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Sample records for amblyomma acari ixodidae

  1. Parasitismo de Amblyomma fuscum (Acari: Ixodidae em humanos Parasitism of Amblyomma fuscum (Acari: Ixodidae on humans

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    Sandro Marques

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Amblyomma fuscum é uma espécie rara de carrapato, recentemente revalidada, com poucos registros de ocorrência na literatura. Neste trabalho, são informados dois registros de parasitismo de A. fuscum em seres humanos: um no Estado de São Paulo (SP e outro possivelmente oriundo do Estado de Santa Catarina (SC, Brasil. Tratam-se dos primeiros registros de parasitismo em humano por esta espécie de carrapato. Um espécime adulto fêmea de A. fuscum foi coletado quando encontrava-se fixado à palma da mão de um dos autores deste trabalho, no município de Guarujá, SP. O segundo espécime, também adulto fêmea, foi coletado quando se encontrava fixado ao tornozelo de uma cidadã da cidade de São Paulo, que havia retornado de Lagoa da Conceição, em Florianópolis, SC, três dias antes. O presente registro de A. fuscum no município de Guarujá, SP, e outro possivelmente oriundo de Florianópolis, SC, reforça os achados prévios deste carrapato nesses dois Estados, especialmente em região costeira. Embora o estágio adulto de A. fuscum tenha sido associado primariamente com répteis, os vários registros em mamíferos (Carnivora e Edentata e o presente registro em seres humanos sugerem uma baixa especificidade parasitária.Amblyomma fuscum is a rare, recently revalidated tick species, with few records in the literature. The present study reports two records of human parasitism by A. fuscum, one in the state of São Paulo (SP, and the other possibly from the state of Santa Catarina (SC, Brazil. These are the first reports of A. fuscum on humans. An adult female specimen of A. fuscum was collected while attached to the palmar area of the hand of one of the authors of the present study, in Guarujá, SP. The second specimen, also an adult female, was collected while attached to the ankle of a resident of São Paulo city, who had returned three days before from Lagoa da Conceição, Florianópolis Municipality, SC. The present report of A

  2. Parasitismo de Amblyomma fuscum (Acari: Ixodidae) em humanos

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    Marques Sandro; Dal Col Rogério; Matos Júnior Marco Otávio de; Gonçalves Elisabeth Fernandes Bertoletti; Pinter Adriano; Labruna Marcelo Bahia

    2006-01-01

    Amblyomma fuscum é uma espécie rara de carrapato, recentemente revalidada, com poucos registros de ocorrência na literatura. Neste trabalho, são informados dois registros de parasitismo de A. fuscum em seres humanos: um no Estado de São Paulo (SP) e outro possivelmente oriundo do Estado de Santa Catarina (SC), Brasil. Tratam-se dos primeiros registros de parasitismo em humano por esta espécie de carrapato. Um espécime adulto fêmea de A. fuscum foi coletado quando encontrava-se fixado à palma ...

  3. Lack of parthenogenesis by Amblyomma cajennense (Acari: Ixodidae

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    Carolina MV de Freitas

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Some reproductive parameters of adult stages of Amblyomma cajennense ticks were studied. The capacity of virgin females to reproduce by parthenogenesis was evaluated, during an experimental infestation, in absence of males, on a horse (Equus cabalus. Ticks were spread either completely free or in limited sites on the body of the animal. The engorged virgin females showed longer feeding periods and lighter body weights than those that had been fertilized. Some of these unmated females produced smaller egg masses, which had no embryonary development. On the other hand, females that had been inseminated produced larger egg masses, with normal embryonary development that led to viable larvae. Under the studied conditions, A. cajennense females did not reproduce by parthenogenesis.

  4. Vector competence of Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae) for Rickettsia rickettsii.

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    Levin, Michael L; Zemtsova, Galina E; Killmaster, Lindsay F; Snellgrove, Alyssa; Schumacher, Lauren B M

    2017-06-01

    Rickettsia rickettsii - the etiologic agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) - is widely spread across the Americas. In the US, Dermacentor spp. ticks are identified as primary vectors of R. rickettsii and Rhipicephalus sanguineus s.l. has been implicated in transmission of this pathogen in several locations in the Southwest. Conversely, ticks of the genus Amblyomma are recognized vectors of RMSF in Central and South America, but not in the US. A. americanum is one of the most aggressive human-biting ticks in the US, whose geographical range overlaps with that of reported RMSF cases. Despite sporadic findings of R. rickettsii DNA in field-collected A. americanum and circumstantial association of this species with human RMSF cases, its vector competence for R. rickettsii has not been appropriately studied. Therefore, we assessed the ability of A. americanum to acquire and transmit two geographically distant isolates of R. rickettsii. The Di-6 isolate of R. rickettsii used in this study originated in Virginia and the AZ-3 isolate originated in Arizona. Under laboratory conditions, A. americanum demonstrated vector competence for both isolates, although the efficiency of acquisition and transovarial transmission was higher for Di-6 than for AZ-3 isolate. Uninfected larvae acquired the pathogen from systemically infected guinea pigs, as well as while feeding side by side with Rickettsia-infected ticks on non-rickettsiemic hosts. Once acquired, R. rickettsii was successfully maintained through the tick molting process and transmitted to susceptible animals during subsequent feedings. Guinea pigs and dogs infested with infected A. americanum developed fever, scrotal edema and dermatitis or macular rash. R. rickettsii DNA was identified in animal blood, skin, and internal organs. The prevalence of infection within tick cohorts gradually increased due to side-by-side feeding of infected and uninfected individuals from 33 to 49% in freshly molted nymphs to 71-98% in

  5. Efficacy of dry ice-baited traps for sampling Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae) varies with life stage but not habitat.

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    Kensinger, B J; Allan, B F

    2011-05-01

    The carbon dioxide-baited trap is the most common and effective method for sampling vector life-stage Amblyomma americanum (L.) (Acari: Ixodidae), although confounding environmental variables are rarely considered. A mark-recapture experiment was designed to compare recapture proportions of A. americanum nymphs and adults between two habitat types: old field and oak-hickory forest. Powdered fluorescent dye was used to mark A. americanum ticks released in 1-m increments from carbon dioxide-baited traps. Adults were recaptured in significantly higher proportion than nymphs, but habitat type had no significant effect on recapture proportions. Tick abundance is an important parameter in the estimation of human risk of exposure to tick-borne disease and the influence of life stage on capture rates should be considered when calculating entomological risk.

  6. Ambush behavior of the tick Amblyomma sculptum (Amblyomma cajennense complex) (Acari: Ixodidae) in the Brazilian Pantanal.

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    Ramos, Vanessa do Nascimento; Osava, Carolina Fonseca; Piovezan, Ubiratan; Szabó, Matias Pablo Juan

    2017-06-01

    We herein describe the ambush behavior of Amblyomma sculptum (Berlese 1888), a widespread and epidemiologically important tick in Brazil. Along two years of sampling by visual search in the Brazilian Pantanal, A. sculptum ticks were observed on the vegetation and in the leaf litter. Most of the ticks were observed between 10 and 50cm above ground level and less than five percent of the total were positioned below 10cm, indicating that they are seeking for middle or large-sized hosts. In both seasons, vapor saturation deficit was low during the morning. No significant relationship was found between questing ticks and daytime interval of observation or saturation deficit. However, questing tick numbers seem be higher in the end of the morning, when saturation deficit reaches its peak. Behavioral patterns of A. sculptum ticks observed in Pantanal underscore the occurrence of this tick and human contact at green anthropogenic sites. Considering A. sculptum questing behavior, inferences on human behavioral patterns that enhance or avoid contact with ticks are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficacy of plant-derived and synthetic compounds on clothing as repellents against Ixodes scapularis and Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae).

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    Jordan, Robert A; Schulze, Terry L; Dolan, Marc C

    2012-01-01

    We conducted field trials to compare the relative repellent activity of two natural product compounds (nootkatone and carvacrol) with commercially available plant-derived (EcoSMART organic insect repellent) and permethrin-based (Repel Permanone) repellents against adult Ixodes scapularis Say and Amblyomma americanum (L.) (Acari: Ixodidae) by using treated coveralls. One day after treatment, nootkatone and carvacrol provided 100% repellency of I. scapularis adults, with nootkatone maintaining complete protection through 3 d, whereas carvacrol showed steadily declining repellency against I. scapularis during the 7-d course of the trials. Nootkatone was at least as effective against host-seeking A. americanum as against I. scapularis through 3 d. Carvacrol provided little protection against A. americanum adults. Both natural compounds performed well initially in comparison with the commercial products. After 7 d, nootkatone was the most effective against both species followed in order of activity by Permanone, EcoSMART, and carvacrol. Nootkatone seems to have offer considerable potential as a clothing repellent against both I. scapularis and A. americanum.

  8. Brazilian distribution of Amblyomma varium Koch, 1844 (Acari: Ixodidae, a common parasite of sloths (Mammalia: Xenarthra

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    Sandro Marques

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Amblyomma varium, commonly known in Brazil as the "carrapato-gigante-da-preguiça" (sloth's giant tick is found from southern Central America to Argentina. The present study adds information on the geographical distribution of A. varium, as well as on their hosts, based on material deposited in the main Brazilian collections and on the available literature. Eighty-two vials, containing 191 adult specimens, deposited in five Acari collections between 1930 and 2001, were examined. These vials included data on the host and collection localities. The biology of A. varium is unknown. However it is known that, during the adult stage, the tick presents a high host specificity and is found almost exclusively on the sloths Bradypus tridactylus, B. variegatus, B.torquatus (Bradypodidae, Choloepus hoffmanni and C. didactylus (Megalonychidae. Based on the material examined, the states of Rondônia, Amazonas, Bahia and Alagoas are newly assigned to geographic distribution of A. varium in Brazil.

  9. Distribution, hosts, 16S rDNA sequences and phylogenetic position of the Neotropical tick Amblyomma parvum (Acari: Ixodidae).

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    Nava, S; Szabó, M P J; Mangold, A J; Guglielmone, A A

    2008-07-01

    The hosts, distribution, intraspecific genetic variation and phylogenetic position of Amblyomma parvum (Acari: Ixodidae) have recently been re-assessed. Data on this tick's hosts and distribution were obtained not only from existing literature but also from unpublished records. Sequences of the ticks' mitochondrial 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) were used to evaluate genetic variation among specimens of A. parvum from different localities in Argentina and Brazil, and to explore the phylogenetic relationships between this tick and other Amblyomma species. Although several species of domestic and wild mammal act as hosts for adult A. parvum, most collected adults of this species have come from cattle and goats. Caviid rodents of the subfamily Caviinae appear to be the hosts for the immature stages. So far, A. parvum has been detected in 12 Neotropical biogeographical provinces (Chaco, Cerrado, Eastern Central America, Venezuelan Coast, Pantanal, Parana Forest, Caatinga, Chiapas, Venezuelan Llanos, Monte, Western Panamanian Isthmus, and Roraima) but the Chaco province has provided significantly more specimens than any other (P<0.0001). The 16S rDNA sequences showed just 0.0%-1.1% divergence among the Argentinean A. parvum investigated and no more than 0.2% divergence among the Brazilian specimens. The observed divergence between the Argentinean and Brazilian specimens was, however, greater (3.0%-3.7%). Although there is now molecular and morphological evidence to indicate that A. parvum, A. pseudoparvum, A. auricularium and A. pseudoconcolor are members of a natural group, previous subgeneric classifications do not reflect this grouping. The subgeneric status of these tick species therefore needs to be re-evaluated. The 16S-rDNA-based evaluation of divergence indicates that the gene flow between Argentinean and Brazilian 'A. parvum' is very limited and that the Argentinean 'A. parvum' may be a different species to the Brazilian.

  10. Prevalence of Ehrlichia, Borrelia, and Rickettsial agents in Amblyomma americanum (Acari : Ixodidae) collected from nine states

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    Mixson, T.R.; Campbell, S.R.; Gill, J.S.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Reichard, M.V.; Schultz, T.L.; Dasch, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    Ambyomma antericanum (L.) (Acari: Ixodidae) is an aggressive tick that feeds on humans during all postembryonic life stages. In many regions of the United States, it is the tick most commonly found attached to humans. Public health interest has grown recently, due to the recognition of new human pathogens transmitted by A. antericanum and the expanding distribution of the tick. A. americanum is a vector of several bacteria pathogenic to humans. Ehrlichia chaffeensis and Ehrlichia ewingii cause moderate-to-severe febrile illness. 'Rickettsia amblyommii,' a member of the spotted fever group Rickettsia, also has recently been implicated as a possible human pathogen based on serologic evidence from persons recovering from illness after a tick bite. We have determined the prevalence of infection of Ehrlichia chaffeensis, E. ewingii, 'Borrelia lonestari,' and R. amblyommii within A. americanum ticks from 29 sites in nine states. Overall infection prevalences were 4.7% for E. chaffeensis (range, 0-27%), 3.5% for E. ewingii (range, 0-18.6%), 2.5% for B. lonestari (range, 0-12.2%), and 41.2% for R. amblyommii (range, 0-84.0%). In addition, 87 ticks (4.3%) were infected with two or more bacteria. This report documents new distribution records for E. ewingii, B. lonestari, and R. amblyommii and underscores the nonhomogeneous distribution of pathogen foci of infection. Additional surveillance throughout the range of A. antericanum is warranted to increase physician and public awareness of the risk of disease to humans from exposure to the agents transmitted by this tick.

  11. Inhibition of the classical pathway of the complement system by saliva of Amblyomma cajennense (Acari: Ixodidae).

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    Franco, Paula F; Silva, Naylene C S; Fazito do Vale, Vladimir; Abreu, Jéssica F; Santos, Vânia C; Gontijo, Nelder F; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Pereira, Marcos H; Sant'Anna, Mauricio R V; Gomes, Alessandra P S; Araujo, Ricardo N

    2016-05-01

    Inhibition of the complement system during and after haematophagy is of utmost importance for tick success in feeding and tick development. The role of such inhibition is to minimise damage to the intestinal epithelium as well as avoiding inflammation and opsonisation of salivary molecules at the bite site. Despite its importance, the salivary anti-complement activity has been characterised only in species belonging to the Ixodes ricinus complex which saliva is able to inhibit the alternative and lectin pathways. Little is known about this activity in other species of the Ixodidae family. Thus, the aim of this study was to describe the inhibition of the classical pathway of the complement system by the saliva of Amblyomma cajennense at different stages of the haematophagy. The A. cajennense saliva and salivary gland extract (SGE) were able to inhibit the complement classical pathway through haemolytic assays with higher activity observed when saliva was used. The anti-complement activity is present in the salivary glands of starving females and also in females throughout the whole feeding process, with significant higher activity soon after tick detachment. The SGE activity from both females fed on mice or horses had no significant correlation (p > 0.05) with tick body weight. The pH found in the intestinal lumen of A. cajennense was 8.04 ± 0.08 and haemolytic assays performed at pH 8.0 showed activation of the classical pathway similarly to what occurs at pH 7.4. Consequently, inhibition could be necessary to protect the tick enterocytes. Indeed, the inhibition observed by SGE was higher in pH 8.0 in comparison to pH 7.4 reinforcing the role of saliva in protecting the intestinal cells. Further studies should be carried out in order to identify the inhibitor molecule and characterise its inhibition mechanism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Experimental infestation with the immatures of Amblyomma dissimile Koch, 1844 (Acari: Ixodidae on Tropidurus torquatus (Lacertilia: Iguanidae and Oryctolagus cuniculus Infestação experimental com as fases imaturas de Amblyomma dissimile Koch, 1844 (Acari: Ixodidae em Tropidurus torquatus (Lacertilia: Iguanidae e Oryctolagus cuniculus

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    L.H.T. Freitas

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Larvas provenientes de duas fêmeas de Amblyomma dissimile Koch, 1844 (Acari: Ixodidae, naturalmente ingurgitadas em uma iguana (Iguana iguana e provenientes do Estado do Mato Grosso, foram utilizadas na infestação experimental de lagartos da espécie Tropidurus torquatus e coelhos domésticos. As larvas alimentadas em ambos os hospedeiros realizaram ecdise para ninfas. As ninfas apenas ingurgitaram no lagarto e mudaram para machos e fêmeas. Este é o primeiro registro do parasitismo de larvas e ninfas de A. dissimile em T. torquatus e de larvas em coelhos.

  13. Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus as experimental hosts for Amblyomma dubitatum Neumann (Acari: Ixodidae Coelhos (Oryctolagus cuniculus como hospedeiros experimentais de Amblyomma dubitatum Neumann (Acari: Ixodidae

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    J. L.H. Faccini

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available O ciclo biológico do Amblyomma dubitatum, que se alimentava experimentalmente em coelhos domésticos, foi avaliado em condições laboratoriais e comparado com dados recentemente obtidos de infestações experimentais em capivaras (Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris, hospedeiros naturais para essa espécie. Os coelhos foram considerados hospedeiros experimentais adequados para larvas e ninfas porque quatro dos cinco parâmetros avaliados (número de carrapatos que ingurgitaram, período de alimentação, percentagem de carrapatos que realizaram muda e período de pré-muda foram semelhantes aos resultados obtidos com capivaras. As percentagens diárias de desprendimento e de muda das larvas e ninfas confirmam os coelhos como hospedeiros experimentais adequados para esses estágios de A. dubitatum. Os resultados do experimento indicam que os coelhos são hospedeiros inadequados para os adultos.

  14. Molecular and morphological identification of a human biting tick, Amblyomma testudinarium (Acari: Ixodidae), in Taiwan.

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    Chao, Li-Lian; Lu, Chun-Wei; Lin, Ying-Fang; Shih, Chien-Ming

    2017-04-01

    Genetic identity and morphological features of a human biting tick, Amblyomma testudinarium, were determined for the first time in Taiwan. Morphological features of adult male and female ticks of Am. testudinarium were observed and photographed by a stereo- microscope. The genetic identity was analyzed by comparing the sequences of mitochondrial 16S ribosomal DNA gene obtained from 18 strains of ticks representing 10 species of Amblyomma, and four outgroup species of Dermacentor and Rhipicephalus ticks. Nine major clades could be easily distinguished by neighbour-joining analysis and were congruent by maximum-parsimony method. All these Am. testudinarium ticks collected from Taiwan and Japan were genetically affiliated to a monophyletic group with highly homogeneous sequence (99.8-100% similarity), and can be discriminated from other species of Amblyomma and other genera of ticks (Dermacentor and Rhipicephalus) with a sequence divergence ranging from 6.9 to 23.9%. Moreover, intra- and inter-species analysis based on the genetic distance (GD) values indicated a lower level (GD Taiwan and Japan, as compared with other lineage groups (GD > 0.108) of Amblyomma ticks, as well as outgroup (GD > 0.172) species. Our results provide the first distinguished features of adult Am. testudinarium ticks and the first genetic identification of Am. testudinarium ticks collected from humans in Taiwan. Seasonal prevalence, host range, and vectorial capacity of this tick species in Taiwan need to be further clarified.

  15. Hosts, distribution and genetic divergence (16S rDNA) of Amblyomma dubitatum (Acari: Ixodidae).

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    Nava, Santiago; Venzal, José M; Labruna, Marcelo B; Mastropaolo, Mariano; González, Enrique M; Mangold, Atilio J; Guglielmone, Alberto A

    2010-08-01

    We supply information about hosts and distribution of Amblyomma dubitatum. In addition, we carry out an analysis of genetic divergence among specimens of A. dubitatum from different localities and with respect to other Neotropical Amblyomma species, using sequences of 16S rDNA gene. Although specimens of A. dubitatum were collected on several mammal species as cattle horse, Tapirus terrestris, Mazama gouazoubira, Tayassu pecari, Sus scrofa, Cerdocyon thous, Myocastor coypus, Allouata caraya, Glossophaga soricina and man, most records of immature and adult stages of A. dubitatum were made on Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris, making this rodent the principal host for all parasitic stages of this ticks. Cricetidae rodents (Lundomys molitor, Scapteromys tumidus), opossums (Didelphis albiventris) and vizcacha (Lagostomus maximus) also were recorded as hosts for immature stages. All findings of A. dubitatum correspond to localities of Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay, and they were concentrated in the Biogeographical provinces of Pampa, Chaco, Cerrado, Brazilian Atlantic Forest, Parana Forest and Araucaria angustifolia Forest. The distribution of A. dubitatum is narrower than that of its principal host, therefore environmental variables rather than hosts determine the distributional ranges of this tick. The intraspecific genetic divergence among 16S rDNA sequences of A. dubitatum ticks collected in different localities from Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay was in all cases lower than 0.8%, whereas the differences with the remaining Amblyomma species included in the analysis were always bigger than 6.8%. Thus, the taxonomic status of A. dubitatum along its distribution appears to be certain at the specific level.

  16. Wild birds as hosts of Amblyomma cajennense (Fabricius, 1787 (Acari: Ixodidae

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    Rosario Rojas

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the prevalence, mean intensity and relative density of ticks in 467 wild birds of 67 species (12 families from forest and cerrado habitats at two protected areas of Minas Gerais, between March and September 1997. Ticks collected (n=177 were identified as larvae and nymphs of Amblyomma cajennense and four other species of Amblyomma. We report for the first time 28 bird species as hosts of the immature stages of A. cajennense, demonstrating the lack of host specificity of the larvae and nymphs. A. cajennense had 15% prevalence on birds, with a mean infestation intensity of 0.37 ticks per host sampled, and 2.5 ticks per infested bird. Prevalence varied in relation to host species, diet and between birds from forests at two successional stages. There were no differences in relation to host forest dependence, participation in mixed flocks of birds, and nest type constructed. A. cajennense is a species of medical and veterinary importance, occurring on domestic animals but is known little of its occurrence on wildlife.

  17. Successful Feeding of Amblyomma coelebs (Acari: Ixodidae) Nymphs on Humans in Brazil: Skin Reactions to Parasitism.

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    Garcia, Marcos V; Matias, Jaqueline; Aguirre, AndrÉ De A R; Csordas, Barbara G; SzabÓ, Matias P J; Andreotti, Renato

    2015-03-01

    Identifying the tick species that successfully feed on humans would increase knowledge of the epidemiology of several tick-borne diseases. These species salivate into the host, increasing the risk of pathogen transmission. However, there is a lack of data in the literature regarding the ticks that prefer to feed on humans. Herein, we describe the successful feeding of Amblyomma coelebs Neumann nymphs on two of the authors after accidental tick bites occurred during field surveys in two preserved areas of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. One of the host-parasite interactions was closely monitored, and the tick development, gross host skin alterations, and related sensations are presented. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  18. Infestations of the bont tick Amblyomma hebraeum (Acari: Ixodidae) on different breeds of cattle in Zimbabwe.

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    Norval, R A; Sutherst, R W; Kerr, J D

    1996-10-01

    Infestations of adults and nymphs of Amblyomma hebraeum were counted on Brahman (Br), Brahman x Simmental (BS), Sanga (Sa) and Hereford (He) steers exposed to infested pastures at Mbizi in southern Zimbabwe in 1986-1987. Herefords were always the most heavily infested, while the Sanga tended to carry the fewest ticks with the Brahman and Brahman x Simmental groups being in between. The ratios of the engorged females on the four breeds were 2.3:1.4:1.4:1.0 for He:Br:BS:Sa. The ratios of the standard nymphs were 2.2:1.4:1.7:1.0 for He:Br:BS:Sa. The results confirm earlier observations in Africa and support the view that there are genetic differences between breeds in the expression of resistance to this tick species.

  19. Amblyomma rotundatum (Koch, 1844) (Acari: Ixodidae) two-host life-cycle on Viperidae snakes.

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    Rodrigues, Daniel Sobreira; Maciel, Ricardo; Cunha, Lucas Maciel; Leite, Romário Cerqueira; de Oliveira, Paulo Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Amblyomma rotundatum is an ixodid tick that infests ectothermic animals and reproduces exclusively by parthenogenesis. This tick has been frequently reported to infest reptiles and amphibians, under natural conditions and sometimes in captivity. It was described in Brazil and several other countries of South, Central and North America. Although many studies have reported aspects of its biology, none of them has used regularly either ophidian as hosts, or controlled temperature, humidity and luminosity for parasitic stages. The objective of this experiment was to study the life cycle of A. rotundatum feeding on Viperidae snakes under room controlled conditions at 27 ± 1 °C temperature, 85 ± 10% relative humidity and 12:12 hours photoperiod for parasitic stages, and under B.O.D incubator conditions at 27 ± 1 °C temperature, 85 ± 10% relative humidity and scotophase for non-parasitic stages. The total duration of the life cycle ranged from 56 to 163 days (mean of 105 days). Two-host life cycle was observed for most of the ixodid population studied.

  20. Analyses of hemolymph from Amblyomma cajennense (Acari: ixodidae) using neutron activation analysis (NAA)

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    Simons, Simone M.; Oliveira, Daniella G.L.; Chudzinski-Tavassi, Ana M., E-mail: daniellaoliveira@butantan.gov.b, E-mail: amchudzinki@butantan.gov.b [Instituto Butantan, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Zamboni, Cibele B., E-mail: czamboni@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis technique (INAA) was applied to determine the elemental composition of hemolymph from Amblyomma cajennense tick. This biological material came from Butantan Institute (Sao Paulo city, Brazil) and it was investigated using the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor (4MW, pool type) at IPEN/CNEN-SP - Brazil. The concentration values for: Br (0.0032 {+-} 0.0005gL{sup -1}), Ca (0.104 {+-} 0.029gL{sup -1}), Cl (4.41 {+-} 0.25gL{sup -1}), I (76 {+-} 27{mu}gL{sup -1}), K (0.38 {+-} 0.09gL{sup -1}), Mg (0.038 {+-} 0.011gL{sup -1}), Na (4.30 {+-} 0.26gL{sup -1}) and S (1.35 {+-} 0.37gL{sup -1}) were determined for the first time. These data were compared with the concentration values established for Americanum and Anatolicum Excavatum tick species to clarify the ion balance in this biological material (hemolymph). This comparison suggests that Na concentration, majority in these species, has a similar behavior. These data also contribute to the understanding of hemolymph composition complementing its characterization as well as for the understanding of several physiological processes, especially those related to salivary secretion. (author)

  1. Biological parameters of Amblyomma coelebs Neumann, 1906 (Acari: Ixodidae under experimental conditions

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    André de Abreu Rangel Aguirre

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One generation of Amblyomma coelebs life cycle under experimental conditions was evaluated. Ten tick pairs were allowed to feed on rabbits under laboratory conditions (LC, resulting six engorged females with a mean weight of 1,403.9 mg. Two females were maintained in a forest reserve under natural conditions (NC, and four were maintained in incubators (LC. The engorgement period lasted 10.33 days. Pre-oviposition periods were 10.75 (NC and 22 days (LC. The mean egg-mass weight was 514.76 mg, and the blood meal conversion index was 36.67% (LC. Incubation period under NC and LC were 91 and 56.33 days and hatching rates were 50% and 28.33%, respectively. Larval engorgement period ranged from 4 to 10 days, with average weight of 1.1 mg. Engorged larvae were incubated under NC and LC, with a premolt period of 27 to 36 days and molting rate of 7.1% and 28.7%, respectively. Nymphal engorgement period ranged from 5 to 7 days, with a mean weight of 18.8 mg and a recovery rate of 54.54%. In LC, the ecdysis mean period was 24.5 days, and molting rate was 44.44%, resulting in 24 adult A. coelebs. Our results show a life cycle of 187.45 (NC and 149 (LC days.

  2. Amblyomma auricularium (Acari: Ixodidae: underwater survival of the non-parasitic phase of feeding females

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    Iwine Joyce Barbosa de Sá-Hungaro

    Full Text Available To determine the effects of immersion in water on the biological parameters of engorged females of the tick species Amblyomma auricularium, 60 females were distributed in six groups, each comprising 10 individuals. The control group – G1 (not immersed was fixed dorsally in a Petri dish and incubated at 27 ± 1°C and 80% RH. The other groups were subjected to immersion periods of 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours, and the sixth group to continuous immersion. After the immersion period, the females were placed in Petri dishes to begin laying. Eggs were collected every 72 hours and kept in biological chambers. All the groups showed significant differences (p <0.05 during the pre-oviposition period. The laying period and the average weight of overall posture did not change. The egg incubation period also did not differ significantly, but the hatching rate in the group immersed for 96h showed a significant difference. Thus, immersion for up to 96 hours does not impair the survival of A. auricularium females, although it may delay egg laying and reduce the number of offspring.

  3. Factors affecting patterns of Amblyomma triste (Acari: Ixodidae) parasitism in a rodent host.

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    Colombo, Valeria C; Nava, Santiago; Antoniazzi, Leandro R; Monje, Lucas D; Racca, Andrea L; Guglielmone, Alberto A; Beldomenico, Pablo M

    2015-07-30

    Here we offer a multivariable analysis that explores associations of different factors (i.e., environmental, host parameters, presence of other ectoparasites) with the interaction of Amblyomma triste immature stages and one of its main hosts in Argentina, the rodent Akodon azarae. Monthly and for two years, we captured and sampled rodents at 16 points located at 4 different sites in the Parana River Delta region. The analyses were conducted with Generalized Linear Mixed Models with a negative binomial response (counts of larvae or nymphs). The independent variables assessed were: (a) environmental: trapping year, season, presence of cattle; type of vegetation (natural grassland or implanted forest); rodent abundance; (b) host parameters: body length; sex; body condition; blood cell counts; natural antibody titres; and (c) co-infestation with other ectoparasites: other stage of A. triste; Ixodes loricatus; lice; mites; and fleas. Two-way interaction terms deemed a priori as relevant were also included in the analysis. Larvae were affected by all environmental variables assessed and by the presence of other ectoparasites (lice, fleas and other tick species). Host factors significantly associated with larval count were sex and levels of natural antibodies. Nymphs were associated with season, presence of cattle, body condition, body length and with burdens of I. loricatus. In most cases, the direction and magnitude of the associations were context-dependent (many interaction terms were significant). The findings of greater significance and implications of our study are two. Firstly, as burdens of A. triste larvae and nymphs were greater where cattle were present, and larval tick burdens were higher in implanted forests, silvopastoral practices developing in the region may affect the population dynamics of A. triste, and consequently the eco-epidemiology of Rickettsia parkeri. Secondly, strong associations and numerous interactions with other ectoparasites suggest that

  4. Ability of two natural products, nootkatone and carvacrol, to suppress Ixodes scapularis and Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae) in a Lyme disease endemic area of New Jersey.

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    Dolan, Marc C; Jordan, Robert A; Schulze, Terry L; Schulze, Christopher J; Manning, Mark Cornell; Ruffolo, Daniel; Schmidt, Jason P; Piesman, Joseph; Karchesy, Joseph J

    2009-12-01

    We evaluated the ability of the natural, plant-derived acaricides nootkatone and carvacrol to suppress Ixodes scapularis Say and Amblyomma americanum (L.) (Acari: Ixodidae). Aqueous formulations of 1 and 5% nootkatone applied by backpack sprayer to the forest litter layer completely suppressed I. scapularis nymphs through 2 d. Thereafter, the level of reduction gradually declined to nootkatone was less effective, but at a 5% concentration, the level of control was similar or greater to that observed with I. scapularis through 21 d postapplication. Initial applications of 0.05% carvacrol were ineffective, but a 5% carvacrol formulation completely suppressed nymphs of both species through 2 d and resulted in significant reduction in I. scapularis and A. americanum nymphs through 28 and 14 d postapplication, respectively. Backpack sprayer applications of 5% nootkatone to the shrub and litter layers resulted in 100% control of I. scapularis adults through 6 d, but the level of reduction declined to 71.5% at 28 d postapplication. By contrast, high-pressure applications of 2% nootkatone to the litter layer resulted in 96.2-100% suppression of both I. scapularis and A. americanum nymphs through 42 d, whereas much lower control was obtained from the same formulation applied by backpack sprayer. Backpack sprayer application of a 3.1% nootkatone nanoemulsion resulted in 97.5-98.9 and 99.3-100% reduction in I. scapularis and A. americanum nymphs, respectively, at 1 d postapplication. Between 7 d and 35 d postapplication, the level of control varied between 57.1% and 92.5% for I. scapularis and between 78.5 and 97.1% for A. americanum nymphs. The ability of natural products to quickly suppress and maintain significant control of populations of these medically important ticks at relatively low concentrations may represent a future alternative to the use of conventional synthetic acaricides.

  5. Suppression of host-seeking Ixodes scapularis and Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae) nymphs after dual applications of plant-derived acaricides in New Jersey.

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    Jordan, Robert A; Dolan, Marc C; Piesman, Joseph; Schulze, Terry L

    2011-04-01

    We evaluated the ability of dual applications of natural, plant-derived acaricides to suppress nymphal Ixodes scapularis Say and Amblyomma americanum (L.) (Acari: Ixodidae) in a Lyme disease endemic area of New Jersey. An aqueous formulation of 2% nootkatone provided >90% control of I. scapularis through 7 d. Control declined to 80.9% at 14 d, and a second application was made that provided >95% control through the remaining 4 wk of the nymphal season. Nootkatone provided >90% control of A. americanum through 35 d postapplication. Applications of 2% carvacrol and EcoTrol T&O resulted in rapid knockdown of both tick species, but control declined significantly to 76.7 and 73.7%, respectively, after 14 d when a second application was made that extended control of both tick species to between 86.2 and 94.8% at 21 d. Subsequently, control declined steadily in all plots by 42 d postapplication except for I. scapularis in carvacrol-treated plots, where levels of control >90% were observed through 35 d. Of the three compounds tested, 2% nootkatone provided the most consistent results, with 96.5 and 91.9% control of I. scapularis and A. americanum through 42 and 35 d, respectively. The ability of plant-derived natural products to quickly suppress and maintain significant control of populations of these medically important ticks may represent a future alternative to the use of conventional synthetic acaricides. In addition, the demonstrated efficacy of properly-timed backpack sprayer application may enable homeowner access to these minimal-risk acaricides.

  6. Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae) Ticks Are Not Vectors of the Lyme Disease Agent, Borrelia burgdorferi (Spirocheatales: Spirochaetaceae): A Review of the Evidence.

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    Stromdahl, Ellen Y; Nadolny, Robyn M; Hickling, Graham J; Hamer, Sarah A; Ogden, Nicholas H; Casal, Cory; Heck, Garrett A; Gibbons, Jennifer A; Cremeans, Taylor F; Pilgard, Mark A

    2018-01-31

    In the early 1980s, Ixodes spp. ticks were implicated as the key North American vectors of Borrelia burgdorferi (Johnson, Schmid, Hyde, Steigerwalt and Brenner) (Spirocheatales: Spirochaetaceae), the etiological agent of Lyme disease. Concurrently, other human-biting tick species were investigated as potential B. burgdorferi vectors. Rashes thought to be erythema migrans were observed in patients bitten by Amblyomma americanum (L.) (Acari: Ixodidae) ticks, and spirochetes were visualized in a small percentage of A. americanum using fluorescent antibody staining methods, sparking interest in this species as a candidate vector of B. burgdorferi. Using molecular methods, the spirochetes were subsequently described as Borrelia lonestari sp. nov. (Spirocheatales: Spirochaetaceae), a transovarially transmitted relapsing fever Borrelia of uncertain clinical significance. In total, 54 surveys from more than 35 research groups, involving more than 52,000 ticks, have revealed a low prevalence of B. lonestari, and scarce B. burgdorferi, in A. americanum. In Lyme disease-endemic areas, A. americanum commonly feeds on B. burgdorferi-infected hosts; the extremely low prevalence of B. burgdorferi in this tick results from a saliva barrier to acquiring infection from infected hosts. At least nine transmission experiments involving B. burgdorferi in A. americanum have failed to demonstrate vector competency. Advancements in molecular analysis strongly suggest that initial reports of B. burgdorferi in A. americanum across many states were misidentified B. lonestari, or DNA contamination, yet the early reports continue to be cited without regard to the later clarifying studies. In this article, the surveillance and vector competency studies of B. burgdorferi in A. americanum are reviewed, and we conclude that A. americanum is not a vector of B. burgdorferi. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2018. This work is written by (a) US

  7. First records of the ticks Amblyomma calcaratum and A. pacae (Acari: Ixodidae parasitizing mammals of Mexico Primeros registros de las garrapatas Amblyomma calcaratum y A. pacae (Acari: Ixodidae parasitando mamíferos de México

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    Carmen Guzmán-Cornejo

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on study of ticks deposited in the Colección Nacional de Ácaros, Instituto de Biología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, we report the first records in Mexico for two species of Amblyomma: Amblyomma calcaratum ex Tamandua mexicana, and Amblyomma pacae ex Tapirus bairdii. These new records increase the number of species recorded for the genus Amblyomma in Mexico to 26.Basado en la revisión de garrapatas depositadas en la Colección Nacional de Ácaros, Instituto de Biología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, establecemos los primeros registros en México para 2 especies del género Amblyomma: Amblyomma calcaratum ex Tamandua mexicana y Amblyomma pacae ex Tapirus bairdii. Estos nuevos registros incrementan a 26 el número de especies del género Amblyomma distribuidas en México.

  8. Evaluation of DEET and eight essential oils for repellency against nymphs of the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae)

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    Eight commercially available essential oils (oregano, clove, thyme, vetiver, sandalwood, cinnamon, cedarwood, and peppermint) were evaluated for repellency against host-seeking nymphs of the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum. Concentration- repellency response was established using the vertical ...

  9. Primeiro registro de Amblyomma geayi (Acari: ixodidae em preguiça (Bradypus variegatus no estado do Acre, Amazônia Ocidental: relato de caso

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    S.F. Souza

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO O Amblyomma geayi é um carrapato da família Ixodidae, encontrado principalmente em mamíferos e aves silvestres de regiões tropicais da América do Sul. Descreve-se a ocorrência de um carrapato ixodídeo da espécie A. geayi, encontrado em uma preguiça (Bradypus variegatus proveniente do Parque Zoobotânico da Universidade Federal do Acre, Rio Branco, Acre, Amazônia Ocidental.

  10. Susceptibility of Four Tick Species Amblyomma americanum, Dermacentor variabilis, Ixodes scapularis, and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae) to Nootkatone

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    The essential oil nootkatone has shown acaricidal activity on ticks. The toxicity of nootkatone was determined in laboratory assays using a vial coating technique against unfed nymphs of four Ixodid ticks: Amblyomma americanum L., Dermacentor variabilis (Say), Ixodes scapularis Say, and Rhipicepha...

  11. Detection of Rickettsia bellii and Rickettsia amblyommii in Amblyomma longirostre (Acari: Ixodidae) from Bahia state, Northeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Douglas; Bezerra, Rodrigo Alves; Luz, Hermes Ribeiro; Faccini, João Luiz Horacio; Gaiotto, Fernanda Amato; Giné, Gastón Andrés Fernandez; Albuquerque, George Rego

    2015-01-01

    Studies investigating rickettsial infections in ticks parasitizing wild animals in the Northeast region of Brazil have been confined to the detection of Rickettsia amblyommii in immature stages of Amblyomma longirostre collected from birds in the state of Bahia, and in immatures and females of Amblyomma auricularium collected from the striped hog-nosed skunk (Conepatus semistriatus) and armadillos (Euphractus sexcinctus) in the state of Pernambuco. The current study extends the distribution of R. amblyommii (strain Aranha), which was detected in A. longirostre collected from the thin-spined porcupine Chaetomys subspinosus and the hairy dwarf porcupine Coendou insidiosus. In addition, we report the first detection of Rickettsia bellii in adults of A. longirostre collected from C. insidiosus in the state of Bahia.

  12. Detection of Rickettsia bellii and Rickettsia amblyommii in Amblyomma longirostre (Acari: Ixodidae from Bahia state, Northeast Brazil

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    Douglas McIntosh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies investigating rickettsial infections in ticks parasitizing wild animals in the Northeast region of Brazil have been confined to the detection of Rickettsia amblyommii in immature stages of Amblyomma longirostre collected from birds in the state of Bahia, and in immatures and females of Amblyomma auriculariumcollected from the striped hog-nosed skunk (Conepatus semistriatus and armadillos (Euphractus sexcinctus in the state of Pernambuco. The current study extends the distribution of R. amblyommii (strain Aranha, which was detected in A. longirostre collected from the thin-spined porcupine Chaetomys subspinosus and the hairy dwarf porcupine Coendou insidiosus. In addition, we report the first detection of Rickettsia bellii in adults of A. longirostre collected from C. insidiosus in the state of Bahia.

  13. Morphological description of Amblyomma brasiliense Aragão, 1908 (Acari: Ixodidae larvae and nymphs Descrição morfológica de larvas e ninfas de Amblyomma brasiliense Aragão, 1908 (Acari: Ixodidae

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    Gustavo Seron Sanches

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The immature stages of Neotropical ticks are poorly known and in many cases have not been described. This work presents a morphological description of Amblyomma brasiliense larvae (F1 and a redescription of nymphs (F1. A. brasiliense is reported as one of the most aggressive ticks to humans in Brazil. Immature ticks obtained from a laboratory colony initiated from adult specimens collected in the Parque Estadual Intervales (24º 18' S and 48º 24' W, São Paulo, Brazil, were analyzed under scanning electron microscope, and also under light and stereoscopic microscopes. A. brasiliense larvae present basis capituli rectangular; short palpi; rounded idiosoma; coxa I with two spurs, the external one being longer than the internal one; and coxae II and III each with one short spur. Nymphs present basis capituli rectangular with a sharp pointed cornua; oval idiosoma with scutum reaching coxa III; coxa I with two evident spurs, the external one being longer than the internal one; coxae II-III each with one short spur; and coxa IV with a very short spur and chitinous tubercles on internal surface of posterior border of idiosoma. These morphological features, in association with chaetotaxy and porotaxy, should make possible the identification of immature Amblyomma ticks.Os estágios imaturos dos carrapatos Neotropicais são pouco conhecidos e, em muitos casos, não estão descritos. Este trabalho apresenta uma descrição morfológica das larvas (F1 e redescrição das ninfas (F1 do carrapato Amblyomma brasiliense, relatado como um dos ixodídeos mais agressivos ao homem no Brasil. Para este fim, carrapatos imaturos de uma colônia iniciada com espécimes adultos do Parque Estadual de Intervales, São Paulo, Brasil foram analisados sob microscopia eletrônica de varredura, microscopia de luz e lupa estereoscópica. Observou-se que larvas têm a base do capítulo retangular, palpos curtos e idiossoma arredondado, coxa I com dois espinhos, sendo o externo

  14. Feral pigs as hosts for Amblyomma sculptum (Acari: Ixodidae) populations in the Pantanal, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil.

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    Ramos, Vanessa do Nascimento; Piovezan, Ubiratan; Franco, Ana Helena Alves; Osava, Carolina Fonseca; Herrera, Heitor Miragaia; Szabó, Matias Pablo Juan

    2014-11-01

    The Pantanal in Brazil is the largest floodplain of the world. This ecosystem, rich in wildlife, has a large feral pig population. Such a large host biomass must have a strong influence on the parasite fauna. In this work, we evaluated the role of feral pigs in the maintenance of Amblyomma sculptum (formerly Amblyomma cajennense), the most prevalent tick species in the Pantanal. Tick infestations were evaluated on 243 feral pigs and their environment. The suitability of domestic pigs, representing their feral relatives, to A. sculptum adults and nymphs was assessed experimentally. Tick infestation of feral pigs was strongly associated with that of the environment: 96 and 97 % of the ticks, respectively, were A. sculptum. The infestation prevalence on this host species was close to 90 % in the dry season and 100 % in the wet season and mean infestation intensity was above 30 ticks in both seasons. Suitability of pigs as hosts for A. sculptum was shown by the high proportion of nymphs and female ticks found engorging on captured feral pigs and adequate biological parameters displayed by ticks from experimental infestations of domestic pigs. Other tick species on feral pigs, albeit in much lower numbers, were Amblyomma parvum and Ornithodorus rostratus. Results show that feral pigs feed a high proportion of the A. sculptum adults and nymphs in their territories and should be a target for tick-borne diseases studies. This is particularly relevant to public health because all the main tick species found on feral pigs are aggressive to humans as well.

  15. Primer registro de infestación en un reptil por larvas de Amblyomma parvitarsum (Acari: Ixodidae en Argentina

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    Gabriel Natalio Castillo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Amblyomma parvitarsum es una garrapata endémica del Altiplano Andino de Argentina, Bolivia, Chile y Perú. En la provincia de San Juan adultos de esta garrapata fueron encontrados en el Parque Nacional San Guillermo sobre Vicugna vicugna. En Argentina también existen citas de adultos de A. parvitarsum sobre bovinos, ovinos y el ñandú . El primer caso de parasitismo de larvas de A. parvitarsum en Liolaemus fue realizado en Chile. El presente trabajo menciona por primera vez para Argentina la presencia de larvas de A. parvitarsum parasitando al lagarto Liolaemus eleodori.

  16. Liolaemus lizards (Squamata: Liolaemidae) as hosts for the nymph of Amblyomma parvitarsum (Acari: Ixodidae), with notes on Rickettsia infection.

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    Muñoz-Leal, Sebastián; Tarragona, Evelina L; Martins, Thiago F; Martín, Claudia M; Burgos-Gallardo, Freddy; Nava, Santiago; Labruna, Marcelo B; González-Acuña, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    Adults of Amblyomma parvitarsum are common ectoparasites of South American camelids of the genera Lama and Vicugna, occuring in highlands of Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Peru and also in Argentinean Patagonia. Whereas larval stages of this tick are known to feed on small lizards, host records for the nymphal instar have remained unreported. Supported by morphological and molecular analyses, herein we report A. parvitarsum nymphs parasitizing two Liolaemus species (Reptilia: Squamata) in the Andean Plateau of Argentina and Chile. Additionally, by a PCR screening targetting gltA and ompA genes, DNA of Rickettsia was detected in one of the collected nymphs. Obtained sequences of this agent were identical to a recent Rickettsia sp. described infecting adults of this tick species in Chile and Argentina.

  17. Artificial feeding of Amblyomma cajennense (Acari: Ixodidae fasting females through capillary tube technique Alimentação artificial de fêmeas de Amblyomma cajennense (Acari: Ixodidae em jejum por meio da técnica de tubos capilares

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    Isis Abel

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to adjust the artificial feeding technique through capillaries and to verify its influence over the biology of Amblyomma cajennense females. Five groups of 20 female ticks were formed. Females were starved for 45 days and then fed with citrated bovine blood using capillary tubes in different periods of time. Females were divided in five experimental groups with 20 individuals each and fed as follows: groups uninterruptedly fed for 12, 24, and 48 hours and groups fed 2 and 6 h a day, for a period of 8 days. Subsequently, ticks were exposed to rabbits for complementary feeding and their biological parameters were analyzed. TIcks were capable of feeding, showing rounded idiosoma, visible even to naked eyes, following the feeding period. The groups fed for 24 hours, 2 hours/day for eight consecutive days or 6h/day for eight consecutive days presented greater weight gain, without statistically significant differences. These results suggested that 24 hours of artificial feeding were enough for fasting females to increase weight by 2.43 mg. Artificial feeding through capillaries did not interfere with parasitic and non-parasitic phases of A. cajennense females.O presente trabalho teve como objetivos adaptar a técnica de alimentação artificial por meio de tubos capilares para fêmeas de Amblyomma cajennense e verificar a sua influência sobre os parâmetros biológicos da espécie. Fêmeas em jejum por 45 dias foram alimentadas com sangue bovino citratado usando tubos capilares por diferentes períodos de tempo: 12, 24 e 48 horas, 2 horas/dia e 6 horas/dia por 8 dias consecutivos, sendo que cada grupo foi composto por 20 carrapatos. Em seguida, os carrapatos foram expostos a coelhos para completar a alimentação e seus parâmetros biológicos foram analisados. Após alimentação artificial, os carrapatos apresentaram idiossoma arredondado mesmo à vista desarmada. Os grupos 24 horas, 8 dias/2 horas/dia e 8 dias/6 horas

  18. Amblyomma aureolatum and Ixodes auritulus (Acari: Ixodidae) on birds in southern Brazil, with notes on their ecology.

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    Arzua, Márcia; Navarro Da Silva, Mário Antonio; Famadas, Kátia Maria; Beati, Lorenza; Barros-Battesti, Darci Moraes

    2003-01-01

    Between January 1999 and December 2000, 876 bird specimens were captured in three different ecological environments from the Reinhard Maack Park, Curitiba, State of Paraná, southern Brazil. A total of 142 birds (16.2%) were infested with Amblyomma aureolatum (Pallas 1772) (N=699) and/or Ixodes auritulus Neumann, 1904 (N=18) ticks. Questing A. aureolatum nymphs (N=2) and adults (N=5) were also collected from the soil and the vegetation. None of the I. auritulus were collected off-host. We collected only immatures of A. aureolatum on birds, but all life stages of I. auritulus. The latter species was collected on Turdus rufiventris and on Synallaxis ruficapilla, which is herein recognized as a host of I. auritulus for the first time. Moreover, this is also the first report of A. aureolatum infesting birds, and 16 different bird species were found infested. It was observed that larval infestation was positively correlated with the dry and cold season, while nymphal infestation was positively correlated with the warm and rainy season. Although only 2-years worth of data is provided, our results suggest the infestation of birds by ticks was significantly higher at the biotopes formed by forest at its first stage of regeneration 'capoeira' and the original Araucaria forest habitat 'mata' than the ecotone between forest and urban areas 'peripheral area'.

  19. Host Specificity of Amblyomma cajennense (Fabricius, 1787 (Acari: Ixodidae with Comments on the Drop-off Rhythm

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    Cristina Marques Lisbôa Lopes

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available The parasitic specificity of larval, nymph and adult Amblyomma cajennense on six different host species: Oryctolagus cuniculus, Rattus norvegicus, Gallus gallus domesticus, Anas platyrhynchus, Coturnix coturnix and Streptopelia decorata is described. In terms of the numbers of larvae and nymphs recovered, O. cuniculus was the best host species. The modal day for drop-off of larvae and nymphs was day three for the mammal hosts, but variable in the birds. We conclude that adult A. cajennense have a strong degree of specificity due to the fact that the tick failed to complete its life cycle on any of the evaluated hosts. The immature stages, on the other hand, showed a low level of specificity, most especially in the larval stage, indicating the existence of secondary hosts which probably serve as dispersers in the wild. The results also indicated a variable drop-off rhythm for larvae and nymphs in two periods, diurnal (6-18 hr and nocturnal (18-6 hr, which differed depending upon the host.

  20. Amblyomma rotundatum (Koch, 1844 (Acari: Ixodidae two-host life-cycle on Viperidae snakes Ciclo dioxênico em Amblyomma rotundatum (Koch, 1844 (Acari: Ixodidaeparasitando serpentes da família Viperidae

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    Daniel Sobreira Rodrigues

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Amblyomma rotundatum is an ixodid tick that infests ectothermic animals and reproduces exclusively by parthenogenesis. This tick has been frequently reported to infest reptiles and amphibians, under natural conditions and sometimes in captivity. It was described in Brazil and several other countries of South, Central and North America. Although many studies have reported aspects of its biology, none of them has used regularly either ophidian as hosts, or controlled temperature, humidity and luminosity for parasitic stages. The objective of this experiment was to study the life cycle of A. rotundatum feeding on Viperidae snakes under room controlled conditions at 27 ± 1 ºC temperature, 85 ± 10% relative humidity and 12:12 hours photoperiod for parasitic stages, and under B.O.D incubator conditions at 27 ± 1 ºC temperature, 85 ± 10% relative humidity and scotophase for non-parasitic stages. The total duration of the life cycle ranged from 56 to 163 days (mean of 105 days. Two-host life cycle was observed for most of the ixodid population studied.Amblyomma rotundatum é um carrapato da família Ixodidae, parasito de animais pecilotérmicos, e que se reproduz exclusivamente por partenogênese. Este carrapato é frequentemente relatado infestando répteis e anfíbios em condições naturais e, às vezes, em animais de cativeiro. Ele já foi relatado no Brasil e em vários outros países das Américas do Sul, Central e do Norte. Embora muitos estudos sobre sua biologia tenham sido publicados, nunca foram utilizados ofídios como hospedeiros e, tão pouco, foram realizados ensaios com os estádios parasitários sob condições controladas de temperatura, umidade e iluminação. O objetivo deste experimento foi estudar o ciclo biológico de A. rotundatum se alimentando em serpentes da família Viperidae sob condições ambientais controladas a 27 ± 1 ºC de temperatura, 85 ± 10% de umidade relativa do ar e 12:12 horas de fotoperíodo para est

  1. Effects of two commercial neem-based insecticides on lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum (L.) (Acari: Ixodidae): deterrence, mortality, and reproduction

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    The lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum (L.), is a widely distributed three-host obligate blood-feeding parasite in the United States and Mexico. It mostly attaches to white-tailed deer, Odocoilus virginianus (Zimmerman) and wild turkey, Meleagris gallopavo L., as well as a wide variety of other do...

  2. Botanical compound p-anisaldehyde repels larval lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum (L.) (Acari: Ixodidae), and halts reproduction by gravid adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    The lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum (L.), widely distributed across eastern, southeastern, and midwestern regions of the United States and south into Mexico, is an obligate blood feeder that attaches to three hosts during the larval, nymphal, and adult stages. White-tailed deer and wild turkey ...

  3. Rickettsia sp. strain colombianensi (Rickettsiales: Rickettsiaceae): a new proposed Rickettsia detected in Amblyomma dissimile (Acari: Ixodidae) from iguanas and free-living larvae ticks from vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Jorge; Portillo, Aránzazu; Oteo, José A; Mattar, Salim

    2012-07-01

    From January to December 2009, 55 Amblyomma dissimile (Koch) ticks removed from iguanas in the municipality of Monteria and 3,114 ticks [458 Amblyomma sp. larvae, 2,636 Rhipicephalus microplus (Canestrini) larvae and 20 Amblyomma sp. nymphs] collected over vegetation in Los Cordobas were included in the study. The ticks were pooled into groups from which DNA was extracted. For initial screening of Rickettsia sp., each pool was analyzed by gltA real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Positive pools were further studied using gltA, ompA, and ompB conventional PCR assays. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis were also conducted. Rickettsial DNA was found in 28 pools of ticks (16 A. dissimile pools and 12 free-living larvae pools) out of 113 (24.7%) using real-time PCR. The same 28 pools were also positive using conventional PCR assays aimed to amplify gltA, ompA, and ompB. For each gene analyzed, PCR products obtained from 4/28 pools (two pools of A. dissimile, one pool of Amblyomma sp. larvae and one pool of Rh. microplus larvae) were randomly chosen and sequenced twice. Nucleotide sequences generated were identical to each other for each of the rickettsial genes gltA, ompA, and ompB, and showed 99.4, 95.6, and 96.4% identity with those of Rickettsia tamurae. They were deposited in the GenBank database under accession numbers JF905456, JF905458, and JF905457, respectively. In conclusion, we present the first molecular evidence of a novel Rickettsia (Rickettsia sp. strain Colombianensi) infecting A. dissimile ticks collected from iguanas, and also Rh. microplus and unspeciated Amblyomma larvae from vegetation in Colombia.

  4. The international trade in reptiles (Reptilia)--the cause of the transfer of exotic ticks (Acari: Ixodida) to Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Magdalena

    2010-05-11

    The problem of the unnatural transfer of exotic ticks (Acari: Ixodida) on reptiles (Reptilia) imported to Poland is presented. In the period from 2003 to 2007, 382 specimens of reptiles belonging to the following genera were investigated: Testudo, Iguana, Varanus, Gongylophis, Python, Spalerosophis, Psammophis. The reptiles most infested with ticks are imported to Poland from Ghana in Africa, and are the commonly bred terrarium reptiles: Varanus exanthematicus and Python regius. As a result of the investigations, the transfer of exotic ticks on reptiles to Poland was confirmed. There were 2104 specimens of the genera Amblyomma and Hyalomma. The following species were found: Amblyomma exornatum Koch, 1844, Amblyomma flavomaculatum (Lucas, 1846), Amblyomma latum Koch, 1844, Amblyomma nuttalli Donitz, 1909, Amblyomma quadricavum (Schulze, 1941), Amblyomma transversale (Lucas, 1844), Amblyomma varanense (Supino, 1897), Amblyomma sp. Koch, 1844, Hyalomma aegyptium (Linnaeus, 1758). All the species of ticks of genus Amblyomma revealed have been discovered in Poland for the first time. During the research, 13 cases of anomalies of morphological structure were confirmed in the ticks A. flavomaculatum, A. latum and H. aegyptium. The expanding phenomenon of the import of exotic reptiles in Poland and Central Europe is important for parasitological and epidemiological considerations, and therefore requires monitoring and wide-ranging prophylactic activities to prevent the inflow of exotic parasites to Poland. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Amblyomma dissimile (Acari: Ixodidae em Hydrodynastes gigas (Squamata: Colubridae no estado Mato Grosso do Sul, Brasil - Nota Prévia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristine Dossin Bastos Fischer

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A Hydrodynastes giga, (Duméril, Bibron & Duméril, 1854 vulgarmente conhecida como surucucu-do-pantanal, é uma serpente de grande porte, que ocorre no norte, centro-oeste, sudeste e sul do Brasil e que pode ser parasitada por ectoparasitos como os carrapatos do gênero Amblyomma. Em dezembro de 2007 foram coletados manualmente três carrapatos de uma serpente H. gigas no pantanal de Miranda, MS, Brasil (19º51'-19º58'S; 56º17'-56º24'W. Os carrapatos foram armazenados e enviados para o Laboratório de Parasitologia do Hospital Veterinário da ULBRA, Canoas, RS, onde foi realizada a identificação de três machos da espécie Amblyomma dissimile. A presente nota faz o primeiro relato de A. dissimile parasitando serpentes da espécie H. gigas no pantanal de Miranda, MS, Brasil.

  6. Susceptibility of four tick species, Amblyomma americanum, Dermacentor variabilis, Ixodes scapularis, and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae), to nootkatone from essential oil of grapefruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flor-Weiler, Lina B; Behle, Robert W; Stafford, Kirby C

    2011-03-01

    Toxicity of nootkatone was determined in laboratory assays against unfed nymphs of Amblyomma americanum L., Dermacentor variabilis (Say), Ixodes scapularis Say, and Rhipicephalus sanguineus Latreille. We determined the 50% lethal concentration (LC50) and 90% lethal concentration (LC90) of nootkatone by recording tick mortality 24 h after exposure in treated glass vials. Nymphs were susceptible to nootkatone with LC50 values of 0.352, 0.233, 0.169, and 0.197 microg/cm2, and LC90 values of 1.001, 0.644, 0.549, and 0.485 microg/cm2 for A. americanum, D. variabilis, I. scapularis, and R. sanguineus, respectively. The LC50 value for R. sanquineus was not significantly different from D. variabilis or I. scapularis. Other LC50 comparisons were significantly different. The LC90 for A. americanum was higher when compared with the three other tick species, which were not significantly different. Because nootkatone is volatile, we measured the amount of nootkatone recovered from duplicate-treated vials before tick exposure and from vials after tick exposure. Nootkatone recovered from vials before exposure ranged from 82 to 112% of the expected amounts. The nootkatone recovered after the 24-h exposure period ranged from 89% from vials coated with higher concentrations of nootkatone, down to 29% from vials coated with low nootkatone concentrations. Determination of the nootkatone residue after vial coating demonstrated loss of the active compound while verifying the levels of tick exposure. Toxicity of low concentrations of nootkatone to the active questing stage of ticks reported in this study provides a reference point for future formulation research to exploit nootkatone as a safe and environment-friendly tick control.

  7. Notas de Ixodologia: II - uma nova espécie do gênero Amblyomma e uma nova espécie do gênero Ixodes (Acari Ixodidae

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    Flavio da Fonseca

    1952-03-01

    Full Text Available A new tick, Amblyomma parkeri, n. sp., is described as a parasite of Coendu sp. from S. Paulo, Brazil. Female holotype, nymph and larva are described (Figs. 2 e 3. The n. sp. differs completly from Koch's species Amblyomma longirostre, the common parasite of the Erethizotidae. Standard data for measures of the female dorsal scutum ixodidae are proposed as follows (fig. 1: PA = Antero-posterior; PB = Postero-basal; PM = Postero-median; TT = Transversal; OO = Inter-ocular; OT= Occulo-transversal; SS = Inter-scapular; CC = Cervical; PT = Postero-transversal; ST = Scapulo-transversal; NPT = Normal to the postero-transversal; NST = Normal to the scapulo-transversal. In the female holotype the standard data are as follows: PA = 2.00 mm; PB = 2.26 mm; PM = 1.10 mm; TT = 2.20 mm; OO = 2.26 mm; SS = 0,84 mm; CC = 0.63 mm; SC = 0.12 mm; NPT = 0.20mm; STN = 0.1 mm. Peritrema 0.80 x 0.42 mm with a narrow postero-internal angle and a large, elongated macula. Coxa I with two short spines and all other coxae with only one shorter spine, shortest in coxa IV. Hypostoma spatulated with formula 3/3. Gnathosoma 1.42 mm long and basis 0.63 mm long by 0.84 greatest wide. Palpi with smoth external surface, 1.00 mm long. Type lot No. 4458 from Cotia, S. Paulo, Brazil; in the acarological collection of the Escola Paulista de Medicina, S. Paulo. Ixodes didelphidis, n. sp., differing from Ixodes loricatus Neumann by the shape of the peritremata (figs. 4 a 5 of the male and female and by the number of the punctations in this organ is described form Didelphidae, Muridae and Cavidae. Twenty eight lots were obtained from Anápolis, Goiás, Brasil, where I. loricatus is subtituded by the n. sp. under description. Comparison with NEUMANN'S types of I. loricatus was possible through the courtesy of Prof. A. BRIZARD from Toulouse, who kindly loaned NEUMANN'S material. Female cotypes N° 40 and male allotype N° 531 in the Collection of Ixodidae of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute.

  8. Ação in vitro dos fungos Beauveria bassiana (Bals Vuill e Metarhizium anisopliae (Metsch Sorok sobre ninfas e adultos de Amblyomma cajennense (Fabricius, 1787 (Acari: Ixodidae In vitro action of the fungi Beauveria bassiana (Bals Vuill and Metarhizium anisopliae (Metsch Sorok on ninphs and adults of Amblyomma cajennense (Fabricius, 1787 (Acari: Ixodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C.S. Reis

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho teve por objetivo verificar a mortalidade in vitro de ninfas e adultos de Amblyomma cajennense frente à ação de isolados dos fungos Beauveria bassiana e Metarhizium anisopliae. Foram avaliados três isolados de M. anisopliae (959, 319 e E9 e dois de B. bassiana (986 e 747. As suspensões de conídios foram preparadas a partir de fungos produzidos em meio de arroz, e cada bioensaio foi constituído de quatro tratamentos nas concentrações 10(5, 10(6, 10(7, 10(8 conídios/ml e um grupo-controle. A análise constou da observação do percentual de mortalidade, 15 dias após o tratamento ou após a ecdise de adultos. Foram observadas diferenças significativas entre os tratamentos quanto à mortalidade para todos os isolados e todos os instares. Nos grupos tratados houve aumento considerável na mortalidade à medida que se aumentava a concentração de conídios na suspensão. Conclui-se que todos os isolados testados causaram mortalidade em testes in vitro sobre esses estádios evolutivos, sugerindo o controle do A. cajennense pela ação desses fungos.This work aimed at the evaluation of the in vitro susceptibility of Amblyomma cajennense nimphs and adults to isolates of Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae fungi. Three isolates of M. anisopliae (959, 319 e E9 and two of B. bassiana (986 e 747 were used. Conidia suspensions were made from fungi grown up in a rice culture medium and each test consisted of four treated groups (10(5, 10(6, 10(7, 10(8 conidia/ ml plus a control group. Viability of individuals was assessed 15 days after treatment or after adult ecdisis. Significative differences were found for all treatments and for all stages studied. A large reduction in the viability of ticks was observed, and this effect increased as conidia concentration raised. Based upon the results obtained, it can be concluded that all isolates tested presented an in vitro lethality for the biological stages of A. cajennense evaluated

  9. Life cycle of female ticks of Amblyomma cooperi Nuttal & Warburton, 1908 (Acari: Ixodidae under laboratory conditions Ciclo biológico de fêmeas do carrapato Amblyomma cooperi Nuttal & Warburton, 1908 (Acari:Ixodidae sob condições de laboratório

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    A.T.S. Almeida

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The biological cycle of female ticks of Amblyomma cooperi was studied under controlled conditions. The study has begun with two engorged females collected in a naturally infested wild capybara. The larvae originated from the oviposition of these two females were used for collecting young adults through artificial infestations in rabbits. The female parasitic and free living phases were evaluated using artificial infestation of ticks in a capybara. The average body weight of females was 958.2± 175.6mg, the average pre-egg laying period was 8.5± 1.4 days, the reproductive efficiency index was 59.5± 4.2 and the nutritional efficiency index was 77.3± 4.8. The incubation and eclosion periods were 41.9 and 5.9 days, respectively, and the rate of eclosion was 64%. These figures were obtained under high relative humidity conditions which were necessary for the success of the egg incubation process of this species. The preliminary data obtained with the artificial infestation in rabbits raises the possibility of this and other domestic species be used as an epidemiologic link between the domestic and the wild environment with the potential exposure of human populations to A. cooperi and to the maculosa fever agent.O ciclo biológico de Amblyomma cooperi foi estudado sob condições de laboratório. O estudo iniciou-se com duas fêmeas ingurgitadas coletadas de uma capivara selvagem naturalmente infestada. As larvas provenientes da postura foram utilizadas para obtenção de adultos, por meio de infestação artificial em coelhos. As fases parasitária e de vida livre das fêmeas foram avaliadas utilizando-se infestação artificial em capivara. A média de peso corporal foi de 958,2± 175,6mg, a média do período de pré-postura de 8,5± 1,4 dias e dos índices de eficiência reprodutiva e nutricional de 59,5± 4,2 e 77,3± 4,6, respectivamente. Os períodos de incubação e eclosão foram de 41,9 e 5,9 dias, respectivamente. A taxa de eclosão foi

  10. Carrapatos do gênero amblyomma (acari: ixodidae e suas relações com os hospedeiros em área endêmica para febre maculosa no Estado de São Paulo Ticks of genus Amblyomma (Acari: Ixodidae and their relationship with hosts in endemic area for spotted fever in the state of São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Perez

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Foram avaliadas 7 espécies da mastofauna e 36 da avifauna quanto à prevalência e intensidade de infestação por carrapatos na ESALQ/USP, no Município de Piracicaba, SP. Analisaram-se 52 indivíduos da mastofauna e 158 da avifauna, parasitados por 12418 carrapatos. Os exemplares adultos (N= 7343 foram encontrados em parasitismo nas capivaras enquanto que os imaturos foram, na maioria, coletados de pequenos mamíferos e aves. Os principais hospedeiros para as formas imaturas, em ordem decrescente, foram gambás (69,1%, capivaras (24,4% e urubus (3,7%. Entre a avifauna, o urubu apresentou o maior número de carrapatos com 69,9%, seguido por indivíduos das famílias Thamnophilidae e Turdidae. Os carrapatos adultos encontrados em capivaras foram A. cajennense (80,8% e A. dubitatum (19,2%. Ambas as espécies foram também coletadas em gambás, correspondendo a 72,4% e 27,6%, respectivamente. Pela facilidade de captura e atratividade de Amblyomma spp. o gambá pode ser usado como bioindicador de infestação em locais endêmicos para febre maculosa. Considerando os índices de parasitismo e prevalência bem como de abundância de carrapatos, susceptibilidade dos hospedeiros, proliferação e susceptibilidade para infecção por R. rickettsi, capivaras e gambás são potenciais hospedeiros amplificadores desse microrganismo no Campus da ESALQ, enquanto eqüídeos, urubus e gatos atuam como hospedeiros secundários.Seven species of mammals and 36 of birds were investigated to determine the tick prevalence and intensity of infestation. The study was conducted at the Esalq/USP in Piracicaba municipality, State of São Paulo. It was collected 52 mammals and 158 birds parasitized by 12,418 ticks. Adult ticks (N= 7,343 were found on capybaras, while the immature were mainly collected on small mammals and birds. The main hosts for immatures in descending order were opossums (69.1%, capybara (24.4% and black vultures (3.7%. Among the avifauna, the black

  11. Seasonal Population changes of Amblyomma Lepidum (Acari ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tick burden, stage and sex ratio were recorded. The results indicated marked seasonal variations on the infestation rate of cattle by the different stages of the tick Amblyomma lepidum. The tick infestation started to increase during the first shower and reached a peak towards or shortly after the end of the rainy season.

  12. Effects of exposing adults of Amblyomma variegatum to neem cake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The efficacy of a trap baited with an attractant blend comprising of attraction aggregation- attachment pheromone (AAAP), 1-octen-3-ol and CO2 and treated with Neem (Azadirachta indica) cake extracts (0.6% of azadirachtin) to attract and expose the ticks, Amblyomma variegatum (Fabricius) (Acari: Ixodidae) to the active ...

  13. Microorganisms in ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) collected on marsupials and rodents from Santa Catarina, Paraná and Mato Grosso do Sul states, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Carolina Moreira; Teixeira, Bernardo Rodrigues; da Silva, Alexandro Guterres; de Oliveira, Renata Carvalho; Strecht, Liana; Ogrzewalska, Maria; de Lemos, Elba Regina S

    2017-01-01

    Information about tick fauna and monitoring of pathogen prevalences in ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) in various habitat types can enhance knowledge about the epidemiology of tick-borne pathogens in Brazil. This work shows the results of a study of tick parasitism of wild rodents and marsupials collected in seven localities in the southern part of Brazil, within Atlantic Forest and Cerrado biomes. A total of 61 ticks were collected from small mammals, and after identification to the species level, the ticks were individually tested for the presence of bacteria of the genera Rickettsia, Borrelia, family Anaplasmataceae, and protozoa of the genus Babesia. The following species of ticks were found: Amblyomma ovale Koch, 1844, Amblyomma dubitatum Neumann, 1899, Amblyomma fuscum Neumann, 1907, Ixodes aragaoi Fonseca, 1935, Ixodes fuscipes Koch, 1844, Ixodes loricatus Neumann, 1899, and Ixodes schulzei Aragão and Fonseca, 1951. Among tested ticks, no DNA of Borrelia, Babesia or Anaplasmataceae was detected. Two nymphs of A. ovale were found infected with Rickettsia bellii and four nymphs of I. aragaoi with Rickettsia sp., genetically close to Rickettsia monacensis, Rickettsia tamurae and the endosymbiont Rickettsia spp., previously found in various Ixodidae. In one nymph of A. fuscum, DNA of a novel Hepatozoon sp. was found. Additionally we provide novel tick-host associations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. The ticks (Acari: Ixodida: Argasidae, Ixodidae) of Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastropaolo, Mariano; Beltrán-Saavedra, L Fabián; Guglielmone, Alberto A

    2014-03-01

    The tick species reported in Bolivia are reviewed here as (1) endemic or established: Ornithodoros echimys, O. guaporensis, O. hasei, O. kohlsi, O. mimon, O. peropteryx, O. rostratus, Otobius megnini, Amblyomma auricularium, A. cajennense, A. calcaratum, A. coelebs, A. dubitatum, A. humerale, A. incisum, A. longirostre, A. naponense, A. nodosum, A. oblongoguttatum, A. ovale, A. parvitarsum, A. parvum, A. pecarium, A. pseudoconcolor, A. rotundatum, A. scalpturatum, A. tigrinum, A. triste, Dermacentor nitens, Haemaphysalis juxtakochi, H. leporispalustris, I. boliviensis, I. cooleyi, I. luciae, Rhipicephalus microplus, R. sanguineus, and (2) erroneously reported: Ornithodoros puertoricensis, O. talaje, O. turicata, Amblyomma americanum, A. maculatum, A. multipunctum, Ixodes ricinus, I. scapularis, Rhipicephalus annulatus. Many of these records are lacking locality and/or host, and some of them need new findings for confirmation. Some of the species recorded may represent a threat for human and animal health, therefore would be of great value to make a countrywide survey of ticks in order to update the information presented in this work. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Further studies on South African plants: Acaricidal activity of organic plant extracts against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wellington, Kevin W

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available -1 Veterinary Parasitology, vol. 234: 10-12 Further studies on South African plants: Acaricidal activity of organic plant extracts against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) Wellington, KW Leboho, T Sakong, BM Adenubi, OT Eloff, JN...

  16. Experimental use of two standard tick collection methods to evaluate the relative effectiveness of several plant-derived and synthetic repellents against Ixodes scapularis and Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Terry L; Jordan, Robert A; Dolan, Marc C

    2011-12-01

    We used two standard tick collection methods to test the relative effectiveness of two natural product compounds (nootkatone and carvacrol, classified as an eremophilene sesquiterpene and a monoterpene, respectively, that are derived from botanical sources) with commercially-available plant-derived (EcoSMART Organic Insect Repellent, comprised of plant essential oils) and permethrin-based (Repel Permanone) repellents against Ixodes scapularis Say and Amblyomma americanum (L.). Cloth drags were equally effective in sampling both species of host-seeking nymphs, whereas CO, traps attracted primarily A. americanum. All four repellents performed well on drags, with nootkatone and Permanone Repel (100% repelled through 14 d) slightly more effective than carvacrol and EcoSMART (90.7% and 97.7% repelled at 14 d, respectively) at repelling I. scapularis nymphs. Although the same trend in percent repellency was noted in the CO2 trap trial against both A. americanum nymphs and adults, EcoSMART outperformed Permanone in repelling A. Americanum nymphs after 14 d in the drag trial. Generally, the effectiveness of all repellents tested declined over time. The use of tick drags and CO2 traps was rapid, inexpensive, and easy to use in determining the relative effectiveness of repellents in the field.

  17. Biological parameters of larvae, nymphs, and engorged females of Amblyomma cajennense (Fabricius, 1787 (Acari: Ixodidae obtained from artificial and successive infestations on Oryctolagus cuniculus (Linnaeus, 1758 (Lagomorpha: Ochotonidae Parâmetros biológicos de larvas, ninfas e fêmeas ingurgitadas de Amblyomma cajennense (Fabricius, 1787 (Acari:Ixodidae obtidas de infestações artificiais e sucessivas em Oryctolagus cuniculus (Lagomorpha:Ochotonidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M.V. Freitas

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of acquired resistance to Amblyomma cajennense ticks was evaluated. A total of 18 rabbits were uniformly distributed into three groups named GL, GN, and GA that were submitted to three consecutive infestations with, respectively, larvae, nymphs, and adults of A. cajennense. After the infestations, the parasitic and reproductive parameters of recovered instars were evaluated. A significant reduction of recovery rates of inoculated ticks was observed only after the third infestation of animals in groups GL and GN (PAvaliou-se o desenvolvimento de resistência adquirida frente ao parasitismo por Amblyomma cajennense. Para tanto, 18 coelhos foram uniformemente distribuídos em três grupos denominados GL, GN e GA e submetidos a três infestações consecutivas por, respectivamente, larvas, ninfas ou adultos de A. cajennense. Após a infestação, estudaram-se os parâmetros parasitários e reprodutivos dos exemplares recuperados. Apenas a partir da terceira infestação dos animais dos grupos GL e GN, pôde-se observar uma queda significativa na taxa de recuperação dos ixodídeos inoculados (P<0,01. O dia modal de queda das larvas e ninfas recuperadas aumentou com o decorrer das infestações. As ninfas ingurgitadas recuperadas apresentaram uma redução significativa (P<0,01 no peso médio corporal entre a primeira e terceira infestação. Observou-se uma queda significativa na taxa média de recuperação das fêmeas ingurgitadas somente na terceira infestação (P<0,01. Todavia, a partir da segunda infestação observou-se nas teleóginas recuperadas, uma redução significativa no peso corporal, peso da postura e eclodibilidade das larvas (P<0,05. Os dados sugerem a ocorrência de resistência em coelhos à infestação por A. cajennense que foi mais evidente contra o estádio adulto.

