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Sample records for amber biomolecular simulation

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Nitrobenzene Dioxygenase Using AMBER Force Field

    OpenAIRE

    Pabis, Anna; Geronimo, Inacrist; York, Darrin M.; Paneth, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation of the oxygenase component of nitrobenzene dioxygenase (NBDO) system, a member of the naphthalene family of Rieske nonheme iron dioxygenases, has been carried out using the AMBER force field combined with a new set of parameters for the description of the mononuclear nonheme iron center and iron–sulfur Rieske cluster. Simulation results provide information on the structure and dynamics of nitrobenzene dioxygenase in an aqueous environment and shed light on specif...

  2. Improved model of hydrated calcium ion for molecular dynamics simulations using classical biomolecular force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jejoong; Wilson, James; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2016-10-01

    Calcium ions (Ca(2+) ) play key roles in various fundamental biological processes such as cell signaling and brain function. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to study such interactions, however, the accuracy of the Ca(2+) models provided by the standard MD force fields has not been rigorously tested. Here, we assess the performance of the Ca(2+) models from the most popular classical force fields AMBER and CHARMM by computing the osmotic pressure of model compounds and the free energy of DNA-DNA interactions. In the simulations performed using the two standard models, Ca(2+) ions are seen to form artificial clusters with chloride, acetate, and phosphate species; the osmotic pressure of CaAc2 and CaCl2 solutions is a small fraction of the experimental values for both force fields. Using the standard parameterization of Ca(2+) ions in the simulations of Ca(2+) -mediated DNA-DNA interactions leads to qualitatively wrong outcomes: both AMBER and CHARMM simulations suggest strong inter-DNA attraction whereas, in experiment, DNA molecules repel one another. The artificial attraction of Ca(2+) to DNA phosphate is strong enough to affect the direction of the electric field-driven translocation of DNA through a solid-state nanopore. To address these shortcomings of the standard Ca(2+) model, we introduce a custom model of a hydrated Ca(2+) ion and show that using our model brings the results of the above MD simulations in quantitative agreement with experiment. Our improved model of Ca(2+) can be readily applied to MD simulations of various biomolecular systems, including nucleic acids, proteins and lipid bilayer membranes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 752-763, 2016. PMID:27144470

  3. An Analysis of Biomolecular Force Fields for Simulations of Polyglutamine in Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluitt, Aaron M. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); de Pablo, Juan J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) peptides are a useful model system for biophysical studies of protein folding and aggregation, both for their intriguing aggregation properties and their own relevance to human disease. The genetic expansion of a polyQ tract triggers the formation of amyloid aggregates associated with nine neurodegenerative diseases. Several clearly identifiable and separable factors, notably the length of the polyQ tract, influence the mechanism of aggregation, its associated kinetics, and the ensemble of structures formed. Atomistic simulations are well positioned to answer open questions regarding the thermodynamics and kinetics of polyQ folding and aggregation. The additional, explicit representation of water permits deeper investigation of the role of solvent dynamics, and it permits a direct comparison of simulation results with infrared spectroscopy experiments. The generation of meaningful simulation results hinges on satisfying two essential criteria: achieving sufficient conformational sampling to draw statistically valid conclusions, and accurately reproducing the intermolecular forces that govern system structure and dynamics. In this work, we examine the ability of 12 biomolecular force fields to reproduce the properties of a simple, 30-residue polyQ peptide (Q30) in explicit water. In addition to secondary and tertiary structure, we consider generic structural properties of polymers that provide additional dimensions for analysis of the highly degenerate disordered states of the molecule. We find that the 12 force fields produce a wide range of predictions. We identify AMBER ff99SB, AMBER ff99SB*, and OPLS-AA/L to be most suitable for studies of polyQ folding and aggregation.

  4. Biomolecular structure refinement using the GROMOS simulation software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Nathan; Allison, Jane R.; Dolenc, Jozica; Eichenberger, Andreas P.; Kunz, Anna-Pitschna E.; Gunsteren, Wilfred F. van, E-mail: wfvgn@igc.phys.chem.ethz.ch [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH, Laboratory of Physical Chemistry (Switzerland)

    2011-11-15

    For the understanding of cellular processes the molecular structure of biomolecules has to be accurately determined. Initial models can be significantly improved by structure refinement techniques. Here, we present the refinement methods and analysis techniques implemented in the GROMOS software for biomolecular simulation. The methodology and some implementation details of the computation of NMR NOE data, {sup 3}J-couplings and residual dipolar couplings, X-ray scattering intensities from crystals and solutions and neutron scattering intensities used in GROMOS is described and refinement strategies and concepts are discussed using example applications. The GROMOS software allows structure refinement combining different types of experimental data with different types of restraining functions, while using a variety of methods to enhance conformational searching and sampling and the thermodynamically calibrated GROMOS force field for biomolecular simulation.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of CO2 Molecules in ZIF-11 Using Refined AMBER Force Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Wongsinlatam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonbonding parameters of AMBER force field have been refined based on ab initio binding energies of CO2–[C7H5N2]− complexes. The energy and geometry scaling factors are obtained to be 1.2 and 0.9 for ε and σ parameters, respectively. Molecular dynamics simulations of CO2 molecules in rigid framework ZIF-11, have then been performed using original AMBER parameters (SIM I and refined parameters (SIM II, respectively. The site-site radial distribution functions and the molecular distribution plots simulations indicate that all hydrogen atoms are favored binding site of CO2 molecules. One slight but notable difference is that CO2 molecules are mostly located around and closer to hydrogen atom of imidazolate ring in SIM II than those found in SIM I. The Zn-Zn and Zn-N RDFs in free flexible framework simulation (SIM III show validity of adapting AMBER bonding parameters. Due to the limitations of computing resources and times in this study, the results of flexible framework simulation using refined nonbonding AMBER parameters (SIM IV are not much different from those obtained in SIM II.

  6. Development of an informatics infrastructure for data exchange of biomolecular simulations: Architecture, data models and ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, J C; Roe, D R; Eilbeck, K; Cheatham Iii, T E; Facelli, J C

    2015-01-01

    Biomolecular simulations aim to simulate structure, dynamics, interactions, and energetics of complex biomolecular systems. With the recent advances in hardware, it is now possible to use more complex and accurate models, but also reach time scales that are biologically significant. Molecular simulations have become a standard tool for toxicology and pharmacology research, but organizing and sharing data - both within the same organization and among different ones - remains a substantial challenge. In this paper we review our recent work leading to the development of a comprehensive informatics infrastructure to facilitate the organization and exchange of biomolecular simulations data. Our efforts include the design of data models and dictionary tools that allow the standardization of the metadata used to describe the biomedical simulations, the development of a thesaurus and ontology for computational reasoning when searching for biomolecular simulations in distributed environments, and the development of systems based on these models to manage and share the data at a large scale (iBIOMES), and within smaller groups of researchers at laboratory scale (iBIOMES Lite), that take advantage of the standardization of the meta data used to describe biomolecular simulations. PMID:26387907

  7. Simulation of Parallel Logical Operations with Biomolecular Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Kadkhoda

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomolecular computing is the computational method that uses the potential of DNA as a parallel computing device. DNA computing can be used to solve NP-complete problems. An appropriate application of DNA computation is large-scale evaluation of parallel computation models such as Boolean Circuits. In this study, we present a molecular-based algorithm for evaluation of Nand-based Boolean Circuits. The contribution of this paper is that the proposed algorithm has been implemented using only three molecular operations and the number of passes in each level is decreased to less than half of previously addressed in the literature. Thus, the proposed algorithm is much easier to implement in the laboratory.

  8. Polarizable Mean-Field Model of Water for Biological Simulations with Amber and Charmm force fields

    CERN Document Server

    Leontyev, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Although a great number of computational models of water are available today, the majority of current biological simulations are done with simple models, such as TIP3P and SPC, developed almost thirty years ago and only slightly modified since then. The reason is that the non-polarizable force fields that are mostly used to describe proteins and other biological molecules are incompatible with more sophisticated modern polarizable models of water. The issue is electronic polarizability: in liquid state, in protein, and in vacuum the water molecule is polarized differently, and therefore has different properties; thus the only way to describe all these different media with the same model is to use a polarizable water model. However, to be compatible with the force field of the rest of the system, e.g. a protein, the latter should be polarizable as well. Here we describe a novel model of water that is in effect polarizable, and yet compatible with the standard non-polarizable force fields such as AMBER, CHARMM,...

  9. Strike a Balance: Optimization of Backbone Torsion Parameters of AMBER Polarizable Force Field for Simulations of Proteins and Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, ZHI-XIANG; ZHANG, WEI; WU, CHUN; LEI, HONGXING; CIEPLAK, PIOTR; DUAN, YONG

    2014-01-01

    Based on the AMBER polarizable model (ff02), we have reoptimized the parameters related to the main-chain (Φ, Ψ) torsion angles by fitting to the Boltzmann-weighted average quantum mechanical (QM) energies of the important regions (i.e., β, PII, αR, and αL regions). Following the naming convention of the AMBER force field series, this release will be called ff02pol.rl The force field has been assessed both by energetic comparison against the QM data and by the replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations of short alanine peptides in water. For Ace-Ala-Nme, the simulated populations in the β, PII and αR regions were approximately 30, 43, and 26%, respectively. For Ace-(Ala)7-Nme, the populations in these three regions were approximately 24, 49, and 26%. Both were in qualitative agreement with the NMR and CD experimental conclusions. In comparison with the previous force field, ff02pol.rl demonstrated good balance among these three important regions. The optimized torsion parameters, together with those in ff02, allow us to carry out simulations on proteins and peptides with the consideration of polarization. PMID:16526038

  10. Performance Analysis Cluster Computing Environments on Molecular Dynamic Simulation of RAD GTPase and LOXCurcumin Molecules with AMBER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heru Suhartanto

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of virtual laboratory on scientific research has produced huge acceleration. One of the virtual scientific research activity is molecular dynamic simulation. The virtual experiments need high computing resources to solve the problem. AMBER is one of the software that provides molecular dynamic simulation that can utilize the parallel computing facilities. In this paper, we conduct the molecular dynamic experiments in order to know reliability of cluster computing environment. The results show that an implicit solvent simulation takes longer time than that in vacuum scenario since one has to consider existence of solvent surround the molecules so the computation is much longer than in vacuum; that the speed up will likely to remain constant on certain additional number of processors; and that there is no significant speed up for case in the LOX-Curcumin explicit solvent simulation.

  11. Biomolecular Electrostatics Simulation by an FMM-based BEM on 512 GPUs

    CERN Document Server

    Yokota, Rio; Bardhan, Jaydeep P; Knepley, Matthew G; Barba, L A

    2010-01-01

    We present simulations of biomolecular electrostatics at a scale not reached before, thanks to both algorithmic and hardware acceleration. The algorithmic acceleration is achieved with the fast multipole method (FMM) in conjunction with a boundary element method (BEM) formulation of the continuum electrostatic model. The hardware acceleration is achieved through graphics processors, GPUs. We demonstrate the power of our algorithms and software for the calculation of the electrostatic interactions between biological molecules in solution. Computational experiments are presented simulating the electrostatics of protein--drug binding and several multi-million atom systems consisting of hundreds to thousands of copies of the problems, which models over 20 million atoms and has more than six billion unknowns, one iteration step requires only a few minutes on 512 GPU nodes. We achieved a sustained performance of 34.6TFlops for the entire BEM calculation. We are currently adapting our solver to model the linearized ...

  12. Modeling Structural Dynamics of Biomolecular Complexes by Coarse-Grained Molecular Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Shoji; Kanada, Ryo; Tan, Cheng; Terakawa, Tsuyoshi; Li, Wenfei; Kenzaki, Hiroo

    2015-12-15

    Due to hierarchic nature of biomolecular systems, their computational modeling calls for multiscale approaches, in which coarse-grained (CG) simulations are used to address long-time dynamics of large systems. Here, we review recent developments and applications of CG modeling methods, focusing on our methods primarily for proteins, DNA, and their complexes. These methods have been implemented in the CG biomolecular simulator, CafeMol. Our CG model has resolution such that ∼10 non-hydrogen atoms are grouped into one CG particle on average. For proteins, each amino acid is represented by one CG particle. For DNA, one nucleotide is simplified by three CG particles, representing sugar, phosphate, and base. The protein modeling is based on the idea that proteins have a globally funnel-like energy landscape, which is encoded in the structure-based potential energy function. We first describe two representative minimal models of proteins, called the elastic network model and the classic Go̅ model. We then present a more elaborate protein model, which extends the minimal model to incorporate sequence and context dependent local flexibility and nonlocal contacts. For DNA, we describe a model developed by de Pablo's group that was tuned to well reproduce sequence-dependent structural and thermodynamic experimental data for single- and double-stranded DNAs. Protein-DNA interactions are modeled either by the structure-based term for specific cases or by electrostatic and excluded volume terms for nonspecific cases. We also discuss the time scale mapping in CG molecular dynamics simulations. While the apparent single time step of our CGMD is about 10 times larger than that in the fully atomistic molecular dynamics for small-scale dynamics, large-scale motions can be further accelerated by two-orders of magnitude with the use of CG model and a low friction constant in Langevin dynamics. Next, we present four examples of applications. First, the classic Go̅ model was used to

  13. Evaluation of Emerging Energy-Efficient Heterogeneous Computing Platforms for Biomolecular and Cellular Simulation Workloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, John E.; Hallock, Michael J.; Phillips, James C.; Peterson, Joseph R.; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Schulten, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Many of the continuing scientific advances achieved through computational biology are predicated on the availability of ongoing increases in computational power required for detailed simulation and analysis of cellular processes on biologically-relevant timescales. A critical challenge facing the development of future exascale supercomputer systems is the development of new computing hardware and associated scientific applications that dramatically improve upon the energy efficiency of existing solutions, while providing increased simulation, analysis, and visualization performance. Mobile computing platforms have recently become powerful enough to support interactive molecular visualization tasks that were previously only possible on laptops and workstations, creating future opportunities for their convenient use for meetings, remote collaboration, and as head mounted displays for immersive stereoscopic viewing. We describe early experiences adapting several biomolecular simulation and analysis applications for emerging heterogeneous computing platforms that combine power-efficient system-on-chip multi-core CPUs with high-performance massively parallel GPUs. We present low-cost power monitoring instrumentation that provides sufficient temporal resolution to evaluate the power consumption of individual CPU algorithms and GPU kernels. We compare the performance and energy efficiency of scientific applications running on emerging platforms with results obtained on traditional platforms, identify hardware and algorithmic performance bottlenecks that affect the usability of these platforms, and describe avenues for improving both the hardware and applications in pursuit of the needs of molecular modeling tasks on mobile devices and future exascale computers.

  14. A minimal implementation of the AMBER-GAUSSIAN interface for ab initio QM/MM-MD simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Takuya; Yamada, Kenta; Koyano, Yoshiyuki; Asada, Toshio; Koga, Nobuaki; Nagaoka, Masataka

    2011-04-15

    For applying to a number of theoretical methodologies based on an ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics method connecting AMBER9 with GAUSSIAN03, we have developed an AMBER-GAUSSIAN interface (AG-IF), which can be one of the simplest architectures. In the AG-IF, only a few subroutines addition is necessary to retrieve the QM/MM energy and forces, obtained by GAUSSIAN, for solving a set of Newtonian equations of motion in AMBER. It is, therefore, easy to be modified for individual applications since AG-IF utilizes most of those functions originally equipped not only in AMBER but also in GAUSSIAN. In the present minimal implementation, only AMBER is modified, whereas GAUSSIAN is left unchanged. Moreover, a different method of calculating electrostatic forces of MM atoms interacting with QM region is proposed. Using the AG-IF, we also demonstrate three examples of application: (i) the QM versus MM comparison in the radial distribution function, (ii) the free energy gradient method, and (iii) the charge from interaction energy and forces. PMID:20949515

  15. A synergic simulation-optimization approach for analyzing biomolecular dynamics in living organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadegh Zadeh, Kouroush

    2011-01-01

    A synergic duo simulation-optimization approach was developed and implemented to study protein-substrate dynamics and binding kinetics in living organisms. The forward problem is a system of several coupled nonlinear partial differential equations which, with a given set of kinetics and diffusion parameters, can provide not only the commonly used bleached area-averaged time series in fluorescence microscopy experiments but more informative full biomolecular/drug space-time series and can be successfully used to study dynamics of both Dirac and Gaussian fluorescence-labeled biomacromolecules in vivo. The incomplete Cholesky preconditioner was coupled with the finite difference discretization scheme and an adaptive time-stepping strategy to solve the forward problem. The proposed approach was validated with analytical as well as reference solutions and used to simulate dynamics of GFP-tagged glucocorticoid receptor (GFP-GR) in mouse cancer cell during a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiment. Model analysis indicates that the commonly practiced bleach spot-averaged time series is not an efficient approach to extract physiological information from the fluorescence microscopy protocols. It was recommended that experimental biophysicists should use full space-time series, resulting from experimental protocols, to study dynamics of biomacromolecules and drugs in living organisms. It was also concluded that in parameterization of biological mass transfer processes, setting the norm of the gradient of the penalty function at the solution to zero is not an efficient stopping rule to end the inverse algorithm. Theoreticians should use multi-criteria stopping rules to quantify model parameters by optimization. PMID:21106190

  16. Lipid14: The Amber Lipid Force Field

    OpenAIRE

    Dickson, Callum J.; Madej, Benjamin D.; Skjevik, Åge A.; Betz, Robin M.; Teigen, Knut; Gould, Ian R.; Walker, Ross C.

    2014-01-01

    The AMBER lipid force field has been updated to create Lipid14, allowing tensionless simulation of a number of lipid types with the AMBER MD package. The modular nature of this force field allows numerous combinations of head and tail groups to create different lipid types, enabling the easy insertion of new lipid species. The Lennard-Jones and torsion parameters of both the head and tail groups have been revised and updated partial charges calculated. The force field has been validated by si...

  17. Event Detection and Sub-state Discovery from Bio-molecular Simulations Using Higher-Order Statistics: Application To Enzyme Adenylate Kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Ramanathan, Arvind; Savol, Andrej J.; Agarwal, Pratul K.; Chennubhotla, Chakra S.

    2012-01-01

    Biomolecular simulations at milli-second and longer timescales can provide vital insights into functional mechanisms. Since post-simulation analyses of such large trajectory data-sets can be a limiting factor in obtaining biological insights, there is an emerging need to identify key dynamical events and relating these events to the biological function online, that is, as simulations are progressing. Recently, we have introduced a novel computational technique, quasi-anharmonic analysis (QAA)...

  18. Bend-twist-stretch model for coarse elastic network simulation of biomolecular motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stember, Joseph N.; Wriggers, Willy

    2009-08-01

    The empirical harmonic potential function of elastic network models (ENMs) is augmented by three- and four-body interactions as well as by a parameter-free connection rule. In the new bend-twist-stretch (BTS) model the complexity of the parametrization is shifted from the spatial level of detail to the potential function, enabling an arbitrary coarse graining of the network. Compared to distance cutoff-based Hookean springs, the approach yields a more stable parametrization of coarse-grained ENMs for biomolecular dynamics. Traditional ENMs give rise to unbounded zero-frequency vibrations when (pseudo)atoms are connected to fewer than three neighbors. A large cutoff is therefore chosen in an ENM (about twice the average nearest-neighbor distance), resulting in many false-positive connections that reduce the spatial detail that can be resolved. More importantly, the required three-neighbor connectedness also limits the coarse graining, i.e., the network must be dense, even in the case of low-resolution structures that exhibit few spatial features. The new BTS model achieves such coarse graining by extending the ENM potential to include three-and four-atom interactions (bending and twisting, respectively) in addition to the traditional two-atom stretching. Thus, the BTS model enables reliable modeling of any three-dimensional graph irrespective of the atom connectedness. The additional potential terms were parametrized using continuum elastic theory of elastic rods, and the distance cutoff was replaced by a competitive Hebb connection rule, setting all free parameters in the model. We validate the approach on a carbon-alpha representation of adenylate kinase and illustrate its use with electron microscopy maps of E. coli RNA polymerase, E. coli ribosome, and eukaryotic chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide 1, which were difficult to model with traditional ENMs. For adenylate kinase, we find excellent reproduction (>90% overlap) of the ENM modes and B factors

  19. Extension of the CHARMM General Force Field to sulfonyl-containing compounds and its utility in biomolecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenbo; He, Xibing; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2012-12-01

    Presented is an extension of the CHARMM General Force Field (CGenFF) to enable the modeling of sulfonyl-containing compounds. Model compounds containing chemical moieties such as sulfone, sulfonamide, sulfonate, and sulfamate were used as the basis for the parameter optimization. Targeting high-level quantum mechanical and experimental crystal data, the new parameters were optimized in a hierarchical fashion designed to maintain compatibility with the remainder of the CHARMM additive force field. The optimized parameters satisfactorily reproduced equilibrium geometries, vibrational frequencies, interactions with water, gas phase dipole moments, and dihedral potential energy scans. Validation involved both crystalline and liquid phase calculations showing the newly developed parameters to satisfactorily reproduce experimental unit cell geometries, crystal intramolecular geometries, and pure solvent densities. The force field was subsequently applied to study conformational preference of a sulfonamide based peptide system. Good agreement with experimental IR/NMR data further validated the newly developed CGenFF parameters as a tool to investigate the dynamic behavior of sulfonyl groups in a biological environment. CGenFF now covers sulfonyl group containing moieties allowing for modeling and simulation of sulfonyl-containing compounds in the context of biomolecular systems including compounds of medicinal interest. PMID:22821581

  20. AMBER User's Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AMBER is a Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code which models the evolution of a representative slice of a relativistic electron beam in a linear accelerator. The beam is modeled as a steady flow and therefore no electromagnetic waves: all the fields (external and self-fields) are electrostatic and magnetostatic fields (for a complete description, see chapter 5). The possible elements describing the accelerator lattice are solenoids, accelerating gaps, pipes and apertures. Several kinds of beam distribution can be loaded: KV, gaussian, semi-gaussian, etc. Alternatively, the user can reconstruct (or load) a distribution from the output of another codefile, for example, an interface generating the beam distribution from output produced from EGUN or LSP codes is available as an option. This documentation first describes in detail the input files needed to run AMBER and the procedure to start the executable. The possible data files and graphical output are explained in the two following chapters. The last chapter describes the physics model and numerical techniques used. An example of input files and the result obtained with these inputs are also given in the Appendix

  1. REACH coarse-grained biomolecular simulation: transferability between different protein structural classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritsugu, Kei; Smith, Jeremy C

    2008-08-01

    Coarse graining of protein interactions provides a means of simulating large biological systems. The REACH (Realistic Extension Algorithm via Covariance Hessian) coarse-graining method, in which the force constants of a residue-scale elastic network model are calculated from the variance-covariance matrix obtained from atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, involves direct mapping between scales without the need for iterative optimization. Here, the transferability of the REACH force field is examined between protein molecules of different structural classes. As test cases, myoglobin (all alpha), plastocyanin (all beta), and dihydrofolate reductase (alpha/beta) are taken. The force constants derived are found to be closely similar in all three proteins. An MD version of REACH is presented, and low-temperature coarse-grained (CG) REACH MD simulations of the three proteins are compared with atomistic MD results. The mean-square fluctuations of the atomistic MD are well reproduced by the CGMD. Model functions for the CG interactions, derived by averaging over the three proteins, are also shown to produce fluctuations in good agreement with the atomistic MD. The results indicate that, similarly to the use of atomistic force fields, it is now possible to use a single, generic REACH force field for all protein studies, without having first to derive parameters from atomistic MD simulation for each individual system studied. The REACH method is thus likely to be a reliable way of determining spatiotemporal motion of a variety of proteins without the need for expensive computation of long atomistic MD simulations. PMID:18469078

  2. A multipole-based water potential with implicit polarization for biomolecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, T R; Liang, T

    2009-04-30

    A new water potential, DMIP (distributed multipoles, implicit polarization), is constructed using distributed multipoles to describe the electrostatic interactions, while accounting for polarization implicitly. In this procedure, small clusters are randomly sampled from atomistic simulations of bulk water using the AMOEBA (Ren and Ponder, J Comput Chem 2002, 23, 1497) potential. The multipole moments of the central water in each cluster are obtained from ab initio densities for each cluster, and the moments are then averaged over all clusters. Properties of bulk water calculated using DMIP compare favorably with existing data from AMOEBA simulations and experiment, with a conservative estimate of reduction in compute time of roughly 40%. The implicit force-field is also shown to work compatibly with existing polarizable multipole-based force-fields for biomolecules. PMID:18785240

  3. Best bang for your buck: GPU nodes for GROMACS biomolecular simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kutzner, Carsten; Fechner, Martin; Esztermann, Ansgar; de Groot, Bert L; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    The molecular dynamics simulation package GROMACS runs efficiently on a wide variety of hardware from commodity workstations to high performance computing clusters. Hardware features are well exploited with a combination of SIMD, multi-threading, and MPI-based SPMD/MPMD parallelism, while GPUs can be used as accelerators to compute interactions offloaded from the CPU. Here we evaluate which hardware produces trajectories with GROMACS 4.6 or 5.0 in the most economical way. We have assembled and benchmarked compute nodes with various CPU/GPU combinations to identify optimal compositions in terms of raw trajectory production rate, performance-to-price ratio, energy efficiency, and several other criteria. Though hardware prices are naturally subject to trends and fluctuations, general tendencies are clearly visible. Adding any type of GPU significantly boosts a node's simulation performance. For inexpensive consumer-class GPUs this improvement equally reflects in the performance-to-price ratio. Although memory is...

  4. Efficient pseudo-random number generators for biomolecular simulations on graphics processors

    CERN Document Server

    Zhmurov, A; Kholodov, Y; Barsegov, V

    2010-01-01

    Langevin Dynamics, Monte Carlo, and all-atom Molecular Dynamics simulations in implicit solvent, widely used to access the microscopic transitions in biomolecules, require a reliable source of random numbers. Here we present the two main approaches for implementation of random number generators (RNGs) on a GPU, which enable one to generate random numbers on the fly. In the one-RNG-per-thread approach, inherent in CPU-based calculations, one RNG produces a stream of random numbers in each thread of execution, whereas the one-RNG-for-all-threads approach builds on the ability of different threads to communicate, thus, sharing random seeds across the entire GPU device. We exemplify the use of these approaches through the development of Ran2, Hybrid Taus, and Lagged Fibonacci algorithms fully implemented on the GPU. As an application-based test of randomness, we carry out LD simulations of N independent harmonic oscillators coupled to a stochastic thermostat. This model allows us to assess statistical quality of ...

  5. Best bang for your buck: GPU nodes for GROMACS biomolecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutzner, Carsten; Páll, Szilárd; Fechner, Martin; Esztermann, Ansgar; de Groot, Bert L; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2015-10-01

    The molecular dynamics simulation package GROMACS runs efficiently on a wide variety of hardware from commodity workstations to high performance computing clusters. Hardware features are well-exploited with a combination of single instruction multiple data, multithreading, and message passing interface (MPI)-based single program multiple data/multiple program multiple data parallelism while graphics processing units (GPUs) can be used as accelerators to compute interactions off-loaded from the CPU. Here, we evaluate which hardware produces trajectories with GROMACS 4.6 or 5.0 in the most economical way. We have assembled and benchmarked compute nodes with various CPU/GPU combinations to identify optimal compositions in terms of raw trajectory production rate, performance-to-price ratio, energy efficiency, and several other criteria. Although hardware prices are naturally subject to trends and fluctuations, general tendencies are clearly visible. Adding any type of GPU significantly boosts a node's simulation performance. For inexpensive consumer-class GPUs this improvement equally reflects in the performance-to-price ratio. Although memory issues in consumer-class GPUs could pass unnoticed as these cards do not support error checking and correction memory, unreliable GPUs can be sorted out with memory checking tools. Apart from the obvious determinants for cost-efficiency like hardware expenses and raw performance, the energy consumption of a node is a major cost factor. Over the typical hardware lifetime until replacement of a few years, the costs for electrical power and cooling can become larger than the costs of the hardware itself. Taking that into account, nodes with a well-balanced ratio of CPU and consumer-class GPU resources produce the maximum amount of GROMACS trajectory over their lifetime. PMID:26238484

  6. Reproducing kernel potential energy surfaces in biomolecular simulations: Nitric oxide binding to myoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multidimensional potential energy surfaces based on reproducing kernel-interpolation are employed to explore the energetics and dynamics of free and bound nitric oxide in myoglobin (Mb). Combining a force field description for the majority of degrees of freedom and the higher-accuracy representation for the NO ligand and the Fe out-of-plane motion allows for a simulation approach akin to a mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics treatment. However, the kernel-representation can be evaluated at conventional force-field speed. With the explicit inclusion of the Fe-out-of-plane (Fe-oop) coordinate, the dynamics and structural equilibrium after photodissociation of the ligand are correctly described compared to experiment. Experimentally, the Fe-oop coordinate plays an important role for the ligand dynamics. This is also found here where the isomerization dynamics between the Fe–ON and Fe–NO state is significantly affected whether or not this co-ordinate is explicitly included. Although the Fe–ON conformation is metastable when considering only the bound 2A state, it may disappear once the 4A state is included. This explains the absence of the Fe–ON state in previous experimental investigations of MbNO

  7. Insect frass in Baltic amber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari A. Kinnunen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Inclusions of wood debris loosened from pine-like trees are abundant in Baltic amber of Eocene and Oligocene age. The possibilities to find insect frass and excrement among wood debris are outlined and some examples are given. Comparison with the frass and excrement produced by present-day insects provide a possibility to identify insects even though their fossils are lacking. This information can be used to characterize former forest environments. Amber forests may have also covered Southern Finland, and this possibility is discussed. Furthermore, the presence of wood debris may be utilized to recognize amber fakes, which is important for both gem trade and paleontology. It is proposed that databases and identification keys of frass and excrement should be constructed.

  8. Further AMBER and Ecolego Intercomparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AMBER compartmental modelling software is used by Quintessa in undertaking Performance Assessment (PA) calculations for SKI. SSI and NRPA are supporting the development of Ecolego which is based on the Matlab/Simulink general purpose modelling software for undertaking PA calculations. Intercomparison calculations using AMBER and Ecolego have been undertaken based on calculation cases considered in SKB's SR97 assessment. The reasons for undertaking such intercomparisons included: 1. to give confidence in the use of AMBER and Ecolego for whole system PA calculations for a deep repository; and 2. to provide SKI and SSI with an understanding of some of the technical issues raised by seeking to repeat the SR97 calculations with different models and software. Conclusions drawn from these intercomparisons included: 1. Both modelling packages successfully reproduced SKB's SR97 calculations for the near field, geosphere and biosphere. 2. AMBER and Ecolego calculations were typically in agreement to within one significant figure, but in several instances the SR97 documentation was not sufficiently clear to enable the implementation of the models in AMBER and Ecolego to be unambiguous. In order to gain more information on the comparisons between the two codes, additional intercomparisons have been undertaken using input data from the Vault Safety Case originally undertaken as part of an IAEA research project (ISAM). The comparisons between the AMBER and Ecolego calculations for the ISAM vault safety case have shown excellent agreement. Calculations at specified times generally agree to around three significant figures, and calculations of peak radionuclide fluxes and concentrations agree to two significant figures. This agreement is particularly good given the large number of model compartments and the inclusion of decay changes of up to six members. The most important situation where agreement may not be as good as that generally found is where radionuclides have been

  9. Models for solvated biomolecular structures

    OpenAIRE

    Cerutti, David

    2007-01-01

    Methods for estimating the structure and energetics of water around biomolecules are presented with the objective of improving the treatment of the biomolecular simulation environment as well as facilitating the use of complex, rigorous water models in the context of structure prediction problems that demand cheap solutions. Salt solutions around biomolecules are studied using an implicit solvent model with explicitly represented ions, revealing that the structure of the ion atmosphere is muc...

  10. Provenance studies of amber by PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analyses by Infrared Spectroscopy and 13 C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance are suitable to determine the paleobotanic source of amber, but cannot differentiate between beds of the same paleobotanic source. Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) using an external set-up is presented as a new and non-destructive semiquantitative method for provenance studies of amber. PIXE analysis is focused at inorganic contents of amber, considering that the composition of microscopic inclusions depends on the sedimentation environment and it can be used to determine similarities and differences between amber samples and correlate them with amber beds. Results of analyses on amber samples from several world regions and a group of archaeological samples from Chiapas, Mexico, are presented. Amber from different regions have specific inorganic elemental contents; archaeological samples can be associated with beds, even if they have the same paleobotanic origin. (Author)

  11. Event Detection and Sub-state Discovery from Bio-molecular Simulations Using Higher-Order Statistics: Application To Enzyme Adenylate Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Arvind; Savol, Andrej J.; Agarwal, Pratul K.; Chennubhotla, Chakra S.

    2012-01-01

    Biomolecular simulations at milli-second and longer timescales can provide vital insights into functional mechanisms. Since post-simulation analyses of such large trajectory data-sets can be a limiting factor in obtaining biological insights, there is an emerging need to identify key dynamical events and relating these events to the biological function online, that is, as simulations are progressing. Recently, we have introduced a novel computational technique, quasi-anharmonic analysis (QAA) (PLoS One 6(1): e15827), for partitioning the conformational landscape into a hierarchy of functionally relevant sub-states. The unique capabilities of QAA are enabled by exploiting anharmonicity in the form of fourth-order statistics for characterizing atomic fluctuations. In this paper, we extend QAA for analyzing long time-scale simulations online. In particular, we present HOST4MD - a higher-order statistical toolbox for molecular dynamics simulations, which (1) identifies key dynamical events as simulations are in progress, (2) explores potential sub-states and (3) identifies conformational transitions that enable the protein to access those sub-states. We demonstrate HOST4MD on micro-second time-scale simulations of the enzyme adenylate kinase in its apo state. HOST4MD identifies several conformational events in these simulations, revealing how the intrinsic coupling between the three sub-domains (LID, CORE and NMP) changes during the simulations. Further, it also identifies an inherent asymmetry in the opening/closing of the two binding sites. We anticipate HOST4MD will provide a powerful and extensible framework for detecting biophysically relevant conformational coordinates from long time-scale simulations. PMID:22733562

  12. Further AMBER and Ecolego Intercomparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maul, Philip; Robinson, Peter [Quintessa Limited, Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom); Broed, Robert [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Center of Physics, Astronomy and Biotechnology; Avila, Rodolfo [Facilia AB, Bromma (Sweden)

    2004-01-01

    The AMBER compartmental modelling software is used by Quintessa in undertaking Performance Assessment (PA) calculations for SKI. SSI and NRPA are supporting the development of Ecolego which is based on the Matlab/Simulink general purpose modelling software for undertaking PA calculations. Intercomparison calculations using AMBER and Ecolego have been undertaken based on calculation cases considered in SKB's SR97 assessment. The reasons for undertaking such intercomparisons included: 1. to give confidence in the use of AMBER and Ecolego for whole system PA calculations for a deep repository; and 2. to provide SKI and SSI with an understanding of some of the technical issues raised by seeking to repeat the SR97 calculations with different models and software. Conclusions drawn from these intercomparisons included: 1. Both modelling packages successfully reproduced SKB's SR97 calculations for the near field, geosphere and biosphere. 2. AMBER and Ecolego calculations were typically in agreement to within one significant figure, but in several instances the SR97 documentation was not sufficiently clear to enable the implementation of the models in AMBER and Ecolego to be unambiguous. In order to gain more information on the comparisons between the two codes, additional intercomparisons have been undertaken using input data from the Vault Safety Case originally undertaken as part of an IAEA research project (ISAM). The comparisons between the AMBER and Ecolego calculations for the ISAM vault safety case have shown excellent agreement. Calculations at specified times generally agree to around three significant figures, and calculations of peak radionuclide fluxes and concentrations agree to two significant figures. This agreement is particularly good given the large number of model compartments and the inclusion of decay changes of up to six members. The most important situation where agreement may not be as good as that generally found is where radionuclides

  13. Biomolecular Science (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-04-01

    A brief fact sheet about NREL Photobiology and Biomolecular Science. The research goal of NREL's Biomolecular Science is to enable cost-competitive advanced lignocellulosic biofuels production by understanding the science critical for overcoming biomass recalcitrance and developing new product and product intermediate pathways. NREL's Photobiology focuses on understanding the capture of solar energy in photosynthetic systems and its use in converting carbon dioxide and water directly into hydrogen and advanced biofuels.

  14. Extension of the GLYCAM06 Biomolecular Force Field to Lipids, Lipid Bilayers and Glycolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, Matthew B; Demarco, Mari L; Yongye, Austin B; Woods, Robert J

    2008-01-01

    GLYCAM06 is a generalisable biomolecular force field that is extendible to diverse molecular classes in the spirit of a small-molecule force field. Here we report parameters for lipids, lipid bilayers and glycolipids for use with GLYCAM06. Only three lipid-specific atom types have been introduced, in keeping with the general philosophy of transferable parameter development. Bond stretching, angle bending, and torsional force constants were derived by fitting to quantum mechanical data for a collection of minimal molecular fragments and related small molecules. Partial atomic charges were computed by fitting to ensemble-averaged quantum-computed molecular electrostatic potentials.In addition to reproducing quantum mechanical internal rotational energies and experimental valence geometries for an array of small molecules, condensed-phase simulations employing the new parameters are shown to reproduce the bulk physical properties of a DMPC lipid bilayer. The new parameters allow for molecular dynamics simulations of complex systems containing lipids, lipid bilayers, glycolipids, and carbohydrates, using an internally consistent force field. By combining the AMBER parameters for proteins with the GLYCAM06 parameters, it is also possible to simulate protein-lipid complexes and proteins in biologically relevant membrane-like environments. PMID:22247593

  15. Implementation of project Safe in Amber. Verification study for SFR 1 SAR-08

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, Gavin; Herben, Martin; Lloyd, Pam; Rose, Danny; Smith, Chris; Barraclough, Ian (Enviros Consulting Ltd (GB))

    2008-03-15

    This report documents an exercise in which AMBER has been used to represent the models used in Project SAFE, a safety assessment undertaken on SFR 1. (AMBER is a flexible, graphical-user-interface based tool that allows users to build their own dynamic compartmental models to represent the migration, degradation and fate of contaminants in an environmental system. AMBER allows the user to assess routine, accidental and long-term contaminant release.) AMBER has been used to undertake assessment calculations on all of the disposal system, including all disposal tunnels and the Silo, the geosphere and several biosphere modules. The near-field conceptual models were implemented with minimal changes to the approach undertaken previously in Project SAFE. Model complexity varied significantly between individual disposal facilities increasing significantly from the BLA to the BTF and BMA tunnels and Silo. Radionuclide transport through the fractured granite geosphere was approximated using a compartment model approach in AMBER. Several biosphere models were implemented in AMBER including reasonable biosphere development, which considered the evolution of the Forsmark area from coastal to lacustrine to agricultural environments in response to land uplift. Parameters were sampled from distributions and simulations were run for 1,000 realisations. In undertaking the comparison of AMBER with the various codes and calculation tools used in Project SAFE it was necessary to undertake a detailed analysis of the modelling approach previously adopted, with particular focus given to the near-field models. As a result some discrepancies in the implementation of the models and documentation were noted. The exercise demonstrates that AMBER is fully capable of representing the features of the SFR 1 disposal system in a safety assessment suitable for SAR-08

  16. Implementation of project Safe in Amber. Verification study for SFR 1 SAR-08

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents an exercise in which AMBER has been used to represent the models used in Project SAFE, a safety assessment undertaken on SFR 1. (AMBER is a flexible, graphical-user-interface based tool that allows users to build their own dynamic compartmental models to represent the migration, degradation and fate of contaminants in an environmental system. AMBER allows the user to assess routine, accidental and long-term contaminant release.) AMBER has been used to undertake assessment calculations on all of the disposal system, including all disposal tunnels and the Silo, the geosphere and several biosphere modules. The near-field conceptual models were implemented with minimal changes to the approach undertaken previously in Project SAFE. Model complexity varied significantly between individual disposal facilities increasing significantly from the BLA to the BTF and BMA tunnels and Silo. Radionuclide transport through the fractured granite geosphere was approximated using a compartment model approach in AMBER. Several biosphere models were implemented in AMBER including reasonable biosphere development, which considered the evolution of the Forsmark area from coastal to lacustrine to agricultural environments in response to land uplift. Parameters were sampled from distributions and simulations were run for 1,000 realisations. In undertaking the comparison of AMBER with the various codes and calculation tools used in Project SAFE it was necessary to undertake a detailed analysis of the modelling approach previously adopted, with particular focus given to the near-field models. As a result some discrepancies in the implementation of the models and documentation were noted. The exercise demonstrates that AMBER is fully capable of representing the features of the SFR 1 disposal system in a safety assessment suitable for SAR-08

  17. ORAC: a molecular dynamics simulation program to explore free energy surfaces in biomolecular systems at the atomistic level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsili, Simone; Signorini, Giorgio Federico; Chelli, Riccardo; Marchi, Massimo; Procacci, Piero

    2010-04-15

    We present the new release of the ORAC engine (Procacci et al., Comput Chem 1997, 18, 1834), a FORTRAN suite to simulate complex biosystems at the atomistic level. The previous release of the ORAC code included multiple time steps integration, smooth particle mesh Ewald method, constant pressure and constant temperature simulations. The present release has been supplemented with the most advanced techniques for enhanced sampling in atomistic systems including replica exchange with solute tempering, metadynamics and steered molecular dynamics. All these computational technologies have been implemented for parallel architectures using the standard MPI communication protocol. ORAC is an open-source program distributed free of charge under the GNU general public license (GPL) at http://www.chim.unifi.it/orac. PMID:19824035

  18. Programming in Biomolecular Computation:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Lars; Jones, Neil; Simonsen, Jakob Grue;

    2011-01-01

    Our goal is to provide a top-down approach to biomolecular computation. In spite of widespread discussion about connections between biology and computation, one question seems notable by its absence: Where are the programs? We identify a number of common features in programming that seem...... conspicuously absent from the literature on biomolecular computing; to partially redress this absence, we introduce a model of computation that is evidently programmable, by programs reminiscent of low-level computer machine code; and at the same time biologically plausible: its functioning is defined...... by a single and relatively small set of chemical-like reaction rules. Further properties: the model is stored-program: programs are the same as data, so programs are not only executable, but are also compilable and interpretable. It is universal: all computable functions can be computed (in natural ways...

  19. Optical characterization of amber from Chiapas, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Morales, Guadalupe; Espinosa-Luna, Rafael; Frausto-Reyes, Claudio

    2013-09-01

    An optical characterization of amber samples from México, the Baltic Sea and fake samples is presented, with the aim of discriminate between genuine and fake samples. We sought to identify the physical variables that could serve as the basis for the development of a device whose operation was able to discriminate between samples of genuine and fake amber. The optical refractive index was determined by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry, Abbe refractometry, and by the Brewster angle. The Raman spectra and the fluorescence optical responses were also determined. The results obtained indicate that the refractive index is not a robust variable that can differentiate between genuine amber and a fake sample. On the other hand, the Raman spectra and the fluorescence responses provide information that allows discriminating between both types of samples. For this reason, we used the results obtained by fluorescence as a basis for the design and construction of a prototype simple, reliable, portable, and affordable for authentication of the Mexican amber.

  20. Improved Parameterization of Amine-Carboxyate and Amine-Phosphate Interactions for Molecular Dynamics Simulations Using the CHARMM and AMBER Force Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Yoo, Jejoong

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of biomolecules have become a mainstream biophysics technique. As the length and time scales amenable to the MD method increase, shortcomings of the empirical force fields---which have been developed and validated using relatively short simulations of small molecules---become apparent. One common artifact is aggregation of water-soluble biomolecules driven by artificially strong charge--charge interactions. Here, we report a systematic refinement of Lennard-Jones parameters (NBFIX) describing amine--carboxylate and amine--phosphate interactions, which brings MD simulations of basic peptide-mediated nucleic acids assemblies and lipid bilayer membranes in better agreement with experiment. As our refinement neither affects the existing parameterization of bonded interaction nor does it alter the solvation free energies, it improves realism of an MD simulation without introducing additional artifacts.

  1. Manufacturing of amber particles suitable for composite fibre melt spinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ļašenko Inga Ļ

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyamide fibre containing amber particles was fabricated. The amber particles were obtained by grinding technology using planetary ball-mills. Scanning electron microscopy and granulometry testing were used to characterise the structure and the size of prepared amber particles. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to analyse the chemical structure of the amber particles. The amber particles were characterised with average size up to 3 μm. The chemical composition of amber before and after the grinding remained unchanged. The amber particles were melt-extruded using polyamide 6 as the matrix. Melt spinning processing was used to fabricate polyamide-amber filaments. Pre-oriented yarns and fully drawn yarns were obtained after hotdrawing experiments. Reported experimental findings of amber composite fibre could be important for textile applications.

  2. Improvements in continuum modeling for biomolecular systems

    CERN Document Server

    Qiao, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Modeling of biomolecular systems plays an essential role in understanding biological processes, such as ionic flow across channels, protein modification or interaction, and cell signaling. The continuum model described by the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB)/Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations has made great contributions towards simulation of these processes. However, the model has shortcomings in its commonly used form and cannot capture (or cannot accurately capture) some important physical properties of biological systems. Considerable efforts have been made to improve the continuum model to account for discrete particle interactions and to make progress in numerical methods to provide accurate and efficient simulation. This review will summarize recent main improvements in continuum modeling for biomolecular systems, with focus on the size-modified models, the coupling of the classical density functional theory and PNP equations, the coupling of polar and nonpolar interactions, and numerical progress.

  3. Biomolecular EPR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hagen, Wilfred Raymond

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive, Up-to-Date Coverage of Spectroscopy Theory and its Applications to Biological SystemsAlthough a multitude of books have been published about spectroscopy, most of them only occasionally refer to biological systems and the specific problems of biomolecular EPR (bioEPR). Biomolecular EPR Spectroscopy provides a practical introduction to bioEPR and demonstrates how this remarkable tool allows researchers to delve into the structural, functional, and analytical analysis of paramagnetic molecules found in the biochemistry of all species on the planet. A Must-Have Reference in an Intrinsically Multidisciplinary FieldThis authoritative reference seamlessly covers all important bioEPR applications, including low-spin and high-spin metalloproteins, spin traps and spin lables, interaction between active sites, and redox systems. It is loaded with practical tricks as well as do's and don'ts that are based on the author's 30 years of experience in the field. The book also comes with an unprecedented set of...

  4. Programming in Biomolecular Computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Lars; Jones, Neil; Simonsen, Jakob Grue

    2010-01-01

    Our goal is to provide a top-down approach to biomolecular computation. In spite of widespread discussion about connections between biology and computation, one question seems notable by its absence: Where are the programs? We introduce a model of computation that is evidently programmable......, by programs reminiscent of low-level computer machine code; and at the same time biologically plausible: its functioning is defined by a single and relatively small set of chemical-like reaction rules. Further properties: the model is stored-program: programs are the same as data, so programs are not only...... in a strong sense: a universal algorithm exists, that is able to execute any program, and is not asymptotically inefficient. A prototype model has been implemented (for now in silico on a conventional computer). This work opens new perspectives on just how computation may be specified at the biological level....

  5. Scalable Molecular Dynamics for Large Biomolecular Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Brunner

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an optimized parallelization scheme for molecular dynamics simulations of large biomolecular systems, implemented in the production-quality molecular dynamics program NAMD. With an object-based hybrid force and spatial decomposition scheme, and an aggressive measurement-based predictive load balancing framework, we have attained speeds and speedups that are much higher than any reported in literature so far. The paper first summarizes the broad methodology we are pursuing, and the basic parallelization scheme we used. It then describes the optimizations that were instrumental in increasing performance, and presents performance results on benchmark simulations.

  6. VFFDT: A New Software for Preparing AMBER Force Field Parameters for Metal-Containing Molecular Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Suqing; Tang, Qing; He, Jian; Du, Shiyu; Xu, Shaofang; Wang, Chaojie; Xu, Yong; Lin, Fu

    2016-04-25

    Force fields are fundamental to molecular dynamics simulations. However, the incompleteness of force field parameters has been a long-standing problem, especially for metal-related systems. In our previous work, we adopted the Seminario method based on the Hessian matrix to systematically derive the zinc-related force field parameters for AMBER. In this work, in order to further simplify the whole protocol, we have implemented a user-friendly Visual Force Field Derivation Toolkit (VFFDT) to derive the force field parameters via simply clicking on the bond or angle in the 3D viewer, and we have further extended our previous program to support the Hessian matrix output from a variety of quantum mechanics (QM) packages, including Gaussian 03/09, ORCA 3.0, QChem, GAMESS-US, and MOPAC 2009/2012. In this toolkit, a universal VFFDT XYZ file format containing the raw Hessian matrix is available for all of the QM packages, and an instant force field parametrization protocol based on a semiempirical quantum mechanics (SQM) method is introduced. The new function that can automatically obtain the relevant parameters for zinc, copper, iron, etc., which can be exported in AMBER Frcmod format, has been added. Furthermore, our VFFDT program can read and write files in AMBER Prepc, AMBER Frcmod, and AMBER Mol2 format and can also be used to customize, view, copy, and paste the force field parameters in the context of the 3D viewer, which provides utilities complementary to ANTECHAMBER, MCPB, and MCPB.py in the AmberTools. PMID:26998926

  7. Improved side-chain torsion potentials for the Amber ff99SB protein force field

    OpenAIRE

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Piana, Stefano; Palmo, Kim; Maragakis, Paul; Klepeis, John L.; Dror, Ron O.; Shaw, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in hardware and software have enabled increasingly long molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of biomolecules, exposing certain limitations in the accuracy of the force fields used for such simulations and spurring efforts to refine these force fields. Recent modifications to the Amber and CHARMM protein force fields, for example, have improved the backbone torsion potentials, remedying deficiencies in earlier versions. Here, we further advance simulation accuracy by improving t...

  8. Penis morphology in a Burmese amber harvestman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Jason A.; Selden, Paul A.; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2016-02-01

    A unique specimen of the fossil harvestman Halitherses grimaldii Giribet and Dunlop, 2005 (Arachnida: Opiliones) from the Cretaceous (ca. 99 Ma) Burmese amber of Myanmar reveals a fully extended penis. This is the first record of a male copulatory organ of this nature preserved in amber and is of special importance due to the age of the deposit. The penis has a slender, distally flattened truncus, a spatulate heart-shaped glans and a short distal stylus, twisted at the tip. In living harvestmen, the penis yields crucial characters for their systematics. Male genital morphology in H. grimaldii appears to be unique among the wider Dyspnoi clade to which this fossil belongs. The large eyes in the fossil differ markedly from other members of the subfamily Ortholasmatinae to which H. grimaldii was originally referred. Based on recent data, it has been argued that large eyes may be plesiomorphic for Palpatores (i.e. the suborders Eupnoi and Dyspnoi), potentially rendering this character plesiomorphic for the fossil too. Thus, the unique structure of the penis seen here, and the probable lack of diaphanous teeth, present in all other extant non-acropsopilionid Dyspnoi, suggest that H. grimaldii represents a new, extinct family of large-eyed dyspnoid harvestmen, Halithersidae fam. nov.; a higher taxon in amber diagnosed here on both somatic and genital characters.

  9. From dynamics to structure and function of model biomolecular systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontaine-Vive-Curtaz, F.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to extend recent works on structure and dynamics of hydrogen bonded crystals to model biomolecular systems and biological processes. The tools that we have used are neutron scattering (NS) and density functional theory (DFT) and force field (FF) based simulation method

  10. Improvements in continuum modeling for biomolecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiao; Ben-Zhuo, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Modeling of biomolecular systems plays an essential role in understanding biological processes, such as ionic flow across channels, protein modification or interaction, and cell signaling. The continuum model described by the Poisson- Boltzmann (PB)/Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations has made great contributions towards simulation of these processes. However, the model has shortcomings in its commonly used form and cannot capture (or cannot accurately capture) some important physical properties of the biological systems. Considerable efforts have been made to improve the continuum model to account for discrete particle interactions and to make progress in numerical methods to provide accurate and efficient simulations. This review will summarize recent main improvements in continuum modeling for biomolecular systems, with focus on the size-modified models, the coupling of the classical density functional theory and the PNP equations, the coupling of polar and nonpolar interactions, and numerical progress. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91230106) and the Chinese Academy of Sciences Program for Cross & Cooperative Team of the Science & Technology Innovation.

  11. OHANA, the AMBER/VLTI Snapshot Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Rivinius, Th; Demers, Z; Quirrenbach, A

    2016-01-01

    We report on the OHANA interferometric snapshot survey, carried out by the VLTI group at the Paranal observatory. It makes use of observing time not useful for any other scheduled scientific or technical tasks in the sense of a backup programme, to characterize the mass-loss for early-type stars. The survey employs the combination of AMBER's high spectral and spatial resolution. The spatially unresolved central object provides a reference frame for the fringe properties observed in the light of the continuum.

  12. Ensemble based convergence assessment of biomolecular trajectories

    CERN Document Server

    Lyman, E; Lyman, Edward; Zuckerman, Daniel M.

    2006-01-01

    Assessing the convergence of a biomolecular simulation is an essential part of any computational investigation. This is because many important quantities (e.g., free energy differences) depend on the relative populations of different conformers; insufficient convergence translates into systematic errors. Here we present a simple method to self-consistently assess the convergence of a simulation. Standard clustering methods first generate a set of reference structures to any desired precision. The trajectory is then classified by proximity to the reference structures, yielding a one-dimensional histogram of structurally distinct populations. Comparing ensembles of different trajectories (or different parts of the same trajectory) built with the same reference structures provides a sensitive, quantitative measure of convergence. Please note: this is a preliminary manuscript, and should be read as such. Comments are most welcome, especially regarding pertinent prior work.

  13. Storing and analysing biomolecular contacts

    OpenAIRE

    Walter, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Biomolecular contacts play a crucial role in all areas of life. In particular, protein-protein (PP) interactions are essential for most processes in biological cells. Antigen-antibody recognition, enzyme substrate binding, hormone receptor binding, RNA splicing, DNA replication and signal transduction are just some examples for the rich variety of PP interactions. In the last years modern proteomic methods have helped to get a better understanding of the complexity within living cell and orga...

  14. Tetracycline-Regulated Suppression of Amber Codons in Mammalian Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Ho-Jin; RajBhandary, Uttam L.

    1998-01-01

    As an approach to inducible suppression of nonsense mutations in mammalian cells, we described recently an amber suppression system in mammalian cells dependent on coexpression of Escherichia coli glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase (GlnRS) along with the E. coli glutamine-inserting amber suppressor tRNA. Here, we report on tetracycline-regulated expression of the E. coli GlnRS gene and, thereby, tetracycline-regulated suppression of amber codons in mammalian HeLa and COS-1 cells. The E. coli GlnRS co...

  15. Mammalian hairs in Early Cretaceous amber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vullo, Romain; Girard, Vincent; Azar, Dany; Néraudeau, Didier

    2010-07-01

    Two mammalian hairs have been found in association with an empty puparium in a ˜100-million-year-old amber (Early Cretaceous) from France. Although hair is known to be an ancestral, ubiquitous feature in the crown Mammalia, the structure of Mesozoic hair has never been described. In contrast to fur and hair of some Jurassic and Cretaceous mammals preserved as carbonized filaments, the exceptional preservation of the fossils described here allows for the study of the cuticular structure. Results show the oldest direct evidence of hair with a modern scale pattern. This discovery implies that the morphology of hair cuticula may have remained unchanged throughout most of mammalian evolution. The association of these hairs with a possible fly puparium provides paleoecological information and indicates peculiar taphonomic conditions.

  16. An asterid flower from neotropical mid-Tertiary amber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poinar, George O; Struwe, Lena

    2016-01-01

    Fossils preserved in amber may provide significant palaeoevolutionary and biogeographical data regarding the evolution of life on Earth(1). Although amber is particularly noted for its detailed preservation of arthropods, the same degree of preservation can be found for vascular plant remains(2). Mid-Tertiary Dominican amber is a rich source for such fossils, and representatives of several angiosperm families have been described. However, no fossilized examples of the large asterid plant clade have yet been reported. Here we describe the first fossil neotropical flowers found in amber from a representative of the asterids. The asterids are one of the largest lineages of flowering plants, containing groups such as the sunflower, potato, coffee and mint families, totalling over 80,000 species(3). The new fossils are only known as flowers, more precisely corollas with stamens and styles. We here describe them as a new species, Strychnos electri sp. nov, in the plant family Loganiaceae (Gentianales). PMID:27249345

  17. First AMBER/VLTI observations of hot massive stars

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, R; Chesneau, O; Weigelt, G; Bonneau, D; Stee, P; Kraus, S; Mourard, D; Meilland, A; Malbet, F; Lisi, F; Kern, P; Beckmann, U; Lagarde, S; Gennari, S; Lecoarer, E; Driebe, T; Accardo, M; Robbe-Dubois, S; Ohnaka, K; Busoni, S; Roussel, A; Zins, G; Behrend, J; Ferruzi, D; Bresson, Y; Duvert, G; Nussbaum, E; Marconi, A; Feautrier, P; Dugu'e, M; Chelli, A; Tatulli, E; Heininger, M; Delboulbé, A; Bonhomme, S; Schertl, D; Testi, L; Mathias, P; Monin, J L; Gluck, L; Hofmann, Karl Heinrich; Salinari, P; Puget, P; Clausse, J M; Fraix-Burnet, D; Foy, R; Isella, A; Stee, Ph.; Driebe, Th.; Feautrier, Ph.; Mathias, Ph.

    2005-01-01

    AMBER is the first near infrared focal instrument of the VLTI. It combines three telescopes and produces spectrally resolved interferometric measures. This paper discusses some preliminary results of the first scientific observations of AMBER with three Unit Telescopes at medium (1500) and high (12000) spectral resolution. We derive a first set of constraints on the structure of the circumstellar material around the Wolf Rayet Gamma2 Velorum and the LBV Eta Carinae.

  18. Integrative NMR for biomolecular research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woonghee; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Dashti, Hesam; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Tonelli, Marco; Westler, William M; Butcher, Samuel E; Henzler-Wildman, Katherine A; Markley, John L

    2016-04-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful technique for determining structural and functional features of biomolecules in physiological solution as well as for observing their intermolecular interactions in real-time. However, complex steps associated with its practice have made the approach daunting for non-specialists. We introduce an NMR platform that makes biomolecular NMR spectroscopy much more accessible by integrating tools, databases, web services, and video tutorials that can be launched by simple installation of NMRFAM software packages or using a cross-platform virtual machine that can be run on any standard laptop or desktop computer. The software package can be downloaded freely from the NMRFAM software download page ( http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/download_packages.html ), and detailed instructions are available from the Integrative NMR Video Tutorial page ( http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/integrative.html ). PMID:27023095

  19. [Advances in biomolecular machine: methane monooxygenases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jixue; Wang, Shizhen; Fang, Baishan

    2015-07-01

    Methane monooxygenases (MMO), regarded as "an amazing biomolecular machine", catalyze the oxidation of methane to methanol under aerobic conditions. MMO catalyze the oxidation of methane elaborately, which is a novel way to catalyze methane to methanol. Furthermore, MMO can inspire the biomolecular machine design. In this review, we introduced MMO including structure, gene and catalytic mechanism. The history and the taxonomy of MMO were also introduced. PMID:26647577

  20. Impact Amber, Popcorn, and Pathology: The Biology of Impact Melt Breccias and Implications for Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R. S.; Schultz, P. H.

    2007-03-01

    We present evidence that superheated impact melts can trap and preserve both floral and faunal remains forming "impact amber." We discuss terrestrial occurrences of impact amber and the strategy it suggests in searching for evidence of past life on other

  1. Optical configuration and analysis of the AMBER/VLTI instrument

    CERN Document Server

    Robbe-Dubois, S; Petrov, R G; Lisi, F; Beckmann, U; Antonelli, P; Bresson, Y; Martinot-Lagarde, G; Roussel, A; Salinari, P; Vannier, M; Chelli, A; Dugué, M; Duvert, G; Gennari, S; Gluck, L; Kern, P; LeCoarer, E; Malbet, F; Millour, F; Perraut, K; Puget, P; Rantakyro, F; Tatulli, E; Weigelt, G; Zins, G

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the design goals and engineering efforts that led to the realization of AMBER (Astronomical Multi BEam combineR) and to the achievement of its present performance. On the basis of the general instrumental concept, AMBER was decomposed into modules whose functions and detailed characteristics are given. Emphasis is put on the spatial filtering system, a key element of the instrument. We established a budget for transmission and contrast degradation through the different modules, and made the detailed optical design. The latter confirmed the overall performance of the instrument and defined the exact implementation of the AMBER optics. The performance was assessed with laboratory measurements and commissionings at the VLTI, in terms of spectral coverage and resolution, instrumental contrast higher than 0.80, minimum magnitude of 11 in K, absolute visibility accuracy of 1%, and differential phase stability of 1E-3 rad over one minute.

  2. IOT Overview: Calibrations of the VLTI Instruments (MIDI and AMBER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, S.; Rantakyrö, F.; Rivinius, T.; Stefl, S.; Hummel, C.; Brillant, S.; Schöller, M.; Percheron, I.; Wittkowski, M.; Richichi, A.; Ballester, P.

    We present here a short review of the calibration processes that are currently applied to the instruments AMBER and MIDI of the VLTI (Very Large Telescope Interferometer) at Paranal. We first introduce the general principles to calibrate the raw data (the "visibilities") that have been measured by long-baseline optical interferometry. Then, we focus on the specific case of the scientific operation of the VLTI instruments. We explain the criteria that have been used to select calibrator stars for the observations with the VLTI instruments, as well as the routine internal calibration techniques. Among these techniques, the "P2VM" (Pixel-to-Visibility Matrix) in the case of AMBER is explained. Also, the daily monitoring of AMBER and MIDI, that has recently been implemented, is shortly introduced.

  3. First Psocodean (Psocodea,Empheriidae) from the Cretaceous Amber of New Jersey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dany AZAR; André NEL; Julian F.PETRULEVI(C)IUS

    2010-01-01

    Representatives of the extinct psocid family Empheriidae are known from Eocene Baltic amber,Lowermost Eocene French amber (Oise),and Lower Cretaceous Spanish amber (Alava).We report herein the first discovery of an empheriid psocid from the Cretaceous amber of New Jersey as Jerseyempheria grimaldii gen.et sp.nov.The fossil is figured and described.The new species is distinguished from related taxa.A discussion and checklist of Empheriidae are provided.

  4. Amber Trust on ostmas Tallinna Külmhoone emafirmat / Liis Kängsepp

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kängsepp, Liis, 1981-

    2005-01-01

    Skandinaavia-USA investeerimisfond Amber Trust loodab enne aasta lõppu allkirjastada Tallinna Külmhoone emafirma Kauno Pieno Centras ostulepingu. Diagramm: Tallinna Külmhoone majandusnäitajad. Vt. samas: Amber Trust tahab investeerida üle 2 miljardi krooni; Amber laiendas tegevust Vetteli kaudu Soome

  5. Chemotaxonomical aspects of lower Cretaceous amber from Reconcavo Basin, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Ricardo; Azevedo, Debora A., E-mail: ricardopereira@iq.ufrj.b, E-mail: debora@iq.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IQ/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Carvalho, Ismar S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias; Fernandes, Antonio Carlos S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Museu Nacional. Dept. de Geologia e Paleontologia

    2011-07-01

    The chemical composition of Lower Cretaceous amber samples from Reconcavo Basin (Salvador, Bahia) was performed by GC-MS to characterize possible botanical sources. The compounds identified were hydrocarbonic and polar diterpenoids, such as abietane, dehydroabietane, tetrahydroretene, dehydroabietol, dehydroabietic acid, ferruginol and sugiol. Other diterpenoid classes were not detected as well as triterpenoids. The composition of the extracts and chemosystematic data allows relating the samples to conifers of Podocarpaceae or Cheirolepidiaceae families due to detection of ferruginol, a specific biomarker to these families. The data concerning Cretaceous amber in the Reconcavo Basin provided information concerning the presence of a resinous flora in the Maracangalha Formation sediments during the Lower Cretaceous. (author)

  6. Empirical corrections to the Amber RNA force field with Target Metadynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gil-Ley, Alejandro; Bussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The computational study of conformational transitions in nucleic acids still faces many challenges. For example, in the case of single stranded RNA tetranucleotides, agreement between simulations and experiments is not satisfactory due to inaccuracies in the force fields commonly used in molecular dynamics simulations. We here use experimental data collected from high-resolution X-ray structures to attempt an improvement of the latest version of the AMBER force field. A modified metadynamics algorithm is used to calculate correcting potentials designed to enforce experimental distributions of backbone torsion angles. Replica-exchange simulations of tetranucleotides including these correcting potentials show significantly better agreement with independent solution experiments for the oligonucleotides containing pyrimidine bases. Although the proposed corrections do not seem to be portable to generic RNA systems, the simulations revealed the importance of the alpha and beta backbone angles on the modulation of ...

