WorldWideScience

Sample records for ambient noise correlation

  1. Monitoring and imaging the atmosphere with infrasonic ambient noise correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Matthew; Evers, Laslo

    2010-05-01

    The existence of widespread infrasonic ambient noise (e.g., microbaroms) opens up the possibility of investigating atmospheric acoustic structure with new techniques designed for continuous stochastic signals. This is in contrast to classical approaches that use deterministic signals (e.g., explosions) with clear phase arrivals. Here, we review some recent advances in the monitoring and imaging of the atmosphere derived from analysis of continuous infrasound noise. From two microbarometers located at Fourpeaked Volcano in Alaska, we observe coherent arrivals in cross-correlations of ambient noise in the microbarom band (0.2-0.5 Hz) at time lags that agree well with speeds expected for a direct infrasound wave in the atmosphere (300-340 m/s). A striking example of the dependence of the ambient noise correlations on atmospheric conditions is evident from a comparison with temperature and wind data measured on nearby ocean buoys. Application of the multiple-filter technique reveals that the group velocity of the infrasound wave is dispersive, with higher group velocities at lower frequencies. This supports the existence of a low-level atmospheric waveguide at Fourpeaked Volcano during the time period under study. We invert the observed time-dependent group velocity dispersion curves for average sound speed profiles as a function of time. The inverted sound speed profiles show that a time-dependent, surface-based inversion layer became stronger over a period of 24 hours, with a colder, denser, and lower sound speed layer moving between the stations. This layer is imaged in the lower 2 km of the atmosphere and demonstrates the sensitivity of ambient noise correlations to the atmospheric boundary layer. Independent analysis of meteorological data in and around Fourpeaked volcano from the same time period supports the results derived from the infrasound ambient noise correlations. We also show examples of ambient noise correlations from time periods of normal temperature

  2. Spatial correlation in the ambient core noise field of a turbofan engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2012-06-01

    An acoustic transfer function relating combustion noise and turbine exit noise in the presence of enclosed ambient core noise is investigated using a dynamic system model and an acoustic system model for the particular turbofan engine studied and for a range of operating conditions. Measurements of cross-spectra magnitude and phase between the combustor and turbine exit and auto-spectra at the turbine exit and combustor are used to show the presence of indirect and direct combustion noise over the frequency range of 0-400 Hz. The procedure used evaluates the ratio of direct to indirect combustion noise. The procedure used also evaluates the post-combustion residence time in the combustor which is a factor in the formation of thermal NO(x) and soot in this region. These measurements are masked by the ambient core noise sound field in this frequency range which is observable since the transducers are situated within an acoustic wavelength of one another. An ambient core noise field model based on one and two dimensional spatial correlation functions is used to replicate the spatially correlated response of the pair of transducers. The spatial correlation function increases measured attenuation due to destructive interference and masks the true attenuation of the turbine.

  3. Improving ambient noise cross-correlations in the noisy ocean bottom environment of the Juan de Fuca plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ye; Ritzwoller, Michael H.

    2017-09-01

    Ambient noise tomography exploits seismic ground motions that propagate coherently over long interstation distances. Such ground motions provide information about the medium of propagation that is recoverable from interstation cross-correlations. Local noise sources, which are particularly strong in ocean bottom environments, corrupt ambient noise cross-correlations and compromise the effectiveness of ambient noise tomography. Based on 62 ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) located on Juan de Fuca (JdF) plate from the Cascadia Initiative experiment and 40 continental stations near the coast of the western United States obtained in 2011 and 2012, we attempt to reduce the effects of local noise on vertical component seismic records across the plate and onto US continent. The goal is to provide better interstation cross-correlations for use in ambient noise tomography and the study of ambient noise directionality. As shown in previous studies, tilt and compliance noise are major sources of noise that contaminate the vertical channels of the OBSs and such noise can be greatly reduced by exploiting information on the horizontal components and the differential pressure gauge records, respectively. We find that ambient noise cross-correlations involving OBSs are of significantly higher signal-to-noise ratio at periods greater than 10 s after reducing these types of noise, particularly in shallow water environments where tilt and compliance noise are especially strong. The reduction of tilt and compliance noise promises to improve the accuracy and spatial extent of ambient noise tomography, allowing measurements based on coherently propagating ambient noise to be made at stations in the shallower parts of the JdF plate and at longer periods than in previous studies. In addition such local noise reduction produces better estimates of the azimuthal content of ambient noise.

  4. Spatial Vertical Directionality and Correlation of Low-Frequency Ambient Noise in Deep Ocean Direct-Arrival Zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiulong; Yang, Kunde; Cao, Ran; Duan, Shunli

    2018-01-23

    Wind-driven and distant shipping noise sources contribute to the total noise field in the deep ocean direct-arrival zones. Wind-driven and distant shipping noise sources may significantly and simultaneously affect the spatial characteristics of the total noise field to some extent. In this work, a ray approach and parabolic equation solution method were jointly utilized to model the low-frequency ambient noise field in a range-dependent deep ocean environment by considering their calculation accuracy and efficiency in near-field wind-driven and far-field distant shipping noise fields. The reanalysis databases of National Center of Environment Prediction (NCEP) and Volunteer Observation System (VOS) were used to model the ambient noise source intensity and distribution. Spatial vertical directionality and correlation were analyzed in three scenarios that correspond to three wind speed conditions. The noise field was dominated by distant shipping noise sources when the wind speed was less than 3 m/s, and then the spatial vertical directionality and vertical correlation of the total noise field were nearly consistent with those of distant shipping noise field. The total noise field was completely dominated by near field wind generated noise sources when the wind speed was greater than 12 m/s at 150 Hz, and then the spatial vertical correlation coefficient and directionality pattern of the total noise field was approximately consistent with that of the wind-driven noise field. The spatial characteristics of the total noise field for wind speeds between 3 m/s and 12 m/s were the weighted results of wind-driven and distant shipping noise fields. Furthermore, the spatial characteristics of low-frequency ambient noise field were compared with the classical Cron/Sherman deep water noise field coherence function. Simulation results with the described modeling method showed good agreement with the experimental measurement results based on the vertical line array deployed near

  5. Acoustic ambient noise recorder

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Saran, A.K.; Navelkar, G.S.; Almeida, A.M.; More, S.R.; Chodankar, P.V.; Murty, C.S.

    with a robust outfit that can withstand high pressures and chemically corrosion resistant materials. Keeping these considerations in view, a CMOS micro-controller-based marine acoustic ambient noise recorder has been developed with a real time clock...

  6. Spatial Vertical Directionality and Correlation of Low-Frequency Ambient Noise in Deep Ocean Direct-Arrival Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiulong Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind-driven and distant shipping noise sources contribute to the total noise field in the deep ocean direct-arrival zones. Wind-driven and distant shipping noise sources may significantly and simultaneously affect the spatial characteristics of the total noise field to some extent. In this work, a ray approach and parabolic equation solution method were jointly utilized to model the low-frequency ambient noise field in a range-dependent deep ocean environment by considering their calculation accuracy and efficiency in near-field wind-driven and far-field distant shipping noise fields. The reanalysis databases of National Center of Environment Prediction (NCEP and Volunteer Observation System (VOS were used to model the ambient noise source intensity and distribution. Spatial vertical directionality and correlation were analyzed in three scenarios that correspond to three wind speed conditions. The noise field was dominated by distant shipping noise sources when the wind speed was less than 3 m/s, and then the spatial vertical directionality and vertical correlation of the total noise field were nearly consistent with those of distant shipping noise field. The total noise field was completely dominated by near field wind generated noise sources when the wind speed was greater than 12 m/s at 150 Hz, and then the spatial vertical correlation coefficient and directionality pattern of the total noise field was approximately consistent with that of the wind-driven noise field. The spatial characteristics of the total noise field for wind speeds between 3 m/s and 12 m/s were the weighted results of wind-driven and distant shipping noise fields. Furthermore, the spatial characteristics of low-frequency ambient noise field were compared with the classical Cron/Sherman deep water noise field coherence function. Simulation results with the described modeling method showed good agreement with the experimental measurement results based on the vertical line

  7. A seismic waves velocity model for Gran Canaria Island from ambient noise correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Jerez, Antonio; Almendros, Javier; Martínez-Arévalo, Carmen; de Lis Mancilla, Flor; Luzón, Francisco; Carmona, Enrique; Martín, Rosa; Sánchez, Nieves

    2014-05-01

    We have analysed continuous ambient seismic noise recorded by a temporary array in Gran Canaria (Canary Islands, Spain) in order to find a velocity model for the top few kilometers. The SISTEVOTENCAN-IGN seismic array consisted of five broadband stations surrounding a sixth central one placed close to Pico de las Nieves, at the center of the island. The array had a radius of 12-14 km, with interstation distances ranging from 10 to 27 km. This network was operative from December 2009 to November 2011. The Green's functions between the 15 pairs of stations have been estimated in the time domain by stacking cross-correlations of 60-s time windows for the whole recording period (~2 years). The effects of several processing adjustments such as 1-bit normalization and spectral whitening are discussed. We observe significant differences (mainly in amplitude) between causal and acausal parts of the estimated Green's functions, which can be associated to an uneven distribution of the seismic noise sources. The application of a phase-matched filter based on an average dispersion curve allowed the effective reduction of some spurious early arrivals and the selection of fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave pulses, making possible an automatic extraction of their group velocities. Then, Rayleigh-wave dispersion curves were retrieved for the set of paths by using frequency-time analysis (FTAN) as well as by following the procedure described by Herrin and Goforth (1977, BSSA) based on the iterative fitting of a phase-matched filter which optimally undisperses the signal. Reliable curves were obtained from 1 s to 6-7 s with group velocities ranging between 1.5 and 2.2 km/s. Some lateral variations in velocity have been detected in spite of the limited spatial coverage and path density, which substantially restricted the resolution. A mean S-wave velocity model has been inverted for this area down to ~3 km.

  8. Crustal and uppermantle velocity structure of the northern Korean Peninsula constrained by ambient noise cross-correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. J.; Rhie, J.; Kim, S.

    2014-12-01

    The seismic velocity structure of the northern Korean Peninsula has not been well known because available seismic data observed inside the region is very rare. Therefore, constructing a one-dimensional (1-D) reference velocity model will be a meaningful first step to understand the detailed velocity structure and also the tectonic evolution of the region. In this study, we use two-year long (2010-2011) ambient noise data recorded by three component broadband seismometers of KIGAM, KMA, F-net, and IRIS networks surrounding the study area. Ambient noise cross-correlations are calculated for station pairs sampling the study area. Multiple filter technique is applied to measure group and phase velocity dispersions of the fundamental mode Rayleigh and Love waves for period ranges between 5 and 70 s, which are sensitive to shear wave velocities in the crust and uppermost mantle. Recently developed inversion method using the Bayesian technique is applied to estimate 1-D models of shear wave velocities and corresponding uncertainties. Combined with the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique, the posterior probability density is evaluated for given data and the prior. Boundaries, velocities, and anisotropy parameters of layers are searched together on the assumption of the layered half-space model. The used method automatically adjusts the number of layers and degree of data fitting by the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) estimation and scaling of the data-covariance matrix, respectively. The estimated anisotropic S-wave velocity model in the crust and upper-mantle can help to investigate tectonic processes of the region. For practical use, our velocity model for the Northern Korean Peninsula can be useful to enhance monitoring power of the underground nuclear tests in given area.

  9. Estimation of time varying system parameters from ambient response using improved Particle-Kalman filter with correlated noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Subhamoy; Crinière, Antoine; Mevel, Laurent; Cerou, Frederic; Dumoulin, Jean

    2017-04-01

    within a PF environment that estimates the parameters. This facilitates employing relatively less expensive linear KF for linear state estimation problem while costly PF is employed only for parameter estimation. Additionally, the proposed algorithm also takes care of those systems for which system and measurement noises are not uncorrelated as it is commonly idealized in standard filtering algorithms. As an example, for mechanical systems under ambient vibration it happens when acceleration response is considered as measurement. Thus the process and measurement noise in these system descriptions are obviously correlated. For this, an improved description for the Kalman gain is developed. Further, to enhance the consistency of particle filtering based parameter estimation involving high dimensional parameter space, a new temporal evolution strategy for the particles is defined. This strategy aims at restricting the solution from diverging (up to the point of no return) because of an isolated event of infeasible estimation which is very much likely especially when dealing with high dimensional parameter space.

  10. Towards full waveform ambient noise inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sager, Korbinian; Ermert, Laura; Boehm, Christian; Fichtner, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    In this work we investigate fundamentals of a method—referred to as full waveform ambient noise inversion—that improves the resolution of tomographic images by extracting waveform information from interstation correlation functions that cannot be used without knowing the distribution of noise sources. The fundamental idea is to drop the principle of Green function retrieval and to establish correlation functions as self-consistent observables in seismology. This involves the following steps: (1) We introduce an operator-based formulation of the forward problem of computing correlation functions. It is valid for arbitrary distributions of noise sources in both space and frequency, and for any type of medium, including 3-D elastic, heterogeneous and attenuating media. In addition, the formulation allows us to keep the derivations independent of time and frequency domain and it facilitates the application of adjoint techniques, which we use to derive efficient expressions to compute first and also second derivatives. The latter are essential for a resolution analysis that accounts for intra- and interparameter trade-offs. (2) In a forward modelling study we investigate the effect of noise sources and structure on different observables. Traveltimes are hardly affected by heterogeneous noise source distributions. On the other hand, the amplitude asymmetry of correlations is at least to first order insensitive to unmodelled Earth structure. Energy and waveform differences are sensitive to both structure and the distribution of noise sources. (3) We design and implement an appropriate inversion scheme, where the extraction of waveform information is successively increased. We demonstrate that full waveform ambient noise inversion has the potential to go beyond ambient noise tomography based on Green function retrieval and to refine noise source location, which is essential for a better understanding of noise generation. Inherent trade-offs between source and structure

  11. Shallow structure of Deception Island, Antarctica, from correlations of ambient seismic noise on a set of dense seismic arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzón, F.; Almendros, J.; García-Jerez, A.

    2011-05-01

    We investigated the shallow velocity structure of Deception Island volcano, Antarctica, using correlations of ambient seismic noise. We selected long records of noise obtained by eight seismic arrays deployed along the inner coast of Deception during the period 2003-2005. Using these data, we calculated average dispersion curves and estimated local 1-D velocity models for the array sites. The combination of these profiles allowed us to obtain a comprehensive model of the shallow velocity structure of the island. The volcano is composed of relatively soft layers of pyroclastic deposits and sediments extending to a depth of about 400 m, with different degrees of compaction. Two layers with thicknesses of about 100 and 300 m and S-wave velocities of around 0.2-0.8 and 0.7-1.1 km s-1, respectively, can be differentiated. The deeper structure is highly variable in terms of wave velocities and layer depths. Although the resolving capabilities are reduced for these layers, the larger S-wave velocities in the range 1.3-2.8 km s-1 indicate that they can be associated with pre-caldera structures and products. There are substantial differences between the different models, which can be spatially related to heterogeneities in the volcano structure. The lowest S-wave velocities may be related to the alterations produced by hydrothermal activity near the surface. On the contrary, the largest velocities occur near the caldera border, revealing the presence of compact materials at shallow depths. Sharp lateral variations can also be observed in the northwest of the bay, which points to the presence of NW-SE faults and/or strong velocity gradients.

  12. Surface wave group velocity in the Osaka sedimentary basin, Japan, estimated using ambient noise cross-correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Kimiyuki; Iwata, Tomotaka; Sekiguchi, Haruko; Somei, Kazuhiro; Miyakoshi, Ken; Aoi, Shin; Kunugi, Takashi

    2017-08-01

    Inter-station cross-correlation functions estimated using continuous ambient noise or microtremor records were used to extract the seismic wave propagation characteristics of the Osaka sedimentary basin, Japan. Temporary continuous observations were conducted at 15 sites in the Osaka basin between 2011 and 2013. The data were analyzed using seismic interferometry. The target period range was 2-8 s. Cross-correlations between all of the possible station pairs were calculated and stacked to produce a year-long data set, and Rayleigh wave signals in the vertical and radial components and Love wave signals in the transverse component were identified from the results. Simulation of inter-station Green's functions using the finite difference method was conducted to check the performance of the current three-dimensional velocity structure model. The measured time lag between the observed and theoretical Green's functions was less than 2 s for most station pairs, which is less than the wave period of interest in the target frequency range. Group velocity tomography was applied to group delay times estimated by means of multiple filter analysis. The estimated group velocities for longer periods of 5-8 s exhibited spatial variation within the basin, which is consistent with the bedrock depth distribution; however, the group velocities for shorter periods of 2-3 s were almost constant over the studied area. The waveform and group velocity information obtained by seismic interferometry analysis can be useful for future reconstruction of a three-dimensional velocity structure model in the Osaka basin.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Correlações entre ruído ambiental em sala de aula e voz do professor Correlations between classroom environmental noise and teachers' voice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Fernanda Guidini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar se existe correlação entre ruído ambiental no interior da sala de aula, intensidade da voz e presença de alteração vocal em professores. MÉTODOS: Foi realizada medição do ruído ambiental em dez salas de escolas municipais de ensino fundamental. A intensidade das vozes das professoras foi medida durante atividade de ensino. Amostras de vogal prolongada [é] e contagem de 1 a 20 emitidas pelas professoras foram analisadas utilizando escala GRBASI. Os resultados obtidos foram correlacionados. RESULTADOS: A média de ruído ambiental sem a presença das crianças em sala de aula variou de 40 a 51 dB(A e com a presença das crianças de 45 a 65 dB(A. Entre as professoras, houve 70% de ocorrência de vozes alteradas no grau geral (G e 90% com tensão na voz (S, variando entre graus discreto e moderado. Constatou-se variação entre 52 dB(A e 68 dB(A na intensidade da voz das professoras, atingindo 7,48 dB(A acima do nível do ruído ambiental. Houve correlação entre a intensidade vocal das professoras e ruído ambiental na presença das crianças durante a aula. CONCLUSÃO: Os níveis de ruído ambiental em sala de aula são altos e se correlacionam com o aumento da intensidade das vozes das professoras. Embora com alta ocorrência de vozes alteradas, não é possível correlacioná-las com o nível de ruído ambiental.PURPOSE: To explore the existence of correlations between environmental noise in classrooms, voice intensity and teacher's vocal problems. METHODS: Environmental noise was measured in 10 classrooms of municipal elementary schools; the intensity of teachers' voice was measured during teaching practice; teachers' speech samples containing emissions of sustained vowel [é] and counting from 1 to 20 were analyzed using the GRBASI protocol; and the results were tested for correlation. RESULTS: The average of environmental noise varied from 40 to 51 dB(A without the presence of children in the classroom, and

  14. GSpecDisp: A matlab GUI package for phase-velocity dispersion measurements from ambient-noise correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghisorkhani, Hamzeh; Gudmundsson, Ólafur; Tryggvason, Ari

    2018-01-01

    We present a graphical user interface (GUI) package to facilitate phase-velocity dispersion measurements of surface waves in noise-correlation traces. The package, called GSpecDisp, provides an interactive environment for the measurements and presentation of the results. The selection of a dispersion curve can be done automatically or manually within the package. The data are time-domain cross-correlations in SAC format, but GSpecDisp measures phase velocity in the spectral domain. Two types of phase-velocity dispersion measurements can be carried out with GSpecDisp; (1) average velocity of a region, and (2) single-pair phase velocity. Both measurements are done by matching the real part of the cross-correlation spectrum with the appropriate Bessel function. Advantages of these two types of measurements are that no prior knowledge about surface-wave dispersion in the region is needed, and that phase velocity can be measured up to that period for which the inter-station distance corresponds to one wavelength. GSpecDisp can measure the phase velocity of Rayleigh and Love waves from all possible components of the noise correlation tensor. First, we briefly present the theory behind the methods that are used, and then describe different modules of the package. Finally, we validate the developed algorithms by applying them to synthetic and real data, and by comparison with other methods. The source code of GSpecDisp can be downloaded from: https://github.com/Hamzeh-Sadeghi/GSpecDisp

  15. Ambient Noise Characteristics During the Sheba Experiment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shaw, Ronald

    2000-01-01

    The ambient noise data recorded by two free-drifting buoys during the 1997-98 SHEBA experiment presented a unique opportunity to gauge the noise field of the Arctic Ocean in a unique and changing environment...

  16. Empirical Green's tensor retrieved from ambient noise cross-correlations at The Geysers geothermal field, Northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Avinash; Taira, Taka'aki; Dreger, Douglas S.; Gritto, Roland

    2018-04-01

    We retrieve empirical Green's functions in the frequency range (˜0.2-0.9 Hz) for interstation distances ranging from ˜1 to ˜30 km (˜0.22 to ˜6.5 times the wavelength) at The Geysers geothermal field, Northern California, from coherency of ambient seismic noise being recorded by a variety of sensors (broad-band, short-period surface and borehole sensors, and one accelerometer). The applied methodology preserves the intercomponent relative amplitudes of the nine-component Green's tensor that allows us to directly compare noise-derived Green's functions (NGFs) with normalized displacement waveforms of complete single-force synthetic Green's functions (SGFs) computed with various 1-D and 3-D velocity models using the frequency-wavenumber integration method and a 3-D finite-difference wave propagation method, respectively. These comparisons provide an effective means of evaluating the suitability of different velocity models to different regions of The Geysers, and assessing the quality of the sensors and the NGFs. In the T-Tangential, R-Radial, Z-Vertical reference frame, the TT, RR, RZ, ZR and ZZ components (first component: force direction, second component: response direction) of NGFs show clear surface waves and even body-wave phases for many station pairs. They are also broadly consistent in phase and intercomponent relative amplitudes with SGFs for the known local seismic velocity structure that was derived primarily from body-wave traveltime tomography, even at interstation distances less than one wavelength. We also find anomalous large amplitudes in TR, TZ, RT and ZT components of NGFs at small interstation distances (≲4 km) that can be attributed to ˜10°-30° sensor misalignments at many stations inferred from analysis of longer period teleseismic waveforms. After correcting for sensor misalignments, significant residual amplitudes in these components for some longer interstation distance (≳8 km) paths are better reproduced by the 3-D velocity

  17. Radial anisotropy ambient noise tomography of volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordret, Aurélien; Rivet, Diane; Shapiro, Nikolai; Jaxybulatov, Kairly; Landès, Matthieu; Koulakov, Ivan; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The use of ambient seismic noise allows us to perform surface-wave tomography of targets which could hardly be imaged by other means. The frequencies involved (~ 0.5 - 20 s), somewhere in between active seismic and regular teleseismic frequency band, make possible the high resolution imaging of intermediate-size targets like volcanic edifices. Moreover, the joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love waves dispersion curves extracted from noise correlations allows us to invert for crustal radial anisotropy. We present here the two first studies of radial anisotropy on volcanoes by showing results from Lake Toba Caldera, a super-volcano in Indonesia, and from Piton de la Fournaise volcano, a hot-spot effusive volcano on the Réunion Island (Indian Ocean). We will see how radial anisotropy can be used to infer the main fabric within a magmatic system and, consequently, its dominant type of intrusion.

  18. Ocean Ambient Noise Measurement and Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Carey, William M

    2011-01-01

    This book develops the theory of ocean ambient noise mechanisms and measurements, and also describes general noise characteristics and computational methods.  It concisely summarizes the vast ambient noise literature using theory combined with key representative results.  The air-sea boundary interaction zone is described in terms of non-dimensional variables requisite for future experiments.  Noise field coherency, rare directional measurements, and unique basin scale computations and methods are presented.  The use of satellite measurements in these basin scale models is demonstrated.  Finally, this book provides a series of appendices giving in-depth mathematical treatments.  With its complete and careful discussions of both theory and experimental results, this book will be of the greatest interest to graduate students and active researchers working in fields related to ambient noise in the ocean.

  19. Ambient noise levels and detection threshold in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuth, Andrea; Ottemöller, Lars; Keers, Henk

    2016-01-01

    Ambient seismic noise is caused by a number of sources in specific frequency bands. The quantification of ambient noise makes it possible to evaluate station and network performance. We evaluate noise levels in Norway from the 2013 data set of the Norwegian National Seismic Network as well as two temporary deployments. Apart from the station performance, we studied the geographical and temporal variations, and developed a local noise model for Norway. The microseism peaks related to the ocean are significant in Norway. We, therefore, investigated the relationship between oceanic weather conditions and noise levels. We find a correlation of low-frequency noise (0.125-0.25 Hz) with wave heights up to 900 km offshore. High (2-10 Hz) and intermediate (0.5-5 Hz) frequency noise correlates only up to 450 km offshore with wave heights. From a geographic perspective, stations in southern Norway show lower noise levels for low frequencies due to a larger distance to the dominant noise sources in the North Atlantic. Finally, we studied the influence of high-frequency noise levels on earthquake detectability and found that a noise level increase of 10 dB decreases the detectability by 0.5 magnitude units. This method provides a practical way to consider noise variations in detection maps.

  20. Global-scale Full Waveform Ambient Noise Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sager, K.; Ermert, L. A.; Boehm, C.; Krischer, L.; Afanasiev, M.; Fichtner, A.

    2017-12-01

    In earthquake tomography, modern tomographic methods exploit waveforms for the benefit of improved resolution. However, these techniques cannot be applied to noise correlation functions without knowing the distribution of noise sources. To overcome this limitation, we develop a method - referred to as full waveform ambient noise inversion - that is valid for arbitrary noise source distributions in both space and frequency, accounts for 3D heterogeneous and attenuating media and the full seismic wave propagation physics. The fundamental idea is to drop the principle of Green function retrieval, which is the basis for current noise tomographic studies, and to establish correlation functions as self-consistent observables in seismology. Based on a synthetic study in 2D, investigating the prerequisites for a joint inversion for noise sources and Earth structure, we extend the open-source waveform modelling and inversion package Salvus (http://salvus.io). It allows us to compute correlation functions in 3D media with heterogeneous noise sources at the surface and the corresponding sensitivity kernels for the distribution of noise sources and Earth structure. We present sensitivity kernels for different cross-correlation time lags and various noise source distributions, and study the effect of 3D heterogeneous Earth structure. For a validation of full waveform ambient noise inversion, we apply it to a global dataset focusing on the Earth's hum period band.

  1. Ambient Noise in an Urbanized Tidal Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Christopher

    In coastal environments, when topographic and bathymetric constrictions are combined with large tidal amplitudes, strong currents (> 2 m/s) can occur. Because such environments are relatively rare and difficult to study, until recently, they have received little attention from the scientific community. However, in recent years, interest in developing tidal hydrokinetic power projects in these environments has motivated studies to improve this understanding. In order to support an analysis of the acoustic effects of tidal power generation, a multi-year study was conducted at a proposed project site in Puget Sound (WA) are analyzed at a site where peak currents exceeded 3.5 m/s. From these analyses, three noise sources are shown to dominate the observed variability in ambient noise between 0.02-30 kHz: anthropogenic noise from vessel traffic, sediment-generated noise during periods of strong currents, and flow-noise resulting from turbulence advected over the hydrophones. To assess the contribution of vessel traffic noise, one calendar year of Automatic Identification System (AIS) ship-traffic data was paired with hydrophone recordings. The study region included inland waters of the Salish Sea within a 20 km radius of the hydrophone deployment site in northern Admiralty Inlet. The variability in spectra and hourly, daily, and monthly ambient noise statistics for unweighted broadband and M-weighted sound pressure levels is driven largely by vessel traffic. Within the one-year study period, at least one AIS transmitting vessel is present in the study area 90% of the time and over 1,363 unique vessels are recorded. A noise budget for vessels equipped with AIS transponders identifies cargo ships, tugs, and passenger vessels as the largest contributors to noise levels. A simple model to predict received levels at the site based on an incoherent summation of noise from different vessel types yields a cumulative probability density function of broadband sound pressure

  2. Amplification and Attenuation across USArray using Ambient Noise Wavefront Tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Bowden, Daniel C.

    2017-11-15

    As seismic travel-time tomography continues to be refined using data from the vast USArray dataset, it is advantageous to also exploit the amplitude information carried by seismic waves. We use ambient noise cross correlation to make observations of surface-wave amplification and attenuation at shorter periods (8 – 32 seconds) than can be observed with only traditional teleseismic earthquake sources. We show that the wavefront tracking approach of [Lin et al., 2012a] can be successfully applied to ambient noise correlations, yielding results quite similar to those from earthquake observations at periods of overlap. This consistency indicates that the wavefront tracking approach is viable for use with ambient noise correlations, despite concerns of the inhomogeneous and unknown distribution of noise sources. The resulting amplification and attenuation maps correlate well with known tectonic and crustal structure; at the shortest periods, our amplification and attenuation maps correlate well with surface geology and known sedimentary basins, while our longest period amplitudes are controlled by crustal thickness and begin to probe upper mantle materials. These amplification and attenuation observations are sensitive to crustal materials in different ways than travel-time observations and may be used to better constrain temperature or density variations. We also value them as an independent means of describing the lateral variability of observed Rayleigh-wave amplitudes without the need for 3D tomographic inversions.

  3. Ambient noise in large rivers (L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vračar, Miodrag S; Mijić, Miomir

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents the results of hydroacoustic noise research in three large European rivers: the Danube, the Sava, and the Tisa. Noise in these rivers was observed during a period of ten years, which includes all annual variation in hydrological and meteorological conditions (flow rate, speed of flow, wind speed, etc.). Noise spectra are characterized by wide maximums at frequencies between 20 and 30 Hz, and relatively constant slope toward higher frequencies. Spectral level of noise changes in time in relatively wide limits. At low frequencies, below 100 Hz, the dynamics of noise level is correlated with the dynamics of water flow and speed. At higher frequencies, noise spectra are mostly influenced by human activities on river and on riverbanks. The influence of wind on noise in rivers is complex due to the annual variation of river surface. The influence of wind is less pronounced than in oceans, seas, and lakes. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  4. Shear velocity of the Rotokawa geothermal field using ambient noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civilini, F.; Savage, M. K.; Townend, J.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise correlation is an increasingly popular seismological technique that uses the ambient seismic noise recorded at two stations to construct an empirical Green's function. Applications of this technique include determining shear velocity structure and attenuation. An advantage of ambient noise is that it does not rely on external sources of seismic energy such as local or teleseismic earthquakes. This method has been used in the geothermal industry to determine the depths at which magmatic processes occur, to distinguish between production and non-production areas, and to observe seismic velocity perturbations associated with fluid extraction. We will present a velocity model for the Rotokawa geothermal field near Taupo, New Zealand, produced from ambient noise cross correlations. Production at Rotokawa is based on the "Rotokawa A" combined cycle power station established in 1997 and the "Nga Awa Purua" triple flash power plant established in 2010. Rotokawa Joint Venture, a partnership between Mighty River Power and Tauhara North No. 2 Trust currently operates 174 MW of generation at Rotokawa. An array of short period seismometers was installed in 2008 and occupies an area of roughly 5 square kilometers around the site. Although both cultural and natural noise sources are recorded at the stations, the instrument separation distance provides a unique challenge for analyzing cross correlations produced by both signal types. The inter-station spacing is on the order of a few kilometers, so waves from cultural sources generally are not coherent from one station to the other, while the wavelength produced by natural noise is greater than the station separation. Velocity models produced from these two source types will be compared to known geological models of the site. Depending on the amount of data needed to adequately construct cross-correlations, a time-dependent model of velocity will be established and compared with geothermal production processes.

  5. Ambient noise analysis of deep ocean measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaul, Roy D.; Knobles, David P.; Wittenborn, A. F.

    2004-05-01

    In October 1975 a measurement exercise designated CHURCH OPAL was done in the northeast Pacific Ocean to assess undersea acoustic noise and propagation phenomena. In 2003 the 10 days of deep ocean multiple hydrophone recordings during CHURCH OPAL were recovered and digitized. This paper presents results previously reported but unavailable for general distribution. The earlier work is augmented with more complete and detailed analyses using modern analytical techniques. Particular attention is given to statistical characterization of ambient noise within and beneath the deep sound channel in relation to distant shipping and local wind speed. [Work supported by ONR.

  6. Spatio-temporal changes of seismic velocity at Miyakejima volcano associated with the 2000 eruption based on the cross-correlation analyses of ambient seismic noise records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggono, T.; Nishimura, T.; Sato, H.; Ueda, H.; Ukawa, M.

    2009-12-01

    Miyakejima Island is located about 170 km to the south of Tokyo, Japan. The 2000 activity started with a small submarine eruption in late June 2000, which accompanied earthquake swarms. A caldera was formed from July to August and had a diameter of about 1.6 km. Since then the volcanic gas was effused and the activity continued for more than four years. We analyze the ambient seismic noise recorded from July 1999 to December 2002 at four NIED seismic stations to study the volcano structure behavior associated with this volcanic activity. The continuous records are sampled at frequency of 100 Hz with an A/D resolution of 16-bit. We apply cross-correlation analyses to the continuous records of vertical component of short period seismometers (1 s) for every possible pair of stations. Before calculating the cross-correlation function (CCF), we bandpass filter the data using three-order Butterworth filter with frequency bands 0.4 - 0.8 Hz and 0.8 - 1.6 Hz. We calculate the CCFs with 60 s window length, and then stack for one day data. The observed CCFs are symmetric at both negative and positive lag times; this means that the distribution of noise sources is quite homogeneous surrounding the Miyakejima Island. We define a reference Green’s function (RGF) for every station pair by stacking the CCFs for about 10 months in 2002 during which no major instrumental errors were found. Once RGF is defined for each station pair, we calculate the cross-correlation coefficient between the RGF and the CCFs of each day, and select “good” CCFs that have cross-correlation coefficient larger than 0.7 and lag time smaller than +/- 0.5 s. We pick travel times of the maximum amplitude of the wave packets at positive and negative lag times, which correspond to the travel time of Rayleigh waves between two stations, from the RGF and the “good” CCFs of each day. To estimate the changes in the medium, we calculate the average travel time difference for periods July 1999 - May 2000

  7. Spatio-temporal changes in seismic velocity associated with the 2000 activity of Miyakejima volcano as inferred from cross-correlation analyses of ambient noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggono, Titi; Nishimura, Takeshi; Sato, Haruo; Ueda, Hideki; Ukawa, Motoo

    2012-12-01

    Miyakejima volcano, Japan, showed strong and interesting volcanic activities in 2000 with the occurrence of dike intrusions, caldera formation and a large amount of gas emission. To understand temporal changes of the volcanic structure associated with this activity, we apply ambient noise correlation analyses to the seismic records of five seismic stations at Miyakejima volcano from July 1999 to December 2002. We calculate cross-correlation functions (CCFs) for eight available station pairs at frequency bands of 0.4-0.8 Hz and 0.8-1.6 Hz, and retrieve the Rayleigh waves propagating with a group velocity of about 1.0 km/s. Comparing CCFs obtained for each day with the reference CCFs that are calculated from a few months of data, we estimate seismic velocity changes before and after the 2000 activity. Results at the two frequency bands show seismic velocity increase and decrease. Shallow structure at the volcanic edifice on the flanks experienced a seismic velocity increase up to 3.3%. On the other hand, the regions located close to the collapsed caldera show a seismic velocity decrease down to 2.3%. To understand the mechanisms that may introduce these seismic velocity increase and decrease, we examine several possible mechanisms of the velocity changes: stress changes due to volcanic pressure sources and caldera formation, and topographic changes. By using the deflation sources previously determined from GPS data, we calculate the stresses at depths of 0 km and 1 km at the volcano. The results suggest that the seismic velocity increases observed at seismic paths on the volcanic flank are explained by the compression caused by the deflation sources associated with magma activity in 2000. Stress sensitivities of the seismic velocity changes are estimated to be 1.5 × 10- 2 to 2.2 × 10- 2 MPa- 1 and 4.6 × 10- 3 to 2.4 × 10- 2 MPa- 1 at frequency bands of 0.4-0.8 Hz and 0.8-1.6 Hz, respectively, which are in the range of the previously reported results. Our three

  8. Ambient Seismic Noise Tomography of Southern Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Andreas; Weidle, Christian; Maupin, Valerie

    2010-05-01

    The noise cross-correlation technique is especially useful in regions like southern Norway since local seismicity is rare and teleseismic records are not able to resolve the upper crust. Within the TopoScandiaDeep project, which aims to investigate the relation between surface topography and lithosphere-asthenosphere structure, we process seismic broadband data from the temporary MAGNUS network in Southern Norway. The receivers were recording 20 months of continuous data between September 2006 and June 2008. Additionally, permanent stations of the National Norwegian Seismic Network, NORSAR and GSN stations in the region are used. After usual preprocessing steps (filtering, prewhitening, temporal normalization), we compute 820 cross-correlation functions from 41 receivers for three month time windows. Evaluation of the azimuthal and temporal variation of signal to noise ratios and f-k analysis of NORSAR array data shows that the dominant propagation direction of seismic noise is south-west to north, corresponding well to the Norwegian coast line. During summer months, the signal to noise ratios decrease and the azimuthal distribution becomes smoother. Time-frequency analysis is applied to measure Rayleigh and Love wave group velocity dispersion curves between each station pair for each three-month correlation stack. The mean and variance of all dispersion curves is computed for each path. After rejection of low-quality data using a signal to noise ratio, minimum wavelength and velocity variance criterion, we obtain a large number of reliable velocity estimates (about 600) for periods between 2 and 15 seconds, which we invert for group velocity maps at respective periods. At all inverted periods, we find positive and negative velocity anomalies for Rayleigh and Love waves that correlate very well with local surface geology. While higher velocities (+5%) can be associated with the Caledonian nappes in the central part of southern Norway, the Oslo Graben is reflected

  9. The influence of ambient noise on maternal behavior in a Bornean sun bear (Helarctos malayanus euryspilus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Megan A; Hall, Suzanne; Bryant, Lisa; Swaisgood, Ronald R

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise has become a pervasive feature of both marine and terrestrial habitats worldwide. While a comprehensive understanding of the biologically significant impacts of noise on wildlife is lacking, concerns regarding its influence persist. Noise is also a common feature in the zoological setting, and much can be learned regarding the species-typical response to ambient noise by studying animals in captivity. Here we correlate behavioral and vocal patterns in a Bornean sun bear (Helarctos malayanus euryspilus) mother and cub with ambient noise levels during the 6-month post-partum period. We hypothesized that loud ambient noise would be correlated with changes in behavior, and predicted that noise would be negatively correlated with maternal care behavior, potentially masking cub vocalizations or providing a distraction to the mother. Contrary to expectation, we found that the mother spent significantly more time attending to her cub (P=0.03) on loud days. We also found that she tended to spend less time feeding (P=0.08); however her time spent resting was not affected. The cub was approximately twice as vocal on loud days, although these results were not statistically significant (humming: P=0.10; squawks/cries: P=0.14). Taken together, these results suggest that the behavioral response to ambient noise may have potential energetic costs, and as a result efforts should be made to reduce ambient noise exposure during the post-partum period. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Three-component ambient noise beamforming in the Parkfield area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löer, Katrin; Riahi, Nima; Saenger, Erik H.

    2018-02-01

    We apply a three-component beamforming algorithm to an ambient noise data set recorded at a seismic array to extract information about both isotropic and anisotropic surface wave velocities. In particular, we test the sensitivity of the method with respect to the array geometry as well as to seasonal variations in the distribution of noise sources. In the earth's crust, anisotropy is typically caused by oriented faults or fractures and can be altered when earthquakes or human activities cause these structures to change. Monitoring anisotropy changes thus provides time dependent information on subsurface processes, provided they can be distinguished from other effects. We analyse ambient noise data at frequencies between 0.08 {{Hz}} and 0.52 {{Hz}} recorded at a three-component array in the Parkfield area, California (US), between November 2001 and April 2002. During this time, no major earthquakes were identified in the area and structural changes are thus not expected. We compute dispersion curves of Love and Rayleigh waves and estimate anisotropy parameters for Love waves. For Rayleigh waves, the azimuthal source coverage is too limited to perform anisotropy analysis. For Love waves, ambient noise sources are more widely distributed and we observe significant and stable surface wave anisotropy for frequencies between 0.2 {{Hz}} and 0.4 {{Hz}}. Synthetic data experiments indicate that the array geometry introduces apparent anisotropy, especially when waves from multiple sources arrive simultaneously at the array. Both the magnitude and the pattern of apparent anisotropy, however, differ significantly from the anisotropy observed in Love wave data. Temporal variations of anisotropy parameters observed at frequencies below 0.2 {{Hz}} and above 0.4 {{Hz}} correlate with changes in the source distribution. Frequencies between 0.2 {{Hz}} and 0.4 {{Hz}}, however, are less affected by these variations and provide relatively stable results over the period of study.

  11. Crustal structure of Australia from ambient seismic noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saygin, Erdinc; Kennett, B. L. N.

    2012-01-01

    Surface wave tomography for Australian crustal structure has been carried out using group velocity measurements in the period range 1-32 s extracted from stacked correlations of ambient noise between station pairs. Both Rayleigh wave and Love wave group velocity maps are constructed for each period using the vertical and transverse component of the Green's function estimates from the ambient noise. The full suite of portable broadband deployments and permanent stations on the continent have been used with over 250 stations in all and up to 7500 paths. The permanent stations provide a useful link between the various shorter-term portable deployments. At each period the group velocity maps are constructed with a fully nonlinear tomographic inversion exploiting a subspace technique and the Fast Marching Method for wavefront tracking. For Rayleigh waves the continental coverage is good enough to allow the construction of a 3D shear wavespeed model in a two stage approach. Local group dispersion information is collated for a distribution of points across the continent and inverted for a 1D SV wavespeed profile using a Neighbourhood Algorithm method. The resulting set of 1D models are then interpolated to produce the final 3D wavespeed model. The group velocity maps show the strong influence of thick sediments at shorter periods, and distinct fast zones associated with cratonic regions. Below the sediments the 3D shear wavespeed model displays significant heterogeneity with only moderate correlation with surface tectonic features. For example, there is no evident expression of the Tasman Line marking the eastern edge of Precambrian outcrop. The large number of available inter-station paths extracted from the ambient noise analysis provide detailed shear wavespeed information for crustal structure across the Australian continent for the first time, including regions where there was no prior sampling because of difficult logistics.

  12. Quantum games with correlated noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawaz, Ahmad; Toor, A H

    2006-01-01

    We analyse quantum games with correlated noise through a generalized quantization scheme. Four different combinations on the basis of entanglement of initial quantum state and the measurement basis are analysed. It is shown that the quantum player only enjoys an advantage over the classical player when both the initial quantum state and the measurement basis are in entangled form. Furthermore, it is shown that for maximum correlation the effects of decoherence diminish and it behaves as a noiseless game

  13. Rayleigh wave tomography in North-China from ambient seismic noise

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Lihua

    2010-01-01

    2008/2009 The theory and methodology of ambient noise tomography has been studied and applied to North-China successfully. Continuous vertical-component seismograms, spanning the period from January 1, 2007 to February 28, 2008 recorded by 190 broadband stations and 10 very broadband stations, have been used. The cross correlation technique has been applied to ambient noise data recorded by North-China Seismic Array for each station pairs of the array. Rayleigh wave group ve...

  14. Investigation of ambient seismic noise using seismic interferometry in western Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzywosz, Natalia

    Passive seismic interferometry is a process by which ambient noise data recorded at different seismic stations can be cross-correlated to estimate Green's functions. In the past, both surface waves and body waves have successfully been extracted by cross-correlation of ambient noise data on both regional and global scales. In this study, I have generated Matlab code to simulate an application of seismic interferometry on a synthetic model with pre-defined layers and p-wave velocities. For areas with known velocity models, the Matlab code produced in this study can be used to generate synthetic seismograms, and model the effects of cross-correlation on receiver responses. In order to develop a general understanding of the ambient noise wavefield in western Montana, a spectral analysis program was developed in Matlab. This program is used to process ambient noise data from the Transportable Array (TA) Seismographic Network, and to generate its power spectral density plots and probability density functions. The detailed spectral analysis provides some insight to the ambient noise sources, and their energy distribution throughout western Montana. In addition, an attempt was made to preprocess ambient noise data from the TA array in Matlab for later use. Although preprocessing of the data was successful, limitations in computing power and time, allowed for temporal stacking of only one month of data. The one month period was not long enough to produce Green's functions which contain coherent body waves.

  15. Ambient noise tomography of Eyjafjallajökull volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benediktsdóttir, Ásdís; Gudmundsson, Ólafur; Brandsdóttir, Bryndís; Tryggvason, Ari

    2017-11-01

    We present a shear-velocity model for the Eyjafjallajökull stratovolcano, based on ambient seismic noise tomography applied to seven months of data from six permanent stations and 10 temporary seismic stations, deployed during and after the 2010 volcanic unrest. Vertical components of noise were cross correlated resulting in 30 robust phase-velocity dispersion curves between 1.6 and 6.5 s in period, displaying a ± 20% variation in phase velocity beneath the volcano. The uneven distribution of noise sources, evaluated using signal-to-noise ratios, was estimated to cause less than 2% error in most curves. Sensitivity kernels showed resolution down to 10 km and the lateral resolution of the resulting phase-velocity maps was about 5 km. The model reveals east-west oriented high-velocity anomalies due east and west of the caldera. Between these a zone of lower velocity is identified, coinciding with the location of earthquakes that occurred during the summit eruption in April 2010. A shallow, southwest elongated low-velocity anomaly is located 5 km southwest of the caldera. The limited depth resolution of the shear-velocity model precludes detection of melt within the volcano.

  16. A neural network for noise correlation classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paitz, Patrick; Gokhberg, Alexey; Fichtner, Andreas

    2018-02-01

    We present an artificial neural network (ANN) for the classification of ambient seismic noise correlations into two categories, suitable and unsuitable for noise tomography. By using only a small manually classified data subset for network training, the ANN allows us to classify large data volumes with low human effort and to encode the valuable subjective experience of data analysts that cannot be captured by a deterministic algorithm. Based on a new feature extraction procedure that exploits the wavelet-like nature of seismic time-series, we efficiently reduce the dimensionality of noise correlation data, still keeping relevant features needed for automated classification. Using global- and regional-scale data sets, we show that classification errors of 20 per cent or less can be achieved when the network training is performed with as little as 3.5 per cent and 16 per cent of the data sets, respectively. Furthermore, the ANN trained on the regional data can be applied to the global data, and vice versa, without a significant increase of the classification error. An experiment where four students manually classified the data, revealed that the classification error they would assign to each other is substantially larger than the classification error of the ANN (>35 per cent). This indicates that reproducibility would be hampered more by human subjectivity than by imperfections of the ANN.

  17. Eastern Arctic ambient noise on a drifting vertical array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozanich, Emma; Gerstoft, Peter; Worcester, Peter F; Dzieciuch, Matthew A; Thode, Aaron

    2017-10-01

    Ambient noise in the eastern Arctic was studied from April to September 2013 using a 22 element vertical hydrophone array as it drifted from near the North Pole (89° 23'N, 62° 35'W) to north of Fram Strait (83° 45'N, 4° 28'W). The hydrophones recorded for 108 min/day on six days per week with a sampling rate of 1953.125 Hz. After removal of data corrupted by non-acoustic transients, 19 days throughout the transit period were analyzed. Noise contributors identified include broadband and tonal ice noises, bowhead whale calling, seismic airgun surveys, and earthquake T phases. The bowhead whale or whales detected are believed to belong to the endangered Spitsbergen population, and were recorded when the array was as far north as 86° 24'N. Median power spectral estimates and empirical probability density functions along the array transit show a change in the ambient noise levels corresponding to seismic survey airgun occurrence and received level at low frequencies and transient ice noises at high frequencies. Median power for the same periods across the array shows that this change is consistent in depth. The median ambient noise for May 2013 was among the lowest of the sparse reported observations in the eastern Arctic but comparable to the more numerous observations of western Arctic noise levels.

  18. The persistent signature of tropical cyclones in ambient seismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualtieri, Lucia; Camargo, Suzana J.; Pascale, Salvatore; Pons, Flavio M. E.; Ekström, Göran

    2018-02-01

    The spectrum of ambient seismic noise shows strong signals associated with tropical cyclones, yet a detailed understanding of these signals and the relationship between them and the storms is currently lacking. Through the analysis of more than a decade of seismic data recorded at several stations located in and adjacent to the northwest Pacific Ocean, here we show that there is a persistent and frequency-dependent signature of tropical cyclones in ambient seismic noise that depends on characteristics of the storm and on the detailed location of the station relative to the storm. An adaptive statistical model shows that the spectral amplitude of ambient seismic noise, and notably of the short-period secondary microseisms, has a strong relationship with tropical cyclone intensity and can be employed to extract information on the tropical cyclones.

  19. The persistent signature of tropical cyclones in ambient seismic noise

    KAUST Repository

    Gualtieri, Lucia

    2017-12-28

    The spectrum of ambient seismic noise shows strong signals associated with tropical cyclones, yet a detailed understanding of these signals and the relationship between them and the storms is currently lacking. Through the analysis of more than a decade of seismic data recorded at several stations located in and adjacent to the northwest Pacific Ocean, here we show that there is a persistent and frequency-dependent signature of tropical cyclones in ambient seismic noise that depends on characteristics of the storm and on the detailed location of the station relative to the storm. An adaptive statistical model shows that the spectral amplitude of ambient seismic noise, and notably of the short-period secondary microseisms, has a strong relationship with tropical cyclone intensity and can be employed to extract information on the tropical cyclones.

  20. Accurate Ambient Noise Assessment Using Smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Willian; Calafate, Carlos T.; Cano, Juan-Carlos; Manzoni, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, smartphones have become ubiquitous and one of the main communication resources for human beings. Their widespread adoption was due to the huge technological progress and to the development of multiple useful applications. Their characteristics have also experienced a substantial improvement as they now integrate multiple sensors able to convert the smartphone into a flexible and multi-purpose sensing unit. The combined use of multiple smartphones endowed with several types of sensors gives the possibility to monitor a certain area with fine spatial and temporal granularity, a procedure typically known as crowdsensing. In this paper, we propose using smartphones as environmental noise-sensing units. For this purpose, we focus our study on the sound capture and processing procedure, analyzing the impact of different noise calculation algorithms, as well as in determining their accuracy when compared to a professional noise measurement unit. We analyze different candidate algorithms using different types of smartphones, and we study the most adequate time period and sampling strategy to optimize the data-gathering process. In addition, we perform an experimental study comparing our approach with the results obtained using a professional device. Experimental results show that, if the smartphone application is well tuned, it is possible to measure noise levels with a accuracy degree comparable to professional devices for the entire dynamic range typically supported by microphones embedded in smartphones, i.e., 35–95 dB. PMID:28430126

  1. Accurate Ambient Noise Assessment Using Smartphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Willian; Calafate, Carlos T; Cano, Juan-Carlos; Manzoni, Pietro

    2017-04-21

    Nowadays, smartphones have become ubiquitous and one of the main communication resources for human beings. Their widespread adoption was due to the huge technological progress and to the development of multiple useful applications. Their characteristics have also experienced a substantial improvement as they now integrate multiple sensors able to convert the smartphone into a flexible and multi-purpose sensing unit. The combined use of multiple smartphones endowed with several types of sensors gives the possibility to monitor a certain area with fine spatial and temporal granularity, a procedure typically known as crowdsensing. In this paper, we propose using smartphones as environmental noise-sensing units. For this purpose, we focus our study on the sound capture and processing procedure, analyzing the impact of different noise calculation algorithms, as well as in determining their accuracy when compared to a professional noise measurement unit. We analyze different candidate algorithms using different types of smartphones, and we study the most adequate time period and sampling strategy to optimize the data-gathering process. In addition, we perform an experimental study comparing our approach with the results obtained using a professional device. Experimental results show that, if the smartphone application is well tuned, it is possible to measure noise levels with a accuracy degree comparable to professional devices for the entire dynamic range typically supported by microphones embedded in smartphones, i.e., 35-95 dB.

  2. Body Wave and Ambient Noise Tomography of Makushin Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, F.; Thurber, C. H.; Syracuse, E. M.; Ghosh, A.; LI, B.; Power, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Located in the eastern portion of the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone, Makushin Volcano is among the most active volcanoes in the United States and has been classified as high threat based on eruptive history and proximity to the City of Unalaska and international air routes. In 2015, five individual seismic stations and three mini seismic arrays of 15 stations each were deployed on Unalaska island to supplement the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) permanent seismic network. This temporary array was operational for one year. Taking advantage of the increased azimuthal coverage and the array's increased earthquake detection capability, we developed body-wave Vp and Vp/Vs seismic images of the velocity structure beneath the volcano. Body-wave tomography results show a complex structure with the upper 5 km of the crust dominated by both positive and negative Vp anomalies. The shallow high-Vp features possibly delineate remnant magma pathways or conduits. Low-Vp regions are found east of the caldera at approximately 6-9 km depth. This is in agreement with previous tomographic work and geodetic models, obtained using InSAR data, which had identified this region as a possible long-term source of magma. We also observe a high Vp/Vs feature extending between 7 and 12 km depth below the caldera, possibly indicating partial melting, although the resolution is diminished at these depths. The distributed stations allow us to further complement body-wave tomography with ambient noise imaging and to obtain higher quality of Vs images. Our data processing includes single station data preparation and station-pair cross-correlation steps (Bensen et al., 2007), and the use of the phase weighted stacking method (Schimmel and Gallart, 2007) to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the cross-correlations. We will show surface-wave dispersion curves, group velocity maps, and ultimately a 3D Vs image. By performing both body wave and ambient noise tomography, we provide a high

  3. Transdimensional, hierarchical, Bayesian inversion of ambient seismic noise: Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowder, E.; Rawlinson, N.; Cornwell, D. G.

    2017-12-01

    We present models of crustal velocity structure in southeastern Australia using a novel, transdimensional and hierarchical, Bayesian inversion approach. The inversion is applied to long-time ambient noise cross-correlations. The study area of SE Australia is thought to represent the eastern margin of Gondwana. Conflicting tectonic models have been proposed to explain the formation of eastern Gondwana and the enigmatic geological relationships in Bass Strait, which separates Tasmania and the mainland. A geologically complex area of crustal accretion, Bass Strait may contain part of an exotic continental block entrained in colliding crusts. Ambient noise data recorded by an array of 24 seismometers is used to produce a high resolution, 3D shear wave velocity model of Bass Strait. Phase velocity maps in the period range 2-30 s are produced and subsequently inverted for 3D shear wave velocity structure. The transdimensional, hierarchical Bayesian, inversion technique is used. This technique proves far superior to linearised inversion. The inversion model is dynamically parameterised during the process, implicitly controlled by the data, and noise is treated as an inversion unknown. The resulting shear wave velocity model shows three sedimentary basins in Bass Strait constrained by slow shear velocities (2.4-2.9 km/s) at 2-10 km depth. These failed rift basins from the breakup of Australia-Antartica appear to be overlying thinned crust, where typical mantle velocities of 3.8-4.0 km/s occur at depths greater than 20 km. High shear wave velocities ( 3.7-3.8 km/s) in our new model also match well with regions of high magnetic and gravity anomalies. Furthermore, we use both Rayleigh and Love wave phase data to to construct Vsv and Vsh maps. These are used to estimate crustal radial anisotropy in the Bass Strait. We interpret that structures delineated by our velocity models support the presence and extent of the exotic Precambrian micro-continent (the Selwyn Block) that was

  4. Evidence of Non-extensivity in Earth's Ambient Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutalonis, Ioannis; Vallianatos, Filippos

    2017-12-01

    The study of ambient seismic noise is one of the important scientific and practical research challenges, due to its use in a number of geophysical applications. In this work, we describe Earth's ambient noise fluctuations in terms of non-extensive statistical physics. We found that Earth's ambient noise increments follow the q-Gaussian distribution. This indicates that Earth's ambient noise's fluctuations are not random and present long-term memory effects that could be described in terms of Tsallis entropy. Our results suggest that q values depend on the time length used and that the non-extensive parameter, q, converges to value q → 1 for short-time windows and a saturation value of q ≈ 1.33 for longer ones. The results are discussed from the point of view of superstatistics introduced by Beck [Contin Mech Thermodyn 16(3):293-304, 2004] and connects the q values with the system's degrees of freedom. Our work indicates that the converged (maximum) value is q = 1.33 and is related to 5 degrees of freedom.

  5. Qademah Fault Artificial Ambient Noise Test

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2014-01-01

    This data set was collected on 7 Dec. 2014 by Sherif and Abdullah. The receiver layout is the same as that of the passive data test at the same location, which is described as follow: 288 receivers are used and arranged as follow - 12 lines, cross-line offset = 10 m - 24 receiver in each line, inline offset = 5 m - Additional 24 receivers are placed at line # 6, where the receiver interval is decreased to 2.5 m. Data Recording: We start recording at 10:10 am and stop recording at 11:25 am. Each record has total of 20 s, with time interval of 0.004 ms and around 2 s overlap between each two successive files. Source: We used a piece of wood attached to a pick-up truck to create the noise; we drove around the array of receivers in a rectangle-shape route during the recording time.

  6. Ambient Noise Tomography in Koyna-Warna region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohilla, S.; Rao, N. P.; Gerstoft, P.; Yao, H.; Fang, H.; Davulluri, S.

    2017-12-01

    In the present study Ambient Noise tomography has been done in the Koyna-Warna region of western India to decipher the complex structural setting and its linkage to the seismogenesis in this unique Reservoir Triggered Seismicity zone. The 3-D velocity model obtained from the study clearly brings out the lateral and vertical variations of shear velocity in the region down to a depth of about 10 km. In the Koyna region, seismicity distribution along the NNE-SSW trending Donachiwada fault zone is seen coinciding with a low velocity zone between two competent zones with a very high velocity > 4.0 km/s. The seismicity between the Koyna and Warna regions roughly trending NW-SE can be clearly seen in the NE-SW depth sections coinciding with a low velocity zone interspersed between two high velocity zones. The most active seismicity cluster south of the Warna Lake correlates with a near-vertical velocity discontinuity with a contrast of about 0.5 km/s is seen in an EW depth section. The study has helped in delineating the major fault zones of the Koyna-Warna region and enabled understanding the seismogenesis with respect to the structural controls in a RTS enviroment.

  7. A high-resolution ambient seismic noise model for Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Toni

    2014-05-01

    In the past several years, geological energy technologies receive growing attention and have been initiated in or close to urban areas. Some of these technologies involve injecting fluids into the subsurface (e.g., oil and gas development, waste disposal, and geothermal energy development) and have been found or suspected to cause small to moderate sized earthquakes. These earthquakes, which may have gone unnoticed in the past when they occurred in remote sparsely populated areas, are now posing a considerable risk for the public acceptance of these technologies in urban areas. The permanent termination of the EGS project in Basel, Switzerland after a number of induced ML~3 (minor) earthquakes in 2006 is one prominent example. It is therefore essential to the future development and success of these geological energy technologies to develop strategies for managing induced seismicity and keeping the size of induced earthquake at a level that is acceptable to all stakeholders. Most guidelines and recommendations on induced seismicity published since the 1970ies conclude that an indispensable component of such a strategy is the establishment of seismic monitoring in an early stage of a project. This is because an appropriate seismic monitoring is the only way to detect and locate induced microearthquakes with sufficient certainty to develop an understanding of the seismic and geomechanical response of the reservoir to the geotechnical operation. In addition, seismic monitoring lays the foundation for the establishment of advanced traffic light systems and is therefore an important confidence building measure towards the local population and authorities. Due to this development an increasing number of seismic monitoring networks are being installed in densely populated areas with strongly heterogeneous, and unfavorable ambient noise conditions. This poses a major challenge on the network design process, which aims to find the sensor geometry that optimizes the

  8. Correlated Levy Noise in Linear Dynamical Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srokowski, T.

    2011-01-01

    Linear dynamical systems, driven by a non-white noise which has the Levy distribution, are analysed. Noise is modelled by a specific stochastic process which is defined by the Langevin equation with a linear force and the Levy distributed symmetric white noise. Correlation properties of the process are discussed. The Fokker-Planck equation driven by that noise is solved. Distributions have the Levy shape and their width, for a given time, is smaller than for processes in the white noise limit. Applicability of the adiabatic approximation in the case of the linear force is discussed. (author)

  9. Random Correlation Matrix and De-Noising

    OpenAIRE

    Ken-ichi Mitsui; Yoshio Tabata

    2006-01-01

    In Finance, the modeling of a correlation matrix is one of the important problems. In particular, the correlation matrix obtained from market data has the noise. Here we apply the de-noising processing based on the wavelet analysis to the noisy correlation matrix, which is generated by a parametric function with random parameters. First of all, we show that two properties, i.e. symmetry and ones of all diagonal elements, of the correlation matrix preserve via the de-noising processing and the...

  10. When ambient noise impairs parent-offspring communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucass, Carsten; Eens, Marcel; Müller, Wendt

    2016-05-01

    Ambient noise has increased in extent, duration and intensity with significant implications for species' lives. Birds especially, because they heavily rely on vocal communication, are highly sensitive towards noise pollution. Noise can impair the quality of a territory or hamper the transmission of vocal signals such as song. The latter has significant fitness consequences as it may erode partner preferences in the context of mate choice. Additional fitness costs may arise if noise masks communication between soliciting offspring and providing parents during the period of parental care. Here, we experimentally manipulated the acoustic environment of blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus) families within their nest boxes with playbacks of previously recorded highway noise and investigated the consequences on parent-offspring communication. We hypothesized that noise interferes with the acoustic cues of parental arrival and vocal components of offspring begging. As such we expected an increase in the frequency of missed detections, when nestlings fail to respond to the returning parent, and a decrease in parental provisioning rates. Parents significantly reduced their rate of provisioning in noisy conditions compared to a control treatment. This reduction is likely to be the consequence of a parental misinterpretation of the offspring hunger level, as we found that nestlings fail to respond to the returning parent more frequently in the presence of noise. Noise also potentially masks vocal begging components, again contributing to parental underestimation of offspring requirements. Either way, it appears that noise impaired parent-offspring communication is likely to reduce reproductive success. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. An intelligent subsurface buoy design for measuring ocean ambient noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Wang, Lei

    2012-11-01

    A type of ultra-low power subsurface buoy system is designed to measure and record ocean ambient noise data. The buoy utilizes a vector hydrophone (pass band 20Hz-1.2kHz) and a 6-element vertical hydrophone array (pass band 20Hz-2kHz) to measure ocean ambient noise. The acoustic signals are passed through an automatically modified gain, a band pass filter, and an analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion module. They are then stored in high-capacity flash memory. In order to identify the direction of noise source, the vector sensor measuring system has integrated an electric-magnetic compass. The system provides a low-rate underwater acoustic communication system which is used to report the buoy state information and a high-speed USB interface which is used to retrieve the recorded data on deck. The whole system weighs about 125kg and can operate autonomously for more than 72 hours. The system's main architecture and the sea-trial test results are provided in this paper.

  12. Ambient noise levels and characterization in Aegean region, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevim, Fatih; Zor, Ekrem; Açıkgöz, Cem; Tarancıoğlu, Adil

    2018-03-01

    We assessed the ambient noise level in the Aegean region and analyzed its diurnal variation and its relation to the earthquake detection capability of the Aegean Region Seismic Network (ARSN). We prepared probability density functions (PDFs) for 19 broadband stations in the Aegean region operated by the Earth and Marine Sciences Institute (EMSI) of the Marmara Research Center (MRC) of the Turkish Scientific Research Council (TÜBİTAK). The power spectral densities (PSDs) used to construct PDFs for each station were computed for the periods between 0.02 and 180 s. In addition, we generated noise map of the Aegean region for different periods using the PDFs to assess the origin of the noise. We analyzed earthquake activity in the region and found that there are more local events recorded at night than during the day for each station. This difference is strongly related to diurnal variation of background noise level for the period range mostly covering the frequency range for the local events. We observed daytime noise level 15 to 20 dB higher than that at the nighttime in high frequencies for almost all stations caused by its proximity to settled areas and roads. Additionally, we observed a splitting peak within the Double Frequency (DF) microseism band; it showed a clear noise increase around the short period DF band at all the stations, decreasing inland. This peak may be related to sea waves locally generated in the Aegean Sea. We also identified a prominent increase related to marble saw companies in some stations' noise PDFs.

  13. Ambient noise levels and characterization in Aegean region, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevim, Fatih; Zor, Ekrem; Açıkgöz, Cem; Tarancıoğlu, Adil

    2017-12-01

    We assessed the ambient noise level in the Aegean region and analyzed its diurnal variation and its relation to the earthquake detection capability of the Aegean Region Seismic Network (ARSN). We prepared probability density functions (PDFs) for 19 broadband stations in the Aegean region operated by the Earth and Marine Sciences Institute (EMSI) of the Marmara Research Center (MRC) of the Turkish Scientific Research Council (TÜBİTAK). The power spectral densities (PSDs) used to construct PDFs for each station were computed for the periods between 0.02 and 180 s. In addition, we generated noise map of the Aegean region for different periods using the PDFs to assess the origin of the noise. We analyzed earthquake activity in the region and found that there are more local events recorded at night than during the day for each station. This difference is strongly related to diurnal variation of background noise level for the period range mostly covering the frequency range for the local events. We observed daytime noise level 15 to 20 dB higher than that at the nighttime in high frequencies for almost all stations caused by its proximity to settled areas and roads. Additionally, we observed a splitting peak within the Double Frequency (DF) microseism band; it showed a clear noise increase around the short period DF band at all the stations, decreasing inland. This peak may be related to sea waves locally generated in the Aegean Sea. We also identified a prominent increase related to marble saw companies in some stations' noise PDFs.

