WorldWideScience

Sample records for alzheimers disease caregivers

  1. Caregiving for Alzheimer's Disease or Other Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit Button Caregiving for Person with Alzheimer's Disease or a related Dementia Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir What is Alzheimer's Disease? Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of ...

  2. Predictors of Alzheimer's Disease Caregiver Depression and Burden: What Noncaregiving Adults Can Learn from Active Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayslip, Bert, Jr.; Han, GiBaeg; Anderson, Cristina L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined similarities and differences between active caregivers (adult children and spouses whose family member had Alzheimer's disease) and not-as-yet caregiving adults (adult children and spouses whose family members are older, but do not as yet suffer from Alzheimer's disease). The objective was to determine what factors predict…

  3. Providing Counseling for Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease and Their Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granello, Paul F.; Fleming, Matthew S.

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive condition that results in brain wasting and eventual death. With its increasing diagnosis rate, counselors will likely acquire clients with Alzheimer's disease or their caregivers. Important background information and several practical counseling methods are provided that may assist counselors working with this…

  4. Alzheimer's Caregiving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Alzheimer's Caregiving After the Diagnosis Now that your family ... the news with family and friends. Learning About Alzheimer’s Sometimes, you may feel that you don't ...

  5. Coping with Specific Stressors in Alzheimer's Disease Caregiving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Gail M.; Schulz, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Examined strategies used by 170 Alzheimer's disease caregivers to cope with memory deficits, communication impairments, and decline of loved one. Wishfulness was related to more depressed affect, regardless of stressor type. Relaxation in response to memory deficits, and acceptance in dealing with communication impairments and decline of loved one…

  6. Psychiatric Sequelae of Chronic Stress in the Elderly: An Exploration of Alzheimer's Disease Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dura, Jason R.; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice

    There is growing evidence that the stress of caring for a relative with Alzheimer's disease may have adverse effects on the caregivers. This study was conducted to explore the mental health consequences of caregiving. Psychological data and mental health status information were obtained from 50 Alzheimer's disease spousal caregivers and from 50…

  7. Family Caregiver's Perception of Alzheimer's disease and caregiving in Chinese culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Baozhen; Mao, Zongfu; Wu, Bei; Mei, Y John; Levkoff, Sue; Wang, Huali

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the perception of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and caregiving among family caregivers of individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD in China. In-depth semistructured interviews were conducted with 46 family caregivers of individuals with cognitive impairment in 2009 in Wuhan and Beijing, China. Participants included 38 spouses, 7 adult children, and 1 sibling, aged between 41 and 85 years old. The findings showed that all family caregivers thought the Chinese terminology of AD laonian chidai, brought discrimination to individuals with cognitive impairment. Caregivers of individuals with AD experienced burden and desired an increase of formal services. Traditional beliefs of respecting elders and caring for extended family members were held among family caregivers of individuals with cognitive impairment, and there was nearly no difference found between caregivers of AD and those of MCI. It implied that traditional culture provided positive influences on caring for elders with cognitive impairment. An alternative term for MCI may contribute to further reducing the discrimination brought by the old Chinese terminology of AD laonian chidai. Development of formal services for elders with cognitive impairment may contribute to reducing caregivers' worries about future caregiving. PMID:25602761

  8. Information and Service Needs among Active and Former Family Caregivers of Persons with Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortinsky, Richard H.; Hathaway, Tania Jo

    1990-01-01

    Interpreted results of needs assessment completed by active caregivers (n=58) and former caregivers (n=57) of relatives with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Results imply need for high-quality educational material throughout caregiving, improved training for health professionals about AD, and role for former caregivers as information resources.…

  9. Factors associated with the variability in caregiver assessments of the capacities of the patients with Alzheimer"s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Conde Sala, Josep Lluís; Reñé Ramírez, Ramon; Turró Garriga, Oriol; Gascón-Bayarri, J.; Juncadella i Puig, Montserrat; Moreno-Cordón, L.; Viñas Diez, V.; Vilalta Franch, Joan; Garre Olmo, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: Several studies have identified certain caregiver factors that can produce variability in their assessments of the capacities of patients with Alzheimer"s disease (AD). Objectives: To identify the caregiver variables associated with variability in their ratings of patients" capacities. Methods: Consecutive sample of 221 out-patients with AD and their family caregivers. The capacities evaluated by caregivers were: the degree of functional disability, using the Disability A...

  10. Caregiver Acceptance of Adverse Effects and Use of Cholinesterase Inhibitors in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremus, Mark; Wolfson, Christina; Vandal, Alain C.; Bergman, Howard; Xie, Qihao

    2007-01-01

    Caregivers play a determining role in choosing treatments for persons with Alzheimer's disease. The objective of this study was to examine caregivers' willingness to have persons with Alzheimer's disease continue taking cholinesterase inhibitors in the event that any 1 of 11 adverse effects was to occur. Data were gathered via postal questionnaire…

  11. Caregiver Burden in Alzheimer's Disease: Differential Associations in Adult-Child and Spousal Caregivers in the GERAS Observational Study

    OpenAIRE

    Reed, Catherine; Belger, Mark; Dell'Agnello, Grazia; Wimo, Anders; Argimon, Josep Maria; Bruno, Giuseppe; Dodel, Richard; Haro, Josep Maria; Jones, Roy W.; Vellas, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims To examine factors influencing the caregiver burden in adult-child and spousal caregivers of community-dwelling patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods Baseline data from the 18-month, prospective, observational GERAS study of 1,497 patients with AD in France, Germany, and the UK were used. Analyses were performed on two groups of caregivers: spouses (n = 985) and adult children (n = 405). General linear models estimated patient and caregiver factors associated with su...

  12. Caring for the Caregiver. A Guide to Living with Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner-Lambert Co., Morris Plains, NJ.

    This book is designed to take caregivers through the basics of patient care and to give them the information needed to guide them through the medical, legal, and financial issues that accompany Alzheimer's disease. The seven chapters of the book cover the following topics: understanding Alzheimer's; caring for a caregiver; medical update; finances…

  13. Life orientation in Finnish family caregivers' of persons with Alzheimer's disease: a diary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Välimäki, Tarja; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri; Pietilä, Anna-Maija; Koivisto, Anne

    2012-12-01

    Family caregivers provide the majority of home care of people with Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we discuss family caregivers' life orientation and changes in life orientation during the first year after the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Family caregivers' unstructured diaries (n = 83), of the first six months after diagnosis (years 2002-2004), were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Two core themes emerged from the data analysis: the meaning of the onset of Alzheimer's disease for the lives of family caregivers, and restructuring life in its entirety. Family caregivers face challenges in their life orientation after the onset of their family members' Alzheimer's disease. Their personal milieu, familial cohesion, and conception of the future consequentially change. They face multiple challenges in the process of becoming caregivers. In this study, it was revealed that the process starts before the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and has an impact on their future. We conclude that family caregivers' well-being should be assessed at the time of the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23186523

  14. Dependence and caregiver burden in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, Damien

    2011-03-01

    The dependence scale has been designed to be sensitive to the overall care needs of the patient and is considered distinct from standard measures of functional ability in this regard. Little is known regarding the relationship between patient dependence and caregiver burden. We recruited 100 patients with Alzheimer\\'s disease or mild cognitive impairment and their caregivers through a memory clinic. Patient function, dependence, hours of care, cognition, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and caregiver burden were assessed. Dependence was significantly correlated with caregiver burden. Functional decline and dependence were most predictive of caregiver burden in patients with mild impairment while behavioral symptoms were most predictive in patients with moderate to severe disease. The dependence scale demonstrated good utility as a predictor of caregiver burden. Interventions to reduce caregiver burden should address patient dependence, functional decline, and behavioral symptoms while successful management of the latter becomes more critical with disease progression.

  15. Measuring the Caregiver Burden of Caring for Community-Residing People with Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Yu

    Full Text Available To assess the direct and indirect effects of patient or caregiver factors on caregiver burden of caring for community-residing people with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD.We conducted a cross-sectional study of patients diagnosed with AD from two hospitals and three communities in Taiyuan, China and their caregivers. For this survey, 200 patients with mild AD and their caregivers were selected. Caregivers were asked to provide sociodemographic information including age, gender, relationship with the patient, level of education, and number of contact hours per week with the patient. Caregiver burden was assessed using the Caregivers Burden Inventory. The caregivers also completed other measures including the Positive Aspects of Caregiving, the Family Adaptation, Partnership, Growth, Affection, and Resolve, and the Social Support Rating Scale. The patients with AD completed the Montreal Cognitive Assessment; their caregivers completed the Activities of Daily Living Scale and a questionnaire about the patients' Behavioral and Psychological symptoms of Dementia. The main outcome in this study was caregiver burden. The care receivers' level of cognitive function, physical function, and behavioral problems were treated as original stress; the primary appraisal variable was measured as the number of hours of caregiving in the previous week reported by the caregiver. Mediator variables included perceived social support, family function, and caregiving experience. Path analysis was used to build the interrelationship among caregiver burden and patient or caregiver factors.A lower level of cognitive function in patients (r = -0.28, p<0.001 and longer hours of caregiving (r = 0.17, p = 0.019 were related to increased caregiver burden. Greater social support (r = -0.23, p<0.001, family function (r = -0.17, p = 0.015 and caregiving experience (r = -0.16, p = 0.012 were related to decreased caregiver burden. Social support (r = 0.16, p = 0.040 and family

  16. Family Stigma and Caregiver Burden in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Perla; Mittelman, Mary S.; Goldstein, Dovrat; Heinik, Jeremia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The stigma experienced by the family members of an individual with a stigmatized illness is defined by 3 dimensions: caregiver stigma, lay public stigma, and structural stigma. Research in the area of mental illness suggests that caregivers' perception of stigma is associated with increased burden. However, the effect of stigma on…

  17. The family support to the caregiver of the person with Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Machado Andrade

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The perception of family caregivers of people with Alzheimer's disease on the family support for the received care, under the light of the phenomenology of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, it was revealed by responses to semi-structured interviews and by depositions in the focus group meetings with ten of them, members of a Mutual Help Group, carried out from September 2009 to June 2010. The study suggests a new understanding of family support to the care, which opens the possibility of transcendence from the caregiver into another self.  

  18. Social representation of Alzheimer's disease for family caregivers: stressful and rewarding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Duarte Folle

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To understand the content of Social Representation (SR of family caregivers of Alzheimer's disease patients. METHOD Interviews were conducted with 26 caregivers and analyzed by the ALCESTE software. RESULTS The SR content was structured in two thematic axes called Daily Life and Care and Medical and Emotional Concepts and Outcomes. The first axis creates images related to the routine of interaction with the sick person, and contains a description of care procedures, experiences, and practices applied every day. The second is composed of subjective and conceptual aspects that make up the social representation of Alzheimer's disease, with meanings related to the emotional, medical, and biological contexts. CONCLUSION Due to the importance of topics related to patients' dependence and the personal and emotional consequences of the disease, overload is the main content of the SR of Alzheimer's disease for caregivers, and the understanding of these SR by health professionals should support the planning of interventions addressing this group of individuals.

  19. El Portal Latino Alzheimer's Project: model program for Latino caregivers of Alzheimer's disease-affected people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Maria P; Villa, Valentine M; Trejo, Laura; Ramírez, Rosa; Ranney, Martha

    2003-04-01

    The article describes the El Portal Latino Alzheimer's Project--a dementia-specific outreach and services program targeting Latino caregivers in the Los Angeles County area. The project is an example of an interorganizational community-based collaborative developed to provide an array of coordinated, ethnic-sensitive services to Latino dementia-affected adults and their family caregivers, using culturally specific outreach and services delivery strategies. Results of an evaluation of service utilization indicate a reduction in barriers to care and an increase in services utilization. Los Angeles County provides a natural urban laboratory to study the special needs and circumstances of older Latinos dealing with chronic and debilitating illnesses. Implications for social work practice are discussed.

  20. Overload in informal caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rêgo, Daniela Brás

    2015-01-01

    A Doença de Alzheimer exige uma demanda de cuidados assumidos pelo cuidador, levando a uma elevada sobrecarga. Este estudo pretendeu compreender as variáveis que se relacionam, predizem e moderam a sobrecarga de cuidadores de doentes com Alzheimer, nos estádios moderado e avançado. Participaram neste estudo 102 cuidadores que responderam às versões portuguesas de: Burden Interview Scale, Carer’s Assessment of Managing Index, Cognitive and Affective Mindfulness Scale-Revised, Fa...

  1. Caregiving men of Alzheimer's disease sufferers in Nuevo León (Mexico: experiences and meanings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Azoh Barry

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite their invaluable contribution to health care, men who fulfill the social role of primary caregivers at an older age represent an understudied group in the state of Nuevo León (Mexico, and elsewhere. Ongoing demographic and epidemiological changes point to a graying population, an increase of disabling chronic and degenerative diseases, and functional limitations linked to a decline in self-reliance. The latter leads to further dependence on assistance which is predominantly home based. This article investigates the lived experiences of caregiving men providing care to their elderly relatives who have Alzheimer's disease (AD. After obtaining verbal informed consent, face-to-face, in-depth interviews were carried out in the natural environment with a convenience sample of 58 spouses and sons. Absenteeism was a common occurrence among those who were still involved in the labor force; however, the ways it was handled differed according to the sector of the economy (formal vs. informal the participant contributed to. Assistance provided by AD support groups, the availability and use of paid helpers, immediate and extended family, and making adjustments to daily routines to accommodate work schedules contributed to easing the burden of care. However, medical expenses put a strain on caregiver finances, and complaints about the costs of medications were consistent among employed and retired caregivers. A mix of positive and negative aspects inherent to this dyadic process was revealed along with trajectories of elder caregiving that were not always unilineal. Relationships of reciprocity, dependence and interdependence, and strengthened family bonds were salient. These findings are discussed in light of existentialist and humanistic theoretical frameworks on social integration and needs, with their propensity for emphasizing cognitive benefits, and the related meanings to individuals. The findings imply that concerted policy making in public

  2. Latino Alzheimer's disease caregivers and depression: using the stress coping model to examine the effects of spirituality and religion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; Hodge, David R

    2014-04-01

    This study used stress coping theory to examine the effects of spirituality and religion on depression among a sample of Latino family members caring for a person with Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the United States. Participants consisted of 209 Latino caregivers (CGs) drawn from baseline data from the Resource for Enhancing Alzheimer's Caregivers Health (REACH) II clinical trial. The findings indicate that church attendance moderates the relationship between subjective forms of stress and depression in tandem with exhibiting direct effects on depression. Consistent with the central role religion plays in Latino culture, the results imply that religious involvement may play an important role in mitigating depression through indirect and direct pathways.

  3. A Yoga and Compassion Meditation Program Reduces Stress in Familial Caregivers of Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. D. Danucalov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease exhibit reduced quality of life and increased stress levels. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of an 8-week yoga and compassion meditation program on the perceived stress, anxiety, depression, and salivary cortisol levels in familial caregivers. A total of 46 volunteers were randomly assigned to participate in a stress-reduction program for a 2-month period (yoga and compassion meditation program—YCMP group (n=25 or an untreated group for the same period of time (control group (n=21. The levels of stress, anxiety, depression, and morning salivary cortisol of the participants were measured before and after intervention. The groups were initially homogeneous; however, after intervention, the groups diverged significantly. The YCMP group exhibited a reduction of the stress (P<0.05, anxiety (P<0.000001, and depression (P<0.00001 levels, as well as a reduction in the concentration of salivary cortisol (P<0.05. Our study suggests that an 8-week yoga and compassion meditation program may offer an effective intervention for reducing perceived stress, anxiety, depression, and salivary cortisol in familial caregivers.

  4. Grief and Personal Growth Experience of Spouses and Adult-Child Caregivers of Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Carol H.; Sanders, Sara; Kelber, Sheryl T.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the grief and personal growth experience of spouses and adult children of individuals with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias and the factors contributing to these experiences. Design and Methods: We used a modification of the Marwit-Meuser-Sanders Caregiver Grief model to examine the…

  5. Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alzheimer's >> Home Text size: A A A 2016 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures download the full report: ... or even slowed. Invest in a world without Alzheimer's. Donate Caregivers In 2015, 15.9 million family ...

  6. Stress in caregivers of Alzheimer´s disease: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamilla Sthefany Andrade de Oliveira

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Check publications related to the topic of stress in caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's, from an analysis of publications from 2006 to April 2013, being the latest in terms of publication in the area. Method: A systematic review by searching the following databases Scielo, Bireme, PubMed with the descriptor: "Stress in caregivers of Alzheimer's;" written in English and Portuguese. Results: 32 articles were found and were within the inclusion criteria and were assessed based on a thematic analysis on issues of practical activity, physical and pathological aspects of alternative interventions. 9 of the 32 articles referred to the practice of care, 13 dealt about the physical-psychopathological, and 9 on interventions. Conclusion: the stress on caregivers is a point that expands into many other problems that trigger impairments in quality of life, from the standpoint of physical, mental, psychological and emotional.

  7. Age Effects on Cognitive and Physiological Parameters in Familial Caregivers of Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Márcio Silveira; Giacobbo, Bruno Lima; Vedovelli, Kelem; de Lima, Daiane Borba; Ferrari, Pamela; Argimon, Irani Iracema de Lima; Walz, Julio Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Older familial caregivers of Alzheimer’s disease patients are subjected to stress-related cognitive and psychophysiological dysfunctions that may affect their quality of life and ability to provide care. Younger caregivers have never been properly evaluated. We hypothesized that they would show qualitatively similar cognitive and psychophysiological alterations to those of older caregivers. Method The cognitive measures of 17 young (31–58 years) and 18 old (63–84 years) caregivers and of 17 young (37–57 years) and 18 old (62–84 years) non-caregiver controls were evaluated together with their salivary cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels, as measured by radioimmunoassays and ELISA assays of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in serum. Results Although younger caregivers had milder impairments in memory and executive functions than older caregivers, their performances fell to the same or lower levels as those of the healthy older controls. Decreases in DHEA and BDNF levels were correlated with the cognitive dysfunctions observed in the older and younger caregivers, respectively. Cortisol at 10PM increased in both caregiver groups. Discussion Younger caregivers were prone to cognitive impairments similar to older caregivers, although the degree and the neuropsychological correlates of the cognitive dysfunctions were somewhat different between the two groups. This work has implications for caregiver and care-recipient health and for research on the neurobiology of stress-related cognitive dysfunctions. PMID:27706235

  8. Are there sex differences in emotional and biological responses in spousal caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Russel L; Lewis, Sharon L; Murphy, Margaret R; Hale, Jennifer M; Blackwell, Paula H; Acton, Gayle J; Clough, Dorothy H; Patrick, Graham J; Bonner, Peter N

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare emotional and biological responses of men and women who are spousal caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Quality-of-life measurements, bioinstrumentation data, and immunophenotype assessments were obtained from female and male spousal caregivers of patients with AD. Spousal caregivers (women, n = 45 with average age 69.7; men, n = 16 with average age 71.4 years) completed questionnaires that assessed psychosocial variables. Blood was drawn and lymphocyte subsets (including natural killer [NK] cell number) were determined using flow cytometry. The degree of relaxation was determined measuring muscle tension (EMG) in the frontalis and trapezius muscles, skin conductance, skin temperature, and heart rate. Male spousal caregivers, as compared to female spousal caregivers, had significantly lower levels of stress, depression, caregiver burden (subjective), anxiety, anger-hostility, and somatic symptoms and higher levels of mental health, sense of coherence, NK cell number, and social and physical functioning. There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups in social support, coping resources, or T, T suppressor, or activated T cells. Women had more T helper cells and fewer NK cells than men. Men had fewer manifestations of a physiological stress response, as indicated by bioinstrumentation parameters. Unique sex-specific issues need to be considered when strategies are implemented to assist the increasing number of caregivers as our society ages.

  9. Children of heroes: Alzheimer's disease--a path toward healing and wholeness for caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelica, Jade

    2013-01-01

    Conventional wisdom postulates that Alzheimer's steals personhood and destroys our opportunities to heal, reconcile, and deepen our relationships with persons who have this disease. In this article, children of Alzheimer's Heroes who have answered the call to love, challenge this conventional wisdom. With clarity, confidence, and courage, we bear witness to the mythic power of Alzheimer's and express gratitude for the surprising gifts that have transformed our lives. PMID:24720237

  10. Early counselling and support for patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers: a qualitative study on outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth V; Waldorff, Frans B; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this qualitative study was to identify and analyse the participants' experienced outcome of an intensive structured psychosocial intervention programme with tailored counselling, education and support groups for home-living patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their s......OBJECTIVES: The aim of this qualitative study was to identify and analyse the participants' experienced outcome of an intensive structured psychosocial intervention programme with tailored counselling, education and support groups for home-living patients with mild Alzheimer's disease...... and their spousal caregivers. METHOD: Data were collected by semi-structured in-depth interviews conducted separately with each person in 10 couples before the intervention and 1-3 months after completed intervention. For the analysis, a template organizing style of interpretation was used. RESULTS: The analysis...... with the challenges their partner's disease involved, and they were able to face everyday life and social relations with more serenity and competence. After the intervention, both patients and caregivers sought suitable support groups they could join as a permanent activity and caregivers sought permanent counselling...

  11. Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senile dementia - Alzheimer type (SDAT); SDAT; Dementia - Alzheimer ... The exact cause of Alzheimer disease (AD) is not known. Research shows that certain changes in the brain lead to AD. You are more likely ...

  12. Alzheimer's Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Alzheimer's Disease Living with Alzheimer's Disease Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... delay or prevent the disease. Free Guide for Alzheimer's Caregivers Caring for a person with Alzheimer's disease ...

  13. Qualidade de vida em cuidadores de idosos portadores de demência de Alzheimer Quality of life of Alzheimer's disease caregivers' people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane dos Anjos de Paula

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Realizar revisão sistemática da literatura acerca da QV dos cuidadores de idosos com DA. MÉTODOS: Revisão sistemática de literatura por meio do PubMed e da MedLine entre os anos de 1997 e 2008, utilizando os termos quality of life, caregivers, Alzheimer disease. RESULTADOS: Dezesseis estudos entre 274 publicações iniciais e 39 artigos posteriormente incluídos pelas referências bibliográficas foram avaliados. A QV dos cuidadores dos idosos demenciados, na maioria dos estudos, estava comprometida negativamente. Diversos fatores interferem na QV do cuidador, desde a gravidade da doença até alterações comportamentais que esses idosos possam vir a apresentar. CONCLUSÃO: É necessária a realização de mais estudos direcionados a esse tema, a fim de buscar estratégias para melhora da QV desse cuidador.OBJECTIVE: Carry out a systematic bibliographycal review about QL of the caregivers of in the elderly with AD. METHODS: A systematic bibliographical review about studies indexed on Pubmed and MedLine, from 1997 to 2008, using as key-words the terms: quality of life, caregivers, Alzheimer Disease. RESULTS: Sixteen of the 274 initial articles and 39 additional papers included in a following phase, based on bibliographical references, were evaluated. A negative impairment in QL of the caregivers of demential in the elderly has been documented in most studies. Several factors affect the caregivers' quality of life, such as severity of the patient's illness and behavior disorders of elderly. CONCLUSION: Futures studies on this theme will be necessary to look for strategies.

  14. Duelo y muerte en cuidadores familiares y profesionales de enfermos de Alzheimer Mourning and death in informal and professional caregivers of Alzheimer's disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Pérez-Godoy Díaz

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Como en cualquier proceso crónico y degenerativo abocado a la muerte, la enfermedad de Alzheimer y las demencias provocan en sus cuidadores familiares y profesionales diversos sentimientos, procesos y duelos tanto ante la muerte real como la muerte psíquica. Utilizando una metodología cualitativa analizamos diversos casos de cuidadores de enfermos de Alzheimer institucionalizados en un centro sociosanitario de donde concluimos que no sólo la muerte real puede provocar un duelo en los cuidadores sino también la pérdida inexorable de capacidades, y en último término su muerte psíquica. Esta muerte afecta también a cuidadores profesionales posiblemente porque les muestra su propia vulnerabilidad como seres humanos, recordándoles su propia muerte y lo que podría percibirse como más cruel: la posibilidad de una muerte en vida.Alzheimer's disease and other dementias can cause in caregivers diverse feelings, processes and mournings, which are lived in different ways. This occurs both in psychological and actual death. By using a methodology of a qualitative research, we look through some different cases of caregivers whose relatives are living in an institution. We conclude that not only the actual death can cause a sense of mourning in caregivers of dementia patients, but also the inexorable loss of capacities and eventually their "psychological" death. This death also possibly affects the professional caregivers because it shows them their vulnerability as human beings. This type of death makes them to think about the possibility of a death in life.

  15. Disclosure of the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease: caregivers' opinions in a Brazilian sample A revelação do diagnóstico de doença de Alzheimer: opiniões de cuidadores em uma amostra brasileira

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Maria Shimizu; I. Raicher; Daniel Yasumasa Takahashi; Paulo Caramelli; Ricardo Nitrini

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Disclosure of the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains a contentious issue, and has been little studied in developing countries. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of socio-demographic factors and the experience of being a caregiver on opinion about disclosing AD diagnosis to the patient in a Brazilian sample. METHOD: Caregivers of 50 AD patients together with 50 control participants that did not have the experience of being a caregiver of AD patient were interviewed...

  16. Qualidade de vida em cuidadores de idosos portadores de demência de Alzheimer Quality of life of Alzheimer's disease caregivers' people

    OpenAIRE

    Juliane dos Anjos de Paula; Francelise Pivetta Roque; Flávio Soares de Araújo

    2008-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Realizar revisão sistemática da literatura acerca da QV dos cuidadores de idosos com DA. MÉTODOS: Revisão sistemática de literatura por meio do PubMed e da MedLine entre os anos de 1997 e 2008, utilizando os termos quality of life, caregivers, Alzheimer disease. RESULTADOS: Dezesseis estudos entre 274 publicações iniciais e 39 artigos posteriormente incluídos pelas referências bibliográficas foram avaliados. A QV dos cuidadores dos idosos demenciados, na maioria dos estudos, estava ...

  17. The Effects of Meditation on Perceived Stress and Related Indices of Psychological Status and Sympathetic Activation in Persons with Alzheimer's Disease and Their Caregivers: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Innes, K. E.; Selfe, T. K.; Brown, C. J.; Rose, K M; Thompson-Heisterman, A

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effects of an 8-week meditation program on perceived stress, sleep, mood, and related outcomes in adults with cognitive impairment and their caregivers. Methods. Community-dwelling adults with a diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment or early-stage Alzheimer's disease, together with their live-in caregivers, were enrolled in the study. After a brief training, participants were asked to meditate for 11 minutes, twice daily for 8 weeks. Major outcomes included meas...

  18. [Approach of the sexuality of Alzheimer's disease patients according to caregivers' guides approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Madeleine; Mietkiewicz, Marie-Claude

    2015-12-01

    If sexual behavior disorders are not a major symptom of Alzheimer's disease, they might be a source for suffering and hardship to the patient's entourage, especially since it is usually not easy to address sexuality. Guides for relatives have been devoted to improve their knowledge about the disease and to help providing best care for the patient. Thirty of the forty-six guides make references to sexual behavior disorders in Alzheimer's disease patients, sometimes in a few lines, sometimes in a few paragraphs illustrated by clinical vignettes. All these guides report two types of sexual disorders, loss of interest and decreased sexual activity, or inappropriate sexual behavior, and give advices to help relatives, spouses and children, managing the patient's sexual disorders without blaming the patients. PMID:26707561

  19. Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among older people. Dementia is a brain disorder that ... higher if a family member has had the disease. No treatment can stop the disease. However, some ...

  20. Appraisal and Coping: Moderators or Mediators of Stress in Alzheimer's Disease Caregivers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morano, Carmen Louis

    2003-01-01

    This study focused on one question: Do caregiver responses--emotion-focused coping, problem-focused coping, appraisal of burden, and appraisal of satisfaction--mediate or moderate the effects of caregiving stress on psychological well-being? Findings indicate that development of interventions that focus on how caregivers appraise their situation,…

  1. Alzheimer's Caregivers - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Alzheimer's Caregivers URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/alzheimerscaregivers.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  2. Convivendo com o portador de Alzheimer: perspectivas do familiar cuidador Conviviendo con el portador de Alzheimer: perspectiva del familiar cuidador Living with the person who has Alzheimer's disease: perspectives of family caregiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iara Cristina Carvalho Freitas

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo teve como objetivo descrever e analisar a convivência com o portador de Alzheimer sob a perspectiva do familiar cuidador. Foi utilizada a abordagem qualitativa. A coleta de dados deu-se através de entrevistas semi-estruturadas, a onze familiares cuidadores de portadores da doença de Alzheimer. Para a análise dos dados utilizou-se o referencial de análise de conteúdo, modalidade temática. Nos resultados os depoimentos obtidos foram categorizados como: a convivência com a sintomatologia e a convivência com as limitações. Considerou-se que a doença de Alzheimer é uma doença familiar e para tanto necessita de uma abordagem singular do enfermeiro que deve assumir seu papel de educador, pesquisador e envolver-se diretamente na assistência prestada.El presente estudio tuvo como objetivo describir y analizar la convivencia con el portador de Alzheimer bajo la perspectiva del familiar cuidador. Fue usado el abordaje cualitativo, con forma exploratoria y descriptiva. La colecta de datos se dio a través de entrevistas semi-estructuradas, a once familiares cuidadores de portadores de la enfermedad de Alzheimer. Para el análisis de los datos se utilizó el referencial de análisis de contenido, modalidad temática. En los resultados los testimonios obtenidos fueron categorizados como: la convivencia con la sintomatología y la convivencia con las limitaciones. Se consideró que la enfermedad de Alzheimer es una dolencia familiar y para tanto necesita un abordaje singular del enfermero que debe asumir su papel de educador, investigador e involucrarse directamente en la asistencia prestada.The present study aimed at describing and analyzing the fliving of the patient with Alzheimer's Disease under the perspective of the caregiver relative. It was used a qualitative approach. The data was collected by semi-structured interviews with eleven caregiver relatives of patients with Alzheimer's disease. The data was analyzed by the

  3. Successful linkage between formal and informal care systems: the mobilization of outside help by caregivers of persons with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Normand; Grenier, Amanda

    2012-10-01

    Health interventions are currently being revamped to address the specific needs of chronic illness and population aging. In this context, focus has increasingly turned to Alzheimer-type dementia, an illness that is considered to mobilize a large number of social actors into long-term involvement of varying intensity. Linkage problems between families and professional systems have been well documented, yet the reasons for this remain relatively unexplored. In this article, we outline how we used social network data and narrative methods to better understand the linkage processes between formal and informal care systems. We present the trajectories of four caregivers of people suffering from Alzheimer's disease who were able to establish relationships with resources outside the family. In each of the cases, the dimensions of trust and recognition were central to establishing and maintaining supportive relationships, and must therefore be understood in light of social network dynamics and the broader environment. Although preliminary, this study contributes to the state of knowledge on linkage problems by proposing "bottom-up" solutions that are client centered. PMID:22785626

  4. A Model Telephone Information and Support Program for Caregivers of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Catherine Chase; Pynoos, Jon

    1990-01-01

    Compared caregivers (N=31) in telephone peer support network and caregivers (N=35) listening to telephone informational lectures. Both groups showed increases in information, perceived social support, satisfaction with social supports. Lecture participants showed greater information gain and more frequent emotional support from family and friends;…

  5. Severity of Dementia, Anosognosia, and Depression in Relation to the Quality of Life of Patients With Alzheimer Disease: Discrepancies Between Patients and Caregivers

    OpenAIRE

    Conde Sala, Josep Lluís; Reñé Ramírez, Ramon; Turró Garriga, Oriol; Gascón-Bayarri, J.; Campdelacreu-Fumadó, J.; Juncadella i Puig, Montserrat; Rico-Pons, I.; Garre Olmo, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the factors associated with discrepancies between patient and caregiver reports of the quality of life of patients (QoLp) with Alzheimer¿s disease (AD). Methods: Cross-sectional analytic study of 141 patients and their caregivers. The instruments used were the Quality of Life in AD (QoL-AD), the Global Deterioration Scale (GDS), the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-d) and the Anosognosia Questionnaire¿Dementia (AQ-D). Differences were analyzed according to GDS stage. ...

  6. Alzheimer's Disease: Differences of Transdermal versus Oral Treatment on Caregiving Time

    OpenAIRE

    Riedel, O.; Emmrich, A.; Klotsche, J.; Dodel, R; Förstl, H; Maier, W.; Reichmann, H; Wittchen, H.-U.

    2012-01-01

    Background Data on indirect effects of dementia treatment on caregiver burden obtained from naturalistic studies are still lacking. We explored differences between patients with oral and transdermal application of acetylcholine esterase inhibitors regarding caregiver's time burden and psychopathology. Methods A cross-sectional naturalistic cohort study of 403 patients in outpatient care with three treatment groups (none, oral, and transdermal) was conducted. Assessments included a standardize...

  7. Implicações da doença de Alzheimer na qualidade de vida do cuidador: um estudo comparativo Implications of Alzheimer's disease for the caregiver's quality of life: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keika Inouye

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve como objetivo comparar a percepção geral e de cada dimensão de qualidade de vida de um grupo de cuidadores de idosos com doença de Alzheimer com um grupo de não-cuidadores emparelhado quanto às variáveis sociodemográficas. As medidas de qualidade de vida foram obtidas por meio da Escala de Avaliação da Qualidade de Vida na Doença de Alzheimer - Versão Cuidador. Foram realizadas análises estatísticas (descritivas e regressão logística ordinal. O grupo de cuidadores apresentou chance maior e significativa de avaliar negativamente as dimensões saúde física, disposição, humor, memória, você em geral e capacidade para fazer atividades de lazer quando comparado ao grupo de não-cuidadores. Quanto aos escores totais de qualidade de vida, a média obtida foi de 38,83 pontos para cuidadores e de 41,81 para não-cuidadores. Esses dados sugerem que o convívio com a doença de Alzheimer influencia negativamente o escore total e algumas dimensões de qualidade de vida do cuidador familiar.This study aimed to compare overall and dimension-specific perceptions of quality of life between a group of caregivers of elderly patients with Alzheimer's disease and a group of non-caregivers, matched for sociodemographic variables. Quality of life was measured with the Quality of Life Evaluation Scale in Alzheimer's Disease (Caregiver Version. Statistical analyses were performed (descriptive and ordinal logistic regression. Caregivers showed significantly higher odds of negatively evaluating the dimensions of physical health, disposition, mood, memory, you in general, and the capacity to perform leisure activities as compared to non-caregivers. Mean total quality of life score was 38.83 for caregivers and 41.81 for non-caregivers. The data suggest that contact with Alzheimer's disease negatively influences the total score and some dimensions of quality of life for family caregivers.

  8. Qualidade de vida de cuidadores de idosos com doença de Alzheimer Calidad de vida de cuidadores de ancianos con enfermedad de Alzheimer Quality of life among caregivers of elders with Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiry Fernanda Pinto

    2009-10-01

    (MEEM. Los datos del cuidador, obtenidos por cuestionarios, fueron el SF - 36 y el Inventario de Depresión de Beck (IDB. RESULTADOS: Los escores más comprometidos del SF -36 de los cuidadores fueron: vitalidad (56,8 y los físicos y emocionales con 58,1, respectivamente. Hubo correlación negativa entre el IDB del cuidador y el índice de Katz de los pacientes; entre el SF - 36 y el IDB y las correlaciones positivas entre los escores del SF -36 e Índice de Katz y entre los dominios de este índice y los escores del MEEM. CONCLUSIÓN: La calidad de vida de los cuidadores de pacientes con DA se mostró alterada, pudiendo comprometer los cuidados prestados por ellos y, evidenció desmejoramiento cuando la capacidad funcional del anciano estuvo más comprometida.OBJECTIVES: To evaluate quality of life among caregivers of elders with Alzheimer's disease and to examine the relationship between patients' quality of life score measured with the Katz Quality of Life Index and the relationship between the caregivers' quality of life measured with the SF-36 and depression score measured with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. METHODS: This study was conducted in a geriatric clinic (Núcleo de Envelhecimento Cerebral of the São Paulo Hospital of the Federal University of São Paulo. The sample consisted of 118 patients with Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers. Sociodemographic and cormobidity data and the Katz score of quality of life and the mini-mental status examination (MMSE score of the patients with Alzheimer's disease were obtained through chart review. Data from caregivers comprised sociodemographic and comorbidity data and the SF-36 score of quality of life and the BDI score of depression. RESULTS: SF-36 scores that were indicative of depression among caregivers were vitality (score = 56.8 and the scores on physical and emotional components were = 58.1, respectively. There was a significantly negative correlation between the caregivers' BDI score and the patients

  9. A benefit-finding intervention for family caregivers of persons with Alzheimer disease: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Sheung-Tak

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caregivers of relatives with Alzheimer’s disease are highly stressed and at risk for physical and psychiatric conditions. Interventions are usually focused on providing caregivers with knowledge of dementia, skills, and/or support, to help them cope with the stress. This model, though true to a certain extent, ignores how caregiver stress is construed in the first place. Besides burden, caregivers also report rewards, uplifts, and gains, such as a sense of purpose and personal growth. Finding benefits through positive reappraisal may offset the effect of caregiving on caregiver outcomes. Design Two randomized controlled trials are planned. They are essentially the same except that Trial 1 is a cluster trial (that is, randomization based on groups of participants whereas in Trial 2, randomization is based on individuals. Participants are randomized into three groups - benefit finding, psychoeducation, and simplified psychoeducation. Participants in each group receive a total of approximately 12 hours of training either in group or individually at home. Booster sessions are provided at around 14 months after the initial treatment. The primary outcomes are caregiver stress (subjective burden, role overload, and cortisol, perceived benefits, subjective health, psychological well-being, and depression. The secondary outcomes are caregiver coping, and behavioral problems and functional impairment of the care-recipient. Outcome measures are obtained at baseline, post-treatment (2 months, and 6, 12, 18 and 30 months. Discussion The emphasis on benefits, rather than losses and difficulties, provides a new dimension to the way interventions for caregivers can be conceptualized and delivered. By focusing on the positive, caregivers may be empowered to sustain caregiving efforts in the long term despite the day-to-day challenges. The two parallel trials will provide an assessment of whether the effectiveness of the intervention

  10. An evaluation of the burden of Alzheimer patients on family caregivers Avaliação do impacto no cuidador familiar do doente de Alzheimer

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Renata Pinatti de Moraes; Luis Sidônio Teixeira da Silva

    2009-01-01

    Caregivers are indispensable to persons living with Alzheimer's disease; however, such care involves hard work, and the consequences of this activity on caregivers are often neglected. The objective of this study was to construct a profile for caregivers of Alzheimer patients and to evaluate the burden such care imposes on them. It is a transversal study of 122 caregivers from the metropolitan region of Londrina, Paraná State, Brazil. Socio-demographic data for the caregivers were analyzed, w...

  11. Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Schachter, Armand S.; Davis, Kenneth L.

    2000-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most devastating brain disorders of elderly humans. It is an undertreated and under-recognized disease that is becoming a major public health problem. The last decade has witnessed a steadily increasing effort directed at discovering the etiology of the disease and developing pharmacological treatment. Recent developments include improved clinical diagnostic guidelines and improved treatment of both cognitive disturbance and behavioral problems. Symptomatic t...

  12. Caregiver awareness of cerebrovascular risk of patients with dementia due to Alzheimer's disease in São Paulo, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Fabricio Ferreira de Oliveira; Jose Roberto Wajman; Paulo Henrique Ferreira Bertolucci

    2014-01-01

    Background Proper control of cerebrovascular risk is essential to prevent cognitive change in dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Objective To investigate whether caregiver awareness to control cerebrovascular risk impacts the lifestyles of patients with AD. Methods Consecutive outpatients with AD were assessed for demographic features, Clinical Dementia Rating scores, cerebrovascular risk, pharmacotherapy, dietary therapy and practice of physical activities. Patients and caregiv...

  13. NEEDS SUPPORT CAREGIVER/FAMILY CARE IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Conceição Leite Funchal Camacho

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Identificar as necessidades de suporte ao cuidador/familiar nos cuidados ao idoso com Doença de Alzheimer (DA. Método: Pesquisa de natureza quanti-qualitativa na qual o cenário deste estudo foi o consultório de enfermagem do Instituto de Psiquiatria da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, referência no atendimento ao cliente com Doença de Alzheimer do Estado do Rio de Janeiro. Resultados: A família é a fonte de suporte a qual seus membros recorrem para resolução de problemas onde encontramos como questões relevantes no suporte o fato do cuidador ser idoso, escassa rede familiar, sobrecarga no cuidado, depressão, falta de disponibilidade para o cuidado, falta de autoridade, impacto da doença, dificuldades no desenvolvimento do cuidado e apoio emocional. Conclusão: Considerar o familiar/cuidador como atuante neste processo de cuidado através de planejamento contínuo constitui um desafio inexorável porque as relações de convivência familiar se fazem presentes e devem ser constantemente consideradas pela enfermeira.

  14. Caregivers for Alzheimer's patients: what we are learning from research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillehay, R C; Sandys, M R

    1990-01-01

    The research literature on adjustment by family members to providing care to victims of Alzheimer's disease is new and expanding rapidly. The purpose of this review is to summarize the categories and methods of that research; to evaluate critically the state of knowledge these studies are producing; and to suggest ways of strengthening future investigations. The review is organized around psychological, social, and health factors as antecedents or correlates of similar categories of outcomes for caregivers. While there are some emerging relationships involving caregiver burden, depression, and psychological well-being, it is difficult to generalize about the determinants or correlates of the consequences of meeting caregiver responsibilities; this difficulty probably results from a failure to deal adequately with key concepts and circumstances of the caregiver. These conceptual and methodological shortcomings are discussed and suggestions for refinement made. PMID:2204604

  15. Caregiver awareness of cerebrovascular risk of patients with dementia due to Alzheimer's disease in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabricio Ferreira de Oliveira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Proper control of cerebrovascular risk is essential to prevent cognitive change in dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Objective To investigate whether caregiver awareness to control cerebrovascular risk impacts the lifestyles of patients with AD. Methods Consecutive outpatients with AD were assessed for demographic features, Clinical Dementia Rating scores, cerebrovascular risk, pharmacotherapy, dietary therapy and practice of physical activities. Patients and caregivers were inquired on awareness of the importance of measures to control cerebrovascular risk. Chi-square test was employed for statistics, significance at ρ < 0.05. Results A total of 217 patients were included; whereas 149 caregivers (68.7% were aware of the need to control cerebrovascular risk, only 11 patients (5.1% simultaneously practiced physical activities and received pharmacological treatment and dietary therapy. Patients with hypertension and diabetes mellitus were more likely to receive dietary therapy (ρ = 0.007. Male patients were more engaged in physical activities (ρ = 0.018. Patients in earlier AD stages exercised (ρ = 0.0003 and received pharmacological treatment more often (ρ = 0.0072. Caregiver awareness of the need to control cerebrovascular risk was higher when patients had hypertension (ρ = 0.024 and/or hypercholesterolemia (ρ = 0.006, and influenced adherence to dietary therapy (ρ = 0.002 and to pharmacological treatment (ρ = 0.001. Discussion Caregiver awareness of the need to control cerebrovascular risk has positive impacts for patients with AD.

  16. Alzheimer's Disease Information Page

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Alzheimer's Disease Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Alzheimer's Disease? Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related, ...

  17. Prevalence of stress, anxiety and depression in with Alzheimer caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Vito Elisabetta

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease presents a social and public health problem affecting millions of Italians. Those affected receive home care from caregivers, subjected to risk of stress. The present investigation focuses on stress, anxiety and depression in caregivers. Methods Data on 200 caregivers and their patients were collected using a specific form to assess cognitive, behavioural, functional patient (MMSE, and ADL-IAD and caregiver stress (CBI. The relationship between stress, depression and disease has been assessed by means of a linear regression, logistic analysis which reveals the relationship between anxiety, stress and depression and cognitive problems, age, the patient's income. Results The caregivers are usually female (64%, mean age of 56.1 years, daughters (70.5%, pensioners and housewives (30%, who care for the sick at home (79%. Of these, 53% had little time for themselves, 55% observed worsening of health, 56% are tired, 51% are not getting enough sleep. Overall, 55% have problems with the patient's family and/or their own family, 57% at work. Furthermore, 29% feel they are failing to cope with the situation as they wish to move away from home. The increase in the degree of anxiety and depression is directly proportional to the severity of the illness, affecting the patient (r = 0.3 stress and depression r = 0.4 related to CBI score. The memory disorders (OR = 8.4, engine problems (OR = 2.6, perception disorders (OR = 1.9 sick of the patient with Alzheimer's disease are predictive of caregiver stress, depression is associated with the presence of other disorders, mainly behavioural (OR = 5.2, low income (OR = 3.4, patients Conclusion The quality of life of caregivers is correlated with the severity of behavioural disorders and duration of the Alzheimer's disease. The severity of the disease plays an important role in reorganization of the family environment in families caring for patients not institutionalised. It is

  18. Caring for Alzheimer's Patients. Supplement to Caregivers' Practical Help to Assist Those Who Care for Patients with Dementia Related Diseases = El Cuidado de los Pacientes de Alzheimer. Suplemento de Ayuda Practica para las Personas Encargadas para Ayudar a los que Cuidan a Pacientes que Sufren de Enfermedades Relacionadas con la Demencia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Office for the Aging, Albany.

    This manual is intended for caregivers of homebound patients with Alzheimer's disease and others who are mentally impaired. It deals with the nature of Alzheimer's, the decline in a patient's abilities, information about available services, and legal and financial issues. The manual provides guidance and suggestions to lessen the daily stress…

  19. Dementia (Including Alzheimer Disease) (Beyond the Basics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient information: Tips for caregivers of people with Alzheimer disease (The Basics) Patient information: Mild cognitive impairment (The Basics) Patient information: Evaluating memory and thinking problems (The Basics) Patient information: Vitamin B12 deficiency and folate (folic acid) deficiency (The ...

  20. Burden among male Alzheimer's caregivers: effects of distinct coping strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Jennifer R; Wilks, Scott E; Lovelace, Lauren L; Chen, Zibei; Spivey, Christina A

    2015-05-01

    Focusing on the understudied, increasing population of male Alzheimer's disease (AD) caregivers, the purpose of this study was to identify their likelihood of utilizing 3 coping strategies (task focused, emotion focused, and avoidance focused) and to examine the effects of each coping strategy on caregiving burden. Data were collected from 138 male AD caregivers in southern United States, including geographically proportional representation of African Americans in the sample. Stepwise regression revealed effects of each coping strategy on caregiving burden, controlling for demographics. The sample reported high burden. Task focused was the highest reported coping strategy. Yet, regression models indicated no significant effect of task-focused coping on burden outcomes. Emotion-focused and avoidance-focused coping each showed significant proportional effects on burden. Implications suggest that emotion- and avoidance-focused coping among male AD caregivers may be maladaptive, that is, reinforcing burden. Male AD caregivers may benefit from more task-focused coping, such as planning and active problem solving. PMID:25267930

  1. The effects of meditation on perceived stress and related indices of psychological status and sympathetic activation in persons with Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, K E; Selfe, T K; Brown, C J; Rose, K M; Thompson-Heisterman, A

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effects of an 8-week meditation program on perceived stress, sleep, mood, and related outcomes in adults with cognitive impairment and their caregivers. Methods. Community-dwelling adults with a diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment or early-stage Alzheimer's disease, together with their live-in caregivers, were enrolled in the study. After a brief training, participants were asked to meditate for 11 minutes, twice daily for 8 weeks. Major outcomes included measures of perceived stress (Perceived Stress Scale), sleep (General Sleep Disturbance Scale), mood (Profile of Mood States), memory functioning (Memory Functioning Questionnaire), and blood pressure. Participants were assessed pre- and post-intervention. Results. Ten participants (5 of 6 dyads) completed the study. Treatment effects did not vary by participant status; analyses were thus pooled across participants. Adherence was good (meditation sessions completed/week: X = 11.4 ± 1.1). Participants demonstrated improvement in all major outcomes, including perceived stress (P memory function (P = 0.04), and blood pressure (systolic, P = 0.004; diastolic, P = 0.065). Conclusions. Findings of this exploratory trial suggest that an 8-week meditation program may offer an acceptable and effective intervention for reducing perceived stress and improving certain domains of sleep, mood, and memory in adults with cognitive impairment and their caregivers.

  2. As repercussões do cuidado na vida do cuidador familiar do idoso com demência de Alzheimer Repercussions of care in the life of family caregivers of elderlies with Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Pessoa de Oliveira

    2012-09-01

    in the life of family caregivers of elderly relatives with Alzheimer's disease. By means of qualitative epistemology, the interview technique was used in the thematic life history modality, and applied to 20 caregivers of elderly individuals enrolled in the Brazilian Association of Alzheimer's Disease in the State of Amazonas, Northern Brazil. The results showed that renouncements emerge in the caregivers' testimonies as a significant repercussion of care. Social deprivation is a reality that is present in the lives of all the caregivers who took part in this study. Anger, impatience, fear, loneliness and shame are feelings experienced by the caregivers in their everyday lives, intermingling with feelings of satisfaction, happiness, compassion and retribution. It is important to highlight that in the present study the care situation lived by the caregivers was permeated by opposing feelings, being considered unpleasant in certain moments and pleasant in others. Thus, it is perceived that it is possible and relevant for the health professionals to identify the pleasure-promoting aspects in the care relationship, praising them before the others. Therefore, the possibility of facing the mishaps in the best possible way should be considered as an eminently present reality in the daily routine of care.

  3. Turning principles into practice in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindesay, J.; Bullock, R.; Daniels, H.; Emre, M.; Foerstl, H.; Froelich, L.; Gabryelewicz, T.; Martinez-Lage, P.; Monsch, A. U.; Tsolaki, M.; van Laar, T.

    2010-01-01

    P>The prevalence of dementia is reaching epidemic proportions globally, but there remain a number of issues that prevent people with dementia, their families and caregivers, from taking control of their condition. In 2008, Alzheimer's Disease International (ADI) launched a Global Alzheimer's Disease

  4. [Night of the Alzheimer's patient: the nightmare of the caregiver via the caregivers'guides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Madeleine; Mietkiewicz, Marie-Claude

    2015-06-01

    Care for Alzheimers' patients is quite a burden on the caregivers. Guides have been devoted to improve their knowledge about the disease and to help to provide the best care for the patient. A recent study on the reluctance of caregivers'spouses to seek external help, shows that none of 31 spouses had read a caregiver's guide. The aim of this study was to assess if caregiver's guides would help caregivers to deal with sleep/wake disorders. Amongst the 46 French guides, published between 1988 and 2013, thirty three raised the subject of the night sleep with more or less details. In these guides sleep disturbances are considered either as a symptom to be monitored or a natural aging process to be supported. We made a survey of the content of the caregiver's guides, of their goals and why they have been designed to. Then we analyze how the night sleep issue is dealt with in the guides, and eventually we consider the place to be granted to the patient in the management of his/her sleep disturbances.