  7. Microsecond-Scale MD Simulations of HIV-1 DIS Kissing-Loop Complexes Predict Bulged-In Conformation of the Bulged Bases and Reveal Interesting Differences between Available Variants of the AMBER RNA Force Fields

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Havrila, Marek; Zgarbová, M.; Jurečka, P.; Banáš, P.; Krepl, Miroslav; Otyepka, M.; Šponer, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 49 (2015), s. 15176-15190. ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP305/12/G034 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : MOLECULAR-DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS * DIMERIZATION INITIATION SITE * QUANTUM-CHEMICAL COMPUTATIONS Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.302, year: 2014

  8. Structural changes in amber due to uranium mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havelcová, Martina; Machovič, Vladimír; Mizera, Jiří; Sýkorová, Ivana; René, Miloš; Borecká, Lenka; Lapčák, Ladislav; Bičáková, Olga; Janeček, Oldřich; Dvořák, Zdeněk

    2016-07-01

    The presence of uranium, with a bulk mass fraction of about 1.5 wt% and radiolytic alterations are a feature of Cenomanian amber from Křižany, at the northeastern edge of the North Bohemian Cretaceous uranium ore district. Pores and microcracks in the amber were filled with a mineral admixture, mainly in the form of Zr-Y-REE enriched uraninite. As a result of radiolytic alterations due to the presence of uranium, structural changes were observed in the Křižany amber in comparison with a reference amber from Nové Strašecí in central Bohemia; this was of similar age and botanical origin but did not contain elevated levels of uranium. Structural changes involved an increase in aromaticity due to dehydroaromatization of aliphatic cyclic hydrocarbons, loss of oxygen functional groups, an increase in the degree of polymerization, crosslinking of CC bonds, formation of a three-dimensional hydrocarbon network in the bulk organic matrix, and carbonization of the organic matrix around the uraninite infill. PMID:27085038

  9. Conducting polymer based biomolecular electronic devices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B D Malhotra; Rahul Singhal

    2003-08-01

    Biomolecular electronics is rapidly evolving from physics, chemistry, biology, electronics and information technology. Organic materials such as proteins, pigments and conducting polymers have been considered as alternatives for carrying out the functions that are presently being performed by semiconductor silicon. Conducting polymers such as polypyrroles, polythiophenes and polyanilines have been projected for applications for a wide range of biomolecular electronic devices such as optical, electronic, drug-delivery, memory and biosensing devices. Our group has been actively working towards the application of conducting polymers to Schottky diodes, metal–insulator–semiconductor (MIS) devices and biosensors for the past 10 years. This paper is a review of some of the results obtained at our laboratory in the area of conducting polymer biomolecular electronics.

  10. Perspective: Markov models for long-timescale biomolecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamics simulations have the potential to provide atomic-level detail and insight to important questions in chemical physics that cannot be observed in typical experiments. However, simply generating a long trajectory is insufficient, as researchers must be able to transform the data in a simulation trajectory into specific scientific insights. Although this analysis step has often been taken for granted, it deserves further attention as large-scale simulations become increasingly routine. In this perspective, we discuss the application of Markov models to the analysis of large-scale biomolecular simulations. We draw attention to recent improvements in the construction of these models as well as several important open issues. In addition, we highlight recent theoretical advances that pave the way for a new generation of models of molecular kinetics

  11. Perspective: Markov Models for Long-Timescale Biomolecular Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Schwantes, Christian R; Pande, Vijay S

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have the potential to provide atomic-level detail and insight to important questions in chemical physics that cannot be observed in typical experiments. However, simply generating a long trajectory is insufficient, as researchers must be able to transform the data in a simulation trajectory into specific scientific insights. Although this analysis step has often been taken for granted, it deserves further attention as large-scale simulations become increasingly routine. In this perspective, we discuss the application of Markov models to the analysis of large-scale biomolecular simulations. We draw attention to recent improvements in the construction of these models as well as several important open issues. In addition, we highlight recent theoretical advances that pave the way for a new generation of models of molecular kinetics.

  12. Entrapment Bias of Arthropods in Miocene Amber Revealed by Trapping Experiments in a Tropical Forest in Chiapas, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Solórzano Kraemer, Mónica M.; Kraemer, Atahualpa S.; Stebner, Frauke; Bickel, Daniel J.; Rust, Jes

    2015-01-01

    All entomological traps have a capturing bias, and amber, viewed as a trap, is no exception. Thus the fauna trapped in amber does not represent the total existing fauna of the former amber forest, rather the fauna living in and around the resin producing tree. In this paper we compare arthropods from a forest very similar to the reconstruction of the Miocene Mexican amber forest, and determine the bias of different trapping methods, including amber. We also show, using cluster analyses, measu...

  13. AMBER and Ecolego Intercomparisons using Calculations from SR 97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AMBER compartmental modelling software has been used by Quintessa in undertaking Performance Assessment (PA) calculations for SKI for the last four years. In particular, it was used in helping to identify key issues in the safety case for SFR 1. SSI and the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA) are supporting the development of Ecolego which is based on the Matlab/Simulink general purpose modelling software and provides a user-friendly Graphical User Interface which is particularly suitable for undertaking PA calculations. At SKI/SSI expert group meetings in September 2002, Quintessa presented some radionuclide transport calculations for a deep repository for spent fuel using AMBER. Comparisons were presented with calculations undertaken by SKB in their SR 97 study. It was agreed that it would be useful to undertake some intercomparison calculations using AMBER and Ecolego based on calculation cases considered in SR 97. The reasons for undertaking such intercomparisons include: 1. to give confidence in the use of AMBER and Ecolego for whole system PA calculations for a deep repository; and 2. to provide SKI and SSI with an understanding of some of the technical issues raised by seeking to repeat the SR 97 calculations with different models and software. This report documents the intercomparison calculations that have been undertaken. The main conclusions that have been drawn are: 1. Both modelling packages could successfully reproduce SKB's SR 97 calculations for the near field, geosphere and biosphere. 2. The results of the deterministic calculations for the near field and both deterministic and probabilistic calculations for the biosphere, where AMBER and Ecolego used compartment models, were typically in agreement to within one significant figure. The identical results for the calculated equilibrium inventories in Bay sediments illustrate that the calculations by AMBER and Ecolego are essentially the same when the compartment models are identical

  14. Review of the El Soplao Amber Outcrop,Early Cretaceous of Cantabria,Spain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    María NAJARRO; Francisco VELASCO; Fernando TORNOS; Véronique DAVIERO-GOMEZ; Bernard GOMEZ; Xavier DELCL(O)S; Enrique PE(N)ALVER; Ricardo P(E)REZ-DE LA FUENTE; Jaime ORTEGA-BLANCO; Cesar MENOR-SALV(A)N; Eduardo BARR(O)N; Carmen SORIANO; Idoia ROSALES; Rafael L(O)PEZ DEL VALLE

    2010-01-01

    El Soplao outcrop,an Early Cretaceous amber deposit recently discovered in northern Spain(Cantabria),has been shown to be the largest site of amber with arthropod inclusions that has been found in Spain so far.Relevant data provided herein for biogeochemistry of the amber,palynology,taphonomy and arthropod bioinclusious complement those previously published.This set of data suggests at least two botanical sources for the amber of El Soplao deposit.The first(type A amber)strongly supports a source related to Cheirolepidiaceae,and the second(type B amber)shows non-specific conifer biomarkers.Comparison of molecular composition of type A amber with Frenelopsis leaves(Cheicolepidiaceae)strongly suggests a biochemical affinity and a common botanical origin.A preliminary palynologlcal study indicates a regional high taxonomical diversity,mainly of pteridophyte spores and gymnosperm pollen grains.According to the preliminary palynological data,the region was inhabited by conifer forests adapted to a dry season under a subtropical climate.The abundant charcoalified wood associated with the amber in the same beds is evidence of paleofires that most likely promoted both the resin production and an intensive erosion of the litter,and subsequent great accumulation of amber plus plant cuticles.In addition,for the first time in the fossil record,charcoalified plant fibers as bioinclusious in amber are reported.Other relevant taphonomic data are the exceptional presence of serpulids and bryozoans on the surfaces of some amber pieces indicating both a long exposure on marine or brackish-water and a mixed assemblage of amber.Lastly,new findings of insect bioinclusions,some of them uncommon in the fossil record or showing remarkable adaptations,are reported.In conclusion,a documented scenario for the origin of the El Soplao amber outcrop is provided.

  15. Advances in integrative modeling of biomolecular complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karaca, E.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution structural information is needed in order to unveil the underlying mechanistic of biomolecular function. Due to the technical limitations or the nature of the underlying complexes, acquiring atomic resolution information is difficult for many challenging systems, while, often, low-re

  16. Flourescence from Gas-Phase Biomolecular Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted

    2013-01-01

    This chapter deals with measurements of fluorescence from electronically excited biomolecular ions where there are no interactions with an external environment. Biomolecules with no natural fluorophores are labelled with a dye for such experiments. First, some of the advantages, but also difficul...

  17. Solid state 13C NMR analysis of Brazilian cretaceous ambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    13C cross polarization with magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (13C CPMAS NMR) spectra have been obtained for the first time to three Cretaceous amber samples from South America. The samples were dated to Lower Cretaceous and collected in sediments from the Amazonas, Araripe and Reconcavo basins, Brazil. All samples have very similar spectra, consistent with a common paleobotanical source. Some aspects of the spectra suggest a relationship between Brazilian ambers and Araucariaceae family, such as intense resonances at 38-39 ppm. All samples are constituted by polylabdane structure associated to Class Ib resins, constituted by polymers of labdanoid diterpenes. Finally, information concerning some structural changes during maturation, such as isomerization of Δ8(17) and Δ12(13) unsaturations, were obtained by 13C NMR analyses. The results concerning botanical affinities are in accordance with previous results obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). (author)

  18. AMBER : a near infrared focal instrument for the VLTI

    OpenAIRE

    Petrov, R. G.; Malbet, F.; Richichi, A.; Hofmann, K.H.; Mourard, Denis; Agabi, Karim; Antonelli, P.; Aristidi, Eric; Baffa, Carlo; Beckmann, Udo; Berio, Philippe; Bresson, Yves; Cassaing, Frederic; Chelli, Alain; Dreiss, Albrecht

    2001-01-01

    AMBER is the General User near-infrared focal instrument of the Very Large Telescope interferometer. Its specifications are based on three key programs on Young Stellar Objects, Active Galactic Nuclei central regions, masses and spectra of hot Extra Solar Planets. It has an imaging capacity because it combines up to three beams and very high accuracy measurement are expected from the spatial filtering of beams by single mode fibers and the comparison of measurements made simultaneously in dif...

  19. Double fossilization in eukaryotic microorganisms from Lower Cretaceous amber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso Jesús

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microfossils are not only useful for elucidating biological macro- and microevolution but also the biogeochemical history of our planet. Pyritization is the most important and extensive mode of preservation of animals and especially of plants. Entrapping in amber, a fossilized resin, is considered an alternative mode of biological preservation. For the first time, the internal organization of 114-million-year-old microfossils entrapped in Lower Cretaceous amber is described and analyzed, using adapted scanning electron microscopy in backscattered electron mode in association with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy microanalysis. Double fossilization of several protists included in diverse taxonomical groups and some vegetal debris is described and analyzed. Results In protists without an exoskeleton or shell (ciliates, naked amoebae, flagellates, determinate structures, including the nuclei, surface envelopes (cortex or cytoplasmic membrane and hyaloplasm are the main sites of pyritization. In protists with a biomineralized skeleton (diatoms, silicon was replaced by pyrite. Permineralization was the main mode of pyritization. Framboidal, subhedral and microcrystalline are the predominant pyrite textures detected in the cells. Abundant pyritized vegetal debris have also been found inside the amber nuggets and the surrounding sediments. This vegetal debris usually contained numerous pyrite framboids and very densely packed polycrystalline pyrite formations infilled with different elements of the secondary xylem. Conclusion Embedding in amber and pyritization are not always alternative modes of biological preservation during geological times, but double fossilization is possible under certain environmental conditions. Pyritization in protists shows a quite different pattern with regard to plants, due to the different composition and cellular architecture in these microorganisms and organisms. Anaerobic sulphate

  20. Webspinners in Early Eocene amber from western India (Insecta, Embiodea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Engel

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The family Scelembiidae (Neoembiodea: Embiomorpha: Archembioidea is recorded from Asia for the first time, based on two individuals preserved in Early Eocene amber from the Cambay Basin, western India. Kumarembia hurleyi Engel & Grimaldi, gen. n. et sp. n., is described, figured, and distinguished from other archembioid genera. The genus shares male genitalic features with scelembiids, otherwise known from South America and Africa.

  1. Seeking carotenoid pigments in amber-preserved fossil feathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Daniel B.; Nascimbene, Paul C.; Dove, Carla J.; Grimaldi, David A.; James, Helen F.

    2014-06-01

    Plumage colours bestowed by carotenoid pigments can be important for visual communication and likely have a long evolutionary history within Aves. Discovering plumage carotenoids in fossil feathers could provide insight into the ecology of ancient birds and non-avian dinosaurs. With reference to a modern feather, we sought chemical evidence of carotenoids in six feathers preserved in amber (Miocene to mid-Cretaceous) and in a feather preserved as a compression fossil (Eocene). Evidence of melanin pigmentation and microstructure preservation was evaluated with scanning electron and light microscopies. We observed fine microstructural details including evidence for melanin pigmentation in the amber and compression fossils, but Raman spectral bands did not confirm the presence of carotenoids in them. Carotenoids may have been originally absent from these feathers or the pigments may have degraded during burial; the preservation of microstructure may suggest the former. Significantly, we show that carotenoid plumage pigments can be detected without sample destruction through an amber matrix using confocal Raman spectroscopy.

  2. Amber bearing deposit in SW Saaremaa, Estonia - sedimentary environment and palaeogeography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Triine; Ots, Mirja; Rosentau, Alar

    2015-04-01

    The paper describes a deposit of natural amber found form Estonia. Finds of natural amber are important in the context of the Bronze Age archaeology, because the amount of Bronze Age archaeological amber found in Estonia is very small. Most of the amber is from the Late Bronze Age and is mainly discovered from the fortified settlements in Saaremaa, some also from burials of the same time. Now, the discovery of the deposit of natural amber in the island of Saaremaa makes us reconsider the general opinion that all archaeological amber items found in Estonia have been imported. The aim of this study is to clarify the origin and age of the natural amber using scientific methods. A layer of buried organic matter (BOM) containing pieces of natural amber was discovered in Holocene coastal plain on Sõrve peninsula, island of Saaremaa. The BOM layer is buried under ca 90 cm-thick sandy coastal deposits and consists of remains of coastal plants and pieces of driftwood. Palaeogeographic reconstructions and sediment composition indicate that the layer was deposited in the coastal zone and buried quickly by sandy marine sediments. According to radiocarbon dating of the seeds of Polygonum lapathifolium the formation of the BOM layer remained in the Late Bronze Age (2480 ± 30 14C yr BP). Amber finds have been characterized using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and isotope analysis of light elements (H and C) - both are referring to Baltic amber. Therefore it is probable that amber was transported to Saaremaa within organic matter from the Latvian-Lithuanian coastal zone where secondary Baltic amber deposits are widely known.

  3. Computational and theoretical aspects of biomolecular structure and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A.E.; Berendzen, J.; Catasti, P., Chen, X. [and others

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report for a project that sought to evaluate and develop theoretical, and computational bases for designing, performing, and analyzing experimental studies in structural biology. Simulations of large biomolecular systems in solution, hydrophobic interactions, and quantum chemical calculations for large systems have been performed. We have developed a code that implements the Fast Multipole Algorithm (FMA) that scales linearly in the number of particles simulated in a large system. New methods have been developed for the analysis of multidimensional NMR data in order to obtain high resolution atomic structures. These methods have been applied to the study of DNA sequences in the human centromere, sequences linked to genetic diseases, and the dynamics and structure of myoglobin.

  4. Game Theory Model of Traffic Participants within Amber Time at Signalized Intersection

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The traffic light scheme is composed of red, green, and amber lights, and it has been defined clearly for the traffic access of red and green lights; however, the definition of that for the amber light is indistinct, which leads to the appearance of uncertainty factors and serious traffic conflicts during the amber light. At present, the traffic administrations are faced with the decision of whether to forbid passing or not during the amber light in the cities of China. On one hand, it will g...

  5. Membrane-based biomolecular smart materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Membrane-based biomolecular materials are a new class of smart material that feature networks of artificial lipid bilayers contained within durable synthetic substrates. Bilayers contained within this modular material platform provide an environment that can be tailored to host an enormous diversity of functional biomolecules, where the functionality of the global material system depends on the type(s) and organization(s) of the biomolecules that are chosen. In this paper, we review a series of biomolecular material platforms developed recently within the Leo Group at Virginia Tech and we discuss several novel coupling mechanisms provided by these hybrid material systems. The platforms developed demonstrate that the functions of biomolecules and the properties of synthetic materials can be combined to operate in concert, and the examples provided demonstrate how the formation and properties of a lipid bilayer can respond to a variety of stimuli including mechanical forces and electric fields

  6. Solvation thermodynamic mapping of molecular surfaces in AmberTools: GIST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Steven; Nguyen, Crystal; Salomon-Ferrer, Romelia; Walker, Ross C; Gilson, Michael K; Kurtzman, Tom

    2016-08-01

    The expulsion of water from surfaces upon molecular recognition and nonspecific association makes a major contribution to the free energy changes of these processes. In order to facilitate the characterization of water structure and thermodynamics on surfaces, we have incorporated Grid Inhomogeneous Solvation Theory (GIST) into the CPPTRAJ toolset of AmberTools. GIST is a grid-based implementation of Inhomogeneous Fluid Solvation Theory, which analyzes the output from molecular dynamics simulations to map out solvation thermodynamic and structural properties on a high-resolution, three-dimensional grid. The CPPTRAJ implementation, called GIST-cpptraj, has a simple, easy-to-use command line interface, and is open source and freely distributed. We have also developed a set of open-source tools, called GISTPP, which facilitate the analysis of GIST output grids. Tutorials for both GIST-cpptraj and GISTPP can be found at ambermd.org. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27317094

  7. IR and py/GC/MS examination of amber relics excavated from 6th century royal tomb in Korean Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jongseo; Yun, Eunyoung; Kang, Hyungtae; Ahn, Jooyoung; Kim, Gyuho

    2016-08-01

    Relics of amber were excavated from King Muryeong's tomb constructed in the 6th century on the Korean peninsula. To estimate the provenance, FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) and py/GC/MS (pyrolysis/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry) analysis were utilized. The reference Baltic amber sample was also analyzed with the same method for comparison. The relics were confirmed to be amber from the FTIR analysis where an absorption band near 1150 cm- 1, characteristic one in Baltic amber, was also observed. In py/GC/MS analysis, pyrolyzed products like butanedioic acid and dehydroabietic acid, known constituents of amber, were observed. In addition, D-fenchyl alcohol, camphor, borneol and butanedioic acid, typical constituents of Baltic amber, were observed in some samples. From this, it appears that some of relics were made from Baltic amber and that Baltic amber was transported to the Korean peninsula in the time of tomb construction.

  8. IR and py/GC/MS examination of amber relics excavated from 6th century royal tomb in Korean Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jongseo; Yun, Eunyoung; Kang, Hyungtae; Ahn, Jooyoung; Kim, Gyuho

    2016-08-01

    Relics of amber were excavated from King Muryeong's tomb constructed in the 6th century on the Korean peninsula. To estimate the provenance, FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) and py/GC/MS (pyrolysis/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry) analysis were utilized. The reference Baltic amber sample was also analyzed with the same method for comparison. The relics were confirmed to be amber from the FTIR analysis where an absorption band near 1150cm(-1), characteristic one in Baltic amber, was also observed. In py/GC/MS analysis, pyrolyzed products like butanedioic acid and dehydroabietic acid, known constituents of amber, were observed. In addition, d-fenchyl alcohol, camphor, borneol and butanedioic acid, typical constituents of Baltic amber, were observed in some samples. From this, it appears that some of relics were made from Baltic amber and that Baltic amber was transported to the Korean peninsula in the time of tomb construction. PMID:27116473

  9. A gilled mushroom, Gerontomyces lepidotus gen. et sp. nov. (Basidiomycota: Agaricales), in Baltic amber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poinar, George

    2016-09-01

    A densely scaled small mushroom in Baltic amber is described as Gerontomyces lepidotus gen. et sp. nov. and is characterized by a convex pileus 1.0 mm in diameter, distant to subdistant lamellae with smooth margins and a centrally inserted cylindrical, solid stipe. Its taxonomic placement is uncertain. This is the first mushroom described from Baltic amber. PMID:27567715

  10. Blue ghosts: a new method for isolating amber mutants defective in essential genes of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, S; Brickman, E R; Beckwith, J

    1981-01-01

    We describe a technique which permits an easy screening for amber mutants defective in essential genes of Escherichia coli. Using this approach, we have isolated three amber mutants defective in the rho gene. An extension of the technique allows the detection of ochre mutants and transposon inser...

  11. Historical survey of the internal use of unprocessed amber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffin, Christofer J

    2015-01-01

    The organic mineraloid gemstone, amber, a fossilized resin collected from Eocene deposits laid down around 44 million years old on the Baltic coast, has been an important geopharmaceutical in the western materia medica since classical times. Once rendered into powdered form, it could be delivered into the body using a wide range of vehicles including lozenges, pills, tablets, troches, electuaries, solutions and lohochs (lick-pots), and with toast and poached eggs. Acting either alone or in combination with a wide range of botanical, zoological and other geological ingredients, it was employed in the treatment of a huge range of diseases. Most prominent among these were various vascular disorders (e.g. haemoptysis, haemorrhage, excessive menstrual bleeding), problems with the urogenital system (e.g. tendency towards miscarriage, impotence, venereal diseases, strangury, dysuria and bladder stones) and alimentary conditions, particularly dysentery. A variety of infectious diseases, including plague, gonorrhoea, measles and fevers could be targeted with amber-containing preparations, as could epilepsy, melancholy and the ravages of old age. Rather more unusual applications included its use in the treatment of impotence, halitosis, drunkenness and a weak back. PMID:26203539

  12. Analyzing biomolecular interactions by variable angle ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiun-Yan; Lee, Chih-Kung; Lee, J. H.; Shiue, Shuen-Chen; Lee, Shu-Sheng; Lin, Shiming

    2001-10-01

    In this paper, an innovative ellipsometer is developed and applied to metrology of the biomolecular interaction on a protein biochip. Both the theory, optical and opto-mechanical configurations of this newly developed ellipsometer and methodologies adopted in system design to improve the system performance are presented. It will be shown that by measuring the ellipsometric parameters, the corresponding concentration variation in biochemical reaction can be calculated according to stoichiometry analysis. By applying the variable angle ellipsometry to analysis of a multi-layered sample, the thickness and concentration are resolved. It is believed that the newly developed ellipsometer biosensor is able to undertake an accurate measurement on biomedical interaction.

  13. Nanoarchitectonics of biomolecular assemblies for functional applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avinash, M. B.; Govindaraju, T.

    2014-10-01

    The stringent processes of natural selection and evolution have enabled extraordinary structure-function properties of biomolecules. Specifically, the archetypal designs of biomolecules, such as amino acids, nucleobases, carbohydrates and lipids amongst others, encode unparalleled information, selectivity and specificity. The integration of biomolecules either with functional molecules or with an embodied functionality ensures an eclectic approach for novel and advanced nanotechnological applications ranging from electronics to biomedicine, besides bright prospects in systems chemistry and synthetic biology. Given this intriguing scenario, our feature article intends to shed light on the emerging field of functional biomolecular engineering.

  14. Nanotube-Based Chemical and Biomolecular Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Koh; B.Kim; S.Hong; H.Lim; H.C.Choi

    2008-01-01

    We present a brief review about recent results regarding carbon nanotube (CNT)-based chemical and biomolecular sensors. For the fabrication of CNT-based sensors, devices containing CNT channels between two metal electrodes are first fabricated usually via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process or "surface programmed assembly" method. Then, the CNT surfaces are often functionalized to enhance the selectivity of the sensors. Using this process, highly-sensitive CNT-based sensors can be fabricated for the selective detection of various chemical and biological molecules such as hydrogen, ammonia, carbon monoxide, chlorine gas, DNA, glucose, alcohol, and proteins.

  15. Micro and Nanotechnologies Enhanced Biomolecular Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tza-Huei Wang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This editorial summarizes some of the recent advances of micro and nanotechnology-based tools and devices for biomolecular detection. These include the incorporation of nanomaterials into a sensor surface or directly interfacing with molecular probes to enhance target detection via more rapid and sensitive responses, and the use of self-assembled organic/inorganic nanocomposites that inhibit exceptional spectroscopic properties to enable facile homogenous assays with efficient binding kinetics. Discussions also include some insight into microfluidic principles behind the development of an integrated sample preparation and biosensor platform toward a miniaturized and fully functional system for point of care applications.

  16. At least 10% shorter C–H bonds in cryogenic protein crystal structures than in current AMBER forcefields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Yuan-Ping, E-mail: pang@mayo.edu

    2015-03-06

    High resolution protein crystal structures resolved with X-ray diffraction data at cryogenic temperature are commonly used as experimental data to refine forcefields and evaluate protein folding simulations. However, it has been unclear hitherto whether the C–H bond lengths in cryogenic protein structures are significantly different from those defined in forcefields to affect protein folding simulations. This article reports the finding that the C–H bonds in high resolution cryogenic protein structures are 10–14% shorter than those defined in current AMBER forcefields, according to 3709 C–H bonds in the cryogenic protein structures with resolutions of 0.62–0.79 Å. Also, 20 all-atom, isothermal–isobaric, 0.5-μs molecular dynamics simulations showed that chignolin folded from a fully-extended backbone formation to the native β-hairpin conformation in the simulations using AMBER forcefield FF12SB at 300 K with an aggregated native state population including standard error of 10 ± 4%. However, the aggregated native state population with standard error reduced to 3 ± 2% in the same simulations except that C–H bonds were shortened by 10–14%. Furthermore, the aggregated native state populations with standard errors increased to 35 ± 3% and 26 ± 3% when using FF12MC, which is based on AMBER forcefield FF99, with and without the shortened C–H bonds, respectively. These results show that the 10–14% bond length differences can significantly affect protein folding simulations and suggest that re-parameterization of C–H bonds according to the cryogenic structures could improve the ability of a forcefield to fold proteins in molecular dynamics simulations. - Highlights: • Cryogenic crystal structures are commonly used in computational studies of proteins. • C–H bonds in the cryogenic structures are shorter than those defined in forcefields. • A survey of 3709 C–H bonds shows that the cryogenic bonds are 10–14% shorter. • The

  17. At least 10% shorter C–H bonds in cryogenic protein crystal structures than in current AMBER forcefields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High resolution protein crystal structures resolved with X-ray diffraction data at cryogenic temperature are commonly used as experimental data to refine forcefields and evaluate protein folding simulations. However, it has been unclear hitherto whether the C–H bond lengths in cryogenic protein structures are significantly different from those defined in forcefields to affect protein folding simulations. This article reports the finding that the C–H bonds in high resolution cryogenic protein structures are 10–14% shorter than those defined in current AMBER forcefields, according to 3709 C–H bonds in the cryogenic protein structures with resolutions of 0.62–0.79 Å. Also, 20 all-atom, isothermal–isobaric, 0.5-μs molecular dynamics simulations showed that chignolin folded from a fully-extended backbone formation to the native β-hairpin conformation in the simulations using AMBER forcefield FF12SB at 300 K with an aggregated native state population including standard error of 10 ± 4%. However, the aggregated native state population with standard error reduced to 3 ± 2% in the same simulations except that C–H bonds were shortened by 10–14%. Furthermore, the aggregated native state populations with standard errors increased to 35 ± 3% and 26 ± 3% when using FF12MC, which is based on AMBER forcefield FF99, with and without the shortened C–H bonds, respectively. These results show that the 10–14% bond length differences can significantly affect protein folding simulations and suggest that re-parameterization of C–H bonds according to the cryogenic structures could improve the ability of a forcefield to fold proteins in molecular dynamics simulations. - Highlights: • Cryogenic crystal structures are commonly used in computational studies of proteins. • C–H bonds in the cryogenic structures are shorter than those defined in forcefields. • A survey of 3709 C–H bonds shows that the cryogenic bonds are 10–14% shorter. • The

  18. Energy dissipation in biomolecular machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lervik, Anders

    2012-07-01

    The operation of a molecular pump, the calcium pump of sarcoplasmic reticulum is studied using mesoscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamics and molecular dynamics. The mesoscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamic description of the pump is compared to the description obtained in the framework of Hill for kinetic enzyme cycles. By comparing these two descriptions at isothermal conditions, they are found to be equivalent. This supports the validity of the mesoscopic approach. An extension of the mesoscopic non-equilibrium framework to also include a heat flux and the corresponding temperature difference is proposed. This can be used to model phenomena such as non-shivering thermogenesis, a process which lack a theoretical description in the kinetic cycle picture. Further, the heat transfer in the calcium pump is studied using molecular dynamics. This is done in order to obtain phenomenological parameters that can be used for the modeling of thermogenesis. A non-stationary non-equilibrium molecular dynamics approach is developed, which may be used to study heat transfer between a small object and the surrounding solvent. This methodology is applied to the calcium pump solvated in water. It is found that the thermal conductivity of the protein is low (0.2 W K-1 m-1) compared to water (0.6 WK-1 m-1). This means that the protein may sustain a large temperature gradient across its structure. The simulations also show that the protein-water surface is important for the heat transfer. The time scale for vibrational energy relaxation is found to be of order 10/100 ps which strengthens the local equilibrium assumption of mesoscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamics. Mesoscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamics is also applied to calculate the thermodynamic efficiency of the calcium pump embedded in lipid bilayers of varying length and from different tissues. This is done in order to show the applicability of mesoscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamics to interpret experimental data. The

  19. Coassembly of aromatic dipeptides into biomolecular necklaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuran, Sivan; Razvag, Yair; Reches, Meital

    2012-11-27

    This paper describes the formation of complex peptide-based structures by the coassembly of two simple peptides, the diphenylalanine peptide and its tert-butyl dicarbonate (Boc) protected analogue. Each of these peptides can self-assemble into a distinct architecture: the diphenylalanine peptide into tubular structures and its analogue into spheres. Integrated together, these peptides coassemble into a construction of beaded strings, where spherical assemblies are connected by elongated elements. Electron and scanning force microscopy demonstrated the morphology of these structures, which we termed "biomolecular necklaces". Additional experiments indicated the reversibility of the coassembly process and the stability of the structures. Furthermore, we suggest a possible mechanism of formation for the biomolecular necklaces. Our suggestion is based on the necklace model for polyelectrolyte chains, which proposes that a necklace structure appears as a result of counterion condensation on the backbone of a polyelectrolyte. Overall, the approach of coassembly, demonstrated using aromatic peptides, can be adapted to any peptides and may lead to the development and discovery of new self-assembled architectures formed by peptides and other biomolecules. PMID:23061818

  20. The aquatic and semiaquatic biota in Miocene amber from the Campo LA Granja mine (Chiapas, Mexico): Paleoenvironmental implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Sánchez, María de Lourdes; Hegna, Thomas A.; Schaaf, Peter; Pérez, Liseth; Centeno-García, Elena; Vega, Francisco J.

    2015-10-01

    Amber from the Campo La Granja mine in Chiapas, Mexico, is distinct from other sources of amber in Chiapas. Campo La Granja amber has distinct layers created by successive flows of resin with thin layers of sand on most surfaces. Aquatic and semi-aquatic arthropods are commonly found. Together these pieces of evidence suggest an estuarine environment similar to modern mangrove communities. The aquatic crustaceans are the most intriguing aspect of the biota. A large number of ostracods have been found in the amber-many with their carapaces open, suggesting that they were alive and submerged in water at the time of entombment. The only known examples of brachyuran crabs preserved in amber are found in the Campo La Granja amber. Amphipods, copepods, isopods, and tanaids are also members of the crustacean fauna preserved in amber.

  1. Entrapment Bias of Arthropods in Miocene Amber Revealed by Trapping Experiments in a Tropical Forest in Chiapas, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solórzano Kraemer, Mónica M.; Kraemer, Atahualpa S.; Stebner, Frauke; Bickel, Daniel J.; Rust, Jes

    2015-01-01

    All entomological traps have a capturing bias, and amber, viewed as a trap, is no exception. Thus the fauna trapped in amber does not represent the total existing fauna of the former amber forest, rather the fauna living in and around the resin producing tree. In this paper we compare arthropods from a forest very similar to the reconstruction of the Miocene Mexican amber forest, and determine the bias of different trapping methods, including amber. We also show, using cluster analyses, measurements of the trapped arthropods, and guild distribution, that the amber trap is a complex entomological trap not comparable with a single artificial trap. At the order level, the most similar trap to amber is the sticky trap. However, in the case of Diptera, at the family level, the Malaise trap is also very similar to amber. Amber captured a higher diversity of arthropods than each of the artificial traps, based on our study of Mexican amber from the Middle Miocene, a time of climate optimum, where temperature and humidity were probably higher than in modern Central America. We conclude that the size bias is qualitatively independent of the kind of trap for non–extreme values. We suggest that frequent specimens in amber were not necessarily the most frequent arthropods in the former amber forest. Selected taxa with higher numbers of specimens appear in amber because of their ecology and behavior, usually closely related with a tree–inhabiting life. Finally, changes of diversity from the Middle Miocene to Recent time in Central and South America can be analyzed by comparing the rich amber faunas from Mexico and the Dominican Republic with the fauna trapped using sticky and Malaise traps in Central America. PMID:25785584

  2. Biomolecular Structure Determination with Divide and Concur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallus, Yoav; Elser, Veit

    2009-03-01

    Divide and concur (D-C) is a general computational approach, designed for the solution of highly frustrated problems. Recently applied to the problems of disk packing, the kissing number problem, and 3-SAT, it was competitive or outperformed special-purpose methods.ootnotetextS. Gravel and V. Elser, Phys. Rev. E 78, 036706 (2008) We present a method for applying the D-C framework to the problem of biomolecular structure determination. From a list of geometric constraints on groups of atoms in the molecule, we construct a deterministic iterative map that efficiently searches for structures simultaneously satisfying all constraints. As our method eschews an energy function and its minimization to focus on geometric constraints, it can very naturally integrate with the geometric constraints due to chemistry and physics, experimental constraints due to NMR data or many other experimental or biological hints. We present some results of our method.

  3. Micro- and nanodevices integrated with biomolecular probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alapan, Yunus; Icoz, Kutay; Gurkan, Umut A

    2015-12-01

    Understanding how biomolecules, proteins and cells interact with their surroundings and other biological entities has become the fundamental design criterion for most biomedical micro- and nanodevices. Advances in biology, medicine, and nanofabrication technologies complement each other and allow us to engineer new tools based on biomolecules utilized as probes. Engineered micro/nanosystems and biomolecules in nature have remarkably robust compatibility in terms of function, size, and physical properties. This article presents the state of the art in micro- and nanoscale devices designed and fabricated with biomolecular probes as their vital constituents. General design and fabrication concepts are presented and three major platform technologies are highlighted: microcantilevers, micro/nanopillars, and microfluidics. Overview of each technology, typical fabrication details, and application areas are presented by emphasizing significant achievements, current challenges, and future opportunities. PMID:26363089

  4. Micro- and nanodevices integrated with biomolecular probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alapan, Yunus; Icoz, Kutay; Gurkan, Umut A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how biomolecules, proteins and cells interact with their surroundings and other biological entities has become the fundamental design criterion for most biomedical micro- and nanodevices. Advances in biology, medicine, and nanofabrication technologies complement each other and allow us to engineer new tools based on biomolecules utilized as probes. Engineered micro/nanosystems and biomolecules in nature have remarkably robust compatibility in terms of function, size, and physical properties. This article presents the state of the art in micro- and nanoscale devices designed and fabricated with biomolecular probes as their vital constituents. General design and fabrication concepts are presented and three major platform technologies are highlighted: microcantilevers, micro/nanopillars, and microfluidics. Overview of each technology, typical fabrication details, and application areas are presented by emphasizing significant achievements, current challenges, and future opportunities. PMID:26363089

  5. Biomolecular Markers in Cancer of the Tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daris Ferrari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of tongue cancer is increasing worldwide, and its aggressiveness remains high regardless of treatment. Genetic changes and the expression of abnormal proteins have been frequently reported in the case of head and neck cancers, but the little information that has been published concerning tongue tumours is often contradictory. This review will concentrate on the immunohistochemical expression of biomolecular markers and their relationships with clinical behaviour and prognosis. Most of these proteins are associated with nodal stage, tumour progression and metastases, but there is still controversy concerning their impact on disease-free and overall survival, and treatment response. More extensive clinical studies are needed to identify the patterns of molecular alterations and the most reliable predictors in order to develop tailored anti-tumour strategies based on the targeting of hypoxia markers, vascular and lymphangiogenic factors, epidermal growth factor receptors, intracytoplasmatic signalling and apoptosis.

  6. A new genus of Podonominae (Diptera: Chironomidae) in Late Eocene Rovno amber from Ukraine

    OpenAIRE

    Baranov, Viktor; Andersen, Trond; Perkovsky, Evgeny

    2014-01-01

    The genus Palaeoboreochlus Baranov et Andersen, n. gen. is erected based on P. inornatus Baranov et Andersen, n. sp. described from a male found in Late Eocene Rovno amber. The new genus groups with Boreochlus Edwards in the tribe "Boreochlini".

  7. GLYCAM06: a generalizable biomolecular force field. Carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, Karl N; Yongye, Austin B; Tschampel, Sarah M; González-Outeiriño, Jorge; Daniels, Charlisa R; Foley, B Lachele; Woods, Robert J

    2008-03-01

    A new derivation of the GLYCAM06 force field, which removes its previous specificity for carbohydrates, and its dependency on the AMBER force field and parameters, is presented. All pertinent force field terms have been explicitly specified and so no default or generic parameters are employed. The new GLYCAM is no longer limited to any particular class of biomolecules, but is extendible to all molecular classes in the spirit of a small-molecule force field. The torsion terms in the present work were all derived from quantum mechanical data from a collection of minimal molecular fragments and related small molecules. For carbohydrates, there is now a single parameter set applicable to both alpha- and beta-anomers and to all monosaccharide ring sizes and conformations. We demonstrate that deriving dihedral parameters by fitting to QM data for internal rotational energy curves for representative small molecules generally leads to correct rotamer populations in molecular dynamics simulations, and that this approach removes the need for phase corrections in the dihedral terms. However, we note that there are cases where this approach is inadequate. Reported here are the basic components of the new force field as well as an illustration of its extension to carbohydrates. In addition to reproducing the gas-phase properties of an array of small test molecules, condensed-phase simulations employing GLYCAM06 are shown to reproduce rotamer populations for key small molecules and representative biopolymer building blocks in explicit water, as well as crystalline lattice properties, such as unit cell dimensions, and vibrational frequencies. PMID:17849372

  8. VLTI/AMBER spectro-interferometric imaging of VX Sgr's inhomogenous outer atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Chiavassa, A; Millour, F; Driebe, T; Wittkowski, M; Plez, B; Thiebeaut, E; Josselin, E; Freytag, B; Scholz, M; Haubois, X

    2009-01-01

    Aims. We aim to explore the photosphere of the very cool late-type star VX Sgr and in particular the existence and characterization of molecular layers above the continuum forming photosphere. Methods. We obtained interferometric observations with the VLTI/AMBER interferometer using the fringe tracker FINITO in the spectral domain 1.45-2.50 micron with a spectral resolution of about 35 and baselines ranging from 15 to 88 meters.We perform independent image reconstruction for different wavelength bins and fit the interferometric data with a geometrical toy model.We also compare the data to 1D dynamical models of Miras atmosphere and to 3D hydrodynamical simulations of red supergiant (RSG) and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Results. Reconstructed images and visibilities show a strong wavelength dependence. The H-band images display two bright spots whose positions are confirmed by the geometrical toy model. The inhomogeneities are qualitatively predicted by 3D simulations. At about 2,00 micron and in the ...

  9. Deterministic characterization of phase noise in biomolecular oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On top of the many external perturbations, cellular oscillators also face intrinsic perturbations due the randomness of chemical kinetics. Biomolecular oscillators, distinct in their parameter sets or distinct in their architecture, show different resilience with respect to such intrinsic perturbations. Assessing this resilience can be done by ensemble stochastic simulations. These are computationally costly and do not permit further insights into the mechanistic cause of the observed resilience. For reaction systems operating at a steady state, the linear noise approximation (LNA) can be used to determine the effect of molecular noise. Here we show that methods based on LNA fail for oscillatory systems and we propose an alternative ansatz. It yields an asymptotic expression for the phase diffusion coefficient of stochastic oscillators. Moreover, it allows us to single out the noise contribution of every reaction in an oscillatory system. We test the approach on the one-loop model of the Drosophila circadian clock. Our results are consistent with those obtained through stochastic simulations with a gain in computational efficiency of about three orders of magnitude

  10. Terpenoid compositions and botanical origins of Late Cretaceous and Miocene amber from China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongle Shi

    Full Text Available The terpenoid compositions of the Late Cretaceous Xixia amber from Central China and the middle Miocene Zhangpu amber from Southeast China were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS to elucidate their botanical origins. The Xixia amber is characterized by sesquiterpenoids, abietane and phyllocladane type diterpenoids, but lacks phenolic abietanes and labdane derivatives. The molecular compositions indicate that the Xixia amber is most likely contributed by the conifer family Araucariaceae, which is today distributed primarily in the Southern Hemisphere, but widely occurred in the Northern Hemisphere during the Mesozoic according to paleobotanical evidence. The middle Miocene Zhangpu amber is characterized by amyrin and amyrone-based triterpenoids and cadalene-based sesquiterpenoids. It is considered derived from the tropical angiosperm family Dipterocarpaceae based on these compounds and the co-occurring fossil winged fruits of the family in Zhangpu. This provides new evidence for the occurrence of a dipterocarp forest in the middle Miocene of Southeast China. It is the first detailed biomarker study for amber from East Asia.

  11. Game Theory Model of Traffic Participants within Amber Time at Signalized Intersection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Qi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The traffic light scheme is composed of red, green, and amber lights, and it has been defined clearly for the traffic access of red and green lights; however, the definition of that for the amber light is indistinct, which leads to the appearance of uncertainty factors and serious traffic conflicts during the amber light. At present, the traffic administrations are faced with the decision of whether to forbid passing or not during the amber light in the cities of China. On one hand, it will go against the purpose of setting amber lights if forbidding passing; on the other hand, it may lead to a mess of traffic flow running if not. And meanwhile the drivers are faced with the decision of passing the intersection or stopping during the amber light as well. So the decision-making behavior of traffic administrations and drivers can be converted into a double game model. And through quantification of their earnings in different choice conditions, the optimum decision-making plan under specific conditions could be solved via the Nash equilibrium solution concept. Thus the results will provide a basis for the formulation of the traffic management strategy.

  12. Game theory model of traffic participants within amber time at signalized intersection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Weiwei; Wen, Huiying; Fu, Chuanyun; Song, Mo

    2014-01-01

    The traffic light scheme is composed of red, green, and amber lights, and it has been defined clearly for the traffic access of red and green lights; however, the definition of that for the amber light is indistinct, which leads to the appearance of uncertainty factors and serious traffic conflicts during the amber light. At present, the traffic administrations are faced with the decision of whether to forbid passing or not during the amber light in the cities of China. On one hand, it will go against the purpose of setting amber lights if forbidding passing; on the other hand, it may lead to a mess of traffic flow running if not. And meanwhile the drivers are faced with the decision of passing the intersection or stopping during the amber light as well. So the decision-making behavior of traffic administrations and drivers can be converted into a double game model. And through quantification of their earnings in different choice conditions, the optimum decision-making plan under specific conditions could be solved via the Nash equilibrium solution concept. Thus the results will provide a basis for the formulation of the traffic management strategy. PMID:25580108

  13. Extracting Biomolecular Interactions Using Semantic Parsing of Biomedical Text

    OpenAIRE

    Garg, Sahil; Galstyan, Aram; Hermjakob, Ulf; Marcu, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We advance the state of the art in biomolecular interaction extraction with three contributions: (i) We show that deep, Abstract Meaning Representations (AMR) significantly improve the accuracy of a biomolecular interaction extraction system when compared to a baseline that relies solely on surface- and syntax-based features; (ii) In contrast with previous approaches that infer relations on a sentence-by-sentence basis, we expand our framework to enable consistent predictions over sets of sen...

  14. Biomolecular surface construction by PDE transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qiong; Yang, Siyang; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2012-03-01

    This work proposes a new framework for the surface generation based on the partial differential equation (PDE) transform. The PDE transform has recently been introduced as a general approach for the mode decomposition of images, signals, and data. It relies on the use of arbitrarily high-order PDEs to achieve the time-frequency localization, control the spectral distribution, and regulate the spatial resolution. The present work provides a new variational derivation of high-order PDE transforms. The fast Fourier transform is utilized to accomplish the PDE transform so as to avoid stringent stability constraints in solving high-order PDEs. As a consequence, the time integration of high-order PDEs can be done efficiently with the fast Fourier transform. The present approach is validated with a variety of test examples in two-dimensional and three-dimensional settings. We explore the impact of the PDE transform parameters, such as the PDE order and propagation time, on the quality of resulting surfaces. Additionally, we utilize a set of 10 proteins to compare the computational efficiency of the present surface generation method and a standard approach in Cartesian meshes. Moreover, we analyze the present method by examining some benchmark indicators of biomolecular surface, that is, surface area, surface-enclosed volume, solvation free energy, and surface electrostatic potential. A test set of 13 protein molecules is used in the present investigation. The electrostatic analysis is carried out via the Poisson-Boltzmann equation model. To further demonstrate the utility of the present PDE transform-based surface method, we solve the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations with a PDE transform surface of a protein. Second-order convergence is observed for the electrostatic potential and concentrations. Finally, to test the capability and efficiency of the present PDE transform-based surface generation method, we apply it to the construction of an excessively large biomolecule, a

  15. Extension of the AMBER molecular dynamics software to Intel's Many Integrated Core (MIC) architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Perri J.; Bhuiyan, Ashraf; Walker, Ross C.

    2016-04-01

    We present an implementation of explicit solvent particle mesh Ewald (PME) classical molecular dynamics (MD) within the PMEMD molecular dynamics engine, that forms part of the AMBER v14 MD software package, that makes use of Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors by offloading portions of the PME direct summation and neighbor list build to the coprocessor. We refer to this implementation as pmemd MIC offload and in this paper present the technical details of the algorithm, including basic models for MPI and OpenMP configuration, and analyze the resultant performance. The algorithm provides the best performance improvement for large systems (>400,000 atoms), achieving a ∼35% performance improvement for satellite tobacco mosaic virus (1,067,095 atoms) when 2 Intel E5-2697 v2 processors (2 ×12 cores, 30M cache, 2.7 GHz) are coupled to an Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor (Model 7120P-1.238/1.333 GHz, 61 cores). The implementation utilizes a two-fold decomposition strategy: spatial decomposition using an MPI library and thread-based decomposition using OpenMP. We also present compiler optimization settings that improve the performance on Intel Xeon processors, while retaining simulation accuracy.

  16. Microwave spectroscopy of biomolecular building blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, José L; López, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    Microwave spectroscopy, considered as the most definitive gas phase structural probe, is able to distinguish between different conformational structures of a molecule, because they have unique spectroscopic constants and give rise to distinct individual rotational spectra.Previously, application of this technique was limited to molecular specimens possessing appreciable vapor pressures, thus discarding the possibility of studying many other molecules of biological importance, in particular those with high melting points, which had a tendency to undergo thermal reactions, and ultimately degradation, upon heating.Nowadays, the combination of laser ablation with Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy techniques, in supersonic jets, has enabled the gas-phase study of such systems. In this chapter, these techniques, including broadband spectroscopy, as well as results of their application into the study of the conformational panorama and structure of biomolecular building blocks, such as amino acids, nucleic bases, and monosaccharides, are briefly discussed, and with them, the tools for conformational assignation - rotational constants, nuclear quadrupole coupling interaction, and dipole moment. PMID:25721775

  17. Integrated Spintronic Platforms for Biomolecular Recognition Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, V. C.; Cardoso, F. A.; Loureiro, J.; Mercier, M.; Germano, J.; Cardoso, S.; Ferreira, R.; Fonseca, L. P.; Sousa, L.; Piedade, M. S.; Freitas, P. P.

    2008-06-01

    This paper covers recent developments in magnetoresistive based biochip platforms fabricated at INESC-MN, and their application to the detection and quantification of pathogenic waterborn microorganisms in water samples for human consumption. Such platforms are intended to give response to the increasing concern related to microbial contaminated water sources. The presented results concern the development of biological active DNA chips and protein chips and the demonstration of the detection capability of the present platforms. Two platforms are described, one including spintronic sensors only (spin-valve based or magnetic tunnel junction based), and the other, a fully scalable platform where each probe site consists of a MTJ in series with a thin film diode (TFD). Two microfluidic systems are described, for cell separation and concentration, and finally, the read out and control integrated electronics are described, allowing the realization of bioassays with a portable point of care unit. The present platforms already allow the detection of complementary biomolecular target recognition with 1 pM concentration.

  18. A multiscale modeling approach for biomolecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowling, Alan, E-mail: bowling@uta.edu; Haghshenas-Jaryani, Mahdi, E-mail: mahdi.haghshenasjaryani@mavs.uta.edu [The University of Texas at Arlington, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (United States)

    2015-04-15

    This paper presents a new multiscale molecular dynamic model for investigating the effects of external interactions, such as contact and impact, during stepping and docking of motor proteins and other biomolecular systems. The model retains the mass properties ensuring that the result satisfies Newton’s second law. This idea is presented using a simple particle model to facilitate discussion of the rigid body model; however, the particle model does provide insights into particle dynamics at the nanoscale. The resulting three-dimensional model predicts a significant decrease in the effect of the random forces associated with Brownian motion. This conclusion runs contrary to the widely accepted notion that the motor protein’s movements are primarily the result of thermal effects. This work focuses on the mechanical aspects of protein locomotion; the effect ATP hydrolysis is estimated as internal forces acting on the mechanical model. In addition, the proposed model can be numerically integrated in a reasonable amount of time. Herein, the differences between the motion predicted by the old and new modeling approaches are compared using a simplified model of myosin V.

  19. Biomolecular Modification of Inorganic Crystal Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Yoreo, J J

    2007-04-27

    The fascinating shapes and hierarchical designs of biomineralized structures are an inspiration to materials scientists because of the potential they suggest for biomolecular control over materials synthesis. Conversely, the failure to prevent or limit tissue mineralization in the vascular, skeletal, and urinary systems is a common source of disease. Understanding the mechanisms by which organisms direct or limit crystallization has long been a central challenge to the biomineralization community. One prevailing view is that mineral-associated macromolecules are responsible for either inhibiting crystallization or initiating and stabilizing non-equilibrium crystal polymorphs and morphologies through interactions between anionic moieties and cations in solution or at mineralizing surfaces. In particular, biomolecules that present carboxyl groups to the growing crystal have been implicated as primary modulators of growth. Here we review the results from a combination of in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular modeling (MM) studies to investigate the effect of specific interactions between carboxylate-rich biomolecules and atomic steps on crystal surfaces during the growth of carbonates, oxalates and phosphates of calcium. Specifically, we how the growth kinetics and morphology depend on the concentration of additives that include citrate, simple amino acids, synthetic Asp-rich polypeptides, and naturally occurring Asp-rich proteins found in both functional and pathological mineral tissues. The results reveal a consistent picture of shape modification in which stereochemical matching of modifiers to specific atomic steps drives shape modification. Inhibition and other changes in growth kinetics are shown to be due to a range of mechanisms that depend on chemistry and molecular size. Some effects are well described by classic crystal growth theories, but others, such as step acceleration due to peptide charge and hydrophylicity, were previously unrealized

  20. The value of advanced multiple beam equalization radiography (AMBER) and storage phosphor radiography in chest X-rays; Zur Validierung des AMBER-Systems und der digitalen Speicherfolienradiographie fuer Thoraxaufnahmen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, C.S. [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum Rudolf Virchow, Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany); Richter, K. [Franz-Volhard-Klinik, Klinikum Rudolf Virchow, Freie Univ. Berlin, Berlin-Buch (Germany); Stein, R. [Franz-Volhard-Klinik, Klinikum Rudolf Virchow, Freie Univ. Berlin, Berlin-Buch (Germany); Busch, H.P. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie, Heidelberg Univ., Klinikum Mannheim (Germany)

    1993-12-31

    The study compared the quality of roentgenologic criteria in the evaluation of the heart and pulmonary vessels on chest X-rays obtained with different imaging systems. Fifty patients had four different chest radiographs, i.e. conventional chest X-rays, AMBER images, digital storage phosphor images, and digital storage radiographs that were obtained with the AMBER system. Comparison of techniques was based on 12 well-defined quality criteria of chest X-rays. Four radiologists with expertise reviewed the films according to these criteria. The AMBER technique was found to be superior to the remaining imaging modalities in visualization of the central pulmonary vessels, the descending aorta, and the left atrium. Peripheral pulmonary vessels were best appreciated with AMBER technique combined with storage phosphor technique. The same technique was superior in the assessment of all cardiovascular criteria. The superiority of this technique versus conventional chest X-rays can be explained on the basis of the linear slope of the gradation curve of AMBER and digital techniques. (orig.) [Deutsch] Es wurde ein Guetevergleich der roentgenologischen Kriterien des Herzens und der Pulmonalgefaesse auf Thoraxaufnahmen unterschiedlicher Bilderzeugungssysteme durchgefuehrt. Von 50 Patienten lagen jeweils 4 miteinander zu vergleichende Aufnahmen vor, und zwar jeweils eine konventionelle Filmfolienaufnahme, eine Aufnahme am AMBER (Advanced Multiple Beam Equalization Radiography)-System, eine digitale Phosphorspeicherfolienaufnahme und eine am AMBER-System angefertigte Speicherfolienaufnahme. Der Vergleich erfolgte anhand von 12 definierten Merkmalen der Thoraxaufnahme. Vier erfahrene Radiologen gaben fuer jedes dieser Kriterien ein Gueteurteil ab. Resultate: Die AMBER-Technik wurde fuer die Darstellung der zentralen Pulmonalgefaesse, der Aorta descendens und des linken Vorhofs als beste Methode eingeschaetzt. Die periphere Lungengefaesszeichnung erhielt die beste Guetebewertung bei

  1. A mechanical Turing machine: blueprint for a biomolecular computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Ehud

    2012-08-01

    We describe a working mechanical device that embodies the theoretical computing machine of Alan Turing, and as such is a universal programmable computer. The device operates on three-dimensional building blocks by applying mechanical analogues of polymer elongation, cleavage and ligation, movement along a polymer, and control by molecular recognition unleashing allosteric conformational changes. Logically, the device is not more complicated than biomolecular machines of the living cell, and all its operations are part of the standard repertoire of these machines; hence, a biomolecular embodiment of the device is not infeasible. If implemented, such a biomolecular device may operate in vivo, interacting with its biochemical environment in a program-controlled manner. In particular, it may 'compute' synthetic biopolymers and release them into its environment in response to input from the environment, a capability that may have broad pharmaceutical and biological applications. PMID:22649583

  2. Advances in biomolecular surface meshing and its applications to mathematical modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN MinXin; LU BenZhuo

    2013-01-01

    In the field of molecular modeling and simulation,molecular surface meshes are necessary for many problems,such as molecular structure visualization and analysis,docking problem and implicit solvent modeling and simulation.Recently,with the developments of advanced mathematical modeling in the field of implicit solvent modeling and simulation,providing surface meshes with good qualities efficiently for large real biomolecular systems becomes an urgent issue beyond its traditional purposes for visualization and geometry analyses for molecular structure.In this review,we summarize recent works on this issue.First,various definitions of molecular surfaces and corresponding meshing methods are introduced.Second,our recent meshing tool,TMSmesh,and its performances are presented.Finally,we show the applications of the molecular surface mesh in implicit solvent modeling and simulations using boundary element method (BEM) and finite element method (FEM).

  3. Direct constraint on the distance of Gamma2 Velorum from AMBER/VLTI observations.

    OpenAIRE

    Millour, F.; G. Petrov, R.; Chesneau, O.; Bonneau, D.; Dessart, L.; Béchet, Clémentine; Tallon-Bosc, Isabelle; Tallon, Michel; Thiébaut, Éric; Thiébaut, Eric; Vakili, F.; Malbet, F.; Mourard, D.; Zins, G.; Roussel, A.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we present the first AMBER observations, of the Wolf-Rayet and O (WR+O) star binary system y2 Velorum. The AMBER instrument was used with the telescopes UT2, UT3, and UT4 on baselines ranging from 46m to 85m. It delivered spectrally dispersed visibilities, as well as differential and closure phases, with a resolution R = 1500 in the spectral band 1.95-2.17 micron. We interpret these data in the context of a binary system with unresolved components, neglecting in a first approxim...

  4. First Record of Anisoptera (Insecta: Odonata) from mid-Cretaceous Burmese Amber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schädel, Mario; Bechly, Günter

    2016-01-01

    The fossil dragonfly Burmalindenia imperfecta gen. et sp. nov. is described from mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber as the first record of the odonate suborder Anisoptera for this locality and one of the few records from amber in general. The inclusion comprises two fragments of the two hind wings of a dragonfly. The fossil can be attributed to a new genus and species of the family Gomphidae, presumably in the subfamily Lindeniinae, and features a strange teratological phenomenon in its wing venation. PMID:27394756

  5. GLYCAM06: A Generalizable Biomolecular Force Field. Carbohydrates

    OpenAIRE

    Kirschner, Karl N.; Yongye, Austin B.; Tschampel, Sarah M.; GONZÁLEZ-OUTEIRIÑO, JORGE; DANIELS, CHARLISA R.; Foley, B. Lachele; Woods, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    A new derivation of the GLYCAM06 force field, which removes its previous specificity for carbohydrates, and its dependency on the AMBER force field and parameters, is presented. All pertinent force field terms have been explicitly specified and so no default or generic parameters are employed. The new GLYCAM is no longer limited to any particular class of biomolecules, but is extendible to all molecular classes in the spirit of a small-molecule force field. The torsion terms in the present wo...

  6. Biomolecular ion detection using high-temperature superconducting MgB2 strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, N.; Shibata, H.; Mawatari, Y.; Koike, M.; Ohkubo, M.

    2015-06-01

    Superconducting strip ion detectors (SSIDs) are promising for realization of ideal ion detection with 100% efficiency and nanosecond-scale time response in time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We have detected single biomolecular ions in the keV range using a 10-nm-thick and 250-nm-wide strip of a high temperature superconductor, magnesium diboride (MgB2), at temperatures of up to 13 K. The output pulse shape is explained remarkably well using circuit simulations and time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau simulations coupled with a heat diffusion equation. The simulations show that the hot spot model is applicable to the proposed MgB2-SSIDs and the normal region expansion is completed within 16 ps, which corresponds to a maximum length of 1010 nm.

  7. Cyclic terpenoids of contemporary resinous plant detritus and of fossil woods, ambers and coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simoneit, B.R.T.; Grimalt, J.O.; Wang, T.G.; Cox, R.E.; Hatcher, P.G.; Nissenbaum, A.

    1986-01-01

    Cyclic terpenoids present in the solvent extractable material of fossil woods, ambers and brown coals have been analyzed. The sample series chosen consisted of wood remains preserved in Holocene in Jurassic sediments and a set of ambers from the Philippines (copalite), Israel, Canada and Dominican Republic. The brown coals selected were from the Fortuna Garsdorf Mine and Miocene formations on Fiji. The fossil wood extracts contained dominant diterpenoid or sesquiterpenoid skeletons, and aromatized species were present at high concentrations, with a major amount of two-ring aromatic compounds. Tricyclic diterpenoids were the predominant compounds in the ambers. The brown coal extracts were composed of major amounts of one- and two-ring aromatized terpenoids, with a greater proportion of triterpenoid derivatives than in the case of the woods and ambers. This was especially noticeable for the German coal, where the triterpenoids were predominant. Open C-ring aromatized structures were also present in this coal. Steroid compounds were not detectable, but some hopanes were found as minor components in the German brown coal. An overview of the skeletal structure classes identified in each sample, as well as the general mass spectrometric characteristics of the unknown compounds are included in the present paper. It can be concluded from these structural distributions that aromatization is the main process for the transformation of terrestrial cyclic terpenoids during diagenesis, constituting a general pathway for all terpenoids.

  8. New predatory cockroaches (Insecta: Blattaria: Manipulatoridae fam.n.) from the Upper Cretaceous Myanmar amber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vršanský, Peter; Bechly, Günter

    2015-04-01

    We describe a new extinct lineage Manipulatoridae (new family) of cockroaches from the Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian) amber of Myanmar. Manipulator modificaputis gen. et sp. n. is a morphologically unique extinct cockroach that represents the first (of a total of 29 known worldwide) cockroach family reported exclusively from the Myanmar amber. This family represents an early side branch of the stem group of Mantodea (most probably a sister group of Eadiidae within Blattaria/Corydioidea) because it has some synapomorphies with the Mantodea (including the stem group and Eadiidae). This family also retains symplesiomorphies that exclude a position in the crown group, and furthermore has unique autapomorphies that exclude a position as a direct ancestor of Mantodea. The unique adaptations such as strongly elongated extremities and freely movable head on a long neck suggest that these animals were pursuit predators. Five additional specimens (including two immatures) reported from the Myanmar amber suggest that this group was relatively rare but belonged to the indigenous and autochthonous inhabitants of the ancient amber forest of the Myanmar region.

  9. A swarm of whiteflies—the first record of gregarious behavior from Eocene Baltic amber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szwedo, Jacek; Drohojowska, Jowita

    2016-04-01

    A new whitefly Snotra christelae gen. et sp. n. is characterized, illustrated, and described from the Baltic amber. It represents the first record of gregarious behavior of Aleyrodinae (Aleyrodidae) whiteflies in fossil state. Implications of this finding on interpretation of whiteflies and their host-plant relationships and evolutionary traits of the group are discussed.

  10. A swarm of whiteflies-the first record of gregarious behavior from Eocene Baltic amber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szwedo, Jacek; Drohojowska, Jowita

    2016-04-01

    A new whitefly Snotra christelae gen. et sp. n. is characterized, illustrated, and described from the Baltic amber. It represents the first record of gregarious behavior of Aleyrodinae (Aleyrodidae) whiteflies in fossil state. Implications of this finding on interpretation of whiteflies and their host-plant relationships and evolutionary traits of the group are discussed. PMID:27023734

  11. A New Thorny Lacewing (Insecta:Neuroptera:Rhachiberothidae) from the Early Cretaceous Amber of Lebanon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Julian F.PETRULEVI(C)IUS; Dany AZAR; André NEL

    2010-01-01

    A new genus and species of Rhachiberothidae,Raptorapax terribilissima gen.et sp.nov.from the Cretaceous amber of Lebanon is described.The new genus is assigned to the subfamily Paraberothinae.The new material confirms the great diversity of the group in the Cretaceous age and its decrease in diversity in recent times.

  12. ASSESMENT OF FACTORS AFFECTING THE PRODUCTIVITY OF AMBER CHARKHA AND ERGONOMIC EVALUATION OF WORKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. THAKRE

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing demands of the cotton fabrics, now a day has made it necessary to increase the production of cotton fabrics. To increase the production it is necessary to study the factors affecting the performance of the women workers working on Amber charkha. Most of the Amber charkha in rural areas are hand operated (i.e. they runwith the help of human energy input. There are various medical, technical and environmental factors which affect the productivity of women workers working on Amber charkha. This paper discusses some of those factors which are responsible for this. The various factors that are affecting the productivity are health factors,sitting posture, working environment, raw material properties, and man machine system. Each of these factors plays an important role in the overall performance of the women workers. Analysis is carried out by comparing the actual readings with the standard norms available in the literature. The detailed project work is carried out to study the different factors affecting the productivity of Amber charkha. The basic necessity of this study is to provide comfortable sitting arrangement and good working environment which would help the workers for achieving better productivity with work satisfaction.