  14. Noise Model Analysis and Estimation of Effect due to Wind Driven Ambient Noise in Shallow Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sakthivel Murugan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal transmission in ocean using water as a channel is a challenging process due to attenuation, spreading, reverberation, absorption, and so forth, apart from the contribution of acoustic signals due to ambient noises. Ambient noises in sea are of two types: manmade (shipping, aircraft over the sea, motor on boat, etc. and natural (rain, wind, seismic, etc., apart from marine mammals and phytoplanktons. Since wind exists in all places and at all time: its effect plays a major role. Hence, in this paper, we concentrate on estimating the effects of wind. Seven sets of data with various wind speeds ranging from 2.11 m/s to 6.57 m/s were used. The analysis is performed for frequencies ranging from 100 Hz to 8 kHz. It is found that a linear relationship between noise spectrum and wind speed exists for the entire frequency range. Further, we developed a noise model for analyzing the noise level. The results of the empirical data are found to fit with results obtained with the aid of noise model.

  15. Icequakes and ambient noise sources detected by a geophone array at the Kaskawulsh glacier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, N.; Tsai, V. C.; Schoof, C.; Whiteford, A.; Flowers, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    Both sliding and meltwater drainage processes of glaciers are expected to generate seismic signals. The confluence of the North and Central arms of the Kaskawulsh glacier in the Yukon Territory is an especially attractive place to study such phenomena not only because of the confluence but also because a nearby ice-dammed lake fills and drains rapidly every summer. We analyzed geophone data from nine stations at the Kaskawulsh glacier during the summer of 2014 to detect and locate icequakes and ambient noise sources. We first detected icequakes automatically by picking arrivals. Then we located events using differential arrival times between stations obtained precisely by cross-correlations, and also applied a double-difference relocation technique. During the 1-month observation period, we found 183 events that clustered near the medial moraine. More icequakes are observed from midnight to noon, potentially due to lower noise levels. These events are distributed on a dipping plane sub-parallel to the glacier flow direction. The depths below the surface range from 200m on the shallower side to 500m on the deeper side. This structure may correspond to the basal slope of the medial moraine and implies that these icequake signals come from either shear basal sliding or an englacial splay fault. We also determined ambient noise source locations for each 1-hour record sequence using the same process as for the icequakes. We located 31 sequences, among which more sequences were observed in the afternoon, possibly related to melting of the glacier. Most of the ambient noise sequences were located in two vertical clusters, with each cluster potentially corresponding to a crevasse or a moulin. We interpret this ambient noise as being produced by meltwater drainage. In both analyses, we find that inter-station differential arrival times obtained by cross-correlations provide effective information to locate sliding or meltwater drainage processes.

  16. Antiferromagnetic noise correlations in optical lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Niels Bohr International Academy, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark, Georg Morten; Syljuåsen, F. T.; Pedersen, K. G. L.

    2009-01-01

    We analyze how noise correlations probed by time-of-flight experiments reveal antiferromagnetic (AF) correlations of fermionic atoms in two-dimensional and three-dimensional optical lattices. Combining analytical and quantum Monte Carlo calculations using experimentally realistic parameters, we s...

  17. Two-receiver measurements of phase velocity: cross-validation of ambient-noise and earthquake-based observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kästle, Emanuel D.; Soomro, Riaz; Weemstra, C.; Boschi, Lapo; Meier, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Phase velocities derived from ambient-noise cross-correlation are compared with phase velocities calculated from cross-correlations of waveform recordings of teleseismic earthquakes whose epicentres are approximately on the station–station great circle. The comparison is conducted both for Rayleigh

  18. Stress Monitoring Potential of Ambient Noise Interferometry in Deep Mine Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dales, P.; Audet, P.; Mercier, J. P.; de Beer, W.; Pascu, A.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the response of the rock mass to mining is of key importance for the planning of mine operations as well as assessing and mitigating the seismic risk. For decades, studies have shown that passive source tomography, also called local earthquake tomography, can provide information on the rock mass response through the estimation of the temporal variation and 3D distribution (spatio-temporal variations) of stress. The spatio-temporal resolution afforded by passive source tomography depends on the seismicity rate and the location of microseismic events. In a mine, seismicity is not stationary, i.e. the locus and rate of seismicity vary with time, thus limiting the spatio-temporal resolution of this technique. Recent developments in the field of ambient noise seismic interferometry (Green's function retrieval from ambient noise) provide hints that continuous recordings of ambient vibrations collected around mines could be used to obtain information on the evolution and 3D distribution of the stress in the rock mass by providing measures of seismic travel times between pairs of sensors. In contrast to passive source tomography that relies on the distribution of seismic events, the resolution afforded by ambient noise interferometry tomography depends solely on the locations of sensors and the frequency content of the ambient noise. We present preliminary results which focus on the temporal stability of the estimated Green's functions, the effect of mine infrastructure on signal quality and preliminary methods to quantify stress changes in the rock mass. In addition, we present the adopted processing scheme built on the Apache Spark engine and demonstrate its effectiveness in parallelizing the computationally intensive cross-correlation routines.

  19. Upper crustal structure of Madeira Island revealed from ambient noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Catarina; Silveira, Graça; Matias, Luís; Caldeira, Rita; Ribeiro, M. Luísa; Dias, Nuno A.; Krüger, Frank; Bento dos Santos, Telmo

    2015-06-01

    We present the first image of the Madeira upper crustal structure, using ambient seismic noise tomography. 16 months of ambient noise, recorded in a dense network of 26 seismometers deployed across Madeira, allowed reconstructing Rayleigh wave Green's functions between receivers. Dispersion analysis was performed in the short period band from 1.0 to 4.0 s. Group velocity measurements were regionalized to obtain 2D tomographic images, with a lateral resolution of 2.0 km in central Madeira. Afterwards, the dispersion curves, extracted from each cell of the 2D group velocity maps, were inverted as a function of depth to obtain a 3D shear wave velocity model of the upper crust, from the surface to a depth of 2.0 km. The obtained 3D velocity model reveals features throughout the island that correlates well with surface geology and island evolution.

  20. Ambient-noise tomography of Katla volcano, south Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeddi, Zeinab; Gudmundsson, Olafur; Tryggvason, Ari

    2017-11-01

    A shear-wave velocity model of subglacial Katla volcano, southern Iceland, has been developed using ambient seismic noise tomography based on data from a temporary network operating between May 2011 and August 2013 and permanent stations around the volcano. Phase-velocity dispersion curves were obtained using cross-correlations of vertical components of 136 station pairs and non-linearly inverted for phase-velocity maps between 1.7 and 7.5 s. Local dispersion curves were inverted for shear-velocity variation with depth using a grid search imposing a fixed ice layer at the top. The resulting one-dimensional (1-D) velocity models were combined to obtain a pseudo three-dimensional (3-D) model with estimated lateral resolution of 8 km and depth resolution varying from close to 1 km near the surface to about 8 km at 10 km depth. Shear wave velocities are generally higher within the Katla central volcano than in its surroundings. The most striking feature of the model is a high-velocity anomaly beneath the caldera at > 6 km depth interpreted to be due to cumulates resulting from differentiation of shallower magma intrusions and remelting of subsiding upper crust. No shallow low-velocity anomaly is resolved beneath the central caldera, but a low-velocity region is found at 2-4 km depth beneath the western half of the caldera. VP/VS ratios, estimated from average velocity-depth profiles from surface-wave data and higher frequency P-wave data, are anomalously high (> 1.9) compared to average Icelandic crust, particularly in the top 2-3 km. This is argued not to be an artifact due to lateral refraction or topography. Instead, this anomaly could be explained as an artifact caused by velocity dispersion due to attenuation and a difference in frequency content, and possibly to a degree by the compositional difference between the transalkalic Fe-Ti basalts of Katla and average tholeiitic Icelandic crust.

  1. Thirty years of progress in applications and modeling of ocean ambient noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siderius, Martin; Buckingham, Michael J.

    2012-11-01

    Ambient noise in the ocean is a stochastic process, which traditionally was considered to be a nuisance, since it reduced the detectability of sonar signals of interest. However, over the last thirty years, it has come to be recognized that the ambient noise itself contains useful information about the ocean and ocean processes. To extract the information, various inversion procedures have been developed, based upon which a number of practical applications of the ambient noise have evolved. Since naturally generated ambient noise is always present in the ocean, it has the advantage of being non-invasive and non-damaging to marine life, including marine mammals. In this article, a summary of the commonly encountered ambient noise models is offered, along with the associated inversion procedures, and some of the more recent applications of the ambient noise are highlighted.

  2. Array enhanced stochastic resonance and spatially correlated noises

    OpenAIRE

    Gora, P. F.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the role of spatial correlations of the noise in the array enhanced stochastic resonance. We show numerically that the noises with negative correlations between different sites lead to significantly larger values of the signal-to-noise ratio than the uncorrelated noises or noises with positive correlations. If the noise is global, the system displays only the conventional stochastic resonance, without any array enhancement.

  3. Ambient Noise Tomography Applied to Nodal Data Sets in Induced Seismicity Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sufri, O.; DeShon, H. R.; Ogwari, P.; Hayward, C.; Magnani, M. B.

    2017-12-01

    We present results of ambient noise tomography performed using nodal datasets with different array apertures and geometries deployed in northern Texas and northern Oklahoma to capture induced earthquakes. We show that ambient noise tomography techniques can be performed on small aperture, oddly shaped array datasets. In northern Texas, the nodal data was collected on 10 Hz single-component vertical sensors that were deployed from the collaboration between SMU and Nodal Seismic. The data was acquired between 25 February and 8 March 2014. First, we compute the cross-correlation between the geophone pairs, which are used as Green's functions to perform ambient noise tomography, and find acceptable results between 0.3-1.0 seconds. We compute the phase velocities for these periods and invert the phase velocities to obtain shear wave velocity structure for up to depths of 200 meters underneath the array. The small aperture of the array (2.6 km x 2.92 km) limits depth resolution. The resulting shear wave velocity model is then used as a shallow velocity constraint to improve double-difference local earthquake tomography using the earthquake data from a co-located local seismic network. We present tomography results aimed at resolving 3D velocity heterogeneity associated with the 2013-2015 Azle-Reno induced earthquake sequence. These techniques are also applied to conduct ambient noise tomography in northern Oklahoma using the IRIS Wavefield Community Experiment data. This data was acquired between 23 June and 20 July 2016 from a larger (6 km x 14 km) aperture array consisting of 5 Hz 3-component nodes. Because the aperture of Wavefield network was larger than the north Texas array, we expect to resolve shear velocity to greater depth and provide 3D information on near surface velocity heterogeneity, and possibly resolve faulting associated with earthquakes beneath the array.

  4. Retrieval of Body-Wave Reflections Using Ambient Noise Interferometry Using a Small-Scale Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Odmaksuel Anísio Bezerra; do Nascimento, Aderson Farias; Schimmel, Martin

    2018-02-01

    We report the retrieval of body-wave reflections from noise records using a small-scale experiment over a mature oil field. The reflections are obtained by cross-correlation and stacking of the data. We used the stacked correlograms to create virtual source-to-receiver common shot gathers and are able to obtain body-wave reflections. Surface waves that obliterate the body-waves in our noise correlations were attenuated following a standard procedure from active source seismics. Further different strategies were employed to cross-correlate and stack the data: classical geometrical normalized cross-correlation (CCGN), phase cross-correlation (PCC), linear stacking**** and phase weighted stacking (PWS). PCC and PWS are based on the instantaneous phase coherence of analytic signals. The four approaches are independent and reveal the reflections; nevertheless, the combination of PWS and CCGN provided the best results. Our analysis is based on 2145 cross-correlations of 600 s data segments. We also compare the resulted virtual shot gathers with an active 2D seismic line near the passive experiment. It is shown that our ambient noise analysis reproduces reflections which are present in the active seismic data.

  5. The preliminary results: Seismic ambient noise Rayleigh wave tomography around Merapi volcano, central Java, Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trichandi, Rahmantara; Yudistira, Tedi; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Zulhan, Zulfakriza; Saygin, Erdinc

    2015-01-01

    Ambient noise tomography is relatively a new method for imaging the shallow structure of the Earth subsurface. We presents the application of this method to produce a Rayleigh wave group velocity maps around the Merapi Volcano, Central Java. Rayleigh waves group velocity maps were reconstructed from the cross-correlation of ambient noise recorded by the DOMERAPI array which consists 43 broadband seismometers. In the processing stage, we first filtered the observation data to separatethe noise from the signal that dominated by the strong volcanic activities. Next, we cross-correlate the filtered data and stack to obtain the Green’s function for all possible station pairs. Then we carefully picked the peak of each Green’s function to estimate the dispersion trend and appliedMultiple Filter Technique to obtain the dispersion curve. Inter-station group velocity curvesare inverted to produceRayleigh wave group velocity maps for periods 1 to 10 s. The resulted Rayleigh group velocity maps show the interesting features around the Merapi Volcano which generally agree with the previous studies. Merapi-Lawu Anomaly (MLA) is emerged as a relatively low anomaly in our group velocity maps

  6. The preliminary results: Seismic ambient noise Rayleigh wave tomography around Merapi volcano, central Java, Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trichandi, Rahmantara, E-mail: rachmantara.tri@gmail.com [Geophysical Engineering, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, 40132, Bandung (Indonesia); Yudistira, Tedi; Nugraha, Andri Dian [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Zulhan, Zulfakriza [Earth Science Graduate Program, Faculty of Earth Science and Technology, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Saygin, Erdinc [Research School of Earth Sciences, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2015-04-24

    Ambient noise tomography is relatively a new method for imaging the shallow structure of the Earth subsurface. We presents the application of this method to produce a Rayleigh wave group velocity maps around the Merapi Volcano, Central Java. Rayleigh waves group velocity maps were reconstructed from the cross-correlation of ambient noise recorded by the DOMERAPI array which consists 43 broadband seismometers. In the processing stage, we first filtered the observation data to separatethe noise from the signal that dominated by the strong volcanic activities. Next, we cross-correlate the filtered data and stack to obtain the Green’s function for all possible station pairs. Then we carefully picked the peak of each Green’s function to estimate the dispersion trend and appliedMultiple Filter Technique to obtain the dispersion curve. Inter-station group velocity curvesare inverted to produceRayleigh wave group velocity maps for periods 1 to 10 s. The resulted Rayleigh group velocity maps show the interesting features around the Merapi Volcano which generally agree with the previous studies. Merapi-Lawu Anomaly (MLA) is emerged as a relatively low anomaly in our group velocity maps.

  7. Noise Spectroscopy in Strongly Correlated Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaqqa, Ali M.

    Strongly correlated materials are an interesting class of materials, thanks to the novel electronic and magnetic phenomena they exhibit as a result of the interplay of various degrees of freedom. This gives rise to an array of potential applications, from Mott-FET to magnetic storage. Many experimental probes have been used to study phase transitions in strongly correlated oxides. Among these, resistance noise spectroscopy, together with conventional transport measurements, provides a unique viewpoint to understand the microscopic dynamics near the phase transitions in these oxides. In this thesis, utilizing noise spectroscopy and transport measurements, four different strongly correlated materials were studied: (1) neodymium nickel oxide (NdNiO 3) ultrathin films, (2) vanadium dioxide (VO2) microribbons, (3) copper vanadium bronze (CuxV2O 5) microribbons and (4) niobium triselenide (NbSe3) microribbons. Ultra thin films of rare-earth nickelates exhibit several temperature-driven phase transitions. In this thesis, we studied the metal-insulator and Neel transitions in a series of NdNiO3 films with different lattice mismatches. Upon colling down, the metal-insulator phase transition is accompanied by a structural (orthorohombic to monoclinic) and magnetic (paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic) transitions as well, making the problem more interesting and complex at the same time. The noise is of the 1/f type and is Gaussian in the high temperature phase, however deviations are seen in the low temperature phases. Below the metal-insulator transition, noise magnitude increases by orders of magnitude: a sign of inhomogeneous electrical conduction as result of phase separation. This is further assured by the non-Gaussian noise signature. At very low temperatures (T thesis, we tried to answer this question by utilizing three different tuning parameters: temperature, voltage bias and strain. Our results point to an unusual noise behavior in the high-temperature metallic phase

  8. Ambient Seismic Noise Tomography of a Loess High Bank at Dunaszekcső (Hungary)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szanyi, Gyöngyvér; Gráczer, Zoltán; Győri, Erzsébet; Kaláb, Zdeněk; Lednická, Markéta

    2016-08-01

    Loess high banks along the right side of the Danube in Hungary are potential subjects of landslides. Small scale ambient seismic noise tomography was used at the Dunaszekcső high bank. The aim of the study was to map near surface velocity anomalies since we assume that the formation of tension cracks—which precede landslides—are represented by low velocities. Mapping Rayleigh wave group velocity distribution can help to image intact and creviced areas and identify the most vulnerable sections. The study area lies at the top of the Castle Hill of Dunaszekcső, which was named after Castellum Lugio, a fortress of Roman origin. The presently active head scarp was formed in April 2011, and our study area was chosen to be at its surroundings. Cross-correlation functions of ambient noise recordings were used to retrieve the dispersion curves, which served as the input of the group velocity tomography. Phase cross-correlation and time-frequency phase weighted stacking was applied to calculate the cross-correlation functions. The average Rayleigh wave group velocity at the loess high bank was found to be 171 ms^{-1}. The group velocity map at a 0.1 s period revealed a low-velocity region, whose location coincides with a highly creviced area, where slope failure takes place along a several meter wide territory. Another low velocity region was found, which might indicate a previously unknown loosened domain. The highest velocities were observed at the supposed remnants of Castellum Lugio.

  9. Microseism Directivity from Noise Cross-correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z.; Gerstoft, P.; Bromirski, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    The direction of microseisms (0.05-0.35 Hz) is determined from noise cross-correlation with conventional pre-processing, where only earthquakes and local cultural transients (e.g. trawling, fish hitting) are removed. Noise cross-correlation has been successfully used to obtain accurate travel times, generally by retaining the phase (but not the amplitude) using one-bit or running-absolute-mean pre-processing. These methods give cross-correlation functions with modified amplitudes, and tend to accentuate long duration signals, thereby biasing the dominant source direction. Here, to avoid introducing bias, the microseism source direction in the Cascadia region was determined from cross-correlation functions for OBS data using conventional pre-processing. No significantly dominant (in the sense of total energy) microseism source directions are detected. Moreover, pelagic-generated signals tend to be weaker but have longer duration, in contrast to coastally-generated signals that tend to be stronger but have shorter duration.

  10. Ambient and at-the-ear occupational noise exposure and serum lipid levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arlien-Søborg, Mai C; Schmedes, Astrid S; Stokholm, Z A

    2016-01-01

    -the-ear occupational noise exposure and serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and triglycerides when accounting for well-established predictors of lipid levels. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 424 industrial workers and 84 financial...... workers to obtain contrast in noise exposure levels. They provided a serum sample and wore portable dosimeters that every 5-s recorded ambient noise exposure levels during a 24-h period. We extracted measurements obtained during work and calculated the full-shift mean ambient noise level. For 331 workers...... who kept a diary on the use of a hearing protection device (HPD), we subtracted 10 dB from every noise recording obtained during HPD use and estimated the mean full-shift noise exposure level at the ear. RESULTS: Mean ambient noise level was 79.9 dB (A) [range 55.0-98.9] and the mean estimated level...

  11. Shear-wave velocity of marine sediments offshore Taiwan using ambient seismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Tse; Lin, Jing-Yi; Kuo-Chen, Hao; Yeh, Yi-Chin; Cheng, Win-Bin

    2017-04-01

    Seismic ambient noise technology has many advantages over the traditional two-station method. The most important one is that noise is happening all the time and it can be widely and evenly distributed. Thus, the Green's Function of any station pair can be obtained through the data cross-correlation process. Many related studies have been performed to estimate the velocity structures based on the inland area. Only a few studies were reported for the marine area due to the relatively shorter recording time of ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) deployment and the high cost of the marine experiment. However, the understanding about the shear-wave velocity (Vs) of the marine sediments is very crucial for the hazard assessment related to submarine landslides, particularly with the growing of submarine resources exploration. In this study, we applied the ambient noise technique to four OBS seismic networks located offshore Taiwan in the aim of getting more information about the noise sources and having the preliminary estimation for the Vs of the marine sediments. Two of the seismic networks were deployed in the NE part of Taiwan, near the Ryukyu subduction system, whereas the others were in the SW area, on the continental margin rich in gas hydrate. Generally, ambient seismic noise could be associated with wind, ocean waves, rock fracturing and anthropogenic activity. In the southwestern Taiwan, the cross-correlation function obtained from two seismic networks indicate similar direction, suggestion that the source from the south part of the network could be the origin of the noise. However, the two networks in the northeastern Taiwan show various source direction, which could be caused by the abrupt change of bathymetry or the volcanic degassing effect frequently observed by the marine geophysical method in the area. The Vs determined from the dispersion curve shows a relatively higher value for the networks in the Okinawa Trough (OT) off NE Taiwan than that in the

  12. Development of a low cost method to estimate the seismic signature of a geothermal field form ambient noise analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tibuleac, Ileana [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2016-06-30

    A new, cost effective and non-invasive exploration method using ambient seismic noise has been tested at Soda Lake, NV, with promising results. The material included in this report demonstrates that, with the advantage of initial S-velocity models estimated from ambient noise surface waves, the seismic reflection survey, although with lower resolution, reproduces the results of the active survey when the ambient seismic noise is not contaminated by strong cultural noise. Ambient noise resolution is less at depth (below 1000m) compared to the active survey. In general, the results are promising and useful information can be recovered from ambient seismic noise, including dipping features and fault locations.

  13. Circadian Rhythm of Ambient Noise Off the Southeast Coast of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, R.; Latha, G.; Prashanthi Devi, M.

    An ambient noise system consisting of a vertical linear hydrophone array was deployed in the shallow waters off Chennai, southeast coast of India from 1 August to 16 September 2013 to record ambient ocean noise of frequencies up to 10kHz. Biological sounds, which are broadband, short duration signals resulting from Terapon theraps, a native species, are a prominent feature of the ocean soundscape. Terapon activity peaks at 8pm and 11pm, and its presence is not observed after 12 midnight in both the months. In the other period, the ambient noise fluctuation is due to wind and vessel traffic. Hence, the present study focuses on the description of the ambient noise fluctuation over two 12h periods, i.e., 12 midnight-12 noon considered as period I, and 12 noon-12 midnight as period II in order to show the circadian rhythm of ambient noise. In this study area, Terapon vocalization reached 25dB above the ambient noise level and it dominates the short-term spectra records in the 0.4-4kHz range. All Terapon signals had daily patterns of sound production with highest levels of activity after dusk during the study period. The result shows that the circadian rhythm of ambient noise is mainly of biological sound generated by Terapon and it is reported first time in the shallow waters off the southeast coast of India.

  14. Highly noise resistant multiqubit quantum correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskowski, Wiesław; Vértesi, Tamás; Wieśniak, Marcin

    2015-11-01

    We analyze robustness of correlations of the N-qubit GHZ and Dicke states against white noise admixture. For sufficiently large N, the Dicke states (for any number of excitations) lead to more robust violation of local realism than the GHZ states (e.g. for N > 8 for the W state). We also identify states that are the most resistant to white noise. Surprisingly, it turns out that these states are the GHZ states augmented with fully product states. Based on our numerical analysis conducted up to N = 8, and an analytical formula derived for any N parties, we conjecture that the three-qubit GHZ state augmented with a product of (N - 3) pure qubits is the most robust against white noise admixture among any N-qubit state. As a by-product, we derive a single Bell inequality and show that it is violated by all pure entangled states of a given number of parties. This gives an alternative proof of Gisin’s theorem.

  15. Seismic tomography and ambient noise reflection interferometry on Reykjanes, SW Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jousset, Philippe; Verdel, Arie; Ágústsson, Kristján; Blanck, Hanna; Franke, Steven; Metz, Malte; Ryberg, Trond; Weemstra, Cornelius; Hersir, Gylfi; Bruhn, David

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in volcano-seismology and seismic noise interferometry have introduced new processing techniques for assessing subsurface structures and controls on fluid flow in geothermal systems. We present tomographic results obtained from seismic data recorded around geothermal reservoirs located both on-land Reykjanes, SW-Iceland and offshore along Reykjanes Ridge. We gathered records from a network of 234 seismic stations (including 24 Ocean Bottom Seismometers) deployed between April 2014 and August 2015. In order to determine the orientation of the OBS stations, we used Rayleigh waves planar particle motions from large magnitude earthquakes. This method proved suitable using the on-land stations: orientations determined using this method with the orientations measured using a giro-compass agreed. We obtain 3D velocity images from two fundamentally different tomography methods. First, we used local earthquakes to perform travel time tomography. The processing includes first arrival picking of P- and S- phases using an automatic detection and picking technique based on Akaike Information Criteria. We locate earthquakes by using a non-linear localization technique, as a priori information for deriving a 1D velocity model. We then computed 3D velocity models of velocities by joint inversion of each earthquake's location and lateral velocity anomalies with respect to the 1D model. Our models confirms previous models obtained in the area, with enhanced details. Second, we performed ambient noise cross-correlation techniques in order to derive an S velocity model, especially where earthquakes did not occur. Cross-correlation techniques involve the computation of cross- correlation between seismic records, from which Green's functions are estimated. Surface wave inversion of the Green's functions allows derivation of an S wave velocity model. Noise correlation theory furthermore shows that zero-offset P-wave reflectivity at selected station locations can be

  16. The Effects of Ambient Conditions on Helicopter Harmonic Noise Radiation: Theory and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Eric; Sim, Ben W.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of ambient atmospheric conditions, air temperature and density, on rotor harmonic noise radiation are characterized using theoretical models and experimental measurements of helicopter noise collected at three different test sites at elevations ranging from sea level to 7000 ft above sea level. Significant changes in the thickness, loading, and blade-vortex interaction noise levels and radiation directions are observed across the different test sites for an AS350 helicopter flying at the same indicated airspeed and gross weight. However, the radiated noise is shown to scale with ambient pressure when the flight condition of the helicopter is defined in nondimensional terms. Although the effective tip Mach number is identified as the primary governing parameter for thickness noise, the nondimensional weight coefficient also impacts lower harmonic loading noise levels, which contribute strongly to low frequency harmonic noise radiation both in and out of the plane of the horizon. Strategies for maintaining the same nondimensional rotor operating condition under different ambient conditions are developed using an analytical model of single main rotor helicopter trim and confirmed using a CAMRAD II model of the AS350 helicopter. The ability of the Fundamental Rotorcraft Acoustics Modeling from Experiments (FRAME) technique to generalize noise measurements made under one set of ambient conditions to make accurate noise predictions under other ambient conditions is also validated.

  17. Ambient Noise Levels in Acute Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of a Tertiary Referral Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia R. B D'Souza

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Advances in neonatal care have resulted in improved survival of neonates admitted to the intensive care of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU. However, the NCU may be an inappropriate milieu, with presence of overwhelming stimuli, most potent being the continuous presence of noise in the ambience of the NICU. Aim and Objectives: To determine and describe the ambient noise levels in the acute NICU of a tertiary referral hospital. Material and Methods: The ambient noise, in this study was the background sound existing in the environment of the acute NICU of a tertiary referral hospital in South India. The ambient noise levels were analyzed by an audiologist and acoustical engineer using a standardized and calibrated Sound Level Meter (SLM i.e., the Hand Held Analyzer type 2250, Brüel and Kjær, Denmark on a weighted frequency A and reported as dB (A. Results: The ambient noise levels were timed measurements yielded by the SLM in terms of L eq, L as well as L exceeded the standard A 10 Aeqmax levels (Leq< 45 dB, L ≤ 50 dB, and Lmax ≤ 65 10 dB.The L eq ranged from 59.4 to 62.12 dB A. A Ventilators with alarms caused the maximum amount of ambient noise yielding a L Sound Pressure Level AF (SPL of 82.14 dB A. Conclusion: The study has found high levels of ambient noise in the acute NICU. Though there are several measures to reduce the ambient noise levels in the NICU, it is essential to raise awareness among health care personnel regarding the observed ambient noise levels and its effects on neonates admitted to the NICU.

  18. Potential Impacts of Ambient Noise in the on Marine Mammals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frisk, George

    2003-01-01

    The Committee was charged with assessing our state of knowledge of underwater noise and recommending research areas to assist in determining whether noise in the ocean adversely affects marine mammals...

  19. Rayleigh wave group-velocity across the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico from ambient noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiros, D.; Pulliam, J.; Polanco Rivera, E.; Huerfano Moreno, V. A.

    2017-12-01

    The eastern North America-Caribbean (NA-CAR) plate boundary near the islands of Hispaniola (which is comprised of the Dominican Republic and Haiti) and Puerto Rico is a complex transition zone in which strain is accommodated by two transform fault systems and oblique subduction. In 2013, scientists from Baylor University, the Autonomous University of Santo Domingo, and the Puerto Rico Seismic Network deployed 16 broadband stations on the Dominican Republic to expand the local permanent network. The goal of the Greater Antilles Seismic Program (GrASP) is to combine its data with that from permanent networks in Puerto Rico, Haiti, Cuba, the Cayman Islands, and Jamaica to develop a better understanding of the crust and upper mantle structure in the Northeastern Caribbean (Greater Antilles). One important goal of GrASP is to develop robust velocity models that can be used to improve earthquake location and seismic hazard efforts. In this study, we focus on obtaining Rayleigh wave group velocity maps from ambient noise tomography. By cross-correlating ambient seismic noise recorded at 53 stations between 2010 to present, we obtain Green's functions between 1165 pairs of stations. From these, we obtain dispersion curves by the application of FTAN methods with phase-matched filtering. Selection criteria depend on the signal-to-noise ratio and seasonal variability, with further filtering done by rejecting velocities incompatible with maps produced from overdamped tomographic inversions. Preliminary dispersion maps show strong correlations with large-scale geological and tectonic features for periods between 5 - 20 s, such as the Cordillera Central in both the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico, the Mona Passage, and the NA-CAR subduction zone. Ongoing efforts focus on including shorter periods in Puerto Rico as its denser station distribution could allow us to retrieve higher resolution group velocity maps.

  20. Potential of ambient seismic noise techniques to monitor the St. Gallen geothermal site (Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermann, A.; Kraft, T.; Larose, E.; Wiemer, S.

    2015-06-01

    The failures of two recent deep geothermal energy projects in Switzerland (Basel, 2006; St. Gallen, 2013) have again highlighted that one of the key challenges for the successful development and operation of deep underground heat exchangers is to control the risk of inducing potentially hazardous seismic events. In St. Gallen, after an injection test and two acid injections that were accompanied by a small number of micro-earthquakes (MLkick). The "killing" procedures that had to be initiated following standard drilling procedures led to a ML3.5 earthquake. With ambient seismic noise cross correlations from nine stations, we observe a significant loss of waveform coherence that we can horizontally and vertically constrain to the injection location of the fluid. The loss of waveform coherence starts with the onset of the fluid injections 4 days prior to the gas kick. We interpret the loss of coherence as a local perturbation of the medium. We show how ambient seismic noise analysis can be used to assess the aseismic response of the subsurface to geomechanical well operations and how this method could have helped to recognize the unexpected reservoir dynamics at an earlier stage than the microseismic response alone, allowed.

  1. Potential of ambient seismic noise techniques to monitor injection induced subsurface changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermann, A.; Kraft, T.; Wiemer, S.

    2015-12-01

    The failures of two recent deep geothermal energy projects in Switzerland (Basel, 2006; St. Gallen, 2013) have again highlighted that one of the key challenges for the successful development and operation of deep underground heat exchangers is to control the risk of inducing potentially hazardous seismic events. In St. Gallen, after an injection test and two acid injections that were accompanied by a small number of micro-earthquakes (ML kick). The "killing" procedures that had to be initiated following standard drilling procedures led to a ML3.5 earthquake. With ambient seismic noise cross correlations from nine stations, we observe a significant loss of waveform coherence that we can horizontally and vertically constrain to the injection location of the fluid. The loss of waveform coherence starts with the onset of the fluid injections 4 days prior to the gas kick. We interpret the loss of coherence as a local perturbation of the medium. We show how ambient seismic noise analysis can be used to assess the aseismic response of the subsurface to geomechanical well operations and how this method could have helped to recognize the unexpected reservoir dynamics at an earlier stage than the microseismic response alone, allowed.

  2. Ambient air pollution, traffic noise and adult asthma prevalence : A BioSHaRE approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cai, Yutong; Zijlema, Wilma L.; Doiron, Dany; Blangiardo, Marta; Burton, Paul R.; Fortier, Isabel; Gaye, Amadou; Gulliver, John; de Hoogh, Kees; Hveem, Kristian; Mbatchou, Stephane; Morley, David W; Stolk, Ronald P.; Elliott, Paul; Hansell, Anna L.; Hodgson, Susan

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the effects of both ambient air pollution and traffic noise on adult asthma prevalence, using harmonised data from three European cohort studies established in 2006-2013 (HUNT3, Lifelines and UK Biobank). Residential exposures to ambient air pollution (particulate matter with

  3. Subsurface Characterization Beneath the Coso Geothermal Field by Ambient Noise Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzwoller, M. H.; Yang, Y.; Levshin, A. L.; Barmin, M. P.; Jones, C. H.

    2009-12-01

    The Coso Geothermal Area has been the subject of numerous geophysical studies over the past 30 years. Various seismological techniques have been applied to evaluate the regional stress distribution, velocity and attenuation structure of the subsurface. None of these studies has imaged subsurface shear velocity using surface waves generated either by local micro-earthquakes or by regional or teleseismic earthquakes, nor have any used interferometric methods based on ambient noise. In this study, we apply an interferometic method based on ambient seismic noise aimed at imaging the shallow shear velocity structure beneath the Coso Geothermal Area. Data are from a PASSCAL experiment deployed between 1998 and 2000 and regional broad-band seismometers operated by CalTech. Cross-correlations are performed between each pair of the COSO PASSCAL and CalTech stations for 15 months from March 1999 to May 2000. After compensating for or correcting instrumental irregularities and selecting reliable Rayleigh wave dispersion measurements from the inter-station cross-correlations, we obtain about 300 measurement paths as the basis for surface wave tomography at periods from 3 to 10 sec. Uncertainties of both group and phase velocity measurements are estimated using the variations among the dispersion curves from one-month cross-correlations in different months. The resulting dispersion maps reveal low group and phase velocities in the COSO volcanic field, especially at 3 sec period for group velocities, and high velocities to the east of the COSO volcanic field. The velocity variations are consistent with surface geological features, which encourages future inversion for 3-D shear velocity structure in the top 15 km of the crust.

  4. Maximal Ambient Noise Levels and Type of Voice Material Required for Valid Use of Smartphones in Clinical Voice Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebacq, Jean; Schoentgen, Jean; Cantarella, Giovanna; Bruss, Franz Thomas; Manfredi, Claudia; DeJonckere, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    Smartphone technology provides new opportunities for recording standardized voice samples of patients and transmitting the audio files to the voice laboratory. This drastically improves the achievement of baseline designs, used in research on efficiency of voice treatments. However, the basic requirement is the suitability of smartphones for recording and digitizing pathologic voices (mainly characterized by period perturbations and noise) without significant distortion. In a previous article, this was tested using realistic synthesized deviant voice samples (/a:/) with three precisely known levels of jitter and of noise in all combinations. High correlations were found between jitter and noise to harmonics ratio measured in (1) recordings via smartphones, (2) direct microphone recordings, and (3) sound files generated by the synthesizer. In the present work, similar experiments were performed (1) in the presence of increasing levels of ambient noise and (2) using synthetic deviant voice samples (/a:/) as well as synthetic voice material simulating a deviant short voiced utterance (/aiuaiuaiu/). Ambient noise levels up to 50 dB A are acceptable. However, signal processing occurs in some smartphones, and this significantly affects estimates of jitter and noise to harmonics ratio when formant changes are introduced in analogy with running speech. The conclusion is that voice material must provisionally be limited to a sustained /a/. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Trajectories of Brownian particles with space-correlated noise

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Spatial correlations of the noise are usually ruled out, and the paths traced by the random walkers are statistically independent. In this study, I consider instead noise which is white in time and has a Gaussian correlation in space, and by means of numerical simulation, I show how the spatial correlation determines the time ...

  6. Stochastic systems with cross-correlated Gaussian white noises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cheng-Yu; Song Yu-Min; Zhou Peng; Yang Hai; Gao Yun

    2010-01-01

    This paper theoretically investigates three stochastic systems with cross-correlation Gaussian white noises. Both steady state properties of the stochastic nonlinear systems and the nonequilibrium transitions induced by the cross-correlated noises are studied. The stationary solutions of the Fokker—Planck equation for three specific examples are analysed. It is shown explicitly that the cross-correlation of white noises can induce nonequilibrium transitions

  7. Effect of Correlated Noises in a Genetic Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhang; Li, Cao

    2010-01-01

    The Stratonovich stochastic differential equation is used to analyze genotype selection in the presence of correlated Gaussian white noises. We study the steady state properties of the genotype selection and discuss the effects of the correlated noises. It is found that the degree of correlation of the noises can be used to select one type of genes from another type of mixing genes. The strong selection of genes caused by a large value of multiplicative noise intensity can be weakened by the intensive negative correlation. (general)

  8. Trajectories of Brownian particles with space-correlated noise

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Langevin equation used to model Brownian motion includes a stochastic process that is routinely assumed to be a Gaussian white noise. Spatial correlations of the noise are usually ruled out, and the paths traced by the random walkers are statistically independent. In this study, I consider instead noise which is white in ...

  9. Investigating Near Surface S-Wave Velocity Properties Using Ambient Noise in Southwestern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hsiang Kuo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ambient noise is typically used to estimate seismic site effects and velocity profiles instead of earthquake recordings, especially in areas with limited seismic data. The dominant Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR frequency of ambient noise is correlated to Vs30, which is the average S-wave velocity in the top 30 m. Vs30 is a widely used parameter for defining seismic amplification in earthquake engineering. HVSR can detect the vertical discontinuity of velocities, that is, the interfaces between hard bedrock and soft sediments. In southwestern Taiwan most strong motion stations are located in the plains and show a dominant frequency lower than 3 Hz. Several stations near the coast have low dominant frequencies of less than 1 Hz. The dominant frequencies are higher than 4 Hz at piedmont stations. The stations in the mountains with dominant frequencies over 8 Hz are typically located on very hard sites. This study analyzed the HVSR characteristics under different seismic site conditions considering the Vs30 from previous study (Kuo et al. 2012. The result implies that HVSRs are a better tool than Vs30 to classify the sites where bedrock is deeper than 30 m. Furthermore, we found a linear correlation between Vs30 and dominant HVSR frequency which could be used as a proxy of Vs30. The Vs30 map in this area was derived using the Engineering Geological Database for Taiwan Strong Motion Instrumentation Program (EGDT. The comparable distribution pattern between the dominant frequency and Vs30 demonstrate that HVSR can recognize S-wave velocity properties at the shallow subsurface.

  10. 3D shear wave velocity structure revealed with ambient noise tomography on a DAS array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, X.; Thurber, C. H.; Wang, H. F.; Fratta, D.

    2017-12-01

    An 8700-m Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) cable was deployed at Brady's Hot Springs, Nevada in March 2016 in a 1.5 by 0.5 km study area. The layout of the DAS array was designed with a zig-zag geometry to obtain relatively uniform areal and varied angular coverage, providing very dense coverage with a one-meter channel spacing. This array continuously recorded signals of a vibroseis truck, earthquakes, and traffic noise during the 15-day deployment. As shown in a previous study (Zeng et al., 2017), ambient noise tomography can be applied to DAS continuous records to image shear wave velocity structure in the near surface. To avoid effects of the vibroseis truck operation, only continuous data recorded during the nighttime was used to compute noise cross-correlation functions for channel pairs within a given linear segment. The frequency band of whitening was set at 5 to 15 Hz and the length of the cross-correlation time window was set to 60 second. The phase velocities were determined using the multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) methodology. The phase velocity dispersion curve was then used to invert for shear wave velocity profiles. A preliminarily velocity model at Brady's Hot Springs (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 2015) was used as the starting model and the sensitivity kernels of Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities were computed with this model. As the sensitivity kernel shows, shear wave velocity in the top 200 m can be constrained with Rayleigh wave group and phase velocities in our frequency band. With the picked phase velocity data, the shear wave velocity structure can be obtained via Occam's inversion (Constable et al., 1987; Lai 1998). Shear wave velocity gradually increases with depth and it is generally faster than the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (2015) model. Furthermore, that model has limiting constraints at shallow depth. The strong spatial variation is interpreted to reflect the different sediments and

  11. Directionality analysis and Rayleigh wave tomography of ambient seismic noise in southern Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Andreas; Weidle, Christian; Maupin, Valérie

    2011-01-01

    We process seismic broad-band data from southern Norway by cross correlation of ambient seismic noise in view of getting a better image of the crustal structure in the area. The main data set sterns from the temporary MAGNUS network which operated continuously from 2006 September to 2008 June. Additionally, data from permanent stations of the National Norwegian Seismic Network, the NORSAR array and GSN stations in the region are used. We compute vertical component cross-correlation functions using 41 receivers for 3-month time windows. Evaluation of the azimuthal and temporal variation of signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and f-k analysis of data from NORSAR array between 3 and 25 s period shows that the dominant source areas of seismic noise are located to the west and north of the network during most of the measurement time, which corresponds well to the Norwegian coast line. During summer months, the SNRs decrease but the azimuthal distribution becomes more uniform between 7 and 12 s period, suggesting a more diffuse character of the wavefield. Primary ocean microseisms above 12 s show different dominant source azimuths during this time period compared to the winter months. Time-frequency analysis is applied to measure Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion curves between each station pair for each 3-month correlation stack and the mean and variance of all dispersion curves is computed for each path. After rejection of low-quality data, a careful analysis shows that the group velocities are not biased by noise directionality. We invert the data for group velocity maps at period bands between 3 and 25 s. At short periods, we find an average Rayleigh wave group speed of about 3 km s-1 and velocity anomalies that correlate very well with local surface geology. While higher velocities (+5 per cent) can be associated with the Caledonian nappes in the central part of southern Norway, the Oslo Graben is reflected by negative velocity anomalies (-3 to -5 per cent). At

  12. Trajectories of Brownian particles with space-correlated noise

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    EDOARDO MILOTTI

    walks with spatially correlated white noise: the time- dependence of the distance of ... Dedicated to the memory of the late Professor Charusita Chakravarty. also quite well-known that the ..... Paths of two 2D random walkers (marked in red and blue) in a background of space-correlated noise. The simu- lated random fields ...

  13. Electrical and noise characteristics of graphene field-effect transistors: ambient effects, noise sources and physical mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumyantsev, S; Liu, G; Stillman, W; Shur, M; Balandin, A A

    2010-10-06

    We fabricated a large number of single and bilayer graphene transistors and carried out a systematic experimental study of their low-frequency noise characteristics. Special attention was given to determining the dominant noise sources in these devices and the effect of aging on the current-voltage and noise characteristics. The analysis of the noise spectral density dependence on the area of graphene channel showed that the dominant contributions to the low-frequency electronic noise come from the graphene layer itself rather than from the contacts. Aging of graphene transistors due to exposure to ambient conditions for over a month resulted in substantially increased noise, attributed to the decreasing mobility of graphene and increasing contact resistance. The noise spectral density in both single and bilayer graphene transistors either increased with deviation from the charge neutrality point or depended weakly on the gate bias. This observation confirms that the low-frequency noise characteristics of graphene transistors are qualitatively different from those of conventional silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors.

  14. Rayleigh wave tomography of the British Isles from ambient seismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolson, Heather; Curtis, Andrew; Baptie, Brian

    2014-08-01

    We present the first Rayleigh wave group speed maps of the British Isles constructed from ambient seismic noise. The maps also constitute the first surface wave tomography study of the crust under the British Isles at a relatively high resolution. We computed interferometric, interstation Rayleigh waves from vertical component records of ambient seismic noise recorded on 63 broad-band and short-period stations across the UK and Ireland. Group velocity measurements were made from the resulting surface wave dispersion curves between 5 and 25 s using a multiple phase-matched filter method. Uncertainties in the group velocities were computed by calculating the standard deviation of four dispersion curves constructed by stacking a random selection of daily cross-correlations. Where an uncertainty could not be obtained for a ray path using this method, we estimated it as a function of the interreceiver distance. Group velocity maps were computed for 5-25-s period using the Fast Marching forward solution of the eikonal equation and iterative, linearized inversion. At short and intermediate periods, the maps show remarkable agreement with the major geological features of the British Isles including: terrane boundaries in Scotland; regions of late Palaeozoic basement uplift; areas of exposed late Proterozoic/early Palaeozoic rocks in southwest Scotland, northern England and northwest Wales and, sedimentary basins formed during the Mesozoic such as the Irish Sea Basin, the Chester Basin, the Worcester Graben and the Wessex Basin. The maps also show a consistent low-velocity anomaly in the region of the Midlands Platform, a Proterozoic crustal block in the English Midlands. At longer periods, which are sensitive velocities in the lower crustal/upper mantle, the maps suggest that the depth of Moho beneath the British Isles decreases towards the north and west. Areas of fast velocity in the lower crust also coincide with areas thought to be associated with underplating of the

  15. 3D basin structure of the Santa Clara Valley constrained by ambient noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, H.; Lee, S. J.; Rhie, J.; Kim, S.

    2017-12-01

    The basin structure is an important factor controls the intensity and duration of ground shaking due to earthquake. Thus it is important to study the basin structure for better understanding seismic hazard and also improving the earthquake preparedness. An active source seismic survey is the most appropriate method to determine the basin structure in detail but its applicability, especially in urban areas, is limited. In this study, we tested the potential of an ambient noise tomography, which can be a cheaper and more easily applicable method compared to a traditional active source survey, to construct the velocity model of the basin. Our testing region is the Santa Clara Valley, which is one of the major urban sedimentary basins in the States. We selected this region because continuous seismic recordings and well defined velocity models are available. Continuous seismic recordings of 6 months from short-period array of Santa Clara Valley Seismic Experiment are cross-correlated with 1 hour time window. And the fast marching method and the subspace method are jointly applied to construct 2-D group velocity maps between 0.2 - 4.0 Hz. Then, shear wave velocity model of the Santa Clara Valley is calculated up to 5 km depth using bayesian inversion technique. Although our model cannot depict the detailed structures, it is roughly comparable with the velocity model of the US Geological Survey, which is constrained by active seismic surveys and field researches. This result indicate that an ambient noise tomography can be a replacement, at least in part, of an active seismic survey to construct the velocity model of the basin.

  16. Direct ambient noise tomography for 3-D near surface shear velocity structure: methodology and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, H.; Fang, H.; Li, C.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, H.; van der Hilst, R. D.; Huang, Y. C.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise tomography has provided essential constraints on crustal and uppermost mantle shear velocity structure in global seismology. Recent studies demonstrate that high frequency (e.g., ~ 1 Hz) surface waves between receivers at short distances can be successfully retrieved from ambient noise cross-correlation and then be used for imaging near surface or shallow crustal shear velocity structures. This approach provides important information for strong ground motion prediction in seismically active area and overburden structure characterization in oil and gas fields. Here we propose a new tomographic method to invert all surface wave dispersion data for 3-D variations of shear wavespeed without the intermediate step of phase or group velocity maps.The method uses frequency-dependent propagation paths and a wavelet-based sparsity-constrained tomographic inversion. A fast marching method is used to compute, at each period, surface wave traveltimes and ray paths between sources and receivers. This avoids the assumption of great-circle propagation that is used in most surface wave tomographic studies, but which is not appropriate in complex media. The wavelet coefficients of the velocity model are estimated with an iteratively reweighted least squares (IRLS) algorithm, and upon iterations the surface wave ray paths and the data sensitivity matrix are updated from the newly obtained velocity model. We apply this new method to determine the 3-D near surface wavespeed variations in the Taipei basin of Taiwan, Hefei urban area and a shale and gas production field in China using the high-frequency interstation Rayleigh wave dispersion data extracted from ambient noisecross-correlation. The results reveal strong effects of off-great-circle propagation of high-frequency surface waves in these regions with above 30% shear wavespeed variations. The proposed approach is more efficient and robust than the traditional two-step surface wave tomography for imaging complex

  17. Imaging of upper crustal structure beneath East Java-Bali, Indonesia with ambient noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martha, Agustya Adi; Cummins, Phil; Saygin, Erdinc; Sri Widiyantoro; Masturyono

    2017-12-01

    The complex geological structures in East Java and Bali provide important opportunities for natural resource exploitation, but also harbor perils associated with natural disasters. Such a condition makes the East Java region an important area for exploration of the subsurface seismic wave velocity structure, especially in its upper crust. We employed the ambient noise tomography method to image the upper crustal structure under this study area. We used seismic data recorded at 24 seismographs of BMKG spread over East Java and Bali. In addition, we installed 28 portable seismographs in East Java from April 2013 to January 2014 for 2-8 weeks, and we installed an additional 28 seismographs simultaneously throughout East Java from August 2015 to April 2016. We constructed inter-station Rayleigh wave Green's functions through cross-correlations of the vertical component of seismic noise recordings at 1500 pairs of stations. We used the Neighborhood Algorithm to construct depth profiles of shear wave velocity (Vs). The main result obtained from this study is the thickness of sediment cover. East Java's southern mountain zone is dominated by higher Vs, the Kendeng basin in the center is dominated by very low Vs, and the Rembang zone (to the North of Kendeng zone) is associated with medium Vs. The existence of structures with oil and gas potential in the Kendeng and Rembang zones can be identified by low Vs.

  18. Monitoring transient changes within overpressured regions of subduction zones using ambient seismic noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Esteban J; Schwartz, Susan Y

    2016-01-01

    In subduction zones, elevated pore fluid pressure, generally linked to metamorphic dehydration reactions, has a profound influence on the mechanical behavior of the plate interface and forearc crust through its control on effective stress. We use seismic noise-based monitoring to characterize seismic velocity variations following the 2012 Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica earthquake [M w (moment magnitude) 7.6] that we attribute to the presence of pressurized pore fluids. Our study reveals a strong velocity reduction (~0.6%) in a region where previous work identified high forearc pore fluid pressure. The depth of this velocity reduction is constrained to be below 5 km and therefore not the result of near-surface damage due to strong ground motions; rather, we posit that it is caused by fracturing of the fluid-pressurized weakened crust due to dynamic stresses. Although pressurized fluids have been implicated in causing coseismic velocity reductions beneath the Japanese volcanic arc, this is the first report of a similar phenomenon in a subduction zone setting. It demonstrates the potential to identify pressurized fluids in subduction zones using temporal variations of seismic velocity inferred from ambient seismic noise correlations.

  19. Ambient noise tomography across Mount St. Helens using a dense seismic array

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yadong

    2017-05-08

    We investigated upper crustal structure with data from a dense seismic array deployed around Mount St. Helens for 2 weeks in the summer of 2014. Interstation cross correlations of ambient seismic noise data from the array were obtained, and clear fundamental mode Rayleigh waves were observed between 2.5 and 5 s periods. In addition, higher-mode signals were observed around 2 s period. Frequency-time analysis was applied to measure fundamental mode Rayleigh wave phase velocities, which were used to invert for 2-D phase velocity maps. An azimuth-dependent traveltime correction was implemented to mitigate potential biases introduced due to an inhomogeneous noise source distribution. Reliable phase velocity maps were only obtained between 3 and 4 s periods due to limitations imposed by the array aperture and higher-mode contamination. The phase velocity tomography results, which are sensitive to structure shallower than 6 km depth, reveal an ~10–15% low-velocity anomaly centered beneath the volcanic edifice and peripheral high-velocity anomalies that likely correspond to cooled igneous intrusions. We suggest that the low-velocity anomaly reflects the high-porosity mixture of lava and ash deposits near the surface of the edifice, a highly fractured magmatic conduit and hydrothermal system beneath the volcano, and possibly a small contribution from silicate melt.

  20. Improving Seismic Velocity Models with Constraints from Autocorrelation of Ambient Seismic Noise and Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-24

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2016-0098 TR-2016-0098 IMPROVING SEISMIC VELOCITY MODELS WITH CONSTRAINTS FROM AUTOCORRELATION OF AMBIENT SEISMIC ...TYPE Final Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 24 Apr 2014 – 24 Mar 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Improving Seismic Velocity Models with Constraints from...Autocorrelation of Ambient Seismic Noise and Signal 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9453-14-C-0214 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62601F 6

  1. Noise robustness of interferometric surface topography evaluation methods. Correlogram correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, Ilia; Kiselev, Egor I.; Drexel, Michael; Hauptmannl, Michael

    2017-12-01

    Different surface height estimation methods are differently affected by interferometric noise. From a theoretical analysis we obtain height variance estimators for the methods. The estimations allow us to rigorously compare the noise robustness of popular evaluation algorithms. The envelope methods have the highest variances and hence the lowest noise resistances. The noise robustness improves from the envelope to the phase methods, but a technique involving the correlation of correlograms is superior even to the latter. We dwell on some details of this correlogram correlation method and the range of its application.

  2. Noiseonomics: the relationship between ambient noise levels in the sea and global economic trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisk, George V

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the topic of noise in the sea and its effects on marine mammals has attracted considerable attention from both the scientific community and the general public. Since marine mammals rely heavily on acoustics as a primary means of communicating, navigating, and foraging in the ocean, any change in their acoustic environment may have an impact on their behavior. Specifically, a growing body of literature suggests that low-frequency, ambient noise levels in the open ocean increased approximately 3.3 dB per decade during the period 1950-2007. Here we show that this increase can be attributed primarily to commercial shipping activity, which in turn, can be linked to global economic growth. As a corollary, we conclude that ambient noise levels can be directly related to global economic conditions. We provide experimental evidence supporting this theory and discuss its implications for predicting future noise levels based on global economic trends.

  3. Self-organizing map and its application in the analysis of ambient noise characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Chunxia; Li, Guijuan; Che, Shuwei; Bai, Jin

    2017-01-01

    The Self-organizing map (SOM) is an unsupervised neural network based on competitive learning, and can solve the problem that the center of clustering is unknown. SOM's theory and the implementation of algorithm are studied in this paper. Simulating example is given to approve the feasibility of SOM in characteristic assessment for multivariate sample. The Ambient sea noise measurement is made in August 2014 on some sea of China. The total source level was forecasted using "ROSS formula" and the sailing information. The statistical variability of broadband ambient noise at frequencies between 20Hz and 31.5 kHz is obtained using SOM. The comparison between measured sound pressure and forecasting pressure is given, and the preliminary analysis of the relationship between ambient noise level and vessels is carried out. The results provide the technical reference to understand the temporal and spatial statistical variability of ambient noise, and are an efficient tool in assessing the potential effect of shipping noise on marine mammals in the special sea area.

  4. Regime shifts driven by dynamic correlations in gene expression noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Yogita; Dutta, Partha Sharathi

    2017-08-01

    Gene expression is a noisy process that leads to regime shifts between alternative steady states among individual living cells, inducing phenotypic variability. The effects of white noise on the regime shift in bistable systems have been well characterized, however little is known about such effects of colored noise (noise with nonzero correlation time). Here, we show that noise correlation time, by considering a genetic circuit of autoactivation, can have a significant effect on the regime shift between distinct phenotypic states in gene expression. We demonstrate this theoretically, using stochastic potential, stationary probability density function, and first-passage time based on the Fokker-Planck description, where the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is used to model colored noise. We find that an increase in noise correlation time in the degradation rate can induce a regime shift from a low to a high protein concentration state and enhance the bistable regime, while an increase in noise correlation time in the basal rate retains the bimodal distribution. We then show how cross-correlated colored noises in basal and degradation rates can induce regime shifts from a low to a high protein concentration state, but reduce the bistable regime. We also validate these results through direct numerical simulations of the stochastic differential equation. In gene expression understanding the causes of regime shift to a harmful phenotype could improve early therapeutic intervention in complex human diseases.

  5. Compressed Sensing with Linear Correlation Between Signal and Measurement Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arildsen, Thomas; Larsen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    Existing convex relaxation-based approaches to reconstruction in compressed sensing assume that noise in the measurements is independent of the signal of interest. We consider the case of noise being linearly correlated with the signal and introduce a simple technique for improving compressed...... sensing reconstruction from such measurements. The technique is based on a linear model of the correlation of additive noise with the signal. The modification of the reconstruction algorithm based on this model is very simple and has negligible additional computational cost compared to standard......-rate quantization of compressed measurements, which is known to introduce correlated noise, and improvements in reconstruction error compared to ordinary Basis Pursuit De-Noising of up to approximately 7 dB are observed for 1 bit/sample quantization. Furthermore, the proposed method is compared to Binary Iterative...

  6. Crustal thickness across the Trans-European Suture Zone from ambient noise autocorrelations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, G.; Knapmeyer-Endrun, B.

    2018-02-01

    We derive autocorrelations from ambient seismic noise to image the reflectivity of the subsurface and to extract the Moho depth beneath the stations for two different data sets in Central Europe. The autocorrelations are calculated by smoothing the spectrum of the data in order to suppress high amplitude, narrow-band signals of industrial origin, applying a phase autocorrelation algorithm and time-frequency domain phase-weighted stacking. The stacked autocorrelation results are filtered and analysed predominantly in the frequency range of 1-2 Hz. Moho depth is automatically picked inside uncertainty windows obtained from prior information. The processing scheme we developed is applied to data from permanent seismic stations located in different geological provinces across Europe, with varying Moho depths between 25 and 50 km, and to the mainly short period temporary PASSEQ stations along seismic profile POLONAISE P4. The autocorrelation results are spatially and temporarily stable, but show a clear correlation with the existence of cultural noise. On average, a minimum of six months of data is needed to obtain stable results. The obtained Moho depth results are in good agreement with the subsurface model provided by seismic profiling, receiver function estimates and the European Moho depth map. In addition to extracting the Moho depth, it is possible to identify an intracrustal layer along the profile, again closely matching the seismic model. For more than half of the broad-band stations, another change in reflectivity within the mantle is observed and can be correlated with the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary to the west and a mid-lithospheric discontinuity beneath the East European Craton. With the application of the developed autocorrelation processing scheme to different stations with varying crustal thicknesses, it is shown that Moho depth can be extracted independent of subsurface structure, when station coverage is low, when no strong seismic sources are

  7. Effects of bladdered fish on ambient noise measurements close to the port of Rotterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ainslie, M.A.; Jong C.A.F. de; Dreschler, J.

    2011-01-01

    Ambient noise in the frequency range 25 Hz to 80 kHz was measured at a site close to the Port of Rotterdam in September 2008, before construction began of a port extension known as ‘Maasvlakte 2’ [http://www.maasvlakte2.com/en/index/], and in September-October 2009 (during construction). Day-night

  8. Horizontal Directionality of Ambient Sea Noise in the North Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-05-01

    interpreting the horizontal directionalit- of the ambient noise shown in figures 11, 12" and 13. This location was in the transpacific shipping lanes...types of errors encountered when determining horizontal arrival angles for the beam response data. The first is due to the angular nature of both the

  9. Ambient Seismic Noise Tomography of a Loess High Bank at Dunaszekcső (Hungary)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Szanyi, G.; Gráczer, Z.; Györi, E.; Kaláb, Zdeněk; Lednická, Markéta

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 173, č. 8 (2016), s. 2913-2928 ISSN 0033-4553 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : seismic interferometry * ambient noise * group velocity * tomography * landslide * high bank Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.591, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00024-016-1304-1

  10. Significance of geological units of the Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic, as seen by ambient noise interferometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžek, Bohuslav; Valentová, L.; Gallovič, F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 173, č. 5 (2016), s. 1663-1682 ISSN 0033-4553 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP210/12/2336; GA MŠk LM2010008 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : ambient noise * geological units * Bohemian Massif * velocity model Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.591, year: 2016

  11. Sub-bottom profiling with ambient noise measured on a drifting vertical array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrison, C.H.; Schippers, P.; Snellen, M.; Weterings, A.

    2005-01-01

    The angle and frequency dependent reflective properties of the seabed can be determined from beam-steered ambient noise measurements on a vertical array of hydrophones. From the up-to-down ratio the beam-smeared modulus square of the plane wave reflection coefficient is obtained. Geo-acoustic

  12. The crustal structure beneath The Netherlands derived from ambient seismic noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yudistira, Tedi; Paulssen, Hanneke; Trampert, Jeannot

    2017-01-01

    This work presents the first comprehensive 3-D model of the crust beneath The Netherlands. To obtain this model, we designed the NARS-Netherlands project, a dense deployment of broadband stations in the area. Rayleigh and Love wave group velocity dispersion was measured from ambient noise

  13. The crustal structure beneath the Netherlands inferred from ambient seismic noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yudistira, T.

    2015-01-01

    A 3-D shear velocity model of the crust beneath the Netherlands is determined from fundamental mode Rayleigh and Love wave group measurements derived from ambient seismic noise recordings. The data are obtained from a temporary array of broad-band seismometers in and around the Netherlands (the

  14. The effects of music, white noise, and ambient noise on sedation and anxiety in patients under spinal anesthesia during surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilkkaya, Nazan Koylu; Ustun, Faik Emre; Sener, Elif Bengi; Kaya, Cengiz; Ustun, Yasemin Burcu; Koksal, Ersin; Kocamanoglu, Ismail Serhat; Ozkan, Fatih

    2014-10-01

    To compare effects of music, white noise, and ambient (background) noise on patient anxiety and sedation. Open, parallel, and randomized controlled trial. Seventy-five patients aged 18 to 60 years who were scheduled for surgical procedures under spinal anesthesia were randomly assigned to ambient noise (Group O), white noise (Group B), or music groups (Group M). We evaluated patients' anxiety and sedation levels via the Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation (OAA/S) scale and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) questionnaire. At 5 minutes before surgery, the STAI-State Anxiety Inventory (SA) value was significantly lower in Group M than the other groups. At 30-minute recovery, Group M showed significantly lower STAI-SA values than the other groups. Patient satisfaction was highest in Group M. OAA/S values were not significantly different between groups during any period (P > .05). We suggest that patient-selected music reduces perioperative anxiety and contributes to patient satisfaction during the perioperative period. Copyright © 2014 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Calibration of Correlation Radiometers Using Pseudo-Random Noise Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Pantoja

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The calibration of correlation radiometers, and particularly aperture synthesis interferometric radiometers, is a critical issue to ensure their performance. Current calibration techniques are based on the measurement of the cross-correlation of receivers’ outputs when injecting noise from a common noise source requiring a very stable distribution network. For large interferometric radiometers this centralized noise injection approach is very complex from the point of view of mass, volume and phase/amplitude equalization. Distributed noise injection techniques have been proposed as a feasible alternative, but are unable to correct for the so-called “baseline errors” associated with the particular pair of receivers forming the baseline. In this work it is proposed the use of centralized Pseudo-Random Noise (PRN signals to calibrate correlation radiometers. PRNs are sequences of symbols with a long repetition period that have a flat spectrum over a bandwidth which is determined by the symbol rate. Since their spectrum resembles that of thermal noise, they can be used to calibrate correlation radiometers. At the same time, since these sequences are deterministic, new calibration schemes can be envisaged, such as the correlation of each receiver’s output with a baseband local replica of the PRN sequence, as well as new distribution schemes of calibration signals. This work analyzes the general requirements and performance of using PRN sequences for the calibration of microwave correlation radiometers, and particularizes the study to a potential implementation in a large aperture synthesis radiometer using an optical distribution network.

  16. Signal and noise in financial correlation matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burda, Zdzisław; Jurkiewicz, Jerzy

    2004-12-01

    Using Random Matrix Theory one can derive exact relations between the eigenvalue spectrum of the covariance matrix and the eigenvalue spectrum of its estimator (experimentally measured correlation matrix). These relations will be used to analyze a particular case of the correlations in financial series and to show that contrary to earlier claims, correlations can be measured also in the “random” part of the spectrum. Implications for the portfolio optimization are briefly discussed.

  17. High ambient noise levels in Vadodara City, India, affected by urbanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neha; Dhiman, Hitesh; Shaikh, Sadaf; Shah, Purvish; Sarkar, Roma; Patel, Shashin

    2016-12-01

    The present research was conducted to study the urbanization of Vadodara city and to monitor the ambient noise level in the industrial, commercial, residential and silence zones of the city. A settlement map created by unsupervised classification for the land use and land cover study of Vadodara city clearly shows the increasing pattern of urbanization in its central part, which may be the result of urban sprawl due to migration of people from the rural to the urban areas. The fluctuation in ambient noise level was recorded using an A-weighted sound level meter in all the four zones of Vadodara city for 3 h at regular intervals of 15 min on 3 consecutive days at the same time. The results showed the highest equivalent noise level of 93.7 dBA in the commercial zone followed by 85.5 dBA in the industrial zone, 73.2 dBA in silence zone, and 70.2 dBA in the residential zone. The values of noise level were high in all the zones of the city increasing remarkably over the prescribed limit given in the Noise Pollution (Control and Regulation) Rules, 2000. Continuous exposure to such high level of noise may lead to detrimental effect on people.

  18. Monitoring Instrument Performance in Regional Broadband Seismic Network Using Ambient Seismic Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, F.; Lyu, S.; Lin, J.

    2017-12-01

    In the past ten years, the number of seismic stations has increased significantly, and regional seismic networks with advanced technology have been gradually developed all over the world. The resulting broadband data help to improve the seismological research. It is important to monitor the performance of broadband instruments in a new network in a long period of time to ensure the accuracy of seismic records. Here, we propose a method that uses ambient noise data in the period range 5-25 s to monitor instrument performance and check data quality in situ. The method is based on an analysis of amplitude and phase index parameters calculated from pairwise cross-correlations of three stations, which provides multiple references for reliable error estimates. Index parameters calculated daily during a two-year observation period are evaluated to identify stations with instrument response errors in near real time. During data processing, initial instrument responses are used in place of available instrument responses to simulate instrument response errors, which are then used to verify our results. We also examine feasibility of the tailing noise using data from stations selected from USArray in different locations and analyze the possible instrumental errors resulting in time-shifts used to verify the method. Additionally, we show an application that effects of instrument response errors that experience pole-zeros variations on monitoring temporal variations in crustal properties appear statistically significant velocity perturbation larger than the standard deviation. The results indicate that monitoring seismic instrument performance helps eliminate data pollution before analysis begins.