  18. Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) of the state of Amazonas, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianizella, Sergio L; Martins, Thiago F; Onofrio, Valeria C; Aguiar, Nair O; Gravena, Waleska; do Nascimento, Carlos A R; Neto, Laérzio C; Faria, Diogo L; Lima, Natália A S; Solorio, Monica R; Maranhão, Louise; Lima, Ivan J; Cobra, Iury V D; Santos, Tamily; Lopes, Gerson P; Ramalho, Emiliano E; Luz, Hermes R; Labruna, Marcelo B

    2018-02-01

    The tick fauna of Brazil is currently composed by 72 species. The state of Amazonas is the largest of Brazil, with an area of ≈ 19% of the Brazilian land. Besides its vast geographic area, only 19 tick species have been reported for Amazonas. Herein, lots containing ticks from the state of Amazonas were examined in three major tick collections from Brazil. A total of 5933 tick specimens were examined and recorded, comprising 2693 males, 1247 females, 1509 nymphs, and 484 larvae. These ticks were identified into the following 22 species: Amblyomma cajennense sensu lato, Amblyomma calcaratum, Amblyomma coelebs, Amblyomma dissimile, Amblyomma dubitatum, Amblyomma geayi, Amblyomma goeldii, Amblyomma humerale, Amblyomma latepunctatun, Amblyomma longirostre, Amblyomma naponense, Amblyomma oblongoguttatum, Amblyomma ovale, Amblyomma rotundatum, Amblyomma scalpturatum, Amblyomma varium, Dermacentor nitens, Haemaphysalis juxtakochi, Ixodes cf. Ixodes fuscipes, Ixodes luciae, Rhipicephalus microplus, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato. Ticks were collected from 17 (27.4%) out of the 62 municipalities that currently compose the state of Amazonas. The following four species are reported for the first time in the state of Amazonas: A. coelebs, A. dubitatum, H. juxtakochi, and Ixodes cf. I. fuscipes. The only tick species previously reported for Amazonas and not found in the present study is Amblyomma parvum. This study provides a great expansion of geographical and host records of ticks for the state of Amazonas, which is now considered to have a tick fauna composed by 23 species. It is noteworthy that we report 1391 Amblyomma nymphs that were identified to 13 different species.

  19. Birds and hard ticks (Acari: Ixodidae, with discussions about hypotheses on tick evolution

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    GUGLIELMONE AA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between birds (Aves and hard ticks (Ixodidae was analyzed for the 386 of 725 tick extant species whose larva, nymph and adults are known as well as their natural hosts. A total of 136 (54 Prostriata= Ixodes, 82 Metastriata= all other genera are frequently found on Aves, but only 32 species (1 associated with Palaeognathae, 31 with Neognathae have all parasitic stages feeding on birds: 25 Ixodes (19% of the species analyzed for this genus, 6 Haemaphysalis (7% and 1 species of Amblyomma (2%. The species of Amblyomma feeds on marine birds (MB, the six Haemaphysalis are parasites of non-marine birds (NMB, and 14 of the 25 Ixodes feed on NMB, one feeds on NMB and MB, and ten on MB. The Australasian Ixodes + I. uriae clade probably originated at an uncertain time from the late Triassic to the early Cretaceous. It is speculated that Prostriata first hosts were Gondwanan theropod dinosaurs in an undetermined place before Pangaea break up; alternatively, if ancestral monotromes were involved in its evolution an Australasian origin of Prostriata seems plausible. As for Prostriata the Motherland of Ixodida is probably Gondwana. RESUMEN. Aves y garrapatas duras (Ixodidae, con discusión sobre hipótesis sobre evolución de las garrapatas. En esta revisión se analizó la relación entre aves y garrapatas duras (Ixodidae para las 386 de 725 especies de garrapatas que utilizan aves como hospedadores para larvas, ninfas y adultos. Un total de 136 especies (54 Prostriata= Ixodes, 82 Metastriata= restantes géneros son frecuentemente encontradas sobre aves, pero solo 32 especies (1 asociada con Palaeognathae, 31 con Neognathae tienen ciclos donde todos los estadios se alimentan sobre aves: 25 Ixodes (19% de las especies analizadas para este género, 6 Haemaphysalis (7% del total y 1 especie de Amblyomma (2% del total. Las especies de Amblyomma se alimentan sobre aves marinas (MB, las seis de Haemaphysalis son parásitas de aves no-marinas (NMB

  20. Association patterns of ticks (Acari: Ixodida: Ixodidae, Argasidae) of small mammals in Cerrado fragments, western Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponchiado, Jonas; Melo, Geruza L; Martins, Thiago F; Krawczak, Felipe S; Labruna, Marcelo B; Cáceres, Nilton C

    2015-03-01

    The present study describes ticks associated with small mammals and analyzes the aggregation patterns according to seasonal and host variations in the Cerrado biome, central-western Brazil. Small mammals were systematically captured in 54 woodland fragments from February 2012 to July 2013. A total of 1,040 animals belonging to eight marsupial and 12 rodent species were captured; 265 animals were parasitized by eight tick species (in decreasing order of abundance): Ornithodoros mimon, Amblyomma coelebs, Amblyomma sculptum, Amblyomma ovale, Amblyomma parvum, Amblyomma dubitatum, Amblyomma parkeri, and Ixodes amarali. With few exceptions, collected ticks were larvae and nymphs. Among the more abundant animals, the marsupial Didelphis albiventris showed the highest tick prevalence (84.4 %), mean abundance (19.2), mean intensity (22.8), richness of ticks species (n = 7), and total abundance of ticks (n = 2,457). Amblyomma sculptum and O. mimon were the most generalist species, collected on four host species. Fifteen new tick-host associations are reported for the first time. Most ticks showed higher prevalence and mean intensity in the dry season, regardless of host species. Overall, tick prevalence and mean intensity of infestation were significantly associated with host gender. Finally, the importance of the large number of records of the argasid O. mimon is discussed.

  1. The tick (Acari: Ixodidae) fauna of Herald's Beacon Islet, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Mackenzie L; Mintram, Kate

    2017-01-01

    A rare opportunity to travel to Herald's Beacon Islet with permission from the Australian government to collect ticks allowed for a survey of the tick fauna of the island to be undertaken for the first time. The avian fauna of the island, which serve as hosts, was also recorded and includes one new species record for the island. The seabird soft tick Ornithodoros capensis Neumann and the seabird hard tick Amblyomma loculosum Neumann were found to be present on the island. Images of the ticks present on the island are presented along with morphological characters for their identification.

  2. Canis familiaris, UN NUEVO HOSPEDERO DE Ornithodoros (A. puertoricensis FOX, 1947 (ACARI: IXODIDA EN COLOMBIA

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    LUIS E. PATERNINA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN Las garrapatas revisten gran importancia en el campo biomédico por sus hábitos hematófagos y asociación con la transmisión de agentes patógenos a humanos y animales. El objetivo de esta investigación fue establecer las especies de garrapatas que parasitan perros en tres poblaciones del área rural del Caribe colombiano. Durante los meses de agosto y diciembre del año 2006 se realizó búsqueda activa de garrapatas sobre caninos domésticos de las localidades de El Campín, Sabanas del Potrero y Escobar Arriba, departamento de Sucre. Las garrapatas recolectadas fueron almacenadas en viales con etanol al 70% e identificadas empleando claves morfológicas de referencia para cada familia. Para la determinación de especie en la familia Argasidae se realizaron estimaciones morfométricas de estructuras externas. Se recolectaron 420 garrapatas a partir de 50 caninos infestados, de un total de 134 perros examinados, que corresponde a una tasa de infestación del 37,3%. Las garrapatas fueron identificadas como Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus y Amblyomma ovale pertenecientes a la familia Ixodidae, y Ornithodoros (Alectorobius puertoricensis de la familia Argasidae. La especie predominante fue R. sanguineus (92,1% en los estados de larva, ninfa y adulto, seguida por larvas de O. puertoricensis, que fueron halladas en menor número sobre caninos de las tres localidades. Se registra, por primera vez en América, el parasitismo de O. puertoricensis sobre caninos domésticos y se confirma su presencia en Colombia. Palabras clave: garrapatas, perros, Ornithodoros puertoricensis, Ixodida, Colombia. ABSTRACT Ticks are very important from the biomedical point of view, by their hematophagic activity and their role in the transmission of pathogenic microorganisms to man and animals. The main goal of this work was to establish the tick species parasiting dogs in three rural localities of the Colombian Caribbean. From

  3. A review of the ticks (Acari, Ixodida of Brazil, their hosts and geographic distribution - 1. The State of Rio Grande do Sul, Southern Brazil

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    Evans DE

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of the ticks (Acari, Ixodida of the State of Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil, was completed as a step towards a definitive list (currently indicated as 12 of such species, their hosts and distribution. The ticks: Argas miniatus (poultry, Ixodes loricatus (opossums, Amblyomma aureolatum (dogs, A. calcaratum (anteaters, A. cooperi (capybaras, A. nodosum (anteaters, A. tigrinum (dogs (Neotropical and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (dogs (introduced, cosmopolitan, Afrotropical were confirmed as present, in addition to the predominant, Boophilus microplus (cattle (introduced, pan-tropical, Oriental. Of the further 18 species thus far reported in the literature as present in the state, but unavailable for examination: only Ornithodoros brasiliensis (humans and their habitations (Neotropical, Ixodes affinis (deer (Nearctic/Neotropical and I. auritulus (birds (Nearctic/Neotropical/Afrotropical/ Australasian are considered likely; 13 species would benefit from corroborative local data but the majority appear unlikely; reports of A. maculatum (Nearctic/Neotropical, but circum-Caribbean are considered erroneous; the validity of A. fuscum is in doubt. The very recent, first known report of the tropical Anocentor nitens (horses(Nearctic/Neotropical, but still apparent absence of the tropical A. cajennense (catholic (Nearctic/Neotropical and the sub-tropical/temperate Ixodes pararicinus (cattle (Neotropical in Rio Grande do Sul are important for considerations on their current biogeographical distribution and its dynamics in South America. The state has relatively long established, introduced ("exotic", Old World tick species (B. microplus, R. sanguineus that continue to represent significant pests and disease vectors to their traditional, introduced domestic animal hosts, cattle and urban dogs. There are also indigenous, New World ticks (A. miniatus, O. brasiliensis, A. aureolatum, A. nitens, as both long established and possibly newly locally

  4. Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae of livestock and their seasonal activities, northwest of Iran

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    Zahra Ramezani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the ticks (Acari: Ixodidae of livestock and their seasonal activities, in northwest of Iran, including the combination of two of the geographical regions of Iran (Caspian and mountain plateau where the majority of the domestic ruminants in Iran exist. Methods: Fifteen villages of Meshkin-Shahr County were selected randomly from different areas of the county. The animal dwellings were visited and the whole body of sheep, cows, goats and dogs were examined for their probable infestation. Samples were identified at the level of species according to the standard morphological key. Results: In this study 1 208 specimen were collected and totally nine species (Dermacentor marginatus, Dermacentor niveus, Haemaphysalis erinacei, Haemaphysalis punctata, Hyalomma anatolicum, Hyalomma asiaticum, Hyalomma marginatum, Rhipicephalus bursa and Rhipicephalus sanguineus were identified in this study. Also 569 host including 40 cows, 450 sheep, 70 goats and 9 dogs were examined for infestation and among them 255 were infested which showed a 44% of infestation among examined livestock. The infestation rate among sheep (46% was higher than other hosts. The infestation rates among the rest of hosts were as: cows (40%, goat (37% and dogs (33%. Conclusions: The results of this study and other studies of the region showed the probability of the establishment and development of the burden of several tick-borne diseases.

  5. Flagging versus dragging as sampling methods for nymphal Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulison, Eric L.; Kuczaj, Isis; Pang, Genevieve; Hickling, Graham J.; Tsao, Jean I.; Ginsberg, Howard S.

    2013-01-01

    The nymphal stage of the blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae), is responsible for most transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiologic agent of Lyme disease, to humans in North America. From 2010 to fall of 2012, we compared two commonly used techniques, flagging and dragging, as sampling methods for nymphal I. scapularis at three sites, each with multiple sampling arrays (grids), in the eastern and central United States. Flagging and dragging collected comparable numbers of nymphs, with no consistent differences between methods. Dragging collected more nymphs than flagging in some samples, but these differences were not consistent among sites or sampling years. The ratio of nymphs collected by flagging vs dragging was not significantly related to shrub density, so habitat type did not have a strong effect on the relative efficacy of these methods. Therefore, although dragging collected more ticks in a few cases, the numbers collected by each method were so variable that neither technique had a clear advantage for sampling nymphal I. scapularis.

  6. New records for Amblyomma sculptum (Ixodidae) on non-passerine birds in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Hermes Ribeiro Luz; João Luiz Horacio Faccini; Gabriel Alves Landulfo; Sócrates Fraga Costa Neto; Kátia Maria Famadas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this paper was to provide new records of Amblyomma sculptum on two species of terricolous birds in two areas of the Cerrado (savannah- like) bioma: two specimens of Cariama cristata were captured in the state of Goiás and one specimen ofCrax fasciolata was captured in the state of Minas Gerais. One of the C. cristata was parasitized by 15 larvae, six nymphs, one male and two females whereas the C. fasciolata was parasitized by seven larvae and eight nymphs. This paper pres...

  7. New records for Amblyomma sculptum (Ixodidae) on non-passerine birds in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Hermes Ribeiro; Faccini, João Luiz Horacio; Landulfo, Gabriel Alves; Costa Neto, Sócrates Fraga; Famadas, Kátia Maria

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to provide new records of Amblyomma sculptum on two species of terricolous birds in two areas of the Cerrado (savannah- like) bioma: two specimens of Cariama cristata were captured in the state of Goiás and one specimen ofCrax fasciolata was captured in the state of Minas Gerais. One of the C. cristata was parasitized by 15 larvae, six nymphs, one male and two females whereas the C. fasciolata was parasitized by seven larvae and eight nymphs. This paper presents a new locality for occurrence of parasitism A. sculptum in C. cristata and a new host for C fasciolata.

  8. New records for Amblyomma sculptum (Ixodidae on non-passerine birds in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermes Ribeiro Luz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this paper was to provide new records of Amblyomma sculptum on two species of terricolous birds in two areas of the Cerrado (savannah- like bioma: two specimens of Cariama cristata were captured in the state of Goiás and one specimen ofCrax fasciolata was captured in the state of Minas Gerais. One of the C. cristata was parasitized by 15 larvae, six nymphs, one male and two females whereas the C. fasciolata was parasitized by seven larvae and eight nymphs. This paper presents a new locality for occurrence of parasitism A. sculptum in C. cristata and a new host for C fasciolata.

  9. A survey of ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) of companion animals in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greay, Telleasha L; Oskam, Charlotte L; Gofton, Alexander W; Rees, Robert L; Ryan, Una M; Irwin, Peter J

    2016-05-10

    Ticks are among the most important vectors of pathogens affecting companion animals, and also cause health problems such as tick paralysis, anaemia, dermatitis, and secondary infections. Twenty ixodid species have previously been recorded on dogs, cats, and horses in Australia, including Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Ixodes holocyclus and Haemaphysalis longicornis, which transmit tick-borne diseases. A survey of hard ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) was conducted during 2012-2015 to investigate tick species that infest dogs, cats, and horses in Australia. Individual tick specimens were collected from dogs, cats and horses across Australia and sample collection locations were mapped using QGIS software. Ticks were morphologically examined to determine species, instar and sex. The companion animal owners responded to questionnaires and data collected were summarised with SPSS software. A total of 4765 individual ticks were identified in this study from 7/8 states and territories in Australia. Overall, 220 larvae, 805 nymphs, 1404 males, and 2336 females of 11 tick species were identified from 837 companion animal hosts. One novel host record was obtained during this study for Ixodes myrmecobii, which was found on Felis catus (domestic cat) in the town of Esperance, Western Australia. The most common tick species identified included R. sanguineus on dogs (73 %), I. holocyclus on cats (81 %) and H. longicornis on horses (60 %). This study is the first of its kind to be conducted in Australia and our results contribute to the understanding of the species and distribution of ticks that parasitise dogs, cats, and horses in Australia. Records of R. sanguineus outside of the recorded distribution range emphasise the need for a systematic study of the habitat range of this species. Several incomplete descriptions of ixodid species encountered in this study hindered morphological identification.

  10. Efficacy of granular deltamethrin against Ixodes scapularis and Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidade) nymphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, T L; Jordan, R A; Hung, R W; Taylor, R C; Markowski, D; Chomsky, M S

    2001-03-01

    A single barrier application of granular deltamethrin to the woodland edges of a forested residential community in late spring significantly reduced the abundance of Ixodes scapularis Say nymphs. The application also suppressed the population of Amblyomma americanum (L.) nymphs, which recently became established in the study area. The efficacy of deltamethrin is compared with other commonly used acaricides.

  11. Bacteria of the genus Rickettsia in ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) collected from birds in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrzewalska, Maria; Literák, Ivan; Capek, Miroslav; Sychra, Oldřich; Calderón, Víctor Álvarez; Rodríguez, Bernardo Calvo; Prudencio, Carlos; Martins, Thiago F; Labruna, Marcelo B

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to document the presence of Rickettsia spp. in ticks parasitizing wild birds in Costa Rica. Birds were trapped at seven locations in Costa Rica during 2004, 2009, and 2010; then visually examined for the presence of ticks. Ticks were identified, and part of them was tested individually for the presence of Rickettsia spp. by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers targeting fragments of the rickettsial genes gltA and ompA. PCR products were DNA-sequenced and analyzed in BLAST to determine similarities with previously reported rickettsial agents. A total of 1878 birds were examined, from which 163 birds (9%) were infested with 388 ticks of the genera Amblyomma and Ixodes. The following Amblyomma (in decreasing order of abundance) were found in immature stages (larvae and nymphs): Amblyomma longirostre, Amblyomma calcaratum, Amblyomma coelebs, Amblyomma sabanerae, Amblyomma varium, Amblyomma maculatum, and Amblyomma ovale. Ixodes ticks were represented by Ixodes minor and two unclassified species, designated here as Ixodes sp. genotype I, and Ixodes sp. genotype II. Twelve of 24 tested A. longirostre ticks were found to be infected with 'Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii', and 2 of 4 A. sabanerae were found to be infected with Rickettsia bellii. Eight of 10 larval Ixodes minor were infected with an endosymbiont (a novel Rickettsia sp. agent) genetically related to the Ixodes scapularis endosymbiont. No rickettsial DNA was found in A. calcaratum, A. coelebs, A. maculatum, A. ovale, A. varium, Ixodes sp. I, and Ixodes sp. II. We report the occurrence of I. minor in Costa Rica for the first time and a number of new bird host-tick associations. Moreover, 'Candidatus R. amblyommii' and R. bellii were found in A. longirostre and A. sabanerae, respectively, in Costa Rica for the first time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular identification of blood meal sources of ticks (Acari, Ixodidae using cytochrome b gene as a genetic marker

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    Ernieenor Faraliana Che Lah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood meal analysis (BMA from ticks allows for the identification of natural hosts of ticks (Acari: Ixodidae. The aim of this study is to identify the blood meal sources of field collected on-host ticks using PCR analysis. DNA of four genera of ticks was isolated and their cytochrome b (Cyt b gene was amplified to identify host blood meals. A phylogenetic tree was constructed based on data of Cyt b sequences using Neighbor Joining (NJ and Maximum Parsimony (MP analysis using MEGA 5.05 for the clustering of hosts of tick species. Twenty out of 27 samples showed maximum similarity (99% with GenBank sequences through a Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST while 7 samples only showed a similarity range of between 91–98%. The phylogenetic trees showed that the blood meal samples were derived from small rodents (Leopoldamys sabanus, Rattus tiomanicus and Sundamys muelleri, shrews (Tupaia glis and mammals (Tapirus indicus and Prionailurus bengalensis, supported by 82–88% bootstrap values. In this study, Cyt b gene as a molecular target produced reliable results and was very significant for the effective identification of ticks’ blood meal. The assay can be used as a tool for identifying unknown blood meals of field collected on-host ticks.

  13. Molecular identification of blood meal sources of ticks (Acari, Ixodidae) using cytochrome b gene as a genetic marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che Lah, Ernieenor Faraliana; Yaakop, Salmah; Ahamad, Mariana; Md Nor, Shukor

    2015-01-01

    Blood meal analysis (BMA) from ticks allows for the identification of natural hosts of ticks (Acari: Ixodidae). The aim of this study is to identify the blood meal sources of field collected on-host ticks using PCR analysis. DNA of four genera of ticks was isolated and their cytochrome b (Cyt b) gene was amplified to identify host blood meals. A phylogenetic tree was constructed based on data of Cyt b sequences using Neighbor Joining (NJ) and Maximum Parsimony (MP) analysis using MEGA 5.05 for the clustering of hosts of tick species. Twenty out of 27 samples showed maximum similarity (99%) with GenBank sequences through a Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) while 7 samples only showed a similarity range of between 91-98%. The phylogenetic trees showed that the blood meal samples were derived from small rodents (Leopoldamyssabanus, Rattustiomanicus and Sundamysmuelleri), shrews (Tupaiaglis) and mammals (Tapirusindicus and Prionailurusbengalensis), supported by 82-88% bootstrap values. In this study, Cyt b gene as a molecular target produced reliable results and was very significant for the effective identification of ticks' blood meal. The assay can be used as a tool for identifying unknown blood meals of field collected on-host ticks.

  14. Environmentally associated ticks (Acari: Ixodidae in Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil Carrapatos (Acari: Ixodidae associados com o ambiente em Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brasil

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    Marcos Valério Garcia

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we report tick species found on wild and domestic animals and in the environment during a one-year sampling period at the Brazilian Farming Research Company beef cattle unit (Embrapa Beef Cattle, which is located within the urban area of Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. From 55 wild hosts including six different species (Nasua nasua, Cebus spp., Cerdocyon thous, Myrmecophaga tridactyla, Tamandua tetradactyla and Dasyprocta aguti, 323 ticks were collected. Amblyomma ovale ticks were found solely on coatis, and Amblyomma nodosum was identified solely on anteaters. No ticks were found on capuchin monkeys. However, Amblyomma cajennense was found on all parasitized host species with the exception of capuchin monkeys. Giant anteaters displayed the highest infestation abundance, with a mean of 53 ticks∕animal. Environmental sampling yielded 166 adult A. cajennense ticks. The tick species found on domestic animals (Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus, R. sanguineus, Dermacentor nitens and A. cajennense were those typically found on these hosts in Brazil. The most prevalent tick species, A. cajennense, was found on both wild and domestic animals and was also prevalent in the environment. Thus, this tick species is the primary vector that allows pathogens to bridge wild and domestic animals in the Cerrado.Neste trabalho são descritas as espécies de carrapatos de animais selvagens e domésticos e do ambiente coletados por um ano na EMBRAPA Gado de Corte localizado na área urbana de Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brasil. Dos 55 hospedeiros selvagens de seis espécies diferentes (Nasua nasua, Cebus spp., Cerdocyon thous, Myrmecophaga tridactyla, Tamandua tetradactyla e Dasyprocta aguti foram coletados 323 carrapatos. Amblyomma ovale foi encontrado apenas em quatis e Amblyomma nodosum apenas sobre tamanduás. Nenhum carrapato foi encontrado sobre macacos-prego. Por outro lado, Amblyomma cajennense foi encontrado em todos os hospedeiros

  15. Some effects of 60Co irradiation on Cowdria ruminantium in its tick host Amblyomma hebraeum Koch (Acarina: Ixodidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spickett, A.M.; Bezuidenhout, J.D.; Jacobsz, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    An attempt was made to attenuate Cowdria ruminantium by irradiation of the nymphal stage of its tick host, Amblyomma hebraeum. The irradiated nymphae were homogenized and serial dilutions of the resultant suspension were injected intravenously into heartwater-susceptible sheep. No attenuation could be demonstrated but the results indicate that progressively more micro-organisms will be destroyed the higher the irradiation dosage applied, and that dosages between 20 and 30 kilorad apparently prove fatal to all the pathogenic organisms

  16. Prevalence and Diversity of Tick-Borne Pathogens in Nymphal Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) in Eastern National Parks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tammi L; Graham, Christine B; Boegler, Karen A; Cherry, Cara C; Maes, Sarah E; Pilgard, Mark A; Hojgaard, Andrias; Buttke, Danielle E; Eisen, Rebecca J

    2017-05-01

    Tick-borne pathogens transmitted by Ixodes scapularis Say (Acari: Ixodidae), also known as the deer tick or blacklegged tick, are increasing in incidence and geographic distribution in the United States. We examined the risk of tick-borne disease exposure in 9 national parks across six Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic States and the District of Columbia in 2014 and 2015. To assess the recreational risk to park visitors, we sampled for ticks along frequently used trails and calculated the density of I. scapularis nymphs (DON) and the density of infected nymphs (DIN). We determined the nymphal infection prevalence of I. scapularis with a suite of tick-borne pathogens including Borrelia burgdorferi, Borrelia miyamotoi, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, and Babesia microti. Ixodes scapularis nymphs were found in all national park units; DON ranged from 0.40 to 13.73 nymphs per 100 m2. Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, was found at all sites where I. scapularis was documented; DIN with B. burgdorferi ranged from 0.06 to 5.71 nymphs per 100 m2. Borrelia miyamotoi and A. phagocytophilum were documented at 60% and 70% of the parks, respectively, while Ba. microti occurred at just 20% of the parks. Ixodes scapularis is well established across much of the Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic States, and our results are generally consistent with previous studies conducted near the areas we sampled. Newly established I. scapularis populations were documented in two locations: Washington, D.C. (Rock Creek Park) and Greene County, Virginia (Shenandoah National Park). This research demonstrates the potential risk of tick-borne pathogen exposure in national parks and can be used to educate park visitors about the importance of preventative actions to minimize tick exposure. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  17. Tick infestation (Acari: Ixodidae) in roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) from northwestern Spain: population dynamics and risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Luís; Panadero, Rosario; Dacal, Vicente; Pato, Francisco Javier; López, Ceferino; Díaz, Pablo; Arias, María Sol; Fernández, Gonzalo; Díez-Baños, Pablo; Morrondo, Patrocinio

    2011-04-01

    During the 2007 and 2008 hunting seasons (April-October) the skin of 367 roe deer (Capreolus capreolus L.), hunted in different preserves from Galicia (Northwestern Spain), were examined for ticks (Acari: Ixodidae). The overall prevalence of infestation by ticks was 83.1%. The predominant species was Ixodes ricinus (83.1%), whereas a single Dermacentor marginatus specimen appeared in one roe deer. All developmental stages of I. ricinus were found parasitizing roe deer, the adults being the most frequent (82.2%), followed by nymphs (45.6%) and larvae (27.2%). The mean intensity of infestation by I. ricinus was 43.2 ± 49.85; most of them were adults (30.7 ± 31.64) and in a lesser extend nymphs (16.9 ± 24.74) and larvae (10.7 ± 29.90). Ixodes ricinus was present all over the study with percentages that oscillated between 100% in spring and 57.4% in autumn. CHAID algorithm showed the sex of roe deer as the most influential factor in tick prevalence, followed by the climatic area. The different developmental stages of I. ricinus were more frequent in males than in females, and the prevalence of adults and larvae were higher in roe deer from coastal areas than in those from mountainous and central areas, whereas nymphs were more frequent in mountainous areas. Host age and density were not determinants for tick infestation. Our results confirm that roe deer are important hosts for I. ricinus in northwestern Spain, serving as a vehicle for the geographic distribution of these ticks.

  18. Bacteria of the genus Rickettsia in ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) collected from birds in Costa Rica

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ogrzewalska, M.; Literák, I.; Čapek, Miroslav; Sychra, O.; Calderón, V. Á.; Rodríguez, B. C.; Prudencio, C.; Martins, T. F.; Labruna, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 4 (2015), s. 478-482 ISSN 1877-959X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA601690901 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Rickettsia * Ticks * Birds * Ixodes * Amblyomma * Costa Rica Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 2.690, year: 2015

  19. Modeling the present and future geographic distribution of the Lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum (Ixodida: Ixodidae), in the continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Yuri P.; Jarnevich, Catherine S.; Barnett, David T.; Monaghan, Andrew J.; Eisen, Rebecca J.

    2015-01-01

    The Lone star tick (Amblyomma americanum L.) is the primary vector for pathogens of significant public health importance in North America, yet relatively little is known about its current and potential future distribution. Building on a published summary of tick collection records, we used an ensemble modeling approach to predict the present-day and future distribution of climatically suitable habitat for establishment of the Lone star tick within the continental United States. Of the nine climatic predictor variables included in our five present-day models, average vapor pressure in July was by far the most important determinant of suitable habitat. The present-day ensemble model predicted an essentially contiguous distribution of suitable habitat extending to the Atlantic coast east of the 100th western meridian and south of the 40th northern parallel, but excluding a high elevation region associated with the Appalachian Mountains. Future ensemble predictions for 2061–2080 forecasted a stable western range limit, northward expansion of suitable habitat into the Upper Midwest and western Pennsylvania, and range contraction along portions of the Gulf coast and the lower Mississippi river valley. These findings are informative for raising awareness of A. americanum-transmitted pathogens in areas where the Lone Star tick has recently or may become established.

  20. Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae on wild animals from the Porto-Primavera Hydroelectric power station area, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo B Labruna

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available From June 2000 to June 2001, a total of 741 ticks were collected from 51 free-living wild animals captured at the Porto-Primavera Hydroelectric power station area, located alongside an approximately 180 km course of the Paraná river, between the states of São Paulo and Mato Grosso do Sul, comprising 9 species of 3 genera: Ambly-omma (7 species, Boophilus (1 and Anocentor (1. A total of 421 immature Amblyomma ticks were reared in laboratory until the adult stage, allowing identification of the species. A. cajennense was the most frequent tick species (mostly immature stages collected on 9 host species: Myrmecophaga tridactyla, Tamandua tetradactyla,Cerdocyon thous, Puma concolor,Tayassu tajacu, Mazama gouazoubira,Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris,Alouatta caraya, Cebus apella. Other tick species were less common, generally restricted to certain host taxa.

  1. Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) on wild animals from the Porto-Primavera Hydroelectric power station area, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labruna, Marcelo B; de Paula, Cátia D; Lima, Thiago F; Sana, Dênis A

    2002-12-01

    From June 2000 to June 2001, a total of 741 ticks were collected from 51 free-living wild animals captured at the Porto-Primavera Hydroelectric power station area, located alongside an approximately 180 km course of the Paran river, between the states of S o Paulo and Mato Grosso do Sul, comprising 9 species of 3 genera: Ambly-omma (7 species), Boophilus (1) and Anocentor (1). A total of 421 immature Amblyomma ticks were reared in laboratory until the adult stage, allowing identification of the species. A. cajennense was the most frequent tick species (mostly immature stages) collected on 9 host species: Myrmecophaga tridactyla, Tamandua tetradactyla,Cerdocyon thous, Puma concolor,Tayassu tajacu, Mazama gouazoubira,Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris,Alouatta caraya, Cebus apella. Other tick species were less common, generally restricted to certain host taxa.

  2. [Interrelatio of acari Ixodidae and hosts of Edentata of the Serra da Canastra, Minas Gerais, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, J R; Linardi, P M; da Encarnação, C D

    1989-01-01

    We received for examination a small colection of ticks captured in the National Park of the Serra da Canastra (MG), between 1979 and 1980. The authors demonstrated the existence of a broad co-accomodation of Amblyomma pseudoconcolor on Edentata of the family Dasypodidae, being Dasypodini the tribe more adjusted to this infestation. In conformity to the Figs 1 and 2, Dasypodini are probably the real hosts of A. pseudoconcolor and also the oldest hosts. For the first time, A. pseudoconcolor is also recorded on Cabassous tatouay, C. unicinctus, Priodontes maximus and Euphractus sexcincuts. Also for the first time A. pseudoconcolor and Amblyomma calcaratum were recorded in the State of Minas Gerais. The ectoparasites are deposited in the "Departamento de Parasitologia da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brasil".

  3. Environmentally associated ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) in Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Marcos Valério; Silva, Dayana Campelo da; Almeida, Robson Ferreira Cavalcante de; Cunha, Rodrigo Casquero; Matias, Jaqueline; Barros, Jacqueline Cavalcante; Andreotti, Renato; Szabó, Matias Pablo Juan

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we report tick species found on wild and domestic animals and in the environment during a one-year sampling period at the Brazilian Farming Research Company beef cattle unit (Embrapa Beef Cattle), which is located within the urban area of Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. From 55 wild hosts including six different species (Nasua nasua, Cebus spp., Cerdocyon thous, Myrmecophaga tridactyla, Tamandua tetradactyla and Dasyprocta aguti), 323 ticks were collected. Amblyomma ovale ticks were found solely on coatis, and Amblyomma nodosum was identified solely on anteaters. No ticks were found on capuchin monkeys. However, Amblyomma cajennense was found on all parasitized host species with the exception of capuchin monkeys. Giant anteaters displayed the highest infestation abundance, with a mean of 53 ticks∕animal. Environmental sampling yielded 166 adult A. cajennense ticks. The tick species found on domestic animals (Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, R. sanguineus, Dermacentor nitens and A. cajennense) were those typically found on these hosts in Brazil. The most prevalent tick species, A. cajennense, was found on both wild and domestic animals and was also prevalent in the environment. Thus, this tick species is the primary vector that allows pathogens to bridge wild and domestic animals in the Cerrado.

  4. Laboratory Study on Biological Control of Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae by Entomopathogenic Indigenous Fungi (Beauveria bassiana

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    M Abdigoudarzi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemical control method using different acaricides as spray, dipping solution or pour-on is routinely used for controlling ticks. Biological control agents are favorable due to their safety for animals and environment. Entomopathogenic fungi such as Beauveria bassiana are well known for controlling ticks. In this study, two Iranian indigenous strains of B. bassiana (B. bassiana 5197 and B. bassiana Evin were selected and grown on specific me­dia. The pathogenic effects of these strains were evaluated on adult stages of two Iranian Ixodidae members (H. anatolicum anatolicum Koch 1844, and H. marginatum Koch 1844 by dipping method.Methods: Two Iranian strains of Beauveria bassiana (Beauveria bassiana 5197 and Beauveria bassiana Evin were selected and were grown successfully on specific media. The pathogenic effects of these strains were evaluated on adult stages of Iranian Ixodidae members such as, Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum and H. marginatum by dipping method (these ticks were grown up at laboratory conditions during 2002 up to 2003 and still it is continued .Results: There was no effect of strain 5197 on mortality or fecundity rates for ticks. There was acute phase sign of paralysis in test group after dipping ticks in suspension made from Evin strain of B. bassiana. In addition, the test groups were totally died after four months, but the control groups survived for six months.Conclusion: High concentration of fungal spores is needed for inducing fungal infection. Additional study using different strains and fungi on Iranian ticks is proposed. 

  5. Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) as ectoparasites of Brazilian wild birds and their association with rickettsial diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Ogrzewalska; Adriano Pinter

    2016-01-01

    Os carrapatos (Acari: Ixodoidea) são ectoparasitas obrigatórias de uma variedade de hospedeiros vertebrados e têm um papel importante na ecologia e transmissão de diversos patógenos causadores de doenças em humanos e animais no mundo todo. No Brasil existem 68 espécies de carrapatos e pelo menos 23 espécies são encontradas parasitando aves silvestres. Esse número tem crescido com o advento de novos estudos ressaltando o papel das aves nos ciclos de vida desses artrópodes. Na América do Sul al...

  6. Preliminary survey of ticks (Acari : Ixodidae on cattle in northern Sudan

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    D.A. Salih

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available In a cross sectional survey conducted during the period June 2001 to July 2002, the geographical distribution of ticks on cattle in the Sudan was determined. Seventeen locations were surveyed from Northern, Central, Eastern, Western, Blue Nile and White Nile Provinces. Total body collections of ticks were made from 20 cattle at each location. Four tick genera and 11 species were identified. The tick species collected included Amblyomma lepidum, Amblyomma variegatum, Boophilus decoloratus, Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum, Hyalomma dromedarii, Hyalomma impeltatum, Hyalomma marginatum rufipes, Hyalomma truncatum, Rhipicephalus evertsi evertsi, Rhipicephalus sanguineus group and Rhipicephalus simus simus. Major ecological changes have occurred due to extensive animal movement, deforestation, desertification and establishment of large mechanized agricultural schemes. These factors have certainly affected the distribution of ticks and tick-borne diseases in the Sudan. The absence of A. variegatum and A. lepidum in northern Sudan was not surprising, since these tick species are known to survive in humid areas and not in the desert and semi-desert areas of northern Sudan. The absence of B. annulatus in northern and central Sudan is in accordance with the finding that this tick species is restricted to the southern parts of the central Sudan. The presence of H. anatolicum anatolicum in Um Benin in relatively high abundance is an interesting finding. The present finding may indicate that the southern limit of this species has changed and moved southwards to latitude 13o N. It is concluded that major changes in tick distribution have taken place in the Sudan

  7. Elemol and Amyris Oil Repel the Ticks Ixodes scapularis and Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae) in Laboratory Bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    The essential oil from Amyris balsamifera (Rutaceae) and elemol, a principal constituent of the essential oil of Osage orange, Maclura pomifera (Moraceae) were evaluated in in vitro and in vivo laboratory bioassays for repellent activity against host-seeking nymphs of the blacklegged tick, Ixodes sc...

  8. Efficacy of Plant-Derived and Synthetic Compounds on Clothing as Repellents Against Ixodes scapularis and Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    repellent activity of natural compounds isolated from essential oil components extracted from the heartwood of Alaska yellow cedar, Chamaecyparis...Isman, M. B. 2006. Botanical insecticides, deterrents, and repellents in modern agriculture and an increasingly reg- ulated world. Annu. Rev. Entomol...Weinzierl,R., andT.Henn. 1994. Botanical insecticides and insecticidal soaps, pp. 541Ð556. In A. R. Leslie (ed.), Handbook of integrated pest

  9. Evaluation of four commercial natural products for repellency and toxicity against the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone star ticks are aggressive ectoparasites of domestic and wild animals, as well as humans. These ticks can transmit many pathogens that cause disease including Erhlichia and tularemia. Common compounds used for personal protection and area sprays are N-diethyl-3-methyl benzamide (DEET) and permet...

  10. Hard ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) of livestock in Nicaragua, with notes about distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düttmann, Christiane; Flores, Byron; Kadoch Z, Nathaniel; Bermúdez C, Sergio

    2016-09-01

    We document the species of ticks that parasitize livestock in Nicaragua. The study was based on tick collection on cattle and horses from 437 farms in nine departments. Of 4841 animals examined (4481 cows and 360 horses), 3299 were parasitized, which represent 68 % of the bovines and 67 % of the equines in study: 59 cows and 25 horses were parasitized by more than one species. In addition, 280 specimens of the entomological museum in León were examined. The ticks found on cattle were Rhipicephalus microplus (75.2 % of the ticks collected), Amblyomma mixtum (20.8 %), A. parvum (2.6 %), A. tenellum (0.7 %), A. maculatum (0.7 %). While the ticks collected from the horses were: Dermacentor nitens (41.5 %), A. mixtum (31.7 %), R. microplus (13.8 %), A. parvum (6.5 %), A. tenellum (3.3 %), D. dissimilis (2.4 %) and A. maculatum (0.8 %).

  11. Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae as ectoparasites of Brazilian wild birds and their association with rickettsial diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ogrzewalska

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Os carrapatos (Acari: Ixodoidea são ectoparasitas obrigatórias de uma variedade de hospedeiros vertebrados e têm um papel importante na ecologia e transmissão de diversos patógenos causadores de doenças em humanos e animais no mundo todo. No Brasil existem 68 espécies de carrapatos e pelo menos 23 espécies são encontradas parasitando aves silvestres. Esse número tem crescido com o advento de novos estudos ressaltando o papel das aves nos ciclos de vida desses artrópodes. Na América do Sul alguns desses carrapatos estão envolvidos na epidemiologia de doenças graves para o ser humano, como a febre maculosa, causada por bactérias do gênero Rickettsia (Rickettsiales: Rickettsiaceae. O alvo desse artigo é apresentar o estado atual de conhecimento sobre a fauna de carrapatos encontrados em aves no Brasil e as associações estabelecidas com as riquetsioses. A literatura disponível sobre carrapatos em aves e ocorrência de riquétsias foi revisada e pôde ser concluído que aves têm um papel importante nos ciclos de vida de várias espécies de carrapatos, sendo especialmente importantes para os estágios imaturos (larvas e ninfas. A maior parte do conhecimento sabrecai na fauna de carrapatos de aves dos biomas Mata Atlântica e Cerrado no sudeste e centro-oeste do Brasil. Já o conhecimento sobre o parasitismo por carrapatos em aves dos outros biomas: Amazônia, Caatinga, Pantanal e Pampas é muito limitado. Além disso, não há estudos sobre o papel de aves como disseminadores de carrapatos entre áreas e também o papel de aves no ciclo de Rickettsia não está totalmente esclarecido.

  12. Gene structure and expression of a pyrethroid-metabolizing esterase, CzEst9, from a pyrethroid resistant Mexican population of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Felix D; Nene, Vishvanath M

    2008-07-01

    A population of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Canestrini) (Acari: Ixodidae), designated Coatzacoalcos, sampled from a ranch near Veracruz, Mexico, was found to possess a high level of resistance to pyrethroid-based acaricides. Bioassay and biochemical and molecular analysis had previously shown that resistance in this population could primarily be attributed to expression of a highly active metabolic esterase designated CzEST9. We cloned and sequenced the entire CzEST9 coding region, including introns and > 1.0 kb upstream from the transcription start site, and we compared the upstream region sequence between individual resistant and susceptible ticks from several populations with different pyrethroid resistance characteristics. In the 1.0-kb upstream region sequence, four variant nucleotides were found, and a TGA trinucleotide occurred as either four, five, or nine tandem repeats. However, none of these promoter region sequence differences could be clearly associated with a pyrethroid-resistant phenotype; thus, we concluded that differences in gene promoter sequence were not responsible for the pyrethroid resistance mechanism in the Cz strain. CzEST9 was expressed in recombinant Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris systems and esterase activity was obtained in recombinant CzEST9 from the P. pastoris system.

  13. Carrapatos (Acari: Ixodidae) capturados na Reserva Natural da Vale do Rio Doce, Linhares, Espírito Santo

    OpenAIRE

    Ogrzewalska,Maria; Uezu,Alexandre; Ferreira,Fernando; Labruna,Marcelo B.

    2007-01-01

    O presente trabalho confirma, após décadas sem novos relatos, a ocorrência dos carrapatos Amblyomma obolongoguttatum Koch, 1844, A. brasiliense Aragão, 1908, e A. humerale Koch, 1844 no Estado do Espírito Santo, Brasil, além do primeiro relato de A. naponense (Packard,1869) para este estado.

  14. Ocorrência de Amblyomma fuscum Neumann, 1899 e Amblyomma humerale Koch, 1844 (Acari: Ixodidae em Bufo arenalis no estado de São Paulo, Brasil Occurence of Amblyomma fuscum Neumann, 1899 and Amblyomma humerale Koch, 1844 (Acari: Ixodidae in Bufo arenalis in the state of São Paulo, Brazil

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    Afonso Lodovico Sinkoc

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho é relatar a ocorrência do parasitismo monoespecífico de A. fuscum NEUMANN, 1899 e A. humerale KOCH, 1844 em sapos (Bufo arenalis no Município de Rosana, Estado de São Paulo, Brasil. Este relato caracteriza um novo hospedeiro e uma nova localização geográfica para estas duas espécies de carrapatos.The objective of this work is to describe the occurence of the monoespecific parasitism of A. fuscum NEUMANN, 1899 and A. humerale KOCH, 1844 in toads (Bufo arenalis from the County of Rosana, State of São Paulo, Brazil. This is the description of a new host and new geographic site for those two species.

  15. Comments on Controversial Tick (Acari: Ixodida) Species Names and Species Described or Resurrected from 2003 to 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-24

    estados do Rio de Janeiro e de Sao Paulo. Entomol Vectores 10:407-410 Andrews RH, Beveridge I, Bull CM, Chilton MB, Dixon B...London Santos Dias JAT (1956) Invalidaqfio de algumas esp6cies ixodol6gicas originalmente determinadas em resultado de indevida rotulagem de material. Inst...Amblyomma curruca A. A. Guglielmone (l) Estaci6n Experimental Agropecuaria Rafaela, Instituto Nacional de Tecnologfa Agropecuaria, C.C. 22, CP

  16. Evaluation of the effectiveness of diaznon against Amblyomma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The evaluation of the effectiveness of acaricides against ticks (Acarina Ixodidae) using a modified tea bag technique is described. The tests involved natural populations of Amblyomma variegatum from natural infestations and cattle at the slaughterhouse Onitsha, South Nigeria. The test carried out between November 2002 ...

  17. Investigation of Borrelia spp. in ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) at the border crossings between China and Russia in Heilongjiang Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shi; Yuan, Chao; Cui, Yun-Fu; Li, Bai-Xiang; Wu, Li-Jie; Liu, Ying

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the precise species of tick vector and the Borrelia spirochete pathogen at the Heilongjiang Province international border with Russia. In this study, ticks were collected from 12 Heilongjiang border crossings (including grasslands, shrublands, forests, and plantantions) to determine the rate and species type of spirochete-infected ticks and the most prevalent spirochete genotypes. The ticks represented three genera and four species of the Ixodidae family [Ixodes persulcatus, Dermacentor silvarum, Haemaphysalis concinna and Haemaphysalis japonica]. Ixodes persulcatus had the highest amount of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato infection of 25.6% and the most common species of Borrelia isolated from Ixodes persulcatus was Borrelia garinii, strain PD91. Our results suggest that Borrelia garinii PD91-infected Ixodes persulcatus may be the principal cause of Lyme disease in the border crossing areas of Heilongjiang Province. Copyright © 2012 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular Phylogeny of a tick, Ixodes granulatus (Acari: Ixodidae) based on cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lah, Ernieenor Faraliana Che; Yaakop, Salmah; Ahamad, Mariana; George, Ernna; Nor, Shukor Md

    2014-09-01

    Identification of a local species of tick, Ixodes granulatus from the family Ixodidae is essential because it has potential to be vector for spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsia and tick thypus. The aim of this study is to portray the relationships among several populations of I. granulatus collected from different species of animal hosts and localities in Peninsular Malaysia. Polymerase Chain Reaction was conducted by amplifying mitochondrial DNA marker, namely cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) sequences from 15 individual ticks that attached to five different hosts caught from three different localities. Confirmation of the species identity was accomplished using BLAST program. Neighbor-joining (NJ) and Maximum Parsimony (MP) tree based on COI sequences were constructed by using PAUP 4.0b10 to identify the relationship among species. The result of this study showed a high genetic heterogeneity between I. granulatus and other species of the same genus (7.2-23.7%). Furthermore, a low intraspecific variation was observed among the species of I. granulatus collected from different localities (0-3.7%). This study produced the first establishment of molecular marker for clarifying genetic species variation and diversity of local I. granulatus tick which contribute to the control of tick-borne infections.

  19. Occurrence of ticks (Acari: Ixodidae on human hosts, in three municipalities in the State of Pará, Brazil Parasitismo por carrapatos (Acari: Ixodidae em humanos, em três municípios do Estado do Pará

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    Nicolau Maués Serra-Freire

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Assuming the existence of tick parasitism in humans in the State of Pará, an aggregate observational study was developed along a transversal line in three cities of the State, during two years. Interviews and examinations of 2,160 townspeople and tourists were carried out, without discrimination of ethnic, sex, age, or social status, and classified for effects analyzed for four bands of age, six types of activities in the society, and two sexes. Larvae, nymphs, and adults of ticks had been identified with cases of parasitism involving six species, of the genus Amblyomma, the genus Ixodes, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Anocentor nitens, and Ornithodorus talaje (the first case registered in Pará, infecting human beings. Adults and agricultural workers were most frequently attacked, followed by students. A. cajennense and R. sanguineus are the species most frequent in the parasitism affecting humans, and A. cajennense is the dominant species. The statistical prevalence was largest in Cachoeira do Arari, Ilha do Marajó. In Santarém the greatest average intensity of parasitism was for R. sanguineus, and in the other locations it wasfor A. cajennense. Agricultural workers faced the greatest risk from parasitism, and to place in practice elementary measures of prevention would reduce by 25% the number of cases.Com a hipótese de parasitismo por carrapatos em humanos no Estado do Pará, foi desenvolvido estudo observacional, agregado, transversal em três mesoregiões do Estado, durante dois anos. Foram entrevistados e examinados 2.160 munícipes, e turistas, sem discriminação étnica, de sexo, idade, e social, classificados para efeito de análises em quatro faixas de idade, seis tipos de atividades na sociedade, e dois sexos. Houve casos de parasitismo por larvas, ninfas, e adultos de carrapatos, envolvendo seis espécies do gênero Amblyomma, o gênero Ixodes, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Anocentor nitens e Ornithodorus talaje (primeiro registo para o

  20. The use of a pour-on and spray dip containing Amitraz to control ticks (Acari : Ixodidae on cattle

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    R. Peter

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Knockdown and persistence efficacies of a pour-on containing Amitraz 1 % and Cypermethrin 1 % and a spray dip containing 12.5 % Amitraz were compared. Knock-down and persistence efficacies of the Amitraz spray dip against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus decoloratus and Amblyomma hebraeum were significantly higher for the duration of the trial than those of the pour-on. In the case of Rhipicephalus appediculatus and Rhipicephalus evertsi evertsi, efficacy was significantly higher on Days 2 and 5. Resistance testing prior to the start of the trial indicated that R. (B. decoloratus was resistant to both Cypermethrin and Amitraz, yet in the case of the spray dip excellent efficacy results were obtained. It is thought that the cattle's scruffy winter coat may have hindered the spread of the pour-on, but that the thorough wetting and especially the higher concentration of active ingredient applied via the spray dip allowed this formulation to be effective. These results show that under certain conditions a spray dip containing 12.5 % Amitraz may be more effective than a pour-on containing 1 % Amitraz and 1 % Cypermethrin, despite apparent in vitro resistance.

  1. Occurrence of ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) on human hosts, in three municipalities in the State of Pará, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Freire, Nicolau Maués

    2010-01-01

    Assuming the existence of tick parasitism in humans in the State of Pará, an aggregate observational study was developed along a transversal line in three cities of the State, during two years. Interviews and examinations of 2,160 townspeople and tourists were carried out, without discrimination of ethnic, sex, age, or social status, and classified for effects analyzed for four bands of age, six types of activities in the society, and two sexes. Larvae, nymphs, and adults of ticks had been identified with cases of parasitism involving six species, of the genus Amblyomma, the genus Ixodes, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Anocentor nitens, and Ornithodorus talaje (the first case registered in Pará), infecting human beings. Adults and agricultural workers were most frequently attacked, followed by students. A. cajennense and R. sanguineus are the species most frequent in the parasitism affecting humans, and A. cajennense is the dominant species. The statistical prevalence was largest in Cachoeira do Arari, Ilha do Marajó. In Santarém the greatest average intensity of parasitism was for R. sanguineus, and in the other locations it wasfor A. cajennense. Agricultural workers faced the greatest risk from parasitism, and to place in practice elementary measures of prevention would reduce by 25% the number of cases.

  2. Names for Ixodidae (Acari: Ixodoidea): valid, synonyms, incertae sedis, nomina dubia, nomina nuda, lapsus, incorrect and suppressed names--with notes on confusions and misidentifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmone, Alberto A; Nava, Santiago

    2014-02-24

    A major, but not exhaustive, literature revision has been made to compile the names of Ixodidae from Linnaeus to present. Names are classified as valid, synonyms, lapsus, incertae sedis, nomina dubia, nomina nuda, incorrect and suppressed. Notes are included for confusions and misidentifications among different tick species. The lists included in this study are neither aimed to be consensual nor focusing to stabilize nomenclature, but rather part of a discussion on the species forming Ixodidae and a potential aid for research on tick taxonomy and phylogeny.

  3. Neuronal projections from the Haller's organ and palp sensilla to the synganglion of Amblyomma americanum

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study was conducted to elucidate the neuronal pathways between peripheral olfactory and taste sensilla and the synganglion in an Ixodidae tick species. The tarsus of the front legs (olfactory nerves) and the fourth palpal segment (gustatory nerves) of unfed Amblyomma americanum males and...

  4. Parasites of domestic and wild animals in South Africa. XLIX. Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae infesting white and black rhinoceroses in southern Africa

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    Ivan G. Horak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the study were to determine the species composition of ticks infesting white and black rhinoceroses in southern Africa as well as the conservation status of those tick species that prefer rhinos as hosts. Ticks were collected opportunistically from rhinos that had been immobilised for management purposes, and 447 white rhinoceroses (Ceratotherium simum and 164 black rhinoceroses (Diceros bicornis were sampled in South Africa, 61 black rhinos in Namibia, 18 white and 12 black rhinos in Zimbabwe, and 24 black rhinos in Zambia. Nineteen tick species were recovered, of which two species, Amblyomma rhinocerotis and Dermacentor rhinocerinus, prefer rhinos as hosts. A. rhinocerotis was collected only in the northeastern KwaZulu-Natal reserves of South Africa and is endangered, while D. rhinocerinus is present in these reserves as well as in the Kruger National Park and surrounding conservancies. Eight of the tick species collected from the rhinos are ornate, and seven species are regularly collected from cattle. The species present on rhinos in the eastern, moister reserves of South Africa were amongst others Amblyomma hebraeum, A. rhinocerotis, D. rhinocerinus, Rhipicephalus maculatus, Rhipicephalus simus and Rhipicephalus zumpti, while those on rhinos in the Karoo and the drier western regions, including Namibia, were the drought-tolerant species, Hyalomma glabrum, Hyalomma rufipes, Hyalomma truncatum and Rhipicephalus gertrudae. The species composition of ticks on rhinoceroses in Zambia differed markedly from those of the other southern African countries in that Amblyomma sparsum, Amblyomma tholloni and Amblyomma variegatum accounted for the majority of infestations.

  5. Parasites of domestic and wild animals in South Africa. XLIX. Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) infesting white and black rhinoceroses in southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, Ivan G; Boshoff, Christiaan R; Cooper, David V; Foggin, Christoper M; Govender, Danny; Harrison, Alan; Hausler, Guy; Hofmeyr, Markus; Kilian, J Werner; MacFadyen, Duncan N; Nel, Pierre J; Peinke, Dean; Squarre, David; Zimmermann, David

    2017-01-30

    The objectives of the study were to determine the species composition of ticks infesting white and black rhinoceroses in southern Africa as well as the conservation status of those tick species that prefer rhinos as hosts. Ticks were collected opportunistically from rhinos that had been immobilised for management purposes, and 447 white rhinoceroses (Ceratotherium simum) and 164 black rhinoceroses (Diceros bicornis) were sampled in South Africa, 61 black rhinos in Namibia, 18 white and 12 black rhinos in Zimbabwe, and 24 black rhinos in Zambia. Nineteen tick species were recovered, of which two species, Amblyomma rhinocerotis and Dermacentor rhinocerinus, prefer rhinos as hosts. A. rhinocerotis was collected only in the northeastern KwaZulu-Natal reserves of South Africa and is endangered, while D. rhinocerinus is present in these reserves as well as in the Kruger National Park and surrounding conservancies. Eight of the tick species collected from the rhinos are ornate, and seven species are regularly collected from cattle. The species present on rhinos in the eastern, moister reserves of South Africa were amongst others Amblyomma hebraeum, A. rhinocerotis, D. rhinocerinus, Rhipicephalus maculatus, Rhipicephalus simus and Rhipicephalus zumpti, while those on rhinos in the Karoo and the drier western regions, including Namibia, were the drought-tolerant species, Hyalomma glabrum, Hyalomma rufipes, Hyalomma truncatum and Rhipicephalus gertrudae. The species composition of ticks on rhinoceroses in Zambia differed markedly from those of the other southern African countries in that Amblyomma sparsum, Amblyomma tholloni and Amblyomma variegatum accounted for the majority of infestations.

  6. In vitro activity of 3β-O-tigloylmelianol from Guarea kunthiana A. Juss (Meliaceae) on oogenesis and ecdysis of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Canestrini) (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Carolina da Silva; Borges, Lígia Miranda Ferreira; Louly, Carla Cristina Braz; Rocha, Thiago Lopes; de Sabóia-Morais, Simone Maria Teixeira; Miguita, Carlos Henrique; Garcez, Walmir Silva; Garcez, Fernanda Rodriguez

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated the effects of 3β-O-tigloylmelianol from Guarea kunthiana A. Juss (Meliaceae) on oogenesis, as a larvicide and on ecdysis of the larvae and the nymphs of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Canestrini) (Acari: Ixodidae). On the oogenesis' test, 48 engorged females were divided into three groups, evaluated at 24, 48 and 72 h post-treatment. Half of the females were treated with 0.01% 3β-O-tigloylmelianol diluted in distilled water and 5% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), while the other half (controls) were exposed to distilled water and 5% DMSO. After treatment, the ovaries were weighed in order to measure the gonadosomatic index (GSI) and were also subjected to standard histological technical tests. On the larvicide and ecdysis' tests, 3β-O-tigloylmelianol was tested at concentrations of 0.01, 0.005, 0.0025 and 0.00125%. Compared with the controls, there was a reduction of GSI of approximately 50% on the treated group, which started at 48 h post treatment. Overall, the protolimonoid 3β-O-tigloylmelianol has caused a significant reduction in the number of oocytes. It has also caused alteration of the cytoplasmic and germinal vesicle diameters. Morphological changes, such as vacuolization, chorion irregularity which has modified the oocytes' morphology as well as alterations on the yolk's granules were also observed. The compound was not larvicide, however, interfered in the ecdysis of the larvae and the nymphs. This study shows that the protolimonoid 3β-O-tigloylmelianol from G. kunthiana acts on oogenesis and ecdysis of R. (B.) microplus, but not as larvicide, indicating that it acts on the endocrine system of the tick. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Detection of protozoans Babesia microti and [i]Toxoplasma gondii[/i] and their co-existence in ticks (Acari: Ixodida collected in Tarnogórski district (Upper Silesia, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Asman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available [b]Introduction[/b]. Ticks (Acari: Ixodida are vectors of many pathogens i. a: [i]Babesia microti [/i][Bm] and [i]Toxoplasma gondii[/i] [Tg]. In Poland, Ixodes ricinus [Ir] is the main vector of both pathogens. This tick species and pathogens transmitted by them are a significant threat to human and animal health. objectives of the study. Detection of the protozoans Bm and Tg in ticks collected in the Tarnogórski district area. [b]Material and methods[/b]. The ticks were collected from vegetation and pets in the spring period of their activity on the territory of the Tarnogórski district. The parasites were preserved in 70% ethanol. DNA was isolated by ammonia method. Bm was detected by nested-PCR using specific primers for the 18S rRNA sequence. To detect the Tg a commercial kit was used. The PCR products were separated on 2% ethidium bromide stained agarose gels and visualised under UV light. [b]Results[/b]. It was showed that all collected ticks belonged to the species Ir. Bm was detected in 50.87% and Tg in 64.91% of all examined ticks. Co-existence of these both protozoans in 36.84% of total examined ticks was noted. [b]Conclusions[/b]. The study showed a high risk of exposure to Bm and Tg in the studied area. Ticks Ir play an important role in the transmission of Bm in this region. Demonstrating a high percentage of ticks collected from animals infected with Tg may indicate their important role in the transmission of this pathogen, but it requires a further studies.

  8. Chemical composition and acaricidal activity of the essential oil of Baccharis dracunculifolia De Candole (1836) and its constituents nerolidol and limonene on larvae and engorged females of Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Assis Lage, Tiago Coelho; Montanari, Ricardo Marques; Fernandes, Sergio Antonio; de Oliveira Monteiro, Caio Márcio; de Oliveira Souza Senra, Tatiane; Zeringota, Viviane; da Silva Matos, Renata; Daemon, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Baccharis dracunculifolia DC (common name "alecrim-do-campo" in Brazil) is a plant with widespread distribution in South America that is the botanical origin of green propolis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition and acaricidal activity of the essential oil of B. dracunculifolia and its constituents nerolidol and limonene on unengorged larvae and engorged females of Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae). The essential oil yield was 0.8% of dry mass and the major constituents were nerolidol (22.3%), germacrene D (7.2%), limonene (6.9%), β-pinene (6.7) and bicyclogermacrene (6.5%). The acaricidal activity of the essential oil and the pure compounds nerolidol and (R)-(+)-limonene were assessed in the laboratory through the modified larval packet test (LPT) and the female immersion test (FIT). In the LPT, the essential oil and nerolidol were both active, causing more than 90% mortality at concentrations from 15.0 and 10.0 mg mL(-1), respectively, whereas (R)-(+)-limonene was not active. In the FIT, the oil and nerolidol caused reduction in the quantity and quality of eggs produced, with control percentages of 96.3% and 90.3% at concentrations of 60.0 and 50.0 mg mL(-1), respectively. It can be concluded that the essential oil obtained from the aerial parts of B. dracunculifolia and its major component nerolidol have high activity on R. microplus larvae and engorged females. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Detection of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto in Amblyomma americanum ticks in the southeastern United States: the case of selective compatibility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rudenko, Natalia; Golovchenko, Maryna; Clark, K.; Oliver, J.; Grubhoffer, Libor

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 5, MAY 25 (2016), č. článku e48. ISSN 2222-1751 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 278976 - ANTIGONE Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : lyme disease spirochete * Dermacentor variabilis * Ixodes scapularis * Ixodidae * Acari * strain Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 5.605, year: 2016

  10. First description of the immature stages and redescription of the adults of Cosmiomma hippopotamensis (Acari: Ixodidae) with notes on its bionomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apanaskevich, Dmitry A; Walker, Jane B; Heyne, Heloise; Bezuidenhout, J Dürr; Horak, Ivan G

    2013-07-01

    Cosmiomma hippopotamensis (Denny, 1843) is one of the most unusual, beautiful, and rare tick species known to the world. All stages of this species possess a unique morphology, on the one hand making them easy to identify, while on the other they exhibit similarities to certain species of Amblyomma Koch, 1844, Dermacentor Koch, 1844, and Hyalomma Koch, 1844. Adults of C. hippopotamensis have been collected on only two occasions from their hosts, namely Hippopotamus amphibius L. and Diceros bicornis (L.), and have been recorded from only a few widely separated localities in East and southern Africa. Here, the larva and nymph are described and illustrated for the first time, while the male and female are illustrated and redescribed. Data on hosts, geographic distribution, and life cycle of C. hippopotamensis are also provided.

  11. The ticks (Acari: Ixodida: Argasidae, Ixodidae) of Paraguay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Naranja-y 26u009S, 57u009W Paraguarı́ 25u379S, 57u099W Quindy 25u589S, 57u139W Sapucai 25u409S, 56u579W PRESIDENTE HAYES Chaco Experimental Station...Ecuador, Panama, Peru and Venezuela. Ornithodoros talaje (Guérin-Méneville)/ Ornithodoros puertoricensis Fox. Cordero et al. (1928) found adults of Orn...the armadillos Dasypus novemcinctus in Caaguazú, Euphractes sex- cinctus in General Dı́az and Puerto Rı́o Negro, Dasypus semptemcinctus in Presidente

  12. Carrapatos do gênero amblyomma (acari: ixodidae) e suas relações com os hospedeiros em área endêmica para febre maculosa no Estado de São Paulo

    OpenAIRE

    Perez,Carlos Alberto; Almeida,Álvaro Fernando de; Almeida,Alexandre; Carvalho,Victor Hugo Barbosa de; Balestrin,Daniele do Carmo; Guimarães,Murilo Saraiva; Costa,Julio C.; Ramos,Leonardo Adriano; Arruda-Santos,Ana Dulce; Máximo-Espíndola,Clarice Pinto; Barros-Battesti,Darci Moraes

    2008-01-01

    Foram avaliadas 7 espécies da mastofauna e 36 da avifauna quanto à prevalência e intensidade de infestação por carrapatos na ESALQ/USP, no Município de Piracicaba, SP. Analisaram-se 52 indivíduos da mastofauna e 158 da avifauna, parasitados por 12418 carrapatos. Os exemplares adultos (N= 7343) foram encontrados em parasitismo nas capivaras enquanto que os imaturos foram, na maioria, coletados de pequenos mamíferos e aves. Os principais hospedeiros para as formas imaturas, em ordem decrescente...

  13. Ixodidas brasileiros e de alguns paizes limitrophes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique de Beaurepaire Aragão

    1936-01-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of the Ixodidae becomes every day, more and more important owing to the fact of the increasing number of diseases of man and animals they can transmit. In Brasil besides transmitting treponemosis, piroplasmosis and anaplasmosis to several domestic animals, the ticks are also responsible fo the transmission of the brazilian rocky mountain spotted fever (A. cajennense and Amblyomma striatum and they can also harbour the virus of the yellow fever and even to transmit it in laboratory experiments (A. cajennense, O. rostratus. The Brazilian fauna of ticks is a small one and has no more than 45 well-established species belonging to the genus Argas, Ornithodoros, Ixodes, Haemaphysalis, Rhipicephalus, Boophilus, Amblyomma and Spaelaeorhynchus. The genus Amblyomma is the best represented one, with 67% of all species of ticks known in Brazil. One of the most important species in the Amblyomma cajennense owing to its abundance and its wide parasitism in many vertebrates: reptiles, birds and mammals, incluing man, who is much attacked by the larva, the nymph and the adult of this species. The other ticks who attack the man are the Amblyomma brasiliense (the pecari tick, in the forests, and the Ornithodoros, especially the species. O. rostratus and brasiliensis. Other species can bite the man, but only occasionally, like Amblyomma fossum, striatum, oblongogutatum etc. Argas persicus, Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Boophilus are very important species not only as parasites but specially because they transmit several diseases to animals. Some of the ticks of the brazilian wild animals are now also parasites of the domestic ones and vice-versa. Arga persicus var. dissimilis is very common among the poultry and transmits the Treponema anserinum (gallinarum. Boophilus microplus is very abundant on our domestic and wild ruminants (Bos, Cervus, Mazama etc. and can also ben found on horse, dogs, Felis onca, Felis concolor etc., and it transmits to cattle

  14. Host-Parasite Relationship of Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae and Argasidae) and Feral Pigs (Sus scrofa) in the Nhecolândia Region of the Pantanal Wetlands in Mato Grosso do Sul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cançado, P H D; Faccini, J L H; Herrera, H M; Tavares, L E R; Mourão, G M; Piranda, E M; Paes, R C S; Ribeiro, C C D U; Borghesan, T C; Piacenti, A K; Kinas, M A; Santos, C C; Ono, T M; Paiva, F

    2013-01-01

    Feral pigs (S. scrofa) were introduced to the Pantanal region around 200 years ago and the population appears to be in expansion. Its eradication is considered to be impossible. The population of feral pigs in the Pantanal wetlands is currently estimated at one million. Two scientific excursions were organized. The first was conducted during the dry season, when 21 feral pigs were captured and the second was during the wet season, when 23 feral pigs were captured. Ticks were collected and the oviposition and hatching process were studied to confirm the biological success of each tick species. Three tick species were found to be feeding on feral pigs: Amblyomma cajennense, A. parvum, and Ornithodoros rostratus. During the dry season, 178 adult A. cajennense were collected, contrasting with 127 A. cajennense specimens in the wet season. This suggests that the seasonality of these ticks in the Brazilian Pantanal wetlands could be different from other regions. The results indicate that A. parvum and A. cajennense are biologically successful parasites in relation to feral pigs. A. cajennense appears to have adapted to this tick-host relationship, as well as the areas where feral pigs are abundant, and could play a role in the amplification of this tick population.

  15. Amblyomma sculptum: genetic diversity and rickettsias in the Brazilian Cerrado biome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitencourth, K; Amorim, M; DE Oliveira, S V; Caetano, R L; Voloch, C M; Gazêta, G S

    2017-12-01

    Amblyomma sculptum (Ixodida: Ixodidae) Berlese, 1888 is the most important tick vector in Brazil, transmitting the bioagent of the most severe form of spotted fever (SF) in part of the Cerrado (in the states of Minas Gerais and São Paulo). In another part of the Cerrado (Central-West region of Brazil), a milder form of SF has been recorded. However, neither the rickettsia nor the vector involved have been characterized. The aim of the current study was to analyse genetic variation and the presence of rickettsia in A. sculptum in Cerrado, from silent areas and with the milder form of SF. Samples were subjected to DNA extraction, amplification and sequencing of 12S rDNA, cytochrome oxidase subunit II and D-loop mitochondrial genes (for tick population analyses), and gltA, htrA, ompA and gene D (sca4) genes for rickettsia researches. Exclusive haplotypes with low frequencies, high haplotype diversity and low nucleotide diversity, star-shaped networks and significant results in neutrality tests indicate A. sculptum population expansions in some areas. Rickettsia amblyommatis, Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae and Rickettsia felis were detected. The A. sculptum diversity is not geographically, or biome delimited, pointing to a different potential in vector capacity, possibly associated with differing tick genetic profiles. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  16. Rickettsia rickettsii isolation from naturally infected Amblyomma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . rickettsii) and is transmitted by the bite of ticks of the genera Dermacentor, Amblyomma and Rhipicephalus. The illness results in a high mortality rate and may be easily confused with other febrile syndromes. In Yucatan State, Mexico, ...

  17. Pesquisa de Rickettsia spp em carrapatos Amblyomma cajennense e Amblyomma dubitatum no Estado de São Paulo Survey of Rickettsia spp in the ticks Amblyomma cajennense and Amblyomma dubitatum in the State of São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Campos Pacheco

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Foi pesquisada a presença de riquétsias em 3.545 carrapatos Amblyomma cajennense e 2.666 Amblyomma dubitatum. Através do teste de hemolinfa, reação em cadeia pela polimerase e isolamento de rickettsia em cultivo celular, todos os Amblyomma cajennense foram negativos, sendo que 634 (23,8% Amblyomma dubitatum mostraram-se infectados com Rickettsia bellii.The presence of rickettsial infection was surveyed in 3,545 Amblyomma cajennense ticks and 2,666 Amblyomma dubitatum ticks. Using the hemolymph test, polymerase chain reaction and isolation of Rickettsia in cell cultures, all of the Amblyomma cajennense were negative, whereas 634 (23.8% of the Amblyomma dubitatum ticks were shown to be infected with Rickettsia bellii.

  18. Relative humidity and activity patterns of Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, K.A.; Ginsberg, Howard S.; Gonzalez, L.; Mather, T.N.

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory studies have shown clear relationships between relative humidity (RH) and the activity and survival of Ixodes scapularis Say (blacklegged tick). However, field studies have produced conflicting results. We examined this relationship using weekly tick count totals and hourly RH observations at three field sites, stratified by latitude, within the state of Rhode Island. Records of nymphal tick abundance were compared with several RH-related variables (e.g., RH at time of sampling and mean weekly daytime RH). In total, 825 nymphs were sampled in 2009, a year of greater precipitation, with a weighted average leaf litter RH recorded at time of sampling of 85.22%. Alternatively, 649 nymphs were collected in 2010, a year of relatively low precipitation, and a weighted average RH recorded at time of sampling was 75.51%. Negative binomial regression analysis of tick count totals identified cumulative hours <82% RH threshold as a significant factor observed in both years (2009: P = 0.0037; 2010: P < 0.0001). Mean weekly daytime RH did not significantly predict tick activity in either year. However, mean weekly daytime RH recorded with 1-wk lag before sample date was a significant variable (P = 0.0016) in 2010. These results suggest a lag effect between moisture availability and patterns of tick activity and abundance. Differences in the relative importance of each RH variable between years may have been due to abnormally wet summer conditions in 2009.

  19. Relative humidity and activity patterns of Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, K.A.; Ginsberg, Howard S.; Gonzalez, L.; Mather, T.N.

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory studies have shown clear relationships between relative humidity (RH) and the activity and survival of Ixodes scapularis Say (blacklegged tick). However, field studies have produced conflicting results. We examined this relationship using weekly tick count totals and hourly RH observations at three field sites, stratified by latitude, within the state of Rhode Island. Records of nymphal tick abundance were compared with several RH-related variables (e.g., RH at time of sampling and mean weekly daytime RH). In total, 825 nymphs were sampled in 2009, a year of greater precipitation, with a weighted average leaf litter RH recorded at time of sampling of 85.22%. Alternatively, 649 nymphs were collected in 2010, a year of relatively low precipitation, and a weighted average RH recorded at time of sampling was 75.51%. Negative binomial regression analysis of tick count totals identified cumulative hours relative importance of each RH variable between years may have been due to abnormally wet summer conditions in 2009.

  20. Biology of Dermacentor marginatus (Acari: Ixodidae under laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Darvishi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate and survey the biology of Dermacentor marginatus (D. marginatus under laboratory conditions. Methods: In this investigation, D. marginatus adult ticks were collected from sheep in Semnan province. Then various developmental stages of D. marginatus including larvae, nymphs and adult males and females under laboratory condition were bred and their biology was scrutinized. Results: The requisite time to complete the life cycle of D. marginatus under controlled laboratory conditions for larvae (26 °C, 75% relative humidity and nymph (26 °C, 95% relative humidity moulting, was on average 92 d (range 75-104 d, including preoviposition and egg incubation (22.5 d, larvae incubation (20.5 d, nymphal stage (28 d along with male maturation (21 d. The index of conversion efficiency and the index of reproduction efficiency in females were 0.397 and 8.300, respectively. Conclusions: Although in this investigation, there was no meaningful correlation between preoviposition period and the weight of female ticks which were laid successfully. The significant linear relationship was fully observed between the weight of engorged female of D. marginatus and the number of eggs laid. The mean of preoviposition period from 5.4 d in autumn to 34.2 d in spring increased. The minimum weight of ticks with laying capacity was 69 mg and lighter ticks (21 mg either did not lay or if they did their eggs did not hatch.

  1. Surveillance of Ixodes ricinus ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfredsson, Matthias; Olafsson, Erling; Eydal, Matthias; Unnsteinsdottir, Ester Rut; Hansford, Kayleigh; Wint, William; Alexander, Neil; Medlock, Jolyon M

    2017-10-10

    Ixodes ricinus is a three-host tick, a principal vector of Borrelia burgdorferi (s.l.) and one of the main vectors of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus. Iceland is located in the North Atlantic Ocean with subpolar oceanic climate. During the past 3-4 decades, average temperature has increased, supporting more favourable conditions for ticks. Reports of I. ricinus have increased in recent years. If these ticks were able to establish in a changing climate, Iceland may face new threats posed by tick-borne diseases. Active field surveillance by tick flagging was conducted at 111 sites around Iceland from August 2015 to September 2016. Longworth mammal traps were used to trap Apodemus sylvaticus in southwestern and southern Iceland. Surveillance on tick importation by migratory birds was conducted in southeastern Iceland, using bird nets and a Heligoland trap. Vulpes lagopus carcasses from all regions of the country were inspected for ticks. In addition, existing and new passive surveillance data from two institutes have been merged and are presented. Continental probability of presence models were produced. Boosted Regression Trees spatial modelling methods and its predictions were assessed against reported presence. By field sampling 26 questing I. ricinus ticks (7 males, 3 females and 16 nymphs) were collected from vegetation from three locations in southern and southeastern Iceland. Four ticks were found on migratory birds at their arrival in May 2016. A total of 52 A. sylvaticus were live-trapped but no ticks were found nor on 315 V. lagopus carcasses. Passive surveillance data collected since 1976, reports further 214 I. ricinus ticks from 202 records, with an increase of submissions in recent years. The continental probability of presence model correctly predicts approximately 75% of the recorded presences, but fails to predict a fairly specific category of recorded presence in areas where the records are probably opportunistic and not likely to lead to establishment. To the best of our knowledge, this study represents the first finding of questing I. ricinus ticks in Iceland. The species could possibly be established locally in Iceland in low abundance, although no questing larvae have yet been detected to confirm established populations. Submitted tick records have increased recently, which may reflect an increase in exposure, or in interest in ticks. Furthermore, the amount of records on dogs, cats and humans indicate that ticks were acquired locally, presenting a local biting risk. Tick findings on migratory birds highlight a possible route of importation. Obtaining questing larvae is now a priority to confirm that I. ricinus populations are established in Iceland. Further surveys on wild mammals (e.g. Rangifer tarandus), livestock and migratory birds are recommended to better understand their role as potential hosts for I. ricinus.

