual NHTSA Driver Distraction Guidelines for In... vehicle safely and that are operated by the driver through visual-manual means (meaning ] the driver...--Simulator and Test Track Studies; Driver Eye Glance Behavior During Visual-Manual Secondary Task...

  4. Crash involvement during the different phases of the New Zealand Graduated Driver Licensing System (GDLS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewis Evans, B.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The New Zealand Graduated Driver Licensing System (GDLS) is designed to allow novice drivers to gain driving experience under conditions of reduced risk. Method: To examine the effectiveness of the GDLS, an analysis of how the crash involvement of novice drivers changes as drivers move

  5. 77 FR 11199 - Visual-Manual NHTSA Driver Distraction Guidelines for In-Vehicle Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    .... Identification of specific driver-activities and driver-behavior that serves as the distraction has presented... Visual-Manual NHTSA Driver Distraction Guidelines for In-Vehicle Electronic Devices; Notice #0;#0;Federal... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Visual-Manual NHTSA Driver Distraction Guidelines for...

  6. Age, gender, mileage and the DBQ: The validity of the Driver Behavior Questionnaire in different driver groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Laila Marianne; Hakamies-Blomqvist, Liisa; Møller, Mette

    2013-01-01

    The Driver Behavior Questionnaire (DBQ) is one of the most widely used instruments for measuring selfreported driving behaviors. Despite the popularity of the DBQ, the applicability of the DBQ in different driver groups has remained mostly unexamined. The present study measured aberrant driving...... behavior using the original DBQ (Reason, J.T., Manstead, A., Stradling, S.G., Baxter, J., Campbell, K., 1990. Errors and violations on the road – a real distinction. Ergonomics, 33 (10/11), 1315–1332) to test the factorial validity and reliability of the instrument across different subgroups of Danish...... drivers. The survey was conducted among 11,004 Danish driving license holders of whom 2250 male and 2190 female drivers completed the questionnaire containing background variables and the DBQ. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis showed that the original three-factor solution, a four...

  7. Robot-assisted gait training improves brachial–ankle pulse wave velocity and peak aerobic capacity in subacute stroke patients with totally dependent ambulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Eun Young; Im, Sang Hee; Kim, Bo Ryun; Seo, Min Ji; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Brachial–ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) evaluates arterial stiffness and also predicts early outcome in stroke patients. The objectives of this study were to investigate arterial stiffness of subacute nonfunctional ambulatory stroke patients and to compare the effects of robot-assisted gait therapy (RAGT) combined with rehabilitation therapy (RT) on arterial stiffness and functional recovery with those of RT alone. Method: The RAGT group (N = 30) received 30 minutes of robot-assisted gait therapy and 30 minutes of conventional RT, and the control group (N = 26) received 60 minutes of RT, 5 times a week for 4 weeks. baPWV was measured and calculated using an automated device. The patients also performed a symptom-limited graded exercise stress test using a bicycle ergometer, and parameters of cardiopulmonary fitness were recorded. Clinical outcome measures were categorized into 4 categories: activities of daily living, balance, ambulatory function, and paretic leg motor function and were evaluated before and after the 4-week intervention. Results: Both groups exhibited significant functional recovery in all clinical outcome measures after the 4-week intervention. However, peak aerobic capacity, peak heart rate, exercise tolerance test duration, and baPWV improved only in the RAGT group, and the improvements in baPWV and peak aerobic capacity were more noticeable in the RAGT group than in the control group. Conclusion: Robot-assisted gait therapy combined with conventional rehabilitation therapy represents an effective method for reversing arterial stiffness and improving peak aerobic capacity in subacute stroke patients with totally dependent ambulation. However, further large-scale studies with longer term follow-up periods are warranted to measure the effects of RAGT on secondary prevention after stroke. PMID:27741123

  8. An epidemiological study of low back pain in professional drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovenzi, Massimo; Rui, Francesca; Negro, Corrado; D'Agostin, Flavia; Angotzi, Giuliano; Bianchi, Sandra; Bramanti, Lucia; Festa, GianLuca; Gatti, Silvana; Pinto, Iole; Rondina, Livia; Stacchini, Nicola

    2006-12-01

    The prevalence of low back pain (LBP) was investigated in 598 Italian professional drivers exposed to whole-body vibration (WBV) and ergonomic risk factors (drivers of earth moving machines, fork-lift truck drivers, truck drivers, bus drivers). The control group consisted of a small sample of 30 fire inspectors not exposed to WBV. Personal, occupational and health histories were collected by means of a structured questionnaire. Vibration measurements were performed on representative samples of the machines and vehicles used by the driver groups. From the vibration magnitudes and exposure durations, alternative measures of vibration dose were estimated for each subject. Daily vibration exposure, expressed in terms of 8-h energy-equivalent frequency-weighted acceleration, A(8), averaged 0.28-0.61 (range 0.10-1.18) m s -2 rms in the driver groups. Duration of exposure to WBV ranged between 1 and 41 years. The 7-day and 12-month prevalence of LBP was greater in the driver groups than in the controls. In the professional drivers, the occurrence of 12-month LBP, high intensity of LBP (Von Korff pain scale score ⩾5), and LBP disability (Roland & Morris disability scale score ⩾12) significantly increased with increasing cumulative vibration exposure. Even though several alternative measures of vibration exposure were associated with LBP outcomes, nevertheless a more regular trend of association with LBP was found for vibration dose expressed as ∑ a vit i (m s -2 h), in which the frequency-weighted acceleration, a v, and lifetime exposure duration, t, were given equal weight. In multivariate data analysis, individual characteristics (e.g. age, body mass index) and a physical load index (derived from combining manual materials handling and awkward postures) were significantly associated with LBP outcomes, while psychosocial work factors (e.g. job decision, job support) showed a marginal relation to LBP. This study tends to confirm that professional driving in industry

  9. High-Voltage LED Light Engine with Integrated Driver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soer, Wouter [Lumileds LLC, San Jose, CA (United States)