  19. Ambient noise forecasting with a large acoustic array in a complex shallow water environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jeffrey S; Wales, Stephen C; Means, Steven L

    2017-11-01

    Forecasting ambient noise levels in the ocean can be a useful way of characterizing the detection performance of sonar systems and projecting bounds on performance into the near future. The assertion is that noise forecasting can be improved with a priori knowledge of source positions coupled with the ability to resolve closely separated sources in bearing. One example of such a system is the large aperture research array located at the South Florida Test Facility. Given radar and Automatic Identification System defined source positions and environmental information, transmission loss (TL) is computed from known source positions to the array. Source levels (SLs) of individual ships are then estimated from computed TL and the pre-determined beam response of the array using a non-negative least squares algorithm. Ambient noise forecasts are formed by projecting the estimated SLs along known ship tracks. Ambient noise forecast estimates are compared to measured beam level data and mean-squared error is computed. A mean squared error as low as 3.5 dB is demonstrated in 30 min forecast estimates when compared to ground truth.

  20. Nonperturbative stochastic dynamics driven by strongly correlated colored noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Jun; Li, Rui; You, J. Q.; Yu, Ting

    2015-02-01

    We propose a quantum model consisting of two remote qubits interacting with two correlated colored noises and establish an exact stochastic Schrödinger equation for this open quantum system. It is shown that the quantum dynamics of the qubit system is profoundly modulated by the mutual correlation between baths and the bath memory capability through dissipation and fluctuation. We report a physical effect on generating inner correlation and entanglement of two distant qubits arising from the strong bath-bath correlation.

  1. Upper crustal structure beneath East Java from ambient noise tomography: A preliminary result

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martha, Agustya Adi; Widiyantoro, Sri; Cummins, Phil; Saygin, Erdinc; Masturyono

    2015-01-01

    East Java has a fairly complex geological structure. Physiographically East Java can be divided into three zones, i.e. the Southern Mountains zone in the southern part, the Kendeng zone in the middle part, and the Rembang zone in the northern part. Most of the seismic hazards in this region are due to processes in the upper crust. In this study, the Ambient Noise Tomography (ANT) method is used to image the upper crustal structure beneath East Java. We have used seismic waveform data recorded by 8Meteorological, Climatological and Geophysical Agency (BMKG) stationary seismographic stations and 16 portable seismographs installed for 2 to 8 weeks. The data were processed to obtain waveforms fromnoise cross-correlation between pairs of seismographic stations. Our preliminary results indicate that the Kendeng zone, an area of low gravity anomaly, is associated with a low velocity zone. On the other hand, the southern mountain range, which has a high gravity anomaly, is related to a high velocity anomaly as shown by our tomographic images

  2. High resolution Rayleigh wave group velocity tomography in North-China from ambient seismic noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Lihua; Wu Jianping; Ding Zhifeng; Panza, G.F.

    2009-03-01

    This study presents the results of the Rayleigh wave group velocity tomography in North-China performed using ambient seismic noise observed at 190 broadband and 10 very broadband stations of the North-China Seismic Array. All available vertical component time-series for the 14 months span between January, 2007 and February, 2008 are cross-correlated to obtain empirical Rayleigh wave Green functions that are subsequently processed, with the multiple filter method, to isolate the group velocity dispersion curves of the fundamental mode of Rayleigh wave. Tomographic maps, with a grid spacing of 0.25 deg. x 0.25 deg., are computed at the periods of 4.5s, 12s, 20s, 28s. The maps at short periods reveal an evident lateral heterogeneity in the crust of North-China, quite well in agreement with known geological and tectonic features. The North China Basin is imaged as a broad low velocity area, while the Taihangshan and Yanshan uplifts and Ordos block are imaged as high velocity zones, and the Quaternary intermountain basins show up as small low-velocity anomalies. The group velocity contours at 4.5s, 12s and 20s are consistent with the Bouguer gravity anomalies measured in the area of the Taihangshan fault, that cuts through the lower crust at least. Most of the historical strong earthquakes (M≥6.0) are located where the tomographic maps show zones with moderate velocity gradient. (author)

  3. The crustal structure beneath The Netherlands derived from ambient seismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudistira, Tedi; Paulssen, Hanneke; Trampert, Jeannot

    2017-11-01

    This work presents the first comprehensive 3-D model of the crust beneath The Netherlands. To obtain this model, we designed the NARS-Netherlands project, a dense deployment of broadband stations in the area. Rayleigh and Love wave group velocity dispersion was measured from ambient noise cross-correlations. Azimuthally anisotropic group velocity maps were then constructed and the isotropic part was used to determine a shear wave speed model that includes the effects of radial anisotropy. Employing the Neighbourhood Algorithm for the depth inversion, we obtained probabilistic estimates of the radially anisotropic model parameters. We found that the variations in the thickness of the top layer largely match the transition from sediments of Permian age to those of Carboniferous age. Regions of high faulting density such as the West Netherlands Basin and Roer Valley Graben are recognized in our model by their negative radial anisotropy (VSH - VSV Love wave group velocity data at periods of around 20 s show evidence for azimuthal anisotropy with a NW-SE fast direction. This anisotropy is likely related to NW-SE rock fabric in the lower crust thought to originate from the Caledonian deformation.

  4. Frequency Dependent Polarization Analysis of Ambient Seismic Noise Recorded at Broadband Seismometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koper, K.; Hawley, V.

    2010-12-01

    Analysis of ambient seismic noise is becoming increasingly relevant to modern seismology. Advances in computational speed and storage have made it feasible to analyze years and even decades of continuous seismic data in short amounts of time. Therefore, it is now possible to perform longitudinal studies of station performance in order to identify degradation or mis-installation of seismic equipment. Long-term noise analysis also provides insight into the evolution of the ocean wave climate, specifically whether the frequency and intensity of storms have changed as global temperatures have changed. Here we present a new approach to polarization analysis of seismic noise recorded by three-component seismometers. Essentially, eigen-decomposition of the 3-by-3 Hermitian spectral matrix associated with a sliding window of data is applied to yield various polarization attributes as a function of time and frequency. This in turn yields fundamental information about the composition of seismic noise, such as the extent to which it is polarized, its mode of propagation, and the direction from which it arrives at the seismometer. The polarization attributes can be viewed as function of time or binned over 2D frequency-time space to deduce regularities in the ambient noise that are unbiased by transient signals from earthquakes and explosions. We applied the algorithm to continuous data recorded in 2009 by the seismic station SLM, located in central North America. A rich variety of noise sources was observed. At low frequencies (3 Hz), Rayleigh-type energy was again dominant, in the form of Rg waves created by nearby cultural activities. Analysis of the time dependence of noise power shows that a frequency range of at least 0.02-1.0 Hz (much larger than the microseism band) is sensitive to annual, meteorologically induced sources of noise. We are currently applying our technique to selected seismometers from USArray and the University of Utah Seismic Network.

  5. Core Noise Diagnostics of Turbofan Engine Noise Using Correlation and Coherence Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Jeffrey H.

    2009-01-01

    Cross-correlation and coherence functions are used to look for periodic acoustic components in turbofan engine combustor time histories, to investigate direct and indirect combustion noise source separation based on signal propagation time delays, and to provide information on combustor acoustics. Using the cross-correlation function, time delays were identified in all cases, clearly indicating the combustor is the source of the noise. In addition, unfiltered and low-pass filtered at 400 Hz signals had a cross-correlation time delay near 90 ms, while the low-pass filtered at less than 400 Hz signals had a cross-correlation time delay longer than 90 ms. Low-pass filtering at frequencies less than 400 Hz partially removes the direct combustion noise signals. The remainder includes the indirect combustion noise signal, which travels more slowly because of the dependence on the entropy convection velocity in the combustor. Source separation of direct and indirect combustion noise is demonstrated by proper use of low-pass filters with the cross-correlation function for a range of operating conditions. The results may lead to a better idea about the acoustics in the combustor and may help develop and validate improved reduced-order physics-based methods for predicting direct and indirect combustion noise.

  6. Optimal filter design for shielded and unshielded ambient noise reduction in fetal magnetocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comani, S.; Mantini, D.; Alleva, G.; Di Luzio, S.; Romani, G. L.

    2005-12-01

    The greatest impediment to extracting high-quality fetal signals from fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) is environmental magnetic noise, which may have peak-to-peak intensity comparable to fetal QRS amplitude. Being an unstructured Gaussian signal with large disturbances at specific frequencies, ambient field noise can be reduced with hardware-based approaches and/or with software algorithms that digitally filter magnetocardiographic recordings. At present, no systematic evaluation of filters' performances on shielded and unshielded fMCG is available. We designed high-pass and low-pass Chebychev II-type filters with zero-phase and stable impulse response; the most commonly used band-pass filters were implemented combining high-pass and low-pass filters. The achieved ambient noise reduction in shielded and unshielded recordings was quantified, and the corresponding signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and signal-to-distortion ratio (SDR) of the retrieved fetal signals was evaluated. The study regarded 66 fMCG datasets at different gestational ages (22-37 weeks). Since the spectral structures of shielded and unshielded magnetic noise were very similar, we concluded that the same filter setting might be applied to both conditions. Band-pass filters (1.0-100 Hz) and (2.0-100 Hz) provided the best combinations of fetal signal detection rates, SNR and SDR; however, the former should be preferred in the case of arrhythmic fetuses, which might present spectral components below 2 Hz.

  7. A survey of models for the prediction of ambient ocean noise: Circa 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doolittle, R.

    1996-01-01

    The state of the art of model development for application to computer studies of undersea search systems utilizing acoustics is surveyed in this document. Due to the demands for surveillance of submarines operating in ocean basins, the development of noise models for application in deep oceans is fairly advanced and somewhat generic. This is due to the deep sound channel, discovered during World War II, which when present allows for long-range sound propagation with little or no interaction with the bottom. Exceptions to this channel, also well understood, are found in both the high latitudes where the sound is upward refracting and in tropical ocean areas with downward refracting sound transmission. The controlling parameter is the sound speed as a function of depth within the ocean, the sound speed profile. When independent of range, this profile may be converted to a noise-versus-depth profile with well-validated consequences for deep-ocean ambient noise. When considering ocean areas of shallow water, the littoral regions, the idea of a genenic ocean channel advisedly is abandoned. The locally unique nature of both the noise production mechanisms and of the channel carrying the sound, obviates the generic treatment. Nevertheless, idealizations of this case exist and promote the understanding if not the exact predictability of the statistics of shallow water ambient noise. Some examples of these models are given in this document.

  8. Optimal filter design for shielded and unshielded ambient noise reduction in fetal magnetocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comani, S; Mantini, D; Alleva, G; Luzio, S Di; Romani, G L

    2005-01-01

    The greatest impediment to extracting high-quality fetal signals from fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) is environmental magnetic noise, which may have peak-to-peak intensity comparable to fetal QRS amplitude. Being an unstructured Gaussian signal with large disturbances at specific frequencies, ambient field noise can be reduced with hardware-based approaches and/or with software algorithms that digitally filter magnetocardiographic recordings. At present, no systematic evaluation of filters' performances on shielded and unshielded fMCG is available. We designed high-pass and low-pass Chebychev II-type filters with zero-phase and stable impulse response; the most commonly used band-pass filters were implemented combining high-pass and low-pass filters. The achieved ambient noise reduction in shielded and unshielded recordings was quantified, and the corresponding signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and signal-to-distortion ratio (SDR) of the retrieved fetal signals was evaluated. The study regarded 66 fMCG datasets at different gestational ages (22-37 weeks). Since the spectral structures of shielded and unshielded magnetic noise were very similar, we concluded that the same filter setting might be applied to both conditions. Band-pass filters (1.0-100 Hz) and (2.0-100 Hz) provided the best combinations of fetal signal detection rates, SNR and SDR; however, the former should be preferred in the case of arrhythmic fetuses, which might present spectral components below 2 Hz

  9. Vertical line array measurements of ambient noise in the North Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhrooz, Mehdi; Wage, Kathleen E; Dzieciuch, Matthew A; Worcester, Peter F

    2017-03-01

    Shipping noise and wind are the dominant sources of ocean noise in the frequency band between 20 and 500 Hz. This paper analyzes noise in that band using data from the SPICEX experiment, which took place in the North Pacific in 2004-2005, and compares the results with other North Pacific experiments. SPICEX included vertical arrays with sensors above and below the surface conjugate depth, facilitating an analysis of the depth dependence of ambient noise. The paper includes several key results. First, the 2004-05 noise levels at 50 Hz measured in SPICEX had not increased relative to levels measured by Morris [(1978). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 64, 581-590] at a nearby North Pacific site three decades earlier, but rather were comparable to those levels. Second, at 50 Hz the noise below the conjugate depth decreases at a rate of -9.9 dB/km, which is similar to the rate measured by Morris and much less than the rate measured by Gaul, Knobles, Shooter, and Wittenborn [(2007). IEEE J. Ocean. Eng. 32, 497-512] for the CHURCH OPAL experiment. Finally, the paper describes the seasonal trends in noise over the year-long time series of the measurements.

  10. Interferometric constraints on quantum geometrical shear noise correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Aaron; Glass, Henry; Richard Gustafson, H.; Hogan, Craig J.; Kamai, Brittany L.; Kwon, Ohkyung; Lanza, Robert; McCuller, Lee; Meyer, Stephan S.; Richardson, Jonathan W.; Stoughton, Chris; Tomlin, Ray; Weiss, Rainer

    2017-07-20

    Final measurements and analysis are reported from the first-generation Holometer, the first instrument capable of measuring correlated variations in space-time position at strain noise power spectral densities smaller than a Planck time. The apparatus consists of two co-located, but independent and isolated, 40 m power-recycled Michelson interferometers, whose outputs are cross-correlated to 25 MHz. The data are sensitive to correlations of differential position across the apparatus over a broad band of frequencies up to and exceeding the inverse light crossing time, 7.6 MHz. By measuring with Planck precision the correlation of position variations at spacelike separations, the Holometer searches for faint, irreducible correlated position noise backgrounds predicted by some models of quantum space-time geometry. The first-generation optical layout is sensitive to quantum geometrical noise correlations with shear symmetry---those that can be interpreted as a fundamental noncommutativity of space-time position in orthogonal directions. General experimental constraints are placed on parameters of a set of models of spatial shear noise correlations, with a sensitivity that exceeds the Planck-scale holographic information bound on position states by a large factor. This result significantly extends the upper limits placed on models of directional noncommutativity by currently operating gravitational wave observatories.

  11. Extraction of Stoneley and acoustic Rayleigh waves from ambient noise on ocean bottom observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonegawa, T.; Fukao, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Obana, K.; Kodaira, S.; Kaneda, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In the interferometry, the wavefield propagating between two positions can be retrieved by correlating ambient noise recorded on the two positions. This approach is useful for applying to various kinds of wavefield, such as ultrasonic, acoustic (ocean acoustic), and also seismology. Off the Kii Peninsula, Japan, more than 150 short-period (4.5 Hz) seismometers, in which hydrophone is also cosited, had been deployed for ~2 months on 2012 by Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) as a part of 'Research concerning Interaction Between the Tokai, Tonankai and Nankai Earthquakes' funded by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan. In this study, correlating ambient noise recorded on the sensors and hydrophones, we attempt to investigate characteristics of wavefield relative to the ocean, sediment, and solid-fluid boundary. The observation period is from Sep. 2012 to Dec. 2012. Station spacing is around 5 km. For 5 lines off the Kii Peninsula, the 30-40 seismometers are distributed at each line. Sampling interval is 200 Hz for both seismometer and hydrophone. The vertical component is just used in this study for correlation analysis. The instruments are located at 100-4800 m in water depth. In the processing for the both records, we applied a bandpass filter of 1-3 Hz, replaced the amplitude to zero if it exceeds a value that was set in this study, and took one-bit normalization. We calculated cross-correlation function (CCF) by using continuous records with a time length of 600 s, stacked the CCFs over the whole observation period. As a result of the analysis for hydrophone, a strong peak can be seen in the CCF for pairs of stations where the separation distance is ~5 km. Although the peak emerges in the CCFs for the separation distance up to 10 km, it disappears in the case that two stations are greater than 15 km separated. As a next approach, along a line off the Kii Peninsula, we aligned CCFs for two stations with

  12. Experimental quantum verification in the presence of temporally correlated noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavadia, S.; Edmunds, C. L.; Hempel, C.; Ball, H.; Roy, F.; Stace, T. M.; Biercuk, M. J.

    2018-02-01

    Growth in the capabilities of quantum information hardware mandates access to techniques for performance verification that function under realistic laboratory conditions. Here we experimentally characterise the impact of common temporally correlated noise processes on both randomised benchmarking (RB) and gate-set tomography (GST). Our analysis highlights the role of sequence structure in enhancing or suppressing the sensitivity of quantum verification protocols to either slowly or rapidly varying noise, which we treat in the limiting cases of quasi-DC miscalibration and white noise power spectra. We perform experiments with a single trapped 171Yb+ ion-qubit and inject engineered noise (" separators="∝σ^ z ) to probe protocol performance. Experiments on RB validate predictions that measured fidelities over sequences are described by a gamma distribution varying between approximately Gaussian, and a broad, highly skewed distribution for rapidly and slowly varying noise, respectively. Similarly we find a strong gate set dependence of default experimental GST procedures in the presence of correlated errors, leading to significant deviations between estimated and calculated diamond distances in the presence of correlated σ^ z errors. Numerical simulations demonstrate that expansion of the gate set to include negative rotations can suppress these discrepancies and increase reported diamond distances by orders of magnitude for the same error processes. Similar effects do not occur for correlated σ^ x or σ^ y errors or depolarising noise processes, highlighting the impact of the critical interplay of selected gate set and the gauge optimisation process on the meaning of the reported diamond norm in correlated noise environments.

  13. Ocean Basin Impact of Ambient Noise on Marine Mammal Detectability, Distribution, and Acoustic Communication - YIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Detectability, Distribution, and Acoustic Communication - YIP Jennifer L. Miksis-Olds Applied Research Laboratory The Pennsylvania State University...5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Pennsylvania State University,Applied Research Laboratory ,PO...0039 to David Bradley titled “Ambient Noise Analysis from Selected CTBTO Hydroacoustic Sites”. Patterns and trends of ocean sound observed in this

  14. Impact of wind on ambient noise recorded by the "13 BB star" seismic array in northern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepore, Simone; Markowicz, Krzysztof; Grad, Marek

    2016-04-01

    corresponding to the best fit between phase slowness and back azimuth. The azimuth was mainly associated to the angle of the highest peak on the vertical component; however, if the related energy was not large enough, the angle of the main noise source on the horizontal component was employed. In some cases, the azimuth of the secondary peak was taken into account, if its energy was strong enough. The results were related to the daily mean wind speed around Europe recorded during the same month. A significant correlation between the daily average level of ambient noise and the mean wind speed was found. The main source of the ambient noise was located in the Atlantic Ocean and in the North Sea: some weaker sources, however, were identified as the Barents, Baltic, Mediterranean, and Black Seas. National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work by NCN grant DEC 2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  15. Wind dependence of ambient noise in a biologically rich coastal area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Delphine; Gervaise, Cédric; Di Iorio, Lucia

    2016-02-01

    The wind dependence of acoustic spectrum between 100 Hz and 16 kHz is investigated for coastal biologically rich areas. The analysis of 5 months of continuous measurements run in a 10 m deep shallow water environment off Brittany (France) showed that wind dependence of spectral levels is subject to masking by biological sounds. When dealing with raw data, the wind dependence of spectral levels was not significant for frequencies where biological sounds were present (2 to 10 kHz). An algorithm developed by Kinda, Simard, Gervaise, Mars, and Fortier [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 134(1), 77-87 (2013)] was used to automatically filter out the loud distinctive biological contribution and estimated the ambient noise spectrum. The wind dependence of ambient noise spectrum was always significant after application of this filter. A mixture model for ambient noise spectrum which accounts for the richness of the soundscape is proposed. This model revealed that wind dependence holds once the wind speed was strong enough to produce sounds higher in amplitude than the biological chorus (9 kn at 3 kHz, 11 kn at 8 kHz). For these higher wind speeds, a logarithmic affine law was adequate and its estimated parameters were compatible with previous studies (average slope 27.1 dB per decade of wind speed increase).

  16. The Effects of Ambient Conditions on Helicopter Rotor Source Noise Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Frederic H.; Greenwood, Eric

    2011-01-01

    A new physics-based method called Fundamental Rotorcraft Acoustic Modeling from Experiments (FRAME) is used to demonstrate the change in rotor harmonic noise of a helicopter operating at different ambient conditions. FRAME is based upon a non-dimensional representation of the governing acoustic and performance equations of a single rotor helicopter. Measured external noise is used together with parameter identification techniques to develop a model of helicopter external noise that is a hybrid between theory and experiment. The FRAME method is used to evaluate the main rotor harmonic noise of a Bell 206B3 helicopter operating at different altitudes. The variation with altitude of Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise, known to be a strong function of the helicopter s advance ratio, is dependent upon which definition of airspeed is flown by the pilot. If normal flight procedures are followed and indicated airspeed (IAS) is held constant, the true airspeed (TAS) of the helicopter increases with altitude. This causes an increase in advance ratio and a decrease in the speed of sound which results in large changes to BVI noise levels. Results also show that thickness noise on this helicopter becomes more intense at high altitudes where advancing tip Mach number increases because the speed of sound is decreasing and advance ratio increasing for the same indicated airspeed. These results suggest that existing measurement-based empirically derived helicopter rotor noise source models may give incorrect noise estimates when they are used at conditions where data were not measured and may need to be corrected for mission land-use planning purposes.

  17. Jet engine noise and infrared plume correlation field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunio, Phillip M.; Weber, Reed A.; Knobel, Kimberly R.; Smith, Christine; Draudt, Andy

    2015-09-01

    Jet engine noise can be a health hazard and environmental pollutant, particularly affecting personnel working in close proximity to jet engines, such as airline mechanics. Mitigating noise could reduce the potential for hearing loss in runway workers; however, there exists a very complex relationship between jet engine design parameters, operating conditions, and resultant noise power levels, and understanding and characterizing this relationship is a key step in mitigating jet engine noise effects. We demonstrate initial results highlighting the utility of high-speed imaging (hypertemporal imaging) in correlating the infrared signatures of jet engines with acoustic noise. This paper builds on prior theoretical analysis of jet engine infrared signatures and their potential relationships to jet engine acoustic emissions. This previous work identified the region of the jet plume most likely to emit both in infrared and in acoustic domains, and it prompted the investigation of wave packets as a physical construct tying together acoustic and infrared energy emissions. As a means of verifying these assertions, a field campaign to collect relevant data was proposed, and data collection was carried out with a bank of infrared instruments imaging a T700 turboshaft engine undergoing routine operational testing. The detection of hypertemporal signatures in association with acoustic signatures of jet engines enables the use of a new domain in characterizing jet engine noise. This may in turn enable new methods of predicting or mitigating jet engine noise, which could lead to socioeconomic benefits for airlines and other operators of large numbers of jet engines.

  18. Ambient awareness: From random noise to digital closeness in online social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levordashka, Ana; Utz, Sonja

    2016-07-01

    Ambient awareness refers to the awareness social media users develop of their online network in result of being constantly exposed to social information, such as microblogging updates. Although each individual bit of information can seem like random noise, their incessant reception can amass to a coherent representation of social others. Despite its growing popularity and important implications for social media research, ambient awareness on public social media has not been studied empirically. We provide evidence for the occurrence of ambient awareness and examine key questions related to its content and functions. A diverse sample of participants reported experiencing awareness, both as a general feeling towards their network as a whole, and as knowledge of individual members of the network, whom they had not met in real life. Our results indicate that ambient awareness can develop peripherally, from fragmented information and in the relative absence of extensive one-to-one communication. We report the effects of demographics, media use, and network variables and discuss the implications of ambient awareness for relational and informational processes online.

  19. Refinements to the method of epicentral location based on surface waves from ambient seismic noise: introducing Love waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levshin, Anatoli L.; Barmin, Mikhail P.; Moschetti, Morgan P.; Mendoza, Carlos; Ritzwoller, Michael H.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and test a modification to a previous method of regional seismic event location based on Empirical Green’s Functions (EGFs) produced from ambient seismic noise. Elastic EGFs between pairs of seismic stations are determined by cross-correlating long ambient noise time-series recorded at the two stations. The EGFs principally contain Rayleigh- and Love-wave energy on the vertical and transverse components, respectively, and we utilize these signals between about 5 and 12 s period. The previous method, based exclusively on Rayleigh waves, may yield biased epicentral locations for certain event types with hypocentral depths between 2 and 5 km. Here we present theoretical arguments that show how Love waves can be introduced to reduce or potentially eliminate the bias. We also present applications of Rayleigh- and Love-wave EGFs to locate 10 reference events in the western United States. The separate Rayleigh and Love epicentral locations and the joint locations using a combination of the two waves agree to within 1 km distance, on average, but confidence ellipses are smallest when both types of waves are used.

  20. Power Mapping and Noise Reduction for Financial Correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, P.-J.; Oeberg, A.; Guhr, T.

    2005-01-01

    The spectral properties of financial correlation matrices can show features known from completely random matrices. A major reason is noise originating from the finite lengths of the financial time series used to compute the correlation matrix elements. In recent years, various methods have been proposed to reduce this noise, i.e. to clean the correlation matrices. This is of direct practical relevance for risk management in portfolio optimization. In this contribution, we discuss in detail the power mapping, a new shrinkage method. We show that the relevant parameter is, to a certain extent, self-determined. Due to the 'hirality' and the normalization of the correlation matrix, the optimal shrinkage parameter is fixed. We apply the power mapping and the well-known filtering method to market data and compare them by optimizing stock portfolios. We address the role of constraints by excluding short selling in the optimization. (author)

  1. The Plumbing System Feeding the Lusi Eruption Revealed by Ambient Noise Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi, Mohammad Javad; Obermann, Anne; Lupi, Matteo; Karyono, Karyono; Mazzini, Adriano

    2017-10-01

    Lusi is a sediment-hosted hydrothermal system featuring clastic-dominated geyser-like eruption behavior in East Java, Indonesia. We use 10 months of ambient seismic noise cross correlations from 30 temporary seismic stations to obtain a 3-D model of shear wave velocity anomalies beneath Lusi, the neighboring Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex, and the Watukosek fault system connecting the two. Our work reveals a hydrothermal plume, rooted at a minimum 6 km depth that reaches the surface at the Lusi site. Furthermore, the inversion shows that this vertical anomaly is connected to the adjacent volcanic complex through a narrow ( 3 km wide) low velocity corridor slicing the survey area at a depth of 4-6 km. The NE-SW direction of this elongated zone matches the strike of the Watukosek fault system. Distinct magmatic chambers are also inferred below the active volcanoes. The large-scale tomography features an exceptional example of a subsurface connection between a volcanic complex and a solitary erupting hydrothermal system hosted in a hydrocarbon-rich back-arc sedimentary basin. These results are consistent with a scenario where deep-seated fluids (e.g., magmas and released hydrothermal fluids) flow along a region of enhanced transmissivity (i.e., the Watukosek fault system damage zone) from the volcanic arc toward the back arc basin where Lusi resides. The triggered metamorphic reactions occurring at depth in the organic-rich sediments generated significant overpressure and fluid upwelling that is today released at the spectacular Lusi eruption site.

  2. Crustal Seismic Vs and Vs anisotropy of Northeast Japan Revealed by Ambient Noise Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K. X.; Gung, Y.; Kuo, B. Y.; Huang, T. Y.

    2017-12-01

    We present 3D crustal models of Vs and Vs azimuthal anisotropy of the Tohoku region, Japan. We employ the Welch's method to derive the empirical Green's functions (EGF) of Rayleigh waves from one year of continuous records of 123 short-period stations of the dense high-sensitivity seismograph network (Hi-net). We compute EGFs for about 4000 station pairs with interstation distance less than 300 km. For each qualified EGF, we measure the dispersion in the period range from 3 to 16 seconds. We then construct the models by using a wavelet-based multi-scale inversion technique. In the resulting models, characteristics of Vs variations and Vs azimuthal anisotropy are closely related to surface geology, Quaternary volcano activities, and plate motions. For the Vs variations in the shallow crust (well correlated to the volcano belt. For the Vs anisotropy, the strength and the patterns of fast polarization directions (FPD) are depth-dependent. In the shallow crust, the anisotropy is strong, and are dominated by the typical orogeny parallel anisotropy, with FPDs parallel to the main strikes of the mountain range. While in the lower crust, the FPDs are generally parallel to the absolute plate motion. Interestingly, the distribution of PFDs is rather chaotic and strength of anisotropy is weak in the middle crust ( 8 - 20 km). We propose that the weak and random anisotropy in this layer is likely related to the presence of magma reservoirs beneath the volcano belt, as the associated active volcanism may cause the destruction of the alignment of crustal fabrics Key words: Tohoku, ambient noise, seismic anisotropy, surface wave tomography, volcano activities

  3. Crustal structure determined from ambient noise tomography near the magmatic centers of the Coso region, southeastern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yingjie; Ritzwoller, Michael H.; Jones, Craig H.

    2011-02-01

    We apply seismic ambient noise tomography to image and investigate the shallow shear velocity structure beneath the Coso geothermal field and surrounding areas. Data from a PASSCAL experiment operated within the Coso geothermal field between 1998 and 2000 and surrounding broadband stations from the Southern California Seismic Network are acquired and processed. Daily cross correlations of ambient noise between all pairs of stations that overlapped in time of deployment were calculated and then stacked over the duration of deployment. Phase velocities of Rayleigh waves between 3 and 10 s periods are measured from the resulting cross correlations. Depending on the period, between about 300 and 600 reliable phase velocity measurements are inverted for phase velocity maps from 3 to 10 s periods, which in turn are inverted for a 3-D shear velocity model beneath the region. The resulting 3-D model reveals features throughout the region that correlate with surface geology. Beneath the Coso geothermal area shear velocities are generally depressed, a prominent low-velocity anomaly is resolved clearly within the top 2 km, no significant anomaly is seen below about 14 km depth, and a weakly resolved anomaly is observed between 6 and 12 km depth. The anomaly in the top 2 km probably results from geothermal alteration in the shallow subsurface, no magmatic body is imaged beneath 14 km depth, but the shear velocity anomaly between 6 and 12 km may be attributable to partial melt. The thickness and amplitude of the magma body trade off in the inversion and are ill determined. Low velocities in the regions surrounding Coso at depths near 7 km underlie areas with Miocene to recent volcanism, suggesting that some magmatic processing of the crust could be focused near this depth.

  4. Effects of noise from non-traffic-related ambient sources on sleep: Review of the literature of 1990-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Omlin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the literature about the effects of specific non-traffic-related ambient noise sources on sleep that appeared in the last two decades. Although everybody is faced with noise of non-traffic and non-industry origin (e.g. sounds made by neighbors, talk, laughter, music, slamming doors, structural equipment, ventilation, heat pumps, noise from animals, barking dogs, outdoor events etc., little scientific knowledge exists about its effects on sleep. The findings of the present extensive literature search and review are as follows: Only a small number of surveys, laboratory and field studies about mainly neighborhood, leisure and animal noise have been carried out. Most of them indicate that ambient noise has some effect on human sleep. However, a quantitative meta-analysis and comparison is not possible due to the small number of studies available and at times large differences in quality.

  5. Deriving Deep Ocean Temperature Changes From the Ambient Acoustic Noise Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambell, K.; Evers, L. G.; Snellen, M.

    2016-12-01

    Passively deriving the deep ocean temperature is a challenge. However, knowledge about changes in the deep ocean temperature are important in relation to climate change. In-situ observations are are and satellite observations are hardly applicable. Low-frequency sound waves of a few hertz can penetrate the deep oceans over long distances. As their propagation is temperature dependent, these waves contain valuable information that can be used for temperature monitoring. In this study, the use of interferometry is demonstrated by applying this technique to ambient noise measured at two hydrophone arrays located near Robinson Crusoe Island in the South Pacific Ocean. The arrays are separated by 40 km and are located at a depth of 800 m. Both arrays consist of three hydrophones with an interstation distance of 2 km. It is shown that the acoustic velocity, and with this the temperature variation, can be derived from measured hydro-acoustic data. Furthermore, the findings are supported by ocean models that describe the propagation of sound between the hydrophone arrays. This study shows the potential of using the ambient noise field for temperature monitoring in the deep ocean.

  6. Uppermost mantle and crustal structure at Tristan da Cunha derived from ambient seismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryberg, T.; Geissler, W. H.; Jokat, W.; Pandey, S.

    2017-08-01

    According to classical plume theory, the Tristan da Cunha hotspot, located ∼400 km east off the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, is thought to have played a major role in the rifting while creating an aseismic Walvis Ridge during and after the breakup of the South Atlantic margins. Volcanic activity on the Tristan da Cunha Island shows that the hotspot might still be there influencing the upper mantle and crustal structure. In this study we present ambient noise data from 24 broadband OBS around Tristan da Cunha and a seismic station on Nightingale Island, which provide first constraints on the crustal and uppermost mantle structure around the island. By combining ambient noise techniques, dispersion curve analysis of Rayleigh waves, 2D tomographic inversion of travel times and 3D depth inversion of dispersion data we derived a 3D VS velocity model around the archipelago of Tristan da Cunha. The model shows an isolated, vertically sharp bounded thickened and modified crust beneath the islands surrounded by thin oceanic crust (feeding system/magmatic underplating, respectively. The observed simple and localized volcanic structure, embedded in a rather homogeneous crust and upper mantle indicates only minor and very localized magmatic overprinting of the existing lithosphere by the Tristan da Cunha hotspot. The uppermost mantle S wave velocity beneath nearby seamounts and to the SW of the islands is also slow and could indicate a thermal influence from a deeper source, whereas the Tristan da Cunha Fracture Zone shows no signs of modification.

  7. On the effect of topography on short-period ambient noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, A.; Weidle, C.; Maupin, V.

    2012-04-01

    Due to the increasing popularity of using empirical Green's functions obtained from ambient seismic noise, more and more regional tomographical studies based on short-periods surface waves are published. Results could potentially be biased in mountainous regions where topography is not small compared to the wavelength and penetration depth of the considered waves. We investigate the effect of topography on the propagation of short-period (3-10 seconds) Rayleigh waves empirically by means of synthetic data using a spectral element code and a 3-D model with real topography. We show that topography along a profile through the studied area can result in an underestimation of phase velocities of up to about 0.7% at the shortest investigated period (3 seconds). Contrary to the expectation that this bias results from the increased surface distance along topography, we find that this error can be estimated by local topographic contrasts in the vicinity of the receiver alone. We discuss and generalize our results by considering topographic profiles through other mountain ranges and find that southern Norway is a good proxy to assess the topography effect. Nevertheless, topographic bias on phase velocity measurements is in general not large enough to produce a significant effect on ambient noise tomographies.

  8. On the effect of topography on surface wave propagation in the ambient noise frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Andreas; Weidle, Christian; Maupin, Valérie

    2012-04-01

    Due to the increasing popularity of analyzing empirical Green's functions obtained from ambient seismic noise, more and more regional tomographical studies based on short-period surface waves are published. Results could potentially be biased in mountainous regions where topography is not small compared to the wavelength and penetration depth of the considered waves. We investigate the effect of topography on the propagation of short-period Rayleigh waves empirically by means of synthetic data using a spectral element code and a 3-D model with real topography. We show that topography along a profile through the studied area can result in an underestimation of phase velocities of up to about 0.7% at the shortest investigated period (3 s). Contrary to the expectation that this bias results from the increased surface distance along topography, we find that this error can be estimated by local topographic contrasts in the vicinity of the receiver alone. We discuss and generalize our results by considering topographic profiles through other mountain ranges and find that southern Norway is a good proxy to assess the topography effect. Nevertheless, topographic bias on phase velocity measurements is in general not large enough to significantly affect recovered velocity variations in the ambient noise frequency range.

  9. Reducing Risk of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Collegiate Music Ensembles Using Ambient Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jason; Chesky, Kris

    2017-09-01

    Student musicians are at risk for noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) as they develop skills and perform during instructional activities. Studies using longitudinal dosimeter data show that pedagogical procedures and instructor behaviors are highly predictive of NIHL risk, thus implying the need for innovative approaches to increase instructor competency in managing instructional activities without interfering with artistic and academic freedom. Ambient information systems, an emerging trend in human-computer interaction that infuses psychological behavioral theories into technologies, can help construct informative risk-regulating systems. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of introducing an ambient information system into the ensemble setting. The system used two ambient displays and a counterbalanced within-subjects treatment study design with six jazz ensemble instructors to determine if the system could induce a behavior change that alters trends in measures resulting from dosimeter data. This study assessed efficacy using time series analysis to determine changes in eight statistical measures of behavior over a 9-wk period. Analysis showed that the system was effective, as all instructors showed changes in a combination of measures. This study is in an important step in developing non-interfering technology to reduce NIHL among academic musicians.

  10. Exploring conservative islands using correlated and uncorrelated noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Rafael M.; Manchein, Cesar; Beims, Marcus W.

    2018-02-01

    In this work, noise is used to analyze the penetration of regular islands in conservative dynamical systems. For this purpose we use the standard map choosing nonlinearity parameters for which a mixed phase space is present. The random variable which simulates noise assumes three distributions, namely equally distributed, normal or Gaussian, and power law (obtained from the same standard map but for other parameters). To investigate the penetration process and explore distinct dynamical behaviors which may occur, we use recurrence time statistics (RTS), Lyapunov exponents and the occupation rate of the phase space. Our main findings are as follows: (i) the standard deviations of the distributions are the most relevant quantity to induce the penetration; (ii) the penetration of islands induce power-law decays in the RTS as a consequence of enhanced trapping; (iii) for the power-law correlated noise an algebraic decay of the RTS is observed, even though sticky motion is absent; and (iv) although strong noise intensities induce an ergodic-like behavior with exponential decays of RTS, the largest Lyapunov exponent is reminiscent of the regular islands.

  11. Ambient noise as the new source for urban engineering seismology and earthquake engineering: a case study from Beijing metropolitan area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lanbo; Chen, Qi-fu; Wang, Weijun; Rohrbach, Eric

    2014-02-01

    In highly populated urban centers, traditional seismic survey sources can no longer be properly applied due to restrictions in modern civilian life styles. The ambient vibration noise, including both microseisms and microtremor, though are generally weak but available anywhere and anytime, can be an ideal supplementary source for conducting seismic surveys for engineering seismology and earthquake engineering. This is fundamentally supported by advanced digital signal processing techniques for effectively extracting the useful information out from the noise. Thus, it can be essentially regarded as a passive seismic method. In this paper we first make a brief survey of the ambient vibration noise, followed by a quick summary of digital signal processing for passive seismic surveys. Then the applications of ambient noise in engineering seismology and earthquake engineering for urban settings are illustrated with examples from Beijing metropolitan area. For engineering seismology the example is the assessment of site effect in a large area via microtremor observations. For earthquake engineering the example is for structural characterization of a typical reinforced concrete high-rise building using background vibration noise. By showing these examples we argue that the ambient noise can be treated as a new source that is economical, practical, and particularly valuable to engineering seismology and earthquake engineering projects for seismic hazard mitigation in urban areas.

  12. Quantum Stackelberg duopoly in the presence of correlated noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Salman; Ramzan, M; Khan, M Khalid

    2010-01-01

    We study the influence of entanglement and correlated noise using correlated amplitude damping, depolarizing and phase damping channels on the quantum Stackelberg duopoly. Our investigations show that under the influence of an amplitude damping channel a critical point exists for an unentangled initial state at which firms get equal payoffs. The game becomes a follower advantage game when the channel is highly decohered. Two critical points corresponding to two values of the entanglement angle are found in the presence of correlated noise. Within the range of these limits of the entanglement angle, the game is a follower advantage game. In the case of a depolarizing channel, the payoffs of the two firms are strongly influenced by the memory parameter. The presence of quantum memory ensures the existence of the Nash equilibrium for the entire range of decoherence and entanglement parameters for both the channels. A local maximum in the payoffs is observed which vanishes as the channel correlation increases. Moreover, under the influence of the depolarizing channel, the game is always a leader advantage game. Furthermore, it is seen that the phase damping channel does not affect the outcome of the game.

  13. Characterization of site-effects in the urban area of Canakkale, Turkey, using ambient noise measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Alper; Bekler, Tolga; Karagöz, Özlem

    2010-05-01

    The local site conditions can cause variations in the ground motion during the earthquake events. These local effects can be estimated by Nakamura method (1989) which is based on the analysis and treatment of earth vibration records by calculating the ratio of horizontal spectrum to vertical spectrum (H/V). This approach uses ambient noises and aids to estimate the dynamic soil conditions like fundamental vibration period and soil amplification of the surface layers, to characterize the seismic hazard during earthquakes and to provide detailed information for seismic microzonation in small scale urban areas. Due to these advantages, the method has been frequently used by a great number of seismologists and engineers. In this study, we aimed at explaining the soil conditions in Çanakkale and Kepez basins by using H/V technique. Çanakkale and Kepez (NW, Turkey) have fairly complex tectonic structure and have been exposed to serious earthquake damages in historical and instrumental period. Active faults, which have influence on the Çanakkale and Kepez settlements, are the Yenice-Gönen fault, Saroz-Gaziköy fault and Etili fault. It is well known that, these faults have produced high magnitude earthquakes such as 7.2 in 1912 and 7.3 in 1953. The surface geology of the surveyed area is covered by quaternary aged sediments. Sarıçay river, which originates from the eastern hilly area, accumulates sediment deposits and forms this alluvial basin. Considering the geological conditions, ambient noises were recorded at 88 measurement points which were selected to provide good coverage of the study area. All records were acquired during the midnight (between 1:00 am and 6:00 am) to reduce the artificial effects in the urban area. Taking into account the effects of undesirable traffic and industrial noises in the vicinity of measurements stations, record lengths were chosen in the range of 25-75 minutes with the sampling rate of 100 Hz. Once the required signal processes

  14. Association between ambient noise exposure, hearing acuity, and risk of acute occupational injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantley, Linda F; Galusha, Deron; Cullen, Mark R; Dixon-Ernst, Christine; Rabinowitz, Peter M; Neitzel, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the associations between acute workplace injury risk, ambient noise exposure, and hearing acuity, adjusting for reported hearing protection use. In a cohort of 9220 aluminum manufacturing workers studied over six years (33 300 person-years, 13 323 person-jobs), multivariate mixed effects models were used to estimate relative risk (RR) of all injuries as well as serious injuries by noise exposure category and hearing threshold level (HTL) adjusting for recognized and potential confounders. Compared to noise exposure was associated with elevated risk in a monotonic and statistically significant exposure-response pattern for all injuries and serious injuries with higher risk estimates observed for serious injuries [82-84.99 dBA: RR 1.26, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.96-1.64; 85-87.99 dBA: RR 1.39, 95% CI 1.05-1.85; ≥88 dBA: RR 2.29, 95% CI 1.52-3.47]. Hearing loss was associated with increased risk for all injuries, but was not a significant predictor of risk for the subset of more serious injuries. Compared to those without hearing loss, workers with HTL ≥25 dB had 21% increased all injury risk (RR 1.21, 95% CI 1.09-1.33) while those with HTL 10-24.99 dB had 6% increased risk (RR 1.06, 95% CI 1.00-1.13). Reported hearing protection type did not predict injury risk. Noise exposure levels as low as 85 dBA may increase workplace injury risk. HTL was associated with increased risk for all, but not the subset of serious, injuries. Additional study is needed both to confirm the observed associations and explore causal pathways.

  15. Solving the generalized Langevin equation with the algebraically correlated noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srokowski, T.; Ploszajczak, M.

    1997-01-01

    The Langevin equation with the memory kernel is solved. The stochastic force possesses algebraic correlations, proportional to 1/t. The velocity autocorrelation function and related quantities characterizing transport properties are calculated at the assumption that the system is in the thermal equilibrium. Stochastic trajectories are simulated numerically, using the kangaroo process as a noise generator. Results of this simulation resemble Levy walks with divergent moments of the velocity distribution. The motion of a Brownian particle is considered both without any external potential and in the harmonic oscillator field, in particular the escape from a potential well. The results are compared with memory-free calculations for the Brownian particle. (author)

  16. Magmatism on rift flanks: Insights from ambient noise phase velocity in Afar region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korostelev, Félicie; Weemstra, Cornelis; Leroy, Sylvie; Boschi, Lapo; Keir, Derek; Ren, Yong; Molinari, Irene; Ahmed, Abdulhakim; Stuart, Graham W.; Rolandone, Frédérique; Khanbari, Khaled; Hammond, James O. S.; Kendall, J. M.; Doubre, Cécile; Ganad, Ismail Al; Goitom, Berhe; Ayele, Atalay

    2015-04-01

    During the breakup of continents in magmatic settings, the extension of the rift valley is commonly assumed to initially occur by border faulting and progressively migrate in space and time toward the spreading axis. Magmatic processes near the rift flanks are commonly ignored. We present phase velocity maps of the crust and uppermost mantle of the conjugate margins of the southern Red Sea (Afar and Yemen) using ambient noise tomography to constrain crustal modification during breakup. Our images show that the low seismic velocities characterize not only the upper crust beneath the axial volcanic systems but also both upper and lower crust beneath the rift flanks where ongoing volcanism and hydrothermal activity occur at the surface. Magmatic modification of the crust beneath rift flanks likely occurs for a protracted period of time during the breakup process and may persist through to early seafloor spreading.

  17. MSNoise: a Python Package for Monitoring Seismic Velocity Changes using Ambient Seismic Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecocq, Thomas; Caudron, Corentin; Brenguier, Florent

    2014-05-01

    We present MSNoise, a complete software suite to compute relative seismic velocity changes under a seismic network, using ambient seismic noise. The whole is written in Python, from the monitoring of data archives, to the production of high quality figures. All steps have been optimized to only compute the necessary steps and to use 'job'-based processing. All steps can be changed by matching the in/outs. MSNoise exposes an API for communication with the data archive and the database. We present a validation of the software on a dataset acquired during the UnderVolc project on the Piton de la Fournaise Volcano, La Réunion Island, France, for which precursory relative changes of seismic velocity are visible for three eruptions betwee 2009 and 2011. MSNoise is available on http://www.msnoise.org

  18. Full-Wave Ambient Noise Tomography of the Long Valley Volcanic Region (California)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinders, A. F.; Shelly, D. R.; Dawson, P. B.; Hill, D. P.; Shen, Y.

    2017-12-01

    In the late 1970s, and throughout the 1990s, Long Valley Caldera (California) experienced intense periods of unrest characterized by uplift of the resurgent dome, earthquake swarms, and CO2 emissions around Mammoth Mountain. While modeling of the uplift and gravity changes support the possibility of new magmatic intrusions beneath the caldera, geologic interpretations conclude that the magmatic system underlying the caldera is moribund. Geophysical studies yield diverse versions of a sizable but poorly resolved low-velocity zone at depth (> 6km), yet whether this zone is indicative of a significant volume of crystal mush, smaller isolated pockets of partial melt, or magmatic fluids, is inconclusive. The nature of this low-velocity zone, and the state of volcano's magmatic system, carry important implications for the significance of resurgent-dome inflation and the nature of associated hazards. To better characterize this low-velocity zone we present preliminary results from a 3D full-waveform ambient-noise seismic tomography model derived from the past 25 years of vertical component broadband and short-period seismic data. This new study uses fully numerical solutions of the wave equation to account for the complex wave propagation in a heterogeneous, 3D earth model, including wave interaction with topography. The method ensures that wave propagation is modeled accurately in 3D, enabling the full use of seismic records. By using empirical Green's functions, derived from ambient noise and modeled as Rayleigh surface waves, we are able to extend model resolution to depths beyond the limits of previous local earthquake studies. The model encompasses not only the Long Valley Caldera, but the entire Long Valley Volcanic Region, including Mammoth Mountain and the Mono Crater/Inyo Domes volcanic chain.

  19. Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Climate, Ambient Air Quality, and Noise (DRAFT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardi, D.A.; Blasing, T.J.; Easterly, C.E.; Hamilton, C.B.

    1994-06-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive background scientific data and related information on climate, ambient air quality, and ambient noise levels collected during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 withdrawing its Notice of Intent of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The report presents a general description of the climate and air quality for the islands of Hawaii (henceforth referred to as Hawaii), Maui, and Oahu. It also presents a literature review as baseline information on the health effects of hydrogen sulfide. the scientific background data and related information is being made available for use by others in conducting future scientific research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

  20. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Climate, ambient air quality, and noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardi, D.A.; Blasing, T.J.; Easterly, C.E.; Reed, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hamilton, C.B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive background scientific data and related information on climate, ambient air quality, and ambient noise levels collected during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The report presents a general description of the climate add air quality for the islands of Hawaii (henceforth referred to as Hawaii), Maui and Oahu. It also presents a literature review as baseline information on the health effects of sulfide. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for use by others in conducting future scientific research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

  1. Time-Lapse Monitoring of an Engineering Scaled Excavation at Federal District, Brazil by Passive Ambient NoiseInterferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Soto, M., Sr.; Hussain, Y.; Martinez-Carvajal, H., Sr.; Martino, S., Sr.; Rocha, M., Sr.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the dynamics of stress relief mechanisms that lead to complete material collapse of unstable slopes is challenging. This research is focused on the novel use of Passive Ambient Noise Interferometry (PANI), a new technique that has revolutionized the seismology. In this technique the impulse response or Green function between two sensors is calculated by cross-correlation of the noise rescored at these stations. We applied PANI to monitor the deformational behavior of a prototype field experiment under semi controlled conditions for their use in landsliding early warning systems.The experimental setup consists of a 2 m engineering-scaled excavation,where induced failure was monitored by ambient vibrations propagating in tropical clayey deposits. The experimental setup consisted of dense network of 20 three components short period seismometers (Sercel L4C-3D) installed in three circular arrays with their distances from face of normal slope as 10, 20 and 30 meters, respectively.The frequency response of these seismometers is in range of 2-100 Hz. Recording was done in continuous mode at sampling rate of 1000 Hz with datalogger (RefTek DAS-130/3). Sensors were time synchronized by twenty 130 GPS/01. In this stage, the stress was applied on the one flank of this normal slope dug in the experimental field of University of Brasilia, by a hydraulic jack through a metallic plate. This incremental loading was kept on rising until the slope failure took place. This loading mechanism provided an opportunity to monitoring the changes in Rayleigh wave velocity before, during and after the complete failure. After initial processing, the green function (GF) or impulse response was calculated between each pair of sensors by cross correlation at time step of 4 second. All individual GFs, for entire monitoring period (30 minutes) were stacked to obtained a single reference GF. Stretching (dt/t) in waveform is calculated by subtracting individual GF from average GF, that

  2. On measuring surface wave phase velocity from station–station cross-correlation of ambient signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boschi, Lapo; Weemstra, Cornelis; Verbeke, Julie

    2012-01-01

    We apply two different algorithms to measure surface wave phase velocity, as a function of frequency, from seismic ambient noise recorded at pairs of stations from a large European network. The two methods are based on consistent theoretical formulations, but differ in the implementation: one met...

  3. VS of the uppermost crust structure of the Campi Flegrei caldera (southern Italy) from ambient noise Rayleigh wave analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzo, M. R.; Nunziata, C.; Strollo, R.

    2017-11-01

    Shear wave velocities (VS) are defined in the uppermost 1-2 km of the Campi Flegrei caldera through the non-linear inversion of the group velocity dispersion curves of fundamental-mode Rayleigh waves extracted from ambient noise cross-correlations between two receivers. Noise recordings, three months long, at 12 seismic stations are cross-correlated between all couples of stations. The experiment provided successful results along 54 paths (inter-stations distance), of which 27 sampled a depth > 1 km. VS contour lines are drawn from 0.06 km b.s.l. to 1 km depth b.s.l. and show difference between the offshore (gulf of Pozzuoli and coastline) and the onshore areas. At 0.06 km b.s.l., the gulf of Pozzuoli and the coastline are characterized by VS of 0.3-0.5 km/s and of 0.5-0.7 km/s, respectively. Such velocities are typical of Neapolitan pyroclastic soils and fractured or altered tuffs. The inland shows VS in the range 0.7-0.9 km/s, typical of Neapolitan compact tuffs. Velocities increase with depth and, at 1 km depth b.s.l., velocities lower than 1.5 km/s are still present in the gulf and along the coastline while velocities higher than 1.9 km/s characterize the eastern sector (grossly coincident with the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff caldera rim), the S. Vito plain and the area between Solfatara and SW of Astroni. Such features are much more evident along two cross-sections drawn in the offshore and onshore sectors by integrating our VS models with literature data. Our models join previous noise cross-correlation studies at greater scale at depths of 0.7-0.8 km, hence the picture of the Campi Flegrei caldera is shown up to a depth of 15 km. VS of about 1.7 km/s, corresponding to compression velocities (VP) of about 3 km/s (computed by using the VP/VS ratio resulted in the inversion), are found at depths of 1.1 km, in the centre of the gulf of Pozzuoli, and at a depth of about 0.7 km b.s.l. onshore. An increment of VS velocity ( 1.9-2.0 km/s) is locally observed onshore

  4. Locating Microseism Sources Using Spurious Arrivals in Intercontinental Noise Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retailleau, Lise; Boué, Pierre; Stehly, Laurent; Campillo, Michel

    2017-10-01

    The accuracy of Green's functions retrieved from seismic noise correlations in the microseism frequency band is limited by the uneven distribution of microseism sources at the surface of the Earth. As a result, correlation functions are often biased as compared to the expected Green's functions, and they can include spurious arrivals. These spurious arrivals are seismic arrivals that are visible on the correlation and do not belong to the theoretical impulse response. In this article, we propose to use Rayleigh wave spurious arrivals detected on correlation functions computed between European and United States seismic stations to locate microseism sources in the Atlantic Ocean. We perform a slant stack on a time distance gather of correlations obtained from an array of stations that comprises a regional deployment and a distant station. The arrival times and the apparent slowness of the spurious arrivals lead to the location of their source, which is obtained through a grid search procedure. We discuss improvements in the location through this methodology as compared to classical back projection of microseism energy. This method is interesting because it only requires an array and a distant station on each side of an ocean, conditions that can be met relatively easily.

  5. Analysis of ambient noise in Yalova, Turkey: discrimination between artificial and natural excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcinkaya, Esref; Tekebas, Serhat; Pinar, Ali

    2013-07-01

    Ambient noise measurements acquired in Yalova, which was highly damaged during the 1999 Izmit earthquake, are analyzed to explore the site characteristics. The region of Yalova is governed by complex geological and geomorphological structures consisting of river beds extending from the mountains to the sea, ridges between them, plains in front of them with different size, and the sea coast. As a result of these shallow geological features, the H/V curves exhibit complex patterns. Clear peaks in the H/V curves, which can be interpreted as reliable site resonance frequency, are observed only at about half of the measurement sites. At the remaining sites industrial peaks, broad peaks, or flat responses dominate the spectral ratio graphs. We observed that man-made noises generated by marble cutting machines in Hersek delta mask the site resonance frequencies or can be misinterpreted as a resonance frequency. In total, we identified three anthropogenic noise sources at fundamental frequencies of 1.3, 1.5, and 1.7 Hz along with their two- and threefold harmonics. The parts of H/V curves showing unusual low scattering can be a clue to identify anthropogenic effects. In the assessment of H/V curves, the site location and the similarity of the near surface geology were taken into account. The Laledere plain with thick and soft sediment sequence surprisingly displays flat responses due to a possible low impedance contrast. The Ciftlikkoy and Hacimehmet plains exhibit clear resonance peaks at nearly 1 Hz possessing the largest amplitudes. These sites experienced the highest damage in Yalova during the Izmit earthquake. In contrast, the Cinarcik region which was also exposed to high damage, do not show any obvious amplifications on the H/V curves. Generally, the H/V curves for valley and ridge sites in Yalova reveals a resonance peak at approximately 1 Hz and almost flat curves, respectively. However, several sites on the ridges and valleys portray different patterns.

  6. Ambient noise tomography of Ecuador: Fore- and back-arc velocity structure and radial anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynner, C.; Beck, S. L.; Porritt, R.; Meltzer, A.; Alvarado, A. P.; Gabriela, P.; Ruiz, M. C.; Hoskins, M.; Stachnik, J.; Rietbrock, A.; Leon-Rios, S.; Regnier, M. M.; Agurto-Detzel, H.; Font, Y.; Charvis, P.

    2017-12-01

    In northern South America, the oceanic Nazca plate subducts beneath the South American continent, giving rise to the high mountains of the northern Andes. The Ecuador subduction zone has a history of large megathrust earthquakes, most recently the Mw=7.8 April 16, 2016, Pedernales earthquake. The volcanic arc in Ecuador is broad with active volcanoes along both the western and eastern cordilleras. Many of these volcanoes surround the city of Quito putting millions of people at risk. A recent international broadband aftershock deployment was conducted for approximately one year after the Pedernales mainshock and this data combined with a sub-set of data from from the permanent IGEPN national network provide an ideal data set to use for ambient noise tomography (ANT) to constrain absolute Vsh and Vsv across Ecuador. ANT studies use noise-generated surface wave dispersion measurements to invert for 3D shear velocity in the crust. Having a precise understanding of crustal velocity structure is necessary to advance a number of projects, including better earthquake locations of the April 16, 2016 Pedernales-earthquake aftershock sequence and identifying large-scale partial melt zones associated with the active volcanic arc. The majority of ANT studies use only Rayleigh waves to constrain Vsv structure. Initial Rayleigh wave ANT results, using periods between 8 and 40 seconds, show a fast phase velocities for the forearc and much slower phase velocities for the high elevation volcanic arc. Including Love wave dispersion measurements can improve overall crustal velocity models, as well as provide constraints on radial anisotropy. Radial anisotropy can develop in a variety of ways but most typically arises from the deformation-induced alignment of anisotropic minerals. Radial anisotropy, therefore, can inform on patterns of ductile crustal flow. Strong radial anisotropy at mid-crustal depths from ANT has already been observed south of Ecuador, in the Central Andean Plateau

  7. Three-dimensional S-wave velocity model of the Bohemian Massif from Bayesian ambient noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentová, Lubica; Gallovič, František; Maierová, Petra

    2017-10-01

    We perform two-step surface wave tomography of phase-velocity dispersion curves obtained by ambient noise cross-correlations in the Bohemian Massif. In the first step, the inter-station dispersion curves were inverted for each period (ranging between 4 and 20 s) separately into phase-velocity maps using 2D adjoint method. In the second step, we perform Bayesian inversion of the set of the phase-velocity maps into an S-wave velocity model. To sample the posterior probability density function, the parallel tempering algorithm is employed providing over 1 million models. From the model samples, not only mean model but also its uncertainty is determined to appraise the reliable features. The model is correlated with known main geologic structures of the Bohemian Massif. The uppermost low-velocity anomalies are in agreement with thick sedimentary basins. In deeper parts (4-20 km), the S-wave velocity anomalies correspond, in general, to main tectonic domains of the Bohemian Massif. The exception is a stable low-velocity body in the middle of the high-velocity Moldanubian domain and high-velocity body resembling a promontory of the Moldanubian into the Teplá-Barrandian domain. The most pronounced (high-velocity) anomaly is located beneath the Eger Rift that is a part of a Tertiary rift system across Europe.

  8. Ambient noise causes independent changes in distinct spectro-temporal features of echolocation calls in horseshoe bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hage, Steffen R; Jiang, Tinglei; Berquist, Sean W; Feng, Jiang; Metzner, Walter

    2014-07-15

    One of the most efficient mechanisms to optimize signal-to-noise ratios is the Lombard effect - an involuntary rise in call amplitude due to ambient noise. It is often accompanied by changes in the spectro-temporal composition of calls. We examined the effects of broadband-filtered noise on the spectro-temporal composition of horseshoe bat echolocation calls, which consist of a constant-frequency component and initial and terminal frequency-modulated components. We found that the frequency-modulated components became larger for almost all noise conditions, whereas the bandwidth of the constant-frequency component increased only when broadband-filtered noise was centered on or above the calls' dominant or fundamental frequency. This indicates that ambient noise independently modifies the associated acoustic parameters of the Lombard effect, such as spectro-temporal features, and could significantly affect the bat's ability to detect and locate targets. Our findings may be of significance in evaluating the impact of environmental noise on echolocation behavior in bats. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Ambient Noise Tomography at Regional and Local Scales in Southern California using Rayleigh Wave Phase Dispersion and Ellipticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, E.; Lin, F. C.; Qiu, H.; Wang, Y.; Allam, A. A.; Clayton, R. W.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Rayleigh waves extracted from cross-correlations of ambient seismic noise have proven useful in imaging the shallow subsurface velocity structure. In contrast to phase velocities, which are sensitive to slightly deeper structure, Rayleigh wave ellipticity (H/V ratios) constrains the uppermost crust. We conduct Rayleigh wave ellipticity and phase dispersion measurements in Southern California between 6 and 18 second periods, computed from multi-component ambient noise cross-correlations using 315 stations across the region in 2015. Because of the complimentary sensitivity of phase velocity and H/V, this method enables simple and accurate resolution of near-surface geological features from the surface to 20km depth. We compare the observed H/V ratios and phase velocities to predictions generated from the current regional models (SCEC UCVM), finding strong correspondence where the near-surface structure is well-resolved by the models. This includes high H/V ratios in the LA Basin, Santa Barbara Basin and Salton Trough; and low ratios in the San Gabriel, San Jacinto and southern Sierra Nevada mountains. Disagreements in regions such as the Western Transverse Ranges, Salton Trough, San Jacinto and Elsinore fault zones motivate further work to improve the community models. A new updated 3D isotropic model of the area is derived via a joint inversion of Rayleigh phase dispersions and H/V ratios. Additionally, we examine azimuthal dependence of the H/V ratio to ascertain anisotropy patterns for each station. Clear 180º periodicity is observed for many stations suggesting strong shallow anisotropy across the region including up to 20% along the San Andreas fault, 15% along the San Jacinto Fault and 25% in the LA Basin. To better resolve basin structures, we apply similar techniques to three dense linear geophone arrays in the San Gabriel and San Bernardino basins. The three arrays are composed by 50-125 three-component 5Hz geophones deployed for one month each with 15-25km

  10. Damage Detection of Structures for Ambient Loading Based on Cross Correlation Function Amplitude and SVM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-sheng Huo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An effective method for the damage detection of skeletal structures which combines the cross correlation function amplitude (CCFA with the support vector machine (SVM is presented in this paper. The proposed method consists of two stages. Firstly, the data features are extracted from the CCFA, which, calculated from dynamic responses and as a representation of the modal shapes of the structure, changes when damage occurs on the structure. The data features are then input into the SVM with the one-against-one (OAO algorithm to classify the damage status of the structure. The simulation data of IASC-ASCE benchmark model and a vibration experiment of truss structure are adopted to verify the feasibility of proposed method. The results show that the proposed method is suitable for the damage identification of skeletal structures with the limited sensors subjected to ambient excitation. As the CCFA based data features are sensitive to damage, the proposed method demonstrates its reliability in the diagnosis of structures with damage, especially for those with minor damage. In addition, the proposed method shows better noise robustness and is more suitable for noisy environments.

  11. Radial anisotropy of Northeast Asia inferred from Bayesian inversions of ambient noise data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. J.; Kim, S.; Rhie, J.

    2017-12-01

    The eastern margin of the Eurasia plate exhibits complex tectonic settings due to interactions with the subducting Pacific and Philippine Sea plates and the colliding India plate. Distributed extensional basins and intraplate volcanoes, and their heterogeneous features in the region are not easily explained with a simple mechanism. Observations of radial anisotropy in the entire lithosphere and the part of the asthenosphere provide the most effective evidence for the deformation of the lithosphere and the associated variation of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). To infer anisotropic structures of crustal and upper-mantle in this region, radial anisotropy is measured using ambient noise data. In a continuation of previous Rayleigh wave tomography study in Northeast Asia, we conduct Love wave tomography to determine radial anisotropy using the Bayesian inversion techniques. Continuous seismic noise recordings of 237 broad-band seismic stations are used and more than 55,000 group and phase velocities of fundamental mode are measured for periods of 5-60 s. Total 8 different types of dispersion maps of Love wave from this study (period 10-60 s), Rayleigh wave from previous tomographic study (Kim et al., 2016; period 8-70 s) and longer period data (period 70-200 s) from a global model (Ekstrom, 2011) are jointly inverted using a hierarchical and transdimensional Bayesian technique. For each grid-node, boundary depths, velocities and anisotropy parameters of layers are sampled simultaneously on the assumption of the layered half-space model. The constructed 3-D radial anisotropy model provides much more details about the crust and upper mantle anisotropic structures, and about the complex undulation of the LAB.

  12. Shot noise as a probe of spin-correlated transport through single atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, S.; Fransson, J.

    2018-03-01

    We address the shot noise in the tunneling current through a local spin, pertaining to recent experiments on magnetic adatoms and single molecular magnets. We show that both uncorrelated and spin-correlated scattering processes contribute vitally to the noise spectrum. The spin-correlated scattering processes provide an additional contribution to the Landauer-Büttiker shot noise expression, accounting for correlations between the tunneling electrons and the localized spin moment. By calculating the Fano factor, we show that both super- and sub-Poissonian shot noise can be described within our approach. Our theory provides transparent insights into noise spectroscopy, consistent with recent experiments using local probing techniques on magnetic atoms.