  13. Using linear-scaling DFT for biomolecular simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Pittock, Chris

    2014-01-01

    In the drug discovery process, there are multiple factors that make a successful candidate other than whether it antagonises a chosen active site, or performs allosteric regulation. Each test candidate is profiled by its absorption into the bloodstream, distribution throughout the organism, its products of metabolism, method of excretion, and overall toxicity; summarised as ADMET. There are currently methods to calculate and predict such properties, but the majority of these involve rule-base...

  14. A self-regulating biomolecular comparator for processing oscillatory signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Deepak K; Franco, Elisa; Schulman, Rebecca

    2015-10-01

    While many cellular processes are driven by biomolecular oscillators, precise control of a downstream on/off process by a biochemical oscillator signal can be difficult: over an oscillator's period, its output signal varies continuously between its amplitude limits and spends a significant fraction of the time at intermediate values between these limits. Further, the oscillator's output is often noisy, with particularly large variations in the amplitude. In electronic systems, an oscillating signal is generally processed by a downstream device such as a comparator that converts a potentially noisy oscillatory input into a square wave output that is predominantly in one of two well-defined on and off states. The comparator's output then controls downstream processes. We describe a method for constructing a synthetic biochemical device that likewise produces a square-wave-type biomolecular output for a variety of oscillatory inputs. The method relies on a separation of time scales between the slow rate of production of an oscillatory signal molecule and the fast rates of intermolecular binding and conformational changes. We show how to control the characteristics of the output by varying the concentrations of the species and the reaction rates. We then use this control to show how our approach could be applied to process different in vitro and in vivo biomolecular oscillators, including the p53-Mdm2 transcriptional oscillator and two types of in vitro transcriptional oscillators. These results demonstrate how modular biomolecular circuits could, in principle, be combined to build complex dynamical systems. The simplicity of our approach also suggests that natural molecular circuits may process some biomolecular oscillator outputs before they are applied downstream. PMID:26378119

  15. Output-input ratio in thermally fluctuating biomolecular machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzynski, Michal; Torchala, Mieczyslaw; Chelminiak, Przemyslaw

    2014-01-01

    Biological molecular machines are proteins that operate under isothermal conditions and hence are referred to as free energy transducers. They can be formally considered as enzymes that simultaneously catalyze two chemical reactions: the free energy-donating (input) reaction and the free energy-accepting (output) one. Most if not all biologically active proteins display a slow stochastic dynamics of transitions between a variety of conformational substates composing their native state. This makes the description of the enzymatic reaction kinetics in terms of conventional rate constants insufficient. In the steady state, upon taking advantage of the assumption that each reaction proceeds through a single pair (the gate) of transition conformational substates of the enzyme-substrates complex, the degree of coupling between the output and the input reaction fluxes has been expressed in terms of the mean first-passage times on a conformational transition network between the distinguished substates. The theory is confronted with the results of random-walk simulations on the five-dimensional hypercube. The formal proof is given that, for single input and output gates, the output-input degree of coupling cannot exceed unity. As some experiments suggest such exceeding, looking for the conditions for increasing the degree of coupling value over unity challenges the theory. Performed simulations of random walks on several model networks involving more extended gates indicate that the case of the degree of coupling value higher than 1 is realized in a natural way on critical branching trees extended by long-range shortcuts. Such networks are scale-free and display the property of the small world. For short-range shortcuts, the networks are scale-free and fractal, representing a reasonable model for biomolecular machines displaying tight coupling, i.e., the degree of coupling equal exactly to unity. A hypothesis is stated that the protein conformational transition networks, as

  16. The Adaptive Buffered Force QM/MM method in the CP2K and AMBER software packages

    CERN Document Server

    Mones, Letif; Götz, Andreas W; Laino, Teodoro; Walker, Ross C; Leimkuhler, Ben; Csányi, Gábor; Bernstein, Noam

    2014-01-01

    The implementation and validation of the adaptive buffered force QM/MM method in two popular packages, CP2K and AMBER are presented. The implementations build on the existing QM/MM functionality in each code, extending it to allow for redefinition of the QM and MM regions during the simulation and reducing QM-MM interface errors by discarding forces near the boundary according to the buffered force-mixing approach. New adaptive thermostats, needed by force-mixing methods, are also implemented. Different variants of the method are benchmarked by simulating the structure of bulk water, water autoprotolysis in the presence of zinc and dimethyl-phosphate hydrolysis using various semiempirical Hamiltonians and density functional theory as the QM model. It is shown that with suitable parameters, based on force convergence tests, the adaptive buffered-force QM/MM scheme can provide an accurate approximation of the structure in the dynamical QM region matching the corresponding fully QM simulations, as well as reprod...

  17. The interplay of intrinsic and extrinsic bounded noises in biomolecular networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravagna, Giulio; Mauri, Giancarlo; d'Onofrio, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    After being considered as a nuisance to be filtered out, it became recently clear that biochemical noise plays a complex role, often fully functional, for a biomolecular network. The influence of intrinsic and extrinsic noises on biomolecular networks has intensively been investigated in last ten years, though contributions on the co-presence of both are sparse. Extrinsic noise is usually modeled as an unbounded white or colored gaussian stochastic process, even though realistic stochastic perturbations are clearly bounded. In this paper we consider Gillespie-like stochastic models of nonlinear networks, i.e. the intrinsic noise, where the model jump rates are affected by colored bounded extrinsic noises synthesized by a suitable biochemical state-dependent Langevin system. These systems are described by a master equation, and a simulation algorithm to analyze them is derived. This new modeling paradigm should enlarge the class of systems amenable at modeling. We investigated the influence of both amplitude and autocorrelation time of a extrinsic Sine-Wiener noise on: (i) the Michaelis-Menten approximation of noisy enzymatic reactions, which we show to be applicable also in co-presence of both intrinsic and extrinsic noise, (ii) a model of enzymatic futile cycle and (iii) a genetic toggle switch. In (ii) and (iii) we show that the presence of a bounded extrinsic noise induces qualitative modifications in the probability densities of the involved chemicals, where new modes emerge, thus suggesting the possible functional role of bounded noises. PMID:23437034

  18. X3DBio2: A visual analysis tool for biomolecular structure comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hong; Thakur, Sidharth; Sethaphong, Latsavongsakda; Yingling, Yaroslava G.

    2013-01-01

    A major problem in structural biology is the recognition of differences and similarities between related three dimensional (3D) biomolecular structures. Investigating these structure relationships is important not only for understanding of functional properties of biologically significant molecules, but also for development of new and improved materials based on naturally-occurring molecules. We developed a new visual analysis tool, X3DBio2, for 3D biomolecular structure comparison and analysis. The tool is designed for elucidation of structural effects of mutations in proteins and nucleic acids and for assessment of time dependent trajectories from molecular dynamics simulations. X3DBio2 is a freely downloadable open source software and provides tightly integrated features to perform many standard analysis and visual exploration tasks. We expect this tool can be applied to solve a variety of biological problems and illustrate the use of the tool on the example study of the differences and similarities between two proteins of the glycosyltransferase family 2 that synthesize polysaccharides oligomers. The size and conformational distances and retained core structural similarity of proteins SpsA to K4CP represent significant epochs in the evolution of inverting glycosyltransferases.

  19. Group transfer theory of single molecule imaging experiments in the F-ATPase biomolecular motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkan-Kacso, Sandor; Marcus, Rudolph

    I describe a chemo-mechanical theory to treat single molecule imaging and ``stalling'' experiments on the F-ATPase enzyme. This enzyme is an effective stepping biomolecular rotary motor with a rotor shaft and a stator ring. Using group transfer theoretical approach the proposed structure-based theory couples the binding transition of nucleotides in the stator subunits and the physics of torsional elasticity in the rotor. The twisting of the elastic rotor domain acts as a perturbation upon the driving potential, the Gibbs free energy. In the theory, without the use of adjustastable parameters, we predict the rate and equilibrium constant dependence of steps such as ATP binding and phosphate release as a function of manipulated rotor angle. Then we compare these predictions to available data from stalling experiments. Besides treating experiments, the theory can provide guides for atomistic simulations, which could calculate the reorganization parameter and the torsional spring constant. The framework is generic and I discuss its application to other single molecule experiments, such as controlled rotation and other biomolecular motors, including motor-DNA complexes and linear motors.[PNAS, Early Edition, Oct. 19, 2015, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1518489112

  20. The interplay of intrinsic and extrinsic bounded noises in biomolecular networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Caravagna

    Full Text Available After being considered as a nuisance to be filtered out, it became recently clear that biochemical noise plays a complex role, often fully functional, for a biomolecular network. The influence of intrinsic and extrinsic noises on biomolecular networks has intensively been investigated in last ten years, though contributions on the co-presence of both are sparse. Extrinsic noise is usually modeled as an unbounded white or colored gaussian stochastic process, even though realistic stochastic perturbations are clearly bounded. In this paper we consider Gillespie-like stochastic models of nonlinear networks, i.e. the intrinsic noise, where the model jump rates are affected by colored bounded extrinsic noises synthesized by a suitable biochemical state-dependent Langevin system. These systems are described by a master equation, and a simulation algorithm to analyze them is derived. This new modeling paradigm should enlarge the class of systems amenable at modeling. We investigated the influence of both amplitude and autocorrelation time of a extrinsic Sine-Wiener noise on: (i the Michaelis-Menten approximation of noisy enzymatic reactions, which we show to be applicable also in co-presence of both intrinsic and extrinsic noise, (ii a model of enzymatic futile cycle and (iii a genetic toggle switch. In (ii and (iii we show that the presence of a bounded extrinsic noise induces qualitative modifications in the probability densities of the involved chemicals, where new modes emerge, thus suggesting the possible functional role of bounded noises.

  1. ACEMD: Accelerating bio-molecular dynamics in the microsecond time-scale

    CERN Document Server

    Harvey, M J; De Fabritiis, G

    2009-01-01

    The high arithmetic performance and intrinsic parallelism of recent graphical processing units (GPUs) can offer a technological edge for molecular dynamics simulations. ACEMD is a production-class bio-molecular dynamics (MD) simulation program designed specifically for GPUs which is able to achieve supercomputing scale performance of 40 nanoseconds/day for all-atom protein systems with over 23,000 atoms. We illustrate the characteristics of the code, its validation and performance. We also run a microsecond-long trajectory for an all-atom molecular system in explicit TIP3P water on a single workstation computer equipped with just 3 GPUs. This performance on cost effective hardware allows ACEMD to reach microsecond timescales routinely with important implications in terms of scientific applications.

  2. Further along the Road Less Traveled: AMBER ff15ipq, an Original Protein Force Field Built on a Self-Consistent Physical Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debiec, Karl T; Cerutti, David S; Baker, Lewis R; Gronenborn, Angela M; Case, David A; Chong, Lillian T

    2016-08-01

    We present the AMBER ff15ipq force field for proteins, the second-generation force field developed using the Implicitly Polarized Q (IPolQ) scheme for deriving implicitly polarized atomic charges in the presence of explicit solvent. The ff15ipq force field is a complete rederivation including more than 300 unique atomic charges, 900 unique torsion terms, 60 new angle parameters, and new atomic radii for polar hydrogens. The atomic charges were derived in the context of the SPC/Eb water model, which yields more-accurate rotational diffusion of proteins and enables direct calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation parameters from molecular dynamics simulations. The atomic radii improve the accuracy of modeling salt bridge interactions relative to contemporary fixed-charge force fields, rectifying a limitation of ff14ipq that resulted from its use of pair-specific Lennard-Jones radii. In addition, ff15ipq reproduces penta-alanine J-coupling constants exceptionally well, gives reasonable agreement with NMR relaxation rates, and maintains the expected conformational propensities of structured proteins/peptides, as well as disordered peptides-all on the microsecond (μs) time scale, which is a critical regime for drug design applications. These encouraging results demonstrate the power and robustness of our automated methods for deriving new force fields. All parameters described here and the mdgx program used to fit them are included in the AmberTools16 distribution. PMID:27399642

  3. Physics at the biomolecular interface fundamentals for molecular targeted therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses primarily on the role of interfacial forces in understanding biological phenomena at the molecular scale. By providing a suitable statistical mechanical apparatus to handle the biomolecular interface, the book becomes uniquely positioned to address core problems in molecular biophysics. It highlights the importance of interfacial tension in delineating a solution to the protein folding problem, in unravelling the physico-chemical basis of enzyme catalysis and protein associations, and in rationally designing molecular targeted therapies. Thus grounded in fundamental science, the book develops a powerful technological platform for drug discovery, while it is set to inspire scientists at any level in their careers determined to address the major challenges in molecular biophysics. The acknowledgment of how exquisitely the structure and dynamics of proteins and their aqueous environment are related attests to the overdue recognition that biomolecular phenomena cannot be effectively understood w...

  4. Quantifying Modularity in the Evolution of Biomolecular Systems

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Functional modules are considered the primary building blocks of biomolecular systems. Here we study to what extent functional modules behave cohesively across genomes:That is, are functional modules also evolutionary modules? We probe this question by analyzing for a large collection of functional modules the phyletic patterns of their genes across 110 genomes. The majority of functional modules display limited evolutionary modularity. This result confirms certain comparative genome analyses...

  5. The biomolecular and ultrastructural basis of epidermolysis bullosa:

    OpenAIRE

    Ciolan, Maria; Olariu, Liviu; Solovan, Caius

    2005-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy, immunoelectron microscopy, immunofluorescence and antigenic mapping have improved our understanding of the dermo-epidermal junction. We have reviewed some ultrastructural and biomolecular aspects related to the dermo-epidermal junction. In part, they are implicated in the pathogenesis of a group of hereditary disorders characterized by skin fragility, collectively known as epidermolysis bullosa (EB). These disorders could benefit in the near future from a gen...

  6. Biomolecular Detection employing the Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS)

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos A Lopez; George G Daaboul; Ahn, Sunmin; Reddington, Alexander P.; Monroe, Margo R.; Zhang, Xirui; Irani, Rostem J.; Yu, Chunxiao; Genco, Caroline A.; Cretich, Marina; Chiari, Marcella; Goldberg, Bennett B.; Connor, John H.; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2011-01-01

    The sensitive measurement of biomolecular interactions has use in many fields and industries such as basic biology and microbiology, environmental/agricultural/biodefense monitoring, nanobiotechnology, and more. For diagnostic applications, monitoring (detecting) the presence, absence, or abnormal expression of targeted proteomic or genomic biomarkers found in patient samples can be used to determine treatment approaches or therapy efficacy. In the research arena, information on molecular aff...

  7. A mechanical Turing machine: blueprint for a biomolecular computer

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro, Ehud

    2012-01-01

    We describe a working mechanical device that embodies the theoretical computing machine of Alan Turing, and as such is a universal programmable computer. The device operates on three-dimensional building blocks by applying mechanical analogues of polymer elongation, cleavage and ligation, movement along a polymer, and control by molecular recognition unleashing allosteric conformational changes. Logically, the device is not more complicated than biomolecular machines of the living cell, and a...

  8. Dynamic Presentation of Immobilized Ligands Regulated through Biomolecular Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Bo; Liu, Yang; Riesberg, Jeremiah J.; Shen, Wei

    2010-01-01

    To mimic the dynamic regulation of signaling ligands immobilized on extracellular matrices or on the surfaces of neighboring cells for guidance of cell behavior and fate selection, we have harnessed biomolecular recognition in combination with polymer engineering to create dynamic surfaces on which the accessibility of immobilized ligands to cell surface receptors can be reversibly interconverted under physiological conditions. The cell-adhesive RGD peptide is chosen as a model ligand. RGD is...

  9. A new genus of nemonychid weevil from Burmese amber (Coleoptera, Curculionoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Davis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The first fossil nemonychid (Nemonychidae in Burmese amber, belonging to the subfamily Rhinorhynchinae, is described and figured as Burmonyx zigrasi Davis and Engel, gen. n. and sp. n. While this specimen also comprises the first definitive record of the subfamily in the Asian continent, other compression fossils exist at least from the Yixian Formation of China and the Karatau site of Kazakhstan which may also deserve placement within this group. Although several important areas of the body are obscured by the shape and fragmented condition of the amber piece, a sufficient number of features are visible to consider adequate placement within Rhinorhynchinae, including the fairly strongly punctate elytral striae and appendiculate, nearly bifid pretarsal claws.

  10. Solid state {sup 13}C NMR analysis of Brazilian cretaceous ambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Ricardo; Azevedo, Debora A., E-mail: ricardopereira@iq.ufrj.b, E-mail: debora@iq.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IQ/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Lab. de Geoquimica Organica Molecular e Ambiental; San Gil, Rosane A.S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IQ/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Lab. de RMN de Solidos; Carvalho, Ismar S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Dept. de Geologia; Fernandes, Antonio Carlos S. [Museu Nacional (MN/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia e Paleontologia

    2011-07-01

    {sup 13}C cross polarization with magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 13}C CPMAS NMR) spectra have been obtained for the first time to three Cretaceous amber samples from South America. The samples were dated to Lower Cretaceous and collected in sediments from the Amazonas, Araripe and Reconcavo basins, Brazil. All samples have very similar spectra, consistent with a common paleobotanical source. Some aspects of the spectra suggest a relationship between Brazilian ambers and Araucariaceae family, such as intense resonances at 38-39 ppm. All samples are constituted by polylabdane structure associated to Class Ib resins, constituted by polymers of labdanoid diterpenes. Finally, information concerning some structural changes during maturation, such as isomerization of {Delta}{sup 8(17)} and {Delta}{sup 12(13)} unsaturations, were obtained by {sup 13}C NMR analyses. The results concerning botanical affinities are in accordance with previous results obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). (author)

  11. New fossil bee flies (Diptera : Bombylioidea) in the Lowermost Eocene amber of the Paris Basin

    OpenAIRE

    A. Nel; Ploëg, G. de

    2004-01-01

    A new genus and two new species of bee flies are described from the Lowermost Eocene amber of the Paris basin: Paradolichomyia eocenica n. gen, n. sp. (Bombyliidae: Toxophorinae) and Proplatypygus matilei n. sp. (Mythicomyiidae). Paradolichomyia eocenica n. gen, n. sp. represents the oldest fossil record of Bombyliidae. It is closely related to the two modern genera Dolichomyia WIEDEMANN 1830 and Zaclava HULL 1973 (Toxophorinae: Systropodini). This discovery suggests that the present Gondwana...

  12. The oldest micropepline beetle from Cretaceous Burmese amber and its phylogenetic implications (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chen-Yang; Huang, Di-Ying

    2014-10-01

    The staphylinid subfamily Micropeplinae includes small strongly sclerotized beetles with truncate elytra leaving the most part of abdomen exposed. Fossil micropeplines are rare and confined to Cenozoic representatives of extant genera. Here, we describe the oldest micropepline, Protopeplus cretaceus gen. and sp. n., from the Upper Cretaceous Burmese amber. Fluorescence microscope and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) were both used to reveal diagnostic features of Micropeplinae and some primitive traits that place Protopeplus very basally within Micropeplinae.

  13. Description of an ancient social bee trapped in amber using diagnostic radioentomology

    OpenAIRE

    Greco, Mark; Welz, Patricia M; Siegrist, Mark; Ferguson, Stephen J.; Gallmann, Peter; Roubik, David W.; Engel, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    The application of non-invasive imaging technologies using X-radiation (diagnostic radioentomology, ‘DR’) is demonstrated for the study of amber-entombed social bees. Here, we examine the external and internal morphology of an Early Miocene (Burdigalian) stingless bee (Apinae: Meliponini) from the Dominican Republic using non-destructive X-ray microtomography analysis. The study permits the accurate reconstruction of features otherwise obscured or impossible to visualize without destroying th...

  14. A new genus of alderflies (Megaloptera: Sialidae) in Upper Cretaceous Burmese amber

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Diying; Azar, Dany; Michael S. Engel; Cai, Chenyang; Garrouste, Romain; Nel, André

    2016-01-01

    International audience A new genus and species of Mesozoic alderfly is described as Haplosialodes liui gen. et sp. nov., and from an adult male preserved in Cretaceous Burmese amber. The new genus is closely related to the genera Haplosialis Navás (Recent fauna of Madagascar), Indosialis Lestage (Recent fauna of Southeast Asia), and Eosialis Nel et al. (Eocene of France), suggesting a possible Early Cretaceous age for the clade that comprises these groups.

  15. Advances in modeling of biomolecular interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cong-zhongCAI; Ze-rongLI; Wan-luWANG; Yu-zongCHEN

    2004-01-01

    Modeling of molecular interactions is increasingly used in life science research and biotechnology development.Examples are computer aided drug design, prediction of protein interactions with other molecules, and simulation of networks of biomolecules in a particular process in human body. This article reviews recent progress in the related fields and provides a brief overview on the methods used in molecular modeling of biological systems.

  16. Mixture of experts models to exploit global sequence similarity on biomolecular sequence labeling

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Background Identification of functionally important sites in biomolecular sequences has broad applications ranging from rational drug design to the analysis of metabolic and signal transduction networks. Experimental determination of such sites lags far behind the number of known biomolecular sequences. Hence, there is a need to develop reliable computational methods for identifying functionally important sites from biomolecular sequences. Results We present a mixture of experts approach to b...

  17. DNA Changes in Tissues Entrapped in Plant Resins (the Precursors of Amber)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, S. O.; Langenegger, K.; Holdenrieder, O.

    There have been many reports characterizing DNA from amber, which is a fossil version of plant resin. Here we report an investigation of the effects of plant resin (from Pseudotsuga menziesii) and drying conditions on the preservation of DNA in biological tissues. We examined the degree of degradation of the DNA by agarose gel electrophoresis of extracted DNA, by polymerase chain reaction, and by DNA sequencing. The plant resin alone appeared to cause little or no damage to DNA. Tissue immersed in plant resin that dried rapidly (exposed to sunlight) contained DNA with little apparent damage. Tissue immersed in the resin that was dried slowly (in shade without sunlight) contained DNA with some degradation (3.5% nucleotide changes). The tissue that was immersed in the resin that was constantly hydrated (by immersion in water) yielded DNA that was severely damaged (50-62% nucleotide changes). Transversions outnumbered transitions in these samples by a ratio of 1.4 : 1. A piece of Baltic amber immersed in water for 5days appeared to be impervious to the water. Thus amber inclusions that initially dried rapidly have the potential to yield undamaged DNA. Those that dried slowly may contain damaged DNA and may be unsuitable for phylogenetic and other studies.

  18. The anamorphic genus Monotosporella (Ascomycota) from Eocene amber and from modern Agathis resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Eva-Maria; Beimforde, Christina; Gube, Matthias; Rikkinen, Jouko; Singh, Hukam; Seyfullah, Leyla J; Heinrichs, Jochen; Nascimbene, Paul C; Reitner, Joachim; Schmidt, Alexander R

    2012-10-01

    The anamorphic fungal genus Monotosporella (Ascomycota, Sordariomycetes) has been reco-vered from a piece of Early Eocene Indian amber, as well as from the surface of extant resin flows in New Caledonia. The fossil fungus was obtained from the Tarkeshwar Lignite Mine of Gujarat State, western India, and was part of the biota of an early tropical angiosperm rainforest. The amber inclusion represents the second fossil record of Sordariomycetes, as well as the first fossil of its particular order (either Savoryellales or Chaetosphaeriales). The fossil fungus is distinguished from extant representatives by possessing both short conidiophores and small two-septate pyriform conidia, and is described as Monotosporella doerfeltii sp. nov. Inside the amber, the anamorph is attached to its substrate, which is likely the degraded thallus of a cladoniform lichen. The extant New Caledonian species is assigned to Monotosporella setosa. It was found growing on semi-solidified resin flows of Agathis ovata (Araucariaceae), and is the first record of Monotosporella from modern resin substrates. PMID:23063189

  19. Enhanced semiempirical QM methods for biomolecular interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nusret Duygu Yilmazer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent successes and failures of the application of ‘enhanced’ semiempirical QM (SQM methods are reviewed in the light of the benefits and backdraws of adding dispersion (D and hydrogen-bond (H correction terms. We find that the accuracy of SQM-DH methods for non-covalent interactions is very often reported to be comparable to dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D, while computation times are about three orders of magnitude lower. SQM-DH methods thus open up a possibility to simulate realistically large model systems for problems both in life and materials science with comparably high accuracy.

  20. Optimizing Protein-Protein van der Waals Interactions for the AMBER ff9x/ff12 Force Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Dail E; Steck, Jonathan K; Nerenberg, Paul S

    2014-01-14

    The quality of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations relies heavily on the accuracy of the underlying force field. In recent years, considerable effort has been put into developing more accurate dihedral angle potentials for MD force fields, but relatively little work has focused on the nonbonded parameters, many of which are two decades old. In this work, we assess the accuracy of protein-protein van der Waals interactions in the AMBER ff9x/ff12 force field. Across a test set of 44 neat organic liquids containing the moieties present in proteins, we find root-mean-square (RMS) errors of 1.26 kcal/mol in enthalpy of vaporization and 0.36 g/cm(3) in liquid densities. We then optimize the van der Waals radii and well depths for all of the relevant atom types using these observables, which lowers the RMS errors in enthalpy of vaporization and liquid density of our validation set to 0.59 kcal/mol (53% reduction) and 0.019 g/cm(3) (46% reduction), respectively. Limitations in our parameter optimization were evident for certain atom types, however, and we discuss the implications of these observations for future force field development. PMID:26579910

  1. Properties of the CO and H$_2$O MOLsphere of the red supergiant Betelgeuse from VLTI/AMBER observations

    CERN Document Server

    Montargès, Miguel; Perrin, Guy; Ohnaka, Keiichi; Chiavassa, Andrea; Ridgway, Stephen T; Lacour, Sylvestre

    2014-01-01

    Context. Betelgeuse is the closest red supergiant (RSG), therefore it is well suited to study the complex processes in its atmosphere that lead to the chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium. Aims. We intend to investigate the shape and composition of the close molecular layer (also known as the MOLsphere) that surrounds the star. This analysis is part of a wider program that aims at understanding the dynamics of the circumstellar envelope of Betelgeuse. Methods. On January and February 2011, Betelgeuse was observed using the VLTI/AMBER interferometer in the H and K bands. Using the medium spectral resolution of the instrument ($R \\sim 1500$), we were able to investigate the carbon monoxide band heads and the water-vapor bands. We used two different approaches to analyse our data: model fitting both in the continuum and absorption lines and then fit with a RHD simulation. Results. Using the continuum data we derive a uniform disk diameter of $41.01 \\pm 0.41$ mas, a power law type limb-darkened disk dia...

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Simple Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, Owner F.; Wengerter, Brian C.; Taylor, Ramona S.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment, in which students were given the opportunity to perform molecular dynamics simulations on a series of molecular liquids using the Amber suite of programs, is presented. They were introduced to both physical theories underlying classical mechanics simulations and to the atom-atom pair distribution function.

  3. Scanning probe and optical tweezer investigations of biomolecular interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigby-Singleton, Shellie

    2002-07-01

    A complex array of intermolecular forces controls the interactions between and within biological molecules. The desire to empirically explore the fundamental forces has led to the development of several biophysical techniques. Of these, the atomic force microscope (AFM) and the optical tweezers have been employed throughout this thesis to monitor the intermolecular forces involved in biomolecular interactions. The AFM is a well-established force sensing technique capable of measuring biomolecular interactions at a single molecule level. However, its versatility has not been extrapolated to the investigation of a drug-enzyme complex. The energy landscape for the force induced dissociation of the DHFR-methotrexate complex was studied. Revealing an energy barrier to dissociation located {approx}0.3 nm from the bound state. Unfortunately, the AFM has a limited range of accessible loading rates and in order to profile the complete energy landscape alternative force sensing instrumentation should be considered, for example the BFP and optical tweezers. Thus, this thesis outlines the development and construction an optical trap capable of measuring intermolecular forces between biomolecules at the single molecule level. To demonstrate the force sensing abilities of the optical set up, proof of principle measurements were performed which investigate the interactions between proteins and polymer surfaces subjected to varying degrees of argon plasma treatment. Complementary data was gained from measurements performed independently by the AFM. Changes in polymer resistance to proteins as a response to changes in polymer surface chemistry were detected utilising both AFM and optical tweezers measurements. Finally, the AFM and optical tweezers were employed as ultrasensitive biosensors. Single molecule investigations of the antibody-antigen interaction between the cardiac troponin I marker and its complementary antibody, reveals the impact therapeutic concentrations of heparin

  4. The value of advanced multiple beam equalization radiography (AMBER) and storage phosphor radiography in chest X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study compared the quality of roentgenologic criteria in the evaluation of the heart and pulmonary vessels on chest X-rays obtained with different imaging systems. Fifty patients had four different chest radiographs, i.e. conventional chest X-rays, AMBER images, digital storage phosphor images, and digital storage radiographs that were obtained with the AMBER system. Comparison of techniques was based on 12 well-defined quality criteria of chest X-rays. Four radiologists with expertise reviewed the films according to these criteria. The AMBER technique was found to be superior to the remaining imaging modalities in visualization of the central pulmonary vessels, the descending aorta, and the left atrium. Peripheral pulmonary vessels were best appreciated with AMBER technique combined with storage phosphor technique. The same technique was superior in the assessment of all cardiovascular criteria. The superiority of this technique versus conventional chest X-rays can be explained on the basis of the linear slope of the gradation curve of AMBER and digital techniques. (orig.)

  5. Evaluating thermodynamic integration performance of the new amber molecular dynamics package and assess potential halogen bonds of enoyl-ACP reductase (FabI) benzimidazole inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Pin-Chih; Johnson, Michael E

    2016-04-01

    Thermodynamic integration (TI) can provide accurate binding free energy insights in a lead optimization program, but its high computational expense has limited its usage. In the effort of developing an efficient and accurate TI protocol for FabI inhibitors lead optimization program, we carefully compared TI with different Amber molecular dynamics (MD) engines (sander and pmemd), MD simulation lengths, the number of intermediate states and transformation steps, and the Lennard-Jones and Coulomb Softcore potentials parameters in the one-step TI, using eleven benzimidazole inhibitors in complex with Francisella tularensis enoyl acyl reductase (FtFabI). To our knowledge, this is the first study to extensively test the new AMBER MD engine, pmemd, on TI and compare the parameters of the Softcore potentials in the one-step TI in a protein-ligand binding system. The best performing model, the one-step pmemd TI, using 6 intermediate states and 1 ns MD simulations, provides better agreement with experimental results (RMSD = 0.52 kcal/mol) than the best performing implicit solvent method, QM/MM-GBSA from our previous study (RMSD = 3.00 kcal/mol), while maintaining similar efficiency. Briefly, we show the optimized TI protocol to be highly accurate and affordable for the FtFabI system. This approach can be implemented in a larger scale benzimidazole scaffold lead optimization against FtFabI. Lastly, the TI results here also provide structure-activity relationship insights, and suggest the parahalogen in benzimidazole compounds might form a weak halogen bond with FabI, which is a well-known halogen bond favoring enzyme. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26666582

  6. Parameters for the AMBER force field for the molecular mechanics modeling of the cobalt corrinoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, H. M.; Ngoma, B.; Egan, T. J.; Brown, K. L.

    2001-04-01

    Additional parameters for the AMBER force field have been developed for the molecular mechanics modeling of the cobalt corrinoids. Parameter development was based on a statistical analysis of the reported structures of these compounds. The resulting force field reproduces bond lengths, bond angles, and torsional angles within 0.01 Å, 0.8°, and 4.0° of the mean crystallographic values, respectively. Parameters for the Co-C bond length and the Co-C-C bond angle for modeling the alkylcobalamins were developed by modeling six alkylcobalamins. The validity of the force field was tested by comparing the results obtained with known experimental features of the structures of the cobalt corrinoids as well as with the results from their modeling using a parameter set for the MM2 force field that has been previously developed and extensively tested. The AMBER force field reproduces the structures of the cobalt corrinoids as well as the MM2 force field, although it tends to underestimate the corrin fold angle, the angle between mean planes through the corrin atoms in the northern and southern half of the molecules, respectively. The force field was applied to a study of the structures of 5'-deoxy-5'-(3-isoadenosyl)cobalamin, 2',5'-dideoxy-5'-adenosylcobalamin and 2',3',5'-trideoxy-5'-adenosylcobalamin. This expansion of the standard AMBER force field provides a force field that can be used for modeling the structures of the B 12-dependent proteins, the structures of some of which are now beginning to emerge. This was verified in a preliminary modeling of the coenzyme B 12 binding site of methylmalonyl coenzyme A mutase.

  7. Role of biomolecular logic systems in biosensors and bioactuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailloux, Shay; Katz, Evgeny

    2014-09-01

    An overview of recent advances in biosensors and bioactuators based on biocomputing systems is presented. Biosensors digitally process multiple biochemical signals through Boolean logic networks of coupled biomolecular reactions and produce an output in the form of a YES/NO response. Compared to traditional single-analyte sensing devices, the biocomputing approach enables high-fidelity multianalyte biosensing, which is particularly beneficial for biomedical applications. Multisignal digital biosensors thus promise advances in rapid diagnosis and treatment of diseases by processing complex patterns of physiological biomarkers. Specifically, they can provide timely detection and alert medical personnel of medical emergencies together with immediate therapeutic intervention. Application of the biocomputing concept has been successfully demonstrated for systems performing logic analysis of biomarkers corresponding to different injuries, particularly as exemplified for liver injury. Wide-ranging applications of multianalyte digital biosensors in medicine, environmental monitoring, and homeland security are anticipated. "Smart" bioactuators, for signal-triggered drug release, for example, were designed by interfacing switchable electrodes with biocomputing systems. Integration of biosensing and bioactuating systems with biomolecular information processing systems advances the potential for further scientific innovations and various practical applications.

  8. Biomolecular logic systems: applications to biosensors and bioactuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Evgeny

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents an overview of recent advances in biosensors and bioactuators based on the biocomputing concept. Novel biosensors digitally process multiple biochemical signals through Boolean logic networks of coupled biomolecular reactions and produce output in the form of YES/NO response. Compared to traditional single-analyte sensing devices, biocomputing approach enables a high-fidelity multi-analyte biosensing, particularly beneficial for biomedical applications. Multi-signal digital biosensors thus promise advances in rapid diagnosis and treatment of diseases by processing complex patterns of physiological biomarkers. Specifically, they can provide timely detection and alert to medical emergencies, along with an immediate therapeutic intervention. Application of the biocomputing concept has been successfully demonstrated for systems performing logic analysis of biomarkers corresponding to different injuries, particularly exemplified for liver injury. Wide-ranging applications of multi-analyte digital biosensors in medicine, environmental monitoring and homeland security are anticipated. "Smart" bioactuators, for example for signal-triggered drug release, were designed by interfacing switchable electrodes and biocomputing systems. Integration of novel biosensing and bioactuating systems with the biomolecular information processing systems keeps promise for further scientific advances and numerous practical applications.

  9. MPBEC, a Matlab Program for Biomolecular Electrostatic Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Perez, Sandra; Marucho, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    One of the most used and efficient approaches to compute electrostatic properties of biological systems is to numerically solve the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation. There are several software packages available that solve the PB equation for molecules in aqueous electrolyte solutions. Most of these software packages are useful for scientists with specialized training and expertise in computational biophysics. However, the user is usually required to manually take several important choices, depending on the complexity of the biological system, to successfully obtain the numerical solution of the PB equation. This may become an obstacle for researchers, experimentalists, even students with no special training in computational methodologies. Aiming to overcome this limitation, in this article we present MPBEC, a free, cross-platform, open-source software that provides non-experts in the field an easy and efficient way to perform biomolecular electrostatic calculations on single processor computers. MPBEC is a Matlab script based on the Adaptative Poisson-Boltzmann Solver, one of the most popular approaches used to solve the PB equation. MPBEC does not require any user programming, text editing or extensive statistical skills, and comes with detailed user-guide documentation. As a unique feature, MPBEC includes a useful graphical user interface (GUI) application which helps and guides users to configure and setup the optimal parameters and approximations to successfully perform the required biomolecular electrostatic calculations. The GUI also incorporates visualization tools to facilitate users pre- and post-analysis of structural and electrical properties of biomolecules.

  10. Programming in Biomolecular Computation: Programs, Self-Interpretation and Visualisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.G. Simonsen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Our goal is to provide a top-down approach to biomolecular computation. In spite of widespread discussion about connections between biology and computation, one question seems notable by its absence: Where are the programs? We identify a number of common features in programming that seem conspicuously absent from the literature on biomolecular computing; to partially redress this absence, we introduce a model of computation that is evidently programmable, by programs reminiscent of low-level computer machine code; and at the same time biologically plausible: its functioning is defined by a single and relatively small set of chemical-like reaction rules. Further properties: the model is stored-program: programs are the same as data, so programs are not only executable, but are also compilable and interpretable. It is universal: all computable functions can be computed (in natural ways and without arcane encodings of data and algorithm; it is also uniform: new ``hardware'' is not needed to solve new problems; and (last but not least it is Turing complete in a strong sense: a universal algorithm exists, that is able to execute any program, and is not asymptotically inefficient.

  11. Perspective: Coarse-grained models for biomolecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noid, W. G.

    2013-09-01

    By focusing on essential features, while averaging over less important details, coarse-grained (CG) models provide significant computational and conceptual advantages with respect to more detailed models. Consequently, despite dramatic advances in computational methodologies and resources, CG models enjoy surging popularity and are becoming increasingly equal partners to atomically detailed models. This perspective surveys the rapidly developing landscape of CG models for biomolecular systems. In particular, this review seeks to provide a balanced, coherent, and unified presentation of several distinct approaches for developing CG models, including top-down, network-based, native-centric, knowledge-based, and bottom-up modeling strategies. The review summarizes their basic philosophies, theoretical foundations, typical applications, and recent developments. Additionally, the review identifies fundamental inter-relationships among the diverse approaches and discusses outstanding challenges in the field. When carefully applied and assessed, current CG models provide highly efficient means for investigating the biological consequences of basic physicochemical principles. Moreover, rigorous bottom-up approaches hold great promise for further improving the accuracy and scope of CG models for biomolecular systems.

  12. Biomolecular interaction analysis for carbon nanotubes and for biocompatibility prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoping; Fang, Jinzhang; Cheng, Yun; Zheng, Jianhui; Zhang, Jingjing; Chen, Tao; Ruan, Benfang Helen

    2016-07-15

    The interactions between carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and biologics have been commonly studied by various microscopy and spectroscopy methods. We tried biomolecular interaction analysis to measure the kinetic interactions between proteins and CNTs. The analysis demonstrated that wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and other proteins have high affinity toward carboxylated CNT (f-MWCNT) but essentially no binding to normal CNT (p-MWCNT). The binding of f-MWCNT-protein showed dose dependence, and the observed kinetic constants were in the range of 10(-9) to 10(-11) M with very small off-rates (10(-3) to 10(-7) s(-1)), indicating a relatively tight and stable f-MWCNT-protein complex formation. Interestingly in hemolysis assay, p-MWCNT showed good biocompatibility, f-MWCNT caused 30% hemolysis, but WGA-coated f-MWCNT did not show hemolysis. Furthermore, the f-MWCNT-WGA complex demonstrated enhanced cytotoxicity toward cancer cells, perhaps through the glycoproteins expressed on the cells' surface. Taken together, biomolecular interaction analysis is a precise method that might be useful in evaluating the binding affinity of biologics to CNTs and in predicting biological actions. PMID:27108187

  13. Eonandeva gen. nov., a new distinctive genus from Eocene Baltic amber (Diptera: Chironomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewska, Marta; Giłka, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    A new fossil genus, Eonandeva gen. nov., with two new species: E. helva sp. nov. (type for the genus) and E. latistyla sp. nov., is described from Eocene Baltic amber (~45-40 Ma). Adult males of both new species show the wing venation pattern, shape and chaetotaxy typical for the tribe Tanytarsini. The characters defined as prior apomorphies for the new genus--the gonostylus with a subapical flattened lobe and the stout, strongly elongated superior volsella--separate Eonandeva from the closely related extant genus Nandeva Wiedenbrug, Reiss et Fittkau, 1998. PMID:26624727

  14. An asymmetry detected in the disk of Kappa CMa with the AMBER/VLTI

    OpenAIRE

    Meilland, Anthony; Millour, Florentin; Stee, Philippe; Domiciano De Souza, Armando; Petrov, Romain; Mourard, Denis; Jankov, Slobodan; Robbe-Dubois, Sylvie; Spang, Alain; Arisitidi, Eric; Antonelli, P.; Beckmann, U.; Bresson, Y.; Chelli, A.; Dugué, M.

    2006-01-01

    Aims. We study the geometry and kinematics of the circumstellar environment of the Be star Kappa CMa in the Br gamma emission line and its nearby continuum. Methods. We use the VLTI/AMBER instrument operating in the K band which provides a spatial resolution of about 6 mas with a spectral resolution of 1500 to study the kinematics within the disk and to infer its rotation law. In order to obtain more kinematical constraints we also use an high spectral resolution Pa beta line profile obtain i...

  15. An AMBER/DYANA/MOLMOL Phosphorylated Amino Acid Library Set and Incorporation into NMR Structure Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein structure determination using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) requires the use of molecular dynamics programs that incorporate both NMR experimental and implicit atomic data. Atomic parameters for each amino acid type are encoded in libraries used by structure calculation programs such as DYANA and AMBER. However, only a few non-standard amino acid library sets are included in these programs or the molecular visualization program MOLMOL. Our laboratory is calculating the phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated states of peptides and proteins using NMR methods. To calculate chemically correct structures, we have extended the available molecular libraries for these programs to include the modified amino acids phosphoserine, phosphothreonine, and phosphotyrosine

  16. PREFACE: Radiation Damage in Biomolecular Systems (RADAM07)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuigan, Kevin G.

    2008-03-01

    The annual meeting of the COST P9 Action `Radiation damage in biomolecular systems' took place from 19-22 June 2007 in the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, in Dublin. The conference was structured into 5 Working Group sessions: Electrons and biomolecular interactions Ions and biomolecular interactions Radiation in physiological environments Theoretical developments for radiation damage Track structure in cells Each of the five working groups presented two sessions of invited talks. Professor Ron Chesser of Texas Tech University, USA gave a riveting plenary talk on `Mechanisms of Adaptive Radiation Responses in Mammals at Chernobyl' and the implications his work has on the Linear-No Threshold model of radiation damage. In addition, this was the first RADAM meeting to take place after the Alexander Litvenenko affair and we were fortunate to have one of the leading scientists involved in the European response Professor Herwig Paretzke of GSF-Institut für Strahlenschutz, Neuherberg, Germany, available to speak. The remaining contributions were presented in the poster session. A total of 72 scientific contributions (32 oral, 40 poster), presented by 97 participants from 22 different countries, gave an overview on the current progress in the 5 different subfields. A 1-day pre-conference `Early Researcher Tutorial Workshop' on the same topic kicked off on 19 June attended by more than 40 postgrads, postdocs and senior researchers. Twenty papers, based on these reports, are included in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. All the contributions in this volume were fully refereed, and they represent a sample of the courses, invited talks and contributed talks presented during RADAM07. The interdisciplinary RADAM07 conference brought together researchers from a variety of different fields with a common interest in biomolecular radiation damage. This is reflected by the disparate backgrounds of the authors of the papers presented in these proceedings

  17. The first Mesozoic microwhip scorpion (Palpigradi): a new genus and species in mid-Cretaceous amber from Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Michael S.; Breitkreuz, Laura C. V.; Cai, Chenyang; Alvarado, Mabel; Azar, Dany; Huang, Diying

    2016-04-01

    A fossil palpigrade is described and figured from mid-Cretaceous (Cenomanian) amber from northern Myanmar. Electrokoenenia yaksha Engel and Huang, gen. n. et sp. n., is the first Mesozoic fossil of its order and the only one known as an inclusion in amber, the only other fossil being a series of individuals encased in Pliocene onyx marble and 94-97 million years younger than E. yaksha. The genus is distinguished from other members of the order but is remarkably consistent in observable morphological details when compared to extant relatives, likely reflecting a consistent microhabitat and biological preferences over the last 100 million years.

  18. Disk and wind interaction in the young stellar object MWC 297 spatially resolved with VLTI/AMBER

    OpenAIRE

    Malbet, F.; Benisty, M.; de Wit, W. J.; Kraus, S.; Meilland, A.; Millour, F.; Tatulli, E.; Berger, J.P.; Chesneau, O.; Hofmann, K.H.; Isella, A.; Natta, A.; Petrov, R.; Preibisch, T.; Stee, P.

    2007-01-01

    The young stellar object MWC 297 is an embedded B1.5Ve star exhibiting strong hydrogen emission lines and a strong near-infrared continuum excess. This object has been observed with the VLT interferometer equipped with the AMBER instrument during its first commissioning run. VLTI/AMBER is currently the only near infrared interferometer which can observe spectrally dispersed visibilities. MWC 297 has been spatially resolved in the continuum with a visibility of $0.50^{+0.08}_{-0.10}$ as well a...

  19. Effect of some parameters in the response of the Perspex 3042, Lot L amber dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The answer of the dosimetric systems is affected by several factors, for what should know as these factors they influence in each one of the different dosimetric systems and by this way to minimize its effect in the value of the absorbed dose and to obtain exact dose values. One of the dosimetric systems more used in the high dose dosimetry like routine dosemeter for the control of the irradiation process are the Perspex dosemeters, for their speed in the obtaining the information, their easy manipulation and the precision that they present. To this dosemeters group they belong the same as the Red and Clear the Amber, which are adequate for the measurement of the radiation dose in the range of high doses. The objective of the present work is to obtain the calibration curves of the dosemeters Amber Perspex 3042, Lot L under our work conditions, like they are the irradiation temperatures and of storage and to know the influence of the rate dose in the value of the absorbed dose for different measurement wavelengths, as well as, the relationship among the one post-irradiation time and the specific absorbance value induced in function of the absorbed dose. (Author)

  20. Crown Group Lejeuneaceae and Pleurocarpous Mosses in Early Eocene (Ypresian) Indian Amber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, Jochen; Scheben, Armin; Bechteler, Julia; Lee, Gaik Ee; Schäfer-Verwimp, Alfons; Hedenäs, Lars; Singh, Hukam; Pócs, Tamás; Nascimbene, Paul C.; Peralta, Denilson F.; Renner, Matt; Schmidt, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    Cambay amber originates from the warmest period of the Eocene, which is also well known for the appearance of early angiosperm-dominated megathermal forests. The humid climate of these forests may have triggered the evolution of epiphytic lineages of bryophytes; however, early Eocene fossils of bryophytes are rare. Here, we present evidence for lejeuneoid liverworts and pleurocarpous mosses in Cambay amber. The preserved morphology of the moss fossil is inconclusive for a detailed taxonomic treatment. The liverwort fossil is, however, distinctive; its zig-zagged stems, suberect complicate-bilobed leaves, large leaf lobules, and small, deeply bifid underleaves suggest a member of Lejeuneaceae subtribe Lejeuneinae (Harpalejeunea, Lejeunea, Microlejeunea). We tested alternative classification possibilities by conducting divergence time estimates based on DNA sequence variation of Lejeuneinae using the age of the fossil for corresponding age constraints. Consideration of the fossil as a stem group member of Microlejeunea or Lejeunea resulted in an Eocene to Late Cretaceous age of the Lejeuneinae crown group. This reconstruction is in good accordance with published divergence time estimates generated without the newly presented fossil evidence. Balancing available evidence, we describe the liverwort fossil as the extinct species Microlejeunea nyiahae, representing the oldest crown group fossil of Lejeuneaceae. PMID:27244582

  1. A binary engine fuelling HD87643' s complex circumstellar environment, using AMBER/VLTI

    CERN Document Server

    Millour, Florentin; Borges-Fernandes, Marcelo; Meilland, Anthony; Mars, Gilbert; Benoist, C; Thiébaut, E; Stee, Philippe; Hofmann, K -H; Baron, Fabien; Young, John R; Bendjoya, Philippe; Carciofi, A C; De Souza, Armando Domiciano; Driebe, Thomas; Jankov, Slobodan; Kervella, Pierre; Petrov, R G; Robbe-Dubois, Sylvie; Vakili, Farrokh; Waters, L B F M; Weigelt, Gerd

    2009-01-01

    Context. The star HD 87643, exhibiting the ?B[e] phenomenon?, has one of the most extreme infrared excesses for this object class. It harbours a large amount of both hot and cold dust, and is surrounded by an extended re?ection nebula. Aims. One of our major goals was to investigate the presence of a companion in HD87643. In addition, the presence of close dusty material was tested through a combination of multi-wavelength high spatial resolution observations. Methods. We observed HD 87643 with high spatial resolution techniques, using the near-IR AMBER/VLTI interferometer with baselines ranging from 60 m to 130 m and the mid-IR MIDI/VLTI interferometer with baselines ranging from 25 m to 65 m. These observations are complemented by NACO/VLT adaptive-optics-corrected images in the K and L-bands, ESO-2.2m optical Wide-Field Imager large-scale images in the B, V and R-bands, Results. We report the direct detection of a companion to HD 87643 by means of image synthesis using the AMBER/VLTI instrument. The presen...

  2. Mesozoic Evaniidae (Insecta:Hymenoptera) in Spanish Amber:Reanalysis of the Phylogeny of the Evanioidea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Enrique PE(N)ALVER; Jaime ORTEGA-BLANCO; André NEL; Xavier DELCL(O)S

    2010-01-01

    One new genus and five new species of the family Evaniidae are described from the Early Cretaceous (Albian) Spanish amber of Pe(n)acerrada-Ⅰ (Province of Burgos),San Just and Arroyo de la Pascueta (both in the Province of Teruel):Cretevania alonsoi sp.nov.,C.montoyai sp.nov.,C.alcalai sp.nov.,C.rubusensis sp.nov.,and Iberoevania roblesi gen.and sp.nov.Taxonomic changes include Cretevania pristina (Zhang and Zhang,2000)comb.nov.,C.exquisita (Zhang,Rasnitsyn,Wang and Zhang,2007) comb.nov.,C.vesca (Zhang,Rasnitsyn,Wang and Zhang,2007) comb.nov.,and C.cyrtocerca (Deans,2004) comb.nov.,as a result of the reinterpretation of the genera Procretevania and Eovernevania.The new well preserved specimens of the genus Cretevania,together with the characters shown by the type specimens of the synonymized genera,give new information about their anatomical characters of taxonomical importance,and the genus Cretevania Rasnitsyn,1975 is re-diagnosed.The holotypes of the Russian species in amber have been revised.A cladistic analysis of fossil and extant groups of the superfamily Evanioidea is included.Cretevania had a wide palaeogeographic distribution,with the highest diversity known from Spain.The 13 known Cretevania species show a high interspecific variation mainly in wing characteristics,and a wide range of body and wing size.

  3. The use of a GIS Red-Amber-Green (RAG) system to define search priorities for burials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somma, Roberta; Silvestro, Massimiliano; Cascio, Maria; Dawson, Lorna; Donnelly, Laurance; Harrison, Mark; McKinley, Jennifer; Ruffell, Alastair

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this research is to promote among the Italian police, magistrates, and geologists, the applications of a Geographical Information System (GIS)-based RAG system for use in ground searches for burials. To date the RAG system has not been used and documented in Italy and would potentially be useful for searches related to clandestine burial sites. This technique, was originally documented by the British Army in the 1st World War. The RAG method is based on the construction of theme maps. RAG maps can facilitate the deployment of appropriate search assets (such as geophysics, probe or search dogs) and therefore applied to ground searches for the potential location of homicide graves or other buried objects (including weapons, explosives, etc.). RAG maps also may assist in the management of resources such as the deployment of search personnel, search teams and dogs. A GIS RAG (Red-Amber-Green) system related to a search for a homicide grave was applied to a test site in Italy, simulating the concealment of a victim in the area of Alì. This is an area of hill in Sicily, characterized by Palaeozoic phyllites. It was assumed during this test that information was provided by an observer who saw a suspect carrying tools on his land during daylight hours. A desktop study of the rural area was first implemented. Data was collated from previous geological, geomorphological, hydrogeological, geophysical and land use surveys. All these data were stored and independently analysed in a GIS using ArcGIS software. For the development of the GIS-based RAG map a digital elevation model (DEM) including a digital surface model (DTS) and digital terrain model (DTM) types were used. These were integrated with data from soil surveys to provide a preliminary assessment of "diggability" - including the possible thickness of loose superficial deposits and soils. Data were stored in different layers within the GIS. These included the delineation of the search area with consideration

  4. Clumpy dust clouds and extended atmosphere of the AGB star W Hydrae revealed with VLT/SPHERE-ZIMPOL and VLTI/AMBER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnaka, K.; Weigelt, G.; Hofmann, K.-H.

    2016-05-01

    the prediction of the hydrodynamical models for the mass loss driven by the scattering due to micron-sized grains. The detection of the clumpy dust clouds close to the star lends support to the dust formation induced by pulsation and large convective cells as predicted by the 3D simulations for AGB stars. Based on SPHERE and AMBER observations made with the Very Large Telescope and Very Large Telescope Interferometer of the European Southern Observatory. Program ID: 095.D-0397(D) and 093.D-0468(A).

  5. Minimal metabolic pathway structure is consistent with associated biomolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordbar, Aarash; Nagarajan, Harish; Lewis, Nathan E; Latif, Haythem; Ebrahim, Ali; Federowicz, Stephen; Schellenberger, Jan; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2014-01-01

    Pathways are a universal paradigm for functionally describing cellular processes. Even though advances in high-throughput data generation have transformed biology, the core of our biological understanding, and hence data interpretation, is still predicated on human-defined pathways. Here, we introduce an unbiased, pathway structure for genome-scale metabolic networks defined based on principles of parsimony that do not mimic canonical human-defined textbook pathways. Instead, these minimal pathways better describe multiple independent pathway-associated biomolecular interaction datasets suggesting a functional organization for metabolism based on parsimonious use of cellular components. We use the inherent predictive capability of these pathways to experimentally discover novel transcriptional regulatory interactions in Escherichia coli metabolism for three transcription factors, effectively doubling the known regulatory roles for Nac and MntR. This study suggests an underlying and fundamental principle in the evolutionary selection of pathway structures; namely, that pathways may be minimal, independent, and segregated. PMID:24987116

  6. Ion irradiation and biomolecular radiation damage II. Indirect effect

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Wei; Su, Wenhui

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported that damage of genome in a living cell by ionizing radiation is about one-third direct and two-thirds indirect. The former which has been introduced in our last paper, concerns direct energy deposition and ionizing reactions in the biomolecules; the latter results from radiation induced reactive species (mainly radicals) in the medium (mainly water) surrounding the biomolecules. In this review, a short description of ion implantation induced radical formation in water is presented. Then we summarize the aqueous radical reaction chemistry of DNA, protein and their components, followed by a brief introduction of biomolecular damage induced by secondary particles (ions and electron). Some downstream biological effects are also discussed.

  7. Nanopatterned structures for biomolecular analysis toward genomic and proteomic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chia-Fu; Gu, Jian; Wei, Qihuo; Liu, Yingjie; Gupta, Ravi; Nishio, Takeyoshi; Zenhausern, Frederic

    2005-01-01

    We report our fabrication of nanoscale devices using electron beam and nanoimprint lithography (NIL). We focus our study in the emerging fields of NIL, nanophotonics and nanobiotechnology and give a few examples as to how these nanodevices may be applied toward genomic and proteomic applications for molecular analysis. The examples include reverse NIL-fabricated nanofluidic channels for DNA stretching, nanoscale molecular traps constructed from dielectric constrictions for DNA or protein focusing by dielectrophoresis, multi-layer nanoburger and nanoburger multiplets for optimized surface-plasma enhanced Raman scattering for protein detection, and biomolecular motor-based nanosystems. The development of advanced nanopatterning techniques promises reliable and high-throughput manufacturing of nanodevices which could impact significantly on the areas of genomics, proteomics, drug discovery and molecular clinical diagnostics.

  8. The biomolecular corona of nanoparticles in circulating biological media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, D.; Caracciolo, G.; Digiacomo, L.; Colapicchioni, V.; Palchetti, S.; Capriotti, A. L.; Cavaliere, C.; Zenezini Chiozzi, R.; Puglisi, A.; Laganà, A.

    2015-08-01

    When nanoparticles come into contact with biological media, they are covered by a biomolecular `corona', which confers a new identity to the particles. In all the studies reported so far nanoparticles are incubated with isolated plasma or serum that are used as a model for protein adsorption. Anyway, bodily fluids are dynamic in nature so the question arises on whether the incubation protocol, i.e. dynamic vs. static incubation, could affect the composition and structure of the biomolecular corona. Here we let multicomponent liposomes interact with fetal bovine serum (FBS) both statically and dynamically, i.e. in contact with circulating FBS (~40 cm s-1). The structure and composition of the liposome-protein corona, as determined by dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic light scattering and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, were found to be dependent on the incubation protocol. Specifically, following dynamic exposure to FBS, multicomponent liposomes were less enriched in complement proteins and appreciably more enriched in apolipoproteins and acute phase proteins (e.g. alpha-1-antitrypsin and inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H3) that are involved in relevant interactions between nanoparticles and living systems. Supported by our results, we speculate that efficient predictive modeling of nanoparticle behavior in vivo will require accurate knowledge of nanoparticle-specific protein fingerprints in circulating biological media.When nanoparticles come into contact with biological media, they are covered by a biomolecular `corona', which confers a new identity to the particles. In all the studies reported so far nanoparticles are incubated with isolated plasma or serum that are used as a model for protein adsorption. Anyway, bodily fluids are dynamic in nature so the question arises on whether the incubation protocol, i.e. dynamic vs. static incubation, could affect the composition and structure of the biomolecular corona. Here we let

  9. Integration of biomolecular logic gates with field-effect transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Enzyme-based AND/OR logic gates are integrated with a capacitive field-effect sensor. → The AND/OR logic gates compose of multi-enzyme system immobilised on sensor surface. → Logic gates were activated by different combinations of chemical inputs (analytes). → The logic output (pH change) produced by the enzymes was read out by the sensor. - Abstract: The integration of biomolecular logic gates with field-effect devices - the basic element of conventional electronic logic gates and computing - is one of the most attractive and promising approaches for the transformation of biomolecular logic principles into macroscopically useable electrical output signals. In this work, capacitive field-effect EIS (electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor) sensors based on a p-Si-SiO2-Ta2O5 structure modified with a multi-enzyme membrane have been used for electronic transduction of biochemical signals processed by enzyme-based OR and AND logic gates. The realised OR logic gate composes of two enzymes (glucose oxidase and esterase) and was activated by ethyl butyrate or/and glucose. The AND logic gate composes of three enzymes (invertase, mutarotase and glucose oxidase) and was activated by two chemical input signals: sucrose and dissolved oxygen. The developed integrated enzyme logic gates produce local pH changes at the EIS sensor surface as a result of biochemical reactions activated by different combinations of chemical input signals, while the pH value of the bulk solution remains unchanged. The pH-induced charge changes at the gate-insulator (Ta2O5) surface of the EIS transducer result in an electronic signal corresponding to the logic output produced by the immobilised enzymes. The logic output signals have been read out by means of a constant-capacitance method.

  10. Calculating free-energy profiles in biomolecular systems from fast nonequilibrium processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forney, Michael W.; Janosi, Lorant; Kosztin, Ioan

    2008-11-01

    Often gaining insight into the functioning of biomolecular systems requires to follow their dynamics along a microscopic reaction coordinate (RC) on a macroscopic time scale, which is beyond the reach of current all atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A practical approach to this inherently multiscale problem is to model the system as a fictitious overdamped Brownian particle that diffuses along the RC in the presence of an effective potential of mean force (PMF) due to the rest of the system. By employing the recently proposed FR method [I. Kosztin , J. Chem. Phys. 124, 064106 (2006)], which requires only a small number of fast nonequilibrium MD simulations of the system in both forward and time reversed directions along the RC, we reconstruct the PMF: (1) of deca-alanine as a function of its end-to-end distance, and (2) that guides the motion of potassium ions through the gramicidin A channel. In both cases the computed PMFs are found to be in good agreement with previous results obtained by different methods. Our approach appears to be about one order of magnitude faster than the other PMF calculation methods and, in addition, it also provides the position-dependent diffusion coefficient along the RC. Thus, the obtained PMF and diffusion coefficient can be used in an overdamped Brownian model to estimate important characteristics of the studied systems, e.g., the mean folding time of the stretched deca-alanine and the mean diffusion time of the potassium ion through gramicidin A.

  11. Calculating free energy profiles in biomolecular systems from fast non-equilibrium processes

    CERN Document Server

    Forney, Michael; Kosztin, Ioan

    2008-01-01

    Often gaining insight into the functioning of biomolecular systems requires to follow their dynamics along a microscopic reaction coordinate (RC) on a macroscopic time scale, which is beyond the reach of current all atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A practical approach to this inherently multiscale problem is to model the system as a fictitious overdamped Brownian particle that diffuses along the RC in the presence of an effective potential of mean force (PMF) due to the rest of the system. By employing the recently proposed FR method [I. Kosztin et al., J. of Chem. Phys. 124, 064106 (2006)], which requires only a small number of fast nonequilibrium MD simulations of the system in both forward and time reversed directions along the RC, we reconstruct the PMF: (1) of deca-alanine as a function of its end-to-end distance, and (2) that guides the motion of potassium ions through the gramicidin A channel. In both cases the computed PMFs are found to be in good agreement with previous results obtained by ...

  12. Description of Pintomyia (Pifanomyia falcaorum sp. n. (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae, a Fossil Sand Fly from Dominican Amber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginaldo Peçanha Brazil

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available A new species of sand fly, Pintomyia (Pifanomyia falcaorum is described from an amber originated from the northern mountain range of Dominican Republic. The male sand fly specimen is well preserved and most features used in Phlebotominae taxonomy are seen with remarkable clarity.

  13. Molecular Modeling of Bifunctional Chelate Peptide Conjugates. 1. Copper and Indium Parameters for the AMBER Force Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichert, David E.; Norrby, Per-Ola; Welch, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    In this work we describe the development of parameters for In(III) and Cu(II) for the AMBER* force field as found in the modeling package MacroModel. These parameters were developed using automated procedures from a combination of crystallographic structures and ab initio calculations. The new pa...

  14. Protocol for MM/PBSA Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Fogolari, Federico; Brigo, Alessandro; Molinari, Henriette

    2003-01-01

    Continuum solvent models have been employed in past years for understanding processes such as protein folding or biomolecular association. In the last decade, several attempts have been made to merge atomic detail molecular dynamics simulations with solvent continuum models. Among continuum models, the Poisson-Boltzmann solvent accessible surface area model is one of the oldest and most fundamental. Notwithstanding its wide usage for simulation of biomolecular electrostatic potential, the Poi...