  2. Efficacy of acaricides against larvae of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806 (Acari: Ixodidae and Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus (Canestrini, 1887 (Acari: Ixodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Melo de Souza

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Parasitism by mites has always been of concern with regard to losses in animal production and to the transmission of etiologic agents of important diseases as well, and about 95% of the developing forms of ticks in the non-parasitic phase are in the environment. In view of the importance of controlling larval stages of ticks in the environment, this study evaluated the efficacy of acaricides in vitro against larvae of Rhipicephalus (B. microplus and R. sanguineus. Accordingly, we tested: 15% cypermethrin (T1; 25% deltamethrin (T2; combination of cypermethrin 5% + 45% dichlorvos + 25% piperonyl butoxide (T3; combination of 15% cypermethrin + 25% chlorpyrifos + 1% citronella (T4; and 12.5% amitraz (T5. In each treatment, there were nine replicates with 20 larvae each. The larvae were observed for motility at: 1, 5, 10, 20 and 30 minutes post-treatment (MPT; 1, 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours post-treatment (HPT; and 5 days post-treatment. Tests in R. (B. microplus and R. sanguineus larvae with 25% deltamethrin served as a positive control and demonstrated 100% loss of motility at 2 HPT for both tick species. R. (B. microplus larvae were most sensitive to treatments containing 15% cypermethrin or 5% cypermethrin combined with dichlorvos and piperonyl butoxide. Larvae of R. sanguineus were most sensitive to treatment with 12.5% amitraz. However, despite the differences in acaricidal effect during the observation time, 100% efficacy was obtained for all treatments against larvae of R. sanguineus and R. (B. microplus at 12 HPT, demonstrating that appropriate doses of commercial acaricides can be effective in environmental control strategies against tick larvae.

  3. Morphological and molecular characterization of Amblyomma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The association of most tick-borne pathogens with specific tick species has made it imperative that proper identification and characterization of such tick vectors is necessary for the purpose of developing effective tick and tick-borne control strategies. This study was undertaken to identify and characterize Amblyomma ...

  4. Toxicity of Millettia ferruginea darasana (family: Fabaceae) against the larvae and adult ticks of Amblyomma variegatum Fabricius a three-host tick in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Manash Kumar; Shiferaw, Yoseph; Hussen, Ahmed

    2015-06-01

    The in vitro toxicity of Millettia ferruginea darasana (family: Fabaceae) was tested against the larvae adult male and female of a three-host tick, Amblyomma variegatum Fabricius (family: Ixodidae or hard tick), known as 'tropical bont tick' parasitic mainly to cattle found in Ethiopia and other equatorial Africa. The 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 % concentrations of the seed oil extracted with petroleum ether were found to kill all (100 % mortality) larvae after 12, 9, 6, 3 and 1.5 h respectively. The results summarized in the Table 1 was found to be statistically significant at the probability level of p = 0.05. The 100 % concentration of the oil caused 100 % mortality of adult male, adult female and fully engorged female tick after 5, 7 and 12 h respectively. The root and root bark showed less toxicity. The leaves did not show any toxicity. [Table: see text].

  5. Acari in archaeology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Anne S

    2009-10-01

    Mites and ticks (Acari) have been found in a variety of archaeological situations. Their identification has enabled data on habitat and dietary preferences to be obtained, and these have been used to interpret study sites. Despite this, Acari are not routinely considered in analyses in the way that other environmental components are. Like forensic science, archaeology draws on biological material to rebuild past human activity, and acarology has the potential to provide a much greater amount of evidence to both than is currently the case. As an aid to workers in these fields, an overview is presented of the Acari that have been extracted from archaeological samples, the situations in which they were found and the contribution their presence can make to the interpretation of sites.

  6. LEVANTAMENTO DA FAUNA ACAROLÓGICA (ORDEM: IXODIDA NO MUNICIPIO DE BOM JESUS DOS PERDÕES, UTILIZANDO MÉTODOS DE CAPTURA DE CARRAPATOS DE VIDA LIVRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Ferreira Vicentini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was describe the acarologic fauna (Order: Ixodida in the municipality of Bom Jesus dos Perdões, beyond compare two capture methods at different points and collection times. To capture were used the drag flannel and carbon dioxide traps. Were performed six collections, one of the regions was predominantly pasture and other flooded. Overall 133 ticks were collected, of these 122 of species Amblyomma sculptum and 11 Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Of total, 54 were in larval stage (40,6% and the peak of collections happened in June, 50 nymphs (37,5% with this peak in September and only 29 in adult stage (21,8% in October. There was no significant difference between the types of traps and the amount of captured ticks in both collection points. Both capture methods were efficient and the two collection points showed similar acarologic fauna.

  7. Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae, the brown dog tick, parasitizing humans in Brazil Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae, o carrapato vermelho do cão, parasitando humanos no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Dantas-Torres

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to describe four cases of human parasitism by Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latrielle in Brazil. During an investigation regarding the species of ectoparasites of domestic dogs from the metropolitan region of Recife, Pernambuco state, four dog owners were found to be parasitized by ticks. The ticks were collected from these individuals and their dogs. All the ticks were identified as Rhipicephalus sanguineus . These are, to our knowledge, the first four cases of human parasitism by this tick species in Brazil. The possible implications of this finding are discussed here.O objetivo deste artigo é descrever quatro casos de parasitismo humano por Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latrielle no Brasil. Durante uma investigação sobre as espécies de ectoparasitas de cães domésticos provenientes da Região Metropolitana de Recife, Pernambuco, quatro proprietários de cães foram encontrados parasitados por carrapatos. Foram coletados carrapatos dos indivíduos e de seus cães. Todos os carrapatos foram identificados como Rhipicephalus sanguineus, sendo, portanto, descritos os primeiros quatro casos de parasitismo humano por esta espécie de carrapato, no Brasil. Neste trabalho, são discutidas as possíveis implicações epidemiológicas deste achado.

  8. Amblyomma tapirellum (Dunn, 1933) collected from tropical forest canopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loaiza, J.R.; Miller, M.J.; Bermingham, E.; Sanjur, O.I.; Jansen, P.A.; Rovira, J.R.; Alvarez, E.; Rodriguez, E.; Davis, P.; Dutari, L.C.; Pecor, J.; Foley, D.; Radtke, M.; Pongsiri, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Free-ranging ticks are widely known to be restricted to the ground level of vegetation. Here, we document the capture of the tick species Amblyomma tapirellum in light traps placed in the forest canopy of Barro Colorado Island, central Panama. A total of forty eight adults and three nymphs were

  9. Rickettsia bellii infecting Amblyomma sabanerae ticks in El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Amália R M; Romero, Luis; Labruna, Marcelo B

    2012-07-01

    Four Amblyomma sabanerae ticks collected from a turtle (Kinosternon sp.) in San Miguel, El Salvador, were found by molecular analysis to be infected by Rickettsia bellii. We provide the first report of Rickettsia bellii in Central America, and the first report of a Rickettsia species in El Salvador.

  10. Mesoplophoroidea (Acari, Oribatida) of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong

    2016-02-29

    The oribatid mite superfamily Mesoplophoroidea (Acari, Oribatida) is reviewed. Seven species in four genera of Mesoplophoroidea from China, including a new species, Mesoplophora (Mesoplophora) heterotricha sp. nov. from Hainan Province, are identified. Tritonymph of Apoplophora pantotrema (Berlese, 1913) is described based on material from China. A comprehensive, fully referenced checklist of all known species and keys to all known species worldwide are provided to facilitate the further study on this group.

  11. Ixodidae ticks in the megapolis of Kyiv, Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Ixodidae include the most common tick species encountered in Europe. The ticks transmit a variety of bacterial and protozoan agents of medical and veterinary significance. The aim of the current work was to investigate distribution of Ixodes ricinus and Dermacentor reticulatus ticks in Kyiv, the...

  12. New Uropodine mites from Tanzania (Acari: Mesostigmata)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kontschán, J.; Starý, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 3683, č. 3 (2013), s. 267-279 ISSN 1175-5326 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Acari * Mesostigmata * Uropodina * new genus * new species * Tanzania Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.060, year: 2013

  13. Molecular detection of Rickettsia species in Amblyomma ticks collected from snakes in Thailand

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sumrandee, C.; Hirunkanokpun, S.; Doornbos, K.; Kitthawee, S.; Baimai, V.; Grubhoffer, Libor; Trinachartvanit, W.; Ahantarig, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 6 (2014), s. 632-640 ISSN 1877-959X Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Tick * Rickettsia spp. * Amblyomma varanense * Amblyomma helvolum * Snake * Thailand Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.718, year: 2014

  14. Susceptibility of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) to pyrethroids and their associations in Pernambuco, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Santana, Breno Barros; Ramos, Rafael Antonio Nascimento; Santana, Marília de Andrade; Alves, Leucio Cãmara; de Carvalho, Gílcia Aparecida

    2013-01-01

    The synthetic pyrethroids and their associations have been widely used for controlling Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. The frequent use of acaricides has been inducing the development of resistance in the tick populations. The aim of this study was to assess the susceptibility of R. (B.) microplus populations to pyrethroids and their associations in the region of Garanhuns, Pernambuco, Brazil. In addition, the level of information among farm owners regarding tick control measures was investigated. Ticks were collected directly from naturally infested dairy cattle in the region and were exposed to pyrethroids and their associations. At the same time, an epidemiological questionnaire was applied with the aim of investigating the level of information among the farmers. The results reported here indicate that R. (B.) microplus populations in the dairy region of Garanhuns show resistance to pyrethroids and their associations, except when the product is associated with piperonyl butoxide. Regarding the results from the epidemiological survey, it was seen that there is a considerable lack of information among the farmers in relation to ixodid control measures. The level of ticks resistance to acaricides varied widely across the region studied. No alternative control programs have been implemented among these farms, thus demonstrating that there is a need for more information relating to the biology and control of R. (B.) microplus.

  15. The Ixodes (Acari: Ixodidae) of Mexico: Parasite-Host and Host-Parasite Checklists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-20

    Ixodes boliviensis Neumann Previous records CHIAPAS: 1&, Planta de Luz, Huixtla, VI-1945, Canis familiaris (recorded as “dog”) [Hoffmann 1962...Ixodes affinis CARNIVORA Canidae “fox” Ixodes boliviensis Canis familiaris L. Ixodes boliviensis Ixodes scapularis Urocyon cinereoargenteus (Schreber

  16. Characterization of pyrethroid resistance and susceptibility to coumaphos in Mexican Boophilus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R J; Davey, R B; George, J E

    1999-09-01

    Two patterns of pyrethroid resistance were characterized from Boophilus microplus (Canestrini) collected in Mexico. One was characteristic of a kdr mutation and the other involved esterase and cytochrome P450 enzyme systems. Very high resistance to permethrin, cypermethrin, and flumethrin, not synergized by TPP and PBO and high resistance to DDT, characterized the kdr-like pattern found in the Corrales and San Felipe strains. Esterase and cytochrome P450-dependent resistance was found in the Coatzacoalcos strain. It was characterized by resistance to permethrin, cypermethrin, and flumethrin, synergized by TPP and PBO, but no resistance to DDT. The Coatzacoalcos strain also showed 3.6-fold resistance to the organophosphate coumaphos. This factor appeared to be independent of pyrethroid resistance. Pyrethroid resistance patterns found in Mexico were similar to those found earlier in Australia. The significance of pyrethroid and coumaphos resistance to the U.S. cattle fever tick quarantine is discussed.

  17. An Annotated List of Tick (Acari: Ixodida) Common Names Authored by Harry Hoogstraal (1917-1986)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Hoogstraal, 1956 ― Hoogstraal (1956) Sumatran forest haemaphysalid, Haemaphysalis sumatraensis Hoogstraal, El Kammah, Kadarsan and Anastos, 1971...the tiger , boar, and sambar deer in Indonesia. Journal of Par- asitology, 57, 1104–1109. Hoogstraal, H., Dhanda, V. & Bhat, H.R. (1972a) Haemaphysalis

  18. First documentation of ivermectin resistance in Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Vivas, R I; Ojeda-Chi, M M; Trinidad-Martinez, I; Pérez de León, A A

    2017-01-15

    The brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Latreille, 1806), is an ectoparasite and disease vector of significant veterinary and public health importance that is distributed widely around the world. The intensive use of synthetic acaricides for tick control exerts a strong selective pressure for brown dog ticks to become resistant to them. Here, we investigated claims from the field regarding treatment failure associated with the use of veterinary products containing ivermectin (IVM) to control brown dog ticks infesting dogs in Yucatan state, Mexico. Dogs in six state municipalities were inspected to sample 15 R. sanguineus s.l. Interviews were conducted with dog owners to gather information on the history of dog treatment with conventional acaricides and IVM. The larval immersion test was used on the progeny of adult female ticks infesting dogs to test for susceptibility to IVM. Dose-mortality regressions, lethal concentrations (LC), their confidence intervals, and slope were estimated by probit analysis. Ten tick populations (66.7%) were classified as resistant compared with the most susceptible population. A high inter-population variation in the phenotypic level of IVM resistance was evident (resistance ratio at LC 50% and LC 99% ranged from 1.0 to 30.5, and from 1.0 to 458.8, respectively). Tick populations classified as resistant were collected from dogs known to have been treated with IVM. To our knowledge, this is the first report of IVM resistance in R. sanguineus s.l. worldwide. Veterinary and pet owner education on integrated tick management practices is required to avoid widespread resistance and increased treatment failure with products containing IVM and other macrocyclic lactones used to control endo- and ectoparasites affecting dogs. Integrated tick management will also help mitigate the burden of brown dog tick-borne diseases on human and animal populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of a Sodium Channel Mutation in Permethrin-Resistant Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Nicholas S G; Kaufman, Phillip E; Weeks, Emma N I; Rowland, Jessica; Tidwell, Jason; Miller, Robert J

    2017-11-07

    The brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latrielle) sensu lato, is an important ectoparasite of dogs and occasionally humans, capable of transmitting several pathogens, such as Rickettsia and Ehrlichia, which are of veterinary and medical importance. The brown dog tick is distributed worldwide and has an affinity for human habitations in much of its range. In some populations, lack of integrated pest management plans and overuse of pyrethroid pesticides and other sodium channel inhibitors has resulted in high levels of resistance to permethrin. Recently, a highly conserved region of the R. sanguineus sodium channel was sequenced, indicating that a single nucleotide polymorphism of thymine to cytosine on domain III segment VI of the sodium channel could confer resistance. A molecular assay targeting a point mutation in the sodium channel was developed and optimized to separate ticks expressing permethrin resistance from those from a susceptible colony. Thereafter, multiple field-collected phenotypically permethrin-resistant populations were evaluated using this molecular assay to determine genotype. As confirmed by DNA sequencing, a point mutation was present at a high rate in phenotypically resistant tick populations that was not present in the susceptible strain. These data suggest an additional permethrin resistance mechanism to metabolic resistance, which has been reported for this tick species, and confirm its association with phenotypic resistance. The results of this study further emphasize the need to preserve acaricide chemistry through rotation of active ingredients used to control ectoparasites. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. The Genus Ixodes (Acari: Ixodidae) in Mexico: Adult Identification Keys, Diagnoses, Hosts, and Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    spurs of coxae I-IV small and about equal in size. Male: Unknown. Distribution in Mexico. Estado de México. Hosts in Mexico. Geomyidae (Mammalia...spur; coxa II with a small internal spur; all coxae with moderate external spurs. Distribution in Mexico. Puebla . Hosts in Mexico. Heteromyidae...Distribution in Mexico. Morelos, Guerrero, Veracruz, and also from Estado de México as I. neotomae Cooley, 1944 (Hoffmann and López-Campos, 2000

  1. Detection of Leishmania (V guyanensis in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae collected from Pecari tajacu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús E. Rojas-Jaimes

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: The results showed the presence of L. (V guyanensis DNA in R. microplus possibly acquired after biting a collarde peccary. Therefore, it is important to design future studies to clarify R. microplus involvement in the transmission of leishmaniasis.

  2. Polymorphism of Beauveria bassiana (Deuteromycota: Hyphomycetes) strains isolated from Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae) in Moldova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitina, G V; Tokarev, Y S; Movila, A A; Yli-Mattila, T

    2011-03-01

    Polymorphism of 10 Beauveria bassiana strains, isolated from Ixodes ricinus in Moldova, was evaluated using traditional (morphological and cultural properties) and molecular (RAPD patterns and ITS sequences) methods. The isolates differed greatly in morphological and cultural features, such as color, consistence, and growth rate. Four RAPD-PCR markers were used to evaluate genetic diversity of the strains. Phylogenetic neighbor-joining analysis of RAPD patterns divided strains into 3 major clades. The ITS sequences of 8 strains were identical to those of known B. bassiana strains. Two subsets (1 and 2) different by one nucleotide change were found in the ITS1 region. One strain of subset 1 was different from known B. bassiana strains by possessing 2 point mutations in the ITS region. RAPD-based clustering correlated to ITS sequence and colony morphology-based grouping of the strains. 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. American Black Bears as Hosts of Blacklegged Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) in the Northeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolnik, Christine P; Makkay, Amanda M; Falco, Richard C; Daniels, Thomas J

    2015-09-01

    Ticks and whole blood were collected from American black bears (Ursus americanus Pallas) between October 2011 and October 2012 across four counties in northwestern New Jersey, an area where blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis Say) and their associated tick-borne pathogens are prevalent. Adult American dog ticks (Dermacentor variabilis Say) were the most frequently collected tick species in late spring, whereas adult and nymphal blacklegged ticks were found in both the late spring and fall months. Additionally, for blacklegged ticks, we determined the quality of bloodmeals that females acquired from black bears compared with bloodmeals from white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus Zimmerman), the most important host for the adult stage of this tick species. Measures of fecundity after feeding on each host species were not significantly different, suggesting that the bloodmeal a female blacklegged tick acquires from a black bear is of similar quality to that obtained from a white-tailed deer. These results establish the American black bear as both a host and quality bloodmeal source to I. scapularis. Thus, black bears may help support blacklegged tick populations in areas where they are both present. In addition, samples of black bear blood were tested for DNA presence of three tick-borne pathogens. Anaplasma phagocytophilum Foggie and Babesia microti Franca were found in 9.2 and 32.3% of blood samples, respectively. All blood samples were quantitative polymerase chain reaction-negative for Borrelia burgdorferi Johnson, Schmid, Hyde, Steigerwalt, & Brenner. Although circulating pathogens were found in blood, the status of black bears as reservoirs for these pathogens remains unknown. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. New host records of Haemaphysalis leporispalustris (Acari: Ixodidae) on birds in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeringóta, Viviane; Maturano, Ralph; Santolin, Ísis Daniele Alves Costa; McIntosh, Douglas; Famadas, Kátia Maria; Daemon, Erik; Faccini, João Luiz Horacio

    2016-05-01

    Birds are an important component of the life histories and bioecology of a number of tick species and of some tick associated pathogens. An examination of the data concerning bird/tick associations in the Neotropics, showed that the tick Haemaphysalis leporispalustrisis (Packard, 1869) was rarely recorded infesting birds. The current study reports parasitism by H. leporispalustris in wild birds collected from Atlantic rain forest environments in the states of Rio de Janeiro (4LL) and Minas Gerais (17LL, 1NN), Brazil. All ticks were identified morphologically to the genus level; total DNA was extracted from each Haemaphysalis tick and examined by PCR and nucleotide sequencing of fragments of the eukaryotic genes encoding 16S rRNA and 12S rRNA. The bird species Arremon semitorquatus, Corythopis delalandi, Fluvicola nengeta, Troglodytes musculus, and Volatinia jacarina were recorded as hosts for H. leporispalustris for the first time in South America, and Turdus rufiventris represented a new record for Brazil.

  5. Pyrosequencing based assessment of bacterial diversity in Turkish Rhipicephalus annulatus and Dermacentor marginatus ticks (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Saban; Dowd, Scot E; Davinic, Marko; Bursali, Ahmet; Keskin, Adem

    2017-03-01

    Ticks continue to be a threat to human and animal health in Turkey, as they are considered important vectors of human and animal diseases. The objectives of this investigation are to characterize the microbial communities of two tick species, Rhipicephalus annulatus and Dermacenter marginatus, analyze patterns of co-occurrence among microbial taxa, identify and compare pathogens contributing human diseases, and determine whether avirulent symbionts could exclude human pathogens from tick communities. Furthermore, this study explores a microbiome of the R. annulatus and D. marginatus via the bacterial 16S tag-encoded FLX-titanium amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP) technique to describe their bacterial diversity. Pyrosequencing was performed on adult males and females isolated from humans from two high-risk Turkish provinces, Sivas and Amasya, during tick outbreaks in 2009. A total of 36,253 sequences were utilized for analyses of the 8 tick samples. Several pathogenic genera such as Francisella, Coxiella, Rickettsia, and Shigella were detected in the ticks tested. The most distinguishable difference between the two species of ticks was the lack of known human pathogen Rickettsia in R. annulatus and in samples 9 and 10 of D. marginatus. These samples had higher relative abundance of Flavobacterium sp., Curvibacter sp., Acidovorax sp., and Bacteroidaceae genera mostly representing symbionts which form a large component of normal tick microbiota. The outcome of this study is consistent with the predictions of the community ecological theory that diversity-rich bacteriomes are more resistant to bacterial invasion (and consequent pathogen dissemination) than diversity-deprived ones.

  6. Distribution of ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) infesting domestic ruminants in mountainous areas of Golestan province, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarani, Moslem; Telmadarraiy, Zakkyeh; Moghaddam, Abdolreza Salahi; Azam, Kamal; Sedaghat, Mohammad Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of ticks on cattle in the mountainous areas of Golestan province and their geographical distribution. Methods In total, 498 animals from 25 herds were selected to search for ticks in 2009-2010. Tick collection was carried out during four seasons, twice per season over a period of 12 month from March 2009 through February 2010 in two districts, Azadshahr and Ramian. Meteorological data were obtained from Iran Meteorological Organization. The geographical points recorded using a Garmin eTrex®H GPS. Results A total of 255 ticks were collected from a total of 219 ruminants including 44 sheep, 63 goats, 99 cows and 13 camels in two districts of the mountainous area of Golestan province, including Azadshahr and Ramian. Five species of ixodid ticks were identified: Rhipicephalus sanguineus (66.5%), Rhipicephalus bursa (4.6%), Hyalomma marginatum (19.9%), Hyalomma anatolicum (6%) and Hyalomma asiaticum (4%). The densities of infestations were calculated for sheep, goats, cows and camels 0.9, 0.79, 0.16 and 0.43 respectively. Seasonal activity of each ixodid tick infesting domestic ruminants was determined. The distribution maps showed ixodid ticks on domestic ruminants, and Rhipicephalus sanguineus were dominant species in the area. Conclusions Such research provides necessary information for human and animal health service mangers to have a better understanding of prevention and control of vector borne diseases especially during the outbreaks. PMID:25183090

  7. Distribution of ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) infesting domestic ruminants in mountainous areas of Golestan province, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Sarani, Moslem; Telmadarraiy, Zakkyeh; Moghaddam, Abdolreza Salahi; Azam, Kamal; Sedaghat, Mohammad Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of ticks on cattle in the mountainous areas of Golestan province and their geographical distribution. Methods: In total, 498 animals from 25 herds were selected to search for ticks in 2009–2010. Tick collection was carried out during four seasons, twice per season over a period of 12 month from March 2009 through February 2010 in two districts, Azadshahr and Ramian. Meteorological data were obtained from Iran Meteorological Organization. The geographi...

  8. Babesia microti (Piroplasmida: Babesiidae) in nymphal Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae) in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rudolf, Ivo; Golovchenko, Maryna; Šikutová, Silvie; Rudenko, Natalia; Grubhoffer, Libor; Hubálek, Zdeněk

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 3 (2005), s. 274-276 ISSN 0015-5683 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/03/0726 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519; CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Babesia microti * Ixodes ricinus Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.138, year: 2005 http://folia.paru.cas.cz/pdfs/showpdf.php?pdf=20766

  9. Genetic diversity of Salp15 in the Ixodes ricinus complex (Acari: Ixodidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    Full Text Available Salp15, a 15-kDa tick salivary gland protein, is both essential for ticks to successfully obtain host blood and also facilitates transmission of Lyme borreliosis. To determine whether the Salp15 gene is expressed in Ixodes persulcatus and Ixodes sinensis, principle vectors of Lyme borreliosis in China, we studied transcriptions of this gene in semi-engorged larvae, nymph and adults of these two species. A total of eight Salp15 homologues, five in I. persulcatus and three in I. sinensis, were identified by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Interestingly, the intra-species similarity of Salp15 is approximately equal to its interspecies similarity and more than one Salp15 protein is expressed in a certain tick developmental stage. Comparison of DNA and proteins with other available tick Salp15 homologues suggests that the Salp15 superfamily is genetically conserved and diverse in the Ixodes ricinus complex. These findings indicate that Salp15 proteins in the I. ricinus complex may play an essential role in interacting with the host immune system and transmission of Borrelia genospecies.

  10. A espermiogenese em Boophilus microplus (Canestrini, 1887) (Acari:ixodidae) : aspectos estruturais e ultra-estruturais

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Augusto Borba Meyer Normann

    1998-01-01

    Resumo: O presente trabalho objetiva descrever a espermiogênese do carrapato do boi - (Boophilus microplus) (Canestrini, 1887), sob aspectos histológicos, histoquímicos, morfológicos e ultra-estruturais. A espermatogênese ocorre no testículo de carrapatos que iniciaram o repasto com sangue. As células da linhagem gamética encontram-se isoladas em cistos. A espermiogênese inicia­-se no organismo masculino, sendo concluída no aparelho reprodutor feminino, em fêmeas jovens. Espermatócitos encist...

  11. Mating activity and physiological age of females in population of Ixodes ricinus (L.) (Acari: Ixodidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikulová, N.; Dusbábek, František; Bouman, Edwin Arien Poul

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 1 (2005), s. 85-92 ISSN 0132-8077 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/04/0751 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Ixodes ricinus * age structure * mating activity Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  12. Parasitism of immature stages of Haemaphysalis sulcata (Acari: Ixodidae) on some reptiles in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Adem; Bursali, Ahmet; Kumlutas, Yusuf; Ilgaz, Cetin; Tekin, Saban

    2013-10-01

    Reptiles may contribute to maintaining tick populations by feeding larvae, nymphs, and adults. The life cycles and tick-host associations of many Turkish ticks are still poorly known, and only 3 ixodid tick species have been reported on 7 reptile species in Turkey. In this study, we performed a tick survey on reptiles in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey. In 2005, 57 reptiles (52 lizards and 5 snakes) comprising 10 species from 5 families were captured and examined for tick infestation. A total of 427 ticks was collected. The majority of ticks found on lizards was the immature stages of Haemaphysalis sulcata, 420 larvae and 4 nymphs. The only adult ticks recorded on the agamid lizard, Laudakia stellio, were Hyalomma aegyptium (1 ♂, 2 ♀). The highest tick infestation rate was recorded on specimens of Timon princeps. This study is the first detailed investigation on ticks infesting reptiles in Turkey. To the best of our knowledge, these tick-host associations have never been documented in the literature.

  13. In vitro activity of pineapple extracts (Ananas comosus, Bromeliaceae) on Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Luciana Ferreira; Giglioti, Rodrigo; Feitosa, Karina Alves; Fantatto, Rafaela Regina; Rabelo, Márcio Dias; Oliveira, Márcia Cristina de Sena; Oliveira, Gilson Pereira de; Bechara, Gervasio Henrique; Chagas, Ana Carolina de Souza

    2013-07-01

    Measures to control the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, based only on chemical products are becoming unsustainable, mainly because of the development of resistance. The objective of this study was to test the effect of the aqueous extract of pineapple skin (AEPS) and bromelain extracted from the stem (Sigma-Aldrich®, B4882) on engorged females and larvae of R. (B.) microplus in vitro. These substances were diluted in water and evaluated at eight concentrations. Engorged females were collected and distributed in groups of 10, with three repetitions for each treatment. After immersion in the solutions, the females were placed in an incubator for observation of survival, oviposition and larval hatching. The larval packet method was used, also with three repetitions with about 100 larvae each. The packets were incubated and the readings were performed after 24 h. The estimated reproduction and efficacy of the solutions were calculated. The LC(50) and LC(90) were estimated using the Probit procedure of the SAS program. The eight concentrations were compared within each treatment by the Tukey test. For the experiment with engorged females, the most effective concentrations were 125, 250 and 500 mg/mL: 33%, 48% and 59% for the AEPS and 27%, 51% and 55% for the bromelain. The LC(50) and LC(90) values were, respectively, 276 and 8691 mg/mL for AEPS and 373 and 5172 mg/mL for bromelain. None of the dilutions tested was effective against the larvae of R. (B.) microplus. This is the first report of the action of pineapple extracts or their constituents on cattle ticks. The results demonstrate that further studies regarding composition of tick cuticle, with evaluation of other solvents and formulations, should be conducted seeking to enhance the effect of pineapple extracts and compounds against this ectoparasite. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Repellent activity of fractioned compounds from Chamaecyparis nootkatensis essential oil against nymphal Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Gabrielle; Dolan, Marc C; Peralta-Cruz, Javier; Schmidt, Jason; Piesman, Joseph; Eisen, Rebecca J; Karchesy, Joseph J

    2006-09-01

    Preliminary repellent activity of 14 natural products isolated from essential oil components extracted from the heartwood of Alaska yellow cedar, Chamaecyparis nootkatensis (D. Don) Spach., were evaluated against nymphal Ixodes scapularis Say in a laboratory bioassay and compared with technical grade N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (deet). Four hours after treatment, nootkatone and valencene-13-ol had repellent concentration (RC)50 values of 0.0458 and 0.0712% (wt:vol), respectively; two additional Alaska yellow cedar compounds, nootkatone 1 --> 10 epoxide and carvacrol had reported RC50 values of 0.0858 and 0.112%, respectively. The observed RC50 value for deet was 0.0728% (wt:vol). Although not statistically significantly more active than deet, the ability of these natural products to repel ticks at relatively low concentrations may represent a potential alternative to synthetic commercial repellents.

  15. Mitotic and meiotic chromosomes of a southern Brazilian population of Boophilus microplus (Acari, Ixodidae

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    Rosane Nunes Garcia

    Full Text Available Using conventional staining with acetic orcein and C-banding techniques it was investigated constitutive heterochromatin chromosomal polymorphisms and the mitotic and the meiotic behavior of male and female chromosomes of Boophilus microplus (Canestrini, 1887. Some differences were detected in the population of southern Brazil as compared to the data of other authors for populations in other latitudes. The differences being mainly concerned with the distribution of constitutive centromeric heterochromatin and variation in the length of heterochromatic blocks in the pericentromeric regions of some chromosome pairs.

  16. Abundance estimation of Ixodes ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) on roe deer (Capreolus capreolus).

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    Kiffner, Christian; Lödige, Christina; Alings, Matthias; Vor, Torsten; Rühe, Ferdinand

    2010-09-01

    Despite the importance of roe deer as a host for Ixodes ticks in central Europe, estimates of total tick burden on roe deer are not available to date. We aimed at providing (1) estimates of life stage and sex specific (larvae, nymphs, males and females, hereafter referred to as tick life stages) total Ixodes burden and (2) equations which can be used to predict the total life stage burden by counting the life stage on a selected body area. Within a period of 1(1/2) years, we conducted whole body counts of ticks from 80 hunter-killed roe deer originating from a beech dominated forest area in central Germany. Averaged over the entire study period (winter 2007-summer 2009), the mean tick burden per roe deer was 64.5 (SE +/- 10.6). Nymphs were the most numerous tick life stage per roe deer (23.9 +/- 3.2), followed by females (21.4 +/- 3.5), larvae (10.8 +/- 4.2) and males (8.4 +/- 1.5). The individual tick burden was highly aggregated (k = 0.46); levels of aggregation were highest in larvae (k = 0.08), followed by males (k = 0.40), females (k = 0.49) and nymphs (k = 0.71). To predict total life stage specific burdens based on counts on selected body parts, we provide linear equations. For estimating larvae abundance on the entire roe deer, counts can be restricted to the front legs. Tick counts restricted to the head are sufficient to estimate total nymph burden and counts on the neck are appropriate for estimating adult ticks (females and males). In order to estimate the combined tick burden, tick counts on the head can be used for extrapolation. The presented linear models are highly significant and explain 84.1, 77.3, 90.5, 91.3, and 65.3% (adjusted R (2)) of the observed variance, respectively. Thus, these models offer a robust basis for rapid tick abundance assessment. This can be useful for studies aiming at estimating effects of abiotic and biotic factors on tick abundance, modelling tick population dynamics, modelling tick-borne pathogen transmission dynamics or assessing the efficacy of acaricides.

  17. Precise identification of different stages of a tick, Ixodes granulatus Supino, 1897 (Acari: Ixodidae

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    Ernieenor Faraliana Che Lah

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: These findings demonstrated for the first time the establishment of COI gene for identifying I. granulatus nymphal tick which is of paramount importance to the control of potential tick-borne infections in Malaysia. Moreover, this study provides evidence that a combination of morphology and molecular data was corroborated as an accurate tool for tick identification.

  18. Habitat Suitability Model for the Distribution of Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) in Minnesota.

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    Johnson, T L; Bjork, J K H; Neitzel, D F; Dorr, F M; Schiffman, E K; Eisen, R J

    2016-05-01

    Ixodes scapularis Say, the black-legged tick, is the primary vector in the eastern United States of several pathogens causing human diseases including Lyme disease, anaplasmosis, and babesiosis. Over the past two decades, I. scapularis-borne diseases have increased in incidence as well as geographic distribution. Lyme disease exists in two major foci in the United States, one encompassing northeastern states and the other in the Upper Midwest. Minnesota represents a state with an appreciable increase in counties reporting I. scapularis-borne illnesses, suggesting geographic expansion of vector populations in recent years. Recent tick distribution records support this assumption. Here, we used those records to create a fine resolution, subcounty-level distribution model for I. scapularis using variable response curves in addition to tests of variable importance. The model identified 19% of Minnesota as potentially suitable for establishment of the tick and indicated with high accuracy (AUC = 0.863) that the distribution is driven by land cover type, summer precipitation, maximum summer temperatures, and annual temperature variation. We provide updated records of established populations near the northwestern species range limit and present a model that increases our understanding of the potential distribution of I. scapularis in Minnesota. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  19. Distribution of Rickettsia rickettsii in ovary cells of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille1806 (Acari: Ixodidae

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    da Silva Costa Luís

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considering the fact that the dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, has a great potential to become the vector of Brazilian Spotted Fever (BSF for humans, the present study aimed to describe the distribution of the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii, the etiological agent of BSF, in different regions of the ovaries of R. sanguineus using histological techniques. The ovaries were obtained from positive females confirmed by the hemolymph test and fed in the nymph stage on guinea pigs inoculated with R. rickettsii. Results The results showed a general distribution of R. rickettsii in the ovary cells, being found in oocytes in all stages of development (I, II, III, IV and V most commonly in the periphery of the oocyte and also in the cytoplasm of pedicel cells. Conclusions The histological analysis of the ovaries of R. sanguineus infected females confirmed the presence of the bacterium, indicating that the infection can interfere negatively in the process of reproduction of the ticks, once alterations were detected both in the shape and cell structure of the oocytes which contained bacteria.

  20. Morphometric Study on Male Specimens of Hyalomma anatolicum (Acari: Ixodidae in West of Iran

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    A Hosseini

    2011-12-01

    Conclusion: Morphometric variation in Hyalomma spp is poorly studied. The variation in range and quantity of the mor­phometric parameters of H.anatolicum ‎underlies that the correct recognition and key construction for Hyalomma spe­cies dependes ‎on a complement morphometric study on the other species.

  1. Biology, ecology and distribution of the tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis Neumann (Acari: Ixodidae) in New Zealand.

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    Heath, Acg

    2016-01-01

    Haemaphysalis longicornis is the only tick in New Zealand that infests livestock. Throughout its range H. longicornis is exposed to and exhibits tolerance to a wide range of environmental conditions, although it flourishes more in moist, warm-temperate environments. This review examines aspects of the biology, physiology and ecology of H. longicornis that determine its distribution and seasonal activity in New Zealand, based on laboratory and field studies. Examples are also drawn from studies outside New Zealand for comparative purposes, especially in the context of seasonal activity as seen in less temperate latitudes. The tick is able to withstand a wide range of temperature, from its developmental threshold of ∼12°C to nearly 40°C at its lethal limit, but its tolerance of dehydration is less wide, especially in the larva and adult, the former especially being the stage that largely determines suitable biotopes for the tick and its present distributional limits. The importance of H. longicornis to the New Zealand livestock industry has recently increased through the establishment and spread of Theileria orientalis Ikeda among dairy and beef cattle, although the tick has always posed production-limiting problems for cattle, deer and to a lesser extent, sheep. The tick's role as a vector of theileriosis and how aspects of the tick's biology affect the spread and maintenance of this disease are discussed. It is proposed that, of available wildlife hosts, the brown hare with its wide-ranging habits, is an important disseminator of ticks. Currently control of ticks is difficult partly because of their wide host range, overlapping activity periods of stadia, and also because the greater part of their annual cycle is spent on pasture. This means that acaricides alone do not satisfactorily reduce tick populations or provide comprehensive protection to stock, so integrated management combining pasture management with good husbandry and chemical prophylaxis is advocated.

  2. Molecular diagnosis of pyrethroid resistance in Mexican strains of Boophilus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Felix D; Li, Andrew Y; Hernandez, Ruben

    2002-09-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) diagnostic assays were used to identify possible resistance-associated roles of two amino acid substitutions found in pyrethroid resistance-associated genes of Boophilus microplus (Canestrini). Individual larvae from the San Felipe target site resistant strain and the Coatzacoalcos (Cz) metabolic resistant strain were separated into resistant and susceptible groups by larval packet bioassays and analyzed by PCR. A Phe --> Ile amino acid mutation in the sodium channel gene S6 transmembrane segment of domain III was found to have a close association with survival of acaricide treatments containing as high as 30% permethrin. As the permethrin dose was increased, an increase was seen in the proportion of surviving larvae that possessed two mutated sodium channel alleles. An Asp --> Asn amino acid substitution, originally found in high allele frequency in alleles of the CzEst9 esterase of the Cz strain, appeared to provide some resistance to permethrin. However, the presence of the mutation did not associate with resistance in the dose-response fashion seen with the sodium channel amino acid mutation. Resistance provided by CzEst9 might be more dependent on concentration of CzEst9 more so than the presence of a mutated allele.

  3. Isolation and identification of an esterase from a Mexican strain of Boophilus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, J H; Guerrero, F D; Hernandez, R

    2002-10-01

    A strain of Mexican Boophilus microplus (Cz) collected near Coatzacoalcos, Veracruz, Mexico, exhibits a moderate, but significant, level of permethrin resistance. Unlike other highly permethrin resistant strains, the Cz strain does not have a mutation within the sodium channel gene that results in target-site insensitivity. However, the Cz strain possesses a substantial increase in general and permethrin esterase activity relative to highly permethrin resistant and control strains suggesting the involvement of a metabolic esterase(s) in the expression of permethrin resistance. We report the isolation of a 62.8 kDa protein from Cz strain larvae that we think is the esterase previously reported as Cz EST9. In addition, internal amino acid sequence data obtained from the 62.8 kDa protein suggest that it is the gene product of a previously reported B. microplus carboxylesterase cDNA. We propose that the 62.8 kDa protein (Cz EST9) has permethrin hydrolytic activity and as a result plays an important role in Cz strain resistance to permethrin.

  4. Survey of ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) and tick-borne pathogens in North Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russart, Nathan M; Dougherty, Michael W; Vaughan, Jefferson A

    2014-09-01

    Ticks were sampled at nine locations throughout North Dakota during early summer of 2010, using flagging techniques and small mammals trapping. In total, 1,762 ticks were collected from eight of the nine locations. The dominant species were Dermacentor variabilis (Say) (82%), found throughout the state, and Ixodes scapularis Say (17%), found in northeastern counties. A few nymphal and adult I. scapularis tested positive for Borrelia burgdorferi (3%) and Anaplasma phagocytophilum (8%). This is the first report of I. scapularis and associated pathogens occurring in North Dakota and provides evidence for continued westward expansion of this important vector tick species in the United States.

  5. Experimental infection of the bat tick Carios fonsecai (Acari: Ixodidae with the rabies virus

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    Silvana Regina Favoretto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction This study assessed the viability of the rabies virus in the argasid tick Carios fonsecai following experimental infection. Methods The mouse inoculation test (MIT, fluorescent antibody test (FAT and polymerase chain reaction (PCR were used. The rabies virus was administered to ticks via the intra-coelomic route, and the ticks were sacrificed at different time points. Results The inoculated ticks were negative for rabies according to the MIT. Ticks macerated with rabies virus were positive according to the MIT and FAT. All of the tick lots tested by PCR were positive. Conclusions The rabies virus became unviable shortly after its inoculation into tick bodies. Ticks are not likely to play an important role in the epidemiology of rabies.

  6. Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae) female ticks exposed to castor oil (Ricinus communis): an ultrastructural overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, B R; Furquim, K C S; Nunes, P H; Camargo-Mathias, M I

    2013-02-01

    Tick control has been accomplished through the use of synthetic acaricides, which has created resistant individuals, as well as contaminating the environment and nontarget organisms. Substances of plant origin, such as oils and extracts of eucalyptus and neem leaves, have been researched as an alternative to replace the synthetic acaricides. Ricinoleic acid esters from castor oil have recently been shown as a promising alternative in eliminating bacterial contamination during ethanol fermentation, by acting as an effective biocide. The same positive results have been observed when these esters are added to the food given to tick-infested rabbits. This study tested the effect of these substance on the reproductive system of Rhipicephalus sanguineus females, added to rabbit food, more specifically on oogenesis. For this, four groups were established: four control groups (CG1, CG2, CG3, and CG4) and four treatment groups (TG1, TG2, TG3, and TG4) with one rabbit in each (New Zealand White), used as hosts. After full 4 days feeding (semi-engorgement), the females were collected and had their ovaries extracted. In this study, it was observed that R. sanguineus females exposed to esters had their ovaries modified, which was demonstrated through transmission electron microscopy techniques. The addition of ricinoleic esters to the diet of tick-infested rabbits revealed how toxic such substances are for the cytoplasmic organelles of oocytes and pedicel cells. These compounds can change the morphophysiology of germ and somatic cells, consequently influencing their viability and, therefore, confirming that the ricinoleic acid esters from castor oil are a promising substance in the control of R. sanguineus.

  7. Potential nontarget effects of Metarhizium anisopliae (Deuteromycetes) used for biological control of ticks (Acari: Ixodidae)

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    Ginsberg, Howard S.; LeBrun, Roger A.; Heyer, Klaus; Zhioua, Elyes

    2002-01-01

    The potential for nontarget effects of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschnikoff) Sorokin, when used for biological control of ticks, was assessed in laboratory trials. Fungal pathogenicity was studied against convergent ladybird beetles, Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, house crickets, Acheta domesticus (L.), and the milkweed bugs Oncopeltus fasciatus (Dallas). Fungal spores applied with a spray tower produced significant mortality in H. convergens and A. domesticus, but effects on O. fasciatus were marginal. Placing treated insects with untreated individuals resulted in mortality from horizontal transmission to untreated beetles and crickets, but not milkweed bugs. Spread of fungal infection in the beetles resulted in mortality on days 4–10 after treatment, while in crickets mortality was on day 2 after treatment, suggesting different levels of pathogenicity and possibly different modes of transmission. Therefore, M. anisopliae varies in pathogenicity to different insects. Inundative applications can potentially affect nontarget species, but M. anisopliae is already widely distributed in North America, so applications for tick control generally would not introduce a novel pathogen into the environment. Pathogenicity in lab trials does not, by itself, demonstrate activity under natural conditions, so field trials are needed to confirm these results and to assess methods to minimize nontarget exposure.

  8. A review of Hyalomma scupense (Acari, Ixodidae in the Maghreb region: from biology to control

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    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyalomma scupense (syn. Hyalomma detritum is a two-host domestic endophilic tick of cattle and secondarily other ungulates in the Maghreb region (Africa. This species transmits several pathogens, among which two are major livestock diseases: Theileria annulata and Theileria equi. Various other pathogens are also transmitted by this tick species, such as Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia bovis. Hyalomma scupense is common in sub-humid and semi-arid areas of several regions in the world, mainly in the Maghreb region. In this region, adults attach to animals during the summer season; larvae and nymphs attach to their hosts during autumn, but there is a regional difference in H. scupense phenology. There is an overlap between immature and adult ticks, leading in some contexts to a dramatic modification of the epidemiology of tick-borne diseases. This tick species attaches preferentially to the posterior udder quarters and thighs. Tick burdens can reach 130 ticks per animal, with a mean of 60 ticks. Calves are 70 times less infested than adult cattle. The control can be implemented through six options: (i rehabilitation of the farm buildings by roughcasting and smoothing the outer and inner surfaces of the enclosures and walls. This control option should be recommended to be combined with a thorough cleaning of the farm and its surrounding area. With regard to Theileria annulata infection, this control option is the most beneficial. (ii Acaricide application to animals during the summer season, targeting adults. (iii Acaricide application during the autumn period for the control of the immature stages. (iv Acaricide application to the walls: many field veterinarians have suggested this option but it is only partially efficient since nymphs enter deep into the cracks and crevices. It should be used if there is a very high tick burden or if there is a high risk of tick-borne diseases. (v Manual tick removal: this method is not efficient since the ticks can feed on several other animal species in the farm. This control option can lead to a reduction of the tick population, but not a decrease in tick-borne disease incidence. (vi Vaccination: this control option consists of injecting the protein Hd86; trials have shown a partial effect on nymphs, with no effect on adult ticks. Combination of two of these control options is recommended in regions where there are high burdens of important tick vectors. Further studies are needed to improve our knowledge on this tick species in the Maghreb region, since the number of published studies on Hyalomma scupense in this region is very limited.

  9. Infection of Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae) by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in North Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhioua, E.; Bouattour, A.; Hu, C.M.; Gharbi, M.; Aeschliman, A.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Gern, L.

    1999-01-01

    Free-living adult Ixodes ricinus L. were collected in Amdoun, situated in the Kroumiry mountains in northwestern Tunisia (North Africa). Using direct fluorescence antibody assay, the infection rate of field-collected I. ricinus by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato was 30.5% (n = 72). No difference in infection rate was observed between male and female ticks. Spirochetes that had been isolated from I. ricinus from Ain Drahim (Kroumiry Mountains) in 1988 were identified as Borrelia lusitaniae (formerly genospecies PotiB2). This is the first identification of a genospecies of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato from the continent of Africa.

  10. Acquisition of Borrelia burgdorferi infection by larval Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) associated with engorgement measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couret, Janelle; Dyer, M.C.; Mather, T.N.; Han, S.; Tsao, J.I.; LeBrun, R.A.; Ginsberg, Howard

    2017-01-01

    Measuring rates of acquisition of the Lyme disease pathogen, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato Johnson, Schmid, Hyde, Steigerwalt & Brenner, by the larval stage of Ixodes scapularis Say is a useful tool for xenodiagnoses of B. burgdorferi in vertebrate hosts. In the nymphal and adult stages of I. scapularis, the duration of attachment to hosts has been shown to predict both body engorgement during blood feeding and the timing of infection with B. burgdorferi. However, these relationships have not been established for the larval stage of I. scapularis. We sought to establish the relationship between body size during engorgement of larval I. scapularis placed on B. burgdorferi-infected, white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus Rafinesque) and the presence or absence of infection in larvae sampled from hosts over time. Body size, time, and their interaction were the best predictors of larval infection with B. burgdorferi. We found that infected larvae showed significantly greater engorgement than uninfected larvae as early as 24 h after placement on a host. These findings may suggest that infection with B. burgdorferi affects the larval feeding process. Alternatively, larvae that engorge more rapidly on hosts may acquire infections faster. Knowledge of these relationships can be applied to improve effective xenodiagnosis of B. burgdorferi in white-footed mice. Further, these findings shed light on vector–pathogen–host interactions during an understudied part of the Lyme disease transmission cycle.

  11. Borrelia infection in Ixodes pararicinus ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) from northwestern Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, Santiago; Barbieri, Amalia M; Maya, Leticia; Colina, Rodney; Mangold, Atilio J; Labruna, Marcelo B; Venzal, José M

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this work was to describe for the first time the presence of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato infecting ticks in Argentina. Unfed specimens of Ixodes pararicinus collected from vegetation in Jujuy Province were tested for Borrelia infection by PCR targeting the gene flagellin (fla), the rrfA-rrlB intergenic spacer region (IGS) and the 16S rDNA (rrs) gene. One male and one female of I. pararicinus collected in Jujuy were found to be positive to Borrelia infection with the three molecular markers tested. Phylogenetically, the Borrelia found in I. pararicinus from Jujuy belongs to the B. burgdorferi s.l complex, and it was similar to one of the genospecies detected in I. aragaoi from Uruguay. Also, this genospecies is closely related to two genospecies known from USA, Borrelia americana and the Borrelia sp. genospecies 1. The epidemiological risk that implies the infection with Borrelia in I. paracinus ticks from Argentina appears to be low because the genospecies detected is not suspected of having clinical relevance and there are no records of Ixodes ticks biting humans in the southern cone of South America. Further studies are needed to assess accurately if there is risk of borreliosis transmitted by ticks in South America. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Unveiling the oxidative metabolism of Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) experimentally exposed to entomopathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunholi-Alves, Vinícius Menezes; Tunholi Alves, Victor Menezes; da Silva, Jairo Pinheiro; Nora Castro, Rosane; Salgueiro, Fernanda Barbosa; Perinotto, Wendell Marcelo de Souza; Gôlo, Patrícia Silva; Camargo, Mariana Guedes; Angelo, Isabele da Costa; Bittencourt, Vânia Rita Elias Pinheiro

    2016-10-01

    Rhipicephalus microplus is an important tick in tropical regions due to the high economic losses caused by its parasitism. Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana are well-known entomopathogenic fungi that can afflict R. microplus ticks. The development of new targets and strategies to control this parasite can be driven by studies of this tick's physiology. Recently, it was reported that when exposed to adverse physiological conditions, ticks can activate fermentative pathways, indicating transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism. Nevertheless, the precise mechanism by which entomopathogenic fungi influence R. microplus metabolism has not been clarified, limiting understanding of the tick-fungus association. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of infection of ticks by M. anisopliae and B. bassiana on the amount of selected carboxylic acids present in the hemolymph, enabling increased understanding of changes previously reported. The results showed preservation in the concentrations of oxalic, lactic, and pyruvic acids in the hemolymph 24 and 48 h after dropping from cattle; while there were variations in the concentration of these carboxylic acids after infection of female ticks to M. anisopliae and B. bassiana. Significant increases were observed in the concentration of oxalic and lactic acids and significant reduction of pyruvic acid for both observation times (24 and 48 h) after infection by entomopathogenic fungi. These results indicate that B. bassiana and M. anisopliae infection alters the basal metabolism of R. microplus females, resulting in the activation of fermentative pathways.

  13. Physiological changes in Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) experimentally infected with entomopathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, Isabele C; Tunholi-Alves, Vinícius M; Tunholi, Victor M; Perinotto, Wendell M S; Gôlo, Patrícia S; Camargo, Mariana G; Quinelato, Simone; Pinheiro, Jairo; Bittencourt, Vânia R E P

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate metabolism plays an important role in the physiology and maintenance of energy stores within living organisms. However, when organisms are exposed to adverse physiological conditions, such as during pathogenic infection, these organisms begin to use alternative substrates (proteins and lipids) for energy production. This paper studied the carbohydrate metabolism of Rhipicephalus microplus after infection with Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae. The parameters evaluated were glucose concentration, enzymatic activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alanine aminostransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminostransferase (AST), amounts of uric acid and urea in the hemolymph, and amount of glycogen in the fat body. The results showed changes in nitrogenous products, including an increase in the amount of urea detected 48 h after infection with both fungi. The enzymatic activities of LDH, ALT, and AST were increased after infection. The amount of glucose was increased 24 h after infection with B. bassiana and was reduced 48 h after infection with both fungi. The amount of glycogen in the fat body was reduced at different times of infection with both fungi. These results demonstrate, for the first time, the changes in carbohydrate metabolism of R. microplus after infection with M. anisopliae and B. bassiana and contribute to a better understanding of this host-parasite relationship. Together with knowledge of diseases that affect these ticks and their susceptibility to entomopathogens, an understanding of tick physiology will be necessary for the effective implementation of current biological control methods and will assist in the discovery of new methods to control this ectoparasite.

  14. Isolation of entomopathogenic fungi from soils and Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) ticks: prevalence and methods.

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    Tuininga, Amy R; Miller, Jessica L; Morath, Shannon U; Daniels, Thomas J; Falco, Richard C; Marchese, Michael; Sahabi, Sadia; Rosa, Dieshia; Stafford, Kirby C

    2009-05-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi are commonly found in forested soils that provide tick habitat, and many species are pathogenic to Ixodes scapularis Say, the blacklegged tick. As a first step to developing effective biocontrol strategies, the objective of this study was to determine the best methods to isolate entomopathogenic fungal species from field-collected samples of soils and ticks from an Eastern deciduous forest where I. scapularis is common. Several methods were assessed: (1) soils, leaf litter, and ticks were plated on two types of media; (2) soils were assayed for entomopathogenic fungi using the Galleria bait method; (3) DNA from internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the nuclear ribosomal repeat was extracted from pure cultures obtained from soils, Galleria, and ticks and was amplified and sequenced; and (4) DNA was extracted directly from ticks, amplified, and sequenced. We conclude that (1) ticks encounter potentially entomopathogenic fungi more often in soil than in leaf litter, (2) many species of potentially entomopathogenic fungi found in the soil can readily be cultured, (3) the Galleria bait method is a sufficiently efficient method for isolation of these fungi from soils, and (4) although DNA extraction from ticks was not possible in this study because of small sample size, DNA extraction from fungi isolated from soils and from ticks was successful and provided clean sequences in 100 and 73% of samples, respectively. A combination of the above methods is clearly necessary for optimal characterization of entomopathogenic fungi associated with ticks in the environment.

  15. Association between entomopathogenic nematodes and fungi for control of Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Caio Márcio Oliveira; Araújo, Laryssa Xavier; Matos, Renata Silva; da Silva Golo, Patrícia; Angelo, Isabele Costa; de Souza Perinotto, Wendell Marcelo; Coelho Rodrigues, Camila Aparecida; Furlong, John; Bittencourt, Vânia Rita Elias Pinheiro; Prata, Márcia Cristina Azevedo

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effect of the association of entomopathogenic nematodes and fungi on Rhipicephalus microplus. The nematodes used were Heterorhabditis bacteriophora HP88 and Heterorhabditis indica LPP1 and the fungi were Metarhizium anisopliae IBCB 116 and Beauveria bassiana ESALQ 986. In the groups treated with the fungi, the females were immersed for 3 min in a conidial suspension, while in the groups treated with the nematodes, the ticks were exposed to infective juveniles. To evaluate the interaction between entomopathogens, the females were first immersed in a conidial suspension and then exposed to the nematodes. The egg mass weight and hatching percentage values of the groups treated with M. anisopliae IBCB 116 and B. bassiana ESALQ 986 in the two experiments were statistically similar (p > 0.05) to the values of the control group. In the groups treated only with nematodes, there was a significant reduction (p fungi, there was a significant reduction (p fungi alone varied from 31 to 55%. In the groups treated with nematodes associated or not with fungi, the control percentage was always greater than 90% and reached 100% in the group treated with H. bacteriophora HP88 associated with the fungus M. anisopliae IBCB 116.

  16. Morphometric Study on Male Specimens of Hyalomma Anatolicum (Acari: Ixodidae in West of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Abdigoudarzi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hyalomma anatolicum is the well-known hard tick, which is one of the most important livestock and hu­man pathogens vector, wide range in host and distributed in all over the Hyalomma geographic fauna as well as in Iran. Taxonomy of the Hyalomma ssp. is debatable whereas their identification is a problematic work. The reasons for this claim is time consuming Delpy’s researches in Iran also Schulze School, Feldman-Muhsam and the Russian tick workers. We would like to understand morphometric variation in the field collected H. anatolicum in Iran also validat­ing some morphologic quantitative and qualitative characters.Methods: A total 247 field-collected tick specimens from different geographical regions in west of Iran includes Khuzestan and Lorestan Provinces were studied. The morphologic characters of the ticks were measured by the cali­brated stereomicroscope ‎armed scaled lens. The measurements were analyzed using SPSS ‎for windows, version 16 on an IBM PC, ‎so varied shapes of species in different geographic ‎regions were drawn by the ‎aid of a drawing tube con­nected to a light stereomicroscope.‎Results: One way ANOVA test revealed significant differences among the quantitative parameters in five zones (P<‎‎ 0.‎‎00‎‎1‎ also each zone to other zone by Post Hoc Tests e.g. LSD. No significant differences in the lateral grooves length/conscutum length ratio parameter were found.Conclusion: Morphometric variation in Hyalomma spp is poorly studied. The variation in range and quantity of the mor­phometric parameters of H.anatolicum ‎underlies that the correct recognition and key construction for Hyalomma spe­cies dependes ‎on a complement morphometric study on the other species.

  17. Artificial feeding of partially engorged Amblyomma sculptum females through capillaries*

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    Isis Abel

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Abel I., Cunha N.C., Rangel C.P., Corrêa F.N. & Fonseca A.H. Artificial feeding of partially engorged Amblyomma sculptum females through capillaries. [Alimentação artificial de fêmeas parcialmente ingurgitadas de Amblyomma sculptum, por meio de tubos capilares]. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 38(supl. 3: 211-217, 2016. Departamento de Epidemiologia e Saúde Pública, Instituto de Veterinária, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, BR 465, km 7, Campus Seropédica 23897-970, Seropédica, RJ, Brazil. E-mail: isisabel@ufpa.br This study presents the standardization of an artificial feeding technique using capillaries and discusses its effects on biological parameters of partially engorged Amblyomma sculptum females. Partially engorged females were sorted for mean baseline weight (71.94 mg, group I; 167.58 mg, group II. Females were detached from rabbits after 7 days of feeding and then exposed to capillary tubes containing citrated bovine blood for 6, 12, and 24 h. Biological parameters were analyzed for each weight group, after each period. All ticks fed on this system took blood meal. Weights before and after artificial feeding were compared, and significant difference was observed. Mean weight gain for group I females artificially fed for 6, 12, and 24 h was 56.05, 86.75 and 192.89 mg, respectively. Weight gain in group II females fed for 6, 12 and 24 h was 133.73, 182.09 and 368.77 mg. Results indicate that capillary feeding may be used routinely in studies on pathogen transmission by A. sculptum females. The ideal initial weight range is discussed in terms of the kind of study design.

  18. Occurrence of Amblyomma longirostre in Cyanocompsa brissonii in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Trevisan Gressler

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Ticks are arthropods that are highly competent in transmitting pathogens to animals and humans. Among these, the genus Amblyomma is the most representative within the Neotropics. Amblyomma longirostre ticks are naturally distributed in countries of South, Central and North America. Their immature stages preferentially parasitize birds (Passeriformes, while adult stages are usually found on rodents. Therefore, reports of this tick species on wild hosts is epidemiologically relevant, especially because of these ticks' potential for transmitting pathogens to other wild and domestic animals, and also to humans. Thus, the aim of this study was to report infestation by Amblyomma longirostre on Cyanocompsa brissonii in southern Brazil.

  19. Inquérito para agentes rickettsiais em carrapatos Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Ixodida, Ixodidae no Nordeste do Brasil

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    Atticus Tanikawa

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, rickettsial infection was searched in 108 canine blood samples and 22 Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Ixodida,Ixodidae ticks collected on these dogs during 2011 and 2012 in Patos municipality, state of Paraíba, northeasternBrazil. Blood samples were tested through indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA by using antigens of six Rickettsiaspecies isolates from Brazil. All 108 dogs tested seronegative for R. rickettsii, R. parkeri, R. amblyommii, R. felis, R.rhipicephali, and R. bellii antigens, suggesting a non-endemic status of the studied region for spotted fever ricketsiosis.Among 22 R. sanguineus ticks, R. felis was detected in one (4.5% specimen by PCR targeting a portion of the rickettsialgltA gene. The possible implications of this unusual PCR finding are discussed.

  20. Occurrence of Amblyomma longirostre in Cyanocompsa brissonii in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas Trevisan Gressler; Larissa Quinto Pereira; Joice Magali Brustolin; Maristela Lovato; Sílvia Gonzalez Monteiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Ticks are arthropods that are highly competent in transmitting pathogens to animals and humans. Among these, the genus Amblyomma is the most representative within the Neotropics. Amblyomma longirostre ticks are naturally distributed in countries of South, Central and North America. Their immature stages preferentially parasitize birds (Passeriformes), while adult stages are usually found on rodents. Therefore, reports of this tick species on wild hosts is epidemiologically relevant,...

  1. Survey of Hard Ticks (Ixodidae) Infesting Camels ( Camelus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine the prevalence and abundance of hard ticks infesting camels, 414 nomadic one - humped camels in Kano State, northwestern Nigeria were selected by random sampling and examined for the presence of ticks on their bodies between January and December 2007. Three species of ticks, Amblyomma ...

  2. Two new species of ptyctimous mites (Acari: Oribatida) from Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twelve species of ptyctimous mites (Acari: Oribatida) are recorded from Ghana for the first time. Two new species are described and illustrated: Phthiracarus bicarinatus sp. nov. and Austrophthiracarus lacunosus sp. nov. Three species are recorded fromWest Africa for the first time. Key words: Acari, Oribatida, ...

  3. Atlas van de Nederlandse watermijten (Acari: Hydrachnidia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, H.; Hammen, van der H.

    2000-01-01

    Atlas of the Dutch water mites (Acari: Hydrachnidia) Few biogeographic studies have been published on water mites. Only Lundblad (1962) has published an atlas of the Swedish water mites. So far, there are no complete publications on the distribution of Dutch water mites. Acarologists who worked on

  4. Localization and visualization of a coxiella-type symbiont within the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyachko, Olga; Stein, Barry D; Grindle, Nathan; Clay, Keith; Fuqua, Clay

    2007-10-01

    A Coxiella-type microbe occurs at 100% frequency in all Amblyomma americanum ticks thus far tested. Using laboratory-reared ticks free of other microbes, we identified the Amblyomma-associated Coxiella microbe in several types of tissue and at various stages of the life cycle of A. americanum by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and diagnostic PCR. We visualized Amblyomma-associated Coxiella through the use of a diagnostic fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay supplemented with PCR-based detection, nucleic acid fluorescent staining, wide-field epifluorescence and confocal microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Specific fluorescent foci were observed in several tick tissues, including the midgut and the Malpighian tubules, but particularly bright signals were observed in the granular acini of salivary gland clusters and in both small and large oocytes. TEM confirmed intracellular bacterial structures in the same tissues. The presence of Amblyomma-associated Coxiella within oocytes is consistent with the vertical transmission of these endosymbionts. Further, the presence of the Amblyomma-associated Coxiella symbiont in other tissues such as salivary glands could potentially lead to interactions with horizontally acquired pathogens.

  5. Phylogenetic relationships of Francisella-like endosymbionts detected in two species of Amblyomma from snakes in Thailand

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sumrandee, C.; Hirunkanokpun, S.; Grubhoffer, Libor; Baimai, V.; Trinachartvanit, W.; Ahantarig, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 1 (2014), s. 29-32 ISSN 1877-959X Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : tick * Francisella-like endosymbiont * Amblyomma varanense * Amblyomma helvolum * snake * Thailand Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.718, year: 2014

  6. An Immunosuppressant Peptide from the Hard Tick Amblyomma variegatum

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    Yufeng Tian

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ixodid ticks are well known for spreading transmitted tick-borne pathogens while being attached to their hosts for almost 1–2 weeks to obtain blood meals. Thus, they must secrete many immunosuppressant factors to combat the hosts’ immune system. In the present work, we investigated an immunosuppressant peptide of the hard tick Amblyomma variegatum. This peptide, named amregulin, is composed of 40 residues with an amino acid sequence of HLHMHGNGATQVFKPRLVLKCPNAAQLIQPGKLQRQLLLQ. A cDNA of the precursor peptide was obtained from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI, Bethesda, MD, USA. In rat splenocytes, amregulin exerts significant anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the secretion of inflammatory factors in vitro, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, interleukin-1 (IL-1, interleukin-8 (IL-8 and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ. In rat splenocytes, treated with amregulin, compared to lipopolysaccharide (LPS alone, the inhibition of the above inflammatory factors was significant at all tested concentrations (2, 4 and 8 µg/mL. Amregulin shows strong free radical scavenging and antioxidant activities (5, 10 and 20 µg/mL in vitro. Amregulin also significantly inhibits adjuvant-induced paw inflammation in mouse models in vivo. This peptide may facilitate the ticks’ successful blood feeding and may lead to host immunotolerance of the tick. These findings have important implications for the understanding of tick-host interactions and the co-evolution between ticks and the viruses that they bear.

  7. Molecular detection of Rickettsia amblyommii in Amblyomma americanum parasitizing humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ju; Yarina, Tamasin; Miller, Melissa K; Stromdahl, Ellen Y; Richards, Allen L

    2010-05-01

    A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay to detect and quantify a portion of the outer membrane protein B gene (ompB) of Rickettsia amblyommii was employed to assess the threat of R. amblyommii exposure to humans parasitized by Amblyomma americanum (the lone star tick). A total of 72 pools of lone star ticks removed from humans were acquired from two collections and used in this study: 44 pools of A. americanum submitted to the Department of Defense Human Tick Test Kit Program in 2003 collected from 220 individuals from 14 states, and 28 pools of A. americanum representing 120 ticks obtained from boy scouts and adult leaders at the Boy Scouts of America National Jamboree held at Fort A.P. Hill, Virginia, in 2005. Of the 72 lone star tick pools representing 340 lone star ticks, 58 pools (80.5%) were positive for R. amblyommii. In addition, individual A. americanum ticks parasitizing humans collected as part of the Department of Defense Human Tick Test Kit Program in 2002 and 2003 from 17 states were evaluated. It was found that 244 of 367 (66.5%) individual A. americanum ticks tested positive for the presence of R. amblyommii DNA. These results clearly show that lone star ticks parasitizing humans are highly infected with R. amblyommii, which may potentiate rickettsial infection of and possibly disease in humans.

  8. Rickettsia bellii in ticks Amblyomma varium Koch, 1844, from birds in Peru

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ogrzewalska, M.; Literák, I.; Cárdenas-Callirgos, J. M.; Čapek, Miroslav; Labruna, M. B.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 4 (2012), s. 254-256 ISSN 1877-959X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA601690901; GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Rickettsia bellii * ticks * Amblyomma calcaratum * birds * Peru Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.353, year: 2012

  9. Rickettsia parkeri infecting free-living Amblyomma triste ticks in the Brazilian Pantanal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Andréia L T; Alves, Alvair S; Nieri-Bastos, Fernanda A; Martins, Thiago F; Witter, Rute; Pacheco, Thábata A; Soares, Herbert S; Marcili, Arlei; Chitarra, Cristiane S; Dutra, Valéria; Nakazato, Luciano; Pacheco, Richard C; Labruna, Marcelo B; Aguiar, Daniel M

    2015-04-01

    The present study evaluated the infection of rickettsiae in 151 Rhipicephalus sanguineus, 59 Amblyomma ovale, 166 Amblyomma triste, one Amblyomma dissimile and four Amblyomma dubitatum ticks collected in the municipality of Poconé, State of Mato Grosso, within the Pantanal biome of Brazil. Ticks were individually processed by the hemolymph test with Gimenez staining, isolation of rickettsia in Vero cell culture by the shell vial technique, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the citrate synthase rickettsial gene. Through the shell vial technique, rickettsiae were successfully isolated and established in Vero cell culture from one free-living A. triste female tick, which previously showed to contain Rickettsia-like organisms by the hemolymph test. Molecular characterization of the rickettsial isolate was achieved through DNA partial sequences of three rickettsial genes (gltA, ompA, ompB), which showed to be all 100% identical to Rickettsia parkeri. After testing all ticks by PCR, the frequency of R. parkeri infection was 7.23% (12/166) in A. triste adult ticks. The remaining ticks were negative by PCR. This is the first report of in vitro isolation of R. parkeri in the Pantanal biome, confirming the occurrence of this emerging rickettsial pathogen in this natural area of South America. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Mite (Acari) fauna of some cultivated plants from Kahramanmaras ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phytophagous mites, Tetranychus turkestani (Ugarov and Nikolski) and Tetranychus cinnabarinus Boisduval, were obtained from eggplant, bean, and cucumber. Predatory mites Phytoseius finitimus Ribaga and Amblyseius andersoni (Chant) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) were identified from eggplant and cucumber, respectively.

  11. New species of Uropodina from Madagascar (Acari: Mesostigmata)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kontschán, J.; Starý, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 3895, č. 4 (2014), s. 547-569 ISSN 1175-5326 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Acari * Mesostigmata * Uropodina * new genus * new species * Madagascar Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.906, year: 2014

  12. The Genus Ixodes (Acari: Ixodidae) in Mexico: Adult Identification Keys, Diagnoses, Hosts, and Distribution (El genero Ixodes (Acari: Ixodidae) en Mexico: claves de identificacion para adultos, diagnosis, huespedes y distribucion)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Mexico. Estado de México. Hosts in Mexico. Geomyidae (Mammalia). Ixodes dentatus Marx, 1899 Ixodes dentatus Marx, 1899: 19, original description...Distribution in Mexico. Puebla . Hosts in Mexico. Heteromyidae (Mammalia). Ixodes guatemalensis Kohls, 1956 Ixodes guatemalensis Kohls, 1956: 636...punctations, larger punctations posteriorly; coxae as in female. Distribution in Mexico. Morelos, Guerrero, Veracruz, and also from Estado de México as I

  13. Atividade in vitro de permetrina, cipermetrina e deltametrina sobre larvas de Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806 (Acari, Ixodidae In vitro activity of permethrin, cipermethrin and deltamethrin on larvae of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806 (Acari, Ixodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.F. Fernandes

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Investigaram-se os efeitos toxicológicos in vitro de três piretróides em diferentes concentrações, formulados para uso pecuário, domiciliar e em cães, sobre larvas de R. sanguineus, objetivando monitorar sua suscetibilidade e fomentar seu controle. Utilizaram-se 1.604 larvas em jejum, com 15 a 21 dias, obtidas por infestação artificial em cão, imersas nas soluções testadas, contidas em dispositivos constituídos por placa de Petri descartável, papel filtro e parafina, mantidas em incubadoras do tipo BOD e observadas ao estereoscópio por 24h. Observaram-se excitabilidade, movimentação repetitiva, diminuição da locomoção, desprendimento, paralisia, "knock-down" e proliferação cuticular de gases e líquidos. A mortalidade na 24ª hora foi de 86,9%, 100,0%, 80,3%, 86,0%, 68,2% e 78,0%, respectivamente, para permetrina 1250ppm e 2500ppm, cipermetrina 150ppm e 300ppm, e deltametrina 25ppm e 50ppm. Não houve mortalidade no grupo controle.Aiming at monitoring the susceptibility, increasing the control and evaluating the toxicological effects, of different concentrations of three pyrethroids were investigated in vitro against Rhipicephalus sanguineus larvae using concentrations formulated for cattle, dogs and household use. A total of 1,604 15-21 day-old fasting larvae, obtained by artificial infestation in dogs, was immersed in the solutions. Larvae were then maintained in BOD incubators inside experimental devices, constituted by disposable Petridishes, filter paper and paraffin, and observed on the stereomicroscope during a 24-hour period. The larvae have shown excitability, repetitive movements, decrease of locomotion, detachment, paralysis, knock-down and production of gases and liquid in the cuticle. Mortality after 24 hours was 86.9% (1250ppm and 100.0% (2500ppm for permethrin; 80.3% (150ppm and 86.0% (300ppm for cipermethrin; and for deltamethrin 68.2% (25ppm and 78.0% (50ppm. Mortality was not observed in the control group.

  14. Eficácia de diferentes formulações de acaricidas sobre larvas de Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806 (Acari: Ixodidae e Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus (Canestrini, 1887 (Acari: Ixodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Melo Souza

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2017v30n1p65 O parasitismo por ácaros sempre foi objeto de preocupações e perdas relacionadas à produção animal, assim como à transmissibilidade de agentes etiológicos de importantes doenças; e aproximadamente 95% das formas evolutivas dos carrapatos em fase não parasitária encontram-se no ambiente. Com base na importância de se controlar estágios larvares dos ixodídeos no ambiente, este estudo avaliou a eficácia de acaricidas in vitro sobre larvas de Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus e Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Foram testadas: Cipermetrina 15% (T1; Deltametrina 25% (T2; associação de Cipermetrina 5% + Diclorvós 45% + Butóxido de piperolina 25% (T3; associação de Cipermetrina 15% + Clorpiriphos 25% + Citronela 1% (T4 e Amitraz 12,5% (T5. Para cada tratamento foram realizadas nove repetições contendo 20 larvas. As observações de motilidade foram realizadas: 1, 5, 10, 20 e 30 minutos após o tratamento (MPT; 1, 2, 6, 12 e 24 h após o tratamento (HPT; 5 dias após o tratamento (DPT. Os testes das larvas de R. (B. microplus e R. sanguineus com deltametrina 25% serviram de controle positivo e demonstraram perda de motilidade de 100% das larvas com duas HPT para ambas de ixodídeos. O R. (B. microplus apresentou maior sensibilidade aos desafios contendo a cipermetrina 15% e 5% associada ao diclorvós e butóxido de piperonila. Larvas de R. sanguineus apresentaram maior sensibilidade em menor tempo ao tratamento com amitraz a 12,5%. Contudo, apesar das diferenças no efeito acaricida observadas no decorrer dos tempos, obteve-se eficácia de 100% para todos os compostos inseticidas sobre os instares das duas espécies 12 HPT, demonstrando que, quando utilizados nas doses recomendadas pelos fabricantes, os produtos comerciais podem ser eficazes em estratégias de controle ambiental das larvas.

  15. Extratos de plantas no controle de Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus (Canestrini, 1887 (Acari: Ixodidae em laboratório Plant extracts in control of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus (Canestrini, 1887 (Acari: Ixodidae in laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia Maria Forti Broglio-Micheletti

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Extratos vegetais foram estudados com o objetivo de avaliar suas eficiências no controle de Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus (Canestrini, 1887 em laboratório. Fêmeas ingurgitadas de carrapato foram coletadas de bovinos e mantidas em placas de Petri. Foram utilizados extratos orgânicos alcoólicos 2% (peso/volume de sementes de Annona muricata L. (Annonaceae (graviola; flores de Syzygium malaccensis (L. (Myrtaceae (jambo; folhas de Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Stapf (Poaceae (capim-santo; folhas de Azadirachta indica A. Juss (Meliaceae (nim; e extrato hexânico na mesma concentração de A. indica (sementes. Os grupos-controle foram compostos por fêmeas sem tratamento e fêmeas tratadas com água destilada e esterilizada e dimetilsulfóxido (DMSO a uma concentração de 1%. O extrato de A. muricata apresentou o maior poder acaricida, com eficácia de 100%, seguido dos extratos de S. malaccensis (75 e 59,24% e A. indica (65 e 38,49%. Houve 100% de redução na eclosão das larvas quando se utilizou o extrato de sementes de A. muricata.Plant extracts were studied to evaluate its efficiency in the control of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus (Canestrini, 1887 in laboratory. Engorged female ticks were collected from the cattle, kept in Petri dishes. Organic alcoholic extracts 2% (weight/volume were used: seeds of Annona muricata L. (Annonaceae (soursop; flowers of Syzygium malaccensis (L. (Myrtaceae (iamb, leaves of Cymbopogon citratus (DC. Stapf (Poaceae (holy grass, leaves of Azadirachta indica A. Juss (Meliaceae (neem and hexane extract 2% (weight/volume of A. indica (seeds. The control groups consisted of untreated females and females treated with distilled water and sterile and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO a concentration of 1%. The extract of A. muricata (seed had the highest mortality with acaricide activity and 100% efficacy followed by extracts of S. malaccensis (75 and 59.24% and A. indica (65 and 38.49%. The seed extract of A. muricata reduced 100% larvae hatch.