  13. Stochastic resonance in FitzHugh-Nagumo neural system driven by correlated non-Gaussian noise and Gaussian noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yong-Feng; Xi, Bei; Wei, Fang; Tan, Jian-Guo

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, the phenomenon of stochastic resonance in FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) neural system driven by correlated non-Gaussian noise and Gaussian white noise is investigated. First, the analytical expression of the stationary probability distribution is derived by using the path integral approach and the unified colored noise approximation. Then, we obtain the expression of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by applying the theory of two-state model. The results show that the phenomena of stochastic resonance and multiple stochastic resonance appear in FHN neural system under different values of parameters. The effects of the multiplicative noise intensity D and the additive noise intensity Q on the SNR are entirely different. In addition, the discharge behavior of FHN neural system is restrained when the value of Q is smaller. But, it is conducive to enhance signal response of FHN neural system when the values of Q and D are relatively larger.

  14. Ambient noise tomography of the Cameroon Volcanic Line and Northern Congo craton: new constraints on the structure of the lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidarelli, M.; Aoudia, A.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the lithospheric structure of Cameroon inverting Rayleigh waves obtained from the cross-correlation of ambient seismic noise. We correlate seismic records between 32 broad-band stations and we obtain good quality Rayleigh waves for 310 interstation paths. We measure group velocity dispersion curves from the reconstructed Rayleigh waves in the period range 10-35 s and we invert the group velocities for tomographic images. After the tomography the group velocities are then inverted, together with longer period group velocity measurements from existing literature, to compute a 3-D S-wave velocity model of the Cameroon lithosphere down to 100 km depth. Our results provide an unprecedented mapping of the physical properties of the different crustal units and their correlations with surface geology, as well as with mantle lithospheric variations. The Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL) appears as a segmented feature exhibiting different physical properties along strike. The active Mt Cameroon volcano is underlain by very low velocities, unlike the other segments of the CVL. The along-strike variations in crustal structure suggest that lateral heterogeneities in lithospheric thickness and physical properties have influenced the location and distribution of magmatism. The crust beneath the Central African Shear Zone exhibits a sizeable low velocity anomaly. The lithosphere beneath Cameroon is characterised by a heterogeneous crust with a relatively constant thickness and a low velocity uppermost mantle at the edge of the Congo Craton. Our results favour processes combining small-scale upwelling at the edge of a thick lithosphere and reactivation of Precambrian basement structures to explain the distribution of Holocene-Recent magmatism and plateau uplift. Our results also indicate that Mt Cameroon and surroundings areas are the most at risk zones for magmatic activity during this stage of CVL development.

  15. Crust azimuthal anisotropy beneath the eastern Tibetan Plateau revealed by ambient noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, X.; Song, X.

    2017-12-01

    The continental collision between India and Eurasia in the Cenozoic has resulted in the rise and growth of the vast Tibetan Plateau (TP). Various geodynamic models, such as rigid-block extrusion, continuous deformation, and the mid-lower crustal flow, have been proposed to describe the growth and expansion of eastern Tibet. To better understand the deformation mechanism of the eastern TP, we performed ambient noise tomography using data from permanent and temporary stations and constructed Rayleigh wave azimuthally anisotropic phase-velocity maps at periods from 8 to 30 s, which mainly sample the crustal structure. The dominant direction of fast wave propagation is oriented NW-SE in the northeastern and eastern TP and N-S in the southeastern TP, which is consistent with the trends of main strike-slip faults and the fast polarization directions of SKS waves and suggests vertically coherent deformation. Furthermore, the magnitude of crustal anisotropy is continuous across main strike-slip faults, which contracts with the prediction of rigid-block extrusion model. Taken together, our model supports vertically coherent distributed deformation in the eastern TP.

  16. Environmental seismology: What can we learn on earth surface processes with ambient noise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larose, Eric; Carrière, Simon; Voisin, Christophe; Bottelin, Pierre; Baillet, Laurent; Guéguen, Philippe; Walter, Fabian; Jongmans, Denis; Guillier, Bertrand; Garambois, Stéphane; Gimbert, Florent; Massey, Chris

    2015-05-01

    Environmental seismology consists in studying the mechanical vibrations that originate from, or that have been affected by external causes, that is to say causes outside the solid Earth. This includes for instance the coupling between the solid Earth and the cryosphere, or the hydrosphere, the anthroposphere and the specific sources of vibration developing there. Environmental seismology also addresses the modifications of the wave propagation due to environmental forcing such as temperature and hydrology. Recent developments in data processing, together with increasing computational power and sensor concentration have led to original observations that allow for the development of this new field of seismology. In this article, we will particularly review how we can track and interpret tiny changes in the subsurface of the Earth related to external changes from modifications of the seismic wave propagation, with application to geomechanics, hydrology, and natural hazard. We will particularly demonstrate that, using ambient noise, we can track 1) thermal variations in the subsoil, in buildings or in rock columns; 2) the temporal and spatial evolution of a water table; 3) the evolution of the rigidity of the soil constituting a landslide, and especially the drop of rigidity preceding a failure event.

  17. Magmatism on rift flanks: insights from Ambient-Noise Phase-velocity in Afar region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korostelev, Félicie; Weemstra, Cornelis; Leroy, Sylvie; Boschi, Lapo; Ren, Yong; Ahmed, Abdulhakim; Keir, Derek; Stuart, Graham W.; Rolandone, Frédérique; Khanbari, Khaled; Hammond, James O. S.; Kendall, J. Michael; Doubre, Cécile; Ganad, Ismail Al

    2015-04-01

    During the breakup of continent in the presence of magma, strain is commonly assumed to initially occur by border faulting, and progressively migrate in space and time towards axial magma intrusion. Magmatic processes near the rift flanks are commonly ignored. We present phase-velocity maps of the crust and uppermost mantle of the conjugate margins of the southern Red Sea (Afar and Yemen) using ambient noise tomography to constrain crustal modification during breakup. Our images show that the low seismic velocities characterize not only upper crust beneath the axial volcanic systems, but also both upper and lower crust beneath rift flanks where ongoing volcanism and hydrothermal activity occurs at the surface. The results show that magmatic modification of the crust beneath rift flanks likely occurs for a protracted period of time during the breakup process, and may persist through to early seafloor spreading. Since ongoing flank magmatism during breakup impacts the thermal evolution of the lithosphere, it has implications for the subsidence history of the rift.

  18. Depth and sharpness variations of 410-km and 660-km discontinuities in North China Craton from dense array ambient noise interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, H.; Feng, J.; Poli, P.; Fang, L.; Wu, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that body waves between pairs of stations can be successfully retrieved from ambient noise cross-correlation at both regional and global scales, although surface waves are the dominant signals. However, it is still difficult to use these retrieved body wave signals to map lateral depth variations of main structural discontinuities or velocity contrasts because of its low signal to noise ratio (SNR). In this research, based on a dense seismic array in eastern North China Craton, reflected P-wave signals from 410-km and 660-km discontinuities can be successfully recovered from ambient noise cross-correlation. To improve SNR of the reflected phases, the cross-correlations are stacked within each bin with the phase-weighted stack (PWS) method. In addition, there exist apparent spatial variations of the relative amplitude ratios between the reflected P410P and P660P phases. The retrieved P410P and P660P phases from stacked correlations reveal lateral variations of both depths and sharpness of the 410-km and 660-km discontinuities along two profiles, which may be related with hot material upwelling and the effect of stagnant Pacific plate in the transition zone beneath North China Craton. The imaging results are generally consistent with the results from teleseismic receiver functions, which demonstrate the possibility of mapping high-resolution topography and sharpness of deep internal discontinuities without earthquake-station geometric limitations. Future joint imaging with both interferometric and passive signals will be better for understanding interface architectures and related dynamic processes of the Earth.

  19. White noise theory of robust nonlinear filtering with correlated state and observation noises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagchi, Arunabha; Karandikar, Rajeeva

    1992-01-01

    In the direct white noise theory of nonlinear filtering, the state process is still modeled as a Markov process satisfying an Ito stochastic differential equation, while a finitely additive white noise is used to model the observation noise. In the present work, this asymmetry is removed by modeling

  20. White noise theory of robust nonlinear filtering with correlated state and observation noises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagchi, Arunabha; Karandikar, Rajeeva

    1994-01-01

    In the existing `direct¿ white noise theory of nonlinear filtering, the state process is still modelled as a Markov process satisfying an Itô stochastic differential equation, while a `finitely additive¿ white noise is used to model the observation noise. We remove this asymmetry by modelling the

  1. Crustal Structure of the Gulf of Aden Continental Margins, from Afar to Oman, by Ambient Noise Seismic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korostelev, F.; Weemstra, C.; Boschi, L.; Leroy, S. D.; Ren, Y.; Stuart, G. W.; Keir, D.; Rolandone, F.; Ahmed, A.; Al Ganad, I.; Khanbari, K. M.; Doubre, C.; Hammond, J. O. S.; Kendall, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Continental rupture processes under mantle plume influence are still poorly known although extensively studied. The Gulf of Aden presents volcanic margins to the west, where they are influenced by the Afar hotspot, and non volcanic margins east of longitude 46° E. We imaged the crustal structure of the Gulf of Aden continental margins from Afar to Oman to evaluate the role of the Afar plume on the evolution of the passive margin and its extent towards the East. We use Ambient Noise Seismic Tomography to better understand the architecture and processes along the Gulf of Aden. This recent method, developed in the last decade, allows us to study the seismic signal propagating between two seismic stations. Ambient Noise Seismic Tomography is thus free from artifacts related to the distribution of earthquakes. We collected continuous records from about 200 permanent or temporary stations since 1999 to compute Rayleigh phase velocity maps over the Gulf of Aden.

  2. Imaging San Jacinto Fault damage zone structure using dense linear arrays: application of ambient noise tomography, Rayleigh wave ellipticity, and site amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Lin, F. C.; Allam, A. A.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The San Jacinto fault is presently the most seismically active component of the San Andreas Transform system in Southern California. To study the damage zone structure, two dense linear geophone arrays (BS and RR) were deployed across the Clark segment of the San Jacinto Fault between Anza and Hemet during winter 2015 and Fall 2016, respectively. Both arrays were 2 km long with 20 m station spacing. Month-long three-component ambient seismic noise data were recorded and used to calculate multi-channel cross-correlation functions. All three-component noise records of each array were normalized simultaneously to retain relative amplitude information between different stations and different components. We observed clear Rayleigh waves and Love waves on the cross-correlations of both arrays at 0.3 - 1 s period. The phase travel times of the Rayleigh waves on both arrays were measured by frequency-time analysis (FTAN), and inverted for Rayleigh wave phase velocity profiles of the upper 500 m depth. For both arrays, we observe prominent asymmetric low velocity zones which narrow with depth. At the BS array near the Hemet Stepover, an approximately 250m wide slow zone is observed to be offset by 75m to the northeast of the surface fault trace. At the RR array near the Anza segment of the fault, a similar low velocity zone width and offset are observed, along with a 10% across-fault velocity contrast. Analyses of Rayleigh wave ellipticity (H/V ratio), Love wave phase travel times, and site amplification are in progress. By using multiple measurements from ambient noise cross-correlations, we can obtain strong constraints on the local damage zone structure of the San Jacinto Fault. The results contribute to improved understanding of rupture directivity, maximum earthquake magnitude and more generally seismic hazard associated with the San Jacinto fault zone.

  3. Crustal structure beneath Liaoning province and the Bohai Sea and its adjacent region in China based on ambient noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Guang-hua; Feng, Ji-Kun; Lin, Jun

    2017-02-01

    The velocity structure of the crust beneath Liaoning province and the Bohai sea in China was imaged using ambient seismic noise recorded by 73 regional broadband stations. All available three-component time series from the 12-month span between January and December 2013 were cross-correlated to yield empirical Green's functions for Rayleigh and Love waves. Phase-velocity dispersion curves for the Rayleigh waves and the Love waves were measured by applying the frequency-time analysis method. Dispersion measurements of the Rayleigh wave and the Love wave were then utilized to construct 2D phase-velocity maps for the Rayleigh wave at 8-35 s periods and the Love wave at 9-32 s periods, respectively. Both Rayleigh and Love phase-velocity maps show significant lateral variations that are correlated well with known geological features and tectonics units in the study region. Next, phase dispersion curves of the Rayleigh wave and the Love wave extracted from each cell of the 2D Rayleigh wave and Love wave phase-velocity maps, respectively, were inverted simultaneously to determine the 3D shear wave velocity structures. The horizontal shear wave velocity images clearly and intuitively exhibit that the earthquake swarms in the Haicheng region and the Tangshan region are mainly clustered in the transition zone between the low- and high-velocity zones in the upper crust, coinciding with fault zones, and their distribution is very closely associated with these faults. The vertical shear wave velocity image reveals that the lower crust downward to the uppermost mantle is featured by distinctly high velocities, with even a high-velocity thinner layer existing at the bottom of the lower crust near Moho in central and northern the Bohai sea along the Tanlu fault, and these phenomena could be caused by the intrusion of mantle material, indicating the Tanlu fault could be just as the uprising channel of deep materials.

  4. Study of site effect using mining induced seismic events and ambient noise from Karviná region

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaláb, Zdeněk; Lyubushin, A. A.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 2 (2008), s. 105-113 ISSN 1214-9705. [Polish-Czech-Slovakian Symposium on Mining and Environmental Geophysics/31./. Janov nad Nisou, 24.09.2007-27.09.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA105/07/0878 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : mining induced seismic event * ambient noise * frequency analysis Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure http://www.irsm.cas.cz

  5. Seismic site characterization of the Kastelli (Kissamos) Basin in northwest Crete (Greece): Assessments using ambient noise recordings

    OpenAIRE

    Moisidi, M; Vallianatos, F; Kershaw, S; Collins, P

    2015-01-01

    Crete is actively seismic and site response studies are needed for estimating local site conditions subjected to seismic activity. In order to collect basic data, we performed ambient noise recordings to estimate the site response of the surface and near subsurface structure of the small-scale Kastelli Basin in northwest Crete. The spatial horizontal to vertical spectral ratios (HVSR) resonance pattern of the investigated sites in the centre of the Basin consists of either one or two peaks di...

  6. Detection capability of the IMS seismic network based on ambient seismic noise measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaebler, Peter J.; Ceranna, Lars

    2016-04-01

    All nuclear explosions - on the Earth's surface, underground, underwater or in the atmosphere - are banned by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). As part of this treaty, a verification regime was put into place to detect, locate and characterize nuclear explosion testings at any time, by anyone and everywhere on the Earth. The International Monitoring System (IMS) plays a key role in the verification regime of the CTBT. Out of the different monitoring techniques used in the IMS, the seismic waveform approach is the most effective technology for monitoring nuclear underground testing and to identify and characterize potential nuclear events. This study introduces a method of seismic threshold monitoring to assess an upper magnitude limit of a potential seismic event in a certain given geographical region. The method is based on ambient seismic background noise measurements at the individual IMS seismic stations as well as on global distance correction terms for body wave magnitudes, which are calculated using the seismic reflectivity method. From our investigations we conclude that a global detection threshold of around mb 4.0 can be achieved using only stations from the primary seismic network, a clear latitudinal dependence for the detection threshold can be observed between northern and southern hemisphere. Including the seismic stations being part of the auxiliary seismic IMS network results in a slight improvement of global detection capability. However, including wave arrivals from distances greater than 120 degrees, mainly PKP-wave arrivals, leads to a significant improvement in average global detection capability. In special this leads to an improvement of the detection threshold on the southern hemisphere. We further investigate the dependence of the detection capability on spatial (latitude and longitude) and temporal (time) parameters, as well as on parameters such as source type and percentage of operational IMS stations.

  7. Ambient seismic noise levels: A survey of the permanent and temporary seismographic networks in Morocco, North Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Fellah, Y.; Khairy Abd Ed-Aal, A.; El Moudnib, L.; Mimoun, H.; Villasenor, A.; Gallart, J.; Thomas, C.; Elouai, D.; Mimoun, C.; Himmi, M.

    2013-12-01

    Abstract The results, of a conducted study carried out to analyze variations in ambient seismic noise levels at sites of the installed broadband stations in Morocco, North Africa, are obtained. The permanent and the temporary seismic stations installed in Morocco of the Scientific Institute ( IS, Rabat, Morocco), institute de Ciencias de la Tierra Jaume almera (ICTJA, Barcelona, Spain) and Institut für Geophysik (Munster, Germany) were used in this study. In this work, we used 23 broadband seismic stations installed in different structural domains covering all Morocco from south to north. The main purposes of the current study are: 1) to present a catalog of seismic background noise spectra for Morocco obtained from recently installed broadband stations, 2) to assess the effects of experimental temporary seismic vault construction, 3) to determine the time needed for noise at sites to stabilize, 4) to establish characteristics and origin of seismic noise at those sites. We calculated power spectral densities of background noise for each component of each broadband seismometer deployed in the different investigated sites and then compared them with the high-noise model and low-noise Model of Peterson (1993). All segments from day and night local time windows were included in the calculation without parsing out earthquakes. The obtained results of the current study could be used forthcoming to evaluate permanent station quality. Moreover, this study could be considered as a first step to develop new seismic noise models in North Africa not included in Peterson (1993). Keywords Background noise; Power spectral density; Model of Peterson; Scientific Institute; Institute de Ciencias de la Tierra Jaume almera; Institut für Geophysik

  8. The effects of observational correlated noises on multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulich, Damián; Zunino, Luciano

    2012-08-01

    We have numerically investigated the effects that observational correlated noises have on the generalized Hurst exponents, h(q), estimated by using the multifractal generalization of detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA). More precisely, artificially generated stochastic binomial multifractals with increased amount of colored noises were analyzed via MF-DFA. It has been recently shown that for moderate additions of white noise, the generalized Hurst exponents are significantly underestimated for qeffects of additive noise, short- term memory and periodic trends, Physica A 390 (2011) 2480-2490]. In this paper, we have found that h(q) with q≥2 are also affected when correlated noises are considered. This is due to the fact that the spurious correlations influence the scaling behaviors associated to large fluctuations. The results obtained are significant for practical situations, where noises with different correlations are inherently present.

  9. Variability in ambient noise levels and call parameters of North Atlantic right whales in three habitat areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Susan E; Urazghildiiev, Ildar; Clark, Christopher W

    2009-02-01

    The North Atlantic right whale inhabits the coastal waters off the east coasts of the United States and Canada, areas characterized by high levels of shipping and fishing activities. Acoustic communication plays an important role in the social behavior of these whales and increases in low-frequency noise may be leading to changes in their calling behavior. This study characterizes the ambient noise levels, including both natural and anthropogenic sources, and right whale upcall parameters in three right whale habitat areas. Continuous recordings were made seasonally using autonomous bottom-mounted recorders in the Bay of Fundy, Canada (2004, 2005), Cape Cod Bay, (2005, 2006), and off the coast of Georgia (2004-2005, 2006-2007). Consistent interannual trends in noise parameters were found for each habitat area, with both the band level and spectrum level measurements higher in the Bay of Fundy than in the other areas. Measured call parameters varied between habitats and between years within the same habitat area, indicating that habitat area and noise levels alone are not sufficient to predict variability in call parameters. These results suggest that right whales may be responding to the peak frequency of noise, rather than the absolute noise level in their environment.

  10. Noise enhanced stability effect in a metastable system with two different kinds of time delays and cross-correlated noises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Zhenglin; Mei Dongcheng

    2011-01-01

    We numerically investigate the influences of the time delay τ simultaneously existing in both the deterministic and fluctuating forces, the time delay τ r existing only in the fluctuating force and the cross-correlation strength λ on the enhancement of the mean first-passage time (MFPT) as a function of the additive D and the multiplicative α noise intensities in a metastable system. The results indicate that both the multiplicative and additive noises can induce the noise-enhanced stability (NES) effect. An increase of λ can enhance or weaken the NES effect induced by the additive noise, depending on the value of τ. However, it weakens the NES effect induced by the multiplicative noise with a suppression of the effect of λ caused by increasing τ. The τ-induced critical behavior on both NES effects can be observed, i.e. an increase of τ can enhance or restrain the NES effects induced by the two kinds of noises. With an increase of λ and τ, MFPT versus D shows a transition from one peak to two peaks and finally one peak, implying the multiple NES effect caused by λ and τ. An increase of τ r can enhance the NES effect induced by the additive noise and weaken the NES effect induced by the multiplicative noise.

  11. Method for numerical simulation of two-term exponentially correlated colored noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, B.; Ayik, S.; Abe, Y.; Gokalp, A.; Yilmaz, O.

    2006-01-01

    A method for numerical simulation of two-term exponentially correlated colored noise is proposed. The method is an extension of traditional method for one-term exponentially correlated colored noise. The validity of the algorithm is tested by comparing numerical simulations with analytical results in two physical applications

  12. Assessment of ambient noise levels in the intensive care unit of a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatem O Qutub

    2009-01-01

    Conclusion : Some sources of environmental noise, such as the use of oxygen, suction equipment or respirators are unavoidable. Nevertheless, hospital ICUs should have measures to minimize the level of exposure to noise in the ICU. Further research in this area might focus on the noise level and other modifiable environmental stress factors in the ICU that affect patients as well as the staff.

  13. Ambient seismic noise as an interesting indirect cue for the Cerithidea decollata migrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazzi, Veronica; Lotti, Alessia

    2017-04-01

    Presence or absence of water, food availability, capability of avoiding predation, and body temperature are constantly changing according to the tidal excursion. In fact, more than the diurnal light-dark variation, tide is shaping the whole intertidal animal life. Therefore, physiological and behavioural systems exist to reduce the stress that the intertidal fauna may face during the unsuitable tidal phase. Cerithidea decollata is a common western Indian Ocean mangrove gastropod. It feeds on the ground at low tide, and climbs the trees two/three hours before the water arrival to avoid submersion. In spite of the irregular East African tidal pattern, it also regularly settles on trunks roughly 40 cm above the maximum level of the incoming tide. Migrations usually take place about twice a day unless at Neap Tide, when snails may remain on the dry ground. Past experiments showed that a biological clock cannot account for water level foreseeing, nor direct visual cues or chemical information from the water itself or from previous migrations have been detected. On the other hand, tidal gravity variations can be felt by the snails. Moreover, other indirect cues could be hypothesize related to a) the oceanic waves reaching the coast and the barrier reef (seismic noise), or b) the changes in ground resistivity (self potential) caused by the sea water moving close. To verify these hypotheses, an integrated geophysical survey (single-station seismic noise and self potential survey) was carried out at Mida Creek (Kenya) to characterize the local seismic wavefield in terms of its amplitude and to measure the temporal variations of the electric potential field. Final goal was to verify whether a correlation exists between the time evolution of these phenomena and the snail movements. Here we present the first results of the seismic noise measurements. Data were acquired by means of a single station all-in-one 3-directional 24-bit digital tromometer equipped with 4.5 Hz

  14. Combined effects of road traffic noise and ambient air pollution in relation to risk for stroke?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette; Lühdorf, Pernille; Ketzel, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to road traffic noise and air pollution have both been associated with risk for stroke. The few studies including both exposures show inconsistent results. We aimed to investigate potential mutual confounding and combined effects between road traffic noise and air pollution in association...... to 2009 were identified in national registers and road traffic noise and air pollution were modeled for all addresses. Analyses were done using Cox regression. A higher mean annual exposure at time of diagnosis of 10µg/m(3) nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and 10dB road traffic noise at the residential address...... was found for combination of high noise and high NO2 (IRR=1.28; 95% CI=1.09-1.52). Fatal stroke was positively associated with air pollution and not with traffic noise. In conclusion, in mutually adjusted models road traffic noise and not air pollution was associated ischemic stroke, while only air...

  15. Shear velocity model for the westernmost Mediterranean from ambient noise and ballistic finite-frequency Rayleigh wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomeras, I.; Villasenor, A.; Thurner, S.; Levander, A.; Gallart, J.; Harnafi, M.

    2014-12-01

    The westernmost Mediterranean comprises the Iberian Peninsula and Morocco, separated by the Alboran Sea and the Algerian Basin. From north to south this region consists of the Pyrenees, resulting from Iberia-Eurasia collision; the Iberian Massif, which has been undeformed since the end of the Paleozoic; the Central System and Iberian Chain, regions with intracontinental Oligocene-Miocene deformation; the Gibraltar Arc (Betics, Rif and Alboran terranes), resulting from post-Oligocene subduction roll-back; and the Atlas Mountains. We analyzed data from recent broad-band array deployments and permanent stations in the area (IberArray and Siberia arrays, the PICASSO array, the University of Munster array, and the Spanish, Portuguese and Moroccan National Networks) to characterize its lithospheric structure. The combined array of 350 stations has an average interstation spacing of ~60 km. We calculated the Rayleigh waves phase velocities from ambient noise (periods 4 to 40 s) and teleseismic events (periods 20 to 167 s). We inverted the phase velocities to obtain a shear velocity model for the lithosphere to ~200 km depth. Our results correlate well with the surface expression of the main structural units with higher crustal velocity for the Iberian Massif than for the Alpine Iberia and Atlas Mountains. The Gibraltar Arc has lower crustal shear velocities than the regional average at all crustal depths. It also shows an arc shaped anomaly with high upper mantle velocities (>4.6 km/s) at shallow depths (volcanic fields in Iberia and Morocco, indicative of high temperatures at relatively shallow depths, and suggesting that the lithosphere has been removed beneath these areas.

  16. Ambient noise tomography reveals basalt and sub-basalt velocity structure beneath the Faroe Islands, North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammarco, Carmelo; Cornwell, David G.; Rawlinson, Nicholas

    2017-11-01

    Ambient noise tomography is applied to seismic data recorded by a portable array of seismographs deployed throughout the Faroe Islands in an effort to illuminate basalt sequences of the North Atlantic Igneous Province, as well as underlying sedimentary layers and Precambrian basement. Rayleigh wave empirical Green's functions between all station pairs are extracted from the data via cross-correlation of long-term recordings, with phase weighted stacking implemented to boost signal-to-noise ratio. Dispersion analysis is applied to extract inter-station group travel-times in the period range 0.5-15 s, followed by inversion for period-dependent group velocity maps. Subsequent inversion for 3-D shear wave velocity reveals the presence of significant lateral heterogeneity (up to 25%) in the crust. Main features of the final model include: (i) a near-surface low velocity layer, interpreted to be the Malinstindur Formation, which comprises subaerial compound lava flows with a weathered upper surface; (ii) a sharp velocity increase at the base of the Malinstindur Formation, which may mark a transition to the underlying Beinisvørð Formation, a thick laterally extensive layer of subaerial basalt sheet lobes; (iii) a low velocity layer at 2.5-7.0 km depth beneath the Beinisvørð Formation, which is consistent with hyaloclastites of the Lopra Formation; (iv) an upper basement layer between depths of 5-9 km and characterized by S wave velocities of approximately 3.2 km/s, consistent with low-grade metamorphosed sedimentary rocks; (v) a high velocity basement, with S wave velocities in excess of 3.6 km/s. This likely reflects the presence of a crystalline mid-lower crust of Archaean continental origin. Compared to previous interpretations of the geological structure beneath the Faroe Islands, our new results point to a more structurally complex and laterally heterogeneous crust, and provide constraints which may help to understand how continental fragments are rifted from the

  17. Auditory map reorganization and pitch discrimination in adult rats chronically exposed to low-level ambient noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Weimin

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral adaption to a changing environment is critical for an animal's survival. How well the brain can modify its functional properties based on experience essentially defines the limits of behavioral adaptation. In adult animals the extent to which experience shapes brain function has not been fully explored. Moreover, the perceptual consequences of experience-induced changes in the brains of adults remain unknown. Here we show that the tonotopic map in the primary auditory cortex of adult rats living with low-level ambient noise underwent a dramatic reorganization. Behaviorally, chronic noise-exposure impaired fine, but not coarse pitch discrimination. When tested in a noisy environment, the noise-exposed rats performed as well as in a quiet environment whereas the control rats performed poorly. This suggests that noise-exposed animals had adapted to living in a noisy environment. Behavioral pattern analyses revealed that stress or distraction engendered by the noisy background could not account for the poor performance of the control rats in a noisy environment. A reorganized auditory map may therefore have served as the neural substrate for the consistent performance of the noise-exposed rats in a noisy environment. PMID:22973201

  18. Relaxation dynamics in the presence of pulse multiplicative noise sources with different correlation properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargovsky, A. V.; Chichigina, O. A.; Anashkina, E. I.; Valenti, D.; Spagnolo, B.

    2015-10-01

    The relaxation dynamics of a system described by a Langevin equation with pulse multiplicative noise sources with different correlation properties is considered. The solution of the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation is derived for Gaussian white noise. Moreover, two pulse processes with regulated periodicity are considered as a noise source: the dead-time-distorted Poisson process and the process with fixed time intervals, which is characterized by an infinite correlation time. We find that the steady state of the system is dependent on the correlation properties of the pulse noise. An increase of the noise correlation causes the decrease of the mean value of the solution at the steady state. The analytical results are in good agreement with the numerical ones.

  19. Monitoring southwest Greenland’s ice sheet melt with ambient seismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordret, Aurélien; Mikesell, T. Dylan; Harig, Christopher; Lipovsky, Bradley P.; Prieto, Germán A.

    2016-01-01

    The Greenland ice sheet presently accounts for ~70% of global ice sheet mass loss. Because this mass loss is associated with sea-level rise at a rate of 0.7 mm/year, the development of improved monitoring techniques to observe ongoing changes in ice sheet mass balance is of paramount concern. Spaceborne mass balance techniques are commonly used; however, they are inadequate for many purposes because of their low spatial and/or temporal resolution. We demonstrate that small variations in seismic wave speed in Earth’s crust, as measured with the correlation of seismic noise, may be used to infer seasonal ice sheet mass balance. Seasonal loading and unloading of glacial mass induces strain in the crust, and these strains then result in seismic velocity changes due to poroelastic processes. Our method provides a new and independent way of monitoring (in near real time) ice sheet mass balance, yielding new constraints on ice sheet evolution and its contribution to global sea-level changes. An increased number of seismic stations in the vicinity of ice sheets will enhance our ability to create detailed space-time records of ice mass variations. PMID:27386524

  20. Correlated and uncorrelated invisible temporal white noise alters mesopic rod signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathibelagal, Amithavikram R; Feigl, Beatrix; Kremers, Jan; Zele, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    We determined how rod signaling at mesopic light levels is altered by extrinsic temporal white noise that is correlated or uncorrelated with the activity of one (magnocellular, parvocellular, or koniocellular) postreceptoral pathway. Rod and cone photoreceptor excitations were independently controlled using a four-primary photostimulator. Psychometric (Weibull) functions were measured for incremental rod pulses (50 to 250 ms) in the presence (or absence; control) of perceptually invisible subthreshold extrinsic noise. Uncorrelated (rod) noise facilitates rod detection. Correlated postreceptoral pathway noise produces differential changes in rod detection thresholds and decreases the slope of the psychometric functions. We demonstrate that invisible extrinsic noise changes rod-signaling characteristics within the three retinogeniculate pathways at mesopic illumination depending on the temporal profile of the rod stimulus and the extrinsic noise type.

  1. Crustal structure and Seismic Hazard studies in Nigeria from ambient noise and earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiri, U. A.

    2016-12-01

    The crust, upper Mantle and seismic hazard studies have been carried out in Nigeria using noise and earthquake data. The data were acquired from stations in Nigeria and international Agencies. Firstly, known depths of sediments in the Lower Benue Trough (LBT) were collected from wells; Resonance frequency (Fo) and average shear-wave velocities (Vs) were then computed using Matlab. Secondly, average velocities were estimated from noise cross-correlation along seismic stations. Thirdly, the moho depths beneath Ife, Kaduna and Nsukka stations were estimated, as well as Vp/Vs ratio using 2009 earthquake with epicenter in Nigeria. Finally, Statistical and Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessment (PSHA) were used to compute seismic hazard parameters in Nigeria and its surroundings. The results showed that, soils on the LBT with average shear wave velocity of about 5684m/s would experience more amplification in case of an earthquake, compared to the basement complex in Nigeria. The Vs beneath the seismic stations in Nigeria were also estimated as 288m/s, 1019m/s, 940.6m/s and 255.02m/s in Ife, Nsukka, Awka, and Abakaliki respectively. The average velocity along the station paths was 4.5km/secs, and the Vp, Vs for depths 100-500km profile in parts of South West Nigeria increased from about 5.83-6.42Km/sec and 3.48-6.31km/s respectively with Vp/Vs ratio decreasing from 1.68 to 1.02. Statistical analysis revealed a trend of increasing earthquake occurrence along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and tending to West African region. The analysis of PSHA shows the likelihood of earthquakes with different magnitudes occurring in Nigeria and other parts West Africa in future. This work is aimed at addressing critical issues regarding sites effect characterization, improved earthquake location and robust seismic hazards assessment for planning in the choice of sites for critical facilities in Nigeria. Keywords: Sediment thickness, Resonance Frequency, Average Velocity, Seismic Hazard, Nigeria

  2. Does ambient noise or hypobaric atmosphere influence olfactory and gustatory function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahne, Torsten; Köppke, Robert; Nehring, Michael; Plontke, Stefan K; Fischer, Hans-Georg

    2018-01-01

    Multidimensional food perception is based mainly on gustatory and olfactory function. Recent research has demonstrated that hypobaric pressure impairs gustatory function and that background noise or distracting auditory stimulation impairs olfactory function. Using a hypobaric chamber, the odor identification, discrimination, and thresholds as well as taste identification and threshold scores were measured in 16 healthy male volunteers under normal and hypobaric (6380 ft) conditions using clinically validated tests. In both conditions, background noise was either canceled out or replaced by white noise presentation (70 dB sound pressure level). Olfactory sensitivity for n-butanol and gustatory sensitivity were impaired in a hypobaric atmosphere. White noise did not influence the odor test results. White noise stimulation impaired sensitivity for sour and sweet but not for bitter or salty tastants. We conclude that hypobaric or noisy environments could impair gustatory and olfactory sensitivity selectively for particular tastants and odorants.

  3. Offshore Southern California lithospheric velocity structure from noise cross-correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, D. C.; Kohler, M. D.; Tsai, V. C.; Weeraratne, D. S.

    2016-05-01

    A new shear wave velocity model offshore Southern California is presented that images plate boundary deformation including both thickening and thinning of the crustal and mantle lithosphere at the westernmost edge of the North American continent. The Asthenospheric and Lithospheric Broadband Architecture from the California Offshore Region Experiment (ALBACORE) ocean bottom seismometer array, together with 65 stations of the onshore Southern California Seismic Network, is used to measure ambient noise correlation functions and Rayleigh wave dispersion curves which are inverted for 3-D shear wave velocities. The resulting velocity model defines the transition from continental lithosphere to oceanic, illuminating the complex history and deformation in the region. A transition to the present-day strike-slip regime between the Pacific and North American Plates resulted in broad deformation and capture of the now >200 km wide continental shelf. Our velocity model suggests the persistence of the uppermost mantle volcanic processes associated with East Pacific Rise spreading adjacent to the Patton Escarpment, which marks the former subduction of Farallon Plate underneath North America. The most prominent of these seismic structures is a low-velocity anomaly underlying the San Juan Seamount, suggesting ponding of magma at the base of the crust, resulting in thickening and ongoing adjustment of the lithosphere due to the localized loading. The velocity model also provides a robust framework for future earthquake location determinations and ground-shaking simulations for risk estimates.

  4. Making sense of the noise: Replication difficulties of Correll's (2008) modulation of 1/f noise in a racial bias task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madurski, Christine; LeBel, Etienne P

    2015-08-01

    Correll (Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 94, 48-59, 2008; Study 2) found that instructions to use or avoid race information decreased the emission of 1/f noise in a weapon identification task (WIT). These results suggested that 1/f noise in racial bias tasks reflected an effortful deliberative process, providing new insights regarding the mechanisms underlying implicit racial biases. Given the potential theoretical and applied importance of understanding the psychological processes underlying implicit racial biases - and in light of the growing demand for independent direct replications of findings to ensure the cumulative nature of our science - we attempted to replicate Correll's finding in two high-powered studies. Despite considerable effort to closely duplicate all procedural and methodological details of the original study (i.e., same cover story, experimental manipulation, implicit measure task, original stimuli, task instructions, sampling frame, population, and statistical analyses), both replication attempts were unsuccessful in replicating the original finding challenging the theoretical account that 1/f noise in racial bias tasks reflects a deliberative process. However, the emission of 1/f noise did consistently emerge across samples in each of our conditions. Hence, future research is needed to clarify the psychological significance of 1/f noise in racial bias tasks.

  5. Underwater Ambient Noise in a Baleen Whale Migratory Habitat Off the Azores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Romagosa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of underwater noise is of particular interest given the increase in noise-generating human activities and the potential negative effects on marine mammals which depend on sound for many vital processes. The Azores archipelago is an important migratory and feeding habitat for blue (Balaenoptera musculus, fin (Balaenoptera physalus and sei whales (Balaenoptera borealis en route to summering grounds in northern Atlantic waters. High levels of low frequency noise in this area could displace whales or interfere with foraging behavior, impacting energy intake during a critical stage of their annual cycle. In this study, bottom-mounted Ecological Acoustic Recorders were deployed at three Azorean seamounts (Condor, Açores, and Gigante to measure temporal variations in background noise levels and ship noise in the 18–1,000 Hz frequency band, used by baleen whales to emit and receive sounds. Monthly average noise levels ranged from 90.3 dB re 1 μPa (Açores seamount to 103.1 dB re 1 μPa (Condor seamount and local ship noise was present up to 13% of the recording time in Condor. At this location, average contribution of local boat noise to background noise levels is almost 10 dB higher than wind contribution, which might temporally affect detection ranges for baleen whale calls and difficult communication at long ranges. Given the low time percentatge with noise levels above 120 dB re 1 μPa found here (3.3% at Condor, we woud expect limited behavioral responses to ships from baleen whales. Sound pressure levels measured in the Azores are lower than those reported for the Mediterranean basin and the Strait of Gibraltar. However, the currently unknown effects of baleen whale vocalization masking and the increasing presence of boats at the monitored sites underline the need for continuous monitoring to understand any long-term impacts on whales.

  6. Classroom Noise and Teachers' Voice Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantala, Leena M; Hakala, Suvi; Holmqvist, Sofia; Sala, Eeva

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to research the associations between noise (ambient and activity noise) and objective metrics of teachers' voices in real working environments (i.e., classrooms). Thirty-two female and 8 male teachers from 14 elementary schools were randomly selected for the study. Ambient noise was measured during breaks in unoccupied classrooms and, likewise, the noise caused by pupils' activity during lessons. Voice samples were recorded before and after a working day. Voice variables measured were sound pressure level (voice SPL), fundamental frequency, jitter, shimmer, and the tilt of the sound spectrum slope (alpha ratio). The ambient noise correlated most often with the fundamental frequency of men and voice SPL, whereas activity noise correlated with the alpha ratio and perturbation values. Teachers working in louder ambient noise spoke more loudly before work than those working in lower noise levels. Voice variables generally changed less during work among teachers working in loud activity noise than among those working in lower noise levels. Ambient and activity noises affect teachers' voice use. Under loud ambient noise teachers seem to speak habitually loudly, and under loud activity noise teachers' ability to react to loading deteriorates.

  7. The sign rule and beyond: boundary effects, flexibility, and noise correlations in neural population codes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Hu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Over repeat presentations of the same stimulus, sensory neurons show variable responses. This "noise" is typically correlated between pairs of cells, and a question with rich history in neuroscience is how these noise correlations impact the population's ability to encode the stimulus. Here, we consider a very general setting for population coding, investigating how information varies as a function of noise correlations, with all other aspects of the problem - neural tuning curves, etc. - held fixed. This work yields unifying insights into the role of noise correlations. These are summarized in the form of theorems, and illustrated with numerical examples involving neurons with diverse tuning curves. Our main contributions are as follows. (1 We generalize previous results to prove a sign rule (SR - if noise correlations between pairs of neurons have opposite signs vs. their signal correlations, then coding performance will improve compared to the independent case. This holds for three different metrics of coding performance, and for arbitrary tuning curves and levels of heterogeneity. This generality is true for our other results as well. (2 As also pointed out in the literature, the SR does not provide a necessary condition for good coding. We show that a diverse set of correlation structures can improve coding. Many of these violate the SR, as do experimentally observed correlations. There is structure to this diversity: we prove that the optimal correlation structures must lie on boundaries of the possible set of noise correlations. (3 We provide a novel set of necessary and sufficient conditions, under which the coding performance (in the presence of noise will be as good as it would be if there were no noise present at all.

  8. The systematic error of temperature noise correlation measurement method and self-calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Hong; Tong Yunxian

    1993-04-01

    The turbulent transport behavior of fluid noise and the nature of noise affect on the velocity measurement system have been studied. The systematic error of velocity measurement system is analyzed. A theoretical calibration method is proposed, which makes the velocity measurement of time-correlation as an absolute measurement method. The theoretical results are in good agreement with experiments

  9. Direct correlation between strengthening mechanisms and electrical noise in strained copper wires

    OpenAIRE

    Bellido, Natalia; Pautrat, Alain; Keller, Clement; Hug, Eric

    2011-01-01

    We have measured the resistance noise of copper metallic wires during a tensile stress. The time variation of the main resistance is continuous up to the wire breakdown, but its fluctuations reveal the intermittent and heterogeneous character of plastic flow. We show in particular direct correlations between strengthening mechanisms and noise spectra characteristics.

  10. Column-parallel correlated multiple sampling circuits for CMOS image sensors and their noise reduction effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Sungho; Itoh, Shinya; Aoyama, Satoshi; Kawahito, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    For low-noise complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors, the reduction of pixel source follower noises is becoming very important. Column-parallel high-gain readout circuits are useful for low-noise CMOS image sensors. This paper presents column-parallel high-gain signal readout circuits, correlated multiple sampling (CMS) circuits and their noise reduction effects. In the CMS, the gain of the noise cancelling is controlled by the number of samplings. It has a similar effect to that of an amplified CDS for the thermal noise but is a little more effective for 1/f and RTS noises. Two types of the CMS with simple integration and folding integration are proposed. In the folding integration, the output signal swing is suppressed by a negative feedback using a comparator and one-bit D-to-A converter. The CMS circuit using the folding integration technique allows to realize a very low-noise level while maintaining a wide dynamic range. The noise reduction effects of their circuits have been investigated with a noise analysis and an implementation of a 1Mpixel pinned photodiode CMOS image sensor. Using 16 samplings, dynamic range of 59.4 dB and noise level of 1.9 e(-) for the simple integration CMS and 75 dB and 2.2 e(-) for the folding integration CMS, respectively, are obtained.

  11. Cross-correlation enhanced stability in a tumor cell growth model with immune surveillance driven by cross-correlated noises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Chunhua; Zhou Xiaofeng; Tao Shufen

    2009-01-01

    The transient properties of a tumor cell growth model with immune surveillance driven by cross-correlated multiplicative and additive noises are investigated. The explicit expression of extinction rate from the state of a stable tumor to the state of extinction is obtained. Based on the numerical computations, we find the following: (i) the intensity of multiplicative noise D and the intensity of additive noise α enhance the extinction rate for the case of λ ≤ 0 (i.e. λ denotes cross-correlation intensity between two noises), but for the case of λ > 0, a critical noise intensity D or α exists at which the extinction rate is the smallest; D and α at first weaken the extinction rate and then enhance it. (ii) The immune rate β and the cross-correlation intensity λ play opposite roles on the extinction rate, i.e. β enhances the extinction rate of the tumor cell, while λ weakens the extinction rate of the tumor cell. Namely, the immune rate can enhance the extinction of the tumor cell and the cross-correlation between two noises can enhance stability of the cancer state.

  12. Measurement of noise and its correlation to performance and geometry of small aircraft propellers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štorch Vít

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A set of small model and UAV propellers is measured both in terms of aerodynamic performance and acoustic noise under static conditions. Apart from obvious correlation of noise to tip speed and propeller diameter the influence of blade pitch, blade pitch distribution, efficiency and shape of the blade is sought. Using the measured performance data a computational model for calculation of aerodynamic noise of propellers will be validated. The range of selected propellers include both propellers designed for nearly static conditions and propellers that are running at highly offdesign conditions, which allows to investigate i.e. the effect of blade stall on both noise level and performance results.

  13. Measurement of noise and its correlation to performance and geometry of small aircraft propellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štorch, Vít; Nožička, Jiří; Brada, Martin; Gemperle, Jiří; Suchý, Jakub

    2016-03-01

    A set of small model and UAV propellers is measured both in terms of aerodynamic performance and acoustic noise under static conditions. Apart from obvious correlation of noise to tip speed and propeller diameter the influence of blade pitch, blade pitch distribution, efficiency and shape of the blade is sought. Using the measured performance data a computational model for calculation of aerodynamic noise of propellers will be validated. The range of selected propellers include both propellers designed for nearly static conditions and propellers that are running at highly offdesign conditions, which allows to investigate i.e. the effect of blade stall on both noise level and performance results.

  14. Electronic Correlated Noise Calibration Standard for Interferometric and Polarimetric Microwave Radiometers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A new type of calibration standard is proposed which produces a pair of microwave noise signals to aid in the characterization and calibration of correlating...

  15. Correlation between Screening estimation and noise measurement in Small Plants in Varamin city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. R. Negahban

    2013-08-01

    Conclusion: No correlation was shown between the results of the two methods used. Thus, it is recommended to change the parameters used in the noise screening form for small plants, with less than 5 workers.

  16. Combined effects of road traffic noise and ambient air pollution in relation to risk for stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Mette; Lühdorf, Pernille; Ketzel, Matthias; Andersen, Zorana J; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole

    2014-08-01

    Exposure to road traffic noise and air pollution have both been associated with risk for stroke. The few studies including both exposures show inconsistent results. We aimed to investigate potential mutual confounding and combined effects between road traffic noise and air pollution in association with risk for stroke. In a population-based cohort of 57,053 people aged 50-64 years at enrollment, we identified 1999 incident stroke cases in national registries, followed by validation through medical records. Mean follow-up time was 11.2 years. Present and historical residential addresses from 1987 to 2009 were identified in national registers and road traffic noise and air pollution were modeled for all addresses. Analyses were done using Cox regression. A higher mean annual exposure at time of diagnosis of 10 µg/m(3) nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and 10 dB road traffic noise at the residential address was associated with ischemic stroke with incidence rate ratios (IRR) of 1.11 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.20) and 1.16 (95% CI: 1.07, 1.24), respectively, in single exposure models. In two-exposure models road traffic noise (IRR: 1.15) and not NO2 (IRR: 1.02) was associated with ischemic stroke. The strongest association was found for combination of high noise and high NO2 (IRR=1.28; 95% CI=1.09-1.52). Fatal stroke was positively associated with air pollution and not with traffic noise. In conclusion, in mutually adjusted models road traffic noise and not air pollution was associated ischemic stroke, while only air pollution affected risk for fatal strokes. There were indications of combined effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Seismic constraints on magma evolution beneath Mount Baekdu (Changbai) volcano from transdimensional Bayesian inversion of ambient noise data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seongryong; Tkalčić, Hrvoje; Rhie, Junkee

    2017-07-01

    The magmatic process of continental intraplate volcanism (CIV) is difficult to understand due to heterogeneous interactions with the crust and the lithospheric upper mantle. Mount Baekdu (Changbai) volcano (MBV) is one of the prominent CIVs in northeast Asia that has shown a complex history of eruptions and associated magmatic structures. In addition, the relationship between the crustal magmatic structures and upper mantle phenomena are enigmatic due to the lack of consistent seismic constraints for the lithospheric structure. To enhance comprehensive understanding of the MBV magma evolution, we image the lithospheric structure beneath the MBV and surrounding regions using ambient noise data and the following two approaches: (1) multiple measures of ambient noise dispersion are acquired through different methods and (2) a transdimensional Bayesian inversion method is utilized to obtain unbiased results in joint analysis of the multiple data sets. The estimated Earth structure shows a thick crust ( 40 km) and a crustal anomaly with relatively high S wave velocity in the depth range 20-40 km. This type of structure extends to 100 km north from the MBV and is accompanied by the shallow and rapid S wave velocity decrease beneath the mantle lid ( 80 km). Through a comparison with previous P wave models, we interpret this structure as a consequence of compositional partitioning by mafic underplating and overlying cooled felsic layers as a result of fractional crystalization.

  18. Phase noise characterization of sub-hertz linewidth lasers via digital cross correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaopeng; Bouchand, Romain; Nicolodi, Daniele; Lours, Michel; Alexandre, Christophe; Le Coq, Yann

    2017-04-01

    Phase noise or frequency noise is a key metric to evaluate the short-term stability of a laser. This property is of great interest for the applications but delicate to characterize, especially for narrow linewidth lasers. In this Letter, we demonstrate a digital cross-correlation scheme to characterize the absolute phase noise of sub-hertz linewidth lasers. Three 1542 nm ultra-stable lasers are used in this approach. For each measurement, two lasers act as references to characterize a third one. Phase noise power spectral density from 0.5 Hz to 0.8 MHz Fourier frequencies can be derived for each laser by a mere change in the configuration of the lasers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time showing the phase noise of sub-hertz linewidth lasers with no reference limitation. We also present an analysis of the laser phase noise performance.

  19. Noise analysis of the measurement of group delay in Fourier white-light interferometric cross correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laude, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    The problem of noise analysis in measuring the group delay introduced by a dispersive optical element by use of white-light interferometric cross correlation is investigated. Two noise types, detection noise and position noise, are specifically analyzed. Detection noise is shown to be highly sensitive to the spectral content of the white-light source at the frequency considered and to the temporal acquisition window. Position noise, which arises from the finite accuracy of the measurement of the scanning mirror's position, can severely damage the estimation of the group delay. Such is shown to be the case for fast Fourier transform-based estimation algorithms. A new algorithm that is insensitive to scanning delay errors is proposed, and subfemtosecond accuracy is obtained without any postprocessing

  20. The shot noise of a strongly correlated quantum dot coupled to the Luttinger liquid leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Kai-Hua; He, Xian; Wang, Huai-Yu; Liu, Kai-Di; Liu, Bei-Yun

    2014-01-01

    We study the shot noise of a strongly correlated quantum dot weakly coupled to Luttinger liquid leads in the Kondo regime by means of the extended equation of motion method. A general zero-frequency shot noise formula with good convergence is derived. The shot noise exhibits a non-monotonic dependence on voltage for weak intralead interaction. There is a peak around the Kondo temperature at low voltage when the interaction is very weak, and its height decreases rapidly with the intralead interaction increasing. When the interaction is moderately strong the peak disappears and the shot noise scales as a power law in bias voltage, indicating that the intralead electron interaction suppresses the shot noise. It is possible that the measurements of the shot noise spectrum can extract the information of the intralead interaction. - Highlights: • The shot noise of a dot coupled to Luttinger liquid leads in the Kondo regime. • A shot noise formula is derived. • Intralead interaction suppresses the shot noise. • The noise shows different voltage-dependence for different intralead interaction

  1. Solving Langevin equation with the stochastic algebraically correlated noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploszajczak, M.; Srokowski, T.

    1996-01-01

    Long time tail in the velocity and force autocorrelation function has been found recently in the molecular dynamics simulations of the peripheral collisions of ions. Simulation of those slowly decaying correlations in the stochastic transport theory requires the development of new methods of generating stochastic force of arbitrarily long correlation times. The Markovian process and the multidimensional Kangaroo process which permit describing various algebraic correlated stochastic processes are proposed. (author)

  2. 3D structures of crust and uppermost mantle and azimuthal anisotropy in Tibet and surrounding regions from ambient noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Zheng, Y.; Ritzwoller, M. H.

    2010-12-01

    Tibet is our planet’s natural laboratory for studying how continents interact and deform in response to the collision between the Indian and the Eurasian plates. Although numerous seismic studies of Tibet have been performed, there remain fundamental disagreements in first-order questions about crustal deformation; e.g., whether the crust deforms coherently vertically or is perhaps coupled to the mantle. The reason is that existing models either do not model the crust effectively or only model the crust beneath parts of Tibet due to limitations in the distribution of seismic stations. In this study, we have applied ambient noise tomography (ANT) to data from FDSN stations, several temporary US PASSCAL installations and the Chinese provincial networks in and around Tibet during 2003 to 2009. Inter-station Rayleigh wave dispersion curves are measured from cross correlations of vertical components. These dispersion measurements are used to invert for isotropic phase velocity maps and azimuthal anisotropy of Rayleigh waves. Major basins, including Tarim, Qadaim and Sichuan, are all well delineated by slow phase velocities at short periods (8-15 sec). Crustal thinning from Tibet to the surrounding regions is manifest as a phase velocity increase at periods from 25 to 40 sec. Resulting phase velocity maps are further inverted for 3D Vs structures of crust and uppermost mantle. Low velocities are observed across most of the Tibetan Plateau at the depth range of 20-50 km. In southeastern Tibet, low velocities extend to the Yunnan Plateau while, in northeastern Tibet, low velocities are confined to the Plateau region and there is no low velocity existing beneath the Qingling Orogen between the Ordos Block and the Sichuan Basin in the crust and uppermost mantle. Prominent high velocities are observed in the middle and lower crust and in the uppermost mantle beneath the Tarim Basin, the Ordos Block and the Sichuan Basin. Patterns of Rayleigh wave azimuthal anisotropy at

  3. Trajectories of Brownian particles with space-correlated noise

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    EDOARDO MILOTTI

    is white in time and has a Gaussian correlation in space, and by means of numerical simulation, I show how the spatial correlation determines the time evolution of the spatial separation of random walkers. Keywords. Stochastic processes; fluctuations; random walks. 1. Introduction. There are physical systems that display ...

  4. The Functional Architecture of Noise Correlation in fMRI Responses from Human Visual Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungwon Ryu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available When an identical stimulus is presented repeatedly, the activity of sensory cortical neurons varies from trial to trial, dubbed ‘neuronal noise’. Recent electrophysiological and imaging studies reported that the ‘noise’ is not just a random and independent deviation from signal and reflects correlated activity among local cortical sites. Here we investigated the structure of correlated ‘noises’ in early human visual areas by monitoring moment-to-moment fluctuations in fMRI responses to visual stimuli. By defining receptive fields and stimulus preferences of individual voxels, we could reveal a reliable functional architecture of noise correlation: noise correlation was high in pairs of voxels whose stimulus preferences are similar and whose receptive fields are close to each other. The analysis of residual correlation confirmed that this functionally defined structure of noise correlation could not be explained by trivial correlations due to anatomical proximity. The spectral analysis of time series revealed that the stimulus-preference-dependent correlation was maximal at a low (<0.035Hz band of temporal frequency whereas the receptive field-dependent correlation was maximal at a medium (0.035∼0.082Hz band. Furthermore, the functional structure of noise correlation was held true for voxel pairs within and between different visual areas, regardless of the presence or types of visual stimulation.

  5. Seismic structure of the upper crust in the Albertine Rift from travel-time and ambient-noise tomography - a comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovlev, Andrey; Kaviani, Ayoub; Ruempker, Georg

    2017-04-01

    Here we present results of the investigation of the upper crust in the Albertine rift around the Rwenzori Mountains. We use a data set collected from a temporary network of 33 broadband stations operated by the RiftLink research group between September 2009 and August 2011. During this period, 82639 P-wave and 73408 S-wave travel times from 12419 local and regional earthquakes were registered. This presents a very rare opportunity to apply both local travel-time and ambient-noise tomography to analyze data from the same network. For the local travel-time tomographic inversion the LOTOS algorithm (Koulakov, 2009) was used. The algorithm performs iterative simultaneous inversions for 3D models of P- and S-velocity anomalies in combination with earthquake locations and origin times. 28955 P- and S-wave picks from 2769 local earthquakes were used. To estimate the resolution and stability of the results a number of the synthetic and real data tests were performed. To perform the ambient noise tomography we use the following procedure. First, we follow the standard procedure described by Bensen et al. (2007) as modified by Boué et al. (2014) to compute the vertical component cross-correlation functions between all pairs of stations. We also adapted the algorithm introduced by Boué et al. (2014) and use the WHISPER software package (Briand et al., 2013) to preprocess individual daily vertical-component waveforms. On the next step, for each period, we use the method of Barmin et al. (2001) to invert the dispersion measurements along each path for group velocity tomographic maps. Finally, we adapt a modified version of the algorithm suggested by Macquet et al. (2014) to invert the group velocity maps for shear velocity structure. We apply several tests, which show that the best resolution is obtained at a period of 8 seconds, which correspond to a depth of approximately 6 km. Models of the seismic structure obtained by the two methods agree well at shallow depth of about

  6. Analysis of the levels of ambient noise present in the Colonia Auditorium (October 2001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalisco, Zapopan; Palafox, Lourdes; Orozco, Martha; Rodriguez, Erika

    2002-11-01

    The study area is located in the city of Guadalajara, defined by: delimited in the north by the Gonzlez Gallo street; in the south by the Anillo Perifrico street; in the east by Avenida Mezquitan; and in the west by Avenida Alcalde. There were 38 measurement points outside the auditorium and 25 inside. A poll was conducted among the neighbors and visitors in both areas, getting 70 replies. Noise levels were between 41-101 dB(A) on the outside, average Leq on the outside was 64.5 dB(A), and inside was 80.15 dB(A). The conclusion is that the whole area is affected by traffic noise, as well by the huge number of visitors, the electric games, and the electric generators that supply energy to them. On the outside 21 points were above 65 dB(A), which means that 55% were above the average; on the inside, 100% were above 65 dB(A). Thus the neighbors are exposed to high noise levels due to the festivities during October. The biggest problem, however, is the noise exposure of the workers inside the auditorium, due to music, games, people, and electric generators.

  7. Gestational diabetes mellitus and exposure to ambient air pollution and road traffic noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie; Olsen, Sjurdur F; Halldorsson, Thorhallur I

    2017-01-01

    Background: Road traffic is a main source of air pollution and noise. Both exposures have been associated with type 2 diabetes, but associations with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have been studied less. Objectives: We aimed to examine single and joint associations of exposure to air pollut...

  8. The effect of noise correlations in populations of diversely tuned neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecker, Alexander S; Berens, Philipp; Tolias, Andreas S; Bethge, Matthias

    2011-10-05

    The amount of information encoded by networks of neurons critically depends on the correlation structure of their activity. Neurons with similar stimulus preferences tend to have higher noise correlations than others. In homogeneous populations of neurons, this limited range correlation structure is highly detrimental to the accuracy of a population code. Therefore, reduced spike count correlations under attention, after adaptation, or after learning have been interpreted as evidence for a more efficient population code. Here, we analyze the role of limited range correlations in more realistic, heterogeneous population models. We use Fisher information and maximum-likelihood decoding to show that reduced correlations do not necessarily improve encoding accuracy. In fact, in populations with more than a few hundred neurons, increasing the level of limited range correlations can substantially improve encoding accuracy. We found that this improvement results from a decrease in noise entropy that is associated with increasing correlations if the marginal distributions are unchanged. Surprisingly, for constant noise entropy and in the limit of large populations, the encoding accuracy is independent of both structure and magnitude of noise correlations.

  9. Gestational diabetes mellitus and exposure to ambient air pollution and road traffic noise: A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Marie; Olsen, Sjurdur F; Halldorsson, Thorhallur I; Zhang, Cuilin; Hjortebjerg, Dorrit; Ketzel, Matthias; Grandström, Charlotta; Sørensen, Mette; Damm, Peter; Langhoff-Roos, Jens; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole

    2017-11-01

    Road traffic is a main source of air pollution and noise. Both exposures have been associated with type 2 diabetes, but associations with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have been studied less. We aimed to examine single and joint associations of exposure to air pollution and road traffic noise on GDM in a prospective cohort. We identified GDM cases from self-reports and hospital records, using two different criteria, among 72,745 singleton pregnancies (1997-2002) from the Danish National Birth Cohort. We modeled nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) and noise from road traffic (L den ) exposure at all pregnancy addresses. According to the two diagnostic criteria: the Danish clinical guidelines, which was our main outcome, and the WHO standard during recruitment period, a total of 565 and 210 women, respectively, had GDM. For both exposures no risk was evident for the common Danish criterion of GDM. A 10-μg/m 3 increase in NO 2 exposure during first trimester was, however, associated with an increased risk of WHO-GDM (adjusted odds ratio (OR)=1.24; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03, 1.49). The corresponding OR associated with a 10-dB higher road traffic noise level was 1.15 (0.94 to 1.18). In mutually adjusted models the OR for NO 2 remained similar 1.22 (0.98, 1.53) whereas that for road traffic noise decreased to 1.03 (0.80, 1.32). Significant associations were also observed for exposure averaged over the 2nd and 3rd trimesters and the full pregnancy. No risk was evident for the common Danish criterion of GDM. NO 2 was associated with higher risk for GDM according to the WHO criterion, which might be due to selection bias. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Understanding the formation of the Ontong Java Plateau through joint ambient noise earthquake tomography and laboratory modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covellone, B. M.; Szwaja, S.; Savage, B. K.; Shen, Y.; Kincaid, C. R.

    2013-12-01

    Current knowledge of the Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) comes from a broad range of research disciplines. Despite decades of work, numerous hypotheses on the origin of the OJP do not fully address all of the geophysical and geochemical observations. A more complete image of the current lower crust and upper mantle seismic structure beneath the plateau will provide a link between the plateau's 120 Ma complex history and it's formation. We investigate the anomalous wave speed structure underlying the OJP using an iterative, full-waveform, joint ambient noise and earthquake tomography approach. A 3-dimensional wave speed model is determined from ambient noise data at periods between 25 and 200 seconds. Data from over 100 earthquakes, recorded between 1990 and 2012, are then added to the inversion to improve data coverage and model resolution. The combination of datasets allows us to best exploit the limited station distribution in the Pacific, resulting in resolution better than 5-degrees beneath the plateau and extending to depths greater than 350 km. To improve our sense of expected deformation patterns for sub-plateau mantle through geologic time, a set of laboratory models were run where OJP residuum viscosity is changed relative to the ambient fluid. Models focus on the interaction between OJP residuum and the rollback-driven flow associated with passage of the Tonga subduction system to the south. Model results show dramatic thinning and extraction of the southern portion of sub-OJP fluid due to subduction induced torroidal flows. Significant distortion of the sub-OJP material over roughly the last 40 Ma is predicted in cases where residuum is either stronger or weaker than ambient fluid. The results of this work confirm an anomalously slow mantle beneath the OJP extending to depths greater than 300 km and provide high-resolution images constraining the magnitude and dimensions of wave speed anomalies that can be used to determine thermal and compositional variations

  11. Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noise is all around you, from televisions and radios to lawn mowers and washing machines. Normally, you ... sensitive structures of the inner ear and cause noise-induced hearing loss. More than 30 million Americans ...

  12. Effective equilibrium picture in the x y model with exponentially correlated noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoluzzi, Matteo; Marconi, Umberto Marini Bettolo; Maggi, Claudio

    2018-02-01

    We study the effect of exponentially correlated noise on the x y model in the limit of small correlation time, discussing the order-disorder transition in the mean field and the topological transition in two dimensions. We map the steady states of the nonequilibrium dynamics into an effective equilibrium theory. In the mean field, the critical temperature increases with the noise correlation time τ , indicating that memory effects promote ordering. This finding is confirmed by numerical simulations. The topological transition temperature in two dimensions remains untouched. However, finite-size effects induce a crossover in the vortices proliferation that is confirmed by numerical simulations.

  13. Variable Correlation Digital Noise Source on FPGA — A Versatile Tool for Debugging Radio Telescope Backends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Kaushal D.; Gupta, Yashwant; Ajith Kumar, B.

    Contemporary wideband radio telescope backends are generally developed on Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) or hybrid (FPGA+GPU) platforms. One of the challenges faced while developing such instruments is the functional verification of the signal processing backend at various stages of development. In the case of an interferometer or pulsar backend, the typical requirement is for one independent noise source per input, with provision for a common, correlated signal component across all the inputs, with controllable level of correlation. This paper describes the design of a FPGA-based variable correlation Digital Noise Source (DNS), and its applications to built-in testing and debugging of correlators and beamformers. This DNS uses the Central Limit Theorem-based approach for generation of Gaussian noise, and the architecture is optimized for resource requirements and ease of integration with existing signal processing blocks on FPGA.

  14. The Impact of Offshore Wind Turbines on Underwater Ambient Noise Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Glegg, Stewart

    2015-01-01

    The underwater sound levels generated by offshore wind turbine farms is a concern because of the possible environmental impact on marine mammals. This paper will consider how sound generated by a wind turbine is transmitted into a shallow water channel. It is shown that the underwater sound levels can be calculated for a typical offshore wind turbine by using the theory of Chapman and Ward (1990) combined with aeroacoustic models of trailing edge noise on the wind turbine blades. A procedure ...

  15. Investigating potential correlations between jet engine noise and plume dynamics in the hypertemporal infrared domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunio, Phillip M.; Weber, Reed; Knobel, Kimberly; Wager, Jason; Lopez, Gerardo

    2014-09-01

    Jet engine noise can be a hazard and environmental pollutant, affecting personnel working in close proximity to jet engines. Mitigating the effects of jet engine noise could reduce the potential for hearing loss in runway workers, but engine noise is not yet sufficiently well-characterized that it can easily be mitigated for new engine designs. That is, there exists a very complex relationship between jet engine design parameters, operating conditions, and resultant noise power levels. In this paper, we propose to evaluate the utility of high-speed imaging (also called hypertemporal imaging) in correlating the infrared signatures of jet aircraft engines with acoustic noise from the jet engines. This paper will focus on a theoretical analysis of jet engine infrared signatures, and will define potentially-detectable characteristics of such signatures in the hypertemporal domain. A systematic test campaign to determine whether such signatures actually exist and can be correlated with acoustic jet engine characteristics will be proposed. The detection of any hypertemporal signatures in association with acoustic signatures of jet engines will enable the use of a new domain in characterizing jet engine noise. This may in turn enable new methods of predicting or mitigating jet engine noise, which could lead to benefits for operators of large numbers of jet engines.