  5. Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-Paula, Vanessa J; Radanovic, Marcia; Diniz, Breno S; Forlenza, Orestes V

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease with well-defined pathophysiological mechanisms, mostly affecting medial temporal lobe and associative neocortical structures. Neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles represent the pathological hallmarks of AD, and are respectively related to the accumulation of the amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ) in brain tissues, and to cytoskeletal changes that arise from the hyperphosphorylation of microtubule-associated Tau protein in neurons. According to the amyloid hypothesis of AD, the overproduction of Aβ is a consequence of the disruption of homeostatic processes that regulate the proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Genetic, age-related and environmental factors contribute to a metabolic shift favoring the amyloidogenic processing of APP in detriment of the physiological, secretory pathway. Aβ peptides are generated by the successive cleavage of APP by beta-secretase (BACE-1) and gamma-secretase, which has been recently characterized as part of the presenilin complex. Among several beta-amyloid isoforms that bear subtle differences depending on the number of C-terminal amino acids, Aβ (1-42) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of AD. The neurotoxic potential of the Aβ peptide results from its biochemical properties that favor aggregation into insoluble oligomers and protofibrils. These further originate fibrillary Aβ species that accumulate into senile and neuritic plaques. These processes, along with a reduction of Aβ clearance from the brain, leads to the extracellular accumulation of Aβ, and the subsequent activation of neurotoxic cascades that ultimately lead to cytoskeletal changes, neuronal dysfunction and cellular death. Intracerebral amyloidosis develops in AD patients in an age-dependent manner, but recent evidence indicate that it may be observed in some subjects as early as in the third or fourth decades of life, with increasing magnitude in late middle age

  6. Disclosure of the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease: caregivers' opinions in a Brazilian sample A revelação do diagnóstico de doença de Alzheimer: opiniões de cuidadores em uma amostra brasileira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Maria Shimizu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disclosure of the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD remains a contentious issue, and has been little studied in developing countries. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of socio-demographic factors and the experience of being a caregiver on opinion about disclosing AD diagnosis to the patient in a Brazilian sample. METHOD: Caregivers of 50 AD patients together with 50 control participants that did not have the experience of being a caregiver of AD patient were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. RESULTS: Most of the participants (73.0% endorsed disclosure of the diagnosis, while caregivers were less prone to disclose (58.0% than controls (88.0%; p=0.0007. Logistic regression confirmed that only the experience of being a caregiver was associated with a lesser tendency for disclosure endorsement. CONCLUSION: The majority of participants was in favor of disclosing the diagnosis, but caregivers were less willing to disclose the diagnosis to the AD patient.FUNDAMENTO: A revelação do diagnóstico de doença de Alzheimer (DA tem sido tema polêmico e pouco estudado em países em desenvolvimento. OBJETIVO: Investigar a influência de fatores sócio-demográficos e a experiência de ter sido cuidador na opinião sobre a revelação do diagnóstico em uma amostra brasileira. MÉTODO: Cuidadores de 50 pacientes com DA e 50 indívíduos controle que não tinham tido experiência como cuidadores de pacientes com DA foram entrevistados com o uso de um questionário estruturado. RESULTADOS: A maioria dos participantes (73,0% manifestou-se a favor da revelação diagnóstico aos pacientes, mas cuidadores foram menos favoráveis (58,0% que controles (88,0%; p=0,0007. Regressão logística demonstrou que apenas a experiência como cuidador foi associada com menor tendência a apoiar a revelação do diagnóstico. CONCLUSÃO: A maioria dos participantes foi a favor da revelação do diagnóstico ao paciente, mas aqueles com experi

  7. The Experience of High Levels of Grief in Caregivers of Persons with Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Sara; Ott, Carol H.; Kelber, Sheryl T.; Noonan, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    An abundance of literature on caregivers of individuals with dementia has been written since the mid-1980s. However, most of this literature focused on the experience of stress, burden, and depression in caregivers, thus excluding the grief experience that also accompanies the caregiving experience. The purpose of this multimethod study is to…

  8. Telephone Networks Connect Caregiving Families of Alzheimer's Victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Catherine Chase; Pynoos, Jon

    1988-01-01

    Describes telephone network bringing family caregivers of Alzheimer's victims together over telephone in rotating pattern of twosomes. Explains how five caregiving spouses and five adult children were matched and connected over three months. Describes program's 25 telephone-accessed audiotapes that guided networks and provided information on…

  9. 2008 Alzheimer's disease facts and figures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the seventh leading cause of all deaths in the United States and the fifth leading cause of death in Americans older than the age of 65 years. More than 5 million Americans are estimated to have Alzheimer's disease. Every 71 seconds someone in America develops Alzheimer's disease; by 2050 it is expected to occur every 33 seconds. During the coming decades, baby boomers are projected to add 10 million people to these numbers. By 2050, the incidence of Alzheimer's disease is expected to approach nearly a million people per year, with a total estimated prevalence of 11 to 16 million persons. Significant cost implications related to Alzheimer's disease and other dementias include an estimated $148 billion annually in direct (Medicare/Medicaid) and indirect (eg, caregiver lost wages and out-of-pocket expenses, decreased business productivity) costs. Not included in these figures are the estimated 10 million caregivers who annually provide $89 billion in unpaid services to individuals with Alzheimer's disease. This report provides information to increase understanding of the public health impact of Alzheimer's disease, including incidence and prevalence, mortality, lifetime risks, costs, and impact on family caregivers. PMID:18631956

  10. Treatments for Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find your chapter: search by state Home > Alzheimer's Disease > Treatments Overview What Is Dementia? What Is Alzheimer's? Younger/Early Onset Facts and Figures Know the 10 Signs Stages Inside the Brain: ...

  11. [Caring for a person affected by Alzheimer's disease: specific aspects of grief in family caregivers and their social support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaquin-Pavan, Evelyne; Pierrot, Marylène

    2007-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (DTA) leads to some behavioural, physical and psychic modifications in the patient that the natural helper (family-spouse-child) will have to face throughout the course of the disease. The authors have tried to identify the nature of losses experienced by helpers so as to bring out some preventive and curative support tracks. This preparatory research-action was conducted with 27 families through semi-directive conversations which enabled to reveal their difficulties (somatic-emotional-affective-organizational), their reactions of adaptation in echo with the losses of the patient along the course of the DTA as well as the elements enabling to maintain or not the ill person's family/close relation link. The analysis of obtained results is proposed according to the concepts of adaptation, affection and separation, systemic approach and coping. The comments and behaviours of helpers are put in relation with the symptoms of mourning as well as with the medical interactions, helper or not. Five chronological times were identified (before diagnosis-moment of the diagnosis-keeping at home-admission in institution-life in institution). The period of white mourning (connected to the loss of the recognition of his/her close relations by the patient) is mainly felt as a vector of suffering. As part of the dynamics of social support, the proposed tracks of nursing interventions mainly target the admission and life in institution; their aim is to offer an adapted support to natural helpers, whether they make the choice or not to support their close patients throughout the institutionalization. In appendices, all the key ideas helping to track down the elements contributing to maintain the ill person's helper/close relation link or accelerating his/her breaking down.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Alzheimer disease Alzheimer disease Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Alzheimer disease is a degenerative disease of the brain ...

  13. Calidad de vida de los cuidadores familiares de los pacientes con enfermedad de Alzheimer / Quality of life of patients with family caregivers of Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Osorio Lambis, Martha

    2011-01-01

    Esta investigación tiene como objetivo describir la calidad de vida del cuidador familiar de paciente con enfermedad de Alzheimer en la ciudad de Cartagena, en las dimensiones física, psicológica, social y espiritual observada y recolectada en su ambiente natural. El diseño del estudio es de tipo descriptivo con abordaje cuantitativo, la muestra fue constituida por 61 cuidadores familiares de pacientes con enfermedad de Alzheimer inscritos en la Fundación Centro Colombiano de Epileps...

  14. Duelo y muerte en cuidadores familiares y profesionales de enfermos de Alzheimer Mourning and death in informal and professional caregivers of Alzheimer's disease patients

    OpenAIRE

    Enrique Pérez-Godoy Díaz; Antonio Javier Moreno-Guerín Baños

    2007-01-01

    Como en cualquier proceso crónico y degenerativo abocado a la muerte, la enfermedad de Alzheimer y las demencias provocan en sus cuidadores familiares y profesionales diversos sentimientos, procesos y duelos tanto ante la muerte real como la muerte psíquica. Utilizando una metodología cualitativa analizamos diversos casos de cuidadores de enfermos de Alzheimer institucionalizados en un centro sociosanitario de donde concluimos que no sólo la muerte real puede provocar un duelo en los cuidador...

  15. Qualidade de vida de idosos com doença de Alzheimer e de seus cuidadores Calidad de vida de los ancianos con enfermedad de Alzheimer y sus cuidadores Quality of life of elders with Alzheimer's disease and of their caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carla Borghi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do estudo foi identificar a qualidade de vida (QV do cuidador e a do idoso com Doença de Alzheimer (DA. Estudo descritivo-exploratório realizado em Maringá, Paraná, junto a 50 idosos e seus respectivos cuidadores. Os dados foram coletados no período de novembro de 2010 a janeiro de 2011 com aplicação da Escala de Avaliação da Qualidade de Vida na Doença de Alzheimer. A média dos escores totais para pacientes e cuidadores foi respectivamente, 26,36 e 35,04 pontos. Os itens moradia (98% e família (72% apresentaram maior satisfação para cuidadores e idosos e os itens memória e tarefas (92% para os cuidadores e lazer (52% para os idosos alcançaram maiores índices de insatisfação. Considera-se que a QV do cuidador reflete diretamente no cuidado prestado e, portanto, também deve ser considerada no planejamento e implementação da assistência ao idoso com DA.El objetivo del estudio fue identificar la calidad de vida (CV del cuidador y la del anciano con Enfermedad de Alzheimer (EA. Estudio descriptivo-exploratorio realizado en Maringá, Paraná, Brasil, junto a 50 ancianos y cuidadores. Los datos fueron recogidos en el período de noviembre de 2010 a enero de 2011 con aplicación de la Escala de Evaluación de la Calidad de Vida en la Enfermedad de Alzheimer. El promedio de los resultados totales para pacientes y cuidadores fue respectivamente, 26,36 y 35,04 puntos. Los ítems vivienda (98% y familia (72% presentaron mayor satisfacción de los cuidadores y ancianos y los ítems memoria y tareas (92% a los cuidadores y ocio (52% a los ancianos alcanzaron mayores índices de insatisfacción. Se considera que la CV del cuidador refleja directamente en el cuidado prestado y, por lo tanto, también debe ser considerada en el planeamiento e implementación de la asistencia al anciano con EA.The objective of the study was to identify the quality of life (QoL of elders with Alzheimer`s Disease (AD and of their caregivers. This

  16. Aripiprazole in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Deyn, P.P.; Drenth, Annemieke F. J.; Kremer, B.P.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Van Dam, D.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Psychosis is a common and difficult to treat symptom in Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is a cause of diminished quality of life and care-giver distress. Atypical antipsychotics are frequently used for the treatment of dementia-related psychosis, despite FDA warnings because of increased

  17. Aripiprazole in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deyn, P.P. de; Drenth, A.F.; Kremer, B.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Dam, D. Van

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Psychosis is a common and difficult to treat symptom in Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is a cause of diminished quality of life and caregiver distress. Atypical antipsychotics are frequently used for the treatment of dementia-related psychosis, despite FDA warnings because of increased m

  18. Early psychosocial intervention in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Sørensen, Jan; Waldorff, Frans B;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the cost utility of early psychosocial intervention for patients with Alzheimer's disease and their primary caregivers. DESIGN: Cost utility evaluation alongside a multicentre, randomised controlled trial with 3 years of follow-up. SETTING: Primary care and memory clinics...

  19. The burden of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Alistair

    2000-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) imposes a severe burden upon patients and their carers. In particular, family carers of AD patients face extreme hardship and distress that represents a major but often hidden burden on healthcare systems. Carers often experience clinically significant alterations in physical and mental health, particularly depression. A number of individual features of the dementia syndrome that are known to be particularly burdensome to carers include the degree of cognitive impairment, amount of help required with activities of daily living, personality changes and the presence of psychiatric symptoms and behavioural disturbances. The neuropsychiatric features of AD patients can adversely impact the relationship between the patient and caregiver generating feelings of strain, burden and social isolation. Individual characteristics of the caregiver including personality, gender, degree of formal and informal support and physical and mental health, as well as attributional style ('coping style') and expressed emotion (critical or hostile attitudes), also dictate carer burden. As informal caregivers play such a crucial role in the care of AD patients, appropriate management strategies that incorporate interventions which address the specific burdens of the individual caregiver are essential. Reducing the burden of care can be achieved by the combination of a number of individual and general measures, including education, respite and emotion-focused interventions. These measures, accompanied by non-pharmacological strategies, are extremely important in the total care of the AD patient, with the emphasis on maintaining people in the community as long as possible.

  20. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heneka, Michael T.; Carson, Monica J.; El Khoury, Joseph; Landreth, Gary E.; Brosseron, Frederic; Feinstein, Douglas L.; Jacobs, Andreas H.; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Vitorica, Javier; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Herrup, Karl; Frautschy, Sally A.; Finsen, Bente; Brown, Guy C.; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Yamanaka, Koji; Koistinaho, Jari; Latz, Eicke; Halle, Annett; Petzold, Gabor C.; Town, Terrence; Morgan, Dave; Shinohara, Mari L.; Perry, V. Hugh; Holmes, Clive; Bazan, Nicolas G.; Brooks, David J.; Hunot, Stephane; Joseph, Bertrand; Deigendesch, Nikolaus; Garaschuk, Olga; Boddeke, Erik; Dinarello, Charles A.; Breitner, John C.; Cole, Greg M.; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Kummer, Markus P.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment, but includes strong interactions with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on microglia and astroglia, and trigg

  1. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heneka, Michael T; Carson, Monica J; Khoury, Joseph El;

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment, but includes strong interactions with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on microglia and astroglia, and tr...

  2. [Alzheimer and the discovery of Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhagn, Lili; Li, Zhiping

    2014-09-01

    Alzheimer was born in Germany in 1864. In 1887, Alzheimer graduated with a medical doctor degree at the University of Würzburg. In 1888, Alzheimer began to work in the Community Hospital for Mental and Epileptic Patients in Frankfurt am Main for 14 years. During this time, Alzheimer published the six-volume Histologic and Histopathologic Studies of the Cerebral Cortex, with co-author Franz Nissl. In 1903, Alzheimer came to work in the Royal Psychiatric Clinic of the University of Munich. One year later, he published his postdoctoral paper of Histological Studies about the Differential Diagnosis of Progressive Paralysis in 1904. In 1912, Alzheimer was provided the chair of psychiatry at the University of Breslau. On the way to Breslau, Alzheimer got sick, and eventually died in 1915. In 1906, Alzheimer found numerous amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain of a patient called Auguste under the microscope. In November of the same year, Alzheimer gave a lecture about Auguste's case at the 37(th) Conference of South-West German Psychiatrists in Tübingen, which received little attention. In 1910, Kraepelin mentioned "Alzheimer's disease" for the first time to name the disease of what Auguste got in the 8th edition of Handbook of Psychiatry. Therefore, Alzheimer achieved worldwide recognition.

  3. Everyday life and social relations in home-living patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers: Quantitative and qualitative analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth Villemoes

    2007-01-01

    interviews with 10 couples before and after the intervention programme. For the analysis, a template organising style of interpretation was used. Patients and caregivers found good support for coping with everyday life and social relations by participating in the intervention programme. Early counselling...... with the changes they face in relation to everyday life and social relations; and 3) to identify and analyse the experience of patients and their spousal caregivers concerning the impact of an intensive psychosocial intervention programme with tailored counselling, education courses and support groups, conducted...... of social participation in AD patients and their caregivers, as well as the impact of AD on the dynamics of couples during the course of the disease....

  4. Cost Analysis of Early Psychosocial Intervention in Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, R.; Sørensen, J.; Waldorff, F.B.;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: To investigate the impact of early psychosocial intervention aimed at patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and their caregivers on resource use and costs from a societal perspective. METHODS: Dyads of patients and their primary caregiver were randomised to intervention (n = 163...

  5. Alzheimer's disease and euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvargonzález, David

    2012-12-01

    Employing the tenets of philosophical materialism, this paper discusses the ethical debate surrounding assisted suicide for persons suffering end-stage Alzheimer's. It first presents a classification of the dissociative situations between "human individual" and "human person". It then moves on to discuss challenges to diagnosed persons and their caregivers in relation to the cardinal virtues of Spinozistic ethics--strength of character (fortitudo), firmness (animositas) and generosity (generositas). Finally, a number of ideas attached to the debate--"right of choice", "death with dignity", "quality of life" and "compassion in dying"--are discussed in order to clarify their foundations. PMID:22939533

  6. Alzheimer's disease: early diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, L W

    2012-06-01

    With ageing of populations, the worldwide population of persons with dementia will reach over 81 million by 2040, of which the most common cause is Alzheimer's disease. In recent years, there have been major advances in the understanding of its pathogenesis, methods to diagnose it, and treatment. Magnetic resonance brain imaging, cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, and Pittsburgh compound B and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography of the brain can facilitate an accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in its early stage, and diagnose the mild cognitive impairment stage of Alzheimer's disease. At present, only symptomatic but not disease-modifying drug treatments are available. Donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine are the currently approved cholinesterase inhibitors for the treatment of mild, moderate, and severe Alzheimer's disease. Overall, cholinesterase inhibitors show beneficial effects on cognition, activity of daily living, behaviour, and overall clinical rating. Memantine is another symptomatic treatment for moderate-to-severe Alzheimer's disease patients. It has a small beneficial effect on cognition, activity of daily living, behaviour, and overall clinical rating. Vitamin E has antioxidant properties, and may be used in some Alzheimer's disease patients without vascular risk factors. Concurrent non-pharmacological and psychosocial management of patients and their caregivers have a very important role. Disease-modifying therapies are still under development, whilst immunotherapy may be a viable option in the near future. PMID:22665688

  7. Cerebrolysin in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antón Álvarez, X; Fuentes, Patricio

    2011-07-01

    Cerebrolysin is a neuropeptide preparation mimicking the action of endogenous neurotrophic factors. Positive effects of Cerebrolysin on β-amyloid- and tau-related pathologies, neuroinflammation, neurotrophic factors, oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, neurotransmission, brain metabolism, neuroplasticity, neuronal apoptosis and degeneration, neurogenesis and cognition were demonstrated in experimental conditions. These pleiotropic effects of Cerebrolysin on Alzheimer's disease-related pathogenic events are consistent with a neurotrophic-like mode of action, and seems to involve the activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/glycogen synthase kinase-3 β intracellular signaling pathway. The clinical efficacy of Cerebrolysin in Alzheimer's disease was evaluated in several randomized, double-blind, clinical trials, showing consistent benefits on global clinical function and cognition, improvements in behavior at high doses, and minor effects on daily living activities in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease, as well as in subgroups of moderate to moderately severe patients. In addition, the clinical benefits of Cerebrolysin were largely maintained for several months after ending treatment, a finding that supports its discontinuous administration. Cerebrolysin was generally well tolerated and did not induce significant adverse events in Alzheimer's patients. Although long-term studies are needed, the data available suggest that Cerebrolysin is effective as monotherapy and constitutes a promising option for combined therapy in Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghul, S; Wilkinson, D

    2001-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a growing problem in an aging Western world, estimated to have cost the US economy USD 1.75 trillion. Until recently, the management of Alzheimer's disease largely comprised support for the family, nursing care and the use of unlicensed medication to control behavioral disturbances. The three new acetylcholinesterase inhibitors licensed to treat Alzheimer's disease (donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine) have provided clinicians with a major impetus to their desire to diagnose and treat this lethal disease. Their effects on cognition are proven. More recent work on the effects of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors on behavioral symptoms, activities of daily living and caregiver burden have also been encouraging. Emerging work indicates their likely efficacy in other dementias (e.g., vascular dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies). This review summarizes the evidence concerning the impact of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in dementia both currently and over the next 5 years. PMID:19811047

  9. Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TDP43-related Dementia 2013 Andrew Watt Characterisation of Tau Imaging Ligands for Alzheimer's Disease and other Dementias 2010 Marco Prado The Prion Protein as a Therapeutic Target in Alzheimer's Disease 2007 ...

  10. Caregiver burden and coping strategies in caregivers of patients with Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iavarone A

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Alessandro Iavarone,1,2 Antonio Rosario Ziello,3,4 Francesca Pastore,3 Angiola Maria Fasanaro,3 Carla Poderico5 1Neurological and Stroke Unit, CTO Hospital, 2Italian Association on Alzheimer's Disease (AIMA, 3Memory Clinic, Neurological Unit, AORN Cardarelli Hospital, Naples, Italy; 4Clinical Research, Telemedicine and Telepharmacy Centre, University of Camerino, Camerino, Italy; 5Department of Psychology, Second University of Naples, Caserta, Italy Background: Alzheimer’s disease (AD causes considerable distress in caregivers who are continuously required to deal with requests from patients. Coping strategies play a fundamental role in modulating the psychologic impact of the disease, although their role is still debated. The present study aims to evaluate the burden and anxiety experienced by caregivers, the effectiveness of adopted coping strategies, and their relationships with burden and anxiety. Methods: Eighty-six caregivers received the Caregiver Burden Inventory (CBI and the ­State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI Y-1 and Y-2. The coping strategies were assessed by means of the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS, according to the model proposed by Endler and Parker in 1990.Results: The CBI scores (overall and single sections were extremely high and correlated with dementia severity. Women, as well as older caregivers, showed higher scores. The trait anxiety (STAI-Y-2 correlated with the CBI overall score. The CISS showed that caregivers mainly adopted task-focused strategies. Women mainly adopted emotion-focused strategies and this style was related to a higher level of distress. Conclusion: AD is associated with high distress among caregivers. The burden strongly correlates with dementia severity and is higher in women and in elderly subjects. Chronic anxiety affects caregivers who mainly rely on emotion-oriented coping strategies. The findings suggest providing support to families of patients with AD through tailored

  11. The Effects of Meditation on Perceived Stress and Related Indices of Psychological Status and Sympathetic Activation in Persons with Alzheimer's Disease and Their Caregivers: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. Innes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the effects of an 8-week meditation program on perceived stress, sleep, mood, and related outcomes in adults with cognitive impairment and their caregivers. Methods. Community-dwelling adults with a diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment or early-stage Alzheimer’s disease, together with their live-in caregivers, were enrolled in the study. After a brief training, participants were asked to meditate for 11 minutes, twice daily for 8 weeks. Major outcomes included measures of perceived stress (Perceived Stress Scale, sleep (General Sleep Disturbance Scale, mood (Profile of Mood States, memory functioning (Memory Functioning Questionnaire, and blood pressure. Participants were assessed pre- and post-intervention. Results. Ten participants (5 of 6 dyads completed the study. Treatment effects did not vary by participant status; analyses were thus pooled across participants. Adherence was good (meditation sessions completed/week: X=11.4±1.1. Participants demonstrated improvement in all major outcomes, including perceived stress (P<0.001, mood (overall, P=0.07; depression, P=0.01, sleep (P<0.04, retrospective memory function (P=0.04, and blood pressure (systolic, P=0.004; diastolic, P=0.065. Conclusions. Findings of this exploratory trial suggest that an 8-week meditation program may offer an acceptable and effective intervention for reducing perceived stress and improving certain domains of sleep, mood, and memory in adults with cognitive impairment and their caregivers.

  12. 2016 Alzheimer's disease facts and figures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    This report describes the public health impact of Alzheimer's disease, including incidence and prevalence, mortality rates, costs of care, and the overall impact on caregivers and society. It also examines in detail the financial impact of Alzheimer's on families, including annual costs to families and the difficult decisions families must often make to pay those costs. An estimated 5.4 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease. By mid-century, the number of people living with Alzheimer's disease in the United States is projected to grow to 13.8 million, fueled in large part by the aging baby boom generation. Today, someone in the country develops Alzheimer's disease every 66 seconds. By 2050, one new case of Alzheimer's is expected to develop every 33 seconds, resulting in nearly 1 million new cases per year. In 2013, official death certificates recorded 84,767 deaths from Alzheimer's disease, making it the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and the fifth leading cause of death in Americans age ≥ 65 years. Between 2000 and 2013, deaths resulting from stroke, heart disease, and prostate cancer decreased 23%, 14%, and 11%, respectively, whereas deaths from Alzheimer's disease increased 71%. The actual number of deaths to which Alzheimer's disease contributes is likely much larger than the number of deaths from Alzheimer's disease recorded on death certificates. In 2016, an estimated 700,000 Americans age ≥ 65 years will die with Alzheimer's disease, and many of them will die because of the complications caused by Alzheimer's disease. In 2015, more than 15 million family members and other unpaid caregivers provided an estimated 18.1 billion hours of care to people with Alzheimer's and other dementias, a contribution valued at more than $221 billion. Average per-person Medicare payments for services to beneficiaries age ≥ 65 years with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias are more than two and a half times as great as payments for all

  13. Caregiver Burden in Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Ilhan Atagun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Duration of human life has been substantially increased in the last fifty years. Survivals of diseases have been prolonged through the advances in medicine. Together with these gratifying consequences, there appeared novel difficulties to cope with. Furthermore developments including globalization, industrialization and transition from rural to urban life occurred during the last century; so family units became smaller and numbers of members on employment in family units increased. As a result numbers of family members to undertake the responsibility of care decreased. As a concept, caregiver burden expresses physical, psychosocial and financial reactions during the course of care providing. Distinct factors including structures of social, cultural and family units and health care systems may affect conditions of care. Caregiver’s age, gender, ethnicity, education, relationship with the patient, attitude towards providing care, financial situation, coping abilities, her own health, beliefs, social support and cultural pattern are the personal factors that are related to perception of caregiver burden. Burden of care giving is geared to differential aspects of care needs. For instance care needs of physically disabled and medical care requiring patients with spinal cord injuries may differ from care needs of chronic psychiatric disorders, demented patients in advanced age of their lives or cancer patients in terminal periods. Strain due to care giving may differ as a result of properties of care demands. It is aimed to review the burden of caregivers in different medical and psychiatric care requiring conditions and to introduce differential aspects of caregiver burden in these different conditions.

  14. Convivendo com o portador de Alzheimer: perspectivas do familiar cuidador Conviviendo con el portador de Alzheimer: perspectiva del familiar cuidador Living with the person who has Alzheimer's disease: perspectives of family caregiver

    OpenAIRE

    Iara Cristina Carvalho Freitas; Kelvia Coelho Campos de Paula; Juliana Lima Soares; Adriana da Cunha Menezes Parente

    2008-01-01

    O presente estudo teve como objetivo descrever e analisar a convivência com o portador de Alzheimer sob a perspectiva do familiar cuidador. Foi utilizada a abordagem qualitativa. A coleta de dados deu-se através de entrevistas semi-estruturadas, a onze familiares cuidadores de portadores da doença de Alzheimer. Para a análise dos dados utilizou-se o referencial de análise de conteúdo, modalidade temática. Nos resultados os depoimentos obtidos foram categorizados como: a convivência com a sint...

  15. Qualidade de vida de cuidadores de idosos com doença de Alzheimer Calidad de vida de cuidadores de ancianos con enfermedad de Alzheimer Quality of life among caregivers of elders with Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Dulce Aparecida Barbosa; Ceres Eloah de Lucena Ferreti; Lídia Ferreira de Souza; Dayana Souza Fram; Angélica Gonçalves Silva Belasco

    2009-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Avaliar a qualidade de vida de cuidadores de idosos com doença de Alzheimer e relacioná-la ao Índice de Katz dos pacientes e ao escore do Inventário de Depressão de Beck dos cuidadores. MÉTODOS: O estudo foi desenvolvido no Núcleo de Envelhecimento Cerebral da Universidade Federal de São Paulo/ Hospital São Paulo. A amostra foi constituída, respectivamente, por 118 cuidadores e seus pacientes com doença de Alzheimer (DA). As informações coletadas nos prontuários dos pacientes foram ...

  16. Analysis of the incidence of the abuse tendency among Alzheimer's disease caregivers%老年痴呆照顾者虐待倾向及影响因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨萍萍; 沈军

    2013-01-01

    目的 了解老年痴呆照顾者虐待倾向现状及影响因素.方法 运用照顾者虐待老年人评估量表中文版(CASE)、自制老年痴呆患者、照顾者一般资料对重庆市主城区242名老年痴呆照顾者进行问卷调查,并对结果进行分析.结果 83.5%的照顾者对老年痴呆患者存在虐待倾向.以Logistic回归模型分析得出照顾者教育程度、分担照顾任务的人数,患者痴呆行为和精神症状、生活自理能力是虐待倾向的影响因素.结论 关注老年痴呆患者的生活现状,保护老年痴呆患者的权益,应及早采取多种有效的措施,预防并减少老年痴照顾者虐待危险行为的发生.%Objective To investigate the influence factors of the caregivers' abuse tendency to Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients in community. Methods 242 caregivers for AD patients in 7 different regions of Chongqing were received as investigations by the caregiver abuse screening and the homemade general information of AD patients and caregivers and their influence factors were analyzed by Logistic regression mode. Results Logistic regression analysis showed that the cognition of taking care of behavior, the time of providing care for,elderly patients with AD behavior and mental symptoms and care capacity were the influence factors of the caregivers'abuse tendency to AD patients in community. Conclusions The life situation of AD patients should be paid attention to protecting their rights and interests. Therefore kinds of measures should be taken to lower the risk for abusing the AD patients for the purpose of increasing their quality of life.

  17. Autosomal-dominant Alzheimer's disease: a review and proposal for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bateman, R.J.; Aisen, P.S.; De Strooper, B.; Fox, N C; Lemere, C. A.; Ringman, J.M.; Salloway, S; Sperling, R. A.; Windisch, M.; Xiong, C.

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant Alzheimer's disease has provided significant understanding of the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. The present review summarizes clinical, pathological, imaging, biochemical, and molecular studies of autosomal-dominant Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the similarities and differences between the dominantly inherited form of Alzheimer's disease and the more common sporadic form of Alzheimer's disease. Current developments in autosomal-dominant Alzheimer's disease are...

  18. [Truth telling of Alzheimer's disease diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes R, Paola; Prato, Juan Andrés

    2012-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease is becoming an increasingly common problem due to population aging. Most of the research on truth telling in relation to diagnosis has been done in oncology. However, although growing, there has a lack of interest about attitudes held among physicians towards disclosing the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Physicians, family caregivers and patients have different views about it. The reasons most often given for communicating the diagnosis are the right to know, relief of anxiety to know the cause of memory problems, early access to treatment and ability to plan ahead. On the contrary, the reasons for concealing the diagnosis are based on the right not to know, the anxiety associated to knowing the diagnosis and the absence of curative therapies for the disease. The aim of this paper is to report the current state of literature on diagnostic truth telling in dementia, review the ethical principles involved, and finally give a strategy to address the issue.

  19. Discrepancy between self- and proxy-rated pain in Alzheimer's disease: results from the danish Alzheimer intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen-Dahm, C.; Vogel, A.; Waldorff, F.B.;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prevalence of self- and proxy-reported pain in a cohort with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to identify characteristics of individuals with AD reporting pain. DESIGN: Data were collected at the baseline visit of the Danish Alzheimer Intervention Study. SETTING......: Community. PARTICIPANTS: Three hundred twenty-one community-living individuals with AD (MMSE >/= 20) and their primary caregivers. MEASUREMENTS: Pain was assessed as part of the EuroQol EQ-5D (caregiver- and self-rated). The Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia, Quality of Life in Alzheimer's Disease...

  20. Exosomes in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, Tarja; Loppi, Sanna; Kanninen, Katja M

    2016-07-01

    Exosomes, nano-sized extracellular vesicles secreted by most cell types, are found everywhere in the body. The role of exosomes in cellular functions has in the past years developed from being considered little more than cellular trashcans, to being proven important intercellular messengers and notable contributors to both health and in disease. A vast number of studies have revealed the multiple, and somewhat controversial role of exosomes in Alzheimer's disease, the most common neurodegenerative disease. Exosomes have been shown to spread toxic amyloid-beta and hyperphosphorylated tau between cells, and they have been suspected of inducing apoptosis and thereby contributing to neuronal loss. On the other hand, exosomes seem to possess the ability to reduce brain amyloid-beta through microglial uptake, and they are known to transfer neuroprotective substances between cells. These features, among many others, make exosomes extremely interesting from the point of view of developing novel therapeutic approaches. The fact that exosomes derived from the central nervous system can be found in bodily fluids also makes them an appealing target for biomarker development, which is not limited only to Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27131734

  1. An evaluation of the burden of Alzheimer patients on family caregivers Avaliação do impacto no cuidador familiar do doente de Alzheimer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Renata Pinatti de Moraes

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Caregivers are indispensable to persons living with Alzheimer's disease; however, such care involves hard work, and the consequences of this activity on caregivers are often neglected. The objective of this study was to construct a profile for caregivers of Alzheimer patients and to evaluate the burden such care imposes on them. It is a transversal study of 122 caregivers from the metropolitan region of Londrina, Paraná State, Brazil. Socio-demographic data for the caregivers were analyzed, while the Katz scale and Lawton index were used to evaluate the functionality of Alzheimer's patients, and the Burden Interview Scale assessed the burden these patients impose on caregivers. Caregivers are predominantly married, are daughters who have learned to care for the patient on a daily basis, usually with some help, and they do so out of love. The caregiver's age (p O cuidador é indispensável ao paciente com doença de Alzheimer, no entanto cuidar é uma tarefa árdua, e as conseqüências dessa atividade em quem cuida são negligenciadas. Estudo transversal realizado na região metropolitana do Município de Londrina, Paraná, Brasil, tem por objetivo caracterizar o perfil e avaliar o impacto da ação sobre 122 cuidadores principais de pacientes com doença de Alzheimer. A escala de Katz e o índice de Lawton foram utilizadas para avaliar a funcionalidade dos pacientes com doença de Alzheimer, e a Burden Interview Scale, para avaliar o impacto no cuidador. Caracterizaram-se seus dados sócio-demográficos. Os cuidadores foram predominantemente filhas, casadas, que aprenderam o cuidado no dia-a-dia, contavam com auxílio e exerciam a função por afeto. Associaram-se ao impacto de forma independente: idade do cuidador (p < 0,01, contar com auxílio (p < 0,01 e número de horas de cuidado (p = 0,01. Os cuidadores estudados apresentaram impacto elevado.

  2. Identical twins with Alzheimer's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Kilpatrick, C; Burns, R; Blumbergs, P C

    1983-01-01

    Genetically proven identical twin sisters with Alzheimer's disease are reported. Both sisters at the age of fifty years developed a dementing illness. Their mother and maternal grandmother developed at the same age a similar illness. It is suggested that in some cases of familial Alzheimer's disease the condition is inherited by a single mutant gene.

  3. Caregiving e malattia di Alzheimer: una ricerca sugli effetti del luogo di cura sul benessere psicofisico dei caregiver

    OpenAIRE

    Ripamonti, C.; Gatti, M; Alessi, C; Fumagalli, B; Sala, F.

    2014-01-01

    Introduzione: Le caratteristiche della malattia di Alzheimer fanno si che la cura del paziente affetto da questo tipo di demenza risulti difficoltosa e possa incidere sull’equilibrio psico-fisico e sulla motivazione di chi opera a stretto contatto con questi malati (Aguglia et al., 2004). L’esposizione prolungata del caregiver a fattori di stress cronici è stata definita “caregiver burden” (Pillemer, Suitor, 1996), termine che esprime il carico fisico, psicologico, sociale e finanziario del c...

  4. Alzheimer's Disease Beyond Abeta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, Terrence

    2010-05-01

    Many of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) clinical trials have made it far enough down the pipeline to allow conclusions about targeting the amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) as a therapeutic approach. Based on these results, it is becoming clear that a multifocal approach to AD treatment is probably necessary. However, critical discussion beyond Abeta is necessary to enable the next wave of AD therapeutic targets. For this reason, the 2010 Keystone Symposium, 'Alzheimer's Disease Beyond Abeta', was organized by JoAnne McLaurin and Tony Wyss-Coray to spark topical discussion and debate. While researchers struggled to get beyond that ever-present pathognomonic feature of AD, new and exciting evidence was presented that raised our awareness of what is around the corner for next-generation AD therapeutics beyond Abeta. This report will describe some of the highlights from Copper Mountain Resort throughout the meeting period of 10-15 January 2010 in Colorado (USA). Despite illuminating scientific presentations and intense discussions, a number of important questions remain concerning the best biomarkers and targets to focus on, and when and how to therapeutically intervene. PMID:20429127

  5. O impacto do declínio cognitivo, da capacidade funcional e da mobilidade de idosos com doença de Alzheimer na sobrecarga dos cuidadores The impact of cognitive, functional, and mobility decline of elderly with Alzheimer disease on their caregivers' burden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa de Lima Borges

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo foi avaliar capacidade funcional, mobilidade e função cognitiva de idosos com a doença de Alzheimer (DA, bem como o nível de sobrecarga de seus cuidadores, verificando possíveis associações entre essas variáveis. Foram selecionados 28 idosos (77,8±8,3 anos diagnosticados com DA por meio do manual diagnóstico e estatístico das doenças mentais e da Classificação Internacional de Doenças; e também os respectivos cuidadores (58,0±13,9 anos, todos participantes da Associação Brasileira de Alzheimer em Goiás. Foram avaliadas função cognitiva, mobilidade e capacidade funcional dos idosos, por meio do miniexame do estado mental, Southampton assessment of mobility e Disability assessment for dementia, respectivamente. O nível de sobrecarga dos cuidadores foi avaliado pela Zarit burden interview. As associações foram calculadas pelo teste de correlação de Spearman e o nível de significância fixado em 0,05. Obtiveram-se correlações fracas significativas entre o nível cognitivo e a escolaridade dos idosos (r=0,389; p=0,041, nível de funcionalidade dos idosos e nível de sobrecarga dos cuidadores (r=-0,398; p=0,036, e mobilidade e tempo de diagnóstico da DA (r=0,401; p=0,042. Os resultados sugerem que o deficit cognitivo não interferiu na capacidade funcional e a perda cognitiva foi proporcionalmente maior que a perda da mobilidade. Foi possível associar a sobrecarga dos cuidadores ao nível de funcionalidade dos idosos com doença de Alzheimer.The purpose here was to assess functional capacity, mobility, and cognitive function of elderly with Alzheimer disease (AD, as well as the level of burden of their respective caregivers, and to search for possible associations between both. Among members of the Brazilian Alzheimer Association in Goiás, 28 subjects (aged 77.8±8.3 years were selected, diagnosed following the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and the International Statistical

  6. Understanding Family Interaction Patterns in Families With Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaber, Patricia; Blair, Kate; Jost, Ellen; Schaffer, Molly; Thurner, Emily

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the dynamic changes that occur in family interaction patterns when Alzheimer's disease is present. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 participants who have a family member with the disease. Using modified analytic induction, guided by the dimensions of the Family Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation (FIRO) Model, participants shared how Alzheimer's disease affected family structure, control dynamics, and intimacy among family members. Findings demonstrate that (a) families reorganize and restructure based on geographic proximity and shifting roles, act out of filial responsibility, and strive to preserve shared meanings and rituals; (b) decision making increases around care of the person with Alzheimer's disease and shifts to the primary caregiver or other family members based on their abilities; and (c) expressions of intimacy intensify while personality is preserved in the person with the disease. The Family FIRO model can inform practitioners using family-centered care with families with Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Alzheimer's disease and other dementias in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Suzy L; Gilmour, Heather; Ramage-Morin, Pamela L

    2016-05-18

    This article provides information on Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, using the 2010/2011 Canadian Community Health Survey, the 2011/2012 Survey of Neurological Conditions in Institutions in Canada, and the 2011 Survey on Living with Neurological Conditions in Canada. Among Canadians aged 45 or older, an estimated 0.8% in private households and 45% in long-term residential care facilities had a diagnosis of dementia. Prevalence rose with age. The vast majority of people with dementia in private households received assistance with medical care (81%), housework and home maintenance (83%), meal preparation (88%), emotional support (90%), transportation (92%), and managing care (92%). Among those receiving assistance, 85% relied, at least in part, on family, friends or neighbours. The primary caregiver tended to be a spouse (46%) or an adult child (44%), most of whom were daughters (71%). The majority of primary caregivers lived in the same household (83%) and provided daily care (86%). PMID:27192206

  8. Micronutrients and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staehelin, Hannes B

    2005-11-01

    The current high life expectancy is overshadowed by neurodegenerative illnesses that lead to dementia and dependence. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common of these conditions, and is considered to be a proteinopathy, with amyloid-beta42 as a key factor, leading via a cascade of events to neurodegeneration. Major factors involved are oxidative stress, perturbed Ca homeostasis and impaired energy metabolism. Protection against oxidative stress by micronutrients (including secondary bioactive substances) has been shown in transgenic Alzheimer model systems to delay AD. Epidemiological evidence is less conclusive, but the vast majority of the evidence supports a protective effect on cognitive functions in old age and AD. Thus, a diet rich in fruits and vegetables but also containing meat and fish is the most suitable to provide adequate micronutrients. The strong link between cardiovascular risk and AD may be explained by common pathogenetic mechanisms mediated, for example, by homocysteine and thus dependant on B-vitamins (folate and vitamins B(12) and B(6)). However, micronutrients may also be harmful. The high affinity of amyloid for metals (Fe, Al and Zn) favours the generation of reactive oxygen species and triggers an inflammatory response. Micronutrients in a balanced diet have a long-lasting, albeit low, protective impact on brain aging, hence prevention should be life long. PMID:16313699

  9. Immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weihua Wang; Liangfeng Fan; De'en Xu; Zhongmin Wen; Rong Yu; Quanhong Ma

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques consisted primarily of aggregated Aβ proteins and neurofibrillary tangles formed by hyperphosphorylated tau protein.Both Aβ and hyperphosphorylated tau are toxic both in vivo and in vitro.Immunotherapy targeting Aβ seems to provide a promising approach to reduce the toxic species in the brain.However,there is little evidence from clinical trials so far indicating the efficacy of Aβ immunotherapy in cognitive improvement.Immunization with tau peptides or anti-tau antibodies could remove the tau aggregates and improve the cognitive function in preclinical study,which provides a novel strategy of AD therapy.In this article,we will summarize the immunotherapeutic strategies targeting either Aβ or tau.

  10. Treatment for Alzheimer's diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Arkadyevna Tyuvina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives an update on the epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD. It points out the role of acetylcholine and glutamatergic components of neurotransmission in the pathogenesis of the disease, as well as their interactions, which is important to keep in mind to have a potentiated response to therapy that includes both these components. Different approaches to AD therapy are considered on the basis of the current ideas on the pathogenetic mechanisms of a degenerative process and with regard to the clinical features of the disease (the nature of the psychopathological symptoms of the disease and its stage. Particular emphasis is placed on compensatory therapy for deficient cholinergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission. Whether psychopharmacological agents may be used and psychotherapeutic work with the relatives of patients with AD should be done are also highlighted. Data on the efficiency of replacement therapy for different dementia stages, which promotes a delay in degenerative processes and a definite stabilization of the mental status, are presented.

  11. Microwaves and Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xia; Huang, Wen-Juan; Chen, Wei-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's diseases (AD) is the most common type of dementia and a neurodegenerative disease that occurs when the nerve cells in the brain die. The cause and treatment of AD remain unknown. However, AD is a disease that affects the brain, an organ that controls behavior. Accordingly, anything that can interact with the brain may affect this organ positively or negatively, thereby protecting or encouraging AD. In this regard, modern life encompasses microwaves for all issues including industrial, communications, medical and domestic tenders, and among all applications, the cell phone wave, which directly exposes the brain, continues to be the most used. Evidence suggests that microwaves may produce various biological effects on the central nervous system (CNS) and many arguments relay the possibility that microwaves may be involved in the pathophysiology of CNS disease, including AD. By contrast, previous studies have reported some beneficial cognitive effects and that microwaves may protect against cognitive impairment in AD. However, although many of the beneficial effects of microwaves are derived from animal models, but can easily be extrapolated to humans, whether microwaves cause AD is an important issue that is to be addressed in the current review.

  12. Useful Information on...Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Gene D.

    This brochure provides information on Alzheimer's disease by examining who gets Alzheimer's disease and what to expect when someone has Alzheimer's disease. Abnormal brain tissue findings are discussed and three clinical features of Alzheimer's disease are listed: dementia; insidious onset of symptoms; and exclusion of all other specific causes of…

  13. Advancing frontiers in Alzheimer's disease research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contain 16 chapters. Some of the titles are: Transmitter Alterations in Alzheimer's Disease: Relation to Cortical Dysfunction as Suggested by Positron Emission Tomography; Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography in the Clinical Evaluation of Dementia; Clinical Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease; Down's Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease: What is the Relationship; and Beta Protein: A Possible Marker for Alzheimer's Disease

  14. Alzheimer caregiver stress: basal natural killer cell activity, pituitary-adrenal cortical function, and sympathetic tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, M; Hauger, R; Patterson, T L; Semple, S; Ziegler, M; Grant, I

    1997-01-01

    The association between Alzheimer caregiving and natural killer (NK) cell activity and basal plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, beta-endorphin, prolactin, epinephrine, norepinephrine, and neuropeptide Y was determined in 100 spousal Alzheimer caregivers and 33 age- and gender-comparable control volunteers upon intake into a study of the psychological and physiologic impact of caregiving. The relationship between these physiologic measures and individual characteristics such as age, gender, medical status, severity of stress, severity of depressive symptoms, and caregiver burden was tested. In addition, the association between NK activity and alterations of the neuroendocrine measures was investigated. As compared to controls, the Alzheimer caregivers had similar levels of NK activity and of basal plasma neuroendocrine hormones and sympathetic measures. While older age and male gender status were associated with increased levels of ACTH, neither medical caseness, severity of life stress, nor severity of depressive symptoms was associated with alterations in any of the multiple physiologic domains. Classification of Alzheimer caregiver burden identified caregivers who were mismatched in terms of the amount of care they were required to provide and the amount of respite time received. The mismatched caregivers had significantly higher basal plasma ACTH but no change in other physiological measures, as compared to non-mismatched caregivers. NK activity was negatively correlated with plasma levels of neuropeptide Y but not with any of the other neuroendocrine measures. Based on this cross-sectional evaluation of NK activity and neuroendocrine and sympathetic measures, we conclude that most Alzheimer caregivers do not show evidence of altered basal physiology.

  15. Effect of cognitive-behavior intervention on caregivers of alzheimer's disease patients%认知行为干预对老年痴呆患者照护者的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚爱华

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of cognitive-behavior intervention on burden and positive feelings in caregivers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Methods 90 caregivers of AD patients were chosen by convenient sampling and were randomly divided into experimental group (45 cases) and control group (45 cases). Experimental group was given cognitive-behavior intervention, and control group was given conventional care. SF-12 health scale, caregivers burden scale and caregivers positive feelings scale were used to evaluate the effect of the intervention before and after 6 months. Results Before intervention, the SF-12 health sare, the burbenscore,the level of PAC were no significant difference betveen the two groups earegivers (P >0. 05). Total psychological score of SF-12 and positive feelings of the experimental group were significantly improved (P < 0. 05), but physical health and burden showed no statistically significant differences between two groups(P >0. 05). Conclusions The cognitive-behavior intervention has a positive effect on improving mental health and positive feelings in caregivers of AD patients.%目的 探讨认知行为干预对老年痴呆患者照护者的负担和积极感受的影响,为临床和社区护理服务提供依据.方法 采用便利抽样的方法,选取就诊的轻、中度老年痴呆患者的照护者90例,随机分为干预组和对照组各45人.干预组给予认知行为干预为基础的综合护理干预,对照组仅给予神经内科常规护理.干预时间6个月,并采用SF-12健康量表、照护者负担最表(CBI)、照护者积极感受量表(PCI)于患者干预前和干预后6个月评价干预效果.结果 干预前两组照护者SF-12健康评分、负担评分、PAC水平比较差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05),干预后干预组照护者SF-12心理健康总分、积极感受明显提高,两组差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);干预后两组SF-12生理健康评分和负担评分比

  16. Medical foods for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Raj C

    2011-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative condition associated with cognitive loss, behavioural changes, functional ability decline and caregiver burden. Given the worldwide public health impact of AD, novel interventions to reduce suffering experienced by AD patients need to be developed. Foods may offer a mechanism for intervention complementary to drugs, devices, biologicals and vaccines. Apart from foods with health claims (including dietary supplements), medical foods are also being explored as an intervention option. The purpose of this article is to describe how medical foods may complement other interventions for AD patients by: (i) defining what a medical food is; (ii) discussing whether AD is a condition amenable to medical food intervention; (iii) reviewing current clinical trial data on medical foods used in participants with AD; and (iv) highlighting steps needed to establish a more comprehensive framework for developing medical foods for AD. While medical foods may be defined differently in other countries, the US Orphan Drug Act of 1998 defined a medical food as a food formulated for enteral intake, taken under physician supervision, and intended to meet the distinctive nutritional requirements identified for a disease or condition. For AD to be amenable to medical food intervention, it must: (i) result in limited or impaired capacity to ingest, digest, absorb or metabolize ordinary foodstuff or certain nutrients; or (ii) have unique, medically determined nutrient requirements; and (iii) require dietary management that cannot be achieved by modification of the normal diet alone. While these criteria are most likely met in advanced AD, identifying unique nutritional requirements in early AD that cannot be met by normal diet modification requires a better understanding of AD pathophysiology. A PubMed search using the terms 'medical food' and 'Alzheimer', limited to clinical trials published in English with human participants with AD aged >65

  17. [Vitamin E and Alzheimer's Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Moeko; Yamada, Masahito

    2015-12-01

    It has been suggested that oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Vitamin E is a potent antioxidant, and the results of some epidemiological studies have suggested that high intake of vitamin E through food is inversely associated with the incidence of Alzheimer's disease. Randomized controlled studies have shown that treatment with vitamin E could delay functional decline in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. However, vitamin E had no cognitive benefits in patients with mild cognitive impairment or in generally healthy older women. Well-designed clinical trials or preventive interventions with vitamin E are necessary to establish its efficacy as therapeutic or preventive agents for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26618765

  18. [Biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ribas, G; López-Sendón Moreno, J L; García-Caldentey, J

    2014-04-01

    The new diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD) include brain imaging and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, with the aim of increasing the certainty of whether a patient has an ongoing AD neuropathologic process or not. Three CSF biomarkers, Aß42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau, reflect the core pathological features of AD. It is already known that these pathological processes of AD starts decades before the first symptoms, so these biomarkers may provide means of early disease detection. At least three stages of AD could be identified: preclinical AD, mild cognitive impairment due to AD, and dementia due to AD. In this review, we aim to summarize the CSF biomarker data available for each of these stages. We also review the actual research on blood-based biomarkers. Recent studies on healthy elderly subjects and on carriers of dominantly inherited AD mutations have also found biomarker changes that allow separate groups in these preclinical stages. These studies may aid for segregate populations in clinical trials and objectively evaluate if there are changes over the pathological processes of AD. Limits to widespread use of CSF biomarkers, apart from the invasive nature of the process itself, is the higher coefficient of variation for the analyses between centres. It requires strict pre-analytical and analytical procedures that may make feasible multi-centre studies and global cut-off points for the different stages of AD.

  19. Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease Quiz | Alzheimer's disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Alzheimer's Disease Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease Quiz Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of ... How many people in the United States have Alzheimer's disease? as many as 5.1 million as ...