  15. New ways to boost molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krieger, E.; Vriend, G.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a set of algorithms that allow to simulate dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR, a common benchmark) with the AMBER all-atom force field at 160 nanoseconds/day on a single Intel Core i7 5960X CPU (no graphics processing unit (GPU), 23,786 atoms, particle mesh Ewald (PME), 8.0 A cutoff, correct

  16. Microbe-like inclusions in tree resins and implications for the fossil record of protists in amber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, V; Lausmaa, J; Sjövall, P; Ragazzi, E; Seyfullah, L J; Schmidt, A R

    2016-07-01

    During the past two decades, a plethora of fossil micro-organisms have been described from various Triassic to Miocene ambers. However, in addition to entrapped microbes, ambers commonly contain microscopic inclusions that sometimes resemble amoebae, ciliates, microfungi, and unicellular algae in size and shape, but do not provide further diagnostic features thereof. For a better assessment of the actual fossil record of unicellular eukaryotes in amber, we studied equivalent inclusions in modern resin of the Araucariaceae; this conifer family comprises important amber-producers in Earth history. Using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), we investigated the chemical nature of the inclusion matter and the resin matrix. Whereas the matrix, as expected, showed a more hydrocarbon/aromatic-dominated composition, the inclusions contain abundant salt ions and polar organics. However, the absence of signals characteristic for cellular biomass, namely distinctive proteinaceous amino acids and lipid moieties, indicates that the inclusions do not contain microbial cellular matter but salts and hydrophilic organic substances that probably derived from the plant itself. Rather than representing protists or their remains, these microbe-like inclusions, for which we propose the term 'pseudoinclusions', consist of compounds that are immiscible with the terpenoid resin matrix and were probably secreted in small amounts together with the actual resin by the plant tissue. Consequently, reports of protists from amber that are only based on the similarity of the overall shape and size to extant taxa, but do not provide relevant features at light-microscopical and ultrastructural level, cannot be accepted as unambiguous fossil evidence for these particular groups. PMID:27027519

  17. Insights into molecular chemistry of Chiapas amber using infrared-light microscopy, PIXE/RBS, and sulfur K-edge XANES spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme, Francisco; Northrup, Paul; Ruvalcaba-Sil, José Luis; Stojanoff, Vivian; Peter Siddons, D.; Alvarado-Ortega, Jesús

    2014-07-01

    Chiapas amber is a natural occurring fossil resin structurally composed of long macromolecule chains with semicrystalline phases associated with both fossil and polymerization process. The most conspicuous characteristic of this fossil polymer is that it preserves ancient organic inclusions. In the present work, PIXE/RBS spectrometry (particle-induced X-ray emission/Rutherford backscattering) were combined with complementary K-edge XANES spectroscopy (X-ray absorption near-edge structure) to identify the amount of sulfur in Chiapas amber. Initially, the amber samples were examined using infrared reflected photomicrography. Amber is transparent to infrared light and so embedded plants and animals are easily visible, showing them in extraordinary detail, as if they were immersed in a water-like solution. The PIXE/RBS data show that the proportion of sulfur in amber is significantly higher than that found in recently formed resins, consistent with the biogeochemical process that transforms the resin into amber during long-term burial in geological deposits. The sulfur K-edge XANES spectra from amber confirm the sulfur abundance and reveal sulfur species in the reduced and intermediate oxidation states in amber. Almost no oxidized sulfur was found, whereas the recent resins show mostly oxidized sulfur fractions. This indicates that labile oxidized sulfur decays during fossilization and resin maturation must occur under conditions of oxygen depletion. The implications of the presence of sulfur in amber for organic preservation is also discussed here. Sulfur compounds work as a polymer additive that promotes intense resin solidification. This restricts the early oxidant-specific biodegradation of the embedded biomatter and, over geological time, provides greater stability against chemical changes.

  18. Interferometric data reduction with AMBER/VLTI Principle,estimators and illustration

    CERN Document Server

    Tatulli, E

    2006-01-01

    We present in this paper an innovative data reduction method for single-mode interferometry. It has been specifically developed for the AMBER instrument, the three-beam combiner of the Very Large Telescope Interferometer, but can be derived for any single-mode interferometer. The algorithm is based on a direct modelling of the fringes in the detector plane. As such, it requires a preliminary calibration of the instrument in order to obtain the calibration matrix which builds the linear relationship between the interferogram and the interferometric observable, that is the complex visibility. Once the calibration procedure has been performed, the signal processing appears to be a classical least square determination of a linear inverse problem. From the estimated complex visibility, we derive the squared visibility, the closure phase and the spectral differential phase. The data reduction procedures are gathered into the so-called amdlib software, now available for the community, and presented in this paper. Fu...

  19. Mid-Cretaceous amber fossils illuminate the past diversity of tropical lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daza, Juan D; Stanley, Edward L; Wagner, Philipp; Bauer, Aaron M; Grimaldi, David A

    2016-03-01

    Modern tropical forests harbor an enormous diversity of squamates, but fossilization in such environments is uncommon and little is known about tropical lizard assemblages of the Mesozoic. We report the oldest lizard assemblage preserved in amber, providing insight into the poorly preserved but potentially diverse mid-Cretaceous paleotropics. Twelve specimens from the Albian-Cenomanian boundary of Myanmar (99 Ma) preserve fine details of soft tissue and osteology, and high-resolution x-ray computed tomography permits detailed comparisons to extant and extinct lizards. The extraordinary preservation allows several specimens to be confidently assigned to groups including stem Gekkota and stem Chamaleonidae. Other taxa are assignable to crown clades on the basis of similar traits. The detailed preservation of osteological and soft tissue characters in these specimens may facilitate their precise phylogenetic placement, making them useful calibration points for molecular divergence time estimates and potential keys for resolving conflicts in higher-order squamate relationships. PMID:26973870

  20. Sooty moulds from European tertiary amber, with notes on the systematic position of Rosaria ('Cyanobacteria').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikkinen, Jouko; Dörfelt, Heinrich; Schmidt, Alexander R; Wunderlich, Jörg

    2003-02-01

    Sooty moulds are described and illustrated from European amber dating back to 22-54 Myr. All the fossils are fragments of superficial subicula composed of brown moniliform hyphae with markedly tapering distal ends. The subglobose cells are identical to those of extant Metacapnodium (Metacapnodiaceae, Capnodiales) species. Also other preserved features, like the type of apical growth, wide-angled branching and the production of two distinctive conidial states, supports a placement in this genus. The fossils demonstrate that Metacapnodium hyphae have remained unchanged for tens of millions of years. This confirms that hyphal morphology and conidial states should be accorded considerable classificatory significance in this group of fungi. The following nomenclatural change is made: Metacapnodium succinum comb. nov. (syn. Rosaria succina). The type specimen was initially described as a filamentous cyanobacterium, due to similarities with Rosaria ramosa. Also the systematic position of this attribute is shortly discussed. PMID:12747338

  1. Modeling of Closure Phase Measurements with AMBER/VLTI - Towards Characterization of Exoplanetary Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Jörgens, V; Joergens, Viki; Quirrenbach, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    Differential phase observations with a near-IR interferometer offer a way to obtain spectra of extrasolar planets. The method makes use of the wavelength dependence of the interferometer phase of the planet/star system, which depends both on the interferometer geometry and on the brightness ratio between the planet and the star. The differential phase is strongly affected by instrumental and atmospheric dispersion effects. Difficulties in calibrating these effects might prevent the application of the differential phase method to systems with a very high contrast, such as extrasolar planets. A promising alternative is the use of spectrally resolved closure phases, which are immune to many of the systematic and random errors affecting the single-baseline phases. We have modeled the response of the AMBER instrument at the VLTI to realistic models of known extrasolar planetary systems, taking into account their theoretical spectra as well as the geometry of the VLTI. We present a strategy to determine the geometr...

  2. Biomolecular detection employing the Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Carlos A; Daaboul, George G; Ahn, Sunmin; Reddington, Alexander P; Monroe, Margo R; Zhang, Xirui; Irani, Rostem J; Yu, Chunxiao; Genco, Caroline A; Cretich, Marina; Chiari, Marcella; Goldberg, Bennett B; Connor, John H; Ünlü, M Selim

    2011-01-01

    The sensitive measurement of biomolecular interactions has use in many fields and industries such as basic biology and microbiology, environmental/agricultural/biodefense monitoring, nanobiotechnology, and more. For diagnostic applications, monitoring (detecting) the presence, absence, or abnormal expression of targeted proteomic or genomic biomarkers found in patient samples can be used to determine treatment approaches or therapy efficacy. In the research arena, information on molecular affinities and specificities are useful for fully characterizing the systems under investigation. Many of the current systems employed to determine molecular concentrations or affinities rely on the use of labels. Examples of these systems include immunoassays such as the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques, gel electrophoresis assays, and mass spectrometry (MS). Generally, these labels are fluorescent, radiological, or colorimetric in nature and are directly or indirectly attached to the molecular target of interest. Though the use of labels is widely accepted and has some benefits, there are drawbacks which are stimulating the development of new label-free methods for measuring these interactions. These drawbacks include practical facets such as increased assay cost, reagent lifespan and usability, storage and safety concerns, wasted time and effort in labelling, and variability among the different reagents due to the labelling processes or labels themselves. On a scientific research basis, the use of these labels can also introduce difficulties such as concerns with effects on protein functionality/structure due to the presence of the attached labels and the inability to directly measure the interactions in real time. Presented here is the use of a new label-free optical biosensor that is amenable to microarray studies, termed the Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS), for detecting proteins, DNA, antigenic material

  3. PARENT: A Parallel Software Suite for the Calculation of Configurational Entropy in Biomolecular Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Markus; Polyansky, Anton A; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2016-04-12

    Accurate estimation of configurational entropy from the in silico-generated biomolecular ensembles, e.g., from molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories, is dependent strongly on exhaustive sampling for physical reasons. This, however, creates a major computational problem for the subsequent estimation of configurational entropy using the Maximum Information Spanning Tree (MIST) or Mutual Information Expansion (MIE) approaches for internal molecular coordinates. In particular, the available software for such estimation exhibits serious limitations when it comes to molecules with hundreds or thousands of atoms, because of its reliance on a serial program architecture. To overcome this problem, we have developed a parallel, hybrid MPI/openMP C++ implementation of MIST and MIE, called PARENT, which is particularly optimized for high-performance computing and provides efficient estimation of configurational entropy in different biological processes (e.g., protein-protein interactions). In addition, PARENT also allows for a detailed mapping of intramolecular allosteric networks. Here, we benchmark the program on a set of 1-μs-long MD trajectories of 10 different protein complexes and their components, demonstrating robustness and good scalability. A direct comparison between MIST and MIE on the same dataset demonstrates a superior convergence behavior for the former approach, when it comes to total simulation length and configurational-space binning. PMID:26989950

  4. An Atomic Force Microscope with Dual Actuation Capability for Biomolecular Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevim, Semih; Shamsudhin, Naveen; Ozer, Sevil; Feng, Luying; Fakhraee, Arielle; Ergeneman, Olgaç; Pané, Salvador; Nelson, Bradley J.; Torun, Hamdi

    2016-06-01

    We report a modular atomic force microscope (AFM) design for biomolecular experiments. The AFM head uses readily available components and incorporates deflection-based optics and a piezotube-based cantilever actuator. Jetted-polymers have been used in the mechanical assembly, which allows rapid manufacturing. In addition, a FeCo-tipped electromagnet provides high-force cantilever actuation with vertical magnetic fields up to 0.55 T. Magnetic field calibration has been performed with a micro-hall sensor, which corresponds well with results from finite element magnetostatics simulations. An integrated force resolution of 1.82 and 2.98 pN, in air and in DI water, respectively was achieved in 1 kHz bandwidth with commercially available cantilevers made of Silicon Nitride. The controller and user interface are implemented on modular hardware to ensure scalability. The AFM can be operated in different modes, such as molecular pulling or force-clamp, by actuating the cantilever with the available actuators. The electromagnetic and piezoelectric actuation capabilities have been demonstrated in unbinding experiments of the biotin-streptavidin complex.

  5. Self-assembling biomolecular catalysts for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Paul C.; Patterson, Dustin P.; Saboda, Kendall N.; Edwards, Ethan J.; Miettinen, Heini M.; Basu, Gautam; Thielges, Megan C.; Douglas, Trevor

    2016-02-01

    The chemistry of highly evolved protein-based compartments has inspired the design of new catalytically active materials that self-assemble from biological components. A frontier of this biodesign is the potential to contribute new catalytic systems for the production of sustainable fuels, such as hydrogen. Here, we show the encapsulation and protection of an active hydrogen-producing and oxygen-tolerant [NiFe]-hydrogenase, sequestered within the capsid of the bacteriophage P22 through directed self-assembly. We co-opted Escherichia coli for biomolecular synthesis and assembly of this nanomaterial by expressing and maturing the EcHyd-1 hydrogenase prior to expression of the P22 coat protein, which subsequently self assembles. By probing the infrared spectroscopic signatures and catalytic activity of the engineered material, we demonstrate that the capsid provides stability and protection to the hydrogenase cargo. These results illustrate how combining biological function with directed supramolecular self-assembly can be used to create new materials for sustainable catalysis.

  6. Function of Amphiphilic Biomolecular Machines: Elastic Protein-based Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urry, Dan W.

    2000-03-01

    Elastic protein-based polymers function as biomolecular machines due to inverse temperature transitions of hydrophobic folding and assembly. The transitions occur either on raising the temperature from below to above the transition temperature, Tt, or on isothermally lowering Tt from above to below an operating temperature. The inverse temperature transition involves a decrease in entropy of the polymer component of the system on raising the temperature and a larger increase in solvent entropy on hydrophobic association. Tt depends on the quantity of hydrophobic hydration that undergoes transition to bulk water. Designed amphiphilic polymers perform free energy transductions involving the intensive variables of mechanical force, pressure, temperature, chemical potential, electrochemical potential and electromagnetic radiation and define a set of five axioms for their function as machines. The physical basis for these diverse energy conversions is competition for hydration between apolar (hydrophobic) and polar (e.g., charged) moieties. The effectiveness of these Tt-type entropic elastic protein-based machines is due to repeating peptide sequences that form regular, dynamic repeating structures and exhibit damping of backbone torsional oscillations on extension.

  7. A programmable biomolecular computing machine with bacterial phenotype output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossoy, Elizaveta; Lavid, Noa; Soreni-Harari, Michal; Shoham, Yuval; Keinan, Ehud

    2007-07-23

    The main advantage of autonomous biomolecular computing devices over electronic computers is their ability to interact directly with biological systems. No interface is required since all components of molecular computers, including hardware, software, input, and output are molecules that interact in solution along a cascade of programmable chemical events. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the output of a computation preduced by a molecular finite automaton can be a visible bacterial phenotype. Our 2-symbol-2-state finite automaton utilized linear double-stranded DNA inputs that were prepared by inserting a string of six base pair symbols into the lacZ gene on the pUC18 plasmid. The computation resulted in a circular plasmid that differed from the original pUC18 by either a 9 base pair (accepting state) or 11 base pair insert (unaccepting state) within the lacZ alpha region gene. Upon transformation and expression of the resultant plasmids in E. coli, the accepting state was represented by production of functional beta-galactosidase and formation of blue colonies on X-gal medium. In contrast, the unaccepting state was represented by white colonies due to a shift in the open reading frame of lacZ. PMID:17562552

  8. SWISS-PROT: connecting biomolecular knowledge via a protein database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasteiger, E; Jung, E; Bairoch, A

    2001-07-01

    With the explosive growth of biological data, the development of new means of data storage was needed. More and more often biological information is no longer published in the conventional way via a publication in a scientific journal, but only deposited into a database. In the last two decades these databases have become essential tools for researchers in biological sciences. Biological databases can be classified according to the type of information they contain. There are basically three types of sequence-related databases (nucleic acid sequences, protein sequences and protein tertiary structures) as well as various specialized data collections. It is important to provide the users of biomolecular databases with a degree of integration between these databases as by nature all of these databases are connected in a scientific sense and each one of them is an important piece to biological complexity. In this review we will highlight our effort in connecting biological information as demonstrated in the SWISS-PROT protein database. PMID:11488411

  9. The close environment of high-mass X-ray binaries at high angular resolution I. VLTI/AMBER and VLTI/PIONIER near-infrared interferometric observations of Vela X-1

    CERN Document Server

    Choquet, E; Bouquin, J -B Le; Merand, A; Berger, J -P; Haubois, X; Perrin, G; Petrucci, P -O; Lazareff, B; Pott, J -U

    2013-01-01

    Recent improvements on the sensitivity and spectral resolution of X-ray observations have led to a better understanding of the properties of matter in the vicinity of High Mass X-ray Binaries hosting a supergiant star and a compact object. However the geometry and physical properties of their environment at larger scales are currently only predicted by simulations. We aim at exploring the environment of Vela X-1 at a few stellar radii of the supergiant using spatially resolved observations in the near-infrared and at studying its dynamical evolution along the 9-day orbital period of the system. We observed Vela X-1 in 2010 and 2012 using long baseline interferometry at VLTI, respectively with the AMBER instrument in the K band and the PIONIER instrument in the H band. The PIONIER observations span through one orbital period to monitor possible evolutions in the geometry of the system. We resolved a structure of $8\\pm3~R_\\star$ from the AMBER data and $2.0\\,_{-1.2}^{+0.7}~R_\\star$ from the PIONIER data. From t...

  10. Computational methods to study the structure and dynamics of biomolecules and biomolecular processes from bioinformatics to molecular quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Since the second half of the 20th century machine computations have played a critical role in science and engineering. Computer-based techniques have become especially important in molecular biology, since they often represent the only viable way to gain insights into the behavior of a biological system as a whole. The complexity of biological systems, which usually needs to be analyzed on different time- and size-scales and with different levels of accuracy, requires the application of different approaches, ranging from comparative analysis of sequences and structural databases, to the analysis of networks of interdependence between cell components and processes, through coarse-grained modeling to atomically detailed simulations, and finally to molecular quantum mechanics. This book provides a comprehensive overview of modern computer-based techniques for computing the structure, properties and dynamics of biomolecules and biomolecular processes. The twenty-two chapters, written by scientists from all over t...

  11. The Tanytarsini (Diptera: Chironomidae) in the collection of the Museum of Amber Inclusions, University of Gdańsk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewska, Marta; Giłka, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Non-biting midges of the tribe Tanytarsini collected in the Museum of Amber Inclusions, University of Gdańsk, Poland, are reviewed. Among over 1500 chironomid specimens examined (inclusions in Baltic amber), 44 Tanytarsini individuals were found, of which 27 well preserved specimens were determined to 7 species, including 3 species described as new. Stempellinella electra sp. nov. (male) displays morphological hypopygial characters unique for the genus, and the antenna composed of 13 flagellomeres. A new checklist of fossil and extant species of this genus is also given, including Stempellinella sofiae (Fusari et Lamas, 2014) comb. nov. Tanytarsus glaesarius sp. nov. (male) is the only Eocene species of the genus with a reduced number of antennal flagellomeres. Tanytarsus protogregarius sp. nov. (male) is the oldest known representative of the gregarius species group. Notes on phylogenetic relations of the new species with their extant congeners are also provided. PMID:25947696

  12. Parisognoriste, a new genus of Lygistorrhinidae (Diptera: Sciaroidea) from the Oise amber with redescription of Palaeognoriste Meunier

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir Blagoderov; Heikki Hippa; André Nel

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A new genus and a new species of Lygistorrhinidae, Parisognoriste eocenica is described from the Eocene Oise amber of the Paris Basin. Parisognoriste sciariforme Meunier, 1904 and Parisognoriste affine Meunier, 1912 are re-described. Lectotypes are designated for both species of Palaeognoriste. The phylogenetic positions of the new genus and Palaeognoriste Meunier are discussed. The paper is an example demonstrating a new approach in cybertaxonomy including automatic generation of ma...

  13. Fundamental parameters of 16 late-type stars derived from their angular diameter measured with VLTI/AMBER

    OpenAIRE

    Cruzalèbes, P.; Jorissen, A.; Rabbia, Y.; Sacuto, S.; Chiavassa, A.; Pasquato, E.; Plez, B.; Eriksson, K; Spang, A.; Chesneau, O.

    2013-01-01

    Thanks to their large angular dimension and brightness, red giants and supergiants are privileged targets for optical long-baseline interferometers. Sixteen red giants and supergiants have been observed with the VLTI/AMBER facility over a two-years period, at medium spectral resolution (R=1500) in the K band. The limb-darkened angular diameters are derived from fits of stellar atmospheric models on the visibility and the triple product data. The angular diameters do not show any significant t...

  14. Duplication and Divergence Effect on Network Motifs in Undirected Bio-Molecular Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei Wang; Jinhu Lu; Xinghuo Yu; Zengrong Liu

    2015-06-01

    Duplication and divergence are two basic evolutionary mechanisms of bio-molecular networks. Real-world bio-molecular networks and their statistical characteristics can be well mimicked by artificial algorithms based on the two mechanisms. Bio-molecular networks consist of network motifs, which act as building blocks of large-scale networks. A fundamental question is how network motifs are evolved from long time evolution and natural selection. By considering the effect of various duplication and divergence strategies, we find that the underlying duplication scheme of the real-world undirected bio-molecular networks would rather follow the anti-preference strategy than the random one. The anti-preference duplication mechanism and the dimerization processes can lead to the formation of various motifs, and robustly conserve proper quantities of motifs in the artificial networks as that in the real-world ones. Furthermore, the anti-preference mechanism and edge deletion divergence can robustly preserve the sparsity of the networks. The investigations reveal the possible evolutionary mechanisms of network motifs in real-world bio-molecular networks, and have potential implications in the design, synthesis and reengineering of biological networks for biomedical purpose. PMID:25203993

  15. Otroacizzia soriae sp. nov., a new Miocene psyllid (Insecta, Hemiptera, Psyllidae from Dominican amber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Gimeno, V.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available new species of the fossil genus Otroacizzia Klimaszewski, 1996 (Hemiptera, Psyllidae is described as Otroacizzia soriae sp. nov. on the basis of a female specimen. This species is preserved in mid-Miocene amber from La Toca mines, Dominican Republic. The genus Otroacizzia is the most diverse psylloid genus in Dominican amber, with four known species. The new species differs from the three previously known species by the presence of a subapical dark band in the fore wing from the anterior part of the end of vein Rs to the end of vein Cu1b, which has a gap in the middle of the cell c1. Other differences in the fore wing are the presence of a strongly curved vein Cu1b and a cell c1 clearly longer than cell m1. Finally, the antennal segment 3 of the new species is one and a half times longer than segment 4.Se describe una nueva especie del género fósil Otroacizzia Klimaszewski, 1996 (Hemiptera, Psyllidae a partir de un ejemplar hembra: Otroacizzia soriae sp. nov. Esta especie está conservada en ámbar del Mioceno medio de las minas de La Toca en República Dominicana. Con cuatro especies conocidas, el género Otroacizzia es el género de psiloideo con mayor diversidad en el ámbar dominicano. La nueva especie difiere de las tres especies ya conocidas por la presencia de una banda oscura subapical en el ala anterior desde la parte anterior del final de la vena Rs hasta el final de la vena Cu1b, la cual presenta una discontinuidad en el medio de la celda c1. Otras diferencias en el ala anterior son la presencia de una vena Cu1b fuertemente curvada y una celda c1 claramente más larga que la celda m1. Finalmente, el tercer segmento antenal de la nueva especie es una vez y media más largo que el cuarto segmento.

  16. Bridging Nano- and Microtribology in Mechanical and Biomolecular Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomala, Agnieszka; Göçerler, Hakan; Gebeshuber, Ille C.

    The physical and chemical composition of surfaces determine various important properties of solids such as corrosion rates, adhesive properties, frictional properties, catalytic activity, wettability, contact potential and - finally and most importantly - failure mechanisms. Very thin, weak layers (of man-made and biological origin) on much harder substrates that reduce friction are the focus of the micro- and nanotribological investigations presented in this chapter.Biomolecular layers fulfil various functions in organs of the human body. Examples comprise the skin that provides a protective physical barrier between the body and the environment, preventing unwanted inward and outward passage of water and electrolytes, reducing penetration by destructive chemicals, arresting the penetration of microorganisms and external antigens and absorbing radiation from the sun, or the epithelium of the cornea that blocks the passage of foreign material, such as dust, water and bacteria, into the eye and that contributes to the lubrication layer that ensures smooth movement of the eyelids over the eyeballs.Monomolecular thin films, additive-derived reaction layers and hard coatings are widely used to tailor tribological properties of surfaces. Nanotribological investigations on these substrates can reveal novel properties regarding the orientation of chemisorbed additive layers, development of rubbing films with time and the relation of frictional properties to surface characteristics in diamond coatings.Depending on the questions to be answered with the tribological research, various micro- and nanotribological measurement methods are applied, including scanning probe microscopy (AFM, FFM), scanning electron microscopy, microtribometer investigations, angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and optical microscopy. Thoughts on the feasibility of a unified approach to energy-dissipating systems and how it might be reached (touching upon new ways of scientific publishing

  17. Soft Supercharging of Biomolecular Ions in Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chingin, Konstantin; Xu, Ning; Chen, Huanwen

    2014-06-01

    The charge states of biomolecular ions in ESI-MS can be significantly increased by the addition of low-vapor supercharging (SC) reagents into the spraying solution. Despite the considerable interest from the community, the mechanistic aspects of SC are not well understood and are hotly debated. Arguments that denaturation accounts for the increased charging observed in proteins sprayed from aqueous solutions containing SC reagent have been published widely, but often with incomplete or ambiguous supporting data. In this work, we explored ESI MS charging and SC behavior of several biopolymers including proteins and DNA oligonucleotides. Analytes were ionized from 100 mM ammonium acetate (NH4Ac) aqueous buffer in both positive (ESI+) and negative (ESI-) ion modes. SC was induced either with m-NBA or by the elevated temperature of ESI capillary. For all the analytes studied we, found striking differences in the ESI MS response to these two modes of activation. The data suggest that activation with m-NBA results in more extensive analyte charging with lower degree of denaturation. When working solution with m-NBA was analyzed at elevated temperatures, the SC effect from m-NBA was neutralized. Instead, the net SC effect was similar to the SC effect achieved by thermal activation only. Overall, our observations indicate that SC reagents enhance ESI charging of biomolecules via distinctly different mechanism compared with the traditional approaches based on analyte denaturation. Instead, the data support the hypothesis that the SC phenomenon involves a direct interaction between a biopolymer and SC reagent occurring in evaporating ESI droplets.

  18. Architecture of transcriptional regulatory circuits is knitted over the topology of bio-molecular interaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soberano de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb; Nielsen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    use the topology of bio-molecular interaction networks in order to constrain the solution space. Such approaches systematically integrate the existing biological knowledge with the 'omics' data. Results: Here we introduce a hypothesis-driven method that integrates bio-molecular network topology with...... transcriptome data, thereby allowing the identification of key biological features (Reporter Features) around which transcriptional changes are significantly concentrated. We have combined transcriptome data with different biological networks in order to identify Reporter Gene Ontologies, Reporter Transcription...... Factors, Reporter Proteins and Reporter Complexes, and use this to decipher the logic of regulatory circuits playing a key role in yeast glucose repression and human diabetes. Conclusion: Reporter Features offer the opportunity to identify regulatory hot-spots in bio-molecular interaction networks that...

  19. Multiple Features Based Approach to Extract Bio-molecular Event Triggers Using Conditional Random Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Majumder

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of Biomedical Natural Language Processing (BioNLP is to capture biomedical phenomena from textual data by extracting relevant entities, information and relations between biomedical entities (i.e. proteins and genes. In general, in most of the published papers, only binary relations were extracted. In a recent past, the focus is shifted towards extracting more complex relations in the form of bio-molecular events that may include several entities or other relations. In this paper we propose an approach that enables event trigger extraction of relatively complex bio-molecular events. We approach this problem as a detection of bio-molecular event trigger using the well-known algorithm, namely Conditional Random Field (CRF. We apply our experiments on development set. It shows the overall average recall, precision and F-measure values of 64.27504%, 69.97559% and 67.00429%, respectively for the event detection.

  20. An asymmetry detected in the disk of Kappa CMa with the AMBER/VLTI

    CERN Document Server

    Meilland, A; Stee, P; De Souza, A D; Petrov, R; Mourard, D; Jankov, S; Robbe-Dubois, S; Spang, A; Arisitidi, E; Meilland, Anthony; Millour, Florentin; Stee, Philippe; Souza, Armando Domiciano De; Petrov, Romain; Mourard, Denis; Jankov, Slobodan; Robbe-Dubois, Sylvie; Spang, Alain; Arisitidi, Eric; al, et

    2006-01-01

    Aims. We study the geometry and kinematics of the circumstellar environment of the Be star Kappa CMa in the Br gamma emission line and its nearby continuum. Methods. We use the VLTI/AMBER instrument operating in the K band which provides a spatial resolution of about 6 mas with a spectral resolution of 1500 to study the kinematics within the disk and to infer its rotation law. In order to obtain more kinematical constraints we also use an high spectral resolution Pa beta line profile obtain in December 2005 at the Observatorio do Pico do Dios, Brazil and we compile V/R line profile variations and spectral energy distribution data points from the literature. Results. Using differential visibilities and differential phases across the Br gamma line we detect an asymmetry in the disk. Moreover, we found that kappa CMa seems difficult to fit within the classical scenario for Be stars, illustrated recently by alpha Arae observations, i.e. a fast rotating B star close to its breakup velocity surrounded by a Kepleria...

  1. Afro-Asian cockroach from Chiapas amber and the lost Tertiary American entomofauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vršanský, Peter; Cifuentes-Ruiz, Paulina; Vidlička, Ľubomír; Čiampor, Fedor; Vega, Francisco J.

    2011-10-01

    Cockroach genera with synanthropic species (Blattella, Ectobius, Supella, Periplaneta, Diploptera and ?Blatta), as well as other insects such as honeybees, although natively limited to certain continents nowadays, had circumtropic distribution in the past. The ease of their reintroduction into their former range suggests a post-Early Miocene environmental stress which led to the extinction of cosmopolitan Tertiary entomofauna in the Americas, whilst in Eurasia, Africa and Australia this fauna survived. This phenomenon is demonstrated here on a low diversity (10 spp.) living cockroach genus Supella, which is peculiar for the circumtropical synanthropic brownbanded cockroach S. longipalpa and also for its exclusively free-living cavicolous species restricted to Africa. S. (Nemosupella) miocenica sp. nov. from the Miocene amber of Chiapas in Mexico is a sister species to the living S. mirabilis from the Lower Guinea forests and adjacent savannas. The difference is restricted to the shape of the central macula on the pronotum, and size, which may indicate the around-Miocene origin of the living, extremely polymorphic Supella species and possibly also the isochronic invasion into the Americas. The species also has a number of characteristics of the Asian (and possibly also Australian) uniform genus Allacta (falling within the generic variability of Supella) suggesting Supella is a direct ancestor of the former. The present species is the first significant evidence for incomplete hiati between well defined cockroach genera — a result of the extensive fossil record of the group. The reported specimen is covered by a mycelium of a parasitic fungus Cordyceps or Entomophthora.

  2. From Correlation to Causality: Statistical Approaches to Learning Regulatory Relationships in Large-Scale Biomolecular Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Robert O; Sachs, Karen; Vitek, Olga

    2016-03-01

    Causal inference, the task of uncovering regulatory relationships between components of biomolecular pathways and networks, is a primary goal of many high-throughput investigations. Statistical associations between observed protein concentrations can suggest an enticing number of hypotheses regarding the underlying causal interactions, but when do such associations reflect the underlying causal biomolecular mechanisms? The goal of this perspective is to provide suggestions for causal inference in large-scale experiments, which utilize high-throughput technologies such as mass-spectrometry-based proteomics. We describe in nontechnical terms the pitfalls of inference in large data sets and suggest methods to overcome these pitfalls and reliably find regulatory associations. PMID:26731284

  3. Engineering intracellular active transport systems as in vivo biomolecular tools.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachand, George David; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda

    2006-11-01

    Active transport systems provide essential functions in terms of cell physiology and metastasis. These systems, however, are also co-opted by invading viruses, enabling directed transport of the virus to and from the cell's nucleus (i.e., the site of virus replication). Based on this concept, fundamentally new approaches for interrogating and manipulating the inner workings of living cells may be achievable by co-opting Nature's active transport systems as an in vivo biomolecular tool. The overall goal of this project was to investigate the ability to engineer kinesin-based transport systems for in vivo applications, specifically the collection of effector proteins (e.g., transcriptional regulators) within single cells. In the first part of this project, a chimeric fusion protein consisting of kinesin and a single chain variable fragment (scFv) of an antibody was successfully produced through a recombinant expression system. The kinesin-scFv retained both catalytic and antigenic functionality, enabling selective capture and transport of target antigens. The incorporation of a rabbit IgG-specific scFv into the kinesin established a generalized system for functionalizing kinesin with a wide range of target-selective antibodies raised in rabbits. The second objective was to develop methods of isolating the intact microtubule network from live cells as a platform for evaluating kinesin-based transport within the cytoskeletal architecture of a cell. Successful isolation of intact microtubule networks from two distinct cell types was demonstrated using glutaraldehyde and methanol fixation methods. This work provides a platform for inferring the ability of kinesin-scFv to function in vivo, and may also serve as a three-dimensional scaffold for evaluating and exploiting kinesin-based transport for nanotechnological applications. Overall, the technology developed in this project represents a first-step in engineering active transport system for in vivo

  4. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulation: Effect of polarization on thrombin-ligand binding energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Li L.; Feng, Guo Q.; Zhang, Qing G.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations lasting 500 ns were performed in explicit water to investigate the effect of polarization on the binding of ligands to human α-thrombin based on the standard nonpolarizable AMBER force field and the quantum-derived polarized protein-specific charge (PPC). The PPC includes the electronic polarization effect of the thrombin-ligand complex, which is absent in the standard force field. A detailed analysis and comparison of the results of the MD simulation with experimental data provided strong evidence that intra-protein, protein-ligand hydrogen bonds and the root-mean-square deviation of backbone atoms were significantly stabilized through electronic polarization. Specifically, two critical hydrogen bonds between thrombin and the ligand were broken at approximately 190 ns when AMBER force field was used and the number of intra-protein backbone hydrogen bonds was higher under PPC than under AMBER. The thrombin-ligand binding energy was computed using the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) method, and the results were consistent with the experimental value obtained using PPC. Because hydrogen bonds were unstable, it was failed to predict the binding affinity under the AMBER force field. Furthermore, the results of the present study revealed that differences in the binding free energy between AMBER and PPC almost comes from the electrostatic interaction. Thus, this study provides evidence that protein polarization is critical to accurately describe protein-ligand binding. PMID:27507430

  5. Force-Field Induced Bias in the Structure of Aβ21-30: A Comparison of OPLS, AMBER, CHARMM, and GROMOS Force Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Micholas Dean; Rao, J Srinivasa; Segelken, Elizabeth; Cruz, Luis

    2015-12-28

    In this work we examine the dynamics of an intrinsically disordered protein fragment of the amyloid β, the Aβ21-30, under seven commonly used molecular dynamics force fields (OPLS-AA, CHARMM27-CMAP, AMBER99, AMBER99SB, AMBER99SB-ILDN, AMBER03, and GROMOS53A6), and three water models (TIP3P, TIP4P, and SPC/E). We find that the tested force fields and water models have little effect on the measures of radii of gyration and solvent accessible surface area (SASA); however, secondary structure measures and intrapeptide hydrogen-bonding are significantly modified, with AMBER (99, 99SB, 99SB-ILDN, and 03) and CHARMM22/27 force-fields readily increasing helical content and the variety of intrapeptide hydrogen bonds. On the basis of a comparison between the population of helical and β structures found in experiments, our data suggest that force fields that suppress the formation of helical structure might be a better choice to model the Aβ21-30 peptide. PMID:26629886

  6. Immersion mode ice nucleation measurements with the new Portable Immersion Mode Cooling chAmber (PIMCA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Monika; Lohmann, Ulrike; Welti, André; Kanji, Zamin A.

    2016-05-01

    The new Portable Immersion Mode Cooling chAmber (PIMCA) has been developed for online immersion freezing of single-immersed aerosol particles. PIMCA is a vertical extension of the established Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber (PINC). PIMCA immerses aerosol particles into cloud droplets before they enter PINC. Immersion freezing experiments on cloud droplets with a radius of 5-7 μm at a prescribed supercooled temperature (T) and water saturation can be conducted, while other ice nucleation mechanisms (deposition, condensation, and contact mode) are excluded. Validation experiments on reference aerosol (kaolinite, ammonium sulfate, and ammonium nitrate) showed good agreement with theory and literature. The PIMCA-PINC setup was tested in the field during the Zurich AMBient Immersion freezing Study (ZAMBIS) in spring 2014 in Zurich, Switzerland. Significant concentrations of submicron ambient aerosol triggering immersion freezing at T > 236 K were rare. The mean frozen cloud droplet number concentration was estimated to be 7.22·105 L-1 for T condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations predicted for the site at a typical supersaturation of SS = 0.3%. This value should be considered as an upper limit of cloud droplet freezing via immersion and homogeneous freezing processes. The predicted ice nucleating particle (INP) concentration based on measured total aerosol larger than 0.5 μm and the parameterization by DeMott et al. (2010) at T = 238 K is INPD10=54 ± 39 L-1. This is a lower limit as supermicron particles were not sampled with PIMCA-PINC during ZAMBIS.

  7. Optical Coherence Tomography and Biomolecular Imaging with Coherent Raman Scattering Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Andersen, Peter E.

    2014-01-01

    The Special Section on Selected Topics in Biophotonics: Optical Coherence Tomography and Biomolecular Imaging with Coherent Raman Scattering Microscopy comprises two invited review papers and several contributed papers from the summer school Biophotonics ’13, as well as contributed papers within...

  8. Transition metal bioconjugates with an organometallic link between the metal and the biomolecular scaffold

    OpenAIRE

    Monney, Angèle; Albrecht, Martin

    2013-01-01

    This overview compiles recent advances in the synthesis and application of organometallic bioconjugates that comprise a metal–carbon linkage between the metal and the biomolecular scaffold. This specific area of bioorganometallic chemistry has been spurred by the discovery of naturally occurring bioorganometallic compounds and afforded organometallic bioconjugates from transition metals binding to amino acids, nucleic acids and other biomolecules. These artificial bioorganometallic compounds ...

  9. Computer Programming and Biomolecular Structure Studies: A Step beyond Internet Bioinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likic, Vladimir A.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the experience of teaching structural bioinformatics to third year undergraduate students in a subject titled "Biomolecular Structure and Bioinformatics." Students were introduced to computer programming and used this knowledge in a practical application as an alternative to the well established Internet bioinformatics…

  10. Molecular Modeling of Bifunctional Chelate Peptide Conjugates. 1. Copper and Indium Parameters for the AMBER Force Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichert, David E.; Norrby, Per-Ola; Welch, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    In this work we describe the development of parameters for In(III) and Cu(II) for the AMBER* force field as found in the modeling package MacroModel. These parameters were developed using automated procedures from a combination of crystallographic structures and ab initio calculations. The new pa...... utilized to examine the conformational effects caused by the conjugation of InDTPA (DTPA = diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) and CuDOTA (DOTA 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid) to the cyclic octapeptide octreotide....

  11. Enhanced light output power of InGaN-based amber LEDs by strain-compensating AlN/AlGaN barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Daisuke; Lu, Shen; Hirahara, Sota; Niwa, Kazumasa; Kamiyama, Satoshi; Ohkawa, Kazuhiro

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the effect of a combined AlN/Al0.03Ga0.97N barrier on InGaN-based amber light-emitting diodes (LEDs) grown by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy. InGaN-based multiple quantum wells with a combined AlN/Al0.03Ga0.97N barrier showed intense photoluminescence with a narrow full-width at half-maximum. The amber LEDs with a combined AlN/Al0.03Ga0.97N barrier achieved a light output power enhanced approximately 2.5-fold at 20 mA compared to that of the LED with a combined AlN/GaN barrier, owing to the reduction of defects in InGaN active layers. Thus, the efficiency of high-In-content InGaN-based LEDs can be improved in the spectrum range of amber.

  12. 琥珀酸酐生产新工艺探讨%The Study of New Technology of Producing Amber Anhydride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕杨

    2012-01-01

    It introduced the properties of Amber Anhydride and widely used in every field.Introducing the major technology of producing Amber Anhydride.Reviewing new tecnology of producing Amber Anhydride and comparing the major technology with new technology to explaining the superiority of new technology.%介绍了琥珀酸酐的性质及在各个领域的广泛用途,介绍了目前国内琥珀酸酐的主要生产工艺技术方案,综述了琥珀酸酐生产新技术,并对目前国内琥珀酸酐的主要生产工艺和琥珀酸酐生产新工艺进行了比较,突出了新工艺的优势。

  13. Molecular composition, chemotaxonomical aspects and botanical origin of Brazilian amber [Composição molecular, aspectos quimiotaxonômicos e origem botânica de âmbares brasileiros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora A. Azevedo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Amber is a plant fossil resin constituted mainly by diterpenes of several classes, such as abietanes, labdanes, pimaranes and kauranes. The botanical origin of amber is related to angiosperms and gymnosperms, depending on the geological period and where it was produced. The analysis of its chemical composition performed using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry and carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance allows the determination of the possible botanical sources, allowing obtaining important information regarding the resinous flora on the geological past of the Earth. Although amber samples are studied primarily by geochemists and paleontologists in the context of paleobotany and paleozoology, the research about its molecular composition is directly related to chemotaxonomy and phytochemistry. The results obtained to Brazilian amber samples until this moment allowed the determination of three possible amber botanical sources in Cretaceous period – Araucariaceae, Podocarpaceae e Cheirolepidiaceae.

  14. Modelling the interaction of several bisphosphonates with hydroxyapatite using the generalised AMBER force field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Janine; Cukrowski, Ignacy; Marques, Helder M.

    2006-12-01

    The ability of the Generalised AMBER Force Field (GAFF) of Kollman and co-workers to model the structures of bisphosphonate ligands, C(R 1)(R 2)(PO 32-) 2, important compounds in the treatment of bone cancer, by molecular mechanics methods is evaluated. The structure of 50 bisphosphonates and nine bisphosphonate esters were predicted and compared to their crystal structures. Partial charges were assigned from a RHF/6-31G ∗ single point calculation at the geometry of the crystal structure. Additional parameters required for GAFF were determined using the methods of the force field's developers. The structures were found to be well replicated with virtually all bond lengths reproduced to within 0.015 Å, or within 1.2 σ of the crystallographic mean. Bond angles were reproduced to within 1.9° (0.8 σ). The observed gauche or anti conformation of the molecules was reproduced, although in several instances gauche conformations observed in the solid state energy-minimised into anti conformations, and vice versa. The interaction of MDP (R 1 = R 2 = H), HEDP (R 1 = OH, R 2 = CH 3), APD (R 1 = OH, R 2 = (CH 2) 2NH 3+), alendronate (R 1 = OH, R 2 = (CH 2) 3NH 3+) and neridronate (R 1 = OH, R 2 = (CH 2) 5NH 3+) with the (001), (010) and (100) faces of hydroxyapaptite was examined by energy-minimising 20 random orientations of each ligand 20 Å from the mineral (where there is no interaction), and then at about 8 Å from the surface whereupon the ligand relaxes onto the surface. The difference in energy between the two systems is the interaction energy. In all cases interaction with hydroxyapatite caused a decrease in energy. When modelled with a dielectric constant of 78 ɛo, non-bonded interactions dominate; electrostatic interactions become important when the dielectric constant is nature of the side chain and is similar to the magnitude of the interaction energy on the other two faces. The magnitude of the second conformation increases with the size of the Cα side

  15. Disk and wind interaction in the young stellar object MWC 297 spatially resolved with VLTI/AMBER

    CERN Document Server

    Malbet, F; De Wit, W J; Kraus, S; Meilland, A; Millour, F; Tatulli, E; Berger, J P; Chesneau, O; Hofmann, Karl Heinrich; Isella, A; Natta, A; Petrov, R; Preibisch, T; Stee, P; Testi, L; Weigelt, G; Antonelli, P; Beckmann, U; Bresson, Y; Chelli, A; Duvert, G; Gluck, L; Kern, P; Lagarde, S; Le Coarer, E; Lisi, F; Perraut, K; Robbe-Dubois, S; Roussel, A; Zins, G; Accardo, M; Acke, B; Agabi, K; Arezki, B; Aristidi, E; Baffa, C; Behrend, J; Blöcker, T; Bonhomme, S; Busoni, S; Cassaing, F; Clausse, J M; Colin, J; Connot, C; Delboulbé, A; Driebe, T; Dugué, M; Feautrier, P; Ferruzzi, D; Forveille, T; Fossat, E; Foy, R; Fraix-Burnet, D; Gallardo, A; Gennari, S; Glentzlin, A; Giani, E; Gil, C; Heiden, M; Heininger, M; Kamm, D; Le Contel, D; Le Contel, J M; López, B; Magnard, Y; Marconi, A; Mars, G; Martinot-Lagarde, G; Mathias, P; Monin, J L; Mouillet, D; Mourard, D; Mege, P; Nussbaum, E; Ohnaka, K; Pacheco, J; Pacini, F; Perrier, C; Puget, P; Rabbia, Y; Rebattu, S; Reynaud, F; Richichi, A; Sacchettini, M; Salinari, P; Schertl, D; Solscheid, W; Stefanini, P; Tallon, M; Tallon-Bosc, I; Tasso, D; Valtier, J C; Vannier, M; Ventura, N; Kiekebusch, M; Rantakyro, F; Schöller, M

    2005-01-01

    The young stellar object MWC 297 has been observed with the VLT interferometer equipped with the AMBER instrument. MWC 297 has been spatially resolved in the continuum with a visibility of 0.50 as well as in the Br gamma emission line where the visibility decrease to a lower value of 0.33. This change in the visibility with the wavelength can be interpreted by the presence of an optically thick disk responsible for the visibility in the continuum and of a stellar wind traced by Br gamma and whose apparent size is 40% larger. We validate this interpretation by building a model of the stellar environment that combines a geometrically thin, optically thick accretion disk model consisting of gas and dust, and a latitude-dependent stellar wind outflowing above the disk surface. The continuum emission and visibilities obtained from this model are fully consistent with the interferometric AMBER data. They agree also with existing optical, near-infrared spectra and other broad-band near-infrared interferometric visib...

  16. Description of a new species, Pintomyia dissimilis nov. sp., a phlebotomine fossil from Dominican Republic amber (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanguinette Cristiani

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phlebotomine sandflies are the vectors of etiological agents of leishmaniases in several areas of the world. In the Neotropical Region, the biodiversity of these insects is more than other regions, probably due the long evolutionary period of this group. Miocene amber from Dominican Republic, currently, has a record of 14 extinct species of Phlebotomine sandflies. Results This paper describes a new fossil species of phlebotomine sandfly from amber found in Dominican Republic. This new species is based on morphological characters of a male such as 5° palpomere longer than 3° + 4°, three well-developed spines in the gonostyle, lateral lobe longer than gonocoxite and permit inclusion of the new species in the genus Pintomyia, series serrana. The paramere, with a curvature in the ventral margin, of the middle of the structure, separates the new species from the others fossils or extant species. Conclusion The new species described in the present study named Pintomyia dissimilis nov. sp. is well differenciated from all known species in this genus.

  17. Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Ngada, N M

    2015-01-01

    The complexity and cost of building and running high-power electrical systems make the use of simulations unavoidable. The simulations available today provide great understanding about how systems really operate. This paper helps the reader to gain an insight into simulation in the field of power converters for particle accelerators. Starting with the definition and basic principles of simulation, two simulation types, as well as their leading tools, are presented: analog and numerical simulations. Some practical applications of each simulation type are also considered. The final conclusion then summarizes the main important items to keep in mind before opting for a simulation tool or before performing a simulation.

  18. Constructing Bio-molecular Databases on a DNA-based Computer

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Weng-Long; Ho,; Guo, Minyi

    2007-01-01

    Codd [Codd 1970] wrote the first paper in which the model of a relational database was proposed. Adleman [Adleman 1994] wrote the first paper in which DNA strands in a test tube were used to solve an instance of the Hamiltonian path problem. From [Adleman 1994], it is obviously indicated that for storing information in molecules of DNA allows for an information density of approximately 1 bit per cubic nm (nanometer) and a dramatic improvement over existing storage media such as video tape which store information at a density of approximately 1 bit per 1012 cubic nanometers. This paper demonstrates that biological operations can be applied to construct bio-molecular databases where data records in relational tables are encoded as DNA strands. In order to achieve the goal, DNA algorithms are proposed to perform eight operations of relational algebra (calculus) on bio-molecular relational databases, which include Cartesian product, union, set difference, selection, projection, intersection, join and division. Fu...

  19. Micromachining microcarrier-based biomolecular encoding for miniaturized and multiplexed immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Zheng-liang; Morita, Yasutaka; Hasan, Quamrul; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2003-08-15

    Micromachining techniques, which originated in the microelectronics industry, have been employed to manufacture microparticles bearing an engraved dot-type signature for biomolecular encoding. These metallic microstructures are photolithographically defined and manufactured in a highly reproducible manner. In addition, the code introduced on the particle face is a straightforward visible feature that is easily recognizable with the use of optical microscopy. The number of distinct codes theoretically could be many thousands, depending on the coding element numbers. Such microparticles are, thus, with appropriate surface organic functionalizations, ideal for encoding biomolecular libraries and serving as a platform for developing high-throughput multiplexed bioassay schemes based on suspension array technology. As proof of this statement, we demonstrated that encoded microparticles tagged with antibodies to human immunoglobulin classes are capable, using imaging detection as the interrogating approach, of high sensitivity and high specificity, as well as multiplexed detection of the respective antigens in a microliter-sample volume. PMID:14651038

  20. PREFACE: India-Japan Workshop on Biomolecular Electronics & Organic Nanotechnology for Environment Preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoda, Mitsuyoshi; Malhotra, Bansi D.

    2012-04-01

    The 'India-Japan Workshop on Biomolecular Electronics & Organic Nanotechnology for Environment Preservation' (IJWBME 2011) will be held on 7-10 December 2011 at EGRET Himeji, Himeji, Hyogo, Japan. This workshop was held for the first time on 17-19 December 2009 at NPL, New Delhi. Keeping in mind the importance of organic nanotechnology and biomolecular electronics for environmental preservation and their anticipated impact on the economics of both the developing and the developed world, IJWBME 2009 was jointly organized by the Department of Biological Functions, Graduate School of Life Sciences and Systems Engineering, the Kyushu Institute of Technology (KIT), Kitakyushu, Japan, and the Department of Science & Technology Centre on Biomolecular Electronics (DSTCBE), National Physical Laboratory (NPL). Much progress in the field of biomolecular electronics and organic nanotechnology for environmental preservation is expected for the 21st Century. Organic optoelectronic devices, such as organic electroluminescent devices, organic thin-film transistors, organic sensors, biological systems and so on have especially attracted much attention. The main purpose of this workshop is to provide an opportunity for researchers interested in biomolecular electronics and organic nanotechnology for environmental preservation, to come together in an informal and friendly atmosphere and exchange technical knowledge and experience. We are sure that this workshop will be very useful and fruitful for all participants in summarizing the recent progress in biomolecular electronics and organic nanotechnology for environmental preservation and preparing new ground for the next generation. Many papers have been submitted from India and Japan and more than 30 papers have been accepted for presentation. The main topics of interest are as follows: Bioelectronics Biomolecular Electronics Fabrication Techniques Self-assembled Monolayers Nano-sensors Environmental Monitoring Organic Devices

  1. Effect of antibody modifications on its biomolecular binding as determined by surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashist, Sandeep Kumar

    2012-02-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based procedure was developed to determine the effect of antibody modifications on its biomolecular binding behavior. Mouse immunoglobulin G (IgG) was immobilized on a protein A-functionalized gold-coated SPR chip. Goat anti-mouse IgG and its various commercially available modifications (i.e., conjugated with atto 550, atto 647, tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate [TRITC], horseradish peroxidase [HRP], or biotin) were employed in exactly the same concentration for the detection of mouse IgG. The various modifications of goat anti-mouse IgG decreased its biomolecular binding to mouse IgG in the order of unmodified>HRP-labeled>atto 550-labeled>biotinylated>TRITC-labeled>atto 647-labeled. PMID:22093612

  2. Synthesis of bacteriophage-coded gene products during infection of Escherichia coli with amber mutants of T3 and T7 defective in gene 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issinger, O G; Hausmann, R

    1973-01-01

    During nonpermissive infection by a T7 amber mutant in gene 1 (phage RNA polymerase-deficient), synthesis of the products of the phage genes 3 (endonuclease), 3, 5 (lysozyme), 5 (DNA polymerase), and 17 (serum blocking power) was shown to occur at about half the rate as during wild-type infection...

  3. Bridge- and Solvent-Mediated Intramolecular Electronic Communications in Ubiquinone-Based Biomolecular Wires

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiao-Yuan; Ma, Wei; Zhou, Hao; Cao, Xiao-Ming; Long, Yi-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Intramolecular electronic communications of molecular wires play a crucial role for developing molecular devices. In the present work, we describe different degrees of intramolecular electronic communications in the redox processes of three ubiquinone-based biomolecular wires (Bis-CoQ0s) evaluated by electrochemistry and Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods in different solvents. We found that the bridges linkers have a significant effect on the electronic communications between the two pe...

  4. Extension of the GLYCAM06 Biomolecular Force Field to Lipids, Lipid Bilayers and Glycolipids

    OpenAIRE

    Tessier, Matthew B; DeMarco, Mari L.; Yongye, Austin B.; Woods, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    GLYCAM06 is a generalisable biomolecular force field that is extendible to diverse molecular classes in the spirit of a small-molecule force field. Here we report parameters for lipids, lipid bilayers and glycolipids for use with GLYCAM06. Only three lipid-specific atom types have been introduced, in keeping with the general philosophy of transferable parameter development. Bond stretching, angle bending, and torsional force constants were derived by fitting to quantum mechanical data for a c...

  5. Markov propagation of allosteric effects in biomolecular systems: application to GroEL–GroES

    OpenAIRE

    Chennubhotla, Chakra; Bahar, Ivet

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a novel approach for elucidating the potential pathways of allosteric communication in biomolecular systems. The methodology, based on Markov propagation of ‘information' across the structure, permits us to partition the network of interactions into soft clusters distinguished by their coherent stochastics. Probabilistic participation of residues in these clusters defines the communication patterns inherent to the network architecture. Application to bacterial chaperonin complex ...

  6. Evaluation of stochastic effects on biomolecular networks using the generalised Nyquist stability criterion

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, J; Bates, D. G.; Postlethwaite, I.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract—Stochastic differential equations are now commonly used to model biomolecular networks in systems biology, and much recent research has been devoted to the development of methods to analyse their stability properties. Stability analysis of such systems may be performed using the Laplace transform, which requires the calculation of the exponential matrix involving time symbolically. However, the calculation of the symbolic exponential matrix is not feasible for problems of even mod...

  7. Atomic force microscopy of self-assembled biomolecular structures and their interaction with metallic nanoparticles.

    OpenAIRE

    Gysemans, Maarten

    2009-01-01

    We applied AFM to study biomolecular wires, both out of interest in thei r biological functions and in the framework of nanotechnology based fabr ication. We have focused on two different kinds of protein wires: Insuli n fibrils and microtubules. Microtubules are an important constituent of the cytoskeleton and fulfill multiple vital functions in the cell. Insu lin fibrils on the other hand are amyloid fibrils without a clear biolog ical role, but with intriguing polymerization properties tha...

  8. The Shadow Map: A General Contact Definition for Capturing the Dynamics of Biomolecular Folding and Function

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey K Noel; Whitford, Paul C.; Onuchic, José N.

    2012-01-01

    Structure-based models (SBMs) are simplified models of the biomolecular dynamics that arise from funneled energy landscapes. We recently introduced an all-atom SBM that explicitly represents the atomic geometry of a biomolecule. While this initial study showed the robustness of the all-atom SBM Hamiltonian to changes in many of the energetic parameters, an important aspect, which has not been explored previously, is the definition of native interactions. In this study, we propose a general de...

  9. A Review of Salam Phase Transition in Protein Amino Acids: Implication for Biomolecular Homochirality

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Fan; Wang, Wenqing

    2002-01-01

    The origin of chirality, closely related to the evolution of life on the earth, has long been debated. In 1991, Abdus Salam suggested a novel approach to achieve biomolecular homochirality by a phase transition. In his subsequent publication, he predicted that this phase transition could eventually change D-amino acids to L-amino acids as C -H bond would break and H atom became a superconductive atom. Since many experiments denied the configuration change in amino acids, Salam hypothesis arou...

  10. Affinity capillary electrophoresis and density functional theory employed for characterization of (bio)molecular interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašička, Václav; Ehala, Sille; Růžička, Martin; Dybal, Jiří; Toman, Petr

    Salzburg: Society of Analytical Chemistry, 2014. OR28. [ISC 2014. International Symposium on Chromatography /30./. 14.09.2014-18.09.2014, Salzburg] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP206/12/0453; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-17224S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : affinity capillary electrophoresis * density functional theory * biomolecular complexes Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  11. Interacting with the biomolecular solvent accessible surface via a haptic feedback device

    OpenAIRE

    Hayward Steven; Stocks Matthew B; Laycock Stephen D

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background From the 1950s computer based renderings of molecules have been produced to aid researchers in their understanding of biomolecular structure and function. A major consideration for any molecular graphics software is the ability to visualise the three dimensional structure of the molecule. Traditionally, this was accomplished via stereoscopic pairs of images and later realised with three dimensional display technologies. Using a haptic feedback device in combination with mo...

  12. Biomolecular Self-Defense and Futility of High-Specificity Therapeutic Targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Simon Rosenfeld

    2011-01-01

    Robustness has been long recognized to be a distinctive property of living entities. While a reasonably wide consensus has been achieved regarding the conceptual meaning of robustness, the biomolecular mechanisms underlying this systemic property are still open to many unresolved questions. The goal of this paper is to provide an overview of existing approaches to characterization of robustness in mathematically sound terms. The concept of robustness is discussed in various contexts including...

  13. Biomolecular Force Field Parameterization via Atoms-in-Molecule Electron Density Partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Daniel J; Vilseck, Jonah Z; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Payne, Mike C; Jorgensen, William L

    2016-05-10

    Molecular mechanics force fields, which are commonly used in biomolecular modeling and computer-aided drug design, typically treat nonbonded interactions using a limited library of empirical parameters that are developed for small molecules. This approach does not account for polarization in larger molecules or proteins, and the parametrization process is labor-intensive. Using linear-scaling density functional theory and atoms-in-molecule electron density partitioning, environment-specific charges and Lennard-Jones parameters are derived directly from quantum mechanical calculations for use in biomolecular modeling of organic and biomolecular systems. The proposed methods significantly reduce the number of empirical parameters needed to construct molecular mechanics force fields, naturally include polarization effects in charge and Lennard-Jones parameters, and scale well to systems comprised of thousands of atoms, including proteins. The feasibility and benefits of this approach are demonstrated by computing free energies of hydration, properties of pure liquids, and the relative binding free energies of indole and benzofuran to the L99A mutant of T4 lysozyme. PMID:27057643

  14. ssDNA-Functionalized Nanoceria: A Redox-Active Aptaswitch for Biomolecular Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bülbül, Gonca; Hayat, Akhtar; Andreescu, Silvana

    2016-04-01

    Quantification of biomolecular binding events is a critical step for the development of biorecognition assays for diagnostics and therapeutic applications. This paper reports the design of redox-active switches based on aptamer conjugated nanoceria for detection and quantification of biomolecular recognition. It is shown that the conformational transition state of the aptamer on nanoceria, combined with the redox properties of these particles can be used to create surface based structure switchable aptasensing platforms. Changes in the redox properties at the nanoceria surface upon binding of the ssDNA and its target analyte enables rapid and highly sensitive measurement of biomolecular interactions. This concept is demonstrated as a general applicable method to the colorimetric detection of DNA binding events. An example of a nanoceria aptaswitch for the colorimetric sensing of Ochratoxin A (OTA) and applicability to other targets is provided. The system can sensitively and selectivity detect as low as 0.15 × 10(-9) m OTA. This novel assay is simple in design and does not involve oligonucleotide labeling or elaborate nanoparticle modification steps. The proposed mechanism discovered here opens up a new way of designing optical sensing methods based on aptamer recognition. This approach can be broadly applicable to many bimolecular recognition processes and related applications. PMID:26844813

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations using graphics processing units

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, J.A.; Hirst, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    It is increasingly easy to develop software that exploits Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). The molecular dynamics simulation community has embraced this recent opportunity. Herein, we outline the current approaches that exploit this technology. In the context of biomolecular simulations, we discuss some of the algorithms that have been implemented and some of the aspects that distinguish the GPU from previous parallel environments. The ubiquity of GPUs and the ingenuity of the simulation com...

  16. A Nonlinear Boundary Condition for Continuum Models of Biomolecular Electrostatics

    OpenAIRE

    Bardhan, J. P.; Tejani, D. A.; Wieckowski, N. S.; Ramaswamy, A; Knepley, M. G.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the behavior of biomolecules such as proteins requires understanding the critical influence of the surrounding fluid (solvent) environment--water with mobile salt ions such as sodium. Unfortunately, for many studies, fully atomistic simulations of biomolecules, surrounded by thousands of water molecules and ions are too computationally slow. Continuum solvent models based on macroscopic dielectric theory (e.g. the Poisson equation) are popular alternatives, but their simplicity ...

  17. Polarization at metal–biomolecular interfaces in solution

    OpenAIRE

    Heinz, Hendrik; Kshitij C. Jha; Luettmer-Strathmann, Jutta; Farmer, Barry L.; Naik, Rajesh R.

    2010-01-01

    Metal surfaces in contact with water, surfactants and biopolymers experience attractive polarization owing to induced charges. This fundamental physical interaction complements stronger epitaxial and covalent surface interactions and remains difficult to measure experimentally. We present a first step to quantify polarization on even gold (Au) surfaces in contact with water and with aqueous solutions of peptides of different charge state (A3 and Flg-Na3) by molecular dynamics simulation in al...

  18. Internal quantum efficiency in yellow-amber light emitting AlGaN-InGaN-GaN heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngo, Thi Huong; Gil, Bernard; Valvin, Pierre [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb – UMR 5221, CNRS and University Montpellier, Case courier 074, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Damilano, Benjamin; Lekhal, Kaddour; De Mierry, Philippe [CRHEA-CNRS Centre de Recherche sur l' Hétéro-Epitaxie et ses Applications, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, rue Bernard Gregory, 06560 Valbonne (France)

    2015-09-21

    We determine the internal quantum efficiency of strain-balanced AlGaN-InGaN-GaN hetero-structures designed for yellow-amber light emission, by using a recent model based on the kinetics of the photoluminescence decay initiated by Iwata et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 117, 075701 (2015)]. Our results indicate that low temperature internal quantum efficiencies sit in the 50% range and we measure that adding an AlGaN layer increases the internal quantum efficiency from 50% up to 57% with respect to the GaN-InGaN case. More dramatic, it almost doubles from 2.5% up to 4.3% at room temperature.

  19. Theoretical description of biomolecular hydration - Application to A-DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A.E.; Hummer, G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States); Soumpasis, D.M. [Max Planck Inst. for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    The local density of water molecules around a biomolecule is constructed from calculated two- and three-points correlation functions of polar solvents in water using a Potential-of-Mean-Force (PMF) expansion. As a simple approximation, the hydration of all polar (including charged) groups in a biomolecule is represented by the hydration of water oxygen in bulk water, and the effect of non-polar groups on hydration are neglected, except for excluded volume effects. Pair and triplet correlation functions are calculated by molecular dynamics simulations. We present calculations of the structural hydration for ideal A-DNA molecules with sequences [d(CG){sub 5}]{sub 2} and [d(C{sub 5}G{sub 5})]{sub 2}. We find that this method can accurately reproduce the hydration patterns of A-DNA observed in neutron diffraction experiments on oriented DNA fibers.

  20. Theoretical description of biomolecular hydration - Application to A-DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The local density of water molecules around a biomolecule is constructed from calculated two- and three-points correlation functions of polar solvents in water using a Potential-of-Mean-Force (PMF) expansion. As a simple approximation, the hydration of all polar (including charged) groups in a biomolecule is represented by the hydration of water oxygen in bulk water, and the effect of non-polar groups on hydration are neglected, except for excluded volume effects. Pair and triplet correlation functions are calculated by molecular dynamics simulations. We present calculations of the structural hydration for ideal A-DNA molecules with sequences [d(CG)5]2 and [d(C5G5)]2. We find that this method can accurately reproduce the hydration patterns of A-DNA observed in neutron diffraction experiments on oriented DNA fibers

  1. Biomolecular transitions: efficient computation of pathways, free energies, and rates

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatt, Divesh

    2011-01-01

    We present an efficient method to compute transition rates between states for a two-state system. The method utilizes the equivalence between steady-state flux and mean first passage rate for such systems. More specifically, the procedure divides the configurational space into smaller regions and equilibrates trajectories within each region efficiently. The equilibrated conditional probabilities between each pair of regions lead to transition rates between the two states. We apply the procedure to a non-trivial coarse-grained model of a 70 residue section of the calcium binding protein, calmodulin. The procedure yields a significant increase in efficiency compared to brute-force simulations, and this efficiency increases dramatically with a decrease in temperature.

  2. Triplex hydration: nanosecond molecular dynamics simulation of the solvated triplex formed by mixed sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Ojha, Rajendra P.; Tiwari, Rakesh K.