  16. The correlation between serum leptin and blood pressure after exposure to noise at work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muayad S Rahma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Several epidemiologic studies have reported that exposure to noise is associated with cardiovascular disease. The increased body weight is often associated with metabolic as well as increased blood pressure. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between the elevation of blood pressure and serum leptin hormones due to the effects of noise in the work place. A total of 80 volunteer males where included in this study with an age range between of 20 and 45 years, they were divided in two groups equally, the 1 st group were exposed to noise in the workplace while the 2 nd group were not. The individual noise exposure was determined by using a sound level meter. The range of noise was 80-100 dBA. Body Mass Index was also taken for each individual by a standard measure, blood pressure was measured by OMRON sphygmomanometer and serum leptin was measured through venous blood sample analysis enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Spearman rank order correlation was used to examine the correlations between Blood pressure value (Systolic, Diastolic and Leptin. All the relationships between parameters showed a positive correlation. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure values had a significant correlation to leptin hormone level in comparison to the control. There was a significant relation between leptin and blood pressure. leptin effects on the sympathetic nervous system may provide a partial explanation. Therefore, Leptin might have diverse cardiovascular actions.

  17. The correlation between serum leptin and blood pressure after exposure to noise at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahma, Muayad S; Mustafa, Bassma Ezzat; Razali, Ailin; Shamsuddin, Niza; Althunibat, Osama Y

    2013-01-01

    Several epidemiologic studies have reported that exposure to noise is associated with cardiovascular disease. The increased body weight is often associated with metabolic as well as increased blood pressure. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between the elevation of blood pressure and serum leptin hormones due to the effects of noise in the work place. A total of 80 volunteer males where included in this study with an age range between of 20 and 45 years, they were divided in two groups equally, the 1 st group were exposed to noise in the workplace while the 2 nd group were not. The individual noise exposure was determined by using a sound level meter. The range of noise was 80-100 dBA. Body Mass Index was also taken for each individual by a standard measure, blood pressure was measured by OMRON sphygmomanometer and serum leptin was measured through venous blood sample analysis enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Spearman rank order correlation was used to examine the correlations between Blood pressure value (Systolic, Diastolic) and Leptin. All the relationships between parameters showed a positive correlation. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure values had a significant correlation to leptin hormone level in comparison to the control. There was a significant relation between leptin and blood pressure. leptin effects on the sympathetic nervous system may provide a partial explanation. Therefore, Leptin might have diverse cardiovascular actions.

  18. Extracting Coherent Information from Noise Based Correlation Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Correlation Processing W. A. Kuperman Marine Physical Laboratory of the Scripps Institution of Ocenaography Univeritiy of California, San Diego La...plotted using the Seismic Analysis Code (SAC). R: Radial, Z: Vertical, T: Transverse. (top) Blue lines represent the DGN hydroacoustic data, (middle...green lines represent the DGS hydroacoustic data, and (bottom) red lines represent the DGAR seismic data. The x-axis corresponds to the time after

  19. 4-D permafrost thaw observations from ambient road traffic noise and a very dense distributed fiber optic sensing array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, N.; Dou, S.; Martin, E. R.; Wagner, A. M.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.

    2017-12-01

    How does frozen soil thaw? The answer to this question affects hydrology, ecology, climate, and human infrastructure. We are using the local ambient noise field from a road recorded on a distributed fiber optic acoustic sensing (DAS) array to monitor the evolution in seismic parameters related to the top-down permafrost thaw process in the upper 10 m. Our field experiment demonstrates the advantages of "Large N" ambient noise studies using DAS, particularly to probe near surface critical zone dynamics. Over 60 days beginning in August 2016, we made continuous seismic recordings with a >4000 channel trenched fiber optic DAS dataset above a controlled permafrost warming demonstration experiment in Fairbanks, AK. The warming experiment accelerated the state of permafrost degradation by approximately two decades in a small 15 m x 20 m area, deepening the permafrost table from 4 m to 5.5 m. Continuous seismic DAS recording of high frequency surface waves (5-30 Hz) generated by vehicles traveling along a nearby road enables our investigation of hypothesized shear wave speed and attenuation changes, which lab measurements suggest may result from decreasing shear modulus and increasing saturation. We develop daily auto- and crosscorrelation function estimates using combinations of horizontal inline, collinear, and crossline DAS sensor orientations and vertical component geophone data, and then invert for maps of Love and Rayleigh wave speed that are sensitive to the upper 30 m. Many issues related to the accuracy, stability, and repeatability of the recovered empirical Green's tensor, as well as the sensitivity of the DAS sensor network will be considered.

  20. Correction of clock errors in seismic data using noise cross-correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hable, Sarah; Sigloch, Karin; Barruol, Guilhem; Hadziioannou, Céline

    2017-04-01

    Correct and verifiable timing of seismic records is crucial for most seismological applications. For seismic land stations, frequent synchronization of the internal station clock with a GPS signal should ensure accurate timing, but loss of GPS synchronization is a common occurrence, especially for remote, temporary stations. In such cases, retrieval of clock timing has been a long-standing problem. The same timing problem applies to Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS), where no GPS signal can be received during deployment and only two GPS synchronizations can be attempted upon deployment and recovery. If successful, a skew correction is usually applied, where the final timing deviation is interpolated linearly across the entire operation period. If GPS synchronization upon recovery fails, then even this simple and unverified, first-order correction is not possible. In recent years, the usage of cross-correlation functions (CCFs) of ambient seismic noise has been demonstrated as a clock-correction method for certain network geometries. We demonstrate the great potential of this technique for island stations and OBS that were installed in the course of the Réunion Hotspot and Upper Mantle - Réunions Unterer Mantel (RHUM-RUM) project in the western Indian Ocean. Four stations on the island La Réunion were affected by clock errors of up to several minutes due to a missing GPS signal. CCFs are calculated for each day and compared with a reference cross-correlation function (RCF), which is usually the average of all CCFs. The clock error of each day is then determined from the measured shift between the daily CCFs and the RCF. To improve the accuracy of the method, CCFs are computed for several land stations and all three seismic components. Averaging over these station pairs and their 9 component pairs reduces the standard deviation of the clock errors by a factor of 4 (from 80 ms to 20 ms). This procedure permits a continuous monitoring of clock errors where small clock

  1. Cross-correlations of diffuse noise in an ocean environment using eigenvalue based statistical inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Ravishankar; Gerstoft, Peter; Hodgkiss, William S

    2012-11-01

    Cross-correlations of diffuse noise fields can be used to extract environmental information. The influence of directional sources (usually ships) often results in a bias of the travel time estimates obtained from the cross-correlations. Using an array of sensors, insights from random matrix theory on the behavior of the eigenvalues of the sample covariance matrix (SCM) in an isotropic noise field are used to isolate the diffuse noise component from the directional sources. A sequential hypothesis testing of the eigenvalues of the SCM reveals eigenvalues dominated by loud sources that are statistical outliers for the assumed diffuse noise model. Travel times obtained from cross-correlations using only the diffuse noise component (i.e., by discarding or attenuating the outliers) converge to the predicted travel times based on the known array sensor spacing and measured sound speed at the site and are stable temporally (i.e., unbiased estimates). Data from the Shallow Water 2006 experiment demonstrates the effectiveness of this approach and that the signal-to-noise ratio builds up as the square root of time, as predicted by theory.

  2. Correlation filters for object detection in nonoverlapping background noise using a noisy reference image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-González, Pablo Mario; Kober, Vitaly

    2009-08-01

    Classical correlation filters for object detection and location estimation are designed assuming that the appearance and the shape of the target are explicitly known. In this work we assume that the target is given at unknown coordinates in a reference image corrupted by additive noise. Optimal correlation filters, with respect to signal-to-noise ratio and peak-to-output energy, for object detection and location estimation are derived. Two mathematical models of observed images are used; the additive noise model for the reference image and the non-overlapping background model for the input scene. Computer simulation results obtained with the proposed filters are presented and compared with those of common correlation filters.

  3. Data correlation based noise level estimation for cone beam projection data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ti; Yan, Hao; Ouyang, Luo; Staub, David; Wang, Jing; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B; Mou, Xuanqin

    2017-01-01

    In regularized iterative reconstruction algorithms, the selection of regularization parameter depends on the noise level of cone beam projection data. Our aim is to propose an algorithm to estimate the noise level of cone beam projection data. We first derived the data correlation of cone beam projection data in the Fourier domain, based on which, the signal and the noise were decoupled. Then the noise was extracted and averaged for estimation. An adaptive regularization parameter selection strategy was introduced based on the estimated noise level. Simulation and real data studies were conducted for performance validation. There exists an approximately zero-energy double-wedge area in the 3D Fourier domain of cone beam projection data. As for the noise level estimation results, the averaged relative errors of the proposed algorithm in the analytical/MC/spotlight-mode simulation experiments were 0.8%, 0.14% and 0.24%, respectively, and outperformed the homogeneous area based as well as the transformation based algorithms. Real studies indicated that the estimated noise levels were inversely proportional to the exposure levels, i.e., the slopes in the log-log plot were -1.0197 and -1.049 with respect to the short-scan and half-fan modes. The introduced regularization parameter selection strategy could deliver promising reconstructed image qualities. Based on the data correlation of cone beam projection data in Fourier domain, the proposed algorithm could estimate the noise level of cone beam projection data accurately and robustly. The estimated noise level could be used to adaptively select the regularization parameter.

  4. Shallow velocity structure above the Socorro Magma Body from ambient noise tomography using the large-N Sevilleta array, central Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, L. L.; Ranasinghe, N. R.; Schmandt, B.; Jiang, C.; Finlay, T. S.; Bilek, S. L.; Aster, R. C.

    2017-12-01

    The Socorro Magma Body (SMB) is one of the largest recognized active mid-crustal magma intrusions globally. Inflation of the SMB drives sporadically seismogenic uplift at rates of up to of few millimeters per year. We examine the upper crustal structure of the northern section of the SMB region using ambient noise seismic data collected from the Sevilleta Array and New Mexico Tech (NMT) seismic network to constrain basin structure and identify possible upper crustal heterogeneities caused by heat flow and/or fluid or magma migration to shallower depths. The Sevilleta Array comprised 801 vertical-component Nodal seismic stations with 10-Hz seismometers deployed within the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in the central Rio Grande rift north of Socorro, New Mexico, for a period of 12 days during February 2015. Five short period seismic stations from the NMT network located south of the Sevilleta array are also used to improve the raypath coverage outside the Sevilleta array. Inter-station ambient noise cross-correlations were computed from all available 20-minute time windows and stacked to obtain estimates of the vertical component Green's function. Clear fundamental mode Rayleigh wave energy is observed from 3 to 6 s period. Beamforming indicates prominent noise sources from the southwest, near Baja California, and the southeast, in the Gulf of Mexico. The frequency-time analysis method was implemented to measure fundamental mode Rayleigh wave phase velocities and the resulting inter-station travel times were inverted to obtain 2-D phase velocity maps. One-dimensional sensitivity kernels indicate that the Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps are sensitive to a depth interval of 1 to 8 km, depending on wave period. The maps show (up to 40%) variations in phase velocity within the Sevilleta Array, with the largest variations found for periods of 5-6 seconds. Holocene to upper Pleistocene, alluvial sediments found in the Socorro Basin consistently show lower phase

  5. Relating the Structure of Noise Correlations in Macaque Primary Visual Cortex to Decoder Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Or P. Mendels

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Noise correlations in neuronal responses can have a strong influence on the information available in large populations. In addition, the structure of noise correlations may have a great impact on the utility of different algorithms to extract this information that may depend on the specific algorithm, and hence may affect our understanding of population codes in the brain. Thus, a better understanding of the structure of noise correlations and their interplay with different readout algorithms is required. Here we use eigendecomposition to investigate the structure of noise correlations in populations of about 50–100 simultaneously recorded neurons in the primary visual cortex of anesthetized monkeys, and we relate this structure to the performance of two common decoders: the population vector and the optimal linear estimator. Our analysis reveals a non-trivial correlation structure, in which the eigenvalue spectrum is composed of several distinct large eigenvalues that represent different shared modes of fluctuation extending over most of the population, and a semi-continuous tail. The largest eigenvalue represents a uniform collective mode of fluctuation. The second and third eigenvalues typically show either a clear functional (i.e., dependent on the preferred orientation of the neurons or spatial structure (i.e., dependent on the physical position of the neurons. We find that the number of shared modes increases with the population size, being roughly 10% of that size. Furthermore, we find that the noise in each of these collective modes grows linearly with the population. This linear growth of correlated noise power can have limiting effects on the utility of averaging neuronal responses across large populations, depending on the readout. Specifically, the collective modes of fluctuation limit the accuracy of the population vector but not of the optimal linear estimator.

  6. Two-detector cross-correlation noise technique and its application in measuring reactor kinetic parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Guiping; Peng Feng; Yi Jieyi

    1988-01-01

    The two-detector cross-correlation noise technique is a new method of measuring reactor kinetic parameters developed in the sixties. It has the advantages of non-perturbation in core, high signal to noise ratio, low space dependent effect, and simple and reliable in measurement. A special set of cross-correlation analyzer has been prepared for measuring kinetic parameters of several reactor assemblies, such as the High Flux Engineering Test Reactor, its zero power mock up facility and a low enriched uranium light water lattice zero power facility

  7. Variations of local seismic response in Benevento (Southern Italy) using earthquakes and ambient noise recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improta, Luigi; di Giulio, Giuseppe; Rovelli, Antonio

    The city of Benevento (Southern Italy) has been repeatedly struck by large historical earthquakes. A heterogeneous geologic structure and widespread soft soil conditions make the estimation of site effects crucial for the seismic hazard assessment of the city. From 2000 until 2004, we installed seismic stations to collect earthquake data over zones with different geological conditions. Despite the high level of urban noise, we recorded more than 150 earthquakes at twelve sites. This data set yields the first, well documented experimental evidence for weak to moderate local amplifications. We investigated site effects primarily by the classical spectral ratio technique (CSR) using a rock station placed on the Benevento hill as reference. All sites in the Calore river valley and in the eastern part of the Benevento hill show a moderate high-frequency (f > 4 Hz) amplification peak. Conversely, sites in the Sabato river valley share weak-to-moderate amplification in a wide frequency band (from 1-2 to 7-10 Hz), without evident frequency peaks. Application of no-reference-site techniques to earthquake and noise data confirms the results of the CSRs in the sites of the Calore river valley and of the eastern part of the Benevento hill, but fails in providing indications for site effects in the Sabato river valley, being the H/V ratios nearly flat. One-dimensional modeling indicates that the ground motion amplification can be essentially explained in terms of a vertically varying geologic structure. High-frequency narrow peaks are caused by the strong impedance contrast existing between near-surface soft deposits and stiff cemented conglomerates. Conversely, broad-band amplifications in the Sabato river valley are likely due to a more complex layering with weak impedance contrasts both in the shallow and deep structure of the valley.

  8. Detection of very long period solar free oscillations in ambient seismic array noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caton, R.; Pavlis, G. L.; Thomson, D. J.; Vernon, F.

    2017-12-01

    For nearly two decades long-period seismologists have been aware that the Earth's free oscillations are in a constant state of excitement, even in the absence of large earthquakes. This phenomenon is now called the "Earth's hum," and much research has been done to determine what generates this hum. Here we examine a hypothesis first put forward by Thomson et al. in 2007 that a portion of the hum's energy comes from the sun. They hypothesized that solar free oscillations couple into the solid Earth, likely through electromagnetic processes, and produce signals that are observable in the frequency domain. If this is true, then at least some measurement of helioseismic oscillations may be possible using relatively cheap, ground-based instruments rather than spacecraft. In this project we attempt to improve upon previous studies by producing spectra from seismic arrays, rather than a single station. We use data from two arrays: The Homestake Mine 3D array in Lead, SD, and the Pinyon Flats array, which has seismometers in boreholes drilled into bedrock. Both have exceptionally low noise levels at ultra long periods and show easily visible earth tides on horizontal component data filtered to below the microseism band. In the Homestake data, below 500 μHz we have found evidence of what we suggest may be closely spaced solar g-mode lines. Such modes are produced by a density inversion at the top of the solar core. There is no sign of these modes in the Pinyon Flats data, but we find this is likely due to the signal-to-noise ratio of those data, which is significantly lower than Homestake. Significance tests of bands below 500 μHz indicate with probability levels as high as 40σ that these lines are not the result of random processes. Critical examination of our processing steps for sources of bias indicate that the observed line structure is not a processing artifact.

  9. Association between ambient noise exposure and school performance of children living in an urban area: a cross-sectional population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, Sophie; Levain, Jean-Pierre; Houot, Hélène; Petit, Rémy; Berthillier, Marc; Defrance, Jérôme; Lardies, Joseph; Masselot, Cyril; Mauny, Frédéric

    2014-04-01

    Most of the studies investigating the effects of the external noise on children's school performance have concerned pupils in schools exposed to high levels due to aircraft or freeway traffic noise. However, little is known about the consequences of the chronic ambient noise exposure at a level commonly encountered in residential urban areas. This study aimed to assess the relationship between the school performance of 8- to 9-year-old-children living in an urban environment and their chronic ambient noise exposure at home and at school. The children's school performances on the national standardized assessment test in French and mathematics were compared with the environmental noise levels. Children's exposure to ambient noise was calculated in front of their bedrooms (Lden) and schools (LAeq,day) using noise prediction modeling. Questionnaires were distributed to the families to collect potential confounding factors. Among the 746 respondent children, 586 were included in multilevel analyses. On average, the LAeq,day at school was 51.5 dB (SD= 4.5 dB; range = 38-58 dB) and the outdoor Lden at home was 56.4 dB (SD= 4.4 dB; range = 44-69 dB). LAeq,day at school was associated with impaired mathematics score (p = 0.02) or impaired French score (p = 0.01). For a + 10 dB gap, the French and mathematics scores were on average lower by about 5.5 points. Lden at home was significantly associated with impaired French performance when considered alone (p school exposure was considered (p = 0.06). The magnitude of the observed effect on school performance may appear modest, but should be considered in light of the number of people who are potentially chronically exposed to similar environmental noise levels.

  10. Population coding in mouse visual cortex: response reliability and dissociability of stimulus tuning and noise correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorrit Steven Montijn

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The primary visual cortex is an excellent model system for investigating how neuronal populations encode information, because of well-documented relationships between stimulus characteristics and neuronal activation patterns. We used two-photon calcium imaging data to relate the performance of different methods for studying population coding (population vectors, template matching and Bayesian decoding algorithms to their underlying assumptions. We show that the variability of neuronal responses may hamper the decoding of population activity, and that a normalization to correct for this variability may be of critical importance for correct decoding of population activity. Second, by comparing noise correlations and stimulus tuning we find that these properties have dissociated anatomical correlates, even though noise correlations have been previously hypothesized to reflect common synaptic input. We hypothesize that noise correlations arise from large nonspecific increases in spiking activity acting on many weak synapses simultaneously, while neuronal stimulus response properties are dependent on more reliable connections. Finally, this paper provides practical guidelines for further research on population coding and shows that population coding cannot be approximated by a simple summation of inputs, but is heavily influenced by factors such as input reliability and noise correlation structure.

  11. Generalized Langevin dynamics of a nanoparticle using a finite element approach: Thermostating with correlated noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uma, B.; Swaminathan, T. N.; Ayyaswamy, P. S.; Eckmann, D. M.; Radhakrishnan, R.

    2011-09-01

    A direct numerical simulation (DNS) procedure is employed to study the thermal motion of a nanoparticle in an incompressible Newtonian stationary fluid medium with the generalized Langevin approach. We consider both the Markovian (white noise) and non-Markovian (Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise and Mittag-Leffler noise) processes. Initial locations of the particle are at various distances from the bounding wall to delineate wall effects. At thermal equilibrium, the numerical results are validated by comparing the calculated translational and rotational temperatures of the particle with those obtained from the equipartition theorem. The nature of the hydrodynamic interactions is verified by comparing the velocity autocorrelation functions and mean square displacements with analytical results. Numerical predictions of wall interactions with the particle in terms of mean square displacements are compared with analytical results. In the non-Markovian Langevin approach, an appropriate choice of colored noise is required to satisfy the power-law decay in the velocity autocorrelation function at long times. The results obtained by using non-Markovian Mittag-Leffler noise simultaneously satisfy the equipartition theorem and the long-time behavior of the hydrodynamic correlations for a range of memory correlation times. The Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process does not provide the appropriate hydrodynamic correlations. Comparing our DNS results to the solution of an one-dimensional generalized Langevin equation, it is observed that where the thermostat adheres to the equipartition theorem, the characteristic memory time in the noise is consistent with the inherent time scale of the memory kernel. The performance of the thermostat with respect to equilibrium and dynamic properties for various noise schemes is discussed.

  12. High Degree Cubature Federated Filter for Multisensor Information Fusion with Correlated Noises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an improved high degree cubature federated filter for the nonlinear fusion system with cross-correlation between process and measurement noises at the same time using the fifth-degree cubature rule and the decorrelated principle in its local filters. The master filter of the federated filter adopts the no-reset mode to fuse local estimates of local filters to generate a global estimate according to the scalar weighted rule. The air-traffic maneuvering target tracking simulations are performed between the proposed filter and the fifth-degree cubature federated filter. Simulations results demonstrate that the proposed filter not only can achieve almost the same accuracy as the fifth-degree cubature federated filter with independent white noises, but also has superior performance to the fifth-degree cubature federated filter while the noises are cross-correlated at the same time.

  13. A Trial for Detecting the Temporal Variation in Seismic Velocity Accompanied by a Slow Slip Event using Seismic Interferometry of Ambient Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Miyuu; Ito, Yoshihiro; Ohta, Kazuaki; Hino, Ryota; Shinohara, Masanao

    2017-04-01

    Seismic interferometry is one of the most effective techniques to detect temporal variations in seismic velocity before or after a large earthquake. Some previous studies have been reported on seismic velocity reduction due to the occurrence of large earthquakes (e.g., Wegler et al., 2009; Yamada et al., 2010) as well as preceding them (e.g., Lockner et al., 1977; Yoshimitsu et al., 2009). However, there have only been a few studies thus far which attempt to detect seismic velocity changes associated with slow slip events (SSEs). In this study, we focus on applying seismic interferometry to ambient noise data from ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) deployed near a subduction zone. Between the end of January 2011 and the largest foreshock occurring on March 9th that precedes the March 11, 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, SSEs and low-frequency tremors were detected offshore Miyagi Prefecture (Ito et al., 2013, 2015; Katakami et al., 2016). We applied our seismic interferometry analysis using ambient noise to recordings from 17 OBS stations that were installed in the vicinity of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake source region, and only considered the recordings from before that major earthquake. All the OBSs are short-period seismometers with three components which have an eigenfrequency of 4.5 Hz. These OBSs were deployed offshore Miyagi Prefecture between November 2010 and April 2011. Before proceeding with the seismic interferometry analysis, we needed to estimate the two horizontal components of the original deployment orientation for 13 OBSs in (we could not estimate them for 4 OBSs). To obtain the OBS orientation, we used particle orbits of some direct P waves from selected tectonic earthquakes, in order to extract one vertical and two horizontal components. Then, the seismic interferometry analysis consisted of the following steps. First, we applied a band-pass filter of 0.25-2.0 Hz and one-bit technique to the ambient noise signal. Second, we calculated auto-correlation

  14. Weak-value amplification and optimal parameter estimation in the presence of correlated noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Josiah; Hallaji, Matin; Steinberg, Aephraim M.; Tollaksen, Jeff; Jordan, Andrew N.

    2017-11-01

    We analytically and numerically investigate the performance of weak-value amplification (WVA) and related parameter estimation methods in the presence of temporally correlated noise. WVA is a special instance of a general measurement strategy that involves sorting data into separate subsets based on the outcome of a second "partitioning" measurement. Using a simplified correlated noise model that can be analyzed exactly together with optimal statistical estimators, we compare WVA to a conventional measurement method. We find that WVA indeed yields a much lower variance of the parameter of interest than the conventional technique does, optimized in the absence of any partitioning measurements. In contrast, a statistically optimal analysis that employs partitioning measurements, incorporating all partitioned results and their known correlations, is found to yield an improvement—typically slight—over the noise reduction achieved by WVA. This result occurs because the simple WVA technique is not tailored to any specific noise environment and therefore does not make use of correlations between the different partitions. We also compare WVA to traditional background subtraction, a familiar technique where measurement outcomes are partitioned to eliminate unknown offsets or errors in calibration. Surprisingly, for the cases we consider, background subtraction turns out to be a special case of the optimal partitioning approach, possessing a similar typically slight advantage over WVA. These results give deeper insight into the role of partitioning measurements (with or without postselection) in enhancing measurement precision, which some have found puzzling. They also resolve previously made conflicting claims about the usefulness of weak-value amplification to precision measurement in the presence of correlated noise. We finish by presenting numerical results to model a more realistic laboratory situation of time-decaying correlations, showing that our conclusions hold

  15. Time-lapse imaging of fault properties at seismogenic depth using repeating earthquakes, active sources and seismic ambient noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xin

    2009-12-01

    The time-varying stress field of fault systems at seismogenic depths plays the mort important role in controlling the sequencing and nucleation of seismic events. Using seismic observations from repeating earthquakes, controlled active sources and seismic ambient noise, five studies at four different fault systems across North America, Central Japan, North and mid-West China are presented to describe our efforts to measure such time dependent structural properties. Repeating and similar earthquakes are hunted and analyzed to study the post-seismic fault relaxation at the aftershock zone of the 1984 M 6.8 western Nagano and the 1976 M 7.8 Tangshan earthquakes. The lack of observed repeating earthquakes at western Nagano is attributed to the absence of a well developed weak fault zone, suggesting that the fault damage zone has been almost completely healed. In contrast, the high percentage of similar and repeating events found at Tangshan suggest the existence of mature fault zones characterized by stable creep under steady tectonic loading. At the Parkfield region of the San Andreas Fault, repeating earthquake clusters and chemical explosions are used to construct a scatterer migration image based on the observation of systematic temporal variations in the seismic waveforms across the occurrence time of the 2004 M 6 Parkfield earthquake. Coseismic fluid charge or discharge in fractures caused by the Parkfield earthquake is used to explain the observed seismic scattering properties change at depth. In the same region, a controlled source cross-well experiment conducted at SAFOD pilot and main holes documents two large excursions in the travel time required for a shear wave to travel through the rock along a fixed pathway shortly before two rupture events, suggesting that they may be related to pre-rupture stress induced changes in crack properties. At central China, a tomographic inversion based on the theory of seismic ambient noise and coda wave interferometry

  16. Investigation of the correlation between noise and vibration characteristics and unsteady flow in a circulator pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Denghao; Ren, Yun; Mou, Jiegang; Gu, Yunqing [Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou (China)

    2017-05-15

    Circulator pumps have wide engineering applications but the acoustics, vibration and unsteady flow structures of the circulator pump are still not fully understood. We investigated the noise and vibration characteristics and unsteady flow structures in a circulator pump at different flow rates. Three-dimensional, unsteady RANS equations were solved on high-quality structured meshes with SST k-ω turbulence model numerically. Measurements were made in a semi-anechoic chamber to get an overview of noise and vibration level of a pump at different flow rates. The 1/3 octave-band filter technique was applied to obtain the explicit frequency spectra of sound, pressure fluctuations and vibration signals and their principal frequencies were identified successfully. The air-borne noise level of the designed condition is lower than that of the off-design conditions, and the highest sound pressure level is found at part-load condition. The acoustic emission from the pump is mainly caused by unsteady flow structures and pressure fluctuations. In addition, both the link between air- borne noise and pressure fluctuation, and the correlation between vibration and unsteady hydrodynamic forces, were quantitatively examined and verified. This work offers good data to understand noise and vibration characteristics of circulator pumps and the relationships among the noise, vibration and unsteady flow structures.

  17. Surface pressure fluctuations on aircraft flaps and their correlation with far-field noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Y. P.; Joshi, M. C.; Bent, P. H.; Yamamoto, K. J.

    2000-07-01

    This paper discusses unsteady surface pressures on aircraft flaps and their correlation with far-field noise. Analyses are made of data from a 4.7% DC-10 aircraft model test, conducted in the 40 × 80 feet wind tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. Results for various slat/wing/flap configurations and various flow conditions are discussed in detail to reveal major trends in surface pressure fluctuations. Spectral analysis, including cross-correlation/coherence, both among unsteady surface pressures and between far-field noise and near-field fluctuations, is used to reveal the most coherent motions in the near field and identify potential sources of noise related to flap flows. Dependencies of surface pressure fluctuations on mean flow Mach numbers, flap settings and slat angles are discussed. Dominant flow features in flap side edge regions, such as the formation of double-vortex structures, are shown to manifest themselves in the unsteady surface pressures as a series of spectral humps. The spectral humps are shown to correlate well with the radiated noise, indicating the existence of major noise sources in flap side edge regions. Strouhal number scaling is used to collapse the data with satisfactory results. The effects of flap side edge fences on surface pressures are also discussed. It is shown that the application of fences effectively increases the thickness of the flaps so that the double-vortex structures have more time to evolve. As a result, the characteristic timescale of the unsteady sources increases, which in turn leads to a decrease in the dominant frequency of the source process. Based on this, an explanation is proposed for the noise reduction mechanism of flap side edge fences.

  18. Polarization Analysis of Ambient Seismic Noise Green's Functions for Monitoring Glacial State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, B.; Horgan, H. J.; Levy, R. H.; Bertler, N. A. N.

    2017-12-01

    Analysis of continuously recorded background seismic noise has emerged as a powerful technique to monitor changes within the Earth. In a process analogous to Einstein's 'Brownian motion', seismic energy enters the Earth through a variety of mechanisms and then is dissipated through scattering processes or through a semi-random distribution of sources. Eventually, in stratified media, some of this energy assembles itself in coherent packets and propagates as seismic surface waves. Through careful analysis of these waves as recorded by two seismic stations over a short period of time, we can reconstruct Empirical Green's Functions (EGF). EGF are sensitive to the material through which the waves are travelling between the two stations. They can thus provide 4D estimates of material properties such as seismic velocity and anisotropy. We specifically analyze both the bulk velocity and the complex phase of these EGF to look for subtle changes in velocity with direction of propagation as well as the nature of particle polarization and ellipticity. These characteristics can then be used as a proxy for contemporaneous stress and strain or 'inherited' strain. Similar approaches have proven successful in mapping stresses and strain in the crust, on plate interface faults, volcanoes, and on glaciers and the Greenland ice sheet. We will present results from applying this approach to continuous broadband data recorded on the West Antarctic Ice Sheet through the Polenet project. Our results suggest that we can reconstruct EGF at least between frequencies of 300mHz and 50mHz for time periods, providing information about the contemporary state of ice and underlying lithosphere on a seasonal or annual basis. Our primary goals are determining glacial state by linking wave propagation to material fabric on micro (crystal orientation) and macro (strain marker) scales and well as rebound processes in the lithosphere during glacial loading and unloading. We will present our current

  19. Ambient Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This software sketches comprise two custom-built ambient sensors, i.e. a noise and a movement sensor. Both sensors measure an ambient value and process the values to a color gradient (green > yellow > red). The sensors were built using the Processing 1.5.1 development environment. Available under

  20. The seismic wave speed structure of the Ontong Java Plateau determined from joint ambient noise and earthquake waveform data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covellone, B. M.; Savage, B. K.; Shen, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) represents the result of a significant event in the Earth's geologic history. Limited geophysical and geochemical data, as well as the plateau's relative isolation in the Pacific Ocean, have made interpretation of the modern day geologic structure and its 120 Ma formation history difficult. Here we present the highest resolution images to date of the wave speed structure of the OJP region. We use an iterative finite-frequency tomography methodology and a unique data set that combines empirical Green's functions extracted from ambient noise and earthquake waveforms. The uniqueness and combination of datasets allow us to best exploit the limited station distribution in the Pacific and image wave speed structures between 35 km and greater than 250 km into the Earth. We image a region of fast shear wave speeds, greater than 4.75 km/s, that extends to greater than 100 km beneath the plateau. The wave speeds are similar to as observed in cratonic environments and are consistent with a compositional anomaly likely a result of eclogite entrainment during the plateau's formation.

  1. Ambient Noise Tomography of Southern California Images Dipping San Andreas-Parallel Structure and Low-Velocity Salton Trough Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, S.; Klemperer, S. L.; Lawrence, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise tomography (ANT) images the entire crust but does not depend on the spatial and temporal distribution of events. Our ANT high-resolution 3D velocity model of southern California uses 849 broadband stations, vastly more than previous studies, and four years of data, 1997-1998, 2007, and 2011, chosen to include our own broadband Salton Seismic Imaging Project, a 40-station transect across the Salton Trough, as well as other campaign stations in both Mexico and the U.S.A., and permanent stations. Our shear-wave model has 0.05° x 0.05° lateral and 1 km vertical blocks. We used the Harvard Community Velocity Model (CVM-H) as the initial model for the inversion. We show significant differences relative to the CVM-H model, especially in the lower crust and upper mantle. We observe prominent low-velocity anomalies in the upper mantle under the Salton Buttes and Cerro Prieto geothermal fields, indicating high-temperatures and possibly partial-melt. Similar low-velocity zones have been previously observed along the Gulf of California. We also observe vertical to gradually dipping lateral velocity contrasts in the lower crust under the southern part of the San Andreas Fault. The east to northeast dip may represent crustal fabric sheared by movement of the Pacific plate under the North American plate prior to the initiation of transform motion.

  2. Near-bottom hydrophone measurements of ambient noise and sperm whale vocalizations in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, Joal; Fisher, Robert; Field, Robert; Turgut, Altan; Ioup, George; Ioup, Juliette; Rayborn, Grayson; Kuczaj, Stan; Caruthers, Jerald; Goodman, Ralph; Sidorovskaia, Natalia

    2002-05-01

    Three bottom-moored hydrophones, 50 m above the bottom, were placed on a downslope line, ending at the largest concentration of sperm whale sightings in the northern Gulf of Mexico, in 600 m, 800 m, and 1000 m water depths. These depths were chosen after upslope propagation modeling, using historical databases, showed transmission losses greater than 110 dB at hydrophones near the bottom in water shallower than 600 m for a 500 m deep source at the 1000 m contour. These autonomously recording hydrophones were environmental acoustic recording system (EARS) buoys obtained from the Naval Oceanographic Office. They were capable of recording signals up to 5500 Hz continuously for 36 days and were deployed from July 17 through August 21. During this period a major marine mammal exercise was being conducted at the surface by the Minerals Management Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service, with other government and university scientists, in which temporary acoustic recording devices were attached to the whales and the whales were monitored by a surface towed array. Our near-bottom measurements of ambient noise and sperm whale vocalizations are discussed and compared to those surface and on-whale measurements. [Research supported by ONR.

  3. Crustal and uppermost mantle structure of southern Norway: results from surface wave analysis of ambient seismic noise and earthquake data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Andreas; Weidle, Christian; Maupin, Valérie

    2012-12-01

    We use ambient seismic noise and earthquake recordings on a temporary regional network in southern Norway to produce Rayleigh and Love wave phase velocity maps from 3 to 67 s period. Local dispersion curves are then jointly inverted for a 3-D shear wave velocity model of the region. We perform a two-step inversion approach. First, a direct search, Monte Carlo algorithm is applied to find best fitting isotropic velocity depth profiles. Those profiles are then used as initial models for a linearised inversion which takes into account radial anisotropy in the shear wave structure. Results reveal crustal as well as uppermost mantle structures in the studied region. Velocity anomalies in the upper crust are rather small in amplitude and can in most parts be related to surface geology in terms of rock densities. Old tectonic units like the Oslo Graben (300-240 Ma) and the Caledonian nappes (440-410 Ma) are clearly imaged. Furthermore, we find clear indications for localized crustal anisotropy of about 3 per cent. Despite generally poor resolution of interface depths in surface wave inversion, we find lateral variation of crustal thickness in agreement with previous studies. We are able to confirm and locate the transition from a slow lithospheric upper mantle underneath southern Norway to a fast shield-like mantle towards Sweden.

  4. Time-Lapse Monitoring with 4D Seismic Coda Waves in Active, Passive and Ambient Noise Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumley, D. E.; Kamei, R.; Saygin, E.; Shragge, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    The Earth's subsurface is continuously changing, due to temporal variations in fluid flow, stress, temperature, geomechanics and geochemistry, for example. These physical changes occur at broad tectonic and earthquake scales, and also at very detailed near-surface and reservoir scales. Changes in the physical states of the earth cause time-varying changes in the physical properties of rocks and fluids, which can be monitored with natural or manmade seismic waves. Time-lapse (4D) seismic monitoring is important for applications related to natural and induced seismicity, hydrocarbon and groundwater reservoir depletion, CO2 sequestration etc. An exciting new research area involves moving beyond traditional methods in order to use the full complex time-lapse scattered wavefield (4D coda waves) for both manmade active-source 3D/4D seismic data, and also to use continuous recordings of natural-source passive seismic data, especially (micro) earthquakes and ocean ambient noise. This research involves full wave-equation approaches including waveform inversion (FWI), interferometry, Large N sensor arrays, "big data" information theory, and high performance supercomputing (HPC). I will present high-level concepts and recent data results that are quite spectacular and highly encouraging.

  5. Seismic monitoring leveraging existing telecom infrastructure at the SDASA: Active, passive, and ambient-noise analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Martin, Eileen R.

    2017-11-28

    We analyze active and passive seismic data recorded by the Stanford distributed acoustic sensing array (SDASA) located in conduits under the Stanford University campus. For the active data we used low-energy sources (betsy gun and sledge hammer) and recorded data using both the DAS array and 98 three-component nodes deployed along a 2D line. The joint analysis of shot profiles extracted from the two data sets shows that some surface waves and refracted events are consistently recorded by the DAS array. In areas where geophone coupling was suboptimal because of surface obstructions, DAS recordings are more coherent. In contrast, surface waves are more reliably recorded by the geophones than the DAS array. Because of the noisy environment and weak sources, neither data set shows clear reflections. We demonstrate the repeatability of DAS recordings of local earthquakes by comparing two weak events (magnitude 0.95 and 1.34) with epicenters 100 m apart that occurred only one minute from each other. Analyzing another local, and slightly stronger, earthquake (magnitude 2.0) we show how the kinematics of both the P-arrival and S-arrival can be measured from the DAS data. Interferometric analysis of passive data shows that reliable virtual-source responses can be extracted from the DAS data. We observe Rayleigh waves when correlating aligned receivers, and Love waves when correlating receivers belonging to segments of the array parallel to each other. Dispersion analysis of the virtual sources shows the expected decrease in surface-wave velocity with increasing frequency.

  6. Neural correlates of ambient thermal sensation: An fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oi, Hajime; Hashimoto, Teruo; Nozawa, Takayuki; Kanno, Akitake; Kawata, Natasha; Hirano, Kanan; Yamamoto, Yuki; Sugiura, Motoaki; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2017-09-12

    An increasing number of biometeorological and psychological studies have demonstrated the importance and complexity of the processes involved in environmental thermal perception in humans. However, extant functional imaging data on thermal perception have yet to fully reveal the neural mechanisms underlying these processes because most studies were performed using local thermal stimulation and did not dissociate thermal sensation from comfort. Thus, for the first time, the present study employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and manipulated ambient temperature during brain measurement to independently explore the neural correlates of thermal sensation and comfort. There were significant correlations between the sensation of a lower temperature and activation in the left dorsal posterior insula, putamen, amygdala, and bilateral retrosplenial cortices but no significant correlations were observed between brain activation and thermal comfort. The dorsal posterior insula corresponds to the phylogenetically new thermosensory cortex whereas the limbic structures (i.e., amygdala and retrosplenial cortex) and dorsal striatum may be associated with supramodal emotional representations and the behavioral motivation to obtain heat, respectively. The co-involvement of these phylogenetically new and old systems may explain the psychological processes underlying the flexible psychological and behavioral thermo-environmental adaptations that are unique to humans.

  7. Observation of Noise Correlated by the Hawking Effect in a Water Tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euvé, L-P; Michel, F; Parentani, R; Philbin, T G; Rousseaux, G

    2016-09-16

    We measured the power spectrum and two-point correlation function for the randomly fluctuating free surface on the downstream side of a stationary flow with a maximum Froude number F_{max}≈0.85 reached above a localized obstacle. On such a flow the scattering of incident long wavelength modes is analogous to that responsible for black hole radiation (the Hawking effect). Our measurements of the noise show a clear correlation between pairs of modes of opposite energies. We also measure the scattering coefficients by applying the same analysis of correlations to waves produced by a wave maker.

  8. Correlation of Noise Signature to Pulsed Power Events at the HERMES III Accelerator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Barbara [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Joseph, Nathan Ryan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Salazar, Juan Diego [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The HERMES III accelerator, which is located at Sandia National Laboratories' Tech Area IV, is the largest pulsed gamma X-ray source in the world. The accelerator is made up of 20 inductive cavities that are charged to 1 MV each by complex pulsed power circuitry. The firing time of the machine components ranges between the microsecond and nanosecond timescales. This results in a variety of electromagnetic frequencies when the accelerator fires. Testing was done to identify the HERMES electromagnetic noise signal and to map it to the various accelerator trigger events. This report will show the measurement methods used to capture the noise spectrum produced from the machine and correlate this noise signature with machine events.

  9. Noise, air pollutants and traffic: continuous measurement and correlation at a high-traffic location in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Zev; Kheirbek, Iyad; Clougherty, Jane E; Ito, Kazuhiko; Matte, Thomas; Markowitz, Steven; Eisl, Holger

    2011-11-01

    Epidemiological studies have linked both noise and air pollution to common adverse health outcomes such as increased blood pressure and myocardial infarction. In urban settings, noise and air pollution share important sources, notably traffic, and several recent studies have shown spatial correlations between noise and air pollution. The temporal association between these exposures, however, has yet to be thoroughly investigated despite the importance of time series studies in air pollution epidemiology and the potential that correlations between these exposures could at least partly confound statistical associations identified in these studies. An aethelometer, for continuous elemental carbon measurement, was co-located with a continuous noise monitor near a major urban highway in New York City for six days in August 2009. Hourly elemental carbon measurements and hourly data on overall noise levels and low, medium and high frequency noise levels were collected. Hourly average concentrations of fine particles and nitrogen oxides, wind speed and direction and car, truck and bus traffic were obtained from nearby regulatory monitors. Overall temporal patterns, as well as day-night and weekday-weekend patterns, were characterized and compared for all variables. Noise levels were correlated with car, truck, and bus traffic and with air pollutants. We observed strong day-night and weekday-weekend variation in noise and air pollutants and correlations between pollutants varied by noise frequency. Medium and high frequency noise were generally more strongly correlated with traffic and traffic-related pollutants than low frequency noise and the correlation with medium and high frequency noise was generally stronger at night. Correlations with nighttime high frequency noise were particularly high for car traffic (Spearman rho=0.84), nitric oxide (0.73) and nitrogen dioxide (0.83). Wind speed and direction mediated relationships between pollutants and noise. Noise levels are

  10. Effects of Tropospheric Spatio-Temporal Correlated Noise on the Analysis of Space Geodetic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Wolf, A.; Jacobs, C. S.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2012-01-01

    The standard VLBI analysis models the distribution of measurement noise as Gaussian. Because the price of recording bits is steadily decreasing, thermal errors will soon no longer dominate. As a result, it is expected that troposphere and instrumentation/clock errors will increasingly become more dominant. Given that both of these errors have correlated spectra, properly modeling the error distributions will become increasingly relevant for optimal analysis. We discuss the advantages of modeling the correlations between tropospheric delays using a Kolmogorov spectrum and the frozen flow assumption pioneered by Treuhaft and Lanyi. We then apply these correlated noise spectra to the weighting of VLBI data analysis for two case studies: X/Ka-band global astrometry and Earth orientation. In both cases we see improved results when the analyses are weighted with correlated noise models vs. the standard uncorrelated models. The X/Ka astrometric scatter improved by approx.10% and the systematic Delta delta vs. delta slope decreased by approx. 50%. The TEMPO Earth orientation results improved by 17% in baseline transverse and 27% in baseline vertical.

  11. Careful accounting of extrinsic noise in protein expression reveals correlations among its sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, John A.; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2017-06-01

    In order to grow and replicate, living cells must express a diverse array of proteins, but the process by which proteins are made includes a great deal of inherent randomness. Understanding this randomness—whether it arises from the discrete stochastic nature of chemical reactivity ("intrinsic" noise), or from cell-to-cell variability in the concentrations of molecules involved in gene expression, or from the timings of important cell-cycle events like DNA replication and cell division ("extrinsic" noise)—remains a challenge. In this article we analyze a model of gene expression that accounts for several extrinsic sources of noise, including those associated with chromosomal replication, cell division, and variability in the numbers of RNA polymerase, ribonuclease E, and ribosomes. We then attempt to fit our model to a large proteomics and transcriptomics data set and find that only through the introduction of a few key correlations among the extrinsic noise sources can we accurately recapitulate the experimental data. These include significant correlations between the rate of mRNA degradation (mediated by ribonuclease E) and the rates of both transcription (RNA polymerase) and translation (ribosomes) and, strikingly, an anticorrelation between the transcription and the translation rates themselves.

  12. Effect of external classroom noise on schoolchildren's reading and mathematics performance: correlation of noise levels and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, M; Skenteris, N; Piperakis, S M

    2015-02-01

    The present study investigated the effect of low, medium, and high traffic road noise as well as irrelevant background speech noise on primary school children's reading and mathematical performance. A total of 676 participants (324 boys, 47.9% and 352 girls, 52.1%) of the 4th and 5th elementary classes participated in the project. The participants were enrolled in public primary schools from urban areas and had ages ranging from 9 to 10 years and from. Schools were selected on the basis of increasing levels of exposure to road traffic noise and then classified into three categories (Low noise: 55-66 dB, Medium noise: 67-77 dB, and High noise: 72-80 dB). We measured reading comprehension and mathematical skills in accordance with the national guidelines for elementary education, using a test designed specifically for the purpose of this study. On the one hand, children in low-level noise schools showed statistically significant differences from children in medium- and high-level noise schools in reading performance (p<0.001). On the other hand, children in low-level noise schools differed significantly from children in high-level noise schools but only in mathematics performance (p=0.001). Girls in general did better in reading score than boys, especially in schools with medium- and high-level noise. Finally the levels of noise and gender were found to be two independent factors.

  13. Seismic reflection response from cross-correlations of ambient vibrations on non-conventional hidrocarbon reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, F. V.; Granados, I.; Aguirre, J.; Carrera, R. Á.

    2017-12-01

    Nowadays, in hydrocarbon industry, there is a need to optimize and reduce exploration costs in the different types of reservoirs, motivating the community specialized in the search and development of alternative exploration geophysical methods. This study show the reflection response obtained from a shale gas / oil deposit through the method of seismic interferometry of ambient vibrations in combination with Wavelet analysis and conventional seismic reflection techniques (CMP & NMO). The method is to generate seismic responses from virtual sources through the process of cross-correlation of records of Ambient Seismic Vibrations (ASV), collected in different receivers. The seismic response obtained is interpreted as the response that would be measured in one of the receivers considering a virtual source in the other. The acquisition of ASV records was performed in northern of Mexico through semi-rectangular arrays of multi-component geophones with instrumental response of 10 Hz. The in-line distance between geophones was 40 m while in cross-line was 280 m, the sampling used during the data collection was 2 ms and the total duration of the records was 6 hours. The results show the reflection response of two lines in the in-line direction and two in the cross-line direction for which the continuity of coherent events have been identified and interpreted as reflectors. There is certainty that the events identified correspond to reflections because the time-frequency analysis performed with the Wavelet Transform has allowed to identify the frequency band in which there are body waves. On the other hand, the CMP and NMO techniques have allowed to emphasize and correct the reflection response obtained during the correlation processes in the frequency band of interest. The results of the processing and analysis of ASV records through the seismic interferometry method have allowed us to see interesting results in light of the cross-correlation process in combination with

  14. Comparison of JADE and canonical correlation analysis for ECG de-noising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzilek, Jakub; Kremen, Vaclav; Lhotska, Lenka

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores differences between two methods for blind source separation within frame of ECG de-noising. First method is joint approximate diagonalization of eigenmatrices, which is based on estimation of fourth order cross-cummulant tensor and its diagonalization. Second one is the statistical method known as canonical correlation analysis, which is based on estimation of correlation matrices between two multidimensional variables. Both methods were used within method, which combines the blind source separation algorithm with decision tree. The evaluation was made on large database of 382 long-term ECG signals and the results were examined. Biggest difference was found in results of 50 Hz power line interference where the CCA algorithm completely failed. Thus main power of CCA lies in estimation of unstructured noise within ECG. JADE algorithm has larger computational complexity thus the CCA perfomed faster when estimating the components.

  15. Surface wave tomography across the Sorgenfrei-Tornquist Zone, SW Scandinavia, using ambient noise and earthquake data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Andreas; Maupin, Valérie; Balling, Niels

    2015-10-01

    We produce a S-wave velocity model of the crust and upper mantle around the Sorgenfrei-Tornquist Zone, southern Scandinavia, by analysing ambient seismic noise and earthquake recordings on temporary and permanent regional network stations. In a first step, we perform tomographical inversion of surface wave dispersion data from seismic noise to obtain Rayleigh and Love wave phase-velocity maps from 3 to about 30 s period. Local dispersion curves are then combined with regionally averaged surface wave velocities from earthquake data measured between 15 and about 100 s period. Dispersion curves are jointly inverted for a 3-D model of the S-wave velocity and radial velocity anisotropy by using a combined Monte Carlo and linearized inversion approach. Results reveal significant crustal as well as uppermost mantle velocity variations at all depth levels. Upper crustal structural variations are mainly controlled by the thick sedimentary Danish Basin with both low S-wave velocities and high anisotropy. Despite of the known limited capability of surface wave inversion to constrain interface depths and model parameter trade-offs, obtained Moho depths are in good agreement with previous studies in the region. Marked crustal thinning is clearly revealed beneath the Danish Basin with a narrow transition to the thicker crust in Swedish shield areas. Despite very different crustal and morphological structures, Denmark and southern Norway both have similar well-defined upper-mantle low-velocity zones, interpreted as asthenosphere, starting a depth of about 100 km. Compared with southern Sweden, showing high upper-mantle velocities, characteristic for shields, velocities are reduced by 0.30-0.40 km s-1 (6-8 per cent) at the depth levels of 140-200 km and radial anisotropy of 2-4 per cent is observed. Our study confirms the importance of the Sorgenfrei-Tornquist Zone, as a very deep structural boundary, separating old, thick, cratonic Baltica lithosphere in southern Sweden from

  16. A statistical assessment of seismic models of the U.S. continental crust using Bayesian inversion of ambient noise surface wave dispersion data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olugboji, T. M.; Lekic, V.; McDonough, W.

    2017-07-01

    We present a new approach for evaluating existing crustal models using ambient noise data sets and its associated uncertainties. We use a transdimensional hierarchical Bayesian inversion approach to invert ambient noise surface wave phase dispersion maps for Love and Rayleigh waves using measurements obtained from Ekström (2014). Spatiospectral analysis shows that our results are comparable to a linear least squares inverse approach (except at higher harmonic degrees), but the procedure has additional advantages: (1) it yields an autoadaptive parameterization that follows Earth structure without making restricting assumptions on model resolution (regularization or damping) and data errors; (2) it can recover non-Gaussian phase velocity probability distributions while quantifying the sources of uncertainties in the data measurements and modeling procedure; and (3) it enables statistical assessments of different crustal models (e.g., CRUST1.0, LITHO1.0, and NACr14) using variable resolution residual and standard deviation maps estimated from the ensemble. These assessments show that in the stable old crust of the Archean, the misfits are statistically negligible, requiring no significant update to crustal models from the ambient noise data set. In other regions of the U.S., significant updates to regionalization and crustal structure are expected especially in the shallow sedimentary basins and the tectonically active regions, where the differences between model predictions and data are statistically significant.

  17. Robust Wavelet Estimation to Eliminate Simultaneously the Effects of Boundary Problems, Outliers, and Correlated Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsaidi M. Altaher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical wavelet thresholding methods suffer from boundary problems caused by the application of the wavelet transformations to a finite signal. As a result, large bias at the edges and artificial wiggles occur when the classical boundary assumptions are not satisfied. Although polynomial wavelet regression and local polynomial wavelet regression effectively reduce the risk of this problem, the estimates from these two methods can be easily affected by the presence of correlated noise and outliers, giving inaccurate estimates. This paper introduces two robust methods in which the effects of boundary problems, outliers, and correlated noise are simultaneously taken into account. The proposed methods combine thresholding estimator with either a local polynomial model or a polynomial model using the generalized least squares method instead of the ordinary one. A primary step that involves removing the outlying observations through a statistical function is considered as well. The practical performance of the proposed methods has been evaluated through simulation experiments and real data examples. The results are strong evidence that the proposed method is extremely effective in terms of correcting the boundary bias and eliminating the effects of outliers and correlated noise.

  18. Structure of magma reservoirs beneath Merapi and surrounding volcanic centers of Central Java modeled from ambient noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulakov, Ivan; Maksotova, Gulzhamal; Jaxybulatov, Kayrly; Kasatkina, Ekaterina; Shapiro, Nikolai M.; Luehr, Birger-G.; El Khrepy, Sami; Al-Arifi, Nassir

    2016-10-01

    We present a three-dimensional model of the distribution of S-wave velocity in the upper crust to a depth of 20 km beneath Central Java based on the analysis of seismic ambient noise data recorded by more than 100 seismic stations in 2004 associated with the MERAMEX project. To invert the Rayleigh wave dispersion curves to construct 2-D group-velocity maps and 3-D distributions of S-wave velocity, we have used a new tomographic algorithm based on iterative linearized inversion. We have performed a series of synthetic tests that demonstrate significantly higher resolution in the upper crust with this model compared to the local earthquake travel-time tomography (LET) model previously applied for the same station network. Beneath the southern flank of Merapi, we identify a large low-velocity anomaly that can be split into two layers. The upper layer reflects the ˜1 km thick sedimentary cover of volcanoclastic deposits. The deeper anomaly at depths of ˜4-8 km may represent a magma reservoir with partially molten rock that feeds several volcanoes in Central Java. Beneath the Merapi summit, we observe another low-velocity anomaly as deep as 8 km that may be associated with the active magma reservoir that feeds the eruptive activity of Merapi. In the southern portion of the study area, in the lower crust, we identify a low-velocity anomaly that may represent the top of the pathways of volatiles and melts ascending from the slab that was previously inferred from the LET model results. We observe that this anomaly is clearly separate from the felsic magma reservoirs in the upper crust.

  19. Anisotropic full waveform ambient noise and earthquake tomography of the Ontong Java Plateau and surrounding Pacific upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, A. C.; Savage, B.; Shen, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The Ontong Java (OJP) and Manihiki plateau (MP) large igneous provinces (LIP) of the Southwest Pacific took shape from a complicated, but poorly understood geological history. Unraveling the formation and deformation of these Pacific LIPs is not straightforward due to limited available data, remote location, and atypical geology. Origin hypotheses include melting of a plume or a fast-spreading triple junction, but distinguishing between these requires a further understanding of 120 Ma of deformation of each LIP. A previous tomographic model of OJP observed highly abnormal Rayleigh shear wave speeds, >4.75km/s, and attributed these to an unusual composition, garnet and clinopyroxene residual from melting pyroxenite entrained within a rising plume. Unfortunately, this model lacks constraints on the horizontally polarized shear wave speeds, SH or Love waves, anisotropy, and attenuation. We therefore perform a transverse-isotropic, scattering-integral, full-waveform tomography between periods of 25 and 200 seconds utilizing both ambient noise empirical Green's functions and seismic data from regional earthquakes. Our tomographic model improves upon previous work using permanent and temporary seismic stations, increased model space, and utilizing three components of seismic data (vertical, radial, and tangential). Included is also an assessment of the anelastic attenuation in the western Pacific using both surface waves and multiple core reflections. Our results will improve the tomographic resolution around OJP and the Pacific upper mantle between 35 and 300 km depth. This improved model will enhance our understanding of the tectonic history of the OJP and MP regions, and the Pacific Indo-Australian plate boundary.

  20. Noise sensitivity of portfolio selection in constant conditional correlation GARCH models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga-Haszonits, I.; Kondor, I.

    2007-11-01

    This paper investigates the efficiency of minimum variance portfolio optimization for stock price movements following the Constant Conditional Correlation GARCH process proposed by Bollerslev. Simulations show that the quality of portfolio selection can be improved substantially by computing optimal portfolio weights from conditional covariances instead of unconditional ones. Measurement noise can be further reduced by applying some filtering method on the conditional correlation matrix (such as Random Matrix Theory based filtering). As an empirical support for the simulation results, the analysis is also carried out for a time series of S&P500 stock prices.

  1. Effects of correlated noise on the full-spectrum combining and complex-symbol combining arraying techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazirani, P.

    1995-01-01

    The process of combining telemetry signals received at multiple antennas, commonly referred to as arraying, can be used to improve communication link performance in the Deep Space Network (DSN). By coherently adding telemetry from multiple receiving sites, arraying produces an enhancement in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over that achievable with any single antenna in the array. A number of different techniques for arraying have been proposed and their performances analyzed in past literature. These analyses have compared different arraying schemes under the assumption that the signals contain additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) and that the noise observed at distinct antennas is independent. In situations where an unwanted background body is visible to multiple antennas in the array, however, the assumption of independent noises is no longer applicable. A planet with significant radiation emissions in the frequency band of interest can be one such source of correlated noise. For example, during much of Galileo's tour of Jupiter, the planet will contribute significantly to the total system noise at various ground stations. This article analyzes the effects of correlated noise on two arraying schemes currently being considered for DSN applications: full-spectrum combining (FSC) and complex-symbol combining (CSC). A framework is presented for characterizing the correlated noise based on physical parameters, and the impact of the noise correlation on the array performance is assessed for each scheme.

  2. Dynamical properties of a tumor growth system in the presence of immunization and colored cross-correlated noises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Zhenglin; Mei Dongcheng

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effects of the noise parameters and immunization strength β on the dynamical properties of a tumor growth system with both immunization and colored cross-correlated noises. The analytical expressions for the associated relaxation time T C and the normalized correlation function C(s) are derived by means of the projection operator method. The results indicate that: (i) T C as a function of the multiplicative noise intensity α shows resonance-like behavior, i.e. the curves of T C versus α exhibit a single-peak structure and its peak position changes with increasing correlation strength between noises λ, the autocorrelation time of multiplicative noise τ 1 , the autocorrelation time of additive noise τ 2 and the cross-correlation time τ 3 . This behavior can be understood in terms of the noise-enhanced stability effect and the influence of the memory effects on it. (ii) The increasing λ, τ 1 , τ 2 and the additive noise intensity D slow down the fluctuation decay of the tumor population, whereas the increasing τ 3 and β speed it up. (iii) C(s) increases as λ, τ 1 , τ 2 and β increase, while it decreases with τ 3 increasing. Our study shows that the effects of some noise parameters on tumor growth can be modified due to the presence of the immunization effect.

  3. Dynamical properties of a tumor growth system in the presence of immunization and colored cross-correlated noises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zheng-Lin; Mei, Dong-Cheng

    2010-05-01

    We investigate the effects of the noise parameters and immunization strength β on the dynamical properties of a tumor growth system with both immunization and colored cross-correlated noises. The analytical expressions for the associated relaxation time TC and the normalized correlation function C(s) are derived by means of the projection operator method. The results indicate that: (i) TC as a function of the multiplicative noise intensity α shows resonance-like behavior, i.e. the curves of TC versus α exhibit a single-peak structure and its peak position changes with increasing correlation strength between noises λ, the autocorrelation time of multiplicative noise τ1, the autocorrelation time of additive noise τ2 and the cross-correlation time τ3. This behavior can be understood in terms of the noise-enhanced stability effect and the influence of the memory effects on it. (ii) The increasing λ, τ1, τ2 and the additive noise intensity D slow down the fluctuation decay of the tumor population, whereas the increasing τ3 and β speed it up. (iii) C(s) increases as λ, τ1, τ2 and β increase, while it decreases with τ3 increasing. Our study shows that the effects of some noise parameters on tumor growth can be modified due to the presence of the immunization effect.

  4. Feature-Selective Attention Adaptively Shifts Noise Correlations in Primary Auditory Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downer, Joshua D; Rapone, Brittany; Verhein, Jessica; O'Connor, Kevin N; Sutter, Mitchell L

    2017-05-24

    Sensory environments often contain an overwhelming amount of information, with both relevant and irrelevant information competing for neural resources. Feature attention mediates this competition by selecting the sensory features needed to form a coherent percept. How attention affects the activity of populations of neurons to support this process is poorly understood because population coding is typically studied through simulations in which one sensory feature is encoded without competition. Therefore, to study the effects of feature attention on population-based neural coding, investigations must be extended to include stimuli with both relevant and irrelevant features. We measured noise correlations ( r noise ) within small neural populations in primary auditory cortex while rhesus macaques performed a novel feature-selective attention task. We found that the effect of feature-selective attention on r noise depended not only on the population tuning to the attended feature, but also on the tuning to the distractor feature. To attempt to explain how these observed effects might support enhanced perceptual performance, we propose an extension of a simple and influential model in which shifts in r noise can simultaneously enhance the representation of the attended feature while suppressing the distractor. These findings present a novel mechanism by which attention modulates neural populations to support sensory processing in cluttered environments. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Although feature-selective attention constitutes one of the building blocks of listening in natural environments, its neural bases remain obscure. To address this, we developed a novel auditory feature-selective attention task and measured noise correlations ( r noise ) in rhesus macaque A1 during task performance. Unlike previous studies showing that the effect of attention on r noise depends on population tuning to the attended feature, we show that the effect of attention depends on the tuning

  5. Measuring changes in ambient noise levels from the installation and operation of a surge wave energy converter in the coastal ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haxel, Joe H [Oregon State Univ., Newport, OR (United States); Henkel, Sarah K [Oregon State Univ., Newport, OR (United States)

    2017-10-18

    Ecosystem impacts resulting from elevated underwater noise levels generated by anthropogenic activities in the coastal ocean are poorly understood and remain difficult to address as a result of a significant gap in knowledge for existing nearshore sound levels. Ambient noise is an important habitat component for marine mammals and fish that use sound for essential functions such as communication, navigation, and foraging. Questions surrounding the amplitudes, frequency distributions, and durations of noise emissions from renewable wave energy conversion (WEC) projects during their construction and operation present concerns for long-term consequences in marine habitats. Oregon’s dynamic nearshore environment presents significant challenges for passive acoustic monitoring that include flow noise contamination from wave orbital motions, turbulence from breaking surf, equipment burial, and fishing pressure from sport and commercial crabbers. This project included 2 techniques for passive acoustic data collection: 1) campaign style deployments of fixed hydrophone lander stations to capture temporal variations in noise levels and 2) a drifting hydrophone system to record spatial variations within the project site. The hydrophone lander deployments were effective and economically feasible for enabling robust temporal measurements of ambient noise levels in a variety of sea state conditions. Limiting factors for the fixed stations included 1) a flow shield mitigation strategy failure in the first deployment resulting in significant wideband data contamination and 2) flow noise contamination of the unshielded sensors restricting valuable analysis to frequencies above 500 Hz for subsequent deployments. Drifting hydrophone measurements were also effective and economically feasible (although logistically challenging in the beginning of the project due to vessel time constraints) providing a spatial distribution of sound levels, comparisons of noise levels in varying levels

  6. Correlation techniques for the improvement of signal-to-noise ratio in measurements with stochastic processes

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, V R; Reddy, T G; Reddy, P Y; Reddy, K R

    2003-01-01

    An AC modulation technique is described to convert stochastic signal variations into an amplitude variation and its retrieval through Fourier analysis. It is shown that this AC detection of signals of stochastic processes when processed through auto- and cross-correlation techniques improve the signal-to-noise ratio; the correlation techniques serve a similar purpose of frequency and phase filtering as that of phase-sensitive detection. A few model calculations applied to nuclear spectroscopy measurements such as Angular Correlations, Mossbauer spectroscopy and Pulse Height Analysis reveal considerable improvement in the sensitivity of signal detection. Experimental implementation of the technique is presented in terms of amplitude variations of harmonics representing the derivatives of normal spectra. Improved detection sensitivity to spectral variations is shown to be significant. These correlation techniques are general and can be made applicable to all the fields of particle counting where measurements ar...

  7. Installation of the light tight cover for the SSD modules (the modules are behind the aluminium plate). The silicon sensors are sensitive to light tight, so ambient light will increase the noise and may even damage them.

    CERN Multimedia

    Nooren, G.

    2004-01-01

    Installation of the light tight cover for the SSD modules (the modules are behind the aluminium plate). The silicon sensors are sensitive to light tight , so ambient light will increase the noise and may even damage them.

  8. Hybrid BEM/empirical approach for scattering of correlated sources in rocket noise prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarino, Mattia; Adamo, Francesco P.; Bianco, Davide; Bartoccini, Daniele

    2017-09-01

    Empirical models such as the Eldred standard model are commonly used for rocket noise prediction. Such models directly provide a definition of the Sound Pressure Level through the quadratic pressure term by uncorrelated sources. In this paper, an improvement of the Eldred Standard model has been formulated. This new formulation contains an explicit expression for the acoustic pressure of each noise source, in terms of amplitude and phase, in order to investigate the sources correlation effects and to propagate them through a wave equation. In particular, the correlation effects between adjacent and not-adjacent sources have been modeled and analyzed. The noise prediction obtained with the revised Eldred-based model has then been used for formulating an empirical/BEM (Boundary Element Method) hybrid approach that allows an evaluation of the scattering effects. In the framework of the European Space Agency funded program VECEP (VEga Consolidation and Evolution Programme), these models have been applied for the prediction of the aeroacoustics loads of the VEGA (Vettore Europeo di Generazione Avanzata - Advanced Generation European Carrier Rocket) launch vehicle at lift-off and the results have been compared with experimental data.