  20. The biological substrates of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains 21 selections. Some of the titles are: Dementia of the Alzheimer Type: Genetic Aspects; Determination of Cerebral Metabolic Patterns in Dementia Using Positron Emission Tomography; Pathology of the Basal Forebrain in Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias; Characterization of Neurofibrillary Tangles with Monoclonal Antibodies Raised Against Alzheimer Neurofibrillary Tangles; and HLA Associations in Alzheimer's Disease

  1. Effects of the Medicare Alzheimer's Disease Demonstration on the use of community-based services.

    OpenAIRE

    Newcomer, R; Spitalny, M; Fox, P.; Yordi, C

    1999-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Did the Medicare Alzheimer's Disease Demonstration with its case management and community service waivers affect the use of community-based long-term care services among people with dementia and their primary caregivers? DATA SOURCES: Baseline and periodic caregiver interviews. Measures include client and caregiver attributes and self-reported service use. STUDY DESIGN: The demonstration randomly assigned voluntary applicants into treatment and control groups. Treatment group ...

  2. A sobrecarga do cuidador familiar de idoso com Alzheimer = Family caregiver burden caring for the elderly with Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Seima, Márcia Daniele; Lenardt, Maria Helena

    2011-01-01

    Trata-se de estudo de corte transversal cujo objetivo foi identificar o nível de sobrecarga do cuidador familiar do idoso com Alzheimer de uma comunidade. A amostra de conveniência foi composta de 208 cuidadores familiares. Os dados foram coletados por meio da aplicação de questionário socioeconômico/demográfico e clínico e escala do Inventário de Sobrecarga de Zarit. Os dados foram compilados e analisados no programa Microsoft Excel 2007. Dos 208 cuidadores, 47 (22,6%) apresentaram sobrecarg...

  3. [Music therapy and Alzheimer disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromeur, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    Music therapy and Alzheimer's dementia. Dementia such as Alzheimer's leads to the deterioration of the patient's global capacities. The cognitive disorders associated with it are disabling and affect every area of the patient's life. Every therapy's session undertaken with and by patients can act as a mirror of the progress of their disease and help to feel better, as described in this article on music therapy. PMID:24908841

  4. A sobrecarga do cuidador familiar de idoso com Alzheimer = Family caregiver burden caring for the elderly with Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seima, Márcia Daniele

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de estudo de corte transversal cujo objetivo foi identificar o nível de sobrecarga do cuidador familiar do idoso com Alzheimer de uma comunidade. A amostra de conveniência foi composta de 208 cuidadores familiares. Os dados foram coletados por meio da aplicação de questionário socioeconômico/demográfico e clínico e escala do Inventário de Sobrecarga de Zarit. Os dados foram compilados e analisados no programa Microsoft Excel 2007. Dos 208 cuidadores, 47 (22,6% apresentaram sobrecarga pequena, 96 (46,2% sobrecarga moderada, 54 (26% sobrecarga moderada a severa e 11 (5,2% sobrecarga severa. O processo de cuidado dos profissionais da saúde junto aos cuidadores não pode ser apenas prescritivo, esse deve ser desenvolvido sob demanda, com intuito de minimizar as sobrecargas, que enfrentam nas situações de cuidado com o idoso portador de Alzheimer

  5. 2012 Alzheimer's disease facts and figures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This report provides information to increase understanding of the public health impact of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Topics addressed include incidence, prevalence, mortality rates, health expenditures and costs of care, and effect on caregivers and society. The report also explores issues that arise when people with AD and other dementias live alone. The characteristics, risks, and unmet needs of this population are described. An estimated 5.4 million Americans have AD, including approximately 200,000 age disease, stroke, and prostate cancer decreased by 13%, 20%, and 8%, respectively, whereas the proportion due to AD increased by 66%. In 2011, more than 15 million family members and other unpaid caregivers provided an estimated 17.4 billion hours of care to people with AD and other dementias, a contribution valued at more than $210 billion. Medicare payments for services to beneficiaries age ≥65 years with AD and other dementias are three times as great as payments for beneficiaries without these conditions, and Medicaid payments are 19 times as great. In 2012, payments for health care, long-term care, and hospice services for people age ≥65 years with AD and other dementias are expected to be $200 billion (not including the contributions of unpaid caregivers). An estimated 800,000 people with AD (one in seven) live alone, and up to half of them do not have an identifiable caregiver. People with dementia who live alone are exposed to risks that exceed the risks encountered by people with dementia who live with others, including inadequate self-care, malnutrition, untreated medical conditions, falls, wandering from home unattended, and accidental deaths. PMID:22404854

  6. Balancing needs as a family caregiver in Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røthing, Merete; Malterud, Kirsti; Frich, Jan C.

    2015-01-01

    Family members in families with severe chronic disease play importantroles in care-giving. In families affected by Huntington’s disease (HD), caregivers encounter practical and emotional challenges and distress.Enduring caregiver burdens may lead to problems and caregivers are inneed of social...

  7. Assessing impulsivity changes in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochat, Lucien; Delbeuck, Xavier; Billieux, Joël; d'Acremont, Mathieu; Van der Linden, Anne-Claude Juillerat; Van der Linden, Martial

    2008-01-01

    Impulsive behaviors are common in brain-damaged patients including those with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD). The objective of this study was to develop and validate a short version of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale assessing changes on 4 different dimensions of impulsivity, namely urgency, (lack of) premeditation, (lack of) perseverance, and sensation seeking, arising in the course of a neurodegenerative disease. To this end, caregivers of 83 probable AD patients completed a short questionnaire adapted from the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of the data were performed and revealed that a model with 4 distinct but related latent variables corresponding to 4 different dimensions of impulsivity fit the data best. Furthermore, the results showed that lack of perseverance, followed by lack of premeditation and urgency, increased after the onset of the disease, whereas sensation seeking decreased. Overall, the multifaceted nature of impulsivity was confirmed in a sample of AD patients, whose caregivers reported significant changes regarding each facet of impulsivity. Consequently, the short version of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale opens up interesting prospects for a better comprehension of behavioral symptoms of dementia. PMID:18580596

  8. Context memory in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Haj, M.; Kessels, R.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by a gradual loss of memory. Specifically, context aspects of memory are impaired in AD. Our review sheds light on the neurocognitive mechanisms of this memory component that forms the core of episodic memory function.

  9. 2013 Alzheimer's disease facts and figures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    This report provides information to increase understanding of the public health impact of Alzheimer's disease (AD), including incidence and prevalence, mortality rates, health expenditures and costs of care, and effect on caregivers and society in general. It also explores the roles and unique challenges of long-distance caregivers, as well as interventions that target those challenges. An estimated 5.2 million Americans have AD. Approximately 200,000 people younger than 65 years with AD comprise the younger onset AD population; 5 million comprise the older onset AD population. Throughout the coming decades, the baby boom generation is projected to add about 10 million to the total number of people in the United States with AD. Today, someone in America develops AD every 68 seconds. By 2050, one new case of AD is expected to develop every 33 seconds, or nearly a million new cases per year, and the total estimated prevalence is expected to be 13.8 million. AD is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and the fifth leading cause of death in Americans age 65 years or older. Between 2000 and 2010, the proportion of deaths resulting from heart disease, stroke, and prostate cancer decreased 16%, 23%, and 8%, respectively, whereas the proportion resulting from AD increased 68%. The number of deaths from AD as determined by official death certificates (83,494 in 2010) likely underrepresents the number of AD-related deaths in the United States. A projected 450,000 older Americans with AD will die in 2013, and a large proportion will die as a result of complications of AD. In 2012, more than 15 million family members and other unpaid caregivers provided an estimated 17.5 billion hours of care to people with AD and other dementias, a contribution valued at more than $216 billion. Medicare payments for services to beneficiaries age 65 years and older with AD and other dementias are three times as great as payments for beneficiaries without these conditions, and

  10. Knowledge of the definition of euthanasia: study with doctors and caregivers of Alzheimer's disease patients O conhecimento da definição de eutanásia: estudo com médicos e cuidadores de pacientes com doença de Alzheimer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Pricoli Vilela

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Euthanasia is an increasingly debated subject among specialized professionals and also among lay people, even in countries such as Brazil where it is not authorized. It is questionable, however, if the concept of euthanasia is well known by these persons. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to investigate knowledge about the definition of euthanasia by family caregivers of patients with dementia and by specialized physicians and also to investigate their personal opinion on this topic. METHODS: We prospectively interviewed 30 physicians from three different medical specialties and 40 family caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease using a structured questionnaire. Two clinicalvignettes were also presented to the physicians in order to ascertain their personal opinion about euthanasia. RESULTS: Among the caregivers, 10 (25.0% knew the correct definition of euthanasia. Regarding their personal view, nine (22.5% were in favor, while 20 (50.0% were against. The remaining 11 (27.5% caregivers were unable to define their position. Among the physicians, 19 (63.3% gave a coherent answer regarding the definition of euthanasia. When they were presented with the clinical vignettes, less than 50% of them were in favor of euthanasia. CONCLUSION: The definition of euthanasia was unknown by most of the lay individuals and also by one third of the physicians. Although it is not officially approved in Brazil, a small proportion of family caregivers and also of specialized physicians would be in favor of the practice of euthanasia.INTRODUÇÃO: A eutanásia é um tema de crescente debate entre profissionais da área de saúde e também entre o púbico leigo, mesmo em países nos quais não é legalizada, como no Brasil. Entretanto, é questionável se a definição do termo é bem conhecida por essas pessoas. OBJETIVO: O propósito do presente estudo foi investigar o conhecimento sobre a definição de eutanásia entre cuidadores familiares

  11. Calcium channel blockers and Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Tan; Yulin Deng; Hong Qing

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by two pathological hallmarks: amyloid plaques and neurofi-brillary tangles. In addition, calcium homeostasis is disrupted in the course of human aging. Recent research shows that dense plaques can cause functional alteration of calcium signals in mice with Alzheimer's disease. Calcium channel blockers are effective therapeutics for treating Alzheimer's disease. This review provides an overview of the current research of calcium channel blockers in-volved in Alzheimer's disease therapy.

  12. Weak central coherence in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Selina M(a)rdh

    2013-01-01

    Central coherence refers to the ability to interpret details of information into a whole. To date, the concept of central coherence is mainly used in research of autism, Asperger's syndrome and recently in the research on eating disorders. The main purpose of the present study was to examine central coherence in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Nine Alzheimer's disease patients and ten age- and gender-matched control subjects, who differed significantly in neurological assessment, were shown a picture of a fire. Compared to control subjects, the Alzheimer's disease patients described the picture in a fragmented way by mentioning details and separate objects without perceiving the context of the fire. In conclusion, patients with Alzheimer's disease are at the weak end of central coherence, and hence suffer from a fragmented view of their surroundings. The findings have important clinical implications for the understanding of patients with Alzheimer's diseaseand also for the possibility of caregivers to meet the Alzheimer's disease individual in an appropriate way in the everyday care.

  13. Coping & Caring: Living with Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, Charles

    This guide on Alzheimer's disease is for those who care for Alzheimer's patients, as well as those who want to learn more about the disease. It answers these questions: (1) what is Alzheimer's? (2) how does the disease progress and how long does it last? (3) how do families cope? and (4) who can provide assistance and information? The guide also…

  14. Swallowing in moderate and severe phases of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheilla de Medeiros Correia

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To characterize the problems of feeding and swallowing in individuals with moderate and severe Alzheimer´s disease (AD and to correlate these with functional aspects. METHOD: Fifty patients with AD and their caregivers participated in this study. The instruments used were: Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR, Mini-Mental State Examination, Index of Activities of Daily Living, Assessment of Feeding and Swallowing Difficulties in Dementia, Functional Outcome Questionnaire for Aphasia, and Swallowing Rating Scale. RESULTS: Problems with passivity, distraction and refusal to eat were encountered in the CDR2 group. Distraction, passivity and inappropriate feeding velocity were predominant in the CDR3 group. The problems were correlated with communication, swallowing severity of AD individuals and caregiver schooling. CONCLUSION: Given the inexorable functional alterations during the course of the disease, it is vital to observe these in patients with a compromised feeding and swallowing mechanism. The present study supplies the instruments to orient caregivers and professionals.

  15. Implicações da doença de Alzheimer na qualidade de vida do cuidador: um estudo comparativo Implications of Alzheimer's disease for the caregiver's quality of life: a comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    Keika Inouye; Elisete Silva Pedrazzani; Sofia Cristina Iost Pavarini

    2010-01-01

    Este estudo teve como objetivo comparar a percepção geral e de cada dimensão de qualidade de vida de um grupo de cuidadores de idosos com doença de Alzheimer com um grupo de não-cuidadores emparelhado quanto às variáveis sociodemográficas. As medidas de qualidade de vida foram obtidas por meio da Escala de Avaliação da Qualidade de Vida na Doença de Alzheimer - Versão Cuidador. Foram realizadas análises estatísticas (descritivas e regressão logística ordinal). O grupo de cuidadores apresentou...

  16. Cerebral imaging revealing Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral imaging is the only non-invasive means of examining the brain and is essential in studying Alzheimer's disease. As a tool for early diagnosis, evaluation and treatment monitoring, this technology is at the heart of the research being done to further improve its reliability and sensitivity. (authors)

  17. Scripting Selves, Stalling Last Shadows: (Auto) Biographical Writing of Alzheimer Patients and Their Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Vaidehi

    2009-01-01

    This article offers a critical discussion of notions of self as they emerge in the diaries kept by Alzheimer patients and their caregivers. It explores ways in which diary writing becomes simultaneously an agentive way by which a sense of "self" gets scripted since memory is fast slipping away, while also pointing to the fluid nature of identities…

  18. Elderly care with alzheimer disease: a focus on the theory of cultural care

    OpenAIRE

    Jose Lúcio Costa Ramos; Maria do Rosário de Menezes

    2012-01-01

    This report was aimed in reflecting on care for the elderly with Alzheimer disease, through family care, focused on Madeleine Leininger’s Theory of Diversity and Universality of Cultural Care. Qualitative study, with 20 home care workers looking after elderly people in Salvador, BA, Brazil, was performed between June and August of 2010.Four categories emerged: characterization of family caregivers of elders with Alzheimer's disease, knowledge about the disease to the practice of caring for th...

  19. [Care relationship between the family caregiver and the elderly with Alzheimer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seima, Marcia Daniele; Lenardt, Maria Helena; Caldas, Célia Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Cross-sectional quantitative and qualitative-descriptive study, aimed to interpret the relationship in the caring of family caregivers and Alzheimer's elderly sufferers, grounded in the concrete dialectic of participation according to Gabriel Marcel's four precepts. The convenience sample entailed 208 family caregivers in the quantitative and 36 in the qualitative aspect. The caregivers were women (n=178, 86%), aged 22-83 years, living with the elderly (n=169, 81%), with more than eight years of formal education (n=147, 71%), not having an occupation (n=121, 58%) and with mild burden (n=96, 46.2%). The synthesis theme was The order of mystery pervaded by faith and supported by hope. The relationship between family members and Alzheimer's elderly sufferer encompasses love, faithfulness, hope and presence. Interpreting this relationship enables nurses to develop sensitivity and creativity for professional practice, taking into account the subjectivity and mystery in human relations. PMID:24861066

  20. A three-year follow-up on the efficacy of psychosocial interventions for patients with mild dementia and their caregivers: the multicentre, rater-blinded, randomized Danish Alzheimer Intervention Study (DAISY)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phung, K.T.T.; Waldorff, F.B.; Buss, D.V.;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the long-term efficacy at the 36-month follow-up of an early psychosocial counselling and support programme lasting 8-12 months for community-dwelling patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers. DESIGN: Multicentre, randomised, controlled, rater-blinded trial....... SETTING: Primary care and memory clinics in five Danish districts. PARTICIPANTS: 330 home-dwelling patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their primary caregivers (dyads). INTERVENTIONS: Dyads were randomised to receive intervention during the first year after diagnosis. Both intervention and control...... of Life Scale for Alzheimer's disease (QoL-AD), Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Questionnaire, Alzheimer's disease Cooperative Study Activities of Daily Living Scale, all-cause mortality and nursing home placement. RESULTS: At a 36-month follow-up, 2 years after the completion of the Danish Alzheimer...

  1. Alzheimer's Disease - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tour - Deutsch (German) Alzheimer's Association Hindi (हिन्दी) Alzheimer's Disease हिन्दी (Hindi) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Italian (italiano) Inside the Brain: An Interactive ...

  2. 2014 Alzheimer's disease facts and figures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    This report discusses the public health impact of Alzheimer's disease (AD), including incidence and prevalence, mortality rates, costs of care, and overall effect on caregivers and society. It also examines the impact of AD on women compared with men. An estimated 5.2 million Americans have AD. Approximately 200,000 people younger than 65 years with AD comprise the younger onset AD population; 5 million are age 65 years or older. By mid-century, fueled in large part by the baby boom generation, the number of people living with AD in the United States is projected to grow by about 9 million. Today, someone in the country develops AD every 67 seconds. By 2050, one new case of AD is expected to develop every 33 seconds, or nearly a million new cases per year, and the total estimated prevalence is expected to be 13.8 million. In 2010, official death certificates recorded 83,494 deaths from AD, making AD the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and the fifth leading cause of death in Americans aged 65 years or older. Between 2000 and 2010, the proportion of deaths resulting from heart disease, stroke, and prostate cancer decreased 16%, 23%, and 8%, respectively, whereas the proportion resulting from AD increased 68%. The actual number of deaths to which AD contributes (or deaths with AD) is likely much larger than the number of deaths from AD recorded on death certificates. In 2014, an estimated 700,000 older Americans will die with AD, and many of them will die from complications caused by AD. In 2013, more than 15 million family members and other unpaid caregivers provided an estimated 17.7 billion hours of care to people with AD and other dementias, a contribution valued at more than $220 billion. Average per-person Medicare payments for services to beneficiaries aged 65 years and older with AD and other dementias are more than two and a half times as great as payments for all beneficiaries without these conditions, and Medicaid payments are 19 times as

  3. Ethical issues in Alzheimer's disease: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuzy, Antoine; Gauthier, Serge

    2012-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) accounts for the majority of dementia cases and leaves clinicians, patients, family members, caregivers, and researchers faced with numerous ethical issues that vary and evolve as a function of disease stage and severity. While the disclosure of a diagnosis of AD dementia is difficult enough, advances in the neurobiology of AD--embodied in the recent revisions to the AD diagnostic guidelines--have translated into an increasing shift toward the diagnosis being made in its pre-dementia stages, when patients have full insight into their prognosis. Genetic issues in AD are significant in the case of rare families with an early onset (before age 65) form of the disease, owing to the presence of deterministic mutations. While genetic testing for the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene--a risk factor for sporadic AD--is widely debated, it may become necessary in the context of novel disease-modifying drugs. The current symptomatic drugs--cholinesterase inhibitors (CIs) and the NMDA receptor antagonist memantine--are relatively simple to use but their access is limited in many countries by economic considerations and therapeutic nihilism. Although their efficacy is modest, they influence the design of protocols for new drugs since placebo treatment in clinical trials involving patients with established dementia is rarely allowed beyond 3 months. Driving privileges are lost in the moderate stages of dementia, with this decision ideally reached using a standardized assessment algorithm. Physical restraints are still overused in moderate-to-severe stages, but the alternative non-pharmacological therapies and caregiver training programs are not yet fully validated using randomized studies. End-of-life care is slowly moving towards a palliative care approach similar to that for end-stage cancer. There will be new drugs in the near future, some of which will delay progression from prodromal stages to dementia, but their use will require careful stopping rules

  4. Cognitive aging and Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Vandenberghe, R; Tournoy, J.

    2005-01-01

    Cognitive aging and clinically probable Alzheimer's disease can be discriminated by means of clinical and neuropsychological testing, and structural and functional imaging techniques. Research at the level of cognitive brain systems and at the molecular level provides exciting new insights into the relation between aging and neurodegeneration. The advances at the clinical and at the basic research levels are necessary if we wish to meet the formidable challenge that the increasing prevalence ...

  5. Alzheimer's Disease and Vitamin E

    OpenAIRE

    Empey, Matthew

    1998-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a form of dementia characterized by generalized and progressive cognitive dysfunction. Research has determined that an important pathological component of AD is neuronal damage and death in certain brain regions precipitated by oxidative damage. This paper reviews the pathology of AD, describes the biochemical processes pertaining to oxidative stress and antioxidant compounds, and reviews the evidence that one particular antioxidant, vitamin E, may be effective in ...

  6. Caregiving

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the many challenges of caregiving. Read stories Caregiver e-newsletter This free, electronic newsletter offers Medicare updates ... other resources for caregivers. Sign up for our e-newsletter Caregiver resources Get targeted information and tools ...

  7. Caregiving

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Caregiver resource kit Caregiver multimedia Tips for making a hospital to home transition Caregivers and experts offer ... have been hospitalized. View more videos Planning for a discharge Information for caregivers of individuals who are ...

  8. Caregiving

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... videos Caregiver medication transitions The importance of medication management and the role of family caregivers. ... the many challenges of caregiving. Read stories Caregiver e-newsletter This ...

  9. Imaging the earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, William; Small, Scott A

    2006-12-01

    Historical progress in medicine can be charted along the lines of technical innovations that have visualized the invisible. One hundred years ago, Alois Alzheimer exploited newly developed histological stains to visualize his eponymonous disease in dead tissue under the microscope. Now, as we are entering the second century of Alzheimer's disease research, technical innovation has endowed us with a range of in vivo imaging techniques that promise to visualize Alzheimer' disease in living people. The earliest stage of Alzheimer's disease is characterized by cell-sickness, not cell-death, and can occur before the deposition of amyloid plaques or neurofibrillary tangles. In principle, 'functional' imaging techniques might be able to detect this early stage of the disease, a stage that was invisible to Alzheimer himself. Here, we will first define the neurobiological meaning of 'function' and then review the different approaches that measure brain dysfunction in Alzheimer' disease.

  10. [The characteristics of Alzheimer's Disease Units in relation to neuropsychological tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Giacoma C; Caffari, Bruno; Vanacore, Nicola; Maggini, Marina; Raschetti, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    The Cronos Project is a post-marketing surveillance study implemented by the Italian Ministry of Health and the National Institute of Health whose main objectives are to characterise the population of Alzheimer's disease patients treated with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and monitor effectiveness and drug safety in the field practice. In this project 503 Alzheimer's disease units were activated located throughout the country. The characteristics of these Alzheimer's disease units are presented for setting (territorial, university, hospital, extra-hospital), health personnel employed, examinations offered (CT and MRI scans and laboratory tests), counselling activities and relationship with caregiver associations in relation to neuropsychological tests. PMID:16037652

  11. 2009 Alzheimer's disease facts and figures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the sixth leading cause of all deaths in the United States, and the fifth leading cause of death in Americans aged 65 and older. Whereas other major causes of death have been on the decrease, deaths attributable to AD have been rising dramatically. Between 2000 and 2006, heart-disease deaths decreased nearly 12%, stroke deaths decreased 18%, and prostate cancer-related deaths decreased 14%, whereas deaths attributable to AD increased 47%. An estimated 5.3 million Americans have AD; the approximately 200,000 persons under age 65 years with AD comprise the younger-onset AD population. Every 70 seconds, someone in America develops AD; by 2050, this time is expected to decrease to every 33 seconds. Over the coming decades, the "baby-boom" population is projected to add 10 million people to these numbers. In 2050, the incidence of AD is expected to approach nearly a million people per year, with a total estimated prevalence of 11 to 16 million people. Significant cost implications related to AD and other dementias include an estimated $148 billion annually in direct (Medicare/Medicaid) and indirect (e.g., decreased business productivity) costs. Not included in these figures is the $94 billion in unpaid services to individuals with AD provided annually by an estimated 10 million caregivers. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is an important component in the continuum from healthy cognition to dementia. Understanding which individuals with MCI are at highest risk for eventually developing AD is key to our ultimate goal of preventing AD. This report provides information meant to increase an understanding of the public-health impact of AD, including incidence and prevalence, mortality, lifetime risks, costs, and impact on family caregivers. This report also sets the stage for a better understanding of the relationship between MCI and AD. PMID:19426951

  12. Recent progress of PET in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na NIU

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in the current elderly population. PET can detect pathophysiological changes in Alzheimer's disease with different radiotracers. This paper will focus on evaluating the value of 18F-FDG, amyloid and tau protein PET imaging in Alzheimer's disease. PET has been demonstrated to play an important role in the research of etiology, early diagnosis, differential dignosis, prognosis and medical treatment of Alzheimer's disease. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.03.007

  13. Alzheimer's disease care management plan: maximizing patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treinkman, Anna

    2005-03-01

    Nurse practitioners have the potential to significantly impact the care of patients with dementia. Healthcare providers can now offer patients medications that will control symptoms and prolong functioning. As a result of ongoing contact with patients, NPs play an important role in assessing and screening patients for AD and educating the patients, families, and caregivers about the disease. Alzheimer's disease is a chronic, progressive illness that requires long-term management. Nurse practitioners should be familiar with available medications and appreciate the need to individualize therapy to maximize efficacy and minimize potential adverse drug reactions.

  14. Study on Alzheimer's disease model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    It is well known that the main brain lesion in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain is neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and senile plaques (SP). The amount of NFT is positively correlated with clinical degree of dementia in AD. It is also well studied that the major component of NFT is abnormally hyperphosphorylated microtubule associated protein tau that is caused by an imbalance of protein kinase and protein phosphatase (PP). To reconstitute a specific AD model based on the above hypothesis, we have injected separately calcium calmodulin dependent protein kinase (CaMKKII) activator, bradykinin and PP-2B inhibitor, cyclosporin A into rat hippocampus in the present study. The results showed that the injection of bradykinin caused learning and memory deficient in rats as well as Alzheimer-like tau phosphorylation, including Ser-262/356, Thr-231/235 and Ser-396/404. On the other hand, the injection of cyclosporin A induced the same phosphorylation sites as above except Ser-262/356, however, it did not mimic rat behavior abnormality as bradykinin injection did. The data suggested that activating of CaMKII and the phosphorylation of Ser-262/356 at tau might responsible for the lesion of learning and memory in our model rats. We also incubated PP-2A and PP-1 inhibitor, okadaic acid with human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y), and found that (1) inhibition of above PPs induced Alzheimer-like phosphorylation and accumulation of neurofilaments, and Alzheimer-like microtubule disruption, (2) melatonin showed certain protection of the cell from okadaic acid toxicity. The data obtained from this study is significant in AD specific model study.

  15. Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Alzheimer's Disease Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... How many Americans over age 65 may have Alzheimer's disease? as many as 5 million as many ...

  16. Cuidando do paciente com Alzheimer: o impacto da doença no cuidador Caring for the Alzheimer's patient: the impact of the illness on the caregiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naira Dutra Lemos

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o impacto subjetivo da Doença de Alzheimer (DA na vida dos cuidadores primários de idosos com esse diagnóstico. MÉTODO: Foi realizado um estudo transversal com 29 cuidadores de pacientes com DA. Os instrumentos utilizados foram: a Caregiver Burden Scale (CBS, um questionário para avaliação social do cuidador e um formulário para elaboração do perfil do paciente. Procedeu-se estatística descritiva simples, Coeficiente de Correlação de Pearson (r, Test T, para amostras independentes, e ANOVA, seguida do método de Bonferroni, a d" 0,05. RESULTADOS: A maioria dos cuidadores era do sexo feminino (89,7%, com idade média entre 48 e 58 anos, sendo 55,2% filhos, 27,6% cônjuges; e 55,2% com 8 anos de estudo. O escore médio global da CBS foi de 2,18. A média do escore total da CBS é maior nos cuidadores de pacientes restritos ao leito (p = 0,020. Os cuidadores com menor grau de escolaridade apresentaram maior escore total na CBS (p = 0,039. CONCLUSÕES: O impacto subjetivo da DA no cuidador foi considerado importante e depende de fatores como o seu nível de escolaridade e o grau de dependência dos pacientes.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the subjective impact of Alzheimer's Disease (AD on the lives of the primary family caregivers of patients suffering from said disease. METHOD: A cross analysis has been carried out among 29 caregivers of patients assisted. The used tools were the CBS, and a questionnaire to carry on a social survey on the caregivers and a formulary to perform an analysis on profile of the patient. Simple descriptive statistics, Pearson's Correlation Coefficient (r, T Test for independent samples and ANOVA were performed, followed by the Bonferroni method, a d" 0.05. RESULTS: Most of caregivers were women (89.7% average age 58, 55.2% elderly's children, 27.6% couples, most of them having studied for over 8 years (55.2%, and 86.2% living with the elderly. The global average impact score on the subjective

  17. Recent developments in Alzheimer's disease therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisen Paul S

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alzheimer's disease is a devastating neurological disorder that affects more than 37 million people worldwide. The economic burden of Alzheimer's disease is massive; in the United States alone, the estimated direct and indirect annual cost of patient care is at least $100 billion. Current FDA-approved drugs for Alzheimer's disease do not prevent or reverse the disease, and provide only modest symptomatic benefits. Driven by the clear unmet medical need and a growing understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease, the number of agents in development has increased dramatically in recent years. Truly *disease-modifying' therapies that target the underlying mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease have now reached late stages of human clinical trials. Primary targets include beta-amyloid, whose presence and accumulation in the brain is thought to contribute to the development of Alzheimer's disease, and tau protein which, when hyperphosphorylated, results in the self-assembly of tangles of paired helical filaments also believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. In this review, we briefly discuss the current status of Alzheimer's disease therapies under study, as well the scientific context in which they have been developed.

  18. 2010 Alzheimer's disease facts and figures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the seventh leading cause of all deaths in the United States and is virtually tied with the sixth leading cause of death-diabetes. AD is the fifth leading cause of death in Americans aged 65 and older. Although other major causes of death have been on the decrease, deaths because of AD have been rising dramatically. Between 2000 and 2006, heart disease deaths decreased 11.1%, stroke deaths decreased 18.2%, and prostate cancer-related deaths decreased 8.7%, whereas deaths because of AD increased 46.1%. Older African-Americans and Hispanics are more likely than older white Americans to have AD or other dementia. Current estimates are that African-Americans are about 2 times more likely, and Hispanics about 1.5 times more likely, than their white counterparts to have these conditions. However, the relationship of race and ethnicity to the development of AD and other dementias is complex and not fully understood. In 2009, nearly 11 million family and other unpaid caregivers provided an estimated 12.5 billion hours of care to persons with AD and other dementias; this care is valued at nearly $144 billion. Medicare payments for services to beneficiaries aged 65 years and older with AD and other dementias are three times higher than for beneficiaries without these conditions. Total payments for 2010 for health care and long-term care services for people aged 65 and older with AD and other dementias are expected to be $172 billion (not including the contributions of unpaid caregivers). An estimated 5.3 million Americans have AD; approximately 200,000 persons under age 65 with AD comprise the younger-onset AD population. Every 70 seconds, someone in America develops AD; by 2050 the time of every 70 seconds is expected to decrease to every 33 seconds. Over the coming decades, the baby boom population is projected to add 10 million people to these numbers. In 2050, the incidence of AD is expected to approach nearly a million people per year, with a

  19. 2011 Alzheimer's disease facts and figures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the sixth leading cause of all deaths in the United States and is the fifth leading cause of death in Americans aged ≥65 years. Although other major causes of death have been on the decrease, deaths because of AD have been rising dramatically. Between 2000 and 2008 (preliminary data), heart disease deaths decreased by 13%, stroke deaths by 20%, and prostate cancer-related deaths by 8%, whereas deaths because of AD increased by 66%. An estimated 5.4 million Americans have AD; approximately 200,000 people aged <65 years with AD comprise the younger-onset AD population. Every 69 seconds, someone in America develops AD; by 2050, the time is expected to accelerate to every 33 seconds. Over the coming decades, the baby boom population is projected to add 10 million people to these numbers. In 2050, the incidence of AD is expected to approach nearly a million people per year, with a total estimated prevalence of 11 to 16 million people. Dramatic increases in the numbers of "oldest-old" (those aged ≥85 years) across all racial and ethnic groups will also significantly affect the numbers of people living with AD. In 2010, nearly 15 million family and other unpaid caregivers provided an estimated 17 billion hours of care to people with AD and other dementias, a contribution valued at more than $202 billion. Medicare payments for services to beneficiaries aged ≥65 years with AD and other dementias are almost 3 times higher than for beneficiaries without these conditions. Total payments in 2011 for health care, long-term care, and hospice services for people aged ≥65years with AD and other dementias are expected to be $183 billion (not including the contributions of unpaid caregivers). This report provides information to increase understanding of the public health effect of AD, including incidence and prevalence, mortality, health expenditures and costs of care, and effect on caregivers and society in general. The report also examines the

  20. Maternal Transmission of Alzheimer Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Heggeli, Kristin; Crook, Julia; Thomas, Colleen; Graff-Radford, Neill

    2012-01-01

    Some propose maternal Alzheimer disease (1) inheritance. We compared dementia family histories in AD cases and cognitively normal controls. We expected more mothers to have AD in both groups. If maternal risk was not only due to female longevity more AD cases’ than controls’ mothers should be demented. We matched 196 AD cases to 200 controls by gender and age. We obtained parent dementia status and age of death for 348 AD and 319 control parents. 24 (12%) controls’ fathers, 26 (13%) AD patien...

  1. Brain Imaging in Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Keith A.; Fox, Nick C.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Klunk, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging has played a variety of roles in the study of Alzheimer disease (AD) over the past four decades. Initially, computed tomography (CT) and then magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used diagnostically to rule out other causes of dementia. More recently, a variety of imaging modalities including structural and functional MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) studies of cerebral metabolism with fluoro-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) and amyloid tracers such as Pittsburgh Compound-B (PiB) have shown characteristic changes in the brains of patients with AD, and in prodromal and even presymptomatic states that can help rule-in the AD pathophysiological process. No one imaging modality can serve all purposes as each have unique strengths and weaknesses. These modalities and their particular utilities are discussed in this article. The challenge for the future will be to combine imaging biomarkers to most efficiently facilitate diagnosis, disease staging, and, most importantly, development of effective disease-modifying therapies. PMID:22474610

  2. Estrogen and early-onset Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.C. Slooter (Arjen); J.B. Bronzova (Juliana); A. Hofman (Albert); C. van Broeckhoven (Christine); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractEstrogen use may be protective for Alzheimer's disease with late onset. However, the effects on early onset Alzheimer's disease are unclear. This issue was studied in a population based setting. For each female patient, a female control was matched on age (within 5 years) and place of re

  3. Alzheimer disease: presenilin springs a leak

    OpenAIRE

    Gandy, S; Doeven, M.K.; Poolman, B.

    2006-01-01

    Presenilins are thought to contribute to Alzheimer disease through a protein cleavage reaction that produces neurotoxic amyloid-beta peptides. A new function for presenilins now comes to light - controlling the leakage of calcium out of the endoplasmic reticulum. Is this a serious challenge to the 'amyloid hypothesis' of Alzheimer disease?

  4. Pharmacoeconomics of cholinesterase inhibitors in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, Linus

    2003-01-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors constitute one of few treatment options available for Alzheimer's disease, the most common cause of dementia. The modest effects and relatively high acquisition costs of these drugs make the health economics of dementia an important subject of study. Simulation models can be used to bring together existing data and make predictions of the long-term cost effectiveness of treatment. Most models have been built around cognitive function as a key parameter based on the observed relationship between cognitive function and costs of care. Patients with more severe disease attain higher total costs of care. Also, these patients have a higher share of formal care costs than do patients with mild disease, who are usually looked after by informal caregivers. The valuation of unpaid care is controversial, and the choice of method may affect results considerably. Another important issue is the measurement of health-related QOL in patients with Alzheimer's disease. The few existing studies have used proxy respondents to elicit utility weights in different disease states; however, this methodology has not been validated. It is likely that the increased drug costs incurred by the use of cholinesterase inhibitors will be offset (at least partly) by savings in other healthcare costs. However, these results should be viewed as preliminary, since we are still awaiting data from long-term follow-up studies. Also, the value of treatment for patients and caregivers in terms of QOL improvements has yet to be established. PMID:13129415

  5. The Importance of Adipokines in Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyid Ahmet Ay

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dementia and Alzheimers disease are characterized by disturbances in brain function and structure. Similarly, body mass index and obesity are associated with certain brain pathologies, including Alzheimers disease and dementia. In fact, there is mounting evidence linking metabolic dysfunction with dementia and Alzheimers disease. Major endocrine axes constitute links between brain and peripheral tissues, especially adipose tissue. Adipose tissue is metabolically very active and produces a variety of adipokines known to affect both peripheral and central nervous system processes. Experimental studies suggest that changes in adipokine function may contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimers disease. Herein, we review the adipokines leptin and adiponectin which are associated with morbidities related to obesity as well as dementia and Alzheimers disease. [Dis Mol Med 2015; 3(2.000: 22-28

  6. MRI morphometry in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    MRI based evaluation of brain atrophy is regarded as a valid method to stage the disease and to assess progression in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Volumetric software programs have made it possible to quantify gray matter in the human brain in an automated fashion. At present, voxel based morphometry (VBM) is easily applicable to the routine clinical procedure with a short execution time. The importance of the VBM approach is that it is not biased to one particular structure and is able to assess anatomical differences throughout the brain. Stand-alone VBM software running on Windows, Voxel-based Specific Regional analysis system for AD (VSRAD), has been widely used in the clinical diagnosis of AD in Japan. On the other hand, recent application of graph theory to MRI has made it possible to analyze changes in structural connectivity in AD.

  7. 7 Warning Signs of Alzheimer's | Alzheimer's disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Alzheimer's Disease 7 Warning Signs of Alzheimer's Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents The ... Suncoast Gerontology Center, University of South Florida. How Alzheimer's Changes the Brain The only definite way to ...

  8. Exploring Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neeti; Singh, Anshika Nikita

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is one of the most common form of dementia occurring in elderly population worldwide. Currently Aβ42, tau and p-tau in the cerebrospinal fluid is estimated for confirmation of AD. CSF which is being used as the potent source for biomarker screening is obtained by invasive lumbar punctures. Thus, there is an urgent need of minimal invasive methods for identification of diagnostic markers for early detection of AD. Blood serum and plasma serves as an appropriate source, due to minimal discomfort to the patients, promoting frequent testing, better follow-up and better consent to clinical trials. Hence, the need of the hour demands discovery of diagnostic and prognostic patient specific signature biomarkers by using emerging technologies of mass spectrometry, microarrays and peptidomics. In this review we summarize the present scenario of AD biomarkers such as circulatory biomarkers, blood based amyloid markers, inflammatory markers and oxidative stress markers being investigated and also some of the potent biomarkers which might be able to predict early onset of Alzheimer's and delay cognitive impairment. PMID:27630867

  9. Harmonized diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morris, J C; Blennow, K; Froelich, L;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Two major sets of criteria for the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) recently have been published, one from an International Working Group (IWG) and the other from working groups convened by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the Alzheimer's Association (AA...

  10. Quantitative evaluation of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchesne, S.; Frisoni, G. B.

    2009-02-01

    We propose a single, quantitative metric called the disease evaluation factor (DEF) and assess its efficiency at estimating disease burden in normal, control subjects (CTRL) and probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. The study group consisted in 75 patients with a diagnosis of probable AD and 75 age-matched normal CTRL without neurological or neuropsychological deficit. We calculated a reference eigenspace of MRI appearance from reference data, in which our CTRL and probable AD subjects were projected. We then calculated the multi-dimensional hyperplane separating the CTRL and probable AD groups. The DEF was estimated via a multidimensional weighted distance of eigencoordinates for a given subject and the CTRL group mean, along salient principal components forming the separating hyperplane. We used quantile plots, Kolmogorov-Smirnov and χ2 tests to compare the DEF values and test that their distribution was normal. We used a linear discriminant test to separate CTRL from probable AD based on the DEF factor, and reached an accuracy of 87%. A quantitative biomarker in AD would act as an important surrogate marker of disease status and progression.

  11. Advances in the study of Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Angue Nkoghe Francoise; Yunman Li

    2005-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia, and the only treatment currently available for the disease is acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Recent progress in understanding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease has suggested possible pharmacological interventions, including acetylcholineseterase inhibitors; secretase inhibitors; cholesterol lowering drugs; metal chelators and amyloid immunization. The objective of this paper is to review the main drugs possibly used for AD and their future therapeutic effects.

  12. The economic costs of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, J W; Ernst, R L

    1987-09-01

    This paper estimates the economic costs of Alzheimer's Disease to individuals and to society, based on review of published Alzheimer's Disease-related research. The analysis is derived from epidemiological projections and cost information for the United States population in 1983. Estimated costs include both direct medical care and social support costs, as well as indirect costs, such as support services provided by family or volunteers, and the value of lost economic productivity in Alzheimer's Disease patients. Mid-range estimates of net annual expected costs for an Alzheimer's Disease patient, excluding the value of lost productivity, are $18,517 in the first year and $17,643 in subsequent years, with direct medical and social services comprising about half of these costs. Under base case assumptions, the total cost of disease per patient in 1983, was $48,544 to $493,277, depending upon patient's age at disease onset. The estimated present value of total net costs to society for all persons first diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease in 1983 was $27.9-31.2 billion. Development of a public or private insurance market for the economic burdens of Alzheimer's Disease would fill some of the gaps in the current US system of financing long-term chronic disease care.

  13. Biological markers of Alzheimer?s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Cruz de Souza

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The challenges for establishing an early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD have created a need for biomarkers that reflect the core pathology of the disease. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF levels of total Tau (T-tau, phosphorylated Tau (P-Tau and beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ42 reflect, respectively, neurofibrillary tangle and amyloid pathologies and are considered as surrogate markers of AD pathophysiology. The combination of low Aβ42 and high levels of T-tau and P-Tau can accurately identify patients with AD at early stages, even before the development of dementia. The combined analysis of the CSF biomarkers is also helpful for the differential diagnosis between AD and other degenerative dementias. The development of these CSF biomarkers has evolved to a novel diagnostic definition of the disease. The identification of a specific clinical phenotype combined with the in vivo evidence of pathophysiological markers offers the possibility to make a diagnosis of AD before the dementia stage with high specificity.

  14. Synaptic changes in Alzheimer's disease in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article describes the current knowledge on biochemical changes in Alzheimer's disease. Following a summary on post mortem findings, results from positron emission tomography will be focused on. This synopsis shows that patients with Alzheimer's disease show very consistently changes in the cholinergic transmission. In addition to this, changes of the dopaminergic, noradrenergic and serotonergic system are observed. It is possible, that clinical, pathological and functional differences in Alzheimer's disease between different patients reflect variations of a single disease process. It is also thinkable, that there are subclassifications in Alzheimer's disease which are reflected in the above described biochemical abnormalities. In this case it is important in therapeutical terms to investigate these subtypes. (orig.)

  15. Lithium May Fend off Alzheimer's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Helen Pilcher; 夏红

    2004-01-01

    @@ Lithium, a common treatment for manic depression, might also help to stave off②Alzheimer's disease. Patients who take the drug to stabilize their mood disorder are less likely to succumb to dementia③, a study reveals.

  16. Education and the risk for Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Letenneur, L; Launer, L J; Andersen, K;

    2000-01-01

    The hypothesis that a low educational level increases the risk for Alzheimer's disease remains controversial. The authors studied the association of years of schooling with the risk for incident dementia and Alzheimer's disease by using pooled data from four European population-based follow......-up studies. Dementia cases were identified in a two-stage procedure that included a detailed diagnostic assessment of screen-positive subjects. Dementia and Alzheimer's disease were diagnosed by using international research criteria. Educational level was categorized by years of schooling as low (...), middle (8-11), or high (> or =12). Relative risks (95% confidence intervals) were estimated by using Poisson regression, adjusting for age, sex, study center, smoking status, and self-reported myocardial infarction and stroke. There were 493 (328) incident cases of dementia (Alzheimer's disease) and 28...

  17. Periodontitis and Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Mark; Harris, Marina; Stevens, Annette; Sussams, Rebecca; Hopkins, Viv; Culliford, David; Fuller, James; Ibbett, Paul; Raybould, Rachel; Thomas, Rhodri; Puenter, Ursula; Teeling, Jessica; Perry, V Hugh; Holmes, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is common in the elderly and may become more common in Alzheimer's disease because of a reduced ability to take care of oral hygiene as the disease progresses. Elevated antibodies to periodontal bacteria are associated with an increased systemic pro-inflammatory state. Elsewhere raised serum pro-inflammatory cytokines have been associated with an increased rate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that periodontitis would be associated with increased dementia severity and a more rapid cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We aimed to determine if periodontitis in Alzheimer's disease is associated with both increased dementia severity and cognitive decline, and an increased systemic pro inflammatory state. In a six month observational cohort study 60 community dwelling participants with mild to moderate Alzheimer's Disease were cognitively assessed and a blood sample taken for systemic inflammatory markers. Dental health was assessed by a dental hygienist, blind to cognitive outcomes. All assessments were repeated at six months. The presence of periodontitis at baseline was not related to baseline cognitive state but was associated with a six fold increase in the rate of cognitive decline as assessed by the ADAS-cog over a six month follow up period. Periodontitis at baseline was associated with a relative increase in the pro-inflammatory state over the six month follow up period. Our data showed that periodontitis is associated with an increase in cognitive decline in Alzheimer's Disease, independent to baseline cognitive state, which may be mediated through effects on systemic inflammation.

  18. Periodontitis and Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Ide

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is common in the elderly and may become more common in Alzheimer's disease because of a reduced ability to take care of oral hygiene as the disease progresses. Elevated antibodies to periodontal bacteria are associated with an increased systemic pro-inflammatory state. Elsewhere raised serum pro-inflammatory cytokines have been associated with an increased rate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that periodontitis would be associated with increased dementia severity and a more rapid cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We aimed to determine if periodontitis in Alzheimer's disease is associated with both increased dementia severity and cognitive decline, and an increased systemic pro inflammatory state. In a six month observational cohort study 60 community dwelling participants with mild to moderate Alzheimer's Disease were cognitively assessed and a blood sample taken for systemic inflammatory markers. Dental health was assessed by a dental hygienist, blind to cognitive outcomes. All assessments were repeated at six months. The presence of periodontitis at baseline was not related to baseline cognitive state but was associated with a six fold increase in the rate of cognitive decline as assessed by the ADAS-cog over a six month follow up period. Periodontitis at baseline was associated with a relative increase in the pro-inflammatory state over the six month follow up period. Our data showed that periodontitis is associated with an increase in cognitive decline in Alzheimer's Disease, independent to baseline cognitive state, which may be mediated through effects on systemic inflammation.

  19. Periodontitis and Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Mark; Harris, Marina; Stevens, Annette; Sussams, Rebecca; Hopkins, Viv; Culliford, David; Fuller, James; Ibbett, Paul; Raybould, Rachel; Thomas, Rhodri; Puenter, Ursula; Teeling, Jessica; Perry, V Hugh; Holmes, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is common in the elderly and may become more common in Alzheimer's disease because of a reduced ability to take care of oral hygiene as the disease progresses. Elevated antibodies to periodontal bacteria are associated with an increased systemic pro-inflammatory state. Elsewhere raised serum pro-inflammatory cytokines have been associated with an increased rate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that periodontitis would be associated with increased dementia severity and a more rapid cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We aimed to determine if periodontitis in Alzheimer's disease is associated with both increased dementia severity and cognitive decline, and an increased systemic pro inflammatory state. In a six month observational cohort study 60 community dwelling participants with mild to moderate Alzheimer's Disease were cognitively assessed and a blood sample taken for systemic inflammatory markers. Dental health was assessed by a dental hygienist, blind to cognitive outcomes. All assessments were repeated at six months. The presence of periodontitis at baseline was not related to baseline cognitive state but was associated with a six fold increase in the rate of cognitive decline as assessed by the ADAS-cog over a six month follow up period. Periodontitis at baseline was associated with a relative increase in the pro-inflammatory state over the six month follow up period. Our data showed that periodontitis is associated with an increase in cognitive decline in Alzheimer's Disease, independent to baseline cognitive state, which may be mediated through effects on systemic inflammation. PMID:26963387

  20. Nuclear microscopy in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The elemental composition of the two types of brain lesions which characterise Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been the subject of intense scrutiny over the last decade, ever since it was proposed that inorganic trace elements, particularly aluminium, might be implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease. The major evidence for this involvement was the detection of aluminium in the characteristic lesions of the AD brain; neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). Using the powerful combination of Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM), it is possible to image and analyse structures in brain sections without recourse to chemical staining. Previous results on elemental composition of senile plaques indicated the absence of aluminium at the 15 parts per million level. We have more recently focused on the analysis of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), destructive structural defects within neurons. Imaging and analysis of neurons in brain tissue presented a greater challenge due to the small dimensional size compared with the plaques. We describe the methodology and the results of imaging and analysing neurons in brain tissue sections using Nuclear Microscopy. Our results show that aluminium is not present in either neurons or surrounding tissue in unstained sections at the 20 ppm level, but can be observed in stained sections. We also report elemental concentrations showing significant elevations of phosphorus, sulphur, chlorine, iron and zinc

  1. Caregiving

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... resource kit Caregiver multimedia Tips for making a hospital to home transition Caregivers and experts offer advice ... Action Find health & drug plans Find doctors, providers, hospitals & plans Where can I get covered medical items? ...

  2. An anemia of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faux, N G; Rembach, A; Wiley, J; Ellis, K A; Ames, D; Fowler, C J; Martins, R N; Pertile, K K; Rumble, R L; Trounson, B; Masters, C L; Bush, A I

    2014-11-01

    Lower hemoglobin is associated with cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since brain iron homeostasis is perturbed in AD, we investigated whether this is peripherally reflected in the hematological and related blood chemistry values from the Australian Imaging Biomarker and Lifestyle (AIBL) study (a community-based, cross-sectional cohort comprising 768 healthy controls (HC), 133 participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 211 participants with AD). We found that individuals with AD had significantly lower hemoglobin, mean cell hemoglobin concentrations, packed cell volume and higher erythrocyte sedimentation rates (adjusted for age, gender, APOE-ɛ4 and site). In AD, plasma iron, transferrin, transferrin saturation and red cell folate levels exhibited a significant distortion of their customary relationship to hemoglobin levels. There was a strong association between anemia and AD (adjusted odds ratio (OR)=2.43, confidence interval (CI) (1.31, 4.54)). Moreover, AD emerged as a strong risk factor for anemia on step-down regression, even when controlling for all other available explanations for anemia (adjusted OR=3.41, 95% CI (1.68, 6.92)). These data indicated that AD is complicated by anemia, which may itself contribute to cognitive decline. PMID:24419041

  3. Alzheimer's Disease: An Exacerbation of Senile Phenoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaev, N K; Stelmashook, E V; Genrikhs, E E; Oborina, M V; Kapkaeva, M R; Skulachev, V P

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by progressive memory loss and cognitive decline accompanied by degeneration of neuronal synapses, massive loss of neurons in the brain, eventually resulting in complete degradation of personality and death. Currently, the cause of the disease is not fully understood, but it is believed that the person's age is the major risk factor for development of Alzheimer's disease. People who have survived after cerebral stroke or traumatic brain injury have substantially increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Social exclusion, low social activity, physical inactivity, poor mental performance, and low level of education are among risk factors for development of this neurodegenerative disease, which is consistent with the concept of phenoptosis (Skulachev, V. P., et al. (1999) Biochemistry (Moscow), 64, 1418-1426; Skulachev, M. V., and Skulachev, V. P. (2014) Biochemistry (Moscow), 79, 977-993) stating that rate of aging is related to psychological and social aspects in human behavior. Here we assumed that Alzheimer's disease might be considered as an exacerbation of senile phenoptosis. If so, then development of this disease could be slowed using mitochondria-targeted antioxidants due to the accumulated data demonstrating a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress both with normal aging and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26638682

  4. Stem cell treatment for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Guo, Kequan; Ikehara, Susumu

    2014-10-23

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive and neurodegenerative disorder that induces dementia in older people. It was first reported in 1907 by Alois Alzheimer, who characterized the disease as causing memory loss and cognitive impairment. Pathologic characteristics of AD are β-amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and neurodegeneration. Current therapies only target the relief of symptoms using various drugs, and do not cure the disease. Recently, stem cell therapy has been shown to be a potential approach to various diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, and in this review, we focus on stem cell therapies for AD.