    2003-01-01

    A theoretical model for the hydration pattern and motion of ions around the triple helical DNA with mixed sequences d(GACTGGTGAC)d(GTCACCAGTC)*d(GACTGGTGAC) in solution, during MD simulation, using the particle mesh Ewald sum method, is elaborated here. The AMBER 5.0 force field has been used during the simulation in solvent. The simulation studies support a dynamically stable atmosphere around the DNA triplex in solution over the entire length of the trajectory. The results have been compare...

  3. Biomolecular conjugation inside synthetic polymer nanopores viaglycoprotein-lectin interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mubarak; Ramirez, Patricio; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Mafe, Salvador; Siwy, Zuzanna; Neumann, Reinhard; Tremel, Wolfgang; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate the supramolecular bioconjugation of concanavalin A (Con A) protein with glycoenzymehorseradish peroxidase (HRP) inside single nanopores, fabricated in heavy ion tracked polymermembranes. Firstly, the HRP-enzyme was covalently immobilized on the inner wall of the pores using carbodiimide coupling chemistry. The immobilized HRP-enzyme molecules bear sugar (mannose) groups available for the binding of Con A protein. Secondly, the bioconjugation of Con A on the pore wall was achieved through its biospecific interactions with the mannose residues of the HRP enzyme. The immobilization of biomolecules inside the nanopore leads to the reduction of the available area for ionic transport, and this blocking effect can be exploited to tune the conductance and selectivity of the nanopore in aqueous solution. Both cylindrical and conical nanopores were used in the experiments. The possibility of obtaining two or more conductance states (output), dictated by the degree of nanopore blocking resulted from the different biomolecules in solution (input), as well as the current rectification properties obtained with the conical nanopore, could also allow implementing information processing at the nanometre scale. Model simulations based on the transport equations further verify the feasibility of the sensing procedure that involves concepts from supramolecular chemistry, molecular imprinting, recognition, and nanotechnology.

  4. Raman spectroscopy detects biomolecular changes associated with nanoencapsulated hesperetin treatment in experimental oral carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurushankar, K.; Gohulkumar, M.; Kumar, Piyush; Krishna, C. Murali; Krishnakumar, N.

    2016-03-01

    Recently it has been shown that Raman spectroscopy possesses great potential in the investigation of biomolecular changes of tumor tissues with therapeutic drug response in a non-invasive and label-free manner. The present study is designed to investigate the antitumor effect of hespertin-loaded nanoparticles (HETNPs) relative to the efficacy of native hesperetin (HET) in modifying the biomolecular changes during 7,12-dimethyl benz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced oral carcinogenesis using a Raman spectroscopic technique. Significant differences in the intensity and shape of the Raman spectra between the control and the experimental tissues at 1800-500 cm-1 were observed. Tumor tissues are characterized by an increase in the relative amount of proteins, nucleic acids, tryptophan and phenylalanine and a decrease in the percentage of lipids when compared to the control tissues. Further, oral administration of HET and its nanoparticulates restored the status of the lipids and significantly decreased the levels of protein and nucleic acid content. Treatment with HETNPs showed a more potent antitumor effect than treatment with native HET, which resulted in an overall reduction in the intensity of several biochemical Raman bands in DMBA-induced oral carcinogenesis being observed. Principal component and linear discriminant analysis (PC-LDA), together with leave-one-out cross validation (LOOCV) on Raman spectra yielded diagnostic sensitivities of 100%, 80%, 91.6% and 65% and specificities of 100%, 65%, 60% and 55% for classification of control versus DMBA, DMBA versus DMBA  +  HET, DMBA versus DMBA  +  HETNPs and DMBA  +  HET versus DMBA  +  HETNPs treated tissue groups, respectively. These results further demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy associated with multivariate statistical algorithms could be a valuable tool for developing a comprehensive understanding of the process of biomolecular changes, and could reveal the signatures of the

  5. Interacting with the biomolecular solvent accessible surface via a haptic feedback device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayward Steven

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From the 1950s computer based renderings of molecules have been produced to aid researchers in their understanding of biomolecular structure and function. A major consideration for any molecular graphics software is the ability to visualise the three dimensional structure of the molecule. Traditionally, this was accomplished via stereoscopic pairs of images and later realised with three dimensional display technologies. Using a haptic feedback device in combination with molecular graphics has the potential to enhance three dimensional visualisation. Although haptic feedback devices have been used to feel the interaction forces during molecular docking they have not been used explicitly as an aid to visualisation. Results A haptic rendering application for biomolecular visualisation has been developed that allows the user to gain three-dimensional awareness of the shape of a biomolecule. By using a water molecule as the probe, modelled as an oxygen atom having hard-sphere interactions with the biomolecule, the process of exploration has the further benefit of being able to determine regions on the molecular surface that are accessible to the solvent. This gives insight into how awkward it is for a water molecule to gain access to or escape from channels and cavities, indicating possible entropic bottlenecks. In the case of liver alcohol dehydrogenase bound to the inhibitor SAD, it was found that there is a channel just wide enough for a single water molecule to pass through. Placing the probe coincident with crystallographic water molecules suggests that they are sometimes located within small pockets that provide a sterically stable environment irrespective of hydrogen bonding considerations. Conclusion By using the software, named HaptiMol ISAS (available from http://www.haptimol.co.uk, one can explore the accessible surface of biomolecules using a three-dimensional input device to gain insights into the shape and water

  6. Biomolecular crystals for material applications and a mechanistic study of an iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkner, Joshua Charles

    The three projects within this work address the difficulties of controlling biomolecular crystal formats (i.e. size and shape), producing 3-D ordered composite materials from biomolecular crystal templates, and understanding the mechanism of a practical iron oxide synthesis. The unifying thread consistent throughout these three topics is the development of methods to manipulate nanomaterials using a bottom-up approach. Biomolecular crystals are nanometer to millimeter sized crystals that have well ordered mesoporous solvent channels. The overall physical dimensions of these crystals are highly dependent on crystallization conditions. The controlled growth of micro- and nanoprotein crystals was studied to provide new pathways for creating smaller crystalline protein materials. This method produced tetragonal hen egg-white lysozyme crystals (250--100,000 nm) with near monodisperse size distributions (membranes or templates. In this work, the porous structure of larger cowpea mosaic virus crystals was used to template metal nanoparticle growth within the body centered cubic crystalline network. The final composite material was found to have long range ordering of palladium and platinum nonocrystal aggregates (10nm) with symmetry consistent to the virus template. Nanoparticle synthesis itself is an immense field of study with an array of diverse applications. The final piece of this work investigates the mechanism behind a previously developed iron oxide synthesis to gain more understanding and direction to future synthesis strategies. The particle growth mechanism was found to proceed by the formation of a solvated iron(III)oleate complex followed by a reduction of iron (III) to iron (II). This unstable iron(II) nucleates to form a wustite (FeO) core which serves as an epitaxial surface for the magnetite (Fe3O4) shell growth. This method produces spherical particles (6-60nm) with relative size distributions of less than 15%.

  7. Dynamics of biomoleculars studied by Rayleigh scattering of Moessbauer radiation and Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on dynamics of biomoleculars, proteins and DNA that plays a role in the supply and the regulation their functional activity, for example, like transducers of oxygen, like enzymes, in photosynthesis and so on. The Mossbauer spectroscopy (MS) and especially Rayleigh Scattering of Mossbauer Radiation (RSMR) permit to obtain the quantitative data on dimensions and times of complex hierarchy of motion in biopolymers and to create correspondent functional models. The scheme of RSMR includes Mossbauer source 57Co, the scatterer---biopolymer, the detector and Mossbauer analyzer (Black absorber---or one-line absorber), that situated before and after the scatterer on definite angle -2θ

  8. Surface-plasmon-enhanced fluorescence from periodic quantum dot arrays through distance control using biomolecular linkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a protein-enabled strategy to fabricate quantum dot (QD) nanoarrays where up to a 15-fold increase in surface-plasmon-enhanced fluorescence has been achieved. This approach permits a comprehensive control both laterally (via lithographically defined gold nanoarrays) and vertically (via the QD-metal distance) of the collectively behaving assemblies of QDs and gold nanoarrays by way of biomolecular recognition. Specifically, we demonstrated the spectral tuning of plasmon resonant metal nanoarrays and self-assembly of protein-functionalized QDs in a stepwise fashion with a concomitant incremental increase in separation from the metal surface through biotin-streptavidin spacer units.

  9. The use of gold nanoparticle aggregation for DNA computing and logic-based biomolecular detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In-Hee; Yang, Kyung-Ae; Zhang, Byoung-Tak [School of Computer Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ji-Hoon [Center for Bioinformation Technology, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji-Yoon; Chai, Young Gyu [Division of Molecular and Life Sciences, Hanyang University, 1271 Sa-dong, Sangnok-gu, Ansan, Gyeonggi-do 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Hoon [Fachgebiet Mikrobiologie und Genetik, Institut fuer Biotechnologie, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Gustav-Meyer Allee 25, D-13355 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: btzhang@bi.snu.ac.kr

    2008-10-01

    The use of DNA molecules as a physical computational material has attracted much interest, especially in the area of DNA computing. DNAs are also useful for logical control and analysis of biological systems if efficient visualization methods are available. Here we present a quick and simple visualization technique that displays the results of the DNA computing process based on a colorimetric change induced by gold nanoparticle aggregation, and we apply it to the logic-based detection of biomolecules. Our results demonstrate its effectiveness in both DNA-based logical computation and logic-based biomolecular detection.

  10. An optics-based variable-temperature assay system for characterizing thermodynamics of biomolecular reactions on solid support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fei, Yiyan; Landry, James P.; Zhu, X. D., E-mail: xdzhu@physics.ucdavis.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Li, Yanhong; Yu, Hai; Lau, Kam; Huang, Shengshu; Chokhawala, Harshal A.; Chen, Xi [Department of Chemistry, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    A biological state is equilibrium of multiple concurrent biomolecular reactions. The relative importance of these reactions depends on physiological temperature typically between 10 °C and 50 °C. Experimentally the temperature dependence of binding reaction constants reveals thermodynamics and thus details of these biomolecular processes. We developed a variable-temperature opto-fluidic system for real-time measurement of multiple (400–10 000) biomolecular binding reactions on solid supports from 10 °C to 60 °C within ±0.1 °C. We illustrate the performance of this system with investigation of binding reactions of plant lectins (carbohydrate-binding proteins) with 24 synthetic glycans (i.e., carbohydrates). We found that the lectin-glycan reactions in general can be enthalpy-driven, entropy-driven, or both, and water molecules play critical roles in the thermodynamics of these reactions.

  11. Highly improved reliability of amber light emitting diode with Ca -α-SiAlON phosphor in glass formed by gas pressure sintering for automotive applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Chang-Bun; Kim, Sanghyun; Choi, Sung-Woo; Yoon, Chulsoo; Ahn, Sang Hyeon; Chung, Woon Jin

    2016-04-01

    Phosphor in glass (PiG) with 40 wt% of Ca-α-SiAlON phosphor and 60 wt% of Pb-free silicate glass was synthesized and mounted on a high-power blue LED to make an amber LED for automotive applications. Gas pressure sintering was applied after the conventional sintering process was used to achieve fully dense PiG plates. Changes in photoluminescence spectra and color coordination were inspected by varying the thickness of the plates that were mounted after optical polishing and machining. A trade-off between luminous flux and color purity was observed. The commercial feasibility of amber PiG packaged LED, which can satisfy international regulations for automotive components, was successfully demonstrated by examining the practical reliability under 85% humidity at an 85°C condition. PMID:27192294

  12. A New Species Group in the Genus Tanytarsus van der Wulp(Diptera:Chironomidae)Based on a Fossil Record from Baltic Amber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wojciech GI(L)KA

    2010-01-01

    A new fossil chironomid,Tanytarsus serafini,found in Baltic amber is described and illustrated based on adult males.The new species and similar extant species of the genus Tanytarsus van der Wulp are compared.Due to several distinct characters of wing,legs and hypopygium,a new species group for Tanytarsus serafini is proposed,and its diagnostic features are evaluated.

  13. Traitement du signal en interferometrie monomode dans le cadre du projet AMBER. Application a l'observation interferometrique de l'environnement > circumstellaire des etoiles jeunes

    OpenAIRE

    Tatulli, Eric

    2004-01-01

    Recent progresses of optical interferometry, in terms of spatial resolution, sensitivity and precision of the measurements, made this technique particularly well suited to study the close environment of young stars which hold the keys of stellar and planet formation. As a matter of fact, the first interferometric observations have unveiled many essential informations on the physical nature of the surrounding structure of these objects. The AMBER instrument, the near infrared three beams recom...

  14. Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gould, Derek A; Chalmers, Nicholas; Johnson, Sheena J;

    2012-01-01

    Recognition of the many limitations of traditional apprenticeship training is driving new approaches to learning medical procedural skills. Among simulation technologies and methods available today, computer-based systems are topical and bring the benefits of automated, repeatable, and reliable...... performance assessments. Human factors research is central to simulator model development that is relevant to real-world imaging-guided interventional tasks and to the credentialing programs in which it would be used....

  15. Clumpy dust clouds and extended atmosphere of the AGB star W Hya revealed with VLT/SPHERE-ZIMPOL and VLTI/AMBER

    CERN Document Server

    Ohnaka, Keiichi; Hofmann, Karl-Heinz

    2016-01-01

    We present visible polarimetric imaging observations of the well-studied AGB star W Hya taken with VLT/SPHERE-ZIMPOL as well as high spectral resolution long-baseline interferometric observations with the AMBER instrument of the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). We observed W Hya with VLT/SPHERE-ZIMPOL at three wavelengths in the continuum (645, 748, and 820 nm), in the Halpha line at 656.3 nm, and in the TiO band at 717 nm. The VLTI/AMBER observations were carried out in the wavelength region of the CO first overtone lines near 2.3 micron with a spectral resolution of 12000. Taking advantage of the polarimetric imaging capability of SPHERE-ZIMPOL combined with the superb adaptive optics performance, we have succeeded in spatially resolving three clumpy dust clouds located at ~50 mas (~2 Rstar) from the central star, revealing dust formation very close to the star. The AMBER data in the individual CO lines suggest a molecular outer atmosphere extending to ~3 Rstar. Furthermore, the SPHERE-ZIMPOL ima...

  16. Spatially encoded strategies in the execution of biomolecular-oriented 3D NMR experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (3D NMR) provides one of the foremost analytical tools available for the elucidation of biomolecular structure, function and dynamics. Executing a 3D NMR experiment generally involves scanning a series of time-domain signals S(t3), as a function of two time variables (t1, t2) which need to undergo parametric incrementations throughout independent experiments. Recent years have witnessed extensive efforts towards the acceleration of this kind of experiments. Among the different approaches that have been proposed counts an 'ultrafast' scheme, which distinguishes itself from other propositions by enabling-at least in principle-the acquisition of the complete multidimensional NMR data set within a single transient. 2D protein NMR implementations of this single-scan method have been demonstrated, yet its potential for 3D acquisitions has only been exemplified on model organic compounds. This publication discusses a number of strategies that could make these spatial encoding protocols compatible with 3D biomolecular NMR applications. These include a merging of 2D ultrafast NMR principles with temporal 2D encoding schemes, which can yield 3D HNCO spectra from peptides and proteins within ∼100 s timescales. New processing issues that facilitate the collection of 3D NMR spectra by relying fully on spatial encoding principles are also assessed, and shown capable of delivering HNCO spectra within 1 s timescales. Limitations and prospects of these various schemes are briefly addressed

  17. DockScreen: A Database of In Silico Biomolecular Interactions to Support Computational Toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael-Rock Goldsmith

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed DockScreen, a database of in silico biomolecular interactions designed to enable rational molecular toxicological insight within a computational toxicology framework. This database is composed of chemical/target (receptor and enzyme binding scores calculated by molecular docking of more than 1000 chemicals into 150 protein targets and contains nearly 135 thousand unique ligand/target binding scores. Obtaining this dataset was achieved using eHiTS (Simbiosys Inc., a fragment-based molecular docking approach with an exhaustive search algorithm, on a heterogeneous distributed high-performance computing framework. The chemical landscape covered in DockScreen comprises selected environmental and therapeutic chemicals. The target landscape covered in DockScreen was selected based on the availability of high-quality crystal structures that covered the assay space of phase I ToxCast in vitro assays. This in silico data provides continuous information that establishes a means for quantitatively comparing, on a structural biophysical basis, a chemical’s profile of biomolecular interactions. The combined minimum-score chemical/target matrix is provided.

  18. Neutral-particle emission in collisions of electrons with biomolecular ions in an electrostatic storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron-biomolecular ion collisions were studied using an electrostatic storage ring with a merging electron beam device. Biomolecular ions produced by an electrospray ion source and accelerated to 20 keV/charge were injected into the ring after being mass-analyzed. The circulating ion beam was then merged with an electron beam. Neutral reaction products in collisions of electrons with ions were detected by a micro-channel plate outside of the ring. Electron-ion collisions were studied for multiply-deprotonated oligonucleotide and peptide anions as well as singly protonated oligonucleotide and peptide cations. For peptide cations, neutrals were resonantly emitted at an electron energy of around 6.5 eV, which was almost independent of the ion masses. This is deduced to come from electron-ion recombination, resulting in the cleavage of a peptide bond. For DNA oligonucleotide cations, resonant neutral particle emission was also observed. In electron and DNA anion collisions, neutrals started to increase from definite threshold energies, where the threshold energies increased in proportion to the ion charge. The same was found for peptide anions. The origin of this phenomenon is discussed

  19. The HADDOCK2.2 Web Server: User-Friendly Integrative Modeling of Biomolecular Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zundert, G C P; Rodrigues, J P G L M; Trellet, M; Schmitz, C; Kastritis, P L; Karaca, E; Melquiond, A S J; van Dijk, M; de Vries, S J; Bonvin, A M J J

    2016-02-22

    The prediction of the quaternary structure of biomolecular macromolecules is of paramount importance for fundamental understanding of cellular processes and drug design. In the era of integrative structural biology, one way of increasing the accuracy of modeling methods used to predict the structure of biomolecular complexes is to include as much experimental or predictive information as possible in the process. This has been at the core of our information-driven docking approach HADDOCK. We present here the updated version 2.2 of the HADDOCK portal, which offers new features such as support for mixed molecule types, additional experimental restraints and improved protocols, all of this in a user-friendly interface. With well over 6000 registered users and 108,000 jobs served, an increasing fraction of which on grid resources, we hope that this timely upgrade will help the community to solve important biological questions and further advance the field. The HADDOCK2.2 Web server is freely accessible to non-profit users at http://haddock.science.uu.nl/services/HADDOCK2.2. PMID:26410586

  20. Optimizing water hyperpolarization and dissolution for sensitivity-enhanced 2D biomolecular NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Greg; Markhasin, Evgeny; Szekely, Or; Bretschneider, Christian; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-03-01

    A recent study explored the use of hyperpolarized water, to enhance the sensitivity of nuclei in biomolecules thanks to rapid proton exchanges with labile amide backbone and sidechain groups. Further optimizations of this approach have now allowed us to achieve proton polarizations approaching 25% in the water transferred into the NMR spectrometer, effective water T1 times approaching 40 s, and a reduction in the dilution demanded for the cryogenic dissolution process. Further hardware developments have allowed us to perform these experiments, repeatedly and reliably, in 5 mm NMR tubes. All these ingredients - particularly the ⩾3000× 1H polarization enhancements over 11.7 T thermal counterparts, long T1 times and a compatibility with high-resolution biomolecular NMR setups - augur well for hyperpolarized 2D NMR studies of peptides, unfolded proteins and intrinsically disordered systems undergoing fast exchanges of their protons with the solvent. This hypothesis is here explored by detailing the provisions that lead to these significant improvements over previous reports, and demonstrating 1D coherence transfer experiments and 2D biomolecular HMQC acquisitions delivering NMR spectral enhancements of 100-500× over their optimized, thermally-polarized, counterparts.

  1. Coupling switches and oscillators as a means to shape cellular signals in biomolecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To understand how a complex biomolecular network functions, a decomposition or a reconstruction process of the network is often needed so as to provide new insights into the regulatory mechanisms underlying various dynamical behaviors and also to gain qualitative knowledge of the network. Unfortunately, it seems that there are still no general rules on how to decompose a complex network into simple modules. An alternative resolution is to decompose a complex network into small modules or subsystems with specified functions such as switches and oscillators and then integrate them by analyzing the interactions between them. The main idea of this approach can be illustrated by considering a bidirectionally coupled network in this paper, i.e., coupled Toggle switch and Repressilator, and analyzing the occurrence of various dynamics, although the theoretical principle may hold for a general class of networks. We show that various biomolecular signals can be shaped by regulating the coupling between the subsystems. The approach presented here can be expected to simplify and analyze even more complex biological networks

  2. Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Sheldon

    2006-01-01

    Ross's Simulation, Fourth Edition introduces aspiring and practicing actuaries, engineers, computer scientists and others to the practical aspects of constructing computerized simulation studies to analyze and interpret real phenomena. Readers learn to apply results of these analyses to problems in a wide variety of fields to obtain effective, accurate solutions and make predictions about future outcomes. This text explains how a computer can be used to generate random numbers, and how to use these random numbers to generate the behavior of a stochastic model over time. It presents the statist

  3. The analysis of the kinetics of extraction of resinoids and hypericines from the amber, Hypericum perforatum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDRIJA A. SMELCEROVIC

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of the extraction of the overall extracted materials (resinoids, total hypericine, hypericine and pseudohypericine from amber (Hypericum perforatum L. was investigated by the procedure of maceration both with and without ultra-sound, using methanol as the extractant. It was found that the period of fast extraction with intensification of the extraction of resinoid by ultra-sound was significantly shorter (about 20 minutes than was needed for the extraction without ultra-sound (about 5 h. Similar results were also obtained for the extraction of the other tested substances. It can be concluded that better drug exploitation can be achieved in a much shorter extraction time by intensification of the extraction using ultra-sound. By preparation of herbal material through pulverization, a significant grade of herbal tissue structure disintegration was achieved, so that turbulent mass transfer plays a dominant role in the extraction. The results show that the coefficient values of fast extraction (b are approximately the same for all the investigated kinetics.

  4. Vetufebrus ovatus n. gen., n. sp. (Haemospororida: Plasmodiidae vectored by a streblid bat fly (Diptera: Streblidae in Dominican amber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poinar George O

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both sexes of bat flies in the families Nycteribiidae and Streblidae (Diptera: Hippoboscoidea reside in the hair or on the wing membranes of bats and feed on blood. Members of the Nycteribiidae transmit bat malaria globally however extant streblids have never been implemented as vectors of bat malaria. The present study shows that during the Tertiary, streblids also were vectors of bat malaria. Results A new haemospororidan, Vetufebrus ovatus, n. gen., n. sp., (Haemospororida: Plasmodiidae is described from two oocysts attached to the midgut wall and sporozoites in salivary glands and ducts of a fossil bat fly (Diptera: Streblidae in Dominican amber. The new genus is characterized by ovoid oocysts, short, stubby sporozoites with rounded ends and its occurrence in a fossil streblid. This is the first haemosporidian reported from a streblid bat fly and shows that representatives of the Hippoboscoidea were vectoring bat malaria in the New World by the mid-Tertiary. Conclusions This report is the first evidence of an extant or extinct streblid bat fly transmitting malaria. Discovering a mid-tertiary malarial parasite in a fossil streblid that closely resembles members of a malarial genus found in nycteribiid bat flies today shows how little we know about the vector associations of streblids. While no malaria parasites have been found in extant streblids, they probably occur and it is possible that streblids were the earliest lineage of flies that transmitted bat malaria to Chiroptera.

  5. Fundamental parameters of 16 late-type stars derived from their angular diameter measured with VLTI/AMBER

    CERN Document Server

    Cruzalèbes, P; Rabbia, Y; Sacuto, S; Chiavassa, A; Pasquato, E; Plez, B; Eriksson, K; Spang, A; Chesneau, O

    2013-01-01

    Thanks to their large angular dimension and brightness, red giants and supergiants are privileged targets for optical long-baseline interferometers. Sixteen red giants and supergiants have been observed with the VLTI/AMBER facility over a two-years period, at medium spectral resolution (R=1500) in the K band. The limb-darkened angular diameters are derived from fits of stellar atmospheric models on the visibility and the triple product data. The angular diameters do not show any significant temporal variation, except for one target: TX Psc, which shows a variation of 4% using visibility data. For the eight targets previously measured by Long-Baseline Interferometry (LBI) in the same spectral range, the difference between our diameters and the literature values is less than 5%, except for TX Psc, which shows a difference of 11%. For the 8 other targets, the present angular diameters are the first measured from LBI. Angular diameters are then used to determine several fundamental stellar parameters, and to loca...

  6. Growth and Properties of Blue and Amber Complex Light Emitting InGaN/GaN Multi-Quantum Wells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Zi-Li; HAN Ping; SHI Yi; ZHENG You-Dou; ZHANG Rong; LIU Bin; XIU Xiang-Qian; SU Hui; LI Yi; HUA Xue-Mei; ZHAO Hong; CHEN Peng

    2011-01-01

    @@ Blue-red complex light emitting InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well(MQW) structures are fabricated by metal organic chemical vapor deposition(MOCVD).The structures are grown on a 2-inch diameter(0001) oriented (c-face) sapphire substrate, which consists of an approximately 2-Etm-thick GaN template and a five-period layer consisting of a 4.9-nm-thick In0.18Ga0.82N well layer and a GaN barrier layer.The surface morphology of the MQW structures is observed by an atomic force microscope(AFM), which indicates the presence of islands of several tens of nanometers in height on the surface.The high resolution x-ray diffraction(XRD)θ/2θ scan is carried out on the symmetric(0002) of the InGaN/GaN MQW structures.At least four order satellite peaks presented in the XRD spectrum indicate that the thickness and alloy compositions of the individual quantum wells are repeatable throughout the active region.Besides the 364 nm GaN band edge emission, two main emissions of blue and amber light from these MQWs are found, which possibly originate from the carrier recombinations in the InGaN/GaN QWs and InGaN quasi-quantum dots embedded in the QWs.

  7. Fundamental properties and atmospheric structure of the red supergiant VY CMa based on VLTI/AMBER spectro-interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Wittkowski, M; Torres, B Arroyo; Marcaide, J M

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the atmospheric structure and fundamental properties of the red supergiant VY CMa. We obtained near-infrared spectro-interferometric observations of VY CMa with spectral resolutions of 35 and 1500 using the AMBER instrument at the VLTI. The visibility data indicate the presence of molecular layers of water vapor and CO in the extended atmosphere with an asymmetric morphology. The uniform disk diameter in the water band around 2.0 mu is increased by \\sim20% compared to the near-continuum bandpass at 2.20-2.25 mu and in the CO band at 2.3-2.5 mu it is increased by up to \\sim50%. The closure phases indicate relatively small deviations from point symmetry close to the photospheric layer, and stronger deviations in the extended H2O and CO layers. Making use of the high spatial and spectral resolution, a near-continuum bandpass can be isolated from contamination by molecular and dusty layers, and the Rosseland-mean photospheric angular diameter is estimated to 11.3 +/- 0.3 mas based on a PHOENIX atmo...

  8. Biomolecular motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Hess

    2005-12-01

    Here, we give a brief introduction to molecular motors, with an emphasis on motor proteins, describe the challenges in interfacing these bionanomachines with an artificial environment, and provide examples of emerging applications.

  9. Electrochemical sensor for multiplex screening of genetically modified DNA: identification of biotech crops by logic-based biomolecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei-Ching; Chuang, Min-Chieh; Ho, Ja-An Annie

    2013-12-15

    Genetically modified (GM) technique, one of the modern biomolecular engineering technologies, has been deemed as profitable strategy to fight against global starvation. Yet rapid and reliable analytical method is deficient to evaluate the quality and potential risk of such resulting GM products. We herein present a biomolecular analytical system constructed with distinct biochemical activities to expedite the computational detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). The computational mechanism provides an alternative to the complex procedures commonly involved in the screening of GMOs. Given that the bioanalytical system is capable of processing promoter, coding and species genes, affirmative interpretations succeed to identify specified GM event in terms of both electrochemical and optical fashions. The biomolecular computational assay exhibits detection capability of genetically modified DNA below sub-nanomolar level and is found interference-free by abundant coexistence of non-GM DNA. This bioanalytical system, furthermore, sophisticates in array fashion operating multiplex screening against variable GM events. Such a biomolecular computational assay and biosensor holds great promise for rapid, cost-effective, and high-fidelity screening of GMO. PMID:23893064

  10. Small-angle X-ray scattering investigations of biomolecular confinement, loading, and release from liquid-crystalline nanochannel assemblies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Angelova, A.; Angelov, Borislav; Garamus, V. M.; Couvreur, P.; Lesieur, S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 3 (2012), s. 445-457. ISSN 1948-7185 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : nanochannels * biomolecular nanostructures * SAXS Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 6.585, year: 2012

  11. Investigation of the Human Disease Osteogenesis Imperfecta: A Research-Based Introduction to Concepts and Skills in Biomolecular Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mate, Karen; Sim, Alistair; Weidenhofer, Judith; Milward, Liz; Scott, Judith

    2013-01-01

    A blended approach encompassing problem-based learning (PBL) and structured inquiry was used in this laboratory exercise based on the congenital disease Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), to introduce commonly used techniques in biomolecular analysis within a clinical context. During a series of PBL sessions students were presented with several…

  12. Molecular simulation study to examine the possibility of detecting collective motion in protein by inelastic neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inelastic and quasielastic neutron scattering gives the information on the dynamics of biological macromolecules. The combination of computer simulation with neutron scattering experiments allows us to characterize a wide range of dynamical phenomena in condensed phase bio-molecular systems. In this work, the dynamic structure factors in (Q,ω)-space were calculated by using the results of bio-molecular simulations. From the simulated inelastic neutron scattering spectra, we discuss the (Q,ω)-range and the resolution of a detector needed to observe function-related protein dynamics. (authors)

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations data of the twenty encoded amino acids in different force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitalini, F; Noé, F; Keller, B G

    2016-06-01

    We present extensive all-atom Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation data of the twenty encoded amino acids in explicit water, simulated with different force fields. The termini of the amino acids have been capped to ensure that the dynamics of the Φ and ψ torsion angles are analogues to the dynamics within a peptide chain. We use representatives of each of the four major force field families: AMBER ff-99SBILDN [1], AMBER ff-03 [2], OPLS-AA/L [3], CHARMM27 [4] and GROMOS43a1 [5], [6]. Our data represents a library and test bed for method development for MD simulations and for force fields development. Part of the data set has been previously used for comparison of the dynamic properties of force fields (Vitalini et al., 2015) [7] and for the construction of peptide basis functions for the variational approach to molecular kinetics [8]. PMID:27054161

  14. Biomolecular papain thin films grown by matrix assisted and conventional pulsed laser deposition: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    György, E.; Pérez del Pino, A.; Sauthier, G.; Figueras, A.

    2009-12-01

    Biomolecular papain thin films were grown both by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) and conventional pulsed laser deposition (PLD) techniques with the aid of an UV KrF∗ (λ =248 nm, τFWHM≅20 ns) excimer laser source. For the MAPLE experiments the targets submitted to laser radiation consisted on frozen composites obtained by dissolving the biomaterial powder in distilled water at 10 wt % concentration. Conventional pressed biomaterial powder targets were used in the PLD experiments. The surface morphology of the obtained thin films was studied by atomic force microscopy and their structure and composition were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The possible physical mechanisms implied in the ablation processes of the two techniques, under comparable experimental conditions were identified. The results showed that the growth mode, surface morphology as well as structure of the deposited biomaterial thin films are determined both by the incident laser fluence value as well as target preparation procedure.

  15. Conformation of bovine submaxillary mucin layers on hydrophobic surface as studied by biomolecular probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakkanen, Kirsi I.; Madsen, Jan Busk; Lee, Seunghwan

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the conformational changes of bovine submaxillary mucin (BSM) adsorbed on a hydrophobic surface (polystyrene (PS)) as a function of concentration in bulk solution (up to 2mg/mL) have been investigated with biomolecular probe-based approaches, including bicinchoninic acid (BCA...... solution. Adsorbed masses of BSM onto hydrophobic surface, as probe by BCA, showed a continuously increasing trend up to 2mg/mL. But, the signals from EIA and ELLA, which probe the concentration of available unglycosylatedC-terminals and the central glycosylated regions, respectively, showed complicated......),enzyme-linkedimmunosorbentassay(EIA),andenzyme linkedlectinassay(ELLA).Theconformationand hydrodynamic diameter of highly purified BSM molecules, as characterized by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS), respectively, showed a slight, yet gradual coiling and compaction in response to the increase in BSM concentration in bulk...

  16. Overcoming the solubility limit with solubility-enhancement tags: successful applications in biomolecular NMR studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the rapid progress of NMR technology has significantly expanded the range of NMR-trackable systems, preparation of NMR-suitable samples that are highly soluble and stable remains a bottleneck for studies of many biological systems. The application of solubility-enhancement tags (SETs) has been highly effective in overcoming solubility and sample stability issues and has enabled structural studies of important biological systems previously deemed unapproachable by solution NMR techniques. In this review, we provide a brief survey of the development and successful applications of the SET strategy in biomolecular NMR. We also comment on the criteria for choosing optimal SETs, such as for differently charged target proteins, and recent new developments on NMR-invisible SETs.

  17. Piezoelectric tuning fork biosensors for the quantitative measurement of biomolecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Laura; Rodrigues, Mafalda; Benito, Angel Maria; Pérez-García, Lluïsa; Puig-Vidal, Manel; Otero, Jorge

    2015-12-01

    The quantitative measurement of biomolecular interactions is of great interest in molecular biology. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has proved its capacity to act as a biosensor and determine the affinity between biomolecules of interest. Nevertheless, the detection scheme presents certain limitations when it comes to developing a compact biosensor. Recently, piezoelectric quartz tuning forks (QTFs) have been used as laser-free detection sensors for AFM. However, only a few studies along these lines have considered soft biological samples, and even fewer constitute quantified molecular recognition experiments. Here, we demonstrate the capacity of QTF probes to perform specific interaction measurements between biotin-streptavidin complexes in buffer solution. We propose in this paper a variant of dynamic force spectroscopy based on representing adhesion energies E (aJ) against pulling rates v (nm s-1). Our results are compared with conventional AFM measurements and show the great potential of these sensors in molecular interaction studies.

  18. Amplified vibrational circular dichroism as a probe of local biomolecular structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingos, Sérgio R; Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Baij, Lambert; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Dunnebier, Dorien A E; Walters, Annemarie J C; Finger, Markus; Nafie, Laurence A; de Bruin, Bas; Buma, Wybren Jan; Woutersen, Sander

    2014-03-01

    We show that the VCD signal intensities of amino acids and oligopeptides can be enhanced by up to 2 orders of magnitude by coupling them to a paramagnetic metal ion. If the redox state of the metal ion is changed from paramagnetic to diamagnetic the VCD amplification vanishes completely. From this observation and from complementary quantum-chemical calculations we conclude that the observed VCD amplification finds its origin in vibronic coupling with low-lying electronic states. We find that the enhancement factor is strongly mode dependent and that it is determined by the distance between the oscillator and the paramagnetic metal ion. This localized character of the VCD amplification provides a unique tool to specifically probe the local structure surrounding a paramagnetic ion and to zoom in on such local structure within larger biomolecular systems. PMID:24506134

  19. Overcoming the solubility limit with solubility-enhancement tags: successful applications in biomolecular NMR studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Pei; Wagner, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Although the rapid progress of NMR technology has significantly expanded the range of NMR-trackable systems, preparation of NMR-suitable samples that are highly soluble and stable remains a bottleneck for studies of many biological systems. The application of solubility-enhancement tags (SETs) has been highly effective in overcoming solubility and sample stability issues and has enabled structural studies of important biological systems previously deemed unapproachable by solution NMR techniques. In this review, we provide a brief survey of the development and successful applications of the SET strategy in biomolecular NMR.We also comment on the criteria for choosing optimal SETs, such as for differently charged target proteins, and recent new developments on NMR-invisible SETs. PMID:19731047

  20. A program to calculate non-bonded interaction energy in biomolecular aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, K; Prasad, C V

    1982-02-01

    This paper describes a program to calculate intermolecular as well as intramolecular electronic potential energy resulting from non-bonded interactions. The underlying theory is obtained by the application of Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation theory to non-overlap regions of a molecular system. The rigorous theoretical expressions for the energy terms are simplified by approximations consistent with those commonly employed in semi-empirical molecular orbital theories. The program is particularly suited for the study of biomolecular assemblies, and in situations where insight into contributions to total energy from various component interaction types is desired. The inclusion of the non-additive dispersion effects in this approach makes it especially interesting for the study of cooperative phenomena in the light of a recent finding [1]. PMID:7067416

  1. Biomolecular self-defense and futility of high-specificity therapeutic targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Robustness has been long recognized to be a distinctive property of living entities. While a reasonably wide consensus has been achieved regarding the conceptual meaning of robustness, the biomolecular mechanisms underlying this systemic property are still open to many unresolved questions. The goal of this paper is to provide an overview of existing approaches to characterization of robustness in mathematically sound terms. The concept of robustness is discussed in various contexts including network vulnerability, nonlinear dynamic stability, and self-organization. The second goal is to discuss the implications of biological robustness for individual-target therapeutics and possible strategies for outsmarting drug resistance arising from it. Special attention is paid to the concept of swarm intelligence, a well studied mechanism of self-organization in natural, societal and artificial systems. It is hypothesized that swarm intelligence is the key to understanding the emergent property of chemoresistance. PMID:22272063

  2. Biochemical Filter with Sigmoidal Response: Increasing the Complexity of Biomolecular Logic

    CERN Document Server

    Privman, Vladimir; Arugula, Mary A; Melnikov, Dmitriy; Bocharova, Vera; Katz, Evgeny

    2010-01-01

    The first realization of a designed, rather than natural, biochemical filter process is reported and analyzed as a promising network component for increasing the complexity of biomolecular logic systems. Key challenge in biochemical logic research has been achieving scalability for complex network designs. Various logic gates have been realized, but a "toolbox" of analog elements for interconnectivity and signal processing has remained elusive. Filters are important as network elements that allow control of noise in signal transmission and conversion. We report a versatile biochemical filtering mechanism designed to have sigmoidal response in combination with signal-conversion process. Horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of chromogenic electron donor by hydrogen peroxide, was altered by adding ascorbate, allowing to selectively suppress the output signal, modifying the response from convex to sigmoidal. A kinetic model was developed for evaluation of the quality of filtering. The results offer improved...

  3. A Review of Salam Phase Transition in Protein Amino Acids Implication for Biomolecular Homochirality

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, F; Bai, Fan; Wang, Wenqing

    2002-01-01

    The origin of chirality, closely related to the evolution of life on the earth, has long been debated. In 1991, Abdus Salam suggested a novel approach to achieve biomolecular homochirality by a phase transition. In his subsequent publication, he predicted that this phase transition could eventually change D-amino acids to L-amino acids as C -H bond would break and H atom became a superconductive atom. Since many experiments denied the configuration change in amino acids, Salam hypothesis aroused suspicion. This paper is aimed to provide direct experimental evidence of a phase transition in alanine, valine single crystals but deny the configuration change of D- to L- enantiomers. New views on Salam phase transition are presented to revalidate its great importance in the origin of homochirality.

  4. Biomolecular Characterization of Diazotrophs Isolated from the Tropical Soil in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulkifli H Shamsuddin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate selected biomolecular characteristics of rice root-associated diazotrophs isolated from the Tanjong Karang rice irrigation project area of Malaysia. Soil and rice plant samples were collected from seven soil series belonging to order Inceptisol (USDA soil taxonomy. A total of 38 diazotrophs were isolated using a nitrogen-free medium. The biochemical properties of the isolated bacteria, such as nitrogenase activity, indoleacetic acid (IAA production and sugar utilization, were measured. According to a cluster analysis of Jaccard’s similarity coefficients, the genetic similarities among the isolated diazotrophs ranged from 10% to 100%. A dendogram constructed using the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA showed that the isolated diazotrophs clustered into 12 groups. The genomic DNA rep-PCR data were subjected to a principal component analysis, and the first four principal components (PC accounted for 52.46% of the total variation among the 38 diazotrophs. The 10 diazotrophs that tested highly positive in the acetylene reduction assay (ARA were identified as Bacillus spp. (9 diazotrophs and Burkholderia sp. (Sb16 using the partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. In the analysis of the biochemical characteristics, three principal components were accounted for approximately 85% of the total variation among the identified diazotrophs. The examination of root colonization using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM proved that two of the isolated diazotrophs (Sb16 and Sb26 were able to colonize the surface and interior of rice roots and fixed 22%–24% of the total tissue nitrogen from the atmosphere. In general, the tropical soils (Inceptisols of the Tanjong Karang rice irrigation project area in Malaysia harbor a diverse group of diazotrophs that exhibit a large variation of biomolecular characteristics.

  5. Versatile single-molecule multi-color excitation and detection fluorescence setup for studying biomolecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Sobhy, M. A.

    2011-11-07

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is at the forefront of tools applied to study biomolecular dynamics both in vitro and in vivo. The ability of the single-molecule fluorescence microscope to conduct simultaneous multi-color excitation and detection is a key experimental feature that is under continuous development. In this paper, we describe in detail the design and the construction of a sophisticated and versatile multi-color excitation and emission fluorescence instrument for studying biomolecular dynamics at the single-molecule level. The setup is novel, economical and compact, where two inverted microscopes share a laser combiner module with six individual laser sources that extend from 400 to 640 nm. Nonetheless, each microscope can independently and in a flexible manner select the combinations, sequences, and intensities of the excitation wavelengths. This high flexibility is achieved by the replacement of conventional mechanical shutters with acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF). The use of AOTF provides major advancement by controlling the intensities, duration, and selection of up to eight different wavelengths with microsecond alternation time in a transparent and easy manner for the end user. To our knowledge this is the first time AOTF is applied to wide-field total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy even though it has been commonly used in multi-wavelength confocal microscopy. The laser outputs from the combiner module are coupled to the microscopes by two sets of four single-mode optic fibers in order to allow for the optimization of the TIRF angle for each wavelength independently. The emission is split into two or four spectral channels to allow for the simultaneous detection of up to four different fluorophores of wide selection and using many possible excitation and photoactivation schemes. We demonstrate the performance of this new setup by conducting two-color alternating excitation single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy

  6. Graph-theoretical identification of dissociation pathways on free energy landscapes of biomolecular interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Stumm, Boris; Helms, Volkhard

    2010-03-01

    Biomolecular association and dissociation reactions take place on complicated interaction free energy landscapes that are still very hard to characterize computationally. For large enough distances, though, it often suffices to consider the six relative translational and rotational degrees of freedom of the two particles treated as rigid bodies. Here, we computed the six-dimensional free energy surface of a dimer of water-soluble alpha-helices by scanning these six degrees of freedom in about one million grid points. In each point, the relative free energy difference was computed as the sum of the polar and nonpolar solvation free energies of the helix dimer and of the intermolecular coulombic interaction energy. The Dijkstra graph algorithm was then applied to search for the lowest cost dissociation pathways based on a weighted, directed graph, where the vertices represent the grid points, the edges connect the grid points and their neighbors, and the weights are the reaction costs between adjacent pairs of grid points. As an example, the configuration of the bound state was chosen as the source node, and the eight corners of the translational cube were chosen as the destination nodes. With the strong electrostatic interaction of the two helices giving rise to a clearly funnel-shaped energy landscape, the eight lowest-energy cost pathways coming from different orientations converge into a well-defined pathway for association. We believe that the methodology presented here will prove useful for identifying low-energy association and dissociation pathways in future studies of complicated free energy landscapes for biomolecular interaction. PMID:19603501

  7. Mutations in genes involved in nonsense mediated decay ameliorate the phenotype of sel-12 mutants with amber stop mutations in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aubert Sylvie

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Presenilin proteins are part of a complex of proteins that can cleave many type I transmembrane proteins, including Notch Receptors and the Amyloid Precursor Protein, in the middle of the transmembrane domain. Dominant mutations in the human presenilin genes PS1 and PS2 lead to Familial Alzheimer's disease. Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans sel-12 presenilin gene cause a highly penetrant egg-laying defect due to reduction of signalling through the lin-12/Notch receptor. Mutations in six spr genes (for suppressor of presenilin are known to strongly suppress sel-12. Mutations in most strong spr genes suppress sel-12 by de-repressing the transcription of the largely functionally equivalent hop-1 presenilin gene. However, how mutations in the spr-2 gene suppress sel-12 is unknown. Results We show that spr-2 mutations increase the levels of sel-12 transcripts with Premature translation Termination Codons (PTCs in embryos and L1 larvae. mRNA transcripts from sel-12 alleles with PTCs undergo degradation by a process known as Nonsense Mediated Decay (NMD. However, spr-2 mutations do not appear to affect NMD. Mutations in the smg genes, which are required for NMD, can restore sel-12(PTC transcript levels and ameliorate the phenotype of sel-12 mutants with amber PTCs. However, the phenotypic suppression of sel-12 by smg genes is nowhere near as strong as the effect of previously characterized spr mutations including spr-2. Consistent with this, we have identified only two mutations in smg genes among the more than 100 spr mutations recovered in genetic screens. Conclusion spr-2 mutations do not suppress sel-12 by affecting NMD of sel-12(PTC transcripts and appear to have a novel mechanism of suppression. The fact that mutations in smg genes can ameliorate the phenotype of sel-12 alleles with amber PTCs suggests that some read-through of sel-12(amber alleles occurs in smg backgrounds.

  8. Large-scale compensation of errors in pairwise-additive empirical force fields: comparison of AMBER intermolecular terms with rigorous DFT-SAPT calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zgarbová, M.; Otyepka, M.; Šponer, Jiří; Hobza, P.; Jurečka, P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 35 (2010), s. 10476-10493. ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/09/1476 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) LC512; GA MŠk(CZ) GD203/09/H046 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : amber empirical potential * DFT-SAPT * compensation of errors Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.454, year: 2010

  9. A New Subfamily of Aphids(Hemiptera,Aphidomorpha)from the Early Cretaceous Lebanese Amber with a Description of the Oldest Apterous Morphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Piotr WEGIEREK; David A.GRIMALDI

    2010-01-01

    Aphids are marked by their high polymorphism,but species reported from the Early Cretaceous are known only from alate morphs.The discovery of an apterous adult morph in Lebanese amber and a larva of the same species are very important for the understanding of both the morphological and biological evolution of this insect group at the very early stage of development.Gondvanoaphis estephani new subfamily,new genus and species of the recent aphids family Thelaxidae is described.The characters of the new genus in respect to other genera placed in Thelaxidae are reviewed.The palaeoecologicai and palaeogeographical data concerning Gondvanoaphis new genus are also discussed.

  10. The Alberta moving beyond breast cancer (AMBER cohort study: a prospective study of physical activity and health-related fitness in breast cancer survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courneya Kerry S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Limited research has examined the association between physical activity, health-related fitness, and disease outcomes in breast cancer survivors. Here, we present the rationale and design of the Alberta Moving Beyond Breast Cancer (AMBER Study, a prospective cohort study designed specifically to examine the role of physical activity and health-related fitness in breast cancer survivorship from the time of diagnosis and for the balance of life. The AMBER Study will examine the role of physical activity and health-related fitness in facilitating treatment completion, alleviating treatment side effects, hastening recovery after treatments, improving long term quality of life, and reducing the risks of disease recurrence, other chronic diseases, and premature death. Methods/Design The AMBER Study will enroll 1500 newly diagnosed, incident, stage I-IIIc breast cancer survivors in Alberta, Canada over a 5 year period. Assessments will be made at baseline (within 90 days of surgery, 1 year, and 3 years consisting of objective and self-reported measurements of physical activity, health-related fitness, blood collection, lymphedema, patient-reported outcomes, and determinants of physical activity. A final assessment at 5 years will measure patient-reported data only. The cohort members will be followed for an additional 5 years for disease outcomes. Discussion The AMBER cohort will answer key questions related to physical activity and health-related fitness in breast cancer survivors including: (1 the independent and interactive associations of physical activity and health-related fitness with disease outcomes (e.g., recurrence, breast cancer-specific mortality, overall survival, treatment completion rates, symptoms and side effects (e.g., pain, lymphedema, fatigue, neuropathy, quality of life, and psychosocial functioning (e.g., anxiety, depression, self-esteem, happiness, (2 the determinants of physical activity and

  11. Detection and kinetic studies of triplex formation by oligodeoxynucleotides using real-time biomolecular interaction analysis (BIA).

    OpenAIRE

    Bates, P. J.; Dosanjh, H. S.; S. Kumar; Jenkins, T. C.; Laughton, C A; Neidle, S

    1995-01-01

    Real-time biomolecular interaction analysis (BIA) has been applied to triplex formation between oligodeoxynucleotides. 5'-Biotinylated oligonucleotides were immobilised on the streptavidin-coated surface of a biosensor chip and subsequently hybridised to their complementary strand. Sequence-specific triplex formation was observed when a suitable third-strand oligopyrimidine was injected over the surface-bound duplex. In addition, a single-stranded oligonucleotide immobilised on the chip surfa...

  12. High spectral resolution imaging of the dynamical atmosphere of the red supergiant Antares in the CO first overtone lines with VLTI/AMBER

    CERN Document Server

    Ohnaka, Keiichi; Schertl, Dieter; Weigelt, Gerd; Baffa, Carlo; Chelli, Alain; Petrov, Romain; Robbe-Dubois, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    We present high spectral resolution aperture-synthesis imaging of the red supergiant Antares (alpha Sco) in individual CO first overtone lines with VLTI/AMBER. The reconstructed images reveal that the star appears differently in the blue wing, line center, and red wing and shows an asymmetrically extended component. The appearance of the star within the CO lines changes drastically within one year, implying a significant change in the velocity field in the atmosphere. Our modeling suggests an outer atmosphere (MOLsphere) extending to 1.2--1.4 stellar radii with CO column densities of (0.5--1)x10^{20} cm^{-2} and a temperature of ~2000 K. While the velocity field in 2009 is characterized by strong upwelling motions at 20--30 km/s, it changed to strong downdrafts in 2010. On the other hand, the AMBER data in the continuum show only a slight deviation from limb-darkened disks and only marginal time variations. We derive a limb-darkened disk diameter of 37.38+/-0.06 mas and a power-law-type limb-darkening paramet...

  13. AMBER-NACO aperture-synthesis imaging of the half-obscured central star and the edge-on disk of the red giant L2 Pup

    CERN Document Server

    Ohnaka, Keiichi; Hofmann, Karl-Heinz; Weigelt, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    The red giant L2 Pup started a dimming event in 1994, which is considered to be caused by the ejection of dust clouds. We present near-IR aperture-synthesis imaging of L2 Pup achieved by combining data from VLT/NACO speckle observations and long-baseline interferometric observations with the AMBER instrument of the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). We also extracted an 8.7 micron image from the mid-IR VLTI instrument MIDI. Our aim is to spatially resolve the innermost region of the circumstellar environment. The diffraction-limited image at 2.27 micron obtained by bispectrum speckle interferometry with NACO with a spatial resolution of 57 mas shows an elongated component. The aperture-synthesis imaging combining the NACO speckle data and AMBER data (2.2--2.29 micron) with a spatial resolution of 5.6x7.3 mas further resolves not only this elongated component, but also the central star. The reconstructed image reveals that the elongated component is a nearly edge-on disk with a size of ~180x50 mas lyi...

  14. AMBER/VLTI high spectral resolution observations of the Br$\\gamma$ emitting region in HD 98922. A compact disc wind launched from the inner disc region

    CERN Document Server

    Garatti, A Caratti o; Lopez, R Garcia; Kraus, S; Schertl, D; Grinin, V P; Weigelt, G; Hofmann, K -H; Massi, F; Lagarde, S; Vannier, M; Malbet, F

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the main physical parameters and the circumstellar environment of the young Herbig Be star HD 98922. We present AMBER/VLTI high spectral resolution (R =12000) interferometric observations across the Br$\\gamma$ line, accompanied by UVES high-resolution spectroscopy and SINFONI-AO assisted near-infrared integral field spectroscopic data. To interpret our observations, we develop a magneto-centrifugally driven disc-wind model. Our analysis of the UVES spectrum shows that HD 98922 is a young (~5x10^5 yr) Herbig Be star (SpT=B9V), located at a distance of 440(+60-50) pc, with a mass accretion rate of ~9+/-3x10^(-7) M_sun yr^(-1). SINFONI K-band AO-assisted imaging shows a spatially resolved circumstellar disc-like region (~140 AU in diameter) with asymmetric brightness distribution. Our AMBER/VLTI UT observations indicate that the Br$\\gamma$ emitting region (radius ~0.31+/-0.04 AU) is smaller than the continuum emitting region (inner dust radius ~0.7+/-0.2 AU), showing significant non-zero V-shaped diff...

  15. New genus and species of broad-nosed weevils from Baltic amber and notes on fossils of the subfamily Entiminae (Coleoptera, Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai Yunakov

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Arostropsis groehni gen. et sp. n. is described from Baltic amber and temporarily placed in the tribe Naupactini. It differs from all recent Naupactini genera with open corbels by very short and flattened scape, distinct lateral carina of the pronotum and elytra, and the rostrum distinctly narrower than the head capsule. The shape of head in the extinct genus is somewhat similar to that of the extant Naupactini genera with enclosed corbels (Platyomus Sahlberg, 1823 and Aptolemus Schoenherr, 1842, but differs in the slender body, open corbels, very short antennal scape and epifrons without a median sulcus (only a longitudinal depression is slightly visible. It is also similar to the Tanymecine genus Pandeleteius Schoenherr, 1834 in general appearance, but distinct by the straight anterior edge of the pronotum, lack of postocular spurs, lobes, and vibrissae, a slightly sloping elytral declivity, lateral ridges on the pronotum, subflattened antennal scape, elongate rostrum, and sparsely setose epistome. A new synonymy of the generic names Protonaupactus Zherikhin, 1971 and Sucinophyllobius Wanat & Borowiec, 1986, syn. n., is established. The Madagascan genus Corecaulus Fairmaire, 1903 is transferred from the tribe Naupactini to the Brachyderini because of its connate claws and the similarity in chaetotaxy of the epistomal area with African and Madagascar Brachyderini genera. A key to the identification of known Baltic amber genera of Entiminae is proposed. A checklist of the prepleistocene fossil Entiminae, based on V.V. Zherikhin’s data, with remarks and corrections, is presented.

  16. Tracing jet emission at the base of a high-mass YSO. First AMBER/VLTI observations of the Br\\gamma emission in IRAS 13481-6124

    CERN Document Server

    Garatti, A Caratti o; Weigelt, G; Schertl, D; Hofmann, K -H; Kraus, S; Oudmaijer, R D; de Wit, W J; Sanna, A; Lopez, R Garcia; Kreplin, A; Ray, T P

    2016-01-01

    To probe the circumstellar environment of IRAS 13481-6124, a 20 M_sun high-mass young stellar object (HMYSO) with a parsec-scale jet and accretion disc, we investigate the origin of its Br\\gamma-emission line through NIR interferometry. We present the first AMBER/VLTI observations of the Br\\gamma-emitting region in an HMYSO at R~1500. Our AMBER/VLTI observations reveal a spatially and spectrally resolved Br\\gamma-line in emission with a strong P Cygni profile, indicating outflowing matter with a terminal velocity of ~500 km/s. Visibilities, differential phases, and closure phases are detected in our observations within the spectral line and in the adjacent continuum. Both total visibilities (continuum plus line emitting region) and pure-line visibilities indicate that the Br\\gamma-emitting region is more compact (2-4 mas in diameter or ~6-13 au at 3.2 kpc) than the continuum-emitting region (~5.4 mas or ~17 au). The absorption feature is also spatially resolved at the longest baselines (81 and 85 m) and has a...

  17. Phase sensitive spectral domain interferometry for label free biomolecular interaction analysis and biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirvi, Sajal

    Biomolecular interaction analysis (BIA) plays vital role in wide variety of fields, which include biomedical research, pharmaceutical industry, medical diagnostics, and biotechnology industry. Study and quantification of interactions between natural biomolecules (proteins, enzymes, DNA) and artificially synthesized molecules (drugs) is routinely done using various labeled and label-free BIA techniques. Labeled BIA (Chemiluminescence, Fluorescence, Radioactive) techniques suffer from steric hindrance of labels on interaction site, difficulty of attaching labels to molecules, higher cost and time of assay development. Label free techniques with real time detection capabilities have demonstrated advantages over traditional labeled techniques. The gold standard for label free BIA is surface Plasmon resonance (SPR) that detects and quantifies the changes in refractive index of the ligand-analyte complex molecule with high sensitivity. Although SPR is a highly sensitive BIA technique, it requires custom-made sensor chips and is not well suited for highly multiplexed BIA required in high throughput applications. Moreover implementation of SPR on various biosensing platforms is limited. In this research work spectral domain phase sensitive interferometry (SD-PSI) has been developed for label-free BIA and biosensing applications to address limitations of SPR and other label free techniques. One distinct advantage of SD-PSI compared to other label-free techniques is that it does not require use of custom fabricated biosensor substrates. Laboratory grade, off-the-shelf glass or plastic substrates of suitable thickness with proper surface functionalization are used as biosensor chips. SD-PSI is tested on four separate BIA and biosensing platforms, which include multi-well plate, flow cell, fiber probe with integrated optics and fiber tip biosensor. Sensitivity of 33 ng/ml for anti-IgG is achieved using multi-well platform. Principle of coherence multiplexing for multi

  18. Impact of attentional demand on visual processing during simulated driving: a MEG study

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra Fort; Robert Martin; Armelle Jacquet-Andrieu; Claude Delpuech

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of attentional demand on car drivers’ cerebral activities using magnetoencephalography (MEG). A car simulator was designed according to the MEG constraints. It included a steering wheel, a turn indicator, a brake pedal and an accelerator pedal. An interactive virtual urban environment was projected onto a screen in front of the subject. Two stimuli of interest were defined: traffic light turning from green to amber and occurrence of left or...

  19. A Quick-responsive DNA Nanotechnology Device for Bio-molecular Homeostasis Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songlin; Wang, Pei; Xiao, Chen; Li, Zheng; Yang, Bing; Fu, Jieyang; Chen, Jing; Wan, Neng; Ma, Cong; Li, Maoteng; Yang, Xiangliang; Zhan, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Physiological processes such as metabolism, cell apoptosis and immune responses, must be strictly regulated to maintain their homeostasis and achieve their normal physiological functions. The speed with which bio-molecular homeostatic regulation occurs directly determines the ability of an organism to adapt to conditional changes. To produce a quick-responsive regulatory system that can be easily utilized for various types of homeostasis, a device called nano-fingers that facilitates the regulation of physiological processes was constructed using DNA origami nanotechnology. This nano-fingers device functioned in linked open and closed phases using two types of DNA tweezers, which were covalently coupled with aptamers that captured specific molecules when the tweezer arms were sufficiently close. Via this specific interaction mechanism, certain physiological processes could be simultaneously regulated from two directions by capturing one biofactor and releasing the other to enhance the regulatory capacity of the device. To validate the universal application of this device, regulation of the homeostasis of the blood coagulant thrombin was attempted using the nano-fingers device. It was successfully demonstrated that this nano-fingers device achieved coagulation buffering upon the input of fuel DNA. This nano-device could also be utilized to regulate the homeostasis of other types of bio-molecules. PMID:27506964

  20. Toxicity evaluation of PEDOT/biomolecular composites intended for neural communication electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asplund, M; Thaning, E; Von Holst, H [Division of Neuronic Engineering, School of Technology and Health, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-14152 Huddinge (Sweden); Lundberg, J [Section for Neuroradiology, R2:02 NKK-lab, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, SE-171 76, Stockholm (Sweden); Sandberg-Nordqvist, A C [Section of Clinical CNS Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, SE-171 76, Stockholm (Sweden); Kostyszyn, B [Center for Hearing and Communication Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, M1:01, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Inganaes, O, E-mail: maria.asplund@sth.kth.s [Biomolecular and Organic Electronics, IFM, Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2009-08-15

    Electrodes coated with the conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene) (PEDOT) possess attractive electrochemical properties for stimulation or recording in the nervous system. Biomolecules, added as counter ions in electropolymerization, could further improve the biomaterial properties, eliminating the need for surfactant counter ions in the process. Such PEDOT/biomolecular composites, using heparin or hyaluronic acid, have previously been investigated electrochemically. In the present study, their biocompatibility is evaluated. An agarose overlay assay using L929 fibroblasts, and elution and direct contact tests on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells are applied to investigate cytotoxicity in vitro. PEDOT:heparin was further evaluated in vivo through polymer-coated implants in rodent cortex. No cytotoxic response was seen to any of the PEDOT materials tested. The examination of cortical tissue exposed to polymer-coated implants showed extensive glial scarring irrespective of implant material (Pt:polymer or Pt). However, quantification of immunological response, through distance measurements from implant site to closest neuron and counting of ED1+ cell density around implant, was comparable to those of platinum controls. These results indicate that PEDOT:heparin surfaces were non-cytotoxic and show no marked difference in immunological response in cortical tissue compared to pure platinum controls.

  1. A method for rapid quantitative assessment of biofilms with biomolecular staining and image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larimer, Curtis; Winder, Eric; Jeters, Robert; Prowant, Matthew; Nettleship, Ian; Addleman, Raymond Shane; Bonheyo, George T

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of bacteria in surface-attached biofilms can be detrimental to human health, dental hygiene, and many industrial processes. Natural biofilms are soft and often transparent, and they have heterogeneous biological composition and structure over micro- and macroscales. As a result, it is challenging to quantify the spatial distribution and overall intensity of biofilms. In this work, a new method was developed to enhance the visibility and quantification of bacterial biofilms. First, broad-spectrum biomolecular staining was used to enhance the visibility of the cells, nucleic acids, and proteins that make up biofilms. Then, an image analysis algorithm was developed to objectively and quantitatively measure biofilm accumulation from digital photographs and results were compared to independent measurements of cell density. This new method was used to quantify the growth intensity of Pseudomonas putida biofilms as they grew over time. This method is simple and fast, and can quantify biofilm growth over a large area with approximately the same precision as the more laborious cell counting method. Stained and processed images facilitate assessment of spatial heterogeneity of a biofilm across a surface. This new approach to biofilm analysis could be applied in studies of natural, industrial, and environmental biofilms. PMID:26643074

  2. Solving the 0/1 Knapsack Problem by a Biomolecular DNA Computer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Taghipour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Solving some mathematical problems such as NP-complete problems by conventional silicon-based computers is problematic and takes so long time. DNA computing is an alternative method of computing which uses DNA molecules for computing purposes. DNA computers have massive degrees of parallel processing capability. The massive parallel processing characteristic of DNA computers is of particular interest in solving NP-complete and hard combinatorial problems. NP-complete problems such as knapsack problem and other hard combinatorial problems can be easily solved by DNA computers in a very short period of time comparing to conventional silicon-based computers. Sticker-based DNA computing is one of the methods of DNA computing. In this paper, the sticker based DNA computing was used for solving the 0/1 knapsack problem. At first, a biomolecular solution space was constructed by using appropriate DNA memory complexes. Then, by the application of a sticker-based parallel algorithm using biological operations, knapsack problem was resolved in polynomial time.

  3. Bridge- and Solvent-Mediated Intramolecular Electronic Communications in Ubiquinone-Based Biomolecular Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Yuan; Ma, Wei; Zhou, Hao; Cao, Xiao-Ming; Long, Yi-Tao

    2015-05-01

    Intramolecular electronic communications of molecular wires play a crucial role for developing molecular devices. In the present work, we describe different degrees of intramolecular electronic communications in the redox processes of three ubiquinone-based biomolecular wires (Bis-CoQ0s) evaluated by electrochemistry and Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods in different solvents. We found that the bridges linkers have a significant effect on the electronic communications between the two peripheral ubiquinone moieties and solvents effects are limited and mostly depend on the nature of solvents. The DFT calculations for the first time indicate the intensity of the electronic communications during the redox processes rely on the molecular orbital elements VL for electron transfer (half of the energy splitting of the LUMO and LUMO+1), which is could be affected by the bridges linkers. The DFT calculations also demonstrates the effect of solvents on the latter two-electron transfer of Bis-CoQ0s is more significant than the former two electrons transfer as the observed electrochemical behaviors of three Bis-CoQ0s. In addition, the electrochemistry and theoretical calculations reveal the intramolecular electronic communications vary in the four-electron redox processes of three Bis-CoQ0s.