    2016-02-29

    LED luminaires have seen dramatic changes in cost breakdown over the past few years. The LED component cost, which until recently was the dominant portion of luminaire cost, has fallen to a level of the same order as the other luminaire components, such as the driver, housing, optics etc. With the current state of the technology, further luminaire performance improvement and cost reduction is realized most effectively by optimization of the whole system, rather than a single component. This project focuses on improving the integration between LEDs and drivers. Lumileds has developed a light engine platform based on low-cost high-power LEDs and driver topologies optimized for integration with these LEDs on a single substrate. The integration of driver and LEDs enables an estimated luminaire cost reduction of about 25% for targeted applications, mostly due to significant reductions in driver and housing cost. The high-power LEDs are based on Lumileds’ patterned sapphire substrate flip-chip (PSS-FC) technology, affording reduced die fabrication and packaging cost compared to existing technology. Two general versions of PSS-FC die were developed in order to create the desired voltage and flux increments for driver integration: (i) small single-junction die (0.5 mm2), optimal for distributed lighting applications, and (ii) larger multi-junction die (2 mm2 and 4 mm2) for high-power directional applications. Two driver topologies were developed: a tapped linear driver topology and a single-stage switch-mode topology, taking advantage of the flexible voltage configurations of the new PSS-FC die and the simplification opportunities enabled by integration of LEDs and driver on the same board. A prototype light engine was developed for an outdoor “core module” application based on the multi-junction PSS-FC die and the single-stage switch-mode driver. The light engine meets the project efficacy target of 128 lm/W at a luminous flux greater than 4100 lm, a correlated

  10. High-Voltage LED Light Engine with Integrated Driver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soer, Wouter [Lumileds LLC, San Jose, CA (United States)

    2016-02-29

    LED luminaires have seen dramatic changes in cost breakdown over the past few years. The LED component cost, which until recently was the dominant portion of luminaire cost, has fallen to a level of the same order as the other luminaire components, such as the driver, housing, optics etc. With the current state of the technology, further luminaire performance improvement and cost reduction is realized most effectively by optimization of the whole system, rather than a single component. This project focuses on improving the integration between LEDs and drivers. Lumileds has developed a light engine platform based on low-cost high-power LEDs and driver topologies optimized for integration with these LEDs on a single substrate. The integration of driver and LEDs enables an estimated luminaire cost reduction of about 25% for targeted applications, mostly due to significant reductions in driver and housing cost. The high-power LEDs are based on Lumileds’ patterned sapphire substrate flip-chip (PSS-FC) technology, affording reduced die fabrication and packaging cost compared to existing technology. Two general versions of PSS-FC die were developed in order to create the desired voltage and flux increments for driver integration: (i) small single-junction die (0.5 mm2), optimal for distributed lighting applications, and (ii) larger multi-junction die (2 mm2 and 4 mm2) for high-power directional applications. Two driver topologies were developed: a tapped linear driver topology and a single-stage switch-mode topology, taking advantage of the flexible voltage configurations of the new PSS-FC die and the simplification opportunities enabled by integration of LEDs and driver on the same board. A prototype light engine was developed for an outdoor “core module” application based on the multi-junction PSS-FC die and the single-stage switch-mode driver. The light engine meets the project efficacy target of 128 lm/W at a luminous flux

  11. MODELING DRIVER BEHAVIOR IN THE DRIVING OF THEIR MOTOR VEHICLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Skrypnikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article holds the gradual formation of images and actions of the driver. As outlined the author's arguments based on the following assumptions: We consider the motion of the mass, mass-produced currently by the domestic industry of automobiles; considered the motion of single cars as the most common and most dangerous cases, allowing to evaluate the influence of parameters on the road driving mode "pure"; drivers tend to reduce travel times and therefore move with the maximum possible speed; drivers choose speed, visually estimating lying in front of part of the way and given the speed at the time of this evaluation; driver behavior, ceteris paribus determined the influence of visibility limitations and conditions visual perception; considered the motion on the ascent and descent, but the determining factor is the direction of descent. Set of operations, branches off the driver, can be represented as a multi-level system comprising three main groups of psycho-physiological processes, activities analyzers (perception of information; the work of the central nervous system (processing and storage; effective activity (responses to the implementation of the decision. On the basis of the received information in human consciousness formed images of the environment, the totality of which is an information model of the object. Comparing it with the standards (memory engrams, the driver generates the mo st appropriate in the circumstances set of actions. Implementation of the decision is the final stage of human response to the external environment and is expressed in the change of the degree of use of traction engine or braking force; change the steering angle as that does not affect the speed of motion, the algorithm of the driver is not taken into account. Analysis of the schemes of algorithms allows to obtain quantitative characteristics of the vehicle: stereotyped figures, logical complexity.

  12. [Ophthalmological experiences with automobile drivers with inadequate vision].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, H; Kröner, B; Dannheim, R

    1984-08-01

    A total of 369 ophthalmological practices were asked to report the number of patients seen within one test week who drove their cars but did not satisfy minimum legal requirements for diurnal visual acuity applicable for applicants for a West German Class 3 driver's license. There were 471 such patients. From this number it can be calculated that approximately 570 000 individuals (+/- 9%) drive cars in the Federal Republic of Germany with inadequate visual acuity. An analysis of the questionnaire produced the following results: Fifty percent of these patients are less than 62 years of age. The main cause of inadequate visual acuity is age. In younger drivers refractive errors were the prime cause and in most cases correction with glasses was possible. In older drivers the loss of acuity was mainly due to opacities of the lens which for the most part could not be corrected by spectacles. Two-thirds of the drivers with inadequate visual acuity consider their vision to be "sufficient" or "good" for driving; younger drivers are more self-critical than older ones. Only 31% of these drivers stopped driving at night of their own accord. As many as two-thirds of the drivers who consider their acuity to be "insufficient" drive their cars during darkness. The authors show that the findings in patients suffering from severe loss of visual acuity must in principle also be valid for patients with minor visual impairments who still meet the minimum legal requirements. This agrees well with published statistical investigations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. 20 CFR 404.1008 - Agent-driver or commission-driver, full-time life insurance salesman, home worker, or traveling...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... commission-driver, full-time life insurance salesman, home worker, or traveling or city salesman. (a) General... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Agent-driver or commission-driver, full-time life insurance salesman, home worker, or traveling or city salesman. 404.1008 Section...

  14. Evidence that implementation intentions reduce drivers' speeding behavior: testing a new intervention to change driver behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, Sarah E; Elliott, Mark A; Kelly, Steve W

    2015-01-01

    Implementation intentions have the potential to break unwanted habits and help individuals behave in line with their goal intentions. We tested the effects of implementation intentions in the context of drivers' speeding behavior. A randomized controlled design was used. Speeding behavior, goal intentions and theoretically derived motivational pre-cursors of goal intentions were measured at both baseline and follow-up (one month later) using self-report questionnaires. Immediately following the baseline questionnaire, the experimental (intervention) group (N=117) specified implementation intentions using a volitional help sheet, which required the participants to link critical situations in which they were tempted to speed with goal-directed responses to resist the temptation. The control group (N=126) instead received general information about the risks of speeding. In support of the hypotheses, the experimental group reported exceeding the speed limit significantly less often at follow-up than did the control group. This effect was specific to 'inclined abstainers' (i.e., participants who reported speeding more than they intended to at baseline and were therefore motivated to reduce their speeding) and could not be attributed to any changes in goal intentions to speed or any other measured motivational construct. Also in line with the hypotheses, implementation intentions attenuated the past-subsequent speeding behavior relationship and augmented the goal intention - subsequent speeding behavior relationship. The findings imply that implementation intentions are effective at reducing speeding and that they do so by weakening the effect of habit, thereby helping drivers to behave in accordance with their existing goal intentions. The volitional help sheet used in this study is an effective tool for promoting implementation intentions to reduce speeding.