  5. Alzheimer's disease due to loss of function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a highly complex disease involving a broad range of clinical, cellular, and biochemical manifestations that are currently not understood in combination. This has led to many views of AD, e.g. the amyloid, tau, presenilin, oxidative stress, and metal hypotheses. The amy......Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a highly complex disease involving a broad range of clinical, cellular, and biochemical manifestations that are currently not understood in combination. This has led to many views of AD, e.g. the amyloid, tau, presenilin, oxidative stress, and metal hypotheses...

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzheimer's disease is often diagnosed too late. Its etiology is still largely unknown and remains one of the big challenges in neurobiological fundamental research. Optimized early and differential diagnosis can be ensured by a dynamic concept of multidisciplinary diagnosis in cooperation between practitioners specializing in brain disorders, clinical psychogeriatric deprtments, and general practitioners. This, in turn, will enable individualized planning of further living conditions and care of Alzheimer patients and their relations as well as efficient and early pharmacotherapy and psychological intervention. (orig)

  7. Frontal variant of Alzheimer's disease and typical Alzheimer's disease: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardino Fernández-Calvo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical heterogeneity is one of the characteristics of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Hence, the atypical frontal or dysexecutive presentation is becoming increasingly well-known, although the underlying factors are still unknown. In this study, the neuropsychological performance of two groups of patients with AD (frontal variant--ADfv--and typical--TAD were compared. The ADfv group (n = 13 was selected due to the existence of frontal hypoperfusion on a simple photon emission computer tomography (SPECT. The results revealed that the ADfv group displayed a severe dysexecutive disorder, more severe neuropsychiatric symptomatology (disinhibition and apathy, more functional impairment, and it generated a higher caregiver overload than the TAD group without frontal impairment (n = 47. Despite the facts that the ADfv group's performance was poorer in all the neuropsychological tests, significant group differences were only found in the processing speed and visuoconstruction tasks. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the processing speed and mental flexibility scores significantly predicted a diagnosis of ADfv. The existence of the grasp reflex, anosognosia, and the absence of apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 allele (APOE e4 were also more prevalent in the ADfv group. This group had a predominance of males and it was more likely to have a positive family history of AD. To conclude, the study suggests that ADfv represents a subtype of AD that seems to have different clinical, neuropsychological, and genetic characteristics from TAD.

  8. Biomarkers for early detection of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Robert C

    2010-09-01

    The existence of an effective biomarker for early detection of Alzheimer disease would facilitate improved diagnosis and stimulate therapeutic trials. Multidisciplinary clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer disease is time consuming and expensive and relies on experts who are rarely available outside of specialty clinics. Thus, many patients do not receive proper diagnosis until the disease has progressed beyond stages in which treatments are maximally effective. In the clinical trial setting, rapid, cost-effective screening of patients for Alzheimer disease is of paramount importance for the development of new treatments. Neuroimaging of cortical amyloid burden and volumetric changes in the brain and assessment of protein concentrations (eg, β-amyloid 1-42, total tau, phosphorylated tau) in cerebrospinal fluid are diagnostic tools that are not widely available. Known genetic markers do not provide sufficient discriminatory power between different forms of dementia to be useful in isolation. Recent studies using panels of biomarkers for diagnosis of Alzheimer disease or mild cognitive impairment have been promising, though no such studies have been cross-validated in independent samples of subjects. The ideal biomarker enabling early detection of Alzheimer disease has not yet been identified.

  9. Imaging markers for Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchetta, Martina; Chételat, Gael; Rabinovici, Gil D.; de Leon, Mony J.; Kaye, Jeffrey; Reiman, Eric M.; Scheltens, Philip; Barkhof, Frederik; Black, Sandra E.; Brooks, David J.; Carrillo, Maria C.; Fox, Nick C.; Herholz, Karl; Nordberg, Agneta; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William J.; Johnson, Keith A.; Rowe, Christopher C.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Thies, William; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Weiner, Michael W.; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; DeCarli, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Revised diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer disease (AD) acknowledge a key role of imaging biomarkers for early diagnosis. Diagnostic accuracy depends on which marker (i.e., amyloid imaging, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose [FDG]-PET, SPECT, MRI) as well as how it is measured (“metric”: visual, manual, semiautomated, or automated segmentation/computation). We evaluated diagnostic accuracy of marker vs metric in separating AD from healthy and prognostic accuracy to predict progression in mild cognitive impairment. The outcome measure was positive (negative) likelihood ratio, LR+ (LR−), defined as the ratio between the probability of positive (negative) test outcome in patients and the probability of positive (negative) test outcome in healthy controls. Diagnostic LR+ of markers was between 4.4 and 9.4 and LR− between 0.25 and 0.08, whereas prognostic LR+ and LR− were between 1.7 and 7.5, and 0.50 and 0.11, respectively. Within metrics, LRs varied up to 100-fold: LR+ from approximately 1 to 100; LR− from approximately 1.00 to 0.01. Markers accounted for 11% and 18% of diagnostic and prognostic variance of LR+ and 16% and 24% of LR−. Across all markers, metrics accounted for an equal or larger amount of variance than markers: 13% and 62% of diagnostic and prognostic variance of LR+, and 29% and 18% of LR−. Within markers, the largest proportion of diagnostic LR+ and LR− variability was within 18F-FDG-PET and MRI metrics, respectively. Diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of imaging AD biomarkers is at least as dependent on how the biomarker is measured as on the biomarker itself. Standard operating procedures are key to biomarker use in the clinical routine and drug trials. PMID:23897875

  10. [Specific care plan in different stages of Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Christophe; Villars, Hélène; Nourhashemi, Fati

    2011-09-01

    The management and follow-up of patients with Alzheimers disease have stage-specific characteristics. In the mild stage, the key challenges are above all to improve the early diagnosis and the communication of the diagnosis. With the patient's agreement, a follow-up should be scheduled to assess, at each stage of the disease, cognitive and functional decline, and detect psycho-behavioral, nutritional or mobility complications. In the moderate or severe stages, prevention and treatment of caregiver burnout should be included in the follow-up. Finally, in the very severe stage, end of life and ethical issues should be considered. The followup and the intervention plan should be adapted to each patient, and require coordination between health care professionals and social workers. However, the practical aspects of the follow-up and the ways in which those can be improved are yet to be defined.

  11. Overload of families taking care of elderly people with Alzheimer's Disease: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carla Borghi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to compare the overload of the main and secondary family carers of patients with Alzheimer's Disease, and identify which dimension generates most impact. METHOD: a comparative study conducted in the city of Maringá, State of Paraná, with 20 primary carers of elderly patients with Alzheimer's Disease and 20 secondary caregivers. The data was collected in May and June 2012, using the Scale for Assessment of Overload of Members of Psychiatric Patients' Families (FBIS-BR, and the results were analysed using the Mann-Whitney test and analysis of variance. RESULTS: the global objective overload, and also in each subscale, was significantly greater in the group of main caregivers; the subjective overload showed no difference between the groups. Comparing the subscales, the routine assistance provided to the patient had greater influence on objective overload in both groups, and the concern with the elderly patient was the dimension that had most influence on the subjective overload of main caregivers and also of secondary caregivers. CONCLUSION: the differences in overload between the different groups reinforces the need for planning of health care actions for each type of caregiver, seeking to reduce these differences.

  12. 75 FR 67899 - National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-04

    ... terrible disease. As we continue our fight against Alzheimer's disease, we must seek new ways to prevent... and attention to those facing Alzheimer's disease. Until we find more effective treatments and a cure... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8591 of October 29, 2010 National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month,...

  13. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease wanes with age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J.M. Hoozemans; A.J.M. Rozemuller; E.S. van Haastert; P. Eikelenboom; W.A. van Gool

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Inflammation is a prominent feature in Alzheimer's disease (AD). It has been proposed that aging has an effect on the function of inflammation in the brain, thereby contributing to the development of age-related diseases like AD. However, the age-dependent relationship between

  14. Family caregivers' views on coordination of care in Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røthing, Merete; Malterud, Kirsti; Frich, Jan C

    2015-01-01

    in partnerships with healthcare professionals. Our study suggests that building respectful partnerships with family caregivers and facilitating the mutual sharing of knowledge may improve the coordination of care. It is important to establish clarity of roles adjusted to caregivers' individual resources......'s illness may be unpredictable or not well understood by some of those involved in the treatment and care. AIM: The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and expectations of family caregivers for persons with Huntington's disease concerning collaboration with healthcare professionals. METHODS......: To shed light on collaboration from the perspectives of family caregivers, we conducted an explorative, qualitative interview study with 15 adult participants experienced from caring for family members in all stages of Huntington's disease. Data were analysed with systematic text condensation, a cross...

  15. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is important for the brain to function well. Alzheimer's disease disrupts this intricate interplay. By compromising the ability ... of the brain changes that take place in Alzheimer's disease. Abnormal structures called beta amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary ...

  16. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is important for the brain to function well. Alzheimer's disease disrupts this intricate interplay. By compromising the ... of the brain changes that take place in Alzheimer's disease. Abnormal structures called beta amyloid plaques and ...

  17. Dietary intake of antioxidants and risk of Alzheimer disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Engelhart (Marianne); M.I. Geerlings (Miriam); A. Ruitenberg (Annemieke); J.C. van Swieten; J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); M.M.B. Breteler (Monique); A. Hofman (Albert)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractCONTEXT: Laboratory findings have suggested that oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. Therefore, the risk of Alzheimer disease might be reduced by intake of antioxidants that counteract the detrimental effects of oxidative stress. OB

  18. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... disease over time destroys memory and thinking skills. Scientific research has revealed some of the brain changes that ... Alzheimer's disease as the brain and body age? Scientific research is helping to unravel the mystery of Alzheimer's ...

  19. Caregiving

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... gov Medicare forms Advance directives & long-term care Electronic prescribing Electronic Health Records (EHRs) Download claims with Medicare’s Blue ... caregiving. Read stories Caregiver e-newsletter This free, electronic newsletter offers Medicare updates and other resources for ...

  20. The pilot European Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative of the European Alzheimer's Disease Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisoni, G.B.; Henneman, W.J.; Weiner, M.W.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In North America, the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) has established a platform to track the brain changes of Alzheimer's disease. A pilot study has been carried out in Europe to test the feasibility of the adoption of the ADNI platform (pilot E-ADNI). METHODS: Seven...... academic sites of the European Alzheimer's Disease Consortium (EADC) enrolled 19 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), 22 with AD, and 18 older healthy persons by using the ADNI clinical and neuropsychological battery. ADNI compliant magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, cerebrospinal fluid...

  1. Verbal fluency in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narahyana Bom de Araujo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare verbal fluency among Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and major depression and to assess the sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with the disease severity. METHODS: Patients from an outpatient university center with a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease or major depression were studied. Severity was staged using the Hoehn & Yahr scale, the Hamilton Depression scale and the Clinical Dementia Rating for Parkinson's disease, major depression, and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. All subjects were tested with the Mini-Mental State Examination, the digit span test, and the verbal fluency test (animals. We fit four types of regression models for the count variable: Poisson model, negative binomial model, zero-inflated Poisson model, and zero-inflated negative binomial model. RESULTS: The mean digit span and verbal fluency scores were lower in patients with Alzheimer's disease (n = 34 than in patients with major depression (n = 52 or Parkinson's disease (n = 17 (p<0.001. The average number of words listed was much lower for Alzheimer's disease patients (7.2 words compared to the patients presenting with major depression (14.6 words or Parkinson's disease (15.7 words (KW test = 32.4; p<0.01. Major depression and Parkinson's disease groups listed 44% (ROM = 1.44 and 48% (ROM = 1.48 more words, respectively, compared to those patients with Alzheimer's disease; these results were independent of age, education, disease severity and attention. Independently of diagnosis, age, and education, severe disease showed a 26% (ROM = 0.74 reduction in the number of words listed when compared to mild cases. CONCLUSIONS: Verbal fluency provides a better characterization of Alzheimer's disease, major depression, and Parkinson's disease, even at later stages.

  2. Social participation in home-living patients with mild Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth Villemoes; Waldorff, Frans Boch; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate social participation in home-living patients with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to identify predictors for low social participation. The study was based on baseline data from 330 home-living patients with mild AD who participated in The Danish...... Alzheimer Intervention Study (DAISY). Proxy-obtained information from primary caregiver assessed patients' social participation. The result showed that low social participation was present in mild AD. Significant independent predictors of low social participation were impairment in activities of daily...

  3. Qualidade de vida de idosos com doença de Alzheimer e de seus cuidadores Calidad de vida de los ancianos con enfermedad de Alzheimer y sus cuidadores Quality of life of elders with Alzheimer's disease and of their caregivers

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Carla Borghi; Anelize Helena Sassá; Paula Cristina Barros de Matos; Maria das Neves Decesaro; Sonia Silva Marcon

    2011-01-01

    O objetivo do estudo foi identificar a qualidade de vida (QV) do cuidador e a do idoso com Doença de Alzheimer (DA). Estudo descritivo-exploratório realizado em Maringá, Paraná, junto a 50 idosos e seus respectivos cuidadores. Os dados foram coletados no período de novembro de 2010 a janeiro de 2011 com aplicação da Escala de Avaliação da Qualidade de Vida na Doença de Alzheimer. A média dos escores totais para pacientes e cuidadores foi respectivamente, 26,36 e 35,04 pontos. Os itens moradia...

  4. [Alzheimer's disease and pharmacists in contact with the public].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreux, C

    2009-03-01

    All healthcare professionals are concerned by Alzheimer's disease, which in France will affect, in just a few years, over one million persons, mainly women. Pharmacists have shown particular interest, irrespective of their sector of activity. Here, we wanted to better define the role of colleagues who are constantly in contact with the public, i.e. in France in drug dispensaries and biology laboratories. Within the framework of the French pharmacy committee for health and social education, Cespharm, the Ethics and Communications working group of the 2008-2012 Alzheimer Disease Committee headed by Professor Joël Menard proposed a project worksheet which can be used by French pharmacists in their action to help Alzheimer patients and their caregivers. This project, prepared by Fabienne Blanchet, the Cespharm director and Christine Curty, mission head, was approved by the Menard commission and is inscribed in the National Alzheimer Plan 2008-2012 presented by this commission in November 2007. Here, our objective is to motivate pharmacists to participate in a structured initial and continuing training program proposed by specialists from the School of Pharmacy and other organizations duly approved by the High Committee for Continuing Education in Pharmacy. In keeping with the general operative procedures of Cespharm, information tools should be developed for colleagues and the public. Available interventions, in terms of prevention, diagnosis and treatment should be updated permanently and transmitted to professionals. Information which can be delivered to patients, and most importantly to their caregivers, concerning local assistance programs should be collected and transmitted to the local professionals. The role of the pharmacist can be summarized with four verbs: listen, reassure, orient, support. It is important to identify all available means enabling a confidential relationship with the persons needing help. Of particular interest are the relationship guides

  5. [Alzheimer's disease and pharmacists in contact with the public].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreux, C

    2009-03-01

    All healthcare professionals are concerned by Alzheimer's disease, which in France will affect, in just a few years, over one million persons, mainly women. Pharmacists have shown particular interest, irrespective of their sector of activity. Here, we wanted to better define the role of colleagues who are constantly in contact with the public, i.e. in France in drug dispensaries and biology laboratories. Within the framework of the French pharmacy committee for health and social education, Cespharm, the Ethics and Communications working group of the 2008-2012 Alzheimer Disease Committee headed by Professor Joël Menard proposed a project worksheet which can be used by French pharmacists in their action to help Alzheimer patients and their caregivers. This project, prepared by Fabienne Blanchet, the Cespharm director and Christine Curty, mission head, was approved by the Menard commission and is inscribed in the National Alzheimer Plan 2008-2012 presented by this commission in November 2007. Here, our objective is to motivate pharmacists to participate in a structured initial and continuing training program proposed by specialists from the School of Pharmacy and other organizations duly approved by the High Committee for Continuing Education in Pharmacy. In keeping with the general operative procedures of Cespharm, information tools should be developed for colleagues and the public. Available interventions, in terms of prevention, diagnosis and treatment should be updated permanently and transmitted to professionals. Information which can be delivered to patients, and most importantly to their caregivers, concerning local assistance programs should be collected and transmitted to the local professionals. The role of the pharmacist can be summarized with four verbs: listen, reassure, orient, support. It is important to identify all available means enabling a confidential relationship with the persons needing help. Of particular interest are the relationship guides

  6. Guidelines and Care Management Issues for People with Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias

    OpenAIRE

    Katie Maslow; John Selstad; Susan J. Denman

    2002-01-01

    Most people with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias do not receive ongoing, intentional medical management for these conditions, and effective coordination of medical and non-medical care is rare. Many published guidelines and consensus statements provide recommendations for identification, diagnosis and ongoing management of key issues, including cognitive decline, behavioral and psychiatric symptoms, depression, safety, family caregiver support and use of community services. These reco...

  7. 76 FR 68615 - National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8745 of November 1, 2011 National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, 2011... heartbreak of watching a loved one struggle with Alzheimer's disease is a pain they know all too well. Alzheimer's disease burdens an increasing number of our Nation's elders and their families, and it...

  8. 77 FR 66519 - National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-06

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8897 of November 1, 2012 National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, 2012... country confront the tragic realities of Alzheimer's disease--an irreversible, fatal illness that robs men... Americans grows in the coming years, Alzheimer's disease will continue to pose serious risks to our...

  9. 78 FR 66611 - National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 9050 of October 31, 2013 National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Alzheimer's disease is an... younger Americans with early-onset Alzheimer's disease. This month, we stand with everyone confronting...

  10. Effects of a multidisciplinar cognitive rehabilitation program for patients with mild Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane F. Viola

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program on cognition, quality of life, and neuropsychiatry symptoms in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease. METHOD: The present study was a single-blind, controlled study that was conducted at a university-based day-hospital memory facility. The study included 25 Alzheimer's patients and their caregivers and involved a 12-week stimulation and psychoeducational program. The comparison group consisted of 16 Alzheimer's patients in waiting lists for future intervention. INTERVENTION: Group sessions were provided by a multiprofessional team and included memory training, computer-assisted cognitive stimulation, expressive activities (painting, verbal expression, writing, physiotherapy, and physical training. Treatment was administered twice a week during 6.5-h gatherings. MEASUREMENTS: The assessment battery comprised the following tests: Mini-Mental State Examination, Short Cognitive Test, Quality of Life in Alzheimer's disease, Neuropsychiatric Inventory, and Geriatric Depression Scale. Test scores were evaluated at baseline and the end of the study by raters who were blinded to the group assignments. RESULTS: Measurements of global cognitive function and performance on attention tasks indicated that patients in the experimental group remained stable, whereas controls displayed mild but significant worsening. The intervention was associated with reduced depression symptoms for patients and caregivers and decreased neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer's subjects. The treatment was also beneficial for the patients' quality of life. CONCLUSION: This multimodal rehabilitation program was associated with cognitive stability and significant improvements in the quality of life for Alzheimer's patients. We also observed a significant decrease in depressive symptoms and caregiver burden. These results support the notion that structured nonpharmacological interventions can yield

  11. Physical and cognitive stimulation in Alzheimer Disease. the GAIA Project: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maci, Tiziana; Pira, Francesco Le; Quattrocchi, Graziella; Nuovo, Santo Di; Perciavalle, Vincenzo; Zappia, Mario

    2012-03-01

    Several data suggest that physical activity and cognitive stimulation have a positive effect on the quality of life (QoL) of people with Alzheimer's disease (AD), slowing the decline due to the disease. A pilot project was undertaken to assess the effect of cognitive stimulation, physical activity, and socialization on patients with AD and their informal caregiver's QoL and mood. Fourteen patients with AD were randomly divided into active treatment group and control group. At the end of treatment, a significant improvement in apathy, anxiety, depression, and QoL in the active treatment group was found. Considering caregivers, those of the active treatment group exhibited a significant improvement in their mood and in their perception of patients' QoL. This study provides evidence that a combined approach based on cognitive stimulation, physical activity, and socialization is a feasible tool to improve mood and QoL in patients with AD and their caregivers. PMID:22495338

  12. A clinical index to predict progression from mild cognitive impairment to dementia due to Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sei J Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mild cognitive impairment is often a precursor to dementia due to Alzheimer's disease, but many patients with mild cognitive impairment never develop dementia. New diagnostic criteria may lead to more patients receiving a diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment. OBJECTIVE: To develop a prediction index for the 3-year risk of progression from mild cognitive impairment to dementia relying only on information that can be readily obtained in most clinical settings. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: 382 participants diagnosed with amnestic mild cognitive impairment enrolled in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI, a multi-site, longitudinal, observational study. MAIN PREDICTORS MEASURES: Demographics, comorbid conditions, caregiver report of participant symptoms and function, and participant performance on individual items from basic neuropsychological scales. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Progression to probable Alzheimer's disease. KEY RESULTS: Subjects had a mean (SD age of 75 (7 years and 43% progressed to probable Alzheimer's disease within 3 years. Important independent predictors of progression included being female, resisting help, becoming upset when separated from caregiver, difficulty shopping alone, forgetting appointments, number of words recalled from a 10-word list, orientation and difficulty drawing a clock. The final point score could range from 0 to 16 (mean [SD]: 4.2 [2.9]. The optimism-corrected Harrell's c-statistic was 0.71(95% CI: 0.68-0.75. Fourteen percent of subjects with low risk scores (0-2 points, n = 124 converted to probable Alzheimer's disease over 3 years, compared to 51% of those with moderate risk scores (3-8 points, n = 223 and 91% of those with high risk scores (9-16 points, n = 35. CONCLUSIONS: An index using factors that can be obtained in most clinical settings can predict progression from amnestic mild cognitive impairment to probable Alzheimer's disease and may help clinicians

  13. Caregiving

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... caring for an aging, seriously ill, or disabled family member or friend, we're here to help ... importance of medication management and the role of family caregivers. View more videos 1 2 3 Features ...

  14. Caregiving

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Medicare rights Authorization to Disclose Personal Health Information Manage Your Health Login to MyMedicare.gov Medicare ... hospitalized. View more videos Planning for a discharge Information for caregivers of individuals who are discharged from ...

  15. Famous forgetters: notable people and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jeffrey M; Jones, Joni L

    2010-03-01

    As life expectancy continues to increase, Alzheimer's disease (AD) has become much more prevalent and as yet there is no cure. This has given rise to the situation Tithonus faced in Greek mythology of living longer but not staying young. In this article, the authors explore this phenomenon while reviewing some notable people and AD. PMID:19949162

  16. Cannabinoids in late-onset Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, A.; Marck, M.A. van der; Elsen, G. van den; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Given the lack of effective treatments for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) and the substantial burden on patients, families, health care systems, and economies, finding an effective therapy is one of the highest medical priorities. The past few years have seen a growing interest in the medicin

  17. Estrogen receptor beta treats Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Tian; Jia Fan; Yang Zhao; Sheng Bi; Lihui Si; Qun Liu

    2013-01-01

    In vitro studies have shown that estrogen receptor β can attenuate the cytotoxic effect of amyloid β protein on PC12 cells through the Akt pathway without estrogen stimulation. In this study, we aimed to observe the effect of estrogen receptor β in Alzheimer's disease rat models established by intraventricular injection of amyloid β protein. Estrogen receptor β lentiviral particles delivered via intraventricular injection increased Akt content in the hippocampus, decreased interleukin-1β mRNA, tumor necrosis factor α mRNA and amyloid β protein levels in the hippocampus, and improved the learning and memory capacities in Alzheimer's disease rats. Estrogen receptor β short hairpin RNA lentiviral particles delivered via intraventricular injection had none of the above impacts on Alzheimer's disease rats. These experimental findings indicate that estrogen receptor β, independent from estrogen, can reduce inflammatory reactions and amyloid β deposition in the hippocampus of Alzheimer's disease rats, and improve learning and memory capacities. This effect may be mediated through activation of the Akt pathway.

  18. Atorvastatin attenuates oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Zhiyou; Yan Yong; Wang Yonglong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate serum level of SOD, MDA, ox-LDL, AchE and Ach in AD, to study atorvastatin influence on serum level of SOD, MDA, ox-LDL, AchE and Acb in AD and its neuroprotection mechanisms. Methods Subjects were divided into: normal blood lipid level group with Alzheimer's disease (A), higher blood lipid level group with Alzheimer's disease (AH), normal blood lipid level Alzheimer's disease group with atorvastatin treeatment (AT),higher blood lipid level Alzheimer's disease group with atorvastatin treeatment(AHT). Ox-LDL was measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay; SOD, MDA, ox-LDL, AchE, Ach and blood lipid level in AD was measured by biochemistry. Results: The serum level of MDA, AchE in AH group after atorvastatin treatment is lower ;The serum level of SOD, Ach in AH group is more increased than that of in A group; The serum level of ox-LDL in AH, A groups is lower than that of in A group; The dementia degree is lower after atorvastatin treatment. Conclusion: Atorvastatin can decrease serum level of MDA, AchE and ox-LDL, and increase that of SOD, Acb, and attenuate dementia symptom in AD, especially, with hyperlipemia. The hypothesis of atorvastatin neuroprotection is concluded that atorvastatin may restrain free radical reaction and retard oxidation in AD.

  19. Alzheimer disease : presenilin springs a leak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gandy, S.; Doeven, M.K.; Poolman, B.

    2006-01-01

    Presenilins are thought to contribute to Alzheimer disease through a protein cleavage reaction that produces neurotoxic amyloid-beta peptides. A new function for presenilins now comes to light - controlling the leakage of calcium out of the endoplasmic reticulum. Is this a serious challenge to the '

  20. Normal tension glaucoma and Alzheimer disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach-Holm, Daniella; Kessing, Svend Vedel; Mogensen, Ulla;

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether normal tension glaucoma (NTG) is associated with increased risk of developing dementia/Alzheimer disease (AD). METHODS: A total of 69 patients with NTG were identified in the case note files in the Glaucoma Clinic, University Hospital of Copenhagen (Rigshospitalet...

  1. Progression of Alzheimer Disease in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vellas, B; Hausner, L; Frolich, L;

    2012-01-01

    The clinical progression of Alzheimer disease (AD) was studied in European subjects under treatment with AChE inhibitors (AChE-I) in relation to geographical location over a 2-years period. One thousand three hundred and six subjects from 11 European countries were clustered into 3 regions (North...

  2. Structural Neuroimaging in Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vernooij, Meike W.; Smits, Marion

    2012-01-01

    The role of structural neuroimaging in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is becoming increasingly important. As a consequence, a basic understanding of what are normal brain changes in aging is key to be able to recognize what is abnormal. The first part of this article discusses normal vers

  3. Hyperhomocysteinemia and Alzheimer's disease: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. van Dam; W.A. van Gool

    2009-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is supposed to be one of the modifiable risk factors that, if treated, may delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The relation between serum homocysteine (Hcy) and vitamin levels during AD and its preclinical phase was systematically reviewed. Searches through large

  4. Caregiver roles in families affected by Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røthing, Merete; Malterud, Kirsti; Frich, Jan C

    2013-01-01

    AIM: The objective of this study was to explore family caregivers' experiences with the impact of Huntington's disease (HD) on the family structure and roles in the family. METHODOLOGY: We interviewed 15 family caregivers in families affected by HD, based on a semi-structured interview guide....... The participants were recruited through hospital departments and a lay organisation for HD in Norway. Data from the interviews were analysed with systematic text condensation. RESULTS: Huntington's disease could have a substantial impact on the family system, the shape of roles among family members......: Huntington's disease has a major impact on family systems. Caregiver roles are shaped by impairments in the affected family member and corresponding dynamic adoption and change in roles within the family. Making assessments of the family structure and roles, professionals may understand more about how...

  5. The social positioning of older people living with Alzheimer's disease who scream in long-term care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbonnais, Anne; Ducharme, Francine

    2015-11-01

    This article describes the social positioning of older people living with Alzheimer's disease who scream in a long-term care home. Few studies have focused on the social positions taken by older people, their family and formal caregivers during interaction and their effects on screams. A secondary data analysis was conducted using Harré and Van Langenhove's positioning theory. The results show that older people are capable of positioning and repositioning themselves in relational patterns. Family and formal caregivers position older people who scream according to their beliefs about their lived experience. They also react emotionally to older people and try to influence their behaviors. Understanding the social positioning of older people with Alzheimer's disease brought out their capacities and their caregivers' concerns for their well-being. Interventions should focus on these strengths and on promoting healthy relations in the triads to enhance quality of care in long-term care homes. PMID:24339123

  6. Socio-economic Aspects of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marešová, Petra; Mohelská, Hana; Dolejš, Josef; Kuča, Kamil

    2015-01-01

    Social development, better living conditions and medical advances lead to the fact that more people have the opportunity to live longer than in the past. The aging population is a characteristic feature of demographic trends in developed countries. This trend is closely linked with the issue of increasing number of diseases in old age and increasing government expenditure on health and social care. The most frequently mentioned diseases in old age include dementia. The cause may lie in all kinds of diseases, the most common are Alzheimer's disease and cerebrovascular disease. Now the care of current 35 million patients with dementia costs over $ 600 billion per year, it is approximately one percent of global Gross Domestic Product. This review discusses the recent issues and questions in the area of social and economic aspects of Alzheimer's disease. It focuses in detail on the national strategies in the approach to Alzheimer's disease, the anticipated problems concerning the insufficient number of social workers and necessary expenses of state budgets in the future. The situation in the area of health insurance companies' expenditures is illustrated in the context of the analysis of long-term care systems, in the chosen countries within the European Union. PMID:26510983

  7. Alzheimer's Project

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... As the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer's care, support and research, the Alzheimer's Association has been ... Alzheimer's I am a caregiver I am a care professional I am a physician I am a ...

  8. 77 FR 11116 - Draft National Plan To Address Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Draft National Plan To Address Alzheimer's Disease AGENCY: Office of the Assistant.... SUMMARY: HHS is soliciting public input on the draft National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease, which... . Background On January 4, 2011, President Barack Obama signed into law the National Alzheimer's Project...

  9. Early-Stage Caregiving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Diagnosis Early-Stage Caregiving Middle-Stage Caregiving Late-Stage Caregiving Find your local Chapter Zip code: Search by state Get Weekly E-News Stay up-to-date on Alzheimer's treatments and care. First ...

  10. New criteria for diagnosing Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Yuryevich Emelin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Department of Nervous Diseases, S.M. Kirov Military Medical Academy, Saint Petersburg The paper gives an analysis of new diagnostic criteria for different stages of Alzheimer Х s disease (AD, which is proposed by the U.S. National Institute on Aging. It considers possibilities for the early diagnosis of AD, including its preclinical diagnosis using the laboratory and neuroimaging markers beta-amyloid, neuronal damage.

  11. Adiposity, type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Luchsinger, José A.; Gustafson, Deborah R

    2009-01-01

    This manuscript provides a comprehensive review of the epidemiologic evidence linking the continuum of adiposity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The mechanisms relating adiposity and T2D to AD may include hyperinsulinemia, advanced products of glycosilation, cerebrovascular disease, and products of adipose tissue metabolism. Elevated adiposity in middle age is related to a higher risk of AD but the data on this association in old age is conflicting. Several studies ha...

  12. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Alzheimer's disease, but there is still much to learn. What other changes are taking place in the ... of Alzheimer's and related brain disorders As we learn more, researchers move ever closer to discovering ways ...

  13. A disease state fingerprint for evaluation of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattila, Jussi; Koikkalainen, Juha; Virkki, Arho;

    2011-01-01

    Diagnostic processes of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are evolving. Knowledge about disease-specific biomarkers is constantly increasing and larger volumes of data are being measured from patients. To gain additional benefits from the collected data, a novel statistical modeling and data visualization...... interpretation of the information. To model the AD state from complex and heterogeneous patient data, a statistical Disease State Index (DSI) method underlying the DSF has been developed. Using baseline data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), the ability of the DSI to model disease...

  14. "The Memory of Beauty" Survives Alzheimer's Disease (but Cannot Help Memory).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveri, Maria Caterina; Ferrante, Ilaria; Brita, Anna Clelia; Rossi, Paola; Liperoti, Rosa; Mammarella, Federica; Bernabei, Roberto; Marini Chiarelli, Maria Vittoria; De Luca, Martina

    2015-01-01

    The aesthetic experience, in particular the experience of beauty in the visual arts, should have neural correlates in the human brain. Neuroesthetics is principally implemented by functional studies in normal subjects, but the neuropsychology of the aesthetic experience, that is, the impact of brain damage on the appreciation of works of art, is a neglected field. Here, 16 mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease patients and 15 caregivers expressed their preference on 16 works of art (eight representational and eight abstract) during programmed visits to an art gallery. A week later, all subjects expressed a preference rate on reproductions of the same works presented in the gallery. Both patients and caregivers were consistent in assigning preference ratings, and in patients consistency was independent of the ability to recognize the works on which the preference rate had been given in an explicit memory task. Caregivers performed at ceiling in the memory task. Both patients and caregivers assigned higher preference ratings for representational than for abstract works and preference consistency was comparable in representational and abstract works. Furthermore, in the memory task, patients did not recognize better artworks they had assigned higher preference ratings to, suggesting that emotional stimuli (as presumably visual works of art are) cannot enhance declarative memory in this pathology. Our data, which were gathered in an ecological context and with real-world stimuli, confirm previous findings on the stability of aesthetic preference in patients with Alzheimer's disease and on the independence of aesthetic preference from cognitive abilities such as memory.

  15. The Danish Alzheimer intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldemar, G; Waldorff, F B; Buss, D V;

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is a lack of appropriately designed trials investigating the efficacy of psychosocial interventions for patients with mild dementia and their family caregivers. This paper reports the rationale and design of the Danish Alzheimer Disease Intervention Study and baseline characteri......Background: There is a lack of appropriately designed trials investigating the efficacy of psychosocial interventions for patients with mild dementia and their family caregivers. This paper reports the rationale and design of the Danish Alzheimer Disease Intervention Study and baseline...

  16. Alzheimer's Disease at a Glance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z Alzheimer’s Disease at a Glance Share: On This Page ... health approaches for preventing or slowing dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease. Currently, there is no strong evidence that ...

  17. Molecular neuroimaging of Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabuurs, Rob Johannes Antonius

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the predominant form of dementia in the aging population and its increasing incidence represents an important socio-economic and public health concern. The hallmarks of this disease, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, are thought to develop early in the disease

  18. Alzheimer's disease: An acquired neurodegenerative laminopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Bess

    2016-05-01

    The nucleus is typically depicted as a sphere encircled by a smooth surface of nuclear envelope. For most cell types, this depiction is accurate. In other cell types and in some pathological conditions, however, the smooth nuclear exterior is interrupted by tubular invaginations of the nuclear envelope, often referred to as a "nucleoplasmic reticulum," into the deep nuclear interior. We have recently reported a significant expansion of the nucleoplasmic reticulum in postmortem human Alzheimer's disease brain tissue. We found that dysfunction of the nucleoskeleton, a lamin-rich meshwork that coats the inner nuclear membrane and associated invaginations, is causal for Alzheimer's disease-related neurodegeneration in vivo. Additionally, we demonstrated that proper function of the nucleoskeleton is required for survival of adult neurons and maintaining genomic architecture. Here, we elaborate on the significance of these findings in regard to pathological states and physiological aging, and discuss cellular causes and consequences of nuclear envelope invagination. PMID:27167528

  19. Alzheimer's disease: synaptic dysfunction and Abeta

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shankar, Ganesh M

    2009-11-23

    Abstract Synapse loss is an early and invariant feature of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD) and there is a strong correlation between the extent of synapse loss and the severity of dementia. Accordingly, it has been proposed that synapse loss underlies the memory impairment evident in the early phase of AD and that since plasticity is important for neuronal viability, persistent disruption of plasticity may account for the frank cell loss typical of later phases of the disease. Extensive multi-disciplinary research has implicated the amyloid β-protein (Aβ) in the aetiology of AD and here we review the evidence that non-fibrillar soluble forms of Aβ are mediators of synaptic compromise. We also discuss the possible mechanisms of Aβ synaptotoxicity and potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

  20. Fusing Heterogeneous Data for Alzheimer's Disease Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Parvathy Sudhir; Leong, Tze-Yun

    2015-01-01

    In multi-view learning, multimodal representations of a real world object or situation are integrated to learn its overall picture. Feature sets from distinct data sources carry different, yet complementary, information which, if analysed together, usually yield better insights and more accurate results. Neuro-degenerative disorders such as dementia are characterized by changes in multiple biomarkers. This work combines the features from neuroimaging and cerebrospinal fluid studies to distinguish Alzheimer's disease patients from healthy subjects. We apply statistical data fusion techniques on 101 subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. We examine whether fusion of biomarkers helps to improve diagnostic accuracy and how the methods compare against each other for this problem. Our results indicate that multimodal data fusion improves classification accuracy. PMID:26262148

  1. Microprobe PIXE analysis and EDX analysis on the brain of patients with Alzheimer`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yumoto, S. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Horino, Y.; Mokuno, Y.; Fujii, K.; Kakimi, S.; Mizutani, T.; Matsushima, H.; Ishikawa, A.

    1996-12-31

    To investigate the cause of Alzheimer`s disease (senile dementia of Alzheimer`s disease type), we examined aluminium (Al) in the brain (hippocampus) of patients with Alzheimer`s disease using heavy ion (5 MeV Si{sup 3+}) microprobe particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. Heavy ion microprobes (3 MeV Si{sup 2+}) have several times higher sensitivity for Al detection than 2 MeV proton microprobes. We also examined Al in the brain of these patients by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). (1) Al was detected in the cell nuclei isolated from the brain of patients with Alzheimer`s disease using 5 MeV Si{sup 3+} microprobe PIXE analysis, and EDX analysis. (2) EDX analysis demonstrated high levels of Al in the nucleolus of nerve cells in frozen sections prepared from the brain of these patients. Our results support the theory that Alzheimer`s disease is caused by accumulation of Al in the nuclei of brain cells. (author)

  2. Molecular regulators of neurogenesis in Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Crews, Leslie Anne

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is characterized by cognitive impairment, progressive neurodegeneration, and formation of amyloid-[Beta] (A[Beta])-containing plaques. These neuropathological features are accompanied by deregulation of signaling cascades such as the cyclin-dependent kinase- 5 (CDK5) pathway. Recent studies have revealed that neurodegeneration in AD is also associated with alterations in hippocampal neurogenesis, which may play a critical role in cognitive impairments and memory loss....

  3. Neurofibrillary pathology and aluminum in Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, R. W.; Lee, V. M. Y; Trojanowski, J Q

    1995-01-01

    Since the first reports of aluminum-induced neurofibrillary degeneration in experimental animals, extensive studies have been performed to clarify the role played by aluminum in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Additional evidence implicating aluminum in AD includes elevated levels of aluminum in the AD brain, epidemiological data linking aluminum exposure to AD, and interactions between aluminum and protein components in the pathological lesions o...

  4. Adverse Stress, Hippocampal Networks, and Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rothman, Sarah M.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    Recent clinical data have implicated chronic adverse stress as a potential risk factor in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and data also suggest that normal, physiological stress responses may be impaired in AD. It is possible that pathology associated with AD causes aberrant responses to chronic stress, due to potential alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Recent work in rodent models of AD suggests that chronic adverse stress exacerbates the cognitive def...

  5. Calmodulin Binding Proteins and Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Danton H; Eshak, Kristeen; Myre, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    The small, calcium-sensor protein, calmodulin, is ubiquitously expressed and central to cell function in all cell types. Here the literature linking calmodulin to Alzheimer's disease is reviewed. Several experimentally-verified calmodulin-binding proteins are involved in the formation of amyloid-β plaques including amyloid-β protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin-1, and ADAM10. Many others possess potential calmodulin-binding domains that remain to be verified. Three calmodulin binding proteins are associated with the formation of neurofibrillary tangles: two kinases (CaMKII, CDK5) and one protein phosphatase (PP2B or calcineurin). Many of the genes recently identified by genome wide association studies and other studies encode proteins that contain putative calmodulin-binding domains but only a couple (e.g., APOE, BIN1) have been experimentally confirmed as calmodulin binding proteins. At least two receptors involved in calcium metabolism and linked to Alzheimer's disease (mAchR; NMDAR) have also been identified as calmodulin-binding proteins. In addition to this, many proteins that are involved in other cellular events intimately associated with Alzheimer's disease including calcium channel function, cholesterol metabolism, neuroinflammation, endocytosis, cell cycle events, and apoptosis have been tentatively or experimentally verified as calmodulin binding proteins. The use of calmodulin as a potential biomarker and as a therapeutic target is discussed. PMID:25812852

  6. Association of Alzheimer's disease and Chlamydophila pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, Tiffany L

    2008-06-01

    This paper critically reviews the association of infection by Chlamydophila pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aging population has increased interest in finding the cause of AD, but studies have yielded contradictory results that are likely due to varying diagnostic tools and different uses of diagnostic tests. Knowledge of AD's characteristics, risk factors, and hypothesized etiologies has expanded since Alois Alzheimer's initial description of AD. Epidemiologic and projection studies provide incidence estimates of AD through a two-stage method: (1) primary diagnosis of dementia by cognitive testing such as Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and (2) clinical diagnosis of AD through criteria such as National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Diseases and Stroke/Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association (NINCDS-ADRDA). Cross-sectional studies yield prevalence estimates of infection by C. pneumoniae by detecting immunoglobulins through laboratory tests such as microimmunofluorescence (MIF). Studies examining the association of C. pneumoniae and AD are limited, but brain autopsy provides information about presence, proximity to areas associated with AD, and bacterial load. Standardization of diagnostic techniques would allow for better comparability of studies, but uncertainty about the best method of diagnosis of infection by C. pneumoniae and AD may call for revised or novel diagnostic tools.

  7. Predicting cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease: an integrated analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez, Oscar L; Schwam, Elias; Cummings, Jeffrey;

    2010-01-01

    Numerous patient- and disease-related factors increase the risk of rapid cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The ability of pharmacological treatment to attenuate this risk remains undefined.......Numerous patient- and disease-related factors increase the risk of rapid cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The ability of pharmacological treatment to attenuate this risk remains undefined....

  8. Alzheimer's disease: oral manifestations, treatment and preventive measures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Ortega-Martínez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the treatment of patients with dementia Alzheimer's type non-current and are facing tough situations. Treatment should be tailored to each stage of the disease and for each patient. In this type of disease is very important to involve families and caregivers to improve the quality of life of patients. The main goal with these patients is prevention. Patients should be all oral manifestations caused by the lack of inadequate oral hygiene, xerostomia and manifestations derived by taking drugs. The aim of this review is to describe the main oral manifestations that can result from this disease and the best treatment options taking into account the clinical stages in which patients are found. RESUMEN En el tratamiento a pacientes con demencias tipo Alzheimer se afrontan situaciones infrecuentes y comprometidas. El tratamiento debe personalizarse para cada estadio de la enfermedad y para cada paciente. En este tipo de enfermedades es muy importante involucrar a los familiares y cuidadores para mejorar la calidad de vida del enfermo. El principal objetivo con estos pacientes es la prevención. Se deben controlar todas las manifestaciones orales provocadas por la falta de una inadecuada higiene oral, la xerostomía y las manifestaciones derivadas por los fármacos que consumen. El objetivo de esta revisión es describir cuáles son las principales manifestaciones orales que pueden derivar de esta enfermedad y las mejores opciones de tratamiento teniendo en cuenta las etapas clínicas en las que se encuentran los pacientes.

  9. Dementia: Depression and Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    MENU Return to Web version Dementia | Depression and Alzheimer’s Disease What is depression? When doctors talk about depression, they mean the medical illness called major depression. Someone who has ...

  10. Pattern of extrapyramidal signs in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosto, Giuseppe; Monsell, Sarah E; Hawes, Stephen E; Mayeux, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) often develop extrapyramidal signs (EPS), which increase in frequency as the disease progresses. We aimed to investigate the patterns of presentation of EPS in AD and their correlation with clinical and neuropathological features. 4284 subjects diagnosed with AD from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center (NACC) database with at least one abnormal Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) assessment were included. Individuals were assigned to a discovery sample and a sensitivity analysis sample (moderate and mild dementia, respectively) and a subset of subjects provided neuropathological data (n = 284). Individuals from the Washington Heights and Inwood Columbia Aging Project (WHICAP) served as validation sample. Patterns of presentation of EPS were identified employing categorical principal component analysis (CATPCA). Six principal components were identified in both mild and moderate AD samples: (I) hand movements, alternating movements, finger tapping, leg agility ("limbs bradykinesia"); (II) posture, postural instability, arising from chair, gait and body bradykinesia/hypokinesia ("axial"); (III) limb rigidity ("rigidity"); (IV) postural tremor; (V) resting tremor; (VI) speech and facial expression. Similar results were obtained in the WHICAP cohort. Individuals with hallucinations, apathy, aberrant night behaviors and more severe dementia showed higher axial and limb bradykinesia scores. "Limb bradykinesia" component was associated with a neuropathological diagnosis of Lewy body disease and "axial" component with reduced AD-type pathology. Patterns of EPS in AD show distinct clinical and neuropathological correlates; they share a pattern of presentation similar to that seen in Parkinson's disease, suggesting common pathogenic mechanisms across neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26338814

  11. Dietary intake of antioxidants and risk of Alzheimer disease

    OpenAIRE

    Engelhart, Marianne; Geerlings, Miriam; Ruitenberg, Annemieke; van Swieten, J C; Witteman, Jacqueline; Breteler, Monique; Hofman, Albert

    2002-01-01

    textabstractCONTEXT: Laboratory findings have suggested that oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. Therefore, the risk of Alzheimer disease might be reduced by intake of antioxidants that counteract the detrimental effects of oxidative stress. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether dietary intake of antioxidants is related to risk of Alzheimer disease. DESIGN AND SETTING: The Rotterdam Study, a population-based, prospective cohort study conducted in the Netherland...

  12. Short-term memory binding deficits in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Mario A; Abrahams, Sharon; Fabi, Katia; Logie, Robert; Luzzi, Simona; Della Sala, Sergio

    2009-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease impairs long term memories for related events (e.g. faces with names) more than for single events (e.g. list of faces or names). Whether or not this associative or 'binding' deficit is also found in short-term memory has not yet been explored. In two experiments we investigated binding deficits in verbal short-term memory in Alzheimer's disease. Experiment 1: 23 patients with Alzheimer's disease and 23 age and education matched healthy elderly were recruited. Participants studied visual arrays of objects (six for healthy elderly and four for Alzheimer's disease patients), colours (six for healthy elderly and four for Alzheimer's disease patients), unbound objects and colours (three for healthy elderly and two for Alzheimer's disease patients in each of the two categories), or objects bound with colours (three for healthy elderly and two for Alzheimer's disease patients). They were then asked to recall the items verbally. The memory of patients with Alzheimer's disease for objects bound with colours was significantly worse than for single or unbound features whereas healthy elderly's memory for bound and unbound features did not differ. Experiment 2: 21 Alzheimer's disease patients and 20 matched healthy elderly were recruited. Memory load was increased for the healthy elderly group to eight items in the conditions assessing memory for single or unbound features and to four items in the condition assessing memory for the binding of these features. For Alzheimer's disease patients the task remained the same. This manipulation permitted the performance to be equated across groups in the conditions assessing memory for single or unbound features. The impairment in Alzheimer's disease patients in recalling bound objects reported in Experiment 1 was replicated. The binding cost was greater than that observed in the healthy elderly group, who did not differ in their performance for bound and unbound features. Alzheimer's disease grossly impairs the

  13. Inhalational Alzheimer's disease: an unrecognized—and treatable—epidemic

    OpenAIRE

    Bredesen, Dale E.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most significant healthcare problems today, with a dire need for effective treatment. Identifying subtypes of Alzheimer's disease may aid in the development of therapeutics, and recently three different subtypes have been described: type 1 (inflammatory), type 2 (non-inflammatory or atrophic), and type 3 (cortical). Here I report that type 3 Alzheimer's disease is the result of exposure to specific toxins, and is most commonly inhalational (IAD), a phenotypic...

  14. Dantrolene, a treatment for Alzheimer disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Li; Wei, Huafeng

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a fatal progressive disease and the most common form of dementia without effective treatments. Previous studies support that the disruption of endoplasmic reticulum Ca through overactivation of ryanodine receptors plays an important role in the pathogenesis of AD. Normalization of intracellular Ca homeostasis could be an effective strategy for AD therapies. Dantrolene, an antagonist of ryanodine receptors and an FDA-approved drug for clinical treatment of malignant hyperthermia and muscle spasms, exhibits neuroprotective effects in multiple models of neurodegenerative disorders. Recent preclinical studies consistently support the therapeutic effects of dantrolene in various types of AD animal models and were summarized in the current review. PMID:25551862

  15. GPCR, a rider of Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaosong LIU; Jian ZHAO

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia that affects thinking,learning,memory and behavior of older people.Based on the previous studies,three pathogenic pathways are now commonly accepted as the culprits of this disease namely,amyloid-β pathway,tauopathology and cholinergic dysfunction.This review focuses on the current findings on the regulatory roles of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the pathological progression of AD and discusses the potential of the GPCRs as novel therapeutic targets for AD.