  4. Chemical and biomolecular characterization of Artemisia umbelliformis Lam., an important ingredient of the alpine liqueur "Genepi".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubiolo, Patrizia; Matteodo, Maura; Bicchi, Carlo; Appendino, Giovanni; Gnavi, Giorgio; Bertea, Cinzia; Maffei, Massimo

    2009-05-13

    Artemisia umbelliformis Lam., an important alpine plant used for the preparation of flavored beverages, showed a remarkable intraspecific variability, at both genomic and gene product (secondary metabolites) levels. The variability of A. umbelliformis Lam. currently cultivated in Piedmont (Italy, Au1) and in Switzerland (Au2) was investigated by combining the chemical analysis of essential oil and sesquiterpene lactones and the molecular characterization of the 5S-rRNA-NTS gene by PCR and PCR-RFLP. Marked differences were observed between the two plants. Au1 essential oil contained alpha- and beta-thujones as the main components, whereas Au2 contained 1,8-cineole, borneol, and beta-pinene. Au1 sesquiterpene lactone fractions contained cis-8-eudesmanolide derivatives and Au2 the trans-6-germacranolide costunolide. Specific A. umbelliformis Au1 and Au2 primers were designed on the sequence of the 5S-rRNA gene spacer region. Furthermore, a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method was applied using RsaI and TaqI restriction enzymes. Chemical and biomolecular data contributed to the characterization of A. umbeliformis chemotypes. PMID:19326948

  5. Bio-objectifying European bodies: standardisation of biobanks in the Biobanking and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamminen, Sakari

    2015-01-01

    The article traces the genealogy of the Minimum Information About Biobank Data Sharing model, created in the European Biobanking and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure to facilitate collaboration among biobanks and to foster the exchange of biological samples and data. This information model is aimed at the identification of biobanks; unification of databases; and objectification of the information, samples, and related studies - to create a completely new 'bio-object infrastructure' within the EU. The paper discusses key challenges in creating a 'universal' information model of such a kind, the most important technical translations of European research policy needed for a standardised model for biobank information, and how this model creates new bio-objects. The author claims that this amounts to redefinition of biobanks and technical governance over virtually bio-objectified European populations. It is argued here that old governance models based on the nation-state need radical reconsideration so that we are prepared for a new and changing situation wherein bodies of information that lack organs flow from one database to another with a click of a mouse. PMID:26626620

  6. Magneto-optical relaxation measurements for the characterization of biomolecular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the magneto-optical relaxation of ferrofluids (MORFF) were applied as a novel homogeneous immunoassay for the investigation of biomolecular interactions. The technique is based on magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) functionalized with antibodies. The relaxation time of the optical birefringence that occurs when a pulsed magnetic field is applied to the nanoparticle suspension depends on the particle size. This enables the detection of particle aggregates formed after the addition of the antigen coupling partner. MORFF size measurements on the original ferrofluid and its fractions obtained by magnetic fractionation are comparable with results from other methods such as atomic force microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy. In kinetic studies, the binding properties of five antigens and their polyclonal antibodies were investigated: human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), human immunoglobulin M (hIgM), human Eotaxin (hEotaxin), human carcinoembryonic antigen (hCEA), and human insulin (hInsulin). The enlargement of the relaxation time observed during the coupling experiments is expressed in terms of a size distribution function, which includes MNP monomers as well as aggregates. The kinetic process can be described by a model of stepwise polymerization. The kinetic parameters obtained are compared to results of surface plasmon resonance measurements

  7. Rapid, Low-Cost Detection of Zika Virus Using Programmable Biomolecular Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardee, Keith; Green, Alexander A; Takahashi, Melissa K; Braff, Dana; Lambert, Guillaume; Lee, Jeong Wook; Ferrante, Tom; Ma, Duo; Donghia, Nina; Fan, Melina; Daringer, Nichole M; Bosch, Irene; Dudley, Dawn M; O'Connor, David H; Gehrke, Lee; Collins, James J

    2016-05-19

    The recent Zika virus outbreak highlights the need for low-cost diagnostics that can be rapidly developed for distribution and use in pandemic regions. Here, we report a pipeline for the rapid design, assembly, and validation of cell-free, paper-based sensors for the detection of the Zika virus RNA genome. By linking isothermal RNA amplification to toehold switch RNA sensors, we detect clinically relevant concentrations of Zika virus sequences and demonstrate specificity against closely related Dengue virus sequences. When coupled with a novel CRISPR/Cas9-based module, our sensors can discriminate between viral strains with single-base resolution. We successfully demonstrate a simple, field-ready sample-processing workflow and detect Zika virus from the plasma of a viremic macaque. Our freeze-dried biomolecular platform resolves important practical limitations to the deployment of molecular diagnostics in the field and demonstrates how synthetic biology can be used to develop diagnostic tools for confronting global health crises. PAPERCLIP. PMID:27160350

  8. Review of Transducer Principles for Label-Free Biomolecular Interaction Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janos Vörös

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Label-free biomolecular interaction analysis is an important technique to study the chemical binding between e.g., protein and protein or protein and small molecule in real-time. The parameters obtained with this technique, such as the affinity, are important for drug development. While the surface plasmon resonance (SPR instruments are most widely used, new types of sensors are emerging. These developments are generally driven by the need for higher throughput, lower sample consumption or by the need of complimentary information to the SPR data. This review aims to give an overview about a wide range of sensor transducers, the working principles and the peculiarities of each technology, e.g., concerning the set-up, sensitivity, sensor size or required sample volume. Starting from optical technologies like the SPR and waveguide based sensors, acoustic sensors like the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM and the film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR, calorimetric and electrochemical sensors are covered. Technologies long established in the market are presented together with those newly commercially available and with technologies in the early development stage. Finally, the commercially available instruments are summarized together with their sensitivity and the number of sensors usable in parallel and an outlook for potential future developments is given.

  9. Photodamage and the importance of photoprotection in biomolecular-powered device applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandelinder, Virginia; Bachand, George D

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, an enhanced understanding of the mechanisms underlying photobleaching and photoblinking of fluorescent dyes has led to improved photoprotection strategies, such as reducing and oxidizing systems (ROXS) that reduce blinking and oxygen scavenging systems to reduce bleaching. Excitation of fluorescent dyes can also result in damage to catalytic proteins (e.g., biomolecular motors), affecting the performance of integrated devices. Here, we characterized the motility of microtubules driven by kinesin motor proteins using various photoprotection strategies, including a microfluidic deoxygenation device. Impaired motility of microtubules was observed at high excitation intensities in the absence of photoprotection as well as in the presence of an enzymatic oxygen scavenging system. In contrast, using a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic deoxygenation device and ROXS, not only were the fluorophores slower to bleach but also moving the velocity and fraction of microtubules over time remained unaffected even at high excitation intensities. Further, we demonstrate the importance of photoprotection by examining the effect of photodamage on the behavior of a switchable mutant of kinesin. Overall, these results demonstrate that improved photoprotection strategies may have a profound impact on functional fluorescently labeled biomolecules in integrated devices. PMID:24350711

  10. A new source for quantum optics with biomolecules and biomolecular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marksteiner, Markus; Haslinger, Philipp; Ulbricht, Hendrik; Arndt, Markus

    2008-03-01

    We present recent progress towards matter wave experiments with amino acids, polypeptides and large biomolecular clusters. All successful experiments on macromolecule interferometry so far, with fullerenes, fullerene derivates and large perfluoroalkyl-functionalized azobenzenes used effusive beam sources. The combination of Stark deflectometry with quantum interferometry also allowed us to create a new device for precisely measuring electric susceptibilities of large molecules in the gas phase. In order to apply quantum interference to molecules of biological interest, we have now implemented a pulsed laser desorption source. The combination of UV laser desorption into an intense noble gas jet and single-photon ionization by a VUV excimer laser (157nm) allows us to observe intense neutral jets of amino acids (e.g. Tryptophan), nucleotides (e.g. Guanin) and polypeptides ranging from tri-peptides to Gramicidin. Remarkably, we also found a new method for producing large neutral amino acid clusters, such as for instance Trp30, with masses exceeding 6000 amu: the addition of alkaline Earth salts in the desorption process leads to the inclusion of at least one metal atom per complex and is sufficient to catalyze the cluster formation process.

  11. Potential-of-mean-force description of ionic interactions and structural hydration in biomolecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummer, G.; Garcia, A.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Biology and Biophysics Group; Soumpasis, D.M. [Max-Planck-Inst for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen (Germany). Biocomputation Group

    1994-10-01

    To understand the functioning of living organisms on a molecular level, it is crucial to dissect the intricate interplay of the immense number of biological molecules. Most of the biochemical processes in cells occur in a liquid environment formed mainly by water and ions. This solvent environment plays an important role in biological systems. The potential-of-mean-force (PMF) formalism attempts to describe quantitatively the interactions of the solvent with biological macromolecules on the basis of an approximate statistical-mechanical representation. At its current status of development, it deals with ionic effects on the biomolecular structure and with the structural hydration of biomolecules. The underlying idea of the PMF formalism is to identify the dominant sources of interactions and incorporate these interactions into the theoretical formalism using PMF`s (or particle correlation functions) extracted from bulk-liquid systems. In the following, the authors shall briefly outline the statistical-mechanical foundation of the PMF formalism and introduce the PMF expansion formalism, which is intimately linked to superposition approximations for higher-order particle correlation functions. The authors shall then sketch applications, which describe the effects of the ionic environment on nucleic-acid structure. Finally, the authors shall present the more recent extension of the PMF idea to describe quantitatively the structural hydration of biomolecules. Results for the interface of ice and water and for the hydration of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) will be discussed.

  12. Biomolecular environment, quantification, and intracellular interaction of multifunctional magnetic SERS nanoprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchner, Tina; Drescher, Daniela; Merk, Virginia; Traub, Heike; Guttmann, Peter; Werner, Stephan; Jakubowski, Norbert; Schneider, Gerd; Kneipp, Janina

    2016-08-15

    Multifunctional composite nanoprobes consisting of iron oxide nanoparticles linked to silver and gold nanoparticles, Ag-Magnetite and Au-Magnetite, respectively, were introduced by endocytic uptake into cultured fibroblast cells. The cells containing the non-toxic nanoprobes were shown to be displaceable in an external magnetic field and can be manipulated in microfluidic channels. The distribution of the composite nanostructures that are contained in the endosomal system is discussed on the basis of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) mapping, quantitative laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) micromapping, and cryo soft X-ray tomography (cryo soft-XRT). Cryo soft-XRT of intact, vitrified cells reveals that the composite nanoprobes form intra-endosomal aggregates. The nanoprobes provide SERS signals from the biomolecular composition of their surface in the endosomal environment. The SERS data indicate the high stability of the nanoprobes and of their plasmonic properties in the harsh environment of endosomes and lysosomes. The spectra point at the molecular composition at the surface of the Ag-Magnetite and Au-Magnetite nanostructures that is very similar to that of other composite structures, but different from the composition of pure silver and gold SERS nanoprobes used for intracellular investigations. As shown by the LA-ICP-MS data, the uptake efficiency of the magnetite composites is approximately two to three times higher than that of the pure gold and silver nanoparticles. PMID:27353290

  13. Biomolecular Nano-Flow-Sensor to Measure Near-Surface Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noji Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have proposed and experimentally demonstrated that the measurement of the near-surface flow at the interface between a liquid and solid using a 10 nm-sized biomolecular motor of F1-ATPase as a nano-flow-sensor. For this purpose, we developed a microfluidic test-bed chip to precisely control the liquid flow acting on the F1-ATPase. In order to visualize the rotation of F1-ATPase, several hundreds nanometer-sized particle was immobilized at the rotational axis of F1-ATPase to enhance the rotation to be detected by optical microscopy. The rotational motion of F1-ATPase, which was immobilized on an inner surface of the test-bed chip, was measured to obtain the correlation between the near-surface flow and the rotation speed of F1-ATPase. As a result, we obtained the relationship that the rotation speed of F1-ATPase was linearly decelerated with increasing flow velocity. The mechanism of the correlation between the rotation speed and the near-surface flow remains unclear, however the concept to use biomolecule as a nano-flow-sensor was proofed successfully. (See supplementary material 1 Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11671-009-9479-3 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. Click here for file

  14. The Effect of Biomolecular Gradients on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Chondrogenesis under Shear Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander L. Rivera

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering is viewed as a promising option for long-term repair of cartilage lesions, but current engineered cartilage constructs fail to match the mechanical properties of native tissue. The extracellular matrix of adult human articular cartilage contains highly organized collagen fibrils that enhance the mechanical properties of the tissue. Unlike articular cartilage, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC based tissue engineered cartilage constructs lack this oriented microstructure and therefore display much lower mechanical strength. The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of biomolecular gradients and shear stress on MSCs undergoing chondrogenesis within a microfluidic device. Via poly(dimethyl siloxane soft-lithography, microfluidic devices containing a gradient generator were created. Human MSCs were seeded within these chambers and exposed to flow-based transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1 gradients. When the MSCs were both confluent and exposed to shear stress, the cells aligned along the flow direction. Exposure to TGF-β1 gradients led to chondrogenesis of MSCs, indicated by positive type II collagen staining. These results, together with a previous study that showed that aligned MSCs produce aligned collagen, suggest that oriented cartilage tissue structures with superior mechanical properties can be obtained by aligning MSCs along the flow direction and exposing MSCs to chondrogenic gradients.

  15. A computational study of the interaction of graphene structures with biomolecular units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballeira, Diego López; Ramos-Berdullas, Nicolás; Pérez-Juste, Ignacio; Fajín, José Luis Cagide; Cordeiro, M Natália D S; Mandado, Marcos

    2016-06-01

    Due to the great interest that biochemical sensors constructed from graphene nanostructures have raised recently, in this work we analyse in detail the electronic factors responsible for the large affinity of biomolecular units for graphene surfaces using ab initio quantum chemical tools based on density functional theory. Both finite and periodic graphene structures have been employed in our study. Whereas the former allows the analysis of the different energy components contributing to the interaction energy separately, the periodic structure provides a more realistic calculation of the total adsorption energy in an extended graphene surface and serves to validate the results obtained using the finite model. In addition, qualitative relations between interaction energy and electron polarization upon adsorption have been established using the finite model. In this work, we have analysed thermodynamically stable adsorption complexes formed by glycine, melamine, pyronin cation, porphine, tetrabenzoporphine and phthalocyanine with a 2D structure of ninety six carbons and periodic structures formed by cells of fifty and seventy two carbons. Differences in the electrostatic, Pauli repulsion, induction and dispersion energies among aromatic and non-aromatic molecules, charged and non-charged molecules and H-π and stacking interactions have been thoroughly analysed in this work. PMID:27210053

  16. Amber Hey!Beautiful!

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    AMBER作为组合f(x)第一个出solo专辑的成员,发行了首张个人作品《Beautiful》,这是一张完全展现她个人魅力的专辑,对她来说同样显得相当的有意义。

  17. Stable carbon isotopes of C3 plant resins and ambers record changes in atmospheric oxygen since the Triassic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappert, Ralf; McKellar, Ryan C.; Wolfe, Alexander P.; Tappert, Michelle C.; Ortega-Blanco, Jaime; Muehlenbachs, Karlis

    2013-11-01

    Estimating the partial pressure of atmospheric oxygen (pO2) in the geological past has been challenging because of the lack of reliable proxies. Here we develop a technique to estimate paleo-pO2 using the stable carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of plant resins-including amber, copal, and resinite-from a wide range of localities and ages (Triassic to modern). Plant resins are particularly suitable as proxies because their highly cross-linked terpenoid structures allow the preservation of pristine δ13C signatures over geological timescales. The distribution of δ13C values of modern resins (n = 126) indicates that (a) resin-producing plant families generally have a similar fractionation behavior during resin biosynthesis, and (b) the fractionation observed in resins is similar to that of bulk plant matter. Resins exhibit a natural variability in δ13C of around 8‰ (δ13C range: -31‰ to -23‰, mean: -27‰), which is caused by local environmental and ecological factors (e.g., water availability, water composition, light exposure, temperature, nutrient availability). To minimize the effects of local conditions and to determine long-term changes in the δ13C of resins, we used mean δ13C values (δ13Cmeanresin) for each geological resin deposit. Fossil resins (n = 412) are generally enriched in 13C compared to their modern counterparts, with shifts in δ13Cmeanresin of up to 6‰. These isotopic shifts follow distinctive trends through time, which are unrelated to post-depositional processes including polymerization and diagenesis. The most enriched fossil resin samples, with a δ13Cmeanresin between -22‰ and -21‰, formed during the Triassic, the mid-Cretaceous, and the early Eocene. Experimental evidence and theoretical considerations suggest that neither change in pCO2 nor in the δ13C of atmospheric CO2 can account for the observed shifts in δ13Cmeanresin. The fractionation of 13C in resin-producing plants (Δ13C), instead, is primarily influenced by

  18. Scaling analysis of bio-molecular dynamics derived from elastic incoherent neutron scattering experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doster, W.; Nakagawa, H.; Appavou, M. S.

    2013-07-01

    Numerous neutron scattering studies of bio-molecular dynamics employ a qualitative analysis of elastic scattering data and atomic mean square displacements. We provide a new quantitative approach showing that the intensity at zero energy exchange can be a rich source of information of bio-structural fluctuations on a pico- to nano-second time scale. Elastic intensity scans performed either as a function of the temperature (back-scattering) and/or by varying the instrumental resolution (time of flight spectroscopy) yield the activation parameters of molecular motions and the approximate structural correlation function in the time domain. The two methods are unified by a scaling function, which depends on the ratio of correlation time and instrumental resolution time. The elastic scattering concept is illustrated with a dynamic characterization of alanine-dipeptide, protein hydration water, and water-coupled protein motions of lysozyme, per-deuterated c-phycocyanin (CPC) and hydrated myoglobin. The complete elastic scattering function versus temperature, momentum exchange, and instrumental resolution is analyzed instead of focusing on a single cross-over temperature of mean square displacements at the apparent onset temperature of an-harmonic motions. Our method predicts the protein dynamical transition (PDT) at Td from the collective (α) structural relaxation rates of the solvation shell as input. By contrast, the secondary (β) relaxation enhances the amplitude of fast local motions in the vicinity of the glass temperature Tg. The PDT is specified by step function in the elastic intensity leading from elastic to viscoelastic dynamic behavior at a transition temperature Td.

  19. Development of a biomolecular assay for postmortem diagnosis of Taenia saginata Cysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, Francesco; Dalmasso, Alessandra; Bellio, Alberto; Martinetti, Manuela; Gili, Stefano; Civera, Tiziana

    2010-10-01

    Bovine cysticercosis is caused by the larval stage of the human tapeworm Taenia saginata. According to European data on meat inspection, the prevalence ranges from 0.007% to 6.8%, but the real prevalence is considered to be at least 10 times higher. Laboratory confirmation of the etiological agent is based on gross, stereomicroscopic, and histological examination of submitted specimens. False identifications may occur, possibly because of death and degeneration of cysts, or because taeniid larvae and other tissue parasites, such as Sarcocystis spp., may cause similar macroscopic morphological lesions. Therefore, tests that can warrant sure identification of taeniid lesions and calcified cysts in the muscle are needed. The focus of our study was to develop a suitable postmortem test that could be applied on putative lesions by T. saginata cysticerci, as ambiguously diagnosed after routine meat inspection. In particular, we proposed a biomolecular assay targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (COI). For developing the polymerase chain reaction assay, viable cysts of Cysticercus bovis (n = 10) were used as positive reference samples, and those of Echinococcus granulosus (n = 3), Cysticercus tenuicollis (n = 3), and Sarcocystis spp. (n = 4) as reference negative controls. Further, to evaluate the applicability of the proposed assay, 171 samples of bovine muscular tissue, obtained from local slaughterhouses and containing lesions recognized as T. saginata cysticerci by macroscopic examination, were tested. The proposed test confirmed the diagnosis at postmortem inspection in 94.7% (162/171) of samples. In conclusion, the assay developed in this study, amplifying a short fragment from the mitochondrial gene COI, showed to be suitable for samples containing both viable and degenerating T. saginata cysticerci, yielding an unequivocal diagnosis. PMID:20618079

  20. Trade-off between responsiveness and noise suppression in biomolecular system responses to environmental cues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V Ratushny

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available When living systems detect changes in their external environment their response must be measured to balance the need to react appropriately with the need to remain stable, ignoring insignificant signals. Because this is a fundamental challenge of all biological systems that execute programs in response to stimuli, we developed a generalized time-frequency analysis (TFA framework to systematically explore the dynamical properties of biomolecular networks. Using TFA, we focused on two well-characterized yeast gene regulatory networks responsive to carbon-source shifts and a mammalian innate immune regulatory network responsive to lipopolysaccharides (LPS. The networks are comprised of two different basic architectures. Dual positive and negative feedback loops make up the yeast galactose network; whereas overlapping positive and negative feed-forward loops are common to the yeast fatty-acid response network and the LPS-induced network of macrophages. TFA revealed remarkably distinct network behaviors in terms of trade-offs in responsiveness and noise suppression that are appropriately tuned to each biological response. The wild type galactose network was found to be highly responsive while the oleate network has greater noise suppression ability. The LPS network appeared more balanced, exhibiting less bias toward noise suppression or responsiveness. Exploration of the network parameter space exposed dramatic differences in system behaviors for each network. These studies highlight fundamental structural and dynamical principles that underlie each network, reveal constrained parameters of positive and negative feedback and feed-forward strengths that tune the networks appropriately for their respective biological roles, and demonstrate the general utility of the TFA approach for systems and synthetic biology.

  1. Scaling analysis of bio-molecular dynamics derived from elastic incoherent neutron scattering experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doster, W. [Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Nakagawa, H. [Jülich Centre for Neutron Science, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Outstation at MLZ, Lichtenbergstraße 1, 85747 Garching (Germany); Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Appavou, M. S. [Jülich Centre for Neutron Science, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Outstation at MLZ, Lichtenbergstraße 1, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2013-07-28

    Numerous neutron scattering studies of bio-molecular dynamics employ a qualitative analysis of elastic scattering data and atomic mean square displacements. We provide a new quantitative approach showing that the intensity at zero energy exchange can be a rich source of information of bio-structural fluctuations on a pico- to nano-second time scale. Elastic intensity scans performed either as a function of the temperature (back-scattering) and/or by varying the instrumental resolution (time of flight spectroscopy) yield the activation parameters of molecular motions and the approximate structural correlation function in the time domain. The two methods are unified by a scaling function, which depends on the ratio of correlation time and instrumental resolution time. The elastic scattering concept is illustrated with a dynamic characterization of alanine-dipeptide, protein hydration water, and water-coupled protein motions of lysozyme, per-deuterated c-phycocyanin (CPC) and hydrated myoglobin. The complete elastic scattering function versus temperature, momentum exchange, and instrumental resolution is analyzed instead of focusing on a single cross-over temperature of mean square displacements at the apparent onset temperature of an-harmonic motions. Our method predicts the protein dynamical transition (PDT) at T{sub d} from the collective (α) structural relaxation rates of the solvation shell as input. By contrast, the secondary (β) relaxation enhances the amplitude of fast local motions in the vicinity of the glass temperature T{sub g}. The PDT is specified by step function in the elastic intensity leading from elastic to viscoelastic dynamic behavior at a transition temperature T{sub d}.

  2. Scaling analysis of bio-molecular dynamics derived from elastic incoherent neutron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous neutron scattering studies of bio-molecular dynamics employ a qualitative analysis of elastic scattering data and atomic mean square displacements. We provide a new quantitative approach showing that the intensity at zero energy exchange can be a rich source of information of bio-structural fluctuations on a pico- to nano-second time scale. Elastic intensity scans performed either as a function of the temperature (back-scattering) and/or by varying the instrumental resolution (time of flight spectroscopy) yield the activation parameters of molecular motions and the approximate structural correlation function in the time domain. The two methods are unified by a scaling function, which depends on the ratio of correlation time and instrumental resolution time. The elastic scattering concept is illustrated with a dynamic characterization of alanine-dipeptide, protein hydration water, and water-coupled protein motions of lysozyme, per-deuterated c-phycocyanin (CPC) and hydrated myoglobin. The complete elastic scattering function versus temperature, momentum exchange, and instrumental resolution is analyzed instead of focusing on a single cross-over temperature of mean square displacements at the apparent onset temperature of an-harmonic motions. Our method predicts the protein dynamical transition (PDT) at Td from the collective (α) structural relaxation rates of the solvation shell as input. By contrast, the secondary (β) relaxation enhances the amplitude of fast local motions in the vicinity of the glass temperature Tg. The PDT is specified by step function in the elastic intensity leading from elastic to viscoelastic dynamic behavior at a transition temperature Td

  3. Evolução biomolecular homoquiral: a origem e a amplificação da quiralidade nas moléculas da vida Homochiral biomolecular evolution: the origin and the amplification of chirality in life molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Augusto R. Rodrigues

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The fact that biologically relevant molecules exist only as one of the two enantiomers is a fascinating example of complete symmetry breaking of chirality and has long intrigued our curiosity. The origin of this selective chirality has remained a fundamental enigma with regard to the origin of life since the time of Pasteur, 160 years ago. The symmetry breaking processes, which include autocatalytic crystallization, asymmetric autocatalysis, spontaneous crystallization, adsorption and polymerization of amino acids on mineral surfaces, provide new insights into the origin of biomolecular homochirality.

  4. A new species of Phyllopsora (Lecanorales, lichen-forming Ascomycota) from Dominican amber, with remarks on the fossil history of lichens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikkinen, Jouko; Poinar, George O

    2008-01-01

    Phyllopsora dominicanus sp. nov. (Bacidiaceae, Lecanorales, lichen-forming Ascomycota) is described and illustrated from Dominican amber. The diagnostic features of the lichen include a minute subfolious thallus of lacinulate, ascending squamules, a well-developed upper cortex, and a net-like pseudocortex on the lower surface. The algal symbionts are unicellular green algae, forming a distinct layer immediately below the upper cortex. The fossil demonstrates that distinguishing features of Phyllopsora have remained unchanged for tens of millions of years. The fossil also provides the first detailed views of mycobiont-photobiont contacts in Tertiary green algal lichens. The mycobiont hyphae formed apical and intercalary appressoria by pressing closely against the photobiont cells. This indicates that a conserved maintenance of structure is also seen in the fine details of the fungal-algal interface. PMID:18319239

  5. Strain-compensated (Ga,In)N/(Al,Ga)N/GaN multiple quantum wells for improved yellow/amber light emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lekhal, K.; Damilano, B., E-mail: bd@crhea.cnrs.fr; De Mierry, P.; Vennéguès, P. [CRHEA-CNRS, Centre de Recherche sur l' Hétéro-Epitaxie et ses Applications, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Valbonne 06560 (France); Ngo, H. T.; Rosales, D.; Gil, B. [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb, CNRS-INP-UMR 5221, Université Montpellier 2, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Hussain, S. [CRHEA-CNRS, Centre de Recherche sur l' Hétéro-Epitaxie et ses Applications, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Valbonne 06560 (France); Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Parc Valrose, 28 av. Valrose, 06108 Nice cedex 2 (France)

    2015-04-06

    Yellow/amber (570–600 nm) emitting In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N/Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1−y}N/GaN multiple quantum wells (QWs) have been grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on GaN-on- sapphire templates. When the (Al,Ga)N thickness of the barrier increases, the room temperature photoluminescence is red-shifted while its yield increases. This is attributed to an increase of the QW internal electric field and an improvement of the material quality due to the compensation of the compressive strain of the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N QWs by the Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1−y}N layers, respectively.

  6. Evaluation of kinetic constants of biomolecular interaction on optical surface plasmon resonance sensor with Newton Iteration Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Guoliang; Hu, Jiandong; Hu, Fengjiang; Wei, Jianguang; Shi, Liang

    2010-10-01

    In the immunology, there are two important types of biomolecular interaction: antigens-antibodies and receptors-ligands. Monitoring the response rate and affinity of biomolecular interaction can help analyze the protein function, drug discover, genomics and proteomics research. Moreover the association rate constant and dissociation rate constant of receptors-ligands are the important parameters for the study of signal transmission between cells. Recent advances in bioanalyzer instruments have greatly simplified the measurement of the kinetics of molecular interactions. Non-destructive and real-time monitoring the response to evaluate the parameters between antigens and antibodies can be performed by using optical surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor technology. This technology provides a quantitative analysis that is carried out rapidly with label-free high-throughput detection using the binding curves of antigens-antibodies. Consequently, the kinetic parameters of interaction between antigens and antibodies can be obtained. This article presents a low cost integrated SPR-based bioanalyzer (HPSPR-6000) designed by ourselves. This bioanalyzer is mainly composed of a biosensor TSPR1K23, a touch-screen monitor, a microprocessor PIC24F128, a microflow cell with three channels, a clamp and a photoelectric conversion device. To obtain the kinetic parameters, sensorgrams may be modeled using one of several binding models provided with BIAevaluation software 3.0, SensiQ or Autolab. This allows calculation of the association rate constant (ka) and the dissociation rate constant (kd). The ratio of ka to kd can be used to estimate the equilibrium constant. Another kind is the analysis software OriginPro, which can process the obtained data by nonlinear fitting and then get some correlative parameters, but it can't be embedded into the bioanalyzer, so the bioanalyzer don't support the use of OriginPro. This paper proposes a novel method to evaluate the kinetic parameters

  7. New product development with the innovative biomolecular sublingual immunotherapy formulations for the management of allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frati F

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Franco Frati,1 Lorenzo Cecchi,2,3 Enrico Scala,4 Erminia Ridolo,5 Ilaria Dell'Albani,1 Eleni Makrì,6 Giovanni Pajno,7 Cristoforo Incorvaia6 1Medical and Scientific Department, Stallergenes, Milan, Italy; 2Interdepartmental Centre of Bioclimatology, University of Florence, Florence, Italy; 3Allergy and Clinical Immunology Section, Azienda Sanitaria di Prato, Prato, Italy; 4Experimental Allergy Unit, IDI-IRCCS, Rome, Italy; 5Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Parma, Parma, Italy; 6Allergy/Pulmonary Rehabilitation, ICP Hospital, Milan, Italy; 7Department of Pediatrics, Allergy Unit, University of Messina, Messina, Italy Abstract: The molecular allergy technique, currently defined as component-resolved diagnosis, significantly improved the diagnosis of allergy, allowing for differentiation between molecules actually responsible for clinical symptoms (genuine sensitizers and those simply cross-reacting or shared by several sources (panallergens, thus influencing the appropriate management of a patient's allergy. This also concerns allergen immunotherapy (AIT, which may be prescribed more precisely based on the component-resolved diagnosis results. However, the advance in diagnosis needs to be mirrored in AIT. According to consensus documents and to expectations of specialists, therapy should be based on standardized extracts containing measured amounts of the clinically relevant molecules, ie, the major allergens. The new generation of extracts for sublingual immunotherapy fulfills these requirements and are thus defined as biomolecular (BM. BM refers to natural extracts with a defined content of major allergens in micrograms. All Staloral BM products are indicated for the treatment of allergic rhinitis with or without asthma. The effectiveness of AIT is related to its ability to modify the immunological response of allergic subjects. The 5-grass and house dust mite extracts were evaluated addressing the T helper 1, T

  8. Pushing back the frontiers of mercury speciation using a combination of biomolecular and isotopic signatures: challenge and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrero, Zoyne; Donard, Olivier F X; Amouroux, David

    2016-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) pollution is considered a major environmental problem due to the extreme toxicity of Hg. However, Hg metabolic pathways in biota remain elusive. An understanding of these pathways is crucial to elucidating the (eco)toxic effects of Hg and its biogeochemical cycle. The development of a new analytical methodology based on both speciation and natural isotopic fractionation represents a promising approach for metabolic studies of Hg and other metal(loid)s. Speciation provides valuable information about the reactivity and potential toxicity of metabolites, while the use of natural isotopic signature analysis adds a complementary dynamic dimension that allows the life history of the target element to be probed, the source of the target element (i.e., the source of pollution) to be identified, and reactions to be tracked. The resulting combined (bio)molecular and isotopic signature affords precious insight into the behavior of Hg in biota and Hg detoxification mechanisms. In the long term, this highly innovative methodology could be used in life and environmental science studies of metal(loid)s to push back the frontiers of our knowledge in this field. This paper summarizes the current status of the application of Hg speciation and the isotopic signature of Hg at the biomolecular level in living organisms, and discusses potential future uses of this combination of techniques. Graphical Abstract Application of Hg speciation and the isotopic signature of Hg to enhance our understanding of the roles of Hg in metabolic, toxicological, and environmental processes. PMID:26753975

  9. A simple knowledge-based mining method for exploring hidden key molecules in a human biomolecular network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuji Shingo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the functional genomics analysis domain, various methodologies are available for interpreting the results produced by high-throughput biological experiments. These methods commonly use a list of genes as an analysis input, and most of them produce a more complicated list of genes or pathways as the results of the analysis. Although there are several network-based methods, which detect key nodes in the network, the results tend to include well-studied, major hub genes. Results To mine the molecules that have biological meaning but to fewer degrees than major hubs, we propose, in this study, a new network-based method for selecting these hidden key molecules based on virtual information flows circulating among the input list of genes. The human biomolecular network was constructed from the Pathway Commons database, and a calculation method based on betweenness centrality was newly developed. We validated the method with the ErbB pathway and applied it to practical cancer research data. We were able to confirm that the output genes, despite having fewer edges than major hubs, have biological meanings that were able to be invoked by the input list of genes. Conclusions The developed method, named NetHiKe (Network-based Hidden Key molecule miner, was able to detect potential key molecules by utilizing the human biomolecular network as a knowledge base. Thus, it is hoped that this method will enhance the progress of biological data analysis in the whole-genome research era.

  10. Nanomechanical force transducers for biomolecular and intracellular measurements: is there room to shrink and why do it?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past couple of decades there has been a tremendous amount of progress on the development of ultrasensitive nanomechanical instruments, which has enabled scientists to peer for the first time into the mechanical world of biomolecular systems. Currently, work-horse instruments such as the atomic force microscope and optical/magnetic tweezers have provided the resolution necessary to extract quantitative force data from various molecular systems down to the femtonewton range, but it remains difficult to access the intracellular environment with these analytical tools as they have fairly large sizes and complicated feedback systems. This review is focused on highlighting some of the major milestones and discoveries in the field of biomolecular mechanics that have been made possible by the development of advanced atomic force microscope and tweezer techniques as well as on introducing emerging state-of-the-art nanomechanical force transducers that are addressing the size limitations presented by these standard tools. We will first briefly cover the basic setup and operation of these instruments, and then focus heavily on summarizing advances in in vitro force studies at both the molecular and cellular level. The last part of this review will include strategies for shrinking down the size of force transducers and provide insight into why this may be important for gaining a more complete understanding of cellular activity and function. (report on progress)

  11. Real-time and label-free detection of biomolecular interactions by oblique-incidence reflectivity difference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Lu, Heng; Dai, Jun; Wen, Juan; Yuan, Kun; Lü, Hui-Bin; Jin, Kui-Juan; Zhou, Yue-Liang; Yang, Guo-Zhen

    2011-01-01

    We successfully conduct the label-free and real-time detection of the interactions between epoxy groups and rabbit IgG and 5' CTT CAG GTC ATG AGC CTG AT 3' oligonucleotide, and between the hybridization of 5' CTT CAG GTC ATG AGC CTG AT 3' and its complementary 3' GAA GTC CAG TAC TCG GAC TA 5' oligonucleotide, by the oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OI-RD) method. The dynamic curves of OI-RD signals, corresponding to the kinetic processes of biomolecular combination or hybridization, are acquired. In our case, the combination of epoxy groups with rabbit IgG and 5' CTT CAG GTC ATG AGC CTG AT 3' oligonucleotide need almost one and a half hours and about two hundred seconds, respectively; and the hybridization of the two oligonucleotides needs about five hundred seconds. The experimental results show that the OI-RD is a promising method for the real-time and label-free detection of biomolecular interactions.

  12. Bioactive membranes for bone regeneration applications: effect of physical and biomolecular signals on mesenchymal stem cell behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejeda-Montes, Esther; Smith, Katherine H; Rebollo, Elena; Gómez, Raúl; Alonso, Matilde; Rodriguez-Cabello, J Carlos; Engel, Elisabeth; Mata, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on the in vitro characterization of bioactive elastin-like recombinamer (ELR) membranes for bone regeneration applications. Four bioactive ELRs exhibiting epitopes designed to promote mesenchymal stem cell adhesion (RGDS), endothelial cell adhesion (REDV), mineralization (HAP), and both cell adhesion and mineralization (HAP-RGDS) were synthesized using standard recombinant protein techniques. The materials were then used to fabricate ELR membranes incorporating a variety of topographical micropatterns including channels, holes and posts. Primary rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) were cultured on the different membranes and the effects of biomolecular and physical signals on cell adhesion, morphology, proliferation, and differentiation were evaluated. All results were analyzed using a custom-made MATLAB program for high throughput image analysis. Effects on cell morphology were mostly dependent on surface topography, while cell proliferation and cell differentiation were largely dependent on the biomolecular signaling from the ELR membranes. In particular, osteogenic differentiation (evaluated by staining for the osteoblastic marker osterix) was significantly enhanced on cells cultured on HAP membranes. Remarkably, cells growing on membranes containing the HAP sequence in non-osteogenic differentiation media exhibited significant up-regulation of the osteogenic marker as early as day 5, while those growing on fibronectin-coated glass in osteogenic differentiation media did not. These results are part of our ongoing effort to develop an optimized molecularly designed periosteal graft. PMID:24035887

  13. NMscatt: a program for calculating inelastic scattering from large biomolecular systems using classical force-field simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Merzel, F; Johnson, M R; Fontaine-Vive, Fabien; Johnson, Mark R.; Merzel, Franci

    2006-01-01

    Computational tools for normal mode analysis, which are widely used in physics and materials science problems, are designed here in a single package called NMscatt (Normal Modes & scattering) that allows arbitrarily large systems to be handled. The package allows inelastic neutron and X-ray scattering observables to be calculated, allowing comparison with experimental data produced at large scale facilities. Various simplification schemes are presented for analysing displacement vectors, which are otherwise too complicated to understand in very large systems.

  14. Production and detection of neutral molecular beams : from single amino acids to biomolecular complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    biomolecular complexes. The largest observed complex is a gramicidin tetramer with a mass of 7,536amu. Furthermore, desorption of tryptophan together with alkaline earth salts, such as calcium-carbonate results in the formation of two different kinds of massive tryptophan clusters: Tryptophan clusters containing a single calcium atom with a mass of up to 6,800amu and also pure clusters with a mass of up to 7,100amu are observed. The inclusion of a metal atom into tryptophan clusters is observed also for strontium, barium ,sodium and copper. The cluster formation is studied additionally for other amino acids such as phenylalanine, the tripeptide tyrosine-tryptophan-glycine and the nucleotide guanine. The cluster formation between two different molecular species was observed after the simultaneous desorption of gramicidin and tryptophan and resulted in the attachment of tryptophan molecules to a single gramicidin. An alternative detection method to photo-ionization is examined by testing a superconducting single photon detector (SSPD) for its ability to detect individual neutral molecules. The sensitivity of the nanostructured SSPD seems not to be limited to small molecules. The superconducting detector is able to record velocity distributions of neutral insulin (∼5,700amu), myoglobin(∼17 kDa) and hemoglobin (∼66 kDa) beams. A check if the intact molecules leave the source is missing due to the lack of alternative detection methods for these molecules. The working principle of the SSPD relies on the fact, that an impinging particle leads to a breakdown of superconductivity. Further developments of the SSPD appear possible and promising in order to increase the mass range of detected neutral organic molecules, which cannot be detected in photo-ionization. The source is developed in order to fulfil the criteria needed for a combination with a Talbot-Lau interferometer. Interference of biomolecules is, beside the prove of the wave-particle duality, interesting for the

  15. GROMACS 4.5: A high-throughput and highly parallel open source molecular simulation toolkit

    OpenAIRE

    Pronk S; Pall S.; Schulz R; Larsson P; Bjelkmar P.; Apostolov R.; Shirts M.R.; Smith J.C.; Kasson P.M.; Van Der Spoel D.

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Molecular simulation has historically been a low-throughput technique, but faster computers and increasing amounts of genomic and structural data are changing this by enabling large-scale automated simulation of, for instance, many conformers or mutants of biomolecules with or without a range of ligands. At the same time, advances in performance and scaling now make it possible to model complex biomolecular interaction and function in a manner directly testable by experiment. Thes...

  16. The nature and fate of natural resins in the geosphere. XII. Investigation of C-ring aromatic diterpenoids in Raritan amber by pyrolysis-GC-matrix isolation FTIR-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Ken B

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Upper Cretaceous amber from the Raritan Formation (Sayerville, New Jersey has been investigated by Pyrolysis-GC-MS and Pyrolysis-GC-matrix isolation FTIR-MS. Results establish the existence of two distinct forms of amber in this deposit. Both forms are Class Ib ambers, but they are unambiguously differentiated on the basis of their (intact diterpenoid composition. The presence of callitrisate in both forms, and cupraene in samples designated form 1, strongly suggest that both derive from related-but-distinct species within the Cupressaceae. In addition to callitrisate, dehydroabietate and analogous 17-nor-, 16,17-dinor- and 15,16,17-trinor- analogues of these compounds are also observed. The distributions of these products in multiple samples suggest that they are the result of biological emplacement, rather than diagenetic modification of the parent compounds. This indicates that the distributions of diterpenes observed in these samples are representative of the original bioterpenoids and, hence, are useful for chemotaxonomic analyses.

  17. Design of Flow Systems for Improved Networking and Reduced Noise in Biomolecular Signal Processing in Biocomputing and Biosensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun Verma

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We consider flow systems that have been utilized for small-scale biomolecular computing and digital signal processing in binary-operating biosensors. Signal measurement is optimized by designing a flow-reversal cuvette and analyzing the experimental data to theoretically extract the pulse shape, as well as reveal the level of noise it possesses. Noise reduction is then carried out numerically. We conclude that this can be accomplished physically via the addition of properly designed well-mixing flow-reversal cell(s as an integral part of the flow system. This approach should enable improved networking capabilities and potentially not only digital but analog signal-processing in such systems. Possible applications in complex biocomputing networks and various sense-and-act systems are discussed.

  18. Studies of the charge instabilities in the complex nano-objects: clusters and bio-molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the last 6 years, my main research works focused on i) the Coulomb instabilities and the fragmentation processes of fullerenes and clusters of fullerenes ii) the stability and the reactivity of complex bio-molecular systems. Concerning the clusters of fullerenes, which are van der Waals type clusters, we have shown that the multiply charged species, obtained in collisions with slow highly charged ions, keep their structural properties but become very good electric conductor. In another hand, with the aim to understand the role of the biologic environment at the molecular scale in the irradiation damage of complex biomolecules, we have studied the charge stabilities of clusters of small biomolecules and the dissociation processes of larger nano-hydrated biomolecules. Theses studies have shown that first, specific molecular recognition mechanisms continue to exist in gas phase and secondly, a small and very simple biochemical environment is enough to change the dynamics of instabilities. (author)

  19. Design of Flow Systems for Improved Networking and Reduced Noise in Biomolecular Signal Processing in Biocomputing and Biosensing Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Arjun; Fratto, Brian E; Privman, Vladimir; Katz, Evgeny

    2016-01-01

    We consider flow systems that have been utilized for small-scale biomolecular computing and digital signal processing in binary-operating biosensors. Signal measurement is optimized by designing a flow-reversal cuvette and analyzing the experimental data to theoretically extract the pulse shape, as well as reveal the level of noise it possesses. Noise reduction is then carried out numerically. We conclude that this can be accomplished physically via the addition of properly designed well-mixing flow-reversal cell(s) as an integral part of the flow system. This approach should enable improved networking capabilities and potentially not only digital but analog signal-processing in such systems. Possible applications in complex biocomputing networks and various sense-and-act systems are discussed. PMID:27399702

  20. (11-22) semipolar InGaN emitters from green to amber on overgrown GaN on micro-rod templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate semipolar InGaN single-quantum-well light emitting diodes (LEDs) in the green, yellow-green, yellow and amber spectral region. The LEDs are grown on our overgrown semipolar (11-22) GaN on micro-rod array templates, which are fabricated on (11-22) GaN grown on m-plane sapphire. Electroluminescence measurements on the (11-22) green LED show a reduced blue-shift in the emission wavelength with increasing driving current, compared to a reference commercial c-plane LED. The blue-shifts for the yellow-green and yellow LEDs are also significantly reduced. All these suggest an effective suppression in quantum confined Stark effect in our (11-22) LEDs. On-wafer measurements yield a linear increase in the light output with the current, and external quantum efficiency demonstrates a significant improvement in the efficiency-droop compared to a commercial c-plane LED. Electro-luminescence polarization measurements show a polarization ratio of about 25% in our semipolar LEDs

  1. Amber Light (590 nm) Induces the Breakdown of Lipid Droplets through Autophagy-Related Lysosomal Degradation in Differentiated Adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Min Sik; Kim, Hyoung-June; Ham, Mira; Choi, Dong-Hwa; Lee, Tae Ryong; Shin, Dong Wook

    2016-01-01

    Lipolysis in the adipocytes provides free fatty acids for other tissues in response to the energy demand. With the rapid increase in obesity-related diseases, finding novel stimuli or mechanisms that regulate lipid metabolism becomes important. We examined the effects of visible light (410, 457, 505, 530, 590, and 660 nm) irradiation on lipolysis regulation in adipocytes differentiated from human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Interestingly, 590 nm (amber) light irradiation significantly reduced the concentration of lipid droplets (LDs). We further investigated the lipolytic signaling pathways that are involved in 590 nm light irradiation-induced breakdown of LDs. Immunoblot analysis revealed that 590 nm light irradiation-induced phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) was insufficient to promote reduction of LDs. We observed that 590 nm light irradiation decreased the expression of perilipin 1. We found that 590 nm light irradiation, but not 505 nm, induced conversion of LC3 I to LC3 II, a representative autophagic marker. We further demonstrated that the lysosomal inhibitors leupeptin/NH4Cl inhibited 590 nm light irradiation-induced reduction of LDs in differentiated adipocytes. Our data suggest that 590 nm light irradiation-induced LD breakdown is partially mediated by autophagy-related lysosomal degradation, and can be applied in clinical settings to reduce obesity. PMID:27346059

  2. (11-22) semipolar InGaN emitters from green to amber on overgrown GaN on micro-rod templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, J., E-mail: j.bai@sheffield.ac.uk; Xu, B.; Guzman, F. G.; Xing, K.; Gong, Y.; Hou, Y.; Wang, T., E-mail: t.wang@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-28

    We demonstrate semipolar InGaN single-quantum-well light emitting diodes (LEDs) in the green, yellow-green, yellow and amber spectral region. The LEDs are grown on our overgrown semipolar (11-22) GaN on micro-rod array templates, which are fabricated on (11-22) GaN grown on m-plane sapphire. Electroluminescence measurements on the (11-22) green LED show a reduced blue-shift in the emission wavelength with increasing driving current, compared to a reference commercial c-plane LED. The blue-shifts for the yellow-green and yellow LEDs are also significantly reduced. All these suggest an effective suppression in quantum confined Stark effect in our (11-22) LEDs. On-wafer measurements yield a linear increase in the light output with the current, and external quantum efficiency demonstrates a significant improvement in the efficiency-droop compared to a commercial c-plane LED. Electro-luminescence polarization measurements show a polarization ratio of about 25% in our semipolar LEDs.

  3. The influence of dose rate, irradiation temperature and post-irradiation storage conditions on the radiation response of Harwell Amber 3042 PMMA dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response of routine dosimeters is not independent of radiation dose rate, and environmental conditions such as humidity and temperature. In Harwell Amber 3042 dosimeters these influences are minimised by careful conditioning, and the use of special packaging material to maintain humidity. This paper describes studies carried out on the influences of irradiation dose rate and temperature, on two batches of dosimeters. Firstly, this paper gives gamma irradiation response data for dose rates of 6.1, 1.3 and 0.5 Gy·s-1 with irradiation temperatures of 20, 30, 40 and 50 deg. C. Dosimeters were irradiated, to doses of 3, 5, 7, 10 and 15 kGy. Secondly, this paper considers irradiation plus post irradiation storage temperatures, at a fixed dose rate of 1.5 Gy·s-1. Dosimeters were irradiated, to doses of 10 and 20 kGy; at temperatures of 30, 40 and 50 deg. C. The dosimeters were stored at these temperatures for 1, 24 and 48 hours before measurement. Results at both of the recommended measurement wavelengths, 603 nm and 651 nm, are presented. The choice of wavelength is discussed, in order to aid the optimum choice for the conditions prevailing. (author)

  4. Comparative effect of physicomechanical and biomolecular cues on zone-specific chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeinzadeh, Seyedsina; Pajoum Shariati, Seyed Ramin; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2016-06-01

    Current tissue engineering approaches to regeneration of articular cartilage rarely restore the tissue to its normal state because the generated tissue lacks the intricate zonal organization of the native cartilage. Zonal regeneration of articular cartilage is hampered by the lack of knowledge for the relation between physical, mechanical, and biomolecular cues and zone-specific chondrogenic differentiation of progenitor cells. This work investigated in 3D the effect of TGF-β1, zone-specific growth factors, optimum matrix stiffness, and adding nanofibers on the expression of chondrogenic markers specific to the superficial, middle, and calcified zones of articular cartilage by the differentiating human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Growth factors included BMP-7, IGF-1, and hydroxyapatite (HA) for the superficial, middle, and calcified zones, respectively; optimum matrix stiffness was 80 kPa, 2.1 MPa, and 320 MPa; and nanofibers were aligned horizontal, random, and perpendicular to the gel surface. hMSCs with zone-specific cell densities were encapsulated in engineered hydrogels and cultured with or without TGF-β1, zone-specific growth factor, optimum matrix modulus, and fiber addition and cultured in basic chondrogenic medium. The expression of encapsulated cells was measured by mRNA, protein, and biochemical analysis. Results indicated that zone-specific matrix stiffness had a dominating effect on chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs to the superficial and calcified zone phenotypes. Addition of aligned nanofibers parallel to the direction of gel surface significantly enhanced expression of Col II in the superficial zone chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs. Conversely, biomolecular factor IGF-1 in combination with TGF-β1 had a dominating effect on the middle zone chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs. Results of this work could potentially lead to the development of multilayer grafts mimicking the zonal organization of articular cartilage. PMID:27038568

  5. Adaptive resolution simulation of a biomolecule and its hydration shell: Structural and dynamical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Aoife C; Potestio, Raffaello; Kremer, Kurt

    2015-05-21

    A fully atomistic modelling of many biophysical and biochemical processes at biologically relevant length- and time scales is beyond our reach with current computational resources, and one approach to overcome this difficulty is the use of multiscale simulation techniques. In such simulations, when system properties necessitate a boundary between resolutions that falls within the solvent region, one can use an approach such as the Adaptive Resolution Scheme (AdResS), in which solvent particles change their resolution on the fly during the simulation. Here, we apply the existing AdResS methodology to biomolecular systems, simulating a fully atomistic protein with an atomistic hydration shell, solvated in a coarse-grained particle reservoir and heat bath. Using as a test case an aqueous solution of the regulatory protein ubiquitin, we first confirm the validity of the AdResS approach for such systems, via an examination of protein and solvent structural and dynamical properties. We then demonstrate how, in addition to providing a computational speedup, such a multiscale AdResS approach can yield otherwise inaccessible physical insights into biomolecular function. We use our methodology to show that protein structure and dynamics can still be correctly modelled using only a few shells of atomistic water molecules. We also discuss aspects of the AdResS methodology peculiar to biomolecular simulations. PMID:26001481

  6. Adaptive resolution simulation of a biomolecule and its hydration shell: Structural and dynamical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Aoife C.; Potestio, Raffaello; Kremer, Kurt

    2015-05-01

    A fully atomistic modelling of many biophysical and biochemical processes at biologically relevant length- and time scales is beyond our reach with current computational resources, and one approach to overcome this difficulty is the use of multiscale simulation techniques. In such simulations, when system properties necessitate a boundary between resolutions that falls within the solvent region, one can use an approach such as the Adaptive Resolution Scheme (AdResS), in which solvent particles change their resolution on the fly during the simulation. Here, we apply the existing AdResS methodology to biomolecular systems, simulating a fully atomistic protein with an atomistic hydration shell, solvated in a coarse-grained particle reservoir and heat bath. Using as a test case an aqueous solution of the regulatory protein ubiquitin, we first confirm the validity of the AdResS approach for such systems, via an examination of protein and solvent structural and dynamical properties. We then demonstrate how, in addition to providing a computational speedup, such a multiscale AdResS approach can yield otherwise inaccessible physical insights into biomolecular function. We use our methodology to show that protein structure and dynamics can still be correctly modelled using only a few shells of atomistic water molecules. We also discuss aspects of the AdResS methodology peculiar to biomolecular simulations.

  7. PREFACE: 1st Nano-IBCT Conference 2011 - Radiation Damage of Biomolecular Systems: Nanoscale Insights into Ion Beam Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Bernd A.; Malot, Christiane; Domaracka, Alicja; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2012-07-01

    The 1st Nano-IBCT Conference entitled 'Radiation Damage in Biomolecular Systems: Nanoscale Insights into Ion Beam Cancer Therapy' was held in Caen, France, in October 2011. The Meeting was organised in the framework of the COST Action MP1002 (Nano-IBCT) which was launched in December 2010 (http://fias.uni-frankfurt.de/nano-ibct). This action aims to promote the understanding of mechanisms and processes underlying the radiation damage of biomolecular systems at the molecular and nanoscopic level and to use the findings to improve the strategy of Ion Beam Cancer Therapy. In the hope of achieving this, participants from different disciplines were invited to represent the fields of physics, biology, medicine and chemistry, and also included those from industry and the operators of hadron therapy centres. Ion beam therapy offers the possibility of excellent dose localization for treatment of malignant tumours, minimizing radiation damage in normal healthy tissue, while maximizing cell killing within the tumour. Several ion beam cancer therapy clinical centres are now operating in Europe and elsewhere. However, the full potential of such therapy can only be exploited by better understanding the physical, chemical and biological mechanisms that lead to cell death under ion irradiation. Considering a range of spatio-temporal scales, the proposed action therefore aims to combine the unique experimental and theoretical expertise available within Europe to acquire greater insight at the nanoscopic and molecular level into radiation damage induced by ion impact. Success in this endeavour will be both an important scientific breakthrough and give great impetus to the practical improvement of this innovative therapeutic technique. Ion therapy potentially provides an important advance in cancer therapy and the COST action MP1002 will be very significant in ensuring Europe's leadership in this field, providing the scientific background, required data and mechanistic insight which

  8. Force and Stress along Simulated Dissociation Pathways of Cucurbituril-Guest Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Velez-Vega, Camilo; Gilson, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    The field of host-guest chemistry provides computationally tractable yet informative model systems for biomolecular recognition. We applied molecular dynamics simulations to study the forces and mechanical stresses associated with forced dissociation of aqueous cucurbituril-guest complexes with high binding affinities. First, the unbinding transitions were modeled with constant velocity pulling (steered dynamics) and a soft spring constant, to model atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments. ...

  9. Molecular Mechanism of Allosteric Communication in Hsp70 Revealed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Chiappori, Federica; Merelli, Ivan; Colombo, Giorgio; Milanesi, Luciano; Morra, Giulia

    2012-01-01

    Author Summary Allostery, or the capability of proteins to respond to ligand binding events with a variation in structure or dynamics at a distant site, is a common feature for biomolecular function and regulation in a large number of proteins. Intra-protein connections and inter-residue coordinations underlie allosteric mechanisms and react to binding primarily through a finely tuned modulation of motions and structures at the microscopic scale. Hence, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations...

  10. Hybrid Acceleration of a Molecular DynamicsSimulation Using Short-Ranged Potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Hornich, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are a very usefultool to study the behavior and interaction of atoms and molecules in chemicaland bio-molecular systems. With the fast rising complexity of such simulationshybrid systems with both, multi-core processors (CPUs) and multiple graphics processingunits (GPUs), become more and more popular. To obtain an optimal performance thisthesis presents and evaluates two different hybrid algorithms, employing allavailable compute capacity from CPUs and GPUs. The...

  11. Stable isotope applications in biomolecular structure and mechanisms. A meeting to bring together producers and users of stable-isotope-labeled compounds to assess current and future needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trewhella, J.; Cross, T.A.; Unkefer, C.J. [eds.

    1994-12-01

    Knowledge of biomolecular structure is a prerequisite for understanding biomolecular function, and stable isotopes play an increasingly important role in structure determination of biological molecules. The first Conference on Stable Isotope Applications in Biomolecular Structure and Mechanisms was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, March 27--31, 1994. More than 120 participants from 8 countries and 44 institutions reviewed significant developments, discussed the most promising applications for stable isotopes, and addressed future needs and challenges. Participants focused on applications of stable isotopes for studies of the structure and function of proteins, peptides, RNA, and DNA. Recent advances in NMR techniques neutron scattering, EPR, and vibrational spectroscopy were highlighted in addition to the production and synthesis of labeled compounds. This volume includes invited speaker and poster presentations as well as a set of reports from discussion panels that focused on the needs of the scientific community and the potential roles of private industry, the National Stable Isotope Resource, and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in serving those needs. This is the leading abstract. Individual papers are processed separately for the database.

  12. Stable isotope applications in biomolecular structure and mechanisms. A meeting to bring together producers and users of stable-isotope-labeled compounds to assess current and future needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowledge of biomolecular structure is a prerequisite for understanding biomolecular function, and stable isotopes play an increasingly important role in structure determination of biological molecules. The first Conference on Stable Isotope Applications in Biomolecular Structure and Mechanisms was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, March 27--31, 1994. More than 120 participants from 8 countries and 44 institutions reviewed significant developments, discussed the most promising applications for stable isotopes, and addressed future needs and challenges. Participants focused on applications of stable isotopes for studies of the structure and function of proteins, peptides, RNA, and DNA. Recent advances in NMR techniques neutron scattering, EPR, and vibrational spectroscopy were highlighted in addition to the production and synthesis of labeled compounds. This volume includes invited speaker and poster presentations as well as a set of reports from discussion panels that focused on the needs of the scientific community and the potential roles of private industry, the National Stable Isotope Resource, and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in serving those needs. This is the leading abstract. Individual papers are processed separately for the database

  13. VLTI/AMBER Studies of the Atmospheric Structure and Fundamental Parameters of Red Giant and Supergiant Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Torres, B.; Wittkowski, M.; Marcaide, J. M.; Abellan, F. J.; Chiavassa, A.; Fabregat, J.; Freytag, B.; Guirado, J. C.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Marti-Vidal, I.; Quirrenbach, A.; Scholz, M.; Wood, P. R.

    2015-08-01

    We present recent near-IR interferometric studies of red giant and supergiant stars, which are aimed at obtaining information on the structure of the atmospheric layers and constraining the fundamental parameters of these objects. The observed visibilities of six red supergiants (RSGs), and also of one of the five red giants observed, indicate large extensions of the molecular layers, as previously observed for Mira stars. These extensions are not predicted by hydrostatic PHOENIX model atmospheres, hydrodynamical (RHD) simulations of stellar convection, or self-excited pulsation models. All these models based on parameters of RSGs lead to atmospheric structures that are too compact compared to our observations. We discuss how alternative processes might explain the atmospheric extensions for these objects. As the continuum appears to be largely free of contamination by molecular layers, we can estimate reliable Rosseland angular radii for our stars. Together with distances and bolometric fluxes, we estimate the effective temperatures and luminosities of our targets, locate them in the HR diagram, and compare their positions to recent evolutionary tracks.

  14. Free Energy Profile of RNA Hairpins: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Nan-Jie; Cieplak, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    RNA hairpin loops are one of the most abundant secondary structure elements and participate in RNA folding and protein-RNA recognition. To characterize the free energy surface of RNA hairpin folding at an atomic level, we calculated the potential of mean force (PMF) as a function of the end-to-end distance, by using umbrella sampling simulations in explicit solvent. Two RNA hairpins containing tetraloop cUUCGg and cUUUUg are studied with AMBER ff99 and CHARMM27 force fields. Experimentally, t...

  15. Photoabsorption and resonance energy transfer phenomenon in CdTe-protein bioconjugates: an insight into QD-biomolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinayaka, Aaydha C; Thakur, Munna S

    2011-05-18

    Luminescent quantum dots (QDs) possess unique photophysical properties, which are advantageous in the development of new generation robust fluorescent probes based on Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) phenomena. Bioconjugation of these QDs with biomolecules create hybrid materials having unique photophysical properties along with biological activity. The present study is aimed at characterizing QD bioconjugates in terms of optical behavior. Colloidal CdTe QDs capped with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) were conjugated to different proteins by the carbodiimide protocol using N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and a coupling reagent like N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). The photoabsorption of these QD-protein bioconjugates demonstrated an effective coupling of electronic orbitals of constituents. A linear variation in absorbance of bioconjugates at 330 nm proportionate to conjugation suggests a covalent attachment as confirmed by gel electrophoresis. A red shift in the fluorescence of bovine serum albumin (BSA) due to conjugation inferred a decrease in Stokes shift and solvent polarization effects on protein. A proportionate quenching in BSA fluorescence followed by an enhancement of QD fluorescence point toward nonradiative dipolar interactions. Further, reduction in photobleaching of BSA suggests QD-biomolecular interactions. Bioconjugation has significantly influenced the photoabsorption spectrum of QD bioconjugates suggesting the formation of a possible protein shell on the surface of QD. The experimental result suggests that these bioconjugates can be considered nanoparticle (NP) superstructures for the development of a new generation of robust nanoprobes. PMID:21452896

  16. Environmental Light and Its Relationship with Electromagnetic Resonances of Biomolecular Interactions, as Predicted by the Resonant Recognition Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Cosic

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The meaning and influence of light to biomolecular interactions, and consequently to health, has been analyzed using the Resonant Recognition Model (RRM. The RRM proposes that biological processes/interactions are based on electromagnetic resonances between interacting biomolecules at specific electromagnetic frequencies within the infra-red, visible and ultra-violet frequency ranges, where each interaction can be identified by the certain frequency critical for resonant activation of specific biological activities of proteins and DNA. We found that: (1 the various biological interactions could be grouped according to their resonant frequency into super families of these functions, enabling simpler analyses of these interactions and consequently analyses of influence of electromagnetic frequencies to health; (2 the RRM spectrum of all analyzed biological functions/interactions is the same as the spectrum of the sun light on the Earth, which is in accordance with fact that life is sustained by the sun light; (3 the water is transparent to RRM frequencies, enabling proteins and DNA to interact without loss of energy; (4 the spectrum of some artificial sources of light, as opposed to the sun light, do not cover the whole RRM spectrum, causing concerns for disturbance to some biological functions and consequently we speculate that it can influence health.

  17. Environmental Light and Its Relationship with Electromagnetic Resonances of Biomolecular Interactions, as Predicted by the Resonant Recognition Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosic, Irena; Cosic, Drasko; Lazar, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    The meaning and influence of light to biomolecular interactions, and consequently to health, has been analyzed using the Resonant Recognition Model (RRM). The RRM proposes that biological processes/interactions are based on electromagnetic resonances between interacting biomolecules at specific electromagnetic frequencies within the infra-red, visible and ultra-violet frequency ranges, where each interaction can be identified by the certain frequency critical for resonant activation of specific biological activities of proteins and DNA. We found that: (1) the various biological interactions could be grouped according to their resonant frequency into super families of these functions, enabling simpler analyses of these interactions and consequently analyses of influence of electromagnetic frequencies to health; (2) the RRM spectrum of all analyzed biological functions/interactions is the same as the spectrum of the sun light on the Earth, which is in accordance with fact that life is sustained by the sun light; (3) the water is transparent to RRM frequencies, enabling proteins and DNA to interact without loss of energy; (4) the spectrum of some artificial sources of light, as opposed to the sun light, do not cover the whole RRM spectrum, causing concerns for disturbance to some biological functions and consequently we speculate that it can influence health. PMID:27367714

  18. Bi-stability of amplitude modulation AFM in air: deterministic and stochastic outcomes for imaging biomolecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamics of the oscillating microcantilever for amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM AFM) operating in air is well understood theoretically but the experimental outcomes are still emerging. We use double-stranded DNA on mica as a model biomolecular system for investigating the connection between theory and experiment. A demonstration that the switching between the two cantilever oscillation states is stochastic in nature is achieved, and it can be induced by means of topographical anomalies on the surface. Whether one or the other attractor basin is accessed depends on the tip-sample separation history used to achieve the imaging conditions, and we show that the behaviour is reproducible when the tip is stable and well characterized. Emergence of background noise occurs in certain regions of parameter space regardless of whether two cantilever oscillation states coexist. The low state has been explored in detail and we note that at low to intermediate values of the free amplitude, noise-free imaging is achieved. The outcomes shown here are general and demonstrate that a thorough and systematic experimental approach in conjunction with standard modelling gives insight into the mechanisms behind image contrast formation in AM AFM in air.