  15. Analyzing Vehicle Fuel Saving Opportunities through Intelligent Driver Feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonder, J.; Earleywine, M.; Sparks, W.

    2012-06-01

    Driving style changes, e.g., improving driver efficiency and motivating driver behavior changes, could deliver significant petroleum savings. This project examines eliminating stop-and-go driving and unnecessary idling, and also adjusting acceleration rates and cruising speeds to ideal levels to quantify fuel savings. Such extreme adjustments can result in dramatic fuel savings of over 30%, but would in reality only be achievable through automated control of vehicles and traffic flow. In real-world driving, efficient driving behaviors could reduce fuel use by 20% on aggressively driven cycles and by 5-10% on more moderately driven trips. A literature survey was conducted of driver behavior influences, and pertinent factors from on-road experiments with different driving styles were observed. This effort highlighted important driver influences such as surrounding vehicle behavior, anxiety over trying to get somewhere quickly, and the power/torque available from the vehicle. Existing feedback approaches often deliver efficiency information and instruction. Three recommendations for maximizing fuel savings from potential drive cycle improvement are: (1) leveraging applications with enhanced incentives, (2) using an approach that is easy and widely deployable to motivate drivers, and (3) utilizing connected vehicle and automation technologies to achieve large and widespread efficiency improvements.

  16. Integrated Context-Aware Driver Assistance System Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhadi M. Shakshuki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, significant improvements have been made in the area of vehicular communication systems. Furthermore, vehicle-to-vehicle communication is considered a key concept for keeping roads safe. An efficient implementation of these systems is necessary to ensure the safety of driving situations and to reduce the collision rates. This paper proposes a Context-Aware Driver Assistance System that links drivers with the physical environment surrounding them using multiple types of sensors and traffic systems as well as considering the senior driver's difficulties and the system processing time. This is achieved by developing a warning system that assists drivers to avoid collisions and improve their response times. The proposed system architecture consists of a set of components to process the user's request such as parking assistance, and to provide responses and advices when needed. These components include communication, knowledge exchange, knowledge update, and context-history. Also, it includes other processes such as context-history manipulation, hazard detection, and hazard detection control. The main goal of the proposed system is to reduce the number of car accidents and improve driver's decisions. The NXT Robotic environment is used to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed system.

  17. Angry drivers: a test of state-trait theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deffenbacher, Jerry L; Richards, Tracy L; Filetti, Linda B; Lynch, Rebekah S

    2005-08-01

    Tested hypotheses from state-trait theory applied to anger while driving. College student drivers high in trait driving anger were compared to drivers low in trait driving anger. High anger drivers were more frequently angered in day-to-day driving (frequency hypothesis). They reported more intense anger in their most angering driving situations, when visualizing provocative driving events, and in day-to-day driving (intensity hypothesis). Driving diaries and surveys showed they engaged in more aggressive behavior and expressed their anger through more verbal, physical, and vehicular means (aggression hypothesis). They reported handling of their anger less well when visualizing provocative events and on the Adaptive/Constructive Expression scale (reduced adaptive expression hypothesis). They engaged in risky behavior (risky behavior hypothesis) and experienced more moving violations, close calls, and losses of concentration, but not more major or minor accidents (partial support for crash-related outcomes hypothesis). High anger drivers were more generally angry and impulsive and employed more negative, less controlled forms of general anger expression. Results supported state-trait theory and added to the literature showing that high anger drivers have some other psychological and behavioral characteristics that may interact negatively with anger behind the wheel.

  18. Neurological symptoms and syndromes in municipal transport drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Sińczuk-Walczak

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The way the municipal transport drivers perform their job contributes to varied burdens linked with the body posture at work, stress, shift work, vibration, noise and exposure to chemical agents. The aim of the study was to assess the condition of the nervous system (NS in municipal transport drivers. Material and Methods: The study covered 42 men, aged 43.4 years (standard deviation (SD: 8.3, employed as bus drivers in the municipal transport enterprise. The duration of employment was 11.8 years on average (SD: 8.6. The condition of the nervous system was assessed on the basis of clinical neurological examinations. Results: Chronic lumbosacral syndrome was found in 54.8% of the subjects. A significant relationship between the incidence of lumbosacral syndrome and the duration of employment (p = 0.032 was observed; significantly higher in drivers employed for 11–15 years (90.9% in comparison to the remaining groups. Nervous system functional disorders were niejedcharacterized by the increased emotional irritability (47.6%, sleep disorders manifested by excessive sleepiness (33.3% or insomnia (28.6% and headaches (3%, mostly tension headaches. Excessive daytime sleepiness was significantly age-dependent (p = 0.038. Conclusions: The evidenced NS disorders indicate the need to undertake preventive measures tailored for the occupational group of bus drivers. Med Pr 2015;66(3:333–341

  19. Drivers influencing streamflow changes in the Upper Turia basin, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmoral, Gloria; Willaarts, Bárbara A; Troch, Peter A; Garrido, Alberto

    2015-01-15

    Many rivers across the world have experienced a significant streamflow reduction over the last decades. Drivers of the observed streamflow changes are multiple, including climate change (CC), land use and land cover changes (LULCC), water transfers and river impoundment. Many of these drivers inter-act simultaneously, making it difficult to discern the impact of each driver individually. In this study we isolate the effects of LULCC on the observed streamflow reduction in the Upper Turia basin (east Spain) during the period 1973-2008. Regression models of annual streamflow are fitted with climatic variables and also additional time variant drivers like LULCC. The ecohydrological model SWAT is used to study the magnitude and sign of streamflow change when LULCC occurs. Our results show that LULCC does play a significant role on the water balance, but it is not the main driver underpinning the observed reduction on Turia's streamflow. Increasing mean temperature is the main factor supporting increasing evapotranspiration and streamflow reduction. In fact, LULCC and CC have had an offsetting effect on the streamflow generation during the study period. While streamflow has been negatively affected by increasing temperature, ongoing LULCC have positively compensated with reduced evapotranspiration rates, thanks to mainly shrubland clearing and forest degradation processes. These findings are valuable for the management of the Turia river basin, as well as a useful approach for the determination of the weight of LULCC on the hydrological response in other regions.