  9. The correlation study of parallel feature extractor and noise reduction approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewi, Deshinta Arrova; Sundararajan, Elankovan; Prabuwono, Anton Satria

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents literature reviews that show variety of techniques to develop parallel feature extractor and finding its correlation with noise reduction approaches for low light intensity images. Low light intensity images are normally displayed as darker images and low contrast. Without proper handling techniques, those images regularly become evidences of misperception of objects and textures, the incapability to section them. The visual illusions regularly clues to disorientation, user fatigue, poor detection and classification performance of humans and computer algorithms. Noise reduction approaches (NR) therefore is an essential step for other image processing steps such as edge detection, image segmentation, image compression, etc. Parallel Feature Extractor (PFE) meant to capture visual contents of images involves partitioning images into segments, detecting image overlaps if any, and controlling distributed and redistributed segments to extract the features. Working on low light intensity images make the PFE face challenges and closely depend on the quality of its pre-processing steps. Some papers have suggested many well established NR as well as PFE strategies however only few resources have suggested or mentioned the correlation between them. This paper reviews best approaches of the NR and the PFE with detailed explanation on the suggested correlation. This finding may suggest relevant strategies of the PFE development. With the help of knowledge based reasoning, computational approaches and algorithms, we present the correlation study between the NR and the PFE that can be useful for the development and enhancement of other existing PFE

  10. Minimum Energy Decentralized Estimation in a Wireless Sensor Network with Correlated Sensor Noises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnopeev Alexey

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Consider the problem of estimating an unknown parameter by a sensor network with a fusion center (FC. Sensor observations are corrupted by additive noises with an arbitrary spatial correlation. Due to bandwidth and energy limitation, each sensor is only able to transmit a finite number of bits to the FC, while the latter must combine the received bits to estimate the unknown parameter. We require the decentralized estimator to have a mean-squared error ( that is within a constant factor to that of the best linear unbiased estimator (BLUE. We minimize the total sensor transmitted energy by selecting sensor quantization levels using the knowledge of noise covariance matrix while meeting the target requirement. Computer simulations show that our designs can achieve energy savings up to when compared to the uniform quantization strategy whereby each sensor generates the same number of bits, irrespective of the quality of its observation and the condition of its channel to the FC.

  11. Determination of local boiling in light water reactors by correlation of the neutron noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwingelstein, G.

    1968-01-01

    The power limit of swimming-pool type reactors depends on the phenomenon of the appearance of burn-out. In order to determine this limit we have attempted to detect the local boiling which usually occurs before the burn out. Local boiling has been simulated by an electrically heated plate placed in the core of the reactor Siloette. The study of local boiling, which is based on the properties of the correlation functions for the neutron noise of detectors placed in the core, shows that a privileged frequency occurs in the power spectrum of the noise. It is intended in the future to determine the influence of various parameters on this characteristic frequency. (author) [fr

  12. Covariance-Based Estimation from Multisensor Delayed Measurements with Random Parameter Matrices and Correlated Noises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Caballero-Águila

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimal least-squares linear estimation problem is addressed for a class of discrete-time multisensor linear stochastic systems subject to randomly delayed measurements with different delay rates. For each sensor, a different binary sequence is used to model the delay process. The measured outputs are perturbed by both random parameter matrices and one-step autocorrelated and cross correlated noises. Using an innovation approach, computationally simple recursive algorithms are obtained for the prediction, filtering, and smoothing problems, without requiring full knowledge of the state-space model generating the signal process, but only the information provided by the delay probabilities and the mean and covariance functions of the processes (signal, random parameter matrices, and noises involved in the observation model. The accuracy of the estimators is measured by their error covariance matrices, which allow us to analyze the estimator performance in a numerical simulation example that illustrates the feasibility of the proposed algorithms.

  13. Long-term exposure to road traffic noise, ambient air pollution, and cardiovascular risk factors in the HUNT and lifelines cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yutong; Hansell, Anna L; Blangiardo, Marta; Burton, Paul R; de Hoogh, Kees; Doiron, Dany; Fortier, Isabel; Gulliver, John; Hveem, Kristian; Mbatchou, Stéphane; Morley, David W; Stolk, Ronald P; Zijlema, Wilma L; Elliott, Paul; Hodgson, Susan

    2017-08-01

    Blood biochemistry may provide information on associations between road traffic noise, air pollution, and cardiovascular disease risk. We evaluated this in two large European cohorts (HUNT3, Lifelines). Road traffic noise exposure was modelled for 2009 using a simplified version of the Common Noise Assessment Methods in Europe (CNOSSOS-EU). Annual ambient air pollution (PM10, NO2) at residence was estimated for 2007 using a Land Use Regression model. The statistical platform DataSHIELD was used to pool data from 144 082 participants aged ≥20 years to enable individual-level analysis. Generalized linear models were fitted to assess cross-sectional associations between pollutants and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), blood lipids and for (Lifelines only) fasting blood glucose, for samples taken during recruitment in 2006-2013. Pooling both cohorts, an inter-quartile range (IQR) higher day-time noise (5.1 dB(A)) was associated with 1.1% [95% confidence interval (95% CI: 0.02-2.2%)] higher hsCRP, 0.7% (95% CI: 0.3-1.1%) higher triglycerides, and 0.5% (95% CI: 0.3-0.7%) higher high-density lipoprotein (HDL); only the association with HDL was robust to adjustment for air pollution. An IQR higher PM10 (2.0 µg/m3) or NO2 (7.4 µg/m3) was associated with higher triglycerides (1.9%, 95% CI: 1.5-2.4% and 2.2%, 95% CI: 1.6-2.7%), independent of adjustment for noise. Additionally for NO2, a significant association with hsCRP (1.9%, 95% CI: 0.5-3.3%) was seen. In Lifelines, an IQR higher noise (4.2 dB(A)) and PM10 (2.4 µg/m3) was associated with 0.2% (95% CI: 0.1-0.3%) and 0.6% (95% CI: 0.4-0.7%) higher fasting glucose respectively, with both remaining robust to adjustment for air/noise pollution. Long-term exposures to road traffic noise and ambient air pollution were associated with blood biochemistry, providing a possible link between road traffic noise/air pollution and cardio-metabolic disease risk. Published on behalf of the European Society of

  14. Noise reduction in acoustic measurements with a particle velocity sensor by means of a cross-correlation technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Honschoten, J.W.; Druyvesteyn, W.F.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Kuipers, Hendrik; Raangs, R.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    In this paper a method is presented to reduce the noise level of a particle velocity sensor, a thermal two-wire sensor sensitive to acoustic particle velocities, which yields a reduction of the noise of 30 dB. The method is based on utilisation of cross- instead of auto-correlation spectra of two of

  15. Background noise levels and correlation with ship traffic in the Gulf of Catania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Salvatore; Buscaino, Giuseppa; Caruso, Francesco; Chierici, Francesco; Embriaco, Davide; Favali, Paolo; Giovanetti, Gabriele; Grammauta, Roasario; Larosa, Giuseppina; Pavan, Gianni; Pellegrino, Carmelo; Pulvirenti, Sara; Riccobene, Giorgio; Sciacca, Virginia; Simeone, Francesco; Beranzoli, Laura; Marinaro, Giuditta

    2015-04-01

    In the last decades the growing interest in the evaluation of the underwater acoustic noise for studies in the fields of geology, biology and high-energy physics is driving the scientific community to collaborate towards a multidisciplinary approach to the topic. In June 2012 in the framework of the European project EMSO, a multidisciplinary underwater observatory, named NEMO-SN1, was installed 25 km off-shore the port of Catania, at a depth of 2100 m and operated until May 2013 by INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) and INGV (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia). NEMO-SN1 hosted aboard geophysical, oceanographic and acoustic sensors: among these a seismic hydrophone model SMID DT-405D(V). In this work, conducted within the activity of the SMO project, the results on the evaluation of the underwater acoustic pollution in the Gulf of Catania through SMID DT-405D(V) recordings are presented. The seismic hydrophone provided a data set of about 11 months of continuous (24/7) recordings. Underwater sounds have been continuously digitized at a sampling frequency of 2 kHz and the acquired data have been stored in 10min long files for off-line analysis. To describe one-year background noise levels, the mean integrated acoustic noise was measured every second (sampling frequency 2000, NFFT 2048) in the 1/3 octave bands with centre frequency 63 Hz and for each 10 minutes-long file the 5th, the 50th and the 98th percentiles were calculated. Measured noise was correlated with the shipping traffic in the area, thanks to the data provided by an AIS receiver installed at the INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud. An acoustic noise increment was measured in coincidence with the passing of crafts in the area and it was possible to identify the characteristic spectrum of each ship. A simple model for the estimation of the acoustic noise induced by the ships passing through the area was developed. The model was applied by using AIS data acquired during the operation

  16. Crustal and uppermost mantle S-wave velocity below the East European Craton in northern Poland from the inversion of ambient-noise records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepore, Simone; Polkowski, Marcin; Grad, Marek

    2018-02-01

    The P-wave velocities (V p) within the East European Craton in Poland are well known through several seismic experiments which permitted to build a high-resolution 3D model down to 60 km depth. However, these seismic data do not provide sufficient information about the S-wave velocities (V s). For this reason, this paper presents the values of lithospheric V s and P-wave-to-S-wave velocity ratios (V p/V s) calculated from the ambient noise recorded during 2014 at "13 BB star" seismic array (13 stations, 78 midpoints) located in northern Poland. The 3D V p model in the area of the array consists of six sedimentary layers having total thickness within 3-7 km and V p in the range 1.85.3 km/s, a three-layer crystalline crust of total thickness 40 km and V p within 6.15-7.15 km/s, and the uppermost mantle, where V p is about 8.25 km/s. The V s and V p/V s values are calculated by the inversion of the surface-wave dispersion curves extracted from the noise cross correlation between all the station pairs. Due to the strong velocity differences among the layers, several modes are recognized in the 0.021 Hz frequency band: therefore, multimodal Monte Carlo inversions are applied. The calculated V s and V p/V s values in the sedimentary cover range within 0.992.66 km/s and 1.751.97 as expected. In the upper crust, the V s value (3.48 ± 0.10 km/s) is very low compared to the starting value of 3.75 ± 0.10 km/s. Consequently, the V p/V s value is very large (1.81 ± 0.03). To explain that the calculated values are compared with the ones for other old cratonic areas.

  17. Preliminary Results From the CAUGHT Experiment: Investigation of the North Central Andes Subsurface Using Receiver Functions and Ambient Noise Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. C.; Ward, K. M.; Porter, R. C.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Wagner, L. S.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2011-12-01

    Altiplano and portions of the Eastern Cordillera, and at approximately 40 under the sub-Andes and westernmost edge of the Beni basin. Unlike previous studies farther south, we do not see an increased crustal thickness beneath the Eastern Cordillera. The CAUGHT station coverage is also ideal for Ambient Noise Tomography (ANT) to investigate the seismic shear wave velocities in the upper crust (<30 km depth). ANT will be used to estimate the depth of basins in the northern Altiplano, and aid in constraining the upper crustal shear wave velocities for improved migration of receiver functions to depth. McQuarrie, N., Barnes, J., and Ehlers, T.A., 2008, Geometric, kinematic and erosional history of the central Andean Plateau (15-17°S), northern Bolivia: Tectonics, v. 27, TC3007, doi:10.1029/2006TC002054.

  18. Two dimension MDW OCDMA code cross-correlation for reduction of phase induced intensity noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Ahmed Israa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we first review 2-D MDW code cross correlation equations and table to be improved significantly by using code correlation properties. These codes can be used in the synchronous optical CDMA systems for multi access interference cancellation and maximum suppress the phase induced intensity noise. Low Psr is due to the reduction of interference noise that is induced by the 2-D MDW code PIIN suppression. High data rate causes increases in BER, requires high effective power and severely deteriorates the system performance. The 2-D W/T MDW code has an excellent system performance where the value of PIIN is suppressed as low as possible at the optimum Psr with high data bit rate. The 2-D MDW code shows better tolerance to PIIN in comparison to others with enhanced system performance. We prove by numerical analysis that the PIIN maximally suppressed by MDW code through the minimizing property of cross correlation in comparison to 2-D PDC and 2-D MQC OCDMA code.scheme systems.

  19. Two dimension MDW OCDMA code cross-correlation for reduction of phase induced intensity noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Israa Sh.; Aljunid, Syed A.; Nordin, Junita M.; Dulaimi, Layth A. Khalil Al; Matem, Rima

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we first review 2-D MDW code cross correlation equations and table to be improved significantly by using code correlation properties. These codes can be used in the synchronous optical CDMA systems for multi access interference cancellation and maximum suppress the phase induced intensity noise. Low Psr is due to the reduction of interference noise that is induced by the 2-D MDW code PIIN suppression. High data rate causes increases in BER, requires high effective power and severely deteriorates the system performance. The 2-D W/T MDW code has an excellent system performance where the value of PIIN is suppressed as low as possible at the optimum Psr with high data bit rate. The 2-D MDW code shows better tolerance to PIIN in comparison to others with enhanced system performance. We prove by numerical analysis that the PIIN maximally suppressed by MDW code through the minimizing property of cross correlation in comparison to 2-D PDC and 2-D MQC OCDMA code.scheme systems.

  20. Regional scale tomography in central Mexico. Preliminary results from the correlation of seismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-García, F.; Quintanar, L.

    2009-04-01

    In addition to local site effects, ground motion from coastal earthquakes on rock sites in central Mexico is amplified in a regional scale, relative to ground motion observed along a direction parallel to the coast. This regional amplification attains a factor of 10 at frequencies that are critical in seismic risk analyses (from 0.2 to at least 2 Hz). This amplification has been related to the irregular crustal structure associated with the presence of the Mexican Volcanic Belt (oblique to the trench along the subduction zone). However, this has not yet been verified. The available models are not well constrained and there is a significant lack of data regarding the crustal structure in this region. Recent publications have shown that the Green's function between two seismic stations may be estimated from the cross-correlation of seismic noise. Most papers have shown that surface wave modes emerge in those correlation functions. The larger the distance between stations, the longer the records of seismic noise that are needed to obtain a useful result. In this paper, we use seismic noise recorded by three different arrays to estimate Rayleigh wave dispersion between stations. two arrays were temporal and one, recently installed, is permanent. The first array consisted of only four stations. It operated continuously for three months in 1997. The second temporary array operated a line of 100 seismic recorders installed perpendicularly to the subduction zone in Mexico, the MASE (Middle American Seismic Experiment) array. From this large array we use data from 18 stations in central Mexico. Finally, we use data from the permanent Mexico basin seismic array, recently installed. We use week- and month-long noise records to compute cross-correlation between vertical components for all possible station pairs. The results show clearly the emergence of clear Rayleigh wave pulses. We use the multiple filter technique to determine group velocities in the period band 4 to 10 s

  1. Waveform correlation and coherence of short-period seismic noise within Gauribidanur array with implications for event detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhadauria, Y.S.; Arora, S.K.

    1995-01-01

    In continuation with our effort to model the short-period micro seismic noise at the seismic array at Gauribidanur (GBA), we have examined in detail time-correlation and spectral coherence of the noise field within the array space. This has implications of maximum possible improvement in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) relevant to event detection. The basis of this study is about a hundred representative wide-band noise samples collected from GBA throughout the year 1992. Both time-structured correlation as well as coherence of the noise waveforms are found to be practically independent of the inter element distances within the array, and they exhibit strong temporal and spectral stability. It turns out that the noise is largely incoherent at frequencies ranging upwards from 2 Hz; the coherency coefficient tends to increase in the lower frequency range attaining a maximum of 0.6 close to 0.5 Hz. While the maximum absolute cross-correlation also diminishes with increasing frequency, the zero-lag cross-correlation is found to be insensitive to frequency filtering regardless of the pass band. An extremely small value of -0.01 of the zero-lag correlation and a comparatively higher year-round average estimate at 0.15 of the maximum absolute time-lagged correlation yields an SNR improvement varying between a probable high of 4.1 and a low of 2.3 for the full 20-element array. 19 refs., 6 figs

  2. Maternal and ambient environmental effects of light on germination in Plantago lanceolata: correlated responses to selection on leaf length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinsberg, A. van

    1998-01-01

    1. Seeds from artificial selection lines were exposed to different maternal and ambient conditions, simulating sunlight and vegetation shade. 2. Lines selected for longer leaves also produced larger seeds, indicating a positive genetic correlation between leaf length and seed size. 3. Light conditions during maturation had no large effect on seed size. 4. Seed germination was reduced by a low ratio of red to far-red light (R/FR ratio) in the ambient environment. 5. Seeds maturated under simulated vegetation shade germinated less readily and were more inhibited by a low ambient R/FR ratio than seeds maturated under full sunlight or R/FR-neutral shade. Thus, low R/FR-ratios in the maternal and ambient environment operated synergistically. 6. Large genotypic variation in the germination responses to both maternal and ambient light conditions was found among and within selection lines, indicating that such responses might have the potential to evolve in response to natural selection. 7. Artificial selection for leaf length had affected seed germination characteristics but correlated responses and thus genetic correlations largely depended on light conditions in the selective environment. Selection for longer leaves under a low R/FR ratio increased seed dormancy and plasticity of germination in response to the R/FR ratio. However, in the opposite selective environment selection for longer leaves reduced seed dormancy and plasticity to the R/FR ratio. It is argued that leaf length and seed germination characteristics are somehow linked by shared physiological mechanisms, which may facilitate concerted changes in shade avoidance responses

  3. Long-termexposure to road traffic noise, ambient air pollution, and cardiovascular risk factors in the HUNT and lifelines cohorts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cai, Yutong; Hansell, Anna L.; Blangiardo, Marta; Burton, Paul R.; de Hoogh, Kees; Doiron, Dany; Fortier, Isabel; Gulliver, John; Hveem, Kristian; Mbatchou, Stéphane; Morley, DavidW.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Zijlema, Wilma L.; Elliott, Paul; Hodgson, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Blood biochemistry may provide information on associations between road traffic noise, air pollution, and cardiovascular disease risk. We evaluated this in two large European cohorts (HUNT3, Lifelines). Methods and results: Road traffic noise exposure was modelled for 2009 using a simplified

  4. The Effects of Ambient Shipping Noise on the Performance of Single and Multiple Channel Moment Detectors for Unknown Transient Signals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pflug, Lisa

    1998-01-01

    ...) detector in both the Gaussian noise and the measured noise. Although the application of one-dimensional passband filters before the moment calculations improves the performance of all three detectors, it induces additional detection gain for the higher order moment detectors.

  5. Research on Ship-Radiated Noise Denoising Using Secondary Variational Mode Decomposition and Correlation Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxing Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available As the sound signal of ships obtained by sensors contains other many significant characteristics of ships and called ship-radiated noise (SN, research into a denoising algorithm and its application has obtained great significance. Using the advantage of variational mode decomposition (VMD combined with the correlation coefficient for denoising, a hybrid secondary denoising algorithm is proposed using secondary VMD combined with a correlation coefficient (CC. First, different kinds of simulation signals are decomposed into several bandwidth-limited intrinsic mode functions (IMFs using VMD, where the decomposition number by VMD is equal to the number by empirical mode decomposition (EMD; then, the CCs between the IMFs and the simulation signal are calculated respectively. The noise IMFs are identified by the CC threshold and the rest of the IMFs are reconstructed in order to realize the first denoising process. Finally, secondary denoising of the simulation signal can be accomplished by repeating the above steps of decomposition, screening and reconstruction. The final denoising result is determined according to the CC threshold. The denoising effect is compared under the different signal-to-noise ratio and the time of decomposition by VMD. Experimental results show the validity of the proposed denoising algorithm using secondary VMD (2VMD combined with CC compared to EMD denoising, ensemble EMD (EEMD denoising, VMD denoising and cubic VMD (3VMD denoising, as well as two denoising algorithms presented recently. The proposed denoising algorithm is applied to feature extraction and classification for SN signals, which can effectively improve the recognition rate of different kinds of ships.

  6. 3-D structure of the crust and uppermost mantle at the junction between the Southeastern Alps and External Dinarides from ambient noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidarelli, Mariangela; Aoudia, Abdelkrim; Costa, Giovanni

    2017-12-01

    We use ambient noise tomography to investigate the crust and the uppermost mantle structure beneath the junction between the Southern Alps, the Dinarides and the Po Plain. We obtained Rayleigh wave empirical Green's functions from cross-correlation of vertical component seismic recordings for three years (2010-2012) using stations from networks in Italy, Slovenia, Austria, Croatia, Serbia and Switzerland. We measure group and phase velocity dispersion curves from the reconstructed Rayleigh waves in the period range 5-30 and 8-37 s, respectively, and we invert the surface wave velocities for tomographic images on a grid of 0.1° × 0.1°. After the tomography, the group velocities are then inverted to compute the 3-D shear wave velocity model of the crust and the upper mantle beneath the region. Our shear wave velocity model provides the 3-D image of the structure in the region between Northeastern Italy, Slovenia and Austria. The velocity variations at shallow depths correlate with known geological and tectonic domains. We find low velocities below the Po Plain, the northern tip of the Adriatic and the Pannonian Basin, whereas higher velocities characterize the Alpine chain. The vertical cross-sections reveal a clear northward increase of the crustal thickness with a sharp northward dipping of the Moho that coincides at the surface with the leading edge of the Alpine thrust front adjacent to the Friuli Plain in Northeastern Italy. This geometry of the Moho mimics fairly well the shallow north dipping geometry of the decollement inferred from permanent GPS velocity field where high interseismic coupling is reported. From the northern Adriatic domain up to the Idrija right lateral strike-slip fault system beneath Western Slovenia, the crustal thickness is more uniform. Right across Idrija fault, to the northeast, and along its strike, we report a clear change of the physical properties of the crust up to the uppermost mantle as reflected by the lateral distribution

  7. Associated relaxation time and the correlation function for a tumor cell growth system subjected to color noises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Canjun; Wei Qun; Mei Dongcheng

    2008-01-01

    The associated relaxation time T c and the normalized correlation function C(s) for a tumor cell growth system subjected to color noises are investigated. Using the Novikov theorem and Fox approach, the steady probability distribution is obtained. Based on them, the expressions of T c and C(s) are derived by means of projection operator method, in which the effects of the memory kernels of the correlation function are taken into account. Performing the numerical computations, it is found: (1) With the cross-correlation intensity |λ|, the additive noise intensity α and the multiplicative noise self-correlation time τ 1 increasing, the tumor cell numbers can be restrained; And the cross-correlation time τ 3 , the multiplicative noise intensity D can induce the tumor cell numbers increasing; However, the additive noise self-correlation time τ 2 cannot affect the tumor cell numbers; The relaxation time T c is a stochastic resonant phenomenon, and the distribution curves exhibit a single-maximum structure with D increasing. (2) The cross-correlation strength λ weakens the related activity between two states of the tumor cell numbers at different time, and enhances the stability of the tumor cell growth system in the steady state; On the contrast, τ 1 and τ 3 enhance the related activity between two states at different time; However, τ 2 has no effect on the related activity between two states at different time

  8. Associated relaxation time and the correlation function for a tumor cell growth system subjected to color noises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Can-Jun; Wei, Qun; Mei, Dong-Cheng

    2008-03-01

    The associated relaxation time T and the normalized correlation function C(s) for a tumor cell growth system subjected to color noises are investigated. Using the Novikov theorem and Fox approach, the steady probability distribution is obtained. Based on them, the expressions of T and C(s) are derived by means of projection operator method, in which the effects of the memory kernels of the correlation function are taken into account. Performing the numerical computations, it is found: (1) With the cross-correlation intensity |λ|, the additive noise intensity α and the multiplicative noise self-correlation time τ increasing, the tumor cell numbers can be restrained; And the cross-correlation time τ, the multiplicative noise intensity D can induce the tumor cell numbers increasing; However, the additive noise self-correlation time τ cannot affect the tumor cell numbers; The relaxation time T is a stochastic resonant phenomenon, and the distribution curves exhibit a single-maximum structure with D increasing. (2) The cross-correlation strength λ weakens the related activity between two states of the tumor cell numbers at different time, and enhances the stability of the tumor cell growth system in the steady state; On the contrast, τ and τ enhance the related activity between two states at different time; However, τ has no effect on the related activity between two states at different time.

  9. Intérvalo unitario de tiempo de medición para ruido ambiental Unit timing for environmental noise measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. Giraldo A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available En las entidades ambientales, los encargados de las mediciones de ruido ambiental y en general todas las personas que de una u otra forma han trabajado en esta temática, en algún momento se han puesto a pensar sobre la representatividad del tiempo unitario de muestreo y la forma de realizar evaluaciones para dar cumplimiento con dicho tiempo, sin que se aumenten considerablemente los costos de medición. En este artículo se plantea una metodología para determinar cómo un intervalo de cierta duración -en este caso, quince (15 minutos- para el muestreo del nivel de presión sonora es representativo para el período de una (1 hora, logrando de esta manera optimizar el uso de los sonómetros "fijos" y proponiendo una estrategia para reducir los costos en las mediciones de ruido ambiental y en general la elaboración de mapas de ruido.The managers of environmental noise measurements in environmental control agencies, or in general every person that work in this subject, have to think on the representativity of the unit measurement time interval, and how to evaluate it in order to get good quality results regarding the unit measurement time without increasing the measurement costs. A methodology for deciding if a certain measuring time interval -in this case, fifteen (15 minutes- is representative of noise pressure levels occurring during one hour, is proposed in this paper. This methodology allows to optimize the use of stationary sound level meters and to propose a strategy for reducing the costs of environmental noise measurements and of the designing of noise maps in general.

  10. Noise-Driven Phenotypic Heterogeneity with Finite Correlation Time in Clonal Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    UnJin Lee

    Full Text Available There has been increasing awareness in the wider biological community of the role of clonal phenotypic heterogeneity in playing key roles in phenomena such as cellular bet-hedging and decision making, as in the case of the phage-λ lysis/lysogeny and B. Subtilis competence/vegetative pathways. Here, we report on the effect of stochasticity in growth rate, cellular memory/intermittency, and its relation to phenotypic heterogeneity. We first present a linear stochastic differential model with finite auto-correlation time, where a randomly fluctuating growth rate with a negative average is shown to result in exponential growth for sufficiently large fluctuations in growth rate. We then present a non-linear stochastic self-regulation model where the loss of coherent self-regulation and an increase in noise can induce a shift from bounded to unbounded growth. An important consequence of these models is that while the average change in phenotype may not differ for various parameter sets, the variance of the resulting distributions may considerably change. This demonstrates the necessity of understanding the influence of variance and heterogeneity within seemingly identical clonal populations, while providing a mechanism for varying functional consequences of such heterogeneity. Our results highlight the importance of a paradigm shift from a deterministic to a probabilistic view of clonality in understanding selection as an optimization problem on noise-driven processes, resulting in a wide range of biological implications, from robustness to environmental stress to the development of drug resistance.

  11. Effect of spatially correlated noise on stochastic synchronization in globally coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yange Shao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of stochastic synchronization in globally coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN neuron system subjected to spatially correlated Gaussian noise is investigated based on dynamical mean-field approximation (DMA and direct simulation (DS. Results from DMA are in good quantitative or qualitative agreement with those from DS for weak noise intensity and larger system size. Whether the consisting single FHN neuron is staying at the resting state, subthreshold oscillatory regime, or the spiking state, our investigation shows that the synchronization ratio of the globally coupled system becomes higher as the noise correlation coefficient increases, and thus we conclude that spatial correlation has an active effect on stochastic synchronization, and the neurons can achieve complete synchronization in the sense of statistics when the noise correlation coefficient tends to one. Our investigation also discloses that the noise spatial correlation plays the same beneficial role as the global coupling strength in enhancing stochastic synchronization in the ensemble. The result might be useful in understanding the information coding mechanism in neural systems.

  12. The seismic ambient noise spectral ratio H/V under de diffuse field approach for simple layered models: Asymptotic behavior for low and high frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzón, F.; García-Jerez, A.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Lunedei, E.; Albarello, D.; Santoyo, M. A.; Almendros, J.

    2013-05-01

    The possibility of retrieving the elastodynamic Green's tensor between two points within an elastic medium from time-domain correlation of ambient noise recorded at such sites was duly confirmed in the pioneering seismic experiments by Campillo and Paul (2003) and Shapiro and Campillo (2004). Afterwards, several theoretical works on this subject have been conducted for simple models showing that such a possibility implies the condition of diffuse wavefield which requires isotropy of the illumination or the fulfillment of certain relationships between the energies of different types of waves (derived from the energy equipartition principle). In this work we examine the reliability of the usual assumptions that emerge from the Diffuse Field Approach (DFA). In particular we deal with the wavefield composition in applications regarding the passive seismic prospecting. We revise briefly the more general formulation of the DFA for full wavefield (FW). In this case the contribution of each wave to the horizontal-and vertical power spectra at surface are analyzed for a simple elastic waveguide (for instance the continental crust-upper mantle interface). Special attention is paid to their compositions at low-and high-frequencies, obtaining the relative powers of each surface wave (SW) type by means of a semi-analytical analysis. We found for some simple models that if body waves are removed from the analysis, the high-frequency horizontal asymptote of the H/V spectral ratio decreases slightly (from 1.33 for FW to around 1.14 for SW) and shows dependence on both the Poisson's ratio of the crust and the S-wave velocity contrast (while FW-H/V asymptote depends on the former only). Experimental tests for a broad band network deployed at SW Pyrenees edge provide H/V curves compatible with any of these values in the band 0.2-1Hz, approximately, supporting the applicability of the DFA approximation. Coexistence of multiple SW-modes produces distortion in the amplitude of both

  13. First to Flush: The Effects of Ambient Noise on Songbird Flight Initiation Distances and Implications for Human Experiences with Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alissa R. Petrelli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the world, birds represent the primary type of wildlife that people experience on a daily basis. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that alterations to the acoustic environment can negatively affect birds as well as humans in a variety of ways, and altered acoustics from noise pollution has the potential to influence human interactions with wild birds. Birds respond to approaching humans in a manner analogous to approaching predators, but the context of the interaction can also greatly influence the distance at which a bird initiates flight or escape behavior (i.e., flight initiation distance or FID. Here, we hypothesized that reliance on different sensory modalities to balance foraging and threat detection can influence how birds respond to approaching threats in the presence of background noise. We surveyed 12 songbird species in California and Wyoming and categorized each species into one of three foraging guilds: ground foragers, canopy gleaners, and hawking flycatchers and predicted FIDs to decrease, remain the same and increase with noise exposure, respectively. Contrary to expectations, the canopy gleaning and flycatching guilds exhibited mixed responses, with some species exhibiting unchanged FIDs with noise while others exhibited increased FIDs with noise. However, FIDs of all ground foraging species and one canopy gleaner decreased with noise levels. Additionally, we found no evidence of phylogenetic structure among species' mean FID responses and only weak phylogenetic structure for the relationship between FIDs and noise levels. Although our results provide mixed support for foraging strategy as a predictor of bird response to noise, our finding that most of the species we surveyed have shorter FIDs with increases in noise levels suggest that human observers may be able to approach ground foraging species more closely under noisy conditions. From an ecological perspective, however, it remains unclear whether

  14. A Near Real-Time Seismic Exploration and Monitoring (i.e., Ambient Seismic Noise Interferometry) Solution Based Upon a Novel "At the Edge" Approach that Leverages Commercially Available Digitizers, Embedded Systems, and an Open-Source Big Data Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, F.; Thangraj, J. S.; Quiros, D.; Pulliam, J.; Queen, J. H.; Queen, M.; Iovenitti, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    Seismic interferometry that makes use of ambient noise requires that cross-correlations of data recorded at two or more stations be stacked over a "long enough" time interval that off-axis sources cancel and the estimated inter-station Green's function converges to the actual function. However, the optimal length of the recording period depends on the characteristics of ambient noise at the site, which vary over time and are therefore not known before data acquisition. Data acquisition parameters cannot be planned in ways that will ensure success while minimizing cost and effort. Experiment durations are typically either too long or too short. Automated, in-field processing can provide inter-station Green's functions in near-real-time, allowing for the immediate evaluation of results and enabling operators to alter data acquisition parameters before demobilizing. We report on the design, system integration, and testing of a strategy for the automation of data acquisition, distribution, and processing of ambient noise using industry-standard, widely-available instrumentation (Reftek 130-01 digitizers and 4.5 Hz geophones). Our solution utilizes an inexpensive embedded system (Raspberry Pi 3), which is configured to acquire data from the Reftek and insert it into a big data store called Apache Cassandra. Cassandra distributes and maintains up-to-date copies of the data, through a WiFi network, as defined by tunable consistency levels and replication factors thus allowing for efficient multi-station computations. At regular intervals, data is extracted from Cassandra and is used to compute Green's functions for all receiver pairs. Results are reviewed and progress toward convergence can be assessed. We successfully tested a 20-node prototype of what we call the "Raspberry Pi-Enhanced Reftek" (RaPiER) array at the Soda Lake Geothermal Field in Nevada in June 2017. While intermittent problems with the WiFi network interfered with the real-time data delivery from some

  15. Correlation of Process Data and Electrochemical Noise to Assess Kraft Digester Corrosion: Kamloops Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, SJ

    2002-05-09

    Electrochemical noise (ECN) probes were deployed in a carbon steel continuous kraft digester at five locations roughly equi-spaced from top to bottom of the vessel. Current and potential noise, the temperature at each probe location, and the value of about 60 process parameters (flow rates, liquor chemistry, etc.) were monitored continuously for a period of one year. Historical vessel inspection data, including inspections accomplished immediately prior to and immediately following probe deployment, and post-test evaluation of the probe components were used to assess/compare corrosion indications from the probes with physical changes in wall thickness and corrosion patterns on the digester shell. The results indicate that furnish composition is a significant variable influencing digester corrosion, with increasing amounts of Douglas fir in the nominal furnish correlating directly with increased corrosion activity on the ECN probes. All five probes detected changes in furnish composition approximately simultaneously, indicating rapid chemical communication through the liquor, but the effect was strongest and persisted longest relatively high in the digester. The ECN probes also indicate significant corrosion activity occurred at each probe position during shutdown/restart transients. Little or no correlation between ECN probe corrosion activity and other operational variables was observed. Post-test evaluation of the probes confirmed general corrosion of a magnitude that closely agreed with corrosion current sums calculated for each probe over the exposure period and with historical average corrosion rates for the respective locations. Further, no pitting was observed on any of the electrodes, which is consistent with the ECN data, relevant polarization curves developed for steel in liquor removed from the digester, and the post-test inspection of the digester.

  16. Detection of sub-threshold periodic signal by multiplicative and additive cross-correlated sine-Wiener noises in the FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuangen; Ma, Chengzhang; Wang, Canjun; Yi, Ming; Gui, Rong

    2018-02-01

    We study the effects of multiplicative and additive cross-correlated sine-Wiener (CCSW) noises on the performance of sub-threshold periodic signal detection in the FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) neuron by calculating Fourier coefficients Q for measuring synchronization between sub-threshold input signal and the response of system. CCSW noises-induced transitions of electrical activity in the FHN neuron model can be observed. Moreover, the performance of sub-threshold periodic signal detection is achieved at moderate noise strength, cross-correlation time and cross-correlation strength of CCSW noises, which indicate the occurrence of CCSW noises-induced stochastic resonance. Furthermore, the performance of sub-threshold signal detection is strongly sensitive to cross-correlation time of CCSW noises. Therefore, the performance can be effectively controlled by regulating cross-correlation time of CCSW noises. These results provide a possible mechanism for amplifying or detecting the sub-threshold signal in the nervous system.

  17. Correlation between corneal and ambient temperature with particular focus on polar conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slettedal, Jon Klokk; Ringvold, Amund

    2015-08-01

    To examine the relationship between human corneal and environmental temperature. An infrared camera was used to measure the corneal surface temperature in a group of healthy volunteers as well as in an experimental setting with donor corneas and an artificial anterior chamber, employing circulating saline at +37°C. Liquid nitrogen was used to obtain a very low temperature in the experimental setting. High ambient temperature measurements were performed in a sauna. In healthy volunteers, the cornea required at least 20-30 min to adapt to change in ambient temperature. The relationship between corneal and external temperature was relatively linear. At the two extremes, +83°C and -40°C, the corneal temperature was +42°C and +25.1°C, respectively. In the experimental setting, corneal temperature was +24.3°C at air temperature -40°C. A rather stable aqueous humour temperature of +37°C and high thermal conductivity of the corneal tissue prevent corneal frostbite even at extremely low ambient temperatures. © 2015 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Unknown input and state estimation for linear discrete-time systems with missing measurements and correlated noises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Huisheng; Zhang, Sijing; Shen, Bo; Liu, Yurong

    2016-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of simultaneous input and state estimation for a class of linear discrete-time systems with missing measurements and correlated noises. The missing measurements occur in a random way and are governed by a series of mutually independent random variables obeying a certain Bernoulli distribution. The process and measurement noises under consideration are correlated at the same time instant. Our attention is focused on the design of recursive estimators for both input and state such that, for all missing measurements and correlated noises, the estimators are unbiased and the estimation error covariances are minimized. This objective is achieved using direct algebraic operation and the design algorithm for the desired estimators is given. Finally, an illustrative example is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed design scheme.

  19. Two-time correlation of heat release rate and spectrum of combustion noise from turbulent premixed flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu

    2015-09-01

    The spectral characteristics of combustion noise are dictated by the temporal correlation of the overall change of heat release rate fluctuations which has not received sufficient attention in prior studies. In this work, the two-time correlation of the volumetric heat release rate fluctuations within the flame brush and its role in modeling combustion noise spectrum are investigated by analyzing direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of turbulent premixed V-flames. This two-time correlation can be well represented by Gaussian-type functions and it captures the slow global variation of the fluctuating heat release rate and hence the low-frequency noise sources of unsteady combustion. The resulting correlation model is applied to predict the far-field noise spectrum from test open flames, and different reference time scales are used to scale this correlation from the DNS data to the test flames. The comparison between predictions and measurements indicates that the correlation models of all reference time scales are capable of reproducing the essential spectral shape including the low- and high-frequency dependencies. Reasonable agreement in the peak frequency, peak sound pressure level, and the Strouhal number scaling of peak frequency is also achieved for two turbulent time scales. A promising convective time scale shows great potential for characterizing the spectral features, yet its predictive capabilities are to be further verified through a longer DNS signal of a bounded flame configuration.

  20. On the Retrieval of the Directional Scattering Matrix from Directional Noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wapenaar, C.P.A.; Thorbecke, J.W.

    2013-01-01

    The crosscorrelation of ambient acoustic noise observed at two receivers yields the impulse response between these receivers, assuming that the noise field is diffuse. In practical situations the noise field exhibits directionality, which imprints the angle-dependent correlation function. For the

  1. Correlation of Air Quality Data to Ultrafine Particles (UFP Concentration and Size Distribution in Ambient Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Hofmann

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This study monitored ultrafine particles (UFP concurrent with environmental air quality data, investigating whether already existing instrumentation used by environmental authorities can provide reference values for estimating UFP concentrations. Of particular interest was the relation of UFP to PM10 (particulate matter and nitrogen oxides (NOx, NO2 in ambient air. Existing PM measurement methods alone did not correspond exactly enough with the actual particle number, but we observed a link between NOx and NO2 to UFP concentration. The combined data could act as proxy-indicator for authorities in estimating particle number concentrations, but cannot replace UFP monitoring.

  2. Passive Acoustic Thermometry Using Low-Frequency Deep Water Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Passive Acoustic Thermometry Using Low-Frequency Deep... thermometry using Cross-correlation processing of deep water ambient noise. OBJECTIVE Our previous research effort has demonstrated that coherent... thermometry using low-frequency deep water ambient noise recorded on the global IMS- CTBTO network Results from this study are expected to help guide the

  3. Joint inversion of teleseismic P waveforms and surface-wave group velocities from ambient seismic noise in the Bohemian Massif

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžek, Bohuslav; Plomerová, Jaroslava; Babuška, Vladislav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 1 (2012), s. 107-140 ISSN 0039-3169 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/07/1088; GA AV ČR IAA300120709; GA MŠk LM2010008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : receiver function * seismic noise * joint inversion * Bohemian Massif * velocity structure Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 0.975, year: 2012

  4. Thermal conductivity of silver loaded conductive epoxy from cryogenic to ambient temperature and its application for precision cryogenic noise measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amils, Ricardo I.; Gallego, Juan Daniel; Sebastián, José Luis; Muñoz, Sagrario; Martín, Agustín; Leuther, Arnulf

    2016-06-01

    The pressure to increase the sensitivity of instrumentation has pushed the use of cryogenic Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) technology into a growing number of fields. These areas range from radio astronomy and deep space communications to fundamental physics. In this context manufacturing for cryogenic environments requires a proper thermal knowledge of the materials to be able to achieve adequate design behavior. In this work, we present experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of a silver filled conductive epoxy (EPO-TEK H20E) which is widely used in cryogenic electronics applications. The characterization has been made using a sample preparation which mimics the practical use of this adhesive in the fabrication of cryogenic devices. We apply the data obtained to a detailed analysis of the effects of the conductive epoxy in a monolithic thermal noise source used for high accuracy cryogenic microwave noise measurements. In this application the epoxy plays a fundamental role since its limited thermal conductivity allows heating the chip with relatively low power. To our knowledge, the cryogenic thermal conductivity data of this epoxy has not been reported before in the literature in the 4-300 K temperature range. A second non-conductive epoxy (Gray Scotch-Weld 2216 B/A), also widely used in cryogenic applications, has been measured in order to validate the method by comparing with previous published data.

  5. Antarctic ice sheet thickness estimation using the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio method with single-station seismic ambient noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Peng; Li, Zhiwei; Li, Fei; Yang, Yuande; Hao, Weifeng; Bao, Feng

    2018-03-01

    We report on a successful application of the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (H / V) method, generally used to investigate the subsurface velocity structures of the shallow crust, to estimate the Antarctic ice sheet thickness for the first time. Using three-component, five-day long, seismic ambient noise records gathered from more than 60 temporary seismic stations located on the Antarctic ice sheet, the ice thickness measured at each station has comparable accuracy to the Bedmap2 database. Preliminary analysis revealed that 60 out of 65 seismic stations on the ice sheet obtained clear peak frequencies (f0) related to the ice sheet thickness in the H / V spectrum. Thus, assuming that the isotropic ice layer lies atop a high velocity half-space bedrock, the ice sheet thickness can be calculated by a simple approximation formula. About half of the calculated ice sheet thicknesses were consistent with the Bedmap2 ice thickness values. To further improve the reliability of ice thickness measurements, two-type models were built to fit the observed H / V spectrum through non-linear inversion. The two-type models represent the isotropic structures of single- and two-layer ice sheets, and the latter depicts the non-uniform, layered characteristics of the ice sheet widely distributed in Antarctica. The inversion results suggest that the ice thicknesses derived from the two-layer ice models were in good concurrence with the Bedmap2 ice thickness database, and that ice thickness differences between the two were within 300 m at almost all stations. Our results support previous finding that the Antarctic ice sheet is stratified. Extensive data processing indicates that the time length of seismic ambient noise records can be shortened to two hours for reliable ice sheet thickness estimation using the H / V method. This study extends the application fields of the H / V method and provides an effective and independent way to measure ice sheet thickness in Antarctica.

  6. Suppression Efficiency of the Correlated Noise and Drift of Self-oscillating Pseudo-differential Eddy Current Displacement Sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaturvedi, V.; Vogel, J.G.; Nihtianov, S.

    2016-01-01

    The suppression efficiency of the correlated noise and drift of self-oscillating front-end circuit in a pseudo-differential eddy-current displacement sensor (ECDS) is investigated using COMSOL and MATLAB. The transfer characteristic of the sensor coil, excited at 200 MHz, is obtained through a FE

  7. The correlation between mixed refrigerant composition and ambient conditions in the PRICO LNG process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Xiongwen; Liu, Jinping; Jiang, Chuanshuo; Cao, Le

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► PRICO LNG process was modelled by Aspen Plus. ► The optimal energy solution of the PRICO process was searched by the genetic algorithm. ► MR composition solutions under different cold box inlet temperature from 263.15 K through 313.15 K were searched. ► MR composition varies with the cold box inlet temperature was linearly regressed to be a set of functions. ► Feasibility and energy efficiency of the composition function were validated. -- Abstract: The mixed refrigerant (MR) process is widely used for the liquefaction of natural gas (NG). The determination of MR composition with respect to variations in ambient conditions is crucial but difficult. PRICO is one of the simplest MR processes, and it is frequently used in small and mid-scale natural gas liquefaction plants. However, the determination of MR composition in the PRICO process is not easy. In this work, we presented a potential solution to this problem. First, operating pressures in the PRICO process were assumed to be fixed. We then programmed a genetic algorithm (GA) method coupling the process simulation software Aspen Plus and optimised the MR composition solution under different cold box inlet temperatures. Linear regression was performed on the MR composition to derive a set of functions, which were then validated for feasibility and energy efficiency. The results show that when the ambient temperature increases, the concentrations of methane, ethylene and propane should decrease, and isopentane should increase. This work may be helpful for designers and operators working with the PRICO process.

  8. Strong Tracking Filter for Nonlinear Systems with Randomly Delayed Measurements and Correlated Noises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel strong tracking filter (STF, which is suitable for dealing with the filtering problem of nonlinear systems when the following cases occur: that is, the constructed model does not match the actual system, the measurements have the one-step random delay, and the process and measurement noises are correlated at the same epoch. Firstly, a framework of decoupling filter (DF based on equivalent model transformation is derived. Further, according to the framework of DF, a new extended Kalman filtering (EKF algorithm via using first-order linearization approximation is developed. Secondly, the computational process of the suboptimal fading factor is derived on the basis of the extended orthogonality principle (EOP. Thirdly, the ultimate form of the proposed STF is obtained by introducing the suboptimal fading factor into the above EKF algorithm. The proposed STF can automatically tune the suboptimal fading factor on the basis of the residuals between available and predicted measurements and further the gain matrices of the proposed STF tune online to improve the filtering performance. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed STF has been proved through numerical simulation experiments.

  9. Annoyance Caused by Noise and Air Pollution during Pregnancy: Associated Factors and Correlation with Outdoor NO2 and Benzene Estimations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Fernández-Somoano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to describe the degree of annoyance among pregnant women in a Spanish cohort and to examine associations with proximity to traffic, NO2 and benzene exposure. We included 2457 participants from the Spanish Childhood and Environment study. Individual exposures to outdoor NO2 and benzene were estimated, temporally adjusted for pregnancy. Interviews about sociodemographic variables, noise and air pollution were carried out. Levels of annoyance were assessed using a scale from 0 (none to 10 (strong and unbearable; a level of 8 to 10 was considered high. The reported prevalence of high annoyance levels from air pollution was 11.2% and 15.0% from noise; the two variables were moderately correlated (0.606. Significant correlations between NO2 and annoyance from air pollution (0.154 and that from noise (0.181 were observed. Annoyance owing to noise and air pollution had a low prevalence in our Spanish population compared with other European populations. Both factors were associated with proximity to traffic. In multivariate models, annoyance from air pollution was related to NO2, building age, and country of birth; annoyance from noise was only related to the first two. The health burden of these exposures can be increased by stress caused by the perception of pollution sources.

  10. Annoyance Caused by Noise and Air Pollution during Pregnancy: Associated Factors and Correlation with Outdoor NO2 and Benzene Estimations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Somoano, Ana; Llop, Sabrina; Aguilera, Inmaculada; Tamayo-Uria, Ibon; Martínez, María Dolores; Foraster, Maria; Ballester, Ferran; Tardón, Adonina

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the degree of annoyance among pregnant women in a Spanish cohort and to examine associations with proximity to traffic, NO2 and benzene exposure. We included 2457 participants from the Spanish Childhood and Environment study. Individual exposures to outdoor NO2 and benzene were estimated, temporally adjusted for pregnancy. Interviews about sociodemographic variables, noise and air pollution were carried out. Levels of annoyance were assessed using a scale from 0 (none) to 10 (strong and unbearable); a level of 8 to 10 was considered high. The reported prevalence of high annoyance levels from air pollution was 11.2% and 15.0% from noise; the two variables were moderately correlated (0.606). Significant correlations between NO2 and annoyance from air pollution (0.154) and that from noise (0.181) were observed. Annoyance owing to noise and air pollution had a low prevalence in our Spanish population compared with other European populations. Both factors were associated with proximity to traffic. In multivariate models, annoyance from air pollution was related to NO2, building age, and country of birth; annoyance from noise was only related to the first two. The health burden of these exposures can be increased by stress caused by the perception of pollution sources. PMID:26095869

  11. Annoyance Caused by Noise and Air Pollution during Pregnancy: Associated Factors and Correlation with Outdoor NO2 and Benzene Estimations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Somoano, Ana; Llop, Sabrina; Aguilera, Inmaculada; Tamayo-Uria, Ibon; Martínez, María Dolores; Foraster, Maria; Ballester, Ferran; Tardón, Adonina

    2015-06-18

    This study aimed to describe the degree of annoyance among pregnant women in a Spanish cohort and to examine associations with proximity to traffic, NO2 and benzene exposure. We included 2457 participants from the Spanish Childhood and Environment study. Individual exposures to outdoor NO2 and benzene were estimated, temporally adjusted for pregnancy. Interviews about sociodemographic variables, noise and air pollution were carried out. Levels of annoyance were assessed using a scale from 0 (none) to 10 (strong and unbearable); a level of 8 to 10 was considered high. The reported prevalence of high annoyance levels from air pollution was 11.2% and 15.0% from noise; the two variables were moderately correlated (0.606). Significant correlations between NO2 and annoyance from air pollution (0.154) and that from noise (0.181) were observed. Annoyance owing to noise and air pollution had a low prevalence in our Spanish population compared with other European populations. Both factors were associated with proximity to traffic. In multivariate models, annoyance from air pollution was related to NO2, building age, and country of birth; annoyance from noise was only related to the first two. The health burden of these exposures can be increased by stress caused by the perception of pollution sources.

  12. Surface wave imaging of the weakly extended Malawi Rift from ambient-noise and teleseismic Rayleigh waves from onshore and lake-bottom seismometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardo, N. J.; Gaherty, J. B.; Shillington, D. J.; Ebinger, C. J.; Nyblade, A. A.; Mbogoni, G. J.; Chindandali, P. R. N.; Ferdinand, R. W.; Mulibo, G. D.; Kamihanda, G.; Keir, D.; Scholz, C.; Selway, K.; O'Donnell, J. P.; Tepp, G.; Gallacher, R.; Mtelela, K.; Salima, J.; Mruma, A.

    2017-06-01

    Located at the southernmost sector of the Western Branch of the East African Rift System, the Malawi Rift exemplifies an active, magma-poor, weakly extended continental rift. To investigate the controls on rifting, we image crustal and uppermost mantle structure beneath the region using ambient-noise and teleseismic Rayleigh-wave phase velocities between 9 and 100 s period. Our study includes six lake-bottom seismometers located in Lake Malawi (Nyasa), the first time seismometers have been deployed in any of the African rift lakes. Noise levels in the lake are lower than that of shallow oceanic environments and allow successful application of compliance corrections and instrument orientation determination. Resulting phase-velocity maps reveal slow velocities primarily confined to Lake Malawi at short periods (T 25 s), a prominent low-velocity anomaly exists beneath the Rungwe Volcanic Province at the northern terminus of the rift basin. Estimates of phase-velocity sensitivity indicates these low velocities occur within the lithospheric mantle and potentially uppermost asthenosphere, suggesting that mantle processes may control the association of volcanic centres and the localization of magmatism. Beneath the main portion of the Malawi Rift, a modest reduction in velocity is also observed at periods sensitive to the crust and upper mantle, but these velocities are much higher than those observed beneath Rungwe.

  13. Noise reduction in Lidar signal using correlation-based EMD combined with soft thresholding and roughness penalty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jianhua; Zhu, Lingyan; Li, Hongxu; Xu, Fan; Liu, Binggang; Yang, Zhenbo

    2018-01-01

    Empirical mode decomposition (EMD) is widely used to analyze the non-linear and non-stationary signals for noise reduction. In this study, a novel EMD-based denoising method, referred to as EMD with soft thresholding and roughness penalty (EMD-STRP), is proposed for the Lidar signal denoising. With the proposed method, the relevant and irrelevant intrinsic mode functions are first distinguished via a correlation coefficient. Then, the soft thresholding technique is applied to the irrelevant modes, and the roughness penalty technique is applied to the relevant modes to extract as much information as possible. The effectiveness of the proposed method was evaluated using three typical signals contaminated by white Gaussian noise. The denoising performance was then compared to the denoising capabilities of other techniques, such as correlation-based EMD partial reconstruction, correlation-based EMD hard thresholding, and wavelet transform. The use of EMD-STRP on the measured Lidar signal resulted in the noise being efficiently suppressed, with an improved signal to noise ratio of 22.25 dB and an extended detection range of 11 km.

  14. Noise-immune complex correlation for optical coherence angiography based on standard and Jones matrix optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makita, Shuichi; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Hong, Young-Joo; Miura, Masahiro; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes a complex correlation mapping algorithm for optical coherence angiography (cmOCA). The proposed algorithm avoids the signal-to-noise ratio dependence and exhibits low noise in vasculature imaging. The complex correlation coefficient of the signals, rather than that of the measured data are estimated, and two-step averaging is introduced. Algorithms of motion artifact removal based on non perfusing tissue detection using correlation are developed. The algorithms are implemented with Jones-matrix OCT. Simultaneous imaging of pigmented tissue and vasculature is also achieved using degree of polarization uniformity imaging with cmOCA. An application of cmOCA to in vivo posterior human eyes is presented to demonstrate that high-contrast images of patients' eyes can be obtained.

  15. Neural correlates of top-down processing in emotion perception: an ERP study of emotional faces in white noise versus noise-alone stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu-Yong; Lee, Tae-Ho; Yoon, So-Jeong; Cho, Yang Seok; Choi, June-Seek; Kim, Hyun Taek

    2010-06-14

    In the present study, we investigated the neural correlates underlying the perception of emotion in response to facial stimuli in order to elucidate the extent to which emotional perception is affected by the top-down process. Subjects performed a forced, two-choice emotion discrimination task towards ambiguous visual stimuli consisted of emotional faces embedded in different levels of visual white noise, including white noise-alone stimuli. ERP recordings and behavioral responses were analyzed according to the four response categories: hit, miss, false alarm and correct rejection. We observed enlarged EPN and LPP amplitudes when subjects reported seeing fearful faces and a typical emotional EPN response in the white noise-alone conditions when fearful faces were not presented. The two components of the ERP data which imply the characteristic modulation reflecting emotional processing showed the type of emotion each individual subjectively perceived. The results suggest that top-down modulations might be indispensable for emotional perception, which consists of two distinct stages of stimulus processing in the brain. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Ambiente urbano e percepção da poluição sonora Urban environment and perception to noise pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Bender Moreira de Lacerda

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A presente pesquisa avaliou a percepção da população de uma grande cidade em relação à poluição sonora (ruído urbano. Buscou-se identificar quais fontes sonoras são percebidas com maior freqüência pela população e quais reações psico-sociais relacionadas ao ruído urbano são identificados por ela. Foi utilizado um questionário composto de questões fechadas, abrangendo aspectos demográficos e aspectos psico-sociais referentes ao ruído ambiental. Oitocentos e noventa e dois (892 indivíduos participaram da pesquisa. As principais fontes de ruído citadas pelos moradores como causadoras de incômodo foram: 1 o tráfego de veículos (67 %, 2 os vizinhos (33%, 3 o barulho de sirenes (23%, 4 o barulho de animais (21% e 5 o barulho gerado pela construção civil (21 %. As principais reações psico-sociais foram: 1 irritabilidade (55%, 2 baixa concentração (28%, 3 insônia (20% e 4 dor de cabeça (19%. Os resultados obtidos coincidem com dados obtidos em pesquisas desenvolvidas na Europa, EUA e no Brasil, de que a poluição sonora ambiental influencia a qualidade de vida da população, gerando reações psico-sociais importantes, como: 1 irritabilidade e 2 insônia. Estes podem estar na base de outras doenças (disfunções cardiovasculares, podendo interferir na saúde e no bem estar dos indivíduos em particular e de uma população urbana como um todo, gerando um problema de saúde pública.The present study investigated the psychosocial complaints related to urban noise among the population of Curitiba. We used a questionnaire of closed-set questions to collect data on demographics and psychosocial reactions to environmental noise when subjects are at home. Eight hundred and ninety-two individuals (892 participated of the study. The main noise sources associated with discomfort or annoyance were traffic noise (67%, neighbors (33%, sirens (23%, animals (21%, and construction (21%. The main psychosocial complaints were

  17. Neural Correlates of Early Sound Encoding and their Relationship to Speech-in-Noise Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Emily B J; Chepesiuk, Alexander M P; Herholz, Sibylle C; Baillet, Sylvain; Zatorre, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    Speech-in-noise (SIN) perception is a complex cognitive skill that affects social, vocational, and educational activities. Poor SIN ability particularly affects young and elderly populations, yet varies considerably even among healthy young adults with normal hearing. Although SIN skills are known to be influenced by top-down processes that can selectively enhance lower-level sound representations, the complementary role of feed-forward mechanisms and their relationship to musical training is poorly understood. Using a paradigm that minimizes the main top-down factors that have been implicated in SIN performance such as working memory, we aimed to better understand how robust encoding of periodicity in the auditory system (as measured by the frequency-following response) contributes to SIN perception. Using magnetoencephalograpy, we found that the strength of encoding at the fundamental frequency in the brainstem, thalamus, and cortex is correlated with SIN accuracy. The amplitude of the slower cortical P2 wave was previously also shown to be related to SIN accuracy and FFR strength; we use MEG source localization to show that the P2 wave originates in a temporal region anterior to that of the cortical FFR. We also confirm that the observed enhancements were related to the extent and timing of musicianship. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that basic feed-forward sound encoding affects SIN perception by providing better information to later processing stages, and that modifying this process may be one mechanism through which musical training might enhance the auditory networks that subserve both musical and language functions.

  18. Neural Correlates of Early Sound Encoding and their Relationship to Speech-in-Noise Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily B. J. Coffey

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Speech-in-noise (SIN perception is a complex cognitive skill that affects social, vocational, and educational activities. Poor SIN ability particularly affects young and elderly populations, yet varies considerably even among healthy young adults with normal hearing. Although SIN skills are known to be influenced by top-down processes that can selectively enhance lower-level sound representations, the complementary role of feed-forward mechanisms and their relationship to musical training is poorly understood. Using a paradigm that minimizes the main top-down factors that have been implicated in SIN performance such as working memory, we aimed to better understand how robust encoding of periodicity in the auditory system (as measured by the frequency-following response contributes to SIN perception. Using magnetoencephalograpy, we found that the strength of encoding at the fundamental frequency in the brainstem, thalamus, and cortex is correlated with SIN accuracy. The amplitude of the slower cortical P2 wave was previously also shown to be related to SIN accuracy and FFR strength; we use MEG source localization to show that the P2 wave originates in a temporal region anterior to that of the cortical FFR. We also confirm that the observed enhancements were related to the extent and timing of musicianship. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that basic feed-forward sound encoding affects SIN perception by providing better information to later processing stages, and that modifying this process may be one mechanism through which musical training might enhance the auditory networks that subserve both musical and language functions.

  19. Effect on the mean first passage time in symmetrical bistable systems by cross-correlation between noises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.; Cao, L.; Wu, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    We present an analytic investigation of the mean first passage time in two opposite directions (from the left well to the right well and from right to left) by studying symmetrical bistable systems driven by correlated Gaussian white noises, and prove that the mean first passage time in two opposite directions is not symmetrical any more when noises are correlated. As examples, the mean first passage time in the quartic bistable model and the sawtooth bistable model are calculated, respectively. From the analytic results of the mean first passage time, we testify further the relation T(from x - to x + ,λ)≠T(from x + to x - ,λ) in the same area of the parameter plan. Moreover, it is found that the dependences of T + (i.e., T(from x - to x + ,λ)) and T - (i.e., T(from x + to x - ,λ)) upon the multiplicative noise intensity Q and the additive noise intensity D exhibit entirely different properties. For same areas of the parameter plan: in the quartic bistable system, when the T + vs. Q curve exhibits a maximum, while the T - vs. Q curve is monotonous; when the T + vs. D curve is monotonous, while the T - vs. D curve experiences a phase transition from decreasing monotonously to possessing one minimum. Increasing Q, when the T + vs. D curve experiences a phase transition from decreasing monotonously to possessing one maximum, while the T - vs. D curve only increases monotonously. Similar behaviours also exist in the sawtooth bistable model

  20. Crustal and upper mantle shear velocities of Iberia, the Alboran Sea, and North Africa from ambient noise and ballistic finite-frequency Rayleigh wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomeras, I.; Villasenor, A.; Thurner, S.; Levander, A.; Gallart, J.; mimoun, H.

    2013-12-01

    The complex Mesozoic-Cenozoic Alpine deformation in the western Mediterranean extends from the Pyrenees in northern Spain to the Atlas Mountains in southern Morocco. The Iberian plate was accreted to the European plate in late Cretaceous, resulting in the formation of the Pyrenees. Cenozoic African-European convergence resulted in subduction of the Tethys oceanic plate beneath Europe. Rapid Oligocene slab rollback from eastern Iberia spread eastward and southward, with the trench breaking into three segments by the time it reached the African coast. One trench segment moved southwestward and westward creating the Alboran Sea, floored by highly extended continental crust, and building the encircling Betics Rif mountains comprising the Gibraltar arc, and the Atlas mountains, which formed as the inversion of a Jurassic rift. A number of recent experiments have instrumented this region with broad-band arrays (the US PICASSO array, Spanish IberArray and Siberia arrays, the University of Munster array), which, including the Spanish, Portuguese, and Moroccan permanent networks, provide a combined array of 350 stations having an average interstation spacing of ~60 km. Taking advantage of this dense deployment, we have calculated the Rayleigh waves phase velocities from ambient noise for short periods (4 s to 40 s) and teleseismic events for longer periods (20 s to 167 s). Approximately 50,000 stations pairs were used to measure the phase velocity from ambient noise and more than 160 teleseismic events to measure phase velocity for longer periods. The inversion of the phase velocity dispersion curves provides a 3D shear velocity for the crust and uppermost mantle. Our results show differences between the various tectonic regions that extend to upper mantle depths (~200 km). In Iberia we obtain, on average, higher upper mantle shear velocities in the western Variscan region than in the younger eastern part. We map high upper mantle velocities (>4.6 km/s) beneath the

  1. Integrating ambient noise with GIS for a new perspective on volcano imaging and monitoring: The case study of Mt. Etna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardo, R.; De Siena, L.

    2017-11-01

    The timely estimation of short- and long-term volcanic hazard relies on the availability of detailed 3D geophysical images of volcanic structures. High-resolution seismic models of the absorbing uppermost conduit systems and highly-heterogeneous shallowest volcanic layers, while particularly challenging to obtain, provide important data to locate feasible eruptive centres and forecast flank collapses and lava ascending paths. Here, we model the volcanic structures of Mt. Etna (Sicily, Italy) and its outskirts using the Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio method, generally applied to industrial and engineering settings. The integration of this technique with Web-based Geographic Information System improves precision during the acquisition phase. It also integrates geological and geophysical visualization of 3D surface and subsurface structures in a queryable environment representing their exact three-dimensional geographic position, enhancing interpretation. The results show high-resolution 3D images of the shallowest volcanic and feeding systems, which complement (1) deeper seismic tomography imaging and (2) the results of recent remote sensing imaging. The study recovers a vertical structure that divides the pre-existing volcanic complexes of Ellittico and Cuvigghiuni. This could be interpreted as a transitional phase between the two systems. A comparison with recent remote sensing and geological results, however, shows that anomalies are generally related to volcano-tectonic structures active during the last 17 years. We infer that seismic noise measurements from miniaturized instruments, when combined with remote sensing techniques, represent an important resource to monitor volcanoes in unrest, reducing the risk of loss of human lives and instrumentation.