  19. Environmental Light and Its Relationship with Electromagnetic Resonances of Biomolecular Interactions, as Predicted by the Resonant Recognition Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosic, Irena; Cosic, Drasko; Lazar, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    The meaning and influence of light to biomolecular interactions, and consequently to health, has been analyzed using the Resonant Recognition Model (RRM). The RRM proposes that biological processes/interactions are based on electromagnetic resonances between interacting biomolecules at specific electromagnetic frequencies within the infra-red, visible and ultra-violet frequency ranges, where each interaction can be identified by the certain frequency critical for resonant activation of specific biological activities of proteins and DNA. We found that: (1) the various biological interactions could be grouped according to their resonant frequency into super families of these functions, enabling simpler analyses of these interactions and consequently analyses of influence of electromagnetic frequencies to health; (2) the RRM spectrum of all analyzed biological functions/interactions is the same as the spectrum of the sun light on the Earth, which is in accordance with fact that life is sustained by the sun light; (3) the water is transparent to RRM frequencies, enabling proteins and DNA to interact without loss of energy; (4) the spectrum of some artificial sources of light, as opposed to the sun light, do not cover the whole RRM spectrum, causing concerns for disturbance to some biological functions and consequently we speculate that it can influence health. PMID:27367714

  20. Constructing Surrogate Models of Complex Systems with Enhanced Sparsity: Quantifying the Influence of Conformational Uncertainty in Biomolecular Solvation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Huan; Yang, Xiu; Zheng, Bin; Lin, Guang; Baker, Nathan A.

    2015-12-31

    Biomolecules exhibit conformational fluctuations near equilibrium states, inducing uncertainty in various biological properties in a dynamic way. We have developed a general method to quantify the uncertainty of target properties induced by conformational fluctuations. Using a generalized polynomial chaos (gPC) expansion, we construct a surrogate model of the target property with respect to varying conformational states. We also propose a method to increase the sparsity of the gPC expansion by defining a set of conformational “active space” random variables. With the increased sparsity, we employ the compressive sensing method to accurately construct the surrogate model. We demonstrate the performance of the surrogate model by evaluating fluctuation-induced uncertainty in solvent-accessible surface area for the bovine trypsin inhibitor protein system and show that the new approach offers more accurate statistical information than standard Monte Carlo approaches. Further more, the constructed surrogate model also enables us to directly evaluate the target property under various conformational states, yielding a more accurate response surface than standard sparse grid collocation methods. In particular, the new method provides higher accuracy in high-dimensional systems, such as biomolecules, where sparse grid performance is limited by the accuracy of the computed quantity of interest. Our new framework is generalizable and can be used to investigate the uncertainty of a wide variety of target properties in biomolecular systems.

  1. Preparation of LiNbO{sub 3} nanoparticles using poly(L-lysine) as a biomolecular additive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Youngjoon; Lee, Sang-Yup, E-mail: leessy@yonsei.ac.kr

    2014-03-01

    The effects of poly(L-lysine) as a biomolecular additive on the synthesis of LiNbO{sub 3} were investigated. PLL is a widely-studied biomolecule containing amino groups that can interact with solid inorganic clusters. The addition of PLL to a LiNbO{sub 3} precursor solution enhanced the aggregation of the produced LiNbO{sub 3} nanoparticles. This aggregation was induced by the electrical attraction of PLL with LiNbO{sub 3} nanoparticles, and was enhanced with increasing PLL molecular weight. Furthermore, the association of PLL with LiNbO{sub 3} nanoparticles was increased by the addition of methanol, which enhanced the miscibility of PLL with the precursor solution working as a co-solvent. The LiNbO{sub 3} nanoparticles generated with PLL exhibited piezoelectric properties without post-thermal treatment, suggesting that PLL contributes to the piezoelectricity. The results of this study are intriguing in terms of the potential for diverse engineering nanomaterials synthesis through a biomolecule that can also improve the physicochemical properties. - Highlights: • Piezoelectric lithium niobate nanoparticles were synthesized with poly(L-lysine). • High molecular weight poly(L-lysine) and co-solvent promoted aggregation of nanoparticles. • Poly(L-lysine) enhanced piezoelectricity of lithium niobate nanoparticles.

  2. Preparation of LiNbO3 nanoparticles using poly(L-lysine) as a biomolecular additive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of poly(L-lysine) as a biomolecular additive on the synthesis of LiNbO3 were investigated. PLL is a widely-studied biomolecule containing amino groups that can interact with solid inorganic clusters. The addition of PLL to a LiNbO3 precursor solution enhanced the aggregation of the produced LiNbO3 nanoparticles. This aggregation was induced by the electrical attraction of PLL with LiNbO3 nanoparticles, and was enhanced with increasing PLL molecular weight. Furthermore, the association of PLL with LiNbO3 nanoparticles was increased by the addition of methanol, which enhanced the miscibility of PLL with the precursor solution working as a co-solvent. The LiNbO3 nanoparticles generated with PLL exhibited piezoelectric properties without post-thermal treatment, suggesting that PLL contributes to the piezoelectricity. The results of this study are intriguing in terms of the potential for diverse engineering nanomaterials synthesis through a biomolecule that can also improve the physicochemical properties. - Highlights: • Piezoelectric lithium niobate nanoparticles were synthesized with poly(L-lysine). • High molecular weight poly(L-lysine) and co-solvent promoted aggregation of nanoparticles. • Poly(L-lysine) enhanced piezoelectricity of lithium niobate nanoparticles

  3. Low-mass molecular dynamics simulation: A simple and generic technique to enhance configurational sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Reducing atomic masses by 10-fold vastly improves sampling in MD simulations. • CLN025 folded in 4 of 10 × 0.5-μs MD simulations when masses were reduced by 10-fold. • CLN025 folded as early as 96.2 ns in 1 of the 4 simulations that captured folding. • CLN025 did not fold in 10 × 0.5-μs MD simulations when standard masses were used. • Low-mass MD simulation is a simple and generic sampling enhancement technique. - Abstract: CLN025 is one of the smallest fast-folding proteins. Until now it has not been reported that CLN025 can autonomously fold to its native conformation in a classical, all-atom, and isothermal–isobaric molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. This article reports the autonomous and repeated folding of CLN025 from a fully extended backbone conformation to its native conformation in explicit solvent in multiple 500-ns MD simulations at 277 K and 1 atm with the first folding event occurring as early as 66.1 ns. These simulations were accomplished by using AMBER forcefield derivatives with atomic masses reduced by 10-fold on Apple Mac Pros. By contrast, no folding event was observed when the simulations were repeated using the original AMBER forcefields of FF12SB and FF14SB. The results demonstrate that low-mass MD simulation is a simple and generic technique to enhance configurational sampling. This technique may propel autonomous folding of a wide range of miniature proteins in classical, all-atom, and isothermal–isobaric MD simulations performed on commodity computers—an important step forward in quantitative biology

  4. Low-mass molecular dynamics simulation: A simple and generic technique to enhance configurational sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Yuan-Ping, E-mail: pang@mayo.edu

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Reducing atomic masses by 10-fold vastly improves sampling in MD simulations. • CLN025 folded in 4 of 10 × 0.5-μs MD simulations when masses were reduced by 10-fold. • CLN025 folded as early as 96.2 ns in 1 of the 4 simulations that captured folding. • CLN025 did not fold in 10 × 0.5-μs MD simulations when standard masses were used. • Low-mass MD simulation is a simple and generic sampling enhancement technique. - Abstract: CLN025 is one of the smallest fast-folding proteins. Until now it has not been reported that CLN025 can autonomously fold to its native conformation in a classical, all-atom, and isothermal–isobaric molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. This article reports the autonomous and repeated folding of CLN025 from a fully extended backbone conformation to its native conformation in explicit solvent in multiple 500-ns MD simulations at 277 K and 1 atm with the first folding event occurring as early as 66.1 ns. These simulations were accomplished by using AMBER forcefield derivatives with atomic masses reduced by 10-fold on Apple Mac Pros. By contrast, no folding event was observed when the simulations were repeated using the original AMBER forcefields of FF12SB and FF14SB. The results demonstrate that low-mass MD simulation is a simple and generic technique to enhance configurational sampling. This technique may propel autonomous folding of a wide range of miniature proteins in classical, all-atom, and isothermal–isobaric MD simulations performed on commodity computers—an important step forward in quantitative biology.

  5. Simulaid: a simulation facilitator and analysis program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezei, Mihaly

    2010-11-15

    Simulaid performs a large number of simulation-related tasks: interconversion and modification of structure and trajectory files, optimization of orientation, and a large variety of analysis functions. The program can handle structures in PDB (Berman et al., Nucleic Acids Res 2000, 28, 235), Charmm (Brooks et al., J Comput Chem 4, 187) CRD, Amber (Case et al.), Macromodel (Mohamadi et al., J Comput Chem 1990, 11, 440), Gromos/Gromacs (Hess et al.), InsightII (InsightII. Accelrys Inc.: San Diego, 2005), Grasp (Nicholls et al., Proteins: Struct Funct Genet 1991, 11, 281) .crg, Tripos (Tripos International, S. H. R., St. Louis, MO) .mol2 (input only), and in the MMC (Mezei, M.; MMC: Monte Carlo program for molecular assemblies. Available at: http://inka.mssm.edu/~mezei/mmc) formats; and trajectories in the formats of Charmm, Amber, Macromodel, and MMC. Analysis features include (but are not limited to): (1) simple distance calculations and hydrogen-bond analysis, (2) calculation of 2-D RMSD maps (produced both as text file with the data and as a color-coded matrix) and cross RMSD maps between trajectories, (3) clustering based on RMSD maps, (4) analysis of torsion angles, Ramachandran (Ramachandran and Sasiskharan, Adv Protein Chem 1968, 23, 283) angles, proline kink (Visiers et al., Protein Eng 2000, 13, 603) angles, pseudorotational (Altona and Sundaralingam, J Am Chem Soc 1972, 94, 8205; Cremer and Pople, J Am Chem Soc 1975, 97, 1354) angles, and (5) analysis based on circular variance (Mezei, J Mol Graphics Model 2003, 21, 463). Torsion angle evolutions are presented in dial plots (Ravishanker et al., J Biomol Struct Dyn 1989, 6, 669). Several of these features are unique to Simulaid. PMID:20740566

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of a single stranded (ss) DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Subhasish; Thakur, Siddarth; Burin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop an understanding of short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to assist the development of new DNA-based biosensors. A ssDNA model containing twelve bases was constructed from the 130-145 codon sequence of the p53 gene. Various thermodynamic macroscopic observables such as temperature, energy distributions, as well as root mean square deviation (RMSD) of the nucleic acid backbone of the ssDNA were studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The AMBER program was used for building the structural model of the ssDNA, and atomistic MD simulations in three different ensembles were carried out using the NAMD program. The microcanonical (NVE), conical (NVT) and isobaric-isothermal (NPT) ensembles were employed to compare the equilibrium characteristics of ssDNA in aqueous solutions. Our results indicate that the conformational stability of the ssDNA is dependent on the thermodynamic conditions.

  7. Effect of some parameters in the response of the Perspex 3042, Lot L amber dosemeters; Efectos de algunos parametros en la respuesta de los dosimetros ambar Perspex 3042, Lote L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieto M, E.F.; Barrera G, G. [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnologicas y Desarrollo Nuclear (CEADEN). Calle 30, No. 502, esq. 5ta. Avenida, Playa, Ciudad de La Habana (Cuba)]. e-mail: efprieto@ceaden.edu.cu

    2004-07-01

    The answer of the dosimetric systems is affected by several factors, for what should know as these factors they influence in each one of the different dosimetric systems and by this way to minimize its effect in the value of the absorbed dose and to obtain exact dose values. One of the dosimetric systems more used in the high dose dosimetry like routine dosemeter for the control of the irradiation process are the Perspex dosemeters, for their speed in the obtaining the information, their easy manipulation and the precision that they present. To this dosemeters group they belong the same as the Red and Clear the Amber, which are adequate for the measurement of the radiation dose in the range of high doses. The objective of the present work is to obtain the calibration curves of the dosemeters Amber Perspex 3042, Lot L under our work conditions, like they are the irradiation temperatures and of storage and to know the influence of the rate dose in the value of the absorbed dose for different measurement wavelengths, as well as, the relationship among the one post-irradiation time and the specific absorbance value induced in function of the absorbed dose. (Author)

  8. Operational nanometric gas counters for nuclear risk assessment at the bio-molecular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The practical implementation of the system for protection of persons against exposure to ionizing radiation requires that appropriate radiation detectors be designed to produce an output signal which can be related to the risk of deleterious biological effect. At present, conventional dosimeters are used to assess the risk either by measurement of macroscopic quantities such as energy imparted, modified by appropriately evaluated weighting factors, or by microdosimeters which can measure simultaneously the dose and a quality factor obtained from the stochastic distribution of dose, e.g. the lineal energy of microdosimetry. Both types of dosimeter now have recognised limitations which inhibit their accuracy for damage assessment. This is because in practice their radiation response functions could not take account of advances in our understanding of the radiobiological damage mechanisms which involve 'target' sizes of sub-micron dimensions, less than 30 nm, and probably as small as molecular dimensions of 2 nm e.g. a segment of the DNA. If radiation detectors can be designed to simulate the response of relevant biological material by allowing for the dimensions and multiplicity of the radiosensitive target sizes, then there are good prospects of achieving significant improvements in dosimetry instrumentation which, in principle, could lead to direct measurement of risk in unknown radiation fields without the need for arbitrary modifying factors or knowledge of the radiation type. In this context of the foregoing, a prototype of a nanodosimetric counter has been built and used to measure the ionization cluster size distributions for energetic α-particles in tissue equivalent gases with a spatial resolution of 1 nm. The total and double differential electron scattering cross-sections of the components of the tissue equivalent gases have been measured absolutely for electron energies up to 5 keV and for scattering angles from 30 deg to 120 deg by applying a new method

  9. Study on Technique of Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging Sensing for Biomolecular Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding Xiang; Rong Xiaofeng; Deng Yan; Yu Xinglong

    2006-01-01

    High resolution of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection is of vital importance. SPR biosensing system resolution is determined by intrinsic sensitivity of biochip and light signal acquisition system. In this article, different signal acquisition system resolutions on photodetector were analyzed based on light intensity and phase detection. Result shows that charge coupled device (CCD) with larger numbers of pixels is potential to achieve higher detection resolution. A 64 pixel line array CCD and a 12 bit ADC can achieve resolution of 10-7 refractive index unit (RIU). In array detection mode, increasing of detection throughput is at the cost of decreasing system resolution. Simulation analysis indicates that, if noise is taken into account, phase modulation methods are capable of providing better noise reduction performance than intensity methods.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of coalescence in TBP/n-dodecane and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) is regarded as the work horse of nuclear fuel cycle. The PUREX process involving the extraction of U (VI) and Pu (IV) from the dissolver solution using a solution of 1.1 M TBP in n-dodecane (n-DD). The physiochemical changes such as dispersion, coalescence and phase disengagement occurring at the interphase during the extraction of metal ion is a complex process. Understanding the phase disengagement at molecular level is essential for understanding the hydrodynamics of solvent extraction process. In this context, MD simulations of coalescence and phase disengagement of the organic phase (TBP or 1.1 M TBP/n-DD) and aqueous phase using AMBER-II (Assisted Model Building with Energy Refinement) are carried out. GAFF Amber force field was used for all energy minimization calculations. The corresponding potential energy is given by equation 1, and the significances of various terms are described elsewhere. All the simulations were carried out by applying suitable periodic boundary conditions with constant pressure coupling. The simulations were performed for 100 ns

  11. Understanding and modulating the competitive surface-adsorption of proteins through coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Vilaseca, Pol; Dawson, Kenneth A.; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2013-01-01

    It is now well accepted that cellular responses to materials in a biological medium reflect greatly the adsorbed biomolecular layer, rather than the material itself. Here, we study by molecular dynamics simulations the competitive protein adsorption on a surface (Vroman effect), i.e. the non-monotonic behavior of the amount of protein adsorbed on a surface in contact with plasma as functions of contact time and plasma concentration. We find a complex behavior, with regimes during which small ...

  12. Programmable ion-sensitive transistor interfaces. II. Biomolecular sensing and manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayant, Krishna; Auluck, Kshitij; Funke, Mary; Anwar, Sharlin; Phelps, Joshua B.; Gordon, Philip H.; Rajwade, Shantanu R.; Kan, Edwin C.

    2013-07-01

    The chemoreceptive neuron metal-oxide-semiconductor transistor described in the preceding paper is further used to monitor the adsorption and interaction of DNA molecules and subsequently manipulate the adsorbed biomolecules with injected static charge. Adsorption of DNA molecules onto poly-L-lysine-coated sensing gates (SGs) modulates the floating gate (FG) potential ψO, which is reflected as a threshold voltage shift measured from the control gate (CG) Vth_CG. The asymmetric capacitive coupling between the CG and SG to the FG results in Vth_CG amplification. The electric field in the SG oxide ESG_ox is fundamentally different when we drive the current readout with VCG and Vref (i.e., the potential applied to the CG and reference electrode, respectively). The VCG-driven readout induces a larger ESG_ox, leading to a larger Vth_CG shift when DNA is present. Simulation studies indicate that the counterion screening within the DNA membrane is responsible for this effect. The DNA manipulation mechanism is enabled by tunneling electrons (program) or holes (erase) onto FGs to produce repulsive or attractive forces. Programming leads to repulsion and eventual desorption of DNA, while erasing reestablishes adsorption. We further show that injected holes or electrons prior to DNA addition either aids or disrupts the immobilization process, which can be used for addressable sensor interfaces. To further substantiate DNA manipulation, we used impedance spectroscopy with a split ac-dc technique to reveal the net interface impedance before and after charge injection.

  13. Structural determination of biomolecular interfaces by nuclear magnetic resonance of proteins with reduced proton density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein interactions are important for understanding many molecular mechanisms underlying cellular processes. So far, interfaces between interacting proteins have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy mostly by using chemical shift perturbations and cross-saturation via intermolecular cross-relaxation. Although powerful, these techniques cannot provide unambiguous estimates of intermolecular distances between interacting proteins. Here, we present an alternative approach, called REDSPRINT (REDduced/Standard PRoton density INTerface identification), to map protein interfaces with greater accuracy by using multiple NMR probes. Our approach is based on monitoring the cross-relaxation from a source protein (or from an arbitrary ligand that need not be a protein) with high proton density to a target protein (or other biomolecule) with low proton density by using isotope-filtered nuclear Overhauser spectroscopy (NOESY). This methodology uses different isotropic labeling for the source and target proteins to identify the source-target interface and also determine the proton density of the source protein at the interface for protein-protein or protein-ligand docking. Simulation indicates significant gains in sensitivity because of the resultant relaxation properties, and the utility of this technique, including a method for direct determination of the protein interface, is demonstrated for two different protein-protein complexes.

  14. When Green and Amber Meet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francisco; Little

    2013-01-01

    Through the ages Scotch whisky has been the drink of kings, politicians, entertainers and those who aspire to the finer things in life.It’s traditionally drunk with a splash of water,straight up or with the debonair "on the rocks" by-line.

  15. Free energy profile of RNA hairpins: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Nan-Jie; Cieplak, Piotr

    2010-02-17

    RNA hairpin loops are one of the most abundant secondary structure elements and participate in RNA folding and protein-RNA recognition. To characterize the free energy surface of RNA hairpin folding at an atomic level, we calculated the potential of mean force (PMF) as a function of the end-to-end distance, by using umbrella sampling simulations in explicit solvent. Two RNA hairpins containing tetraloop cUUCGg and cUUUUg are studied with AMBER ff99 and CHARMM27 force fields. Experimentally, the UUCG hairpin is known to be significantly more stable than UUUU. In this study, the calculations using AMBER force field give a qualitatively correct description for the folding of two RNA hairpins, as the calculated PMF confirms the global stability of the folded structures and the resulting relative folding free energy is in quantitative agreement with the experimental result. The hairpin stabilities are also correctly differentiated by the more rapid molecular mechanics-Poisson Boltzmann-surface area approach, but the relative free energy estimated from this method is overestimated. The free energy profile shows that the native state basin and the unfolded state plateau are separated by a wide shoulder region, which samples a variety of native-like structures with frayed terminal basepair. The calculated PMF lacks major barriers that are expected near the transition regions, and this is attributed to the limitation of the 1-D reaction coordinate. The PMF results are compared with other studies of small RNA hairpins using kinetics method and coarse grained models. The two RNA hairpins described by CHARMM27 are significantly more deformable than those represented by AMBER. Compared with the AMBER results, the CHARMM27 calculated DeltaG(fold) for the UUUU tetraloop is in better agreement with the experimental results. However, the CHARMM27 calculation does not confirm the global stability of the experimental UUCG structure; instead, the extended conformations are predicted

  16. In pursuit of an accurate spatial and temporal model of biomolecules at the atomistic level: a perspective on computer simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Alan [The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Harlen, Oliver G. [University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Harris, Sarah A., E-mail: s.a.harris@leeds.ac.uk [University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Khalid, Syma; Leung, Yuk Ming [University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Lonsdale, Richard [Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Kaiser-Wilhelm-Platz 1, 45470 Mülheim an der Ruhr (Germany); Philipps-Universität Marburg, Hans-Meerwein Strasse, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Mulholland, Adrian J. [University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Pearson, Arwen R. [University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Read, Daniel J.; Richardson, Robin A. [University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    The current computational techniques available for biomolecular simulation are described, and the successes and limitations of each with reference to the experimental biophysical methods that they complement are presented. Despite huge advances in the computational techniques available for simulating biomolecules at the quantum-mechanical, atomistic and coarse-grained levels, there is still a widespread perception amongst the experimental community that these calculations are highly specialist and are not generally applicable by researchers outside the theoretical community. In this article, the successes and limitations of biomolecular simulation and the further developments that are likely in the near future are discussed. A brief overview is also provided of the experimental biophysical methods that are commonly used to probe biomolecular structure and dynamics, and the accuracy of the information that can be obtained from each is compared with that from modelling. It is concluded that progress towards an accurate spatial and temporal model of biomacromolecules requires a combination of all of these biophysical techniques, both experimental and computational.

  17. Applicability of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes as biosensors: Effect of biomolecular adsorption on the transport properties of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiaoliang; Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Gowtham, S.; Pandey, Ravindra; Karna, Shashi P.

    2013-04-01

    The effect of molecular adsorption on the transport properties of single walled carbon and boron nitride nanotubes (CNTs and BNNTs) is investigated using density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function methods. The calculated I-V characteristics predict noticeable changes in the conductivity of semiconducting BNNTs due to physisorption of nucleic acid base molecules. Specifically, guanine which binds to the side wall of BNNT significantly enhances its conductivity by introducing conduction channels near the Fermi energy of the bioconjugated system. For metallic CNTs, a large background current masks relatively small changes in current due to the biomolecular adsorption. The results therefore suggest the suitability of BNNTs for biosensing applications.

  18. Las dos versiones de la De Psalterii Anglicani exemplari animaduersio de Benito Arias Montano en la Biblia Políglota de Amberes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dávila Pérez, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the eighth and final volume of the Antwerp Polyglot Arias Montano published a short text titled De Psalterii Anglicani Exemplari Animaduersio. In his defense of the Hebrew original of the Old Testament, Montano set out to warn the reader that some of the more esteemed manuscripts by the so-called Hebrew-haters of his time were of little value. For this purpose, Arias Montano examined a Hebrew manuscript of the Psalter considered to be of particular antiquity and significance by the powerful bishop Wilhelm D. Lindanus, and concluded that it was in fact recent and quite worthless in many aspects, thereby fiercely attacking the latter’s scholarly reputation. This attack, based in part on a false accusation, was the beginning of a scholarly controversy lasting over fifteen years. The present essay calls attention to the fact that two versions of the Animaduersio, very different from each other, can be found in surviving copies of the Polyglot Bible. In order to illuminate the circumstances that led to these versions, the author proposes a threefold goal: (1 to gather the Latin text and the Spanish translation of the two versions of the Animaduersio; (2 to examine the reasons why Arias Montano rewrote his text in the light of the private correspondence of both scholars; (3 and to propose an approximate date for each of the versions.En el octavo y último volumen de la Biblia Regia de Amberes Benito Arias Montano publicaba un breve texto titulado De Psalterii Anglicani exemplari animaduersio. En el marco de su defensa del original hebreo del Antiguo Testamento, su autor consideraba necesario advertir al lector de que algunos de los manuscritos más apreciados por los llamados «misohebreos» de su tiempo carecían de todo valor. Para ello, Arias Montano examinó un manuscrito hebreo del salterio elogiado como muy antiguo y relevante por el poderoso obispo Guillermo D. Lindano, y concluía que el códice era reciente y de escaso valor, cargando de

  19. Deoxyhexanucleotide containing a vinyl chloride induced DNA lesion, 1,N6-ethenoadenine: synthesis, physical characterization, and incorporation into a duplex bacteriophage M13 genome as part of an amber codon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic synthesis and recombinant DNA techniques have been used to situate a single 1,N6-ethenoadenine (epsilon Ade) DNA adduct at an amber codon in the genome of an M13mp19 phage derivative. The deoxyhexanucleotide d[GCT(epsilon A)GC] was chemically synthesized by the phosphotriester method. Physical studies involving fluorescence, circular dichroism , and 1H NMR indicated epsilon Ade to be very efficiently stacked in the hexamer, especially with the 5'-thymine. Melting profile and circular dichroism studies provided evidence of the loss of base-pairing capabilities attendant with formation of the etheno ring. The modified hexanucleotide was incorporated into a six-base gap formed in the genome of an M13mp19 insertion mutant. Phage of the insertion mutant, M13mp19-NheI, produced light blue plaques on SupE strains because of the introduced amber codon. Formation of a hybrid between the single-strand DNA (plus strand) of M13mp19-NheI with SmaI-linearized M13mp19 replicative form produced a heteroduplex with a six-base gap in the minus strand. The modified hexamer [5'-32P]d-[GCT(epsilon A)GC], after 5'-phosphorylation, was ligated into this gap by using bacteriophage T4 DNA ligase to generate a singly adducted genome with epsilon Ade at minus strand position 6274. Introduction of the radiolabel provided a useful marker for characterization of the singly adducted genome, and indeed the label appeared in the anticipated fragments when digested by several restriction endonucleases. Evidence that ligation occurred on both 5' and 3' sides of the oligonucleotide also was obtained. The M13mp19-NheI genome containing epsilon Ade will be used as a probe for studying mutagenesis and repair of this DNA adduct in Escherichia coli

  20. Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Wenyu; Bryson, David I.; Crumpton, Jason B.; Wynn, Jessica; Santos, Webster L.

    2013-01-01

    On-bead high-throughput screening of a medium-sized (1000_2000 Da) branched peptideboronic acid (BPBA) library consisting of 46 656 unique sequences against HIV-1 RRE RNA generated peptides with binding affinities in the low micromolar range. In particular, BPBA1 had a Kd of 1.4 _M with RRE IIB, preference for RNA over DNA (27 fold), and selectivity of up to >75 fold against a panel of RRE IIB variants. Structure_activity studies suggest that the boronic acid moiety and ͐branching in peptide...

  1. Abstractions for biomolecular computations

    CERN Document Server

    Okunoye, Babatunde O

    2008-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid is increasingly being understood to be an informational molecule, capable of information processing.It has found application in the determination of non-deterministic algorithms and in the design of molecular computing devices. This is a theoretical analysis of the mathematical properties and relations of the molecules which constituting DNA, which explains in part why DNA is a successful computing molecule.

  2. Biomolecular computation for bionanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jian-Qin

    2006-01-01

    Computers built with moleware? The drive toward non-silicon computing is underway, and this first-of-its-kind guide to molecular computation gives researchers a firm grasp of the technologies, biochemical details, and theoretical models at the cutting edge. It explores advances in molecular biology and nanotechnology and illuminates how the convergence of various technologies is propelling computational capacity beyond the limitations of traditional hardware technology and into the realm of moleware.

  3. Reactive biomolecular divergence in genetically altered yeast cells and isolated mitochondria as measured by biocavity laser spectroscopy : a rapid diagnostic method for studying cellular responses to stress and disease.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaffe, Michael P. (University of California, San Diego, CA); Gourley, Paul Lee; Copeland, Robert Guild; McDonald, Anthony Eugene; Hendricks, Judy K.; Naviaux, Robert K. (Univesity of California, San Diego, CA)

    2006-12-01

    We report an analysis of four strains of baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) using biocavity laser spectroscopy. The four strains are grouped in two pairs (wild type and altered), in which one strain differs genetically at a single locus, affecting mitochondrial function. In one pair, the wild-type rho+ and a rho0 strain differ by complete removal of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). In the second pair, the wild-type rho+ and a rho- strain differ by knock-out of the nuclear gene encoding Cox4, an essential subunit of cytochrome c oxidase. The biocavity laser is used to measure the biophysical optic parameter Deltalambda, a laser wavelength shift relating to the optical density of cell or mitochondria that uniquely reflects its size and biomolecular composition. As such, Deltalambda is a powerful parameter that rapidly interrogates the biomolecular state of single cells and mitochondria. Wild-type cells and mitochondria produce Gaussian-like distributions with a single peak. In contrast, mutant cells and mitochondria produce leptokurtotic distributions that are asymmetric and highly skewed to the right. These distribution changes could be self-consistently modeled with a single, log-normal distribution undergoing a thousand-fold increase in variance of biomolecular composition. These features reflect a new state of stressed or diseased cells that we call a reactive biomolecular divergence (RBD) that reflects the vital interdependence of mitochondria and the nucleus.

  4. Communication: Multiple atomistic force fields in a single enhanced sampling simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang Viet, Man [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 (United States); Derreumaux, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.derreumaux@ibpc.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie Théorique, UPR 9080, CNRS, Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité IBPC, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Institut Universitaire de France, 103 Bvd Saint-Germain, 75005 Paris (France); Nguyen, Phuong H., E-mail: phuong.nguyen@ibpc.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie Théorique, UPR 9080, CNRS, Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité IBPC, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France)

    2015-07-14

    The main concerns of biomolecular dynamics simulations are the convergence of the conformational sampling and the dependence of the results on the force fields. While the first issue can be addressed by employing enhanced sampling techniques such as simulated tempering or replica exchange molecular dynamics, repeating these simulations with different force fields is very time consuming. Here, we propose an automatic method that includes different force fields into a single advanced sampling simulation. Conformational sampling using three all-atom force fields is enhanced by simulated tempering and by formulating the weight parameters of the simulated tempering method in terms of the energy fluctuations, the system is able to perform random walk in both temperature and force field spaces. The method is first demonstrated on a 1D system and then validated by the folding of the 10-residue chignolin peptide in explicit water.

  5. Communication: Multiple atomistic force fields in a single enhanced sampling simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main concerns of biomolecular dynamics simulations are the convergence of the conformational sampling and the dependence of the results on the force fields. While the first issue can be addressed by employing enhanced sampling techniques such as simulated tempering or replica exchange molecular dynamics, repeating these simulations with different force fields is very time consuming. Here, we propose an automatic method that includes different force fields into a single advanced sampling simulation. Conformational sampling using three all-atom force fields is enhanced by simulated tempering and by formulating the weight parameters of the simulated tempering method in terms of the energy fluctuations, the system is able to perform random walk in both temperature and force field spaces. The method is first demonstrated on a 1D system and then validated by the folding of the 10-residue chignolin peptide in explicit water

  6. New ways to boost molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Elmar; Vriend, Gert

    2015-05-15

    We describe a set of algorithms that allow to simulate dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR, a common benchmark) with the AMBER all-atom force field at 160 nanoseconds/day on a single Intel Core i7 5960X CPU (no graphics processing unit (GPU), 23,786 atoms, particle mesh Ewald (PME), 8.0 Å cutoff, correct atom masses, reproducible trajectory, CPU with 3.6 GHz, no turbo boost, 8 AVX registers). The new features include a mixed multiple time-step algorithm (reaching 5 fs), a tuned version of LINCS to constrain bond angles, the fusion of pair list creation and force calculation, pressure coupling with a "densostat," and exploitation of new CPU instruction sets like AVX2. The impact of Intel's new transactional memory, atomic instructions, and sloppy pair lists is also analyzed. The algorithms map well to GPUs and can automatically handle most Protein Data Bank (PDB) files including ligands. An implementation is available as part of the YASARA molecular modeling and simulation program from www.YASARA.org. PMID:25824339

  7. Evaluation of biomolecular distributions in rat brain tissues by means of ToF-SIMS using a continuous beam of Ar clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Shusuke; Yokoyama, Yuta; Aoyagi, Satoka; Himi, Naoyuki; Fletcher, John S; Lockyer, Nicholas P; Henderson, Alex; Vickerman, John C

    2016-06-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) provides detailed chemical structure information and high spatial resolution images. Therefore, ToF-SIMS is useful for studying biological phenomena such as ischemia. In this study, in order to evaluate cerebral microinfarction, the distribution of biomolecules generated by ischemia was measured with ToF-SIMS. ToF-SIMS data sets were analyzed by means of multivariate analysis for interpreting complex samples containing unknown information and to obtain biomolecular mapping indicated by fragment ions from the target biomolecules. Using conventional ToF-SIMS (primary ion source: Bi cluster ion), it is difficult to detect secondary ions beyond approximately 1000 u. Moreover, the intensity of secondary ions related to biomolecules is not always high enough for imaging because of low concentration even if the masses are lower than 1000 u. However, for the observation of biomolecular distributions in tissues, it is important to detect low amounts of biological molecules from a particular area of tissue. Rat brain tissue samples were measured with ToF-SIMS (J105, Ionoptika, Ltd., Chandlers Ford, UK), using a continuous beam of Ar clusters as a primary ion source. ToF-SIMS with Ar clusters efficiently detects secondary ions related to biomolecules and larger molecules. Molecules detected by ToF-SIMS were examined by analyzing ToF-SIMS data using multivariate analysis. Microspheres (45 μm diameter) were injected into the rat unilateral internal carotid artery (MS rat) to cause cerebral microinfarction. The rat brain was sliced and then measured with ToF-SIMS. The brain samples of a normal rat and the MS rat were examined to find specific secondary ions related to important biomolecules, and then the difference between them was investigated. Finally, specific secondary ions were found around vessels incorporating microspheres in the MS rat. The results suggest that important biomolecules related to cerebral

  8. Thermo-responsive cell culture carriers based on poly(vinyl methyl ether)—the effect of biomolecular ligands to balance cell adhesion and stimulated detachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, Juliane; Nitschke, Mirko; Pette, Dagmar; Valtink, Monika; Gramm, Stefan; Härtel, Frauke V.; Noll, Thomas; Funk, Richard H. W.; Engelmann, Katrin; Werner, Carsten

    2015-08-01

    Two established material systems for thermally stimulated detachment of adherent cells were combined in a cross-linked polymer blend to merge favorable properties. Through this approach poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNiPAAm) with its superior switching characteristic was paired with a poly(vinyl methyl ether)-based composition that allows adjusting physico-chemical and biomolecular properties in a wide range. Beyond pure PNiPAAm, the proposed thermo-responsive coating provides thickness, stiffness and swelling behavior, as well as an apposite density of reactive sites for biomolecular functionalization, as effective tuning parameters to meet specific requirements of a particular cell type regarding initial adhesion and ease of detachment. To illustrate the strength of this approach, the novel cell culture carrier was applied to generate transplantable sheets of human corneal endothelial cells (HCEC). Sheets were grown, detached, and transferred onto planar targets. Cell morphology, viability and functionality were analyzed by immunocytochemistry and determination of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) before and after sheet detachment and transfer. HCEC layers showed regular morphology with appropriate TEER. Cells were positive for function-associated marker proteins ZO-1, Na+/K+-ATPase, and paxillin, and extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin, laminin and collagen type IV before and after transfer. Sheet detachment and transfer did not impair cell viability. Subsequently, a potential application in ophthalmology was demonstrated by transplantation onto de-endothelialized porcine corneas in vitro. The novel thermo-responsive cell culture carrier facilitates the generation and transfer of functional HCEC sheets. This paves the way to generate tissue engineered human corneal endothelium as an alternative transplant source for endothelial keratoplasty.

  9. Classification of Modern and Old Río Tinto Sedimentary Deposits Through the Biomolecular Record Using a Life Marker Biochip: Implications for Detecting Life on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parro, Victor; Fernández-Remolar, David; Rodríguez-Manfredi, José A.; Cruz-Gil, Patricia; Rivas, Luis A.; Ruiz-Bermejo, Marta; Moreno-Paz, Mercedes; García-Villadangos, Miriam; Gómez-Ortiz, David; Blanco-López, Yolanda; Menor-Salván, César; Prieto-Ballesteros, Olga; Gómez-Elvira, Javier

    2011-01-01

    The particular mineralogy formed in the acidic conditions of the Río Tinto has proven to be a first-order analogue for the acid-sulfate aqueous environments of Mars. Therefore, studies about the formation and preservation of biosignatures in the Río Tinto will provide insights into equivalent processes on Mars. We characterized the biomolecular patterns recorded in samples of modern and old fluvial sediments along a segment of the river by means of an antibody microarray containing more than 200 antibodies (LDCHIP200, for Life Detector Chip) against whole microorganisms, universal biomolecules, or environmental extracts. Samples containing 0.3-0.5g of solid material were automatically analyzed in situ by the Signs Of LIfe Detector instrument (SOLID2), and the results were corroborated by extensive analysis in the laboratory. Positive antigen-antibody reactions indicated the presence of microbial strains or high-molecular-weight biopolymers that originated from them. The LDCHIP200 results were quantified and subjected to a multivariate analysis for immunoprofiling. We associated similar immunopatterns, and biomolecular markers, to samples with similar sedimentary age. Phyllosilicate-rich samples from modern fluvial sediments gave strong positive reactions with antibodies against bacteria of the genus Acidithiobacillus and against biochemical extracts from Río Tinto sediments and biofilms. These samples contained high amounts of sugars (mostly polysaccharides) with monosaccharides like glucose, rhamnose, fucose, and so on. By contrast, the older deposits, which are a mix of clastic sands and evaporites, showed only a few positives with LDCHIP200, consistent with lower protein and sugar content. We conclude that LDCHIP200 results can establish a correlation between microenvironments, diagenetic stages, and age with the biomarker profile associated with a sample. Our results would help in the search for putative martian biomarkers in acidic deposits with similar

  10. Biological Membranes in Extreme Conditions: Simulations of Anionic Archaeal Tetraether Lipid Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda De Castro, Luis Felipe; Dopson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the majority of organisms that have cells bound by di-ester phospholipids, archaeal membranes consist of di- and tetraether phospholipids. Originating from organisms that withstand harsh conditions (e.g., low pH and a wide range of temperatures) such membranes have physical properties that make them attractive materials for biological research and biotechnological applications. We developed force-field parameters based on the widely used Generalized Amber Force Field (GAFF) to enable the study of anionic tetraether membranes of the model archaean Sulfolobus acidocaldarius by computer simulations. The simulations reveal that the physical properties of these unique membranes depend on the number of cyclopentane rings included in each lipid unit, and on the size of cations that are used to ensure charge neutrality. This suggests that the biophysical properties of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius cells depend not only on the compositions of their membranes but also on the media in which they grow. PMID:27167213

  11. Biological Membranes in Extreme Conditions: Simulations of Anionic Archaeal Tetraether Lipid Membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Felipe Pineda De Castro

    Full Text Available In contrast to the majority of organisms that have cells bound by di-ester phospholipids, archaeal membranes consist of di- and tetraether phospholipids. Originating from organisms that withstand harsh conditions (e.g., low pH and a wide range of temperatures such membranes have physical properties that make them attractive materials for biological research and biotechnological applications. We developed force-field parameters based on the widely used Generalized Amber Force Field (GAFF to enable the study of anionic tetraether membranes of the model archaean Sulfolobus acidocaldarius by computer simulations. The simulations reveal that the physical properties of these unique membranes depend on the number of cyclopentane rings included in each lipid unit, and on the size of cations that are used to ensure charge neutrality. This suggests that the biophysical properties of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius cells depend not only on the compositions of their membranes but also on the media in which they grow.

  12. Development of Polarizable Models for Molecular Mechanical Calculations III: Polarizable Water Models Conforming to Thole Polarization Screening Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Cieplak, Piotr; Cai, Qin; Hsieh, Meng-Juei; Wang, Junmei; Duan, Yong

    2012-01-01

    As an integrated step towards a coherent polarizable force field for biomolecular modeling, we analyzed four polarizable water models to evaluate their consistencies with the Thole polarization screening schemes utilized in our latest Amber polarizable force field. Specifically, we studied the performance of both the Thole linear and exponential schemes in these water models to assess their abilities to reproduce experimental water properties. The analysis shows that the tested water models reproduce most of the room-temperature properties of liquid water reasonably well, but fall short of reproducing the dynamic properties and temperature-dependent properties. This study demonstrates the necessity to further fine-tune water polarizable potentials for more robust polarizable force fields for biomolecular simulations. PMID:22712654

  13. Development of polarizable models for molecular mechanical calculations. 3. Polarizable water models conforming to Thole polarization screening schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Cieplak, Piotr; Cai, Qin; Hsieh, Meng-Juei; Wang, Junmei; Duan, Yong; Luo, Ray

    2012-07-19

    As an integrated step toward a coherent polarizable force field for biomolecular modeling, we analyzed four polarizable water models to evaluate their consistencies with the Thole polarization screening schemes utilized in our latest Amber polarizable force field. Specifically, we studied the performance of both the Thole linear and exponential schemes in these water models to assess their abilities to reproduce experimental water properties. The analysis shows that the tested water models reproduce most of the room-temperature properties of liquid water reasonably well but fall short of reproducing the dynamic properties and temperature-dependent properties. This study demonstrates the necessity to further fine-tune water polarizable potentials for more robust polarizable force fields for biomolecular simulations. PMID:22712654

  14. Poisson-Nernst-Planck Equations for Simulating Biomolecular Diffusion-Reaction Processes II: Size Effects on Ionic Distributions and Diffusion-Reaction Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Benzhuo; Zhou, Y.C.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of finite particle size on electrostatics, density profiles, and diffusion have been a long existing topic in the study of ionic solution. The previous size-modified Poisson-Boltzmann and Poisson-Nernst-Planck models are revisited in this article. In contrast to many previous works that can only treat particle species with a single uniform size or two sizes, we generalize the Borukhov model to obtain a size-modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck (SMPNP) model that is able to treat nonuniform particle sizes. The numerical tractability of the model is demonstrated as well. The main contributions of this study are as follows. 1), We show that an (arbitrarily) size-modified PB model is indeed implied by the SMPNP equations under certain boundary/interface conditions, and can be reproduced through numerical solutions of the SMPNP. 2), The size effects in the SMPNP effectively reduce the densities of highly concentrated counterions around the biomolecule. 3), The SMPNP is applied to the diffusion-reaction process for the first time, to our knowledge. In the case of low substrate density near the enzyme reactive site, it is observed that the rate coefficients predicted by SMPNP model are considerably larger than those by the PNP model, suggesting both ions and substrates are subject to finite size effects. 4), An accurate finite element method and a convergent Gummel iteration are developed for the numerical solution of the completely coupled nonlinear system of SMPNP equations. PMID:21575582

  15. Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations for simulating biomolecular diffusion-reaction processes II: size effects on ionic distributions and diffusion-reaction rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Benzhuo; Zhou, Y C

    2011-05-18

    The effects of finite particle size on electrostatics, density profiles, and diffusion have been a long existing topic in the study of ionic solution. The previous size-modified Poisson-Boltzmann and Poisson-Nernst-Planck models are revisited in this article. In contrast to many previous works that can only treat particle species with a single uniform size or two sizes, we generalize the Borukhov model to obtain a size-modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck (SMPNP) model that is able to treat nonuniform particle sizes. The numerical tractability of the model is demonstrated as well. The main contributions of this study are as follows. 1), We show that an (arbitrarily) size-modified PB model is indeed implied by the SMPNP equations under certain boundary/interface conditions, and can be reproduced through numerical solutions of the SMPNP. 2), The size effects in the SMPNP effectively reduce the densities of highly concentrated counterions around the biomolecule. 3), The SMPNP is applied to the diffusion-reaction process for the first time, to our knowledge. In the case of low substrate density near the enzyme reactive site, it is observed that the rate coefficients predicted by SMPNP model are considerably larger than those by the PNP model, suggesting both ions and substrates are subject to finite size effects. 4), An accurate finite element method and a convergent Gummel iteration are developed for the numerical solution of the completely coupled nonlinear system of SMPNP equations. PMID:21575582

  16. Refinement of the Sugar-Phosphate Backbone Torsion Beta for AMBER Force Fields Improves the Description of Z- and B-DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zgarbová, M.; Šponer, Jiří; Otyepka, M.; Cheatham III, T. E.; Galindo-Murillo, R.; Jurečka, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 12 (2015), s. 5723-5736. ISSN 1549-9618 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : MOLECULAR- DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS * NUCLEIC-ACID STRUCTURES * QUANTUM -CHEMICAL COMPUTATIONS Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.498, year: 2014

  17. Stochastic simulations of the tetracycline operon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaznessis Yiannis N

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tetracycline operon is a self-regulated system. It is found naturally in bacteria where it confers resistance to antibiotic tetracycline. Because of the performance of the molecular elements of the tetracycline operon, these elements are widely used as parts of synthetic gene networks where the protein production can be efficiently turned on and off in response to the presence or the absence of tetracycline. In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of the tetracycline operon. To this end, we develop a mathematical model guided by experimental findings. Our model consists of biochemical reactions that capture the biomolecular interactions of this intriguing system. Having in mind that small biological systems are subjects to stochasticity, we use a stochastic algorithm to simulate the tetracycline operon behavior. A sensitivity analysis of two critical parameters embodied this system is also performed providing a useful understanding of the function of this system. Results Simulations generate a timeline of biomolecular events that confer resistance to bacteria against tetracycline. We monitor the amounts of intracellular TetR2 and TetA proteins, the two important regulatory and resistance molecules, as a function of intrecellular tetracycline. We find that lack of one of the promoters of the tetracycline operon has no influence on the total behavior of this system inferring that this promoter is not essential for Escherichia coli. Sensitivity analysis with respect to the binding strength of tetracycline to repressor and of repressor to operators suggests that these two parameters play a predominant role in the behavior of the system. The results of the simulations agree well with experimental observations such as tight repression, fast gene expression, induction with tetracycline, and small intracellular TetR2 amounts. Conclusions Computer simulations of the tetracycline operon afford augmented insight into the

  18. Sylvie Germaın’in gecelerin kitabı ve amber- gece adlı yapıtlarında büyülü gerçekçilik

    OpenAIRE

    YILDIRIM, Ceylan

    2011-01-01

    ÖZET Çalışmamız, Germain’in Gecelerin Kitabı ve Amber-Gece adlı yapıtlarının Büyülü Gerçekçi anlatım tarzına göre incelenmesi ve yazarın her iki yapıtında kullanılan Büyülü Gerçekçi öğelerin örneklerle açıklanmasını kapsar. Germain’in söz konusu iki yapıtında hangi Büyülü Gerçekçi anlatım tekniklerini kullandığı, bu tarzın anlatım tekniklerini kullanırken hangi unsurlardan ya da kişilerden esinlenmiş olabileceği gösterilmeye çalışılmıştır. Germain’in iki yapıtının Büyülü Gerçek...

  19. Revision of tuberculous lesions in the Bácsalmás-Oalmás series--preliminary morphological and biomolecular studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pósa, Annamária; Maixner, Frank; Lovász, Gabriella; Molnár, Erika; Bereczki, Zsolt; Perrin, Pascale; Zink, Albert; Pálfi, György

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations carried out in some parts of the 16th-17th century AD series of Bácsalmás-Oalmás (southern Hungary) have already provided interesting paleopathological cases of tuberculosis (e.g. Molnár & Pálfi 1994). These studies were essentially based on macromorphological analysis, biomolecular methods were used only in a few cases (e.g. Haas et al. 2000). From a macromorphological point of view, former investigations have only considered 'classical' tuberculosis (TB) alterations (advanced-stage lesions in common skeletal locations). However, due to the recent development of diagnostic criteria in the field of the paleopathology of infectious diseases, new approaches have been introduced in the identification of skeletal TB lesions (Pálfi et al. 1999, Maczel 2003). Molecular methods for the detection of mycobacterial aDNA have also been developed considerably in the last few years (e.g. Donoghue 2008, Donoghue 2011). The good state of preservation of the material, the important chronological period of the series and the relative high prevalence of TB reported in preliminary studies encouraged us to carry out a revision of TB-related lesions in the complete Bácsalmás-Oalmás series. A five year international research program--including both macroscopic and biomolecular studies of the series--was recently started. The present paper summarizes the results ofa pilot project conducted to optimize the further systematic paleopathological and paleomicrobial studies. Skeletal material of 205 individuals was chosen forthe macromorphological test-investigation, which was focused both on classical/advanced stage skeletal TB alterations (tuberculous spondylitis, tuberculous arthritis) and atypical/early-stage TB lesions (rib lesions, superficial vertebral changes, endocranial alterations, early-stage spondylodiscitis). In addition, the association of possible stress factors (long bone periostitis, cribra orbitalia, cribra cranii) were also considered

  20. Monte Carlo simulation for dose distribution calculations in a CT-based phantom at the Portuguese gamma irradiation facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Carlos; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Oliveira, M. Carmo; Ferreira, L. M.

    2004-01-01

    In preview works the Portuguese Gamma Irradiation Facility, UTR, has been simulated using the MCNP code and the product to be irradiated has been drawn using the boolean operators with the MCNP surfaces. However, sometimes the product to be irradiated could have an irregular shape. The paper describes an alternative way for drawing the corresponding volume based on CT image data in a format of a 3D matrix of voxels. This data are read by a specific code called SCMS which transforms it into a MCNP input file. The dimensions of each MCNP voxel depend on the number of elements in the CT-based matrix. Additionally, the new approach allows one to know dose distributions anywhere without extra definitions of surfaces or volumes. Experimental dose measurements were carried out using Amber Perspex dosimeters. This work presents the results of MCNP simulations using both modeling modes - the standard mode and the voxel mode.

  1. Coarse-grained DNA model capable of simulating ribose flexibility

    CERN Document Server

    Kovaleva, Natalya A; Mazo, Mikhail A; Zubova, Elena A

    2014-01-01

    We propose a "sugar" coarse-grained (CG) DNA model capable of simulating both biologically significant B- and A-DNA forms. The number of degrees of freedom is reduced to six grains per nucleotide. We show that this is the minimal number sufficient for this purpose. The key features of the sugar CG DNA model are: (1) simulation of sugar repuckering between C2'-endo and C3'-endo by the use of one non-harmonic potential and one three-particle potential, (2) explicit representation of sodium counterions and (3) implicit solvent approach. Effects of solvation and of partial charge screening at small distances are taken into account through the shape of potentials of interactions between charged particles. We obtain parameters of the sugar CG DNA model from the all-atom AMBER model. The suggested model allows adequate simulation of the transitions between A- and B-DNA forms, as well as of large deformations of long DNA molecules, for example, in binding with proteins. Small modifications of the model can provide th...

  2. BioMagResBank (BMRB) as a partner in the Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB): new policies affecting biomolecular NMR depositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the role of the BioMagResBank (BMRB) within the Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) and recent policies affecting the deposition of biomolecular NMR data. All PDB depositions of structures based on NMR data must now be accompanied by experimental restraints. A scheme has been devised that allows depositors to specify a representative structure and to define residues within that structure found experimentally to be largely unstructured. The BMRB now accepts coordinate sets representing three-dimensional structural models based on experimental NMR data of molecules of biological interest that fall outside the guidelines of the Protein Data Bank (i.e., the molecule is a peptide with 23 or fewer residues, a polynucleotide with 3 or fewer residues, a polysaccharide with 3 or fewer sugar residues, or a natural product), provided that the coordinates are accompanied by representation of the covalent structure of the molecule (atom connectivity), assigned NMR chemical shifts, and the structural restraints used in generating model. The BMRB now contains an archive of NMR data for metabolites and other small molecules found in biological systems

  3. Fluid dynamics modeling for synchronizing surface plasmon resonance and quartz crystal microbalance as tools for biomolecular and targeted drug delivery studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viitala, Tapani; Liang, Huamin; Gupta, Mayur; Zwinger, Thomas; Yliperttula, Marjo; Bunker, Alex

    2012-07-15

    We have used computational fluid dynamics modeling (CFD) to synchronize the flow conditions in the flow channels of two complementary surface-sensitive characterization techniques: surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Since the footprint of the flow channels of the two devices is specified by their function, the flow behavior can only be varied either by altering the height of the flow channel, or altering the volumetric rate of flow (flow rate) through the channel. The relevant quantity that must be calibrated is the shear strain on the measurement surface (center and bottom) of the flow channel. Our CFD modeling shows that the flow behavior is in the Stokes flow regime. We were thus able to generate a scaling expression with parameters for flow rate and flow channel height for each of the two devices: f(QCM)=2.64f(SPR)(h(QCM)/h(SPR)(2), where f(QCM) and f(SPR) are the flow rates in the SPR and QCM flow channels, respectively, and h(QCM)/h(SPR) is the ratio of the heights of the two channels. We demonstrate the success of our calibration procedure through the combined use of commercially available SPR and QCM flow channel devices on both a biomolecular interaction system of surface immobilized biotin and streptavidin and a targeted drug delivery model system of biotinylated liposomes interacting with a streptavidin functionalized surface. PMID:22579516

  4. Real-Time, Label-Free Detection of Biomolecular Interactions in Sandwich Assays by the Oblique-Incidence Reflectivity Difference Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Shin Sun

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important goals in proteomics is to detect the real-time kinetics of diverse biomolecular interactions. Fluorescence, which requires extrinsic tags, is a commonly and widely used method because of its high convenience and sensitivity. However, in order to maintain the conformational and functional integrality of biomolecules, label-free detection methods are highly under demand. We have developed the oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OI-RD technique for label-free, kinetic measurements of protein-biomolecule interactions. Incorporating the total internal refection geometry into the OI-RD technique, we are able to detect as low as 0.1% of a protein monolayer, and this sensitivity is comparable with other label-free techniques such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR. The unique advantage of OI-RD over SPR is no need for dielectric layers. Moreover, using a photodiode array as the detector enables multi-channel detection and also eliminates the over-time signal drift. In this paper, we demonstrate the applicability and feasibility of the OI-RD technique by measuring the kinetics of protein-protein and protein-small molecule interactions in sandwich assays.

  5. The functional interactome of GSTP: A regulatory biomolecular network at the interface with the Nrf2 adaption response to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolini, Desirée; Galli, Francesco

    2016-04-15

    Glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP), and possibly other members of the subfamily of cytosolic GSTs, are increasingly proposed to have roles far beyond the classical GSH-dependent enzymatic detoxification of electrophilic metabolites and xenobiotics. Emerging evidence suggests that these are essential components of the redox sensing and signaling platform of cells. GSTP monomers physically interact with cellular proteins, such as other cytosolic GSTs, signaling kinases and the membrane peroxidase peroxiredoxin 6. Other interactions reported in literature include that with regulatory proteins such as Fanconi anemia complementation group C protein, transglutaminase 2 and several members of the keratin family of genes. Transcription factors downstream of inflammatory and oxidative stress pathways, namely STAT3 and Nrf2, were recently identified to be further components of this interactome. Together these pieces of evidence suggest the existence of a regulatory biomolecular network in which GSTP represents a node of functional convergence and coordination of signaling and transcription proteins, namely the "GSTP interactome", associated with key cellular processes such as cell cycle regulation and the stress response. These aspects and the methodological approach to explore the cellular interactome(s) are discussed in this review paper. PMID:26922696

  6. A real-time de-noising method applied for transient and weak biomolecular interaction analysis in surface plasmon resonance biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Shuyue; Shi, Chunfei; Ou, Huichao; Song, Hong; Wang, Xiaoping

    2016-03-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensing technology will likely become a type of label-free technology for transient and weak biomolecular interaction analysis (BIA); however, it needs some improvement with regard to high-speed and high-resolution measurement. We studied a type of real-time de-noising (RD) data processing method for SPR sensorgrams based on moving average; it can immediately distinguish ultra-weak signals during the process of experiment, and can display a low-noise sensorgram in real time. A flow injection analysis experiment and a CM5 sensorchip affinity experiment are designed to evaluate the characteristics of the RD method. High noise suppression ability and low signal distortion risks of the RD method have been proved. The RD method does not significantly distort signals of the sensorgram in the molecular affinity experiment, and K D values of the RD method essentially coincide with those of the raw sensorgram with a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Meanwhile, by the RD method denoising the sensorgram with an ultralow SNR that is closer to the condition of the transient and weak molecular interactions, the kinetic constant can be more accurately analyzed, whereas it cannot be realized for the raw sensorgram. The crucial function and significance of the RD method are primarily embodied in the measurement limit of SPR sensing.

  7. Hybrid microarray based on double biomolecular markers of DNA and carbohydrate for simultaneous genotypic and phenotypic detection of cholera toxin-producing Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hwa Hui; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Chang Sup; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2016-05-15

    Life-threatening diarrheal cholera is usually caused by water or food contaminated with cholera toxin-producing Vibrio cholerae. For the prevention and surveillance of cholera, it is crucial to rapidly and precisely detect and identify the etiological causes, such as V. cholerae and/or its toxin. In the present work, we propose the use of a hybrid double biomolecular marker (DBM) microarray containing 16S rRNA-based DNA capture probe to genotypically identify V. cholerae and GM1 pentasaccharide capture probe to phenotypically detect cholera toxin. We employed a simple sample preparation method to directly obtain genomic DNA and secreted cholera toxin as target materials from bacterial cells. By utilizing the constructed DBM microarray and prepared samples, V. cholerae and cholera toxin were detected successfully, selectively, and simultaneously; the DBM microarray was able to analyze the pathogenicity of the identified V. cholerae regardless of whether the bacteria produces toxin. Therefore, our proposed DBM microarray is a new effective platform for identifying bacteria and analyzing bacterial pathogenicity simultaneously. PMID:26735874

  8. A real-time de-noising method applied for transient and weak biomolecular interaction analysis in surface plasmon resonance biosensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensing technology will likely become a type of label-free technology for transient and weak biomolecular interaction analysis (BIA); however, it needs some improvement with regard to high-speed and high-resolution measurement. We studied a type of real-time de-noising (RD) data processing method for SPR sensorgrams based on moving average; it can immediately distinguish ultra-weak signals during the process of experiment, and can display a low-noise sensorgram in real time. A flow injection analysis experiment and a CM5 sensorchip affinity experiment are designed to evaluate the characteristics of the RD method. High noise suppression ability and low signal distortion risks of the RD method have been proved. The RD method does not significantly distort signals of the sensorgram in the molecular affinity experiment, and K D values of the RD method essentially coincide with those of the raw sensorgram with a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Meanwhile, by the RD method denoising the sensorgram with an ultralow SNR that is closer to the condition of the transient and weak molecular interactions, the kinetic constant can be more accurately analyzed, whereas it cannot be realized for the raw sensorgram. The crucial function and significance of the RD method are primarily embodied in the measurement limit of SPR sensing. (paper)

  9. Science Letters: Demonstration of a new biosensing concept for immunodiagnostic applications based on change in surface conductance of antibodies after biomolecular interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VASHIST Sandeep Kumar; KAUR Inderpreet; BAJPAI Ram Prakash; BHARADWAJ Lalit Mohan; TEWARI Rupinder; RAITERI Roberto

    2006-01-01

    We report an important observation that the surface conductivity of antibody layer immobilized on polylysine-coated glass substrate decreases upon the formation of complex with their specific antigens. This change in conductivity has been observed for both monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. The conductance of monoclonal mouse IgG immobilized on polylysine-coated glass substrate changed from 1.02×l0-8 Ω-1 to 1.41×l0-11 Ω-1 at 10 V when complex is formed due to the specific biomolecular interactions with rabbit anti-mouse IgG F(ab')2. Similar behavior was observed when the same set up was tested in two clinical assays: (1) anti-Leishmania antigen polyclonal antibodies taken from Kala Azar positive patient serum interacting with Leishmania promastigote antigen, and (2) anti-p21 polyclonal antibodies interacting with p21 antigen. The proposed concept can represent a new immunodiagnostic technique and may have wide ranging applications in biosensors and nanobiotechnology too.

  10. In-frame amber stop codon replacement mutagenesis for the directed evolution of proteins containing non-canonical amino acids: identification of residues open to bio-orthogonal modification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A J Arpino

    Full Text Available Expanded genetic code approaches are a powerful means to add new and useful chemistry to proteins at defined residues positions. One such use is the introduction of non-biological reactive chemical handles for site-specific biocompatible orthogonal conjugation of proteins. Due to our currently limited information on the impact of non-canonical amino acids (nAAs on the protein structure-function relationship, rational protein engineering is a "hit and miss" approach to selecting suitable sites. Furthermore, dogma suggests surface exposed native residues should be the primary focus for introducing new conjugation chemistry. Here we describe a directed evolution approach to introduce and select for in-frame codon replacement to facilitate engineering proteins with nAAs. To demonstrate the approach, the commonly reprogrammed amber stop codon (TAG was randomly introduced in-frame in two different proteins: the bionanotechnologically important cyt b(562 and therapeutic protein KGF. The target protein is linked at the gene level to sfGFP via a TEV protease site. In absence of a nAA, an in-frame TAG will terminate translation resulting in a non-fluorescent cell phenotype. In the presence of a nAA, TAG will encode for nAA incorporation so instilling a green fluorescence phenotype on E. coli. The presence of endogenously expressed TEV proteases separates in vivo target protein from its fusion to sfGFP if expressed as a soluble fusion product. Using this approach, we incorporated an azide reactive handle and identified residue positions amenable to conjugation with a fluorescence dye via strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC. Interestingly, best positions for efficient conjugation via SPAAC were residues whose native side chain were buried through analysis of their determined 3D structures and thus may not have been chosen through rational protein engineering. Molecular modeling suggests these buried native residues could become partially

  11. Retractación o pertinacia. Vicisitudes de un tratado parcialmente perdido de Arias Montano al hilo de la polémica en torno a la Biblia Políglota de Amberes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dávila Pérez, Antonio

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to bring to light the origin, chronology and possible contents of a treatise by Arias Montano, partially lost until today. That treatise was the culmination of the long and fierce controversy that Arias Montano and Wilhem van der Lindt were involved in the last quarter of the 16th Century in the context of the polemics between supporters and detractors of the Hebrew original text of the Bible. Yet the main cause of this scientific enmity was a defamatory writing against Lindano published by Arias Montano in the Polyglot Bible of Antwerp. Taking as a starting point Arias Montano’s and Lindano’s Latin correspondence we will try to reconstruct a non-well-known story of complaints and retractions between two theologians whose ultimate goal is to preserve their own fame.

    El objetivo de este artículo es dar a conocer el origen, cronología y posibles contenidos de un tratado de Arias Montano parcialmente perdido hasta el día de hoy. Dicho tratado fue el colofón de la larga controversia que Arias Montano y Guillermo Lindano mantuvieron en el último cuarto del siglo XVI en el marco de la polémica entre defensores y detractores del original hebreo de la Biblia. Pero la causa principal de esta enemistad científica es un escrito difamatorio contra Lindano publicado por Arias Montano en la Biblia Políglota de Amberes. Tomando como punto de partida el epistolario latino de Arias Montano y Lindano se reconstruye aquí una historia no bien conocida de denuncias y retractaciones entre dos teólogos cuyo fin último es velar por su propia fama.