  20. Loss of hearing in drivers of mine locomotives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanish, R.

    1982-02-01

    One of the most dangerous factors in railroad transport is noise. Drivers of locomotives are exposed to the noise of engines and cars on rails, transporting workers to their places of work; coupling of cars and emptying cars by overturning them; and the transport of fire cars. To determine the amount of noise drivers are subjected to, the Zavodski Institute for National Public Health conducted studies on noise in underground mines. By means of portable noisemeters worn by drivers measurement of the noise of cars running on rails, passing over joints of railroad tracks, and reflected from the rock walls of the drift was made. Mine ventilators added a constant source of noise. At the Zavodski Institute, 64 drivers were examined in the otorhinolaryngology department. Thresholds of hearing were measured by means of tonal audiometry. Combining results of this examination with measurements of noise in the uranium mines, it was determined that the hearing of drivers of mine locomotives deteriorated on the average of 1 dB per year at a frequency of 4000 Hz. (6 refs.) (In Russian)

  1. Reaction time of drivers who caused road traffic accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurić Predrag

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Human factor is the single cause of road traffic injuries in 57%, and together with other factors in more than 90% of all road traffic accidents. Human factor includes many aspects, where reaction time is very important. Material and methods. Thirty healthy drivers 28-40 y.o. with 50-500 km passed per week, having caused at least one road traffic accident in the last ten years were selected, provided they were not under the influence of alcohol and drugs during traffic accident. The same number of control were selected. Both cases and controls were tested to reaction time. Results. We found statistically significant difference between car drivers who caused car accidents and those who did not in both simple and choice reaction times. Discussion. Car drivers who caused road traffic accidents have longer reaction time (both simple and choice reaction time, but as the tasks were more complex, that difference was less visible. Since drivers involved in this study had introductory phase before measuring their reaction times, they faced with unpleasant sound when they made mistake, which forced them to be aware not to make a mistake in further tasks, so they showed longer reaction times. Conclusion. Measuring of reaction time seems to be important, and as we have showed they are different in drivers who have caused road traffic accidents and those who have do not.

  2. Keep the driver in control: Automating automobiles of the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Victoria A; Stanton, Neville A

    2016-03-01

    Automated automobiles will be on our roads within the next decade but the role of the driver has not yet been formerly recognised or designed. Rather, the driver is often left in a passive monitoring role until they are required to reclaim control from the vehicle. This research aimed to test the idea of driver-initiated automation, in which the automation offers decision support that can be either accepted or ignored. The test case examined a combination of lateral and longitudinal control in addition to an auto-overtake system. Despite putting the driver in control of the automated systems by enabling them to accept or ignore behavioural suggestions (e.g. overtake), there were still issues associated with increased workload and decreased trust. These issues are likely to have arisen due to the way in which the automated system has been designed. Recommendations for improvements in systems design have been made which are likely to improve trust and make the role of the driver more transparent concerning their authority over the automated system.

  3. Predicting Driver Behavior during the Yellow Interval Using Video Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Jia, Xudong; Shao, Chunfu

    2016-12-06

    At a signalized intersection, drivers must make a stop/go decision at the onset of the yellow signal. Incorrect decisions would lead to red light running (RLR) violations or crashes. This study aims to predict drivers' stop/go decisions and RLR violations during yellow intervals. Traffic data such as vehicle approaching speed, acceleration, distance to the intersection, and occurrence of RLR violations are gathered by a Vehicle Data Collection System (VDCS). An enhanced Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) is used to extract moving vehicles from target lanes, and the Kalman Filter (KF) algorithm is utilized to acquire vehicle trajectories. The data collected from the VDCS are further analyzed by a sequential logit model, and the relationship between drivers' stop/go decisions and RLR violations is identified. The results indicate that the distance of vehicles to the stop line at the onset of the yellow signal is an important predictor for both drivers' stop/go decisions and RLR violations. In addition, vehicle approaching speed is a contributing factor for stop/go decisions. Furthermore, the accelerations of vehicles after the onset of the yellow signal are positively related to RLR violations. The findings of this study can be used to predict the probability of drivers' RLR violations and improve traffic safety at signalized intersections.

  4. Do German drivers use their smartphones safely?-Not really!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollrath, Mark; Huemer, Anja Katharina; Teller, Carolin; Likhacheva, Anastasia; Fricke, Jana

    2016-11-01

    Research in the laboratory as well as in naturalistic driving studies has shown that texting while driving seems to be the most dangerous driver distraction. However, there is still some discussion about the extent to which drivers adapt their behavior to the traffic situation. Accordingly, they might use their phones only in easy driving situations but refrain from doing so when driving becomes more demanding. For Germany, no reliable data on these topics could be found although overall smartphone use has also increased exponentially in this country. As observational studies have proven to be an effective means to gather these data, such a study was done observing 11,837 drivers in three big German cities (Braunschweig, Hannover, Berlin) during daytime. An alarmingly high rate of texting while driving was found (4.5%) as compared to other international studies. This was even more frequent than the use of handheld (2.2%) and hands-free (1.7%) phones combined. Thus, there seems to be a special problem in Germany with texting which should be further examined as this activity is highly distracting. Finally, there was some indication that drivers adapt their secondary task activities to the requirements of the driving task (e.g. somewhat less texting when moving than when stationary at a red traffic light). However, these adaptations were not very strong. Thus, drivers seem to underestimate the dangers due to distraction. This could be a starting point for countermeasures which increase this awareness of danger.

  5. Design Drivers of Water Data Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, D.; Zaslavsky, I.

    2008-12-01

    The CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System (HIS) is being developed as a geographically distributed network of hydrologic data sources and functions that are integrated using web services so that they function as a connected whole. The core of the HIS service-oriented architecture is a collection of water web services, which provide uniform access to multiple repositories of observation data. These services use SOAP protocols communicating WaterML (Water Markup Language). When a client makes a data or metadata request using a CUAHSI HIS web service, these requests are made in standard manner, following the CUAHSI HIS web service signatures - regardless of how the underlying data source may be organized. Also, regardless of the format in which the data are returned by the source, the web services respond to requests by returning the data in a standard format of WaterML. The goal of WaterML design has been to capture semantics of hydrologic observations discovery and retrieval and express the point observations information model as an XML schema. To a large extent, it follows the representation of the information model as adopted by the CUASHI Observations Data Model (ODM) relational design. Another driver of WaterML design is specifications and metadata adopted by USGS NWIS, EPA STORET, and other federal agencies, as it seeks to provide a common foundation for exchanging both agency data and data collected in multiple academic projects. Another WaterML design principle was to create, in version 1 of HIS in particular, a fairly rigid and simple XML schema which is easy to generate and parse, thus creating the least barrier for adoption by hydrologists. WaterML includes a series of elements that reflect common notions used in describing hydrologic observations, such as site, variable, source, observation series, seriesCatalog, and data values. Each of the three main request methods in the water web services - GetSiteInfo, GetVariableInfo, and GetValues - has a