  2. Engineering geological zonation of a complex landslide system through seismic ambient noise measurements at the Selmun Promontory (Malta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannucci, Roberto; Martino, Salvatore; Paciello, Antonella; D'Amico, Sebastiano; Galea, Pauline

    2018-01-01

    The cliff slope of the Selmun Promontory, located in the Northern part of the island of Malta (Central Mediterranean Sea) close to the coastline, is involved in a landslide process as exhibited by the large block-size talus at its bottom. The landslide process is related to the geological succession outcropping in the Selmun area, characterised by the over-position of a grained limestone on a plastic clay, that induces a lateral spreading phenomenon associated with detachment and collapse of different-size rock blocks. The landslide process shapes a typical landscape with a stable plateau of stiff limestone bordered by an unstable cliff slope. The ruins of Għajn Ħadid Tower, the first of the thirteen watchtowers built in 1658 by the Grand Master Martin de Redin, stand out on the Selmun Promontory. The conservation of this important heritage site, already damaged by an earthquake which struck the Maltese Archipelago on October 12th 1856, is currently threatened by a progressive retreat of the landslide process towards the inland plateau area. During 2015 and 2016, field surveys were carried out to derive an engineering geological model of the Selmun Promontory. After a high-resolution geomechanical survey, the spatial distribution of the joints affecting the limestone was obtained. At the same time, 116 single-station noise measurements were carried out to cover the inland and edge plateau zones as well as the clayey slope area. The obtained 1-hour time histories were analysed through the horizontal to vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) technique, as well as polarity and ellipticity analysis of particle motion to define the local seismic response in zones having different stability conditions, i.e. related to the presence of unstable rock blocks characterised by different vibrational modes. The results obtained confirm the suitability of passive seismic geophysical techniques for zoning landslide hazard in case of rock slopes and demonstrate the relevance of

  3. Individual variation in metabolic reaction norms over ambient temperature causes low correlation between basal and standard metabolic rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briga, Michael; Verhulst, Simon

    2017-09-15

    Basal metabolic rate (BMR) is often assumed to be indicative of the energy turnover at ambient temperatures ( T a ) below the thermoneutral zone (SMR), but this assumption has remained largely untested. Using a new statistical approach, we quantified the consistency in nocturnal metabolic rate across a temperature range in zebra finches ( N =3213 measurements on 407 individuals) living permanently in eight outdoor aviaries. Foraging conditions were either benign or harsh, and body mass and mass-adjusted BMR (BMR m ) and SMR (SMR m ) were lower in individuals living in a harsh foraging environment. The correlation between SMR m at different T a was high ( r =0.91), independent of foraging environment, showing that individuals are consistently ranked according to their SMR m However, the correlations between BMR m and SMR m were always lower (average: r =0.29; range: 0metabolic response to lower T a at least in part reflected differential body temperature ( T b ) regulation: early morning T b was lower at low T a , and more so in individuals with a weaker metabolic response to lower T a Our findings have implications for the use of BMR in the estimation of time-energy budgets and comparative analyses: we suggest that the use of metabolic rates at ecologically relevant T a , such as the easily tractable SMR, will be more informative than the use of BMR as a proxy for energy turnover. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. A GIS-based spatial correlation analysis for ambient air pollution and AECOPD hospitalizations in Jinan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenqiao; Ying, Yangyang; Wu, Quanyuan; Zhang, Haiping; Ma, Dedong; Xiao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    workplace associated with a 7% (95%CI: [3.3%, 10%]) increase of hospitalizations due to AECOPD. Ambient air pollution is correlated with AECOPD hospitalizations spatially. A 10 μg/m(3) increase of PM10 at workplace was associated with a 7% (95%CI: [3.3%, 10%]) increase of hospitalizations due to AECOPD in Jinan, 2009. As a spatial data processing tool, GIS has novel and great potential on air pollutants exposure assessment and spatial analysis in AECOPD research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Crustal and upper mantle S-wave velocity structures across the Taiwan Strait from ambient seismic noise and teleseismic Rayleigh wave analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y.; Yao, H.; Wu, F. T.; Liang, W.; Huang, B.; Lin, C.; Wen, K.

    2013-12-01

    Although orogeny seems to have stopped in western Taiwan large and small earthquakes do occur in the Taiwan Strait. Limited studies have focused on this region before and were barely within reach for comprehensive projects like TAICRUST and TAIGER for logistical reasons; thus, the overall crustal structures of the Taiwan Strait remain unknown. Time domain empirical Green's function (TDEGF) from ambient seismic noise to determine crustal velocity structure allows us to study an area using station pairs on its periphery. This research aims to resolve 1-D average crustal and upper mantle S-wave velocity (Vs) structures alone paths of several broadband station-pairs across the Taiwan Strait; 5-120 s Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion data derived by combining TDEGF and traditional surface wave two-station method (TS). The average Vs structures show significant differences in the upper 15 km as expected. In general, the highest Vs are observed in the coastal area of Mainland China and the lowest Vs appear along the southwest offshore of the Taiwan Island; they differ by about 0.6-1.1 km/s. For different parts of the Strait, the Vs are lower in the middle by about 0.1-0.2 km/s relative to those in the northern and southern parts. The overall crustal thickness is approximately 30 km, much thinner and less variable than under the Taiwan Island.

  6. Some Neurocognitive Correlates of Noise-Vocoded Speech Perception in Children With Normal Hearing: A Replication and Extension of ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Adrienne S; Pisoni, David B; Kronenberger, William G; Faulkner, Kathleen F

    Noise-vocoded speech is a valuable research tool for testing experimental hypotheses about the effects of spectral degradation on speech recognition in adults with normal hearing (NH). However, very little research has utilized noise-vocoded speech with children with NH. Earlier studies with children with NH focused primarily on the amount of spectral information needed for speech recognition without assessing the contribution of neurocognitive processes to speech perception and spoken word recognition. In this study, we first replicated the seminal findings reported by ) who investigated effects of lexical density and word frequency on noise-vocoded speech perception in a small group of children with NH. We then extended the research to investigate relations between noise-vocoded speech recognition abilities and five neurocognitive measures: auditory attention (AA) and response set, talker discrimination, and verbal and nonverbal short-term working memory. Thirty-one children with NH between 5 and 13 years of age were assessed on their ability to perceive lexically controlled words in isolation and in sentences that were noise-vocoded to four spectral channels. Children were also administered vocabulary assessments (Peabody Picture Vocabulary test-4th Edition and Expressive Vocabulary test-2nd Edition) and measures of AA (NEPSY AA and response set and a talker discrimination task) and short-term memory (visual digit and symbol spans). Consistent with the findings reported in the original ) study, we found that children perceived noise-vocoded lexically easy words better than lexically hard words. Words in sentences were also recognized better than the same words presented in isolation. No significant correlations were observed between noise-vocoded speech recognition scores and the Peabody Picture Vocabulary test-4th Edition using language quotients to control for age effects. However, children who scored higher on the Expressive Vocabulary test-2nd Edition

  7. Generalized randomly amplified linear system driven by Gaussian noises: Extreme heavy tail and algebraic correlation decay in plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbrecher, Gyoergy; Weyssow, B.

    2004-01-01

    The extreme heavy tail and the power-law decay of the turbulent flux correlation observed in hot magnetically confined plasmas are modeled by a system of coupled Langevin equations describing a continuous time linear randomly amplified stochastic process where the amplification factor is driven by a superposition of colored noises which, in a suitable limit, generate a fractional Brownian motion. An exact analytical formula for the power-law tail exponent β is derived. The extremely small value of the heavy tail exponent and the power-law distribution of laminar times also found experimentally are obtained, in a robust manner, for a wide range of input values, as a consequence of the (asymptotic) self-similarity property of the noise spectrum. As a by-product, a new representation of the persistent fractional Brownian motion is obtained

  8. Long-term Self-noise Estimates of Seismic Sensors From a High-noise Vault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, S. P.; Goessen, S.; Hill, P.; Rietbrock, A.

    2017-12-01

    To understand the detection capabilities of seismic stations and for reducing biases in ambient noise imaging, it is vital to assess the contribution of instrument self-noise to overall site noise. Self-noise estimates typically come from vault installations in continental interiors with very low ambient noise levels. However, this approach restricts the independent assessment of self-noise by individual end-users to assess any variations in their own instrument pools from nominal specifications given by manufacturers and from estimations given in comparative test papers. However, the calculation method should be adapted to variable installation conditions. One problem is that microseism noise can contaminate self-noise results caused by instrument misalignment errors or manufacturing limits; this effect becomes stronger where ambient noise is higher. Moreover, due to expected stochastic and time-varying sensor noise, estimates based on hand-picking small numbers of data segments may not accurately reflect true self-noise. We report on results from a self-noise test experiment of Güralp seismic instruments (3T, 3ESPC broadband seismometers, Fortis strong motion accelerometer) that were installed in the sub-surface vault of the Eskdalemuir Seismic Observatory in Scotland, UK over the period October 2016-August 2017. Due to vault's proximity to the ocean, secondary microseism noise is strong, so we efficiently compute the angle of misalignment that maximises waveform coherence with a reference sensor. Self-noise was calculated using the 3-sensor correlation technique and we compute probability density functions of self-noise to assess its spread over time. We find that not correcting for misalignments as low as 0.1° can cause self-noise to be artificially higher by up to 15 dB at frequencies of 0.1-1 Hz. Our method thus efficiently removes the effect of microseism contamination on self-noise; for example, it restores the minimum noise floor for a 360s - 50 Hz 3T to

  9. White noise analysis for the correlation-type elementary motion detectors with half-wave rectifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Hideaki; Aonishi, Toru

    2018-06-01

    The motion detection mechanism of insects has been attracted attention of many researchers. Several motion-detection models have been proposed on the basis of insect visual system studies. Here, we examine two models, the Hassenstein-Reichardt (HR) model and the two-detector (2D) model. We analytically obtain the mean and variance of the stationary responses of the HR and the 2D models to white noise, and we derive the signal-to-fluctuation-noise ratio (SFNR) to evaluate encoding abilities of the two models. Especially when analyzing the 2D model, we calculate higher-order cumulants of a rectified Gaussian. The results show that the 2D model robustly works almost as well as the HR model in several sets of parameters estimated on the basis of experimental data. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Hamiltonian formulation of quantum error correction and correlated noise: Effects of syndrome extraction in the long-time limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novais, E.; Mucciolo, Eduardo R.; Baranger, Harold U.

    2008-07-01

    We analyze the long-time behavior of a quantum computer running a quantum error correction (QEC) code in the presence of a correlated environment. Starting from a Hamiltonian formulation of realistic noise models, and assuming that QEC is indeed possible, we find formal expressions for the probability of a given syndrome history and the associated residual decoherence encoded in the reduced density matrix. Systems with nonzero gate times (“long gates”) are included in our analysis by using an upper bound on the noise. In order to introduce the local error probability for a qubit, we assume that propagation of signals through the environment is slower than the QEC period (hypercube assumption). This allows an explicit calculation in the case of a generalized spin-boson model and a quantum frustration model. The key result is a dimensional criterion: If the correlations decay sufficiently fast, the system evolves toward a stochastic error model for which the threshold theorem of fault-tolerant quantum computation has been proven. On the other hand, if the correlations decay slowly, the traditional proof of this threshold theorem does not hold. This dimensional criterion bears many similarities to criteria that occur in the theory of quantum phase transitions.

  11. San Andreas Fault dip, Peninsular Ranges mafic lower crust and partial melt in the Salton Trough, Southern California, from ambient-noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Shahar; Klemperer, Simon L.; Lawrence, Jesse F.

    2015-11-01

    We use ambient-noise tomography to improve CVM-H11.9, a community velocity model of southern California. Our new 3-D shear-velocity model with 0.05° x 0.05° lateral and 1 km vertical blocks reveals new structure beneath the San Andreas Fault (SAF), Peninsular Ranges batholith (PRB), southern Sierra Nevada batholith (SNB), and the Salton Trough (ST). We use 4 years of data recorded on 849 broadband stations, vastly more than previous studies and including our own broadband Salton Seismic Imaging Project, a 40 station transect across the ST, as well as other campaign stations in both Mexico and the United States. Mean lower crust and upper mantle wave speeds (3.6 km/s at 20 km, 4.2 km/s at 40 km) are low by global standards. Across the SAF, southeast of San Gorgonio Pass, we observe vertical to steeply dipping lateral velocity contrasts that extend beneath the Moho. Beneath the western PRB and westernmost southern SNB, we observe relatively high shear velocities (≥3.8 km/s) in the lower crust that we interpret as the mafic roots of the overlying arc. Relatively high-velocity upper mantle (up to ˜4.5 km/s) may be part of the intact arc, or possibly a remnant of the Farallon plate. Beneath the ST, we observe zones of low shear-velocity in the lower crust and upper mantle which permit up to ˜4.5% melt in the lower crust and up to ˜6% melt in the upper mantle, depending on the assumed composition and pore geometry. Our results preclude the existence of older continental crust beneath the ST and support the creation of new crust beneath the ST.

  12. Comparison of Sensor Noise Effects on Fitts and Projection Based Phase Only Cross Correlation Algorithms for High Speed Video Trackers (PostPrint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    AFRL-RD-PS- TP-2015-0001 AFRL-RD-PS- TP-2015-0001 COMPARISON OF SENSOR NOISE EFFECTS ON FITTS AND PROJECTION BASED PHASE ONLY CROSS CORRELATION...ISSAC THORNTON KENTON T. WOOD, DR-IV, DAF Program Manager Chief, Laser...Comparison of Sensor Noise Effects on Fitts and Projection Based Phase Only Cross Correlation Algorithms for High Speed Video Trackers (PostPrint) 5c

  13. A method of noise reduction in heterodyne interferometric vibration metrology by combining auto-correlation analysis and spectral filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Hongliang; Xiao, Wen; Chen, Zonghui; Ma, Lan; Pan, Feng

    2018-01-01

    Heterodyne interferometric vibration metrology is a useful technique for dynamic displacement and velocity measurement as it can provide a synchronous full-field output signal. With the advent of cost effective, high-speed real-time signal processing systems and software, processing of the complex signals encountered in interferometry has become more feasible. However, due to the coherent nature of the laser sources, the sequence of heterodyne interferogram are corrupted by a mixture of coherent speckle and incoherent additive noise, which can severely degrade the accuracy of the demodulated signal and the optical display. In this paper, a new heterodyne interferometric demodulation method by combining auto-correlation analysis and spectral filtering is described leading to an expression for the dynamic displacement and velocity of the object under test that is significantly more accurate in both the amplitude and frequency of the vibrating waveform. We present a mathematical model of the signals obtained from interferograms that contain both vibration information of the measured objects and the noise. A simulation of the signal demodulation process is presented and used to investigate the noise from the system and external factors. The experimental results show excellent agreement with measurements from a commercial Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV).

  14. State and parameter estimation of state-space model with entry-wise correlated uniform noise

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavelková, Lenka; Kárný, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 11 (2014), s. 1189-1205 ISSN 0890-6327 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01030123; GA ČR GA13-13502S Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1075907 Keywords : state-space models * bounded noise * filtering problems * estimation algorithms * uncertain dynamic systems Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory Impact factor: 1.346, year: 2014 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/AS/pavelkova-0422958.pdf

  15. Activation of parallel fiber feedback by spatially diffuse stimuli reduces signal and noise correlations via independent mechanisms in a cerebellum-like structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Simmonds

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Correlations between the activities of neighboring neurons are observed ubiquitously across systems and species and are dynamically regulated by several factors such as the stimulus' spatiotemporal extent as well as by the brain's internal state. Using the electrosensory system of gymnotiform weakly electric fish, we recorded the activities of pyramidal cell pairs within the electrosensory lateral line lobe (ELL under spatially localized and diffuse stimulation. We found that both signal and noise correlations were markedly reduced (>40% under the latter stimulation. Through a network model incorporating key anatomical features of the ELL, we reveal how activation of diffuse parallel fiber feedback from granule cells by spatially diffuse stimulation can explain both the reduction in signal as well as the reduction in noise correlations seen experimentally through independent mechanisms. First, we show that burst-timing dependent plasticity, which leads to a negative image of the stimulus and thereby reduces single neuron responses, decreases signal but not noise correlations. Second, we show trial-to-trial variability in the responses of single granule cells to sensory input reduces noise but not signal correlations. Thus, our model predicts that the same feedback pathway can simultaneously reduce both signal and noise correlations through independent mechanisms. To test this prediction experimentally, we pharmacologically inactivated parallel fiber feedback onto ELL pyramidal cells. In agreement with modeling predictions, we found that inactivation increased both signal and noise correlations but that there was no significant relationship between magnitude of the increase in signal correlations and the magnitude of the increase in noise correlations. The mechanisms reported in this study are expected to be generally applicable to the cerebellum as well as other cerebellum-like structures. We further discuss the implications of such

  16. Correlation of magnetostriction variation on magnetic loss and noise for power transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shan-Jen; Liu, Jui-Jung; Chang, Yeong-Hwa; Fu, Chao-Ming; Hsu, Chang-Hung; Lee, Chun-Yao; Chang, Chia-Wen

    2015-05-01

    Magnetostriction (MS)-caused strain in single-phase three-legged cores with different core cutting forms, which suffer from induced magnetic loss and noise, was studied. It is found that adopting each different core form types induces magnetostriction ɛ variation in a transformer core operating with a high-frequency AC signal. The results are compared with finite element analysis simulations. It is also indicated that magnetostriction ɛ variations are significant in the rolling direction and along limbs and yokes. In this paper, it is proposed that core corner sides and T-joint parts without cutting structure, the core exhibits lower core loss and lower heat dissipation due to the fact that the magnetic flux that passes through corner sides shows lower magnetostriction variation. The magnetic properties resulting from magnetostriction variation in core loss and heat dissipation phenomena are significantly different from other core forms because of stronger contributions from magnetostatic forces. The main contribution for reducing core loss and noise, making them much less in corner numbers and cutting-fabricated forms, can be expected to come from lower magnetic flux and magnetostriction variation.

  17. Visualising mental representations: a primer on noise-based reverse correlation in social psychology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, L|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/400417464; Todorov, Alexander; Dotsch, R|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328554197

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, social psychologists have adopted the psychophysical method of reverse correlation. Reverse correlation is a data-driven method in which judgments of randomly varying stimuli are used to reconstruct participants' internal representation subtending those judgments. Here, we review

  18. Robust Frame Synchronization for Low Signal-to-Noise Ratio Channels Using Energy-Corrected Differential Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Pansoo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent standards for wireless transmission require reliable synchronization for channels with low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR as well as with a large amount of frequency offset, which necessitates a robust correlator structure for the initial frame synchronization process. In this paper, a new correlation strategy especially targeted for low SNR regions is proposed and its performance is analyzed. By utilizing a modified energy correction term, the proposed method effectively reduces the variance of the decision variable to enhance the detection performance. Most importantly, the method is demonstrated to outperform all previously reported schemes by a significant margin, for SNRs below 5 dB regardless of the existence of the frequency offsets. A variation of the proposed method is also presented for further enhancement over the channels with small frequency errors. The particular application considered for the performance verification is the second generation digital video broadcasting system for satellites (DVB-S2.

  19. Automated Processing Workflow for Ambient Seismic Recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, A. J.; Shragge, J.

    2017-12-01

    Structural imaging using body-wave energy present in ambient seismic data remains a challenging task, largely because these wave modes are commonly much weaker than surface wave energy. In a number of situations body-wave energy has been extracted successfully; however, (nearly) all successful body-wave extraction and imaging approaches have focused on cross-correlation processing. While this is useful for interferometric purposes, it can also lead to the inclusion of unwanted noise events that dominate the resulting stack, leaving body-wave energy overpowered by the coherent noise. Conversely, wave-equation imaging can be applied directly on non-correlated ambient data that has been preprocessed to mitigate unwanted energy (i.e., surface waves, burst-like and electromechanical noise) to enhance body-wave arrivals. Following this approach, though, requires a significant preprocessing effort on often Terabytes of ambient seismic data, which is expensive and requires automation to be a feasible approach. In this work we outline an automated processing workflow designed to optimize body wave energy from an ambient seismic data set acquired on a large-N array at a mine site near Lalor Lake, Manitoba, Canada. We show that processing ambient seismic data in the recording domain, rather than the cross-correlation domain, allows us to mitigate energy that is inappropriate for body-wave imaging. We first develop a method for window selection that automatically identifies and removes data contaminated by coherent high-energy bursts. We then apply time- and frequency-domain debursting techniques to mitigate the effects of remaining strong amplitude and/or monochromatic energy without severely degrading the overall waveforms. After each processing step we implement a QC check to investigate improvements in the convergence rates - and the emergence of reflection events - in the cross-correlation plus stack waveforms over hour-long windows. Overall, the QC analyses suggest that

  20. Acoustic methods in sodium flow for characterising pump cavitation and noise erosion correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courbiere, E.; Defaucheux, J.; Garnaud, P.

    1982-11-01

    Under the terms of agreements between the CEA and Jeumont-Schneider on fast breeder reactor sodium pumps, joint preliminary water mockup tests were carried out at the Jeumont facility. Similar experiments were carried out on the Superphenix primary sodium pumps during water testings at the EDF facility in Gennevilliers. The purpose of these tests was to define acoustic criteria for pump cavitation and to study the similitude between the mockup and the actual pump. This paper also presents the results of cavitation erosion tests conducted under CEA research programs. Two points are covered in the conclusion. (a) The test results show that pump noise changes with the drop in hydraulic performance characteristics, and can thus be representative of caviting conditions. (b) It should be possible to develop an acoustic method capable of discriminating between erosive and non-destructive cavitation

  1. Imaging the Iceland Hotspot Track Beneath Greenland with Seismic Noise Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordret, A.

    2017-12-01

    During the past 65 million years, the Greenland craton drifted over the Iceland hotspot; however, uncertainties in geodynamic modeling and a lack of geophysical evidence prevent an accurate reconstruction of the hotspot track. I image the Greenland lithosphere down to 300 km depth with seismic noise tomography. The hotspot track is observed as a linear high-velocity anomaly in the middle crust associated with magmatic intrusions. In the upper mantle, the remnant thermal signature of the hotspot manifests as low velocity and low viscosity bodies. This new detailed picture of the Greenland lithosphere will drive more accurate geodynamic reconstructions of tectonic plate motions and prediction of Greenland heat flow, which in turn will enable more precise estimations of the Greenland ice-sheet mass balance.

  2. Visualising mental representations: a primer on noise-based reverse correlation in social psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Brinkman, L; Todorov, Alexander; Dotsch, R

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, social psychologists have adopted the psychophysical method of reverse correlation. Reverse correlation is a data-driven method in which judgments of randomly varying stimuli are used to reconstruct participants' internal representation subtending those judgments. Here, we review the method and its findings within the context of social psychology, discussing its promises, achievements, and validity. Our review suggests that, even in these early stages, the technique has prove...

  3. Can we trace the eastern Gondwanan margin in Australia? New perspectives from transdimensional inversion of ambient noise for 3D shear velocity structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilia, S.; Rawlinson, N.; Direen, N. G.

    2013-12-01

    Although the notion of Rodinia is quite well accepted in the geoscience community, the location and nature of the eastern continental margin of the Gondwana fragment in Australia is still vague and remains one of the most hotly debated topics in Australian geology. Moreover, most post-Rodinian reconstructions models choose not to tackle the ';Tasmanian challenge', and focus only on the tectonic evolution of mainland southeast Australia, thereby conveniently ignoring the wider tectonic implications of Tasmania's complex geological history. One of the chief limitations of the tectonic reconstructions in this region is a lack of information on Paleozoic (possibly Proterozoic) basement structures. Vast Mesozoic-Cainozoic sedimentary and volcanic cover sequences obscure older outcrops and limit the power of direct observational techniques. In response to these challenges, our effort is focused on ambient seismic noise for imaging 3D crustal shear velocity structure using surface waves, which is capable of illuminating basement structure beneath younger cover. The data used in this study is sourced from the WOMBAT transportable seismic array, which is compounded by around 650 stations spanning the majority of southeastern Australia, including Tasmania and several islands in Bass Strait. To produce the highest quality Green's functions, careful processing of the data has been performed, after which group velocity dispersion measurements have been carried out using a frequency-time analysis method on the symmetric component of the empirical Green's functions (EGFs). Group dispersion measurements from the EGFs have been inverted using a novel hierarchical, transdimensional, Bayesian algorithm to obtain Rayleigh-wave group velocity maps at different periods from 2 to 30 s. The new approach has several advantages in that the number and distribution of model parameters are implicitly controlled by the data, in which the noise is treated as unknown in the inversion. This

  4. Functional Architecture of Noise Correlations in Human Early Visual Cortex and its Relationship with Coherent Spontaneous Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungwon Ryu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Responses of single sensory neurons to stimuli are ‘noisy’, varying substantially across repeated trials of identical stimulation. Intriguingly, these individual ‘noise responses’ (NR—deviations from their means—are not isolated; rather they are highly correlated, referred to as ‘noise correlation’ (NC. From a computational viewpoint, the presence and nature of NC exert great impacts on the information processing capacity of neurons as they encode sensory events as a population, decode those encoded neural responses, and contribute to perceptual choices for action. Regarding the origin of NR, on the other hand, there has been growing evidence pointing to its tight linkage with ‘spontaneous responses’ (SR—fluctuations of neural activity in the absence of external input or tasks. To investigate the functional structure of NC and its relationship with ‘correlations in SR’ (SC, we defined population receptive fields (pRFs of unit volumes of gray matter (UV in human early visual cortex and computed NRs and SRs using fMRI. NC increased with an increasing degree of similarity in pRF tuning properties such as orientation, spatial frequency, and visuotopic position, particularly between UV pairs close in cortical distance. This ‘like-to-like’ structure of NC remained unaltered across scan runs with different stimuli, even among between-area UV pairs. SC was higher than NC, and its functional and temporal structures were quite similar to those of NC. Furthermore, the partial correlation analysis revealed that NC between a given pair of UVs was best predicted by their SC than by any other factors examined in the current study.

  5. On the Capacity of Densely Packed Arrays with Mutual Coupling and Correlated Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Dehghanian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Capacity of a wireless link can be enhanced by increasing the number of receive antennas. However, imposed receiver physical size constraints necessitate that the antenna elements be in close proximity, which typically reduces the overall link capacity of the wireless channel. Counterintuitively, under certain conditions the capacity of the overall link can be enhanced by decreasing antenna spacings. The focus of this paper is that of identifying the fundamental mechanisms and the conditions that give rise to this excess capacity. Closed-form expressions that directly quantify this capacity gain are derived based on a representative circuit theoretic model. Interesting insights are developed about the impact of different noise and interference sources and the limiting effect of heat losses in the antenna system. The capacity analysis is subsequently generalized to encompass the effect of antenna current deformation and load mismatch due to mutual coupling, based on the standard Method of Moments (MoM analysis, demonstrating similar capacity enhancement behavior as predicted by the closed-form expressions.

  6. Noise reduction methods applied to two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) reveal complementary benefits of pre- and post-treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foist, Rod B; Schulze, H Georg; Ivanov, Andre; Turner, Robin F B

    2011-05-01

    Two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) is a powerful spectral analysis technique widely used in many fields of spectroscopy because it can reveal spectral information in complex systems that is not readily evident in the original spectral data alone. However, noise may severely distort the information and thus limit the technique's usefulness. Consequently, noise reduction is often performed before implementing 2D-COS. In general, this is implemented using one-dimensional (1D) methods applied to the individual input spectra, but, because 2D-COS is based on sets of successive spectra and produces 2D outputs, there is also scope for the utilization of 2D noise-reduction methods. Furthermore, 2D noise reduction can be applied either to the original set of spectra before performing 2D-COS ("pretreatment") or on the 2D-COS output ("post-treatment"). Very little work has been done on post-treatment; hence, the relative advantages of these two approaches are unclear. In this work we compare the noise-reduction performance on 2D-COS of pretreatment and post-treatment using 1D (wavelets) and 2D algorithms (wavelets, matrix maximum entropy). The 2D methods generally outperformed the 1D method in pretreatment noise reduction. 2D post-treatment in some cases was superior to pretreatment and, unexpectedly, also provided correlation coefficient maps that were similar to 2D correlation spectroscopy maps but with apparent better contrast.

  7. Individual variation in metabolic reaction norms over ambient temperature causes low correlation between basal and standard metabolic rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briga, Michael; Verhulst, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Basal metabolic rate (BMR) is often assumed to be indicative of the energy turnover at ambient temperatures (T-a) below the thermoneutral zone (SMR), but this assumption has remained largely untested. Using a new statistical approach, we quantified the consistency in nocturnal metabolic rate across

  8. Active Control of Jet Noise Using High Resolution TRPIV Part 2: Velocity-Pressure-Acoustic Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Kerwin; Kostka, Stanislav; Berger, Zachary; Berry, Matthew; Gogineni, Sivaram; Glauser, Mark

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the pressure, velocity and acoustic field of a transonic jet. Test conditions comprise a 2 inch nozzle, analyzing two flow speeds, Mach 0.6 and 0.85, with open loop control explored for the Mach 0.6 case. We make simultaneous measurements of the near-field pressure and far-field acoustics at 40 kHz, alongside 10 kHz time resolved PIV measurements in the r-z plane. Cross correlations are performed exploring how both the near-field Fourier filtered pressure and low dimensional POD modes relate to the far-field acoustics. Of interest are those signatures witch exhibit the strongest correlation with far-field, and subsequently how these structures can be controlled. The goal is to investigate how flow-induced perturbations, via synthetic jet actuators, of the developing shear layer might bring insight into how one may alter the flow such that the far-field acoustic signature is mitigated. The TR-PIV measurements will prove to be a powerful tool in being able to track the propagation of physical structures for both the controlled and uncontrolled jet.

  9. Inversion of seismic data: how to take the correlated nature of noise into account; Inversion de donnees sismiques: prise en compte de la nature correlee du bruit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renard, F.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of seismic inversion is to recover an Earth model that best fits some observed data. To reach that goal, we have to minimize an objective function that measures the amplitude of the misfits according to a norm to be chosen in data space. In general, the used norm is the L2 norm. Unfortunately, such a norm is not adapted to data corrupted by correlated noise: the noise is in that case inverted as signal and the inversion results are unacceptable. The goal of this thesis is to obtain satisfactory results to the inverse problem in that situation. For this purpose, we study two inverse problems: reflection tomography and waveform inversion. In reflection tomography, we propose a new formulation of the continuum inverse problem which relies on a H1 norm in data space. This allows us to account for the correlated nature of the noise that corrupts the kinematic information. However, this norm does not give more satisfactory results than the ones obtained with the classical formalism. This is why, for sake of simplicity, we recommend to use this classical formalism. Then we try to understand how to properly sample the kinematic information so as to obtain an accurate approximation of the continuum inverse problem. In waveform inversion, we propose to directly invert data corrupted by some correlated noise. A first idea consists in rejecting the noise in the residues. In that goal, we can use a semi-norm to formulate the inverse problem. This technique gives very good results, except when the data are corrupted by random noise. Thus we propose a second method which consists in retrieving, by solving an inverse problem, the signal and the noise whose sum best fits the data. This technique gives very satisfactory results, even if some random noise pollutes the data, and is moreover solved, thanks to an original algorithm, in a very efficient way. (author)

  10. Ambient diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Part I. FundamentalsIntroductionWhat is Ambient Diagnostics?Diagnostic ModelsMultimedia IntelligenceCrowd SourcingSoft SensorsScience of SimplicityPersonal DiagnosesBasic AlgorithmsBasic ToolsSummaryProblemsTransformationEarly Discoveries of Heartbeat PatternsTransforms, Features, and AttributesSequential FeaturesSpatiotemporal FeaturesShape FeaturesImagery FeaturesFrequency Domain FeaturesMulti-Resolution FeaturesSummaryProblemsPattern RecognitionSimilarities and DistancesClustering MethodsClassification MethodsClassifier Accuracy MeasuresSummaryProblemsPart II. Multimedia IntelligenceSound RecognitionMicrophone AppsModern Acoustic Transducers (Microphones)Frequency Response CharacteristicsDigital Audio File FormatsHeart Sound SensingLung Sound SensingSnore MeterSpectrogram (STFT)Ambient Sound AnalysisSound RecognitionRecognizing Asthma SoundPeak ShiftFeature CompressionRegroupingNoise IssuesFuture ApplicationsSummaryProblemsColor SensorsColor SensingHuman Color VisionColor SensorsColor Matching ExperimentsC...

  11. Individual variation in metabolic reaction norms over ambient temperature causes low correlation between basal and standard metabolic rate

    OpenAIRE

    Briga, Michael; Verhulst, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Basal metabolic rate (BMR) is often assumed to be indicative of the energy turnover at ambient temperatures (T-a) below the thermoneutral zone (SMR), but this assumption has remained largely untested. Using a new statistical approach, we quantified the consistency in nocturnal metabolic rate across a temperature range in zebra finches (N=3213 measurements on 407 individuals) living permanently in eight outdoor aviaries. Foraging conditions were either benign or harsh, and body mass and mass-a...

  12. Separating Direct and Indirect Turbofan Engine Combustion Noise While Estimating Post-Combustion (Post-Flame) Residence Time Using the Correlation Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2011-01-01

    A previous investigation on the presence of direct and indirect combustion noise for a full-scale turbofan engine using a far-field microphone at 130 is extended by also examining signals obtained at two additional downstream directions using far-field microphones at 110 deg and 160 deg. A generalized cross-correlation function technique is used to study the change in propagation time to the far field of the combined direct and indirect combustion noise signal as a sequence of low-pass filters are applied. The filtering procedure used produces no phase distortion. As the low-pass filter frequency is decreased, the travel time increases because the relative amount of direct combustion noise is reduced. The indirect combustion noise signal travels more slowly because in the combustor entropy fluctuations move with the flow velocity, which is slow compared to the local speed of sound. The indirect combustion noise signal travels at acoustic velocities after reaching the turbine and being converted into an acoustic signal. The direct combustion noise is always propagating at acoustic velocities. The results show that the estimated indirect combustion noise time delay values (post-combustion residence times) measured at each angle are fairly consistent with one another for a relevant range of operating conditions and demonstrate source separation of a mixture of direct and indirect combustion noise. The results may lead to a better idea about the acoustics in the combustor and may help develop and validate improved reduced-order physics-based methods for predicting turbofan engine core noise.

  13. A Small Leak Detection Method Based on VMD Adaptive De-Noising and Ambiguity Correlation Classification Intended for Natural Gas Pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qiyang; Li, Jian; Bai, Zhiliang; Sun, Jiedi; Zhou, Nan; Zeng, Zhoumo

    2016-12-13

    In this study, a small leak detection method based on variational mode decomposition (VMD) and ambiguity correlation classification (ACC) is proposed. The signals acquired from sensors were decomposed using the VMD, and numerous components were obtained. According to the probability density function (PDF), an adaptive de-noising algorithm based on VMD is proposed for noise component processing and de-noised components reconstruction. Furthermore, the ambiguity function image was employed for analysis of the reconstructed signals. Based on the correlation coefficient, ACC is proposed to detect the small leak of pipeline. The analysis of pipeline leakage signals, using 1 mm and 2 mm leaks, has shown that proposed detection method can detect a small leak accurately and effectively. Moreover, the experimental results have shown that the proposed method achieved better performances than support vector machine (SVM) and back propagation neural network (BP) methods.

  14. A Small Leak Detection Method Based on VMD Adaptive De-Noising and Ambiguity Correlation Classification Intended for Natural Gas Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiyang Xiao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a small leak detection method based on variational mode decomposition (VMD and ambiguity correlation classification (ACC is proposed. The signals acquired from sensors were decomposed using the VMD, and numerous components were obtained. According to the probability density function (PDF, an adaptive de-noising algorithm based on VMD is proposed for noise component processing and de-noised components reconstruction. Furthermore, the ambiguity function image was employed for analysis of the reconstructed signals. Based on the correlation coefficient, ACC is proposed to detect the small leak of pipeline. The analysis of pipeline leakage signals, using 1 mm and 2 mm leaks, has shown that proposed detection method can detect a small leak accurately and effectively. Moreover, the experimental results have shown that the proposed method achieved better performances than support vector machine (SVM and back propagation neural network (BP methods.

  15. [Correlation of noises in the channels of digital X-ray receiver-transformer and the evaluation of registration's quant efficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porosev, V V; Shekhtman, L I; Zelikman, M I; Blinov, N N

    2004-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental research results related with the influence of correlation of signals in neighboring elements of digital X-ray receiver-transformer produced on the evaluation of the output ratio noise/signal and, as a consequence, on the evaluation of quantum registration efficiency are described in the paper.

  16. Classroom Noise and Teachers' Voice Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantala, Leena M.; Hakala, Suvi; Holmqvist, Sofia; Sala, Eeva

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to research the associations between noise (ambient and activity noise) and objective metrics of teachers' voices in real working environments (i.e., classrooms). Method: Thirty-two female and 8 male teachers from 14 elementary schools were randomly selected for the study. Ambient noise was measured during breaks…

  17. Electrical conduction noise and its correlation with structural properties of Cu2ZnSnS4 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubair Ansari, Mohd; Munjal, Sandeep; Kumar, Vikram; Khare, Neeraj

    2016-07-01

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films have been deposited by ultrasonic assisted chemical vapor deposition in a single step process at different substrate temperatures and structural, morphological, electrical and conduction noise characteristics of the CZTS thin films have been studied. Single phase CZTS thin films are formed at 275 °C and 325 °C deposition temperatures, whereas the CZTS thin film deposited at 375 °C showed secondary phase also. The crystallinity of the films improves and resistivity decreases with the increases of the deposition temperature. The temperature dependent electrical conductivity of the films reveals that in the temperature range 300-250 K, thermally activated conduction is observed. The conduction noise in the CZTS thin films, exhibits 1/f noise in the low frequency region and found to be strongly dependent on the film deposition temperatures. The film deposited at 275 °C and 375 °C shows larger conduction noise, whereas the film deposited at 325 °C shows smaller noise. For the low frequency 1/f noise, the value of α is also found to be the minimum for the film deposited at 325 °C. The higher value of conduction noise in the film deposited at 275 °C is related to poor crystallinity and less compact morphology. For the film deposited at 375 °C, crystallinity and compactness improves, but the presence of the secondary phases seems to be responsible for generating higher noise. The smallest conduction noise of the film deposited at 325 °C is due to single phase film with better crystallinity and smaller trap density ˜5.1 × 1015 cm-2 eV-1.

  18. Noise Trauma-Induced Behavioral Gap Detection Deficits Correlate with Reorganization of Excitatory and Inhibitory Local Circuits in the Inferior Colliculus and Are Prevented by Acoustic Enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Joshua J; Zhang-Hooks, Ying-Xin; Roos, Hannah; Nguyen, Tuan; Kandler, Karl

    2017-06-28

    Hearing loss leads to a host of cellular and synaptic changes in auditory brain areas that are thought to give rise to auditory perception deficits such as temporal processing impairments, hyperacusis, and tinnitus. However, little is known about possible changes in synaptic circuit connectivity that may underlie these hearing deficits. Here, we show that mild hearing loss as a result of brief noise exposure leads to a pronounced reorganization of local excitatory and inhibitory circuits in the mouse inferior colliculus. The exact nature of these reorganizations correlated with the presence or absence of the animals' impairments in detecting brief sound gaps, a commonly used behavioral sign for tinnitus in animal models. Mice with gap detection deficits (GDDs) showed a shift in the balance of synaptic excitation and inhibition that was present in both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons, whereas mice without GDDs showed stable excitation-inhibition balances. Acoustic enrichment (AE) with moderate intensity, pulsed white noise immediately after noise trauma prevented both circuit reorganization and GDDs, raising the possibility of using AE immediately after cochlear damage to prevent or alleviate the emergence of central auditory processing deficits. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Noise overexposure is a major cause of central auditory processing disorders, including tinnitus, yet the changes in synaptic connectivity underlying these disorders remain poorly understood. Here, we find that brief noise overexposure leads to distinct reorganizations of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs onto glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons and that the nature of these reorganizations correlates with animals' impairments in detecting brief sound gaps, which is often considered a sign of tinnitus. Acoustic enrichment immediately after noise trauma prevents circuit reorganizations and gap detection deficits, highlighting the potential for using sound therapy soon after cochlear damage

  19. Non-Markovian noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulinski, A.

    1994-01-01

    The properties of non-Markovian noises with exponentially correlated memory are discussed. Considered are dichotomic noise, white shot noise, Gaussian white noise, and Gaussian colored noise. The stationary correlation functions of the non-Markovian versions of these noises are given by linear combinations of two or three exponential functions (colored noises) or of the δ function and exponential function (white noises). The non-Markovian white noises are well defined only when the kernel of the non-Markovian master equation contains a nonzero admixture of a Markovian term. Approximate equations governing the probability densities for processes driven by such non-Markovian noises are derived, including non-Markovian versions of the Fokker-Planck equation and the telegrapher's equation. As an example, it is shown how the non-Markovian nature changes the behavior of the driven linear process

  20. Ambient Space and Ambient Sensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Ulrik

    The ambient is the aesthetic production of the sensation of being surrounded. As a concept, 'ambient' is mostly used in relation to the music genre 'ambient music' and Brian Eno's idea of environmental background music. However, the production of ambient sensations must be regarded as a central...

  1. Long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and traffic noise and incident hypertension in seven cohorts of the European study of cohorts for air pollution effects (ESCAPE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuks, Kateryna B; Weinmayr, Gudrun; Basagaña, Xavier; Gruzieva, Olena; Hampel, Regina; Oftedal, Bente; Sørensen, Mette; Wolf, Kathrin; Aamodt, Geir; Aasvang, Gunn Marit; Aguilera, Inmaculada; Becker, Thomas; Beelen, Rob; Brunekreef, Bert; Caracciolo, Barbara; Cyrys, Josef; Elosua, Roberto; Eriksen, Kirsten Thorup; Foraster, Maria; Fratiglioni, Laura; Hilding, Agneta; Houthuijs, Danny; Korek, Michal; Künzli, Nino; Marrugat, Jaume; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Penell, Johanna; Pershagen, Göran; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Swart, Wim J R; Peters, Annette; Hoffmann, Barbara

    2017-04-01

    We investigated whether traffic-related air pollution and noise are associated with incident hypertension in European cohorts. We included seven cohorts of the European study of cohorts for air pollution effects (ESCAPE). We modelled concentrations of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 µm (PM2.5), ≤10 µm (PM10), >2.5, and ≤10 µm (PMcoarse), soot (PM2.5 absorbance), and nitrogen oxides at the addresses of participants with land use regression. Residential exposure to traffic noise was modelled at the facade according to the EU Directive 2002/49/EC. We assessed hypertension as (i) self-reported and (ii) measured (systolic BP ≥ 140 mmHg or diastolic BP ≥ 90 mmHg or intake of BP lowering medication (BPLM). We used Poisson regression with robust variance estimation to analyse associations of traffic-related exposures with incidence of hypertension, controlling for relevant confounders, and combined the results from individual studies with random-effects meta-analysis. Among 41 072 participants free of self-reported hypertension at baseline, 6207 (15.1%) incident cases occurred within 5-9 years of follow-up. Incidence of self-reported hypertension was positively associated with PM2.5 (relative risk (RR) 1.22 [95%-confidence interval (CI):1.08; 1.37] per 5 µg/m³) and PM2.5 absorbance (RR 1.13 [95% CI:1.02; 1.24] per 10 - 5m - 1). These estimates decreased slightly upon adjustment for road traffic noise. Road traffic noise was weakly positively associated with the incidence of self-reported hypertension. Among 10 896 participants at risk, 3549 new cases of measured hypertension occurred. We found no clear associations with measured hypertension. Long-term residential exposures to air pollution and noise are associated with increased incidence of self-reported hypertension. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Noise suppression by noise

    OpenAIRE

    Vilar, J. M. G. (José M. G.), 1972-; Rubí Capaceti, José Miguel

    2001-01-01

    We have analyzed the interplay between an externally added noise and the intrinsic noise of systems that relax fast towards a stationary state, and found that increasing the intensity of the external noise can reduce the total noise of the system. We have established a general criterion for the appearance of this phenomenon and discussed two examples in detail.

  3. Using optical fibers with different modes to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of diffuse correlation spectroscopy flow-oximeter measurements

    OpenAIRE

    He, Lian; Lin, Yu; Shang, Yu; Shelton, Brent J.; Yu, Guoqiang

    2013-01-01

    The dual-wavelength diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) flow-oximeter is an emerging technique enabling simultaneous measurements of blood flow and blood oxygenation changes in deep tissues. High signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is crucial when applying DCS technologies in the study of human tissues where the detected signals are usually very weak. In this study, single-mode, few-mode, and multimode fibers are compared to explore the possibility of improving the SNR of DCS flow-oximeter measure...

  4. Can we use the q-Gaussian of ambient noise fluctuations as a vulnerability index? A case study in Cultural Heritage buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallianatos, Filippos; Koutalonis, Ioannis; Moisidi, Margarita; Chatzopoulos, Georgios

    2018-05-01

    In this work we study in terms of Tsallis statistical mechanics the properties of microtremors' fluctuations in two church bell towers, which are monuments of cultural heritage, in the city of Chania (Crete, Greece). We have shown that fluctuations of ambient vibrations recordings in the Church tower bells follow a q-Gaussian distribution. The behavior of Tsallis q parameter with the level (high) of the measuring point within the tower and the amplification factors at that points as extracted from horizontal-to-vertical (HVSR) spectral ratios are presented and discussed. Since q decreases as the amplification factor increases, we could suggest q as a vulnerability index, where, as q decreases approaching unity, then the structural system is getting more vulnerable. The latter approach suggests that introducing ideas of Tsallis statistics could be useful in characterizing extremely complex processes as that governed the estimation of seismic vulnerability in which a multidisciplinary approach is required.

  5. Ambient Space and Ambient Sensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Ulrik

    The ambient is the aesthetic production of the sensation of being surrounded. As a concept, 'ambient' is mostly used in relation to the music genre 'ambient music' and Brian Eno's idea of environmental background music. However, the production of ambient sensations must be regarded as a central......, dehierarchization, ubiquity and the production of unfocused sensations in contrast to the conventional notion of the aesthetic experience as a focused contemplation of a stationary object....

  6. Equation for Combustion Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T. M.

    1982-01-01

    Mathematical relationship derived for interactions between turbulent flame and combustion noise. Relationship is rigorous theoretical correlation of combustion noise and combustion process. Establishes foundation for acoustic measurements as tool for investigating structure of turbulent flames. Mathematical relationship is expected to aid researchers in field of noise generated by combustion.

  7. An environmental index of noise and light pollution at EU by spatial correlation of quiet and unlit areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votsi, Nefta-Eleftheria P; Kallimanis, Athanasios S; Pantis, Ioannis D

    2017-02-01

    Quietness exists in places without human induced noise sources and could offer multiple benefits to citizens. Unlit areas are sites free of human intense interference at night time. The aim of this research is to develop an integrated environmental index of noise and light pollution. In order to achieve this goal the spatial pattern of quietness and darkness of Europe was identified, as well as their overlap. The environmental index revealed that the spatial patterns of Quiet and Unlit Areas differ to a great extent highlighting the importance of preserving quietness as well as darkness in EU. The spatial overlap of these two environmental characteristics covers 32.06% of EU surface area, which could be considered a feasible threshold for protection. This diurnal and nocturnal metric of environmental quality accompanied with all direct and indirect benefits to human well-being could indicate a target for environmental protection in the EU policy and practices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Drone noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinney, Charles; Sirohi, Jayant; University of Texas at Austin Team

    2017-11-01

    A basic understanding of the noise produced by single and multirotor drones operating at static thrust conditions is presented. This work acts as an extension to previous efforts conducted at The University of Texas at Austin (Tinney et al. 2017, AHS Forum 73). Propeller diameters ranging from 8 inch to 12 inch are examined for configurations comprising an isolated rotor, a quadcopter configuration and a hexacopter configuration, and with a constant drone pitch of 2.25. An azimuthal array of half-inch microphones, placed between 2 and 3 hub-center diameters from the drone center, are used to assess the acoustic near-field. Thrust levels, acquired using a six degree-of-freedom load cell, are then used to correlate acoustic noise levels to aerodynamic performance for each drone configuration. The findings reveal a nearly logarithmic increase in noise with increasing thrust. However, for the same thrust condition, considerable noise reduction is achieved by increasing the number of propeller blades thereby reducing the blade passage frequency and both the thickness and loading noise sources that accompany it.

  9. Near surface structure of the North Anatolian Fault Zone near 30°E from Rayleigh and Love wave tomography using ambient seismic noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G.; Rost, S.; Houseman, G. A.; Hillers, G.

    2017-12-01

    By utilising short period surface waves present in the noise field, we can construct images of shallow structure in the Earth's upper crust: a depth-range that is usually poorly resolved in earthquake tomography. Here, we use data from a dense seismic array (Dense Array for Northern Anatolia - DANA) deployed across the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) in the source region of the 1999 magnitude 7.6 Izmit earthquake in western Turkey. The NAFZ is a major strike-slip system that extends 1200 km across northern Turkey and continues to pose a high level of seismic hazard, in particular to the mega-city of Istanbul. We obtain maps of group velocity variation using surface wave tomography applied to short period (1- 6 s) Rayleigh and Love waves to construct high-resolution images of SV and SH-wave velocity in the upper 5 km of a 70 km x 35 km region centred on the eastern end of the fault segment that ruptured in the 1999 Izmit earthquake. The average Rayleigh wave group velocities in the region vary between 1.8 km/s at 1.5 s period, to 2.2 km/s at 6 s period. The NAFZ bifurcates into northern and southern strands in this region; both are active but only the northern strand ruptured in the 1999 event. The signatures of both the northern and southern branches of the NAFZ are clearly associated with strong gradients in seismic velocity that also denote the boundaries of major tectonic units. This observation implies that the fault zone exploits the pre-existing structure of the Intra-Pontide suture zone. To the north of the NAFZ, we observe low S-wave velocities ( 2.0 km/s) associated with the unconsolidated sediments of the Adapazari basin, and blocks of weathered terrigenous clastic sediments. To the south of the northern branch of the NAFZ in the Armutlu block, we detect higher velocities ( 2.9 km/s) associated with a shallow crystalline basement, in particular a block of metamorphosed schists and marbles that bound the northern branch of the NAFZ.

  10. Noise thermometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Brixy, H.; Kakuta, Tsunemi.

    1996-03-01

    The noise thermometry (NT) is a temperature measuring method by which the absolute temperature measurement can be performed with a very high accuracy and without any influence of ambient environments and of the thermal history of its NT sensor (electric resistor). Hence it is quite suitable for application as a standard thermometry to the in-situ temperature calibration of incore thermocouples. The KFA Juelich had played a pioneering role in the development of NT and applied the results successfully to the AVR for testing its feasibility. In this report, all about the NT including its principle, sensor elements and system configurations are presented together with the experiences in the AVR and the results of investigation to apply it to high temperature measurement. The NT can be adopted as a standard method for incore temperature measurement and in situ temperature calibration in the HTTR. (author). 85 refs

  11. Noise thermometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von Brixy, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Kakuta, Tsunemi

    1996-03-01

    The noise thermometry (NT) is a temperature measuring method by which the absolute temperature measurement can be performed with a very high accuracy and without any influence of ambient environments and of the thermal history of its NT sensor (electric resistor). Hence it is quite suitable for application as a standard thermometry to the in-situ temperature calibration of incore thermocouples. The KFA Juelich had played a pioneering role in the development of NT and applied the results successfully to the AVR for testing its feasibility. In this report, all about the NT including its principle, sensor elements and system configurations are presented together with the experiences in the AVR and the results of investigation to apply it to high temperature measurement. The NT can be adopted as a standard method for incore temperature measurement and in situ temperature calibration in the HTTR. (author). 85 refs.

  12. Reliability characterization of SiON and MGHK MOSFETs using flicker noise and its correlation with the bias temperature instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samnakay, Rameez; Balandin, Alexander A.; Srinivasan, Purushothaman

    2017-09-01

    Bias temperature instability (BTI) is one of the critical device degradation mechanisms in poly-Si/SiON and metal gate/high-k complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technologies. Using the pre- and post-BTI flicker noise measurements, we investigated the bulk trap density, Nt, in both of these technologies. The low-frequency noise spectra were predominantly of 1/fγ type with γ < 1 for NMOS and ∼1 for PMOS. For SiON based technologies, the lower VTH degradation due to PBTI was noticed while considerable VTH degradation was observed for NBTI in both SiON and MGHK technologies. Both MGHK and SiON pFETs show a clear increase in the effective volume trap density, Nt, after NBTI. The increase in Nt in MGHK n-MOSFETs during PBTI is markedly higher than that in MGHK p-MOSFETs during NBTI. From 2012-2016 he was a Research Assistant with the Nano-Device Laboratory at the University of California - Riverside, as well as a member of the Quality and Reliability engineering team at Globalfoundries, Inc. during the summer of 2014. He has currently authored or co-authored 10 journal publications and numerous conference presentations. His current research interests include 1/f noise in high-k dielectrics and fabricated 2D van der Waal thin-film devices Mr. Samnakay's awards and honors include the Dean's Distinguished Fellowship Award (University of California-Riverside) and induction into the IEEE-HKN honors society. He also serves as a reviewer for 6 journals including Applied Physics Letters, Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter and Nanotechnology journals.

  13. A note on errors and signal to noise ratio of binary cross-correlation measurements of system impulse response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummins, J.D.

    1964-02-01

    The sources of error in the measurement of system impulse response using test signals of a discrete interval binary nature are considered. Methods of correcting for the errors due to theoretical imperfections are given and the variance of the estimate of the system impulse response due to random noise is determined. Several topics related to the main topic are considered e.g. determination of a theoretical model from experimental results. General conclusions about the magnitude of the errors due to the theoretical imperfections are made. (author)

  14. Det ambiente

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Ulrik

    Om begrebet "det ambiente", der beskriver, hvad der sker, når vi fornemmer baggrundsmusikkens diskrete beats, betragter udsigten gennem panoramavinduet eller tager 3D-brillerne på og læner os tilbage i biografsædet. Bogen analyserer, hvorfan ambiente oplevelser skabes, og hvilke konsekvenser det...

  15. Correlações fenotípica, genética aditiva e ambiental em cenoura Phenotypic, additive genetic and environmental correlations in carrots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter José Siqueira

    1993-01-01

    ízes comerciáveis (PC e produção total (PT. Finalmente, discute-se a participação relativa dos efeitos de ambiente e genéticos na correlação fenotípica.Since development of commercial varieties involves simultaneous selection for various traits, previous knowledge of their interrelationships may also be fundamental to the breeder as the strategies to be adopted. The objective of this research was to estimate phenotypic, additive genetic and environmental correlations for a number of traits of agronomic interest in carrot (Daucus carota L. cultivar Campinas, grown during the fall-winter and spring-summer seasons at the Experiment Station of Monte Alegre do Sul, Instituto Agronômico de Campinas (IAC, State of São Paulo, Brazil. This germplasm, originated from the "Seção de Hortaliças" (IAC, presents, besides a high level of resistance to Alternaria dauci, a large variation for root shape and a tendency to early bolting, stimulated by low temperatures and/or long photoperiods during the crop vegetative stage. Data were obtained by evaluating 102 half-sib progenies on a randomized block design experiment with four and three replications, respectively, for the fall-winter and spring-summer planting dates. Phenotypic (rF, additive genetic (rA and environmental (rE correlations were estimated by covariance analyses between pairs of characters, in both planting dates. The phenotypic and additive genetic correlations were negative only for pairs of characters involving percentage of early flowering (EF or percentage of defective roots, while the correlations were high (>0.5 for most of the pairs of characters in both planting dates. Selection for percentage of cylindric marketable roots will lead to reduction in EF as well as increases in marketable root yield and total root yield in both planting. This research further presents a discussion of the relative participation of environmental and genetic effects in the phenotypic correlation.

  16. Det Ambiente

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Ulrik

    Det ambiente er iscenesættelsen af en karakteristisk sanseoplevelse, der er kendetegnet ved fornemmelsen af at være omgivet. I dag bliver begrebet om det ambiente mest anvendt i forbindelse med musikgenren ’ambient musik’. Det ambiente er dog ikke essentielt knyttet til det musikalske, men må...... forstås som et betydeligt bredere fænomen i den moderne æstetiske kultur, der spiller en væsentlig rolle i oplevelsen af moderne transportformer, arkitektur, film, lydkunst, installationskunst og digitale multimedieiscenesættelser. En forståelse af det ambiente er derfor centralt for forståelsen af en...... moderne æstetiseret oplevelseskultur i almindelighed. Da det ambiente ikke hidtil har været gjort til genstand for en mere indgående teoretisk behandling, er der dog stor usikkerhed omkring, hvad fænomenet overhovedet indebærer. Hovedformålet med Det ambiente – Sansning, medialisering, omgivelse er derfor...

  17. Time-of-flight camera via a single-pixel correlation image sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Tianyi; Chen, Qian; He, Weiji; Dai, Huidong; Ye, Ling; Gu, Guohua

    2018-04-01

    A time-of-flight imager based on single-pixel correlation image sensors is proposed for noise-free depth map acquisition in presence of ambient light. Digital micro-mirror device and time-modulated IR-laser provide spatial and temporal illumination on the unknown object. Compressed sensing and ‘four bucket principle’ method are combined to reconstruct the depth map from a sequence of measurements at a low sampling rate. Second-order correlation transform is also introduced to reduce the noise from the detector itself and direct ambient light. Computer simulations are presented to validate the computational models and improvement of reconstructions.

  18. Intelligent Noise Removal from EMG Signal Using Focused Time-Lagged Recurrent Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Kale

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromyography (EMG signals can be used for clinical/biomedical application and modern human computer interaction. EMG signals acquire noise while traveling through tissue, inherent noise in electronics equipment, ambient noise, and so forth. ANN approach is studied for reduction of noise in EMG signal. In this paper, it is shown that Focused Time-Lagged Recurrent Neural Network (FTLRNN can elegantly solve to reduce the noise from EMG signal. After rigorous computer simulations, authors developed an optimal FTLRNN model, which removes the noise from the EMG signal. Results show that the proposed optimal FTLRNN model has an MSE (Mean Square Error as low as 0.000067 and 0.000048, correlation coefficient as high as 0.99950 and 0.99939 for noise signal and EMG signal, respectively, when validated on the test dataset. It is also noticed that the output of the estimated FTLRNN model closely follows the real one. This network is indeed robust as EMG signal tolerates the noise variance from 0.1 to 0.4 for uniform noise and 0.30 for Gaussian noise. It is clear that the training of the network is independent of specific partitioning of dataset. It is seen that the performance of the proposed FTLRNN model clearly outperforms the best Multilayer perceptron (MLP and Radial Basis Function NN (RBF models. The simple NN model such as the FTLRNN with single-hidden layer can be employed to remove noise from EMG signal.

  19. Study of environmental noise in a BWR plant like the Nuclear Power Plant Laguna Verde; Estudio de ruido ambiental en una planta BWR como la Central Nuclear Laguna Verde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tijerina S, F.; Cruz G, M.; Amador C, C., E-mail: francisco.tijerina@cfe.gob.mx [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Subgerencia de Ingenieria, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km. 42.5, Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In all industry type the health costs generated by the noise are high, because the noise can cause nuisance and to harm the capacity to work when causing tension and to perturb the concentration, and in more severe cases to reach to lose the sense of the hearing in the long term. The noise levels in the industry have been designated for the different types of use like residential, commercial, and industrial and silence areas. The noise can cause accidents when obstructing the communications and alarm signs. For this reason the noise should be controlled and mitigated, at a low level as reasonably is possible, taking into account that the noise is an acoustic contamination. The present study determines a bases line of the environmental noise levels in a nuclear power plant BWR-5 as Laguna Verde, (like reference) to be able to determine and to give pursuit to the possible solutions to eliminate or to limit the noise level in the different job areas. The noise levels were registered with a meter of integrative noise level (sonometer) and areas of noise exposure levels mapping the general areas in the buildings were established, being the registered maximum level of 96.94 dba in the building of the Reactor-elevation 0.65 m under the operation conditions of Extended Power Up rate (EPU) of 120% PTN. Knowing that the exposition to noises and the noise dose in the job place can influence in the health and in the safety of the workers, are extensive topics that they should be analyzed for separate as they are: to) the effects in the health of the exposure to the noise, b) how measuring the noise, c) the methods and technologies to combat and to control the noise in the industry by part of engineering area and d) the function of the industrial safety bodies as delegates of the health and safety in the task against the noise in the job. (author)

  20. Noise-tolerance analysis for detection and reconstruction of absorbing inhomogeneities with diffuse optical tomography using single- and phase-correlated dual-source schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanmani, B; Vasu, R M

    2007-01-01

    An iterative reconstruction procedure is used to invert intensity data from both single- and phase-correlated dual-source illuminations for absorption inhomogeneities. The Jacobian for the dual source is constructed by an algebraic addition of the Jacobians estimated for the two sources separately. By numerical simulations, it is shown that the dual-source scheme performs superior to the single-source system in regard to (i) noise tolerance in data and (ii) ability to reconstruct smaller and lower contrast objects. The quality of reconstructions from single-source data, as indicated by mean-square error at convergence, is markedly poorer compared to their dual-source counterpart, when noise in data was in excess of 2%. With fixed contrast and decreasing inhomogeneity diameter, our simulations showed that, for diameters below 7 mm, the dual-source scheme has a higher percentage contrast recovery compared to the single-source scheme. Similarly, the dual-source scheme reconstructs to a higher percentage contrast recovery from lower contrast inhomogeneity, in comparison to the single-source scheme

  1. Anthropogenic noise pollution from pile-driving disrupts the structure and dynamics of fish shoals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert-Read, James E; Kremer, Louise; Bruintjes, Rick; Radford, Andrew N; Ioannou, Christos C

    2017-09-27

    Noise produced from a variety of human activities can affect the physiology and behaviour of individual animals, but whether noise disrupts the social behaviour of animals is largely unknown. Animal groups such as flocks of birds or shoals of fish use simple interaction rules to coordinate their movements with near neighbours. In turn, this coordination allows individuals to gain the benefits of group living such as reduced predation risk and social information exchange. Noise could change how individuals interact in groups if noise is perceived as a threat, or if it masked, distracted or stressed individuals, and this could have impacts on the benefits of grouping. Here, we recorded trajectories of individual juvenile seabass ( Dicentrarchus labrax ) in groups under controlled laboratory conditions. Groups were exposed to playbacks of either ambient background sound recorded in their natural habitat, or playbacks of pile-driving, commonly used in marine construction. The pile-driving playback affected the structure and dynamics of the fish shoals significantly more than the ambient-sound playback. Compared to the ambient-sound playback, groups experiencing the pile-driving playback became less cohesive, less directionally ordered, and were less correlated in speed and directional changes. In effect, the additional-noise treatment disrupted the abilities of individuals to coordinate their movements with one another. Our work highlights the potential for noise pollution from pile-driving to disrupt the collective dynamics of fish shoals, which could have implications for the functional benefits of a group's collective behaviour. © 2017 The Authors.

  2. Periodismo ambiental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Lemos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Los periodistas toman el tema del medio ambiente cada vez más en serio. El uso de temas relacionados con el medio ambiente, debe estar ligado al análisis socio-económico y a las posibilidades de comunicación y educación de diferentes regiones del mundo. A continuación se presenta un resumen de la situación ambiental, las acciones de prensa y comunicación que se llevan a cabo en América Central (Panamá, El Salvador, Costa Rica y en Sudamérica Brasil,Colombia, Chile, México, y Perú. Se concluye en la necesidad de formar hábitos ecológicos. Los comunicadores deben presentar soluciones a los problemas, fomentar campañas comunes, compartir información y velar por el ambiente ambiente para que las generaciones futuras no tengan que perecer.

  3. Noise Gating Solar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForest, Craig; Seaton, Daniel B.; Darnell, John A.

    2017-08-01

    I present and demonstrate a new, general purpose post-processing technique, "3D noise gating", that can reduce image noise by an order of magnitude or more without effective loss of spatial or temporal resolution in typical solar applications.Nearly all scientific images are, ultimately, limited by noise. Noise can be direct Poisson "shot noise" from photon counting effects, or introduced by other means such as detector read noise. Noise is typically represented as a random variable (perhaps with location- or image-dependent characteristics) that is sampled once per pixel or once per resolution element of an image sequence. Noise limits many aspects of image analysis, including photometry, spatiotemporal resolution, feature identification, morphology extraction, and background modeling and separation.Identifying and separating noise from image signal is difficult. The common practice of blurring in space and/or time works because most image "signal" is concentrated in the low Fourier components of an image, while noise is evenly distributed. Blurring in space and/or time attenuates the high spatial and temporal frequencies, reducing noise at the expense of also attenuating image detail. Noise-gating exploits the same property -- "coherence" -- that we use to identify features in images, to separate image features from noise.Processing image sequences through 3-D noise gating results in spectacular (more than 10x) improvements in signal-to-noise ratio, while not blurring bright, resolved features in either space or time. This improves most types of image analysis, including feature identification, time sequence extraction, absolute and relative photometry (including differential emission measure analysis), feature tracking, computer vision, correlation tracking, background modeling, cross-scale analysis, visual display/presentation, and image compression.I will introduce noise gating, describe the method, and show examples from several instruments (including SDO

  4. Nível de ruído no ambiente de trabalho do professor de educação física em aulas de ciclismo indoor Nivel de ruido en el ambiente de trabajo del profesor de educación física en aulas de ciclismo indoor Level of noise at the workplace environment among physical education teachers in indoor bike classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Palma

    2009-04-01

    presión fue medido en dB(A en el nivel equivalente de energía en diferentes puntos de la sala y momentos de la clase. Los análisis estadísticos utilizados fueron el ANOVA, el chi-cuadrado y la correlación de Pearson. RESULTADOS: Los niveles de presión sonora variaron entre 74,4 dB(A y 101,6 dB(A. Los valores promedios encontrados durante las aulas fueron: a Calentamiento (promedio= 88,45 dB(A; b Parte principal (promedio= 95,86 dB(A; y, encierre (promedio= 85,12 dB(A. El ruido de fondo presentó el valor promedio de 66,89 dB(A. Hubo diferencias significativas (pOBJECTIVE:To analyze the level of noise at the workplace environment among Physical Education teachers during indoor bike classes and its association with some aspects of health. METHODS: Cross-sectional study carried out in 15 different gyms with 15 teachers in Rio de Janeiro (Southeastern Brazil in 2007. A standardized questionnaire, tested in relation to its replication, was used in order to find out the characteristics of the process and the way this job is organized, as well as complaints related to health reported by these teachers. The SRQ-20 (Self-Report Questionnaire was utilized in order to verify the existence of minor psychiatric disturbances. The levels of sound pressure were measured by a portable appliance. The level of pressure was verified in dB(A at equivalent energy levels (Leq in different places of the room at different moments during the class. ANOVA, chi-square and Pearson's correlation analyses were performed. RESULTS: The levels of sound pressure varied from 74.4 dB(A to 101.6 dB(A. The results during the class were: a warm-up (mean=88.45 dB(A; b main part (mean= 95.86 dB(A; and, closure (mean= 85.12 dB(A. The mean background noise was 66.89 dB(A. There were significant differences (p<0.001 among the background noise levels within different moments of the class. The noise was not related to minor psychiatric disturbances. CONCLUSIONS: Physical education professionals working with

  5. On the attenuation of the ambient seismic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weemstra, C.

    2013-01-01

    Although myriad applications exploiting the ambient seismic field have been reported to date, comparatively little attention has been paid to its potential to resolve subsurface attenuation. The ambient seismic field, however, may ultimately prove itself an invaluable asset in constraining subsurface attenuation structure. Especially areas with dense seismometer coverage hold great potential. Moreover, since this coverage continues to grow, significant developments may await in the future. Subsurface structure in terms of attenuation is of great importance for many reasons. For example, knowledge of the attenuation structure may aid in predicting ground motions caused by future large earthquakes. From a scientific perspective, a great deal of new information may be extracted, potentially fostering research in related fields (e.g., geodynamics, hydrology). Both from an environmental and economic point of view, inversion of the ambient seismic wavefield for attenuation structure may in the future provide a means to image hydrocarbon reservoirs. In sufficiently diffuse wavefields, simple cross-correlation of long noise time series recorded by two receivers results in the response at one of the receivers as if there was a source at the position of the other. I present a case study that shows that thus retrieved surface waves can be used to recover attenuation beneath an array of ocean-bottom seismometers. Given the small aperture of the seismic survey, this is unprecedented. Unambiguous interpretation of recovered attenuation values is of major importance. Lack of understanding of the effect that preprocessing has on the amplitude of the noise cross-correlation prevents such unambiguous interpretation. I carefully examine the effect spectral whitening has on the noise cross-correlation. Emphasis is given to the dependence of the amplitudes on the length of the time windows employed in the cross-correlation procedure. Short time-window lengths may require an additional

  6. Identification and measurement of combustion noise from a turbofan engine using correlation and coherence techniques. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karchmer, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    Fluctuating pressure measurements within the combustor and tailpipe of a turbofan engine are made simultaneously with far field acoustic measurements. The pressure measurements within the engine are accomplished with cooled semi-infinite waveguide probes utilizing conventional condenser microphones as the transducers. The measurements are taken over a broad range of engine operating conditions and for 16 far field microphone positions between 10 deg and 160 deg relative to the engine inlet axis. Correlation and coherence techniques are used to determine the relative phase and amplitude relationships between the internal pressures and far field acoustic pressures. The results indicate that the combustor is a low frequency source region for acoustic propagation through the tailpipe and out to the far field. Specifically, it is found that the relation between source pressure and the resulting sound pressure involves a 180 deg phase shift. The latter result is obtained by Fourier transforming the cross correlation function between the source pressure and acoustic pressure after removing the propagation delay time. Further, it is found that the transfer function between the source pressure and acoustic pressure has a magnitude approximately proportional to frequency squared. These results are shown to be consistent with a model using a modified source term in Lighthill's turbulence stress tensor, wherein the fluctuating Reynolds stresses are replaced with the pressure fluctuations due to fluctuating entropy.