  16. 阿尔茨海默病患者的主要照料者心理健康与生活质量的相关性研究%Co-relationship study for the psychological states and quality of life of Primary caregivers of Alzheimer disease patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭小林; 赵科; 赵晋; 文晏; 张骁; 彭晶晶; 黄杰; 李远

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between psychological states and quality of life and theirs influencing factors of the primary caregivers of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. Methods 192 cases of AD patients and their primary caregivers were collected by convenience sampling method, assessed by 90 Symptom Checklist (SCL-90), World Health Organization Quality of life was measured profiles (WHOQOL-BREF), Zarit Burden of Care Questionnaire (ZBI), Social Support Rating Scale (SSRS), mini-mental state examination (MMSE), Activities of Daily Living scale (ADL) and Neuropsychiatry questionnaire (NPI) to analyze the mental health and quality of life and theirs influencing factors. While 60 primary caregivers of chronic heart failure (CHF) were as a control to compare the two groups of mental health and quality of life. Results The SCL-90 total scores of AD group were significantly higher than the CRF group (Z=-9.967, P=0.000), the WHOQOL-BREF total score of the two groups had no statistical significance (Z=-1.838, P=0.066), there were statistical difference in psychological, environmental field score between the two groups (t=4.514, P=0.000;Z=-2.209, P=0.027). Quality of life of AD caregivers who with lower monthly income, chronic physical illness, heavier care burden, lower social support were lower than who with higher monthly income, without chronic physical illness, lighter care burden, higher social support. The SCL-90 total score, depression and hostility scores of AD caregivers were significantly negatively correlated with WHOQOL-BREF scores (P<0.01), the somatization, compulsion, anxiety scores were negatively correlated with WHOQOL-BREF scores (P<0.05). Social support, care burden, economic income, hostility, somatization and physical illness, etc, were got into the regression equation in which the quality of life as the dependent variable (R2=0.305). Conclusion The mental health of primary caregivers of AD patients was closely related to the quality of

  17. Effects of anosognosia and neuropsychiatric symptoms on the quality of life of patients with alzheimer's disease: a 24-month follow-up study

    OpenAIRE

    Conde Sala, Josep Lluís; Turró Garriga, O.; Piñan Hernández, S.; Portellano Ortiz, C.; Viñas Diez, V.; Gascón Bayarri, J.; Reñé Ramírez, R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Neuropsychiatric symptoms and anosognosia are known to influence the perceived quality of life of patients (QoL-p) with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study analysed their impact on patient and caregiver ratings of QoL-p and how these ratings changed in relation to the severity of dementia. Methods: A baseline sample of 221 patients and caregivers was followed up over 24 months. Instruments: Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), Anosognosia Questionnaire-Dementia (AQ-D), Quality of Li...

  18. Clinical differences in patients with alzheimer's disease according to the presence or absence of anosognosia: implications for perceived quality of life

    OpenAIRE

    Conde Sala, Josep Lluís; Reñé-Ramírez, Ramón; Turró Garriga, Oriol; Gascón-Bayarri, J.; Juncadella i Puig, Montserrat; Moreno-Cordón, L.; Viñas Diez, V.; Garre Olmo, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to determine the factors that predict anosognosia in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to examine the effect of anosognosia on patient and caregiver perceptions of the patient's quality of life (QoL-p), using a cross-sectional design with 164 patients and their caregivers. Instruments of measurement included Anosognosia Questionnaire-Dementia, Geriatric Depression Scale, Quality of Life in AD (QoL-AD), Disability Assessment for Dementia, Neuropsychiatric Inv...

  19. Genome instability in Alzheimer disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Yujun; Song, Hyundong; Croteau, Deborah L;

    2016-01-01

    to the development of noninvasive treatment strategies. Further investigations into the molecular mechanisms connecting DNA damage to AD pathology may help to develop novel treatment strategies for this debilitating disease. Here we provide an overview of the role of genome instability and DNA repair deficiency...... in AD pathology and discuss research strategies that include genome instability as a component....

  20. New cardiovascular targets to prevent late onset Alzheimer disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, J.A.H.R.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of dementia rises to between 20% and 40% with advancing age. The dominant cause of dementia in approximately 70% of these patients is Alzheimer disease. There is no effective disease-modifying pharmaceutical treatment for this neurodegenerative disease. A wide range of Alzheimer drugs

  1. Alzheimer - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - Alzheimer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on Alzheimer disease : Alzheimer's Association -- www.alz.org Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center -- www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers ...

  2. 2015 Alzheimer's disease facts and figures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report discusses the public health impact of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), including incidence and prevalence, mortality rates, costs of care and the overall effect on caregivers and society. It also examines the challenges encountered by health care providers when disclosing an AD diagnosis to patients and caregivers. An estimated 5.3 million Americans have AD; 5.1 million are age 65 years, and approximately 200,000 are age disease, stroke and prostate cancer decreased 14%, 23% and 11%, respectively, whereas deaths from AD increased 71%. The actual number of deaths to which AD contributes (or deaths with AD) is likely much larger than the number of deaths from AD recorded on death certificates. In 2015, an estimated 700,000 Americans age 65 years will die with AD, and many of them will die from complications caused by AD. In 2014, more than 15 million family members and other unpaid caregivers provided an estimated 17.9 billion hours of care to people with AD and other dementias, a contribution valued at more than $217 billion. Average per-person Medicare payments for services to beneficiaries age 65 years with AD and other dementias are more than two and a half times as great as payments for all beneficiaries without these conditions, and Medicaid payments are 19 times as great. Total payments in 2015 for health care, long-term care and hospice services for people age 65 years with dementia are expected to be $226 billion. Among people with a diagnosis of AD or another dementia, fewer than half report having been told of the diagnosis by their health care provider. Though the benefits of a prompt, clear and accurate disclosure of an AD diagnosis are recognized by the medical profession, improvements to the disclosure process are needed. These improvements may require stronger support systems for health care providers and their patients. PMID:25984581

  3. [Nutritional status and Alzheimer's disease: preliminary results of the REAL.FR study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocker, P; Benhamidat, T; Benoit, M; Staccini, P; Bertogliati, C; Guérin, O; Lechowski, L; Robert, P H

    2003-10-01

    Weight loss is common in elderly people with dementia, particularly those with Alzheimer' disease (AD), and feeding difficulties are major issues in their care in the later stages of the disease. In this study (REAL FR for Réseau sur la maladie d'Alzheimer Français) we prospectively used the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) to examine the nutritional status of 479 subjects. Three groups of patients were studied: group 1 = 22 patients with undernutrition (MNA = 17), group 2 = 166 patients with risk of undernutrition (17 < MNA < 24), and group 3 = 291 patients without undernutrition (MNA = 24). Correlations with behavioral and psychological signs and symptoms of dementia (Neuropsychiatric Inventory NPI), with caregiver distress (Zarit), and with the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) were studied. Undernutrition is more frequently associated with low MMSE (p < 0.001), high behavioural disturbances (p < 0.001) and high distress of caregivers (p < 0.001). Risk of undernutrition is also associated with NPI (p < 0.001) and Zarit (p < 0.001). These first results in a French cohort of patients with AD underline the importance of the evaluation of nutritional status and finally the follow-up of eating behavior, cognitive status and the quality of life of the caregivers.

  4. Common Alzheimer's Disease Research Ontology: National Institute on Aging and Alzheimer's Association collaborative project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refolo, Lorenzo M; Snyder, Heather; Liggins, Charlene; Ryan, Laurie; Silverberg, Nina; Petanceska, Suzana; Carrillo, Maria C

    2012-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is recognized as a public health crisis worldwide. As public and private funding agencies around the world enhance and expand their support of Alzheimer's disease research, there is an urgent need to coordinate funding strategies and leverage resources to maximize the impact on public health and avoid duplication of effort and inefficiency. Such coordination requires a comprehensive assessment of the current landscape of Alzheimer's disease research in the United States and internationally. To this end, the National Institute on Aging at the National Institutes of Health and the Alzheimer's Association developed the Common Alzheimer's Disease Research Ontology (CADRO) as a dynamic portfolio analysis tool that can be used by funding agencies worldwide for strategic planning and coordination.

  5. Immunotherapy against amyloid pathology in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimberti, Daniela; Ghezzi, Laura; Scarpini, Elio

    2013-10-15

    The first drugs developed for Alzheimer's disease (AD), anticholinesterase inhibitors (AchEI), increase acetylcholine levels, previously demonstrated to be reduced in AD. To date, four AchEI are approved for the treatment of mild to moderate AD. A further therapeutic option available for moderate to severe AD is memantine. These treatments are symptomatic, whereas drugs under development are supposed to modify pathological steps leading to AD, thus acting on the evolution of the disease. For this reason they are currently termed "disease modifying" drugs. To block the progression of the disease, they have to interfere with pathogenic steps at the basis of clinical symptoms, including the deposition of extracellular amyloid beta (Aβ) plaques and of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles. The most innovative approach is represented by the vaccination and passive immunization against Aβ peptide. In this article, current knowledge about concluded and ongoing clinical trials with both vaccination with different antigens and passive immunization will be reviewed and discussed.

  6. Neuroimaging Measures as Endophenotypes in Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith N. Braskie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Late onset Alzheimer's disease (AD is moderately to highly heritable. Apolipoprotein E allele ε4 (APOE4 has been replicated consistently as an AD risk factor over many studies, and recently confirmed variants in other genes such as CLU, CR1, and PICALM each increase the lifetime risk of AD. However, much of the heritability of AD remains unexplained. AD is a complex disease that is diagnosed largely through neuropsychological testing, though neuroimaging measures may be more sensitive for detecting the incipient disease stages. Difficulties in early diagnosis and variable environmental contributions to the disease can obscure genetic relationships in traditional case-control genetic studies. Neuroimaging measures may be used as endophenotypes for AD, offering a reliable, objective tool to search for possible genetic risk factors. Imaging measures might also clarify the specific mechanisms by which proposed risk factors influence the brain.

  7. Childhood Cancer: Meanings Attributed to the Disease by Parent Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Manuel Quintana

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to comprehend the meanings that parents/caregivers of children and adolescents diagnosed with cancer attribute to their child’s disease. It is a qualitative, exploratory/descriptive study. Data were collected through group discussions and individual interviews with the parents/caregivers of children/adolescents and categorized using content analysis. The impressions of the researchers were recorded in a field diary, contributing to the data analysis. The results indicate that the disease and treatment involve periods of psychological suffering that affect the family structure. Cancer was reported as a real enemy to be fought through coping or avoidance, which generates expectations about the future and causes feelings of fear, as well as hope. It was concluded that the childhood cancer causes repercussions in the family relationships, the recognition of which can contribute to both the preparation of professional teams who work with this population, as well as the public health policies developed.

  8. A disease state fingerprint for evaluation of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattila, Jussi; Koikkalainen, Juha; Virkki, Arho;

    2011-01-01

    Diagnostic processes of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are evolving. Knowledge about disease-specific biomarkers is constantly increasing and larger volumes of data are being measured from patients. To gain additional benefits from the collected data, a novel statistical modeling and data visualization...... system is proposed for supporting clinical diagnosis of AD. The proposed system computes an evidence-based estimate of a patient's AD state by comparing his or her heterogeneous neuropsychological, clinical, and biomarker data to previously diagnosed cases. The AD state in this context denotes a patient...... interpretation of the information. To model the AD state from complex and heterogeneous patient data, a statistical Disease State Index (DSI) method underlying the DSF has been developed. Using baseline data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), the ability of the DSI to model disease...

  9. Atherosclerosis, biomarkers of atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiolaki, Aidonio; Tsamis, Konstantinos I; Milionis, Haralampos J; Kyritsis, Athanassios P; Kosmidou, Maria; Giannopoulos, Sotirios

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent type of dementia, involving progressive deterioration of neuronal networks. Although the pathophysiological mechanism of AD is not fully elucidated, apart from β-amyloid and tau protein, a diverse number of factors such as cardiovascular risk factors, inflammation, and lipids metabolism may play a significant role. Numerous epidemiological and laboratory studies support vascular injury and inflammation, as key pathological processes. The present review is focused on cardiovascular risk factors, lipids, and circulating biomarkers of inflammation, discussing them as independent mechanisms converging to the same final pathogenetic cascade of AD.

  10. Treatment of Alzheimer Disease With CT Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Eugene R.; Hosfeld, Victor D.; Nadolski, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) primarily affects older adults. This neurodegenerative disorder is the most common cause of dementia and is a leading source of their morbidity and mortality. Patient care costs in the United States are about 200 billion dollars and will more than double by 2040. This case report describes the remarkable improvement in a patient with advanced AD in hospice who received 5 computed tomography scans of the brain, about 40 mGy each, over a period of 3 months. The mechanism appears to be radiation-induced upregulation of the patient’s adaptive protection systems against AD, which partially restored cognition, memory, speech, movement, and appetite. PMID:27103883

  11. [Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease and Nutrients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Mieko

    2016-07-01

    The dietary recommendations for the prevention and management of Alzheimer's disease (AD), are the Mediterranean diet and the Japanese-style diet, both of which contain well-balanced nutrients from fish and vegetables. These diets are rich in vitamin E, carotenes, antioxidant flavonoids, vitamin B12, folate, and n-3PUFA. According to recent review supplementation of folate and vitamin E may protect against elderly people's cognitive decline when the serum folate is dairy products; and a lower amount of carbohydrates and refined sugar. PMID:27395465

  12. Challenges With Manual-Based Multimodal Psychotherapy for People With Alzheimer's Disease: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonga, Johanne Bjoernstad; Karlsoeen, Bente Brekne; Arnevik, Espen Ajo; Werheid, Katja; Korsnes, Maria S; Ulstein, Ingun Dina

    2016-06-01

    Earlier detection of dementia requires increased knowledge of how to help people in the early stages of dementia. However, few studies have focused on how psychotherapy should be adapted to improve the outcome of therapy for people with Alzheimer's disease. The aims of the present study were to identify and to explore possible obstacles encountered during the use of manual-based psychotherapy for people with early-stage Alzheimer's disease. The study found that individual adaptations to the treatment manual were necessary, particularly the modification of memory aids in order to adapt them to patients' functional level and previous experience with modern technology. In addition, caregivers were essential for both treatment and homework completion, while reduced awareness constituted an obstacle for adherence to the manual. PMID:26385947

  13. CSF Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Anoop

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common form of dementia that affects several million people worldwide. The major neuropathological hallmarks of AD are the presence of extracellular amyloid plaques that are composed of Aβ40 and Aβ42 and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFT, which is composed of hyperphosphorylated protein Tau. While the amyloid plaques and NFT could define the disease progression involving neuronal loss and dysfunction, significant cognitive decline occurs before their appearance. Although significant advances in neuroimaging techniques provide the structure and physiology of brain of AD cases, the biomarker studies based on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and plasma represent the most direct and convenient means to study the disease progression. Biomarkers are useful in detecting the preclinical as well as symptomatic stages of AD. In this paper, we discuss the recent advancements of various biomarkers with particular emphasis on CSF biomarkers for monitoring the early development of AD before significant cognitive dysfunction.

  14. Metal ions, Alzheimer's disease and chelation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budimir, Ana

    2011-03-01

    In the last few years, various studies have been providing evidence that metal ions are critically involved in the pathogenesis of major neurological diseases (Alzheimer, Parkinson). Metal ion chelators have been suggested as potential therapies for diseases involving metal ion imbalance. Neurodegeneration is an excellent target for exploiting the metal chelator approach to therapeutics. In contrast to the direct chelation approach in metal ion overload disorders, in neurodegeneration the goal seems to be a better and subtle modulation of metal ion homeostasis, aimed at restoring ionic balance. Thus, moderate chelators able to coordinate deleterious metals without disturbing metal homeostasis are needed. To date, several chelating agents have been investigated for their potential to treat neurodegeneration, and a series of 8-hydroxyquinoline analogues showed the greatest potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Metal ions, Alzheimer's disease and chelation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budimir, Ana

    2011-03-01

    In the last few years, various studies have been providing evidence that metal ions are critically involved in the pathogenesis of major neurological diseases (Alzheimer, Parkinson). Metal ion chelators have been suggested as potential therapies for diseases involving metal ion imbalance. Neurodegeneration is an excellent target for exploiting the metal chelator approach to therapeutics. In contrast to the direct chelation approach in metal ion overload disorders, in neurodegeneration the goal seems to be a better and subtle modulation of metal ion homeostasis, aimed at restoring ionic balance. Thus, moderate chelators able to coordinate deleterious metals without disturbing metal homeostasis are needed. To date, several chelating agents have been investigated for their potential to treat neurodegeneration, and a series of 8-hydroxyquinoline analogues showed the greatest potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21406339

  16. HEAD TRAUMA AND THE RISK OF ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDUIJN, CM; TANJA, TA; HAAXMA, R; SCHULTE, W; SAAN, RJ; LAMERIS, AJ; ANTONIDESHENDRIKS, G; HOFMAN, A

    1992-01-01

    A population-based case-control study of the association between head trauma and Alzheimer's disease was conducted in the Netherlands from 1980 to 1987. The study comprised 198 patients with clinically diagnosed early onset Alzheimer's disease and 198 age- and sex-matched population controls. Adjust

  17. Aging and Alzheimer's Disease: Lessons from the Nun Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowdon, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a woman who maintained high cognitive test scores until her death at 101 years of age despite anatomical evidence of Alzheimer's disease. The woman was part of a larger "Nun Study" in which 678 sisters donated their brains to teach others about the etiology of aging and Alzheimer's disease. Findings are discussed. (RJM)

  18. Telomere shortening reduces Alzheimer's disease amyloid pathology in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rolyan, Harshvardhan; Scheffold, Annika; Heinrich, Annette; Begus-Nahrmann, Yvonne; Langkopf, Britta Heike; Hoelter, Sabine M.; Vogt-Weisenhorn, Daniela M.; Liss, Birgit; Wurst, Wolfgang; Lie, Dieter Chichung; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf; Biber, Knut; Rudolph, Karl Lenhard

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder of the elderly and advancing age is the major risk factor for Alzheimer's disease development. Telomere shortening represents one of the molecular causes of ageing that limits the proliferative capacity of cells, including neural stem cells. Studie

  19. Are Judgments of Semantic Relatedness Systematically Impaired in Alzheimer's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornberger, M.; Bell, B.; Graham, K. S.; Rogers, T. T.

    2009-01-01

    We employed a triadic comparison task in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and healthy controls to contrast (a) multidimensional scaling (MDS) and accuracy-based assessments of semantic memory, and (b) degraded-store versus degraded-access accounts of semantic impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Similar to other studies using triadic…

  20. Distinct Mechanisms of Impairment in Cognitive Ageing and Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapstone, Mark; Dickerson, Kathryn; Duffy, Charles J.

    2008-01-01

    Similar manifestations of functional decline in ageing and Alzheimer's disease obscure differences in the underlying cognitive mechanisms of impairment. We sought to examine the contributions of top-down attentional and bottom-up perceptual factors to visual self-movement processing in ageing and Alzheimer's disease. We administered a novel…

  1. Head trauma and the risk of Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. van Duijn (Cock); T.A. Tanja (Teun); R. Haaxma (Rob); W. Schulte (Wim); R.J. Saan; A.J. Lameris; G. Antonides-Hendriks (Gea); A. Hofman (Albert)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractA population-based case-control study of the association between head trauma and Alzheimer's disease was conducted in the Netherlands from 1980 to 1987. The study comprised 198 patients with clinically diagnosed early onset Alzheimer's disease and 198 age- and sex-matched population cont

  2. Software tool for improved prediction of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soininen, Hilkka; Mattila, Jussi; Koikkalainen, Juha;

    2012-01-01

    Diagnostic criteria of Alzheimer's disease (AD) emphasize the integration of clinical data and biomarkers. In practice, collection and analysis of patient data vary greatly across different countries and clinics.......Diagnostic criteria of Alzheimer's disease (AD) emphasize the integration of clinical data and biomarkers. In practice, collection and analysis of patient data vary greatly across different countries and clinics....

  3. The Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Scale: Development and Psychometric Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Brian D.; Balsis, Steve; Otilingam, Poorni G.; Hanson, Priya K.; Gatz, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study provides preliminary evidence for the acceptability, reliability, and validity of the new Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Scale (ADKS), a content and psychometric update to the Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Test. Design and Methods: Traditional scale development methods were used to generate items and evaluate their psychometric…

  4. Longitudinal morphometric MRI study of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A longitudinal morphometric MRI study of Alzheimer's disease (AD) was conducted to determine the relationship between the progression of the symptoms and the progression of the brain atrophy. The Voxel-based Specific Regional Analysis System for Alzheimer's Disease (VSRAD), developed by Matsuda et al. was used as a method of morphometry to perform the statistical MR image analysis. Thirty-eight patients of AD patients were investigated with VSRAD. These patients were divided into two groups according to the progression of symptoms based on a clinical evaluation. One group was the progress group (20 patients), while the other group was the stable group (18 patients) for comparison. The relationship was investigated between the speed of the symptomatic progression and the change in each VSRAD indicator. Consequently, the entorhinal Z-score and the entorhinal atrophy rate showed a correlation with the speed of the symptomatic progression. The increase of the entorhinal Z-score in the follow-up was larger in the progress group than that in the stable group (0.65/1.28 years in the progress group and 0.05/1.26 years in the stable group.). These results suggest that a rapid symptomatic progression in an AD patient accompanies the rapid progression of atrophy in the entorhinal cortex. (author)

  5. Caregivers for Dementia Patients: Complex Determinants of Well-Being and Burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwyther, Lisa P.; George, Linda K.

    1986-01-01

    This symposium includes three papers that provide new insights into the caregiving experience. Papers focus upon a group of caregivers who appear to be at special risk for negative outcomes, the family caregivers of older persons suffering from Alzheimer's Disease or a related disorder. (Author/ABB)

  6. Stress, Meditation, and Alzheimer's Disease Prevention: Where The Evidence Stands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalsa, Dharma Singh

    2015-01-01

    Although meditation is believed to be over five thousand years old, scientific research on it is in its infancy. Mitigating the extensive negative biochemical effects of stress is a superficially discussed target of Alzheimer's disease (AD) prevention, yet may be critically important. This paper reviews lifestyle and stress as possible factors contributing to AD and meditation's effects on cognition and well-being for reduction of neurodegeneration and prevention of AD. This review highlights Kirtan Kriya (KK), an easy, cost effective meditation technique requiring only 12 minutes a day, which has been successfully employed to improve memory in studies of people with subjective cognitive decline, mild cognitive impairment, and highly stressed caregivers, all of whom are at increased risk for subsequent development of AD. KK has also been shown to improve sleep, decrease depression, reduce anxiety, down regulate inflammatory genes, upregulate immune system genes, improve insulin and glucose regulatory genes, and increase telomerase by 43%; the largest ever recorded. KK also improves psycho-spiritual well-being or spiritual fitness, important for maintenance of cognitive function and prevention of AD. KK is easy to learn and practice by aging individuals. It is the premise of this review that meditation in general, and KK specifically, along with other modalities such as dietary modification, physical exercise, mental stimulation, and socialization, may be beneficial as part of an AD prevention program.

  7. Health literacy and disease-specific knowledge of caregivers for children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carden, Marcus A; Newlin, Jennifer; Smith, Wally; Sisler, India

    2016-03-01

    This study was conducted to measure the health literacy (HL) and disease-specific knowledge (DSK) of caregivers for children with sickle cell disease (SCD) and relate them to their child's health care utilization. The authors conducted a cross-sectional study of caregiver-child dyads attending an urban pediatric sickle cell clinic. Caregivers were administered the Shortened Test of Functional Health Literacy (S-TOFHLA) and a locally developed DSK questionnaire. Retrospective review of the child's electronic medical record (EMR) was performed to determine annual emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations. A total of 142 caregiver-child dyads were recruited for the study. Less than 5% of caregivers had limited HL, with less education (P =.03) and primary language other than English (P =.04) being the only risk factors. Although caregiver HL was not associated with ED visits or hospitalizations, surprisingly DSK was. Caregivers with higher DSK scores had children with higher annual rates of ED utilization (P =.002) and hospitalizations (P =.001), and these children were also more likely to be classified as high ED utilizers (≥4 visits per year; P =.01). Further, caregiver adherence to medication and clinic visits was associated with their child's age (P =.01). Although HL and DSK are both constructs that measure basic health understanding, they differently affect caregivers' ability to navigate and understand the health care system of children with chronic illnesses. This study suggests that the DSK/health care utilization relationship may be a more important measure than HL for programs following children with sickle cell disease and could also have applications in other pediatric chronic diseases. PMID:26934177

  8. Chemokines in CSF of Alzheimer's disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jôice Dias Corrêa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Some studies have linked the presence of chemokines to the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Then, the identification of these mediators may contribute to diagnosis. Our objective was to evaluate the levels of beta-amyloid (BA, tau, phospho-tau (p-tau and chemokines (CCL2, CXCL8 and CXCL10 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of patients with AD and healthy controls. The correlation of these markers with clinical parameters was also evaluated. The levels of p-tau were higher in AD compared to controls, while the tau/p-tau ratio was decreased. The expression of CCL2 was increased in AD. A positive correlation was observed between BA levels and all chemokines studied, and between CCL2 and p-tau levels. Our results suggest that levels of CCL2 in CSF are involved in the pathogenesis of AD and it may be an additional useful biomarker for monitoring disease progression.

  9. Alzheimer's disease: Cerebrovascular dysfunction, oxidative stress, and advanced clinical therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W. Marlatt; P.J. Lucassen; G. Perry; M.A. Smith; X. Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Many lines of independent research have provided convergent evidence regarding oxidative stress, cerebrovascular disease, dementia, and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Clinical studies spurred by these findings engage basic and clinical communities with tangible results regarding molecular targets and pat

  10. Cerebral microvascular pathology in aging and Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farkas, E; Luiten, PGM

    2001-01-01

    The aging of the central nervous system and the development of incapacitating neurological diseases like Alzheimer's disease (AD) are generally associated with a wide range of histological and pathophysiological changes eventually leading to compromised cognitive status. Although the diverse trigger

  11. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the next neuron. This cellular circuitry enables communication within the brain. Healthy neurotransmission is important for ... diseases, genetics, and lifestyle factors have on the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease as the brain and ...

  12. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... important for the brain to function well. Alzheimer's disease disrupts this intricate interplay. By compromising the ability of neurons to communicate with one another, the disease over time destroys memory and thinking skills. Scientific ...

  13. FDA Facilitates Research on Earlier Stages of Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Updates FDA Facilitates Research on Earlier Stages of Alzheimer's Disease Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... disease.” back to top New Paths for New Alzheimer’s Drugs FDA’s draft guidance aims to encourage research ...

  14. Biological and genetic markers of sporadic Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engelborghs S

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available With the development of new treatments, there is an increasing need for early diagnosis of sporadic Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, biological markers allowing positive diagnosis early in the course of the disease are highly desirable. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of protein tau were shown to be significantly increased in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Although sensitivity is high, poor specificity limits the diagnostic value of this marker. The same is true for the 42 amino acid isoform of beta-amyloid protein that is significantly decreased in cerebrospinal fluid of Alzheimer's disease patients. However, combining both markers could improve specificity at least allowing differentiation between Alzheimer's disease, normal ageing and depressive pseudodementia. Other biological markers such as cerebrospinal fluid levels of neurotransmitters, cytokines or superoxide dismutase were shown to have even less diagnostic value. The apolipoprotein epsilon 4 allele is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease but not a diagnostic marker as many individuals who inherit epsilon 4 do not develop the disease. Till now, a single diagnostic marker allowing discrimination between Alzheimer's disease and other dementias does not exist. Combined cerebrospinal fluid levels of beta-amyloid protein and tau protein might be used as a marker that helps discriminating Alzheimer's disease from normal ageing and depression.

  15. Assessing neuronal networks: understanding Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bokde, Arun L W

    2012-02-01

    Findings derived from neuroimaging of the structural and functional organization of the human brain have led to the widely supported hypothesis that neuronal networks of temporally coordinated brain activity across different regional brain structures underpin cognitive function. Failure of integration within a network leads to cognitive dysfunction. The current discussion on Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD) argues that it presents in part a disconnection syndrome. Studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and electroencephalography demonstrate that synchronicity of brain activity is altered in AD and correlates with cognitive deficits. Moreover, recent advances in diffusion tensor imaging have made it possible to track axonal projections across the brain, revealing substantial regional impairment in fiber-tract integrity in AD. Accumulating evidence points towards a network breakdown reflecting disconnection at both the structural and functional system level. The exact relationship among these multiple mechanistic variables and their contribution to cognitive alterations and ultimately decline is yet unknown. Focused research efforts aimed at the integration of both function and structure hold great promise not only in improving our understanding of cognition but also of its characteristic progressive metamorphosis in complex chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as AD.

  16. Alzheimer's: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stress Caregiver Depression Relationship Changes Grief & Loss as Alzheimer's Progresses Start Here What You Need to Know ... Weekly E-News Stay up-to-date on Alzheimer's treatments and care. First name: Last name: Email: * ...

  17. Association studies on susceptibility genes in Alzheimer disease

    OpenAIRE

    Björk, Behnosh Fakhri

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly. Due to the complexity of AD, it has been difficult to find genetic risk factors predisposing to disease. To date, three genes (APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2) with disease causing genetic variants have been reported for the rare early onset monogenic forms of AD. For the more prevalent, late onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD), the epsilon4 allele of the APOE gene, is the only confirmed genetic risk factor. However,...

  18. Alzheimer disease and pre-emptive suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Dena S

    2014-08-01

    There is a flood of papers being published on new ways to diagnose Alzheimer disease (AD) before it is symptomatic, involving a combination of invasive tests (eg, spinal tap), and pen and paper tests. This changes the landscape with respect to genetic tests for risk of AD, making rational suicide a much more feasible option. Before the availability of these presymptomatic tests, even someone with a high risk of developing AD could not know if and when the disease was approaching. One could lose years of good life by committing suicide too soon, or risk waiting until it was too late and dementia had already sapped one of the ability to form and carry out a plan. One can now put together what one knows about one's risk, with continuing surveillance via these clinical tests, and have a good strategy for planning one's suicide before one becomes demented. This has implications for how these genetic and clinical tests are marketed and deployed, and the language one uses to speak about them. The phrase 'there is nothing one can do' is insulting and disrespectful of the planned suicide option, as is the language of the Risk Evaluation and Education for Alzheimer's Disease (REVEAL) studies and others that conclude that it is 'safe' to tell subjects their risk status for AD. Further, the argument put forward by some researchers that presymptomatic testing should remain within research protocols, and the results not shared with subjects until such time as treatments become available, disrespects the autonomy of people at high risk who consider suicide an option.

  19. Domain adaptation for Alzheimer's disease diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachinger, Christian; Reuter, Martin

    2016-10-01

    With the increasing prevalence of Alzheimer's disease, research focuses on the early computer-aided diagnosis of dementia with the goal to understand the disease process, determine risk and preserving factors, and explore preventive therapies. By now, large amounts of data from multi-site studies have been made available for developing, training, and evaluating automated classifiers. Yet, their translation to the clinic remains challenging, in part due to their limited generalizability across different datasets. In this work, we describe a compact classification approach that mitigates overfitting by regularizing the multinomial regression with the mixed ℓ1/ℓ2 norm. We combine volume, thickness, and anatomical shape features from MRI scans to characterize neuroanatomy for the three-class classification of Alzheimer's disease, mild cognitive impairment and healthy controls. We demonstrate high classification accuracy via independent evaluation within the scope of the CADDementia challenge. We, furthermore, demonstrate that variations between source and target datasets can substantially influence classification accuracy. The main contribution of this work addresses this problem by proposing an approach for supervised domain adaptation based on instance weighting. Integration of this method into our classifier allows us to assess different strategies for domain adaptation. Our results demonstrate (i) that training on only the target training set yields better results than the naïve combination (union) of source and target training sets, and (ii) that domain adaptation with instance weighting yields the best classification results, especially if only a small training component of the target dataset is available. These insights imply that successful deployment of systems for computer-aided diagnostics to the clinic depends not only on accurate classifiers that avoid overfitting, but also on a dedicated domain adaptation strategy. PMID:27262241

  20. Vaccination against Alzheimer disease: an update on future strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fettelschoss, Antonia; Zabel, Franziska; Bachmann, Martin F

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is a devastating chronic disease without adequate therapy. More than 10 years ago, it was demonstrated in transgenic mouse models that vaccination may be a novel, disease-modifying therapy for Alzheimer. Subsequent clinical development has been a roller-coaster with some positive and many negative news. Here, we would like to summarize evidence that next generation vaccines optimized for old people and focusing on patients with mild disease stand a good chance to proof efficacious for the treatment of Alzheimer.

  1. Interneurons in the human olfactory system in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; Flores-Cuadrado, Alicia; Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; de la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2016-02-01

    The principal olfactory structures display Alzheimer's disease (AD) related pathology at early stages of the disease. Consequently, olfactory deficits are among the earliest symptoms. Reliable olfactory tests for accurate clinical diagnosis are rarely made. In addition, neuropathological analysis postmortem of olfactory structures is often not made. Therefore, the relationship between the clinical features and the underlying pathology is poorly defined. Traditionally, research into Alzheimer's disease has focused on the degeneration of cortical temporal projection neurons and cholinergic neurons. Recent evidence has demonstrated the neurodegeneration of interneuron populations in AD. This review provides an updated overview of the pathological involvement of interneuron populations in the human olfactory system in Alzheimer's disease.

  2. The rat as an animal model of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Kloskowska, Ewa; Winblad, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    As a disease model, the laboratory rat has contributed enormously to neuroscience research over the years. It has also been a popular animal model for Alzheimer's disease but its popularity has diminished during the last decade, as techniques for genetic manipulation in rats have lagged behind...... that of mice. In recent years, the rat has been making a comeback as an Alzheimer's disease model and the appearance of increasing numbers of transgenic rats will be a welcome and valuable complement to the existing mouse models. This review summarizes the contributions and current status of the rat...... as an animal model of Alzheimer's disease....

  3. Fish, docosahexaenoic acid and Alzheimer's disease. : Fish, Docosahexaenoic Acid and Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cunnane, Stephen,; Plourde, Mélanie; Pifferi, Fabien; Bégin, Michel; Féart, Catherine; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Cognitive decline in the elderly, particularly Alzheimer's disease (AD), is a major socio-economic and healthcare concern. We review here the literature on one specific aspect of diet affecting AD, that of the omega3 fatty acids, particularly the brain's principle omega3 fatty acid - docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). DHA has deservedly received wide attention as a nutrient supporting both optimal brain development and for cardiovascular health. Our aim here is to critically ...

  4. Metal dyshomeostasis and oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenough, Mark A; Camakaris, James; Bush, Ashley I

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the leading cause of dementia in the elderly and is defined by two pathological hallmarks; the accumulation of aggregated amyloid beta and excessively phosphorylated Tau proteins. The etiology of Alzheimer's disease progression is still debated, however, increased oxidative stress is an early and sustained event that underlies much of the neurotoxicity and consequent neuronal loss. Amyloid beta is a metal binding protein and copper, zinc and iron promote amyloid beta oligomer formation. Additionally, copper and iron are redox active and can generate reactive oxygen species via Fenton (and Fenton-like chemistry) and the Haber-Weiss reaction. Copper, zinc and iron are naturally abundant in the brain but Alzheimer's disease brain contains elevated concentrations of these metals in areas of amyloid plaque pathology. Amyloid beta can become pro-oxidant and when complexed to copper or iron it can generate hydrogen peroxide. Accumulating evidence suggests that copper, zinc, and iron homeostasis may become perturbed in Alzheimer's disease and could underlie an increased oxidative stress burden. In this review we discuss oxidative/nitrosative stress in Alzheimer's disease with a focus on the role that metals play in this process. Recent studies have started to elucidate molecular links with oxidative/nitrosative stress and Alzheimer's disease. Finally, we discuss metal binding compounds that are designed to cross the blood brain barrier and restore metal homeostasis as potential Alzheimer's disease therapeutics.

  5. Nutrition and the risk of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Nan; Yu, Jin-Tai; Tan, Lin; Wang, Ying-Li; Sun, Lei; Tan, Lan

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that accounts for the major cause of dementia, and the increasing worldwide prevalence of AD is a major public health concern. Increasing epidemiological studies suggest that diet and nutrition might be important modifiable risk factors for AD. Dietary supplementation of antioxidants, B vitamins, polyphenols, and polyunsaturated fatty acids are beneficial to AD, and consumptions of fish, fruits, vegetables, coffee, and light-to-moderate alcohol reduce the risk of AD. However, many of the results from randomized controlled trials are contradictory to that of epidemiological studies. Dietary patterns summarizing an overall diet are gaining momentum in recent years. Adherence to a healthy diet, the Japanese diet, and the Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower risk of AD. This paper will focus on the evidence linking many nutrients, foods, and dietary patterns to AD. PMID:23865055

  6. Mitochondria, cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, M; Calsolaro, V; Orsucci, D; Carlesi, C; Choub, A; Piazza, S; Siciliano, G

    2009-01-01

    To date, the beta amyloid (Abeta) cascade hypothesis remains the main pathogenetic model of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but its role in the majority of sporadic AD cases is unclear. The "mitochondrial cascade hypothesis" could explain many of the biochemical, genetic, and pathological features of sporadic AD. Somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) could cause energy failure, increased oxidative stress, and accumulation of Abeta, which in a vicious cycle reinforce the mtDNA damage and the oxidative stress. Despite the evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction in AD, no causative mutations in the mtDNA have been detected so far. Indeed, results of studies on the role of mtDNA haplogroups in AD are controversial. In this review we discuss the role of the mitochondria, and especially of the mtDNA, in the cascade of events leading to neurodegeneration, dementia, and AD. PMID:20798880

  7. Nutrition and the Risk of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that accounts for the major cause of dementia, and the increasing worldwide prevalence of AD is a major public health concern. Increasing epidemiological studies suggest that diet and nutrition might be important modifiable risk factors for AD. Dietary supplementation of antioxidants, B vitamins, polyphenols, and polyunsaturated fatty acids are beneficial to AD, and consumptions of fish, fruits, vegetables, coffee, and light-to-moderate alcohol reduce the risk of AD. However, many of the results from randomized controlled trials are contradictory to that of epidemiological studies. Dietary patterns summarizing an overall diet are gaining momentum in recent years. Adherence to a healthy diet, the Japanese diet, and the Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower risk of AD. This paper will focus on the evidence linking many nutrients, foods, and dietary patterns to AD.

  8. Memory for music in Alzheimer's disease: unforgettable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Amee; Samson, Séverine

    2009-03-01

    The notion that memory for music can be preserved in patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD) has been raised by a number of case studies. In this paper, we review the current research examining musical memory in patients with AD. In keeping with models of memory described in the non-musical domain, we propose that various forms of musical memory exist, and may be differentially impaired in AD, reflecting the pattern of neuropathological changes associated with the condition. Our synthesis of this literature reveals a dissociation between explicit and implicit musical memory functions. Implicit, specifically procedural musical memory, or the ability to play a musical instrument, can be spared in musicians with AD. In contrast, explicit musical memory, or the recognition of familiar or unfamiliar melodies, is typically impaired. Thus, the notion that music is unforgettable in AD is not wholly supported. Rather, it appears that the ability to play a musical instrument may be unforgettable in some musicians with AD. PMID:19214750

  9. Disruption of zinc homeostasis in Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, J. D.; Crafford, A. M.; Markesbery, W. R.; Lovell, M. A.

    2002-04-01

    The basic hypothesis being tested is that, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), the delicate balance of brain Zn is disrupted and may play a role in the pathogenesis of neuron degeneration. Micro-PIXE measurements reveal a significant elevation of Zn in senile plaques (SP) in AD brain compared with adjacent neuropil and a significant increase in AD neuropil compared to control neuropil. The observation of elevated Zn in SP is of interest because the amyloid precursor protein contains a Zn binding site that may prevent normal cleavage leading to the generation of a toxic fragment of beta amyloid, the constituent of SP. The potential of using laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry as a complimentary microprobe technique is also presented.

  10. PET and SPECT investigations in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine offers a wide range of possibilities to investigate dementia. Various SPECT and PET tracers will be introduced in this article first. Different questions concerning evaluation of dementia are discussed taking Alzheimer's disease (AD) as an example. It is important to perform nuclear medicine investigations on high technical level, using standardized methods as statistical parametric mapping (SPM) for evaluation. If neuroprotective therapies are available, an early diagnosis, the determination of risk factors and longitudinal investigations will be the focus of interest and the main goal of nuclear medicine. Apart from measuring cerebral perfusion and glucose metabolism the development of new ligands, concerning the cholinergic system and the visualization of amyloid plaques, is of great importance. (orig.)

  11. Disruption of zinc homeostasis in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic hypothesis being tested is that, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), the delicate balance of brain Zn is disrupted and may play a role in the pathogenesis of neuron degeneration. Micro-PIXE measurements reveal a significant elevation of Zn in senile plaques (SP) in AD brain compared with adjacent neuropil and a significant increase in AD neuropil compared to control neuropil. The observation of elevated Zn in SP is of interest because the amyloid precursor protein contains a Zn binding site that may prevent normal cleavage leading to the generation of a toxic fragment of beta amyloid, the constituent of SP. The potential of using laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry as a complimentary microprobe technique is also presented

  12. Metaphor comprehension in Alzheimer's disease: novelty matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanzio, Martina; Geminiani, Giuliano; Leotta, Daniela; Cappa, Stefano

    2008-10-01

    The comprehension of non-literal language was investigated in 20 probable Alzheimer's disease (pAD) patients by comparing their performance to that of 20 matched control subjects. pAD patients were unimpaired in the comprehension of conventional metaphors and idioms. However, their performance was significantly lower in the case of non-conventional (novel) metaphor comprehension. This ability was not related to global cognitive deterioration or to deficits in the cognitive domains of attention, memory and language comprehension. On the other hand, the impairment in verbal reasoning appeared to be relevant for both novel and conventional metaphor comprehension. The relationship between novel metaphor comprehension and performance in the visual-spatial planning task of the Behavioral Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS) suggests that executive impairment, possibly related to prefrontal dysfunction, may be responsible for the pAD patients' poor performance in novel metaphor comprehension. The present findings suggest a role of the prefrontal cortex in novel metaphor comprehension.

  13. Immunotherapeutic Strategies for Alzheimer's Disease Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beka Solomon

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring antibodies against amyloid-β peptides have been found in human cerebrospinal fluid and in the plasma of healthy individuals, but were significantly lower in Alzheimer's disease (AD patients, suggesting that AD may be an immunodeficient disorder. The performance of anti-amyloid-β antibodies in transgenic mice models of AD showed that they are delivered to the central nervous system, preventing and dissolving amyloid-β plaques. Moreover, these antibodies protected the mice from learning and age-related memory deficits. Active and/or passive immunization against the amyloid-β peptide has been proposed as a method for preventing and/or treating AD. Immunotherapy represents fascinating ways to test the amyloid hypothesis and offers genuine opportunities for AD treatment, but requires careful antigen and antibody selection to maximize efficacy and minimize adverse events.

  14. Memory for music in Alzheimer's disease: unforgettable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Amee; Samson, Séverine

    2009-03-01

    The notion that memory for music can be preserved in patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD) has been raised by a number of case studies. In this paper, we review the current research examining musical memory in patients with AD. In keeping with models of memory described in the non-musical domain, we propose that various forms of musical memory exist, and may be differentially impaired in AD, reflecting the pattern of neuropathological changes associated with the condition. Our synthesis of this literature reveals a dissociation between explicit and implicit musical memory functions. Implicit, specifically procedural musical memory, or the ability to play a musical instrument, can be spared in musicians with AD. In contrast, explicit musical memory, or the recognition of familiar or unfamiliar melodies, is typically impaired. Thus, the notion that music is unforgettable in AD is not wholly supported. Rather, it appears that the ability to play a musical instrument may be unforgettable in some musicians with AD.

  15. Explorative and targeted neuroproteomics in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmalm, Ann; Portelius, Erik; Öhrfelt, Annika; Brinkmalm, Gunnar; Andreasson, Ulf; Gobom, Johan; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive brain amyloidosis that injures brain regions involved in memory consolidation and other higher brain functions. Neuropathologically, the disease is characterized by accumulation of a 42 amino acid peptide called amyloid β (Aβ42) in extracellular senile plaques, intraneuronal inclusions of hyperphosphorylated tau protein in neurofibrillary tangles, and neuronal and axonal degeneration and loss. Biomarker assays capturing these pathologies have been developed for use on cerebrospinal fluid samples but there are additional molecular pathways that most likely contribute to the neurodegeneration and full clinical expression of AD. One way of learning more about AD pathogenesis is to identify novel biomarkers for these pathways and examine them in longitudinal studies of patients in different stages of the disease. Here, we discuss targeted proteomic approaches to study AD and AD-related pathologies in closer detail and explorative approaches to discover novel pathways that may contribute to the disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuroproteomics: Applications in neuroscience and neurology.

  16. Biomaterials for the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadavi, Darya; Poot, André A

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) as a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disease represents a huge unmet need for treatment. The low efficacy of current treatment methods is not only due to low drug potency but also due to the presence of various obstacles in the delivery routes. One of the main barriers is the blood-brain barrier. The increasing prevalence of AD and the low efficacy of current therapies have increased the amount of research on unraveling of disease pathways and development of treatment strategies. One of the interesting areas for the latter subject is biomaterials and their applications. This interest originates from the fact that biomaterials are very useful for the delivery of therapeutic agents, such as drugs, proteins, and/or cells, in order to treat diseases and regenerate tissues. Recently, manufacturing of nano-sized delivery systems has increased the efficacy and delivery potential of biomaterials. In this article, we review the latest developments with regard to the use of biomaterials for the treatment of AD, including nanoparticles and liposomes for delivery of therapeutic compounds and scaffolds for cell delivery strategies. PMID:27379232

  17. Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Clinical significance and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease describes the recognition and diagnosis in patients with very mild dementia. Internationally accepted diagnostic criteria support the diagnosis based on clinical evaluation. Recent advances in structural and functional neuroimaging as well as studies on specific proteins in the cerebro-spinal fluid that are related to distinct pathophysiological disease processes are most promising approaches to defining biological markers of Alzheimer's disease. (orig.)

  18. Magnitude and Causes of Bias among Family Caregivers rating Alzheimer’s Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Richard; Cook, Thomas B.; Beach, Scott R.; Lingler, Jennifer H.; Martire, Lynn M.; Monin, Joan K.; Czaja, Sara J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Family caregivers generally underestimate the health and well-being of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients when compared to patient self-assessments. The goals of this study were to identify caregiver, patient, and contextual factors associated with caregiver rating bias. Methods 105 patients with AD and their family caregivers were assessed twice by trained interviewers one year apart. In separate interviews, caregivers were asked to rate the quality of life and suffering of their patient relative, and patients provided self-ratings using the same structured instruments. Multivariate cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses were used to identify predictors of caregiver-patient discrepancies. Results Caregivers consistently reported significantly higher levels of suffering and lower levels of quality of life than patients. Caregiver psychological well-being and health status accounted for a substantial portion of the difference in caregiver and patient ratings in both cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. Caregiver depression and burden were consistently positively associated with the magnitude of caregiver-patient discrepancy, and caregiver health status was negatively associated with the size of the discrepancy. Conclusions Caregiver assessments of dementia patients may determine the type and frequency of treatment received by the patient, and caregivers’ ability to reliably detect change in patient status can play a critical role in evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic interventions and pharmacologic agents. Clinicians and researchers working with dementia patients who rely on caregiver reports of patient status should be sensitive to the health and well-being of the caregiver and recognize that caregiver assessments may be negatively biased when the caregiver’s own well-being is compromised. PMID:23290199

  19. Compliance and Caregiver Satisfaction in Alzheimer’s Disease: Results from the AXEPT Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Bernabei

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: According to experimental data, a transdermal application is preferred by caregivers of Alzheimer’s disease (AD patients compared with oral medications. The AXEPT study compared compliance to treatment among community-dwelling patients with mild-to-moderate AD treated with transdermal application compared to oral medications and caregiver satisfaction in a real clinical setting. Methods: Data from 45 memory clinics in Italy were collected between September 8, 2010 and January 31, 2011. Compliance to treatment and caregiver satisfaction were measured using the Caregiver Medication Interview. Results: A total of 855 AD patients and their caregivers participated in the study. Nearly 80% of caregivers of patients on patch were not concerned about adherence to treatment compared with 64% of caregivers of patients on oral drugs. Among caregivers of patients on patch, 94% did not report any difficulties in remembering to administer treatment compared with 73% of caregivers of patients on oral medications. The highest level of compliance and satisfaction was reported by caregivers of patients on transdermal application. Conclusion: Caregivers of patients treated with a transdermal application appeared to be more satisfied and reported a higher level of compliance than caregivers of patients receiving anti-AD oral medications.

  20. Perception of Alzheimer Disease in Iranian Traditional Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifadini, Rostam; Tajadini, Haleh; Choopani, Rasool; Mehrabani, Mitra; Kamalinegad, Mohamad; Haghdoost, Aliakbar

    2016-01-01

    Context: Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia. In regards to the world’s aging population, control and treatment of AD will be one of the major concerns of global public health in the next century. Alzheimer disease was not mentioned with the same phrase or its equivalent in traditional medical texts. The main of present paper was to investigate symptoms and causes of alzheimer disease from the view point of Iranian traditional medicine. Evidence Acquisition: In this qualitative study, we searched reliable sources of Iranian traditional medicine such as Canon of Medicide by Avicenna (Al-Quanon fi- tibb), Aghili cure by Aghili’s (Molajat-E-aghili), Tib-E-Akbari, Exire -E-Aazam and Sharh-E-Asbab and some reliable resources of neurology were probed base on keywords to find a disease that had the most overlap in terms of symptoms with alzheimer disease. By taking from the relevant materials, the extracted texts were compared and analyzed. Results: Findings showed that alzheimer disease has the most overlap with Nesyan (fisad-e-zekr, fisad-e-fekr and fisad-e-takhayol) symptoms in Iranian traditional medicine. Although this is not a perfect overlap and there are causes, including coldness and dryness of the brain or coldness and wetness that could also lead to alzheimer disease according to Iranian traditional medicine. Conclusions: According to Iranian traditional medicine, The brain dystemperement is considered the main causes of alzheimer disease. By correcting the brain dystemperement, alzheimer can be well managed. This study helps to suggest a better strategy for preventing and treating alzheimer in the future. PMID:27247784

  1. Estrogen Intake and Copper Depositions: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Amtage

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a patient with chronic postmenopausal estrogen intake with presence of Kayser-Fleischer ring in the cornea and Alzheimer's disease and discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms of estrogen intake and copper accumulation in various tissues, including the central nervous system. Sonography was compatible with copper accumulation in the basal ganglia, but the patient showed no clinical signs of Wilson's disease. Magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography revealed a typical pattern for Alzheimer's disease. We propose increased copper levels as a direct effect of estrogen intake due to an augmented ATP7A-mRNA in the intestine. Moreover, we discuss the impact of elevated free serum copper on accompanying Alzheimer's disease, knowing that copper plays a crucial role in the formation of amyloid plaques and tau aggregation. This might offer a partial explanation for the observation that postmenopausal estrogen therapy is associated with a higher risk of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Can We Prevent Parkinson's and Alzheimer's Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kedar N

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD and Alzheimer's (AD are major progressive neurological disorders, the risk of which increases with advancing age (65 years and over. In familial cases, however, early onset of disease (about 35 years is observed. In spite of extensive basic and clinical research on PD and AD, no preventive or long-term effective treatment strategies are available. Several studies have indicated that oxidative stress is a major risk factor for the initiation and progression of sporadic PD and AD. Even a-synuclein and b-amyloid fragments that are associated with the PD and AD, respectively, mediate part of their action via oxidative stress. Therefore, reducing oxidative stress appears to be a rational choice for the prevention and reduction in the rate of progression of these neurological disorders. This review provides a brief description of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of PD and AD, and the scientific rationale for the use of multiple antioxidants in the prevention of these neurological diseases.