  6. Driver Vision Based Perception-Response Time Prediction and Assistance Model on Mountain Highway Curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Chen, Yuren

    2016-12-30

    To make driving assistance system more humanized, this study focused on the prediction and assistance of drivers' perception-response time on mountain highway curves. Field tests were conducted to collect real-time driving data and driver vision information. A driver-vision lane model quantified curve elements in drivers' vision. A multinomial log-linear model was established to predict perception-response time with traffic/road environment information, driver-vision lane model, and mechanical status (last second). A corresponding assistance model showed a positive impact on drivers' perception-response times on mountain highway curves. Model results revealed that the driver-vision lane model and visual elements did have important influence on drivers' perception-response time. Compared with roadside passive road safety infrastructure, proper visual geometry design, timely visual guidance, and visual information integrality of a curve are significant factors for drivers' perception-response time.

  7. Aplicação do modelo hipercubo de filas para avaliar a descentralização de ambulâncias em um sistema urbano de atendimento médico de urgência

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Algisi Takeda

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Uma das maiores preocupações de sistemas urbanos de atendimento médico-emergencial é a rapidez no atendimento às vítimas. Os tempos de resposta dependem de diversos fatores como condições de tráfego local, dia da semana e período do dia, tipo e número de veículos disponíveis, localização destes veículos, políticas de despacho, etc. Neste trabalho apresenta-se uma análise dos efeitos da descentralização de ambulâncias que operam no sistema de atendimento médico-emergencial (SAMU-192 de Campinas, SP. O problema é tratado por meio do modelo hipercubo de filas espacialmente distribuídas, que considera variações aleatórias dos processos de chegada e atendimento dos chamados emergenciais. A aplicação do modelo produz uma ampla variedade de indicadores de desempenho para o sistema, que são comparados com os valores reais observados. Os resultados obtidos com a descentralização das ambulâncias mostraram uma significativa elevação do nível de serviço oferecido aos usuários.One of the major concerns of urban emergency medical systems is to provide the fastest possible first care medical assistance to the victims. The response times depend on different aspects such as: local traffic conditions, weekday and time, type and number of available vehicles, location of these vehicles, dispatching policies, etc. This work analyzes the effects of decentralizing ambulances in the emergency medical system (SAMU-192 of Campinas, SP. The problem is dealt with the hypercube queuing model, which considers stochastic variations of the arrival and service processes of the emergency calls. The application of the model produces a wide variety of system performance indicators, which are compared to the actual observed values. The results obtained with ambulance decentralization showed a significant increase in the service level offered to the users.

  8. Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance Programs: Announcement of the Provider Enrollment Moratoria Access Waiver Demonstration of Part B Non-Emergency Ground Ambulance Suppliers and Home Health Agencies in Moratoria-Designated Geographic Locations. Implementation of the waiver demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-03

    This notice announces the Provider Enrollment Moratoria Access Waiver Demonstration of Part B Non-Emergency Ground Ambulance Suppliers and Home Health Agencies in 6 states. The demonstration is being implemented in accordance with section 402 of the Social Security Amendments of 1967 and gives CMS the authority to grant waivers to the statewide enrollment moratoria on a case-by-case basis in response to access to care issues, and to subject providers and suppliers enrolling via such waivers to heightened screening, oversight, and investigations.

  9. Towards Driver's State Recognition on Real Driving Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Rigas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work a methodology for detecting drivers' stress and fatigue and predicting driving performance is presented. The proposed methodology exploits a set of features obtained from three different sources: (i physiological signals from the driver (ECG, EDA, and respiration, (ii video recordings from the driver's face, and (iii environmental information. The extracted features are examined in terms of their contribution to the classification of the states under investigation. The most significant indicators are selected and used for classification using various classifiers. The approach has been validated on an annotated dataset collected during real-world driving. The results obtained from the combination of physiological signals, video features, and driving environment parameters indicate high classification accuracy (88% using three fatigue scales and 86% using two stress scales. A series of experiments on a simulation environment confirms the association of fatigue states with driving performance.

  10. Reliability and Availability Studies in the RIA Linac Driver

    CERN Document Server

    Schnirman-Lessner, Eliane

    2005-01-01

    The RIA facility will include various complex systems and must provide radioactive beams to many users simultaneously. The availability of radioactive beams for most experiments at the fully-commissioned facility should be as high as possible within design cost limitations. To make a realistic estimate of the achievable reliability a detailed analysis is required. The RIA driver linac is a complex machine containing a large number of SC resonators and capable of accelerating multiple-charge-state beams. At the pre-CDR stage of the design it is essential to identify critical facility subsystem failures that can prevent the driver linac from operating. The reliability and availability of the driver linac are studied using expert information and data from operating machines such as ATLAS, APS, JLab, and LANL. Availability studies are performed with a Monte-Carlo simulation code previously applied to availability assessments of the NLC facility [http://www.slac.stanford.edu/xorg/accelops/Full/LCoptsfull] and the ...

  11. Processes, Performance Drivers and ICT Tools in Human Resources Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oškrdal Václav

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an insight to processes, performance drivers and ICT tools in human resources (HR management area. On the basis of a modern approach to HR management, a set of business processes that are handled by today’s HR managers is defined. Consequently, the concept of ICT-supported performance drivers and their relevance in the area of HR management as well as the relationship between HR business processes, performance drivers and ICT tools are defined. The theoretical outcomes are further enhanced with results obtained from a survey among Czech companies. This article was written with kind courtesy of finances provided by VŠE IGA grant „IGA – 32/2010“.

  12. Risk of severe driver injury by driving with psychoactive substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hels, Tove; Lyckegaard, Allan; Bernhoft, Inger Marie;

    2013-01-01

    /L) and benzoylecgonine. The least risky drug seemed to be cannabis and benzodiazepines and Z-drugs. For male drivers, the risk of being severely injured by driving with any of the psychoactive substances was about 65% of that of female drivers. For each of the substance groups there was a decrease in the risk of severe......Driving with alcohol and other psychoactive substances imposes an increased risk of severe injury accidents. In a population-based case-control design, the relative risks of severe driver injury (MAIS ≥ 2) by driving with ten substance groups were approximated by odds ratios (alcohol, amphetamines......, benzoylecgonine, cocaine, cannabis, illicit opiates, benzodiazepines and Z-drugs, i.e. zolpidem and zopiclone, medicinal opioids, alcohol-drug combinations and drug-drug combinations). Data from six countries were included in the study: Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Italy, Lithuania and the Netherlands. Case samples...