  16. The parasitism of Ixodes luciae (Acari: Ixodidae on marsupials and rodents in Peruvian Amazon O parasitismo do Ixodes luciae (Acari: ixodidae em marsupiais e em roedores na Amazônia Peruana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Mónica Díaz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work the infestation with I. luciae on Didelphimorphia and Rodentia in different environments of Peruvian Amazon was studied. Didelphimorphia was represented by the family Didelphidae. Specimens belonging to Caluromys lanatus, Didelphis marsupialis, Marmosops sp.2, Metachirus nudicaudatus, Philander andersoni and Philander opossum were infested with adults I. luciae and one Micoureus sp. was infested with larvae. In Rodentia, the infestation with I. luciae nymphs was restricted to Hylaeamys perenensis, Hylaeamys yunganus and Oligoryzomys microtis, while one Oecomys bicolor (all Cricetidae was infested with larvae of this species. The few larvae were found on rodents captured in primary forest. The only significant difference (P No presente trabalho, infestações por Ixodes luciae em Didelphimorphia e Rodentia em diferentes ambientes da Amazônia peruana foram estudadas. Didelphimorphia foi representada pela família Didelphidae. Espécimes pertencentes a Caluromys lanatus, Didelphis marsupialis, Marmosops sp., Metachirus nudicaudatus, Philander andersoni e Philander opossum foram encontrados infestadas por adultos de I. luciae; um Micoureus sp. foi encontrado infestado por larvas. Em Rodentia, a infestação por ninfas de I. luciae estiveram restritas a Hylaeamys perenensis, Hylaeamys yunganus e Oligoryzomys microtis, enquanto que um Oecomys bicolor (todos Cricetidae esteve infestado por larvas de I. luciae. As poucas larvas foram encontradas em roedores capturados na floresta primária. A única diferença significante (P < 0.05 na prevalência de carrapatos adultos em Didelphimorphia foi entre P. andersoni e M. nudicaudatus (distribuição chi-quadrado. A distribuição de carrapatos adultos foi significativamente diferente em P. andersoni quando comparado com M. nudicaudatus, P. opossum e D. marsupialis (teste Kruskal-Wallis. Nenhum efeito significante do mês ou ambiente foi observado em relação à infestação por carrapato adulto em Didelphimorphia. Tanto a prevalência de infestações por ninfas, como a distribuição do carrapato indicaram que H. perenensis e H. yunganus estiveram mais propensos a estarem infestados por ninfas de I. luciae do que O. microtis. A prevalência de infestações por ninfas foi maior em florestas primária e secundária do que em áreas rurais, enquanto que a abundância foi maior em floresta secundária, quando comparada com áreas rurais (P < 0.05. O teste Kruskal-Wallis indicou diferenças (P < 0.05 para infestações por ninfas durante Dezembro, em relação a Janeiro, Março, Abril e Junho. O ciclo natural de I. luciae parece ser continuo, destacado por adultos parasitando Philander e ninfas parasitando Hylaeamys em ambientes florestais.

  17. Mutation in the Sodium Channel Gene Corresponds With Phenotypic Resistance of Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Acari: Ixodidae) to Pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klafke, G M; Miller, R J; Tidwell, J; Barreto, R; Guerrero, F D; Kaufman, P E; Pérez de León, A A

    2017-11-07

    The brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Latreille), is a cosmopolitan ectoparasite and vector of pathogens that kill humans and animals. Pyrethroids represent a class of synthetic acaricides that have been used intensely to try to control the brown dog tick and mitigate the risk of tick-borne disease transmission. However, acaricide resistance is an emerging problem in the management of the brown dog tick. Understanding the mechanism of resistance to acaricides, including pyrethroids, is important to adapt brown dog tick control strategies. The main objective of this study was to determine if target-site mutations associated with pyrethroid resistance in other pests could be associated with phenotypic resistance detected in a brown dog tick population from Florida. We amplified segment 6 of the domain III of the voltage-sensitive sodium channel protein, using cDNAs synthesized from pyrethroid-susceptible and pyrethroid-resistant tick strains. A single nucleotide point mutation (SNP) identified in a highly conserved region of domain III S6 in the resistant ticks resulted in an amino acid change from phenylalanine to leucine. This mutation is characteristic of resistance phenotypes in other tick species, and is the first report of this mutation in R. sanguineus. Molecular assays based on this knowledge could be developed to diagnose the risk for pyrethroid resistance, and to inform decisions on integrated brown dog tick management practices. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Resistance to coumaphos and diazinon in Boophilus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) and evidence for the involvement of an oxidative detoxification mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Andrew Y; Davey, Ronald B; Miller, Robert J; George, John E

    2003-07-01

    The levels of resistance to two organophosphate acaricides, coumaphos and diazinon, in several Mexican strains of Boophilus microplus (Canestrini) were evaluated using the FAO larval packet test. Regression analysis of LC50 data revealed a significant cross-resistance pattern between those two acaricides. Metabolic mechanisms of resistance were investigated with synergist bioassays. Piperonyl butoxide (PBO) reduced coumaphos toxicity in susceptible strains, but synergized coumaphos toxicity in resistant strains. There was a significant correlation between PBO synergism ratios and the coumaphos resistance ratios. The results suggest that an enhanced cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (cytP450)-mediated detoxification mechanism may exist in the resistant strains, in addition to the cytP450-mediated metabolic pathway that activates coumaphos. PBO failed to synergize diazinon toxicity in resistant strains, suggesting the cytP450 involved in detoxification were specific. Triphenylphosphate (TPP) synergized toxicity of both acaricides in both susceptible and resistant strains, and there was no correlation between TPP synergism ratios and the LC50 estimates for either acaricide. Esterases may not play a major role in resistance to coumaphos and diazinon in those strains. Bioassays with diethyl maleate (DEM) revealed a significant correlation between DEM synergism ratios and LC50 estimates for diazinon, suggesting a possible role for glutathione S-transferases in diazinon detoxification. Resistance to coumaphos in the Mexican strains of B. microplus was likely to be conferred by both a cytP450-mediated detoxification mechanism described here and the mechanism of insensitive acetylcholinesterases reported elsewhere. The results of this study also underscore the potential risk of coumaphos resistance in B. microplus from Mexico to the U.S. cattle fever tick eradication program.

  19. Rhipicephalus microplus and Dermacentor nitens (Acari: Ixodidae) Coparasitize White-Tailed Deer on St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Suzanne L; Durden, Lance A; Reuter, Jon D

    2017-09-01

    Ticks parasitizing introduced white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmermann), on St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands, were recorded during and after drought conditions. Tick infestation prevalences were 22% at the start of the drought (July 2015), 66% at the height of the drought (March 2016), and 35% after the drought had ended (July 2016; n = 67 deer). Samples of ticks from 22 tranquilized deer in July 2016 revealed the presence of two species, the southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Canestrini), and the tropical horse tick, Dermacentor (Anocentor) nitens Neumann. Both tick species have considerable veterinary importance, especially for cattle and horses, respectively, as nuisance biters and also as vectors of parasitic piroplasms or of Anaplasma marginale Theiler. All 22 deer examined were infested by R. microplus, whereas 14 (64%) of the samples also included specimens of D. nitens. Because of the large numbers of ticks recorded, wild deer on St. John could develop associated health problems (pruritis, alopecia, anemia, low weight gain, tick-borne pathogens and parasites) and could also serve as a source of these ticks for cattle and horses. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Detection of Anaplasma phagocytophilum DNA in Ixodes ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) from Madeira Island and Setubal District, mainland Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Ana Sofia; Santos-Silva, Maria Margarida; Almeida, Victor Carlos; Bacellar, Fátima; Dumler, John Stephen

    2004-09-01

    A total of 278 Ixodes ticks, collected from Madeira Island and Setubal District, mainland Portugal, were examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the presence of Anaplasma phagocytophilum. Six (4%) of 142 Ixodes ricinus nymphs collected in Madeira Island and 1 nymph and 1 male (2%) of 93 I. ventalloi collected in Setubal District tested positive for A. phagocytophilum msp2 genes or rrs. Infection was not detected among 43 I. ricinus on mainland Portugal. All PCR products were confirmed by nucleotide sequencing to be identical or to be most closely related to A. phagocytophilum. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of A. phagocytophilum in ticks from Setubal District, mainland Portugal, and the first documentation of Anaplasma infection in I. ventalloi. Moreover, these findings confirm the persistence of A. phagocytophilum in Madeira Island's I. ricinus.

  1. Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) infesting some small mammals from Northern Turkey with new tick-host associations and locality records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Adem; Selçuk, Ahmet Yesari; Kefelioğlu, Haluk

    2017-12-01

    Ticks are obligate ectoparasites of a vast range of terrestrial vertebrates which may play an important role in the transmission of many zoonotic pathogens to humans and animals. In the current study, we performed an investigation on ticks infesting some small mammals captured from Samsun and Tokat provinces, Northern Turkey. One hundred forty-five mammalian samples belonging to four species, namely Cricetulus migratorius (n = 1), Apodemus flavicollis (n = 17), Crocidura suaveolens (n = 102) and Sorex volnuchini (n = 25), were examined for the presence of tick infestations. A total of 273 (74 larvae, 194 nymphs, 5 females) hard ticks were collected from 88 mammalian samples. Ticks were identified as Ixodes laguri (1 nymph), I. redikorzevi (22 larvae, 186 nymphs, 5 females), I. ricinus (52 larvae, 4 nymphs) and Rhipicephalus turanicus (3 nymphs). Here, we also provided new tick mammalian host associations for Turkey. In addition, I. laguri and I. redikorzevi ticks were recorded for the first time in Samsun province of Turkey.

  2. Efficacy and environmental persistence of nootkatone for the control of the blacklegged tick (Acari: Ixodidae) in residential landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, Anuja; Stafford, Kirby C; Behle, Robert W

    2012-09-01

    The ability of the plant-derived compound nootkatone to control nymphs of the blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis Say, was evaluated at lawn perimeter plots at homes in Lyme disease endemic areas of Connecticut. Three formulations of nootkatone ranging from 0.05 to 0.84% (0.06 - 1.03 g AI/m2) were applied by a hydraulic sprayer from 2008 to 2010. In 2008, the 0.84% emulsifiable nootkatone formulation provided 100% control of I. scapularis through week 1, but declined to 49 and 0% by 2 and 3 wk posttreatment, respectively. A combination of 0.05% nootkatone and entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium brunneum Petch F52, resulted in 50% control for the first week posttreatment and no control in subsequent weeks. The 0.84% emulsifiable nootkatone formulation was phytotoxic, although no damage was observed with the 0.05% formulation with Metarhizium. Residual analysis of nootkatone collected on filter paper disks showed that > or = 95% of the emulsified nootkatone for both formulations was lost within 7 d after application. A lignin-encapsulated nootkatone formulation (0.56 and 0.46% in 2009 and 2010, respectively) provided 100% control of I. scapularis for 8 wk in 2009 and, in 2010, 67% control at approximately 1 wk posttreatment with respect to the pretreatment counts, although there was no difference in tick abundance posttreatment. A 0.60% Maillard-reaction encapsulated nootkatone formulation in 2010 provided a similar level of control (62%). Nootkatone in the lignin and Maillard formulations were more persistent than the emulsifiable formulation. Little or no phytotoxicity was observed with the encapsulated formulations. Encapsulating nootkatone reduced phytotoxicity and appeared to reduce environmental loss. While nootkatone can provide effective tick control, further work is needed to refine formulations to address phytotoxicity, yet provide sufficient material to control ticks.

  3. Evaluation acaricidal efficacy of botanical extract from Eupatorium adenophorum against the hard tick Haemaphysalis longicornis (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nong, Xiang; Tan, Yong-Jian; Wang, Jia-Hai; Xie, Yue; Fang, Chun-Lin; Chen, Lin; Liu, Tian-Fei; Yang, De-Ying; Gu, Xiao-Bin; Peng, Xue-Rong; Wang, Shu-Xian; Yang, Guang-You

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the acaricidal activity of a botanical extract from Eupatorium adenophorum against the hard tick Haemaphysalis longicornis. This could result in developing effective extracts of E. adenophorum as a source of natural, low-toxicity plant-based acaricidal drugs. Adult engorged females of H. longicornis were collected from naturally infected goats. The engorged females were reared in the laboratory and their offspring (larvae and nymphs) were used as test ectoparasites. The toxic effects of botanical extracts from E. adenophorum against larvae and nymphs of H. longicornis were evaluated. The results showed that the extracts with 1.5 and 1.0g/ml (w/v) concentrations were toxic for H. longicornis, comparable to a toxic effect of 2% chlorpyrifos (positive control). The median lethal time (LT50) for larval and nymphal ticks with 1.5g/ml (w/v) concentration of extract were 0.790 (LT99=1.065) and 1.018 (LT99=10.608) hours, respectively, whereas the LT50 of 1.0g/ml (w/v) concentration were 1.445 (LT99=6.047) and 1.313 (LT99=29.932) hours for larval and nymphal ticks, respectively. At a concentration of 1.5g/ml (w/v), an acaricidal effect of 100% was achieved for both larval and nymphal ticks, while a concentration of 1.0g/ml (w/v) resulted in 100% (for larvae) and 93% (for nymphs) within a 6h period. In additional, we found that the relatively low concentration (0.5g/ml) also obtained a good acaricidal effect during the short experimental period, with 2.22 and 2.651h LT50 for larval and nymphal ticks, respectively. These results indicate that E. adenophorum contains potent acaricidal ingredients against the hard tick H. longicornis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. In vitro acaricidal efficacy of plant extracts from Brazilian flora and isolated substances against Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Paula Pimentel; Amorim, Juliana Mendes; Castilho, Rachel Oliveira; Leite, Romário Cerqueira; Ribeiro, Múcio Flávio Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    The tick Rhipicephalus microplus causes significant losses in livestock cattle and has developed increasing resistance to the primary acaricides that are used to treat these infections. The objective of this study was to identify new biomolecules or isolated substances showing acaricidal activity from plants. Larval packet tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of 11 species of plants and three isolated substances (betulinic acid, eugenol, and nerolidol) on R. microplus. An adult female immersion test was performed with the substance that showed the highest larvicidal activity, which was evaluated for inhibition of reproduction. Tests using Licania tomentosa, Hymenaea stigonocarpa, Hymenaea courbaril, Stryphnodendron obovatum, Jacaranda cuspidifolia, Jacaranda ulei, Struthanthus polyrhizus, Chrysobalanus icaco, Vernonia phosphorea, Duguetia furfuracea, and Simarouba versicolor extracts as well as the isolated substance betulinic acid indicated lower acaricidal effects on R. microplus larvae. The extract displaying the best larvicidal activity was the ethanolic extract from L. tomentosa at a concentration of 60%, resulting in a mortality rate of 40.3%. However, nerolidol and eugenol showed larvicidal activity, which was highest for eugenol. Nerolidol caused a 96.5% mortality rate in the R. microplus larvae at a high concentration of 30%, and eugenol caused 100% mortality at a concentration of 0.3%. In the adult immersion test, 5% eugenol was identified as a good biomolecule for controlling R. microplus, as demonstrated by its high acaricidal activity and inhibition of oviposition.

  5. Deltamethrin as inductor agent of precocious ovarian degeneration in Rhipicephalus sanguineus s.l. (Acari: Ixodidae) ticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo-Mathias, Maria Izabel; Pereira, Natalia Rubio Claret; da Silva Reis, Camila; de Almeida, Cristiane Regina; Dos Santos Mendes, Douglas Rodrigo; de Araújo, Giselle Bezerra; Postali, Lays; Figueroa, Tober; Ferreira, Allan Roberto Fernandes; Santos, Juan Parente; de Oliveira, Patrícia Rosa

    2017-06-01

    The cosmopolitan species Rhipicephalus sanguineus s.l. is one of the most widely distributed ticks all over the world. These ectoparasites are vectors of several pathogens and cause significant direct damage to their hosts. The biological success of these ectoparasites has been attributed to their ovaries and salivary glands, organs that ensure their survival in various environmental conditions. The importance of the ovaries in ticks is that, after mating, the individuals are able to lay approximately three thousand eggs. The present study had the objective to demonstrate the effects of deltamethrin obtained from the product Butox P CE 25 ® (MSD Saúde Animal, São Paulo, Brazil) on the ovarian development of R. sanguineus s.l. females. The chemical was tested in the concentrations of 25, 50, 100 and 200 ppm (respectively 80, 40, 20 and 10 times lower than the recommended by the manufacturer). Through the application of histological techniques and HE staining, the results showed that the deltamethrin was potentially able to modify the morphophysiology of the oocytes in all developmental stages, interfering in the vitellogenesis, causing intense vacuolation, cytoplasmic disorganization, and alterations in the chorion secretion. In addition, the chemical affected the germ vesicle of some oocytes, causing damages and hypertrophy, fragmenting the chromatin and forming bodies strongly stained by hematoxylin. Therefore, this study confirmed that the deltamethrin had an important action on the reproductive system of the R. sanguineus s.l. females, causing the precocious structural disorganization of the germ cells, consequently preventing the generation of new individuals.

  6. Comparison of 16S and COX1 genes mitochondrial regions and their usefulness for genetic analysis of ticks (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paternina, Luis Enrique; Verbel-Vergara, Daniel; Bejarano, Eduar Elías

    2016-06-03

    In recent decades the analysis of mitochondrial genes has been used for population and phylogenetic studies of ticks allowing many advances in their systematics. Mitochondrial ribosomal 16S (16S) subunit is one of the most frequently used among those genes available for tick analysis, whereas cytochrome oxidase gene 1 (COX1) has recently been used and proposed as an alternative to the traditional 16S gene marker.  To evaluate the usefulness of 16S and COX1 in genetic studies of ticks by analyzing sequences of three species commonly found in the Caribbean region of Colombia.  The analysis of both genes sequences allowed us to identify the three species with high levels of confidence and interspecific genetic divergence (19-22%), although only COX1 allowed us to detect intraspecific genetic variability (up to ~0.8%). A substitution saturation analysis indicated that the 16S gene was not saturated with transitions while the COX1 gene showed saturation distances starting at ~17%.  Our results indicated that the 16S gene seems to have better features for interspecific phylogenetic analyses because of its high level of genetic divergence and low saturation pattern, while the COX1 gene appears to be more useful for intraspecific genetic variability studies. However, as our study was conducted at a local scale, future studies at different biogeographical scales would help to establish its usefulness in wider and more complex scenarios.

  7. Partial characterization of a novel anti-inflammatory protein from salivary gland extract of Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum (Acari: Ixodidae ticks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayukh Ghosh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum ticks transmit Theileria annulata, causative agent of tropical theileriosis to cattle and buffaloes causing a major economic loss in terms of production and mortality in tropical countries. Ticks have evolved several immune evading strategies to circumvent hosts’ rejection and achieve engorgement. Successful feeding of ticks relies on a pharmacy of chemicals located in their complex salivary glands and secreted saliva. These chemicals in saliva could inhibit host inflammatory responses through modulating cytokine secretion and detoxifying reactive oxygen species. Therefore, the present study was aimed to characterize anti-inflammatory peptides from salivary gland extract (SGE of H. a. anatolicum ticks with a view that this information could be utilized in raising vaccines, designing synthetic peptides or peptidomimetics which can further be developed as novel therapeutics. Materials and Methods: Salivary glands were dissected out from partially fed adult female H. a. anatolicum ticks and homogenized under the ice to prepare SGE. Gel filtration chromatography was performed using Sephadex G-50 column to fractionate the crude extract. Protein was estimated in each fraction and analyzed for identification of anti-inflammatory activity. Sodium dodecyl sulfate - polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE was run for further characterization of protein in desired fractions. Results: A novel 28 kDa protein was identified in H. a. anatolicum SGE with pronounced anti-inflammatory activity. Conclusion: Purification and partial characterization of H. a. anatolicum SGE by size-exclusion chromatography and SDSPAGE depicted a 28 kDa protein with prominent anti-inflammatory activity.

  8. Desempenho do programa BABSIM no estudo epidemiológico de Boophilus microplus (Canestrini, 1889 (Acari: Ixodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fonseca A.H.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Os modelos de simulação são ferramentas úteis na análise das inter-relações bioecológicas dos carrapatos. Partindo dessa premissa, objetivou-se avaliar o desempenho do programa BABSIM como auxiliar no estudo epidemiológico de B. microplus para o Estado de Minas Gerais, validando-se os ajustes no programa pela análise comparativa das curvas populacionais observadas e simuladas em Pedro Leopoldo e São Miguel do Anta, MG. As simulações foram realizadas com o programa BABSIM utilizando-se os parâmetros biológicos originais do programa e com ajustes nas temperaturas mínimas para oviposição e incubação dos ovos, no índice de encontro do hospedeiro pelas larvas, e no índice de sobrevivência dos estádios de vida livre. Os ajustes nos parâmetros biológicos propiciaram aumento na intensidade da carga parasitária, porém não foram suficientes para representar com maior precisão a dinâmica populacional no ecossistema em São Miguel do Anta. As simulações procedidas com os parâmetros biológicos originais e ajustados apresentaram comportamento variável para os diferentes anos em relação aos observados no estudo experimental de Pedro Leopoldo. Apesar de os resultados das simulações terem contribuído para a análise do conjunto de variáveis que interagem para determinar as variações do tamanho das populações de carrapatos nos ecossistemas estudados, eles indicaram, também, a necessidade de introduzir modificações nos submodelos que representam as inter-relações parasito-ambiente antrópico, assim como a necessidade de modificar o programa para permitir alterações de manejo dos animais, dentro de um mesmo ano de simulação, e, dessa maneira, justificar com maior precisão a dinâmica populacional em diferentes tipos de ecossistemas.

  9. Haemaphysalis juxtakochi Cooley, 1946 (Acari: Ixodidae) parasitando Mazama nana (Hensel, 1872) (Artiodactyla: Cervidae) no estado do Rio Grande do Sul

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, João Ricardo; Salomão, Edson Luís; Doyle, Rovaina L.; Onofrio, Valéria; Barros-Battesti, Darci M.; Guglielmone, Alberto A.

    2007-01-01

    O encontro de Haemaphysalis juxtakochi Cooley, um carrapato ixodídeo, no veado bororó-do-sul, Mazama nana (Hensel), representa novo relato de ocorrência, após 34 anos de seu registro no Estado do Rio Grande do Sul. Os exemplares de carrapatos (3 machos e 1 fêmea) foram encontrados em Cachoeira do Sul, RS (30º02’21"S, 52º53’38"W). O local está a 72 m acima do nível do mar, com uma média anual de temperatura de 18,8°C, e uma precipitação média anual de 1.438 mm. Este é o primeiro registro de H....

  10. Haemaphysalis juxtakochi Cooley, 1946 (Acari: Ixodidae) parasitando Mazama nana (Hensel, 1872) (Artiodactyla: Cervidae) no estado do Rio Grande do Sul

    OpenAIRE

    Martins,João Ricardo; Salomão,Edson Luís; Doyle,Rovaina L.; Onofrio,Valéria; Barros-Battesti,Darci M.; Guglielmone,Alberto A.

    2007-01-01

    O encontro de Haemaphysalis juxtakochi Cooley, um carrapato ixodídeo, no veado bororó-do-sul, Mazama nana (Hensel), representa novo relato de ocorrência, após 34 anos de seu registro no Estado do Rio Grande do Sul. Os exemplares de carrapatos (3 machos e 1 fêmea) foram encontrados em Cachoeira do Sul, RS (30º02’21"S, 52º53’38"W). O local está a 72 m acima do nível do mar, com uma média anual de temperatura de 18,8°C, e uma precipitação média anual de 1.438 mm. Este é o primeiro re...

  11. Description of a new tick species, Ixodes collaris n. sp. (Acari: Ixodidae), from bats (Chiroptera: Hipposideridae, Rhinolophidae) in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornok, Sándor; Görföl, Tamás; Estók, Péter; Tu, Vuong Tan; Kontschán, Jenő

    2016-06-10

    In a recent study on ixodid bat ticks from Eurasia, a high genetic difference was found between Ixodes vespertilionis from Europe and Vietnam. Accordingly, it was proposed that I. vespertilionis is a species complex, with at least one additional, hitherto undescribed species. The aim of the present study was to investigate the morphology of bat ticks from Vietnam and to assess their taxonomic status in comparison with those collected in Europe. Ixodid bat ticks (two females and two nymphs) collected from the pomona leaf-nosed bat (Hipposideros pomona) (Hipposideridae) and intermediate horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus affinis) (Rhinolophidae) in Vietnam showed major morphological differences from European isolates of I. vespertilionis, including the shape of the scutum, the enclosure and shape of porose areas, the presence of a caudo-lateral collar-like ridge ventrally on the basis capituli, polytrich coxae with short setae, and grouped (non-linear) arrangement of anterior pit sensillae in Haller's organ. In this study the female and the nymph of an ixodid bat tick species from Vietnam are described for the first time. The genetic and morphological differences between I. vespertilionis Koch, 1844 and these bat ticks from Vietnam justify the status of the latter as a distinct species, Ixodes collaris Hornok n. sp.

  12. Parasitismo humano por Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (ACARI: IXODIDAE no Mato Grosso do Sul, Centro-Oeste do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Cunha Lima Acosta

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available O parasitismo humano pelo carrapato marrom do cão, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (s. l., um importante parasita para a saúde pública e veterinária, é raramente relatado no continente americano. Este trabalho relata o registro de um macho de R. sanguineus s. l. parasitando um humano na cidade de Campo Grande, estado do Mato Grosso do Sul, no Centro-Oeste do Brasil. Essa observação é relevante para a saúde pública, uma vez que os carrapatos desse complexo são conhecidos como vetores de riquétsias do grupo da febre maculosa para cães e humanos.

  13. SELECCIÓN DE AISLADOS DE HONGOS ENTOMOPATÓGENOS PARA EL CONTROL DE Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Martha Cruz-Avalos

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del presente estudio fue evaluar la susceptibilidad in vitro de larvas no alimentadas de Rhipicephalus microplus a diferentes aislados de hongos entomopatógenos nativos de suelo de unidades ganaderas y conocer las características de crecimiento y potencial de inóculo de los aislados que mostraran ser más patógenos. Se evaluó la patogenicidad y virulencia de aislados de Metarhizium anisopliae sensu lato (Ma, Beauveria bassiana (Bb e, Isaria fumorosea (Ifr, en larvas de R. microplus de 7 días de edad, expuestas mediante inmersión en una solución acuosa a la concentración 1x108 conidios/ml. Los aislados Ma135 y Ma133, presentaron alta patogenicidad con 100 y 94% de mortalidad, con valores CL50 de 5.2x104 y 2.5x104 conidios/ml, respectivamente. En estos aislados, la producción de esporas fue de 1.0x10¹º conidios/ml, y el crecimiento radial de micelio fue de 3.07 y 3.60 mm/día, respectivamente. Estos resultados demuestran que los aislados Ma135 y Ma133, pueden ser considerados potenciales agentes de control biológico en larvas de R. microplus. Â

  14. Toxic and repellent activity of selected monoterpenoids (thymol, carvacrol and linalool) against the castor bean tick, Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabari, Mohaddeseh Abouhosseini; Youssefi, Mohammad Reza; Maggi, Filippo; Benelli, Giovanni

    2017-10-15

    The castor bean tick, Ixodes ricinus, is a species of medical and veterinary importance. The use of synthetic acaricides for tick control has led to development of resistance, residues in the environment and animal products, and public health concerns. In this regard, plant essential oils and their main constituents represent an appealing alternative strategy to combat ticks. The phenols thymol and carvacrol and the alcohol linalool are monoterpenoids occurring in essential oils of several aromatic and medicinal plants, such as thyme, oregano, savory, lavender and coriander. Recent studies have shown toxicity of these monoterpenoids against selected mosquito vectors and other arthropod pests. However, information on their bioactivity on I. ricinus is not available. On this basis, here we evaluated the ovicidal, larvicidal and repellency effects of these compounds against I. ricinus. Concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2 and 5% were sprayed on the egg masses, then hatching rates were noted. Larvicidal assays were conducted on unengorged larvae, following the larval packet technique. The repellency was determined by measuring the vertical migration behavior of ticks in laboratory conditions. Carvacrol and thymol at all concentrations tested led to a significant hatching decrease, showing an efficacy higher than permethrin, whereas linalool did not cause any significant effect. In the larvae treated with carvacrol and thymol (1, 2 and 5%), mortality rates reached 100% after 24h, showing a larvicidal efficacy higher than permethrin, whereas no effect was seen in the larval groups treated with linalool. Carvacrol and thymol at all concentrations tested showed >90% repellency on I. ricinus. Linalool was scarcely effective (50.24% repellency) only at the concentration of 5%. Overall, based on these results, the phenols carvacrol and thymol can be considered as candidate ingredients for the development of novel acaricidal formulations to control the populations of I. ricinus and the spread of related tick-borne diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Use of an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction assay to genotype pyrethroid resistant strains of Boophilus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, F D; Davey, R B; Miller, R J

    2001-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction-based assay was developed to detect the presence of a pyrethroid resistance-associated amino acid substitution in Boophilus microplus (Canestrini). The assay uses a simple method for the extraction of genomic DNA from individual larvae and genotypes individuals for the presence of a Phe-->Ile amino acid substitution in the S6 transmembrane segment of domain III of the para-like sodium channel, clearly distinguishing heterozygotes from homozygotes. High frequencies for this amino acid substitution were found in the Corrales and San Felipe strains, which have target site insensitivity mechanisms for pyrethroid resistance. The Caporal resistant strain contained lower yet substantial numbers of amino acid-substituted alleles. Low amino acid substitution frequencies were found in the susceptible reference Gonzales strain and the Coatzacoalcos strain, which has metabolic esterase-mediated pyrethroid resistance. The amino acid substitution was not found in six other strains that were susceptible to pyrethroids.

  16. In vitro activities of plant extracts from the Brazilian Cerrado and Pantanal against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Carolina da Silva; Borges, Ligia Miranda Ferreira; Nicácio, José; Alves, Reginaldo Dias; Miguita, Carlos Henrique; Violante, Ivana Maria Póvoa; Hamerski, Lidilhone; Garcez, Walmir Silva; Garcez, Fernanda Rodrigues

    2013-07-01

    A total of 73 ethanol extracts from different anatomical parts of 44 plant species belonging to 24 families, native to the Mid-Western region of Brazil, were assessed in vitro for their effect on the reproductive cycle of engorged females of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, using the adult immersion test. All extracts were evaluated at the concentration of 0.2 % and, among the extracts tested, the one obtained from the fruits of Guarea kunthiana (Meliaceae) proved to be highly efficacious, showing 99.1 % of product effectiveness. Extracts from other three species were shown to be moderately active, namely Nymphaea amazonum trunk (Nymphaeaceae) [51.7 %], Strychnos pseudoquina trunk (Loganiaceae) [48 %] [corrected] and Ocotea lancifolia leaves (Lauraceae) [34.5 %], while the remaining extracts were shown to be weakly active or inactive. This is the first report on the bioactivity of these species on egg production by engorged females of R. microplus.

  17. Evaluation of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae resistance to different acaricide formulations using samples from Brazilian properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro de Oliveira Souza Higa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus tick is responsible for considerable economic losses in Brazil, causing leather damage, weight loss and reduced milk production in cattle and results in the transmission of pathogens. Currently, the main method for controlling this tick is using acaricides, but their indiscriminate use is one of the major causes of resistance dissemination. In this study, the adult immersion test (AIT was used to evaluate resistance in ticks from 28 properties located in five different states (Mato Grosso do Sul, Mato Grosso, Ceará, São Paulo, e Minas Gerais and the Distrito Federal (DF of Brazil. The resistance was found in 47.64% of the repetitions demonstrating an efficacy of less than 90% in various locations throughout the country. The larvae packet test was used to evaluate samples from ten properties in four states (Mato Grosso do Sul, Mato Grosso, Minas Gerais and Espírito Santo. Spray products belonging to the main classes of acaricides, including combination formulations, were used in both types of test. New cases of resistance were found on properties within the states of Ceará, Espírito Santo and Mato Grosso, where such resistance was not previously reported.

  18. Ixodes (Multidentatus paranaensis n. sp. (Acari: Ixodidae a parasite of Streptoprocne biscutata (Sclater 1865 (Apodiformes: Apodidae birds in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barros-Battesti Darci Moraes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available During an ecological study, carried out between 1994 and 1996 with Streptoprocne biscutata (Sclater (Apodiformes: Apodidae birds, that inhabit caves in the Quatro Barras County, State of Paraná, Southern Brazil, a new tick species of the subgenus Multidentatus was observed. The female, male, nymph, and larva of Ixodes (Multidentatus paranaensis n. sp., are described. Of the 12 known species of the subgenus Multidentatus, only I. (M. auritulus Neumann, 1904 and I. (M. murreleti Cooley and Kohls, 1945 occur in the Neartic region and only I. (M. auritulus occurs in the Neotropical region. As such, I. (M. paranaensis n. sp. increases the number of species and the distribution area of the subgenus Multidentatus in the Americas.

  19. Cattle Fever Tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, (Acari: Ixodidae): potential control on pastures by the application of urea fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    The southern cattle fever tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, spends as much as 80–90% of its life cycle as a larva questing for a host. Standard control methods are limited to on-host applications, leaving a need for methods directed at the pasture infesting stages. Reports from Brazil indic...

  20. Salivary gland extract from engorged Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae) stimulates in vitro growth of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rudolf, Ivo; Šikutová, Silvie; Kopecký, Jan; Hubálek, Zdeněk

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 3 (2010), s. 294-298 ISSN 0233-111X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/03/0726; GA AV ČR IAA600960811 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519; CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : salivary gland extract * Ixodes ricinus ticks * Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.395, year: 2010

  1. Transmission differentials for multible pathogens as inferred from their prevalence in larva, nymph and sult of Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per M.; Christoffersen, Christian S.; Moutailler, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Ixodes ricinus serves as vector for a range of microorganisms capable of causing clinical illness in humans. The microorganisms occur in the same vector populations and are generally affected by the same tick-host interactions. Still, the instars have different host preferences which should...

  2. Acaricidal activity of extracts from Petiveria alliacea (Phytolaccaceae) against the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado-Aguilar, J A; Aguilar-Caballero, A; Rodriguez-Vivas, R I; Borges-Argaez, R; Garcia-Vazquez, Z; Mendez-Gonzalez, M

    2010-03-25

    The acaricidal activity of crude extracts and fractions from stems and leaves of Petiveria alliacea (Phytolaccaceae) was carried out on larvae and adults of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus using the larval immersion test (LIT) and adult immersion test (AIT), respectively. Methanolic extracts of stems and leaves of P. alliacea showed 100% mortality on the LIT bioassay. On the other hand, methanolic extracts of leaves and stem on the AIT test showed 26% and 86% of mortality, respectively, egg laying inhibition of 40% and 91%, respectively and hatchability inhibition of 26% and 17%, respectively. Purification of the active stem methanolic extract showed that the activity was present in the n-hexane non-polar fraction. Bioassay-guided purification of the n-hexane fraction produced 10 semi-purified fractions; fraction B had the highest activity against tick larvae (100% mortality). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry demonstrated that the chemical composition of the active fraction B samples were mainly composed of benzyltrisulfide (BTS) and benzyldisulfide (BDS). These metabolites might be responsible for the acaricidal activity of stem extract of P. alliacea. However, further experiments to evaluate the acaricidal activity of BTS and BDS on larvae and adults of R. (B.) microplus are needed. Our results showed that P. alliacea is a promising biocontrol candidate as acaricide against R. (B.) microplus resistant strains.

  3. A Density Map of the Tick-Borne Encephalitis and Lyme Borreliosis Vector Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae) for Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugger, Katharina; Boehnke, Denise; Petney, Trevor; Dobler, Gerhard; Pfeffer, Martin; Silaghi, Cornelia; Schaub, Günter A; Pinior, Beate; Dautel, Hans; Kahl, Olaf; Pfister, Kurt; Süss, Jochen; Rubel, Franz

    2016-11-01

    The castor bean tick Ixodes ricinus (L.) is the principal vector for a variety of viral, bacterial, and protozoan pathogens causing a growing public-health issue over the past decades. However, a national density map of I. ricinus is still missing. Here, I. ricinus nymphs in Germany were investigated by compiling a high-resolution map depicting the mean annually accumulated nymphal density, as observed by monthly flagging an area of 100 m 2 Input data comprise ticks collected at 69 sampling sites. The model domain covers an area of about 357,000 km 2 (regional scale). Two negative binomial regression models were fitted to the data to interpolate the tick densities to unsampled locations using bioclimatic variables and land cover, which were selected according to their significance by the Akaike information criterion (AIC). The default model was fitted to the complete dataset resulting in AIC = 842. An optimized model resulted in a significantly better value of AIC = 732. Tick densities are very low in urban (green) areas. Maximum annual densities up to 1,000 nymphs per 100 m 2 are observed in broad-leaved forests. The tick maps were verified by leave-one-out cross-validation. Root mean square errors of RMSE = 137 and RMSE = 126 nymphs per 100 m 2 were estimated for the two models, respectively. These errors are of the order of the interannual variation of the tick densities. The compilation of a high-resolution density map of unfed nymphal I. ricinus for Germany provides a novel, nationwide insight into the distribution of an important disease vector. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Ornithodoros faccinii n. sp. (Acari: Ixodida: Argasidae) parasitizing the frog Thoropa miliaris (Amphibia: Anura: Cycloramphidae) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros-Battesti, Darci Moraes; Landulfo, Gabriel Alves; Luz, Hermes Ribeiro; Marcili, Arlei; Onofrio, Valeria Castilho; Famadas, Kátia Maria

    2015-05-13

    Most argasid ticks from the Neotropical region are parasites of mammals and birds, with a few records from reptiles. Many species of the genus Ornithodoros are known only through larval descriptions, and their chaetotaxy and morphological characteristics have been used to separate the taxa. In the present study, we describe the larva and the nymph of first instar of a new species of the genus Ornithodoros that was collected from frogs of the species Thoropa miliaris. Larvae of Ornithodoros were collected from frogs of the species T. miliaris at waterfalls in the state of Rio de Janeiro, southeastern Brazil. The larval and nymphal description was based on optical and scanning electron microscopy. Molecular analysis using the argasid 16S rRNA sequences available in GenBank was also conducted. Ornithodoros faccinii sp. n. is closely related to Ornithodoros clarki Jones & Clifford, Ornithodoros marinkellei Kohls, Clifford & Jones, Ornithodoros capensis Neumann and Ornithodoros sawaii Kitaoka & Susuki. However, the larval morphology of the new species is unique. The mitochondrial 16S rDNA partial sequence of O. faccinii generated in the present study was deposited in GenBank under the number KP861242. The larvae collected from Thoropa miliaris are a new species, Ornithodoros faccinii n. sp. This is the first report of argasid ticks on frogs in Brazil, the second on frogs and the third on Amphibia in the Neotropical region.

  5. Prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi (Spirochaetales: Spirochaetaceae) in Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) adults in New Jersey, 2000-2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Terry L; Jordan, Robert A; Hung, Robert W; Puelle, Rose S; Markowski, Daniel; Chomsky, Martin S

    2003-07-01

    Using polymerase chain reaction, we analyzed 529 Ixodes scapularis Say adults collected from 16 of New Jersey's 21 counties for the presence of Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiological agent of Lyme disease. Overall, 261 (49.3%) were positive. B. burgdorferi was detected in ticks obtained from each county and from 53 of the 58 (93.1%) municipalities surveyed. The observed statewide prevalence in New Jersey is similar to those reported from other northeastern and mid-Atlantic states.

  6. Two ways of experimental infection of Ixodes ricinus ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) with spirochetes of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fišerová, Lenka; Černá, Kateřina; Horká, Helena; Kopecký, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 2 (2008), s. 150-154 ISSN 0015-5683 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/05/0811; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Lyme disease spirochete * Borrelia burgdorferi * Borrelia baronii * Borrelia afzelii * tick * Ixodes ricinus Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 1.307, year: 2008

  7. Cattle fever tick, Rhipicephalus annulatus (Acari: Ixodidae), and the quest for discovery of its natural enemies in the Balkan Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattle fever tick, Rhipicephalus annulatus (CFT), is a hard tick native to the Mediterranean region that is invasive in the southwestern USA. The tick is known to develop on cattle and white tailed deer, and it transmits two lethal diseases, piroplasmosis and babesiosis. Extensive use of acaricides...

  8. Transmission of the Lyme Disease Spirochete Borrelia mayonii in Relation to Duration of Attachment by Nymphal Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Marc C; Breuner, Nicole E; Hojgaard, Andrias; Boegler, Karen A; Hoxmeier, J Charles; Replogle, Adam J; Eisen, Lars

    2017-09-01

    The recently recognized Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia mayonii, has been detected in host-seeking Ixodes scapularis Say ticks and is associated with human disease in the Upper Midwest. Although experimentally shown to be vector competent, studies have been lacking to determine the duration of time from attachment of a single B. mayonii-infected I. scapularis nymph to transmission of spirochetes to a host. If B. mayonii spirochetes were found to be transmitted within the first 24 h after tick attachment, in contrast to Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes (>24 h), then current recommendations for tick checks and prompt tick removal as a way to prevent transmission of Lyme disease spirochetes would need to be amended. We therefore conducted a study to determine the probability of transmission of B. mayonii spirochetes from single infected nymphal I. scapularis ticks to susceptible experimental mouse hosts at three time points postattachment (24, 48, and 72 h) and for a complete feed (>72-96 h). No evidence of infection with or exposure to B. mayonii occurred in mice that were fed upon by a single infected nymph for 24 or 48 h. The probability of transmission by a single infected nymphal tick was 31% after 72 h of attachment and 57% for a complete feed. In addition, due to unintended simultaneous feeding upon some mice by two B. mayonii-infected nymphs, we recorded a single occasion in which feeding for 48 h by two infected nymphs resulted in transmission and viable infection in the mouse. We conclude that the duration of attachment of a single infected nymphal I. scapularis tick required for transmission of B. mayonii appears to be similar to that for B. burgdorferi: transmission is minimal for the first 24 h of attachment, rare up to 48 h, but then increases distinctly by 72 h postattachment. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  9. New Oppioidea taxa from Madagascar (Acari: Oribatida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahunka, S.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of the continuous survey of the Madagascan Oribatida Fauna some newly surveyed Oppioidea (Acari: Oribatida species are discussed. Altogether 15 species are listed of the recently studied, identified and described taxa originating from several sites of the island (Malagasy Republic. Seven species of them are new to science and some other known only from few localities. One species represents also a new genus, Interbelba gen. nov. Three species, Berniniella bicarinata (Paoli, 1908, Quadroppia circumita (Hammer, 1961 and Discosuctobelba variosetosa (Hammer, 1961are recorded from Madagascar for the first time. With 22 figures.

  10. Efficacy of sarolaner (Simparic?) against induced infestations of Amblyomma cajennense on dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Fabio; Franz, Lilian; Campos, Diefrey Ribeiro; Azevedo, Tha?s Ribeiro Correia; Cunha, Daise; Six, Robert H.; Maeder, Steven; Cree, Travis

    2017-01-01

    Background Amblyomma cajennense is the main vector of Rickettsia rickettsii which causes Brazilian spotted fever. This adult tick preferably infests horses and capybaras, but has low host specificity during its immature stages, thus posing a threat to humans and dogs. In this study, the efficacy of sarolaner (Simparic?/Simparica?, Zoetis) when administered once orally to dogs at 2?mg/kg was evaluated against induced infestations of A. cajennense nymphs for up to 35?days after treatment. Metho...

  11. Occurrence of Amblyomma longirostre in Ramphastos dicolorus in Southern Brazil Ocorrência de Amblyomma longirostre em Ramphastos dicolorus no Sul do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Fabio Soares

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The species Amblyomma longirostre Koch, 1844 is poorly known in the state of Rio Grande do Sul. Usually the adult stage could be found on Sphigurus spp. and the immatures on birds (Passeriformes. Although A. longirostre is distributed in the Neotropical region, from Panama to Uruguay, it also occurs in Central America and the United States. The aim of this study was to report that Ramphastos dicolorus Linnaeus 1766 is a new host record for this tick species.A espécie Amblyomma longirostre Koch, 1844 é pouco conhecida no Estado do Rio Grande do Sul. Normalmente a fase adulta pode ser encontrada em porquinhos Sphigurus spp., e as fases imaturas podem ser encontradas em aves (Passeriformes. A. longirostre distribui-se na região neotropical, do Panamá ao Uruguai. Ela também ocorre na América Central e nos Estados Unidos. Este estudo tem como objetivo relatar que Ramphastos dicolorus Linnaeus 1766 é um novo hospedeiro dessa espécie de carrapato.

  12. Nieuwe vondsten van watermijten in Nederland (Acari: Hydrachnidia).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, H.; Hoek, van den T.-H.; Wiggers, R.

    2006-01-01

    New records of water mites in the Netherlands (Acari: Hydrachnidia) Three species of water mite new to the fauna of the Netherlands are reported, i.e. Hydryphantes flexuosus, Panisus michaeli and Nilotonia borneri. Moreover, a number of new records of rare species is given. Re-identification of

  13. New Uropodina species and records from Malaysia (Acari: Mesostigmata)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kontschán, J.; Starý, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 2 (2012), s. 177-192 ISSN 1217-8837 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : Acari * new records * new species * Malaysia Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.472, year: 2012

  14. A list of oribatid mites (Acari, Oribatida) of Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermilov, Sergey G

    2015-01-01

    A species list of identified oribatid mite taxa (Acari, Oribatida) in the fauna of Vietnam is provided. During 1967-2015, a total of 535 species/subspecies from 222 genera and 81 families was registered. Of these, 194 species/subspecies were described as new for science from Vietnam.

  15. Two new Uropodina species from Ethiopia (Acari: Mesostigmata)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kontschán, J.; Starý, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 1 (2013), s. 49-56 ISSN 1681-5556 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Acari * Uropodina * Afrotropical * Ethiopia * new species * new synonymy Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.500, year: 2013

  16. External and gastrointestinal parasites of the rufous-collared sparrow Zonotrichia capensis (Passeriformes, Emberizidae in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Llanos-Soto

    Full Text Available Abstract A total of 277 rufous-collared sparrows, Zonotrichia capensis Müller, 1776 (Emberizidae, were examined for external parasites. The birds were captured using mist nets in seven locations in northern and central Chile. Additionally, seven carcasses from central Chile (the Biobío region were necropsied to evaluate the presence of endoparasite infection. Ectoparasites were found on 35.8% (99/277 of the examined birds and they were represented by the following arthropods: feather mites Amerodectes zonotrichiae Mironov and González-Acuña, 2014 (Analgoidea: Proctophyllodidae, Proctophyllodes polyxenus Atyeo and Braasch, 1966 (Analgoidea: Proctophyllodidae, and Trouessartia capensis Berla, 1959 (Analgoidea: Trouessartiidae; a louse Philopterus sp. (Phthiraptera: Ischnocera; and ticks Amblyomma tigrinum Koch, 1844 (Acari: Ixodidae and Ixodes auritulus Neumann, 1904 (Acari: Ixodidae. Two of the seven necropsied carcasses were infected with the acanthocephalan Mediorhynchus papillosus Van Cleave, 1916 (Gigantorhynchida: Gigantorhynchidae. To our knowledge, this study reports P. polyxenus, Philopterus sp., A. tigrinum, and M. papillosus for the first time for Z. capensis and expands the distributional range for T. capensis to Chile.

  17. An acarologic survey and Amblyomma americanum distribution map with implications for tularemia risk in Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, H.E.; Yates, K.F.; Dietrich, G.; MacMillan, K.; Graham, C.B.; Reese, S.M.; Helterbrand, Wm. S.; Nicholson, W.L.; Blount, K.; Mead, P.S.; Patrick, S.L.; Eisen, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    In the United States, tickborne diseases occur focally. Missouri represents a major focus of several tickborne diseases that includes spotted fever rickettsiosis, tularemia, and ehrlichiosis. Our study sought to determine the potential risk of human exposure to human-biting vector ticks in this area. We collected ticks in 79 sites in southern Missouri during June 7-10, 2009, which yielded 1,047 adult and 3,585 nymphal Amblyomma americanum, 5 adult Amblyomma maculatum, 19 adult Dermacentor variabilis, and 5 nymphal Ixodes brunneus. Logistic regression analysis showed that areas posing an elevated risk of exposure to A. americanum nymphs or adults were more likely to be classified as forested than grassland, and the probability of being classified as elevated risk increased with increasing relative humidity during the month of June (30-year average). Overall accuracy of each of the two models was greater than 70% and showed that 20% and 30% of the state were classified as elevated risk for human exposure to nymphs and adults, respectively. We also found a significant positive association between heightened acarologic risk and counties reporting tularemia cases. Our study provides an updated distribution map for A. americanum in Missouri and suggests a wide-spread risk of human exposure to A. americanum and their associated pathogens in this region. Copyright ?? 2011 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  18. Molecular detection of Rickettsia bellii in Amblyomma rotundatum from imported red-footed tortoise (Chelonoides carbonaria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erster, Oran; Roth, Asael; Avni, Zvi; King, Rony; Shkap, Varda

    2015-06-01

    Introduction of exotic ticks and pathogens through international animal trade (farm animals and pets) is a serious threat to public health and local fauna. Rapid and correct identification of potential threats is an important step on the way to conduct an efficient control of imported pests. In this report we describe the molecular identification of the neotropic tick Amblyomma rotundatum intercepted from red-footed tortoise (Chelonoides carbonaria), imported to Israel from Florida, USA. Molecular analysis of the ticks conducted upon their identification, revealed that they were infected with Rickettsia bellii. Following their collection, the ticks were examined morphologically and five molecular markers were used to determine their taxonomic identity: cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COX1), cytochrome b (CytB), 12S rRNA, 16S rRNA and internal transcribed sequence 2 (ITS-2). Molecular analysis indicated that all of the collected ticks were Amblyomma rotundatum. Using rickettsial gltA (citrate synthase) gene in real-time PCR analysis we found that approximately 25% of the intercepted ticks (8 of 33) were infected with Rickettsia bellii. It is concluded that accurate and timely identification of imported exotic ticks prevented their introduction to Israel, and that use of molecular tools may further improve the response to such potential threats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Distribution and habitat utilization of the gopher tortoise tick (Amblyomma tuberculatum) in southern Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennen, Joshua R.; Qualls, Carl P.

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of the gopher tortoise tick (Amblyomma tuberculatum) has been considered intrinsically linked to the distribution of its primary host, gopher tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus). However, the presence of G. polyphemus does not always equate to the presence of A. tuberculatum. There is a paucity of data on the ecology, habitat preferences, and distribution of A. tuberculatum. The goals of this study were to assess the distribution of A. tuberculatum in southern Mississippi and to determine which, if any, habitat parameters explain the distribution pattern of A. tuberculatum. During 2006-2007, we examined 13 G. polyphemus populations in southern Mississippi for the presence of A. tuberculatum, and we measured a suite of habitat parameters at each site. Only 23% of the G. polyphemus populations supported A. tuberculatum, suggesting a more restricted distribution than its host. The results of our multivariate analyses identified several habitat variables, e.g., depth of sand and percentage of sand in the topsoil and burrow apron, as being important in discriminating between sites with, and without, A. tuberculatum. Amblyomma tuberculatum was only found at sites with a mean sand depth of >100 cm and a mean percentage of topsoil and burrow apron sand composition >94.0 and 92.4, respectively. Thus, environmental factors, and not just its host's range, seem to influence the distribution of A. tuberculatum.

  20. Ocorrência de ixodidae parasitos de capivara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris linnaeus, 1766) na estação ecológica do Taim, Rio Grande - RS, Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Sinkoc,Afonso Lodovico; Brum,João Guilherme Werner; Müller,Gertrud; Begrow,Angela; Paulsen,Rosa Maria Massaro

    1997-01-01

    O objetivo deste trabalho foi identificar as espécies de carrapatos observadas sobre capivaras na Estação Ecológica do Taim, Rio Grande- RS, Brasil. Foram examinadas 27 capivaras encontradas mortas por atropelamento na BR 471, em seu trecho que corta a Estação, sendo cole lados 497 carrapatos das espécies Amblyomma cooperi (=A. lutzi; = A. ypisilophorum), Amblyomma triste, Amblyomma tigrinum e ninfas do gênero Amblyomma. A. cooperi representou 68,41% dos carrapatos identificados, com uma freq...

  1. “Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae” en Amblyomma tigrinum, San Luis, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel CICUTTIN

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del estudio fue detectar especies del género Rickettsia en garrapatas de la especie Amblyomma tigrinum colectadas sobre carnívoros domésticos y en sangre de caninos domésticos de la provincia de San Luis (Argentina. Entre 2013 y 2015 se colectaron 56 garrapatas adultas de la especie A. tigrinum sobre caninos y felinos domésticos, y se obtuvieron 65 muestras sanguíneas de caninos. Tres garrapatas resultaron positivas mediante la amplificación de un fragmento del espacio intergénico 23S-5S ARNr del género Rickettsia, lográndose secuenciar uno de los productos positivos. La muestra positiva secuenciada también resultó positiva por PCRs de los fragmentos de los genes gltA y ompA. Las secuencias obtenidas resultaron tener una identidad del 100 % de identidad con “Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae”. Todas las muestras sanguíneas resultaron negativas. “Ca. R. andeanae” no ha sido asociada con enfermedad en humanos o animales, sin embargo, es necesario realizar nuevas investigaciones para lograr un mayor conocimiento del riesgo potencial de transmisión de rickettsiosis en la región. SUMMARY. “Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae” in Amblyomma tigrinum ticks from San Luis (Argentina. The aim of this study was to detect species of Rickettsia in Amblyomma tigrinum ticks collected from domestic carnivores and blood of domestic dogs of San Luis (Argentina. Between 2013 and 2015, 56 adults of A. tigrinum from dogs and cats and 65 blood from dogs were collected. Three ticks were positive by amplification of a 23S-5S rRNA fragment, and the sequence of one of the positive products was obtained. The positive sample sequenced was positive by PCRs of fragments of genes gltA and ompA. The sequences obtained were 100% identical with "Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae". All blood samples were negative. “Ca. R. andeanae” has not been associated with disease in humans or animals; however, further research is necessary to achieve greater

  2. Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae, a spotted fever group agent infecting Amblyomma parvum ticks in two Brazilian biomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Aparecida Nieri-Bastos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Adult ticks of the species Amblyomma parvum were collected from the vegetation in the Pantanal biome (state of Mato Grosso do Sul and from horses in the Cerrado biome (state of Piauí in Brazil. The ticks were individually tested for rickettsial infection via polymerase chain reaction (PCR targeting three rickettsial genes, gltA, ompA and ompB. Overall, 63.5% (40/63 and 66.7% (2/3 of A. parvum ticks from Pantanal and Cerrado, respectively, contained rickettsial DNA, which were all confirmed by DNA sequencing to be 100% identical to the corresponding fragments of the gltA, ompA and ompB genes of Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae. This report is the first to describe Ca. R. andeanae in Brazil.

  3. Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae, a spotted fever group agent infecting Amblyomma parvum ticks in two Brazilian biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieri-Bastos, Fernanda Aparecida; Lopes, Marcos Gomes; Cançado, Paulo Henrique Duarte; Rossa, Giselle Ayres Razera; Faccini, João Luiz Horácio; Gennari, Solange Maria; Labruna, Marcelo Bahia

    2014-04-01

    Adult ticks of the species Amblyomma parvum were collected from the vegetation in the Pantanal biome (state of Mato Grosso do Sul) and from horses in the Cerrado biome (state of Piauí) in Brazil. The ticks were individually tested for rickettsial infection via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting three rickettsial genes, gltA, ompA and ompB. Overall, 63.5% (40/63) and 66.7% (2/3) of A. parvum ticks from Pantanal and Cerrado, respectively, contained rickettsial DNA, which were all confirmed by DNA sequencing to be 100% identical to the corresponding fragments of the gltA, ompA and ompB genes of Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae. This report is the first to describe Ca. R. andeanae in Brazil.

  4. Blood Meal Analysis to Identify Reservoir Hosts for Amblyomma americanum Ticks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goessling, Lisa S.; Storch, Gregory A.; Thach, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    Efforts to identify wildlife reservoirs for tick-borne pathogens are frequently limited by poor understanding of tick–host interactions and potentially transient infectivity of hosts under natural conditions. To identify reservoir hosts for lone star tick (Amblyomma americanum)–associated pathogens, we used a novel technology. In field-collected ticks, we used PCR to amplify a portion of the 18S rRNA gene in remnant blood meal DNA. Reverse line blot hybridization with host-specific probes was then used to subsequently detect and identify amplified DNA. Although several other taxa of wildlife hosts contribute to tick infection rates, our results confirm that the white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) is a reservoir host for several A. americanum–associated pathogens. Identification of host blood meal frequency and reservoir competence can help in determining human infection rates caused by these pathogens. PMID:20202418

  5. Discovery of filarial nematode DNA in Amblyomma americanum in Northern Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Tyler C; Orr, John M; Smith, Joshua D; Arias, Jorge R; Rasgon, Jason L; Norris, Douglas E

    2016-03-01

    Ticks collected in 2011 were screened for the presence of filarial nematode genetic material, and positive samples were sequenced for analysis. Monanema-like filarial nematode DNA was recently discovered in Amblyomma americanum in northern Virginia, marking the first time genetic material from this parasite has been discovered in ticks in the state. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that this material was directly related to a previously discovered filarial nematode in A. americanum populations in Maryland as well as recently identified parasites in Ixodes scapularis from southern Connecticut. Further study is warranted to visually confirm the presence of these nematodes, characterize their distribution, and determine if these ticks are intermediate hosts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Feeding period required by Amblyomma aureolatum ticks for transmission of Rickettsia rickettsii to vertebrate hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Danilo G; Soares, Herbert S; Soares, João Fábio; Labruna, Marcelo B

    2014-09-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is endemic to the São Paulo metropolitan area, Brazil, where the etiologic agent, Rickettsia rickettsii, is transmitted to humans by adult Amblyomma aureolatum ticks. We determined the minimal feeding period required by A. aureolatum nymphs and adults to transmit R. rickettsii to guinea pigs. Unfed nymphs and unfed adult ticks had to be attached to the host for >10 hours to transmit R. rickettsii. In contrast, fed ticks needed a minimum of 10 minutes of attachment to transmit R. rickettsii to hosts. Most confirmed infections of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in humans in the São Paulo metropolitan area have been associated with contact with domestic dogs, the main host of A. aureolatum adult ticks. The typical expectation that transmission of tickborne bacteria to humans as well as to dogs requires ≥2 hours of tick attachment may discourage persons from immediately removing them and result in transmission of this lethal bacterium.

  7. Hosts, seasonality and geographic distribution of the South African tortoise tick, Amblyomma marmoreum

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    I.G. Horak

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The tortoise tick Amblyomma marmoreum was collected from large numbers of reptiles and other animals during the course of numerous surveys conducted in South Africa. A total of 1 229 ticks, of which 550 were adults, were recovered from 309 reptiles belonging to 13 species, with leopard tortoises, Geochelone pardalis being the most heavily infested. The 269 birds sampled harboured 4 901 larvae, 217 nymphs and no adult ticks, and the prevalence of infestation was greatest on hel meted guinea fowls, Numida meleagris. Only two larvae were recovered from 610 rodents, including 31 spring hares, Pedetes capensis, whereas 1 144 other small mammals yielded 1 835 immature ticks, of which 1 655 were collected from 623 scrub hares, Lepus saxatilis. The 213 carnivores examined harboured 2 459 ticks of which none were adult. A single adult tick and 6 684 larvae and 62 nymphs were recovered from 656 large herbivores, and a total of 4 081 immature ticks and three adults were collected from 1 543 domestic animals and 194 humans. Adult male and female A. marmoreum were most numerous on reptiles during January and February, and larvae during March. The largest numbers of larvae were present on domestic cattle and helmeted guineafowls in the Eastern Cape Province during March or April respectively, whereas larvae were most numerous on helmeted guineafowls, scrub hares and the vegetation in north-eastern Mpumalanga Province during May. In both provinces nymphs were most numerous between October and December. Amblyomma marmoreum appears to be most prevalent in the western regions of the Western and Eastern Cape and Free State provinces, and the north-eastern regions of the Northern Cape, KwaZulu- Natal, Mpumulanga and Limpopo provinces.

  8. The Distinct Transcriptional Response of the Midgut of Amblyomma sculptum and Amblyomma aureolatum Ticks to Rickettsia rickettsii Correlates to Their Differences in Susceptibility to Infection

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    Andréa C. Fogaça

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Rickettsia rickettsii is a tick-borne obligate intracellular bacterium that causes Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF. In Brazil, two species of ticks in the genus Amblyomma, A. sculptum and A. aureolatum, are incriminated as vectors of this bacterium. Importantly, these two species present remarkable differences in susceptibility to R. rickettsii infection, where A. aureolatum is more susceptible than A. sculptum. In the current study, A. aureolatum and A. sculptum ticks were fed on suitable hosts previously inoculated with R. rickettsii, mimicking a natural infection. As control, ticks were fed on non-infected animals. Both midgut and salivary glands of all positively infected ticks were colonized by R. rickettsii. We did not observe ticks with infection restricted to midgut, suggesting that important factors for controlling rickettsial colonization were produced in this organ. In order to identify such factors, the total RNA extracted from the midgut (MG was submitted to next generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq. The majority of the coding sequences (CDSs of A. sculptum differentially expressed by infection were upregulated, whereas most of modulated CDSs of A. aureolatum were downregulated. The functional categories that comprise upregulated CDSs of A. sculptum, for instance, metabolism, signal transduction, protein modification, extracellular matrix, and immunity also include CDSs of A. aureolatum that were downregulated by infection. This is the first study that reports the effects of an experimental infection with the highly virulent R. rickettsii on the gene expression of two natural tick vectors. The distinct transcriptional profiles of MG of A. sculptum and A. aureolatum upon infection stimulus strongly suggest that molecular factors in this organ are responsible for delineating the susceptibility to R. rickettsii. Functional studies to determine the role played by proteins encoded by differentially expressed CDSs in the acquisition of R

  9. Amblyomma americanum tick calreticulin binds C1q but does not inhibit activation of the classical complement cascade

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Tae Kwon; Ibelli, Adriana Mércia Guaratini; Mulenga, Albert

    2015-01-01

    In this study we characterized Amblyomma americanum (Aam) tick calreticulin (CRT) homolog in tick feeding physiology. In nature, different tick species can be found feeding on the same animal host. This suggests that different tick species found feeding on the same host can modulate the same host anti-tick defense pathways to successfully feed. From this perspective it’s plausible that different tick species can utilize universally conserved proteins such as CRT to regulate and facilitate fee...

  10. Borrelia sp. phylogenetically different from Lyme disease- and relapsing fever-related Borrelia spp. in Amblyomma varanense from Python reticulatus

    OpenAIRE

    Trinachartvanit, Wachareeporn; Hirunkanokpun, Supanee; Sudsangiem, Ronnayuth; Lijuan, Wanwisa; Boonkusol, Duangjai; Baimai, Visut; Ahantarig, Arunee

    2016-01-01

    Background Species of the genus Borrelia are causative agents of Lyme disease and relapsing fever. Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vector-borne disease in the northern hemisphere. However, in some parts of the world Lyme borreliosis and relapsing fever may be caused by novel Borrelia genotypes. Herein, we report the presence of a Borrelia sp. in an Amblyomma varanense collected from Python reticulatus. Methods Ticks were collected from snakes, identified to species level and examin...

  11. New records of water mites (Acari: Hydrachnidia, Halacaroidea) from Patagonia (Chile)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pešić, V.; Smit, H.; Datry, T.

    2010-01-01

    New records of water mite species (Acari: Hydrachnidia, Halacaroidea) from Patagonia (Southern Chile) are reported. Four species, Anisitsiellides australis Smit, 2002, Peregrinacarus falklandensis Bartsch, 2001, Lobohalacarus weberi (Romijn & Viets, 1924) and Soldanellonyx monardi Walter, 1919 are

  12. Three new .i.Trachyuropoda./i. (Acari: Uropodina: Trachyuropodidae) species from the Neotropical region

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kontschán, J.; Starý, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 1 (2013), s. 7-14 ISSN 1300-0179 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Acari * Uropodina * Trachyuropoda * Galápagos Islands Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.585, year: 2013

  13. Molecular detection of Rickettsia rhipicephali and other spotted fever group Rickettsia species in Amblyomma ticks infesting wild birds in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeringóta, Viviane; Maturano, Ralph; Luz, Hermes Ribeiro; Senra, Tatiane Oliveira Souza; Daemon, Erik; Faccini, João Luiz Horacio; McIntosh, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    The current study evaluated parasitism of wild birds by ticks in a fragment of Atlantic Forest in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, and examined the ticks for rickettsial agents. Birds were captured during 2014 and 2015 and ticks were identified by sequencing fragments of the 16S and 12S ribosomal DNA. Among 260 birds representing 19 families and 52 species, a total of 69 (26.5%) were found to be infested by larvae (LL) and/or nymphs (NN) of Amblyomma longirostre (Koch, 1844) (45 LL, 4 NN), Amblyomma calcaratum Neumann, 1899 (9 LL, 15 NN), Amblyomma nodosum Neumann, 1899 (2 NN), Amblyomma parkeri Fonseca and Aragão, 1952 (21 LL), Amblyomma sp. haplotype Nazaré (77 LL), and Haemaphysalis leporispalustris (Packard, 1869) (17 LL, 1 NN). The use of PCR and sequencing of the rickettsial genes gltA, htrA, ompA and ompB, revealed the presence of "Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii" in A. longirostre (13/49; 26%) and Rickettsia parkeri (strain ApPR) in both A. parkeri (1/21; 5%) and haplotype Nazaré (42/77; 55%) ticks. In addition, we detected Rickettsia rhipicephali in 31 (40%) of the 77 haplotype Nazaré ticks. This is the first record of this rickettsial agent in a species of the genus Amblyomma. The pathogenic potential of this bacterium is undetermined, but the unprecedented association with Amblyomma ticks may represent a cause for concern for public and/or animal health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. The Microbiome of Ehrlichia-Infected and Uninfected Lone Star Ticks (Amblyomma americanum.

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    R T Trout Fryxell

    Full Text Available The Lone Star tick, Amblyomma americanum, transmits several bacterial pathogens including species of Anaplasma and Ehrlichia. Amblyomma americanum also hosts a number of non-pathogenic bacterial endosymbionts. Recent studies of other arthropod and insect vectors have documented that commensal microflora can influence transmission of vector-borne pathogens; however, little is known about tick microbiomes and their possible influence on tick-borne diseases. Our objective was to compare bacterial communities associated with A. americanum, comparing Anaplasma/Ehrlichia -infected and uninfected ticks. Field-collected questing specimens (n = 50 were used in the analyses, of which 17 were identified as Anaplasma/Ehrlichia infected based on PCR amplification and sequencing of groEL genes. Bacterial communities from each specimen were characterized using Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicon libraries. There was a broad range in diversity between samples, with inverse Simpson's Diversity indices ranging from 1.28-89.5. There were no statistical differences in the overall microbial community structure between PCR diagnosed Anaplasma/Ehrlichia-positive and negative ticks, but there were differences based on collection method (P < 0.05, collection site (P < 0.05, and sex (P < 0.1 suggesting that environmental factors may structure A. americanum microbiomes. Interestingly, there was not always agreement between Illumina sequencing and PCR diagnostics: Ehrlichia was identified in 16S rRNA gene libraries from three PCR-negative specimens; conversely, Ehrlichia was not found in libraries of six PCR-positive ticks. Illumina sequencing also helped identify co-infections, for example, one specimen had both Ehrlichia and Anaplasma. Other taxa of interest in these specimens included Coxiella, Borrelia, and Rickettsia. Identification of bacterial community differences between specimens of a single tick species from a single geographical site indicates that

  15. Prevalence ofAmblyomma gervaisiticks on captive snakes in Tamil Nadu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catherine, B R; Jayathangaraj, M G; Soundararajan, C; Bala Guru, C; Yogaraj, D

    2017-12-01

    Ticks are the important ectoparasites that occur on snakes and transmit rickettsiosis, anaplasmosis and ehrlichiosis. A total of 62 snakes (Reticulated python, Indian Rock Python, Rat snakes and Spectacled cobra) were examined for tick infestation at Chennai Snake Park Trust (Guindy), Arignar Anna Zoological Park (Vandalur) and Rescue centre (Velachery) in Tamil Nadu from September, 2015 to June, 2016. Ticks from infested snakes were collected and were identified as Amblyomma gervaisi (previously known as Aponomma gervaisi ). Overall occurrence of tick infestation on snakes was 66.13%. Highest prevalence of tick infestation was observed more on Reticulated Python ( Python reticulatus , 90.91%) followed by Indian Rock Python ( Python molurus , 88.89%), Spectacled cobra ( Naja naja, 33.33%) and Rat snake ( Ptyas mucosa, 21.05%). Highest prevalence of ticks were observed on snakes reared at Chennai Snake Park Trust, Guindy (83.33%), followed by Arignar Anna Zoological Park, Vandalur (60.00%) and low level prevalence of 37.50% on snakes at Rescue centre, Velachery. Among the system of management, the prevalence of ticks were more on captive snakes (70.37%) than the free ranging snakes (37.5%). The presences of ticks were more on the first quarter when compared to other three quarters and were highly significant ( P  ≤ 0.01).

  16. A snapshot of the microbiome of Amblyomma tuberculatum ticks infesting the gopher tortoise, an endangered species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budachetri, Khemraj; Gaillard, Daniel; Williams, Jaclyn; Mukherjee, Nabanita; Karim, Shahid

    2016-10-01

    The gopher tortoise tick, Amblyomma tuberculatum, has a unique relationship with the gopher tortoise, Gopherus polyphemus, found in sandy habitats across the southeastern United States. We aimed to understand the overall bacterial community associated with A. tuberculatum while also focusing on spotted fever group Rickettsia. These tortoises in the Southern Mississippi region are a federally threatened species; therefore, we have carefully trapped the tortoises and removed the species-specific ticks attached to them. Genomic DNA was extracted from individual ticks and used to explore overall bacterial load using pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA on 454-sequencing platform. The spotted fever group of Rickettsia was explored by amplifying rickettsial outer membrane protein A (rompA) gene by nested PCR. Sequencing results revealed 330 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) after all the necessary curation of sequences. Four whole A. tuberculatum ticks showed Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes as the most dominant phyla with a total of 74 different bacterial genera detected. Together Rickettsiae and Francisella showed >85% abundance, thus dominating the bacterial community structure. Partial sequences obtained from ompA amplicons revealed the presence of an uncharacterized Rickettsia similar to the Rickettsial endosymbiont of A. tuberculatum. This is the first preliminary profile of a complete bacterial community from gopher tortoise ticks and warrants further investigation regarding the functional role of Rickettsial and Francisella-like endosymbionts in tick physiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. A deep insight into the sialotranscriptome of the gulf coast tick, Amblyomma maculatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Karim

    Full Text Available Saliva of blood sucking arthropods contains compounds that antagonize their hosts' hemostasis, which include platelet aggregation, vasoconstriction and blood clotting; saliva of these organisms also has anti-inflammatory and immunomodullatory properties. Perhaps because hosts mount an active immune response against these compounds, the diversity of these compounds is large even among related blood sucking species. Because of these properties, saliva helps blood feeding as well as help the establishment of pathogens that can be transmitted during blood feeding.We have obtained 1,626,969 reads by pyrosequencing a salivary gland cDNA library from adult females Amblyomma maculatum ticks at different times of feeding. Assembly of this data produced 72,441 sequences larger than 149 nucleotides from which 15,914 coding sequences were extracted. Of these, 5,353 had >75% coverage to their best match in the non-redundant database from the National Center for Biotechnology information, allowing for the deposition of 4,850 sequences to GenBank. The annotated data sets are available as hyperlinked spreadsheets. Putative secreted proteins were classified in 133 families, most of which have no known function.This data set of proteins constitutes a mining platform for novel pharmacologically active proteins and for uncovering vaccine targets against A. maculatum and the diseases they carry.

  18. A conceptual model of the Amblyomma americanum life cycle in northeast Missouri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzek, D C; Foré, S A; Bevell, J G; Kim, H-J

    2013-06-01

    The geographic distribution of Amblyomma americanum (the lone star tick) has increased as has its role as a pathogen vector. The objectives of this study were to determine seasonal activity patterns of each life stage of A. americanum in the northwestern part of the species range and the relationship of these activity patterns among life stages and degree days. Tick activity was monitored over four years since 2007 in a forest and old field habitat located in northeast Missouri. Every other week from February to December, ticks were collected using bait and drag methods. Autocorrelations demonstrated yearly seasonal patterns in each life stage and cross-correlations between life stages depicted a relationship between activity at a life stage and the previous stage's activity. Cross-correlations indicated that degree days were related to activity. These data indicated that A. americanum generally complete their life cycle in a minimum of two years in northeast Missouri, with overwintering occurring predominantly in the nymphal and adult stages. These data provide a baseline to compare the life cycle of A. americanum in northeast Missouri to populations in different parts of the species range or at different times in the region. © 2013 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  19. Characterization of the bacterial communities of life stages of free living lone star ticks (Amblyomma americanum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Newkirk, Amanda Jo; Rowe, Lori A; Mixson-Hayden, Tonya R; Dasch, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    The lone star tick (Amblyomma americanum) is an abundant and aggressive biter of humans, domestic animals, and wildlife in the southeastern-central USA and an important vector of several known and suspected zoonotic bacterial pathogens. However, the biological drivers of bacterial community variation in this tick are still poorly defined. Knowing the community context in which tick-borne bacterial pathogens exist and evolve is required to fully understand the ecology and immunobiology of the ticks and to design effective public health and veterinary interventions. We performed a metagenomic survey of the bacterial communities of questing A. americanum and tested 131 individuals (66 nymphs, 24 males, and 41 females) from five sites in three states. Pyrosequencing was performed with barcoded eubacterial primers targeting variable 16S rRNA gene regions 5-3. The bacterial communities were dominated by Rickettsia (likely R. amblyommii) and an obligate Coxiella symbiont, together accounting for 6.7-100% of sequences per tick. DNAs from Midichloria, Borrelia, Wolbachia, Ehrlichia, Pseudomonas, or unidentified Bacillales, Enterobacteriaceae, or Rhizobiales groups were also detected frequently. Wolbachia and Midichloria significantly co-occurred in Georgia (plife cycle and that some sex-specific attributes may be detectable in nymphs.