  3. [Angiotensin converting enzyme and Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugaevskaia, E V

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an incurable degenerative disease of the central nervous system, leading to dementia. The basis of AD is neurodegenerative process that leads to death of neurons in the cerebral cortex. This neurodegenerative process is associated with the formation of neurofibrillary tangles in the brain and the deposition of senile plaques, the main component of which is a beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta). Risk factors for AD are age, as well as hypertension, atherosclerosis, diabetes and hypercholesterolemia in the pathogenesis of which involved angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)--key enzyme of the renin-angiotensin (RAS) and kallikrein-kinin (KKS) systems. Recently it was discovered that ACE, along with other metallopeptidases, participates in the metabolism of Abeta, cleaving the bonds at the N-terminal and C-terminal region of the molecule Abeta. The role of the ACE in the degradation processes of Abeta takes an interest. It is associated with the fact that the using of ACE inhibitors is the main therapeutic approach used in the treatment of various forms of hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases. However, until now not been resolved, can be used antihypertensive drugs that inhibit RAS for the treatment or prevention of AD. Currently, there are numerous studies on finding the relationship between RAS and AD. PMID:23650720

  4. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease wanes with age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoozemans Jeroen JM

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation is a prominent feature in Alzheimer's disease (AD. It has been proposed that aging has an effect on the function of inflammation in the brain, thereby contributing to the development of age-related diseases like AD. However, the age-dependent relationship between inflammation and clinical phenotype of AD has never been investigated. Methods In this study we have analysed features of the neuroinflammatory response in clinically and pathologically confirmed AD and control cases in relation to age (range 52-97 years. The mid-temporal cortex of 19 controls and 19 AD cases was assessed for the occurrence of microglia and astrocytes by immunohistochemistry using antibodies directed against CD68 (KP1, HLA class II (CR3/43 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. Results By measuring the area density of immunoreactivity we found significantly more microglia and astrocytes in AD cases younger than 80 years compared to older AD patients. In addition, the presence of KP1, CR3/43 and GFAP decreases significantly with increasing age in AD. Conclusion Our data suggest that the association between neuroinflammation and AD is stronger in relatively young patients than in the oldest patients. This age-dependent relationship between inflammation and clinical phenotype of AD has implications for the interpretation of biomarkers and treatment of the disease.

  5. Alzheimer's disease drug development: translational neuroscience strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Jeffrey L; Banks, Sarah J; Gary, Ronald K; Kinney, Jefferson W; Lombardo, Joseph M; Walsh, Ryan R; Zhong, Kate

    2013-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an urgent public health challenge that is rapidly approaching epidemic proportions. New therapies that defer or prevent the onset, delay the decline, or improve the symptoms are urgently needed. All phase 3 drug development programs for disease-modifying agents have failed thus far. New approaches to drug development are needed. Translational neuroscience focuses on the linkages between basic neuroscience and the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic products that will improve the lives of patients or prevent the occurrence of brain disorders. Translational neuroscience includes new preclinical models that may better predict human efficacy and safety, improved clinical trial designs and outcomes that will accelerate drug development, and the use of biomarkers to more rapidly provide information regarding the effects of drugs on the underlying disease biology. Early translational research is complemented by later stage translational approaches regarding how best to use evidence to impact clinical practice and to assess the influence of new treatments on the public health. Funding of translational research is evolving with an increased emphasis on academic and NIH involvement in drug development. Translational neuroscience provides a framework for advancing development of new therapies for AD patients.

  6. Evaluation of Anosognosia in Alzheimer's Disease Using the Symptoms of Early Dementia-11 Questionnaire (SED-11Q

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohko Maki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The objective is to propose a brief method to evaluate anosognosia in Alzheimer's disease (AD using the Symptoms of Early Dementia-11 Questionnaire (SED-11Q, a short informant-based screening questionnaire for identifying dementia. Methods: The participants were 107 elderly individuals: 13 with a Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR of 0.5, 73 with mild AD of CDR 1, and 21 with moderate AD of CDR 2. The patients and caregivers answered the SED-11Q independently, and the degree of discrepancy indicated the severity of anosognosia. Results: The scores were as follows: caregiver scores were 2.46 ± 1.85 (mean ± SD in CDR 0.5, 6.36 ± 3.02 in CDR 1, and 9.00 ± 1.14 in CDR 2; patient scores were 2.00 ± 1.78, 2.55 ± 2.33, and 1.33 ± 2.46, respectively. Discrepancy was 0.46 ± 1.61, 3.81 ± 3.95, and 7.67 ± 2.87, respectively, and the caregiver assessments were significantly higher than the patient assessments in CDR 1 and CDR 2 (p Conclusion: The SED-11Q serves a dual purpose: caregiver assessment is useful for the screening of dementia, and any discrepancy between the patient and the caregiver assessment is considered as an indication of the severity of anosognosia; this can be informative for caregivers and essential for successful care.

  7. Association between Cytokine production and disease severity in Alzheimer's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Farahzad Jabbari Azad; Ali Talaei; Houshang Rafatpanah; Hadis Yousefzadeh; Rahele Jafari; Andishe Talaei; Reza Farid Hosseini

    2014-01-01

    The role of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-3, and IL-6 in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) has long been reported in literature. In this case-control study, the concentrations of these cytokines in altered T lymphocytes, as well as serum vitamin B12, have been compared in terms of factors such as, age, the clinical course and the patients' disease risk. 40 patients who met the DSM-IV-TR criteria of AD were selected and an age- and g...

  8. Caregiver Burden and Psychoeducational Interventions in Alzheimer’s Disease: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Beinart

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caring for a patient with Alzheimer’s disease (AD is associated with poor quality of life and deteriorating health for the caregiver. Methods: This comprehensive review was performed to investigate the current literature on caregiver burden, factors affecting caregiver burden and the effectiveness of different types of intervention. Results: Successful psychoeducational interventions for caregivers have included provision of information about AD, care planning, advice about patient management and the importance of self-care, skills training to aid patient management, stress management training, and problem-solving and decision-making guidance. Conclusion: Interventions that are individually tailored to the caregiver are particularly effective at reducing caregiver burden and should be further investigated. The use of effective pharmacological treatment for the improvement and/or stabilisation of AD symptoms in the patient is also likely to improve caregiver burden.

  9. Alzheimer's Project

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Alzheimer's Gala A Night at Sardi's Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month World Alzheimer's Month HBO Alzheimer’s ... HBO's "THE ALZHEIMER'S PROJECT" takes a look at the faces behind the disease - and the forces leading us ...

  10. Support for an hypothesis linking Alzheimer`s disease and Down syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geller, L.N.; Benjamin, M.B.; Dressler, D. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A connection between Alzheimer`s disease (AD) and Down syndrome (trisomy 21) is indicated by the fact that Down syndrome individuals develop AD neuropathology by the third or fourth decade of life. One explanation for the connection between AD and Down syndrome would be that the overexpression of a gene or genes on chromosome 21 results in Alzheimer`s disease, the most likely candidate being the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene. However, mutations in the APP gene have been found to be associated with only a very small percentage of familial AD cases. An alternative cause of some Alzheimer`s disease cases may be sporadic trisomy of chromosome 21, resulting from mutations or toxins that cause chromosome nondisjunction. Several predictions can be made based on this hypothesis. One prediction is that there should be more trisomy 21 in cells from AD individuals than from unaffected controls. Using quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization to compare the number of trisomy chromosome 21 cells in cultured fibroblasts from AD and unaffected individuals, we have shown that there are a significantly larger number of trisomy 21 cells from AD individuals. Another prediction is that a defect in the mitotic spindle apparatus could be the underlying cause of the aneuploidy. Cultured lymphoblasts from AD and unaffected individuals were briefly exposed to the microtubule-disrupting agent colchicine. As assayed by the subsequent appearance of metaphase chromosomes showing centromere separation, cells from AD patients were significantly more sensitive to colchicine treatment compared to cells from unaffected individuals, supporting the prediction of an altered spindle apparatus. Finally, we would predict that both types of patients should share some physical symptoms. We have also found that AD, like Down`s patients, are hypersensitive to the effect of the cholinergic antagonist, tropicamide, on pupil dilation, which may serve as a diagnostic test for Alzheimer`s disease.

  11. The rationale for deep brain stimulation in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzadeh, Zaman; Bari, Ausaf; Lozano, Andres M

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a major worldwide health problem with no effective therapy. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has emerged as a useful therapy for certain movement disorders and is increasingly being investigated for treatment of other neural circuit disorders. Here we review the rationale for investigating DBS as a therapy for Alzheimer's disease. Phase I clinical trials of DBS targeting memory circuits in Alzheimer's disease patients have shown promising results in clinical assessments of cognitive function, neurophysiological tests of cortical glucose metabolism, and neuroanatomical volumetric measurements showing reduced rates of atrophy. These findings have been supported by animal studies, where electrical stimulation of multiple nodes within the memory circuit have shown neuroplasticity through stimulation-enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis and improved performance in memory tasks. The precise mechanisms by which DBS may enhance memory and cognitive functions in Alzheimer's disease patients and the degree of its clinical efficacy continue to be examined in ongoing clinical trials. PMID:26443701

  12. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... receive messages from each other as electrical charges travel down the axon to the end of the ... another place. These released fragments are thought to benefit neurons. In Alzheimer's disease, the first cut is ...

  13. Lentivirus-expressed siRNA vectors against Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Kevin A; Masliah, Eliezer

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease, and the accumulation of APP products ultimately leads to the familiar histopathological and clinical manifestations associated with this most common form of dementia. A protein that has been shown to promote APP accumulation is beta-secretase (beta-site APP cleaving enzyme 1, or BACE1), which is increased in the cerebrospinal fluid in those affected with Alzheimer disease. Through in vivo studies using APP transgenic mice, we demonstrated that decreasing the expression of BACE1 via lentiviral vector delivery of BACE1 siRNA has the potential for significantly reducing the cleavage of APP, accumulation of these products, and consequent neurodegeneration. As such, lentiviral-expressed siRNA against BACE1 is a therapeutic possibility in the treatment of Alzheimer disease. We detail the use of lentivirus-expressed siRNA as a method to ameliorate Alzheimer disease neuropathology in APP transgenic mice.

  14. Could Lipoprotein Lipase Play a Role in Alzheimer's Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Francois Blain

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews recent literature on the role of lipoprotein lipase in the central nervous system with a focus on its recently described role in synaptic remodeling. This novel role could have implication for Alzheimer's disease treatment.

  15. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... proteins in the neuron's cell membrane are processed differently. Normally, an enzyme called alpha-secretase snips amyloid ... Alzheimer's disease, but there is still much to learn. What other changes are taking place in the ...

  16. Melanopsin retinal ganglion cell loss in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Morgia, Chiara; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Koronyo, Yosef;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Melanopsin retinal ganglion cells (mRGCs) are photoreceptors driving circadian photoentrainment, and circadian dysfunction characterizes Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated mRGCs in AD, hypothesizing their contribution to circadian dysfunction. METHODS: We assessed retinal nerve...

  17. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... over time destroys memory and thinking skills. Scientific research has revealed some of the brain changes that ... disease as the brain and body age? Scientific research is helping to unravel the mystery of Alzheimer's ...

  18. Inside the Brain: Unraveling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available The human brain is a remarkable organ. Complex chemical and electrical processes take place within our brains that let ... of developing Alzheimer's disease as the brain and body age? Scientific research is helping to unravel the ...

  19. Research Sheds Light on Mechanism of Alzheimer's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Scientists from the Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica (SIMM) under the CAS Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences have made significant progress in suggesting a possible mechanism for the accumulation of amyloid β-peptides (Aβs), which are believed to cause Alzheimer's disease. Aβs are fragments of a protein that is snipped from another protein called amyloid precursor protein (APP). In a healthy brain, these protein fragments would be broken down and eliminated. In Alzheimer's disease, unfortunately, the fragments accumulate to form hard, insoluble plaques, which are the characteristic lesions found in Alzheimer's patients and could dramatically inhibit several genes critical to memory and learning.

  20. Clinical utility of color-form naming in Alzheimer's disease: preliminary evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Peter; Wiig, Elisabeth H; Warkentin, Siegbert;

    2004-01-01

    Performances on Alzheimer's Quick Test color-form naming and Mini-Mental State Examination were compared for 38 adults with Alzheimer's disease and 38 age- and sex-matched normal controls. Group means differed significantly and indicated longer naming times by adults with Alzheimer's disease...... associated with Alzheimer's disease, are preliminary given the relatively small sample....

  1. Stem cell strategies for Alzheimer's disease therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugaya, K; Alvarez, A; Marutle, A; Kwak, Y D; Choumkina, E

    2006-06-01

    We have found much evidence that the brain is capable of regenerating neurons after maturation. In our previous study, human neural stem cells (HNSCs) transplanted into aged rat brains differentiated into neural cells and significantly improved the cognitive functions of the animals, indicating that HNSCs may be a promising candidate for cell-replacement therapies for neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, ethical and practical issues associated with HNSCs compel us to explore alternative strategies. Here, we report novel technologies to differentiate adult human mesenchymal stem cells, a subset of stromal cells in the bone marrow, into neural cells by modifying DNA methylation or over expression of nanog, a homeobox gene expressed in embryonic stem cells. We also report peripheral administrations of a pyrimidine derivative that increases endogenous stem cell proliferation improves cognitive function of the aged animal. Although these results may promise a bright future for clinical applications used towards stem cell strategies in AD therapy, we must acknowledge the complexity of AD. We found that glial differentiation takes place in stem cells transplanted into amyloid-( precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice. We also found that over expression of APP gene or recombinant APP treatment causes glial differentiation of stem cells. Although further detailed mechanistic studies may be required, RNA interference of APP or reduction of APP levels in the brain can significantly reduced glial differentiation of stem cells and may be useful in promoting neurogenesis after stem cell transplantation. PMID:16953146

  2. Computed tomography of the temporal horns at Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the literature there are different opinions referring to the involvement of the temporal lobes or horns at Alzheimer's disease. Conventionally computed tomogram of the head does not include the temporal horn in its full length. A simple method to demonstrate the temporal horns after cranial computer tomography is described. It allows the evaluation of temporal lobe and temporal horn if questionable alterations at Alzheimer's disease are to be discussed. (orig.)

  3. Mitochondria Are Related to Synaptic Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Baloyannis, Stavros J.

    2011-01-01

    Morphological alterations of mitochondria may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, been associated with oxidative stress and A β -peptide-induced toxicity. We proceeded to estimation of mitochondria on electron micrographs of autopsy specimens of Alzheimer's disease. We found substantial morphological and morphometric changes of the mitochondria in the neurons of the hippocampus, the neocortex, the cerebellar cortex, the thalamus, the globus pallidus, the red nuc...

  4. Functional neuroanatomy of auditory scene analysis in Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Golden, Hannah L.; Jennifer L. Agustus; Johanna C. Goll; Downey, Laura E; Mummery, Catherine J.; Jonathan M Schott; Crutch, Sebastian J.; Jason D Warren

    2015-01-01

    Auditory scene analysis is a demanding computational process that is performed automatically and efficiently by the healthy brain but vulnerable to the neurodegenerative pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Here we assessed the functional neuroanatomy of auditory scene analysis in Alzheimer's disease using the well-known ‘cocktail party effect’ as a model paradigm whereby stored templates for auditory objects (e.g., hearing one's spoken name) are used to segregate auditory ‘foreground’ and ‘back...

  5. Proxy-rated quality of life in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Asmus; Bhattacharya, Suvosree; Waldemar, Gunhild;

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated the change in proxy rated quality of life (QoL) of a large cohort of home living patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) over a period of 36 months.......The study investigated the change in proxy rated quality of life (QoL) of a large cohort of home living patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) over a period of 36 months....

  6. Hallucinations, delusions, and cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, R.; Gilley, D; Bennett, D.; Beckett, L.; Evans, D.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To examine the occurrence of hallucinations and delusions in Alzheimer's disease over a 4 year period and their association with rate of cognitive decline.
METHODS—A cohort of 410 persons with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease underwent annual clinical evaluations over a 4 year period. Participation in follow up exceeded 90% in survivors. Evaluations included structured informant interview, from which the presence or absence of hallucinations and delusio...

  7. How can we help caregivers of patients with Alzheimer’s dementia?

    OpenAIRE

    Wojciech Mateusz Rachel; Agnieszka Turkot

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) caregivers experience significant changes in a social, family and professional life depending on diverse factors. The caregiver burden is mainly related to patients with behavioural disturbances (BPSD) and loss of cognitive functions. Caring for a patient with dementia directly links to significant psychological stress. It also affects the caregivers' physical and mental health. The psychiatric morbidity is higher among the caregivers population. Depression, anxiety dis...

  8. Circulating Biomarker Panels in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafari, Sachli; Backes, Christina; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The early diagnosis of diseases frequently represents an important unmet clinical need supporting in-time treatment of pathologies. This also applies to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, estimated to affect millions of individuals worldwide. The respective diagnostic and prognostic markers, especially for the preclinical stages of AD, are expected to improve patients' outcome significantly. In the last decades, many approaches to detecting AD have been developed, including markers to discover changes in amyloid-β levels [from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or using positron emission tomography] or other brain imaging technologies such as structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), functional-connectivity MRI or task-related functional MRI. A major challenge is the detection of AD using minimally or even noninvasive biomarkers from body fluids such as plasma or serum. Circulating biomarker candidates based on mRNAs or proteins measured from blood cells, plasma or serum have been proposed for various pathologies including AD. As for other diseases, there is a tendency to use marker signatures obtained by high-throughput approaches, which allow the generation of profiles of hundreds to thousands of biomarkers simultaneously [microarrays, mass spectrometry or next-generation sequencing (NGS)]. Beyond mRNAs and proteins, recent approaches have measured small noncoding RNA (so-called microRNA) profiles in AD patients' blood samples using NGS or array-based technologies. Generally, the development of marker panels is in its early stages and requires further, substantial clinical validation. In this review, we provide an overview of different circulating AD biomarkers, starting with a brief summary of CSF markers and focusing on novel biomarker signatures such as small noncoding RNA profiles.

  9. Neuronal histamine and cognitive symptoms in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlomuzica, Armin; Dere, Dorothea; Binder, Sonja; De Souza Silva, Maria Angelica; Huston, Joseph P; Dere, Ekrem

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by extracellular amyloid plaque deposits, mainly composed of amyloid-beta peptide and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles consisting of aggregated hyperphosphorylated tau protein. Amyloid-beta represents a neurotoxic proteolytic cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein. The progressive cognitive decline that is associated with Alzheimer's disease has been mainly attributed to a deficit in cholinergic neurotransmission due to the continuous degeneration of cholinergic neurons e.g. in the basal forebrain. There is evidence suggesting that other neurotransmitter systems including neuronal histamine also contribute to the development and maintenance of Alzheimer's disease-related cognitive deficits. Pathological changes in the neuronal histaminergic system of such patients are highly predictive of ensuing cognitive deficits. Furthermore, histamine-related drugs, including histamine 3 receptor antagonists, have been demonstrated to alleviate cognitive symptoms in Alzheimer's disease. This review summarizes findings from animal and clinical research on the relationship between the neuronal histaminergic system and cognitive deterioration in Alzheimer's disease. The significance of the neuronal histaminergic system as a promising target for the development of more effective drugs for the treatment of cognitive symptoms is discussed. Furthermore, the option to use histamine-related agents as neurogenesis-stimulating therapy that counteracts progressive brain atrophy in Alzheimer's disease is considered. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'.

  10. The Role of Mast Cells in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik-Dasthagirisaheb, Yasdani B; Conti, Pio

    2016-01-01

    Immunity and inflammation are deeply involved in Alzheimer's disease. The most important properties of pathological Alzheimer's disease are the extracellular deposits of amyloid â-protein plaque aggregates along with other unknown mutated proteins, which are implicated in immunity and inflammation. Mast cells are found in the brain of all mammalian species and in the periphery, and their biological mediators, including cytokines/chemokines, arachidonic acid products and stored enzymes, play an import role in Alzheimer's disease. Cytokines/chemokines, which are generated mostly by microglia and astrocytes in Alzheimer's disease, contribute to nearly every aspect of neuroinflammation and amyloid â-protein plaque aggregates may induce in mast cells the release of a plethora of mediators, including pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines such as interleukin-1, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, CXCL8 and CCL2-3-4. These proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines are prominent mediators of neuroinflammation in brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, and their inhibition may be associated with improved recovery. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the roles of mast cell mediators (stored and de novo synthesis) in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27629855

  11. Mitochondrial haplotypes associated with biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry G Ridge

    Full Text Available Various studies have suggested that the mitochondrial genome plays a role in late-onset Alzheimer's disease, although results are mixed. We used an endophenotype-based approach to further characterize mitochondrial genetic variation and its relationship to risk markers for Alzheimer's disease. We analyzed longitudinal data from non-demented, mild cognitive impairment, and late-onset Alzheimer's disease participants in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative with genetic, brain imaging, and behavioral data. We assessed the relationship of structural MRI and cognitive biomarkers with mitochondrial genome variation using TreeScanning, a haplotype-based approach that concentrates statistical power by analyzing evolutionarily meaningful groups (or clades of haplotypes together for association with a phenotype. Four clades were associated with three different endophenotypes: whole brain volume, percent change in temporal pole thickness, and left hippocampal atrophy over two years. This is the first study of its kind to identify mitochondrial variation associated with brain imaging endophenotypes of Alzheimer's disease. Our results provide additional evidence that the mitochondrial genome plays a role in risk for Alzheimer's disease.

  12. The Search for Biomarkers in Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As population demographic shift and the number of individuals with Alzheimer Disease (AD continue to increase, the challenge is to develop targeted, effective treatments and our ability to recognize early symptoms. In view of this, the need for specific AD biomarker is crucial. CONTENT: In recent years it has become evident that CSF concentrations of some brain-specific proteins are related to underlying disease pathogenesis and may therefore aid clinical investigation. Among several, we have focused on three candidates that have been suggested to fulfil the requirements for biomarkers of AD: β-amyloid 42 (Aβ42, total Tau (T-tau and tau phosphorylated at various epitopes (P-tau. An increasing number of studies suggest that supplementary use of these CSF markers, preferably in combination, adds to the accuracy of an AD diagnosis. More recently visinin-like protein (VLP-1, a marker for neuronal cell injury has been studied. CSF VLP-1 concentrations were 50% higher in AD patients than in the control population. SUMMARY: The number of studies aimed at the identification of new biomarkers for AD is expected to increase rapidly, not only because of the increasing insights into the pathological mechanisms underlying this disease, but also because new therapies have been developed or are under consideration now, which warrant an early and specific diagnosis for effective treatment of the patients. KEYWORDS: dementia, amyloid plaque, neurofibrillary tangels, amyloid β-peptide 42 (Aβ42, total tau (T-tau, phosphorylated tau (P-tau, visinin–like protein 1 (VLP-1.

  13. One-year longitudinal evaluation of neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer's disease. The REAL.FR Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, M; Robert, P H; Staccini, P; Brocker, P; Guerin, O; Lechowski, L; Vellas, B

    2005-01-01

    Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms are major and frequent manifestations of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). The aim of the present study was to evaluate neuropsychiatric symptoms in the PHRC REAL.FR cohort (for Réseau sur la maladie d'Alzheimer Français) after one year of evolution. Four hundred and eighty two patients with mild and moderate AD were assessed. A majority of them had significant symptoms at inclusion (85.3 % of subjects with mild AD, 89.7% of patients with a moderate AD). Patients with mild AD had a significant increase of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) frequency x severity scores for apathy and aberrant motor behavior. Patients with moderate AD had a significant increase of NPI disinhibition, aberrant motor behavior and sleep disorders scores. The variation of NPI total score at one year correlated positively with change in Zarit's caregiver burden score, independently of global cognitive evolution. After one year, a group of 54 patients were institutionalized in nursing home or long term care unit. When compared to non institutionalized patients, the institutionalized group was characterized at base line by a lower MMSE score, a higher Zarit caregiver burden score, and a higher NPI agitation and disinhibition scores.

  14. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Studies in Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Guerra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although motor deficits affect patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD only at later stages, recent studies demonstrated that primary motor cortex is precociously affected by neuronal degeneration. It is conceivable that neuronal loss is compensated by reorganization of the neural circuitries, thereby maintaining motor performances in daily living. Effectively several transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS studies have demonstrated that cortical excitability is enhanced in AD and primary motor cortex presents functional reorganization. Although the best hypothesis for the pathogenesis of AD remains the degeneration of cholinergic neurons in specific regions of the basal forebrain, the application of specific TMS protocols pointed out a role of other neurotransmitters. The present paper provides a perspective of the TMS techniques used to study neurophysiological aspects of AD showing also that, based on different patterns of cortical excitability, TMS may be useful in discriminating between physiological and pathological brain aging at least at the group level. Moreover repetitive TMS might become useful in the rehabilitation of AD patients. Finally integrated approaches utilizing TMS together with others neuro-physiological techniques, such as high-density EEG, and structural and functional imaging as well as biological markers are proposed as promising tool for large-scale, low-cost, and noninvasive evaluation of at-risk populations.

  15. Auditory confrontation naming in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Jason; Bakker, Arnold; Maroof, David Aaron

    2010-11-01

    Naming is a fundamental aspect of language and is virtually always assessed with visual confrontation tests. Tests of the ability to name objects by their characteristic sounds would be particularly useful in the assessment of visually impaired patients, and may be particularly sensitive in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We developed an auditory naming task, requiring the identification of the source of environmental sounds (i.e., animal calls, musical instruments, vehicles) and multiple-choice recognition of those not identified. In two separate studies mild-to-moderate AD patients performed more poorly than cognitively normal elderly on the auditory naming task. This task was also more difficult than two versions of a comparable visual naming task, and correlated more highly with Mini-Mental State Exam score. Internal consistency reliability was acceptable, although ROC analysis revealed auditory naming to be slightly less successful than visual confrontation naming in discriminating AD patients from normal participants. Nonetheless, our auditory naming task may prove useful in research and clinical practice, especially with visually impaired patients. PMID:20981630

  16. Cannabinoids in late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Aia; van der Marck, M A; van den Elsen, Gah; Olde Rikkert, Mgm

    2015-06-01

    Given the lack of effective treatments for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) and the substantial burden on patients, families, health care systems, and economies, finding an effective therapy is one of the highest medical priorities. The past few years have seen a growing interest in the medicinal uses of cannabinoids, the bioactive components of the cannabis plant, including the treatment of LOAD and other physical conditions that are common in older people. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that cannabinoids can reduce oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and the formation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, the key hallmarks of LOAD. In addition, in population-based studies, cannabinoids reduced dementia-related symptoms (e.g., behavioral disturbances). The current article provides an overview of the potential of cannabinoids in the treatment of LOAD and related neuropsychiatric symptoms in older people. We also discuss the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of cannabinoid-based drugs in older people with dementia. PMID:25788394

  17. Retrieval monitoring and anosognosia in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, David A; Chen, Jennifer M; Wiseman, Amy L; Schacter, Daniel L; Budson, Andrew E

    2007-09-01

    This study explored the relationship between episodic memory and anosognosia (a lack of deficit awareness) among patients with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). Participants studied words and pictures for subsequent memory tests. Healthy older adults made fewer false recognition errors when trying to remember pictures compared with words, suggesting that the perceptual distinctiveness of picture memories enhanced retrieval monitoring (the distinctiveness heuristic). In contrast, although participants with AD could discriminate between studied and nonstudied items, they had difficulty recollecting the specific presentation formats (words or pictures), and they had limited use of the distinctiveness heuristic. Critically, the demands of the memory test modulated the relationship between memory accuracy and anosognosia. Greater anosognosia was associated with impaired memory accuracy when participants with AD tried to remember words but not when they tried to remember pictures. These data further delineate the retrieval monitoring difficulties among individuals with AD and suggest that anosognosia measures are most likely to correlate with memory tests that require the effortful retrieval of nondistinctive information. PMID:17784804

  18. Alzheimer's disease: inside, outside, upside down.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, S D; Schmidt, A M; Stern, D

    2001-01-01

    Neurotoxicity of beta-amyloid peptide (A beta) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is usually thought to arise from the nonspecific effects of high concentrations of A beta on vulnerable neurons, resulting in membrane destabilization and increasing intracellular calcium concentration. This review advances the hypothesis that at early stages of AD, when A beta is present in lower amounts, its ability to perturb the function of cellular targets is mediated by specific cofactors present on the cell surface and intracellularly. Receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) is a cell-surface receptor which binds A beta and amplifies its effects on cells in the nanomolar range. The intracellular enzyme A beta-binding alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD) is likely to engage nascent A beta formed in the endoplasmic reticulum, and to mediate cell stress from this site. The analysis of A beta interaction with RAGE and ABAD, as well as other cofactors, provides insight into new mechanisms and, potentially, identifies therapeutic targets relevant to neuronal dysfunction in AD. PMID:11447831

  19. Neuroimaging in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We sought to identify a marker for Alzheimer's disease (AD) for antemortem diagnosis. To determine whether the detection of reduced blood flow in the parietotemporal cortex, shown by single photon emission CT (SPECT), and of medial temporal lobe atrophy, shown by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), would be useful in diagnosis, we studied 38 patients with AD diagnosed by the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria and 26 healthy elderly controls. Parietotemporal hypoperfusion was qualitatively assessed by physicians who were unaware of the clinical diagnosis, and the severity of medial temporal lobe atrophy was quantitated by planimetric and linear measurements. Although an accurate diagnosis of AD was made in 80% or more of the patients by SPECT or MRI studies alone, the combination of SPECT and MRI gave a higher diagnostic accuracy, with a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 92%. Since regional functional or structural changes were detected in 92% of early or mild patients, including possible AD, the combination of SPECT and MRI studies were useful in the early diagnosis of AD. Findings suggest that a functional abnormality in the parietotemporal lobe and an atrophic change in the medial temporal lobe are characteristic of AD, and that SPECT and MIR regional changes may be useful as antemorten diagnostic markers. (author)

  20. Cranial CT frindings of familial Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three cases of familial Alzheimer's disease were reported. The patients had an average of 41 years, and developed memory disturbance and pyramidal tract syndromes. Two had disturbance of gait and showed cerebellar symptoms. All three patients had hypotension, but had no hypotensive episodes, and no change in character or loss of character. Their IQ was extremely low, and encephalograms had delta theta waves dominant in right frontal region in one case, and general delta theta waves in the other two cases. Brain scintigraphy showed reflux to ventricle in case 2, but not in case 1. Cerebrospinal fluid was normal in all three cases, and chromosomes of cases 1 and 2 were normal 46 XY. CT scan showed that the cerebral cortex of all three patients was markedly shrunken, the sulci were enlarged and the ventricle was enlarged without being extremely rounded; the degree of cerebral atrophy according to Huckman et al. was mild in case 1 and moderate in cases 2 and 3. Slight cerebellar atrophy was detected in case 3. (Kaihara, S.)

  1. Spatial Navigation in Preclinical Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Samantha L; Fagan, Anne M; Morris, John C; Head, Denise

    2016-02-01

    Although several previous studies have demonstrated navigational deficits in early-stage symptomatic Alzheimer's disease (AD), navigational abilities in preclinical AD have not been examined. The present investigation examined the effects of preclinical AD and early-stage symptomatic AD on spatial navigation performance. Performance on tasks of wayfinding and route learning in a virtual reality environment were examined. Comparisons were made across the following three groups: Clinically normal without preclinical AD (n = 42), clinically normal with preclinical AD (n = 13), and early-stage symptomatic AD (n = 16) groups. Preclinical AD was defined based on cerebrospinal fluid Aβ42 levels below 500 pg/ml. Preclinical AD was associated with deficits in the use of a wayfinding strategy, but not a route learning strategy. Moreover, post-hoc analyses indicated that wayfinding performance had moderate sensitivity and specificity. Results also confirmed early-stage symptomatic AD-related deficits in the use of both wayfinding and route learning strategies. The results of this study suggest that aspects of spatial navigation may be particularly sensitive at detecting the earliest cognitive deficits of AD. PMID:26967209

  2. Spatial Navigation in Preclinical Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Samantha L.; Fagan, Anne M.; Morris, John C.; Head, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Although several previous studies have demonstrated navigational deficits in early-stage symptomatic Alzheimer's disease (AD), navigational abilities in preclinical AD have not been examined. The present investigation examined the effects of preclinical AD and early-stage symptomatic AD on spatial navigation performance. Performance on tasks of wayfinding and route learning in a virtual reality environment were examined. Comparisons were made across the following three groups: Clinically normal without preclinical AD (n = 42), clinically normal with preclinical AD (n = 13), and early-stage symptomatic AD (n = 16) groups. Preclinical AD was defined based on cerebrospinal fluid Aβ42 levels below 500 pg/ml. Preclinical AD was associated with deficits in the use of a wayfinding strategy, but not a route learning strategy. Moreover, post-hoc analyses indicated that wayfinding performance had moderate sensitivity and specificity. Results also confirmed early-stage symptomatic AD-related deficits in the use of both wayfinding and route learning strategies. The results of this study suggest that aspects of spatial navigation may be particularly sensitive at detecting the earliest cognitive deficits of AD. PMID:26967209

  3. Common polygenic variation enhances risk prediction for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escott-Price, Valentina; Sims, Rebecca; Bannister, Christian; Harold, Denise; Vronskaya, Maria; Majounie, Elisa; Badarinarayan, Nandini; Morgan, Kevin; Passmore, Peter; Holmes, Clive; Powell, John; Brayne, Carol; Gill, Michael; Mead, Simon; Goate, Alison; Cruchaga, Carlos; Lambert, Jean-Charles; van Duijn, Cornelia; Maier, Wolfgang; Ramirez, Alfredo; Holmans, Peter; Jones, Lesley; Hardy, John; Seshadri, Sudha; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Amouyel, Philippe; Williams, Julie

    2015-12-01

    The identification of subjects at high risk for Alzheimer's disease is important for prognosis and early intervention. We investigated the polygenic architecture of Alzheimer's disease and the accuracy of Alzheimer's disease prediction models, including and excluding the polygenic component in the model. This study used genotype data from the powerful dataset comprising 17 008 cases and 37 154 controls obtained from the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project (IGAP). Polygenic score analysis tested whether the alleles identified to associate with disease in one sample set were significantly enriched in the cases relative to the controls in an independent sample. The disease prediction accuracy was investigated in a subset of the IGAP data, a sample of 3049 cases and 1554 controls (for whom APOE genotype data were available) by means of sensitivity, specificity, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and positive and negative predictive values. We observed significant evidence for a polygenic component enriched in Alzheimer's disease (P = 4.9 × 10(-26)). This enrichment remained significant after APOE and other genome-wide associated regions were excluded (P = 3.4 × 10(-19)). The best prediction accuracy AUC = 78.2% (95% confidence interval 77-80%) was achieved by a logistic regression model with APOE, the polygenic score, sex and age as predictors. In conclusion, Alzheimer's disease has a significant polygenic component, which has predictive utility for Alzheimer's disease risk and could be a valuable research tool complementing experimental designs, including preventative clinical trials, stem cell selection and high/low risk clinical studies. In modelling a range of sample disease prevalences, we found that polygenic scores almost doubles case prediction from chance with increased prediction at polygenic extremes. PMID:26490334

  4. O impacto do declínio cognitivo, da capacidade funcional e da mobilidade de idosos com doença de Alzheimer na sobrecarga dos cuidadores The impact of cognitive, functional, and mobility decline of elderly with Alzheimer disease on their caregivers' burden

    OpenAIRE

    Larissa de Lima Borges; Cristina Rodrigues Albuquerque; Patrícia Azevedo Garcia

    2009-01-01

    O objetivo foi avaliar capacidade funcional, mobilidade e função cognitiva de idosos com a doença de Alzheimer (DA), bem como o nível de sobrecarga de seus cuidadores, verificando possíveis associações entre essas variáveis. Foram selecionados 28 idosos (77,8±8,3 anos) diagnosticados com DA por meio do manual diagnóstico e estatístico das doenças mentais e da Classificação Internacional de Doenças; e também os respectivos cuidadores (58,0±13,9 anos), todos participantes da Associação Brasilei...

  5. Effect of diabetes on caregiver burden in an observational study of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lebrec, Jeremie; Ascher-Svanum, Haya; Chen, Yun-Fei; Reed, Catherine; Kahle-Wrobleski, Kristin; Hake, Ann Marie; Raskin, Joel; Naderali, Ebrahim; Schuster, Dara; Heine, Robert J; Kendall, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The burden on caregivers of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is associated with the patient’s functional status and may also be influenced by chronic comorbid medical conditions, such as diabetes. This post-hoc exploratory analysis assessed whether comorbid diabetes in patients with AD affects caregiver burden, and whether caregivers with diabetes experience greater burden than caregivers without diabetes. Caregiver and patient healthcare resource use (HCRU) were also assesse...

  6. Alzheimer's disease is incurable but preventable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, Jack C

    2010-01-01

    The dramatic rising incidence and costs of Alzheimer's disease (AD) require that research efforts and funding be primarily directed on either finding a cure or applying preventive measures to curb this disorder. A cure for AD appears unlikely when significant cognitive loss has occurred because the neuronal networks that controlled the perturbed cognitive abilities are either dead or irreversibly damaged and replacing them, even if it were technically possible, would not reconstruct the intellectual identity of the host. Prevention of risk factors to sporadic AD is a more realistic stratagem and treatment, when indicated, ideally should begin in cognitively intact individuals as part of a mass screening effort. Prevention of modifiable risk factors to AD is cost-effective because it reduces hospice or hospital stay, repeated doctor visits, and long-term care. Presently, neurocognitive and neuroimaging tests are used with partial success in identifying persons at higher risk of AD but these tests can not pinpoint either a cause or a specific intervention that could attenuate disease progress. We previously proposed that carotid artery ultrasound +echocardiography together with ankle-brachail index (CAUSE+ABI) as mass screening tests in asymptomatic persons could detect not only cardio-cerebrovascular risk factors to AD, but also identify an indicated intervention. CAUSE+ABI are simple to perform, cost-effective, non-invasive, and reasonably accurate for the intended purpose. Additionally, detection of cardio-cerebrovasacular abnormalities long before expression of cognitive deterioration allows higher success rate with earlier treatment. Evidence-based medicine is recommended for optimizing clinical decision-making in evaluating AD risk factors and their treatment. PMID:20182017

  7. Biomedicine and Informatics Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Cheng

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In a perspective of biomedicine and informatics, the mechanism of Alzheimer's, senile amnesia, or other aging-associated and cognitive impairment related diseases involve four important informative processing procedures: propagation, consolidation, retrieval and cognition, In this study, we systematically model the four procedures based on published experimental data. When modeling the propagation, we develop an equivalent circuit of biological membrane to describe how the neuron signals are propagated, attenuated, compensated, transferred, oscillated and filtered; and how wrong signals are related to the diseases. Our circuit involves complex admittances, resonance angular frequencies, propagating constants, active pump currents, transfer functions in frequency domain and memory functions in time domain. Our circuit explains recurrent of brain neurons and clinical EEG frequencies as well as represents an encoding of current or electric field intensity (EFI. When modeling the consolidation and the retrieval of long term memory (LTM, we emphasize the EFI consists of a non conservative electric field intensity (NCEFI and a conservative electric field intensity (CEFI. It is mostly a NCEFI of acquired information to evoke an informative flow: from the inherited or mutant DNA to the transcribed RNA, from the transcribed RNA to the translated proteins. Some new synthesized proteins relate to the memory functions. The charges of the proteins and the memory functions mostly store the LTM and play an important role during the LTM retrieval. When modeling the cognition in working memory (WM, our model demonstrates: if a sum of two sets of EFI signals is enhanced positively (or negatively, at a sub-cellular level (especially at the axon hillock, the sum supports a positive (or negative cognition; otherwise, the sum tends to be no cognition. A set of related brain neurons in WM work organically to vote, by EFI signal outputs through their axons, if they

  8. Inflammaging as a prodrome to Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rrapo Elona

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recently, the term "inflammaging" was coined by Franceshci and colleagues to characterize a widely accepted paradigm that ageing is accompanied by a low-grade chronic up-regulation of certain pro-inflammatory responses. Inflammaging differs significantly from the traditional five cardinal features of acute inflammation in that it is characterized by a relative decline in adaptive immunity and T-helper 2 responses and is associated with increased innate immunity by cells of the mononuclear phagocyte lineage. While the over-active innate immunity characteristic of inflammaging may remain subclinical in many elderly individuals, a portion of individuals (postulated to have a "high responder inflammatory genotype" may shift from a state of "normal" or "subclinical" inflammaging to one or more of a number of age-associated diseases. We and others have found that IFN-γ and other pro-inflammatory cytokines interact with processing and production of Aβ peptide, the pathological hallmark feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD, suggesting that inflammaging may be a "prodrome" to AD. Although conditions of enhanced innate immune response with overproduction of pro-inflammatory proteins are associated with both healthy aging and AD, it is suggested that those who age "well" demonstrate anti-inflammaging mechanisms and biomarkers that likely counteract the adverse immune response of inflammaging. Thus, opposing the features of inflammaging may prevent or treat the symptoms of AD. In this review, we fully characterize the aging immune system. In addition, we explain how three novel treatments, (1 human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBC, (2 flavanoids, and (3 Aβ vaccination oppose the forces of inflammaging and AD-like pathology in various mouse models.

  9. Talking with Children: Tips for Caregivers, Parents, and Teachers during Infectious Disease Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children: TIPS FOR CAREGIVERS, PARENTS, AND TEACHERS DURING INFECTIOUS DISEASE OUTBREAKS What You Should Know When children and youth watch news on TV about an infectious disease outbreak, read about it in the news, or ...

  10. Developmental Disabilities and Alzheimer's Disease...What You Should Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arc, Arlington, TX.

    This booklet provides an overview of Alzheimer's disease along with a description of the disease, how to find out if someone has it, and how it affects adults with developmental disabilities. It also provides information on what to do and suggests where to seek help. Specific sections discuss: (1) the etiology of the disease; (2) symptoms of…

  11. Towards an All-Polymer Biosensor for Early Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Nikolaj Ormstrup; Heegaard, Niels

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is quickly evolving into one of the biggest and most costly health issues in Europe and the United States. AD is a protein misfolding disease, caused by accumulation of abnormally folded β-amyloid and tau protein in the brain. The build-up of protein is believed to degene......Alzheimer's disease (AD) is quickly evolving into one of the biggest and most costly health issues in Europe and the United States. AD is a protein misfolding disease, caused by accumulation of abnormally folded β-amyloid and tau protein in the brain. The build-up of protein is believed...

  12. Impact of Neuroprotection on Incidence of Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Raúl de la Fuente-Fernández

    2006-01-01

    Converging evidence suggests that high levels of education and intellectual activity increase the cognitive reserve and reduce the risk of dementia. However, little is known about the impact that different neuroprotective strategies may have on the incidence of Alzheimer's disease. Using a simple mathematical regression model, it is shown here that age-specific counts of basic cognitive units (surrogate of neurons or synapses) in the normal population can be estimated from Alzheimer's inciden...

  13. Alzheimer's Disease Diagnostics by Adaptation of 3D Convolutional Network

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseini-Asl, Ehsan; Keynto, Robert; El-Baz, Ayman

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis, playing an important role in preventing progress and treating the Alzheimer\\{'}s disease (AD), is based on classification of features extracted from brain images. The features have to accurately capture main AD-related variations of anatomical brain structures, such as, e.g., ventricles size, hippocampus shape, cortical thickness, and brain volume. This paper proposed to predict the AD with a deep 3D convolutional neural network (3D-CNN), which can learn generic features capt...

  14. Support for Alzheimer's Caregivers: Psychometric Evaluation of Familial and Friend Support Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks, Scott E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Information on the shortened, 20-item version of the Perceived Social Support Scale (S-PSSS) is scarce. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the psychometric properties of the S-PSSS Family (SSfa) and Friends (SSfr) subscales. Method: Because of their common coping method of social support, a cross-sectional sample of Alzheimer's…

  15. The Experience of Care-Giving for a Person with Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, Connie Lynn

    2010-01-01

    As the population continues to become more aged and at risk for chronic illness, there will be a growing need for caregivers. Caregivers to persons with Parkinson's disease (PD) face the challenge of providing care over many years due to the chronic progressive nature of this neurological disorder. The purpose of this study was to understand and…

  16. Alzheimer's Project

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and the effects this debilitating and fatal disease has on those with Alzheimer's and their families. September ... Alzheimer's care, support and research, the Alzheimer's Association has been an active partner in "THE ALZHEIMER'S PROJECT," ...

  17. Alzheimer's Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will not share your information. * Required. View archives. Alzheimer's impact is growing Alzheimer's disease is the sixth- ... Last Updated: Our vision is a world without Alzheimer's Formed in 1980, the Alzheimer's Association advances research ...

  18. Diagnostic attributions versus labeling: impact of Alzheimer's disease and major depression diagnoses on emotions, beliefs, and helping intentions of family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadley, V G; Haley, W E

    2001-07-01

    Labeling theory suggests that applying disease labels to behavior may serve to medicalize deviance and produce stigma. In contrast, attribution theory suggests that this practice may evoke sympathetic responses. Female undergraduates (N = 221) read vignettes describing an older parent exhibiting inappropriate behavior in a social situation, with diagnostic label (Alzheimer's disease, major depression, no label), personal congruence of the behavior (congruent, incongruent, no information), and parent gender manipulated across participants. Participants rated their emotional responses, attributions, and willingness to help. The Alzheimer's disease label, and to a lesser extent the major depression label, produced more sympathy toward the parent, less blame, and greater willingness to help, indicating that the provision of these labels may facilitate compassionate attitudes and enhanced caregiving toward older adults. However, participants reported greater anger and higher personality attributions toward fathers than mothers, suggesting that the influence of parent gender on potential caregivers' reactions warrants further attention. PMID:11445611

  19. Impaired lysosomal cobalamin transport in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hua; Li, Hongyun; Ruberu, Kalani; Garner, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Cobalamin (vitamin B12) is required for erythrocyte formation and DNA synthesis and it plays a crucial role in maintaining neurological function. As a coenzyme for methionine synthase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase, cobalamin utilization depends on its efficient transit through the intracellular lysosomal compartment and subsequent delivery to the cytosol and mitochondria. Lysosomal function deteriorates in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Lysosomal acidification is defective in AD and lysosomal proteolysis is disrupted by AD-related presenilin 1 mutation. In this study, we propose that AD related lysosomal dysfunction may impair lysosomal cobalamin transport. The experiments use in vitro and in vivo models of AD to define how lysosomal dysfunction directly affects cobalamin utilization. SH-SY5Y-AβPP mutant cells were treated with a proteasome inhibitor to induce lysosomal amyloid-β accumulation. We metabolically labeled these cells with [57Co] cobalamin and isolated purified lysosomes, mitochondria, and cytosol fractions. The results indicated that proteasome inhibition was associated with lysosomal amyloid-β accumulation and a doubling of lysosomal [57Co] cobalamin levels. We also used AβPPxPS1 transgenic AD mice that were intraperitoneally injected with [57Co] cobalamin. The amount of [57Co] cobalamin in the major organs of these mice was measured and the subcellular [57Co] cobalamin distribution in the brain was assessed. The results demonstrated that lysosomal [57Co] cobalamin level was significantly increased by 56% in the AβPPxPS1 AD mouse brains as compared to wild type control mice. Together these data provide evidence that lysosomal cobalamin may be impaired in AD in association with amyloid-β accumulation. PMID:25125476

  20. Microglial dysfunction connects depression and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Luís Eduardo; Beckman, Danielle; Ferreira, Sergio T

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) are highly prevalent neuropsychiatric conditions with intriguing epidemiological overlaps. Depressed patients are at increased risk of developing late-onset AD, and around one in four AD patients are co-diagnosed with MDD. Microglia are the main cellular effectors of innate immunity in the brain, and their activation is central to neuroinflammation - a ubiquitous process in brain pathology, thought to be a causal factor of both AD and MDD. Microglia serve several physiological functions, including roles in synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis, which may be disrupted in neuroinflammation. Following early work on the 'sickness behavior' of humans and other animals, microglia-derived inflammatory cytokines have been shown to produce depressive-like symptoms when administered exogenously or released in response to infection. MDD patients consistently show increased circulating levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and anti-inflammatory drugs show promise for treating depression. Activated microglia are abundant in the AD brain, and concentrate around senile plaques, hallmark lesions composed of aggregated amyloid-β peptide (Aβ). The Aβ burden in affected brains is regulated largely by microglial clearance, and the complex activation state of microglia may be crucial for AD progression. Intriguingly, recent reports have linked soluble Aβ oligomers, toxins that accumulate in AD brains and are thought to cause memory impairment, to increased brain cytokine production and depressive-like behavior in mice. Here, we review recent findings supporting the inflammatory hypotheses of AD and MDD, focusing on microglia as a common player and therapeutic target linking these devastating disorders. PMID:26612494

  1. Gaps in Alzheimer's Knowledge among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshbaugh, Elaine M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of the disease, it appears that there may be a need for increased education for formal and family caregivers of those with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. Today's college students will be asked to fill both of these roles in the future. This study examined the level of knowledge of Alzheimer's…

  2. Brain imaging of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changhao Yin; Siou Li; Weina Zhao; Jiachun Feng

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly increasing prevalence of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease has the potential to create a major worldwide healthcare crisis. Structural MRI studies in patients with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment are currently attracting considerable interest. It is extremely important to study early structural and metabolic changes, such as those in the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, and gray matter structures in the medial temporal lobe, to allow the early detection of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. The microstructural integrity of white matter can be studied with diffusion tensor imaging. Increased mean diffusivity and decreased fractional anisotropy are found in subjects with white matter damage. Functional imaging studies with positron emission tomography tracer compounds enable detection of amyloid plaques in the living brain in patients with Alzheimer's disease. In this review, we will focus on key findings from brain imaging studies in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, including structural brain changes studied with MRI and white matter changes seen with diffusion tensor imaging, and other specific imaging methodologies will also be discussed.

  3. Potential Role of Aminoprocalcitonin in the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Eva; Antequera, Desiree; López-González, Irene; Ferrer, Isidro; Miñano, Francisco J; Carro, Eva

    2016-10-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that inflammatory responses cause brain atrophy and play a prominent and early role in the progression of Alzheimer disease. Recent findings show that the neuroendocrine peptide aminoprocalcitonin (NPCT) plays a critical role in the development of systemic inflammatory response; however, the presence, possible function, regulation, and mechanisms by which NPCT may be involved in Alzheimer disease neuropathology remain unknown. We explored the expression of NPCT and its interaction with amyloid-β (Aβ), and proinflammatory and neurogenic effects. By using brain samples of Alzheimer disease patients and APP/PS1 transgenic mice, we evaluated the potential role of NPCT on Aβ-related pathology. We found that NPCT is expressed in hippocampal and cortical neurons and Aβ-induced up-regulation of NPCT expression. Peripherally administered antibodies against NPCT decreased microglial activation, decreased circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines, and prevented Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in experimental models of Alzheimer disease. Remarkably, anti-NPTC therapy resulted in a significant improvement in the behavioral status of APP/PS1 mice. Our results indicate a central role of NPCT in Alzheimer disease pathogenesis and suggest NPCT as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target. PMID:27497681

  4. Memantine Attenuates Alzheimer's Disease-Like Pathology and Cognitive Impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochuan Wang

    Full Text Available Deficiency of protein phosphatase-2A is a key event in Alzheimer's disease. An endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase-2A, inhibitor-1, I1PP2A, which inhibits the phosphatase activity by interacting with its catalytic subunit protein phosphatase-2Ac, is known to be upregulated in Alzheimer's disease brain. In the present study, we overexpressed I1PP2A by intracerebroventricular injection with adeno-associated virus vector-1-I1PP2A in Wistar rats. The I1PP2A rats showed a decrease in brain protein phosphatase-2A activity, abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, neurodegeneration, an increase in the level of activated glycogen synthase kinase-3beta, enhanced expression of intraneuronal amyloid-beta and spatial reference memory deficit; littermates treated identically but with vector only, i.e., adeno-associated virus vector-1-enhanced GFP, served as a control. Treatment with memantine, a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist which is an approved drug for treatment of Alzheimer's disease, rescued protein phosphatase-2A activity by decreasing its demethylation at Leu309 selectively and attenuated Alzheimer's disease-like pathology and cognitive impairment in adeno-associated virus vector-1-I1PP2A rats. These findings provide new clues into the possible mechanism of the beneficial therapeutic effect of memantine in Alzheimer's disease patients.