  7. Analysis of residuals from enzyme kinetic and protein folding experiments in the presence of correlated experimental noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmic, Petr; Lorenz, Thorsten; Reinstein, Jochen

    2009-12-01

    Experimental data from continuous enzyme assays or protein folding experiments often contain hundreds, or even thousands, of densely spaced data points. When the sampling interval is extremely short, the experimental data points might not be statistically independent. The resulting neighborhood correlation invalidates important theoretical assumptions of nonlinear regression analysis. As a consequence, certain goodness-of-fit criteria, such as the runs-of-signs test and the autocorrelation function, might indicate a systematic lack of fit even if the experiment does agree very well with the underlying theoretical model. A solution to this problem is to analyze only a subset of the residuals of fit, such that any excessive neighborhood correlation is eliminated. Substrate kinetics of the HIV protease and the unfolding kinetics of UMP/CMP kinase, a globular protein from Dictyostelium discoideum, serve as two illustrative examples. A suitable data-reduction algorithm has been incorporated into software DYNAFIT [P. Kuzmic, Anal. Biochem. 237 (1996) 260-273], freely available to all academic researchers from http://www.biokin.com.

  8. Characterization of an Outdoor Ambient Radio Frequency Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-16

    TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Test Operations Procedure (TOP) 06-2-595 Characterization of an Outdoor Ambient ...DTIC), AD No.: 14. ABSTRACT This TOP provides procedures to characterize an ambient radio frequency (RF) environment (sometimes referred to as...spectrum analyzer, ambient RF noise floor, RF interference 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18

  9. Noise Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us Share Clean Air Act Title IV - Noise Pollution The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments added a ... abatement 7642 Authorization of appropriations What is Noise Pollution? The traditional definition of noise is “unwanted or ...

  10. Relationship between the field local quadrature and the quantum discord of a photon-added correlated channel under the influence of scattering and phase fluctuation noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Serna, Francisco A.; Mendieta-Jimenez, Francisco J.; Rojas, Fernando

    2017-10-01

    We study quantum correlations and discord in a bipartite continuous variable hybrid system formed by linear combinations of coherent states {|{α }\\rangle } and single photon-added coherent states of the form {|{ψ }\\rangle }_{ {dp(pa)}}= N/√{2} (\\hat{a}^\\dagger {|{α }\\rangle }_a{|{α }\\rangle }_b ± \\hat{b}^\\dagger {|{α }\\rangle }_a{|{α }\\rangle }_b). We stablish a relationship between the quantum discord with a local observable (the quadrature variance for one subsystem) under the influence of scattering and phase fluctuation noise. For the pure states the quantum correlations are characterized by means of measurement induced disturbance (MID) with simultaneous quadrature measurements. In a scenario where homodyne conditional measurements are available we show that the MID provides an easy way to select optimal phases to obtain information of the maximal correlations in the channels. The quantum correlations of these entangled states with channel losses are quantitatively characterized with the quantum discord (QD) with a displaced qubit projector. We observe that as scattering increases, QD decreases monotonically. At the same time for the state {|{ψ }\\rangle }_{ {dp}}, QD is more resistant to high phase fluctuations when the average photon number n_0 is bigger than zero, but if phase fluctuations are low, QD is more resistant if n_0=0. For the dp model with scattering, we obtain an analytical expression of the QD as a function of the observable quadrature variance in a local subsystem. This relation allows us to have a way to obtain the degree of QD in the channel by just measuring a local property observable such as the quadrature variance. For the other model this relation still exists but is explored numerically. This relation is an important result that allows to identify quantum processing capabilities in terms of just local observables.

  11. Pileup noise behavior and corrections in the ATLAS EMCal

    CERN Document Server

    Seneca, Jordan Anders Leo

    2017-01-01

    In this note, the pile-up influence on the energy resolution of the ATLAS LAr EMCal expected until the end of run 2 is explored, with the supercluster algorithm. The pile-up noise is extracted for various η-regions and electron energies, and found to match the expected behavior. An attempt is then made at improving the energy resolution using the ambient energy density and pileup tracks using two methods for finding correlations. The corrections yield no significant improvement to the energy resolution due to small correlations.

  12. Robust corrections for topographically-correlated atmospheric noise in InSAR data from large deforming regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekaert, David; Walters, Richard; Hooper, Andrew; Wright, Tim; Parker, Doug

    2014-05-01

    For Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) the atmosphere forms one of the biggest challenges when it comes to the extraction of small-magnitude long-wavelength tectonic signals. Spatio-temporal variation of water vapour, pressure and temperature in the troposphere is the main cause of these signals, introducing apparent differential path delays in interferograms of up to 15 cm. Several correction techniques have been applied in the past that rely on external data from weather models, GPS or spectrometer data, but these are typically limited by the lower spatial resolution of the auxiliary data. Alternatively, time-series InSAR techniques and filtering of the interferometric phase in space and time can be applied, but separating atmospheric delays from non-linear deformation is challenging. Another method, which can be applied to individual interferograms, is to estimate the correlation between interferometric phase and topography, either in a non-deforming area or using a frequency band insensitive to deformation. While this method can be successful for small areas, it does not account for spatial variation of atmospheric properties, which can be significant across regions larger than 100 km. While the slope relating phase and topography can be reliably estimated for subregions, the intercept cannot, as it is biased by the presence of unrelated signals. The intercept cannot however be neglected, as the mean height of each subregion typically varies, leading to a different intercept for each window. Here we present a new power-law representation of the topographically-correlated phase delay that can be applied locally and which is able to account for these spatial variations in atmospheric properties. We estimate the power-law from sounding data to fit altitudes of up to 4 km, as this includes the topography range in most regions of interest. We also constrain the power-law by specifying the height above which the relative tropospheric delays are

  13. Adaptive noise cancellation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akram, N.

    1999-01-01

    In this report we describe the concept of adaptive noise canceling, an alternative method of estimating signals corrupted by additive noise of interference. The method uses 'primary' input containing the corrupted signal and a 'reference' input containing noise correlated in some unknown way with the primary noise, the reference input is adaptively filtered and subtracted from the primary input to obtain the signal estimate. Adaptive filtering before subtraction allows the treatment of inputs that are deterministic or stochastic, stationary or time variable. When the reference input is free of signal and certain other conditions are met then noise in the primary input can be essentially eliminated without signal distortion. It is further shown that the adaptive filter also acts as notch filter. Simulated results illustrate the usefulness of the adaptive noise canceling technique. (author)

  14. Combustion noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahle, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A review of the subject of combustion generated noise is presented. Combustion noise is an important noise source in industrial furnaces and process heaters, turbopropulsion and gas turbine systems, flaring operations, Diesel engines, and rocket engines. The state-of-the-art in combustion noise importance, understanding, prediction and scaling is presented for these systems. The fundamentals and available theories of combustion noise are given. Controversies in the field are discussed and recommendations for future research are made.

  15. Using optical fibers with different modes to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of diffuse correlation spectroscopy flow-oximeter measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lian; Lin, Yu; Shang, Yu; Shelton, Brent J.; Yu, Guoqiang

    2013-03-01

    The dual-wavelength diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) flow-oximeter is an emerging technique enabling simultaneous measurements of blood flow and blood oxygenation changes in deep tissues. High signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is crucial when applying DCS technologies in the study of human tissues where the detected signals are usually very weak. In this study, single-mode, few-mode, and multimode fibers are compared to explore the possibility of improving the SNR of DCS flow-oximeter measurements. Experiments on liquid phantom solutions and in vivo muscle tissues show only slight improvements in flow measurements when using the few-mode fiber compared with using the single-mode fiber. However, light intensities detected by the few-mode and multimode fibers are increased, leading to significant SNR improvements in detections of phantom optical property and tissue blood oxygenation. The outcomes from this study provide useful guidance for the selection of optical fibers to improve DCS flow-oximeter measurements.

  16. CNOSSOS-EU: Development of a common environmental noise assessment method in the European Union; CNOSSOS-EU: desarrollo de un metodo comun de evaluacion del ruido ambiental en la Union Europea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aspuru Soloaga, I.; Segues Echazarreta Segues, F.

    2011-07-01

    This article presents the main aspects of the work undertaken in the development of the common european method of environmental noise assessment CNOSSOS-EU. It summarizes the design, structure and content, and the methodological basis on which it is based. Taking into account the experience gained in the first round of strategic noise mapping, some conclusions are settled about its applications for the third round, and tits implications for the Spanish case. (Author) 9 refs.

  17. THE ACOUSTIC CONTAMINATION OF SCHOOL ENVIRONMENT DUE TO URBAN NOISES IN THE FEDERAL DISTRICT, BRASIL = A CONTAMINAÇÃO ACÚSTICA DE AMBIENTES ESCOLARES DEVIDO AOS RUÍDOS URBANOS NO DISTRITO FEDERAL, BRASIL

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandre Eniz; Sérgio Luiz Garavelli

    2006-01-01

    Urban noises are more and more presents in our daily life, invading residences, work places, leisure locations, hospitals and schools, becoming a potential harm to social interaction, communication, behavior, school performance, health etc. The main objective of this work was to analyze and quantify the environmental noise in ten schools of the basic education in District Federal, Brazil. The adopted parameter was the equivalent sound pressure level Leq (A), which was evaluated according to t...

  18. Controlled Noise Seismology

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2015-08-19

    We use controlled noise seismology (CNS) to generate surface waves, where we continuously record seismic data while generating artificial noise along the profile line. To generate the CNS data we drove a vehicle around the geophone line and continuously recorded the generated noise. The recorded data set is then correlated over different time windows and the correlograms are stacked together to generate the surface waves. The virtual shot gathers reveal surface waves with moveout velocities that closely approximate those from active source shot gathers.

  19. Noise-Reduction Circuit For Imaging Photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Luis J.; Pain, Bedabrata; Staller, Craig; Hickok, Roger W.

    1995-01-01

    Developmental correlated-triple-sampling circuit suppresses capacitor reset noise and attenuates low frequency noise in integrated-and-sampled circuits of multiplexed photodiode arrays. Noise reduction circuit part of Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) instrument to fly aboard Cassini spacecraft to explore Saturn and its moons. Modified versions of circuit also useful for reducing noise in terrestrial photosensor instruments.

  20. Minimizing noise-temperature measurement errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzried, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of noise-temperature measurement errors of low-noise amplifiers was performed. Results of this analysis can be used to optimize measurement schemes for minimum errors. For the cases evaluated, the effective noise temperature (Te) of a Ka-band maser can be measured most accurately by switching between an ambient and a 2-K cooled load without an isolation attenuator. A measurement accuracy of 0.3 K was obtained for this example.

  1. High level white noise generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borkowski, C.J.; Blalock, T.V.

    1979-01-01

    A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application

  2. High level white noise generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Casimer J.; Blalock, Theron V.

    1979-01-01

    A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application.

  3. Road traffic noise: self-reported noise annoyance versus GIS modelled road traffic noise exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birk, Matthias; Ivina, Olga; von Klot, Stephanie; Babisch, Wolfgang; Heinrich, Joachim

    2011-11-01

    self-reported road traffic noise annoyance is commonly used in epidemiological studies for assessment of potential health effects. Alternatively, some studies have used geographic information system (GIS) modelled exposure to road traffic noise as an objective parameter. The aim of this study was to analyse the association between noise exposure due to neighbouring road traffic and the noise annoyance of adults, taking other determinants into consideration. parents of 951 Munich children from the two German birth cohorts GINIplus and LISAplus reported their annoyance due to road traffic noise at home. GIS modelled road traffic noise exposure (L(den), maximum within a 50 m buffer) from the noise map of the city of Munich was available for all families. GIS-based calculated distance to the closest major road (≥10,000 vehicles per day) and questionnaire based-information about family income, parental education and the type of the street of residence were explored for their potential influence. An ordered logit regression model was applied. The noise levels (L(den)) and the reported noise annoyance were compared with an established exposure-response function. the correlation between noise annoyance and noise exposure (L(den)) was fair (Spearman correlation r(s) = 0.37). The distance to a major road and the type of street were strong predictors for the noise annoyance. The annoyance modelled by the established exposure-response function and that estimated by the ordered logit model were moderately associated (Pearson's correlation r(p) = 0.50). road traffic noise annoyance was associated with GIS modelled neighbouring road traffic noise exposure (L(den)). The distance to a major road and the type of street were additional explanatory factors of the noise annoyance appraisal.

  4. Noise Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Environmental Health Systems puts forth an increasing effort in the U.S. to develop ways of controlling noise, particularly in industrial environments due to Federal and State laws, labor union insistence and new findings relative to noise pollution impact on human health. NASA's Apollo guidance control system aided in the development of a noise protection product, SMART. The basis of all SMART products is SMART compound a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy/sound absorbing qualities. The basic compound was later refined for noise protection use.

  5. Inhibitory noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Destexhe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cortical neurons in vivo may operate in high-conductance states, in which the major part of the neuron's input conductance is due to synaptic activity, sometimes several-fold larger than the resting conductance. We examine here the contribution of inhibition in such high-conductance states. At the level of the absolute conductance values, several studies have shown that cortical neurons in vivo are characterized by strong inhibitory conductances. However, conductances are balanced and spiking activity is mostly determined by fluctuations, but not much is known about excitatory and inhibitory contributions to these fluctuations. Models and dynamic-clamp experiments show that, during high-conductance states, spikes are mainly determined by fluctuations of inhibition, or by inhibitory noise. This stands in contrast to low-conductance states, in which excitatory conductances determine spiking activity. To determine these contributions from experimental data, maximum likelihood methods can be designed and applied to intracellular recordings in vivo. Such methods indicate that action potentials are indeed mostly correlated with inhibitory fluctuations in awake animals. These results argue for a determinant role for inhibitory fluctuations in evoking spikes, and do not support feed-forward modes of processing, for which opposite patterns are predicted.

  6. Ambient environment in the coal mining complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, V.K.

    1998-01-01

    Environment is all pervading and therefore associated with all individuals. The ambient environment with respect to any activity lies a little outside and the receiving body outside the active zone denotes ambient environment. Basically, air quality and noise level are two physical ingredients whose assessment gives an idea of impact on the ambience. Though largely blamed for polluted conditions, the general ambient conditions in the coal fields do not show a tardy image. Being a low level dispersion industry, its impact remains concentrated in the active core zone. This has been brought out here. The paper presents the status of air quality, and noise level in some coal fields in India. It also discloses a brighter future and sustainable development due to increased concern for environment. (author)

  7. An inexpensive sensor for noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Laura; Tatum, Marcus; Thomas, Geb; Sousan, Sinan; Koehler, Kirsten; Peters, Thomas

    2018-02-08

    Noise is a pervasive workplace hazard that varies spatially and temporally. The cost of direct-reading instruments for noise hampers their use in a network. The objectives for this work were to (1) develop an inexpensive noise sensor (noise sensors for use in an inexpensive sensor network. The inexpensive noise sensor consists of an electret condenser microphone, an amplifier circuit, and a microcontroller with a small form factor (28 mm by 47 mm by 9 mm) than can be operated as a stand-alone unit. Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate 50 of the new sensors at 5 sound levels: (1) ambient sound in a quiet office; (2) a pink noise test signal from 65 to 85 dBA in 10 dBA increments; and (3) 94 dBA using a SLM calibrator. Ninety-four percent of the noise sensors (n = 46) were within ± 2 dBA of the SLM for sound levels from 65 dBA to 94 dBA. As sound level increased, bias decreased, ranging from 18.3% in the quiet office to 0.48% at 94 dBA. Overall bias of the sensors was 0.83% across the 75 dBA to 94 dBA range. These sensors are available for a variety of uses and can be customized for many applications, including incorporation into a stationary sensor network for continuous monitoring of noise in manufacturing environments.

  8. Environmental Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumberg, Martin

    Environmental noise may be defined as unwanted sound that is caused by emissions from traffic (roads, air traffic corridors, and railways), industrial sites and recreational infrastructures, which may cause both annoyance and damage to health. Noise in the environment or community seriously affects people, interfering with daily activities at school, work and home and during leisure time.

  9. Identification of modal parameters from nonstationary ambient vibration data using the channel-expansion technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, Dar Yun; Lin, Chang Sheng

    2011-01-01

    The identification of modal parameters from the response data only is studied for structural systems under nonstationary ambient vibration. In a previous paper by the authors, the modal parameters of a system were identified using the correlation method in conjunction with the curve-fitting technique. This was done by working within the assumption that the ambient excitation is a nonstationary white noise in the form of a product model. In the present paper, the Ibrahim time-domain method (ITD) is extended for modal-parameter identification from the nonstationary ambient response data without any additional treatment of converting the original data into the form of free vibration. The ambient responses corresponding to various nonstationary inputs can be approximately expressed as a sum of exponential functions. In effect, the ITD method can be used in conjunction with the channel-expansion technique to identify the major modes of a structural system. To distinguish the structural modes from the non-structural modes, the concept of mode -shape coherence and confidence factor is employed. Numerical simulations, including one example of using the practical excitation data, confirm the validity and robustness of the proposed method for identification of modal parameters from the nonstationary ambient response

  10. Intermittent Noise Induces Physiological Stress in a Coastal Marine Fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tye A Nichols

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic noise in the ocean has increased substantially in recent decades, and motorized vessels produce what is likely the most common form of underwater noise pollution. Noise has the potential to induce physiological stress in marine fishes, which may have negative ecological consequences. In this study, physiological effects of increased noise (playback of boat noise recorded in the field on a coastal marine fish (the giant kelpfish, Heterostichus rostratus were investigated by measuring the stress responses (cortisol concentration of fish to increased noise of various temporal dynamics and noise levels. Giant kelpfish exhibited acute stress responses when exposed to intermittent noise, but not to continuous noise or control conditions (playback of recorded natural ambient sound. These results suggest that variability in the acoustic environment may be more important than the period of noise exposure for inducing stress in a marine fish, and provide information regarding noise levels at which physiological responses occur.

  11. Intermittent Noise Induces Physiological Stress in a Coastal Marine Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Tye A; Anderson, Todd W; Širović, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise in the ocean has increased substantially in recent decades, and motorized vessels produce what is likely the most common form of underwater noise pollution. Noise has the potential to induce physiological stress in marine fishes, which may have negative ecological consequences. In this study, physiological effects of increased noise (playback of boat noise recorded in the field) on a coastal marine fish (the giant kelpfish, Heterostichus rostratus) were investigated by measuring the stress responses (cortisol concentration) of fish to increased noise of various temporal dynamics and noise levels. Giant kelpfish exhibited acute stress responses when exposed to intermittent noise, but not to continuous noise or control conditions (playback of recorded natural ambient sound). These results suggest that variability in the acoustic environment may be more important than the period of noise exposure for inducing stress in a marine fish, and provide information regarding noise levels at which physiological responses occur.

  12. Correlation of rectal temperature and peripheral temperature from implantable radio-frequency microchips in Holstein steers challenged with lipopolysaccharide under thermoneutral and high ambient temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, E D; Fried, K; Velasco, J M; Dahl, G E

    2012-12-01

    Early detection of disease can speed treatment, slow spread of disease in a herd, and improve health status of animals. Immune stimulation increases rectal temperature (RT). Injectable radio-frequency implants (RFI) can provide temperature at the site of implantation. The fidelity of peripheral site temperature, determined by RFI, relative to RT is unknown in cattle. We hypothesized that during lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge, temperature at 3 peripheral sites would be similar to RT in steers (n = 4; BW 77 ± 2.1 kg). The 3 sites were 1) subcutaneous (SC) at the base of the ear (ET); 2) SC posterior to the poll (PT); and 3) SC beneath the umbilical fold (UT). Steers were housed in controlled temperature (CT) rooms (between 18 and 21°C; n = 2/room). Rectal temperature, ET, PT, and UT were recorded every 8 h daily. On d 7, 21, 22, 36, and 37, RT and RFI were taken every 5 min for 6 h, every 15 min for 3 h, and every 30 min for 15 h. To test RFI during a simulated immune challenge, LPS (E. coli 055:B5) was injected intravenously (i.v.) at 1000 h on d 22 and 37. Basal temperatures (°C) were RT (38.7 ± 0.20), ET (37.1 ± 0.86), PT (36.7 ± 0.57), and UT (36.3 ± 0.97). Rectal temperature increased to 39.9 ± 0.30°C after LPS, but ET, PT, and UT decreased. Heat stress also increases RT, which makes it difficult to identify sick animals using RT. The second hypothesis tested was that ET positively correlates to RT and negatively correlates to RT during LPS under heat stress. Four steers (127 ± 7.3 kg) were housed in CT chambers (n = 2/chamber), implanted with a RFI, and allowed 2 wk to acclimate. One chamber remained at 20°C, the other was increased to 34°C starting at 0800 h for a period of 48 h. The LPS was administered i.v. to all steers at 1000 h on d 2. After a 2-wk recovery at 20°C, the temperature was increased in the other chamber, resulting in a crossover design with each steer serving as its own control. Pearson's correlation coefficients for ET and

  13. Effect of de-correlating turbulence on the low frequency decay of jet-surface interaction noise in sub-sonic unheated air jets using a CFD-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, M. Z.; Leib, S. J.; Bozak, R. F.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we extend the Rapid-distortion theory (RDT)-based model derived by Goldstein, Afsar & Leib (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 736, pp. 532-569, 2013) for the sound generated by the interaction of a large-aspect-ratio rectangular jet with the trailing edge of a flat plate to include a more realistic upstream turbulence spectrum that possess a de-correlation (i.e. negative dip) in its space-time structure and use results from three-dimensional Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solutions to determine the mean flow, turbulent kinetic energy and turbulence length & time scales. Since the interaction noise dominates the low-frequency portion of the spectrum, we use an appropriate asymptotic approximation for the Rayleigh equation Green's function, which enters the analysis, based on a two-dimensional mean flow representation for the jet. We use the model to predict jet-surface interaction noise for a range of subsonic acoustic Mach number jets, nozzle aspect ratios, streamwise and transverse trailing-edge locations and compare them with experimental data. The RANS meanflow computations are also compared with flow data for selected cases to assess their validity. We find that finite de-correlation in the turbulence spectrum increases the low-frequency algebraic decay (the low-frequency "roll-off") of the acoustic spectrum with angular frequency to give a model that has a pure dipole frequency scaling. This gives better agreement with noise data compared to Goldstein et al. (2013) for Strouhal numbers less than the peak jet-surface interaction noise. For example, through sensitivity analysis we find that there is a difference of 10 dB at the lowest frequency for which data exists (relative to a model without de-correlation effects included) for the highest acoustic Mach number case. Secondly, our results for the planar flow theory provide a first estimate of the low-frequency amplification due to the jet-surface interaction for moderate aspect ratio nozzles when RANS

  14. The Relationship between Vessel Traffic and Noise Levels Received by Killer Whales (Orcinus orca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Juliana; Holt, Marla M; Giles, Deborah A; Hanson, M Bradley; Emmons, Candice K; Hogan, Jeffrey T; Branch, Trevor A; VanBlaricom, Glenn R

    2015-01-01

    Whale watching has become increasingly popular as an ecotourism activity around the globe and is beneficial for environmental education and local economies. Southern Resident killer whales (Orcinus orca) comprise an endangered population that is frequently observed by a large whale watching fleet in the inland waters of Washington state and British Columbia. One of the factors identified as a risk to recovery for the population is the effect of vessels and associated noise. An examination of the effects of vessels and associated noise on whale behavior utilized novel equipment to address limitations of previous studies. Digital acoustic recording tags (DTAGs) measured the noise levels the tagged whales received while laser positioning systems allowed collection of geo-referenced data for tagged whales and all vessels within 1000 m of the tagged whale. The objective of the current study was to compare vessel data and DTAG recordings to relate vessel traffic to the ambient noise received by tagged whales. Two analyses were conducted, one including all recording intervals, and one that excluded intervals when only the research vessel was present. For all data, significant predictors of noise levels were length (inverse relationship), number of propellers, and vessel speed, but only 15% of the variation in noise was explained by this model. When research-vessel-only intervals were excluded, vessel speed was the only significant predictor of noise levels, and explained 42% of the variation. Simple linear regressions (ignoring covariates) found that average vessel speed and number of propellers were the only significant correlates with noise levels. We conclude that vessel speed is the most important predictor of noise levels received by whales in this study. Thus, measures that reduce vessel speed in the vicinity of killer whales would reduce noise exposure in this population.

  15. The relationship between vessel traffic and noise levels received by killer whales (Orcinus orca)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Juliana; Holt, Marla M.; Giles, Deborah A.; Hanson, M. Bradley; Emmons, Candice K.; Hogan, Jeffrey T.; Branch, Trevor A.; VanBlaricom, Glenn R.

    2015-01-01

    Whale watching has become increasingly popular as an ecotourism activity around the globe and is beneficial for environmental education and local economies. Southern Resident killer whales (Orcinus orca) comprise an endangered population that is frequently observed by a large whale watching fleet in the inland waters of Washington state and British Columbia. One of the factors identified as a risk to recovery for the population is the effect of vessels and associated noise. An examination of the effects of vessels and associated noise on whale behavior utilized novel equipment to address limitations of previous studies. Digital acoustic recording tags (DTAGs) measured the noise levels the tagged whales received while laser positioning systems allowed collection of geo-referenced data for tagged whales and all vessels within 1000 m of the tagged whale. The objective of the current study was to compare vessel data and DTAG recordings to relate vessel traffic to the ambient noise received by tagged whales. Two analyses were conducted, one including all recording intervals, and one that excluded intervals when only the research vessel was present. For all data, significant predictors of noise levels were length (inverse relationship), number of propellers, and vessel speed, but only 15% of the variation in noise was explained by this model. When research-vessel-only intervals were excluded, vessel speed was the only significant predictor of noise levels, and explained 42% of the variation. Simple linear regressions (ignoring covariates) found that average vessel speed and number of propellers were the only significant correlates with noise levels. We conclude that vessel speed is the most important predictor of noise levels received by whales in this study. Thus, measures that reduce vessel speed in the vicinity of killer whales would reduce noise exposure in this population.

  16. The Relationship between Vessel Traffic and Noise Levels Received by Killer Whales (Orcinus orca.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Houghton

    Full Text Available Whale watching has become increasingly popular as an ecotourism activity around the globe and is beneficial for environmental education and local economies. Southern Resident killer whales (Orcinus orca comprise an endangered population that is frequently observed by a large whale watching fleet in the inland waters of Washington state and British Columbia. One of the factors identified as a risk to recovery for the population is the effect of vessels and associated noise. An examination of the effects of vessels and associated noise on whale behavior utilized novel equipment to address limitations of previous studies. Digital acoustic recording tags (DTAGs measured the noise levels the tagged whales received while laser positioning systems allowed collection of geo-referenced data for tagged whales and all vessels within 1000 m of the tagged whale. The objective of the current study was to compare vessel data and DTAG recordings to relate vessel traffic to the ambient noise received by tagged whales. Two analyses were conducted, one including all recording intervals, and one that excluded intervals when only the research vessel was present. For all data, significant predictors of noise levels were length (inverse relationship, number of propellers, and vessel speed, but only 15% of the variation in noise was explained by this model. When research-vessel-only intervals were excluded, vessel speed was the only significant predictor of noise levels, and explained 42% of the variation. Simple linear regressions (ignoring covariates found that average vessel speed and number of propellers were the only significant correlates with noise levels. We conclude that vessel speed is the most important predictor of noise levels received by whales in this study. Thus, measures that reduce vessel speed in the vicinity of killer whales would reduce noise exposure in this population.

  17. Uso de ardósia na construção de celas de maternidade para suínos: II - ambiente térmico e avaliação dos ruídos Use of slate to built swine nursery cells: II - thermal environment and noise evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline de O. Castro

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve o objetivo de avaliar o ambiente térmico e o ruído em celas de maternidade para suínos com divisórias de alvenaria ou com rochas de ardósia. Para as medidas das variáveis de conforto térmico e de ruídos, utilizaram-se de termômetros e decibelímetro. No interior das celas e para a análise estatística, foram usados doze matrizes e cento e trinta e nove leitões, distribuídos em delineamento em blocos casualizados, em esquema de parcelas subdivididas. Os resultados mostraram que, no período da manhã, em ambos os tratamentos, as condições de conforto térmico foram mais adequadas para as matrizes, enquanto no período da tarde, mais adequadas para os leitões; com relação ao ruído, este foi menor nas celas de alvenaria. De forma geral, o ambiente no interior das celas construídas em ardósia apresentou umidade relativa mais baixa, e ITGU e temperatura mais elevada que as celas construídas em alvenaria. O nível de ruídos permaneceu dentro dos limites considerados ideais para suínos em ambos os tratamentos.The aim of the present study was to evaluate the thermal environment and noise levels in swine farrowing cells built with masonry or slate. Thermometers and sound level meter equipment were used to measure the thermal comfort variables. Inside the cells and for the statistical analysis, twelve sows and one hundred thirty-nine piglets were used, distributed in a randomized blocks design in a split-plot arrangement. The results showed that in the morning, in both treatments, the thermal comfort conditions were more suitable for sows, while in the afternoon it was more suitable for piglets. The noise was lower in the masonry cells. Overall, the environment inside in the cells built with slate presented lower relative humidity and, higher BGHI and temperature than those built with masonry. The noise level remained within the thresholds considered as ideal for swine in both treatments.

  18. Impact of noise on hearing amongst commercial motor bike riders in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ambient noise level and noise-induced hearing impairment (NIHI) in 200 motorbike riders from six motorbike parks were evaluated. All were males aged between 20- 62 years. Subjects were sampled using a cluster sampling technique. Parameters measured were environmental noise using the noise meter (peters) ...

  19. Method for measuring self-noise of vector hydrophones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Chen, Hongjuan

    2017-09-01

    The Vector Hydrophone (VH) is widely used to remotely detect underwater targets. Accurately measuring the self-noise of the VH provides an important basis for evaluating the performance of the detection system in which it is utilized, since the ability to acquire weak signals is determined by the VH self-noise level. To accurately measure the VH self-noise level in actual working conditions, the Dual-channel Transfer Function Method (DTFM) is proposed to reduce ambient background noise interference. In this paper, the underlying principles of DTFM in reducing ambient background noise is analyzed. The numerical simulations to determine the influence of ambient background noise, and the sensitivity difference of the two VHs on the measurement results are studied. The results of measuring the VH self-noise level in a small laboratory water tank by using DTMF indicate that ambient background noise interference can be reduced effectively by employing DTMF, more accurate self-noise level can be obtained as well. The DTMF provides an effective method for accurately measuring the self-noise level of VHs and also provides technical support for the practical application of the VH in underwater acoustics.

  20. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss - A Preventable Disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Thomas W.; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia H.; Stokholm, Zara A.

    2017-01-01

    statistically significant among baseline participants with first exposure before the 1980s (odds ratio: 1.90, 95% CI: 1.11; 3.22). CONCLUSIONS: We observed declining industrial noise levels, increased use of HPD and no significant impact on hearing thresholds from current ambient industrial noise levels, which...... insignificant, inverse association between higher ambient cumulative noise exposure and poorer hearing (-0.10 dB hearing threshold shift per dB-year (95% confidence interval (CI): -0.36; 0.16)). The risk of hearing loss seemed to increase with earlier first year of noise exposure, but odds ratios were only...

  1. Adaptive Suppression of Noise in Voice Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozel, David; DeVault, James A.; Birr, Richard B.

    2003-01-01

    A subsystem for the adaptive suppression of noise in a voice communication system effects a high level of reduction of noise that enters the system through microphones. The subsystem includes a digital signal processor (DSP) plus circuitry that implements voice-recognition and spectral- manipulation techniques. The development of the adaptive noise-suppression subsystem was prompted by the following considerations: During processing of the space shuttle at Kennedy Space Center, voice communications among test team members have been significantly impaired in several instances because some test participants have had to communicate from locations with high ambient noise levels. Ear protection for the personnel involved is commercially available and is used in such situations. However, commercially available noise-canceling microphones do not provide sufficient reduction of noise that enters through microphones and thus becomes transmitted on outbound communication links.

  2. Seismic Interferometry Using Persistent Noise Sources for Temporal Subsurface Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dales, Philippe; Audet, Pascal; Olivier, Gerrit

    2017-11-01

    In passive source seismology, seismic interferometry typically refers to the cross correlation of ambient noise to construct an estimate of the Green's function between sensors. The presence of persistent natural and/or anthropogenic sources can bias or prevent the retrieval of these estimated Green's functions. Here we show how these strong persistent sources can be used to measure small changes in the medium between a source and either (or both) source-sensor pairs. The method relies on localizing the sources and using this information to identify and select cross-correlation functions for each source of interest. We illustrate this method by monitoring growth of a block cave at an underground mine using three nearly continuously operating ore crushers which dominate the wavefield. This technique should work equally well in natural environments using sources such as volcanic tremor, hydrothermal bubble cavitation, and microseisms.

  3. Noise cancellation in magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography with isolated reference sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Jr., Robert H.; Espy, Michelle A.; Matlachov, Andrei; Volegov, Petr

    2010-06-01

    An apparatus measures electromagnetic signals from a weak signal source. A plurality of primary sensors is placed in functional proximity to the weak signal source with an electromagnetic field isolation surface arranged adjacent the primary sensors and between the weak signal source and sources of ambient noise. A plurality of reference sensors is placed adjacent the electromagnetic field isolation surface and arranged between the electromagnetic isolation surface and sources of ambient noise.

  4. Thermal activation by power-limited coloured noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Peter; Neiman, Alexander; Afghan, Muhammad K N; Nadkarni, Suhita; Ullah, Ghanim [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Quantitative Biology Institute, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States)

    2005-01-01

    We consider thermal activation in a bistable potential in the presence of correlated (Ornstein-Uhlenbeck) noise. Escape rates are discussed as a function of the correlation time of the noise at a constant variance of the noise. In contrast to a large body of previous work, where the variance of the noise decreases with increasing correlation time of the noise, we find a bell-shaped curve for the escape rate with a vanishing rate at zero and infinite correlation times. We further calculate threshold crossing rates driven by energy-constrained coloured noise.

  5. Noise Pollution and Health Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geravandi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Noise pollution is of particular importance due to the physical and psychological effects on humans. Noise is a stressor that affects the autonomic nervous system and the endocrine system. Noise is also a threat to marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Health risks from noise are correlated with road traffic. In other words, noise health effects are the health consequences of elevated sound levels. Objectives This study aims to determine the effect of noise pollution (near roadways on health issues in Ahvaz, Iran. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, equivalent sound pressure level were measured by sound level meters TES-1353 in 75 locations around 4 roadways, which had a high load of traffic in Ahvaz City during day time. During the study, 820 measurements were recorded at measuring stations, for 7 days per week with 1-hour interval between each measurement. Statistical analysis was carried out by SPSS software. Results According to the research findings, the equivalent sound pressure levels in all stations were 76.28 ± 3.12 dB (Mean ± SD. According to sound measurements and the survey questionnaire, noise pollution is higher than EPA (US Environmental Protection Agency and Iran standard level. Based on result of this study the worst noise health effects were the nervousness and sleep quality during 2012. Conclusions According to the results of this study, with increasing load of traffic, there is an increasing need for proper consideration plans to control noise pollution and prevent its effects.

  6. Atmosphere and Ambient Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Ulrik

    Atmosphere and Ambient Space This paper explores the relation between atmosphere and ambient space. Atmosphere and ambient space share many salient properties. They are both ontologically indeterminate, constantly varying and formally diffuse and they are both experienced as a subtle, non......-signifying property of a given space. But from a certain point of view, the two concepts also designate quite dissimilar experiences of space. To be ’ambient’ means to surround. Accordingly, ambient space is that space, which surrounds something or somebody. (Gibson 1987: 65) Since space is essentially...... of a surrounding character, all space can thus be described as having a fundamentally ambient character. So what precisely is an ambient space, then? As I will argue in my presentation, ambient space is a sensory effect of spatiality when a space is experienced as being particularly surrounding: a ‘space effect...

  7. Body-wave retrieval and imaging from ambient seismic fields with very dense arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, N.; Boué, P.; Beroza, G. C.

    2015-12-01

    Correlation-based analyses of ambient seismic wavefields is a powerful tool for retrieving subsurface information such as stiffness, anisotropy, and heterogeneity at a variety of scales. These analyses can be considered to be data-driven wavefield modeling. Studies of ambient-field tomography have been mostly focused on the surface waves, especially fundamental-mode Rayleigh waves. Although the surface-wave tomography is useful to model 3D velocities, the spatial resolution is limited due to the extended depth sensitivity of the surface wave measurements. Moreover, to represent elastic media, we need at least two stiffness parameters (e.g., shear and bulk moduli). We develop a technique to retrieve P diving waves from the ambient field observed by the dense geophone network (~2500 receivers with 100-m spacing) at Long Beach, California. With two-step filtering, we improve the signal-to-noise ratio of body waves to extract P wave observations that we use for tomography to estimate 3D P-wave velocity structure. The small scale-length heterogeneity of the velocity model follows a power law with ellipsoidal anisotropy. We also discuss possibilities to retrieve reflected waves from the ambient field and show other applications of the body-wave extraction at different locations and scales. Note that reflected waves penetrate deeper than diving waves and have the potential to provide much higher spatial resolution.

  8. Road traffic noise and incident myocardial infarction: a prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Nordsborg, Rikke B

    2012-01-01

    Both road traffic noise and ambient air pollution have been associated with risk for ischemic heart disease, but only few inconsistent studies include both exposures.......Both road traffic noise and ambient air pollution have been associated with risk for ischemic heart disease, but only few inconsistent studies include both exposures....

  9. Impact of noise and air pollution on pregnancy outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gehring, Ulrike|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831344; Tamburic, Lillian; Sbihi, Hind; Davies, Hugh W.; Brauer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background: Motorized traffic is an important source of both air pollution and community noise. While there is growing evidence for an adverse effect of ambient air pollution on reproductive health, little is known about the association between traffic noise and pregnancy outcomes. Methods: We

  10. The future is 'ambient'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugmayr, Artur

    2006-02-01

    The research field of ambient media starts to spread rapidly and first applications for consumer homes are on the way. Ambient media is the logical continuation of research around media. Media has been evolving from old media (e.g. print media), to integrated presentation in one form (multimedia - or new media), to generating a synthetic world (virtual reality), to the natural environment is the user-interface (ambient media), and will be evolving towards real/synthetic undistinguishable media (bio-media or bio-multimedia). After the IT bubble was bursting, multimedia was lacking a vision of potential future scenarios and applications. Within this research paper the potentials, applications, and market available solutions of mobile ambient multimedia are studied. The different features of ambient mobile multimedia are manifold and include wearable computers, adaptive software, context awareness, ubiquitous computers, middleware, and wireless networks. The paper especially focuses on algorithms and methods that can be utilized to realize modern mobile ambient systems.

  11. Occupational Noise Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safety and Health Topics / Occupational Noise Exposure Occupational Noise Exposure This page requires that javascript be enabled ... interprets the signal as sound. x What is noise? Noise and vibration are both fluctuations in the ...

  12. Noise in Optical Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Palle

    1997-01-01

    Noise in optical amplifiers is discussed on the basis of photons and electromagntic fields. Formulas for quantum noise from spontaneous emission, signal-spontaneous beat noise and spontaneous-spontaneous beat noise are derived.......Noise in optical amplifiers is discussed on the basis of photons and electromagntic fields. Formulas for quantum noise from spontaneous emission, signal-spontaneous beat noise and spontaneous-spontaneous beat noise are derived....

  13. Stochastic resonance in an asymmetric bistable system driven by multiplicative colored noise and additive white noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Bingchang; Xu Wei

    2008-01-01

    The phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR) in a bistable system driven by multiplicative colored and additive white noises and a periodic rectangular signal with a constant component is studied by using the unified colored noise approximation and the theory of signal-to-noise (SNR) in the adiabatic limit. The analytic expression of the SNR is obtained for arbitrary signal amplitude without being restricted to small amplitudes. The SNR is a non-monotonic function of intensities of multiplicative colored and additive white noises and correlation time of multiplicative colored noise, so SR exhibits in the bistable system. The effects of potential asymmetry r and correlation time τ of multiplicative colored noise on SNR are opposite. Moreover, It is more sensitive to control SR through adjusting the additive white noise intensity D than adjusting the multiplicative colored noise intensity Q

  14. Yesterday's noise - today's signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serdula, K.J.

    1978-01-01

    Plant performance can be improved by noise analysis. This paper describes noise characteristics, imposed noise and response functions, a case history of cost benefits derived from application of noise analysis techniques, areas for application of noise analysis techniques with special reference to the Gentilly-1 nuclear generating station, and the validity of noise measurement results. (E.C.B.)

  15. Tinnitus and leisure noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Warwick; Carter, Lyndal

    2017-04-01

    To study the relationship of life-time noise exposure and experience of tinnitus. Audiometric measures included otoscopy, pure tone air- and bone-conduction hearing threshold levels (HTL) and otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). Participants completed questionnaires including demographic information, past hearing health, history of participation in loud leisure activities, and attitudes to noise. A representative sample (1435) of the young (11-35 years old) Australian population. Of the sample, 63% indicated they experienced tinnitus in some form. There was no correlation of tinnitus experience with HTL or OAE amplitudes. Although median octave band HTLs for those who experienced tinnitus "all the time" were slightly higher for those who did not, neither group exhibited HTLs outside clinically-normal values. Of those who experienced tinnitus a direct correlation was found between frequency of experience of tinnitus and increasing cumulative, life-time noise exposure. Those who experienced tinnitus were more likely to report noticing deterioration in their hearing ability over time and to report difficulty hearing in quiet and/or noisy situations. Experience of tinnitus was found throughout this young population but not associated with HTLs or variation in OAE amplitudes. Males experienced 'permanent' tinnitus at significantly greater rate than females.

  16. Full noise characterization of a low-noise two-stage SQUID amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falferi, P [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR-Fondazione Bruno Kessler, 38100 Povo, Trento (Italy); Mezzena, R [INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Trento, Sezione di Padova, 38100 Povo, Trento (Italy); Vinante, A [INFN, Sezione di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy)], E-mail: falferi@science.unitn.it

    2009-07-15

    From measurements performed on a low-noise two-stage SQUID amplifier coupled to a high- Q electrical resonator we give a complete noise characterization of the SQUID amplifier around the resonator frequency of 11 kHz in terms of additive, back action and cross-correlation noise spectral densities. The minimum noise temperature evaluated at 135 mK is 10 {mu}K and corresponds to an energy resolution of 18{Dirac_h}.

  17. Noise Abatement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    SMART, Sound Modification and Regulated Temperature compound, is a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy and sound absorbing qualities. It is derived from a very elastic plastic which was an effective noise abatement material in the Apollo Guidance System. Discovered by a NASA employee, it is marketed by Environmental Health Systems, Inc. (EHS). The product has been successfully employed by a diaper company with noisy dryers and a sugar company with noisy blowers. The company also manufactures an audiometric test booth and acoustical office partitions.

  18. Licenciamento ambiental e sustentabilidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Macedo Valinhas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A sustentabilidade está apoiada principalmente nas dimensões econômica, ambiental e social. No entanto, sem a dimensão política ela não se constrói. Um dos principais instrumentos de comando e controle da política nacional de meio ambiente, o licenciamento ambiental é um processo contínuo de gestão ambiental pública e privada. Analisou-se o processo de licenciamento ambiental como acoplamento estrutural entre os sistemas social, econômico e ambiental. Apesar da constatação de críticas aos mecanismos de comando e controle dos últimos anos, foi verificado que o Estado do Rio de Janeiro tem buscado integrar a política ambiental do Estado à gestão ambiental privada e que esta integração busca atender às demandas dos sistemas sociais e econômicos para as questões ambientais. Em linhas gerais, este caminho segue as estratégias e ações propostas na Agenda 21 brasileira.

  19. Tandem Cylinder Noise Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; CHoudhari, Meelan M.; Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01

    capture the complete decay in the spanwise correlation, thereby producing reasonable noise radiation levels.

  20. Quantum Noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beenakker, C W J

    2005-01-01

    Quantum Noise is advertised as a handbook, and this is indeed how it functions for me these days: it is a book that I keep within hand's reach, ready to be consulted on the proper use of quantum stochastic methods in the course of my research on quantum dots. I should point out that quantum optics, the target field for this book, is not my field by training. So I have much to learn, and find this handbook to be a reliable and helpful guide. Crispin Gardiner previously wrote the Handbook of Stochastic Methods (also published by Springer), which provides an overview of methods in classical statistical physics. Quantum Noise, written jointly with Peter Zoller, is the counterpart for quantum statistical physics, and indeed the two books rely on each other by frequent cross referencing. The fundamental problem addressed by Quantum Noise is how the quantum dynamics of an open system can be described statistically by treating the environment as a source of noise. This is a general problem in condensed matter physics (in particular in the context of Josephson junctions) and in quantum optics. The emphasis in this book in on the optical applications (for condensed matter applications one could consult Quantum Dissipative Systems by Ulrich Weiss, published by World Scientific). The optical applications centre around the interaction of light with atoms, where the atoms represent the open system and the light is the noisy environment. A complete description of the production and detection of non-classical states of radiation (such as squeezed states) can be obtained using one of the equivalent quantum stochastic formulations: the quantum Langevin equation for the field operators (in either the Ito or the Stratonovich form), the Master equation for the density matrix, or the stochastic Schroedinger equation for the wave functions. Each formulation is fully developed here (as one would expect from a handbook), with detailed instructions on how to go from one to the other. The

  1. Jet Noise Scaling in Dual Stream Nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Bridges, James

    2010-01-01

    Power spectral laws in dual stream jets are studied by considering such flows a superposition of appropriate single-stream coaxial jets. Noise generation in each mixing region is modeled using spectral power laws developed earlier for single stream jets as a function of jet temperature and observer angle. Similarity arguments indicate that jet noise in dual stream nozzles may be considered as a composite of four single stream jets representing primary/secondary, secondary/ambient, transition, and fully mixed zones. Frequency filter are designed to highlight spectral contribution from each jet. Predictions are provided at an area ratio of 2.0--bypass ratio from 0.80 to 3.40, and are compared with measurements within a wide range of velocity and temperature ratios. These models suggest that the low frequency noise in unheated jets is dominated by the fully mixed region at all velocity ratios, while the high frequency noise is dominated by the secondary when the velocity ratio is larger than 0.80. Transition and fully mixed jets equally dominate the low frequency noise in heated jets. At velocity ratios less than 0.50, the high frequency noise from primary/bypass becomes a significant contributing factor similar to that in the secondary/ambient jet.

  2. A rapid prototyping system for broadband multichannel active noise and vibration control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselink, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years the need for active and passive noise reduction methods has increased. This is due to an increase in the ambient noise caused by industrialization and the extended use of power tools. The effects of noise on a person can be quite severe and can cause illness and in severe cased lead

  3. Noise measurements on Si sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelou, I.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Prouskas, C.; Triantis, F.; Tzoulis, N.; Aspell, P.; Barney, D.; Bloch, Ph.; Kloukinas, K.; Peisert, A. E-mail: anna.elliott-peisert@cern.ch; Reynaud, S.; Go, A.; Elsha, V.; Zubarev, E.; Cheremukhin, A.; Zamiatin, N

    2002-11-01

    Developing silicon strip sensors for the CMS Preshower detector we have noticed that some strips have a noise higher than the average and not correlated to a high leakage current. In order to investigate this effect we have developed a set-up for noise measurement on wafers and diced sensors that does not require bonding. The set-up is based on the DeltaStream chip coupled to a probe card. We have tested 45 sensors and found that the strips with an above average noise have a higher relative current increase as a function of voltage, {delta}I/(I{delta}V). We also observed that, on these strips, the breakdown occurs within about 60 V from the voltage at which the noise is observed. We describe our measurement method and present the results.

  4. Noise in strong laser-atom interactions: Phase telegraph noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberly, J.H.; Wodkiewicz, K.; Shore, B.W.

    1984-01-01

    We discuss strong laser-atom interactions that are subjected to jump-type (random telegraph) random-phase noise. Physically, the jumps may arise from laser fluctuations, from collisions of various kinds, or from other external forces. Our discussion is carried out in two stages. First, direct and partially heuristic calculations determine the laser spectrum and also give a third-order differential equation for the average inversion of a two-level atom on resonance. At this stage a number of general features of the interaction are able to be studied easily. The optical analog of motional narrowing, for example, is clearly predicted. Second, we show that the theory of generalized Poisson processes allows laser-atom interactions in the presence of random telegraph noise of all kinds (not only phase noise) to be treated systematically, by means of a master equation first used in the context of quantum optics by Burshtein. We use the Burshtein equation to obtain an exact expression for the two-level atom's steady-state resonance fluorescence spectrum, when the exciting laser exhibits phase telegraph noise. Some comparisons are made with results obtained from other noise models. Detailed treatments of the effects ofmly jumps, or as a model of finite laser bandwidth effects, in which the laser frequency exhibits random jumps. We show that these two types of frequency noise can be distinguished in light-scattering spectra. We also discuss examples which demonstrate both temporal and spectral motional narrowing, nonexponential correlations, and non-Lorentzian spectra. Its exact solubility in finite terms makes the frequency-telegraph noise model an attractive alternative to the white-noise Ornstein-Uhlenbeck frequency noise model which has been previously applied to laser-atom interactions

  5. Underwater noise from a wave energy converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tougaard, Jakob

    in full operation and start and stop of the converter. Median broad band (10 Hz – 20 kHz) sound pressure level (Leq) was 123 dB re. 1 Pa, irrespective of status of the wave energy converter (stopped, running or starting/stopping). The most pronounced peak in the third-octave spectrum was in the 160 Hz...... band during start and stop of the converter, attributed to the hydraulic pump responsible for lifting and lowering the absorbers. Less pronounced, but still statistically significant differences were seen in the bands 125, 160, 200 and 250 Hz when operation and ambient were compared. No statistically...... significant noise above ambient could be detected above the 250 Hz band. The absolute increase in noise above ambient was very small. L50 third-octave levels in the four bands with the converter running were thus only 1-2 dB above ambient L50 levels. The noise recorded 25 m from the wave energy converter...

  6. Underwater Noise Modeling in Lithuanian Area of the Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatas Bagočius

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Along with rising awareness of public and scientific societies about environmental and ecological impacts of underwater noise, the need for underwater noise modelling in the shallow Lithuanian area of Baltic Sea emerged. Marine Strategy Framework Directive issues regarding underwater noise indicators refers to possibility of evaluation of Good Environmental State using underwater noise measurements as well as possibility to model underwater noise. Main anthropogenic underwater noise contributor in the Seas is the shipping lanes as known due to date, with no exclusion of Lithuanian Baltic Sea area. In this manuscript, it is presented the methods of development of simplistic underwater ambient noise model purposed for computation of underwater soundscape in shallow area of the Lithuanian Baltic Sea.

  7. A generalized formulation for noise-based seismic velocity change measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-García, C.; Brenguier, F.; Boué, P.; Shapiro, N.; Droznin, D.; Droznina, S.; Senyukov, S.; Gordeev, E.

    2017-12-01

    The observation of continuous seismic velocity changes is a powerful tool for detecting seasonal variations in crustal structure, volcanic unrest, co- and post-seismic evolution of stress in fault areas or the effects of fluid injection. The standard approach for measuring such velocity changes relies on comparison of travel times in the coda of a set of seismic signals, usually noise-based cross-correlations retrieved at different dates, and a reference trace, usually a averaged function over dates. A good stability in both space and time of the noise sources is then the main assumption for reliable measurements. Unfortunately, these conditions are often not fulfilled, as it happens when ambient-noise sources are non-stationary, such as the emissions of low-frequency volcanic tremors.We propose a generalized formulation for retrieving continuous time series of noise-based seismic velocity changes without any arbitrary reference cross-correlation function. We set up a general framework for future applications of this technique performing synthetic tests. In particular, we study the reliability of the retrieved velocity changes in case of seasonal-type trends, transient effects (similar to those produced as a result of an earthquake or a volcanic eruption) and sudden velocity drops and recoveries as the effects of transient local source emissions. Finally, we apply this approach to a real dataset of noise cross-correlations. We choose the Klyuchevskoy volcanic group (Kamchatka) as a case study where the recorded wavefield is hampered by loss of data and dominated by strongly localized volcanic tremor sources. Despite the mentioned wavefield contaminations, we retrieve clear seismic velocity drops associated with the eruptions of the Klyuchevskoy an the Tolbachik volcanoes in 2010 and 2012, respectively.

  8. Bayesian Ambient Noise Inversion for Geoacoustic Uncertainty Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    are generally not available for non-linear problems, Markov chain Monte Carlo ( MCMC ) methods are used to sample from this distribution.4 In this...APPROACH Traditional investigation of seabed sediment properties has relied heavily on direct measurements, such as core sampling and geo-probes...for numerical estimation of the posterior probability density (PPD) over the geoacoustic parameters of interest: Since analytical solutions for the PPD

  9. Noise and Hearing Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Noise and Hearing Protection Noise and Hearing Protection Patient ... it is. How can I tell if a noise is dangerous? People differ in their sensitivity to ...

  10. Noise-evoked otoacoustic emissions in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maat, B; Wit, HP; van Dijk, P

    2000-01-01

    Click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (CEOAEs) and acoustical responses evoked by bandlimited Gaussian noise (noise-evoked otoacoustic emissions; NEOAEs) were measured in three normal-hearing subjects. For the NEOAEs the first- and second-order Wiener kernel and polynomial correlation functions up to

  11. High internal noise and poor external noise filtering characterize perception in autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Woon Ju; Schauder, Kimberly B; Zhang, Ruyuan; Bennetto, Loisa; Tadin, Duje

    2017-12-14

    An emerging hypothesis postulates that internal noise is a key factor influencing perceptual abilities in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Given fundamental and inescapable effects of noise on nearly all aspects of neural processing, this could be a critical abnormality with broad implications for perception, behavior, and cognition. However, this proposal has been challenged by both theoretical and empirical studies. A crucial question is whether and how internal noise limits perception in ASD, independently from other sources of perceptual inefficiency, such as the ability to filter out external noise. Here, we separately estimated internal noise and external noise filtering in ASD. In children and adolescents with and without ASD, we computationally modeled individuals' visual orientation discrimination in the presence of varying levels of external noise. The results revealed increased internal noise and worse external noise filtering in individuals with ASD. For both factors, we also observed high inter-individual variability in ASD, with only the internal noise estimates significantly correlating with severity of ASD symptoms. We provide evidence for reduced perceptual efficiency in ASD that is due to both increased internal noise and worse external noise filtering, while highlighting internal noise as a possible contributing factor to variability in ASD symptoms.

  12. Oma modal indication by sensitivity to added artificial noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Martin O.; Olsen, Peter; Tarpø, Marius

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a modal indicator for use in OMA identification techniques relying on the correlation function for extraction of parameters. We propose to add small amounts of artificial white Gaussian noise to the correlation function and measuring the sensitivity of the identified modes...... to this noise. The idea is to identify system parameters many times, each time adding a tiny amount of uncorrelated white Gaussian noise to the correlation function. Since the noise modes are more affected by the adding of tiny amounts of additional noise, than the physical modes, the variance of the estimated...... parameters gives an effective modal indicator....

  13. Oma modal indication by sensitivity to added artificial noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Martin O.; Olsen, Peter; Tarpø, Marius

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a modal indicator for use in OMA identification techniques relying on the correlation function for extraction of parameters. We propose to add small amounts of artificial white Gaussian noise to the correlation function and measuring the sensitivity of the identified modes...... to this noise. The idea is to identify system parameters many times, each time adding a tiny amount of uncorrelated white Gaussian noise to the correlation function. Since the noise modes are more affected by the adding of tiny amounts of additional noise, than the physical modes, the variance of the estimated...

  14. Noise-Measuring Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, J. M.

    1965-01-01

    A noise-measuring method based on the use of a calibrated noise generator and an output meter with a special scale is described. The method eliminates the effect of noise contributions occurring in the circuits following the device under test.......A noise-measuring method based on the use of a calibrated noise generator and an output meter with a special scale is described. The method eliminates the effect of noise contributions occurring in the circuits following the device under test....

  15. Realized Variance and Market Microstructure Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter R.; Lunde, Asger

    2006-01-01

    -based estimator dominates the RV for the estimation of integrated variance (IV). An empirical analysis of the Dow Jones Industrial Average stocks reveals that market microstructure noise its time-dependent and correlated with increments in the efficient price. This has important implications for volatility......We study market microstructure noise in high-frequency data and analyze its implications for the realized variance (RV) under a general specification for the noise. We show that kernel-based estimators can unearth important characteristics of market microstructure noise and that a simple kernel...

  16. Gas-correlation lidar

    OpenAIRE

    Edner, H; Svanberg, Sune; Uneus, L; Wendt, W

    1984-01-01

    Basic principles for the extension of gas-correlation techniques to the lidar situation are discussed. Favorable signal-to-noise ratios and relaxed laser requirements characterize the technique. Preliminary experiments on atomic mercury are reported.

  17. An investigation of ambient gameplay

    OpenAIRE

    Eyles, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Inspired by Brian Eno's ambient music, which is persistent and supports different levels of engagement, this research explores ambient gameplay in computer, video and pervasive games. Through the creation of original games containing ambient gameplay and looking for ambient gameplay in existing commercial games, this research focuses on gameplay that supports a range of depths of player engagement. This research is not concerned with ambient intelligent environments or other technologies that...

  18. Quantum Noise from Reduced Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacchini, Bassano

    2016-07-01

    We consider the description of quantum noise within the framework of the standard Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics applied to a composite system environment setting. Averaging over the environmental degrees of freedom leads to a stochastic quantum dynamics, described by equations complying with the constraints arising from the statistical structure of quantum mechanics. Simple examples are considered in the framework of open system dynamics described within a master equation approach, pointing in particular to the appearance of the phenomenon of decoherence and to the relevance of quantum correlation functions of the environment in the determination of the action of quantum noise.

  19. Ambient oxygen promotes tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Joong Sung

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen serves as an essential factor for oxidative stress, and it has been shown to be a mutagen in bacteria. While it is well established that ambient oxygen can also cause genomic instability in cultured mammalian cells, its effect on de novo tumorigenesis at the organismal level is unclear. Herein, by decreasing ambient oxygen exposure, we report a ∼50% increase in the median tumor-free survival time of p53-/- mice. In the thymus, reducing oxygen exposure decreased the levels of oxidative DNA damage and RAG recombinase, both of which are known to promote lymphomagenesis in p53-/- mice. Oxygen is further shown to be associated with genomic instability in two additional cancer models involving the APC tumor suppressor gene and chemical carcinogenesis. Together, these observations represent the first report directly testing the effect of ambient oxygen on de novo tumorigenesis and provide important physiologic evidence demonstrating its critical role in increasing genomic instability in vivo.

  20. El ambiente social

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Granada

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Con el título de« Ambiente Social» se quiere enfatizar que el concepto de Ambiente no se agota en lo ecológico (físico-biótico. Así mismo, dentro lo psicosocial, la noción de territorio adquiere importancia y otorga significación a la «experiencia ambiental», ya que abre ventanas hacia la comprensión de actividades como el ordenamiento territorial y a la mediación de las dimensiones psicológica, social y cultural del espacio. Finalmente, aunque el ordenamiento del territorio suele enfocarse desde los componentes sociopolíticos y económicos con el ánimo de planificación, el componente psicosocial traduce aspectos del ordenamiento dentro de la vida cotidiana y relaciona nociones como identidad y arraigo, entre otras.

  1. Ambiente, patrimonio y turismo

    OpenAIRE

    Mantero, Juan Carlos

    2003-01-01

    El tema de la conferencia asignado por los responsables del Tercer Congreso Latinoamericano de Investigación Turística supuso asumir la problemática de la interacción ambiente patrimonio turismo para realizar una reflexión que a partir de la definición de tales nociones permitiera acceder a una reflexión respecto de su significación cultural en la comunidad. El patrimonio de la comunidad comprende el ambiente e incluye la naturaleza y la cultura, del ayer y del presente, en su dimensión tangi...

  2. Active Noise Control for Dishwasher noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nokhaeng; Park, Youngjin

    2016-09-01

    The dishwasher is a useful home appliance and continually used for automatically washing dishes. It's commonly placed in the kitchen with built-in style for practicality and better use of space. In this environment, people are easily exposed to dishwasher noise, so it is an important issue for the consumers, especially for the people living in open and narrow space. Recently, the sound power levels of the noise are about 40 - 50 dBA. It could be achieved by removal of noise sources and passive means of insulating acoustical path. For more reduction, such a quiet mode with the lower speed of cycle has been introduced, but this deteriorates the washing capacity. Under this background, we propose active noise control for dishwasher noise. It is observed that the noise is propagating mainly from the lower part of the front side. Control speakers are placed in the part for the collocation. Observation part of estimating sound field distribution and control part of generating the anti-noise are designed for active noise control. Simulation result shows proposed active noise control scheme could have a potential application for dishwasher noise reduction.

  3. Phenomenon of entropic stochastic resonance with asymmetric dichotomous noise and white noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Feng; Li, Shao-Fu; Cheng, Xiao-Feng

    2012-01-01

    The entropic stochastic resonance (ESR) in a confined system subject to asymmetric dichotomous noise, white noise, and a periodic square-wave signal is investigated. Under the adiabatic approximation condition, by use of the properties of the dichotomous noise, we obtain the expression of the output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) based on two-state theory. The SNR is shown to be a nonmonotonic function of the strength and asymmetry of the dichotomous noise, the intensity of the white noise, and the amplitude of the square-wave signal. The SNR varies non-monotonically with increases in the parameters of the confined structure. The influence of the correlation rate of the dichotomous noise and the frequency of the external constant force on the SNR is also discussed.

  4. 1/f noise: diffusive systems and music

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, R.F.

    1975-11-01

    Measurements of the 1/f voltage noise in continuous metal films are reported. At room temperature, samples of pure metals and bismuth (with a carrier density smaller by 10/sup 5/) of similar volume had comparable noise. The results suggest that the noise arises from equilibrium temperature fluctuations modulating the resistance. Spatial correlation of the noise implied that the fluctuations obey a diffusion equation. The empirical inclusion of an explicit 1/f region and appropriate normalization lead to excellent agreement with the measured noise. If the fluctuations are assumed to be spatially correlated, the diffusion equation can yield an extended 1/f region in the power spectrum. The temperature response of a sample to delta and step function power inputs is shown to have the same shape as the autocorrelation function for uncorrelated and correlated temperature fluctuations, respectively. The spectrum obtained from the cosine transform of the measured step function response is in excellent agreement with the measured 1/f voltage noise spectrum. Spatially correlated equilibrium temperature fluctuations are not the dominant source of 1/f noise in semiconductors and metal films. However, the agreement between the low-frequency spectrum of fluctuations in the mean-square Johnson noise voltage and the resistance fluctuation spectrum measured in the presence of a current demonstrates that in these systems the 1/f noise is also due to equilibrium resistance fluctuations. Loudness fluctuations in music and speech and pitch fluctuations in music also show the 1/f behavior. 1/f noise sources, consequently, are d