  13. Advances on Driver Oncogenes of Squamous Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei HONG

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Next to adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the lung is the most frequent histologic subtype in non-small cell lung cancer. Several molecular alterations have been defined as "driver oncogenes" responsible for both the initiation and maintenance of the malignancy. The squamous cell carcinoma of the lung has recently shown peculiar molecular characteristics which relate with both carcinogenesis and response to targeted drugs. So far, about 40% of lung squamous cell carcinoma has been found harbouring driver oncogenes, in which fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1 plays important roles. In this review, we will report the mainly advances on some latest driver mutations of squamous cell lung cancer.

  14. A control theoretic model of driver steering behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donges, E.

    1977-01-01

    A quantitative description of driver steering behavior such as a mathematical model is presented. The steering task is divided into two levels: (1) the guidance level involving the perception of the instantaneous and future course of the forcing function provided by the forward view of the road, and the response to it in an anticipatory open-loop control mode; (2) the stabilization level whereby any occuring deviations from the forcing function are compensated for in a closed-loop control mode. This concept of the duality of the driver's steering activity led to a newly developed two-level model of driver steering behavior. Its parameters are identified on the basis of data measured in driving simulator experiments. The parameter estimates of both levels of the model show significant dependence on the experimental situation which can be characterized by variables such as vehicle speed and desired path curvature.

  15. Research on Driver Behavior in Yellow Interval at Signalized Intersections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaosheng Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vehicles are often caught in dilemma zone when they approach signalized intersections in yellow interval. The existence of dilemma zone which is significantly influenced by driver behavior seriously affects the efficiency and safety of intersections. This paper proposes the driver behavior models in yellow interval by logistic regression and fuzzy decision tree modeling, respectively, based on camera image data. Vehicle’s speed and distance to stop line are considered in logistic regression model, which also brings in a dummy variable to describe installation of countdown timer display. Fuzzy decision tree model is generated by FID3 algorithm whose heuristic information is fuzzy information entropy based on membership functions. This paper concludes that fuzzy decision tree is more accurate to describe driver behavior at signalized intersection than logistic regression model.

  16. Driver beam-led EURISOL target design constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Noah, Etam; Catherall, Richard; Kadi, Yacine; Kharoua, Cyril; Lettry, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    The EURISOL (European Isotope Separation Online) Design Study is addressing new high power target design challenges. A three-step method [1] was proposed to split the high power linac proton driver beam into one $H^{-}$ branch for the 4 $MW_{b}$ [2] mercury target that produces radioactive ion beams (RIB) via spallation neutroninduced fission in a secondary actinide target and three 100 $kW_{b}$ $H^{+}$ branches for the direct targets producing RIBs via fragmentation and spallation reactions. This scheme minimises transient thermo-mechanical stresses on targets and preserves the cw nature of the driver beam in the four branches. The heat load for oxides, carbides, refractory metal foils and liquid metals is driven by the incident proton driver beam while for actinides, exothermic fission reactions are an additional contribution. This paper discusses the constraints that are specific to each class of material and the target design strategies.

  17. CW high intensity non-scaling FFAG proton drivers

    CERN Document Server

    Johnstone, C; Makino, K; Snopok, P

    2012-01-01

    Accelerators are playing increasingly important roles in basic science, technology, and medicine including nuclear power, industrial irradiation, material science, and neutrino production. Proton and light-ion accelerators in particular have many research, energy and medical applications, providing one of the most effective treatments for many types of cancer. Ultra high-intensity and high-energy (GeV) proton drivers are a critical technology for accelerator-driven sub-critical reactors (ADS) and many HEP programs (Muon Collider). These high-intensity GeV-range proton drivers are particularly challenging, encountering duty cycle and space-charge limits in the synchrotron and machine size concerns in the weaker-focusing cyclotrons; a 10-20 MW proton driver is not presently considered technically achievable with conventional re-circulating accelerators. One, as-yet, unexplored re-circulating accelerator, the Fixed-field Alternating Gradient, or FFAG, is an attractive alternative to the cyclotron. Its strong foc...

  18. POLITICAL PROCESS DRIVERS OF CORRUPTION IN EASTERN EUROPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada-Iuliana POPESCU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Corruption stands as one of the many obstacles to the political and economic security of the Eastern European region. Thus, despite the political and economic instability in the region, Eastern European countries, in and outside of the European Union need to fight corruption collectively and individually. The task is difficult, but hope is justified because the causes of corruption in this part of the region are similar and anti-corruption expertise is available. We believe that a deeper analysis of corruption’s drivers can produce a better articulated and more efficient anti-corruption strategy. This strategy will create an anti-corruption infrastructure that will strengthen the Eastern European Partnership. As a prelude to the deeper analysis that we believe must be a part of this strategy, this paper identifies the main drivers of corruption in the Eastern European Partnership countries and explains why addressing these drivers will strengthen the Eastern European Partnership.

  19. Drivers and Interpretations of Doctoral Education Today: National Comparisons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andres, Lesley; Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard; Castano, Liliana Del Pilar Gallego

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, doctoral education has undergone a sea change with several global trends increasingly apparent. Drivers of change include massification and professionalization of doctoral education and the introduction of quality assurance systems. The impact of these drivers, and the forms...... that they take, however, are dependent on doctoral education within a given national context. This paper is frontline in that it contributes to the literature on doctoral education by examining the ways in which these global trends and drivers are being taken up in policies and practices by various countries. We...... do so by comparing recent changes in each of the following countries: Canada, Colombia, Denmark, Finland, the UK, and the USA. Each country case is based on national education policies, policy reports on doctoral education (e.g., OECD and EU policy texts), and related materials. We use the same...

  20. THE MACROECONOMIC DRIVERS OF ECONOMIC GROWTH IN MALAWI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Themba G. Chirwa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the main macroeconomic drivers of economic growth in Malawi. The drivers are identified by examining the various development plans and reforms that Malawi implemented during the period 1970-2011. The examination concludes that the main macroeconomic drivers of economic growth in Malawi during this period were the accumulation of physical capital, human capital development, international trade, inflation and the real exchange rate. The examination also shows that country-specific development policies and institutions are important in identifying and influencing the macroeconomic factors of growth. Although Malawi has been able to identify the factors that would contribute to sustainable economic growth in its development policies, these factors were influenced by a number of structural challenges, such as low investment rates, inadequate investment in human capital, balance-of-payment problems, macroeconomic instability, and frequent policy reversals in the implementation of macroeconomic reforms.