  20. Human otoacariasis caused by Amblyomma testudinarium: Diagnosis and management: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Yoshio; Tanigawa, Tohru; Shibata, Rei

    2017-06-01

    Tick infestation of the external auditory canal (EAC) constitutes <1% of all patients presenting with ear complaints. Consequently, parameters for the diagnosis and management of ticks in the EAC have not been established. We report 2 cases of EAC infestation by Amblyomma testudinarium in 2 female patients, aged 12- and 72 years old. In both patients, otoscopic examination revealed engorged ticks attached to the ear canal. The 12-year-old girl had a narrow EAC, necessitating slight dislodging of the tick to determine if its mouth parts were embedded in the EAC skin. The tick's mouth parts were confirmed to be free, enabling complete removal of the tick. The 72-year-old woman had a wide EAC, enabling tick removal using Hartman's forceps because the tick's mouth parts were confirmed to be free of the skin. Prophylactic tetracycline (200 mg/day) was administered to each patient for 7 days; neither showed any signs of fever or rash. This report describes 2 patients with A testudinarium infestation of the EAC, and proposes a simple, noninvasive protocol for determining if the tick is anchored to the ear canal.

  1. The Epidemiology and Geographic Distribution of Relapsing Fever Borreliosis in West and North Africa, with a Review of the Ornithodoros erraticus Complex (Acari: Ixodida)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trape, Jean-François; Diatta, Georges; Arnathau, Céline; Bitam, Idir; Sarih, M’hammed; Belghyti, Driss; Bouattour, Ali; Elguero, Eric; Vial, Laurence; Mané, Youssouph; Baldé, Cellou; Pugnolle, Franck; Chauvancy, Gilles; Mahé, Gil; Granjon, Laurent; Duplantier, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Background Relapsing fever is the most frequent bacterial disease in Africa. Four main vector / pathogen complexes are classically recognized, with the louse Pediculus humanus acting as vector for B. recurrentis and the soft ticks Ornithodoros sonrai, O. erraticus and O. moubata acting as vectors for Borrelia crocidurae, B. hispanica and B. duttonii, respectively. Our aim was to investigate the epidemiology of the disease in West, North and Central Africa. Methods And Findings From 2002 to 2012, we conducted field surveys in 17 African countries and in Spain. We investigated the occurrence of Ornithodoros ticks in rodent burrows in 282 study sites. We collected 1,629 small mammals that may act as reservoir for Borrelia infections. Using molecular methods we studied genetic diversity among Ornithodoros ticks and Borrelia infections in ticks and small mammals. Of 9,870 burrows investigated, 1,196 (12.1%) were inhabited by Ornithodoros ticks. In West Africa, the southern and eastern limits of the vectors and Borrelia infections in ticks and small mammals were 13°N and 01°E, respectively. Molecular studies revealed the occurrence of nine different Ornithodoros species, including five species new for science, with six of them harboring Borrelia infections. Only B. crocidurae was found in West Africa and three Borrelia species were identified in North Africa: B. crocidurae, B. hispanica, and B. merionesi. Conclusions Borrelia Spirochetes responsible for relapsing fever in humans are highly prevalent both in Ornithodoros ticks and small mammals in North and West Africa but Ornithodoros ticks seem absent south of 13°N and small mammals are not infected in these regions. The number of Ornithodoros species acting as vector of relapsing fever is much higher than previously known. PMID:24223812

  2. Seasonal and diel activity of Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae) subpopulations in Denmark. Aspects of size, physiological age, and malate dehydrogenase genotype in a forest site without any undergrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, P M; Kaufmann, U

    2003-01-01

    The underlying population dynamics and the behavioural patterns of the vectors are key issues in understanding the transmission of vector borne pathogens. For the tick Ixodes ricinus both seasonal and diel activity have been described as bimodal patterns, which in seasonal aspect has been interpreted as representing two cohorts. However, recent studies have shown that this interpretation may be incorrect. The aim of this study was to obtain more detailed information on nymph host seeking by studying subpopulations of ticks during the day and season. The study was designed to allow for comparisons of the diel variation and seasonal variation in their dependency in a number of tick characteristics. The study took place in a forest with planted beech trees without any undergrowth. Ticks were collected by flagging the dead leaves on the forest floor. For each nymph, a number of visual observations were made. The size and physiological age was observed and the nymphs were genotyped in the malate dehydrogenase locus (MDH, E.C. 1.1.1.37). Briefly the main results can be given as: (i) There were significant differences in the composition of size classes during the season, but only limited trends in time. (ii) The proportion of the small nymphs was highly variable, with a variation from 3% to 24% in October and September, respectively. (iii) The diel variation in MDH genotypes was significant in May and August. (iv) Nymph size classes and physiological age appeared to interact. The non-random interaction was caused by a relatively even distribution of small nymphs in all four age classes, while large nymphs tended to fall into age class 2 and 3. The length by age interaction for the individual months was noted to be significant in May, July, August and September, but not in June. Similarly the interaction was significant in the morning and afternoon, but not at midday. The overall results describe the seasonal and diel activity patterns as changing systematically for several characteristics under the influence of weather condition and population dynamics. The observations are best interpreted as being produced of a single cohort of ticks, but the revealed complexity of the host seeking activity suggest that measures of activity x abundance should be interpreted very cautiously in relation to population dynamics.

  3. Facilitative ecological interactions between invasive species: Arundo donax (Poaceae) stands as favorable habitat for cattle ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) along the U.S.-Mexico border

    Science.gov (United States)

    The southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Canestrini), is a key vector of protozoa that causes bovine babesiosis. Largely eradicated from most of the U.S., the cattle tick continues to infest the Cattle Fever Tick Quarantine Zone in south Texas. Management areas of the souther...

  4. Morphological and molecular identification of the brown dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus and the camel tick Hyalomma dromedarii (Acari: Ixodidae vectors of Rickettsioses in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hend H. A. M. Abdullah

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Rickettsioses have an epidemiological importance that includes pathogens, vectors, and hosts. The dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus and the camel tick Hyalomma dromedarii play important roles as vectors and reservoirs of Rickettsiae. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Rickettsiae in ixodid ticks species infesting dogs and camels in Egypt, in addition to, the morphological and molecular identification of R. sanguineus and H. dromedarii. Materials and Methods: A total of 601 and 104 of ticks’ specimens were collected from dogs and camels, respectively, in Cairo, Giza and Sinai provinces. Hemolymph staining technique and OmpA and gltA genes amplification were performed to estimate the prevalence rate of Rickettsiae in ticks. For morphological identification of tick species, light microscope (LM and scanning electron microscope (SEM were used. In addition to the phylogenetic analyses of 18S rDNA, Second internal transcript spacer, 12S rDNA, cytochrome c oxidase subunit-1, and 16S rDNA were performed for molecular identification of two tick species. Results: The prevalence rate of Rickettsiae in ticks was 11.6% using hemolymph staining technique and 6.17% by OmpA and gltA genes amplification. Morphological identification revealed that 100% of dogs were infested by R. sanguineus while 91.9% of camels had been infested by H. dromedarii. The phylogenetic analyses of five DNA markers confirmed morphological identification by LM and SEM. The two tick species sequences analyses proved 96-100% sequences identities when compared with the reference data in Genbank records. Conclusion: The present studies confirm the suitability of mitochondrial DNA markers for reliable identification of ticks at both intra- and inter-species level over the nuclear ones. In addition to, the detection of Rickettsiae in both ticks’ species and establishment of the phylogenetic status of R. sanguineus and H. dromedarii would be useful in understanding the epidemiology of ticks and tick borne rickettsioses in Egypt.

  5. Temporal and spatial distribution of Ixodes pacificus and Dermacentor occidentalis (Acari: Ixodidae) and prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi in Contra Costa County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, V L; Beesley, C

    1993-05-01

    The seasonal activity and spatial distribution of adult and immature Ixodes pacificus Cooley & Kohls and Dermacentor occidentalis Marx were determined along trails and on hillsides in two parks in Contra Costa County, CA. I. pacificus and D. occidentalis adults were most numerous in January and May, respectively. Adult ticks were significantly more abundant along heavily vegetated trails than on open grassy hillsides, and on the uphill versus the downhill side of trails. Five species of rodents were captured, and numbers of I. pacificus and D. occidentalis larvae per rodent were highest in May-June and July, respectively. Few nymphs were recovered either by flagging or from captured rodents. An average of 2.2 and 2.8% of the I. pacificus adults collected from the two parks were infected with the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi Johnson, Schmid, Hyde, Steigerwalt & Brenner. The greatest risk of contracting Lyme disease from adult I. pacificus in these two Contra Costa County parks is during the winter months, especially while hiking near the uphill side of trails.

  6. The influence of preprandial insemination on feeding and oviposition of Ixodes persulcatus females (Acari: Ixodidae) and some thoughts concerning mating strategies in ticks of the genus Ixodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioffe-Uspensky, Inna; Uspensky, Igor

    2017-10-01

    Prostriate ticks (subfamily Ixodinae, genus Ixodes) can copulate and the females can be inseminated before attachment to the host. In tests with Ixodes persulcatus females collected in the field and fed without males on the host, it was shown that this preprandial insemination is necessary and sufficient for successful engorgement and oviposition if female feeding took place in up to 1 month after collection. A 2-month period between preprandial insemination and female feeding was followed by a significant decrease in the proportion of normally engorged females and significant increase in egg mortality. If a small number of males were added to feeding females in this case, the number of normally engorged females increased but the egg mortality remained as high. Spermatophore destruction during the 2-month period is assumed to have a negative effect on the viability of eggs produced after additional (perprandial) insemination. Prostriate ticks are believed to be an intermediate group between argasid and metastriate ticks. Transition from nidicolous parasitism in argasid ticks to exophily (pasture parasitism) in metastriate ticks determines the change in mating strategy from off-host to on-host copulation. We review the available data concerning mating strategies in representatives of different subgenera of the genus Ixodes in the context of this evolutionary relationship. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Parasitism of Ixodes (Multidentatus auritulus Neumann (Acari: Ixodidae on birds from the city of Curitiba, state of Paraná, southern Brazil

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    Márcia Arzua

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The tick-bird relationship of 56 specimens of birds (Passeriformes and Columbiformes collected in the city of Curitiba, State of Paraná, between 1990 and 1995, among which 102 specimens of Ixodes (Multidentatus auritulus were found and analyzed. New host records were also produced including the first report of I. auritulus on a Columbiformes bird in Brazil.

  8. Parasitism of Ixodes (Multidentatus) auritulus Neumann (Acari: Ixodidae) on birds from the city of Curitiba, state of Paraná, southern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Arzua,Márcia; Barros-Battesti,Darci Moraes

    1999-01-01

    The tick-bird relationship of 56 specimens of birds (Passeriformes and Columbiformes) collected in the city of Curitiba, State of Paraná, between 1990 and 1995, among which 102 specimens of Ixodes (Multidentatus) auritulus were found and analyzed. New host records were also produced including the first report of I. auritulus on a Columbiformes bird in Brazil.

  9. Responses of lone star tick (acari: ixodidae) nymphs to the repellent deet applied in acetone and ethanol solutions in vitro bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behavioral bioassays remain a standard tool in the discovery, development, and registration of repellents. Although tick repellent bioassays tend to be rather uncomplicated, several factors can influence their outcomes. Typically repellent bioassays use a solvent, such as acetone or ethanol, to disp...

  10. Effect of the salivary gland and midgut extracts from Ixodes ricinus and Dermacentor reticulatus (Acari : Ixodidae) on the growth of Borrelia garinii in vitro

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rudolf, Ivo; Hubálek, Zdeněk

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 2 (2003), s. 159-160 ISSN 0015-5683 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6022001; GA ČR GA206/00/1204; GA ČR GA206/03/0726 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6093917 Keywords : Ixodes ricinus * Dermacentor reticulatus Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.469, year: 2003 http://folia.paru.cas.cz/pdfs/showpdf.php?pdf=20661

  11. The introduction and subsequent extinction of the camel tick Hyalomma (Euhyalomma) dromedarii (Acari, Ixodidae) in Australia, with a review of the introduction of foreign ticks to Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Mackenzie L

    2018-03-01

    Historically, several tick taxonomists have reported Hyalomma aegyptium within Australia due to misidentifications. This has resulted in confusion relating to the occurrence of the genus Hyalomma within Australia. Based on the recent discovery of museum specimens of Hyalomma dromedarii, misidentified as H. aegyptium, the historical occurrence of H. dromedarii is reported for the first time within Australia, along with its apparent subsequent extinction. The introduction and naturalisation of foreign tick species into Australia is also reviewed.

  12. In-vitro efficacy of a botanical acaricide and its active ingredients against larvae of susceptible and acaricide-resistant strains of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus Canestrini (Acari: Ixodidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticks and tick-borne diseases are a major constraint for the sustainable cattle industry in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The developments of resistance to most of the commonly used acaricides lead to an attempt to screen herbal products for their possible acaricidal activity to...

  13. Parasites of domestic and wild animals in South Africa. XLVIII. Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) infesting domestic cats and wild felids in southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, Ivan G; Heyne, Heloise; Donkin, Edward F

    2010-11-24

    Ticks collected from domestic cats (Felis catus), cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus),caracals (Caracal caracal), African wild cats (Felis lybica), black-footed cats (Felis nigripes), a serval (Leptailurus serval), lions(Panthera leo), and leopards (Panthera pardus) were identified and counted. Thirteen species of ixodid ticks and one argasid tick were identified from domestic cats and 17 species of ixodid ticks from wild felids. The domestic cats and wild felids harboured 11 ixodid species in common. The adults of Haemaphysalis elliptica, the most abundant tick species infesting cats and wild felids, were most numerous on a domestic cat in late winter and in mid-summer, during 2 consecutive years. The recorded geographic distribution of the recently described Haemaphysalis colesbergensis, a parasite of cats and caracals, was extended by 2 new locality records in the Northern Cape Province, South Africa.

  14. Chemical composition and acaricide activity of an essential oil from a rare chemotype of Cinnamomum verum Presl on Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Ildenice Nogueira; Monteiro, Odair Dos Santos; Costa-Junior, Lívio Martins; da Silva Lima, Aldilene; Andrade, Eloisa Helena de Aguiar; Maia, José Guilherme Soares; Mouchrek Filho, Victor Elias

    2017-04-30

    The Essential Oils (EOs) from the leaves of species Cinnamomum verum J. Presl are used in the pharmaceutical industry for their numerous biological activities. Currently, the main compound of C. verum EO is eugenol which has acaricidal activity; however, a rare chemotype with benzyl benzoate as the main component can be found. Benzyl benzoate is recognized as an acaricide; however, studies of the C. verum EOs benzyl benzoate chemotype on Rhipicephalus microplus were not reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the acaricide activity of an EO from a rare chemotype of C. verum, as well as purified benzyl benzoate, against larvae and engorged females of R. microplus resistant to amidines and pyrethroids. The EO was extracted from C. verum leaves and the compounds present were identified using a gas phase chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer. Efficacy against R. microplus was assessed by the larval packet and the engorged female immersion tests. A rare chemotype of C. verum was found to produce EOs with benzyl benzoate (65.4%) as the main compound. The C. verum essential oil was 3.3 times more efficient on the R. microplus larvae than was benzyl benzoate. However, no differences were found on the R. microplus engorged females. This is the first report regarding the acaricidal activity of C. verum with chemotype benzyl benzoate, and this compound showed acaricidal activity on R. microplus larvae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Acaricidal effect and chemical composition of essential oils extracted from Cuminum cyminum, Pimenta dioica and Ocimum basilicum against the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Velazquez, Moises; Castillo-Herrera, Gustavo Adolfo; Rosario-Cruz, Rodrigo; Flores-Fernandez, Jose Miguel; Lopez-Ramirez, Julisa; Hernandez-Gutierrez, Rodolfo; Lugo-Cervantes, Eugenia del Carmen

    2011-02-01

    Acaricidal activity of essential oils extracted from cumin seeds (Cuminum cyminum), allspice berries (Pimenta dioica) and basil leaves (Ocimum basilicum) were tested on 10-day-old Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus tick larvae using the LPT. Two-fold dilutions of the three essential oils were tested from a starting dilution of 20% down to 1.25%. Results showed a high toxicological effect for cumin, producing 100% mortality in all tested concentrations on R. microplus larvae. Similarly, allspice essential oil produced 100% mortality at all concentrations with the exception of a dramatic decrease at 1.25% concentration. Conversely, basil essential oil was not shown to be toxic against R. microplus larvae. The most common compounds detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were as follows: cumin: cuminaldehyde (22.03%), γ-terpinene (15.69%) and 2-caren-10-al (12.89%); allspice: methyl eugenol (62.7%) and eugenol (8.3%); basil: linalool (30.61%) and estragole (20.04%). Results clearly indicate that C. cyminum and P. dioica essential oils can be used as an effective alternative for R. microplus tick control, and there is a high probability they can be used for other ticks affecting cattle in Mexico and throughout the world, thereby reducing the necessity for traditional and unfriendly synthetic acaricides.

  16. Characterization of Haemaphysalis flava (Acari: Ixodidae from Qingling subspecies of giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca qinlingensis in Qinling Mountains (Central China by morphology and molecular markers.

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    Wen-yu Cheng

    Full Text Available Tick is one of important ectoparasites capable of causing direct damage to their hosts and also acts as vectors of relevant infectious agents. In the present study, the taxa of 10 ticks, collected from Qinling giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca qinlingensis in Qinling Mountains of China in April 2010, were determined using morphology and molecular markers (nucleotide ITS2 rDNA and mitochondrial 16S. Microscopic observation demonstrated that the morphological features of these ticks were similar to Haemaphysalis flava. Compared with other Haemaphysalis species, genetic variations between Haemaphysalis collected from A. m. qinlingensis and H. flava were the lowest in ITS2 rDNA and mitochondrial 16S, with sequence differences of 2.06%-2.40% and 1.30%-4.70%, respectively. Phylogenetic relationships showed that all the Haemaphysalis collected from A. m. qinlingensis were grouped with H. flava, further confirmed that the Haemaphysalis sp. is H. flava. This is the first report of ticks in giant panda by combining with morphology and molecular markers. This study also provided evidence that combining morphology and molecular tools provide a valuable and efficient tool for tick identification.

  17. Lyme disease risk in southern California: abiotic and environmental drivers of Ixodes pacificus (Acari: Ixodidae) density and infection prevalence with Borrelia burgdorferi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Andrew J; Hyon, David W; Brewington, John B; O'Connor, Kerry E; Swei, Andrea; Briggs, Cheryl J

    2017-01-05

    Tick-borne diseases, particularly Lyme disease, are emerging across the northern hemisphere. In order to manage emerging diseases and predict where emergence will likely occur, it is necessary to understand the factors influencing the distribution, abundance and infection prevalence of vector species. In North America, Lyme disease is the most common vector-borne disease and is transmitted by blacklegged ticks. This study aimed to explore the abiotic and environmental drivers of density and infection prevalence of western blacklegged ticks (Ixodes pacificus) in southern California, an understudied and densely populated region of North America. Over the course of this two-year study, densities of I. pacificus adults were consistently positively associated with host availability for juvenile ticks and dense oak woodland habitat. Densities of nymphal and larval I. pacificus, on the other hand were primarily predicted by host availability for juvenile ticks in the first year of the study, and by habitat characteristics such as dense leaf litter in the second year. Infection with the causative agent of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi (sensu stricto), and related spirochetes was not predicted by the abiotic conditions promoting I. pacificus populations, but rather by diversity of the tick community, and in particular by the presence of two Ixodes tick species that do not generally feed on humans (Ixodes spinipalpis and Ixodes peromysci). Borrelia spp. infection was not detected in the I. pacificus populations sampled, but was detected in other vector species that may maintain enzootic transmission of the pathogen on the landscape. This study identified dense oak woodlands as high-risk habitats for I. pacificus tick encounter in southern California. The shift in relative importance of host availability to habitat characteristics in predicting juvenile tick abundance occurred as California's historic drought intensified, suggesting that habitat providing suitable microclimates for tick survivorship became centrally important to patterns of abundance in the face of deleterious abiotic conditions. These results underscore the need for further investigation of the effects of climate change on tick-borne disease in California. Finally, despite low risk of human Lyme disease infection posed by I. pacificus in southern California, evidence of infection was found in other tick species, suggesting that enzootic transmission of tick-borne borreliae may be occurring in southern California, and involve parallel enzootic cycles with other tick and host species but not necessarily humans.

  18. Transcriptome of the female synganglion of the black-legged tick Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae with comparison between Illumina and 454 systems.

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    Noble Egekwu

    Full Text Available Illumina and 454 pyrosequencing were used to characterize genes from the synganglion of female Ixodes scapularis. GO term searching success for biological processes was similar for samples sequenced by both methods. However, for molecular processes, it was more successful for the Illumina samples than for 454 samples. Functional assignments of transcripts predicting neuropeptides, neuropeptide receptors, neurotransmitter receptors and other genes of interest was done, supported by strong e-values (<-6, and high consensus sequence alignments. Transcripts predicting 15 putative neuropeptide prepropeptides ((allatostatin, allatotropin, bursicon α, corticotropin releasing factor (CRF, CRF-binding protein, eclosion hormone, FMRFamide, glycoprotein A, insulin-like peptide, ion transport peptide, myoinhibitory peptide, inotocin ( =  neurophysin-oxytocin, Neuropeptide F, sulfakinin and SIFamide and transcripts predicting receptors for 14 neuropeptides (allatostatin, calcitonin, cardioacceleratory peptide, corazonin, CRF, eclosion hormone, gonadotropin-releasing hormone/AKH-like, insulin-like peptide, neuropeptide F, proctolin, pyrokinin, SIFamide, sulfakinin and tachykinin are reported. Similar to Dermacentor variabilis, we found transcripts matching pro-protein convertase, essential for converting neuropeptide hormones to their mature form. Additionally, transcripts predicting 6 neurotransmitter/neuromodulator receptors (acetylcholine, GABA, dopamine, glutamate, octopamine and serotonin and 3 neurotransmitter transporters (GABA transporter, noradrenalin-norepinephrine transporter and Na+-neurotransmitter/symporter are described. Further, we found transcripts predicting genes for pheromone odorant receptor, gustatory receptor, novel GPCR messages, ecdysone nuclear receptor, JH esterase binding protein, steroidogenic activating protein, chitin synthase, chitinase, and other genes of interest. Also found were transcripts predicting genes for spermatogenesis-associated protein, major sperm protein, spermidine oxidase and spermidine synthase, genes not normally expressed in the female CNS of other invertebrates. The diversity of messages predicting important genes identified in this study offers a valuable resource useful for understanding how the tick synganglion regulates important physiological functions.

  19. Biological activities of chamomile (Matricaria chamomile) flowers’ extract against the survival and egg laying of the cattle fever tick (Acari Ixodidae)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirali-Kheirabadi, Khodadad; Razzaghi-Abyaneh, Mehdi

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, the potential of acaricidal activity of chamomile flowers’ extract was studied against engorged Rhipicephalus annulatus tick under laboratory condition. For this purpose, the engorged females of Rhipicephalus annulatus were exposed to two-fold serial dilutions of chamomile flowers’ extract (0.5%, 1.0%, 2.0%, 4.0% and 8.0%) using “dipping method” in vitro. The engorged ticks were immersed in different plant dilutions (five ticks for each dilution) for 1 min and they were immediately incubated in separate Petri dishes for each replicate at 26 °C and 80% relative humidity. Mortality rate for each treatment was recorded 5 d after incubation. The mortality rate caused by different dilutions of chamomile flowers’ extract ranged from 6.67% to 26.7%, whereas no mortality was recorded for non-treated control group. The mass of produced eggs varied from 0.23 g (in 8.0% solution) to 0.58 g (in control), with no statistical differences between the treatments and control (P>0.05). Also the chamomile flowers’ extract in highest concentration used (8.0%) caused 46.67% failure in egg laying in engorged females while no failure was observed for non-treated control group. Macroscopic observations indicated that in effective concentrations of plant (4.0% and 8.0%), patchy hemorrhagic swelling appeared on the skin of treated ticks. The results presented for the first time in this study imply that chamomile may be considered as a promising plant for biocontrol of cattle fever tick disease in the field condition. PMID:17726752

  20. Prevention of infectious tick-borne diseases in humans: Comparative studies of the repellency of different dodecanoic acid-formulations against Ixodes ricinus ticks (Acari: Ixodidae

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    Dautel Hans

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ticks of the species Ixodes ricinus are the main vectors of Lyme Borreliosis and Tick-borne Encephalitis – two rapidly emerging diseases in Europe. Repellents provide a practical means of protection against tick bites and can therefore minimize the transmission of tick-borne diseases. We developed and tested seven different dodecanoic acid (DDA-formulations for their efficacy in repelling host-seeking nymphs of I. ricinus by laboratory screening. The ultimately selected formulation was then used for comparative investigations of commercially available tick repellents in humans. Methods Laboratory screening tests were performed using the Moving-object (MO bioassay. All test formulations contained 10% of the naturally occurring active substance DDA and differed only in terms of the quantitative and qualitative composition of inactive ingredients and fragrances. The test procedure used in the human bioassays is a modification of an assay described by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and recommended for regulatory affairs. Repellency was computed using the equation: R = 100 - NR/N × 100, where NR is the number of non-repelled ticks, and N is the respective number of control ticks. All investigations were conducted in a controlled laboratory environment offering standardized test conditions. Results All test formulations strongly repelled nymphs of I. ricinus (100-81% protection as shown by the MO-bioassay. The majority of ticks dropped off the treated surface of the heated rotating drum that served as the attractant (1 mg/cm2 repellent applied. The 10% DDA-based formulation, that produced the best results in laboratory screening, was as effective as the coconut oil-based reference product. The mean protection time of both preparations was generally similar and averaged 8 hours. Repellency investigations in humans showed that the most effective 10% DDA-based formulation (~1.67 mg/cm2 applied strongly avoided the attachment of I. ricinus nymphs and adults for at least 6 hours. The test repellent always provided protection (83-63% against I. ricinus nymphs equivalent to the natural coconut oil based reference product and a better protection (88-75% against adult ticks than the synthetic Icaridin-containing reference repellent. Conclusion We found that the 10% DDA-based formulation (ContraZeck® is an easily applied and very effective natural repellent against I. ricinus ticks. By reducing the human-vector contact the product minimises the risk of transmission of tick-borne diseases in humans.

  1. [Haemaphysalis juxtakochi Cooley, 1946 (Acari: Ixodidae) parasitizing Mazama nana (Hensel, 1872) (Artiodactyla: Cervidae) in the State of Rio Grande do Sul].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, João Ricardo; Salomão, Edson Luís; Doyle, Rovaina L; Onofrio, Valéria; Barros-Battesti, Darci M; Guglielmone, Alberto A

    2007-01-01

    The record of Haemaphysalis juxtakochi Cooley, an ixodid tick, on the brocket deer, Mazama nana (Hensel), represents a new report after 34 years of its last report in the State of Rio Grande do Sul. The tick specimens (three males and one female) were found in Cachoeira do Sul, RS (30 degrees 02'21''S, 52 degrees 53'38''W). This place is elevated 72 m sea above, with an annual average temperature of 18.8 degrees C, and annual average rainfall of 1.438 mm. This is the first record of this tick species in a Cervidae and it is the second occurrence report for the State of Rio Grande do Sul.

  2. Description of the immature stages and redescription of the female of Ixodes schulzei Aragão & Fonseca, 1951 (Acari: Ixodidae), an endemic tick species of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros-Battesti, Darci M; Onofrio, Valeria C; Faccini, João L H; Labruna, Marcelo B; Arruda-Santos, Ana D; Giacomin, Flávia G

    2007-11-01

    Ixodes schulzei Aragão & Fonseca, 1951 is a tick endemic to Brazil, where nine species of Ixodes Latreille, 1796 are currently known to occur. Larvae, nymphs and females of I. schulzei were obtained from a laboratory colony originating from an engorged female collected on a free-living water rat Nectomys squamipes from the Santa Branca municipality, São Paulo State. Only female ticks were obtained from engorged nymphs. Unfed immature and female adult specimens were measured and the descriptions were based on optical and scanning electron microscopy, as were drawings of some features of the larva. Both immature stages present the very long palpi and basis capituli, and the female has large, contiguous porose areas. However, the basis capituli is triangular, with a slight central elevation in the larva and nymph, whereas in the female this area is depressed. The I. schulzei types deposited at the FIOCRUZ (Instituto Oswaldo Cruz) were also examined, as was other material from collections, such as the IBSP (Coleção Acarológica do Instituto Butantan), CNC-FMVZ/USP (Coleção Nacional de Carrapatos da Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia da USP) and USNTC (United States National Tick Collection). In addition, the relationship between I. schulzei and other immature neotropical species of Ixodes is discussed.

  3. Repellency to ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) of extracts of nigella sativa L.(Ranunculaceae) and the anti-inflammatory DogsBestFriend™

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motivated by observations that the canine anti-inflammatory cream DogsBestFriend™ (DBF) appeared to deter flies, mosquitoes, and ticks from treated animals, repellent efficacy bioassays using four species of ticks were conducted with three extracts of Nigella sativa L. (Ranunculaceae), a constituent...

  4. Detection of protozoans Babesia microti and Toxoplasma gondii and their co-existence in ticks (Acari: Ixodida collected in Tarnogórski district (Upper Silesia, Poland

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    Marek Asman

    2015-02-01

    The study showed a high risk of exposure to Bm and Tg in the studied area. Ticks Ir play an important role in the transmission of Bm in this region. Demonstrating a high percentage of ticks collected from animals infected with Tg may indicate their important role in the transmission of this pathogen, but it requires a further studies.

  5. Effect of Metarhizium anisopliae (Ascomycete), Cypermethrin, and D-Limonene, Alone and Combined, on Larval Mortality of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado-Rebolledo, Omar Francisco; Molina-Ochoa, Jaime; Lezama-Gutiérrez, Roberto; García-Márquez, Luis Jorge; Minchaca-Llerenas, Yureida B; Morales-Barrera, Eduardo; Tellez, Guillermo; Hargis, Billy; Skoda, Steven R; Foster, John E

    2017-09-01

    The effect of the fungus Metarhizium anisopliae Ma14 strain, D-limonene, and cypermethrin, alone and combined, on the mortality of Rhipicephalus sanguineus Latreille larvae was evaluated. Eight separate groups with 25 tick larvae were inoculated with the fungus, cypermethrin, and D-limonene, and four groups were used as untreated controls. The groups were inoculated with serial dilutions of each treatment material: for example, conidial concentrations were 1 × 101, 1 × 102, 1 × 103, 1 × 104, 1 × 105, 1 × 106, 1 × 107, and 1 × 108. A complete randomized experimental design was used. Significant differences were obtained between fungal concentrations, with larval mortalities ranging from 29 to 100%; the D-limonene concentrations showed significant differences, with mortalities that ranged from 47.9 to 82.6%, and cypermethrin mortalities ranged from 69.9 to 89.9% when each was applied alone. In the combined application, the serial dilution of the Ma14 fungus plus cypermethrin at 0.1% concentration caused mortalities ranging from 92.9 to 100%; the mix of serially diluted Ma14 plus D-limonene at 0.1% caused mortalities from 10.3 to 100%; and the mix consisting of serially diluted D-limonene plus cypermethrin at 0.1% caused mortalities from 7.4 to 35.9%. Further laboratory and field research could show that these materials, alone and in combinations, are useful in future tick management and control programs. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. The first assessment of the stress inducible defense of Leucaena leucocephala with acaricidal potential effect against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae

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    Lêdia Feitosa Wanderley

    Full Text Available Abstract Plants respond to wounding caused by mechanical stress or herbivory by synthesizing defense proteins. There are no studies reporting the action of induced plant proteins against ticks. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of mechanically wounded Leucaena leucocephala leaves against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus. Initially, we carried out time course experiments to evaluate the impact of mechanical wounding on the protein content and the peroxidase, catalase and protease inhibitor activities in L. leucocephala. We then evaluated the acaricidal activity on R. (B. microplus from protein extract collected from L. leucocephala after mechanical wounding. L. leucocephala leaves were artificially wounded, and after 6, 12, 24 and 48h, the leaves were collected for protein extraction. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of the proteins were performed. The protein content and peroxidase and protease activities increased 12h after wounding, and the acaricidal activity of this protein extract was evaluated using engorged R. (B. microplus females. The protein extract obtained after wounding reduced egg production (8.5% compared to those without wounding. Furthermore, the extract reduced egg hatching by 47.7% and showed an overall efficacy of 56.3% at 0.1 mgP/mL of the protein. We demonstrated that L. leucocephala defensive proteins could be effective against R. (B. microplus.

  7. Differences in the acquired resistance of dogs, hamsters, and guinea pigs to repeated infestations with adult ticks Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Acari: Ixodidae

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    Matias Pablo Juan Szabó

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available Tick-bite naive experimental groups of dogs, hamsters and guinea pigs were infested three times with adult ticks Rhipicephalus sanguineus and the acquired resistance, based on the variation of some biological parameters of the female tick was compared. The results showed that hamsters and mainly guinea pigs develop a very efficient immunity to this tick species as demonstrated by a very significant drop in the efficiency rate of female ticks in converting their food reservoir to eggs and larvae from the first to the second and third infestations. At the same time, dogs were unable to display such a resistance. Female tick performance was similar throughout the infestations in this host; there was even a tendency of improvement of the performance with the succession of infestations. These results underline the need of comparative studies on the acquired resistance to ticks involving natural and unnatural hosts as a way of putting in evidence defence mechanisms which might be altered or hidden in natural host - parasite relationships.

  8. Identification of non-host semiochemicals for the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Acari: Ixodidae), from tick-resistant beagles, Canis lupus familiaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Lígia Miranda Ferreira; de Oliveira Filho, Jaires Gomes; Ferreira, Lorena Lopes; Louly, Carla Cristina Braz; Pickett, John A; Birkett, Michael A

    2015-07-01

    Studies have shown that the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato, when fed on the beagle breed of dog, Canis lupus familiaris, development negatively affected in comparison with tick development after feeding on the English cocker spaniel breed. Thus leading to the suggestion that beagle dogs are be tick-resistant dogs. Behavioural studies have demonstrated that more ticks are attracted by extracts from cocker spaniels than from beagles and that the odour of beagles is a repellent. To test the hypothesis that resistant hosts produce repellent compounds, we undertook comparative chemical analysis on beagle odour and cocker spaniel extracts using coupled high-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and also used Petri-dish and olfactometer behavioural assays to assess the response of ticks to identified non-host compounds. The beagle odour extracts contained almost three times as many chemical compounds as cocker spaniel samples. Several non-host compounds were identified, i.e. 2-hexanone, benzaldehyde, nonane, decane and undecane. In Petri-dish assays, 2-hexanone was repellent at 30 min at concentrations of 0.200 and 0.050 mg cm(-2), whilst at 10 min, the 0.100 mg cm(-2) concentration was repellent. Benzaldehyde repelled ticks at 30 min (0.200 mg cm(-2)) and at 5 min (0.050 mg cm(-2)). Undecane was repellent for R. sanguineus s.l. ticks for the first 5 min at the highest concentration tested. Nonane and decane did not show any significant repellency at any concentration or time evaluated. When 2-hexanone and benzaldehyde were combined, an increase in the repellency rate was observed, with activity comparable or better than N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET). In olfactometer bioassays, a 1:1 mixture of 2-hexanone:benzaldehyde and DEET were repellent for R. sanguineus s.l. adults at the concentration of 0.200 mg cm(-2). This study identified non-host semiochemicals that mediate avoidance of the beagle dog breed by R. sanguineus s.l. This finding may enable development of new approaches to control this tick. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Potential of Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) as a bioassay probe for Metarhizium brunneum (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) activity against Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, Anuja; Stafford, Kirby C

    2011-12-01

    The yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor L., has been used to indicate qualitatively the presence of entomopathogenic fungi in the soil or as a model for evaluating stress and other factors on fungal activity. Although this beetle appears highly susceptible to many of these fungi, little quantitative information is available on the sensitivity of T. molitor to a specific fungus and, therefore, fungal presence or as an indicator for pathogenicity to other species. The purpose of this study was to establish the suitability of T. molitor larvae as a bioassay probe for Metarhizium brunneum for comparison against the blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis. Nine concentrations of M. brunneum strain F52 ranging from 1.0 x 10(1) to 8.4 x 10(8) conidial/ml were simultaneously tested against T. molitor larvae and I. scapularis adults. Larvae of yellow mealworm were less sensitive to M. brunneum than I. scapularis adults (LC50's 4.4 x 10(7) and 1.7 x 10(5) conidia/ml, respectively, 4-wk post-treatment). The greater sensitivity of I. scapularis to the fungus suggests that the detection of fungal mycosis in mealworms would indicate sufficient inoculum to be pathogenic to I. scapularis and make this insect a suitable probe for evaluation of the presence and activity of M. brunneum against the blacklegged tick in field applications.

  10. SCREENING OF THE ACARICIDAL EFFICACY OF PHYTOCHEMICAL EXTRACTS ON THE CATTLE TICK Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus (Acari: ixodidae BY LARVAL IMMERSION TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Alberto Rosado-Aguilar

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to determine the acaricidal efficacy of selected native plants from Yucatán, Mexico on acaricide resistant larvae of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus. Methanolic extracts from roots, leaves, stems, and stem barks of 15 plants were tested using the modified larval immersion test. A final concentration of 10% (100 mg/ml of plant crude-extract was used. The percentage mortality from different plants and extracts were: Petiveria alliacea  leaves (95.7±2.9 % and stems (99.2±0.5 %; Diospyros anisandra leaves (87.9±8.6 % and stem bark (98.8±1.0 %; Havardia albicans leaves (93.0±12.0 %, Caesalpinia gaumeri (90.1±4.8 % and Capraria biflora (86.6±9.9 %, stems of Solanum tridinamum (98.0±1.7 % and Solanum erianthum (97.8±1.8 %, stem bark of Bursera simaruba (99.1±0.7 % and Cassearia corymbosa (99.5±0.5 %; and the root of Ocimum micrantun (87.0±3.2 %. We concluded that plants from Yucatan, Mexico showed a high acaricidal efficacy that could be used to control R. (B. microplus acaricide resistant larvae. P. alliacea, Havardia albicans and Caesalpinia gaumeri were of the most encouraging plants to be used as an acaricide. Further studies are needed to evaluate these plants on adult ticks (in vivo conditions and to identify the active compound(s on R. (B. microplus.

  11. First transcriptome of the testis-vas deferens-male accessory gland and proteome of the spermatophore from Dermacentor variabilis (Acari: Ixodidae.

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    Daniel E Sonenshine

    Full Text Available Ticks are important vectors of numerous human diseases and animal diseases. Feeding stimulates spermatogenesis, mating and insemination of male factors that trigger female reproduction. The physiology of male reproduction and its regulation of female development are essentially a black box. Several transcriptomes have catalogued expression of tick genes in the salivary glands, synganglion and midgut but no comprehensive investigation has addressed male reproduction and mating. Consequently, a new global approach using transcriptomics, proteomics, and quantitative gene expression is needed to understand male reproduction and stimulation of female reproduction.This first transcriptome to the reproductive biology of fed male ticks, Dermacentor variabilis, was obtained by 454 pyrosequencing (563,093 reads, 12,804 contigs. Gene Ontology (Biological Processes level III recognized 3,866 transcripts in 73 different categories; spermiogenesis; spermatogenesis; peptidases, lipases and hydrolases; oxidative and environmental stress; immune defense; and protein binding. Reproduction-associated genes included serine/threonine kinase, metalloendoproteinases, ferritins, serine proteases, trypsin, cysteine proteases, serpins, a cystatin, GPCR and others. qRT-PCR showed significant upregulation from unfed versus fed adult male reproductive organs of zinc metalloprotease, astacin metalloprotease and serine protease, enzymes important in spermiogenesis and mating activity in insects, as well as a GPCR with the greatest similarity to a SIFamide receptor known to be important in regulating courtship behavior in Drosophila. Proteomics on these organs and the spermatophore by tryptic digestion/Liquid chromatography/Mass spectrometry/Mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS demonstrated expression of many of the same messages found by 454 sequencing, supporting their identification, and revealed differences in protein distribution in the reproductive system versus the spermatophore. We found Efα but no EF β in the transcriptome and neither of these proteins in the spermatophore. Thus, the previously described model for male regulation of female reproduction may not apply to other ticks. A new paradigm is needed to explain male stimulation of female tick reproduction.

  12. Parasites of domestic and wild animals in South Africa. XLIX. Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) infesting white and black rhinoceroses in southern Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan G. Horak; Christiaan R. Boshoff; David V. Cooper; Christoper M. Foggin; Danny Govender; Alan Harrison; Guy Hausler; Markus Hofmeyr; J. Werner Kilian; Duncan N. MacFadyen; Pierre J. Nel; Dean Peinke; David Squarre; David Zimmermann

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to determine the species composition of ticks infesting white and black rhinoceroses in southern Africa as well as the conservation status of those tick species that prefer rhinos as hosts. Ticks were collected opportunistically from rhinos that had been immobilised for management purposes, and 447 white rhinoceroses (Ceratotherium simum) and 164 black rhinoceroses (Diceros bicornis) were sampled in South Africa, 61 black rhinos in Namibia, 18 white and 12 bla...

  13. Abundance and seasonal activity of Haemaphysalis concinna (Acari: Ixodidae) at the border between China and Russia in Northern Inner Mongolia, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Hao; Xu, Shiqi; Yu, Zhijun; Li, Ningxin; Wang, Rongrong; Gao, Xiaohe; Yang, Xiaolong; Liu, Jingze

    2016-01-04

    Haemaphysalis concinna, a three-host tick vector of several pathogens, poses a high risk to the health of humans and livestock. However, knowledge of the seasonal activities, relative density and other ecological characteristics of this tick is quite limited and fragmentary. This knowledge gap represents a bottleneck in our understanding of the health risks associated with tick-borne pathogens. We conducted a two-year study from April 2012 to March 2014 in Northern Inner Mongolia situated on the China-Russia border, China, to investigate the seasonal activities and relative density of the three developmental stages of H. concinna. During the study period, feeding ticks were removed weekly from domestic sheep and their attachment sites were recorded. Questing ticks were collected weekly from five habitats (broadleaf forest, coniferous forest, shrubs, grassland and mixed coniferous forest) using the flagging-dragging method of capture. Rodents were captured and examined on two consecutive nights each week from June to September in 2012. H. concinna ticks were found mainly in shrubs and grasslands habitats. Adults were encountered from February to October with the major peak occurring in June. Larvae, which were observed mainly from late April to late September, reached peak numbers in late July. Nymphs were observed mainly from March to October, and their numbers peaked in early July. H. concinna adults and nymphs were found attached to sheep and their most favored sites of attachment were the face and ears. H. concinna larvae were found on two rodent species, Apodemus peninsulae and Eutamias sibiricus. The relative density and seasonal activities of H. concinna have been systematically reported for Northern Inner Mongolia, China. The information about the hosts infested by H. concinna and its preferred attachment sites on sheep will help efforts to control this tick and the tick-borne diseases carried by it.

  14. In Vitro Evaluation of Essential Oils Derived from Piper nigrum (Piperaceae) and Citrus limonum (Rutaceae) against the Tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Jeane; Rocha, Leandro; Castro, Helena C.

    2017-01-01

    The present research aimed to study the chemical composition and acaricidal activity of Citrus limonum and Piper nigrum essential oils against the cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus. GC-MS analysis of C. limonum essential oil showed limonene (50.3%), β-pinene (14.4%), and γ-terpinene (11.7%) as the major components; P. nigrum oil was mainly composed of β-caryophyllene (26.2%), σ-ocymene (5.8%), and α-pinene (5.5%). Acaricide activity was evaluated at concentrations of 2.5, 5.0, and 10.0% (v/v) of each plant oil, as well as 1 : 1 combination of both oils (5% : 5%, 2.5% : 2.5%, and 1.25% : 1.25% each), by immersing engorged R. microplus females for one minute. The LC90 of oils from C. limonum, P. nigrum, and the combination were 4.9%, 14.8%, and 5.1%, respectively. C. limonum essential oil caused 100% mortality of engorged females at the highest concentration (10%). P. nigrum essential oil inhibited egg-laying by up to 96% in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting it reduces tick fecundity. When combined, the oils presented toxicity as to C. limonum oil alone, but with stronger inhibition of oviposition (5% : 5%), indicating a possible additive effect against R. microplus. The present data provide support for further investigation of novel natural products to control bovine tick infestations. PMID:29123924

  15. Acaricidal effect of essential oils from Lippia graveolens (Lamiales: Verbenaceae), Rosmarinus officinalis (Lamiales: Lamiaceae), and Allium sativum (Liliales: Liliaceae) against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Velazquez, M; Rosario-Cruz, R; Castillo-Herrera, G; Flores-Fernandez, J M; Alvarez, A H; Lugo-Cervantes, E

    2011-07-01

    Acaricidal effects of three essential oils extracted from Mexican oregano leaves (Lippia graveolens Kunth), rosemary leaves (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), and garlic bulbs (Allium sativum L.) on 10-d-old Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Canestrini) tick larvae were evaluated by using the larval packet test bioassay. Serial dilutions of the three essential oils were tested from a starting concentration of 20 to 1.25%. Results showed that both Mexican oregano and garlic essential oils had very similar activity, producing high mortality (90-100%) in all tested concentrations on 10-d-old R. microplus tick larvae. Rosemary essential oil produced >85% larval mortality at the higher concentrations (10 and 20%), but the effect decreased noticeably to 40% at an oil concentration of 5%, and mortality was absent at 2.5 and 1.25% of the essential oil concentration. Chemical composition of the essential oils was elucidated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. Mexican oregano essential oil included thymol (24.59%), carvacrol (24.54%), p-cymene (13.6%), and y-terpinene (7.43%) as its main compounds, whereas rosemary essential oil was rich in a-pinene (31.07%), verbenone (15.26%), and 1,8-cineol (14.2%), and garlic essential oil was rich in diallyl trisulfide (33.57%), diallyl disulfide (30.93%), and methyl allyl trisulfide (11.28%). These results suggest that Mexican oregano and garlic essential oils merit further investigation as components of alternative approaches for R. microplus tick control.

  16. Activity studies of sesquiterpene oxides and sulfides from the plant Hyptis suaveolens (Lamiaceae) and its repellency on Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashitani, T; Garboui, S S; Schubert, F; Vongsombath, C; Liblikas, I; Pålsson, K; Borg-Karlson, A-K

    2015-12-01

    Hyptis suaveolens (Lamiaceae), a plant traditionally used as a mosquito repellent, has been investigated for repellent properties against nymphs of the tick Ixodes ricinus. Essential oils and volatile compounds of fresh and dried leaves, from plants originating from Laos and Guinea-Bissau, were identified by GC-MS and tested in a tick repellency bioassay. All the essential oils were strongly repellent against the ticks, even though the main volatile constituents differed in their proportions of potentially tick repellent chemicals. (+)/(-)-sabinene were present in high amounts in all preparations, and dominated the emission from dry and fresh leaves together with 1,8-cineol and α-phellandrene. 1,8-Cineol and sabinene were major compounds in the essential oils from H. suaveolens from Laos. Main compounds in H. suaveolens from Guinea-Bissau were (-)-sabinene, limonene and terpinolene. Among the sesquiterpene hydrocarbons identified, α-humulene exhibited strong tick repellency (96.8 %). Structure activity studies of oxidation or sulfidation products of germacrene D, α-humulene and β-caryophyllene, showed increased tick repellent activity: of mint sulfide (59.4 %), humulene-6,7-oxide (94.5 %) and caryophyllene-6,7-oxide (96.9 %). The substitution of oxygen with sulfur slightly lowered the repellency. The effects of the constituents in the oils can then be regarded as a trade off between the subsequently lower volatility of the sesquiterpene derivatives compared to the monoterpenes and may thus increase their potential usefulness as tick repellents.

  17. Toxicity of extract of Magonia pubescens (Sapindales: Sapindaceae) St. Hil. to control the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille)(Acari: Ixodidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Fernando F.; D'Alessandro, Walmirton B.; Freitas, Edmeia P.S.

    2008-01-01

    The action of crude ethanol extract of the stem bark of the soapberry Magonia pubescens St. Hil. was studied upon larvae of the Brown Dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille). Tick larvae were obtained by maintaining gravid females in an incubator, after collecting them from naturally infested kennels. The tick larvae were placed in envelopes of filter paper impregnated with different concentrations of the extract dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and distilled water. Four tests were repeated with each solution (n ≥ 120). The control was carried out in DMSO and distilled water. The bioassays were performed at 27±1 deg C, RH ≥ 80% and 12:12 light cycle. Mortality was observed after 48h exposure. All motionless larvae were considered to be dead. The extract of M. pubescens showed larvicidal potential against R. sanguineus. The lethal concentrations of 1503 ppm (LC 50 ) and 9991 ppm (LC 99 ) were obtained. There was no mortality in the control group. Based on the results of the current study, M. pubescens should be recognized as an future alternative acaricide for the control of Brown Dog tick. These results reinforce the importance of the preservation of this soapberry in its natural biome. (author)

  18. Paired real-time PCR assays for detection of Borrelia miyamotoi in North American Ixodes scapularis and Ixodes pacificus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Christine B; Pilgard, Mark A; Maes, Sarah E; Hojgaard, Andrias; Eisen, Rebecca J

    2016-10-01

    Borrelia miyamotoi is an emerging, tick-borne human pathogen. In North America, it is primarily associated with Ixodes scapularis and Ixodes pacificus, two species known to bite humans. Here we describe the development and evaluation of a pair of real-time TaqMan PCR assays designed to detect B. miyamotoi in North American ticks. We sought to achieve sensitivity to B. miyamotoi strains associated with ticks throughout North America, the full genetic diversity of which is unknown, by targeting sequences that are largely conserved between B. miyamotoi strains from the eastern United States and genetically distinct B. miyamotoi strains from Japan. The two assays target different loci on the B. miyamotoi chromosome and can be run side by side under identical cycling conditions. One of the assays also includes a tick DNA target that can be used to verify the integrity of tick-derived samples. Using both recombinant plasmid controls and genomic DNA from North American and Japanese strains, we determined that both assays reliably detect as few as 5 copies of the B. miyamotoi genome. We verified that neither detects B. burgdorferi, B. lonestari or B. turicatae. This sensitive and specific pair of assays successfully detected B. miyamotoi in naturally-infected, colony-reared nymphs and in field-collected I. scapularis and I. pacificus from the Northeast and the Pacific Northwest respectively. These assays will be useful in screening field-collected Ixodes spp. from varied regions of North America to assess the risk of human exposure to this emerging pathogen. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  19. Ixodes ricinus ticks (Acari, Ixodidae) as a vector of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and Borrelia miyamotoi in Lower Silesia, Poland--preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiewra, Dorota; Stańczak, Joanna; Richter, Magdalena

    2014-10-01

    Ixodes ricinus is the primary vector of Borrelia spirochetes in Europe, including both the Lyme borreliosis (LB) group and the relapsing fever (RF) group. The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence of different genospecies from the B. burgdorferi s.l. complex and B. miyamotoi in questing I. ricinus collected in chosen areas in Lower Silesia, SW Poland. A total of 599 I. ricinus ticks were investigated using the PCR-RFLP method. The calculated overall minimum infection rate of ticks with Borrelia spirochetes in Lower Silesia was 15.5%. Five different restriction patterns, characteristic of B. afzelii, B. garinii, B. burgdoreri s.s., B. valaisiana, and B. miyamotoi, were obtained and confirmed by DNA sequencing. At least 14% of ticks were infected with B. burgdorferi s.l. while B.afzelii was the dominant genospecies (68.5%). The MIR for B. miyamotoi was calculated at 2%. Four co-infections in single adult ticks were found: B. miyamotoi/B. afzelii, B. miyamotoi/B. burdorferi s.s., B. miyamotoi/B. garinii, and B. afzelii/B. burgdorferi s.s. The results of this study confirm the risk of LB and RF occuring in both urban and protected areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Preliminary survey for entomopathogenic fungi associated with Ixodes scapularis>/i> (Acari: Ixodidae) in southern New York and New England, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhioua, Elyes; Ginsberg, Howard S.; Humber, Richard A.; LeBrun, Roger A.

    1999-01-01

    Free-living larval, nymphal, and adult Ixodes scapularis Say were collected from scattered locales in southern New England and New York to determine infection rates with entomopathogenic fungi. Infection rates of larvae, nymphs, males, and females were 0% (571), 0% (272), 0% (57), and 4.3% (47), respectively. Two entomopathogenic fungi were isolated from field-collected I. scapularis females from Fire Island, NY. Isolates were identified as Verticillium lecanii (Zimmermann) Viegas and Verticillium sp. (a member of the Verticillium lecanii species complex).Ixodes scapularis Say is the principal vector of Borrelia burgdorferi Johnson, Schmid, Hyde, Steigerwalt & Brenner (Burgdorfer et al. 1982, Johnson et al. 1984), the etiologic agent of Lyme disease in the northeastern and upper-midwestern United States. Control of I. scapularis is based on chemical treatment (Mather et al. 1987b; Schulze et al. 1987, 1991), environmental management (Wilson et al. 1988, Schulze et al. 1995), and habitat modification (Wilson 1986). These methods have shown variable success, and some potentially have negative environmental effects (Wilson and Deblinger 1993, Ginsberg 1994).Studies concerning natural predators, parasitoids, and pathogens of I. scapularis are rare. The use of ground-dwelling birds as tick predators has had only limited success (Duffy et al. 1992). Nymphal I. scapularis are often infected with the parasitic wasp Ixodiphagus hookeri (Howard) (Mather et al. 1987a, Hu et al. 1993, Stafford et al. 1996, Hu and Hyland 1997), but this wasp does not effectively control I. scapularis populations (Stafford et al. 1996). The entomopathogenic nematodes Steinernema carpocapsae (Weiser) and S. glaseri (Steiner) are pathogenic only to engorged female I. scapularis, and thus have limited applicability (Zhioua et al. 1995). In contrast, the entomogenous fungus Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschnikoff) Sorokin is highly pathogenic to all stages of I. scapularis, unfed as well as engorged, and thus has considerable potential as a microbial control agent (Zhioua et al. 1997).European studies have suggested that entomopathogenic fungi might serve as natural controls of of Ixodes ricinus L. populations (Samsinakova et al. 1974, Eilenberg et al. 1991, Kalsbeek et al. 1995). In the current study, we describe the isolation of entomopathogenic fungi from field-collected I. scapularis.

  1. Facilitative ecological interactions between invasive species: Arundo donax stands as favorable habitat for cattle ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) along the U.S.-Mexico border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racelis, A E; Davey, R B; Goolsby, J A; Pérez de León, A A; Varner, K; Duhaime, R

    2012-03-01

    The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) spp. is a key vector of protozoa that cause bovine babesiosis. Largely eradicated from most of the United States, the cattle tick continues to infest south Texas, and recent outbreaks in this area may signal a resurgence of cattle tick populations despite current management efforts. An improved understanding of the dynamic ecology of cattle fever ticks along the U.S.-Mexico border is required to devise strategies for sustainable eradication efforts. Management areas of the cattle tick overlap considerably with dense, wide infestations of the non-native, invasive grass known as giant reed (Arundo donax L.). Here we show that stands of giant reed are associated with abiotic and biotic conditions that are favorable to tick survival, especially when compared with other nearby habitats (open pastures of buffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare) and closed canopy native forests). Overhead canopies in giant reed stands and native riparian forests reduce daily high temperature, which was the best abiotic predictor of oviposition by engorged females. In sites where temperatures were extreme, specifically open grasslands, fewer females laid eggs and the resulting egg masses were smaller. Pitfall trap collections of ground dwelling arthropods suggest a low potential for natural suppression of tick populations in giant reed stands. The finding that A. donax infestations present environmental conditions that facilitate the survival and persistence of cattle ticks, as well or better than native riparian habitats and open grasslands, represents an alarming complication for cattle fever tick management in the United States.

  2. Efficacy and environmental persistence of nootkatone for the control of the blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) in the residential landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated the ability of the plant-derived compound nootkatone to control nymphs of the blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis Say, applied to the perimeter of lawns around homes in Lyme disease endemic areas of Connecticut. Three formulations of nootkatone ranging from 0.05 to 0.84% (0.06 to 1.03 g...

  3. Lab-on-a-chip and SDS-PAGE analysis of hemolymph protein profile from Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) infected with entomopathogenic nematode and fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golo, Patrícia Silva; Dos Santos, Alessa Siqueira de Oliveira; Monteiro, Caio Marcio Oliveira; Perinotto, Wendell Marcelo de Souza; Quinelato, Simone; Camargo, Mariana Guedes; de Sá, Fillipe Araujo; Angelo, Isabele da Costa; Martins, Marta Fonseca; Prata, Marcia Cristina de Azevedo; Bittencourt, Vânia Rita Elias Pinheiro

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, lab-on-a-chip electrophoresis (LoaC) was suggested as an alternative method to the conventional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions (SDS-PAGE) to analyze raw cell-free tick hemolymph. Rhipicephalus microplus females were exposed to the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae senso latu IBCB 116 strain and/or to the entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis indica LPP1 strain. Hemolymph from not exposed or exposed ticks was collected 16 and 24 h after exposure and analyze by SDS-PAGE or LoaC. SDS-PAGE yielded 15 bands and LoaC electrophoresis 17 bands. Despite the differences in the number of bands, when the hemolymph protein profiles of exposed or unexposed ticks were compared in the same method, no suppressing or additional bands were detected among the treatments regardless the method (i.e., SDS-PAGE or chip electrophoresis using the Protein 230 Kit®). The potential of LoaC electrophoresis to detect protein bands from tick hemolymph was considered more efficient in comparison to the detection obtained using the traditional SDS-PAGE method, especially when it comes to protein subunits heavier than 100 KDa. LoaC electrophoresis provided a very good reproducibility, and is much faster than the conventional SDS-PAGE method, which requires several hours for one analysis. Despite both methods can be used to analyze tick hemolymph composition, LoaC was considered more suitable for cell-free hemolymph protein separation and detection. LoaC hemolymph band percent data reported changes in key proteins (i.e., HeLp and vitellogenin) exceptionally important for tick embryogenesis. This study reported, for the first time, tick hemolymph protein profile using LoaC.

  4. Ocorrência de ixodidae parasitos de capivara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris linnaeus, 1766 na estação ecológica do Taim, Rio Grande - RS, Brasil Occurence of ixodidae parasites of capybara (Hydrochoeurus hydrochaeris linnaeus, 1766 in the ecologic area of Taim, Rio Grande - RS, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonso Lodovico Sinkoc

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi identificar as espécies de carrapatos observadas sobre capivaras na Estação Ecológica do Taim, Rio Grande- RS, Brasil. Foram examinadas 27 capivaras encontradas mortas por atropelamento na BR 471, em seu trecho que corta a Estação, sendo cole lados 497 carrapatos das espécies Amblyomma cooperi (=A. lutzi; = A. ypisilophorum, Amblyomma triste, Amblyomma tigrinum e ninfas do gênero Amblyomma. A. cooperi representou 68,41% dos carrapatos identificados, com uma freqüência de parasitismo de 92,60% dos hospedeiros, enquanto A. triste representou 24,75% dos carrapatos em 44,43% dos hospedeiros e A. tigrinum foi coletado em 14,81% dos hospedeiros, totalizando 1,21% dos carrapatos. As ninfas de Amblyomma sp. foram cotetadas em 18,51% dos hospedeiros apresentando um percentual de 5,63% do total de carrapatos. A relação macho : fêmea apresentou valores de 2,3 : 1 e 2 : l para o A. cooperi e A. triste, respectivamente. Todos hospedeiros apresentavam-se parasitados, com uma média de 18,4 carrapatos, variando de 1 a 64 carrapatos coletados por hospedeiro.The aim of this article was the identification ofthe tick species observed on capybara in wildlife in the Ecologic Area of Taim, Rio Grande - RS; Brazil. Twenly seven capybaras found dead by trample in the road BR 471 in the Ecologic Area, wereexamined ticks coilected of the species Amblyomma cooperi (= A. lutzi and = A. ypisilophorum, Amblyomma triste, Amblyomma tigrinum and ninphs of the Genus Amblyomma. Amblyomma cooperi represented 68.41% of the ticks with a frequency of parasitism of 92.60% of the hosts; Amblyomma triste species represented 24.75% of the collected ticks m 44.43% of the hosts; Amblyomma tigrinum species were coilected m 14.81% of the hosts from a total of 1.21% of the found ticks and, the nimphs of Amblyomma were coilected in 18.51% of the hosts per forming 5.63% of the ali ticks coilected. The relation mate .female showed values of 2.3:1 and 2

  5. Rickettsia amblyommii infecting Amblyomma auricularium ticks in Pernambuco, northeastern Brazil: isolation, transovarial transmission, and transstadial perpetuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Danilo G; Nieri-Bastos, Fernanda A; Horta, Maurício C; Soares, Herbert S; Nicola, Patricia A; Pereira, Luiz Cezar M; Labruna, Marcelo B

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated rickettsial infection in Amblyomma auricularium ticks from the state of Pernambuco, northeastern Brazil. An engorged female of A. auricularium collected from a skunk (Conepatus semistriatus) was sent alive to the laboratory, where the female was found through molecular analysis to be infected by Rickettsia amblyommii. This engorged female oviposited, and its offspring was reared through three consecutive generations, always using tick-naïve rabbits to feed the ticks. PCR performed on five egg pools, 10 larvae, 10 nymphs, and 10 adults of each of the three generations always yielded rickettsial DNA, indicating maintenance of rickettsial infection in the ticks by transstadial and transovarial passages. DNA sequences of random PCR products from eggs, larvae, nymphs, and adults were identified as R. amblyommii. All infested rabbits seroconverted to R. amblyommii antigens at the 21(st) day after infestation, indicating that larvae, nymphs, and adults transmitted R. amblyommii through parasitism. However, no infested rabbit presented fever or any clinical alteration during the experimental period. Rickettsiae were successfully isolated from the two A. auricularium females, and the isolates were established in Vero cell culture. Molecular characterization of the isolates confirmed R. amblyommii by sequencing partial gltA, ompA, and ompB genes. From another sample of 15 A. auricularium adult ticks collected from two armadillos (Euphractus sexcinctus), eight (53.3%) were infected by R. amblyommii. This study reports R. amblyommii infecting the tick A. auricularium for the first time. This is also the first report of rickettsia infecting ticks in the northeastern region of Brazil.

  6. Prevalence of Ehrlichia ruminantium in adult Amblyomma variegatum collected from cattle in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esemu, Seraphine N; Besong, Willington O; Ndip, Roland N; Ndip, Lucy M

    2013-03-01

    Ehrlichia ruminantium, the etiologic agent of the economically important disease heartwater, is an obligate intracellular bacterium transmitted by ticks of the genus Amblyomma, particularly A. hebraeum and A. variegatum. Although serologic and microscopic evidence of the presence of heartwater have been reported in ruminants in Cameroon, knowledge of E. ruminantium infection in the tick vector, A. variegatum, is lacking. In order to determine the infectivity of A. variegatum ticks by E. ruminantium, we analysed 500 un-engorged A. variegatum ticks collected by hand-picking from predilection sites from 182 cattle [115 ticks from 82 cattle at Société de Développement et d'Exploitation des Productions Animales (SODEPA) Dumbo ranch (SDR) and 385 ticks from 100 cattle at the Upper Farms ranch (UFR)] by amplification of the open reading frame (ORF) 2 of the pCS20 region of E. ruminantium. PCR amplification of the 279 bp fragment of the pCS20 region detected E. ruminantium DNA in 142 (28.4 %) of the 500 ticks with a higher infection rate (47/115; 40.9 %) observed in ticks from SDR and 24.7 % (95/385) of ticks collected from cattle at UFR. Twenty five randomly selected PCR products were sequenced and results indicated that some of the isolates shared homology with one another and to sequences of E. ruminantium in the GenBank. This report represents the first molecular evidence of E. ruminantium infection in A. variegatum ticks in Cameroon and suggests possible exposure of cattle to this pathogen in our environment.

  7. Efficacy of sarolaner (Simparic™) against induced infestations of Amblyomma cajennense on dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Fabio; Franz, Lilian; Campos, Diefrey Ribeiro; Azevedo, Thaís Ribeiro Correia; Cunha, Daise; Six, Robert H; Maeder, Steven; Cree, Travis

    2017-08-17

    Amblyomma cajennense is the main vector of Rickettsia rickettsii which causes Brazilian spotted fever. This adult tick preferably infests horses and capybaras, but has low host specificity during its immature stages, thus posing a threat to humans and dogs. In this study, the efficacy of sarolaner (Simparic™/Simparica®, Zoetis) when administered once orally to dogs at 2 mg/kg was evaluated against induced infestations of A. cajennense nymphs for up to 35 days after treatment. Based on pretreatment tick counts, 20 dogs were randomly allocated to treatment with sarolaner (Simparic™) dosed at 2 mg/kg of body weight or a placebo on Day 0 of the study. Artificial infestations were performed using laboratory raised A. cajennense nymphs on study days -2, 5, 12, 19, 26 and 33. Efficacy was determined at 48 h post-treatment or post-infestation at each time point relative to the counts for dogs that received placebo. There were no adverse reactions to treatment. A single dose of sarolaner (Simparic™) provided 100% efficacy on study days 2, 7 and 14; and ≥ 99.6% on days 21, 28 and 35. Geometric mean live tick counts for sarolaner were significantly lower than those for placebo on all days (P sarolaner (Simparic™) administered once orally at 2 mg/kg provided 100% efficacy against existing infestations and ≥ 99.6% efficacy within 48 h against weekly challenges of A. cajennense for at least 35 days after treatment.

  8. Characterization of the bacterial communities of life stages of free living lone star ticks (Amblyomma americanum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Jo Williams-Newkirk

    Full Text Available The lone star tick (Amblyomma americanum is an abundant and aggressive biter of humans, domestic animals, and wildlife in the southeastern-central USA and an important vector of several known and suspected zoonotic bacterial pathogens. However, the biological drivers of bacterial community variation in this tick are still poorly defined. Knowing the community context in which tick-borne bacterial pathogens exist and evolve is required to fully understand the ecology and immunobiology of the ticks and to design effective public health and veterinary interventions. We performed a metagenomic survey of the bacterial communities of questing A. americanum and tested 131 individuals (66 nymphs, 24 males, and 41 females from five sites in three states. Pyrosequencing was performed with barcoded eubacterial primers targeting variable 16S rRNA gene regions 5-3. The bacterial communities were dominated by Rickettsia (likely R. amblyommii and an obligate Coxiella symbiont, together accounting for 6.7-100% of sequences per tick. DNAs from Midichloria, Borrelia, Wolbachia, Ehrlichia, Pseudomonas, or unidentified Bacillales, Enterobacteriaceae, or Rhizobiales groups were also detected frequently. Wolbachia and Midichloria significantly co-occurred in Georgia (p<0.00001, but not in other states. The significance of the Midichloria-Wolbachia co-occurrence is unknown. Among ticks collected in Georgia, nymphs differed from adults in both the composition (p = 0.002 and structure (p = 0.002 of their bacterial communities. Adults differed only in their community structure (p = 0.002 with males containing more Rickettsia and females containing more Coxiella. Comparisons among adult ticks collected in New York and North Carolina supported the findings from the Georgia collection despite differences in geography, collection date, and sample handling, implying that the differences detected are consistent attributes. The data also suggest that some members of

  9. Detection of a Borrelia species in questing Gulf Coast ticks, Amblyomma maculatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Keun; Smith, Whitney Crow; McIntosh, Chelsea; Ferrari, Flavia Girao; Moore-Henderson, Brittany; Varela-Stokes, Andrea

    2014-06-01

    Borrelia spp. are agents of Lyme disease and relapsing fever, diseases which use Ixodes hard ticks and Ornithodoros soft ticks, respectively, as primary vectors. Some relapsing fever spirochetes, such as B. miyamotoi, are also found in hard ticks. To date, no Borrelia sp. is known to use the hard tick, Amblyomma maculatum, as a vector. However, both B. burgdorferi and B. lonestari were recently detected in A. maculatum removed from hosts. In our study, DNA extracts from 306 questing adult A. maculatum collected in Mississippi in 2009 and 2010 were tested for Borrelia spp. DNA by PCR amplification of flaB and 16S rRNA gene targets. An additional 97 A. maculatum collected in 2013 were tested by amplification of 16S rRNA gene target. Two ticks, one collected in 2009 and the other in 2010, were positive by PCR of the flaB and 16S rRNA gene targets; both were collected from the same location in central Mississippi. Interestingly, 16S rRNA gene amplicons from these two tick extracts were 98% identical to twelve Borrelia spp. including the reptile-associated spirochete B. turcica and Borrelia sp. "tAG158M"; flaB amplicons from these two ticks shared closest identity (89%) to the reptile-associated spirochete, B. turcica. These results demonstrate a Borrelia sp. in unfed A. maculatum ticks that is unique from other species in the NCBI database and in a clade with reptile-associated Borrelia species. Detection of a previously unrecognized Borrelia in a hard tick species generates additional questions regarding the bacterial fauna in these arthropods and warrants further studies to better understand this fauna. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Transmission dynamics and control of Rickettsia rickettsii in populations of Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris and Amblyomma sculptum.

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    Gina Polo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Brazilian Spotted Fever (BSF, caused by the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii, is the tick-borne disease that generates the largest number of human deaths in the world. In Brazil, the current increase of BSF human cases has been associated with the presence and expansion of capybaras Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris, which act as primary hosts for the tick Amblyomma sculptum, vector of the R. rickettsii in this area.We proposed a semi-discrete-time stochastic model to evaluate the role of capybaras in the transmission dynamics of R. rickettsii. Through a sensitivity analysis, we identified the parameters with significant influence on the R. rickettsii establishment. Afterward, we implemented the Gillespie's algorithm to simulate the impact of potential public health interventions to prevent BSF human cases.The introduction of a single infected capybara with at least one infected attached tick is enough to trigger the disease in a non-endemic area. We found that to avoid the formation of new BSF-endemic areas, it is crucial to impede the emigration of capybaras from endemic areas by reducing their birth rate by more than 58%. Model results were corroborated by ex-situ data generated from field studies, and this supports our proposal to prevent BSF human cases by implementing control strategies focused on capybaras.The proposed stochastic model illustrates how strategies for the control and prevention of vector-borne infectious diseases can be focused on amplifier hosts management practices. This work provides a basis for future prevention strategies for other neglected vector-borne diseases.

  11. Resistência a acaricidas em Phytoseiulus macropilis (Banks) (Acari: Phytoseiidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Rezende, Daniela Duarte Monteiro

    2010-01-01

    O ácaro predador Phytoseiulus macropilis (Banks) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) possui grande potencial como agente de controle biológico do ácaro-rajado Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae). No entanto, o controle químico pode interferir negativamente na efetividade deste predador. Uma alternativa que permitiria explorar o potencial apresentado por P. macropilis como inimigo natural do ácaro-rajado seria a seleção de indivíduos resistentes aos principais pesticidas a partir de coletas em á...

  12. Amblyomma americanum as a Bridging Vector for Human Infection with Francisella tularensis.

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    Rinosh J Mani

    Full Text Available The γ-proteobacterium Francisella tularensis causes seasonal tick-transmitted tularemia outbreaks in natural rabbit hosts and incidental infections in humans in the south-central United States. Although Dermacentor variabilis is considered a primary vector for F. tularensis, Amblyomma americanum is the most abundant tick species in this endemic region. A systematic study of F. tularensis colonization of A. americanum was undertaken to better understand its potential to serve as an overwintering reservoir for F. tularensis and as a bridging vector for human infections. Colony-reared A. americanum were artificially fed F. tularensis subspecies holarctica strain LVS via glass capillaries and colonization levels determined. Capillary-fed larva and nymph were initially infected with 10(4 CFU/tick which declined prior to molting for both stages, but rebounded post-molting in nymphs and persisted in 53% at 10(3 to 10(8 CFU/nymph at 168 days post-capillary feeding (longest sampling time in the study. In contrast, only 18% of adults molted from colonized nymphs maintained LVS colonization at 10(1 to 10(5 CFU/adult at 168 days post-capillary feeding (longest sampling time. For adults, LVS initially colonized the gut and disseminated to salivary glands by 24 h and had an ID50 of <5CFU in mice. Francisella tularensis infected the ovaries of gravid females, but transmission to eggs was infrequent and transovarial transmission to hatched larvae was not observed. The prolonged persistence of F. tularensis in A. americanum nymphs supports A. americanum as an overwintering reservoir for F. tularensis from which seasonal epizootics may originate; however, although the rapid dissemination of F. tularensis from gut to salivary glands in adults A. americanum is compatible with intermittent feeding adult males acting as bridging vectors for incidental F. tularensis infections of humans, acquisition of F. tularensis by adults may be unlikely based on adult feeding

  13. Deorphanization and target validation of cross-tick species conserved novel Amblyomma americanum tick saliva protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulenga, Albert; Kim, Tae Kwon; Ibelli, Adriana Mércia Guaratini

    2013-05-01

    We previously identified a cross-tick species conserved tick feeding stimuli responsive Amblyomma americanum (Aam) AV422 gene. This study demonstrates that AamAV422 belongs to a novel group of arthropod proteins that is characterized by 14 cysteine amino acid residues: C(23)-X7/9-C(33)-X23/24-C(58)-X8-C(67)-X7-C(75)-X23-C(99)-X15-C(115)-X10-C(126)-X24/25/33-C(150)C(151)-X7-C(159)-X8-C(168)-X23/24-C(192)-X9/10-C(202) predicted to form seven disulfide bonds. We show that AamAV422 protein is a ubiquitously expressed protein that is injected into the host within the first 24h of the tick attaching onto the host as revealed by Western blotting analyses of recombinant (r)AamAV422, tick saliva and dissected tick organ protein extracts using antibodies to 24 and 48 h tick saliva proteins. Native AamAV422 is apparently involved with mediating tick anti-hemostasis and anti-complement functions in that rAamAV422 delayed plasma clotting time in a dose responsive manner by up to ≈ 160 s, prevented platelet aggregation by up to ≈ 16% and caused ≈ 24% reduction in production of terminal complement complexes. Target validation analysis revealed that rAamAV422 is a potential candidate for a cocktail or multivalent tick vaccine preparation in that RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of AamAV422 mRNA caused a statistically significant (≈ 44%) reduction in tick engorgement weights, which is proxy for amounts of ingested blood. We speculate that AamAV422 is a potential target antigen for development of the highly desired universal tick vaccine in that consistent with high conservation among ticks, antibodies to 24h Ixodes scapularis tick saliva proteins specifically bound rAamAV422. We discuss data in this study in the context of advancing the biology of tick feeding physiology and discovery of potential target antigens for tick vaccine development. Copyright © 2013 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of sulfur on density of Tetranychus pacificus (Acari: Tetranychidae) and Galendromus occidentalis (Acari: Phytoseiidae) in a central California vineyard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    Sulfur is the oldest and most widely used fungicide in the vineyards of California, where it is used for control of powdery mildew (Uncinula necator [Schw.] Burr). For decades, sulfur use has been associated with outbreaks of Tetranychus pacificus McGregor (Acari: Tetranychidae) on cultivated grapes in the San Joaquin Valley. I undertook large-scale field studies to test this association, to evaluate the impact of sulfur on Galendromus occidentalis (Nesbit) (Acari: Phytoseiidae), a major predator of T. pacificus, and to determine if timing of sulfur applications with respect to grape bloom has an impact on T. pacificus density. The studies took place in a 32 ha vineyard in Fresno County, and all fungicide applications were made with commercial-scale equipment. In 1998 a 'high sulfur' treatment, a combination of wettable sulfur and sulfur dust, was compared to 'low sulfur,' in which demethylation inhibitor (DMI) fungicides partially substituted for sulfur. In 1999 treatments were 'sulfur,' 'DMI,' 'sulfur pre-bloom' (here sulfur was applied prior to grape bloom, in late May, and then DMIs were applied until mid-season) and 'sulfur post-bloom' (the reverse of 'sulfur pre-bloom'). In each year, the T. pacificus population increase came after the end of fungicide applications, and results clearly show a relationship between sulfur use and T. pacificus density. In 1998, mean T. pacificus density was 2.7 times higher and mean G. occidentalis density 2.5 times higher in 'high sulfur' compared to 'low sulfur.' In 1999, the highest T. pacificus counts were in the 'sulfur' and 'sulfur pre-bloom' treatments, 4.8 times higher than 'sulfur post-bloom' and 2 times higher than 'DMIs.' Density of G. occidentalis was 2.3 times as high in 'sulfur' or 'sulfur pre-bloom' than 'DMIs.' The predator/prey ratio was not significantly different among treatments in 1998, but in 1999 it was highest in the 'sulfur pre-bloom' treatment. In 1999, density of Homeopronematus anconai (Baker) (Acari

  15. Mites (acari) infesting commensal rats in Suez Canal zone, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el Kady, G A; Shoukry, A; Ragheb, D A; el Said, A M; Habib, K S; Morsy, T A

    1995-08-01

    Mites are arthropods distinguished from ticks by usually being microscopical in size and have a hypostome unarmed with tooth-like anchoring processes. They are group in a number of suborders, each with super-families and families including many genera of medical and economic importance. In this paper, commensal rodents (Rattus norvegicus, R. r. alexandrinus and R. r. frugivorous) were surveyed in the Suez Canal Zone for their acari ectoparasites. Four species of mites were recovered. In a descending order of mite indices, they were Eulaelaps stabularis (4.83 on 6 rats), Laelaps nuttalli (3.11 on 27 rats), Ornithonyssus bacoti (1.66 on 9 rats) and Dermanyssus gallinae (0.66 on 24 rats). The overall mite indices in the three governorates were 3.66 in Suez, 2.82 in Ismailia and zero in Port Said. The medical and economic importance of the mites were discussed.