  12. Bayesian ensemble refinement by replica simulations and reweighting

    CERN Document Server

    Hummer, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    We describe different Bayesian ensemble refinement methods, examine their interrelation, and discuss their practical application. With ensemble refinement, the properties of dynamic and partially disordered (bio)molecular structures can be characterized by integrating a wide range of experimental data, including measurements of ensemble-averaged observables. We start from a Bayesian formulation in which the posterior is a functional that ranks different configuration space distributions. By maximizing this posterior, we derive an optimal Bayesian ensemble distribution. For discrete configurations, this optimal distribution is identical to that obtained by the maximum entropy "ensemble refinement of SAXS" (EROS) formulation. Bayesian replica ensemble refinement enhances the sampling of relevant configurations by imposing restraints on averages of observables in coupled replica molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the strength of the restraint scales with the number of replicas and we show that this sca...

  13. A Coarse-Grained DNA Model Parameterized from Atomistic Simulations by Inverse Monte Carlo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Korolev

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Computer modeling of very large biomolecular systems, such as long DNA polyelectrolytes or protein-DNA complex-like chromatin cannot reach all-atom resolution in a foreseeable future and this necessitates the development of coarse-grained (CG approximations. DNA is both highly charged and mechanically rigid semi-flexible polymer and adequate DNA modeling requires a correct description of both its structural stiffness and salt-dependent electrostatic forces. Here, we present a novel CG model of DNA that approximates the DNA polymer as a chain of 5-bead units. Each unit represents two DNA base pairs with one central bead for bases and pentose moieties and four others for phosphate groups. Charges, intra- and inter-molecular force field potentials for the CG DNA model were calculated using the inverse Monte Carlo method from all atom molecular dynamic (MD simulations of 22 bp DNA oligonucleotides. The CG model was tested by performing dielectric continuum Langevin MD simulations of a 200 bp double helix DNA in solutions of monovalent salt with explicit ions. Excellent agreement with experimental data was obtained for the dependence of the DNA persistent length on salt concentration in the range 0.1–100 mM. The new CG DNA model is suitable for modeling various biomolecular systems with adequate description of electrostatic and mechanical properties.

  14. Lipid interaction sites on channels, transporters and receptors: Recent insights from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedger, George; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-10-01

    Lipid molecules are able to selectively interact with specific sites on integral membrane proteins, and modulate their structure and function. Identification and characterization of these sites are of importance for our understanding of the molecular basis of membrane protein function and stability, and may facilitate the design of lipid-like drug molecules. Molecular dynamics simulations provide a powerful tool for the identification of these sites, complementing advances in membrane protein structural biology and biophysics. We describe recent notable biomolecular simulation studies which have identified lipid interaction sites on a range of different membrane proteins. The sites identified in these simulation studies agree well with those identified by complementary experimental techniques. This demonstrates the power of the molecular dynamics approach in the prediction and characterization of lipid interaction sites on integral membrane proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:26946244

  15. GPU-enabled molecular dynamics simulations of ankyrin kinase complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Vertika; Chong, Wei Lim; Wisitponchai, Tanchanok; Nimmanpipug, Piyarat; Zain, Sharifuddin M.; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abd.; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran

    2014-10-01

    The ankyrin repeat (AR) protein can be used as a versatile scaffold for protein-protein interactions. It has been found that the heterotrimeric complex between integrin-linked kinase (ILK), PINCH, and parvin is an essential signaling platform, serving as a convergence point for integrin and growth-factor signaling and regulating cell adhesion, spreading, and migration. Using ILK-AR with high affinity for the PINCH1 as our model system, we explored a structure-based computational protocol to probe and characterize binding affinity hot spots at protein-protein interfaces. In this study, the long time scale dynamics simulations with GPU accelerated molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in AMBER12 have been performed to locate the hot spots of protein-protein interaction by the analysis of the Molecular Mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area/Generalized Born Solvent Area (MM-PBSA/GBSA) of the MD trajectories. Our calculations suggest good binding affinity of the complex and also the residues critical in the binding.

  16. Fluidic switching in nanochannels for the control of Inchworm: a synthetic biomolecular motor with a power stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niman, Cassandra S.; Zuckermann, Martin J.; Balaz, Martina; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O.; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Forde, Nancy R.; Linke, Heiner

    2014-11-01

    Synthetic molecular motors typically take nanometer-scale steps through rectification of thermal motion. Here we propose Inchworm, a DNA-based motor that employs a pronounced power stroke to take micrometer-scale steps on a time scale of seconds, and we design, fabricate, and analyze the nanofluidic device needed to operate the motor. Inchworm is a kbp-long, double-stranded DNA confined inside a nanochannel in a stretched configuration. Motor stepping is achieved through externally controlled changes in salt concentration (changing the DNA's extension), coordinated with ligand-gated binding of the DNA's ends to the functionalized nanochannel surface. Brownian dynamics simulations predict that Inchworm's stall force is determined by its entropic spring constant and is ~0.1 pN. Operation of the motor requires periodic cycling of four different buffers surrounding the DNA inside a nanochannel, while keeping constant the hydrodynamic load force on the DNA. We present a two-layer fluidic device incorporating 100 nm-radius nanochannels that are connected through a few-nm-wide slit to a microfluidic system used for in situ buffer exchanges, either diffusionally (zero flow) or with controlled hydrodynamic flow. Combining experiment with finite-element modeling, we demonstrate the device's key performance features and experimentally establish achievable Inchworm stepping times of the order of seconds or faster.Synthetic molecular motors typically take nanometer-scale steps through rectification of thermal motion. Here we propose Inchworm, a DNA-based motor that employs a pronounced power stroke to take micrometer-scale steps on a time scale of seconds, and we design, fabricate, and analyze the nanofluidic device needed to operate the motor. Inchworm is a kbp-long, double-stranded DNA confined inside a nanochannel in a stretched configuration. Motor stepping is achieved through externally controlled changes in salt concentration (changing the DNA's extension), coordinated

  17. Efficient and Unbiased Sampling of Biomolecular Systems in the Canonical Ensemble: A Review of Self-Guided Langevin Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiongwu; Damjanovic, Ana; Brooks, Bernard R

    2012-01-31

    This review provides a comprehensive description of the self-guided Langevin dynamics (SGLD) and the self-guided molecular dynamics (SGMD) methods and their applications. Example systems are included to provide guidance on optimal application of these methods in simulation studies. SGMD/SGLD has enhanced ability to overcome energy barriers and accelerate rare events to affordable time scales. It has been demonstrated that with moderate parameters, SGLD can routinely cross energy barriers of 20 kT at a rate that molecular dynamics (MD) or Langevin dynamics (LD) crosses 10 kT barriers. The core of these methods is the use of local averages of forces and momenta in a direct manner that can preserve the canonical ensemble. The use of such local averages results in methods where low frequency motion "borrows" energy from high frequency degrees of freedom when a barrier is approached and then returns that excess energy after a barrier is crossed. This self-guiding effect also results in an accelerated diffusion to enhance conformational sampling efficiency. The resulting ensemble with SGLD deviates in a small way from the canonical ensemble, and that deviation can be corrected with either an on-the-fly or a post processing reweighting procedure that provides an excellent canonical ensemble for systems with a limited number of accelerated degrees of freedom. Since reweighting procedures are generally not size extensive, a newer method, SGLDfp, uses local averages of both momenta and forces to preserve the ensemble without reweighting. The SGLDfp approach is size extensive and can be used to accelerate low frequency motion in large systems, or in systems with explicit solvent where solvent diffusion is also to be enhanced. Since these methods are direct and straightforward, they can be used in conjunction with many other sampling methods or free energy methods by simply replacing the integration of degrees of freedom that are normally sampled by MD or LD. PMID:23913991

  18. Effects of Clear Kefir on Biomolecular Aspects of Glycemic Status of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM Patients in Bandung, West Java [Study on Human Blood Glucose, c Peptide and Insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judiono J

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes Mellitus (DM triggers an excessive reaction of free-radicals. It increases reactive oxygen species and reduces antioxidants status as well as the β cell damage. Clear kefir was used for DM therapies, however it limited biomolecular exploration of its bioactive roles. Research aimed to investigate the effects of clear kefir on the biomolecular nature of the glycemic status of T2DM in Bandung. Methods: The randomized pretest-posttest control group was conducted by 106 T2DM patients. Research was done in several hospitals in Bandung and Cimahi, West Java from 2012–2013. Samples were divided randomly into three groups: (1 T2DM with HbA1c 7 fed standard diet and supplemented 200 ml/day by clear kefir, (3 T2DM with HbA1c was fed a standard diet as a control group. Dose response was obtained from a preeliminary vivo study, and then converted to human dosage by year 2011. Intervention was effectively done for 30 days. HbA1c was measured by HPLC. Fasting blood glucose (FBG and Postprandial blood glucose levels (PBG were measured by enzymes levels. C Peptide and insulin were measured by Elisa. Data was analyzed by a statictics programme by significance p<0,05. Study was approved by ethic committee. Results : HbA1c was significantly reduced in delta level (p<0.01 and FBG (p<0.015 among kefir groups. PBG was not significantly reduced among groups. C-Peptide was significantly increased in delta level, except in control group (p<0.014. Insulin was reduced significantly, except in control group (p<0.003. Conclusions : Supplementation of clear kefir reduced blood glucose levels (HbA1c, FBG, PBG and increased c-peptide. Clear kefir’s biomolecular mechanisms and chemistry characterization is a challenge for future studies.

  19. Atomic Spectral Methods for Ab Initio Molecular Electronic Energy Surfaces: Transitioning From Small-Molecule to Biomolecular-Suitable Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jeffrey D; Ben-Nun, Michal; Rollin, Kyle; Bromley, Michael W J; Li, Jiabo; Hinde, Robert J; Winstead, Carl L; Sheehy, Jeffrey A; Boatz, Jerry A; Langhoff, Peter W

    2016-08-25

    Continuing attention has addressed incorportation of the electronically dynamical attributes of biomolecules in the largely static first-generation molecular-mechanical force fields commonly employed in molecular-dynamics simulations. We describe here a universal quantum-mechanical approach to calculations of the electronic energy surfaces of both small molecules and large aggregates on a common basis which can include such electronic attributes, and which also seems well-suited to adaptation in ab initio molecular-dynamics applications. In contrast to the more familiar orbital-product-based methodologies employed in traditional small-molecule computational quantum chemistry, the present approach is based on an "ex-post-facto" method in which Hamiltonian matrices are evaluated prior to wave function antisymmetrization, implemented here in the support of a Hilbert space of orthonormal products of many-electron atomic spectral eigenstates familiar from the van der Waals theory of long-range interactions. The general theory in its various forms incorporates the early semiempirical atoms- and diatomics-in-molecules approaches of Moffitt, Ellison, Tully, Kuntz, and others in a comprehensive mathematical setting, and generalizes the developments of Eisenschitz, London, Claverie, and others addressing electron permutation symmetry adaptation issues, completing these early attempts to treat van der Waals and chemical forces on a common basis. Exact expressions are obtained for molecular Hamiltonian matrices and for associated energy eigenvalues as sums of separate atomic and interaction-energy terms, similar in this respect to the forms of classical force fields. The latter representation is seen to also provide a long-missing general definition of the energies of individual atoms and of their interactions within molecules and matter free from subjective additional constraints. A computer code suite is described for calculations of the many-electron atomic eigenspectra and

  20. Theory, modeling and simulation: Annual report 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, T.H. Jr.; Garrett, B.C.

    1994-07-01

    Developing the knowledge base needed to address the environmental restoration issues of the US Department of Energy requires a fundamental understanding of molecules and their interactions in insolation and in liquids, on surfaces, and at interfaces. To meet these needs, the PNL has established the Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) and will soon begin construction of a new, collaborative research facility devoted to advancing the understanding of environmental molecular science. Research in the Theory, Modeling, and Simulation program (TMS), which is one of seven research directorates in the EMSL, will play a critical role in understanding molecular processes important in restoring DOE`s research, development and production sites, including understanding the migration and reactions of contaminants in soils and groundwater, the development of separation process for isolation of pollutants, the development of improved materials for waste storage, understanding the enzymatic reactions involved in the biodegradation of contaminants, and understanding the interaction of hazardous chemicals with living organisms. The research objectives of the TMS program are to apply available techniques to study fundamental molecular processes involved in natural and contaminated systems; to extend current techniques to treat molecular systems of future importance and to develop techniques for addressing problems that are computationally intractable at present; to apply molecular modeling techniques to simulate molecular processes occurring in the multispecies, multiphase systems characteristic of natural and polluted environments; and to extend current molecular modeling techniques to treat complex molecular systems and to improve the reliability and accuracy of such simulations. The program contains three research activities: Molecular Theory/Modeling, Solid State Theory, and Biomolecular Modeling/Simulation. Extended abstracts are presented for 89 studies.

  1. Theory, modeling and simulation: Annual report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developing the knowledge base needed to address the environmental restoration issues of the US Department of Energy requires a fundamental understanding of molecules and their interactions in insolation and in liquids, on surfaces, and at interfaces. To meet these needs, the PNL has established the Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) and will soon begin construction of a new, collaborative research facility devoted to advancing the understanding of environmental molecular science. Research in the Theory, Modeling, and Simulation program (TMS), which is one of seven research directorates in the EMSL, will play a critical role in understanding molecular processes important in restoring DOE's research, development and production sites, including understanding the migration and reactions of contaminants in soils and groundwater, the development of separation process for isolation of pollutants, the development of improved materials for waste storage, understanding the enzymatic reactions involved in the biodegradation of contaminants, and understanding the interaction of hazardous chemicals with living organisms. The research objectives of the TMS program are to apply available techniques to study fundamental molecular processes involved in natural and contaminated systems; to extend current techniques to treat molecular systems of future importance and to develop techniques for addressing problems that are computationally intractable at present; to apply molecular modeling techniques to simulate molecular processes occurring in the multispecies, multiphase systems characteristic of natural and polluted environments; and to extend current molecular modeling techniques to treat complex molecular systems and to improve the reliability and accuracy of such simulations. The program contains three research activities: Molecular Theory/Modeling, Solid State Theory, and Biomolecular Modeling/Simulation. Extended abstracts are presented for 89 studies

  2. Lockout/Tagout (LOTO) Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The Lockout/Tagout (LOTO) Simulator is a portable training aid, or demonstration tool, designed to physically illustrate real-time critical-safety concepts of electrical lockout/tagout. The objective is to prevent misinterpretations of what is off and what is on during maintenance and repair of complex electrical systems. The simulator is designed in the form of a hinged box that opens up and stands on its own as an easel for demonstrations. On the outer face of the unit is a simulated circuit breaker box housing the switches. The breakers control the main power to the unit, a light bulb, and an electrical control cabinet. The light bulb is wired so that either of two breakers can provide power to it. When power is sent to the electrical control cabinet, a red indicator light illuminates. Inside the cabinet is the power supply from a personal computer. The power supply produces a 12-V dc output that is sent over to a small fan next to it, also from a computer, and an amber light on the front of the cabinet illuminates. A separate switch powers the fan on and off. The power supply is behind a plastic shield to protect against exposure to live conductors. Electrical banana jacks are mounted in the plastic shield to allow a voltmeter to be connected safely when opening the cabinet and taking a meter reading to verify de-energization as part of a simulation exercise. This LOTO simulator prototype is designed and fabricated as an all-in-one unit. All accessories can be stored inside the hinged case, and there is a handle on top for ease of transport. The circuit breaker labels attach with hook and loop fasteners so that they may be moved and changed to fit the training or demonstration scenario. The warning signs and labels on the electrical control box are magnetic, allowing for easy reconfiguration to emulate different equipment setups. A specially designed magnetic cover was made to disguise the indicator lights for demonstrations when these indicators are not used

  3. Simulators IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings contain papers on simulators with artificial intelligence, and the human decision making process; visuals for simulators: human factors, training, and psycho-physical impacts; the role of institutional structure on simulation projects; maintenance trainers for economic value and safety; biomedical simulators for understanding nature, for medical benefits, and the physiological effects of simulators; the mathematical models and numerical techniques that drive today's simulators; and the demography of simulators, with census papers identifying the population of real-time simulator training devices; nuclear reactors

  4. Self-learning Multiscale Simulation for Achieving High Accuracy and High Efficiency Simultaneously

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Wenfei

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new multi-scale molecular dynamics simulation method which can achieve high accuracy and high sampling efficiency simultaneously without aforehand knowledge of the coarse grained (CG) potential and test it for a biomolecular system. Based on the resolution exchange simulations between atomistic and CG replicas, a self-learning strategy is introduced to progressively improve the CG potential by an iterative way. Two tests show that, the new method can rapidly improve the CG potential and achieve efficient sampling even starting from an unrealistic CG potential. The resulting free energy agreed well with exact result and the convergence by the method was much faster than that by the replica exchange method. The method is generic and can be applied to many biological as well as non-biological problems.

  5. Insights into prion protein function from atomistic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Bernholc, Jerzy

    2010-01-01

    Computer simulations are a powerful tool for studies of biological systems. They have often been used to study prion protein (PrP), a protein responsible for neurodegenerative diseases, which include "mad cow disease" in cattle and Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease in humans. An important aspect of the prion protein is its interaction with copper ion, which is thought to be relevant for PrP's yet undetermined function and also potentially play a role in prion diseases. for studies of copper attachment to the prion protein, computer simulations have often been used to complement experimental data and to obtain binding structures of Cu-PrP complexes. This paper summarizes the results of recent ab initio calculations of copper-prion protein interactions focusing on the recently discovered concentration-dependent binding modes in the octarepeat region of this protein. In addition to determining the binding structures, computer simulations were also used to make predictions about PrP's function and the role of copper in prion diseases. The results demonstrate the predictive power and applicability of ab initio simulations for studies of metal-biomolecular complexes. PMID:20118658

  6. Encapsulated membrane proteins: A simplified system for molecular simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sarah C; Khalid, Syma; Pollock, Naomi L; Knowles, Tim J; Edler, Karen; Rothnie, Alice J; R T Thomas, Owen; Dafforn, Timothy R

    2016-10-01

    Over the past 50years there has been considerable progress in our understanding of biomolecular interactions at an atomic level. This in turn has allowed molecular simulation methods employing full atomistic modelling at ever larger scales to develop. However, some challenging areas still remain where there is either a lack of atomic resolution structures or where the simulation system is inherently complex. An area where both challenges are present is that of membranes containing membrane proteins. In this review we analyse a new practical approach to membrane protein study that offers a potential new route to high resolution structures and the possibility to simplify simulations. These new approaches collectively recognise that preservation of the interaction between the membrane protein and the lipid bilayer is often essential to maintain structure and function. The new methods preserve these interactions by producing nano-scale disc shaped particles that include bilayer and the chosen protein. Currently two approaches lead in this area: the MSP system that relies on peptides to stabilise the discs, and SMALPs where an amphipathic styrene maleic acid copolymer is used. Both methods greatly enable protein production and hence have the potential to accelerate atomic resolution structure determination as well as providing a simplified format for simulations of membrane protein dynamics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:26946242

  7. Magnetic levitation-based Martian and Lunar gravity simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valles, J. M. Jr; Maris, H. J.; Seidel, G. M.; Tang, J.; Yao, W.

    2005-01-01

    Missions to Mars will subject living specimens to a range of low gravity environments. Deleterious biological effects of prolonged exposure to Martian gravity (0.38 g), Lunar gravity (0.17 g), and microgravity are expected, but the mechanisms involved and potential for remedies are unknown. We are proposing the development of a facility that provides a simulated Martian and Lunar gravity environment for experiments on biological systems in a well controlled laboratory setting. The magnetic adjustable gravity simulator will employ intense, inhomogeneous magnetic fields to exert magnetic body forces on a specimen that oppose the body force of gravity. By adjusting the magnetic field, it is possible to continuously adjust the total body force acting on a specimen. The simulator system considered consists of a superconducting solenoid with a room temperature bore sufficiently large to accommodate small whole organisms, cell cultures, and gravity sensitive bio-molecular solutions. It will have good optical access so that the organisms can be viewed in situ. This facility will be valuable for experimental observations and public demonstrations of systems in simulated reduced gravity. c2005 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  8. Report on result 1998. Research and development on fusion area. Part 3 (biomolecular mechanism and design); 1998 nendo seika hokokusho. Yugo ryoiki kenkyu kaihatsu daisan bunsatsu (bimolecular mechanism and design)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    An organism is a molecular mechanical system consisting of nucleic acid, peptide and protein having a self-forming and a self-repairing function. For the purpose of creating cells, tissues and molecular mechanism alternating these biological functions, their basic technology was developed. Concretely, studies were made on three-dimensional cellular structural module engineering and biomolecular mechanism and design. Studies on biological soft tissue resulted in success by giving atmospheric glow discharge treatment to the inner surface of a tubular PVC. An artificial vitreous body was created using PVA hydrogels. In addition, liver cells were successfully cultured for the first time in the world. Studies on biological hard tissue revealed that osteopontin plays a role of a trigger for the initial differentiation of the osteoblast cell. Further, a basic experiment was carried out on the initial response of the cartilage cell. In the research on the molecular mechanism, examination was made on the mechanism of a double-head molecular motor. Examination was also made on the adjustment of the hydrogenase LB film as an electricity/hydrogen energy conversion element and on the biomolecular mechanism and design. (NEDO)

  9. Multichannel imaging with the AMBER FMCW SAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, M.P.G.; Rossum, W.L. van; Graaf, M.W. van der; Vlothuizen, W.J.; Tan, R.G.

    2014-01-01

    An X-band Digital Array Synthetic Aperture Radar for a Short Range Tactical UAV is presented. The Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave radar principle in combination with digital beam forming over 24 receive channels is used to achieve low power and advanced imaging SAR capabilities on small platform

  10. Radiation damage in biomolecular systems

    CERN Document Server

    Fuss, Martina Christina

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of X-rays and radioactivity, ionizing radiations have been widely applied in medicine both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The risks associated with radiation exposure and handling led to the parallel development of the field of radiation protection. Pioneering experiments done by Sanche and co-workers in 2000 showed that low-energy secondary electrons, which are abundantly generated along radiation tracks, are primarily responsible for radiation damage through successive interactions with the molecular constituents of the medium. Apart from ionizing processes, which are usually related to radiation damage, below the ionization level low-energy electrons can induce molecular fragmentation via dissociative processes such as internal excitation and electron attachment. This prompted collaborative projects between different research groups from European countries together with other specialists from Canada,  the USA and Australia. This book summarizes the advances achieved by these...

  11. Biomolecular Assembly of Gold Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micheel, Christine Marya

    2005-05-20

    Over the past ten years, methods have been developed to construct discrete nanostructures using nanocrystals and biomolecules. While these frequently consist of gold nanocrystals and DNA, semiconductor nanocrystals as well as antibodies and enzymes have also been used. One example of discrete nanostructures is dimers of gold nanocrystals linked together with complementary DNA. This type of nanostructure is also known as a nanocrystal molecule. Discrete nanostructures of this kind have a number of potential applications, from highly parallel self-assembly of electronics components and rapid read-out of DNA computations to biological imaging and a variety of bioassays. My research focused in three main areas. The first area, the refinement of electrophoresis as a purification and characterization method, included application of agarose gel electrophoresis to the purification of discrete gold nanocrystal/DNA conjugates and nanocrystal molecules, as well as development of a more detailed understanding of the hydrodynamic behavior of these materials in gels. The second area, the development of methods for quantitative analysis of transmission electron microscope data, used computer programs written to find pair correlations as well as higher order correlations. With these programs, it is possible to reliably locate and measure nanocrystal molecules in TEM images. The final area of research explored the use of DNA ligase in the formation of nanocrystal molecules. Synthesis of dimers of gold particles linked with a single strand of DNA possible through the use of DNA ligase opens the possibility for amplification of nanostructures in a manner similar to polymerase chain reaction. These three areas are discussed in the context of the work in the Alivisatos group, as well as the field as a whole.

  12. RECENT PROGRESS IN BIOMOLECULAR NMR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ Structural genomics and proteomics were born from the understanding that functions of a protein are dictated by its 3D structure and dynamics. To understand protein functions on a genomic scale, we must know protein structures on a genomic scale. High resolution NMR can be used for this purpose. Traditional multidimensional NMR structure determination protocols become ineffective for structural genomics since to obtain a structure of a small protein of 15kD requires many months of painstaking spectral analysis and modeling. Recent advances in magnet and probe technology and in experimental methods have expanded the range of proteins amenable to structure determination and make the large scale structure determination possible. These advances are (1) effective expression systems for protein production, (2) introduction of cryoprobe, (3) structure determination with the use of the minimal amount of structural restraints obtained from the chemical shifts, residual dipolar couplings, NOEs, and computer modeling. In this talk,Iwill briefly outline these developments and related works done in our NMR lab.

  13. Longevity: epigenetic and biomolecular aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taormina, Giusi; Mirisola, Mario G

    2015-04-01

    Many aging theories and their related molecular mechanisms have been proposed. Simple model organisms such as yeasts, worms, fruit flies and others have massively contributed to their clarification, and many genes and pathways have been associated with longevity regulation. Among them, insulin/IGF-1 plays a key and evolutionary conserved role. Interestingly, dietary interventions can modulate this pathway. Calorie restriction (CR), intermittent fasting, and protein and amino acid restriction prolong the lifespan of mammals by IGF-1 regulation. However, some recent findings support the hypothesis that the long-term effects of diet also involve epigenetic mechanisms. In this review, we describe the best characterized aging pathways and highlight the role of epigenetics in diet-mediated longevity. PMID:25883209

  14. Chiral interaction and biomolecular evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent developments in the concept of chiral interaction open now new options and dynamical possibilities for biomolecules which have so far been overlooked. A few of these possibilities are mentioned, such as the control mechanism of enzymatic activity and the role played by non-ergodicity in evolutionary processes. It is shown that chiral interaction, being a surface phenomenon, does not obey Barron's symmetry constraints, which are suitable for force fields present in bulk interactions. In particular, the situation at the ocean-air surface in the prebiotic era is described, as well as the possible role played by chiral interaction in conjunction with the terrestrial magnetic field normal to the ocean surface, which could have lead to a process of deracernization at the ocean-air interface. (author)

  15. Computational Methods for Biomolecular Electrostatics

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Feng; Olsen, Brett; Baker, Nathan A.

    2008-01-01

    An understanding of intermolecular interactions is essential for insight into how cells develop, operate, communicate and control their activities. Such interactions include several components: contributions from linear, angular, and torsional forces in covalent bonds, van der Waals forces, as well as electrostatics. Among the various components of molecular interactions, electrostatics are of special importance because of their long range and their influence on polar or charged molecules, in...

  16. Adaptive resolution simulation of an atomistic protein in MARTINI water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an adaptive resolution simulation of protein G in multiscale water. We couple atomistic water around the protein with mesoscopic water, where four water molecules are represented with one coarse-grained bead, farther away. We circumvent the difficulties that arise from coupling to the coarse-grained model via a 4-to-1 molecule coarse-grain mapping by using bundled water models, i.e., we restrict the relative movement of water molecules that are mapped to the same coarse-grained bead employing harmonic springs. The water molecules change their resolution from four molecules to one coarse-grained particle and vice versa adaptively on-the-fly. Having performed 15 ns long molecular dynamics simulations, we observe within our error bars no differences between structural (e.g., root-mean-squared deviation and fluctuations of backbone atoms, radius of gyration, the stability of native contacts and secondary structure, and the solvent accessible surface area) and dynamical properties of the protein in the adaptive resolution approach compared to the fully atomistically solvated model. Our multiscale model is compatible with the widely used MARTINI force field and will therefore significantly enhance the scope of biomolecular simulations

  17. Peptide Bond Isomerization in High-Temperature Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Chris; Pomès, Régis; García, Angel E

    2016-04-12

    Force fields for molecular simulation are generally optimized to model macromolecules such as proteins at ambient temperature and pressure. Nevertheless, elevated temperatures are frequently used to enhance conformational sampling, either during system setup or as a component of an advanced sampling technique such as temperature replica exchange. Because macromolecular force fields are now put upon to simulate temperatures and time scales that greatly exceed their original design specifications, it is appropriate to re-evaluate whether these force fields are up to the task. Here, we quantify the rates of peptide bond isomerization in high-temperature simulations of three octameric peptides and a small fast-folding protein. We show that peptide octamers with and without proline residues undergo cis/trans isomerization every 1-5 ns at 800 K with three classical atomistic force fields (AMBER99SB-ILDN, CHARMM22/CMAP, and OPLS-AA/L). On the low microsecond time scale, these force fields permit isomerization of nonprolyl peptide bonds at temperatures ≥500 K, and the CHARMM22/CMAP force field permits isomerization of prolyl peptide bonds ≥400 K. Moreover, the OPLS-AA/L force field allows chiral inversion about the Cα atom at 800 K. Finally, we show that temperature replica exchange permits cis peptide bonds developed at 540 K to subsequently migrate back to the 300 K ensemble, where cis peptide bonds are present in 2 ± 1% of the population of Trp-cage TC5b, including up to 4% of its folded state. Further work is required to assess the accuracy of cis/trans isomerization in the current generation of protein force fields. PMID:26866899

  18. Quantum Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Georgescu, I. M.; Ashhab, S.; Nori, Franco

    2013-01-01

    Simulating quantum mechanics is known to be a difficult computational problem, especially when dealing with large systems. However, this difficulty may be overcome by using some controllable quantum system to study another less controllable or accessible quantum system, i.e., quantum simulation. Quantum simulation promises to have applications in the study of many problems in, e.g., condensed-matter physics, high-energy physics, atomic physics, quantum chemistry and cosmology. Quantum simulat...

  19. Simulated experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cybernetic model has been developed to elucidate some of the main principles of the growth regulation system in the epidermis of the hairless mouse. A number of actual and theoretical biological experiments have been simulated on the model. These included simulating the cell kinetics as measured by pulse labelling with tritiated thymidine and by continuous labelling with tritiated thymidine. Other simulated experiments included steady state, wear and tear, painting with a carcinogen, heredity and heredity and tumour. Numerous diagrams illustrate the results of these simulated experiments. (JIW)

  20. Simulation of the thermodynamics of folding and unfolding of the Trp-cage mini-protein TC5b using different combinations of force fields and solvation models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; John; ZengHui

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations based on AMBER force fields(ff96 and ff03) and generalized Born models(igb1 and igb5) have been carried out in order to study folding/unfolding of the Trp-cage mini-protein TC5b.The thermodynamic properties of TC5b were found to be sensitive to the specific version of the solvation model and force field employed.When the ff96/igb5 combination was used,the predicted melting temperature from unfolding simulations was in good agreement with the experimental value of 315 K,but the folding simulation did not converge.The most stable thermodynamic profile in both folding and unfolding simulations was obtained when the ff03/igb5 combination was employed,and the predicted melting temperature was about 345 K,showing over-stabilization of the protein.Simulations using the igb1 version in combination with ff96 or ff03 were difficult to converge within the simulation time limit(50 ns).

  1. Simulated Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snadden, R. B.; Runquist, O.

    1975-01-01

    Presents an experiment in which a programmable calculator is employed as a data generating system for simulated laboratory experiments. The example used as an illustration is a simulated conductimetric titration of an aqueous solution of HC1 with an aqueous solution of NaOH. (Author/EB)

  2. SJFHQ Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Schacher, Gordon; Dailey, James; Looney, John; Saylor, Steven; Jenson, Jack; Hutchins, Susan; Gallup, Shelley

    2004-01-01

    A four level architecture has been developed for SJFHQ processes. This architecture has been used to develop a simulation of SJFHQ operations. Correct simulation performance has been verified and initial results produced. The results focus on personal work tasking and multi-tasking effects.

  3. Excel simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Verschuuren, Gerard M

    2013-01-01

    Covering a variety of Excel simulations, from gambling to genetics, this introduction is for people interested in modeling future events, without the cost of an expensive textbook. The simulations covered offer a fun alternative to the usual Excel topics and include situations such as roulette, password cracking, sex determination, population growth, and traffic patterns, among many others.

  4. The ABCs of molecular dynamics simulations on B-DNA, circa 2012

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    David L Beveridge; Thomas E Cheatham III; Mihaly Mezei

    2012-07-01

    This article provides a retrospective on the ABC initiative in the area of all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations including explicit solvent on all tetranucleotide steps of duplex B-form DNA duplex, ca. 2012. The ABC consortium has completed two phases of simulations, the most current being a set of 50–100 trajectories based on the AMBER ff99 force field together with the parmbsc0 modification. Some general perspectives on the field of MD on DNA and sequence effects on DNA structure are provided, followed by an overview our MD results, including a detailed comparison of the ff99/parmbsc0 results with crystal and NMR structures available for d(CGCGAATTCGCG). Some projects inspired by or related to the ABC initiative and database are also reviewed, including methods for the trajectory analyses, informatics of dealing with the large database of results, compressions of trajectories for efficacy of distribution, DNA solvation by water and ions, parameterization of coarse-grained models with applications and gene finding and genome annotation

  5. Simulation tools

    CERN Document Server

    Jenni, F

    2006-01-01

    In the last two decades, simulation tools made a significant contribution to the great progress in development of power electronics. Time to market was shortened and development costs were reduced drastically. Falling costs, as well as improved speed and precision, opened new fields of application. Today, continuous and switched circuits can be mixed. A comfortable number of powerful simulation tools is available. The users have to choose the best suitable for their application. Here a simple rule applies: The best available simulation tool is the tool the user is already used to (provided, it can solve the task). Abilities, speed, user friendliness and other features are continuously being improved—even though they are already powerful and comfortable. This paper aims at giving the reader an insight into the simulation of power electronics. Starting with a short description of the fundamentals of a simulation tool as well as properties of tools, several tools are presented. Starting with simplified models ...

  6. Process simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The search for an optimal design of a heavy water plant is done by means of a simulation model for the mass and enthalpy balances of the SH2-H2O exchange process. A symplified model for the simulation diagram where the entire plant is represented by a sole tray tower with recicles, and heat and mass feeds/extractions was used. The tower is simulated by the method developed by Tomich with the convergence part given by the algorithm of Broyden. The concluding part of the work is centered in setting the design parameters (flowrates, heat exchange rates, number of plates) wich give the desired process operating conditions. (author)

  7. Solar Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Oriel Corporation's simulators have a high pressure xenon lamp whose reflected light is processed by an optical system to produce a uniform solar beam. Because of many different types of applications, the simulators must be adjustable to replicate many different areas of the solar radiation spectrum. Simulators are laboratory tools for such purposes as testing and calibrating solar cells, or other solar energy systems, testing dyes, paints and pigments, pharmaceuticals and cosmetic preparations, plant and animal studies, food and agriculture studies and oceanographic research.

  8. Calculation and visualization of atomistic mechanical stresses in nanomaterials and biomolecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T Fenley

    Full Text Available Many biomolecules have machine-like functions, and accordingly are discussed in terms of mechanical properties like force and motion. However, the concept of stress, a mechanical property that is of fundamental importance in the study of macroscopic mechanics, is not commonly applied in the biomolecular context. We anticipate that microscopical stress analyses of biomolecules and nanomaterials will provide useful mechanistic insights and help guide molecular design. To enable such applications, we have developed Calculator of Atomistic Mechanical Stress (CAMS, an open-source software package for computing atomic resolution stresses from molecular dynamics (MD simulations. The software also enables decomposition of stress into contributions from bonded, nonbonded and Generalized Born potential terms. CAMS reads GROMACS topology and trajectory files, which are easily generated from AMBER files as well; and time-varying stresses may be animated and visualized in the VMD viewer. Here, we review relevant theory and present illustrative applications.

  9. Simulated Mission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG YUANKAI

    2010-01-01

    @@ On June 3,27-year-old Chinese astronaut trainer Wang Yue walked into a mock spaceship at a Moscow research institute with five other foreign space enthusiasts in an unprecedented simulation of a manned mission to Mars.

  10. Two distinct states of the HAMP domain from sensory rhodopsin transducer observed in unbiased molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Gushchin

    Full Text Available HAMP domain is a ubiquitous module of bacterial and archaeal two-component signaling systems. Considerable progress has been made recently in studies of its structure and conformational changes. However, the mechanism of signal transduction through the HAMP domain is not clear. It remains a question whether all the HAMPs have the same mechanism of action and what are the differences between the domains from different protein families. Here, we present the results of unbiased molecular dynamics simulations of the HAMP domain from the archaeal phototaxis signal transducer NpHtrII. Two distinct conformational states of the HAMP domain are observed, that differ in relative position of the helices AS1 and AS2. The longitudinal shift is roughly equal to a half of an α-helix turn, although sometimes it reaches one full turn. The states are closely related to the position of bulky hydrophobic aminoacids at the HAMP domain core. The observed features are in good agreement with recent experimental results and allow us to propose that the states detected in the simulations are the resting state and the signaling state of the NpHtrII HAMP domain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first observation of the same HAMP domain in different conformations. The simulations also underline the difference between AMBER ff99-SB-ILDN and CHARMM22-CMAP forcefields, as the former favors the resting state and the latter favors the signaling state.

  11. Speed of conformational change: comparing explicit and implicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandakrishnan, Ramu; Drozdetski, Aleksander; Walker, Ross C; Onufriev, Alexey V

    2015-03-10

    Adequate sampling of conformation space remains challenging in atomistic simulations, especially if the solvent is treated explicitly. Implicit-solvent simulations can speed up conformational sampling significantly. We compare the speed of conformational sampling between two commonly used methods of each class: the explicit-solvent particle mesh Ewald (PME) with TIP3P water model and a popular generalized Born (GB) implicit-solvent model, as implemented in the AMBER package. We systematically investigate small (dihedral angle flips in a protein), large (nucleosome tail collapse and DNA unwrapping), and mixed (folding of a miniprotein) conformational changes, with nominal simulation times ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds depending on system size. The speedups in conformational sampling for GB relative to PME simulations, are highly system- and problem-dependent. Where the simulation temperatures for PME and GB are the same, the corresponding speedups are approximately onefold (small conformational changes), between ∼1- and ∼100-fold (large changes), and approximately sevenfold (mixed case). The effects of temperature on speedup and free-energy landscapes, which may differ substantially between the solvent models, are discussed in detail for the case of miniprotein folding. In addition to speeding up conformational sampling, due to algorithmic differences, the implicit solvent model can be computationally faster for small systems or slower for large systems, depending on the number of solute and solvent atoms. For the conformational changes considered here, the combined speedups are approximately twofold, ∼1- to 60-fold, and ∼50-fold, respectively, in the low solvent viscosity regime afforded by the implicit solvent. For all the systems studied, 1) conformational sampling speedup increases as Langevin collision frequency (effective viscosity) decreases; and 2) conformational sampling speedup is mainly due to reduction in solvent viscosity rather than

  12. Advances in modeling of biomolecular interactions%生物体内分子间相互作用模拟方法进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡从中; 李泽荣; 王万录; 陈宇综

    2004-01-01

    Modeling of molecular interactions is increasingly used in life science research and biotechnology development.Examples are computer aided drug design, prediction of protein interactions with other molecules, and simulation of networks of biomolecules in a particular process in human body. This article reviews recent progress in the related fields and provides a brief overview on the methods used in molecular modeling of biological systems.

  13. Structural stability versus conformational sampling in biomolecular systems: Why is the charge transfer efficiency in G4-DNA better than in double-stranded DNA?

    OpenAIRE

    Woiczikowski, P. Benjamin; Kubař, Tomáš; Gutiérrez, Rafael; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Elstner, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    The electrical conduction properties of G4-DNA are investigated using a hybrid approach, which combines electronic structure calculations, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and the formulation of an effective tight-binding model Hamiltonian. Charge transport is studied by computing transmission functions along the MD trajectories. Though G4-DNA is structurally more stable than double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), our results strongly suggest that the potential improvement of the electrical transpo...

  14. Hydrodynamic Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Alex P. L.

    The main aim of this lecture is to provide a broad overview of the area of hydrodynamic simulation. The provision of introductions to a couple of basic algorithms for solving the equations of gas dynamics is a secondary objective. Hydrodynamic simulation in the context of laser-plasma physics and inertial fusion is now a large and mature field, deserving of an entire book (or books…) for a proper treatment. Individual topics will not be treated in great depth, and mathematical detail is avoided where possible. It is hoped that the reader will understand the key aspects of hydrodynamic simulation and the ability to write a very simple 1D hydro-solver with a view to using this knowledge as a "springboard" for more in-depth study.

  15. Colonoscopy simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei; Wang, Jianning; Qiu, Feng; Kaufman, Arie; Anderson, Joseph

    2007-03-01

    Effective colonoscopic screening for polyps with optical or virtual means requires adequate visualization of the entire colon surface. The purpose of this study is to investigate by simulation the degree of colon surface coverage during a routine optical colonoscopy (OC). To simulate OC, a generic wide angle and fisheye camera model is used to calibrate the fisheye lens of an Olympus endoscope with a field of view of 140 degrees. Then, the colonoscopy procedure is simulated using volume rendering fly-through along the hugging corner path in the retrograde direction. This shortest path is computed using the segmented and cleansed colon CT datasets. A large number of virtual fisheye cameras are placed along the shortest path to simulate the OC. At each camera position, a discrete volumetric ray-casting method is used to determine which triangles can be seen from the camera. Then, the percentage of the covered colon surface of the OC simulation is computed. Surface coverage at this point may serve as a rough estimate of readily visualized mucosa in a standard OC examination. We also compute the percentage of the covered colon surface for the virtual colonoscopy (VC) by placing virtual pinhole cameras on the central path of the colon and flying in only the antegrade direction as well as flying in both antegrade and retrograde directions. Our simulation study reveals that about 23% of the colon surface is missed in the standard OC examination and about 9% of the colon surface is missed in the VC examination when navigating in both directions.

  16. RPC simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Riegler, W

    2000-01-01

    This note discusses simulation results of several important RPC performance characteristics. We discuss single gap RPCs with 2mm gap that are used in ATLAS and LHCb. Signal formation as well as the dependence of the time resolution on amplifier characteristics and noise are discussed. The signal propagation along the RPC strips, ideal termination networks and crosstalk are analyzed in detail. Primary ionization was calculated with HEED [1], the electrical RPC parameters and fields were calculated with MAXWELL[2]. The signal propagation was simulated with PSPICE [3] and MATHEMATICA [4].

  17. Bayesian ensemble refinement by replica simulations and reweighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummer, Gerhard; Köfinger, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    We describe different Bayesian ensemble refinement methods, examine their interrelation, and discuss their practical application. With ensemble refinement, the properties of dynamic and partially disordered (bio)molecular structures can be characterized by integrating a wide range of experimental data, including measurements of ensemble-averaged observables. We start from a Bayesian formulation in which the posterior is a functional that ranks different configuration space distributions. By maximizing this posterior, we derive an optimal Bayesian ensemble distribution. For discrete configurations, this optimal distribution is identical to that obtained by the maximum entropy "ensemble refinement of SAXS" (EROS) formulation. Bayesian replica ensemble refinement enhances the sampling of relevant configurations by imposing restraints on averages of observables in coupled replica molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the strength of the restraints should scale linearly with the number of replicas to ensure convergence to the optimal Bayesian result in the limit of infinitely many replicas. In the "Bayesian inference of ensembles" method, we combine the replica and EROS approaches to accelerate the convergence. An adaptive algorithm can be used to sample directly from the optimal ensemble, without replicas. We discuss the incorporation of single-molecule measurements and dynamic observables such as relaxation parameters. The theoretical analysis of different Bayesian ensemble refinement approaches provides a basis for practical applications and a starting point for further investigations.

  18. Simulating Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipinos, Savas

    2010-01-01

    This article describes one classroom activity in which the author simulates the Newtonian gravity, and employs the Euclidean Geometry with the use of new technologies (NT). The prerequisites for this activity were some knowledge of the formulae for a particle free fall in Physics and most certainly, a good understanding of the notion of similarity…

  19. Simulation techniques for cosmological simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Dolag, K; Schindler, S; Diaferio, A; Bykov, A M

    2008-01-01

    Modern cosmological observations allow us to study in great detail the evolution and history of the large scale structure hierarchy. The fundamental problem of accurate constraints on the cosmological parameters, within a given cosmological model, requires precise modelling of the observed structure. In this paper we briefly review the current most effective techniques of large scale structure simulations, emphasising both their advantages and shortcomings. Starting with basics of the direct N-body simulations appropriate to modelling cold dark matter evolution, we then discuss the direct-sum technique GRAPE, particle-mesh (PM) and hybrid methods, combining the PM and the tree algorithms. Simulations of baryonic matter in the Universe often use hydrodynamic codes based on both particle methods that discretise mass, and grid-based methods. We briefly describe Eulerian grid methods, and also some variants of Lagrangian smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) methods.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulations on Parallel Computers: a Study of Polar Versus Nonpolar Media Effects in Small Molecule Solvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debolt, Stephen Edward

    Solvent effects were studied and described via molecular dynamics (MD) and free energy perturbation (FEP) simulations using the molecular mechanics program AMBER. The following specific topics were explored:. Polar solvents cause a blue shift of the rm nto pi^* transition band of simple alkyl carbonyl compounds. The ground- versus excited-state solvation effects responsible for the observed solvatochromism are described in terms of the molecular level details of solute-solvent interactions in several modeled solvents spanning the range from polar to nonpolar, including water, methanol, and carbon tetrachloride. The structure and dynamics of octanol media were studied to explore the question: "why is octanol/water media such a good biophase analog?". The formation of linear and cyclic polymers of hydrogen-bonded solvent molecules, micelle-like clusters, and the effects of saturating waters are described. Two small drug-sized molecules, benzene and phenol, were solvated in water-saturated octanol. The solute-solvent structure and dynamics were analysed. The difference in their partitioning free energies was calculated. MD and FEP calculations were adapted for parallel computation, increasing their "speed" or the time span accessible by a simulation. The non-cyclic polyether ionophore salinomycin was studied in methanol solvent via parallel FEP. The path of binding and release for a potassium ion was investigated by calculating the potential of mean force along the "exit vector".

  1. Simulating events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferretti, C.; Bruzzone, L. [Techint Italimpianti, Milan (Italy)

    2000-06-01

    The Petacalco Marine terminal on the Pacific coast in the harbour of Lazaro Carclenas (Michoacan) in Mexico, provides coal to the thermoelectric power plant at Pdte Plutarco Elias Calles in the port area. The plant is being converted from oil to burn coal to generate 2100 MW of power. The article describes the layout of the terminal and equipment employed in the unloading, coal stacking, coal handling areas and the receiving area at the power plant. The contractor Techint Italimpianti has developed a software system, MHATIS, for marine terminal management which is nearly complete. The discrete event simulator with its graphic interface provides a real-type decision support system for simulating changes to the terminal operations and evaluating impacts. The article describes how MHATIS is used. 7 figs.

  2. Neuromechanical simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Donald H.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of the interaction between the body and the brain for the control of behavior has been recognized in recent years with the advent of neuromechanics, a field in which the coupling between neural and biomechanical processes is an explicit focus. A major tool used in neuromechanics is simulation, which connects computational models of neural circuits to models of an animal’s body situated in a virtual physical world. This connection closes the feedback loop that links the ...

  3. Simulating Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merker, G.; Schwarz, C.; Stiesch, G.; Otto, F.

    The content spans from simple thermodynamics of the combustion engine to complex models for the description of the air/fuel mixture, ignition, combustion and pollutant formation considering the engine periphery of petrol and diesel engines. Thus the emphasis of the book is on the simulation models and how they are applicable for the development of modern combustion engines. Computers can be used as the engineers testbench following the rules and recommendations described here.

  4. Simulation of Surrounding Vehicles in Driving Simulators

    OpenAIRE

    Olstam, Johan

    2009-01-01

    Driving simulators and microscopic traffic simulation are important tools for making evaluations of driving and traffic. A driving simulator is de-signed to imitate real driving and is used to conduct experiments on driver behavior. Traffic simulation is commonly used to evaluate the quality of service of different infrastructure designs. This thesis considers a different application of traffic simulation, namely the simulation of surrounding vehicles in driving simulators. The surrounding tr...

  5. Design and simulation of bio fluidic sensor based on photonic crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajini Gaddam Kesava Reddy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Photonic crystals are materials patterned with a periodicity in dielectric constant in one, two and three dimensions and associated with Bragg scattering which can create range of forbidden frequencies called Photonic Band Gap (PBG. By optimizing various parameters and creating defects, we will review the design and characterization of waveguides, optical cavities and multi-fluidic channel devices. We have used such waveguides and laser nanocavities as Biosensor, in which field intensity is strongly dependent on the type of biofliud and its refractive index. This design and simulation technique leads to development of a nanophotonic sensor for detection of biofluids.  In this paper, we have simulated sensing of biofliud in various photonic defect structures with the help of a numerical algorithm called Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD method. The simulation result shows the high sensitivity for the change in the bio-molecular structure. For developing the complete sensor system, we have to use the MEMS technologies to integrate on-chip fluidic transport components with sensing systems. The resulting biofluidic system will have the capability to continuously monitor the concentration of a large number of relevant biological molecules continuously from ambulatory patients.   Keywords: FDTD, Photonic Crystals, Bio fluid Sensor, Optical Cavity.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation of phosphorylation-induced conformational transitions in the mycobacterium tuberculosis response regulator PrrA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Guo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcmahon, Benjamin H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tung, Chang - Shung [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Phosphorylation-activated modulation of response regulators (RR) is predominantly used by bacteria as a strategy in regulating their two-component signaling (TCS) systems, the underlying molecular mechanisms are however far from fully understood. In this work we have conducted a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the phosphorylation-induced conformational transitions of RRs with the Mycobacterium Tuberculosis PrrA as a particular example. Starting from the full-length inactive structure of PrrA we introduced a local disturbance by phosphorylating the conserved aspartic acid residue, Asp-58, in the regulatory domain. A Go-model-type algorithm packaged with AMBER force fields was then applied to simulate the dynamics upon phosphorylation. The MD simulation shows that the phosphorylation of Asp-58 facilitates PrrA, whose inactive state has a compact conformation with a closed interdomain interface, to open up with its interdomain separation being increased by an average of about 1.5 {angstrom} for a simulation of 20 ns. The trans-activation loop, which is completely buried within the interdomain interface in the inactive PrrA, is found to become more exposed with the phosphorylated structure as well. These results provide more structural details of how the phosphorylation of a local aspartate activates PrrA to undergo a global conformational rearrangement toward its extended active state. This work also indicates that MD simulations can serve as a fast tool to unravel the regulation mechanisms of all RRs, which is especially valuable when the structures of full-length active RRs are currently unavailable.

  7. A generic implementation of replica exchange with solute tempering (REST2) algorithm in NAMD for complex biophysical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Sunhwan; Jiang, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Replica Exchange with Solute Tempering (REST2) is a powerful sampling enhancement algorithm of molecular dynamics (MD) in that it needs significantly smaller number of replicas but achieves higher sampling efficiency relative to standard temperature exchange algorithm. In this paper, we extend the applicability of REST2 for quantitative biophysical simulations through a robust and generic implementation in greatly scalable MD software NAMD. The rescaling procedure of force field parameters controlling REST2 "hot region" is implemented into NAMD at the source code level. A user can conveniently select hot region through VMD and write the selection information into a PDB file. The rescaling keyword/parameter is written in NAMD Tcl script interface that enables an on-the-fly simulation parameter change. Our implementation of REST2 is within communication-enabled Tcl script built on top of Charm++, thus communication overhead of an exchange attempt is vanishingly small. Such a generic implementation facilitates seamless cooperation between REST2 and other modules of NAMD to provide enhanced sampling for complex biomolecular simulations. Three challenging applications including native REST2 simulation for peptide folding-unfolding transition, free energy perturbation/REST2 for absolute binding affinity of protein-ligand complex and umbrella sampling/REST2 Hamiltonian exchange for free energy landscape calculation were carried out on IBM Blue Gene/Q supercomputer to demonstrate efficacy of REST2 based on the present implementation.

  8. UAS Air Traffic Controller Acceptability Study. 2; Evaluating Detect and Avoid Technology and Communication Delays in Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comstock, James R., Jr.; Ghatas, Rania W.; Consiglio, Maria C.; Chamberlain, James P.; Hoffler, Keith D.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of communications delays and winds on air traffic controller ratings of acceptability of horizontal miss distances (HMDs) for encounters between Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) and manned aircraft in a simulation of the Dallas-Ft. Worth (DFW) airspace. Fourteen encounters per hour were staged in the presence of moderate background traffic. Seven recently retired controllers with experience at DFW served as subjects. Guidance provided to the UAS pilots for maintaining a given HMD was provided by information from Detect and Avoid (DAA) self-separation algorithms (Stratway+) displayed on the Multi-Aircraft Control System. This guidance consisted of amber "bands" on the heading scale of the UAS navigation display indicating headings that would result in a loss of well clear between the UAS and nearby traffic. Winds tested were successfully handled by the DAA algorithms and did not affect the controller acceptability ratings of the HMDs. Voice communications delays for the UAS were also tested and included one-way delay times of 0, 400, 1200, and 1800 msec. For longer communications delays, there were changes in strategy and communications flow that were observed and reported by the controllers. The aim of this work is to provide useful information for guiding future rules and regulations applicable to flying UAS in the NAS. Information from this study will also be of value to the Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics (RTCA) Special Committee 228 - Minimum Performance Standards for UAS.

  9. Extended phase-space methods for enhanced sampling in molecular simulations: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi eFujisaki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Molecular Dynamics simulations are a powerful approach to study biomolecular conformational changes or protein-ligand, protein-protein and protein-DNA/RNA interactions. Straightforward applications however are often hampered by incomplete sampling, since in a typical simulated trajectory the system will spend most of its time trapped by high energy barriers in restricted regions of the configuration space. Over the years, several techniques have been designed to overcome this problem and enhance space sampling. Here, we review a class of methods that rely on the idea of extending the set of dynamical variables of the system by adding extra ones associated to functions describing the process under study. In particular, we illustrate the Temperature Accelerated Molecular Dynamics (TAMD, Logarithmic Mean Force Dynamics (LogMFD, andMultiscale Enhanced Sampling (MSES algorithms. We also discuss combinations with techniques for searching reaction paths. We show the advantages presented by this approach and how it allows to quickly sample important regions of the free energy landscape via automatic exploration.

  10. Self-assembly of phenylalanine oligopeptides: insights from experiments and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamamis, Phanourios; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Reches, Meital; Marshall, Karen; Sikorski, Pawel; Serpell, Louise; Gazit, Ehud; Archontis, Georgios

    2009-06-17

    Studies of peptide-based nanostructures provide general insights into biomolecular self-assembly and can lead material engineering toward technological applications. The diphenylalanine peptide (FF) self-assembles into discrete, hollow, well ordered nanotubes, and its derivatives form nanoassemblies of various morphologies. Here we demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, the formation of planar nanostructures with beta-sheet content by the triphenylalanine peptide (FFF). We characterize these structures using various microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. We also obtain insights into the interactions and structural properties of the FF and FFF nanostructures by 0.4-micros, implicit-solvent, replica-exchange, molecular-dynamics simulations of aqueous FF and FFF solutions. In the simulations the peptides form aggregates, which often contain open or ring-like peptide networks, as well as elementary and network-containing structures with beta-sheet characteristics. The networks are stabilized by polar and nonpolar interactions, and by the surrounding aggregate. In particular, the charged termini of neighbor peptides are involved in hydrogen-bonding interactions and their aromatic side chains form "T-shaped" contacts, as in three-dimensional FF crystals. These interactions may assist the FF and FFF self-assembly at the early stage, and may also stabilize the mature nanostructures. The FFF peptides have higher network propensities and increased aggregate stabilities with respect to FF, which can be interpreted energetically. PMID:19527662

  11. Scaling of Multimillion-Atom Biological Molecular Dynamics Simulation on a Petascale Supercomputer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Roland; Lindner, Benjamin; Petridis, Loukas; Smith, Jeremy C

    2009-10-13

    A strategy is described for a fast all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of multimillion-atom biological systems on massively parallel supercomputers. The strategy is developed using benchmark systems of particular interest to bioenergy research, comprising models of cellulose and lignocellulosic biomass in an aqueous solution. The approach involves using the reaction field (RF) method for the computation of long-range electrostatic interactions, which permits efficient scaling on many thousands of cores. Although the range of applicability of the RF method for biomolecular systems remains to be demonstrated, for the benchmark systems the use of the RF produces molecular dipole moments, Kirkwood G factors, other structural properties, and mean-square fluctuations in excellent agreement with those obtained with the commonly used Particle Mesh Ewald method. With RF, three million- and five million-atom biological systems scale well up to ∼30k cores, producing ∼30 ns/day. Atomistic simulations of very large systems for time scales approaching the microsecond would, therefore, appear now to be within reach. PMID:26631792

  12. Large-Scale Analysis of 48 DNA and 48 RNA Tetranucleotides Studied by 1 μs Explicit-Solvent Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrodt, Michael V; Andrews, Casey T; Elcock, Adrian H

    2015-12-01

    An understanding of how the conformational behavior of single-stranded DNAs and RNAs depend on sequence is likely to be important for attempts to rationalize the thermodynamics of nucleic acid folding. In an attempt to further our understanding of such sequence dependences, we report here the results of 192 (1 μs) explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of 48 DNA and 48 RNA tetranucleotide sequences performed using recently reported modifications to the AMBER force field. Each tetranucleotide was simulated starting from two different conformations, a fully natively stacked and a completely unstacked conformation, and populations of the various possible base stacking arrangements were analyzed. The simulations indicate that, for both DNA and RNA, the populations of fully natively stacked conformations increase linearly with increasing numbers of purines in the sequence, while the conformational entropies, computed by two complementary methods, decrease. Despite the comparatively short simulation times, the computed free energies of stacking of the 16 possible combinations of bases in the middle of the sequences are found to be in good correspondence with values reported recently from simulations of dinucleoside monophosphates using the same force field. Finally, consistent with recent reports from other groups, non-native stacking interactions, i.e., between bases that are not adjacent in sequence, are shown to be a recurring feature of the simulations; in particular, stacking interactions of bases in a i:i+2 relationship are shown to occur significantly more frequently when the intervening base is a pyrimidine. Given that the high prevalence of non-native stacking interactions is thought to be unrealistic, it appears that further parametrization work will be required before accurate conformational descriptions of single-stranded nucleic acids can be obtained with current force fields. PMID:26580891

  13. Theoretical Frameworks for Multiscale Modeling and Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Biomolecular systems have been modeled at a variety of scales, ranging from explicit treatment of electrons and nuclei to continuum description of bulk deformation or velocity. Many challenges of interfacing between scales have been overcome. Multiple models at different scales have been used to study the same system or calculate the same property (e.g., channel conductance). Accurate modeling of biochemical processes under in vivo conditions and the bridging of molecular and subcellular scal...

  14. First-Principles Study of Graphene-Based Biomolecular Sensor%石墨烯基生物分子传感器件的第一性原理研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹辉; 倪祥; 彭盛霖; 欧阳俊; 陈羽; 欧阳方平

    2013-01-01

      基于第一性原理模拟,我们构建了一种具有石墨烯电极的纳米间隙生物分子传感器件的理论模型。研究发现,当碱基分子胞嘧啶、甲基化胞嘧啶和羟甲基化胞嘧啶分别通过器件时,器件横向电流的大小差异约有1个数量级,器件对此类分子具有一定的分辨能力。分子之间的区分度大小受单链脱氧核糖核酸(DNA)中相邻碱基分子间的相互作用及碱基分子构型的影响。研究工作表明,此类石墨烯基分子传感器可准确高效地区分具有不同结构的碱基分子,为准确定位DNA链中的变异碱基分子提出了一种新的思路。%First-principles calculations were applied to design and study the electron transport behavior of a biomolecular sensor with graphene-based electrodes. It is shown that the designed biosensor is capable of distinguishing different nucleotide molecules such as cytosine, methylcytosine, and hydroxymethylcytosine. The current was seen to change by nearly one order of magnitude, while molecules passed through the device individual y. The resolution capacity of the present device was primarily determined by the interactions and specific configurations of two adjacent single-stranded desoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules and their specific configurations. This graphene-based biosensor was proved to be effective and efficient in detecting and distinguishing different DNA molecules, which provides a new potential method to pinpoint exactly varietal base molecules in DNA chains for the genetic information.

  15. STSE: Spatio-Temporal Simulation Environment Dedicated to Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerber Susanne

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, the availability of high-resolution microscopy together with the advancements in the development of biomarkers as reporters of biomolecular interactions increased the importance of imaging methods in molecular cell biology. These techniques enable the investigation of cellular characteristics like volume, size and geometry as well as volume and geometry of intracellular compartments, and the amount of existing proteins in a spatially resolved manner. Such detailed investigations opened up many new areas of research in the study of spatial, complex and dynamic cellular systems. One of the crucial challenges for the study of such systems is the design of a well stuctured and optimized workflow to provide a systematic and efficient hypothesis verification. Computer Science can efficiently address this task by providing software that facilitates handling, analysis, and evaluation of biological data to the benefit of experimenters and modelers. Results The Spatio-Temporal Simulation Environment (STSE is a set of open-source tools provided to conduct spatio-temporal simulations in discrete structures based on microscopy images. The framework contains modules to digitize, represent, analyze, and mathematically model spatial distributions of biochemical species. Graphical user interface (GUI tools provided with the software enable meshing of the simulation space based on the Voronoi concept. In addition, it supports to automatically acquire spatial information to the mesh from the images based on pixel luminosity (e.g. corresponding to molecular levels from microscopy images. STSE is freely available either as a stand-alone version or included in the linux live distribution Systems Biology Operational Software (SB.OS and can be downloaded from http://www.stse-software.org/. The Python source code as well as a comprehensive user manual and video tutorials are also offered to the research community. We discuss main concepts

  16. Railway Simulation with the CASSANDRA Simulation System

    OpenAIRE

    Szűcs, Gábor

    2001-01-01

    In this paper a railway simulator will be presented and illustrated with a railway network model, which is used for education, i.e. the training of railway system operators. The new railway simulation system is developed using a general simulation software, CASSANDRA that is usable not only for the railway network building but for planning, analysis and optimum finding as well.

  17. DELightcurveSimulation: Light curve simulation code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Samuel D.

    2016-02-01

    DELightcurveSimulation simulates light curves with any given power spectral density and any probability density function, following the algorithm described in Emmanoulopoulos et al. (2013). The simulated products have exactly the same variability and statistical properties as the observed light curves. The code is a Python implementation of the Mathematica code provided by Emmanoulopoulos et al.

  18. Spectral Color Effects in Biomolecular Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Hecht, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    Persistent spectral hole burning has been employed to investigate various model systems of biological relevance upon their interactions with synthetic or intrinsic chromophores. The model chromophore thionin was assessed for its specific interactions with DNA oligonucleotides and cyclodextrin; the protein phycocyanin has been analyzed for its internal electrostatics. In all experiments spectral color effects have been found - changes of thermodynamic and electrostatic parameters within the sa...

  19. Biomolecular transport and separation in nanotubular networks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stachowiak, Jeanne C.; Stevens, Mark Jackson (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Robinson, David B.; Branda, Steven S.; Zendejas, Frank; Meagher, Robert J.; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Bachand, George David (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Hayden, Carl C.; Sinha, Anupama; Abate, Elisa; Wang, Julia; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Liu, Haiqing (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-09-01

    Cell membranes are dynamic substrates that achieve a diverse array of functions through multi-scale reconfigurations. We explore the morphological changes that occur upon protein interaction to model membrane systems that induce deformation of their planar structure to yield nanotube assemblies. In the two examples shown in this report we will describe the use of membrane adhesion and particle trajectory to form lipid nanotubes via mechanical stretching, and protein adsorption onto domains and the induction of membrane curvature through steric pressure. Through this work the relationship between membrane bending rigidity, protein affinity, and line tension of phase separated structures were examined and their relationship in biological membranes explored.

  20. Cellular automata modelling of biomolecular networks dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonchev, D; Thomas, S; Apte, A; Kier, L B

    2010-01-01

    The modelling of biological systems dynamics is traditionally performed by ordinary differential equations (ODEs). When dealing with intracellular networks of genes, proteins and metabolites, however, this approach is hindered by network complexity and the lack of experimental kinetic parameters. This opened the field for other modelling techniques, such as cellular automata (CA) and agent-based modelling (ABM). This article reviews this emerging field of studies on network dynamics in molecular biology. The basics of the CA technique are discussed along with an extensive list of related software and websites. The application of CA to networks of biochemical reactions is exemplified in detail by the case studies of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway, the FAS-ligand (FASL)-induced and Bcl-2-related apoptosis. The potential of the CA method to model basic pathways patterns, to identify ways to control pathway dynamics and to help in generating strategies to fight with cancer is demonstrated. The different line of CA applications presented includes the search for the best-performing network motifs, an analysis of importance for effective intracellular signalling and pathway cross-talk. PMID:20373215