  1. Linear transformer driver for pulse generation with fifth harmonic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazarakis, Michael G.; Kim, Alexander A.; Sinebryukhov, Vadim A.; Volkov, Sergey N.; Kondratiev, Sergey S.; Alexeenko, Vitaly M.; Bayol, Frederic; Demol, Gauthier; Stygar, William A.; Leckbee, Joshua; Oliver, Bryan V.; Kiefer, Mark L.

    2017-03-21

    A linear transformer driver includes at least one ferrite ring positioned to accept a load. The linear transformer driver also includes a first, second, and third power delivery module. The first power delivery module sends a first energy in the form of a first pulse to the load. The second power delivery module sends a second energy in the form of a second pulse to the load. The third power delivery module sends a third energy in the form of a third pulse to the load. The linear transformer driver is configured to form a flat-top pulse by the superposition of the first, second, and third pulses. The first, second, and third pulses have different frequencies.

  2. Drowsy drivers--medical implication of highway traffic safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, S

    2011-01-01

    The estimates of the contribution of drowsiness and fatigue to the number of road crashes is often neglected considerably, due both to under-reporting of these factors by drivers, and technical difficulty in investigating the problem. Preventing and treating the reasons for falling asleep behind the wheel may have considerable contribution in traffic safety. Therefore the licensing authorities in co-operation with the medical profession should attend more closely to the issue of sleep related disorders and their implications for driving in cases with notoriously high risk. The police and other enforcement authorities need appropriate knowledge and procedures to detect drivers at risk of falling asleep while driving. Considering the increasing number of road traffic accidents day per day, it is a need of the hour to detect drivers possibly at risk, and to take appropriate precautions in terms of education, advice and treatment regimes, as well as restrictions on licensing.

  3. An outcome evaluation of the 'Skipper' designated driver program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, A; Watson, B

    2014-05-01

    The general aim of designated driver programs is to reduce the level of drink driving by encouraging potential drink drivers to travel with a driver who has abstained from (or at least limited) consuming alcohol. Designated driver programs appear to be quite widespread around the world, however a limited number have been subject to rigorous evaluation. This paper reports results from an outcome evaluation of a designated driver program called 'Skipper', which was trialled in a provincial city in Queensland, Australia. The outcome evaluation included surveys three weeks prior to (baseline), four months following (1st follow-up), and 16 months following (2nd follow-up) the commencement of the trial in both the 'intervention area' (baseline, n=202; 1st follow-up, n=211; 2nd follow-up, n=200) and a 'comparison area'(baseline, n=203; 1st follow-up, n=199; 2nd follow-up, n=201); and a comparison of random breath testing and crash data before and after the trial. The survey results indicate that awareness of the program in the intervention area was quite high four months following its introduction and that this was maintained at 16 months. The results also suggest that the 'Skipper' program and the related publicity had positive impacts on behaviour with an increase in the proportion of people participating in designated driver as a passenger. It is less clear, however, whether the 'Skipper' program impacted on other behaviours of interest, such as drink driving or involvement in alcohol-related crashes. Suggestions for further research and program improvement are discussed as well as limitations of the research.

  4. Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Karl T.; Pruski, Marek; Washton, Nancy M.; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2013-03-07

    This report recaps the "Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance" workshop, held in late 2011. This exploratory workshop's goal was to discuss and address challenges for the next generation of magnetic resonance experimentation. During the workshop, participants from throughout the world outlined the science drivers and instrumentation demands for high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and associated magnetic resonance techniques, discussed barriers to their advancement, and deliberated the path forward for significant and impactful advances in the field.

  5. DRIVER: Building a Sustainable Infrastructure of European Scientific Repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Lossau

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available DRIVER has a clear vision: All research institutions in Europe and worldwide make all their research publications openly accessible through institutional repositories. The vision follows the Berlin Declaration, which called in October 2003 for ‘free and unrestricted access to sciences and human knowledge representation worldwide’. Initiated by the internationally renowned German research organisation the Max-Planck-Society, and signed by many international research organisations and institutes, the Berlin Declaration has set a political statement. In building a sustainable infrastructure for scientific repositories, DRIVER brings to this statement the reality of scholarly communication in the future.

  6. Noise induced hearing loss risk assessment in truck drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Ali; Nasiri, Saleh; Kazerooni, Farshid Khodaparast; Oliaei, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    Hearing sense is one of the key elements which may have impact on the driver's task quality. This cross-sectional study investigates the hearing status of 500 truck drivers by pure tone audiometry (AC) in one of the cities in Fars province, Iran. Hearing threshold levels of the subjects were measured in frequencies of 500Hz-8000Hz. Screening and determination of permanent threshold shift (PTS) was the first aim of this study. Hence tests were done at least 16 hours after any exposure to noticeable sound. The effect of age as a confounding factor was considered using ISO equation and subtracted from whole hearing threshold. The threshold of 25 dB HL and above was considered abnormal but the calculation of hearing was also carried out using 0 dB HL as reference. Subjects were categorized into two groups on the basis of working experience and the hearing threshold of 25 dB was considered a boundary of normal hearing sense. The results of Pearson Chi-Square test showed that working experience as an independent variable has significant contributing effect on hearing thresholds of truck drivers in frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 Hz (p greater than 0.05). Also, it was shown that currently nine and 12.6 % of truck drivers suffer from impaired hearing sense in left and right respectively (hearing threshold level greater than 25 dB) in mid frequencies (500, 1000, 2000 Hz) and 45% in high frequencies of both ears (4000 and 8000 Hz). The results indicated that hearing damage of professional drivers was expected to occur sooner at 4000 and 8000 Hz than lower frequencies. Finally it was deduced that the occupational conditions of truck drivers may have bilateral, symmetrical harmful effect on hearing threshold sense in all frequencies mainly in frequency of 4000 Hz, so health surveillance programs such as education and periodic medical examinations are emphasized for pre-diagnosing and prevention of any possible impairment and an urgent need to take up some interventions

  7. The frequency of drugs in randomly selected drivers in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese; Steentoft, Anni; Hels, Tove;

    the most frequent illicit drugs detected above the limit of quantitation (LOQ); while, codeine, tramadol, zopiclone, and benzodiazepines were the most frequent legal drugs. Middle aged men (median age 47.5 years) dominated the drunk driving group, while the drivers positive for illegal drugs consisted...... mainly of young men (median age 26 years). Middle aged women (median age 44.5 years) often tested positive for benzodiazepines at concentrations exceeding the legal limits. Interestingly, 0.6% of drivers tested positive for tramadol, at concentrations above the DRUID cut off; although, tramadol...