  16. An annotated checklist of oribatid mites (Acari: Oribatida) of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akrami, Mohammad Ali

    2015-05-28

    Oribatid mites (Acari: Oribatida) are one of the largest and dominating groups of soil inhabitants that play an important role in the formation and fertilization processes of the soils. In the present paper, a list of oribatid mites of Iran (excluding Astigmata) is present based mainly on the collected and identified species and on literature records since 1961. In total, 380 species belonging to 191 genera and 86 families have been recorded and these are listed along with their known geographical distributions and localities in Iran. The following seven species Sellnickochthonius cricoides (Weis-Fogh, 1948), Hypochthoniella minutissima (Berlese, 1904), Nothrus silvestris Nicolet, 1855, Hemileius (Hemileius) initialis (Berlese, 1908), Punctoribates (Punctoribates) punctum (C. L. Koch, 1839), Ceratozetes conjunctus Mihelčič, 1956, Eupelops tardus (C. L. Koch, 1835) and Pelopsis Hall, 1911 are recorded for the first time from Iran. The closing date for publications included in this list was 15 January 2015.

  17. Oviposition behaviour of the soil mite Veigaia cerva (Acari: Veigaiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Tomasz; Faleńczyk-Koziróg, Katarzyna; Kaczmarek, Sławomir

    2013-07-01

    We observed the oviposition behaviour of the soil mite Veigaia cerva (Kramer) (Acari: Veigaiidae) using continuous video-monitoring. Five phases could be recognized. Phase I involved inspection of the substrate. In phase II the female rhythmically moved her gnathosoma and first pair of legs. After an inactive phase III, the soma was raised (IV), and the egg was laid (V). In the actual egg laying three sub-phases could be distinguished: internal egg movement, placing the egg in front of the gnathosoma, and depositing the egg using the chelicerae. The palps and first pair of legs were used to position the egg between the chelicerae. The whole process took on average 333 ± 22 s.

  18. The local effect of hypersensitive or inflammatory reactions to nymphal Amblyomma variegatum on simultaneous infections with Dermatophilus congolensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, C M; Walker, A R

    1993-08-01

    Amblyomma variegatum nymphs were applied to sites infected with Dermatophilus congolensis on eight rabbits. Four rabbits were previously sensitized to the feeding of nymphal A. variegatum to produce hypersensitive reactions to the tick feeding; the remaining four rabbits had no previous exposure to nymphal A. variegatum and produced inflammatory reactions to the tick feeding. The resulting dermatophilosis infections were assessed for three weeks and there was a correlation between the position of the inflammatory tick attachment sites and the foci of infection. There was a significant increase in the lesions at sites with inflammatory reactions to the ticks, compared with sites not exposed to tick feeding; these differences appeared to be due to individual variation in the host response and were not sustained throughout the assessment.

  19. Borrelia sp. phylogenetically different from Lyme disease- and relapsing fever-related Borrelia spp. in Amblyomma varanense from Python reticulatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinachartvanit, Wachareeporn; Hirunkanokpun, Supanee; Sudsangiem, Ronnayuth; Lijuan, Wanwisa; Boonkusol, Duangjai; Baimai, Visut; Ahantarig, Arunee

    2016-06-24

    Species of the genus Borrelia are causative agents of Lyme disease and relapsing fever. Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vector-borne disease in the northern hemisphere. However, in some parts of the world Lyme borreliosis and relapsing fever may be caused by novel Borrelia genotypes. Herein, we report the presence of a Borrelia sp. in an Amblyomma varanense collected from Python reticulatus. Ticks were collected from snakes, identified to species level and examined by PCR for the presence of Borrelia spp. flaB and 16S rRNA genes. Phylogenetic trees were constructed using the neighbour-joining method. Three A. varanense ticks collected from P. reticulatus were positive for a unique Borrelia sp., which was phylogenetically divergent from both Lyme disease- and relapsing fever-associated Borrelia spp. The results of this study suggest for the first time that there is a Borrelia sp. in A. varanense tick in the snake P. reticulatus that might be novel.

  20. Host selection by questing female Amblyomma maculatum Koch, to cattle with feeding male ticks in southern Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeba, S B; Teel, P D; Longnecker, M T; Strey, O F

    2010-08-27

    The feeding associations among male and female Gulf Coast ticks, Amblyomma maculatum Koch, were examined using archived data obtained from untreated free-ranging cattle pastured on native rangeland. There was significant evidence of a relationship between male and female tick presence on hosts (p-value ticks parasitizing cows relative to the number of male (M) ticks present for both early (F=0.090+0.162 M) and late season (F=2.098+0.337 M). These equations could be used to optimize the scheduling of surveillance and control efforts for Gulf Coast tick adults and may establish baseline dosage for pheromone applications. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Rickettsia parkeri Rickettsiosis in Different Ecological Regions of Argentina and Its Association with Amblyomma tigrinum as a Potential Vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romer, Yamila; Nava, Santiago; Govedic, Francisco; Cicuttin, Gabriel; Denison, Amy M.; Singleton, Joseph; Kelly, Aubree J.; Kato, Cecilia Y.; Paddock, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    Rickettsia parkeri, a newly recognized tick-borne pathogen of humans in the Americas, is a confirmed cause of spotted fever group rickettsiosis in Argentina. Until recently, almost all cases of R. parkeri rickettsiosis in Argentina have originated from the Paraná River Delta, where entomological surveys have identified populations of R. parkeri-infected Amblyomma triste ticks. In this report, we describe confirmed cases of R. parkeri rickettsiosis from Córdoba and La Rioja provinces, which are located several hundred kilometers inland, and in a more arid ecological region, where A. triste ticks do not occur. Additionally, we identified questing A. tigrinum ticks naturally infected with R. parkeri in Córdoba province. These data provide evidence that another human-biting tick species serves as a potential vector of R. parkeri in Argentina and possibly, other countries of South America. PMID:25349376

  2. A novel relapsing fever Borrelia sp. infects the salivary glands of the molted hard tick, Amblyomma geoemydae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Ai; Sugimori, Chieko; Fujita, Hiromi; Kadosaka, Teruki; Taylor, Kyle R; Tsubota, Toshio; Konnai, Satoru; Tajima, Tomoko; Sato, Kozue; Watanabe, Haruo; Ohnishi, Makoto; Kawabata, Hiroki

    2012-09-01

    A novel relapsing fever Borrelia sp. was found in Amblyomma geoemydae in Japan. The novel Borrelia sp. was phylogenetically related to the hard (ixodid) tick-borne relapsing fever Borrelia spp. Borrelia miyamotoi and B. lonestari. The novel relapsing fever Borrelia sp. was detected in 39 A. geoemydae (39/274: 14.2%), of which 14 (14/274: 5.1%) were co-infected with the novel relapsing fever Borrelia sp. and Borrelia sp. tAG, one of the reptile-associated borreliae. Transstadial transmission of the novel relapsing fever Borrelia sp. occurred in the tick midgut and the salivary glands, although Borrelia sp. tAG was only detected in the tick midgut. The difference of the borrelial niche in molted ticks might be associated with borrelial characterization. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  3. Landscape features associated to the occurrence of Amblyomma sculptum ticks: an application of zero inflated regression models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Bernardo Pedro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Bernardo-Pedro T., Silveira A.K. & Tassinari W.S. Landscape features associated to the occurrence of Amblyomma sculptum ticks: an application of zero inflated regression models. [Características de paisagem associadas à ocorrência de carrapatos Amblyomma sculptum: uma aplicação dos modelos de regressão inflacionados de zeros.] Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 38(supl. 3:39-46, 2016. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Veterinárias, Departamento de Parasitologia Animal, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, BR-465, km 7, Seropédica, RJ 23890-000, Brasil. E-mail: thiago.b.pedro@gmail.com The aim of the present study was to analyze the association between landscape features and occurrence of A. sculptum ticks, using zero inflated regression models. A total of 503 ticks were collected during the period of the research. Most of them were captured in sites related to the following features: 20-40m altitude (93.64%, 0-2.5% declivity (57.65%, plain land (93.04%, albaqualf type of soil (52.68%, presence of capybaras (56.06% and high occurrence favorability of A. sculptum (84.89%. Regarding the non-inflated part of the bivariate models, all variables were significant, which means all of them contribute to A. sculptum occurrence. In the final multivariate model, only geomorphology and type of soil were relevant variables to explain A. sculptum occurrence. In conclusion, landscape features – especially geomorphology and type of soil – are associated to A. sculptum abundance in the research area, what indicates that these variables should be taken into consideration when planning tick control programs.

  4. New records of Acari from the sub-Antarctic Prince Edward Islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marshall, D.J.; Gremmen, N.J.M.; Coetzee, L.; Oconnor, B.M.; Pugh, P.J.A.; Theron, P.D.; Ueckermann, E.A.

    1999-01-01

    Sixty species of Acari are recorded from the sub-Antarctic Marion and Prince Edward Islands (the Prince Edward archipelago). Twenty of the 45 species collected on recent expeditions are new and currently undescribed. Other new taxa include a family of Mesostigmata, four new genera, and the first

  5. Investigations of Gamasina mites in natural and man-affected soils in Latvia (Acari: Mesostigmata)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salmane, I.

    2003-01-01

    Investigations of Gamasina mites in natural and man-affected soils in Latvia (Acari: Mesostigmata) A short overview is presented on Gamasina material collected in 22 natural and man-disturbed habitats in Latvia. Species diversity, average density and species dominance were investigated. Altogether

  6. Description of a new species of Terminalichus (Acari: Trombidiformes: Tenuipalpidae) from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yun; Fan, Qing-Hai; Huang, Jian

    2014-01-07

    A new species Terminalichus sanya Xu & Fan sp. nov. (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) on Terminalia catappa L. (Combretaceae) from China is described and illustrated. The ontogenetic changes in ventral and leg chaetotaxy on the female, deutonymph, protonymph and larva are presented. The generic definition of Terminalichus is updated and a key to the world species is provided.

  7. The effect of starvation on the metabolic rate and microanatomy of Galumna elimata (Acari: Oribatida)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hubert, J.; Šustr, Vladimír

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 98, - (2001), s. 265-275 ISSN 1210-5759 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/97/0629 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6066911 Keywords : Acari * starvation * mortality Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.802, year: 2001

  8. Oribatid mites in different forest types in the Netherlands (Acari: Oribatida)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaitsev, A.; Berg, M.P.

    2001-01-01

    Mosmijten in verschillende bostypen in Nederland (Acari: Oribatida) In 2000 werd de bodemfauna van 47 bossen bemonsterd (tabel 1), verdeeld over 23 bostypen (tabel 2). In totaal werden 144 soorten mosmijten gevonden, waarvan er 16 nieuw zijn voor de Nederlandse fauna. Van elke soort wordt een

  9. New oribatid mites of the superfamily Galumnoidea (Acari, Oribatida) from the Republic of Congo

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Starý, Josef

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 2 (2005), s. 113-119 ISSN 0006-3088 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : Acari * Oribatida e * taxonomy Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.240, year: 2005

  10. The comparison of orobatid mite (Acari: Orobatida) communities at various pathces in the seminatural meadow

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hubert, Jan; Kolmanová, Andrea; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2004), s. 328-341 ISSN 1335-342X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK6005114 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6005908 Keywords : Acari * grassland * community Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.078, year: 2004

  11. New species of .i.Notophthiracarus./i. (Acari, Oribatida, Phthiracaroidea) from Tanzania

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niedbala, W.; Starý, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 49, 15/16 (2015), s. 905-914 ISSN 0022-2933 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Acari * ptyctimous mites * taxonomy * new species * Tanzania Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.010, year: 2015

  12. Pyemotes johnmoseri (Khaustov)(Acari: Pyemotidae) as a parasitoid of Xylophagous insects from Aydin, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tbrahim Cakmak; Tulin Aksit; Sultan Cobanoglu

    2006-01-01

    Pyemotes johnmoseri (Khaustov) (Acari: Pyemotidae) was collected from Hypoborus ficus (Erichson) and Hesperophanes griseus Fab. (Col.: Cerambycidae) in fig (Ficus carica cv Calymirna) orchards in Aydin, Turkey during 2003-2004. We describe and illustrate the male and female of P. ...

  13. Primeiro registro de Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae em mudas de teca no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre dos Santos

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available O ácaro fitófago Tetranychus urticae (Kock, 1836 (Acari: Tetranychidae foi relatado e suas injúrias caracterizadas pela primeira vez em viveiro de produção mudas de teca (Tectona grandis no Brasil.

  14. A novel disease affecting the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis (Acari, Phytoseiidae): 1. Symptoms in adult females

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schütte, C.; Kleijn, P.W.; Dicke, M.

    2006-01-01

    Adult female Phytoseiulus persimilis Athias-Henriot (Acari, Phytoseiidae) of one of our laboratory populations showed a lower degree of attraction to herbivore-induced plant volatiles than other laboratory populations. We hypothesized earlier that this consistent change in foraging behavior is a

  15. Pyemotes herfsi (Acari: Pyemotidae), a mite new to North America as the cause of bite outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberto B. Broce; Ludek Zurek; James A. Kalisch; Robert Brown; David L. Keith; David Gordon; Janis Geodeke; Cal Welbourn; John Moser; Ronald Ochoa; Eduardo Azziz-Baumgartner; Fuyuen Yip; Jacob Weber

    2006-01-01

    High incidences of red, itching, and painful welts on people in the midwestern United States led to the discovery of a European species of mite, Pyemotes herfsi (Oudemans) (Acari: Pyemotidae), preying on gall-making midge larvae on oak leaves. The mites' great reproductive potential, small size, and high capacity for dispersal by wind make them...

  16. Five New Records of Raphignathoid Mites (Acari: Raphignathoidea) from Poland/ Pięć Nowych Gatunków Roztoczy Z Nadrodziny Raphignathoidea (Acari) Stwierdzonych W Faunie Polski

    OpenAIRE

    Doðan Salih; Sevsay Sevgi; Mąkol Joanna; Zeytun Erhan; Buğa Evren

    2014-01-01

    Pięć nowych gatunków roztoczy (Acari: Raphignathoidea) zostało odnoto- wanych jako nowe dla fauny Polski: trzy z rodziny Stigmaeidae, Eustigmaeus rhodomela (Koch), Mediolata obtecta Dónel et Doóan, Stigmaeus glabrisetus Summers, jeden z rodziny Cryptognathidae, Favognathus cucurbita (Berlese), i jeden z rodziny Barbutiidae, Barbuda anguineus (Berlese). Ostatni z wymienio- nych jest jednocześnie pierwszym stwierdzeniem przedstawiciela rodziny Barbutiidae w Polsce.

  17. Five New Records of Raphignathoid Mites (Acari: Raphignathoidea from Poland/ Pięć Nowych Gatunków Roztoczy Z Nadrodziny Raphignathoidea (Acari Stwierdzonych W Faunie Polski

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doðan Salih

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pięć nowych gatunków roztoczy (Acari: Raphignathoidea zostało odnoto- wanych jako nowe dla fauny Polski: trzy z rodziny Stigmaeidae, Eustigmaeus rhodomela (Koch, Mediolata obtecta Dónel et Doóan, Stigmaeus glabrisetus Summers, jeden z rodziny Cryptognathidae, Favognathus cucurbita (Berlese, i jeden z rodziny Barbutiidae, Barbuda anguineus (Berlese. Ostatni z wymienio- nych jest jednocześnie pierwszym stwierdzeniem przedstawiciela rodziny Barbutiidae w Polsce.

  18. Ação do fungo Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo Vuillemin, 1912 sobre a fase parasitária do carrapato Anocentor nitens (Neumann, 1897 Schulze, 1937 (Acari: ixodidae Action of the fungus Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo Vuillemin, 1912 on the parasitic phase of the tick Anocentor nitens (Neumann, 1897 Schulze, 1937 (Acari: ixodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Gonzalez Monteiro

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A patogenicidade do fungo Beauveria bassiana (isolado 986 foi avaliada no desenvolvimento da fase parasitária do Anocentor nitens, acompanhando o desenvolvimento de larvas não alimentadas até o estágio adulto. Foram utilizados dois tratamentos e um grupo controle com cinco repetições cada. No tratamento 1 (T1, as orelhas dos bovinos foram banhadas com a suspensão fúngica de 10(8 conídios ml-1; no tratamento 2 (T2, as orelhas foram banhadas com água destilada e espalhante adesivo. No grupo controle (C, as orelhas foram banhadas com água destilada. Após 24 horas dos tratamentos, as orelhas de cada animal foram infestadas com 100mg de larvas. Os parâmetros analisados, em cada tratamento, foram: número e peso de fêmeas recuperadas; períodos de pré-postura, postura, incubação, eclosão e longevidade; percentual de eclosão; peso da massa de ovos e da quenógina; índices de eficiência reprodutiva e nutricional. Verificou-se que, no T1 e T2, o número de fêmeas recuperadas, após 35 dias, foi significantemente menor (PThis study evaluated the pathogenicity of the fungus Beauveria bassiana (Isolate 986 on the development of the parasitic phase of Anocentor nitens by accompanying the development of unfed larvae until the adult stage. Two treated and one control group were used with five repetitions each. In the first treated group (T1, cattle ears were bathed with a fungal suspension of 10(8 conidia ml-1, second treated group (T2, the ears were bathed with distilled water and Tween 80 1% and the control group (C, the ears were bathed with distilled water. One day after treatment, the ears of each animal were infested with 100 mg of larvae. The parameters analyzed in each treatment were: number and weight of females recovered; periods of pre-oviposition, oviposition, incubation, eclosion and longevity; percentage of eggs hatched; weight of the egg mass and of females after oviposition. We found that in the two treated groups the number of females recovered was significantly lower (P<0.05 than in the control group. 35, 70 and 117 females were recovered from the T1, T2 and C, respectively. The females obtained from the surviving larvae of the treated groups did not suffer any deleterious effects from the entomopathogen studied.

  19. Ocorrência de Borrelia spp. em cultura de células embrionárias do carrapato Boophilus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae no Estado do Mato Grosso do Sul, Brasil Occurrence of Borrelia spp. in culture of embryonic cells of the tick Boophilus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae in the State of the Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jania de Rezende

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo reportar a ocorrência de Borrelia spp. em culturas de células embrionárias de Boophilus microplus infectados naturalmente. Sete dias após o início de uma nova cultura primária de células embrionárias do carrapato B. microplus, incubadas a 31ºC, notou-se que as células começaram a degenerar. Ao exame em microscópio de contraste de fase detectou-se a presença de microrganismos alongado e com grande mobilidade. Lâminas de microscópio confeccionadas com amostras do sobrenadante da cultura, hemolinfa e massa de ovos, coradas pelo May Grünwald-Giemsa, permitiram a visualização de espiroquetas. O exame morfológico do microrganismo e sua visualização em B. microplus sugere ser Borrelia spp.The aim of the present work was to report the occurrence of Borrelia spp. in embryonic cell cultures from naturally infected Boophilus microplus. Seven days after the beginning of a primary culture of embryonic cells of B. microplus at 31ºC was noted that the cells start suffering degeneration. Under examination at phase contrast microscope, the presence of prolongated microorganisms with great mobility was detected. Microscopic slides of the culture supernatant, hemolymph and egg mass, were stained by May Grünwald-Giemsa, allowing the visualization of the spirochetes. The morphologic examination of the microorganism and its visualization in. B. microplus, suggest to be Borrelia spp.

  20. Haemaphysalis juxtakochi Cooley, 1946 (Acari: Ixodidae) parasitando Mazama nana (Hensel, 1872) (Artiodactyla: Cervidae) no estado do Rio Grande do Sul Haemaphysalis juxtakochi Cooley, 1946 (Acari: Ixodidae) parasitizing Mazama nana (Hensel, 1872) (Artiodactyla: Cervidae) in the State of Rio Grande do Sul

    OpenAIRE

    João Ricardo Martins; Edson Luís Salomão; Rovaina L. Doyle; Valéria Onofrio; Darci M. Barros-Battesti; Alberto A. Guglielmone

    2007-01-01

    O encontro de Haemaphysalis juxtakochi Cooley, um carrapato ixodídeo, no veado bororó-do-sul, Mazama nana (Hensel), representa novo relato de ocorrência, após 34 anos de seu registro no Estado do Rio Grande do Sul. Os exemplares de carrapatos (3 machos e 1 fêmea) foram encontrados em Cachoeira do Sul, RS (30º02’21"S, 52º53’38"W). O local está a 72 m acima do nível do mar, com uma média anual de temperatura de 18,8°C, e uma precipitação média anual de 1.438 mm. Este é o primeiro re...

  1. Haemaphysalis juxtakochi Cooley, 1946 (Acari: Ixodidae parasitando Mazama nana (Hensel, 1872 (Artiodactyla: Cervidae no estado do Rio Grande do Sul Haemaphysalis juxtakochi Cooley, 1946 (Acari: Ixodidae parasitizing Mazama nana (Hensel, 1872 (Artiodactyla: Cervidae in the State of Rio Grande do Sul

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    João Ricardo Martins

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available O encontro de Haemaphysalis juxtakochi Cooley, um carrapato ixodídeo, no veado bororó-do-sul, Mazama nana (Hensel, representa novo relato de ocorrência, após 34 anos de seu registro no Estado do Rio Grande do Sul. Os exemplares de carrapatos (3 machos e 1 fêmea foram encontrados em Cachoeira do Sul, RS (30º02’21"S, 52º53’38"W. O local está a 72 m acima do nível do mar, com uma média anual de temperatura de 18,8°C, e uma precipitação média anual de 1.438 mm. Este é o primeiro registro de H. juxtakochi nesta espécie de cervídeo e um segundo relato de ocorrência para o Estado do Rio Grande do Sul.The record of Haemaphysalis juxtakochi Cooley, an ixodid tick, on the brocket deer, Mazama nana (Hensel, represents a new report after 34 years of its last report in the State of Rio Grande do Sul. The tick specimens (three males and one female were found in Cachoeira do Sul, RS (30º02’21"S, 52º53’38"W. This place is elevated 72 m sea above, with an annual average temperature of 18.8°C, and annual average rainfall of 1.438 mm. This is the first record of this tick species in a Cervidae and it is the second occurrence report for the State of Rio Grande do Sul.

  2. Influência do comportamento gregário nos processos de muda de Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806 (acari: ixodidae, em condições laboratoriais Influence of aggregation on the molting process of Rhipicephalus sanguineus, (Latreille, 1806 (acari: ixodidae under laboratory conditions

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    Paulo Henrique D. Cançado

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se com o experimento verificar a influência de diferentes agregações sobre os parâmetros relacionados ao processo de ecdise ninfal e de adulto de Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806. Foram utilizados como hospedeiros 10 coelhos domésticos (Oryctolagus cuniculus primos-infestados. Foram analisados os períodos de pré-ecdise, de ecdise e de muda, o percentual e o ritmo de ecdise para todos os estágios estudados. Durante toda a fase não-parasitária, os carrapatos foram mantidos em condições controladas de umidade (80±5% e temperatura (27±1ºC. Um total de 1560 larvas ingurgitadas e de 1560 ninfas ingurgitadas foi utilizado. Os carrapatos foram divididos em seis grupos contendo um, cinco, dez, 20, 40 e 80 espécimes cada. Para cada um desses grupos foram realizadas dez repetições. Os processos de ecdise ninfal e de adulto foram acompanhados diariamente. Após a análise dos resultados, verificou-se que não houve relação entre as diferentes agregações e o percentual de ecdise em nenhuma etapa experimental. Em todos os outros parâmetros biológicos estudados, verificaram-se diferenças significativas (pThe objective of this experiment was to evaluate the influence of different aggregations on the molting process of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806. Tick-naïve domestic rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus were used as experimental hosts for the parasitic phase. A total of 10 rabbits were used on the experiment. All tick free-living phases were kept in incubator at 27±1ºC, 80±5% relative humidity and scotophase. The periods of pre-molt, molt, percentage of ecdisis and molt rhythm of larvae and nymphs were studied. A total of 1560 engorged larvae and 1560 nymphs of R. sanguineus were divided in six groups of aggregations: 1, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 ticks with ten repetitions each one. The ecdises of nymphs and adults were daily observed. The percentage of ecdysis was the only parameter with no aggregations effects. All others parameters were statistically different (p<0,05. The results suggested that highest aggregations accelerate the molting process.

  3. Avaliação in vitro da eficácia de acaricidas sobre Boophilus microplus (Canestrini, 1887 (Acari: Ixodidae de bovinos no município de Ilhéus, Bahia, Brasil In vitro valuation of acaricides efficiency to Boophilus microplus (Canestrini, 1887 (Acari: Ixodidae from bovines at the region of Ilhéus, Bahia, Brazil

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    Dunezeu Alves Campos Júnior

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available O carrapato Boophilus microplus é a espécie de maior distribuição geográfica e importância econômica para os países produtores de bovinos em áreas tropicais e sub-tropicais do planeta. No Brasil, a Região Nordeste apresenta algumas áreas mais favoráveis para as infestações do gado. O controle químico ainda é a forma mais eficaz de combate deste ectoparasita, mas o manejo inadequado dos acaricidas tem contribuído com o aparecimento de resistência de populações aos produtos disponíveis no mercado. O município de Ilhéus, na Região Cacaueira da Bahia, vem incrementando sua atividade pecuária em substituição à lavoura cacaueira devastada. Foram realizados 30 testes de imersão in vitro (biocarrapaticidogramas com fêmeas ingurgitadas de B. microplus colhidas em propriedades rurais aleatoriamente selecionadas num grupo de 96 entrevistadas na região. O estudo revelou a existência de resistência ou sensibilidade de populações de B. microplus frente aos carrapaticidas de contato mais utilizados nas propriedades de exploração pecuária da região de Ilhéus. Os quatro carrapaticidas testados apresentaram as seguintes eficiências médias: Amitraz - 30,95%; Deltametrina - 65,04%; Cipermetrina / diclorvos - 75,73%; e Triclorfon / coumaphos / cyfluthrin - 75,13%.The tick Boophilus microplus is the species with the greatest geographical distribution and economic importance for the countries situated at tropical and sub-tropical zones of the planet. In Brazil, the Northwest Region is showed as the most favorable to the cattle infestation. Chemical control is an efficient control method employed, but the inadequate handling of acaricides contributed for to the onset of resistant ticks to the available acaricides in the market. The county of Ilhéus, at the Cocoa's Region from Bahia, has been increasing the cattle activity instead of the devastated cocoa's plantations. Between April and September 2000, in vitro imersion tests were performed with engorged females of B. microplus collected from 30 farms randomly chosen in a group of 96 interviewed at the region. The current study showed the existence of resistance or sensibility of the populations of B. microplus to the contact acaricides commonly used at cattle properties of the region of Ilhéus. The four acaricides tested showed the following levels of efficiency: Amidin - 30.95%; Deltamethrin - 65.04%; Cipermethrin / diclorvos - 75.73%; and Triclorfon / coumaphos / cyfluthrin - 75.13%.

  4. New histochemical and morphological findings in the female genital tract of Boophilus microplus (Acari, Ixodidae: an attempt toward the elucidation of fertilization in ticks Novas características histoquímicas e morfológicas no trato genital feminino de Boophilus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae: uma tentativa para a elucidação da fertilização nos carrapatos

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    Casimiro García-Fernández

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available At present not only is the site of fertilization in ticks still unknown but it is also unclear as to how this mystery can be solved. Signs of fertilization can be observed throughout the female genital tract and these can be clues for the elucidation of the unsolved questions relating to ticks fertilization. In Boophilus microplus (Canestrini, 1887 the most important signs are the following: the final eversion of the acrosomal canal in females ready for oviposition; the presence of small tubules, resembling the subplasmalemal process of the spermatozoon between the oviduct cells; budding nuclei throughout the female genital tract; and the two Feulgen and DAPI positive areas in the oocyte at vitelogenesis. These morphological characteristics suggest that fertilization takes place in the internal cylinder which extends from the uterus to the ovary itself.Até o momento, não só o lugar da fertilização em carrapatos é desconhecido, mas também não é claro como este mistério possa ser esclarecido. Sinais de fertilização podem ser observados ao longo do trato genital feminino e estes podem ser pistas para a elucidação das questões relacionadas à fertilização em ácaros. Em Boophilus microplus (Canestrini, 1887, os sinais mais importantes são os seguintes: a eversão final do canal acrossômico em fêmeas prestes à oviposição; a presença de pequenos túbulos assemelhando-se a processos subplasmalêmicos dos espermatozóides entre as células do oviduto; brotamentos nucleares ao longo do trato genital feminino e as duas áreas Feulgen e DAPI positivas nos ovócitos em processo de vitelogênese. Estas características morfológicas sugerem que a fertilização ocorra no cilindro interno, o qual se estende desde o útero até o ovário inclusive.

  5. Controle de Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806 (Acari: Ixodidae no canil da Escola de Veterinária da UFMG, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brasil Control of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806 (Acari: Ixodidae in the kennel of the UFMG Veterinary School, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil

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    Gustavo F. Paz

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo teve como proposta controlar uma infestação natural de Rhipicephalus sanguineus em um canil pertencente à Escola de Veterinária da UFMG, com uma área de 72 m² e 25 cães de diversas raças. Um teste de sensibilidade a produtos acaricidas foi aplicado em uma amostra de carrapatos capturados no canil. Dos produtos testados: Amitraz 12,5% (Produto 1; uma associação de Alfametrina 2% e Dichlorvós 60% (produto 2; Deltametrina 5% (produto 3 e uma associação de Trichlorfon 77,6%, Coumaphós 1% e Cyfluthrin 1% (produto 4; somente os produtos 1 e 4 apresentaram 100% de eficácia. O Amitraz 12,5% foi utilizado no controle dos estádios de R. sanguineus presentes no ambiente do canil, com um esquema de 4 aplicações a cada 7 dias de intervalo. Para os estádios parasitários, um único tratamento com Flumetrina 1.0% pour-on foi empregado em todos os animais. A inspeção e o monitoramento do ambiente e dos animais foram realizados durante um período de um ano. Estas medidas de controle reduziram significativamente a população de carrapatos dentro do canil. O canil não apresentou infestação pelo carrapato nos seis meses seguintes aos tratamentos. Uma infestação leve foi observada no 7º mês pós-tratamento, quando foi realizada uma nova aplicação de Amitraz 12,5% no ambiente do canil e um novo tratamento com Flumetrina 1.0% pour-on nos animais, com resultados satisfatórios.The present work was aimed at proposing a control measure for Rhipicephalus sanguineus in a naturally infected kennel of 72 m² of the UFMG Veterinary School with 25 dogs of different breeds. A sensitivity test to acaricide products was applied in a sample of R. sanguineus. Out of the acaricide products tested: 12.5% Amitraz (product 1; 2% Alfamethrin and 60% Dichlorvos association (product 2; 5% Deltamethrin (product 3 and the association between 77.6% Trichlorfon, 1.0% Coumaphos and 1.0% Cyfluthrin (product 4; only 1 and 4 products showed 100% efficacy. Amitraz (12.5% was used for controlling R. sanguineus in the surrounding of the kennel, on which four treatments every seven days were carried out in the facilities. For parasitic R. sanguineus, a single topical treatment was used: Flumetrin 1.0% pour - on on all the 25 dogs. This control measure significantly reduced the population of R. sanguineus within the kennel. A slight infestation was observed in the seventh month after treatment. A new application of 12.5% Amitraz was done in the kennel as well as a new topical treatment with Flumetrin 1.0% pour - on on the dogs. The control procedure proposed in the present study was an emergency measure and its effectiveness was checked through environmental surveys throughout a one-year period.

  6. Ação de extrato e óleo de nim no controle de Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus (Canestrini, 1887 (Acari: Ixodidae em laboratório Action of extract and oil neem in the control of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus (Canestrini, 1887 (Acari: Ixodidae in laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia Maria Forti Broglio-Micheletti

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Extratos vegetais orgânicos e óleos emulsionáveis de Azadirachta indica A. Juss (Meliaceae (nim foram estudados com o objetivo de avaliar seus efeitos no controle de fêmeas ingurgitadas de Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus (Canestrini, 1887 em laboratório. Foram utilizados extratos orgânicos hexânicos e alcoólicos a 2% (peso/volume, em testes de imersão, durante 5 minutos, preparados com sementes, solubilizados em dimetilsulfóxido (DMSO a 1%. O experimento foi inteiramente casualizado, sendo constituído por 6 tratamentos e 5 repetições, cada uma delas representada por 5 carrapatos. O grupo controle consistiu de fêmeas sem tratamento. Com base nos resultados deste trabalho, pode-se indicar que os tratamentos extrato de semente (hexano e óleo emulsionável I¹, em concentração a 2%, possuem significativo potencial adjuvante de controle do carrapato bovino, pois ocasionam a mortalidade nos primeiros dias após o tratamento e interferem na reprodução, mostrando ser uma alternativa aos carrapaticidas normalmente utilizados.Organic plant extracts and emulsified oil of Azadirachta indica A. Juss (Meliaceae (neem were studied to evaluate its effects in control of engorged females of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus (Canestrini, 1887 in the laboratory. Hexane and alcoholic organic extracts, 2% (weight/volume were used in tests of immersion for 5 minutes, prepared with seeds, solubilized in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO to 1%. The experiment was entirely randomized, consisting of 6 treatments and 5 replicates, each represented by 5 ticks. Control groups consisted of untreated females. Based on the results of this work, we can indicate that the seed extract (hexanic fraction and óleo emulsionável I1 concentration to 2% have significant adjuvant potential to control the cattle tick, because, cause the mortality in the first days after the treatment and interfere in the reproduction, showing to be an alternative to acaricides normally used.

  7. Percepção dos produtores de leite do município de Passos, MG, sobre o carrapato Boophilus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae, 2001 Perception of dairy farmers from Passos county, MG, Brazil, concerning the tick Boophilus microplus (acari: ixodidae, 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Maria Barcellos Magalhães da Rocha

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Entrevistas com 25 proprietários de rebanhos com produção diária acima de 500 litros de leite, sorteados da listagem da cooperativa de Passos/MG/Brasil, foram aplicadas para caracterizar suas percepções sobre a biologia do Boophilus microplus e suas atitudes no controle de carrapatos. A maioria desses produtores tem pelo menos o ensino médio completo e está na atividade há mais de dez anos. Os prejuízos biológicos produzidos pelos carrapatos são bem percebidos por eles; porém, não demonstraram conhecimento sobre a biologia do B. microplus e as desvantagens dos banhos carrapaticidas, principalmente com relação aos riscos toxicológicos. Esses produtores realizam controle de carrapatos sem critérios técnicos e com alta freqüência, baseando-se na avaliação subjetiva da infestação nos animais. Isto favorece o estabelecimento da resistência aos acaricidas e demonstra que a transferência de tecnologia sobre controle de carrapatos para o setor pecuário é falha.Twenty five dairy farms were randomly chosen from all farms producing more than 500 liters of milk/ day in Passos, MG, Brazil. The owners were interviewed to characterize their perceptions about the biology of B. microplus and their attitudes towards tick control. Most of the producers have a college degree and more than six year-experience in the activity. The biological damages caused by ticks are perceived by the farmers. Their tick control is performed without technical criteria and they did not show a proper knowledge on the biology of B. microplus nor on the toxicological risks of acaricides application. The results reveal a gap between the technology and farmers, favoring tick resistance to acaricides.

  8. Controle do carrapato Boophilus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae em sistemas de produção de leite da microrregião fisiográfica fluminense do grande Rio - Rio de Janeiro Control of the cattle tick Boophilus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae in dairy farm systems of the physiographic microrregion of grande Rio, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juracy de Castro Borba Santos Júnior

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do trabalho foi analisar os métodos de controle do carrapato Boophilus microplus realizados em três fazendas representativas dos sistemas de produção de leite da Microrregião Fisiográfica Fluminense do Grande Rio, Rio de Janeiro, levando-se em consideração o manejo das fazendas, o grau de sangue Bos taurus e Bos indicus dos rebanhos, os fatores climáticos e a prevalência estacional do carrapato. Para efeito de avaliação, foi utilizada a contagem periódica de fêmeas ingurgitadas medindo entre 4,5 e 8mm, no antímero direito de 20% das vacas em lactação de cada fazenda, durante um ano. A diferença no manejo das pastagens, a composição genética dos rebanhos e as condições climáticas influenciaram a prevalência estacional de B. microplus. A maior lotação animal por hectare, o elevado "stand" vegetativo das pastagens e o maior grau de sangue B. taurus contribuíram para as maiores infestações de carrapatos nas fazendas. O controle de B. microplus realizado pelos proprietários teve importância secundária em relação as outras atitudes de manejo dos rebanhos. Ficou evidenciado o uso excessivo e ineficiente de produtos químicos para o controle de B. microplus nas fazendas. Para implantação de medidas de controle estratégico do B. Microplus, fazem-se necessários esforços para a transferência e adoção dos resultados de pesquisas disponíveis aos produtores rurais.The objective of the study was to analyse the control methods of the cattle tick, Boophilus microplus. The experiment was carried out on three farms of the dairy production systems of the Fluminense Physiographic Microregion of Grande Rio, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Farm management, the Bos indicus and Bos taurus composition of herds, climatic factors and seasonal variation in tick infestation level of cattle was taken into account. Counts of engorged female ticks, measuring between 4.5 and 8.0mm, in 20% of the lactating cows of each farm, were carried out during one year, June 1996 to May, 1997. Pasture management differences, genetic composition of the herds and climatic conditions, influenced the seasonal incidence of B. microplus. The highest cattle stocking rate per hectare, taller vegetative stand of pasture and greater proportion of B. taurus genes in herds contributed to increase tick infestation on farms. The direct control of B. microplus, carried out by the owners on farms, had a secondary importance compared to other factors of herd management. Excessive and inefficient use of chemical acaricide products was observed. Efforts should be made for the transfer and adoption of research results for rural producers to facilitate the implantation of strategic control measures against B. microplus.

  9. Seroprevalence of Rickettsia spp. in Equids and Molecular Detection of 'Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii' in Amblyomma cajennense Sensu Lato Ticks From the Pantanal Region of Mato Grosso, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Alvair Da S; Melo, Andréia L T; Amorim, Marcus V; Borges, Alice M C M; Gaíva E Silva, Lucas; Martins, Thiago F; Labruna, Marcelo B; Aguiar, Daniel M; Pacheco, Richard C

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate exposure of equids to rickettsial agents (Rickettsia rickettsii, Rickettsia parkeri, 'Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii', Rickettsia rhipicephali, and Rickettsia bellii) and rickettsial infection in ticks of a Pantanal region of Brazil. Sera of 547 equids (500 horses and 47 donkeys) were evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence assay. In total, 665 adults and 106 nymphal pools of Amblyomma cajennense F. sensu lato, 10 Dermacentor nitens Neumann ticks, and 88 larval pools of Amblyomma sp. were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Overall, 337 (61.6%) equids were reactive (titer ≥64) to at least one antigen of Rickettsia spp. The prevalence values for Rickettsia were 66%, and the highest endpoint titers were observed for 'Ca. R. amblyommii'. By PCR 3 (0.45%) A. cajennense s.l. females were positive for 'Ca. R. amblyommii'. Minimum infection rates of 0.75% for nymphs and 0.34% for larvae were calculated. Positive samples of ticks have had a fragment of the 16S mitochondrial rRNA gene sequenced and sequences showed 99% identity to Amblyomma sculptum Berlese. This study reports a wide exposure of equids to Rickettsia agents, and PCR evidence of infection with 'Ca. R. amblyommii', for the first time, in A. sculptum. © 2014 Entomological Society of America.

  10. Interaction between acari ectoparasites and rodents in Suez Governorate, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, T A; Fayad, M E; el Hariry, M A; Morsy, T A

    1995-08-01

    From the medical point of view, the relation between man and rodents comes in the priority. Some rodent populations are wild but others are commensal and live in close association with man. They steal his food and conveying many zoonotic diseases. Their arthropod ectoparasites play an important role in conveying or transmitting these zoonotic diseases. Several disorders and diseases of man are tick borne relapsing fever, Rocky mountain spotted fever, Lyme disease, and many others. Besides numerous species of mites occasionally infest man. They transmit several diseases as Rickettsia tsutsugamushi fever, epidemic haemorrhagic fever, and they cause severe allergic reaction. The results obtained are summarized in the following (1) Six species and subspecies of rodents were detected. In a descending order of abundance, they were (a) Rattus norvegicus, (b) Rattus rattus alexandrinus (c) Rattus rattus frugivorous (d) Acomys cahirinus (e) Gerbillus gerbillus asyutensis (f) Mus m. praetextus. (2) The most common rodent was R. norvegicus and the least common was M. musculus. (3) The collected ticks and mites were 2 genera of tick larvae; Rhipicephalus species and Hyalomma species. The collected mites were Ornithonyssus bacoti and Laelaps nuttali. (4) Most of the tick larvae were collected from wild rodents; Gerbillus g. asyutensis. (5) Most of the mites were collected from commensal rodents particularly R. norvegicus. Descriptive morphology and illustrations were given to the collected rodents and their acari ectoparasites.

  11. Catalase is a determinant of the colonization and transovarial transmission of Rickettsia parkeri in the Gulf Coast tick Amblyomma maculatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budachetri, K; Kumar, D; Karim, S

    2017-08-01

    The Gulf Coast tick (Amblyomma maculatum) has evolved as a competent vector of the spotted-fever group rickettsia, Rickettsia parkeri. In this study, the functional role of catalase, an enzyme responsible for the degradation of toxic hydrogen peroxide, in the colonization of the tick vector by R. parkeri and transovarial transmission of this pathogen to the next tick generation, was investigated. Catalase gene (CAT) expression in midgut, salivary glands and ovarian tissues exhibited a 2-11-fold increase in transcription level upon R. parkeri infection. Depletion of CAT transcripts using an RNA-interference approach significantly reduced R. parkeri infection levels in midgut and salivary gland tissues by 53-63%. The role of CAT in transovarial transmission of R. parkeri was confirmed by simultaneously blocking the transcript and the enzyme by injecting double-stranded RNA for CAT and a catalase inhibitor (3-amino-1,2,4-triazole) into gravid females. Simultaneous inhibition of the CAT transcript and the enzyme significantly reduced the egg conversion ratio with a 44% reduction of R. parkeri transovarial transmission. These data suggest that catalase is required for rickettsial colonization of the tick vector and transovarial transmission to the next generation. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  12. Investigations of Gamasina mites in natural and man-affected soils in Latvia (Acari: Mesostigmata)

    OpenAIRE

    Salmane, I.

    2003-01-01

    Investigations of Gamasina mites in natural and man-affected soils in Latvia (Acari: Mesostigmata) A short overview is presented on Gamasina material collected in 22 natural and man-disturbed habitats in Latvia. Species diversity, average density and species dominance were investigated. Altogether 167 Gamasina species from 14 families were found. The highest number of species was found for field margins and the lowest for pine forests and arable lands affected by calciferous dust. The highest...

  13. A large parasitengonid mite (Acari, Erythraeoidea from the Early Cretaceous Crato Formation of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Dunlop

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A new large, fossil mite (Arachnida: Acari, Pararainbowia martilli n. gen. n. sp., is described from the Early Cretaceous (Aptian Crato Formation from Ceará State, Brazil. It is assigned to the Cohort Parasitengona and the superfamily Erythraeoidea, some extant members of which can reach up to seven millimetres in body length. Given that doubts have been raised about the identity of putative Crato feather mite eggs, this new fossil represents the first unequivocal record of Acari from the Crato Formation, the first non-amber record of an erythraeoid mite and the oldest named example of this superfamily. Fossil erythraeoids from Mesozoic and Tertiary ambers are briefly reviewed – including a widely overlooked Late Cretaceous species – with comments on Mesozoic mites in general. Thirteen Baltic amber erythraeoids have been formally described, but much unstudied material from various amber sources remains. Ein neues großes Milbenfossil (Arachnida: Acari, Pararainbowia martilli n. gen. n. sp., wird aus der Crato Formation (Unterkreide, Aptium des Ceará Gebietes in Brasilien beschrieben. Es wird der Kohorte Parasitengona und der Überfamilie Erythraeoidea zugeordnet; die modernen Vertreter erreichen eine Körperlänge bis zu sieben mm. Weil die Identität von Federmilbeneiern aus der Crato Formation in Frage gestellt wurde, ist dieser Neufund der erste klare Hinweis von Acari aus der Crato Formation. Es ist die erste erythraeoide Milbe, die nicht aus dem Bernstein stammt sowie das älteste genannte Beispiel dieser Überfamilie. Fossile erythraeoide Milben aus dem Bernstein des Mesozoikum und des Tertiärs werden kurz zusammengefasst – u. a. eine weitgehend übersehene Art aus der Oberkreide – mit allgemeinen Anmerkungen zu den mesozoischen Milben. Dreizehn erythraeoide Milbenarten sind aus dem baltischen Bernstein genannt und beschrieben worden, aber weiteres unbearbeitetes Material von verschiedenen Bernstein-Fundpunkten liegt noch vor

  14. Fine structure of the gnathosoma of archegozetes longisetosus [corrected] aoki (acari: oribatida, trhypochthoniidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Gerd; Heethoff, Michael; Norton, Roy A; Schmelzle, Sebastian; Seniczak, Anna; Seniczak, Stanisław

    2011-09-01

    Oribatida are one of the main groups of Acari comprising mostly important decomposers in soils. Most species are particle feeders, an exceptional mode of nutrition in Arachnida. Hence, their feeding organs, the gnathosoma, are of special functional interest. We studied nearly all components using scanning and transmission electron microscopies as well as reconstructions based on synchrotron X-ray microtomography from the model oribatid Archegozetes longisetosus. Besides cuticular structures, we describe the full set of muscles and confirm the presence of a trochanter remnant at the base of the chelicera. Setae on the prodorsum and the anterior and posterior infracapitular setae are mechanoreceptors innervated by two dendrites ending with tubular bodies. Dendrites of adoral setae, anterior setae of the chelicerae, and the supracoxal setae show neither obvious tubular bodies nor wall or terminal pores. Thus their function remains obscure. For the first time, a muscular proprioreceptor has been found in Arachnida. It likely monitors the actions of muscles moving the movable digit of the chelicera. Glandular structures within and associated with the gnathosoma are described. Dermal glands represented by secretory porose areas are found within the infracapitulum. More complex associated glands comprise the podocephalic glands and the infracapitular glands, the ducts of which were traced completely for the first time. The components described are mostly fundamental for the gnathosoma of Actinotrichida (Acariformes), one of the two lineages of Acari, to which Oribatida belong. The gnathosoma is generally considered the most relevant putative synapomorphy of Acari. Since the monophyly of Acari has become more and more questionable during the last decades, a thorough reinvestigation of this body part is necessary for a comprehensive understanding of acarine and even arachnid phylogeny and evolution. This article provides a starting point of such a re-evaluation of the

  15. Two new species of Austrophthiracarus (Acari: Oribatida: phthiracaridae) from New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    The genus Austrophthiracarus (Acari: Oribatida: Phthiracaridae) was represented in New Zealand by four species prior to this work. In this paper, two new species of Austrophthiracarus are described from the South Island, New Zealand: Austrophthiracarus cronadun sp. nov. collected near Cronadun, Buller and Austrophthiracarus tawhai sp. nov. from (Catlins State Forest, Otago. A key to all known species of Austrophthiracarus in New Zealand is provided.

  16. Acaricidal and repellent activities of essential oil of Eucalyptus globulus against Dermanyssus gallinae (Acari: Mesostigmata)

    OpenAIRE

    Dehghani-Samani Amir; Madreseh-Ghahfarokhi Samin; Dehghani-Samani Azam; Pirali-Kheirabadi Khodadad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: By considering an increase in drug resistance against red mites, finding the nonchemical herbal acaricide against Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer) (Acari: Mesostigmata) is necessary to kill them and to reduce the chemical resistance against chemical acaricides in this specie. Dermanyssus gallinae is a potential vector of the causal agent of several viral diseases such as Equine encephalitis and St. Louis encephalitis. It can be a vector of bacteria such as Salmonella spp., Mycobac...

  17. Amblyomma cajennense infestation on horses in two microregions of the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Infestação por Amblyomma cajennense em equinos de duas microrregiões do estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Sandes Pires

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate factors associated with infestation by Amblyomma cajennense on horses in two microregions of the state of Rio de Janeiro. Horses on 62 farms in the municipalities of the Itaguaí and Serrana microregions were evaluated between January and May 2009. The animals were examined to determine the presence of ticks and infestation level. The animals' rearing and management were assessed on each farm property using an epidemiological questionnaire. Out of the 635 horses evaluated, 41.6% were infested with A. cajennense. It was observed that farms in low-altitude regions (OR=3.69; CI: 2.3-5.8, with unsatisfactory zootechnical and sanitary management (OR=5.92; CI: 3.8-9.2 and an extensive rearing system (OR=4.25; CI: 2.1-8.5 were factors associated with tick infestation (p O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar os fatores associados à infestação por Amblyomma cajennense em equinos em duas microrregiões do estado do Rio de Janeiro. Equinos de 62 fazendas nos municípios das microrregiões de Itaguaí e Serrana foram avaliados entre janeiro e maio de 2009. Os animais foram inspecionados quanto à presença e ao nível de infestação destes carrapatos. As condições de criação e o manejo foram avaliados em cada propriedade, por um questionário epidemiológico. Dos 635 equinos avaliados, 41,6% apresentavam-se infestados por A. cajennense. Observou-se que as criações dos animais em regiões de baixas altitudes (OR=3,69, IC: 2,3-5,8, em propriedades com manejo zootécnico e sanitário insatisfatório (OR=5,92, IC: 3,8-9,2 e em sistema de criação extensivo (OR=4,25, IC: 2,1-8,5 foram fatores associados (p < 0,05 à infestação, sendo também relacionados à intensa infestação nos equinos. O uso de carrapaticida nos equinos também apresentou associação (p < 0,05 à infestação, sendo descritas pelos proprietários, diferentes condutas terapêuticas, em intervalos alternados de tratamento. Baixas

  18. Marine water mites (Acari: Hydrachnidia: Pontarachnidae) from Taiwan, Korea and India, with the first description of the male of Pontarachna australis Smit, 2003

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pesic, V.; Chatterjee, T.; Chan, B.K.K.; Ingole, B.S.

    , D.R. (1996) A freshwater species of Pontarachna (Acari, Pontarachnidae) from South Africa, with a discussion of genital acetabula in the family. Anales Instituto de Biologa, Universidad Nacionale Aut- noma de Mxico, Seria Zoologa, 67, 259...

  19. A new species of Atractides Koch, 1837 (Acari: Hydrachnidia, Hygrobatidae from Ethiopia, with a discussion on the biodiversity of the genus Atractides in the Afrotropical region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Pesic

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Atractides Koch, 1837 (Acari, Hydrachnidia is described from Ethiopia. The world number of Atractides now tallies 297 species. The diversity of the genus Atractides in the Afrotropical region is briefly discussed.

  20. Mites (Acari: Scutacaridae) associated with the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis Invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), from Louisiana and Tennessee, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst Ebermann; John C. Moser

    2008-01-01

    Four species of Scutacarus and one of Imparipes (Acari: Scutacaridae) are documented as phoretic from alates and workers of the red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta Buren) in Louisiana and Tennessee, U.S.A. One, Imparipes (Imparipes) louisianae)

  1. A new species of Litarachna Walter, 1925 (Acari: Hydrachnidia) from the West Indian Coast, with a discussion on the diversity of the family Pontarachnidae Koenike, 1910

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pesic, V.; Chatterjee, T.; Ingole, B.S.; Velip, D.; Pavicevic, A.

    Litarachna indica, a new species of the marine water mite family Pontarachnidae (Acari: Hydrachnidia) is described from the tropical West Indian coast. The total number of Pontarachnidae species worldwide tallies exactly 43 species...

  2. Amblyomma americanum tick calreticulin binds C1q but does not inhibit activation of the classical complement cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Kwon; Ibelli, Adriana Mércia Guaratini; Mulenga, Albert

    2015-02-01

    In this study we characterized Amblyomma americanum (Aam) tick calreticulin (CRT) homolog in tick feeding physiology. In nature, different tick species can be found feeding on the same animal host. This suggests that different tick species found feeding on the same host can modulate the same host anti-tick defense pathways to successfully feed. From this perspective it's plausible that different tick species can utilize universally conserved proteins such as CRT to regulate and facilitate feeding. CRT is a multi-functional protein found in most taxa that is injected into the vertebrate host during tick feeding. Apart from it's current use as a biomarker for human tick bites, role(s) of this protein in tick feeding physiology have not been elucidated. Here we show that annotated functional CRT amino acid motifs are well conserved in tick CRT. However our data show that despite high amino acid identity levels to functionally characterized CRT homologs in other organisms, AamCRT is apparently functionally different. Pichia pastoris expressed recombinant (r) AamCRT bound C1q, the first component of the classical complement system, but it did not inhibit activation of this pathway. This contrast with reports of other parasite CRT that inhibited activation of the classical complement pathway through sequestration of C1q. Furthermore rAamCRT did not bind factor Xa in contrast to reports of parasite CRT binding factor Xa, an important protease in the blood clotting system. Consistent with this observation, rAamCRT did not affect plasma clotting or platelet aggregation. We discuss our findings in the context of tick feeding physiology.

  3. Efficacy of indigenous predatory mites (Acari: Phytoseiidae) against the citrus rust mite Phyllocoptruta oleivora (Acari: Eriophyidae): augmentation and conservation biological control in Israeli citrus orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maoz, Yonatan; Gal, Shira; Argov, Yael; Domeratzky, Sylvie; Melamed, Eti; Gan-Mor, Samuel; Coll, Moshe; Palevsky, Eric

    2014-07-01

    The citrus rust mite (CRM), Phyllocoptruta oleivora (Acari: Eriophyidae) is a cosmopolitan key pest of citrus, inflicting severe economic damage if not controlled. In Israel, CRM damages all citrus cultivars. International regulation and increasing control failures of CRM led growers to seek sustainable biological control solutions such as acarine biological control agents. Laboratory studies conducted in Israel have indicated that the indigenous predator species Amblyseius swirskii, Iphiseius degenerans, Typhlodromus athiasae and Euseius scutalis (all Acari: Phytoseiidae) can potentially control CRM. Our general objective in the present study was to bridge the gap of knowledge between laboratory studies and the lack of control efficacy of these species in commercial orchards. Predator augmentation in the field showed that although predator populations increased immediately following releases they later decreased and did not affect CRM populations. When A. swirskii augmentation was combined with a series of maize pollen applications, A. swirskii populations were enhanced substantially and continuously but again CRM populations were not affected. Growth chamber studies with CRM-infested seedlings, with or without a maize pollen supplement, indicated that pollen provisioning led to population increase of E. scutalis and A. swirskii but only E. scutalis significantly lowered CRM populations. Control with E. scutalis was confirmed in the field on CRM infested seedlings with pollen provisioned by adjacent flowering Rhodes grass. While experiments in mature citrus orchard showed that pollen supplement usually increased predator populations they also indicated that other factors such as intraguild interactions and pesticide treatments should be taken into account when devising CRM biological control programs.

  4. On the sterile male release technique: sterilization by γ-radiation (60Co) in Amblyomma variegatum (Fabricius, 1794), Hyalomma anatolicum excavatum (Koch, 1844), and Rhipicephalus appendiculatus (Neumann, 1901)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuthner, U.

    1975-01-01

    Nymphal stages (2-3 days before moulting) and adult male ticks (one week after moulting) of Amblyomma variegatum, Hyalomma a. excavatum, and Rhipicephalus appendiculatus were exposed to irradiation with gamma-rays in the range of 0-8 krad. All ticks irradiated with a dose of 2 krad or more became 100% sterile. There was found no significant difference in engorged weight, time of engorgement, and egg weight in control-ticks and female partner-ticks of Amblyomma variegatum, males of which had received an irradiation dose of 2 krad as nymphs or adults. The same result was obtained in Hyalomma a. excavatum and Rhipicephalus appendiculatus when the males were irradiated as adults with 2 krad. However, significant differences occured when males of Hyalomma a. excavatum and Rhipicephalus appendiculatus were irradiated as nymphs with 2 krad. This applied also when males of all 3 species of ticks (nymphs or adults) were irradiated with higher doses. Since it was found that parthenogenesis occured in different degrees in all 3 species of ticks the practical application of the sterile-male-release-technique appears doubtful at least in the 3 investigated strains. (orig.) [de

  5. Response of forest soil Acari to prescribed fire following stand structure manipulation in the southern Cascade Range.Can

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael A. Camann; Nancy E. Gillette; Karen L. Lamoncha; Sylvia R. Mori

    2008-01-01

    We studied responses of Acari, especially oribatid mites, to prescribed low-intensity fire in an east side pine site in the southern Cascade Range in California. We compared oribatid population and assemblage responses to prescribed fire in stands that had been selectively logged to enhance old growth characteristics, in logged stands to minimize old growth...

  6. The presence of webbing affects the oviposition rate of two-spotted spider mites, Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oku, K.; Magalhães, S.; Dicke, M.

    2009-01-01

    Several species of tetranychid mites including Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae) construct complicated three-dimensional webs on plant leaves. These webs provide protection against biotic and abiotic stress. As producing web is likely to entail a cost, mites that arrive on a leaf with

  7. Water mites (Acari: Hydrachnidia) from the hyporheic waters of the Selwyn River (New Zealand), with descriptions of nine new species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pesic, V.; Smit, H.; Datry, T.

    2010-01-01

    New records of water mite species (Acari: Hydrachnidia) from hyporheic waters of Selwyn River (South Island, New Zealand) are reported. One new genus, Canterburaturus Pesic & Smit n. gen. (Aturidae) and nine new species are described: Taintaturus selwynus Pesic & Smit n. sp., T. rostratus Pesic &

  8. The Rhagidiidae (Acari: Prostigmata) in NW Lapland: Could their assemblages be climate warming monitors related to environmental and habitat patterns?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zacharda, Miloslav; Kučera, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 1 (2010), s. 1-8 ISSN 0031-4056 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/06/1236 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Lapland * Acari * Rhagidiidae * Monitor * Climate warming Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.474, year: 2010

  9. Effect of coconut palm proximities and Musa spp. germplasm resistance to colonization by Raoiella indica (Acari: Tenuipalpidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) is the predominant host for Raoiella indica Hirst (Acari: Tenuipalpidae), false spider mite infestations do occur on bananas and plantains (Musa spp. Colla). Since its introduction, the banana and plantain industries have been negatively impacted to different deg...

  10. New feather mites of the subfamily Pterodectinae (Acari: Astigmata: Proctophyllodidae) from passerines (Aves: Passeriformes) in Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mironov, S. V.; Literák, I.; Čapek, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 1947, - (2008), s. 1-38 ISSN 1175-5326 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : Acari * Astigmata * feather mites * systematics * Brazil * Proctophyllodidae * Aves * Passeriformes Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.740, year: 2008 http://www.mapress.com/zootaxa/2008/f/zt01947p038.pdf

  11. IN VITRO EFFECT OF SORGHUM (SORGHUM BICOLOR SEED EXTRACTS AS A BIOLOGICAL ACARICIDAL AGAINST SOME HARD TICK (IXODIDAE IN SULAIMANI GOVERNORATE - KURDISTAN REGION/IRAQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahzad H.S. Mustafa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in Sulaimani governorate in order to identify the biological control of some Ixodidae genera among different flocks of cattle, sheep and goats. Four genera of Ixodidae; Boophilus spp., Hyalomma spp., Rhipicephalus spp. and Haemaphysalis spp., were identified in these infested animals. According to chi–square test, the highest distribution of Boophulis spp., was recorded in cattle (56.51%, and the highest distribution of Hyalomma spp., (49.82% and Rhipicephalus spp., (28.16% which were in sheep. The highest number of Haemophasylas spp., was obtained from goats (6.67%, whereas the lowest number of this genus (2.88% and 2.89% was collected from cattle and sheep respectively. The toxicity of Sorghum bicolor seed extract was tested against the more distributed Ixodidae genera (Boophilus spp. and Hyalomma spp. by immersion method on mature ticks, four concentrations (23.2, 17.4, 11.6 and 5.8 mg/dl, in addition to the control treatment (0 mg/dl of the seed were used to evaluate the engorged females in vitro. The results showed that 100% of absolute cumulative mortality of Boophilus spp., was gain after 72 hr by 23.2 mg/dl extract concentration, followed by 17.4 mg/dl which gave 90% mortality, whereas 100% absolute cumulative mortality for Hyalomma spp., was obtained by 23.2 mg/dl extract concentration after 48 hr, followed by 17.4, 11.6 and 5.8 mg/dl concentration that gave 90%, 80% and 40% mortality after 72 hr.

  12. Comparative speed of kill of sarolaner (Simparica) and afoxolaner (NexGard) against induced infestations of Amblyomma americanum on dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six, Robert H; Everett, William R; Chapin, Sara; Mahabir, Sean P

    2016-02-19

    The lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum, infests dogs and cats in North America and is the vector of the pathogens that cause monocytic and granulocytic ehrlichiosis in dogs and humans. A parasiticide's speed of kill is important to minimize the direct and deleterious effects of tick infestation and especially to reduce the risk of transmission of tick-borne pathogens. In this study, speed of kill of a novel orally administered isoxazoline parasiticide, sarolaner (Simparica chewable tablets), against A. americanum on dogs was evaluated and compared with afoxolaner (NexGard) for 5 weeks following a single oral dose. Based on pretreatment tick counts, 24 dogs were randomly allocated to treatment with sarolaner (2 to 4 mg/kg), afoxolaner (2.5 to 6.8 mg/kg) or a placebo. Dogs were examined and live ticks counted at 8, 12, and 24 h after treatment and subsequent re-infestations on Days 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35. Efficacy was determined at each time point relative to counts for placebo dogs. A single oral dose of sarolaner provided 100 % efficacy within 24 h of treatment, and consistently provided >90% efficacy against subsequent weekly re-infestations with ticks to Day 28. Significantly more live ticks were recovered from afoxolaner-treated dogs than from sarolaner-treated dogs at 24 h after infestation from Day 7 through Day 35 (P ≤ 0.0247). At 24 h, efficacy of afoxolaner declined to less than 90% from Day 14 to the end of the study. There were no adverse reactions to treatment. In this controlled laboratory evaluation, sarolaner had a faster speed of kill against A. americanum ticks than afoxolaner. The rapid and consistent kill of ticks by sarolaner within 24 h after a single oral dose over 28 days, suggests this treatment will provide highly effective and reliable control of ticks over the entire treatment interval, and could help reduce the risk of transmission of tick-borne pathogens by A. americanum.

  13. Tick (Amblyomma chabaudi) infestation of endemic tortoises in southwest Madagascar and investigation of tick-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Julian; Ganzhorn, Jörg U; Silaghi, Cornelia; Krüger, Andreas; Pothmann, Daniela; Ratovonamana, R Yedidya; Veit, Alexandra; Keller, Christian; Poppert, Sven

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the role of endemic ticks as vectors for bacterial and protozoan pathogens for animals and humans in Madagascar and their interaction in anthropogenic habitats where humans, their livestock and native Malagasy species (vectors and hosts) come into more frequent contact than in natural forest ecosystems. The aims of the study were (1) to test whether habitat degradation is associated with increased infestation of tortoises by ticks and (2) to investigate whether ticks carried Babesia, Borrelia or Rickettsia species that might be pathogenic for humans and livestock. We studied hard ticks of two endemic Malagasy tortoises, Astrochelys radiata and Pyxis arachnoides in March and April 2013 in southwest Madagascar. Two tortoise habitats were compared, the National Park of Tsimanampetsotsa and the adjacent degraded pasture and agricultural land at the end of the wet season. Ticks were screened for protozoan and bacterial pathogens via PCR on DNA isolated from ticks using genus-specific primers. Only one out of 42 A. radiata collected from both habitats had ticks. The low prevalence did not allow further analyses of the effect of habitat degradation. Forty-two P. arachnoides were found in the anthropogenic habitat and 36 individuals in the national park. Tick infestation rates of P. arachnoides differed significantly between the two study sites. Tortoises inside the park had lower tick prevalence than outside (8 of 36 (22%) versus 32 of 42 individuals (76%)) and infected animals tended to have fewer ticks inside than outside the park. All ticks collected in both habitats were adults of the ixodid tick Amblyomma chabaudi, which is supposed to be a host-specific tick of P. arachnoides. Screening for Borrelia sp. and Babesia sp. was negative in all ticks. But all A. chabaudi ticks were infected with Rickettsia africae, known to cause spotted fever in humans. Thus, habitat degradation seems to be linked to higher infestation of tortoises with ticks with

  14. Mites (Acari Associated with the Desert Seed Harvester Ant, Messor pergandei (Mayr

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    Kaitlin A. Uppstrom

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mites (Acari associated with the seed harvester ant Messor pergandei were investigated in the Sonoran desert of Arizona. At least seven representatives of the mite genera Armacarus, Lemanniella, Petalomium, Forcellinia, Histiostoma, Unguidispus, and Cosmoglyphus are phoretically associated with M. pergandei. Most of these morphospecies show preference for specific phoretic attachment sites and primarily use female alates rather than male alates for dispersal. Five mite morphospecies were found in low numbers inhabiting the chaff piles: Tydeidae sp., Procaeculus sp., Anystidae sp., Bakerdania sp., and Tetranychidae sp. The phoretic Petalomium sp. was observed consuming fungus growing on a dead queen, but the roles of the other mite species remain mostly unresolved.

  15. Water mites from caves of the Ha Giang province, northern Vietnam (Acari: Hydrachnidia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pešić, Vladimir; Gerecke, Reinhard

    2014-03-07

    Four species of water mites (Acari, Hydrachnidia) were collected in 2010 during an Italian speleological expedition to caves of the Ha Giang region in northern Vietnam from rimstone pools or other tiny accumulations of percolating water. Four taxa new to science are described, representing the families Torrenticolidae (Torrenticola anophthalma nov. sp., Stygotorrenticola coniseta nov. gen., nov. sp.), Limnesiidae (Raptorhydracarinae subfam. nov., Raptorhydracarus tomasini nov. gen., nov sp.) and Athienemanniidae (Africasia vietnamitica sp. nov.). Most of these taxa show striking morphological adaptations to subterranean life.

  16. A rare finding of mites (Arachnida: Acari: Leeuwenhoekiidae) parasitising a whip spider (Arachnida: Amblypygi: Charinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves-Souza, Thiago; Giupponi, Alessandro P L; Hernandes, Fabio A

    2014-04-01

    Twelve larvae of unidentified species of Odontacarus Ewing, 1929 (Acari: Leeuwenhoekiidae) were found parasitising an adult male whip spider Charinus brasilianus Weygoldt (Charinidae) in Santa Teresa, mountainous region of Espirito Santo state, southeastern Brazil. These larvae occurred in the intersegmental membrane of prosoma and legs. This is the first report of ectoparasitic mites infecting a charinid whip spider and the first record of leeuwenhoekiid mites parasitising an invertebrate host. We suggest that future studies are essential to understand the reasons why these events of parasitism are so rare in the order Amblypygi.

  17. Acrotritia species (Acari: Oribatida: Euphthiracaridae) from China with description of a new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Chen, Jun

    2015-03-24

    In this paper, eight species of Acrotritia (Acari: Oribatida: Euphthiracaridae) are identified, including a new species, Acrotritia tibetensis sp. nov., and four newly recorded species from China: Acrotritia gracile (Niedbała, 2000), Acrotritia hauseri (Mahunka, 1991), Acrotritia refracta (Niedbała, 1998) and Acrotritia simile (Mahunka, 1982). An updated diagnosis of the genus and remarks on some known species are presented, the validity of species A. hauseri is discussed, and a key to Chinese known species of Acrotritia is also provided.

  18. The oribatid mite subgenus Galumna (Galumna (Acari, Oribatida, Galumnidae in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Ermilov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Five species of the subgenus Galumna (Galumna (Acari, Oribatida, Galumnidae are registered in the Philippine oribatid mite fauna. A new species, G. (G. makilingensis sp. n., is described; it is most similar morphologically to G. (G. tokyoensis Aoki, 1966, but differs from the latter by the morphology of porose areas Aa and Ap, rostral setae, and length of interlamellar setae. Three species, G. (G. crenata Deb & Raychaudhuri, 1975, G. (G. cf. exigua Sellnick, 1925 and G. (G. khoii Mahunka, 1989, are recorded in the Philippines for the first time. The species G. (G. crenata is redescribed. An identification key to the Philippine species of Galumna (Galumna is given.

  19. Systematic placement of some taxa in the family Galumnidae (Acari, Oribatida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermilov, Sergey G; Bayartogtokh, Badamdorj

    2015-06-04

    Based on the recent ascertaining studies of type specimens, the new systematic placement for one subgenus and three species of oribatid mites of the family Galumnidae (Acari, Oribatida) are proposed, resulting in the following taxonomic proposals: Pergalumna (Bigalumna) Mahunka & Mahunka-Papp, 2009 stat. nov., P. (B.) rimosa (Mahunka & Mahunka-Papp, 2009) comb. nov., Allogalumna quadrimaculata (Mahunka, 1988) comb. nov. and A. brevisetosa (Bayartogtokh & Weigmann, 2005) comb. nov. The initial taxonomic position of the species, Galumna scripta Balogh & Mahunka, 1966, is supported. Some details on important morphological characters of these species are provided.

  20. Oribatid mites (Acari, Oribatida) of plain area of the Southern European Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, Natalia V; Poltavskaya, Marina P

    2013-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the fauna of oribatid mites (Acari: Oribatida) mostly of a plain area of the Southern European Russia. The most updated taxonomic list of oribatid mite taxa compiled from the original authors' data collected after sam- pling soil, nests and plumage of birds, as well as published sources is presented. It includes 256 species of oribatid mites belonging to 72 families. Twenty species and one family of oribatid mites are recorded for the first time at the research territory. The abundance of mites in the soil is also provided for selected species.

  1. The oribatid mite subgenus Galumna (Galumna) (Acari, Oribatida, Galumnidae) in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermilov, Sergey G; Corpuz-Raros, Leonila; Tolstikov, Andrei V

    2014-01-01

    Five species of the subgenus Galumna (Galumna) (Acari, Oribatida, Galumnidae) are registered in the Philippine oribatid mite fauna. A new species, Galumna (Galumna) makilingensissp. n., is described; it is most similar morphologically to Galumna (Galumna) tokyoensis Aoki, 1966, but differs from the latter by the morphology of porose areas Aa and Ap, rostral setae, and length of interlamellar setae. Three species, Galumna (Galumna) crenata Deb & Raychaudhuri, 1975, Galumna (Galumna) cf.exigua Sellnick, 1925 and Galumna (Galumna) khoii Mahunka, 1989, are recorded in the Philippines for the first time. The species Galumna (Galumna) crenata is redescribed. An identification key to the Philippine species of Galumna (Galumna) is given.

  2. The residual and direct effects of reduced-risk and conventional miticides on twospotted spider mites, Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae) and predatory mites (Acari: Phytoseiidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liburd, O.E.; White, J.C.; Rhodes, E.M.; Browdy, A.A.

    2007-01-01

    The residual effects of several reduced-risk and conventional miticides were evaluated in strawberries (Fragaria × ananassa Duchesne) on the twospotted spider mite (TSSM), Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae) and on 2 predatory mites, Neoseiulus californicus McGregor and Phytoseiulus persimilis Athias-Henriot (Acari: Phytoseiidae). Experiments were conducted in the laboratory and greenhouse. The greenhouse experiments also tested the direct effects of the miticides on TSSM. The efficacy of conventional and reduced-risk miticides was evaluated on strawberry leaf discs and on whole plants for control of TSSM. Furthermore, the residual effects of these miticides were evaluated on whole strawberry plants against selective predatory mites. For TSSM, 5 treatments were evaluated: a conventional miticide; fenbutatin-oxide (Vendex[reg]) and 3 reduced-risk miticides; binfenazate (Acramite 50WP[reg]), activated garlic extract (Repel[reg]), sesame seed and castor oil (Wipeout[reg]), and a water-treated control. For predatory mites, the residual effects of only Acramite[reg] and Vendex[reg] were evaluated. Acramite[reg] was the most effective acaricide in reducing TSSM populations in both the laboratory and greenhouse experiments. Vendex[reg] and Wipeout[reg] were also effective in the laboratory, but did not cause significant reduction of TSSM in the greenhouse. Repel[reg] was the least effective of the 4 pesticides evaluated. Neither Acramite[reg] nor Vendex[reg] had a significant effect on either predatory mite species. However, there appeared to be more predatory mites on the Vendex[reg]-treated plants than on the Acramite[reg]-treated plants. There were significantly more predatory mites of both species on the cue plants, which were inoculated with TSSM versus the non-cue plants, which were not inoculated. (author) [es

  3. Development, oviposition, and mortality of Neoseiulus fallacis (Acari: Phytoseiidae) in response to reduced-risk insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Raul T; Walgenbach, James F

    2005-12-01

    Eight reduced-risk insecticides (acetamiprid, thiamethoxam, imidacloprid, thiacloprid, methoxyfenozide, pyriproxyfen, indoxacarb, and spinosad) and three conventional insecticides (azinphosmethyl, fenpropathrin, and esfenvalerate) were tested against Neoseiulus fallacis (Garman) (Acari: Phytoseiidae), the most abundant predacious mite in North Carolina apple (Malus spp.) orchards. To assess the effect of insecticides on development and mortality of N. fallacis immatures, 12-h-old eggs were individually placed on bean leaf disks previously dipped in insecticide solutions. Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae) females were added as a food source. None of the reduced-risk insecticides significantly affected immature N. fallacis compared with the control; however, the pyrethroids esfenvalerate and fenpropathrin were highly toxic to immatures. To evaluate the effect of insecticides on mortality and oviposition of adult N. fallacis, 7- to 8-d-old females were confined on insecticide-treated bean leaves with Malephora crocea (Aizoaceae) pollen added as a food source. Spinosad resulted in the highest mortality, whereas azinphosmethyl, acetamiprid, fenpropathrin, and imidacloprid were moderately toxic, and mortality from esfenvalerate, indoxacarb, thiacloprid, methoxyfenozide, pyriproxyfen, and thiamethoxam did not differ significantly from the control. Oviposition was affected in a similar manner, with the exception of acetamiprid that did not affect oviposition, and thiamethoxam that reduced oviposition.