  5. Preserved painting creativity in an artist with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornazzari, L R

    2005-06-01

    Creativity in any of its forms, either visual, musical, literary or performing arts, may be conceived as a cognitive capability, and should be actively explored in relation to patients with Alzheimer disease and related dementias, even when other cognitive functions do not allow us to even communicate with them. We are reporting the case of a talented artist with the diagnosis of early onset Alzheimer disease (AD) with progressive cognitive impairment but with preservation of her creativity until very late in the course of the disease. PMID:15885044

  6. Alzheimer's Disease in the Danish Malnutrition Period 1999-2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre-Sørensen, Maja; Kristensen, Gustav David Westergaard

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies published over the last few years have shown that malnutrition is a risk factor for developing and worsening Alzheimer's disease (AD) and that a balanced diet can delay the onset of the disease. During the period from January 1999 to January 2007, a statistically...... from AD associated with the period when the general nutritional state among the elderly in Denmark worsened (from 1999 to 2007). CONCLUSION: The study concludes that the malnutrition period resulted in an excess death rate from Alzheimer's disease. All in all, a total of 345 extra lives were lost...

  7. The S100B/RAGE Axis in Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelle Leclerc

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that the small EF-hand calcium-binding protein S100B plays an important role in Alzheimer's disease. Among other evidences are the increased levels of both S100B and its receptor, the Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts (RAGEs in the AD diseased brain. The regulation of RAGE signaling by S100B is complex and probably involves other ligands including the amyloid beta peptide (A, the Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs, or transtheyretin. In this paper we discuss the current literature regarding the role of S100B/RAGE activation in Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Concordance of Race or Ethnicity of Interventionists and Caregivers of Dementia Patients: Relationship to Attrition and Treatment Outcomes in the REACH Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, Kathleen A.; Schulz, Richard; Stone, Roslyn A.; Klinger, Julie; Mercurio, Rocco

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We assess the effects of racial or ethnic concordance between caregivers and interventionists on caregiver attrition, change in depression, and change in burden in a multisite randomized clinical trial. Design and Methods: Family caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease were randomized to intervention or control groups at six sites…

  9. Impact of neuroprotection on incidence of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl de la Fuente-Fernández

    Full Text Available Converging evidence suggests that high levels of education and intellectual activity increase the cognitive reserve and reduce the risk of dementia. However, little is known about the impact that different neuroprotective strategies may have on the incidence of Alzheimer's disease. Using a simple mathematical regression model, it is shown here that age-specific counts of basic cognitive units (surrogate of neurons or synapses in the normal population can be estimated from Alzheimer's incidence rates. Hence, the model can be used to test the effect of neuroprotection on Alzheimer's incidence. It was found that the number of basic cognitive units decreases with age, but levels off in older people. There were no gender differences after correcting for survival. The model shows that even modest neuroprotective effects on basic cognitive units can lead to dramatic reductions in the number of Alzheimer's cases. Most remarkably, a 5% increase in the cognitive reserve would prevent one third of Alzheimer's cases. These results suggest that public health policies aimed at increasing the cognitive reserve in the general population (e.g., implementing higher levels of education are likely the most effective strategy for preventing Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Stem cell therapy for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Salam, Omar M E

    2011-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder which impairs the memory and intellectual abilities of the affected individuals. Loss of episodic as well as semantic memory is an early and principal feature. The basal forebrain cholinergic system is the population of neurons most affected by the neurodegenerative process. Extracellular as well as intracellular deposition of beta-amyloid or Abeta (Abeta) protein, intracellular formation of neurofibrillary tangles and neuronal loss are the neuropathological hallmarks of AD. In the last few years, hopes were raised that cell replacement therapy would provide cure by compensating the lost neuronal systems. Stem cells obtained from embryonic as well as adult tissue and grafted into the intact brain of mice or rats were mostly followed by their incorporation into the host parenchyma and differentiation into functional neural lineages. In the lesioned brain, stem cells exhibited targeted migration towards the damaged regions of the brain, where they engrafted, proliferated and matured into functional neurones. Neural precursor cells can be intravenously administered and yet migrate into brain damaged areas and induce functional recovery. Observations in animal models of AD have provided evidence that transplanted stem cells or neural precursor cells (NPCs) survive, migrate, and differentiate into cholinergic neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes with amelioration of the learning/memory deficits. Besides replacement of lost or damaged cells, stem cells stimulate endogenous neural precursors, enhance structural neuroplasticity, and down regulate proinflammatory cytokines and neuronal apoptotic death. Stem cells could also be genetically modified to express growth factors into the brain. In the last years, evidence indicated that the adult brain of mammals preserves the capacity to generate new neurons from neural stem/progenitor cells. Inefficient adult neurogenesis may contribute to the

  11. Time estimation in mild Alzheimer's disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichelli Paolo

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Time information processing relies on memory, which greatly supports the operations of hypothetical internal timekeepers. Scalar Expectancy Theory (SET postulates the existence of a memory component that is functionally separated from an internal clock and other processing stages. SET has devised several experimental procedures to map these cognitive stages onto cerebral regions and neurotransmitter systems. One of these, the time bisection procedure, has provided support for a dissociation between the clock stage, controlled by dopaminergic systems, and the memory stage, mainly supported by cholinergic neuronal networks. This study aimed at linking the specific memory processes predicted by SET to brain mechanisms, by submitting time bisection tasks to patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD, that are known to present substantial degeneration of the fronto-temporal regions underpinning memory. Methods Twelve mild AD patients were required to make temporal judgments about intervals either ranging from 100 to 600 ms (short time bisection task or from 1000 to 3000 ms (long time bisection task. Their performance was compared with that of a group of aged-matched control participants and a group of young control subjects. Results Long time bisection scores of AD patients were not significantly different from those of the two control groups. In contrast, AD patients showed increased variability (as indexed by increased WR values in timing millisecond durations and a generalized inconsistency of responses over the same interval in both the short and long bisection tasks. A similar, though milder, decreased millisecond interval sensitivity was found for elderly subjects. Conclusion The present results, that are consistent with those of previous timing studies in AD, are interpreted within the SET framework as not selectively dependent on working or reference memory disruptions but as possibly due to distortions in different

  12. Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome: treating two paths to dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weksler, M.E.; Szabo, P.; Relkin, N.R.; Reidenberg, M.M.; Weksler, B.B.; Coppus, A.M.W.

    2013-01-01

    Successful therapy of dementia, like any disease, depends upon understanding its pathogenesis. This review contrasts the dominant pathways to dementia which differ in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in Down's syndrome (DS). Impaired clearance of neurotoxic amyloid beta peptides (Abeta) leads to dementi

  13. Alzheimer's Disease. LC Science Tracer Bullet 87-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammons, Vivian O., Comp.

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by a degeneration and shrinkage of brain tissue; the symptoms include progressive memory loss, bizarre behavior, difficulty in speaking and walking, incontinence, and confusion. Positive diagnosis is possible only upon examination of brain tissue at autopsy. The disease affects not only the patient but also the…

  14. Botanics: a potential source of new therapies for Alzheimer's disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Syad AN; Devi KP

    2014-01-01

    Arif Nisha Syad, Kasi Pandima Devi Department of Biotechnology, Alagappa University, Karaikudi, Tamil Nadu, India Abstract: Alzheimer's disease is an age-related, complex neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of memory and impairment of multiple cognitive functions. Several factors contribute to the progression and development of the disease including amyloid beta accumulation, neurofibrillary tangle formation, cholinergic deficit, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and apop...

  15. Accumulation of murine amyloid-β mimics early Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, Markus; Bracke, Alexander; Avchalumov, Yosef; Schumacher, Toni; Hofrichter, Jacqueline; Paarmann, Kristin; Fröhlich, Christina; Lange, Cathleen; Brüning, Thomas; von Bohlen Und Halbach, Oliver; Pahnke, Jens

    2015-08-01

    Amyloidosis mouse models of Alzheimer's disease are generally established by transgenic approaches leading to an overexpression of mutated human genes that are known to be involved in the generation of amyloid-β in Alzheimer's families. Although these models made substantial contributions to the current knowledge about the 'amyloid hypothesis' of Alzheimer's disease, the overproduction of amyloid-β peptides mimics only inherited (familiar) Alzheimer's disease, which accounts for mild cognitive impairment. Using behavioural tests, electrophysiology and morphological analyses, we compared different ABC transporter-deficient animals and found that alterations are most prominent in neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice. We show that these mice have a reduced probability to survive, show increased anxiety in new environments, and have a reduced working memory performance. Furthermore, we detected morphological changes in the hippocampus and amygdala, e.g. astrogliosis and reduced numbers of synapses, leading to defective long-term potentiation in functional measurements. Compared to human, murine amyloid-β is poorly aggregating, due to changes in three amino acids at N-terminal positions 5, 10, and 13. Interestingly, our findings account for the action of early occurring amyloid-β species/aggregates, i.e. monomers and small amyloid-β oligomers. Thus, neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice present a new model for early effects of amyloid-β-related mild cognitive impairment that allows investigations without artificial overexpression of inherited Alzheimer's disease genes. PMID:25991605

  16. La alimentación del enfermo de Alzheimer en el ámbito familiar Alzheimer`s disease patients nutrition in the domestic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Botella Trelis

    2004-05-01

    relatives. Data collected were: gender, staging of dementia, time since diagnosis, weight, nutritional habits, food consumption, dysphagia, complications presented and information received by relatives. Results: 241 patients, 70% were female, mean age 76 years old, 52% of patients had the diagnosis given between 3-5 years ago, 48% suffer severe dementia (GDS > 6, Weight loss was found in 31% and 98% of patients maintain oral intake of food. A well balanced diet was present in 24% of patients and fluid intake higher than 4 glasses in 28%. Food processing was done at home in 91% of cases, of whom 40% were puree food, 26% presented dysphagia to liquids and 19% to solid food. Regarding caregivers: 5% has received no information related to Alzheimer's Disease, but 50% has no information related to nutrition. Conclusions: Almost all the patients received oral nutrition and despite of severiry of dementia and dysphagia they are receiving a quite well balanced diet. Fluid intake is generally poor and many patients are loosing weight, other complications are not very relevant. There is an important lack of information related to the nutritional bases of these patients and to how food processing can be improved as the disease progresses.

  17. Peripheral glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilander, L; Boberg, M; Lithell, H

    1993-04-01

    Twenty-four patients with Alzheimer's disease and matched controls were examined with reference to metabolic parameters such as peripheral insulin and glucose metabolism, serum lipid concentrations and blood pressure levels. Blood glucose levels and insulin response were measured during an intravenous glucose tolerance test and peripheral insulin sensitivity was estimated with the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp technique. There were no differences recorded between the two groups in glucose metabolism, triglyceride, cholesterol or HDL-cholesterol levels. The patients with Alzheimer's disease had significantly lower blood pressure levels, which partly could be explained by ongoing treatment with neuroleptics and antidepressives. Previous findings of higher insulin levels in Alzheimer's disease could not be verified. PMID:8503259

  18. Alzheimer's disease and Type 2 diabetes mellitus: the cholinesterase connection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siva Prasad Akula

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus tend to occur together. We sought to identify protein(s common to both conditions that could suggest a possible unifying pathogenic role. Using human neuronal butyrylcholinesterase (AAH08396.1 as the reference protein we used BLAST Tool for protein to protein comparison in humans. We found three groups of sequences among a series of 12, with an E-value between 0–12, common to both Alzheimer's disease and diabetes: butyrylcholinesterase precursor K allele (NP_000046.1, acetylcholinesterase isoform E4-E6 precursor (NP_000656.1, and apoptosis-related acetylcholinesterase (1B41|A. Butyrylcholinesterase and acetylcholinesterase related proteins were found common to both Alzheimer's disease and diabetes; they may play an etiological role via influencing insulin resistance and lipid metabolism.

  19. Early detection of Alzheimer's disease using MRI hippocampal texture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lauge; Igel, Christian; Hansen, Naja Liv;

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with reduction in hippocampal volume in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, it is unknown whether hippocampal texture changes in persons with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) that does not have a change in hippocam......Cognitive impairment in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with reduction in hippocampal volume in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, it is unknown whether hippocampal texture changes in persons with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) that does not have a change...... in hippocampal volume. We tested the hypothesis that hippocampal texture has association to early cognitive loss beyond that of volumetric changes. The texture marker was trained and evaluated using T1-weighted MRI scans from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database, and subsequently...

  20. Efficacy of psychosocial intervention in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldorff, F B; Buss, D V; Eckermann, A;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy at 12 months of an early psychosocial counselling and support programme for outpatients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their primary care givers. DESIGN: Multicentre, randomised, controlled, rater blinded trial. SETTING: Primary care and memory clinics in five...... Danish districts. PARTICIPANTS: 330 outpatients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their 330 primary care givers. INTERVENTIONS: Participating dyads (patient and primary care giver) were randomised to control support during follow-up or to control support plus DAISY intervention (multifaceted and semi...... for attrition (P = 0.0146 and P = 0.0103 respectively). CONCLUSIONS: The multifaceted, semi-tailored intervention with counselling, education, and support for patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their care givers did not have any significant effect beyond that with well structured follow-up support at 12...

  1. Inhalational Alzheimer's disease: an unrecognized—and treatable—epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredesen, Dale E.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most significant healthcare problems today, with a dire need for effective treatment. Identifying subtypes of Alzheimer's disease may aid in the development of therapeutics, and recently three different subtypes have been described: type 1 (inflammatory), type 2 (non-inflammatory or atrophic), and type 3 (cortical). Here I report that type 3 Alzheimer's disease is the result of exposure to specific toxins, and is most commonly inhalational (IAD), a phenotypic manifestation of chronic inflammatory response syndrome (CIRS), due to biotoxins such as mycotoxins. The appropriate recognition of IAD as a potentially important pathogenetic condition in patients with cognitive decline offers the opportunity for successful treatment of a large number of patients whose current prognoses, in the absence of accurate diagnosis, are grave. PMID:26870879

  2. Inhalational Alzheimer's disease: an unrecognized - and treatable - epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredesen, Dale E

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most significant healthcare problems today, with a dire need for effective treatment. Identifying subtypes of Alzheimer's disease may aid in the development of therapeutics, and recently three different subtypes have been described: type 1 (inflammatory), type 2 (non-inflammatory or atrophic), and type 3 (cortical). Here I report that type 3 Alzheimer's disease is the result of exposure to specific toxins, and is most commonly inhalational (IAD), a phenotypic manifestation of chronic inflammatory response syndrome (CIRS), due to biotoxins such as mycotoxins. The appropriate recognition of IAD as a potentially important pathogenetic condition in patients with cognitive decline offers the opportunity for successful treatment of a large number of patients whose current prognoses, in the absence of accurate diagnosis, are grave. PMID:26870879

  3. The Valsalva maneuver and Alzheimer's disease: is there a link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wostyn, Peter; Audenaert, Kurt; De Deyn, Peter Paul

    2009-02-01

    Recent research findings provide evidence for Alzheimer's disease-related changes in brain diseases, such as normal pressure hydrocephalus and traumatic brain injury, and in glaucoma at the level of the retinal ganglion cells. This is a group of diseases that affect central nervous system tissue and are characterized by elevation of intracranial or intraocular pressure and/or local shear stress and strain. This strengthens the possibility that Alzheimer-type changes in these diseases may result at least in part from exposure of central nervous system tissue to elevated mechanical load. As activities or diseases with significant Valsalva effort can generate increased intracranial pressures, we hypothesize that individuals who frequently perform strong Valsalva maneuvers (e.g., long hours of repetitive heavy lifting, sequences of blows during the playing of a wind instrument, forceful and repetitive cough, bearing-down efforts during parturition) may be more susceptible to developing Alzheimer's disease. In this paper, we discuss three hypotheses about the mechanisms by which extensive use of the Valsalva maneuver might contribute to the neuropathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease: via mechanical stress-induced events in the hippocampus and/or via changes in the secretory process of the choroid plexus and/or via hemodynamic changes in cerebral blood flow. If confirmed, this hypothesis could have implications in clinical practice. PMID:19199876

  4. Bioenergetics breakdown in Alzheimer's disease: targets for new therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Saxena, Uday

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is rapidly growing worldwide and yet there is no cure for it. Currently available drugs only provide symptomatic relief and do not intervene in disease process sufficiently enough to prevent or cure it. Characteristic features of this disease are decline in neuronal mass and cognitive functions. The most dominant hypothesis proposed for pathogenesis of this disease is called “amyloid hypothesis". It states that excessive production of amyloid peptides called abeta peptides...

  5. Cerebral microbleeds in early Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliakova, T; Levin, O; Arablinskiy, A; Vasenina, E; Zerr, I

    2016-10-01

    We hypothesize that cerebral microbleeds (CMB) in patients with different neuropsychological profiles (amnestic or non-amnestic) and MRI features of vascular damage could provide important information on the underlying pathological process in early Alzheimer's disease. The study was performed at two trial sites. We studied 136 outpatients with cognitive decline. MRI was performed using a magnetic field of 1.5 and 3 T. Neuropsychological assessment included Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Montreal Cognitive Assessment scale (MoCA), Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination (ACE-R), Cambridge Cognitive Examination battery (CAMCOG) (Part 3), Clock Drawing Test, fluency test and the visual memory test (SCT). CSF was examined for standard parameters such as tau, phosphorylated tau, amyloid-β 1-40 and 42 and Qalbumin, in accordance with established protocols and genotype. In 61 patients (45 %), at least 1 CMB was found. Most of the CMBs were described in the amnestic profile (67 %). In 86 % of the cases, multiple CMB were observed. The ratio of Aβ1-40/42 in non-amnestic patients with CMB was significantly lower (mean 0.6) than in patients without CMB (mean 1.2). A notable difference in the albumin ratio as an indicator of the BBB was observed between groups with and without CMB. In the CMP-positive group, the E2 genotype was observed more frequently, and the E4 genotype less frequently, than in the CMB-negative group. Based on the cerebrospinal fluid-serum albumin ratio, we were able to show that patients with CMB present several features of BBB dysfunction. According to logistic regression, the predictive factors for CMB in patients with cognitive decline were age, WMHs score and albumin ratio. We found a significant reduction in the Aβ-amyloid ratio in the non-amnestic profile group with CMB (particularly in the cortical region) in comparison to those without CMB. While this is an interesting finding, its significance needs to be assessed in a prospective follow-up.

  6. Early complement components in Alzheimer's disease brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerhuis, R; Janssen, I; Hack, C E; Eikelenboom, P

    1996-01-01

    Activation products of the early complement components C1, C4 and C3 can be found colocalized with diffuse and fibrillar beta-amyloid (beta/A4) deposits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Immunohistochemically, C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-Inh) and the C1 subcomponents C1s and C1r can not, or only occasionally, be detected in plaques or in astrocytes. The present finding that C1q, C1s and C1-Inh mRNA are present in both AD and control brains suggests that the variable immunohistochemical staining results for C1r, C1s and C1-Inh are due to a rapid consumption, and that the inability to detect C1s, C1r or C1-Inh is probably due to the dissociation of C1s-C1-Inh and C1r-C1-Inh complexes from the activator-bound C1q into the fluid phase. Employing monoclonal antibodies specific for different forms of C1-Inh, no complexed C1-Inh could be found, whereas inactivated C1-Inh seems to be present in astrocytes surrounding beta/A4 plaques in AD brains. These findings, together with our finding (using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction) that C1-Inh is locally produced in the brain, suggest that in the brain complement activation at the C1 level is regulated by C1-Inh. Immunohistochemically, no evidence for the presence of the late complement components C5, C7 and C9, or of the membrane attack complex (MAC), was found in beta/A4 plaques. In contrast to the mRNA encoding the early components, that of the late complement components appears to be hardly detectable (C7) or absent (C9). Thus, without blood-brain-barrier impairment, the late complement components are probably present at too low a concentration to allow the formation of the MAC, which is generally believed to be responsible for at least some of the neurodegenerative effects observed in AD. Therefore, the present findings support the idea that in AD, complement does not function as an inflammatory mediator through MAC formation, but through the action of early component activation products.

  7. Endothelial progenitor cells with Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Xiao-dong; ZHANG Yun; LIU Li; SUN Ning; ZHANG Ming-yi; ZHANG Jian-ning

    2011-01-01

    Background Endothelial dysfunction is thought to be critical events in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD).Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have provided insight into maintaining and repairing endothelial function. To study the relation between EPCs and AD, we explored the number of circulating EPCs in patients with AD.Methods A total of 104 patients were recruited from both the outpatients and inpatients of the geriatric neurology department at General Hospital, rianjin Medical University. Consecutive patients with newly diagnosed AD (n=30),patients with vascular dementia (VaD, n=34), and healthy elderly control subjects with normal cognition (n=40) were enrolled after matching for age, gender, body mass index, medical history, current medication and Mini Mental State Examination. Middle cerebral artery flow velocity was examined with transcranial Doppler. Endothelial function was evaluated according to the level of EPCs, and peripheral blood EPCs was counted by flow cytometry.Results There were no significant statistical differences of clinical data in AD, VaD and control groups (P >0.05). The patients with AD showed decreased CD34-positive (CD34+) or CD133-positive (CD133+) levels compared to the control subjects, but there were no significant statistical differences in patients with AD. The patients with AD had significantly lower CD34+CD133+ EPCs(CD34 and CD133 double positive endothelial progenitor cells) than the control subjects (P <0.05). In the patients with AD, a lower CD34+CD133+ EPCs count was independently associated with a lower Mini-Mental State Examination score (r=0.514, P=0.004). Patients with VaD also showed a significant decrease in CD34+CD133+ EPCs levels, but this was not evidently associated with the Mini-Mental State Examination score. The changes of middle cerebral artery flow velocity were similar between AD and VaD. Middle cerebral artery flow velocity was decreased in the AD and VaD groups and significantly lower than

  8. Efficacy of psychosocial intervention in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease: the multicentre, rater blinded, randomised Danish Alzheimer Intervention Study (DAISY)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldorff, F.B.; Buss, D.V.; Eckermann, A.;

    2012-01-01

    To assess the efficacy at 12 months of an early psychosocial counselling and support programme for outpatients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their primary care givers.......To assess the efficacy at 12 months of an early psychosocial counselling and support programme for outpatients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their primary care givers....

  9. Corpus callosum atrophy in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Kristian Steen; Garde, Ellen; Skimminge, Arnold;

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have found atrophy of the corpus callosum (CC) in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it remains unclear whether callosal atrophy is already present in the early stages of AD, and to what extent it may be associated with other structural changes in the brain, such as ......Several studies have found atrophy of the corpus callosum (CC) in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it remains unclear whether callosal atrophy is already present in the early stages of AD, and to what extent it may be associated with other structural changes in the brain...

  10. The Category Cued Recall test in very mild Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Asmus; Mortensen, E.L.; Gade, A.;

    2007-01-01

    Episodic memory tests that measure cued recall may be particularly effective in the diagnosis of early Alzheimer's disease (AD) because they examine both episodic and semantic memory functions. The Category Cued Recall (CCR) test provides superordinate semantic cues at encoding and retrieval......, and high discriminative validity has been claimed for this test. The aim of this study was to investigate the discriminative validity for this test when compared with the 10-word memory list from Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS-cog) that measures free recall. The clinical diagnosis of AD...

  11. Gene therapy in Alzheimer's disease - potential for disease modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Per; Iwata, Nobuhisa; Muramatsu, Shin-ichi; Tjernberg, Lars O; Winblad, Bengt; Saido, Takaomi C

    2010-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major cause of dementia in the elderly, leading to memory loss and cognitive decline. The mechanism underlying onset of the disease has not been fully elucidated. However, characteristic pathological manifestations include extracellular accumulation and aggregation of the amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) into plaques and intracellular accumulation and aggregation of hyperphosphorylated tau, forming neurofibrillary tangles. Despite extensive research worldwide, no disease modifying treatment is yet available. In this review, we focus on gene therapy as a potential treatment for AD, and summarize recent work in the field, ranging from proof-of-concept studies in animal models to clinical trials. The multifactorial causes of AD offer a variety of possible targets for gene therapy, including two neurotrophic growth factors, nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, Abeta-degrading enzymes, such as neprilysin, endothelin-converting enzyme and cathepsin B, and AD associated apolipoprotein E. This review also discusses advantages and drawbacks of various rapidly developing virus-mediated gene delivery techniques for gene therapy. Finally, approaches aiming at down-regulating amyloid precursor protein (APP) and beta-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 levels by means of siRNA-mediated knockdown are briefly summarized. Overall, the prospects appear hopeful that gene therapy has the potential to be a disease modifying treatment for AD.

  12. [Alzheimer's disease: a public health problem: yes, but a priority?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartigues, J F; Helmer, C; Dubois, B; Duyckaerts, C; Laurent, B; Pasquier, F; Touchon, J

    2002-03-01

    Alzheimer's Disease is a major Public Health problem for many reasons. First, it is a frequent disease since, in France, the prevalence was estimated at about 400.000 cases, and the annual incidence at 100.000 cases. The frequency of the disease increases, in particular due to the ageing of the population. This disease has major consequences on the life of the patient and his/her caretaker. The cost of the disease is important, estimated at about 50 milliards of French francs. Pharmaceutical treatment and other interventions are possible in particular to delay the nursing home placement. On the other hand, this disease is often ignored, under-diagnosed, underestimated and exposed to inequality in resorting to care. In summary, Alzheimer's Disease (AD) has all the criteria required for a major public health problem. In spite of this observation, AD is not yet considered as a priority for health authorities, although attitudes are changing.

  13. How close is the stem cell cure to the Alzheimer's disease Future and beyond?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Tang

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease, a progressive neurodegenerative illness, is the most common form of dementia. So far, there is neither an effective prevention nor a cure for Alzheimer's disease. In recent decades, stem cell therapy has been one of the most promising treatments for Alzheimer's disease patients. This article aims to summarize the current progress in the stem cell treatments for Alzheimer's disease from an experiment to a clinical research.

  14. [Awareness of deficits and anosognosia in Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, C; Antoine, P; Guermonprez, P; Frigard, B

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews studies concerning unawareness of deficits in Alzheimer's disease. Unawareness of the deficits associated with dementia has frequently been reported in clinical descriptions of the later stages of the disease. Consistent with the literature, we shall use the expressions impaired awareness, unawareness of deficits, anosognosia, and lack of insight interchangeably. Anosognosia can be defined as an impaired ability to recognize the presence or appreciate the severity of deficits in sensory, perceptual, motor, affective, or cognitive functioning. Unawareness has been operationally defined in a variety of ways. Unawareness can be measured as the discrepancy between the patient's self-report and the report of a natural caregiver or the clinical rating of a health care professional. The reports generally concern with several domains, most often memory domain. Discrepancy between subjective ratings and neuropsychological performance during clinical assessment has also been used to measure anosognosia. Advantages, limits and equivalence of these different methods are discussed. The impact of family burden has to be considered as a systematic methodological bias if the natural caregiver is implicated in the assessment. The psychometric properties of the clinical assessment have also to be discussed. The psychological nature of the discrepancy between patient's self-report and cognitive performances has to be analyzed and the necessity of ecological protocols, longitudinal assessment is discussed. The major results concerning prevalence, nature of anosognosia and the associated disorders are analyzed. In particular, the notion of heterogeneity of anosognosia and the correlates with depression, severity of dementia and executive dysfunction are developed. Prevalence is largely function of methodological choices and conceptual definition of anosognosia. Three major researches are compared and the contrast between their results (prevalence from 23% to 75% in

  15. Deformability of Erythrocytes and Oxidative Damage in Alzheimer Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukerrem Betul Yerer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: A lowered cerebral perfusion as a consequence of hemodynamic microcirculatory insufficiency is one of the factors underlying in Alzheimer's disease, which is a neurodegenerative disorder leading to progressive cognitive impairment. Erythrocyte deformability is one of the major factors affecting the microcirculatory hemodynamics which is closely related to the oxidative damage. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the erythrocyte deformability, nitric oxide levels and oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease. Methods: The blood samples of 30 elderly people in three groups consisting of healthy control and different severities of the disease (low and severe were used. Then the erythrocytes were isolated and the deformability of erythrocytes was determined by Rheodyne SSD evaluating the elongation indexes of the erythrocytes under different shear stress. The catalase, glutathione peroxidase and plasma nitric oxide levels were measured spectrophotometric ally. Results: The plasma nitric oxide levels, catalase activities were found significantly higher and glutathione peroxidase activity was significantly lower in severe Alzheimer's disease patients compared to the control group. However, the deformability of erythrocytes was not significantly affected from these alterations. Conclusion: the oxidant-antioxidant status is dramatically changed in Alzheimer's disease patients with the severity of the disease and similar alterations were seen in the nitric oxide levels without any significant change in erythrocyte deformability. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(2.000: 65-75

  16. A multidisciplinary approach to Alzheimer's disease: who should be members of the team?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkowski, C L

    1998-04-27

    The treatment goal for persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is to maintain the highest level of function possible and to minimize behavioral disturbances. Since multiple factors have an impact on function, a multidisciplinary approach to treatment and care is most effective. Whereas the primary-care physician can diagnose AD in most patients, data collection and routine examinations can be conducted by a nurse practitioner/clinical nurse specialist, and nonprofessional staff can often do mental status testing. Nutritionists, pharmacists, geropsychiatrists, home-healthcare case managers, elder-law attorneys, support services, and caregivers all fill important roles as members of the "AD team." With two AD drugs currently available and several impending new introductions, pharmacotherapy is becoming an increasingly more critical treatment option. PMID:9617847

  17. [Interest of a mental representation approach to the disclosure of Alzheimer's disease diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Antérion, Catherine; Saint-Péron, Laurie; Barrelon, Marie-Odile; Richard-Mornas, Aurélie

    2014-09-01

    This paper explores the mental representation of Alzheimer disease (AD) by assessing the number of words given by the subjects when asked to quickly write seven words characterizing AD in three groups of subjects: 22 caregivers, 22 professional informants, and 28 naïve subjects. The generated words were classified into six dimensions: memory, other neuropsychological impairments, behavioral disorders, consequences on caregiver relationships, familial and social changes, and health. AD mental representation was clearly negative in the three groups and did not differ between groups. Memory was the most frequent dimension reported in all groups with 78 quoted words (20.1% of responses). However the hierarchical classification of the dimensions differed in the three groups. The caregivers reported more words related to social and familial changes. Social and familial modifications, and behavioral changes were first reported by the professionals. The naïve subjects firstly quoted words concerning memory and others neuropsychological deficits. However, naïve subjects who had previously be in contact with AD patients mainly reported words about behavior changes. Actually, naïve subjects are not fully naïve because the clinical aspects of the disease are currently well known in the general population. Families and professional informants reported that AD familial and social changes had a deeper impact than cognitive or behavioral aspects. This preliminary study suggests that AD mental representation is the same in the general population, but the weight of the different dimensions affecting AD differed between subjects concerned or not by the disease (family or professional versus naïve subjects). Therefore, the weight of the different dimensions is to be taken into account for a better approach of the disclosure of AD diagnosis.

  18. [Interest of a mental representation approach to the disclosure of Alzheimer's disease diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Antérion, Catherine; Saint-Péron, Laurie; Barrelon, Marie-Odile; Richard-Mornas, Aurélie

    2014-09-01

    This paper explores the mental representation of Alzheimer disease (AD) by assessing the number of words given by the subjects when asked to quickly write seven words characterizing AD in three groups of subjects: 22 caregivers, 22 professional informants, and 28 naïve subjects. The generated words were classified into six dimensions: memory, other neuropsychological impairments, behavioral disorders, consequences on caregiver relationships, familial and social changes, and health. AD mental representation was clearly negative in the three groups and did not differ between groups. Memory was the most frequent dimension reported in all groups with 78 quoted words (20.1% of responses). However the hierarchical classification of the dimensions differed in the three groups. The caregivers reported more words related to social and familial changes. Social and familial modifications, and behavioral changes were first reported by the professionals. The naïve subjects firstly quoted words concerning memory and others neuropsychological deficits. However, naïve subjects who had previously be in contact with AD patients mainly reported words about behavior changes. Actually, naïve subjects are not fully naïve because the clinical aspects of the disease are currently well known in the general population. Families and professional informants reported that AD familial and social changes had a deeper impact than cognitive or behavioral aspects. This preliminary study suggests that AD mental representation is the same in the general population, but the weight of the different dimensions affecting AD differed between subjects concerned or not by the disease (family or professional versus naïve subjects). Therefore, the weight of the different dimensions is to be taken into account for a better approach of the disclosure of AD diagnosis. PMID:25245316

  19. Exploring Spirituality in Family Caregivers of Patients With Primary Malignant Brain Tumors Across the Disease Trajectory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberry, Alyssa G.; Jean Choi, Chien-Wen; Donovan, Heidi S.; Schulz, Richard; Bender, Catherine; Given, Barbara; Sherwood, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To determine whether the perceived level of spirituality in family caregivers of patients with primary malignant brain tumors (PMBTs) changes across the disease trajectory. Design Ongoing descriptive, longitudinal study. Setting Southwestern Pennsylvania. Sample 50 family caregivers of patients with PMBT. Methods Caregivers and care recipients were recruited at time of diagnosis. Participants were interviewed at two subse-quent time points, four and eight months following diagnosis. Main Research Variables Care recipients’ symptoms, neuro-psychologic status, and physical function, as well as caregiver social support. Findings Results showed no significant difference in spirituality scores reported at baseline and eight months (p = 0.8), suggesting that spirituality may be a stable trait across the disease trajectory. Conclusions Spirituality remains relatively stable along the course of the disease trajectory. Reports of caregiver depressive symptoms and anxiety were lower when paired with higher reports of spirituality. Implications for Nursing Clinicians can better identify caregivers at risk for negative outcomes by identifying those who report lower levels of spirituality. Future interventions should focus on the development and implementation of interventions that provide protective buffers such as increased social support. Knowledge Translation Spirituality is a relatively stable trait. High levels of spirituality can serve as a protective buffer from negative mental health outcomes. Caregivers with low levels of spirituality may be at risk for greater levels of burden, anxiety, and stress. PMID:23615145

  20. Generic and disease-specific measures of quality of life in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattacharya, Sumangala; Vogel, A.; Hansen, M.L.;

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the pattern of association of generic and disease-specific quality of life (QoL) scales with standard clinical outcome variables in Alzheimer's disease (AD)....

  1. Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease: hypersensitivity to X-rays in cultured cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fibroblast and/or lymphoblastoid lines from patients with several inherited primary neuronal degenerations are hypersensitive to DNA-damaging agents. Therefore, lymphoblastoid lines were irradiated from patients with sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The mean survival values of the eight Parkinson's disease and of the six Alzheimer's disease lines, but not of the five amyotrophic lateral sclerosis lines, were less than that of the 28 normal lines. Our results with Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease cells can be explained by a genetic defect arising as a somatic mutation during embryogenesis, causing defective repair of the X-ray type of DNA damage. Such a DNA repair defect could cause an abnormal accumulation of spontaneously occurring DNA damage in Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease neurons in vivo, resulting in their premature death. (author)

  2. Therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease based on the metal hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Ashley I; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2008-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia in the elderly, and it is characterized by elevated brain iron levels and accumulation of copper and zinc in cerebral beta-amyloid deposits (e.g., senile plaques). Both ionic zinc and copper are able to accelerate the aggregation of Abeta, the principle component of beta-amyloid deposits. Copper (and iron) can also promote the neurotoxic redox activity of Abeta and induce oxidative cross-linking of the peptide into stable oligomers. Recent reports have documented the release of Abeta together with ionic zinc and copper in cortical glutamatergic synapses after excitation. This, in turn, leads to the formation of Abeta oligomers, which, in turn, modulates long-term potentiation by controlling synaptic levels of the NMDA receptor. The excessive accumulation of Abeta oligomers in the synaptic cleft would then be predicted to adversely affect synaptic neurotransmission. Based on these findings, we have proposed the "Metal Hypothesis of Alzheimer's Disease," which stipulates that the neuropathogenic effects of Abeta in Alzheimer's disease are promoted by (and possibly even dependent on) Abeta-metal interactions. Increasingly sophisticated pharmaceutical approaches are now being implemented to attenuate abnormal Abeta-metal interactions without causing systemic disturbance of essential metals. Small molecules targeting Abeta-metal interactions (e.g., PBT2) are currently advancing through clinical trials and show increasing promise as disease-modifying agents for Alzheimer's disease based on the "metal hypothesis."

  3. Does the Shoe Fit? Ethical, Legal, and Policy Considerations of Global Positioning System Shoes for Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y Tony; Kels, Charles G

    2016-08-01

    As the overall incidence of Alzheimer's disease rises, the burden on caregivers and law enforcement institutions will increase to find individuals who wander. As such, technological innovations that could reduce this burden will become increasingly important. One such innovation is the GPS Shoe. As with any innovation involving the transfer of personal data to third parties, potential pitfalls with respect to loss of privacy and inadequate consent counterbalance the substantial promise of GPS shoes. To some extent, advance planning can mitigate these concerns, wherein individuals willingly elect to be monitored before their impairments progress to a stage that makes such authorization impractical. Nonetheless, tension may arise between the peace of mind of caregivers and family members and other important considerations at the intersection of autonomy, privacy, dignity, and consent. Ultimately, confronting ethical, legal, and policy considerations at the front end of product development and deployment will help ensure that new technologies are used wisely and that their lifesaving potential is realized. PMID:27394035

  4. Does the Shoe Fit? Ethical, Legal, and Policy Considerations of Global Positioning System Shoes for Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y Tony; Kels, Charles G

    2016-08-01

    As the overall incidence of Alzheimer's disease rises, the burden on caregivers and law enforcement institutions will increase to find individuals who wander. As such, technological innovations that could reduce this burden will become increasingly important. One such innovation is the GPS Shoe. As with any innovation involving the transfer of personal data to third parties, potential pitfalls with respect to loss of privacy and inadequate consent counterbalance the substantial promise of GPS shoes. To some extent, advance planning can mitigate these concerns, wherein individuals willingly elect to be monitored before their impairments progress to a stage that makes such authorization impractical. Nonetheless, tension may arise between the peace of mind of caregivers and family members and other important considerations at the intersection of autonomy, privacy, dignity, and consent. Ultimately, confronting ethical, legal, and policy considerations at the front end of product development and deployment will help ensure that new technologies are used wisely and that their lifesaving potential is realized.

  5. Generic and disease-specific measures of quality of life in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattacharya, Suvosree; Vogel, Asmus; Hansen, Marie-Louise H;

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the pattern of association of generic and disease-specific quality of life (QoL) scales with standard clinical outcome variables in Alzheimer's disease (AD).......The aim of the study was to investigate the pattern of association of generic and disease-specific quality of life (QoL) scales with standard clinical outcome variables in Alzheimer's disease (AD)....

  6. Emotional reactivity and awareness of task performance in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mograbi, Daniel C; Brown, Richard G; Salas, Christian; Morris, Robin G

    2012-07-01

    Lack of awareness about performance in tasks is a common feature of Alzheimer's disease. Nevertheless, clinical anecdotes have suggested that patients may show emotional or behavioural responses to the experience of failure despite reporting limited awareness, an aspect which has been little explored experimentally. The current study investigated emotional reactions to success or failure in tasks despite unawareness of performance in Alzheimer's disease. For this purpose, novel computerised tasks which expose participants to systematic success or failure were used in a group of Alzheimer's disease patients (n=23) and age-matched controls (n=21). Two experiments, the first with reaction time tasks and the second with memory tasks, were carried out, and in each experiment two parallel tasks were used, one in a success condition and one in a failure condition. Awareness of performance was measured comparing participant estimations of performance with actual performance. Emotional reactivity was assessed with a self-report questionnaire and rating of filmed facial expressions. In both experiments the results indicated that, relative to controls, Alzheimer's disease patients exhibited impaired awareness of performance, but comparable differential reactivity to failure relative to success tasks, both in terms of self-report and facial expressions. This suggests that affective valence of failure experience is processed despite unawareness of task performance, which might indicate implicit processing of information in neural pathways bypassing awareness. PMID:22609573

  7. The Effect of Alzheimer's Disease and Aging on Conceptual Combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taler, Vanessa; Chertkow, Howard; Saumier, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) subjects, healthy elderly, and young adults interpreted a series of novel noun-noun expressions composed of familiar object words. Subjects interpreted each item by selecting one of three possible definitions: a definition in which the referents of each noun were associated together in a particular context (e.g., rabbit…

  8. Rapid cognitive improvement in Alzheimer's disease following perispinal etanercept administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobinick Edward L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Substantial basic science and clinical evidence suggests that excess tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha is centrally involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. In addition to its pro-inflammatory functions, TNF-alpha has recently been recognized to be a gliotransmitter that regulates synaptic function in neural networks. TNF-alpha has also recently been shown to mediate the disruption in synaptic memory mechanisms, which is caused by beta-amyloid and beta-amyloid oligomers. The efficacy of etanercept, a biologic antagonist of TNF-alpha, delivered by perispinal administration, for treatment of Alzheimer's disease over a period of six months has been previously reported in a pilot study. This report details rapid cognitive improvement, beginning within minutes, using this same anti-TNF treatment modality, in a patient with late-onset Alzheimer's disease. Rapid cognitive improvement following perispinal etanercept may be related to amelioration of the effects of excess TNF-alpha on synaptic mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease and provides a promising area for additional investigation and therapeutic intervention.

  9. Retrograde amnesia for semantic information in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeter, M.; Kollen, A.; Scheltens, P.

    2005-01-01

    Patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease and normal controls were tested on a retrograde amnesia test with semantic content (Neologism and Vocabulary Test, or NVT), consisting of neologisms to be defined. Patients showed a decrement as compared to normal controls, pointing to retrograde am

  10. Are Alzheimer's disease, hypertension, and cerebrocapillary damage related?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farkas, E; De Vos, RAI; Steur, ENHJ; Luiten, PGM

    2000-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients are often subject to vascular dysfunction besides their specific CNS pathology, which warrants further examination of the interaction between vascular factors and the development of dementia. The association of decreased cerebral blood flow (CBF) or hypertension wit

  11. Close encounter: mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    De Strooper, Bart; Scorrano, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis is linked to loss of presenilins, components of γ-secretase. Presenilins are located at MAM, a membrane domain at the interface of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Presenilin loss alters ER–mitochondrial communication, linking it to AD pathogenesis.

  12. Neural activities during affective processing in people with Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Tatia M. C.; Sun, Delin; Leung, Mei-Kei; Chu, Leung-Wing; Keysers, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This study examined brain activities in people with Alzheimer's disease when viewing happy, sad, and fearful facial expressions of others. A functional magnetic resonance imaging and a voxel-based morphometry methodology together with a passive viewing of emotional faces paradigm were employed to co

  13. Effects of music on autobiographical verbal narration in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Haj, M.; Clement, S.; Fasotti, L.; Allain, P.

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence suggesting a beneficial effect of music exposure on autobiographical memory in patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Our paper was aimed at revealing the linguistic characteristics of these music-evoked autobiographical narrations. Eighteen AD patients and 18 he

  14. Roles of sigma-1 receptors in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jia-Li; Fang, Min; Zhao, Yan-Xin; Liu, Xue-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder and the leading cause of senile dementia all over the world. Still no existing drugs can effectively reverse the cognitive impairment. However, Sigma-1 (σ-1) receptors have been long implicated in multiple neurological and psychiatric conditions over these years. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of σ-1 receptor functions. Through regulation of lipid rafts, secretases, kinases, neuroceptors and ion channels, σ-1 receptors can influence cellular signal transduction, TCA cycle, oxidative stress, neuron plasticity and neurotransmitter release etc. Based on this, we suggest the key cellular mechanisms linking σ-1 receptor to Alzheimer's disease. Besides, we detail the evidences showing that σ-1 receptors agonists, being the promising compounds for treatment of cognitive dysfunction, exhibit robust neuroprotection and anti-amnesia effect against Aβ neurotoxicity in the progress of Alzheimer's disease. The evidence comes from animal models, preclinical studies in humans and full clinical trials. In addition, the questions to be solved regarding this receptor are also presented. When concerned with NMDAR, σ-1 receptor activation may result in two totally different influences on AD. Utilization of σ-1 agents early in AD remains an overlooked therapeutic opportunity. This article may pave the way for further studies about sigma-1 receptor on Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26131055

  15. Neuropeptides in Alzheimer's Disease : From Pathophysiological Mechanisms to Therapeutic Opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dam, Debby; Van Dijck, Annemie; Janssen, Leen; De Deyn, Peter Paul

    2013-01-01

    Neuropeptides are found throughout the entire nervous system where they can act as neurotransmitter, neuromodulator or neurohormone. In those functions, they play important roles in the regulation of cognition and behavior. In brain disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD), where abnormal cognition a

  16. Semantic memory impairment in the earliest phases of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Asmus; Gade, Anders; Stokholm, Jette;

    2005-01-01

    The presence and the nature of semantic memory dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been widely debated. This study aimed to determine the frequency of impaired semantic test performances in mild AD and to study whether incipient semantic impairments could be identified in predementia AD....

  17. The impact of Alzheimer's disease on the chinese economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keogh-Brown, Marcus R; Jensen, Henning Tarp; Arrighi, H Michael;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent increases in life expectancy may greatly expand future Alzheimer's Disease (AD) burdens. China's demographic profile, aging workforce and predicted increasing burden of AD-related care make its economy vulnerable to AD impacts. Previous economic estimates of AD predominantly...

  18. Music Enhances Autobiographical Memory in Mild Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Haj, Mohamad; Postal, Virginie; Allain, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Studies have shown that the "Four Seasons" music may enhance the autobiographical performance of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. We used a repeated measures design in which autobiographical recall of 12 mild AD patients was assessed using a free narrative method under three conditions: (a) in "Silence," (b) after being exposed to the opus "Four…

  19. Semantic memory impairment in the earliest phases of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Asmus; Gade, Anders; Stokholm, Jette;

    2005-01-01

    The presence and the nature of semantic memory dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been widely debated. This study aimed to determine the frequency of impaired semantic test performances in mild AD and to study whether incipient semantic impairments could be identified in predementia AD...

  20. Awareness of deficits in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Asmus; Stokholm, Jette; Gade, Anders;

    2004-01-01

    In this study we investigated impaired awareness of cognitive deficits in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Very few studies have addressed this topic, and methodological inconsistencies make the comparison of previous studies difficult. From a prospective...

  1. Altered subcellular localization of ornithine decarboxylase in Alzheimer's disease brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Tatjana; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Volkman, Inga;

    2006-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein can through ligand-mimicking induce expression of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis. We report here the regional distribution and cellular localization of ODC immunoreactivity in Alzheimer's disease (AD...

  2. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in the Pathophysiology of Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Andreasen, Jesper Tobias; Arvaniti, Maria;

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have been pursued for decades as potential molecular targets to treat cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD) due to their positioning within regions of the brain critical in learning and memory, such as the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus...

  3. Voice Onset Time Production in Speakers with Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Julie; Ryalls, Jack; Brice, Alejandro; Whiteside, Janet

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, voice onset time (VOT) measurements were compared between a group of individuals with moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD) and a group of healthy age- and gender-matched peers. Participants read a list of consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words, which included the six stop consonants. The VOT measurements were made from…

  4. Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Mild to Moderate Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen-Dahm, Christina; Waldemar, Gunhild; Staehelin Jensen, Troels;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autonomic function has received little attention in Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD pathology has an impact on brain regions which are important for central autonomic control, but it is unclear if AD is associated with disturbance of autonomic function. OBJECTIVE: To investigate autonomic...

  5. Semantic Priming for Coordinate Distant Concepts in Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, R.; Zannino, G. D.; Caltagirone, C.; Carlesimo, G. A.

    2011-01-01

    Semantic priming paradigms have been used to investigate semantic knowledge in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). While priming effects produced by prime-target pairs with associative relatedness reflect processes at both lexical and semantic levels, priming effects produced by words that are semantically related but not associated should…

  6. Biological metals and Alzheimer's disease: implications for therapeutics and diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duce, James A; Bush, Ashley I

    2010-09-01

    The equilibrium of metal ions is critical for many physiological functions, particularly in the central nervous system, where metals are essential for development and maintenance of enzymatic activities, mitochondrial function, myelination, neurotransmission as well as learning and memory. Due to their importance, cells have evolved complex machinery for controlling metal-ion homeostasis. However, disruption of these mechanisms, or absorption of detrimental metals with no known biological function, alter the ionic balance and can result in a disease state, including several neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Understanding the complex structural and functional interactions of metal ions with the various intracellular and extracellular components of the central nervous system, under normal conditions and during neurodegeneration, is essential for the development of effective therapies. Accordingly, assisting the balance of metal ions back to homeostatic levels has been proposed as a disease-modifying therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer's disease as well as other neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Pharmacological strategies for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doraiswamy, P Murali; Xiong, Glen L

    2006-01-01

    This review examines key pharmacological strategies that have been clinically studied for the primary or secondary prevention of Alzheimer's disease. Much information (neuropsychological, genetic and imaging) is already available to characterise an individual's risk for developing Alzheimer's disease. However, regulatory pathways for obtaining a prevention indication are less well charted, and such trials tend to involve 3- to 7-year studies of 1000 - 5000 individuals, depending on baseline status. Treatments developed for prevention will also need to have superior safety. For these reasons, > 100 proprietary pharmacological products are currently being developed for an Alzheimer's disease treatment, but only a few are being studied for prevention. Randomised trial data are available for antihypertensive agents (calcium channel blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors), pravastatin, simvastatin, conjugated oestrogen, raloxifene, rofecoxib, CX516 (AMPA agonist) and cholinesterase inhibitors regarding efficacy for Alzheimer's disease prevention. At least four large prevention trials of conjugated oestrogen, selenium and vitamin E, Ginkgo biloba and statins are currently underway. Strategies using other agents have not yet been evaluated in Alzheimer's disease prevention clinical trials. These include anti-amyloid antibodies, active immunisation, selective secretase inhibitors and modulators, microtubule stabilisers (e.g., paclitaxel), R-flurbiprofen, xaliproden, ONO-2506, FK962 (somatostatin releaser), SGS 742 (GABA(B) antagonist), TCH 346 (apoptosis inhibitor), Alzhemedtrade mark, phophodiesterase inhibitors, rosiglitazone, leuprolide, interferons, metal-protein attenuating compounds (e.g., PBT2), CX717, rasagaline, huperzine A, antioxidants and memantine. Studies combining lifestyle modification and drug therapy have not been conducted. Full validation of surrogate markers for disease progression (such as amyloid imaging) should further facilitate drug

  8. Alzheimer's Project

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... disease has on those with Alzheimer's and their families. September 14, 2009 "The Alzheimer's Project" wins two ... way Americans thinks about Alzheimer's disease. Tell your family and friends. Post info on your Web site . ...