  8. Low back trouble among urban bus drivers in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netterstrøm, Bo; Juel, K

    1989-01-01

    a questionnaire in 1978 regarding psychosocial factors and health. The prevalence of frequent low back pain was 57%. In a control group of 195 motormen the prevalence was 40%. Standardized Morbidity Ratio for bus drivers discharged from hospital during the period 1978-1984 with the diagnosis lumbar disc...... herniation was 137 compared to all Danish men. These differences were statistically significant. Of psychosocial factors only "the feeling of being mentally unbalanced" was found to be statistically significantly related to subsequent hospital discharge with a LBT-diagnosis. Long seniority as bus driver...

  9. The drivers to adopt renewable energy among residential users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Zahari Abdul; Elinda, Esa

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to examine the drivers to adopt renewable energy (RE) among residential users in Malaysia. Based on the theoretical framework of a consumer’s decision making process, an empirical study of the adoption of RE was conducted. A total of 501 residential users were used in this study. This study proved that perceived utility of new technology, perceived utility of new service, and perceived benefit of new technology are the drivers to adopt RE among residential users. These factors are knowing crucial to RE suppliers and producers because it will generates more demand from the residential users and the percentage of energy mix from RE sources can be increase.

  10. Ambulation and spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Elizabeth C; Kobetic, Rudi; Triolo, Ronald J

    2013-05-01

    Walking is possible for many patients with a spinal cord injury. Avenues enabling walking include braces, robotics and FES. Among the benefits are improved musculoskeletal and mental health, however unrealistic expectations may lead to negative changes in quality of life. Use rigorous assessment standards to gauge the improvement of walking during the rehabilitation process, but also yearly. Continued walking after discharge may be limited by challenges, such as lack of accessibility in and outside the home, and complications, such as shoulder pain or injuries from falls. It is critical to determine the risks and benefits of walking for each patient.

  11. THE PREVALENCE OF MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS AMONG BUS DRIVERS IN TRICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Musculoskeletal disorders are widespread in many countries around the world. It has been reported that about 58 percent of the world's population over the age of 10 years spent one third of their life span at work. The population at a high risk include nursing facilities, transportation, mining, food processing, leather tanning, heavy and light manufacturing. Transport workers have been found to be at high risk of developing work related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSDs. There has been literature evidence regarding the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in bus drivers of various cities of different countries. But no study has been done so far in Tricity (Chandigarh, Panchkula and Mohali for the same. The purpose of this study is to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of work related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSDs among bus drivers of Tricity. Methods: 300 bus drivers were included in the study according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The standardized Nordic questionnaire for musculoskeletal disorder and a self administered questionnaire were filled by therapist after the personal interview of each driver. Results: Unpaired t test was used to measure the difference in variable of two groups and Karl Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used to determine the correlation between two entities. In the present study, the subjects were in the age group of 25 to 50 years. Out of the total sample of 300 male bus drivers in Tricity, 159 reported that they had WRMSDs. The prevalence of WRMSDs among bus drivers in Tricity was 53%. In present study, the prevalence of low back pain was highest among the bus drivers that are 30.3%, then neck pain 17.3%, knee pain 14.7%, shoulder 6.3%, ankle and feet 5.7%, upper back 4%, hip and thigh 4%, elbow 1.3% and wrist and hand 1.3%. Thus low back pain, neck pain and knee pain are the most prevalent WRMSDs amongst bus drivers. Conclusions: Work-related biomechanical

  12. Age, gender, mileage and the DBQ: The validity of the Driver Behavior Questionnaire in different driver groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Laila Marianne; Hakamies-Blomqvist, Liisa; Møller, Mette;

    2013-01-01

    The Driver Behavior Questionnaire (DBQ) is one of the most widely used instruments for measuring selfreported driving behaviors. Despite the popularity of the DBQ, the applicability of the DBQ in different driver groups has remained mostly unexamined. The present study measured aberrant driving...... behavior using the original DBQ (Reason, J.T., Manstead, A., Stradling, S.G., Baxter, J., Campbell, K., 1990. Errors and violations on the road – a real distinction. Ergonomics, 33 (10/11), 1315–1332) to test the factorial validity and reliability of the instrument across different subgroups of Danish...

  13. Review of bus drivers' occupational stress and stress prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kompier, M.A.J.; Di Martino, V.

    1995-01-01

    Although heterogeneous in methodology and content, 32 studies from 13 countries on bus drivers' work and health are similar in their conclusions. Bus-driving–characterized by high demands, low control and low support – can be regarded as a classic example of high-strain occupation, with high risks o

  14. Guiding Teen Drivers (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-10-20

    Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death among teens. This podcast discusses the importance of helping to keep young drivers safe.  Created: 10/20/2016 by MMWR.   Date Released: 10/20/2016.

  15. Food waste drivers in Europe, from identification to possible interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canali, Massimo; Amani, Pegah; Aramyan, Lusine; Gheoldus, Manuela; Moates, Graham; Östergren, Karin; Silvennoinen, Kirsi; Waldron, Keith; Vittuari, Matteo

    2017-01-01

    The growing volumes of food globally lost or wasted and implications for food security and sustainability have raised the concern of researchers, governments, international organizations and grass-root movements. Much research and experiences investigating food waste causes and drivers focus on o

  16. Parents Are the Key to Safe Teen Drivers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-18

    This podcast offers information to help parents keep their teen drivers safer on the road.  Created: 10/18/2010 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 10/18/2010.

  17. 77 FR 60956 - State Graduated Driver Licensing Incentive Grant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... program under the amended Section 405 program. The statute sets forth minimum qualification criteria... provisions under 5 U.S.C. 553. Accordingly, this notice seeks public comment on the minimum qualification... qualification criteria for the State Graduated Driver Licensing Incentive Grant program authorized under...

  18. Drivers of seasonality in Arctic carbon dioxide fluxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbufong, Herbert Njuabe

    and the potential for widespread feedbacks with global consequences. In this thesis, I present and discuss the findings of an investigation of comparable drivers of the seasonality in carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes across heterogeneous Arctic tundra ecosystems. Due to the remoteness and the harsh climatic conditions...

  19. Psychoactive substances in seriously injured drivers in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese; Steentoft, Anni; Bernhoft, IM

    2013-01-01

    This study assesses the presence of a number of psychoactive substances, including alcohol, based on blood samples from 840 seriously injured drivers admitted to five selected hospitals located in five different regions of Denmark. The study was a part of the EU 6th framework program DRUID (Drivi...

  20. Math on the Job. Tractor-Trailer Driver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This booklet is intended to help mainstreamed mentally retarded, emotionally disturbed, or learning disabled high school students acquire a basic understanding of the responsibilities and working conditions of tractor-trailer drivers and to practice basic math skills necessary in the occupation. The first section provides a brief introduction to…