  4. Phytoseiid mites of the Canary Islands (Acari, Phytoseiidae. II. Tenerife and La Gomera Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferragut, F.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Phytoseiid mites (Acari, Phytoseiidae inhabiting plants in natural ecosystems from Tenerife and La Gomera islands (Canary Islands have been studied. Surveys were conducted from 1997 to 2002. Eleven species were collected, one of them being reported for the first time from the Canary Islands and six of them reported for the first time from Tenerife and La Gomera islands. Euseius machadoi n. sp. collected from woody plants in the Canarian laurisilva is proposed as a new species.

    En muestreos realizados desde 1997 hasta 2002 se ha estudiado la fauna de ácaros fitoseidos (Acari, Phytoseiidae asociada a plantas de ecosistemas naturales de las islas de Tenerife y La Gomera (Islas Canarias. Se han recolectado un total de 11 especies, siendo una de ellas citada por vez primera en las islas Canarias y seis de ellas citadas por primera vez en las islas de Tenerife y La Gomera. Euseius machadoi n. sp., recolectado en plantas leñosas de la laurisilva canaria, se propone como una nueva especie.

  5. Reproductive parameters of Phytoseiulus macropilis (Banks fed with Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Phytoseiidae, Tetranychidae in laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. C. Souza-Pimentel

    Full Text Available Abstract Predatory mites that belong to the Phytoseiidae family are one of the main natural enemies of phytophagous mites, thus allowing for their use as a biological control. Phytoseiulus macropilis (Banks, 1904 (Acari: Phytoseiidae is among the main species of predatory mites used for this purpose. Tetranychus urticae Koch, 1836 (Acari: Tetranychidae is considered to be one of the most important species of mite pests and has been described as attacking over 1,100 species of plants in 140 families with economic value. The objective of the present study was to investigate, in the laboratory, the reproductive parameters of the predatory mite P. macropilis when fed T. urticae. Experiments were conducted under laboratory conditions at 25 ± 2 °C of temperature, 70 ± 10% RH and 14 hours of photophase. In addition, biological aspects were evaluated and a fertility life table was established. The results of these experiments demonstrated that the longevity of adult female was 27.5 days and adult male was 29.0 days. The population was estimated to increase approximately 27 times (Ro in mean generation time (T, which was 17.7 days. Lastly, the mite population grew 1.2 times/day (λ and doubled every 3.7 days (TD.

  6. [Taxonomic status of the Burana virus (BURV) (Bunyaviridae, Nairovirus, Tamdy group) isolated from the ticks Haemaphysalis punctata Canestrini et Fanzago, 1877 and Haem. concinna Koch, 1844 (Ixodidae, Haemaphysalinae) in Kyrgyzstan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'vov, D K; Al'khovskiĭ, S V; Shchelkanov, M Iu; Shchetinin, A M; Deriabin, P G; Gitel'man, A K; Aristova, V A; Botikov, A G

    2014-01-01

    Complete genome sequence of the Burana virus (BURV) was determined using the next-generation sequencing approach (ID GenBank KF801651). The prototype strain of BURV LEIV-Krg760 was originally isolated from the ticks Haemaphysalis punctata Canestrini et Fanzago, 1877 (Ixodidae, Haemaphysalinae), collected from cows in Tokmak wildlife sanctuary, eastern part of the Chu valley (43 degrees 10' N, 74 degrees 40' E) near Burana village, Kirgizia, in April 1971. Molecular genetics and phylogenetic analyses showed that the BURV belonged to the Nairovirus genus, Bunyaviridae and is related to Tamdy virus (TAMV) that is also associated with the ixodidae ticks of pasture biocenosis in Central Asia. Previous studies showed that TAMV is the prototypic virus of new phylogenetic Tamdy group in the Nairovirus genus. Thus, BURV was classified as a new virus of the Tamdy group, Nairovirus, Bunyaviridae.

  7. Beklemishevia hispaniola n. sp., nuevo representante de la Cohorte Palaeosomata (Acari, Oribatei en España

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez-Iñigo, C.

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available A new species of oribatid mite (Acari, Oribatei belonging to the family Ctenacaridae (Cohors Palaeosomata is described; this species was recorded several times in Spain as Beklemishevia galeodula Zachvatkin, 1945. The new species is easily distinguishable from the mentioned one because of the presence of three claws in every leg, a noticeable pigidial neotrichy and the absence of short, almost spiniform, setae on the pygidium.Se describe una nueva especie de oribátido (Acari, Oribatei perteneciente a la familia Ctenacaridae (Cohorte Palaeosomata que habia sido citada varias veces en España como Beklemishevia galeodula Zachvatkin, 1945, y de la que se diferencia por presentar tres uñas en todas las patas, una acentuada neotriquia pigidial y carecer de setas cortas espiniformes en el pigidio.

  8. Synergism of thymol, carvacrol and eugenol in larvae of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, and brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, L X; Novato, T P L; Zeringota, V; Maturano, R; Melo, D; DA Silva, B C; Daemon, E; DE Carvalho, M G; Monteiro, C M O

    2016-12-01

    The effects of combinations of the monoterpenes thymol and carvacrol and the phenylpropanoid eugenol in larvae of Rhipicephalus microplus (Canestrini, 1888) (Acari: Ixodidae) and Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (s.l.) (Acari: Ixodidae) were assessed by the larval packet test. The CompuSyn program was used to make qualitative assessments of the effects (synergistic, additive and antagonistic) of the associations. The effects of all combinations tested against R. microplus larvae were synergistic, with combination indices (CIs) eugenol and thymol + eugenol have synergistic effects in R. microplus and R. sanguineus s.l. larvae. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  9. Community structure variability of Uropodina mites (Acari: Mesostigmata) in nests of the common mole, Talpa europaea, in Central Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Napiera?a, Agnieszka; M?dra, Anna; Leszczy?ska-Deja, Kornelia; Gwiazdowicz, Dariusz J.; Go?dyn, Bart?omiej; B?oszyk, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Underground nests of Talpa europaea, known as the common mole, are very specific microhabitats, which are also quite often inhabited by various groups of arthropods. Mites from the suborder Uropodina (Acari: Mesostigmata) are only one of them. One could expect that mole nests that are closely located are inhabited by communities of arthropods with similar species composition and structure. However, results of empirical studies clearly show that even nests which are close to each other can be ...

  10. Reproduction and development of laboratory and wild house dust mites (Acari: Pyroglyphidae) and their relationship to the natural dust ecosystem

    OpenAIRE

    Hart, Barbara; Crowther, David; Wilkinson, Toby; Biddulph, Phillip; Ucci, Marcella; Pretlove, Stephen; Ridley, Ian; Oreszczyn, Tadj

    2007-01-01

    Life histories of “wild” house dust mites, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Trouessart) (Acari: Pyroglyphidae), were compared with laboratory cultures by using a diet consisting of skin and dust or a laboratory diet consisting of dried liver and yeast. Under constant conditions of 25 C and 75% RH, fecundity and rate of reproduction were higher in laboratory cultures on both diets compared with wild mites. There were also trends for a shorter prereproductive period and more rapid egg developmen...

  11. First record of larvae of the water mite Hydrachna processifera Piersig, 1895 from Turkey (Acari, Hydrachnidia, Hydrachnidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medeni Aykut

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Larvae of water mite Hydrachna processifera Piersig, 1895 (Acari, Hydrachnidiae were reported on diving beetles Dytiscus marginalis Linnaeus, 1758 (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae from Turkey. The redescription of the larva was made. Earlier, the larva H. processifera was described as H. inermis, but it was subsequently synonymized with H. processifera. The larva of H. processifera is a new record for the Turkish fauna. All larvae of H. processifera were found on the mesosternum of the one specimens (prevalence = 16.7%.

  12. RANK CORRELATIONS AT THE LEVEL OF SOIL MITES (ACARI: GAMASIDA; ORIBATIDA) FROM CENTRAL PARKS OF BUCHAREST CITY, ROMANIA

    OpenAIRE

    Manu, Minodora; Honciuc, Viorica

    2010-01-01

    The study of soil mites (Acari: Gamasida; Oribatida) was done in three parks in Bucharest city, Cişmigiu, Unirea and Izvor, achieved by transects situated in the lateral sides (near the roads, boulevards or street), or in the middle of these areas. From 72 identified species of mites, 54 were saprophages-detritophages (Oribatida) and 18 predators (Gamasida). In all the parks 22 common species were identified: 14 oribatids and 8 predators. Spearman rank correlations applied between the number ...

  13. The genus Notophthiracarus of New Zealand (Acari: Oribatida: Phthiracaridae): three new species and a key to 24 described species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    The genus Notophthiracarus (Acari: Oribatida: Phthiracaridae) was represented in New Zealand by 21 species prior to this work. In this paper, three new species of Notophthiracarus from New Zealand are described: Notophthiracarus dugdalei sp. nov. and Notophthiracarus matatatipu sp. nov. from Darran Mts., Tutoko Bench, and Notophthiracarus whakau sp. nov. from the Red Island, Mercury Islands. A key to all known species of Notophthiracarus in New Zealand is also provided.

  14. New hosts and parasitism notes for the mite Leptus (Acari: Erythraeidae) in fragments of the Atlantic Forest, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, A I A; Fadini, M A M; Pikart, T G; Zanuncio, J C; Serrão, J E

    2012-08-01

    New hosts and parasitism notes for the mite Leptus (Acari: Erythraeidae) in Brazil. Larval erythraeid mites are common ectoparasites of harvestmen (Opiliones). Studies describing insects as potential hosts have received little attention. Specimens of an undescribed species of the genus Leptus were collected in association with predatory and phytophagous Heteroptera bugs in a secondary forest in Viçosa, Minas Gerais state, Brazil. New mite-host records and information on seasonality of this mite are presented.

  15. New hosts and parasitism notes for the mite Leptus (Acari: Erythraeidae) in fragments of the Atlantic Forest, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira,AIA.; Fadini,MAM.; Pikart,TG.; Zanuncio,JC.; Serrão,JE.

    2012-01-01

    New hosts and parasitism notes for the mite Leptus (Acari: Erythraeidae) in Brazil. Larval erythraeid mites are common ectoparasites of harvestmen (Opiliones). Studies describing insects as potential hosts have received little attention. Specimens of an undescribed species of the genus Leptus were collected in association with predatory and phytophagous Heteroptera bugs in a secondary forest in Viçosa, Minas Gerais state, Brazil. New mite-host records and information on seasonality of this mi...

  16. New hosts and parasitism notes for the mite Leptus (Acari: Erythraeidae in fragments of the Atlantic Forest, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AIA. Pereira

    Full Text Available New hosts and parasitism notes for the mite Leptus (Acari: Erythraeidae in Brazil. Larval erythraeid mites are common ectoparasites of harvestmen (Opiliones. Studies describing insects as potential hosts have received little attention. Specimens of an undescribed species of the genus Leptus were collected in association with predatory and phytophagous Heteroptera bugs in a secondary forest in Viçosa, Minas Gerais state, Brazil. New mite-host records and information on seasonality of this mite are presented.

  17. The conclusion of a comparative efficacy study of fluralaner and sarolaner against the tick Amblyomma americanum on dogs is based on results obtained at study times that are outside the fluralaner label recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, Rob

    2017-01-01

    The only fluralaner-related conclusion presented in a study comparing the efficacy of fluralaner and sarolaner for control of the tick Amblyomma americanum on dogs is based on study times that are outside the label administration recommendations. Label recommendations for fluralaner treatment of A. americanum on dogs in the USA require re-administration at 56?days. This 56?day re-administration was not conducted in the study; therefore, all assessed time points following 56?days post-treatmen...

  18. Amblyomma americanum ticks infected with in vitro cultured wild-type and mutants of Ehrlichia chaffeensis are competent to produce infection in naïve deer and dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Jaworski, Deborah C.; Cheng, Chuanmin; Nair, Arathy D. S.; Ganta, Roman R.

    2016-01-01

    Monocytic ehrlichiosis in people caused by the intracellular bacterium, Ehrlichia chaffeensis, is an emerging infectious disease transmitted by the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum. Tick transmission disease models for ehrlichiosis require at least two hosts and two tick blood feeding episodes to recapitulate the natural transmission cycle. One blood feeding is necessary for the tick to acquire the infection from an infected host and the next feeding is needed to transmit the bacterium to...

  19. Acaricide resistance mechanisms in the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae and other important Acari: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Vontas, John; Tsagkarakou, Anastasia; Dermauw, Wannes; Tirry, Luc

    2010-08-01

    The two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae Koch is one of the economically most important pests in a wide range of outdoor and protected crops worldwide. Its control has been and still is largely based on the use of insecticides and acaricides. However, due to its short life cycle, abundant progeny and arrhenotokous reproduction, it is able to develop resistance to these compounds very rapidly. As a consequence, it has the dubious reputation to be the"most resistant species" in terms of the total number of pesticides to which populations have become resistant, and its control has become problematic in many areas worldwide. Insecticide and acaricide resistance has also been reported in the ectoparasite Sarcoptes scabiei, the causative organism of scabies, and other economically important Acari, such as the Southern cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus, one of the biggest arthropod threats to livestock, and the parasitic mite Varroa destructor, a major economic burden for beekeepers worldwide. Although resistance research in Acari has not kept pace with that in insects, a number of studies on the molecular mechanisms responsible for the resistant phenotype has been conducted recently. In this review, state-of-the-art information on T. urticae resistance, supplemented with data on other important Acari has been brought together. Considerable attention is given to the underlying resistance mechanisms that have been elucidated at the molecular level. The incidence of bifenazate resistance in T. urticae is expanded as an insecticide resistance evolutionary paradigm in arthropods. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Die Rolle von Amsel (Turdus merula), Rotdrossel (Turdus iliacus) und Singdrossel (Turdus philomelos) als Blutwirte für Zecken (Acari: Ixodidae) und Reservoirwirte für vier Genospezies des Borrelia burgdorferi-Artenkomplexes

    OpenAIRE

    Stern, Christian; Kaiser, Andreas; Maier, Walter A.; Kampen, Helge

    2008-01-01

    Vögel spielen vor allem aufgrund ihrer Häufigkeit in natürlichen und anthropogenen Habitaten sowie ihrer von anderen Wirbeltieren unübertroffenen Mobilität als natürliche Reservoire von Krankheitserregern eine bedeutende infektionsepidemiologische Rolle. Darüber hinaus können Zugvögel während ihrer Migration Erreger wie Vektoren über hunderte oder tausende von Kilometern transportieren und in ihrer Verbreitung extrem begünstigen. Dass Vögel neben anderen Tiergruppen eine wichtige Wirtsfunktio...

  1. The genus Hyalomma Koch, 1844. I. Reinstatement of Hyalomma (Euhyalomma glabrum Delpy, 1949 (Acari, Ixodidae as a valid species with a redescription of the adults, the first description of its immature stages and notes on its biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.A. Apanaskevich

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available For nearly 50 years the ixodid tick Hyalomma marginatum turanicum, reputedly introduced into South Africa on imported Persian sheep, has been considered identical to the Asian Hyalomma (Euhyalomma marginatum turanicum Pomerantzev, 1946. Comparisons of this tick with the Asian H. (E. m. turanicum and other subspecies of Hyalomma (Euhyalomma marginatum, however, reveal that it is an old taxon, namely Hyalomma rufipes glabrum Delpy, 1949. It is hereby reinstated as Hyalomma (Euhyalomma glabrum, and its adults are redescribed and its immature stages described for the first time. The preferred hosts of its adults are large herbivores such as zebras, gems bok and eland, on which it occurs during summer. The preferred hosts of its immature stages are scrub hares and ground-frequenting birds, on which it is present during autumn and winter. Data on its distribution and possible disease relationships are also provided.

  2. Notas de ixodologia: VII - Otocentor nitens Neuman, 1897 versus Anocentor columbianus Schulze, 1937 e comentários sôbre a rápida disseminação desse ixodideo no Brasil (Acari: Ixodidae

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    Henrique B. Aragão

    1953-12-01

    Full Text Available Anocentor columbianus Schulze, 1937 is a synonym of Otocentor nitens (Neumann, 1897. Otocentor Cooley, 1938 becomes a synonym of Anocentor Schulze 1937. The correct name of the species is now Anocentor nitens (Neumann, 1897. In Brazil this species was first recorderd by ARAGÃO (in FLOCH and ABONNENC, 1945 in Belém do Pará and by FONSECA (1948 in Goyaz. New records from Minas Gerais and Matto Grosso are presented and a new host, the jaguar, Panthera onca, is added.

  3. Comparación y utilidad de las regiones mitocondriales de los genes 16S y COX1 para los análisis genéticos en garrapatas (Acari: Ixodidae

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    Luis Enrique Paternina

    2016-06-01

    Conclusión. Los resultados indicaron que el gen 16S parece tener mejores características para los análisis filogenéticos interespecíficos dada su alta divergencia genética y baja saturación de transiciones, mientras que el gen COX1 parece ser más útil para estudios de variabilidad genética intraespecífica. Sin embargo, dado que el estudio se hizo a escala local, se requieren más investigaciones en diferentes escalas biogeográficas para establecer su utilidad en circunstancias más amplias y complejas.

  4. Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae as a parasite of pampas deer (Ozoctoceros bezoarticus and cattle in Brazil's Central Pantanal Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus como parasita de veado-campeiro (Ozoctoceros bezoarticus e do gado bovino no Pantanal Central do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Duarte Cançado

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In the Pantanal, domestic and wild animals share the same habitats; their parasites and environment interact in a complex and dynamic way. The Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus is the most important cattle tick in Brazil. In the past two decades, some traditional management practices are being replaced with the aim of intensifying cattle production. Forested areas are being replaced by exotic pasture and ranch owners are replacing Nelore for European breeds. The pampas deer (Ozoctoceros bezoarticus is a medium-sized cervid that occurs in grasslands of South America. Between December 2005 and January 2007, we captured and collected ticks from 15 pampas deer and 172 bovines. The abundance, intensity, and prevalence of ticks found in cattle were lower than those in pampas deer (p No Pantanal Brasileiro, onde animais domésticos e selvagens compartilham os mesmos habitats; hospedeiros, parasitas e ambientes encontram-se em interação complexa e dinâmica. Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus é o carrapato bovino mais importante no Brasil. Nas últimas duas décadas práticas de manejo vem sendo substituídas com objetivo de aumentar a produtividade. Áreas de florestas estão sendo substituídas por pastagens exóticas e os produtores começam a utilizar raças européias no lugar do Nelore. O veado-campeiro é um cervídeo que ocorre em áreas de campo na América do sul. Entre dezembro de 2005 e janeiro de 2007, foram coletados carrapatos de 20 veados-campeiros e 172 bovinos. Os valores de abundância, intensidade parasitária e prevalência de carrapatos no gado foram menores que os valores encontrados no veado-campeiro (p < 0,05, indicando que o veado-campeiro é mais susceptível que o bovino. O elevado número de fêmeas ingurgitadas coletadas, sua capacidade de ovipor e o percentual de eclosão indicam que a população veado-campeiro na região de estudo é suficiente para manter o R. (B. microplus, desta maneira participando na epidemiologia dos carrapatos e das doenças por eles transmitidas. O recente desmatamento, a introdução de Brachiaria sp. e do gado europeu precisam ser cuidadosamente avaliados, para prevenir perdas na industria do gado e vida selvagem.

  5. The complete mitochondrial genome of the citrus red mite Panonychus citri (Acari: Tetranychidae: high genome rearrangement and extremely truncated tRNAs

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    Dou Wei

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The family Tetranychidae (Chelicerata: Acari includes ~1200 species, many of which are of agronomic importance. To date, mitochondrial genomes of only two Tetranychidae species have been sequenced, and it has been found that these two mitochondrial genomes are characterized by many unusual features in genome organization and structure such as gene order and nucleotide frequency. The scarcity of available sequence data has greatly impeded evolutionary studies in Acari (mites and ticks. Information on Tetranychidae mitochondrial genomes is quite important for phylogenetic evaluation and population genetics, as well as the molecular evolution of functional genes such as acaricide-resistance genes. In this study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of Panonychus citri (Family Tetranychidae, a worldwide citrus pest, and provide a comparison to other Acari. Results The mitochondrial genome of P. citri is a typical circular molecule of 13,077 bp, and contains the complete set of 37 genes that are usually found in metazoans. This is the smallest mitochondrial genome within all sequenced Acari and other Chelicerata, primarily due to the significant size reduction of protein coding genes (PCGs, a large rRNA gene, and the A + T-rich region. The mitochondrial gene order for P. citri is the same as those for P. ulmi and Tetranychus urticae, but distinctly different from other Acari by a series of gene translocations and/or inversions. The majority of the P. citri mitochondrial genome has a high A + T content (85.28%, which is also reflected by AT-rich codons being used more frequently, but exhibits a positive GC-skew (0.03. The Acari mitochondrial nad1 exhibits a faster amino acid substitution rate than other genes, and the variation of nucleotide substitution patterns of PCGs is significantly correlated with the G + C content. Most tRNA genes of P. citri are extremely truncated and atypical (44-65, 54.1 ± 4.1 bp, lacking

  6. Mutual interference between adult females of Galendromus flumenis (Acari: Phytoseiidae) feeding on eggs of Banks grass mite decreases predation efficiency and increases emigration rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganjisaffar, Fatemeh; Nachman, Gøsta Støger; Perring, Thomas M.

    2017-01-01

    The Banks grass mite, Oligonychus pratensis (Banks) (Acari: Tetranychidae) causes significant damage to dates in California (USA), if not controlled. Studies are underway to develop biological control strategies against this pest in dates using the predatory mite Galendromus flumenis (Chant) (Acari...... predator density due to mutual interference. Analysis of emigration data considering the arena size and predator numbers showed that the emigration rate of G. flumenis was higher from small arenas, and increased with increasing predator numbers. When emigration data were analyzed using prey and predator...

  7. First record of the genus .i.Bloszykiella./i. in Kenya with the description of .i.Bloszykiella tertia./i. sp n. (Acari: Uropodidae) from a .i.Pinus radiata./i. D. Don plantation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kontschán, J.; Starý, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 3 (2015), s. 629-635 ISSN 1681-5556 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Acari * new species * Pinus radiata plantation * Kenya Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.708, year: 2015

  8. A new Paraleius species (Acari, Oribatida, Scheloribatidae associated with bark beetles (Curculionidae, Scolytinae in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Knee

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Bark beetles (Scolytinae are hosts to a broad diversity of mites (Acari, including several genera of Oribatida (Sarcoptiformes. Of these, Paraleius (Scheloribatidae species are the most frequently collected oribatid mites associated with bark beetles. A new species was discovered while surveying the acarofauna of bark beetles in Eastern Canada and is described as Paraleius leahae sp. n. (Oribatida, Scheloribatidae. This species was collected from two host beetle species, Hylastes porculus Erickson and Dendroctonus valens LeConte, in Ontario, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. The genus Paraleius is rediagnosed, Metaleius is considered a synonym of Paraleius, and the proposed synonymy of Paraleius with Siculobata is rejected. The three known species are Paraleius leontonycha (Berlese, P. leahae sp. n., and P. strenzkei (Travé, comb. n. The barcode region of cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI was amplified from P. leahae sp. n.

  9. A new Paraleius species (Acari, Oribatida, Scheloribatidae) associated with bark beetles (Curculionidae, Scolytinae) in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee, Wayne

    2017-01-01

    Bark beetles (Scolytinae) are hosts to a broad diversity of mites (Acari), including several genera of Oribatida (Sarcoptiformes). Of these, Paraleius (Scheloribatidae) species are the most frequently collected oribatid mites associated with bark beetles. A new species was discovered while surveying the acarofauna of bark beetles in Eastern Canada and is described as Paraleius leahae sp. n. (Oribatida, Scheloribatidae). This species was collected from two host beetle species, Hylastes porculus Erickson and Dendroctonus valens LeConte, in Ontario, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. The genus Paraleius is rediagnosed, Metaleius is considered a synonym of Paraleius , and the proposed synonymy of Paraleius with Siculobata is rejected. The three known species are Paraleius leontonycha (Berlese), P. leahae sp. n. , and P. strenzkei (Travé), comb. n. The barcode region of cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) was amplified from P. leahae sp. n.

  10. First Report of Raoiella indica (Hirst) (Acari: Tenuipalpide) in Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, F T; Silva, J E P; Ventura, M U; Pasini, A; Roggia, S

    2017-06-01

    The red palm mite (RPM), Raoiella indica (Hirst) (Acari: Tenuipalpidae), was found for the first time in the Paraná State, in southern Brazil. The first observations occurred in September 2015, on strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa Duch) leaves, which is not considered a typical host plant of RPM. It is probable that its occurrence on this plant was serendipitous. Visual surveys for RPM were carried out on four typical host plants (banana, coconut, foxtail palm, and real palm), in five cities of the Paraná State (Bela Vista do Paraíso, Londrina, Maringá, Marialva, and Sarandi). RPM was found on each of the four typical host plants, in each of the five cities. Our survey extends RPM occurrence to the southern region of Brazil and indicates that the pest could be widespread in the country.

  11. A new Paraleius species (Acari, Oribatida, Scheloribatidae) associated with bark beetles (Curculionidae, Scolytinae) in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee, Wayne

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Bark beetles (Scolytinae) are hosts to a broad diversity of mites (Acari), including several genera of Oribatida (Sarcoptiformes). Of these, Paraleius (Scheloribatidae) species are the most frequently collected oribatid mites associated with bark beetles. A new species was discovered while surveying the acarofauna of bark beetles in Eastern Canada and is described as Paraleius leahae sp. n. (Oribatida, Scheloribatidae). This species was collected from two host beetle species, Hylastes porculus Erickson and Dendroctonus valens LeConte, in Ontario, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. The genus Paraleius is rediagnosed, Metaleius is considered a synonym of Paraleius, and the proposed synonymy of Paraleius with Siculobata is rejected. The three known species are Paraleius leontonycha (Berlese), P. leahae sp. n., and P. strenzkei (Travé), comb. n. The barcode region of cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) was amplified from P. leahae sp. n. PMID:28769635

  12. Benefits and risks of the subcutaneous immunotherapy with acari extracts in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and bronchial asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpio Rodríguez-Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The records of patients from the Allergology Service in the Previsora Policlinic, Camagüey were revised to evaluate benefits and risks of the subcutaneous immunotherapy (ITSC with extracts of acari. The study was observational, analytic and retrospective of cases and controls in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and bronchial asthma. A total of 160 subjects, older than 18 years old, were chosen. Eighty out of them had already received ITSC with dose increase during 13 weeks and maintenance with monthly injections during 18 months. A total of 80 patients who only received prevention measures and medications during the crises were paired. Questionnaires were applied for quality of rhinoconjunctivitis life and asthma, about the consumption of medications and the frequency of the crises. The adverse events were measured, as they were local and systemic to the cutaneous tests, to the ITSC and the different pharmacological treatments. There was a significant increase of the punctuation of life quality questionnaires, (p=0.011. The consumption of medications decreased in both the cases and the controls, without significant differences (p=0.083. The frequency of the rhinitis and asthma crises decrease in the group of ITSC (p=0.029. Slight local and systemic reactions were reported in both groups with Odds ratio (OR=2.029 in the ITSC group, with a 95% confidence interval of 1.114–3.967 (p=0.019. The results show that the subcutaneous immunotherapy with acari offers benefits and few risks to patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma.

  13. Efeitos de Beauveria bassiana (Bals Vuill e Metarhizium anisopliae (Metsc Sorok sobre fêmeas ingurgitadas de Amblyomma cajennense (Fabricius, 1787 em condições de laboratório Effects of Beauveria bassiana (Bals Vuill and Metarhizium anisopliae (Metsc Sorok on engorged females of Amblyomma cajennense (Fabricius, 1787 in laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C.S. Reis

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro susceptibility of Amblyomma cajennense engorged females to some isolated of the fungus Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae was verified and lethal concentrations (LC 50 and LC 90 were calculated. The females were dived in conidia suspensions for five minutes, and kept in climatically controlled chambers BOD under 27° C and 80% relative humidity. Each bioassay had four treatments in concentrations of 10(5,10(6,10(7e10(8 conidia/ml. A control group was also used. The following characteristics were evaluated: weight and period of oviposition, indexes of reproductive and nutritional efficiency and percentage of microbiological control. A dose dependent negative effect was observed in ticks treated with the suspension. All isolates tested cause a negative effect on in vitro tests of engorged females of A. cajennense, suggesting its potential for microbiological control of tick's species.

  14. Rickettsia lusitaniae associated with Ornithodoros yumatensis (Acari: Argasidae) from two caves in Yucatan, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Montes, Sokani; Guzmán-Cornejo, Carmen; Martínez-Nájera, Yecenia; Becker, Ingeborg; Venzal, José M; Labruna, Marcelo B

    2016-10-01

    The genus Rickettsia includes obligate intracellular bacteria transmitted by several hematophagous arthropods such as ticks, fleas and sucking lice. In particular hard ticks (Ixodidae) have been cited as the main vectors of pathogenic rickettsiae in Mexico. However, there have been only two records of a single Rickettsia species associated with Mexican soft ticks (Argasidae). In this study, we searched for rickettsial DNA in argasid ticks (13 adults and eight nymphs of Ornithodoros yumatensis) from two bat caves in the state of Yucatan, Mexico. Additionally one larva collected in a cave from Chiapas, Mexico, and associated with Desmodus rotundus was used to corroborate the tick taxonomic determination. Of these, nine ticks (43%) yielded expected PCR products for the rickettsial gltA gene. These PCR-positive ticks were tested with additional PCR protocols targeting the rickettsial genes gltA, ompA and ompB. DNA partial sequences from these genes showed 99-100% identities with Rickettsia lusitaniae, an agent isolated from O. erraticus in Portugal, and closely related to R. felis and R. hoogstraalii. Based on the results from this study, the inventory of rickettsiae distributed in Mexico increases from six to seven species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. More about the role of 2,6-dichlorophenol in tick courtship: identification and olfactometer bioassay in Amblyomma cajennense and Rhipicephalus sanguineus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Cristina Braz Louly

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,6-DCP in Amblyomma cajennense and to evaluate its role in A. cajennense and Rhipicephalus sanguineus courtship. Hexanic extract from attractive females was purified by solid phase extraction and the phenol was identified by the single ion monitoring method using GC/MS. In an olfactometer, the responses of A. cajennense and R. sanguineus males to females, control rubber septa or rubber septa impregnated with 2,6-DCP at 50, 500, and 5000 ng, respectively, were studied. 2,6-DCP was identified in A. cajennense extract and the males oriented themselves toward the concentration of 500 ng. These septa and the females were recognized as copula partners. The septa treated with 2,6-DCP did not attract and were not even recognized by the R. sanguineus males, whereas the females were recognized. Due to the presence of 2,6-DCP in A. cajennense and the results of biological bioassays, it was concluded that this compound acts as an attractant and mounting sex pheromone in this tick, but it does not play any role in R. sanguineus courtship.

  16. Comparative Evaluation of Infected and Noninfected Amblyomma triste Ticks with Rickettsia parkeri, the Agent of an Emerging Rickettsiosis in the New World

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    F. A. Nieri-Bastos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of Rickettsia parkeri in South America has been associated with Amblyomma triste ticks. The present study evaluated under laboratory conditions two colonies of A. triste: one started from engorged females that were naturally infected by R. parkeri (designated as infected group; the other started from noninfected females (designated as control group. Both colonies were reared in parallel for five consecutive generations. Tick-naïve domestic rabbits were used for feeding of each tick stage and generation. R. parkeri was preserved by transstadial maintenance and transovarial transmission in A. triste ticks for five consecutive generations, because all tested larvae, nymphs, and adults from the infected group were shown by PCR to contain rickettsial DNA. All rabbits infested by larvae, nymphs, and adults from the infected group seroconverted, indicating that these tick stages were all vector competent for R. parkeri. Expressive differences in mortality rates were observed between engorged nymphs from the infected and control groups, as indicated by 65.9% and 92.4% molting success, respectively. Our results indicate that A. triste can act as a natural reservoir for R. parkeri. However, due to deleterious effect caused by R. parkeri on engorged nymphs, amplifier vertebrate hosts might be necessary for natural long-term maintenance of R. parkeri in A. triste.

  17. A prevalent alpha-proteobacterium Paracoccus sp. in a population of the Cayenne ticks (Amblyomma cajennense) from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Ferreira, Erik; Piesman, Joseph; Zeidner, Nordin S; Soares, Carlos A G

    2012-12-01

    As Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever is the most common tick-borne disease in South America, the presence of Rickettsia sp. in Amblyomma ticks is a possible indication of its endemicity in certain geographic regions. In the present work, bacterial DNA sequences related to Rickettsia amblyommii genes in A. dubitatum ticks, collected in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso, were discovered. Simultaneously, Paracoccus sp. was detected in aproximately 77% of A. cajennense specimens collected in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. This is the first report of Paracoccus sp. infection in a specific tick population, and raises the possibility of these bacteria being maintained and/or transmitted by ticks. Whether Paracoccus sp. represents another group of pathogenic Rhodobacteraceae or simply plays a role in A. cajennense physiology, is unknown. The data also demonstrate that the rickettsial 16S rRNA specific primers used forRickettsia spp. screening can also detect Paracoccus alpha-proteobacteria infection in biological samples. Hence, a PCR-RFLP strategy is presented to distinguish between these two groups of bacteria.

  18. Molecular characterization of a new monopartite dsRNA mycovirus from mycorrhizal Thelephora terrestris (Ehrh.) and its detection in soil oribatid mites (Acari: Oribatida)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrzik, Karel; Sarkisova, Tatiana; Starý, Josef; Koloniuk, Igor; Hrabáková, Lenka; Kubešová, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 489, FEB 2016 (2016), s. 12-19 ISSN 0042-6822 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH13136 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Acari * Earthfan fungus * Mycovirus * Oribatida Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.353, year: 2016

  19. Pyemotes tritici (Acari: Pyemotidae): a parasitoid of Agrilus auroguttatus and Agrilus coxalis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in the southwestern United States of America and southern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom W. Coleman; Michael I. Jones; Mark S. Hoddle; Laurel J. Haavik; John C. Moser; Mary L. Flint; Steven J. Seybold

    2015-01-01

    The straw itch mite, Pyemotes tritici Lagrèze-Fossat andMontané (Acari: Pyemotidae), was discovered parasitising the goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus auroguttatus Schaeffer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive exotic species to California, United States of America, and the Mexican goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus coxalis Waterhouse (Coleoptera:...

  20. New records of water mites of the genus Atractides Koch, 1837 (Acari: Hydrachnidia, Hygrobatidae) from Thailand, Malaysia and Sulawesi (Indonesia), with the description of four new species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pesic, V.; Smit, H.

    2009-01-01

    New records of water mites of the genus Atractides Koch, 1837 (Acari: Hydrachnidia, Hygrobatidae) from Thailand, Malaysia and Sulawesi are presented. Four species new to science, Atractides siamis, A. malayensis, A. tahanensis and A. sulawesiensis, are described; a first description of the male is

  1. New species and new records of mites of the genus Stigmaeus(Acari: Prostigmata: Stigmaeidae) from Crimea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaustov, Alexander A

    2014-05-06

    Three new species of the genus Stigmaeus Koch, 1836 (Acari: Stigmaeidae) are described from various habitats in Crimea: Stigmaeus kuznetsovi sp. nov. from nests of Microtus socialis (Rodentia: Cricetidae); S. mitrofanovi sp. nov. from galleries of Pityogenes bistridentatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) under the bark of Pinus pallasiana, and S. silvestris sp. nov. from rotten log of Pinus pallasiana. Stigmaeus corticeus Kuznetsov and Wainstein, 1977 and S. maraghehiensis Bagheri and Ueckermann, 2012 are recorded for the first time in Crimea. A key to species of the genus Stigmaeus of Crimea is provided.

  2. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    El-Kady, Gamal A. Vol 2 (2000) - Articles Survey and population dynamics of freshwater snails in newly settled areas of the Sinai peninsula. Abstract PDF · Vol 2 (2000) - Articles Bionomics of ticks collected from the Sinai Peninsula, Egypt. I. Biology of Hyalomma schulzei (Olenev) (Acari: Ixodidae) under laboratory ...

  3. Evaluation of the speed of kill of sarolaner (Simparica™) against induced infestations of three species of ticks (Amblyomma maculatum, Ixodes scapularis, Ixodes ricinus) on dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six, Robert H; Geurden, Thomas; Carter, Lori; Everett, William R; McLoughlin, A; Mahabir, Sean P; Myers, Melanie R; Slootmans, Nathalie

    2016-05-30

    The rapid speed of kill of sarolaner (Simparica™, Zoetis), a novel isoxazoline compound, was demonstrated against three tick species known to infest dogs in Europe or the United States. Efficacy was measured against an existing infestation and against subsequent weekly re-infestations for 35 days after treatment. Dogs were randomly allocated to treatment with a single oral dose of either placebo or sarolaner (2mg/kg) based on pre-treatment host-suitability tick counts. Dogs were infested with approximately 50 unfed adult Ixodes scapularis, Ixodes ricinus or Amblyomma maculatum ticks on Days-2, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35. Tick counts were conducted at 4 (I. scapularis only), 8, 12 and 24h after treatment on Day 0 and after each subsequent re-infestation. No treatment-related adverse reactions occurred during any of these studies. Dogs in the placebo-treated groups maintained adequate tick infestations (recovery of 20-70% of applied ticks) throughout the duration of the studies. Following treatment, live tick counts were significantly reduced relative to placebo at the 8h post treatment counts indicating that sarolaner started killing existing infestations of ticks rapidly after treatment. Efficacy was 90.1% against I. ricinus, 98.8% against I. scapularis, and 99.2% against A. maculatum within 12h, and 100% efficacy was achieved at 24h after treatment against all three tick species. This speed of kill was maintained throughout the month with ≥95.7%, ≥98.7% and ≥89.6% efficacy against I. scapularis, I. ricinus, and A. maculatum, respectively, at 24h after re-infestation at least through Day 28. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. High detection rate of Rickettsia africae in Amblyomma variegatum but low prevalence of anti-rickettsial antibodies in healthy pregnant women in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Christian; Krüger, Andreas; Schwarz, Norbert Georg; Rakotozandrindrainy, Raphael; Rakotondrainiarivelo, Jean Philibert; Razafindrabe, Tsiry; Derschum, Henri; Silaghi, Cornelia; Pothmann, Daniela; Veit, Alexandra; Hogan, Benedikt; May, Jürgen; Girmann, Mirko; Kramme, Stefanie; Fleischer, Bernhard; Poppert, Sven

    2016-02-01

    Tick-borne spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsioses are emerging infectious diseases in Sub-Saharan Africa. In Madagascar, the endemicity of tick-borne rickettsiae and their vectors has been incompletely studied. The first part of the present study was conducted in 2011 and 2012 to identify potential anthropophilic tick vectors for SFG rickettsiae on cattle from seven Malagasy regions, and to detect and characterize rickettsiae in these ticks. Amblyomma variegatum was the only anthropophilic tick species found on 262 cattle. Using a novel ompB-specific qPCR, screening for rickettsial DNA was performed on 111 A. variegatum ticks. Rickettsial DNA was detected in 96 of 111 ticks studied (86.5%). Rickettsia africae was identified as the only infecting rickettsia using phylogenetic analysis of ompA and ompB gene sequences and three variable intergenic spacers from 11 ticks. The second part of the study was a cross-sectional survey for antibodies against SFG rickettsiae in plasma samples taken from healthy, pregnant women at six locations in Madagascar, two at sea level and four between 450 and 1300m altitude. An indirect fluorescent antibody test with Rickettsia conorii as surrogate SFG rickettsial antigen was used. We found R. conorii-seropositives at all altitudes with prevalences between 0.5% and 3.1%. Our results suggest that A. variegatum ticks highly infected with R. africae are the most prevalent cattle-associated tick vectors for SFG rickettsiosis in Madagascar. Transmission of SFG rickettsiosis to humans occurs at different altitudes in Madagascar and should be considered as a relevant cause of febrile diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Structural characterization of tick cement cones collected from in vivo and artificial membrane blood-fed Lone Star ticks (Amblyomma americanum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullard, Rebekah; Allen, Paige; Chao, Chien-Chung; Douglas, Jessica; Das, Pradipta; Morgan, Sarah E; Ching, Wei-Mei; Karim, Shahid

    2016-07-01

    The Lone Star tick, Amblyomma americanum, is endemic to the southeastern United States and capable of transmitting pathogenic diseases and causing non-pathogenic conditions. To remain firmly attached to the host, the tick secretes a proteinaceous matrix termed the cement cone which hardens around the tick's mouthparts to assist in the attachment of the tick as well as to protect the mouthparts from the host immune system. Cement cones collected from ticks on a host are commonly contaminated with host skin and hair making analysis of the cone difficult. To reduce the contamination found in the cement cone, we have adapted an artificial membrane feeding system used to feed long mouthpart ticks. Cones collected from in vivo and membrane fed ticks are analyzed to determine changes in the cone morphology. Comparisons of the cement cones using light microscopy shows similar structures and color however using scanning electron microscopy the cones have drastically different structures. The in vivo cones contain fibrils, sheets, and are heavily textured whereas cones from membrane fed ticks are remarkably smooth with no distinct structures. Analysis of the secondary protein structures using FTIR-ATR show both in vivo and membrane fed cement cones contain β sheets but only in vivo cement cones contain helical protein structures. Additionally, proteomic analysis using LC-MS/MS identifies many proteins including glycine rich proteins, metalloproteases, and protease inhibitors. Proteomic analysis of the cones identified both secreted and non-secreted tick proteins. Artificial membrane feeding is a suitable model for increased collection of cement cones for proteomic analysis however, structurally there are significant differences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Relative abundance of hard tick on reared cattle (Family: Bovidae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey was carried out among cattle reared in Idah LGA of Kogi State, for tick infestations for a period of four months (May – August, 2009). A total of 294 cattle were sampled, 181 were infested with three species of hard ticks (Family: Ixodidae), comprising of Amblyomma variegatum, Boophilus decoloratus, and ...

  7. Parâmetros biológicos de fêmeas adultas Amblyomma cajennense alimentadas em coelhos tratados com bioterápico ultradiluído Biological parameters of Amblyomma cajennense adult females fed on rabbits treated with ultradiluted biotherapic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Rodrigues de Almeida

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Os bioterápicos são considerados medicamentos homeopáticos por serem preparados de acordo com a farmacotécnica homeopática, submetidos à diluição e dinamização. Com o objetivo de avaliar os efeitos da administração de bioterápico ultradiluído sobre parâmetros biológicos de carrapatos Amblyomma cajennense, oito coelhos de três meses de idade, separados em dois grupos de quatro animais, constituindo os grupos tratado e controle, receberam o bioterápico na potência 30 DH (Decimal Hering e soro fisiológico 30DH, respectivamente. Em seguida, os animais foram infestados experimentalmente com 10 casais de carrapatos A. cajennense e submetidos novamente aos referidos tratamentos. O bioterápico ultradiluído foi preparado a partir de carrapatos adultos machos e fêmeas de A. cajennense. Foram avaliados parâmetros biológicos relativos à postura e à eclosão larval de A. cajennense. De acordo com os resultados obtidos, não foram detectados efeitos significativos sobre os parâmetros biológicos de fêmeas A. cajennense alimentadas em coelhos tratados com o bioterápico, quando comparados ao grupo controle. Novos testes, envolvendo outras espécies hospedeiras e o acompanhamento de infestações subseqüentes, devem ser dedicados à avaliação do potencial terapêutico profilático dos bioterápicos ultradiluídos nas ectoparasitoses dos animais domésticos.The biotherapics are considered homeopathic medicine because are produced in agreement to the homeopathic pharmacotechnic being diluted and dinamizated. To evaluate the effects of ultradiluted biotherapic on biologic parameters of Amblyomma cajennense ticks, 8 rabbits, about 3 months old, were divided into 2 groups of 4 animals each: treated and control groups which received biotherapic 30 DH potency (Hering’s decimal and 30DH physiologic serum, respectively. Following, the animals were infested with 10 couples A. cajennense and treated again. The ultradiluted biotherapic was

  8. Primeiro registro de Oligonychus yothersi (McGregor (Acari: Tetranychidae em Eucalyptus grandis Hill ex Maiden no Brasil First record of Oligonychus yothersi (McGregor (Acari: Tetranychidae on Eucalyptus grandis Hill ex Maiden in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Fagundes Pereira

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Relata-se a infestação de um ácaro-vermelho em mudas clonais de Eucalyptus grandis Hill ex Maiden, mantidas em casa de vegetação no município de Martinho Campos, Minas Gerais. O ácaro foi observado na parte superior das folhas que exibiam sinais de sucção de seiva e bronzeamento. Essas injúrias causaram desenvolvimento anormal e morte de plantas. O ácaro foi identificado como Oligonychus yothersi (McGregor (Acari: Tetranychidae, e isso representa o primeiro registro dessa espécie em mudas clonais de E. grandis no Brasil.An infestation of the red spider mite was reported in clone seedlings of Eucalyptus grandis Hill ex Maiden under greenhouse conditions, in the municipality of Martinho Campos, Minas Gerais State. The spider mite was found on the leaf upper faces with signs of sap suction and bronzing. Such injuries caused abnormal development and plant death. The spider mite was identified as Oligonychus yothersi (McGregor (Acari: Tetranychidae. This is the first record of O. yothersi on E. grandis seedlings in Brazil.

  9. Ricoseius loxocheles (Acari: Phytoseiidae) is not a predator of false spider mite on coffee crops: What does it eat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacacela Ajila, Henry E; Ferreira, João A M; Colares, Felipe; Oliveira, Cleber M; Bernardo, Ana Maria G; Venzon, Madelaine; Pallini, Angelo

    2018-01-01

    Ricoseius loxocheles (De Leon) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) is often found in coffee crops and is known to feed on coffee leaf rust, Hemileia vastatrix Berkeley and Broome (Uredinales). As the occurrence of coffee leaf rust is limited primarily to the rainy season, the mite may use other food sources to survive during the periods of low pathogen prevalence. It is well known that phytoseiid mites can survive on a variety of food sources, such as herbivorous mites, fungi and pollen. We evaluated the ability of R. loxocheles to survive and reproduce on a diet of Brevipalpus phoenicis Geijskes (Acari: Tenuipalpidae), cattail pollen (Typha spp.), clover rust (Puccinia oxalidis), bee pollen (Santa Bárbara ® dehydrated pollen, Santa Bárbara, MG, Brazil) and coffee leaf rust. Ricoseius loxocheles did not survive or reproduce on any B. phoenicis stages tested (egg, larva, adult). The survival and oviposition of R. loxocheles were directly affected by the presence of coffee rust urediniospores, but not by the presence of the prey. Survival and oviposition of the phytoseiid were similar when fed cattail pollen, clover rust and coffee leaf rust but was lower when fed bee pollen. Our results show that R. loxocheles is not a predator of B. phoenicis but it is able to utilize other resources besides coffee leaf rust.

  10. Morphometric variations of laelapine mite (Acari: Mesostigmata populations infesting small mammals (Mammalia in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Martins-Hatano

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to evaluate the morphometric variation of laelapine populations (Acari, Mesostigmata associated with neotropical oryzomyine rodents at different geographic localities in Brazil. Three nominal mite species were selected for study, all infesting the pelage of small mammals at different localities in Rio de Janeiro, Espírito Santo, Bahia, and the Federal District, Brazil. To analyse morphometric characteristics, thirty-seven morphological characters distributed across the whole body of each specimen were measured. We use the Analysis of Principal Components, extracting the three first axes and projecting each mite in these axes. Major species level changes in the taxonomy of the host mammals allows an independent examination of morphometric variation of mites infesting a set of distinctly different host species at different geographic localities. Gigantolaelaps vitzthumi and Laelaps differens are associated with oryzomyine rodents of the genus Cerradomys, and consistently showed a tendency to cluster by host phylogeny. Laelaps manguinhosi associated with Nectomys rattus in central Brazil is morphometrically distinct from mites infesting N. squamipes in the coastal restingas of Rio de Janeiro and Espírito Santo. The results obtained here indicate that laelapine mite populations can vary among geographic areas and among phylogenetically related host species. Clearly, the study of these mites at the population level can be an important tool for clarifying the taxonomy of both mites and hosts.

  11. Acaricidal and repellent activities of essential oil of Eucalyptus globulus against Dermanyssus gallinae (Acari: Mesostigmata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehghani-Samani Amir

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: By considering an increase in drug resistance against red mites, finding the nonchemical herbal acaricide against Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer (Acari: Mesostigmata is necessary to kill them and to reduce the chemical resistance against chemical acaricides in this specie. Dermanyssus gallinae is a potential vector of the causal agent of several viral diseases such as Equine encephalitis and St. Louis encephalitis. It can be a vector of bacteria such as Salmonella spp., Mycobacterium spp. and Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae. It is also known to cause itching dermatosis in humans. In this study acaricidal and repellent activities of essential oil of Eucalyptus globulus against Dermanyssus gallinae were studied. Methods: After extracting the essential oil, different concentrations of the plant extract were prepared. Then, acaricidal effect of different concentrations was tested on poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae, by dropping 3-4 drops of essential oil on mites. Repellent activity of essential oil was tested by Y-tube olfactometer bioassay. After the test, total number of killed and repellent mites reported. Results: Concentration of 1:2 or 50% had more acaricidal effect on mites. Also essential oil of Eucalyptus globulus had repellent activity against red mites. Conclusion: This study showed that essential oil of Eucalyptus globulus had acaricidal and repellent activities against red mites. Hence it might be used as a herbal acaricide against it to kill and to reduce the chemical resistance in this specie.

  12. Historical review of the genus Dermanyssus Dugès, 1834 (Acari: Mesostigmata: Dermanyssidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy L.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A synthetic review of the historical systematics of Dermanyssus Dugès, 1834 (Acari: Mesostigmata: Dermanyssidae is provided. The classification at the specific level in this early genus has not really been clarified during more than a century despite its economic impact, and the history of the genus is complex and includes various stages. Moreover, Dermanyssus currently includes 23 species, whereas the last review took only 18 species into account. Changes in the species status and position in the genus Dermanyssus from 1834 until today are presented. The evolution of the generic definition is explored and compared with other genera of the group. How the discrimination between the different species evolved in the genus is also examined. Some difficulties in the specific definitions are discussed. A current diagnosis of the genus Dermanyssus is given. A table of the species included in this genus since its first description along with their respective current positions, a list of the currently included species in Dermanyssus with their hosts, and a world map presenting their geographic distribution are provided.

  13. Laboratory studies to elucidate the residual toxicity of eight insecticides to Anystis baccarum (Acari: Anystidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurin, Marie-Claude; Bostanian, Noubar J

    2007-08-01

    Anystis baccarum (L.) [=Anystis agilis (Banks)] (Acari: Anystidae) is a common predatory mite recently identified in apple (Malus spp.) orchards and in vineyards (Vitus spp.) in Québec, Canada. Studies of its susceptibility to pesticides used in these crops need to be carried out to encourage integrated pest management programs. A laboratory evaluation of methoxyfenozide, acetamiprid, thiamethoxam, imidacloprid, spinosad, phosmet, carbaryl, and lambda-cyhalothrin showed that residues of lambda-cyhalothrin, phosmet, and carbaryl were highly toxic in 48-h petri dish bioassays. The field rate of lambda-cyhalothrin is 0.0184 g (AI) /liter, which is 26-fold the estimated LC50 of 0.0007 g (AI) /liter) for this predator. The field rate for phosmet is 0.6000 g (AI) /liter, which is 118-fold the LC50 for phosmet, which is 0.0051 g (AI) /liter), and the field rate for carbaryl is 1.960 g (AI) /liter, which is 784-fold the estimated LC50 of 0.0025 g (AI) /liter). Five other insecticides, methoxyfenozide, acetamiprid, thiamethoxam, imidacloprid, and spinosad, were evaluated and found to be nontoxic.

  14. Temperature-dependent fumigant activity of essential oils against twospotted spider mite (Acari: Tetranychidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eu Gene; Roh, Hyun Sik; Coudron, Thomas A; Park, Chung Gyoo

    2011-04-01

    Fumigant activity of 34 commercial essential oils was assessed on female adults and eggs of twospotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae) at three temperatures (5, 15, and 25 degrees C). Common thyme, cinnamon, and lemongrass oils were equally effective on twospotted spider mite adults showing 85.8-100% mortality at 5 and 10 microl/liter air at 25 degrees C. At a lower temperature of 15 degrees C, lemongrass and peppermint resulted in > or =90% mortality of adults at 10 microl/liter air. Only lemongrass was relatively active at 5 microl/liter air, at 15 degrees C. At 5 degrees C, lemongrass and peppermint caused significantly higher adult mortality than controls but only at 10 microl/liter air. Common thyme oil showed the highest ovicidal activity at 5 microl/liter air at 25 degrees C. Among the main components of common thyme and lemongrass oils, citral was lethal to twospotted spider mite adults at all tested temperatures. Carvacrol, thymol, and citral caused the same inhibitory effects on the hatch of twospotted spider mite eggs at 25 degrees C. However, citral was more active than other compounds to twospotted spider mite eggs at 15 degrees C. Therefore, we conclude that citral has the best potential for development as a fumigant against twospotted spider mite on agricultural products harvested late in the growing season.

  15. Factors determining species displacement of related predatory mite species (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Tetsuo; Hanawa, Masumi; Shimazaki, Sayaka; Yokoyama, Natsuki; Fu, Chun-Qing; Sugawara, Reo; Yano, Shuichi

    2014-06-01

    Neoseiulus womersleyi (Acari: Phytoseiidae) used to be the dominant species in fruit-tree orchards throughout Japan, but starting in the 1990s, N. womersleyi began to be displaced by Neoseiulus californicus in central and southwestern Japan. The present study was conducted to examine factors explaining the displacement of N. womersleyi by N. californicus. First, we confirmed under laboratory conditions that N. californicus could exclude N. womersleyi if they initially coexisted in a 1:1 ratio. During a 2-h continuous observation period, none of the heterospecific pairs had copulated and after 5 days together with heterospecific males, none of the females had laid eggs. When these females were placed with conspecific males, normal numbers of offspring were produced. Moreover, conspecific matings were not substantially disturbed in the presence of heterospecific males or females. Total fecundity was significantly lower in N. womersleyi than in N. californicus, but their r m values did not differ from each other. On the other hand, the frequency of intraguild predation by N. californicus on N. womersleyi was significantly higher than vice versa. From these results, we concluded that not reproductive interference nor differential female fecundity but asymmetrical intraguild predation seemed to explain the competitive exclusion of N. womersleyi by N. californicus.

  16. New species of oribatid mites with auriculate pteromorphs (Acari, Oribatida, Galumnidae) from the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermilov, Sergey G; Corpuz-Raros, Leonila

    2015-01-14

    Three new species of oribatid mites of the family Galumnidae (Acari, Oribatida), Galumna (Cosmogalumna) vladopesici sp. nov., Carinogalumna philippinensis sp. nov. and Setogalumna luzonica sp. nov., are described from the Philippines. Galumna (Cosmogalumna) vladopesici sp. nov. is most similar morphologically to G. (C.) dongnaiensis Ermilov & Anichkin, 2013, but it differs from the latter by the surface of body, genital and anal plates, and by the number and size of notogastral porose areas. Carinogalumna philippinensis sp. nov. differs from all species of Carinogalumna by the number of notogastral porose areas and structure of lamellar and sublamellar lines. Setogalumna luzonica sp. nov. is most similar morphologically to S. excellens P. Balogh, 1985, but it differs from the latter by the body size, morphology of bothridial setae, anterior notogastral margin and notogastral porose areas Aa, and structure of lamellar and sublamellar lines. The genera Galumna and Carinogalumna are recorded for the first time in Philippines, and the genus Setogalumna in the Oriental region. Identification keys to known species of Galumna (Cosmogalumna) and Setogalumna are given. 

  17. Residual bioassay to assess the toxicity of Acaricides against Aceria guerreronis (Acari: Eriophyidae) under laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Vaneska B; Lima, Debora B; Gondim, Manoel G C; Siqueira, Herbert A A

    2012-08-01

    Aceria guerreronis Keifer (Acari: Eriophyidae) is considered a major pest of the coconut (Cocos nucifera L.), and the use of pesticides is the current method to control it. However, no standard toxicological tests exist to select and assess the efficiency of molecules against the coconut mite. The aim of this study was to develop a methodology that allows for the evaluation of the relative toxicity of acaricides to A. guerreronis through rapid laboratory procedures. We confined A. guerreronis on arenas made out of coconut leaflets and tested two application methods: immersing the leaf fragments in acaricides and spraying acaricides on the leaf fragments under a Potter spray tower. In the latter application method, we sprayed leaf fragments both populated with and devoid of mites. We evaluated the comparative toxicity of two populations (Itamaracá and Petrolina, Pernambuco, Brazil) by spraying on leaflets without mites and submitted the mortality data to probit analysis after 24 h of exposure. No difference was observed in the LC50, regardless of whether the leaflets were immersed or sprayed with acaricide (abamectin, chlorfenapyr or fenpyroximate). The toxicity of chlorfenapyr and fenpyroximate did not differ, irrespective of whether it was applied directly to the leaflet or to the mite; however, the toxicity of abamectin was higher when applied directly to the mite. Chlorpyrifos and abamectin toxicities were lower for the Petrolina population than for the Itamaracá population. Immersing and spraying coconut leaflets can be used to assess the mortality of A. guerreronis under laboratory conditions.

  18. UM OLHAR SOBRE A CIDADE DE ACARI: DO APOGEU AO ANONIMATO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luiza Medeiros Galvão

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Consta do presente trabalho uma análise do quadro de desaceleração socioeconômica da cidade de Acari, causada pelo fim das atividades das agroindústrias algodoeiras. Para a compreensão da cidade, adotamos como metodologia uma abordagem geohistórica, privilegiando, ainda que em breve, a importância do gado e do algodão para origem e expansão, respectivamente do seu sítio urbano. Como discussão teórica, trabalhamos o conceito de cidade, com duplo objetivo: refletir sobre ela como lugar de reprodução do capital e das relações de trabalho; e compreendê-la como lugar da memória e da história. Por fim, discorremos sobre aspectos do cotidiano da cidade, objeto de estudo, na qual coexistem, como pares contraditórios, a crise, deflagrada desde o fechamento das indústrias, e o harmonioso cotidiano, embora anônimo, demonstrado pelos seus moradores. Por ter ocupado posição de destaque no cenário econômico e histórico do Rio Grande do Norte, abordamos a história e memória, para justificar a cidade como espaço de referência.

  19. Biology, ecology and control of the Penthaleus species complex (Acari: Penthaleidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umina, Paul A; Hoffmann, Ary A; Weeks, Andrew R

    2004-01-01

    Blue oat mites, Penthaleus spp. (Acari: Penthaleidae), are major agricultural pests in southern Australia and other parts of the world, attacking various pasture, vegetable and crop plants. Management of these mites has been complicated by the recent discovery of three cryptic pest species of Penthaleus, whereas prior research had assumed a single species. The taxonomy, population genetics, ecology, biology and control of the Penthaleus spp. complex are reviewed. Adult Penthaleus have a dark blue-black body approximately 1 mm in length, and eight red-orange legs. Within Australia, they are winter pests completing two or three generations a season, depending on conditions. The summer is passed as diapausing eggs, when long-distance dispersal is thought to occur. The Penthaleus spp. reproduce by thelytokous parthenogenesis, with populations comprising clones that differ ecologically. The three pest Penthaleus spp. differ markedly in their distributions, plant hosts, timing of diapause egg production and response to pesticides, highlighting the need to develop control strategies that consider each species separately. Chemicals are the main weapons used in current control programs, however research continues into alternative more sustainable management options. Host plant resistance, crop rotations, conservation of natural enemies, and improved timing of pesticide application would improve the management of these pests. The most cost-effective and environmentally acceptable means of control will result from the integration of these practices combined with the development of a simple field-based kit to distinguish the different mite species.

  20. Practical sampling plans for Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) in Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colonies and apiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K V; Moon, R D; Burkness, E C; Hutchison, W D; Spivak, M

    2010-08-01

    The parasitic mite Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman (Acari: Varroidae) is arguably the most detrimental pest of the European-derived honey bee, Apis mellifera L. Unfortunately, beekeepers lack a standardized sampling plan to make informed treatment decisions. Based on data from 31 commercial apiaries, we developed sampling plans for use by beekeepers and researchers to estimate the density of mites in individual colonies or whole apiaries. Beekeepers can estimate a colony's mite density with chosen level of precision by dislodging mites from approximately to 300 adult bees taken from one brood box frame in the colony, and they can extrapolate to mite density on a colony's adults and pupae combined by doubling the number of mites on adults. For sampling whole apiaries, beekeepers can repeat the process in each of n = 8 colonies, regardless of apiary size. Researchers desiring greater precision can estimate mite density in an individual colony by examining three, 300-bee sample units. Extrapolation to density on adults and pupae may require independent estimates of numbers of adults, of pupae, and of their respective mite densities. Researchers can estimate apiary-level mite density by taking one 300-bee sample unit per colony, but should do so from a variable number of colonies, depending on apiary size. These practical sampling plans will allow beekeepers and researchers to quantify mite infestation levels and enhance understanding and management of V. destructor.

  1. Study of Acari and Collembola Populations in Four Cultivation Systems in Dourados - MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosilda Mara Mussury

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The impact four cultivation systems on the soil fauna was studied, using Oribatida and Gamasida acarids as bioindicators and collembolan. The research was carried out in experimental fields, located in EMBRAPA - CPAO in Dourados, Centerwest of Brazil from July 1997 to December 1999. The constant pasture system presented smaller impact on the soil fauna followed by agricultural cattle rotation and a direct plantation system. In the conventional plantation series, the populational density of the mesofauna organisms was low, especially collembolan families.O impacto de quatro sistemas de cultivo sobre a fauna de solo foram estudados, utilizando-se como bioindicadores os acari Oribatida e Gamasida e os Collembola. A pesquisa foi conduzida em campos experimentais, localizados na EMBRAPA - CPAO no município de Dourados, MS, no período de julho de 1997 à dezembro de 1999. O sistema de pastagem contínua apresentou menor impacto sobre a fauna de solo seguido da rotação agricultura pecuária e do sistema de plantio direto. Nas sucessões do plantio convencional, a densidade populacional dos organismos da mesofauna foi baixa, em especial as famílias de colembolos.

  2. Tick-Host Range Adaptation: Changes in Protein Profiles in Unfed Adult Ixodes scapularis and Amblyomma americanum Saliva Stimulated to Feed on Different Hosts

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    Lucas Tirloni

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the molecular basis of how ticks adapt to feed on different animal hosts is central to understanding tick and tick-borne disease (TBD epidemiology. There is evidence that ticks differentially express specific sets of genes when stimulated to start feeding. This study was initiated to investigate if ticks such as Ixodes scapularis and Amblyomma americanum that are adapted to feed on multiple hosts utilized the same sets of proteins to prepare for feeding. We exposed I. scapularis and A. americanum to feeding stimuli of different hosts (rabbit, human, and dog by keeping unfed adult ticks enclosed in a perforated microfuge in close contact with host skin, but not allowing ticks to attach on host. Our data suggest that ticks of the same species differentially express tick saliva proteins (TSPs when stimulated to start feeding on different hosts. SDS-PAGE and silver staining analysis revealed unique electrophoretic profiles in saliva of I. scapularis and A. americanum that were stimulated to feed on different hosts: rabbit, human, and dog. LC-MS/MS sequencing and pairwise analysis demonstrated that I. scapularis and A. americanum ticks expressed unique protein profiles in their saliva when stimulated to start feeding on different hosts: rabbit, dog, or human. Specifically, our data revealed TSPs that were unique to each treatment and those that were shared between treatments. Overall, we identified a total of 276 and 340 non-redundant I. scapularis and A. americanum TSPs, which we have classified into 28 functional classes including: secreted conserved proteins (unknown functions, proteinase inhibitors, lipocalins, extracellular matrix/cell adhesion, heme/iron metabolism, signal transduction and immunity-related proteins being the most predominant in saliva of unfed ticks. With exception of research on vaccines against Rhipicephalus microplus, which its natural host, cattle, research on vaccine against other ticks relies feeding ticks

  3. Primary embryonic cells of Rhipicephalus microplus and Amblyomma cajennense ticks as a substrate for the development of Borrelia burgdorferi (strain G39/40

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    J. Rezende

    Full Text Available Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme borreliosis, is a spirochetes transmitted by ticks to humans and animals. Its cultivation in vitro in tick cells allows studies of its biology and provides methodology for future research in Brazil, and for the isolation of Borrelia spp. We examined in vitro the characteristics of embryonic cells of Rhipicephalus microplus and Amblyomma cajennense in cell culture and investigated the suitability of embryonic cells as a substrate for cultivation of B. burgdorferi. Subcultures were prepared from primary cultures of embrionary cells of R. microplus and A. cajennense maintained in Leibovitz's (L-15 complete medium at 28 ºC and 31 ºC, respectively. When a monolayer had formed, the L-15 was replaced with Barbour-Stoener-Kelly medium for experiments to infect cell cultures with B. burgdorferi. After 72 hours of cultivation, the spirochetes were counted using an inverted phase contrast microscope and dark-field illumination (400×. Survival, multiplication and the adherence of B. burgdorferi for embryonic cells of R. microplus and A. cajennense were observed. B. burgdorferi cultured with embryonic cells of R. microplus grew on average to a density (final count of 2.4 × 10(7 spirochetes/mL, whereas in cell-free culture, an average of 2.5 × 10(7 spirochetes/mL were counted. When cultivated with A. cajennense cells, the final count of spirochetes was on average 1.7 × 10(7 spirochetes/mL, while spirochetes cultured under cell-free conditions replicated on average of 2.2 × 10(7 spirochetes/mL. Similar results were observed in the final count of Spirochetes cultivated in cells of R. microplus and A. cajennense, when compared with cell-free control. These results demonstrated that cells of R. microplus and A. cajennense have the potential to be used as growth substrate for B. burgdorferi in the study of its interaction with host cells.

  4. Comparative speed of kill of sarolaner (Simparica™ Chewables) and fluralaner (Bravecto(®)) against induced infestations of Amblyomma americanum on dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six, Robert H; Young, David R; Myers, Melanie R; Mahabir, Sean P

    2016-07-18

    The lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum, infests dogs and cats in North America and transmits the pathogens Ehrlichia chaffeensis and Ehrlichia ewingii, which cause monocytic and granulocytic ehrlichiosis in dogs and humans, and Cytauxzoon felis which causes cytauxzoonosis in cats. A parasiticide's speed of kill is important to minimize the direct deleterious effects [related to blood-feeding] of tick infestation and reduce the risk of transmission of tick-borne pathogens. In this study the speed of kill of sarolaner (Simparica™ Chewables) administered monthly for 3 months against A. americanum on dogs was evaluated and compared with a single dose of fluralaner (Bravecto(®)) for 13 weeks. Based on pretreatment tick counts, 24 dogs were randomly allocated to treatment with placebo or sarolaner at the label rate (2 to 4 mg/kg) on Days 0, 30 and 60 or with fluralaner (25 to 56 mg/kg) once according to manufacturer's instructions on Day 0. Dogs were examined and live ticks counted at 8, 12, and 24 h after treatment and subsequent re-infestations on Days 14, 28, 42, 58, 76 and 90. Acaricidal efficacy was determined at each time point relative to counts for placebo dogs. Monthly oral doses of sarolaner provided > 95 % efficacy within 24 h of treatment, and consistently provided > 70 % efficacy against subsequent re-infestations with ticks within 24 h over the entire treatment period. Significantly more live ticks were recovered from fluralaner-treated dogs than from sarolaner-treated dogs at 24 h after re-infestation from Day 42 onwards. At 24 h, efficacy of fluralaner was ≤ 20 % from Day 42 to the end of the study on Day 90. There were no adverse reactions to treatment. In this controlled laboratory evaluation, monthly treatment with sarolaner provided consistent efficacy against A. americanum with > 70 % of ticks killed within 24 h after a single oral dose over the duration of the study. Monthly treatment with sarolaner consistently killed

  5. Two new families (Acari: Alicorhagiidae and Platyhelminthes: Prorhynchidae reported for the Hungarian fauna From leaf litter in the Bükk Mountains

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    Pfliegler, W.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Two new members of the Hungarian fauna are reported, both of them were collected in beech forest leaf litter in the Bükk Mountains, North-East Hungary: Alicorhagia fragilis Berlese, 1910 (Arthropoda: Arachnida: Acari: Sarcoptiformes: Endeostigmata: Alicorhagiidae and Geocentrophora baltica (Kennel, 1883 (Platyhelminthes: Rhabditophora: Trepaxonemata: Amplimatricata: 'Lecithoepitheliata': Prorhynchida: Prorhynchidae. The families Alicorhagiidae and Prorhynchidae both represent new taxa in the fauna of the country.

  6. Acaricidal and oviposition deterring effects of santalol identified in sandalwood oil against two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Roh, Hyun Sik; Lim, Eu Gene; Kim, Jinwoo; Park, Chung Gyoo

    2011-01-01

    Thirty-four plant essential oils were screened for their acaricidal and oviposition deterrent activities against two-spotted spider mite (TSSM), Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae), in the laboratory using a leaf-dip bioassay. From initial trials, sandalwood and common thyme oils were observed to be the most effective against TSSM adult females. Subsequent trials confirmed that only sandalwood oil was significantly active (87.2???2.9% mortality) against TSSM adult females. Sandalw...

  7. Monitoring Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Acari: Acaridae) With Traps in Dry-Cured Ham Aging Rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoah, Barbara; Schilling, M W; Phillips, Thomas W

    2016-08-01

    Methyl bromide is the most effective fumigant for controlling the mold (or ham) mite, Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank) (Acari: Acaridae), the most significant pest of dry-cured ham. However, methyl bromide is being phased out of use. Therefore, integrated pest management (IPM) methods should be developed to help control mites in dry-cured ham plants. The foundation of a successful IPM program is an effective monitoring program that provides information on pest presence and abundance over time. By using food-baited traps fabricated from disposable petri dishes and a dog food-based bait, mite activity over time and space was monitored in five dry-cured ham aging rooms from three commercial processing facilities that differed in their fumigation frequencies. Weekly sampling of the mite was conducted from June 2012 to September 2013. There were significant differences in the average weekly trap captures in all facilities, especially before and after fumigation, with the majority of mites in traps prior to fumigation. Mite numbers had a pattern of sharp decline after fumigation, followed by a steady increase until the next fumigation. Average trap captures varied due to trap location over the study period at all study sites, indicating that traps could be used to identify specific locations within an aging room where mite infestation of hams was more likely to occur. These findings can inform facility managers of mite population changes that can be used as one factor toward making pest management decisions and assessing the impact of fumigation or other pest mitigation actions. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Susceptibility of Tetranychus urticae Koch. (Acari: Tetranychidae to Isolates of Entomopathogenic Fungus Beauveria bassiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavimira A. Draganova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioassays with five isolates of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (Bals.- Criv. Vuillemin were conducted under laboratory conditions with a goal to estimate their virulence to the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae Koch. (Acari: Tetranychidae. Common bean plants with mites were treated by spraying conidial suspensions of isolates at concentrations of 106, 107 and 108 conidia/ml. Lethal effects of the fungal isolates wereevaluated as percentages of cumulative daily mortality due to mycoses, corrected for mortality in the control variant. Virulence of the isolates was estimated based on values of the median lethal time (LT50 calculated by probit analysis for the variants treated with conidial suspensions at the concentration of 106 conidia/ml.The two-spotted spider mite was found susceptible to the examined isolates of the entomopathogenic fungus B. bassiana. Mycosis caused to T. urticae by the B. bassiana isolates 444 Bb and 445 Bb had fast lethal effect after treatment with conidial suspensions even at the concentration of 106 conidia/ml. The mean mortality values of host individuals were 83.78 ± 3.62% and 68.49 ± 4.28% on the first day, respectively, and up to 100% in both variants on the fourth day.The isolates 426 Bb, 444 Bb and 445 Bb of B. bassiana were highly virulent to two-spotted spider mites with values of the median lethal time varied within overlapped narrow confidence intervals from 0.122 to 1.084 days (average value 0.162 days, from 0.117 to 1.398 days (average value 0.146 days and from 0.106 to 1.162 days (average value 0.131 days,respectively. Significant differences regarding virulence of the three isolates at p-level < 0.05 could not been proved. The other two examined isolates were distinctly less virulent to T. urticae than these three B. bassiana isolates.

  9. Effect of Pollen from Different Plant Species on Development of Typhlodromus pyri (Sheuten (Acari: Phytoseiidae Efecto del Polen de Diferentes Especies Vegetales sobre el Desarrollo de Typhlodromus pyri (Sheuten (Acari: Phytoseiidae

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    Paulina Bermúdez

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Typhlodromus pyri (Sheuten (Acari: Phytoseiidae is a phytoseiid mite with a high potential in controlling the false Chilean mite (Brevipalpus chilensis Baker; Acari: Tenuipalpidae. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of different plant species pollen as a complementary food in the development of T. pyri when its prey is in low levels of availability. Mites were individually placed on black plastic boxes with pollen and maintained at a temperature of 26 ± 2 °C, 70 ± 5% relative humidity (RH, and a photoperiod of 16:8 h (L:D. Postembryonic development of T. pyri was studied in 11 pollen species, as well as in a mixed diet of Hirschfeldia incana (L. and B. chilensis. Results show that H. incana was the only pollen in which there was no mortality (P > 0.05 along with the control (Oxalis pes-caprae L.. Mean duration from egg to adult with H. incana was 8.70 ± 1.66 d, protonymph 3.27 ± 0.21 d, and deutonymph 2.90 ± 1.45 d (P > 0.05. The mix feeding of T. pyri did not show any significant differences neither in the mean time from egg to adult, nor in mortality by feeding only with B. chilensis. Survival curves of T. pyri fed only with H. incana pollen, combined with B. chilensis, and only with B. chilensis are higher in the first 14 d of life. The sex ratio was not significantly affected by being fed only with H. incana pollen, B. chilensis, or by a combination of both.Typhlodromus pyri (Sheuten (Acari: Phytoseiidae es un ácaro que presenta un alto potencial de uso para el control de la falsa arañita roja de la vid (Brevipalpus chilensis Baker; Acari: Tenuipalpidae. El objetivo de este estudio fue determinar el efecto del polen de diferentes especies vegetales como alimento complementario para T. pyri cuando escasea su presa. Los parámetros post-embrionarios de T. pyri se estudiaron en 11 especies de polen, en una dieta mixta de polen de Hirschfeldia incana (L. y B. chilensis. Los ácaros se colocaron individualmente sobre

  10. SELETIVIDADE DE INSETICIDAS A Neoseiulus californicus MCGREGOR (ACARI: PHYTOSEIIDAE EM MACIEIRA, NO RIO GRANDE DO SUL AGROCHEMICAL SELECTIVITY TO Neoseiulus californicus MCGREGOR (ACARI: PHYTOSEIIDAE ON APPLE IN RIO GRANDE DO SUL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LINO BITTENCOURT MONTEIRO

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Testes para determinar os efeitos de agroquímicos homologados para macieira foram realizados em laboratório sobre Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae. Os indivíduos testados foram coletados de um pomar comercial da Agriflor Ltda, em Vacaria, Rio Grande do Sul, após várias liberações inoculativas. Os inseticidas utilizados foram os tradicionalmente recomendados para o controle de pragas, principalmente mosca-das-frutas Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera: Tephritidae. A oviposição e a mortalidade dos ácaros foram avaliadas 12; 24; 48 e 96 horas após a pulverização, cujos produtos foram classificados em quatro classes de toxicidade (IOBC/WPRS. Azinphos ethyl, deltametrina e fenthion provocaram 100% de mortalidade, sendo que dimethoate, fenitrotion, paration, phosmet e triclorfon foram levemente nocivos (classe 2. Malation foi considerado neutro para esta população.The side-effects of agrochemical to Neoseiulus californicus (Acari: Phytoseiidae were studied in laboratory. The mites were collected in commercial apple orchard of Agropastoril Rincão das Flores, in Vacaria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, after successive inoculative releases. The insecticids used were recommended to control of same pest, as Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera: Tephritidae. The reproduction effect and mortality were evalued 12, 24, 48 and 96 hours after pulverization, while the agrochemical were ranked in toxicity classes, according to IOBC/WPRS. Azinphos ethyl, deltametrina e fenthion were harmful with ca. 100% of mortality in 24 hours, dimethoate, fenitrotion, paration, phosmet e triclorfon were slightly harmful (class 2. Malation was harmless.