  9. Alzheimer's Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caused by another type of dementia . Myth 2: Alzheimer’s disease is not fatal. Reality: Alzheimer's disease has ... home. Myth 3: Only older people can get Alzheimer's Reality: Alzheimer's can strike people in their 30s, ...

  10. [Development of Disease-modifying Therapy for Alzheimer's Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2016-04-01

    The development of disease-modifying therapy (DMT) that can arrest the pathological processes of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has emerged as one of the highest priorities of medical research. Two pathological hallmarks, amyloid-beta (Abeta) protein deposition and tau accumulation, are the major targets of DMT. Immunotherapy for Abeta removal and secretase inhibitors/modulators that reduce total or accumulation-prone Abeta are candidate DMTs against Abeta. Compounds that prevent tau aggregation are also under development. Clinical trials that test the efficacy of these DMT candidates are in preparation or ongoing. Recent studies of biomarkers of AD brain lesions have indicated that Abeta and tau accumulation appears 10 to 30 years before the occurrence of dementia and gradually propagate to reach the level that causes symptoms. Therefore, efficacy of DMT has to be evaluated in the preclinical stage of AD. The incidence of preclinical AD in the cognitively normal, aged population are estimated to be around 19%. Thus, currently available biomarkers, amyloid/tau PET imaging and cerebrospinal fluid measurements of Abeta and tau, are, perhaps, too invasive and costly. An international collaborative effort is needed to overcome this issue. PMID:27056864

  11. Caregiving Hassles Scale: Assessing the Daily Hassles of Caring for a Family Member with Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Jennifer M.; Stephens, Mary Ann Parris

    1989-01-01

    Primary caregivers to Alzheimer disease patients (N=60) twice completed Caregiving Hassles Scale and reported on their well-being. Scale provided reliable and psychometrically sound instrument for assessing hassles associated with assistance in basic and instrumental activities of daily living, care-recipient cognitive status and behavior, and…

  12. Prion Disease Induces Alzheimer Disease-Like Neuropathologic Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tousseyn, Thomas; Bajsarowicz, Krystyna; Sánchez, Henry; Gheyara, Ania; Oehler, Abby; Geschwind, Michael; DeArmond, Bernadette; DeArmond, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the brains of 266 patients with prion diseases (PrionD) and found that 46 (17%) had Alzheimer disease (AD)-like changes. To explore potential mechanistic links between PrionD and AD, we exposed human brain aggregates (Hu BrnAggs) to brain homogenate from a patient with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and found that the neurons in the Hu BrnAggs produced many β-amyloid (β42) inclusions, whereas uninfected, control-exposed Hu BrnAggs did not. Western blots of 20-pooled CJD-infected BrnAggs verified higher Aβ42 levels than controls. We next examined the CA1 region of the hippocampus from 14 patients with PrionD and found that 5 patients had low levels of scrapie-associated prion protein (PrPSc), many Aβ42 intraneuronal inclusions, low APOE-4, and no significant nerve cell loss. Seven patients had high levels of PrPSc, low Aβ42, high APOE-4 and 40% nerve cell loss, suggesting that APOE-4 and PrPSc together cause neuron loss in PrionD. There were also increased levels of hyperphosphorylated tau protein (Hτ) and Hτ-positive neuropil threads and neuron bodies in both PrionD and AD groups. The brains of 6 age-matched control patients without dementia did not contain Aβ42 deposits; however, there were rare Hτ-positive threads in 5 controls and 2 controls had a few Hτ-positive nerve cell bodies. We conclude that PrionD may trigger biochemical changes similar to AD and suggest that PrionD are diseases of PrPSc, Aβ42, APOE-4 and abnormal tau. PMID:26226132

  13. Translocator protein (TSPO) role in aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repalli, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Cellular damage and deregulated apoptotic cell death lead to functional impairment, and a main consequence of these events is aging. Cellular damage is initiated by different stress/risk factors such as oxidative stress, inflammation, and heavy metals. These stress/risk factors affect the cellular homeostasis by altering methylation status of several aging and Alzheimer's disease associated genes; these effects can be manifested immediately after exposure to stress and at later stages of life. However, when cellular damage exceeds certain threshold levels apoptosis is initiated. This review discusses the stress factors involved in cellular damage and the role and potential of TSPO-mediated cell death in aging as well as in Alzheimer's disease, which is also characterized by extensive cell death. Mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic death through the release of cytochrome c is regulated by TSPO, and increased expression of this protein is observed in both elderly people and in patients with Alzheimer's disease. TSPO forms and mediates opening of the mitochondrial membrane pore, mPTP and oxidizes cardiolipin, and these events lead to the leakage of apoptotic death mediators, such as cytochrome c, resulting in cell death. However, TSPO has many proposed functions and can also increase steroid synthesis, which leads to inhibition of inflammation and inhibition of the release of apoptotic factors, thereby decreasing cell damage and promoting cell survival. Thus, TSPO mediates apoptosis and decreases the cell damage, which in turn dictates the process of aging as well as the functionality of organs such as the brain. TSPO modulation with ligands in the Alzheimer's disease mouse model showed improvement in behavioral symptoms, and studies in Drosophila species showed increased cell survival and prolonged lifespan in flies after TSPO inhibition. These data suggest that since effects/signs of stress can manifest at any time, prevention through change in lifestyle and TSPO

  14. Systematic review of atorvastatin for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Sun; Genfa Wang; Zhihong Pan; Shuyan Chen

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the clinical efficacy and safety of atorvastatin in the treatment of Alz-heimer's disease.DATA SOURCES: Medline (1948/2011-04), Embase (1966/2011-04), Cochrane Library (Issue 3, 2011), Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (1989/2011-04), and the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (1979/2011-04) were searched for randomized clinical trials regardless of lan-guage. Abstracts of conference papers were manually searched. Furthermore, Current Controlled Trials (http://controlled-trials.com), Clinical Trials.gov (http://clinicaltrials.gov), and Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (http://www.chictr.org) were also searched.Key words included Alzheimer disease, dementia, cognition, affection, memory dysfunction, hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors, atorvastatin and statins.DATA SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials of grade A or B according to quality evaluation criteria of the Cochrane Collaboration were selected, in which atorvastatin and placebo were used to evaluate the effects of atorvastatin in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Study methodological quality was evaluated based on criteria described in Cochrane Reviewer's Handbook 5.0.1. Revman 5.1 software was used for data analysis.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Clinical efficacy, safety, withdrawal from the studies, and withdrawal due to adverse effects.CONCLUSION: There is insufficient evidence to recommend atorvastatin for the treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease, because there was no benefit on general function, cognitive function or mental/behavior abnormality outcome measures. Efficacy and safety need to be confirmed by larger and higher quality randomized controlled trials, especially for moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease, because results of this systematic review may be limited by selection bias, implementation bias, as well as measurement bias.

  15. Neuroprotective Effect against Alzheimer's Disease of Porcine Brain Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wipawee Thukham-Mee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Despite the increasing importance of Alzheimer’s disease, no effective therapeutic strategy is available. Therefore, neuroprotective strategy is still required. Recent findings show that numerous substances possessing antioxidant can improve neurodegeneration and memory impairment. Based on the antioxidant effect and its reputation to serve as brain tonic in traditional folklore, we hypothesized that porcine brain extract could mitigate neurodegeneration and memory impairment. Therefore, this study was set up to determine the effect of porcine brain extract on memory impairment and neurodegeneration in animal models of Alzheimer’s disease. Approach: Male Wistar rats (180-220 g had been orally given porcine brain extract at doses of 0.5 and 2.5 mg kg-1 BW for a period of 4 weeks before and 1 week after the induction of cognitive deficit condition as those found in early phase of Alzheimer’s disease via the intraventricular injection of AF64A, a cholinotoxin. Rats were assessed the spatial memory using Morris water maze test. Then, they were determined neuron density in hippocampus using histological techniques. Moreover, the assessment of acetylcholinesterase (AChE activity and malondialdehyde (MDA level in hippocampus were also performed. Results: It was found that both doses of porcine brain extract could enhance memory, neuron and cholinergic neuron density in all subregions of hippocampus. In addition, the decreased AChE and MDA were also observed. Therefore, our results suggested that the possible underlying mechanism of the extract might occur partly via the decrease in oxidative stress marker, MDA and AChE. Conclusion: This study clearly demonstrates that porcine brain extract can protect against memory impairment and neurodegeneration in animal model of Alzheimer’s disease. Therefore, it should be serve as the potential food supplement or adjuvant therapy against Alzheimer’s disease and other age-related cognitive

  16. A novel neurotrophic drug for cognitive enhancement and Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Chen

    Full Text Available Currently, the major drug discovery paradigm for neurodegenerative diseases is based upon high affinity ligands for single disease-specific targets. For Alzheimer's disease (AD, the focus is the amyloid beta peptide (Aß that mediates familial Alzheimer's disease pathology. However, given that age is the greatest risk factor for AD, we explored an alternative drug discovery scheme that is based upon efficacy in multiple cell culture models of age-associated pathologies rather than exclusively amyloid metabolism. Using this approach, we identified an exceptionally potent, orally active, neurotrophic molecule that facilitates memory in normal rodents, and prevents the loss of synaptic proteins and cognitive decline in a transgenic AD mouse model.

  17. Mortality from Alzheimer's Disease in the United States: Data for 2000 and 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... System . Multiple cause-of-death files. Alzheimer's Association. Alzheimer's disease facts and figures, Alzheimer's & dementia [PDF - 1.2 MB] Vol 8, Issue 2. 2012. Hoyert DL, Xu JQ. Deaths: Preliminary data for 2011 [PDF - 891 KB] . ... Disease Education and Referral Center National Institute on Aging. ...

  18. Understanding suffering: Utermohlen's self-portraits and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Elizabeth M

    2013-01-01

    Human suffering is a universal experience simply defined as, or associated with, physical or psychological pain and distress. Faculty seeks ways to help its students understand and ease their patients' suffering. The author uses Alzheimer's disease as an exemplar of suffering and describes a creative teaching strategy using 9 self-portraits that chronicle American-born artist William Utermohlen's deterioration from the disease. PMID:23222627

  19. Revisiting rodent models: Octodon degus as Alzheimer's disease model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Johannes; Krohn, Markus; Paarmann, Kristin; Schwitlick, Christina; Brüning, Thomas; Marreiros, Rita; Müller-Schiffmann, Andreas; Korth, Carsten; Braun, Katharina; Pahnke, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease primarily occurs as sporadic disease and is accompanied with vast socio-economic problems. The mandatory basic research relies on robust and reliable disease models to overcome increasing incidence and emerging social challenges. Rodent models are most efficient, versatile, and predominantly used in research. However, only highly artificial and mostly genetically modified models are available. As these 'engineered' models reproduce only isolated features, researchers demand more suitable models of sporadic neurodegenerative diseases. One very promising animal model was the South American rodent Octodon degus, which was repeatedly described as natural 'sporadic Alzheimer's disease model' with 'Alzheimer's disease-like neuropathology'. To unveil advantages over the 'artificial' mouse models, we re-evaluated the age-dependent, neurohistological changes in young and aged Octodon degus (1 to 5-years-old) bred in a wild-type colony in Germany. In our hands, extensive neuropathological analyses of young and aged animals revealed normal age-related cortical changes without obvious signs for extensive degeneration as seen in patients with dementia. Neither significant neuronal loss nor enhanced microglial activation were observed in aged animals. Silver impregnation methods, conventional, and immunohistological stains as well as biochemical fractionations revealed neither amyloid accumulation nor tangle formation. Phosphoepitope-specific antibodies against tau species displayed similar intraneuronal reactivity in both, young and aged Octodon degus.In contrast to previous results, our study suggests that Octodon degus born and bred in captivity do not inevitably develop cortical amyloidosis, tangle formation or neuronal loss as seen in Alzheimer's disease patients or transgenic disease models. PMID:27566602

  20. A Survey of TCM Treatment for Alzheimer's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a disorder in the aged people, characterized by irreversible and progressive degeneration of the intelligence, memory, ability of orientation, judgment, speech and thinking. It is often accompanied with character changes. Statistical data show that 5%-15% of the old people suffer from mild to severe symptoms of dementia, which becomes a burden to their families and the society. The following is a survey of TCM treatment for the disease.

  1. Vitamin D and the risk of dementia and Alzheimer disease

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas J Littlejohns; Henley, William E.; Lang, Iain A.; Annweiler, Cedric; Beauchet, Olivier; Chaves, Paulo H. M.; Fried, Linda; Kestenbaum, Bryan R.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Langa, Kenneth M.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Kos, Katarina; Soni, Maya; Llewellyn, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether low vitamin D concentrations are associated with an increased risk of incident all-cause dementia and Alzheimer disease. Methods: One thousand six hundred fifty-eight elderly ambulatory adults free from dementia, cardiovascular disease, and stroke who participated in the US population–based Cardiovascular Health Study between 1992–1993 and 1999 were included. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass...

  2. Chronic mild cerebrovascular dysfunction as a cause for Alzheimer's disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Humpel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive chronic disorder and is characterized by β-amyloid plaques and angiopathy, tau pathology, neuronal cell death, and inflammatory responses. The reasons for this disease are not known. This review proposes the hypothesis that a chronic mild longlasting cerebrovascular dysfunction could initiate a cascade of events leading to AD. It is suggested that (vascular) risk factors (e.g. hypercholesterolemia, type 2 diabetes, hyperhomocysteinemia) causes either ...

  3. Research progress on animal models of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen DONG

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a degenerative disease of the central nervous system, and its pathogenesis is complex. Animal models play an important role in study on pathogenesis and treatment of AD. This paper summarized methods of building models, observation on animal models and evaluation index in recent years, so as to provide related evidence for basic and clinical research in future. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.08.003

  4. Research progress on animal models of Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Wen; Wang, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a degenerative disease of the central nervous system, and its pathogenesis is complex. Animal models play an important role in study on pathogenesis and treatment of AD. This paper summarized methods of building models, observation on animal models and evaluation index in recent years, so as to provide related evidence for basic and clinical research in future. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.08.003

  5. Friend or foe? Targeting microglia in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhib-Jalbut, Suhayl

    2016-10-01

    Inflammation is believed to be a component of a number of degenerative brain diseases including Alzheimer's disease. A recent article by Fu and colleagues (2016) demonstrated that the cytokine IL-33 can modulate microglia in an animal model of AD to become better scavengers of beta-amyloid and less pro-inflammatory. The findings have potential therapeutic implications for a number of brain conditions. PMID:27442003

  6. Vascular and Alzheimer's disease markers independently predict brain atrophy rate in Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Josephine; Carmichael, Owen T; Leung, Kelvin K; Schwarz, Christopher; Ridgway, Gerard R; Bartlett, Jonathan W; Malone, Ian B; Schott, Jonathan M; Rossor, Martin N; Biessels, Geert Jan; DeCarli, Charlie; Fox, Nick C

    2013-08-01

    This study assessed relationships among white matter hyperintensities (WMH), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology markers, and brain volume loss. Subjects included 197 controls, 331 individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 146 individuals with AD with serial volumetric 1.5-T MRI. CSF Aβ1-42 (n = 351) and tau (n = 346) were measured. Brain volume change was quantified using the boundary shift integral (BSI). We assessed the association between baseline WMH volume and annualized BSI, adjusting for intracranial volume. We also performed multiple regression analyses in the CSF subset, assessing the relationships of WMH and Aβ1-42 and/or tau with BSI. WMH burden was positively associated with BSI in controls (p = 0.02) but not MCI or AD. In multivariable models, WMH (p = 0.003) and Aβ1-42 (p = 0.001) were independently associated with BSI in controls; in MCI Aβ1-42 (p brain atrophy in the context of AD pathology in pre-dementia stages.

  7. The Danish Alzheimer Intervention Study: Rationale, Study Design and Baseline Characteristics of the Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldemar, G.; Waldorff, F.B.; Buss, D.V.;

    2011-01-01

    There is a lack of appropriately designed trials investigating the efficacy of psychosocial interventions for patients with mild dementia and their family caregivers. This paper reports the rationale and design of the Danish Alzheimer Disease Intervention Study and baseline characteristics...

  8. Religiosity as a mediator of caregiver well-being: does ethnicity make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morano, Carmen L; King, Denise

    2005-01-01

    This study used an adaptation of the stress and appraisal model to examine the mediating effects of religiosity on caregiving strain and gain with an ethnically diverse sample of 384 Alzheimer's disease caregivers. While the regression analysis indicated that religiosity did not mediate the stress of providing care for the entire sample, there were significant differences in the use of religiosity depending on the ethnicity (African American, Hispanic, and White non-Hispanic) of the caregiver, as well as significant differences between the three cohorts in the levels of caregiving strain (depression) and gain (self-acceptance). Implications for the use of religiosity as a protective factor for AD caregivers are discussed.

  9. Impaired awareness of deficits and neuropsychiatric symptoms in early Alzheimer's disease: the Danish Alzheimer Intervention Study (DAISY)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Asmus; Waldorff, Frans Boch; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2010-01-01

    Impaired awareness may be associated with increased neuropsychiatric symptoms in moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease, but relatively little is known about the association in early Alzheimer's disease. The aim of this study was to investigate if impaired awareness was associated with a higher...... frequency of neuropsychiatric symptoms in early Alzheimer's disease. In a Danish multicenter study, 321 patients with MMSE score > or =20 were evaluated. Patients with poor insight had significantly more neuropsychiatric symptoms than patients with full insight. When patients had increasing neuropsychiatric...

  10. Burnout in a sample of Alzheimer’s disease caregivers in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annibal Truzzi

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Caregiver burden has been associated to both caregiver and patient factors, but little is known about their relationship to burnout. We aimed at investigating burnout correlations to the sociodemographic and clinical variables of a sample of caregivers of Alzheimer’s disease (AD outpatients. Methods: AD patients (n=69 and their caregivers completed a sociodemographic questionnaire, Maslach Burnout Inventory, Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories. Patients were administered the Mini Mental State Examination, the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, Clinical Dementia Rating and the Functional Activities Questionnaire. Burnout and each dimension (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment were correlated to caregivers’ sociodemographic characteristics, burden of care, anxious and depressive symptoms as well as to the patients’ behavioral, functional and cognitive profile. Results: Burden of care was the only variable that associated to caregiver burnout. Emotional exhaustion was the most prevalent dimension and associated to all caregivers’ and patients’ clinical variables. Conclusions: Caregiver burden associated to burnout, and emotional exhaustion is the dimension mostly associated to dementia severity and psychiatric morbidity in caregivers.

  11. Impact of disease, cognitive and behavioural factors on caregiver outcome in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watermeyer, Tamlyn J; Brown, Richard G; Sidle, Katie C L; Oliver, David J; Allen, Christopher; Karlsson, Joanna; Ellis, Cathy; Shaw, Christopher E; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Goldstein, Laura H

    2015-01-01

    Up to 50% of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) show mild to moderate cognitive-behavioural change alongside their progressive functional impairment. This study examines the relative impact of patients' disease symptoms, behavioural change and current executive function and social cognition abilities on psychosocial outcomes in spouse caregivers of people with ALS. Thirty-five spouse caregivers rated their own levels of depression and anxiety, subjective burden and marital satisfaction. Caregivers also rated their partner's everyday behaviour. The patients were assessed for disease severity and cognitive function, with composite scores derived for executive function and social cognition. Regression analyses revealed that caregiver burden was predicted by the severity of patients' limb involvement and behavioural problems. Depression was predicted by patients' limb involvement, while behavioural problems and patient age predicted caregiver anxiety. Current marital satisfaction was predicted by patient behavioural problems beyond the level of pre-illness marital satisfaction. In conclusion, the study highlights the potential impact of ALS patients' functional impairment and behavioural change on ALS caregivers' psychosocial functioning. Clinical communication with ALS families should emphasise both physical and psychological challenges presented by the disease. PMID:26199108

  12. The impact of the nocturnal disabilities of Parkinson's disease on caregivers' burden: implications for interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viwattanakulvanid, Pramon; Kaewwilai, Lalita; Jitkritsadakul, Onanong; Brenden, Neil R; Setthawatcharawanich, Suwanna; Boonrod, Nonglak; Mekawichai, Pawut; Bhidayasiri, Roongroj

    2014-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) imposes a burden on those who care for the person afflicted. The objective of this study was to assess and analyze the main determinants of caregivers' burden, especially the nocturnal manifestations of PD. This multi-center, national, cross-sectional study included 89 patient-caregiver pairs. Caregiver self-assessments were performed with Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview (ZCBI). Patient self-assessments were performed with Modified Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale (MPDSS), Nocturnal Akinesia Dystonia and Cramp Score (NADCS), HADS and Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire (PDQ-8). Most of the caregivers were employed women, and the majority had been permanently taking care of the patient for 6.8 ± 5.4 years. The study found that the ZCBI mean score of the caregivers significantly worsened as patients became more dependent (HY: 4-5, p = 0.036), and the mean ZCBI score of spousal caregivers (19.4; SD 15.5) was significantly higher than that of the offspring group (11.7; SD 7.9) (p = 0.008). Disease duration (r = 0.22), NADCS (r = 0.38), MPDSS (r = -0.36), PDQ-8 SI (r = 0.39) and HADS (total, anxiety and depression) scores (r = 0.46-0.49), and HADS (total, anxiety and depression scores (r = 0.37-0.52), had significant negative effect on caregivers' burden. Moderate association was found on MPDSS item 14 (r = 0.38) and NADCS akinesia score (r = 0.37). Patients' anxiety, nocturnal akinesia and the feeling of tiredness and sleepiness upon awakening in the morning were independent predictors of caregivers' burden (adjusted R2 = 0.46). Based on these findings, treatment of early mood symptoms of the patients and caregivers at risk may be helpful for the effective management of PD and it is also important to have well-designed psycho-educational and multicomponent interventions in the community for caregivers of persons with PD. PMID:24682360

  13. [Behavioral and psychologic symptoms in Alzheimer's disease: results of the REAL.FR study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, M; Staccini, P; Brocker, P; Benhamidat, T; Bertogliati, C; Lechowski, L; Tortrat, D; Robert, P H

    2003-10-01

    Behavioral and Psychological Signs and Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD) are important manifestations of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and other forms of dementia, because they are associate with care-giver distress, increase the likelihood of institutionalization, and may be associated with more rapid cognitive decline In this study (REAL.FR for Réseau sur la maladie d'Alzheimer Français) we prospectively used the Neuropsychiatric Inventory NPI to examine BPSD. 255 AD patients with a Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score between 11 and 20 and 244 AD patients with a MMSE between 21 and 30 were examined. Factor analysis was carried out leading to three different syndromes according to the level of cognitive impairment. BPSD were detected in 92.5% of the patients with a MMSE between 11 and 20, and in 84% of the patients with a MMSE between 21 and 30. Apathy was the most common abnormality, followed by anxiety and dysphoria. These results in a French cohort of patients with AD underline the importance of the evaluation and finally of the treatment of BPSD.

  14. Interventions for Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Neurocognitive Impairment Due to Alzheimer's Disease: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClam, Tamela D; Marano, Christopher M; Rosenberg, Paul B; Lyketsos, Constantine G

    2015-01-01

    Neurocognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease (previously termed Alzheimer's dementia) (AD) is the most common form of cognitive impairment worldwide. Given the anticipated increase in the population aged 65 and over, the prevalence of persons with AD is expected to increase exponentially during the next 30 years. Noncognitive neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) commonly occur in AD and are associated with adverse outcomes for patients and their caregivers. This review summarizes randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) published between 2004 and 2014 with a primary outcome measure of change in symptom severity for NPS in AD. Of the 388 articles initially identified through a literature search, 33 trials met inclusion criteria. Fifteen of these studies had agitation/aggression as a targeted symptom. Twenty-eight evaluated pharmacologic treatments, including psychotropics, cognitive enhancers, stimulants, and nutraceuticals. Nonpharmacologic interventions included bright light, music, exercise, and cognitive-stimulation therapies. Among the pharmacologic interventions, modest efficacy was reported with aripiprazole, citalopram, trazodone, methylphenidate, and scheduled analgesics. Significant reduction in symptom severity was reported with nearly all the nonpharmacologic interventions. Variations in methodology such as inclusion criteria, study setting, and outcome measures limit the generalizability of these results. Barriers to the implementation of nonpharmacologic interventions in clinical settings include resource and training limitations. Electroconvulsive therapy and dronabinol are promising as emerging treatment strategies. Randomized clinical trials are needed in order to validate the utility of electroconvulsive therapy and dronabinol, including where and with whom these interventions will prove most valuable. PMID:26332220

  15. Fluorescence tomography in a murine model of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Scott B.; Kumar, Anand T. N.; Dunn, Andrew K.; Boas, David A.; Bacskai, Brian J.

    2007-02-01

    Noninvasive molecular imaging of amyloid plaques in murine Alzheimer's disease models would accelerate drug development and basic Alzheimer's research. Amyloid plaques differ from traditional fluorescent targets in size and spatial distribution and therefore present a unique challenge for biomarker development and tomography. To study imaging feasibility and establish biomarker criteria, we developed a digital mouse head model from a 100 μm-resolution, digital, segmented mouse atlas1. The cortical region of the brain was filled with a spatially uniform distribution of plaques that had different fluorescent properties from the surrounding brain tissue, similar to current transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Fluorescence was simulated with a Monte Carlo algorithm using different plaque densities, detection geometries, and background fluorescence. Our preliminary results demonstrated that shielding effects might require nonlinear reconstruction algorithms and that background fluorescence would seriously hinder quantitative burden estimation. The Monte Carlo based approach presented here offers a powerful way to study the feasibility of non-invasive imaging in murine Alzheimer's models and to optimize experimental conditions.

  16. A family living with Alzheimer's disease: The communicative challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Danielle

    2015-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease irrevocably challenges a person's capacity to communicate with others. Earlier research on these challenges focused on the language disorders associated with the condition and situated language deficit solely in the limitations of a person's cognitive and semantic impairments. This research falls short of gaining insight into the actual interactional experiences of a person with Alzheimer's and their family. Drawing on a UK data set of 70 telephone calls recorded over a two-and-a-half year period (2006-2008) between one elderly woman with Alzheimer's disease, and her daughter and son-in-law, this paper explores the role which communication (and its degeneration) plays in family relationships. Investigating these interactions, using a conversation analytic approach, reveals that there are clearly communicative difficulties, but closer inspection suggests that they arise due to the contingencies that are generated by the other's contributions in the interaction. That being so, this paper marks a departure from the traditional focus on language level analysis and the assumption that deficits are intrinsic to the individual with Alzheimer's, and instead focuses on the collaborative communicative challenges that arise in the interaction itself and which have a profound impact on people's lives and relationships.

  17. A family living with Alzheimer's disease: The communicative challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Danielle

    2015-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease irrevocably challenges a person's capacity to communicate with others. Earlier research on these challenges focused on the language disorders associated with the condition and situated language deficit solely in the limitations of a person's cognitive and semantic impairments. This research falls short of gaining insight into the actual interactional experiences of a person with Alzheimer's and their family. Drawing on a UK data set of 70 telephone calls recorded over a two-and-a-half year period (2006-2008) between one elderly woman with Alzheimer's disease, and her daughter and son-in-law, this paper explores the role which communication (and its degeneration) plays in family relationships. Investigating these interactions, using a conversation analytic approach, reveals that there are clearly communicative difficulties, but closer inspection suggests that they arise due to the contingencies that are generated by the other's contributions in the interaction. That being so, this paper marks a departure from the traditional focus on language level analysis and the assumption that deficits are intrinsic to the individual with Alzheimer's, and instead focuses on the collaborative communicative challenges that arise in the interaction itself and which have a profound impact on people's lives and relationships. PMID:24339113

  18. 100 Years of Alzheimer's disease (1906-2006).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lage, José Manuel Martínez

    2006-01-01

    As we commemorate the first centennial since Alzheimer's disease (AD) was first diagnosed, this article casts back into the past while also looking to the future. It reflects on the life of Alois Alzheimer (1864-1915) and the scientific work he undertook in describing the disorder suffered by Auguste D. from age 51 to 56 and the neuropathological findings revealed by her brain, reminding us of the origin of the eponym. It highlights how, throughout the 1960's, the true importance of AD as the major cause of late life dementia ultimately came to light and narrates the evolution of the concepts related to AD throughout the years and its recognition as a major public health problem. Finally, the article pays homage to the work done by the Alzheimer's Association and the research undertaken at the Alzheimer's Disease Centres within the framework of the National Institute on Aging (NIA) Program, briefly discussing the long road travelled in the fight against AD in the past 25 years and the scientific odyssey that we trust will result in finding a cure. PMID:17004362

  19. Disrupted modular brain dynamics reflect cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, W; van der Flier, W M; Koene, T; Smits, L L; Scheltens, P; Stam, C J

    2012-02-15

    The relation between pathology and cognitive dysfunction in dementia is still poorly understood, although disturbed communication between different brain regions is almost certainly involved. In this study we combine magneto-encephalography (MEG) and network analysis to investigate the role of functional sub-networks (modules) in the brain with regard to cognitive failure in Alzheimer's disease. Whole-head resting-state (MEG) was performed in 18 Alzheimer patients (age 67 ± 9, 6 females, MMSE 23 ± 5) and 18 healthy controls (age 66 ± 9, 11 females, MMSE 29 ± 1). We constructed functional brain networks based on interregional synchronization measurements, and performed graph theoretical analysis with a focus on modular organization. The overall modular strength and the number of modules changed significantly in Alzheimer patients. The parietal cortex was the most highly connected network area, but showed the strongest intramodular losses. Nonetheless, weakening of intermodular connectivity was even more outspoken, and more strongly related to cognitive impairment. The results of this study demonstrate that particularly the loss of communication between different functional brain regions reflects cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. These findings imply the relevance of regarding dementia as a functional network disorder. PMID:22154957

  20. The role of SPECT in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzheimer's disease is a widespread debilitating neurological disorder which normally affects people in their later life. The personal and financial impact of this disease on patients and their families is enormous, with round-the-clock care being required for those severely affected. There is no single test available to diagnose the disease and, at this time, diagnosis is by a process of elimination. The author considers that neuroimaging has played an important role to this effect, and the use of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is playing an increasing part in helping to eliminate other forms of dementia which may cause similar symptoms to Alzheimer's. It is expected that the relative availability and low cost of SPECT would make it the imaging method of choice in the future. 11 refs., tabs., figs

  1. Animal models for Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia: a perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Götz

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In dementia research, animal models have become indispensable tools. They not only model aspects of the human condition, but also simulate processes that occur in humans and hence provide insight into how disease is initiated and propagated. The present review discusses two prominent human neurodegenerative disorders, Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia. It discusses what we would like to model in animals and highlights some of the more recent achievements using species as diverse as mice, fish, flies and worms. Advances in imaging and therapy are explored. We also discuss some anticipated new models and developments. These will reveal how key players in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia, such as the peptide Aβ (amyloid β and the protein tau, cause neuronal dysfunction and eventually, neuronal demise. Understanding these processes fully will lead to early diagnosis and therapy.

  2. Magnetoencephalography as a Putative Biomarker for Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Zamrini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's Disease (AD is the most common dementia in the elderly and is estimated to affect tens of millions of people worldwide. AD is believed to have a prodromal stage lasting ten or more years. While amyloid deposits, tau filaments, and loss of brain cells are characteristics of the disease, the loss of dendritic spines and of synapses predate such changes. Popular preclinical detection strategies mainly involve cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, magnetic resonance imaging, metabolic PET scans, and amyloid imaging. One strategy missing from this list involves neurophysiological measures, which might be more sensitive to detect alterations in brain function. The Magnetoencephalography International Consortium of Alzheimer's Disease arose out of the need to advance the use of Magnetoencephalography (MEG, as a tool in AD and pre-AD research. This paper presents a framework for using MEG in dementia research, and for short-term research priorities.

  3. Alzheimer's Disease Mechanisms and Emerging Roads to Novel Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala Frigerio, Carlo; De Strooper, Bart

    2016-07-01

    Ten years of remarkable progress in understanding the fundamental biochemistry of Alzheimer's disease have been followed by ten years of remarkable and increasing clinical insight into the natural progression of the disorder. The concept of a long, intermediary, prodromal phase between the first appearance of amyloid plaques and tangles and the manifestation of dementia is now well established. The major challenge for the next decade is to chart the many cellular processes that underlie this phase and link the biochemical alterations to the clinical manifestation of Alzheimer's disease. We discuss here how genetics, new cell culture systems, and improved animal models will fuel this work. We anticipate that the resulting novel insights will provide a basis for further drug development for this terrible disease. PMID:27050320

  4. New therapeutic strategy for Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, E; Cuzzocrea, S

    2010-01-01

    The development of potential neuroprotective therapies for neurodegenerative diseases (Parkinson's and Alzheimer's Disease) must be based on understanding their molecular and biochemical pathogenesis. Many potential pathways of neuronal cell death have been implicated in a mouse model of neurodegenerative disease, including excitotoxicity, toxicity from reactive oxygen species (superoxide anion, nitric oxide, hydroxyl radical), apoptosis (caspase-dependent and -independent pathways), necrosis and glial injury. Some agents that act on these pathways may be available for protecting the brain against chronic neurodegenerative conditions like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Drugs currently used to treat neurological disease and injuries provide temporary relief of symptoms but do not stop or slow the underlying neurodegenerative process. Restorative therapies for Parkinson's Disease are currently focused on cell replacement and administration of growth factors and small-molecule neurotrophic agents. The new experimental drugs, by contrast, target the common, underlying cause of destructive process of brain cell death. For example, p53 inhibitors attack a key protein involved in nerve cell death and represent a new strategy for preserving brain function following sudden injury or chronic disease. Analogues of pifithrin-alpha (PFT), which was shown in previous studies to inhibit p53, were designed, synthesized and tested to see whether they would work against cultured brain cells and animal models of neurodegenerative disease. Moreover, several agents based on the predominant anti-amyloid strategy, targeting amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide, which aggregates in the plaques that are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, would affect disease progression. Researchers are already making great strides in developing a vaccine for this progressive brain disorder. Immunization could offer a way to blunt or even prevent the deadly, memory-robbing disease. Here we review many of

  5. Association between Cytokine production and disease severity in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahzad Jabbari Azad

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of transforming growth factor (TGF-β1, interferon (IFN-γ, interleukin (IL-2, IL-3, and IL-6 in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease (AD has long been reported in literature. In this case-control study, the concentrations of these cytokines in altered T lymphocytes, as well as serum vitamin B12, have been compared in terms of factors such as, age, the clinical course and the patients' disease risk. 40 patients who met the DSM-IV-TR criteria of AD were selected and an age- and gender-matched control group was recruited. The participants' cognitive performance was measured according to the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE, the Global Deterioration Scale (GDS and Clinical Dementia Ratio (CDR. The levels of cytokines were measured in supernatants of lymphocytes culture, using assays of ELISA and atomic absorption. Higher levels of IL-6 and IFN-γ were found more in the altered T lymphocytes of the AD patients rather than in the control individuals. Furthermore, a marginal significant difference was found between the TGF-β levels of the two study groups. Regression analysis of CDR score and cytokines showed the inverse significant correlation between CDR score and IFN-γ levels. Furthermore, the relation between MMSE scores and IFN-γ was significant, meaning that by increasing MMSE score, IFN-γ level was significantly increased. This study suggests that the levels of IL-6 and IFN-γ are significantly increased in altered T lymphocytes of AD patients, as compared to those who are not inflicted with AD, and that they are related to the patient's age. Also, IFN-γ is related to the severity stage of the AD.

  6. Dual task and postural control in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Pires de Andrade

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with neurodegenerative diseases are required to use cognitive resources while maintaining postural control. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a frontal cognitive task on postural control in patients with Alzheimer, Parkinson and controls. Thirty-eight participants were instructed to stand upright on a force platform in two experimental conditions: single and dual task. Participants with Parkinson's disease presented an increase in the coefficient of variation greater than 100% in the dual task as compared to the single task for center of pressure (COP area and COP path. In addition, patients with Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease had a higher number of errors during the execution of the cognitive task when compared to the group of elderly without neurodegenerative diseases. The motor cortex, which is engaged in postural control, does not seem to compete with frontal brain regions in the performance of the cognitive task. However, patients with Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease presented worsened performance in cognitive task.

  7. Drawing Disorders in Alzheimer's Disease and Other Forms of Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojano, Luigi; Gainotti, Guido

    2016-04-21

    Drawing is a multicomponential process that can be impaired by many kinds of brain lesions. Drawing disorders are very common in Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia, and can provide clinical information for the distinction of the different dementing diseases. In our review we started from an overview of the neural and cognitive bases of drawing, and from a recollection of the drawing tasks more frequently used for assessing individuals with dementia. Then, we analyzed drawing disorders in dementia, paying special attention to those observed in Alzheimer's disease, from the prodromal stages of the amnesic mild cognitive impairment to the stages of full-blown dementia, both in the sporadic forms with late onset in the entorhino-hippocampal structures and in those with early onset in the posterior neocortical structures. We reviewed the drawing features that could differentiate Alzheimer's disease from vascular dementia and from the most frequent forms of degenerative dementia, namely frontotemporal dementia and Lewy body disease. Finally, we examined some peculiar aspects of drawing disorders in dementia, such as perseverations, rotations, and closing-in. We argue that a careful analysis of drawing errors helps to differentiate the different forms of dementia more than overall accuracy in drawing. PMID:27104898

  8. Bioinformatics methods in drug repurposing for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siavelis, John C; Bourdakou, Marilena M; Athanasiadis, Emmanouil I; Spyrou, George M; Nikita, Konstantina S

    2016-03-01

    Alarming epidemiological features of Alzheimer's disease impose curative treatment rather than symptomatic relief. Drug repurposing, that is reappraisal of a substance's indications against other diseases, offers time, cost and efficiency benefits in drug development, especially when in silico techniques are used. In this study, we have used gene signatures, where up- and down-regulated gene lists summarize a cell's gene expression perturbation from a drug or disease. To cope with the inherent biological and computational noise, we used an integrative approach on five disease-related microarray data sets of hippocampal origin with three different methods of evaluating differential gene expression and four drug repurposing tools. We found a list of 27 potential anti-Alzheimer agents that were additionally processed with regard to molecular similarity, pathway/ontology enrichment and network analysis. Protein kinase C, histone deacetylase, glycogen synthase kinase 3 and arginase inhibitors appear consistently in the resultant drug list and may exert their pharmacologic action in an epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated subpathway of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26197808

  9. Studying infrared light therapy for treating Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mengmeng; Wang, Qiyan; Zeng, Yuhui; Meng, Qingqiang; Zhang, Jun; Wei, Xunbin

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an extensive neurodegenerative disease. It is generally believed that there are some connections between AD and amyloid protein plaques in the brain. AD is a chronic disease that usually starts slowly and gets worse over time. The typical symptoms are memory loss, language disorders, mood swings and behavioral issues. Gradual losses of somatic functions eventually lead patients to death. Currently, the main therapeutic method is pharmacotherapy, which may temporarily reduce symptoms, but has many side effects. No current treatment can reverse AD's deterioration. Infrared (IR) light therapy has been studied in a range of single and multiple irradiation protocols in previous studies and was found beneficial for neuropathology. In our research, we have verified the effect of infrared light on AD through Alzheimer's disease mouse model. This transgenic mouse model is made by co-injecting two vectors encoding mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) and mutant presenilin-1 (PSEN1). We designed an experimental apparatus for treating mice, which primarily includes a therapeutic box and a LED array, which emits infrared light. After the treatment, we assessed the effects of infrared light by testing cognitive performance of the mice in Morris water maze. Our results show that infra-red therapy is able to improve cognitive performance in the mouse model. It might provide a novel and safe way to treat Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Physical activity benefits for Alzheimer's disease patients (A Review)

    OpenAIRE

    Pano, Genti

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic and degenerative disease which is the main cause for dementia in older adults. It is well known that exercise can reduce the risk level for vascular risk factors, heart diseases (Blair et al., 1996), atherosclerosis (Lakka et al., 2001), stroke (Kurl et al., 2001) and diabetes (Seals et al., 1984; Houmard et al., 1996), diseases that can increase the risk for dementia and AD (Gustafson et al., 2003). Main objective of this study was to review the latest l...

  11. Apatia na doença de Alzheimer Apathy in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Lúcio Teixeira-Jr

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Apatia é a mais comum síndrome neuropsiquiátrica na doença de Alzheimer, afetando entre 30 e 60% dos pacientes. Pode ser definida como perda de motivação e se manifesta com alterações afetivas, cognitivas e comportamentais, determinando, respectivamente, redução da resposta emocional, perda de autocrítica e retração social. Nesse artigo, são apresentadas as características clínicas da síndrome apática e suas perspectivas terapêuticas. Conclui-se que há uma superposição considerável entre apatia e depressão na doença de Alzheimer, mas ambas as condições são consideradas síndromes independentes. Intervenções farmacológicas para apatia incluem psicoestimulantes, como o metilfenidato, agentes dopaminérgicos e inibidores de colinesterase; mas os resultados são controversos e não há tratamento estabelecido.Apathy is the most common neuropsychiatry syndrome in Alzheimer's disease affecting 30-60% of patients. It can be defined as a loss of motivation and manifests in affect, cognition and behavioral changes, determining blunted emotional response, lack of insight and social retraction, respectively. In this paper, the clinical features and the therapeutic perspectives of apathy are presented. There is considerable overlap between apathy and depression in Alzheimer's disease, but both are considered discrete syndromes. Pharmacological interventions for apathy include psychostimulants, such as methylphenidate, dopaminergic agents and cholinesterase inhibitors, but the results are controversial and there is no established treatment.

  12. Neurobiology of apathy in Alzheimer's disease Neurobiologia da apatia na doença de Alzheimer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Cerqueira Guimarães

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Apathy is considered the most frequent neuropsychiatric disturbance in dementia and its outcome is generally deleterious. Apathy can be related to a dysfunction of the anatomical-system that supports the generation of voluntary actions, namely the prefrontal cortex and/or the prefrontal-subcortical circuits. In Alzheimer's disease, pathological and neuroimaging data indicate that apathy is likely due to a dysfunction of the medial prefrontal cortex. Accordingly, in this review article, we propose a pathophysiological model to explain apathetic behavior in Alzheimer's disease, combining data from neuroimaging, neuropathology and experimental research on the role of orbito-frontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, basal ganglia and dopamine in decision-making neurobiology.Apatia é considerada a alteração neuropsiquiátrica mais freqüente nas demências e suas conseqüências são habitualmente deletérias. Apatia pode ser relacionada à disfunção do sistema anatômico responsável pela geração de ações voluntárias, conhecido com córtex pré-frontal e/ou circuitos pré-frontais-subcorticais. Na doença de Alzheimer, evidências neuropatológicas e de neuroimagem funcional indicam que a apatia é provavelmente decorrente da disfunção do córtex pré-frontal medial. Assim, neste artigo de revisão, apresentamos uma proposta de um modelo fisiopatológico para explicar o comportamento apático na doença de Alzheimer, combinando dados de neuropatologia, neuroimagem e experimentação animal sobre o papel do córtex órbito-frontal, cíngulo anterior, núcleos da base e dopamina na neurobiologia da tomada de decisão.

  13. lnvestigation on children with acute non-communicable diseases and their caregivers in developing countries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aaron Asibi Abuosi; Delali Margaret Badasu; Alfred Edwin Yawson; Francis Anderson Adzei; Deborah Atobrah; John Kwasi Anarfi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate children with acute non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and their caregivers in developing countries. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in three out of the ten regions of Ghana. A total of 1 540 caregivers/parents of children with NCDs were interviewed. Data was analysed with the aid of IBM SPSS version 20. Statistical techniques used in the analysis included frequencies, means, SD and factor analysis. Findings were analysed according to the major themes of the study. Results: Caregivers indicated that the incidence of NCDs among children is on the in-crease. They also believed that enemies can cause diseases in children. Caregivers tend to seek treatment in hospitals/clinics rather than from traditional or herbal medicine. However, they complement biomedical treatment with prayers for healing/deliverance. It was also found that NCDs have a negative effect on the physical and mental development of children as well as their school performance;and caring for children with NCDs also poses material, emotional and financial burden to caregivers. Conclusions: Serious attention needs to be given to the development and implementa-tion of policies to better the lot of children with NCDs. Conscious efforts need to be made to encourage and assist the caregivers with necessary resources to cater for their children's educational and health needs in particular.

  14. Doença de Alzheimer esporádica de início precoce Sporadic early onset Alzheimer´s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annibal Truzzi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A doença de Alzheimer (DA é a principal causa de demência. Um subgrupo de pacientes apresenta sua forma familiar ou precoce (Alzheimer's disease (AD is the main cause of dementia. A subgroup of patients has the familial or early-onset (<65 years form of AD, with rapid course and a dominant genetic transmission through many generations. We report a case of a patient without a positive familiar history for AD, who presented early memory problems and progressive functional and cognitive (speech, praxis, executive functions e viso-spatial habilities decline. Behavioural (imnsonia, psychomotor agitation and hypersexuality and psychological (depression symptoms of AD were noticed in different stages of the disease. Structural and functional neuroimaging techniques showed impairment of posterior cortical areas. Early onset AD can be confounded with psychiatric disorders especially when there is no familiar history for AD. The presenile impact on both patient and family is intense and treatment in the early stages is very important to reduce patient and caregivers' burden.

  15. Environment, epigenetics and neurodegeneration: Focus on nutrition in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolia, Vincenzina; Lucarelli, Marco; Fuso, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Many different environmental factors (nutrients, pollutants, chemicals, physical activity, lifestyle, physical and mental stress) can modulate epigenetic markers in the developing and adult organism. Epigenetics, in turn, can cause and is associated with several neurodegenerative and aging-dependent human diseases. Alzheimer's disease certainly represents one of the most relevant neurodegenerative disorders due to its incidence and its huge socio-economic impact. Therefore, it is easy to understand why recent literature focuses on the epigenetic modifications associated with Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. One of the most intriguing and, at the same time, worrying evidence is that even "mild" environmental factors (such as behavioral or physical stress) as well as the under-threshold exposure to pollutants and chemicals, can be effective. Finally, even mild nutrients disequilibria can result in long-lasting and functional alterations of many epigenetic markers, although they don't have an immediate acute effect. Therefore, we will probably have to re-define the current risk threshold for many factors, molecules and stresses. Among the many different environmental factors affecting the epigenome, nutrition represents one of the most investigated fields; the reasons are probably that each person interacts with nutrients and that, in turn, nutrients can modulate at molecular level the epigenetic biochemical pathways. The role that nutrition can exert in modulating epigenetic modifications in Alzheimer's disease will be discussed with particular emphasis on the role of B vitamins and DNA methylation. PMID:25456841

  16. Olive Oil and its Potential Effects on Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Shan; Zhang, G. P.

    Alzheimer's disease is a neuro-degenerative brain disease that is responsible for affecting the lives of hundreds of thousands of people every year. There has been no evidence to suggest a cure for the disease and the only existing treatments have very low rates of success in trial patients. This is largely due to the fact that the brain is one of the most undiscovered parts of the human body. Brain chemistry is highly complex and responds to its environment in random and radical ways. My research includes testing the reactionary outcomes of combining compounds of olive oil with the 20 basic amino acids. Regions around the world with olive oil based diets show a direct correlation to lower rates of Alzheimer's. Testing few compounds of olive oil with chemicals already found in the brain may yield to a better understanding as to why that is. I took the compounds tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol, and oleocanthal, and combined them with the 20 basic amino acids and calculated the total energy of the new molecule. The molecules produced with acceptably low energy values will be the center of further research. These molecules could lead to truly understanding olive oil's effect on the brain, and ultimately, the cure or prevention of Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Caloric restriction: beneficial effects on brain aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cauwenberghe, Caroline; Vandendriessche, Charysse; Libert, Claude; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E

    2016-08-01

    Dietary interventions such as caloric restriction (CR) extend lifespan and health span. Recent data from animal and human studies indicate that CR slows down the aging process, benefits general health, and improves memory performance. Caloric restriction also retards and slows down the progression of different age-related diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. However, the specific molecular basis of these effects remains unclear. A better understanding of the pathways underlying these effects could pave the way to novel preventive or therapeutic strategies. In this review, we will discuss the mechanisms and effects of CR on aging and Alzheimer's disease. A potential alternative to CR as a lifestyle modification is the use of CR mimetics. These compounds mimic the biochemical and functional effects of CR without the need to reduce energy intake. We discuss the effect of two of the most investigated mimetics, resveratrol and rapamycin, on aging and their potential as Alzheimer's disease therapeutics. However, additional research will be needed to determine the safety, efficacy, and usability of CR and its mimetics before a general recommendation can be proposed to implement them. PMID:27240590

  18. Validation of Alzheimer's disease CSF and plasma biological markers: the multicentre reliability study of the pilot European Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (E-ADNI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buerger, Katharina; Frisoni, Giovanni; Uspenskaya, Olga;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiatives ("ADNI") aim to validate neuroimaging and biochemical markers of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Data of the pilot European-ADNI (E-ADNI) biological marker programme of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma candidate biomarkers are reported. METHODS...

  19. Alzheimer's Disease: Mechanism and Approach to Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amemori, Takashi; Jendelova, Pavla; Ruzicka, Jiri; Urdzikova, Lucia Machova; Sykova, Eva

    2015-11-04

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. The risk of AD increases with age. Although two of the main pathological features of AD, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, were already recognized by Alois Alzheimer at the beginning of the 20th century, the pathogenesis of the disease remains unsettled. Therapeutic approaches targeting plaques or tangles have not yet resulted in satisfactory improvements in AD treatment. This may, in part, be due to early-onset and late-onset AD pathogenesis being underpinned by different mechanisms. Most animal models of AD are generated from gene mutations involved in early onset familial AD, accounting for only 1% of all cases, which may consequently complicate our understanding of AD mechanisms. In this article, the authors discuss the pathogenesis of AD according to the two main neuropathologies, including senescence-related mechanisms and possible treatments using stem cells, namely mesenchymal and neural stem cells.

  20. Differentiating Alzheimer disease-associated aggregates with small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honson, Nicolette S; Johnson, Ronald L; Huang, Wenwei; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P; Kuret, Jeff

    2007-12-01

    Alzheimer disease is diagnosed postmortem by the density and spatial distribution of beta-amyloid plaques and tau-bearing neurofibrillary tangles. The major protein component of each lesion adopts cross-beta-sheet conformation capable of binding small molecules with submicromolar affinity. In many cases, however, Alzheimer pathology overlaps with Lewy body disease, characterized by the accumulation of a third cross-beta-sheet forming protein, alpha-synuclein. To determine the feasibility of distinguishing tau aggregates from beta-amyloid and alpha-synuclein aggregates with small molecule probes, a library containing 72,455 small molecules was screened for antagonists of tau-aggregate-mediated changes in Thioflavin S fluorescence, followed by secondary screens to distinguish the relative affinity for each substrate protein. Results showed that >10-fold binding selectivity among substrates could be achieved, with molecules selective for tau aggregates containing at least three aromatic or rigid moieties connected by two rotatable bonds.