  11. Primer registro del hongo Neozygites sp. (Zygomycota: Entomophthorales, patógeno de Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae en la República Argentina First record of Neozygites sp. (Zygomycota: Entomophthorales, pathogen of Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae in Argentina

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    Ana C. Scorsetti

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se cita por primera vez para la Argentina la presencia del hongo entomopatógeno Neozygites cf. floridana (Zygomycota: Zygomycetes: Entomophthorales como patógeno de la «arañuela roja», Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae, importante plaga de cultivos hortícolas en la región. Los muestreos fueron realizados en el cinturón hortícola del Gran La Plata sobre cultivos de tomate, pimiento, berenjena, y otras hortalizas. El material de herbario, como preparaciones microscópicas y ácaros infectados fue depositado en el Herbario del Instituto de Botánica C. Spegazzini y en el herbario micológico del CEPAVE. Este trabajo contribuye a ampliar la distribución y el espectro de hospedadores de Neozygites , así como ampliar la información de los hongos entomopatógenos en la Argentina.In this paper, the presence of the fungi Neozygites cf. floridana (Zygomycota: Zygomycetes: Entomophthorales, as pathogen of the mite Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae, is recorded for first time in Argentina. Samplings were carried out in La Plata , on tomato, pepper, egg-plant, and other horticultural crops. Microscopic slides and mites infected were placed in the Herbarium of the Institute of Botany C. Spegazzini and in the Herbarium of CEPAVE. This work contributes to further expand the distribution and the host range of Neozygites as well as the information of entomopathogenic fungi in Argentina.

  12. TAMBO VIEJO: UN ASENTAMIENTO FORTIFICADO EN EL VALLE DE ACARÍ, PERÚ (Tambo Viejo: A Fortified Settlement in the Acari Valley, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidio M. Valdez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available La aparición de los asentamientos fortificados y el origen del conflicto violento son temas poco discutidos en el contexto de la arqueología peruana. Considero que es oportuno investigar y determinar cuándo y por qué surgieron los primeros asentamientos fortificados. El propósito central de este artículo está precisamente orientado a responder tales interrogantes y discutir el tema del conflicto violento en el valle de Acarí y, por extensión, en la costa sur del Perú. Las evidencias arqueológicas disponibles señalan que, durante el periodo Intermedio Temprano, Tambo Viejo fue un asentamiento defendido por varias estructuras perimétricas. Otros sitios contemporáneos de Tambo Viejo en Acarí también fueron fortificados. Además, existe en el mismo valle evidencia tangible de violencia en la forma de prisioneros que posteriormente fueron decapitados. En contraste a la evidencia proveniente de Acarí, no existen asentamientos del periodo Intermedio Temprano identificables como fortificaciones, lo que hace de los sitios de Acarí los primeros asentamientos fortificados de toda la costa sur. ENGLISH: The emergence of violent conflict and of fortified settlements is a subject little studied within Peruvian archaeology. However, I consider it vital to investigate and determine the time and the reasons under which fortified settlements were first established. The central aim of this paper is to discuss when and why fortified settlements emerged first in the Acari Valley and, by extension, in the south coast of Peru. Available archaeological evidence indicates that during the Early Intermediate Period, Tambo Viejo was a fortified settlement protected by several massive walls. Other neighbouring sites in Acari were also fortified. Furthermore, in Acari there is conclusive evidence for violence in the form of decapitated individuals. In contrast to evidence coming from Acari, not a single Early Intermediate Period settlement from other

  13. Peruvian oribatid mites (Acari, Oribatida from the German Biological Expedition, with description of a new species of the genus Pergalumna

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    Sergey Ermilov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study is based on oribatid mite material (Acari, Oribatida collected during the German Expedition in 2011 in Peru. An annotated checklist of identified oribatid mites, including 16 species from 14 genera and 8 families, is provided. Thirteen species and two genera (Notohermannia, Zetomimus are recorded for the first time in Peru; the genus Notohermannia and species Notohermannia obtusa are recorded for the first time in the Neotropical region. A new species of the genus Pergalumna (Galumnidae, P. paraboliviana sp. n., is described. The new species is most similar to Pergalumna boliviana Ermilov, 2013 from Bolivia, however, it differs from the latter by the body size, morphology of porose areas A1 and the presence of interlamellar setae.

  14. New and little known species of oribatid mites of the subgenus Galumna (Galumna) (Acari, Oribatida, Galumnidae) from Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermilov, Sergey G

    2015-04-13

    Two new species of oribatid mites of the subgenus Galumna (Galumna) (Acari, Oribatida, Galumnidae) are described from soil and litter of forest zones of southern Vietnam. Galumna (G.) paramastigophora sp. nov. differs from known species of calcicola-group by the morphology of bothridial setae and length of interlamellar setae; also, the new species is similar morphologically to Leptogalumna (Aegyptogalumna) mastigophora, however, it differs from the latter by the presence of lamellar lines, morphology of interlamellar setae and absence of notogastral setae. Galumna (G.) pseudotriquetra sp. nov. is similar morphologically to Galumna (G.) triquetra, however, it differs from the latter by the length of lamellar setae, number of postanal porose areas and morphology of notogastral porose areas Aa. Supplementary description of Galumna (G.) aba and remarks to the original description of Galumna (G.) levisensilla are presented.

  15. Peruvian oribatid mites (Acari, Oribatida) from the German Biological Expedition, with description of a new species of the genus Pergalumna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermilov, Sergey G; Gwiazdowicz, Dariusz J

    2015-01-01

    The present study is based on oribatid mite material (Acari, Oribatida) collected during the German Expedition in 2011 in Peru. An annotated checklist of identified oribatid mites, including 16 species from 14 genera and 8 families, is provided. Thirteen species and two genera (Notohermannia, Zetomimus) are recorded for the first time in Peru; the genus Notohermannia and species Notohermanniaobtusa are recorded for the first time in the Neotropical region. A new species of the genus Pergalumna (Galumnidae), Pergalumnaparaboliviana sp. n., is described. The new species is most similar to Pergalumnaboliviana Ermilov, 2013 from Bolivia, however, it differs from the latter by the body size, morphology of porose areas A1 and the presence of interlamellar setae.

  16. Acari; Tetranychidae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The LD50 values and slopes were determined using probit analysis and resistance factors calculated. All .... The LD50 values of all field population were higher than those of the susceptible strain for the five miticides assayed. Resistance of the field populations to. Protect® ..... Piraneo TG, Bull J, Morales AM, Lavine CL,.

  17. A survey of tick-borne pathogens in dogs and their ticks in the Pantanal biome, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, A L T; Witter, R; Martins, T F; Pacheco, T A; Alves, A S; Chitarra, C S; Dutra, V; Nakazato, L; Pacheco, R C; Labruna, M B; Aguiar, D M

    2016-03-01

    Tick and blood samples collected from domestic dogs in the Brazilian Pantanal were tested by molecular methods for the presence of tick-borne protozoa and bacteria. Among 320 sampled dogs, 3.13% were infected by Babesia vogeli (Piroplasmida: Babesiidae), 8.75% by Hepatozoon canis (Eucoccidiorida: Hepatozoidae), 7.19% by Anaplasma platys (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae), and 0.94% by an unclassified Anaplasma sp. In three tick species collected from dogs, the following tick-borne agents were detected: (a) B. vogeli, An. platys and Ehrlichia canis (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae), infecting Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (Ixodida: Ixodidae) ticks; (b) H. canis, an unclassified Anaplasma sp. and Rickettsia amblyommii (Rickettsiales: Rickettsiaceae), infecting Amblyomma cajennense sensu lato (Ixodida: Ixodidae) ticks, and (c) Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic rainforest, an emerging human pathogen, infecting Amblyomma ovale ticks. Molecular analysis, based on a mitochondrial gene, revealed that the Am. cajennense s.l. ticks of the present study corresponded to Amblyomma sculptum, a member of the Am. cajennense species complex, and that Rh. sanguineus s.l. belonged to the tropical lineage. Whereas dogs are exposed to a number of tick-borne bacterial and protozoan agents in the Pantanal biome, humans are potentially exposed to infection by spotted fever group rickettsiae (e.g. R. amblyommii and Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic rainforest) because both Am. sculptum and Am. ovale are among the most important human-biting ticks in Brazil. © 2015 The Royal Entomological Society.

  18. Catalogue and historical overview of juvenile instars of oribatid mites (Acari: Oribatida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Roy A; Ermilov, Sergey G

    2014-07-08

    Oribatid mites (Acari: Oribatida) comprise a taxonomically and morphologically diverse suborder of about 10,000 described species, not including the hyporder Astigmata, with collectively a global distribution. They are primarily soil and litter inhabitants, feeding on fungi and decaying plant remains with various levels of specificity. Though all five active instars are important for reasons that relate to both ecology and systematics, most species are known only as adults. Our purpose was to gather the existing world literature on the active juvenile instars (i.e., excluding prelarva) of oribatid mites, to put classifications and nomenclature in a current context, and to identify the nature of the information in each paper. A selected historical overview identifies the contributions of 19th century authors C.L. Koch, H. Nicolet and A.D. Michael, and summarizes errors that resulted in various oribatid mite juveniles being classified in genera, families and even suborders that were different from those of their adult instars. The catalogue includes all species known to us for which juveniles have been described: 805 species in 310 genera, representing only about 8% of the known oribatid mite species and 30% of genera. These represent 118 families, about 70% of those known. At the superfamily level, representation is weakest among the diverse Oppioidea and Oribatuloidea, and those superfamilies with juveniles that are endophagous in organic substrates, such as Phthiracaroidea, Euphthiracaroidea and Carabodoidea. Representation is strongest in the middle-derivative hyporder Nothrina, in which adults and juveniles are more easily associated, and in brachypyline superfamilies that are mostly affiliated with aquatic, semiaquatic or intertidal environments, such as Limnozetoidea and Ameronothroidea. Juvenile instars remain unknown for 45 families of Brachypylina. Four new nomenclatural actions were proposed: Ojaithrus nymphoides Habeeb, 1982 is a junior synonym of

  19. Detección de anticuerpos contra Borrelia burgdorferi e identificación de garrapatas ixodidas en Piura Y Amazonas, Perú

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    Martha Glenny A

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Detectar anticuerpos IgG/IgM contra Borrelia burgdorferi en población general, procedentes de los departamentos de Piura y Amazonas e identificar especies de garrapatas probablemente incriminadas en la transmisión de la enfermedad de Lyme. Material y Métodos: Entre agosto del año 2001 y junio de 2002, se colectaron muestras de sangre de 232 pobladores procedentes de ocho localidades del Departamento de Piura y 12 del Departamento de Amazonas, para evaluar mediante ELISA Captia™ Lyme IgG/IgM (Trinity biotech la presencia de anticuerpos contra Borrelia burgdorferi. Además, se colectaron garrapatas en animales domésticos por búsqueda directa. Resultados: Se detectó seropositividad en 9,9 % de los sueros evaluados. Asimismo, de 433 garrapatas colectadas se identificaron los géneros: Ixodes (5,5%, Amblyomma (18,0%, Rhipicephalus (23,5%, Anocentor (31,1% y Boophilus (21,7%. Conclusiones: Existen personas seropositivas por Borrelia en Piura y Amazonas, coincidiendo con los hallazgos realizados en Sapillica en el año 1992, además se detectó la presencia de garrapatas del género Ixodes en Piura.

  20. Prevalence of equine Piroplasmosis and its association with tick infestation in the State of São Paulo, Brazil Prevalência da Piroplasmose equina e sua associação com infestação por carrapatos no Estado de São Paulo

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    Claudia E. Kerber

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Serum samples were collected from 582 horses from 40 stud farms in the State of São Paulo and tick (Acari: Ixodidae infestations were evaluated on them. Serum samples were subjected to the complement fixation test (CFT and a competitive inhibition ELISA (cELISA for Babesia caballi and Theileria equi. Logistic regression analyses were performed to construct multivariate models that could explain the dependent variable (horses positive for B. caballi or T. equi as a function of the independent variables (presence or abundance of each one of the tick species found on the farms. A higher overall prevalence of B. caballi (54.1% than of T. equi (21.6% was found by the two tests. The ticks Dermacentor nitens Neumann, 1897, Amblyomma cajennense (Fabricius, 1787 and Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus (Canestrini, 1887 were present on horses on 38 (95%, 20 (50%, and 4 (10% farms, respectively. Infestations by D. nitens were statistically associated with B. caballi-positive horses on the farms by either the CFT or cELISA. Infestations by A. cajennense were statistically associated with T. equi-positive horses on the farms by either CFT or cELISA.Amostras de soro sanguineo foram coletadas de 582 equinos de 40 haras no estado de São Paulo, onde as infestações por carrapatos foram avaliadas nos animais. Os soros foram testados por reação de fixação do complemento (RFC e ELISA competitivo por inibição (cELISA com antígenos de Babesia caballi e Theileria equi. Análises de regressão logística foram realizadas para construir modelos multivariados que pudessem explicar as variáveis dependentes (equinos positivos para B. caballi ou T. equi em função de variáveis independentes (presença e abundância de cada uma das espécies de carrapatos encontradas nos equinos dos haras. Em geral, os dois testes sorológicos indicaram uma prevalência maior para B. caballi (54,1% do que para T. equi (21,6%. Os carrapatos Dermacentor nitens Neumann, 1897

  1. Generic revision of the large-winged mite superfamily Galumnoidea (Acari, Oribatida) of the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermilov, Sergey G; Klimov, Pavel B

    2017-11-27

    Genus-level taxa in the oribatid mite superfamily Galumnoidea (Acari, Oribatida) are revised based on morphology of adults and a previously published phylogenetic analysis. We give a concise overview of the general morphology of Galumnoidea, diagnoses and a key for families, genera, and subgenera, and a taxonomic list with two families, 39 genera, 9 non-nominal subgenera, and 590 species. The following nomenclatorial changes to genus-group taxa resulted from our revision: Allogalumna (Allogalumna) Grandjean, 1936 (=Xenogalumna Balogh, 1960(b) syn. nov.), Flagellozetes (Cosmogalumna) Aoki, 1988 comb. nov. (from Galumna (Cosmogalumna)), Flagellozetes (Variogalumna) Mahunka, 1995 stat. nov., Galumna (Galumna) Heyden, 1826 (=Rostrogalumna Engelbrecht, 1973 syn. nov.), Pilogalumna Grandjean, 1956(a) (=Disparagalumna Hammer, 1973 syn. nov.), Trichogalumna (Tanzanycha) Koçak & Kemal, 2008 stat. nov., Galumnella Berlese, 1916(a) (=Monogalumnella Mahunka, 1986 syn. nov. =Trichogalumnella Mahunka, 1992 syn. nov., =Bigalumnella Mahunka, 1994 syn. nov.). The following changes are made to species-group nomenclature: Angulogalumna areolata (Starý, 2005) comb. nov. (from Cuspidogalumna) et stat. ressur. (=Galumna (Angulogalumna) staryi Subías, 2010 syn. nov. replacement name for secondary homonym Galumna (Angulogalumna) areolata (Starý, 2005)), Allogalumna (Allogalumna) longula (Balogh, 1960(b)) comb. nov. (from Xenogalumna), Flagellozetes (Cosmogalumna) areticulata (Ermilov, Sandmann, Klarner, Widyastuti & Scheu, 2015(d)) comb. nov. (from Galumna (Cosmogalumna)), F. (C.) dongnaiensis (Ermilov & Anichkin, 2013) comb. nov. (from Galumna (Cosmogalumna)), F. (C.) ekaterinae (Ermilov & Friedrich, 2016(b)) comb. nov. (from Galumna (Cosmogalumna)), F. (C.) hiroyoshii (Nakamura & Fujikawa, 2004) comb. nov. (from Galumna (Cosmogalumna)), F. (C.) ornata (Aoki, 1988) comb. nov. (from Galumna (Cosmogalumna)), F. (C.) imperfectus (Aoki & Hu, 1993) comb. nov. (from Galumna (Cosmogalumna

  2. A revision of the family Ameroseiidae (Acari, Mesostigmata), with some data on Slovak fauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mašán, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The family Ameroseiidae Evans, 1961 (Acari: Mesostigmata) includes a total of 12 valid and adequately described genera, namely Afrocypholaelaps Elsen, 1972, Ameroseiella Bregetova, 1977, Ameroseius Berlese, 1904, Asperolaelaps Womersley, 1956, Brontispalaelaps Womersley, 1956, Epicriopsis Berlese, 1916, Hattena Domrow, 1963, Kleemannia Oudemans, 1930, Neocypholaelaps Vitzthum, 1942, Pseudoameroseius gen. n., Sertitympanum Elsen & Whitaker, 1985 and Sinoseius Bai & Gu, 1995. One of these genera includes subgenera, namely Kleemannia (Primoseius) Womersley, 1956. All genera are reviewed and re-diagnosed, and a dichotomous key is provided for their identification. Ameroseius (50 species), Kleemannia (28 species) and Neocypholaelaps (22 species) are the largest genera in the family. Ameroseiella, Kleemannia, Kleemannia (Primoseius) and Sinoseius are considered to be valid taxa and, in presented systematic classification, they are removed from synonymy with Ameroseius. The genus Pseudoameroseius gen. n., with type species Ameroseius michaelangeli Moraza, 2006 (from Canary Islands), is newly erected to further refine broad primary concept of Ameroseius as understood by some former authors (Karg, Bregetova). Asperolaelaps is removed from synonymy with Neocypholaelaps. Three new species are here described, namely Ameroseius renatae sp. n. (based on specimens from Slovakia), Kleemannia dolichochaeta sp. n. (from Spain) and Kleemannia miranda sp. n. (from U.S.A.). The following new junior synonymies are proposed: Ameroseius apodius Karg, 1971 = Ameroseiella macrochelae (Westerboer, 1963); Ameroseius bregetovae Livshits & Mitrofanov, 1975 = Neocypholaelaps favus Ishikawa, 1968; Ameroseius chinensis Khalili-Moghadam & Saboori, 2016 = Ameroseius guyimingi Ma, 1997; Ameroseius crassisetosus Ye & Ma, 1993, Ameroseius qinghaiensis Li & Yang, 2000 and Ameroseius norvegicus Narita, Abduch & Moraes, 2015 = Ameroseius corbiculus (Sowerby, 1806); Ameroseius dubitatus Berlese

  3. A revision of the family Ameroseiidae (Acari, Mesostigmata, with some data on Slovak fauna

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    Peter Mašán

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The family Ameroseiidae Evans, 1961 (Acari: Mesostigmata includes a total of 12 valid and adequately described genera, namely Afrocypholaelaps Elsen, 1972, Ameroseiella Bregetova, 1977, Ameroseius Berlese, 1904, Asperolaelaps Womersley, 1956, Brontispalaelaps Womersley, 1956, Epicriopsis Berlese, 1916, Hattena Domrow, 1963, Kleemannia Oudemans, 1930, Neocypholaelaps Vitzthum, 1942, Pseudoameroseius gen. n., Sertitympanum Elsen & Whitaker, 1985 and Sinoseius Bai & Gu, 1995. One of these genera includes subgenera, namely Kleemannia (Primoseius Womersley, 1956. All genera are reviewed and re-diagnosed, and a dichotomous key is provided for their identification. Ameroseius (50 species, Kleemannia (28 species and Neocypholaelaps (22 species are the largest genera in the family. Ameroseiella, Kleemannia, Kleemannia (Primoseius and Sinoseius are considered to be valid taxa and, in presented systematic classification, they are removed from synonymy with Ameroseius. The genus Pseudoameroseius gen. n., with type species Ameroseius michaelangeli Moraza, 2006 (from Canary Islands, is newly erected to further refine broad primary concept of Ameroseius as understood by some former authors (Karg, Bregetova. Asperolaelaps is removed from synonymy with Neocypholaelaps. Three new species are here described, namely Ameroseius renatae sp. n. (based on specimens from Slovakia, Kleemannia dolichochaeta sp. n. (from Spain and Kleemannia miranda sp. n. (from U.S.A.. The following new junior synonymies are proposed: Ameroseius apodius Karg, 1971 = Ameroseiella macrochelae (Westerboer, 1963; Ameroseius bregetovae Livshits & Mitrofanov, 1975 = Neocypholaelaps favus Ishikawa, 1968; Ameroseius chinensis Khalili-Moghadam & Saboori, 2016 = Ameroseius guyimingi Ma, 1997; Ameroseius crassisetosus Ye & Ma, 1993, Ameroseius qinghaiensis Li & Yang, 2000 and Ameroseius norvegicus Narita, Abduch & Moraes, 2015 = Ameroseius corbiculus (Sowerby, 1806; Ameroseius dubitatus Berlese

  4. Comparative Efficacy of an Imidacloprid/Flumethrin Collar (Seresto®) and an Oral Afoxolaner Chewable (NexGard®) against Tick (Dermacentor variabilis and Amblyomma americanum) Infestations on Dogs: a Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmes, Cameon M; Hostetler, Joe; Davis, Wendell L; Settje, Terry; Everett, William R

    2015-08-01

    This randomised controlled laboratory study demonstrated the residual speed of efficacy of an imidacloprid/flumethrin collar (Seresto(®), Bayer) for the control of ticks (Dermacentor variabilis, Amblyomma americanum) at 6 and 12 hours postinfestation on dogs when compared to oral afoxolaner (NexGard(®), Merial). Dogs were randomised by pre-treatment tick counts: Group 1) imidacloprid 10 % (w/w) / flumethrin 4.5 % (w/w) collar, 2) afoxolaner chewable (dosage 3.1 - 6.2 mg/kg), and 3) non-treated controls. Ticks (50/species/dog) were infested on days 3, 14, 21, and 28; live (attached and non-attached) and dead attached ticks were counted 6 and 12 hours later. Efficacy against live D. variabilis at 6 hours for Group 1 was 95 - 100 % and for Group 2 was 38 - 48 %; efficacy at 12 hours for Group 1 was 97 - 100 % and for Group 2 was 27 - 59 %. Efficacy against A. americanum at 6 hours for Group 1 was 94 - 100 % and for Group 2 was afoxolaner on all challenge days.

  5. The conclusion of a comparative efficacy study of fluralaner and sarolaner against the tick Amblyomma americanum on dogs is based on results obtained at study times that are outside the fluralaner label recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Rob

    2017-03-24

    The only fluralaner-related conclusion presented in a study comparing the efficacy of fluralaner and sarolaner for control of the tick Amblyomma americanum on dogs is based on study times that are outside the label administration recommendations. Label recommendations for fluralaner treatment of A. americanum on dogs in the USA require re-administration at 56 days. This 56 day re-administration was not conducted in the study; therefore, all assessed time points following 56 days post-treatment in the study present comparisons that are not consistent with fluralaner administration recommendations. The only comparative time point assessed prior to 56 days showing a difference between treatments was at 42 days post-administration, a time point when methodological problems were identified by the investigators. Therefore, the only comparative study conclusion that a difference was shown between fluralaner and sarolaner beyond 6 weeks (42 days) after treatment is not based on recommended product use. Furthermore, if the study does not show that there is a difference between the treatments at times when the products are used as recommended, then there also can be no comparative discussion of the risk of tick-borne pathogen transmission risk between treatments.

  6. Life history of Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor, 1954 (Acari: Phytoseiidae fed with castor bean (Ricinus communisL. pollen in laboratory conditions

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    PP Marafeli

    Full Text Available The predatory mite, Neoseiulus californicus(McGregor, 1954 (Acari: Phytoseiidae is one of the principal natural enemies of tetranychid mites in several countries, promoting efficient control of those mites in several food and ornamental crops. Pest attacks such as that of the spider mite, Tetranychus urticaeKoch, 1836 (Acari: Tetranychidae, is one of the problems faced by farmers, especially in the greenhouse, due to the difficulty of its control with the use of chemicals because of the development of fast resistance making it hard to control it. The objective of this work was to study the life history of the predatory mite N. californicus as a contribution to its mass laboratory rearing, having castor bean plant [Ricinus communis L. (Euphorbiaceae] pollen as food, for its subsequent use as a natural enemy of T. urticae on a cultivation of greenhouse rosebushes. The studies were carried out in the laboratory, at 25 ± 2°C of temperature, 70 ± 10% RH and a 14 hour photophase. The biological aspects and the fertility life table were appraised. Longevity of 32.9 days was verified for adult females and 40.4 days for males. The intrinsic rate of increase (rm was 0.2 and the mean generation time (T was 17.2 days. The population doubled every 4.1 days. The results obtained were similar to those in which the predatory mite N. californicus fed on T. urticae.

  7. Community structure variability of Uropodina mites (Acari: Mesostigmata) in nests of the common mole, Talpa europaea, in Central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napierała, Agnieszka; Mądra, Anna; Leszczyńska-Deja, Kornelia; Gwiazdowicz, Dariusz J; Gołdyn, Bartłomiej; Błoszyk, Jerzy

    2016-04-01

    Underground nests of Talpa europaea, known as the common mole, are very specific microhabitats, which are also quite often inhabited by various groups of arthropods. Mites from the suborder Uropodina (Acari: Mesostigmata) are only one of them. One could expect that mole nests that are closely located are inhabited by communities of arthropods with similar species composition and structure. However, results of empirical studies clearly show that even nests which are close to each other can be different both in terms of the species composition and abundance of Uropodina communities. So far, little is known about the factors that can cause these differences. The major aim of this study was to identify factors determining species composition, abundance, and community structure of Uropodina communities in mole nests. The study is based on material collected during a long-term investigation conducted in western parts of Poland. The results indicate that the two most important factors influencing species composition and abundance of Uropodina communities in mole nests are nest-building material and depth at which nests are located. Composition of Uropodina communities in nests of moles was also compared with that of other microhabitats (e.g. rotten wood, forest litter, soil) based on data from 4421 samples collected in Poland. Communities of this habitat prove most similar to these of open areas, especially meadows, as well as some forest types.

  8. Compatibility of reduced-risk insecticides with the non-target predatory mite Iphiseius degenerans (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döker, İsmail; Pappas, Maria L; Samaras, Konstantinos; Triantafyllou, Anneta; Kazak, Cengiz; Broufas, George D

    2015-09-01

    Iphiseius degenerans (Berlese) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) is a common predatory mite in citrus orchards in some areas of the Mediterranean basin and an important biological control agent of the thrips Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) in Integrated Pest Management (IPM) programmes in greenhouse crops. In this study, we evaluated the effects of the 'reduced-risk' insecticides acetamiprid, chlorantraniliprole, flubendiamide, metaflumizone, methoxyfenozide, spinetoram and thiamethoxam on I. degenerans, as a means of testing their compatibility in IPM programmes. Although all pesticides decreased immature survival, high mortality was only recorded for young larvae when exposed to acetamiprid, while metaflumizone, thiamethoxam and spinetoram resulted in intermediate lethal effects. The estimated LC50 values of acetamiprid, spinetoram and thiamethoxam for I. degenerans females were 0.52, 0.84 and 0.16-fold lower than the respective maximum recommended doses of the pesticides for field application. Although all pesticides tested significantly decreased fecundity, highest rates corresponded to the three pesticides already mentioned. Chlorantraniliprole, flubendiamide and methoxyfenozide may preliminarily be included in IPM programmes, whereas the effects of acetamiprid, metaflumizone, spinetoram and thiamethoxam on I. degenerans should be clarified in further field toxicological tests. This information could be useful for rationally planning and implementing pest management on a sustainable basis. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Transcriptome Analysis of the Carmine Spider Mite, Tetranychus cinnabarinus (Boisduval, 1867 (Acari: Tetranychidae, and Its Response to β-Sitosterol

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    Chunya Bu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetranychus cinnabarinus (Acari: Tetranychidae is a worldwide polyphagous agricultural pest that has the title of resistance champion among arthropods. We reported previously the identification of the acaricidal compound β-sitosterol from Mentha piperita and Inula japonica. However, the acaricidal mechanism of β-sitosterol is unclear. Due to the limited genetic research carried out, we de novo assembled the transcriptome of T. cinnabarinus using Illumina sequencing and conducted a differential expression analysis of control and β-sitosterol-treated mites. In total, we obtained >5.4 G high-quality bases for each sample with unprecedented sequencing depth and assembled them into 22,941 unigenes. We identified 617 xenobiotic metabolism-related genes involved in detoxification, binding, and transporting of xenobiotics. A highly expanded xenobiotic metabolic system was found in mites. T. cinnabarinus detoxification genes—including carboxyl/cholinesterase and ABC transporter class C—were upregulated after β-sitosterol treatment. Defense-related proteins, such as Toll-like receptor, legumain, and serine proteases, were also activated. Furthermore, other important genes—such as the chloride channel protein, cytochrome b, carboxypeptidase, peritrophic membrane chitin binding protein, and calphostin—may also play important roles in mites’ response to β-sitosterol. Our results demonstrate that high-throughput-omics tool facilitates identification of xenobiotic metabolism-related genes and illustration of the acaricidal mechanisms of β-sitosterol.

  10. Three new species of oribatid mites of the family Punctoribatidae (Acari, Oribatida) from alpine bogs of New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermilov, Sergey G; Minor, Maria A

    2016-03-15

    Three new species of oribatid mites of the family Punctoribatidae (Acari, Oribatida) are described from alpine bogs of the Central Otago region in the South Island of New Zealand. Macrogena hexasetosa sp. nov. is morphologically most similar to M. brevisensilla Ermilov & Minor, 2015, however, it differs from the latter by larger body size, the presence of six pairs of genital setae, notogastral and ano-adanal setae of medium size, setiform rostral setae, narrower tutorial cusps, the absence of antero-ventral teeth on genua I, II and femora II, and by the absence of striae on the subcapitular mentum. Porallozetes badamdorji sp. nov. differs from the type species-P. dispar (Hammer, 1973)-by larger body length, the presence of interlamellar setae, short and clavate bothridial setae, anterior notogastral margin, notogastral setae of medium size, semi-oval dorsophragmata, and by the position of notogastral porose areas A2 posteriorly to A1. Safrobates gerdi sp. nov. differs from the type species-S. miniporus Mahunka, 1989-by larger body size, the presence of setiform rostral setae, and by notogastral setae of medium length. Porallozetes and Safrobates are recorded in New Zealand for the first time. Generic diagnoses for Macrogena, Porallozetes and Safrobates are given.

  11. Intraspecific variation of the octotaxic system in Protoribates paracapucinus (Acari, Oribatida, Haplozetidae), with systematic and taxonomic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigmann, Gerd; Ermilov, Sergey G

    2016-01-25

    The octotaxic system of notogaster in poronotic oribatid mites (Acari, Oribatida) usually is represented by two types, either porose areas or saccules. These dermal gland structures are observed as constant for each species (except sexual dimorphism; see below), therefore their type often is used as key character, and in consequence of this, it is used in taxonomy and systematics as diagnostic character for different taxa levels from species to family (Subías 2004, online version 2015; Weigmann 2006; Norton & Behan-Pelletier 2009; Bayartogtokh 2010). However, there are exceptions: for Drymobates silvicola Grandjean, 1930 (Drymobatidae) and Galumna (Atypicogalumna) corpuzrarosae Ermilov, Sandmann, Klarner, Widyastuti & Scheu, 2015 (Galumnidae), a composite octotaxic system is known, including side by side porose areas and saccules in every specimen (Grandjean 1930; Ermilov et al. 2015). Behan-Pelletier (2015) reports several cases of sexual dimorphism of the octotaxic system in Poronota, all with different appearance of porose areas. But for the licneremaeoid Glanderemaeus hammerae Balogh & Csiszár, 1963 (whose familial placement is unclear) a unique sexual dimorphism in octotaxic system is described-males with saccules, females with porose areas (see also Norton et al. 1997).

  12. Impact of ectohumus application in birch and pine nurseries on the presence of soil mites (Acari, Oribatida in particular

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    Klimek Andrzej

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Intensively used forest nurseries are characterised by degradation processes that lead to a drop in the quality of seedlings. The main reason of this problem is a decrease in biological soil diversity. Therefore, an attempt of nursery soil enrichment by introducing ectohumus – as compost and fresh litter – from the pine forest was carried out. The research was carried out in 2009–2011 in the Bielawy forest nursery near the city of Toruń, Poland. The objective of the study was to determine the impact of organic fertilisation (compost made up of forest humus and mulching using fresh ectohumus on the density and community composition of Acari mites and on species composition of oribatid mites (Oribatida in the nurseries of silver birch and Scots pine. Mites, especially oribatid mites, were treated as bioindicators of soil biological activity. Research has shown that mulching using fresh ectohumus caused a multiple increase in the density of mites, especially in saprophagous mites Oribatida. Oribatid mites were clearly more numerous in birch cultivation than in that of pine. Overall, 27 species of oribatid mites were found. Mulching resulted in a significant growth in species diversity in both cultivations. The most numerous oribatid mite in the area under the study was Oribatula tibialis. This species was present in all plots and showed clear preference for birch cultivation. Tectocepheus velatus and Oppiella nova, common and known to be present in a variety of environments, were slightly less numerous.

  13. THE EFFECT OF CATTLE LIQUID MANURE FERTILIZATION ON THE SOIL MITES (ACARI OF PERMANENT MEADOW IN POLAND

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    RADOMIR GRACZYK

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different doses of cattle liquid manure, with or without the VIT-TRA agent, on the mites of permanent meadow, with species analysis of oribatid mites (Acari, Oribatida was investigated. Samples were taken from 13 plots, fertilized with cattle liquid manure in doses 40, 60 and 80 m3· ha-1 and VIT-TRA agent. The dose 40 m3· ha-1 increased the abundance of mites, comparing to the control plot, while doses 60 and 80 m3· ha-1 decreased it. The fungicidal agent, with medium and high dose of fertilizer, signifi cantly decreased the density of Oribatida, Gamasida and Actinedida in relation to small dose of fertilizer with this agent. The mites reacted in a similar way to the bactericidal agent, but acting of virocidal agent was indistinct. The Oribatida dominated among the mites, while the Actinedida and Gamasida were less abundant. Among the Oribatida the most abundant were: Parachipteria bella, Liebstadia humerata, Achipteria coleoptrata and Scheloribates laevigatus. The Oribatida preferred the lower part of grasses, and their density distinctly decreased with the soil depth.

  14. Ecology and host specificity of laelapine mites (Acari: Laelapidae) of small mammals in an Atlantic forest area of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Hatano, Fernanda; Gettinger, Donald; Bergallo, Helena G

    2002-02-01

    Mesostigmatic mites of the Laelapinae Berlese, 1892 (Acari: Laelapidae) are nidicolous arthropods that commonly occur in the fur of Neotropical small mammmals. In this 2-yr study, the laelapine acarofauna associated with the small mammal community in an area of Atlantic forest on Ilha Grande, Rio de Janeiro State, was examined, including observations on patterns of host specificity, mite dispersal, ecology, and food habits. A total of 1,347 laelapines was sampled from the pelage of 6 species of small mammals (Marmosops incanus, Nectomys squamipes, Oryzomys russatus, Rhipidomys n. sp., Oxymycterus dasytrichus, and Trinomys dimidiatus), all of which occurred exclusively in monoxenous associations with their hosts. No evidence of a blood meal was observed in the gut of the mites. With the exception of the 2 species of Tur, mite populations on hosts were entirely or nearly restricted to adult females. These results, together with some morphological characteristics of laelapines, reinforce the hypotheses that Neotropical laelapine mites are not ectoparasitic, and that females disperse by phoresy.

  15. New Miticides for Integrated Pest Management of Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) in Honey Bee Colonies on the Canadian Prairies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandervalk, L P; Nasr, M E; Dosdall, L M

    2014-12-01

    Varroa destructor Anderson and Trueman 2000 (Acari: Varroidae) is an ectoparasitic mite of the honey bee, Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae). Honey bee colonies require extensive management to prevent mortality caused by varroa mites and the viruses they vector. New miticides (Thymovar and HopGuard) to manage varroa mites were evaluated during the spring and fall treatment windows of the Canadian prairies to determine their effectiveness as part of an integrated management strategy. Thymovar and HopGuard were evaluated alongside the currently used industry standards: Apivar and formic acid. Results demonstrated that Apivar and formic acid remain effective V. destructor management options under spring and fall conditions. Applications of Thymovar during spring were associated with a reduction in brood area, and therefore should be limited to the fall season. The miticide HopGuard was not effective in managing V. destructor, and alteration of the current delivery system is necessary. This study demonstrates the potential for new effective treatment options to supplement currently used V. destructor integrated pest management systems. © 2014 Entomological Society of America.

  16. Sarcoptes scabiei (Acari: Sarcoptidae) mite extract modulates expression of cytokines and adhesion molecules by human dermal microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, B Laurel; Arlian, Larry G; Morgan, Marjorie S

    2006-09-01

    The inflammatory and immune responses seen with the worldwide disease scabies, caused by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei (De Geer) (Acari: Sarcoptidae), are complex. Clinical symptoms are delayed for weeks in patients when they are infested with scabies for the first time. This study was undertaken to elucidate the role of the human dermal microvascular endothelial cell (HMVEC-D) in modulating the inflammatory and immune responses in the skin to S. scabiei. Extracts of S. scabiei were incubated with HMVEC-D and the expression of adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors on the cells and the secretion of selected cytokines were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. S. scabiei extract was found to inhibit HMVEC-D expression of E-selectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, although not intercellular adhesion molecule-1. The secretion of interleukin-8 also was inhibited by S. scabiei extract. S. scabiei extract increased expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR-1 and both down-regulated and up-regulated expression of CXCR-2, depending on the concentration tested. These findings help explain the delayed inflammatory reaction to infestation with S. scabiei.

  17. Stray dogs of northern Jordan as reservoirs of ticks and tick-borne hemopathogens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Qablan, M.; Kubelová, M.; Široký, P.; Modrý, David; Amr, Z. S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 1 (2012), s. 301-307 ISSN 0932-0113 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/09/0927 Grant - others:GA CR(CZ) GA524/09/0715 Keywords : ANAPLASMA-PHAGOCYTOPHILUM * GRANULOCYTIC EHRLICHIOSIS * MOLECULAR EVIDENCE * CANINE BABESIOSIS * HEPATOZOON-CANIS * ISRAEL * IXODIDAE * ACARI * COINFECTION * INFECTION Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 2.852, year: 2012

  18. Diet of free ranging Angora goats in a False Upper Karoo veld type

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sth. Afr.7 . 44-50. FOURIE, L.J. & KOK, O.B., 1992. The role of host behaviour in trck- host interactions: a domestic host-paralysis tick model. Exp. Appl. AcarutL. 13.213-225. FOURIE, L.J., KOK, O.B. & VAN ZYL, J.M., 1991. Spatial distribution of the Karoo paralysis tick lxotles rubicundus (Acari: Ixodidae) within a False Upper ...

  19. Evaluation of Bacillus thuringiensis Pathogenicity for a Strain of the Tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, Resistant to Chemical Pesticides

    OpenAIRE

    Fern?ndez-Ruvalcaba, Manuel; Pe?a-Chora, Guadalupe; Romo-Mart?nez, Armando; Hern?ndez-Vel?zquez, V?ctor; de Parra, Alejandra Bravo; De La Rosa, Diego P?rez

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenicity of four native strains of Bacillus thuringiensis against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Canestrine) (Acari: Ixodidae) was evaluated. A R. microplus strain that is resistant to organophosphates, pyrethroids, and amidines, was used in this study. Adult R. microplus females were bioassayed using the immersion test of Drummond against 60 B. thuringiensis strains. Four strains, GP123, GP138, GP130, and GP140, were found to be toxic. For the immersion test, the total protein...

  20. Feeding electrogram studies on the African cattle brown ear tick Rhipicephalus appendiculatus: evidence for an antifeeding effect of tick resistant serum

    OpenAIRE

    Lösel, P. M.; Guerin, Patrick M.; Diehl, Peter A.

    2008-01-01

    Feeding behaviour of partially engorged Rhipicephalus appendiculatus (Neumann) (Acari: Ixodidae) on rabbit serum held in capillary tubes and placed over the tick mouthparts was studied using the feeding electrogram technique with simultaneous macro video photography. Correlation of electrical events with fluid movement in the vicinity of the tick's mouthparts and the capillary meniscus, permitted the characterization of an orderly sequence of signals, termed the ‘Feeding Complex’, associated ...

  1. [Morphological adaptations of acariform mites (Acari: Acariformes) to permanent parasitism on mammals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkov, A V

    2007-01-01

    The external morphological adaptations to parasitism in acariform mites (Acari: Acariformes), permanently parasiting mammals, are briefly summated and analyzed. According to several external morphological criteria (structures of gnathosoma, idiosoma, setation, legs and life cycle), the following six morphoecotypes were established: skin mites (i)-- Cheyletidae, Chirorhynchobiidae, Lobalgidae, Myobiidae, Myocoptidae (the most part), Rhyncoptidae, Psoroptidae; fur mites (ii)--Atopomelidae, Clirodiscidae, Listrophoridae, Myocoptidae (Trichoecius only); skin burrowing mites (iii)--Sarcoptidae; intradermal mites (iv) - sorergatidae and Demodicidae; interstitial mites (v) - pimyodicidae; respiratory mites (vi) - reynetidae, Gastronyssidae, Lemurnyssidae, Pneumocoptidae. In the case of prostigmatic mites, the detailed reconstruction of the origin and evolution of "parasitic" morphoecotypes is possible due to the tentative phylogenetic hypotheses, which were proposed for the infraorder Eleutherengon, a, including the most part of the permanent mammalian parasites among prostigmatic mites (Kethley in Norton, 1993; Bochkov, 2002). The parasitism of Speleognathinae (Ereynetidae) in the mammalian respiratory tract arose independently of the other prostigmats. It is quite possible that these mites switched on mammals from birds, because they are more widely represented on these hosts than on mammals. The prostigmatic parasitism on mammalian skin seems to be originated independently in myobiids, in the five cheyletid tribes, Cheyletiellini, Niheliini, and Teinocheylini, Chelonotini, Cheyletini, and, probably, in a cheyletoid ansector of the sister families Psorergatidae-Demodicidae (Bochkov, Fain, 2001; Bochkov, 2002). Demodicids and psorergatids developed adaptations to parasitism in the skin gland ducts and directly in the epithelial level, respectively in the process of the subsequent specialization. Mites of the family Epimyodicidae belong to the phylogenetic line

  2. Seletividade de agrotóxicos usados na cultura da macieira a Neoseiulus Californicus (McGregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae1 Pesticide selectivity used in apple crops Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine de Andrade Meyer

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar os efeitos secundários dos principais agrotóxicos utilizados em macieira sobre adultos e imaturos de Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae. Os testes foram conduzidos em laboratório, utilizando as doses dos produtos recomendadas para a cultura e o método de contato e residual com pulverização em superfície de folha. Foram testados tebufenozida, fosmete, metidationa, clorpirifós, abamectina, fenpiroximato, piridabem, captana, mancozebe (duas dosagens e ditianona. Para o cálculo do efeito total (E% sobre os adultos, avaliaram-se a mortalidade, a oviposição e a viabilidade dos ovos, e para os imaturos, somente a mortalidade. Os resultados do E% foram avaliados 96 horas após a pulverização. Os produtos foram classificados quanto ao efeito total (E% de toxicidade proposta pela IOBC/WPRS. Fosmete, tebufenozida e metidationa foram inócuos; abamectina, fenpiroximato, clorpirifós, captana, mancozebe (nas duas dosagens testadas e ditianona foram levemente nocivos, e piridabem foi moderadamente nocivo aos adultos de N. californicus. O fungicida mancozebe, na maior dosagem (320g,i.a./100L, foi o que mais afetou o ácaro predador. Quanto à seletividade dos agrotóxicos aos imaturos, constatouse que abamectina e piridabem foram moderadamente nocivos, e os demais foram inócuos. Nenhum produto foi classificado como nocivo, evidenciando a tolerância de N. californicus a estes agrotóxicos. Estes resultados permitem uma escolha e manejo mais adequado para os agrotóxicos utilizados nos pomares comerciais de macieira, de forma que a presença deste ácaro predador exerça pressão de controle do ácaro-vermelho.The objective of this study was to evaluate the side effects of the main pesticides used in adult and immature Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor (Acari: Phytoseiidae. The tests were carried out in the laboratory by using the contact and residual spraying method on the leaf surface. It was tested

  3. Ocorrência do ácaro fitófago Catarhinus tricholaenae Keifer (Acari: Diptilomiopidae em cultivares de milho Bt Occurrence of the phytophagous mite Catarhinus tricholaenae Keifer (Acari: Diptilomiopidae on Bt corn cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Antônio Matiello Fadini

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a ocorrência do microácaro-da-face-inferior-das-folhas-de-milho Catarhinus tricholaenae Keifer (Acari: Diptilomiopidae em cultivares transgênicas de milho, contendo as proteínas Cry1F e Cry 1 A(b e milho não Bt. Durante o período de junho de 2010 a janeiro de 2011, foram coletadas, quinzenalmente, cinco amostras aleatórias de quatro folhas em talhões de milho Bt, contendo a proteína Cry 1F e Cry 1 A(b, e de milho não Bt em áreas experimentais da Embrapa Milho e Sorgo, em Sete Lagoas, MG. As amostras de folhas foram vistoriadas por 15 minutos na região da nervura central, em busca de adultos de C. tricholaenae. Foram registrados 2.930 indivíduos de C. tricholaenae, sendo que 1.114 no milho Bt Cry 1F, 753 em Cry 1 A(b e 1063 indivíduos em folhas das cultivares não Bt. As maiores abundâncias populacionais médias ocorreram nos meses de novembro e dezembro. Os fatores estágio fenológico das plantas e precipitação afetaram positivamente a abundância de C. tricholaenae. A abundância média do período de coleta de C. tricholaenae foi reduzida pela cultivar de milho contendo a proteína Cry 1 A(b. Esse é o primeiro registro de ácaros sobre cultivares de milho transgênico no Brasil.The objective of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of "microácaro-da-face-inferior-das-folhas-de-milho" Catarhinus tricholaenae Keifer (Acari: Diptilomiopidae on transgenic cultivars of corn containing proteins Cry1F and Cry 1 A (b and non-Bt corn. During the period from June 2010 to January 2011 were collected, every two weeks, five random samples of four leaves in plots of Bt corn containing the protein Cry 1F and Cry 1 A (b and non-Bt corn in the experimental area of Embrapa Corn and Sorghum, Sete Lagoas, MG. The leaf samples were examined for 15 minutes in the central region of leaf in search of adult C. tricholaenae. We recorded 2930 individuals of C. tricholaenae, 1114 on Bt Cry 1F, 752 on Cry 1 A

  4. Comparative Efficacy of an Imidacloprid/Flumethrin Collar (Seresto®) and an Oral Fluralaner Chewable Tablet (Bravecto®) against Tick (Dermacentor variabilis and Amblyomma americanum) Infestations on Dogs: a Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmes, Cameon M; Hostetler, Joe; Davis, Wendell L; Settje, Terry; McMinn, Amy; Everett, William R

    2015-08-01

    This controlled laboratory study demonstrated the residual speed of efficacy of an imidacloprid/flumethrin collar (Seresto(®), Bayer) for the control of ticks (Dermacentor variabilis, Amblyomma americanum) at 6 and 12 hours post-infestation on dogs when compared to oral fluralaner (Bravecto(®), Merck). Dogs were randomised by pre-treatment tick counts: Group 1) imidacloprid 10 % (w/w)/flumethrin 4.5 % (w/w) collar, 2) fluralaner (dosage 25.1 - 49.4 mg/kg), and 3) non-treated controls. Ticks (50/species/dog) were infested on days 3, 14, 21, 28, 42, and 56 followed by 50 D. variabilis on days 70 and 84. Live and dead attached ticks were counted 6 and 12 hours later. Efficacy against both species at 6 and 12 hours for Group 1 was 94 - 100 %. Efficacy for Group 2 against both species at 6 hours was 4 - 69 %; efficacy at 12 hours was 8 - 100 %. Live (attached and non-attached) tick counts at 6 hours in Group 1 were significantly lower (p ≤ 0.05) than counts in Group 2 and 3 on all days. At 12 hours, live counts were significantly lower (p ≤ 0.05) in Group 1 than Group 2 for D. variabilis from days 56 - 84 and for A. americanum from days 28 - 56. There were significantly fewer (p ≤ 0.05) total ticks (total live and dead attached) on dogs in Group 1 compared to Group 2 and 3 at all time points. This study demonstrated that an imidacloprid/flumethrin collar was highly efficacious (94 - 100 %) at repelling and killing ticks on dogs at 6 and 12 hours post-infestation and was more efficacious than fluralaner as early as 6 hours post-infestation on all challenge days.

  5. Amblyomma americanum ticks infected with in vitro cultured wild-type and mutants of Ehrlichia chaffeensis are competent to produce infection in naïve deer and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Deborah C; Cheng, Chuanmin; Nair, Arathy D S; Ganta, Roman R

    2017-01-01

    Monocytic ehrlichiosis in people caused by the intracellular bacterium, Ehrlichia chaffeensis, is an emerging infectious disease transmitted by the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum. Tick transmission disease models for ehrlichiosis require at least two hosts and two tick blood feeding episodes to recapitulate the natural transmission cycle. One blood feeding is necessary for the tick to acquire the infection from an infected host and the next feeding is needed to transmit the bacterium to a naïve host. We have developed a model for E. chaffeensis transmission that eliminates the entire tick acquisition stage while still producing high numbers of infected ticks that are also able to transmit infections to naïve hosts. Fully engorged A. americanum nymphs were ventrally needle-infected, possibly into the midgut, and following molting, the unfed adult ticks were used to infect naive deer and dogs. We have also described using the ticks infected by this method the transmission of both wild-type and transposon mutants of E. chaffeensis to its primary reservoir host, white tailed deer and to another known host, dog. The infection progression and IgG antibody responses in deer were similar to those observed with transmission feeding of ticks acquiring infection by natural blood feeding. The pathogen infections acquired by natural tick transmission and by feeding needle-infected ticks on animals were also similar to intravenous infections in causing persistent infections. Needle-infected ticks having the ability to transmit pathogens will be a valuable resource to substantially simplify the process of generating infected ticks and to study infection systems in vertebrate hosts where interference of other pathogens could be avoided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Removal of drone brood from Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colonies to control Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) and retain adult drones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wantuch, Holly A; Tarpy, David R

    2009-12-01

    The parasitic mite Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman (Acari: Varroidae) has plagued European honey bees, Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae), in the Americas since its introduction in the 1980s. For many years, these mites were sufficiently controlled using synthetic acaricides. Recently, however, beekeepers have experienced increased resistance by mites to chemical pesticides, which are also known to leave residues in hive products such as wax and honey. Thus there has been increased emphasis on nonchemical integrated pest management control tactics for Varroa. Because mites preferentially reproduce in drone brood (pupal males), we developed a treatment strategy focusing on salvaging parasitized drones while removing mites from them. We removed drone brood from colonies in which there was no acaricidal application and banked them in separate "drone-brood receiving" colonies treated with pesticides to kill mites emerging with drones. We tested 20 colonies divided into three groups: 1) negative control (no mite treatment), 2) positive control (treatment with acaricides), and 3) drone-brood removal and placement into drone-brood receiving colonies. We found that drone-brood trapping significantly lowered mite numbers during the early months of the season, eliminating the need for additional control measures in the spring. However, mite levels in the drone-brood removal group increased later in the summer, suggesting that this benefit does not persist throughout the entire season. Our results suggest that this method of drone-brood trapping can be used as an element of an integrated control strategy to control varroa mites, eliminating a large portion of the Varroa population with limited chemical treatments while retaining the benefits of maintaining adult drones in the population.

  7. Contact and fumigant toxicity of cinnamaldehyde and cinnamic acid and related compounds to Dermatophagoides farinae and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Acari: Pyroglyphidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhangqian; Kim, Hyun-Kyung; Tao, Wenqi; Wang, Mo; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2011-03-01

    Toxicities of (E)-cinnamaldehyde and (E)-cinnamic acid and their 41 structurally related compounds to adult Dermatophagoides farinae Hughes and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus Trouessart (Acari: Pyroglyphidae) were examined using fabric-circle contact plus fumigant and vapor-phase mortality bioassays. Results were compared with those of two acaricides, benzylbenzoate and dibutyl phthalate. In contact plus fumigant mortality bioassays, the most toxic compounds were (E)-cinnamaldehyde, methyl (E)-cinnamate, cinnamyl acetate, and hydrocinnamaldehyde against adult D.farinae (17.5-23.3 mg/m2) and D. pteronyssinus (19.0-24.0 mg/m2), based on 24-h 50% lethal concentration (LC50) values. These compounds were significantly more toxic than either benzyl benzoate (LC50, 64.9 and 60.5 mg/m2) or dibutyl phthalate (218.9 and 232.3 mg/m2). The toxicity of allyl cinnamate versus benzyl benzoate was not significantly different. Structure-activity relationship indicates that structural characteristics, such as types of functional groups, carbon skeleton, and saturation, appear to play a role in determining the compound toxicities. In vapor-phase mortality bioassays, these compounds were effective against adult D. farinae in closed, but not in open containers, indicating that their mode of delivery was largely a result of vapor action. The active compounds described merit further study as potential house dust mite control fumigants with contact action in light of global efforts to reduce the level of highly toxic synthetic acaricides in indoor environments.

  8. Reproduction and development of laboratory and wild house dust mites (Acari: Pyroglyphidae) and their relationship to the natural dust ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, B J; Crowther, D; Wilkinson, T; Biddulph, P; Ucci, M; Pretlove, S; Ridley, I; Oreszczyn, T

    2007-07-01

    Life histories of "wild" house dust mites, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Trouessart) (Acari: Pyroglyphidae), were compared with laboratory cultures by using a diet consisting of skin and dust or a laboratory diet consisting of dried liver and yeast. Under constant conditions of 25 degrees C and 75% RH, fecundity and rate of reproduction were higher in laboratory cultures on both diets compared with wild mites. There were also trends for a shorter prereproductive period and more rapid egg development of laboratory mites compared with wild mites. Overall, there was little effect of diet on either strain of mites at 75% RH. At low RH (64%), fecundity was significantly lower (for both strains on both diets), and there were also trends for longer prereproductive period, reduced rate of reproduction, reduced adult survival, prolonged egg and juvenile development, or a combination compared with 75% RH. Additionally egg and juvenile mortality were significantly higher on the liver and yeast diet. Overall, the skin and dust diet favored both strains of mites at 64% RH. On the liver and yeast diet at 64% RH, wild mite adults performed significantly better than laboratory mites, and egg mortality was lower. These results suggest that laboratory mites have stronger reproduction and development than wild mites, except when under environmental stress and that diet is a significant factor, particularly in suboptimal conditions. This could have important implications for predictive models of house dust mite populations in their natural habitat. Ideally, such models should be developed using data from wild dust mite populations reared on a natural diet.

  9. Phylogeny and species delineation in European species of the genus Steganacarus (Acari, Oribatida) using mitochondrial and nuclear markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreipe, Victoria; Corral-Hernández, Elena; Scheu, Stefan; Schaefer, Ina; Maraun, Mark

    2015-06-01

    Species of the genus Steganacarus are soil-living oribatid mites (Acari, Phthiracaridae) with a ptychoid body. The phylogeny and species status of the species of Steganacarus are not resolved, some authors group all ten German species of Steganacarus within the genus Steganacarus whereas others split them into three subgenera, Steganacarus, Tropacarus and Atropacarus. Additionally, two species, S. magnus and T. carinatus, comprise morphotypes of questionable species status. We investigated the phylogeny and species status of ten European Steganacarus species, i.e. S. applicatus, S. herculeanus, S. magnus forma magna, S. magnus forma anomala, S. spinosus, Tropacarus brevipilus, T. carinatus forma carinata, T. carinatus forma pulcherrima, Atropacarus striculus and Rhacaplacarus ortizi. We used two molecular markers, a 251 bp fragment of the nuclear gene 28S rDNA (D3) and a 477 bp fragment of the mitochondrial COI region. The phylogeny based on a combined analysis of D3 and COI separated four subgenera (Steganacarus, Tropacarus and Atropacarus, Rhacaplacarus) indicating that they form monophyletic groups. The COI region separated all ten species of the genus Steganacarus and showed variation within some species often correlating with the geographic origin of the species. Resolution of the more conserved D3 region was limited, indicating that radiation events are rather recent. Overall, our results indicate that both genes alone cannot be used for phylogeny and barcoding since variation is too low in D3 and too high in COI. However, when used in combination these genes provide reliable insight into the phylogeny, radiation and species status of taxa of the genus Steganacarus.

  10. Positive correlation of trophic level and proportion of sexual taxa of oribatid mites (Acari: Oribatida) in alpine soil systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Barbara M; Meyer, Erwin; Maraun, Mark

    2014-08-01

    We investigated community structure, trophic ecology (using stable isotope ratios; (15)N/(14)N, (13)C/(12)C) and reproductive mode of oribatid mites (Acari, Oribatida) along an altitudinal gradient (2,050-2,900 m) in the Central Alps (Obergurgl, Austria). We hypothesized that (1) the community structure changes with altitude, (2) oribatid mites span over four trophic levels, (3) the proportion of sexual taxa increases with altitude, and (4) the proportion of sexual taxa increases with trophic level, i.e. is positively correlated with the δ(15)N signatures. Oribatid mite community structure changed with altitude indicating that oribatid mites occupy different niches at different altitudes. Oribatid mites spanned over 12 δ(15)N units, i.e. about four trophic levels, which is similar to lowland forest ecosystems. The proportion of sexually reproducing taxa increased from 2,050 to 2,900 m suggesting that limited resource availability at high altitudes favors sexual reproduction. Sexual taxa more frequently occurred higher in the food web indicating that the reproductive mode is related to nutrition of oribatid mites. Generally, oribatid mite community structure changed from being decomposer dominated at lower altitude to being dominated by fungal and lichen feeders, and predators at higher altitude. This supports the view that resources from dead organic material become less available with increasing altitude forcing species to feed on living resources such as fungi, lichens and nematodes. Our findings support the hypothesis that limited resource accessibility (at high altitudes) favors sexually reproducing species whereas ample resource supply (at lower altitudes) favors parthenogenetic species.

  11. Poderá o carrapato transmitir a lepra?: mais quatro amostras de culturas de bacilos acido-alcool resistentes obtidas de carrapatos (2 de "Amblyomma cajennense"e 2 de "Boophilus microplus" infectados em leprosos do Paraná: 3ª nota May leprosy be transmitted by ticks?: third note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. de Souza-Araujo

    1942-01-01

    Full Text Available The AA. carried out experiments in the leprosarium São Roque, State of Paraná, South Brazil, to verify if the cattle tick Boophilus microplus could be experimentally infected in lepers, which was true. The AA. Tried also to be ascertained if Boophilus microplus and Amblyomma cajennense could change of hosts during their feedings which was true, both ticks continue feeding, the last species for many days, after being transferred from one to another leper. The junior A. describes in full their experiments and also a dermatites caused by tick bites. The senior A. brought to Rio de Janeiro most of the infected ticks for examination, which revealed a very high positivity. He smeared the sediments of lots of both species of ticks in Loewenstein medium and after a variable periode of incubation at 37° C. he obtained four new samples of cultures of acid-fast organisms, two from Amblyomma cajennense and two from Boophilus microplus. These cultures are being studied and will be inoculated into laboratory animals. The senior A. inoculated new batches of white rats with sediments of many ticks infected in lepers. Various hypotheses of both previous notes upon the subject now are verified facts. The A. is accumulating facts to draw the conclusions in the future. He also suggested the leprosy workers in the interior of the country to cooperate with him in such important studies, specially in the habitat of lepers in the rural zones of various States.

  12. Parasitismo por malófagos (Insecta e ácaros (Acari em Turdus leucomelas (Aves nas estações reprodutiva e de muda de penas no Parque Estadual do Rio Preto, Minas Gerais, Brasil Parasitism of chewing lice (Insecta and feather mites (Acari on Turdus leucomelas (Aves during reproductive and molt seasons at the State Park of Rio Preto, Minas Gerais, Brazil

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    Alexandre M. J. Enout

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The rates of infestation by chewing lice and feather mites on Turdus leucomelas Vieillot, 1818 (Aves: Turdidae were used to test the hypothesis of that parasitism either increases or decreases according to, reproductive and molting seasons, respectively. Samples were obtained at the State Park of Rio Preto, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, in October and December of 2006 and in March of 2007. The dust-ruffling technique was used in to remove the parasites from the body of their hosts. Five species of chewing-lice were found on the birds, with Myrsidea sp. and Brueelia sp. being the most prevalent parasites, whereas Menacanthus eurysternus Burmeister, 1838 was the least prevalent. No statistically significant difference was found between the infestation rates in the reproductive and molt seasons. Two suborders and four families of Acari were found on the birds.

  13. Ocorrência de Ornithonyssus bursa (Berlese, 1888 (Acari: Macronyssidae em filhotes de Megascops choliba (corujinha-do-mato e Pitangus sulphuratus (bem-te-vi, no Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil Ocurrence of Ornithonyssus bursa (Berlese, 1888 (Acari: Macronyssidae on Megascops choliba (tropical screech-owl and Pitangus sulphuratus (great kiskadee nestlings in the Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil

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    Carolina S. Mascarenhas

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available O Núcleo de Reabilitação da Fauna Silvestre e Centro de Triagem de Animais Silvestres da Universidade Federal de Pelotas - RS atendeu dois filhotes de Megascops choliba (corujinha-do-mato (Strigiformes - Strigidae e dois de Pitangus sulphuratus (bem-te-vi (Passeriformes - Tyrannidae intensamente parasitados por ácaros, em maio de 2005 e dezembro de 2006, respectivamente. Os filhotes e o ninho de P. sulphuratus foram recolhidos na zona urbana da cidade de Pelotas - RS após forte temporal. Os ácaros foram removidos, colocados em álcool 70% e levados ao laboratório de parasitologia para identificação. Os espécimes foram clarificados em lactofenol, montados em meio de Hoyer e identificados como Ornithonyssus bursa (Acari - Macronyssidae. Registra-se Megascops choliba e Pitangus sulphuratus como hospedeiros de Ornithonyssus bursa, no Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil.The Center for Rehabilitation of Wildlife and Center for Selection of Wild Animal of the Federal University of Pelotas has attended two nestlings of Megascops choliba (tropical screech-owl (Strigiformes - Strigidae and two of Pitangus sulphuratus (great kiskadee (Passeriformes - Tyrannidae heavily parasitized by mites, in May 2005 and December 2006, respectively. The nestlings and the nest of P. sulphuratus were collected in the Pelotas urban area after severe storms. The mites were removed, clarified in lactofenol, permanently mounted in Hoyer's medium and identified as Ornithonyssus bursa (Acari - Macronyssidae. Megascops choliba and Pitangus sulphuratus are reported as host of Ornithonyssus bursa in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil.

  14. Characterization of the complete mitochondrial genome of the storage mite pest Tyrophagus longior (Gervais) (Acari: Acaridae) and comparative mitogenomic analysis of four acarid mites.

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    Yang, Banghe; Li, Chaopin

    2016-02-01

    Mites of the genus Tyrophagus are economically important polyphagous pest commonly living on stored products and also responsible for allergic reactions to humans. Complete mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) and the gene features therein are widely used as molecular markers in the study of population genetics, phylogenetics as well as molecular evolution. However, scarcity on the sequence data has greatly impeded the studies in these areas pertaining to the Acari (mites and ticks). Information on the Tyrophagus mitogenomes is quite critical for phylogenetic evaluation and molecular evolution of the mitogenomes within Acariformes. Herein, we reported the complete mitogenome of the allergenic acarid storage mite Tyrophagus longior (Astigmata: Acaridae), an important member of stored food pests, and compared with those of other three acarid mites. The complete mitogenome of T. longior was a circular molecule of 13,271 bp. Unexpectedly, only 19 transfer RNA genes (tRNAs) were present, lacking trnF, trnS1 and trnQ. Furthermore, it also contained 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs) and 2 genes for rRNA (rrnS and rrnL) commonly detected in metazoans. The four mitogenomes displayed similar characteristics with respect to the gene content, nucleotide comparison, and codon usages. Yet, the gene order of T. longior was different from that in other Acari. The J-strands of the four mitogenomes possessed high A+T content (67.4-70.0%), and exhibited positive GC-skews and negative AT-skews. Most inferred tRNAs of T. longior were extremely truncated, lacking either a D- or T-arm, as found in other acarid mites. In T. longior mitogenome the A+T-rich region was just 50 bp in length and can be folded as a stable stem-loop structure, whereas in the region some structures of microsatellite-like (AT)n and palindromic sequences was not present. Besides, reconstructing of the phylogenetic relationship based on concatenated amino acid sequences of 13 PCGs supported that monophyly of the family

  15. Diversity of Quill Mites of the Family Syringophilidae (Acari: Prostigmata) Parasitizing Owls (Aves: Strigiformes) With Remarks on the Host-Parasite Relationships.

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    Skoracki, Maciej; Unsoeld, Markus; Marciniak, Natalia; Sikora, Bozena

    2016-07-01

    The quill mite fauna of the family Syringophilidae (Acari: Prostigmata: Cheyletoidea) associated with owls (Aves: Strigiformes) is reviewed. A new genus is proposed, Neobubophilus Skoracki & Unsoeld gen. nov. It differs from closely related Bubophilus (Bubophilus Philips and Norton, 1978) by the absence of leg setae vsII in the both sexes. In addition, four new species are described: (1) Neobubophilus cunicularius Skoracki & Unsoeld sp. nov. from Athene cunicularia (Molina, 1782) (Strigidae) from Paraguay; (2) Neobubophilus atheneus Skoracki & Unsoeld sp. nov. from Athene noctua (Scopoli, 1769) and Athene brama (Temminck, 1821) (Strigidae), both from India; (3) Bubophilus tytonus Skoracki & Unsoeld sp. nov. from Tyto alba affinis (Blyth, 1862) (Tytonidae) from Cameroon, and (4) Megasyringophilus dalmas Skoracki & Unsoeld sp. nov. from Megascops choliba (Vieillot, 1817) (Strigidae) from Venezuela. The following new host species are given: Bubo bubo (Linnaeus, 1758) (Strigidae) from Nepal for Bubophilus ascalaphus (Philips and Norton 1978) and Strix woodfordii (Smith, 1834) (Strigidae) from Tanzania for Bubophilus aluconis (aluconis Nattress and Skoracki 2009). A key for syringophilid genera and species associated with owls is constructed. The host-parasite relationships of syringophilid mites and owls are discussed. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com Version of Record, first published online May 24, 2016 with fixed content and layout in compliance with Art. 8.1.3.2 ICZN.

  16. Predicting the population dynamics of the house dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Acari: Pyroglyphidae) in response to a constant hygrothermal environment using a model of the mite life cycle.

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    Biddulph, Phillip; Crowther, David; Leung, Brian; Wilkinson, Toby; Hart, Barbara; Oreszczyn, Tadj; Pretlove, Stephen; Ridley, Ian; Ucci, Marcella

    2007-01-01

    A generalised model of the life cycle of a house dust mite, which can be tailored to any particular species of domestic mite, is presented. The model takes into account the effects of hygrothermal conditions on each life cycle phase. It is used in a computer simulation program, called POPMITE, which, by incorporating a population age structure, is able to predict population dynamics. The POPMITE simulation is adapted to the Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Acari: Pyroglyphidae) (DP) mite using published data on the egg development period, total development period, adult longevity, mortality during egg development, mortality during juvenile development, and fecundity of individual DP mites held at a range of constant hygrothermal conditions. An example is given which illustrates how the model functions under constant hygrothermal conditions. A preliminary validation of POPMITE is made by a comparison of the POPMITE predictions with published measurements of population growth of DP mites held at a range constant hygrothermal conditions for 21 days. The POPMITE simulation is used to provide predictions of population growth or decline for a wide range of constant relative humidity and temperature combinations for 30 and 60 days. The adaptation of the model to correctly take account of fluctuating hygrothermal conditions is discussed.

  17. Acaricidal and oviposition deterring effects of santalol identified in sandalwood oil against two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Hyun Sik; Lim, Eu Gene; Kim, Jinwoo; Park, Chung Gyoo

    2011-12-01

    Thirty-four plant essential oils were screened for their acaricidal and oviposition deterrent activities against two-spotted spider mite (TSSM), Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae), in the laboratory using a leaf-dip bioassay. From initial trials, sandalwood and common thyme oils were observed to be the most effective against TSSM adult females. Subsequent trials confirmed that only sandalwood oil was significantly active (87.2 ± 2.9% mortality) against TSSM adult females. Sandalwood oil also demonstrated oviposition deterring effects based on a 89.3% reduction of the total number of eggs on leaf disks treated with the oil. GC-MS analysis revealed that the main components of the sandalwood oil were α-santalol (45.8%), β-santalol (20.6%), β-sinensal (9.4%), and epi-β-santalol (3.3%). A mixture of α- and β-santalol (51.0:22.9, respectively) produced significantly higher mortality (85.5 ± 2.9%) and oviposition deterrent effects (94.7% reduction in the number of eggs) than the control. Phytotoxicity was not shown on rose shoots to which a 0.1% solution of sandalwood oil was applied.

  18. Toxicidade diferencial de produtos à base de abamectina ao ácaro Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes, 1939 (Acari: Tenuipalpidae em citros Differential toxicity of abamectin based products over Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes, 1939 (Acari: Tenuipalpidae mite in citrus

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    Daniel Júnior de Andrade

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available O ácaro Brevipalpus phoenicis é uma das principais pragas dos citros por ser vetor do "Citrus Leprosis Virus" (CiLV, agente causal da leprose, uma das mais graves doenças da citricultura. Objetivou-se avaliar o efeito tóxico de produtos à base de abamectina sobre o ácaro B. phoenicis. Foram realizados um experimento de ação direta e três de ação residual no Laboratório de Acarologia do Departamento de Proteção de Plantas (Fitossanidade da FCAV - UNESP, Jaboticabal-SP. O delineamento adotado nos bioensaios foi o inteiramente casualizado, onde 10 tratamentos foram repetidos 7 vezes, sendo cada repetição composta por um fruto de laranja. Os tratamentos estudados (mL p.c./100 L de água foram: Acaramik a 20; 30; 40 e 50 mL; Vertimec a 30 e 40 mL; Abamectin Nortox a 30 e 40 mL; Tricofol a 77 mL e uma testemunha sem aplicação. Utilizaram-se frutos com presença de verrugose, que foram lavados e parcialmente parafinados, deixando-se uma área sem parafina, que foi circundada com cola entomológica para contenção dos ácaros. Transferiram-se 20 ácaros adultos B. phoenicis para cada fruto. No bioensaio de ação direta, a transferência foi realizada antes das aplicações e, nos bioensaios de ação residual, aos 5; 10 e 15 dias após a aplicação dos produtos. A aplicação dos produtos sobre os frutos foi realizada em Torre de Potter. Os resultados obtidos nos bioensaios evidenciaram que os melhores tratamentos foram: Tricofol a 77 mL, Acaramik a 40 e 50 mL e Vertimec a 40 mL. De forma geral, os produtos testados podem ser utilizados no controle do ácaro B. phoenicis.The mite Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes, 1939 (Acari: Tenuipalpidae is one of the most important pests in Brazil citrus plantation, because it is the virus "Citrus Leprosis Virus" (CiLV vector, one of the most serious citrus plantation diseases. The purpose of this experiment was to evaluate the toxical effect of abamectin in the mite B. phoenicis. It was performed

  19. Ácaros de penas e carrapatos (Acari associados a Turdus albicollis Vieillot (Aves, Muscicapidae em uma área de Mata Atlântica da Ilha Grande, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil Feather mites and ticks (Acari associated to Turdus albicollis Vieillot (Aves, Muscicapidae in an area of Atlantic Forest at Ilha Grande, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil

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    Alline Storni

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available O parasitismo é um importante mecanismo que afeta populações e comunidades. O objetivo deste estudo foi investigar a fauna de ectoparasitos que habita o corpo do sabiá-de-coleira, Turdus albicollis Vieillot, 1818 e avaliar se a massa corporal do hospedeiro é afetada por estes parasitos. Os indivíduos de T. albicollis foram mensalmente capturados na Ilha Grande, Rio de Janeiro, no período de julho de 1999 a junho de 2000, em uma área de Floresta Atlântica. As aves foram individualmente marcadas, pesadas e examinadas para registrar e quantificar a presença de ectoparasitos. A abundância e a localização dos parasitos no corpo do hospedeiro foram registradas. Em 54 indivíduos de T. albicollis amostrados, foram encontrados duas espécies de ectoparasitos. A prevalência de ácaros de penas, Pterodectes turdinus Berla, 1959, foi de 72,2% enquanto que a de carrapatos, Amblyomma longirostre Koch, 1844, foi de 27,8%. A abundância mensal de P. turdinus foi significativamente relacionada com os meses do ano, sendo maior nos meses com menor freqüência de chuva. Não houve relação estatisticamente significativa entre a massa corporal do hospedeiro (g e a abundância total de ácaros de penas e carrapatos.Parasitism is an important mechanism affecting populations and communities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ectoparasites fauna living on the body of the white-necked trush, Turdus albicollis Vieillot, 1818, and to evaluate if the host body mass is affected by these parasites. Turdus albicollis were monthly captured at Ilha Grande, Rio de Janeiro, from July 1999 to June 2000 in an area of Atlantic Forest. The birds were individualy marked, weighed and carefully checked to record and quantify the presence of ectoparasites. Parasite abundance and location on the bird's body were recorded. In 54 individuals of T. albicollis sampled, two ectoparasite species were found. The prevalence of the feather mite Pterodectes turdinus

  20. Elenco y biogeografía de los ácaros acuáticos (Acari, Parasitengona, Hydrachnidia de Sudamérica

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    Rosso de Ferradás, B.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Checklist and catalog publications demonstrate a clear connection between basic taxonomy and biodiversity issues. According to some estimates, only 10-30% of all global species have been named. As in other fields, catalogs provide an important source of information concerning species diversity in freshwater ecology.

    South America is a continent dominated by freshwater ecosystems. The tremendous habitat diversity created by this landscape supports a high number of arthropods, including water mites, which belong to the hyperdiverse group Acari. South America has a substantial task ahead in cataloging its biodiversity.

    Much has been published on water mites in South America. In fact, according to Besch, water mites were the most studied with the exception of Europe up until the 1960’s. Most of the collections were conducted by two acarologists (Lundblad and Karl Viets during the 1940’s. Today, the collection, identification and description process of water mites is slower. In the 1980’s, the north-american acarologist D. R. Cook produced two lengthy papers about neotropical water mites in four regions of South America. Recently, several Argentine acarologists have published papers on water mites from diverse habitats and regions in South America.

    The catalog presented here includes information regarding 6 superfamilies, including 23 families in 118 genera of true water mites (Hydrachnidia, Parasitengona, Acari. It also includes the references concerning the species, distribution in various regions of South America and –as far as known– habitat.

    At present, there are 916 species from several authors cataloged in 11 countries in South America. The degree of knowledge varies greatly from country to country, with numerous entries for Brazil and none for French Guiana.

    Las publicaciones de catálogos y listados de especies determinan una clara conexión entre taxonomía básica y temas